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Sample records for 1-norepinephrine induced pathologic

  1. Tau pathology induces intraneuronal cholesterol accumulation.

    PubMed

    Glöckner, Frauke; Ohm, Thomas G

    2014-09-01

    Epidemiologic and experimental data suggest the involvement of cholesterol metabolism in the development and progression of Alzheimer disease and Niemann-Pick type C disease, but not of frontotemporal dementias. In these 3 neurodegenerative diseases, however, protein tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation into neurofibrillary tangles are observed. To elucidate the relationship between cholesterol and tau, we compared sterol levels of neurons burdened with neurofibrillary tangles with those of their unaffected neighbors using semiquantitative filipin fluorescence microscopy in mice expressing P301L mutant human tau (a well-described model of FTDP-17) and in P301L transgenic mice lacking apolipoprotein E (the major cholesterol transporter in the brain). Cellular unesterified cholesterol was higher in neurons affected by tau pathology irrespective of apolipoprotein E deficiency. This argues for an impact of tau pathology on cellular cholesterol homeostasis. We suggest that there is a bidirectional mode of action: Disturbances in cellular cholesterol metabolism may promote tau pathology, but tau pathology may also alter neuronal cholesterol homeostasis; once it is established, a vicious cycle may promote neurofibrillary tangle formation.

  2. Pathologic changes induced by an euthanasia agent.

    PubMed

    Port, C D; Garvin, P J; Ganote, C E; Sawyer, D C

    1978-08-01

    Dogs and cats killed by intravenous injection of either 0.3 ml/kg body weight T-61 or 100 mg/kg body weight pentoarbital and necropsied at less than 5 minutes or at 15 minutes after injection did not have gross or microscopic pathological changes. However, dogs and cats killed with T-61 at a dose of 1.0--1.5 ml/kg body weight and necropsied at 15 minutes after injection had significant gross and microscopic pathological lesions. Grossly, the lungs were severely edematous, did not collapse, and were deep red. Microscopically, the lungs had severe pulmonary edema and endothelial necrosis. Endothelial swelling of glomerular tuft vessels was also present. These lung and kidney lesions are classified as an euthanasia artefact. PMID:703253

  3. Paternal Transmission of Stressed-Induced Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, David M.; LaPlant, Quincey; Watts, Emily L.; Hodes, Georgia E.; Russo, Scott J.; Feng, Jian; Oosting, Ronald S.; Vialou, Vincent; Nestler, Eric J.

    2011-01-01

    Background There has been recent interest in the possibility that epigenetic mechanisms might contribute to the trans-generational transmission of stress-induced vulnerability. Here, we focused on possible paternal transmission using the social defeat stress paradigm. Methods Adult male mice exposed to chronic social defeat stress, or control non-defeated mice, were bred with normal female mice and their offspring were assessed behaviorally for depressive- and anxiety-like measures. Plasma levels of corticosterone and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were also assayed. To directly assess the role of epigenetic mechanisms, we used in vitro fertilization (IVF); behavioral assessments were conducted on offspring of mice from IVF-control and IVF-defeated fathers. Results We show that both male and female offspring from defeated fathers exhibit increased measures of several depression- and anxiety-like behaviors. The male offspring of defeated fathers also display increased baseline plasma levels of corticosterone and decreased levels of VEGF. However, most of these behavioral changes were not observed when offspring were generated through IVF. Conclusion These results suggest that, while behavioral adaptations that occur after chronic social defeat stress can be transmitted from the father to his male and female F1 progeny, only very subtle changes might be transmitted epigenetically under the conditions tested. PMID:21679926

  4. Pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, E.; Farber, J.L. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 29 chapters. Some of the titles are: Genetic and Systemic Diseases; Cell Injury; Inflammation; The Gastrointestinal o Tract; The Pancreas; Environmental and Nutritional Pathology; Infectious and Parasitic Diseases; and Blood Vessels.

  5. Anchanling reduces pathology in a lactacystin- induced Parkinson's disease model☆

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yinghong; Wu, Zhengzhi; Gao, Xiaowei; Zhu, Qingwei; Jin, Yu; Wu, Anmin; Huang, Andrew C. J.

    2012-01-01

    A rat model of Parkinson's disease was induced by injecting lactacystin stereotaxically into the left mesencephalic ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra pars compacta. After rats were intragastrically perfused with Anchanling, a Chinese medicine, mainly composed of magnolol, for 5 weeks, when compared with Parkinson's disease model rats, tyrosine hydroxylase expression was increased, α-synuclein and ubiquitin expression was decreased, substantia nigra cell apoptosis was reduced, and apomorphine-induced rotational behavior was improved. Results suggested that Anchanling can ameliorate Parkinson's disease pathology possibly by enhancing degradation activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. PMID:25767493

  6. Pathology and biology of radiation-induced cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Tapio, Soile

    2016-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading global cause of death. The risk for this disease is significantly increased in populations exposed to ionizing radiation, but the mechanisms are not fully elucidated yet. This review aims to gather and discuss the latest data about pathological and biological consequences in the radiation-exposed heart in a comprehensive manner. A better understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying radiation-induced damage in heart tissue and cardiac vasculature will provide novel targets for therapeutic interventions. These may be valuable for individuals clinically or occupationally exposed to varying doses of ionizing radiation. PMID:27422929

  7. Experimental microembolism induces localized neuritic pathology in guinea pig cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Ming; Cai, Yan; Liu, Fei; Yang, La; Hu, Xia; Patrylo, Peter R; Cai, Huaibin; Luo, Xue-Gang; Xiao, Dong; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2015-05-10

    Microbleeds are a common finding in aged human brains. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), neuritic plaques composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) deposits and dystrophic neurites occur frequently around cerebral vasculature, raising a compelling question as to whether, and if so, how, microvascular abnormality and amyloid/neuritic pathology might be causally related. Here we used a guinea pig model of cerebral microembolism to explore a potential inductive effect of vascular injury on neuritic and amyloid pathogenesis. Brains were examined 7-30 days after experimental microvascular embolization occupying ~0.5% of total cortical area. Compared to sham-operated controls, glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity was increased in the embolized cerebrum, evidently around intracortical vasculature. Swollen/sprouting neurites exhibiting increased reactivity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase, parvalbumin, vesicular glutamate transporter 1 and choline acetyltransferase appeared locally in the embolized brains in proximity to intracortical vasculature. The embolization-induced swollen/sprouting neurites were also robustly immunoreactive for β-amyloid precursor protein and β-secretase-1, the substrate and initiating enzyme for Aβ genesis. These experimental data suggest that microvascular injury can induce multisystem neuritic pathology associated with an enhanced amyloidogenic potential in wild-type mammalian brain.

  8. Oral glutathione supplementation drastically reduces Helicobacter-induced gastric pathologies

    PubMed Central

    De Bruyne, Ellen; Ducatelle, Richard; Foss, Dennis; Sanchez, Margaret; Joosten, Myrthe; Zhang, Guangzhi; Smet, Annemieke; Pasmans, Frank; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Flahou, Bram

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter (H.) suis causes gastric pathologies in both pigs and humans. Very little is known on the metabolism of this bacterium and its impact on the host. In this study, we have revealed the importance of the glutamate-generating metabolism, as shown by a complete depletion of glutamine (Gln) in the medium during H. suis culture. Besides Gln, H. suis can also convert glutathione (GSH) to glutamate, and both reactions are catalyzed by the H. suis γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT). Both for H. pylori and H. suis, it has been hypothesized that the degradation of Gln and GSH may lead to a deficiency for the host, possibly initiating or promoting several pathologies. Therefore the in vivo effect of oral supplementation with Gln and GSH was assessed. Oral supplementation with Gln was shown to temper H. suis induced gastritis and epithelial (hyper)proliferation in Mongolian gerbils. Astonishingly, supplementation of the feed with GSH, another GGT substrate, resulted in inflammation and epithelial proliferation levels returning to baseline levels of uninfected controls. This indicates that Gln and GSH supplementation may help reducing tissue damage caused by Helicobacter infection in both humans and pigs, highlighting their potential as a supportive therapy during and after Helicobacter eradication therapy. PMID:26833404

  9. Non-fecalith-induced appendicitis: etiology, imaging, and pathology.

    PubMed

    Swischuk, Leonard E; Chung, Dai H; Hawkins, Hal K; Jadhav, Siddharth P; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to document the imaging and pathology findings in non-fecalith-induced appendicitis. We reviewed the imaging and pathologic findings in 40 patients with histologically proven purulent appendicitis seen over a 2-year period. Findings documented were (1) total appendiceal involvement, (2) predominant appendiceal tip involvement, (3) presence of a fecalith, and (4) presence of lymphoid hyperplasia. There were a total of 40 patients, 28 males and 12 females. The age range was 2-18 years with a mean of 11.5 years. Twenty-two (55 %) patients demonstrated classic purulent appendicitis of the whole appendix, 20 (91 %) of these appendices had a fecalith. Eighteen (45 %) patients demonstrated purulent appendicitis confined to or predominately involving the tip of the appendix, and all 18 (100 %) patients demonstrated marked lymphoid hyperplasia. Only two (11 %) of these appendices had a fecalith. Overall, a fecalith was found in only 55 % of our cases, while 45 % demonstrated no fecalith, but rather marked lymphoid hyperplasia. Lymphoid hyperplasia appeared to be the underlying predisposing cause of purulent appendicitis in these cases.

  10. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition reduces stress-induced affective pathology.

    PubMed

    Gamble-George, Joyonna Carrie; Baldi, Rita; Halladay, Lindsay; Kocharian, Adrina; Hartley, Nolan; Silva, Carolyn Grace; Roberts, Holly; Haymer, Andre; Marnett, Lawrence J; Holmes, Andrew; Patel, Sachin

    2016-01-01

    Mood and anxiety disorders are the most prevalent psychiatric conditions and are exacerbated by stress. Recent studies have suggested cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition could represent a novel treatment approach or augmentation strategy for affective disorders including anxiety disorders and major depression. We show that traditional COX-2 inhibitors and a newly developed substrate-selective COX-2 inhibitor (SSCI) reduce a variety of stress-induced behavioral pathologies in mice. We found that these behavioral effects were associated with a dampening of neuronal excitability in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) ex vivo and in vivo, and were mediated by small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channel and CB1 cannabinoid receptor activation. Taken together, these data provide further support for the potential utility of SSCIs, as well as traditional COX-2 inhibitors, as novel treatment approaches for stress-related psychiatric disorders. PMID:27162170

  11. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition reduces stress-induced affective pathology

    PubMed Central

    Gamble-George, Joyonna Carrie; Baldi, Rita; Halladay, Lindsay; Kocharian, Adrina; Hartley, Nolan; Silva, Carolyn Grace; Roberts, Holly; Haymer, Andre; Marnett, Lawrence J; Holmes, Andrew; Patel, Sachin

    2016-01-01

    Mood and anxiety disorders are the most prevalent psychiatric conditions and are exacerbated by stress. Recent studies have suggested cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition could represent a novel treatment approach or augmentation strategy for affective disorders including anxiety disorders and major depression. We show that traditional COX-2 inhibitors and a newly developed substrate-selective COX-2 inhibitor (SSCI) reduce a variety of stress-induced behavioral pathologies in mice. We found that these behavioral effects were associated with a dampening of neuronal excitability in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) ex vivo and in vivo, and were mediated by small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channel and CB1 cannabinoid receptor activation. Taken together, these data provide further support for the potential utility of SSCIs, as well as traditional COX-2 inhibitors, as novel treatment approaches for stress-related psychiatric disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14137.001 PMID:27162170

  12. Tau protein is essential for stress-induced brain pathology.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Sofia; Vaz-Silva, João; Pinto, Vitor; Dalla, Christina; Kokras, Nikolaos; Bedenk, Benedikt; Mack, Natalie; Czisch, Michael; Almeida, Osborne F X; Sousa, Nuno; Sotiropoulos, Ioannis

    2016-06-28

    Exposure to chronic stress is frequently accompanied by cognitive and affective disorders in association with neurostructural adaptations. Chronic stress was previously shown to trigger Alzheimer's-like neuropathology, which is characterized by Tau hyperphosphorylation and missorting into dendritic spines followed by memory deficits. Here, we demonstrate that stress-driven hippocampal deficits in wild-type mice are accompanied by synaptic missorting of Tau and enhanced Fyn/GluN2B-driven synaptic signaling. In contrast, mice lacking Tau [Tau knockout (Tau-KO) mice] do not exhibit stress-induced pathological behaviors and atrophy of hippocampal dendrites or deficits of hippocampal connectivity. These findings implicate Tau as an essential mediator of the adverse effects of stress on brain structure and function. PMID:27274066

  13. Superior neuroprotective effects of cerebrolysin in nanoparticle-induced exacerbation of hyperthermia-induced brain pathology.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aruna; Muresanu, Dafin Fior; Mössler, Herbert; Sharma, Hari Shanker

    2012-02-01

    In recent years, the incidence of heat stroke and associated brain pathology are increasing Worldwide. More than half of the world's population are living in areas associated with high environmental heat especially during the summer seasons. Thus, new research is needed using novel drug targets to achieve neuroprotection in heat-induced brain pathology. Previous research from our laboratory showed that the pathophysiology of brain injuries following heat stroke are exacerbated by chronic intoxication of engineered nanoparticles of small sizes (50-60 nm) following identical heat exposure in rats. Interestingly, in nanoparticle-intoxicated animals the known neuroprotective agents in standard doses failed to induce effective neuroprotection. This suggests that the dose-response of the drugs either requires modification or new therapeutic agents are needed to provide better neuroprotection in nanoparticle-intoxicated animals after heat stroke. This review is focused on the use of cerebrolysin, a mixture of several neurotrophic factors and active peptide fragments, in relation to other neuroprotective agents normally used to treat ischemic stroke in clinics in nanoparticle-induced exacerbation of brain damage in heat stroke. It appears that cerebrolysin exerts the most superior neuroprotective effects in heat stress as compared to other neuroprotective agents on brain pathology in normal rats. Interestingly, to induce effective neuroprotection in nanoparticle-induced exacerbation of brain pathology a double dose of cerebrolysin is needed. On the other hand, double doses of the other drugs were quite ineffective in reducing brain damage. These observations suggest that the drug type and doses are important factors in attenuating nanoparticle-induced exacerbation of brain pathology in heat stroke. The functional significance and possible mechanisms of drug-induced neuroprotection in nanoparticle-treated, heat-stressed rats are discussed.

  14. Supra-physiological dose of testosterone induces pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Pirompol, Prapawadee; Teekabut, Vassana; Weerachatyanukul, Wattana; Bupha-Intr, Tepmanas; Wattanapermpool, Jonggonnee

    2016-04-01

    Testosterone and androgenic anabolic steroids have been misused for enhancement of physical performance despite many reports on cardiac sudden death. Although physiological level of testosterone provided many regulatory benefits to human health, including the cardiovascular function, supra-physiological levels of the hormone induce hypertrophy of the heart with unclear contractile activation. In this study, dose- and time-dependent effects of high-testosterone treatment on cardiac structure and function were evaluated. Adult male rats were divided into four groups of testosterone treatment for 0, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg BW for 4, 8, or 12 weeks. Increases in both percentage heart:body weight ratio and cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area in representing hypertrophy of the heart were significantly shown in all testosterone-treated groups to the same degree. In 4-week-treated rats, physiological cardiac hypertrophy was apparent with an upregulation of α-MHC without any change in myofilament contractile activation. In contrast, pathological cardiac hypertrophy was observed in 8- and 12-week testosterone-treated groups, as indicated by suppression of myofilament activation and myocardial collagen deposition without transition of MHC isoforms. Only in 12-week testosterone-treated group, eccentric cardiac hypertrophy was demonstrated with unaltered myocardial stiffness, but significant reductions in the phosphorylation signals of ERK1/2 and mTOR. Results of our study suggest that the outcome of testosterone-induced cardiac hypertrophy is not dose dependent but is rather relied on the factor of exposure to duration in inducing maladaptive responses of the heart. PMID:26850730

  15. Castration Induces Parkinson Disease Pathologies in Young Male Mice via Inducible Nitric-oxide Synthase*

    PubMed Central

    Khasnavis, Saurabh; Ghosh, Anamitra; Roy, Avik; Pahan, Kalipada

    2013-01-01

    Although Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, available animal models do not exhibit irreversible neurodegeneration, and this is a major obstacle in finding out an effective drug against this disease. Here we delineate a new irreversible model to study PD pathogenesis. The model is based on simple castration of young male mice. Levels of inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS), glial markers (glial fibrillary acidic protein and CD11b), and α-synuclein were higher in nigra of castrated male mice than normal male mice. On the other hand, after castration, the level of glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) markedly decreased in the nigra of male mice. Accordingly, castration also induced the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons in the nigra and decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase-positive fibers and neurotransmitters in the striatum. Reversal of nigrostriatal pathologies in castrated male mice by subcutaneous implantation of 5α-dihydrotestosterone pellets validates an important role of male sex hormone in castration-induced nigrostriatal pathology. Interestingly, castration was unable to cause glial activation, decrease nigral GDNF, augment the death of nigral dopaminergic neurons, induce the loss of striatal fibers, and impair neurotransmitters in iNOS−/− male mice. Furthermore, we demonstrate that iNOS-derived NO is responsible for decreased expression of GDNF in activated astrocytes. Together, our results suggest that castration induces nigrostriatal pathologies via iNOS-mediated decrease in GDNF. These results are important because castrated young male mice may be used as a simple, toxin-free, and nontransgenic animal model to study PD-related nigrostriatal pathologies, paving the way for easy drug screening against PD. PMID:23744073

  16. Castration induces Parkinson disease pathologies in young male mice via inducible nitric-oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Khasnavis, Saurabh; Ghosh, Anamitra; Roy, Avik; Pahan, Kalipada

    2013-07-19

    Although Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, available animal models do not exhibit irreversible neurodegeneration, and this is a major obstacle in finding out an effective drug against this disease. Here we delineate a new irreversible model to study PD pathogenesis. The model is based on simple castration of young male mice. Levels of inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS), glial markers (glial fibrillary acidic protein and CD11b), and α-synuclein were higher in nigra of castrated male mice than normal male mice. On the other hand, after castration, the level of glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) markedly decreased in the nigra of male mice. Accordingly, castration also induced the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons in the nigra and decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase-positive fibers and neurotransmitters in the striatum. Reversal of nigrostriatal pathologies in castrated male mice by subcutaneous implantation of 5α-dihydrotestosterone pellets validates an important role of male sex hormone in castration-induced nigrostriatal pathology. Interestingly, castration was unable to cause glial activation, decrease nigral GDNF, augment the death of nigral dopaminergic neurons, induce the loss of striatal fibers, and impair neurotransmitters in iNOS(-/-) male mice. Furthermore, we demonstrate that iNOS-derived NO is responsible for decreased expression of GDNF in activated astrocytes. Together, our results suggest that castration induces nigrostriatal pathologies via iNOS-mediated decrease in GDNF. These results are important because castrated young male mice may be used as a simple, toxin-free, and nontransgenic animal model to study PD-related nigrostriatal pathologies, paving the way for easy drug screening against PD.

  17. Aging predisposes to acute inflammatory induced pathology after tumor immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bouchlaka, Myriam N.; Sckisel, Gail D.; Chen, Mingyi; Mirsoian, Annie; Zamora, Anthony E.; Maverakis, Emanual; Wilkins, Danice E.C.; Alderson, Kory L.; Hsiao, Hui-Hua; Weiss, Jonathan M.; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Hesdorffer, Charles; Ferrucci, Luigi; Longo, Dan L.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Wiltrout, Robert H.; Redelman, Doug; Taub, Dennis D.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer commonly occurs in the elderly and immunotherapy (IT) is being increasingly applied to this population. However, the majority of preclinical mouse tumor models assessing potential efficacy and toxicities of therapeutics use young mice. We assessed the impact of age on responses to systemic immune stimulation. In contrast to young mice, systemic cancer IT regimens or LPS given to aged mice resulted in rapid and lethal toxicities affecting multiple organs correlating with heightened proinflammatory cytokines systemically and within the parenchymal tissues. This inflammatory response and increased morbidity with age was independent of T cells or NK cells. However, prior in vivo depletion of macrophages in aged mice resulted in lesser cytokine levels, increased survival, and decreased liver histopathology. Furthermore, macrophages from aged mice and normal human elderly volunteers displayed heightened TNF and IL-6 production upon in vitro stimulation. Treatment of both TNF knockout mice and in vivo TNF blockade in aged mice resulted in significant increases in survival and lessened pathology. Importantly, TNF blockade in tumor-bearing, aged mice receiving IT displayed significant anti-tumor effects. These data demonstrate the critical role of macrophages in the age-associated hyper-inflammatory cytokine responses to systemic immunostimulation and underscore the importance of performing preclinical assessments in aged mice. PMID:24081947

  18. Glandular epithelial AR inactivation enhances PTEN deletion-induced uterine pathology.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaesung Peter; Zheng, Yu; Handelsman, David J; Simanainen, Ulla

    2016-05-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) deletion induces uterine pathology, whereas androgen actions via androgen receptor (AR) support uterine growth and therefore may modify uterine cancer risk. We hypothesized that the androgen actions mediated via uterine glandular epithelial AR could modify PTEN deletion-induced uterine pathology. To test our hypothesis, we developed uterine glandular epithelium-specific PTEN and/or AR knockout mouse models comparing the uterine pathology among wild-type (WT), glandular epithelium-specific AR inactivation (ugeARKO), PTEN deletion (ugePTENKO), and the combined PTEN and AR knockout (ugePTENARKO) female mice. The double knockout restricted to glandular epithelium showed that AR inactivation enhanced PTEN deletion-induced uterine pathology with development of intraepithelial neoplasia by 20 weeks of age. In ugePTENARKO, 6/10 (60%) developed intraepithelial neoplasia, whereas 3/10 (30%) developed only glandular hyperplasia in ugePTENKO uterus. No uterine pathology was observed in WT (n=8) and ugeARKO (n=7) uteri. Uterine weight was significantly (P=0.002) increased in ugePTENARKO (374±97 mg (mean±s.e.)) compared with WT (97±6 mg), ugeARKO (94±12 mg), and ugePTENKO (205±33 mg). Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and P-AKT expression was modified by uterine pathology but did not differ between ugePTENKO and ugePTENARKO, suggesting that its expressions are not directly affected by androgens. However, progesterone receptor (PR) expression was reduced in ugePTENARKO compared to ugePTENKO uterus, suggesting that PR expression could be regulated by glandular epithelial AR inactivation. In conclusion, glandular epithelial AR inactivation (with persistent stromal AR action) enhanced PTEN deletion-induced uterine pathology possibly by downregulating PR expression in the uterus.

  19. Cadmium-Induced Pathologies: Where Is the Oxidative Balance Lost (or Not)?

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Ambily Ravindran; DeGheselle, Olivier; Smeets, Karen; Van Kerkhove, Emmy; Cuypers, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Over the years, anthropogenic factors have led to cadmium (Cd) accumulation in the environment causing various health problems in humans. Although Cd is not a Fenton-like metal, it induces oxidative stress in various animal models via indirect mechanisms. The degree of Cd-induced oxidative stress depends on the dose, duration and frequency of Cd exposure. Also the presence or absence of serum in experimental conditions, type of cells and their antioxidant capacity, as well as the speciation of Cd are important determinants. At the cellular level, the Cd-induced oxidative stress either leads to oxidative damage or activates signal transduction pathways to initiate defence responses. This balance is important on how different organ systems respond to Cd stress and ultimately define the pathological outcome. In this review, we highlight the Cd-induced oxidant/antioxidant status as well as the damage versus signalling scenario in relation to Cd toxicity. Emphasis is addressed to Cd-induced pathologies of major target organs, including a section on cell proliferation and carcinogenesis. Furthermore, attention is paid to Cd-induced oxidative stress in undifferentiated stem cells, which can provide information for future therapies in preventing Cd-induced pathologies. PMID:23507750

  20. Musculoskeletal Pathology.

    PubMed

    Peat, Frances J; Kawcak, Christopher E

    2015-08-01

    The current understanding of pathology as it relates to common diseases of the equine musculoskeletal system is reviewed. Conditions are organized under the fundamental categories of developmental, exercise-induced, infectious, and miscellaneous pathology. The overview of developmental pathology incorporates the new classification system of juvenile osteochondral conditions. Discussion of exercise-induced pathology emphasizes increased understanding of the contribution of cumulative microdamage caused by repetitive cyclic loading. Miscellaneous musculoskeletal pathology focuses on laminitis, which current knowledge indicates should be regarded as a clinical syndrome with a variety of possible distinct mechanisms of structural failure that are outlined in this overview. PMID:26037607

  1. Diabetes Mellitus Induces Alzheimer’s Disease Pathology: Histopathological Evidence from Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the major causative disease of dementia and is characterized pathologically by the accumulation of senile plaques (SPs) and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in the brain. Although genetic studies show that β-amyloid protein (Aβ), the major component of SPs, is the key factor underlying AD pathogenesis, it remains unclear why advanced age often leads to AD. Interestingly, several epidemiological and clinical studies show that type II diabetes mellitus (DM) patients are more likely to exhibit increased susceptibility to AD. Moreover, growing evidence suggests that there are several connections between the neuropathology that underlies AD and DM, and there is evidence that the experimental induction of DM can cause cognitive dysfunction, even in rodent animal models. This mini-review summarizes histopathological evidence that DM induces AD pathology in animal models and discusses the possibility that aberrant insulin signaling is a key factor in the induction of AD pathology. PMID:27058526

  2. Acrolein induces Alzheimer's disease-like pathologies in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Juan; Jin, Ming-Hua; Pi, Rong-Biao; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Ouyang, Ying; Chao, Xiao-Juan; Chen, Mei-Hui; Liu, Pei-Qing; Yu, Jian-Chen; Ramassamy, Charles; Dou, Juan; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Jiang, Yi-Ming; Qin, Jian

    2013-03-13

    The pathologic mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have not been fully uncovered. Acrolein, a ubiquitous dietary pollutant and by-product of oxidative stress, can induce cytotoxicity in neurons, which might play an important role in the etiology of AD. Here, we examined the effects of Acrolein on the AD pathologies in vitro and in vivo. We found Acrolein induced HT22 cells death in concentration- and time-dependent manners. Interestingly, Acrolein increased proteins' levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP), β-secretase (BACE-1) and the amyloid β-peptide transporter receptor for advanced glycation end products, and decreased A-disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) 10 levels. In vivo, chronic oral exposure to Acrolein (2.5 mg/kg/day by intragastric gavage for 8 weeks) induced mild cognitive declination and pyknosis/atrophy of hippocampal neurons. The activity of superoxide dismutase was down-regulated while the level of malondialdehyde was up-regulated in rat brain. Moreover, Acrolein resulted in activation of astrocytes, up-regulation of BACE-1 in cortex and down-regulation of ADAM-10 in hippocampus and cortex. Taken together, our findings suggest that exposure to Acrolein induces AD-like pathology in vitro and in vivo. Scavenging Acrolein might be beneficial for the therapy of AD.

  3. Interleukin-12 inhibits pathological neovascularization in mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yedi; Yoshida, Shigeo; Kubo, Yuki; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Nakama, Takahito; Yamaguchi, Muneo; Ishikawa, Keijiro; Nakao, Shintaro; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Sonoda, Koh-Hei

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-induced retinal neovascularization is a major pathological condition in many vision-threatening diseases. In the present study, we determined whether interleukin (IL)-12, a cytokine that regulates angiogenesis, plays a role in the neovascularization in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). We found that the expressions of the mRNAs of both IL-12p35 and IL-12p40 were significantly reduced in the OIR retinas compared to that of the room air-raised control. The sizes of the avascular areas and neovascular tufts were larger in IL-12p40 knock-out (KO) mice than that in wild type (WT) mice. In addition, an intravitreal injection of recombinant IL-12 reduced both avascular areas and neovascular tufts. IL-12 injection enhanced the expressions of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and other downstream chemokines. In an in vitro system, IL-12 had no significant effect on tube formation of human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRECs). Moreover, a blockade of IFN-γ suppressed the inhibitory effect of IL-12 on pathological neovascularization. These results suggest that IL-12 plays important roles in inhibiting pathological retinal neovascularization. PMID:27312090

  4. [Morphological structure of suprarenal glands in experimental vibration-induced pathology].

    PubMed

    Kapanadze, N A; Abzianidze, E N; Sumbadze, Ts M; Korkiia, I I; Amiranidze, M V

    2009-01-01

    Technical progress has caused development of vibration-induced pathology, which is determined by harmful factors or environmental effects. The harmful factors include physical factors--noise, mechanical vibrations, low temperature, high humidity of the air and incorrect lighting. The aim of our study was the investigation of morphological changes in suprarenal glands under condition of vibration-induced pathology. The experiment was conducted on 20 grown-up white male rats weighting 180-200 g. The animals were daily under an hour vibration during 2 months. The vibration frequency was modulated by means of a general vibration. After an experiment, animals were decapitated in condition of general anesthesia. The experiment revealed important changes in the morphological structure of suprarenal glands. The vibration pathology causes following changes: vessels' and sinusoid capillaries' uneven widening, develop the infiltrate cells, bleeding areas, necrosis and other changes. Based on above-stated it is supposed that technical progress and introduction of new technologies is one of the risk factors, which can cause neurohumoral disorders.

  5. Bortezomib-induced painful neuropathy in rats: a behavioral, neurophysiological and pathological study in rats.

    PubMed

    Meregalli, Cristina; Canta, Annalisa; Carozzi, Valentina A; Chiorazzi, Alessia; Oggioni, Norberto; Gilardini, Alessandra; Ceresa, Cecilia; Avezza, Federica; Crippa, Luca; Marmiroli, Paola; Cavaletti, Guido

    2010-04-01

    Bortezomib is a proteasome inhibitor showing strong antitumor activity against many tumors, primarily multiple myeloma. Bortezomib-induced neuropathic pain is the main side effect and the dose-limiting factor of the drug in clinical practice. In order to obtain a pre-clinical model to reproduce the characteristic pain symptoms in bortezomib-treated patients, we developed an animal model of bortezomib-induced nociceptive sensory neuropathy. In this study, bortezomib (0.15 or 0.20mg/kg) was administered to Wistar rats three times/week for 8 weeks, followed by a 4 week follow-up period. At the end of the treatment period a significant decrease in weight gain was observed in the treated groups vs. controls, and hematological and histopathological parameters were evaluated. After the treatment period, both doses of bortezomib induced a severe reduction in nerve conduction velocity and demonstrated a dose-cumulative effect of the drug. The sensory behavioral assessment showed the onset of mechanical allodynia, while no effect on thermal perception was observed. Sciatic nerves and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were collected at the end of the 8-week treatment and at the end of the follow-up period. The pathological examination revealed a dose-dependent axonopathy of the unmyelinated fibers in nerves of treated animals. No pathological alteration in most of DRG satellite cells and neurons was observed. Therefore, this animal model may be useful for studying the neurotoxicity and pain onset mechanisms related to bortezomib treatment.

  6. IL-33 Contributes to Schistosoma japonicum-induced Hepatic Pathology through Induction of M2 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hui; Zhang, Qixian; Li, Xiaojuan; Liu, Zhen; Shen, Jia; Sun, Rui; Wei, Jie; Zhao, Jia; Wu, Xiaoying; Feng, Feng; Zhong, Shuping; Sun, Xi; Wu, Zhongdao

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-33 is involved in T helper (Th)2-biased immune responses in mice infected with Schistosoma, but the precise mechanism remains to be elucidated. Herein, we investigated the role of IL-33 and its receptor ST2L in hepatic granuloma pathology induced by Schistosoma japonicum infection. We found that IL-33 induced the increased production of IL-5 and IL-13 from splenocytes and liver mononuclear cells (MNCs) of infected mice. The infected mice developed significantly higher number of ST2L-expressing cells in spleen and liver. Most of the ST2L-expressing cells in liver were F4/80+ macrophages, indicating the key role of macrophages in the response to IL-33. However, the liver MNCs in male-only worm infection had a poor response to IL-33, though elevated serum IL-33 was observed. ST2L+F4/80+ cells were lower in male-only worm infection than that of mixed infection. IL-33 and soluble egg antigen (SEA) upregulated ST2L expression on macrophages in vitro and ST2L-expressing macrophage displayed MHCII-CD11b+M2 phenotype. Macrophage deletion significantly attenuated IL-33-induced type 2 immunity and egg granuloma formation during S. japonicum infection. These data demonstrate that IL-33 contributes to hepatic granuloma pathology through induction of M2 macrophages during S. japonicum infection. PMID:27445267

  7. Effects of EGFR Inhibitor on Helicobacter pylori Induced Gastric Epithelial Pathology in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree, Jean E.; Jeremy, Anthony H.T.; Duval, Cedric; Dixon, Michael F.; Danjo, Kazuma; Carr, Ian M.; Pritchard, D. Mark; Robinson, Philip A.

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori transactivates the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and predisposes to gastric cancer development in humans and animal models. To examine the importance of EGFR signalling to gastric pathology, this study investigated whether treatment of Mongolian gerbils with a selective EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, EKB-569, altered gastric pathology in chronic H. pylori infection. Gerbils were infected with H. pylori and six weeks later received either EKB-569-supplemented, or control diet, for 32 weeks prior to sacrifice. EKB-569-treated H. pylori-infected gerbils had no difference in H. pylori colonisation or inflammation scores compared to infected animals on control diet, but showed significantly less corpus atrophy, mucous metaplasia and submucosal glandular herniations along with markedly reduced antral and corpus epithelial proliferation to apoptosis ratios. EKB-569-treated infected gerbils had significantly decreased abundance of Cox-2, Adam17 and Egfr gastric transcripts relative to infected animals on control diet. EGFR inhibition by EKB-569 therefore reduced the severity of pre-neoplastic gastric pathology in chronically H. pylori-infected gerbils. EKB-569 increased gastric epithelial apoptosis in H. pylori-infected gerbils which counteracted some of the consequences of increased gastric epithelial cell proliferation. Similar chemopreventative strategies may be useful in humans who are at high risk of developing H. pylori- induced gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:25437333

  8. Pathological Significance of a Panel of Urinary Biomarkers in Patients with Drug-Induced Tubulointerstitial Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu; Yang, Li; Su, Tao; Wang, Chen; Liu, Gang

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Although a renal biopsy is indispensable for depicting the severity of pathologic lesions in drug-induced tubulointerstitial nephritis (DTIN), it is not acceptable in some cases and cannot be performed serially because of its invasive nature. Therefore, the discovery of noninvasive markers that are closely related to the pathology of DTIN is of great value. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: In this study, the urinary levels of monocyte chemotactic peptide-1 (MCP-1), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase, and α1-microglobulin were measured in 40 DTIN subjects, and the performances of these parameters for distinguishing different pathologic lesions were compared. Results: Linear correlation and receiver operating characteristic curve analyses showed that urinary MCP-1 levels were able to identify serious interstitial edema and inflammatory infiltration with greater accuracy than the other biomarkers (r = 0.501, P < 0.001 and r = 0.768, P < 0.001, respectively), whereas urinary NGAL levels showed the highest correlation coefficient with tubular atrophy (r = 0.692, P < 0.001). Conclusions: These results suggest that these biomarker levels were higher in patients with DTIN than in controls. Urinary MCP-1 levels correlated and were predictive of the gradated severity of acute lesions in DTIN, whereas the roles of NGAL and α1-microglobulin in chronic alterations require further study. PMID:20813857

  9. The use of recently developed histochemical markers for localizing neurotoxicant induced regional brain pathologies.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sumit; Raymick, James; Schmued, Larry C

    2014-04-01

    Neuronal and vascular brain components are interrelated morphologically, physiologically and developmentally. Due to this close interrelationship, it is often difficult to understand the cause and effect relationship between neuronal vs. vascular dysfunction and pathology. This review will discuss four of the more promising recent developments for detecting vascular pathology, and will compare them with the labeling pattern seen with markers of glial and neuronal pathology; following exposure to well characterized neurotoxicants. To detect the vascular dysfunction in the brain, we recently developed a Fluoro-Turquoise gelatin conjugate (FT-gel), a fluorescent probe that helps to delineate between healthy vs. sclerotic vessels. Similarly, we have investigated the potential for Fluoro-Gold to label in vivo all the endothelial cells in the brain as they co-localize with RECA, an endothelial cell marker. We have also developed Amylo-Glo, a fluorescent tracer that can detect neurotoxic A-beta aggregates in the brain. In this article, we will discuss the potential use of these novel histochemical markers to study the neurotoxicant induced brain. We will also discuss neurovascular strategies that may offer novel therapeutic opportunities for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24763333

  10. The use of recently developed histochemical markers for localizing neurotoxicant induced regional brain pathologies.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sumit; Raymick, James; Schmued, Larry C

    2014-04-01

    Neuronal and vascular brain components are interrelated morphologically, physiologically and developmentally. Due to this close interrelationship, it is often difficult to understand the cause and effect relationship between neuronal vs. vascular dysfunction and pathology. This review will discuss four of the more promising recent developments for detecting vascular pathology, and will compare them with the labeling pattern seen with markers of glial and neuronal pathology; following exposure to well characterized neurotoxicants. To detect the vascular dysfunction in the brain, we recently developed a Fluoro-Turquoise gelatin conjugate (FT-gel), a fluorescent probe that helps to delineate between healthy vs. sclerotic vessels. Similarly, we have investigated the potential for Fluoro-Gold to label in vivo all the endothelial cells in the brain as they co-localize with RECA, an endothelial cell marker. We have also developed Amylo-Glo, a fluorescent tracer that can detect neurotoxic A-beta aggregates in the brain. In this article, we will discuss the potential use of these novel histochemical markers to study the neurotoxicant induced brain. We will also discuss neurovascular strategies that may offer novel therapeutic opportunities for neurodegenerative disorders.

  11. Pathological sprouting of adult nociceptors in chronic prostate cancer-induced bone pain.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M; Bloom, Aaron P; Stake, James I; Mantyh, William G; Taylor, Reid N; Freeman, Katie T; Ghilardi, Joseph R; Kuskowski, Michael A; Mantyh, Patrick W

    2010-11-01

    Pain frequently accompanies cancer. What remains unclear is why this pain frequently becomes more severe and difficult to control with disease progression. Here we test the hypothesis that with disease progression, sensory nerve fibers that innervate the tumor-bearing tissue undergo a pathological sprouting and reorganization, which in other nonmalignant pathologies has been shown to generate and maintain chronic pain. Injection of canine prostate cancer cells into mouse bone induces a remarkable sprouting of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP(+)) and neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200(+)) sensory nerve fibers. Nearly all sensory nerve fibers that undergo sprouting also coexpress tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA(+)). This ectopic sprouting occurs in sensory nerve fibers that are in close proximity to colonies of prostate cancer cells, tumor-associated stromal cells and newly formed woven bone, which together form sclerotic lesions that closely mirror the osteoblastic bone lesions induced by metastatic prostate tumors in humans. Preventive treatment with an antibody that sequesters nerve growth factor (NGF), administered when the pain and bone remodeling were first observed, blocks this ectopic sprouting and attenuates cancer pain. Interestingly, reverse transcription PCR analysis indicated that the prostate cancer cells themselves do not express detectable levels of mRNA coding for NGF. This suggests that the tumor-associated stromal cells express and release NGF, which drives the pathological reorganization of nearby TrkA(+) sensory nerve fibers. Therapies that prevent this reorganization of sensory nerve fibers may provide insight into the evolving mechanisms that drive cancer pain and lead to more effective control of this chronic pain state.

  12. Pathologic Fracture of the Femur in Brown Tumor Induced in Parathyroid Carcinoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Hyun; Kwon, Yong-Uk; Park, Jun-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Brown tumor refers to a change of skeletones that develops as a complication of hyperparathyroidism. As osteoclast is activated to stimulate reabsorption and fibrosis of bone, it causes a cystic change of the bone. Parathyroid carcinoma is being reported as a tumor that induces primary hyperparathyroidism. It causes excessive secretion of the parathyroid hormone and increases the blood parathyroid hormone and calcium. Bone deformation due to brown tumor is known to be naturally recovered through the treatment for hyperparathyroidism. However, there is no clearly defined treatment for lesions that can induce pathological fractures developing in lower extremities. We experienced a case where brown tumor developed in the proximal femur of a 57-year-old female patient due to parathyroid carcinoma. In this case, spontaneous fracture occurred without any trauma, and it was cured by performing intramedullary nailing fixation and parathyroidectomy. We report the treatment results along with a literature review. PMID:27777921

  13. Blast-induced color change in photonic crystals corresponds with brain pathology.

    PubMed

    Cullen, D Kacy; Browne, Kevin D; Xu, Yongan; Adeeb, Saleena; Wolf, John A; McCarron, Richard M; Yang, Shu; Chavko, Mikulas; Smith, Douglas H

    2011-11-01

    A high incidence of blast exposure is a 21st century reality in counter-insurgency warfare. However, thresholds for closed-head blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) remain unknown. Moreover, without objective information about relative blast exposure, warfighters with bTBI may not receive appropriate medical care and may remain in harm's way. Accordingly, we have engineered a blast injury dosimeter (BID) using a photonic crystalline material that changes color following blast exposure. The photonic crystals are fabricated using SU-8 via multi-beam interference laser lithography. The final BID is similar in appearance to an array of small colored stickers that may be affixed to uniforms or helmets in multiple locations. Although durable under normal conditions, the photonic crystalline micro- and nano-structure are precisely altered by blast to create a color change. These BIDs were evaluated using a rat model of bTBI, for which blast shockwave exposure was generated via a compressed air-driven shock tube. With prototype BID arrays affixed to the animals, we found that BID color changes corresponded with subtle brain pathologies, including neuronal degeneration and reactive astrocytosis. These subtle changes were most notable in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, and cerebellum. These data demonstrate the feasibility of using a materials-based, power-free colorimetric BID as the first self-contained blast sensor calibrated to correspond with brain pathology.

  14. Blast-Induced Color Change in Photonic Crystals Corresponds with Brain Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, D. Kacy; Browne, Kevin D.; Xu, Yongan; Adeeb, Saleena; Wolf, John A.; McCarron, Richard M.; Yang, Shu; Chavko, Mikulas

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A high incidence of blast exposure is a 21st century reality in counter-insurgency warfare. However, thresholds for closed-head blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) remain unknown. Moreover, without objective information about relative blast exposure, warfighters with bTBI may not receive appropriate medical care and may remain in harm's way. Accordingly, we have engineered a blast injury dosimeter (BID) using a photonic crystalline material that changes color following blast exposure. The photonic crystals are fabricated using SU-8 via multi-beam interference laser lithography. The final BID is similar in appearance to an array of small colored stickers that may be affixed to uniforms or helmets in multiple locations. Although durable under normal conditions, the photonic crystalline micro- and nano-structure are precisely altered by blast to create a color change. These BIDs were evaluated using a rat model of bTBI, for which blast shockwave exposure was generated via a compressed air-driven shock tube. With prototype BID arrays affixed to the animals, we found that BID color changes corresponded with subtle brain pathologies, including neuronal degeneration and reactive astrocytosis. These subtle changes were most notable in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, and cerebellum. These data demonstrate the feasibility of using a materials-based, power-free colorimetric BID as the first self-contained blast sensor calibrated to correspond with brain pathology. PMID:22082449

  15. Pulmonary overexpression of IL-9 induces Th2 cytokine expression, leading to immune pathology

    PubMed Central

    Temann, Ulla-Angela; Ray, Prabir; Flavell, Richard A.

    2002-01-01

    IL-9 is a pleiotropic cytokine with multiple functions on many cell types involved in the pathology of human asthma. The constitutive overexpression of IL-9 in the lungs of transgenic mice resulted in an asthma-like phenotype. To define the contribution of IL-9 to lung inflammation we generated transgenic mice in which lung-specific expression of the IL-9 transgene is inducible by doxycycline. Transgene induction resulted in lymphocytic and eosinophilic infiltration of the lung, airway epithelial cell hypertrophy with mucus production, and mast cell hyperplasia, similar to that seen in mice that constitutively expressed IL-9 in their lungs. Various cytokines, including IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, were expressed in the lung in response to IL-9. Blockade of IL-4 or IL-5 following IL-9 induction reduced airway eosinophilia without affecting mucus production. In contrast, neutralization of IL-13 completely abolished both lung inflammation and mucus production. These findings suggest that pathologic changes in the lung require additional signals beyond IL-9, provided by IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, to develop fully. PMID:11781348

  16. Amelioration of Influenza-Induced Pathology in Mice by Coinfection with Trichinella spiralis

    PubMed Central

    Furze, Rebecca C.; Hussell, Tracy; Selkirk, Murray E.

    2006-01-01

    Illness due to respiratory virus infection is often induced by excessive infiltration of cells into pulmonary tissues, leading to airway occlusion. We show here that infection with Trichinella spiralis results in lower levels of tumor necrosis factor in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and inhibits cellular recruitment into the airways of mice coinfected with influenza A virus. Infiltration of neutrophils and CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes was reduced, resulting in animals gaining weight more rapidly following the initial phase of infection. Influenza resulted in a generalized increase in vascular permeability in pulmonary tissues, and this was suppressed by parasite infection, although the effects were restricted to the early phase of trichinosis. Moreover, the number of cells producing interleukin-10 (IL-10), and the local levels of this cytokine, were reduced, suggesting that amelioration of pulmonary pathology by parasite infection occurs independently of IL-10 production. PMID:16495568

  17. Yohimbine-Induced Amygdala Activation in Pathological Gamblers: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Elman, Igor; Becerra, Lino; Tschibelu, Evelyne; Yamamoto, Rinah; George, Edward; Borsook, David

    2012-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives There is evidence that drug addiction is associated with increased physiological and psychological responses to stress. In this pilot functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study we assessed whether a prototype behavioral addiction, pathological gambling (PG), is likewise associated with an enhanced response to stress. Methods We induced stress by injecting yohimbine (0.2–0.3 mg/kg, IV), an alpha-2 adrenoceptor antagonist that elicits stress-like physiological and psychological effects in humans and in laboratory animals, to four subjects with PG and to five non-gamblers mentally healthy control subjects. Their fMRI brain responses were assessed along with subjective stress and gambling urges ratings. Results Voxelwise analyses of data sets from individual subjects, utilizing generalized linear model approach, revealed significant left amygdala activation in response to yohimbine across all PG subjects. This amygdala effect was not observed in the five control individuals. Yohimbine elicited subjective stress ratings in both groups with greater (albeit not statically significantly) average response in the PG subjects. On the other hand, yohimbine did not induce urges to gamble. Conclusions The present data support the hypothesis of brain sensitization to pharmacologically-induced stress in PG. PMID:22319607

  18. Microglial activation precedes dopamine terminal pathology in methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    LaVoie, Matthew J; Card, J Patrick; Hastings, Teresa G

    2004-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated methamphetamine (METH)-induced toxicity to dopaminergic and serotonergic axons in rat striatum. Although several studies have identified the nature of reactive astrogliosis in this lesion model, the response of microglia has not been examined in detail. In this investigation, we characterized the temporal relationship of reactive microgliosis to neuropathological alterations of dopaminergic axons in striatum following exposure to methamphetamine. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered a neurotoxic regimen of methamphetamine and survived 12 h, or 1, 2, 4, and 6 days after treatment. Immunohistochemical methods were used to evaluate reactive changes in microglia throughout the brain of methamphetamine-treated rats, with a particular focus upon striatum. Pronounced morphological changes, indicative of reactive microgliosis, were evident in the brains of all methamphetamine-treated animals and were absent in saline-treated control animals. These included hyperplastic changes in cell morphology that substantially increased the size and staining intensity of reactive microglia. Quantitative analysis of reactive microglial changes in striatum demonstrated that these changes were most robust within the ventrolateral region and were maximal 2 days after methamphetamine administration. Analysis of tissue also revealed that microglial activation preceded the appearance of pathological changes in striatal dopamine fibers. Reactive microgliosis was also observed in extra-striatal regions (somatosensory and piriform cortices, and periaqueductal gray). These data demonstrate a consistent, robust, and selective activation of microglia in response to methamphetamine administration that, at least in striatum, precedes the appearance of morphological indicators of axon pathology. These observations raise the possibility that activated microglia may contribute to methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity.

  19. [Cryobiology and pathologic lesions induced by freezing-thawing processes in prostatic tissue. Second part].

    PubMed

    Escudero Barrilero, Angel; Arias Fúnez, Fernando; Patrón Rodríguez, Rafael Rodríguez; García González, Ricardo; Cuesta Roca, Carmen

    2004-12-01

    Cryosurgery is an emerging technology consisting on controlled freezing of tissues. Good results, maintained in the long-term, have been referred in the treatment of prostate adenocarcinoma. A role as possible substitute of partial nephrectomy in the treatment of renal adenocarcinomas smaller than 4-5 cm is under research. There is no discussion that freezing destroys cellular machinery and triggers several events the final result of which is cell death by necrosis and apoptosis. The decrease of temperature makes extracellular liquid crystallize and creates a hyperosmotic environment, which induces water to go out of the cell producing intracellular dehydration. Intracellular ice is created with fast freezing speeds being attributed the most destructive effect on biological tissues with irreparable damage. In blood vessels, it directly induces endothelial cell death and mechanical lesions of the endothelium; the consequence is the formation of thrombi that obstruct the lumen of the vessel. In the post-thawing phase there is an increase in free radicals formation and neutrophil activity, which induces cellular membrane lipids peroxidation and new endothelium lesions. Tissue destruction is determined by: minimal temperature achieved, freezing speeds, freezing phase duration, number of freezing-thawing cycles provided, and distance to the freezing focus. As we move away from the freezing focus cells are affected in different ways, and there are several mechanisms proposed to explain the lethal action induced by temperatures higher than--40 degrees C. In our series pathologic findings were: necrosis, hemorrhagic areas either developed or not, fibrosis, hyalinization and increases in the relative number of hematic capillaries, microscopic calcifications, basal cells hyperplasia, and transitional or squamous metaplasia. Residual cancer is localized in the areas less affected by freezing. It should be emphasize the scarce morbimortality associated with the procedure. It

  20. Chemotherapy-induced endometrial pathology: mimicry of malignancy and viral endometritis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Yoon, Gun; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy is a common type of preoperative neoadjuvant treatment and postoperative adjuvant or palliative therapy for many different types of malignancies. Certain chemotherapeutic agents can induce bizarre epithelial atypia that mimics malignancy. Unfamiliarity with these changes could potentially cause confusion with a neoplastic or infectious process. The endometrium is one of the few sites where chemotherapy-induced epithelial atypia has not been appreciated. We identified four patients with marked cytologic atypia of the endometrial glandular epithelium from the surgical pathology files of Severance Hospital. The histopathologic features, immunostaining results and medical records of these patients were reviewed. All patients underwent hysteroscopic examination with endometrial curettage for investigation of vaginal bleeding. They had previously undergone chemotherapy for uterine cervical cancer (n=1), rectal cancer (n=2) and myelodysplastic syndrome (n=1). The chemotherapy regimens included alkylating agents (busulfan, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, cisplatin, and oxaliplatin), pyrimidine antagonists (capecitabine, decitabine, and 5-fluorouracil), taxanes (paclitaxel), and topoisomerase inhibitors (irinotecan and etoposide). On histopathological examination, the atypical epithelial changes included marked nuclear enlargement and pleomorphism, a degenerative-looking chromatin pattern, abundant microvacuolated cytoplasm, and preservation of the nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio. This study demonstrates that certain chemotherapeutic agents may cause bizarre, reactive atypia of the endometrial glandular epithelium. These changes should not be interpreted as neoplastic or infectious in nature. An awareness of prior exposure to cytotoxic agents and a familiarity with the nature and distribution of these bizarre alterations is essential to avoid misinterpretation of the morphologic features and prevent unnecessary treatment. PMID:27347355

  1. Chemotherapy-induced endometrial pathology: mimicry of malignancy and viral endometritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Yoon, Gun; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy is a common type of preoperative neoadjuvant treatment and postoperative adjuvant or palliative therapy for many different types of malignancies. Certain chemotherapeutic agents can induce bizarre epithelial atypia that mimics malignancy. Unfamiliarity with these changes could potentially cause confusion with a neoplastic or infectious process. The endometrium is one of the few sites where chemotherapy-induced epithelial atypia has not been appreciated. We identified four patients with marked cytologic atypia of the endometrial glandular epithelium from the surgical pathology files of Severance Hospital. The histopathologic features, immunostaining results and medical records of these patients were reviewed. All patients underwent hysteroscopic examination with endometrial curettage for investigation of vaginal bleeding. They had previously undergone chemotherapy for uterine cervical cancer (n=1), rectal cancer (n=2) and myelodysplastic syndrome (n=1). The chemotherapy regimens included alkylating agents (busulfan, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, cisplatin, and oxaliplatin), pyrimidine antagonists (capecitabine, decitabine, and 5-fluorouracil), taxanes (paclitaxel), and topoisomerase inhibitors (irinotecan and etoposide). On histopathological examination, the atypical epithelial changes included marked nuclear enlargement and pleomorphism, a degenerative-looking chromatin pattern, abundant microvacuolated cytoplasm, and preservation of the nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio. This study demonstrates that certain chemotherapeutic agents may cause bizarre, reactive atypia of the endometrial glandular epithelium. These changes should not be interpreted as neoplastic or infectious in nature. An awareness of prior exposure to cytotoxic agents and a familiarity with the nature and distribution of these bizarre alterations is essential to avoid misinterpretation of the morphologic features and prevent unnecessary treatment. PMID:27347355

  2. Impact of rapamycin on status epilepticus induced hippocampal pathology and weight gain.

    PubMed

    Hester, Michael S; Hosford, Bethany E; Santos, Victor R; Singh, Shatrunjai P; Rolle, Isaiah J; LaSarge, Candi L; Liska, John P; Garcia-Cairasco, Norberto; Danzer, Steve C

    2016-06-01

    Growing evidence implicates the dentate gyrus in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Dentate granule cells limit the amount of excitatory signaling through the hippocampus and exhibit striking neuroplastic changes that may impair this function during epileptogenesis. Furthermore, aberrant integration of newly-generated granule cells underlies the majority of dentate restructuring. Recently, attention has focused on the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway as a potential mediator of epileptogenic change. Systemic administration of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin has promising therapeutic potential, as it has been shown to reduce seizure frequency and seizure severity in rodent models. Here, we tested whether mTOR signaling facilitates abnormal development of granule cells during epileptogenesis. We also examined dentate inflammation and mossy cell death in the dentate hilus. To determine if mTOR activation is necessary for abnormal granule cell development, transgenic mice that harbored fluorescently-labeled adult-born granule cells were treated with rapamycin following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus. Systemic rapamycin effectively blocked phosphorylation of S6 protein (a readout of mTOR activity) and reduced granule cell mossy fiber axon sprouting. However, the accumulation of ectopic granule cells and granule cells with aberrant basal dendrites was not significantly reduced. Mossy cell death and reactive astrocytosis were also unaffected. These data suggest that anti-epileptogenic effects of mTOR inhibition may be mediated by mechanisms other than inhibition of these common dentate pathologies. Consistent with this conclusion, rapamycin prevented pathological weight gain in epileptic mice, suggesting that rapamycin might act on central circuits or even peripheral tissues controlling weight gain in epilepsy. PMID:26995324

  3. Erythropoietin attenuates Alzheimer-like memory impairments and pathological changes induced by amyloid β42 in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Pei; Yang, Guo-Jun; Jin, Li; Yang, Hong-Mei; Chen, Jie; Chai, Gao-Shang; Wang, Li

    2015-08-27

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) is a key molecule in the neurodegenerative progression of Alzheimer׳s disease (AD). It is critical to develop a treatment that can arrest the Aβ-induced pathologic progression of AD. Erythropoietin (EPO) has various protective effects in the nervous system. However, the effect of EPO on Aβ-induced Alzheimer-like cognitive deficits and pathological changes remains unclear. In the present study, we observed that the treatment of mice with EPO (1000 IU/kg) attenuated Aβ42-induced cognitive deficits and tau hyperphosphorylation at multiple AD-related sites through the regulation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). We also observed that EPO attenuated the Aβ42-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in brain. These results indicate a potential role for EPO in AD therapy.

  4. Detrimental Effects of Diet-Induced Obesity on τ Pathology Are Independent of Insulin Resistance in τ Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Leboucher, Antoine; Laurent, Cyril; Fernandez-Gomez, Francisco-José; Burnouf, Sylvie; Troquier, Laetitia; Eddarkaoui, Sabiha; Demeyer, Dominique; Caillierez, Raphaëlle; Zommer, Nadège; Vallez, Emmanuelle; Bantubungi, Kadiombo; Breton, Christophe; Pigny, Pascal; Buée-Scherrer, Valérie; Staels, Bart; Hamdane, Malika; Tailleux, Anne; Buée, Luc; Blum, David

    2013-01-01

    The τ pathology found in Alzheimer disease (AD) is crucial in cognitive decline. Midlife development of obesity, a major risk factor of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, increases the risk of dementia and AD later in life. The impact of obesity on AD risk has been suggested to be related to central insulin resistance, secondary to peripheral insulin resistance. The effects of diet-induced obesity (DIO) on τ pathology remain unknown. In this study, we evaluated effects of a high-fat diet, given at an early pathological stage, in the THY-Tau22 transgenic mouse model of progressive AD-like τ pathology. We found that early and progressive obesity potentiated spatial learning deficits as well as hippocampal τ pathology at a later stage. Surprisingly, THY-Tau22 mice did not exhibit peripheral insulin resistance. Further, pathological worsening occurred while hippocampal insulin signaling was upregulated. Together, our data demonstrate that DIO worsens τ phosphorylation and learning abilities in τ transgenic mice independently from peripheral/central insulin resistance. PMID:23250356

  5. Activation of Hypoxia‐Inducible Factor‐2 in Adipocytes Results in Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qun; Huang, Yan; Booth, Carmen J.; Haase, Volker H.; Johnson, Randall S.; Celeste Simon, M.; Giordano, Frank J.; Yun, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity can cause structural and functional abnormalities of the heart via complex but largely undefined mechanisms. Emerging evidence has shown that obesity results in reduced oxygen concentrations, or hypoxia, in adipose tissue. We hypothesized that the adipocyte hypoxia‐signaling pathway plays an essential role in the development of obesity‐associated cardiomyopathy. Methods and Results Using a mouse model in which the hypoxia‐inducible factor (HIF) pathway is activated by deletion of the von Hippel–Lindau gene specifically in adipocytes, we found that mice with adipocyte–von Hippel–Lindau deletion developed lethal cardiac hypertrophy. HIF activation in adipocytes results in overexpression of key cardiomyopathy‐associated genes in adipose tissue, increased serum levels of several proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin‐1β and monocyte chemotactic protein‐1, and activation of nuclear factor–κB and nuclear factor of activated T cells in the heart. Interestingly, genetic deletion of Hif2a, but not Hif1a, was able to rescue cardiac hypertrophy and abrogate adipose inflammation. Conclusion We have discovered a previously uncharacterized mechanism underlying a critical and direct role of the adipocyte HIF‐2 transcription factor in the development of adipose inflammation and pathological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:24326162

  6. High fat diet induces specific pathological changes in hypothalamic orexin neurons in mice.

    PubMed

    Nobunaga, Mizuki; Obukuro, Kanae; Kurauchi, Yuki; Hisatsune, Akinori; Seki, Takahiro; Tsutsui, Masato; Katsuki, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    Loss of orexin neurons in the hypothalamus is a prominent feature of narcolepsy and several other neurological conditions. We have recently demonstrated that sleep deprivation stimulates local nitric oxide (NO) production by neuronal NO synthase in the lateral hypothalamus, which leads to selective degeneration of orexin neurons accompanied by formation of orexin-immunoreactive aggregates. Here we analyzed whether lifestyle-related conditions other than sleep deprivation could trigger similar pathological changes in orexin neurons. Four-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were fed with high fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the number of orexin-immunopositive neurons was significantly decreased by HFD intake, whereas the number of melanin-concentrating hormone-immunopositive neurons was unchanged. In addition, HFD promoted formation of intracellular orexin-immunoreactive aggregates in a subset of orexin neurons. We also confirmed that expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in the hypothalamus was upregulated in response to HFD intake. Notably, loss of orexin-immunopositive neurons and formation of orexin-immunoreactive aggregates were not observed in iNOS knockout mice fed with HFD. These results indicate that inappropriate dietary conditions could trigger specific neuropathological events in orexin neurons in an iNOS-dependent manner.

  7. Total parenteral nutrition induced liver pathology: an autopsy series of 24 newborn cases.

    PubMed

    Zambrano, Eduardo; El-Hennawy, Magdy; Ehrenkranz, Richard A; Zelterman, Daniel; Reyes-Múgica, Miguel

    2004-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN)-induced liver injury is a common complication in neonates managed with newborn intensive care. In several of these cases, irreversible and even fatal liver damage may develop, with patients dying of liver failure. In spite of multiple studies over several years, the pathogenesis of TPN-induced liver damage remains poorly understood. Clinical data from 24 neonates with clinical history of receiving TPN who died at Yale-New Haven Children's Hospital and had autopsies performed, were collected by medical record review without knowledge of liver pathology findings. Liver histological sections from these patients were evaluated for multiple parameters without knowledge of the clinical course. Continuous data were analyzed by Wilcoxon signed-rank test and Mann-Whitney test, and dichotomous data by Fisher's exact test; P < 0.05 was considered significant. Different histopathological abnormalities with varying degrees of severity were observed. A progression in the severity of histopathological changes in relation to duration of TPN administration (DTPN) was found. While patients with DTPN of < 2 wk had no fibrosis or only mild degrees of fibrosis, patients with more than 6 wk of DTPN developed moderate-to-severe fibrosis. Similar results were observed for cholestasis and bile duct proliferation. We did not find significant differences for birth weight, gestational age, occurrence of necrotizing enterocolitis, sepsis, or enteral feedings between the group with normal-to-mild liver changes ( n = 16), and the group with moderate-to-severe liver changes ( n = 8). On the other hand, DTPN was significantly different between these two groups ( P = 0.008). Also, patients small for gestational age ( P = 0.003) and patients with bronchopulmonary dysplasia ( P = 0.001) were more commonly seen in the group with moderate-to-severe histopathological findings. Intracellular copper was detected in 12.5% of patients with moderate-to-severe liver changes

  8. Pathological Lesions and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Expressions in the Liver of Mice Experimentally Infected with Clonorchis sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qing-Li; Shen, Ji-Qing; Xue, Yan; Cheng, Xiao-Bing; Jiang, Zhi-Hua; Yang, Yi-Chao; Chen, Ying-Dan; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2015-01-01

    The nitric oxide (NO) formation and intrinsic nitrosation may be involved in the possible mechanisms of liver fluke-associated carcinogenesis. We still do not know much about the responses of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) induced by Clonorchis sinensis infection. This study was conducted to explore the pathological lesions and iNOS expressions in the liver of mice with different infection intensity levels of C. sinensis. Extensive periductal inflammatory cell infiltration, bile duct hyperplasia, and fibrosis were commonly observed during the infection. The different pathological responses in liver tissues strongly correlated with the infection intensity of C. sinensis. Massive acute spotty necrosis occurred in the liver parenchyma after a severe infection. The iNOS activity in liver tissues increased, and iNOS-expressing cells with morphological differences were observed after a moderate or severe infection. The iNOS-expressing cells in liver tissues had multiple origins. PMID:26797449

  9. Pathological Lesions and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Expressions in the Liver of Mice Experimentally Infected with Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing-Li; Shen, Ji-Qing; Xue, Yan; Cheng, Xiao-Bing; Jiang, Zhi-Hua; Yang, Yi-Chao; Chen, Ying-Dan; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2015-12-01

    The nitric oxide (NO) formation and intrinsic nitrosation may be involved in the possible mechanisms of liver fluke-associated carcinogenesis. We still do not know much about the responses of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) induced by Clonorchis sinensis infection. This study was conducted to explore the pathological lesions and iNOS expressions in the liver of mice with different infection intensity levels of C. sinensis. Extensive periductal inflammatory cell infiltration, bile duct hyperplasia, and fibrosis were commonly observed during the infection. The different pathological responses in liver tissues strongly correlated with the infection intensity of C. sinensis. Massive acute spotty necrosis occurred in the liver parenchyma after a severe infection. The iNOS activity in liver tissues increased, and iNOS-expressing cells with morphological differences were observed after a moderate or severe infection. The iNOS-expressing cells in liver tissues had multiple origins.

  10. Characterisation of proton pump antibodies and stomach pathology in gastritis induced by neonatal immunisation without adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, D L; Sentry, J W; Toh, B H

    2001-01-01

    It has previously been reported that neonatal BALB.D2 mice injected with native proton pump antigens without adjuvant develop an irreversible gastritis (Claeys et al, 1997). The ease of inititating gastritis in the neonate stands in contrast with the difficulty in initiating gastritis in adult mice that require repeated immunisation in adjuvant that is reversible following cessation of immunisation (Scarff et al, 1997). In view of these contrasting observations, we set out to ascertain whether we could confirm the observations in neonatal mice as well as further characterise the pathology and the autoantibody response. We found that neonatal gastritis-susceptible BALB/c mice (n=12), immunised with either pig or mouse gastric membranes in the absence of adjuvant, develop gastritis without circulating antibody to parietal cells detected by immunofluorescence, a hallmark of murine and human gastritis (Toh et al, 1997). However, mice immunized with pig gastric membranes (n=6) had circulating antibodies reactive by immunofluorescence to recombinant alpha and/or beta subunit of gastric H+/K+-ATPase expressed by insect cells (Sfalpha and Sfbeta). Four mice from this cohort with antibodies to Sfbeta also had reactivity to gastric H+/K+-ATPase by ELISA, and 3 immunoblotted the beta but not the alpha subunit of the ATPase. In the cohort of mice immunised with mouse gastric membranes (n=6), four produced antibodies reactive by immunofluorescence to Sfalpha, two of which were also reactive to Sfbeta and one developed antibodies detected by ELISA to gastric H+/K+-ATPase. However, no members of this cohort had antibodies reactive by immunoblotting to either the beta or alpha subunit of the ATPase. In all cases gastritic stomachs were characterised by areas deficient in ribosome-rich zymogenic cells and marked reductions in H+/K+-ATPase-positive parietal cells. Metaplasia detected by Maxwell stain, as clusters of mucus-producing cells throughout gastric units, were non

  11. Analysis of camelid antibodies for antivenom development: Neutralisation of venom-induced pathology.

    PubMed

    Cook, Darren A N; Owen, Timothy; Wagstaff, Simon C; Kinne, Joerg; Wernery, Ulrich; Harrison, Robert A

    2010-09-01

    Camelid IgG has been reported to be less immunogenic, less able to activate the complement cascade and more thermostable than IgG from other mammals, and has the ability to bind antigens that are unreactive with other mammalian IgGs. We are investigating whether these attributes of camelid IgG translate into antivenom with immunological and venom-neutralising efficacy advantages over conventional equine and ovine antivenoms. The objective of this study was to determine the preclinical venom-neutralising effectiveness of IgG from camels immunised with venoms, individually or in combination, of the saw-scaled viper, Echis ocellatus, the puff adder, Bitis arietans and the spitting cobra, Naja nigricollis - the most medically-important snake species in West Africa. Neutralisation of the pathological effects of venoms from E. ocellatus, B. arietans and N. nigricollis by IgG from the venom-immunised camels, or commercial antivenom, was compared using assays of venom lethality (ED(50)), haemorrhage (MHD) and coagulopathy (MCD). The E. ocellatus venom ED(50), MHD and MCD results of the E. ocellatus monospecific camel IgG antivenom were broadly equivalent to comparable ovine (EchiTAbG, MicroPharm Ltd, Wales) and equine (SAIMR Echis, South African Vaccine Producer, South Africa) antivenoms, although the equine antivenom required half the amount of IgG. The B. arietans monospecific camel IgG neutralised the lethal effects of B. arietans venom at one fourth the concentration of the SAIMR polyspecific antivenom (a monospecific B. arietans antivenom is not available). The N. nigricollis camel IgG antivenom was ineffective (at the maximum permitted dose, 100 mul) against the lethal effects of N. nigricollis venom. All the equine polyspecific antivenoms required more than 100 microl to be effective against this venom. The polyspecific camel IgG antivenom, prepared from five camels, was effective against the venom-induced effects of E. ocellatus but not against that of B. arietans

  12. System-based identification of toxicity pathways associated with multi-walled carbon nanotube-induced pathological responses

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder-Talkington, Brandi N.; Dymacek, Julian; Porter, Dale W.; Wolfarth, Michael G.; Mercer, Robert R.; Pacurari, Maricica; Denvir, James; Castranova, Vincent; Qian, Yong; Guo, Nancy L.

    2013-10-15

    The fibrous shape and biopersistence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) have raised concern over their potential toxicity after pulmonary exposure. As in vivo exposure to MWCNT produced a transient inflammatory and progressive fibrotic response, this study sought to identify significant biological processes associated with lung inflammation and fibrosis pathology data, based upon whole genome mRNA expression, bronchoaveolar lavage scores, and morphometric analysis from C57BL/6J mice exposed by pharyngeal aspiration to 0, 10, 20, 40, or 80 μg MWCNT at 1, 7, 28, or 56 days post-exposure. Using a novel computational model employing non-negative matrix factorization and Monte Carlo Markov Chain simulation, significant biological processes with expression similar to MWCNT-induced lung inflammation and fibrosis pathology data in mice were identified. A subset of genes in these processes was determined to be functionally related to either fibrosis or inflammation by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and was used to determine potential significant signaling cascades. Two genes determined to be functionally related to inflammation and fibrosis, vascular endothelial growth factor A (vegfa) and C-C motif chemokine 2 (ccl2), were confirmed by in vitro studies of mRNA and protein expression in small airway epithelial cells exposed to MWCNT as concordant with in vivo expression. This study identified that the novel computational model was sufficient to determine biological processes strongly associated with the pathology of lung inflammation and fibrosis and could identify potential toxicity signaling pathways and mechanisms of MWCNT exposure which could be used for future animal studies to support human risk assessment and intervention efforts. - Highlights: • A novel computational model identified toxicity pathways matching in vivo pathology. • Systematic identification of MWCNT-induced biological processes in mouse lungs • MWCNT-induced functional networks of lung

  13. Prevalence and intensity of pathologies induced by the toxic dinoflagellate, Heterocapsa circularisquama, in the Mediterranean mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Basti, Leila; Endo, Makoto; Segawa, Susumu; Shumway, Sandra E; Tanaka, Yuji; Nagai, Satoshi

    2015-06-01

    induces a broad cytotoxic effect in six vital organs, even at low density (5 cells ml(-1)) and low temperature (15°C), but not in muscular organs. Combining cell density, time, and duration of exposure, the organ most affected by the harmful alga was the gill, followed by the labial palps and mantle, the stomach and intestines, and the hepatopancreas. The results of this pathological analysis show that exposure to H. ciruclarisquama severely affects the gills, the labial palps, and mantle thereby interfering with particle clearance and sorting, cleansing, and respiration, but also affects the stomach, intestines, and hepatopancreas, altering the digestive processes and possibly detoxification pathways, if mussels are able to detoxify the toxins of H. circularisquama. In the most severe cases, bivalves would most likely have died as a result of combined severe alterations of the vital functions, failure of tissue repair, and moderate to heavy hemorrhaging in both the external organs and the digestive organs concomitantly with light to moderate alterations in the detoxifying processes.

