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Sample records for 1-norepinephrine induced pathologic

  1. Mechanisms of Autoantibody-Induced Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Ralf J.; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen; Leypoldt, Frank; Kaya, Ziya; Bieber, Katja; McLachlan, Sandra M.; Komorowski, Lars; Luo, Jie; Cabral-Marques, Otavio; Hammers, Christoph M.; Lindstrom, Jon M.; Lamprecht, Peter; Fischer, Andrea; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Tersteeg, Claudia; Sondermann, Peter; Rapoport, Basil; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Probst, Christian; El Beidaq, Asmaa; Schmidt, Enno; Verkman, Alan; Manz, Rudolf A.; Nimmerjahn, Falk

    2017-01-01

    Autoantibodies are frequently observed in healthy individuals. In a minority of these individuals, they lead to manifestation of autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis or Graves’ disease. Overall, more than 2.5% of the population is affected by autoantibody-driven autoimmune disease. Pathways leading to autoantibody-induced pathology greatly differ among different diseases, and autoantibodies directed against the same antigen, depending on the targeted epitope, can have diverse effects. To foster knowledge in autoantibody-induced pathology and to encourage development of urgently needed novel therapeutic strategies, we here categorized autoantibodies according to their effects. According to our algorithm, autoantibodies can be classified into the following categories: (1) mimic receptor stimulation, (2) blocking of neural transmission, (3) induction of altered signaling, triggering uncontrolled (4) microthrombosis, (5) cell lysis, (6) neutrophil activation, and (7) induction of inflammation. These mechanisms in relation to disease, as well as principles of autoantibody generation and detection, are reviewed herein. PMID:28620373

  2. Influence of water quality on cholesterol induced systemic pathology.

    PubMed

    Sparks, D L; Martin, T; Stankovic, G; Wagoner, T; Van Andel, R

    2007-01-01

    Reduced systemic pathology was identified in cholesterol-fed rabbits administered distilled water compared to animals drinking local tap water; this included pathology of the liver and spleen. Studies directed at determining the effect of the trace metals aluminum, copper and zinc on cholesterol-induced systemic pathology were undertaken. As previously reported copper added to distilled drinking water (0.12 PPM) increased Alzheimer-like pathology in the brain, but did not augment pathology of the spleen or liver. Aluminum added to distilled water (0.36 PPM) administered to drink exacerbated cholesterol-induced hepatic pathology but not splenic pathology, and addition of 0.36 PPM zinc to the distilled drinking water failed to affect pathology of either the liver or spleen. The overall increase in both central and systemic pathology observed among cholesterol-fed rabbits administered tap water seems to be due to different trace metal contaminants occurring in tap water.

  3. Tau pathology induces intraneuronal cholesterol accumulation.

    PubMed

    Glöckner, Frauke; Ohm, Thomas G

    2014-09-01

    Epidemiologic and experimental data suggest the involvement of cholesterol metabolism in the development and progression of Alzheimer disease and Niemann-Pick type C disease, but not of frontotemporal dementias. In these 3 neurodegenerative diseases, however, protein tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation into neurofibrillary tangles are observed. To elucidate the relationship between cholesterol and tau, we compared sterol levels of neurons burdened with neurofibrillary tangles with those of their unaffected neighbors using semiquantitative filipin fluorescence microscopy in mice expressing P301L mutant human tau (a well-described model of FTDP-17) and in P301L transgenic mice lacking apolipoprotein E (the major cholesterol transporter in the brain). Cellular unesterified cholesterol was higher in neurons affected by tau pathology irrespective of apolipoprotein E deficiency. This argues for an impact of tau pathology on cellular cholesterol homeostasis. We suggest that there is a bidirectional mode of action: Disturbances in cellular cholesterol metabolism may promote tau pathology, but tau pathology may also alter neuronal cholesterol homeostasis; once it is established, a vicious cycle may promote neurofibrillary tangle formation.

  4. Pathology of practolol-induced ocular toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Rahi, A H; Chapman, C M; Garner, A; Wright, P

    1976-01-01

    The ocular side-effects of prolonged practolol administration concern the cornea and conjunctiva and are related to deficient tear secretion and the formation of an autoantibody which has an affinity for the intercellular zones of squanmous epithelium. Histopathological study of six cases, including a review of the necropsy findings in two, showed destruction of lacrimal gland tissue, epidermalization of the conjunctival epithelium, with epitheliolysis and stromal ulceration of the cornea leading to perforation in two patients. Immunoperoxidase studies showed fixation of specific antibody in the corneal and conjunctival epithelium but, in the one case in which the tissue could be adequately studied, complement fixation could not be demonstrated. Possibly, therefore, the immune response in patients with practolol-induced ocular damage is secondary to the epithelial disturbance rather than its cause. Images PMID:952801

  5. Phenotypes and Pathology of Drug-Induced Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Zachary D

    2017-02-01

    Drug hepatotoxicity can simulate nearly any clinical syndrome or pathologic lesion that may occur in the liver, so clinical and histopathologic diagnosis of drug-induced liver injury may be difficult. Nevertheless, most drugs that are known to idiosyncratic liver injury tend to cause patterns of injury that produce characteristic phenotypes. Recognition of these patterns or phenotypes in liver biopsy material is helpful in evaluation of clinical cases of suspected drug-induced liver injury.

  6. Exercise preconditioning attenuates pressure overload-induced pathological cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tongyi; Tang, Hao; Zhang, Ben; Cai, Chengliang; Liu, Xiaohong; Han, Qingqi; Zou, Liangjian

    2015-01-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy, a common response of the heart to a variety of cardiovascular diseases, is typically associated with myocytes remodeling and fibrotic replacement, cardiac dysfunction. Exercise preconditioning (EP) increases the myocardial mechanical load and enhances tolerance of cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), however, is less reported in pathological cardiac hypertrophy. To determine the effect of EP in pathological cardiac hypertrophy, Male 10-wk-old Sprague-Dawley rats (n=30) were subjected to 4 weeks of EP followed by 4-8 weeks of pressure overload (transverse aortic constriction, TAC) to induce pathological remodeling. TAC in untrained controls (n=30) led to pathological cardiac hypertrophy, depressed systolic function. We observed that left ventricular wall thickness in end diastole, heart size, heart weight-to-body weight ratio, heart weight-to-tibia length ratio, cross-sectional area of cardiomyocytes and the reactivation of fetal genes (atrial natriuretic peptide and brain natriuretic peptide) were markedly increased, meanwhile left ventricular internal dimension at end-diastole, systolic function were significantly decreased by TAC at 4 wks after operation (P < 0.01), all of which were effectively inhibited by EP treatment (P < 0.05), but the differences of these parameters were decreased at 8 wks after operation. Furthermore, EP treatment inhibited degradation of IκBα, and decreased NF-κB p65 subunit levels in the nuclear fraction, and then reduced IL2 levels in the myocardium of rats subject to TAC. EP can effectively attenuate pathological cardiac hypertrophic responses induced by TAC possibly through inhibition of degradation of IκB and blockade of the NF-κB signaling pathway in the early stage of pathological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:25755743

  7. Pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, E.; Farber, J.L. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 29 chapters. Some of the titles are: Genetic and Systemic Diseases; Cell Injury; Inflammation; The Gastrointestinal o Tract; The Pancreas; Environmental and Nutritional Pathology; Infectious and Parasitic Diseases; and Blood Vessels.

  8. Anchanling reduces pathology in a lactacystin- induced Parkinson's disease model☆

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yinghong; Wu, Zhengzhi; Gao, Xiaowei; Zhu, Qingwei; Jin, Yu; Wu, Anmin; Huang, Andrew C. J.

    2012-01-01

    A rat model of Parkinson's disease was induced by injecting lactacystin stereotaxically into the left mesencephalic ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra pars compacta. After rats were intragastrically perfused with Anchanling, a Chinese medicine, mainly composed of magnolol, for 5 weeks, when compared with Parkinson's disease model rats, tyrosine hydroxylase expression was increased, α-synuclein and ubiquitin expression was decreased, substantia nigra cell apoptosis was reduced, and apomorphine-induced rotational behavior was improved. Results suggested that Anchanling can ameliorate Parkinson's disease pathology possibly by enhancing degradation activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. PMID:25767493

  9. Complex pathologies of angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms*

    PubMed Central

    Daugherty, Alan; Cassis, Lisa A.; Lu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) is the primary bioactive peptide of the renin angiotensin system that plays a critical role in many cardiovascular diseases. Subcutaneous infusion of AngII into mice induces the development of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Like human AAAs, AngII-induced AAA tissues exhibit progressive changes and considerable heterogeneity. This complex pathology provides an impediment to the quantification of aneurysmal tissue composition by biochemical and immunostaining techniques. Therefore, while the mouse model of AngII-induced AAAs provides a salutary approach to studying the mechanisms of the evolution of AAAs in humans, meaningful interpretation of mechanisms requires consideration of the heterogeneous nature of the diseased tissue. PMID:21796801

  10. Pathology and biology of radiation-induced cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Tapio, Soile

    2016-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading global cause of death. The risk for this disease is significantly increased in populations exposed to ionizing radiation, but the mechanisms are not fully elucidated yet. This review aims to gather and discuss the latest data about pathological and biological consequences in the radiation-exposed heart in a comprehensive manner. A better understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying radiation-induced damage in heart tissue and cardiac vasculature will provide novel targets for therapeutic interventions. These may be valuable for individuals clinically or occupationally exposed to varying doses of ionizing radiation. PMID:27422929

  11. Rescue of tau-induced synaptic transmission pathology by paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Erez, Hadas; Shemesh, Or A.; Spira, Micha E.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral and electrophysiological studies of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other tauopathies have revealed that the onset of cognitive decline correlates better with synaptic dysfunctions than with hallmark pathologies such as extracellular amyloid-β plaques, intracellular hyperphosphorylated tau or neuronal loss. Recent experiments have also demonstrated that anti-cancer microtubule (MT)-stabilizing drugs can rescue tau-induced behavioral decline and hallmark neuron pathologies. Nevertheless, the mechanisms underlying tau-induced synaptic dysfunction as well as those involved in the rescue of cognitive decline by MTs-stabilizing drugs remain unclear. Here we began to study these mechanisms using the glutaminergic sensory-motoneuron synapse derived from Aplysia ganglia, electrophysiological methods, the expression of mutant-human tau (mt-htau) either pre or postsynaptically and the antimitotic drug paclitaxel. Expression of mt-htau in the presynaptic neurons led to reduced excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) amplitude generated by rested synapses within 3 days of mt-htau expression, and to deeper levels of homosynaptic depression. mt-htau-induced synaptic weakening correlated with reduced releasable presynaptic vesicle pools as revealed by the induction of asynchronous neurotransmitter release by hypertonic sucrose solution. Paclitaxel totally rescued tau-induced synaptic weakening by maintaining the availability of the presynaptic vesicle stores. Postsynaptic expression of mt-htau did not impair the above described synaptic-transmission parameters for up to 5 days. Along with earlier confocal microscope observations from our laboratory, these findings suggest that tau-induced synaptic dysfunction is the outcome of impaired axoplasmic transport and the ensuing reduction in the releasable presynaptic vesicle stores rather than the direct effects of mt-htau or paclitaxel on the synaptic release mechanisms. PMID:24574970

  12. Experimental microembolism induces localized neuritic pathology in guinea pig cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Ming; Cai, Yan; Liu, Fei; Yang, La; Hu, Xia; Patrylo, Peter R; Cai, Huaibin; Luo, Xue-Gang; Xiao, Dong; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2015-05-10

    Microbleeds are a common finding in aged human brains. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), neuritic plaques composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) deposits and dystrophic neurites occur frequently around cerebral vasculature, raising a compelling question as to whether, and if so, how, microvascular abnormality and amyloid/neuritic pathology might be causally related. Here we used a guinea pig model of cerebral microembolism to explore a potential inductive effect of vascular injury on neuritic and amyloid pathogenesis. Brains were examined 7-30 days after experimental microvascular embolization occupying ~0.5% of total cortical area. Compared to sham-operated controls, glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity was increased in the embolized cerebrum, evidently around intracortical vasculature. Swollen/sprouting neurites exhibiting increased reactivity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase, parvalbumin, vesicular glutamate transporter 1 and choline acetyltransferase appeared locally in the embolized brains in proximity to intracortical vasculature. The embolization-induced swollen/sprouting neurites were also robustly immunoreactive for β-amyloid precursor protein and β-secretase-1, the substrate and initiating enzyme for Aβ genesis. These experimental data suggest that microvascular injury can induce multisystem neuritic pathology associated with an enhanced amyloidogenic potential in wild-type mammalian brain.

  13. Experimental microembolism induces localized neuritic pathology in guinea pig cerebrum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-Ming; Cai, Yan; Liu, Fei; Yang, La; Hu, Xia; Patrylo, Peter R.; Cai, Huaibin; Luo, Xue-Gang; Xiao, Dong; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Microbleeds are a common finding in aged human brains. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), neuritic plaques composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) deposits and dystrophic neurites occur frequently around cerebral vasculature, raising a compelling question as to whether, and if so, how, microvascular abnormality and amyloid/neuritic pathology might be causally related. Here we used a guinea pig model of cerebral microembolism to explore a potential inductive effect of vascular injury on neuritic and amyloid pathogenesis. Brains were examined 7-30 days after experimental microvascular embolization occupying ~0.5% of total cortical area. Compared to sham-operated controls, glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity was increased in the embolized cerebrum, evidently around intracortical vasculature. Swollen/sprouting neurites exhibiting increased reactivity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase, parvalbumin, vesicular glutamate transporter 1 and choline acetyltransferase appeared locally in the embolized brains in proximity to intracortical vasculature. The embolization-induced swollen/sprouting neurites were also robustly immunoreactive for β-amyloid precursor protein and β-secretase-1, the substrate and initiating enzyme for Aβ genesis. These experimental data suggest that microvascular injury can induce multisystem neuritic pathology associated with an enhanced amyloidogenic potential in wild-type mammalian brain. PMID:25871402

  14. Mercury-Induced Membranous Nephropathy: Clinical and Pathological Features

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shi-Jun; Zhang, Su-Hua; Chen, Hui-Ping; Zeng, Cai-Hong; Zheng, Chun-Xia; Li, Lei-Shi

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Long-term contact with mercury may induce membranous nephropathy (MN); however, the clinical pathologic features and pathogenesis of mercury-induced MN have not been investigated. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: The present study retrospectively evaluated 11 cases of mercury-induced MN to analyze its causes and its clinical and pathologic features. Results: A total of 10 women and 1 man ages 15 to 45 years were enrolled in the present study. Mercury exposure was caused by mercury-containing pills (five patients), skin lightening cream (four patients), hair-dyeing agents (one patient), and mercury vapor (one patient). The duration of contact with mercury ranged from 2 to 60 months, and the urinary mercury concentrations were 1.5 to 50 times higher than reference values. All patients presented with proteinuria and normal renal function; three had nephrotic syndrome. Light microscopy revealed thickened glomerular basement membrane and mildly proliferative mesangial cells. Acute tubulointerstitial injury occurred in three patients. The immunofluorescence findings showed granular deposits of IgG and C3 along the glomerular capillary wall, mostly accompanied by deposits of C4 and C1q. IgG1 and IgG4 (predominantly IgG1) deposits were observed along the glomerular capillary loops. Nine patients reached complete remission in follow-up after withdrawal from mercury exposure. Conclusions: Deposits of IgG1 subclasses in renal tissues indicated that the pathogenesis of mercury-induced MN differs from that of idiopathic MN. It is important that clinicians are aware that mercury exposure should be considered a possible cause of membranous nephropathy. PMID:20089494

  15. Non-fecalith-induced appendicitis: etiology, imaging, and pathology.

    PubMed

    Swischuk, Leonard E; Chung, Dai H; Hawkins, Hal K; Jadhav, Siddharth P; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to document the imaging and pathology findings in non-fecalith-induced appendicitis. We reviewed the imaging and pathologic findings in 40 patients with histologically proven purulent appendicitis seen over a 2-year period. Findings documented were (1) total appendiceal involvement, (2) predominant appendiceal tip involvement, (3) presence of a fecalith, and (4) presence of lymphoid hyperplasia. There were a total of 40 patients, 28 males and 12 females. The age range was 2-18 years with a mean of 11.5 years. Twenty-two (55 %) patients demonstrated classic purulent appendicitis of the whole appendix, 20 (91 %) of these appendices had a fecalith. Eighteen (45 %) patients demonstrated purulent appendicitis confined to or predominately involving the tip of the appendix, and all 18 (100 %) patients demonstrated marked lymphoid hyperplasia. Only two (11 %) of these appendices had a fecalith. Overall, a fecalith was found in only 55 % of our cases, while 45 % demonstrated no fecalith, but rather marked lymphoid hyperplasia. Lymphoid hyperplasia appeared to be the underlying predisposing cause of purulent appendicitis in these cases.

  16. Oral glutathione supplementation drastically reduces Helicobacter-induced gastric pathologies

    PubMed Central

    De Bruyne, Ellen; Ducatelle, Richard; Foss, Dennis; Sanchez, Margaret; Joosten, Myrthe; Zhang, Guangzhi; Smet, Annemieke; Pasmans, Frank; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Flahou, Bram

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter (H.) suis causes gastric pathologies in both pigs and humans. Very little is known on the metabolism of this bacterium and its impact on the host. In this study, we have revealed the importance of the glutamate-generating metabolism, as shown by a complete depletion of glutamine (Gln) in the medium during H. suis culture. Besides Gln, H. suis can also convert glutathione (GSH) to glutamate, and both reactions are catalyzed by the H. suis γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT). Both for H. pylori and H. suis, it has been hypothesized that the degradation of Gln and GSH may lead to a deficiency for the host, possibly initiating or promoting several pathologies. Therefore the in vivo effect of oral supplementation with Gln and GSH was assessed. Oral supplementation with Gln was shown to temper H. suis induced gastritis and epithelial (hyper)proliferation in Mongolian gerbils. Astonishingly, supplementation of the feed with GSH, another GGT substrate, resulted in inflammation and epithelial proliferation levels returning to baseline levels of uninfected controls. This indicates that Gln and GSH supplementation may help reducing tissue damage caused by Helicobacter infection in both humans and pigs, highlighting their potential as a supportive therapy during and after Helicobacter eradication therapy. PMID:26833404

  17. Tau protein is essential for stress-induced brain pathology

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Sofia; Vaz-Silva, João; Pinto, Vitor; Dalla, Christina; Kokras, Nikolaos; Bedenk, Benedikt; Mack, Natalie; Czisch, Michael; Almeida, Osborne F. X.; Sousa, Nuno; Sotiropoulos, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to chronic stress is frequently accompanied by cognitive and affective disorders in association with neurostructural adaptations. Chronic stress was previously shown to trigger Alzheimer’s-like neuropathology, which is characterized by Tau hyperphosphorylation and missorting into dendritic spines followed by memory deficits. Here, we demonstrate that stress-driven hippocampal deficits in wild-type mice are accompanied by synaptic missorting of Tau and enhanced Fyn/GluN2B-driven synaptic signaling. In contrast, mice lacking Tau [Tau knockout (Tau-KO) mice] do not exhibit stress-induced pathological behaviors and atrophy of hippocampal dendrites or deficits of hippocampal connectivity. These findings implicate Tau as an essential mediator of the adverse effects of stress on brain structure and function. PMID:27274066

  18. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition reduces stress-induced affective pathology

    PubMed Central

    Gamble-George, Joyonna Carrie; Baldi, Rita; Halladay, Lindsay; Kocharian, Adrina; Hartley, Nolan; Silva, Carolyn Grace; Roberts, Holly; Haymer, Andre; Marnett, Lawrence J; Holmes, Andrew; Patel, Sachin

    2016-01-01

    Mood and anxiety disorders are the most prevalent psychiatric conditions and are exacerbated by stress. Recent studies have suggested cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition could represent a novel treatment approach or augmentation strategy for affective disorders including anxiety disorders and major depression. We show that traditional COX-2 inhibitors and a newly developed substrate-selective COX-2 inhibitor (SSCI) reduce a variety of stress-induced behavioral pathologies in mice. We found that these behavioral effects were associated with a dampening of neuronal excitability in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) ex vivo and in vivo, and were mediated by small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channel and CB1 cannabinoid receptor activation. Taken together, these data provide further support for the potential utility of SSCIs, as well as traditional COX-2 inhibitors, as novel treatment approaches for stress-related psychiatric disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14137.001 PMID:27162170

  19. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition reduces stress-induced affective pathology.

    PubMed

    Gamble-George, Joyonna Carrie; Baldi, Rita; Halladay, Lindsay; Kocharian, Adrina; Hartley, Nolan; Silva, Carolyn Grace; Roberts, Holly; Haymer, Andre; Marnett, Lawrence J; Holmes, Andrew; Patel, Sachin

    2016-05-10

    Mood and anxiety disorders are the most prevalent psychiatric conditions and are exacerbated by stress. Recent studies have suggested cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition could represent a novel treatment approach or augmentation strategy for affective disorders including anxiety disorders and major depression. We show that traditional COX-2 inhibitors and a newly developed substrate-selective COX-2 inhibitor (SSCI) reduce a variety of stress-induced behavioral pathologies in mice. We found that these behavioral effects were associated with a dampening of neuronal excitability in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) ex vivo and in vivo, and were mediated by small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channel and CB1 cannabinoid receptor activation. Taken together, these data provide further support for the potential utility of SSCIs, as well as traditional COX-2 inhibitors, as novel treatment approaches for stress-related psychiatric disorders.

