Science.gov

Sample records for 1-mw pulsed spallation

  1. Feasibility study of a 1-MW pulsed spallation source

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.; Chae, Y.C.; Crosbie, E.

    1995-12-31

    A feasibility study of a 1-MW pulsed spallation source based on a rapidly cycling proton synchrotron (RCS) has been completed. The facility consists of a 400-MeV HP{sup -} linac, a 30-Hz RCS that accelerates the 400-MeV beam to 2 GeV, and two neutron-generating target stations. The design time-averaged current of the accelerator system is 0.5 mA, or 1.04{times}1014 protons per pulse. The linac system consists of an H{sup -}ion source, a 2-MeV RFQ, a 70-MeV DTL and a 330-MeV CCL. Transverse phase space painting to achieve a Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (K-V) distribution of the injected particles in the RCS is accomplished by charge exchange injection and programming of the closed orbit during injection. The synchrotron lattice uses FODO cells of {approx}90{degrees} phase advance. Dispersion-free straight sections are obtained by using a missing magnet scheme. Synchrotron magnets are powered by a dual-frequency resonant circuit that excites the magnets at a 20-Hz rate and de-excites them at a 60-Hz rate, resulting in an effective rate of 30 Hz, and reducing the required peak rf voltage by 1/3. A key feature, of the design of this accelerator system is that beam losses are from injection to extraction, reducing activation to levels consistent with hands-on maintenance. Details of the study are presented.

  2. Small-angle scattering instruments on a 1 MW long pulse spallation source

    SciTech Connect

    Olah, G.A.; Hjelm, R.P.; Seeger, P.A.

    1995-12-01

    Two small-angle neutron scattering instruments have been designed and optimized for installation at a 1 MW long pulse spallation source. The first of these instruments allows access to length scales in materials from 10 to 400 {angstrom}, and the second instrument from 40 to 1200 {angstrom}. Design characteristics were determined and optimization was done using the MCLIB Monte Carlo instrument simulation package. The code has been {open_quote}benchmarked{close_quote} by simulating the {open_quote}as-built{close_quote} D11 spectrometer at ILL and a performance comparison of the three instruments was made. Comparisons were made by evaluating the scattered intensity for {delta} scatterers at different Q values for various instrument configurations needed to span a Q-range of 0.0007 - 0.44 {angstrom}{sup {minus}1}.

  3. Rationale for a spallation neutron source target system test facility at the 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, W.F.

    1995-12-01

    The conceptual design study for a 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center has shown the feasibility of including a spallation neutron test facility at a relatively low cost. This document presents a rationale for developing such a test bed. Currently, neutron scattering facilities operate at a maximum power of 0.2 MW. Proposed new designs call for power levels as high as 10 MW, and future transmutation activities may require as much as 200 MW. A test bed will allow assessment of target neutronics; thermal hydraulics; remote handling; mechanical structure; corrosion in aqueous, non-aqueous, liquid metal, and molten salt systems; thermal shock on systems and system components; and materials for target systems. Reliable data in these areas are crucial to the safe and reliable operation of new high-power facilities. These tests will provide data useful not only to spallation neutron sources proposed or under development, but also to other projects in accelerator-driven transmutation technologies such as the production of tritium.

  4. Inelastic scattering research at a 1 MW long pulse spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Carlile, C.J.

    1995-12-31

    The brief was, with respect to the LPSS bench mark design supplied (60 Hz, 1 MW, Imsec proton pulse, with a split, non-fissile target and 4 moderators in a flux trap geometry design), to identify a set of instruments, and to assess their performance with respect to existing spectrometers on other sources. Any modifications to the existing instruments which would make them more effective on the bench-mark source, or conversely, any modifications to the source bench-mark required by the proposed instruments were to be identified, as were any uncertainties in the estimated performances, or any R & D needed to make the proposed instruments viable. Any new instrument concepts specifically matched to the long pulse itself were to be identified and assessed. This process was to result in an indicative list of instruments for the source. A figure of around 10 spectrometers was to be aimed for.

  5. Analysis and simulation of a small-angle neutron scattering instrument on a 1 MW long pulse spallation source

    SciTech Connect

    Olah, G.A.; Hjelm, R.P.; Lujan, M. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    We studied the design and performance of a small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument for a proposed 1 MW, 60 Hz long pulsed spallation source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). An analysis of the effects of source characteristics and chopper performance combined with instrument simulations using the LANSCE Monte Carlo instrument simulations package shows that the T{sub 0} chopper should be no more than 5 m from the source with the frame overlap and frame definition choppers at 5.6 and greater than 7 m, respectively. The study showed that an optimal pulse structure has an exponential decaying tail with {tau} {approx} 750 {mu}s. The Monte Carlo simulations were used to optimize the LPSS SANS, showing that an optimal length is 18 m. The simulations show that an instrument with variable length is best to match the needs of a given measurement. The performance of the optimized LPSS instrument was found to be comparable with present world standard instruments.

  6. Fundamental neutron physics at a 1 MW long pulse spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.L.

    1995-12-31

    Modern neutron sources and modern neutron science share a common origin in mid twentieth century scientific investigations concerned with the study of the fundamental interactions between elementary particles. Since the time of that common origin, neutron science and the study of elementary particles have evolved into quite disparate disciplines. The neutron became recognized as a powerful tool for the study of condensed matter with modern neutron sources being primarily used (and primarily justified) as tools for condensed matter research. The study of elementary particles has, of course, led to the development of rather different tools and is now dominated by activities carried out at extremely high energies. Notwithstanding this trend, the study of fundamental interactions using neutrons has continued and remains a vigorous activity at many contemporary neutron sources. This research, like neutron scattering research, has benefited enormously by the development of modern high flux neutron facilities. Future sources, particularly high power spallation sources, offer exciting possibilities for the continuation of this program of research.

  7. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the Spallation Neutron Source 1-MW beam operationa

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Baoxi; Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Welton, Robert F; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin P

    2012-01-01

    The H- injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the Spallation Neutron Source 1-MW beam operation with ~38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to ~1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: 1) inconsistent dependence of the post-RFQ beam current on the ion source tilt angle, and 2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  8. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE AT 1 MW

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, John D

    2011-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has been operating at the MW level for about one year. Experience in beam loss control and machine activation at this power level is presented. Also experience with machine protection systems is reviewed, which is critical at this power level. One of the most challenging operational aspects of high power operation has been attaining high availability, which is also discussed

  9. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the spallation neutron source 1-MW beam operation

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B. X.; Welton, R. F.; Murray, S. N. Jr.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.; Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.

    2012-02-15

    The H{sup -} injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the spallation neutron source 1 MW beam operation with {approx}38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to {approx}1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: (1) inconsistent dependence of the post-radio frequency quadrupole accelerator beam current on the ion source tilt angle and (2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  10. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the spallation neutron source 1-MW beam operation

    SciTech Connect

    Kalvas, T.; Welton, Robert F; Pennisi, Terry R

    2012-01-01

    The H{sup -} injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the spallation neutron source 1 MW beam operation with {approx}38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to {approx}1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: (1) inconsistent dependence of the post-radio frequency quadrupole accelerator beam current on the ion source tilt angle and (2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  11. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the spallation neutron source 1-MW beam operation.

    PubMed

    Han, B X; Kalvas, T; Tarvainen, O; Welton, R F; Murray, S N; Pennisi, T R; Santana, M; Stockli, M P

    2012-02-01

    The H(-) injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the spallation neutron source 1 MW beam operation with ∼38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to ∼1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: (1) inconsistent dependence of the post-radio frequency quadrupole accelerator beam current on the ion source tilt angle and (2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  12. Pulsed spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1996-05-01

    This paper reviews the early history of pulsed spallation neutron source development ar Argonne and provides an overview of existing sources world wide. A number of proposals for machines more powerful than currently exist are under development, which are briefly described. The author reviews the status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, its instrumentation, and its user program, and provide a few examples of applications in fundamental condensed matter physics, materials science and technology.

  13. Pulsed spallation Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    This paper reviews the early history of pulsed spallation neutron source development at Argonne and provides an overview of existing sources world wide. A number of proposals for machines more powerful than currently exist are under development, which are briefly described. The author reviews the status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, its instrumentation, and its user program, and provides a few examples of applications in fundamental condensed matter physics, materials science and technology.

  14. LANSCE linac RF performance for a long pulse spallation source

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, J.; Regan, A.; Bolme, G.

    1996-09-01

    The present LANL Long Pulse Spallation Source (LPSS) design consists of a 1 MW neutron spallation target fed by a pulsed proton beam from the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE, formerly LAMPF) accelerator. This proton beam would have a repetition rate of 60 Hz and a pulse length of 1 ms for a duty factor of 6%. An average/peak currentof 1.25 mA/21 mA would be required foran 800 MeV beam to provide this power at this duty factor. The spallation target would reside in Area A and use the H+ beam. The LANSCE accelerator would also be required to simultaneoulsy deliver H- beams to the Manual Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (MLNSC) and Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility. Presently LANSCE delivers 16.5 mA peak of H+ beam at 120 Hz, with a 625 {mu}S beam pulsewidth; H- beams are also accelerated for MLNSC and WNR. In Nov. 1995, linac operation shifted to LPSS pulse parameters, except for the peak curent which remained at 16.5 mA. In addition to delivering 800 kW H+ proton beam to physics production targets, H- beams were simultaneously delivered to customers for the PSR feeding MLNSC and to researchers using WNR. Performance of the RF powerplants for the 201.25 MHz drift tube linac 805 MHz side coupled linac, and associated electronics is described. Conclusion of the experiment is that the LANSCE linac can be upgraded through modest improvements to drive a 1 MW LPSS.

  15. A proposal for a long-pulse spallation source at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Weinacht, D.

    1995-12-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is proposing a new spallation neutron source that will provide the US with an internationally competitive facility for neutron science and technology that can be built in approximately three years for less than $100 million. The establishment of a 1-MW, long-pulse spallation source (LPSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) will meet many of the present needs of scientists in the neutron scattering community and provide a significant boost to neutron research in the US. The new facility will support the development of a future, more intense spallation neutron source, that is planned by DOE`s Office of Energy Research. Together with the existing short pulse spallation source (SPSS) at the Manual Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (MLNSC) at Los Alamos, the new LPSS will provide US scientists with a complementary pair of high-performance neutron sources to rival the world`s leading facilities in Europe.

  16. The performance of neutron spectrometers AR a long-pulse spallation source

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Daemen, L.L.

    1995-12-01

    At a recent workshop at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory members of the international neutron scattering community discussed the performance to be anticipated from neutron scattering instruments installed at a 1 MW long-pulse spallation source (LPSS). Although the report of this workshop is long, its principal conclusions can be easily summarised and almost as easily understood. This article presents such a synthesis for a 60 Hz LPSS with 1 msec proton pulses. We discuss some of the limitations of the workshop conclusions and suggest a simple analysis of the performance differences that might be expected between short- and long-pulse sources both of which exploit coupled moderators.

  17. Producing persistent, high-current, high-duty-factor H{sup -} beams for routine 1 MW operation of Spallation Neutron Source (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P.; Han, B. X.; Hardek, T. W.; Kang, Y. W.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Welton, R.

    2012-02-15

    Since 2009, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has been producing neutrons with ion beam powers near 1 MW, which requires the extraction of {approx}50 mA H{sup -} ions from the ion source with a {approx}5% duty factor. The 50 mA are achieved after an initial dose of {approx}3 mg of Cs and heating the Cs collar to {approx}170 deg. C. The 50 mA normally persist for the entire 4-week source service cycles. Fundamental processes are reviewed to elucidate the persistence of the SNS H{sup -} beams without a steady feed of Cs and why the Cs collar temperature may have to be kept near 170 deg. C.

  18. Experimental results of the 140 GHz, 1 MW long-pulse gyrotron for W7-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppenburg, K.; Arnold, A.; Borie, E.; Dammertz, G.; Giguet, E.; Heidinger, R.; Illy, S.; Kuntze, M.; Le Cloarec, G.; Legrand, F.; Leonhardt, W.; Lievin, C.; Neffe, G.; Piosczyk, B.; Schmid, M.; Thumm, M.

    2003-02-01

    Gyrotrons at high frequency with high output power are mainly developed for microwave heating and current drive in plasmas for thermonuclear fusion. For the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X now under construction at IPP Greifswald, Germany, a 10 MW ECRH system is foreseen. A 1 MW, 140 GHz long-pulse gyrotron has been designed and a pre-prototype (Maquette) has been constructed and tested in an European collaboration between FZK Karlsruhe, CRPP Lausanne, IPF Suttgart, IPP Greifswald, CEA Cadarache and TED Vélizy [1]. The cylindrical cavity is designed for operating in the TE28,8 mode. It is a standard tapered cavity with linear input downtaper and a non-linear uptaper. The diameter of the cylindrical part is 40.96 mm. The transitions between tapers and straight section are smoothly rounded to avoid mode conversion. The TE28,8-cavity mode is transformed to a Gaussian TEM0,0 output mode by a mode converter consisting of a rippled-wall waveguide launcher followed by a three mirror system. The output window uses a single, edge cooled CVD-diamond disk with an outer diameter of 106 mm, a window aperture of 88 mm and a thickness of 1.8 mm corresponding to four half wavelengths. The collector is at ground potential, and a depression voltage for energy recovery can be applied to the cavity and to the first two mirrors. Additional normal-conducting coils are employed to the collector in order to produce an axial magnetic field for sweeping the electron beam with a frequency of 7 Hz. A temperature limited magnetron injection gun without intermediate anode ( diode type ) is used. In short pulse operation at the design current of 40 A an output power of 1 MW could be achieved for an accelerating voltage of 82 kV without depression voltage and with a depression voltage of 25 kV an output power of 1.15 MW at an accelerating voltage of 84 kV has been measured. For these values an efficiency of 49% was obtained. At constant accelerating voltages, the output power did not change up to

  19. Elastic scattering research at a 1 MW long pulse spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, R.K.

    1995-12-31

    The elastic scattering working group investigated instrumentation for powder diffraction, single-crystal diffraction, small-angle diffraction, and reflectometry. For this purpose, three subgroups were formed; one for powder diffraction and single-crystal diffraction, one for small-angle diffraction, and one for reflectometry. For the most part these subgroups worked separately, but for part of the time the reflectometry and small-angle diffraction subgroups met together to discuss areas of common interest. Contributors in each of these subgroups are indicated below along with the discussion of these subgroup deliberations.

  20. Thermal-hydraulic simulation of mercury target concepts for a pulsed spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Siman-Tov, M.; Wendel, M.; Haines, J.

    1996-06-01

    The Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (ORSNS) is a high-power, accelerator-based pulsed spallation neutron source being designed by a multi-laboratory team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory to achieve very high fluxes of neutrons for scientific experiments. The ORSNS is projected to have a 1 MW proton beam upgradable to 5 MW. About 60% of the beam power (1-5 MW, 17-83 kJ/pulse in 0.5 microsec at 60 cps) is deposited in the liquid metal (mercury) target having the dimensions of 65x30x10 cm (about 19.5 liter). Peak steady state power density is about 150 and 785 MW/m{sup 3} for 1 MW and 5 MW beam respectively, whereas peak pulsed power density is as high as 5.2 and 26.1 GW/m{sup 3}, respectively. The peak pulse temperature rise rate is 14 million C/s (for 5 MW beam) whereas the total pulse temperature rise is only 7 C. In addition to thermal shock and materials compatibility, key feasibility issues for the target are related to its thermal-hydraulic performance. This includes proper flow distribution, flow reversals, possible {open_quotes}hot spots{close_quotes} and the challenge of mitigating the effects of thermal shock through possible injection of helium bubbles throughout the mercury volume or other concepts. The general computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code CFDS-FLOW3D was used to simulate the thermal and flow distribution in three preliminary concepts of the mercury target. Very initial CFD simulation of He bubbles injection demonstrates some potential for simulating behavior of He bubbles in flowing mercury. Much study and development will be required to be able to `predict`, even in a crude way, such a complex phenomena. Future direction in both design and R&D is outlined.

  1. A Long-Pulse Spallation Source at Los Alamos: Facility description and preliminary neutronic performance for cold neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, G.J.; Weinacht, D.J.; Pitcher, E.J.; Ferguson, P.D.

    1998-03-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has discussed installing a new 1-MW spallation neutron target station in an existing building at the end of its 800-MeV proton linear accelerator. Because the accelerator provides pulses of protons each about 1 msec in duration, the new source would be a Long Pulse Spallation Source (LPSS). The facility would employ vertical extraction of moderators and reflectors, and horizontal extraction of the spallation target. An LPSS uses coupled moderators rather than decoupled ones. There are potential gains of about a factor of 6 to 7 in the time-averaged neutron brightness for cold-neutron production from a coupled liquid H{sub 2} moderator compared to a decoupled one. However, these gains come at the expense of putting ``tails`` on the neutron pulses. The particulars of the neutron pulses from a moderator (e.g., energy-dependent rise times, peak intensities, pulse widths, and decay constant(s) of the tails) are crucial parameters for designing instruments and estimating their performance at an LPSS. Tungsten is the reference target material. Inconel 718 is the reference target canister and proton beam window material, with Al-6061 being the choice for the liquid H{sub 2} moderator canister and vacuum container. A 1-MW LPSS would have world-class neutronic performance. The authors describe the proposed Los Alamos LPSS facility, and show that, for cold neutrons, the calculated time-averaged neutronic performance of a liquid H{sub 2} moderator at the 1-MW LPSS is equivalent to about 1/4th the calculated neutronic performance of the best liquid D{sub 2} moderator at the Institute Laue-Langevin reactor. They show that the time-averaged moderator neutronic brightness increases as the size of the moderator gets smaller.

  2. Recent Performance and Ignition Tests of the pulsed SNS H- Source for 1-MW Neutron Production

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P; Han, Baoxi; Murray, Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Piller, Chip; Santana, Manuel; Welton, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    After acquiring several reliable spare targets, SNS ramped the beam power from 850 kW to 1.4 MW, which required an increase in H- beam pulse length from 0.88 to 1.0 ms at 60 Hz. This increase initially produced slow 2-MHz power ramp-ups and, after several weeks of uninterrupted operation, it produced plasma outages every time the pulse length was raised above ~0.95 ms. Similar outages were previously observed towards the end of long service cycles, which were believed to indicate that the breakdown voltage of the high purity hydrogen started to exceed the induced electric fields. In 2011 the RF was reconfigured to start with 10 cycles of 1.96 MHz, which yielded the shortest H- beam rise times and apparently eliminated those plasma outages. The new, pulse-length dependent outages were eliminated by increasing the initial frequency to 1.985 MHz. However, careful frequency studies are unable to justify this frequency. In addition, the paper discusses the issues and solutions for the electron-dump voltage, which starts to sag and become unstable after several weeks of high current operation.

  3. Recent performance and ignition tests of the pulsed SNS H- source for 1-MW neutron production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockli, Martin P.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Welton, R. F.

    2015-04-01

    After acquiring several reliable spare targets, SNS ramped the beam power from 850 kW to 1.4 MW, which required an increase in H- beam pulse length from 0.88 to 1.0 ms at 60 Hz. This increase initially produced slow 2-MHz power ramp-ups and, after several weeks of uninterrupted operation, it produced plasma outages every time the pulse length was raised above ˜0.95 ms. Similar outages were previously observed towards the end of long service cycles, which were believed to indicate that the breakdown voltage of the high purity hydrogen started to exceed the induced electric fields. In 2011 the RF was reconfigured to start with 10 cycles of 1.96 MHz, which yielded the shortest H- beam rise times and apparently eliminated those plasma outages. The new, pulse-length dependent outages were eliminated by increasing the initial frequency to 1.985 MHz. However, careful frequency studies are unable to justify this frequency. In addition, the paper discusses the issues and solutions for the electron-dump voltage, which starts to sag and become unstable after several weeks of high current operation. At the request of the authors and the Proceedings Editor this article has been updated to include References 3-13, which were present in the author's original submission but were lost during manuscript processing in the Proceedings Editor's office. The updated article was published on 5 May 2015.

  4. The performance of neutron scattering spectrometers at a long-pulse spallation source

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.

    1997-06-01

    In this document the author considers the performance of a long pulse spallation source for those neutron scattering experiments that are usually performed with a monochromatic beam at a continuous wave (CW) source such as a nuclear reactor. The first conclusion drawn is that comparison of the performance of neutron scattering spectrometers at CW and pulsed sources is simpler for long-pulsed sources than it is for the short-pulse variety. Even though detailed instrument design and assessment will require Monte Carlo simulations (which have already been performed at Los Alamos for SANS and reflectometry), simple arguments are sufficient to assess the approximate performance of spectrometers at an LPSS and to support the contention that a 1 MW long-pulse source can provide attractive performance, especially for instrumentation designed for soft-condensed-matter science. Because coupled moderators can be exploited at such a source, its time average cold flux is equivalent to that of a research reactor with a power of about 15 MW, so only a factor of 4 gain from source pulsing is necessary to obtain performance that is comparable with the ILL. In favorable cases, the gain from pulsing can be even more than this, approaching the limit set by the peak flux, giving about 4 times the performance of the ILL. Because of its low duty factor, an LPSS provides the greatest performance gains for relatively low resolution experiments with cold neutrons. It should thus be considered complementary to short pulse sources which are most effective for high resolution experiments using thermal or epithermal neutrons.

  5. Shielding calculations for the Long Pulse Spallation Source Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, L.S.; Pitcher, E.J.; Brael, R.E.; Russell, G.J.

    1996-04-01

    We describe tools under development for use in deep penetration shielding problems in accelerator environments. The LAHET monte carlo code is now being upgraded in anticipation of a merger of this code with MCNP. Variance reduction via Geometry Splitting/Russian Roulette has recently been added to LAHET and is now being tested in the design of shielding for the Long Pulse Spallation Source Facility. In addition, we demonstrate methods of visualizing fluence based quantities such as equivalent dose and heating throughout the target and shielding.

  6. Mercury Cavitation Phenomenon in Pulsed Spallation Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Futakawa, Masatoshi; Naoe, Takashi; Kawai, Masayoshi

    2008-06-24

    Innovative researches will be performed at Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility in J-PARC, in which a mercury target system will be installed as MW-class pulse spallation neutron sources. Proton beams will be injected into mercury target to induce the spallation reaction. At the moment the intense proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in the mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall. Localized impacts by micro-jets and/or shock waves which are caused by cavitation bubble collapse impose pitting damage on the vessel wall. The pitting damage which degrades the structural integrity of target vessels is a crucial issue for high power mercury targets. Micro-gas-bubbles injection into mercury may be useful to mitigate the pressure wave and the pitting damage. The visualization of cavitation-bubble and gas-bubble collapse behaviors was carried out by using a high-speed video camera. The differences between them are recognized.

  7. 5 MW pulsed spallation neutron source, Preconceptual design study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report describes a self-consistent base line design for a 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (PSNS). It is intended to establish feasibility of design and as a basis for further expanded and detailed studies. It may also serve as a basis for establishing project cost (30% accuracy) in order to intercompare competing designs for a PSNS not only on the basis of technical feasibility and technical merit but also on the basis of projected total cost. The accelerator design considered here is based on the objective of a pulsed neutron source obtained by means of a pulsed proton beam with average beam power of 5 MW, in {approx} 1 {mu}sec pulses, operating at a repetition rate of 60 Hz. Two target stations are incorporated in the basic facility: one for operation at 10 Hz for long-wavelength instruments, and one operating at 50 Hz for instruments utilizing thermal neutrons. The design approach for the proton accelerator is to use a low energy linear accelerator (at 0.6 GeV), operating at 60 Hz, in tandem with two fast cycling booster synchrotrons (at 3.6 GeV), operating at 30 Hz. It is assumed here that considerations of cost and overall system reliability may favor the present design approach over the alternative approach pursued elsewhere, whereby use is made of a high energy linear accelerator in conjunction with a dc accumulation ring. With the knowledge that this alternative design is under active development, it was deliberately decided to favor here the low energy linac-fast cycling booster approach. Clearly, the present design, as developed here, must be carried to the full conceptual design stage in order to facilitate a meaningful technology and cost comparison with alternative designs.

  8. Recent performance and ignition tests of the pulsed SNS H{sup −} source for 1-MW neutron production

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P. Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Welton, R. F.

    2015-04-08

    After acquiring several reliable spare targets, SNS ramped the beam power from 850 kW to 1.4 MW, which required an increase in H{sup −} beam pulse length from 0.88 to 1.0 ms at 60 Hz. This increase initially produced slow 2-MHz power ramp-ups and, after several weeks of uninterrupted operation, it produced plasma outages every time the pulse length was raised above ∼0.95 ms. Similar outages were previously observed towards the end of long service cycles, which were believed to indicate that the breakdown voltage of the high purity hydrogen started to exceed the induced electric fields. In 2011 the RF was reconfigured to start with 10 cycles of 1.96 MHz, which yielded the shortest H{sup −} beam rise times and apparently eliminated those plasma outages. The new, pulse-length dependent outages were eliminated by increasing the initial frequency to 1.985 MHz. However, careful frequency studies are unable to justify this frequency. In addition, the paper discusses the issues and solutions for the electron-dump voltage, which starts to sag and become unstable after several weeks of high current operation. At the request of the authors and the Proceedings Editor this article has been updated to include References 3–13, which were present in the author’s original submission but were lost during manuscript processing in the Proceedings Editor's office. The updated article was published on 5 May 2015.

  9. Generation of negative pressures and spallation phenomena in diamond exposed to a picosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Abrosimov, S A; Bazhulin, A P; Bol'shakov, A P; Konov, V I; Krasyuk, I K; Pashinin, P P; Ral'chenko, V G; Semenov, A Yu; Sovyk, D N; Stuchebryukhov, I A; Khomich, A A; Fortov, V E; Khishchenko, K V

    2014-06-30

    The spallation phenomena in poly- and single-crystal synthetic diamonds have been experimentally investigated. A shockwave impact on a target was implemented using a 70-ps laser pulse in the Kamerton-T facility. The ablation pressure of 0.66 TPa on the front target surface was formed by pulsed radiation of a neodymium phosphate glass laser (second harmonic λ = 0.527 mm, pulse energy 2.5 J) with an intensity as high as 2 × 10{sup 13} W cm{sup -2}. The maximum diamond spall strength σ* ≈ 16.5 GPa is found to be 24% of the theoretical ultimate strength. Raman scattering data indicate that a small amount of crystalline diamond in the spallation region on the rear side of the target is graphitised. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  10. Small-angle neutron scattering at pulsed spallation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Seeger, P.A.; Hjelm, R.P. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The importance of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) in biological, chemical, physical, and engineering research mandates that all intense neutron sources be equipped with SANS instruments. Four existing instruments are described, and the general differences between pulsed-source and reactor-based instrument designs are discussed. The basic geometries are identical, but dynamic range is achieved by using a broad band of wavelengths (with time-of-flight analysis) rather than by moving the detector. This allows a more optimized collimation system. Data acquisition requirements at a pulsed source are more severe, requiring large, fast histogramming memories. Data reduction is also more complex, as all wave length-dependent and angle-dependent backgrounds and non-linearities must be accounted for before data can be transformed to intensity vs Q. A comparison is shown between the Los Alamos pulsed instrument and D-11 (Institute Laue-Langevin), and examples from the four major topics of the conference are shown. The general conclusion is that reactor-based instruments remain superior at very low Q or if only a narrow range of Q is required, but that the current generation of pulsed-source instruments is competitive at moderate Q and may be faster when a wide range of Q is required. In principle, a user should choose which facility to use on the basis of optimizing the experiment; in practice the tradeoffs are not severe and the choice is usually made on the basis of availability.

  11. Spallation in metallic systems: Effects of microstructure, and loading pulse shape, rate and orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, S. N.

    2011-06-01

    The dynamic nature of spallation and the ubiquitous presence of microstructure may give rise to significant dependences on microstructure and loading, as indicated by indirect experimental observations. We present systematic, direct molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of spallation in metallic systems represented by Cu and a CuZr glass. The ``microstructure'' includes various defects in Cu, porous Cu, atomic-level inhomogeneities in the CuZr glass, and the Cu crystal -CuZr glass interfaces. We explore supported and decaying shock loading pulses, as well as different loading orientations. Tensile loading rates are changed via varying the flyer and target thicknesses in shock simulations, and more significantly (down to ~106 s-1), with accelerated MD simulations of single-void growth in Cu (mimicking shock). Our direct simulations reveal strong dependences of spallation on microstructure and loading, and quantitative dynamics of void nucleation/growth as well as mechanisms for plasticity, void nucleation and their interactions in the absence or presence of defects or interfaces. The future task of incorporating statistically the microstructure effects and their rate dependences into analytic models is of great interest to shock physics but a challenge. Work done in collaboration with T.C. Germann, D. Perez, Q. An, B. Arman, W.Z. Han, D.L. Tonks, J.E. Hammerberg, A.F. Voter, Los Alamos National Laboratory; W.A. Goddard III, Caltech; and T. Cagin, Texas A & M University.

  12. Heat generation and neutron beam characteristics in a high power pulsed spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Jerng, D.W.; Carpenter, J.M.

    1996-11-01

    In the course of conceptual design of a high power pulsed spallation source, a Monte Carlo model was developed for heat generation and neutronics studies. In this paper, we present two sets of results. The first set of calculations was performed with a simple target model to investigate general characteristics of power distribution and neutron production with various proton energies ranging from 0.8 to 12 GeV. The second set was performed with a realistic target model including major components of the target system to provide basic parameters for engineering design of a high power pulsed spallation source. Calculated results generally confirm that higher proton energy provides and advantage in target cooling system requirements and yet somewhat lower neutron beam intensity as a counter effect. The heat generation in the systems surrounding the target was investigated in detail and found to have important variation with position and according to proton beam energy. Calculations of the neutron currents from the moderators showed that the neutron beam intensity from moderators in the front region of the target decreased fro higher proton energy while that from moderators in the back region of the target remained almost unchanged.

  13. Proceedings of the workshop on ion source issues relevant to a pulsed spallation neutron source: Part 2 workshop presentations

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, L.; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Alonso, J.

    1994-10-01

    As part of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Pulsed Spallation Source study, this Workshop was convened to address ion-source technology`s present status with respect to the next-generation Pulsed Spallation Source in the 1-5 MW range for the neutron scattering community. Considerations of Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) parameters and designs were included in the discussions throughout the Workshop. Ion-source requirements and actually-achieved performances were assessed, resulting in a determination of research and development requirements to bridge the gap. Part 1 of these Proceedings summarizes the Workshop; Part 2 contains viewgraphs of Workshop presentations.

  14. A pulsed spallation neutron source: Solution with a 1.25 GeV accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Blumberg, L.N.; Luccio, A.U.; Van Steenbergen, A.

    1995-10-30

    As a possible alternative design approach for the 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (PSNS), the use of an intermediate energy Linac, in conjunction with two accumulator rings has been studied. The lower final beam energy necessitates the use of higher beam current. This disadvantage is greatly offset by the use of dc rings, reducing by an order of magnitude the RF requirements, simplifying greatly the ring magnets and associated power supplies, and eliminating the use of aperture demanding, impedance compensated, ceramic chambers. The reduced magnet/magnet power supply cost and reduction of ring beam energy, permits greater sophistication in ring lattice structure design, easing the beam injection configuration and permitting greater control over localizing unavoidable beam loss.

  15. Jet formation in spallation of metal film from substrate under action of femtosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Inogamov, N. A.; Zhakhovskii, V. V.; Khokhlov, V. A.

    2015-01-15

    It is well known that during ablation by an ultrashort laser pulse, the main contribution to ablation of the substance is determined not by evaporation, but by the thermomechanical spallation of the substance. For identical metals and pulse parameters, the type of spallation is determined by film thickness d{sub f}. An important gauge is metal heating depth d{sub T} at the two-temperature stage, at which electron temperature is higher than ion temperature. We compare cases with d{sub f} < d{sub T} (thin film) and d{sub f} ≫ d{sub T} (bulk target). Radius R{sub L} of the spot of heating by an optical laser is the next (after d{sub f}) important geometrical parameter. The morphology of film bulging in cases where d{sub f} < d{sub T} on the substrate (blistering) changes upon a change in radius R{sub L} in the range from diffraction limit R{sub L} ∼ λ to high values of R{sub L} ≫ λ, where λ ∼ 1 μm is the wavelength of optical laser radiation. When d{sub f} < d{sub T}, R{sub L} ∼ λ, and F{sub abs} > F{sub m}, gold film deposited on the glass target acquires a cupola-shaped blister with a miniature frozen nanojet in the form of a tip on the circular top of the cupola (F{sub abs} and F{sub m} are the absorbed energy and the melting threshold of the film per unit surface area of the film). A new physical mechanism leading to the formation of the nanojet is proposed.

  16. Linac-driven spallation-neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Jason, A.J.

    1995-05-01

    Strong interest has arisen in accelerator-driven spallation-neutron sources that surpass existing facilities (such as ISIS at Rutherford or LANSCE at Los Alamos) by more than an order of magnitude in beam power delivered to the spallation target. The approach chosen by Los Alamos (as well as the European Spallation Source) provides the full beam energy by acceleration in a linac as opposed to primary acceleration in a synchrotron or other circular device. Two modes of neutron production are visualized for the source. A short-pulse mode produces 1 MW of beam power (at 60 pps) in pulses, of length less than 1 ms, by compression of the linac macropulse through multi-turn injection in an accumulator ring. A long-pulse mode produces a similar beam power with 1-ms-long pulses directly applied to a target. This latter mode rivals the performance of existing reactor facilities to very low neutron energies. Combination with the short-pulse mode addresses virtually all applications.

  17. Conceptual moderator studies for the Spallation Neutron Source short-pulse second target station.

    PubMed

    Gallmeier, F X; Lu, W; Riemer, B W; Zhao, J K; Herwig, K W; Robertson, J L

    2016-06-01

    Candidate moderator configurations for a short-pulse second target station (STS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have been identified using a global optimizer framework built around the MCNPX particle transport code. Neutron brightness metrics were selected as the figure-of-merit. We assumed that STS would use one out of six proton pulses produced by an SNS accelerator upgraded to operate at 1.3 GeV proton energy, 2.8 MW power and 60 Hz repetition rate. The simulations indicate that the peak brightness can be increased by a factor of 5 and 2.5 on a per proton pulse basis compared to the SNS first target station for both coupled and decoupled para-hydrogen moderators, respectively. Additional increases by factors of 3 and 2 were demonstrated for coupled and decoupled moderators, respectively, by reducing the area of neutron emission from 100 × 100 mm(2) to 20 × 20 mm(2). This increase in brightness has the potential to translate to an increase of beam intensity at the instruments' sample positions even though the total neutron emission of the smaller moderator is less than that of the larger. This is especially true for instruments with small samples (beam dimensions). The increased fluxes in the STS moderators come at accelerated poison and de-coupler burnout and higher radiation-induced material damage rates per unit power, which overall translate into lower moderator lifetimes. A first effort was undertaken to group decoupled moderators into a cluster collectively positioning them at the peak neutron production zone in the target and having a three-port neutron emission scheme that complements that of a cylindrical coupled moderator. PMID:27370444

  18. Conceptual moderator studies for the Spallation Neutron Source short-pulse second target station.

    PubMed

    Gallmeier, F X; Lu, W; Riemer, B W; Zhao, J K; Herwig, K W; Robertson, J L

    2016-06-01

    Candidate moderator configurations for a short-pulse second target station (STS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have been identified using a global optimizer framework built around the MCNPX particle transport code. Neutron brightness metrics were selected as the figure-of-merit. We assumed that STS would use one out of six proton pulses produced by an SNS accelerator upgraded to operate at 1.3 GeV proton energy, 2.8 MW power and 60 Hz repetition rate. The simulations indicate that the peak brightness can be increased by a factor of 5 and 2.5 on a per proton pulse basis compared to the SNS first target station for both coupled and decoupled para-hydrogen moderators, respectively. Additional increases by factors of 3 and 2 were demonstrated for coupled and decoupled moderators, respectively, by reducing the area of neutron emission from 100 × 100 mm(2) to 20 × 20 mm(2). This increase in brightness has the potential to translate to an increase of beam intensity at the instruments' sample positions even though the total neutron emission of the smaller moderator is less than that of the larger. This is especially true for instruments with small samples (beam dimensions). The increased fluxes in the STS moderators come at accelerated poison and de-coupler burnout and higher radiation-induced material damage rates per unit power, which overall translate into lower moderator lifetimes. A first effort was undertaken to group decoupled moderators into a cluster collectively positioning them at the peak neutron production zone in the target and having a three-port neutron emission scheme that complements that of a cylindrical coupled moderator.

  19. Conceptual moderator studies for the Spallation Neutron Source short-pulse second target station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallmeier, F. X.; Lu, W.; Riemer, B. W.; Zhao, J. K.; Herwig, K. W.; Robertson, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    Candidate moderator configurations for a short-pulse second target station (STS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have been identified using a global optimizer framework built around the MCNPX particle transport code. Neutron brightness metrics were selected as the figure-of-merit. We assumed that STS would use one out of six proton pulses produced by an SNS accelerator upgraded to operate at 1.3 GeV proton energy, 2.8 MW power and 60 Hz repetition rate. The simulations indicate that the peak brightness can be increased by a factor of 5 and 2.5 on a per proton pulse basis compared to the SNS first target station for both coupled and decoupled para-hydrogen moderators, respectively. Additional increases by factors of 3 and 2 were demonstrated for coupled and decoupled moderators, respectively, by reducing the area of neutron emission from 100 × 100 mm2 to 20 × 20 mm2. This increase in brightness has the potential to translate to an increase of beam intensity at the instruments' sample positions even though the total neutron emission of the smaller moderator is less than that of the larger. This is especially true for instruments with small samples (beam dimensions). The increased fluxes in the STS moderators come at accelerated poison and de-coupler burnout and higher radiation-induced material damage rates per unit power, which overall translate into lower moderator lifetimes. A first effort was undertaken to group decoupled moderators into a cluster collectively positioning them at the peak neutron production zone in the target and having a three-port neutron emission scheme that complements that of a cylindrical coupled moderator.

  20. Conceptual moderator studies for the Spallation Neutron Source short-pulse second target station

    DOE PAGES

    Gallmeier, F. X.; Lu, W.; Riemer, B. W.; Zhao, J. K.; Herwig, K. W.; Robertson, J. L.

    2016-06-14

    We identified candidate moderator configurations for a short-pulse second target station (STS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) using a global optimizer framework built around the MCNPX particle transport code. Neutron brightness metrics were selected as the figure-of-merit. We assumed that STS would use one out of six proton pulses produced by an SNS accelerator upgraded to operate at 1.3 GeV proton energy, 2.8 MW power and 60 Hz repetition rate. The simulations indicate that the peak brightness can be increased by a factor of 5 and 2.5 on a per proton pulse basis compared tomore » the SNS first target station for both coupled and decoupled para-hydrogen moderators, respectively. Additional increases by factors of 3 and 2 were demonstrated for coupled and decoupled moderators, respectively, by reducing the area of neutron emission from 100 × 100 mm2 to 20 × 20 mm2. Furthermore, this increase in brightness has the potential to translate to an increase of beam intensity at the instruments’ sample positions even though the total neutron emission of the smaller moderator is less than that of the larger. This is especially true for instruments with small samples (beam dimensions). The increased fluxes in the STS moderators come at accelerated poison and de-coupler burnout and higher radiation-induced material damage rates per unit power, which overall translate into lower moderator lifetimes. Our first effort decoupled group moderators into a cluster collectively positioning them at the peak neutron production zone in the target and having a three-port neutron emission scheme that complements that of a cylindrical coupled moderator.« less

  1. High Field Pulsed Magnets for Neutron Scattering at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granroth, G. E.; Lee, J.; Fogh, E.; Christensen, N. B.; Toft-Petersen, R.; Nojiri, H.

    2015-03-01

    A High Field Pulsed Magnet (HFPM) setup, is in use at the Spallation Nuetron Source(SNS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory. With this device, we recently measured the high field magnetic spin structure of LiNiPO4. The results of this study will be highlighted as an example of possible measurements that can be performed with this device. To further extend the HFPM capabilities at SNS, we have learned to design and wind these coils in house. This contribution will summarize the magnet coil design optimization procedure. Specifically by varying the geometry of the multi-layer coil, we arrive at a design that balances the maximum field strength, neutron scattering angle, and the field homogeneity for a specific set of parameters. We will show that a 6.3kJ capacitor bank, can provide a magnetic field as high as 30T for a maximum scattering angle around 40° with homogeneity of +/- 4 % in a 2mm diameter spherical volume. We will also compare the calculations to measurements from a recently wound test coil. This work was supported in part by the Lab Directors' Research and Development Fund of ORNL.

  2. Performance of the H- Ion Source Supporting 1-MW Beam Operations at SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Baoxi; Hardek, Thomas W; Kang, Yoon W; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Piller, Chip; Santana, Manuel; Welton, Robert F; Stockli, Martin P

    2011-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory reached 1-MW of beam power in September 2009, and now routinely operates near 1-MW for the production of neutrons. This paper reviews the performance, operational issues, implemented and planned mitigations of the SNS H- ion source to support such high power-level beams with high availability. Some results from R&D activities are also briefly described.

  3. Performance of the H{sup -} Ion Source Supporting 1-MW Beam Operations at SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B. X.; Hardek, T.; Kang, Y.; Murray, S. N. Jr.; Pennisi, T. R.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Welton, R. F.; Stockli, M. P.

    2011-09-26

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory reached 1-MW of beam power in September 2009, and now routinely operates near 1-MW for the production of neutrons. This paper reviews the performance, operational issues, implemented and planned mitigations of the SNS H{sup -} ion source to support such high power-level beams with high availability. Some results from R and D activities are also briefly described.

  4. Finite element simulation of the film spallation process induced by the pulsed laser peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, M.; Zeng, D. Y.; Kan, J. P.; Zhang, Y. K.; Cai, L.; Shen, Z. H.; Zhang, X. R.; Zhang, S. Y.

    2003-09-01

    The laser spallation technique for measuring the interface strength between a coating and a substrate is similar to laser shock peening, in which the stress wave induced by laser shock cause debond on the interface between a hard coating with micron thickness and a metal substrate. According to the modified experiment setup of the laser spallation technique, finite element analysis simulated the process of the film spallation by taking the laser loading as a direct input. We presented a numerical model of finite element that the laser spallation process includes two related, but uncoupled procedures. One was transient heat transfer in a two-layer medium. The other was the related transient elastic wave propagation in the same two-layer media, which was the result of the thermal misfit by transient heating. Based on the threshold of film spallation, we analyzed the process of laser shocking to study the propagation of stress wave and evaluate the spall resistance of sputtered films. The analysis result showed the dynamic adhesive strength of the interface between the TiN coating and the 304 stainless steel substrate was 193.0 MPa.

  5. Status Report on the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.

    1998-10-12

    The purpose of the Spallation Neutron Source Project (SNS) is to generate low-energy neutrons (ambient [{approximately}200 meV] and cold [{approximately}50 meV]) which can be used by up to 18 neutron beam lines to study the structure and functionality of materials. The neutrons are generated by the spallation process initiated by the interactions of 1-GeV protons with a Hg target. These neutrons are reflected by a Pb reflector and are moderated by 2 water (ambient) and 2 super critical hydrogen (cryogenic) moderators. The pulse structure for the 1 MW proton beam is 60 Hertz and < 0.7 {micro}s/pulse. The facility must be upgradable to higher power levels (2- and 4- MW) with minimal operational interruptions. Although not included in the current funding or baseline, a second target station and associated support structure which will be designed to utilize cold neutrons is also considered to be an upgrade that must be incorporated with minimal impact on operations.

  6. Small Gas Bubble Experiment for Mitigation of Cavitation Damage and Pressure Waves in Short-pulse Mercury Spallation Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Felde, David K; Sangrey, Robert L; Abdou, Ashraf A; West, David L; Shea, Thomas J; Hasegawa, Shoichi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Naoe, Dr. Takashi; Farny, Dr. Caleb H.; Kaminsky, Andrew L

    2014-01-01

    Populations of small helium gas bubbles were introduced into a flowing mercury experiment test loop to evaluate mitigation of beam-pulse induced cavitation damage and pressure waves. The test loop was developed and thoroughly tested at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) prior to irradiations at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research Center (LANSCE-WNR) facility. Twelve candidate bubblers were evaluated over a range of mercury flow and gas injection rates by use of a novel optical measurement technique that accurately assessed the generated bubble size distributions. Final selection for irradiation testing included two variations of a swirl bubbler provided by Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) collaborators and one orifice bubbler developed at SNS. Bubble populations of interest consisted of sizes up to 150 m in radius with achieved gas void fractions in the 10^-5 to 10^-4 range. The nominal WNR beam pulse used for the experiment created energy deposition in the mercury comparable to SNS pulses operating at 2.5 MW. Nineteen test conditions were completed each with 100 pulses, including variations on mercury flow, gas injection and protons per pulse. The principal measure of cavitation damage mitigation was surface damage assessment on test specimens that were manually replaced for each test condition. Damage assessment was done after radiation decay and decontamination by optical and laser profiling microscopy with damaged area fraction and maximum pit depth being the more valued results. Damage was reduced by flow alone; the best mitigation from bubble injection was between half and a quarter that of flow alone. Other data collected included surface motion tracking by three laser Doppler vibrometers (LDV), loop wall dynamic strain, beam diagnostics for charge and beam profile assessment, embedded hydrophones and pressure sensors, and sound measurement by a suite of conventional and contact microphones.

  7. VERITAS: a high-flux neutron reflectometer with vertical sample geometry for a long pulse spallation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattauch, S.; Ioffe, A.; Lott, D.; Menelle, A.; Ott, F.; Medic, Z.

    2016-04-01

    An instrument concept of a reflectometer with a vertical sample geometry fitted to the long pulse structure of a spallation source, called “VERITAS” at the ESS, is presented. It focuses on designing a reflectometer with high intensity at the lowest possible background following the users' demand to investigate thin layers or interfacial areas in the sub-nanometer length scale. The high intensity approach of the vertical reflectometer fits very well to the long pulse structure of the ESS. Its main goal is to deliver as much usable intensity as possible at the sample position and be able to access a reflectivity range of 8 orders of magnitude and more. The concept assures that the reflectivity measurements can be performed in its best way to maximize the flux delivered to the sample. The reflectometer is optimized for studies of (magnetic) layers having thicknesses down to 5Å and a surface area of 1x1cm2. With reflectivity measurements the depth-resolved, laterally averaged chemical and magnetic profile can be investigated. By using polarised neutrons, additional vector information on the in-plane magnetic correlations (off-specular scattering at the pm length scale, GISANS at the nm length scale) can be studied. The full polarisation analysis could be used for soft matter samples to correct for incoherent scattering which is presently limiting neutron reflectivity studies to a reflectivity range on the order of 10-6.

  8. Comments on the possibility of cavitation in liquid metal targets for pulsed spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter J.M.

    1996-06-01

    When short pulses of protons strike the volume of a liquid target, the rapid heating produces a pressurized region which relaxes as the pressure wave propagates outward. Skala and Bauer have modeled the effects of the pressure wave impinging on the container walls of a liquid mercury target under ESS conditions. They find that high pressures and high wall stresses result if the medium is uniform, nearly incompressible liquid. The pressure and the stresses are much reduced if the liquid contains bubbles of helium, due to their high compressibility. However, according to the calculation, the pressure still reaches an atmosphere or so at the surface, which reflects the compressive wave as a rarefaction wave of the same magnitude. Even such modest underpressures can lead to the growth of bubbles (cavitation) at or near the surface, which can collapse violently and erode the container surface. It is necessary to avoid this. Leighton provides a wide ranging discussion of pressure waves in bubbly media, which may provide insights into the nature and control of cavitation phenomena. The paper surveys some of the relevant information from that source.

  9. The Impact of Pulsed Spallation Neutron Sources on Condensed Matter Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finney, J. L.

    1993-03-01

    The exploitation of neutron scattering techniques in studies of the structure and dynamics of condensed matter has been one of the major scientific successes of the past 20 years. Based initially on high flux reactors, which produce continuous beams of neutrons, a wide range of pure and applied problems in physics, chemistry, biological sciences, engineering, materials and earth sciences have been tackled, and much new understanding gained. More recently, sources based on proton accelerators have been built, and their particular characteristics - all of which derive from the fact that sharp pulses of neutrons are produced at frequencies of between 20 and 50 Hz - explored. These characteristics, which allow science to be done that would be difficult, inefficient or impossible on a reactor source, have greatly widened the range of scientific problems that can be tackled using neutrons. This chapter gives examples from experiments performed on the most powerful such source - ISIS in the UK - and looks forward briefly to future developments in the next millenium.

  10. The European scene regarding spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, G.S.

    1996-06-01

    In Europe, a short pulse spallation neutron source, ISIS, has been operating for over 10 years, working its way up to a beam power level of 200 kW. A continuous source, SINQ, designed for a beam power of up to 1 MW, is scheduled to start operating at the end of 1996, and a detailed feasibility study has been completed for a 410 kW short pulse source, AUSTRON. Each of these sources seems to have settled for a target concept which is at or near the limits of its feasibility: The ISIS depleted uranium plate targets, heavy water cooled and Zircaloy clad, have so far not shown satisfactory service time and operation is likely to continue with a Ta-plate target, which, in the past has been used successfully for the equivalent of one full-beam-year before it was taken out of service due to degrading thermal properties. SINQ will initially use a rod target, made of Zircaloy only, but plans exist to move on to clad lead rods as quickly as possible. Apart from the not yet explored effect of hydrogen and helium production, there are also concerns about the generation of 7-Be in the cooling water from the spallation of oxygen, which might result in undesirably high radioactivity in the cooling plant room. A Liquid metal target, also under investigation for SINQ, would not only reduce this problem to a level of about 10 %, but would also minimize the risk of radiolytic corrosion in the beam interaction zone. Base on similar arguments, AUSTRON has been designed for edge cooled targets, but thermal and stress analyses show, that this concept is not feasible at higher power levels.

  11. 110 GHz, 1 MW Gyrotron Design Upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauffman, Steve; Felch, Kevin; Borchard, Philipp; Cahalan, Pat; Chu, Sam; Dubrule, Craig

    1999-11-01

    Communications and Power Industries has incorporated a number of design changes into its most recent series of 110 GHz 1 MW gyrotrons, for use in ECH and ECCD experiments on the DIII-D tokamak. Two development gyrotrons previously installed at DIII-D used a modulating-anode electron gun design and output windows consisting of double-disk face-cooled sapphire on one system and an edge-cooled CVD diamond disk on the other. Three new systems presently in fabrication and test employ (a) a single-anode electron gun to avoid excitation of spurious modes during turn-on and turn-off and to simplify power supply requirements, (b) a modified TE_22,6 cavity to reduce competition from neighboring modes, (c) a two inch aperture edge-cooled CVD diamond window to allow transmission of a 1 MW Gaussian output beam, (d) a superconducting magnet system with a cryo-cooler to reduce liquid helium consumption, and (e) a number of internal and external plumbing simplifications to make cooling system connections more straightforward. Initial test results, if available, will be presented.

  12. Preconceptual design of a Long-Pulse Spallation Source (LPSS) at the LANSCE Facility: Target system, facility, and material handling considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, W.F.

    1995-12-01

    This report provides a summary of a preconceptual design study for the proposed Long-Pulse Spallation. Source (LPSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The LPSS will use a 0.8-MW proton beam to produce neutrons from a tungsten target. This study focuses on the design of the target station and changes to the existing building that would be made to accommodate the LPSS. The LPSS will provide fifteen flight paths to neutron scattering instruments. In addition, options for generating ultracold neutrons, pions, and muons will be available. Flight-energy, forward-scattered neutrons on the downstream side of the target will also be available for autoradiography studies. A Target Test Bed (TTB) is also proposed for full-beam tests of component materials and advanced spallation neutron sources. The design allows for separation of the experiment hall from the beam line, target, and flight paths. The target and moderator systems and the systems/components to be tested in the TTB will be emplaced and removed separately by remotely operated, shielded equipment. Irradiated materials will be transported to a hot cell adjacent to the target chamber for testing by remotely operated instruments. These tests will provide information about how materials properties are affected by proton and neutron beams.

  13. Active beam position stabilization of pulsed lasers for long-distance ion profile diagnostics at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS).

    PubMed

    Hardin, Robert A; Liu, Yun; Long, Cary; Aleksandrov, Alexander; Blokland, Willem

    2011-02-14

    A high peak-power Q-switched laser has been used to monitor the ion beam profiles in the superconducting linac at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The laser beam suffers from position drift due to movement, vibration, or thermal effects on the optical components in the 250-meter long laser beam transport line. We have designed, bench-tested, and implemented a beam position stabilization system by using an Ethernet CMOS camera, computer image processing and analysis, and a piezo-driven mirror platform. The system can respond at frequencies up to 30 Hz with a high position detection accuracy. With the beam stabilization system, we have achieved a laser beam pointing stability within a range of 2 μrad (horizontal) to 4 μrad (vertical), corresponding to beam drifts of only 0.5 mm × 1 mm at the furthest measurement station located 250 meters away from the light source.

  14. Active beam position stabilization of pulsed lasers for long-distance ion profile diagnostics at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, Robert A; Liu, Yun; Long, Cary D; Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Blokland, Willem

    2011-01-01

    A high peak-power Q-switched laser has been used to monitor the ion beam profiles in the superconducting linac at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The laser beam suffers from position drift due to movement, vibration, or thermal effects on the optical components in the 250-meter long laser beam transport line. We have designed, bench-tested, and implemented a beam position stabilization system by using an Ethernet CMOS camera, computer image processing and analysis, and a piezo-driven mirror platform. The system can respond at frequencies up to 30 Hz with a high position detection accuracy. With the beam stabilization system, we have achieved a laser beam pointing stability within a range of 2 rad (horizontal) to 4 rad (vertical), corresponding to beam drifts of only 0.5 mm 1 mm at the furthest measurement station located 250 meters away from the light source.

  15. Spallation Neutron Source reaches megawatt power

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. William F. Brinkman

    2009-09-30

    The Department of Energy's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), already the world's most powerful facility for pulsed neutron scattering science, is now the first pulsed spallation neutron source to break the one-megawatt barrier. "Advances in the materials sciences are fundamental to the development of clean and sustainable energy technologies. In reaching this milestone of operating power, the Spallation Neutron Source is providing scientists with an unmatched resource for unlocking the secrets of materials at the molecular level," said Dr. William F. Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science.

  16. Spallation Neutron Source reaches megawatt power

    ScienceCinema

    Dr. William F. Brinkman

    2016-07-12

    The Department of Energy's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), already the world's most powerful facility for pulsed neutron scattering science, is now the first pulsed spallation neutron source to break the one-megawatt barrier. "Advances in the materials sciences are fundamental to the development of clean and sustainable energy technologies. In reaching this milestone of operating power, the Spallation Neutron Source is providing scientists with an unmatched resource for unlocking the secrets of materials at the molecular level," said Dr. William F. Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science.

  17. Simulation of a suite of generic long-pulse neutron instruments to optimize the time structure of the European Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lefmann, Kim; Kleno, Kaspar H.; Holm, Sonja L.; Sales, Morten; Birk, Jonas Okkels; Hansen, Britt R.; Knudsen, Erik; Willendrup, Peter K.; Lieutenant, Klaus; Moos, Lars von; Andersen, Ken H.

    2013-05-15

    We here describe the result of simulations of 15 generic neutron instruments for the long-pulsed European Spallation Source. All instruments have been simulated for 20 different settings of the source time structure, corresponding to pulse lengths between 1 ms and 2 ms; and repetition frequencies between 10 Hz and 25 Hz. The relative change in performance with time structure is given for each instrument, and an unweighted average is calculated. The performance of the instrument suite is proportional to (a) the peak flux and (b) the duty cycle to a power of approximately 0.3. This information is an important input to determining the best accelerator parameters. In addition, we find that in our simple guide systems, most neutrons reaching the sample originate from the central 3-5 cm of the moderator. This result can be used as an input in later optimization of the moderator design. We discuss the relevance and validity of defining a single figure-of-merit for a full facility and compare with evaluations of the individual instrument classes.

  18. In-situ structural integrity evaluation for high-power pulsed spallation neutron source - Effects of cavitation damage on structural vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Tao; Naoe, Takashi; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    A double-wall structure mercury target will be installed at the high-power pulsed spallation neutron source in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Cavitation damage on the inner wall is an important factor governing the lifetime of the target-vessel. To monitor the structural integrity of the target vessel, displacement velocity at a point on the outer surface of the target vessel is measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). The measured signals can be used for evaluating the damage inside the target vessel because of cyclic loading and cavitation bubble collapse caused by pulsed-beam induced pressure waves. The wavelet differential analysis (WDA) was applied to reveal the effects of the damage on vibrational cycling. To reduce the effects of noise superimposed on the vibration signals on the WDA results, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), statistical methods were applied. Results from laboratory experiments, numerical simulation results with random noise added, and target vessel field data were analyzed by the WDA and the statistical methods. The analyses demonstrated that the established in-situ diagnostic technique can be used to effectively evaluate the structural response of the target vessel.

  19. Design considerations in achieving 1 MW CW operation with a whispering-gallery-mode gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Felch, K.; Feinstein, J.; Hess, C.; Huey, H.; Jongewaard, E.; Jory, H.; Neilson, J.; Pendleton, R.; Pirkle, D.; Zitelli, L. )

    1989-09-01

    Varian is developing high-power, CW gyrotrons at frequencies in the range 100 GHz to 150 GHz, for use in electron cyclotron heating applications. Early test vehicles have utilized a TE{sub 15,2,1} interaction cavity, have achieved short-pulse power levels of 820 kW and average power levels of 80 kW at 140 GHz. Present tests are aimed at reaching 400 kW under CW operating conditions and up to 1 MW for short pulse durations. Work is also underway on modifications to the present design that will enable power levels of up to 1 MW CW to be achieved. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Neutron spallation sources in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, P. J.

    1996-11-01

    After a brief general and historical discussion, the main design features of spallation sources are described. At the present time, Europe not only has the world-leading pulsed neutron spallation source, the SNS-ISIS at RAL, UK, but it is on the point of commissioning a world-leading continuous cyclotron-driven source, the SINQ at PSI, Switzerland. Looking to the future, yet more powerful pulsed sources are actively under study and the difficult problem of high-power target design (>250 kW) is leading to a new technology for liquid targets. The accelerator designs, although basically classical, require custom-built solutions that are often at the limit of present day accelerator technology.

  1. Neutron spallation sources in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, P. J.

    1996-11-01

    After a brief general and historical discussion, the main design features of spallation sources are described. At the present time, Europe not only has the world-leading pulsed neutron spallation source, the SNS-ISIS at RAL, UK, but it is on the point of commissioning a world-leading continuous cyclotron-driven source, the SINQ at PSI, Switzerland. Looking to the future, yet more powerful pulsed sources are actively under study and the difficult problem of high-power target design (>250 kW) is leading to a new technology for liquid targets. The accelerator designs, although basically classical, require custom-built solutions that are often at the limit of presentday accelerator technology.

  2. Nanoscale surface boiling in sub-threshold damage and above-threshold spallation of bulk aluminum and gold by single femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionin, Andrey A.; Kudryashov, Sergey I.; Makarov, Sergey V.; Levchenko, Alexey O.; Rudenko, Andrey A.; Saraeva, Irina N.; Zayarny, Dmitry A.; Nathala, Chandra R.; Husinsky, Wolfgang

    2016-02-01

    The sub and near-threshold topographic signatures of the spallation of nanometer-thick melt layers during single-shot femtosecond laser ablation of bulk aluminum and gold were experimentally observed for the first time, using scanning electron microscopy with high spatial resolution. The novel ablative nanofeatures—sub-threshold boiling nanopits, the partially detached ultrathin solidified melt layer, and the lamellar surface structure under the layer along the spallative crater border, as well as the foam-like nanostructure of the crater bottom—indicate the boiling origin of the spallation threshold, rather than the thermomechanical rupture of the molten surface layer in a propagating unloading wave. These ablative surface nanofeatures were also revealed in trenches of single-shot, near-wavelength normal interference ripples on the aluminum surface, indicating their spallative nature and being promising for biosensing applications.

  3. BEAM LOSS MITIGATION IN THE OAK RIDGE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator complex routinely delivers 1 MW of beam power to the spallation target. Due to this high beam power, understanding and minimizing the beam loss is an ongoing focus area of the accelerator physics program. In some areas of the accelerator facility the equipment parameters corresponding to the minimum loss are very different from the design parameters. In this presentation we will summarize the SNS beam loss measurements, the methods used to minimize the beam loss, and compare the design vs. the loss-minimized equipment parameters.

  4. Radiative neutron capture as a counting technique at pulsed spallation neutron sources: a review of current progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schooneveld, E. M.; Pietropaolo, A.; Andreani, C.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Rhodes, N. J.; Senesi, R.; Tardocchi, M.; Gorini, G.

    2016-09-01

    Neutron scattering techniques are attracting an increasing interest from scientists in various research fields, ranging from physics and chemistry to biology and archaeometry. The success of these neutron scattering applications is stimulated by the development of higher performance instrumentation. The development of new techniques and concepts, including radiative capture based neutron detection, is therefore a key issue to be addressed. Radiative capture based neutron detectors utilize the emission of prompt gamma rays after neutron absorption in a suitable isotope and the detection of those gammas by a photon counter. They can be used as simple counters in the thermal region and (simultaneously) as energy selector and counters for neutrons in the eV energy region. Several years of extensive development have made eV neutron spectrometers operating in the so-called resonance detector spectrometer (RDS) configuration outperform their conventional counterparts. In fact, the VESUVIO spectrometer, a flagship instrument at ISIS serving a continuous user programme for eV inelastic neutron spectroscopy measurements, is operating in the RDS configuration since 2007. In this review, we discuss the physical mechanism underlying the RDS configuration and the development of associated instrumentation. A few successful neutron scattering experiments that utilize the radiative capture counting techniques will be presented together with the potential of this technique for thermal neutron diffraction measurements. We also outline possible improvements and future perspectives for radiative capture based neutron detectors in neutron scattering application at pulsed neutron sources.

  5. Radiative neutron capture as a counting technique at pulsed spallation neutron sources: a review of current progress.

    PubMed

    Schooneveld, E M; Pietropaolo, A; Andreani, C; Perelli Cippo, E; Rhodes, N J; Senesi, R; Tardocchi, M; Gorini, G

    2016-09-01

    Neutron scattering techniques are attracting an increasing interest from scientists in various research fields, ranging from physics and chemistry to biology and archaeometry. The success of these neutron scattering applications is stimulated by the development of higher performance instrumentation. The development of new techniques and concepts, including radiative capture based neutron detection, is therefore a key issue to be addressed. Radiative capture based neutron detectors utilize the emission of prompt gamma rays after neutron absorption in a suitable isotope and the detection of those gammas by a photon counter. They can be used as simple counters in the thermal region and (simultaneously) as energy selector and counters for neutrons in the eV energy region. Several years of extensive development have made eV neutron spectrometers operating in the so-called resonance detector spectrometer (RDS) configuration outperform their conventional counterparts. In fact, the VESUVIO spectrometer, a flagship instrument at ISIS serving a continuous user programme for eV inelastic neutron spectroscopy measurements, is operating in the RDS configuration since 2007. In this review, we discuss the physical mechanism underlying the RDS configuration and the development of associated instrumentation. A few successful neutron scattering experiments that utilize the radiative capture counting techniques will be presented together with the potential of this technique for thermal neutron diffraction measurements. We also outline possible improvements and future perspectives for radiative capture based neutron detectors in neutron scattering application at pulsed neutron sources. PMID:27502571

  6. Plans for a Collaboratively Developed Distributed Control System for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    DeVan, W.R.; Gurd, D.P.; Hammonds, J.; Lewis, S.A.; Smith, J.D.