  14. Effect of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells on lung pathology and inflammation in ovalbumin-induced asthma in mouse

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadian, Maryam; Boskabady, Mohammad Hosein; Kashani, Iraj Ragerdi; Jahromi, Gila Pirzad; Omidi, Amene; Nejad, Amir Kavian; Khamse, Safoura; Sadeghipour, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have attracted significant interest to treat asthma and its complication. In this study, the effects of BMSCs on lung pathology and inflammation in an ovalbumin-induced asthma model in mouse were examined. Materials and Methods: BALB/c mice were divided into three groups: control group (animals were not sensitized), asthma group (animals were sensitized by ovalbumin), asthma+BMSC group (animals were sensitized by ovalbumin and treated with BMSCs). BMSCs were isolated and characterized and then labeled with Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). After that the cells transferred into asthmatic mice. Histopathological changes of the airways, BMSCs migration and total and differential white blood cell (WBC) count in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were evaluated. Results: A large number of BrdU-BMSCs were found in the lungs of mice treated with BMSCs. The histopathological changes, BAL total WBC counts and the percentage of neutrophils and eosinophils were increased in asthma group compared to the control group. Treatment with BMSCs significantly decreased airway pathological indices, inflammatory cell infiltration, and also goblet cell hyperplasia. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that BMSCs therapy significantly suppressed the lung pathology and inflammation in the ovalbumin induced asthma model in mouse. PMID:27096065

  15. Dysregulation of Prefrontal Cortex-Mediated Slow-Evolving Limbic Dynamics Drives Stress-Induced Emotional Pathology.

    PubMed

    Hultman, Rainbo; Mague, Stephen D; Li, Qiang; Katz, Brittany M; Michel, Nadine; Lin, Lizhen; Wang, Joyce; David, Lisa K; Blount, Cameron; Chandy, Rithi; Carlson, David; Ulrich, Kyle; Carin, Lawrence; Dunson, David; Kumar, Sunil; Deisseroth, Karl; Moore, Scott D; Dzirasa, Kafui

    2016-07-20

    Circuits distributed across cortico-limbic brain regions compose the networks that mediate emotional behavior. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) regulates ultraslow (<1 Hz) dynamics across these networks, and PFC dysfunction is implicated in stress-related illnesses including major depressive disorder (MDD). To uncover the mechanism whereby stress-induced changes in PFC circuitry alter emotional networks to yield pathology, we used a multi-disciplinary approach including in vivo recordings in mice and chronic social defeat stress. Our network model, inferred using machine learning, linked stress-induced behavioral pathology to the capacity of PFC to synchronize amygdala and VTA activity. Direct stimulation of PFC-amygdala circuitry with DREADDs normalized PFC-dependent limbic synchrony in stress-susceptible animals and restored normal behavior. In addition to providing insights into MDD mechanisms, our findings demonstrate an interdisciplinary approach that can be used to identify the large-scale network changes that underlie complex emotional pathologies and the specific network nodes that can be used to develop targeted interventions. PMID:27346529

  16. Amyloid beta-protein induces the cerebrovascular cellular pathology of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Van Nostrand, W E; Davis-Salinas, J; Saporito-Irwin, S M

    1996-01-17

    One of the hallmark pathologic characteristics of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related disorders is deposition of the 39-42 amino acid amyloid beta-protein (A beta) in the walls of cerebral blood vessels. The cerebrovascular A beta deposits in these disorders are associated with degenerating smooth muscle cells in the vessel wall which have been implicated in the expression of the amyloid beta-protein precursor (A beta PP) and formation of A beta. We have established primary cultures of human cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells as a model for investigating the cellular pathologic processes involved in the cerebral amyloid angiopathy of AD and related disorders. Recently, we have shown that A beta 1-42, the predominant pathologic cerebrovascular form of A beta, causes extensive cellular degeneration that is accompanied by a striking increase in the levels of cellular A beta PP, potentially amyloidogenic carboxyl terminal A beta PP fragments, and soluble A beta peptide in the cultured human cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells. Together, these studies provide evidence that A beta contributes to the onset and progression of the cerebrovascular pathology associated with AD and related disorders and suggests the mechanism involves a molecular cascade with a novel product-precursor relationship that results in the adverse production and accumulation of A beta.

  17. Tau Protein Mediates APP Intracellular Domain (AICD)-Induced Alzheimer’s-Like Pathological Features in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Hana N.; Pimplikar, Sanjay W.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is cleaved by gamma-secretase to simultaneously generate amyloid beta (Aβ) and APP Intracellular Domain (AICD) peptides. Aβ plays a pivotal role in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis but recent studies suggest that amyloid-independent mechanisms also contribute to the disease. We previously showed that AICD transgenic mice (AICD-Tg) exhibit AD-like features such as tau pathology, aberrant neuronal activity, memory deficits and neurodegeneration in an age-dependent manner. Since AD is a tauopathy and tau has been shown to mediate Aβ–induced toxicity, we examined the role of tau in AICD-induced pathological features. We report that ablating endogenous tau protects AICD-Tg mice from deficits in adult neurogenesis, seizure severity, short-term memory deficits and neurodegeneration. Deletion of tau restored abnormal phosphorylation of NMDA receptors, which is likely to underlie hyperexcitability and associated excitotoxicity in AICD-Tg mice. Conversely, overexpression of wild-type human tau aggravated receptor phosphorylation, impaired adult neurogenesis, memory deficits and neurodegeneration. Our findings show that tau is essential for mediating the deleterious effects of AICD. Since tau also mediates Aβ-induced toxic effects, our findings suggest that tau is a common downstream factor in both amyloid-dependent and–independent pathogenic mechanisms and therefore could be a more effective drug target for therapeutic intervention in AD. PMID:27459671

  18. CD34 Promotes Pathological Epi-Retinal Neovascularization in a Mouse Model of Oxygen-Induced Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Siemerink, Martin J.; Dallinga, Marchien G.; Gora, Tomek; Cait, Jessica; Vogels, Ilse M. C.; Yetin-Arik, Bahar; Van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.; Klaassen, Ingeborg; McNagny, Kelly M.; Schlingemann, Reinier O.

    2016-01-01

    The sialomucins CD34 and podocalyxin (PODXL) are anti-adhesive molecules expressed at the luminal membrane of endothelial cells of small blood vessels and facilitate vascular lumen formation in the developing mouse aorta. CD34 transcript and protein levels are increased during human angiogenesis, its expression is particularly enriched on endothelial tip cell filopodia and CD34 is a marker for tip cells in vitro. Here, we investigated whether CD34 merely marks endothelial tip cells or has a functional role in tip cells and angiogenesis. We assessed that silencing CD34 in human microvascular endothelial cells has little effect on endothelial cell migration or invasion, but has a significant effect on vascular-endothelial growth factor-induced angiogenic sprouting activity in vitro. In vivo, the absence of CD34 reduced the density of filopodia on retinal endothelial tip cells in neonatal mice, but did not influence the overall architecture of the retinal vascular network. In oxygen-induced retinopathy, Cd34-/- mice showed normal intra-retinal regenerative angiogenesis but the number of pathological epi-retinal neovascular tufts were reduced. We conclude that CD34 is not essential for developmental vascularization in the retina, but its expression promotes the formation of pathological, invasive vessels during neovascularization. PMID:27352134

  19. Endotoxin-induced basal respiration alterations of renal HK-2 cells: A sign of pathologic metabolism down-regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Quoilin, C.; Mouithys-Mickalad, A.; Duranteau, J.; Gallez, B.; Hoebeke, M.

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A HK-2 cells model of inflammation-induced acute kidney injury. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two oximetry methods: high resolution respirometry and ESR spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxygen consumption rates of renal cells decrease when treated with LPS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cells do not recover normal respiration when the LPS treatment is removed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This basal respiration alteration is a sign of pathologic metabolism down-regulation. -- Abstract: To study the mechanism of oxygen regulation in inflammation-induced acute kidney injury, we investigate the effects of a bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) on the basal respiration of proximal tubular epithelial cells (HK-2) both by high-resolution respirometry and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. These two complementary methods have shown that HK-2 cells exhibit a decreased oxygen consumption rate when treated with LPS. Surprisingly, this cellular respiration alteration persists even after the stress factor was removed. We suggested that this irreversible decrease in renal oxygen consumption after LPS challenge is related to a pathologic metabolic down-regulation such as a lack of oxygen utilization by cells.

  20. Capillariid nematodes in Brazilian turkeys, Meleagris gallopavo (Galliformes, Phasianidae): pathology induced by Baruscapillaria obsignata and Eucoleus annulatus (Trichinelloidea, Capillariidae).

    PubMed

    Pinto, Roberto Magalhães; Brener, Beatriz; Tortelly, Rogério; Menezes, Rodrigo Caldas; Muniz-Pereira, Luís Cláudio

    2008-05-01

    The pathology induced in turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) by two capillariid nematodes, Baruscapillaria obsignata and Eucoleus annulatus is described together with data on prevalences, mean infection and range of worm burdens. B. obsignata occurred with a prevalence of 72.5% in the 40 examined hosts in a range of 2-461 nematodes and a mean intensity of 68.6, whereas E. annulatus was present in 2.5% of the animals, with a total amount of five recovered parasites. Gross lesions were not observed in the parasitized birds. Lesions due to B. obsignata mainly consisted of the thickening of intestinal villi with a mild mixed inflammatory infiltrate with the presence of mononuclear cells and heterophils. The lesions induced by E. annulatus were represented by foci of inflammatory infiltrate with heterophils in the crop epithelium and esophagus of a single infected female. These are the first pathological findings related to the presence of capillariid worms in turkeys to be reported in Brazil so far. Capillaria anatis, although present, was not pathogenic to the investigated turkeys.

  1. Increased mast cell density in capecitabine-induced hand-foot syndrome: a new pathologic finding.

    PubMed

    Latif, Sarah; Fraga, Garth; Gadzia, Joseph

    2010-03-01

    Hand-foot syndrome is a common adverse effect of therapy with capecitabine (Xeloda) for the treatment of various carcinomas. Symptoms suggesting hand-foot syndrome include pain, pruritus, erythema, tingling and desquamation limited to the palms and soles of feet. Documented pathological findings are few, but include apoptosis of keratinocytes, bizarre mitotic figures, loss of polarity of keratinocytes and vacuolar degeneration of the basal layer of the epidermis. A 63-year-old white female presented with painful, pruritic palmar and plantar erythema and desquamation. A punch biopsy taken from her palm exhibited vacuolization of basal keratinocytes, but none of the other previously documented findings though there were increased mast cells (18-20 per high power field). The patient was treated with clobetasol lotion and her symptoms drastically improved in two weeks. The pathologic findings in this patient suggest new insights in the pathogenesis of hand-foot syndrome from capecitabine leads to a possible explanation for the edematous or urticarial clinical changes seen in these patients.

  2. Luteolin Reduces Alzheimer’s Disease Pathologies Induced by Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sawmiller, Darrell; Li, Song; Shahaduzzaman, Md; Smith, Adam J.; Obregon, Demian; Giunta, Brian; Borlongan, Cesar V.; Sanberg, Paul R.; Tan, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs in response to an acute insult to the head and is recognized as a major risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Indeed, recent studies have suggested a pathological overlap between TBI and AD, with both conditions exhibiting amyloid-beta (Aβ) deposits, tauopathy, and neuroinflammation. Additional studies involving animal models of AD indicate that some AD-related genotypic determinants may be critical factors enhancing temporal and phenotypic symptoms of TBI. Thus in the present study, we examined sub-acute effects of moderate TBI delivered by a gas-driven shock tube device in Aβ depositing Tg2576 mice. Three days later, significant increases in b-amyloid deposition, glycogen synthase-3 (GSK-3) activation, phospho-tau, and pro-inflammatory cytokines were observed. Importantly, peripheral treatment with the naturally occurring flavonoid, luteolin, significantly abolished these accelerated pathologies. This study lays the groundwork for a safe and natural compound that could prevent or treat TBI with minimal or no deleterious side effects in combat personnel and others at risk or who have experienced TBI. PMID:24413756

  3. Muscle Tissue Damage Induced by the Venom of Bothrops asper: Identification of Early and Late Pathological Events through Proteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Cristina; Macêdo, Jéssica Kele A.; Feoli, Andrés; Escalante, Teresa; Rucavado, Alexandra; Gutiérrez, José María; Fox, Jay W.

    2016-01-01

    The time-course of the pathological effects induced by the venom of the snake Bothrops asper in muscle tissue was investigated by a combination of histology, proteomic analysis of exudates collected in the vicinity of damaged muscle, and immunodetection of extracellular matrix proteins in exudates. Proteomic assay of exudates has become an excellent new methodological tool to detect key biomarkers of tissue alterations for a more integrative perspective of snake venom-induced pathology. The time-course analysis of the intracellular proteins showed an early presence of cytosolic and mitochondrial proteins in exudates, while cytoskeletal proteins increased later on. This underscores the rapid cytotoxic effect of venom, especially in muscle fibers, due to the action of myotoxic phospholipases A2, followed by the action of proteinases in the cytoskeleton of damaged muscle fibers. Similarly, the early presence of basement membrane (BM) and other extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in exudates reflects the rapid microvascular damage and hemorrhage induced by snake venom metalloproteinases. The presence of fragments of type IV collagen and perlecan one hour after envenoming suggests that hydrolysis of these mechanically/structurally-relevant BM components plays a key role in the genesis of hemorrhage. On the other hand, the increment of some ECM proteins in the exudate at later time intervals is likely a consequence of the action of endogenous matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) or of de novo synthesis of ECM proteins during tissue remodeling as part of the inflammatory reaction. Our results offer relevant insights for a more integrative and systematic understanding of the time-course dynamics of muscle tissue damage induced by B. asper venom and possibly other viperid venoms. PMID:27035343

  4. Pathological process induced by Demodex sp. (Acari: Demodicidae) in the skin of eland, Taurotragus oryx (Pallas).

    PubMed

    Bukva, V; Vítovec, J; Moucha, P; Váhala, J

    1988-01-01

    Taxonomic characters of Demodex sp. (near to D. kutzeri Bukva, 1987) are described and discussed. Pronounced, disperse, chronic, multinodular folliculitis induced by this hair follicle inhabitant in the skin of eland, Taurotragus oryx, is described at the histological level.

  5. Bacterial modulins: a novel class of virulence factors which cause host tissue pathology by inducing cytokine synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, B; Poole, S; Wilson, M

    1996-01-01

    Cytokines are a diverse group of proteins and glycoproteins which have potent and wide-ranging effects on eukaryotic cell function and are now recognized as important mediators of tissue pathology in infectious diseases. It is increasingly recognized that for many bacterial species, cytokine induction is a major virulence mechanism. Until recent years, the only bacterial component known to stimulate cytokine synthesis was lipopolysaccharide (LPS). It is only within the past decade that it has been clearly shown that many components associated with the bacterial cell wall, including proteins, glycoproteins, lipoproteins, carbohydrates, and lipids, have the capacity to stimulate mammalian cells to produce a diverse array of cytokines. It has been established that many of these cytokine-inducing molecules act by mechanisms distinct from that of LPS, and thus their activities are not due to LPS contamination. Bacteria produce a wide range of virulence factors which cause host tissue pathology, and these diverse factors have been grouped into four families: adhesins, aggressins, impedins, and invasins. We suggest that the array of bacterial cytokine-inducing molecules represents a new class of bacterial virulence factor, and, by analogy with the known virulence families, we suggest the term "modulin" to describe these molecules, because the action of cytokines is to modulate eukaryotic cell behavior. This review summarizes our current understanding of cytokine biology in relation to tissue homeostasis and disease and concisely reviews the current literature on the cytokine-inducing molecules produced by gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, with an emphasis on the cellular mechanisms responsible for cytokine induction. We propose that modulins, by controlling the host immune and inflammatory responses, maintain the large commensal flora that all multicellular organisms support. PMID:8801436

  6. The pathology of experimentally induced cecal amebiasis in gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus). Liver changes and amebic liver abscess formation.

    PubMed Central

    Chadee, K.; Meerovitch, E.

    1985-01-01

    The pathogenesis of experimentally induced cecal amebiasis in gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) was studied from 5 to 60 days after inoculation. Ulcerative lesions were noted 10 to 60 days after inoculation. The sequential development of lesions was asynchronous and progressed from destruction of the interglandular epithelium and of glandular crypt elements to loss of mucosa and formation of granulomatous lesions in the submucosa involving the muscularis mucosae. Pathologic changes in the liver correlated with the formation of ulcerative cecal lesions. Subacute hepatic changes showed lymphocytic portal infiltrate, Kupffer cell hyperplasia, multinucleated giant cells, granuloma formation, and sinusoidal mononuclear and granulocytic infiltrates. Metastatic amebic liver abscesses occurred as early as 10 days after inoculation, and small abscesses were found in the portal areas of the right liver lobe. The sequential development and pathologic manifestation of the infection and the usefulness of the gerbil for the study of human intestinal amebiasis are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 PMID:4014436

  7. The expression of Wnt-1 inducible signaling pathway protein-2 in astrocytoma: Correlation between pathological grade and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Gelei; Tang, Zhi; Yuan, Xianrui; Yuan, Jian; Zhao, Jie; Zhang, Zhiping; He, Zhengwen; Liu, Jingping

    2015-01-01

    Wnt-1 inducible signaling pathway protein-2 (WISP-2) is a member of the CCN family, which is critical for the control of cell morphology, motion, adhesion and other processes involved in tumorigenesis. The expression pattern and clinical significance of WISP-2 in astrocytomas remains unclear. In this study, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to systematically investigate the expression of WISP-2 in 47 astrocytoma tissues of different pathological grades and 10 normal brain tissues. The mRNA expression levels of WISP-2 in the astrocytoma tissues were observed to be significantly higher than those in the normal brain tissues. Furthermore, the upregulation of WISP-2 was found to be associated with astrocytomas of higher pathological grades. Subsequently, 154 astrocytoma and 15 normal brain tissues were analyzed using immunohistochemistry and similar results were obtained. Univariate and multivariate survival analyses were used to determine the correlations between WISP-2 expression and overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). The results indicated that the expression of WISP-2 was found to negatively correlate with patient PFS and OS. These results demonstrated that the WISP-2 protein is involved in the pathogenesis and progression of human astrocytomas and may serve as a malignant biomarker of this disease.

  8. CD34 is required for infiltration of eosinophils into the colon and pathology associated with DSS-induced ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Maltby, Steven; Wohlfarth, Carolin; Gold, Matthew; Zbytnuik, Lori; Hughes, Michael R; McNagny, Kelly M

    2010-09-01

    Eosinophil migration into the gut and the release of granular mediators plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases, including ulcerative colitis. We recently demonstrated that eosinophil migration into the lung requires cell surface expression of the sialomucin CD34 on mast cells and eosinophils in an asthma model. Based on these findings, we investigated a similar role for CD34 in the migration of eosinophils and other inflammatory cells into the colon as well as explored the effects of CD34 ablation on disease development in a dextran sulfate sodium-induced model of ulcerative colitis. Our findings demonstrate decreased disease severity in dextran sulfate sodium-treated Cd34(-/-) mice, as assessed by weight loss, diarrhea, bleeding, colon shortening and tissue pathology, compared with wild-type controls. CD34 was predominantly expressed on eosinophils within inflamed colon tissues, and Cd34(-/-) animals exhibited drastically reduced colon eosinophil infiltration. Using chimeric animals, we demonstrated that decreased disease pathology resulted from loss of CD34 from bone marrow-derived cells and that eosinophilia in Cd34(-/-)IL5(Tg) animals was sufficient to overcome protection from disease. In addition, we demonstrated a decrease in peripheral blood eosinophil numbers following dextran sulfate sodium treatment. These findings demonstrate that CD34 was expressed on colon-infiltrating eosinophils and played a role in eosinophil migration. Further, our findings suggest CD34 is required for efficient eosinophil migration, but not proliferation or expansion, in the development of ulcerative colitis.

  9. Myocardial pathology induced by aldosterone is dependent on non-canonical activities of G protein-coupled receptor kinases

    PubMed Central

    Cannavo, Alessandro; Liccardo, Daniela; Eguchi, Akito; Elliott, Katherine J.; Traynham, Christopher J.; Ibetti, Jessica; Eguchi, Satoru; Leosco, Dario; Ferrara, Nicola; Rengo, Giuseppe; Koch, Walter J.

    2016-01-01

    Hyper-aldosteronism is associated with myocardial dysfunction including induction of cardiac fibrosis and maladaptive hypertrophy. Mechanisms of these cardiotoxicities are not fully understood. Here we show that mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) activation by aldosterone leads to pathological myocardial signalling mediated by mitochondrial G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) pro-death activity and GRK5 pro-hypertrophic action. Moreover, these MR-dependent GRK2 and GRK5 non-canonical activities appear to involve cross-talk with the angiotensin II type-1 receptor (AT1R). Most importantly, we show that ventricular dysfunction caused by chronic hyper-aldosteronism in vivo is completely prevented in cardiac Grk2 knockout mice (KO) and to a lesser extent in Grk5 KO mice. However, aldosterone-induced cardiac hypertrophy is totally prevented in Grk5 KO mice. We also show human data consistent with MR activation status in heart failure influencing GRK2 levels. Therefore, our study uncovers GRKs as targets for ameliorating pathological cardiac effects associated with high-aldosterone levels. PMID:26932512

  10. The cytokines interleukin 27 and interferon-γ promote distinct Treg cell populations required to limit infection-induced pathology.

    PubMed

    Hall, Aisling O'Hara; Beiting, Daniel P; Tato, Cristina; John, Beena; Oldenhove, Guillaume; Lombana, Claudia Gonzalez; Pritchard, Gretchen Harms; Silver, Jonathan S; Bouladoux, Nicolas; Stumhofer, Jason S; Harris, Tajie H; Grainger, John; Wojno, Elia D Tait; Wagage, Sagie; Roos, David S; Scott, Philip; Turka, Laurence A; Cherry, Sara; Reiner, Steven L; Cua, Daniel; Belkaid, Yasmine; Elloso, M Merle; Hunter, Christopher A

    2012-09-21

    Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) promotes a population of T-bet(+) CXCR3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells that limit T helper 1 (Th1) cell-mediated pathology. Our studies demonstrate that interleukin-27 (IL-27) also promoted expression of T-bet and CXCR3 in Treg cells. During infection with Toxoplasma gondii, a similar population emerged that limited T cell responses and was dependent on IFN-γ in the periphery but on IL-27 at mucosal sites. Transfer of Treg cells ameliorated the infection-induced pathology observed in Il27(-/-) mice, and this was dependent on their ability to produce IL-10. Microarray analysis revealed that Treg cells exposed to either IFN-γ or IL-27 have distinct transcriptional profiles. Thus, IFN-γ and IL-27 have different roles in Treg cell biology and IL-27 is a key cytokine that promotes the development of Treg cells specialized to control Th1 cell-mediated immunity at local sites of inflammation.

  11. Human Truncated Tau Induces Mature Neurofibrillary Pathology in a Mouse Model of Human Tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Zimova, Ivana; Brezovakova, Veronika; Hromadka, Tomas; Weisova, Petronela; Cubinkova, Veronika; Valachova, Bernadeta; Filipcik, Peter; Jadhav, Santosh; Smolek, Tomas; Novak, Michal; Zilka, Norbert

    2016-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) represents the most common neurodegenerative disorder. Several animal models have been developed in order to test pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease and to predict effects of pharmacological interventions. Here we examine the molecular and behavioral features of R3m/4 transgenic mice expressing human non-mutated truncated tau protein (3R tau, aa151-391) that were previously used for efficacy testing of passive tau vaccine. The mouse model reliably recapitulated crucial histopathological features of human AD, such as pre-tangles, neurofibrillary tangles, and neuropil threads. The pathology was predominantly located in the brain stem. Transgenic mice developed mature sarkosyl insoluble tau complexes consisting of mouse endogenous and human truncated and hyperphosphorylated forms of tau protein. The histopathological and biochemical features were accompanied by significant sensorimotor impairment and reduced lifespan. The sensorimotor impairment was monitored by a highly sensitive, fully-automated tool that allowed us to assess early deficit in gait and locomotion. We suggest that the novel transgenic mouse model can serve as a valuable tool for analysis of the therapeutic efficacy of tau vaccines for AD therapy. PMID:27567836

  12. Exposure of fish to high-intensity sonar does not induce acute pathology.

    PubMed

    Kane, A S; Song, J; Halvorsen, M B; Miller, D L; Salierno, J D; Wysocki, L E; Zeddies, D; Popper, A N

    2010-05-01

    This study investigated immediate effects of intense sound exposure associated with low-frequency (170-320 Hz) or with mid-frequency (2.8-3.8 kHz) sonars on caged rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus and hybrid sunfish Lepomis sp. in Seneca Lake, New York, U.S.A. This study focused on potential effects on inner ear tissues using scanning electron microscopy and on non-auditory tissues using gross and histopathology. Fishes were exposed to low-frequency sounds for 324 or 628 s with a received peak signal level of 193 dB re 1 microPa (root mean square, rms) or to mid-frequency sounds for 15 s with a received peak signal level of 210 dB re 1 microPa (rms). Although a variety of clinical observations from various tissues and organ systems were described, no exposure-related pathologies were observed. This study represents the first investigation of the effects of high-intensity sonar on fish tissues in vivo. Data from this study indicate that exposure to low and midfrequency sonars, as described in this report, might not have acute effects on fish tissues.

  13. The effect of lipopolysaccharide-induced obesity and its chronic inflammation on influenza virus-related pathology.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sun-Young; Sohn, Sung-Hwa; Lee, Sang-Yeon; Park, Hye-Lim; Park, Yong-Wook; Kim, Hun; Nam, Jae-Hwan

    2015-11-01

    Obese individuals show increased susceptibility to infection, low vaccine efficacy, and worse pathophysiology. However, it is unclear how obesity affects these events. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of obesity-triggered chronic inflammation on immune cells after influenza virus infection. Control and lipopolysaccharide mice, in which an osmotic pump continually released Tween saline or lipopolysaccharide, were prepared and 3 weeks later were infected with pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza A virus. In lipopolysaccharide mice, we found a reduction in macrophage activation markers in the steady state, and reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6, in restimulated peritoneal macrophages. Interestingly, lipopolysaccharide-triggered chronic inflammation exacerbated the severity of pathological symptoms in the lungs after challenge with influenza virus. Taken together, the increased severity of virus-induced symptoms in obese individuals with chronic inflammation may be, at least partially, caused by macrophage dysfunction.

  14. The LSD1 inhibitor RN-1 induces fetal hemoglobin synthesis and reduces disease pathology in sickle cell mice

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Shuaiying; Lim, Kim-Chew; Shi, Lihong; Lee, Mary; Jearawiriyapaisarn, Natee; Myers, Greggory; Campbell, Andrew; Harro, David; Iwase, Shigeki; Trievel, Raymond C.; Rivers, Angela; DeSimone, Joseph; Lavelle, Donald; Saunthararajah, Yogen

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) has been shown to induce fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels in cultured human erythroid cells in vitro. Here we report the in vivo effects of LSD1 inactivation by a selective and more potent inhibitor, RN-1, in a sickle cell disease (SCD) mouse model. Compared with untreated animals, RN-1 administration leads to induced HbF synthesis and to increased frequencies of HbF-positive cells and mature erythrocytes, as well as fewer reticulocytes and sickle cells, in the peripheral blood of treated SCD mice. In keeping with these observations, histologic analyses of the liver and spleen of treated SCD mice verified that they do not exhibit the necrotic lesions that are usually associated with SCD. These data indicate that RN-1 can effectively induce HbF levels in red blood cells and reduce disease pathology in SCD mice, and may therefore offer new therapeutic possibilities for treating SCD. PMID:26031919

  15. Calcium and adenosine triphosphate control of cellular pathology: asparaginase-induced pancreatitis elicited via protease-activated receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shuang; Gerasimenko, Julia V.; Tsugorka, Tatiana; Gryshchenko, Oleksiy; Samarasinghe, Sujith; Gerasimenko, Oleg V.

    2016-01-01

    Exocytotic secretion of digestive enzymes from pancreatic acinar cells is elicited by physiological cytosolic Ca2+ signals, occurring as repetitive short-lasting spikes largely confined to the secretory granule region, that stimulate mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. By contrast, sustained global cytosolic Ca2+ elevations decrease ATP levels and cause necrosis, leading to the disease acute pancreatitis (AP). Toxic Ca2+ signals can be evoked by products of alcohol and fatty acids as well as bile acids. Here, we have investigated the mechanism by which l-asparaginase evokes AP. Asparaginase is an essential element in the successful treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, the most common type of cancer affecting children, but AP is a side-effect occurring in about 5–10% of cases. Like other pancreatitis-inducing agents, asparaginase evoked intracellular Ca2+ release followed by Ca2+ entry and also substantially reduced Ca2+ extrusion because of decreased intracellular ATP levels. The toxic Ca2+ signals caused extensive necrosis. The asparaginase-induced pathology depended on protease-activated receptor 2 and its inhibition prevented the toxic Ca2+ signals and necrosis. We tested the effects of inhibiting the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ entry by the Ca2+ channel inhibitor GSK-7975A. This markedly reduced asparaginase-induced Ca2+ entry and also protected effectively against the development of necrosis. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377732

  16. Administration of NaHS Attenuates Footshock-Induced Pathologies and Emotional and Cognitive Dysfunction in Triple Transgenic Alzheimer's Mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hei-Jen; Chen, Shu-Ling; Hsieh-Li, Hsiu Mei

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive cognitive decline and neuropsychiatric symptoms. Increasing evidence indicates that environmental risk factors in young adults may accelerate cognitive loss in AD and that Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) may represent an innovative treatment to slow the progression of AD. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of NaHS, an H2S donor, in a triple transgenic AD mouse model (3×Tg-AD) under footshock with situational reminders (SRs). Inescapable footshock with SRs induced anxiety and cognitive dysfunction as well as a decrease in the levels of plasma H2S and GSH and an increase in IL-6 levels in 3×Tg-AD mice. Under footshock with SR stimulus, amyloid deposition, tau protein hyperphosphorylation, and microgliosis were highly increased in the stress-responsive brain structures, including the hippocampus and amygdala, of the AD mice. Oxidative stress, inflammatory response, and β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) levels were also increased, and the level of inactivated glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) (pSer9) was decreased in the hippocampi of AD mice subjected to footshock with SRs. Furthermore, the numbers of cholinergic neurons in the medial septum/diagonal band of Broca (MS/DB) and noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC) were also decreased in the 3×Tg-AD mice under footshock with SRs. These biochemical hallmarks and pathological presentations were all alleviated by the semi-acute administration of NaHS in the AD mice. Together, these findings suggest that footshock with SRs induces the impairment of spatial cognition and emotion, which involve pathological changes in the peripheral and central systems, including the hippocampus, MS/DB, LC, and BLA, and that the administration of NaHS may be a candidate strategy to ameliorate the progression of neurodegeneration. PMID:26635562

  17. Reversible pathologic and cognitive phenotypes in an inducible model of Alzheimer-amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Melnikova, Tatiana; Fromholt, Susan; Kim, HyunSu; Lee, Deidre; Xu, Guilian; Price, Ashleigh; Moore, Brenda D.; Golde, Todd E.; Felsenstein, Kevin M.; Savonenko, Alena; Borchelt, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic mice that express mutant amyloid precursor protein (APPsi) using tet-Off vector systems provide an alternative model for assessing short- and long-term effects of Aβ-targeting therapies on phenotypes related to the deposition of Alzheimer-type amyloid. Here we use such a model, termed APPsi:tTA, to determine what phenotypes persist in mice with high amyloid burden after new production of APP/Aβ has been suppressed. We find that 12-13 month old APPsi:tTA mice are impaired in cognitive tasks that assess short- and long-term memories. Acutely suppressing new APPsi/Aβ production produced highly significant improvements in performance short-term spatial memory tasks; which upon continued suppression translated to superior performance in more demanding tasks that assess long-term spatial memory and working memory. Deficits in episodic-like memory and cognitive flexibility, however, were more persistent. Arresting mutant APPsi production caused a rapid decline in the brain levels of soluble APP ectodomains, full-length APP, and APP C-terminal fragments. As expected, amyloid deposits persisted after new APP/Aβ production was inhibited whereas, unexpectedly, we detected persistent pools of solubilizable, relatively mobile, Aβ42. Additionally, we observed persistent levels of Aβ immunoreactive entities that were of a size consistent with SDS-resistant oligomeric assemblies. Thus, in this model with significant amyloid pathology, a rapid amelioration of cognitive deficits was observed despite persistent levels of oligomeric Aβ assemblies and low, but detectable solubilizable Aβ42 peptides. These findings implicate complex relationships between accumulating Aβ and activities of APP, soluble APP ectodomains, and/or APP CTFs in mediating cognitive deficits in this model of amyloidosis. PMID:23447589

  18. Reversible pathologic and cognitive phenotypes in an inducible model of Alzheimer-amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Melnikova, Tatiana; Fromholt, Susan; Kim, HyunSu; Lee, Deidre; Xu, Guilian; Price, Ashleigh; Moore, Brenda D; Golde, Todd E; Felsenstein, Kevin M; Savonenko, Alena; Borchelt, David R

    2013-02-27

    Transgenic mice that express mutant amyloid precursor protein (APPsi) using tet-Off vector systems provide an alternative model for assessing short- and long-term effects of Aβ-targeting therapies on phenotypes related to the deposition of Alzheimer-type amyloid. Here we use such a model, termed APPsi:tTA, to determine what phenotypes persist in mice with high amyloid burden after new production of APP/Aβ has been suppressed. We find that 12- to 13-month-old APPsi:tTA mice are impaired in cognitive tasks that assess short- and long-term memories. Acutely suppressing new APPsi/Aβ production produced highly significant improvements in performing short-term spatial memory tasks, which upon continued suppression translated to superior performance in more demanding tasks that assess long-term spatial memory and working memory. Deficits in episodic-like memory and cognitive flexibility, however, were more persistent. Arresting mutant APPsi production caused a rapid decline in the brain levels of soluble APP ectodomains, full-length APP, and APP C-terminal fragments. As expected, amyloid deposits persisted after new APP/Aβ production was inhibited, whereas, unexpectedly, we detected persistent pools of solubilizable, relatively mobile, Aβ42. Additionally, we observed persistent levels of Aβ-immunoreactive entities that were of a size consistent with SDS-resistant oligomeric assemblies. Thus, in this model with significant amyloid pathology, a rapid amelioration of cognitive deficits was observed despite persistent levels of oligomeric Aβ assemblies and low, but detectable solubilizable Aβ42 peptides. These findings implicate complex relationships between accumulating Aβ and activities of APP, soluble APP ectodomains, and/or APP C-terminal fragments in mediating cognitive deficits in this model of amyloidosis.

  19. Pathological, Immunohistochemical and Molecular Findings Associated with Senecavirus A-Induced Lesions in Neonatal Piglets.

    PubMed

    Leme, R A; Oliveira, T E S; Alfieri, A F; Headley, S A; Alfieri, A A

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the cause of the mortality of piglets with cutaneous, enteric and neurological disorders from seven pig farms located in different geographical regions of Brazil. Twelve 1- to 5-day-old piglets were submitted for pathological evaluation. The principal gross findings included faint rib impressions on the pleural surface of the lungs (n = 9), diphtheritic glossitis (n = 6) and ulcerative lesions at the coronary band (n = 5). Histopathology revealed interstitial pneumonia (n = 12), myocarditis (n = 6), diphtheritic glossitis (n = 3), encephalitis (n = 3) and atrophy of intestinal villi with vacuolation of the superficial epithelial cells (n = 6). Immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibodies specific for Senecavirus A (SenV-A) demonstrated immunoreactivity of the choroid plexus of the cerebrum, degenerate epithelium of ulcerative lesions of the tongue, the urothelium of the kidney and urinary bladder, and the superficial cells of the intestine. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR), PCR and/or quantitative PCR assays were used to investigate viral agents associated with vesicular and/or enteric diseases. Antigens and RNA of SenV-A were identified in multiple tissues of all piglets; molecular assays for all other viruses evaluated yielded negative results. These findings confirm the participation of SenV-A in the multiple lesions observed in these piglets. Several theories are proposed: SenV-A may be eliminated via the urinary system, neurological disease may occur due to initial invasion of choroid plexus, enteric disease may be related to atrophy and fusion of villi of the small intestine, and vertical transmission could be a form of dissemination. PMID:27473601

  20. HDAC1 nuclear export induced by pathological conditions is essential for the onset of axonal damage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Young; Shen, Siming; Dietz, Karen; He, Ye; Howell, Owain; Reynolds, Richard; Casaccia, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    Histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) is a nuclear enzyme involved in transcriptional repression. We report here that cytosolic HDAC1 is detected in damaged axons in brains of human patients with Multiple Sclerosis and of mice with cuprizone-induced demyelination, ex vivo models of demyelination and in cultured neurons exposed to glutamate and TNF-α. Nuclear export of HDAC1 is mediated by the interaction with the nuclear receptor CRM-1 and leads to impaired mitochondrial transport. The formation of complexes between exported HDAC1 and members of the kinesin family of motor proteins hinders the interaction with cargo molecules thereby inhibiting mitochondrial movement and inducing localized beadings. This effect is prevented by inhibiting HDAC1 nuclear export with leptomycin B, treating neurons with pharmacological inhibitors of HDAC activity or silencing HDAC1 but not other HDAC isoforms. Together these data identify nuclear export of HDAC1 as a critical event for impaired mitochondrial transport in damaged neurons. PMID:20037577

  1. Effect of thiamine pyrophosphate on retinopathy induced by hyperglycemia in rats: A biochemical and pathological evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Cinici, Emine; Ahiskali, Ibrahim; Cetin, Nihal; Suleyman, Bahadir; Kukula, Osman; Altuner, Durdu; Coban, Abdulkadir; Balta, Hilal; Kuzucu, Mehmet; Suleyman, Halis

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Information is lacking on the protective effects of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) against hyperglycemia-induced retinopathy in rats. This study investigated the biochemical and histopathological aspects of the effect of TPP on hyperglycemia-induced retinopathy induced by alloxan in rats. Materials and Methods: The rats were separated into a diabetic TPP-administered group (DTPG), a diabetes control group (DCG) and a healthy group (HG). While the DTPG was given TPP, the DCG and HG were administered distilled water as a solvent at the same concentrations. This procedure was repeated daily for 3 months. At the end of this period, all of the rats were euthanized under thiopental sodium anesthesia, and biochemical and histopathological analyses of the ocular retinal tissues were performed. The results of the DTPG were compared with those of the DCG and HG. Results: TPP prevented hyperglycemia by increasing the amount of malondialdehyde and decreasing endogen antioxidants, including total glutathione, glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferase and superoxide dismutase. In addition, the amounts of the DNA oxidation product 8-hydroxyguanine were significantly lower in the retinas of the DTPG compared to the DCG. In the retinas of the DCG, there was a marked increase in vascular structures and congestion, in addition to edema. In contrast, little vascularization and edema were observed in the DTPG, and there was no congestion. The results suggest that TPP significantly reduced the degree of hyperglycemia-induced retinopathy. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that TPP may be useful for prophylaxis against diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27488151

  2. An immune pathological and ultrastructural skin analysis for rhododenol-induced leukoderma patients.

    PubMed

    Tanemura, Atsushi; Yang, Lingli; Yang, Fei; Nagata, Yuiko; Wataya-Kaneda, Mari; Fukai, Kazuyoshi; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Ohe, Rintaro; Yamakawa, Mitsunori; Suzuki, Tamio; Katayama, Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    As reported in the mass media on July 2013, numerous consumers who had used the cosmetic ingredient containing rhododendrol (4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-butanol, Trade name; rhododenol), which is a melanin inhibitor isolated from Acer nikoense Maxim, released from Kanebo Cosmetics Inc. (Tokyo, Japan) noticed leukoderma patches on their face, neck and hands. We have experienced 32 cases that developed leukoderma after using such cosmetics so far and skin biopsy samples in some cases were obtained from both leukoderma and pigmented lesions. A histopathological analysis for skin lesions obtained from such patients notably showed basal hypo-pigmentation, melanin incontinence, and remaining melanocytes in most patients which is not relevant in vitiligo vulgaris. Subsequently, we comprehensively carried out immunohistochemical analyses of immune-competent cells infiltration to assess the effect of the cellular immune response to inducible hypopigmentation. Furthermore, detailed morphological observations performed by electron-microscopy notably showed the presence of melanocytes with only a small number of melanosomes, dermal fibroblasts containing melanosome globules and melanophages whereas no damage associated with melanosome transfer and the basal layer apparatus. These findings provide a cue to diagnose as rhododenol-induced leukoderma differentiate from vitiligo vulgaris and for rhododendrol to induce local immunity in addition to melanocyte damage.

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus-induced pathology favored by cellular transmission and activation

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.E.; Yoffe, B.; Bosworth, C.G.; Hollinger, F.B.; Rich, R.R.

    1988-03-01

    Epidemiological data suggest that transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) occurs primarily by transference of virally infected cells. However, the efficiency of lytic productive infection induced by HIV after transmission of cell-associated virus vs. free virus is difficult to assess. The present studies compare the extent of depletion of CD4+ (helper/inducer) T cells after mixing uninfected cells with either free HIV or irradiated HIV-infected allogeneic or autologous cells in vitro. Rapid CD4+ cellular depletion occurred only in cultures containing allogeneic infected cells or after addition of a nonspecific T cell activation signal to cultures with autologous infected cells. These in vitro observations strongly support the epidemiological implication that interactions between infected and uninfected cells are the most efficient means of transmission and HIV-induced cytopathology in vivo. They also provide direct support for the concept that immunological stimulation by foreign cells infected with HIV dramatically increases the likelihood of transmission. These in vitro observations suggest a model for the acquisition of HIV in vivo and the role of cellular activation in dissemination of the virus to uninfected cells in an infected individual.

  4. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Pulmonary Infection in Humanized Mice Induces Human Anti-RSV Immune Responses and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anurag; Wu, Wenzhu; Sung, Biin; Huang, Jing; Tsao, Tiffany; Li, Xiangming; Gomi, Rika; Tsuji, Moriya

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of lower respiratory tract disease, which causes high rates of morbidity and mortality in infants and the elderly. Models of human RSV pulmonary disease are needed to better understand RSV pathogenesis and to assess the efficacy of RSV vaccines. We assessed the RSV-specific human innate, humoral, and cellular immune responses in humanized mice (mice with a human immune system [HIS mice]) with functional human CD4+ T and B cells. These mice were generated by introduction of HLA class II genes, various human cytokines, and human B cell activation factor into immunodeficient NOD scid gamma (NSG) mice by the use of an adeno-associated virus vector, followed by engraftment of human hematopoietic stem cells. During the first 3 days of infection, HIS mice lost more weight and cleared RSV faster than NSG mice. Human chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 3 (CCL3) and human interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression was detected in the RSV-infected HIS mice. The pathological features induced by RSV infection in HIS mice included peribronchiolar inflammation, neutrophil predominance in the bronchioalveolar lavage fluid, and enhanced airway mucus production. Human anti-RSV IgG and RSV-neutralizing antibodies were detected in serum and human anti-RSV mucosal IgA was detected in bronchioalveolar lavage fluid for up to 6 weeks. RSV infection induced an RSV-specific human gamma interferon response in HIS mouse splenocytes. These results indicate that human immune cells can induce features of RSV lung disease, including mucus hyperplasia, in murine lungs and that HIS mice can be used to elicit human anti-RSV humoral and cellular immunity. IMPORTANCE Infections with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are common and can cause severe lung disease in infants and the elderly. The lack of a suitable animal model with disease features similar to those in humans has hampered efforts to predict the efficacy of novel anti-RSV therapies and

  5. Toxico-pathological effects in rats induced by lambda-cyhalothrin.

    PubMed

    Dahamna, S; Harzallah, D; Guemache, A; Sekfali, N

    2009-01-01

    Pesticides are widely used chemicals making human exposure to pesticides a realistic possibility. Biomonitoring is a common and useful tool for assessing human exposure to pesticides. Pyrethroids are effective insecticides that are often used in household sprays, aerosol bombs, insect repellents, pet shampoos, and lice treatments. Using products containing these compounds will expose people to these chemicals. Since these compounds frequently are used on crOPs, they are often detected in fruits and vegetables. Biomonitoring of exposure is a useful tool for assessing exposure to pesticides. Biomonitoring involves the measurement of the parent pesticide, its metabolite or reaction product in biological media, typically blood or urine, to determine if an exposure has occurred and the extent of that exposure. Although not without its limitations, biomonitoring has great utility in integrating all routes of exposure allowing for one exposure measurement. Pesticides have much shorter environmental half-lives and tend not to bioaccumulate. In fact, from humans within 24 hr as the parent pesticide, a mercapturic acid detoxification product, oxidative or dealkylation metabolites, and/or glucuronide or sulphate-bound metabolites. However, because of the heavy agricultural and residential use of these chemicals, humans are continually exposed to many of these chemicals. The objective of the present study was to explore modification in toxico-pathological responses of rats treated with lambda-cyhalothrin (commercially called karate). Rats (250 g weight), were gavaged by 1/100 LD50 for 4 weeks (one dose every week). Blood was collected before dosing and after 48 hours from the treatment. Enzyme activities were assayed in the plasma samples obtained. Glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), Glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), Alkaline phosphatase (ALPH) and Glucose. The results showed a decrease in RBC; WBC and Hb. This probably explained by the effect of lambda cyhalothrin

  6. Biliary albumin excretion induced by bile salts in rats is a pathological phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, M.; Kitani, K.; Kanai, S. )

    1989-09-01

    The bile to plasma 125I-albumin concentration ratio (B/P ratio) was examined before and during various bile salt infusions in male Wistar rats that had previously received iv injection of 125I-albumin. Endogenous rat albumin and IgG concentrations in the bile were also determined by a single radial immunodiffusion method. Taurocholate (TC) infusion (1.0 mumol/min/100 g body wt) significantly increased the bile flow rate in the first hr but the flow began to decline in the second hr. The B/P ratio as well as rat albumin (and IgG) excretion into the bile significantly increased as early as 15 min after the start of TC infusion, and the increase became more pronounced in the second hr, when the bile flow began to decrease. Infusion of taurochenodeoxycholate (TCDC, 0.4 mumol/min/100 g) caused a reduction in bile flow 15 min after the start of infusion but the B/P ratio increased 40 times at its peak compared with the basal value before the bile salt infusion. Simultaneous infusion of tauroursodeoxycholate (TUDC, 0.6 mumol/min/100 g) and TCDC not only abolished the cholestasis induced by TCDC but maintained stable choleresis as long as for 2 hr. During this choleretic period, the B/P ration never exceeded the basal value. The choleresis induced by either taurodehydrocholate (TDHC) or bucolome was not accompanied by enhanced albumin excretion. In rats given TDHC infusion, albumin excretion started to increase only after the bile flow began to decline following the initial choleretic period. The enhanced excretion of albumin induced by TC and TCDC is therefore suggested to be caused not by the choleresis per se but by a possible concomitant increase in the communication between sinusoids and bile canaliculi, which eventually leads to cholestasis.

  7. Honokiol inhibits pathological retinal neovascularization in oxygen-induced retinopathy mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Vavilala, Divya Teja; O’Bryhim, Bliss E.; Ponnaluri, V.K. Chaithanya; White, R. Sid; Radel, Jeff; Symons, R.C. Andrew; Mukherji, Mridul

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Aberrant activation of HIF pathway is the underlying cause of ischemic neovascularization. •Honokiol has better therapeutic index as a HIF inhibitor than digoxin and doxorubicin. •Daily IP injection of honokiol in OIR mouse model reduced retinal neovascularization. •Honokiol also prevents vaso-obliteration, the characteristic feature of the OIR model. •Honokiol enhanced physiological revascularization of the retinal vascular plexuses. -- Abstract: Aberrant activation of the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) pathway is the underlying cause of retinal neovascularization, one of the most common causes of blindness worldwide. The HIF pathway also plays critical roles during tumor angiogenesis and cancer stem cell transformation. We have recently shown that honokiol is a potent inhibitor of the HIF pathway in a number of cancer and retinal pigment epithelial cell lines. Here we evaluate the safety and efficacy of honokiol, digoxin, and doxorubicin, three recently identified HIF inhibitors from natural sources. Our studies show that honokiol has a better safety to efficacy profile as a HIF inhibitor than digoxin and doxorubicin. Further, we show for the first time that daily intraperitoneal injection of honokiol starting at postnatal day (P) 12 in an oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) mouse model significantly reduced retinal neovascularization at P17. Administration of honokiol also prevents the oxygen-induced central retinal vaso-obliteration, characteristic feature of the OIR model. Additionally, honokiol enhanced physiological revascularization of the retinal vascular plexuses. Since honokiol suppresses multiple pathways activated by HIF, in addition to the VEGF signaling, it may provide advantages over current treatments utilizing specific VEGF antagonists for ocular neovascular diseases and cancers.

  8. VEGF Mediates ApoE4-Induced Neovascularization and Synaptic Pathology in the Choroid and Retina.

    PubMed

    Antes, Ran; Salomon-Zimri, Shiran; Beck, Susanne C; Garcia Garrido, Marina; Livnat, Tami; Maharshak, Idit; Kadar, Tamar; Seeliger, Mathias; Weinberger, Dov; Michaelson, Daniel M

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4), the most prevalent genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), is associated with neuronal and vascular impairments. Recent findings suggest that retina of apoE4 mice have synaptic and functional impairments. We presently investigated the effects of apoE4 on retinal and choroidal vasculature and the possible role of VEGF in these effects. There were no histological differences between the retinal and choroidal vasculatures of naïve apoE3 and apoE4 mice. In contrast, laserdriven choroidal injury induced higher levels of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in apoE4 than in apoE3 mice. These effects were associated with an inflammatory response and with activation of the Muller cells and asrocytic markers gluthatione synthetase and GFAP, all of which were more pronounced in the apoE4 mice. CNV also induced a transient increase in the levels of the synaptic markers synaptophysin and PSD95 which were however similar in the apoE4 and apoE3 naive mice. Retinal and choroidal VEGF and apoE levels were lower in naïve apoE4 than in corresponding apoE3 mice. In contrast, VEGF and apoE levels rose more pronouncedly following laser injury in the apoE4 than in apoE3 mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that the apoE4-induced retinal impairments, under basal conditions, may be related to reduced VEGF levels in the eyes of these mice. The hyper-neovascularization in the apoE4 mice might be driven by increased inflammation and the associated surge in VEGF following injury. Retinal and choroidal VEGF and apoE levels were lower in naïve apoE4 than in corresponding apoE3 mice. In contrast, VEGF and apoE levels rose more pronouncedly following laser injury in the apoE4 than in apoE3 mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that the apoE4-induced retinal impairments, under basal conditions, may be related to reduced VEGF levels in the eyes of these mice. The hyper-neovascularization in the apoE4 mice might be driven by increased inflammation

  9. Rat white matter injury model induced by endothelin-1 injection: technical modification and pathological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ono, Hideaki; Imai, Hideaki; Miyawaki, Satoru; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2016-01-01

    White matter injury is an important cause of functional disability of the brain. We comprehensively analyzed a modified endothelin-1 (ET‑1) injection-induced white matter injury model in the rat which is very valuable for investigating the underlying mechanisms of subcortical ischemic stroke. ET-1 was stereotactically injected into the internal capsule of the rat. To avoid complications with leakage of ET-1 into the lateral ventricle, the safest trajectory angle to the target was established. Rats with white matter injury were extensively evaluated for structural changes and functional sequelae, using motor function tests, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, histopathology evolution, volume estimation of the lesion, and neuroanatomical identification of affected neurons using the retrograde tracer hydroxystilbamidine. Optimization of the trajectory of the ET-1 injection needle provided excellent survival rate. MR imaging visualized the white matter injury 2 days after surgery. Motor function deficit appeared temporarily after the operation. Histological studies confirmed damage of axons and myelin sheaths followed by inflammatory reaction and gliosis similar to lacunar infarction, with lesion volume of less than 1% of the whole brain. Hydroxystilbamidine injected into the lesion revealed wide spatial distribution of the affected neuronal population. Compared with prior ET-1 injection models, this method induced standardized amount of white matter damage and temporary motor function deficit in a reproducible and safe manner. The present model is valuable for studying the pathophysiology of not only ischemia, but a broader set of white matter damage conditions in the lissencephalic brain. PMID:27685774

  10. Implications of Sertoli cell induced germ cell apoptosis to testicular pathology

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Caitlin J; Richburg, John H

    2014-01-01

    After exposure to toxicants, degenerating germ cells represents the most common testicular histopathological alteration, regardless of the mechanism of toxicity. Therefore, deciphering the primary toxicant cellular target and mechanism of action can be extremely difficult. However, most testicular toxicants display a cell-specific and a stage-specific pattern of damage, which is the best evidence for identifying the primary cellular target (i.e. germ cell, Sertoli cell, peritubular myoid cell, or Leydig cell). Some toxicant-induced Sertoli cell injury presents with germ cell apoptosis occurring primarily in spermatocytes in rats in stages XI-XIV, I and II. Although some toxicants result in spermatid degeneration and apoptosis, it is still unclear if spermatid apoptosis is a result of Sertoli cell-selective apoptosis or a direct effect of toxicants on spermatids, therefore if this is seen as the earliest change, one cannot infer the mechanism of apoptosis. This review summarizes some of the distinguishing features of Sertoli cell-induced germ cell apoptosis and the associated mechanisms of cell death to provide the toxicologist observing similar cell death, with evidence about a potential mode of action. PMID:26413394

  11. [Amiodaron neuropathy: clinical and pathological study of a new drug induced lipidosis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Dudognon, P; Hauw, J J; de Baecque, C; Derrida, J P; Escourolle, R; Nick, E J

    1979-01-01

    The authors report a case of amiodaron-induced neuropathy in a seventy one years old man. First signs appeared seventeen months after the treatment was started with 400 mg/day for one year and continued with 200 mg/day. Examination on the 29th month disclosed a severe sensory and motor deficit of the limbs with distal predominancy. Motor nerve conduction velocity was strongly impaired without modification of distal latencies. Fundi were normal. The patient improved quickly after drug withdrawal. The authors review the rare similar cases reported in the literature and attempt to describe the clinical caracteristics of amiodaron neuropathy. Qualitative and quantitative light and electron microscopical studies of nerve, muscle and skin biopsies, including teased fibers preparations were performed and they disclosed a marked reduction of the number of myelinated fibers. Wallerian degeneration predominated (31 p. 100) other segmental demyalination (25 p. 100). Numerous polymorphous lipid-laden lysosomes were present in Schwann cells, fibrocytes, pericytes, endothelial and muscle cells. These previously undescribed morphological findings are similar to those present in perhexiline maleate intoxications. We believe amiodaron neuropathy is a new neuropathy with drug-induced lipidosis. PMID:531409

  12. Potential Role of the Gut/Liver/Lung Axis in Alcohol-Induced Tissue Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Veronica L.; Beier, Juliane I.; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D.; Roman, Jesse; Arteel, Gavin E.

    2015-01-01

    Both Alcoholic Liver Disease (ALD) and alcohol-related susceptibility to acute lung injury are estimated to account for the highest morbidity and mortality related to chronic alcohol abuse and, thus, represent a focus of intense investigation. In general, alcohol-induced derangements to both organs are considered to be independent and are often evaluated separately. However, the liver and lung share many general responses to damage, and specific responses to alcohol exposure. For example, both organs possess resident macrophages that play key roles in mediating the immune/inflammatory response. Additionally, alcohol-induced damage to both organs appears to involve oxidative stress that favors tissue injury. Another mechanism that appears to be shared between the organs is that inflammatory injury to both organs is enhanced by alcohol exposure. Lastly, altered extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition appears to be a key step in disease progression in both organs. Indeed, recent studies suggest that early subtle changes in the ECM may predispose the target organ to an inflammatory insult. The purpose of this chapter is to review the parallel mechanisms of liver and lung injury in response to alcohol consumption. This chapter will also explore the potential that these mechanisms are interdependent, as part of a gut-liver-lung axis. PMID:26437442

  13. Two Rare Human Mitofusin 2 Mutations Alter Mitochondrial Dynamics and Induce Retinal and Cardiac Pathology in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Bhandari, Poonam; Zhao, Peter; Jowdy, Casey C.; Engelhard, John T.; Dorn, Gerald W.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial fusion is essential to organelle homeostasis and organ health. Inexplicably, loss of function mutations of mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) specifically affect neurological tissue, causing Charcot Marie Tooth syndrome (CMT) and atypical optic atrophy. As CMT-linked Mfn2 mutations are predominantly within the GTPase domain, we postulated that Mfn2 mutations in other functional domains might affect non-neurological tissues. Here, we defined in vitro and in vivo consequences of rare human mutations in the poorly characterized Mfn2 HR1 domain. Human exome sequencing data identified 4 rare non-synonymous Mfn2 HR1 domain mutations, two bioinformatically predicted as damaging. Recombinant expression of these (Mfn2 M393I and R400Q) in Mfn2-null murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) revealed incomplete rescue of characteristic mitochondrial fragmentation, compared to wild-type human Mfn2 (hMfn2); Mfn2 400Q uniquely induced mitochondrial fragmentation in normal MEFs. To compare Mfn2 mutation effects in neurological and non-neurological tissues in vivo, hMfn2 and the two mutants were expressed in Drosophila eyes or heart tubes made deficient in endogenous fly mitofusin (dMfn) through organ-specific RNAi expression. The two mutants induced similar Drosophila eye phenotypes: small eyes and an inability to rescue the eye pathology induced by suppression of dMfn. In contrast, Mfn2 400Q induced more severe cardiomyocyte mitochondrial fragmentation and cardiac phenotypes than Mfn2 393I, including heart tube dilation, depressed fractional shortening, and progressively impaired negative geotaxis. These data reveal a central functional role for Mfn2 HR1 domains, describe organ-specific effects of two Mfn2 HR1 mutations, and strongly support prospective studies of Mfn2 400Q in heritable human heart disease of unknown genetic etiology. PMID:22957060

  14. Radio-induced gliomas: 20-year experience and critical review of the pathology.

    PubMed

    Salvati, Maurizio; D'Elia, Alessandro; Melone, Graziella Angelina; Brogna, Christian; Frati, Alessandro; Raco, Antonino; Delfini, Roberto

    2008-09-01

    The authors report their personal experience with a surgical series of 16 cases of cerebral radiation-induced gliomas, defining diagnostic criteria and surgical and clinical characteristics. There were ten males and six females, with a median age of 45.9 years. Irradiation had initially been given for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in six cases, tinea capitis in four cases, scalp hemangioma in three cases, cutaneous hemangioma, cavernous angioma, and medulloblastoma in one case each. There were 14 cases of glioblastoma (grade IV WHO) and 2 cases of astrocytoma (grade II WHO), with a mean latency time of 17 years (range: 6-26 years). For glioblastomas mean survival time was 10.4 months, accounting for 1-3% of all the glioblastomas treated. A thorough revision of the pertinent literature revealed some clinical-biological peculiarities.

  15. Arsenic-Induced Genotoxicity and Genetic Susceptibility to Arsenic-Related Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Faita, Francesca; Cori, Liliana; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Andreassi, Maria Grazia

    2013-01-01

    The arsenic (As) exposure represents an important problem in many parts of the World. Indeed, it is estimated that over 100 million individuals are exposed to arsenic, mainly through a contamination of groundwaters. Chronic exposure to As is associated with adverse effects on human health such as cancers, cardiovascular diseases, neurological diseases and the rate of morbidity and mortality in populations exposed is alarming. The purpose of this review is to summarize the genotoxic effects of As in the cells as well as to discuss the importance of signaling and repair of arsenic-induced DNA damage. The current knowledge of specific polymorphisms in candidate genes that confer susceptibility to arsenic exposure is also reviewed. We also discuss the perspectives offered by the determination of biological markers of early effect on health, incorporating genetic polymorphisms, with biomarkers for exposure to better evaluate exposure-response clinical relationships as well as to develop novel preventative strategies for arsenic- health effects. PMID:23583964

  16. The tick saliva immunosuppressor, Salp15, contributes to Th17-induced pathology during Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Juncadella, Ignacio J.; Bates, Tonya C.; Suleiman, Reem; Monteagudo-Mera, Andrea; Olson, Chris M.; Navasa, Nicolás; Olivera, Elias R.; Osborne, Barbara A.; Anguita, Juan

    2010-01-01

    Summary Salp15 is a tick saliva protein that inhibits CD4+ T cell differentiation through its interaction with CD4. The protein inhibits early signaling events during T cell activation and IL-2 production. Because murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis development is mediated by central nervous system-infiltrating CD4+ T cells that are specific for myelin-associated proteins, we sought to determine whether the treatment of mice with Salp15 during EAE induction would prevent the generation of proinflammatory T cell responses and the development of the disease. Surprisingly, Salp15-treated mice developed more severe EAE than control animals. The treatment of EAE-induced mice with the tick saliva protein did not result in increased infiltration of T cells to the central nervous system, indicating that Salp15 had not affected the permeability of the blood-brain barrier. Salp15 treatment did not affect the development of antibody responses against the eliciting peptide or the presence of IFNγ in the sera. The treatment with Salp15 resulted, however, in the increased differentiation of Th17 cells in vivo, as evidenced by higher IL-17 production from PLP139-151-specific CD4+ T cells isolated from the central nervous system and the periphery. In vitro, Salp15 was able to induce the differentiation of Th17 cells in the presence of IL-6 and the absence of TGFβ These results suggest that a conductive milieu for the differentiation of Th17 cells can be achieved by restriction of the production of IL-2 during T cell differentiation, a role that may be performed by TGFβ and other immunosuppressive agents. PMID:20920474

  17. MIF Participates in Toxoplasma gondii-Induced Pathology Following Oral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Madi, Kalil; Feijó, Daniel F.; Assunção-Miranda, Iranaia; Souza, Heitor S. P.; Bozza, Marcelo T.

    2011-01-01

    Background Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is essential for controlling parasite burden and survival in a model of systemic Toxoplasma gondii infection. Peroral T. gondii infection induces small intestine necrosis and death in susceptible hosts, and in many aspects resembles inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Considering the critical role of MIF in the pathogenesis of IBD, we hypothesized that MIF participates in the inflammatory response induced by oral infection with T. gondii. Methodology/Principal Findings Mif deficient (Mif−/−) and wild-type mice in the C57Bl/6 background were orally infected with T. gondii strain ME49. Mif−/− mice had reduced lethality, ileal inflammation and tissue damage despite of an increased intestinal parasite load compared to wt mice. Lack of MIF caused a reduction of TNF-α, IL-12, IFN-γ and IL-23 and an increased expression of IL-22 in ileal mucosa. Moreover, suppressed pro-inflammatory responses at the ileal mucosa observed in Mif−/− mice was not due to upregulation of IL-4, IL-10 or TGF-β. MIF also affected the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) but not MMP-2 in the intestine of infected mice. Signs of systemic inflammation including the increased concentrations of inflammatory cytokines in the plasma and liver damage were less pronounced in Mif−/− mice compared to wild-type mice. Conclusion/Significance In conclusion, our data suggested that in susceptible hosts MIF controls T. gondii infection with the cost of increasing local and systemic inflammation, tissue damage and death. PMID:21977228

  18. Computational Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Louis, David N.; Feldman, Michael; Carter, Alexis B.; Dighe, Anand S.; Pfeifer, John D.; Bry, Lynn; Almeida, Jonas S.; Saltz, Joel; Braun, Jonathan; Tomaszewski, John E.; Gilbertson, John R.; Sinard, John H.; Gerber, Georg K.; Galli, Stephen J.; Golden, Jeffrey A.; Becich, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Context We define the scope and needs within the new discipline of computational pathology, a discipline critical to the future of both the practice of pathology and, more broadly, medical practice in general. Objective To define the scope and needs of computational pathology. Data Sources A meeting was convened in Boston, Massachusetts, in July 2014 prior to the annual Association of Pathology Chairs meeting, and it was attended by a variety of pathologists, including individuals highly invested in pathology informatics as well as chairs of pathology departments. Conclusions The meeting made recommendations to promote computational pathology, including clearly defining the field and articulating its value propositions; asserting that the value propositions for health care systems must include means to incorporate robust computational approaches to implement data-driven methods that aid in guiding individual and population health care; leveraging computational pathology as a center for data interpretation in modern health care systems; stating that realizing the value proposition will require working with institutional administrations, other departments, and pathology colleagues; declaring that a robust pipeline should be fostered that trains and develops future computational pathologists, for those with both pathology and non-pathology backgrounds; and deciding that computational pathology should serve as a hub for data-related research in health care systems. The dissemination of these recommendations to pathology and bioinformatics departments should help facilitate the development of computational pathology. PMID:26098131

  19. Resveratrol Protects against High-Fat Diet Induced Renal Pathological Damage and Cell Senescence by Activating SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nannan; Li, Zhongchi; Xu, Kang; Wang, Yanying; Wang, Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Obesity-related renal diseases have been a worldwide issue. Effective strategy that prevents high fat-diet induced renal damage is of great significance. Resveratrol, a natural plant polyphenol, is famous for its antioxidant activity, cardioprotective effects and anticancer properties. However whether resveratrol can play a role in the treatment of renal diseases is unknown. In this study, we added resveratrol in normal glucose or high glucose medium and provide evidences that resveratrol protects against high-glucose triggered oxidative stress and cell senescence. Moreover, mice were fed with standard diet, standard diet plus resveratrol, high-fat diet or high-fat diet plus resveratrol for 3 months, and results show that resveratrol treatment prevents high-fat diet induced renal pathological damage by activating SIRT1, a key member in the mammalian sirtuin family that response to calorie restriction life-extension method. This research confirms the potential role of resveratrol in the treatment of renal diseases and may provide an effective and convenient method to mimic the beneficial effects of calorie restriction. PMID:27582325

  20. Disruption of the Circadian Clock in Mice Increases Intestinal Permeability and Promotes Alcohol-Induced Hepatic Pathology and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Summa, Keith C; Voigt, Robin M; Forsyth, Christopher B; Shaikh, Maliha; Cavanaugh, Kate; Tang, Yueming; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Song, Shiwen; Turek, Fred W; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock orchestrates temporal patterns of physiology and behavior relative to the environmental light:dark cycle by generating and organizing transcriptional and biochemical rhythms in cells and tissues throughout the body. Circadian clock genes have been shown to regulate the physiology and function of the gastrointestinal tract. Disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier enables the translocation of proinflammatory bacterial products, such as endotoxin, across the intestinal wall and into systemic circulation; a process that has been linked to pathologic inflammatory states associated with metabolic, hepatic, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases - many of which are commonly reported in shift workers. Here we report, for the first time, that circadian disorganization, using independent genetic and environmental strategies, increases permeability of the intestinal epithelial barrier (i.e., gut leakiness) in mice. Utilizing chronic alcohol consumption as a well-established model of induced intestinal hyperpermeability, we also found that both genetic and environmental circadian disruption promote alcohol-induced gut leakiness, endotoxemia and steatohepatitis, possibly through a mechanism involving the tight junction protein occludin. Circadian organization thus appears critical for the maintenance of intestinal barrier integrity, especially in the context of injurious agents, such as alcohol. Circadian disruption may therefore represent a previously unrecognized risk factor underlying the susceptibility to or development of alcoholic liver disease, as well as other conditions associated with intestinal hyperpermeability and an endotoxin-triggered inflammatory state. PMID:23825629

  1. Disruption of the Circadian Clock in Mice Increases Intestinal Permeability and Promotes Alcohol-Induced Hepatic Pathology and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, Christopher B.; Shaikh, Maliha; Cavanaugh, Kate; Tang, Yueming; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Song, Shiwen

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock orchestrates temporal patterns of physiology and behavior relative to the environmental light:dark cycle by generating and organizing transcriptional and biochemical rhythms in cells and tissues throughout the body. Circadian clock genes have been shown to regulate the physiology and function of the gastrointestinal tract. Disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier enables the translocation of proinflammatory bacterial products, such as endotoxin, across the intestinal wall and into systemic circulation; a process that has been linked to pathologic inflammatory states associated with metabolic, hepatic, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases – many of which are commonly reported in shift workers. Here we report, for the first time, that circadian disorganization, using independent genetic and environmental strategies, increases permeability of the intestinal epithelial barrier (i.e., gut leakiness) in mice. Utilizing chronic alcohol consumption as a well-established model of induced intestinal hyperpermeability, we also found that both genetic and environmental circadian disruption promote alcohol-induced gut leakiness, endotoxemia and steatohepatitis, possibly through a mechanism involving the tight junction protein occludin. Circadian organization thus appears critical for the maintenance of intestinal barrier integrity, especially in the context of injurious agents, such as alcohol. Circadian disruption may therefore represent a previously unrecognized risk factor underlying the susceptibility to or development of alcoholic liver disease, as well as other conditions associated with intestinal hyperpermeability and an endotoxin-triggered inflammatory state. PMID:23825629

  2. CD34 Is Required for Infiltration of Eosinophils into the Colon and Pathology Associated with DSS-Induced Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Maltby, Steven; Wohlfarth, Carolin; Gold, Matthew; Zbytnuik, Lori; Hughes, Michael R.; McNagny, Kelly M.

    2010-01-01

    Eosinophil migration into the gut and the release of granular mediators plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases, including ulcerative colitis. We recently demonstrated that eosinophil migration into the lung requires cell surface expression of the sialomucin CD34 on mast cells and eosinophils in an asthma model. Based on these findings, we investigated a similar role for CD34 in the migration of eosinophils and other inflammatory cells into the colon as well as explored the effects of CD34 ablation on disease development in a dextran sulfate sodium-induced model of ulcerative colitis. Our findings demonstrate decreased disease severity in dextran sulfate sodium-treated Cd34−/− mice, as assessed by weight loss, diarrhea, bleeding, colon shortening and tissue pathology, compared with wild-type controls. CD34 was predominantly expressed on eosinophils within inflamed colon tissues, and Cd34−/− animals exhibited drastically reduced colon eosinophil infiltration. Using chimeric animals, we demonstrated that decreased disease pathology resulted from loss of CD34 from bone marrow-derived cells and that eosinophilia in Cd34−/−IL5Tg animals was sufficient to overcome protection from disease. In addition, we demonstrated a decrease in peripheral blood eosinophil numbers following dextran sulfate sodium treatment. These findings demonstrate that CD34 was expressed on colon-infiltrating eosinophils and played a role in eosinophil migration. Further, our findings suggest CD34 is required for efficient eosinophil migration, but not proliferation or expansion, in the development of ulcerative colitis. PMID:20696776

  3. Pathology of non-thermal irreversible electroporation (N-TIRE)-induced ablation of the canine brain.

    PubMed

    Rossmeisl, John H; Garcia, Paulo A; Roberston, John L; Ellis, Thomas L; Davalos, Rafael V

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the neuropathologic features of normal canine brain ablated with non-thermal irreversible electroporation (N-TIRE). The parietal cerebral cortices of four dogs were treated with N-TIRE using a dose-escalation protocol with an additional dog receiving sham treatment. Animals were allowed to recover following N-TIRE ablation and the effects of treatment were monitored with clinical and magnetic resonance imaging examinations. Brains were subjected to histopathologic and ultrastructural assessment along with Bcl-2, caspase-3, and caspase-9 immunohistochemical staining following sacrifice 72 h post-treatment. Adverse clinical effects of N-TIRE were only observed in the dog treated at the upper energy tier. MRI and neuropathologic examinations indicated that N-TIRE ablation resulted in focal regions of severe cytoarchitectural and blood-brain-barrier disruption. Lesion size correlated to the intensity of the applied electrical field. N-TIRE-induced lesions were characterized by parenchymal necrosis and hemorrhage; however, large blood vessels were preserved. A transition zone containing parenchymal edema, perivascular inflammatory cuffs, and reactive gliosis was interspersed between the necrotic focus and normal neuropil. Apoptotic labeling indices were not different between the N-TIRE-treated and control brains. This study identified N-TIRE pulse parameters that can be used to safely create circumscribed foci of brain necrosis while selectively preserving major vascular structures. PMID:23820168

  4. Pathology of non-thermal irreversible electroporation (N-TIRE)-induced ablation of the canine brain

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Paulo A.; Roberston, John L.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the neuropathologic features of normal canine brain ablated with non-thermal irreversible electroporation (N-TIRE). The parietal cerebral cortices of four dogs were treated with N-TIRE using a dose-escalation protocol with an additional dog receiving sham treatment. Animals were allowed to recover following N-TIRE ablation and the effects of treatment were monitored with clinical and magnetic resonance imaging examinations. Brains were subjected to histopathologic and ultrastructural assessment along with Bcl-2, caspase-3, and caspase-9 immunohistochemical staining following sacrifice 72 h post-treatment. Adverse clinical effects of N-TIRE were only observed in the dog treated at the upper energy tier. MRI and neuropathologic examinations indicated that N-TIRE ablation resulted in focal regions of severe cytoarchitectural and blood-brain-barrier disruption. Lesion size correlated to the intensity of the applied electrical field. N-TIRE-induced lesions were characterized by parenchymal necrosis and hemorrhage; however, large blood vessels were preserved. A transition zone containing parenchymal edema, perivascular inflammatory cuffs, and reactive gliosis was interspersed between the necrotic focus and normal neuropil. Apoptotic labeling indices were not different between the N-TIRE-treated and control brains. This study identified N-TIRE pulse parameters that can be used to safely create circumscribed foci of brain necrosis while selectively preserving major vascular structures. PMID:23820168

  5. Functional and ultrastructural cell pathology induced by fuel oil in cultured dolphin renal cells.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, C J; Sharova, L V; Gray, L

    2000-10-01

    Investigations were undertaken to elucidate in a marine mammal renal cell culture system the toxicity and some of the mechanisms of cytopathology in a standardized preparation following exposure to No. 1 fuel oil. Cell survivability of a cultured SP1K renal cell line from the Atlantic spotted dolphin Stenella plagiodon was reduced in a dose-dependent manner after a 12-h exposure to fuel oil. Early morphologic changes reflecting cytotoxicity, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy, included enlarged rough endoplasmic reticula, cytoplasmic vacuolization, and degenerative cytoplasmic inclusions, but mitochondria remained resistant. Assessment of extracellular proton loss by microphysiometry of cultured cells revealed fuel oil-induced enhancement of proton loss that was dependent upon both protein kinase C and renal epithelial Na(+)/H(+) counter-transport functioning, as the specific inhibitors H-7 and amiloride reduced this stimulatory petroleum effect. Cell cycle progression and apoptosis (programmed cell death) were studied in dolphin renal cells exposed to fuel oil for 12, 24, and 48 hours. The toxicant increased the percentage of cells in GO/GI phase and decreased the percentage of cells in S phase starting after 24 hours. The number of cells undergoing early apoptosis was also increased after 24 hours. PMID:11023700

  6. Enduring deficits in memory and neuronal pathology after blast-induced traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Sajja, Venkata Siva Sai Sujith; Hubbard, W. Brad; Hall, Christina S.; Ghoddoussi, Farhad; Galloway, Matthew P.; VandeVord, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Few preclinical studies have assessed the long-term neuropathology and behavioral deficits after sustaining blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT). Previous studies have shown extensive astrogliosis and cell death at acute stages (<7 days) but the temporal response at a chronic stage has yet to be ascertained. Here, we used behavioral assays, immmunohistochemistry and neurochemistry in limbic areas such as the amygdala (Amy), Hippocampus (Hipp), nucleus accumbens (Nac), and prefrontal cortex (PFC), to determine the long-term effects of a single blast exposure. Behavioral results identified elevated avoidance behavior and decreased short-term memory at either one or three months after a single blast event. At three months after BINT, markers for neurodegeneration (FJB) and microglia activation (Iba-1) increased while index of mature neurons (NeuN) significantly decreased in all brain regions examined. Gliosis (GFAP) increased in all regions except the Nac but only PFC was positive for apoptosis (caspase-3). At three months, tau was selectively elevated in the PFC and Hipp whereas α-synuclein transiently increased in the Hipp at one month after blast exposure. The composite neurochemical measure, myo-inositol+glycine/creatine, was consistently increased in each brain region three months following blast. Overall, a single blast event resulted in enduring long-term effects on behavior and neuropathological sequelae. PMID:26537106

  7. The effect of dry needling and treadmill running on inducing pathological changes in rat Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bom Soo; Joo, Young Chae; Choi, Byung Hyune; Kim, Kil Hwan; Kang, Joon Soon; Park, So Ra

    2015-11-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a common degenerative condition without a definitive treatment. An adequate chronic animal model of Achilles tendinopathy has not yet been developed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the individual and combined effects of dry needling and treadmill running on the Achilles tendon of rats. Percutaneous dry needling, designed to physically replicate microrupture of collagen fibers in overloaded tendons, was performed on the right Achilles tendon of 80 Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were randomly divided into two groups: a treadmill group, which included rats that underwent daily uphill treadmill running (n = 40), and a cage group, which included rats that could move freely within their cages (n = 40). At the end of weeks 1 and 4, 20 rats from each group were sacrificed, and bilateral Achilles tendons were collected. The harvested tendons were subjected to mechanical testing and histological analysis. Dry needling induced histological and mechanical changes in the Achilles tendons at week 1, and the changes persisted at week 4. The needled Achilles tendons of the treadmill group tended to show more severe histological and mechanical changes than those of the cage group, although these differences were not statistically significant. Dry needling combined with free cage activity or treadmill running produced tendinopathy-like changes in rat Achilles tendons up to 4 weeks after injury. Dry needling is an easy procedure with a short induction period and a high success rate, suggesting it may have relevance in the design of an Achilles tendinopathy model.