  20. Proteasome inhibition alleviates prolonged moderate compression-induced muscle pathology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The molecular mechanism initiating deep pressure ulcer remains to be elucidated. The present study tested the hypothesis that the ubiquitin proteasome system is involved in the signalling mechanism in pressure-induced deep tissue injury. Methods Adult Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to an experimental compression model to induce deep tissue injury. The tibialis region of the right hind limb was subjected to 100 mmHg of static pressure for six hours on each of two consecutive days. The compression pressure was continuously monitored by a three-axial force transducer within the compression indentor. The left hind limb served as the intra-animal control. Muscle tissues underneath the compressed region were collected and used for analyses. Results Our results demonstrated that the activity of 20S proteasome and the protein abundance of ubiquitin and MAFbx/atrogin-1 were elevated in conjunction with pathohistological changes in the compressed muscle, as compared to control muscle. The administration of the proteasome inhibitor MG132 was found to be effective in ameliorating the development of pathological histology in compressed muscle. Furthermore, 20S proteasome activity and protein content of ubiquitin and MAFbx/atrogin-1 showed no apparent increase in the MG132-treated muscle following compression. Conclusion Our data suggest that the ubiquitin proteasome system may play a role in the pathogenesis of pressure-induced deep tissue injury. PMID:21385343

  1. Superior neuroprotective effects of cerebrolysin in nanoparticle-induced exacerbation of hyperthermia-induced brain pathology.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aruna; Muresanu, Dafin Fior; Mössler, Herbert; Sharma, Hari Shanker

    2012-02-01

    In recent years, the incidence of heat stroke and associated brain pathology are increasing Worldwide. More than half of the world's population are living in areas associated with high environmental heat especially during the summer seasons. Thus, new research is needed using novel drug targets to achieve neuroprotection in heat-induced brain pathology. Previous research from our laboratory showed that the pathophysiology of brain injuries following heat stroke are exacerbated by chronic intoxication of engineered nanoparticles of small sizes (50-60 nm) following identical heat exposure in rats. Interestingly, in nanoparticle-intoxicated animals the known neuroprotective agents in standard doses failed to induce effective neuroprotection. This suggests that the dose-response of the drugs either requires modification or new therapeutic agents are needed to provide better neuroprotection in nanoparticle-intoxicated animals after heat stroke. This review is focused on the use of cerebrolysin, a mixture of several neurotrophic factors and active peptide fragments, in relation to other neuroprotective agents normally used to treat ischemic stroke in clinics in nanoparticle-induced exacerbation of brain damage in heat stroke. It appears that cerebrolysin exerts the most superior neuroprotective effects in heat stress as compared to other neuroprotective agents on brain pathology in normal rats. Interestingly, to induce effective neuroprotection in nanoparticle-induced exacerbation of brain pathology a double dose of cerebrolysin is needed. On the other hand, double doses of the other drugs were quite ineffective in reducing brain damage. These observations suggest that the drug type and doses are important factors in attenuating nanoparticle-induced exacerbation of brain pathology in heat stroke. The functional significance and possible mechanisms of drug-induced neuroprotection in nanoparticle-treated, heat-stressed rats are discussed.

  2. Supra-physiological dose of testosterone induces pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Pirompol, Prapawadee; Teekabut, Vassana; Weerachatyanukul, Wattana; Bupha-Intr, Tepmanas; Wattanapermpool, Jonggonnee

    2016-04-01

    Testosterone and androgenic anabolic steroids have been misused for enhancement of physical performance despite many reports on cardiac sudden death. Although physiological level of testosterone provided many regulatory benefits to human health, including the cardiovascular function, supra-physiological levels of the hormone induce hypertrophy of the heart with unclear contractile activation. In this study, dose- and time-dependent effects of high-testosterone treatment on cardiac structure and function were evaluated. Adult male rats were divided into four groups of testosterone treatment for 0, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg BW for 4, 8, or 12 weeks. Increases in both percentage heart:body weight ratio and cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area in representing hypertrophy of the heart were significantly shown in all testosterone-treated groups to the same degree. In 4-week-treated rats, physiological cardiac hypertrophy was apparent with an upregulation of α-MHC without any change in myofilament contractile activation. In contrast, pathological cardiac hypertrophy was observed in 8- and 12-week testosterone-treated groups, as indicated by suppression of myofilament activation and myocardial collagen deposition without transition of MHC isoforms. Only in 12-week testosterone-treated group, eccentric cardiac hypertrophy was demonstrated with unaltered myocardial stiffness, but significant reductions in the phosphorylation signals of ERK1/2 and mTOR. Results of our study suggest that the outcome of testosterone-induced cardiac hypertrophy is not dose dependent but is rather relied on the factor of exposure to duration in inducing maladaptive responses of the heart. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  3. Castration induces Parkinson disease pathologies in young male mice via inducible nitric-oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Khasnavis, Saurabh; Ghosh, Anamitra; Roy, Avik; Pahan, Kalipada

    2013-07-19

    Although Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, available animal models do not exhibit irreversible neurodegeneration, and this is a major obstacle in finding out an effective drug against this disease. Here we delineate a new irreversible model to study PD pathogenesis. The model is based on simple castration of young male mice. Levels of inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS), glial markers (glial fibrillary acidic protein and CD11b), and α-synuclein were higher in nigra of castrated male mice than normal male mice. On the other hand, after castration, the level of glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) markedly decreased in the nigra of male mice. Accordingly, castration also induced the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons in the nigra and decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase-positive fibers and neurotransmitters in the striatum. Reversal of nigrostriatal pathologies in castrated male mice by subcutaneous implantation of 5α-dihydrotestosterone pellets validates an important role of male sex hormone in castration-induced nigrostriatal pathology. Interestingly, castration was unable to cause glial activation, decrease nigral GDNF, augment the death of nigral dopaminergic neurons, induce the loss of striatal fibers, and impair neurotransmitters in iNOS(-/-) male mice. Furthermore, we demonstrate that iNOS-derived NO is responsible for decreased expression of GDNF in activated astrocytes. Together, our results suggest that castration induces nigrostriatal pathologies via iNOS-mediated decrease in GDNF. These results are important because castrated young male mice may be used as a simple, toxin-free, and nontransgenic animal model to study PD-related nigrostriatal pathologies, paving the way for easy drug screening against PD.

  4. Pathology of BHA- and BHT-induced lesions.

    PubMed

    Moch, R W

    1986-01-01

    The pathology lesions from three studies, two with butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and one with butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), are reviewed. When BHA was fed at 0.5 and 2.0% of the diet to F344 rats for two years, there was an increase in epithelial hyperplasia of the forestomach at both treatment levels. Papilloma and squamous-cell carcinoma of the forestomach were increased at the 2.0% level. When BHA was fed to beagle dogs at 1.0 and 1.3% of the diet for 180 days, no lesions/tumours of the distal oesophagus or stomach could be identified either at gross necropsy or by light or electron microscopy. The BHT was fed to Wistar rats at 0, 25, 100 and 250 mg/kg body weight. At the highest dose there was an increase in the number of rats with hepatocellular adenoma and with hepatocellular carcinoma.

  5. Inducers and inhibitors of biomineralization: lessons from pathological calcification.

    PubMed

    Giachelli, C M

    2005-11-01

    Ectopic calcification is a common response to soft tissue injury and systemic mineral imbalance and can lead to devastating clinical consequences when present in joints, heart valves and blood vessels. We have hypothesized that mineralization of matrices in any tissue is normally controlled by a balance between procalcific and anticalcific regulatory proteins such that abnormal deposition of apatite is avoided. Alterations in this balance induced by injury, disease or genetic deficiency are postulated to induce ectopic mineral deposition. Over the past several years, we have developed in vitro and in vivo models of ectopic calcification to investigate potential inducers and inhibitors of this process. Osteopontin, a secreted phosphoprotein, has emerged as a major inhibitor of ectopic mineralization. Osteopontin is a potent inhibitor of vascular cell calcification in vitro and mice lacking osteopontin are highly susceptible to ectopic calcification. Furthermore, osteopontin treatment of biomaterials protected against ectopic mineralization. Our studies indicate that in addition to inhibiting apatite crystal initiation and growth, osteopontin stimulates resorption of ectopic calcification via peripheral macrophages and giant cells. In contrast, inorganic phosphate has emerged as a major inducer of mineralization in these systems. Elevated inorganic phosphate (Pi) was shown to induce smooth muscle cell matrix calcification with morphological properties similar to those observed in calcified human valves and atherosclerotic plaques. Furthermore, mineralization induced by inorganic phosphate was dependent on the activity of the sodium-dependent phosphate cotransporter, Pit-1. These studies implicate controlled, transcellular transport of Pi as a major requirement for matrix calcification.

  6. Pathologic role of stressed-induced glucocorticoids in drug-induced liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Masson, Mary Jane; Collins, Lindsay A; Carpenter, Leah D; Graf, Mary L; Ryan, Pauline M; Bourdi, Mohammed; Pohl, Lance R

    2010-07-02

    We previously reported that acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury (AILI) in mice is associated with a rise in serum levels of the glucocorticoid (GC), corticosterone. In the current study, we provide evidence that endogenous GC play a pathologic role in AILI. Specifically, pretreatment of mice with the GC receptor (GCR) inhibitor, RU486 (mifepristrone), protected normal but not adrenalectomized mice from AILI, while pretreatment with dexamethasone, a synthetic GC, exacerbated AILI. RU486 did not affect the depletion of whole liver reduced GSH or the formation of APAP-protein adducts. It also had no effects on the formation of reactive oxygen species or the depletion of mitochondrial GSH or ATP. While RU486 pretreatment also protected against halothane-induced liver injury, it exacerbated concanavalin A (ConA)- and carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4))-induced liver injury, demonstrating the complexity of GC effects in different types of liver injury. These results suggest that under certain conditions, elevated levels of GC might represent a previously unappreciated risk factor for liver injury caused by APAP and other drugs through the diverse biological processes regulated by GCR. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Quantitative analysis of pathological nails using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique.

    PubMed

    Hamzaoui, S; Khleifia, R; Jaïdane, N; Ben Lakhdar, Z

    2011-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used as a potential method for simultaneous measurement of the elements Ca, Na, and K, for normal and pathological nails. We compared the measured LIBS spectra of these elements for normal and pathological nails. The B²∑+ --> X²∑+ violet band emission spectrum of CN was used for the estimation of the transient temperature of the plasma plume and consequently of the sample surface considering thermodynamic equilibrium.

  8. Aging predisposes to acute inflammatory induced pathology after tumor immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bouchlaka, Myriam N.; Sckisel, Gail D.; Chen, Mingyi; Mirsoian, Annie; Zamora, Anthony E.; Maverakis, Emanual; Wilkins, Danice E.C.; Alderson, Kory L.; Hsiao, Hui-Hua; Weiss, Jonathan M.; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Hesdorffer, Charles; Ferrucci, Luigi; Longo, Dan L.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Wiltrout, Robert H.; Redelman, Doug; Taub, Dennis D.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer commonly occurs in the elderly and immunotherapy (IT) is being increasingly applied to this population. However, the majority of preclinical mouse tumor models assessing potential efficacy and toxicities of therapeutics use young mice. We assessed the impact of age on responses to systemic immune stimulation. In contrast to young mice, systemic cancer IT regimens or LPS given to aged mice resulted in rapid and lethal toxicities affecting multiple organs correlating with heightened proinflammatory cytokines systemically and within the parenchymal tissues. This inflammatory response and increased morbidity with age was independent of T cells or NK cells. However, prior in vivo depletion of macrophages in aged mice resulted in lesser cytokine levels, increased survival, and decreased liver histopathology. Furthermore, macrophages from aged mice and normal human elderly volunteers displayed heightened TNF and IL-6 production upon in vitro stimulation. Treatment of both TNF knockout mice and in vivo TNF blockade in aged mice resulted in significant increases in survival and lessened pathology. Importantly, TNF blockade in tumor-bearing, aged mice receiving IT displayed significant anti-tumor effects. These data demonstrate the critical role of macrophages in the age-associated hyper-inflammatory cytokine responses to systemic immunostimulation and underscore the importance of performing preclinical assessments in aged mice. PMID:24081947

  9. Aging predisposes to acute inflammatory induced pathology after tumor immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bouchlaka, Myriam N; Sckisel, Gail D; Chen, Mingyi; Mirsoian, Annie; Zamora, Anthony E; Maverakis, Emanual; Wilkins, Danice E C; Alderson, Kory L; Hsiao, Hui-Hua; Weiss, Jonathan M; Monjazeb, Arta M; Hesdorffer, Charles; Ferrucci, Luigi; Longo, Dan L; Blazar, Bruce R; Wiltrout, Robert H; Redelman, Doug; Taub, Dennis D; Murphy, William J

    2013-10-21

    Cancer commonly occurs in the elderly and immunotherapy (IT) is being increasingly applied to this population. However, the majority of preclinical mouse tumor models assessing potential efficacy and toxicities of therapeutics use young mice. We assessed the impact of age on responses to systemic immune stimulation. In contrast to young mice, systemic cancer IT regimens or LPS given to aged mice resulted in rapid and lethal toxicities affecting multiple organs correlating with heightened proinflammatory cytokines systemically and within the parenchymal tissues. This inflammatory response and increased morbidity with age was independent of T cells or NK cells. However, prior in vivo depletion of macrophages in aged mice resulted in lesser cytokine levels, increased survival, and decreased liver histopathology. Furthermore, macrophages from aged mice and normal human elderly volunteers displayed heightened TNF and IL-6 production upon in vitro stimulation. Treatment of both TNF knockout mice and in vivo TNF blockade in aged mice resulted in significant increases in survival and lessened pathology. Importantly, TNF blockade in tumor-bearing, aged mice receiving IT displayed significant anti-tumor effects. These data demonstrate the critical role of macrophages in the age-associated hyper-inflammatory cytokine responses to systemic immunostimulation and underscore the importance of performing preclinical assessments in aged mice.

  10. Controversies in the Mechanism of Total Parenteral Nutrition Induced Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Jain Ajay; Teckman, Jeffery H.

    2015-01-01

    Over 30,000 patients are permanently dependent on Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN) for survival with several folds higher requiring TPN for a prolonged duration. Unfortunately, it can cause potentially fatal complications. TPN infusion results in impairment of gut mucosal integrity, enhanced inflammation, increased cytokine expression and trans-mucosal bacterial permeation. It also causes endotoxin associated down regulation of bile acid transporters and Parenteral Nutrition Associated Liver Disease (PNALD), which includes steatosis, disrupted glucose metabolism, disrupted lipid metabolism, cholestasis and liver failure. Despite multiple theories, its etiology and pathophysiology remains elusive and is likely multifactorial. An important cause for TPN related pathologies appears to be a disruption in the normal enterohepatic circulation due to a lack of feeding during such therapy. This is further validated by the fact that in clinical settings, once cholestasis sets in, its reversal occurs when a patient is receiving a major portion of calories enterally. There are several other postulated mechanisms including gut bacterial permeation predisposing to endotoxin associated down regulation of bile acid transporters. An additional potential mechanism includes toxicity of the TPN solution itself, such as lipid mediated hepatic toxicity. Prematurity, leading to a poor development of bile acid regulating nuclear receptors and transporters has also been implicated as a causative factor. This review presents the current controversies and research into mechanisms of TPN associated injury. PMID:27417369

  11. Amyloidogenic α-synuclein seeds do not invariably induce rapid, widespread pathology in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sacino, Amanda N.; Brooks, Mieu; Thomas, Michael A.; McKinney, Alex B.; McGarvey, Nicholas H.; Rutherford, Nicola L.; Ceballos-Diaz, Carolina; Robertson, Janice; Golde, Todd E.; Giasson, Benoit I.

    2014-01-01

    To further evaluate the parameters whereby intracerebral administration of recombinant α-synuclein (αS) induces pathological phenotypes in mice, we conducted a series of studies where αS fibrils were injected into the brains of M83 (A53T) and M47 (E46K) αS transgenic (Tg) mice, and non-transgenic (nTg) mice. Using multiple markers to assess αS inclusion formation, we find that injected fibrillar human αS induced widespread cerebral αS inclusion formation in the M83 Tg mice, but in both nTg and M47 Tg mice, induced αS inclusion pathology is largely restricted to the site of injection. Furthermore, mouse αS fibrils injected into nTg mice brains also resulted in inclusion pathology restricted to the site of injection with no evidence for spread. We find no compelling evidence for extensive spread of αS pathology within white matter tracts, and we attribute previous reports of white matter tract spreading to cross-reactivity of the αS pSer129/81A antibody with phosphorylated neurofilament subunit L (NFL). These studies suggest that with the exception of the M83 mice which appear to be uniquely susceptible to induction of inclusion pathology by exogenous forms of αS there are significant barriers in mice to widespread induction of αS pathology following intracerebral administration of amyloidogenic αS. PMID:24659240

  12. A pathologic cascade leading to synaptic dysfunction in α-synuclein-induced neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Scott, David A.; Tabarean, Iustin; Tang, Yong; Cartier, Anna; Masliah, Eliezer; Roy, Subhojit

    2010-01-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases are typified by intra-neuronal α-synuclein deposits, synaptic dysfunction and dementia. While even modest α-synuclein elevations can be pathologic, the precise cascade of events induced by excessive α-synuclein and eventually culminating in synaptotoxicity is unclear. Towards this, we developed a quantitative model-system to evaluate evolving α-synuclein-induced pathologic events with high spatial and temporal resolution, using cultured neurons from brains of transgenic mice over-expressing fluorescent-human-α-synuclein. Transgenic α-synuclein was pathologically altered over time and over-expressing neurons showed striking neurotransmitter release deficits and enlarged synaptic vesicles; a phenotype reminiscent of previous animal-models lacking critical presynaptic proteins. Indeed several endogenous presynaptic proteins involved in exo- and endo-cytosis were undetectable in a subset of transgenic boutons (‘vacant synapses’) with diminished levels in the remainder; suggesting that such diminutions were triggering the overall synaptic pathology. Similar synaptic protein alterations were also retrospectively seen in human pathologic brains, highlighting potential relevance to human disease. Collectively the data suggest a previously unknown cascade of events where pathologic α-synuclein leads to a loss of a number of critical presynaptic proteins, thereby inducing functional synaptic deficits. PMID:20554859

  13. A pathologic cascade leading to synaptic dysfunction in alpha-synuclein-induced neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Scott, David A; Tabarean, Iustin; Tang, Yong; Cartier, Anna; Masliah, Eliezer; Roy, Subhojit

    2010-06-16

    Several neurodegenerative diseases are typified by intraneuronal alpha-synuclein deposits, synaptic dysfunction, and dementia. While even modest alpha-synuclein elevations can be pathologic, the precise cascade of events induced by excessive alpha-synuclein and eventually culminating in synaptotoxicity is unclear. To elucidate this, we developed a quantitative model system to evaluate evolving alpha-synuclein-induced pathologic events with high spatial and temporal resolution, using cultured neurons from brains of transgenic mice overexpressing fluorescent-human-alpha-synuclein. Transgenic alpha-synuclein was pathologically altered over time and overexpressing neurons showed striking neurotransmitter release deficits and enlarged synaptic vesicles; a phenotype reminiscent of previous animal models lacking critical presynaptic proteins. Indeed, several endogenous presynaptic proteins involved in exocytosis and endocytosis were undetectable in a subset of transgenic boutons ("vacant synapses") with diminished levels in the remainder, suggesting that such diminutions were triggering the overall synaptic pathology. Similar synaptic protein alterations were also retrospectively seen in human pathologic brains, highlighting potential relevance to human disease. Collectively the data suggest a previously unknown cascade of events where pathologic alpha-synuclein leads to a loss of a number of critical presynaptic proteins, thereby inducing functional synaptic deficits.

  14. Novel Mechanism of Arenavirus-Induced Liver Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Juliane I.; Jokinen, Jenny D.; Holz, Gretchen E.; Whang, Patrick S.; Martin, Amah M.; Warner, Nikole L.; Arteel, Gavin E.; Lukashevich, Igor S.