    1999-03-29

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based pulsed neutron source to be built in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The facility has five major sections - a ''front end'' consisting of a 65 keV H{sup -} ion source followed by a 2.5 MeV RFQ; a 1 GeV linac; a storage ring; a 1MW spallation neutron target (upgradeable to 2 MW); the conventional facilities to support these machines and a suite of neutron scattering instruments to exploit them. These components will be designed and implemented by five collaborating institutions: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Front End), Los Alamos National Laboratory (Linac); Brookhaven National Laboratory (Storage Ring); Argonne National Laboratory (Instruments); and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Neutron Source and Conventional Facilities). It is proposed to implement a fully integrated control system for all aspects of this complex. The system will be developed collaboratively, with some degree of local autonomy for distributed systems, but centralized accountability. Technical integration will be based upon the widely-used EPICS control system toolkit, and a complete set of hardware and software standards. The scope of the integrated control system includes site-wide timing and synchronization, networking and machine protection. This paper discusses the technical and organizational issues of planning a large control system to be developed collaboratively at five different institutions, the approaches being taken to address those issues, as well as some of the particular technical challenges for the SNS control system.

  7. Extrapolation of the Dutch 1 MW tunable free electron maser to a 5 MW ECRH source

    SciTech Connect

    Caplan, M.; Nelson, S.; Kamin, G.; Antonsen, T. Levush, B.; Urbanus, W.; Tulupov, A.

    1995-04-01

    A Free Electron Maser (FEM) is now under construction at the FOM Institute (Rijnhuizen) Netherlands with the goal of producing 1 MW long pulse to CW microwave output in the range 130 GHz to 250 GHz with wall plug efficiencies of 50% (Verhoeven, et al EC-9 Conference). An extrapolated version of this device is proposed which by scaling up the beam current, would produce microwave power levels of up to 5 MW CW in order to reduce the cost per watt and increase the power per module, thus providing the fusion community with a practical ECRH source.

  8. 100 GHz, 1 MW, CW gyrotron study program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Felch, K.; Bier, R.; Caplan, M.; Jory, H.

    1983-09-01

    The results of a study program to investigate the feasibility of various approaches in designing a 100 GHz, 1 MW CW gyrotron are presented. A summary is given of the possible configurations for a high average power, high frequency gyrotron, including an historical survey of experimental results which are relevant to the various approaches. A set of basic scaling considerations which enable qualitative comparisons between particular gyrotron interaction circuits is presented. These calculations are important in understanding the role of various electron beam and circuit parameters in achieving a viable gyrotron design. Following these scaling exercises, a series of design calculations is presented for a possible approach in achieving 100 GHz, 1 MW CW. These calculations include analyses of the electron gun and interaction circuit parts of the gyrotron, and a general analysis of other aspects of a high average power, high frequency gyrotron. Scalability of important aspects of the design to other frequencies is also discussed, as well as key technology issues.

  9. Commissioning of 170 GHz, 1 MW EC H&CD in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, J. H.; Sakamoto, K.; Joung, M.; Park, S. I.; Kim, H. J.; Han, W. S.; Kim, J. S.; Bae, Y. S.; Yang, H. L.; Kwak, J. G.; Kwon, M.; Namkung, W.; Park, H.; Cho, M. H.; Kajiwara, K.; Oda, Y.; Hosea, J.; Ellis, R.; Doane, J.; Olstad, R.

    2012-09-01

    The newly installed electron cyclotron heating and current drive (EC H&CD) system with a frequency of 170 GHz was successfully commissioned and used for the second-harmonic ECH-assisted startup in 2011 operational campaign of the KSTAR. As a RF power source, ITER pre-prototype of 170 GHz, 1 MW continuous-wave gyrotron, is loaned from the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). During the KSTAR 2011 plamma campaign, maxumum pulse length of 10 sec at 0.6 MW EC beam was reliably injected into the plasma and the 170 GHz second harmonic ECH-assisted start-up was successful leading to reduce the flux consumption at toroidal magnetic field of 3 T. As a result, the flux consumption until the plasma current flat-top was reduced from 4.13 Wb for pure Ohmic to 3.62 Wb (12 % reduction) for the perpendicular injection. When the EC beam is launched with toroidal angle of 20 deg in co-CD direction, more reduced magnetic flux consumption was obtained with 3.14 Wb (24 % reduction) compared with pure OH plasmas. In recent, the gyrotron has been successfully commissioned with the output power of 1 MW and the pulse duration of 20 sec in KSTAR. This paper presents successful commissioning of 170 GHz EC H&CD system in KSTAR as well as the heating and startup experimental results.

  10. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of the liquid mercury target for the national spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Siman-Tov, M.; Wendel, M.W.; Haines, J.R.; Rogers, M.

    1997-04-01

    The National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS) is a high-energy, accelerator-based spallation neutron source being designed by a multi-laboratory team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to achieve very high fluxes of neutrons for scientific experiments. The NSNS is proposed to have a 1 MW beam of high-energy ({approximately}1 GeV) protons upgradable to 5 MW and operating at 60 Hz with a pulse duration of 0.5 {mu}s. Peak steady-state power density in the target is about 640 MW/m{sup 3} for 1 MW, whereas the pulse instantaneous peak power density is as high as 22,000 GW/m{sup 3}. The local peak temperature rise for a single pulse over it`s time-averaged value is only 6{degrees}C, but the rate of this temperature rise during the pulse is extremely fast ({approximately}12 million {degrees}C/s). In addition to the resulting thermal shock and materials compatibility concerns, key feasibility issues for the target are related to its thermal-hydraulic performance. These include proper flow distribution, flow reversals and stagnation zones, possible {open_quotes}hot spots{close_quotes}, cooling of the beam {open_quotes}window{close_quotes}, and the challenge of mitigating the effects of thermal shock through possible injection of helium bubbles. An analytic approach was used on the PC spreadsheet EXCEL to evaluate target design options and to determine the global T/H parameters in the current concept. The general computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code CFX was used to simulate the detailed time-averaged two-dimensional thermal and flow distributions in the liquid mercury. In this paper, an overview of the project and the results of this preliminary work are presented. Heat transfer characteristics of liquid mercury under wetting and non-wetting conditions are discussed, and future directions of the program in T/H analysis and R&D are outlined.

  11. Spallation radiation effects in materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mansur, L.K.; Farrell, K.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1996-06-01

    Spallation refers to the process whereby particles (chiefly neutrons) are ejected from nuclei upon bombardment by high-energy protons. Spallation neutron sources (SNS`s) use these neutrons for neutron scattering and diffraction research, and SNS`s are proposed as the basis for systems for tritium production and transmutation of nuclear waste. Materials in SNS`s are exposed to the incident proton beam (energies typically about 1000 MeV) and to the spallation neutrons (spectrum of energies extending up to about 1000 MeV). By contrast the fission neutrons in nuclear reactors have an average energy of only about 2 MeV, and the neutrons in fusion reactors would have energies below about 14 MeV. Furthermore, the protons and neutrons in SNS`s for scattering and diffraction research are pulsed at frequencies of about 10 to 60 Hz, from which significant changes in the kinetics of point and extended defects may be expected. In addition, much higher transmutation rates occur in SNS-irradiated materials, On the whole, then, significant differences in microstructural development and macroscopic properties may result upon exposure in SNS systems, as compared with fission and fusion irradiations. In a more general sense, subjecting materials to new radiation environments has almost routinely led to new discoveries. To the extent that data are avaiable, however, the spallation environment appears to increase the degree of damage without introducing totally new effects. The first part of this presentation is an overview of radiation effects in materials, outlining essential concepts and property changes and their physical bases. This background is followed by a description of SNS irradiation environments and the effects on materials of exposure to these environments. A special discussion is given of the selection of target (e.g., liquid mercury), container (e.g., austenitic stainless steel or ferritic/martensitic steel), and structural materials in SNS systems.

  12. Neutronic performance of a benchmark 1-MW LPSS

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, G.J.; Pitcher, E.J.; Ferguson, P.D.

    1995-12-31

    We used split-target/flux-trap-moderator geometry in our 1-MW LPSS computational benchmark performance calculations because the simulation models were readily available. Also, this target/moderator arrangement is a proven LANSCE design and a good neutronic performer. The model has four moderator viewed surfaces, each with a 13x13 cm field-of-view. For our scoping neutronic-performance calculations, we attempted to get as much engineering realism into the target-system mockup as possible. In our present model, we account for target/reflector dilution by cooling; the D{sub 2}O coolant fractions are adequate for 1 MW of 800-MeV protons (1.25 mA). We have incorporated a proton beam entry window and target canisters into the model, as well as (partial) moderator and vacuum canisters. The model does not account for target and moderator cooling lines and baffles, entire moderator canisters, and structural material in the reflector.

  13. Utilization of Monte Carlo Calculations in Radiation Transport Analyses to Support the Design of the U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.

    2000-10-23

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has given the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project approval to begin Title I design of the proposed facility to be built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and construction is scheduled to commence in FY01 . The SNS initially will consist of an accelerator system capable of delivering an {approximately}0.5 microsecond pulse of 1 GeV protons, at a 60 Hz frequency, with 1 MW of beam power, into a single target station. The SNS will eventually be upgraded to a 2 MW facility with two target stations (a 60 Hz station and a 10 Hz station). The radiation transport analysis, which includes the neutronic, shielding, activation, and safety analyses, is critical to the design of an intense high-energy accelerator facility like the proposed SNS, and the Monte Carlo method is the cornerstone of the radiation transport analyses.

  14. H- radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Sourcea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, R. F.; Dudnikov, V. G.; Gawne, K. R.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Roseberry, R. T.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.; Turvey, M. W.

    2012-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent ˜38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of ˜90%. H- beam pulses (˜1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, ˜60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of ˜0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of ˜99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of ˜75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance/installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to ˜100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

  15. H- radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, Robert F; Pennisi, Terry R; Roseberry, Ron T; Stockli, Martin P

    2012-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent {approx}38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of {approx}90%. H{sup -} beam pulses ({approx}1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, {approx}60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of {approx}0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of {approx}99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of {approx}75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance/installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to {approx}100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

  16. H- radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Source.

    PubMed

    Welton, R F; Dudnikov, V G; Gawne, K R; Han, B X; Murray, S N; Pennisi, T R; Roseberry, R T; Santana, M; Stockli, M P; Turvey, M W

    2012-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent ∼38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of ∼90%. H(-) beam pulses (∼1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, ∼60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of ∼0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of ∼99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of ∼75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance∕installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to ∼100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

  17. Neutron scattering instrumentation for biology at spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.

    1994-12-31

    Conventional wisdom holds that since biological entities are large, they must be studied with cold neutrons, a domain in which reactor sources of neutrons are often supposed to be pre-eminent. In fact, the current generation of pulsed spallation neutron sources, such as LANSCE at Los Alamos and ISIS in the United Kingdom, has demonstrated a capability for small angle scattering (SANS) - a typical cold- neutron application - that was not anticipated five years ago. Although no one has yet built a Laue diffractometer at a pulsed spallation source, calculations show that such an instrument would provide an exceptional capability for protein crystallography at one of the existing high-power spoliation sources. Even more exciting is the prospect of installing such spectrometers either at a next-generation, short-pulse spallation source or at a long-pulse spallation source. A recent Los Alamos study has shown that a one-megawatt, short-pulse source, which is an order of magnitude more powerful than LANSCE, could be built with today`s technology. In Europe, a preconceptual design study for a five-megawatt source is under way. Although such short-pulse sources are likely to be the wave of the future, they may not be necessary for some applications - such as Laue diffraction - which can be performed very well at a long-pulse spoliation source. Recently, it has been argued by Mezei that a facility that combines a short-pulse spallation source similar to LANSCE, with a one-megawatt, long-pulse spallation source would provide a cost-effective solution to the global shortage of neutrons for research. The basis for this assertion as well as the performance of some existing neutron spectrometers at short-pulse sources will be examined in this presentation.

  18. Initial Testing of a 140 GHz 1 MW Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauffman, Stephen; Felch, Kevin; Blank, Monica; Borchard, Philipp; Cahalan, Pat; Chu, Sam; Jory, Howard

    2001-10-01

    CPI has completed the fabrication of a 140 GHz 1 MW CW gyrotron to be used on the W7-X stellarator at IPP Greifswald. Testing of the initial build of this gyrotron had just begun when this abstract was prepared, and was expected to finish in September, at which time a planned rebuild of the device was scheduled to begin. This poster will summarize the gyrotron design, present results of initial testing, and outline any design changes planned as a consequence of these results. This gyrotron's design employs a number of advanced features, including a diode electron gun for simplified operation, a single-stage depressed collector to enhance overall efficiency, a CVD diamond output window, an internal mode converter that converts the excited TE28,7 cavity mode to a Gaussian output beam, and a high-voltage layout that locates all external high voltage below the superconducting magnet system without requiring an oil tank for insulation. Similar features are being used for an 84 GHz 500 kW system being built for the KSTAR tokamak program and for a 110 GHz 1.5 MW system being designed in collaboration with MIT, UMd, UW, GA, and Calabazas Creek Research with funding provided by DOE.

  19. Basis for the power supply reliability study of the 1 MW neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    McGhee, D.G.; Fathizadeh, M.

    1993-07-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) upgrade to 1 MW requires new power supply designs. This paper describes the tools and the methodology needed to assess the reliability of the power supplies. Both the design and operation of the power supplies in the synchrotron will be taken into account. To develop a reliability budget, the experiments to be conducted with this accelerator are reviewed, and data is collected on the number and duration of interruptions possible before an experiment is required to start over. Once the budget is established, several accelerators of this type will be examined. The budget is allocated to the different accelerator systems based on their operating experience. The accelerator data is usually in terms of machine availability and system down time. It takes into account mean time to failure (MTTF), time to diagnose, time to repair or replace the failed components, and time to get the machine back online. These estimated times are used as baselines for the design. Even though we are in the early stage of design, available data can be analyzed to estimate the MTTF for the power supplies.

  20. CHARACTERISTICS OF DIAMOND WINDOWS ON THE 1 MW, 110 GHz GYROTRON SYSTEMS ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

    SciTech Connect

    Y.A. GORELOV; J. LOHR; R.W. CALLIS; D. PONCE

    2002-08-01

    Diamond disks made using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique are now in common use as gyrotron output windows. The low millimeter wave losses and excellent thermal conductivity of diamond have made it possible to use such windows in gyrotrons with {approx}1 MW output power and pulse length up to and greater than 10 s. A ubiquitous characteristic of diamond gyrotron windows is the presence of apparent hot spots in the infrared images registered during rf pulses. Many of these spots are co-located with bright points seen in visible video images. The spots do not seem to compromise the integrity of the windows. Analysis of the infrared observations on several different gyrotrons operating at the DIII-D tokamak are reported.

  1. Ramping up the Spallation Neutron Source beam power with the H{sup -} source using 0 mg Cs/day

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, M. P.; Han, B.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Welton, R. F.

    2010-02-15

    This paper describes the ramp up of the beam power for the Spallation Neutron Source by ramping up the pulse length, the repetition rate, and the beam current emerging from the H{sup -} source. Starting out with low repetition rates ({<=}10 Hz) and short pulse lengths ({<=}0.2 ms), the H{sup -} source and low-energy beam transport delivered from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory exceeded the requirements with almost perfect availability. This paper discusses the modifications that were required to exceed 0.2 ms pulse length and 0.2% duty factor with acceptable availability and performance. Currently, the source is supporting neutron production at 1 MW with 38 mA linac beam current at 60 Hz and 0.9 ms pulse length. The pulse length will be increased to {approx}1.1 ms to meet the requirements for neutron production with a power between 1 and 1.4 MW. A medium-energy beam transport (MEBT) beam current of 46 mA with a 5.4% duty factor has been demonstrated for 32 h. A 56 mA MEBT beam current with a 4.1% duty factor has been demonstrated for 20 min at the conclusion of a 12-day production run. This is close to the 59 mA needed for 3 MW neutron productions. Also notable is the Cs{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} cesium system, which dispenses {approx}10 mg of Cs during the startup of the ion source, sufficient for producing the required 38 mA for 4 weeks without significant degradation.

  2. The European Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lindroos M.; Calaga R.; Bousson S.; Danared H.; Devanz G. et al

    2011-04-20

    In 2003 the joint European effort to design a European Spallation Source (ESS) resulted in a set of reports, and in May 2009 Lund was agreed to be the ESS site. The ESS Scandinavia office has since then worked on setting all the necessary legal and organizational matters in place so that the Design Update and construction can be started in January 2011, in collaboration with European partners. The Design Update phase is expected to end in 2012, to be followed by a construction phase, with first neutrons expected in 2018-2019.

  3. Narrow linewidth picosecond pulsed laser with mega-watt peak power at UV wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yun; Huang, Chunning; Deibele, Craig Edmond

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) burst mode laser system to generate 66 ps/402.5 MHz pulses with mega-watt peak power at 355 nm. The seed laser is based on a direct electro-optic modulation of a fiber laser output. A very high extinction ratio (45 dB) has been achieved by using an adaptive bias control. The multi-stage Nd:YAG amplifier system allows a uniformly temporal shaping of macropulses with tunable pulse duration. The light output form the amplifier is converted to 355 nm and over 1 MW UV peak power is obtained when the laser is operating in a 5- s/10-Hz macropulse mode. The laser output has a transform limited spectrum bandwidth with a very narrow linewidth of individual laser mode. The immediate application of the laser system is the laser assisted hydrogen ion beam stripping for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS).

  4. Decommissioning and PIE of the MEGAPIE spallation target

    SciTech Connect

    Latge, C.; Henry, J.; Wohlmuther, M.; Dai, Y.; Gavillet, D.; Hammer, B.; Heinitz, S.; Neuhausen, J.; Schumann, D.; Thomsen, K.; Tuerler, A.; Wagner, W.; Gessi, A.; Guertin, A.; Konstantinovic, M.; Lindau, R.; Maloy, S.; Saito, S.

    2013-07-01

    A key experiment in the Accelerated Driven Systems roadmap, the MEGAwatt PIlot Experiment (MEGAPIE) (1 MW) was initiated in 1999 in order to design and build a liquid lead-bismuth spallation target, then to operate it into the Swiss spallation neutron facility SINQ at Paul Scherrer Institute. The target has been designed, manufactured, and tested during integral tests, before irradiation carried out end of 2006. During irradiation, neutron and thermo hydraulic measurements were performed allowing deep interpretation of the experiment and validation of the models used during design phase. The decommissioning, Post Irradiation Examinations and waste management phases were defined properly. The phases dedicated to cutting, sampling, cleaning, waste management, samples preparation and shipping to various laboratories were performed by PSI teams: all these phases constitute a huge work, which allows now to perform post-irradiation examination (PIE) of structural material, irradiated in relevant conditions. Preliminary results are presented in the paper, they concern chemical characterization. The following radio-nuclides have been identified by γ-spectrometry: {sup 60}Co, {sup 101}Rh, {sup 102}Rh, {sup 108m}Ag, {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 172}Hf/Lu, {sup 173}Lu, {sup 194}Hg/Au, {sup 195}Au, {sup 207}Bi. For some of these nuclides the activities can be easily evaluated from γ-spectrometry results ({sup 207}Bi, {sup 194}Hg/Au), while other nuclides can only be determined after chemical separations ({sup 108m}Ag, {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 195}Au, {sup 129}I, {sup 36}Cl and α-emitting {sup 208-210}Po). The concentration of {sup 129}I is lower than expected. The chemical analysis already performed on spallation and corrosion products in the lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) are very relevant for further applications of LBE as a spallation media and more generally as a coolant.

  5. EXCESS RF POWER REQUIRED FOR RF CONTROL OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE (SNS) LINAC, A PULSED HIGH-INTENSITY SUPERCONDUCTING PROTON ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    M. LYNCH; S. KWON; ET AL

    2001-06-01

    A high-intensity proton linac, such as that being planned for the SNS, requires accurate RF control of cavity fields for the entire pulse in order to avoid beam spill. The current design requirement for the SNS is RF field stability within {+-}0.5% and {+-}0.5{sup o} [1]. This RF control capability is achieved by the control electronics using the excess RF power to correct disturbances. To minimize the initial capital costs, the RF system is designed with 'just enough' RF power. All the usual disturbances exist, such as beam noise, klystron/HVPS noise, coupler imperfections, transport losses, turn-on and turn-off transients, etc. As a superconducting linac, there are added disturbances of large magnitude, including Lorentz detuning and microphonics. The effects of these disturbances and the power required to correct them are estimated, and the result shows that the highest power systems in the SNS have just enough margin, with little or no excess margin.

  6. Split-target neutronics and the MLNSC spallation target system

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, G.J.; Ferguson, P.D.; Pitcher, E.J.; Court, J.D.

    1996-12-31

    The Manuel Lujan, Jr., Neutron Scattering Center (MLNSC) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is one of four operating Short-Pulse Spallation Sources worldwide. The MLNSC target system (composed of targets, moderators, and reflectors) was first installed in 1985. The target system employs a split tungsten spallation target with a void space in between (the flux-trap gap); this target system will be upgraded in 1998. The ability to efficiently split a spallation target allowed us to introduce the concept of flux-trap moderators and ultimately the notion of backscattering and upstream moderators. The upgraded MLNSC target system will employ both flux-trap and upstream/backscattering moderators to simultaneously service 16 neutron flight paths with high-intensity neutron beams for materials science research.

  7. The thermal spallation drilling process

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    Holes can be produced in very hard rock more easily and less expensively by thermal spallation than by conventional means. This drilling process has been used for producing blast holes in the taconite iron mines and for quarrying granite. It is potentially valuable for drilling holes in very hard rock for the exploitation of geothermal energy and the storage of various commodities. However, investigation and development of the thermal spallation drilling process is proceeding slowly.

  8. New spallation neutron sources, their performance and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Pulsed spallation sources now operating in the world are at the KEK Laboratory in Japan (the KENS source), at Los Alamos National Laboratory (WNR) and at Argonne National Laboratory (IPNS), both the latter being in the US. The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) is currently the world's most intense source with a peak neutron flux of 4 x 10/sup 14/ n cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/ at a repetition rate of 30 Hz, and globally producing approx. 1.5 x 10/sup 15/ n/sec. Present pulsed sources are still relatively weak compared to their potential. In 1985 the Rutherford Spallation Neutron Source will come on line, and eventually be approx. 30 more intense than the present IPNS. Later, in 1986 the WNR/PSR option at Los Alamos will make that facility of comparable intensity, while a subcritical fission booster at IPNS will keep IPNS competitive. These new sources will expand the applications of pulsed neutrons but are still based on accelerators built for other scientific purposes, usually nuclear or high-energy physics. Accelerator physicists are now designing machines expressly for spallation neutron research, and the proton currents attainable appear in the milliamps. (IPNS now runs at 0.5 GeV and 14 ..mu..A). Such design teams are at the KFA Laboratory Julich, Argonne National Laboratory and KEK. Characteristics, particularly the different time structure of the pulses, of these new sources will be discussed. S

  9. Post irradiation examination of the Spallation Neutron Source target vessels

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, David A; Ferguson, Phillip D; Mansur, Louis K

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is an accelerator-based pulsed neutron source that produces high-energy spallation neutrons by bombarding liquid mercury flowing through a stainless steel target vessel. During operation the proton beam and spallation neutrons produce radiation damage in the AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel target vessel and water-cooled shroud. The beam pulses also cause rapid heating of the liquid mercury, which may produce cavitation erosion damage on the inner surface of the target vessel. The cavitation erosion rate is thought to be highly sensitive to beam power and predicted to be the primary life-limiting factor of target vessel. Though mitigation of cavitation erosion and radiation damage to the target vessel will be a critical for successful high-power operation of the SNS facility, the effects of radiation damage and cavitation erosion to target vessels in liquid metal spallation systems are not well known. Therefore preparations are being undertaken to perform post irradiation examination (PIE) of the liquid mercury target vessel and water-cooled shroud after end-of-life occurs. An overview of the planned PIE for the SNS target vessel is presented here, including proposed techniques for specimen acquisition and subsequent material properties characterization.

  10. H{sup -} radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, R. F.; Gawne, K. R.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Roseberry, R. T.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.; Dudnikov, V. G.; Turvey, M. W.

    2012-02-15

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent {approx}38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of {approx}90%. H{sup -} beam pulses ({approx}1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, {approx}60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of {approx}0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of {approx}99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of {approx}75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance/installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to {approx}100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

  11. Status of KSTAR 170 GHz, 1 MW Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive System

    SciTech Connect

    Joung, M.; Bae, Y. S.; Jeong, J. H.; Park, S.; Kim, H. J.; Yang, H. L.; Park, H.; Cho, M. H.; Namkung, W.; Hosea, J.; Ellis, R.; Sakamoto, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Doane, J.

    2011-12-23

    A 170 GHz Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (ECH/CD) system on KSTAR is designed to launch total 2.4 MW of power for up to 300 sec into the plasma. At present the first 1 MW ECH/CD system is under installation and commissioning for 2011 KSTAR campaign. The 170 GHz, 1 MW, 300 sec gyrotron and the matching optics unit (MOU) will be provided from JAEA under collaboration between NFRI and JAEA. The transmission line consists of MOU and 70 m long 63.5 mm ID corrugated waveguides with the eight miter bends. The 1 MW, 10 sec launcher is developed based on the existing two-mirror front-end launcher in collaboration with Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and Pohang University of Science and Technology, and is installed on the low field side in the KSTAR equatorial plane. The mirror pivot is located at 30 cm below from the equatorial plane. 3.6 MVA power supply system is manufactured and now is under commissioning to meet the triode gun operation of JAEA gyrotron. The power supply consists of 66 kV/55 A cathode power supply, mode-anode system, and 50 kV/160 mA body power supply. In this paper, the current status of KSTAR 170 GHz, 1 MW ECH/CD system will be presented as well as the experimental plan utilizing 170 GHz new ECH/CD system.

  12. Target Operational Experience at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; Janney, Jim G; Kaminskas, Saulius; McClintock, David A; Rosenblad, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has operated at unprecedented power levels for a short-pulse spallation source. Target operations have been successful but not without difficulties. Three targets out of the eight used to date have ended life unexpectedly causing interruptions to the neutron science users. The first of a kind mercury target design experiences beam-pulse induced cavitation damage that is suspected in one of the target leaks. The two other targets suffered early failures due to defective welds. Diagnosing the causes of target leaks and understanding of the progression of cavitation erosion and radiation damage effects has made use of post-irradiation examination (PIE) capabilities. As a result of PIE, review of quality assurance practices and related investigations, design changes are being implemented and manufacturing oversight improved. This paper describes SNS target operating experience, including the more important observations and lessons learned.

  13. Materials for spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, W.F.; Daemen, L.L.

    1996-03-01

    The Workshop on Materials for Spallation Neutron Sources at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, February 6 to 10, 1995, gathered scientists from Department of Energy national laboratories, other federal institutions, universities, and industry to discuss areas in which work is needed, successful designs and use of materials, and opportunities for further studies. During the first day of the workshop, speakers presented overviews of current spallation neutron sources. During the next 3 days, seven panels allowed speakers to present information on a variety of topics ranging from experimental and theoretical considerations on radiation damage to materials safety issues. An attempt was made to identify specific problems that require attention within the context of spallation neutron sources. This proceedings is a collection of summaries from the overview sessions and the panel presentations.

  14. Synchrotron based spallation neutron source concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.

    1998-07-01

    During the past 20 years, rapid-cycling synchrotrons (RCS) have been used very productively to generate short-pulse thermal neutron beams for neutron scattering research by materials science communities in Japan (KENS), the UK (ISIS) and the US (IPNS). The most powerful source in existence, ISIS in the UK, delivers a 160-kW proton beam to a neutron-generating target. Several recently proposed facilities require proton beams in the MW range to produce intense short-pulse neutron beams. In some proposals, a linear accelerator provides the beam power and an accumulator ring compresses the pulse length to the required {approx} 1 {micro}s. In others, RCS technology provides the bulk of the beam power and compresses the pulse length. Some synchrotron-based proposals achieve the desired beam power by combining two or more synchrotrons of the same energy, and others propose a combination of lower and higher energy synchrotrons. This paper presents the rationale for using RCS technology, and a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of synchrotron-based spallation sources.

  15. A vacuum window for a 1 MW CW 110 GHz gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, C.P.; Doane, J.L.; DiMartino, M.

    1994-07-01

    Development of high power microwave sources for fusion applications is limited by the availability of suitable vacuum windows in the 100 to 200 GHz frequency range. A novel vacuum window is described which uses water cooled sapphire as the dielectric. Heat removal is achieved by using thin slats of sapphire interleaved and brazed to niobium hexagonal tubes in which the cooling water flows. Analysis indicates a window 100 cm{sup 2} in area can readily pass 1 MW in the HE{sub 11} mode at 110 GHz for current experimental applications and 1 MW with a HE{sub 11}{sup 0}-HE{sub 12}{sup 0} mixture at 170 GHz, the projected ITER frequency.

  16. Design of a 1-MW CW 8.5 GHz transmitter for planetary RADAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, Daniel J.; Bhanji, Alaudin M.

    1990-01-01

    A proposed conceptual design for increasing the output power of an existing X-band planetary radar transmitter from 365 kW to 1 MW CW is discussed. The paper covers the basic transmitter system requirements as dictated by the specifications for the radar. The characteristics and expected performance of the high-power klystrons are considered and the transmitter power amplifier system is discussed. Also included in the discussion is the design of the exiter system. Two alternative feed systems for delivering the 1-MW CW signal to the antenna system are described. The expected performance of the beam supply, heat exchanger, and monitor and control devices is also presented. Finally, an assessment of the state-of-the-art technology to meet system requirements is given and possible areas of difficulty are summarized.

  17. Synchronous Generator with HTS-2G field coils for Windmills with output power 1 MW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, K.; Kovalev, L.; Poltavets, V.; Samsonovich, S.; Ilyasov, R.; Levin, A.; Surin, M.

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays synchronous generators for wind-mills are developed worldwide. The cost of the generator is determined by its size and weight. In this deal the implementation of HTS-2G generators is very perspective. The application of HTS 2G field coils in the rotor allows to reduce the size of the generator is 1.75 times. In this work the design 1 MW HTS-2G generator is considered. The designed 1 MW HTS-2G generator has the following parameters: rotor diameter 800 mm, active length 400 mm, phase voltage 690V, rotor speed 600 min-1 rotor field coils with HTS-2G tapes. HTS-2G field coils located in the rotating cryostat and cooled by liquid nitrogen. The simulation and optimization of HTS-2G field coils geometry allowed to increase feed DC current up to 50A. Copper stator windings are water cooled. Magnetic and electrical losses in 1 MW HTS-2G generator do not exceed 1.6% of the nominal output power. In the construction of HTS-2G generator the wave multiplier with ratio 1:40 is used. The latter allows to reduce the total mass of HTS-2G generator down to 1.5 tons. The small-scale model of HTS-2G generator with output power 50 kW was designed, manufactured and tested. The test results showed good agreement with calculation results. The manufacturing of 1 MW HTS-2G generator is planned in 2014. This work is done under support of Rosatom within the frames of Russian Project "Superconducting Industry".

  18. Production of {sup 99}Mo using LEU and molybdenum targets in a 1 MW Triga reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, S.C.

    1993-12-31

    The production of {sup 99}Mo using Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) and natural molybdenum targets in a 1 MW Triga reactor is investigated. The successive linear programming technique is applied to minimize the target loadings for different yield constraints. The irradiation time is related to the kinetics of the growth and decay of {sup 99}Mo. The feasibility of a neutron generated based {sup 99}Mo production system is discussed.

  19. Development of gyrotrons for fusion with power exceeding 1 MW over a wide frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kariya, T.; Imai, T.; Minami, R.; Numakura, T.; Eguchi, T.; Kato, T.; Endo, Y.; Ichimura, M.; Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Takahashi, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Ito, S.; Mutoh, T.; Sakamoto, K.; Idei, H.; Zushi, H.; Nagasaki, K.; Sano, F.; Ono, M.; Mitsunaka, Y.

    2015-09-01

    Megawatt-class gyrotrons covering a wide frequency range (14 GHz-300 GHz) are in increasing demand for nuclear fusion. Recent electron cyclotron heating and electron cyclotron current drive experiments highlight a requirement of megawatt-scale gyrotrons at a relatively lower frequency (14-35 GHz) range of some plasma devices, like GAMMA 10/PDX of the University of Tsukuba, QUEST of Kyushu University, NSTX-U of Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, and Heliotron J of Kyoto University. Collaborative studies for designing a new 28 GHz/35 GHz dual-frequency gyrotron and a 14 GHz gyrotron have commenced. Operation above 1 MW of 28 GHz/35 GHz dual oscillation was demonstrated experimentally. Further in the design of dual-frequency gyrotron, operations with 2 MW 3 s and 0.4 MW CW (continuous wave) at 28 GHz, and power exceeding 1 MW for 3 s at 34.8 GHz have been shown to be feasible. The 14 GHz gyrotron is expected to operate above 1 MW. We are also developing higher frequency gyrotrons (77-300 GHz). The joint program of National Institute for Fusion Science and the University of Tsukuba developed two new 154 GHz gyrotrons for the large helical device after the demonstration of three 77 GHz gyrotrons. The 154 GHz gyrotrons achieved a maximum output power of 1.25 MW and quasi-CW operation of 0.35 MW for 30 min.

  20. Rear surface spallation on single-crystal silicon in nanosecond laser micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jun; Orlov, Sergei S.; Hesselink, Lambertus

    2005-05-01

    Rear surface spallation of single-crystal silicon under 5-ns laser pulse ablation at intensities of 0.6-60GW/cm2 is studied through postablation examination of the ablated samples. The spallation threshold energy and the spallation depth's dependences on the energy and target thickness are measured. From the linear relation between the spallation threshold energy and the target thickness, an estimation of the material spall strength around 1.4GPa is obtained, in reasonable agreement with the spall strength estimation of 0.8-1.2GPa at a strain rate of 107s-1 using Grady's model for brittle materials. The experiment reveals the internal fracturing process over an extended zone in silicon, which is controlled by the competition between the shock pressure load and the laser ablation rate. The qualities of the laser microstructuring and micromachining results are greatly improved by using an acoustic impedance matching approach.

  1. Spallation neutron source/proposed rf system

    SciTech Connect

    Meth, M.; Brennan, J.M.

    1993-09-30

    The rf system for the synchrotrons of the spallation neutron source is designed to accelerate 1.4 {times} 10{sup 14} protons/pulse to an energy of 3.6 GeV. Injection energy is 600 MeV. The synchrotron repetition frequency is 30 Hz, with a 50% duty factor. The choice of operating frequency is somewhat arbitrary. The authors propose a low frequency of 1.3 to 1.6 MHz, which is the second harmonic of the revolution frequency. The advantages of such a low frequency system are: (1) There will be two bunches in the machines and the time between bunches will be sufficiently long to allow for the rise time of the extraction kicker. No missing bunches will be necessary, which simplifies injection, and transient beam loading problems are avoided. (2) With only two bunches there are no unstable coupled-bunch modes of longitudinal instability. (3) In multi-gap low frequency cavities the transient time factor is essentially unity because the rf wavelength is much longer than the cavity dimensions. (4) Cavities in this low frequency range are basically lumped-element type structures, where the sources of the inductance and capacitance are clearly identified. This allows effective control of higher order mode impedances in such cavities. (5) Ferrite-loaded low-frequency cavities are necessarily low impedance structures; ferrites are lossy. This low impedance makes it possible to achieve system stability without large amounts of feedback in a heavily beam loaded system. (6) BNL has a good deal of experience in building rf systems in this range of frequency, voltage, and power level. This report outlines the essential parameters of a practical rf system for the synchrotrons of the Spallation Neutron Source. The design uses materials, ferrites and vacuum tubes, that are commercially available and with which the laboratory has recent experience.

  2. Design and characterization of the DC acceleration and transport system required for the FOM 1 MW free electron maser experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Caplan, M.; Urbanus, W.H.; Geer, C. van der

    1995-12-31

    A Free Electron Maser (FEM) has been constructed and is soon to be tested at the FOM Institute (Rijnhuizen) Netherlands with the goal of producing 1 MW long pulse to CW microwave output in the range 130 GHz to 250 GHz. The design uses a DC beam system in a depressed collector configuration in order to make the overall wall plug efficiency 50%. The high voltage ({approximately} 2 MeV) power supply provides only the body interception current ({approximately} 30 mA) while the 12 amp beam current is supplied by the 100-200 keV collector supplies. Some of the design features to ensure low interception current, which is critical to long pulse (CW) operation are: (1) DC beam in-line transport and acceleration system, (2) emittance conserving solenoid focusing system, (3) halo suppression techniques at cathode edge, and (4) very low beam fill factor (<20%). A relativistic version of the Herman Optical theory developed for microwave tubes is used to determine current distribution functions everywhere along the beam from the electron gun, through the DC accelerator and transport system to the wiggler. This theory takes into account thermals far out on the gaussian tail which translates into beam current far outside the ideal beam edge. This theory is applied to the FOM beam line design to predict a series of beam envelope contours containing various percentages of total beam current up to 99.9%. Predictions of body interception current due to finite emittance (effective temperature) are presented and compared with measured experimental results.

  3. The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S.; Abraham, W.; Aleksandrov, A.; Allen, C.; Alonso, J.; Anderson, D.; Arenius, D.; Arthur, T.; Assadi, S.; Ayers, J.; Bach, P.; Badea, V.; Battle, R.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Bergmann, B.; Bernardin, J.; Bhatia, T.; Billen, J.; Birke, T.; Bjorklund, E.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Blind, B.; Blokland, W.; Bookwalter, V.; Borovina, D.; Bowling, S.; Bradley, J.; Brantley, C.; Brennan, J.; Brodowski, J.; Brown, S.; Brown, R.; Bruce, D.; Bultman, N.; Cameron, P.; Campisi, I.; Casagrande, F.; Catalan-Lasheras, N.; Champion, M.; Champion, M.; Chen, Z.; Cheng, D.; Cho, Y.; Christensen, K.; Chu, C.; Cleaves, J.; Connolly, R.; Cote, T.; Cousineau, S.; Crandall, K.; Creel, J.; Crofford, M.; Cull, P.; Cutler, R.; Dabney, R.; Dalesio, L.; Daly, E.; Damm, R.; Danilov, V.; Davino, D.; Davis, K.; Dawson, C.; Day, L.; Deibele, C.; Delayen, J.; DeLong, J.; Demello, A.; DeVan, W.; Digennaro, R.; Dixon, K.; Dodson, G.; Doleans, M.; Doolittle, L.; Doss, J.; Drury, M.; Elliot, T.; Ellis, S.; Error, J.; Fazekas, J.; Fedotov, A.; Feng, P.; Fischer, J.; Fox, W.; Fuja, R.; Funk, W.; Galambos, J.; Ganni, V.; Garnett, R.; Geng, X.; Gentzlinger, R.; Giannella, M.; Gibson, P.; Gillis, R.; Gioia, J.; Gordon, J.; Gough, R.; Greer, J.; Gregory, W.; Gribble, R.; Grice, W.; Gurd, D.; Gurd, P.; Guthrie, A.; Hahn, H.; Hardek, T.; Hardekopf, R.; Harrison, J.; Hatfield, D.; He, P.; Hechler, M.; Heistermann, F.; Helus, S.; Hiatt, T.; Hicks, S.; Hill, J.; Hill, J.; Hoff, L.; Hoff, M.; Hogan, J.; Holding, M.; Holik, P.; Holmes, J.; Holtkamp, N.; Hovater, C.; Howell, M.; Hseuh, H.; Huhn, A.; Hunter, T.; Ilg, T.; Jackson, J.; Jain, A.; Jason, A.; Jeon, D.; Johnson, G.; Jones, A.; Joseph, S.; Justice, A.; Kang, Y.; Kasemir, K.; Keller, R.; Kersevan, R.; Kerstiens, D.; Kesselman, M.; Kim, S.; Kneisel, P.; Kravchuk, L.; Kuneli, T.; Kurennoy, S.; Kustom, R.; Kwon, S.; Ladd, P.; Lambiase, R.; Lee, Y. Y.; Leitner, M.; Leung, K.-N.; Lewis, S.; Liaw, C.; Lionberger, C.; Lo, C. C.; Long, C.; Ludewig, H.; Ludvig, J.; Luft, P.; Lynch, M.; Ma, H.; MacGill, R.; Macha, K.; Madre, B.; Mahler, G.; Mahoney, K.; Maines, J.; Mammosser, J.; Mann, T.; Marneris, I.; Marroquin, P.; Martineau, R.; Matsumoto, K.; McCarthy, M.; McChesney, C.; McGahern, W.; McGehee, P.; Meng, W.; Merz, B.; Meyer, R.; Meyer, R.; Miller, B.; Mitchell, R.; Mize, J.; Monroy, M.; Munro, J.; Murdoch, G.; Musson, J.; Nath, S.; Nelson, R.; Nelson, R.; O`Hara, J.; Olsen, D.; Oren, W.; Oshatz, D.; Owens, T.; Pai, C.; Papaphilippou, I.; Patterson, N.; Patterson, J.; Pearson, C.; Pelaia, T.; Pieck, M.; Piller, C.; Plawski, T.; Plum, M.; Pogge, J.; Power, J.; Powers, T.; Preble, J.; Prokop, M.; Pruyn, J.; Purcell, D.; Rank, J.; Raparia, D.; Ratti, A.; Reass, W.; Reece, K.; Rees, D.; Regan, A.; Regis, M.; Reijonen, J.; Rej, D.; Richards, D.; Richied, D.; Rode, C.; Rodriguez, W.; Rodriguez, M.; Rohlev, A.; Rose, C.; Roseberry, T.; Rowton, L.; Roybal, W.; Rust, K.; Salazer, G.; Sandberg, J.; Saunders, J.; Schenkel, T.; Schneider, W.; Schrage, D.; Schubert, J.; Severino, F.; Shafer, R.; Shea, T.; Shishlo, A.; Shoaee, H.; Sibley, C.; Sims, J.; Smee, S.; Smith, J.; Smith, K.; Spitz, R.; Staples, J.; Stein, P.; Stettler, M.; Stirbet, M.; Stockli, M.; Stone, W.; Stout, D.; Stovall, J.; Strelo, W.; Strong, H.; Sundelin, R.; Syversrud, D.; Szajbler, M.; Takeda, H.; Tallerico, P.; Tang, J.; Tanke, E.; Tepikian, S.; Thomae, R.; Thompson, D.; Thomson, D.; Thuot, M.; Treml, C.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Tuzel, W.; Vassioutchenko, A.; Virostek, S.; Wallig, J.; Wanderer, P.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J. G.; Wangler, T.; Warren, D.; Wei, J.; Weiss, D.; Welton, R.; Weng, J.; Weng, W.-T.; Wezensky, M.; White, M.; Whitlatch, T.; Williams, D.; Williams, E.; Wilson, K.; Wiseman, M.; Wood, R.; Wright, P.; Wu, A.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Young, K.; Young, L.; Yourd, R.; Zachoszcz, A.; Zaltsman, A.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W.; Zhang, Y.; Zhukov, A.

    2014-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) was designed and constructed by a collaboration of six U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories. The SNS accelerator system consists of a 1 GeV linear accelerator and an accumulator ring providing 1.4 MW of proton beam power in microsecond-long beam pulses to a liquid mercury target for neutron production. The accelerator complex consists of a front-end negative hydrogen-ion injector system, an 87 MeV drift tube linear accelerator, a 186 MeV side-coupled linear accelerator, a 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, a 248-m circumference accumulator ring and associated beam transport lines. The accelerator complex is supported by ~100 high-power RF power systems, a 2 K cryogenic plant, ~400 DC and pulsed power supply systems, ~400 beam diagnostic devices and a distributed control system handling ~100,000 I/O signals. The beam dynamics design of the SNS accelerator is presented, as is the engineering design of the major accelerator subsystems.

  4. The Spallation Neutron Source Beam Commissioning and Initial Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Stuart; Aleksandrov, Alexander V.; Allen, Christopher K.; Assadi, Saeed; Bartoski, Dirk; Blokland, Willem; Casagrande, F.; Campisi, I.; Chu, C.; Cousineau, Sarah M.; Crofford, Mark T.; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Deibele, Craig E.; Dodson, George W.; Feshenko, A.; Galambos, John D.; Han, Baoxi; Hardek, T.; Holmes, Jeffrey A.; Holtkamp, N.; Howell, Matthew P.; Jeon, D.; Kang, Yoon W.; Kasemir, Kay; Kim, Sang-Ho; Kravchuk, L.; Long, Cary D.; McManamy, T.; Pelaia, II, Tom; Piller, Chip; Plum, Michael A.; Pogge, James R.; Purcell, John David; Shea, T.; Shishlo, Andrei P; Sibley, C.; Stockli, Martin P.; Stout, D.; Tanke, E.; Welton, Robert F; Zhang, Y.; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2015-09-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator delivers a one mega-Watt beam to a mercury target to produce neutrons used for neutron scattering materials research. It delivers ~ 1 GeV protons in short (< 1 us) pulses at 60 Hz. At an average power of ~ one mega-Watt, it is the highest-powered pulsed proton accelerator. The accelerator includes the first use of superconducting RF acceleration for a pulsed protons at this energy. The storage ring used to create the short time structure has record peak particle per pulse intensity. Beam commissioning took place in a staged manner during the construction phase of SNS. After the construction, neutron production operations began within a few months, and one mega-Watt operation was achieved within three years. The methods used to commission the beam and the experiences during initial operation are discussed.

  5. Development of 1 MW-class HTS motor for podded ship propulsion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemoto, K.; Aizawa, K.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoshikawa, K.; Kimura, Y.; Izumi, M.; Ohashi, K.; Numano, M.; Okumura, K.; Yamaguchi, M.; Gocho, Y.; Kosuge, E.

    2010-06-01

    To reduce fuel consumption and lead to a major reduction of pollution from NOx, SOx and CO2, the electric ship propulsion system is one of the most prospective substitutes for conventional ship propulsion systems. In order to spread it, innovative technologies for the improvement of the power transmission are required. The high temperature superconducting technology has the possibility for a drastic reduction of power transmission loss. Recently, electric podded propulsions have become popular for large cruise vessels, icebreakers and chemical tankers because of the flexibility of the equipment arrangement and the stern hull design, and better maneuverability in harbour, etc. In this paper, a 1 MW-class High temperature superconducting (HTS) motor with high efficiency, smaller size and simple structure, which is designed and manufactured for podded propulsion, is reported. For the case of a coastal ship driven by the optimized podded propulsion in which the 1MW HTS motor is equipped, the reductions of fluid dynamic resistance and power transmission losses are demonstrated. The present research & development has been supported by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO).

  6. Simulation of a beam rotation system for a spallation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Tibor; Reggiani, Davide; Seidel, Mike; Talanov, Vadim; Wohlmuther, Michael

    2015-04-01

    With a nominal beam power of nearly 1 MW on target, the Swiss Spallation Neutron Source (SINQ), ranks among the world's most powerful spallation neutron sources. The proton beam transport to the SINQ target is carried out exclusively by means of linear magnetic elements. In the transport line to SINQ the beam is scattered in two meson production targets and as a consequence, at the SINQ target entrance the beam shape can be described by Gaussian distributions in transverse x and y directions with tails cut short by collimators. This leads to a highly nonuniform power distribution inside the SINQ target, giving rise to thermal and mechanical stresses. In view of a future proton beam intensity upgrade, the possibility of homogenizing the beam distribution by means of a fast beam rotation system is currently under investigation. Important aspects which need to be studied are the impact of a rotating proton beam on the resulting neutron spectra, spatial flux distributions and additional—previously not present—proton losses causing unwanted activation of accelerator components. Hence a new source description method was developed for the radiation transport code MCNPX. This new feature makes direct use of the results from the proton beam optics code TURTLE. Its advantage to existing MCNPX source options is that all phase space information and correlations of each primary beam particle computed with TURTLE are preserved and transferred to MCNPX. Simulations of the different beam distributions together with their consequences in terms of neutron production are presented in this publication. Additionally, a detailed description of the coupling method between TURTLE and MCNPX is provided.

  7. MEGAPIE project, experience of electromagnetic pumps operation in the Swiss Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dementjev, S.; Groeschel, F.; Jekabsons, N.

    2008-09-01

    The MEGAPIE project with the aim to design, build and operate a 1 MW liquid metal target in the SINQ facility (Swiss Spallation Neutron Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland) was a key experiment on the way to experimental accelerator driven systems (ADS) for transmutation of nuclear waste and for the development of liquid metal spallation targets. The electromagnetic pump system for the target, consisting of two electromagnetic pumps and two flowmeters, was designed and fabricated at the Institute of Physics, University of Latvia (IPUL) in 2003-2004. ATEA (France) integrated the pumps into the target in the beginning of 2005. The assembled target was commissioned at PSI in the frame of the MEGAPIE integral test (MIT) at the end of 2005. The target was being irradiated in the SINQ during 18 weeks in August-December 2006 in the course of the MEGAPIE-SINQ experiment . It was one of the first high-power liquid metal targets coupled with a proton accelerator and operating in a spallation source under full-service conditions. Tables 1, Figs 6, Refs 6.

  8. Recent Performance of the SNS H-Source for 1-MW Neutron Production

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P; Han, Baoxi; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Welton, Robert F

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the performance of the SNS ion source and LEBT as they continue to deliver ~50 mA H- beams at a 5.3% duty factor required for neutron production with a ~1MW proton beam since the fall of 2009. The source continues to deliver persistent H- beams for up to 6 weeks without adding Cs after an initial dose of ~4 mg, except when there are excessive plasma impurities. In one case the H- beam decayed due to an air leak, which is shown to be consistent with sputtering of the Cs layer, and which allows to bracket the plasma potential. In another case, the performance of two sources degraded progressively, which appears to be consistent with a progressive deterioration of the Cs covered Mo converter. These two and other recently discovered issues are discussed in detail.

  9. Conceptual design of a 1-MW CW X-band transmitter for planetary radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhanji, A. M.; Hoppe, D. J.; Conroy, B. L.; Freiley, A. J.

    1988-01-01

    A proposed conceptual design to increase the output power of an existing X-band radar transmitter used for planetary radar exploration from 365 kW to 1 MW CW is presented. The basic transmitter system requirements as dictated by the specifications for the radar are covered. The characteristics and expected performance of the high-power klystrons are considered, and the transmitter power amplifier system is described. Also included is the design of all of the associated high-power microwave components, the feed system, and the phase-stable exciter. The expected performance of the beam supply, heat exchanger, and monitor and control devices is also presented. Finally, an assessment of the state-of-the-art technology needed to meet system requirements is given and possible areas of difficulty are summarized.

  10. Conceptual design of a 1-MW CW X-band transmitter for planetary radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhanji, A. M.; Hoppe, D. J.; Conroy, B. L.; Freiley, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    A proposed conceptual design to increase the output power of an existing X-band planetary radar transmitter used for planetary radar exploration from 365 kW to 1 MW CW is presented. The basic transmitter system requirements as dictated by the specifications for the radar are covered. The characteristics and expected performance of the high-power klystrons are considered, and the transmitter power amplifier system is discussed. Also included is the design of all of the associated high-power microwave components, the feed system, and the phase-stable exciter. The expected performance of the beam supply, heat exchanger, and monitor and control devices is also presented. Finally, an assessment of the state-of-the-art technology needed to meet system requirements is given and possible areas of difficulty are summarized.

  11. Savings analysis of a 1 MW cogeneration system at a Texas mental health facility

    SciTech Connect

    Athar, A.; Turner, W.D.; Caton, J.A.; McClean, G.

    1995-12-31

    Cogeneration is defined as the generation of electric power and coincident recovery of useful thermal energy from a single prime mover using a single fuel. The 1 MW gas turbine cogeneration system at Texas Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation (TDMHMR), Austin, came on line in March, 1992 and is a unique application of federal and state funds. This system has been analyzed for its present performance and loads using hourly measured data. The Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) at Texas A and M University has been collecting hourly data for natural gas use and the electrical energy produced by the engine since August, 1992. Waste heat recovered by the Waste Heat Recovery Boiler (WHRB) is also monitored. This paper describes the present system, analyzes the system using hourly monitored data, calculates energy and dollar savings, compares the measured results with the estimated savings, and discusses some of the problems encountered during the first year of operation.

  12. Spallator: a new option for nuclear power

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.; Grand, P.; Takahashi, H.; Powell, J.R.; Kouts, H.J.

    1983-06-01

    The principles of the spallator reactor are reviewed. Advances in linear accelerator technology allow the design and construction of high current (hundreds of mA) continuous wave high energy (thousands of MeV) proton machines in the near term. Spallation neutronic calculations building on existing experimental results, indicate substantial neutron yields on uranium targets. Spallator target assembly designs based on water cooled reactor technology indicate operable efficient systems. Fuel cycles are presented which supply fissile material to thermal power reactors and reduce fission product waste. Preliminary comparative analysis indicates an economically competitive system in which a single purpose self-sufficient spallator supplies fuel to a number of LWRs. The spallator assures a long-term LWR power reactor economy. International interest in advancing the technology is indicated.

  13. VESPA: The vibrational spectrometer for the European Spallation Source.

    PubMed

    Fedrigo, Anna; Colognesi, Daniele; Bertelsen, Mads; Hartl, Monika; Lefmann, Kim; Deen, Pascale P; Strobl, Markus; Grazzi, Francesco; Zoppi, Marco

    2016-06-01

    VESPA, Vibrational Excitation Spectrometer with Pyrolytic-graphite Analysers, aims to probe molecular excitations via inelastic neutron scattering. It is a thermal high resolution inverted geometry time-of-flight instrument designed to maximise the use of the long pulse of the European Spallation Source. The wavelength frame multiplication technique was applied to provide simultaneously a broad dynamic range (about 0-500 meV) while a system of optical blind choppers allows to trade flux for energy resolution. Thanks to its high flux, VESPA will allow the investigation of dynamical and in situ experiments in physical chemistry. Here we describe the design parameters and the corresponding McStas simulations.

  14. VESPA: The vibrational spectrometer for the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedrigo, Anna; Colognesi, Daniele; Bertelsen, Mads; Hartl, Monika; Lefmann, Kim; Deen, Pascale P.; Strobl, Markus; Grazzi, Francesco; Zoppi, Marco

    2016-06-01

    VESPA, Vibrational Excitation Spectrometer with Pyrolytic-graphite Analysers, aims to probe molecular excitations via inelastic neutron scattering. It is a thermal high resolution inverted geometry time-of-flight instrument designed to maximise the use of the long pulse of the European Spallation Source. The wavelength frame multiplication technique was applied to provide simultaneously a broad dynamic range (about 0-500 meV) while a system of optical blind choppers allows to trade flux for energy resolution. Thanks to its high flux, VESPA will allow the investigation of dynamical and in situ experiments in physical chemistry. Here we describe the design parameters and the corresponding McStas simulations.

  15. High-pressure beamline (PLANET) at the spallation neutron source, J-PARC (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagi, H.; Hattori, T.; Arima, H.; Utsumi, W. S.; Komatsu, K.; Nagai, T.; Yagi, T.

    2009-12-01

    Material and Life Science experimental Facility (MLF) of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) will be one of the most powerful spallation neutron facilities in the world. The pulsed neutron source with a liquid Hg target is designed to be running at 25 Hz with a power of 1 MW. We have started the construction of the powder diffractometer dedicated to high-pressure experiments (PLANET) on BL-11. PLANET aims to study structures of hydrogen-bearing materials including dense hydrous minerals of the Earth’s deep interior, magmas and light element liquids. The instrument will realize diffraction and radiography experiments for powder and liquid/glass samples at high pressures up to 20 GPa and 2000 K using a large sized multi-anvil hydraulic press that can apply forces of ˜1500 ton. The instrument views a decoupled liquid H2 moderator with a cross section of 100 × 100 mm2. The primary and secondary fight paths are 25 m and 1.5 m, respectively. The 11.5-m-long supermirror guide with elliptical shape starts at a distance of 11.5 m from the moderator. Design of elliptical geometry is optimized by means of incorporating several different grade mirrors and linear approximation with planar guide in order to save cost for production without degradation of the intensity performance. The guide has a rectangular cross-section and consists of four walls coated with supermirror material. Sample is placed at 2 m from the guide exit. The 90° detectors will be installed at 1.5 m from the sample position. For the powder diffraction measurements using a multi-anvil press, an incident neutron beam passes through the vertical anvil gaps and irradiates the sample in the pressure medium. Diffracted neutrons go through the other anvil gaps at 90° direction. Half inch 3He linear position sensitive detectors with 600 mm length will be arranged horizontally and form these detector banks, which cover the scattering angle of 79° ≤ 2θ ≤ 101° and -35° ≤ Φ ≤ +35°. The

  16. rf improvements for Spallation Neutron Source H- ion sourcea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Y. W.; Fuja, R.; Goulding, R. H.; Hardek, T.; Lee, S.-W.; McCarthy, M. P.; Piller, M. C.; Shin, K.; Stockli, M. P.; Welton, R. F.

    2010-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is ramping up the accelerated proton beam power to 1.4 MW and just reached 1 MW. The rf-driven multicusp ion source that originates from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been delivering ˜38 mA H- beam in the linac at 60 Hz, 0.9 ms. To improve availability, a rf-driven external antenna multicusp ion source with a water-cooled ceramic aluminum nitride (AlN) plasma chamber is developed. Computer modeling and simulations have been made to analyze and optimize the rf performance of the new ion source. Operational statistics and test runs with up to 56 mA medium energy beam transport beam current identify the 2 MHz rf system as a limiting factor in the system availability and beam production. Plasma ignition system is under development by using a separate 13 MHz system. To improve the availability of the rf power system with easier maintenance, we tested a 70 kV isolation transformer for the 80 kW, 6% duty cycle 2 MHz amplifier to power the ion source from a grounded solid-state amplifier.

  17. Spallation Neutron Source Accident Terms for Environmental Impact Statement Input

    SciTech Connect

    Devore, J.R.; Harrington, R.M.

    1998-08-01

    This report is about accidents with the potential to release radioactive materials into the environment surrounding the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). As shown in Chap. 2, the inventories of radioactivity at the SNS are dominated by the target facility. Source terms for a wide range of target facility accidents, from anticipated events to worst-case beyond-design-basis events, are provided in Chaps. 3 and 4. The most important criterion applied to these accident source terms is that they should not underestimate potential release. Therefore, conservative methodology was employed for the release estimates. Although the source terms are very conservative, excessive conservatism has been avoided by basing the releases on physical principles. Since it is envisioned that the SNS facility may eventually (after about 10 years) be expanded and modified to support a 4-MW proton beam operational capability, the source terms estimated in this report are applicable to a 4-MW operating proton beam power unless otherwise specified. This is bounding with regard to the 1-MW facility that will be built and operated initially. See further discussion below in Sect. 1.2.

  18. European Spallation Source and Neutron Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeck, James

    2014-03-01

    International collaborations in large-scale scientific projects can link Sciences and Society. Following this goal, the European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries. Scandinavia is providing 50 percent of the construction cost whilst the other member states are providing financial support mainly via in-kind contribution from institutes, laboratories or industries of the given countries. Scientists and engineers from 35 different countries are members of the workforce in Lund who participate in its design and construction. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics by producing very high flux neutrons to study condensed matter physics, chemistry, biology, nuclear physics and materials science. The ESS will be up to 30 times brighter than today's leading facilities and neutron sources. A tungsten target and a 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator, composed mainly of superconducting Radio-Frequency components, are used to achieve these goals.

  19. International test and demonstration of a 1-MW wellhead generator: Helical screw expander power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, R. A.

    1984-06-01

    A 1-MW wellhead generator was tested in 1980, 1981, and 1982 by Mexico, Italy, and New Zealand at Cerro Prieto, Cesano, and Broadlands, respectively. The total flow helical screw expander portable power plant, Model 76-1, had been built for the U.S. Government and field-tested in Utah, USA, in 1978 and 1979. The expander had oversized internal clearances designed for self-cleaning operation on fluids that deposit adherent scale normally detrimental to the utiliation of liquid dominated fields. Conditions with which the expander was tested included inlet pressures of 64 to 220 psia, inlet qualities of 0% to 100%, exhaust pressures of 3.1 to 40 psia, electrial loads of idle and 110 to 933 kW, electrical frequencies of 50 and 60 Hz, male rotor speeds of 2500 to 4000 rpm, and fluid characteristics to 310,000 ppm total dissolved solids and noncondensables to 38 wt % of the vapor. Some testing was done on-grid. Typical expander isentropic efficiency was 40% to 50% with the clearances not closed, and 5 percentage points or more higher with the clearances partly closed. The expander efficiency increased approximately logarithmically with shaft power for most operations, while inlet quality, speed, and pressure ratio across the machine had only small effects. These findings are all in agreement with the Utah test results.

  20. Ultra Clean 1.1MW High Efficiency Natural Gas Engine Powered System

    SciTech Connect

    Zurlo, James; Lueck, Steve

    2011-08-31

    Dresser, Inc. (GE Energy, Waukesha gas engines) will develop, test, demonstrate, and commercialize a 1.1 Megawatt (MW) natural gas fueled combined heat and power reciprocating engine powered package. This package will feature a total efficiency > 75% and ultra low CARB permitting emissions. Our modular design will cover the 1 – 6 MW size range, and this scalable technology can be used in both smaller and larger engine powered CHP packages. To further advance one of the key advantages of reciprocating engines, the engine, generator and CHP package will be optimized for low initial and operating costs. Dresser, Inc. will leverage the knowledge gained in the DOE - ARES program. Dresser, Inc. will work with commercial, regulatory, and government entities to help break down barriers to wider deployment of CHP. The outcome of this project will be a commercially successful 1.1 MW CHP package with high electrical and total efficiency that will significantly reduce emissions compared to the current central power plant paradigm. Principal objectives by phases for Budget Period 1 include: • Phase 1 – market study to determine optimum system performance, target first cost, lifecycle cost, and creation of a detailed product specification. • Phase 2 – Refinement of the Waukesha CHP system design concepts, identification of critical characteristics, initial evaluation of technical solutions, and risk mitigation plans. Background

  1. Design and performance of a 1 MW-5 s high temperature superconductor magnetic energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morandi, Antonio; Gholizad, Babak; Fabbri, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of a 1 MW-5 s superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system based on state-of-the-art high-temperature superconductor (HTS) materials is investigated in detail. Both YBCO coated conductors and MgB2 are considered. A procedure for the electromagnetic design of the coil is introduced and the final layout is arrived at and compared for the two materials. The choice of the inductance of the coil is carried out as part of the design procedure. Both low-field (3 T) and high-field (8 T) designs are considered for the YBCO. AC losses during a complete charge/discharge cycle at full power are estimated and the cooling power needed for continuous operation is derived. The power conditioning system and control algorithms needed to carry out various operations are discussed in detail. Performances of the SMES system during voltage sag compensation, load leveling and power factor correction are investigated by means of numerical simulation.