  8. Effects of a low-level semiconductor gallium arsenide laser on local pathological alterations induced by Bothrops moojeni snake venom.

    PubMed

    Aranha de Sousa, Elziliam; Bittencourt, José Adolfo Homobono Machado; Seabra de Oliveira, Nayana Keyla; Correia Henriques, Shayanne Vanessa; dos Santos Picanço, Leide Caroline; Lobato, Camila Pena; Ribeiro, José Renato; Pereira, Washington Luiz Assunção; Carvalho, José Carlos Tavares; da Silva, Jocivânia Oliveira

    2013-10-01

    Antivenom therapy has been ineffective in neutralizing the tissue damage caused by snakebites. Among therapeutic strategies to minimize effects after envenoming, it was hypothesized that a low level laser would reduce complications and reduce the severity of local snake venom effects. In the current study, the effect of a low-level semiconductor gallium arsenide (GaAs) laser on the local pathological alterations induced by B. moojeni snake venom was investigated. The experimental groups consisted of five male mice, each administered either B. moojeni venom (VB), B. moojeni venom + antivenom (VAV), B. moojeni venom + laser (VL), B. moojeni venom + antivenom + laser (VAVL), or sterile saline solution (SSS) alone. Paw oedema was induced by intradermal administration of 0.05 mg kg(-1) of B. moojeni venom and was expressed in mm of directly induced oedema. Mice received by subcutaneous route 0.20 mg kg(-1) of venom for evaluating nociceptive activity and the time (in seconds) spent in licking and biting the injected paw was taken as an indicator of pain response. Inflammatory infiltration was determined by counting the number of leukocytes present in the gastrocnemius muscle after venom injection (0.10 mg kg(-1)). For histological examination of myonecrosis, venom (0.10 mg kg(-1)) was administered intramuscularly. The site of venom injection was irradiated by the GaAs laser and some animals received antivenom intraperitoneally. The results indicated that GaAs laser irradiation can help in reducing some local effects produced by the B. moojeni venom in mice, stimulating phagocytosis, proliferation of myoblasts and the regeneration of muscle fibers.

  9. The effect of dry needling and treadmill running on inducing pathological changes in rat Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bom Soo; Joo, Young Chae; Choi, Byung Hyune; Kim, Kil Hwan; Kang, Joon Soon; Park, So Ra

    2015-11-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a common degenerative condition without a definitive treatment. An adequate chronic animal model of Achilles tendinopathy has not yet been developed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the individual and combined effects of dry needling and treadmill running on the Achilles tendon of rats. Percutaneous dry needling, designed to physically replicate microrupture of collagen fibers in overloaded tendons, was performed on the right Achilles tendon of 80 Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were randomly divided into two groups: a treadmill group, which included rats that underwent daily uphill treadmill running (n = 40), and a cage group, which included rats that could move freely within their cages (n = 40). At the end of weeks 1 and 4, 20 rats from each group were sacrificed, and bilateral Achilles tendons were collected. The harvested tendons were subjected to mechanical testing and histological analysis. Dry needling induced histological and mechanical changes in the Achilles tendons at week 1, and the changes persisted at week 4. The needled Achilles tendons of the treadmill group tended to show more severe histological and mechanical changes than those of the cage group, although these differences were not statistically significant. Dry needling combined with free cage activity or treadmill running produced tendinopathy-like changes in rat Achilles tendons up to 4 weeks after injury. Dry needling is an easy procedure with a short induction period and a high success rate, suggesting it may have relevance in the design of an Achilles tendinopathy model. PMID:26076317

  10. Selective Activation of the Prostaglandin E2 Circuit in Chronic Injury-Induced Pathologic Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liclican, Elvira L.; Nguyen, Van; Sullivan, Aaron B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a prevalent and established mediator of inflammation and pain in numerous tissues and diseases. Distribution and expression of the four PGE2 receptors (EP1-EP4) can dictate whether PGE2 exerts an anti-inflammatory or a proinflammatory and/or a proangiogenic effect. The role and mechanism of endogenous PGE2 in the cornea, and the regulation of EP expression during a dynamic and complex inflammatory/reparative response remain to be clearly defined. Methods. Chronic or acute self-resolving inflammation was induced in mice by corneal suture or epithelial abrasion, respectively. Reepithelialization was monitored by fluorescein staining and neovascularization quantified by CD31/PECAM-1 immunofluorescence. PGE2 formation was analyzed by lipidomics and polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) infiltration quantified by myeloperoxidase activity. Expression of EPs and inflammatory/angiogenic mediators was assessed by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Mice eyes were treated with PGE2 (100 ng topically, three times a day) for up to 7 days. Results. COX-2, EP-2, and EP-4 expression was upregulated with chronic inflammation that correlated with increased corneal PGE2 formation and marked neovascularization. In contrast, acute abrasion injury did not alter PGE2 or EP levels. PGE2 treatment amplified PMN infiltration and the angiogenic response to chronic inflammation but did not affect wound healing or PMN infiltration after epithelial abrasion. Exacerbated inflammatory neovascularization with PGE2 treatment was independent of the VEGF circuit but was associated with a significant induction of the eotaxin-CCR3 axis. Conclusions. These findings place the corneal PGE2 circuit as an endogenous mediator of inflammatory neovascularization rather than general inflammation and demonstrate that chronic inflammation selectively regulates this circuit at the level of biosynthetic enzyme and receptor expression. PMID:20610836

  11. Pathological Analysis of Cell Differentiation in Cholesterol Granulomas Experimentally Induced in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenzo; Nakano, Keisuke; Matsuda, Saeka; Tsujigiwa, Hidetsugu; Ochiai, Takanaga; Shoumura, Masahito; Osuga, Naoto; Hasegawa, Hiromasa; Kawakami, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    In this study, cholesterin was implanted in the subcutaneous tissue in mice to induce the formation of cholesterol granuloma. Histological examination was carried out to determine the type and source of cells. The tissue surrounding the embedded cholesterin was examined histologically within the period of 6 months. Cell differentiation in cholesterol granulomas was investigated using ddY mice and GFP bone marrow transplanted mice. Cholesterin was embedded in mice subcutaneously and histopathological examination was carried out in a period of 6 months. Results showed that at 2 weeks, cholesterin was replaced partly by granulation tissues. The majority of cells in the granulation tissues were macrophages and foreign body giant cells and the center consists of small amount of fibroblasts, collagen fibers and capillaries. At 3 months, more granulation tissue was observed compared to 2 weeks. Similar cells were observed, however, there were more fibroblasts, collagen bundles and capillaries present compared to 2 weeks. At 6 months, the cholesterin was mostly substituted by fibrous tissues consisting mainly of fibroblasts and collagen fibers with some macrophages and foreign body giant cells. Specifically, the outer part of the tissue consists of fibroblasts, collagen bundles and capillaries and the inner portion is filled with collagen bundles. Immunohistochemistry revealed that macrophages and foreign body giant cells were positive to GFP and CD68 although the fibroblasts and capillaries in the outer portion of cholesterol granulomas were GFP negative. Some spindle shape fibroblasts were also GFP positive. Immunofluorescent double staining revealed that cells lining the blood vessels were both positive to GFP and CD31 indicating that those were endothelial cells and were actually derived from the transplanted bone marrow cells. The results suggest that macrophages, foreign body giant cells as well as fibroblasts and capillary endothelial cells are bone marrow derived

  12. Pathological Analysis of Cell Differentiation in Cholesterol Granulomas Experimentally Induced in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Kenzo; Nakano, Keisuke; Matsuda, Saeka; Tsujigiwa, Hidetsugu; Ochiai, Takanaga; Shoumura, Masahito; Osuga, Naoto; Hasegawa, Hiromasa; Kawakami, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    In this study, cholesterin was implanted in the subcutaneous tissue in mice to induce the formation of cholesterol granuloma. Histological examination was carried out to determine the type and source of cells. The tissue surrounding the embedded cholesterin was examined histologically within the period of 6 months. Cell differentiation in cholesterol granulomas was investigated using ddY mice and GFP bone marrow transplanted mice. Cholesterin was embedded in mice subcutaneously and histopathological examination was carried out in a period of 6 months. Results showed that at 2 weeks, cholesterin was replaced partly by granulation tissues. The majority of cells in the granulation tissues were macrophages and foreign body giant cells and the center consists of small amount of fibroblasts, collagen fibers and capillaries. At 3 months, more granulation tissue was observed compared to 2 weeks. Similar cells were observed, however, there were more fibroblasts, collagen bundles and capillaries present compared to 2 weeks. At 6 months, the cholesterin was mostly substituted by fibrous tissues consisting mainly of fibroblasts and collagen fibers with some macrophages and foreign body giant cells. Specifically, the outer part of the tissue consists of fibroblasts, collagen bundles and capillaries and the inner portion is filled with collagen bundles. Immunohistochemistry revealed that macrophages and foreign body giant cells were positive to GFP and CD68 although the fibroblasts and capillaries in the outer portion of cholesterol granulomas were GFP negative. Some spindle shape fibroblasts were also GFP positive. Immunofluorescent double staining revealed that cells lining the blood vessels were both positive to GFP and CD31 indicating that those were endothelial cells and were actually derived from the transplanted bone marrow cells. The results suggest that macrophages, foreign body giant cells as well as fibroblasts and capillary endothelial cells are bone marrow derived

  13. A role for β2* nicotinic receptors in a model of local amyloid pathology induced in dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Sylvia; Catteau, Julie; Besson, Morgane; Maskos, Uwe

    2016-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the presence of plaques and tangles. Only certain brain regions are vulnerable to progressive neurodegeneration. It is therefore important to study the contribution of key brain structures to AD pathology. Here, we investigated the consequences of amyloid accumulation specifically in dentate gyrus (DG). This was obtained with viral transduction of human amyloid precursor protein harboring 3 pathogenic mutations (hAPP-SLA, Swedish, London, and Austrian) in DG. Adult wild-type C57Bl/6J mice exhibited long-term expression of hAPP-SLA, synthesis and deposition of oligomeric amyloid beta (Aβ), and associated memory impairment. We then investigated the role of α7 or β2 subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor by transducing hAPP-SLA into C57Bl/6J mice knock-out (KO) for α7 or β2 subunits. β2 KO mice did not exhibit memory loss induced by hAPP-SLA expression, whereas aged mice lacking the α7 subunit displayed a hAPP-SLA independent cognitive deficit. The present data reveal a role for β2 containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the memory deficits associated with DG specific amyloid beta expression.

  14. Bone Marrow-Derived Endothelial Progenitor Cells Protect Against Scopolamine-Induced Alzheimer-Like Pathological Aberrations.

    PubMed

    Safar, Marwa M; Arab, Hany H; Rizk, Sherine M; El-Maraghy, Shohda A

    2016-04-01

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Patients with AD have displayed decreased circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) which repair and maintain the endothelial function. Transplantation of EPCs has emerged as a promising approach for the management of cerebrovascular diseases including ischemic stroke, however, its impact on AD has been poorly described. Thus, the current study aimed at investigating the effects of bone marrow-derived (BM) EPCs transplantation in repeated scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment, an experimental model that replicates biomarkers of AD. Intravenously transplanted BM-EPCs migrated into the brain of rats and improved the learning and memory deficits. Meanwhile, they mitigated the deposition of amyloid plaques and associated histopathological alterations. At the molecular levels, BM-EPCs blunted the increase of hippocampal amyloid beta protein (Aβ), amyloid precursor protein (APP) and reinstated the Aβ-degrading neprilysin together with downregulation of p-tau and its upstream glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). They also corrected the perturbations of neurotransmitter levels including restoration of acetylcholine and associated esterase along with dopamine, GABA, and the neuroexitatory glutamate. Furthermore, BM-EPCs induced behavioral recovery via boosting of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its upstream cAMP response element binding (CREB), suppression of the proinflammatory tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and upregulation of interleukin-10 (IL-10). BM-EPCs also augmented Nrf2 and seladin-1. Generally, these actions were analogous to those exerted by adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) and the reference anti-Alzheimer donepezil. For the first time, these findings highlight the beneficial actions of BM-EPCs against the memory

  15. Alpinate Oxyphyllae Fructus Inhibits IGFII-Related Signaling Pathway to Attenuate Ang II-Induced Pathological Hypertrophy in H9c2 Cardiomyoblasts.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chuan-Te; Chang, Yung-Ming; Lin, Shu-Luan; Chen, Yueh-Sheng; Yeh, Yu-Lan; Padma, Viswanadha Vijaya; Tsai, Chin-Chuan; Chen, Ray-Jade; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2016-03-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a very important cardiovascular disease inducer and may cause cardiac pathological hypertrophy and remodeling. We evaluated a Chinese traditional medicine, alpinate oxyphyllae fructus (AOF), for therapeutic efficacy for treating Ang II-induced cardiac hypertrophy. AOF has been used to treat patients with various symptoms accompanying hypertension and cerebrovascular disorders in Korea. We investigated its protective effect against Ang II-induced cytoskeletal change and hypertrophy in H9c2 cells. The results showed that treating cells with Ang II resulted in pathological hypertrophy, such as increased expression of transcription factors NFAT-3/p-NFAT-3, hypertrophic response genes (atrial natriuretic peptide [ANP] and b-type natriuretic peptide [BNP]), and Gαq down-stream effectors (PLCβ3 and calcineurin). Pretreatment with AOF (60-100 μg/mL) led to significantly reduced hypertrophy. We also found that AOF pretreatment significantly suppressed the cardiac remodeling proteins, metalloproteinase (MMP9 and MMP2), and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), induced by Ang II challenge. In conclusion, we provide evidence that AOF protects against Ang II-induced pathological hypertrophy by specifically inhibiting the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) II/IIR-related signaling pathway in H9c2 cells. AOF might be a candidate for cardiac hypertrophy and ventricular remodeling prevention in chronic cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26987022

  16. Waddlia chondrophila induces systemic infection, organ pathology, and elicits Th1-associated humoral immunity in a murine model of genital infection

    PubMed Central

    Vasilevsky, Sam; Gyger, Joel; Piersigilli, Alessandra; Pilloux, Ludovic; Greub, Gilbert; Stojanov, Milos; Baud, David

    2015-01-01

    Waddlia chondrophila is a known bovine abortigenic Chlamydia-related bacterium that has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes in human. However, there is a lack of knowledge regarding how W. chondrophila infection spreads, its ability to elicit an immune response and induce pathology. A murine model of genital infection was developed to investigate the pathogenicity and immune response associated with a W. chondrophila infection. Genital inoculation of the bacterial agent resulted in a dose-dependent infection that spread to lumbar lymph nodes and successively to spleen and liver. Bacterial-induced pathology peaked on day 14, characterized by leukocyte infiltration (uterine horn, liver, and spleen), necrosis (liver) and extramedullary hematopoiesis (spleen). Immunohistochemistry demonstrated the presence of a large number of W. chondrophila in the spleen on day 14. Robust IgG titers were detected by day 14 and remained high until day 52. IgG isotypes consisted of high IgG2a, moderate IgG3 and no detectable IgG1, indicating a Th1-associated immune response. This study provides the first evidence that W. chondrophila genital infection is capable of inducing a systemic infection that spreads to major organs, induces uterus, spleen, and liver pathology and elicits a Th1-skewed humoral response. This new animal model will help our understanding of the mechanisms related to intracellular bacteria-induced miscarriages, the most frequent complication of pregnancy that affects one in four women. PMID:26583077

  17. Allosuppressor- and allohelper-T cells in acute and chronic graft-vs. -host (GVH) disease. III. Different Lyt subsets of donor T cells induce different pathological syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Rolink, A.G.; Gleichmann, E.

    1983-08-01

    Previous work from this laboratory has led to the hypothesis that the stimulatory pathological symptoms of chronic graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD) are caused by alloreactive donor T helper (TH) cells, whereas the suppressive pathological symptoms of acute GVHD are caused by alloreactive T suppressor (TS) cells of the donor. We analyzed the Lyt phenotypes of B10 donor T cells required for the induction of either acute or chronic GVHD in H-2-different (B10 X DBA/2)F1 recipients. When nonirradiated F1 mice were used as the recipients, we found unseparated B10 T cells induced only a moderate formation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-like autoantibodies, but a high percentage of lethal GVHD (LGVHD). In contrast, Lyt-1+2- donor T cells were unable to induce LGVHD in these recipients but were capable of inducing a vigorous formation of SLE-like autoantibodies and severe immune-complex glomerulonephritis. Lyt-1-2+ T cells were incapable of inducing either acute or chronic GVHD. The sensitivity and accuracy of the GVH system were increased by using irradiated F1 mice as recipients and then comparing donor-cell inocula that contained similar numbers of T lymphocytes. Donor-cell inocula were used that had been tested for their allohelper and allosuppressor effects on F1 B cells in vitro. In the irradiated F1 recipients unseparated donor T cells were superior to T cell subsets in inducing LGVHD. In contrast Lyt-1+2- T cells, but neither unseparated T cells nor Lyt-1-2+ T cells, were capable of inducing a vigorous formation of SLE-like auto-antibodies. We conclude that the stimulatory pathological symptoms of chronic GVHD are caused by Lyt-1+2- allohelper T cells. In contrast, the development of the suppressive pathological symptoms of acute GVHD appears to involve alloreactive Lyt-1+2+ T suppressor cells.

  18. Osler's pathology.

    PubMed

    Pai, S A

    2000-12-01

    Sir William Osler, one of the giants of clinical medicine, had his initial training as a pathologist. He was one of the physicians responsible for the impact that autopsies have had on medicine. He also contributed to the development of laboratory medicine. Osler made significant discoveries in anatomic pathology and hematology. His expertise was restricted not just to human pathology, but also to veterinary pathology. His mentors played a fundamental role in his achievements in academics.

  19. Deficiency of cardiac Acyl-CoA synthetase-1 induces diastolic dysfunction, but pathologic hypertrophy is reversed by rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Paul, David S; Grevengoed, Trisha J; Pascual, Florencia; Ellis, Jessica M; Willis, Monte S; Coleman, Rosalind A

    2014-06-01

    In mice with temporally-induced cardiac-specific deficiency of acyl-CoA synthetase-1 (Acsl1(H-/-)), the heart is unable to oxidize long-chain fatty acids and relies primarily on glucose for energy. These metabolic changes result in the development of both a spontaneous cardiac hypertrophy and increased phosphorylated S6 kinase (S6K), a substrate of the mechanistic target of rapamycin, mTOR. Doppler echocardiography revealed evidence of significant diastolic dysfunction, indicated by a reduced E/A ratio and increased mean performance index, although the deceleration time and the expression of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase and phospholamban showed no difference between genotypes. To determine the role of mTOR in the development of cardiac hypertrophy, we treated Acsl1(H-/-) mice with rapamycin. Six to eight week old Acsl1(H-/-) mice and their littermate controls were given i.p. tamoxifen to eliminate cardiac Acsl1, then concomitantly treated for 10weeks with i.p. rapamycin or vehicle alone. Rapamycin completely blocked the enhanced ventricular S6K phosphorylation and cardiac hypertrophy and attenuated the expression of hypertrophy-associated fetal genes, including α-skeletal actin and B-type natriuretic peptide. mTOR activation of the related Acsl3 gene, usually associated with pathologic hypertrophy, was also attenuated in the Acsl1(H-/-) hearts, indicating that alternative pathways of fatty acid activation did not compensate for the loss of Acsl1. Compared to controls, Acsl1(H-/-) hearts exhibited an 8-fold higher uptake of 2-deoxy[1-(14)C]glucose and a 35% lower uptake of the fatty acid analog 2-bromo[1-(14)C]palmitate. These data indicate that Acsl1-deficiency causes diastolic dysfunction and that mTOR activation is linked to the development of cardiac hypertrophy in Acsl1(H-/-) mice. PMID:24631848

  20. Virulence ranking of some Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis strains according to their ability to multiply in the lungs, induce lung pathology, and cause mortality in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, P L; North, R J

    1995-01-01

    Three virulent strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (H37Rv, Erdman, and NYH-27) and two virulent strains of M. bovis (Ravenel and Branch) were compared in terms of their growth rates in the livers and the lungs of mice, their ability to cause lung pathology, and the time taken for them to cause death. In immunocompetent mice, all strains caused an infection that progressed for 20 days or more and then underwent resolution in the liver but not in the lungs. In the lungs, infection persisted and induced progressive pathology. According to host survival time, Ravenel was the most virulent strain, followed, in decreasing order of virulence, by Branch, H37Rv, Erdman, and NYH-27. The much longer survival times of mice infected with M. tuberculosis strains allowed time for lung histopathology to change from a histiocytic alveolitis to a chronic fibroblastic fibrosis that eventually obliterated most of the lung architecture. By contrast, in mice infected with M. bovis strains, the alveolitis that developed during early infection was rapid and expansive enough to cause death before chronic lung pathology became evident. In mice depleted of CD4+ T cells, increased growth of all virulent strains induced necrotic exudative lung lesions that rapidly filled most of the alveolar sacs with inflammatory cells. These mice died much earlier than infected control mice did. Attenuated strains had longer population doubling times in vivo and failed to cause progressive disease or pathology in the lungs or livers of immunocompetent mice. PMID:7642273

  1. Pleiotropic effects of YC-1 selectively inhibit pathological retinal neovascularization and promote physiological revascularization in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy.

    PubMed

    DeNiro, M; Al-Halafi, A; Al-Mohanna, F H; Alsmadi, O; Al-Mohanna, F A

    2010-03-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) have been implicated in ischemia-induced retinal neovascularization. Retinal ischemia has been shown to induce VEGF and iNOS expression. It has been postulated that one of the crucial consequences of iNOS expression in the ischemic retina is the inhibition of angiogenesis. Furthermore, iNOS was shown to be overexpressed in Müller cells from patients with diabetic retinopathy. YC-1, a small molecule inhibitor of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 alpha, has been shown to inhibit iNOS expression in various tissue models. Our aim was to assess the pleiotropic effects of YC-1 in an oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) mouse model and evaluate its therapeutic potential in HIF-1- and iNOS-mediated retinal pathologies. Dual-injections of YC-1 into the neovascular retinas decreased the total retinopathy score, inhibited vaso-obliteration and pathologic tuft formation, and concomitantly promoted physiological retinal revascularization, compared with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-treated group. Furthermore, YC-1-treated retinas exhibited a marked increase in immunoreactivities for CD31 and von Willebrand factor and displayed significant inhibition in HIF-1alpha protein expression. Furthermore, YC-1 down-regulated VEGF, erythropoietin, endothelin-1, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and iNOS message and protein levels. When hypoxic Müller and neuoroglial cells were treated with YC-1, iNOS mRNA and protein levels were reduced in a dose-dependent fashion. We demonstrate that YC-1 inhibits pathological retinal neovascularization by exhibiting antineovascular activities, which impaired ischemia-induced expression of HIF-1 and its downstream angiogenic molecules. Furthermore, YC-1 enhanced physiological revascularization of the retinal vascular plexuses via the inhibition of iNOS mRNA and protein expressions. The pleiotropic effects of YC-1 allude to its possible use as a promising therapeutic iNOS inhibitor

  2. Cocaine Self-Administration Experience Induces Pathological Phasic Accumbens Dopamine Signals and Abnormal Incentive Behaviors in Drug-Abstinent Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuefei; Sugam, Jonathan A.; Carelli, Regina M.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic exposure to drugs of abuse is linked to long-lasting alterations in the function of limbic system structures, including the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Although cocaine acts via dopaminergic mechanisms within the NAc, less is known about whether phasic dopamine (DA) signaling in the NAc is altered in animals with cocaine self-administration experience or if these animals learn and interact normally with stimuli in their environment. Here, separate groups of rats self-administered either intravenous cocaine or water to a receptacle (controls), followed by 30 d of enforced abstinence. Next, all rats learned an appetitive Pavlovian discrimination and voltammetric recordings of real-time DA release were taken in either the NAc core or shell of cocaine and control subjects. Cocaine experience differentially impaired DA signaling in the core and shell relative to controls. Although phasic DA signals in the shell were essentially abolished for all stimuli, in the core, DA did not distinguish between cues and was abnormally biased toward reward delivery. Further, cocaine rats were unable to learn higher-order associations and even altered simple conditioned approach behaviors, displaying enhanced preoccupation with cue-associated stimuli (sign-tracking; ST) but diminished time at the food cup awaiting reward delivery (goal-tracking). Critically, whereas control DA signaling correlated with ST behaviors, cocaine experience abolished this relationship. These findings show that cocaine has persistent, differential, and pathological effects on both DA signaling and DA-dependent behaviors and suggest that psychostimulant experience may remodel the very circuits that bias organisms toward repeated relapse. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Relapsing to drug abuse despite periods of abstinence and sincere attempts to quit is one of the most pernicious facets of addiction. Unfortunately, little is known about how the dopamine (DA) system functions after periods of drug abstinence

  3. Sub-chronic inhalation of high concentrations of manganese sulfate induces lower airway pathology in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Dorman, David C; Struve, Melanie F; Gross, Elizabeth A; Wong, Brian A; Howroyd, Paul C

    2005-01-01

    Background Neurotoxicity and pulmonary dysfunction are well-recognized problems associated with prolonged human exposure to high concentrations of airborne manganese. Surprisingly, histological characterization of pulmonary responses induced by manganese remains incomplete. The primary objective of this study was to characterize histologic changes in the monkey respiratory tract following manganese inhalation. Methods Subchronic (6 hr/day, 5 days/week) inhalation exposure of young male rhesus monkeys to manganese sulfate was performed. One cohort of monkeys (n = 4–6 animals/exposure concentration) was exposed to air or manganese sulfate at 0.06, 0.3, or 1.5 mg Mn/m3 for 65 exposure days. Another eight monkeys were exposed to manganese sulfate at 1.5 mg Mn/m3 for 65 exposure days and held for 45 or 90 days before evaluation. A second cohort (n = 4 monkeys per time point) was exposed to manganese sulfate at 1.5 mg Mn/m3 and evaluated after 15 or 33 exposure days. Evaluations included measurement of lung manganese concentrations and evaluation of respiratory histologic changes. Tissue manganese concentrations were compared for the exposure and control groups by tests for homogeneity of variance, analysis of variance, followed by Dunnett's multiple comparison. Histopathological findings were evaluated using a Pearson's Chi-Square test. Results Animals exposed to manganese sulfate at ≥0.3 mg Mn/m3 for 65 days had increased lung manganese concentrations. Exposure to manganese sulfate at 1.5 mg Mn/m3 for ≥15 exposure days resulted in increased lung manganese concentrations, mild subacute bronchiolitis, alveolar duct inflammation, and proliferation of bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue. Bronchiolitis and alveolar duct inflammatory changes were absent 45 days post-exposure, suggesting that these lesions are reversible upon cessation of subchronic high-dose manganese exposure. Conclusion High-dose subchronic manganese sulfate inhalation is associated with increased

  4. Oral pathology.

    PubMed

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2008-05-01

    Oral disease is exceedingly common in small animal patients. In addition, there is a very wide variety of pathologies that are encountered within the oral cavity. These conditions often cause significant pain and/or localized and systemic infection; however, the majority of these conditions have little to no obvious clinical signs. Therefore, diagnosis is not typically made until late in the disease course. Knowledge of these diseases will better equip the practitioner to effectively treat them. This article covers the more common forms of oral pathology in the dog and cat, excluding periodontal disease, which is covered in its own chapter. The various pathologies are presented in graphic form, and the etiology, clinical signs, recommended diagnostic tests, and treatment options are discussed. Pathologies that are covered include: persistent deciduous teeth, fractured teeth, intrinsically stained teeth, feline tooth resorption, caries, oral neoplasia, eosinophilic granuloma complex, lymphoplasmacytic gingivostomatitis, enamel hypoplasia, and "missing" teeth.

  5. Intraneuronal aggregation of the β-CTF fragment of APP (C99) induces Aβ-independent lysosomal-autophagic pathology.

    PubMed

    Lauritzen, Inger; Pardossi-Piquard, Raphaëlle; Bourgeois, Alexandre; Pagnotta, Sophie; Biferi, Maria-Grazia; Barkats, Martine; Lacor, Pascale; Klein, William; Bauer, Charlotte; Checler, Frederic

    2016-08-01

    Endosomal-autophagic-lysosomal (EAL) dysfunction is an early and prominent neuropathological feature of Alzheimers's disease, yet the exact molecular mechanisms contributing to this pathology remain undefined. By combined biochemical, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural approaches, we demonstrate a link between EAL pathology and the intraneuronal accumulation of the β-secretase-derived βAPP fragment (C99) in two in vivo models, 3xTgAD mice and adeno-associated viral-mediated C99-infected mice. We present a pathological loop in which the accumulation of C99 is both the effect and causality of impaired lysosomal-autophagic function. The deleterious effect of C99 was found to be linked to its aggregation within EAL-vesicle membranes leading to disrupted lysosomal proteolysis and autophagic impairment. This effect was Aβ independent and was even exacerbated when γ-secretase was pharmacologically inhibited. No effect was observed in inhibitor-treated wild-type animals suggesting that lysosomal dysfunction was indeed directly linked to C99 accumulation. In some brain areas, strong C99 expression also led to inflammatory responses and synaptic dysfunction. Taken together, this work demonstrates a toxic effect of C99 which could underlie some of the early-stage anatomical hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease pathology. Our work also proposes molecular mechanisms likely explaining some of the unfavorable side-effects associated with γ-secretase inhibitor-directed therapies. PMID:27138984

  6. Protocol consisting of cisplatin, etoposide and irinotecan induced complete pathological remission of primary small cell carcinoma of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Takashi; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Shingo; Kamoto, Toshiyuki; Ogawa, Osamu

    2006-09-01

    A 73-year-old man with primary small-cell carcinoma of the bladder was treated by radical cystectomy with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Pathological complete remission was achieved by combination chemotherapy composed of cisplatin, etoposide and irinotecan. The patient is free of disease 19 months after surgery.

  7. Mechanisms for virus-induced liver disease: tumor necrosis factor-mediated pathology independent of natural killer and T cells during murine cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Orange, J S; Salazar-Mather, T P; Opal, S M; Biron, C A

    1997-01-01

    The contribution of endogenous NK cells and cytokines to virus-induced liver pathology was evaluated during murine cytomegalovirus infections of mice. In immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice, the virus induced a self-limited liver disease characterized by hepatitis, with focal inflammation, and large grossly visible subcapsular necrotic foci. The inflammatory foci were most numerous and contained the greatest number of cells 3 days after infection; they colocalized with areas of viral antigen expression. The largest number of necrotic foci was found 2 days after infection. Overall hepatic damage, assessed as increased expression of liver enzymes in serum, accompanied the development of inflammatory and necrotic foci. Experiments with neutralizing antibodies demonstrated that although virus-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) can have antiviral effects, it also mediated significant liver pathology. TNF was required for development of hepatic necrotic foci and increased levels of liver enzymes in serum but not for increased numbers of inflammatory foci. The necrotic foci and liver enzyme indications of pathology occurred independently of NK and T cells, because mice rendered NK-cell deficient by treatment with antibodies, T- and B-cell-deficient Rag-/- mice, and NK- and T-cell-deficient E26 mice all manifested both parameters of disease. Development of necrotic foci and maximally increased levels of liver enzymes in serum also were TNF dependent in NK-cell-deficient mice. Moreover, in the immunodeficient E26 mice, virus-induced liver disease was progressive, with eventual death of the host, and neutralization of TNF significantly increased longevity. These results establish conditions separating hepatitis from significant liver damage and demonstrate a cytokine-mediated component to viral pathogenesis. PMID:9371583

  8. Determinants of pathologic mineralization.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Thorsten

    2008-01-01

    Physiologic mineralization is necessary for the formation of skeletal tissues and for their appropriate functions during adulthood. Mineralization has to be controlled and restricted to specific regions. If the mineralization process occurs in regions that normally do not mineralize, there can be severe consequences (pathologic or ectopic mineralization). Recent findings have indicated that physiologic and pathologic mineralization events are initiated by matrix vesicles, membrane-enclosed particles released from the plasma membranes of mineralization-competent cells. The understanding of how these vesicles are released from the plasma membrane and initiate the mineralization process may provide novel therapeutic strategies to prevent pathologic mineralization. In addition, other regulators (activators and inhibitors) of physiologic mineralization have been identified and characterized, and there is evidence that the same factors also contribute to the regulation of pathologic mineralization. Finally, programmed cell death (apoptosis) may be a contributor to physiologic mineralization and if occurring after tissue injury may induce pathologic mineralization and mineralization-related differentiation events in the injured and surrounding areas. This review describes how the understanding of mechanisms and factors regulating physiologic mineralization can be used to develop new therapeutic strategies to prevent pathologic or ectopic mineralization events.

  9. Prolonged diet induced obesity has minimal effects towards brain pathology in mouse model of cerebral amyloid angiopathy: implications for studying obesity-brain interactions in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Le; Dasuri, Kalavathi; Fernandez-Kim, Sun-Ok; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J; Freeman, Linnea R; Pepping, Jennifer K; Beckett, Tina L; Murphy, M Paul; Keller, Jeffrey N

    2013-09-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) occurs in nearly every individual with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Down's syndrome, and is the second largest cause of intracerebral hemorrhage. Mouse models of CAA have demonstrated evidence for increased gliosis contributing to CAA pathology. Nearly two thirds of Americans are overweight or obese, with little known about the effects of obesity on the brain, although increasingly the vasculature appears to be a principle target of obesity effects on the brain. In the current study we describe for the first time whether diet induced obesity (DIO) modulates glial reactivity, amyloid levels, and inflammatory signaling in a mouse model of CAA. In these studies we identify surprisingly that DIO does not significantly increase Aβ levels, astrocyte (GFAP) or microglial (IBA-1) gliosis in the CAA mice. However, within the hippocampal gyri a localized increase in reactive microglia were increased in the CA1 and stratum oriens relative to CAA mice on a control diet. DIO was observed to selectively increase IL-6 in CAA mice, with IL-1β and TNF-α not increased in CAA mice in response to DIO. Taken together, these data show that prolonged DIO has only modest effects towards Aβ in a mouse model of CAA, but appears to elevate some localized microglial reactivity within the hippocampal gyri and selective markers of inflammatory signaling. These data are consistent with the majority of the existing literature in other models of Aβ pathology, which surprisingly show a mixed profile of DIO effects towards pathological processes in mouse models of neurodegenerative disease. The importance for considering the potential impact of ceiling effects in pathology within mouse models of Aβ pathogenesis, and the current experimental limitations for DIO in mice to fully replicate metabolic dysfunction present in human obesity, are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Animal Models of Disease.

  10. [Clinical pathology].

    PubMed

    Dimitrijević, Jovan

    2006-05-01

    This work describes the basic elements of pathology used in clinical practice. Pathology plays an important role in clinical and scientific work, but only a few areas of pathology will be covered. Although the contribution of oncological and surgical pathology to therapy is the most well known, the cases chosen here will involve infectious pathology, diseases of the kidney and the liver, autoimmune diseases, as well as organ transplantation. Especially important is the description of methods that enable more accurate morphological diagnoses, such as histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and electronic microscopy. Previous experience and joint work with clinical doctors have enabled the definition of significant morphological elements as well as of essential methods of pathohistological diagnosis. Besides, as is often the case, although disease symptoms are difficult to discern and biochemical results do not show significant changes compared to normal values, the results of biopsy come as a surprise to clinical doctors. For example, in virus hepatitis B involving so-called asymptomatic HBsAg carriers, we discovered every morphological form of hepatitis, from minimal lesions to chronic, persistent, and active hepatitis. With hepatitis C, certain morphological lesions point to the etiopathogenesis of this disease and thus help to confirm the diagnosis and to instigate therapy on time. Another significant experience involves kidney biopsies in cases when clinical findings are asymptomatic. Often, in such cases, morphological findings point to glomerulonephritis and glomerulopathy at different stages. Timely and subtle morphological diagnostics offer a more precise explanation for the pathological injury of tissues than other diagnostic methods. In this way, by adopting new methods, the work of pathologists is included more and more in everyday clinical practice. The inclusion of pathologists in a transplantation team makes sure a proper selection of

  11. Myelin injury induces axonal transport impairment but not AD-like pathology in the hippocampus of cuprizone-fed mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Junjun; Zhou, Hong; Bai, Feng; Ren, Qingguo; Zhang, Zhijun

    2016-01-01

    Both multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are progressive neurological disorders with myelin injury and memory impairment. However, whether myelin impairment could cause AD-like neurological pathology remains unclear. To explore neurological pathology following myelin injury, we assessed cognitive function, the expression of myelin proteins, axonal transport-associated proteins, axonal structural proteins, synapse-associated proteins, tau and beta amyloid and the status of neurons, using the cuprizone mouse model of demyelination. We found the mild impairment of learning ability in cuprizone-fed mice and the decreased expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) in the hippocampus. And anti-LINGO-1 improved learning ability and partly restored MBP level. Furthermore, we also found kinesin light chain (KLC), neurofilament light chain (NFL) and neurofilament heavy chain (NF200) were declined in demyelinated hippocampus, which could be partly improved by treatment with anti-LINGO-1. However, we did not observe the increased expression of beta amyloid, hyperphosphorylation of tau and loss of neurons in demyelinated hippocampus. Our results suggest that demyelination might lead to the impairment of neuronal transport, but not cause increased level of hyperphosphorylated tau and beta amyloid. Our research demonstrates remyelination might be an effective pathway to recover the function of neuronal axons and cognition in MS. PMID:27129150

  12. Myelin injury induces axonal transport impairment but not AD-like pathology in the hippocampus of cuprizone-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Junjun; Zhou, Hong; Bai, Feng; Ren, Qingguo; Zhang, Zhijun

    2016-05-24

    Both multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are progressive neurological disorders with myelin injury and memory impairment. However, whether myelin impairment could cause AD-like neurological pathology remains unclear. To explore neurological pathology following myelin injury, we assessed cognitive function, the expression of myelin proteins, axonal transport-associated proteins, axonal structural proteins, synapse-associated proteins, tau and beta amyloid and the status of neurons, using the cuprizone mouse model of demyelination. We found the mild impairment of learning ability in cuprizone-fed mice and the decreased expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) in the hippocampus. And anti-LINGO-1 improved learning ability and partly restored MBP level. Furthermore, we also found kinesin light chain (KLC), neurofilament light chain (NFL) and neurofilament heavy chain (NF200) were declined in demyelinated hippocampus, which could be partly improved by treatment with anti-LINGO-1. However, we did not observe the increased expression of beta amyloid, hyperphosphorylation of tau and loss of neurons in demyelinated hippocampus. Our results suggest that demyelination might lead to the impairment of neuronal transport, but not cause increased level of hyperphosphorylated tau and beta amyloid. Our research demonstrates remyelination might be an effective pathway to recover the function of neuronal axons and cognition in MS. PMID:27129150

  13. Triosephosphate Isomerase I170V Alters Catalytic Site, Enhances Stability and Induces Pathology in a Drosophila Model of TPI Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Bartholomew P.; Amrich, Christopher G.; Kammerer, Charles J.; Stuchul, Kimberly A.; Larsen, Samantha B.; Rode, Sascha; Aslam, Anoshé A.; Heroux, Annie; Wetzel, Ronald; VanDemark, Andrew P.; Palladino, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) is a glycolytic enzyme which homodimerizes for full catalytic activity. Mutations of the TPI gene elicit a disease known as TPI Deficiency, a glycolytic enzymopathy noted for its unique severity of neurological symptoms. Evidence suggests that TPI Deficiency pathogenesis may be due to conformational changes of the protein, likely affecting dimerization and protein stability. In this report, we genetically and physically characterize a human disease-associated TPI mutation caused by an I170V substitution. Human TPII170V elicits behavioral abnormalities in Drosophila. An examination of hTPII170V enzyme kinetics revealed this substitution reduced catalytic turnover, while assessments of thermal stability demonstrated an increase in enzyme stability. The crystal structure of the homodimeric I170V mutant reveals changes in the geometry of critical residues within the catalytic pocket. Collectively these data reveal new observations of the structural and kinetic determinants of TPI deficiency pathology, providing new insights into disease pathogenesis. PMID:25463631

  14. Increased protein kinase C gamma activity induces Purkinje cell pathology in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia 14.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jingmin; Hassler, Melanie L; Shimobayashi, Etsuko; Paka, Nagendher; Streit, Raphael; Kapfhammer, Josef P

    2014-10-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are hereditary diseases leading to Purkinje cell degeneration and cerebellar dysfunction. Most forms of SCA are caused by expansion of CAG repeats similar to other polyglutamine disorders such as Huntington's disease. In contrast, in the autosomal dominant SCA-14 the disease is caused by mutations in the protein kinase C gamma (PKCγ) gene which is a well characterized signaling molecule in cerebellar Purkinje cells. The study of SCA-14, therefore, offers the unique opportunity to reveal the molecular and pathological mechanism eventually leading to Purkinje cell dysfunction and degeneration. We have created a mouse model of SCA-14 in which PKCγ protein with a mutation found in SCA-14 is specifically expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells. We find that in mice expressing the mutated PKCγ protein the morphology of Purkinje cells in cerebellar slice cultures is drastically altered and mimics closely the morphology seen after pharmacological PKC activation. Similar morphological abnormalities were seen in localized areas of the cerebellum of juvenile transgenic mice in vivo. In adult transgenic mice there is evidence for some localized loss of Purkinje cells but there is no overall cerebellar atrophy. Transgenic mice show a mild cerebellar ataxia revealed by testing on the rotarod and on the walking beam. Our findings provide evidence for both an increased PKCγ activity in Purkinje cells in vivo and for pathological changes typical for cerebellar disease thus linking the increased and dysregulated activity of PKCγ tightly to the development of cerebellar disease in SCA-14 and possibly also in other forms of SCA.

  15. Triosephosphate isomerase I170V alters catalytic site, enhances stability and induces pathology in a Drosophila model of TPI deficiency

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Roland, Bartholomew P.; Amrich, Christopher G.; Kammerer, Charles J.; Stuchul, Kimberly A.; Larsen, Samantha B.; Rode, Sascha; Aslam, Anoshe A.; Heroux, Annie; Wetzel, Ronald; VanDemark, Andrew P.; et al

    2014-10-16

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) is a glycolytic enzyme which homodimerizes for full catalytic activity. Mutations of the TPI gene elicit a disease known as TPI Deficiency, a glycolytic enzymopathy noted for its unique severity of neurological symptoms. Evidence suggests that TPI Deficiency pathogenesis may be due to conformational changes of the protein, likely affecting dimerization and protein stability. In this report, we genetically and physically characterize a human disease-associated TPI mutation caused by an I170V substitution. Human TPII170V elicits behavioral abnormalities in Drosophila. An examination of hTPII170V enzyme kinetics revealed this substitution reduced catalytic turnover, while assessments of thermal stability demonstratedmore » an increase in enzyme stability. Furthermore, the crystal structure of the homodimeric I170V mutant reveals changes in the geometry of critical residues within the catalytic pocket. In the end, collectively these data reveal new observations of the structural and kinetic determinants of TPI deficiency pathology, providing new insights into disease pathogenesis.« less

  16. Lack of graft-versus-host-like pathology in mercury-induced autoimmunity of Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Bigazzi, P E; Kosuda, L L; Hannigan, M O; Whalen, B; Greiner, D L

    2003-11-01

    The repeated administration of mercury to Brown Norway (BN) rats induces the production of autoantibodies to laminin 1 and other autoantigens, accompanied by renal deposition of immunoglobulins and a membranous glomerulonephropathy. A graft-versus-host-like (GVHL) syndrome, characterized by widespread necrotizing leukocytoclastic vasculitis of the bowel, skin, and other tissues, has also been observed after mercury treatment of BN rats. These findings have suggested that the autoimmunity caused by the administration of mercury to BN rats may result as a xenobiotic-induced GVHL effect under the control of OX22+ T lymphocytes. However, previous studies of mercury-induced autoimmunity have never reported any evidence of GVHL lesions. Therefore, we have carefully examined various tissues from a large group of BN rats injected with HgCl(2) to identify possible areas of inflammatory reactions that may have been unnoticed in previous investigations. In addition, we have determined by flow cytometry whether exposure to mercury results in percentage and numerical alterations of OX22+ or other lymphocyte subpopulations in lymphoid organs of HgCl(2)-treated BN rats. The present article confirms that mercury induces autoimmune responses to laminin 1 but does not corroborate the hypothesis of a GVHL syndrome regulated by OX22+ lymphocytes. First, changes in OX22+ cells during treatment with HgCl(2) were infrequent and had no significant correlation with the kinetics of autoimmune responses to laminin 1. Second, we detected no GVHL lesions in skin and intestine of mercury-treated BN rats.

  17. A crucial role for macrophages in the pathology of K/B x N serum-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Samuel; Rajasekaran, Narendiran; Jeisy-Walder, Elvira; Snapper, Scott B; Illges, Harald

    2005-10-01

    Autoantibodies in the form of immune complexes are known to be crucial mediators in initiating inflammation in a variety of autoimmune diseases. This has been well documented in the anti-collagen II antibody-induced arthritis animal model for a long time now. Recently, in the K/B x N mouse model (the F1 of the TCR-transgenic KRN and the diabetic NOD mice), anti-glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) autoantibodies have been shown to induce arthritis. Experimental work in the K/B x N model demonstrated key roles of autoantigenic immune complexes activating the alternative pathway of complement, the subsequent association with C5aR and Fc gammaRIII-mediated cell activation and production of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1 and TNF-alpha, finally leading to joint destruction. The presence of high amounts of inflammatory cytokines and matrix-degrading proteases at sites of inflammation obviously put the cytokine-producing macrophages as the next target for investigation in this model. Here, we show that mice depleted of macrophages by clodronate liposome treatment are completely resistant to K/B x N serum-induced arthritis. Reconstituting clodronate liposome-treated mice with macrophages from naive animals could reverse this resistance. Also, we found that deficiencies in the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein and CD40, which are both implicated in macrophage activation, chemotaxis and phagocytosis, are not essential in serum-induced arthritis. Mast cell degranulation was seen in arthritogenic serum-treated mice even in the absence of macrophages, possibly suggesting that mast cell degranulation/activation acts hierarchically before macrophages in the inflammatory cascade of anti-GPI antibody-induced arthritis.

  18. ApoE4 induces Aβ42, tau, and neuronal pathology in the hippocampus of young targeted replacement apoE4 mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent findings suggest that the pathological effects of apoE4, the most prevalent genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), start many years before the onset of the disease and are already detectable at a young age. In the present study we investigated the extent to which such pathological and cognitive impairments also occur in young apoE4 mice. Results This study revealed that the levels of the presynaptic glutamatergic vesicular transporter, VGlut, in the CA3, CA1, and DG hippocampal subfields were lower in hippocampal neurons of young (4-month-old) apoE4-targeted replacement mice than in those of the apoE3 mice. In contrast, the corresponding inhibitory GABAergic nerve terminals and perikarya were not affected by apoE4. This synaptic effect was associated with hyperphosphorylation of tau in these neurons. In addition, apoE4 increased the accumulation of neuronal Aβ42 and induced mitochondrial changes, both of which were specifically pronounced in CA3 neurons. Spatial navigation behavioral studies revealed that these hippocampal pathological effects of apoE4 are associated with corresponding behavioral impairments. Time-course studies revealed that the effects of apoE4 on tau hyperphosphorylation and the mitochondria were already apparent at the age of 1 month and that the apoE4-driven accumulation of neuronal Aβ and reduced VGlut levels evolve later and are apparent at the age of 2–4 months. Furthermore, the levels of tau phosphorylation decrease in apoE3 mice and increase in apoE4 mice between 1 and 4 months, whereas the levels of Aβ42 decrease in apoE3 mice and are not affected in apoE4 mice over the same time period. Conclusions These findings show that apoE4 stimulates the accumulation of Aβ42 and hyperphosphorylated tau and reduces the levels of VGlut in hippocampal neurons of young apoE4-targeted replacement mice and that these neurochemical effects are associated with cognitive impairments. This model is not associated with

  19. Ameliorative Effects of Antioxidants on the Hippocampal Accumulation of Pathologic Tau in a Rat Model of Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaoping; West, Matthew B.; Cheng, Weihua; Ewert, Donald L.; Li, Wei; Saunders, Debra; Towner, Rheal A.; Floyd, Robert A.; Kopke, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can lead to early onset dementia and other related neurodegenerative diseases. We previously demonstrated that damage to the central auditory pathway resulting from blast-induced TBI (bTBI) could be significantly attenuated by a combinatorial antioxidant treatment regimen. In the current study, we examined the localization patterns of normal Tau and the potential blast-induced accumulation of neurotoxic variants of this microtubule-associated protein that are believed to potentiate the neurodegenerative effects associated with synaptic dysfunction in the hippocampus following three successive blast overpressure exposures in nontransgenic rats. We observed a marked increase in the number of both hyperphosphorylated and oligomeric Tau-positive hilar mossy cells and somatic accumulation of endogenous Tau in oligodendrocytes in the hippocampus. Remarkably, a combinatorial regimen of 2,4-disulfonyl α-phenyl tertiary butyl nitrone (HPN-07) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) resulted in striking reductions in the numbers of both mossy cells and oligodendrocytes positively labeled for these pathological Tau immunoreactivity patterns in response to bTBI. This treatment strategy represents a promising therapeutic approach for simultaneously reducing or eliminating both primary auditory injury and nonauditory changes associated with bTBI-induced hippocampal neurodegeneration. PMID:27034735

  20. Extraintestinal Helminth Infection Limits Pathology and Proinflammatory Cytokine Expression during DSS-Induced Ulcerative Colitis: A Role for Alternatively Activated Macrophages and Prostaglandins.

    PubMed

    Ledesma-Soto, Yadira; Callejas, Blanca E; Terrazas, César A; Reyes, Jose L; Espinoza-Jiménez, Arlett; González, Marisol I; León-Cabrera, Sonia; Morales, Rosario; Olguín, Jonadab E; Saavedra, Rafael; Oghumu, Steve; Satoskar, Abhay R; Terrazas, Luis I

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation of the intestinal mucosa is characteristic of inflammatory bowel diseases such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Helminth parasites have developed immunomodulatory strategies that may impact the outcome of several inflammatory diseases. Therefore, we investigated whether Taenia crassiceps infection is able to decrease the inflammatory effects of dextran sulfate sodium- (DSS-) induced ulcerative colitis in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. Preinfection significantly reduced the manifestations of DSS-induced colitis, as weight loss and shortened colon length, and decreased the disease activity index independently of the genetic background of the mice. Taenia infection decreased systemic levels of proinflammatory cytokines while increasing levels of IL-4 and IL-10, and the inflammatory infiltrate into the colon was also markedly reduced. RT-PCR assays from colon showed that T. crassiceps-infected mice displayed increased expression of Arginase-1 but decreased expression of iNOS compared to DSS-treated uninfected mice. The percentages of T regulatory cells were not increased. The adoptive transfer of alternatively activated macrophages (AAMФs) from infected mice into mice with DSS-induced colitis reduced the severity of colon inflammation. Administration of indomethacin abrogated the anticolitic effect of Taenia. Thus, T. crassiceps infection limits the pathology of ulcerative colitis by suppressing inflammatory responses mechanistically associated with AAMФs and prostaglandins.

  1. Extraintestinal Helminth Infection Limits Pathology and Proinflammatory Cytokine Expression during DSS-Induced Ulcerative Colitis: A Role for Alternatively Activated Macrophages and Prostaglandins

    PubMed Central

    Ledesma-Soto, Yadira; Callejas, Blanca E.; Terrazas, César A.; Reyes, Jose L.; Espinoza-Jiménez, Arlett; González, Marisol I.; León-Cabrera, Sonia; Morales, Rosario; Olguín, Jonadab E.; Saavedra, Rafael; Oghumu, Steve; Satoskar, Abhay R.; Terrazas, Luis I.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation of the intestinal mucosa is characteristic of inflammatory bowel diseases such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Helminth parasites have developed immunomodulatory strategies that may impact the outcome of several inflammatory diseases. Therefore, we investigated whether Taenia crassiceps infection is able to decrease the inflammatory effects of dextran sulfate sodium- (DSS-) induced ulcerative colitis in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. Preinfection significantly reduced the manifestations of DSS-induced colitis, as weight loss and shortened colon length, and decreased the disease activity index independently of the genetic background of the mice. Taenia infection decreased systemic levels of proinflammatory cytokines while increasing levels of IL-4 and IL-10, and the inflammatory infiltrate into the colon was also markedly reduced. RT-PCR assays from colon showed that T. crassiceps-infected mice displayed increased expression of Arginase-1 but decreased expression of iNOS compared to DSS-treated uninfected mice. The percentages of T regulatory cells were not increased. The adoptive transfer of alternatively activated macrophages (AAMФs) from infected mice into mice with DSS-induced colitis reduced the severity of colon inflammation. Administration of indomethacin abrogated the anticolitic effect of Taenia. Thus, T. crassiceps infection limits the pathology of ulcerative colitis by suppressing inflammatory responses mechanistically associated with AAMФs and prostaglandins. PMID:26090422

  2. Administration of NaHS Attenuates Footshock-Induced Pathologies and Emotional and Cognitive Dysfunction in Triple Transgenic Alzheimer’s Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hei-Jen; Chen, Shu-Ling; Hsieh-Li, Hsiu Mei

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by progressive cognitive decline and neuropsychiatric symptoms. Increasing evidence indicates that environmental risk factors in young adults may accelerate cognitive loss in AD and that Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) may represent an innovative treatment to slow the progression of AD. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of NaHS, an H2S donor, in a triple transgenic AD mouse model (3×Tg-AD) under footshock with situational reminders (SRs). Inescapable footshock with SRs induced anxiety and cognitive dysfunction as well as a decrease in the levels of plasma H2S and GSH and an increase in IL-6 levels in 3×Tg-AD mice. Under footshock with SR stimulus, amyloid deposition, tau protein hyperphosphorylation, and microgliosis were highly increased in the stress-responsive brain structures, including the hippocampus and amygdala, of the AD mice. Oxidative stress, inflammatory response, and β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) levels were also increased, and the level of inactivated glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) (pSer9) was decreased in the hippocampi of AD mice subjected to footshock with SRs. Furthermore, the numbers of cholinergic neurons in the medial septum/diagonal band of Broca (MS/DB) and noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC) were also decreased in the 3×Tg-AD mice under footshock with SRs. These biochemical hallmarks and pathological presentations were all alleviated by the semi-acute administration of NaHS in the AD mice. Together, these findings suggest that footshock with SRs induces the impairment of spatial cognition and emotion, which involve pathological changes in the peripheral and central systems, including the hippocampus, MS/DB, LC, and BLA, and that the administration of NaHS may be a candidate strategy to ameliorate the progression of neurodegeneration. PMID:26635562

  3. An evaluation of the clinical pathologic findings in experimentally induced urinary bladder rupture in pre-ruminant calves.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, D G; MacWilliams, P S

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to study the biochemical abnormalities that develop over time in preruminant calves with experimentally induced uroperitoneum. Uroperitoneum was produced by incising the bladder via a standing left flank laparotomy. Serum and peritoneal concentrations sodium, chloride, potassium, phosphate and creatinine were determined at 0, 2, 4, 8, 24, and 40 h. Serum creatinine concentration was increased by 8 h post-bladder rupture. Peritoneal concentrations of potassium and phosphate were significantly elevated 2 h after bladder rupture and peritoneal creatinine was significantly elevated by 4 h. Serum to peritoneal fluid ratios for potassium, phosphate and creatinine exceeded 2:1 within 2 h of bladder rupture. Pre-ruminant calves with experimentally induced uroperitoneum did not become hyperkalemic during the 40 h experiment. PMID:9553714

  4. Heat-stress and light-stress induce different cellular pathologies in the symbiotic dinoflagellate during coral bleaching.

    PubMed

    Downs, C A; McDougall, Kathleen E; Woodley, Cheryl M; Fauth, John E; Richmond, Robert H; Kushmaro, Ariel; Gibb, Stuart W; Loya, Yossi; Ostrander, Gary K; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti

    2013-01-01

    Coral bleaching is a significant contributor to the worldwide degradation of coral reefs and is indicative of the termination of symbiosis between the coral host and its symbiotic algae (dinoflagellate; Symbiodinium sp. complex), usually by expulsion or xenophagy (symbiophagy) of its dinoflagellates. Herein, we provide evidence that during the earliest stages of environmentally induced bleaching, heat stress and light stress generate distinctly different pathomorphological changes in the chloroplasts, while a combined heat- and light-stress exposure induces both pathomorphologies; suggesting that these stressors act on the dinoflagellate by different mechanisms. Within the first 48 hours of a heat stress (32°C) under low-light conditions, heat stress induced decomposition of thylakoid structures before observation of extensive oxidative damage; thus it is the disorganization of the thylakoids that creates the conditions allowing photo-oxidative-stress. Conversely, during the first 48 hours of a light stress (2007 µmoles m(-2) s(-1) PAR) at 25°C, condensation or fusion of multiple thylakoid lamellae occurred coincidently with levels of oxidative damage products, implying that photo-oxidative stress causes the structural membrane damage within the chloroplasts. Exposure to combined heat- and light-stresses induced both pathomorphologies, confirming that these stressors acted on the dinoflagellate via different mechanisms. Within 72 hours of exposure to heat and/or light stresses, homeostatic processes (e.g., heat-shock protein and anti-oxidant enzyme response) were evident in the remaining intact dinoflagellates, regardless of the initiating stressor. Understanding the sequence of events during bleaching when triggered by different environmental stressors is important for predicting both severity and consequences of coral bleaching.

  5. Heat-Stress and Light-Stress Induce Different Cellular Pathologies in the Symbiotic Dinoflagellate during Coral Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Downs, C. A.; McDougall, Kathleen E.; Woodley, Cheryl M.; Fauth, John E.; Richmond, Robert H.; Kushmaro, Ariel; Gibb, Stuart W.; Loya, Yossi; Ostrander, Gary K.; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti

    2013-01-01

    Coral bleaching is a significant contributor to the worldwide degradation of coral reefs and is indicative of the termination of symbiosis between the coral host and its symbiotic algae (dinoflagellate; Symbiodinium sp. complex), usually by expulsion or xenophagy (symbiophagy) of its dinoflagellates. Herein, we provide evidence that during the earliest stages of environmentally induced bleaching, heat stress and light stress generate distinctly different pathomorphological changes in the chloroplasts, while a combined heat- and light-stress exposure induces both pathomorphologies; suggesting that these stressors act on the dinoflagellate by different mechanisms. Within the first 48 hours of a heat stress (32°C) under low-light conditions, heat stress induced decomposition of thylakoid structures before observation of extensive oxidative damage; thus it is the disorganization of the thylakoids that creates the conditions allowing photo-oxidative-stress. Conversely, during the first 48 hours of a light stress (2007 µmoles m−2 s−1 PAR) at 25°C, condensation or fusion of multiple thylakoid lamellae occurred coincidently with levels of oxidative damage products, implying that photo-oxidative stress causes the structural membrane damage within the chloroplasts. Exposure to combined heat- and light-stresses induced both pathomorphologies, confirming that these stressors acted on the dinoflagellate via different mechanisms. Within 72 hours of exposure to heat and/or light stresses, homeostatic processes (e.g., heat-shock protein and anti-oxidant enzyme response) were evident in the remaining intact dinoflagellates, regardless of the initiating stressor. Understanding the sequence of events during bleaching when triggered by different environmental stressors is important for predicting both severity and consequences of coral bleaching. PMID:24324575

  6. Inducible Expression of Inflammatory Chemokines in Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Infected Mice: Role of MIP-1α in Lung Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Haeberle, Helene A.; Kuziel, William A.; Dieterich, Hans-Juergen; Casola, Antonella; Gatalica, Zoran; Garofalo, Roberto P.

    2001-01-01

    Lower respiratory tract disease caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is characterized by profound airway mucosa inflammation, both in infants with naturally acquired infection and in experimentally inoculated animal models. Chemokines are central regulatory molecules in inflammatory, immune, and infectious processes of the lung. In this study, we demonstrate that intranasal infection of BALB/c mice with RSV A results in inducible expression of lung chemokines belonging to the CXC (MIP-2 and IP-10), CC (RANTES, eotaxin, MIP-1β, MIP-1α, MCP-1, TCA-3) and C (lymphotactin) families. Chemokine mRNA expression occurred as early as 24 h following inoculation and persisted for at least 5 days in mice inoculated with the highest dose of virus (107 PFU). In general, levels of chemokine mRNA and protein were dependent on the dose of RSV inoculum and paralleled the intensity of lung cellular inflammation. Immunohisthochemical studies indicated that RSV-induced expression of MIP-1α, one of the most abundantly expressed chemokines, was primarily localized in epithelial cells of the alveoli and bronchioles, as well as in adjoining capillary endothelium. Genetically altered mice with a selective deletion of the MIP-1α gene (−/− mice) demonstrated a significant reduction in lung inflammation following RSV infection, compared to control littermates (+/+ mice). Despite the paucity of infiltrating cells, the peak RSV titer in the lung of −/− mice was not significantly different from that observed in +/+ mice. These results provide the first direct evidence that RSV infection may induce lung inflammation via the early production of inflammatory chemokines. PMID:11134301

  7. MicroRNA-21 Orchestrates High Glucose-induced Signals to TOR Complex 1, Resulting in Renal Cell Pathology in Diabetes*

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Nirmalya; Das, Falguni; Mariappan, Meenalakshmi M.; Mandal, Chandi Charan; Ghosh-Choudhury, Nandini; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S.; Choudhury, Goutam Ghosh

    2011-01-01

    Hyperglycemia induces a wide array of signaling pathways in the kidney that lead to hypertrophy and matrix expansion, eventually culminating in progressive kidney failure. High glucose-induced reduction of the tumor suppressor protein phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted in chromosome 10 (PTEN) contributes to renal cell hypertrophy and matrix expansion. We identified microRNA-21 (miR-21) as the molecular link between high glucose and PTEN suppression. Renal cortices from OVE26 type 1 diabetic mice showed significantly elevated levels of miR-21 associated with reduced PTEN and increased fibronectin content. In renal mesangial cells, high glucose increased the expression of miR-21, which targeted the 3′-UTR of PTEN mRNA to inhibit PTEN protein expression. Overexpression of miR-21 mimicked the action of high glucose, which included a reduction in PTEN expression and a concomitant increase in Akt phosphorylation. In contrast, expression of miR-21 Sponge, to inhibit endogenous miR-21, prevented down-regulation of PTEN and phosphorylation of Akt induced by high glucose. Interestingly, high glucose-stimulated miR-21 inactivated PRAS40, a negative regulator of TORC1. Finally, miR-21 enhanced high glucose-induced TORC1 activity, resulting in renal cell hypertrophy and fibronectin expression. Thus, our results identify a previously unrecognized function of miR-21 that is the reciprocal regulation of PTEN levels and Akt/TORC1 activity that mediate critical pathologic features of diabetic kidney disease. PMID:21613227

  8. Diffusion kurtosis imaging probes cortical alterations and white matter pathology following cuprizone induced demyelination and spontaneous remyelination.

    PubMed

    Guglielmetti, C; Veraart, J; Roelant, E; Mai, Z; Daans, J; Van Audekerke, J; Naeyaert, M; Vanhoutte, G; Delgado Y Palacios, R; Praet, J; Fieremans, E; Ponsaerts, P; Sijbers, J; Van der Linden, A; Verhoye, M

    2016-01-15

    Although MRI is the gold standard for the diagnosis and monitoring of multiple sclerosis (MS), current conventional MRI techniques often fail to detect cortical alterations and provide little information about gliosis, axonal damage and myelin status of lesioned areas. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) provide sensitive and complementary measures of the neural tissue microstructure. Additionally, specific white matter tract integrity (WMTI) metrics modelling the diffusion in white matter were recently derived. In the current study we used the well-characterized cuprizone mouse model of central nervous system demyelination to assess the temporal evolution of diffusion tensor (DT), diffusion kurtosis tensor (DK) and WMTI-derived metrics following acute inflammatory demyelination and spontaneous remyelination. While DT-derived metrics were unable to detect cuprizone induced cortical alterations, the mean kurtosis (MK) and radial kurtosis (RK) were found decreased under cuprizone administration, as compared to age-matched controls, in both the motor and somatosensory cortices. The MK remained decreased in the motor cortices at the end of the recovery period, reflecting long lasting impairment of myelination. In white matter, DT, DK and WMTI-derived metrics enabled the detection of cuprizone induced changes differentially according to the stage and the severity of the lesion. More specifically, the MK, the RK and the axonal water fraction (AWF) were the most sensitive for the detection of cuprizone induced changes in the genu of the corpus callosum, a region less affected by cuprizone administration. Additionally, microgliosis was associated with an increase of MK and RK during the acute inflammatory demyelination phase. In regions undergoing severe demyelination, namely the body and splenium of the corpus callosum, DT-derived metrics, notably the mean diffusion (MD) and radial diffusion (RD), were among the best discriminators between

  9. Diffusion kurtosis imaging probes cortical alterations and white matter pathology following cuprizone induced demyelination and spontaneous remyelination.

    PubMed

    Guglielmetti, C; Veraart, J; Roelant, E; Mai, Z; Daans, J; Van Audekerke, J; Naeyaert, M; Vanhoutte, G; Delgado Y Palacios, R; Praet, J; Fieremans, E; Ponsaerts, P; Sijbers, J; Van der Linden, A; Verhoye, M

    2016-01-15

    Although MRI is the gold standard for the diagnosis and monitoring of multiple sclerosis (MS), current conventional MRI techniques often fail to detect cortical alterations and provide little information about gliosis, axonal damage and myelin status of lesioned areas. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) provide sensitive and complementary measures of the neural tissue microstructure. Additionally, specific white matter tract integrity (WMTI) metrics modelling the diffusion in white matter were recently derived. In the current study we used the well-characterized cuprizone mouse model of central nervous system demyelination to assess the temporal evolution of diffusion tensor (DT), diffusion kurtosis tensor (DK) and WMTI-derived metrics following acute inflammatory demyelination and spontaneous remyelination. While DT-derived metrics were unable to detect cuprizone induced cortical alterations, the mean kurtosis (MK) and radial kurtosis (RK) were found decreased under cuprizone administration, as compared to age-matched controls, in both the motor and somatosensory cortices. The MK remained decreased in the motor cortices at the end of the recovery period, reflecting long lasting impairment of myelination. In white matter, DT, DK and WMTI-derived metrics enabled the detection of cuprizone induced changes differentially according to the stage and the severity of the lesion. More specifically, the MK, the RK and the axonal water fraction (AWF) were the most sensitive for the detection of cuprizone induced changes in the genu of the corpus callosum, a region less affected by cuprizone administration. Additionally, microgliosis was associated with an increase of MK and RK during the acute inflammatory demyelination phase. In regions undergoing severe demyelination, namely the body and splenium of the corpus callosum, DT-derived metrics, notably the mean diffusion (MD) and radial diffusion (RD), were among the best discriminators between

  10. Inclusion body disease of cranes: comparison of pathologic findings in cranes with acquired vs. experimentally induced disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuh, J.C.; Sileo, L.; Siegfried, L.M.; Yuill, Thomas M.

    1986-01-01

    Inclusion body disease of cranes was the cause of death in 17 immature and mature cranes of 5 different species in Wisconsin. A herpesvirus of unknown origin was the apparent cause. An isolate of this herpesvirus was used to experimentally infect 3 species of cranes. Macroscopic and microscopic lesions associated with naturally acquired and experimentally induced disease were essentially identical. Multifocal hepatic and splenic necrosis was found in all cranes evaluated. Necrosis of the gastrointestinal tract, thymus, and bursa of Fabricius also was seen in some of the cranes. Eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies often were commonly associated with hepatic lesions, sometimes with the splenic lesions, and rarely with the thymic or gastrointestinal tract lesions. The lesions of this inclusion body disease were similar to those reported for cranes in Austria from which a crane herpesvirus was isolated.

  11. Acupuncture-induced changes in functional connectivity of the primary somatosensory cortex varied with pathological stages of Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoxuan; Zhu, Yifang; Li, Chuanfu; Park, Kyungmo; Mohamed, Abdalla Z; Wu, Hongli; Xu, Chunsheng; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Linying; Yang, Jun; Qiu, Bensheng

    2014-10-01

    Bell's palsy is the most common cause of acute facial nerve paralysis. In China, Bell's palsy is frequently treated with acupuncture. However, its efficacy and underlying mechanism are still controversial. In this study, we used functional MRI to investigate the effect of acupuncture on the functional connectivity of the brain in Bell's palsy patients and healthy individuals. The patients were further grouped according to disease duration and facial motor performance. The results of resting-state functional MRI connectivity show that acupuncture induces significant connectivity changes in the primary somatosensory region of both early and late recovery groups, but no significant changes in either the healthy control group or the recovered group. In the recovery group, the changes also varied with regions and disease duration. Therefore, we propose that the effect of acupuncture stimulation may depend on the functional connectivity status of patients with Bell's palsy.

  12. PEDF and its roles in physiological and pathological conditions: implication in diabetic and hypoxia-induced angiogenic diseases

    PubMed Central

    He, Xuemin; Cheng, Rui; Benyajati, Siribhinya

    2015-01-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a broadly expressed multifunctional member of the serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) family. This widely studied protein plays critical roles in many physiological and pathophysiological processes, including neuroprotection, angiogenesis, fibrogenesis and inflammation. The present review summarizes the temporal and spatial distribution patterns of PEDF in a variety of developing and adult organs, and discusses its functions in maintaining physiological homoeostasis. The major focus of the present review is to discuss the implication of PEDF in diabetic and hypoxia-induced angiogenesis, and the pathways mediating PEDF's effects under these conditions. Furthermore, the regulatory mechanisms of PEDF expression, function and degradation are also reviewed. Finally, the therapeutic potential of PEDF as an anti-angiogenic drug is briefly summarized. PMID:25881671

  13. Acupuncture-induced changes in functional connectivity of the primary somatosensory cortex varied with pathological stages of Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoxuan; Zhu, Yifang; Li, Chuanfu; Park, Kyungmo; Mohamed, Abdalla Z; Wu, Hongli; Xu, Chunsheng; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Linying; Yang, Jun; Qiu, Bensheng

    2014-10-01

    Bell's palsy is the most common cause of acute facial nerve paralysis. In China, Bell's palsy is frequently treated with acupuncture. However, its efficacy and underlying mechanism are still controversial. In this study, we used functional MRI to investigate the effect of acupuncture on the functional connectivity of the brain in Bell's palsy patients and healthy individuals. The patients were further grouped according to disease duration and facial motor performance. The results of resting-state functional MRI connectivity show that acupuncture induces significant connectivity changes in the primary somatosensory region of both early and late recovery groups, but no significant changes in either the healthy control group or the recovered group. In the recovery group, the changes also varied with regions and disease duration. Therefore, we propose that the effect of acupuncture stimulation may depend on the functional connectivity status of patients with Bell's palsy. PMID:25121624

  14. Early maturation and distinct tau pathology in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons from patients with MAPT mutations.