    2015-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) encompass a group of diseases with cardinal symptoms of fever, hemorrhage, and shock. The liver is a critical mediator of VHF disease pathogenesis and high levels of ALT/AST transaminases in plasma correlate with poor prognosis. In fact, Lassa Fever (LF), the most prevalent VHF in Africa, was initially clinically described as hepatitis. Previous studies in non-human primate (NHP) models also correlated LF pathogenesis with a robust proliferative response in the liver. The purpose of the current study was to gain insight into the mechanism of liver injury and to determine the potential role of proliferation in LF pathogenesis. C57Bl/6J mice were infected with either the pathogenic (for NHPs) strain of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV, the prototypic arenavirus), LCMV-WE, or with the non-pathogenic strain, LCMV-ARM. As expected, LCMV-WE, but not ARM, caused a hepatitis-like infection. LCMV-WE also induced a robust increase in the number of actively cycling hepatocytes. Despite this increase in proliferation, there was no significant difference in liver size between LCMV-WE and LCMV-ARM, suggesting that cell cycle was incomplete. Indeed, cells appeared arrested in the G1 phase and LCMV-WE infection increased the number of hepatocytes that were simultaneously stained for proliferation and apoptosis. LCMV-WE infection also induced expression of a non-conventional virus receptor, AXL-1, from the TAM (TYRO3/AXL/MERTK) family of receptor tyrosine kinases and this expression correlated with proliferation. Taken together, these results shed new light on the mechanism of liver involvement in VHF pathogenesis. Specifically, it is hypothesized that the induction of hepatocyte proliferation contributes to expansion of the infection to parenchymal cells. Elevated levels of plasma transaminases are likely explained, at least in part, by abortive cell cycle arrest induced by the infection. These results may lead to the development of new

  15. Dietary zinc modifies diabetic-induced renal pathology in rats.

    PubMed

    Elsaed, Wael M; Mohamed, Hazem Abdelhamid

    2017-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate how far dietary zinc (Zn) modifies the histomorphological alterations induced by diabetes in rat kidneys. The animals were divided into negative control group (10 rats). Diabetes was induced in thirty animals by streptozotocin. After confirming diabetes, the animals were divided into three groups (n = 10). Group II served as the positive control group (fed on standard diet), group III was fed on Zn deficient diet, and group IV was fed on Zn supplemented diet. Caspase-3 immune staining was used to estimate the caspase activity. Stereological procedures were used to measure the quantity of the immune stain and the surface area of the Bowman's space. The renal cortices of group II rats revealed apparent widening of Bowman's spaces with few apoptotic figures. The filtration barrier showed thickening of the basement membrane. The proximal convoluted tubules showed patchy loss of the apical microvilli with swollen mitochondria. The distal convoluted tubules revealed area of irregular basal enfolding. The picture was aggravated by Zn deficiency in group III besides areas of cortical interstitial fibrosis. The histopathological alterations were minimal in the cortices of group IV. A significant increase of the Bowman's space surface area in group II and IV while decrease in group III compared with group I. The expression of Caspase-3 density was significantly increased in group II and III compared with group I while in group IV was non significant. In conclusion, dietary Zn modulated renal cortical changes caused by diabetes in rats.

  16. Glandular epithelial AR inactivation enhances PTEN deletion-induced uterine pathology.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaesung Peter; Zheng, Yu; Handelsman, David J; Simanainen, Ulla

    2016-05-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) deletion induces uterine pathology, whereas androgen actions via androgen receptor (AR) support uterine growth and therefore may modify uterine cancer risk. We hypothesized that the androgen actions mediated via uterine glandular epithelial AR could modify PTEN deletion-induced uterine pathology. To test our hypothesis, we developed uterine glandular epithelium-specific PTEN and/or AR knockout mouse models comparing the uterine pathology among wild-type (WT), glandular epithelium-specific AR inactivation (ugeARKO), PTEN deletion (ugePTENKO), and the combined PTEN and AR knockout (ugePTENARKO) female mice. The double knockout restricted to glandular epithelium showed that AR inactivation enhanced PTEN deletion-induced uterine pathology with development of intraepithelial neoplasia by 20 weeks of age. In ugePTENARKO, 6/10 (60%) developed intraepithelial neoplasia, whereas 3/10 (30%) developed only glandular hyperplasia in ugePTENKO uterus. No uterine pathology was observed in WT (n=8) and ugeARKO (n=7) uteri. Uterine weight was significantly (P=0.002) increased in ugePTENARKO (374±97 mg (mean±s.e.)) compared with WT (97±6 mg), ugeARKO (94±12 mg), and ugePTENKO (205±33 mg). Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and P-AKT expression was modified by uterine pathology but did not differ between ugePTENKO and ugePTENARKO, suggesting that its expressions are not directly affected by androgens. However, progesterone receptor (PR) expression was reduced in ugePTENARKO compared to ugePTENKO uterus, suggesting that PR expression could be regulated by glandular epithelial AR inactivation. In conclusion, glandular epithelial AR inactivation (with persistent stromal AR action) enhanced PTEN deletion-induced uterine pathology possibly by downregulating PR expression in the uterus. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  17. Okadaic acid induced neurotoxicity: an emerging tool to study Alzheimer's disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Pradip K; Rai, Shivika; Nath, Chandishwar

    2013-07-01

    Okadaic acid (OKA) is one of the main polyether toxins produced by marine microalgae which causes diarrhetic shellfish poisoning. It is a selective and potent inhibitor of serine/threonine phosphatases 1 and 2A induces hyperphosphorylation of tau in vitro and in vivo. The reduced activity of phosphatases like, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) has been implicated in the brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. It is reported that AD is a complex multifactorial neurodegenerative disorder and hyperphosphorylated tau proteins is a major pathological hallmark of AD. The molecular pathogenesis of AD includes an extracellular deposition of beta amyloid (Aβ), accumulation of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFT), GSK3β activation, oxidative stress, altered neurotransmitter and inflammatory cascades. Several lines of evidence suggested that the microinfusion of OKA into the rat brain causes cognitive deficiency, NFTs-like pathological changes and oxidative stress as seen in AD pathology via tau hyperphosphorylation caused by inhibition of protein phosphatases. So, communal data and information inferred that OKA induces neurodegeneration along with tau hyperphosphorylation; GSK3β activation, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and neurotoxicity which is a characteristic feature of AD pathology. Through this collected evidence, it is suggested that OKA induced neurotoxicity may be a novel tool to study Alzheimer's disease pathology and helpful in development of new therapeutic approach. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Oral recombinant human or mouse lactoferrin reduces Mycobacterium tuberculosis TDM induced granulomatous lung pathology.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Shen-An; Kruzel, Marian L; Actor, Jeffrey K

    2017-02-01

    Trehalose 6'6-dimycolate (TDM) is the most abundant glycolipid on the cell wall of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). TDM is capable of inducing granulomatous pathology in mouse models that resembles those induced by MTB infection. Using the acute TDM model, this work investigates the effect of recombinant human and mouse lactoferrin to reduce granulomatous pathology. C57BL/6 mice were injected intravenously with TDM at a dose of 25 μg·mouse(-1). At day 4 and 6, recombinant human or mouse lactoferrin (1 mg·(100 μL)(-1)·mouse(-1)) were delivered by gavage. At day 7 after TDM injection, mice were evaluated for lung pathology, cytokine production, and leukocyte populations. Mice given human or mouse lactoferrin had reduced production of IL-12p40 in their lungs. Mouse lactoferrin increased IL-6 and KC (CXCL1) in lung tissue. Increased numbers of macrophages were observed in TDM-injected mice given human or mouse lactoferrin. Granulomatous pathology, composed of mainly migrated leukocytes, was visually reduced in mice that received human or mouse lactoferrin. Quantitation of granulomatous pathology demonstrated a significant decrease in mice given human or mouse lactoferrin compared with TDM control mice. This report is the first to directly compare the immune modulatory effects of both heterologous recombinant human and homologous mouse lactoferrin on the development of TDM-induced granulomas.

  19. Induced pluripotent stem cells with a pathological mitochondrial DNA deletion

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Anne B. C.; Gagne, Katelyn E.; McLoughlin, Erin M.; Baccei, Anna; Gorman, Bryan; Hartung, Odelya; Miller, Justine D.; Zhang, Jin; Zon, Rebecca L.; Ince, Tan A.; Neufeld, Ellis J.; Lerou, Paul H.; Fleming, Mark D.; Daley, George Q.; Agarwal, Suneet

    2013-01-01

    In congenital mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) disorders, a mixture of normal and mutated mtDNA (termed heteroplasmy) exists at varying levels in different tissues, which determines the severity and phenotypic expression of disease. Pearson marrow pancreas syndrome (PS) is a congenital bone marrow failure disorder caused by heteroplasmic deletions in mtDNA. The cause of the hematopoietic failure in PS is unknown, and adequate cellular and animal models are lacking. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are particularly amenable for studying mtDNA disorders, as cytoplasmic genetic material is retained during direct reprogramming. Here we derive and characterize iPS cells from a patient with PS. Taking advantage of the tendency for heteroplasmy to change with cell passage, we isolated isogenic PS-iPS cells without detectable levels of deleted mtDNA. We found that PS-iPS cells carrying a high burden of deleted mtDNA displayed differences in growth, mitochondrial function, and hematopoietic phenotype when differentiated in vitro, compared to isogenic iPS cells without deleted mtDNA. Our results demonstrate that reprogramming somatic cells from patients with mtDNA disorders can yield pluripotent stem cells with varying burdens of heteroplasmy that might be useful in the study and treatment of mitochondrial diseases. PMID:23400930

  20. Cadmium-Induced Pathologies: Where Is the Oxidative Balance Lost (or Not)?

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Ambily Ravindran; DeGheselle, Olivier; Smeets, Karen; Van Kerkhove, Emmy; Cuypers, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Over the years, anthropogenic factors have led to cadmium (Cd) accumulation in the environment causing various health problems in humans. Although Cd is not a Fenton-like metal, it induces oxidative stress in various animal models via indirect mechanisms. The degree of Cd-induced oxidative stress depends on the dose, duration and frequency of Cd exposure. Also the presence or absence of serum in experimental conditions, type of cells and their antioxidant capacity, as well as the speciation of Cd are important determinants. At the cellular level, the Cd-induced oxidative stress either leads to oxidative damage or activates signal transduction pathways to initiate defence responses. This balance is important on how different organ systems respond to Cd stress and ultimately define the pathological outcome. In this review, we highlight the Cd-induced oxidant/antioxidant status as well as the damage versus signalling scenario in relation to Cd toxicity. Emphasis is addressed to Cd-induced pathologies of major target organs, including a section on cell proliferation and carcinogenesis. Furthermore, attention is paid to Cd-induced oxidative stress in undifferentiated stem cells, which can provide information for future therapies in preventing Cd-induced pathologies. PMID:23507750

  1. Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric pathology: insights from in vivo and ex vivo models

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jonathan M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gastric colonization with Helicobacter pylori induces diverse human pathological conditions, including superficial gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, and gastric adenocarcinoma and its precursors. The treatment of these conditions often relies on the eradication of H. pylori, an intervention that is increasingly difficult to achieve and that does not prevent disease progression in some contexts. There is, therefore, a pressing need to develop new experimental models of H. pylori-associated gastric pathology to support novel drug development in this field. Here, we review the current status of in vivo and ex vivo models of gastric H. pylori colonization, and of Helicobacter-induced gastric pathology, focusing on models of gastric pathology induced by H. pylori, Helicobacter felis and Helicobacter suis in rodents and large animals. We also discuss the more recent development of gastric organoid cultures from murine and human gastric tissue, as well as from human pluripotent stem cells, and the outcomes of H. pylori infection in these systems. PMID:28151409

  2. Diabetes Mellitus Induces Alzheimer's Disease Pathology: Histopathological Evidence from Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Nobuyuki

    2016-04-05

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the major causative disease of dementia and is characterized pathologically by the accumulation of senile plaques (SPs) and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in the brain. Although genetic studies show that β-amyloid protein (Aβ), the major component of SPs, is the key factor underlying AD pathogenesis, it remains unclear why advanced age often leads to AD. Interestingly, several epidemiological and clinical studies show that type II diabetes mellitus (DM) patients are more likely to exhibit increased susceptibility to AD. Moreover, growing evidence suggests that there are several connections between the neuropathology that underlies AD and DM, and there is evidence that the experimental induction of DM can cause cognitive dysfunction, even in rodent animal models. This mini-review summarizes histopathological evidence that DM induces AD pathology in animal models and discusses the possibility that aberrant insulin signaling is a key factor in the induction of AD pathology.

  3. Musculoskeletal Pathology.

    PubMed

    Peat, Frances J; Kawcak, Christopher E

    2015-08-01

    The current understanding of pathology as it relates to common diseases of the equine musculoskeletal system is reviewed. Conditions are organized under the fundamental categories of developmental, exercise-induced, infectious, and miscellaneous pathology. The overview of developmental pathology incorporates the new classification system of juvenile osteochondral conditions. Discussion of exercise-induced pathology emphasizes increased understanding of the contribution of cumulative microdamage caused by repetitive cyclic loading. Miscellaneous musculoskeletal pathology focuses on laminitis, which current knowledge indicates should be regarded as a clinical syndrome with a variety of possible distinct mechanisms of structural failure that are outlined in this overview. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Inflammation induced by infection potentiates tau pathological features in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Sy, Michael; Kitazawa, Masashi; Medeiros, Rodrigo; Whitman, Lucia; Cheng, David; Lane, Thomas E; Laferla, Frank M

    2011-06-01

    Comorbidities that promote the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) remain to be uncovered and evaluated in animal models. Because elderly individuals are vulnerable to viral and bacterial infections, these microbial agents may be considered important comorbidities that could potentiate an already existing and tenuous inflammatory condition in the brain, accelerating cognitive decline, particularly if the cellular and molecular mechanisms can be defined. Researchers have recently demonstrated that triggering inflammation in the brain exacerbates tau pathological characteristics in animal models. Herein, we explore whether inflammation induced via viral infection, compared with inflammation induced via bacterial lipopolysaccharide, modulates AD-like pathological features in the 3xTg-AD mouse model and provide evidence to support the hypothesis that infectious agents may act as a comorbidity for AD. Our study shows that infection-induced acute or chronic inflammation significantly exacerbates tau pathological characteristics, with chronic inflammation leading to impairments in spatial memory. Tau phosphorylation was increased via a glycogen synthase kinase-3β-dependent mechanism, and there was a prominent shift of tau from the detergent-soluble to the detergent-insoluble fraction. During chronic inflammation, we found that inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase-3β activity with lithium reduced tau phosphorylation and the accumulation of insoluble tau and reversed memory impairments. Taken together, infectious agents that trigger central nervous system inflammation may serve as a comorbidity for AD, leading to cognitive impairments by a mechanism that involves exacerbation of tau pathological characteristics. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Amiodarone-induced epididymitis: a pathologically confirmed case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yi; Liu, Hongyun; Cheng, Jianguo; Bu, Peili

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of amiodarone-induced epididymitis and review the pertinent literature. This disease is currently a diagnosis of exclusion and is believed to be self-limiting. We found new evidence for the pathological diagnosis and identified amiodarone-like crystals in the epididymis as a pathological mechanism of this disease. This case also suggests that amiodarone-induced epididymitis is not self-limiting. Continued use of amiodarone according to the current guidelines led to a bilateral epididymectomy. We recommend withdrawal or reduction of amiodarone dosage immediately once the signs and symptoms of epididymitis present in this population of patients. When epididymitis does not seem to be caused by an infection or any other identifiable etiology, this should not be overlooked by the cardiologist, urologist or general practitioner. These findings and recommendations should help reduce the suffering of patients and improve their clinical outcomes.

  6. Dysregulation of prefrontal cortex-mediated slow evolving limbic dynamics drives stress-induced emotional pathology

    PubMed Central

    Hultman, Rainbo; Mague, Stephen D.; Li, Qiang; Katz, Brittany M.; Michel, Nadine; Lin, Lizhen; Wang, Joyce; David, Lisa K.; Blount, Cameron; Chandy, Rithi; Carlson, David; Ulrich, Kyle; Carin, Lawrence; Dunson, David; Kumar, Sunil; Deisseroth, Karl; Moore, Scott D.; Dzirasa, Kafui

    2016-01-01

    Summary Circuits distributed across cortico-limbic brain regions compose the networks that mediate emotional behavior. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) regulates ultraslow (<1Hz) dynamics across these networks, and PFC dysfunction is implicated in stress-related illnesses including major depressive disorder (MDD). To uncover the mechanism whereby stress-induced changes in PFC circuitry alter emotional networks to yield pathology, we used a multi-disciplinary approach including in vivo recordings in mice and chronic social-defeat stress. Our network model, inferred using machine learning, linked stress-induced behavioral pathology to the capacity of PFC to synchronize amygdala and VTA activity. Direct stimulation of PFC-amygdala circuitry with DREADDs normalized PFC-dependent limbic synchrony in stress-susceptible animals and restored normal behavior. In addition to providing insights into MDD mechanisms, our findings demonstrate an interdisciplinary approach that can be used to identify the large-scale network changes that underlie complex emotional pathologies and the specific network nodes that can be used to develop targeted interventions. PMID:27346529

  7. Interleukin-12 inhibits pathological neovascularization in mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yedi; Yoshida, Shigeo; Kubo, Yuki; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Nakama, Takahito; Yamaguchi, Muneo; Ishikawa, Keijiro; Nakao, Shintaro; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Sonoda, Koh-Hei

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-induced retinal neovascularization is a major pathological condition in many vision-threatening diseases. In the present study, we determined whether interleukin (IL)-12, a cytokine that regulates angiogenesis, plays a role in the neovascularization in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). We found that the expressions of the mRNAs of both IL-12p35 and IL-12p40 were significantly reduced in the OIR retinas compared to that of the room air-raised control. The sizes of the avascular areas and neovascular tufts were larger in IL-12p40 knock-out (KO) mice than that in wild type (WT) mice. In addition, an intravitreal injection of recombinant IL-12 reduced both avascular areas and neovascular tufts. IL-12 injection enhanced the expressions of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and other downstream chemokines. In an in vitro system, IL-12 had no significant effect on tube formation of human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRECs). Moreover, a blockade of IFN-γ suppressed the inhibitory effect of IL-12 on pathological neovascularization. These results suggest that IL-12 plays important roles in inhibiting pathological retinal neovascularization. PMID:27312090

  8. Nerol alleviates pathologic markers in the oxazolone-induced colitis model.

    PubMed

    González-Ramírez, Adriana Estrella; González-Trujano, María Eva; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra A; Alvarado-Vásquez, Noé; López-Muñoz, Francisco Javier

    2016-04-05

    Nerol is a natural monoterpene with antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties. Its possible beneficial effects in ulcerative colitis and its corresponding mechanism of action have not been determined to date. The aim of this study was to investigate whether nerol prevents the appearance of pathological markers and hyperalgesia in oxazolone-induced colitis, and protects against gastric damage produced by ethanol. The experimental design included groups of oxazolone-treated mice receiving nerol at 10-300 mg/kg, p.o., or a reference drug (sulfasalazine, 100 mg/kg, p.o.) compared to sham and untreated groups. Gastric damage was evaluated in the absolute ethanol-induced ulcer model in rats. Variables measured in animals with oxazolone-induced colitis included weight loss, stool consistency and macroscopic colon damage; mechanical nociception was determined by the use of von Frey filaments, whereas levels of inflammatory cytokines were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Nerol (30-300 mg/kg, p.o.) prevented or significantly decreased the pathological alterations observed in the oxazolone- induced colitis model. It also showed antinociceptive effects and reduced the increased levels of inflammatory cytokines (IL-13 and TNF-α). Gastric damage was also prevented starting at 10 mg/kg, p.o. In conclusion, our results provide evidence for a beneficial effect of nerol after colitis induction involving tissue protection, antinociception and modulation of the immunological system, suggesting the therapeutic potential of this monoterpene as a novel alternative in controlling ulcerative colitis.

  9. Iron Deposition Leads to Neuronal α-Synuclein Pathology by Inducing Autophagy Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Wenbin; Jin, Lirong; Wang, Zigao; Wang, Lingyan; Fei, Guoqiang; Ye, Fanlong; Pan, Xiaoli; Wang, Changpeng; Zhong, Chunjiu

    2017-01-01

    Growing evidence has indicated that iron deposition in the substantia nigra plays an important role in Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, the underlying mechanism is still elusive. Using primary dopaminergic neurons and SH-SY5Y cells cultured in vitro, we observed that iron loading increased α-synuclein and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in these cells but did not affect the intracellular α-synuclein mRNA levels. Furthermore, iron loading significantly downregulated Beclin-1 levels and decreased the ratio of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 isoforms (LC3 II/LC3 I). However, a significant change in the levels of autophagy-related gene 5 (Atg5) was not observed in either neurons or SH-SY5Y cells after iron treatment. After treatment with rapamycin, the iron loading-induced increase in the α-synuclein level was significantly reversed and ROS generation was alleviated in both cultured neurons and SH-SY5Y cells. These results indicate that the inhibition of autophagy is critical for the pathological alterations in α-synuclein induced by iron loading. Moreover, treatment with vitamin E did not affect the increase in the α-synuclein levels but significantly eliminated the iron-induced ROS production. Together, our study shows that autophagy dysfunction contributes to iron-induced α-synuclein pathology. PMID:28138322

  10. Iron Deposition Leads to Neuronal α-Synuclein Pathology by Inducing Autophagy Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wan, Wenbin; Jin, Lirong; Wang, Zigao; Wang, Lingyan; Fei, Guoqiang; Ye, Fanlong; Pan, Xiaoli; Wang, Changpeng; Zhong, Chunjiu

    2017-01-01

    Growing evidence has indicated that iron deposition in the substantia nigra plays an important role in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the underlying mechanism is still elusive. Using primary dopaminergic neurons and SH-SY5Y cells cultured in vitro, we observed that iron loading increased α-synuclein and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in these cells but did not affect the intracellular α-synuclein mRNA levels. Furthermore, iron loading significantly downregulated Beclin-1 levels and decreased the ratio of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 isoforms (LC3 II/LC3 I). However, a significant change in the levels of autophagy-related gene 5 (Atg5) was not observed in either neurons or SH-SY5Y cells after iron treatment. After treatment with rapamycin, the iron loading-induced increase in the α-synuclein level was significantly reversed and ROS generation was alleviated in both cultured neurons and SH-SY5Y cells. These results indicate that the inhibition of autophagy is critical for the pathological alterations in α-synuclein induced by iron loading. Moreover, treatment with vitamin E did not affect the increase in the α-synuclein levels but significantly eliminated the iron-induced ROS production. Together, our study shows that autophagy dysfunction contributes to iron-induced α-synuclein pathology.