  2. International test and demonstration of a 1-MW wellhead generator: Helical screw expander power plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    A 1-MW wellhead generator was tested in 1980, 1981, and 1982 by Mexico, Italy, and New Zealand at Cerro Prieto, Cesano, and Broadlands, respectively. The total flow helical screw expander portable power plant, Model 76-1, had been built for the U.S. Government and field-tested in Utah, USA, in 1978 and 1979. The expander had oversized internal clearances designed for self-cleaning operation on fluids that deposit adherent scale normally detrimental to the utiliation of liquid dominated fields. Conditions with which the expander was tested included inlet pressures of 64 to 220 psia, inlet qualities of 0% to 100%, exhaust pressures of 3.1 to 40 psia, electrial loads of idle and 110 to 933 kW, electrical frequencies of 50 and 60 Hz, male rotor speeds of 2500 to 4000 rpm, and fluid characteristics to 310,000 ppm total dissolved solids and noncondensables to 38 wt % of the vapor. Some testing was done on-grid. Typical expander isentropic efficiency was 40% to 50% with the clearances not closed, and 5 percentage points or more higher with the clearances partly closed. The expander efficiency increased approximately logarithmically with shaft power for most operations, while inlet quality, speed, and pressure ratio across the machine had only small effects. These findings are all in agreement with the Utah test results.

  3. Engineering of beam direct conversion for a 120-kV, 1-MW ion beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, W. L.; Doggett, J. N.; Hamilton, G. W.; Kinney, J. D.; Moir, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    Practical systems for beam direct conversion are required to recover the energy from ion beams at high efficiency and at very high beam power densities in the environment of a high-power neutral-injection system. Such an experiment is now in progress using a 120-kV beam with a maximum total current of 20 A. After neutralization, the H(+) component to be recovered will have a power of approximately 1 MW. A system testing these concepts has been designed and tested at 15 kV, 2 kW in preparation for the full-power tests. The engineering problems involved in the full-power tests affect electron suppression, gas pumping, voltage holding, diagnostics, and measurement conditions. Planning for future experiments at higher power includes the use of cryopumping and electron suppression by a magnetic field rather than by an electrostatic field. Beam direct conversion for large fusion experiments and reactors will save millions of dollars in the cost of power supplies and electricity and will dispose of the charged beam under conditions that may not be possible by other techniques.

  4. Design of a 4.5 MJ/1 MW sectored toroidal superconducting energy storage magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhunia, Uttam; Akhter, Javed; Nandi, Chinmay; Pal, Gautam; Saha, Subimal

    2014-09-01

    A 4.5 MJ/1 MW superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system is being developed at VECC centre, Kolkata. The magnet system consists of the cryostat and coil assembly comprising eight superconducting solenoid coils made of custom-made NbTi based Rutherford-type cable and arranged in toroidal fashion with finite inter-sector gap. Since the strong electromagnetic force distributed to the coil is asymmetric and non-uniform in nature, a precise 3-D finite element analysis (FEA) has been carried out to design a mechanically stable coil and support structure under various operational scenarios. The results reveal that maximum stress developed on coil and its support structure is below allowable stress limit. Extensive transient analysis has also been carried out to evaluate transient loss and assess the feasibility of using helium re-condensation technology with commercially available cryo-refrigerators. Finally, quench protection scenario has also been discussed suitable for this toroidal-type SMES system. The article investigates the design concept of the cryostat and coil assembly.

  5. Data acquisition system for the ARCO 1 MW photovoltaic power facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resnik, W. M.; Lambarski, T. J.

    Components and performance of the data acquisition system being used to monitor the performance of a 1 MW photovoltaic (PV) array in California are described. One microcomputer controls the system data acquisition and storage functions while another monitors and reports sensor data to the control computer. Modem communications over five lines permits remote access to the system's status. The control computer has 320 kbytes of RAM, a display and floppy disk storage. The sensor monitoring computer scans each sensor several times per second to update its internal registers. Full meteorological, array status and performance data sets are taken,along with intruder alarm signals. The monitoring system is capable of detecting severe wind conditions and recommending that the control computer stow the tracking panel arrays. Alarm signals can also be transmitted to remote control points and must be reset manually to verify reception and comprehension. The control computer plays reveille at dawn and taps at night to the solar cell array using an internal tone generator.

  6. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    ... resting for at least 10 minutes. Take the exercise heart rate while you are exercising. ... pulse rate can help determine if the patient's heart is pumping. ... rate gives information about your fitness level and health.

  7. Slow neutron leakage spectra from spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S G; Carpenter, J M; Prael, R E

    1980-02-01

    An efficient technique is described for Monte Carlo simulation of neutron beam spectra from target-moderator-reflector assemblies typical of pulsed spallation neutron sources. The technique involves the scoring of the transport-theoretical probability that a neutron will emerge from the moderator surface in the direction of interest, at each collision. An angle-biasing probability is also introduced which further enhances efficiency in simple problems. These modifications were introduced into the VIM low energy neutron transport code, representing the spatial and energy distributions of the source neutrons approximately as those of evaporation neutrons generated through the spallation process by protons of various energies. The intensity of slow neutrons leaking from various reflected moderators was studied for various neutron source arrangements. These include computations relating to early measurements on a mockup-assembly, a brief survey of moderator materials and sizes, and a survey of the effects of varying source and moderator configurations with a practical, liquid metal cooled uranium source Wing and slab, i.e., tangential and radial moderator arrangements, and Be vs CH/sub 2/ reflectors are compared. Results are also presented for several complicated geometries which more closely represent realistic arrangements for a practical source, and for a subcritical fission multiplier such as might be driven by an electron linac. An adaptation of the code was developed to enable time dependent calculations, and investigated the effects of the reflector, decoupling and void liner materials on the pulse shape.

  8. Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (ORSNS) target station design integration

    SciTech Connect

    McManamy, T.; Booth, R.; Cleaves, J.; Gabriel, T.

    1996-06-01

    The conceptual design for a 1- to 3-MW short pulse spallation source with a liquid mercury target has been started recently. The design tools and methods being developed to define requirements, integrate the work, and provide early cost guidance will be presented with a summary of the current target station design status. The initial design point was selected with performance and cost estimate projections by a systems code. This code was developed recently using cost estimates from the Brookhaven Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source study and experience from the Advanced Neutron Source Project`s conceptual design. It will be updated and improved as the design develops. Performance was characterized by a simplified figure of merit based on a ratio of neutron production to costs. A work breakdown structure was developed, with simplified systems diagrams used to define interfaces and system responsibilities. A risk assessment method was used to identify potential problems, to identify required research and development (R&D), and to aid contingency development. Preliminary 3-D models of the target station are being used to develop remote maintenance concepts and to estimate costs.

  9. New head picked for European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The UK physicist John Womersley is to become the next director-general of the €1.8bn European Spallation Source (ESS), which is currently being built in Lund, Sweden, by a 17-member consortium of European countries.

  10. Physics and technology of spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, G. S.

    2001-05-01

    A substantial body of research is necessary in order to be able to make reliable predictions on the performance and safety of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS), in particular of their spallation targets. So far, practical experience has resulted from the development of research neutron sources only. Next to fission and fusion, spallation is an efficient process for releasing neutrons from nuclei. Unlike the other two reactions, it is an endothermal process and can, therefore, not be used per se in energy generation. In order to sustain a spallation reaction, an energetic beam of particles, most commonly protons, must be supplied onto a heavy target. Spallation can, however, play an important role as a source of neutrons whose flux can be easily controlled via the driving beam. Although sophisticated Monte Carlo codes exist to compute all aspects of a spallation facility, many features can be understood on the basis of simple physics arguments. Technically a spallation facility is very demanding, not only because a reliable and economic accelerator of high power is needed to drive the reaction, but also, and in particular, because high levels of radiation and heat are generated in the target which are difficult to cope with. Radiation effects in a spallation environment are different from those commonly encountered in a reactor and are probably even more temperature dependent than the latter because of the high gas production rate. A commonly favored solution is the use of molten heavy metal targets. While radiation damage is not a problem in this case, except for the container, other issues need to be considered. R&D carried out for the development of spallation neutron sources will thus be beneficial also directly for ADS.

  11. Negative pressures and spallation in water drops subjected to nanosecond shock waves

    DOE PAGES

    Stan, Claudiu A.; Willmott, Philip R.; Stone, Howard A.; Koglin, Jason E.; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew L.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Gumerlock, Karl L.; Blaj, Gabriel; Sierra, Raymond G.; et al

    2016-05-16

    Most experimental studies of cavitation in liquid water at negative pressures reported cavitation at tensions significantly smaller than those expected for homogeneous nucleation, suggesting that achievable tensions are limited by heterogeneous cavitation. We generated tension pulses with nanosecond rise times in water by reflecting cylindrical shock waves, produced by X-ray laser pulses, at the internal surface of drops of water. Depending on the X-ray pulse energy, a range of cavitation phenomena occurred, including the rupture and detachment, or spallation, of thin liquid layers at the surface of the drop. When spallation occurred, we evaluated that negative pressures below –100 MPamore » were reached in the drops. As a result, we model the negative pressures from shock reflection experiments using a nucleation-and-growth model that explains how rapid decompression could outrun heterogeneous cavitation in water, and enable the study of stretched water close to homogeneous cavitation pressures.« less

  12. Negative Pressures and Spallation in Water Drops Subjected to Nanosecond Shock Waves.

    PubMed

    Stan, Claudiu A; Willmott, Philip R; Stone, Howard A; Koglin, Jason E; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew L; Robinson, Joseph S; Gumerlock, Karl L; Blaj, Gabriel; Sierra, Raymond G; Boutet, Sébastien; Guillet, Serge A H; Curtis, Robin H; Vetter, Sharon L; Loos, Henrik; Turner, James L; Decker, Franz-Josef

    2016-06-01

    Most experimental studies of cavitation in liquid water at negative pressures reported cavitation at tensions significantly smaller than those expected for homogeneous nucleation, suggesting that achievable tensions are limited by heterogeneous cavitation. We generated tension pulses with nanosecond rise times in water by reflecting cylindrical shock waves, produced by X-ray laser pulses, at the internal surface of drops of water. Depending on the X-ray pulse energy, a range of cavitation phenomena occurred, including the rupture and detachment, or spallation, of thin liquid layers at the surface of the drop. When spallation occurred, we evaluated that negative pressures below -100 MPa were reached in the drops. We model the negative pressures from shock reflection experiments using a nucleation-and-growth model that explains how rapid decompression could outrun heterogeneous cavitation in water, and enable the study of stretched water close to homogeneous cavitation pressures. PMID:27182751

  13. Negative Pressures and Spallation in Water Drops Subjected to Nanosecond Shock Waves.

    PubMed

    Stan, Claudiu A; Willmott, Philip R; Stone, Howard A; Koglin, Jason E; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew L; Robinson, Joseph S; Gumerlock, Karl L; Blaj, Gabriel; Sierra, Raymond G; Boutet, Sébastien; Guillet, Serge A H; Curtis, Robin H; Vetter, Sharon L; Loos, Henrik; Turner, James L; Decker, Franz-Josef

    2016-06-01

    Most experimental studies of cavitation in liquid water at negative pressures reported cavitation at tensions significantly smaller than those expected for homogeneous nucleation, suggesting that achievable tensions are limited by heterogeneous cavitation. We generated tension pulses with nanosecond rise times in water by reflecting cylindrical shock waves, produced by X-ray laser pulses, at the internal surface of drops of water. Depending on the X-ray pulse energy, a range of cavitation phenomena occurred, including the rupture and detachment, or spallation, of thin liquid layers at the surface of the drop. When spallation occurred, we evaluated that negative pressures below -100 MPa were reached in the drops. We model the negative pressures from shock reflection experiments using a nucleation-and-growth model that explains how rapid decompression could outrun heterogeneous cavitation in water, and enable the study of stretched water close to homogeneous cavitation pressures.

  14. Construction, testing of the 1 MW, 130-260 GHz Fusion-FEM

    SciTech Connect

    Urbanus, W.H.; Bongers, G.; Dijk, C.A.J. van

    1995-12-31

    During the previous 9 months the major part of the Fusion-FEM has been constructed. The 2 MV Insulated Core Transformer, the electron gun, the accelerator, the focusing lenses and the undulator have been tested on-site. In the present - temporary - set-up, the electron beam line consists of a 12 A, 80 keV thermionic electron gun, a 2 MeV dc accelerator, beam transport optics, the undulator and a collector. The gun is mounted in the high voltage terminal, which is now at -2 MV, and the undulator and mm-wave system am at ground potential outside the SF{sub 6}-filled pressure tank. This so-called inverse set-up allows easy access to the larger part of the beam line, the undulator and the mm-wave system, which is important in the conditioning phase. The decelerator and depressed collector am not yet installed. The design of the electron beam line has been optimised using the GPS particle-tracking code and the TOSCA code. The TOSCA code is used for accurate field calculations of the magnetic lenses. The results are used in the GPS code. The combination of these two codes allows optimization of the tens designs with respect to aberations, such as to avoid emittance growth. The mm-wave beam line has been designed, including a Boron-Nitride, Brewster angle, high power, broadband window. The window is designed for transmitting 1 MW of mm-wave power in the frequency range 130 - 260 GHz. Loss power is of the order of a percent. The first major goal is the transport of the electron beam through the undulator with only a small loss current. We report the final design of the electron beam line, the design of the mm-wave beam line, and the status of construction and testing of the Fusion-FEM.

  15. Spallation of the Galileo probe heat shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundell, J. H.

    1982-06-01

    The Galileo probe heat shield will encounter severe radiative and convective heating during entry into Jupiter's atmosphere. The shield is made of two different carbon phenolic composites; one is chopped-molded, and the other is tape-wrapped, both of which tend to spall under intense heating conditions. To characterize this phenomenon, an experimental program, using a gasdynamic laser, was initiated. Tests were performed at a variety of radiation intensities, and both the total and spallation mass-loss rates were measured and correlated with intensity. These correlations were then applied to calculated flight heating conditions for two model atmospheres. Entry of a 310-kg probe into the nominal atmosphere would result in a spallation mass loss of 6.3 kg, or 7.4% of the expected thermochemical mass loss. Similarly, entry of that probe into the cool-dense atmosphere would result in 11.9 kg of spallation, or about 10% of the expected thermochemical mass loss.

  16. 1-MW Beam Operation Scenario of the J-PARC 3-GeV Rapid Cycling Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotchi, Hideaki

    The J-PARC 3-GeV Rapid Cycling Synchrotron initiates the final stage of beam commissioning aiming for the design output beam power of 1 MW from Oct. 2014 after completing the injector linac upgrade. In this paper, emittance growth and beam loss issues for the coming 1-MW beam operation will be discussed together with their possible mitigation scenarios, based on numerical simulations.

  17. Fundamental neutron physics beamline at the spallation neutron source at ORNL

    DOE PAGES

    Fomin, N.; Greene, G. L.; Allen, R. R.; Cianciolo, V.; Crawford, C.; Tito, T. M.; Huffman, P. R.; Iverson, E. B.; Mahurin, R.; Snow, W. M.

    2014-11-04

    In this paper, we describe the Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline (FnPB) facility located at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The FnPB was designed for the conduct of experiments that investigate scientific issues in nuclear physics, particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology using a pulsed slow neutron beam. Finally, we present a detailed description of the design philosophy, beamline components, and measured fluxes of the polychromatic and monochromatic beams.

  18. Coherent Scattering Investigations at the Spallation Neutron Source: a Snowmass White Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Akimov, D.; Bernstein, A.; BarbeauP.,; Barton, P. J.; Bolozdynya, A.; Cabrera-Palmer, B.; Cavanna, F.; Cianciolo, Vince; Collar, J.; Cooper, R. J.; Dean, D. J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Etenko, A.; Fields, N.; Foxe, M.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Fomin, N.; Gallmeier, F.; Garishvili, I.; Gerling, M.; Green, M.; Greene, Geoffrey; Hatzikoutelis, A.; Henning, Reyco; Hix, R.; Hogan, D.; Hornback, D.; Jovanovic, I.; Hossbach, T.; Iverson, Erik B; Klein, S. R.; Khromov, A.; Link, J.; Louis, W.; Lu, W.; Mauger, C.; Marleau, P.; Markoff, D.; Martin, R. D.; Mueller, Paul Edward; Newby, J.; Orrell, John L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Penttila, Seppo; Patton, K.; Poon, A. W.; Radford, David C; Reyna, D.; Ray, H.; Scholberg, K.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Tayloe, R.; Vetter, K.; Virtue, C.; Wilkerson, J.; Yoo, J.; Yu, Chang-Hong

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, provides an intense flux of neutrinos in the few tens-of-MeV range, with a sharply-pulsed timing structure that is beneficial for background rejection. In this white paper, we describe how the SNS source can be used for a measurement of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CENNS), and the physics reach of different phases of such an experimental program (CSI: Coherent Scattering Investigations at the SNS).

  19. Core Vessel Insert Handling Robot for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Van B; Dayton, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source provides the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams for scientific research and industrial development. Its eighteen neutron beam lines will eventually support up to twenty-four simultaneous experiments. Each beam line consists of various optical components which guide the neutrons to a particular instrument. The optical components nearest the neutron moderators are the core vessel inserts. Located approximately 9 m below the high bay floor, these inserts are bolted to the core vessel chamber and are part of the vacuum boundary. They are in a highly radioactive environment and must periodically be replaced. During initial SNS construction, four of the beam lines received Core Vessel Insert plugs rather than functional inserts. Remote replacement of the first Core Vessel Insert plug was recently completed using several pieces of custom-designed tooling, including a highly complicated Core Vessel Insert Robot. The design of this tool are discussed.

  20. VESPA: The vibrational spectrometer for the European Spallation Source.

    PubMed

    Fedrigo, Anna; Colognesi, Daniele; Bertelsen, Mads; Hartl, Monika; Lefmann, Kim; Deen, Pascale P; Strobl, Markus; Grazzi, Francesco; Zoppi, Marco

    2016-06-01

    VESPA, Vibrational Excitation Spectrometer with Pyrolytic-graphite Analysers, aims to probe molecular excitations via inelastic neutron scattering. It is a thermal high resolution inverted geometry time-of-flight instrument designed to maximise the use of the long pulse of the European Spallation Source. The wavelength frame multiplication technique was applied to provide simultaneously a broad dynamic range (about 0-500 meV) while a system of optical blind choppers allows to trade flux for energy resolution. Thanks to its high flux, VESPA will allow the investigation of dynamical and in situ experiments in physical chemistry. Here we describe the design parameters and the corresponding McStas simulations. PMID:27370491

  1. STATUS OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE SUPERCONDUCTING RF FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, Daniel S; Assadi, Saeed; Campisi, Isidoro E; Casagrande, Fabio; Crofford, Mark T; DeVan, Bill; Hardek, Thomas W; Henderson, Stuart D; Howell, Matthew P; Kang, Yoon W; Geng, Xiaosong; Stone Jr, William C; Strong, William Herb; Williams, Derrick C; Wright, Paul Alan

    2007-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project was completed with only limited superconducting RF (SRF) facilities installed as part of the project. A concerted effort has been initiated to install the infrastructure and equipment necessary to maintain and repair the superconducting Linac, and to support power upgrade research and development (R&D). Installation of a Class10/100/10,000 cleanroom and outfitting of the test cave with RF, vacuum, controls, personnel protection and cryogenics systems is underway. A horizontal cryostat, which can house a helium vessel/cavity and fundamental power coupler for full power, pulsed testing, is being procured. Equipment for cryomodule assembly and disassembly is being procured. This effort, while derived from the experience of the SRF community, will provide a unique high power test capability as well as long term maintenance capabilities. This paper presents the current status and the future plans for the SNS SRF facilities.

  2. Decay heat calculations for a 500 kW W-Ta spallation target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Quanzhi; Lu, Youlian; Hu, Zhiliang; Zhou, Bin; Yin, Wen; Liang, Tianjiao

    2015-05-01

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is a short-pulsed neutron scattering facility. The beam power is designed to be 100 kW in Phase I, with the capability of upgrading to 500 kW. Tantalum (Ta)-cladded tungsten (W) was chosen as the spallation target due to its high neutron yield. Ta claddings can solve the problem of the corrosiveness of W plates, although they produce high decay heat after intense irradiation. This paper presents the decay heat distributions and evolutions for the future upgraded 500 kW W-Ta spallation target. The calculations are performed using the MCNPX2.5 Monte Carlo code and the CINDER'90 activation code. The decay heat distributions show that for the W plates, decay heat is mainly produced via the spallation reaction process, whereas for the Ta claddings, it is mainly produced via the neutron capture process. An effective method of reducing the decay heat in the W-Ta target is also presented and discussed.

  3. Initial observations of cavitation-induced erosion of liquid metal spallation target vessels at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, David A; Riemer, Bernie; Ferguson, Phillip D; Carroll, Adam J; Dayton, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    During operation of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory the mechanical properties of the AISI 316L target module are altered by high-energy neutron and proton radiation. The interior surfaces of the target vessel are also damaged by cavitation-induced erosion, which results from repetitive rapid heating of the liquid mercury by high-energy proton beam pulses. Until recently no observations of cavitation-induced erosion were possible for conditions prototypical to the SNS. Post irradiation examination (PIE) of the first and second operational SNS targets was performed to gain insight into the radiation-induced changes in mechanical properties of the 316L target material and the extent of cavitation-induced erosion to the target vessel inner surfaces. Observations of cavitation-induced erosion of the first and second operational SNS target modules are presented here, including images of the target vessel interiors and specimens removed from the target beam-entrance regions.

  4. Neutron Production by Muon Spallation I: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Luu, T; Hagmann, C

    2006-11-13

    We describe the physics and codes developed in the Muon Physics Package. This package is a self-contained Fortran90 module that is intended to be used with the Monte Carlo package MCNPX. We calculate simulated energy spectra, multiplicities, and angular distributions of direct neutrons and pions from muon spallation.

  5. Producing Persistent, High-Current, High-Duty-Factor H- Beams for Routine 1 MW Operation of SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P; Han, Baoxi; Hardek, Thomas W; Kang, Yoon W; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Piller, Chip; Santana, Manuel; Welton, Robert F

    2012-01-01

    Since 2009, SNS has been producing neutrons with ion beam powers near 1 MW, which requires the extraction of ~50 mA H- ions from the ion source with a ~5% duty factor. The 50 mA are achieved after an initial dose of ~3 mg of Cs and heating the Cs collar to ~170 C. The 50 mA normally persist for the entire 4-week source service cycles. Fundamental processes are reviewed to elucidate the persistence of the SNS H- beams without a steady feed of Cs and why the Cs collar temperature may have to be kept near 170 C.

  6. Shape design and CFD analysis on a 1MW-class horizontal axis tidal current turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, P. M.; Choi, Y. D.

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to develop a 1MW-class horizontal axis tidal current turbine rotor blade which can be applied near the southwest island regions of South Korea. On the basis of actual tidal current conditions of southern region of Korea, configuration design of 1MW class turbine rotor blade is carried out by BEMT (Blade element momentum theory). The hydrodynamic performance including the lift and drag forces, is conducted with the variation of the angle of attack using an open source code of X-Foil. The purpose of the study is to study the shape of the hydrofoil used and how it affects the performance of the turbine. After a thorough study of many airfoils, a new hydrofoil is developed using the S814 and DU-91-W2- 250 airfoils, which show good performance for rough conditions. A combination of the upper and lower surface of the two hydrofoils is tested. Three dimensional models were developed and the optimized blade geometry is used for CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) analysis with hexahedral numerical grids. Power coefficient, pressure coefficient and velocity distributions are investigated according to Tip Speed Ratio by CFD analysis.

  7. A 1 MW, 100 kV, less than 100 kg space based dc-dc power converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, J. R.; White, C. W.

    1991-01-01

    A 1 MW dc-dc power converter has been designed which has an input voltage of 5 kV +/-3 percent, an output voltage of 100 kV +/- 0.25 percent, and a run time of 1000 s at full power. The estimated system mass is 83.8 kg, giving a power density of 11.9 kW/kg. The system exceeded the weight goal of 10 kW/kg through the use of innovative components and system concepts. The system volume is approximately 0.1 cu m, and the overall system efficiency is estimated to be 87 percent. Some of the unique system features include a 50-kHz H-bridge inverter using MOS-controlled thyristors as the switching devices, a resonance transformer to step up the voltage, open-cycle cryogenic hydrogen gas cooling, and a nonrigid, inflatable housing which provides on-demand pressurization of the power converter local environment. This system scales very well to higher output powers. The weight of the 10-MW system with the same input and output voltage requirements and overall system configuration is estimated to be 575.3 kg. This gives a power density of 17.4 kW/kg, significantly higher than the 11.9 kW/kg estimated at 1 MW.

  8. Nanoscale Laser-Induced Spallation in SiO2 Films Containing Gold Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryashov, S.I.; Allen, S.D.; Papernov, S.; Schmid, A.W.

    2006-02-16

    A phenomenological theory of ultraviolet pulsed-laser-induced spallation is proposed to interpret crater formation in SiO2 thin films containing absorbing 18.5-nm gold particles. The theory considers a spherical thermoacoustic stress wave propagating from a thermal source produced by laser-energy absorption inside the particle and surrounding ionized volume. Calculations show that the tensile stress associated with such an acoustic wave may exceed the local strength of the material and cause fracture and spallation of the top film portion. The theory provides an explanation of the experimentally observed complex (two-cone) shape of craters formed in the film with particle-lodging depth exceeding 110 nm. Theoretical estimates for the threshold stress amplitude and peak temperature in the thermal source are in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations.

  9. Systematic neutron guide misalignment for an accelerator-driven spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zendler, C.; Bentley, P. M.

    2016-08-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a long pulse spallation neutron source that is currently under construction in Lund, Sweden. A considerable fraction of the 22 planned instruments extend as far as 75-150 m from the source. In such long beam lines, misalignment between neutron guide segments can decrease the neutron transmission significantly. In addition to a random misalignment from installation tolerances, the ground on which ESS is built can be expected to sink with time, and thus shift the neutron guide segments further away from the ideal alignment axis in a systematic way. These systematic errors are correlated to the ground structure, position of buildings and shielding installation. Since the largest deformation is expected close to the target, even short instruments might be noticeably affected. In this study, the effect of this systematic misalignment on short and long ESS beam lines is analyzed, and a possible mitigation by overillumination of subsequent guide sections investigated.

  10. Challenges and design solutions of the liquid hydrogen circuit at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallimore, S.; Nilsson, P.; Sabbagh, P.; Takibayev, A.; Weisend, J. G., II; Beßler, Y.; Klaus, M.

    2014-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS), Lund, Sweden will be a 5MW long-pulse neutron spallation research facility and will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. Neutrons are produced by accelerating a high-energy proton beam into a rotating helium-cooled tungsten target. These neutrons pass through moderators to reduce their energy to an appropriate range (< 5 meV for cold neutrons); two of which will use liquid hydrogen at 17 K as the moderating and cooling medium. There are several technical challenges to overcome in the design of a robust system that will operate under such conditions, not least the 20 kW of deposited heat. These challenges and the associated design solutions will be detailed in this paper.

  11. A neutron resonance capture analysis experimental station at the ISIS spallation source.

    PubMed

    Pietropaolo, Antonino; Gorini, Giuseppe; Festa, Giulia; Reali, Enzo; Grazzi, Francesco; Schooneveld, Erik M

    2010-09-01

    Neutron resonance capture analysis (NRCA) is a nuclear technique that is used to determine the elemental composition of materials and artifacts (e.g., bronze objects) of archaeological interest. NRCA experiments are mostly performed at the GELINA facility in Belgium, a pulsed neutron source operating with an electron linear accelerator. Very intense fluxes of epithermal neutrons are also provided by spallation neutron sources, such as the ISIS spallation neutron source in the United Kingdom. In the present study, the suitability of the Italian Neutron Experimental Station (INES) beam line for NRCA measurements is assessed using a compact (n, γ) resonance detector made of a Yttrium-Aluminum-Perovskite (YAP) scintillation crystal coupled with a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) readout. The measurements provided a qualitative recognition of the composition of the standard sample, a lower limit for the sensitivity for NRCA for almost-in-traces elements, and an estimation of the relative isotopic concentration in the sample.

  12. Heat Deposit Calculation in Spallation Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmanov, F. I.; Travleev, A. A.; Latysheva, L. N.; Vecchi, M.

    2001-11-01

    The present study concerns the calculation of the heat deposition in one of the EAP-80 basic units - the spallation module including the beam window, lead-bismuth spallation target and primary liquid metal cooling system. It is assumed that the model of sub-critical reactor under investigation is based on ANSALDO-INFN-ENEA-CRS4 reference configuration1. The calculation have been done by means of a couple computer codes: INCC 2 and GEANT3.21 3. These codes have been preliminary tested on the experimental data obtained in 4 for the case of interaction of proton beam and lead-bismuth targets at the energy Ep= 800MeV which is close to energy range relevant for ADS configuration.

  13. From reactors to long pulse sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mezei, F. |

    1995-12-31

    We will show, that by using an adapted instrumentation concept, the performance of a continuous source can be emulated by one switch on in long pulses for only about 10% of the total time. This 10 fold gain in neutron economy opens up the way for building reactor like sources with an order of magnitude higher flux than the present technological limits. Linac accelerator driven spallation lends itself favorably for the realization of this kind of long pulse sources, which will be complementary to short pulse spallation sources, the same way continuous reactor sources are.

  14. INJECTION CHOICE FOR SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE RING.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; BEEBE-WANG,J.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; BRODOWSKI,J.; FEDOTOV,A.; GARDNER,C.; LEE,Y.Y.; RAPARIA,D.; DANILOV,V.; HOLMES,J.; PRIOR,C.; REES,G.; MACHIDA,S.

    2001-06-18

    Injection is key in the low-loss design of high-intensity proton facilities like the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). During the design of both the accumulator and the rapid-cycling-synchrotron version of the SNS, extensive comparison has been made to select injection scenarios that satisfy SNS's low-loss design criteria. This paper presents issues and considerations pertaining to the final choice of the SNS injection systems.

  15. THE RF SYSTEM DESIGN FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    D. REES; M. LYNCH; ET AL

    2001-06-01

    Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator includes a nominally 1000 MeV, 2 mA average current linac consisting of a radio frequency quadrapole (RFQ), drift tube linac (DTL), coupled cavity linac (CCL), a medium and high beta super conducting (SC) linac, and two buncher cavities for beam transport to the ring. Los Alamos is responsible for the RF systems for all sections of the linac. The SNS linac is a pulsed proton linac and the RF system must support a 1 msec beam pulse at up to a 60 Hz repetition rate. The RFQ and DTL utilize seven, 2.5 MW klystrons and operate at 402.5 MHz. The CCL, SC, and buncher cavities operate at 805 MHz. Six, 5 MW klystrons are utilized for the CCL and buncher cavities while eighty-one 550 kW klystrons are used for the SC cavities. All of the RF hardware for the SNS linac is currently in production. This paper will present details of the RF system-level design as well as specific details of the SNS RF equipment. The design parameters will be discussed. One of the design challenges has been achieving a reasonable cost with the very large number of high-power klystrons. The approaches we used to reduce cost and the resulting design compromises will be discussed.

  16. Evaluation of the 3-GeV proton beam profile at the spallation target of the JSNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meigo, Shin-ichiro; Noda, Fumiaki; Ishikura, Syuichi; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Ikeda, Yujiro

    2006-06-01

    At JSNS, 3-GeV protons beam is delivered from rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) to the spallation neutron target. In order to reduce the damage of pitting on the target container, the peak current density should be kept as small as possible. In this study, the beam profile at spallation neutron target is evaluated. The phase-space distribution, including the space-charge effect, is calculated with SIMPSONS code. The beam profile on the target is obtained with the transfer matrix from exit of RCS to the target. As for injection to RCS, two methods of correlated and anti-correlated painting are considered. By using anti-correlated painting for injection of beam at RCS, it is found the shape of beam becomes flatter than the distribution by using correlated painting. As other aspect for the study of target, in order to carry out target performance test especially for the study of pitting issue, it is better to have the beam profile variety from the beginning of facility. The adjustable range for the beam profile at the beginning is also studied. Although the beam shape is narrow and the duty is very low, the strong enough peak density is achievable equivalent as 1 MW.

  17. The effects of shockwave profile shape and shock obliquity on spallation in Cu and Ta: kinetic and stress-state effects on damage evolution(u)

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, George T

    2010-12-14

    Widespread research over the past five decades has provided a wealth of experimental data and insight concerning shock hardening and the spallation response of materials subjected to square-topped shock-wave loading profiles. Less quantitative data have been gathered on the effect of direct, in-contact, high explosive (HE)-driven Taylor wave (or triangular-wave) loading profile shock loading on the shock hardening, damage evolution, or spallation response of materials. Explosive loading induces an impulse dubbed a 'Taylor Wave'. This is a significantly different loading history than that achieved by a square-topped impulse in terms of both the pulse duration at a fixed peak pressure, and a different unloading strain rate from the peak Hugoniot state achieved. The goal of this research is to quantify the influence of shockwave obliquity on the spallation response of copper and tantalum by subjecting plates of each material to HE-driven sweeping detonation-wave loading and quantify both the wave propagation and the post-mortem damage evolution. This talk will summarize our current understanding of damage evolution during sweeping detonation-wave spallation loading in Cu and Ta and show comparisons to modeling simulations. The spallation responses of Cu and Ta are both shown to be critically dependent on the shockwave profile and the stress-state of the shock. Based on variations in the specifics of the shock drive (pulse shape, peak stress, shock obliquity) and sample geometry in Cu and Ta, 'spall strength' varies by over a factor of two and the details of the mechanisms of the damage evolution is seen to vary. Simplistic models of spallation, such as P{sub min} based on 1-D square-top shock data lack the physics to capture the influence of kinetics on damage evolution such as that operative during sweeping detonation loading. Such considerations are important for the development of predictive models of damage evolution and spallation in metals and alloys.

  18. Surface modification to prevent oxide scale spallation

    DOEpatents

    Stephens, Elizabeth V; Sun, Xin; Liu, Wenning; Stevenson, Jeffry W; Surdoval, Wayne; Khaleel, Mohammad A

    2013-07-16

    A surface modification to prevent oxide scale spallation is disclosed. The surface modification includes a ferritic stainless steel substrate having a modified surface. A cross-section of the modified surface exhibits a periodic morphology. The periodic morphology does not exceed a critical buckling length, which is equivalent to the length of a wave attribute observed in the cross section periodic morphology. The modified surface can be created using at least one of the following processes: shot peening, surface blasting and surface grinding. A coating can be applied to the modified surface.

  19. Basic physics with spallation-neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Michaudon, A.F.

    1994-05-01

    The neutron has unique intrinsic properties widely used in basic and applied sciences. The neutron plays a well-known role in applied sciences and technology and is a unique probe well suited for the exploration of condensed-matter properties. But the neutron is also used for many other basic-physics studies, including nuclear physics, particle physics, fundamental physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. These last studies are briefly reviewed in this paper. Spallation-neutron sources today have unmatched neutron-beam properties for such studies and have great potential in future technological developments whereby these studies could be carried out under much improved conditions.

  20. NOBLE GAS PRODUCTION FROM MERCURY SPALLATION AT SNS

    SciTech Connect

    DeVore, Joe R; Lu, Wei; Schwahn, Scott O

    2013-01-01

    Calculations for predicting the distribution of the products of spallation reactions between high energy protons and target materials are well developed and are used for design and operational applications in many projects both within DOE and in other arenas. These calculations are based on theory and limited experimental data that verifies rates of production of some spallation products exist. At the Spallation Neutron Source, a helium stream from the mercury target flows through a system to remove radioactivity from this mercury target offgas. The operation of this system offers a window through which the production of noble gases from mercury spallation by protons may be observed. This paper describes studies designed to measure the production rates of twelve noble gas isotopes within the Spallation Neutron Source mercury target.

  1. Emittance studies of the Spallation Neutron Source external-antenna H{sup -} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B. X.; Stockli, M. P.; Welton, R. F.; Pennisi, T. R.; Murray, S. N.; Santana, M.; Long, C. D.

    2010-02-15

    A new Allison-type emittance scanner has been built to characterize the ion sources and low energy beam transport systems at Spallation Neutron Source. In this work, the emittance characteristics of the H{sup -} beam produced with the external-antenna rf-driven ion source and transported through the two-lens electrostatic low energy beam transport are studied. The beam emittance dependence on beam intensity, extraction parameters, and the evolution of the emittance and twiss parameters over beam pulse duration are presented.

  2. HYSPEC : A CRYSTAL TIME OF FLIGHT HYBRID SPECTROMETER FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    SHAPIRO,S.M.; ZALIZNYAK,I.A.

    2002-12-30

    This document lays out a proposal by the Instrument Development Team (IDT) composed of scientists from leading Universities and National Laboratories to design and build a conceptually new high-flux inelastic neutron spectrometer at the pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge. This instrument is intended to supply users of the SNS and scientific community, of which the IDT is an integral part, with a platform for ground-breaking investigations of the low-energy atomic-scale dynamical properties of crystalline solids. It is also planned that the proposed instrument will be equipped with a polarization analysis capability, therefore becoming the first polarized beam inelastic spectrometer in the SNS instrument suite, and the first successful polarized beam inelastic instrument at a pulsed spallation source worldwide. The proposed instrument is designed primarily for inelastic and elastic neutron spectroscopy of single crystals. In fact, the most informative neutron scattering studies of the dynamical properties of solids nearly always require single crystal samples, and they are almost invariably flux-limited. In addition, in measurements with polarization analysis the available flux is reduced through selection of the particular neutron polarization, which puts even more stringent limits on the feasibility of a particular experiment. To date, these investigations have mostly been carried out on crystal spectrometers at high-flux reactors, which usually employ focusing Bragg optics to concentrate the neutron beam on a typically small sample. Construction at Oak Ridge of the high-luminosity spallation neutron source, which will provide intense pulsed neutron beams with time-averaged fluxes equal to those at medium-flux reactors, opens entirely new opportunities for single crystal neutron spectroscopy. Drawing upon experience acquired during decades of studies with both crystal and time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometers, the IDT has developed a conceptual

  3. Management of tritium European Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Ene, D.; Andersson, K.; Jensen, M.; Nielsen, S.; Severin, G.

    2015-03-15

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) will produce tritium via spallation and activation processes during operational activities. Within the location of ESS facility in Lund, Sweden site it is mandatory to demonstrate that the management strategy of the produced tritium ensures the compliance with the country regulation criteria. The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the different aspects of the tritium management in ESS facility. Besides the design parameter study of the helium coolant purification system of the target the consequences of the tritium releasing into the environment were also analyzed. Calculations show that the annual release of tritium during the normal operations represents a small fraction from the estimated total dose. However, more refined calculations of migration of activated-groundwater should be performed for higher hydraulic conductivities, with the availability of the results on soil examinations. With the assumption of 100% release of tritium to the atmosphere during the occurring of the extreme accidents, it was found as well that the total dose complies with the constraint. (authors)

  4. Using spallation neutron sources for defense research

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Sterbenz, S.M.; Weinacht, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    Advanced characterization techniques and accelerated simulation are the cornerstones of the Energy Department`s science-based program to maintain confidence in the safety, reliability, and performance of the US nuclear deterrent in an era of no nuclear testing. Neutrons and protons provided by an accelerator-based facility have an important role to play in this program, impacting several of the key stockpile stewardship and management issues identified by the Department of Defense. Many of the techniques used for defense research at a spallation source have been used for many years for the basic research community, and to a lesser extent by industrial scientists. By providing access to a broad spectrum of researchers with different backgrounds, a spallation source such as the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center is able to promote synergistic interaction between defense, basic and industrial researchers. This broadens the scientific basis of the stockpile stewardship program in the short term and will provide spin-off to industrial and basic research in the longer term.

  5. Spallation studies on shock loaded uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, D.L.; Hixson, R.; Gustavsen, R.L.; Vorthman, J.E.; Kelly, A.; Zurek, A.K.; Thissel, W.R.

    1997-12-31

    Uranium samples at two different purity levels were used for spall strength measurements at three different stress levels. A 50 mm single-stage gas-gun was used to produce planar impact conditions using Z-cut quartz impactors. Samples of depleted uranium were taken from very high purity material and from material that had 300 ppm of carbon added. A pair of shots was done for each impact strength, one member of the pair with VISAR diagnostics and the second with soft recovery for metallographical examination. A series of increasing final stress states were chosen to effectively freeze the microstructural damage at three places in the development to full spall separation. This allowed determination of the dependence of spall mechanisms on stress level and sample purity. This report will discuss both the results of the metallurgical examination of soft recovered samples and the modeling of the free surface VISAR data. The micrographs taken from the recovered samples show brittle cracking as the spallation failure mechanism. Deformation induced twins are plentiful and obviously play a role in the spallation process. The twins are produced in the initial shock loading and, so, are present already before the fracture process begins. The 1 d characteristics code CHARADE has been used to model the free surface VISAR data.

  6. Conceptual design for one megawatt spallation neutron source at Argonne

    SciTech Connect

    Chio, Y.; Bailey, J.; Brown, B.

    1993-12-31

    The feasibility study of a spallation neutron source based on a rapid cycling synchrotron which delivers a proton beam of 2 GeV in energy and 0.5mA time-average current at a 30-Hz repetition rate is presented. The lattice consists of 90-degree phase advanced FODO cells with dispersion-free straight sections, and has a three-fold symmetry. The ring magnet system will be energized by 20-Hz and 60-Hz resonant circuits to decrease the dB/dt during the acceleration cycle. This lowers the peak acceleration voltage requirement to 130kV. The single turn extraction system will be used to extract the beam alternatively to two target stations. The first station will operate at 10Hz for research using long wavelength neutrons, and the second station will use the remaining pulses, collectively, providing 36 neutron beams. The 400-MeV negative-hydrogen-ion injector linac consists of an ion source, rf quadrupole, matching section, 100MeV drift-tube linac, and a 300-Mev coupled-cavity linac.

  7. Economic and Environmental Assessment of a 1 MW Grid Connected Rooftop Solar PV System for Energy Efficient Building in Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Sanjib; Hosain, Rubayet; Rahman, Toufiqur; Rabbi, Ahmead Fazle

    This paper evaluates the potentiality of a 1 MW grid connected rooftop solar PV system for an Energy Efficient Building in Bangladesh, which was estimated by utilizing NASA SSE solar radiation data, PVsyst simulation software and RETScreen simulation software. Economic and environmental viability for a ten-storied building with roof area of 6,500 m2 in the Capital City of Bangladesh, Dhaka was assessed by using the RETScreen simulation software. The yearly electricity production of the proposed system was 1,581 MWh estimated by PVsyst where the technical prospective of gird-connected solar PV in Bangladesh was calculated as about 50,174 MW. The economic assessments were determined the simple payback in such a way that the generated electricity first fulfills the demand of the building, and then the rest of the energy is supplied to the grid. The result indicates that the roof top solar PV system for an Energy efficient building in Dhaka city has a favorable condition for development both in economic and environmental point of view.

  8. Determination of spallation neutron flux through spectral adjustment techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosby, M. A.; Engle, J. W.; Jackman, K. R.; Nortier, F. M.; Birnbaum, E. R.

    2016-08-01

    The Los Alamos Isotope Production Facility (IPF) creates medical isotopes using a proton beam impinged on a target stack. Spallation neutrons are created in the interaction of the beam with target. The use of these spallation neutrons to produce additional radionuclides has been proposed. However, the energy distribution and magnitude of the flux is not well understood. A modified SAND-II spectral adjustment routine has been used with radioactivation foils to determine the differential neutron fluence for these spallation neutrons during a standard IPF production run.

  9. Laser-Induced Spallation of Microsphere Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Hiraiwa, Morgan; Stossel, Melicent; Khanolkar, Amey; Wang, Junlan; Boechler, Nicholas

    2016-08-01

    The detachment of a semiordered monolayer of polystyrene microspheres adhered to an aluminum-coated glass substrate is studied using a laser-induced spallation technique. The microsphere-substrate adhesion force is estimated from substrate surface displacement measurements obtained using optical interferometry, and a rigid-body model that accounts for the inertia of the microspheres. The estimated adhesion force is compared with estimates obtained using an adhesive contact model together with interferometric measurements of the out-of-plane microsphere contact resonance, and with estimated work of adhesion values for the polystyrene-aluminum interface. Scanning electron microscope images of detached monolayer regions reveal a unique morphology, namely, partially detached monolayer flakes composed of single hexagonal close packed crystalline domains. This work contributes to the fields of microsphere adhesion and contact dynamics, and demonstrates a unique monolayer delamination morphology. PMID:27409715

  10. On the feasibility of a 1 MW inverter in less than a cubic meter volume for vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect

    Podlesak, T.F.; Singh, H.

    1995-12-31

    The Army Tank-Automotive Command (TACOM) which is committed to an All-Electric Tank, commissioned a study of the feasibility of 1 MW inverter in less than a cubic meter volume. TACOM has the constraint of very limited available volume, in that this volume is protected by armor and is thus at a premium. The study strategy was to evaluate a series of general inverter topologies, utilizing various power semiconductors. The first inverter evaluated was a standard, hard switched DC link with Gate Turnoff Thyristors (GTOs) as the power semiconductors. Since four quadrant operation is a requirement, two antiparallel GTOs are required at each of the twelve switches, yielding a total of twenty-four GTOs. Even with the large auxiliaries required by the GTOs, the inverter volume easily meets the specified volume. The next case was a quasi-resonant DC link circuit using Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBTs). The ratings on the IGBTs surveyed were much less than that of comparable size GTOs, particularly in voltage, resulting in higher operating currents and therefore larger conduction losses, these being approximately twice that of the GTOs. The next case was a similar inverter using advanced MOS Controlled Thyristors (MCTs). These are devices currently under development, to be rated at 3 kV. They have minimal driver and snubber requirements and the least conduction losses, being approximately a third of those calculated for the GTOs. Inverter volume is less than half that associated with baseline GTO inverter. The added complexity of four quadrant operation favors the next topology, the matrix inverter. The often discussed liability of two antiparallel semiconductors at each switch position is negated by a similar need in the DC topologies. The study concludes with an assessment of foreseeable advanced technologies that may favorably impact the reduction of the size of the inverter.

  11. Spallation nucleosynthesis by accelerated charged-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Goriely, S.

    2008-05-12

    Recent observations have suggested the presence of radioactive elements, such as Pm and 84{<=}Z{<=}99 elements) at the surface of the magnetic star HD101065, also known as Przybylski's star. This star is know to be a chemically peculiar star and its anomalous 38spallation processes resulting from the interaction of the stellar material with stellar energetic particle can by themselves only explain the abundances determined by observation at the surface of HD101065. We show that specific parametric simulations can explain many different observational aspects, and in particular that a significant production of Z>30 heavy elements can be achieved. In this nucleosynthesis process, the secondary-neutron captures play a crucial role. The most attractive feature of the spallation process is the systematic production of Pm and Tc and the possible synthesis of actinides and sub-actinides.Based on such a parametric model, it is also shown that intense fluences of accelerated charged-particles interacting with surrounding material can efficiently produce elements heavier than iron. Different regimes are investigated and shown to be at the origin of p- and s-nuclei in the case of high-fluence low-flux events and r-nuclei for high-fluence high-flux irradiations. The possible existence of such irradiation events need to be confirmed by hydrodynamics simulations, but most of all by spectroscopic observations through the detection of short-lived radio-elements.

  12. Estimation of neutron-induced spallation yields of krypton isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karol, Paul J.; Tobin, Michael J.; Shibata, Seiichi

    1983-10-01

    A procedure is outlined for estimating cross sections for neutron-induced spallation products relative to those for proton-induced reactions. When combined with known proton spallation systematics, it is demonstrated that cumulative yields for cosmogenically-important stable 84Kr and 86Kr isotopes are ~1.4 and ~2.8 times greater, respectively, for incident neutrons compared to protons at 0.2<=E<=3.0 GeV for nearby medium mass targets. Yields for lighter kryptons are relatively insensitive to the identity of the incident nucleon. NUCLEAR REACTIONS (n, spallation), 0.2<=En<=3.0 GeV, stable Kr product yield estimates from proton spallation systematics.

  13. Proceedings of the international workshop on spallation materials technology

    SciTech Connect

    Mansur, L.K.; Ullmaier, H.

    1996-10-01

    This document contains papers which were presented at the International Workshop on Spallation Materials Technology. Topics included: overviews and thermal response; operational experience; materials experience; target station and component design; particle transport and damage calculations; neutron sources; and compatibility.

  14. ACCELERATOR SYSTEMS MODIFICATIONS FOR A SECOND TARGET STATION AT THE OAK RIDGE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, John D; Kim, Sang-Ho; Plum, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    A second target station is planned for the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source. The ion source will be upgraded to increase the peak current from 38 to 49 mA, additional superconducting RF cavities will be added to the linac to increase the H beam energy from 938 to 1300 MeV, and the accumulator ring will receive modifications to the injection and extraction systems to accommodate the higher beam energy. After pulse compression in the storage ring one sixth of the beam pulses (10 out of 60 Hz) will be diverted to the second target by kicker and septum magnets added to the existing Ring to Target Beam Transport (RTBT) line. No further modifications will be made to the RTBT so that when the kicker and septum magnets are turned off the original beam transport lattice will be unaffected. In this paper we will discuss these and other planned modifications and upgrades to the accelerator facility.

  15. Spallation in NiTi under One-Dimensional Shock Loading

    SciTech Connect

    Wallwork, A.; Workman, A.; Meziere, Y. J. E.; Millett, J. C. F.; Bourne, N. K.

    2006-07-28

    The dynamic response of the shape memory alloy NiTi has been of interest to a number of investigators because it displays a shape memory effect. The dynamic tensile (spall) strength of this material is measured under one-dimensional shock loading. The loading stress pulse length and impact stress were varied to a peak stress of 15 GPa. The pull back stress ({sigma}pbs) was found to increase with the applied pulse length. This suggests that the dynamic tensile strength is dependent upon the generation of a deformation micro structure that evolves behind the shock front. In contrast, increasing stress levels result in a near-constant pull back stress, although at the lowest applied stress, spallation did not occur.

  16. Enhancement of laser-induced rear surface spallation by pyramid textured structures on silicon wafer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Z R; Palina, N; Chen, J; Aberle, A G; Hoex, B; Hong, M H

    2012-11-01

    Pulsed laser ablation is increasingly being applied to locally open the rear dielectric layer of advanced silicon wafer solar cell structures, such as aluminum local back surface field solar cells. We report that the laser ablation process on the rear surface of the solar cell at a relatively low laser fluence can cause undesirable spallation at the front surface which is textured with random upright pyramids. This phenomenon is attributed to the enhancement of the surface spallation effect by up to 3 times due to the confinement of the pressure waves at the tips of these random pyramids. Laser ablation at different laser focus positions and laser fluences is carried out to achieve optimized laser processing of the solar cells.

  17. Deexcitation Modes in Spallation Nuclear Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, F. G.; Guzmán, F.; Rodriguez, O.; Tumbarell, O.; Souza, D. A.; Samana, A. R.; Andrade-II, E.; Bernal Castillo, J. L.; Deppman, A.

    2016-08-01

    Spallation nuclear reactions in the range of 0.2 to 1.2 GeV are studied using the CRISP code. A new approach for the deexcitation stage of the compound nucleus was introduced. For the calculations of the level densities, this approach is based on the Back-shifted Fermi gas model (BSFG), which takes into account pairing effects and shell corrections, whereas the calculation of the fission barriers were performed by means of the Extended Thomas-Fermi plus Strutinsky Integral (ETFSI) method, which is a high-speed approximation to the Hartree-Fock method with pairing correlations treated as in the usual BCS plus blocking approach. This procedure is more appropriate to calculate level densities for exotic nuclei. Satisfactory results were obtained and compared with experimental data obtained in the GSI experiments. As another important result, we highlight some directions for the development of a qualitatively superior version of the CRISP code with the implementation of more realistic and suitable physical models to be applied in stable and exotic nuclei that participate in the process. This new version of the code includes several substantial changes in the decay of the hot compound nucleus which allow satisfactory agreement with the experimental data and a reduction of the adjustment parameters.

  18. Cryogenics at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisend, J. G., II; Arnold, P.; Hees, J. Fydrych. W.; Jurns, J. M.; Wang, X. L.

    Cryogenics plays an important role at the European Spallation Source, a world class neutron science center, currently under construction in Lund, Sweden. Three principal applications of cryogenics are found at ESS. The SRF cryomodules of the ESS proton linac require cooling at 2 K, 4.5 K and 40 K; the hydrogenmoderator surrounding the target that produces neutrons, requires cooling via 16.5 K helium and LHe is required for many of the scientific instruments. These needs will be met by a set of three cryogenic refrigeration/liquefaction plants and an extensive cryogenic distribution system. Significant progress has been made on the ESS cryogenic system in preparation for the expected first beam on target in 2019. This work includes: funding of industry studies for the accelerator cryoplant, preliminary design of the cryogenic distribution system, investigation of possible in kind contributors and release of the invitation to tender for the accelerator cryoplant.This paper describes the requirements, design solutions and current status of the ESS cryogenic system. The planned recovery of waste heat from the cryogenic plants, a unique aspect of ESS, is described. The procurement of the cryogenic system, expected to be done via a combination of purchase via competitive bids and in kind contributions is also discussed.

  19. Cryogenic System for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Arenius, D.; Chronis, W.; Creel, J.; Dixon, K.; Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.

    2004-06-23

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a neutron-scattering facility being built at Oak Ridge, TN for the US Department of Energy. The SNS accelerator linac consists of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities in cryostats (cryomodules). The linac cryomodules are cooled to 2.1 K by a 2300 watt cryogenic refrigeration system. As an SNS partner laboratory, Jefferson Lab is responsible for the installed integrated cryogenic system design for the SNS linac accelerator consisting of major subsystem equipment engineered and procured from industry. Jefferson Lab's work included developing the major vendor subsystem equipment procurement specifications, equipment procurement, and the integrated system engineering support of the field installation and commissioning. The major cryogenic system components include liquid nitrogen storage, gaseous helium storage, cryogen distribution transfer line system, 2.1-K cold box consisting of four stages of cold compressors, 4.5-K cold box, warm helium compressors with its associated oil removal, gas management, helium purification, gas impurity monitoring systems, and the supportive utilities of electrical power, cooling water and instrument air. The system overview, project organization, the important aspects, and the capabilities of the cryogenic system are described.

  20. Spallation reactions: A successful interplay between modeling and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, J.-C.

    2015-06-01

    The spallation reactions are a type of nuclear reaction which occur in space by interaction of the cosmic rays with interstellar bodies. The first spallation reactions induced with an accelerator took place in 1947 at the Berkeley cyclotron (University of California) with 200MeV deuterons and 400MeV alpha beams. They highlighted the multiple emission of neutrons and charged particles and the production of a large number of residual nuclei far different from the target nuclei. In the same year, R. Serber described the reaction in two steps: a first and fast one with high-energy particle emission leading to an excited remnant nucleus, and a second one, much slower, the de-excitation of the remnant. In 2010 IAEA organized a workshop to present the results of the most widely used spallation codes within a benchmark of spallation models. If one of the goals was to understand the deficiencies, if any, in each code, one remarkable outcome points out the overall high-quality level of some models and so the great improvements achieved since Serber. Particle transport codes can then rely on such spallation models to treat the reactions between a light particle and an atomic nucleus with energies spanning from few tens of MeV up to some GeV. An overview of the spallation reactions modeling is presented in order to point out the incomparable contribution of models based on basic physics to numerous applications where such reactions occur. Validations or benchmarks, which are necessary steps in the improvement process, are also addressed, as well as the potential future domains of development. Spallation reactions modeling is a representative case of continuous studies aiming at understanding a reaction mechanism and which end up in a powerful tool.

  1. High-Power Linac for the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, D. J.

    2002-04-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be the world’s most intense source of neutrons for fundamental science and industrial applications. Design and construction of this facility, located at Oak Ridge, is a joint venture between six DOE laboratories. Construction began in 1999 and is currently ahead of the scheduled 2006 completion date. Injecting a high-power, pulsed proton beam into a mercury target produces neutrons. In this talk, we review the physics requirements, design, and status of the construction of the 1-GeV, 1.4-MW average power RF linac for SNS. The accelerator consists of a drift tube linac (DTL), a coupled-cavity linac (CCL), and a superconducting rf (SRF) linac. The phase and quadrupole settings are set to avoid structure and parametric resonances, with coherent resonances posing minimal risk for emittance growth. The DTL is 37 m long and accelerates the ions to 87 MeV. The CCL is 55 m long and accelerates the ions to 186 MeV. The rf structure design and stability for both the DTL and CCL have been validated with scale models. The SRF linac has a modular design to accelerate ions to 1000 MeV, with a straightforward upgrade to 1.3 GeV at a later date. 3D particle-in-cell simulations of beam dynamics are performed to validate performance. The accelerator utilizes 93 MW of pulsed power operating continuously at 60-Hz with an 8factor. Approximately one hundred 402.5 or 805-MHz klystrons, with outputs between 0.55 and 5 MW, are used. The klystrons are powered by a novel converter-modulator that takes advantage of recent advances in IGBT switch plate assemblies and low-loss material cores for boost transformer. Beam diagnostics include position, phase, profile, and current monitors. They are designed to enable accurate beam steering and matching, and to minimize beam loss that would lead to activation and prevent hands-on maintenance.

  2. De novo intrachromosomal gene conversion from OPN1MW to OPN1LW in the male germline results in Blue Cone Monochromacy

    PubMed Central

    Buena-Atienza, Elena; Rüther, Klaus; Baumann, Britta; Bergholz, Richard; Birch, David; De Baere, Elfride; Dollfus, Helene; Greally, Marie T.; Gustavsson, Peter; Hamel, Christian P.; Heckenlively, John R.; Leroy, Bart P.; Plomp, Astrid S.; Pott, Jan Willem R.; Rose, Katherine; Rosenberg, Thomas; Stark, Zornitza; Verheij, Joke B. G. M.; Weleber, Richard; Zobor, Ditta; Weisschuh, Nicole; Kohl, Susanne; Wissinger, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    X-linked cone dysfunction disorders such as Blue Cone Monochromacy and X-linked Cone Dystrophy are characterized by complete loss (of) or reduced L- and M- cone function due to defects in the OPN1LW/OPN1MW gene cluster. Here we investigated 24 affected males from 16 families with either a structurally intact gene cluster or at least one intact single (hybrid) gene but harbouring rare combinations of common SNPs in exon 3 in single or multiple OPN1LW and OPN1MW gene copies. We assessed twelve different OPN1LW/MW exon 3 haplotypes by semi-quantitative minigene splicing assay. Nine haplotypes resulted in aberrant splicing of ≥20% of transcripts including the known pathogenic haplotypes (i.e. ‘LIAVA’, ‘LVAVA’) with absent or minute amounts of correctly spliced transcripts, respectively. De novo formation of the ‘LIAVA’ haplotype derived from an ancestral less deleterious ‘LIAVS’ haplotype was observed in one family with strikingly different phenotypes among affected family members. We could establish intrachromosomal gene conversion in the male germline as underlying mechanism. Gene conversion in the OPN1LW/OPN1MW genes has been postulated, however, we are first to demonstrate a de novo gene conversion within the lineage of a pedigree. PMID:27339364

  3. Spallation Characteristics of Poly-Methyl Meth-Acrylic (PMMA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkowski, Peter; Dandekar, D. P.

    1999-06-01

    This work describes the results derived from plane shock wave spallation experiments performed on Poly-Methyl Meth-Acrylic (PMMA) Polymer. These experiments were conducted using the Army Research Laboratories 102 mm Bore, 8 m long Light Gas Gun located at Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD. The PMMA used in this work was manufactured by Rohm & Haas as their Ultra-Violet Absorbing (UVA), Type II Plexiglass. Its density is 1.188 Mg/m3 and longitudinal shock velocity is 2.72 mm/μ s. Spallation experiments were conducted at impact stresses between 0.2 and 2.0 GPa. The PMMA appears to exhibit a constant tensile strength of 0.15 GPa up to an impact stress of 0.75 GPa. Unlike metal and ceramic materials, the PMMA exhibits a dwell time in the spallation inversly proportional to the impact stress. At a low impact stress of 0.40 GPa, spallation of the PMMA occurs over a time period of 0.80 micro-seconds. At an impact stress of 0.75 GPa, the spallation occurs over 0.40 micro-seconds. This variation in time required to spall the PMMA will be analyzed and theories discussed.

  4. Radiation damage problems in high power spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmaier, H.; Carsughi, F.

    1995-08-01

    In planning the next generation of spallation sources with proton beam powers of several MW (as, for example, the European Spallation Source, ESS), it was soon recognized that materials' degradation by radiation damage will be the most problematic factor in determining the efficiency, lifetime and availability of high power spallation targets. This article gives a short introduction to the physics of radiation damage in metals and points out the differences in the irradiation conditions for materials in fission, fusion and spallation environments, respectively. Based on the expected displacement damage (dpa), hydrogen and helium production, temperatures and stresses we then attempt to identify the critical radiation damage effects for target, window and structural materials. The following compilation of data on proton irradiation of candidate materials (Ta, W, Al and their alloys) shows that the present data base is by far too narrow for materials' selection or lifetime predictions. Since such information is urgently needed for conceptual designs, further investigations are planned beginning with the examination (mechanical tests and TEM in hot cells) of already irradiated specimens: a Ta target assembly removed recently from ISIS at RAL; steel and Al beam windows and TEM specimens irradiated in LANL and PSI, respectively. Parallel to these efforts new irradiations are foreseen in a dual beam facility, in ISOLDE at CERN, and in the spallation source SINQ which is expected to start operation in 1996.