    PubMed

    Iovino, Mariangela; Agathou, Sylvia; González-Rueda, Ana; Del Castillo Velasco-Herrera, Martin; Borroni, Barbara; Alberici, Antonella; Lynch, Timothy; O'Dowd, Sean; Geti, Imbisaat; Gaffney, Daniel; Vallier, Ludovic; Paulsen, Ole; Káradóttir, Ragnhildur Thóra; Spillantini, Maria Grazia

    2015-11-01

    Tauopathies, such as Alzheimer's disease, some cases of frontotemporal dementia, corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy, are characterized by aggregates of the microtubule-associated protein tau, which are linked to neuronal death and disease development and can be caused by mutations in the MAPT gene. Six tau isoforms are present in the adult human brain and they differ by the presence of 3(3R) or 4(4R) C-terminal repeats. Only the shortest 3R isoform is present in foetal brain. MAPT mutations found in human disease affect tau binding to microtubules or the 3R:4R isoform ratio by altering exon 10 splicing. We have differentiated neurons from induced pluripotent stem cells derived from fibroblasts of controls and patients with N279K and P301L MAPT mutations. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons recapitulate developmental tau expression, showing the adult brain tau isoforms after several months in culture. Both N279K and P301L neurons exhibit earlier electrophysiological maturation and altered mitochondrial transport compared to controls. Specifically, the N279K neurons show abnormally premature developmental 4R tau expression, including changes in the 3R:4R isoform ratio and AT100-hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates, while P301L neurons are characterized by contorted processes with varicosity-like structures, some containing both alpha-synuclein and 4R tau. The previously unreported faster maturation of MAPT mutant human neurons, the developmental expression of 4R tau and the morphological alterations may contribute to disease development.

  15. The cysteinyl leukotriene 2 receptor mediates retinal edema and pathological neovascularization in a murine model of oxygen-induced retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Barajas-Espinosa, Alma; Ni, Nathan C; Yan, Dong; Zarini, Simona; Murphy, Robert C; Funk, Colin D

    2012-03-01

    Leukotrienes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of degenerative diabetic retinopathy, with research focusing primarily on leukotriene B(4), with little attention devoted to the cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs), which act through cysLT receptors (CysLT(1)R and CysLT(2)R). We demonstrate here the presence of CysLT(2)R in pericytes and endothelial cells of superficial retinal vasculature using an indirect assay by assessment of β-galactosidase expression in CysLT(2)R-knockout (KO) mice. Retinal damage was induced in KO and wild-type (WT) mice using an established oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model. CysLT(2)R expression following OIR was intensely up-regulated compared to sham-treated controls. Staining with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin revealed enhanced tissue damage (as assessed by vasoobliteration/vasoproliferation) in KO mice compared to WT controls, yet the opposite was true with respect to retinal edema. However, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1) transcripts were increased by OIR similarly with respect to genotype. Intravitreal application of exogenous cysLTs elicited greater vasculature leakage (assessed ex vivo) in eyes from WT mice compared to KO mice. While mRNA encoding enzymes for various components of the leukotriene cascade were detected in sham- and OIR-treated retinas, only prostaglandins and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids, but not leukotrienes, were detected in A23187-treated retina preparations. Together, these results implicate the CysLT(2)R in the progression of ischemic retinopathy.

  16. Early maturation and distinct tau pathology in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons from patients with MAPT mutations

    PubMed Central

    Iovino, Mariangela; Agathou, Sylvia; González-Rueda, Ana; Del Castillo Velasco-Herrera, Martin; Borroni, Barbara; Alberici, Antonella; Lynch, Timothy; O’Dowd, Sean; Geti, Imbisaat; Gaffney, Daniel; Vallier, Ludovic; Paulsen, Ole; Káradóttir, Ragnhildur Thóra

    2015-01-01

    Tauopathies, such as Alzheimer’s disease, some cases of frontotemporal dementia, corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy, are characterized by aggregates of the microtubule-associated protein tau, which are linked to neuronal death and disease development and can be caused by mutations in the MAPT gene. Six tau isoforms are present in the adult human brain and they differ by the presence of 3(3R) or 4(4R) C-terminal repeats. Only the shortest 3R isoform is present in foetal brain. MAPT mutations found in human disease affect tau binding to microtubules or the 3R:4R isoform ratio by altering exon 10 splicing. We have differentiated neurons from induced pluripotent stem cells derived from fibroblasts of controls and patients with N279K and P301L MAPT mutations. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons recapitulate developmental tau expression, showing the adult brain tau isoforms after several months in culture. Both N279K and P301L neurons exhibit earlier electrophysiological maturation and altered mitochondrial transport compared to controls. Specifically, the N279K neurons show abnormally premature developmental 4R tau expression, including changes in the 3R:4R isoform ratio and AT100-hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates, while P301L neurons are characterized by contorted processes with varicosity-like structures, some containing both alpha-synuclein and 4R tau. The previously unreported faster maturation of MAPT mutant human neurons, the developmental expression of 4R tau and the morphological alterations may contribute to disease development. PMID:26220942

  17. The roles of exercise-induced immune system disturbances in the pathology of heat stroke : the dual pathway model of heat stroke.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chin Leong; Mackinnon, Laurel T

    2006-01-01

    Heat stroke is a life-threatening condition that can be fatal if not appropriately managed. Although heat stroke has been recognised as a medical condition for centuries, a universally accepted definition of heat stroke is lacking and the pathology of heat stroke is not fully understood. Information derived from autopsy reports and the clinical presentation of patients with heat stroke indicates that hyperthermia, septicaemia, central nervous system impairment and cardiovascular failure play important roles in the pathology of heat stroke. The current models of heat stroke advocate that heat stroke is triggered by hyperthermia but is driven by endotoxaemia. Endotoxaemia triggers the systemic inflammatory response, which can lead to systemic coagulation and haemorrhage, necrosis, cell death and multi-organ failure. However, the current heat stroke models cannot fully explain the discrepancies in high core temperature (Tc) as a trigger of heat stroke within and between individuals. Research on the concept of critical Tc as a limitation to endurance exercise implies that a high Tc may function as a signal to trigger the protective mechanisms against heat stroke. Athletes undergoing a period of intense training are subjected to a variety of immune and gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances. The immune disturbances include the suppression of immune cells and their functions, suppression of cell-mediated immunity, translocation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), suppression of anti-LPS antibodies, increased macrophage activity due to muscle tissue damage, and increased concentration of circulating inflammatory and pyrogenic cytokines. Common symptoms of exercise-induced GI disturbances include diarrhoea, vomiting, gastrointestinal bleeding, and cramps, which may increase gut-related LPS translocation. This article discusses the current evidence that supports the argument that these exercise-induced immune and GI disturbances may contribute to the development of endotoxaemia and

  18. Cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase prevents diabetes-induced pathological changes by inhibiting NF-κB signaling activation in the heart.

    PubMed

    Cong, Weitao; Ruan, Dandan; Xuan, Yuanhu; Niu, Chao; Tao, Youli; Wang, Yang; Zhan, Kungao; Cai, Lu; Jin, Litai; Tan, Yi

    2015-12-01

    Catalase is an antioxidant enzyme that specifically catabolizes hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Overexpression of catalase via a heart-specific promoter (CAT-TG) was reported to reduce diabetes-induced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and further prevent diabetes-induced pathological abnormalities, including cardiac structural derangement and left ventricular abnormity in mice. However, the mechanism by which catalase overexpression protects heart function remains unclear. This study found that activation of a ROS-dependent NF-κB signaling pathway was downregulated in hearts of diabetic mice overexpressing catalase. In addition, catalase overexpression inhibited the significant increase in nitration levels of key enzymes involved in energy metabolism, including α-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase E1 component (α-KGD) and ATP synthase α and β subunits (ATP-α and ATP-β). To assess the effects of the NF-κB pathway activation on heart function, Bay11-7082, an inhibitor of the NF-κB signaling pathway, was injected into diabetic mice, protecting mice against the development of cardiac damage and increased nitrative modifications of key enzymes involved in energy metabolism. In conclusion, these findings demonstrated that catalase protects mouse hearts against diabetic cardiomyopathy, partially by suppressing NF-κB-dependent inflammatory responses and associated protein nitration.

  19. CNS-targeted production of IL-17A induces glial activation, microvascular pathology and enhances the neuroinflammatory response to systemic endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Julian; Krauthausen, Marius; Hofer, Markus J; Heneka, Michael T; Campbell, Iain L; Müller, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-17A (IL-17A) is a key cytokine modulating the course of inflammatory diseases. Whereas effector functions of IL-17A like induction of antimicrobial peptides and leukocyte infiltration could clearly be demonstrated for peripheral organs, CNS specific effects are not well defined and appear controversial. To further clarify the functional significance of IL-17A in the CNS, we generated a transgenic mouse line with astrocyte-restricted expression of the IL-17A gene. GFAP/IL-17A transgenic mice develop normally and do not show any signs of neurological dysfunction. However, histological characterization revealed astrocytosis and activation of microglia. Demyelination, neurodegeneration or prominent tissue damage was not observed but a vascular pathology mimicking microangiopathic features was evident. Histological and flow cytometric analysis demonstrated the absence of parenchymal infiltration of immune cells into the CNS of GFAP/IL-17A transgenic mice. In GFAP/IL-17A mice, LPS-induced endotoxemia led to a more pronounced microglial activation with expansion of a distinct CD45(high)/CD11b(+) population and increased induction of proinflammatory cytokines compared with controls. Our data argues against a direct role of IL-17A in mediating tissue damage during neuroinflammation. More likely IL-17A acts as a modulating factor in the network of induced cytokines. This novel mouse model will be a very useful tool to further characterize the role of IL-17A in neuroinflammatory disease models.

  20. Cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase prevents diabetes-induced pathological changes by inhibiting NF-κB signaling activation in the heart.

    PubMed

    Cong, Weitao; Ruan, Dandan; Xuan, Yuanhu; Niu, Chao; Tao, Youli; Wang, Yang; Zhan, Kungao; Cai, Lu; Jin, Litai; Tan, Yi

    2015-12-01

    Catalase is an antioxidant enzyme that specifically catabolizes hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Overexpression of catalase via a heart-specific promoter (CAT-TG) was reported to reduce diabetes-induced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and further prevent diabetes-induced pathological abnormalities, including cardiac structural derangement and left ventricular abnormity in mice. However, the mechanism by which catalase overexpression protects heart function remains unclear. This study found that activation of a ROS-dependent NF-κB signaling pathway was downregulated in hearts of diabetic mice overexpressing catalase. In addition, catalase overexpression inhibited the significant increase in nitration levels of key enzymes involved in energy metabolism, including α-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase E1 component (α-KGD) and ATP synthase α and β subunits (ATP-α and ATP-β). To assess the effects of the NF-κB pathway activation on heart function, Bay11-7082, an inhibitor of the NF-κB signaling pathway, was injected into diabetic mice, protecting mice against the development of cardiac damage and increased nitrative modifications of key enzymes involved in energy metabolism. In conclusion, these findings demonstrated that catalase protects mouse hearts against diabetic cardiomyopathy, partially by suppressing NF-κB-dependent inflammatory responses and associated protein nitration. PMID:26456065

  1. GSK-3β-induced Tau pathology drives hippocampal neuronal cell death in Huntington's disease: involvement of astrocyte–neuron interactions

    PubMed Central

    L'Episcopo, F; Drouin-Ouellet, J; Tirolo, C; Pulvirenti, A; Giugno, R; Testa, N; Caniglia, S; Serapide, M F; Cisbani, G; Barker, R A; Cicchetti, F; Marchetti, B

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) has emerged as a critical factor in several pathways involved in hippocampal neuronal maintenance and function. In Huntington's disease (HD), there are early hippocampal deficits both in patients and transgenic mouse models, which prompted us to investigate whether disease-specific changes in GSK-3β expression may underlie these abnormalities. Thirty-three postmortem hippocampal samples from HD patients (neuropathological grades 2–4) and age- and sex-matched normal control cases were analyzed using real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCRs (qPCRs) and immunohistochemistry. In vitro and in vivo studies looking at hippocampal pathology and GSK-3β were also undertaken in transgenic R6/2 and wild-type mice. We identified a disease and stage-dependent upregulation of GSK-3β mRNA and protein levels in the HD hippocampus, with the active isoform pGSK-3β-Tyr216 being strongly expressed in dentate gyrus (DG) neurons and astrocytes at a time when phosphorylation of Tau at the AT8 epitope was also present in these same neurons. This upregulation of pGSK-3β-Tyr216 was also found in the R6/2 hippocampus in vivo and linked to the increased vulnerability of primary hippocampal neurons in vitro. In addition, the increased expression of GSK-3β in the astrocytes of R6/2 mice appeared to be the main driver of Tau phosphorylation and caspase3 activation-induced neuronal death, at least in part via an exacerbated production of major proinflammatory mediators. This stage-dependent overactivation of GSK-3β in HD-affected hippocampal neurons and astrocytes therefore points to GSK-3β as being a critical factor in the pathological development of this condition. As such, therapeutic targeting of this pathway may help ameliorate neuronal dysfunction in HD. PMID:27124580

  2. GSK-3β-induced Tau pathology drives hippocampal neuronal cell death in Huntington's disease: involvement of astrocyte-neuron interactions.

    PubMed

    L'Episcopo, F; Drouin-Ouellet, J; Tirolo, C; Pulvirenti, A; Giugno, R; Testa, N; Caniglia, S; Serapide, M F; Cisbani, G; Barker, R A; Cicchetti, F; Marchetti, B

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) has emerged as a critical factor in several pathways involved in hippocampal neuronal maintenance and function. In Huntington's disease (HD), there are early hippocampal deficits both in patients and transgenic mouse models, which prompted us to investigate whether disease-specific changes in GSK-3β expression may underlie these abnormalities. Thirty-three postmortem hippocampal samples from HD patients (neuropathological grades 2-4) and age- and sex-matched normal control cases were analyzed using real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCRs (qPCRs) and immunohistochemistry. In vitro and in vivo studies looking at hippocampal pathology and GSK-3β were also undertaken in transgenic R6/2 and wild-type mice. We identified a disease and stage-dependent upregulation of GSK-3β mRNA and protein levels in the HD hippocampus, with the active isoform pGSK-3β-Tyr(216) being strongly expressed in dentate gyrus (DG) neurons and astrocytes at a time when phosphorylation of Tau at the AT8 epitope was also present in these same neurons. This upregulation of pGSK-3β-Tyr(216) was also found in the R6/2 hippocampus in vivo and linked to the increased vulnerability of primary hippocampal neurons in vitro. In addition, the increased expression of GSK-3β in the astrocytes of R6/2 mice appeared to be the main driver of Tau phosphorylation and caspase3 activation-induced neuronal death, at least in part via an exacerbated production of major proinflammatory mediators. This stage-dependent overactivation of GSK-3β in HD-affected hippocampal neurons and astrocytes therefore points to GSK-3β as being a critical factor in the pathological development of this condition. As such, therapeutic targeting of this pathway may help ameliorate neuronal dysfunction in HD. PMID:27124580

  3. Meso 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and monoisoamyl DMSA effect on gallium arsenide induced pathological liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Flora, S J S; Dubey, Rupa; Kannan, G M; Chauhan, R S; Pant, B P; Jaiswal, D K

    2002-06-01

    The effect of meso 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and monoisoamyl DMSA (MiADMSA) on gallium arsenide (GaAs) induced liver damage was studied. The oral feeding rat model was used in this study. The animals were exposed to 10 mg/kg GaAs, orally, once daily, 5 days a week for 24 weeks and treated thereafter with single oral daily dose of either 0.3 mmol/kg DMSA or MiADMSA for two course of 5 days treatment. The animals were sacrificed thereafter. Lipid peroxidation was assessed by measuring liver thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS). Liver damage was assessed by number of biochemical variables and by light microscopy. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) beside reduced glutathione (GSH) concentration was measured in blood. Exposure to GaAs produced a significant reduction in GSH while, increased the oxidized glutathione (GSSG) concentration. Hepatic glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase activity increased significantly while level of serum transaminase increased moderately. Gallium arsenide exposure also produced marked hepatic histopathological lesions. Overall, treatment with MiADMSA proved to be better than DMSA in the mobilization of arsenic and in the turnover of some of the above mentioned GaAs sensitive biochemical alterations. Histopathological lesions also, responded more favorably to chelation treatment with MiADMSA than DMSA.

  4. Protective effects of kolaviron and quercetin on cadmium-induced testicular damage and endocrine pathology in rats.

    PubMed

    Farombi, E O; Adedara, I A; Akinrinde, S A; Ojo, O O; Eboh, A S

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects of kolaviron, a biflavonoid from Garcinia kola seed, and quercetin on cadmium-induced reproductive toxicity in rats. Adult male rats were administered with either cadmium (15 mg kg(-1)) alone or in combination with kolaviron (200 mg kg(-1)) or quercetin (10 mg kg(-1)) daily for 5 days. Cadmium-treated rats showed (P < 0.05) decrease in the body weight gain, testis and epididymis weights. However, upon co-administration of kolaviron or quercetin, these changes were significantly reversed in cadmium-treated rats. Also, administration of kolaviron or quercetin significantly prevented cadmium-mediated decrease in sperm motility and epididymal sperm concentration and reversed the increased level of sperm abnormality to near control. In testes and sperm, cadmium treatment resulted in significant decrease in the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase, whereas it increased glutathione S-transferase activity as well as hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde levels. While plasma levels of triiodothyronine and tetraiodothyronine remained unaffected, the levels of testosterone, luteinising hormone and follicle stimulating hormone were decreased in cadmium-treated rats. Cadmium treatment caused mild congestion of interstitial vessels and oedema in the testes. Taken together, kolaviron and quercetin inhibited the adverse effects of cadmium on the antioxidant enzymes, markers of oxidative stress, endocrine and testicular structure in rats. PMID:22356231

  5. Lower activation-induced T-cell apoptosis is related to the pathological immune response in secondary infection with hetero-serotype dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wang; Yan, Huacheng; Ma, Yuling; Yu, Tiantian; Guo, Hongxia; Kuang, Yuchan; Ren, Ruiwen; Li, Jintao

    2016-03-01

    The available evidence suggests that dengue virus-specific T lymphocytes and cytokine storm play a pivotal role in the immunopathogenesis of plasma leakage. Investigations are underway to identify the immune profiles associated with increased or decreased risk for severe disease. In this study, CD14+ cells from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients who recovered from DENV-1 infection were infected with DENV-1 or DENV-2 and co-cultured with memory T cells. We found that secondary infection with DENV-2 suppresses the cell reproductive capacity but forms more cell clones and more functional cells to produce more proinflammatory factors (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12 and IL-17) and less regulatory cytokines (IL-10, TGF-β) which results in higher viral replication compared to secondary infection with DENV-1. Memory dengue virus-specific T cells which are induced in a primary dengue virus infection are reactivated by the heterologous serotype of dengue virus and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) during a secondary infection. Dramatically, less apoptosis and more continuous activation of T cells in secondary infection with hetero-serotype DENV were observed. This discovery which has not been reported previously may be the reasonable and vital interpretation for the cytokine storm and severe symptoms observed in secondary infection with DENV. In summary, secondary infection with hetero-serotype DENV elicits the relatively pathological immune response while secondary infection with homologous-serotype DENV induces the relatively protective immune response by activation-induced cell death (AICD) of T cells.

  6. Sequential Alterations in Catabolic and Anabolic Gene Expression Parallel Pathological Changes during Progression of Monoiodoacetate-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Rath, Bjoern; Deschner, James; Gassner, Robert; Butterfield, Timothy A.; Agarwal, Sudha

    2011-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is one of the major causes of cartilage destruction in osteoarthritis. Here, we systematically analyzed the changes in gene expression associated with the progression of cartilage destruction in monoiodoacetate-induced arthritis (MIA) of the rat knee. Sprague Dawley female rats were given intra-articular injection of monoiodoacetate in the knee. The progression of MIA was monitored macroscopically, microscopically and by micro-computed tomography. Grade 1 damage was observed by day 5 post-monoiodoacetate injection, progressively increasing to Grade 2 by day 9, and to Grade 3–3.5 by day 21. Affymetrix GeneChip was utilized to analyze the transcriptome-wide changes in gene expression, and the expression of salient genes was confirmed by real-time-PCR. Functional networks generated by Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) from the microarray data correlated the macroscopic/histologic findings with molecular interactions of genes/gene products. Temporal changes in gene expression during the progression of MIA were categorized into five major gene clusters. IPA revealed that Grade 1 damage was associated with upregulation of acute/innate inflammatory responsive genes (Cluster I) and suppression of genes associated with musculoskeletal development and function (Cluster IV). Grade 2 damage was associated with upregulation of chronic inflammatory and immune trafficking genes (Cluster II) and downregulation of genes associated with musculoskeletal disorders (Cluster IV). The Grade 3 to 3.5 cartilage damage was associated with chronic inflammatory and immune adaptation genes (Cluster III). These findings suggest that temporal regulation of discrete gene clusters involving inflammatory mediators, receptors, and proteases may control the progression of cartilage destruction. In this process, IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-15, IL-12, chemokines, and NF-κB act as central nodes of the inflammatory networks, regulating catabolic processes. Simultaneously, upregulation of

  7. HSF1 and NF-κB p65 participate in the process of exercise preconditioning attenuating pressure overload-induced pathological cardiac hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tongyi; Zhang, Ben; Yang, Fan; Cai, Chengliang; Wang, Guokun; Han, Qingqi; Zou, Liangjian

    2015-05-08

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy, often accompanied by hypertension, aortic stenosis and valvular defects, is typically associated with myocyte remodeling and cardiac dysfunction. Exercise preconditioning (EP) has been proven to enhance the tolerance of the myocardium to cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, the effects of EP in pathological cardiac hypertrophy are rarely reported. 10-wk-old male Sprague–Dawley rats (n = 80) were randomly divided into four groups: sham, TAC, EP + sham and EP + TAC. Two EP groups were subjected to 4 weeks of treadmill training, and the EP + TAC and TAC groups were followed by TAC operations. The sham and EP + sham groups underwent the same operation without aortic constriction. Eight weeks after the surgery, we evaluated the effects of EP by echocardiography, morphology, and histology and observed the expressions of the associated proteins. Compared with the respective control groups, hypertrophy-related indicators were significantly increased in the TAC and EP + TAC groups (p < 0.05). However, between the TAC and EP + TAC groups, all of these changes were effectively inhibited by EP treatment (p < 0.05). Furthermore, EP treatment upregulated the expression of HSF1 and HSP70, increased the HSF1 levels in the nuclear fraction, inhibited the expression of the NF-κB p65 subunit, decreased the NF-κB p65 subunit levels in the nuclear fraction, and reduced the IL2 levels in the myocardia of rats. EP could effectively reduce the cardiac hypertrophic responses induced by TAC and may play a protective role by upregulating the expressions of HSF1 and HSP70, activating HSF1 and then inhibiting the expression of NF-κB p65 and nuclear translocation. - Highlights: • EP could effectively reduce the cardiac hypertrophic responses induced by TAC. • EP may play a protective role by upregulating the expressions of HSF1 and HSP70 and then activating HSF1. • EP may play a protective role by inhibiting the expression

  8. Building a Better Analgesic: Multifunctional Compounds that Address Injury-Induced Pathology to Enhance Analgesic Efficacy while Eliminating Unwanted Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Largent-Milnes, T. M.; Brookshire, S. W.; Skinner, D. P.; Hanlon, K. E.; Giuvelis, D.; Yamamoto, T.; Davis, P.; Campos, C. R.; Nair, P.; Deekonda, S.; Bilsky, E. J.; Porreca, F.; Hruby, V. J.

    2013-01-01

    The most highly abused prescription drugs are opioids used for the treatment of pain. Physician-reported drug-seeking behavior has resulted in a significant health concern among doctors trying to adequately treat pain while limiting the misuse or diversion of pain medications. In addition to abuse liability, opioid use is associated with unwanted side effects that complicate pain management, including opioid-induced emesis and constipation. This has resulted in restricting long-term doses of opioids and inadequate treatment of both acute and chronic debilitating pain, demonstrating a compelling need for novel analgesics. Recent reports indicate that adaptations in endogenous substance P/neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1) are induced by chronic pain and sustained opioid exposure, and these changes may contribute to processes responsible for opioid abuse liability, emesis, and analgesic tolerance. Here, we describe a multifunctional mu-/delta-opioid agonist/NK1 antagonist compound [Tyr-d-Ala-Gly-Phe-Met-Pro-Leu-Trp-NH-Bn(CF3)2 (TY027)] that has a preclinical profile of excellent antinociceptive efficacy, low abuse liability, and no opioid-related emesis or constipation. In rodent models of acute and neuropathic pain, TY027 demonstrates analgesic efficacy following central or systemic administration with a plasma half-life of more than 4 hours and central nervous system penetration. These data demonstrate that an innovative opioid designed to contest the pathology created by chronic pain and sustained opioids results in antinociceptive efficacy in rodent models, with significantly fewer side effects than morphine. Such rationally designed, multitargeted compounds are a promising therapeutic approach in treating patients who suffer from acute and chronic pain. PMID:23860305

  9. Evening primrose oil and celecoxib inhibited pathological angiogenesis, inflammation, and oxidative stress in adjuvant-induced arthritis: novel role of angiopoietin-1.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, R M; Moustafa, Y M; El-Azab, M F

    2014-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by overproduction of inflammatory mediators along with undermined oxidative defensive mechanisms. Pathological angiogenesis was found to play a critical role in the progression of this disease. The current study was carried out to evaluate the anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant effects of evening primrose oil (EPO), rich in gamma linolenic acid (GLA), either alone or in combination with aspirin or celecoxib, on adjuvant-induced arthritis. Arthritis was induced by subcutaneous injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in the right hind paw of male albino rats. All treatments were administered orally from day 0 (EPO, 5 g/kg b.w.) or day 4 (celecoxib, 5 mg/kg; aspirin, 150 mg/kg) till day 27 after CFA injection. In the arthritic group, the results revealed significant decrease in the body weight and increase in ankle circumference, plasma angiopoietin-1 (ANG-1) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels. Anti-oxidant status was suppressed as manifested by significant decline in reduced glutathione content along with decreased enzymatic activity of superoxide dismutase and increased lipid peroxidation. Oral administration of EPO exerted normalization of body weight, ANG-1, and TNF-α levels with restoration of activity as shown by reduced malondialdehyde levels. Moreover, histopathological examination demonstrated that EPO significantly reduced the synovial hyperplasia and inflammatory cells invasion in joint tissues, an effect that was enhanced by combination with aspirin or celecoxib. The joint use of GLA-rich natural oils, which possess anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant activities, with traditional analgesics represents a promising strategy to restrain the progression of rheumatoid arthritis.

  10. Autoantibody response and pregnancy-related pathology induced by combined LPS and tetanus toxoid hyperimmunization in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Petrušić, Vladimir; Todorović, Nevena; Živković, Irena; Dimitrijević, Rajna; Muhandes, Lina; Rajnpreht, Irena; Dimitrijević, Ljiljana

    2015-03-01

    Recent data concerning antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) induction have shown that β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI) binds lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which results in conformational changes, exposition of a cryptic epitope and possible pathological anti-β2GPI antibody production. In order to investigate the effects of LPS on the induction of APS-related pathology, we performed hyperimmunization of BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice with LPS, alone or in combination with tetanus toxoid (TTd), a protein structurally similar to β2GPI. We report that, although high affinity pathological anti-β2GPI antibodies were produced in all groups of animals, the reproductive pathology was recorded only in mice that received both LPS and TTd, implying on the important roles of both infections and molecular mimicry in APS pathogenesis. Moreover, APS-related reproductive pathology was more pronounced in BALB/c (lowered fertility and fecundity) than C57BL/6 mice (lowered fecundity), which correlated well with the disruption in natural antibody network observed in BALB/c mouse strain.

  11. SNOMED CT in pathology.

    PubMed

    García-Rojo, Marcial; Daniel, Christel; Laurinavicius, Arvydas

    2012-01-01

    Pathology information systems have been using SNOMED II for many years, and in most cases, they are in a migration process to SNOMED CT. COST Action IC0604 (EURO-TELEPATH) has considered terminology normalization one of its strategic objectives. This paper reviews the use of SNOMED CT in healthcare, with a special focus in pathology. Nowadays, SNOMED CT is mainly used for concept search and coding of clinical data. Some ontological errors found in SNOMED CT are described. The Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) initiative has fostered the use of SNOMED CT, also in Pathology, as recommended in the Supplement Anatomic Pathology Structured Reports of the IHE Anatomic Pathology Technical Framework. Rule governing concept post-coordination is also described. Some recent initiatives are trying to define a SNOMED CT subset for Pathology. The Spanish Society of Pathology has defined a subset for specimens and procedures in Pathology. Regarding diagnosis coding, the morphological abnormality sub-hierarchy of SNOMED CT need to be significantly extended and improved to become useful for pathologists. A consensus is needed to encode pathology reports with the adequate hierarchies and concepts. This will make the implementation of pathology structured reports more feasible.

  12. Application of Molecular Pathology in Endocrine Pathology.

    PubMed

    Linke, Ebru Serinsoz; Tezel, Gaye Güler

    2015-01-01

    Rapid growth in knowledge of cell and molecular biology led to the increased usage of molecular techniques in anatomical pathology. This is also due to the advances achieved in the techniques introduced in the last few years which are less laborious as compared to the techniques used at the beginning of the "molecular era". The initial assays were also very expensive and were not performed except for selected centers. Moreover, the clinicians were not sure how to make use of the accumulating molecular information. That situation has also changed and molecular techniques are being performed in a wide variety of medical settings which also has a reflection on the endocrine system pathology among other organ systems. This review will provide an update of genetic changes observed in different endocrine system pathologies and their diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic values.

  13. Stratification of HPV-induced cervical pathology using the virally encoded molecular marker E4 in combination with p16 or MCM.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Heather; Soneji, Yasmina; Van Baars, Romy; Arora, Rupali; Jenkins, David; van de Sandt, Miekel; Wu, Zhonglin; Quint, Wim; Jach, Robert; Okon, Krzysztof; Huras, Hubert; Singer, Albert; Doorbar, John

    2015-07-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types cause cervical lesions of varying severity, ranging from transient productive infections to high-grade neoplasia. Disease stratification requires the examination of lesional pathology, and possibly also the detection of biomarkers. P16(INK4a) and MCM are established surrogates of high-risk HPV E6/E7 activity, and can be extensively expressed in high-grade lesions. Here we have combined these two cellular biomarkers with detection of the abundant HPV-encoded E4 protein in order to identify both productive and transforming lesions. This approach has allowed us to distinguish true papillomavirus infections from similar pathologies, and has allowed us to divide the heterogeneous CIN2 category into those that are CIN1-like and express E4, and those that more closely resemble nonproductive CIN3. To achieve this, 530 lesional areas were evaluated according to standard pathology criteria and by using a multiple staining approach that allows us to superimpose biomarker patterns either singly or in combination onto an annotated hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) image. Conventional grading of neoplasia was established by review panel, and compared directly with the composite molecular pathology visualized on the same tissue section. The detection of E4 coincided with the onset of vacuolation, becoming abundant in koilocytes as the MCM marker declined and cells lost their defined nuclear margins as visualized by standard H&E staining. Of the dual marker approaches, p16(INK4a) and E4 appeared most promising, with E4 generally identifying areas of low-grade disease even when p16(INK4a) was present. Extensive p16(INK4a) expression usually coincided with an absence of E4 expression or its focal retention in sporadic cells within the lesion. Our results suggest that a straightforward molecular evaluation of HPV life-cycle deregulation in cervical neoplasia may help improve disease stratification, and that this can be achieved using complementary

  14. Stratification of HPV-Induced Cervical Pathology using the Virally-Encoded Molecular Marker E4 in Combination with p16 or MCM

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Heather; Soneji, Yasmina; Van Baars, Romy; Arora, Rupali; Jenkins, David; van de Sandt, Miekel; Wu, Zhonglin; Quint, Wim; Jach, Robert; Okon, Krzysztof; Huras, Hubert; Singer, Albert; Doorbar, John

    2015-01-01

    High-risk HPV types cause cervical lesions of varying severity, ranging from transient productive infections to high-grade neoplasia. Disease stratification requires the examination of lesional pathology, and possibly also the detection of biomarkers. P16INK4a and MCM are established surrogates of high-risk HPV E6/E7 activity, and can be extensively expressed in high-grade lesions. Here we have combined these two cellular biomarkers with detection of the abundant HPV-encoded E4 protein in order to identify both productive and transforming lesions. This approach has allowed us to distinguish true papillomavirus infections from similar pathologies, and has allowed us to divide the heterogeneous CIN2 category into those that are CIN1-like and express E4, and those that more closely resemble non-productive CIN3. To achieve this, 530 lesional areas were evaluated according to standard pathology criteria and by using a multiple staining approach that allows us to superimpose biomarker patterns either singly or in combination onto an annotated haematoxylin & eosin image. Conventional grading of neoplasia was established by review panel, and compared directly to the composite molecular pathology visualised on the same tissue section. The detection of E4 coincided with the onset of vacuolation, becoming abundant in koilocytes as the MCM marker declined and cells lost their defined nuclear margins as visualised by standard H&E staining. Of the dual marker approaches, p16INK4a and E4 appeared most promising, with E4 generally identifying areas of low-grade disease even when p16INK4a was present. Extensive p16INK4a expression usually coincided with an absence of E4 expression or its focal retention in sporadic cells within the lesion. Our results suggest that a straightforward molecular evaluation of HPV life-cycle deregulation in cervical neoplasia may help improve disease stratification, and that this can be achieved using complementary molecular biomarker pairs such as MCM

  15. Handheld computing in pathology

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung; Parwani, Anil; Satyanarayanan, Mahadev; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2012-01-01

    Handheld computing has had many applications in medicine, but relatively few in pathology. Most reported uses of handhelds in pathology have been limited to experimental endeavors in telemedicine or education. With recent advances in handheld hardware and software, along with concurrent advances in whole-slide imaging (WSI), new opportunities and challenges have presented themselves. This review addresses the current state of handheld hardware and software, provides a history of handheld devices in medicine focusing on pathology, and presents future use cases for such handhelds in pathology. PMID:22616027

  16. Inhibition of PAR-4 and P2Y12 receptor-mediated platelet activation produces distinct hepatic pathologies in experimental xenobiotic-induced cholestatic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Nikita; Kopec, Anna K; Ray, Jessica L; Luyendyk, James P

    2016-07-15

    Emerging evidence supports a protective effect of platelets in experimental cholestatic liver injury and cholangiofibrosis. Coagulation-mediated platelet activation has been shown to inhibit experimental chronic cholestatic liver necrosis and biliary fibrosis. This occurs through thrombin-mediated activation of protease activated receptor-4 (PAR-4) in mice. However, it is not known whether other pathways of platelet activation, such as adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-mediated receptor P2Y12 activation is also protective. We tested the hypothesis that inhibition of P2Y12-mediated platelet activation exacerbates hepatic injury and cholangiofibrosis, and examined the impact of P2Y12 inhibition in both the presence and absence of PAR-4. Treatment of wild-type mice with the P2Y12 receptor antagonist clopidogrel increased biliary hyperplasia and cholangiofibrosis in wild-type mice exposed to the xenobiotic alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT) for 4 weeks compared to vehicle-treated mice exposed to ANIT. Interestingly, this effect of clopidogrel occurred without a corresponding increase in hepatocellular necrosis. Whereas biliary hyperplasia and cholangiofibrosis were increased in PAR-4(-/-) mice, clopidogrel treatment failed to further increase these pathologies in PAR-4(-/-) mice. The results indicate that inhibition of receptor P2Y12-mediated platelet activation exacerbates bile duct fibrosis in ANIT-exposed mice, independent of hepatocellular necrosis. Moreover, the lack of an added effect of clopidogrel administration on the exaggerated pathology in ANIT-exposed PAR-4(-/-) mice reinforces the prevailing importance of coagulation-mediated platelet activation in limiting this unique liver pathology. PMID:27475285

  17. Alzheimer's disease Advax(CpG)- adjuvanted MultiTEP-based dual and single vaccines induce high-titer antibodies against various forms of tau and Aβ pathological molecules.

    PubMed

    Davtyan, Hayk; Zagorski, Karen; Rajapaksha, Harinda; Hovakimyan, Armine; Davtyan, Arpine; Petrushina, Irina; Kazarian, Konstantin; Cribbs, David H; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Agadjanyan, Michael G; Ghochikyan, Anahit

    2016-01-01

    Although β-amyloid (Aβ) may be the primary driver of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology, accumulation of pathological tau correlates with dementia in AD patients. Thus, the prevention/inhibition of AD may require vaccine/s targeting Aβ and tau simultaneously or sequentially. Since high antibody titers are required for AD vaccine efficacy, we have decided to generate vaccines, targeting Aβ (AV-1959R), Tau (AV-1980R) or Aβ/tau (AV-1953R) B cell epitopes, based on immunogenic MultiTEP platform and evaluate the immunogenicity of these vaccines formulated with Advax(CpG), delta inulin, Alhydrogel(®), Montanide-ISA51, Montanide-ISA720, MPLA-SM pharmaceutical grade adjuvants. Formulation of AV-1959R in Advax(CpG) induced the highest cellular and humoral immune responses in mice. The dual-epitope vaccine, AV-1953R, or the combination of AV-1959R and AV-1980R vaccines formulated with Advax(CpG) induced robust antibody responses against various forms of both, Aβ and tau pathological molecules. While anti-Aβ antibody titers after AV-1953R immunization were similar to that in mice vaccinated with AV-1959R or AV-1959R/AV-1980R combination, anti-tau titers were significantly lower after AV-1953R injection when compared to the AV-1980R or AV-1959R/AV-1980R. In silico 3D-modeling provided insight into the differences in immunogenicity of these vaccine constructs. In sum, AV-1959R and AV-1980R formulated with Advax(CpG) adjuvant were identified as promising immunogenic vaccines for ongoing pre-clinical assessment and future human clinical trials. PMID:27363809

  18. Alzheimer’s disease AdvaxCpG- adjuvanted MultiTEP-based dual and single vaccines induce high-titer antibodies against various forms of tau and Aβ pathological molecules

    PubMed Central

    Davtyan, Hayk; Zagorski, Karen; Rajapaksha, Harinda; Hovakimyan, Armine; Davtyan, Arpine; Petrushina, Irina; Kazarian, Konstantin; Cribbs, David H.; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Agadjanyan, Michael G.; Ghochikyan, Anahit

    2016-01-01

    Although β-amyloid (Aβ) may be the primary driver of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathology, accumulation of pathological tau correlates with dementia in AD patients. Thus, the prevention/inhibition of AD may require vaccine/s targeting Aβ and tau simultaneously or sequentially. Since high antibody titers are required for AD vaccine efficacy, we have decided to generate vaccines, targeting Aβ (AV-1959R), Tau (AV-1980R) or Aβ/tau (AV-1953R) B cell epitopes, based on immunogenic MultiTEP platform and evaluate the immunogenicity of these vaccines formulated with AdvaxCpG, delta inulin, Alhydrogel®, Montanide-ISA51, Montanide-ISA720, MPLA-SM pharmaceutical grade adjuvants. Formulation of AV-1959R in AdvaxCpG induced the highest cellular and humoral immune responses in mice. The dual-epitope vaccine, AV-1953R, or the combination of AV-1959R and AV-1980R vaccines formulated with AdvaxCpG induced robust antibody responses against various forms of both, Aβ and tau pathological molecules. While anti-Aβ antibody titers after AV-1953R immunization were similar to that in mice vaccinated with AV-1959R or AV-1959R/AV-1980R combination, anti-tau titers were significantly lower after AV-1953R injection when compared to the AV-1980R or AV-1959R/AV-1980R. In silico 3D-modeling provided insight into the differences in immunogenicity of these vaccine constructs. In sum, AV-1959R and AV-1980R formulated with AdvaxCpG adjuvant were identified as promising immunogenic vaccines for ongoing pre-clinical assessment and future human clinical trials. PMID:27363809

  19. Pathological Significance of Mitochondrial Glycation

    PubMed Central

    Pun, Pamela Boon Li; Murphy, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Glycation, the nonenzymatic glycosylation of biomolecules, is commonly observed in diabetes and ageing. Reactive dicarbonyl species such as methylglyoxal and glyoxal are thought to be major physiological precursors of glycation. Because these dicarbonyls tend to be formed intracellularly, the levels of advanced glycation end products on cellular proteins are higher than on extracellular ones. The formation of glycation adducts within cells can have severe functional consequences such as inhibition of protein activity and promotion of DNA mutations. Although several lines of evidence suggest that there are specific mitochondrial targets of glycation, and mitochondrial dysfunction itself has been implicated in disease and ageing, it is unclear if glycation of biomolecules specifically within mitochondria induces dysfunction and contributes to disease pathology. We discuss here the possibility that mitochondrial glycation contributes to disease, focussing on diabetes, ageing, cancer, and neurodegeneration, and highlight the current limitations in our understanding of the pathological significance of mitochondrial glycation. PMID:22778743

  20. Opportunities in Speech Pathology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Parley W.

    The importance of speech is discussed and speech pathology is described. Types of communication disorders considered are articulation disorders, aphasia, facial deformity, hearing loss, stuttering, delayed speech, voice disorders, and cerebral palsy; examples of five disorders are given. Speech pathology is investigated from these aspects: the…

  1. Uterine pathology and infertility.

    PubMed

    Flamigni, C; Gianaroli, L; Ferraretti, A P; Jasonni, V M; Melega, C; Possati, G

    1985-01-01

    The authors describe the factors influencing implantation with reference to uterine pathology; the role that it plays both in the case of failure of implantation and in the case of repeated abortions is discussed and the techniques of treatment in the presence of uterine pathology affecting fertility are listed.

  2. Radiographic pathology for technologists

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, J.D.; Kowalczyk, N.

    1988-01-01

    This book explains the fundamentals of disease mechanisms and relates this to the practice of radiologic science. Each chapter begins with a discussion of normal anatomy and physiology, then covers pathology and demonstrates how the pathology appears on film. Imaging modalities such as computed tomography, MRI, and ultrasound are also discussed. Clinical case studies are included.

  3. Pathological VWF fibers resist tPA and ADAMTS13 while promoting the contact pathway and shear-induced platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Herbig, Bradley A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Under severe stenotic conditions, von Willebrand Factor (VWF) multimerizes into large insoluble fibers at pathological shear rates. Objective Evaluate the mechanics and biology of VWF fibers without the confounding effects of endothelium or collagen. Methods Within a micropost-impingement microfluidic device, >100 µm long VWF fibers multimerized on the post within 10 min using EDTA-treated PFP perfused at wall shear rates >5000 s−1. Results VWF fiber thickness increased to >10 µm by increasing shear rate to 10,000 s−1. In a stress-strain test, fibrous VWF had an elastic modulus of ~50 MPa. The insoluble VWF fibers were non-amyloid since they rapidly dissolved in trypsin, plasmin, or 2% SDS, but were resistant to 50 nM ADAMTS13 or 100 nM tPA in plasma. Following fiber formation, perfusion of low corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI)-treated (4 µg/ml), recalcified citrated plasma at 1500 s−1 caused fibrin formation on the VWF fibers, a result not observed with purified type 1 collagen or a naked micropost. During VWF fiber formation, contact pathway factors accumulated on VWF since the use of EDTA/PPACK/apixaban/high CTI-treated PFP during VWF fiber formation prevented subsequent fibrin production from low CTI, recalcified citrated PFP. VWF fibers displayed FXIIa-immunostaining. When PPACK-inhibited whole blood was perfused over VWF fibers, platelets rolled and arrested on the surface of VWF, but only displayed P-selectin if prevailing shear rates were pathological. Platelet arrest on VWF fibers was blocked with αIIbβ3 antagonist GR144053. Conclusions We report VWF fiber-contact pathway crosstalk and mechanisms of thrombolytic resistance in hemodynamic settings of myocardial infarction. PMID:26178390

  4. A genetic and pathologic study of a DENV2 clinical isolate capable of inducing encephalitis and hematological disturbances in immunocompetent mice.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Jaime Henrique; Pereira Bizerra, Raíza Sales; dos Santos Alves, Rúbens Prince; Sbrogio-Almeida, Maria Elisabete; Levi, José Eduardo; Capurro, Margareth Lara; de Souza Ferreira, Luís Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the causative agent of dengue fever (DF), a mosquito-borne illness endemic to tropical and subtropical regions. There is currently no effective drug or vaccine formulation for the prevention of DF and its more severe forms, i.e., dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). There are two generally available experimental models for the study of DENV pathogenicity as well as the evaluation of potential vaccine candidates. The first model consists of non-human primates, which do not develop symptoms but rather a transient viremia. Second, mouse-adapted virus strains or immunocompromised mouse lineages are utilized, which display some of the pathological features of the infection observed in humans but may not be relevant to the results with regard to the wild-type original virus strains or mouse lineages. In this study, we describe a genetic and pathological study of a DENV2 clinical isolate, named JHA1, which is naturally capable of infecting and killing Balb/c mice and reproduces some of the symptoms observed in DENV-infected subjects. Sequence analyses demonstrated that the JHA1 isolate belongs to the American genotype group and carries genetic markers previously associated with neurovirulence in mouse-adapted virus strains. The JHA1 strain was lethal to immunocompetent mice following intracranial (i.c.) inoculation with a LD(50) of approximately 50 PFU. Mice infected with the JHA1 strain lost weight and exhibited general tissue damage and hematological disturbances, with similarity to those symptoms observed in infected humans. In addition, it was demonstrated that the JHA1 strain shares immunological determinants with the DENV2 NGC reference strain, as evaluated by cross-reactivity of anti-envelope glycoprotein (domain III) antibodies. The present results indicate that the JHA1 isolate may be a useful tool in the study of DENV pathogenicity and will help in the evaluation of anti-DENV vaccine formulations as well as

  5. [Gunshot wounds: forensic pathology].

    PubMed

    Lorin de la Grandmaison, Geoffroy

    2012-02-01

    Gunshot wounds are among the most complex traumatic lesions encountered in forensic pathology. At the time of autopsy, careful scrutiny of the wounds is essential for correct interpretation of the lesions. Complementary pathological analysis has many interests: differentiation between entrance and exit wounds, estimation of firing distance, differentiation between vital and post mortem wounds and wounds dating. In case of multiple headshots, neuropathological examination can provide arguments for or against suicide. Sampling of gunshot wounds at autopsy must be systematic. Pathological data should be confronted respectively to autopsy and death scene investigation data and also ballistic studies. Forensic pathologist must be aware of the limits of optic microscopy.

  6. Endothelial TWIST1 Promotes Pathological Ocular Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Liu, Chi-Hsiu; Sun, Ye; Gong, Yan; Fu, Zhongjie; Evans, Lucy P.; Tian, Katherine T.; Juan, Aimee M.; Hurst, Christian G.; Mammoto, Akiko; Chen, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Pathological neovessel formation impacts many blinding vascular eye diseases. Identification of molecular signatures distinguishing pathological neovascularization from normal quiescent vessels is critical for developing new interventions. Twist-related protein 1 (TWIST1) is a transcription factor important in tumor and pulmonary angiogenesis. This study investigated the potential role of TWIST1 in modulating pathological ocular angiogenesis in mice. Methods. Twist1 expression and localization were analyzed in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). Pathological ocular angiogenesis in Tie2-driven conditional Twist1 knockout mice were evaluated in both OIR and laser-induced choroidal neovascularization models. In addition, the effects of TWIST1 on angiogenesis and endothelial cell function were analyzed in sprouting assays of aortic rings and choroidal explants isolated from Twist1 knockout mice, and in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells treated with TWIST1 small interfering RNA (siRNA). Results. TWIST1 is highly enriched in pathological neovessels in OIR retinas. Conditional Tie2-driven depletion of Twist1 significantly suppressed pathological neovessels in OIR without impacting developmental retinal angiogenesis. In a laser-induced choroidal neovascularization model, Twist1 deficiency also resulted in significantly smaller lesions with decreased vascular leakage. In addition, loss of Twist1 significantly decreased vascular sprouting in both aortic ring and choroid explants. Knockdown of TWIST1 in endothelial cells led to dampened expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and decreased endothelial cell proliferation. Conclusions. Our study suggests that TWIST1 is a novel regulator of pathologic ocular angiogenesis and may represent a new molecular target for developing potential therapeutic treatments to suppress pathological neovascularization in vascular eye diseases. PMID:25414194

  7. Colorectal carcinoma: Pathologic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Matthew; Ravula, Sreelakshmi; Tatishchev, Sergei F.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is one of the most common cancers and one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in the United States. Pathologic examination of biopsy, polypectomy and resection specimens is crucial to appropriate patient managemnt, prognosis assessment and family counseling. Molecular testing plays an increasingly important role in the era of personalized medicine. This review article focuses on the histopathology and molecular pathology of colorectal carcinoma and its precursor lesions, with an emphasis on their clinical relevance. PMID:22943008

  8. Triosephosphate isomerase I170V alters catalytic site, enhances stability and induces pathology in a Drosophila model of TPI deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Roland, Bartholomew P.; Amrich, Christopher G.; Kammerer, Charles J.; Stuchul, Kimberly A.; Larsen, Samantha B.; Rode, Sascha; Aslam, Anoshe A.; Heroux, Annie; Wetzel, Ronald; VanDemark, Andrew P.; Palladino, Michael J.

    2014-10-16

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) is a glycolytic enzyme which homodimerizes for full catalytic activity. Mutations of the TPI gene elicit a disease known as TPI Deficiency, a glycolytic enzymopathy noted for its unique severity of neurological symptoms. Evidence suggests that TPI Deficiency pathogenesis may be due to conformational changes of the protein, likely affecting dimerization and protein stability. In this report, we genetically and physically characterize a human disease-associated TPI mutation caused by an I170V substitution. Human TPII170V elicits behavioral abnormalities in Drosophila. An examination of hTPII170V enzyme kinetics revealed this substitution reduced catalytic turnover, while assessments of thermal stability demonstrated an increase in enzyme stability. Furthermore, the crystal structure of the homodimeric I170V mutant reveals changes in the geometry of critical residues within the catalytic pocket. In the end, collectively these data reveal new observations of the structural and kinetic determinants of TPI deficiency pathology, providing new insights into disease pathogenesis.

  9. Osteoarthritis-like pathologic changes in the knee joint induced by environmental disruption of circadian rhythms is potentiated by a high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Kc, Ranjan; Li, Xin; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Voigt, Robin M.; Summa, Keith C.; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Tryniszewska, Beata; Keshavarzian, Ali; Turek, Fred W.; Meng, Qing-Jun; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    A variety of environmental factors contribute to progressive development of osteoarthritis (OA). Environmental factors that upset circadian rhythms have been linked to various diseases. Our recent work establishes chronic environmental circadian disruption - analogous to rotating shiftwork-associated disruption of circadian rhythms in humans - as a novel risk factor for the development of OA. Evidence suggests shift workers are prone to obesity and also show altered eating habits (i.e., increased preference for high-fat containing food). In the present study, we investigated the impact of chronic circadian rhythm disruption in combination with a high-fat diet (HFD) on progression of OA in a mouse model. Our study demonstrates that when mice with chronically circadian rhythms were fed a HFD, there was a significant proteoglycan (PG) loss and fibrillation in knee joint as well as increased activation of the expression of the catabolic mediators involved in cartilage homeostasis. Our results, for the first time, provide the evidence that environmental disruption of circadian rhythms plus HFD potentiate OA-like pathological changes in the mouse joints. Thus, our findings may open new perspectives on the interactions of chronic circadian rhythms disruption with diet in the development of OA and may have potential clinical implications. PMID:26584570

  10. Osteoarthritis-like pathologic changes in the knee joint induced by environmental disruption of circadian rhythms is potentiated by a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Kc, Ranjan; Li, Xin; Forsyth, Christopher B; Voigt, Robin M; Summa, Keith C; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Tryniszewska, Beata; Keshavarzian, Ali; Turek, Fred W; Meng, Qing-Jun; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    A variety of environmental factors contribute to progressive development of osteoarthritis (OA). Environmental factors that upset circadian rhythms have been linked to various diseases. Our recent work establishes chronic environmental circadian disruption - analogous to rotating shiftwork-associated disruption of circadian rhythms in humans - as a novel risk factor for the development of OA. Evidence suggests shift workers are prone to obesity and also show altered eating habits (i.e., increased preference for high-fat containing food). In the present study, we investigated the impact of chronic circadian rhythm disruption in combination with a high-fat diet (HFD) on progression of OA in a mouse model. Our study demonstrates that when mice with chronically circadian rhythms were fed a HFD, there was a significant proteoglycan (PG) loss and fibrillation in knee joint as well as increased activation of the expression of the catabolic mediators involved in cartilage homeostasis. Our results, for the first time, provide the evidence that environmental disruption of circadian rhythms plus HFD potentiate OA-like pathological changes in the mouse joints. Thus, our findings may open new perspectives on the interactions of chronic circadian rhythms disruption with diet in the development of OA and may have potential clinical implications. PMID:26584570

  11. Simulation of 'pathologic' changes in ICG waveforms resulting from superposition of the 'preejection' and ejection waves induced by left ventricular contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermishkin, V. V.; Kolesnikov, V. A.; Lukoshkova, E. V.; Sonina, R. S.

    2013-04-01

    The impedance cardiography (ICG) is widely used for beat-to-beat noninvasive evaluation of the left ventricular stroke volume and contractility. It implies the correct determination of the ejection start and end points and the amplitudes of certain peaks in the differentiated impedance cardiogram. An accurate identification of ejection onset by ICG is often problematic, especially in the cardiologic patients, due to peculiar waveforms. Using a simple theoretical model, we tested the hypothesis that two major processes are responsible for the formation of impedance systolic wave: (1) the changes in the heart geometry and surrounding vessels produced by ventricular contraction, which occur during the isovolumic phase and precede ejection, and (2) expansion of aorta and adjacent arteries during the ejection phase. The former process initiates the preejection wave WpE and the latter triggers the ejection wave WEj. The model predicts a potential mechanism of generating the abnormal shapes of dZ/dt due to the presence of preejection waves and explains the related errors in ICG time and amplitude parameters. An appropriate decomposition method is a promising way to avoid the masking effects of these waves and a further step to correct determination of the onset of ejection and the corresponding peak amplitudes from 'pathologically shaped' ICG signals.

  12. The Effects of Taoren-Honghua Herb Pair on Pathological Microvessel and Angiogenesis-Associated Signaling Pathway in Mice Model of CCl4-Induced Chronic Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Xi, Shengyan; Yue, Lifeng; Shi, Mengmeng; Peng, Ying; Xu, Yangxinzi; Wang, Xinrong; Li, Qian; Kang, Zhijun; Li, Hanjing; Wang, Yanhui

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver disease is one of the most common diseases that threaten human health. Effective treatment is still lacking in western medicine. Semen Persicae (Taoren) and Flos Carthami (Honghua) are known to relieve acute hepatic injury and inflammation, improve microcirculation, and reduce tissue fiber. The aim of our study is to investigate the potential mechanisms of Taoren-Honghua Herb Pair (THHP) in murine model of chronic liver disease caused by Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4). Mice were randomly divided into seven groups: (1) blank, (2) model, (3) control (colchicine, 0.1 mg/kg), (4) THHP (5.53, 2.67, and 1.33 g/kg), and (5) Tao Hong Siwu Decoction (THSWD) (8.50 g/kg). Histological change and microvessels density were examined by microscopy. Hepatic function, serum fibrosis related factors, and hepatic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were measured with ELISA. VEGF, kinase insert domain-containing receptor (KDR), Flt-1, and Akt mRNA expression in hepatic tissue were determined with PCR. Tissues of Akt, pAkt, KDR, and Flt-1 were measured with western blotting. Data from this study showed that THHP improved hepatic function and restrained the hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. Its role in inhibiting pathological angiogenesis and hepatic fibrogenesis may be through affecting the angiogenesis-associated VEGF and its upstream and downstream signaling pathways. PMID:27293456

  13. The Effects of Taoren-Honghua Herb Pair on Pathological Microvessel and Angiogenesis-Associated Signaling Pathway in Mice Model of CCl4-Induced Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Shengyan; Yue, Lifeng; Shi, Mengmeng; Peng, Ying; Xu, Yangxinzi; Wang, Xinrong; Li, Qian; Kang, Zhijun; Li, Hanjing; Wang, Yanhui

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver disease is one of the most common diseases that threaten human health. Effective treatment is still lacking in western medicine. Semen Persicae (Taoren) and Flos Carthami (Honghua) are known to relieve acute hepatic injury and inflammation, improve microcirculation, and reduce tissue fiber. The aim of our study is to investigate the potential mechanisms of Taoren-Honghua Herb Pair (THHP) in murine model of chronic liver disease caused by Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4). Mice were randomly divided into seven groups: (1) blank, (2) model, (3) control (colchicine, 0.1 mg/kg), (4) THHP (5.53, 2.67, and 1.33 g/kg), and (5) Tao Hong Siwu Decoction (THSWD) (8.50 g/kg). Histological change and microvessels density were examined by microscopy. Hepatic function, serum fibrosis related factors, and hepatic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were measured with ELISA. VEGF, kinase insert domain-containing receptor (KDR), Flt-1, and Akt mRNA expression in hepatic tissue were determined with PCR. Tissues of Akt, pAkt, KDR, and Flt-1 were measured with western blotting. Data from this study showed that THHP improved hepatic function and restrained the hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. Its role in inhibiting pathological angiogenesis and hepatic fibrogenesis may be through affecting the angiogenesis-associated VEGF and its upstream and downstream signaling pathways. PMID:27293456

  14. Shiga toxin 2-induced intestinal pathology in infant rabbits is A-subunit dependent and responsive to the tyrosine kinase and potential ZAK inhibitor imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Samuel M.; Thorpe, Cheleste M.; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Rogers, Arlin B.; Obata, Fumiko; Vozenilek, Aimee; Kolling, Glynis L.; Kane, Anne V.; Magun, Bruce E.; Jandhyala, Dakshina M.

    2012-01-01

    Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are a major cause of food-borne illness worldwide. However, a consensus regarding the role Shiga toxins play in the onset of diarrhea and hemorrhagic colitis (HC) is lacking. One of the obstacles to understanding the role of Shiga toxins to STEC-mediated intestinal pathology is a deficit in small animal models that perfectly mimic human disease. Infant rabbits have been previously used to study STEC and/or Shiga toxin-mediated intestinal inflammation and diarrhea. We demonstrate using infant rabbits that Shiga toxin-mediated intestinal damage requires A-subunit activity, and like the human colon, that of the infant rabbit expresses the Shiga toxin receptor Gb3. We also demonstrate that Shiga toxin treatment of the infant rabbit results in apoptosis and activation of p38 within colonic tissues. Finally we demonstrate that the infant rabbit model may be used to test candidate therapeutics against Shiga toxin-mediated intestinal damage. While the p38 inhibitor SB203580 and the ZAK inhibitor DHP-2 were ineffective at preventing Shiga toxin-mediated damage to the colon, pretreatment of infant rabbits with the drug imatinib resulted in a decrease of Shiga toxin-mediated heterophil infiltration of the colon. Therefore, we propose that this model may be useful in elucidating mechanisms by which Shiga toxins could contribute to intestinal damage in the human. PMID:23162799

  15. [Evaluation of the phagocytic activity and the killing of peripheral blood monocytes in the offspring of female rats with an experimental drug induced liver pathology].

    PubMed

    Bryukhin, G V; Shopova, A V

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the functional activity of monocytes of peripheral blood in the offspring of female rats with paracetamol liver disease was investigated. Phagocytic property of these cells and their bactericidal activity was investigated. It is established, that the drug induced liver disease leads to reducing of functional activity of peripheral blood monocytes. PMID:25318164

  16. From the Cover: Zinc Deficiency Worsens and Supplementation Prevents High-Fat Diet Induced Vascular Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Pathological Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Shudong; Luo, Manyu; Zhang, Zhiguo; Dai, Xiaozhen; Kong, Maiying; Cai, Lu; Wang, Yuehui; Shi, Bingyin; Tan, Yi

    2016-09-01

    Obesity has become a common public health problem in the world and raises the risk of various cardiovascular diseases. Zinc is essential for multiple organs in terms of normal structure and function. The present study investigated the effects of high fat diet (HFD) induced obesity on the aorta in mice, and evaluated whether it can be affected by zinc deficiency or supplementation. Four-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were fed HFD with varied amounts of zinc (deficiency, adequate and supplementation) for 3 and 6 months. Results showed that HFD feeding induced a time-dependent aortic remodeling, demonstrated by increased vessel wall thickness, tunica cell proliferation and fibrotic responses, and inflammatory response, reflected by increased expression of inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1). HFD feeding also caused aortic oxidative damage, reflected by 3-nitrotyrosine and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal accumulation, and down-regulated nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) expression and function, shown by down-regulation of its downstream antioxidants, catalase, NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (quinone 1), and metallothionein expression. The vascular effects of obesity-induced by HFD was exacerbated by zinc deficiency but significantly improved by zinc supplementation. In addition, down-regulation of Nrf2 function and associated antioxidants expression were also worsened by zinc deficiency but improved by zinc supplementation. These results suggest that HFD induces aortic remodeling, which can be exacerbated by zinc deficiency and improved by zinc supplementation. PMID:27370414

  17. Co-Infection With Intestinal Helminths Markedly Reduces Proinflammatory Cytokines And Disease Severity In Natural And Induced High-Pathology Schistosomiasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection with the trematode helminth Schistosoma mansoni results in a parasite egg-induced, CD4 T cell-mediated, hepato-intestinal granulomatous and fibrosing inflammation that varies greatly in severity, with a higher frequency of milder forms typical in endemic areas. One possible explanation is...

  18. Clearance of pathological antibodies using biomimetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Copp, Jonathan A.; Fang, Ronnie H.; Luk, Brian T.; Hu, Che-Ming J.; Gao, Weiwei; Zhang, Kang; Zhang, Liangfang

    2014-01-01

    Pathological antibodies have been demonstrated to play a key role in type II immune hypersensitivity reactions, resulting in the destruction of healthy tissues and leading to considerable morbidity for the patient. Unfortunately, current treatments present significant iatrogenic risk while still falling short for many patients in achieving clinical remission. In the present work, we explored the capability of target cell membrane-coated nanoparticles to abrogate the effect of pathological antibodies in an effort to minimize disease burden, without the need for drug-based immune suppression. Inspired by antibody-driven pathology, we used intact RBC membranes stabilized by biodegradable polymeric nanoparticle cores to serve as an alternative target for pathological antibodies in an antibody-induced anemia disease model. Through both in vitro and in vivo studies, we demonstrated efficacy of RBC membrane-cloaked nanoparticles to bind and neutralize anti-RBC polyclonal IgG effectively, and thus preserve circulating RBCs. PMID:25197051

  19. Overview of Glutamatergic Dysregulation in Central Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Miladinovic, Tanya; Nashed, Mina G.; Singh, Gurmit

    2015-01-01

    As the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, glutamate plays a key role in many central pathologies, including gliomas, psychiatric, neurodevelopmental, and neurodegenerative disorders. Post-mortem and serological studies have implicated glutamatergic dysregulation in these pathologies, and pharmacological modulation of glutamate receptors and transporters has provided further validation for the involvement of glutamate. Furthermore, efforts from genetic, in vitro, and animal studies are actively elucidating the specific glutamatergic mechanisms that contribute to the aetiology of central pathologies. However, details regarding specific mechanisms remain sparse and progress in effectively modulating glutamate to alleviate symptoms or inhibit disease states has been relatively slow. In this report, we review what is currently known about glutamate signalling in central pathologies. We also discuss glutamate’s mediating role in comorbidities, specifically cancer-induced bone pain and depression. PMID:26569330

  20. Cigarette smoke induced genotoxicity and respiratory tract pathology: evidence to support reduced exposure time and animal numbers in tobacco product testing.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, Annette; Ordoñez, Patricia; Thorne, David; Walker, David; Camacho, Oscar M; Büttner, Ansgar; Dillon, Debbie; Meredith, Clive

    2016-06-01

    Many laboratories are working to develop in vitro models that will replace in vivo tests, but occasionally there remains a regulatory expectation of some in vivo testing. Historically, cigarettes have been tested in vivo for 90 days. Recently, methods to reduce and refine animal use have been explored. This study investigated the potential of reducing animal cigarette smoke (CS) exposure to 3 or 6 weeks, and the feasibility of separate lung lobes for histopathology or the Comet assay. Rats were exposed to sham air or CS (1 or 2 h) for 3 or 6 weeks. Respiratory tissues were processed for histopathological evaluation, and Alveolar type II cells (AEC II) isolated for the Comet assay. Blood was collected for Pig-a and micronucleus quantification. Histopathological analyses demonstrated exposure effects, which were generally dependent on CS dose (1 or 2 h, 5 days/week). Comet analysis identified that DNA damage increased in AEC II following 3 or 6 weeks CS exposure, and the level at 6 weeks was higher than 3 weeks. Pig-a mutation or micronucleus levels were not increased. In conclusion, this study showed that 3 weeks of CS exposure was sufficient to observe respiratory tract pathology and DNA damage in isolated AEC II. Differences between the 3 and 6 week data imply that DNA damage in the lung is cumulative. Reducing exposure time, plus analyzing separate lung lobes for DNA damage or histopathology, supports a strategy to reduce and refine animal use in tobacco product testing and is aligned to the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement).

  1. Cigarette smoke induced genotoxicity and respiratory tract pathology: evidence to support reduced exposure time and animal numbers in tobacco product testing

    PubMed Central

    Dalrymple, Annette; Ordoñez, Patricia; Thorne, David; Walker, David; Camacho, Oscar M.; Büttner, Ansgar; Dillon, Debbie; Meredith, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Many laboratories are working to develop in vitro models that will replace in vivo tests, but occasionally there remains a regulatory expectation of some in vivo testing. Historically, cigarettes have been tested in vivo for 90 days. Recently, methods to reduce and refine animal use have been explored. This study investigated the potential of reducing animal cigarette smoke (CS) exposure to 3 or 6 weeks, and the feasibility of separate lung lobes for histopathology or the Comet assay. Rats were exposed to sham air or CS (1 or 2 h) for 3 or 6 weeks. Respiratory tissues were processed for histopathological evaluation, and Alveolar type II cells (AEC II) isolated for the Comet assay. Blood was collected for Pig-a and micronucleus quantification. Histopathological analyses demonstrated exposure effects, which were generally dependent on CS dose (1 or 2 h, 5 days/week). Comet analysis identified that DNA damage increased in AEC II following 3 or 6 weeks CS exposure, and the level at 6 weeks was higher than 3 weeks. Pig-a mutation or micronucleus levels were not increased. In conclusion, this study showed that 3 weeks of CS exposure was sufficient to observe respiratory tract pathology and DNA damage in isolated AEC II. Differences between the 3 and 6 week data imply that DNA damage in the lung is cumulative. Reducing exposure time, plus analyzing separate lung lobes for DNA damage or histopathology, supports a strategy to reduce and refine animal use in tobacco product testing and is aligned to the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement). PMID:27160659

  2. Extrastriatal dopaminergic abnormalities of DA homeostasis in Parkinson’s patients with medication-induced pathological gambling: A [11C] FLB-457 and PET study

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Nicola J.; Miyasaki, Janis M.; Zurowski, Mateusz; Ko, Ji Hyun; Cho, Sang Soo; Pellecchia, Giovanna; Antonelli, Francesca; Houle, Sylvain; Lang, Anthony E.; Strafella, Antonio P.

    2012-01-01

    Impulse control disorders such as pathological gambling (PG) are a serious and common adverse effect of dopamine (DA) replacement medication in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Patients with PG have increased impulsivity and abnormalities in striatal DA, in common with behavioural and substance addictions in the non-PD population. To date, no studies have investigated the role of extrastriatal dopaminergic abnormalities in PD patients with PG. We used the PET radiotracer, [11C] FLB-457, with high-affinity for extrastriatal DA D2/3 receptors. 14 PD patients on DA agonists were imaged while they performed a gambling task involving real monetary reward and a control task. Trait impulsivity was measured with the Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS). Seven of the patients had a history of PG that developed subsequent to DA agonist medication. Change in [11C] FLB-457 binding potential (BP) during gambling was reduced in PD with PG patients in the midbrain, where D2/D3 receptors are dominated by autoreceptors. The degree of change in [11C] FLB-457 binding in this region correlated with impulsivity. In the cortex, [11C] FLB-457 BP was significantly greater in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in PD patients with PG during the control task, and binding in this region was also correlated with impulsivity. Our findings provide the first evidence that PD patients with PG have dysfunctional activation of DA autoreceptors in the midbrain and low DA tone in the ACC. Thus, altered striatal and cortical DA homeostasis may incur vulnerability for the development of PG in PD, linked with the impulsive personality trait. PMID:22766031

  3. Cigarette smoke induced genotoxicity and respiratory tract pathology: evidence to support reduced exposure time and animal numbers in tobacco product testing.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, Annette; Ordoñez, Patricia; Thorne, David; Walker, David; Camacho, Oscar M; Büttner, Ansgar; Dillon, Debbie; Meredith, Clive

    2016-06-01

    Many laboratories are working to develop in vitro models that will replace in vivo tests, but occasionally there remains a regulatory expectation of some in vivo testing. Historically, cigarettes have been tested in vivo for 90 days. Recently, methods to reduce and refine animal use have been explored. This study investigated the potential of reducing animal cigarette smoke (CS) exposure to 3 or 6 weeks, and the feasibility of separate lung lobes for histopathology or the Comet assay. Rats were exposed to sham air or CS (1 or 2 h) for 3 or 6 weeks. Respiratory tissues were processed for histopathological evaluation, and Alveolar type II cells (AEC II) isolated for the Comet assay. Blood was collected for Pig-a and micronucleus quantification. Histopathological analyses demonstrated exposure effects, which were generally dependent on CS dose (1 or 2 h, 5 days/week). Comet analysis identified that DNA damage increased in AEC II following 3 or 6 weeks CS exposure, and the level at 6 weeks was higher than 3 weeks. Pig-a mutation or micronucleus levels were not increased. In conclusion, this study showed that 3 weeks of CS exposure was sufficient to observe respiratory tract pathology and DNA damage in isolated AEC II. Differences between the 3 and 6 week data imply that DNA damage in the lung is cumulative. Reducing exposure time, plus analyzing separate lung lobes for DNA damage or histopathology, supports a strategy to reduce and refine animal use in tobacco product testing and is aligned to the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement). PMID:27160659

  4. Reactive microglia drive tau pathology and contribute to the spreading of pathological tau in the brain.

    PubMed

    Maphis, Nicole; Xu, Guixiang; Kokiko-Cochran, Olga N; Jiang, Shanya; Cardona, Astrid; Ransohoff, Richard M; Lamb, Bruce T; Bhaskar, Kiran

    2015-06-01

    Pathological aggregation of tau is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies. We have previously shown that the deficiency of the microglial fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1) led to the acceleration of tau pathology and memory impairment in an hTau mouse model of tauopathy. Here, we show that microglia drive tau pathology in a cell-autonomous manner. First, tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation occur as early as 2 months of age in hTauCx3cr1(-/-) mice. Second, CD45(+) microglial activation correlates with the spatial memory deficit and spread of tau pathology in the anatomically connected regions of the hippocampus. Third, adoptive transfer of purified microglia derived from hTauCx3cr1(-/-) mice induces tau hyperphosphorylation within the brains of non-transgenic recipient mice. Finally, inclusion of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (Kineret®) in the adoptive transfer inoculum significantly reduces microglia-induced tau pathology. Together, our results suggest that reactive microglia are sufficient to drive tau pathology and correlate with the spread of pathological tau in the brain.

  5. Reactive microglia drive tau pathology and contribute to the spreading of pathological tau in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Maphis, Nicole; Xu, Guixiang; Kokiko-Cochran, Olga N.; Jiang, Shanya; Cardona, Astrid; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Lamb, Bruce T.

    2015-01-01

    Pathological aggregation of tau is a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease and related tauopathies. We have previously shown that the deficiency of the microglial fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1) led to the acceleration of tau pathology and memory impairment in an hTau mouse model of tauopathy. Here, we show that microglia drive tau pathology in a cell-autonomous manner. First, tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation occur as early as 2 months of age in hTauCx3cr1−/− mice. Second, CD45+ microglial activation correlates with the spatial memory deficit and spread of tau pathology in the anatomically connected regions of the hippocampus. Third, adoptive transfer of purified microglia derived from hTauCx3cr1−/− mice induces tau hyperphosphorylation within the brains of non-transgenic recipient mice. Finally, inclusion of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (Kineret®) in the adoptive transfer inoculum significantly reduces microglia-induced tau pathology. Together, our results suggest that reactive microglia are sufficient to drive tau pathology and correlate with the spread of pathological tau in the brain. PMID:25833819

  6. Rac1 signaling regulates sepsis-induced pathologic inflammation in the lung via attenuation of Mac-1 expression and CXC chemokine formation.