  11. TLR and NKG2D Signaling Pathways Mediate CS-Induced Pulmonary Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Wortham, Brian W.; Eppert, Bryan L.; Flury, Jennifer L.; Morgado Garcia, Sara; Borchers, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) can have deleterious effects on lung epithelial cells including cell death and the initiation of inflammatory responses. CS-induced cell injury can elaborate cell surface signals and cellular byproducts that stimulate immune system surveillance. Our previous work has shown that the expression of ligands for the cytotoxic lymphocyte activating receptor NKG2D is enhanced in patients with COPD and that the induction of these ligands in a mouse model can replicate COPD pathologies. Here, we extend these findings to demonstrate a role for the NKG2D receptor in CS-induced pathophysiology and provide evidence linking nucleic acid-sensing endosomal toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling to COPD pathology through NKG2D activation. Specifically, we show that mice deficient in NKG2D exhibit attenuated pulmonary inflammation and airspace enlargement in a model of CS-induced emphysema. Additionally, we show that CS exposure induces the release of free nucleic acids in the bronchoalveolar lavage and that direct exposure of mouse lung epithelial cells to cigarette smoke extract similarly induces functional nucleic acids as assessed by TLR3, 7, and 9 reporter cell lines. We demonstrate that exposure of mouse lung epithelial cells to TLR ligands stimulates the surface expression of RAET1, a ligand for NKG2D, and that mice deficient in TLR3/7/9 receptor signaling do not exhibit CS-induced NK cell hyperresponsiveness and airspace enlargement. The findings indicate that CS-induced airway injury stimulates TLR signaling by endogenous nucleic acids leading to elevated NKG2D ligand expression. Activation of these pathways plays a major role in the altered NK cell function, pulmonary inflammation and remodeling related to long-term CS exposure. PMID:24130907

  12. N-CAM exhibits a regulatory function in pathological angiogenesis in oxygen induced retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, Joakim; Ståhlberg, Anders; Wolfhagen Sand, Fredrik; Gerhardt, Holger; Semb, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy and retinopathy of prematurity are diseases caused by pathological angiogenesis in the retina as a consequence of local hypoxia. The underlying mechanism for epiretinal neovascularization (tuft formation), which contributes to blindness, has yet to be identified. Neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) is expressed by Müller cells and astrocytes, which are in close contact with the retinal vasculature, during normal developmental angiogenesis. Notably, during oxygen induced retinopathy (OIR) N-CAM accumulated on astrocytes surrounding the epiretinal tufts. Here, we show that N-CAM ablation results in reduced vascular tuft formation due to reduced endothelial cell proliferation despite an elevation in VEGFA mRNA expression, whereas retinal developmental angiogenesis was unaffected. We conclude that N-CAM exhibits a regulatory function in pathological angiogenesis in OIR. This is a novel finding that can be of clinical relevance in diseases associated with proliferative vasculopathy.

  13. N-CAM Exhibits a Regulatory Function in Pathological Angiogenesis in Oxygen Induced Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Håkansson, Joakim; Ståhlberg, Anders; Wolfhagen Sand, Fredrik; Gerhardt, Holger; Semb, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Background Diabetic retinopathy and retinopathy of prematurity are diseases caused by pathological angiogenesis in the retina as a consequence of local hypoxia. The underlying mechanism for epiretinal neovascularization (tuft formation), which contributes to blindness, has yet to be identified. Neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) is expressed by Müller cells and astrocytes, which are in close contact with the retinal vasculature, during normal developmental angiogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings Notably, during oxygen induced retinopathy (OIR) N-CAM accumulated on astrocytes surrounding the epiretinal tufts. Here, we show that N-CAM ablation results in reduced vascular tuft formation due to reduced endothelial cell proliferation despite an elevation in VEGFA mRNA expression, whereas retinal developmental angiogenesis was unaffected. Conclusion/Significance We conclude that N-CAM exhibits a regulatory function in pathological angiogenesis in OIR. This is a novel finding that can be of clinical relevance in diseases associated with proliferative vasculopathy. PMID:22043302

  14. Selective white matter pathology induces a specific impairment in spatial working memory.

    PubMed

    Coltman, Robin; Spain, Aisling; Tsenkina, Yanina; Fowler, Jill H; Smith, Jessica; Scullion, Gillian; Allerhand, Mike; Scott, Fiona; Kalaria, Rajesh N; Ihara, Masafumi; Daumas, Stephanie; Deary, Ian J; Wood, Emma; McCulloch, James; Horsburgh, Karen

    2011-12-01

    The integrity of the white matter is critical in regulating efficient neuronal communication and maintaining cognitive function. Damage to brain white matter putatively contributes to age-related cognitive decline. There is a growing interest in animal models from which the mechanistic basis of white matter pathology in aging can be elucidated but to date there has been a lack of systematic behavior and pathology in the same mice. Anatomically widespread, diffuse white matter damage was induced, in 3 different cohorts of C57Bl/6J mice, by chronic hypoperfusion produced by bilateral carotid stenosis. A comprehensive assessment of spatial memory (spatial reference learning and memory; cohort 1) and serial spatial learning and memory (cohort 2) using the water maze, and spatial working memory (cohort 3) using the 8-arm radial arm maze, was conducted. In parallel, a systematic assessment of white matter components (myelin, axon, glia) was conducted using immunohistochemical markers (myelin-associated glycoprotein [MAG], degraded myelin basic protein [dMBP], anti-amyloid precursor protein [APP], anti-ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule [Iba-1]). Ischemic neuronal perikarya damage, assessed using histology (hematoxylin and eosin; H&E), was absent in all shams but was present in some hypoperfused mice (2/11 in cohort 1, 4/14 in cohort 2, and 17/24 in cohort 3). All animals with neuronal perikaryal damage were excluded from further study. Diffuse white matter damage occurred, throughout the brain, in all hypoperfused mice in each cohort and was essentially absent in sham-operated controls. There was a selective impairment in spatial working memory, with all other measures of spatial memory remaining intact, in hypoperfused mice with selective white matter damage. The results demonstrate that diffuse white matter pathology, in the absence of gray matter damage, induces a selective impairment of spatial working memory. This highlights the importance of assessing

  15. Human isolates of Bartonella tamiae induce pathology in experimentally inoculated immunocompetent mice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Bartonella tamiae, a newly described bacterial species, was isolated from the blood of three hospitalized patients in Thailand. These patients presented with headache, myalgia, anemia, and mild liver function abnormalities. Since B. tamiae was presumed to be the cause of their illness, these isolates were inoculated into immunocompetent mice to determine their relative pathogenicity in inducing manifestations of disease and pathology similar to that observed in humans. Methods Three groups of four Swiss Webster female mice aged 15-18 months were each inoculated with 106-7 colony forming units of one of three B. tamiae isolates [Th239, Th307, and Th339]. A mouse from each experimental group was sampled at 3, 4, 5 and 6 weeks post-inoculation. Two saline inoculated age-matched controls were included in the study. Samples collected at necropsy were evaluated for the presence of B. tamiae DNA, and tissues were formalin-fixed, stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and examined for histopathology. Results Following inoculation with B. tamiae, mice developed ulcerative skin lesions and subcutaneous masses on the lateral thorax, as well as axillary and inguinal lymphadenopathy. B. tamiae DNA was found in subcutaneous masses, lymph node, and liver of inoculated mice. Histopathological changes were observed in tissues of inoculated mice, and severity of lesions correlated with the isolate inoculated, with the most severe pathology induced by B. tamiae Th239. Mice inoculated with Th239 and Th339 demonstrated myocarditis, lymphadenitis with associated vascular necrosis, and granulomatous hepatitis and nephritis with associated hepatocellular and renal necrosis. Mice inoculated with Th307 developed a deep dermatitis and granulomas within the kidneys. Conclusions The three isolates of B. tamiae evaluated in this study induce disease in immunocompetent Swiss Webster mice up to 6 weeks after inoculation. The human patients from whom these isolates were obtained had

  16. Platelets play an important role in TNF-induced microvascular endothelial cell pathology.

    PubMed Central

    Lou, J.; Donati, Y. R.; Juillard, P.; Giroud, C.; Vesin, C.; Mili, N.; Grau, G. E.

    1997-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) is known to be an important mediator in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases. Vascular endothelial cells represent a major target of TNF effects. Platelet sequestration has been found in brain microvessels during experimental cerebral malaria and lung in experimental pulmonary fibrosis, implying that it may participate in TNF-dependent microvascular pathology. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of platelet-endothelial interaction, using co-cultures between platelets and TNF-activated mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs). Adhesion and fusion of platelets to MVECs was evidenced by electron microscopy, dye transfer, and flow cytometry. It was induced by TNF and interferon-gamma and depended on LFA-1 expressed on the platelet surface and ICAM-1 expressed on MVECs. The adhesion and fusion also led to the transfer of platelet markers on the MVEC surface, rendering these more adherent for leukocytes, and to an enhanced MVEC sensitivity to TNF-induced injury. These results suggest that platelets can participate in TNF-induced microvascular pathology. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:9358766

  17. Time-Dependent Progression of Demyelination and Axonal Pathology in MP4-Induced Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Stormanns, Eva R.; Recks, Mascha S.; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by inflammation, demyelination and axonal pathology. Myelin basic protein/proteolipid protein (MBP-PLP) fusion protein MP4 is capable of inducing chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in susceptible mouse strains mirroring diverse histopathological and immunological hallmarks of MS. Limited availability of human tissue underscores the importance of animal models to study the pathology of MS. Methods Twenty-two female C57BL/6 (B6) mice were immunized with MP4 and the clinical development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was observed. Methylene blue-stained semi-thin and ultra-thin sections of the lumbar spinal cord were assessed at the peak of acute EAE, three months (chronic EAE) and six months after onset of EAE (long-term EAE). The extent of lesional area and inflammation were analyzed in semi-thin sections on a light microscopic level. The magnitude of demyelination and axonal damage were determined using electron microscopy. Emphasis was put on the ventrolateral tract (VLT) of the spinal cord. Results B6 mice demonstrated increasing demyelination and severe axonal pathology in the course of MP4-induced EAE. In addition, mitochondrial swelling and a decrease in the nearest neighbor neurofilament distance (NNND) as early signs of axonal damage were evident with the onset of EAE. In semi-thin sections we observed the maximum of lesional area in the chronic state of EAE while inflammation was found to a similar extent in acute and chronic EAE. In contrast to the well-established myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) model, disease stages of MP4-induced EAE could not be distinguished by assessing the extent of parenchymal edema or the grade of inflammation. Conclusions Our results complement our previous ultrastructural studies of B6 EAE models and suggest that B6 mice immunized with different antigens constitute

  18. Time-Dependent Progression of Demyelination and Axonal Pathology in MP4-Induced Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Prinz, Johanna; Karacivi, Aylin; Stormanns, Eva R; Recks, Mascha S; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by inflammation, demyelination and axonal pathology. Myelin basic protein/proteolipid protein (MBP-PLP) fusion protein MP4 is capable of inducing chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in susceptible mouse strains mirroring diverse histopathological and immunological hallmarks of MS. Lack of human tissue underscores the importance of animal models to study the pathology of MS. Twenty-two female C57BL/6 (B6) mice were immunized with MP4 and the clinical development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was observed. Methylene blue-stained semi-thin and ultra-thin sections of the lumbar spinal cord were assessed at the peak of acute EAE, three months (chronic EAE) and six months after onset of EAE (long-term EAE). The extent of lesional area and inflammation were analyzed in semi-thin sections on a light microscopic level. The magnitude of demyelination and axonal damage were determined using electron microscopy. Emphasis was put on the ventrolateral tract (VLT) of the spinal cord. B6 mice demonstrated increasing demyelination and severe axonal pathology in the course of MP4-induced EAE. Additionally, mitochondrial swelling and a decrease in the nearest neighbor neurofilament distance (NNND) as early signs of axonal damage were evident with the onset of EAE. In semi-thin sections we observed the maximum of lesional area in the chronic state of EAE while inflammation was found to a similar extent in acute and chronic EAE. In contrast to the well-established myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) model, disease stages of MP4-induced EAE could not be distinguished by assessing the extent of parenchymal edema or the grade of inflammation. Our results complement our previous ultrastructural studies of B6 EAE models and suggest that B6 mice immunized with different antigens constitute useful instruments to study the diverse histopathological

  19. Muscle contracture emulating system for studying artificially induced pathological gait in intact individuals.

    PubMed

    Olensek, Andrej; Matjacic, Zlatko; Bajd, Tadej

    2005-11-01

    When studying pathological gait it is important to correctly identify primary gait anomalies originating from damage to the central nervous and musculoskeletal system and separate them from compensatory changes of gait pattern, which is often challenging due to the lack of knowledge related to biomechanics of pathological gait. A mechanical system consisting of specially designed trousers, special shoe arrangement, and elastic ropes attached to selected locations on the trousers and shoes is proposed to allow emulation of muscle contractures of soleus (SOL) and gastrocnemius (GAS) muscles and both SOL-GAS. The main objective of this study was to evaluate and compare gait variability as recorded in normal gait and when being constrained with the proposed system. Six neurologically and orthopedically intact volunteers walked along a 7-m walkway while gait kinematics and kinetics were recorded using VICON motion analysis system and two AMTI forceplates. Statistical analysis of coefficient of variation of kinematics and kinetics as recorded in normal walking and during the most constrained SOL-GAS condition showed comparable gait variability. Inspection of resulting group averaged gait patterns revealed considerable resemblance to a selected clinical example of spastic diplegia, indicating that the proposed mechanical system potentially represents a novel method for studying emulated pathological gait arising from artificially induced muscle contractures in neurologically intact individuals.

  20. The Use of Recently Developed Histochemical Markers for Localizing Neurotoxicant Induced Regional Brain Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Sumit; Raymick, James; Schmued, Larry C.

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal and vascular brain components are interrelated morphologically, physiologically and developmentally. Due to this close interrelationship, it is often difficult to understand the cause and effect relationship between neuronal vs. vascular dysfunction and pathology. This review will discuss four of the more promising recent developments for detecting vascular pathology, and will compare them with the labeling pattern seen with markers of glial and neuronal pathology; following exposure to well characterized neurotoxicants. To detect the vascular dysfunction in the brain, we recently developed a Fluoro-Turquoise gelatin conjugate (FT-gel), a fluorescent probe that helps to delineate between healthy vs. sclerotic vessels. Similarly, we have investigated the potential for Fluoro-Gold to label in vivo all the endothelial cells in the brain as they co-localize with RECA, an endothelial cell marker. We have also developed Amylo-Glo, a fluorescent tracer that can detect neurotoxic A-beta aggregates in the brain. In this article, we will discuss the potential use of these novel histochemical markers to study the neurotoxicant induced brain. We will also discuss neurovascular strategies that may offer novel therapeutic opportunities for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24763333

  1. Capsaicin ameliorates stress-induced Alzheimer's disease-like pathological and cognitive impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xia; Jia, Lin-Wei; Li, Xiao-Hong; Cheng, Xiang-Shu; Xie, Jia-Zhao; Ma, Zhi-Wei; Xu, Wei-Jie; Liu, Yue; Yao, Yun; Du, Lai-Ling; Zhou, Xin-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Hyperphosphorylated tau aggregated into neurofibrillary tangles is a hallmark lesion of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is linked to synaptic and cognitive impairments. In animal models, cold water stress (CWS) can cause cognitive disorder and tau hyperphosphorylation. Capsaicin (CAP), a specific TRPV1 agonist, is neuroprotective against stress-induced impairment, but the detailed mechanisms are still elusive. Here, we investigated whether CAP mitigates CWS-induced cognitive and AD-like pathological alterations in rats. The animals were administered CAP (10 mg/kg in 0.2 ml, 0.1% ethanol) or a control (0.2 ml normal saline, 0.1% ethanol) by intragastric infusion 1 h before CWS treatment. Our results showed that CAP significantly attenuated CWS-induced spatial memory impairment and suppression of PP-DG long-term potentiation; CAP abolished CWS-induced dendritic regression and enhanced several memory-associated proteins decreased by CWS, such as synapsin I and PSD93; CAP also prevented CWS-induced tau hyperphosphorylation by abolishing inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A. Taken together, this study demonstrated that activation of TRPV1 can mitigate CWS-induced AD-like neuropathological alterations and cognitive impairment and may be a promising target for therapeutic intervention in AD.

  2. Seeding induced by alpha-synuclein oligomers provides evidence for spreading of alpha-synuclein pathology.

    PubMed

    Danzer, Karin M; Krebs, Simon K; Wolff, Michael; Birk, Gerald; Hengerer, Bastian

    2009-10-01

    Lewy bodies, alpha-synuclein (alpha-syn) immunopositive intracellular deposits, are the pathological hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD). Interestingly, Lewybody-like structures have been identified in fetal tissue grafts about one decade after transplantation into the striatum of PD patients. One possible explanation for the accelerated deposition of alpha-syn in the graft is that the aggregation of alpha-syn from the host tissue to the graft is spread by a prion disease-like mechanism. We discuss here an in vitro model which might recapitulate some aspects of disease propagation in PD. We found here that in vitro-generated alpha-syn oligomers induce transmembrane seeding of alpha-syn aggregation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This effect was observed in primary neuronal cultures as well as in neuronal cell lines. The seeding oligomers were characterized by a distinctive lithium dodecyl sulfate-stable oligomer pattern and could be generated in a dynamic process out of pore-forming oligomers. We propose that alpha-syn oligomers form as a dynamic mixture of oligomer types with different properties and that alpha-syn oligomers can be converted into different types depending on the brain milieu conditions. Our data indicate that extracellular alpha-syn oligomers can induce intracellular alpha-syn aggregation, therefore we hypothesize that a similar mechanism might lead to alpha-syn pathology propagation.

  3. Pathological Analysis of the Ruptured Vascular Wall of Hypoperfusion-induced Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Kugo, Hirona; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Tanaka, Hiroki; Hashimoto, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Chie; Sawaragi, Ayaka; Urano, Tetsumei; Unno, Naoki; Moriyama, Tatsuya

    2017-04-04

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a vascular disease that results in the gradual dilation of the abdominal aorta and has a high rupture-related mortality rate. However, the mechanism of AAA rupture remains unknown. In our previous study, we established a novel AAA animal model (hypoperfusion-induced AAA rat model) with spontaneous AAA rupture. Using the hypoperfusion-induced AAA rat model, we demonstrated that the abnormal appearance of adipocytes in the vascular wall is associated with AAA rupture. However, pathological analysis of the rupture area has not been performed because it is particularly difficult to identify the rupture point. In this study, we succeeded in obtaining samples from the rupture point and performed a histological analysis of the ruptured area in the vascular wall in the hypoperfusion-induced AAA rat model. Adipocytes were observed along the AAA-ruptured area of the vascular wall. In the areas around the adipocytes, macrophage infiltration and protein levels of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 were significantly increased and collagen-positive areas were significantly decreased, as compared with areas without adipocytes. The AAA diameter was correlated with the number of adipocytes in the vascular wall of the hypoperfusion-induced AAA rat model. On the other hand, serum triglyceride levels and serum total cholesterol levels were not correlated with the number of adipocytes in the vascular wall. These results suggest that local adipocyte accumulation in the vascular wall, not serum lipids, has an important role in AAA rupture.