  5. RESULTS FROM CAVITATION DAMAGE EXPERIMENTS WITH MERCURY SPALLATION TARGETS AT THE LANSCE WNR IN 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; Abdou, Ashraf A; Felde, David K; Sangrey, Robert L; Wendel, Mark W

    2010-01-01

    Damage assessment from proton beam induced cavitation experiments on mercury spallation targets done at the LANSCE WNR facility has been completed. The experiments investigated two key questions for the Spallation Neutron Source target, namely, how damage is affected by flow velocity in the SNS coolant channel geometry, and how damage scales with proton beam intensity at a given constant charge per pulse. With regard to the former question, prior in-beam experiments indicated that the coolant channel geometry with stagnant mercury was especially vulnerable to damage which might warrant a design change. Yet other results indicated a reduction in damage with the introduction of flow. Using more prototypic to the SNS, the 2008 experiment damage results show the channel is less vulnerable than the bulk mercury side of the vessel wall. They also show no benefit from increasing channel flow velocity beyond nominal SNS speeds. The second question probed a consensus belief that damage scales with beam intensity (protons per unit area) by a power law dependence with exponent of around 4. Results from a 2005 experiment did not support this power law dependence but some observations were inconsistent and unexplained. These latest results show weaker damage dependence.

  6. Cavitation damage prediction for spallation target vessels by assessment of acoustic vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Futakawa, Masatoshi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Hasegawa, Shoichi; Ikeda, Dr. Yujiro; Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark W; Haines, John R; Bauer, Guenter; Naoe, Dr. Takashi; Okita, Dr. Kohei; Fujiwara, Dr. Akiko; Matsumoto, Dr. Yoichiro; Tanaka, Dr. Nobuatsu

    2008-01-01

    Liquid-mercury target systems for MW-class spallation neutron sources are being developed around the world. Proton beams are used to induce the spallation reaction. At the moment the proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in the mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall. In order to estimate the cavitation erosion, i.e. the pitting damage formed by the collapse of cavitation bubbles, off-beam tests were performed by using an electric magnetic impact testing machine (MIMTM), which can impose equivalent pressure pulses in mercury. The damage potential was defined based on the relationship between the pitting damage and the time-integrated acoustic vibration induced by impact due to the bubble collapses. Additionally, the damage potential was measured in on-beam tests carried out by using the proton beam at WNR (Weapons Neutron Research) facility in Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). In this paper, the concept of the damage potential, the relationship between the pitting damage formation and the damage potential both in off-beam and on-beam tests is shown.

  7. Modeling of water radiolysis at spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Daemen, L.L.; Kanner, G.S.; Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.; Brun, T.O.; Sommer, W.F.

    1998-12-01

    In spallation neutron sources neutrons are produced when a beam of high-energy particles (e.g., 1 GeV protons) collides with a (water-cooled) heavy metal target such as tungsten. The resulting spallation reactions produce a complex radiation environment (which differs from typical conditions at fission and fusion reactors) leading to the radiolysis of water molecules. Most water radiolysis products are short-lived but extremely reactive. When formed in the vicinity of the target surface they can react with metal atoms, thereby contributing to target corrosion. The authors will describe the results of calculations and experiments performed at Los Alamos to determine the impact on target corrosion of water radiolysis in the spallation radiation environment. The computational methodology relies on the use of the Los Alamos radiation transport code, LAHET, to determine the radiation environment, and the AEA code, FACSIMILE, to model reaction-diffusion processes.

  8. Monte Carlo modeling of spallation targets containing uranium and americium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshkin, Yury; Pshenichnov, Igor; Mishustin, Igor; Greiner, Walter

    2014-09-01

    Neutron production and transport in spallation targets made of uranium and americium are studied with a Geant4-based code MCADS (Monte Carlo model for Accelerator Driven Systems). A good agreement of MCADS results with experimental data on neutron- and proton-induced reactions on 241Am and 243Am nuclei allows to use this model for simulations with extended Am targets. It was demonstrated that MCADS model can be used for calculating the values of critical mass for 233,235U, 237Np, 239Pu and 241Am. Several geometry options and material compositions (U, U + Am, Am, Am2O3) are considered for spallation targets to be used in Accelerator Driven Systems. All considered options operate as deep subcritical targets having neutron multiplication factor of k∼0.5. It is found that more than 4 kg of Am can be burned in one spallation target during the first year of operation.

  9. GRAIN-SCALE FAILURE IN THERMAL SPALLATION DRILLING

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, S C; Lomov, I; Roberts, J J

    2012-01-19

    Geothermal power promises clean, renewable, reliable and potentially widely-available energy, but is limited by high initial capital costs. New drilling technologies are required to make geothermal power financially competitive with other energy sources. One potential solution is offered by Thermal Spallation Drilling (TSD) - a novel drilling technique in which small particles (spalls) are released from the rock surface by rapid heating. While TSD has the potential to improve drilling rates of brittle granitic rocks, the coupled thermomechanical processes involved in TSD are poorly described, making system control and optimization difficult for this drilling technology. In this paper, we discuss results from a new modeling effort investigating thermal spallation drilling. In particular, we describe an explicit model that simulates the grain-scale mechanics of thermal spallation and use this model to examine existing theories concerning spalling mechanisms. We will report how borehole conditions influence spall production, and discuss implications for macro-scale models of drilling systems.

  10. Characterization of the radiation background at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiJulio, Douglas D.; Cherkashyna, Nataliia; Scherzinger, Julius; Khaplanov, Anton; Pfeiffer, Dorothea; Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Fissum, Kevin G.; Kanaki, Kalliopi; Kirstein, Oliver; Ehlers, Georg; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Hornbach, Donald E.; Iverson, Erik B.; Newby, Robert J.; Hall-Wilton, Richard J.; Bentley, Phillip M.

    2016-09-01

    We present a survey of the radiation background at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN, USA during routine daily operation. A broad range of detectors was used to characterize primarily the neutron and photon fields throughout the facility. These include a WENDI-2 extended range dosimeter, a thermoscientific NRD, an Arktis 4He detector, and a standard NaI photon detector. The information gathered from the detectors was used to map out the neutron dose rates throughout the facility and also the neutron dose rate and flux profiles of several different beamlines. The survey provides detailed information useful for developing future shielding concepts at spallation neutron sources, such as the European Spallation Source (ESS), currently under construction in Lund, Sweden.

  11. Detection of supernova neutrinos at spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ming-Yang; Guo, Xin-Heng; Young, Bing-Lin

    2016-07-01

    After considering supernova shock effects, Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effects, neutrino collective effects, and Earth matter effects, the detection of supernova neutrinos at the China Spallation Neutron Source is studied and the expected numbers of different flavor supernova neutrinos observed through various reaction channels are calculated with the neutrino energy spectra described by the Fermi-Dirac distribution and the “beta fit” distribution respectively. Furthermore, the numerical calculation method of supernova neutrino detection on Earth is applied to some other spallation neutron sources, and the total expected numbers of supernova neutrinos observed through different reactions channels are given. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205185, 11175020, 11275025, 11575023)

  12. Neutron guide optimisation for a time-of-flight neutron imaging instrument at the European Spallation Source.

    PubMed

    Hilger, A; Kardjilov, N; Manke, I; Zendler, C; Lieutenant, K; Habicht, K; Banhart, J; Strobl, M

    2015-01-12

    A neutron transport system for the planned imaging instrument ODIN at the future European Spallation Source (ESS) based on neutron optical components was designed and optimized. Different ways of prompt pulse suppression were studied. The spectral performance of the optimal neutron guide configuration is presented. In addition, the influence of the gaps in the guide system needed for the required chopper configuration was investigated. Given that the requirements for an imaging instrument located on a long guide system and hosting a complex chopper system are extremely demanding in terms of spectral and divergence needs, this study can be beneficial for a wide range of instruments in various ways. PMID:25835677

  13. Spallation in Ti-6Al-4V: Stress Measurements and Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, C.; Bourne, N. K.; Millett, J. C. F.

    2006-07-28

    Previous work by a number of authors has shown that the spall strength of the engineering alloy, Ti 6Al - 4V increases markedly with pulse duration. In this paper, we have reproduced those results in a low oxygen variant of the alloy, over a range of impact stresses. The microstructure consisted of a mixture of primary {alpha} grains in a matrix of transformed {beta}. Samples have also been shock loaded and recovered under conditions of one-dimensional strain, to compliment the results of the stress gauge experiments. In all the recovered samples, complete spallation occurred, but examination of damage at secondary sites showed that this occurred via nucleation and growth of pores. Ductile failure appears to be a mixture of void formation and coalescence within primary {alpha} grains and along primary {alpha} / transformed {beta} boundaries.

  14. Shock-induced consolidation and spallation of Cu nanopowders

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.; Han, W. Z.; Luo, S. N.; An, Q.; Goddard, W. A. III

    2012-01-01

    A useful synthesis technique, shock synthesis of bulk nanomaterials from nanopowders, is explored here with molecular dynamics simulations. We choose nanoporous Cu ({approx}11 nm in grain size and 6% porosity) as a representative system, and perform consolidation and spallation simulations. The spallation simulations characterize the consolidated nanopowders in terms of spall strength and damage mechanisms. The impactor is full density Cu, and the impact velocity (u{sub i}) ranges from 0.2 to 2 km s{sup -1}. We present detailed analysis of consolidation and spallation processes, including atomic-level structure and wave propagation features. The critical values of u{sub i} are identified for the onset plasticity at the contact points (0.2 km s{sup -1}) and complete void collapse (0.5 km s{sup -1}). Void collapse involves dislocations, lattice rotation, shearing/friction, heating, and microkinetic energy. Plasticity initiated at the contact points and its propagation play a key role in void collapse at low u{sub i}, while the pronounced, grain-wise deformation may contribute as well at high u{sub i}. The grain structure gives rise to nonplanar shock response at nanometer scales. Bulk nanomaterials from ultrafine nanopowders ({approx}10 nm) can be synthesized with shock waves. For spallation, grain boundary (GB) or GB triple junction damage prevails, while we also observe intragranular voids as a result of GB plasticity.

  15. Opportunities for Neutrino Physics at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Efremenko, Yuri; Hix, William Raphael

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss opportunities for a neutrino program at the Spallation Neutrons Source (SNS) being commissioning at ORNL. Possible investigations can include study of neutrino-nuclear cross sections in the energy rage important for supernova dynamics and neutrino nucleosynthesis, search for neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering, and various tests of the standard model of electro-weak interactions.

  16. The Spallation Neutron Source and the Neutrino Physics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Stancu, Ion

    2008-02-21

    In this paper we describe the recently-completed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), along with a proposed long-term neutrino physics program to study neutrino-nucleus cross-sections and neutrino oscillations.

  17. Neutrino Cross-Section Measurements at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stancu, Ion

    2008-02-21

    In this paper we discuss the proposal to build a neutrino facility at the recently-completed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This facility can host an extensive, long-term program to study neutrino-nucleus cross-sections in the range of interest for nuclear astrophysics and nuclear theory.

  18. Test and demonstration of a 1-MW wellhead generator: helical screw expander power plant, Model 76-1. Final report to the International Energy Agency

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-04

    A 1-MW geothermal wellhead power plant incorporating a Lysholm or helical screw expander (HSE) was field tested between 1980 and 1983 by Mexico, Italy, and New Zealand with technical assistance from the United States. The objectives were to provide data on the reliability and performance of the HSE and to assess the costs and benefits of its use. The range of conditions under which the HSE was tested included loads up to 933 kW, mass flowrates of 14,600 to 395, 000 lbs/hr, inlet pressures of 64 to 220 psia, inlet qualities of 0 to 100%, exhaust pressures of 3.1 to 40 psia, total dissolved solids up to 310,000 ppM, and noncondensible gases up to 38% of the vapor mass flow. Typical machine efficiencies of 40 to 50% were calculated. For most operations efficiency increased approximately logarithmically with shaft power, while inlet quality and rotor speed had only small effects. The HSE was designed with oversized internal clearances in the expectation that adherent scale would form during operation. Improvements in machine efficiency of 3.5 to 4 percentage points were observed over some test periods with some scale deposition. A comparison with a 1-MW back-pressure turbine showed that the HSE can compete favorably under certain conditions. The HSE was found to be a rugged energy conversion machine for geothermal applications, but some subsystems were found to require further development. 7 refs., 28 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Note: Emittance measurements of intense pulsed proton beam for different pulse length and repetition rate

    SciTech Connect

    Miracoli, R.; Gammino, S.; Celona, L.; Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Gobin, R.; Delferriere, O.; Adroit, G.; Senee, F.; Ciavola, G.

    2012-05-15

    The high intensity ion source (SILHI), in operation at CEA-Saclay, has been used to produce a 90 mA pulsed proton beam with pulse length and repetition rates suitable for the European Spallation Source (ESS) linac. Typical r-r{sup '} rms normalized emittance values smaller than 0.2{pi} mm mrad have been measured for operation in pulsed mode (0.01 < duty cycle < 0.15 and 1 ms < pulse duration < 10 ms) that are relevant for the design update of the Linac to be used at the ESS in Lund.

  20. RISE/FALL TIME ENHANCEMENT OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE LINAC LEBT CHOPPER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Peplov, Vladimir V; Saethre, Robert B

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Linac Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) chopper system provides fast chopping of the H- ion beam in the LEBT structure. Four identical pulsed power supplies (pulsers) create a series of 2.5 kV pulses to the four deflection electrodes floating on the focusing voltage of -50 kV. Each pulser is connected to the electrode through the network which consists of high voltage (HV) cables, a blocking capacitor, HV feed-through connectors, current-limiting resistors and transient voltage suppressors. Effective beam chopping requires minimal rise/fall time of the rectangular HV pulses on the load. In the present configuration these values are approximately 100 ns. Methods of reducing rise/fall time on the LEBT electrodes are discussed. Results of simulation and comparative measurements of the original and upgraded system on the test stand are presented. Furthermore, the effect of these changes on reliability degradation caused by arcing in the LEBT structure is discussed.

  1. Initial tests of the Spallation Neutron Source H{sup -} ion source with an external antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, R.F.; Stockli, M.P.; Murray, S.N.; Kang, Y.; Peters, J.

    2006-03-15

    The ion source for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a radio-frequency (rf) multicusp source designed to deliver H{sup -} beam pulses of 40 mA to the SNS accelerator with a normalized root-mean-square emittance of less than 0.2{pi} mm mrad, with a pulse length of 1 ms and a repetition rate of 60 Hz. In order to achieve this performance the source must operate with both high-pulse rf power, {approx}50 kW, and high average rf power, {approx}3.5 kW, over a continuous operational period of 3 weeks. During operation at these power levels the plasma-immersed, porcelain-coated rf antenna is susceptible to damage, limiting source lifetime. We are therefore developing an ion source where the plasma is separated from the Cu antenna by an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} discharge chamber. This article describes the ion source, presents initial beam extraction measurements, and details our ongoing effort to develop this concept into a suitable ion source for the SNS.

  2. Cavitation Damage Experiments for Mercury Spallation Targets At the LANSCE WNR in 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark W; Felde, David K

    2010-01-01

    Proton beam experiments investigating cavitation damage in short pulse mercury spallation targets were performed at LANSCE WNR in July of 2008. They included two main areas for investigation: damage dependence on mercury velocity using geometry more prototypic to the SNS target than previously employed and damage dependence on incident proton beam flux intensity. The flow dependence experiment employed six test targets with mercury velocity in the channel ranging from 0 to more than 4 m/s. Each was hit with 100 WNR beam pulses with peak proton flux equivalent to that of SNS operating at 2.7 MW. Damage dependence on incident proton beam flux intensity was also investigated with three intensity levels used on simple rectangular shaped targets without mercury flow. Intensity variation was imposed by focusing the beam differently while maintaining protons per pulse. This kept total energy deposited in each target constant. A fourth test target was hit with various beams: constant protons and varied spot size; constant spot size and varied protons. No damage will be assessed in this case. Instead, acoustic emissions associated with cavitation collapse were measured by laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) from readings of exterior vessel motions as well as by mercury wetted acoustic transducers. This paper will provide a description of the experiment and present available results. Damage assessment will require several months before surface analysis can be completed and was not available in time for IWSMT-9.

  3. R&D-needs and opportunities to broaden the data base on materials and technology for liquid metal spallation targets

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, G.S.

    1996-06-01

    Liquid metals have so far only been used to a very limited extent as spallation targets, notably at the ISOLDE-facility at CERN (Pb and La) to produce radioactive isotopes. Virtually no systematic studies have been carried out so far. The available data base is by no means sufficient to answer conclusively very important questions such as predicting reliably the service time of medium-to-high power target systems or determining precisely what technological measures are required and appropriate to maintain an optimum coolant quality, to mitigate the effects of pressure waves in short pulse sources and others. During the workshop several areas have been identified, where there exists an urgent need for improved knowledge and reliable data, and opportunities have been presented to acquire such knowledge and to generate such data. Opportunities to do such research and pertinent know-how, although scarce, are spread over institutions in several countries, and efforts to use these opportunities often require substantial resources both in man power and money. The workshop participants therefore unanimously supported the view that a coordinated and internationally concerted effort should be undertaken to make the best possible use of existing opportunities and available resources in order to develop the knowledge and technology necessary for the deployment and safe operation of target systems suitable for pulsed spallation neutron sources in the multi-megawatt range of beam power.

  4. A high power accelerator driver system for spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Jason, A.; Blind, B.; Channell, P.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). For several years, the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) and the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) have provided a successful driver for the nearly 100-kW Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) source. The authors have studied an upgrade to this system. The goal of this effort was to establish a credible design for the accelerator driver of a next-generation source providing 1-MW of beam power. They have explored a limited subset of the possible approaches to a driver and have considered only the low 1-MW beam power. The next-generation source must utilize the optimum technology and may require larger neutron intensities than they now envision.

  5. Spallation processes and nuclear interaction products of cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Silberberg, R; Tsao, C H

    1990-08-01

    Most cosmic-ray nuclei heavier than helium have suffered nuclear collisions in the interstellar gas, with transformation of nuclear composition. The isotopic and elemental composition at the sources has to be inferred from the observed composition near the Earth. The source composition permits tests of current ideas on sites of origin, nucleosynthesis in stars, evolution of stars, the mixing and composition of the interstellar medium and injection processes prior to acceleration. The effects of nuclear spallation, production of radioactive nuclides and the time dependence of their decay provide valuable information on the acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays, their nuclear transformations, and their confinement time in the Galaxy. The formation of spallation products that only decay by electron capture and are relatively long-lived permits an investigation of the nature and density fluctuations (like clouds) of the interstellar medium. Since nuclear collisions yield positrons, antiprotons, gamma rays and neutrinos, we shall discuss these topics briefly.

  6. Spallation processes and nuclear interaction products of cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silberberg, R.; Tsao, C. H.

    1990-01-01

    Most cosmic-ray nuclei heavier than helium have suffered nuclear collisions in the interstellar gas, with transformation of nuclear composition. The isotopic and elemental composition at the sources has to be inferred from the observed composition near the Earth. The source composition permits tests of current ideas on sites of origin, nucleosynthesis in stars, evolution of stars, the mixing and composition of the interstellar medium and injection processes prior to acceleration. The effects of nuclear spallation, production of radioactive nuclides and the time dependence of their decay provide valuable information on the acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays, their nuclear transformations, and their confinement time in the Galaxy. The formation of spallation products that only decay by electron capture and are relatively long-lived permits an investigation of the nature and density fluctuations (like clouds) of the interstellar medium. Since nuclear collisions yield positrons, antiprotons, gamma rays and neutrinos, we shall discuss these topics briefly.

  7. Current status of JAERI spallation target material program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, K.; Sasa, T.; Ishikura, S.; Mukugi, K.; Kai, T.; Ouchi, N.; Ioka, I.

    2001-07-01

    In the joint project of spallation neutron source between JAERI and KEK, material technology has been developed for the mercury target in the neutron source facility, the lead-bismuth target in the transmutation test facility, superconducting accelerator, post-irradiation examination and the ion beam test. Design of target system is progressing for the mercury spallation target: a pressure test of moderator, an impacting test in mercury and a corrosion test have been carried out. For nuclear transmutation with ADS an engineering facility is proposed. A material corrosion test loop is built-up and SS316 and F82H steels are to be tested in a flowing Pb-Bi. Fracture toughness of superconducting cavity material was found to be considerably large at 4 K. Irradiated samples at SINQ are to be transported to JAERI Hot Laboratory. For simulating radiation damage small disk specimens were irradiated in single, dual and triple ion beam modes.

  8. Fission of 232Th in a spallation neutron field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurevich, V. I.; Nikolaev, V. A.; Yakovlev, R. M.

    2016-03-01

    The spatial distributions of thorium fission reaction rate in a spallation neutron field of thick lead target bombarded by protons or deuterons with energy between 1.0 and 3.7 GeV were measured. Approximately a linear dependence of the thorium fission rate on the beam energy is observed. The mean fission cross section of 232Th <σ f > ≈ 123 mb and it does not depend on energy and type of the beam particles.

  9. Moisture-Induced Alumina Scale Spallation: The Hydrogen Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2010-01-01

    For some time the oxidation community has been concerned with interfacial spallation of protective alumina scales, not just upon immediate cool down, but as a time-delayed phenomenon. Moisture-induced delayed spallation (MIDS) and desktop spallation (DTS) of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) refer to this process. It is most apparent for relatively adherent alumina scales that have survived initial cool down in a dry environment, have built up considerable thickness and strain energy, and have been somewhat damaged, such as by cyclic oxidation cracking. Indeed, a "sensitive zone" can be described that maximizes the observed effect as a function of all the relevant factors. Moisture has been postulated to serve as a source of interfacial hydrogen embrittlement. Hydrogen is derived from reaction with aluminum in the alloy at an exposed interface. The purpose of this monograph is to trace the close analogy of this phenomenon to other hydrogen-induced effects, such as embrittlement of aluminides and blistering of alloys and anodic alumina films. A formalized, top-down, logic-tree structure is presented as a guide to this discussion. A theoretical basis for interfacial weakening by hydrogen is first cited, as are demonstrations of hydrogen detection as a reaction product or interfacial species. Further support is provided by critical experiments that recreate the moisture effect, but by isolating hydrogen from other potential causative factors. These experiments include tests in H 2-containing atmospheres or cathodic hydrogen charging. Accordingly, they strongly indicate that interfacial hydrogen, derived from moisture, is the key chemical species accounting for delayed alumina scale spallation.

  10. Moisture-Induced Alumina Scale Spallation: The Hydrogen Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2009-01-01

    For some time our community has been concerned with interfacial spallation of protective alumina scales, not just upon immediate cooldown, but as a time-delayed phenomenon. Moisture-induced delayed spallation (MIDS) and desktop spallation (DTS) of TBC's refer to this process. It is most apparent for relatively adherent alumina scales that have survived cool down in a dry environment, built up considerable thickness and strain energy, and have been somewhat damaged, such as by cyclic oxidation cracking. Indeed, a "sweet zone" can be defined that maximizes the observed effect as a function of all the relevant factors. Moisture has been postulated to serve as a source of interfacial hydrogen embrittlement derived from reaction with aluminum in the alloy at an exposed interface. The purpose of this monograph is to trace the close analogy of this phenomenon to other hydrogen effects, such as embrittlement of aluminides and blistering of alloys and anodic alumina films. A formalized, top-down, logic tree structure is presented as a guide to this discussion. A theoretical basis for interfacial weakening by hydrogen is first cited, as are demonstrations of hydrogen as a reaction product or detected interfacial species. Further support is provided by critical experiments that produce the same moisture effect, but by isolating hydrogen from other potential causative factors. These experiments include tests in H2-containing atmospheres or cathodic hydrogen charging.

  11. Energy deposition calculated by PHITS code in Pb spallation target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Quanzhi

    2016-01-01

    Energy deposition in a Pb spallation target irradiated by high energetic protons was calculated by PHITS2.52 code. The validation of the energy deposition and neutron production calculated by PHITS code was performed. Results show good agreements between the simulation results and the experimental data. Detailed comparison shows that for the total energy deposition, PHITS simulation result was about 15% overestimation than that of the experimental data. For the energy deposition along the length of the Pb target, the discrepancy mainly presented at the front part of the Pb target. Calculation indicates that most of the energy deposition comes from the ionizations of the primary protons and the produced secondary particles. With the event generator mode of PHITS, the deposit energy distribution for the particles and the light nulclei is presented for the first time. It indicates that the primary protons with energy more than 100 MeV are the most contributors to the total energy deposition. The energy depositions peaking at 10 MeV and 0.1 MeV, are mainly caused by the electrons, pions, d, t, 3He and also α particles during the cascade process and the evaporation process, respectively. The energy deposition density caused by different proton beam profiles are also calculated and compared. Such calculation and analyses are much helpful for better understanding the physical mechanism of energy deposition in the spallation target, and greatly useful for the thermal hydraulic design of the spallation target.

  12. GEM-based thermal neutron beam monitors for spallation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croci, G.; Claps, G.; Caniello, R.; Cazzaniga, C.; Grosso, G.; Murtas, F.; Tardocchi, M.; Vassallo, E.; Gorini, G.; Horstmann, C.; Kampmann, R.; Nowak, G.; Stoermer, M.

    2013-12-01

    The development of new large area and high flux thermal neutron detectors for future neutron spallation sources, like the European Spallation Source (ESS) is motivated by the problem of 3He shortage. In the framework of the development of ESS, GEM (Gas Electron Multiplier) is one of the detector technologies that are being explored as thermal neutron sensors. A first prototype of GEM-based thermal neutron beam monitor (bGEM) has been built during 2012. The bGEM is a triple GEM gaseous detector equipped with an aluminum cathode coated by 1 μm thick B4C layer used to convert thermal neutrons to charged particles through the 10B(n,7Li)α nuclear reaction. This paper describes the results obtained by testing a bGEM detector at the ISIS spallation source on the VESUVIO beamline. Beam profiles (FWHMx=31 mm and FWHMy=36 mm), bGEM thermal neutron counting efficiency (≈1%), detector stability (3.45%) and the time-of-flight spectrum of the beam were successfully measured. This prototype represents the first step towards the development of thermal neutrons detectors with efficiency larger than 50% as alternatives to 3He-based gaseous detectors.

  13. Astrophysical Li-7 as a product of big bang nucleosynthesis and galactic cosmic-ray spallation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olive, Keith A.; Schramm, David N.

    1992-01-01

    The astrophysical Li-7 abundance is considered to be largely primordial, while the Be and B abundances are thought to be due to galactic cosmic ray (GCR) spallation reactions on top of a much smaller big bang component. But GCR spallation should also produce Li-7. As a consistency check on the combination of big bang nucleosynthesis and GCR spallation, the Be and B data from a sample of hot population II stars is used to subtract from the measured Li-7 abundance an estimate of the amount generated by GCR spallation for each star in the sample, and then to add to this baseline an estimate of the metallicity-dependent augmentation of Li-7 due to spallation. The singly reduced primordial Li-7 abundance is still consistent with big bang nucleosynthesis, and a single GCR spallation model can fit the Be, B, and corrected Li-7 abundances for all the stars in the sample.

  14. Mercury target R&D for the Oak Ridge spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, J.R.; DiStefano, J.; Farrell, K.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1996-06-01

    The conceptual design for the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (ORSNS) incorporates liquid mercury as its reference target material. A flowing liquid target was selected mainly because of the increased power handling capability possible with the convective transport process. The major reasons for choosing mercury as the liquid target material are because it: (1) is a liquid at room temperature, (2) has good heat transport properties, and (3) has a high atomic number and mass density resulting in high neutron yield and source brightness. Since liquid targets are not widely utilized in presently operating accelerator targets and because of the challenges posed by the intense, pulsed thermal energy deposition ({approximately}20-100 kJ deposited during each 1-10 {mu}s pulse), considerable R&D is planned for the mercury target concept. The key feasibility issue that will be addressed in early R&D efforts are the effects of the thermal shock environment, which will include development and testing of approaches to mitigate these effects. Materials compatiblity and ES&H issues associated with the use of liquid mercury are also of major importance in early R&D efforts. A brief description of the mercury target design concept, results of initial evaluations of its performance characteristics, identification of its critical issues, and an outline of the R&D program aimed at addressing these issues will be presented.

  15. Design, status and first operations of the spallation neutron source polyphase resonant converter modulator system

    SciTech Connect

    Reass, W. A.; Apgar, S. E.; Baca, D. M.; Doss, James D.; Gonzales, J.; Gribble, R. F.; Hardek, T. W.; Lynch, M. T.; Rees, D. E.; Tallerico, P. J.; Trujillo, P. B.; Anderson, D. E.; Heidenreich, D. A.; Hicks, J. D.; Leontiev, V. N.

    2003-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a new 1.4 MW average power beam, 1 GeV accelerator being built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The accelerator requires 15 converter-modulator stations each providing between 9 and 11 MW pulses with up to a 1 .I MW average power. The converter-modulator can be described as a resonant 20 kHz polyphase boost inverter. Each converter modulator derives its buss voltage from a standard substation cast-core transformer. Each substation is followed by an SCR pre-regulator to accommodate voltage changes from no load to full load, in addition to providing a soft-start function. Energy storage is provided by self-clearing metallized hazy polypropylene traction capacitors. These capacitors do not fail short, but clear any internal anomaly. Three 'H-Bridge' IGBT transistor networks are used to generate the polyphase 20 kHz transformer primary drive waveforms. The 20 kHz drive waveforms are time-gated to generate the desired klystron pulse width. Pulse width modulation of the individual 20 lcHz pulses is utilized to provide regulated output waveforms with DSP based adaptive feedforward and feedback techniques. The boost transformer design utilizes nanocrystalline alloy that provides low core loss at design flux levels and switching frequencies. Capacitors are used on the transformer secondary networks to resonate the leakage inductance. The transformers are wound for a specific leakage inductance, not turns ratio. This design technique generates multiple secondary volts per turn as compared to the primary. With the appropriate tuning conditions, switching losses are minimized. The resonant topology has the added benefit of being deQed in a klystron fault condition, with little energy deposited in the arc. This obviates the need of crowbars or other related networks. A review of these design parameters, operational performance, production status, and OWL installation and performance to date will be presented.

  16. Pulsed-neutron techniques for condensed-matter research

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.S.; Carpenter, J.M.; Jorgensen, J.D.; Price, D.L.; Kamitakahara, W.

    1981-01-01

    Pulsed spallation sources are reviewed in a historical content as the latest generation of neutron sources in a line that started with the discovery of the neutron in 1932 and proceeded through research-reactor and accelerator-driven sources. The characteristics of the spallation sources are discussed in relation to their capabilities for structural and dynamical studies of condensed matter with slow neutrons and radiation effects research with fast neutrons. The new scientific opportunities opened up in these fields by the unique features of the sources are briefly reviewed, with some examples of completed work and experiments being planned.

  17. Design, construction, system integration, and test results of the 1 MW CW RF system for the e-gun cavity in the energy recovery LINAC at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lenci,S.J.; Eisen, E. L.; Dickey, D. L.; Sainz, J. E.; Utay, P. F.; Zaltsman, A.; Lambiase, R.

    2009-05-04

    Brookhaven's ERL (Energy Recovery LINAC) requires a 1 MW CW RF system for the superconducting electron gun cavity. The system consists primarily of a klystron tube, transmitter, and High-Voltage Power Supply (HVPS). The 703.75 MHz klystron made by CPl, Inc. provides RF power of 1MW CW with efficiency of 65%. It has a single output window, diode-type electron gun, and collector capable of dissipating the entire beam power. It was fully factory tested including 24-hour heat run at 1.1 MW CWo The solid state HVPS designed by Continental Electronics provides up to 100 kV at low ripple and 2.1 MW CW with over 95% efficiency. With minimal stored energy and a fast shut-down mode no crowbar circuit is needed. Continental 's transmitter includes PLC based user interface and monitoring, RF pre-amplifier, magnet and Vac-Ion pump supplies, cooling water instrumentation, and integral safety interlock system. BNL installed the klystron, HVPS, and transmitter along with other items, such as circulator, water load, and waveguide components. The collaboration of BNL, CPI, and Continental in the design, installation, and testing was essential to the successful operation of the 1MW system.

  18. LOW LOSS DESIGN OF THE LINAC AND ACCUMULATOR RING FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    RAPARIA,D.

    2003-02-03

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a second generation pulsed neutron source and is presently in the fourth year of a seven-year construction cycle at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A collaboration of six national laboratories (ANL, BNL, LANL, LBNL, ORNL, TJNAF) is responsible for the design and construction of the various subsystems. The operation of the facility will begin in 2006 and deliver a 1.0 GeV, 1.4 MW proton beam with pulse length of 650 nanosecond at a repetition rate of 60 Hz, on a liquid mercury target. It consists of an RF volume H{sup -} source of 50 mA peak current at 6% duty; an all electrostatic Low-Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) which also serves as a first stage beam chopper with {+-} 25 ns rise/fall time; a 402.5 MHz, 4-vane Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) for acceleration up to 2.5 MeV; a Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) housing a second stage chopper (<{+-} 10ns rise/fall), an adjustable beam halo scraper, and diagnostics devices; a 6-tank Drift Tube Linac (DTL) with permanent magnet quadrupoles up to 87 MeV; an 805 MHz, 4-module, Side Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL) up to 186 MeV; an 805 MHz, superconducting RF (SRF) linac with eleven medium beta ({beta} = 0.61) cryo-modules and twelve high beta ({beta} = 0.81) cryo-modules accelerating the beam to the full energy; a High Energy Beam transport (HEBT) for diagnostics, transverse and longitudinal collimation, energy correction, painting and matching; an accumulator ring compressing the 1 GeV, 1 ms pulse to 650 ns for delivery onto the target through a Ring to Target Beam Transport (RTBT) with transverse collimators.

  19. Conceptual design of the time-of-flight backscattering spectrometer MIRACLES, at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsapatsaris, N.; Lechner, R. E.; Markó, M.; Bordallo, H. N.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we present the conceptual design of the backscattering time-of-flight spectrometer MIRACLES approved for construction at the long-pulse European Spallation Source (ESS). MIRACLES's unparalleled combination of variable resolution, high flux, extended energy, and momentum transfer (0.2-6 Å-1) ranges will open new avenues for neutron backscattering spectroscopy. Its remarkable flexibility can be attributed to 3 key elements: the long-pulse time structure and low repetition rate of the ESS neutron source, the chopper cascade that tailors the moderator pulse in the primary part of the spectrometer, and the bent Si(111) analyzer crystals arranged in a near-backscattering geometry in the secondary part of the spectrometer. Analytical calculations combined with instrument Monte-Carlo simulations show that the instrument will provide a variable elastic energy resolution, δ(ħ ω), between 2 and 32 μeV, when using a wavelength of λ ≈ 6.267 Å (Si(111)-reflection), with an energy transfer range, ħ ω, centered at the elastic line from -600 to +600 μeV. In addition, when selecting λ ≈ 2.08 Å (i.e., the Si(333)-reflection), δ(ħ ω) can be relaxed to 300 μeV and ħ ω from about 10 meV in energy gain to ca -40 meV in energy loss. Finally, the dynamic wavelength range of MIRACLES, approximately 1.8 Å, can be shifted within the interval of 2-20 Å to allow the measurement of low-energy inelastic excitations.

  20. Conceptual design of the time-of-flight backscattering spectrometer, MIRACLES, at the European Spallation Source.

    PubMed

    Tsapatsaris, N; Lechner, R E; Markó, M; Bordallo, H N

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we present the conceptual design of the backscattering time-of-flight spectrometer MIRACLES approved for construction at the long-pulse European Spallation Source (ESS). MIRACLES's unparalleled combination of variable resolution, high flux, extended energy, and momentum transfer (0.2-6 Å(-1)) ranges will open new avenues for neutron backscattering spectroscopy. Its remarkable flexibility can be attributed to 3 key elements: the long-pulse time structure and low repetition rate of the ESS neutron source, the chopper cascade that tailors the moderator pulse in the primary part of the spectrometer, and the bent Si(111) analyzer crystals arranged in a near-backscattering geometry in the secondary part of the spectrometer. Analytical calculations combined with instrument Monte-Carlo simulations show that the instrument will provide a variable elastic energy resolution, δ(ħ ω), between 2 and 32 μeV, when using a wavelength of λ ≈ 6.267 Å (Si(111)-reflection), with an energy transfer range, ħ ω, centered at the elastic line from -600 to +600 μeV. In addition, when selecting λ ≈ 2.08 Å (i.e., the Si(333)-reflection), δ(ħ ω) can be relaxed to 300 μeV and ħ ω from about 10 meV in energy gain to ca -40 meV in energy loss. Finally, the dynamic wavelength range of MIRACLES, approximately 1.8 Å, can be shifted within the interval of 2-20 Å to allow the measurement of low-energy inelastic excitations.

  1. Conceptual design of the time-of-flight backscattering spectrometer, MIRACLES, at the European Spallation Source.

    PubMed

    Tsapatsaris, N; Lechner, R E; Markó, M; Bordallo, H N

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we present the conceptual design of the backscattering time-of-flight spectrometer MIRACLES approved for construction at the long-pulse European Spallation Source (ESS). MIRACLES's unparalleled combination of variable resolution, high flux, extended energy, and momentum transfer (0.2-6 Å(-1)) ranges will open new avenues for neutron backscattering spectroscopy. Its remarkable flexibility can be attributed to 3 key elements: the long-pulse time structure and low repetition rate of the ESS neutron source, the chopper cascade that tailors the moderator pulse in the primary part of the spectrometer, and the bent Si(111) analyzer crystals arranged in a near-backscattering geometry in the secondary part of the spectrometer. Analytical calculations combined with instrument Monte-Carlo simulations show that the instrument will provide a variable elastic energy resolution, δ(ħ ω), between 2 and 32 μeV, when using a wavelength of λ ≈ 6.267 Å (Si(111)-reflection), with an energy transfer range, ħ ω, centered at the elastic line from -600 to +600 μeV. In addition, when selecting λ ≈ 2.08 Å (i.e., the Si(333)-reflection), δ(ħ ω) can be relaxed to 300 μeV and ħ ω from about 10 meV in energy gain to ca -40 meV in energy loss. Finally, the dynamic wavelength range of MIRACLES, approximately 1.8 Å, can be shifted within the interval of 2-20 Å to allow the measurement of low-energy inelastic excitations. PMID:27587171

  2. Moisture-Induced TBC Spallation on Turbine Blade Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James

    2011-01-01

    Delayed failure of TBCs is a widely observed laboratory phenomenon, although many of the early observations went unreported. The weekend effect or DeskTop Spallation (DTS) is characterized by initial survival of a TBC after accelerated laboratory thermal cycling, then failure by exposure to ambient humidity or water. Once initiated, failure can occur quite dramatically in less than a second. To this end, the water drop test and digital video recordings have become useful techniques in studies at NASA (Smialek, Zhu, Cuy), DECHMA (Rudolphi, Renusch, Schuetze), and CNRS Toulouse/SNECMA (Deneux, Cadoret, Hervier, Monceau). In the present study the results for a commercial turbine blade, with a standard EB-PVD 7YSZ TBC top coat and Pt-aluminide diffusion bond coat are reported. Cut sections were intermittently oxidized at 1100, 1150, and 1200 C and monitored by weight change and visual appearance. Failures were distributed widely over a 5-100 hr time range, depending on temperature. At some opportune times, failure was captured by video recording, documenting the appearance and speed of the moisture-induced spallation process. Failure interfaces exhibited alumina scale grains, decorated with Ta-rich oxide particles, and alumina inclusions as islands and streamers. The phenomenon is thus rooted in moisture-induced delayed spallation (MIDS) of the alumina scale formed on the bond coat. In that regard, many studies show the susceptibility of alumina scales to moisture, as long as high strain energy and a partially exposed interface exist. The latter conditions result from severe cyclic oxidation conditions, which produce a highly stressed and partially damaged scale. In one model, it has been proposed that moisture reacts with aluminum in the bond coat to release hydrogen atoms that embrittle the interface. A negative synergistic effect with interfacial sulfur is also invoked.

  3. Moisture-Induced TBC Spallation on Turbine Blade Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Delayed failure of TBCs is a widely observed laboratory phenomenon, although many of the early observations went unreported. "The weekend effect" or "DeskTop Spallation" (DTS) is characterized by initial survival of a TBC after accelerated laboratory thermal cycling, then failure by exposure to ambient humidity or water. Once initiated, failure can occur quite dramatically in less than a second. To this end, the water drop test and digital video recordings have become useful techniques in studies at NASA (Smialek, Zhu, Cuy), DECHMA (Rudolphi, Renusch, Schuetze), and CNRS Toulouse/SNECMA (Deneux, Cadoret, Hervier, Monceau). In the present study the results for a commercial turbine blade, with a standard EB-PVD 7YSZ TBC top coat and Pt-aluminide diffusion bond monitored by weight change and visual appearance. Failures were distributed widely over a 5-100 hr time range, depending on temperature. At some opportune times, failure was captured by video recording, documenting the appearance and speed of the moisture-induced spallation process. Failure interfaces exhibited alumina scale grains, decorated with Ta-rich oxide particles, and alumina inclusions as islands and streamers. The phenomenon is thus rooted in moisture-induced delayed spallation (MIDS) of the alumina scale formed on the bond coat. In that regard, many studies show the susceptibility of alumina scales to moisture, as long as high strain energy and a partially exposed interface exist. The latter conditions result from severe cyclic oxidation conditions, which produce a highly stressed and partially damaged scale. In one model, it has been proposed that moisture reacts with aluminum in the bond coat to release hydrogen atoms that 'embrittle' the interface. A negative synergistic effect with interfacial sulfur is also invoked.

  4. Structural-Response Analysis, Fatigue-Life Prediction, and Material Selection for 1 MW Horizontal-Axis Wind-Turbine Blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Arakere, G.; Subramanian, E.; Sellappan, V.; Vallejo, A.; Ozen, M.

    2010-08-01

    The problem of mechanical design, performance prediction (e.g., flap-wise/ edge-wise bending stiffness, fatigue-controlled life, the extent of bending-to-torsion coupling), and material selection for a prototypical 1 MW horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) blade is investigated using various computer-aided engineering tools. For example, a computer program was developed which can automatically generate both a geometrical model and a full finite-element input deck for a given single HAWT-blade with a given airfoil shape, size, and the type and position of the interior load-bearing longitudinal beam/shear-webs. In addition, composite-material laminate lay-up can be specified and varied in order to obtain a best combination of the blade aerodynamic efficiency and longevity. A simple procedure for HAWT-blade material selection is also developed which attempts to identify the optimal material candidates for a given set of functional requirements, longevity and low weight.

  5. Beginnings of remote handling at the RAL Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Liska, D.J.; Hirst, J.

    1985-01-01

    Expenditure of funds and resources for remote maintenance systems traditionally are delayed until late in an accelerator's development. However, simple remote-surveillance equipment can be included early in facility planning to set the stage for future remote-handling needs and to identify appropriate personnel. Some basic equipment developed in the UK at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) that serves this function and that has been used to monitor beam loss during commissioning is described. A photograph of this equipment, positioned over the extractor septum magnet, is shown. This method can serve as a pattern approach to the problem of initiating remote-handling activities in other facilities.

  6. Study of accelerator neutrino detection at a spallation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ming-Yang

    2016-06-01

    We study the detection of accelerator neutrinos produced at the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS). Using the code FLUKA, we have simulated the production of neutrinos in a proton beam on a tungsten target and obtained the yield efficiency, numerical flux, and average energy of different flavors of neutrinos. Furthermore, detection of these accelerator neutrinos is investigated in two reaction channels: neutrino-electron reactions and neutrino-carbon reactions. The expected numbers of different flavors of neutrinos have also been calculated. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205185, 11175020)

  7. Multiple-Scale Geomechanical Models for Thermal Spallation Drilling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomov, I.; Walsh, S. D.; Roberts, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    Widespread adoption of geothermal energy will require access to deeply buried geothermal sources in granitic basement rocks at high temperatures and pressures. Exploiting these resources necessitates novel methods for drilling, stimulation, and maintenance, under operating conditions difficult or impossible to test in laboratory settings. Physically rigorous numerical modeling tools are vital to highlight potential risks, guide process optimization and reduce the uncertainties involved in these developing technologies. In this presentation, we discuss a numerical modeling effort investigating the multiscale mechanics of thermal spallation drilling (TSD) - a technique in which rock is fragmented into small flakes by a high temperature fluid jet. This process encompasses interconnected phenomena on several length and time scales: from system-scale fluid dynamics to grain-scale thermomechanics of spallation. Here we describe how these disperate scales are simulated using GEODYN, a parallel Eulerian compressible solid and fluid dynamics code with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) capabilities. GEODYN is able to simulate materials under extremely large deformations, resolve details of wave propagation within grains, and uses a continuum damage mechanics approach to represent fracture. We will present results from both system- and grain-scale simulations describing the transfer of heat from the high temperature jet to the rock face, and the effect of grain-scale properties such as incipient flaw distribution, grain size and grain size distribution, heat flux, applied temperature and material heterogeneity on the onset of spallation. Detailed computer modeling helps to address several of the uncertainties surrounding TSD: 1) What rock compositions are drillable with TSD? 2) How do grain size and grain size distribution affect TSD and drilling rates? 3) What combination of macroscopic (Poisson ratio, heat capacity and thermal conductivity) and microscopic (flaw distribution

  8. Workshop: Research and development plans for high power spallation neutron testing at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-05

    This report consists of vugraphs from presentations at the meeting. The papers covered the following topics: (1) APS as a proton source; (2) target status for NSNS (National Spallation Neutron Source); (3) spallation neutron source in Japan; (4) liquid LiBi flow loop; and (5) research and development plans for high power tests at the AGS.

  9. ASPUN: design for an Argonne super-intense pulsed neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Khoe, T.K.; Kustom, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Argonne pioneered the pulsed spallation neutron source with the ZING-P and IPNS-I concepts. IPNS-I is now a reliable and actively used source for pulsed spallation neutrons. The accelerator is a 500-MeV, 8 to 9 ..mu..a, 30-Hz rapid-cycling proton synchrotron. Other proton spallation sources are now in operation or in construction. These include KENS-I at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics in Japan, the WNR/PSR at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the USA, and the SNS at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in England. Newer and bolder concepts are being developed for more-intense pulsed spallation neutron sources. These include SNQ at the KFA Laboratory in Juelich, Germany, ASTOR at the Swiss Institute for Nuclear Physics in Switzerland, and ASPUN, the Argonne concept. ASPUN is based on the Fixed-Field Alternating Gradient concept. The design goal is to provide a time-averaged beam of 3.5 ma at 1100 MeV on a spallation target in intense bursts, 100 to 200 nanoseconds long, at a repetition rate of no more than 60 to 85 Hz.

  10. Ion-source and LEBT issues with the front-end systems for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, R.; Cheng, D.; DiGennaro, R.; Gough, R.A.; Greer, J.; Leung, K.N.; Ratti, A.; Reijonen, J.; Thomae, R.W.; Schenkel, T.; Staples, J.W.; Yourd, R.; Aleksandrov, A.; Stockli, M.P.; Welton, R.W.

    2001-09-01

    The Front-End Systems (FES) of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project are being built by Berkeley Lab and will deliver a pulsed 40-mA H{sup -} ion beam at 2.5 MeV energy to the subsequent Drift-Tube Linac. The FES accelerator components comprise an rf driven, volume-production, cesium-enhanced, multi-cusp Ion Source; an electrostatic Low-Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) that includes provisions for transverse focusing, steering, and beam chopping; an RFQ accelerator; and a Medium-Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) line. The challenges for Ion Source and LEBT design are the generation of a plasma suitable for creating the required high H{sup -} ion density, lifetime of the rf antenna at 6% duty factor, removal of the parasitic electron population from the extracted negative ions, and emittance conservation. The paper discusses these issues in detail and highlights key experimental results obtained so far.

  11. Unified description of fission in fusion and spallation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mancusi, Davide; Charity, Robert J.; Cugnon, Joseph

    2010-10-15

    We present a statistical-model description of fission, in the framework of compound-nucleus decay, which is found to simultaneously reproduce data from both heavy-ion-induced fusion reactions and proton-induced spallation reactions at around 1 GeV. For the spallation reactions, the initial compound-nucleus population is predicted by the Liege intranuclear cascade model. We are able to reproduce experimental fission probabilities and fission-fragment mass distributions in both reactions types with the same parameter sets. However, no unique parameter set was obtained for the fission probability. The introduction of fission transients can be offset by an increase of the ratio of level-density parameters for the saddle-point and ground-state configurations. Changes to the finite-range fission barriers could be offset by a scaling of the Bohr-Wheeler decay width as predicted by Kramers. The parameter sets presented allow accurate prediction of fission probabilities for excitation energies up to 300 MeV and spins up to 60 ({h_bar}/2{pi}).

  12. Generic guide concepts for the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zendler, C.; Martin Rodriguez, D.; Bentley, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    The construction of the European Spallation Source (ESS) faces many challenges from the neutron beam transport point of view: the spallation source is specified as being driven by a 5 MW beam of protons, each with 2 GeV energy, and yet the requirements in instrument background suppression relative to measured signal vary between 10-6 and 10-8. The energetic particles, particularly above 20 MeV, which are expected to be produced in abundance in the target, have to be filtered in order to make the beamlines safe, operational and provide good quality measurements with low background. We present generic neutron guides of short and medium length instruments which are optimised for good performance at minimal cost. Direct line of sight to the source is avoided twice, with either the first point out of line of sight or both being inside the bunker (20 m) to minimise shielding costs. These guide geometries are regarded as a baseline to define standards for instruments to be constructed at ESS. They are used to find commonalities and develop principles and solutions for common problems. Lastly, we report the impact of employing the over-illumination concept to mitigate losses from random misalignment passively, and that over-illumination should be used sparingly in key locations to be effective. For more widespread alignment issues, a more direct, active approach is likely to be needed.

  13. The continued development of the Spallation Neutron Source external antenna H{sup -} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, R. F.; Carmichael, J.; Fuga, R.; Goulding, R. H.; Han, B.; Kang, Y.; Lee, S. W.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T.; Potter, K. G.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.; Desai, N. J.

    2010-02-15

    The U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based, pulsed neutron-scattering facility, currently in the process of ramping up neutron production. In order to ensure that the SNS will meet its operational commitments as well as provide for future facility upgrades with high reliability, we are developing a rf-driven, H{sup -} ion source based on a water-cooled, ceramic aluminum nitride (AlN) plasma chamber. To date, early versions of this source have delivered up to 42 mA to the SNS front end and unanalyzed beam currents up to {approx}100 mA (60 Hz, 1 ms) to the ion source test stand. This source was operated on the SNS accelerator from February to April 2009 and produced {approx}35 mA (beam current required by the ramp up plan) with availability of {approx}97%. During this run several ion source failures identified reliability issues, which must be addressed before the source re-enters production: plasma ignition, antenna lifetime, magnet cooling, and cooling jacket integrity. This report discusses these issues, details proposed engineering solutions, and notes progress to date.

  14. Spallation occurrence from polyamide materials irradiated by thermal plasma with water absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Yasunori; Nakagawa, T.; Shinsei, N.; Uesugi, Y.; Ishijima, T.

    2016-09-01

    This paper first describes the effect of water absorption in polyamide material irradiated by thermal plasmas on the occurrence of spallation phenomena. The interaction between polyamide materials and arc plasmas occurs particularly in the low voltage circuit breaker and aerospace fields. Spallation phenomena are those in which polymer particles are ejected from polymer bulk materials irradiated by high heat flux. To confirm the effect of water absorption into the polyamide material on spallation phenomena, polyamide specimens with and without water absorption were irradiated by Ar inductively coupled thermal plasma. The results show that the polyamide specimen with water absorption ejected spallation particles, whereas the polyamide specimen without water absorption were only slightly ejected, indicating that water absorption promotes the occurrence of spallation. The cooling effects of the spallation polyamide 66 (PA66) particles ablation were also estimated in hot air to assess the arc quenching ability from the spallation particle inclusion. This estimation showed that 10 and more PA66 particles inclusion might decrease the air temperature by 3000 K effectively, which can be useful to enhance arc quenching in circuit breakers working in air.

  15. Radiological Hazard of Spallation Products in Accelerator-Driven System

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, M.; Stankovskii, A.; Artisyuk, V.; Korovin, Yu.; Shmelev, A.; Titarenko, Yu.

    2002-09-15

    The central issue underlying this paper is related to elucidating the hazard of radioactive spallation products that might be an important factor affecting the design option of accelerator-driven systems (ADSs). Hazard analysis based on the concept of Annual Limit on Intake identifies alpha-emitting isotopes of rare earths (REs) (dysprosium, gadolinium, and samarium) as the dominant contributors to the overall toxicity of traditional (W, Pb, Pb-Bi) targets. The matter is addressed from several points of view: code validation to simulate their yields, choice of material for the neutron producing targets, and challenging the beam type. The paper quantitatively determines the domain in which the toxicity of REs exceeds that of polonium activation products broadly discussed now in connection with advertising lead-bismuth technology for the needs of ADSs.

  16. Probing neutrino magnetic moments at the Spallation Neutron Source facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmas, T. S.; Miranda, O. G.; Papoulias, D. K.; Tórtola, M.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2015-07-01

    Majorana neutrino electromagnetic properties are studied through neutral current coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering. We focus on the potential of the recently planned COHERENT experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source to probe muon-neutrino magnetic moments. The resulting sensitivities are determined on the basis of a χ2 analysis employing realistic nuclear structure calculations in the context of the quasiparticle random phase approximation. We find that they can improve existing limits by half an order of magnitude. In addition, we show that these facilities allow for standard model precision tests in the low energy regime, with a competitive determination of the weak mixing angle. Finally, they also offer the capability to probe other electromagnetic neutrino properties, such as the neutrino charge radius. We illustrate our results for various choices of experimental setup and target material.

  17. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE HIGH-POWER PROTECTION MODULE TEST STAND

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung-Woo; Ball, Jeffrey Allen; Crofford, Mark T; Davidson Jr, Taylor L; Jones, Stacey L; Hardek, Thomas W

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) High-Power Protection Module (HPM) provides interlocks and fast shutdown for the radio frequency (RF) system to protect the accelerating structures and high power RF (HPRF) Distribution System. The HPM has required some functional upgrades since the start of beam operations and an upgrade to the HPM test stand was required to support these added features. The HPM test stand currently verifies functionality, RF channel calibration, and measurement of the speed of shutdown to ensure the specifications are met. The upgraded test stand was implemented in a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) to allow for future growth and flexibility. Work is currently progressing on automation of the test stand to better perform the required module calibration schedule.

  18. COMMISSIONING OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE ACCELERATOR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator complex consists of a 2.5 MeV H- front-end injector system, a 186 MeV normal-conducting linear accelerator, a 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, an accumulator ring, and associated beam transport lines. The linac was commissioned in five discrete runs, starting in 2002 and completed in 2005. The accumulator ring and associated beam transport lines were commissioned in two runs from January to April 2006. With the completed commissioning of the SNS accelerator, the facility has begun initial low-power operations. In the course of beam commissioning, most beam performance parameters and beam intensity goals have been achieved at low duty factor. A number of beam dynamics measurements have been performed, including emittance evolution, transverse coupling in the ring, beam instability thresholds, and beam distributions on the target. The commissioning results, achieved beam performance and initial operating experience of the SNS will be discussed

  19. Electron Cloud Mitigation in the Spallation Neutron Source Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Brodowski, J.; Cameron, P.; Davino, Daniele; Fedotov, A.; He, P.; Hseuh, H.; Lee, Y.Y.; Ludewig, H.; Meng, W.; Raparia, D.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zhang, S.Y.; Catalan-Lasheras, N.; Macek, R.J.; Furman, Miguel A.; Aleksandrov, A.; Cousineau, S.; Danilov, V.; Henderson, S.; /Brookhaven /CERN /LANL, Ctr. for Nonlinear Studies /LBL, Berkeley /Oak Ridge /SLAC

    2008-03-17

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring is designed to accumulate, via H{sup -} injection, protons of 2 MW beam power at 1 GeV kinetic energy at a repetition rate of 60 Hz [1]. At such beam intensity, electron-cloud is expected to be one of the intensity-limiting mechanisms that complicate ring operations. This paper summarizes mitigation strategy adopted in the design, both in suppressing electron-cloud formation and in enhancing Landau damping, including tapered magnetic field and monitoring system for the collection of stripped electrons at injection, TiN coated beam chamber for suppression of the secondary yield, clearing electrodes dedicated for the injection region and parasitic on BPMs around the ring, solenoid windings in the collimation region, and planning of vacuum systems for beam scrubbing upon operation.

  20. Spallation Target Design for Accelerator-Driven Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohar, Yousry

    2010-06-01

    A design methodology for the lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) spallation target has been developed and applied. This methodology includes the target interface with the subcritical assembly and the different engineering aspects of the target design, physics, heat-transfer, hydraulics, structural, radiological, and safety analyses. Several design constrains were defined and utilized for the target design process to satisfy different engineering requirements and to minimize the time and the cost of the design development. Target interface requirements with the subcritical assembly were defined based on performance parameters and material damage issues to enhance the lifetime of the target structure. Different structural materials were considered to define the most promising candidate based on the current database including radiation effects.

  1. Electron-cloud mitigation in the spallation neutron source ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brodowski, J.; Cameron, P.; Davino, D.; Fedotov, A.; He, P.; Hseuh, H.; Lee, Y.Y.; Meng, W.; Raparia, D.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zhang, S.Y.; Danilov, V.; Henderson, S.; Furman, M.; Pivi, M.; Macek, R.

    2003-05-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring is designed to accumulate, via H- injection, protons of 2 MW beam power at 1 GeV kinetic energy at a repetition rate of 60 Hz [1]. At such beam intensity, electron cloud is expected to be one of the intensity-limiting mechanisms that complicate ring operations. This paper summarizes mitigation strategy adopted in the design, both in suppressing electron-cloud formation and in enhancing Landau damping, including tapered magnetic field and monitoring system for the collection of stripped electrons at injection, TiN coated beam chamber for suppression of the secondary yield, clearing electrodes dedicated for the injection region and parasitic on BPMs around the ring, solenoid windings in the collimation region, and planning of vacuum systems for beam scrubbing upon operation.

  2. Preliminary Numerical and Experimental Analysis of the Spallation Phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Alexandre; Bailey, Sean C. C.; Panerai, Francesco; Davuluri, Raghava S. C.; Vazsonyi, Alexander R.; Zhang, Huaibao; Lippay, Zachary S.; Mansour, Nagi N.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Bathel, Brett F.; Splinter, Scott C.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    The spallation phenomenon was studied through numerical analysis using a coupled Lagrangian particle tracking code and a hypersonic aerothermodynamics computational fluid dynamics solver. The results show that carbon emission from spalled particles results in a significant modification of the gas composition of the post shock layer. Preliminary results from a test-campaign at the NASA Langley HYMETS facility are presented. Using an automated image processing of high-speed images, two-dimensional velocity vectors of the spalled particles were calculated. In a 30 second test at 100 W/cm2 of cold-wall heat-flux, more than 1300 particles were detected, with an average velocity of 102 m/s, and most frequent observed velocity of 60 m/s.

  3. A multitask neutron beam line for spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietropaolo, A.; Festa, G.; Grazzi, F.; Barzagli, E.; Scherillo, A.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Civita, F.

    2011-08-01

    Here we present a new concept for a time-of-flight neutron scattering instrument allowing for simultaneous application of three different techniques: time-of-flight neutron diffraction, neutron resonance capture analysis and Bragg edge transmission analysis. The instrument can provide average resolution neutron radiography too. The potential of the proposed concept was explored by implementing the necessary equipment on INES (Italian Neutron Experimental Station) at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). The results obtained show the effectiveness of the proposed instrument to acquire relevant quantitative information in a non-invasive way on a historical metallurgical sample, namely a Japanese hand guard (tsuba). The aforementioned neutron techniques simultaneously exploited the extended neutron energy range available from 10 meV to 1 keV. This allowed a fully satisfactory characterization of the sample in terms of metal components and their combination in different phases, and forging and assembling methods.

  4. THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE CRYOMODULE TEST STAND RF SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Crofford, Mark T; Ball, Jeffrey Allen; Davidson Jr, Taylor L; Hardek, Thomas W; Heidenreich, Dale A; Kasemir, Kay; Kim, Sang-Ho; Kang, Yoon

    2008-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has recently commissioned a cryomodule test facility for the repair and testing of the super-conducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. This facility utilizes the original 402.5/805 MHz Radio Frequency (RF) Klystron Test Stand as its power source along with dual Low Level RF (LLRF) control systems. One control system is based on the standard SNS Linac LLRF controls with a second system for open-loop only control. The system is designed to allow simultaneous testing of devices in the test cave and other devices which can be tested outside of the enclosure. Initial tests have shown good results; some improvements are yet to be implemented.

  5. Mesoscale polycrystal calculations of damage in spallation in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, Davis L; Bingert, John F; Livescu, Veronica; Luo, Shengnian; Bronkhorst, C A

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this project is to produce a damage model for spallation in metals informed by the polycrystalline grain structure at the mesoscale. Earlier damage models addressed the continuwn macroscale in which these effects were averaged out. In this work we focus on cross sections from recovered samples examined with EBSD (electron backscattered diffraction), which reveal crystal grain orientations and voids. We seek to understand the loading histories of specific sample regions by meshing up the crystal grain structure of these regions and simulating the stress, strain, and damage histories in our hydro code, FLAG. The stresses and strain histories are the fundamental drivers of damage and must be calculated. The calculated final damage structures are compared with those from the recovered samples to validate the simulations.

  6. Sulfur and Moisture Effects on Alumina Scale and TBC Spallation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2007-01-01

    It has been well established that a few ppmw sulfur impurity may segregate to the interface of thermally grown alumina scales and the underlying substrate, resulting in bond degradation and premature spallation. This has been shown for NiAl and NiCrAl-based alloys, bare single crystal superalloys, or coated superalloys. The role of reactive elements (especially Y) has been to getter the sulfur in the bulk and preclude interfacial segregation. Pt additions are also very beneficial, however a similar thermodynamic explanation does not apply. The purpose of the present discussion is to highlight some observations of these effects on Rene'142, Rene'N5, PWA1480, and PWA1484. For PWA1480, we have mapped cyclic oxidation and spallation in terms of potential sulfur interfacial layers and found that a cumulative amount of about one monolayer is sufficient to degrade long term adhesion. Depending on substrate thickness, optimum performance occurs if sulfur is reduced below about 0.2-0.5 ppmw. This is accomplished in the laboratory by hydrogen annealing or commercially by melt-fluxing. Excellent 1150 C cyclic oxidation is thus demonstrated for desulfurized Rene'142, Rene'N5, and PWA1484. Alternatively, a series of N5 alloys provided by GE-AE have shown that as little as 15 ppmw of Y dopant was effective in providing remarkable scale adhesion. In support of a Y-S gettering mechanism, hydrogen annealing was unable to desulfurize these alloys from their initial level of 5 ppmw S. This impurity and critical doping level corresponds closely to YS or Y2S3 stoichiometry. In many cases, Y-doped alloys or alloys with marginal sulfur levels exhibit an oxidative sensitivity to the ambient humidity called Moisture-Induced Delayed Spallation (MIDS). After substantial scale growth, coupled with damage from repeated cycling, cold samples may spall after a period of time, breathing on them, or immersing them in water. While stress corrosion arguments may apply, we propose that the underlying

  7. Spallation recoil and age of presolar grains in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, U.; Begemann, F.