    PubMed

    Hwaiz, Rundk; Hasan, Zirak; Rahman, Milladur; Zhang, Su; Palani, Karzan; Syk, Ingvar; Jeppsson, Bengt; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2013-08-01

    Excessive neutrophil recruitment is a major feature in septic lung damage although the signaling mechanisms behind pulmonary infiltration of neutrophils in sepsis remain elusive. In the present study, we hypothesized that Rac1 might play an important role in pulmonary neutrophil accumulation and tissue injury in abdominal sepsis. Male C57BL/6 mice were treated with Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 (5 mg/kg) before cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue were collected for the quantification of neutrophil recruitment and edema and CXC chemokine formation. Blood was collected for the determination of Mac-1 on neutrophils and proinflammatory compounds in plasma. Gene expression of CXC chemokines and tumor necrosis factor alpha was determined by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in alveolar macrophages. Rac1 activity was increased in lungs from septic animals, and NSC23766 significantly decreased pulmonary activity of Rac1 induced by CLP. Administration of NSC23766 markedly reduced CLP-triggered neutrophil infiltration, edema formation, and tissue damage in the lung. Inhibition of Rac1 decreased CLP-induced neutrophil expression of Mac-1 and pulmonary formation of CXC chemokines. Moreover, NSC23766 abolished the sepsis-evoked elevation of messenger RNA levels of CXC chemokines and tumor necrosis factor alpha in alveolar macrophages. Rac1 inhibition decreased the CLP-induced increase in plasma levels of high mobility group protein B1 and interleukin 6, indicating a role of Rac1 in systemic inflammation. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that Rac1 signaling plays a key role in regulating pulmonary infiltration of neutrophils and tissue injury via regulation of chemokine production in the lung and Mac-1 expression on neutrophils in abdominal sepsis. Thus, targeting Rac1 activity might be a useful strategy to protect the lung in abdominal sepsis.

  7. Molecular Pathology Informatics.

    PubMed

    Roy, Somak

    2015-06-01

    Molecular informatics (MI) is an evolving discipline that will support the dynamic landscape of molecular pathology and personalized medicine. MI provides a fertile ground for development of clinical solutions to bridge the gap between clinical informatics and bioinformatics. Rapid adoption of next generation sequencing (NGS) in the clinical arena has triggered major endeavors in MI that are expected to bring a paradigm shift in the practice of pathology. This brief review presents a broad overview of various aspects of MI, particularly in the context of NGS based testing. PMID:26065793

  8. Complexity and forensic pathology.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard Martin

    2015-12-01

    It has become increasingly apparent that nonlinearity and complexity are the norm in human physiological systems, the relevance of which is informing an enhanced understanding of basic pathological processes such as inflammation, the host response to severe trauma, and critical illness. This article will explore how an understanding of nonlinear systems and complexity might inform the study of the pathophysiology of deaths of medicolegal interest, and how 'complexity thinking' might usefully be incorporated into modern forensic medicine and forensic pathology research, education and practice.

  9. Reinforcement pathology and obesity.

    PubMed

    Carr, Katelyn A; Daniel, Tinuke Oluyomi; Lin, Henry; Epstein, Leonard H

    2011-09-01

    Obesity is, in part, a result of positive energy balance or energy intake exceeding physiological needs. Excess energy intake is determined by a series of food choices over time. These choices involve both motivational and executive function processes. Problems arise when there is excessive motivation to eat and low impulse control, a situation we have termed reinforcement pathology. Motivational and executive function processes have also been implicated in the development of drug dependence and addiction. In this review we discuss the application of reinforcement pathology to obesity, and implications of this approach for obesity treatment. PMID:21999693

  10. Reinforcement pathology and obesity.

    PubMed

    Carr, Katelyn A; Daniel, Tinuke Oluyomi; Lin, Henry; Epstein, Leonard H

    2011-09-01

    Obesity is, in part, a result of positive energy balance or energy intake exceeding physiological needs. Excess energy intake is determined by a series of food choices over time. These choices involve both motivational and executive function processes. Problems arise when there is excessive motivation to eat and low impulse control, a situation we have termed reinforcement pathology. Motivational and executive function processes have also been implicated in the development of drug dependence and addiction. In this review we discuss the application of reinforcement pathology to obesity, and implications of this approach for obesity treatment.

  11. Docosahexaenoic acid promotes dopaminergic differentiation in induced pluripotent stem cells and inhibits teratoma formation in rats with Parkinson-like pathology.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yuh-Lih; Chen, Shih-Jen; Kao, Chung-Lan; Hung, Shih-Chieh; Ding, Dah-Ching; Yu, Cheng-Chia; Chen, Yi-Jen; Ku, Hung-Hai; Lin, Chin-Po; Lee, Kun-Hsiung; Chen, Yu-Chih; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Hsu, Chuan-Chih; Chen, Liang-Kung; Li, Hsin-Yang; Chiou, Shih-Hwa

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the degeneration of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the midbrain. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have shown potential for differentiation and may become a resource of functional neurons for the treatment of PD. However, teratoma formation is a major concern for transplantation-based therapies. This study examined whether functional neurons could be efficiently generated from iPS cells using a five-step induction procedure combined with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) treatment. We demonstrated that DHA, a ligand for the RXR/Nurr1 heterodimer, significantly activated expression of the Nurr1 gene and the Nurr1-related pathway in iPS cells. DHA treatment facilitated iPS differentiation into tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons in vitro and in vivo and functionally increased dopamine release in transplanted grafts in PD-like animals. Furthermore, DHA dramatically upregulated the endogenous expression levels of neuroprotective genes (Bcl-2, Bcl-xl, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor) and protected against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced apoptosis in iPS-derived neuronal precursor cells. DHA-treated iPS cells significantly improved the behavior of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-treated PD-like rats compared to control or eicosapentaenoic acid-treated group. Importantly, the in vivo experiment suggests that DHA induces the differentiation of functional dopaminergic precursors and improves the abnormal behavior of 6-OHDA-treated PD-like rats by 4 months after transplantation. Furthermore, we found that DHA treatment in iPS cell-grafted rats significantly downregulated the mRNA expression of embryonic stem cell-specific genes (Oct-4 and c-Myc) in the graft and effectively blocked teratoma formation. Importantly, 3 Tesla-magnetic resonance imaging and ex vivo green fluorescence protein imaging revealed that no teratomas were present

  12. [Urothelial carcinoma. Does surgical pathology learn from molecular pathology?].

    PubMed

    Hofstädter, F

    2008-11-01

    The question is raised whether the new theories about initiation and progression of urothelial carcinoma gained by molecular techniques show effects on the classification and histopathological diagnosis. As fundamental new concepts are considered: two pathways of tumor progression, clonality of synchronous and metachronous tumors, tumor-analogous molecular findings in flat lesions, and stromal invasion as dominant principle of molecular tumor classification.The dual pathogenesis of molecular pathology is reflected by the WHO 2004 classification by the differentiation into low and high grade malignancy, but diluted by the use of PUNLMP (papillary urothelial neoplasia of low malignant potential). The new concept of frequent oligoclonality should induce investigations about the mechanism of propagation of these migrating or metastasizing cells and whether they possess stem cell characteristics. The role of flat urothelial lesions must be revised from a molecular pathological view point, but the histological diagnosis does not gain profit till now. The expression signatures of stromal invasive tumors compared with non-invasive ones points to the major importance of an exact histopathological diagnosis in this area.

  13. Administration of microparticles from blood of the lipopolysaccharide-treated rats serves to induce pathologic changes of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongxia; Meng, Xiangyu; Liang, Xiaoyan; Gao, Yue

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of intratracheal and intravenous administration of microparticles (MPs) on developing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The blood MPs from lipopolysaccharide-treated rats were collected and examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cellular source of the MPs was identified by fluorescent-labeled antibodies after the circulating MPs were delivered to naïve rats. Levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-10 productions in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma were determined 24 h after the rats received intratracheal and intravenous administration of the MPs. Histopathologic examination of lungs was performed by light microscope. A TEM image of MPs showed spherical particles at a variable diameter from 0.1 to 0.5 µm. Endothelial- and leukocyte-derived vesicles were abundant in the investigated samples. Treatment with MPs may lead to significant increases in MPO, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-10 productions in BALF and plasma of the rats (all P < 0.001). Morphological observation indicated that alveolar structures were destroyed with a large amount of neutrophil infiltration in the lungs of the MP-treated rats. Perivascular and/or intra-alveolar hemorrhage were serious and hyaline membrane formed in the alveoli. Intratracheal and intravenous approaches to delivery of the circulating MPs to naïve recipient rats may induce ARDS. This presents an inducer of the onset of ARDS and provides potential therapeutic targets for attenuating lung injury. PMID:26088862

  14. Pathological Gambling Subtypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vachon, David D.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Although pathological gambling (PG) is regarded in the 4th edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (American Psychiatric Association, 1994) as a unitary diagnostic construct, it is likely composed of distinct subtypes. In the current report, the authors used cluster analyses of personality traits with a…

  15. Pathological Gambling: Psychiatric Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westphal, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Three psychiatric conceptual models: addictive, obsessive-compulsive spectrum and mood spectrum disorder have been proposed for pathological gambling. The objectives of this paper are to (1) evaluate the evidence base from the most recent reviews of each model, (2) update the evidence through 2007 and (3) summarize the status of the evidence for…

  16. Pathological fractures in children

    PubMed Central

    De Mattos, C. B. R.; Binitie, O.; Dormans, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Pathological fractures in children can occur as a result of a variety of conditions, ranging from metabolic diseases and infection to tumours. Fractures through benign and malignant bone tumours should be recognised and managed appropriately by the treating orthopaedic surgeon. The most common benign bone tumours that cause pathological fractures in children are unicameral bone cysts, aneurysmal bone cysts, non-ossifying fibromas and fibrous dysplasia. Although pathological fractures through a primary bone malignancy are rare, these should be recognised quickly in order to achieve better outcomes. A thorough history, physical examination and review of plain radiographs are crucial to determine the cause and guide treatment. In most benign cases the fracture will heal and the lesion can be addressed at the time of the fracture, or after the fracture is healed. A step-wise and multidisciplinary approach is necessary in caring for paediatric patients with malignancies. Pathological fractures do not have to be treated by amputation; these fractures can heal and limb salvage can be performed when indicated. PMID:23610658

  17. Next-Generation Pathology.

    PubMed

    Caie, Peter D; Harrison, David J

    2016-01-01

    The field of pathology is rapidly transforming from a semiquantitative and empirical science toward a big data discipline. Large data sets from across multiple omics fields may now be extracted from a patient's tissue sample. Tissue is, however, complex, heterogeneous, and prone to artifact. A reductionist view of tissue and disease progression, which does not take this complexity into account, may lead to single biomarkers failing in clinical trials. The integration of standardized multi-omics big data and the retention of valuable information on spatial heterogeneity are imperative to model complex disease mechanisms. Mathematical modeling through systems pathology approaches is the ideal medium to distill the significant information from these large, multi-parametric, and hierarchical data sets. Systems pathology may also predict the dynamical response of disease progression or response to therapy regimens from a static tissue sample. Next-generation pathology will incorporate big data with systems medicine in order to personalize clinical practice for both prognostic and predictive patient care.

  18. Effects of Urtica dioica L. seed on lipid peroxidation, antioxidants and liver pathology in aflatoxin-induced tissue injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Yener, Zabit; Celik, Ismail; Ilhan, Fatma; Bal, Ramazan

    2009-02-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the hepatoprotective and antioxidant properties of Urtica dioica L. seeds (UDS) extract against aflatoxin (AF)-exposure in rats. The preventive potential and antioxidant capacity of the plant's extract was evaluated by liver histopathological changes, measuring serum marker enzymes, antioxidant defense systems and lipid peroxidation (Malondialdehyde, MDA) content in some tissues of rats. Eighteen rats were randomly divided into one of three experimental groups: control, AF-treated group and AF+UDS-treated group. Rats in control group were fed with a diet without AF. Rats in AF-treated group and AF+UDS-treated group received approximately 25 microgr of AF/rat/day. AF+UDS groups also received 2 mL of UDS oils/rat/day by gavage for 90 days. Administration of UDS extract restored the AF-induced imbalance between MDA and antioxidant system towards near normal particularly in liver. Hepatoprotection by UDS is further substantiated by the almost normal histologic findings in AF+UDS-treated group as against degenerative changes in the AF-treated rats. It is concluded that UDS has a hepatoprotective effect in rats with aflatoxicosis, probably acting by promoting the antioxidative defense systems. PMID:19073231

  19. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-induced change in intestinal function and pathology: evidence for the involvement of arylhydrocarbon receptor-mediated alteration of glucose transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Takumi; Kan-o, Shoko; Mutoh, Junpei; Takeda, Shuso; Ishii, Yuji; Hashiguchi, Isamu; Akamine, Akifumi; Yamada, Hideyuki . E-mail: yamada@xenoba.phar.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2005-05-15

    Although numerous studies have been performed to clarify the mechanism(s) underlying the toxicological responses induced by dioxins, their effect on the intestine is less well understood. To address this issue, we examined the effect of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on the pathology and function of the intestine in arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-sensitive (C57BL/6J) and -less-sensitive (DBA/2J) mice. A single oral administration of TCDD (100 {mu}g/kg) to C57BL/6J mice produced changes in villous structure and nuclear/cytoplasm ratio in the epithelial cells of the intestine. Furthermore, in an oral glucose tolerance test, the serum glucose level was significantly increased in the C57BL/6J mouse but not in the DBA/2J mouse by TCDD treatment. In agreement with this, the expression of intestinal mRNAs coding sodium-glucose co-transporter 1 (SGLT1) and glucose transporter type 2 were increased only in C57BL/6J mice by TCDD. The increase in the former transporter was also confirmed from its protein level. The glucose level in the intestinal contents is thought to be one of the factors contributing to SGLT1 induction. Concerning with this, the intestinal activity of sucrase and lactase was significantly increased only in C57BL/6J mice by TCDD. These results suggest that while TCDD produces initial damage to the intestinal epithelium, the tissues induce SGLT1 to facilitate the absorption of glucose, which is expected, at least partially, to combat the wasting syndrome induced by TCDD. The data provided here also suggest that AhR is involved in the mechanism of SGLT1 induction.

  20. Pathology informatics fellowship training: Focus on molecular pathology

    PubMed Central

    Mandelker, Diana; Lee, Roy E.; Platt, Mia Y.; Riedlinger, Gregory; Quinn, Andrew; Rao, Luigi K. F.; Klepeis, Veronica E.; Mahowald, Michael; Lane, William J.; Beckwith, Bruce A.; Baron, Jason M.; McClintock, David S.; Kuo, Frank C.; Lebo, Matthew S.; Gilbertson, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pathology informatics is both emerging as a distinct subspecialty and simultaneously becoming deeply integrated within the breadth of pathology practice. As specialists, pathology informaticians need a broad skill set, including aptitude with information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management. Currently, many of those seeking training in pathology informatics additionally choose training in a second subspecialty. Combining pathology informatics training with molecular pathology is a natural extension, as molecular pathology is a subspecialty with high potential for application of modern biomedical informatics techniques. Methods and Results: Pathology informatics and molecular pathology fellows and faculty evaluated the current fellowship program's core curriculum topics and subtopics for relevance to molecular pathology. By focusing on the overlap between the two disciplines, a structured curriculum consisting of didactics, operational rotations, and research projects was developed for those fellows interested in both pathology informatics and molecular pathology. Conclusions: The scope of molecular diagnostics is expanding dramatically as technology advances and our understanding of disease extends to the genetic level. Here, we highlight many of the informatics challenges facing molecular pathology today, and outline specific informatics principles necessary for the training of future molecular pathologists. PMID:24843823

  1. [Czech eponyms in pathology].

    PubMed

    Steiner, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    The 24th European Congress of Pathology taking place in Prague is an opportunity to remind our society of the Czech names appearing as eponyms in pathological terminology: Karel Rokitanský - R. protuberance in dermoid cyst; R. thrombogenic theory of atherosclerosis; Mayer - R. - Küster - Hauser - Winckel syndrome (congenital malformation of the vagina and uterus); Václav Treitz - T. duodenal ligament; T. retroperitoneal hernia; T. uremic colitis; Vilém Dušan Lambl - L. excrescences of heart valves; Lamblia (Giardia) intestinalis, and also the foundation of urological cytology; Stanislav Provázek - Prowazek - Halberstädter bodies (trachoma), Rickettsia Prowazeki (typhus fever); Josef Vaněk - V. tumor (gastric inflammatory fibroid polyp), and also discovery of the etiology of pneumocystic pneumonia; Otto Jírovec - Pneumocystis Jiroveci; Blahoslav Bednář - B. tumor (pigmented dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans).

  2. Attenuation of cold stress-induced exacerbation of cardiac and adipose tissue pathology and metabolic disorders in a rat model of metabolic syndrome by the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU486

    PubMed Central

    Nagasawa, K; Matsuura, N; Takeshita, Y; Ito, S; Sano, Y; Yamada, Y; Uchinaka, A; Murohara, T; Nagata, K

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Chronic stress affects the central nervous system as well as endocrine, metabolic and immune systems. However, the effects of cold stress on cardiovascular and metabolic disorders in metabolic syndrome (MetS) have remained unclear. We recently characterized DahlS.Z-Leprfa/Leprfa (DS/obese) rats, derived from a cross between Dahl salt-sensitive and Zucker rats, as a new animal model of MetS. We have now investigated the effects of chronic cold stress and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) blockade on cardiac and adipose tissue pathology as well as on metabolic parameters in this model. Methods: DS/obese rats were exposed to cold stress (immersion in ice-cold water to a depth of 1–2 cm for 2 h per day) with or without subcutaneous injection of the GR antagonist RU486 (2 mg kg−1day−1) for 4 weeks beginning at 9 weeks of age. Age-matched homozygous lean (DahlS.Z-Lepr+/Lepr+) littermates served as a control. Results: Chronic cold stress exacerbated hypertension as well as left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction in DS/obese rats in a manner sensitive to RU486 treatment. Cold stress with or without RU486 did not affect body weight or fat mass. In contrast, cold stress further increased cardiac oxidative stress as well as macrophage infiltration and proinflammatory gene expression in LV and visceral fat tissue, with all of these effects being attenuated by RU486. Cold stress also further increased GR and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 mRNA and protein abundance in LV and visceral adipose tissue, and these effects were again inhibited by RU486. In addition, RU486 ameliorated the stress-induced aggravation of dyslipidemia, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in DS/obese rats. Conclusions: Our results implicate GR signaling in cold stress-induced exacerbation of cardiac and adipose tissue pathology as well as of abnormal glucose and lipid metabolism in a rat model of MetS. PMID:27110688

  3. [Pathology of implants].

    PubMed

    Mittermayer, C; Eblenkamp, M; Richter, H A; Zwadlo-Klarwasser, G; Bhardwaj, R S; Klosterhalfen, B

    2002-01-01

    Progress in the surgery of implants and biomaterials can be accomplished by: 1. Painstakingly analysing and registering of defaulting implants after explantation within a "National Registry of Implant Pathology". 2. Development of a DNA-microarray named "Implantat/Chronic Wound" in order to discover the differential transcriptional activities of cells brought into contact with different foreign surfaces. 3. Predictive cell-engineering combined with custom-made implant surfaces with the aim of optimal patient care.

  4. [Pathology of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Theegarten, D; Hager, T

    2016-09-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and the second most frequent cause in women. The pathology of lung tumors is of special relevance concerning therapy and prognosis and current classification systems have to be taken into consideration. The results of molecular tissue subtyping allow further classification and therapeutic options. The histological entities are mainly associated with typical X‑ray morphological features. PMID:27495784

  5. Tripartite motif 32 prevents pathological cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jia; Ji, Yanxiao; Zhang, Xiaojing; Wang, Pixiao; Deng, Keqiong; Jiang, Xi; Ma, Genshan

    2016-01-01

    TRIM32 (tripartite motif 32) is widely accepted to be an E3 ligase that interacts with and eventually ubiquitylates multiple substrates. TRIM32 mutants have been associated with LGMD-2H (limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2H). However, whether TRIM32 is involved in cardiac hypertrophy induced by biomechanical stresses and neurohumoral mediators remains unclear. We generated mice and isolated NRCMs (neonatal rat cardiomyocytes) that overexpressed or were deficient in TRIM32 to investigate the effect of TRIM32 on AB (aortic banding) or AngII (angiotensin II)-mediated cardiac hypertrophy. Echocardiography and both pathological and molecular analyses were used to determine the extent of cardiac hypertrophy and subsequent fibrosis. Our results showed that overexpression of TRIM32 in the heart significantly alleviated the hypertrophic response induced by pressure overload, whereas TRIM32 deficiency dramatically aggravated pathological cardiac remodelling. Similar results were also found in cultured NRCMs incubated with AngII. Mechanistically, the present study suggests that TRIM32 exerts cardioprotective action by interruption of Akt- but not MAPK (mitogen-dependent protein kinase)-dependent signalling pathways. Additionally, inactivation of Akt by LY294002 offset the exacerbated hypertrophic response induced by AB in TRIM32-deficient mice. In conclusion, the present study indicates that TRIM32 plays a protective role in AB-induced pathological cardiac remodelling by blocking Akt-dependent signalling. Therefore TRIM32 could be a novel therapeutic target for the prevention of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. PMID:26884348

  6. Pathology Gross Photography: The Beginning of Digital Pathology.

    PubMed

    Rampy, B Alan; Glassy, Eric F

    2016-03-01

    The underutilized practice of photographing anatomic pathology specimens from surgical pathology and autopsies is an invaluable benefit to patients, clinicians, pathologists, and students. Photographic documentation of clinical specimens is essential for the effective practice of pathology. When considering what specimens to photograph, all grossly evident pathology, absent yet expected pathologic features, and gross-only specimens should be thoroughly documented. Specimen preparation prior to photography includes proper lighting and background, wiping surfaces of blood, removing material such as tubes or bandages, orienting the specimen in a logical fashion, framing the specimen to fill the screen, positioning of probes, and using the right-sized scale. PMID:26851666

  7. Pathology Gross Photography: The Beginning of Digital Pathology.

    PubMed

    Rampy, B Alan; Glassy, Eric F

    2015-06-01

    The underutilized practice of photographing anatomic pathology specimens from surgical pathology and autopsies is an invaluable benefit to patients, clinicians, pathologists, and students. Photographic documentation of clinical specimens is essential for the effective practice of pathology. When considering what specimens to photograph, all grossly evident pathology, absent yet expected pathologic features, and gross-only specimens should be thoroughly documented. Specimen preparation prior to photography includes proper lighting and background, wiping surfaces of blood, removing material such as tubes or bandages, orienting the specimen in a logical fashion, framing the specimen to fill the screen, positioning of probes, and using the right-sized scale.

  8. Pathologic and physiologic phimosis

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Thomas B.; Pike, John G.; Leonard, Michael P.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review the differences between physiologic and pathologic phimosis, review proper foreskin care, and discuss when it is appropriate to seek consultation regarding a phimotic foreskin. SOURCES OF INFORMATION This paper is based on selected findings from a MEDLINE search for literature on phimosis and circumcision referrals and on our experience at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Urology Clinic. MeSH headings used in our MEDLINE search included “phimosis,” “referral and consultation,” and “circumcision.” Most of the available articles about phimosis and foreskin referrals were retrospective reviews and cohort studies (levels II and III evidence). MAIN MESSAGE Phimosis is defined as the inability to retract the foreskin. Differentiating between physiologic and pathologic phimosis is important, as the former is managed conservatively and the latter requires surgical intervention. Great anxiety exists among patients and parentsregarding non-retractile foreskins. Most phimosis referrals seen in pediatric urology clinics are normal physiologically phimotic foreskins. Referrals of patients with physiologic phimosis to urology clinics can create anxiety about the need for surgery among patients and parents, while unnecessarily expanding the waiting list for specialty assessment. Uncircumcised penises require no special care. With normal washing, using soap and water, and gentle retraction during urination and bathing, most foreskins will become retractile over time. CONCLUSION Physiologic phimosis is often seen by family physicians. These patients and their parents require reassurance of normalcy and reinforcement of proper preputial hygiene. Consultation should be sought when evidence of pathologic phimosis is present, as this requires surgical management. PMID:17872680

  9. Marketing the pathology practice.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, E N

    1995-07-01

    Effective marketing of the pathology practice is essential in the face of an increasingly competitive market. Successful marketing begins with a market-driven planning process. As opposed to the traditional planning process used in health care organizations, a market-driven approach is externally driven. Implementing a market-driven plan also requires recognition of the definition of the service. Each market to which pathologists direct their service defines the service differently. Recognition of these different service definitions and creation of a product to meet these needs could lead to competitive advantages in the marketplace.

  10. Nanotechnology: Toxicologic Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Hubbs, Ann F.; Sargent, Linda M.; Porter, Dale W.; Sager, Tina M.; Chen, Bean T.; Frazer, David G.; Castranova, Vincent; Sriram, Krishnan; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.; Reynolds, Steven H.; Battelli, Lori A.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; McKinney, Walter; Fluharty, Kara L.; Mercer, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology involves technology, science, and engineering in dimensions less than 100 nm. A virtually infinite number of potential nanoscale products can be produced from many different molecules and their combinations. The exponentially increasing number of nanoscale products will solve critical needs in engineering, science, and medicine. However, the virtually infinite number of potential nanotechnology products is a challenge for toxicologic pathologists. Because of their size, nanoparticulates can have therapeutic and toxic effects distinct from micron-sized particulates of the same composition. In the nanoscale, distinct intercellular and intracellular translocation pathways may provide a different distribution than that obtained by micron-sized particulates. Nanoparticulates interact with subcellular structures including microtubules, actin filaments, centrosomes, and chromatin; interactions that may be facilitated in the nanoscale. Features that distinguish nanoparticulates from fine particulates include increased surface area per unit mass and quantum effects. In addition, some nanotechnology products, including the fullerenes, have a novel and reactive surface. Augmented microscopic procedures including enhanced dark-field imaging, immunofluorescence, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and confocal microscopy are useful when evaluating nanoparticulate toxicologic pathology. Thus, the pathology assessment is facilitated by understanding the unique features at the nanoscale and the tools that can assist in evaluating nanotoxicology studies. PMID:23389777

  11. Aminoglycoside-induced cochlear pathology in man.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, L G; Hawkins, J E; Kingsley, T C; Black, F O; Matz, G J

    1981-01-01

    Temporal bones from five patients with hearing loss as a result of aminoglycoside treatment were examined by the method of microdissection and surface preparations, followed by celloidin embedding and serial sectioning of the modiolus. Three patients had received the newer antibiotics, gentamicin, tobramycin, and amikacin; the other two neomycin. In the cochleas from two patients of the first group there was only a small loss of hair cells, restricted to the lower end of the basal turn. The third, who had been treated with several antibiotics over a longer period of time, showed more extensive but strikingly asymmetrical patterns of degeneration in the two ears. This patient, as well as the fourth, who had received neomycin during peritoneal lavage, had numerous patchy areas of complete disappearance of Corti's organ in the basal turn, with incipient degeneration of the distal ends of the nerve fibers in adjacent portions of the osseous spiral lamina. The fifth patient, who had become deaf after prolonged treatment with neomycin by mouth, showed a complete loss of cochlear hair cells. Nerve fibers were present only in the middle and upper turns, where supporting cells remained. Midmodiolar sections showed a proportionately much greater loss of the distal than of the proximal processes of the cells of the spiral ganglion. These findings underscore once again the special hazard for the inner ear that is associated with the clinical use of neomycin, regardless of the route of administration. PMID:6282040

  12. [Molecular pathology of schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Uezato, Akihito; Nishikawa, Toru

    2013-04-01

    Dopamine hypothesis has dominated as a molecular pathology of schizophrenia over the past few decades and anti-dopaminergic drugs are currently the most widespread available treatment option. Converging lines of evidence suggest altered regulation of other neurotransmitters including glutamate, GABA and acetylcholine, results in the dysregulation of dopaminergic neurons in schizophrenia, and is involved in the comprehensive symptoms such as positive, negative, and cognitive dysfunction. In the prefrontal cortex of patients with schizophrenia; dysfunctional NMDA-type glutamate receptors on GABAergic interneurons cause disinhibition of pyramidal glutamatergic neurons, resulting in increase in the firing of dopaminergic neurons. Cognitive dysfunction of schizophrenia may be a representation of asynchronous glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. In addition to the effects of NMDA receptor modulators including D-serine, emerging evidences of the roles of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on glutamatergic and dopaminergic regulations suggest new treatment options for schizophrenia.

  13. Molecular Pathology and Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Ha, Patrick K; Stenman, Göran

    2016-01-01

    The field of salivary gland tumor biology is quite broad, given the numerous subtypes of both benign and malignant tumors originating from the major and minor salivary glands. Knowledge about the molecular pathology of these lesions is still limited, and there are few clinically useful diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. However, recent discoveries of certain key genomic alterations, such as chromosome translocations, copy number alterations, and mutations, provide new insights into the molecular pathogenesis of these lesions and may help to better define them. It is also hoped that this new knowledge can help to guide therapy, but this translation has been somewhat slow to develop, perhaps due to the rarity of these tumors and the lack of large, randomized studies. However, because of the limitations inherent in what surgery and radiation can provide, there is an urgent need for understanding of the mechanisms of carcinogenesis in these tumors individually, so that chemotherapy and/or targeted therapy can be rationally selected.

  14. Imaging of pituitary pathology.

    PubMed

    Buchfelder, Michael; Schlaffer, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques play a vital role in the diagnosis, surveillance, and treatment monitoring of patients with pituitary disease. For its high soft tissue contrast, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging provides detailed information about the localization and extent of a lesion. It is thus, to date, the most important imaging technique for documenting or ruling out structural lesions. It is usually the first and only imaging procedure to be employed in pituitary pathology. While large pituitary adenomas are reliably depicted in standard T1-weighted sequences, small microadenomas, such as in Cushing's disease, may only become visible if repeat studies, sophisticated techniques and high-field scanners are employed. For monitoring treatment effects after surgical procedures, drug applications, or irradiation, follow-up studies with identical parameters should be employed, preferably at the same investigation site. Some space is devoted to intraoperative imaging, which not only allows assessment of how radical tumor resection needs to be during pituitary tumor surgery, but also provides extremely accurate structural data for neuronavigation. Less frequent lesions, such as craniopharyngiomas, meningiomas, germ cell tumors, gliomas, skull base tumors, hypothalamic hamartomas, vascular malformations, inflammatory and developmental lesions and other, even less frequent pathologies should be considered in the differential diagnosis. The particular strength of computed tomography (CT) is the direct depiction of calcification, a weakness of MRI, and the high resolution of bone structures at the skull base. This chapter presents the characteristics of both frequent and less commonly encountered tumoral lesions, with an emphasis on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:25248586

  15. Pathologic tooth migration.

    PubMed

    Brunsvold, Michael A

    2005-06-01

    Pathologic tooth migration (PTM) is a common complication of moderate to severe periodontitis and is often the motivation for patients to seek periodontal therapy. In this review of the literature, available information concerning prevalence, etiology, treatment, and prevention of pathologic tooth migration is summarized. Prevalence of PTM among periodontal patients has been reported to range from 30.03% to 55.8%. A survey of the literature regarding chief complaints of periodontal patients support these high prevalence findings. The etiology of PTM appears to be multifactorial. Periodontal bone loss appears to be a major factor in the etiology of PTM. Many aspects of occlusion can contribute to abnormal migration of teeth, and more than one of those factors may be present in an individual patient. Soft tissue forces of the tongue, cheeks, and lips are known to cause tooth movement and in some situations can cause PTM. Also considered important in the etiology of PTM is pressure produced from inflammatory tissues within periodontal pockets. Because extrusion is a common form of PTM, clinical observations support the theory that eruption forces sometimes play a role in the etiology of PTM. Many oral habits have been associated with PTM which are often difficult for the therapist to detect. Most cases of severe PTM require a team approach to achieve success. Periodontal, orthodontic, and prosthodontic treatment are often required. Many patient variables enter into the selection of treatment for PTM. In early stages of PTM, spontaneous correction of migrated teeth sometimes occurs after periodontal therapy. Light intrusive forces are used successfully to treat extrusion and flaring forms of PTM. Based on the literature reviewed, it appears that many cases of PTM could be prevented through the early diagnosis and treatment of periodontal disease, occlusal contributing factors, gingival enlargement, and oral habits. PMID:15948679

  16. Pathological characterization and morphometric analysis of hepatic lesions in SHRSP5/Dmcr, an experimental non-alcoholic steatohepatitis model, induced by high-fat and high-cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Horai, Yasushi; Utsumi, Hiroyuki; Ono, Yuko; Kishimoto, Toshimitsu; Ono, Yuuichi; Fukunari, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    SHRSP5/Dmcr is a newly established substrain of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHRSP). Recently, high-fat and high-cholesterol (HFC) diet-fed SHRSP5/Dmcr has been reported as a novel rat model of developing hepatic lesions similar to human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The aim of this study was to investigate the detailed pathological conditions induced by HFC diet in SHRSP5/Dmcr rats using molecular biological methods and morphometric analysis. SHRSP5/Dmcr rats at 6 weeks of age were fed on either HFC diet or stroke-prone (SP) diet for 2, 4, 6, 8 and 16 weeks and histopathological changes in the liver, blood chemistry and mRNA expression levels in the liver were investigated. As evidenced by the histopathological examination of the liver of the SHRSP5/Dmcr rats, hepatic steatosis and lobular inflammation were present, with gradual increasing severity from 2 weeks after the introduction of the HFC diet. Partial hepatic fibrosis was detected at 6 weeks and spread over the entire region of the liver with more severe bridging formation by 16 weeks. The degrees of NASH-like hepatic lesions such as steatosis (the size distribution of lipid droplets), inflammation and fibrosis were quantified by morphometric analysis. Eosinophilic inclusion bodies encountered in the hepatocytes had immunoreactivity with Cox-4 and double-membrane walls, identified as mega-mitochondria. Serum ALT and bilirubins, and the mRNA expression levels related to fibrosis were closely correlated with hepatic histopathological changes. The clear feeding time-dependent progression of NASH-like hepatic lesion in HFC diet-fed SHRSP5/Dmcr rats reinforced the conclusion that this strain might be a useful model of NASH and of inflammatory fibrotic liver disease. PMID:27037502

  17. Nontraditional applications in clinical pathology.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Holly L; Register, Thomas C; Tripathi, Niraj K; Bolliger, Anne Provencher; Everds, Nancy; Zelmanovic, David; Poitout, Florence; Bounous, Denise I; Wescott, Debra; Ramaiah, Shashi K

    2014-10-01

    Most published reviews of preclinical toxicological clinical pathology focus on the fundamental aspects of hematology, clinical chemistry, coagulation, and urinalysis in routine toxicology animal species, for example, rats, mice, dogs, and nonhuman primates. The objective of this continuing education course was to present and discuss contemporary examples of nonroutine applications of clinical pathology endpoints used in the drug development setting. Area experts discussed bone turnover markers of laboratory animal species, clinical pathology of pregnant and growing laboratory animals, clinical pathology of nonroutine laboratory animal species, and unique applications of the Siemens Advia(®) hematology analyzer. This article is a summary based on a presentation given at the 31st Annual Symposium of the Society of Toxicologic Pathology, during the Continuing Education Course titled "Nontraditional Applications of Clinical Pathology in Drug Discovery and Preclinical Toxicology."

  18. [Diagnostic significance of pathologic synkinesis for detection of pyramidal pathology].

    PubMed

    Baliasnyĭ, M M

    1991-01-01

    Five types of pathological synkinesis (++blepharo-ocular, ++blepharo-facial, ++bucco-manual, ++digito-digital on the hands, ++pedo-digital) are described. They are of definite importance for revealing pyramidal pathology including its early stages as well as for objective evaluation and observation of the time-course of changes in the illness. PMID:1654715

  19. [Diagnostic significance of pathologic synkinesis for detection of pyramidal pathology].

    PubMed

    Baliasnyĭ, M M

    1991-01-01

    Five types of pathological synkinesis (++blepharo-ocular, ++blepharo-facial, ++bucco-manual, ++digito-digital on the hands, ++pedo-digital) are described. They are of definite importance for revealing pyramidal pathology including its early stages as well as for objective evaluation and observation of the time-course of changes in the illness.

  20. Forest pathology in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, D.E.

    2003-01-01

    Native Hawaiian forests are characterised by a high degree of endemism, including pathogens as well as their hosts. With the exceptions of koa (Acacia koa Gray), possibly maile (Alyxia oliviformis Gaud.), and, in the past, sandalwood (Santalum spp.), forest species are of little commercial value. On the other hand, these forests are immensely important from a cultural, ecological, and evolutionary standpoint. Forest disease research was lacking during the mid-twentieth century, but increased markedly with the recognition of ohia (Metrosideros polymorpha Gaud.) decline in the 1970s. Because many pathogens are themselves endemic, or are assumed to be, having evolved with their hosts, research emphasis in natural areas is on understanding host-parasite interactions and evolutionary influences, rather than disease control. Aside from management of native forests, attempts at establishing a commercial forest industry have included importation of several species of pine, Araucaria, and Eucalyptus as timber crops, and of numerous ornamentals. Diseases of these species have been introduced with their hosts. The attacking of native species by introduced pathogens is problematic - for example, Armillaria mellea (Vahl ex Fr.) Que??l. on koa and mamane (Sophora chrysophylla (Salisb.) Seem.). Much work remains to be done in both native and commercial aspects of Hawaiian forest pathology.

  1. Microchimerism in endocrine pathology.

    PubMed

    Rust, Daniel W; Bianchi, Diana W

    2009-01-01

    Chimerism in an individual refers to the coexistence of cells arising from two distinct organisms. It can arise iatrogenically via transplant or blood transfusion, and physiologically via twin to twin transfer, or from trafficking between mother and fetus during pregnancy. Many of the diseases associated with microchimerism affect the endocrine system (e.g., autoimmune thyroid disease and diabetes mellitus type 1). Microchimerism is relevant to endocrine pathology because (a) it is associated with pregnancy, a condition of complex endocrine physiology; (b) materno-fetal and feto-maternal cellular migration must involve the placenta, itself an endocrine organ; and (c) in some species, chimerism results in states of intersexuality, a condition intimately involved with endocrine physiology. Studies of feto-maternal microchimerism in the thyroid have documented the presence of fetal cells in association with Hashimoto thyroiditis, Graves' disease, thyroid adenoma, and papillary thyroid carcinoma. Studies of materno-fetal microchimerism have documented the presence of maternal cells in juvenile diabetes and other pediatric conditions. Microchimerism plays a potential role in the repair of diseased thyroid and pancreatic tissues.

  2. Rabies: ocular pathology.

    PubMed Central

    Haltia, M; Tarkkanen, A; Kivelä, T

    1989-01-01

    Ocular pathology in the first European case of human bat-borne rabies is described. The patient was a 30-year-old bat scientist who seven weeks after bat bite developed neurological symptoms and died 23 days later. Rabies virus antigens were detected in brain smears. After extensive virological studies the virus turned out to be a rabies-related virus, closely resembling the Duvenhage virus isolated from bats in South Africa in 1980. By light microscopy focal chronic inflammatory infiltration of the ciliary body and of the choroid was found. PAS-positive exudate was seen in the subretinal and in the outer plexiform layers of the retina, and retinal veins showed endothelial damage and perivascular inflammation. Many of the retinal ganglion cells were destroyed. The presence of rabies-related viral antigen in the retinal ganglion cells was shown by positive cytoplasmic immunofluorescence, though electron microscopy failed to identify definite viral structures in the retina. By immunohistochemistry glial fibrillary acidic protein was observed in the Müller's cells, which are normally negative for this antigen but express it as a reactive change when the retina is damaged. Synaptophysin, a constituent of presynaptic vesicles of normal retinal neurons, was not detected in the retina. Images PMID:2920157

  3. Pathology of bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Domingo, M; Vidal, E; Marco, A

    2014-10-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is a chronic granulomatous caseous-necrotising inflammatory process that mainly affects the lungs and their draining lymph nodes (Ln.). The pathological changes associated with bTB infection reflect the interplay between the host defence mechanisms and the mycobacterial virulence factors and the balance between the immunologic protective responses and the damaging inflammatory processes. Inhalation is the most common infection route and causes lesions of the nasopharynx and lower respiratory tract, including its associated lymph nodes. The initial infection (primary complex) may be followed by chronic (post-primary) tuberculosis or may be generalised. Goat tuberculosis often produces liquefactive necrosis and caverns, similarly to human TB. The assessment of the severity of TB lesions is crucial for vaccine trials. Semi-quantitative gross lesion scoring systems have been developed for cattle, but imaging technology has allowed the development of more standardised, objective, and quantitative methods, such as multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), which provides quantitative measures of lesion volume. PMID:24731532

  4. Pathologies Associated with the p53 Response

    PubMed Central

    Gudkov, Andrei V.; Komarova, Elena A.

    2010-01-01

    Although p53 is a major cancer preventive factor, under certain extreme stress conditions it may induce severe pathologies. Analyses of animal models indicate that p53 is largely responsible for the toxicity of ionizing radiation or DNA damaging drugs contributing to hematopoietic component of acute radiation syndrome and largely determining severe adverse effects of cancer treatment. p53-mediated damage is strictly tissue specific and occurs in tissues prone to p53-dependent apoptosis (e.g., hematopoietic system and hair follicles); on the contrary, p53 can serve as a survival factor in tissues that respond to p53 activation by cell cycle arrest (e.g., endothelium of small intestine). There are multiple experimental indications that p53 contributes to pathogenicity of acute ischemic diseases. Temporary reversible suppression of p53 by small molecules can be an effective and safe approach to reduce severity of p53-associated pathologies. PMID:20595398

  5. Regression of Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy: Signaling Pathways and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jianglong; Kang, Y. James

    2012-01-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy is a key risk factor for heart failure. It is associated with increased interstitial fibrosis, cell death and cardiac dysfunction. The progression of pathological cardiac hypertrophy has long been considered as irreversible. However, recent clinical observations and experimental studies have produced evidence showing the reversal of pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Left ventricle assist devices used in heart failure patients for bridging to transplantation not only improve peripheral circulation but also often cause reverse remodeling of the geometry and recovery of the function of the heart. Dietary supplementation with physiologically relevant levels of copper can reverse pathological cardiac hypertrophy in mice. Angiogenesis is essential and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a constitutive factor for the regression. The action of VEGF is mediated by VEGF receptor-1, whose activation is linked to cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase-1 (PKG-1) signaling pathways, and inhibition of cyclic GMP degradation leads to regression of pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Most of these pathways are regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor. Potential therapeutic targets for promoting the regression include: promotion of angiogenesis, selective enhancement of VEGF receptor-1 signaling pathways, stimulation of PKG-1 pathways, and sustention of hypoxia-inducible factor transcriptional activity. More exciting insights into the regression of pathological cardiac hypertrophy are emerging. The time of translating the concept of regression of pathological cardiac hypertrophy to clinical practice is coming. PMID:22750195

  6. Pathology of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Makoto; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Aoki, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a serious health and socioeconomic issue all over the world, affecting more than 300 million individuals. The disease is considered as an inflammatory disease in the airway, leading to airway hyperresponsiveness, obstruction, mucus hyper-production and airway wall remodeling. The presence of airway inflammation in asthmatic patients has been found in the nineteenth century. As the information in patients with asthma increase, paradigm change in immunology and molecular biology have resulted in an extensive evaluation of inflammatory cells and mediators involved in the pathophysiology of asthma. Moreover, it is recognized that airway remodeling into detail, characterized by thickening of the airway wall, can be profound consequences on the mechanics of airway narrowing and contribute to the chronic progression of the disease. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition plays an important role in airway remodeling. These epithelial and mesenchymal cells cause persistence of the inflammatory infiltration and induce histological changes in the airway wall, increasing thickness of the basement membrane, collagen deposition and smooth muscle hypertrophy and hyperplasia. Resulting of airway inflammation, airway remodeling leads to the airway wall thickening and induces increased airway smooth muscle mass, which generate asthmatic symptoms. Asthma is classically recognized as the typical Th2 disease, with increased IgE levels and eosinophilic inflammation in the airway. Emerging Th2 cytokines modulates the airway inflammation, which induces airway remodeling. Biological agents, which have specific molecular targets for these Th2 cytokines, are available and clinical trials for asthma are ongoing. However, the relatively simple paradigm has been doubted because of the realization that strategies designed to suppress Th2 function are not effective enough for all patients in the clinical trials. In the future, it is required to understand more details for phenotypes of

  7. Digital pathology and anatomic pathology laboratory information system integration to support digital pathology sign-out

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Huazhang; Birsa, Joe; Farahani, Navid; Hartman, Douglas J.; Piccoli, Anthony; O’Leary, Matthew; McHugh, Jeffrey; Nyman, Mark; Stratman, Curtis; Kvarnstrom, Vanja; Yousem, Samuel; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-01-01

    Background: The adoption of digital pathology offers benefits over labor-intensive, time-consuming, and error-prone manual processes. However, because most workflow and laboratory transactions are centered around the anatomical pathology laboratory information system (APLIS), adoption of digital pathology ideally requires integration with the APLIS. A digital pathology system (DPS) integrated with the APLIS was recently implemented at our institution for diagnostic use. We demonstrate how such integration supports digital workflow to sign-out anatomical pathology cases. Methods: Workflow begins when pathology cases get accessioned into the APLIS (CoPathPlus). Glass slides from these cases are then digitized (Omnyx VL120 scanner) and automatically uploaded into the DPS (Omnyx® Integrated Digital Pathology (IDP) software v.1.3). The APLIS transmits case data to the DPS via a publishing web service. The DPS associates scanned images with the correct case using barcode labels on slides and information received from the APLIS. When pathologists remotely open a case in the DPS, additional information (e.g. gross pathology details, prior cases) gets retrieved from the APLIS through a query web service. Results: Following validation of this integration, pathologists at our institution have signed out more than 1000 surgical pathology cases in a production environment. Integration between the APLIS and DPS enabled pathologists to review digital slides while simultaneously having access to pertinent case metadata. The introduction of a digital workflow eliminated costly manual tasks involving matching of glass slides and avoided delays waiting for glass slides to be delivered. Conclusion: Integrating the DPS and APLIS were instrumental for successfully implementing a digital solution at our institution for pathology sign-out. The integration streamlined our digital sign-out workflow, diminished the potential for human error related to matching slides, and improved the sign

  8. Image Analysis in Surgical Pathology.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Mark C; Monaco, James P; Bui, Marilyn M

    2016-06-01

    Digitization of glass slides of surgical pathology samples facilitates a number of value-added capabilities beyond what a pathologist could previously do with a microscope. Image analysis is one of the most fundamental opportunities to leverage the advantages that digital pathology provides. The ability to quantify aspects of a digital image is an extraordinary opportunity to collect data with exquisite accuracy and reliability. In this review, we describe the history of image analysis in pathology and the present state of technology processes as well as examples of research and clinical use. PMID:27241112

  9. Utilization management in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Lewandrowski, Kent; Black-Schaffer, Steven

    2014-01-01

    There is relatively little published literature concerning utilization management in anatomic pathology. Nonetheless there are many utilization management opportunities that currently exist and are well recognized. Some of these impact only the cost structure within the pathology department itself whereas others reduce charges for third party payers. Utilization management may result in medical legal liabilities for breaching the standard of care. For this reason it will be important for pathology professional societies to develop national utilization guidelines to assist individual practices in implementing a medically sound approach to utilization management.

  10. Cue reactivity in active pathological, abstinent pathological, and regular gamblers.

    PubMed

    Sodano, Ruthlyn; Wulfert, Edelgard

    2010-03-01

    Twenty-one treatment-seeking pathological gamblers, 21 pathological gamblers in recovery, and 21 recreational gamblers watched two video-taped exciting gambling scenarios and an exciting roller-coaster control scenario while their arousal (heart rate and subjective excitement) and urge to gamble were being measured. The gamblers did not differ significantly in cue-elicited heart rate elevations or excitement. However, the active pathological gamblers reported significantly greater urges to gamble across all cues compared to the abstinent pathological gamblers and, with marginal significance (p = 0.06), also compared to the social gamblers. Further exploration of these findings revealed that active pathological gamblers experience urges to gamble in response to exciting situations, whether or not they are gambling related, whereas abstinent and social gamblers only report urges to an exciting gambling-related cue. This suggests that for pathological gamblers excitement itself, irrespective of its source, may become a conditioned stimulus capable of triggering gambling behavior. Implications for treatment and future research are discussed. PMID:19662519

  11. Meckel on developmental pathology.

    PubMed

    Opitz, John M; Schultka, Rüdiger; Göbbel, Luminita

    2006-01-15

    cartilage named after him, and as having interpreted, correctly, the developmental nature of the "Meckel" diverticulum. It is virtually unknown that Meckel also first enuntiated the concept and distinction between primary and secondary malformations/anomalies, introduced the notion of heredity into the causal analysis of congenital anomalies, was the father of syndromology (the Meckel syndrome), had a clear understanding of pleiotropy and heterogeneity, and can unequivocally be regarded as the father of developmental pathology. In hindsight, and inspite of much professional success, Meckel emerges as a tragic figure in the history of biology, his life cut short at 52 without an ability to incorporate cell theory and the embryological insights of his younger contemporaries into his intellectual edifice which might have made it possible for him to finally and clearly see "analogy" (now homology), of which he was the greatest expert in his era, as incontrovertible evidence for descent. In that case, Darwin and Haeckel might have even had the courtesy of a tip-of-the-hat in Meckel's direction. PMID:16353245

  12. [Proteoglycans and pathology--new aspects].

    PubMed

    Kolset, S O; Drevon, C A; Prydz, K

    1997-03-10

    It is well documented that proteoglycans are involved in a wide range of pathological conditions. Recently published results in international journals provide new information on the role of proteoglycans in such conditions. A mutation in the gene encoding for a cell surface proteoglycan has been demonstrated in overgrowth syndromes. A proteoglycan has been isolated from urine and shown to induce cachexia in cancer patients. Furthermore, in both achondrogenesis and colon cancer, the reduced ability to sulphate proteoglycans is due to genetic defects in cellular sulfate transporters. Finally, fibrosis has been inhibited in glomerulonephritic mice by transferring the gene for decorin, a transforming growth factor beta-1 binding proteoglycan, into muscle tissue. PMID:9103006

  13. [Pathology of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease].

    PubMed

    Oka, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Although genetic testing is available, nerve biopsy is useful in selected patients for the diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). These are sporadic cases of hereditary neuropathy, or familial cases in which genetic testing is negative. CMT is caused by mutations of various genes. The pathological features of CMT have mostly been investigated using nerve biopsy, which may shed light on the presumed functions of mutated gene products. PMP22 duplication in CMT1A induces numerous large onion bulb lesions (OB). Compared to chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, the differential features of CMT1A are patchy distribution of OB and non-inflammatory lesions. CMT1B also manifests as OB, but presents abnormal compaction of myelin sheaths caused by uncompacted myelin or excessive myelin folding. CMT2 includes axonal neuropathies and many causative genes have been found. CMT2A (MFN2 mutation) shows abnormal mitochondria with a spherical morphology instead of tubular in the longitudinal direction. CMT4 consists of autosomal recessive forms with demyelinating pathology. Most subtypes have mutations of genes relating to myelin maintenance, and pathologically, they show abnormal folding of the myelin structure.

  14. American Society for Clinical Pathology

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Clinical Pathology Expands List of Commonly Used Tests and Treatments Physicians and Patients Should Question CMS Listens to ASCP, Gives Providers more Flexibility in MACRA Implementation ePolicy News September 2016 Urge ...

  15. Detection of peripheral nerve pathology

    PubMed Central

    Seelig, Michael J.; Baker, Jonathan C.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Pestronk, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare accuracy of ultrasound and MRI for detecting focal peripheral nerve pathology, excluding idiopathic carpal or cubital tunnel syndromes. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of patients referred for neuromuscular ultrasound to identify patients who had ultrasound and MRI of the same limb for suspected brachial plexopathy or mononeuropathies, excluding carpal/cubital tunnel syndromes. Ultrasound and MRI results were compared to diagnoses determined by surgical or, if not performed, clinical/electrodiagnostic evaluation. Results: We identified 53 patients who had both ultrasound and MRI of whom 46 (87%) had nerve pathology diagnosed by surgical (n = 39) or clinical/electrodiagnostic (n = 14) evaluation. Ultrasound detected the diagnosed nerve pathology (true positive) more often than MRI (43/46 vs 31/46, p < 0.001). Nerve pathology was correctly excluded (true negative) with equal frequency by MRI and ultrasound (both 6/7). In 25% (13/53), ultrasound was accurate (true positive or true negative) when MRI was not. These pathologies were typically (10/13) long (>2 cm) and only occasionally (2/13) outside the MRI field of view. MRI missed multifocal pathology identified with ultrasound in 6 of 7 patients, often (5/7) because pathology was outside the MRI field of view. Conclusions: Imaging frequently detects peripheral nerve pathology and contributes to the differential diagnosis in patients with mononeuropathies and brachial plexopathies. Ultrasound is more sensitive than MRI (93% vs 67%), has equivalent specificity (86%), and better identifies multifocal lesions than MRI. In sonographically accessible regions ultrasound is the preferred initial imaging modality for anatomic evaluation of suspected peripheral nervous system lesions. PMID:23553474

  16. Clinical pathology of alcohol.

    PubMed Central

    Marks, V

    1983-01-01

    There is good though not conclusive evidence that a small to modest average daily intake of alcohol--that is, 20-30 g/day is associated with increased longevity due mainly to a reduction in death from cardiovascular disease. Larger average daily alcohol intakes--especially those in excess of 60 g/day for men and 40 g/day for women--are associated with gradually increasing morbidity and mortality rates from a variety of diseases. Alcohol may be unrecognised as the cause of somatic disease, which can occur without overt psychosocial evidence of alcohol abuse, unless the index of suspicion is high and a thorough drink history obtained. Laboratory tests for the detection and/or confirmation of alcohol abuse are useful but subject to serious limitations being neither as sensitive nor specific as sometimes believed. The value of random blood and/or breath alcohol measurements, in outpatients, as an aid to diagnosis of alcohol-induced organic disease is probably not sufficiently appreciated and, though relatively insensitive, is highly specific. PMID:6339563

  17. Clowns benefit children hospitalized for respiratory pathologies.

    PubMed

    Bertini, Mario; Isola, Elena; Paolone, Giuseppe; Curcio, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    The study aims at evaluating health-generating function of humor therapy in a hospital ward hosting children suffering from respiratory pathologies. The main scope of this study is to investigate possible positive effects of the presence of a clown on both the clinical evolution of the on-going disease, and on some physiological and pain parameters. Forty-three children with respiratory pathologies participated in the study: 21 of them belonged to the experimental group (EG) and 22 children to the control group (CG). During their hospitalization, the children of the EG interacted with two clowns who were experienced in the field of pediatric intervention. All participants were evaluated with respect to clinical progress and to a series of physiological and pain measures both before and after the clown interaction. When compared with the CG, EG children showed an earlier disappearance of the pathological symptoms. Moreover, the interaction of the clown with the children led to a statistically significant lowering of diastolic blood pressure, respiratory frequency and temperature in the EG as compared with the control group. The other two parameters of systolic pressure and heart frequency yielded results in the same direction, without reaching statistical significance. A similar health-inducing effect of clown presence was observed on pain parameters, both by self evaluation and assessment by nurses. Taken together, our data indicate that the presence of clowns in the ward has a possible health-inducing effect. Thus, humor can be seen as an easy-to-use, inexpensive and natural therapeutic modality to be used within different therapeutic settings. PMID:21785637

  18. Clowns Benefit Children Hospitalized for Respiratory Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Bertini, Mario; Isola, Elena; Paolone, Giuseppe; Curcio, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    The study aims at evaluating health-generating function of humor therapy in a hospital ward hosting children suffering from respiratory pathologies. The main scope of this study is to investigate possible positive effects of the presence of a clown on both the clinical evolution of the on-going disease, and on some physiological and pain parameters. Forty-three children with respiratory pathologies participated in the study: 21 of them belonged to the experimental group (EG) and 22 children to the control group (CG). During their hospitalization, the children of the EG interacted with two clowns who were experienced in the field of pediatric intervention. All participants were evaluated with respect to clinical progress and to a series of physiological and pain measures both before and after the clown interaction. When compared with the CG, EG children showed an earlier disappearance of the pathological symptoms. Moreover, the interaction of the clown with the children led to a statistically significant lowering of diastolic blood pressure, respiratory frequency and temperature in the EG as compared with the control group. The other two parameters of systolic pressure and heart frequency yielded results in the same direction, without reaching statistical significance. A similar health-inducing effect of clown presence was observed on pain parameters, both by self evaluation and assessment by nurses. Taken together, our data indicate that the presence of clowns in the ward has a possible health-inducing effect. Thus, humor can be seen as an easy-to-use, inexpensive and natural therapeutic modality to be used within different therapeutic settings. PMID:21785637

  19. Clowns benefit children hospitalized for respiratory pathologies.

    PubMed

    Bertini, Mario; Isola, Elena; Paolone, Giuseppe; Curcio, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    The study aims at evaluating health-generating function of humor therapy in a hospital ward hosting children suffering from respiratory pathologies. The main scope of this study is to investigate possible positive effects of the presence of a clown on both the clinical evolution of the on-going disease, and on some physiological and pain parameters. Forty-three children with respiratory pathologies participated in the study: 21 of them belonged to the experimental group (EG) and 22 children to the control group (CG). During their hospitalization, the children of the EG interacted with two clowns who were experienced in the field of pediatric intervention. All participants were evaluated with respect to clinical progress and to a series of physiological and pain measures both before and after the clown interaction. When compared with the CG, EG children showed an earlier disappearance of the pathological symptoms. Moreover, the interaction of the clown with the children led to a statistically significant lowering of diastolic blood pressure, respiratory frequency and temperature in the EG as compared with the control group. The other two parameters of systolic pressure and heart frequency yielded results in the same direction, without reaching statistical significance. A similar health-inducing effect of clown presence was observed on pain parameters, both by self evaluation and assessment by nurses. Taken together, our data indicate that the presence of clowns in the ward has a possible health-inducing effect. Thus, humor can be seen as an easy-to-use, inexpensive and natural therapeutic modality to be used within different therapeutic settings.

  20. Domoic Acid Toxicologic Pathology: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Pulido, Olga M.

    2008-01-01

    Domoic acid was identified as the toxin responsible for an outbreak of human poisoning that occurred in Canada in 1987 following consumption of contaminated blue mussels [Mytilus edulis]. The poisoning was characterized by a constellation of clinical symptoms and signs. Among the most prominent features described was memory impairment which led to the name Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning [ASP]. Domoic acid is produced by certain marine organisms, such as the red alga Chondria armata and planktonic diatom of the genus Pseudo-nitzschia. Since 1987, monitoring programs have been successful in preventing other human incidents of ASP. However, there are documented cases of domoic acid intoxication in wild animals and outbreaks of coastal water contamination in many regions world-wide. Hence domoic acid continues to pose a global risk to the health and safety of humans and wildlife. Several mechanisms have been implicated as mediators for the effects of domoic acid. Of particular importance is the role played by glutamate receptors as mediators of excitatory neurotransmission and the demonstration of a wide distribution of these receptors outside the central nervous system, prompting the attention to other tissues as potential target sites. The aim of this document is to provide a comprehensive review of ASP, DOM induced pathology including ultrastructural changes associated to subchronic oral exposure, and discussion of key proposed mechanisms of cell/tissue injury involved in DOM induced brain pathology and considerations relevant to food safety and human health. PMID:18728725

  1. Introduction: human pathology within the broad scope of comparative pathology.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, H E

    1996-01-01

    Pathologic integration is the basic phenomenon of comparative pathology. Since man evolved as earth's most influential species, he was unequally influenced the progression and prevention of diseases in himself and other species. This has both positive and negative ramifications. Positive influences have been life-style, the prolongation of life under healthy conditions and medical progress as seen in the treatment of diabetes mellitus, dental hygiene and other factors, such as the decrease of infectious and parasitic diseases, which are still dominating factors in developing nations. Negative influences are side effects of medical treatments, the appearance of occupational, and certain recreational diseases. These are the pathologic effects of man's life-style to which car accidents, smoking and other factors can be added. Different species are affected by environmental changes such as pollution, ozone, acidic rain, polluted food, and transmission of different diseases from one species to another. Interspecies-specifically the direct influence of man in the extermination of other species, or the indirect influence such as through pollutants in the environment producing chain reactions in different species, can be distinguished. The physical environment has been changed as can be seen in air pollution in large cities, the damage to the ozone layer and the increase of malignant melanoma in certain regions of western Australia. The industrialized nations are dominated by non-infectious diseases such as atherosclerosis and neoplasms, whereas in the developing nations parasitic and infectious diseases stand in the fore-front. Particular diseases like acquired immunodeficiency syndrome increase in both types of nations. These diseases may have developed from other species, e.g. the plague which was originally a disease of rodents, especially rats where it was transmitted by the flea, Xenopsylla cheopis, Rothschild. The principle of foremost importance is the disruption

  2. High-Molecular-Weight Paired Helical Filaments from Alzheimer Brain Induces Seeding of Wild-Type Mouse Tau into an Argyrophilic 4R Tau Pathology in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Audouard, Emilie; Houben, Sarah; Masaracchia, Caterina; Yilmaz, Zehra; Suain, Valérie; Authelet, Michèle; De Decker, Robert; Buée, Luc; Boom, Alain; Leroy, Karelle; Ando, Kunie; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2016-10-01

    In Alzheimer disease, the development of tau pathology follows neuroanatomically connected pathways, suggesting that abnormal tau species might recruit normal tau by passage from cell to cell. Herein, we analyzed the effect of stereotaxic brain injection of human Alzheimer high-molecular-weight paired helical filaments (PHFs) in the dentate gyrus of wild-type and mutant tau THY-Tau22 mice. After 3 months of incubation, wild-type and THY-Tau22 mice developed an atrophy of the dentate gyrus and a tau pathology characterized by Gallyas and tau-positive grain-like inclusions into granule cells that extended in the hippocampal hilus and eventually away into the alveus, and the fimbria. Gallyas-positive neuropil threads and oligodendroglial coiled bodies were also observed. These tau inclusions were composed only of mouse tau, and were immunoreactive with antibodies to 4R tau, phosphotau, misfolded tau, ubiquitin, and p62. Although local hyperphosphorylation of tau was increased in the dentate gyrus in THY-Tau22 mice, the development of neurofibrillary tangles made of mutant human tau was not accelerated in the hippocampus, indicating that wild-type human PHFs were inefficient in seeding tau aggregates made of G272V/P301S mutant human tau. Our results indicate thus that injection of human wild-type Alzheimer PHF seeded aggregation of wild-type murine tau into an argyrophilic 4R tau pathology, and constitutes an interesting model independent of expression of a mutant tau protein.

  3. High-Molecular-Weight Paired Helical Filaments from Alzheimer Brain Induces Seeding of Wild-Type Mouse Tau into an Argyrophilic 4R Tau Pathology in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Audouard, Emilie; Houben, Sarah; Masaracchia, Caterina; Yilmaz, Zehra; Suain, Valérie; Authelet, Michèle; De Decker, Robert; Buée, Luc; Boom, Alain; Leroy, Karelle; Ando, Kunie; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2016-10-01

    In Alzheimer disease, the development of tau pathology follows neuroanatomically connected pathways, suggesting that abnormal tau species might recruit normal tau by passage from cell to cell. Herein, we analyzed the effect of stereotaxic brain injection of human Alzheimer high-molecular-weight paired helical filaments (PHFs) in the dentate gyrus of wild-type and mutant tau THY-Tau22 mice. After 3 months of incubation, wild-type and THY-Tau22 mice developed an atrophy of the dentate gyrus and a tau pathology characterized by Gallyas and tau-positive grain-like inclusions into granule cells that extended in the hippocampal hilus and eventually away into the alveus, and the fimbria. Gallyas-positive neuropil threads and oligodendroglial coiled bodies were also observed. These tau inclusions were composed only of mouse tau, and were immunoreactive with antibodies to 4R tau, phosphotau, misfolded tau, ubiquitin, and p62. Although local hyperphosphorylation of tau was increased in the dentate gyrus in THY-Tau22 mice, the development of neurofibrillary tangles made of mutant human tau was not accelerated in the hippocampus, indicating that wild-type human PHFs were inefficient in seeding tau aggregates made of G272V/P301S mutant human tau. Our results indicate thus that injection of human wild-type Alzheimer PHF seeded aggregation of wild-type murine tau into an argyrophilic 4R tau pathology, and constitutes an interesting model independent of expression of a mutant tau protein. PMID:27497324

  4. Communication skills in diagnostic pathology.

    PubMed

    Lehr, Hans-Anton; Bosman, Fred T

    2016-01-01

    Communication is an essential element of good medical practice also in pathology. In contrast to technical or diagnostic skills, communication skills are not easy to define, teach, or assess. Rules almost do not exist. In this paper, which has a rather personal character and cannot be taken as a set of guidelines, important aspects of communication in pathology are explored. This includes what should be communicated to the pathologist on the pathology request form, communication between pathologists during internal (interpathologist) consultation, communication around frozen section diagnoses, modalities of communication of a final diagnosis, with whom and how critical and unexpected findings should be communicated, (in-)adequate routes of communication for pathology diagnoses, who will (or might) receive pathology reports, and what should be communicated and how in case of an error or a technical problem. An earlier more formal description of what the responsibilities are of a pathologist as communicator and as collaborator in a medical team is added in separate tables. The intention of the paper is to stimulate reflection and discussion rather than to formulate strict rules.

  5. The pathology of shin splints.

    PubMed

    Kues, J M

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to critically evaluate experimental evidence describing the pathology associated with shin splints. Shin splints are defined as medial or posteromedial leg pain which is brought about by walking, running, or related activities and which decreases with rest. The evidence indicates that shin splints may be due to pathology of the posteromedial tibial cortex, the periosteum of the posteromedial tibia, or the crural fascia of the deep posterior compartment of the leg. Research is needed to determine if increased pressure in the deep posterior compartment of the leg or pathology of the muscles, tendons, or interosseous membrane of the leg are associated with shin splints. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 1990;12(3):115-121.

  6. [Pathology of the vitreomacular interface].

    PubMed

    Pop, Monica; Gheorghe, Alina

    2014-01-01

    Vitreous role in the pathophysiology of retinal diseases has increased importantly over the recent years. This was possible using Optical Coherence Tomography which reviewed the way the vitreoretinal interface should be looked at and defined and classified new pathologies such as Vitreoretinal Traction Syndrome. Vitreous is not an empty space but an important anatomical structure with role in ocular physiology. With age biochemical changes occur so that vitreous starts to liquefy. Once the vitreous is liquefied (sinchisis) it collapses and passes in the retrohialoid space (sineresis). In complete PVD besides sinchisis there is a weakness of the adherence between the posterior cortex and ILM with total detachment of posterior cortex. Abnormal adhesions are associated with incomplete PVD. The definition and understanting of vitreoretinal pathology is an active and continuous process, PVD being the trigger of a lot of retinal pathologies: epiretinal membrane, macular hole, tractional macular oedema, VMTS, myopic traction maculopathy, exacerbations of exudative ARMD.

  7. Optimal breast cancer pathology manifesto.

    PubMed

    Tot, T; Viale, G; Rutgers, E; Bergsten-Nordström, E; Costa, A

    2015-11-01

    This manifesto was prepared by a European Breast Cancer (EBC) Council working group and launched at the European Breast Cancer Conference in Glasgow on 20 March 2014. It sets out optimal technical and organisational requirements for a breast cancer pathology service, in the light of concerns about variability and lack of patient-centred focus. It is not a guideline about how pathology services should be performed. It is a call for all in the cancer community--pathologists, oncologists, patient advocates, health administrators and policymakers--to check that services are available that serve the needs of patients in a high quality, timely way.

  8. Optimal breast cancer pathology manifesto.

    PubMed

    Tot, T; Viale, G; Rutgers, E; Bergsten-Nordström, E; Costa, A

    2015-11-01

    This manifesto was prepared by a European Breast Cancer (EBC) Council working group and launched at the European Breast Cancer Conference in Glasgow on 20 March 2014. It sets out optimal technical and organisational requirements for a breast cancer pathology service, in the light of concerns about variability and lack of patient-centred focus. It is not a guideline about how pathology services should be performed. It is a call for all in the cancer community--pathologists, oncologists, patient advocates, health administrators and policymakers--to check that services are available that serve the needs of patients in a high quality, timely way. PMID:26283037

  9. [Fibronectin, aging and related pathologies].

    PubMed

    Labat-Robert, J; Chevalier, X

    1991-01-01

    It could be demonstrated that plasma and tissue fibronectin (FN) increase with age. Some age dependent diseases as diabetes, osteoarthritis and Werner syndrome produce also an increase of tissue fibronectin biosynthesis. Plasma fibronectin decreases in diabetes and in breast cancer. Alternative splicing of the FN gene appears also to vary with age and in some related pathologies. Nutritional status and UV light also influence FN biosynthesis. It appears therefore that the determination of plasma FN and its isoforms as well as the study of tissue FN may be of interest for the study of chronological aging and related pathologies. PMID:1835421

  10. Current diagnosis of temporomandibular pathologies.

    PubMed

    Learreta, Jorge A; Matos, Jane L F; Matos, Marcelo Freire; Durst, Andreas C

    2009-04-01

    The current scientific knowledge of TMJ pathologies points to the importance of etiological research and the need for differential diagnosis using the most modem technological resources. Those include MRI, computed tomography, serologic studies, genetic mapping, and bioelectronic instruments which allow clinicians to study, understand, and measure respectively, the structural changes of soft and hard tissues, infections, genetic susceptibility for autoimmune diseases, and stomatognathic function. The purpose of this article is an overview of the current knowledge and related tools for the diagnosis of TMJ pathologies.

  11. 27 CFR 22.107 - Pathological laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pathological laboratories... Pathological laboratories. (a) Pathological laboratories, not operated by a hospital or sanitarium, may... sanitariums. If a pathological laboratory does not exclusively conduct analyses or tests for hospitals...

  12. 27 CFR 22.107 - Pathological laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pathological laboratories... Pathological laboratories. (a) Pathological laboratories, not operated by a hospital or sanitarium, may... sanitariums. If a pathological laboratory does not exclusively conduct analyses or tests for hospitals...

  13. 27 CFR 22.107 - Pathological laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pathological laboratories... Pathological laboratories. (a) Pathological laboratories, not operated by a hospital or sanitarium, may... sanitariums. If a pathological laboratory does not exclusively conduct analyses or tests for hospitals...

  14. 27 CFR 22.107 - Pathological laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pathological laboratories... Pathological laboratories. (a) Pathological laboratories, not operated by a hospital or sanitarium, may... sanitariums. If a pathological laboratory does not exclusively conduct analyses or tests for hospitals...

  15. 27 CFR 22.107 - Pathological laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pathological laboratories... Pathological laboratories. (a) Pathological laboratories, not operated by a hospital or sanitarium, may... sanitariums. If a pathological laboratory does not exclusively conduct analyses or tests for hospitals...

  16. Learning Biology with Plant Pathology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Juliet E.

    This monograph contains 10 plant pathology experiments that were written to correspond to portions of a biology curriculum. Each experiment is suitable to a biology topic and designed to encourage exploration of those biological concepts being taught. Experiments include: (1) The Symptoms and Signs of Disease; (2) Koch's Postulates; (3)…

  17. Giving your heart to pathology.

    PubMed

    Klaassen, Jim

    2015-10-17

    Jim KIaassen recently joined Axiom Veterinary Laboratories as a clinical pathologist. During his career, Dr Klaassen has worked in small animal practice, lectured in clinical pathology, undertaken preclinical research and held senior roles in commercial veterinary laboratories in the USA, including as chief medical officer of Antech Diagnostics.

  18. Surgical pathology of urologic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Javadpour, N.; Barsky, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    This text details recent advances in methods for detecting, diagnosing, and managing genitourinary diseases. Included are chapters on imaging techniques (including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and ultrasound; tumor markers (such as alphafetoprotein, human chorionic gonadotropin, prostatic specific antigen, and T-antigens); immunocytochemistry; pediatric urologic pathology; and other key topics.

  19. THE PATHOLOGY OF MENTAL RETARDATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CROME, L.; STERN, J.

    DATA FROM RECENT COMPREHENSIVE STUDIES OF THE PATHOLOGY OF MENTAL RETARDATION ARE ASSEMBLED, INCLUDING MATERIAL ON ETIOLOGY, MORPHOLOGY, BIOCHEMISTRY, AND LABORATORY DIAGNOSIS. AREAS COVERED ARE (1) GENETIC CAUSES OF MENTAL RETARDATION, (2) DISORDERS OF GESTATION, (3) BIRTH INJURY, (4) GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS OF POSTNATAL CAUSES OF MENTAL…

  20. Cognitive Deterioration and Associated Pathology Induced by Chronic Low-Level Aluminum Ingestion in a Translational Rat Model Provides an Explanation of Alzheimer's Disease, Tests for Susceptibility and Avenues for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Walton, J. R.

    2012-01-01

    A translational aging rat model for chronic aluminum (Al) neurotoxicity mimics human Al exposure by ingesting Al, throughout middle age and old age, in equivalent amounts to those ingested by Americans from their food, water, and Al additives. Most rats that consumed Al in an amount equivalent to the high end of the human total dietary Al range developed severe cognitive deterioration in old age. High-stage Al accumulation occurred in the entorhinal cortical cells of origin for the perforant pathway and hippocampal CA1 cells, resulting in microtubule depletion and dendritic dieback. Analogous pathological change in humans leads to destruction of the perforant pathway and Alzheimer's disease dementia. The hippocampus is thereby isolated from neocortical input and output normally mediated by the entorhinal cortex. Additional evidence is presented that Al is involved in the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, amyloid plaques, granulovacuolar degeneration, and other pathological changes of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The shared characteristics indicate that AD is a human form of chronic Al neurotoxicity. This translational animal model provides fresh strategies for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of AD. PMID:22928148

  1. Protection by Neuroglobin Expression in Brain Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Baez, Eliana; Echeverria, Valentina; Cabezas, Ricardo; Ávila-Rodriguez, Marco; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Barreto, George E.