  4. Frequency and Pathological Characteristics of Drug-Induced Liver Injury in a Tertiary Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Ettel, Mark; Gonzalez, Gabriel Acosta; Gera, Shweta; Eze, Ogechukwu; Sigal, Samuel; Park, James S; Xu, Ruliang

    2017-09-02

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) accounts for approximately 10% of acute hepatitis cases. DILI can arise as idiosyncratic or intrinsic injury from hundreds of drugs, herbals, and nutritional supplements and is essential to recognize as one of the differential diagnoses of hepatitis in a liver biopsy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the frequency and pathological characteristics of DILI related to the variety of hepatotoxic agents. We searched our pathology database for all patients with hepatitis diagnosed on liver biopsy from January 2012 to May 2016, and selected patients with a diagnosis of DILI. Electronic medical records were reviewed for patient medication list, history of herbal medicine or supplement use, and pre-biopsy liver function test (LFT) results. Clinical and pathologic correlation was used to determine the causative or related agents for DILI. We then assessed histopathologic features of liver injury and categorized biopsy findings as primarily bile duct injury, lobular/portal hepatitis, or mixed changes. 604 total liver biopsies for hepatitis or liver injury were identified, of which 70 cases (11.6%) carried the diagnosis of DILI confirmed by clinical correlation. The most common etiologies associated with DILI were supplements and herbal products (31.4%), antimicrobials (14.3%), chemotherapeutics (11.4%), antilipidemics (7.1%) and immunomodulatory agents (7.1%). LFT results positively correlated with histological findings. Nutritional/herbal supplements have emerged as one of the major hepatotoxicity agents. DILI can manifest as predominantly hepatitis, bile duct injury or combination. Histological pattern recognition in the liver biopsy may help identify specific hepatotoxic agents causing DILI. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Impaired GAPDH-induced mitophagy contributes to the pathology of Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sunhee; Disatnik, Marie-Hélène; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in multiple neurodegenerative diseases. In order to maintain a healthy population of functional mitochondria in cells, defective mitochondria must be properly eliminated by lysosomal machinery in a process referred to as mitophagy. Here, we uncover a new molecular mechanism underlying mitophagy driven by glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) under the pathological condition of Huntington’s disease (HD) caused by expansion of polyglutamine repeats. Expression of expanded polyglutamine tracts catalytically inactivates GAPDH (iGAPDH), which triggers its selective association with damaged mitochondria in several cell culture models of HD. Through this mechanism, iGAPDH serves as a signaling molecule to induce direct engulfment of damaged mitochondria into lysosomes (micro-mitophagy). However, abnormal interaction of mitochondrial GAPDH with long polyglutamine tracts stalled GAPDH-mediated mitophagy, leading to accumulation of damaged mitochondria, and increased cell death. We further demonstrated that overexpression of inactive GAPDH rescues this blunted process and enhances mitochondrial function and cell survival, indicating a role for GAPDH-driven mitophagy in the pathology of HD. PMID:26268247

  6. Plasmalogens participate in very-long-chain fatty acid-induced pathology.

    PubMed

    Brites, Pedro; Mooyer, Petra A W; El Mrabet, Leila; Waterham, Hans R; Wanders, Ronald J A

    2009-02-01

    Peroxisomes are organelles responsible for multiple metabolic pathways including, the biosynthesis of plasmalogens, a class of phospholipids, and the beta-oxidation of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA). Lack of peroxisomes or dysfunction in any of their normal functions is the cellular basis for human peroxisomal disorders. Here we used mouse models to understand and define the biochemical and cellular determinants that mediate the pathophysiological consequences caused by peroxisomal dysfunctions. We investigated the role and effects of cellular plasmalogens and VLCFA accumulation in liver, testis and nervous tissue using Pex7 and Abcd1 knockout (KO) mice. In addition, we also generated a Pex7:Abcd1 double KO mouse to investigate how different peroxisomal dysfunctions modulate cellular function and pathology. We found that plasmalogens function as fundamental structural phospholipids and protect cells from damage caused by VLCFA accumulation. In testis, plasmalogens protect spermatocytes from VLCFA-induced degeneration and apoptosis. In nervous tissue, we found that gliosis, inflammatory demyelination and axonopathy caused by accumulation of VLCFA are modulated by plasmalogens. Our findings demonstrate the importance of normal peroxisomal functioning and allow the understanding of the pathological causality of peroxisomal dysfunctions. Nervous tissue deficient in plasmalogens is more prone to damage, illustrating the importance of plasmalogens in peroxisomal disorders including Zellweger syndrome and X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

  7. Blast-Induced Color Change in Photonic Crystals Corresponds with Brain Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, D. Kacy; Browne, Kevin D.; Xu, Yongan; Adeeb, Saleena; Wolf, John A.; McCarron, Richard M.; Yang, Shu; Chavko, Mikulas

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A high incidence of blast exposure is a 21st century reality in counter-insurgency warfare. However, thresholds for closed-head blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) remain unknown. Moreover, without objective information about relative blast exposure, warfighters with bTBI may not receive appropriate medical care and may remain in harm's way. Accordingly, we have engineered a blast injury dosimeter (BID) using a photonic crystalline material that changes color following blast exposure. The photonic crystals are fabricated using SU-8 via multi-beam interference laser lithography. The final BID is similar in appearance to an array of small colored stickers that may be affixed to uniforms or helmets in multiple locations. Although durable under normal conditions, the photonic crystalline micro- and nano-structure are precisely altered by blast to create a color change. These BIDs were evaluated using a rat model of bTBI, for which blast shockwave exposure was generated via a compressed air-driven shock tube. With prototype BID arrays affixed to the animals, we found that BID color changes corresponded with subtle brain pathologies, including neuronal degeneration and reactive astrocytosis. These subtle changes were most notable in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, and cerebellum. These data demonstrate the feasibility of using a materials-based, power-free colorimetric BID as the first self-contained blast sensor calibrated to correspond with brain pathology. PMID:22082449

  8. Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG) Attenuates TNF-induced Pathologic Bone Resorption and Suppresses Osteoclastogenesis by Inducing A20 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Sehwan; Bae, Seyeon; Murata, Koichi; Ivashkiv, Lionel B.; Park-Min, Kyung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Investigations on the therapeutic effects of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) have focused on the suppression of autoantibody- and immune complex-mediated inflammatory pathogenesis. Inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis are often accompanied by excessive bone erosion but the effect of IVIG on osteoclasts, bone-resorbing cells, has not been studied. Here, we investigate whether IVIG directly regulates osteoclast differentiation and has therapeutic potential for suppressing osteoclast-mediated pathologic bone resorption. IVIG or cross-linking of Fcγ receptors with plate-bound IgG suppressed receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis and expression of osteoclast-related genes such as integrin β3 and cathepsin K in a dose-dependent manner. Mechanistically, IVIG or plate-bound IgG suppressed osteoclastogenesis by downregulating RANKL-induced expression of NFATC1, the master regulator of osteoclastogenesis. IVIG suppressed NFATC1 expression by attenuating RANKL-induced NF-κB signaling, explained in part by induction of the inflammatory signaling inhibitor A20. IVIG administration attenuated in vivo osteoclastogenesis and suppressed bone resorption in the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced calvarial osteolysis model. Our findings show that, in addition to suppressing inflammation, IVIG directly inhibits osteoclastogenesis through a mechanism involving suppression of RANK signaling. Direct suppression of osteoclast differentiation may provide beneficial effects on preserving bone mass when IVIG is used to treat rheumatic disorders. PMID:26189496

  9. Increased 4R-Tau Induces Pathological Changes in a Human-Tau Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Schoch, Kathleen M; DeVos, Sarah L; Miller, Rebecca L; Chun, Seung J; Norrbom, Michaela; Wozniak, David F; Dawson, Hana N; Bennett, C Frank; Rigo, Frank; Miller, Timothy M

    2016-06-01

    Pathological evidence for selective four-repeat (4R) tau deposition in certain dementias and exon 10-positioned MAPT mutations together suggest a 4R-specific role in causing disease. However, direct assessments of 4R toxicity have not yet been accomplished in vivo. Increasing 4R-tau expression without change to total tau in human tau-expressing mice induced more severe seizures and nesting behavior abnormality, increased tau phosphorylation, and produced a shift toward oligomeric tau. Exon 10 skipping could also be accomplished in vivo, providing support for a 4R-tau targeted approach to target 4R-tau toxicity and, in cases of primary MAPT mutation, eliminate the disease-causing mutation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cellular and chemokine-mediated regulation in schistosome-induced hepatic pathology.

    PubMed

    Chuah, Candy; Jones, Malcolm K; Burke, Melissa L; McManus, Donald P; Gobert, Geoffrey N

    2014-03-01

    In hepatic schistosomiasis, pathology arises when schistosome eggs become lodged in the host liver, evoking an interleukin 4 (IL-4)- and IL-13-mediated dominant CD4(+) Th2 immune response. This response leads to the development of granulomas and fibrosis, with eosinophils, neutrophils, macrophages, hepatic stellate cells, and lymphocytes all identified as major cellular contributors to these events. This review outlines the cellular and molecular mechanisms of hepatic schistosomiasis, with an emphasis on the major cellular components and their release of chemokines. The differences between Schistosoma mansoni- and Schistosoma japonicum-induced hepatic granuloma are also discussed. This comprehensive overview of the processes associated with hepatic schistosomiasis may provide new insights into improved treatment for both schistosomiasis and other granulofibrotic diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Lithium prevents long-term neural and behavioral pathology induced by early alcohol exposure.

    PubMed

    Sadrian, B; Subbanna, S; Wilson, D A; Basavarajappa, B S; Saito, M

    2012-03-29

    Fetal alcohol exposure can cause developmental defects in offspring known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). FASD symptoms range from obvious facial deformities to changes in neuroanatomy and neurophysiology that disrupt normal brain function and behavior. Ethanol exposure at postnatal day 7 in C57BL/6 mice induces neuronal cell death and long-lasting neurobehavioral dysfunction. Previous work has demonstrated that early ethanol exposure impairs spatial memory task performance into adulthood and perturbs local and interregional brain circuit integrity in the olfacto-hippocampal pathway. Here we pursue these findings to examine whether lithium prevents anatomical, neurophysiological, and behavioral pathologies that result from early ethanol exposure. Lithium has neuroprotective properties that have been shown to prevent ethanol-induced apoptosis. Here we show that mice co-treated with lithium on the same day as ethanol exposure exhibit dramatically reduced acute neurodegeneration in the hippocampus and retain hippocampal-dependent spatial memory as adults. Lithium co-treatment also blocked ethanol-induced disruption in synaptic plasticity in slice recordings of hippocampal CA1 in the adult mouse brain. Moreover, long-lasting dysfunctions caused by ethanol in olfacto-hippocampal networks, including sensory-evoked oscillations and resting state coherence, were prevented in mice co-treated with lithium. Together, these results provide behavioral and physiological evidence that lithium is capable of preventing or reducing immediate and long-term deleterious consequences of early ethanol exposure on brain function. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of interferon-gamma in interleukin 12-induced pathology in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Car, B. D.; Eng, V. M.; Schnyder, B.; LeHir, M.; Shakhov, A. N.; Woerly, G.; Huang, S.; Aguet, M.; Anderson, T. D.; Ryffel, B.

    1995-01-01

    Interleukin 12 (IL-12) activates natural killer (NK) and T cells with the secondary synthesis and release of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and other cytokines. IL-12-induced organ alterations are reported for mice and the pathogenetic role of IFN-gamma is investigated by the use of mice deficient in the IFN-gamma receptor (IFN-gamma R-/-). IL-12 caused a rapid infiltration of liver and splenic red pulp with activated macrophages; this and increased NK cells resulted in a fivefold increase of splenic weight in wild-type mice. Splenomegaly was associated with myelosuppression and decreasing peripheral leukocyte counts. IL-12-induced changes in wild-type mice were associated with markedly increased IFN-gamma serum levels and up-regulation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II expression in various epithelia. IL-12 induced a qualitatively similar macrophage infiltration in IFN-gamma R-/- mice, less marked splenomegaly (to 2 x normal), and no MHC upregulation. Strikingly increased vascular endothelial intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression was apparent in both IFN-gamma R-/- and IFN-gamma R+/+ mice. Restricted to mutant mice was a severe, invariably lethal, interstitial, and perivascular pulmonary macrophage infiltration with diffuse pulmonary edema. Extensive quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed an increase of only IL-6 and IL-10 pulmonary gene transcripts in IFN-gamma R-/- mice compared with wild-type mice. IL-12-induced myelosuppression is due to IFN-gamma-release from NK cells and T cells, and is associated with macrophage activation and distinct MHC class I and II antigen upregulation. The pulmonary pathology in IFN-gamma R-/- mice, however, reveals a toxic potential for IL-12 and suggests that endogenous IFN-gamma plays a protective role in preventing fatal pulmonary disease in these mice. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:7495294

  13. [Cryobiology and pathologic lesions induced by freezing-thawing processes in prostatic tissue. Second part].

    PubMed

    Escudero Barrilero, Angel; Arias Fúnez, Fernando; Patrón Rodríguez, Rafael Rodríguez; García González, Ricardo; Cuesta Roca, Carmen

    2004-12-01

    Cryosurgery is an emerging technology consisting on controlled freezing of tissues. Good results, maintained in the long-term, have been referred in the treatment of prostate adenocarcinoma. A role as possible substitute of partial nephrectomy in the treatment of renal adenocarcinomas smaller than 4-5 cm is under research. There is no discussion that freezing destroys cellular machinery and triggers several events the final result of which is cell death by necrosis and apoptosis. The decrease of temperature makes extracellular liquid crystallize and creates a hyperosmotic environment, which induces water to go out of the cell producing intracellular dehydration. Intracellular ice is created with fast freezing speeds being attributed the most destructive effect on biological tissues with irreparable damage. In blood vessels, it directly induces endothelial cell death and mechanical lesions of the endothelium; the consequence is the formation of thrombi that obstruct the lumen of the vessel. In the post-thawing phase there is an increase in free radicals formation and neutrophil activity, which induces cellular membrane lipids peroxidation and new endothelium lesions. Tissue destruction is determined by: minimal temperature achieved, freezing speeds, freezing phase duration, number of freezing-thawing cycles provided, and distance to the freezing focus. As we move away from the freezing focus cells are affected in different ways, and there are several mechanisms proposed to explain the lethal action induced by temperatures higher than--40 degrees C. In our series pathologic findings were: necrosis, hemorrhagic areas either developed or not, fibrosis, hyalinization and increases in the relative number of hematic capillaries, microscopic calcifications, basal cells hyperplasia, and transitional or squamous metaplasia. Residual cancer is localized in the areas less affected by freezing. It should be emphasize the scarce morbimortality associated with the procedure. It

  14. Thr175-phosphorylated tau induces pathologic fibril formation via GSK3β-mediated phosphorylation of Thr231 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Moszczynski, Alexander J; Gohar, May; Volkening, Kathryn; Leystra-Lantz, Cheryl; Strong, Wendy; Strong, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    We have previously shown that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with cognitive impairment can be characterized by pathologic inclusions of microtubule-associated protein tau (tau) phosphorylated at Thr(175) (pThr(175)) in association with GSK3β activation. We have now examined whether pThr(175) induces GSK3β activation and whether this leads to pathologic fibril formation through Thr(231) phosphorylation. Seventy-two hours after transfection of Neuro2A cells with pseudophosphorylated green fluorescent protein-tagged 2N4R tau (Thr(175)Asp), phosphorylated kinase glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (active GSK3β) levels were significantly increased as was pathologic fibril formation and cell death. Treatment with each of 4 GSK3β inhibitors or small hairpin RNA knockdown of GSK3β abolished fibril formation and prevented cell death. Inhibition of Thr(231) phosphorylation (Thr(231)Ala) prevented pathologic tau fibril formation, regardless of Thr(175) state, whereas Thr(231)Asp (pseudophosphorylated at Thr(231)) developed pathologic tau fibrils. Ser(235) mutations did not affect fibril formation, indicating an unprimed mechanism of Thr(231) phosphorylation. These findings suggest a mechanism of tau pathology by which pThr(175) induces GSK3β phosphorylation of Thr(231) leading to fibril formation, indicating a potential therapeutic avenue for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Plasmid-deficient Chlamydia muridarum fail to induce immune pathology and protect against oviduct disease.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Catherine M; Ingalls, Robin R; Andrews, Charles W; Scurlock, Amy M; Darville, Toni

    2007-09-15

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the most prevalent sexually transmitted bacterial infection in the world. In women, genital infection can cause endometritis and pelvic inflammatory disease with the severe sequelae of ectopic pregnancy or infertility. Chlamydia sp. do not damage tissues directly, but induce an injurious host inflammatory response at the infected site. In the murine model of genital disease with Chlamydia muridarum, TLR2 plays a role in both early production of inflammatory mediators and development of chronic oviduct pathology. We report the results of studies with plasmid-cured C. muridarum mutants that retain the ability to infect the murine genital tract, but fail to cause disease in the oviduct. These mutants do not stimulate TLR2-dependent cytokine production in mice, nor in innate immune cells or epithelial cells in vitro. They induce an effective Th1 immune response, with no evidence for Th1-immune-mediated collateral tissue damage. Furthermore, mice previously infected with the plasmid-deficient strains are protected against oviduct disease upon challenge with virulent C. muridarum. If plasmid-cured derivatives of human C. trachomatis biovars exhibit similar phenotypic characteristics, they have the potential to serve as vaccines to prevent human disease.

  16. Chemotherapy-induced endometrial pathology: mimicry of malignancy and viral endometritis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Yoon, Gun; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy is a common type of preoperative neoadjuvant treatment and postoperative adjuvant or palliative therapy for many different types of malignancies. Certain chemotherapeutic agents can induce bizarre epithelial atypia that mimics malignancy. Unfamiliarity with these changes could potentially cause confusion with a neoplastic or infectious process. The endometrium is one of the few sites where chemotherapy-induced epithelial atypia has not been appreciated. We identified four patients with marked cytologic atypia of the endometrial glandular epithelium from the surgical pathology files of Severance Hospital. The histopathologic features, immunostaining results and medical records of these patients were reviewed. All patients underwent hysteroscopic examination with endometrial curettage for investigation of vaginal bleeding. They had previously undergone chemotherapy for uterine cervical cancer (n=1), rectal cancer (n=2) and myelodysplastic syndrome (n=1). The chemotherapy regimens included alkylating agents (busulfan, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, cisplatin, and oxaliplatin), pyrimidine antagonists (capecitabine, decitabine, and 5-fluorouracil), taxanes (paclitaxel), and topoisomerase inhibitors (irinotecan and etoposide). On histopathological examination, the atypical epithelial changes included marked nuclear enlargement and pleomorphism, a degenerative-looking chromatin pattern, abundant microvacuolated cytoplasm, and preservation of the nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio. This study demonstrates that certain chemotherapeutic agents may cause bizarre, reactive atypia of the endometrial glandular epithelium. These changes should not be interpreted as neoplastic or infectious in nature. An awareness of prior exposure to cytotoxic agents and a familiarity with the nature and distribution of these bizarre alterations is essential to avoid misinterpretation of the morphologic features and prevent unnecessary treatment. PMID:27347355

  17. Impact of rapamycin on status epilepticus induced hippocampal pathology and weight gain

    PubMed Central

    Hester, Michael S.; Hosford, Bethany E.; Santos, Victor R.; Singh, Shatrunjai P.; Rolle, Isaiah; LaSarge, Candi L.; Liska, John P.; Garcia-Cairasco, Norberto; Danzer, Steve C.

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence implicates the dentate gyrus in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Dentate granule cells limit the amount of excitatory signaling through the hippocampus and exhibit striking neuroplastic changes that may impair this function during epileptogenesis. Furthermore, aberrant integration of newly-generated granule cells underlies the majority of dentate restructuring. Recently, attention has focused on the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway as a potential mediator of epileptogenic change. Systemic administration of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin has promising therapeutic potential, as it has been shown to reduce seizure frequency and seizure severity in rodent models. Here, we tested whether mTOR signaling facilitates abnormal development of granule cells during epileptogenesis. We also examined dentate inflammation and mossy cell death in the dentate hilus. To determine if mTOR activation is necessary for abnormal granule cell development, transgenic mice that harbored fluorescently-labeled adult-born granule cells were treated with rapamycin following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus. Systemic rapamycin effectively blocked phosphorylation of S6 protein (a readout of mTOR activity) and reduced granule cell mossy fiber axon sprouting. However, the accumulation of ectopic granule cells and granule cells with aberrant basal dendrites was not significantly reduced. Mossy cell death and reactive astrocytosis were also unaffected. These data suggest that anti-epileptogenic effects of mTOR inhibition may be mediated by mechanisms other than inhibition of these common dentate pathologies. Consistent with this conclusion, rapamycin prevented pathological weight gain in epileptic mice, suggesting that rapamycin might act on central circuits or even peripheral tissues controlling weight gain in epilepsy. PMID:26995324

  18. Impact of rapamycin on status epilepticus induced hippocampal pathology and weight gain.

    PubMed

    Hester, Michael S; Hosford, Bethany E; Santos, Victor R; Singh, Shatrunjai P; Rolle, Isaiah J; LaSarge, Candi L; Liska, John P; Garcia-Cairasco, Norberto; Danzer, Steve C

    2016-06-01

    Growing evidence implicates the dentate gyrus in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Dentate granule cells limit the amount of excitatory signaling through the hippocampus and exhibit striking neuroplastic changes that may impair this function during epileptogenesis. Furthermore, aberrant integration of newly-generated granule cells underlies the majority of dentate restructuring. Recently, attention has focused on the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway as a potential mediator of epileptogenic change. Systemic administration of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin has promising therapeutic potential, as it has been shown to reduce seizure frequency and seizure severity in rodent models. Here, we tested whether mTOR signaling facilitates abnormal development of granule cells during epileptogenesis. We also examined dentate inflammation and mossy cell death in the dentate hilus. To determine if mTOR activation is necessary for abnormal granule cell development, transgenic mice that harbored fluorescently-labeled adult-born granule cells were treated with rapamycin following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus. Systemic rapamycin effectively blocked phosphorylation of S6 protein (a readout of mTOR activity) and reduced granule cell mossy fiber axon sprouting. However, the accumulation of ectopic granule cells and granule cells with aberrant basal dendrites was not significantly reduced. Mossy cell death and reactive astrocytosis were also unaffected. These data suggest that anti-epileptogenic effects of mTOR inhibition may be mediated by mechanisms other than inhibition of these common dentate pathologies. Consistent with this conclusion, rapamycin prevented pathological weight gain in epileptic mice, suggesting that rapamycin might act on central circuits or even peripheral tissues controlling weight gain in epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The changes of serum proteome and tissular pathology in mouse induced by botulinum toxin E injection.