    2000-01-01

    We have determined the recoil losses from silicon carbide grain size fractions of spallation neon produced by irradiation with 1.6 GeV protons. During the irradiation the SiC grains were dispersed in paraffin wax in order to avoid re-implantation into neighboring grains. Analysis for spallogenic 21Ne of grain size separates in the size range 0.3 μm to 6 μm and comparison with the 22Na activity of the SiC+paraffin mixture indicates an effective recoil range of 2-3 μm with no apparent effect from acid treatments such as routinely used in the isolation of meteoritic SiC grains. Our results indicate that the majority of presolar SiC grains in primitive meteorites, which are ~μm-sized, will have lost essentially all spallogenic Ne produced by cosmic ray interaction in the interstellar medium. This argues against the validity of previously published presolar ages of Murchison SiC (~10 to ~130 Ma; increasing with grain size; Lewis et al., 1994), where recoil losses had been based on calculated recoil energies. It is argued that the observed variations in meteoritic SiC grain size fractions of 21Ne/22Ne ratios are more likely due to the effects of nucleosynthesis in the He burning shell of the parent AGB stars which imposes new boundary conditions on nuclear parameters and stellar models. It is suggested that spallation-Xe produced on the abundant Ba and REE in presolar SiC, rather than spallogenic Ne, may be a promising approach to the presolar age problem. There is a hint in the currently available Xe data (Lewis et al., 1994) that the large (>1 μm) grains may be younger than the smaller (<1 μm) ones.

  8. Critical beam dynamical issues in neutron spallation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabst, M.; Bongardt, K.; Letchford, A. P.

    1996-06-01

    The accelerator part of proposed neutron spallation sources consists of a high intensity linac and compressor ring or rapid cycling synchrotron. The most critical part of such a high current machine is to keep activation caused by particle loss along the linac or at ring injection down to an acceptable limit. Sources of particle loss along the linac can be beam mismatch, resonances of any kind, temperature transfer within a bunch and/or nonlinear internal or external forces. In addition machine errors like misalignments, tolerances, and rf errors have to be considered. All these sources cause emittance growth. The common way of setting up the beam dynamics of high intensity linacs is governed by avoiding these sources and testing it by Monte-Carlo simulations. To get information on the possible loss mechanism, the only way is to increase the particle number of the Monte-Carlo simulations and to study phase space distributions in detail. Monte-Carlo simulations with 50000 particles for the 1.334 GeV coupled cavity linac of the European Spallation Source (ESS) are presented. It is shown that it is possible to design a non-space charge dominated linac for 200 mA bunch current with almost constant emittances. A detailed study of the phase space distribution along the linac shows a small number of halo particles nearby the bunch core. This halo is acceptable for ring injection. Some information related to particle loss in the linac and in the compressor ring afterwards is extracted and comments for positioning scrapers are made.

  9. Neutron spallation measurements and impacts on low-background experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguayo, E.; Kouzes, R. T.; Siciliano, E. R.

    2014-09-01

    Ultralow-background experiments, such as neutrinoless double-β decay, solar neutrino, and dark-matter searches, are carried out deep underground to escape background events created by cosmic-ray muons passing through the detector volumes. However, such experiments may nevertheless be limited in sensitivity by cosmogenically induced backgrounds. This limit can be attributable to cosmogenically created radioactive isotopes produced either in situ during operation or prior to construction when the detector construction materials are above ground. An accurate knowledge of the production of the latter source of background is of paramount importance to be able to interpret the results of low-background experiments. One way to deal with the characterization of cosmogenic background production is to use Monte Carlo simulations to model the spallation reactions arising from cosmic-ray neutrons, protons, and muons. The objective of this work was to evaluate the degree of accuracy that such simulations could provide by comparing measurements for various materials to results from two standard Monte Carlo codes using the same physics model for generating intranuclear cascades. The simulated results from both codes provide the correct trends of neutron production with increasing material density. However, there was substantial disagreement between the models and experimental results for lower-density materials of Al, Fe, and Cu. The model values, when normalized to the Pb experimental results, show disagreement with experiment by a factor of about two for Fe and Cu and significantly greater for Al. It is concluded that additional neutron-induced spallation measurements are required to refine models routinely employed in underground physics research. Further data collection against the above materials is an initial list for benchmarking.

  10. HIGH ENERGY PULSED POWER SYSTEM FOR AGS SUPER NEUTRINO FOCUSING HORN.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG, S.Y.; SANDBERG, J.; WENG, W.-T.

    2005-05-16

    This paper present a preliminary design of a 300 kA, 2.5 Hz pulsed power system. This system will drive the focusing horn of proposed Brookhaven AGS Neutrino Super Beam Facility for Very Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiment. The peak output power of the horn pulsed power system will reach Giga-watts, and the upgraded AGS will be capable of delivering 1 MW in beam power.

  11. Shock-induced Spallation Phenomena in Copper-Niobium Nanolayered Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Niraj; Stukowski, Alexander; Baskes, Michael; Srivilliputhur, Srinivasan

    2011-03-01

    Shock-induced spallation phenomena in Copper-Niobium nanolayered composites conforming to a Kurdjumov-Sach's orientation relation were simulated using molecular dynamics to determine both spallation strength and the nature of void formation. The target structures consisted of varying numbers of alternating copper and niobium layers with thicknesses varying from 1 nm to 22 nm. Flyer velocities ranged from 3.5 to 11.5 A/ps, corresponding to an approximate strain rate of 109 s -1 . Spallation occurs in the vicinity of the Cu-Nb interface, and always in the copper layer. The proposed factors contributing to spallation will be discussed, as well as what effect the layer morphology has on the strength of the target.

  12. Technology and science at a high-power spallation source: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    These proceedings cover many aspects of the usefulness of spallation neutrons. Nine different areas are considered: surfaces and interfaces, engineering, materials science, polymers and complex fluids, chemistry, structural biology, nuclear engineering and radiation effects, condensed matter physics and fundamental physics.

  13. Waveform Correlation Based Detection of Aftershocks of the 6 August 2007 4.1 Mw Crandall Canyon Mine Collapse in Central Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koper, K. D.; Kubacki, T. M.; McCarter, M. K.; Pankow, K. L.

    2012-12-01

    On 6 August 2007 at 08:48:40 (UTC) a 3.9 ML seismic event occurred about 22 km ESE of the town of Mount Pleasant in the coal mining district of central Utah [Pechmann et al., 2008]. An epicenter of 39.4675°N, 111.2249°W and source depth of 0.5 km were determined by University of Utah Seismograph Stations (UUSS). It quickly became clear that the seismic event was associated with a catastrophic collapse at the Crandall Canyon coal mine in which six miners were killed. Subsequent moment tensor inversion showed that a pure double-couple mechanism did not fit the observed waveforms and instead a mechanism dominated by a closing crack (which incorporates an isotropic component) and a smaller residual double-couple and/or CLVD source was preferred [Ford et al., 2008]. The full moment tensor had a scalar moment corresponding to 4.1 Mw. In the 60 days following the mine collapse UUSS located 42 seismic events in the immediate source region. These events had magnitudes of 0.8-2.5 Mc and were detected using standard network association procedures with data from permanent stations of the Utah Regional Seismic Network (URSN), as well as 5 temporary seismometers that UUSS installed in the source area within 2-3 days of the main event. Simple inspection of continuous data from the nearest station shows evidence for a much larger number of seismic events, especially in the hours immediately following the collapse. These events originally went undetected because they were too small to be recorded at a significant number of the permanent URSN stations. Here we use waveform correlation methods to formally detect and locate these tiny aftershocks. We performed multi-channel cross-correlation [vanDecar and Crosson, 1990] on the 42 catalog events using data recorded at the nearest permanent broadband URSN station, MTPU, which was located about 19 km to the south of the mine. A 15-s long window starting 5 s before the expected P arrival was used on data that had been bandpass filtered

  14. Mining Archived HYSPEC User Data to Analyze the Prompt Pulse at the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Michael B.; Iverson, Erik B.; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Winn, Barry L.

    2015-10-01

    The Hybrid-Spectrometer (HYSPEC) is one of 17 instruments currently operated at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL). The secondary spectrometer of this instrument is located inside an out-building off the north side of the SNS instrument hall. HYSPEC has experienced a larger background feature than similar inelastic instruments since its commissioning in 2011. This background feature is caused by a phenomenon known as the “prompt pulse” which is an essential part of neutron production in a pulsed spallation source but comes with unfortunate side effects.

  15. R&D of A MW-class solid-target for a spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi; Furusaka, Michihiro; Kikuchi, Kenji; Kurishita, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Ryuzo; Li, Jing-Feng; Sugimoto, Katsuhisa; Yamamura, Tsutomu; Hiraoka, Yutaka; Abe, Katsunori; Hasegawa, Akira; Yoshiie, Masatoshi; Takenaka, Hiroyuki; Mishima, Katsuichiro; Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki; Tanabe, Tetsuo; Yoshida, Naoaki; Igarashi, Tadashi

    2003-05-01

    R&D for a MW-class solid target composed of tungsten was undertaken to produce a pulsed intense neutron source for a future neutron scattering-facility. In order to solve the corrosion of tungsten, tungsten target blocks were clad with tantalum by means of HIP'ing, brazing and electrolytic coating in a molten salt bath. The applicability of the HIP'ing method was tested through fabricating target blocks for KENS (spallation neutron source at KEK). A further investigation to certify the optimum HIP conditions was made with the small punch test method. The results showed that the optimum temperature was 1500 °C at which the W/Ta interface gave the strongest fracture strength. In the case of the block with a hole for thermocouple, it was found that the fabrication preciseness of a straight hole and a tantalum sheath influenced the results. The development of a tungsten stainless-steel alloy was tried to produce a bare tungsten target, using techniques in powder metallurgy. Corrosion tests for various tungsten alloys were made while varying the water temperature and velocity. The mass loss of tungsten in very slow water at 180 °C was as low as 0.022 mg/y, but increased remarkably with water velocity. Simulation experiments for radiation damage to supplement the STIP-III experiments were made to investigate material hardening by hydrogen and helium, and microstructures irradiated by electrons. Both experiments showed consistent results on the order of the dislocation numbers and irradiation hardness among the different tungsten materials. Thermal-hydraulic designs were made for two types of solid target system of tungsten: slab and rod geometry as a function of the proton beam power. The neutronic performance of a solid target system was compared with that of mercury target based on Monte Carlo calculations by using the MCNP code.

  16. Neutron diffractometers for structural biology at spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenborn, B.P.; Pitcher, E.

    1994-12-31

    Spallation neutron sources are ideal for diffraction studies of proteins and oriented molecular complexes. With spoliation neutrons and their time dependent wavelength structure, it is easy to electronically select data with an optimal wavelength bandwidth and cover the whole Laue spectrum as time (wavelength) resolved snapshots. This optimized data quality with best peak-to-background ratios and provides adequate spatial and energy resolution to eliminate peak overlaps. The application of this concept will use choppers to select the desired Laue wavelength spectrum and employ focusing optics and large cylindrical {sup 3}He detectors to optimize data collection rates. Such a diffractometer will cover a Laue wavelength range from 1 to 5{Angstrom} with a flight path length of 10m and an energy resolution of 0.25{Angstrom}. Moderator concepts for maximal flux distribution within this energy range will be discussed using calculated flux profiles. Since the energy resolution required for such timed data collection in this super Laue techniques is not very high, the use of a linac only (LAMPF) spoliation target is an exciting possibility with an order of magnitude increase in flux.

  17. A High Intensity Linac for the National Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jason, A.; Bhatia, T.; Billen, J.; Schrage, D.; Kurennoy, S.; Krawczyk, F.; Lynch, M.; Nath, S.; Shafer, R.; Takeda, H.; Tallerico, P.; Wangler, T.; Wood, R.; Young, L.; Grand, P.; McKenzie-Wilson, R.

    1997-05-01

    The National Spallation Neutron Source to be constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, requires a linac capable of delivering up to 5 MW of beam power to an accumulator ring with a nominal 6.2% duty factor and an energy of 1 GeV. Los Alamos, responsible for the linac design, has developed an appropriate room-temperature linac that consists of a drift-tube section from 2.5 to 20 MeV, a coupled-cavity drift-tube section to 100 MeV, and a coupled-cavity section to 1 GeV. The initial scenario requires an average 1.1-mA beam current with a corresponding 28 mA peak current and a 1.2-Mhz chopped time structure corresponding to the ring period. Upgrade to a 4.4 mA average current requires funneling with a peak current of 112 mA in the high-energy sections. Further parameters are presented along with beam dynamics and structure choices and mechanical and rf engineering considerations.

  18. Status of R&D on Mitigating the Effects of Pressure Waves for the Spallation Neutron Source Mercury Target

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark W; Felde, David K; Abdou, Ashraf A; McClintock, David A

    2012-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been conducting R&D on mitigating the effects of pressure waves in mercury spallation targets since 2001. More precisely, cavitation damage of the target vessel caused by the short beam pulse threatens to limit its lifetime more severely than radiation damage as well as limit its ultimate power capacity and hence its neutron intensity performance. The R&D program has moved from verification of the beam-induced damage phenomena to study of material and surface treatments for damage resistance to the current emphasis on gas injection techniques for damage mitigation. Two techniques are being worked on: injection of small dispersed gas bubbles that mitigate the pressure waves volumetrically; and protective gas walls that isolate the vessel from the damaging effects of collapsing cavitation bubbles. The latter has demonstrated good damage mitigation during in-beam testing with limited pulses, and adequate gas wall coverage at the beam entrance window has been demonstrated with the SNS mercury target flow configuration using a full scale mercury test loop. A question on the required area coverage remains which depends on results from SNS target post irradiation examination. The small gas bubble technique has been less effective during past in-beam tests but those results were with un-optimized and un-verified bubble populations. Another round of in-beam tests with small gas bubbles is planned for 2011. The first SNS target was removed from service in mid 2009 and samples were cut from two locations at the target s beam entrance window. Through-wall damage was observed at the innermost mercury vessel wall (not a containment wall). The damage pattern suggested correlation with the local mercury flow condition which is nearly stagnant at the peak damage location. Detailed post irradiation examination of the samples is under way that will assess the erosion and measure irradiation-induced changes

  19. Materials problems in the targets of high-power spallation = sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmaier, Hans

    1998-04-01

    In spallation sources, the neutrons (utilized as probes for condensed matter research or for inducing nuclear transmutations) are generated by protons of around 1 GeV energy which cause spallation of the nuclei is a heavy metal target. Since the beam powers of the proposed future facilities are in the range of 1 to several 10 MW, radiation damage will play the crucial role for the lifetime of materials in the target components in or close to the proton beam. Although the extensive knowledge accumulated in fission and fusion materials R&D provides the base for spallation materials selection, there are important issues where data are lacking. The most prominent are (a) the extremely high production rates of foreign elements especially H and He isotopes and (b) the low operating temperatures (RT-250^oC). The contribution summarizes the international efforts on spallation materials R&D with emphasis on radiation damage effects. First results of mechanical tests and microstructural studies on components of spent targets from LAMPF (LANL) and ISIS (Rutherford Lab., UK) and from simulation experiments will be reported. Based on these data, lower limits for the lifetime of the most critical target components will be estimated. Finally, the parameters and the goals of an international irradiation program in the Swiss spallation source SINQ are presented.

  20. Modeling astatine production in liquid lead-bismuth spallation targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, J. C.; Boudard, A.; Cugnon, J.; Ghali, S.; Leray, S.; Mancusi, D.; Zanini, L.

    2013-03-01

    Astatine isotopes can be produced in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic targets through proton-induced double charge exchange reactions on bismuth or in secondary helium-induced interactions. Models implemented into the most common high-energy transport codes generally have difficulties to correctly estimate their production yields as was shown recently by the ISOLDE Collaboration, which measured release rates from a lead-bismuth target irradiated by 1.4 and 1 GeV protons. In this paper, we first study the capability of the new version of the Liège intranuclear cascade model, INCL4.6, coupled to the deexcitation code ABLA07 to predict the different elementary reactions involved in the production of such isotopes through a detailed comparison of the model with the available experimental data from the literature. Although a few remaining deficiencies are identified, very satisfactory results are found, thanks in particular to improvements brought recently on the treatment of low-energy helium-induced reactions. The implementation of the models into MCNPX allows identifying the respective contributions of the different possible reaction channels in the ISOLDE case. Finally, the full simulation of the ISOLDE experiment is performed, taking into account the likely rather long diffusion time from the target, and compared with the measured diffusion rates for the different astatine isotopes, at the two studied energies, 1.4 and 1 GeV. The shape of the isotopic distribution is perfectly reproduced as well as the absolute release rates, assuming in the calculation a diffusion time between 5 and 10hours. This work finally shows that our model, thanks to the attention paid to the emission of high-energy clusters and to low-energy cluster induced reactions, can be safely used within MCNPX to predict isotopes with a charge larger than that of the target by two units in spallation targets, and, probably, more generally to isotopes created in secondary reactions induced by composite

  1. Superconducting Prototype Cavities for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati

    2001-09-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source project includes a superconducting linac section in the energy range from 186 MeV to 1000 MeV. For this energy range two types of cavities are needed with geometrical {beta} values of {beta} = 0.61 and {beta} = 0.81. An aggressive cavity prototyping program is being pursued at Jefferson Lab, which calls for fabricating and testing four {beta} = 0.61 cavities and two {beta} = 0.81 cavities. Both types consist of six cells made from high purity niobium and feature one HOM coupler on each beam pipe and a port for a high power coaxial input coupler. Three of the four {beta} = 0.61 cavities will be used for a cryomodule test in early 2002. At this time four medium beta cavities and one high beta cavity have been completed at JLab. The first tests on the {beta} = 0.61 and {beta} = 0.81 exceeded the design values for gradient and Q value: E{sub acc} = 10.1 MV/m and Q = 5 x 10{sup 9} at 2.1K for the {beta} = 0.61 and E{sub acc} = 12.3 MV/m and Q = 5 x 10{sup 9} at 2.1 K for the {beta} = 0.81. One of the medium beta cavities has been equipped with an integrated helium vessel and measurements of the static Lorentz force detuning have been done and compared to the ''bare'' cavities. In addition two single cell cavities have been fabricated, equipped with welded-on HOM couplers. They are being used to evaluate the HOM couplers with respect to multipacting, fundamental mode rejection and HOM damping as far as possible in a single cell. This paper describes the cavity design with respect to electromagnetic and mechanical features, the fabrication efforts and the results obtained with the different cavities existing at the time of this workshop.

  2. The COHERENT Experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Steven Ray

    2015-09-30

    The COHERENT collaboration's primary objective is to measure coherent elastic neutrino- nucleus scattering (CEvNS) using the unique, high-quality source of tens-of-MeV neutrinos provided by the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In spite of its large cross section, the CEvNS process has never been observed, due to tiny energies of the resulting nuclear recoils which are out of reach for standard neutrino detectors. The measurement of CEvNS has now become feasible, thanks to the development of ultra-sensitive technology for rare decay and weakly-interacting massive particle (dark matter) searches. The CEvNS cross section is cleanly predicted in the standard model; hence its measurement provides a standard model test. It is relevant for supernova physics and supernova-neutrino detection, and enables validation of dark-matter detector background and detector-response models. In the long term, precision measurement of CEvNS will address questions of nuclear structure. COHERENT will deploy multiple detector technologies in a phased approach: a 14-kg CsI[Na] scintillating crystal, 15 kg of p-type point-contact germanium detectors, and 100 kg of liquid xenon in a two-phase time projection chamber. Following an extensive background measurement campaign, a location in the SNS basement has proven to be neutron-quiet and suitable for deployment of the COHERENT detector suite. The simultaneous deployment of the three COHERENT detector subsystems will test the N=2 dependence of the cross section and ensure an unambiguous discovery of CEvNS. This document describes concisely the COHERENT physics motivations, sensitivity and plans for measurements at the SNS to be accomplished on a four-year timescale.

  3. Oxidative Recession, Sulfur Release, and Al203 Spallation for Y-Doped Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2001-01-01

    Second-order spallation phenomena have been noted for Y-doped Rene'N5 after long term oxidation at 1150 degrees C. The reason for this behavior has not been conclusively identified. A mass equivalence analysis has shown that the surface recession resulting from oxidation has the potential of releasing about 0.15 monolayer of sulfur for every 1 mg/sq cm of oxygen reacted for an alloy containing 5 ppmw of sulfur. This amount is significant in comparison to levels that have been shown to result in first-order spallation behavior for undoped alloys. Oxidative recession is therefore speculated to be a contributing source of sulfur and second-order spallation for Y-doped alloys.

  4. Cooperative pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Michael; Glaser, Steffen J.

    2010-11-01

    We introduce the concept of cooperative (COOP) pulses which are designed to compensate each other's imperfections. In multi-scan experiments, COOP pulses can cancel undesired signal contributions, complementing and generalizing phase cycles. COOP pulses can be efficiently optimized using an extended version of the optimal-control-based gradient ascent pulse engineering (GRAPE) algorithm. The advantage of the COOP approach is experimentally demonstrated for broadband and band-selective pulses.

  5. An apparatus for studying spallation neutrons in the Aberdeen Tunnel laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blyth, S. C.; Chan, Y. L.; Chen, X. C.; Chu, M. C.; Hahn, R. L.; Ho, T. H.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hu, B. Z.; Kwan, K. K.; Kwok, M. W.; Kwok, T.; Lau, Y. P.; Lee, K. P.; Leung, J. K. C.; Leung, K. Y.; Lin, G. L.; Lin, Y. C.; Luk, K. B.; Luk, W. H.; Ngai, H. Y.; Ngan, S. Y.; Pun, C. S. J.; Shih, K.; Tam, Y. H.; Tsang, R. H. M.; Wang, C. H.; Wong, C. M.; Wong, H. L.; Wong, H. H. C.; Wong, K. K.; Yeh, M.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we describe the design, construction and performance of an apparatus installed in the Aberdeen Tunnel laboratory in Hong Kong for studying spallation neutrons induced by cosmic-ray muons under a vertical rock overburden of 611 m water equivalent (m.w.e.). The apparatus comprises six horizontal layers of plastic-scintillator hodoscopes for determining the direction and position of the incident cosmic-ray muons. Sandwiched between the hodoscope planes is a neutron detector filled with 650 kg of liquid scintillator doped with about 0.06% of Gadolinium by weight for improving the efficiency of detecting the spallation neutrons. Performance of the apparatus is also presented.

  6. Calculations of radiation damage in target, container and window materials for spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Wechsler, M.S.; Ferguson, P.D.; Sommer, W.F.; Mansur, L.K.

    1996-07-01

    Radiation damage in target, container, and window materials for spallation neutron sources is am important factor in the design of target stations for accelerator-driver transmutation technologies. Calculations are described that use the LAHET and SPECTER codes to obtain displacement and helium production rates in tungsten, 316 stainless steel, and Inconel 718, which are major target, container, and window materials, respectively. Results are compared for the three materials, based on neutron spectra for NSNS and ATW spallation neutron sources, where the neutron fluxes are normalized to give the same flux of neutrons of all energies.

  7. Parametric study of spallation targets for the MYRRHA reactor using MCNPX simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebello, A. L. P.; Martinez, A. S.; Gonçalves, A. C.

    2014-06-01

    The present work aims to evaluate the behavior of neutron multiplicity in a spallation target using MCNPX simulations, focusing on its application in the MYRRHA reactor. It was studied the two types of spallation target proposed for the MYRRHA project, windowless and windows target, in order to compare them and find saturation boundaries. Some saturation boundaries were found and the windowless target proved to be as viable as the windows one. Each one produced nearly the same number of neutrons per incident proton. Using the concept of neutron cost, it was also observed that the optimum conditions on neutron production occur at about 1GeV, for both target designs.

  8. A time-of-flight backscattering spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source, BASIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamontov, E.; Herwig, K. W.

    2011-08-01

    We describe the design and current performance of the backscattering silicon spectrometer (BASIS), a time-of-flight backscattering spectrometer built at the spallation neutron source (SNS) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). BASIS is the first silicon-based backscattering spectrometer installed at a spallation neutron source. In addition to high intensity, it offers a high-energy resolution of about 3.5 μeV and a large and variable energy transfer range. These ensure an excellent overlap with the dynamic ranges accessible at other inelastic spectrometers at the SNS.

  9. Development of solid state bonding processes for spallation neutron targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Andrew T.

    Solid state bonding techniques are of vital interest to current and future spallation target design efforts for both cladding and wider fabrication requirements. The distinct needs of both water and liquid metal cooled sources were considered in this study. Development of hot isostatic pressing techniques and process controls necessary for successful cladding of tungsten with tantalum as needed for existing water cooled designs constituted the first component of this work. A second independent study performed with an emphasis on high temperature lead bismuth coolants focused on exploration of uniaxial diffusion bonding methods to join tungsten and tantalum to HT9, a ferritic-martensitic stainless steel. A technique for evaluation of the thermal performance of joined interfaces was also developed and employed to study the diffusion bonded systems. Hot isostatic pressing performed at 1500°C for 3 hours and 200 MPa was found to produce an acceptable tantalum-tungsten bond provided extensive tantalum getter foil was used to wrap the target during the process. Excellent interface coherency was observed along with no oxidation or carburization on the tantalum surface. Uniaxial diffusion bonding at a temperature of 1060°C for 3 hours at pressures below 7 MPa resulted in excessive intermetallic formation at the HT9-tungsten and HT9-tantalum interfaces and significant residual interface porosity. Nickel and NiP interlayers were also observed to impart little benefit but did stabilize austenite with the HT9. A transition to lower temperatures and higher pressures improved bond quality. Conditions of 900°C for 3 hours and 70 MPa significantly improved both the HT9-tungsten and HT9-tantalum interfaces compared with the high temperature bond. An exploratory investigation of vanadium interlayers enhanced the result even further under these conditions and warrants further investigation. All interfaces produced in this study possessed a thermal resistance well below that needed

  10. Preparation and Testing of Corrosion and Spallation-Resistant Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, John

    2015-11-01

    with the Rene 80. One-inch-diameter buttons were machined from each of the bonded blocks and sent to Siemens for standard oxidation, spallation, and corrosion testing, which should be complete in the spring of 2016.

  11. Dissertation: Precompound Emission of Energetic Light Fragments in Spallation Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kerby, Leslie Marie

    2015-08-04

    Emission of light fragments (LF) from nuclear reactions is an open question. Different reaction mechanisms contribute to their production; the relative roles of each, and how they change with incident energy, mass number of the target, and the type and emission energy of the fragments is not completely understood. None of the available models are able to accurately predict emission of LF from arbitrary reactions. However, the ability to describe production of LF (especially at energies ≳ 30 MeV) from many reactions is important for different applications, such as cosmic-ray-induced Single Event Upsets (SEUs), radiation protection, and cancer therapy with proton and heavy-ion beams, to name just a few. The Cascade-Exciton Model (CEM) version 03.03 and the Los Alamos version of the Quark-Gluon String Model (LAQGSM) version 03.03 event generators in Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code version 6 (MCNP6) describe quite well the spectra of fragments with sizes up to ⁴He across a broad range of target masses and incident energies (up to ~ 5 GeV for CEM and up to ~ 1 TeV/A for LAQGSM). However, they do not predict the high energy tails of LF spectra heavier than ⁴He well. Most LF with energies above several tens of MeV are emitted during the precompound stage of a reaction. The current versions of the CEM and LAQGSM event generators do not account for precompound emission of LF larger than ⁴He. The aim of our work is to extend the precompound model in them to include such processes, leading to an increase of predictive power of LF-production in MCNP6. This entails upgrading the Modified Exciton Model currently used at the preequilibrium stage in CEM and LAQGSM. It also includes expansion and examination of the coalescence and Fermi break-up models used in the precompound stages of spallation reactions within CEM and LAQGSM. Extending our models to include emission of fragments heavier than ⁴He at the precompound stage has indeed provided results that have much

  12. High power testing of the 402.5 MHZ and 805 MHZ RF windows for the spallation neutron source accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, K. A.; De Baca, J. M.; Harrison, J. S.; Rodriguez, M. B.; Torrez, P. A.; Warner, D. K.

    2003-01-01

    Hisorically, Radio Frequency (RF) windows have been a common point of failure in input power couplers; therefore, reliable RF windows are critical to the success of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project. The normal conducting part of the SNS accelerator requires six RF windows at 402.5 MHz and eight RF windows at 805 MHz[l]. Each RF window will transmit up to 180 kW of average power and 2.5 MW peak power at 60 Hz with 1.2 millisecond pulses. The RF windows, designed and manufactured by Thales, were tested at the full average power for 4 hours to ensure no problems with the high average power and then tested to an effective forward power level of 10 MW by testing at 2.5 MW forward power into a short and varying the phase of the standing wave. The sliding short was moved from 0 to 180 degrees to ensure no arcing or breakdown problems occur in any part of the window. This paper discusses the results of the high power testing of both the 402.5 MHz and the 805 MHz RF windows. Problems encountered during testing and the solutions for these problems are discussed.

  13. Awareness, Preference, Utilization, and Messaging Research for the Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, Rebecca; Kszos, Lynn A

    2011-03-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) offers the scientific community unique access to two types of world-class neutron sources at a single site - the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The 85-MW HFIR provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world, and the SNS is one of the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams. Management of these two resources is the responsibility of the Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD). NScD commissioned this survey research to develop baseline information regarding awareness of and perceptions about neutron science. Specific areas of investigative interest include the following: (1) awareness levels among those in the scientific community about the two neutron sources that ORNL offers; (2) the level of understanding members of various scientific communities have regarding benefits that neutron scattering techniques offer; and (3) any perceptions that negatively impact utilization of the facilities. NScD leadership identified users of two light sources in North America - the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory - as key publics. Given the type of research in which these scientists engage, they would quite likely benefit from including the neutron techniques available at SNS and HFIR among their scientific investigation tools. The objective of the survey of users of APS, NSLS, SNS, and HFIR was to explore awareness of and perceptions regarding SNS and HFIR among those in selected scientific communities. Perceptions of SNS and FHIR will provide a foundation for strategic communication plan development and for developing key educational messages. The survey was conducted in two phases. The first phase included qualitative methods of (1) key stakeholder meetings; (2) online interviews with user administrators of APS and NSLS; and (3) one-on-one interviews

  14. PULSE SORTER

    DOEpatents

    Wade, E.J.

    1958-07-29

    An apparatus is described for counting and recording the number of electrical pulses occurring in each of a timed sequence of groups of pulses. The particular feature of the invention resides in a novel timing circuit of the univibrator type which provides very accurately timed pulses for opening each of a series of coincidence channels in sequence. The univibrator is shown incorporated in a pulse analyzing system wherein a series of pulse counting channels are periodically opened in order, one at a time, for a predetermtned open time interval, so that only one channel will be open at the time of occurrence of any of the electrical pulses to be sorted.

  15. Influence of Sample Geometry on Sweeping-Detonation-Wave Spallation in Tantalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, George, III; Hull, Larry; Livescu, Veronica; Briggs, Matt; Meyer, Ross; Los Alamos National Laboratory Team

    2015-06-01

    Widespread research over the past five decades has provided a wealth of experimental data and insight concerning shock hardening and the spallation response of materials subjected to square-topped shock-wave loading profiles. Less quantitative data have been gathered on the effect of direct, in-contact, sweeping-wave high explosive (HE)-driven Taylor wave loading profile shock loading on the shock hardening, damage evolution, or spallation response of materials. Sweeping-wave loading is a significantly different loading history than that achieved by a square-topped impulse or 1-D HE-driven plane-wave shock in terms of the evolving spherical and shear stresses applied to the specimen. The goal of this research is to quantify the combined influence of shockwave obliquity evolution plus sample geometry on the spallation response of Tantalum(Ta) by subjecting a curved Ta plate to HE-driven sweeping detonation-wave loading and quantify both the wave propagation and the post-mortem damage evolution. This talk will summarize our current understanding of the similarity and differences between the shock hardening and damage evolution during sweeping detonation-wave spallation loading observed in flat and curved Ta plate samples.

  16. Multimaterial lamination as a means of retarding penetration and spallation failures in plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibattista, J. D.; Humes, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental data are presented which show that hypervelocity impact spallation and penetration failures of a single solid aluminum plate and of a solid aluminum plate spaced a distance behind a Whipple meteor bumper may be retarded by replacing the solid aluminum plate with a laminated plate. Four sets of experiments were conducted. The first set of experiments was conducted with projectile mass and velocity held constant and with polycarbonate cylinders impacted into single plates of different construction. The second set of experiments was done with single plates of various construction and aluminum spherical projectiles of similar mass but different velocities. These two experiments showed that a laminated plate of aluminum and polycarbonate or aluminum and methyl methacrylate could prevent spallation and penetration failures with a lower areal density than either an all-aluminum laminated plate or a solid aluminum plate. The aluminum laminated plate was in turn superior to the solid aluminum plate in resisting spallation and penetration failures. In addition, through an example of 6061-T6 aluminum and methyl methacrylate, it is shown that a laminated structure ballistically superior to its parent materials may be built. The last two sets of experiments were conducted using bumper-protected main walls of solid aluminum and of laminated aluminum and polycarbonate. Again, under hypervelocity impact conditions, the laminated main walls were superior to the solid aluminum main walls in retarding spallation and penetration failures.

  17. Tensile property changes of metals irradiated to low doses with fission, fusion and spallation neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Heinisch, H.L.; Hamilton, M.L.; Sommer, W.F.; Ferguson, P.D.

    1991-11-01

    Radiation effects due to low doses of spallation neutrons are compared directly to those produced by fission and fusion neutrons. Yield stress changes of pure Cu, alumina-dispersion-strengthened Cu and AISI 316 stainless steel irradiated at 36--55{degrees}C in the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) are compared with earlier results of irradiations at 90{degrees}C using 14 MeV D-T fusion neutrons at the Rotating Target Neutron Source and fission reactor neutrons in the Omega West Reactor. At doses up to 0.04 displacements per atom (dpa), the yield stress changes due to the three quite different neutron spectra correlate well on the basis of dpa in the stainless steel and the Cu alloy. However, in pure Cu, the measured yield stress changes due to spallation neutrons were anomalously small and should be verified by additional irradiations. With the exception of pure Cu, the low dose, low temperature experiments reveal no fundamental differences in radiation hardening by fission, fusion or spallation neutrons when compared on the basis of dpa.

  18. A calorimetric measurement of the heat deposition in the vicinity of a spallation neutron target

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.E.; Moritz, L.; Spitzer, H.; Thorson, I.M.

    1986-07-01

    An experiment to measure the heat deposition in various materials in the vicinity of a spallation neuron target is described. This experiment has been performed at the Thermal Neutron Facility, TRIUMF. In the analysis of the data, the contributions to the heat deposition from (n,..gamma..) capture processes, fast neutron, and prompt gamma-ray scattering are separated.

  19. High energy particle background at neutron spallation sources and possible solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkashyna, N.; Kanaki, K.; Kittelmann, T.; Filges, U.; Deen, P.; Herwig, K.; Ehlers, G.; Greene, G.; Carpenter, J.; Connatser, R.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Bentley, P. M.

    2014-07-01

    Modern spallation neutron sources are driven by proton beams ~ GeV energies. Whereas low energy particle background shielding is well understood for reactors sources of neutrons (~20 MeV), for high energies (100s MeV to multiple GeV) there is potential to improve shielding solutions and reduce instrument backgrounds significantly. We present initial measured data on high energy particle backgrounds, which illustrate the results of particle showers caused by high energy particles from spallation neutron sources. We use detailed physics models of different materials to identify new shielding solutions for such neutron sources, including laminated layers of multiple materials. In addition to the steel and concrete, which are used traditionally, we introduce some other options that are new to the neutron scattering community, among which there are copper alloys as used in hadronic calorimeters in high energy physics laboratories. These concepts have very attractive energy absorption characteristics, and simulations predict that the background suppression could be improved by one or two orders of magnitude. These solutions are expected to be great benefit to the European Spallation Source, where the majority of instruments are potentially affected by high energy backgrounds, as well as to existing spallation sources.

  20. Moisture-Induced Spallation and Interfacial Hydrogen Embrittlement of Alumina Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2005-01-01

    Thermal expansion mismatch stresses and interfacial sulfur activity are the major factors producing primary Al2O3 scale spallation on high temperature alloys. However, moisture-induced delayed spallation appears as a secondary, but often dramatic, illustration of an additional mechanistic detail. A historical review of delayed failure of alumina scales and TBC s on superalloys is presented herein. Similarities with metallic phenomena suggest that hydrogen embrittlement from ambient humidity, resulting from the reaction Al+3H2O=Al(OH)3+3H(+)+3e(-), is the operative mechanism. This proposal was tested by standard cathodic hydrogen charging in 1N H2SO4, applied to Rene N5 pre-oxidized at 1150 C for 1000 1-hr cycles, and monitored by weight change, induced current, and microstructure. Here cathodic polarization at -2.0 V abruptly stripped mature Al2O3 scales at the oxide-metal interface. Anodic polarization at +2.0 V, however, produced alloy dissolution. Finally, with no applied voltage, the electrolyte alone produced neither scale spallation nor alloy dissolution. These experiments thus highlight the detrimental effects of hydrogen charging on alumina scale adhesion. It is proposed that interfacial hydrogen embrittlement is produced by moist air and is the root cause of both moisture-induced, delayed scale spallation and desktop TBC failures.

  1. Influence of microstructural anisotropy on the spallation of 1080 eutectoid steel

    SciTech Connect

    Bourne, N. K.; Millett, J. C. F.; Lopez, M. F.; Vecchio, K. S.; Gray, G. T. , III

    2001-01-01

    While the influence of crystallographic texture on elastic and plastic constitutive response has seen extensive investigation in recent years, the influence of texture on the dynamic fracture of engineering materials remains less extensively explored. In particular, the influence of anisotropy, both textural and morphological, on the spallation behavior of materials remains poorly quantified. In this study, the spallation response of 1080-steel has been studied as a function of microstructural morphological anisotropy. In this study the influence of elongated MnS stringers, resident within a crystallographically isotropic eutectoid steel, on the spallation response of 1080 steel was investigated. That of a fully-pearlitic 1080 steel loaded to 5 GPa was found to be dominated by the heterogeneous nucleation of damage normal and orthogonal to the MnS stringers. Delamination between the matrix pearlitic microstructure and the MnS stringers was seen to correlate to a significantly lower pull-back signal during transverse loading than to that parallel to the stringer axis. The 'pull-back' signals and post-spallation metallographic observations are discussed with reference to the influence of microstructural anisotropy on void nucleation and growth.

  2. INFLUENCE OF MICROSTRUCTURAL ANISOTROPY ON THE SPALLATION OF 1080 EUTECTOID STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    G.T. GRAY; M.F. LOPEZ; ET AL

    2001-06-01

    While the influence of crystallographic texture on elastic and plastic constitutive response has seen extensive investigation in recent years, the influence of texture on the dynamic fracture of engineering materials remains less extensively explored. In particular, the influence of anisotropy, both textural and morphological, on the spallation behavior of materials remains poorly quantified. In this study, the spallation response of 1080-steel has been studied as a function of microstructural morphological anisotropy. In this study the influence of elongated MnS stringers, resident within a crystallographically isotropic eutectoid steel, on the spallation response of 1080 steel was investigated. That of a fully-pearlitic 1080 steel loaded to 5 GPa was found to be dominated by the heterogeneous nucleation of damage normal and orthogonal to the MnS stringers. Delamination between the matrix pearlitic microstructure and the MnS stringers was seen to correlate to a significantly lower pull-back signal during transverse loading than to that parallel to the stringer axis. The ''pull-back'' signals and post-spallation metallographic observations are discussed with reference to the influence of microstructural anisotropy on void nucleation and growth.

  3. Pulse Oximetry

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.thoracic.org amount of gases (oxygen and carbon dioxide) that are in your blood. To get an ... Also, a pulse oximeter does not measure your carbon dioxide level. How accurate is the pulse oximeter? The ...

  4. A technical and economic evaluation of thermal spallation drilling technology

    SciTech Connect

    1984-07-10

    Thermal spallation of rock may be defined as a type of progressive rock failure caused by the creation of thermal stresses induced by a sudden application of heat from a high temperature source. This technology is applicable to only certain types of hard rock, such as dolomite, taconite, and granite. In 1981 and 1982, the deepest holes ever drilled by this process were drilled in granite to depths of 1086 feet and 425 feet respectively. Penetration rates at the bottom of the deeper hole reached a maximum of 100 ft/hr. Because of these high rates, considerable interest was generated concerning the use of this technology for the drilling of deep holes. Based on this interest, this study was undertaken to evaluate the technical and economic aspects of the technology in general. This methodology has been used for blasthole drilling, the cutting of chambers at the bottom of drilled holes, and the cutting of narrow grooves in rock. However, because of the very high temperatures generated by the flame jet and the application of the technology to only certain types of rock, other areas of use have been very limited. In this report, evaluation of the technology was performed by conceptually designing and costing a theoretical flame jet drilling rig. The design process reviews a number of different concepts of the various components needed, and then chooses those pieces of equipment that best suit the needs of the system and have the best chance of being properly developed. The final concept consists of a flexible umbilical hose containing several internal hoses for carrying the various required fluids. An evaluation of this system was then made to determine its operational characteristics. The drilling capabilities and the economics of this rig were then compared to a conventional rotary drilling rig by theoretically drilling two holes of approximately 15,000 feet in depth. This comparison was done by use of a spread sheet type computer program. The results of this study

  5. A megawatt solid-state modulator for high repetition rate pulse generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Pribyl, P.; Gekelman, W.

    2016-02-01

    A novel solid-state modulator capable of generating rapid consecutive power pulses is constructed to facilitate experiments on plasma interaction with high power microwave pulses. The modulator is designed to output a 100 kHz tone burst, which consists of up to 10 pulses, each with 1 μs duration and 1 MW peak power. The pulses are formed by discharging a total of 480 μF capacitors through 24 synchronized MOSFETs and 6 step-up transformers. The highly modular design, as a replacement of an old single-pulse version used in earlier experiments which employs a pulse forming network, brings great flexibility and wide potential to its application. A systematic cost-effectiveness analysis is also presented.

  6. A megawatt solid-state modulator for high repetition rate pulse generation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Pribyl, P; Gekelman, W

    2016-02-01

    A novel solid-state modulator capable of generating rapid consecutive power pulses is constructed to facilitate experiments on plasma interaction with high power microwave pulses. The modulator is designed to output a 100 kHz tone burst, which consists of up to 10 pulses, each with 1 μs duration and 1 MW peak power. The pulses are formed by discharging a total of 480 μF capacitors through 24 synchronized MOSFETs and 6 step-up transformers. The highly modular design, as a replacement of an old single-pulse version used in earlier experiments which employs a pulse forming network, brings great flexibility and wide potential to its application. A systematic cost-effectiveness analysis is also presented. PMID:26931851

  7. A megawatt solid-state modulator for high repetition rate pulse generation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Pribyl, P; Gekelman, W

    2016-02-01

    A novel solid-state modulator capable of generating rapid consecutive power pulses is constructed to facilitate experiments on plasma interaction with high power microwave pulses. The modulator is designed to output a 100 kHz tone burst, which consists of up to 10 pulses, each with 1 μs duration and 1 MW peak power. The pulses are formed by discharging a total of 480 μF capacitors through 24 synchronized MOSFETs and 6 step-up transformers. The highly modular design, as a replacement of an old single-pulse version used in earlier experiments which employs a pulse forming network, brings great flexibility and wide potential to its application. A systematic cost-effectiveness analysis is also presented.

  8. ICRF Heated Long-Pulse Plasma Discharges in LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumazawa, R.; Seki, T.; Mutoh, T.; Saito, K.; Watari, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Sakamoto, M.; Watanabe, T.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takeiri, Y.; Oka, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Osakabe, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Kaneko, O.; Miyazawa, J.; Morita, S.; Narihara, K.; Shoji, M.; Masuzaki, S.; Goto, M.; Morisaki, T.; Peterson, B. J.; Sato, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Ashikawa, N.; Nishimura, K.; Funaba, H.; Chikaraishi, H.; Notake, T.; Torii, Y.; Okada, H.; Ichimura, M.; Higaki, H.; Takase, Y.; Kasahara, H.; Shimpo, F.; Nomura, G.; Takahashi, C.; Yokota, M.; Kato, A.; Zhao, Yanping; Yoon, J. S.; Kwak, J. G.; Yamada, H.; Kawahata, K.; Ohyabu, N.; Ida, K.; Nagayama, Y.; Noda, N.; Komori, A.; Sudo, S.; Motojima, O.; LHD Experimental Group

    2006-01-01

    A long-pulse plasma discharge for more than 30 min. was achieved on the Large Helical Device (LHD). A plasma of ne = 0.8× 1019 m-3 and Ti0 = 2.0 keV was sustained with PICH = 0.52 MW, PECH = 0.1 MW and averaged PNBI = 0.067 MW. Total injected heating energy was 1.3 GJ, which was a quarter of the prepared RF heating energy. One of the keys to the success of the experiment was a dispersion of the local plasma heat load to divertors, accomplished by shifting the magnetic axis inward and outward.

  9. Innovation on high-power long-pulse gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, Alexander; Sakamoto, Keishi; Thumm, Manfred

    2011-12-01

    Progress in the worldwide development of high-power gyrotrons for magnetic confinement fusion plasma applications is described. After technology breakthroughs in research on gyrotron components in the 1990s, significant progress has been achieved in the last decade, in particular, in the field of long-pulse and continuous wave (CW) gyrotrons for a wide range of frequencies. At present, the development of 1 MW-class CW gyrotrons has been very successful; these are applicable for self-ignition experiments on fusion plasmas and their confinement in the tokamak ITER, for long-pulse confinement experiments in the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) and for EC H&CD in the future tokamak JT-60SA. For this progress in the field of high-power long-pulse gyrotrons, innovations such as the realization of high-efficiency stable oscillation in very high order cavity modes, the use of single-stage depressed collectors for energy recovery, highly efficient internal quasi-optical mode converters and synthetic diamond windows have essentially contributed. The total tube efficiencies are around 50% and the purity of the fundamental Gaussian output mode is 97% and higher. In addition, activities for advanced gyrotrons, e.g. a 2 MW gyrotron using a coaxial cavity, multi-frequency 1 MW gyrotrons and power modulation technology, have made progress.

  10. PULSE GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Roeschke, C.W.

    1957-09-24

    An improvement in pulse generators is described by which there are produced pulses of a duration from about 1 to 10 microseconds with a truly flat top and extremely rapid rise and fall. The pulses are produced by triggering from a separate input or by modifying the current to operate as a free-running pulse generator. In its broad aspect, the disclosed pulse generator comprises a first tube with an anode capacitor and grid circuit which controls the firing; a second tube series connected in the cathode circuit of the first tube such that discharge of the first tube places a voltage across it as the leading edge of the desired pulse; and an integrator circuit from the plate across the grid of the second tube to control the discharge time of the second tube, determining the pulse length.

  11. Long-pulse plasma discharge on the Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumazawa, R.; Mutoh, T.; Saito, K.; Seki, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Ohkubo, K.; Takeiri, Y.; Oka, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Osakabe, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Kaneko, O.; Miyazawa, J.; Morita, S.; Narihara, K.; Shoji, M.; Masuzaki, S.; Kobayashi, M.; Ogawa, H.; Goto, M.; Morisaki, T.; Peterson, B. J.; Sato, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Ashikawa, N.; Nishimura, K.; Funaba, H.; Chikaraishi, H.; Watari, T.; Watanabe, T.; Sakamoto, M.; Ichimura, M.; Takase, Y.; Notake, T.; Takeuchi, N.; Torii, Y.; Shimpo, F.; Nomura, G.; Takahashi, C.; Yokota, M.; Kato, A.; Zhao, Y.; Kwak, J. G.; Yoon, J. S.; Yamada, H.; Kawahata, K.; Ohyabu, N.; Ida, K.; Nagayama, Y.; Noda, N.; Komori, A.; Sudo, S.; Motojima, O.; LHD experiment Group

    2006-03-01

    A long-pulse plasma discharge of more than 30 min duration was achieved on the Large Helical Device (LHD). A plasma of ne = 0.8 × 1019 m-3 and Ti0 = 2.0 keV was sustained with PICH = 0.52 MW, PECH = 0.1 MW and averaged PNBI = 0.067 MW. The total injected heating energy was 1.3 GJ. One of the keys to the success of the experiment was a dispersion of the local plasma heat load to divertors, accomplished by sweeping the magnetic axis inward and outward. Causes limiting the long pulse plasma discharge are discussed. An ion impurity penetration limited further long-pulse discharge in the 8th experimental campaign (2004).

  12. Experimental measurement of surface temperatures during flame-jet induced thermal spallation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, M. A.; Tester, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal spallation is a method whereby the surface of a rock is rapidly heated causing small (100 1000 μm) flakes or spalls, to form. When applied to drilling, a supersonic, high temperature (2600 K) gas jet is directed at the rock to provide the heat source and sweep away the spalls. Previous studies of thermal spallation drilling indicate that penetration rates of up to 30 m/hr (100 ft/hr), approximately ten times greater than commonly obtained using conventional rotary mechanical methods, can be achieved in competent, non-fractured hard rock such as granite. A total direct operating cost for drilling in granite using a flame-jet spallation drill was estimated by Browning (1981) to be approximately 9/m in 1991 (about 3/ft) compared to “trouble-free” well drilling costs for conventional rotary methods in similar rock to depths of 3 to 7 km (10000 to 21000 ft) of 300 to 900/m (100 to 300/ft) (Tester and Herzog, 1990, 1992). The Browning estimates for spallation drilling are obviously optimistic in that they don't include capital costs for the rig and associated hardware. However, the substantially higher penetration rates, significantly reduced wear of downhole components, and the high efficiency of rock communition in comparison to rotary methods suggest that substantial cost reductions could be possible in deep drilling applications. For example, in the construction of hot dry rock geothermal power plants where rotary mechanical methods are used for well drilling to depths of (4 to 5 km), about half of the initial capital cost would be required for well drilling alone (Tester and Herzog, 1992). The current study has focused on gaining a better understanding of both the rock failure mechanism that occurs during thermal spallation and the heat transfer from the gas jet to the rock surface. Rock mechanics modeling leads to an expression for the surface temperature during spallation as a function of rock physical properties and the incident heat flux. Surface

  13. Shock-induced spall in copper: the effects of anisotropy, temperature, loading pulse and defect

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Shengnian; Germann, Timothy C; An, Qi; Han, Li - Bo

    2009-07-28

    Shock-induced spall in Cu is investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. We examine spallation in initially perfect crystals and defective solids with grain boundaries (columnar bicrystals), stacking faults or vacancies, as well as the effect of temperature and loading pulses. Spall in single crystal Cu is anisotropic, and defects and high temperature may reduce the spall strength. Taylor-wave (triangular shock-release wave) loading is explored in comparison with square wave shock loading.

  14. Pulse stretcher

    DOEpatents

    Horton, J.A.

    1994-05-03

    Apparatus for increasing the length of a laser pulse to reduce its peak power without substantial loss in the average power of the pulse is disclosed. The apparatus uses a White cell having a plurality of optical delay paths of successively increasing number of passes between the field mirror and the objective mirrors. A pulse from a laser travels through a multi-leg reflective path between a beam splitter and a totally reflective mirror to the laser output. The laser pulse is also simultaneously injected through the beam splitter to the input mirrors of the optical delay paths. The pulses from the output mirrors of the optical delay paths go simultaneously to the laser output and to the input mirrors of the longer optical delay paths. The beam splitter is 50% reflective and 50% transmissive to provide equal attenuation of all of the pulses at the laser output. 6 figures.

  15. Pulse Voltammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojek, Zbigniew

    The idea of imposing potential pulses and measuring the currents at the end of each pulse was proposed by Barker in a little-known journal as early as in 1958 [1]. However, the first reliable trouble-free and affordable polarographs offering voltammetric pulse techniques appeared on the market only in the 1970s. This delay was due to some limitations on the electronic side. In the 1990s, again substantial progress in electrochemical pulse instrumentation took place. This was related to the introduction of microprocessors, computers, and advanced software.

  16. Spallation model for the titanium-rich supernova remnant cassiopeia A.

    PubMed

    Ouyed, Rachid; Leahy, Denis; Ouyed, Amir; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2011-10-01

    Titanium-rich subluminous supernovae are rare and challenge current SN nucleosynthesis models. We present a model in which ejecta from a standard supernova is impacted by a second explosion of the neutron star (a quark nova), resulting in spallation reactions that lead to (56)Ni destruction and (44)Ti creation under the right conditions. Basic calculations of the spallation products shows that a delay between the two explosions of ∼5  days reproduces the observed abundance of (44)Ti in Cas A and explains its low luminosity as a result of the destruction of (56)Ni. Our results could have important implications for light curves of subluminous as well as superluminous supernovae.

  17. Development of a gas layer to mitigate cavitation damage in liquid mercury spallation targets

    SciTech Connect

    Felde, David K; Wendel, Mark W; Riemer, Bernie

    2008-01-01

    Establish of a gas layer between the flowing liquid and container wall is proposed for mitigating the effects of cavitation in mercury spallation targets. Previous work has shown an order of magnitude decrease in damage for a gas layer developed in a stagnant mercury target for an in-beam experiment. This work is aimed at extending these results to the more complex conditions introduced by a flowing mercury target system. A water-loop has been fabricated to provide initial insights on potential gas injection methods into a flowing liquid. An existing full-scale flow loop designed to simulate the Spallation Neutron Source target system will be used to extend these studies to mercury. A parallel analytical effort is being conducted using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling to provide direction to the experimental effort. Some preliminary simulations of gas injection through a single hole have been completed and show behavior of the models that is qualitatively meaningful.

  18. Spallation model for the titanium-rich supernova remnant cassiopeia A.

    PubMed

    Ouyed, Rachid; Leahy, Denis; Ouyed, Amir; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2011-10-01

    Titanium-rich subluminous supernovae are rare and challenge current SN nucleosynthesis models. We present a model in which ejecta from a standard supernova is impacted by a second explosion of the neutron star (a quark nova), resulting in spallation reactions that lead to (56)Ni destruction and (44)Ti creation under the right conditions. Basic calculations of the spallation products shows that a delay between the two explosions of ∼5  days reproduces the observed abundance of (44)Ti in Cas A and explains its low luminosity as a result of the destruction of (56)Ni. Our results could have important implications for light curves of subluminous as well as superluminous supernovae. PMID:22107282

  19. Synthesis of neutron-rich transuranic nuclei in fissile spallation targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishustin, Igor; Malyshkin, Yury; Pshenichnov, Igor; Greiner, Walter

    2015-04-01

    A possibility of synthesizing neutron-rich superheavy elements in spallation targets of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) is considered. A dedicated software called Nuclide Composition Dynamics (NuCoD) was developed to model the evolution of isotope composition in the targets during a long-time irradiation by intense proton and deuteron beams. Simulation results show that transuranic elements up to 249Bk can be produced in multiple neutron capture reactions in macroscopic quantities. However, the neutron flux achievable in a spallation target is still insufficient to overcome the so-called fermium gap. Further optimization of the target design, in particular, by including moderating material and covering it by a reflector could turn ADS into an alternative source of transuranic elements in addition to nuclear fission reactors.

  20. Spallation Model for the Titanium-Rich Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyed, Rachid; Leahy, Denis; Ouyed, Amir; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2011-10-07

    Titanium-rich subluminous supernovae are rare and challenge current SN nucleosynthesis models. We present a model in which ejecta from a standard supernova is impacted by a second explosion of the neutron star (a quark nova), resulting in spallation reactions that lead to {sup 56}Ni destruction and {sup 44}Ti creation under the right conditions. Basic calculations of the spallation products shows that a delay between the two explosions of {approx}5 days reproduces the observed abundance of {sup 44}Ti in Cas A and explains its low luminosity as a result of the destruction of {sup 56}Ni. Our results could have important implications for light curves of subluminous as well as superluminous supernovae.

  1. RESULTS OF BACKGROUND SUBTRACTION TECHNIQUES ON THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE BEAM LOSS MONITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Pogge, James R; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2010-01-01

    Recent improvements to the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) beam loss monitor (BLM) designs have been made with the goal of significantly reducing background noise. This paper outlines this effort and analyzes the results. The significance of this noise reduction is the ability to use the BLM sensors [1], [2], [3] distributed throughout the SNS accelerator as a method to monitor activation of components as well as monitor beam losses.

  2. Automatic beam position control at Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF)

    SciTech Connect

    Oothoudt, M.; Pillai, C.; Zumbro, M.

    1997-08-01

    Historically the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) has used manual methods to control the position of the 800 kW, 800 MeV proton beam on targets. New experiments, however, require more stringent position control more frequently than can be done manually for long periods of time. Data from an existing harp is used to automatically adjust steering magnets to maintain beam position to required tolerances.

  3. Spallation backgrounds in Super-Kamiokande are made in muon-induced showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shirley Weishi; Beacom, John F.

    2015-05-01

    Crucial questions about solar and supernova neutrinos remain unanswered. Super-Kamiokande has the exposure needed for progress, but detector backgrounds are a limiting factor. A leading component is the beta decays of isotopes produced by cosmic-ray muons and their secondaries, which initiate nuclear spallation reactions. Cuts of events after and surrounding muon tracks reduce this spallation decay background by ≃ 90 % (at a cost of ≃ 20 % deadtime), but its rate at 6-18 MeV is still dominant. A better way to cut this background was suggested in a Super-Kamiokande paper by Bays et al. [Phys. Rev. D 85, 052007 (2012)] on a search for the diffuse supernova neutrino background. They found that spallation decays above 16 MeV were preceded near the same location by a peak in the apparent Cherenkov light profile from the muon; a more aggressive cut was applied to a limited section of the muon track, leading to decreased background without increased deadtime. We put their empirical discovery on a firm theoretical foundation. We show that almost all spallation decay isotopes are produced by muon-induced showers and that these showers are rare enough and energetic enough to be identifiable. This is the first such demonstration for any detector. We detail how the physics of showers explains the peak in the muon Cherenkov light profile and other Super-K observations. Our results provide a physical basis for practical improvements in background rejection that will benefit multiple studies. For solar neutrinos, in particular, it should be possible to dramatically reduce backgrounds at energies as low as 6 MeV.

  4. Process technology and effects of spallation products: Circuit components, maintenance, and handling

    SciTech Connect

    Sigg, B.; Haines, S.J.; Dressler, R.; McManamy, T.

    1996-06-01

    Working Session D included an assessment of the status of the technology and components required to: (1) remove impurities from the liquid metal (mercury or Pb-Bi) target flow loop including the effects of spallation products, (2) provide the flow parameters necessary for target operations, and (3) maintain the target system. A series of brief presentations were made to focus the discussion on these issues. The subjects of these presentations, and presenters were: (1) Spallation products and solubilities - R. Dressler; (2) Spallation products for Pb-Bi - Y. Orlov; (3) Clean/up/impurity removal components - B. Sigg; (4) {open_quotes}Road-Map{close_quotes} and remote handling needs - T. McManamy; (5) Remote handling issues and development - M. Holding. The overall conclusion of this session was that, with the exception of (i) spallation product related processing issues, (ii) helium injection and clean-up, and (iii) specialized remote handling equipment, the technology for all other circuit components (excluding the target itself) exists. Operating systems at the Institute of Physics in Riga, Latvia (O. Lielausis) and at Ben-Gurion University in Beer Shiva, Israel (S. Lesin) have demonstrated that other liquid metal circuit components including pumps, heat exchangers, valves, seals, and piping are readily available and have been reliably used for many years. In the three areas listed above, the designs and analysis are not judged to be mature enough to determine whether and what types of technology development are required. Further design and analysis of the liquid metal target system is therefore needed to define flow circuit processing and remote handling equipment requirements and thereby identify any development needs.

  5. The Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer MaNDi at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, Leighton; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Frost, Matthew J.; He, Junhong; Weiss, Kevin L.; McFeeters, Hana; Tomanicek, Stephen J.; Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; Langan, Paul; Iverson, Erik B.

    2015-07-18

    The Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer (MaNDi) is located on beamline 11B of the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Moreover, the instrument is a neutron time-of-flight wavelength-resolved Laue diffractometer optimized to collect diffraction data from single crystals. Finally, the instrument has been designed to provide flexibility in several instrumental parameters, such as beam divergence and wavelength bandwidth, to allow data collection from a range of macromolecular systems.

  6. The Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer MaNDi at the Spallation Neutron Source

    DOE PAGES

    Coates, Leighton; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Frost, Matthew J.; He, Junhong; Weiss, Kevin L.; McFeeters, Hana; Tomanicek, Stephen J.; Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; Langan, Paul; Iverson, Erik B.

    2015-07-18

    The Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer (MaNDi) is located on beamline 11B of the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Moreover, the instrument is a neutron time-of-flight wavelength-resolved Laue diffractometer optimized to collect diffraction data from single crystals. Finally, the instrument has been designed to provide flexibility in several instrumental parameters, such as beam divergence and wavelength bandwidth, to allow data collection from a range of macromolecular systems.

  7. Heavy density liquid metal spallation target studies for Indian ADS programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyamurthy, P.; Gantayet, L. M.; Ray, A. K.

    2007-02-01

    Department of Atomic Energy, India has taken up the development of ADS in view of many attractive features like inherent safety, capability to transmute large quantities of nuclear waste, better utilization of thorium etc. A roadmap has been finalized for the development of ADS. One of the key components of the ADS is the spallation target. Considering the neutron yield, thermal-hydraulics and radiation damage issues, we are proposing to develop spallation target based on heavy density liquid metals like lead and lead{bismuth{eutectic (LBE). Both window and windowless target configurations are presently being studied. In view of the various advantages we are also studying liquid metal flow circulation based on gas lift mechanism. An R&D programme has been initiated to address various physics and technology issues of ADS target. Under this programme, mercury and LBE experimental facilities are presently being set up. Along with these facilities, computational tools related to spallation physics (FLUKA) and CFD are being developed, and the existing ones are utilized to design the entire target loop as well as sub-systems. In this presentation the details of these activities are presented.

  8. Delayed Alumina Scale Spallation on Rene'n5+y: Moisture Effects and Acoustic Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Morscher, Gregory N.

    2001-01-01

    The single crystal superalloy Rene'N5 (with or without Y-doping and hydrogen annealing) was cyclically oxidized at 1150 C for 1000 hours. After considerable scale growth (>= 500 hours), even the adherent alumina scales formed on Y-doped samples exhibited delayed interfacial spallation during subsequent water immersion tests, performed up to one year after oxidation. Spallation was characterized by weight loss, the amount of spalled area, and acoustic emission response. Hydrogen annealing (prior to oxidation) reduced spallation both before and after immersion, but without measurably reducing the bulk sulfur content of the Y-doped alloys. The duration and frequency of sequential, co-located acoustic emission events implied an interfacial crack growth rate at least 10(exp -3) m/s, but possibly higher than 10(exp 2) m/s. This is much greater than classic moisture-assisted slow crack growth rates in bulk alumina (10(exp -6) to 10(exp -3) m/s), which may still have occurred undetected by acoustic emission. An alternative failure sequence is proposed: an incubation process for preferential moisture ingress leads to a local decrease in interfacial toughness, thus allowing fast fracture driven by stored strain energy.