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes play an important role in physiological, metabolic, and structural functions, and when impaired, they can be involved in various pathologies including Alzheimer, focal ischemic stroke, and traumatic brain injury. These disorders involve an imbalance in the blood flow and nutrients such as glucose and lactate, leading to biochemical and molecular changes that cause neuronal damage, which is followed by loss of cognitive and motor functions. Previous studies have shown that astrocytes are more resilient than neurons during brain insults as a consequence of their more effective antioxidant systems, transporters, and enzymes, which made them less susceptible to excitotoxicity. In addition, astrocytes synthesize and release different protective molecules for neurons, including neuroglobin, a member of the globin family of proteins. After brain injury, neuroglobin expression is induced in astrocytes. Since neuroglobin promotes neuronal survival, its increased expression in astrocytes after brain injury may represent an endogenous neuroprotective mechanism. Here, we review the role of neuroglobin in the central nervous system, its relationship with different pathologies, and the role of different factors that regulate its expression in astrocytes.

  2. Protection by Neuroglobin Expression in Brain Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Baez, Eliana; Echeverria, Valentina; Cabezas, Ricardo; Ávila-Rodriguez, Marco; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Barreto, George E.

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes play an important role in physiological, metabolic, and structural functions, and when impaired, they can be involved in various pathologies including Alzheimer, focal ischemic stroke, and traumatic brain injury. These disorders involve an imbalance in the blood flow and nutrients such as glucose and lactate, leading to biochemical and molecular changes that cause neuronal damage, which is followed by loss of cognitive and motor functions. Previous studies have shown that astrocytes are more resilient than neurons during brain insults as a consequence of their more effective antioxidant systems, transporters, and enzymes, which made them less susceptible to excitotoxicity. In addition, astrocytes synthesize and release different protective molecules for neurons, including neuroglobin, a member of the globin family of proteins. After brain injury, neuroglobin expression is induced in astrocytes. Since neuroglobin promotes neuronal survival, its increased expression in astrocytes after brain injury may represent an endogenous neuroprotective mechanism. Here, we review the role of neuroglobin in the central nervous system, its relationship with different pathologies, and the role of different factors that regulate its expression in astrocytes. PMID:27672379

  3. Protection by Neuroglobin Expression in Brain Pathologies.

    PubMed

    Baez, Eliana; Echeverria, Valentina; Cabezas, Ricardo; Ávila-Rodriguez, Marco; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Barreto, George E

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes play an important role in physiological, metabolic, and structural functions, and when impaired, they can be involved in various pathologies including Alzheimer, focal ischemic stroke, and traumatic brain injury. These disorders involve an imbalance in the blood flow and nutrients such as glucose and lactate, leading to biochemical and molecular changes that cause neuronal damage, which is followed by loss of cognitive and motor functions. Previous studies have shown that astrocytes are more resilient than neurons during brain insults as a consequence of their more effective antioxidant systems, transporters, and enzymes, which made them less susceptible to excitotoxicity. In addition, astrocytes synthesize and release different protective molecules for neurons, including neuroglobin, a member of the globin family of proteins. After brain injury, neuroglobin expression is induced in astrocytes. Since neuroglobin promotes neuronal survival, its increased expression in astrocytes after brain injury may represent an endogenous neuroprotective mechanism. Here, we review the role of neuroglobin in the central nervous system, its relationship with different pathologies, and the role of different factors that regulate its expression in astrocytes.

  4. Protection by Neuroglobin Expression in Brain Pathologies.

    PubMed

    Baez, Eliana; Echeverria, Valentina; Cabezas, Ricardo; Ávila-Rodriguez, Marco; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Barreto, George E

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes play an important role in physiological, metabolic, and structural functions, and when impaired, they can be involved in various pathologies including Alzheimer, focal ischemic stroke, and traumatic brain injury. These disorders involve an imbalance in the blood flow and nutrients such as glucose and lactate, leading to biochemical and molecular changes that cause neuronal damage, which is followed by loss of cognitive and motor functions. Previous studies have shown that astrocytes are more resilient than neurons during brain insults as a consequence of their more effective antioxidant systems, transporters, and enzymes, which made them less susceptible to excitotoxicity. In addition, astrocytes synthesize and release different protective molecules for neurons, including neuroglobin, a member of the globin family of proteins. After brain injury, neuroglobin expression is induced in astrocytes. Since neuroglobin promotes neuronal survival, its increased expression in astrocytes after brain injury may represent an endogenous neuroprotective mechanism. Here, we review the role of neuroglobin in the central nervous system, its relationship with different pathologies, and the role of different factors that regulate its expression in astrocytes. PMID:27672379

  5. Pathology effects at radiation doses below those causing increased mortality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnes, Bruce A.; Gavrilova, Natalia; Grahn, Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Mortality data from experiments conducted at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) on the long-term effects of external whole-body irradiation on B6CF(1) mice were used to investigate radiation-induced effects at intermediate doses of (60)Co gamma rays or fission-spectrum neutrons either delivered as a single exposure or protracted over 60 once-weekly exposures. Kaplan-Meier analyses were used to identify the lowest dose in the ANL data (within radiation quality, pattern of exposure, and sex) at which radiation-induced mortality caused by primary tumors could be detected (approximately 1-2 Gy for gamma rays and 10-15 cGy for neutrons). Doses at and below these levels were then examined for radiation-induced shifts in the spectrum of pathology detected at death. To do this, specific pathology events were pooled into larger assemblages based on whether they were cancer, cardiovascular disease or non-neoplastic diseases detected within the lungs and pleura, liver and biliary tract, reproductive organs, or urinary tract. Cancer and cardiovascular disease were further subdivided into categories based on whether they caused death, contributed to death, or were simply observed at death. Counts of how often events falling within each of these combined pathology categories occurred within a mouse were then used as predictor variables in logistic regression to determine whether irradiated mice could be distinguished from control mice. Increased pathology burdens were detected in irradiated mice at doses lower than those causing detectable shifts in mortality-22 cGy for gamma rays and 2 cGy for neutrons. These findings suggest that (1) models based on mortality data alone may underestimate radiation effects, (2) radiation may have adverse health consequences (i.e. elevated health risks) even when mortality risks are not detected, and (3) radiation-induced pathologies other than cancer do occur, and they involve multiple organ systems.

  6. Interleukin-22: immunobiology and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Dudakov, Jarrod A.; Hanash, Alan M.; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-22 (IL-22) is a recently described IL-10 family cytokine that is produced by T-helper (Th)-17 cells, γδ T cells, NKT cells and newly described innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). Knowledge of IL-22 biology has rapidly evolved since its discovery in 2000, and a role for IL-22 has been identified in numerous tissues including the intestines, lung, liver, kidney, thymus, pancreas and skin. IL-22 primarily targets non-hematopoietic epithelial and stromal cells where it can promote proliferation and play a role in tissue regeneration. In addition, IL-22 regulates host defense at barrier surfaces. However, IL-22 has also been linked to several conditions involving inflammatory tissue pathology. In this review, we will assess the current understanding of this cytokine, including its physiologic and pathologic effects on epithelial cell function. PMID:25706098

  7. α-Synuclein: Experimental Pathology.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Masato; Nonaka, Takashi; Masuda-Suzukake, Masami

    2016-01-01

    α-Synuclein, which is present as a small, soluble, cytosolic protein in healthy subjects, is converted to amyloid-like fibrils in diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and multiple system atrophy (MSA). Bulk synthesis of purified α-synuclein has made it more convenient to study the nature of the normal protein and the mechanism of its conversion to an abnormal form in vitro and in vivo. Synthetic α-synuclein fibrils and pathological α-synuclein from diseased brains can act as triggers to convert normal α-synuclein to an abnormal form via prion-like mechanisms. In this article, we describe the experimental pathologies of α-synuclein both in vitro and in vivo in human and animal models. Prion-like spreading of abnormal α-synuclein from cell to cell can account for the progression of these α-synucleinopathies. PMID:27481772

  8. Rotator cuff and subacromial pathology.

    PubMed

    Yablon, Corrie M; Jacobson, Jon A

    2015-07-01

    Both MRI and ultrasound (US) demonstrate equivalent accuracy in the evaluation of the rotator cuff. Both modalities have their advantages, disadvantages, and pitfalls. Radiography is an important complementary modality in that it can demonstrate occult sources of shoulder pain. MRI is recommended for the evaluation of shoulder pain in patients < 40 years of age because labral pathology is frequently identified. However, in patients > 40 years, US should be the first-line modality because the incidence of rotator cuff pathology increases with age. US is useful to guide procedures such as subacromial injection and calcific tendinosis lavage. Radiologists should be knowledgeable of both MRI and US of the shoulder to tailor these examinations to the specific needs of their patients.

  9. Quality in pathology laboratory practice.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, S

    1995-06-01

    Quality refers not only to analytical quality control, a traditional area of laboratory excellence, but to the entire science of quality management. As measures of quality, structural indicators refer to staffing and physical facilities, process indicators to the institutions operations and, perhaps most importantly, outcome indicators address the ultimate patient care uses that pathology information is put to. Comparison of performance to peer laboratories, external quality control, is a practical, if limited, yardstick of performance. Customer satisfaction and turn-around-time of tests are receiving more recent attention as quality measures. Blood banking, because of its inherently complex cycle from donor phlebotomy to product infusion, requires special considerations with regard to quality management. Reporting of anatomical pathology, where the only gold standard is a consensus of experts, also does not lend itself to classical numerical quality assessment. PMID:7670717

  10. Pathology of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Finnie, John W

    2014-12-01

    Although traumatic brain injury (TBI) is frequently encountered in veterinary practice in companion animals, livestock and horses, inflicted head injury is a common method of euthanasia in domestic livestock, and malicious head trauma can lead to forensic investigation, the pathology of TBI has generally received little attention in the veterinary literature. This review highlights the pathology and pathogenesis of cerebral lesions produced by blunt, non-missile and penetrating, missile head injuries as an aid to the more accurate diagnosis of neurotrauma cases. If more cases of TBI in animals that result in fatality or euthanasia are subjected to rigorous neuropathological examination, this will lead to a better understanding of the nature and development of brain lesions in these species, rather than extrapolating data from human studies. PMID:25178417

  11. Insulin dysfunction and Tau pathology

    PubMed Central

    El Khoury, Noura B.; Gratuze, Maud; Papon, Marie-Amélie; Bretteville, Alexis; Planel, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) include senile plaques of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides (a cleavage product of the Amyloid Precursor Protein, or APP) and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) of hyperphosphorylated Tau protein assembled in paired helical filaments (PHF). NFT pathology is important since it correlates with the degree of cognitive impairment in AD. Only a small proportion of AD is due to genetic variants, whereas the large majority of cases (~99%) is late onset and sporadic in origin. The cause of sporadic AD is likely to be multifactorial, with external factors interacting with biological or genetic susceptibilities to accelerate the manifestation of the disease. Insulin dysfunction, manifested by diabetes mellitus (DM) might be such factor, as there is extensive data from epidemiological studies suggesting that DM is associated with an increased relative risk for AD. Type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are known to affect multiple cognitive functions in patients. In this context, understanding the effects of diabetes on Tau pathogenesis is important since Tau pathology show a strong relationship to dementia in AD, and to memory loss in normal aging and mild cognitive impairment. Here, we reviewed preclinical studies that link insulin dysfunction to Tau protein pathogenesis, one of the major pathological hallmarks of AD. We found more than 30 studies reporting Tau phosphorylation in a mouse or rat model of insulin dysfunction. We also payed attention to potential sources of artifacts, such as hypothermia and anesthesia, that were demonstrated to results in Tau hyperphosphorylation and could major confounding experimental factors. We found that very few studies reported the temperature of the animals, and only a handful did not use anesthesia. Overall, most published studies showed that insulin dysfunction can promote Tau hyperphosphorylation and pathology, both directly and indirectly, through hypothermia. PMID:24574966

  12. [Pathological horseshoe kidney. Therapeutic aspects].

    PubMed

    Bennani, S; Touijer, A; Aboutaieb, R; el Mrini, M; Benjelloun, S

    1994-01-01

    The authors report the various therapeutic modalities of uropathies associated with horseshoe kidney, based on a series of 20 pathologic horseshoe kidneys, associated with 12 cases of renal stones, 5 ureteropelvic junction obstructions, 3 kidney tumors, 2 cases of pyonephrosis and finally 1 traumatic horseshoe kidney. The specific anatomic and surgical features of this uncommon malformation are emphasized and the therapeutic features of each uropathy associated with horseshoe kidney are discussed. PMID:7825982

  13. Diagnostic pathology in 2012: development of digital pathology in an open access journal

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Herein we describe and interpret the digital world of diagnostic surgical pathology, and take the in Pathology leading Open Access Journal Diagnostic Pathology as example. Virtual slide http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1944221953867351 PMID:23305209

  14. The molecular pathology of haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Larner, A J

    1987-06-01

    The great success of recombinant DNA technology in unravelling the pathology of the thalassaemias at a molecular level has encouraged the application of these methods to other single gene disorders of man in the hope of gaining a deeper insight into the biochemical defects underlying them. An example of this approach is provided by the sex-linked recessive disorders of blood clotting: haemophilia and Christmas disease. These clinically indistinguishable, life-long disorders result from the deficiency or abnormality of the clotting proteins factor VIII and factor IX, respectively, which both participate in the activation of factor X in the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. This paper looks at the information concerning the molecular biology and pathology of the haemophilias which has recently been forthcoming. The genes for factor VIII and factor IX have both been successfully cloned within the past five years, with that of factor VIII, achieved in 1984, being a particular tour de force. It encompasses 0.1 per cent of the human X chromosome and is the largest gene yet characterised. Gene cloning is the starting point from which gene probes can be designed to elucidate the molecular pathology of the haemophilias. The implications of these discoveries for the practice of clinical medicine are reviewed, with special emphasis on prenatal diagnosis and carrier detection by means of restriction fragment length polymorphisms, and replacement therapy with recombinant factor VIII.

  15. Ultrastructural pathology and immunohistochemistry of mustard gas lesion

    SciTech Connect

    Petrali, J.P.; Oglesby, S.B.; Hamilton, T.A.; Mills, K.R.

    1993-05-13

    The ultrastructural pathology of sulfur mustard gas (HD) skin toxicity has been characterized for several in vivo and in vitro model systems. In animal models, the pathology involves the latent lethal targeting of skin basal cells, a disabling of hemidesmosomes and a progressive edema of the lamina lucida, all of which contribute to the formation of characteristic microblisters at the dermal-epidermal junction. However, the effects of HD toxicity on structural proteins of extracellular domains of the dermal-epidermal junction have not been elucidated. We are beginning an immunohistochemical study of these domains in the hairless guinea pig and summarize here the time course effects of HD of three structural proteins: bullous pemphigoid antigen, laminin and Type IV collagen. The results of this combined ultrastructural and immunohistochemical study indicate that proteins of extracellular matrices of the basement membrane are antigenically altered during the development of HD-induced skin pathology and may contribute to the formation of microblisters.

  16. Congruence Couple Therapy for Pathological Gambling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Bonnie K.

    2009-01-01

    Couple therapy models for pathological gambling are limited. Congruence Couple Therapy is an integrative, humanistic, systems model that addresses intrapsychic, interpersonal, intergenerational, and universal-spiritual disconnections of pathological gamblers and their spouses to shift towards congruence. Specifically, CCT's theoretical…

  17. Crucial Contributions by T Lymphocytes (Effector, Regulatory, and Checkpoint Inhibitor) and Cytokines (TH1, TH2, and TH17) to a Pathological Complete Response Induced by Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Women with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Chandan; Eremin, Jennifer M.; Cowley, Gerard; Ilyas, Mohammed; Eremin, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    The tumour microenvironment consists of malignant cells, stroma, and immune cells. Prominent tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in breast cancer are associated with a good prognosis and are predictors of a pathological complete response (pCR) with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). The contribution of different T effector/regulatory cells and cytokines to tumour cell death with NAC requires further characterisation and was investigated in this study. Breast tumours from 33 women with large and locally advanced breast cancers undergoing NAC were immunohistochemically (intratumoural, stromal) assessed for T cell subsets and cytokine expression using labelled antibodies, employing established semiquantitative methods. Prominent levels of TILs and CD4+, CD8+, and CTLA-4+ (stromal) T cells and CD8+ : FOXP3+ ratios were associated with a significant pCR; no association was seen with FOXP3+, CTLA-4+ (intratumoural), and PD-1+ T cells. NAC significantly reduced CD4+, FOXP3+, CTLA-4+ (stromal) (concurrently blood FOXP3+, CTLA-4+ Tregs), and PD-1+ T cells; no reduction was seen with CD8+ and CTLA-4+ (intratumoural) T cells. High post-NAC tumour levels of FOXP3+ T cells, IL-10, and IL-17 were associated with a failed pCR. Our study has characterised further the contribution of T effector/regulatory cells and cytokines to tumour cell death with NAC. PMID:27777963

  18. Interactions of Pathological Hallmark Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Oláh, Judit; Vincze, Orsolya; Virók, Dezső; Simon, Dóra; Bozsó, Zsolt; Tőkési, Natália; Horváth, István; Hlavanda, Emma; Kovács, János; Magyar, Anna; Szűcs, Mária; Orosz, Ferenc; Penke, Botond; Ovádi, Judit

    2011-01-01

    The disordered tubulin polymerization promoting protein (TPPP/p25) was found to be co-enriched in neuronal and glial inclusions with α-synuclein in Parkinson disease and multiple system atrophy, respectively; however, co-occurrence of α-synuclein with β-amyloid (Aβ) in human brain inclusions has been recently reported, suggesting the existence of mixed type pathologies that could result in obstacles in the correct diagnosis and treatment. Here we identified TPPP/p25 as an interacting partner of the soluble Aβ oligomers as major risk factors for Alzheimer disease using ProtoArray human protein microarray. The interactions of oligomeric Aβ with proteins involved in the etiology of neurological disorders were characterized by ELISA, surface plasmon resonance, pelleting experiments, and tubulin polymerization assay. We showed that the Aβ42 tightly bound to TPPP/p25 (Kd = 85 nm) and caused aberrant protein aggregation by inhibiting the physiologically relevant TPPP/p25-derived microtubule assembly. The pair-wise interactions of Aβ42, α-synuclein, and tubulin were found to be relatively weak; however, these three components formed soluble ternary complex exclusively in the absence of TPPP/p25. The aggregation-facilitating activity of TPPP/p25 and its interaction with Aβ was monitored by electron microscopy with purified proteins by pelleting experiments with cell-free extracts as well as by confocal microscopy with CHO cells expressing TPPP/p25 or amyloid. The finding that the interaction of TPPP/p25 with Aβ can produce pathological-like aggregates is tightly coupled with unusual pathology of the Alzheimer disease revealed previously; that is, partial co-localization of Aβ and TPPP/p25 in the case of diffuse Lewy body disease with Alzheimer disease. PMID:21832049

  19. Pathological gambling and criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    Rachlin, S; Halpern, A L; Portnow, S L

    1986-01-01

    There exists significant interdisciplinary support for eliminating the volitional component of the insanity defense. Somewhat in contrast to this trend is the presentation of pathological gambling as a potentially exculpatory condition in criminal trials. The authors discuss three federal appellate court decisions on this attempted inappropriate usage of psychiatric diagnostic nomenclature. All have upheld convictions, and thereby rejected contentions that such an impulse disorder can form the basis for a valid plea of lack of criminal responsibility. It is suggested that the public interest will be served by statutorily making disturbances of behavioral control insufficient to raise a defense of insanity.

  20. Pathological buying and partnership status.

    PubMed

    Müller, Astrid; de Zwaan, Martina; Mitchell, James E; Zimmermann, Tanja

    2016-05-30

    This pilot study investigated the partnership status and the level of pathological buying (PB) in 157 female patients with PB and 1153 women from a German population-based sample. Slightly more than half of both samples were currently living with a partner. The results suggest a protective effect of being in a couple relationship in the representative sample. In contrast, having a partner was not related to the severity of PB among patients. Future studies should address the question of whether the characteristics and quality of partnership have an impact on the severity and course of PB, and vice versa.

  1. Iliopsoas: Pathology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Christian N

    2016-07-01

    Disorders of the iliopsoas can be a significant source of groin pain in the athletic population. Commonly described pathologic conditions include iliopsoas bursitis, tendonitis, impingement, and snapping. The first-line treatment for iliopsoas disorders is typically conservative, including activity modification, physical therapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and corticosteroid injections. Surgical treatment can be considered if the patient fails conservative measures and typically involves arthroscopic lengthening of the musculotendinous unit and treatment of concomitant intra-articular abnormality. Tendon release has been described: in the central compartment, in the peripheral compartment, and at the lesser trochanter, with similar outcomes observed between the techniques. PMID:27343394

  2. [Cartilage tumors : Pathology and radiomorphology].

    PubMed

    Uhl, M; Herget, G; Kurz, P

    2016-06-01

    Primary cartilage-forming tumors of the bone are frequent entities in the daily work of skeletal radiologists. This article describes the correlation of pathology and radiology in cartilage-forming skeletal tumors, in particular, enchondroma, osteochondroma, periosteal chondromas, chondroblastoma and various forms of chondrosarcoma. After reading, the radiologist should be able to deduce the different patterns of cartilage tumors on radiographs, CT, and MRI from the pathological aspects. Differentiation of enchondroma and chondrosarcoma is a frequent diagnostic challenge. Some imaging parameters, e. g., deep cortical scalloping (more than two thirds of the cortical thickness), cortical destruction, or a soft-tissue mass, are features of a sarcoma. Osteochondromas are bony protrusions with a continuous extension of bone marrow from the parent bone, the host cortical bone runs continuously from the osseous surface of the tumor into the shaft of the osteochondroma and the osteochondroma has a cartilage cap. Chondromyxoid fibromas are well-defined lytic and eccentric lesions of the metaphysis of the long bones, with nonspecific MRI findings. Chondroblastomas have a strong predilection for the epiphysis of long tubular bones and develop an intense perifocal bone marrow edema. Dedifferentiated chondrosarcomas are bimorphic lesions with a low-grade chondrogenic component and a high-grade noncartilaginous component. Most chondrogenic tumors have a predilection with regard to site and age at manifestation. PMID:27233920

  3. Virtual microscopy in pathology education.

    PubMed

    Dee, Fred R

    2009-08-01

    Technology for acquisition of virtual slides was developed in 1985; however, it was not until the late 1990s that desktop computers had enough processing speed to commercialize virtual microscopy and apply the technology to education. By 2000, the progressive decrease in use of traditional microscopy in medical student education had set the stage for the entry of virtual microscopy into medical schools. Since that time, it has been successfully implemented into many pathology courses in the United States and around the world, with surveys indicating that about 50% of pathology courses already have or expect to implement virtual microscopy. Over the last decade, in addition to an increasing ability to emulate traditional microscopy, virtual microscopy has allowed educators to take advantage of the accessibility, efficiency, and pedagogic versatility of the computer and the Internet. The cost of virtual microscopy in education is now quite reasonable after taking into account replacement cost for microscopes, maintenance of glass slides, and the fact that 1-dimensional microscope space can be converted to multiuse computer laboratories or research. Although the current technology for implementation of virtual microscopy in histopathology education is very good, it could be further improved upon by better low-power screen resolution and depth of field. Nevertheless, virtual microscopy is beginning to play an increasing role in continuing education, house staff education, and evaluation of competency in histopathology. As Z-axis viewing (focusing) becomes more efficient, virtual microscopy will also become integrated into education in cytology, hematology, microbiology, and urinalysis.

  4. The evolution of anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Stanley; Coffman, Frederick

    2013-01-01

    Science advances both by conceptual leaps and by improved observational and analytic tools. Mechanism and function in biological systems can best be understood in the context of the complex microenvironments in which they occur, and for this purpose morphologic analysis can be critical. Technological advances in cell and tissue imaging are currently finding application in a wide variety of basic, translational, and clinical biomedical studies. "Biophotonics in Pathology" was designed as a multi-authored work to describe the various kinds of imaging strategies that have been developed as computational power keeps increasing. Some of these overlap with radiologic techniques and others do not. The field is continuously evolving, and in this commentary I will touch on additional techniques for morphology-based interrogation of cells and tissues that have recently been described. However, it is important to note that though we are expanding our armamentarium as pathologists, our radiological colleagues have been doing this for many years. Clearly, they have embraced new imaging techniques to a greater extent than have pathologists. This commentary discusses some of the factors responsible for this, and suggests that pathology and radiology are converging towards a more holistic approach to diagnostic imaging.

  5. Dental radiology and oral pathology.

    PubMed

    Halstead, C L; Hoard, B C

    1991-01-01

    This article represents an overview of normal and pathological findings of the oral structures for the practicing radiologist. Some of the disease processes discussed are of dental etiology, whereas others are manifestations of systemic diseases. Normal tooth development is described followed by an overview of radiolucent, radiopaque, and mixed lucent-opaque lesions. In the radiolucent category, normal anatomical landmarks of the jaws include the mental foramen, manidbular canal, incisive canal and maxillary sinuses. Other lucencies that represent normal structures or variations include developing tooth buds and root apices, healing dental extraction sites, prominent submandibular fossae and nutrient canals. In the radiopaque category, normal anatomical landmarks of the jaws include the genial tubercle, mental ridge, external oblique ridge, walls of the submandibular canal, walls of the maxillary sinus, nasal septum, stylohyoid ligament, and zygomatic process. Other opacities that represent normal structures or variations include dental restoration material, dental endodontic material, retained roots, sialoliths, salivary duct calculi, calcified lymph nodes, recent extraction sites, hypercementosis, and foreign bodies. Pathological entities which present radiographically as lucencies, opacities, and mixed lucent-opaque areas include inflammatory lesions, cysts, fibro-osseous disease, benign neoplasms, malignant neoplasms, and lesions secondary to metabolic disorders.

  6. Cardiac pathological conditions in young soldiers: case series.

    PubMed

    Villacorta-Lyew, Rachel; Laselle, Brooks; Mazzoncini, Joseph P; Merchant, Emily; Buckley, Peter J

    2008-11-01

    We briefly review the disease processes for four young healthy soldiers who presented to our emergency department with serious cardiac pathological conditions. We present two unusual cases of myocardial infarction, a coronary artery aneurysm, and a case of smallpox vaccine-induced myocarditis/pericarditis. Our intent is to encourage others in military medicine to maintain a high index of suspicion for cardiac conditions even in a relatively young healthy population. PMID:19055189

  7. The Neuropsychopharmacology of Pathological Gambling

    PubMed Central

    Zakeri, Kourosh; Potenza, Marc N.

    2013-01-01

    Pathological gambling (PG) is an impulse control disorder with prevalence estimates in the range of 0.2–2% in the general population. PG can significantly impact one’s ability to function as it may negatively influence social, financial, and occupational aspects of life. Historically, PG has received relatively little attention from researchers and clinicians, and few treatments, particularly pharmacological, have been both validated and widely employed. Given the clinical relevance of PG, it is important that researchers examine pharmacological and behavioral treatments for their safety and efficacy and that clinicians use empirically validated therapies. Multiple neurochemicals, including serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, and opioids, and related neurocircuitry, particularly ventral cortico-striatal pathways, have been implicated in PG. The neurobiological rationale for therapies, particularly pharmacological ones, is reviewed with a perspective on the generation of improved prevention and treatment strategies for PG. PMID:24288522

  8. Pathology of growth hormone excess.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, K

    1988-09-01

    This paper briefly reviews the pathology of growth hormone excess. Prolonged oversecretion of growth hormone is associated with elevated serum growth hormone as well as somatomedian C levels and the clinical signs and symptoms of acromegaly or gigantism. Morphologic studies, including immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy, revealed that several distinct morphologic lesions can be present in the pituitary gland of patients with acromegaly or gigantism. Although substantial progress has been achieved during the last two decades, more work is required to correlate the morphologic features of adenoma cells with their biologic behavior. We feel that the future can be viewed with optimism and further exciting results can be expected by the interaction of pathologists, clinical endocrinologists and basic scientists. PMID:3070506

  9. Molecular pathology in real time.

    PubMed

    Ryška, Aleš

    2016-03-01

    With the development of sophisticated individualized therapeutic approaches, the role of pathology in classification of tumors is enormously increasing. The solely morphological characterization of neoplastic process is no more sufficient for qualified decision on optimal therapeutic approach. Thus, morphologic diagnosis must be supplemented by molecular analysis of the lesion with emphasis on the detection of status of certain markers used as predictive factors for targeted therapy. Both intrinsic and acquired types of intratumor heterogeneity have an impact at various moments of cancer diagnostics and therapy. The primary heterogeneity of neoplastic tissue represents a significant problem in patients, where only limited biopsy samples from the primary tumor are available for diagnosis, such as core needle biopsy specimens in breast cancer, transthoracic or endobronchial biopsies in lung cancer, or endoscopic biopsies in gastric cancer. Detection of predictive markers may be influenced by this heterogeneity, and the marker detection may be falsely negative or (less probably) falsely positive. In addition, as these markers are often detected in the tissue samples from primary tumor, the differences between molecular features of the primary lesion and its metastases may be responsible for failure of systemic therapy in patients with discordant phenotype between primary and metastatic disease. The fact of tumor heterogeneity must be taken into consideration already in establishing pathological diagnosis. One has to be aware that limited biopsy specimen must not always be fully representative of the entire tumor volume. To overcome these limitations, there does not exist one single simple solution. Examination of more tissue (preference of surgical resection specimens over biopsies, whenever possible), use of ultra-sensitive methods able to identify the minute subclones as a source of possible resistance to treatment, and detection of secondary molecular events from

  10. Revised histopathological consensus classification of joint implant related pathology.

    PubMed

    Krenn, V; Morawietz, L; Perino, G; Kienapfel, H; Ascherl, R; Hassenpflug, G J; Thomsen, M; Thomas, P; Huber, M; Kendoff, D; Baumhoer, D; Krukemeyer, M G; Natu, S; Boettner, F; Zustin, J; Kölbel, B; Rüther, W; Kretzer, J P; Tiemann, A; Trampuz, A; Frommelt, L; Tichilow, R; Söder, S; Müller, S; Parvizi, J; Illgner, U; Gehrke, T

    2014-12-01

    This extended classification of joint implant related pathology is a practical histopathologic classification based on defined morphological criteria covering the complete spectrum of pathohistologic changes in periprosthetic tissues. These changes may occur as a consequence of endoprosthetic replacement of large joints and may lead to a reduction in the prosthesis survival rate. We describe the established consensus classification of the periprosthetic membrane, in which aseptic and septic prosthetic loosening can be subdivided into four histological types, as well as histopathological criteria for additional significant pathologies including endoprosthetic-associated arthrofibrosis, particle-induced immunological, inflammatory and toxic mechanisms (adverse reactions), and bone tissue pathologies. These characteristic tissue alterations and their relationships are summarized in the extended classification. Since particle heterogeneity in periprosthetic tissue is high and particle identification is a necessary part of diagnosis, the identification of different types of particles is described in the histopathological particle algorithm. The morphological qualities of prosthetic material particles and the demarcation between abrasion and non-abrasion endogenous particles are also summarized. This feasible classification which is based on low cost standard tissue processing and examination and on well-defined diagnostic criteria is a solid platform for the histological diagnosis of implant associated pathologies providing a stable and reproducible tool for the surgical pathologist. Since this classification is suitable for standardized histopathological diagnostics, it might also provide a useful data set for joint arthroplasty registers, particularly for registers based on so-called routine data.

  11. [Pathology in Russia: where are we going?].

    PubMed

    Permiakov, N K

    1998-01-01

    The history of Russian pathologic anatomy from the postwar time to nowadays is briefly reviewed. Negative effects of some legislative acts of the all levels of public health, profound financial crisis are shown. Particularly negative were consequences of a narrow specialization of medicine which affected also pathologic anatomy. Insufficient classical education that includes theoretical and prosecutor training of the general profile results in the fall of interest to general pathology this having a negative effect on the prestige of this profession. PMID:9582980

  12. Spinal excitatory mechanisms of pathological pain.

    PubMed

    Kuner, Rohini

    2015-04-01

    An important property of the nociceptive system is its plasticity, ie, the ability to change in an experience-dependent manner, which is implicated in the transition from acute pain to chronic pathological pain. Disease-induced plasticity can occur at both structural and functional levels and manifests as changes in individual molecules, synapses, cellular function, and network activity. In this short review, the author discusses how synaptic plasticity may mediate pathophysiological alterations linked to chronic pain by virtue of shifting the balance between excitation and inhibition, with a particular emphasis on the spinal dorsal horn. In particular, mechanisms of spinal synaptic potentiation and how these are manifest as nociceptive hypersensitivity represent an avenue with recent advances. Structural remodeling and reorganization represent another exciting area of advance in our understanding of pain. Here, new insights into maladaptive structural plasticity of spinal synapses and molecular determinants thereof will be discussed. Finally, the role of synapse-to-nucleus communication in mediating long-term changes in nociceptive sensitivity is discussed from the view point of pain chronicity.

  13. [Dreams in normal and pathological aging].

    PubMed

    Guénolé, Fabian; Marcaggi, Geoffrey; Baleyte, Jean-Marc; Garma, Lucile

    2010-06-01

    Although most of scientific knowledge in dream research is based on young adult studies, this article provides a review of the effects of normal and pathological aging on dream psychology. It starts with preliminary comments about epistemological and methodological principles of dream research, its singularities in aged persons, and the modifications of sleep physiology with age. The whole literature agrees that dream recall progressively decreases from the beginning of adulthood - not in old age - and that dream reports become less intense, perceptually and emotionally. This evolution occurs faster in men than women, with gender differences in the content of dreams. The chronological modifications could be explained partly by changes in lifestyle and attitude towards dreams in early adulthood, but mainly by modifications of sleep physiology, particularly the decrease and qualitative changes of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Dreams have usually little subjective importance in the mental life of aged persons. However, working with dreams can be a valuable tool for psychotherapy in the aged. According to the few existing data, patients suffering degenerative dementia dream much less than healthy aged persons. In Alzheimer's disease, this could be linked to the decrease of REM sleep, and atrophy of associative sensory areas of the cerebral cortex. Most studied aspects of dreaming in degenerative cognitive disorders are REM sleep behavior disorders, and nightmares induced by cholinesterase inhibitors. More studies are needed to better characterize the evolution of dreams with age, particularly studies performed in sleep laboratory.

  14. Methyl salicylate 2-O-β-d-lactoside alleviates the pathological progression of pristane-induced systemic lupus erythematosus-like disease in mice via suppression of inflammatory response and signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    He, Yang-Yang; Yan, Yu; Zhang, Hui-Fang; Lin, Yi-Huang; Chen, Yu-Cai; Yan, Yi; Wu, Ping; Fang, Jian-Song; Yang, Shu-Hui; Du, Guan-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), with a high incidence rate and insufficient therapy worldwide, is a complex disease involving multiple organs characterized primarily by inflammation due to deposition of immunocomplexes formed by production of autoantibodies. The mechanism of SLE remains unclear, and the disease still cannot be cured. We used pristane to induce SLE in female BALB/c mice. Methyl salicylate 2-O-β-d-lactoside (MSL; 200, 400, and 800 mg/kg) was orally administered 45 days after pristane injection for 4.5 months. The results showed that MSL antagonized the increasing levels of multiple types of antibodies and cytokines in lupus mice. MSL was found to suppress joint swelling and have potent inhibitory effect on arthritis-like symptoms. MSL also significantly decreased the spleen index and expression of inflammatory markers in the lupus mice. MSL protected the kidneys of lupus mice from injury through inhibiting the expression of inflammatory cytokines and reducing the IgG and C3 immunocomplex deposits. Further Western blot assays revealed that the downregulation of the intracellular inflammatory signals of NFκB and JAK/STAT3 might be the potential molecular mechanisms of the pharmacological activity of MSL against SLE in vivo. These findings may demonstrate that MSL has the potential to be a useful and highly effective treatment for SLE. PMID:27729775

  15. A history of pituitary pathology.

    PubMed

    Asa, Sylvia L; Mete, Ozgur

    2014-03-01

    The history of pituitary pathology is a long one that dates back to biblical times, but the last 25 years have represented an era of "coming of age." The role of the pituitary in health and disease was the subject of many studies over the last century. With the development of electron microscopy, immunoassays, and immunohistochemistry, the functional alterations associated with pituitary disease have been clarified. The additional information provided by molecular genetic studies has allowed progress in understanding the pathogenesis of pituitary disorders. Nevertheless, many questions remain to be answered. For example, pathologists cannot morphologically distinguish locally aggressive adenomas from carcinomas when tumor is confined to the sella. Sadly, basal cell carcinoma, the most common carcinoma of skin, usually causes less morbidity than pituitary adenomas, which occur in almost 20 % of the general population, can cause significant illness and even death, and yet are still classified as benign. The opportunity to increase awareness of the impact of these common lesions on quality of life is the current challenge for physicians and patients. We anticipate that ongoing multidisciplinary approaches to pituitary disease research will offer new insights into diseases arising from this fascinating organ.

  16. Transgenerational inheritance of stress pathology.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Stephen G; Phillips, David I

    2012-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that maternal exposure to adversity during pregnancy leads to life-long effects in offspring. While there appears to be some commonality in the effects of maternal stress on endocrine and behavioral outcomes in the first generation offspring, it is clear that effects are highly dependent on species, sex and age, as well as on the time in pregnancy when stress is experienced. Recent studies have identified that the effects of maternal stress are not confined to the first generation and that they can extend over multiple generations. These effects are also evident in humans. While our understanding of the potential mechanisms by which transgenerational programming of the stress response occurs remain largely undetermined, recent studies have begun to identify potential mechanisms of transfer. These include modified maternal adaptations to pregnancy, altered maternal behavior and transgenerational epigenetic programming. Such transgenerational programming of stress responses and pathologies has important societal consequences as it could provide a biological explanation for the generational persistence of human behaviors in populations exposed to adversity.

  17. Pathological Gambling: Neuropsychopharmacology and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bullock, Scott A.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2013-01-01

    Pathological gambling (PG) affects about 0.2–2% of adults and the impact extends to family members, employers and society as a whole. Recent research has identified similarities in the pathophysiologies of PG and substance use disorders (SUDs). As such, findings regarding SUDs provide a framework for investigating PG. The aims of the manuscript are two-fold. First, we will briefly revivew neural systems implicated in PG. Cortico-limbic circuitry involving the ventral striatum, ventromedial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex are discussed as are the neurotransmitters norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine, opioids, glutamate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). This background will provide a framework for reviewing the psychopharmacological treatments that have been tested for efficacy and safety in treating PG. Of medications, the strongest data suggest the efficacy and tolerability of opioid antagonists in the treatment of PG, and other agents have varying degree of empirical support. As behavioral therapies have also shown efficacy, they will be briefly considered as well. Future research is needed to understand how treatments work in PG and for whom specific treatments might work best. PMID:24349964

  18. Practical pathology of aging mice.

    PubMed

    Pettan-Brewer, Christina; Treuting, Piper M

    2011-01-01

    Old mice will have a subset of lesions as part of the progressive decline in organ function that defines aging. External and palpable lesions will be noted by the research, husbandry, or veterinary staff during testing, cage changing, or physical exams. While these readily observable lesions may cause alarm, not all cause undue distress or are life-threatening. In aging research, mice are maintained until near end of life that, depending on strain and genetic manipulation, can be upwards of 33 months. Aging research has unique welfare issues related to age-related decline, debilitation, fragility, and associated pain of chronic diseases. An effective aging research program includes the collaboration and education of the research, husbandry, and veterinary staff, and of the members of the institution animal care and use committee. This collaborative effort is critical to humanely maintaining older mice and preventing excessive censorship due to non-lethal diseases. Part of the educational process is becoming familiar with how old mice appear clinically, at necropsy and histopathologically. This baseline knowledge is important in making the determination of humane end points, defining health span, contributing causes of death and effects of interventions. The goal of this paper is to introduce investigators to age-associated diseases and lesion patterns in mice from clinical presentation to pathologic assessment. To do so, we present and illustrate the common clinical appearances, necropsy and histopathological lesions seen in subsets of the aging colonies maintained at the University of Washington. PMID:22953032

  19. [Pathological diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Tamaru, Jun-ichi

    2014-03-01

    This lymphoma was recognized by Thomas Hodgkin in 1832. In 1865, Samuel Wilks named it Hodgkin disease. Now, the term Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is acceptable over Hodgkin disease. Since the neoplastic cells of the disease is well-recognized to be a lymphoid cell, especially B lymphocyte. In WHO classification published in 2008, HLs are divided into two entities: Classical HL and nodular lymphocyte predominat HL. The former is composed of four different subtypes: nodular sclerosis (NS), mixed cellularity (MC), lymphocyte rich (LR), and lymphocyte depletion (LD). HL is characterized by the morphological feature comprising a minority of neoplastic cells, Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells and popcorn (LP) cells and a majority of non-neoplastic reactive cells. Antigen receptor gene analyses by prevailing molecular methods and flow cytometry are not appropriate method for the diagnosis of HL, because of small number of neoplastic cells. They are, however, very useful in the differential diagnosis to rule out other lymphomas. Even the present when science progressed, pathological (morphological and immunohistochemical) examination is very worth for diagnosis of HL. PMID:24724402

  20. Bone Remodeling Under Pathological Conditions.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wenmei; Li, Shuai; Pacios, Sandra; Wang, Yu; Graves, Dana T

    2016-01-01

    Bone is masterfully programmed to repair itself through the coupling of bone formation following bone resorption, a process referred to as coupling. In inflammatory or other conditions, the balance between bone resorption and bone formation shifts so that a net bone loss results. This review focuses on four pathologic conditions in which remodeling leads to net loss of bone, postmenopausal osteoporosis, arthritis, periodontal disease, and disuse bone loss, which is similar to bone loss associated with microgravity. In most of these there is an acceleration of the resorptive process due to increased formation of bone metabolic units. This initially leads to a net bone loss since the time period of resorption is much faster than the time needed for bone formation that follows. In addition, each of these processes is characterized by an uncoupling that leads to net bone loss. Mechanisms responsible for increased rates of bone resorption, i.e. the formation of more bone metabolic units, involve enhanced expression of inflammatory cytokines and increased expression of RANKL. Moreover, the reasons for uncoupling are discussed which range from a decrease in expression of growth factors and bone morphogenetic proteins to increased expression of factors that inhibit Wnt signaling. PMID:26599114

  1. Pathologizing sexual deviance: a history.

    PubMed

    De Block, Andreas; Adriaens, Pieter R

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a historical perspective on how both American and European psychiatrists have conceptualized and categorized sexual deviance throughout the past 150 years. During this time, quite a number of sexual preferences, desires, and behaviors have been pathologized and depathologized at will, thus revealing psychiatry's constant struggle to distinguish mental disorder--in other words, the "perversions," "sexual deviations," or "paraphilias"--from immoral, unethical, or illegal behavior. This struggle is apparent in the works of 19th- and early-20th-century psychiatrists and sexologists, but it is also present in the more recent psychiatric textbooks and diagnostic manuals, such as the consecutive editions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). While much of the historical literature revolves around the controversy over homosexuality, this article also reviews the recent medicohistorical and sociohistorical work on other forms of sexual deviance, including the diagnostic categories listed in the latest edition, the DSM-IV-TR: exhibitionism, voyeurism, fetishism, frotteurism, pedophilia, sexual masochism, sexual sadism, and transvestic fetishism. PMID:23480073

  2. Hodgkin lymphoma: Pathology and biology.

    PubMed

    Mathas, Stephan; Hartmann, Sylvia; Küppers, Ralf

    2016-07-01

    The Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) tumor cells of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), as well as the lymphocyte predominant (LP) cells of nodular lymphocyte predominant HL (NLPHL), are derived from mature B cells. However, HRS cells have largely lost their B-cell phenotype and show a very unusual expression of many markers of other hematopoietic cell lineages, which aids in the differential diagnosis between classical HL (cHL) and NLPHL and distinguishes cHL from all other hematopoietic malignancies. The bi- or multinucleated Reed-Sternberg cells most likely derive from the mononuclear Hodgkin cells through a process of incomplete cytokinesis. HRS cells show a deregulated activation of numerous signaling pathways, which is partly mediated by cellular interactions in the lymphoma microenvironment and partly by genetic lesions. In a fraction of cases, Epstein-Barr virus contributes to the pathogenesis of cHL. Recurrent genetic lesions in HRS cells identified so far often involve members of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and JAK/STAT pathways and genes involved in major histocompatibility complex expression. However, further lead transforming events likely remain to be identified. We here discuss the current knowledge on HL pathology and biology. PMID:27496304

  3. Practical pathology of aging mice

    PubMed Central

    Pettan-Brewer, Christina; Treuting, Piper M.

    2011-01-01

    Old mice will have a subset of lesions as part of the progressive decline in organ function that defines aging. External and palpable lesions will be noted by the research, husbandry, or veterinary staff during testing, cage changing, or physical exams. While these readily observable lesions may cause alarm, not all cause undue distress or are life-threatening. In aging research, mice are maintained until near end of life that, depending on strain and genetic manipulation, can be upwards of 33 months. Aging research has unique welfare issues related to age-related decline, debilitation, fragility, and associated pain of chronic diseases. An effective aging research program includes the collaboration and education of the research, husbandry, and veterinary staff, and of the members of the institution animal care and use committee. This collaborative effort is critical to humanely maintaining older mice and preventing excessive censorship due to non-lethal diseases. Part of the educational process is becoming familiar with how old mice appear clinically, at necropsy and histopathologically. This baseline knowledge is important in making the determination of humane end points, defining health span, contributing causes of death and effects of interventions. The goal of this paper is to introduce investigators to age-associated diseases and lesion patterns in mice from clinical presentation to pathologic assessment. To do so, we present and illustrate the common clinical appearances, necropsy and histopathological lesions seen in subsets of the aging colonies maintained at the University of Washington. PMID:22953032

  4. A classification of the mechanisms producing pathological tissue changes.

    PubMed

    Grippo, John O; Oh, Daniel S

    2013-05-01

    The objectives are to present a classification of mechanisms which can produce pathological changes in body tissues and fluids, as well as to clarify and define the term biocorrosion, which has had a singular use in engineering. Considering the emerging field of biomedical engineering, it is essential to use precise definitions in the lexicons of engineering, bioengineering and related sciences such as medicine, dentistry and veterinary medicine. The mechanisms of stress, friction and biocorrosion and their pathological effects on tissues are described. Biocorrosion refers to the chemical, biochemical and electrochemical changes by degradation or induced growth of living body tissues and fluids. Various agents which can affect living tissues causing biocorrosion are enumerated which support the necessity and justify the use of this encompassing and more precise definition of biocorrosion. A distinction is made between the mechanisms of corrosion and biocorrosion.

  5. Endothelial microRNA-150 is an intrinsic suppressor of pathologic ocular neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chi-Hsiu; Sun, Ye; Li, Jie; Gong, Yan; Tian, Katherine T.; Evans, Lucy P.; Morss, Peyton C.; Fredrick, Thomas W.; Saba, Nicholas J.; Chen, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Pathologic ocular neovascularization commonly causes blindness. It is critical to identify the factors altered in pathologically proliferating versus normally quiescent vessels to develop effective targeted therapeutics. MicroRNAs regulate both physiological and pathological angiogenesis through modulating expression of gene targets at the posttranscriptional level. However, it is not completely understood if specific microRNAs are altered in pathologic ocular blood vessels, influencing vascular eye diseases. Here we investigated the potential role of a specific microRNA, miR-150, in regulating ocular neovascularization. We found that miR-150 was highly expressed in normal quiescent retinal blood vessels and significantly suppressed in pathologic neovessels in a mouse model of oxygen-induced proliferative retinopathy. MiR-150 substantially decreased endothelial cell function including cell proliferation, migration, and tubular formation and specifically suppressed the expression of multiple angiogenic regulators, CXCR4, DLL4, and FZD4, in endothelial cells. Intravitreal injection of miR-150 mimic significantly decreased pathologic retinal neovascularization in vivo in both wild-type and miR-150 knockout mice. Loss of miR-150 significantly promoted angiogenesis in aortic rings and choroidal explants ex vivo and laser-induced choroidal neovascularization in vivo. In conclusion, miR-150 is specifically enriched in quiescent normal vessels and functions as an endothelium-specific endogenous inhibitor of pathologic ocular neovascularization. PMID:26374840

  6. The Family Functioning of Female Pathological Gamblers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, Nicki; Smith, David; Thomas, Trang

    2009-01-01

    The available evidence suggests that pathological gambling significantly disrupts family relationships and has a substantial impact on family members. However, these conclusions are based almost exclusively on male pathological gamblers and their female spouses or partners. The current study, which was a secondary study derived from a treatment…

  7. Pathological Gambling and Related Problems among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladouceur, Robert; Boudreault, Normand; Jacques, Christian; Vitaro, Frank

    1999-01-01

    Evaluates the prevalence of pathological gambling and related problems among 3,426 students in junior and senior high schools in Quebec City. Results indicate that 77% have gambled in the last twelve months and 13% gamble at least once a week. Results also reveal that pathological gambling is associated with drug and alcohol use, poor grades, and…

  8. [Computer technologies in teaching pathological anatomy].

    PubMed

    Ponomarev, A B; Fedorov, D N

    2015-01-01

    The paper gives experience with personal computers used at the Academician A.L. Strukov Department of Pathological Anatomy for more than 20 years. It shows the objective necessity of introducing computer technologies at all stages of acquiring skills in anatomical pathology, including lectures, students' free work, test check, etc.

  9. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Pathological Gamblers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, Nancy M.; Ammerman, Yola; Bohl, Jaime; Doersch, Anne; Gay, Heather; Kadden, Ronald; Molina, Cheryl; Steinberg, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated efficacy of psychotherapies for pathological gambling. Pathological gamblers (N = 231) were randomly assigned to (a) referral to Gamblers Anonymous (GA), (b) GA referral plus a cognitive-behavioral (CB) workbook, or (c) GA referral plus 8 sessions of individual CB therapy. Gambling and related problems were assessed…

  10. Diagnosis and pathology of endocrine diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Shriver, B.D.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 22 papers under the headings of Diagnosis and Pathology of endocrine diseases. Topics covered include: Laboratory tests in the diagnosis and management of thyroid disorders, Pathology of thyroid diseases, Diagnosis of adrenourtical disease, Radiologic techniques in evaluating endocrine disorders; and the Pituitary and adrenal glands.

  11. 42 CFR 493.853 - Condition: Pathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Performing Tests of Moderate Complexity (including the Subcategory), High Complexity, Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.853 Condition: Pathology. The specialty of pathology includes, for purposes...

  12. 42 CFR 493.853 - Condition: Pathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Performing Tests of Moderate Complexity (including the Subcategory), High Complexity, Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.853 Condition: Pathology. The specialty of pathology includes, for purposes...

  13. Pathological Demand Avoidance: Exploring the Behavioural Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Nions, Elizabeth; Viding, Essi; Greven, Corina U; Ronald, Angelica; Happé, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    "Pathological Demand Avoidance" is a term increasingly used by practitioners in the United Kingdom. It was coined to describe a profile of obsessive resistance to everyday demands and requests, with a tendency to resort to "socially manipulative" behaviour, including outrageous or embarrassing acts. Pathological demand…

  14. Acute kidney injury by arsine poisoning: the ultrastructural pathology of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Young; Eom, Minseob; Yang, Jae Won; Han, Byoung Geun; Choi, Seung Ok; Kim, Jae Seok

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic is a terribly poisonous material. There have been many reports of arsine poisoning in workers, and a few have discussed acute kidney injury by arsine. But literatures which investigated the pathologic findings are uncommon, and especially, the ones describing ultrastructural findings are rare. Here, we report an incident of acute arsine poisoning complicated by acute kidney injury and suggest the characteristics of the renal pathology in arsine-induced renal injury, especially the ultrastructural findings.

  15. Advances in salivary gland pathology.

    PubMed

    Cheuk, W; Chan, J K C

    2007-07-01

    This review summarizes the new findings on salivary gland pathology under the following categories: immunohistochemistry; molecular genetics; newly recognized tumour types; known tumour entities with new findings; and progression of salivary gland tumours. In the application of immunohistochemistry, CD117 can aid in highlighting the luminal cell component of various salivary gland tumours, whereas p63 or maspin can aid in highlighting the abluminal cell component. A high Ki67 index remains the most useful marker to predict adverse outcome in salivary gland carcinoma. Specific chromosomal translocations are recognized in pleomorphic adenoma (with translocation involving PLGA1 or HMGA2 gene) and mucoepidermoid carcinoma (with MECT1-MAML2 gene fusion). Newly recognized entities include: sclerosing polycystic adenosis (with recent molecular evidence supporting its neoplastic nature), sclerosing mucoepidermoid carcinoma with eosinophilia, keratocystoma, adenoma with additional stromal component (lymphadenoma, lipoadenoma and adenofibroma), cribriform adenocarcinoma of the tongue and signet ring adenocarcinoma of minor salivary gland. Known tumour entities with new findings include: salivary duct carcinoma (with newly recognized mucinous, micropapillary and sarcomatoid variants), intraductal carcinoma (with controversies in terminology), mucoepidermoid carcinoma (with newly proposed grading parameters and oncocytic variant), epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma (with newly recognized morphological variants), small cell carcinoma (with most cases being related to Merkel cell carcinoma), extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma (with specific chromosomal translocation) and chronic sclerosing sialadenitis (being a component of IgG4-related sclerosing disease). Progression of salivary gland tumours can take the form of malignant transformation of a benign tumour, progression from low-grade to high-grade carcinoma, dedifferentiation, or stromal invasion of an in situ carcinoma.

  16. The Oral Pathology Related Articles Published in Iranian Journal of Pathology from 2006 to 2015

    PubMed Central

    Shamim, Thorakkal

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a paucity of information about the oral pathology related articles published in a pathology journal. This study aimed to audit the oral pathology related articles published in Iranian Journal of Pathology (Iran J Pathol) from 2006 to 2015. Methods: Bibliometric analysis of issues of Iran J Pathol from 2006 to 2015 was performed using web-based search. The articles published were analyzed for type of article and individual topic of oral pathology. The articles published were also checked for authorship trends. Results: Out of the total 49 published articles related to oral pathology, case reports (21) and original articles (18) contributed the major share. The highest number of oral pathology related articles was published in 2011, 2014 and 2015 with 8 articles each and the least published year was 2012 with 1 article. Among the oral pathology related articles published, spindle cell neoplasms (7) followed by salivary gland tumors (5), jaw tumors (4), oral granulomatous conditions (4), lymphomas (4), oral cancer (3) and odontogenic cysts (3) form the major attraction of the contributors. The largest numbers of published articles related to oral pathology were received from Tehran University of Medical Sciences; Tehran (7) followed by Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (6) and Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (5). Conclusion: This paper may be considered as a baseline study for the bibliometric information regarding oral pathology related articles published in a pathology journal. PMID:27799973

  17. Impaired Decisional Impulsivity in Pathological Videogamers

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Michael A.; Worbe, Yulia; Bolton, Sorcha; Harrison, Neil A.; Bullmore, Edward T.; Voon, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Background Pathological gaming is an emerging and poorly understood problem. Impulsivity is commonly impaired in disorders of behavioural and substance addiction, hence we sought to systematically investigate the different subtypes of decisional and motor impulsivity in a well-defined pathological gaming cohort. Methods Fifty-two pathological gaming subjects and age-, gender- and IQ-matched healthy volunteers were tested on decisional impulsivity (Information Sampling Task testing reflection impulsivity and delay discounting questionnaire testing impulsive choice), and motor impulsivity (Stop Signal Task testing motor response inhibition, and the premature responding task). We used stringent diagnostic criteria highlighting functional impairment. Results In the Information Sampling Task, pathological gaming participants sampled less evidence prior to making a decision and scored fewer points compared with healthy volunteers. Gaming severity was also negatively correlated with evidence gathered and positively correlated with sampling error and points acquired. In the delay discounting task, pathological gamers made more impulsive choices, preferring smaller immediate over larger delayed rewards. Pathological gamers made more premature responses related to comorbid nicotine use. Greater number of hours played also correlated with a Motivational Index. Greater frequency of role playing games was associated with impaired motor response inhibition and strategy games with faster Go reaction time. Conclusions We show that pathological gaming is associated with impaired decisional impulsivity with negative consequences in task performance. Decisional impulsivity may be a potential target in therapeutic management. PMID:24146789

  18. The comparison of pathology in ferrets infected by H9N2 avian influenza viruses with different genomic features.

    PubMed

    Gao, Rongbao; Bai, Tian; Li, Xiaodan; Xiong, Ying; Huang, Yiwei; Pan, Ming; Zhang, Ye; Bo, Hong; Zou, Shumei; Shu, Yuelong

    2016-01-15

    H9N2 avian influenza virus circulates widely in poultry and has been responsible for sporadic human infections in several regions. Few studies have been conducted on the pathogenicity of H9N2 AIV isolates that have different genomic features. We compared the pathology induced by a novel reassortant H9N2 virus and two currently circulating H9N2 viruses that have different genomic features in ferrets. The results showed that the three viruses can induce infections with various amounts of viral shedding in ferrets. The novel H9N2 induced respiratory infection, but no pathological lesions were observed in lung tissues. The other two viruses induced mild to intermediate pathological lesions in lung tissues, although the clinical signs presented mildly in ferrets. The pathological lesions presented a diversity consistent with viral replication in ferrets. PMID:26638019

  19. Human wild-type tau interacts with wingless pathway components and produces neurofibrillary pathology in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Jackson, George R; Wiedau-Pazos, Martina; Sang, Tzu-Kang; Wagle, Naveed; Brown, Carlos A; Massachi, Sasan; Geschwind, Daniel H

    2002-05-16

    Pathologic alterations in the microtubule-associated protein tau have been implicated in a number of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Here, we show that tau overexpression, in combination with phosphorylation by the Drosophila glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) homolog and wingless pathway component (Shaggy), exacerbated neurodegeneration induced by tau overexpression alone, leading to neurofibrillary pathology in the fly. Furthermore, manipulation of other wingless signaling molecules downstream from shaggy demonstrated that components of the Wnt signaling pathway modulate neurodegeneration induced by tau pathology in vivo but suggested that tau phosphorylation by GSK-3beta differs from canonical Wnt effects on beta-catenin stability and TCF activity. The genetic system we have established provides a powerful reagent for identification of novel modifiers of tau-induced neurodegeneration that may serve as future therapeutic targets. PMID:12062036

  20. Pallidal stimulation suppresses pathological dysrhythmia in the parkinsonian motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Although there is general consensus that deep brain stimulation (DBS) yields substantial clinical benefit in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), the therapeutic mechanism of DBS remains a matter of debate. Recent studies demonstrate that DBS targeting the globus pallidus internus (GPi-DBS) suppresses pathological oscillations in firing rate and between-cell spike synchrony in the vicinity of the electrode but has negligible effects on population-level firing rate or the prevalence of burst firing. The present investigation examines the downstream consequences of GPi-DBS at the level of the primary motor cortex (M1). Multielectrode, single cell recordings were conducted in the M1 of two parkinsonian nonhuman primates (Macaca fasicularis). GPi-DBS that induced significant reductions in muscular rigidity also reduced the prevalence of both beta (12–30 Hz) oscillations in single unit firing rates and of coherent spiking between pairs of M1 neurons. In individual neurons, GPi-DBS-induced increases in mean firing rate were three times more common than decreases; however, averaged across the population of M1 neurons, GPi-DBS induced no net change in mean firing rate. The population-level prevalence of burst firing was also not affected by GPi-DBS. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that suppression of both pathological, beta oscillations and synchronous activity throughout the cortico-basal ganglia network is a major therapeutic mechanism of GPi-DBS. PMID:25652922

  1. Brain Pathology in Adult Rats Treated With Domoic Acid.

    PubMed

    Vieira, A C; Alemañ, N; Cifuentes, J M; Bermúdez, R; Peña, M López; Botana, L M

    2015-11-01

    Domoic acid (DA) is a neurotoxin reported to produce damage to the hippocampus, which plays an important role in memory. The authors inoculated rats intraperitoneally with an effective toxic dose of DA to study the distribution of the toxin in major internal organs by using immunohistochemistry, as well as to evaluate the induced pathology by means of histopathologic and immunohistochemical methods at different time points after toxin administration (6, 10, and 24 hours; 5 and 54 days). DA was detected by immunohistochemistry exclusively in pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus at 6 and 10 hours after dosing. Lesions induced by DA were prominent at 5 days following treatment in selected regions of the brain: hippocampus, amygdala, piriform and perirhinal cortices, olfactory tubercle, septal nuclei, and thalamus. The authors found 2 types of lesions: delayed death of selective neurons and large areas of necrosis, both accompanied by astrocytosis and microgliosis. At 54 days after DA exposure, the pathology was characterized by still-distinguishable dying neurons, calcified lesions in the thalamus, persistent astrocytosis, and pronounced microgliosis. The expression of nitric oxide synthases suggests a role for nitric oxide in the pathogenesis of neuronal degeneration and chronic inflammation induced by DA in the brain.

  2. Bar Coding and Tracking in Pathology.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Matthew G; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2015-06-01

    Bar coding and specimen tracking are intricately linked to pathology workflow and efficiency. In the pathology laboratory, bar coding facilitates many laboratory practices, including specimen tracking, automation, and quality management. Data obtained from bar coding can be used to identify, locate, standardize, and audit specimens to achieve maximal laboratory efficiency and patient safety. Variables that need to be considered when implementing and maintaining a bar coding and tracking system include assets to be labeled, bar code symbologies, hardware, software, workflow, and laboratory and information technology infrastructure as well as interoperability with the laboratory information system. This article addresses these issues, primarily focusing on surgical pathology.

  3. The pathology of primary blast overpressure injury.

    PubMed

    Mayorga, M A

    1997-07-25

    Primary blast injury occurs in civilian and military detonations and from the firing of weapon systems. The pathology of primary blast injury has been reported for the last 70 years and has primarily been limited to descriptions of gross pathology and histology. Commonly accepted tenets have not been confirmed as blast overpressure experiments in enclosures and with multiple detonations have been conducted. Organ systems other than the ear and the lung are playing a greater role in injury definition and research importance. This paper is an overview and update of the current understanding of the pathology of primary blast injury.

  4. Pathological narcissism and the obstruction of love.

    PubMed

    Kealy, David; Ogrodniczuk, John S

    2014-03-01

    Pathological narcissism is a form of maladaptive self-regulation that impedes the capacity to love. Although narcissism is often construed as excessive self-love, individuals with pathological narcissism are impaired in being able to love themselves as well as others. With the subject of impaired love in mind, we review selected conceptualizations from an enormous and diverse psychodynamic literature on narcissism. Major theoretical approaches illustrate a number of psychodynamics associated with narcissistic self-regulatory problems. This paper provides a concise overview of major conceptual themes regarding pathological narcissism and impaired capacity to love.

  5. "Slide less pathology": Fairy tale or reality?

    PubMed

    Indu, M; Rathy, R; Binu, M P

    2016-01-01

    Pathology practice is significantly advanced in various frontiers. Therefore, "slide less digital" pathology will not be a mere imagination in near future. Digitalization of histopathological slides (whole slide imaging [WSI]) is possible with the help of whole slide scanner. The WSI has a positive impact not only in routine practice but also in research field, medical education and bioindustry. Even if digital pathology has definitive advantages, its widespread use is not yet possible. As it is an upcoming technology in our field, this article is aimed to discussessential aspects of WSI. PMID:27601824

  6. Speckle Tracking Based Strain Analysis Is Sensitive for Early Detection of Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    An, Xiangbo; Wang, Jingjing; Li, Hao; Lu, Zhizhen; Bai, Yan; Xiao, Han; Zhang, Youyi; Song, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a key pathological process of many cardiac diseases. However, early detection of cardiac hypertrophy is difficult by the currently used non-invasive method and new approaches are in urgent need for efficient diagnosis of cardiac malfunction. Here we report that speckle tracking-based strain analysis is more sensitive than conventional echocardiography for early detection of pathological cardiac hypertrophy in the isoproterenol (ISO) mouse model. Pathological hypertrophy was induced by a single subcutaneous injection of ISO. Physiological cardiac hypertrophy was established by daily treadmill exercise for six weeks. Strain analysis, including radial strain (RS), radial strain rate (RSR) and longitudinal strain (LS), showed marked decrease as early as 3 days after ISO injection. Moreover, unlike the regional changes in cardiac infarction, strain analysis revealed global cardiac dysfunction that affects the entire heart in ISO-induced hypertrophy. In contrast, conventional echocardiography, only detected altered E/E’, an index reflecting cardiac diastolic function, at 7 days after ISO injection. No change was detected on fractional shortening (FS), E/A and E’/A’ at 3 days or 7 days after ISO injection. Interestingly, strain analysis revealed cardiac dysfunction only in ISO-induced pathological hypertrophy but not the physiological hypertrophy induced by exercise. Taken together, our study indicates that strain analysis offers a more sensitive approach for early detection of cardiac dysfunction than conventional echocardiography. Moreover, multiple strain readouts distinguish pathological cardiac hypertrophy from physiological hypertrophy. PMID:26871457

  7. Speckle Tracking Based Strain Analysis Is Sensitive for Early Detection of Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    An, Xiangbo; Wang, Jingjing; Li, Hao; Lu, Zhizhen; Bai, Yan; Xiao, Han; Zhang, Youyi; Song, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a key pathological process of many cardiac diseases. However, early detection of cardiac hypertrophy is difficult by the currently used non-invasive method and new approaches are in urgent need for efficient diagnosis of cardiac malfunction. Here we report that speckle tracking-based strain analysis is more sensitive than conventional echocardiography for early detection of pathological cardiac hypertrophy in the isoproterenol (ISO) mouse model. Pathological hypertrophy was induced by a single subcutaneous injection of ISO. Physiological cardiac hypertrophy was established by daily treadmill exercise for six weeks. Strain analysis, including radial strain (RS), radial strain rate (RSR) and longitudinal strain (LS), showed marked decrease as early as 3 days after ISO injection. Moreover, unlike the regional changes in cardiac infarction, strain analysis revealed global cardiac dysfunction that affects the entire heart in ISO-induced hypertrophy. In contrast, conventional echocardiography, only detected altered E/E', an index reflecting cardiac diastolic function, at 7 days after ISO injection. No change was detected on fractional shortening (FS), E/A and E'/A' at 3 days or 7 days after ISO injection. Interestingly, strain analysis revealed cardiac dysfunction only in ISO-induced pathological hypertrophy but not the physiological hypertrophy induced by exercise. Taken together, our study indicates that strain analysis offers a more sensitive approach for early detection of cardiac dysfunction than conventional echocardiography. Moreover, multiple strain readouts distinguish pathological cardiac hypertrophy from physiological hypertrophy.

  8. University of California, Irvine-Pathology Extraction Pipeline: the pathology extraction pipeline for information extraction from pathology reports.

    PubMed

    Ashish, Naveen; Dahm, Lisa; Boicey, Charles

    2014-12-01

    We describe Pathology Extraction Pipeline (PEP)--a new Open Health Natural Language Processing pipeline that we have developed for information extraction from pathology reports, with the goal of populating the extracted data into a research data warehouse. Specifically, we have built upon Medical Knowledge Analysis Tool pipeline (MedKATp), which is an extraction framework focused on pathology reports. Our particular contributions include additional customization and development on MedKATp to extract data elements and relationships from cancer pathology reports in richer detail than at present, an abstraction layer that provides significantly easier configuration of MedKATp for extraction tasks, and a machine-learning-based approach that makes the extraction more resilient to deviations from the common reporting format in a pathology reports corpus. We present experimental results demonstrating the effectiveness of our pipeline for information extraction in a real-world task, demonstrating performance improvement due to our approach for increasing extractor resilience to format deviation, and finally demonstrating the scalability of the pipeline across pathology reports for different cancer types.

  9. Pathological Buying Online as a Specific Form of Internet Addiction: A Model-Based Experimental Investigation.

    PubMed

    Trotzke, Patrick; Starcke, Katrin; Müller, Astrid; Brand, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate different factors of vulnerability for pathological buying in the online context and to determine whether online pathological buying has parallels to a specific Internet addiction. According to a model of specific Internet addiction by Brand and colleagues, potential vulnerability factors may consist of a predisposing excitability from shopping and as mediating variable, specific Internet use expectancies. Additionally, in line with models on addiction behavior, cue-induced craving should also constitute an important factor for online pathological buying. The theoretical model was tested in this study by investigating 240 female participants with a cue-reactivity paradigm, which was composed of online shopping pictures, to assess excitability from shopping. Craving (before and after the cue-reactivity paradigm) and online shopping expectancies were measured. The tendency for pathological buying and online pathological buying were screened with the Compulsive Buying Scale (CBS) and the Short Internet Addiction Test modified for shopping (s-IATshopping). The results demonstrated that the relationship between individual's excitability from shopping and online pathological buying tendency was partially mediated by specific Internet use expectancies for online shopping (model's R² = .742, p < .001). Furthermore, craving and online pathological buying tendencies were correlated (r = .556, p < .001), and an increase in craving after the cue presentation was observed solely in individuals scoring high for online pathological buying (t(28) = 2.98, p < .01, d = 0.44). Both screening instruments were correlated (r = .517, p < .001), and diagnostic concordances as well as divergences were indicated by applying the proposed cut-off criteria. In line with the model for specific Internet addiction, the study identified potential vulnerability factors for online pathological buying and suggests potential parallels. The presence of craving in

  10. Pathological Buying Online as a Specific Form of Internet Addiction: A Model-Based Experimental Investigation.

    PubMed

    Trotzke, Patrick; Starcke, Katrin; Müller, Astrid; Brand, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate different factors of vulnerability for pathological buying in the online context and to determine whether online pathological buying has parallels to a specific Internet addiction. According to a model of specific Internet addiction by Brand and colleagues, potential vulnerability factors may consist of a predisposing excitability from shopping and as mediating variable, specific Internet use expectancies. Additionally, in line with models on addiction behavior, cue-induced craving should also constitute an important factor for online pathological buying. The theoretical model was tested in this study by investigating 240 female participants with a cue-reactivity paradigm, which was composed of online shopping pictures, to assess excitability from shopping. Craving (before and after the cue-reactivity paradigm) and online shopping expectancies were measured. The tendency for pathological buying and online pathological buying were screened with the Compulsive Buying Scale (CBS) and the Short Internet Addiction Test modified for shopping (s-IATshopping). The results demonstrated that the relationship between individual's excitability from shopping and online pathological buying tendency was partially mediated by specific Internet use expectancies for online shopping (model's R² = .742, p < .001). Furthermore, craving and online pathological buying tendencies were correlated (r = .556, p < .001), and an increase in craving after the cue presentation was observed solely in individuals scoring high for online pathological buying (t(28) = 2.98, p < .01, d = 0.44). Both screening instruments were correlated (r = .517, p < .001), and diagnostic concordances as well as divergences were indicated by applying the proposed cut-off criteria. In line with the model for specific Internet addiction, the study identified potential vulnerability factors for online pathological buying and suggests potential parallels. The presence of craving in

  11. Pathological Buying Online as a Specific Form of Internet Addiction: A Model-Based Experimental Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Trotzke, Patrick; Starcke, Katrin; Müller, Astrid; Brand, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate different factors of vulnerability for pathological buying in the online context and to determine whether online pathological buying has parallels to a specific Internet addiction. According to a model of specific Internet addiction by Brand and colleagues, potential vulnerability factors may consist of a predisposing excitability from shopping and as mediating variable, specific Internet use expectancies. Additionally, in line with models on addiction behavior, cue-induced craving should also constitute an important factor for online pathological buying. The theoretical model was tested in this study by investigating 240 female participants with a cue-reactivity paradigm, which was composed of online shopping pictures, to assess excitability from shopping. Craving (before and after the cue-reactivity paradigm) and online shopping expectancies were measured. The tendency for pathological buying and online pathological buying were screened with the Compulsive Buying Scale (CBS) and the Short Internet Addiction Test modified for shopping (s-IATshopping). The results demonstrated that the relationship between individual’s excitability from shopping and online pathological buying tendency was partially mediated by specific Internet use expectancies for online shopping (model’s R² = .742, p < .001). Furthermore, craving and online pathological buying tendencies were correlated (r = .556, p < .001), and an increase in craving after the cue presentation was observed solely in individuals scoring high for online pathological buying (t(28) = 2.98, p < .01, d = 0.44). Both screening instruments were correlated (r = .517, p < .001), and diagnostic concordances as well as divergences were indicated by applying the proposed cut-off criteria. In line with the model for specific Internet addiction, the study identified potential vulnerability factors for online pathological buying and suggests potential parallels. The presence of craving in

  12. Osteoarthritis accelerates and exacerbates Alzheimer's disease pathology in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate whether localized peripheral inflammation, such as osteoarthritis, contributes to neuroinflammation and neurodegenerative disease in vivo. Methods We employed the inducible Col1-IL1βXAT mouse model of osteoarthritis, in which induction of osteoarthritis in the knees and temporomandibular joints resulted in astrocyte and microglial activation in the brain, accompanied by upregulation of inflammation-related gene expression. The biological significance of the link between peripheral and brain inflammation was explored in the APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) whereby osteoarthritis resulted in neuroinflammation as well as exacerbation and acceleration of AD pathology. Results Induction of osteoarthritis exacerbated and accelerated the development of neuroinflammation, as assessed by glial cell activation and quantification of inflammation-related mRNAs, as well as Aβ pathology, assessed by the number and size of amyloid plaques, in the APP/PS1; Col1-IL1βXAT compound transgenic mouse. Conclusion This work supports a model by which peripheral inflammation triggers the development of neuroinflammation and subsequently the induction of AD pathology. Better understanding of the link between peripheral localized inflammation, whether in the form of osteoarthritis, atherosclerosis or other conditions, and brain inflammation, may prove critical to our understanding of the pathophysiology of disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21899735

  13. Autofluorescence spectroscopy of normal and pathological tissues of the bladder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A'Amar, Ousama M.; Guillemin, Francois H.; Begorre, Henri; Yvroud, Edouard

    1997-12-01

    Autofluorescence spectra of normal and pathological mucosa of the bladder were measured in vivo in five patients using 410 nm excitation light and ex vivo in five samples, within 30 minutes after removal, using both 364 and 400 nm excitation lights. Inflammatory and angiodysplasia post-radiotherapy lesions, and papilloma were differentiated from normal mucosa by the low autofluorescence intensity and the shape of spectra. The autofluorescence intensity ratio, at a common emission peak (515 - 520 nm) induced by 410 nm and 1 mW excitation light, between normal mucosa and pathological tissues for each patient was variable. A minimum of 5 and a maximum of 22.5 were observed. The autofluorescence intensity for certain inflammatory post-radiotherapy lesions was null. Furthermore, due to high absorption of hemoglobin, spectra of angiodysplasia post-radiotherapy lesions were characterized by two peaks at about 555 and 600 nm. The measured autofluorescence spectra in samples caused by two excitation wavelengths (360 & 400 nm) and 1 mW light power showed similar structures to in vivo results. Though, a NADH peak appeared in variable intensities in spectra of both normal and pathological tissues at the excitation light of 364 nm. In certain lesions, this emission was highly attenuated.