    PubMed

    Wang, J F; Mao, X Y; Zhao, C

    2014-01-01

    The experiment were performed to investigate the poisoning-related proteins and main pathological changes after mouse suffered from injection of botulinum toxin serotype E. Dose of 0.75 LD50 botulinum toxin serotype E per mice were administrated by intraperitoneal injection. Survival mouse were picked as experimental group. The blood were collected from orbital blood and serum sample was separated by centrifugation. The heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney were fixed in 10 % neutral buffered formalin and then developed paraffin sections. Serum protein components were analyzed by SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis coupled with 2-DE SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis. Differentially expressed proteins were analyzed by PDQUest8.0 software and subjected to ion trap mass spectrometry equipped with a high performance liquid chromatography system. The observation of pathological section showed that heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney exhibited pathological changes in different degree, especially in heart, liver and lung tissues. Heart muscle tissue display serious inflammatory response, heart muscle fiber compulsively expanded and filled with erythrocyte and inflammatory exudates, some heart muscle fiber ruptured, even necrosis; hepatic cell in edge of liver occur apoptosis and some hepatic cell have disintegrated, and even died; pulmonary alveoli broken and partial vein filled with blood. Serum proteins component present a significant changes between control serum and botulism in 24 h by SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis and 2-DE-SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis. Twenty differentially expressed protein spots were observed in 2-DE profiles, in which 14 protein spots were undetectable in serum proteome under botulism, 3 protein spots exclusively expressed in state of botulism, 3 protein spots were low-expressed in serum proteome under botulism. Fourteen proteins have been identified among 20 spots elected on two-dimensional electrophoresis gels. Crystal proteins family exclusively expressed in

  20. Identification of pivotal cellular factors involved in HPV-induced dysplastic and neoplastic cervical pathologies.

    PubMed

    Mattarocci, Stefano; Abbruzzese, Claudia; Mileo, Anna M; Carosi, Mariantonia; Pescarmona, Edoardo; Vico, Carmen; Federico, Antonio; Vizza, Enrico; Corrado, Giacomo; Arisi, Ivan; Felsani, Armando; Paggi, Marco G

    2014-04-01

    Cervical carcinoma represents the paradigm of virus-induced cancers, where virtually all cervical cancers come from previous "high-risk" HPV infection. The persistent expression of the HPV viral oncoproteins E6 and E7 is responsible for the reprogramming of fundamental cellular functions in the host cell, thus generating a noticeable, yet only partially explored, imbalance in protein molecular networks and cell signaling pathways. Eighty-eight cellular factors, identified as HPV direct or surrogate targets, were chosen and monitored in a retrospective analysis for their mRNA expression in HPV-induced cervical lesions, from dysplasia to cancer. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) was performed by using formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded archival samples. Gene expression analysis identified 40 genes significantly modulated in LSIL, HSIL, and squamous cervical carcinoma. Interestingly, among these, the expression level of a panel of four genes, TOP2A, CTNNB1, PFKM, and GSN, was able to distinguish between normal tissues and cervical carcinomas. Immunohistochemistry was also done to assess protein expression of two genes among those up-regulated during the transition between dysplasia and carcinoma, namely E2F1 and CDC25A, and their correlation with clinical parameters. Besides the possibility of significantly enhancing the use of some of these factors in diagnostic or prognostic procedures, these data clearly outline specific pathways, and thus key biological processes, altered in cervical dysplasia and carcinoma. Deeper insight on how these molecular mechanisms work may help widen the spectrum of novel innovative approaches to these virus-induced cell pathologies. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Detrimental Effects of Diet-Induced Obesity on τ Pathology Are Independent of Insulin Resistance in τ Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Leboucher, Antoine; Laurent, Cyril; Fernandez-Gomez, Francisco-José; Burnouf, Sylvie; Troquier, Laetitia; Eddarkaoui, Sabiha; Demeyer, Dominique; Caillierez, Raphaëlle; Zommer, Nadège; Vallez, Emmanuelle; Bantubungi, Kadiombo; Breton, Christophe; Pigny, Pascal; Buée-Scherrer, Valérie; Staels, Bart; Hamdane, Malika; Tailleux, Anne; Buée, Luc; Blum, David

    2013-01-01

    The τ pathology found in Alzheimer disease (AD) is crucial in cognitive decline. Midlife development of obesity, a major risk factor of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, increases the risk of dementia and AD later in life. The impact of obesity on AD risk has been suggested to be related to central insulin resistance, secondary to peripheral insulin resistance. The effects of diet-induced obesity (DIO) on τ pathology remain unknown. In this study, we evaluated effects of a high-fat diet, given at an early pathological stage, in the THY-Tau22 transgenic mouse model of progressive AD-like τ pathology. We found that early and progressive obesity potentiated spatial learning deficits as well as hippocampal τ pathology at a later stage. Surprisingly, THY-Tau22 mice did not exhibit peripheral insulin resistance. Further, pathological worsening occurred while hippocampal insulin signaling was upregulated. Together, our data demonstrate that DIO worsens τ phosphorylation and learning abilities in τ transgenic mice independently from peripheral/central insulin resistance. PMID:23250356

  2. In vitro pathological modelling using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells: the case of progeria.

    PubMed

    Nissan, Xavier; Blondel, Sophie; Peschanski, Marc

    2011-12-01

    Progeria, also known as HGPS (Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome), is a rare fatal genetic disease characterized by an appearance of accelerated aging in children. This syndrome is typically caused by mutations in codon 608 (C1804T) of the gene encoding lamins A and C, LMNA, leading to the production of a truncated form of the protein called progerin. Owing to their unique potential to self-renew and to differentiate into any cell types of the organism, pluripotent stem cells offer a unique tool to study molecular and cellular mechanisms related to this global and systemic disease. Recent studies have exploited this potential by generating human induced pluripotent stem cells from HGPS patients' fibroblasts displaying several phenotypic defects characteristic of HGPS such as nuclear abnormalities, progerin expression, altered DNA-repair mechanisms and premature senescence. Altogether, these findings provide new insights on the use of pluripotent stem cells for pathological modelling and may open original therapeutic perspectives for diseases that lack pre-clinical in vitro human models, such as HGPS.

  3. High fat diet induces specific pathological changes in hypothalamic orexin neurons in mice.

    PubMed

    Nobunaga, Mizuki; Obukuro, Kanae; Kurauchi, Yuki; Hisatsune, Akinori; Seki, Takahiro; Tsutsui, Masato; Katsuki, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    Loss of orexin neurons in the hypothalamus is a prominent feature of narcolepsy and several other neurological conditions. We have recently demonstrated that sleep deprivation stimulates local nitric oxide (NO) production by neuronal NO synthase in the lateral hypothalamus, which leads to selective degeneration of orexin neurons accompanied by formation of orexin-immunoreactive aggregates. Here we analyzed whether lifestyle-related conditions other than sleep deprivation could trigger similar pathological changes in orexin neurons. Four-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were fed with high fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the number of orexin-immunopositive neurons was significantly decreased by HFD intake, whereas the number of melanin-concentrating hormone-immunopositive neurons was unchanged. In addition, HFD promoted formation of intracellular orexin-immunoreactive aggregates in a subset of orexin neurons. We also confirmed that expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in the hypothalamus was upregulated in response to HFD intake. Notably, loss of orexin-immunopositive neurons and formation of orexin-immunoreactive aggregates were not observed in iNOS knockout mice fed with HFD. These results indicate that inappropriate dietary conditions could trigger specific neuropathological events in orexin neurons in an iNOS-dependent manner. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Artemether Treatment of Prepatent Schistosoma japonicum Induces Resistance to Reinfection in Association with Reduced Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Bartley, Paul B.; Glanfield, Amber; Li, Yuesheng; Stanisic, Danielle I.; Duke, Mary; Jones, Malcolm K.; McManus, Donald P.

    2009-01-01

    Artemether (ART) is a well-described antimalarial with efficacy against juvenile schistosomes, with 7-day-old schistosomula being particularly susceptible. Both ART-affected worms and parasites developing from irradiated cercariae die at similar times after infection. Our aim was to determine if ART treatment of prepatent schistosomiasis japonica may result in the generation of a protective immune response. Female CBA mice were treated with a single dose of ART at defined time points after percutaneous infection with a virulent Chinese mainland strain of Schistosoma japonicum. Half of the mouse cohorts were subjected to homologous parasite strain reinfection after drug treatment to assess protective effects of ART therapy. Two independent trials demonstrated that a statistically significant (58% and 50%) reduction in challenge worm burden occurred after reinfection of those mice treated with ART at two weeks p.i. A reduction in the IL-4 response to soluble worm antigen preparation (SWAP) was also seen in ART-treated mice but with no correlation to reinfection resistance. In the Chinese mainland strain used, ART treatment of prepatent infection at the appropriate time point induced resistance to reinfection. There was also an anti-pathology effect observed in ART-treated mice that remained significant after reinfection. PMID:18541772

  5. Transgenic over-expression of YY1 induces pathologic cardiac hypertrophy in a sex-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Stauffer, Brian L.; Dockstader, Karen; Russell, Gloria; Hijmans, Jamie; Walker, Lisa; Cecil, Mackenzie; Demos-Davies, Kimberly; Medway, Allen; McKinsey, Timothy A.; Sucharov, Carmen C.

    2015-01-01

    YY1 can activate or repress transcription of various genes. In cardiac myocytes in culture YY1 has been shown to regulate expression of several genes involved in myocyte pathology. YY1 can also acutely protect the heart against detrimental changes in gene expression. In this study we show that cardiac over-expression of YY1 induces pathologic cardiac hypertrophy in male mice, measured by changes in gene expression and lower ejection fraction/fractional shortening. In contrast, female animals are protected against pathologic gene expression changes and cardiac dysfunction. Furthermore, we show that YY1 regulates, in a sex-specific manner, the expression of mammalian enable (Mena), a factor that regulates cytoskeletal actin dynamics and whose expression is increased in several models of cardiac pathology, and that Mena expression in humans with heart failure is sex-dependent. Finally, we show that sex differences in YY1 expression are also observed in human heart failure. In summary, this is the first work to show that YY1 has a sex-specific effect in the regulation of cardiac pathology. PMID:25935483

  6. Cue-induced craving in pathological buying: empirical evidence and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Trotzke, Patrick; Starcke, Katrin; Pedersen, Anya; Brand, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Pathological buying is associated with marked distress and impaired functioning in important life domains. It is currently under debate whether pathological buying can be considered a behavioral addiction. In analogy to results reported in addicted individuals, craving reactions elicited by addiction-related cues might be an underlying mechanism for the etiology and pathogenesis of pathological buying. In the present study, 30 pathological buyers and 30 matched control participants were examined with a cue-reactivity paradigm consisting of shopping and control cues. Skin conductance responses, as well as subjective ratings for arousal, valence, and urge to buy, were assessed. Subjective craving reactions were measured before and after the cue-reactivity paradigm. On a physiological level, skin conductance responses toward shopping cues were higher in pathological buyers (mean [M; standard deviation {SD}] = 0.26 [0.13]) compared with control participants (M [SD] = 0.19 [0.09]; t(58) = 2.29, p = .025, d = 0.60). On a behavioral level, the individuals with pathological buying rated the shopping cues as more arousing and more positive, and reported a greater urge to buy compared with control participants and with control cues. An increase in subjective craving after completing the cue-reactivity paradigm was observed only in the pathological buyers (Mpre [SD] = 1.95 [1.47], Mpost [SD] = 2.87 [1.79]; t(29) = 5.07, p < .001, d = 0.97). Cue-reactivity and craving might be potential correlates for the development and maintenance of pathological buying. The results demonstrate similarities between pathological buying and substance or behavioral addictions and provide implications for clinical treatment.

  7. Atrazine induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease, lean phenotype and sperm epimutation pathology biomarkers.

    PubMed

    McBirney, Margaux; King, Stephanie E; Pappalardo, Michelle; Houser, Elizabeth; Unkefer, Margaret; Nilsson, Eric; Sadler-Riggleman, Ingrid; Beck, Daniel; Winchester, Paul; Skinner, Michael K

    2017-01-01

    Ancestral environmental exposures to a variety of environmental toxicants and other factors have been shown to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease. The current study examined the potential transgenerational actions of the herbicide atrazine. Atrazine is one of the most commonly used herbicides in the agricultural industry, in particular with corn and soy crops. Outbred gestating female rats were transiently exposed to a vehicle control or atrazine. The F1 generation offspring were bred to generate the F2 generation and then the F2 generation bred to generate the F3 generation. The F1, F2 and F3 generation control and atrazine lineage rats were aged and various pathologies investigated. The male sperm were collected to investigate DNA methylation differences between the control and atrazine lineage sperm. The F1 generation offspring (directly exposed as a fetus) did not develop disease, but weighed less compared to controls. The F2 generation (grand-offspring) was found to have increased frequency of testis disease and mammary tumors in males and females, early onset puberty in males, and decreased body weight in females compared to controls. The transgenerational F3 generation rats were found to have increased frequency of testis disease, early onset puberty in females, behavioral alterations (motor hyperactivity) and a lean phenotype in males and females. The frequency of multiple diseases was significantly higher in the transgenerational F3 generation atrazine lineage males and females. The transgenerational transmission of disease requires germline (egg or sperm) epigenetic alterations. The sperm differential DNA methylation regions (DMRs), termed epimutations, induced by atrazine were identified in the F1, F2 and F3 generations. Gene associations with the DMRs were identified. For the transgenerational F3 generation sperm, unique sets of DMRs (epimutations) were found to be associated with the lean phenotype or testis

  8. The Polyphenol Altenusin Inhibits in Vitro Fibrillization of Tau and Reduces Induced Tau Pathology in Primary Neurons.

    PubMed

    Chua, Sook Wern; Cornejo, Alberto; van Eersel, Janet; Stevens, Claire H; Vaca, Inmaculada; Cueto, Mercedes; Kassiou, Michael; Gladbach, Amadeus; Macmillan, Alex; Lewis, Lev; Whan, Renee; Ittner, Lars M

    2017-04-19

    In Alzheimer's disease, the microtubule-associated protein tau forms intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). A critical step in the formation of NFTs is the conversion of soluble tau into insoluble filaments. Accordingly, a current therapeutic strategy in clinical trials is aimed at preventing tau aggregation. Here, we assessed altenusin, a bioactive polyphenolic compound, for its potential to inhibit tau aggregation. Altenusin inhibits aggregation of tau protein into paired helical filaments in vitro. This was associated with stabilization of tau dimers and other oligomers into globular structures as revealed by atomic force microscopy. Moreover, altenusin reduced tau phosphorylation in cells expressing pathogenic tau, and prevented neuritic tau pathology induced by incubation of primary neurons with tau fibrils. However, treatment of tau transgenic mice did not improve neuropathology and functional deficits. Taken together, altenusin prevents tau fibrillization in vitro and induced tau pathology in neurons.

  9. Acetylation-induced TDP-43 pathology is suppressed by an HSF1-dependent chaperone program.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Wander, Connor M; Yuan, Chao-Xing; Bereman, Michael S; Cohen, Todd J

    2017-07-19

    TDP-43 pathology marks a spectrum of multisystem proteinopathies including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, frontotemporal lobar degeneration, and sporadic inclusion body myositis. Surprisingly, it has been challenging to recapitulate this pathology, highlighting an incomplete understanding of TDP-43 regulatory mechanisms. Here we provide evidence supporting TDP-43 acetylation as a trigger for disease pathology. Using cultured cells and mouse skeletal muscle, we show that TDP-43 acetylation-mimics promote TDP-43 phosphorylation and ubiquitination, perturb mitochondria, and initiate degenerative inflammatory responses that resemble sporadic inclusion body myositis pathology. Analysis of functionally linked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis proteins revealed recruitment of p62, ubiquilin-2, and optineurin to TDP-43 aggregates. We demonstrate that TDP-43 acetylation-mimic pathology is potently suppressed by an HSF1-dependent mechanism that disaggregates TDP-43. Our study illustrates bidirectional TDP-43 processing in which TDP-43 aggregation is targeted by a coordinated chaperone response. Thus, activation or restoration of refolding mechanisms may alleviate TDP-43 aggregation in tissues that are uniquely susceptible to TDP-43 proteinopathies.TDP-43 aggregation is linked to various diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Here the authors show that acetylation of the protein triggers TDP-43 pathology in cultured cells and mouse skeletal muscle, which can be cleared through an HSF1-dependent chaperone mechanism that disaggregates the protein.

  10. System-based identification of toxicity pathways associated with multi-walled carbon nanotube-induced pathological responses

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder-Talkington, Brandi N.; Dymacek, Julian; Porter, Dale W.; Wolfarth, Michael G.; Mercer, Robert R.; Pacurari, Maricica; Denvir, James; Castranova, Vincent; Qian, Yong; Guo, Nancy L.

    2013-10-15

    The fibrous shape and biopersistence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) have raised concern over their potential toxicity after pulmonary exposure. As in vivo exposure to MWCNT produced a transient inflammatory and progressive fibrotic response, this study sought to identify significant biological processes associated with lung inflammation and fibrosis pathology data, based upon whole genome mRNA expression, bronchoaveolar lavage scores, and morphometric analysis from C57BL/6J mice exposed by pharyngeal aspiration to 0, 10, 20, 40, or 80 μg MWCNT at 1, 7, 28, or 56 days post-exposure. Using a novel computational model employing non-negative matrix factorization and Monte Carlo Markov Chain simulation, significant biological processes with expression similar to MWCNT-induced lung inflammation and fibrosis pathology data in mice were identified. A subset of genes in these processes was determined to be functionally related to either fibrosis or inflammation by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and was used to determine potential significant signaling cascades. Two genes determined to be functionally related to inflammation and fibrosis, vascular endothelial growth factor A (vegfa) and C-C motif chemokine 2 (ccl2), were confirmed by in vitro studies of mRNA and protein expression in small airway epithelial cells exposed to MWCNT as concordant with in vivo expression. This study identified that the novel computational model was sufficient to determine biological processes strongly associated with the pathology of lung inflammation and fibrosis and could identify potential toxicity signaling pathways and mechanisms of MWCNT exposure which could be used for future animal studies to support human risk assessment and intervention efforts. - Highlights: • A novel computational model identified toxicity pathways matching in vivo pathology. • Systematic identification of MWCNT-induced biological processes in mouse lungs • MWCNT-induced functional networks of lung

  11. Prevalence and intensity of pathologies induced by the toxic dinoflagellate, Heterocapsa circularisquama, in the Mediterranean mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Basti, Leila; Endo, Makoto; Segawa, Susumu; Shumway, Sandra E; Tanaka, Yuji; Nagai, Satoshi

    2015-06-01

    induces a broad cytotoxic effect in six vital organs, even at low density (5 cells ml(-1)) and low temperature (15°C), but not in muscular organs. Combining cell density, time, and duration of exposure, the organ most affected by the harmful alga was the gill, followed by the labial palps and mantle, the stomach and intestines, and the hepatopancreas. The results of this pathological analysis show that exposure to H. ciruclarisquama severely affects the gills, the labial palps, and mantle thereby interfering with particle clearance and sorting, cleansing, and respiration, but also affects the stomach, intestines, and hepatopancreas, altering the digestive processes and possibly detoxification pathways, if mussels are able to detoxify the toxins of H. circularisquama. In the most severe cases, bivalves would most likely have died as a result of combined severe alterations of the vital functions, failure of tissue repair, and moderate to heavy hemorrhaging in both the external organs and the digestive organs concomitantly with light to moderate alterations in the detoxifying processes.

  12. [Pathological changes in different parts of the larynx in canines following laryngeal burns induced by inhalation of hot air at various temperatures].

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Zhao, Ran; Zhang, Guo-an

    2014-10-18

    To examine pathological changes in different parts of the larynx in canines after laryngeal burns induced by hot dry air at various temperatures and compare the pathological results with clinical typing. Eighteen healthy, male, adult dogs were randomly assigned to inhale hot dry air at 80 °C (Group 1), 160 °C (Group 2) or 320 °C (Group 3) for 20 min to induce inhalation injury. Pathological changes after hot air inhalation were examined at different locations of the larynx including the epiglottis, laryngeal vestibule, vocal folds and trachea. Pathological changes were mainly characterized by local mucosal atrophy in the larynx in Group 1 and moderate edema in the laryngeal submucosa in Group 2. Group 3 showed two types of pathological changes in the larynx: severe edema as well as atrophy and charring. Due to its special anatomy and functions, the larynx has different responses to inhalation injuries induced by hot air at different temperatures. The pathological observation and analysis showed that the pathological changes brought about by laryngeal burns at 80 °C and 160 °C were generally consistent with laryngoscopic manifestations of congestion and edema. Inhalation of hot dry air at 320 °C led to two types of pathological changes, severe edema and atrophy and charring. Hence, pathological analysis of laryngeal burns may be used as a supplemental tool to clinical typing.