  9. Conceptual Design of the Liquid Hydrogen Moderator Cooling Circuit for the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, M.; Haberstroh, Ch.; Quack, H.; Beßler, Y.; Butzek, M.

    The European Spallation Sourcein Lund, Sweden, will be a 5 MW beam power neutron spallation research center. As subsystem of the target station the moderators play a vital role by slowing down high energy neutrons set free during the spallation process. To provide maximum neutron flux intensities with high availability for scattering experiments a conceptual liquid hydrogen moderator cooling circulation design proposal was developed. Supercritical hydrogen at 17 K will be utilized to absorb energy of the incoming neutrons in two parallel moderator vessels. A helium refrigerator provides the necessary cooling capacity by implementing an additional helium expansion turbine downstream the refrigerator coldbox. Strategies for the mitigation of pressure fluctuations due to beam trips are being presented. Solutions in form of electrical heaters and an accumulator or an expansion vessel are discussed. Different supercritical hydrogen circulator implementation scenarios are being matched to indicate the most reliable setup. For an efficient moderation process parahydrogen concentrations higher than 99% have to be guaranteed at the moderator inlet. Due to potential conversion of parahydrogen to orthohydrogen via irradiation processes the implementation of an ortho-parahydrogen catalyst bed is being evaluated. Methods for a continuous measurement of the apparent parahydrogen concentration at the moderator in- and outlet will be introduced. The arrangement and interaction of the components will be detailed in the paper.

  10. SPACS: A semi-empirical parameterization for isotopic spallation cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, C.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Kelić-Heil, A.

    2014-12-01

    A new semi-empirical parameterization for residue cross sections in spallation reactions is presented. The prescription named SPACS, for spallation cross sections, permits calculating the fragment production in proton- and neutron-induced collisions with light up to heavy non-fissile partners from the Fermi regime to ultra-relativistic energies. The model is fully analytical, based on a new parameterization of the mass yields, accounting for the dependence on bombarding energy. The formalism for the isobaric distribution consists of a commonly used functional form, borrowed from the empirical parameterization of fragmentation cross sections EPAX, with the observed suited adjustments for spallation, and extended to the charge-pickup channel. Structural and even-odd staggering related to the last stage of the primary-residue deexcitation process is additionally explicitly introduced with a new prescription. Calculations are benchmarked with recent data collected at GSI, Darmstadt as well as with previous measurements employing various techniques. The dependences observed experimentally on collision energy, reaction-partner mass, and proton-neutron asymmetry are well described. A fast analytical parameterization, such as SPACS, can be relevant to be implemented in complex simulations as used for practical issues at nuclear facilities and plants. Its predictive power also makes it useful for cross-section estimates in astrophysics and biophysics.

  11. Spallator and APEX nuclear fuel cycle: a new option for nuclear power

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.

    1982-01-01

    A new nuclear fuel cycle is described which provides a long term supply of nuclear fuel for the thermal LWR nuclear power reactors and eliminates the need for long-term storage of radioactive waste. Fissile fuel is produced by the Spallator which depends on the production of spallation neutrons by the interaction of high-energy (1 to 2 GeV) protons on a heavy-metal target. The neutrons are absorbed in a surrounding natural-uranium or thorium blanket in which fissile Pu-239 to U-233 is produced. Advances in linear accelerator technology makes it possible to design and construct a high-beam-current continuous-wave proton linac for production purposes. The target is similar to a sub-critical reactor and produces heat which is converted to electricity for supplying the linac. The Spallator is a self-sufficient fuel producer, which can compete with the fast breeder. The APEX fuel cycle depends on recycling the transuranics and long-lived fission products while extracting the stable and short-lived fission products when reprocessing the fuel. Transmutation and decay within the fuel cycle and decay of short-lived fission products external to the fuel cycle eliminates the need for long-term geological age shortage of fission-product waste.

  12. An investigation into spallation of titanium alloy using plate impact experiments and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, P.; Cullis, I.; Bardilas, A.; Cogar, J.; Proud, W. G.; Hammond, R. I.

    2003-09-01

    Spallation studies have proved invaluable in determining the spall strengths of these materials, which are then used for various assessment and design purposes. However, there are still many uncertainties regarding the spallation process, particlllarly in alloys, due to the difficulty in developing predictive constitutive and failure models for these materials. One difficulty is that the simulation results depend as much on the constitutive and fracture behaviour as the numerical treatment, particularly post failure. The purpose of this paper is to isolate these effects by using very well controlled data for Ti6Al4Vn alloy under a range of impact scenarios using VISAR. These experiments have been simulated using the Lagrangian hydrocode DYNA and the Eulerian hydrocode CTH. The study renforces the view that the simulation of uniaxial spall signais, represents a significant challenge for the constitutive and fracture models, as well as the post failure numerical treatment within the hydrocode. The results of the simulations are discussed in the wider context of validation of constitutive and fracture models and the lack of real understanding concerning the spallation processes in these alloys.

  13. Moisture-Induced Delayed Alumina Scale Spallation on a Ni(Pt)Al Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2009-01-01

    Delayed interfacial scale failure takes place after cooling for samples of a Ni(Pt)Al-coated CMSX4 single crystal superalloy, cycled at 1150 C for up to 2000 hr. One sample exhibited premature coating grain boundary wrinkling, alumina scale spallation to bare metal, and a final weight loss of 3.3 mg/cm2 . Spallation under ambient conditions was monitored with time after cooldown and was found to continue for 24 hr. This produced up to 0.05 mg/cm2 additional loss for each hold, accumulating 0.7 mg/cm 2 (20 percent of the total) over the course of the test. After test termination, water immersion produced an additional 0.15 mg/cm2 loss. (A duplicate sample produced much less wrinkling and time dependent spalling, maintaining a net weight gain.) The results are consistent with the general phenomena of moisture-induced delayed spallation (MIDS) of mature, distressed alumina scales formed on oxidation resistant M-Al alloys. Relative ambient humidity is discussed as the factor controlling adsorbed moisture, reaction with the substrate, and hydrogen effects on interface strength.

  14. PULSE AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Johnstone, C.W.

    1958-06-17

    The improvement of pulse amplifiers used with scintillation detectors is described. The pulse amplifier circuit has the advantage of reducing the harmful effects of overloading cause by large signal inputs. In general the pulse amplifier circuit comprises two amplifier tubes with the input pulses applied to one amplifier grid and coupled to the second amplifier tube through a common cathode load. The output of the second amplifier is coupled from the plate circuit to a cathode follower tube grid and a diode tube in connected from grid to cathode of the cathode follower tube. Degenerative feedback is provided in the second amplifier by coupling a signal from the cathode follower cathode to the second amplifier grid. The circuit proqides moderate gain stability, and overload protection for subsequent pulse circuits.

  15. Current pulse effects on cylindrical damage experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Ann M; Rousculp, Christopher L

    2009-01-01

    A series of joint experiments between LANL and VNIIEF use a VNIIEF-designed helical generator to provide currents for driving a LANL-designed cylindrical spallation experimental load. Under proper driving conditions, a cylindrical configuration allows for a natural recollection of the damaged material. In addition, the damaged material is able to come to a complete stop due to its strength, avoiding application of further forces. Thus far, experiments have provided data about failure initiation of a well-characterized material (aluminum) in a cylindrical geometry, behavior of material recollected after damage from pressures in the damage initiation regime, and behavior of material recollected after complete failure. In addition to post-shot collection of the damaged target material for subsequent metallographic analysis, dynamic in-situ experimental diagnostics include velocimetry and transverse radial radiography. This paper will focus on the effects of tailoring the driving current pulse to obtain the desired data.

  16. DrSPINE - New approach to data reduction and analysis for neutron spin echo experiments from pulsed and reactor sources

    SciTech Connect

    Monkenbusch, Michael; Holderer, Olaf; Ohl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Neutron spin echo (NSE) method at a pulsed neutron source presents new challenges to the data reduction and analysis as compared to the instruments installed at reactor sources. The main advantage of the pulsed source NSE is the ability to resolve the neutron wavelength and collect neutrons over a wider bandwidth. This allows us to more precisely determine the symmetry phase and measure the data for several Q-values at the same time. Based on the experience gained at the SNS NSE - the first, and to date the only one, NSE instrument installed at a pulsed spallation source, we propose a novel and unified approach to the NSE data processing.

  17. Monitoring method for neutron flux for a spallation target in an accelerator driven sub-critical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiang, He, Zhi-Yong; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Xue-Ying; Cui, Wen-Juan; Chen, Zhi-Qiang; Xu, Hu-Shan

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we study a monitoring method for neutron flux for the spallation target used in an accelerator driven sub-critical (ADS) system, where a spallation target located vertically at the centre of a sub-critical core is bombarded vertically by high-energy protons from an accelerator. First, by considering the characteristics in the spatial variation of neutron flux from the spallation target, we propose a multi-point measurement technique, i.e. the spallation neutron flux should be measured at multiple vertical locations. To explain why the flux should be measured at multiple locations, we have studied neutron production from a tungsten target bombarded by a 250 MeV-proton beam with Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations. The simulation results indicate that the neutron flux at the central location is up to three orders of magnitude higher than the flux at lower locations. Secondly, we have developed an effective technique in order to measure the spallation neutron flux with a fission chamber (FC), by establishing the relation between the fission rate measured by FC and the spallation neutron flux. Since this relation is linear for a FC, a constant calibration factor is used to derive the neutron flux from the measured fission rate. This calibration factor can be extracted from the energy spectra of spallation neutrons. Finally, we have evaluated the proposed calibration method for a FC in the environment of an ADS system. The results indicate that the proposed method functions very well. Supported by Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA03010000 and XDA03030000) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China(91426301).

  18. Fiber Optic Picosecond Laser Pulse Transmission Line for Hydrogen Ion Beam Profile Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yun; Huang, Chunning; Aleksandrov, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    We present a fiber optic laser pulse transmission line for non-intrusive longitudinal profile measurement of the hydrogen ion (H-) beam at the front-end of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator. The 80.5 MHz, 2.5 ps, multi-killowatt optical pulses are delivered to the accelerator beam line through a large mode area polarization maintaining optical fiber to ensure a high measurement stability. The transmission efficiency, output laser beam quality, pulse jitter and pulse width broadening over a 100-ft fiber line are experimentally investigated. A successful measurement of the H- beam microbunch (~130 ps) profile is obtained. Our experiment is the first demonstration of particle beam profile diagnostics using fiber optic laser pulse transmission line.

  19. Fiber optic picosecond laser pulse transmission line for hydrogen ion beam longitudinal profile measurement.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chunning; Liu, Yun; Aleksandrov, Alexander

    2013-07-01

    We present a fiber optic laser pulse transmission line for nonintrusive longitudinal profile measurement of the hydrogen ion (H(-)) beam at the front-end of the Spallation Neutron Source accelerator. The 80.5 MHz, 2.5 ps, multikilowatt optical pulses are delivered to the accelerator beam line through a large-mode-area polarization-maintaining optical fiber to ensure high measurement stability. The transmission efficiency, output laser beam quality, pulse jitter, and pulse width broadening over a 30 m long fiber line are experimentally investigated. A successful measurement of the H(-) beam microbunch (~130 ps) profile is obtained. The experiment is the first demonstration to our knowledge of particle beam profile diagnostics using a fiber optic laser pulse transmission line.

  20. A compact time-of-flight SANS instrument optimised for measurements of small sample volumes at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kynde, Søren; Hewitt Klenø, Kaspar; Nagy, Gergely; Mortensen, Kell; Lefmann, Kim; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Arleth, Lise

    2014-11-01

    The high flux at European Spallation Source (ESS) will allow for performing experiments with relatively small beam-sizes while maintaining a high intensity of the incoming beam. The pulsed nature of the source makes the facility optimal for time-of-flight small-angle neutron scattering (ToF-SANS). We find that a relatively compact SANS instrument becomes the optimal choice in order to obtain the widest possible q-range in a single setting and the best possible exploitation of the neutrons in each pulse and hence obtaining the highest possible flux at the sample position. The instrument proposed in the present article is optimised for performing fast measurements of small scattering volumes, typically down to 2×2×2 mm3, while covering a broad q-range from about 0.005 1/Å to 0.5 1/Å in a single instrument setting. This q-range corresponds to that available at a typical good BioSAXS instrument and is relevant for a wide set of biomacromolecular samples. A central advantage of covering the whole q-range in a single setting is that each sample has to be loaded only once. This makes it convenient to use the fully automated high-throughput flow-through sample changers commonly applied at modern synchrotron BioSAXS-facilities. The central drawback of choosing a very compact instrument is that the resolution in terms of δλ / λ obtained with the short wavelength neutrons becomes worse than what is usually the standard at state-of-the-art SANS instruments. Our McStas based simulations of the instrument performance for a set of characteristic biomacromolecular samples show that the resulting smearing effects still have relatively minor effects on the obtained data and can be compensated for in the data analysis. However, in cases where a better resolution is required in combination with the large simultaneous q-range characteristic of the instrument, we show that this can be obtained by inserting a set of choppers.

  1. Pulse Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hands On!, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity using computer software to investigate the role of the heart and blood, how the blood system responds to exercise, and how pulse rate is a good measure of physical condition. (ASK)

  2. Pulse stretcher

    DOEpatents

    Horton, James A.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus (20) for increasing the length of a laser pulse to reduce its peak power without substantial loss in the average power of the pulse. The apparatus (20) uses a White cell (10) having a plurality of optical delay paths (18a-18d) of successively increasing number of passes between the field mirror (13) and the objective mirrors (11 and 12). A pulse (26) from a laser (27) travels through a multi-leg reflective path (28) between a beam splitter (21) and a totally reflective mirror (24) to the laser output (37). The laser pulse (26) is also simultaneously injected through the beam splitter (21) to the input mirrors (14a-14d) of the optical delay paths (18a-18d). The pulses from the output mirrors (16a-16d) of the optical delay paths (18a-18d) go simultaneously to the laser output (37) and to the input mirrors ( 14b-14d) of the longer optical delay paths. The beam splitter (21) is 50% reflective and 50% transmissive to provide equal attenuation of all of the pulses at the laser output (37).

  3. Neutron production enhancements for the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, E. B.

    1999-01-04

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) was the first high energy spallation neutron source in the US dedicated to materials research. It has operated for sixteen years, and in that time has had a very prolific record concerning the development of new target and moderator systems for pulsed spallation sources. IPNS supports a very productive user program on its thirteen instruments, which are oversubscribed by more than two times, meanwhile having an excellent overall reliability of 95%. Although the proton beam power is relatively low at 7 kW, the target and moderator systems are very efficient. The typical beam power which gives an equivalent flux for long-wavelength neutrons is about 60 kW, due to the use of a uranium target and liquid and solid methane moderators, precluded at some sources due to a higher accelerator power. The development of new target and moderator systems is by no means stagnant at IPNS. They are presently considering numerous enhancements to the target and moderators that offer prospects for increasing the useful neutron production by substantial factors. Many of these enhancements could be combined, although their combined benefit has not yet been well established. Meanwhile, IPNS is embarking on a coherent program of study concerning these improvements and their possible combination and implementation. Moreover, any improvements accomplished at IPNS would immediately increase the performance of IPNS instruments.

  4. Bacterial Spores in Granite Survive Hypervelocity Launch by Spallation: Implications for Lithopanspermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo-Cavazos, Patricia; Langenhorst, Falko; Melosh, H. Jay; Nicholson, Wayne L.

    2009-09-01

    Bacterial spores are considered good candidates for endolithic life-forms that could survive interplanetary transport by natural impact processes, i. e., lithopanspermia. Organisms within rock can only embark on an interplanetary journey if they survive ejection from the surface of the donor planet and the associated extremes of compressional shock, heating, and acceleration. Previous simulation experiments have measured each of these three stresses more or less in isolation of one another, and results to date indicate that spores of the model organism Bacillus subtilis can survive each stress applied singly. Few simulations, however, have combined all three stresses simultaneously. Because considerable experimental and theoretical evidence supports a spallation mechanism for launch, we devised an experimental simulation of launch by spallation using the Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR). B. subtilis spores were applied to the surface of a granite target that was impacted from above by an aluminum projectile fired at 5.4 km/s. Granite spall fragments were captured in a foam recovery fixture and then recovered and assayed for shock damage by transmission electron microscopy and for spore survival by viability assays. Peak shock pressure at the impact site was calculated to be 57.1 Pa, though recovered spall fragments were only very lightly shocked at pressures of 5-7 GPa. Spore survival was calculated to be on the order of 10-5, which is in agreement with results of previous static compressional shock experiments. These results demonstrate that endolithic spores can survive launch by spallation from a hypervelocity impact, which lends further evidence in favor of lithopanspermia theory.

  5. Bacterial spores in granite survive hypervelocity launch by spallation: implications for lithopanspermia.

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Cavazos, Patricia; Langenhorst, Falko; Melosh, H Jay; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2009-09-01

    Bacterial spores are considered good candidates for endolithic life-forms that could survive interplanetary transport by natural impact processes, i.e., lithopanspermia. Organisms within rock can only embark on an interplanetary journey if they survive ejection from the surface of the donor planet and the associated extremes of compressional shock, heating, and acceleration. Previous simulation experiments have measured each of these three stresses more or less in isolation of one another, and results to date indicate that spores of the model organism Bacillus subtilis can survive each stress applied singly. Few simulations, however, have combined all three stresses simultaneously. Because considerable experimental and theoretical evidence supports a spallation mechanism for launch, we devised an experimental simulation of launch by spallation using the Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR). B. subtilis spores were applied to the surface of a granite target that was impacted from above by an aluminum projectile fired at 5.4 km/s. Granite spall fragments were captured in a foam recovery fixture and then recovered and assayed for shock damage by transmission electron microscopy and for spore survival by viability assays. Peak shock pressure at the impact site was calculated to be 57.1 GPa, though recovered spall fragments were only very lightly shocked at pressures of 5-7 GPa. Spore survival was calculated to be on the order of 10(-5), which is in agreement with results of previous static compressional shock experiments. These results demonstrate that endolithic spores can survive launch by spallation from a hypervelocity impact, which lends further evidence in favor of lithopanspermia theory.

  6. Bacterial spores in granite survive hypervelocity launch by spallation: implications for lithopanspermia.

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Cavazos, Patricia; Langenhorst, Falko; Melosh, H Jay; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2009-09-01

    Bacterial spores are considered good candidates for endolithic life-forms that could survive interplanetary transport by natural impact processes, i.e., lithopanspermia. Organisms within rock can only embark on an interplanetary journey if they survive ejection from the surface of the donor planet and the associated extremes of compressional shock, heating, and acceleration. Previous simulation experiments have measured each of these three stresses more or less in isolation of one another, and results to date indicate that spores of the model organism Bacillus subtilis can survive each stress applied singly. Few simulations, however, have combined all three stresses simultaneously. Because considerable experimental and theoretical evidence supports a spallation mechanism for launch, we devised an experimental simulation of launch by spallation using the Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR). B. subtilis spores were applied to the surface of a granite target that was impacted from above by an aluminum projectile fired at 5.4 km/s. Granite spall fragments were captured in a foam recovery fixture and then recovered and assayed for shock damage by transmission electron microscopy and for spore survival by viability assays. Peak shock pressure at the impact site was calculated to be 57.1 GPa, though recovered spall fragments were only very lightly shocked at pressures of 5-7 GPa. Spore survival was calculated to be on the order of 10(-5), which is in agreement with results of previous static compressional shock experiments. These results demonstrate that endolithic spores can survive launch by spallation from a hypervelocity impact, which lends further evidence in favor of lithopanspermia theory. PMID:19778276

  7. Testing Procedures and Results of the Prototype Fundamental Power Coupler for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stirbet, M; Campisi, I E; Daly, E F; Davis, G K; Drury, M; Kneisel, P; Myneni, G; Powers, T; Schneider, W J; Wilson, K M; Kang, Y; Cummings, K A; Hardek, T

    2001-06-01

    High-power RF testing with peak power in excess of 500 kW has been performed on prototype Fundamental Power Couplers (FPC) for the Spallation Neutron Source superconducting (SNS) cavities. The testing followed the development of procedures for cleaning, assembling and preparing the FPC for installation in the test stand. The qualification of the couplers has occurred for the time being only in a limited set of conditions (travelling wave, 20 pps) as the available RF system and control instrumentation are under improvement.

  8. Mitigation and Prediction of Spallation of Oxide Scales on Ferritic Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y. S.; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Xu, Zhijie; Xu, Wei; Koeppel, Brian J.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2015-02-04

    This report summarizes results from experimental and modeling studies performed by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on behalf of the Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Core Technology Program. The results indicate that application of physical surface modifications, such as surface blasting, prior to application of protective surface coatings can substantially increase oxide scale spallation resistance during long-term exposure to elevated temperatures (e.g., 800-850ºC). To better understand and predict the benefits of surface modification, an integrated modeling framework was developed and applied to the obtained experimental results.

  9. Facility for fast neutron irradiation tests of electronics at the ISIS spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Andreani, C.; Pietropaolo, A.; Salsano, A.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Gerardin, S.; Frost, C. D.; Ansell, S.; Platt, S. P.

    2008-03-17

    The VESUVIO beam line at the ISIS spallation neutron source was set up for neutron irradiation tests in the neutron energy range above 10 MeV. The neutron flux and energy spectrum were shown, in benchmark activation measurements, to provide a neutron spectrum similar to the ambient one at sea level, but with an enhancement in intensity of a factor of 10{sup 7}. Such conditions are suitable for accelerated testing of electronic components, as was demonstrated here by measurements of soft error rates in recent technology field programable gate arrays.

  10. Spallation neutron source saddle antenna H{sup -} ion source project

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim; Johnson, Rolland P.; Dudnikova, Galina; Stockli, Martin; Welton, Robert

    2010-02-15

    In this project we are developing an H{sup -} source which will synthesize the most important developments in the field of negative ion sources to provide high current, high brightness, good lifetime, high reliability, and high power efficiency. We describe two planned modifications to the present spallation neutron source external antenna source in order to increase the plasma density near the output aperture: (1) replacing the present 2 MHz plasma-forming solenoid antenna with a 13 MHz saddle-type antenna and (2) replacing the permanent multicusp magnetic system with a weaker electromagnet.

  11. Spallation Neutrons and Pressure SNAP DE-FG02-03ER46085 CLOSE-OUT MAY 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Parise, John B

    2009-05-22

    The purpose of the grant was to build a community of scientist and to draw upon their expertise to design and build the world's first dedicated high pressure beamline at a spallation source - the so called Spallation Neutron And Pressure (SNAP) beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at OAk Ridge NAtional LAboratory. . Key to this endeavor was an annual meeting attended by the instrument design team and the executive committee. The discussions at those meeting set an ambitious agenda for beamline design and construction and highlighted key science areas of interest for the community. This report documents in 4 appendices the deliberations at the annual SNAP meetings and the evolution of the beamline optics from concept to construction. The appendices also contain key science opportunities for extreme conditions research.

  12. Spallation Source Modelling for an ADS Using the MCNPX and GEANT4 Packages for Sensitivity Analysis of Reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolin, M. Q.; Marinho, F.; Palma, D. A. P.; Martinez, A. S.

    2014-04-01

    A simulation for the time evolution of the MYRRHA conceptual reactor was developed. The SERPENT code was used to simulate the nuclear fuel depletion and the spallation source which drives the system was simulated using both MCNPX and GEANT4 packages. The obtained results for the neutron energy spectrum from the spallation are coherent with each other and were used as input for the SERPENT code which simulated a constant power operation regime. The obtained results show that the criticality of the system is not sensitive to the spallation models employed and only relative small deviations with respect to the inverse kinetic model coming from the point kinetic equations proposed by Gandini were observed.

  13. Big-bang nucleosynthesis with a long-lived charged massive particle including {sup 4}He spallation processes in a bound state

    SciTech Connect

    Jittoh, Toshifumi; Kohri, Kazunori; Koike, Masafumi; Sato, Joe; Sugai, Kenichi; Yamanaka, Masato; Yazaki, Koichi

    2012-07-27

    We propose helium-4 spallation processes induced by long-lived stau in supersymmetric standard models, and investigate an impact of the processes on light elements abundances. We show that, as long as the phase space of helium-4 spallation processes is open, they are more important than stau-catalyzed fusion and hence constrain the stau property.

  14. Magnetic structures of actinide materials by pulsed neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, A.C.; Goldstone, J.A.; Huber, J.G.; Giorgi, A.L.; Conant, J.W.; Severing, A.; Cort, B.; Robinson, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    We describe some attempts to observe magnetic structure in various actinide (5f-electron) materials. Our experimental technique is neutron powder diffraction as practiced at a spallation (pulsed) neutron source. We will discuss our investigations of {alpha}-Pu, {delta}-Pu, {alpha}-UD{sub 3} and {beta}-UD{sub 3}. {beta}-UD{sub 3} is a simple ferromagnet: surprisingly, the moments on the two non-equivalent uranium atoms are the same within experimental error. {alpha}-UD{sub 3}, {alpha}-Pu and {delta}-Pu are non-magnetic, within the limits of our observations. Our work with pulsed neutron diffraction shows that it is a useful technique for research on magnetic materials.

  15. Multifunctional optical correlator for picosecond ultraviolet laser pulse measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhman, Abdurahim; Wang, Yang; Garcia, Frances; Long, Cary D.; Huang, Chunning; Takeda, Yasuhiro; Liu, Yun

    2014-01-01

    A compact optical correlator system that measures both the autocorrelation between two infrared (IR) lights and the cross-correlation between an IR and an ultraviolet (UV) light using a single nonlinear optical crystal has been designed and experimentally demonstrated. The rapid scanning of optical delay line, switching between auto and cross-correlations, crystal angle tuning, and data acquisition and processing are all computer controlled. Pulse widths of an IR light from a mode-locked laser are measured by the correlator and the results are compared with a direct measurement using a high-speed photodetector system. The correlator has been used to study the parameter dependence of the pulse width of a macropulse UV laser designed for laser-assisted hydrogen ion (H-) beam stripping for the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  16. Multifunctional optical correlator for picosecond ultraviolet laser pulse measurement

    DOE PAGES

    Rakhman, Abdurahim; Wang, Yang; Garcia, Frances; Long, Cary D.; Huang, Chunning; Takeda, Yasuhiro; Liu, Yun

    2014-01-01

    A compact optical correlator system that measures both the autocorrelation between two infrared (IR) lights and the cross-correlation between an IR and an ultraviolet (UV) light using a single nonlinear optical crystal has been designed and experimentally demonstrated. The rapid scanning of optical delay line, switching between auto and cross-correlations, crystal angle tuning, and data acquisition and processing are all computer controlled. Pulse widths of an IR light from a mode-locked laser are measured by the correlator and the results are compared with a direct measurement using a high-speed photodetector system. The correlator has been used to study the parametermore » dependence of the pulse width of a macropulse UV laser designed for laser-assisted hydrogen ion (H-) beam stripping for the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.« less

  17. PULSE COUNTER

    DOEpatents

    Trumbo, D.E.

    1959-02-10

    A transistorized pulse-counting circuit adapted for use with nuclear radiation detecting detecting devices to provide a small, light weight portable counter is reported. The small size and low power requirements of the transistor are of particular value in this instance. The circuit provides an adjustable count scale with a single transistor which is triggered by the accumulated charge on a storage capacitor.

  18. Computational Benchmark Calculations Relevant to the Neutronic Design of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Gallmeier, F.X.; Glasgow, D.C.; Jerde, E.A.; Johnson, J.O.; Yugo, J.J.

    1999-11-14

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will provide an intense source of low-energy neutrons for experimental use. The low-energy neutrons are produced by the interaction of a high-energy (1.0 GeV) proton beam on a mercury (Hg) target and slowed down in liquid hydrogen or light water moderators. Computer codes and computational techniques are being benchmarked against relevant experimental data to validate and verify the tools being used to predict the performance of the SNS. The LAHET Code System (LCS), which includes LAHET, HTAPE ad HMCNP (a modified version of MCNP version 3b), have been applied to the analysis of experiments that were conducted in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In the AGS experiments, foils of various materials were placed around a mercury-filled stainless steel cylinder, which was bombarded with protons at 1.6 GeV. Neutrons created in the mercury target, activated the foils. Activities of the relevant isotopes were accurately measured and compared with calculated predictions. Measurements at BNL were provided in part by collaborating scientists from JAERI as part of the AGS Spallation Target Experiment (ASTE) collaboration. To date, calculations have shown good agreement with measurements.

  19. Spallation reactions in shock waves at supernova explosions and related problems

    SciTech Connect

    Ustinova, G. K.

    2013-05-15

    The isotopic anomalies of some extinct radionuclides testify to the outburst of a nearby supernova just before the collapse of the protosolar nebula, and to the fact that the supernova was Sn Ia, i.e. the carbon-detonation supernova. A key role of spallation reactions in the formation of isotopic anomalies in the primordial matter of the Solar System is revealed. It is conditioned by the diffusive acceleration of particles in the explosive shock waves, which leads to the amplification of rigidity of the energy spectrum of particles and its enrichment with heavier ions. The quantitative calculations of such isotopic anomalies of many elements are presented. It is well-grounded that the anomalous Xe-HL in meteoritic nanodiamonds was formed simultaneously with nanodiamonds themselves during the shock wave propagation at the Sn Ia explosion. The possible effects of shock wave fractionation of noble gases in the atmosphere of planets are considered. The origin of light elements Li, Be and B in spallation reactions, predicted by Fowler in the middle of the last century, is argued. All the investigated isotopic anomalies give the evidence for the extremely high magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) conditions at the initial stage of free expansion of the explosive shock wave from Sn Ia, which can be essential in solution of the problem of origin of cosmic rays. The specific iron-enriched matter of Sn Ia and its MHD-separation in turbulent processes must be taking into account in the models of origin of the Solar System.

  20. Study of the Production of Radioactive Isotopes through Cosmic Muon Spallation in KamLAND

    SciTech Connect

    KamLAND Collaboration; Abe, S.; Enomoto, S.; Furuno, K.; Gando, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kibe, Y.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Minekawa, Y.; Mitsui, T.; Nakajima, K.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, M.; Shimizu, I.; Shimizu, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Terashima, A.; Watanabe, H.; Yonezawa, E.; Yoshida, S.; Kozlov, A.; Murayama, H.; Busenitz, J.; Classen, T.; Grant, C.; Keefer, G.; Leonard, D. S.; McKee, D.; Piepke, A.; Banks, T. I.; Bloxham, T.; Detwiler, J. A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Gray, F.; Guardincerri, E.; Hsu, L.; Ichimura, K.; Kadel, R.; Lendvai, C.; Luk, K.-B.; O'Donnell, T.; Steiner, H. M.; Winslow, L. A.; Dwyer, D. A.; Jillings, C.; Mauger, C.; McKeown, R. D.; Vogel, P.; Zhang, C.; Berger, B. E.; Lane, C. E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Pakvasa, S.; Foster, J.; Horton-Smith, G. A.; Tang, A.; Dazeley, S.; Downum, K. E.; Gratta, G.; Tolich, K.; Bugg, W.; Efremenko, Y.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Heeger, K. M.; Piquemal, F.; Ricol, J.-S.; Decowski, M. P.

    2009-06-30

    Radioactive isotopes produced through cosmic muon spallation are a background for rare event detection in {nu} detectors, double-beta-decay experiments, and dark-matter searches. Understanding the nature of cosmogenic backgrounds is particularly important for future experiments aiming to determine the pep and CNO solar neutrino fluxes, for which the background is dominated by the spallation production of {sup 11}C. Data from the Kamioka Liquid scintillator Anti-Neutrino Detector (KamLAND) provides valuable information for better understanding these backgrounds, especially in liquid scintillator, and for checking estimates from current simulations based upon MUSIC, FLUKA, and Geant4. Using the time correlation between detected muons and neutron captures, the neutron production yield in the KamLAND liquid scintillator is measured to be (2.8 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -4} n/({mu} {center_dot} (g/cm{sup 2})). For other isotopes, the production yield is determined from the observed time correlation related to known isotope lifetimes. We find some yields are inconsistent with extrapolations based on an accelerator muon beam experiment.

  1. Production of radioactive isotopes through cosmic muon spallation in KamLAND

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, S.; Furuno, K.; Gando, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Kibe, Y.; Kishimoto, Y.; Minekawa, Y.; Mitsui, T.; Nakajima, K.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, M.; Shimizu, I.; Shimizu, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Terashima, A.; Watanabe, H.

    2010-02-15

    Radioactive isotopes produced through cosmic muon spallation are a background for rare-event detection in nu detectors, double-beta-decay experiments, and dark-matter searches. Understanding the nature of cosmogenic backgrounds is particularly important for future experiments aiming to determine the pep and CNO solar neutrino fluxes, for which the background is dominated by the spallation production of {sup 11}C. Data from the Kamioka liquid-scintillator antineutrino detector (KamLAND) provides valuable information for better understanding these backgrounds, especially in liquid scintillators, and for checking estimates from current simulations based upon MUSIC, FLUKA, and GEANT4. Using the time correlation between detected muons and neutron captures, the neutron production yield in the KamLAND liquid scintillator is measured to be Y{sub n}=(2.8+-0.3)x10{sup -4} mu{sup -1} g{sup -1} cm{sup 2}. For other isotopes, the production yield is determined from the observed time correlation related to known isotope lifetimes. We find some yields are inconsistent with extrapolations based on an accelerator muon beam experiment.

  2. Waste heat recovery from the European Spallation Source cryogenic helium plants - implications for system design

    SciTech Connect

    Jurns, John M.; Bäck, Harald; Gierow, Martin

    2014-01-29

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) neutron spallation project currently being designed will be built outside of Lund, Sweden. The ESS design includes three helium cryoplants, providing cryogenic cooling for the proton accelerator superconducting cavities, the target neutron source, and for the ESS instrument suite. In total, the cryoplants consume approximately 7 MW of electrical power, and will produce approximately 36 kW of refrigeration at temperatures ranging from 2-16 K. Most of the power consumed by the cryoplants ends up as waste heat, which must be rejected. One hallmark of the ESS design is the goal to recycle waste heat from ESS to the city of Lund district heating system. The design of the cooling system must optimize the delivery of waste heat from ESS to the district heating system and also assure the efficient operation of ESS systems. This report outlines the cooling scheme for the ESS cryoplants, and examines the effect of the cooling system design on cryoplant design, availability and operation.

  3. Coupled Ablation, Heat Conduction, Pyrolysis, Shape Change and Spallation of the Galileo Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Y.-K.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The Galileo probe enters the atmosphere of Jupiter in December 1995. This paper presents numerical methodology and detailed results of our final pre-impact calculations for the heat shield response. The calculations are performed using a highly modified version of a viscous shock layer code with massive radiation coupled with a surface thermochemical ablation and spallation model and with the transient in-depth thermal response of the charring and ablating heat shield. The flowfield is quasi-steady along the trajectory, but the heat shield thermal response is dynamic. Each surface node of the VSL grid is coupled with a one-dimensional thermal response calculation. The thermal solver includes heat conduction, pyrolysis, and grid movement owing to surface recession. Initial conditions for the heat shield temperature and density were obtained from the high altitude rarefied-flow calculations of Haas and Milos. Galileo probe surface temperature, shape, mass flux, and element flux are all determined as functions of time along the trajectory with spallation varied parametrically. The calculations also estimate the in-depth density and temperature profiles for the heat shield. All this information is required to determine the time-dependent vehicle mass and drag coefficient which are necessary inputs for the atmospheric reconstruction experiment on board the probe.

  4. Spallation neutron production and the current intra-nuclear cascade and transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filges, D.; Goldenbaum, F.; Enke, M.; Galin, J.; Herbach, C.-M.; Hilscher, D.; Jahnke, U.; Letourneau, A.; Lott, B.; Neef, R.-D.; Nünighoff, K.; Paul, N.; Péghaire, A.; Pienkowski, L.; Schaal, H.; Schröder, U.; Sterzenbach, G.; Tietze, A.; Tishchenko, V.; Toke, J.; Wohlmuther, M.

    A recent renascent interest in energetic proton-induced production of neutrons originates largely from the inception of projects for target stations of intense spallation neutron sources, like the planned European Spallation Source (ESS), accelerator-driven nuclear reactors, nuclear waste transmutation, and also from the application for radioactive beams. In the framework of such a neutron production, of major importance is the search for ways for the most efficient conversion of the primary beam energy into neutron production. Although the issue has been quite successfully addressed experimentally by varying the incident proton energy for various target materials and by covering a huge collection of different target geometries --providing an exhaustive matrix of benchmark data-- the ultimate challenge is to increase the predictive power of transport codes currently on the market. To scrutinize these codes, calculations of reaction cross-sections, hadronic interaction lengths, average neutron multiplicities, neutron multiplicity and energy distributions, and the development of hadronic showers are confronted with recent experimental data of the NESSI collaboration. Program packages like HERMES, LCS or MCNPX master the prevision of reaction cross-sections, hadronic interaction lengths, averaged neutron multiplicities and neutron multiplicity distributions in thick and thin targets for a wide spectrum of incident proton energies, geometrical shapes and materials of the target generally within less than 10% deviation, while production cross-section measurements for light charged particles on thin targets point out that appreciable distinctions exist within these models.

  5. Waste heat recovery from the European Spallation Source cryogenic helium plants - implications for system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurns, John M.; Bäck, Harald; Gierow, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) neutron spallation project currently being designed will be built outside of Lund, Sweden. The ESS design includes three helium cryoplants, providing cryogenic cooling for the proton accelerator superconducting cavities, the target neutron source, and for the ESS instrument suite. In total, the cryoplants consume approximately 7 MW of electrical power, and will produce approximately 36 kW of refrigeration at temperatures ranging from 2-16 K. Most of the power consumed by the cryoplants ends up as waste heat, which must be rejected. One hallmark of the ESS design is the goal to recycle waste heat from ESS to the city of Lund district heating system. The design of the cooling system must optimize the delivery of waste heat from ESS to the district heating system and also assure the efficient operation of ESS systems. This report outlines the cooling scheme for the ESS cryoplants, and examines the effect of the cooling system design on cryoplant design, availability and operation.

  6. Production of radioactive isotopes through cosmic muon spallation in KamLAND

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, S.; Enomoto, S.; Furuno, K.; Gando, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kibe, Y.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Minekawa, Y.; Mitsui, T.; Nakajima, K.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, M.; Shimizu, I.; Shimizu, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Terashima, A.; Watanabe, H.; Yonezawa, E.; Yoshida, S.; Kozlov, A.; Murayama, H.; Busenitz, J.; Classen, T.; Grant, C.; Keefer, G.; Leonard, D. S.; McKee, D.; Piepke, A.; Banks, T. I.; Bloxham, T.; Detwiler, J. A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Gray, F.; Guardincerri, E.; Hsu, L.; Ichimura, K.; Kadel, R.; Lendvai, C.; Luk, K.-B.; O'Donnell, T.; Steiner, H. M.; Winslow, L. A.; Dwyer, D. A.; Jillings, C.; Mauger, C.; McKeown, R. D.; Vogel, P.; Zhang, C.; Berger, B. E.; Lane, C. E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Pakvasa, S.; Foster, J.; Horton-Smith, G. A.; Tang, A.; Dazeley, S.; Downum, K. E.; Gratta, G.; Tolich, K.; Bugg, W.; Efremenko, Y.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Heeger, K. M.; Piquemal, F.; Ricol, J.-S.; Decowski, M. P.; KamLAND Collaboration

    2010-02-01

    Radioactive isotopes produced through cosmic muon spallation are a background for rare-event detection in ν detectors, double-β-decay experiments, and dark-matter searches. Understanding the nature of cosmogenic backgrounds is particularly important for future experiments aiming to determine the pep and CNO solar neutrino fluxes, for which the background is dominated by the spallation production of C11. Data from the Kamioka liquid-scintillator antineutrino detector (KamLAND) provides valuable information for better understanding these backgrounds, especially in liquid scintillators, and for checking estimates from current simulations based upon MUSIC, FLUKA, and GEANT4. Using the time correlation between detected muons and neutron captures, the neutron production yield in the KamLAND liquid scintillator is measured to be Yn=(2.8±0.3)×10-4μ-1g-1cm2. For other isotopes, the production yield is determined from the observed time correlation related to known isotope lifetimes. We find some yields are inconsistent with extrapolations based on an accelerator muon beam experiment.

  7. Assessment of the neutron cross section database for mercury for the ORNL spallation source

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.; Spencer, R.R.; Ingersoll, D.T.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1996-06-01

    Neutron source generation based on a high energy particle accelerator has been considered as an alternative to the canceled Advanced Neutron Source project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The proposed technique consists of a spallation neutron source in which neutrons are produced via the interaction of high-energy charged particles in a heavy metal target. Preliminary studies indicate that liquid mercury bombarded with GeV protons provides an excellent neutron source. Accordingly, a survey has been made of the available neutron cross-section data. Since it is expected that spectral modifiers, specifically moderators, will also be incorporated into the source design, the survey included thermal energy, resonance region, and high energy data. It was found that data of individual isotopes were almost non-existent and that the only evaluation found for the natural element had regions of missing data or discrepant data. Therefore, it appears that to achieve the desired degree of accuracy in the spallation source design it is necessary to re-evaluate the mercury database including making new measurements. During the presentation the currently available data will be presented and experiments proposed which can lead to design quality cross sections.

  8. Spallation reactions in shock waves at supernova explosions and related problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustinova, G. K.

    2013-05-01

    The isotopic anomalies of some extinct radionuclides testify to the outburst of a nearby supernova just before the collapse of the protosolar nebula, and to the fact that the supernova was Sn Ia, i.e. the carbon-detonation supernova. A key role of spallation reactions in the formation of isotopic anomalies in the primordial matter of the Solar System is revealed. It is conditioned by the diffusive acceleration of particles in the explosive shock waves, which leads to the amplification of rigidity of the energy spectrum of particles and its enrichment with heavier ions. The quantitative calculations of such isotopic anomalies of many elements are presented. It is well-grounded that the anomalous Xe- HL in meteoritic nanodiamonds was formed simultaneously with nanodiamonds themselves during the shock wave propagation at the Sn Ia explosion. The possible effects of shock wave fractionation of noble gases in the atmosphere of planets are considered. The origin of light elements Li, Be and B in spallation reactions, predicted by Fowler in the middle of the last century, is argued. All the investigated isotopic anomalies give the evidence for the extremely high magneto- hydrodynamics (MHD) conditions at the initial stage of free expansion of the explosive shock wave from Sn Ia, which can be essential in solution of the problem of origin of cosmic rays. The specific iron-enriched matter of Sn Ia and its MHD-separation in turbulent processes must be taking into account in the models of origin of the Solar System.

  9. HEIMDAL: A thermal neutron powder diffractometer with high and flexible resolution combined with SANS and neutron imaging - Designed for materials science studies at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, Sonja L.; Lefmann, Kim; Henry, Paul F.; Bertelsen, Mads; Schefer, Jürg; Christensen, Mogens

    2016-08-01

    HEIMDAL will be a multi length scale neutron scattering instrument for the study of structures covering almost nine orders of magnitude from 0.01 nm to 50 mm. The instrument is accepted for construction at the European Spallation Source (ESS) and features a variable resolution thermal neutron powder diffractometer (TNPD), combined with small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron imaging (NI). The instrument uses a novel combination of a cold and a thermal guide to fulfill the diverse requirements for diffraction and SANS. With an instrument length of 170 m, HEIMDAL will take advantage of the high neutron flux of the long pulse at ESS, whilst maintaining a high q-resolution due to the long flight path. The q-range coverage is up to 20 Å-1 allowing low-resolution PDF analysis. With the addition of SANS, HEIMDAL will be able to cover a uniquely broad length scale within a single instrumental set-up. HEIMDAL will be able to accommodate modern materials research in a broad variety of fields, and the task of the instrument will be to study advanced functional materials in action, as in situ and in operandi at multiple length scales (0.01-100 nm) quasi simultaneously. The instrument combines state-of-the-art neutron scattering techniques (TNPD, SANS, and NI) with the goal of studying real materials, in real time, under real conditions. This article describes the instrument design ideas, calculations and results of simulations and virtual experiments.

  10. Measurement of adhesion strength of solid-state diffusion bonding between nickel and copper by means of laser shock spallation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satou, Manabu; Akamatsu, Hitoshi; Hasegawa, Akira

    2009-06-01

    Coating and bonding techniques between different materials are essential to the field of technology. Bonding mechanism is of interest from scientific points of view. Several works concerning to the strength such bonding have been revealed that the strength depended on crystallographic orientations, differences of thermal expansion and chemical affinity and so on. The methods adopted for those measurements had uncertainties due to plastic deformation near the interface. A laser shock spallation method was utilized to measure adhesion strength of the bonding in this paper to minimize the deformation outside of the interface. A well-established method to make bonding between unalloyed nickel and copper was utilized, that was solid-state diffusion bonding at elevated temperatures. Irradiation by Nd:YAG laser with 7ns-pulse width created shock wave that caused tensile stress after reflection at free surface. The stress depended on laser power and was estimated by surface velocity profile measured by a laser interferometer. The adhesion strength was determined by the critical laser power that caused exfoliation of the bonding interface.

  11. Helium and hydrogen generation in pure metals irradiated with high-energy protons and spallation neutrons in LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, B. M.; James, M. R.; Garner, F. A.; Maloy, S. A.

    2002-12-01

    High-power spallation neutron sources will require accurate estimates of cross-sections for generation of He and H in structural materials. At high-proton energies, very high levels of gas atoms are generated in all constituents of typical iron-based and nickel-based structural alloys, with He typically ˜150 appm/dpa and H at levels ˜3-5 times higher. Improved estimates of these cross-sections have been derived from a series of irradiations conducted at relatively low temperatures (<100 °C) in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center as part of a test program supporting the Accelerator Production of Tritium Program. Pure metal dosimetry foils were irradiated in two different spectra ranging from ˜800 MeV protons to a mixed distribution of both protons and spallation neutrons. Most of the gas production was due to spallation reactions with the proton beam, although gas and especially damage production from lower-energy spallation neutrons became more significant at the mixed proton/neutron location. The measured He concentrations are similar to those derived in other proton environments, but larger by about a factor of two than those calculated using the LAHET/MCNPX code system. Unlike He, the measured H retention levels are affected by diffusional losses, but H is still retained at rather high concentrations, allowing a lower bound estimate of the H generation cross-sections.

  12. Simulation of impact/explosive driven spallation in metals: comparative study of damage and dynamic strength models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikkurthi, V. R.; Chaturvedi, S.

    2012-07-01

    Spallation refers to fracture occurring in materials due to tensile loading. This paper presents an overview of our extensive one- and two-dimensional simulations done to study spallation in impact/explosive loaded Copper or Mild Steel targets, using an Arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian hydrocode. Three methods of computing the spall strength and spall thickness have been employed. The computed spall parameters have been compared with Russian spall experiments. In impact loaded targets, due to a square shock wave, only one scab has been observed. In the case of explosive loading, as the rarefaction associated with the incoming shock wave is triangular, there occur many high-tension regions leading to the formation of multiple scabs (typically 2-3 scabs). Effect of flier velocity and target temperature on spallation has been studied. These trends match with experiments. Edge effects due to finite diameter of the target attenuate the incoming shock wave by lateral release, resulting in more marked damage near the axis than on the periphery. Four damage models and three dynamic strength models have been examined to determine the best-suited model for spallation studies. It is found that the Void Growth (VG) damage model and Zerilli-Armstrong strength model yield spall parameters close to experiments.

  13. Pulsed hydrojet

    DOEpatents

    Bohachevsky, I.O.; Torrey, M.D.

    1986-06-10

    An underwater pulsed hydrojet propulsion system is provided for accelerating and propelling a projectile or other vessel. A reactant, such as lithium, is fluidized and injected into a water volume. The resulting reaction produces an energy density in a time effective to form a steam pocket. Thrust flaps or baffles direct the pressure from the steam pocket toward an exit nozzle for accelerating a water volume to create thrust. A control system regulates the dispersion of reactant to control thrust characteristics.

  14. 1.1 MW peak power in doubly QML composite Nd:YVO4/Nd:YVO4/Nd:YVO4/KTP sub-nanosecond green laser with EO and Bi-GaAs.

    PubMed

    Li, Shixia; Li, Dechun; Zhao, Shengzhi; Li, Guiqiu; Li, Xiangyang; Qiao, Hui

    2016-02-22

    By simultaneously employing electro-optic (EO) modulator and Bi-doped GaAs, dual-loss-modulated Q-switched and mode-locked (QML) multi-segment composite Nd:YVO4/Nd:YVO4/Nd:YVO4/KTP sub-nanosecond green laser is demonstrated with low repetition rate and high peak power. When the incident pump power is up to 6.93 W, only one mode-locking pulse underneath a Q-switching envelope is generated with sub-nanosecond pulse duration at one kilohertz repetition rate. An average output power of 445 mW and a pulse duration of 399 ps are obtained with the incident pump power of 11.13 W, corresponding to a peak power of 1.115 MW which is the highest one in doubly QML sub-nanosecond green laser by now. The laser characteristics are better than those obtained with EO and GaAs. The experimental results indicate that Bi-GaAs is a promising saturable absorber for dual-loss-modulated QML laser.

  15. A comparison of four direct geometry time-of-flight spectrometers at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Matthew B; Niedziela, Jennifer L; Abernathy, Douglas L; Debeer-Schmitt, Lisa M; Garlea, Vasile O; Granroth, Garrett E; Graves-Brook, Melissa K; Ehlers, Georg; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Podlesnyak, Andrey A; Winn, Barry L

    2014-04-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory now hosts four direct geometry time-of-flight chopper spectrometers. These instruments cover a range of wave vector and energy transfer space with varying degrees of neutron flux and resolution. The regions of reciprocal and energy space available to measure at these instruments is not exclusive and overlaps significantly. We present a direct comparison of the capabilities of this instrumentation, conducted by data mining the instrument usage histories, and specific scanning regimes. In addition, one of the common science missions for these instruments is the study of magnetic excitations in condensed matter systems. We have measured the powder averaged spin wave spectra in one particular sample using each of these instruments, and use these data in our comparisons.

  16. A comparison of four direct geometry time-of-flight spectrometers at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M. B.; Abernathy, D. L.; Ehlers, G.; Garlea, O.; Podlesnyak, A.; Winn, B.; Niedziela, J. L.; DeBeer-Schmitt, L.; Graves-Brook, M.; Granroth, G. E.; Kolesnikov, A. I.

    2014-04-15

    The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory now hosts four direct geometry time-of-flight chopper spectrometers. These instruments cover a range of wave-vector and energy transfer space with varying degrees of neutron flux and resolution. The regions of reciprocal and energy space available to measure at these instruments are not exclusive and overlap significantly. We present a direct comparison of the capabilities of this instrumentation, conducted by data mining the instrument usage histories, and specific scanning regimes. In addition, one of the common science missions for these instruments is the study of magnetic excitations in condensed matter systems. We have measured the powder averaged spin wave spectra in one particular sample using each of these instruments, and use these data in our comparisons.

  17. Acceptance scan technique for the drift tube linac of the spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, D.; Stovall, J.; Takeda, H.; Nath, S.; Billen, J.; Young, L.; Kisselev, I.; Shishlo, A.; Aleksandrov, A.; Assadi, S.; Chu, C. M.; Cousineau, S.; Danilov, V.; Galambos, J.; Henderson, S.; Kim, S.; Kravchuk, L.; Tanke, E.

    2007-01-01

    For high intensity proton accelerators, it is vital to reduce the machine activation by minimizing the beam loss from many sources. One of such sources is longitudinal mismatch. To minimize a potential mismatch, it is important to set accurately the rf set-point (rf field amplitude and phase) of a high-intensity linac such as the drift tube linac (DTL) of the spallation neutron source. A widely used technique called the acceptance scan was studied extensively and applied successfully to tune the DTL tanks since the initial commissioning. From the acceptance scan one can obtain the longitudinal beam profile at the entrance of each DTL tank. But except tank 1, acceptance scan alone cannot determine the incoming beam energy deviation, leading to small uncertainties in the rf set point.

  18. Geant4 simulations of the neutron production and transport in the n_TOF spallation target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerendegui-Marco, J.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Guerrero, C.; Quesada, J. M.

    2016-11-01

    The neutron production and transport in the spallation target of the n_TOF facility at CERN has been simulated with Geant4. The results obtained with the different hadronic Physics Lists provided by Geant4 have been compared with the experimental neutron flux in n_TOF-EAR1. The best overall agreement in both the absolute value and the energy dependence of the flux from thermal to 1GeV, is obtained with the INCL++ model coupled with the Fritiof Model(FTFP). This Physics List has been thus used to simulate and study the main features of the new n_TOF-EAR2 beam line, currently in its commissioning phase.

  19. EXPERIENCE WITH COLLABORATIVE DEVELOPMENT FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE FROM A PARTNER LAB PERSPECTIVE.

    SciTech Connect

    HOFF, L.T.

    2005-10-10

    Collaborative development and operation of large physics experiments is fairly common. Less common is the collaborative development or operation of accelerators. A current example of the latter is the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The SNS project was conceived as a collaborative effort between six DOE facilities. In the SNS case, the control system was also developed collaboratively. The SNS project has now moved beyond the collaborative development phase and into the phase where Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) is integrating contributions from collaborating ''partner labs'' and is beginning accelerator operations. In this paper, the author reflects on the benefits and drawbacks of the collaborative development of an accelerator control system as implemented for the SNS project from the perspective of a partner lab.

  20. Development of a fast traveling-wave beam chopper for the National Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S.S.; Jason, A.J.; Krawczyk, F.L.; Power, J.

    1997-10-01

    High current and severe restrictions on beam losses, below 1 nA/m, in the designed linac for the National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS) require clean and fast--with the rise time from 2% to 98% less than 2.5 ns to accommodate a 402.5-MHz beam structure--beam chopping in its front end, at the beam energy 2.5 MeV. The R and D program includes both modification of the existing LANSCE coax-plate chopper to reduce parasitic coupling between adjacent plates, and development of new traveling-wave deflecting structures, in particular, based on a meander line. Using analytical methods and three-dimensional time-domain computer simulations the authors study transient effects in such structures to choose an optimal chopper design.

  1. Coincidence Doppler broadening study of Eurofer 97 irradiated in spallation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabelová, V.; Kršjak, V.; Kuriplach, J.; Dai, Y.; Slugeň, V.

    2015-03-01

    The behavior of transmutation helium during isochronal annealing of irradiated Eurofer 97 was investigated using coincidence Doppler broadening spectroscopy (CDBS). The investigated ferritic martensitic steel was irradiated in 2000 and 2001 in the frame of the STIP-II project at the Swiss neutron spallation source (SINQ) (irradiation with neutrons and protons) at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). During isochronal annealing experiment, coarsening of vacancy clusters and/or growth of helium bubbles was observed at T ⩾ 500 °C. This process causes an increase of low-momentum annihilation events and related increase of the S parameter during thermal treatment of material. On the other hand, the maximum concentration of helium in small vacancy clusters (Vn) was observed after annealing at 400 °C, where an excellent correlation with the calculated CDBS profiles of Vn + Hem clusters was found.

  2. Energy-Deposition and Damage Calculations in Core-Vessel Inserts at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, B.D.

    2002-06-25

    Heat-deposition and damage calculations are described for core-vessel inserts in the target area of the Spallation Neutron Source. Two separate designs for these inserts (or neutron beam tubes) were studied; a single-unit insert and a multi-unit insert. The single unit contains a neutron guide; the multi unit does not. Both units are constructed of stainless steel. For the single unit, separate studies were carried out with the guide composed of stainless steel, glass, and aluminum. Results are also reported for an aluminum window on the front of the insert, a layer of nickel on the guide, a cadmium shield surrounding the guide, and a stainless steel plug in the beam-tube opening. The locations of both inserts were the most forward positions to be occupied by each design respectively thus ensuring that the calculations are conservative.

  3. Integrating advanced materials simulation techniques into an automated data analysis workflow at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Borreguero Calvo, Jose M; Campbell, Stuart I; Delaire, Olivier A; Doucet, Mathieu; Goswami, Monojoy; Hagen, Mark E; Lynch, Vickie E; Proffen, Thomas E; Ren, Shelly; Savici, Andrei T; Sumpter, Bobby G

    2014-01-01

    This presentation will review developments on the integration of advanced modeling and simulation techniques into the analysis step of experimental data obtained at the Spallation Neutron Source. A workflow framework for the purpose of refining molecular mechanics force-fields against quasi-elastic neutron scattering data is presented. The workflow combines software components to submit model simulations to remote high performance computers, a message broker interface for communications between the optimizer engine and the simulation production step, and tools to convolve the simulated data with the experimental resolution. A test application shows the correction to a popular fixed-charge water model in order to account polarization effects due to the presence of solvated ions. Future enhancements to the refinement workflow are discussed. This work is funded through the DOE Center for Accelerating Materials Modeling.

  4. A neutron booster for spallation sources—application to accelerator driven systems and isotope production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galy, J.; Magill, J.; Van Dam, H.; Valko, J.

    2002-06-01

    One can design a critical system with fissile material in the form of a thin layer on the inner surface of a cylindrical neutron moderator such as graphite or beryllium. Recently, we have investigated the properties of critical and near critical systems based on the use of thin actinide layers of uranium, plutonium and americium. The thickness of the required fissile layer depends on the type of fissile material, its concentration in the layer and on the geometrical arrangement, but is typically in the μm-mm range. The resulting total mass of fissile material can be as low as 100 g. Thin fissile layers have a variety of applications in nuclear technology—for example in the design neutron amplifiers for medical applications and "fast" islands in thermal reactors for waste incineration. In the present paper, we investigate the properties of a neutron booster unit for spallation sources and isotope production. In those applications a layer of fissile material surrounds the spallation source. Such a module could be developed for spallation targets foreseen in the MYRRHA (L. Van Den Durpel, H. Aı̈t Abderrahim, P. D'hondt, G. Minsart, J.L. Bellefontaine, S. Bodart, B. Ponsard, F. Vermeersch, W. Wacquier. A prototype accelerator driven system in Belgium: the Myrrha project, Technical Committee Meeting on Feasibility and Motivation for Hybrid concepts for Nuclear Energy generation and Transmutation, Madrid, Spain, September 17-19, 1997 [1]). or MEGAPIE (M. Salvatores, G.S. Bauer, G. Heusener. The MEGAPIE initiative: executive outline and status as per November 1999, MPO-1-GB-6/0_GB, 1999 [2]) projects. With a neutron multiplication factor of the booster unit in the range 10-20 (i.e. with a keff of 0.9-0.95), considerably less powerful accelerators would be required to obtain the desired neutron flux. Instead of the powerful accelerators with proton energies of 1 GeV and currents of 10 mA foreseen for accelerator driven systems, similar neutron fluxes can be obtained

  5. Experiment Automation with a Robot Arm using the Liquids Reflectometer Instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Zolnierczuk, Piotr A; Vacaliuc, Bogdan; Sundaram, Madhan; Parizzi, Andre A; Halbert, Candice E; Hoffmann, Michael C; Greene, Gayle C; Browning, Jim; Ankner, John Francis

    2013-01-01

    The Liquids Reflectometer instrument installed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) enables observations of chemical kinetics, solid-state reactions and phase-transitions of thin film materials at both solid and liquid surfaces. Effective measurement of these behaviors requires each sample to be calibrated dynamically using the neutron beam and the data acquisition system in a feedback loop. Since the SNS is an intense neutron source, the time needed to perform the measurement can be the same as the alignment process, leading to a labor-intensive operation that is exhausting to users. An update to the instrument control system, completed in March 2013, implemented the key features of automated sample alignment and robot-driven sample management, allowing for unattended operation over extended periods, lasting as long as 20 hours. We present a case study of the effort, detailing the mechanical, electrical and software modifications that were made as well as the lessons learned during the integration, verification and testing process.

  6. The new Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source -- Design and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlers, Georg; Podlesnyak, Andrey A.; Niedziela, Jennifer L.; Iverson, Erik B.; Sokol, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    The design and performance of the new cold neutron chopper spectrometer (CNCS) at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge are described. CNCS is a direct-geometry inelastic time-of-flight spectrometer, designed essentially to cover the same energy and momentum transfer ranges as IN5 at ILL, LET at ISIS, DCS at NIST, TOFTOF at FRM-II, AMATERAS at J-PARC, PHAROS at LANSCE, and NEAT at HZB, at similar energy resolution. Measured values of key figures such as neutron flux at sample position and energy resolution are compared between measurements and ray tracing Monte Carlo simulations, and good agreement (better than 20% of absolute numbers) has been achieved. The instrument performs very well in the cold and thermal neutron energy ranges, and promises to become a workhorse for the neutron scattering community for quasielastic and inelastic scattering experiments.

  7. The new cold neutron chopper spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source: Design and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlers, G.; Podlesnyak, A. A.; Niedziela, J. L.; Iverson, E. B.; Sokol, P. E.

    2011-08-15

    The design and performance of the new cold neutron chopper spectrometer (CNCS) at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge are described. CNCS is a direct-geometry inelastic time-of-flight spectrometer, designed essentially to cover the same energy and momentum transfer ranges as IN5 at ILL, LET at ISIS, DCS at NIST, TOFTOF at FRM-II, AMATERAS at J-PARC, PHAROS at LANSCE, and NEAT at HZB, at similar energy resolution. Measured values of key figures such as neutron flux at sample position and energy resolution are compared between measurements and ray tracing Monte Carlo simulations, and good agreement (better than 20% of absolute numbers) has been achieved. The instrument performs very well in the cold and thermal neutron energy ranges, and promises to become a workhorse for the neutron scattering community for quasielastic and inelastic scattering experiments.

  8. Application of automated weight windows to spallation neutron source shielding calculations using Geant4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenander, John; DiJulio, Douglas D.

    2015-10-01

    We present an implementation of a general weight-window generator for global variance reduction in Geant4 based applications. The implementation is flexible and can be easily adjusted to a user-defined model. In this work, the weight-window generator was applied to calculations based on an instrument shielding model of the European Spallation Source, which is currently under construction in Lund, Sweden. The results and performance of the implemented methods were evaluated through the definition of two figures of merit. It was found that the biased simulations showed an overall improvement in performance compared to the unbiased simulations. The present work demonstrates both the suitability of the generator method and Geant4 for these types of calculations.

  9. Spallation process with simultaneous multi-particle emission in nuclear evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, B. M.

    2013-05-06

    High energy probes have been used currently to explore nuclear reaction mechanism and nuclear structure. The spallation process governs the reaction process around 1 GeV energy regime. A new aspect introduced here to describe the nuclear reaction is the in-medium nucleonnucleon collision framework. The nucleon-nucleon scattering is kinematically treated by using an effective mass to represent the nuclear binding. In respect to the evaporation phase of the reaction, we introduce the simultaneous particles emission decay. This process becomes important due to the rise of new channels at high excitation energy regime of the compound nucleus. As results, the particles yields in the rapid and evaporation phases are obtained and compared to experimental data. The effect and relevance of these simultaneous emission processes in the evaporation chain is also discussed.