  14. BRAIN TEMPERATURE HOMEOSTASIS: PHYSIOLOGICAL FLUCTUATIONS AND PATHOLOGICAL SHIFTS

    PubMed Central

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this work is to discuss brain temperature as a physiological parameter, which reflects the balance between metabolism-related intra-brain heat production and heat loss by cerebral circulation to the rest of the body and then to the external environment. First, we present data on fluctuations in brain temperature occurring under physiological and behavioral conditions and discuss their mechanisms. Since most processes governing neural activity are temperature-dependent, we consider how naturally occurring temperature fluctuations could affect neural activity and neural functions. Then, we review brain temperature changes induced by psychomotor stimulants and show that the hyperthermic effects of these drugs are state-dependent and modulated by environmental conditions. Since high temperature could irreversibly damage neural cells and dramatically worsen various pathological processes, we consider the situations associated with pathological brain hyperthermia and evaluate its role in acute perturbations of brain functions, neurotoxicity, and neurodegeneration. We also discuss the complexities and limitations in consideration of brain temperature within the frameworks of physiological regulation and homeostasis. While different adaptive mechanisms could, within some limits, compensate for an altered heat balance of the brain, real life often creates situations when this balance could not be compensated, resulting in pathology and life-threatening health complications. PMID:20036808

  15. Vocal Fold Pathologies and Three-Dimensional Flow Separation Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostoli, Adam G.; Weiland, Kelley S.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-11-01

    Polyps and nodules are two different pathologies, which are geometric abnormalities that form on the medial surface of the vocal folds, and have been shown to significantly disrupt a person's ability to communicate. Although the mechanism by which the vocal folds self-oscillate and the three-dimensional nature of the glottal jet has been studied, the effect of irregularities caused by pathologies is not fully understood. Examining the formation and evolution of vortical structures created by a geometric protuberance is important, not only for understanding the aerodynamic forces exerted by these structures on the vocal folds, but also in the treatment of the above-mentioned pathological conditions. Using a wall-mounted prolate hemispheroid with a 2:1 aspect ratio in cross flow, the present investigation considers three-dimensional flow separation induced by a model vocal fold polyp. Building on previous work using skin friction line visualization, both the velocity flow field and wall pressure measurements around the model polyp are presented and compared. Supported by the National Science Foundation, Grant No. CBET-1236351 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE).

  16. [Pathological gambling--what do we know?].

    PubMed

    Gisela Buchner, Ursula; Wodarz, Norbert

    2011-08-01

    According to epidemiological studies, there are 103 000-290 000 people in Germany afflicted by pathological gambling. In many cases the disorder remains hidden for a long time with only a few of the problematic or pathological gamblers seeking help in the professional helping network. Focussing on the relevant results for Germany, this review summarizes the recent research concerning "pathological gambling". The main topics are diagnosis, nosological status, epidemiology, gender-related differences and common screening instruments. Furthermore, the increasing probability for the development of pathological gambling upon existing other psychiatric disorders, e. g. personality disorder, mood and anxiety disorders, substance-related disorders or ADHD, is discussed as well as the current approaches in treatment.

  17. Problem and Pathological Gambling among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinchfield, Randy; Hanson, William E.; Olson, Douglas H.

    2006-01-01

    This chapter examines problem and pathological gambling among college students and reports on prevalence rate, risk and protective factors, prevention and intervention, and recommendations for college student personnel and other university administrators.

  18. American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention of Cervical Cancer ASCCP has endorsed American Society of Clinical Oncology's Guidelines for Secondary Prevention of ... 7227 Toll-Free (240) 575-9880 Fax © American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology * Required * First Name: * ...

  19. Forensic veterinary pathology, today's situation and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ottinger, T; Rasmusson, B; Segerstad, C H A; Merck, M; Goot, F V D; Olsén, L; Gavier-Widén, D

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the current status of forensic veterinary pathology, a survey was composed directed at pathology laboratories and institutes, mostly in Europe. The questions included number of and type of cases, resources available, level of special training of the investigating pathologists and the general view on the current status and future of the discipline. The surveys were sent to 134 laboratories and were returned by 72 respondents of which 93 per cent work on forensic pathology cases. The results indicate scarcity of training opportunities and special education, and insufficient veterinary-specific reference data and information on forensic analyses. More cooperation with human forensic pathology was desired by many respondents, as was more interaction across country borders.

  20. On Carcinomas and Other Pathological Entities

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anand; Ceusters, Werner; Rosse, Cornelius

    2005-01-01

    Tumours, abscesses, cysts, scars and fractures are familiar types of what we shall call pathological continuant entities. The instances of such types exist always in or on anatomical structures, which thereby become transformed into pathological anatomical structures of corresponding types: a fractured tibia, a blistered thumb, a carcinomatous colon. In previous work on biomedical ontologies we showed how the provision of formal definitions for relations such as is_a, part_of and transformation_of can facilitate the integration of such ontologies in ways which have the potential to support new kinds of automated reasoning. We here extend this approach to the treatment of pathologies, focusing especially on those pathological continuant entities which arise when organs become affected by carcinomas. PMID:18629199

  1. Types of Psychotherapy for Pathological Gamblers

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Several types of psychotherapy are currently used to treat pathological gamblers. These include Gambler's Anonymous, cognitive behavioral therapy, behavioral therapy, psychodynamic therapy, and family therapy. Research into which types of psychotherapy are the most effective for pathological gambling is limited but is a growing area of study. Group therapy, namely Gambler's Anonymous, provides peer support and structure. Cognitive behavior therapy aims to identify and correct cognitive distortions about gambling. Psychodynamic psychotherapy can help recovering gamblers address core conflicts and hidden psychological meanings of gambling. Family therapy is helpful by providing support and education and eliminating enabling behaviors. To date, no single type of psychotherapy has emerged as the most effective form of treatment. As in other addictive disorders, treatment retention of pathological gamblers is highly variable. Understanding the types of psychotherapy that are available for pathological gamblers, as well their underlying principles, will assist clinicians in managing this complex behavioral disorder. PMID:21152147

  2. Assessment and management of pathological gambling.

    PubMed

    McConaghy, N

    1988-08-01

    This article describes a brief treatment--imaginal desensitization--which enables pathological gamblers to retain control of gambling, discusses its development and advances evidence from 2-9 years' follow-up of its efficacy.

  3. Induction process of trainees in pathology residency

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Imran; Ali, Natasha

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the evolution of the induction process of pathology residency at The Aga Khan University hospital. The Department of Postgraduate Medical Education was established in 1985. The induction process is an exhaustive exercise that includes an admission test held simultaneously in Karachi, Hyderabad, Lahore, and Rawalpindi, followed by an interview of the shortlisted candidates. The pathology residency program was started 25 years ago and since then the induction process has undergone major changes with the course of time. PMID:27313487

  4. Human Vision Pathology Diagnostics by Photogrammetrics Means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murynin, A.; Knyaz, V.; Mateev, I.

    2014-06-01

    One of the reasons of such vision pathology as human stereoscopic vision capability dysfunction is an asymmetry of a human face. As a rule, such dysfunctions occur as early as in the babyhood, when diagnostic methods applied for adults are ineffective. Early diagnostics and prophylaxis could help in treatment of such pathology and face 3D modeling is one of the promising ways to solve this problem.

  5. Demystified … Molecular pathology in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, J

    2002-01-01

    In the past 10 years, molecular biology has found major applications in pathology, particularly in oncology. This has been a field of enormous expansion, where pure science has found a place in clinical practice and is now of everyday use in any academic unit. This demystified review will discuss the techniques used in molecular pathology and then provide examples of how these can be used in oncology. PMID:12456768

  6. [Pathology of placenta of rats induced by fatty acid deficiency].

    PubMed

    Glocker, T M

    2000-01-01

    Lipids are important cell components, both from the structural and the functional point of view. Besides, they intervene in transporting functions, cell recognition and immunity. Essential Fatty Acids (EFA) are important for the functional and structural maintenance of animal organisms. In our laboratory, it was demonstrated that one group of pregnant rats fed on an EFA deficient diet, and other group of rats fed on the same diet but with 5% of corn oil (rich in linoleic acid) showed alterations on the development of the metrial gland. In the present work, 57 female rats of a Wistar strain were fed since weaning with one of the following diets: EFAD: deficient in essential fatty acids, COD: EFAD + 5% corn oil (linoleic acid sufficient but alpha-linoleic acid deficient); SAD: EFAD + 5% soy oil (both EFA sufficient) and CD: commercial diet. After 3 months the animals were sacrificed on the 13 th. day of gestation. Uteru's horns were dissected and the implantation sities were fixed on formol and embebbed in parafin. The observations were carried out with H/E coloured cross-sections and the corialantoidea placenta, the cities of implantations and the sitios of reabsortions were studied. The metrial gland of DAGE and DAM rats presented structural modifications compared to DC rats. The most relevant findings were: indifferentiation of the granulated metrial gland cells and an increase in the amount of connective tissue. In DAS rats, on the contrary, the aspect of the metrial gland was similar to the observed in the DC group. In the DAGE and the DAM groups Labyrinthium was enlarged with vascular septum group. Mean while DAS was similar to group DC (thin and vascular). Differences in the cities of implantations and reabsortions were not detected. The present results suggest that alpha-linolenico acid is essential for the rat placenta to reach normal development.

  7. Comparative pathology of silicate pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Brambilla, C.; Abraham, J.; Brambilla, E.; Benirschke, K.; Bloor, C.

    1979-01-01

    A simple pneumoconiosis with lamellar birefringent crystals was observed in animals dying in the San Diego Zoo. We studied 100 autopsies from 11 mammalian and eight avian species. In mammals, mild pulmonary lesions comprised crystal-laden macrophages in alveoli and lymphatics. Interstitial fibrosis was present in 20% of cases. There were no nodules. In birds, dust retention produced large granulomas around tertiary bronchi without fibrosis. Mineralogic analysis using scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed most of the crystals to be silicates. Ninety percent were complex silicates, with aluminum-potassium silicates comprising 70% of the analyzed particles. Electron and x-ray diffraction showed the silicates to be muscovite mica and its hydrothermal degradation product, ie, illite clay. This mica was also present on filtration membranes of atmospheric air samples obtained from the San Diego Zoo. The amount of dust retention was related to the animal's age, anatomic or ecologic variances, and length of stay in the San Diego Zoo. Its semidesert atmosphere is rich in silicates, which are inhaled and deposited in the lungs. Similar mica-induced lesions are found in humans living in this region or the Southwest of the USA. This simple pneumoconiosis is likely to be widespread in human populations living in desert or semidesert climates. Images Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:223447

  8. Calcium in the initiation, progression and as an effector of Alzheimer's disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Green, Kim N

    2009-09-01

    The cause(s) of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (sAD) are complex and currently poorly understood. They likely result from a combination of genetic, environmental, proteomic and lipidomic factors that crucially occur only in the aged brain. Age-related changes in calcium levels and dynamics have the potential to increase the production and accumulation of both amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) and tau pathologies in the AD brain, although these two pathologies themselves can induce calcium dyshomeostasis, particularly at synaptic membranes. This review discuses the evidence for a role for calcium dyshomeostasis in the initiation of pathology, as well as the evidence for these pathologies themselves disrupting normal calcium homeostasis, which lead to synaptic and neuronal dysfunction, synaptotoxicity and neuronal loss, underlying the dementia associated with the disease.

  9. Activation of the Endothelin System Mediates Pathological Angiogenesis during Ischemic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Chintan; Narayanan, S. Priya; Zhang, Wenbo; Xu, Zhimin; Sukumari-Ramesh, Sangeetha; Dhandapani, Krishnan M.; Caldwell, R. William; Caldwell, Ruth B.

    2015-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity adversely affects premature infants because of oxygen-induced damage of the immature retinal vasculature, resulting in pathological neovascularization (NV). Our pilot studies using the mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) showed marked increases in angiogenic mediators, including endothelins and endothelin receptor (EDNR) A. We hypothesized that activation of the endothelin system via EDNRA plays a causal role in pathological angiogenesis and up-regulation of angiogenic mediators, including vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) in OIR. Mice were exposed to 75% oxygen from post-natal day P7 to P12, treated with either vehicle or EDNRA antagonist BQ-123 or EDNRB antagonist BQ-788 on P12, and kept at room air from P12 to P17 (ischemic phase). RT-PCR analysis revealed increased levels of EDN2 and EDNRA mRNA, and Western blot analysis revealed increased EDN2 expression during the ischemic phase. EDNRA inhibition significantly increased vessel sprouting, resulting in enhanced physiological angiogenesis and decreased pathological NV, whereas EDNRB inhibition modestly improved vascular repair. OIR triggered significant increases in VEGFA protein and mRNA for delta-like ligand 4, apelin, angiopoietin-2, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. BQ-123 treatment significantly reduced these alterations. EDN2 expression was localized to retinal glia and pathological NV tufts of the OIR retinas. EDN2 also induced VEGFA protein expression in cultured astrocytes. In conclusion, inhibition of the EDNRA during OIR suppresses pathological NV and promotes physiological angiogenesis. PMID:25203536

  10. Nuclear receptor RORα regulates pathologic retinal angiogenesis by modulating SOCS3-dependent inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ye; Liu, Chi-Hsiu; SanGiovanni, John Paul; Evans, Lucy P.; Tian, Katherine T.; Zhang, Bing; Stahl, Andreas; Pu, William T.; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Solt, Laura A.; Chen, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Pathologic ocular angiogenesis is a leading cause of blindness, influenced by both dysregulated lipid metabolism and inflammation. Retinoic-acid-receptor–related orphan receptor alpha (RORα) is a lipid-sensing nuclear receptor with diverse biologic function including regulation of lipid metabolism and inflammation; however, its role in pathologic retinal angiogenesis remains poorly understood. Using a mouse model of oxygen-induced proliferative retinopathy, we showed that RORα expression was significantly increased and genetic deficiency of RORα substantially suppressed pathologic retinal neovascularization. Loss of RORα led to decreased levels of proinflammatory cytokines and increased levels of antiinflammatory cytokines in retinopathy. RORα directly suppressed the gene transcription of suppressors of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3), a critical negative regulator of inflammation. Inhibition of SOCS3 abolished the antiinflammatory and vasoprotective effects of RORα deficiency in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, treatment with a RORα inverse agonist SR1001 effectively protected against pathologic neovascularization in both oxygen-induced retinopathy and another angiogenic model of very-low–density lipoprotein receptor (Vldlr)-deficient (Vldlr−/−) mice with spontaneous subretinal neovascularization, whereas a RORα agonist worsened oxygen-induced retinopathy. Our data demonstrate that RORα is a novel regulator of pathologic retinal neovascularization, and RORα inhibition may represent a new way to treat ocular neovascularization. PMID:26243880

  11. Exposure to particulate hexavalent chromium exacerbates allergic asthma pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Brent C.; Constant, Stephanie L.; Patierno, Steven R.; Jurjus, Rosalyn A.; Ceryak, Susan M.

    2012-02-15

    Airborne hexavalent chromate, Cr(VI), has been identified by the Environmental Protection Agency as a possible health threat in urban areas, due to the carcinogenic potential of some of its forms. Particulate chromates are produced in many different industrial settings, with high levels of aerosolized forms historically documented. Along with an increased risk of lung cancer, a high incidence of allergic asthma has been reported in workers exposed to certain inhaled particulate Cr(VI) compounds. However, a direct causal association between Cr(VI) and allergic asthma has not been established. We recently showed that inhaled particulate Cr(VI) induces an innate neutrophilic inflammatory response in BALB/c mice. In the current studies we investigated how the inflammation induced by inhaled particulate Cr(VI) might alter the pathology of an allergic asthmatic response. We used a well-established mouse model of allergic asthma. Groups of ovalbumin protein (OVA)-primed mice were challenged either with OVA alone, or with a combination of OVA and particulate zinc chromate, and various parameters associated with asthmatic responses were measured. Co-exposure to particulate Cr(VI) and OVA mediated a mixed form of asthma in which both eosinophils and neutrophils are present in airways, tissue pathology is markedly exacerbated, and airway hyperresponsiveness is significantly increased. Taken together these findings suggest that inhalation of particulate forms of Cr(VI) may augment the severity of ongoing allergic asthma, as well as alter its phenotype. Such findings may have implications for asthmatics in settings in which airborne particulate Cr(VI) compounds are present at high levels. -- Highlights: ► Allergic asthma correlated with exposure to certain inhaled particulate chromates. ► Direct causal association between Cr(VI) and allergic asthma not established. ► Cr exacerbated pathology and airway hyperresponsiveness in an OVA-challenged mouse. ► Particulate Cr

  12. Pathology and emerging infections--quo vadimus?

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, D. A.; Bryan, R. T.; Hughes, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    There have been dramatic changes in the occurrence of infectious diseases throughout the world in the previous two decades. The emergence of new microbial agents, and the reemergence of infections previously believed to be controlled, threatens the health of all populations. The emergence of these infectious diseases has occurred during a period of breakdown in the capabilities of the public health surveillance systems, prevention programs, and disease control efforts. Expertise in pathology is critical to provide a strong national control program for emerging and reemerging infectious diseases. Despite the many significant achievements made by pathologists in improving understanding of the pathogenesis and diagnosis of infectious diseases, the field of pathology remains largely oriented toward neoplastic diseases, and has not yet identified infectious disease diagnosis as an important component of anatomic pathology training and research, even in the face of the current threats posed by microbial agents. In addition, there is currently a dearth of infectious disease pathologists in the United States and elsewhere in the world, and the use of the autopsy, a prime pathological tool for diagnosis of emerging infections, is on the wane. The most serious problem is that no formal training program for infectious disease pathology currently exists in the United States or elsewhere in the world. As a consequence of this lack of training opportunities, there is a severe deficiency of young, well-educated pathologists with infectious disease expertise. This article explores the historical linkages between the disciplines of infectious diseases and pathology, and suggests that infectious disease pathology as a subspecialty be strengthened and training programs be initiated. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7495275

  13. Imatinib Activates Pathological Hypertrophy by Altering Myocyte Calcium Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Larry; Makarewich, Catherine A.; Berretta, Remus M.; Gao, Hui; Troupes, Constantine D.; Woitek, Felix; Recchia, Fabio; Kubo, Hajime; Force, Thomas; Houser, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Imatinib mesylate is a selective tyrosine-kinase inhibitor used in the treatment of multiple cancers, most notably chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). There is evidence that imatinib can induce cardiotoxicity in cancer patients. Our hypothesis is that imatinib alters calcium regulatory mechanisms and can contribute to development of pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Methods/Results Neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) were treated with clinical doses (Low: 2µM, High: 5µM) of imatinib and assessed for molecular changes. Imatinib increased peak systolic Ca2+ and Ca2+ transient decay rates and Western analysis revealed significant increases in phosphorylation of phospholamban (Thr-17) and the ryanodine receptor (Ser-2814), signifying activation of CaMKII. Imatinib significantly increased NRVM volume as assessed by Coulter counter, myocyte surface area and ANP abundance seen by Western. Imatinib induced cell death, but did not activate the classical apoptotic program as assessed by caspase-3 cleavage, indicating a necrotic mechanism of death in myocytes. We expressed AdNFATc3-GFP in NRVMS and showed imatinib treatment significantly increased NFAT translocation that was inhibited by the calcineurin inhibitor FK506 or CaMKII inhibitors. Conclusion These data show that imatinib can activate pathological hypertrophic signaling pathways by altering intracellular Ca2+ dynamics. This is likely a contributing mechanism for the adverse cardiac effects of imatinib. PMID:24931551

  14. Pathological pregnancy and psychological symptoms in women.

    PubMed

    Bjelanović, Vedran; Babić, Dragan; Oresković, Slavko; Tomić, Vajdana; Martinac, Marko; Juras, Josip

    2012-09-01

    Pregnancy is followed by many physiologic, organic and psychological changes and disorders, which can become more serious in pregnancy followed by complications, especially in women with pathological conditions during pregnancy. The purpose of this study was to find out and analyze the prevalence and intensity of psychological disorders in women with pathological conditions during pregnancy and compare it with conditions in pregnant women who had normal development of pregnancy. The research is approved by the Ethical committee of the Mostar University Hospital Center, and it was made in accordance with Helsinki declaration and good clinical practices. The research conducted section for pathology of pregnancy of Department for gynecology and obstetrics of the Mostar University Hospital Center. It included 82 pregnant women with disorders in pregnancy developement and control group consisted of pregnant women who had normal development of pregnancy. The research work was conducted from September 2007 to August 2008 in Mostar University Hospital Center. Pregnant women had Standard and laboratory tests, Ultrasound. CTG examinations were done for all pregnant women and additional tests for those women with complications during pregnancy. Pregnant women completed sociobiographical, obstetrical-clinical and psychological SCL 90-R questionnaire. Pregnant women with pathological pregnancy exibited significantly more psychological symptoms in comparison to pregnant women with normal pregnancy (p < 0.001 to p = 0.004). Frequency and intensity of psychical symptoms and disorders statisticly are more characteristic in pathological pregnancy (61%/40.6%). The statistical data indicate a significantly higher score of psychological disorders in those pregnant women with primary school education (p = 0.050), those who take more than 60% carbohydrates (p = 0.001), those with pathological CTG records (p < 0.001), those with pathological ultrasound results (p < 0.001 to 0.216) and

  15. Pathology of excessive production of growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Scheithauer, B W; Kovacs, K; Randall, R V; Horvath, E; Laws, E R

    1986-08-01

    Since its clinical description in the last century, much progress has been made in our understanding of acromegaly. From an initial description of pituitary enlargement as just another manifestation of generalized visceromegaly, the pituitary abnormality has come to be recognized, in most instances, as the underlying aetiological factor. Gigantism and acromegaly are manifestations of disordered pituitary physiology, but the lesion responsible may be hypothalamic, adenohypophyseal or ectopic in location. The best known pathological hypothalamic basis for acromegaly is represented by a neuronal malformation or 'gangliocytoma'. It usually takes the form of an intrasellar gangliocytoma or, more rarely, a hypothalamic hamartoma. The neuronal elaboration of GHRH may play a role in the development of a growth hormone adenoma; the pituitary process may pass through an intermediate stage of somatotropic hyperplasia. When acromegaly has its basis in a pituitary abnormality, the lesion is almost exclusively an adenoma; the non-tumorous adenohypophysis shows no evidence of coexistent hyperplasia. Surprisingly, such tumours are more often engaged in the formation of multiple hormones rather than GH alone. They frequently produce not only GH and prolactin, the products characteristics of cells of the acidophil line, but also glycoprotein hormones, usually TSH. The spectrum of adenomas also varies in its degree of differentiation from a histogenetically primitive lesion, the acidophil stem cell adenoma, to well-differentiated tumours of varying cellular composition and hormone content. Each adenoma type has its clinicopathological, histochemical, immunocytological and ultrastructural characteristics. The isolation and characterization of GHRH has permitted the identification of neuroendocrine tumours, most of foregut origin, elaborating this releasing hormone. Such functional tumours induce hyperplasia of pituitary somatotrophs and may, on occasion, result in the formation of

  16. Veterinary Forensic Pathology: The Search for Truth.

    PubMed

    McDonough, S P; McEwen, B J

    2016-09-01

    Veterinary forensic pathology is emerging as a distinct discipline, and this special issue is a major step forward in establishing the scientific basis of the discipline. A forensic necropsy uses the same skill set needed for investigations of natural disease, but the analytical framework and purpose of forensic pathology differ significantly. The requirement of legal credibility and all that it entails distinguishes the forensic from routine diagnostic cases. Despite the extraordinary depth and breadth of knowledge afforded by their training, almost 75% of veterinary pathologists report that their training has not adequately prepared them to handle forensic cases. Many veterinary pathologists, however, are interested and willing to develop expertise in the discipline. Lessons learned from tragic examples of wrongful convictions in medical forensic pathology indicate that a solid foundation for the evolving discipline of veterinary forensic pathology requires a commitment to education, training, and certification. The overarching theme of this issue is that the forensic necropsy is just one aspect in the investigation of a case of suspected animal abuse or neglect. As veterinary pathologists, we must be aware of the roles filled by other veterinary forensic experts involved in these cases and how our findings are an integral part of an investigation. We hope that the outcome of this special issue of the journal is that veterinary pathologists begin to familiarize themselves with not only forensic pathology but also all aspects of veterinary forensic science.

  17. Equine laryngeal hemiplegia. Part IV. Muscle pathology.

    PubMed

    Cahill, J I; Goulden, B E

    1986-11-01

    This study confirmed that neurogenic muscle pathology exists in intrinsic laryngeal muscles supplied by the recurrent laryngeal nerves in horses subclinically and clinically affected with laryngeal hemiplegia. An important additional observation was the occurrence in three out of four laryngeal hemiplegic horses of neurogenic muscle changes in a hindlimb muscle, the extensor digitorum longus, a muscle supplied by another long peripheral nerve. This finding suggests that a polynenropathy exists in laryngeal hemiplegic horses, and supports the classification of this disease as a distal axonopathy. Comparison of the degree of pathology in the intrinsic laryngeal muscles and that of the recurrent laryngeal nerves innervating them, demonstrated a strong correlation between the extent of damage in the distal left recurrent laryngeal nerve and the overall degree of muscle pathology. The muscle damage in clinically affected horses is a reflection of the nerve damage present in the most distal portion of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. The more variable pathological changes found in proximal levels of the left and right recurrent laryngeal nerves probably reflects the ongoing nature of the pathological process affecting nerve fibres. The existence of a subclinically affected group of horses, the earliest involvement of an adductor, the left cricoarytenoideus lateralis muscle, and the presence of changes in the right intrinsic laryngeal muscles all confirmed the findings of previous workers.

  18. Widespread cytoskeletal pathology characterizes corticobasal degeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Feany, M. B.; Dickson, D. W.

    1995-01-01

    Corticobasal degeneration (CBD) is a rare, progressive neurological disorder characterized by widespread neuronal and glial pathology. Using immunohistochemistry and laser confocal microscopy, we demonstrate that the nonamyloid cortical plaques of CBD are actually collections of abnormal tau in the distal processes of astrocytes. These glial cells express both vimentin and CD44, markers of astrocyte activation. Glial pathology also includes tau-positive cytoplasmic inclusions, here localized to Leu 7-expressing oligodendrocytes. In addition, a wide array of neuronal pathology is defined with tau-positive inclusions in multiple domains of a variety of cortical neurons. CBD thus exhibits widespread glial and neuronal cytoskeletal pathology, including a novel structure, the astrocytic plaque. CBD is a disease of generalized cytoskeletal disruption affecting several cell types and multiple domains of these cells. The further definition of CBD pathology refines the diagnosis and pathophysiological understanding of this unique disease and has important implications for other neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer's disease, characterized by abnormal tau deposition. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7778678

  19. Molecular imaging of Alzheimer disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Kantarci, K

    2014-06-01

    Development of molecular imaging agents for fibrillar β-amyloid positron-emission tomography during the past decade has brought molecular imaging of Alzheimer disease pathology into the spotlight. Large cohort studies with longitudinal follow-up in cognitively normal individuals and patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer disease indicate that β-amyloid deposition can be detected many years before the onset of symptoms with molecular imaging, and its progression can be followed longitudinally. The utility of β-amyloid PET in the differential diagnosis of Alzheimer disease is greatest when there is no pathologic overlap between 2 dementia syndromes, such as in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and Alzheimer disease. However β-amyloid PET alone may be insufficient in distinguishing dementia syndromes that commonly have overlapping β-amyloid pathology, such as dementia with Lewy bodies and vascular dementia, which represent the 2 most common dementia pathologies after Alzheimer disease. The role of molecular imaging in Alzheimer disease clinical trials is growing rapidly, especially in an era when preventive interventions are designed to eradicate the pathology targeted by molecular imaging agents.

  20. Veterinary Forensic Pathology: The Search for Truth.

    PubMed

    McDonough, S P; McEwen, B J

    2016-09-01

    Veterinary forensic pathology is emerging as a distinct discipline, and this special issue is a major step forward in establishing the scientific basis of the discipline. A forensic necropsy uses the same skill set needed for investigations of natural disease, but the analytical framework and purpose of forensic pathology differ significantly. The requirement of legal credibility and all that it entails distinguishes the forensic from routine diagnostic cases. Despite the extraordinary depth and breadth of knowledge afforded by their training, almost 75% of veterinary pathologists report that their training has not adequately prepared them to handle forensic cases. Many veterinary pathologists, however, are interested and willing to develop expertise in the discipline. Lessons learned from tragic examples of wrongful convictions in medical forensic pathology indicate that a solid foundation for the evolving discipline of veterinary forensic pathology requires a commitment to education, training, and certification. The overarching theme of this issue is that the forensic necropsy is just one aspect in the investigation of a case of suspected animal abuse or neglect. As veterinary pathologists, we must be aware of the roles filled by other veterinary forensic experts involved in these cases and how our findings are an integral part of an investigation. We hope that the outcome of this special issue of the journal is that veterinary pathologists begin to familiarize themselves with not only forensic pathology but also all aspects of veterinary forensic science. PMID:27515387

  1. Antibodies as Mediators of Brain Pathology.

    PubMed

    Brimberg, Lior; Mader, Simone; Fujieda, Yuichiro; Arinuma, Yoshiyuki; Kowal, Czeslawa; Volpe, Bruce T; Diamond, Betty

    2015-11-01

    The brain is normally sequestered from antibody exposure by the blood brain barrier. However, antibodies can access the brain during fetal development before the barrier achieves full integrity, and in disease states when barrier integrity is compromised. Recent studies suggest that antibodies contribute to brain pathology associated with autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and neuromyelitis optica, and can lead to transient or permanent behavioral or cognitive abnormalities. We review these findings here and examine the circumstances associated with antibody entry into the brain, the routes of access and the mechanisms that then effect pathology. Understanding these processes and the nature and specificity of neuronal autoantibodies may reveal therapeutic strategies toward alleviating or preventing the neurological pathologies and behavioral abnormalities associated with autoimmune disease.

  2. Microscopic colitis: pathologic considerations, changing dogma.

    PubMed

    Robert, Marie E

    2004-01-01

    Microscopic colitis as an entity was first recognized in 1976, and has become one of the most frequent diseases to exclude on colonic mucosal biopsies. In some pathology practices, up to 30% of colonic biopsies received are from patients in whom microscopic colitis is the clinical question. In this review, the evolution of the terminology and early studies describing the pathology of microscopic colitis are discussed. The pathology of lymphocytic and collagenous colitis is reviewed in detail, including common diagnostic pitfalls, and what is currently known about the pathogenesis of these diseases. The differential diagnosis of microscopic colitis includes other idiopathic inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn's and ulcerative colitis), infections, and drug reactions. The distinction between these entities and microscopic colitis is discussed in detail. Finally, recent studies have revealed new histopathologic changes in microscopic colitis that challenge the currently held concepts of how microscopic colitis fits into the spectrum of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  3. Antibodies as Mediators of Brain Pathology.

    PubMed

    Brimberg, Lior; Mader, Simone; Fujieda, Yuichiro; Arinuma, Yoshiyuki; Kowal, Czeslawa; Volpe, Bruce T; Diamond, Betty

    2015-11-01

    The brain is normally sequestered from antibody exposure by the blood brain barrier. However, antibodies can access the brain during fetal development before the barrier achieves full integrity, and in disease states when barrier integrity is compromised. Recent studies suggest that antibodies contribute to brain pathology associated with autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and neuromyelitis optica, and can lead to transient or permanent behavioral or cognitive abnormalities. We review these findings here and examine the circumstances associated with antibody entry into the brain, the routes of access and the mechanisms that then effect pathology. Understanding these processes and the nature and specificity of neuronal autoantibodies may reveal therapeutic strategies toward alleviating or preventing the neurological pathologies and behavioral abnormalities associated with autoimmune disease. PMID:26494046

  4. A cognitive model of pathological worry

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Colette R.; Mathews, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    We present an evidence-based model of pathological worry in which worry arises from an interaction between involuntary (bottom-up) processes, such as habitual biases in attention and interpretation favouring threat content, and voluntary (top-down) processes, such as attentional control. At a pre-conscious level, these processes influence the competition between mental representations when some correspond to the intended focus of attention and others to threat distracters. Processing biases influence the probability of threat representations initially intruding into awareness as negative thoughts. Worry in predominantly verbal form then develops, influenced by conscious processes such as attempts to resolve the perceived threat and the redirection of attentional control resources to worry content, as well as the continuing influence of habitual processing biases. After describing this model, we present evidence for each component process and for their causal role in pathological worry, together with implications for new directions in the treatment of pathological worry. PMID:22863541

  5. Investigation of spinal pathology in notalgia paresthetica.

    PubMed

    Savk, Oner; Savk, Ekin

    2005-06-01

    A possible association of spinal pathology with notalgia paresthetica (NP) was investigated through clinical and radiographic evaluation. Forty-three NP patients underwent dermatologic and orthopedic examination accompanied by radiography of the spine. Sixty-one lesions in 43 patients were evaluated. In 34 patients, various vertebral pathologies were observed radiographically by a blinded investigator, and in 28 of these cases these changes were most prominent in the vertebrae which corresponded to a lesional dermatome. Thirty-seven lesions were accompanied by spinal changes decided to be relevant (60.7%). The striking correlation of NP localization with spinal pathology suggests that spinal nerve impingement may contribute to the pathogenesis of this entity. PMID:15928634

  6. Personality Pathology and Interpersonal Problem Stability

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Aidan G.C.; Scott, Lori N.; Stepp, Stephanie D.; Hallquist, Michael N.; Pilkonis, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Personality disorders (PDs) are often described as stable, which ignores the important dynamic processes and shifts that are observed clinically in individuals with PD. The current study examined patterns of variability in problematic interpersonal functioning, a core feature of personality pathology. Participants (N=150) were assessed for personality pathology at baseline and also completed the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems–Circumplex Scales at baseline and every three months over the course of a year. Baseline PD was used to predict individual means and variability parameters in generalized interpersonal distress, agentic problems, and communal problems across repeated assessments. Disorders associated with disinhibition predicted variability in generalized distress and agentic problems, whereas only antagonism related disorders predicted variability in communal problems. These associations reveal dynamic processes involved in multiple dimensions of personality pathology and suggest that future research on instability is needed that expands beyond the historical focus on borderline PD. PMID:25562539

  7. Antibodies as Mediators of Brain Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Brimberg, Lior; Mader, Simone; Fujieda, Yuichiro; Arinuma, Yoshiyuki; Kowal, Czeslawa; Volpe, Bruce T.; Diamond, Betty

    2016-01-01

    The brain is normally sequestered from antibody exposure by the blood brain barrier. However, antibodies can access the brain during fetal development before the barrier achieves full integrity, and in disease states when barrier integrity is compromised. Recent studies suggest that antibodies contribute to brain pathology associated with autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and neuromyelitis optica, and can lead to transient or permanent behavioral or cognitive abnormalities. We review these findings here and examine the circumstances associated with antibody entry into the brain, the routes of access and the mechanisms that then effect pathology. Understanding these processes and the nature and specificity of neuronal autoantibodies may reveal therapeutic strategies toward alleviating or preventing the neurological pathologies and behavioral abnormalities associated with autoimmune disease. PMID:26494046

  8. Giant clival chordoma causing pathological laughter

    PubMed Central

    Gripp, Daniel Andrade; do Souto, Antonio Aversa; Gonsales, Douglas; Christiani, Marcio de Miranda Chaves; Nogueira, Janio; Lopes, Helio Ferreira; Torres, Yasmine Coura

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chordomas are rare slowly growing tumors that originate from remnants of the notochord. They have a malignant local behavior, causing symptoms due to bone infiltration and compression of neurovascular structures. Only a few cases of brain tumors associated with pathological laughter have been reported in the literature. Case Description: We report a case of a 42-year-old male patient with this atypical clinical presentation treated at our institution, and discuss the concerning literature. Conclusion: Although being a very rare presentation of chordomas, pathological laughter is usually expected to improve after brain stem decompression. PMID:24778906

  9. [Pathology and clinical medicine. An introduction].

    PubMed

    Baumann, R P

    1977-05-01

    In the introduction the author presents a review of themes connected with the autopsy and some problems of pathology which are not discussed in further detail during the course of the symposium. Thus, the signification and influence of religious, metaphysical, legal, socioeconomical and certain technical factors of the autopsy practice are briefly described, followed by a synopsis of the situation of the pathologist facing the demands of medicine, science, education, and administration. As a conclusion, follows a survey of the history and the activities of the Neuchâtel Institute of pathological anatomy.

  10. Adrenoleukodystrophy: molecular genetics, pathology, and Lorenzo's oil.

    PubMed

    Moser, H W; Powers, J M; Smith, K D

    1995-07-01

    Knowledge about adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), a disorder which was described first in 1923, has increased greatly during recent years. The principal biochemical abnormality, the presumed enzyme defect, and the gene defect, have been defined. A dietary therapy has been proposed and attracted world-wide attention through a motion picture. Nevertheless, many questions remain and cannot be answered without a more fundamental understanding of pathology and pathogenesis. This article will provide a review of the history, clinical features, pathology, biochemistry, and the gene defect, and then appraise current efforts to clarify pathogenesis and develop therapeutic approaches.

  11. [The pathology of smoldering multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Shibayama, Hirohiko

    2015-01-01

    The precursor states (named as monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance [MGUS] and smoldering multiple myeloma [SMM]) consistently exist before symptomatic multiple myeloma is diagnosed. After approximately 30 years have passed since Kyle et al. advocated MGUS and SMM for the first time, the pathology and prognosis of these diseases have been clarified considerably. Recently, the safety and efficacy of the early treatment for the patients with high risk SMM are shown. In this article, the current understanding of the pathology of SMM as well as MGUS including the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment is reviewed. PMID:25626300

  12. Departmental audit in surgical anatomical pathology.

    PubMed

    Hocking, G R; Niteckis, V N; Cairns, B J; Hayman, J A

    1997-11-01

    Internal auditing of performance by pathology providers is a necessary component of total quality management. In this study a peer review of 10% of departmental surgical anatomical pathology accessions received over a seven month period was performed. A number of critical performance parameters were analysed including turn-around times, accuracy of reports and technical proficiency. The results demonstrated an approximate 2% significant error rate in macroscopic and microscopic descriptions, technically good quality sections and stains and generally satisfactory turn-around times. The value and costing of such an audit and changes initiated by the audit are discussed.

  13. [Topical preparations for therapy of tonsillar pathology].

    PubMed

    Kriukov, A I; Kunel'skaia, N L; Tsarapkin, G Y U; Izotova, G N; Tovmasian, A S

    2015-01-01

    This paper highlights clinical and diagnostic aspects of tonsillar pathology with special reference to modern methods for the treatment of pharyngeal diseases of different etiology. A detailed characteristic of local symptomatic therapy is presented including the use of NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). These agents have advantages over other medications for local therapy due to high anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities. Also, they significantly improve the patients' quality of life. The use of a local anti-inflammatory drug is a major component of the treatment of inflammatory pharyngeal pathology. Regardless of the nature of the disease, either bacterial or viral. PMID:26288210

  14. Imaging of Common Arthroscopic Pathology of the Ankle.

    PubMed

    Grambart, Sean T

    2016-10-01

    Arthroscopy of the ankle is used in the treatment and diagnosis of a spectrum of intra-articular pathology including soft tissue and osseous impingement, osteochondral lesions, arthrofibrosis, and synovitis. To help identify the correct pathology, imaging techniques are often used to aid the surgeon in diagnosing pathology and determining best treatment options. This article discusses the use of imaging in various ankle pathologies.

  15. Reversing pathologically increased EEG power by acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation

    PubMed Central

    Adamchic, Ilya; Toth, Timea; Hauptmann, Christian; Tass, Peter Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic Coordinated Reset (CR) neuromodulation is a patterned stimulation with tones adjusted to the patient's dominant tinnitus frequency, which aims at desynchronizing pathological neuronal synchronization. In a recent proof-of-concept study, CR therapy, delivered 4–6 h/day more than 12 weeks, induced a significant clinical improvement along with a significant long-lasting decrease of pathological oscillatory power in the low frequency as well as γ band and an increase of the α power in a network of tinnitus-related brain areas. As yet, it remains unclear whether CR shifts the brain activity toward physiological levels or whether it induces clinically beneficial, but nonetheless abnormal electroencephalographic (EEG) patterns, for example excessively decreased δ and/or γ. Here, we compared the patients' spontaneous EEG data at baseline as well as after 12 weeks of CR therapy with the spontaneous EEG of healthy controls by means of Brain Electrical Source Analysis source montage and standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography techniques. The relationship between changes in EEG power and clinical scores was investigated using a partial least squares approach. In this way, we show that acoustic CR neuromodulation leads to a normalization of the oscillatory power in the tinnitus-related network of brain areas, most prominently in temporal regions. A positive association was found between the changes in tinnitus severity and the normalization of δ and γ power in the temporal, parietal, and cingulate cortical regions. Our findings demonstrate a widespread CR-induced normalization of EEG power, significantly associated with a reduction of tinnitus severity. PMID:23907785

  16. The interpersonal core of personality pathology

    PubMed Central

    Hopwood, Christopher J.; Wright, Aidan G.C.; Ansell, Emily B.; Pincus, Aaron L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that personality pathology is, at its core, fundamentally interpersonal. We review the proposed DSM-5 Section 3 redefinition of personality pathology involving self and interpersonal dysfunction, which we regard as a substantial improvement over the DSM-IV (and DSM-5 Section 2) definition. We note similarities between the proposed scheme and contemporary interpersonal theory and interpret the DSM-5 Section 3 definition using the underlying assumptions and evidence base of the interpersonal paradigm in clinical psychology. We describe how grounding the proposed DSM-5 Section 3 definition in interpersonal theory, and in particular a focus on the “interpersonal situation”, adds to its theoretical texture, empirical support, and clinical utility. We provide a clinical example that demonstrates the ability of contemporary interpersonal theory to augment the DSM-5 definition of personality pathology. We conclude with directions for further research that could clarify the core of personality pathology, and how interpersonal theory can inform research aimed at enhancing the DSM-5 Section 3 proposal and ultimately justify its migration to DSM-5 Section 2. PMID:23735037

  17. Lone atrial fibrillation: Pathologic or not?

    PubMed

    Chambers, Patrick William

    2007-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation risk has been strongly associated with increasing age and visceral obesity. These characteristics are strongly associated with diabetes, decreased heart rate variability, and chronic inflammation. Lone atrial fibrillation (LAF) on the other hand exhibits a predilection for the physically fit and the middle aged, especially males. Given these opposing features it is postulated that pathologic AF is due to cardiac fibrosis and other age related changes while LAF is due to physiologic neurohormonal changes related to autonomic tone, insulin sensitivity, and electrolyte imbalance and that pathologic AF and LAF can be reliably differentiated via an anthropometric approach using weight, height, hip, and waist measurements. An anthropometric study is undertaken from an LAF database to test this hypothesis. Such individuals in addition to being younger and predominantly male appear to be taller with less central adiposity vs. those with pathologic AF. The ramifications of these findings with respect to insulin resistance, sympathetic tone, inflammation and hypertension, often associated with pathologic atrial fibrillation, are discussed. Speculation is drawn about possible etiologic link with mitral valve prolapse, which is commonly encountered in the tall and thin and which shares multiple clinical features with LAF. PMID:17005327

  18. Anxious Writers: Distinguishing Anxiety from Pathology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Martin

    An exploration of writing anxiety suggests that it is a normal form of behavior rather than a pathology, but that it varies in degrees of its dysfunctionality. Excerpts from the log books of college students in a writing anxiety workshop illustrate four broad categories of writing anxiety: procrastination, feeling emotionally distressed, thinking…

  19. Speech-Language Pathology: Preparing Early Interventionists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prelock, Patricia A.; Deppe, Janet

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explain the role of speech-language pathology in early intervention. The expected credentials of professionals in the field are described, and the current numbers of practitioners serving young children are identified. Several resource documents available from the American Speech-­Language Hearing Association are…

  20. Speech-Language-Pathology and Audiology Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    The handbook contains State Education Department rules and regulations that govern speech-language pathology and audiology in New York State. The handbook also describes licensure and first registration as a licensed speech-language pathologist or audiologist. The introduction discusses professional regulation in New York State while the second…

  1. Mild Cognitive Impairment: Pathology and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mufson, Elliott J.; Binder, Lester; Counts, Scott E.; DeKosky, Steven T.; deTolledo-Morrell, Leyla; Ginsberg, Stephen D.; Ikonomovic, Milos D.; Perez, Sylvia E.; Scheff, Stephen W.

    2012-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is rapidly becoming one of the most common clinical manifestations affecting the elderly. The pathologic and molecular substrate of people diagnosed with MCI is not well established. Since MCI is a human specific disorder and neither the clinical nor the neuropathological course appears to follows a direct linear path, it is imperative to characterize neuropathology changes in the brains of people who came to autopsy with a well-characterized clinical diagnosis of MCI. Herein, we discuss findings derived from clinical pathologic studies of autopsy cases with various subtypes of MCI antemortem. The heterogeneity of clinical MCI imparts significant challenges to any review of this subject. The pathologic substrate of MCI is equally complex and must take into account not only conventional plaque and tangle pathology but also a wide range of cellular biochemical and molecular deficits many of which relate to cognitive decline as well as compensatory responses to the progressive disease process. The multifaceted nature of the neuronal disconnection syndrome associated with MCI, suggests that there is no single event, which precipitates this prodromal stage of AD. In fact, it can be argued that neuronal degeneration initiated at different levels of the central nervous system drive cognitive decline as a final common pathway at this stage of the dementing disease process. PMID:22101321

  2. Risk factors of peri-implant pathology.

    PubMed

    de Araújo Nobre, Miguel; Mano Azul, António; Rocha, Evangelista; Maló, Paulo

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to identify risk factors for the incidence of peri-implant pathology. One-thousand, two-hundred and seventy-fifty patients (255 cases and 1020 controls), rehabilitated with dental implants, were included. Peri-implant pathology was defined as the presence of peri-implant pockets ≥ 5 mm, bleeding on probing, vertical bone loss, and loss of attachment ≥ 2 mm. Cases and controls were matched for age, gender, and duration of follow-up. A logistic regression model was used, with estimation of the OR for each variable and interaction, with a level of significance of 5%. The risk factors for peri-implant pathology were: history of periodontitis (OR = 19), bacterial plaque (OR = 3.6), bleeding (OR = 2.9), bone level on the medium third of the implant (OR = 13.9), lack of prosthetic fit or non-optimal screw joint (OR = 5.9), metal-ceramic restorations (OR = 3.9), and the interaction between bacterial plaque and the proximity of other teeth or implants (PROXI) (OR = 4.3). PROXI (OR = 0.44) exerted a protective effect when independent. Based on the results, peri-implant pathology represents a group of multifactorial situations with interaction of biological and biomechanical components in its pathogenesis. It was possible to model the condition and to assess, with high precision, the risk profile of each patient. PMID:25894059

  3. Pathological Left-Handedness: An Explanatory Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satz, Paul

    Reported was an explanatory conceptual model for pathological left-handedness (PLH) and related hypotheses, some of which could not be tested empirically due to lack of information. The model was reported to provide an explanation for the relationship between handedness and specific learning disability, and handedness and cerebral dominance for…

  4. Urologic pathology with clinical and radiologic correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Someren, A.

    1989-01-01

    This book is devoted to the kidneys, urinary passages, renal transplantation, male genitalia, and adrenal glands. Each chapter has the same format: congenital conditions are discussed then, inflammatory and nonneoplastic disorders; and, finally, neoplasms. For each disease process, the clinical presentation, radiologic findings, pathologic characteristics, therapy, and prognosis are discussed.

  5. Preface: Insect Pathology, 2nd ed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insect pathology is an essential component of entomology and provides a non-chemical alternative for insect pest management. There are several groups of organisms that can infect and kill insects including viruses, fungi, microsporidia, bacteria, protists, and nematodes. The dilemma in insect patho...

  6. The Chernobyl thyroid cancer experience: pathology.

    PubMed

    LiVolsi, V A; Abrosimov, A A; Bogdanova, T; Fadda, G; Hunt, J L; Ito, M; Rosai, J; Thomas, G A; Williams, E D

    2011-05-01

    The Chernobyl accident was followed by a large increase in the incidence of thyroid carcinoma in the areas exposed to high levels of fallout. The Chernobyl Tumor Bank was set up in 1998 to make tumours available for study internationally, and a pathology panel reviewed all the tumours and established an agreed diagnosis. The thyroid tumours that were discovered after the Chernobyl nuclear accident were virtually all (95%) of the papillary carcinoma type. Rare examples of other tumour types were identified. Within the papillary group, several subtypes were noted, including classical or usual type, follicular variant, solid variant and mixed patterns Diffuse sclerosis variant, cribriform/morular type and Warthin-like variant were rare. No tall cell or columnar cell variants were identified. The tumours examined by the Pathology Panel of the Chernobyl Tumor Bank constitute a large representative sample (estimated at about 50%) of the tumours that developed in this population. This overview describes the method adopted by the panel and the different diagnostic categories adopted; illustrates the pathology of these neoplasms; compares the pathological characteristics of the early lesions with those identified after long latency periods and the institution of screening programmes and outlines the possible associated causes for the various morphological patterns seen.

  7. Mobile Technology for the Practice of Pathology.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Douglas J

    2016-03-01

    Recently, several technological advances have been introduced to mobile phones leading some people to refer to them as "smartphones." These changes have led to widespread consumer adoption. A similar adoption has occurred within the medical field and this revolution is changing the practice of medicine, including pathology. Several mobile applications have been published for dermatology, orthopedics, ophthalmology, neurosurgery, and clinical pathology. The applications are wide ranging, including mobile technology to increase patient engagement, self-monitoring by patients, clinical algorithm calculation, facilitation between experts to resource-poor environments. These advances have been received with mixed reviews. For anatomic pathology, mobile technology applications can be broken into 4 broad categories: (a) educational uses, (b) microscope with mobile phone, (c) mobile phone as microscope/acquisition device, and (d) miscellaneous. Using a mobile phone as an acquisition device paired with a microscope seems to be the most interesting current application because of the need for expert consultation with resource-poor environments. However, several emerging uses for mobile technology may become more prominent as the technology matures including image analysis, alternative light sources, and increased opportunities for clinician and patient engagement. The flexibility represented by mobile technology represents a burgeoning field in pathology informatics.

  8. Risk Factors and Prodromal Eating Pathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stice, Eric; Ng, Janet; Shaw, Heather

    2010-01-01

    Prospective studies have identified factors that increase risk for eating pathology onset, including perceived pressure for thinness, thin-ideal internalization, body dissatisfaction, dietary restraint, and negative affect. Research also suggests that body dissatisfaction and dietary restraint may constitute prodromal stages of the development of…

  9. Bone marrow-derived cells are differentially involved in pathological and physiological retinal angiogenesis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, He; Otani, Atsushi; Oishi, Akio; Yodoi, Yuko; Kameda, Takanori; Kojima, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2010-01-08

    Purpose: Bone marrow-derived cells have been shown to play roles in angiogenesis. Although these cells have been shown to promote angiogenesis, it is not yet clear whether these cells affect all types of angiogenesis. This study investigated the involvement of bone marrow-derived cells in pathological and physiological angiogenesis in the murine retina. Materials and methods: The oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model was used as a retinal angiogenesis model in newborn mice. To block the influence of bone marrow-derived cells, the mice were irradiated with a 4-Gy dose of radiation from a {sup 137}Cs source. Irradiation was performed in four different conditions with radio dense 2-cm thick lead disks; (1) H group, the head were covered with these discs to protect the eyes from radiation; (2) A group, all of the body was covered with these discs; (3) N group, mice were completely unshielded; (4) C group, mice were put in the irradiator but were not irradiated. On P17, the retinal areas showing pathological and physiological retinal angiogenesis were measured and compared to the retinas of nonirradiated mice. Results: Although irradiation induced leukocyte depletion, it did not affect the number of other cell types or body weight. Retinal nonperfusion areas were significantly larger in irradiated mice than in control mice (P < 0.05), indicating that physiological angiogenesis was impaired. However, the formation of tuft-like angiogenesis processes was more prominent in the irradiated mice (P < 0.05), indicating that pathological angiogenesis was intact. Conclusions: Bone marrow-derived cells seem to be differentially involved in the formation of physiological and pathological retinal vessels. Pathological angiogenesis in the murine retina does not require functional bone marrow-derived cells, but these cells are important for the formation of physiological vessels. Our results add a new insight into the pathology of retinal angiogenesis and bolster the hypothesis that

  10. [Pathological gambling: a clinical and therapeutic-evolutive study of a group of pathologic gamblers].

    PubMed

    Saiz Ruiz, J; Moreno Oliver, I; López-Ibor Aliño, J J

    1992-01-01

    Gambling dependence or pathological gambling is a psychiatric disorder, recognised as such by the North American Psychiatric Association since 1980. Since 1981 we are carrying out a treatment program for patients who suffer from pathological gambling at the Psychiatric Service of "Ramón y Cajal" Hospital. There is an individualized treatment for each patient and their inclusion in group therapy discussions. We present a descriptive study of the most representative socio-demographic, clinical and therapeutic-evolutive data of 46 patients following treatment in our program. All fulfill the diagnostic criteria of DSM III-R for pathological gambling. They were 37 males and 9 females, with an average age of 39 years. More than half of the patients (58%) were consumers of alcoholic beverages; the drug consumption index found was 4% and practically they all were smokers (87%). The excessive drinking and pathological gambling incidence found among family were 35% and 20% respectively. Our therapeutic results support the idea that pathological gambling is a treatable disorder. After an average of two years following treatment 46% of our patients stopped or notably reduced its impulse to gamble. The high incidence of alcohol or drugs consumption among pathological gamblers and their families suggest a biological and psychological relationship between pathological gambling and the classical addictive disorders. PMID:1529750

  11. The Modified POSAS: A Novel Approach to Defining Pathologic and Non-Pathologic Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Fearmonti, Regina; Bond, Jennifer; Erdmann, Detlev; Levin, L. Scott; Pizzo, Salvatore V; Levinson, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Background Scarring is a highly prevalent and multifactorial process, yet no studies to date have attempted to distinguish pathologic from non-pathologic scarring. Methods This article defines and proposes methods of classifying pathologic scarring as it pertains to clinical presentation. Results We propose a new scar scale that incorporates pain and functional impairment. Conclusion The modified POSAS scar assessment scale is the first of its kind to factor in the functional deficits, pain and pruritus of scarring into measurements of associated morbidity. This has great potential in evaluating patient response to treatment and analyzing clinical outcomes. PMID:21200219

  12. Modeling the complex pathology of Alzheimer's disease in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Funez, Pedro; de Mena, Lorena; Rincon-Limas, Diego E

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia and the most common neurodegenerative disorder. AD is mostly a sporadic disorder and its main risk factor is age, but mutations in three genes that promote the accumulation of the amyloid-β (Aβ42) peptide revealed the critical role of amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing in AD. Neurofibrillary tangles enriched in tau are the other pathological hallmark of AD, but the lack of causative tau mutations still puzzles researchers. Here, we describe the contribution of a powerful invertebrate model, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, to uncover the function and pathogenesis of human APP, Aβ42, and tau. APP and tau participate in many complex cellular processes, although their main function is microtubule stabilization and the to-and-fro transport of axonal vesicles. Additionally, expression of secreted Aβ42 induces prominent neuronal death in Drosophila, a critical feature of AD, making this model a popular choice for identifying intrinsic and extrinsic factors mediating Aβ42 neurotoxicity. Overall, Drosophila has made significant contributions to better understand the complex pathology of AD, although additional insight can be expected from combining multiple transgenes, performing genome-wide loss-of-function screens, and testing anti-tau therapies alone or in combination with Aβ42.

  13. Skeletal muscle pathology in endurance athletes with acquired training intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Grobler, L; Collins, M; Lambert, M; Sinclair-Smith, C; Derman, W; St, C; Noakes, T

    2004-01-01

    Background: It is well established that prolonged, exhaustive endurance exercise is capable of inducing skeletal muscle damage and temporary impairment of muscle function. Although skeletal muscle has a remarkable capacity for repair and adaptation, this may be limited, ultimately resulting in an accumulation of chronic skeletal muscle pathology. Case studies have alluded to an association between long term, high volume endurance training and racing, acquired training intolerance, and chronic skeletal muscle pathology. Objective: To systematically compare the skeletal muscle structural and ultrastructural status of endurance athletes with acquired training intolerance (ATI group) with asymptomatic endurance athletes matched for age and years of endurance training (CON group). Methods: Histological and electron microscopic analyses were carried out on a biopsy sample of the vastus lateralis from 18 ATI and 17 CON endurance athletes. The presence of structural and ultrastructural disruptions was compared between the two groups of athletes. Results: Significantly more athletes in the ATI group than in the CON group presented with fibre size variation (15 v 6; p = 0.006), internal nuclei (9 v 2; p = 0.03), and z disc streaming (6 v 0; p = 0.02). Conclusions: There is an association between increased skeletal muscle disruptions and acquired training intolerance in endurance athletes. Further studies are required to determine the nature of this association and the possible mechanisms involved. PMID:15562162

  14. Minireview: physiological and pathological actions of RAS in the ovary.

    PubMed

    Fan, Heng-Yu; Richards, Joanne S

    2010-02-01

    The small G proteins of the RAS superfamily act as molecular switches in the transduction of cellular signals critical for a wide range of normal developmental events as well as pathological processes. However, the functions of Ras genes in ovarian cells have only started to be unveiled. RAS, most likely KRAS that is highly expressed in granulosa cells of growing follicles, appears crucial for mediating the gonadotropin-induced events associated with the unique physiological process of ovulation. By contrast, conditional expression of a constitutively active Kras(G12D) mutant in granulosa cells results in ovulation defects due to the complete disruption of normal follicular growth, cessation of granulosa cell proliferation, and blockage of granulosa cell apoptosis and differentiation. When the tumor suppressor Pten is disrupted conditionally in the Kras(G12D)-expressing granulosa cells, granulosa cell tumors fail to develop. However, ovarian surface epithelial cells expressing the same Pten;Kras(G12D) mutations rapidly become ovarian surface epithelial serous cystadenocarcinomas. In this minireview, we summarize some of the physiological as well as pathological functions of RAS in the rodent ovary, discuss the implications of the Kras(G12D) mutant mouse models for understanding human diseases such as premature ovarian failure and ovarian cancers, and highlight new questions raised by the results of recent studies.

  15. [The pathological neural plasticity and its application in acupuncture research].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hui-ying; Mu, Ping; Dong, Yan

    2008-02-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is involved in a variety of disease conditions. Some seeming peripheral diseases, like chronic pain and disorders in major organs, indeed have clear pathological basis in the CNS. On the other hand, some clinically-beneficial peripheral stimulation, such as acupuncture and massage, exerts significant influence on central neurons. This review attempts to summary recent findings in neuroscience about how pathological insults long-term plastic changes within neural circuits, leading to maladaptive behaviors. This neuroplasticity-based theory not only conceptualizes a cellular mechanism for a plethora of neuropathophysiology but also provides clinical strategies for treating neural diseases. Drug addiction is a chronic brain disease, defined as compulsive drug-seeking, drug-craving, and drug-taking behaviors. Extensive experimental evidence suggests that following exposure to drugs of abuse, neurons within the mesolimbic dopamine system undergo a series of plastic changes that may lead to compulsive emotional and motivational states. It is believed that the first step to unlock the secret of drug addiction is to identify, evaluate, and conceptualize drug-induced neural plasticity. Synaptic plasticity is one form of neuroplasticity that has been best characterized. Using addiction-related synaptic plasticity as a working model, this review attempts to depict the general concept and experimental approach in studying the pathophysiological neural basis of acupuncture.

  16. The status and future of clinical pathology in Korea.

    PubMed

    Cho, H I

    1998-07-01

    Since its introduction half a century ago, modern clinical pathology in Korea has become an essential part of medical practice. The foundations of such fast development are manpower development systems, the government-certified clinical pathologist board system, the medical technologist license system, a medical insurance system providing universal coverage and the decisive introduction of modern technologies. Current issues in clinical pathology are the below cost fee system, the high rate at which claims are rejected, the government's intention to introduce an alternative fee system and 'overheated' competition among commercial laboratories. The 'fee-for-service system' inducing deviated medical practices and low publicity for the discipline-leading to reduction in the number of applications for residency-are serious issues which demand a solution. For continuing success, total laboratory automation (TLA), together with information and core laboratory systems, and an accreditation and audit system must be introduced. Clinical pathologists should, in addition, be trained as laboratory physicians. To extend laboratory usage by developing new demands and needs and expanding the future market for laboratories, effective publicity campaigns through the mass media and internet should be emphasized.

  17. The pathological prion protein forms ionic conductance in lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Paulis, Daniele; Maras, Bruno; Schininà, M Eugenia; di Francesco, Laura; Principe, Serena; Galeno, Roberta; Abdel-Haq, Hanin; Cardone, Franco; Florio, Tullio; Pocchiari, Maurizio; Mazzanti, Michele

    2011-08-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are neurodegenerative pathologies characterized by the accumulation of amyloid fibrils mainly composed of the pathological isoform of the prion protein (PrP(TSE)). PrP(TSE) pre-amyloid fibrils are supposed to induce neurodegenerative lesions possibly through the alteration of membrane permeability. The effect of PrP(TSE) on cellular membranes has been modeled in vitro by synthetic peptides that are, however, only partially representative of PrP(TSE) isoforms found in vivo. In the present work we show that a synthetic membrane exposed to PrP27-30 extracted from TSE-infected hamster brains changes its permeability because of the formation of molecular pores that alter the conductance of the synthetic lipid bilayer. Synthetic membrane challenged with the recombinant prion peptide PrP90-231 shows a much lower conductance. Elevation of calcium ion concentration not only increases the current amplitude due to the action of both PrP27-30 and PrP90-231 on the membrane, but also amplifies the interaction of PrP90-231 with the lipid bilayer.

  18. Modeling the complex pathology of Alzheimer's disease in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Funez, Pedro; de Mena, Lorena; Rincon-Limas, Diego E

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia and the most common neurodegenerative disorder. AD is mostly a sporadic disorder and its main risk factor is age, but mutations in three genes that promote the accumulation of the amyloid-β (Aβ42) peptide revealed the critical role of amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing in AD. Neurofibrillary tangles enriched in tau are the other pathological hallmark of AD, but the lack of causative tau mutations still puzzles researchers. Here, we describe the contribution of a powerful invertebrate model, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, to uncover the function and pathogenesis of human APP, Aβ42, and tau. APP and tau participate in many complex cellular processes, although their main function is microtubule stabilization and the to-and-fro transport of axonal vesicles. Additionally, expression of secreted Aβ42 induces prominent neuronal death in Drosophila, a critical feature of AD, making this model a popular choice for identifying intrinsic and extrinsic factors mediating Aβ42 neurotoxicity. Overall, Drosophila has made significant contributions to better understand the complex pathology of AD, although additional insight can be expected from combining multiple transgenes, performing genome-wide loss-of-function screens, and testing anti-tau therapies alone or in combination with Aβ42. PMID:26024860

  19. Spectrin and calpain: a 'target' and a 'sniper' in the pathology of neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Czogalla, A; Sikorski, A F

    2005-09-01

    It is well documented that activation of calpain, a calcium-sensitive cysteine protease, marks the pathology of naturally and experimentally occurring neurodegenerative conditions. Calpain-mediated proteolysis of major membrane-skeletal protein, alphaII-spectrin, results in the appearance of two unique and highly stable breakdown products, which is an early event in neural cell pathology. This review focuses on spectrin degradation by calpain within neurons induced by diverse conditions, emphasizing a current picture of multi-pattern neuronal death and a recent success in the development of spectrin-based biomarkers. The issue is presented in the context of the major structural and functional properties of the two proteins.

  20. Effects of Self-Objectification on Self-Reported Eating Pathology and Depression.

    PubMed

    Register, Joshua D; Katrevich, Alina V; Aruguete, Mara S; Edman, Jeanne L

    2015-01-01

    Self-objectification occurs when people internalize an observer's perspective onto their own bodies. This study experimentally examined the impacts of self-objectification on 156 male and female college students. We induced a state of self-objectification by having undergraduate students in an experimental condition describe their bodies in writing, from an observer's viewpoint. Participants then completed a questionnaire measuring self-reported eating pathology and depression. When compared with a control group, the self-objectification manipulation caused an increase in self-reported eating pathology in both men and women. The results support previous research finding broad, negative impacts of self-objectification. PMID:26219177

  1. Regulator of calcineurin 1 mediates pathological vascular wall remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, Vanesa; Méndez-Barbero, Nerea; Jesús Jiménez-Borreguero, Luis; Roqué, Mercè; Novensá, Laura; Belén García-Redondo, Ana; Salaices, Mercedes; Vila, Luis; Arbonés, María L.

    2011-01-01

    Artery wall remodeling, a major feature of diseases such as hypertension, restenosis, atherosclerosis, and aneurysm, involves changes in the tunica media mass that reduce or increase the vessel lumen. The identification of molecules involved in vessel remodeling could aid the development of improved treatments for these pathologies. Angiotensin II (AngII) is a key effector of aortic wall remodeling that contributes to aneurysm formation and restenosis through incompletely defined signaling pathways. We show that AngII induces vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and vessel remodeling in mouse models of restenosis and aneurysm. These effects were prevented by pharmacological inhibition of calcineurin (CN) or lentiviral delivery of CN-inhibitory peptides. Whole-genome analysis revealed >1,500 AngII-regulated genes in VSMCs, with just 11 of them requiring CN activation. Of these, the most sensitive to CN activation was regulator of CN 1 (Rcan1). Rcan1 was strongly activated by AngII in vitro and in vivo and was required for AngII-induced VSMC migration. Remarkably, Rcan1−/− mice were resistant to AngII-induced aneurysm and restenosis. Our results indicate that aneurysm formation and restenosis share mechanistic elements and identify Rcan1 as a potential therapeutic target for prevention of aneurysm and restenosis progression. PMID:21930771

  2. Drug addiction as a pathology of staged neuroplasticity.

    PubMed

    Kalivas, Peter W; O'Brien, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Using addictive drugs can evolve from controlled social use into the compulsive relapsing disorder that characterizes addiction. This transition to addiction results from genetic, developmental, and sociological vulnerabilities, combined with pharmacologically induced plasticity in brain circuitry that strengthens learned drug-associated behaviors at the expense of adaptive responding for natural rewards. Advances over the last decade have identified the brain circuits most vulnerable to drug-induced changes, as well as many associated molecular and morphological underpinnings. This growing knowledge has contributed to an expanded understanding of how drugs usurp normal learning circuitry to create the pathology of addiction, as evidenced by involuntary activation of reward circuits in response to drug-associated cues and simultaneous reports of drug craving. This new understanding provides unprecedented potential opportunities for novel pharmacotherapeutic targets in treating addiction. There appears to be plasticity associated with the addiction phenomenon in general as well as changes produced by addiction to a specific class of addicting drugs. These findings also provide the basis for the current understanding of addiction as a chronic, relapsing disease of the brain with changes that persist long after the last use of the drug. Here, we describe the neuroplasticity in brain circuits and cell function induced by addictive drugs that is thought to underlie the compulsions to resume drug-taking, and discuss how this knowledge is impelling exploration and testing of novel addiction therapies. PMID:17805308

  3. Lack of netrin-4 modulates pathologic neovascularization in the eye

    PubMed Central

    Kociok, Norbert; Crespo-Garcia, Sergio; Liang, Yong; Klein, Sabrina V.; Nürnberg, Christina; Reichhart, Nadine; Skosyrski, Sergej; Moritz, Eva; Maier, Anna-Karina; Brunken, William J.; Strauß, Olaf; Koch, Manuel; Joussen, Antonia M.

    2016-01-01

    Netrins are a family of matrix-binding proteins that function as guidance signals. Netrin-4 displays pathologic roles in tumorigenesis and neovascularization. To answer the question whether netrin-4 acts either pro- or anti-angiogenic, angiogenesis in the retina was assessed in Ntn-4−/− mice with oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) and laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV), mimicking hypoxia-mediated neovascularization and inflammatory mediated angiogenesis. The basement membrane protein netrin-4 was found to be localised to mature retinal blood vessels. Netrin-4, but not netrin-1 mRNA expression, increased in response to relative hypoxia and recovered to normal levels at the end of blood vessel formation. No changes in the retina were found in normoxic Ntn-4−/− mice. In OIR, Ntn-4−/− mice initially displayed larger avascular areas which recovered faster to revascularization. Ganzfeld electroretinography showed faster recovery of retinal function in Ntn-4−/− mice. Expression of netrin receptors, Unc5H2 (Unc-5 homolog B, C. elegans) and DCC (deleted in colorectal carcinoma), was found in Müller cells and astrocytes. Laser-induced neovascularization in Nnt-4−/− mice did not differ to that in the controls. Our results indicate a role for netrin-4 as an angiogenesis modulating factor in O2-dependent vascular homeostasis while being less important during normal retinal developmental angiogenesis or during inflammatory neovascularization. PMID:26732856

  4. Matrix Gla protein in tumoral pathology

    PubMed Central

    GHEORGHE, SIMONA ROXANA; CRĂCIUN, ALEXANDRA MĂRIOARA

    2016-01-01

    Matrix Gla protein is a vitamin K-dependent protein secreted by chondrocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells. The presence of matrix Gla protein was reported in arterial and venous walls, lungs, kidney, uterus, heart, tooth cementum and eyes. Several studies identified matrix Gla protein in tumoral pathology. Until recently, it was thought to only have an inhibitory role of physiological and ectopic calcification. New studies demonstrated that it also has a role in physiological and pathological angiogenesis, as well as in tumorigenesis. The aim of this review is to report the latest findings related to the expression and clinical implications of matrix Gla protein in different types of cancer with an emphasis on cerebral tumors. PMID:27547048

  5. Conflicting pathology reports: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Shahar, Tal; Rozovski, Uri; Shapira, Yuval; Nossek, Erez; Zelikovich, Bracha; Jossiphov, Joseph; Ram, Zvi; Kanner, Andrew A; Siegal, Tali; Blumenthal, Deborah T; Lavon, Iris

    2015-02-01

    The differential diagnosis of a brain lesion with two discordant pathology reports includes the presence of collision tumor, metaplastic changes, and labeling errors that occurred during the processing of the specimen. The authors present a case in which the first brain biopsy from a 47-year-old patient with a history of heavy smoking was compatible with metastatic small cell carcinoma, and the second biopsy taken during decompression craniotomy 3 weeks later was compatible with WHO Grade IV glioblastoma. Using short tandem repeat (STR) analysis of the two specimens and nontumor-derived patient DNA, the authors found that the two specimens did not belong to the same individual. The authors conclude that allele imbalance or loss of heterozygosity detected by STR analysis is a reliable and valuable diagnostic tool for clarifying discrepancies in discordant pathology reports.

  6. Personality disorders and dimensions in pathological gambling.

    PubMed

    Odlaug, Brian L; Schreiber, Liana R N; Grant, Jon E

    2012-06-01

    Comorbid DSM-IV Axis II personality disorders appear to be common in pathological gambling (PG) and may contribute to the chronic problems often associated with the disorder. This study sought to examine the relationship between PG, personality disorders, and impulsivity in a sample of pathological gamblers. Personality assessments included the SCID-II, Eysenck Impulsiveness Questionnaire, Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire, and Barratt Impulsiveness Scale. A total of 77 individuals with DSM-IV PG were included in this study, of which 35 (45.5%) met criteria for at least one personality disorder. Specific aspects of impulsivity were associated with certain personality disorders in PG when grouped by cluster, yet the presence of a personality disorder was not positively correlated with gambling severity. It remains unclear how the presence of a personality disorder and aspects of impulsivity may affect treatment outcome. Further exploration of these disorders and dimensions of personality may encourage a more inclusively global treatment approach.