  13. Grape seed extract attenuates lung parenchyma pathology in ovalbumin-induced mouse asthma model: an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Yomna Ibrahim

    2012-10-01

    Due to the growing incidence of asthma and because of the non-specificity and side effects of the conventional drugs, the development of novel agents for the treatment of asthma has become considerably important. Natural plant products offer promising alternatives for the development of effective and safe treatments. Grape seed extract (GSE) is one such phytochemical supplement that has been shown to have potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the effect of GSE to suppress lung parenchyma pathology and inflammation in ovalbumin-induced murine asthma model. Ovalbumin exposure was associated with many pathological and morphometric alterations in the lungs of asthmatic mice. The alterations involved alveolar size reduction, alveolar wall thickening, cellular infiltration and blood capillary congestion, as well as significant increase in the number of type II pneumocytes and lamellar bodies. However, GSE significantly ameliorated of the pathological changes of ovalbumin-induced asthma. The results support the possibility of GSE as an effective, safe anti-inflammatory dietary supplement to attenuate the pathogenicity of asthma. While these preliminary results appear promising, further studies are required to elucidate the precise mechanism of the modulatory effect of GSE on asthma remodeling. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparative evaluation of differential laser-induced perturbation spectroscopy as a technique to discriminate emerging skin pathology.

    PubMed

    Kozikowski, Raymond T; Smith, Sarah E; Lee, Jennifer A; Castleman, William L; Sorg, Brian S; Hahn, David W

    2012-06-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy has been widely investigated as a technique for identifying pathological tissue; however, unrelated subject-to-subject variations in spectra complicate data analysis and interpretation. We describe and evaluate a new biosensing technique, differential laser-induced perturbation spectroscopy (DLIPS), based on deep ultraviolet (UV) photochemical perturbation in combination with difference spectroscopy. This technique combines sequential fluorescence probing (pre- and post-perturbation) with sub-ablative UV perturbation and difference spectroscopy to provide a new spectral dimension, facilitating two improvements over fluorescence spectroscopy. First, the differential technique eliminates significant variations in absolute fluorescence response within subject populations. Second, UV perturbations alter the extracellular matrix (ECM), directly coupling the DLIPS response to the biological structure. Improved biosensing with DLIPS is demonstrated in vivo in a murine model of chemically induced skin lesion development. Component loading analysis of the data indicates that the DLIPS technique couples to structural proteins in the ECM. Analysis of variance shows that DLIPS has a significant response to emerging pathology as opposed to other population differences. An optimal likelihood ratio classifier for the DLIPS dataset shows that this technique holds promise for improved diagnosis of epithelial pathology. Results further indicate that DLIPS may improve diagnosis of tissue by augmenting fluorescence spectra (i.e. orthogonal sensing).

  15. Comparative evaluation of differential laser-induced perturbation spectroscopy as a technique to discriminate emerging skin pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozikowski, Raymond T.; Smith, Sarah E.; Lee, Jennifer A.; Castleman, William L.; Sorg, Brian S.; Hahn, David W.

    2012-06-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy has been widely investigated as a technique for identifying pathological tissue; however, unrelated subject-to-subject variations in spectra complicate data analysis and interpretation. We describe and evaluate a new biosensing technique, differential laser-induced perturbation spectroscopy (DLIPS), based on deep ultraviolet (UV) photochemical perturbation in combination with difference spectroscopy. This technique combines sequential fluorescence probing (pre- and post-perturbation) with sub-ablative UV perturbation and difference spectroscopy to provide a new spectral dimension, facilitating two improvements over fluorescence spectroscopy. First, the differential technique eliminates significant variations in absolute fluorescence response within subject populations. Second, UV perturbations alter the extracellular matrix (ECM), directly coupling the DLIPS response to the biological structure. Improved biosensing with DLIPS is demonstrated in vivo in a murine model of chemically induced skin lesion development. Component loading analysis of the data indicates that the DLIPS technique couples to structural proteins in the ECM. Analysis of variance shows that DLIPS has a significant response to emerging pathology as opposed to other population differences. An optimal likelihood ratio classifier for the DLIPS dataset shows that this technique holds promise for improved diagnosis of epithelial pathology. Results further indicate that DLIPS may improve diagnosis of tissue by augmenting fluorescence spectra (i.e. orthogonal sensing).

  16. Implication of diethylcarbamazine induced morbidity and the role of cellular responses associated with bancroftian filariasis pathologies.

    PubMed

    Makunde, W H; Kamugisha, M L; Makunde, R A; Malecela-Lazaro, M N; Kitua, A Y

    2006-01-01

    Pre and post-diethylcarbamazine treatment clinical expression, microfilaraemia prevalence and cellular responses were investigated in individuals in Tanga, Tanzania. Fifty-seven male individuals (aged = 15 years old) were identified for further studies on IL-4, IL-6, IL-8. IFN-gamma, IL-beta, TNF-alpha and nitric oxide in plasma and hydrocoele fluid. Microfilarial prevalence in the examined individuals was 12% with a geometric mean intensity (GMI) of 838 mff/ml in a community with a population of 1018 individuals. Microfilaraemic hydrocoele stage II and III were the most frequent pathologies observed with prevalence of 17.5% and 42. 1 %, respectively. All study individuals treated with diethylcarbamazine (DEC) standard dose of 6 mg/kg experienced post-treatment adverse events. There was no direct relationship between elevated IL-6 and the occurrence and severity of clinical adverse effects post-treatment. The findings from this study suggests that, blood elevated cytokine profile is not the main etiological factor in the inflammatory responses developing after treatment of bancroftian filariasis infections and pathology with DEC. Plasma levels of cellular (cytokines) responses during treatment revealed a proportion of symptomatic patients. Prior to treatment, patients with hydroecoele had high levels of IL-6 than those without the pathology. In conclusion these findings do not support the hypothesis that pro-inflammatory cytokines are directly responsible for adverse events to DEC chemotherapy in bancroftian filariasis infections and pathologies such as hydrocoele, lymphoedema and elephantiasis.

  17. miR-222 is Necessary for Exercise-induced Cardiac Growth and Protects Against Pathological Cardiac Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaojun; Xiao, Junjie; Zhu, Han; Wei, Xin; Platt, Colin; Damilano, Federico; Xiao, Chunyang; Bezzerides, Vassilios; Boström, Pontus; Che, Lin; Zhang, Chunxiang; Spiegelman, Bruce M; Rosenzweig, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Exercise induces physiological cardiac growth and protects the heart against pathological remodeling. Recent work suggests exercise also enhances the heart’s capacity for repair, which could be important for regenerative therapies. While microRNAs are important in certain cardiac pathologies, less is known about their functional roles in exercise-induced cardiac phenotypes. We profiled cardiac microRNA expression in two distinct models of exercise and found microRNA-222 (miR-222) was upregulated in both. Downstream miR-222 targets modulating cardiomyocyte phenotype were identified, including HIPK1 and Homeobox-1. Inhibition of miR-222 in vivo completely blocked cardiac and cardiomyocyte growth in response to exercise, while reducing markers of cardiomyocyte proliferation. Importantly, mice with inducible cardiomyocyte miR-222 expression were resistant to adverse cardiac remodeling and dysfunction after ischemic injury. These studies implicate miR-222 as necessary for exercise-induced cardiomyocyte growth and proliferation in the adult mammalian heart and show that it is sufficient to protect the heart against adverse remodeling. PMID:25863248

  18. miR-222 is necessary for exercise-induced cardiac growth and protects against pathological cardiac remodeling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojun; Xiao, Junjie; Zhu, Han; Wei, Xin; Platt, Colin; Damilano, Federico; Xiao, Chunyang; Bezzerides, Vassilios; Boström, Pontus; Che, Lin; Zhang, Chunxiang; Spiegelman, Bruce M; Rosenzweig, Anthony

    2015-04-07

    Exercise induces physiological cardiac growth and protects the heart against pathological remodeling. Recent work suggests exercise also enhances the heart's capacity for repair, which could be important for regenerative therapies. While microRNAs are important in certain cardiac pathologies, less is known about their functional roles in exercise-induced cardiac phenotypes. We profiled cardiac microRNA expression in two distinct models of exercise and found microRNA-222 (miR-222) was upregulated in both. Downstream miR-222 targets modulating cardiomyocyte phenotypes were identified, including HIPK1 and HMBOX1. Inhibition of miR-222 in vivo completely blocked cardiac and cardiomyocyte growth in response to exercise while reducing markers of cardiomyocyte proliferation. Importantly, mice with inducible cardiomyocyte miR-222 expression were resistant to adverse cardiac remodeling and dysfunction after ischemic injury. These studies implicate miR-222 as necessary for exercise-induced cardiomyocyte growth and proliferation in the adult mammalian heart and show that it is sufficient to protect the heart against adverse remodeling.

  19. Preventive effects of quercetin against benzo[a]pyrene-induced DNA damages and pulmonary precancerous pathologic changes in mice.

    PubMed

    Jin, Nian-zu; Zhu, Yan-ping; Zhou, Jian-wei; Mao, Li; Zhao, Ren-cheng; Fang, Tai-hui; Wang, Xin-ru

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the preventive effects of quercetin against benzo[a]pyrene-induced blood lymphocyte DNA damages and pulmonary precancerous pathologic changes in mice, and to reveal the potential mechanism behind these effects. In this study, mice in quercetin-treated groups were given quercetin for 90 days. After one week of treatment, mice in the quercetin-treated groups and the positive control group received a single intraperitoneal dose of benzo[a]pyrene (100 mg/kg body weight). The results of single cell gel electrophoresis assay showed that the average lengths of the comet cell tail and DNA damage in the peripheral blood lymphocytes of mice induced by benzo[a]pyrene decreased significantly as a result of quercetin treatment dose-dependently. Light microscopic examination showed that the degrees of pulmonary precancerous pathologic changes in the quercetin-treated groups decreased significantly compared with those in the positive control group. Meanwhile, the cytochrome P4501A1-linked 7-ethoxyresorufin O-dealkylase activities in lung microsomes of mice decreased as the dose of quercetin increased. The results of this in vivo study revealed that quercetin had a significant preventive effect on benzo[a]pyrene-induced DNA damage, and had a potential chemopreventive effect on the carcinogenesis of lung cancer induced by benzo[a]pyrene. The mechanism of these effects of quercetin could be related to the inhibition of cytochrome P4501A1 activity.

  20. Neurofibrillary tangle-like tau pathology induced by synthetic tau fibrils in primary neurons over-expressing mutant tau.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing L; Lee, Virginia M Y

    2013-03-18

    Increasing evidence demonstrates the transmissibility of fibrillar species of tau protein, but this has never been directly tested in neurons, the cell type most affected by formation of tau inclusions in neurodegenerative tauopathies. Here we show that synthetic tau fibrils made from recombinant protein not only time-dependently recruit normal tau into neurofibrillary tangle-like insoluble aggregates in primary hippocampal neurons over-expressing human tau, but also induce neuritic tau pathology in non-transgenic neurons. This study provides highly compelling support for the protein-only hypothesis of pathological tau transmission in primary neurons and describes a useful neuronal model for studying the pathogenesis of tauopathies. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The adaptor protein CIKS/Act1 is necessary to induce collagen-induced arthritis pathology and it contributes to collagen-specific antibody production

    PubMed Central

    Pisitkun, Prapaporn; Claudio, Estefania; Ren, Nina; Wang, Hongshan; Siebenlist, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Objective CIKS/Act1 is an adaptor molecule necessary for signaling by members of the IL-17 cytokine family. Here we aim to determine whether this adaptor is required for collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). If required, CIKS-mediated signaling could be a potential target for therapeutic intervention in rheumatoid arthritis. Methods CIA model studies were performed with CIKS deficient and sufficient mice on an otherwise wild-type C57BL/6 background or on a background lacking FcγRIIb. In addition, wild-type and CIKS deficient mice were subjected to collagen-antibody induced arthritis (CAIA) studies. Arthritis pathology was determined by visual inspection of the paws, by histochemical analysis of tissue sections and by measurements of collagen-specific antibodies. Results Arthritis pathology could be readily induced with the CIA model in wild-type mice and pathology was exacerbated in FcγRIIb-deficient mice. In contrast, CIKS deficient mice were protected from all aspects of CIA pathology, even in FcγRIIb deficient mice. The absence of CIKS completely prevented neutrophil infiltration into joints, bone erosion and cartilage damage; furthermore, production of collagen type 2-specific antibodies (CII-Abs) was reduced. In contrast to the CIA model, CIKS deficient mice remained susceptible to arthritis induced with the CAIA model. Conclusion CIKS-mediated signaling is necessary for the pathogenesis in the CIA model, but not in the CAIA model. These findings suggest critical functions of CIKS during the development of arthritis in the CIA model, including in the formation of CII-Abs, and they mark the CIKS adaptor as a potential therapeutic target in RA. PMID:20662069

  2. Exogenous α-Synuclein Fibrils Induce Lewy Body Pathology Leading to Synaptic Dysfunction and Neuron Death

    PubMed Central

    Volpicelli-Daley, Laura A.; Luk, Kelvin C.; Patel, Tapan P.; Tanik, Selcuk A.; Riddle, Dawn M.; Stieber, Anna; Meany, David F.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Inclusions comprised of α-synuclein (α-syn), i.e. Lewy bodies (LBs) and Lewy neurites (LNs), define synucleinopathies including Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). Here, we demonstrate that pre-formed fibrils generated from full length and truncated recombinant α-syn enter primary neurons, likely by adsorptive-mediated endocytosis and promote recruitment of soluble endogenous α-syn into insoluble PD-like LBs and LNs. Remarkably, endogenous α-syn was sufficient for formation of these aggregates, and overexpression of wild type or mutant α-syn was not required. LN-like pathology first developed in axons and propagated to form LB-like inclusions in perikarya. Accumulation of pathologic α-syn led to selective decreases in synaptic proteins, progressive impairments in neuronal excitability and connectivity, and eventually, neuron death. Thus, our data contribute important insights into the etiology and pathogenesis of PD-like α-syn inclusions, their impact on neuronal functions, and provide a model for discovering therapeutics targeting pathologic α-syn- mediated neurodegeneration. PMID:21982369

  3. Long-Term Systemic Exposure to Rotenone Induces Central and Peripheral Pathology of Parkinson's Disease in Mice.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Shinki; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Miyoshi, Ko; Asanuma, Masato

    2015-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with motor and non-motor symptoms that precede the onset of motor symptoms. Rotenone is often used to induce PD-like pathology in the central nervous system (CNS) and enteric nervous system (ENS). However, there is little or no information on the temporal changes in other neural tissues and the spread of pathology throughout the entire body organs. Here, we recorded the serial immunohistochemical changes in neurons and glial cells of the striatum, substantia nigra (SN), olfactory bulb (OB), thoracic cord (ThC) and ascending colon (AC) induced by 1-, 3- and 6-week administration of rotenone (50 mg/kg/day) infused subcutaneously in C57BL mice using an osmotic pump. Rotenone exposure for 3 or 6 weeks caused neurodegeneration in the striatum, whereas neuronal damage was seen in the SN and OB only after 6 weeks. Moreover, rotenone induced neurodegeneration in the myenteric plexus of AC but not in ThC. Rotenone also activated glial cells before any apparent neurodegeneration in the CNS but not in the ENS. Our results demonstrated that subcutaneous administration of rotenone can cause progressive neurodegeneration in the OB and AC, in addition to the nigrostriatal pathway, and temporal differential glial activation, and that these changes do not spread retrogradely from OB or ENS to nigrostriatal pathway. The results suggested that the different vulnerability of neurons to the neurotoxic effects of rotenone administrated subcutaneously are due to glial activation in these neural tissues.

  4. Caffeine protects against oxidative stress and Alzheimer's disease-like pathology in rabbit hippocampus induced by cholesterol-enriched diet.

    PubMed

    Prasanthi, Jaya R P; Dasari, Bhanu; Marwarha, Gurdeep; Larson, Tyler; Chen, Xuesong; Geiger, Jonathan D; Ghribi, Othman

    2010-10-15

    Cholesterol has been linked to the pathogenesis of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) as a risk factor increasing beta-amyloid (Abeta) and oxidative stress levels. Caffeine has antioxidant properties and has been demonstrated to reduce Abeta levels in transgenic mouse models of familial AD. However, the effects of caffeine on cholesterol-induced sporadic AD pathology have not been determined. In this study, we determined the effects of caffeine on Abeta levels, tau phosphorylation, oxidative stress generation, and caffeine-target receptors in rabbits fed a 2% cholesterol-enriched diet, a model system for sporadic AD. Our results showed that the cholesterol-enriched diet increased levels of Abeta, tau phosphorylation, and oxidative stress measured as increased levels of reactive oxygen species and isoprostanes, glutathione depletion, and increased levels of endoplasmic reticulum stress marker proteins. Additionally, the cholesterol-enriched diet reduced the levels of adenosine A(1) receptors (A(1)R) but not ryanodine or adenosine A(2A) receptors. Caffeine, administered at 0.5 and 30mg/day in the drinking water, reduced the cholesterol-induced increase in Abeta, phosphorylated tau, and oxidative stress levels and reversed the cholesterol-induced decrease in A(1)R levels. Our results suggest that even very low doses of caffeine might protect against sporadic AD-like pathology. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Treatment of drug-induced psychosis in Parkinson's disease with ziprasidone can induce severe dose-dependent off-periods and pathological laughing.

    PubMed

    Schindehütte, Jan; Trenkwalder, Claudia

    2007-02-01

    "Atypical anti-psychotics" are substances of choice in treating drug-induced psychosis (DP) in Parkinson's disease (PD). We report on four patients with DP who received treatment with ziprasidone after previously applied clozapine and quetiapine had failed. Three patients showed a significant improvement of DP, without deterioration of motor function. In one case, ziprasidone considerably increased decline in off-periods. Two patients developed pathological laughing as a possible side-effect of ziprasidone. Ziprasidone may serve as an additional "atypical anti-psychotic" for the treatment of DP in PD but can also induce deterioration of motor function.

  6. Proton microprobe and particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis for studies of pathological brain tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Malmqvist, K.G.; Brun, A.; Inamura, K.; Martins, E.; Salford, L.G.; Siesjoe, B.K.T.; Tapper, U.A.; Themner, K.

    1988-09-01

    Particle Induced X-ray Emission and proton microprobe analyses have been applied for the investigation of regional elemental distributions in connection with various pathological states in the brain. Malignant brain tumors and adjacent histologically intact tissue removed during surgery were analysed with PIXE. Systematic elemental variations, e.g., for calcium and selenium, were observed in the tumor front. The proton microprobe was applied to study the Ca and K concentrations in various cell strata in hippocampus following transient ischaemia in rat brain. Significant increases in the Ca level occurred in selectively vulnerable cells within 48 h after the ischaemia.

  7. Endotoxin-induced basal respiration alterations of renal HK-2 cells: a sign of pathologic metabolism down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Quoilin, C; Mouithys-Mickalad, A; Duranteau, J; Gallez, B; Hoebeke, M

    2012-06-29

    To study the mechanism of oxygen regulation in inflammation-induced acute kidney injury, we investigate the effects of a bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) on the basal respiration of proximal tubular epithelial cells (HK-2) both by high-resolution respirometry and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. These two complementary methods have shown that HK-2 cells exhibit a decreased oxygen consumption rate when treated with LPS. Surprisingly, this cellular respiration alteration persists even after the stress factor was removed. We suggested that this irreversible decrease in renal oxygen consumption after LPS challenge is related to a pathologic metabolic down-regulation such as a lack of oxygen utilization by cells.

  8. The Recall Response Induced by Genital Challenge with Chlamydia muridarum Protects the Oviduct from Pathology but Not from Reinfection

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Melissa M.; Zurenski, Matthew A.; Frazer, Lauren C.; O'Connell, Catherine M.; Andrews, Charles W.; Mintus, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    The significant morbidities of ectopic pregnancy and infertility observed in women after Chlamydia trachomatis genital infection result from ascension of the bacteria from the endocervix to the oviduct, where an overly aggressive inflammatory response leads to chronic scarring and Fallopian tube obstruction. A vaccine to prevent chlamydia-induced disease is urgently needed. An important question for vaccine development is whether sterilizing immunity at the level of the oviduct is essential for protection because of the possibility that a chlamydial component drives a deleterious anamnestic T cell response upon oviduct reinfection. We show that mice inoculated with attenuated plasmid-cured strains of Chlamydia muridarum are protected from oviduct pathology upon challenge with wild-type C. muridarum Nigg despite induction of a response that did not prevent reinfection of the oviduct. Interestingly, repeated abbreviated infections with Nigg also elicited recall responses that protected the oviduct from pathology despite low-level reinfection of this vulnerable tissue site. Challenged mice displayed significant decreases in tissue infiltration of inflammatory leukocytes with marked reductions in frequencies of neutrophils but significant increases in frequencies of CD4 Th1 and CD8 T cells. An anamnestic antibody response was also detected. These data indicate that exposure to a live attenuated chlamydial vaccine or repeated abbreviated genital infection with virulent chlamydiae promotes anamnestic antibody and T cell responses that protect the oviduct from pathology despite a lack of sterilizing immunity at the site. PMID:22431649

  9. The recall response induced by genital challenge with Chlamydia muridarum protects the oviduct from pathology but not from reinfection.