  10. PULSE COLUMN

    DOEpatents

    Grimmett, E.S.

    1964-01-01

    This patent covers a continuous countercurrent liquidsolids contactor column having a number of contactor states each comprising a perforated plate, a layer of balls, and a downcomer tube; a liquid-pulsing piston; and a solids discharger formed of a conical section at the bottom of the column, and a tubular extension on the lowest downcomer terminating in the conical section. Between the conical section and the downcomer extension is formed a small annular opening, through which solids fall coming through the perforated plate of the lowest contactor stage. This annular opening is small enough that the pressure drop thereacross is greater than the pressure drop upward through the lowest contactor stage. (AEC)

  11. Department of Energy review of the National Spallation Neutron Source Project

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    A Department of Energy (DOE) review of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS) was conducted. The NSNS will be a new high-power spallation neutron source; initially, it will operate at 1 megawatt (MW), but is designed to be upgradeable to significantly higher power, at lower cost, when accelerator and target technologies are developed for higher power. The 53-member Review Committee examined the projected cost, schedule, technical scope, and management structure described in the CDR. For each of the major components of the NSNS, the Committee determined that the project team had produced credible designs that can be expected to work well. What remains to be done is to integrate the design of these components. With the exception of the liquid mercury target, the NSNS Project will rely heavily on proven technologies and, thus, will face a relatively low risk to successful project completion. The Total Project Cost (TPC) presented to the Committee in the CDR was $1.266 billion in as-spent dollars. In general, the Committee felt that the laboratory consortium had presented a credible estimate for each of the major components but that value engineering might produce some savings. The construction schedule presented to the Committee covered six years beginning in FY 1999. The Committee questioned whether all parts of the project could be completed according to this schedule. In particular, the linac and the conventional facilities appeared to have overly optimistic schedules. The NSNS project team was encouraged to reexamine these activities and to consider a more conservative seven-year schedule. Another concern of the Committee was the management structure. In summary, the Committee felt that this Conceptual Design Report was a very credible proposal, and that there is a high probability for successful completion of this major project within the proposed budget, although the six-year proposed schedule may be optimistic.

  12. Flowing lead spallation target design for use in an ADTT experimental facility located at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, C.A.; Bracht, R.R.; Buksa, J.J.

    1994-08-01

    A conceptual design has been initiated for a flowing lead spallation target for use in an ADTT experimental facility located at LAMPF. The lead is contained using Nb-1Zr as the structural material. This material was selected based on its favorable material properties as well as its compatibility with the flowing lead. Heat deposited in the lead and the Nb-1Zr container by the 800-MeV, 1-mA beam is removed by the flowing lead and transferred to helium via a conventional heat exchanger. The neutronic, thermal hydraulic, and stress characteristics of the system have been determined. In addition, a module to control the thaw and freeze of the lead has been developed and incorporated into the target system design. The entire primary target system (spallation target, thaw/freeze system, and intermediate heat exchanger) has been designed to be built as a contained module to allow easy insertion into an experimental ADTT blanket assembly and to provide multiple levels of containment for the lead. For the 800-MeV LAMPF beam, the target delivers a source of approximately 18 neutrons/proton. A total of 540 kW are deposited in the target. The lead temperature ranges from 400 to 500 C. The peak structural heating occurs at the beam interface, and the target is designed to maximize cooling at this point. An innovative thin-window structure has been incorporated that allows direct, convective cooling of the window by the inlet flowing lead. Safe, and reliable operation of the target has been maximized through simple, robust engineering

  13. Very low electron temperature in warm dense matter formed by focused picosecond soft x-ray laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ishino, Masahiko Hasegawa, Noboru; Nishikino, Masaharu; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Yamagiwa, Mitsuru; Pikuz, Tatiana; Skobelev, Igor; Faenov, Anatoly; Inogamov, Nail

    2014-11-14

    We investigated the optical emission from the ablating surfaces induced by the irradiations of soft x-ray laser (SXRL) pulses with the aim of estimation of the maximum electron temperature. No emission signal in the spectral range of 400–800 nm could be observed despite the formation of damage structures on the target surfaces. Hence, we estimated an upper limit for the electron temperature of 0.4–0.7 eV for the process duration of 100–1000 ps. Our results imply that the ablation and/or surface modification by the SXRL is not accompanied by plasma formation but is induced by thermo-mechanical pressure, which is so called a spallative ablation. This spallative ablation process occurs in the low electron temperature region of a non-equilibrium state of warm dense matter.

  14. Tapered pulse tube for pulse tube refrigerators

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Olson, Jeffrey R.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal insulation of the pulse tube in a pulse-tube refrigerator is maintained by optimally varying the radius of the pulse tube to suppress convective heat loss from mass flux streaming in the pulse tube. A simple cone with an optimum taper angle will often provide sufficient improvement. Alternatively, the pulse tube radius r as a function of axial position x can be shaped with r(x) such that streaming is optimally suppressed at each x.

  15. 2-D Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of A Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Cassibry, J. T.; Wu, S. T.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Experiments are being performed on the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) MK-1 pulsed plasma thruster. Data produced from the experiments provide an opportunity to further understand the plasma dynamics in these thrusters via detailed computational modeling. The detailed and accurate understanding of the plasma dynamics in these devices holds the key towards extending their capabilities in a number of applications, including their applications as high power (greater than 1 MW) thrusters, and their use for producing high-velocity, uniform plasma jets for experimental purposes. For this study, the 2-D MHD modeling code, MACH2, is used to provide detailed interpretation of the experimental data. At the same time, a 0-D physics model of the plasma initial phase is developed to guide our 2-D modeling studies.

  16. An Experimental Study of a Pulsed Electromagnetic Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Eskridge, Richard; Lee, Mike; Smith, James; Martin, Adam; Markusic, Tom E.; Cassibry, Jason T.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Experiments are being performed on the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) pulsed electromagnetic plasma accelerator (PEPA-0). Data produced from the experiments provide an opportunity to further understand the plasma dynamics in these thrusters via detailed computational modeling. The detailed and accurate understanding of the plasma dynamics in these devices holds the key towards extending their capabilities in a number of applications, including their applications as high power (greater than 1 MW) thrusters, and their use for producing high-velocity, uniform plasma jets for experimental purposes. For this study, the 2-D MHD modeling code, MACH2, is used to provide detailed interpretation of the experimental data. At the same time, a 0-D physics model of the plasma initial phase is developed to guide our 2-D modeling studies.

  17. Preliminary Pulsing Experiments to Measure Delayed Neutron Emission Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, W.S.; Parish, T.A.; Raman, S.

    1998-10-05

    Recent interest in delayed neutron parameters including comparisons between macroscopic (experimental) and microscopic (calculated) results have prompted a set of experiments using the 1MW Triga Reactor at the Texas A and M University (TAMU) Nuclear Science Center (NSC) designed to measure the complete set of seven-group delayed neutron parameters for several higher actinides. Operating the Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR) in a pulsed mode, a complete set of delayed neutron parameters were measured for Np-237 and Am-243. The total delayed neutron yield per 100 fissions for Np-237 and Am-243 was found to be 1.14 {+-} 0.07 and 0.85 {+-} 0.05, respectively. Comparisons to previous measurements are made where such measurements are available.

  18. Nanochannels fabricated by high-intensity femtosecond laser pulses on dielectric surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryashov, Sergey I.; Mourou, Gerard; Joglekar, Ajit; Herbstman, Jeffrey F.; Hunt, Alan J.

    2007-10-01

    Direct scanning electron microscopy examination reveals a complex structure of narrow, micron-deep, internal nanochannels within shallow, nanoscale, external craters fabricated on glass and sapphire surfaces by single high-intensity femtosecond laser pulses, with nearly the same intensity thresholds for both features. Formation of the channels is accompanied by extensive expulsion of molten material produced via surface spallation and phase explosion mechanisms, and redeposited around the corresponding external craters. Potential mechanisms underlying fabrication of the unexpectedly deep channels in dielectrics are considered.

  19. Some general reflections on {open_quotes}long pulse{close_quotes} neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, G.S.

    1995-12-31

    A long pulse spallation neutron source (LPSS) having about 20 times more time average thermal flux than its short pulse counterpart (SPSS) at the same proton beam power and featuring a pronounced time structure not available on CW sources (CWNS) of equal time average flux can in principle host instruments typical for both classes of facilities. While the need for additional choppers introduces some restrictions on inverted time of flight techniques typical for SPSS and high incident neutron energies are not easier to use on LPSS than on CWNS, taking advantage of the pulsed nature of the neutron flux can enhance significantly the performance of direct time of flight instruments and of crystal spectrometers or diffractometers. In the paper some of the options are reviewed in a general manner and criteria are discussed which can be used to optimize the performance enhancement.

  20. Spallation reaction study for fission products in nuclear waste: Cross section measurements for 137Cs and 90Sr on proton and deuteron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Otsu, H.; Sakurai, H.; Ahn, D. S.; Aikawa, M.; Doornenbal, P.; Fukuda, N.; Isobe, T.; Kawakami, S.; Koyama, S.; Kubo, T.; Kubono, S.; Lorusso, G.; Maeda, Y.; Makinaga, A.; Momiyama, S.; Nakano, K.; Niikura, M.; Shiga, Y.; Söderström, P.-A.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H.; Takeuchi, S.; Taniuchi, R.; Watanabe, Ya.; Watanabe, Yu.; Yamasaki, H.; Yoshida, K.

    2016-03-01

    We have studied spallation reactions for the fission products 137Cs and 90Sr for the purpose of nuclear waste transmutation. The spallation cross sections on the proton and deuteron were obtained in inverse kinematics for the first time using secondary beams of 137Cs and 90Sr at 185 MeV/nucleon at the RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory. The target dependence has been investigated systematically, and the cross-section differences between the proton and deuteron are found to be larger for lighter spallation products. The experimental data are compared with the PHITS calculation, which includes cascade and evaporation processes. Our results suggest that both proton- and deuteron-induced spallation reactions are promising mechanisms for the transmutation of radioactive fission products.

  1. Pulsed photoconductivity in diamond upon quasi-continuous laser excitation at 222 nm at the formation of an electron-hole liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, E. I.; Genin, D. E.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2016-06-01

    An order-of-magnitude enhancement of the pulsed photocurrent in a polycrystalline diamond sample synthesized by chemical vapor deposition is observed under the conditions of formation of an electron-hole liquid. Nonequilibrium charge carriers are excited by laser pulses at a wavelength of 222 nm with FWHM pulse duration of 18 ns and peak intensity above 2.5 MW/cm2 upon cooling the sample to 90 K. For peak intensities of laser excitation lower than 1 MW/cm2, sample cooling from 300 to 90 K leads to a decrease in pulsed photocurrent by about a factor of 5. The observed increase in pulsed photocurrent is attributed to the formation of the electron-hole liquid.

  2. Solid-state pulse modulator using Marx generator for a medical linac electron-gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Heuijin; Hyeok Jeong, Dong; Lee, Manwoo; Lee, Mujin; Yi, Jungyu; Yang, Kwangmo; Ro, Sung Chae

    2016-04-01

    A medical linac is used for the cancer treatment and consists of an accelerating column, waveguide components, a magnetron, an electron-gun, a pulse modulator, and an irradiation system. The pulse modulator based on hydrogen thyratron-switched pulse-forming network is commonly used in linac. As the improvement of the high power semiconductors in switching speed, voltage rating, and current rating, an insulated gate bipolar transistor has become the more popular device used for pulsed power systems. We propose a solid-state pulse modulator to generator high voltage by multi-stacked storage-switch stages based on the Marx generator. The advantage of our modulator comes from the use of two semiconductors to control charging and discharging of the storage capacitor at each stage and it allows to generate the pulse with various amplitudes, widths, and shapes. In addition, a gate driver for two semiconductors is designed to reduce the control channels and to protect the circuits. It is developed for providing the pulsed power to a medical linac electron-gun that requires 25 kV and 1 A as the first application. In order to improve the power efficiency and achieve the compactness modulator, a capacitor charging power supply, a Marx pulse generator, and an electron-gun heater isolated transformer are constructed and integrated. This technology is also being developed to extend the high power pulsed system with > 1 MW and also other applications such as a plasma immersed ion implantation and a micro pulse electrostatic precipitator which especially require variable pulse shape and high repetition rate > 1 kHz. The paper describes the design features and the construction of this solid-state pulse modulator. Also shown are the performance results into the linac electron-gun.

  3. OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AVAILABILITY AND IMPROVEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, Roy I; Peplov, Vladimir V; Wezensky, Mark W; Norris, Kevin Paul; Barnett, William E; Hicks, Jim; Weaver, Joey T; Moss, John; Rust, Kenneth R; Mize, Jeffery J; Anderson, David E

    2011-01-01

    SNS electrical systems have been operational for 4 years. System availability statistics and improvements are presented for AC electrical systems, DC and pulsed power supplies and klystron modulators.

  4. Titanium spallation cross sections between 30 and 584 MeV and Ar-39 activities on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinburnn, F.; Fireman, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    The production cross sections of Ar39 for Ti spallation at 45-, 319-, 433-, and 584-MeV proton energies were measured to be 0.37 + or - 0.09, 12.4 + or - 3.7, 9.1 + or - 2.7, and 17.8 + or - 6.2 mb, respectively. Normalized Ar39 production rates and activities are also derived for protons above 40 MeV and for three differential proton spectra of the type approximately E(- alpha). It is concluded that, even for samples of high-Ti content, Ti spallation by solar protons below 200-MeV energy does not contribute significantly to their Ar39 radioactivity.

  5. Comparison between experiments and molecular dynamic simulations of spallation induced by ultra-short laser shock on micrometric Tantalum targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuq-Lelandais, Jean-Paul; Boustie, Michel; Soulard, Laurent; Berthe, Laurent; Sollier, Arnaud; Bontaz-Carion, Joelle; Combis, Patrick; de Resseguier, Thibaut; Lescoute, Emilien

    2009-06-01

    Shock wave propagation and the spallation within materials induced by laser shock have been investigated for roughly two decades. With the latest laser technologies evolution, one can access to shorter regimes in durations, going below the picosecond range. Shots performed with the LULI 100TW facility evidence the possibility to obtain spallation in a few microns thick metallic target. Such conditions provide an experimental data layout directly comparable with molecular dynamic simulations accessible to these scales. Molecular dynamic simulations on a single crystal of Tantalum have been performed with the CEA TERA 10 computer. First, the Hugoniot calculated by the equilibrium molecular dynamics has been compared with experimental data to check the potential (EAM) relevance to reproduce the shock wave propagation. Then, a large scale simulation on a micrometric target has been performed. We have observed the microscopic ductile damage process, the pore apparition and their time and space evolution. The results are compared with experimental results and classical one- dimensional hydrodynamic simulations.

  6. Simulation of spallation life of metals in relation to operating stresses in the nanosecond loading time range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, P. V.; Bakeev, R. A.

    2015-10-01

    Spall fracture of materials is still the only means for investigation of the material life and mechanisms of its fracture in the micro-, nano-, and picosecond time ranges of tensile loading. The phenomenological model based on the concepts of multiscale fracture of materials as nonlinear dynamic systems is shown to satisfactorily describe their life in the given range. The model is employed for the calculation of spallation life.

  7. ADJUSTABLE DOUBLE PULSE GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Gratian, J.W.; Gratian, A.C.

    1961-08-01

    >A modulator pulse source having adjustable pulse width and adjustable pulse spacing is described. The generator consists of a cross coupled multivibrator having adjustable time constant circuitry in each leg, an adjustable differentiating circuit in the output of each leg, a mixing and rectifying circuit for combining the differentiated pulses and generating in its output a resultant sequence of negative pulses, and a final amplifying circuit for inverting and square-topping the pulses. (AEC)

  8. {sup 48}Ti(n,xnpa{gamma}) reaction cross sections using spallation neutrons for E{sub n} = 1 to 20 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D; Mitchell, G E; Garrett, P E; Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Cooper, J R; Hoffman, R D; Younes, W; Devlin, N; Fotiades, N; Nelson, R O

    2005-01-06

    {gamma}-ray excitation functions have been measured for the interaction of fast neutrons with {sup 48}Ti (neutron energy from 1 MeV to 250 MeV). The Los Alamos National Laboratory spallation neutron source, at the LANSCE/WNR facility, provided a ''white'' neutron beam which is produced by bombarding a natural W target with a pulsed proton beam. The prompt-reaction {gamma} rays were measured with the large-scale Compton-suppressed Ge spectrometer, GEANIE. Neutron energies were determined by the time-of-flight technique. Excitation functions were converted to partial {gamma}-ray cross sections, taking into account the dead-time correction, the target thickness, the detector efficiency, and neutron flux (monitored with an in-line fission chamber). The data analysis is presented here for neutron energies between 1 to 20 MeV. Partial {gamma}-ray cross sections for transitions in {sup 47,48}Ti, {sup 48}Sc, and {sup 45}Ca have been determined. These results are compared to Hauser-Feshbach predictions calculated using the STAPRE code, which includes compound nuclear and pre-equilibrium emission. The partial cross sections for {gamma} rays, whose discrete {gamma}-ray cascade path leads to the ground state in {sup 48}Ti, {sup 47}Ti, {sup 48}Sc, and {sup 45}Ca have been summed to obtain estimates of the lower limits for reaction cross sections. Partial cross sections for unobserved {gamma}-rays are predicted from the STAPRE code. These lower limits are combined with Hauser-Feshbach calculations to deduce {sup 48}Ti(n,n'){sup 48}Ti, {sup 48}Ti(n,2n){sup 47}Ti, {sup 48}Ti(n,p){sup 48}Sc, and {sup 48}Ti(n,{alpha}){sup 45}Ca reaction channel cross sections.

  9. Tailoring the amplification of attosecond pulse through detuned X-ray FEL undulator.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kang, Heung-Sik; Kim, Dong Eon

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate that the amplification of attosecond pulse in X-ray free electron laser (FEL) undulator can be tailored. The characteristic of the amplification of an isolated attosecond pulse in the FEL undulator is investigated. An isolated 180 attoseconds full width half maximum (FWHM) pulse at 1.25 nm with a spectral bandwidth of 1% is injected into an undulator. The simulation results show that for a direct seeding of 3MW, the seed is amplified to the peak power of 106 GW (40 μJ, an output pulse-width of 383 attoseconds) in the presence of a detuning at FEL resonance condition in 100-m long undulator. We note that the introduction of detuning leads to the better performance compared to the case without detuning: shorter by 15.5% in a pulse-width and higher by 76.6% in an output power. Tapering yields a higher power (116% increases in the output power compared to the case without detuning) but a longer pulse (15.4% longer in the pulse-width). It was observed that ± Δλ(r)/8 (Δλ(r)/λ(r) ~1%) is the maximum degree of detuning, beyond which the amplification becomes poor: lower in the output power and longer in the pulse duration. The minimum power for a seed pulse needs to be higher than 1 MW for the successful amplification of an attosecond pulse at 1.25 nm. Also, the electron beam energy-spread must be less than 0.1% for a suitable propagation of attosecond pulse along the FEL undulator under this study. PMID:25836141

  10. The PIT MkV pulsed inductive thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dailey, C. Lee; Lovberg, Ralph H.

    1993-01-01

    The pulsed inductive thruster (PIT) is an electrodeless, magnetic rocket engine that can operate with any gaseous propellant. A puff of gas injected against the face of a flat (spiral) coil is ionized and ejected by the magnetic field of a fast-rising current pulse from a capacitor bank discharge. Single shot operation on an impulse balance has provided efficiency and I(sub sp) data that characterize operation at any power level (pulse rate). The 1-m diameter MkV thruster concept offers low estimated engine mass at low powers, together with power capability up to more than 1 MW for the 1-m diameter design. A 20 kW design estimate indicates specific mass comparable to Ion Engine specific mass for 10,000 hour operation, while a 100,000 hour design would have a specific mass 1/3 that of the Ion Engine. Performance data are reported for ammonia and hydrazine. With ammonia, at 32 KV coil voltage, efficiency is a little more than 50 percent from 4000 to more than 8000 seconds I(sub sp). Comparison with data at 24 and 28 kV indicates that a wider I(sub sp) range could be achieved at higher coil voltages, if required for deep space missions.

  11. Potential containment materials for liquid-lead and lead-bismuth eutectic spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.J.; Butt, D.P.; Beard, C.A.

    1997-11-01

    Lead (Pb) and lead-bismuth eutectic (44Pb-56Bi) have been the two primary candidate liquid-metal target materials for the production of spallation neutrons. Selection of a container material for the liquid-metal target will greatly affect the lifetime and safety of the target subsystem. For the lead target, niobium-1 (wt%) zirconium (Nb-1Zr) is a candidate containment material for liquid lead, but its poor oxidation resistance has been a major concern. The oxidation rate of Nb-1Zr was studied based on the calculations of thickness loss due to oxidation. According to these calculations, it appeared that uncoated Nb-1Zr may be used for a one-year operation at 900 C at P{sub O{sub 2}} = 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} torr, but the same material may not be used in argon with 5-ppm oxygen. Coating technologies to reduce the oxidation of Nb-1Zr are reviewed, as are other candidate refractory metals such as molybdenum, tantalum, and tungsten. For the Pb-Bi target, three candidate containment materials are suggested based on a literature survey of the materials compatibility and proton irradiation tests: Croloy 2-1/4, modified 9Cr-1Mo, and 12Cr-1Mo (HT-9) steel. These materials seem to be used only if the lead-bismuth is thoroughly deoxidized and treated with zirconium and magnesium.

  12. Improved design of proton source and low energy beam transport line for European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, L.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Torrisi, G.; Cheymol, B.; Ponton, A.; Galatà, A.; Patti, G.; Gozzo, A.; Lega, L.; Ciavola, G.

    2014-02-01

    The design update of the European Spallation Source (ESS) accelerator is almost complete and the construction of the prototype of the microwave discharge ion source able to provide a proton beam current larger than 70 mA to the 3.6 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) started. The source named PS-ESS (Proton Source for ESS) was designed with a flexible magnetic system and an extraction system able to merge conservative solutions with significant advances. The ESS injector has taken advantage of recent theoretical updates and new plasma diagnostics tools developed at INFN-LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). The design strategy considers the PS-ESS and the low energy beam transport line as a whole, where the proton beam behaves like an almost neutralized non-thermalized plasma. Innovative solutions have been used as hereinafter described. Thermo-mechanical optimization has been performed to withstand the chopped beam and the misaligned focused beam over the RFQ input collimator; the results are reported here.

  13. Separation of beam and electrons in the spallation neutron source H{sup -} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Whealton, J.H.; Raridon, R.J.; Leung, K.N.

    1997-12-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) requires an ion source producing an H{sup {minus}} beam with a peak current of 35mA at a 6.2 percent duty factor. For the design of this ion source, extracted electrons must be transported and dumped without adversely affecting the H{sup {minus}} beam optics. Two issues are considered: (1) electron containment transport and controlled removal; and (2) first-order H{sup {minus}} beam steering. For electron containment, various magnetic, geometric and electrode biasing configurations are analyzed. A kinetic description for the negative ions and electrons is employed with self-consistent fields obtained from a steady-state solution to Poisson`s equation. Guiding center electron trajectories are used when the gyroradius is sufficiently small. The magnetic fields used to control the transport of the electrons and the asymmetric sheath produced by the gyrating electrons steer the ion beam. Scenarios for correcting this steering by split acceleration and focusing electrodes will be considered in some detail.

  14. Spallation in laser shock-loaded tin below and just above melting on release

    SciTech Connect

    Resseguier, T. de; Signor, L.; Dragon, A.; Severin, P.; Boustie, M.

    2007-10-01

    Spall damage in solid materials has been one of the most widely studied shock-induced phenomena for several decades, for both applied and basic scientific motivations. Comparatively, very little data can be found yet about spallation in liquid metals. In a recent paper, we have reported an exploratory investigation of liquid spall in tin samples melted upon laser shocks of very high intensities. Here, we present further experimental results obtained over a lower pressure range, where we focus on the transition from the ductile fracture behavior of solid tin to the cavitating spall expected above melting. This transition is clearly evidenced from both time-resolved free surface velocity measurements and post-test examination of the recovered targets. The drop in tensile strength associated with melting is evaluated from the velocity profiles. Detailed views of the fracture surfaces in the spall craters provide an insight into the cavitation process. Experimental data are compared to preliminary computations to determine the loading pressures and to assess the overall consistency of our interpretation of the results.

  15. Accelerating Data Acquisition, Reduction, and Analysis at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Stuart I; Kohl, James Arthur; Granroth, Garrett E; Miller, Ross G; Doucet, Mathieu; Stansberry, Dale V; Proffen, Thomas E; Taylor, Russell J; Dillow, David

    2014-01-01

    ORNL operates the world's brightest neutron source, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Funded by the US DOE Office of Basic Energy Science, this national user facility hosts hundreds of scientists from around the world, providing a platform to enable break-through research in materials science, sustainable energy, and basic science. While the SNS provides scientists with advanced experimental instruments, the deluge of data generated from these instruments represents both a big data challenge and a big data opportunity. For example, instruments at the SNS can now generate multiple millions of neutron events per second providing unprecedented experiment fidelity but leaving the user with a dataset that cannot be processed and analyzed in a timely fashion using legacy techniques. To address this big data challenge, ORNL has developed a near real-time streaming data reduction and analysis infrastructure. The Accelerating Data Acquisition, Reduction, and Analysis (ADARA) system provides a live streaming data infrastructure based on a high-performance publish subscribe system, in situ data reduction, visualization, and analysis tools, and integration with a high-performance computing and data storage infrastructure. ADARA allows users of the SNS instruments to analyze their experiment as it is run and make changes to the experiment in real-time and visualize the results of these changes. In this paper we describe ADARA, provide a high-level architectural overview of the system, and present a set of use-cases and real-world demonstrations of the technology.

  16. On the nucleon effective mass role to the high energy proton spallation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, B. M.; Pinheiro, A. R. C.; Gonçalves, M.; Duarte, S. B.; Cabral, R. G.

    2016-04-01

    We explore the effect of the nucleon effective mass to the dynamic evolution of the rapid phase of proton-nucleus spallation reactions. The analysis of the relaxation time for the non-equilibrium phase is studied by variations in the effective mass parameter. We determine the final excitation energy of the hot residual nucleus at the end of cascade phase and the de-excitation of the nuclear system is carried out considering the competition of particle evaporation and fission processes. It was shown that the excitation energy depends of the hot compound residual nucleus at the end of the rapid phase on the changing effective mass. The multiplicity of particles was also analyzed in cascade and evaporation phase of the reaction. The use of nucleon effective mass during cascade phase can be considered as an effect of the many-body nuclear interactions not included explicitly in a treatment to the nucleon-nucleon interaction inside the nucleus. This procedure represents a more realistic scenario to obtain the neutron multiplicity generated in this reaction, which is a benchmark for the calculation of the neutronic in the ADS reactors.

  17. Characterization of irradiated AISI 316L stainless steel disks removed from the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Vevera, Bradley J; Hyres, James W; McClintock, David A; Riemer, Bernie

    2014-01-01

    Irradiated AISI 316L stainless steel disks were removed from the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) for post-irradiation examination (PIE) to assess mechanical property changes due to radiation damage and erosion of the target vessel. Topics reviewed include high-resolution photography of the disk specimens, cleaning to remove mercury (Hg) residue and surface oxides, profile mapping of cavitation pits using high frequency ultrasonic testing (UT), high-resolution surface replication, and machining of test specimens using wire electrical discharge machining (EDM), tensile testing, Rockwell Superficial hardness testing, Vickers microhardness testing, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The effectiveness of the cleaning procedure was evident in the pre- and post-cleaning photography and permitted accurate placement of the test specimens on the disks. Due to the limited amount of material available and the unique geometry of the disks, machine fixturing and test specimen design were critical aspects of this work. Multiple designs were considered and refined during mock-up test runs on unirradiated disks. The techniques used to successfully machine and test the various specimens will be presented along with a summary of important findings from the laboratory examinations.

  18. Stripper foil failure modes and cures at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Cousineau, Sarah M; Galambos, John D; Kim, Sang-Ho; Ladd, Peter; Luck, Chris; Peters, Charles C; Polsky, Yarom; Shaw, Robert W; Raparia, Deepak; Macek, Robert James; Plum, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source comprises a 1 GeV, 1.4 MW linear accelerator followed by an accumulator ring and a liquid mercury target. To manage the beam loss caused by the $H^0$ excited states created during the $H^-$ charge exchange injection into the accumulator ring, the stripper foil is located inside one of the chicane dipoles. This has some interesting consequences that were not fully appreciated until the beam power reached about 840 kW. One consequence was sudden failure of the stripper foil system due to convoy electrons stripped from the incoming $H^-$ beam, which circled around to strike the foil bracket and cause bracket failure. Another consequence is that convoy electrons can reflect back up from the electron catcher and strike the foil and bracket. An additional contributor to foil system failure is vacuum breakdown due to the charge developed on the foil by secondary electron emission. In this paper we detail these and other interesting failure mechanisms and describe the improvements we have made to mitigate them.

  19. Stripper foil failure modes and cures at the Oak Rdige Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.A.; Raparia, D.; Cousineau, S.M.; Galambos, J.; Kim, S.H.; Ladd, P.; Luck, C.F.; Peters, C.C.; Polsky, Y.; Shaw, R.W.; Macek, R.J.

    2011-03-28

    The Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source comprises a 1 GeV, 1.5 MW linear accelerator followed by an accumulator ring and a liquid mercury target. To manage the beam loss caused by the H{sup 0} excited states created during the H{sup -} charge-exchange injection into the accumulator ring, the stripper foil is located inside one of the chicane dipoles. This has some interesting consequences that were not fully appreciated until the beam power reached about 840 kW. One consequence was sudden failure of the stripper foil system due to convoy electrons stripped from the incoming H{sup -} beam, which circled around to strike the foil bracket and cause bracket failure. Another consequence is that convoy electrons can reflect back up from the electron catcher and strike the foil and bracket. An additional contributor to foil system failure is vacuum breakdown due to the charge developed on the foil by secondary electron emission. In this paper we detail these and other interesting failure mechanisms and describe the improvements we have made to mitigate them.

  20. Characterization of an explosively bonded aluminum proton beam window for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, David A; Janney, Jim G; Parish, Chad M

    2014-01-01

    An effort is underway at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to change the design of the 1st Generation high-nickel alloy proton beam window (PBW) to one that utilizes aluminum for the window material. One of the key challenges to implementation of an aluminum PBW at the SNS was selection of an appropriate joining method to bond an aluminum window to the stainless steel bulk shielding of the PBW assembly. An explosively formed bond was selected as the most promising joining method for the aluminum PBW design. A testing campaign was conducted to evaluate the strength and efficacy of explosively formed bonds that were produced using two different interlayer materials: niobium and titanium. The characterization methods reported here include tensile testing, thermal-shock leak testing, optical microscopy, and advanced scanning electron microscopy. All tensile specimens examined failed in the aluminum interlayer and measured tensile strengths were all slightly greater than the native properties of the aluminum interlayer, while elongation values were all slightly lower. A leak developed in the test vessel with a niobium interlayer joint after repeated thermal-shock cycles, and was attributed to an extensive crack network that formed in a layer of niobium-rich intermetallics located on the bond interfaces of the niobium interlayer; the test vessel with a titanium interlayer did not develop a leak under the conditions tested. Due to the experience gained from these characterizations, the explosively formed bond with a titanium interlayer was selected for the aluminum PBW design at the SNS.

  1. Distribution and surface enrichment of radionuclides in lead-bismuth eutectic from spallation targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer-Rotzler, Bernadette; Neuhausen, Jörg; Boutellier, Viktor; Wohlmuther, Michael; Zanini, L.; David, J.-C.; Türler, Andreas; Schumann, Dorothea

    2016-07-01

    With the development of new high-power neutron spallation sources --both for scientific application and as neutron production tool for accelerator-driven systems-- the demand for experimentally obtained nuclear data on the residue nuclei production in the target is constantly increasing. In the present work, we examined two lead-bismuth-eutectic targets, irradiated with high-energy protons, concerning their radionuclide content and the spatial distribution of selected isotopes. The first one was the so-called ISOLDE target, being irradiated with 1-1.4GeV protons at CERN-ISOLDE, the second one was the MEGAPIE target, irradiated at PSI with 590MeV protons. In particular, we investigated the phenomenon of radionuclide enrichment on free surfaces in both targets. It turned out that considerable accumulation can be found especially in the case of lanthanides. The depletion process is enhanced at increased temperatures. The results are compared with theoretical predictions; some possible consequences of the findings are illustrated.

  2. Dynamically polarized samples for neutron protein crystallography at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jinkui; Pierce, Josh; Myles, Dean; Robertson, J. L.; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Standaert, Bob; Cuneo, Matt; Li, Le; Meilleur, Flora

    2016-09-01

    To prepare for the next generation neutron scattering instruments for the planned second target station at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and to broaden the scientific impact of neutron protein crystallography at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, we have recently ramped up our efforts to develop a dynamically polarized target for neutron protein crystallography at the SNS. Proteins contain a large amount of hydrogen which contributes to incoherent diffraction background and limits the sensitivity of neutron protein crystallography. This incoherent background can be suppressed by using polarized neutron diffraction, which in the same time also improves the coherent diffraction signal. Our plan is to develop a custom Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) setup tailored to neutron protein diffraction instruments. Protein crystals will be polarized at a magnetic field of 5 T and temperatures of below 1 K. After the dynamic polarization process, the sample will be brought to a frozen-spin mode in a 0.5 T holding field and at temperatures below 100 mK. In a parallel effort, we are also investigating various ways of incorporating polarization agents needed for DNP, such as site specific spin labels, into protein crystals.

  3. Control system for the Spallation Neutron Source H{sup -} source test facility Allison scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Long, C. D.; Stockli, M. P.; Gorlov, T. V.; Han, B.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.

    2010-02-15

    Spallation Neutron Source is currently in progress of a multiyear plan to ramp ion beam power to the initial design power of 1.4 MW. Key to reaching this goal is understanding and improving the operation of the H{sup -} ion source. An Allison scanner was installed on the ion source in the test facility to support this improvement. This paper will discuss the hardware and the software control system of the installed Allison scanner. The hardware for the system consists of several parts. The heart of the system is the scanner head, complete with associated bias plates, slits, and signal detector. There are two analog controlled high voltage power supplies to bias the plates in the head, and a motor with associated controller to position the head in the beam. A multifunction data acquisition card reads the signals from the signal detector, as well as supplies the analog voltage control for the power supplies. To synchronize data acquisition with the source, the same timing signal that is used to trigger the source itself is used to trigger data acquisition. Finally, there is an industrial personal computer to control the rest of the hardware. Control software was developed using National Instruments LABVIEW, and consists of two parts: a data acquisition program to control the hardware and a stand alone application for offline user data analysis.

  4. The Evolution of the Cryogenic System of the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hees, W.; Arnold, Ph; Fydrych, J.; Jurns, J.; Wang, X. L.; Weisend, J. G., II

    2015-12-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is an intergovernmental project building a multidisciplinary research laboratory based upon the world's most powerful neutron source to be built in Lund, Sweden. The ESS will use a superconducting linear accelerator which will deliver protons with 5 MW of power to the target at 2.0 GeV with a nominal current of 62.5 mA. A cryomodule test stand will be supplied with helium for the site acceptance tests. The target will have two moderators using supercritical hydrogen to cool down the neutrons. The neutron instruments and the experiments’ sample environment will use liquid helium and liquid nitrogen to cool detectors and samples. The ESS cryogenic system is designed to deliver cryogenic cooling capacity to all three client system. A first concept of the ESS cryogenic system was developed in 2010 and 2011 with a limited amount of input from the clients as well as from site infrastructure (i.e. buildings and utilities). The design had to be flexible enough to accommodate future changes in scope, schedule and available infrastructure. Over the following years the design has evolved together with these parameters to achieve a maturity today which allowed us to order the accelerator cryoplant and to start procurement of many of the other parts of the ESS cryogenic system. This paper presents the evolution of the design throughout the years and the factors influencing certain design choices.

  5. Optimizing moderator dimensions for neutron scattering at the spallation neutron source.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J K; Robertson, J L; Herwig, Kenneth W; Gallmeier, Franz X; Riemer, Bernard W

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we investigate the effect of neutron moderator dimensions on the performance of neutron scattering instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). In a recent study of the planned second target station at the SNS facility, we have found that the dimensions of a moderator play a significant role in determining its surface brightness. A smaller moderator may be significantly brighter over a smaller viewing area. One of the immediate implications of this finding is that for modern neutron scattering instrument designs, moderator dimensions and brightness have to be incorporated as an integrated optimization parameter. Here, we establish a strategy of matching neutron scattering instruments with moderators using analytical and Monte Carlo techniques. In order to simplify our treatment, we group the instruments into two broad categories: those with natural collimation and those that use neutron guide systems. For instruments using natural collimation, the optimal moderator selection depends on the size of the moderator, the sample, and the moderator brightness. The desired beam divergence only plays a role in determining the distance between sample and moderator. For instruments using neutron optical systems, the smallest moderator available that is larger than the entrance dimension of the closest optical element will perform the best (assuming, as is the case here that smaller moderators are brighter).

  6. Design progress of cryogenic hydrogen system for China Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. P.; Zhang, Y.; Xiao, J.; He, C. C.; Ding, M. Y.; Wang, Y. Q.; Li, N.; He, K.

    2014-01-01

    China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is a large proton accelerator research facility with 100 kW beam power. Construction started in October 2011 and is expected to last 6.5 years. The cryogenic hydrogen circulation is cooled by a helium refrigerator with cooling capacity of 2200 W at 20 K and provides supercritical hydrogen to neutron moderating system. Important progresses of CSNS cryogenic system were concluded as follows. Firstly, process design of cryogenic system has been completed including helium refrigerator, hydrogen loop, gas distribution, and safety interlock. Secondly, an accumulator prototype was designed to mitigate pressure fluctuation caused by dynamic heat load from neutron moderation. Performance test of the accumulator has been carried out at room and liquid nitrogen temperature. Results show the accumulator with welding bellows regulates hydrogen pressure well. Parameters of key equipment have been identified. The contract for the helium refrigerator has been signed. Mechanical design of the hydrogen cold box has been completed, and the hydrogen pump, ortho-para hydrogen convertor, helium-hydrogen heat exchanger, hydrogen heater, and cryogenic valves are in procurement. Finally, Hydrogen safety interlock has been finished as well, including the logic of gas distribution, vacuum, hydrogen leakage and ventilation. Generally, design and construction of CSNS cryogenic system is conducted as expected.

  7. Thick target spallation product yields from 800 MeV protons on tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J.L.; Staples, P.; Butler, G.

    1994-07-01

    A number of newly-conceived accelerator based technologies will employ medium-energy particles stopping in thick targets to produce large numbers of neutrons. It is important to quantify the residual radionuclides in the target because one must understand what nuclei and decay gammas are produced in order to design adequate shielding, to estimate ultimate waste disposal problems, and to predict possible effects of accidental dispersion during operation. Because stopping-length targets are considered, radionuclide production must be known as a function of energy. Moreover, secondary particle production, mostly neutrons, implies a need to be able to calculate particle transport. To test the overall ability to calculate radionuclide yields, a thick-target measurement was carried out and the results compared to detailed calculations. Although numerous measurements of thin-target spallation yields have been made, there have been only a few measurements on thick systems. The most complete study showed results for Pb and U systems. In this contribution, the authors report on measurements made for a stopping-length W target. Special efforts were made to measure short-lived isotopes, and reliable data on isotopes with two or three minute half-lives were obtained.

  8. Improvements to the internal and external antenna H(-) ion sources at the Spallation Neutron Source.

    PubMed

    Welton, R F; Dudnikov, V G; Han, B X; Murray, S N; Pennisi, T R; Pillar, C; Santana, M; Stockli, M P; Turvey, M W

    2014-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), a large scale neutron production facility, routinely operates with 30-40 mA peak current in the linac. Recent measurements have shown that our RF-driven internal antenna, Cs-enhanced, multi-cusp ion sources injects ∼55 mA of H(-) beam current (∼1 ms, 60 Hz) at 65-kV into a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator through a closely coupled electrostatic Low-Energy Beam Transport system. Over the last several years a decrease in RFQ transmission and issues with internal antennas has stimulated source development at the SNS both for the internal and external antenna ion sources. This report discusses progress in improving internal antenna reliability, H(-) yield improvements which resulted from modifications to the outlet aperture assembly (applicable to both internal and external antenna sources) and studies made of the long standing problem of beam persistence with the external antenna source. The current status of the external antenna ion source will also be presented.

  9. Thermohydraulic behavior of the liquid metal target of a spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Y.

    1996-06-01

    The author presents work done on three main problems. (1) Natural circulation in double coaxial cylindircal container: The thermohydraulic behaviour of the liquid metal target of the spallation neutron source at PSI has been investigated. The configuration is a natural-circulation loop in a concentric double-tube-type container. The results show that the natural-circulation loop concept is valid for the design phase of the target construction, and the current specified design criteria will be fulfilled with the proposed parameter values. (2) Flow around the window: Water experiments were performed for geometry optimisation of the window shape of the SINQ container for avoiding generating recirculation zones at peripheral area and the optimal cooling of the central part of the beam entrance window. Flow visualisation technique was mainly used for various window shapes, gap distance between the window and the guide tube edge. (3) Flow in window cooling channels: Flows in narrow gaps of cooling channels of two different types of windows were studied by flow visualisation techniques. One type is a slightly curved round cooling channel and the other is hemispherical shape, both of which have only 2 mm gap distance and the water inlet is located on one side and flows out from the opposite side. In both cases, the central part of the flow area has lower velocity than peripheral area.

  10. Design progress of cryogenic hydrogen system for China Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G. P.; Zhang, Y.; Xiao, J.; He, C. C.; Ding, M. Y.; Wang, Y. Q.; Li, N.; He, K.

    2014-01-29

    China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is a large proton accelerator research facility with 100 kW beam power. Construction started in October 2011 and is expected to last 6.5 years. The cryogenic hydrogen circulation is cooled by a helium refrigerator with cooling capacity of 2200 W at 20 K and provides supercritical hydrogen to neutron moderating system. Important progresses of CSNS cryogenic system were concluded as follows. Firstly, process design of cryogenic system has been completed including helium refrigerator, hydrogen loop, gas distribution, and safety interlock. Secondly, an accumulator prototype was designed to mitigate pressure fluctuation caused by dynamic heat load from neutron moderation. Performance test of the accumulator has been carried out at room and liquid nitrogen temperature. Results show the accumulator with welding bellows regulates hydrogen pressure well. Parameters of key equipment have been identified. The contract for the helium refrigerator has been signed. Mechanical design of the hydrogen cold box has been completed, and the hydrogen pump, ortho-para hydrogen convertor, helium-hydrogen heat exchanger, hydrogen heater, and cryogenic valves are in procurement. Finally, Hydrogen safety interlock has been finished as well, including the logic of gas distribution, vacuum, hydrogen leakage and ventilation. Generally, design and construction of CSNS cryogenic system is conducted as expected.

  11. Improved design of proton source and low energy beam transport line for European Spallation Source.

    PubMed

    Neri, L; Celona, L; Gammino, S; Mascali, D; Castro, G; Torrisi, G; Cheymol, B; Ponton, A; Galatà, A; Patti, G; Gozzo, A; Lega, L; Ciavola, G

    2014-02-01

    The design update of the European Spallation Source (ESS) accelerator is almost complete and the construction of the prototype of the microwave discharge ion source able to provide a proton beam current larger than 70 mA to the 3.6 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) started. The source named PS-ESS (Proton Source for ESS) was designed with a flexible magnetic system and an extraction system able to merge conservative solutions with significant advances. The ESS injector has taken advantage of recent theoretical updates and new plasma diagnostics tools developed at INFN-LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). The design strategy considers the PS-ESS and the low energy beam transport line as a whole, where the proton beam behaves like an almost neutralized non-thermalized plasma. Innovative solutions have been used as hereinafter described. Thermo-mechanical optimization has been performed to withstand the chopped beam and the misaligned focused beam over the RFQ input collimator; the results are reported here.

  12. Improved design of proton source and low energy beam transport line for European Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Neri, L. Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Ciavola, G.; Torrisi, G.; Cheymol, B.; Ponton, A.; Galatà, A.; Patti, G.; Gozzo, A.; Lega, L.

    2014-02-15

    The design update of the European Spallation Source (ESS) accelerator is almost complete and the construction of the prototype of the microwave discharge ion source able to provide a proton beam current larger than 70 mA to the 3.6 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) started. The source named PS-ESS (Proton Source for ESS) was designed with a flexible magnetic system and an extraction system able to merge conservative solutions with significant advances. The ESS injector has taken advantage of recent theoretical updates and new plasma diagnostics tools developed at INFN-LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). The design strategy considers the PS-ESS and the low energy beam transport line as a whole, where the proton beam behaves like an almost neutralized non-thermalized plasma. Innovative solutions have been used as hereinafter described. Thermo-mechanical optimization has been performed to withstand the chopped beam and the misaligned focused beam over the RFQ input collimator; the results are reported here.

  13. The Nanoscale Ordered MAterials Diffractometer NOMAD at the Spallation Neutron Source SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Feygenson, Mikhail; Carruth, John William; Hoffmann, Ron; Chipley, Kenneth King; Neuefeind, Joerg C

    2012-01-01

    The Nanoscale Ordered Materials Diffractometer (NOMAD) is neutron time-of-flight diffractometer designed to determine pair dist ribution functions of a wide range of materials ranging from short range ordered liquids to long range ordered crystals. Due to a large neutron flux provided by the Spallation Neutron Source SNS and a large detector coverage neutron count-rates exceed comparable instruments by one to two orders of magnitude. This is achieved while maintaining a relatively high momentum transfer resolution of a $\\delta Q/Q \\sim 0.8\\%$ FWHM (typical), and an achievable $\\delta Q/Q$ of 0.24\\% FWHM (best). The real space resolution is related to the maximum momentum transfer; A maximum momentum transfer of 50\\AA$^{-1}$ can be achieved routinely and the maximum momentum transfer given by the detector configuration and the incident neutron spectrum is 125 \\AA$^{-1}$. High stability of the source and the detector allow small contrast isotope experiments to be performed. A detailed description of the instrument is given and the results of experiments with standard samples are discussed.

  14. Investigations with Gaseous Electron Multipliers for use on the ISIS spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duxbury, D.; Rhodes, N.; Schooneveld, E.; Spill, E.

    2012-01-01

    Several investigations have been undertaken to ascertain the suitability of gaseous electron multipliers (GEMs) for use as a neutron detector on the ISIS spallation neutron source. Our initial investigations focused purely on whether these devices could be operated at the elevated pressure of 3He and CF4 necessary for 1mm position resolution (2.6 bars of CF4). In fact we were able to operate the GEMs at suitable gains with 3.5 bars of CF4. However encouraging these results were, we found that the GEMs charged up over time, which we postulated was due to the kapton substrate. A similar problem was seen at the early stages of the development of the microstrip gas chamber (MSGC), a solution of which was to use the semiconducting glass Schott S8900 as the substrate. Therefore we focused our attention to the manufacture of a GEM structure on an S8900 substrate. Our first devices were manufactured from 1mm thick glass and exhibit gains in excess of 1 × 104 for a single GEM stage in an argon isobutane gas mixture, when illuminated with 55Fe x-rays. A small amount of charging under irradiation has been observed in a flowing gas mixture, but the GEMs quickly stabilise and track atmospheric conditions. Further measurements in a 3He:CF4 atmosphere will show how suited these devices are to the needs of ISIS.

  15. Long pulse production from short pulses

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-01-01

    A method of producing a long output pulse (SA) from a short pump pulse (P), using an elongated amplified fiber (11) having a doped core (12) that provides an amplifying medium for light of one color when driven into an excited state by light of a shorter wavelength and a surrounding cladding 13. A seed beam (S) of the longer wavelength is injected into the core (12) at one end of the fiber (11) and a pump pulse (P) of the shorter wavelength is injected into the cladding (13) at the other end of the fiber (11). The counter-propagating seed beam (S) and pump pulse (P) will produce an amplified output pulse (SA) having a time duration equal to twice the transit time of the pump pulse (P) through the fiber (11) plus the length of the pump pulse (P).

  16. Long pulse production from short pulses

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, J.S.

    1994-08-02

    A method of producing a long output pulse from a short pump pulse is disclosed, using an elongated amplified fiber having a doped core that provides an amplifying medium for light of one color when driven into an excited state by light of a shorter wavelength and a surrounding cladding. A seed beam of the longer wavelength is injected into the core at one end of the fiber and a pump pulse of the shorter wavelength is injected into the cladding at the other end of the fiber. The counter-propagating seed beam and pump pulse will produce an amplified output pulse having a time duration equal to twice the transit time of the pump pulse through the fiber plus the length of the pump pulse. 3 figs.

  17. Chirped-pulse amplification with narrowband pulses.

    PubMed

    Shverdin, M Y; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Betts, S M; Gibson, D J; Messerly, M J; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P J

    2010-07-15

    We demonstrate a compact hyperdispersion stretcher and compressor pair that permit chirped-pulse amplification in Nd:YAG. We generate 750 mJ, 0.2 nm FWHM, 10 Hz pulses recompressed to an 8 ps near-transform-limited duration. The dispersion-matched pulse compressor and stretcher impart a chirp of 7300 ps/nm, in a 3 m x 1 m footprint.

  18. Chirped-pulse amplification with narrowband pulses.

    PubMed

    Shverdin, M Y; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Betts, S M; Gibson, D J; Messerly, M J; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P J

    2010-07-15

    We demonstrate a compact hyperdispersion stretcher and compressor pair that permit chirped-pulse amplification in Nd:YAG. We generate 750 mJ, 0.2 nm FWHM, 10 Hz pulses recompressed to an 8 ps near-transform-limited duration. The dispersion-matched pulse compressor and stretcher impart a chirp of 7300 ps/nm, in a 3 m x 1 m footprint. PMID:20634869

  19. Production of Actinium-225 via High Energy Proton Induced Spallation of Thorium-232

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, James T.; Nolen, Jerry; Vandergrift, George; Gomes, Itacil; Kroc, Tom; Horwitz, Phil; McAlister, Dan; Bowers, Del; Sullivan, Vivian; Greene, John

    2011-12-30

    The science of cancer research is currently expanding its use of alpha particle emitting radioisotopes. Coupled with the discovery and proliferation of molecular species that seek out and attach to tumors, new therapy and diagnostics are being developed to enhance the treatment of cancer and other diseases. This latest technology is commonly referred to as Alpha Immunotherapy (AIT). Actinium-225/Bismuth-213 is a parent/daughter alpha-emitting radioisotope pair that is highly sought after because of the potential for treating numerous diseases and its ability to be chemically compatible with many known and widely used carrier molecules (such as monoclonal antibodies and proteins/peptides). Unfortunately, the worldwide supply of actinium-225 is limited to about 1,000mCi annually and most of that is currently spoken for, thus limiting the ability of this radioisotope pair to enter into research and subsequently clinical trials. The route proposed herein utilizes high energy protons to produce actinium-225 via spallation of a thorium-232 target. As part of previous R and D efforts carried out at Argonne National Laboratory recently in support of the proposed US FRIB facility, it was shown that a very effective production mechanism for actinium-225 is spallation of thorium-232 by high energy proton beams. The base-line simulation for the production rate of actinium-225 by this reaction mechanism is 8E12 atoms per second at 200 MeV proton beam energy with 50 g/cm2 thorium target and 100 kW beam power. An irradiation of one actinium-225 half-life (10 days) produces {approx}100 Ci of actinium-225. For a given beam current the reaction cross section increases slightly with energy to about 400 MeV and then decreases slightly for beam energies in the several GeV regime. The object of this effort is to refine the simulations at proton beam energies of 400 MeV and above up to about 8 GeV. Once completed, the simulations will be experimentally verified using 400 MeV and 8 Ge

  20. Outline of a proposal for a new neutron source: The pulsed neutron research facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.S.; Carpenter, J.M.; Kustom, R.L.

    1992-04-01

    Accelerator-based, pulsed spallation neutron sources have been performing neutron scattering research for about fifteen years. During this time beam intensities have increased by a factor of 100 and more than 50 spectrometers are now operating on four major sources worldwide. The pulsed sources have proven to be highly effective and complementary to reactor-based sources in that there are important scientific areas for which each type of source has unique capabilities. We describe a proposal for a new pulsed neutron facility based on a Fixed Field Alternating Gradient synchrotron. The specifications for this new machine, which are now only being formulated, are for an accelerator that will produce (100 {divided by} 200) {mu}A of time-averaged proton current at (500 {divided by} 1000) MeV, in short pulses at 30 Hz. Appropriate target and moderator systems and an array of scattering instruments will be provided to make the facility a full-blown research installation. The neutron source, named the Pulsed Neutron Research Facility (PNRF), will be as powerful as any pulsed source now operating in the world and will also act as a test bed for the Fixed Field Alternating Gradient Synchrotron concept as a basis for more powerful sources in the future. The peak thermal neutron flux in PNRF will be about 5{center dot}10{sup 15}n/cm{sup 2}{center dot}s.

  1. Outline of a proposal for a new neutron source: The pulsed neutron research facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.S.; Carpenter, J.M.; Kustom, R.L.

    1992-04-01

    Accelerator-based, pulsed spallation neutron sources have been performing neutron scattering research for about fifteen years. During this time beam intensities have increased by a factor of 100 and more than 50 spectrometers are now operating on four major sources worldwide. The pulsed sources have proven to be highly effective and complementary to reactor-based sources in that there are important scientific areas for which each type of source has unique capabilities. We describe a proposal for a new pulsed neutron facility based on a Fixed Field Alternating Gradient synchrotron. The specifications for this new machine, which are now only being formulated, are for an accelerator that will produce (100 {divided_by} 200) {mu}A of time-averaged proton current at (500 {divided_by} 1000) MeV, in short pulses at 30 Hz. Appropriate target and moderator systems and an array of scattering instruments will be provided to make the facility a full-blown research installation. The neutron source, named the Pulsed Neutron Research Facility (PNRF), will be as powerful as any pulsed source now operating in the world and will also act as a test bed for the Fixed Field Alternating Gradient Synchrotron concept as a basis for more powerful sources in the future. The peak thermal neutron flux in PNRF will be about 5{center_dot}10{sup 15}n/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s.

  2. Helium Bubble Injection Solution To The Cavitation Damage At The Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, M. W.; Ruggles, A. E.

    2009-03-10

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is one of the largest science projects in the United States, with total cost near 1.4 Billion Dollars. The limiting factor of the facility had always been assumed to be the lifetime of the target window due to radiation damage. After further investigation, the lifetime of the target was determined not to be limited by radiation damage but by cavitation damage. The cavitation damage derives from pressure waves caused by the beam energy deposition. Vapor bubbles form when low to negative pressures occur in the mercury near the stainless steel target window due to wave interaction with the structure. Collapse of these bubbles can focus wave energy in small liquid jets that erode the window surface. Compressibility of the mercury can be enhanced to reduce the amplitude of the pressure wave caused by the beam energy deposition. To enhance compressibility, small (10 to 30 micron diameter) gas bubbles could be injected into the bulk of the mercury. Solubility and diffusivity parameters of inert gas in mercury are required for a complete mechanical simulation and engineering of these strategies. Using current theoretical models, one obtains a theoretical Henry coefficient of helium in mercury on the order of 3.9E15 Pa-molHg/molHe at 300 K. This low solubility was confirmed by a direct, offline experimental method. Mercury was charged with helium and any pressure change was recorded. Any pressure change was attributed to gas going into solution. Therefore, with the sensitivity of the experiment, a lower limit of 9E12 Pa-molHg/molHe was placed on the mercury-helium system. These values guarantee a stable bubble lifetime needed within the SNS mercury target to mitigate cavitation issues.

  3. Time-of-flight diffractometer with multiple pulse overlap - an example for the application of modern tools for instrument design

    SciTech Connect

    Stuhr, U.; Bauer, G.S.; Wagner, W.

    1997-09-01

    A Time-of-Flight Diffractometer with high pulse rates, allowing multiple frame overlap, is a completely novel design of an instrument dedicated for high resolution strain-field mapping. We elaborated a detailed concept of this instrument applying analytical calculations and Monte Carlo computer simulations. Having established the instrument concept, the computer simulations will now be extended to optimize the total performance of the instrument. To illustrate the necessity and possibilities of applying modem tools for instrument design, we describe, as an example, the different steps towards the development of the detailed design of this instrument, which we intend to build at the Swiss spallation. source SINQ in the near future.

  4. Working group summary report on effects of pulsed operation

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.; Ni, L.

    1996-06-01

    In a short pulsed spallation neutron source, extremely high energy ({approx_gt}1 GeV) proton beam pulses are injected into a liquid metal target in a very short period of time ({approximately}1 {mu}sec) at a high repetition rate ({approximately}50 Hertz). The beam energy will be deposited in the target materials (such as mercury or lead) and converted into heat. It causes a sudden temperature rise and resulting pressure wave. This pressure wave travels through the liquid, reaches the steel container wall and may possibly lead to material damage due to induced stress. Almost all participants agreed that the shock problem due to the short pulse operation in the liquid metal target could be serious and could present a challenging problem. It was determined that the following points need to be addressed: (1) equation of state for mercury (2) code validation and benchmark experiments (3) shock effects on the entire target system (4) two phase flow by gas injection. All these investigations should be carried out in the framework of international cooperation. Two small scaled Hg pressure pulse tests are planned at ORNL to provide insight into the pressure wave propagation and thermal shock effects. One experiment will use exploding wires to generate the pulse pressure, the other the electron beam at ORELA. Also PSI, LANL, CERN (ISOLDE facility), INR and IPPE could contribute to the experimental methods for producing shock. The necessary R&D for bubble injection might be performed at PSI, RIGA, ORNL or Ben-Gurion University. All of the above experiments can possibly yield benchmarking data which is absolutely necessary for code validation.

  5. DIFFERENTIAL PULSE HEIGHT DISCRIMINATOR

    DOEpatents

    Test, L.D.

    1958-11-11

    Pulse-height discriminators are described, specifically a differential pulse-height discriminator which is adapted to respond to pulses of a band of amplitudes, but to reject pulses of amplitudes greater or less than tbe preselected band. In general, the discriminator includes a vacuum tube having a plurality of grids adapted to cut off plate current in the tube upon the application of sufficient negative voltage. One grid is held below cutoff, while a positive pulse proportional to the amplltude of each pulse is applled to this grid. Another grid has a negative pulse proportional to the amplitude of each pulse simultaneously applied to it. With this arrangement the tube will only pass pulses which are of sufficlent amplitude to counter the cutoff bias but not of sufficlent amplitude to cutoff the tube.

  6. Laser pulse stacking method

    DOEpatents

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter. 2 figs.

  7. Nerve-pulse interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.C.

    1982-01-01

    Some recent experimental and theoretical results on mechanisms through which individual nerve pulses can interact are reviewed. Three modes of interactions are considered: (1) interaction of pulses as they travel along a single fiber which leads to velocity dispersion; (2) propagation of pairs of pulses through a branching region leading to quantum pulse code transformations; and (3) interaction of pulses on parallel fibers through which they may form a pulse assembly. This notion is analogous to Hebb's concept of a cell assembly, but on a lower level of the neural hierarchy.

  8. Preliminary assessment of the nuclide migration from the activation zone around the proposed Spallation Neutron Source facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dole, L.R.

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential impacts of migrating radionuclides from the activation zone around the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Using conservatively high estimates of the potential inventory of radioactive activation products that could form in the proposed compacted-soil shield berm around an SNS facility on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a conservative, simplified transport model was used to estimate the potential worst-case concentrations of the 12 long-lived isotopes in the groundwater under a site with the hydrologic characteristics of the ORR.

  9. Production and segregation of transmutation elements Ca, Ti, Sc in the F82H steel under mixed spectrum irradiation of high energy protons and spallation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuksenko, Viacheslav; Pareige, Cristelle; Pareige, Philippe; Dai, Yong

    2014-04-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steel F82H was irradiated at 345 °C in a mixed proton-neutron spectrum in the Swiss spallation neutron source up to 20.3 dpa. Nanoscale investigations using the atom probe tomography (APT) technique were performed in order to study the atomic scale evolution of the microstructure of the F82H steel under irradiation. Spallation products Ca, Ti and Sc have been detected. The irradiation led to the production of about 370 appm of Ca, 90 appm of Sc and 800 appm of Ti. APT experiments revealed that regardless their low bulk concentrations, the spallation products extensively participate in the evolution of the microstructure: formation of radiation-induced clusters, segregation at the dislocation loops and alteration of the microchemistry of carbides. In this paper, a quantitative description of the observed features is presented and results are compared with TEM data of the literature obtained on the same steel and under similar irradiation conditions.

  10. Pulse to pulse klystron diagnosis system

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, J.; Davidson, V.; Genova, L.; Johnson, R.; Reagan, D.

    1981-03-01

    This report describes a system used to study the behavior of SLAC high powered klystrons operating with a twice normal pulse width of 5 ..mu..s. At present, up to eight of the klystrons installed along the accelerator can be operated with long pulses and monitored by this system. The report will also discuss some of the recent findings and investigations.

  11. Development of a KSTAR ICRF antenna for long pulse operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Y. D.; Kwak, J. G.; Kim, S. K.; Yoon, J. S.; Hong, B. G.; Hwang, C. K.; Wang, S. J.; Jeong, S. U.

    2003-09-01

    A prototype ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antenna with RF power of 6 MW has been developed for the long pulse (300 s), high power operation in the Korea superconducting tokamak advanced research (KSTAR) tokamak. Cooling paths in the antenna were carefully designed to remove the dissipated RF power loss. An RF power test has been performed to estimate the standoff capability of the antenna. A high power RF test at a frequency of 30 MHz gives a standoff voltage of 30.5 kVp for 60 s and 23.2 kVp for 300 s (without cooling). During the RF pulse, the peak voltage, forward/reflected powers, temperature of the antenna, and gas pressure are measured. A vacuum feedthrough of 1 MW RF power has been developed, which has two alumina ceramic cylinders and an O-ring seal. For cooling of the ceramic parts, dry air is injected into the ceramic surface through two outer nozzles. Independent cooling water channels are installed to cool the inner conductor of the feedthrough. RF high voltage tests show that stable operation is possible, with a peak voltage of 28.9 kVp for 300 s, without any severe damage.

  12. Constant potential pulse polarography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christie, J.H.; Jackson, L.L.; Osteryoung, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    The new technique of constant potential pulse polarography, In which all pulses are to be the same potential, is presented theoretically and evaluated experimentally. The response obtained is in the form of a faradaic current wave superimposed on a constant capacitative component. Results obtained with a computer-controlled system exhibit a capillary response current similar to that observed In normal pulse polarography. Calibration curves for Pb obtained using a modified commercial pulse polarographic instrument are in good accord with theoretical predictions.