  7. Epidemiology of pathological gambling in Edmonton.

    PubMed

    Bland, R C; Newman, S C; Orn, H; Stebelsky, G

    1993-03-01

    Thirty lifetime pathological gamblers (DSM-III, no exclusion criteria) were identified when 7,214 randomly selected household residents of Edmonton were interviewed by trained lay interviewers using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule. The lifelong prevalence of pathological gambling was 0.42% (ratio of males to females 3:1). The peak age of onset was 25 to 29 years. Gamblers had high rates of comorbidity with other psychiatric disorders. They were likely to have made suicide attempts (13.3%), to have been convicted of offences (26.7%), to be spouse and child abusers (23.3% and 16.7% respectively) and to have spent long periods unemployed (40%). In addition, 80% had trouble at home or work because of gambling, and 60% borrowed or stole to gamble.

  8. Matrix Gla protein in tumoral pathology.

    PubMed

    Gheorghe, Simona Roxana; Crăciun, Alexandra Mărioara

    2016-01-01

    Matrix Gla protein is a vitamin K-dependent protein secreted by chondrocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells. The presence of matrix Gla protein was reported in arterial and venous walls, lungs, kidney, uterus, heart, tooth cementum and eyes. Several studies identified matrix Gla protein in tumoral pathology. Until recently, it was thought to only have an inhibitory role of physiological and ectopic calcification. New studies demonstrated that it also has a role in physiological and pathological angiogenesis, as well as in tumorigenesis. The aim of this review is to report the latest findings related to the expression and clinical implications of matrix Gla protein in different types of cancer with an emphasis on cerebral tumors. PMID:27547048

  9. Wildfire risk as a socioecological pathology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fischer, A. Paige; Spies, Thomas A; Steelman, Toddi A; Moseley, Cassandra; Johnson, Bart R; Bailey, John D.; Ager, Alan A; Bourgeron, Patrick S.; Charnley, Susan; Collins, Brandon M.; Kline, Jeffrey D; Leahy, Jessica E; Littell, Jeremy; Millington, James D A; Nielsen-Pincus, Max; Olsen, Christine S; Paveglio, Travis B; Roos, Christopher I.; Steen-Adams, Michelle M; Stevens, Forrest R; Vukomanovic, Jelena; White, Eric M; Bowman, David M J S

    2016-01-01

    Wildfire risk in temperate forests has become a nearly intractable problem that can be characterized as a socioecological “pathology”: that is, a set of complex and problematic interactions among social and ecological systems across multiple spatial and temporal scales. Assessments of wildfire risk could benefit from recognizing and accounting for these interactions in terms of socioecological systems, also known as coupled natural and human systems (CNHS). We characterize the primary social and ecological dimensions of the wildfire risk pathology, paying particular attention to the governance system around wildfire risk, and suggest strategies to mitigate the pathology through innovative planning approaches, analytical tools, and policies. We caution that even with a clear understanding of the problem and possible solutions, the system by which human actors govern fire-prone forests may evolve incrementally in imperfect ways and can be expected to resist change even as we learn better ways to manage CNHS.

  10. Pathology of the uterine tubal junction.

    PubMed

    Biffignandi, F

    1982-01-01

    First the Author reviews briefly the anatomy and the physiology of the Uterine-Tubal Junction (UTJ) with a main concern for the muscular pattern and the secretory activity of this part of the tube, in relation with the hormonal and nervous control. Speaking about the pathology of the UTJ that can impair fertility, different are the causes: chronic infections and their sequelae, salpingitis isthmica nodosa, polyps, iatrogenic lesions (mainly following sterilization procedures), congenital malformations. Other pathologies might be: ectopic pregnancies - 2.5% of all tubal pregnancies - and neoplasms even if not related to infertility. The therapy in most cases for restoring the continuity and hopefully the function of the tube is surgery through a microsurgical approach.

  11. Multidetector CT of hepatic artery pathologies.

    PubMed

    Karaosmanoglu, D; Erol, B; Karcaaltincaba, M

    2012-01-01

    The hepatic artery can be involved by a variety of pathology and diseases.Today MDCT enables high quality imaging of the hepatic artery using axial, MIP and volume rendered images. We illustrate MDCT findings of anatomical variations, aneurysm, dilatation, dissection, arteriovenous fistula, thrombosis and stenosis. Aneurysms can be saccular, fusiform and multiple and may develop due to atherosclerosis, vasculitis, trauma and biopsy. Dilatation of hepatic artery can be seen in portal hypertension, Osler-Weber-Rendu disease and hemangiomatosis. Hepatic artery can be occluded after trauma and transplantation. Dissection develops due to atherosclerosis, Marfan and Ehler Danlos syndromes and during pregnancy. Arteriovenous fistula can be congenital and acquired. We conclude that various hepatic artery pathologies can be confidently diagnosed by MDCT.

  12. Pathology of drug-associated gastrointestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Price, Ashley B

    2003-11-01

    A large number of drugs have gastrointestinal side-effects of which diarrhoea or constipation, nausea and vomiting are amongst the commonest. In relatively few are there diagnostic pathological changes and this review draws attention to the most common. Incriminating a drug as a cause of specific pathological changes requires the drug to be associated with the changes, for the latter to resolve when the drug is withdrawn and for them to re-appear when a patient is rechallenged with the drug. Individual histological features such as apoptosis, tissue infiltration by eosinophils and increased intra-epithelial lymphocytes within the gut mucosa can be clues to an iatrogenic aetiology but these are by no means specific. Amongst the few pathognomonic patterns of drug reactions is pseudomembranous colitis and diaphragm disease. These, along with others such as reactive gastritis and the collagenous and lymphocytic forms of microscopic colitis, in which drugs have also been implicated, are described here. PMID:14651719

  13. Pathology of renal diseases in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Boonpucknavig, Vijitr; Soontornniyomkij, Virawudh

    2003-01-01

    Renal diseases unique to the tropics are those that occur in association with infectious diseases including dengue hemorrhagic fever, typhoid fever, shigellosis, leptospirosis, lepromatous leprosy, malaria, opisthorchiasis, and schistosomiasis. These renal complications can be classified on the basis of their clinical and pathologic characteristics into acute transient reversible glomerulonephritis, chronic progressive irreversible glomerulonephritis, amyloidosis, and acute renal failure (ARF) resulting from acute tubular necrosis, acute tubulointerstitial nephritis, and thrombotic microangiopathy. Certain primary glomerular diseases including immunoglobulin (Ig) M nephropathy and focal segmental and global glomerulosclerosis are prevalent in some tropical countries. Renal complications of venomous snakebites also are common in the tropics. This article discusses and summarizes important works in the literature in respect to the clinical syndromes, pathologic features, and pathogenesis of tropical renal diseases both in humans and experimental animal models.

  14. [Pathology and viral metagenomics, a recent history].

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Pauline; Albina, Emmanuel; Eloit, Marc; Roumagnac, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    Human, animal and plant viral diseases have greatly benefited from recent metagenomics developments. Viral metagenomics is a culture-independent approach used to investigate the complete viral genetic populations of a sample. During the last decade, metagenomics concepts and techniques that were first used by ecologists progressively spread into the scientific field of viral pathology. The sample, which was first for ecologists a fraction of ecosystem, became for pathologists an organism that hosts millions of microbes and viruses. This new approach, providing without a priori high resolution qualitative and quantitative data on the viral diversity, is now revolutionizing the way pathologists decipher viral diseases. This review describes the very last improvements of the high throughput next generation sequencing methods and discusses the applications of viral metagenomics in viral pathology, including discovery of novel viruses, viral surveillance and diagnostic, large-scale molecular epidemiology, and viral evolution.

  15. Pathological changes in anabolic androgenic steroid users.

    PubMed

    Lusetti, Monia; Licata, Manuela; Silingardi, Enrico; Reggiani Bonetti, Luca; Palmiere, Cristian

    2015-07-01

    Several classes of recreational and prescription drugs have additional effects on the heart and vasculature, which may significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality in chronic users. The study presented herein focuses on pathological changes involving the heart possibly due to anabolic androgenic steroid use. The role these hormones may play in their occurrence of sudden cardiac death is also investigated. 98 medico-legal cases including 6 anabolic androgenic steroid users were retrospectively reviewed. Autopsies, histology, immunohistochemistry, biochemistry and toxicology were performed in all cases. Pathological changes consisted of various degrees of interstitial and perivascular fibrosis as well as fibroadipous metaplasia and perineural fibrosis within the myocardium of the left ventricle. Within the limits of the small number of investigated cases, our results appear to confirm former observations on this topic and suggest anabolic androgenic steroid's potential causative role in the pathogenesis of sudden cardiac deaths in chronic users.

  16. Pathological and Molecular Evaluation of Pancreatic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Rishi, Arvind; Goggins, Michael; Wood, Laura D.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic neoplasms are morphologically and genetically heterogeneous and include wide variety of neoplasms ranging from benign to malignant with an extremely poor clinical outcome. Our understanding of these pancreatic neoplasms has improved significantly with recent advances in cancer sequencing. Awareness of molecular pathogenesis brings in new opportunities for early detection, improved prognostication, and personalized gene-specific therapies. Here we review the pathological classification of pancreatic neoplasms from their molecular and genetic perspective. All of the major tumor types that arise in the pancreas have been sequenced, and a new classification that incorporates molecular findings together with pathological findings is now possible (Table 1). This classification has significant implications for our understanding of why tumors aggregate in some families, for the development of early detection tests, and for the development of personalized therapies for patients with established cancers. Here we describe this new classification using the framework of the standard histological classification. PMID:25726050

  17. [Chondroblastoma of the patella with pathological fracture].

    PubMed

    Rischke, B; Engels, C; Pietsch, E; Werner, M; Delling, G

    2000-10-01

    Chondroblastoma is a rare benign bone tumor of cartilaginous origin. The typical localization of a chondroblastoma is the epiphysis of long tubular bones--the patella is a very unusual site with an estimated occurrence of 2%. We report a case of a 16-year-old patient with a chondroblastoma of the patella associated with a pathologic fracture. Partial resection of the patella was performed. This is the sixth case in the literature that associates patellar chondroblastoma with fracture.

  18. [Pathology of alcoholism. Experiences and treatment possibilities].

    PubMed

    Gallimberti, L; Benussi, G; Gasparini, V; Sottile, F

    1981-12-22

    In the present study, the state of art of alcohol-related pathology is described, and the most credited etiological theories reviewed. An effort has been made to apply theory to the daily practice of the health practitioner and the social worker, who operate in the field. Particular emphasis has been given to the experience in the County of Dolo, Italy, where alcohol-related problems have been successfully dealt with by the Alcoholism Unit of the local General Hospital.

  19. On the Existence of Pathological Detonation Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C M

    2003-07-11

    Pathological detonation waves with velocities greater than Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) have been proposed theoretically but never observed experimentally in gaseous, liquid or solid explosives. Two types of pathological chemical reaction zones have been identified within the Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doring (ZND) model: an exothermic chemical decomposition with a mole decrease during from the von Neumann spike state to the C-J state and an exothermic reaction followed by an endothermic reaction (eigenvalue detonation). The high temperatures reached in detonation reaction zones cause sufficient radial and atom formation to insure overall mole increases in gaseous H{sub 2} + O{sub 2} detonations. Aluminized explosives exhibit a slight mole decrease when the solid aluminum particles are oxidized, but this does not negate the large mole increase that occurs during explosive decomposition. Porous solid explosives whose products form with more cold compression energy than that of the solid are an unlikely possibility for pathological detonation. Eigenvalue detonations have been postulated for H{sub 2} + Cl{sub 2} gas phase detonations and for plastic bonded solid explosives if endothermic binder decomposition follows exothermic explosive decomposition. Chemical kinetic and physical arguments are presented to eliminate these possible pathological detonations. In the case of H{sub 2} + Cl{sub 2}, highly vibrationally excited HCl molecules dissociate Cl{sub 2} molecules during the exothermic portion of the reaction zone rather than later in the flow process. In the plastic bonded explosives, the binders are located on the surfaces of explosive particles and thus are exposed to ''hot spots'' created by the three-dimensional Mach stem shock front. Any remaining binder material rapidly reacts in collisions with the high, vibrationally excited reaction products formed during explosive decomposition. Therefore eigenvalue detonations are extremely unlikely to occur in gaseous, liquid or

  20. Odontoid process pathologic fracture in spinal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ould-Slimane, M; Lenoir, T; Dauzac, C; Breitel, D; Hoffmann, E; Guigui, P; Ilharreborde, B

    2010-02-01

    Craniovertebral junction tuberculosis is a rare lesion in which treatment remains controversial. Options range from conservative treatment to surgery, independently of any associated neurological threat. We here report the first case of pathologic odontoid fracture in a context of spinal tuberculosis, complicated by unusual neurological evolution. The patient presented with non-contiguous multifocal tuberculosis, of which there have previously been only 6 reported cases.

  1. Facts about artefacts in diagnostic pathology.

    PubMed

    Pattari, S K; Dey, P

    2002-01-01

    Literal meaning of artefact given by 'Oxford Advanced Learner Dictionary' is 'a thing made by people'. In medical science 'the fact' is not true; but we observe routinely is called artefact. We face various types of artefacts in daily reporting of pathology specimen. Many times artefacts hinder the actual diagnosis. The artefacts i. e. fixation artefact, processing artefact, staining artefact, mounting artefact, air bubbles etc. can cause difficulty in diagnosis and a pathologist should be trained to identify those artefacts. PMID:12593582

  2. Facts about artefacts in diagnostic pathology.

    PubMed

    Pattari, S K; Dey, P

    2002-01-01

    Literal meaning of artefact given by 'Oxford Advanced Learner Dictionary' is 'a thing made by people'. In medical science 'the fact' is not true; but we observe routinely is called artefact. We face various types of artefacts in daily reporting of pathology specimen. Many times artefacts hinder the actual diagnosis. The artefacts i. e. fixation artefact, processing artefact, staining artefact, mounting artefact, air bubbles etc. can cause difficulty in diagnosis and a pathologist should be trained to identify those artefacts.

  3. Temporal bone pathology in scuba diving deaths.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, P J; Parell, G J; Becker, G D; Paparella, M M

    1993-09-01

    Scuba diving has long been associated with otologic injuries; however, little is known about temporal bone pathology in diving-related deaths. We examined 18 temporal bones from 11 divers who died, primarily from complications of rapid ascent. Bleeding into the middle ear and mastoid air cells was nearly universal. Inner ear damage included hemorrhage around Reissner's membrane and the round window membrane and rupture of the utricle and saccule. Most of the observed inner ear damage was not surgically treatable.

  4. Pathological Gambling: Biological and Clinical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Topf, Jocelyn L.; Yip, Sarah W.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2009-01-01

    Pathological gambling (PG) is categorized as an impulse control disorder (ICD). Phenomenological, neurobiological and pharmacological data suggest similarities in the pathophysiologies of substance use disorders (SUDs) and PG. Both behavioral and pharmacological approaches, including those that have been empirically validated for SUDs, have shown promise in the treatment of PG. Findings from biological studies of PG are reviewed, and treatment approaches based on controlled studies are summarized. PMID:20161094

  5. An Anatomic Pathology System Using the File Manager

    PubMed Central

    Ginsburg, R. E.; Tatarczuk, J. R.; Roy, G. R.

    1981-01-01

    An Anatomic Pathology System incorporating patient data from surgical pathology, cytopathology and autopsy pathology is presented. The System includes four interconnected files created with the aid of the File Manager. One file, containing patient demographic data, can be used as a connecting node to other patient databases. Five MUMPS routines, using File Manager functions, allow System users unfamiliar with computers and computer programming to easily enter, edit and retrieve patient information. Retrieved information is in a format to reconstruct, when possible, a patient's medical history from the pathology database and to correlate surgical pathology, cytopathology and autopsy pathology data.

  6. A perspective on digital and computational pathology.

    PubMed

    Ramamurthy, Bhagavathi; Coffman, Frederick D; Cohen, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    The digitization of images has not only led to increasingly sophisticated methods of quantitating information from those images themselves, but also to the development of new physics-based techniques for extracting information from the original specimen and presenting this as visual data in both two and three-dimensional (3D) forms. This evolution of an image-based discipline has reached maturity in Radiology, but it is only just beginning in Pathology. An historical perspective is provided both on the current state of computational imaging in pathology and of the factors that are impeding further progress in the development and application of these approaches. Emphasis is placed on barriers to the dissemination of information in this area. The value of computational imaging in basic and translational research is clear. However, while there are many examples of "virtual diagnostics" in Radiology, there are only relatively few in Pathology. Nevertheless, we can do cellular level analysis of lesions accessible by endoscopic or catheterization procedures, and a number of steps have been taken toward real-time imaging as adjuncts to traditional biopsies. Progress in computational imaging will greatly expand the role of pathologists in clinical medicine as well as research. PMID:26110096

  7. The pathology roadmap in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Surmeier, D. James; Sulzer, David

    2013-01-01

    An under-appreciated clue about pathogenesis in Parkinson disease (PD) is the distribution of pathology in the early and middle stages of the disease. This pathological ‘roadmap’ shows that in addition to dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), a significant number of other central and peripheral neuronal populations exhibit Lewy pathology, phenotypic dysregulation or frank degeneration in PD patients. This spatially distributed, at-risk population of neurons shares a number of features, including autonomously generated activity, broad action potentials, low intrinsic calcium buffering capacity and long, poorly myelinated, highly branched axons. Many, and perhaps all, of these traits add to the metabolic burden in these neurons, suggesting that mitochondrial deficits could drive pathogenesis in PD—in agreement with a large segment of the literature. What is less clear is how this neuronal phenotype might shape the susceptibility to proteostatic dysfunction or to the spread of α-synuclein fibrils deposited in the extracellular space. The review explores the literature on these issues and their translational implications. PMID:23324593

  8. Clinical and Pathological Characteristics of Organized Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Nobuo; Watanabe, Tomoo; Ito, Tsukasa; Kubota, Toshinori; Suzuki, Yusuke; Ishida, Akihiro; Aoyagi, Masaru; Matsubara, Atsushi; Izuhara, Kenji; Kakehata, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To study the clinical and pathological characteristics of patients with organized hematoma with malignant features in maxillary sinuses. Subjects and Methods. This was a retrospective study of five patients who were treated surgically for organized hematoma. The preoperative CT and MRI findings were studied clinically. The expressions of CD31, CD34, and periostin in surgical samples were investigated by immunohistochemistry. Results. The clinical features of organized hematoma, such as a mass expanding from the maxillary sinus with bone destruction, resembled those of maxillary carcinoma. However, CT and MRI provided sufficient and useful information to differentiate this condition from malignancy. Surgical resection was the first-line treatment because of the presence of a firm capsule. Characteristic histopathological findings were a mixture of dilated vessels, hemorrhage, fibrin exudation, fibrosis, hyalinization, and neovascularization. The expressions of periostin, CD31, and CD34 were observed in organized hematoma of the maxillary sinus. Conclusion. The expressions of periostin, CD31, and CD34 were observed in organized hematoma of the maxillary sinus. Organized hematoma is characterized pathologically by a mixture of bleeding, dilated vessels, hemorrhage, fibrin exudation, fibrosis, hyalinization, and neovascularization. CT and MRI show heterogeneous findings reflecting a mixture of these pathological entities. PMID:23533421

  9. Long head of the biceps tendon pathology

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez, Maximiliano; Calvo, Ana Belén; Alvarez, Victoria; Lepore, Salvador; Ibañez, Federico; Reybet, Juan; Vedova, Franco Della; Aeschlimann, Mauro; Taborro, Betina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Disorders of the long head of the biceps tendon can exist in conjunction with other shoulder pathologies. It was proposed as a cause of pain in patients with rotator cuff injury. A detailed history, thorough physical examination and radiographical evaluation are necessary for a correct diagnosis. The aim of our study was to describe the surgical technique and analyze the results obtained in patients based on the same. Materials and Methods: Were included in this retrospective study 70 patients who had lesions in the long head of the biceps tendon, diagnosed with MRI treated at our institution with arthroscopic biotenodesis technique of the tendon with interference screw in the lower portion of the bicipital groove since January 2009 to January 2012. Functional clinical evaluation was performed with the appropriate scores for the disease (ASES, Rowe, Simple Shoulder Test, Constant Murley). Pain was evaluated using Visual Analog Scale. Results: The Rowe score was 86 points, 81 points ASES, SST 9 points, Constant and Murley 87 points. The VAS showed poor post surgical pain. At the time, no associated deformity similar to a Popeye sign was observed. Discussion: The decision to perform a surgical management of the long head of the biceps pathology depends on the clinical presentation, thorough physical examination with specific test, the presence of associated pathologies and failure of nonsurgical treatment.

  10. A perspective on digital and computational pathology

    PubMed Central

    Ramamurthy, Bhagavathi; Coffman, Frederick D.; Cohen, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    The digitization of images has not only led to increasingly sophisticated methods of quantitating information from those images themselves, but also to the development of new physics-based techniques for extracting information from the original specimen and presenting this as visual data in both two and three-dimensional (3D) forms. This evolution of an image-based discipline has reached maturity in Radiology, but it is only just beginning in Pathology. An historical perspective is provided both on the current state of computational imaging in pathology and of the factors that are impeding further progress in the development and application of these approaches. Emphasis is placed on barriers to the dissemination of information in this area. The value of computational imaging in basic and translational research is clear. However, while there are many examples of “virtual diagnostics” in Radiology, there are only relatively few in Pathology. Nevertheless, we can do cellular level analysis of lesions accessible by endoscopic or catheterization procedures, and a number of steps have been taken toward real-time imaging as adjuncts to traditional biopsies. Progress in computational imaging will greatly expand the role of pathologists in clinical medicine as well as research. PMID:26110096

  11. Photomatrix LED therapy of extensive cutaneous pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharov, Vladimir P.; Menyaev, Yulian A.; Zharova, I. Z.; Leviev, Dmitry O.; Tsarev, V. N.; Sarantsev, V. P.; Krusic, Joze

    2000-05-01

    Standard sources of radiation have not sufficient efficiency at treating spatially extended pathology, especially when pathologic areas involve opposite sides of the human being's body or when they are uneven in shape. The typical examples of such pathology are extensive burns, oedema, inflammatory processes, infectious wounds, actinic keratosis, psoriasis, arthritis and neurological diseases. Superbright LEDs gathered in a matrix and grasping the area of irradiation are the most suitable sources of radiation. This article presents the result of investigation of the effectiveness of various types of the blue-to-infrared spectrum range LED array that allow irradiating a surface with an area from several cm2 to several thousand cm2 including the whole human being's body with the intensity varying from 1 to 100 mW/cm2. Besides the matrixes, composed of separate light diodes, modular systems with separate monolithic hybrid chips with a high density of positioning the sources of radiation are considered. The peculiarities and results of applying such systems to treat oedema, cancer, weight regulation, neurological diseases, different infections diseases in combination with PDT, stomatitis and paradontosis are analyzed. The parameters of the photomatrix LED for different spectral regions and different geometry from flat shape to semispherical and cylindrical are presented. The perspective combination photomatrix LED with another therapeutical devices including photovacuum and photomagnetic therapy are considered.

  12. [Incidental finding of pathological coagulation parameters].

    PubMed

    Luxembourg, B; Lindhoff-Last, E

    2014-10-01

    Pathological coagulation parameters may reflect life-threatening hemorrhagic or thromboembolic diseases but may also be a laboratory result without any clinical significance, result from in vitro phenomena or preanalytical errors. This article gives an overview of potential pitfalls in coagulation diagnostics, lists the differential diagnoses of pathological coagulation parameters and describes further steps in the diagnostic approach to clarify pathological results. The focus lies on coagulation parameters that are frequently determined in routine clinical investigations, e.g. platelet count, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and fibrinogen. Besides heparin, fondaparinux, danaparoid, and vitamin K antagonists, direct factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors are nowadays available for therapeutic anticoagulation. This article gives an overview of the influence of anticoagulants on coagulation parameters which depends on the dose, the time of the last administration, as well as the method used for the determination of coagulation parameters. Moreover, common reasons for elevation of the fibrin degradation product D-dimer are presented. The clinical utility of D-dimer assays is limited by their poor specificity. Elevated D-dimer concentrations can be found in various diseases and also under normal physiological circumstances (e.g. in the elderly). Thus, the most useful clinical application of D-dimer is evidence of normal values to essentially rule out venous thromboembolism. PMID:25190093

  13. Sensorineural Tinnitus: Its Pathology and Probable Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Aage R.

    2016-01-01

    Tinnitus is not a single disease but a group of different diseases with different pathologies and therefore different treatments. Regarding tinnitus as a single disease is hampering progress in understanding of the pathophysiology of tinnitus and perhaps, more importantly, it is a serious obstacle in development of effective treatments for tinnitus. Subjective tinnitus is a phantom sound that takes many different forms and has similarities with chronic neuropathic pain. The pathology may be in the cochlea, in the auditory nerve, or, most commonly, in the brain. Like chronic neuropathic pain tinnitus is not life threatening but influences many normal functions such as sleep and the ability to concentrate on work. Some forms of chronic tinnitus have two components, a (phantom) sound and a component that may best be described as suffering or distress. The pathology of these two components may be different and the treatment that is most effective may be different for these two components. The most common form of treatment of tinnitus is pharmacological agents and behavioral treatment combined with sound therapy. Less common treatments are hypnosis and acupuncture. Various forms of neuromodulation are becoming in use in an attempt to reverse maladaptive plastic changes in the brain. PMID:26977153

  14. Pathology of Mouse Models of Accelerated Aging.

    PubMed

    Harkema, L; Youssef, S A; de Bruin, A

    2016-03-01

    Progeroid mouse models display phenotypes in multiple organ systems that suggest premature aging and resemble features of natural aging of both mice and humans. The prospect of a significant increase in the global elderly population within the next decades has led to the emergence of "geroscience," which aims at elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in aging. Progeroid mouse models are frequently used in geroscience as they provide insight into the molecular mechanisms that are involved in the highly complex process of natural aging. This review provides an overview of the most commonly reported nonneoplastic macroscopic and microscopic pathologic findings in progeroid mouse models (eg, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, degenerative joint disease, intervertebral disc degeneration, kyphosis, sarcopenia, cutaneous atrophy, wound healing, hair loss, alopecia, lymphoid atrophy, cataract, corneal endothelial dystrophy, retinal degenerative diseases, and vascular remodeling). Furthermore, several shortcomings in pathologic analysis and descriptions of these models are discussed. Progeroid mouse models are valuable models for aging, but thorough knowledge of both the mouse strain background and the progeria-related phenotype is required to guide interpretation and translation of the pathology data. PMID:26864891

  15. Sensorineural Tinnitus: Its Pathology and Probable Therapies.

    PubMed

    Møller, Aage R

    2016-01-01

    Tinnitus is not a single disease but a group of different diseases with different pathologies and therefore different treatments. Regarding tinnitus as a single disease is hampering progress in understanding of the pathophysiology of tinnitus and perhaps, more importantly, it is a serious obstacle in development of effective treatments for tinnitus. Subjective tinnitus is a phantom sound that takes many different forms and has similarities with chronic neuropathic pain. The pathology may be in the cochlea, in the auditory nerve, or, most commonly, in the brain. Like chronic neuropathic pain tinnitus is not life threatening but influences many normal functions such as sleep and the ability to concentrate on work. Some forms of chronic tinnitus have two components, a (phantom) sound and a component that may best be described as suffering or distress. The pathology of these two components may be different and the treatment that is most effective may be different for these two components. The most common form of treatment of tinnitus is pharmacological agents and behavioral treatment combined with sound therapy. Less common treatments are hypnosis and acupuncture. Various forms of neuromodulation are becoming in use in an attempt to reverse maladaptive plastic changes in the brain. PMID:26977153

  16. Clinical pathology services: remapping our strategic itinerary.

    PubMed

    Blanckaert, Norbert

    2010-07-01

    Both technological advances and economic drivers have led to major changes in clinical laboratories across the world, with vastly improved testing productivity. However, the production process capability advances have far outpaced the clinical pathologists' success in assuring optimal test utilization and interpretation. While productivity of 'commodity' testing increases, our healthcare value productivity decreases. Such developments constitute a serious threat to our clinical pathology specialty, not only because pathologists may lose direct control of the commodity testing production activities, but also because the present evolution exposes a failure of our core clinical activities, the pathologist's knowledge processes that translate 'commodity' results into medical outcomes optimization. At a time when a revolution in health care organization is inescapable in the years ahead, clinical pathology must proceed from a merely reactive strategy (to fulfill the 'more with less' demands) to a proactive strategy where we build excellence and visibility in knowledge services on a strong foothold of operational excellence. Based on a Strengths-Weaknesses-Opportunities-Threats analysis, we argue that clinical pathology should safeguard and expand its healthcare value productivity by assuming leadership in building integrated laboratory services networks. We also suggest that the core knowledge processes deserve a system approach, for example, by applying a risk-based quality management system. PMID:20491600

  17. Pathology of cloaca anomalies with case correlation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anita; Bischoff, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    During the fourth week of human embryo development, a transient common channel known as a cloaca is formed from which three cavities with three external orifices arises. Cloaca anomalies occur when there is failure of separation of the rectum, vagina, and urethra channel resulting in a single drain into the perineum. In our previous institutional studies, Runck et al. compared human and mouse cloaca development and found early mis-patterning of the embryonic cloaca deranged hedgehog and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP) signaling. Also, our group reported the embryological correlation of the epithelial and stromal histology found in step sections of the common channel in 14 cloaca malformations in humans. In this review, we present the pathology of a 4-year-old female with a cloaca and VACTERL complex, and summarize our current knowledge of cloaca pathology. Furthermore, we suggest that careful pathological examination of cloaca specimens in conjunction with surgical orientation may result in a better understanding of the etiology of this condition. PMID:26969228

  18. Clinical pathology services: remapping our strategic itinerary.

    PubMed

    Blanckaert, Norbert

    2010-07-01

    Both technological advances and economic drivers have led to major changes in clinical laboratories across the world, with vastly improved testing productivity. However, the production process capability advances have far outpaced the clinical pathologists' success in assuring optimal test utilization and interpretation. While productivity of 'commodity' testing increases, our healthcare value productivity decreases. Such developments constitute a serious threat to our clinical pathology specialty, not only because pathologists may lose direct control of the commodity testing production activities, but also because the present evolution exposes a failure of our core clinical activities, the pathologist's knowledge processes that translate 'commodity' results into medical outcomes optimization. At a time when a revolution in health care organization is inescapable in the years ahead, clinical pathology must proceed from a merely reactive strategy (to fulfill the 'more with less' demands) to a proactive strategy where we build excellence and visibility in knowledge services on a strong foothold of operational excellence. Based on a Strengths-Weaknesses-Opportunities-Threats analysis, we argue that clinical pathology should safeguard and expand its healthcare value productivity by assuming leadership in building integrated laboratory services networks. We also suggest that the core knowledge processes deserve a system approach, for example, by applying a risk-based quality management system.

  19. Unexpected cellular players in Rett syndrome pathology.

    PubMed

    Cronk, James C; Derecki, Noel C; Litvak, Vladimir; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    Rett syndrome is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder, primarily caused by mutations of methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Although the genetic cause of disease was identified over a decade ago, a significant gap still remains in both our clinical and scientific understanding of its pathogenesis. Neurons are known to be primary players in pathology, with their dysfunction being the key in Rett syndrome. While studies in mice have demonstrated a clear causative - and potential therapeutic - role for neurons in Rett syndrome, recent work has suggested that other tissues also contribute significantly to progression of the disease. Indeed, Rett syndrome is known to present with several common peripheral pathologies, such as osteopenia, scoliosis, gastrointestinal problems including nutritional defects, and general growth deficit. Mouse models assessing the potential role of non-neuronal cell types have confirmed both roles in disease and potential therapeutic targets. A new picture is emerging in which neurons both initiate and drive pathology, while dysfunction of other cell types and peripheral tissues exacerbate disease, possibly amplifying further neurologic problems, and ultimately result in a positive feedback loop of progressively worsening symptoms. Here, we review what is known about neuronal and non-neuronal cell types, and discuss how this new, integrative understanding of the disease may allow for additional clinical and scientific pathways for treating and understanding Rett syndrome.

  20. Currently available useful immunohistochemical markers of renal pathology for the diagnosis of renal allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Kanzaki, Go; Shimizu, Akira

    2015-07-01

    Renal allograft dysfunction may be induced by various causes, including alloimmune rejection, viral infection, urinary tract obstruction, calcineurin inhibitor nephrotoxicity and/or recurrent renal disease. In order to determine the underlying cause, a renal biopsy is performed and the renal transplant pathology is diagnosed using the internationally consensus Banff classification. Although a progressive understanding of allograft rejection has provided numerous immunohistochemical markers, only the C4d is regarded to be a sufficiently useful marker for antibody-mediated allograft rejection according to the Banff classification. This review summarizes currently available useful immunohistochemical markers of renal transplant pathology, including C4d, with diagnostic implications for human renal allograft rejection. In particular, we discuss immunohistochemical markers in the following three categories: immunohistochemical markers of renal pathology used to (i) analyze the mechanisms of alloimmune rejection, (ii) monitor cell injury and/or inflammation associated with rejection and (iii) identify renal components in order to improve the diagnosis of rejection. In addition, recent progress in the field of renal transplant pathology includes the development of a new method for assessing molecular pathology using OMICS analyses. As the recent findings of various studies in patients undergoing renal transplantation are very encouraging, novel immunohistochemical markers must be also developed and combined with new technologies for the diagnosis of human renal allograft rejection.

  1. Bezafibrate administration improves behavioral deficits and tau pathology in P301S mice.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Magali; Stack, Cliona; Elipenahli, Ceyhan; Jainuddin, Shari; Gerges, Meri; Starkova, Natalia; Calingasan, Noel Y; Yang, Lichuan; Tampellini, Davide; Starkov, Anatoly A; Chan, Robin B; Di Paolo, Gilbert; Pujol, Aurora; Beal, M Flint

    2012-12-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-mediated transcription factors, which control both lipid and energy metabolism and inflammation pathways. PPARγ agonists are effective in the treatment of metabolic diseases and, more recently, neurodegenerative diseases, in which they show promising neuroprotective effects. We studied the effects of the pan-PPAR agonist bezafibrate on tau pathology, inflammation, lipid metabolism and behavior in transgenic mice with the P301S human tau mutation, which causes familial frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Bezafibrate treatment significantly decreased tau hyperphosphorylation using AT8 staining and the number of MC1-positive neurons. Bezafibrate treatment also diminished microglial activation and expression of both inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase 2. Additionally, the drug differentially affected the brain and brown fat lipidome of control and P301S mice, preventing lipid vacuoles in brown fat. These effects were associated with behavioral improvement, as evidenced by reduced hyperactivity and disinhibition in the P301S mice. Bezafibrate therefore exerts neuroprotective effects in a mouse model of tauopathy, as shown by decreased tau pathology and behavioral improvement. Since bezafibrate was given to the mice before tau pathology had developed, our data suggest that bezafibrate exerts a preventive effect on both tau pathology and its behavioral consequences. Bezafibrate is therefore a promising agent for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases associated with tau pathology. PMID:22922230

  2. Nemo-Like Kinase (NLK) Is a Pathological Signaling Effector in the Mouse Heart

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Suh-Chin J.; Sargent, Michelle A.; York, Allen J.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.

    2016-01-01

    Nemo-like kinase (NLK) is an evolutionary conserved serine/threonine protein kinase implicated in development, proliferation and apoptosis regulation. Here we identified NLK as a gene product induced in the hearts of mice subjected to pressure overload or myocardial infarction injury, suggesting a potential regulatory role with pathological stimulation to this organ. To examine the potential functional consequences of increased NLK levels, cardiac-specific transgenic mice with inducible expression of this gene product were generated, as well as cardiac-specific Nlk gene-deleted mice. NLK transgenic mice demonstrated baseline cardiac hypertrophy, dilation, interstitial fibrosis, apoptosis and progression towards heart failure in response to two surgery-induced cardiac disease models. In contrast, cardiac-specific deletion of Nlk from the heart, achieved by crossing a Nlk-loxP allele containing mouse with either a mouse containing a β-myosin heavy chain promoter driven Cre transgene or a tamoxifen inducible α-myosin heavy chain promoter containing transgene driving a MerCreMer cDNA, protected the mice from cardiac dysfunction following pathological stimuli. Mechanistically, NLK interacted with multiple proteins including the transcription factor Stat1, which was significantly increased in the hearts of NLK transgenic mice. These results indicate that NLK is a pathological effector in the heart. PMID:27764156

  3. The Rise of Forensic Pathology in Human Medicine: Lessons for Veterinary Forensic Pathology.

    PubMed

    Pollanen, M S

    2016-09-01

    The rise of forensic pathology in human medicine has greatly contributed to the administration of justice, public safety and security, and medical knowledge. However, the evolution of human forensic pathology has been challenging. Veterinary forensic pathologists can learn from some of the lessons that have informed the growth and development of human forensic pathology. Three main observations have emerged in the past decade. First, wrongful convictions tell us to use a truth-seeking stance rather than an a priori "think dirty" stance when investigating obscure death. Second, missed homicides and concealed homicides tell us that training and certification are the beginning of reliable forensic pathology. Third, failure of a sustainable institutional arrangement that fosters a combination of service, research, and teaching will lead to stagnation of knowledge. Forensic pathology of humans and animals will flourish, help protect society, and support justice if we embrace a modern biomedical scientific model for our practice. We must build training programs, contribute to the published literature, and forge strong collaborative institutions.

  4. Guidelines for resident training in veterinary clinical pathology. III: cytopathology and surgical pathology.

    PubMed

    Kidney, Beverly A; Dial, Sharon M; Christopher, Mary M

    2009-09-01

    The Education Committee of the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology has identified a need for improved structure and guidance of training residents in clinical pathology. This article is the third in a series of articles that address this need. The goals of this article are to describe learning objectives and competencies in knowledge, abilities, and skills in cytopathology and surgical pathology (CSP); provide options and ideas for training activities; and identify resources in veterinary CSP for faculty, training program coordinators, and residents. Guidelines were developed in consultation with Education Committee members and peer experts and with evaluation of the literature. The primary objectives of training in CSP are: (1) to develop a thorough, extensive, and relevant knowledge base of biomedical and clinical sciences applicable to the practice of CSP in domestic animals, laboratory animals, and other nondomestic animal species; (2) to be able to reason, think critically, investigate, use scientific evidence, and communicate effectively when making diagnoses and consulting and to improve and advance the practice of pathology; and (3) to acquire selected technical skills used in CSP and pathology laboratory management. These guidelines define expected competencies that will help ensure proficiency, leadership, and the advancement of knowledge in veterinary CSP and will provide a useful framework for didactic and clinical activities in resident-training programs.

  5. Imaging of Common Arthroscopic Pathology of the Ankle.

    PubMed

    Grambart, Sean T

    2016-10-01

    Arthroscopy of the ankle is used in the treatment and diagnosis of a spectrum of intra-articular pathology including soft tissue and osseous impingement, osteochondral lesions, arthrofibrosis, and synovitis. To help identify the correct pathology, imaging techniques are often used to aid the surgeon in diagnosing pathology and determining best treatment options. This article discusses the use of imaging in various ankle pathologies. PMID:27599435

  6. 42 CFR 493.1220 - Condition: Oral pathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Oral pathology. 493.1220 Section 493....1220 Condition: Oral pathology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Oral pathology, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230 through 493.1256, and §§...

  7. The Effects of Pathological Gaming on Aggressive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemmens, Jeroen S.; Valkenburg, Patti M.; Peter, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Studies have shown that pathological involvement with computer or video games is related to excessive gaming binges and aggressive behavior. Our aims for this study were to longitudinally examine if pathological gaming leads to increasingly excessive gaming habits, and how pathological gaming may cause an increase in physical aggression. For this…

  8. Instrumental Dimensioning of Normal and Pathological Phonation Using Acoustic Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putzer, Manfred; Barry, William J.

    2008-01-01

    The present study deals with the dimensions of normal and pathological phonation. Separation of normal voices from pathological voices is tested under different aspects. Using a new parametrization of voice-quality properties in the acoustic signal, the vowel productions of 534 speakers (267 M, 267 F) without any reported voice pathology and the…

  9. Contrasting Pathology of the Stress Granule Proteins TIA-1 and G3BP in Tauopathies

    PubMed Central

    Vanderweyde, Tara; Yu, Haung; Varnum, Megan; Liu-Yesucevitz, Liqun; Citro, Allison; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Duff, Karen; Wolozin, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Stress induces aggregation of RNA-binding proteins to form inclusions, termed stress granules (SGs). Recent evidence suggests that SG proteins also colocalize with neuropathological structures, but whether this occurs in Alzheimer’s disease is unknown. We examined the relationship between SG proteins and neuropathology in brain tissue from P301L Tau transgenic mice, as well as in cases of Alzheimer’s disease and FTDP-17. The pattern of SG pathology differs dramatically based on the RNA-binding protein examined. SGs positive for T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) or tristetraprolin (TTP) initially do not colocalize with tau pathology, but then merge with tau inclusions as disease severity increases. In contrast, G3BP (ras GAP-binding protein) identifies a novel type of molecular pathology that shows increasing accumulation in neurons with increasing disease severity, but often is not associated with classic markers of tau pathology. TIA-1 and TTP both bind phospho-tau, and TIA-1 overexpression induces formation of inclusions containing phospho-tau. These data suggest that SG formation might stimulate tau pathophysiology. Thus, study of RNA-binding proteins and SG biology highlights novel pathways interacting with the pathophysiology of AD, providing potentially new avenues for identifying diseased neurons and potentially novel mechanisms regulating tau biology. PMID:22699908

  10. Uncommon Manifestations of Intervertebral Disk Pathologic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Diehn, Felix E; Maus, Timothy P; Morris, Jonathan M; Carr, Carrie M; Kotsenas, Amy L; Luetmer, Patrick H; Lehman, Vance T; Thielen, Kent R; Nassr, Ahmad; Wald, John T

    2016-01-01

    Beyond the familiar disk herniations with typical clinical features, intervertebral disk pathologic conditions can have a wide spectrum of imaging and clinical manifestations. The goal of this review is to illustrate and discuss unusual manifestations of intervertebral disk pathologic conditions that radiologists may encounter, including disk herniations in unusual locations, those with atypical imaging features, and those with uncommon pathophysiologic findings. Examples of atypical disk herniations presented include dorsal epidural, intradural, symptomatic thoracic (including giant calcified), extreme lateral (retroperitoneal), fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose-avid, acute intravertebral (Schmorl node), and massive lumbar disk herniations. Examples of atypical pathophysiologic conditions covered are discal cysts, fibrocartilaginous emboli to the spinal cord, tiny calcified disks or disk-level spiculated osteophytes causing spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak and intracranial hypotension, and pediatric acute calcific discitis. This broad gamut of disease includes a variety of sizes of disk pathologic conditions, from the tiny (eg, the minuscule calcified disks causing high-flow CSF leaks) to the extremely large (eg, giant calcified thoracic intradural disk herniations causing myelopathy). A spectrum of clinical acuity is represented, from hyperacute fibrocartilaginous emboli causing spinal cord infarct, to acute Schmorl nodes, to chronic intradural herniations. The entities included are characterized by a range of clinical courses, from the typically devastating cord infarct caused by fibrocartilaginous emboli, to the usually spontaneously resolving pediatric acute calcific discitis. Several conditions have important differential diagnostic considerations, and others have relatively diagnostic imaging findings. The pathophysiologic findings are well understood for some of these entities and poorly defined for others. Radiologists' knowledge of this broad scope of

  11. [Pathology of travelers in the Antilles. Role of imported metropolitan pathology].

    PubMed

    Strobel, M; Gabriel, J M; Cousin, P; Daijardin, J B; De Caunes, F; Dorak, B

    1993-01-01

    A preliminary and retrospective review--with a southern perspective--of some traveller's pathologies, mostly imported, and leading to hospital admission in Guadeloupe (FWI). End stage patients (cancer, AIDS...) frequently travel for a last, "compassional" trip. Ischemic heart disease is the leading pathology imported from the mother country (France). As well as in diabetes or psychiatric illness, destabilization frequently occurs as a consequence of travel (jet lag). Compulsive tennis plus dehydration cause the very common stone passage of nephrolithiasis. Concern is growing for heroin withdrawal syndrome or cocaine (crack)-abuse, and for supply for rare and expensive anticancer, antigraft rejection or antinfective (AIDS) agents. Much more familiar to us are photodermatitis, larva migrans, dengue, or ciguaterra, locally acquired. On the other hand some pathologies are quite "exotic" to us: Kaposi sarcoma, Lyme, or Behçet disease, familial mediterranean fever, brucellosis.

  12. Manpower in pathology 1969-1975

    PubMed Central

    Greenbury, C. L.

    1971-01-01

    An attempt has been made to assess for the period 1969-1975 the demand for consultant pathologists and the adequacy of the trainee cadre to fulfil this demand. In addition new data have been acquired on the way in which pathologists apportion their time between specialties and the availability of specialist opinion and other derived information. The demand for consultants in all specialties, with the exception of morbid anatomy, is likely to exceed the supply. The shortfall is greatest in medical microbiology and chemical pathology, but may be felt equally in haematology in the short term. PMID:5094688

  13. Manpower in pathology 1969-1975.

    PubMed

    Greenbury, C L

    1971-09-01

    An attempt has been made to assess for the period 1969-1975 the demand for consultant pathologists and the adequacy of the trainee cadre to fulfil this demand. In addition new data have been acquired on the way in which pathologists apportion their time between specialties and the availability of specialist opinion and other derived information. The demand for consultants in all specialties, with the exception of morbid anatomy, is likely to exceed the supply. The shortfall is greatest in medical microbiology and chemical pathology, but may be felt equally in haematology in the short term.

  14. Comparative and experimental pathology of fibrosing colonopathy.

    PubMed

    van Velzen, D; Ball, L M; Dezfulian, A R; Southgate, A; Howard, C V

    1996-03-01

    Although the occurrence of fibrosing colonopathy is temporally associated with the introduction of high-strength pancreatic enzyme supplements, its pathogenesis remains uncertain. The UK case-control study showed fibrosing colonopathy to be associated with high doses of high-strength pancreatic enzyme supplements and with a group of brands which occupy only 30% of the market. Two alternative hypotheses were proposed to explain the aetiology of fibrosing colonopathy: exposure to high levels of enzymes or to as yet unidentified components of the formulation. Comparison of the anatomical pathology of fibrosing colonopathy with that of previously encountered forms of obstructive gastrointestinal pathology, such as stricturing lesions due to potassium chloride preparations and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, confirmed it to be a previously unencountered, long-segment lesion of the colon. Thus the use of the descriptive term 'stricture' is a misnomer leading to much clinical confusion when discussing obstructive bowel pathology in cystic fibrosis patients. Gavage studies in the rat with one of the two monomers (ethyl acrylate) forming the methacrylic acid copolymer (Eudragit L30D55) used for the enteric coating of the high-strength pancreatic enzyme supplements, have shown pathology comparable to fibrosing colonopathy. These findings prompted a series of exploratory studies in adolescent pigs. After seven days caecal gavage of Eudragit L30D55 at doses of 10, 50 or 500 mg/kg/day (comparable to human intake), extensive fibrosing colonopathy-like changes, inclusive of dense submucosal fibrosis, were noted at all dose levels in seven out of nine animals. Similar studies of the monomer components of the Eudragit L30D55 copolymer, at dose levels of 0.015 to 50 mg/kg/day, representing possible residues in Eudragit L30D55, did not produce comparable changes. The conclusion is that, although the precise mechanisms have not been elucidated, the role of enteric coatings

  15. Hierarchical nucleus segmentation in digital pathology images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Ratner, Vadim; Zhu, Liangjia; Diprima, Tammy; Kurc, Tahsin; Tannenbaum, Allen; Saltz, Joel

    2016-03-01

    Extracting nuclei is one of the most actively studied topic in the digital pathology researches. Most of the studies directly search the nuclei (or seeds for the nuclei) from the finest resolution available. While the richest information has been utilized by such approaches, it is sometimes difficult to address the heterogeneity of nuclei in different tissues. In this work, we propose a hierarchical approach which starts from the lower resolution level and adaptively adjusts the parameters while progressing into finer and finer resolution. The algorithm is tested on brain and lung cancers images from The Cancer Genome Atlas data set.

  16. The Pathology of Acute Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Lefkowitch, Jay H

    2016-05-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a rare and severe liver disease that usually develops in 8 weeks or less in individuals without preexisting liver disease. Its chief causes worldwide are hepatitis virus infections (hepatitis A, B, and E) and drug hepatotoxicity (particularly intentional or unintentional acetaminophen toxicity). Massive hepatic necrosis is often seen in liver specimens in ALF and features marked loss of hepatocytes, variable degrees of inflammation, and a stereotypic proliferation of bile ductular structures (neocholangioles) derived from activated periportal hepatic progenitor cells. This paper reviews the liver pathology in ALF, including forms of zonal necrosis and their etiologies. PMID:27058243

  17. [Pathologic manifestations of hormonal receptor mutations].

    PubMed

    Milgrom, E

    2000-01-01

    Mutations of receptor genes are involved in various aspects of thyroid and gonadal pathology. Activating mutations of TSH and LH receptors are associated with hyperthyroidism and premature puberty. These mutations are dominant and lead to the synthesis of a constitutive receptor, i.e. a receptor active even in the absence of hormone. Inactivating mutations of TSH, gonadotropin and GnRH receptors are recessive. They determine either a hypothyroidism or a hypogonadism. In the case of alterations of gonadotropin receptors the hypogonadism is hypergonadotrophic. It is hypogonadotrophic in the case of mutations of the GnRH receptor. PMID:10989556

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Perirenal Pathology.

    PubMed

    Glockner, James F; Lee, Christine U

    2016-05-01

    The perirenal space can be involved by a variety of neoplastic, inflammatory, infectious, and proliferative disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging is often an ideal technique for identification and staging of lesions arising within the perirenal space, with its superior soft tissue characterization as well as its ability to visualize extension into blood vessels and adjacent organs. This pictorial essay describes the magnetic resonance imaging appearance of a variety of pathologies which can arise from or involve the perirenal space, and provides a framework for categorization and differential diagnosis of these lesions.

  19. Hierarchical nucleus segmentation in digital pathology images

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yi; Ratner, Vadim; Zhu, Liangjia; Diprima, Tammy; Kurc, Tahsin; Tannenbaum, Allen; Saltz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Extracting nuclei is one of the most actively studied topic in the digital pathology researches. Most of the studies directly search the nuclei (or seeds for the nuclei) from the finest resolution available. While the richest information has been utilized by such approaches, it is sometimes difficult to address the heterogeneity of nuclei in different tissues. In this work, we propose a hierarchical approach which starts from the lower resolution level and adaptively adjusts the parameters while progressing into finer and finer resolution. The algorithm is tested on brain and lung cancers images from The Cancer Genome Atlas data set. PMID:27375315

  20. MURCS association: ultrasonographic findings and pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, C O; McFarland, R D; Timmons, C; Ramus, R; Twickler, D M

    1996-12-01

    MURCS association is a rare, lethal and unusual constellation of nonrandom findings that includes mullerian duct aplasia, renal aplasia, and cervicothoracic somite dysplasia.1-3 It has been described in 30 patients by Duncan and coworkers2 in 1979, in which report the authors proposed an embryologic cause for these defects.3 Antenatal ultrasonographic findings included a massive, cystic umbilical cord related to a patent urachus, enlarged bladder, single small kidney, and suspicion of urethral obstruction in a fetus of female phenotype. These findings are rare in a case of MURCS and were all confirmed on pathologic examination. PMID:8947863

  1. Indications for ultrasonography in parotid pathologies.

    PubMed

    Bruneton, J N; Sicart, M; Roux, P; Pastaud, P; Nicolau, A; Delorme, G

    1983-01-01

    In connection with 141 cases of parotid tumours, 21 adenopathies of the parotid region and 22 cases of parotitis, the authors define the role of ultrasonography in the exploration of the salivary glands. Use of simple criteria permits differentiation of benign from malignant tumours with a good degree of sensitivity (79.8% in our series). This score allows ultrasonography to be offered as the first complementary examination when dealing with a tumefaction of the parotid region. When ultrasonographic findings evoke a malignant lesion, a CT scan seems necessary to evaluate any extension in depth. In contrast, ultrasonography does not appear justified in cases of parotitis or lithiasic pathologies.

  2. Public attitudes about normal and pathological grief.

    PubMed

    Penman, Emma L; Breen, Lauren J; Hewitt, Lauren Y; Prigerson, Holly G

    2014-01-01

    Determining public expectations of grief is an important contributor to the debate differentiating normal from pathological grief. An international sample of 348 participants was randomly allocated to 1 of 12 conditions comprising a bereavement vignette and self-report items measuring grief expectations and social distance. Participants expected grief to decrease steadily between 2 weeks and 6 months then stabilize; however, time did not affect social distance. Gender of the bereaved and circumstances of death did not influence expectations, but did interact to influence social distance. These factors must be accounted for in determining a deviation from the norm in diagnostic nosology. PMID:24738705

  3. Review: Cerebral microvascular pathology in aging and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Brown, William R.; Thore, Clara R.

    2010-01-01

    This review of age-related brain microvascular pathologies focuses on topics studied by this laboratory, including anatomy of the blood supply, tortuous vessels, venous collagenosis, capillary remnants, vascular density, and microembolic brain injury. Our studies feature thick sections, large blocks embedded in celloidin, and vascular staining by alkaline phosphatase (AP). This permits study of the vascular network in three dimensions, and the differentiation of afferent from efferent vessels. Current evidence suggests that there is decreased vascular density in aging, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and leukoaraiosis (LA), and cerebrovascular dysfunction precedes and accompanies cognitive dysfunction and neurodegeneration. A decline in cerebrovascular angiogenesis may inhibit recovery from hypoxia-induced capillary loss. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is inhibited by tortuous arterioles and deposition of excessive collagen in veins and venules. Misery perfusion due to capillary loss appears to occur before cell loss in LA, and CBF is also reduced in the normal-appearing white matter. Hypoperfusion occurs early in AD, inducing white matter lesions and correlating with dementia. In vascular dementia, cholinergic reductions are correlated with cognitive impairment, and cholinesterase inhibitors have some benefit. Most lipid microemboli from cardiac surgery pass through the brain in a few days, but some remain for weeks. They can cause what appears to be a type of vascular dementia years after surgery. Donepezil has shown some benefit. Emboli, such as clots, cholesterol crystals, and microspheres can be extruded through the walls of cerebral vessels, but there is no evidence yet that lipid emboli undergo such extravasation. PMID:20946471

  4. PhD graduate training programs in pathology: 2003 report from the American Society for Investigative Pathology workshop on pathology graduate education.

    PubMed

    Kemp, John D; Bowser, Robert

    2004-07-01

    Graduate training is one of the most important activities in which we engage. Through PhD training programs in pathology, we continually renew the intellectual vigor of our discipline and assure its position as a vibrant force in the life sciences. To focus on this important issue, the Education Committee of the American Society for Investigative Pathology (ASIP) organized a workshop on April 11, 2003 for pathology graduate program directors from across the United States and Canada. The goals of this workshop were to better define the current models of pathology graduate training programs, to identify key issues pertaining to the curriculum of pathology training programs and strategies to better market pathology graduate training opportunities, and to identify challenges for the future. Twenty-three program directors and other faculty interested in pathology graduate education, as well as 2 invited PhD students, attended the workshop. Workshop participants concluded that the integration of more and better disease-related education into graduate training programs would attract more and better-qualified students into pathology career pathways that will ultimately fulfill important societal needs and train future leaders of the biomedical research community. The ASIP is facilitating this goal by taking a leadership role in publicizing educational efforts in pathology and by making systematic use of its Website for sharing information about curriculum ideas and materials, as well as course syllabi.

  5. Relationship between magnification and resolution in digital pathology systems.

    PubMed

    Sellaro, Tiffany L; Filkins, Robert; Hoffman, Chelsea; Fine, Jeffrey L; Ho, Jon; Parwani, Anil V; Pantanowitz, Liron; Montalto, Michael

    2013-08-22

    Many pathology laboratories are implementing digital pathology systems. The image resolution and scanning (digitization) magnification can vary greatly between these digital pathology systems. In addition, when digital images are compared with viewing images using a microscope, the cellular features can vary in size. This article highlights differences in magnification and resolution between the conventional microscopes and the digital pathology systems. As more pathologists adopt digital pathology, it is important that they understand these differences and how they ultimately translate into what the pathologist can see and how this may impact their overall viewing experience.

  6. Biological effects of dynamic shear stress in cardiovascular pathologies and devices

    PubMed Central

    Girdhar, Gaurav; Bluestein, Danny

    2010-01-01

    Altered and highly dynamic shear stress conditions have been implicated in endothelial dysfunction leading to cardiovascular disease, and in thromboembolic complications in prosthetic cardiovascular devices. In addition to vascular damage, the pathological flow patterns characterizing cardiovascular pathologies and blood flow in prosthetic devices induce shear activation and damage to blood constituents. Investigation of the specific and accentuated effects of such flow-induced perturbations on individual cell-types in vitro is critical for the optimization of device design, whereby specific design modifications can be made to minimize such perturbations. Such effects are also critical in understanding the development of cardiovascular disease. This review addresses limitations to replicate such dynamic flow conditions in vitro and also introduces the idea of modified in vitro devices, one of which is developed in the authors' laboratory, with dynamic capabilities to investigate the aforementioned effects in greater detail. PMID:18331179

  7. In-vivo NIR autofluorescence of rat mammary tumors discriminates pathological malignancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Laure S.; Lucidi, Vincenzo; Rosenau, Werner; Demos, Stavros G.; Brasch, Robert C.

    2003-10-01

    Benign and malignant mammary tumors were induced in rats using a potent carcinogen, N-ethyl-N-nitrosurea (ENU). Induced tumors were examined under near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging (excitation wavelength 670 to 730 nm, detection wavelength 750 and 800 nm) to search for a difference in the photophysical properties of the tumors reflecting their pathologic status. Three benign and eight malignant tumors were examined optically and pathologically. The non-enhanced optical images showed a significantly lower (P<0.05) spontaneous fluorescent signal in the benign tumors than in their malignant counterparts. The precise chemical origin for the observed differences in tumor autofluorescence remains undetermined. It can be hypothesized that the reported high concentration of porphyrins, NIR-fluorescing compounds, in the malignant lesions, could account for the observed increased autofluorescence.

  8. Objective pathological diagnosis of coal worker's pneumoconiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, E.R.; Watkins, G.; Lam, N.V.; Tsuda, H.; Hermann, C.; Johal, J.; Liu, H.

    1981-05-08

    Pertinent pathological features of lungs obtained at autopsies from 99 coal miners were compared with those observed in the lungs of 268 male town dwellers of comparable age who were not occupationally related to the coal mining or other industries at risk for development of pneumoconiosis. The degree of anthracotic pigment deposition and severity of type of pigmented lesion with its accompanying reticulum fiber formation and fibrosis were significantly greater in lungs of miners. There was a high degree of overlap in degree of pigment deposition, particularly those quantitated as grades 1 and 2 and in lesions regarded as types 1 and 2. The greatest divergence was observed for prevalence of nodular pulmonary lesions (type 4). There was also a considerable divergence in the type 3 alteration characterized by nonnodular aggregates of carbon-laden macrophages accompanied by minimal reactive fibrosis. It appears that an objective pathological diagnosis of coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) can be rendered only by the demonstration of type 4 lesions. Approximately 25% of coal miners exhibited unequivocal features of CWP. No significant differences concerning incidence or types of emphysema or frequency of chronic cor pulmonale were encountered between the two populations.

  9. Objective pathological diagnosis of coal workers' pneumoconiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, E.R.; Watkins, G.; Lam, N.V.; Tsuda, H.; Hermann, C.; Johal, J.; Liu, H.

    1981-05-08

    Pertinent pathological features of lungs obtained at autopsies from 99 coal miners were compared with those observed in the lungs of 268 male town dwellers of comparable age who were not occupationally related to the coal mining or other industries at risk for development of pneumoconiosis. The degree of anthracotic pigment deposition and severity of type of pigmented lesion with its accompanying reticulum fiber formation and fibrosis were significantly greater in lungs of miners. There was a high degree of overlap in degrees of pigment deposition, particularly those quantitated as grades 1 and 2 and in lesions regarded as types 1 and 2. The greatest divergence was observed for prevalence of nodular pulmonary lesions (type 4). There was also a considerable divergence in the type 3 alteration characterized by nonnodular aggregates of carbon-laden macrophages accompanied by minimal reactive fibrosis. It appears that an objective pathological diagnosis of coal workers' pneumoconiosis can be rendered only by the demonstration of type 4 lesions. Approximately 25% of coal miners exhibited unequivocal features of CWP. No significant differences concerning incidence or types of emphysema or frequency of chronic cor pulmonale were encountered between the two populations.

  10. Pulmonary pathology in pediatric cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Milner, Danny; Factor, Rachel; Whitten, Rich; Carr, Richard A; Kamiza, Steve; Pinkus, Geraldine; Molyneux, Malcolm; Taylor, Terrie

    2013-12-01

    Respiratory signs are common in African children where malaria is highly endemic, and thus, parsing the role of pulmonary pathology in illness is challenging. We examined the lungs of 100 children from an autopsy series in Blantyre, Malawi, many of whom death was attributed to Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Our aim was to describe the pathologic manifestations of fatal malaria; to understand the role of parasites, pigment, and macrophages; and to catalog comorbidities. From available patients, which included 55 patients with cerebral malaria and 45 controls, we obtained 4 cores of lung tissue for immunohistochemistry and morphological evaluation. We found that, in patients with cerebral malaria, large numbers of malaria parasites were present in pulmonary alveolar capillaries, together with extensive deposits of malaria pigment (hemozoin). The number of pulmonary macrophages in this vascular bed did not differ between patients with cerebral malaria, noncerebral malaria, and nonmalarial diagnoses. Comorbidities found in some cerebral malaria patients included pneumonia, pulmonary edema, hemorrhage, and systemic activation of coagulation. We conclude that the respiratory distress seen in patients with cerebral malaria does not appear to be anatomic in origin but that increasing malaria pigment is strongly associated with cerebral malaria at autopsy.

  11. Calcaneal chondroblastoma with pathologic fracture and recurrence.

    PubMed

    Dutt, Laksha; Schade, Valerie L; Manoso, Mark W

    2015-01-01

    Chondroblastomas account for <2% of all bone tumors. The calcaneus is the fifth most common location of occurrence. Males in their second decade of life are most often affected, presenting with an insidious onset of localized pain, swelling, and tenderness. The finding of associated pathologic fracture has been rare. Imaging studies can aid in the formulation of the differential diagnosis and surgical plan. The definitive diagnosis requires histologic examination. Curettage and bone grafting is curative in >80% of cases. Local recurrence rates of ≤38% have been reported, most often because of inadequate resection, and have been associated with malignant conversion and metastasis. Adjuvant therapies can help minimize the incidence of local recurrence. Long-term follow-up examinations are recommended, given the protracted interval that can exist between recurrence and the potential for malignant conversion and metastasis. We present the case of a young, healthy, active male with a calcaneal chondroblastoma and associated pathologic fracture whose initial treatment consisted of curettage, hydrogen peroxide lavage, and allogeneic bone grafting. Recurrence developed at 15 months postoperatively and was treated with repeat curettage, high-speed burring, and reconstruction with steel Steinman pins and polymethylmethacrylate, resulting in no pain or recurrence at the 5-month follow-up point.

  12. Aging of signal transduction pathways, and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Morgan E.; Silva, Haroldo S.; Conboy, Irina M.

    2008-01-01

    The major cell signaling pathways, and their specific mechanisms of transduction, have been a subject of investigation for many years. As our understanding of these pathways advances, we find that they are evolutionarily well-conserved not only individually, but also at the level of their crosstalk and signal integration. Productive interactions within the key signal transduction networks determine success in embryonic organogenesis, and postnatal tissue repair throughout adulthood. However, aside from clues revealed through examining age-related degenerative diseases, much remains uncertain about imbalances within these pathways during normal aging. Further, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which alterations in the major cell signal transduction networks cause age-related pathologies. The aim of this review is to describe the complex interplay between the Notch, TGFβ, WNT, RTK-Ras and Hh signaling pathways, with a specific focus on the changes introduced within these networks by the aging process, and those typical of age-associated human pathologies. PMID:18474281

  13. Minimally Invasive Approach to Achilles Tendon Pathology.

    PubMed

    Hegewald, Kenneth W; Doyle, Matthew D; Todd, Nicholas W; Rush, Shannon M

    2016-01-01

    Many surgical procedures have been described for Achilles tendon pathology; however, no overwhelming consensus has been reached for surgical treatment. Open repair using a central or paramedian incision allows excellent visualization for end-to-end anastomosis in the case of a complete rupture and detachment and reattachment for insertional pathologies. Postoperative wound dehiscence and infection in the Achilles tendon have considerable deleterious effects on overall functional recovery and outcome and sometimes require plastic surgery techniques to achieve coverage. With the aim of avoiding such complications, foot and ankle surgeons have studied less invasive techniques for repair. We describe a percutaneous approach to Achilles tendinopathy using a modification of the Bunnell suture weave technique combined with the use of interference screws. No direct end-to-end repair of the tendon is performed, rather, the proximal stump is brought in direct proximity of the distal stump, preventing overlengthening and proximal stump retraction. This technique also reduces the suture creep often seen with end-to-end tendon repair by providing a direct, rigid suture to bone interface. We have used the new technique to minimize dissection and exposure while restoring function and accelerating recovery postoperatively. PMID:26385574

  14. Is pathological gambling moderated by age?

    PubMed

    Granero, Roser; Penelo, Eva; Stinchfield, Randy; Fernandez-Aranda, Fernando; Savvidou, Lamprini G; Fröberg, Frida; Aymamí, Neus; Gómez-Peña, Mónica; Pérez-Serrano, Miriam; del Pino-Gutiérrez, Amparo; Menchón, José M; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana

    2014-06-01

    The age of a patient is a strong moderator of both the course and the evolution of disorders/diseases. However, the effects of current age in pathological gambling (PG) have rarely been examined. The aim of this study is to explore the moderating effects of the patients' current age in relation to personality traits and clinical outcomes of PG. A total sample of 2,309 treatment-seeking patients for PG, diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria, participated in this study and were assessed with the Diagnostic Questionnaire for Pathological Gambling according to DSM-IV criteria, the South Oaks Gambling Screen, the Symptom Checklist, the Temperament and Character Inventory-R, and other clinical and psychopathological measures. Orthogonal polynomial contrasts showed linear trends in the relationship between age and PG: the older the patient, the more comorbid health problems were visible. The presence of additional quadratic trends also suggests that age plays a significant role in moderating the possibility of existing PG problems and general psychopathology. No interaction term was found between age and sex, but it was present for age and some personality traits: self-transcendence and reward dependence (these two traits were only relevant to the level of impairment due to PG at specific ages). This study suggests that the patients' age influences psychopathological and clinical aspects associated to PG. Intervention in the earliest manifestations of this complex problem is essential in order to better address the need of successful treatment planning.

  15. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2016-06-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion.

  16. Assessment of breast pathologies using nonlinear microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yuankai K.; Shen, Dejun; Sheikine, Yuri; Ahsen, Osman O.; Wang, Helen H.; Schmolze, Daniel B.; Johnson, Nicole B.; Brooker, Jeffrey S.; Cable, Alex E.; Connolly, James L.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid intraoperative assessment of breast excision specimens is clinically important because up to 40% of patients undergoing breast-conserving cancer surgery require reexcision for positive or close margins. We demonstrate nonlinear microscopy (NLM) for the assessment of benign and malignant breast pathologies in fresh surgical specimens. A total of 179 specimens from 50 patients was imaged with NLM using rapid extrinsic nuclear staining with acridine orange and intrinsic second harmonic contrast generation from collagen. Imaging was performed on fresh, intact specimens without the need for fixation, embedding, and sectioning required for conventional histopathology. A visualization method to aid pathological interpretation is presented that maps NLM contrast from two-photon fluorescence and second harmonic signals to features closely resembling histopathology using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Mosaicking is used to overcome trade-offs between resolution and field of view, enabling imaging of subcellular features over square-centimeter specimens. After NLM examination, specimens were processed for standard paraffin-embedded histology using a protocol that coregistered histological sections to NLM images for paired assessment. Blinded NLM reading by three pathologists achieved 95.4% sensitivity and 93.3% specificity, compared with paraffin-embedded histology, for identifying invasive cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ versus benign breast tissue. Interobserver agreement was κ = 0.88 for NLM and κ = 0.89 for histology. These results show that NLM achieves high diagnostic accuracy, can be rapidly performed on unfixed specimens, and is a promising method for intraoperative margin assessment. PMID:25313045

  17. Genetics and underlying pathology of dementia.

    PubMed

    Ferencz, Beata; Gerritsen, Lotte

    2015-03-01

    As the population steadily ages, dementia, in all its forms, remains a great societal challenge. Yet, our knowledge of their etiology remains rather limited. To this end, genetic studies can give us insight into the underlying mechanisms that lead to the development of dementia, potentially facilitating treatments in the future. In this review we cover the most recent genetic risk factors associated with the onset of the four most common dementia types today, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Vascular Dementia (VaD), Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD) and Lewy Body Dementia (LBD). Moreover, we discuss the overlap in major underlying pathologies of dementia derived from their genetic associations. While all four dementia types appear to involve genes associated with tau-pathology and neuroinflammation only LBD, AD and VaD appear to involve amyloid genes while LBD and FTLD share alpha synuclein genes. Together these findings suggest that some of the dementias may exist along a spectrum and demonstrates the necessity to conduct large-scale studies pinpointing the etiology of the dementias and potential gene and environment interactions that may influence their development.

  18. Calcaneal chondroblastoma with pathologic fracture and recurrence.

    PubMed

    Dutt, Laksha; Schade, Valerie L; Manoso, Mark W

    2015-01-01

    Chondroblastomas account for <2% of all bone tumors. The calcaneus is the fifth most common location of occurrence. Males in their second decade of life are most often affected, presenting with an insidious onset of localized pain, swelling, and tenderness. The finding of associated pathologic fracture has been rare. Imaging studies can aid in the formulation of the differential diagnosis and surgical plan. The definitive diagnosis requires histologic examination. Curettage and bone grafting is curative in >80% of cases. Local recurrence rates of ≤38% have been reported, most often because of inadequate resection, and have been associated with malignant conversion and metastasis. Adjuvant therapies can help minimize the incidence of local recurrence. Long-term follow-up examinations are recommended, given the protracted interval that can exist between recurrence and the potential for malignant conversion and metastasis. We present the case of a young, healthy, active male with a calcaneal chondroblastoma and associated pathologic fracture whose initial treatment consisted of curettage, hydrogen peroxide lavage, and allogeneic bone grafting. Recurrence developed at 15 months postoperatively and was treated with repeat curettage, high-speed burring, and reconstruction with steel Steinman pins and polymethylmethacrylate, resulting in no pain or recurrence at the 5-month follow-up point. PMID:25624038

  19. Pathways by which Abeta facilitates tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Blurton-Jones, Mathew; Laferla, Frank M

    2006-12-01

    Since the initial description one hundred years ago by Dr. Alois Alzheimer, the disorder that bears his name has been characterized by the occurrence of two brain lesions: amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). Yet the precise relationship between beta-amyloid (Abeta) and tau, the two proteins that accumulate within these lesions, has proven elusive. Today, a growing body of work supports the notion that Abeta may directly or indirectly interact with tau to accelerate NFT formation. Here we review recent evidence that Abeta can adversely affect distinct molecular and cellular pathways, thereby facilitating tau phosphorylation, aggregation, mis-localization, and accumulation. Studies are presented that support four putative mechanisms by which Abeta may facilitate the development of tau pathology. A great deal of work suggests that Abeta may drive tau pathology by activating specific kinases, providing a straightforward mechanism by which Abeta may enhance tau hyperphosphorylation and NFT formation. In the AD brain, Abeta also triggers a massive inflammatory response and pro-inflammatory cytokines can in turn indirectly modulate tau phosphorylation. Mounting evidence also suggests that Abeta may inhibit tau degradation via the proteasome. Lastly, Abeta and tau may indirectly interact at the level of axonal transport and evidence is presented for two possible scenarios by which axonal transport deficits may play a role. We propose that the four putative mechanisms described in this review likely mediate the interactions between Abeta and tau, thereby leading to the development of AD neurodegeneration.

  20. The preanalytic phase in veterinary clinical pathology.

    PubMed

    Braun, Jean-Pierre; Bourgès-Abella, Nathalie; Geffré, Anne; Concordet, Didier; Trumel, Cathy

    2015-03-01

    This article presents the general causes of preanalytic variability with a few examples showing specialists and practitioners that special and improved care should be given to this too often neglected phase. The preanalytic phase of clinical pathology includes all the steps from specimen collection to analysis. It is the phase where most laboratory errors occur in human, and probably also in veterinary clinical pathology. Numerous causes may affect the validity of the results, including technical factors, such as the choice of anticoagulant, the blood vessel sampled, and the duration and conditions of specimen handling. While the latter factors can be defined, influence of biologic and physiologic factors such as feeding and fasting, stress, and biologic and endocrine rhythms can often not be controlled. Nevertheless, as many factors as possible should at least be documented. The importance of the preanalytic phase is often not given the necessary attention, although the validity of the results and consequent clinical decision making and medical management of animal patients would likely be improved if the quality of specimens submitted to the laboratory was optimized.