  13. Alternate drop pulse polarography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christie, J.H.; Jackson, L.L.; Osteryoung, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    The new technique of alternate drop pulse polarography is presented. An experimental evaluation of alternate drop pulse polarography shows complete compensation of the capacitative background due to drop expansion. The capillary response phenomenon was studied in the absence of faradaic reaction and the capillary response current was found to depend on the pulse width to the -0.72 power. Increased signal-to-noise ratios were obtained using alternate drop pulse polarography at shorter drop times.

  14. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, John S.; Sheffield, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radio frequency powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  15. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1985-05-20

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radiofrequency-powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  16. Electrical pulse generator

    DOEpatents

    Norris, Neil J.

    1979-01-01

    A technique for generating high-voltage, wide dynamic range, shaped electrical pulses in the nanosecond range. Two transmission lines are coupled together by resistive elements distributed along the length of the lines. The conductance of each coupling resistive element as a function of its position along the line is selected to produce the desired pulse shape in the output line when an easily produced pulse, such as a step function pulse, is applied to the input line.

  17. Development and Preliminary Commissioning Results of a Long Pulse 140 GHz ECRH System on EAST Tokamak (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Handong; Wang, Xiaojie; Liu, Fukun; Zhang, Jian; Huang, Yiyun; Shan, Jiafang; Wu, Dajun; Hu, Huaichuan; Li, Bo; Li, Miaohui; Yang, Yong; Feng, Jianqiang; Xu, Weiye; Tang, Yunying; Wei, Wei; Xu, Liqing; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Hailin; Lohr, J.; A. Gorelov, Y.; P. Anderson, J.; Ma, Wendong; Wu, Zege; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Liyuan; Guo, Fei; Sun, Haozhang; Yan, Xinsheng; East Team

    2016-04-01

    A long pulse electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) system has been developed to meet the requirements of steady-state operation for the EAST superconducting tokamak, and the first EC wave was successfully injected into plasma during the 2015 spring campaign. The system is mainly composed of four 140 GHz gyrotron systems, 4 ITER-Like transmission lines, 4 independent channel launchers and corresponding power supplies, a water cooling, control & inter-lock system etc. Each gyrotron is expected to deliver a maximum power of 1 MW and be operated at 100-1000 s pulse lengths. The No.1 and No.2 gyrotron systems have been installed. In the initial commissioning, a series of parameters of 1 MW 1 s, 900 kW 10 s, 800 kW 95 s and 650 kW 753 s have been demonstrated successfully on the No.1 gyrotron system based on calorimetric dummy load measurements. Significant plasma heating and MHD instability suppression effects were observed in EAST experiments. In addition, high confinement (H-mode) discharges triggered by ECRH were obtained. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2011GB102000, 2012GB103000 and 2015GB103000)

  18. Vacuum seals design and testing for a linear accelerator of the National Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Z. Chen; C. Gautier; F. Hemez; N. K. Bultman

    2000-02-01

    Vacuum seals are very important to ensure that the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Linac has an optimum vacuum system. The vacuum joints between flanges must have reliable seals to minimize the leak rate and meet vacuum and electrical requirements. In addition, it is desirable to simplify the installation and thereby also simplify the maintenance required. This report summarizes an investigation of the metal vacuum seals that include the metal C-seal, Energized Spring seal, Helcoflex Copper Delta seal, Aluminum Delta seal, delta seal with limiting ring, and the prototype of the copper diamond seals. The report also contains the material certifications, design, finite element analysis, and testing for all of these seals. It is a valuable reference for any vacuum system design. To evaluate the suitability of several types of metal seals for use in the SNS Linac and to determine the torque applied on the bolts, a series of vacuum leak rate tests on the metal seals have been completed at Los Alamos Laboratory. A copper plated flange, using the same type of delta seal that was used for testing with the stainless steel flange, has also been studied and tested. A vacuum seal is desired that requires significantly less loading than a standard ConFlat flange with a copper gasket for the coupling cavity assembly. To save the intersegment space the authors use thinner flanges in the design. The leak rate of the thin ConFlat flange with a copper gasket is a baseline for the vacuum test on all seals and thin flanges. A finite element analysis of a long coupling cavity flange with a copper delta seal has been performed in order to confirm the design of the long coupling cavity flange and the welded area of a cavity body with the flange. This analysis is also necessary to predict a potential deformation of the cavity under the combined force of atmospheric pressure and the seating load of the seal. Modeling of this assembly has been achieved using both HKS/Abaqus and COSMOS

  19. Nanodiamond Foils for H- Stripping to Support the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and Related Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Vispute, R D; Ermer, Henry K; Sinsky, Phillip; Seiser, Andrew; Shaw, Robert W; Wilson, Leslie L; Harris, Gary; Piazza, Fabrice

    2013-01-01

    Thin diamond foils are needed in many particle accelerator experiments regarding nuclear and atomic physics, as well as in some interdisciplinary research. Particularly, nanodiamond texture is attractive for this purpose as it possesses a unique combination of diamond properties such as high thermal conductivity, mechanical strength and high radiation hardness; therefore, it is a potential material for energetic ion beam stripper foils. At the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), the installed set of foils must be able to survive a nominal five-month operation period, without the need for unscheduled costly shutdowns and repairs. Thus, a single nanodiamond foil about the size of a postage stamp is critical to the entire operation of SNS and similar sources in U.S. laboratories and around the world. We are investigating nanocrystalline, polycrystalline and their admixture films fabricated using a hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) system for H- stripping to support the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Here we discuss optimization of process variables such as substrate temperature, process gas ratio of H2/Ar/CH4, substrate to filament distance, filament temperature, carburization conditions, and filament geometry to achieve high purity diamond foils on patterned silicon substrates with manageable intrinsic and thermal stresses so that they can be released as free standing foils without curling. An in situ laser reflectance interferometry tool (LRI) is used for monitoring the growth characteristics of the diamond thin film materials. The optimization process has yielded free standing foils with no pinholes. The sp3/sp2 bonds are controlled to optimize electrical resistivity to reduce the possibility of surface charging of the foils. The integrated LRI and HFCVD process provides real time information on the growth of films and can quickly illustrate growth features and control over film thickness. The results are discussed in the light of development

  20. High-energy in-beam neutron measurements of metal-based shielding for accelerator-driven spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiJulio, D. D.; Cooper-Jensen, C. P.; Björgvinsdóttir, H.; Kokai, Z.; Bentley, P. M.

    2016-05-01

    Metal-based shielding plays an important role in the attenuation of harmful and unwanted radiation at an accelerator-driven spallation neutron source. At the European Spallation Source, currently under construction in Lund, Sweden, metal-based materials are planned to be used extensively as neutron guide substrates in addition to other shielding structures around neutron guides. The usage of metal-based materials in the vicinity of neutron guides however requires careful consideration in order to minimize potential background effects in a neutron instrument at the facility. Therefore, we have carried out a combined study involving high-energy neutron measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of metal-based shielding, both to validate the simulation methodology and also to investigate the benefits and drawbacks of different metal-based solutions. The measurements were carried out at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala, Sweden, using a 174.1 MeV neutron beam and various thicknesses of aluminum-, iron-, and copper-based shielding blocks. The results were compared to geant4 simulations and revealed excellent agreement. Our combined study highlights the particular situations where one type of metal-based solution may be preferred over another.

  1. Comparison Between Experiments and Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Spallation Induced by Ultra-Short Laser Shock on Micrometric Tantalum Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuq-Lelandais, J.-P.; Boustie, M.; Soulard, L.; Berthe, L.; Sollier, A.; Bontaz-Carion, J.; Combis, P.; de Rességuier, T.; Lescoute, E.

    2009-12-01

    Shock wave propagation and the spallation within materials induced by laser shock have been investigated for roughly two decades. With the latest laser technologies evolution, one can access to shorter regimes in durations, going below the picosecond range. Shots performed with the LULI 100 TW facility evidence the possibility to obtain spallation in a few microns thick metallic target. Such conditions provide an experimental data layout which may be directly comparable with molecular dynamic simulations reachable to these scales. Molecular dynamic simulations on a single crystal of Tantalum have been performed with the CEA TERA 10 computer. First, the Hugoniot calculated by the equilibrium molecular dynamics has been compared with experimental data to check the potential (EAM) relevance to reproduce the shock wave propagation. Then, large scale simulations on a micrometric target have been performed. We have observed the microscopic ductile damage process, the pore apparition and their time and space evolution. The results are compared with experimental results and classical one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations.

  2. Considerations about chopper configuration at a time-of-flight SANS instrument at a spallation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaksch, Sebastian

    2016-11-01

    In any neutron scattering experiment the measurement of the position of the scattered neutrons and their respective velocities is necessary. In order to do so, a position sensitive detector as well as a way to determine the velocities is needed. Measuring the velocities can either be done by using only a single wavelength and therefore velocity or by creating pulses, where the start and end time of each pulse is known and registering the time of arrival at the detector, which is the case we want to consider here. This pulse shaping process in neutron scattering instruments is usually done by using a configuration of several choppers. This set of choppers is then used to define both the beginning and the end of the pulse. Additionally there is of course also a selection in phase space determining the final resolution that can be achieved by the instrument. Taking into account the special requirements of a specific instrument, here a small-angle neutron scattering instrument, creates an additional set of restrictions that have to be taken into account. In this manuscript a chopper configuration for two possible settings, namely a maximum flux and a high-resolution mode will be presented.

  3. Pulsed Neutron Powder Diffraction for Materials Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiyama, T.

    2008-03-01

    The accelerator-based neutron diffraction began in the end of 60's at Tohoku University which was succeeded by the four spallation neutron facilities with proton accelerators at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (Japan), Argonne National Laboratory and Los Alamos Laboratory (USA), and Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK). Since then, the next generation source has been pursued for 20 years, and 1MW-class spallation neutron sources will be appeared in about three years at the three parts of the world: Japan, UK and USA. The joint proton accelerator project (J-PARC), a collaborative project between KEK and JAEA, is one of them. The aim of the talk is to describe about J-PARC and the neutron diffractometers being installed at the materials and life science facility of J-PARC. The materials and life science facility of J-PARC has 23 neutron beam ports and will start delivering the first neutron beam of 25 Hz from 2008 May. Until now, more than 20 proposals have been reviewed by the review committee, and accepted proposal groups have started to get fund. Those proposals include five polycrystalline diffractometers: a super high resolution powder diffractometer (SHRPD), a 0.2%-resolution powder diffractometer of Ibaraki prefecture (IPD), an engineering diffractometers (Takumi), a high intensity S(Q) diffractometer (VSD), and a high-pressure dedicated diffractometer. SHRPD, Takumi and IPD are being designed and constructed by the joint team of KEK, JAEA and Ibaraki University, whose member are originally from the KEK powder group. These three instruments are expected to start in 2008. VSD is a super high intensity diffractometer with the highest resolution of Δd/d = 0.3%. VSD can measure rapid time-dependent phenomena of crystalline materials as well as glass, liquid and amorphous materials. The pair distribution function will be routinely obtained by the Fourier transiformation of S(Q) data. Q range of VSD will be as wide as 0.01 Å-1

  4. Hybrid chirped pulse amplification system

    DOEpatents

    Barty, Christopher P.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2005-03-29

    A hybrid chirped pulse amplification system wherein a short-pulse oscillator generates an oscillator pulse. The oscillator pulse is stretched to produce a stretched oscillator seed pulse. A pump laser generates a pump laser pulse. The stretched oscillator seed pulse and the pump laser pulse are directed into an optical parametric amplifier producing an optical parametric amplifier output amplified signal pulse and an optical parametric amplifier output unconverted pump pulse. The optical parametric amplifier output amplified signal pulse and the optical parametric amplifier output laser pulse are directed into a laser amplifier producing a laser amplifier output pulse. The laser amplifier output pulse is compressed to produce a recompressed hybrid chirped pulse amplification pulse.

  5. Stress pulse phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    McGlaun, M.

    1993-08-01

    This paper is an introductory discussion of stress pulse phenomena in simple solids and fluids. Stress pulse phenomena is a very rich and complex field that has been studied by many scientists and engineers. This paper describes the behavior of stress pulses in idealized materials. Inviscid fluids and simple solids are realistic enough to illustrate the basic behavior of stress pulses. Sections 2 through 8 deal with the behavior of pressure pulses. Pressure is best thought of as the average stress at a point. Section 9 deals with shear stresses which are most important in studying solids.

  6. Laser fusion pulse shape controller

    DOEpatents

    Siebert, Larry D.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus for controlling the pulse shape, i.e., the pulse duration and intensity pattern, of a pulsed laser system, and which is particularly well adapted for controlling the pellet ignition pulse in a laser-driven fusion reaction system. The apparatus comprises a laser generator for providing an optical control pulse of the shape desired, a pulsed laser triggered by the control pulse, and a plurality of optical Kerr-effect gates serially disposed at the output of the pulsed laser and selectively triggered by the control pulse to pass only a portion of the pulsed laser output generally corresponding in shape to the control pulse.

  7. PULSE DURATION LENGTHENER

    DOEpatents

    Aiken, W.R.

    1958-02-01

    This patent pertains to pulse modifying apparatus and, more particularly, describes a device to provide a rise time and time base expander for signal pulses having a very short duration. The basic element of the device is a vacuum tube comprising a charged particie beam, grid control means, an accelerating electrode, a drift tube, and a collector electrode. As the short duration input pulse modulates the particle beam through the grid control means, the voltage between the drift tube and accelerating electrode is caused to vary, whereby the output signal from the collector is a pulse having longer rise time, expanded duration and proportionate characteristics of the original pulse. The invention is particuiarly useful where subsequent pulse circultry does not have the frequency bandwidth to handle the short duration pulse without distorting it.

  8. ELECTRICAL PULSE COUNTER APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Kaufman, W.M.; Jeeves, T.A.

    1962-09-01

    A progressive electrical pulse counter circuit rs designed for the counting of a chain of input pulses. The circuit employs a series of direct connected bistable counting stages simultaneously pulsed by each input pulse and a delay means connected between each of the stages. Each bistable stage has two d-c operative states, which stage, when in its initial state, prevents the next succeeding stage from changing its condition when the latter stage is pulsed. Since the delay circuits between the stages prevents the immediate decay of the d-c state of each stage when the stages are pulsed, only one stage will change its state for each input pulse, thereby providing progressive stage-by-stage counting. (AEC)

  9. PULSE RATE DIVIDER

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, H.C. Jr.

    1962-12-18

    A compact pulse-rate divider circuit affording low impedance output and high input pulse repetition rates is described. The circuit features a single secondary emission tube having a capacitor interposed between its dynode and its control grid. An output pulse is produced at the anode of the tube each time an incoming pulse at the control grid drives the tube above cutoff and the duration of each output pulse corresponds to the charging time of the capacitor. Pulses incoming during the time the grid bias established by the discharging capacitor is sufficiently negative that the pulses are unable to drive the tube above cutoff do not produce output pulses at the anode; these pulses are lost and a dividing action is thus produced by the circuit. The time constant of the discharge path may be vanied to vary in turn the division ratio of the circuit; the time constant of the charging circuit may be varied to vary the width of the output pulses. (AEC)

  10. PULSE HEIGHT ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Goldsworthy, W.W.

    1958-06-01

    A differential pulse-height discriminator circuit is described which is readily adaptable for operation in a single-channel pulse-height analyzer. The novel aspect of the circuit lies in the specific arrangement of differential pulse-height discriminator which includes two pulse-height discriminators having a comnnon input and an anticoincidence circuit having two interconnected vacuum tubes with a common cathode resistor. Pulses from the output of one discriminator circuit are delayed and coupled to the grid of one of the anticoincidence tubes by a resistor. The output pulses from the other discriminator circuit are coupled through a cathode follower circuit, which has a cathode resistor of such value as to provide a long time constant with the interelectrode capacitance of the tube, to lenthen the output pulses. The pulses are then fed to the grid of the other anticoincidence tube. With such connections of the circuits, only when the incoming pulse has a pesk value between the operating levels of the two discriminators does an output pulse occur from the anticoincidence circuit.

  11. Measurements of the temporal and spatial phase variations of a 33 GHz pulsed free electron laser amplifier and application to high gradient RF acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Volfbeyn, P.; Bekefi, G.

    1995-12-31

    We report the results of temporal and spatial measurements of phase of a pulsed free electron laser amplifier (FEL) operating in combined wiggler and axial guide magnetic fields. The 33 GHz FEL is driven by a mildly relativistic electron beam (750 kV, 90-300 A, 30 ns) and generates 61 MW of radiation with a high power magnetron as the input source. The phase is measured by an interferometric technique from which frequency shifting is determined. The results are simulated with a computer code. Experimental studies on a CERN-CLIC 32.98 GHz 26-cell high gradient accelerating section (HGA) were carried out for input powers from 0.1 MW to 35 MW. The FEL served as the r.f. power source for the HGA. The maximum power in the transmitted pulse was measured to be 15 MW for an input pulse of 35 MW. The theoretically calculated shunt impedance of 116 M{Omega}/m predicts a field gradient of 65 MeV/m inside the HGA. For power levels >3MW the pulse transmitted through the HGA was observed to be shorter than the input pulse and pulse shortening became more serious with increasing power input. At the highest power levels the output pulse length (about 5 nsec) was about one quarter of the input pulse length. Various tests suggest that these undesirable effects occur in the input coupler to the HGA. Light and X-ray production inside the HGA have been observed.

  12. Large-scale atomistic simulations of surface nanostructuring by short pulse laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chengping; Shugaev, Maxim; Zhigilei, Leonid

    2015-03-01

    The availability of petascale supercomputing resources has expanded the range of research questions that can be addressed in the simulations and, in particular, enabled large-scale atomistic simulations of short pulse laser nanostructuring of metal surfaces. A series of simulations performed for systems consisting of 108 - 109 atoms is used in this study to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the generation of complex multiscale surface morphology and microstructure. At low laser fluence, just below the spallation threshold, a concurrent occurrence of fast laser melting, dynamic relaxation of laser-induced stresses, and rapid cooling and resolidification of the transiently melted surface region is found to produce a sub-surface porous region covered by a nanocrystalline layer. At higher laser fluences, in the spallation and phase explosion regimes, the material disintegration and ejection driven by the relaxation of laser-induced stresses and/or explosive release of vapor leads to the formation of complex surface morphology that can only be studied in billion-atom simulations. The first result from a billion atom simulation of surface nanostructuring performed on Titan will be discussed in the presentation. Financial support is provided by NSF (DMR-0907247 and CMMI-1301298) and AFOSR (FA9550-10-1-0541). Computational support is provided by the OLCF (MAT048) and NSF XSEDE (TG-DMR110090).

  13. European Neutrons form Parasitic Research to Global Strategy: Realizing Plans for a Transnational European Spallation Source in the Wake of the Cold War

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiserfeld, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Studies of Big Science have early on focused on instrumentation and scientific co-operation in large organizations, later on to take into account symbolic values and specific research styles while more recently also involving the relevance of commercial interests and economic development as well as the assimilation of research traditions. In accordance with these transformed practices, this presentation will analyze how an organization with the purpose of realizing a Big-Science facility, The European Spallation Source, has successfully managed to present the project as relevant to different national and international policy-makers, to the community of European neutron researchers as well as to different industrial interests. All this has been achieved in a research-policy environment, which has been the subject to drastic transformations, from calls to engage researchers from the former eastern bloc in the early 1990s via competition with American and Asian researchers at the turn of the century 2000 to intensified demands on business applications. During this process, there has also been fierce competition between different potential sites in the U.K., Germany, Spain, Hungary and Sweden, not once, but twice. The project has in addition been plagued by withdrawals of key actors as well as challenging problems in the field of spallation-source construction. Nevertheless, the European Spallation Source has survived from the early 1990s until today, now initiating the construction process at Lund in southern Sweden. In this presentation, the different measures taken and arguments raised by the European Spallation Source project in order to realize the facility will be analysed. Especially the different designs of the European Spallation Source will be analysed as responses to external demands and threats.

  14. PULSE AMPLITUDE ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Greenblatt, M.H.

    1958-03-25

    This patent pertains to pulse amplitude analyzers for sorting and counting a serles of pulses, and specifically discloses an analyzer which ls simple in construction and presents the puise height distribution visually on an oscilloscope screen. According to the invention, the pulses are applied to the vertical deflection plates of an oscilloscope and trigger the horizontal sweep. Each pulse starts at the same point on the screen and has a maximum amplitude substantially along the same vertical line. A mask is placed over the screen except for a slot running along the line where the maximum amplitudes of the pulses appear. After the slot has been scanned by a photocell in combination with a slotted rotating disk, the photocell signal is displayed on an auxiliary oscilloscope as vertical deflection along a horizontal time base to portray the pulse amplitude distribution.

  15. PULSE AMPLITUDE ANALYSERS

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, I.A.D.

    1956-05-15

    This patent pentains to an electrical pulse amplitude analyzer, capable of accepting input pulses having a separation between adjacent pulses in the order of one microsecond while providing a large number of channels of classification. In its broad aspect the described pulse amplitude analyzer utilizes a storage cathode ray tube und control circuitry whereby the amplitude of the analyzed pulses controls both the intensity and vertical defiection of the beam to charge particular spots in horizontal sectors of the tube face as the beam is moved horizontally across the tube face. As soon as the beam has swept the length of the tube the information stored therein is read out by scanning individually each horizontal sector corresponding to a certain range of pulse amplitudes and applying the output signal from each scan to separate indicating means.

  16. Design and preliminary tests of a twin coil HTS SMES for pulse power operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badel, Arnaud; Tixador, Pascal; Berger, Kevin; Deleglise, Marc

    2011-05-01

    The design of a twin coil 2 × 200 kJ-1 MW pulse power high temperature superconductor (HTS) superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) demonstrator is presented. Its aim is to test at small scale various possibilities of electromagnetic launcher powering. The foreseen operation modes include high voltage discharge in power capacitors, sequential discharges of identical energies from two coupled coils, and XRAM current multiplication. Special attention was paid to the arrangement of the coils for the energies discharged to be equal. The coils are cooled by conduction from three cryocoolers; the thermal design was optimized in order to maintain the coils around 15 K in spite of the high number of current leads required for XRAM operation (eight). Preliminary tests of the demonstrator are also presented, showing that the thermal and electrical characteristics are in very good agreement with the design objectives.

  17. PulseSoar

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, P.; Peglow, S.

    1992-07-21

    This paper is an introduction to the PulseSoar concept. PulseSoar is a hypervelocity airplane that uses existing airport facilities and current technologies to fly at the very edge of space. It will be shown that PulseSoar can fly between any two points on the globe in less than two hours with fuel efficiency exceeding current state of the art commercial airliners. In addition, it will be shown that PulseSoar avoids environmental issues concerning the ozone layer and sonic booms because of its unique flight profile. All of this can be achieved with current technology. PulseSoar does not require the development of enabling technology. It is a concept which can be demonstrated today. The importance of this idea goes beyond the technical significance`s of PulseSoar in terms of feasibility and performance. PulseSoar could provide a crucial economic advantage to America`s largest export market: commercial aircraft. PulseSoar is a breakthrough concept for addressing the emerging markets of long range and high speed aircraft. Application of PulseSoar to commercial transport could provide the US Aerospace industry a substantial lead in offering high speed/long range aircraft to the world`s airlines. The rapid emergence of a US developed high speed aircraft could also be important to our competitiveness in the Pacific Rim and South American economies. A quick and inexpensive demonstration vehicle is proposed to bang the concept to reality within two years. This discussion will address all the major technical subjects encompassed by PulseSoar and identifies several near-term, and low risk, applications which may be further explored with the initial demonstration vehicle. What is PulseSoar? PulseSoar could enable high speed, high altitude and long range flight without many of the difficulties encountered by traditional hypersonic vehicles.

  18. PULSED INDICATOR CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Linlor, W.I.; Kerns, Q.A.

    1960-11-15

    A system is given for detecting incremental changes in a transducer impedance terminating a transmission line. Principal novelty resides in the transducer impedance terminating the line in a mismatch and a pulse generator being provided to apply discrete pulses to the input end of the line. The amplitudes of the pulses reflected to the input end of the line from the mismatched transducer impedance are then observed as a very accurate measure of the instantaneous value of the latter.

  19. High voltage pulse conditioning

    DOEpatents

    Springfield, Ray M.; Wheat, Jr., Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for conditioning high voltage pulses from particle accelerators in order to shorten the rise times of the pulses. Flashover switches in the cathode stalk of the transmission line hold off conduction for a determinable period of time, reflecting the early portion of the pulses. Diodes upstream of the switches divert energy into the magnetic and electrostatic storage of the capacitance and inductance inherent to the transmission line until the switches close.

  20. Femtosecond polarization pulse shaping.

    PubMed

    Brixner, T; Gerber, G

    2001-04-15

    We report computer-controlled femtosecond polarization pulse shaping where intensity, momentary frequency, and light polarization are varied as functions of time. For the first time to our knowledge, a pulse shaper is used to modulate the degree of ellipticity as well as the orientation of the elliptical principal axes within a single laser pulse by use of a 256-pixel two-layer liquid-crystal display inside a zero-dispersion compressor. Interferometric stability of the setup is not required. Complete pulse characterization is achieved by dual-channel spectral interferometry. This technology has a large range of applications, especially in the field of quantum control.

  1. Femtosecond polarization pulse shaping.

    PubMed

    Brixner, T; Gerber, G

    2001-04-15

    We report computer-controlled femtosecond polarization pulse shaping where intensity, momentary frequency, and light polarization are varied as functions of time. For the first time to our knowledge, a pulse shaper is used to modulate the degree of ellipticity as well as the orientation of the elliptical principal axes within a single laser pulse by use of a 256-pixel two-layer liquid-crystal display inside a zero-dispersion compressor. Interferometric stability of the setup is not required. Complete pulse characterization is achieved by dual-channel spectral interferometry. This technology has a large range of applications, especially in the field of quantum control. PMID:18040384

  2. The cold neutron chopper spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source—A review of the first 8 years of operation

    DOE PAGES

    Ehlers, G.; Podlesnyak, A. A.; Kolesnikov, A. I.

    2016-09-13

    The first eight years of operation of the Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer (CNCS) at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge is being reviewed. The instrument has been part of the facility user program since 2009, and more than 250 individual user experiments have been performed to date. CNCS is an extremely powerful and versatile instrument and offers leading edge performance in terms of beam intensity, energy resolution, and flexibility to trade one for another. In addition, experiments are being routinely performed with the sample at extreme conditions: T ≲ 0.05 K, p ≳ 2 GPa, and B = 8more » T can be achieved individually or in combination. In particular, CNCS is in a position to advance the state of the art with inelastic neutron scattering under pressure, and some of the recent accomplishments in this area will be presented in more detail.« less

  3. Performance of the Los Alamos National Laboratory spallation-driven solid-deuterium ultra-cold neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, A.; Makela, M.; Bagdasarova, Y.; Boissevain, J.; Bowles, T. J.; Currie, S. A.; Hill, R. E.; Hogan, G.; Morris, C. L.; Mortensen, R. N.; Ramsey, J.; Seestrom, S. J.; Sondheim, W. E.; Teasdale, W.; Wang, Z.; Back, H. O.; Broussard, L. J.; Hoagland, J.; Holley, A. T.; Pattie, R. W. Jr.; and others

    2013-01-15

    In this paper, we describe the performance of the Los Alamos spallation-driven solid-deuterium ultra-cold neutron (UCN) source. Measurements of the cold neutron flux, the very low energy neutron production rate, and the UCN rates and density at the exit from the biological shield are presented and compared to Monte Carlo predictions. The cold neutron rates compare well with predictions from the Monte Carlo code MCNPX and the UCN rates agree with our custom UCN Monte Carlo code. The source is shown to perform as modeled. The maximum delivered UCN density at the exit from the biological shield is 52(9) UCN/cc with a solid deuterium volume of {approx}1500 cm{sup 3}.

  4. Spallation as a dominant source of pusher-fuel and hot-spot mix in inertial confinement fusion capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orth, Charles D.

    2016-02-01

    We suggest that a potentially dominant but previously neglected source of pusher-fuel and hot-spot "mix" may have been the main degradation mechanism for fusion energy yields of modern inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules designed and fielded to achieve high yields—not hydrodynamic instabilities. This potentially dominant mix source is the spallation of small chunks or "grains" of pusher material into the fuel regions whenever (1) the solid material adjacent to the fuel changes its phase by nucleation and (2) this solid material spalls under shock loading and sudden decompression. We describe this mix mechanism, support it with simulations and experimental evidence, and explain how to eliminate it and thereby allow higher yields for ICF capsules and possibly ignition at the National Ignition Facility.

  5. Testing Single Phase IGBT H-Bridge Switch Plates for the High Voltage Converter Modulator at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Peplov, Vladimir V; Anderson, David E; Solley, Dennis J

    2014-01-01

    Three IGBT H-bridge switching networks are used in each High Voltage Converter Modulator (HVCM) system at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to generate drive currents to three boost transformer primaries switching between positive and negative bus voltages at 20 kHz. Every switch plate assembly is tested before installing it into an operational HVCM. A Single Phase Test Stand has been built for this purpose, and it is used for adjustment, measurement and testing of different configurations of switch plates. This paper will present a description of the Test Stand configuration and discuss the results of testing switch plates with two different types of IGBT gate drivers currently in use on the HVCM systems. Comparison of timing characteristics of the original and new drivers and the resulting performance reinforces the necessity to replace the original H-bridge network drivers with the upgraded units.

  6. Spallation as a dominant source of pusher-fuel and hot-spot mix in inertial confinement fusion capsules

    DOE PAGES

    Orth, Charles D.

    2016-02-23

    We suggest that a potentially dominant but previously neglected source of pusher-fuel and hot-spot “mix” may have been the main degradation mechanism for fusion energy yields of modern inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules designed and fielded to achieve high yields — not hydrodynamic instabilities. This potentially dominant mix source is the spallation of small chunks or “grains” of pusher material into the fuel regions whenever (1) the solid material adjacent to the fuel changes its phase by nucleation, and (2) this solid material spalls under shock loading and sudden decompression. Finally, we describe this mix mechanism, support it with simulationsmore » and experimental evidence, and explain how to eliminate it and thereby allow higher yields for ICF capsules and possibly ignition at the National Ignition Facility.« less

  7. Light nuclides produced in the proton-induced spallation of {sup 238}U at 1 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ricciardi, M.V.; Armbruster, P.; Enqvist, T.; Kelic, A.; Rejmund, F.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Yordanov, O.; Benlliure, J.; Pereira, J.; Bernas, M.; Mustapha, B.; Stephan, C.; Tassan-Got, L.

    2006-01-15

    The production of light and intermediate-mass nuclides formed in the reaction {sup 1}H+{sup 238}U at 1 GeV was measured at the Fragment Separator at GSI, Darmstadt. The experiment was performed in inverse kinematics, by shooting a 1 A GeV {sup 238}U beam on a thin liquid-hydrogen target. A total of 254 isotopes of all elements in the range 7{<=}Z{<=}37 were unambiguously identified, and the velocity distributions of the produced nuclides were determined with high precision. The results show that the nuclides are produced in a very asymmetric binary decay of heavy nuclei originating from the spallation of uranium. All the features of the produced nuclides merge with the characteristics of the fission products as their mass increases.

  8. Conceptual Design for Replacement of the DTL and CCL with Superconducting RF Cavities in the Spallation Neutron Source Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, Mark S; Doleans, Marc; Kim, Sang-Ho

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source Linac utilizes normal conducting RF cavities in the low energy section from 2.5 MeV to 186 MeV. Six Drift Tube Linac (DTL) structures accelerate the beam to 87 MeV, and four Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL) structures provide further acceleration to 186 MeV. The remainder of the Linac is comprised of 81 superconducting cavities packaged in 23 cryomodules to provide final beam energy of approximately 1 GeV. The superconducting Linac has proven to be substantially more reliable than the normal conducting Linac despite the greater number of stations and the complexity associated with the cryogenic plant and distribution. A conceptual design has been initiated on a replacement of the DTL and CCL with superconducting RF cavities. The motivation, constraints, and conceptual design are presented.

  9. Calculation Package: Derivation of Facility-Specific Derived Air Concentration (DAC) Values in Support of Spallation Neutron Source Operations

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, David A

    2009-12-01

    Derived air concentration (DAC) values for 175 radionuclides* produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), but not listed in Appendix A of 10 CFR 835 (01/01/2009 version), are presented. The proposed DAC values, ranging between 1 E-07 {micro}Ci/mL and 2 E-03 {micro}Ci/mL, were calculated in accordance with the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and are intended to support an exemption request seeking regulatory relief from the 10 CFR 835, Appendix A, requirement to apply restrictive DACs of 2E-13 {micro}Ci/mL and 4E-11 {micro}Ci/mL and for non-listed alpha and non-alpha-emitting radionuclides, respectively.

  10. Status of Cryogenic System for Spallation Neutron Source's Superconducting Radiofrequency Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ting; Casagrande, Fabio; Ganni, Venkatarao; Knudsen, Peter N; Strong, William Herb

    2011-01-01

    Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) is building an independent cryogenic system for its Superconducting Radiofrequency Test Facility (SRFTF). The scope of the system is to support the SNS cryomodule test and cavity test at 2-K (using vacuum pump) and 4.5K for the maintenance purpose and Power Upgrade Project of SNS, and to provide the part of the cooling power needed to backup the current CHL to keep Linac at 4.5-K during CHL maintenance period in the future. The system is constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is to construct an independent 4K helium refrigeration system with helium Dewar and distribution box as load interface. It is schedule to be commissioned in 2013. Here we report the concept design of the system and the status of the first phase of this project.

  11. Comparison between measurements, simulations, and theoretical predictions of the extraction kicker transverse dipole instability in the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Cousineau, Sarah M; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Jain, Lalit K

    2011-01-01

    Occasionally it is possible to bring together experiment, theory, and simulation in detail. Such an occasion occurred during a high intensity beam physics study in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). A transverse dipole instability in the vertical direction has been observed in the accumulator ring for a coasting beam that was stored for 10000 turns. This instability was observed at a beam intensity of about 12 microcoulombs and was characterized by a frequency spectrum peaking at about 6 MHz. The probable cause of the instability is the impedance of the ring extraction kickers. We carry out here a detailed benchmark of the observed instability, uniting an analysis of the experimental data, a precise ORBIT Code tracking simulation, and a theoretical estimate of the observed beam instability.

  12. Initial testing of a Compact Crystal Positioning System for the TOPAZ Single-Crystal Diffractometer at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, Matthew J; Austin, Michael D; Viola, Robert; Thomison, Jack; Carmen, Peter; Hoffmann, Christina; Miller, Echo M; Mosier, Lisa B; Overbay, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    A precise, versatile, and automated method of orienting a sub-millimeter crystal in a focused neutron beam is required for e cient operation of the TOPAZ Single Crystal Di ractometer at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. To ful ll this need, a Compact Crystal Positioning System (CCPS) has been developed in collaboration with Square One Systems Design in Jackson, Wyoming. The system incorporates a tripod design with six vacuum-compatible piezoelectric linear motors capable of < 1 m resolution. National Instruments LabVIEW provides a means of system automation while at the same time accommodating the modular nature of the SNS sample environment control software for straightforward system integration. Initial results in a cryogenic test environment will be presented, as well as results from ambient tests performed at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory.

  13. Impedance measurements of the extraction kicker system for the rapid cycling synchrotron of China Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liang-Sheng; Wang, Sheng; Liu, Yu-Dong; Li, Yong; Liu, Ren-Hong; Xiao, Ou-Zheng

    2016-04-01

    The fast extraction kicker system is one of the most important accelerator components and the main source of impedance in the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron of the China Spallation Neutron Source. It is necessary to understand the kicker impedance before its installation into the tunnel. Conventional and improved wire methods are employed in the impedance measurement. The experimental results for the kicker impedance are explained by comparison with simulation using CST PARTICLE STUDIO. The simulation and measurement results confirm that the window-frame ferrite geometry and the end plate are the important structures causing coupling impedance. It is proved in the measurements that the mismatching from the power form network to the kicker leads to a serious oscillation sideband of the longitudinal and vertical impedance and the oscillation can be reduced by ferrite absorbing material. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175193, 11275221)

  14. The cold neutron chopper spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source—A review of the first 8 years of operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, G.; Podlesnyak, A. A.; Kolesnikov, A. I.

    2016-09-01

    The first eight years of operation of the Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer (CNCS) at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge is being reviewed. The instrument has been part of the facility user program since 2009, and more than 250 individual user experiments have been performed to date. CNCS is an extremely powerful and versatile instrument and offers leading edge performance in terms of beam intensity, energy resolution, and flexibility to trade one for another. Experiments are being routinely performed with the sample at extreme conditions: T ≲ 0.05 K, p ≳ 2 GPa, and B = 8 T can be achieved individually or in combination. In particular, CNCS is in a position to advance the state of the art with inelastic neutron scattering under pressure, and some of the recent accomplishments in this area will be presented in more detail.

  15. Results from the TARC experiment: spallation neutron phenomenology in lead and neutron-driven nuclear transmutation by adiabatic resonance crossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abánades, A.; Aleixandre, J.; Andriamonje, S.; Angelopoulos, A.; Apostolakis, A.; Arnould, H.; Belle, E.; Bompas, C. A.; Brozzi, D.; Bueno, J.; Buono, S.; Carminati, F.; Casagrande, F.; Cennini, P.; Collar, J. I.; Cerro, E.; Del Moral, R.; Díez, S.; Dumps, L.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid, M.; Fernández, R.; Gálvez, J.; García, J.; Gelès, C.; Giorni, A.; González, E.; González, O.; Goulas, I.; Heuer, D.; Hussonnois, M.; Kadi, Y.; Karaiskos, P.; Kitis, G.; Klapisch, R.; Kokkas, P.; Lacoste, V.; Le Naour, C.; López, C.; Loiseaux, J. M.; Martínez-Val, J. M.; Méplan, O.; Nifenecker, H.; Oropesa, J.; Papadopoulos, I.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Pérez-Enciso, E.; Pérez-Navarro, A.; Perlado, M.; Placci, A.; Poza, M.; Revol, J.-P.; Rubbia, C.; Rubio, J. A.; Sakelliou, L.; Saldaña, F.; Savvidis, E.; Schussler, F.; Sirvent, C.; Tamarit, J.; Trubert, D.; Tzima, A.; Viano, J. B.; Vieira, S.; Vlachoudis, V.; Zioutas, K.

    2002-02-01

    We summarize here the results of the TARC experiment whose main purpose is to demonstrate the possibility of using Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (ARC) to destroy efficiently Long-Lived Fission Fragments (LLFFs) in accelerator-driven systems and to validate a new simulation developed in the framework of the Energy Amplifier programme. An experimental set-up was installed in a CERN PS proton beam line to study how neutrons produced by spallation at relatively high energy ( E n⩾1 MeV) slow down quasi-adiabatically with almost flat isolethargic energy distribution and reach the capture resonance energy of an element to be transmuted where they will have a high probability of being captured. Precision measurements of energy and space distributions of spallation neutrons (using 2.5 and 3.5 GeV/ c protons) slowing down in a 3.3 m×3.3 m×3 m lead volume and of neutron capture rates on LLFFs 99Tc, 129I, and several other elements were performed. An appropriate formalism and appropriate computational tools necessary for the analysis and understanding of the data were developed and validated in detail. Our direct experimental observation of ARC demonstrates the possibility to destroy, in a parasitic mode, outside the Energy Amplifier core, large amounts of 99Tc or 129I at a rate exceeding the production rate, thereby making it practical to reduce correspondingly the existing stockpile of LLFFs. In addition, TARC opens up new possibilities for radioactive isotope production as an alternative to nuclear reactors, in particular for medical applications, as well as new possibilities for neutron research and industrial applications.

  16. The proposed spallation neutron source and modernized reactor as possible sites for a low temperature irradiation facility in Germany*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böning, K.; Gläser, W.; Golub, R.; Meier, J.

    1982-07-01

    A feasibility study for a Spallation Neutron Source (SNQ) in Germany was completed in June 1981. In this project an intensity-modulated LINAC (100 pps) would provide a proton beam of energy 1100 MeV and time-average current Īp = 5 mA . Spallation neutrons are produced in the lead material of a rotating target wheel and moderated in a hybrid arrangement consisting of both a small H 2O volume and a large D 2O tank. Here the maximum values of the peak and time-average thermal fluxes are ̂gf th ≈ 1.3 × 10 16 cm -2 s -1 and ¯gf th ≈ 6.5 × 10 14 cm -2 s -1, respectively. A low temperature irradiation facility (LTIF) has been proposed to allow irradiations in the temperature range of 4.5 to 450 K with either thermal neutrons ( ¯gf th ≈ 1 × 10 14 cm -2 s -1) or fast neutrons ( ¯gf f ≈ 2 × 10 13 cm -2 s -1). The advantages and disadvantages of having this LTIF at the SNQ are discussed with respect to the alternative of installing it at a fission reactor. Finally, the example of a possible modernization and upgrading of the Munich research reactor FRM is used to discuss the performance of such a reactor and the concept of a LTIF in this case, and to point out the complementarity of an optimized SNQ (high- ̂gf applications) and such a modernized reactor (high- ¯gf applications).

  17. Time-resolved microscopy reveals the driving mechanism of particle formation during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dentin-like ivory.

    PubMed

    Domke, Matthias; Gavrilova, Anna; Rapp, Stephan; Frentzen, Matthias; Meister, Joerg; Huber, Heinz P

    2015-07-01

    In dental health care, the application of ultrashort laser pulses enables dental tissue ablation free from thermal side effects, such as melting and cracking. However, these laser types create undesired micro- and nanoparticles, which might cause a health risk for the patient or surgeon. The aim of this study was to investigate the driving mechanisms of micro- and nanoparticle formation during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dental tissue. Time-resolved microscopy was chosen to observe the ablation dynamics of mammoth ivory after irradiation with 660 fs laser pulses. The results suggest that nanoparticles might arise in the excited region. The thermal expansion of the excited material induces high pressure in the surrounding bulk tissue, generating a pressure wave. The rarefaction wave behind this pressure wave causes spallation, leading to ejection of microparticles.

  18. Time-resolved microscopy reveals the driving mechanism of particle formation during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dentin-like ivory.

    PubMed

    Domke, Matthias; Gavrilova, Anna; Rapp, Stephan; Frentzen, Matthias; Meister, Joerg; Huber, Heinz P

    2015-07-01

    In dental health care, the application of ultrashort laser pulses enables dental tissue ablation free from thermal side effects, such as melting and cracking. However, these laser types create undesired micro- and nanoparticles, which might cause a health risk for the patient or surgeon. The aim of this study was to investigate the driving mechanisms of micro- and nanoparticle formation during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dental tissue. Time-resolved microscopy was chosen to observe the ablation dynamics of mammoth ivory after irradiation with 660 fs laser pulses. The results suggest that nanoparticles might arise in the excited region. The thermal expansion of the excited material induces high pressure in the surrounding bulk tissue, generating a pressure wave. The rarefaction wave behind this pressure wave causes spallation, leading to ejection of microparticles. PMID:26172613

  19. Time-resolved microscopy reveals the driving mechanism of particle formation during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dentin-like ivory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domke, Matthias; Gavrilova, Anna; Rapp, Stephan; Frentzen, Matthias; Meister, Joerg; Huber, Heinz P.

    2015-07-01

    In dental health care, the application of ultrashort laser pulses enables dental tissue ablation free from thermal side effects, such as melting and cracking. However, these laser types create undesired micro- and nanoparticles, which might cause a health risk for the patient or surgeon. The aim of this study was to investigate the driving mechanisms of micro- and nanoparticle formation during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dental tissue. Time-resolved microscopy was chosen to observe the ablation dynamics of mammoth ivory after irradiation with 660 fs laser pulses. The results suggest that nanoparticles might arise in the excited region. The thermal expansion of the excited material induces high pressure in the surrounding bulk tissue, generating a pressure wave. The rarefaction wave behind this pressure wave causes spallation, leading to ejection of microparticles.

  20. Opportunities in pulse combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Brenchley, D.L.; Bomelburg, H.J.

    1985-10-01

    In most pulse combustors, the combustion occurs near the closed end of a tube where inlet valves operate in phase with the pressure amplitude variations. Thus, within the combustion zone, both the temperature and the pressure oscillate around a mean value. However, the development of practical applications of pulse combustion has been hampered because effective design requires the right combination of the combustor's dimensions, valve characteristics, fuel/oxidizer combination, and flow pattern. Pulse combustion has several additional advantages for energy conversion efficiency, including high combustion and thermal efficiency, high combustion intensity, and high convective heat transfer rates. Also, pulse combustion can be self-aspirating, generating a pressure boost without using a blower. This allows the use of a compact heat exchanger that may include a condensing section and may obviate the need for a chimney. In the last decade, these features have revived interest in pulse combustion research and development, which has resulted in the development of a pulse combustion air heater by Lennox, and a pulse combustion hydronic unit by Hydrotherm, Inc. To appraise this potential for energy savings, a systematic study was conducted of the many past and present attempts to use pulse combustion for practical purposes. The authors recommended areas where pulse combustion technology could possibly be applied in the future and identified areas in which additional R and D would be necessary. Many of the results of the study project derived from a special workshop on pulse combustion. This document highlights the main points of the study report, with particular emphasis on pulse combustion application in chemical engineering.

  1. PULSE HEIGHT ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Johnstone, C.W.

    1958-01-21

    An anticoincidence device is described for a pair of adjacent channels of a multi-channel pulse height analyzer for preventing the lower channel from generating a count pulse in response to an input pulse when the input pulse has sufficient magnitude to reach the upper level channel. The anticoincidence circuit comprises a window amplifier, upper and lower level discriminators, and a biased-off amplifier. The output of the window amplifier is coupled to the inputs of the discriminators, the output of the upper level discriminator is connected to the resistance end of a series R-C network, the output of the lower level discriminator is coupled to the capacitance end of the R-C network, and the grid of the biased-off amplifier is coupled to the junction of the R-C network. In operation each discriminator produces a negative pulse output when the input pulse traverses its voltage setting. As a result of the connections to the R-C network, a trigger pulse will be sent to the biased-off amplifier when the incoming pulse level is sufficient to trigger only the lower level discriminator.

  2. Pulsed Fission Propulsion Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the 1960's U.S. Government laboratories, under Project Orion, investigated a pulsed nuclear fission propulsion system. Small nuclear pulse units would be sequentially discharged from the aft end of the vehicle. A blast shield and shock absorber system would protect the crew and convert the shock loads into a continuous propusive force.

  3. Pulsed Fission Propulsion Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the 1960's U.S. Government laboratories, under Project Orion, investigated a pulsed nuclear fission propulsion system. Small nuclear pulse units would be sequentially discharged from the aft end of the vehicle. A blast shield and shock absorber system would protect the crew and convert the shock loads into a continuous propulsive force.

  4. PULSE AMPLITUDE DISTRIBUTION RECORDER

    DOEpatents

    Cowper, G.

    1958-08-12

    A device is described for automatica1ly recording pulse annplitude distribution received from a counter. The novelty of the device consists of the over-all arrangement of conventional circuit elements to provide an easy to read permanent record of the pulse amplitude distribution during a certain time period. In the device a pulse analyzer separates the pulses according to annplitude into several channels. A scaler in each channel counts the pulses and operates a pen marker positioned over a drivable recorder sheet. Since the scalers in each channel have the sanne capacity, the control circuitry permits counting of the incoming pulses until one scaler reaches capacity, whereupon the input is removed and an internal oscillator supplies the necessary pulses to fill up the other scalers. Movement of the chart sheet is initiated wben the first scaler reaches capacity to thereby give a series of marks at spacings proportional to the time required to fill the remaining scalers, and accessory equipment marks calibration points on the recorder sheet to facilitate direct reading of the number of external pulses supplied to each scaler.

  5. Sources of pulsed radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, M.C. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Characteristics of various sources of pulsed radiation are examined from the viewpoint of their importance to the radiation chemist, and some examples of uses of such sources are mentioned. A summary is given of the application of methods of physical dosimetry to pulsed sources, and the calibration of convenient chemical dosimeters by physical dosimetry is outlined. 7 figures, 1 table.

  6. Pulsed Laser Tissue Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Joseph T.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Jansen, E. Duco; Motamedi, Massoud; Welch, Ashley J.

    Pulsed lasers, by virtue of their ability to deliver energy in a spatially and temporally confined fashion, are able to micromachine biological tissues. The clinical success of pulsed laser treatment, however, is often limited by the extent of damage that is caused to the tissue in the vicinity of the ablation crater. In general, pulsed ablation is a trade off between thermal damage to surrounding tissue, caused by relatively long pulses (>100 ms), and mechanical damage to surrounding tissue, caused by relatively short pulses (<1 ms). To identify the origin of pulsed laser induced damage, the possible laser tissue interactions and ablation are discussed here and in Chapter 14. The purpose of this chapter is to provide the reader with a condensed overview of the parameters that must be considered in the process of pulsed laser ablation of soft tissue. In this chapter, pulsed infrared ablation of biological soft tissue is used as a paradigm to illustrate the concepts and design considerations. Generally speaking, the absorption of laser light may lead to photothermal, photomechanical or photochemical interaction with the irradiated tissue [1-5]. The vast majority of therapeutic laser-tissue interactions is based on photothermal interactions where laser energy is converted into heat. Subsequent to thermalization of the absorbed optical energy, heat transfer mechanisms, in particular conduction allow thermal diffusion from high temperature areas to surrounding regions. When laser penetration depth is less than the laser spot radius, the thermal diffusion time, τ th, can be defined as:

  7. Extrusion cooking: Legume pulses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extrusion is used commercially to produce high value breakfast and snack foods based on cereals such as wheat or corn. However, this processing method is not being commercially used for legume pulses seeds due to the perception that they do not expand well in extrusion. Extrusion cooking of pulses (...

  8. Composite Pulse Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Jerry L.; Cloyd, Jason H.

    2007-01-01

    A modification of the design of the pulse tube in a pulse-tube cryocooler reduces axial thermal conductance while preserving radial thermal conductance. It is desirable to minimize axial thermal conductance in the pulse-tube wall to minimize leakage of heat between the warm and cold ends of the pulse tube. At the same time, it is desirable to maximize radial thermal conductance at the cold end of the pulse tube to ensure adequate thermal contact between (1) a heat exchanger in the form of a stack of copper screens inside the pulse tube at the cold end and (2) the remainder of the cold tip, which is the object to which the heat load is applied and from which heat must be removed. The modified design yields a low-heat-leak pulse tube that can be easily integrated with a cold tip. A typical pulse tube of prior design is either a thin-walled metal tube or a metal tube with a nonmetallic lining. It is desirable that the outer surface of a pulse tube be cylindrical (in contradistinction to tapered) to simplify the design of a regenerator that is also part of the cryocooler. Under some conditions, it is desirable to taper the inner surface of the pulse tube to reduce acoustic streaming. The combination of a cylindrical outer surface and a tapered inner surface can lead to unacceptably large axial conduction if the pulse tube is made entirely of metal. Making the pulse-tube wall of a nonmetallic, lowthermal- conductivity material would not solve the problem because the wall would not afford the needed thermal contact for the stack of screens in the cold end. The modified design calls for fabricating the pulse tube in two parts: a longer, nonmetallic part that is tapered on the inside and cylindrical on the outside and a shorter, metallic part that is cylindrical on both the inside and the outside. The nonmetallic part can be made from G-10 fiberglass-reinforced epoxy or other low-thermal-conductivity, cryogenically compatible material. The metallic part must have high

  9. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    Florida State University is investigating the concept of pulsed electron beams for fly ash precipitation. This report describes the results and data on three of the subtasks of this project and preliminary work only on the remaining five subtasks. Described are the modification of precharger for pulsed and DC energization of anode; installation of the Q/A measurement system; and modification and installation of pulsed power supply to provide both pulsed and DC energization of the anode. The other tasks include: measurement of the removal efficiency for monodisperse simulated fly ash particles; measurement of particle charge; optimization of pulse energization schedule for maximum removal efficiency; practical assessment of results; and measurement of the removal efficiency for polydisperse test particles. 15 figs., 1 tab. (CK)

  10. Pulsed hall thruster system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hruby, Vladimir J. (Inventor); Pote, Bruce M. (Inventor); Gamero-Castano, Manuel (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A pulsed Hall thruster system includes a Hall thruster having an electron source, a magnetic circuit, and a discharge chamber; a power processing unit for firing the Hall thruster to generate a discharge; a propellant storage and delivery system for providing propellant to the discharge chamber and a control unit for defining a pulse duration .tau.<0.1d.sup.3.rho./m, where d is the characteristic size of the thruster, .rho. is the propellant density at standard conditions, and m is the propellant mass flow rate for operating either the power processing unit to provide to the Hall thruster a power pulse of a pre-selected duration, .tau., or operating the propellant storage and delivery system to provide a propellant flow pulse of duration, .tau., or providing both as pulses, synchronized to arrive coincidentally at the discharge chamber to enable the Hall thruster to produce a discreet output impulse.

  11. The e-SCRUB Machine: an 800-kV, 500-kW average power pulsed electron beam generator for flue-gas scrubbing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, James R.; Briggs, Ray; Crewson, Walter F.; Johnson, R. D.; Ratafia-Brown, J. A.; Richardson, W. K.; Rienstra, W. W.; Ballard, Perry G.; Cukr, Jeffrey; Cassel, R. L.; Schlitt, Leland; Genuario, R. D.; Morgan, R. D.; Tripoli, G. A.

    1995-03-01

    This paper gives an overview of electron beam dry scrubbing (EBDS) to remove SOx and NOx from flue gases of coal-fired power plants. It also describes the e-SCRUB program, a program currently underway to commercialize this process with an integrated pulsed electron beam. The electron beam, together with injected water and ammonia, causes chemical reactions which convert the SOx and NOx into commercial grade agricultural fertilizer, a usable byproduct. The e-SCRUB facility is a test bed to demonstrate the feasibility and performance of a repetitive, reliable pulsed electron beam generator operating at average power levels of up to 1 MW. This facility contains the electron beam generator and all the auxiliary and support systems required by the machine, including a computer driven central experiment control system, a 100,000 SCFM flowing dry nitrogen load which simulates the characteristics of a power plant flue, and a 2 MVA dedicated electrical service to power the machine. The e-SCRUB electron beam machine is designed to produce an 800 kV pulsed electron beam with a repetition rate of 667 pps. The energy per pulse deposited into the flue gas is approximately 750 J. The pulsed power system converts the utility power input to a 667 pps, 800 kV pulse train which powers the electron gun. The functional units of the pulsed power system will be discussed in the paper, along with some preliminary experimental results.

  12. Localized wave pulse experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D L; Henderson, T L; Krueger, K L; Lewis, D K; Zilkowski, R N

    1999-06-01

    The Localized Wave project of the Strategic System Support Program has recently finished an experiment in cooperation with the Advanced SONAR group of the Applied Research Laboratory of the University of Texas at Austin. The purpose of the experiment was three-fold. They wanted to see if (1) the LW pulse could propagate over significant distances, to see if (2) a new type of array and drive system specifically designed for the pulse would increase efficiency over single frequency tone bursts, and to see if (3) the complexity of our 24 channel drivers resulted in better efficiency than a single equivalent pulse driving a piston. In the experiment, several LW pulses were launched from the Lake Travis facility and propagated over distances of either 100 feet or 600 feet, through a thermocline for the 600 foot measurements. The results show conclusively that the Localized Wave will propagate past the near field distance. The LW pulses resulted in extremely broad frequency band width pulses with narrow spatial beam patterns and unmeasurable side lobes. Their array gain was better than most tone bursts and further, were better than their equivalent piston pulses. This marks the first test of several Low Diffraction beams against their equivalent piston pulses, as well as the first propagation of LW pulses over appreciable distances. The LW pulse is now proven a useful tool in open water, rather than a laboratory curiosity. The experimental system and array were built by ARL, and the experiments were conducted by ARL staff on their standard test range. The 600 feet measurements were made at the farthest extent of that range.

  13. ALARA Review of the Spallation Neutron Source Accumulator Ring and Transfer Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Haire, M.J.

    2003-06-30

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is designed to meet the growing need for new tools that will deepen our understanding in materials science, life science, chemistry, fundamental and nuclear physics, earth and environmental sciences, and engineering sciences. The SNS is an accelerator-based neutron-scattering facility that when operational will produce an average beam power of 2 MW at a repetition rate of 60 Hz. The accelerator complex consists of the front-end systems, which will include an ion source; a 1-GeV full-energy linear accelerator; a single accumulator ring and its transfer lines; and a liquid mercury target. This report documents an as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) review of the accumulator ring and transfer lines at their early design stage. An ALARA working group was formed and conducted a review of the SNS ring and transfer lines at the {approx}25% complete design stage to help ensure that ALARA principles are being incorporated into the design. The radiological aspects of the SNS design criteria were reviewed against regulatory requirements and ALARA principles. Proposed features and measures were then reviewed against the SNS design criteria. As part of the overall review, the working group reviewed the design manual; design drawings and process and instrumentation diagrams; the environment, safety, and health manual; and other related reports and literature. The group also talked with SNS design engineers to obtain explanations of pertinent subject matter. The ALARA group found that ALARA principles are indeed being incorporated into the early design stage. Radiation fields have been characterized, and shielding calculations have been performed. Radiological issues are being adequately addressed with regard to equipment selection, access control, confinement structure and ventilation, and contamination control. Radiation monitoring instrumentation for worker and environment protection are also being considered--a good practice at this

  14. Preference pulses without reinforcers.

    PubMed

    McLean, Anthony P; Grace, Randolph C; Pitts, Raymond C; Hughes, Christine E

    2014-05-01

    Preference pulses are thought to represent strong, short-term effects of reinforcers on preference in concurrent schedules. However, the general shape of preference pulses is substantially determined by the distributions of responses-per-visit (visit lengths) for the two choice alternatives. In several series of simulations, we varied the means and standard deviations of distributions describing visits to two concurrently available response alternatives, arranged "reinforcers" according to concurrent variable-interval schedules, and found a range of different preference pulses. Because characteristics of these distributions describe global aspects of behavior, and the simulations assumed no local effects of reinforcement, these preference pulses derive from the visit structure alone. This strongly questions whether preference pulses should continue to be interpreted as representing local effects of reinforcement. We suggest an alternative approach whereby local effects are assessed by subtracting the artifactual part, which derives from visit structure, from the observed preference pulses. This yields "residual" preference pulses. We illustrate this method in application to published data from mixed dependent concurrent schedules, revealing evidence that the delivery of reinforcers had modest lengthening effects on the duration of the current visit, a conclusion that is quantitatively consistent with early research on short-term effects of reinforcement.

  15. RF pulsed heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritzkau, David Peace

    RF pulsed heating is a process by which a metal is heated from magnetic fields on its surface due to high-power pulsed RF. When the thermal stresses induced are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Pulsed heating limits the maximum magnetic field on the surface and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient in a normal conducting accelerator structure. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE011 mode at a resonant frequency of 11.424 GHz is designed to study pulsed heating on OFE copper, a material commonly used in normal conducting accelerator structures. The high-power pulsed RF is supplied by an X-band klystron capable of outputting 50 MW, 1.5 μs pulses. The test pieces of the cavity are designed to be removable to allow testing of different materials with different surface preparations. A diagnostic tool is developed to measure the temperature rise in the cavity utilizing the dynamic Q change of the resonant mode due to heating. The diagnostic consists of simultaneously exciting a TE012 mode to steady-state in the cavity at 18 GHz and measuring the change in reflected power as the cavity is heated from high-power pulsed RF. Two experimental runs were completed. One run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 120 K for 56 × 106 pulses. The second run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 82 K for 86 × 106 pulses. Scanning electron microscope pictures show extensive damage occurring in the region of maximum temperature rise on the surface of the test pieces.

  16. Dynamic pulse difference circuit

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, Gerald L.

    1978-01-01

    A digital electronic circuit of especial use for subtracting background activity pulses in gamma spectrometry comprises an up-down counter connected to count up with signal-channel pulses and to count down with background-channel pulses. A detector responsive to the count position of the up-down counter provides a signal when the up-down counter has completed one scaling sequence cycle of counts in the up direction. In an alternate embodiment, a detector responsive to the count position of the up-down counter provides a signal upon overflow of the counter.

  17. SHORT PULSE STRETCHER

    DOEpatents

    Branum, D.R.; Cummins, W.F.

    1962-12-01

    >A short pulse stretching circuit capable of stretching a short puise to enable it to be displayed on a relatively slow sweeping oscilloscope is described. Moreover, the duration of the pulse is increased by charging a capacitor through a diode and thereafter discharging the capacitor at such time as is desired. In the circuit the trigger pulse alone passes through a delay line, whereas the main signal passes through the diode only, and results in over-all circuit losses which are proportional to the low losses of the diode only. (AEC)

  18. Topical report on a preconceptual design for the Spallation-Induced Lithium Conversion (SILC) target for the accelerator production of tritium (APT)

    SciTech Connect

    Van Tuyle, G.J.; Cokinos, D.M.; Czajkowski, C.; Franz, E.M.; Kroeger, P.; Todosow, M.; Youngblood, R.; Zucker, M.

    1993-09-30

    The preconceptual design of the APT Li-Al target system, also referred to as the Spallation-Induced Lithium Conversion (SILC), target system, is summarized in this report. The system has been designed to produce a ``3/8 Goal`` quantity of tritium using the 200-mA, 1.0 GeV proton beam emerging from the LANL-designed LINAC. The SILC target system consists of a beam expander, a heavy-water-cooled lead spallation neutron source assembly surrounded by light-water-cooled Li-Al blankets, a target window, heat removal systems, and related safety systems. The preconceptual design of each of these major components is described. Descriptions are also provided for the target fabrication, tritium extraction, and waste-steam processes. Performance characteristics are presented and discussed.

  19. Design and development of a prototype 25 kV, 10 A long pulse Marx modulator for high power klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Mahesh; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2016-02-01

    Research, design, and development of high average power modulators for the proposed Indian Spallation Neutron Source are in progress at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology. With this objective, a prototype of 25 kV, 10 A, 1 ms Marx modulator at repetition rate of 1 Hz has been designed and developed which serves as a proof of principle and technology assessment stage for further development of high repetition rate high voltage high average power modulators. Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) based modules of 2.8 kV switching capability have been used as main modules. The modulator had 8.2% droop in output voltage pulse without any droop compensation circuit. A droop compensation involving 15 corrector modules has been used to reduce the droop up to 1%. We have used IGBT based 250 V switches to realize the corrector module. A microcontroller based control unit was designed and developed for triggering the main and corrector modules. With this control unit, programmable output pulse has been achieved. Electrical isolation between high voltage circuits and control circuit has been achieved by the use of fiber optic based control signal transmission. Output pulses of 1 ms pulse width, 800 ns rise time, and 5 μs fall time have been achieved. The modulator has advantages of modular design, adjustable pulse width, adjustable rise time, and fall time.

  20. Pulse Coil Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    Set of relays tested easily and repeatedly. Pulse coil tester causes coil under test to generate transient voltage; waveform indicates condition of coil. Tester accommodates assembly of up to four coils at a time.