    PubMed

    Riley, Melissa M; Zurenski, Matthew A; Frazer, Lauren C; O'Connell, Catherine M; Andrews, Charles W; Mintus, Margaret; Darville, Toni

    2012-06-01

    The significant morbidities of ectopic pregnancy and infertility observed in women after Chlamydia trachomatis genital infection result from ascension of the bacteria from the endocervix to the oviduct, where an overly aggressive inflammatory response leads to chronic scarring and Fallopian tube obstruction. A vaccine to prevent chlamydia-induced disease is urgently needed. An important question for vaccine development is whether sterilizing immunity at the level of the oviduct is essential for protection because of the possibility that a chlamydial component drives a deleterious anamnestic T cell response upon oviduct reinfection. We show that mice inoculated with attenuated plasmid-cured strains of Chlamydia muridarum are protected from oviduct pathology upon challenge with wild-type C. muridarum Nigg despite induction of a response that did not prevent reinfection of the oviduct. Interestingly, repeated abbreviated infections with Nigg also elicited recall responses that protected the oviduct from pathology despite low-level reinfection of this vulnerable tissue site. Challenged mice displayed significant decreases in tissue infiltration of inflammatory leukocytes with marked reductions in frequencies of neutrophils but significant increases in frequencies of CD4 Th1 and CD8 T cells. An anamnestic antibody response was also detected. These data indicate that exposure to a live attenuated chlamydial vaccine or repeated abbreviated genital infection with virulent chlamydiae promotes anamnestic antibody and T cell responses that protect the oviduct from pathology despite a lack of sterilizing immunity at the site.

  10. Rescue of neurons from undergoing hallmark tau-induced Alzheimer's disease cell pathologies by the antimitotic drug paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Shemesh, Or A; Spira, Micha E

    2011-07-01

    Through the use of live confocal imaging, electron microscopy, and the novel cell biological platform of cultured Aplysia neurons we show that unfolding of the hallmark cell pathologies induced by mutant-human-tau (mt-human-tau) expression is rescued by 10 nM paclitaxel. At this concentration paclitaxel prevents mt-human-tau-induced swelling of axonal segments, translocation of tau and microtubules (MT) to submembrane domains, reduction in the number of MTs along the axon, reversal of the MT polar orientation, impaired organelle transport, accumulation of macro-autophagosomes and lysosomes, compromised neurite morphology and degeneration. Unexpectedly, higher paclitaxel concentrations (100 nM) do not prevent these events from occurring and in fact facilitate them. We conclude that antimitotic MT-stabilizing reagents have the potential to serve as drugs to prevent or slow down the unfolding of tauopathies.

  11. Propranolol inhibition of β-adrenergic receptor does not suppress pathologic neovascularization in oxygen-induced retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Joyal, Jean-Sebastian; Hatton, Colman J; Juan, Aimee M; Pei, Dorothy T; Hurst, Christian G; Xu, Dan; Stahl, Andreas; Hellstrom, Ann; Smith, Lois E H

    2012-05-17

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a leading cause of blindness in children and is, in its most severe form, characterized by uncontrolled growth of vision-threatening pathologic vessels. Propranolol, a nonselective β-adrenergic receptor blocker, was reported to protect against pathologic retinal neovascularization in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). Based on this single animal study using nonstandard evaluation of retinopathy, clinical trials are currently ongoing to evaluate propranolol treatment in stage 2 ROP patients who tend to experience spontaneous disease regression and are at low risk of blindness. Because these ROP patients are vulnerable premature infants who are still in a fragile state of incomplete development, the efficacy of propranolol treatment in retinopathy needs to be evaluated thoroughly in preclinical animal models of retinopathy and potential benefits weighed against potential adverse effects. Retinopathy was induced by exposing neonatal mice to 75% oxygen from postnatal day (P) 7 to P12. Three routes of propranolol treatment were assessed from P12 to P16: oral gavage, intraperitoneal injection, or subcutaneous injection, with doses varying between 2 and 60 mg/kg/day. At P17, retinal flatmounts were stained with isolectin and quantified with a standard protocol to measure vasoobliteration and pathologic neovascularization. Retinal gene expression was analyzed with qRT-PCR using RNA isolated from retinas of control and propranolol-treated pups. None of the treatment approaches at any dose of propranolol (up to 60 mg/kg/day) were effective in preventing the development of retinopathy in a mouse model of OIR, evaluated using standard techniques. Propranolol treatment also did not change retinal expression of angiogenic factors including vascular endothelial growth factor. Propranolol treatment via three routes and up to 30 times the standard human dose failed to suppress retinopathy development in mice. These data bring

  12. Propranolol Inhibition of β-Adrenergic Receptor Does Not Suppress Pathologic Neovascularization in Oxygen-Induced Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Joyal, Jean-Sebastian; Hatton, Colman J.; Juan, Aimee M.; Pei, Dorothy T.; Hurst, Christian G.; Xu, Dan; Stahl, Andreas; Hellstrom, Ann; Smith, Lois E. H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a leading cause of blindness in children and is, in its most severe form, characterized by uncontrolled growth of vision-threatening pathologic vessels. Propranolol, a nonselective β-adrenergic receptor blocker, was reported to protect against pathologic retinal neovascularization in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). Based on this single animal study using nonstandard evaluation of retinopathy, clinical trials are currently ongoing to evaluate propranolol treatment in stage 2 ROP patients who tend to experience spontaneous disease regression and are at low risk of blindness. Because these ROP patients are vulnerable premature infants who are still in a fragile state of incomplete development, the efficacy of propranolol treatment in retinopathy needs to be evaluated thoroughly in preclinical animal models of retinopathy and potential benefits weighed against potential adverse effects. Methods. Retinopathy was induced by exposing neonatal mice to 75% oxygen from postnatal day (P) 7 to P12. Three routes of propranolol treatment were assessed from P12 to P16: oral gavage, intraperitoneal injection, or subcutaneous injection, with doses varying between 2 and 60 mg/kg/day. At P17, retinal flatmounts were stained with isolectin and quantified with a standard protocol to measure vasoobliteration and pathologic neovascularization. Retinal gene expression was analyzed with qRT-PCR using RNA isolated from retinas of control and propranolol-treated pups. Results. None of the treatment approaches at any dose of propranolol (up to 60 mg/kg/day) were effective in preventing the development of retinopathy in a mouse model of OIR, evaluated using standard techniques. Propranolol treatment also did not change retinal expression of angiogenic factors including vascular endothelial growth factor. Conclusions. Propranolol treatment via three routes and up to 30 times the standard human dose failed to suppress retinopathy

  13. Myelin-reactive antibodies mediate the pathology of MBP-PLP fusion protein MP4-induced EAE.

    PubMed

    Kuerten, Stefanie; Pauly, Robert; Rottlaender, Andrea; Rodi, Michael; Gruppe, Traugott L; Addicks, Klaus; Tary-Lehmann, Magdalena; Lehmann, Paul V

    2011-07-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is frequently used for studies of multiple sclerosis (MS). Because in most EAE models T cells mediate the pathology in the absence of B cells/autoantibodies, the notion has evolved that also MS may be a primarily T cell-mediated disease. We have previously introduced MBP-PLP fusion protein (MP4)-induced EAE in C57BL/6 mice. Here we show that the disease in this model is antibody-dependent. Immunization of B cell-deficient mice did not induce EAE. When such B cell-deficient mice were, however, injected with MBP/PLP-specific antibodies in addition to the immunization with MP4, they developed disease of a severity and course that was similar to the wild-type mice. The deposition of antibodies in demyelinated lesions provided further evidence for the contribution of MBP/PLP-specific antibodies to CNS lesion formation. Based upon these data we suggest a two-stage model for the involvement of MBP/PLP-specific antibodies in autoimmune CNS pathology.

  14. Endotoxin-induced basal respiration alterations of renal HK-2 cells: A sign of pathologic metabolism down-regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Quoilin, C.; Mouithys-Mickalad, A.; Duranteau, J.; Gallez, B.; Hoebeke, M.

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A HK-2 cells model of inflammation-induced acute kidney injury. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two oximetry methods: high resolution respirometry and ESR spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxygen consumption rates of renal cells decrease when treated with LPS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cells do not recover normal respiration when the LPS treatment is removed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This basal respiration alteration is a sign of pathologic metabolism down-regulation. -- Abstract: To study the mechanism of oxygen regulation in inflammation-induced acute kidney injury, we investigate the effects of a bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) on the basal respiration of proximal tubular epithelial cells (HK-2) both by high-resolution respirometry and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. These two complementary methods have shown that HK-2 cells exhibit a decreased oxygen consumption rate when treated with LPS. Surprisingly, this cellular respiration alteration persists even after the stress factor was removed. We suggested that this irreversible decrease in renal oxygen consumption after LPS challenge is related to a pathologic metabolic down-regulation such as a lack of oxygen utilization by cells.

  15. Myopathy induced by HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors in rabbits: a pathological, electrophysiological, and biochemical study.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, K; Kuriyama, M; Sonoda, Y; Yoshidome, H; Nakagawa, H; Fujiyama, J; Higuchi, I; Osame, M

    1998-09-01

    A combination of electrophysiological, pathological, and biochemical studies were performed in myopathy induced by 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors. Simvastatin (a lipophilic inhibitor) or pravastatin (a hydrophilic inhibitor) were administered by gavage to rabbits. In Group I (simvastatin-treated group, 50 mg/kg/day for 4 weeks), four rabbits showed muscle necrosis and high serum creatine kinase (CK) levels, and all six rabbits showed electrical myotonia. In Group II (pravastatin-treated group, 100 mg/kg/day for 4 weeks), no rabbit showed either condition. In Group III (pravastatin-treated group, 200 mg/kg/day for 3 weeks plus 300 mg/kg/day for 3 weeks), one rabbit showed muscle necrosis and high serum CK level and two rabbits showed electrical myotonia. The pathological findings were muscle fiber necrosis and degeneration with increased acid phosphatase activity by light microscopy, autophagic vacuoles and mitochondrial swelling, and disruption and hypercontraction of myofibrils by electron microscopy. Ubiquinone content decreased in skeletal muscle by 22 to 36% in Group I, by 18 to 52% in Group II, and by 49 to 72% in Group III. However, mitochondrial enzyme activities of respiratory chain were normal in all groups. These results indicate that myopathy was not induced by a secondary dysfunction of mitochondrial respiration due to low ubiquinone levels.

  16. Capillariid nematodes in Brazilian turkeys, Meleagris gallopavo (Galliformes, Phasianidae): pathology induced by Baruscapillaria obsignata and Eucoleus annulatus (Trichinelloidea, Capillariidae).

    PubMed

    Pinto, Roberto Magalhães; Brener, Beatriz; Tortelly, Rogério; Menezes, Rodrigo Caldas; Muniz-Pereira, Luís Cláudio

    2008-05-01

    The pathology induced in turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) by two capillariid nematodes, Baruscapillaria obsignata and Eucoleus annulatus is described together with data on prevalences, mean infection and range of worm burdens. B. obsignata occurred with a prevalence of 72.5% in the 40 examined hosts in a range of 2-461 nematodes and a mean intensity of 68.6, whereas E. annulatus was present in 2.5% of the animals, with a total amount of five recovered parasites. Gross lesions were not observed in the parasitized birds. Lesions due to B. obsignata mainly consisted of the thickening of intestinal villi with a mild mixed inflammatory infiltrate with the presence of mononuclear cells and heterophils. The lesions induced by E. annulatus were represented by foci of inflammatory infiltrate with heterophils in the crop epithelium and esophagus of a single infected female. These are the first pathological findings related to the presence of capillariid worms in turkeys to be reported in Brazil so far. Capillaria anatis, although present, was not pathogenic to the investigated turkeys.

  17. Muscle Tissue Damage Induced by the Venom of Bothrops asper: Identification of Early and Late Pathological Events through Proteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Cristina; Macêdo, Jéssica Kele A.; Feoli, Andrés; Escalante, Teresa; Rucavado, Alexandra; Gutiérrez, José María; Fox, Jay W.

    2016-01-01

    The time-course of the pathological effects induced by the venom of the snake Bothrops asper in muscle tissue was investigated by a combination of histology, proteomic analysis of exudates collected in the vicinity of damaged muscle, and immunodetection of extracellular matrix proteins in exudates. Proteomic assay of exudates has become an excellent new methodological tool to detect key biomarkers of tissue alterations for a more integrative perspective of snake venom-induced pathology. The time-course analysis of the intracellular proteins showed an early presence of cytosolic and mitochondrial proteins in exudates, while cytoskeletal proteins increased later on. This underscores the rapid cytotoxic effect of venom, especially in muscle fibers, due to the action of myotoxic phospholipases A2, followed by the action of proteinases in the cytoskeleton of damaged muscle fibers. Similarly, the early presence of basement membrane (BM) and other extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in exudates reflects the rapid microvascular damage and hemorrhage induced by snake venom metalloproteinases. The presence of fragments of type IV collagen and perlecan one hour after envenoming suggests that hydrolysis of these mechanically/structurally-relevant BM components plays a key role in the genesis of hemorrhage. On the other hand, the increment of some ECM proteins in the exudate at later time intervals is likely a consequence of the action of endogenous matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) or of de novo synthesis of ECM proteins during tissue remodeling as part of the inflammatory reaction. Our results offer relevant insights for a more integrative and systematic understanding of the time-course dynamics of muscle tissue damage induced by B. asper venom and possibly other viperid venoms. PMID:27035343

  18. Influenza-induced innate immunity: regulators of viral replication, respiratory tract pathology & adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Oslund, Karen L; Baumgarth, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Influenza virus infections usually cause mild to moderately severe respiratory disease, however some infections, like those involving the avian H5N1 virus, can cause massive viral pneumonia, systemic disease and death. The innate immune response of respiratory tract resident cells is the first line of defense and limits virus replication. Enhanced cytokine and chemokine production following infection, however, appears to underlie much of the pathology that develops after infection with highly pathogenic strains. A so-called `cytokine storm' can damage the lung tissue and cause systemic disease, despite the control of viral replication. By summarizing current knowledge of the innate responses mounted to influenza infection, this review highlights the importance of the respiratory tract epithelial cells as regulators of innate and adaptive immunity to influenza virus. PMID:21909336

  19. Bacterial modulins: a novel class of virulence factors which cause host tissue pathology by inducing cytokine synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, B; Poole, S; Wilson, M

    1996-01-01

    Cytokines are a diverse group of proteins and glycoproteins which have potent and wide-ranging effects on eukaryotic cell function and are now recognized as important mediators of tissue pathology in infectious diseases. It is increasingly recognized that for many bacterial species, cytokine induction is a major virulence mechanism. Until recent years, the only bacterial component known to stimulate cytokine synthesis was lipopolysaccharide (LPS). It is only within the past decade that it has been clearly shown that many components associated with the bacterial cell wall, including proteins, glycoproteins, lipoproteins, carbohydrates, and lipids, have the capacity to stimulate mammalian cells to produce a diverse array of cytokines. It has been established that many of these cytokine-inducing molecules act by mechanisms distinct from that of LPS, and thus their activities are not due to LPS contamination. Bacteria produce a wide range of virulence factors which cause host tissue pathology, and these diverse factors have been grouped into four families: adhesins, aggressins, impedins, and invasins. We suggest that the array of bacterial cytokine-inducing molecules represents a new class of bacterial virulence factor, and, by analogy with the known virulence families, we suggest the term "modulin" to describe these molecules, because the action of cytokines is to modulate eukaryotic cell behavior. This review summarizes our current understanding of cytokine biology in relation to tissue homeostasis and disease and concisely reviews the current literature on the cytokine-inducing molecules produced by gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, with an emphasis on the cellular mechanisms responsible for cytokine induction. We propose that modulins, by controlling the host immune and inflammatory responses, maintain the large commensal flora that all multicellular organisms support. PMID:8801436

  20. Effects of vitamin E administration on Plasmodium berghei induced pathological changes and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, M A; Zuwahu, M M B; Isah, M B; Jatau, I D; Aliyu, A B; Umar, I A

    2012-03-01

    The effects of daily intraperitoneal doses of 1000 i.u/kg body weight of vitamin E on the course of Plasmodium berghei NK 65 infection and the parasite-induced anemia as well as alterations in the relative weight of some selected organs and antioxidant status in mice were investigated. The number of parasitized red cells were not initially affected by the vitamin administration but were persistently lowered after 11th day post infection to the termination of the experiment. The P. berghei infection was found to induce anemia, significantly (P<0.05) increased the relative weight of liver, spleen and kidney but significantly decreased (P<0.05) the relative brain weight. However, all the parasite-induced changes in these parameters were significantly (P<0.05) ameliorated by the vitamin administration. Furthermore, malonydialdehyde concentration in the serum, liver and brain of infected animals was significantly (P<0.05) increased whereas superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were significantly (P<0.05) decreased by the infection. But vitamin E administration was found to, a significant degree (P<0.05), reversed the disease-induced alterations in these oxidative stress markers. It was concluded that vitamin E at the dose and route used prevented P. berghei induced anemia as well as alterations in relative organ weight and antioxidant status in mice.

  1. [Chronic transvenous pacemaker/implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads implantation induced pathological changes].

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhui; Dykoski, Richard; Li, Jianming

    2015-05-01

    Widely pacemaker/implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation is also related to an increasing need for transvenous lead extraction. Understanding the location and extent of pathological changes, including adhesions and fibrous tissue formation along the course of chronic pacemaker/ICD leads, are essential for operators performing lead extraction operations in order to reduce the potential life threatening complications. Three parts are included in the research, pathological examination on 83 extracted pacemaker/ICD leads using excimer laser technique from March 2008 to March 2011, autopsy examination of one died patient during lead extraction for lead-related infective endocarditis, and anatomical analysis on pacemaker/ICD leads from 10 patients died of other non-cardiac causes. Extensive encapsulated fibrous tissue around the leads and extensive adhesion/fibrosis along the course of the leads from venous entry site to the lead/myocardial interface could be detected on transvenous pacemaker/ICD leads. Since the tissue at the junction between superior vena cava (SVC) and right atrium (RA) is very thin, free of pericardium, thus, this is a common place for extensive adhesion/fibrosis and myocardial perforation/tear during lead extraction, which accounted for one death during extraction in our cohort. Extensive adhesion and fibrosis were also observed at the tricuspid valve and subvalvular structures. Leads implanted to the right ventricular apex were close to the epicardial surface and prone to perforation through myocardium. It is common to observe thrombus on the leads or at the interface between leads and myocardial tissue, especially at right atrial appendage (RAA) at the site of lead insertion. Extensive adhesions and fibrosis can be commonly seen along the course of pacemaker/ICD leads, and at SVC to RA junction, the tricuspid valve/subvalvular structures, and RA/RV lead interface. The tissue at SVC to RA junction is very thin, making it

  2. Microbiological and pathological examination of fatal calf pneumonia cases induced by bacterial and viral respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Szeredi, Levente; Jánosi, Szilárd; Pálfi, Vilmos

    2010-09-01

    The infectious origin of fatal cases of calf pneumonia was studied in 48 calves from 27 different herds on postmortem examination. Lung tissue samples were examined by pathological, histological, bacterial culture, virus isolation and immunohistochemical methods for the detection of viral and bacterial infections. Pneumonia was diagnosed in 47/48 cases and infectious agents were found in 40/47 (85%) of those cases. The presence of multiple respiratory pathogens in 23/40 (57.5%) cases indicated the complex origin of fatal calf pneumonia. The most important respiratory pathogens were Mannheimia-Pasteurella in 36/40 (90%) cases, followed by Arcanobacterium pyogenes in 16/40 (40%) cases, Mycoplasma bovis in 12/40 (30%) cases, and bovine respiratory syncytial virus in 4/40 (10%) cases. Histophilus somni was detected in 2/40 (5%) cases, while bovine herpesvirus-1, bovine viral diarrhoea virus and parainfluenza virus-3 were each found in 1/40 (2.5%) case. Mastadenovirus, bovine coronavirus, influenza A virus or Chlamydiaceae were not detected.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of reconstructed ferritin as an iron-induced pathological model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balejcikova, Lucia; Strbak, Oliver; Baciak, Ladislav; Kovac, Jozef; Masarova, Marta; Krafcik, Andrej; Frollo, Ivan; Dobrota, Dusan; Kopcansky, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Iron, an essential element of the human body, is a significant risk factor, particularly in the case of its concentration increasing above the specific limit. Therefore, iron is stored in the non-toxic form of the globular protein, ferritin, consisting of an apoferritin shell and iron core. Numerous studies confirmed the disruption of homeostasis and accumulation of iron in patients with various diseases (e.g. cancer, cardiovascular or neurological conditions), which is closely related to ferritin metabolism. Such iron imbalance enables the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a sensitive technique for the detection of iron-based aggregates through changes in the relaxation times, followed by the change in the inherent image contrast. For our in vitrostudy, modified ferritins with different iron loadings were prepared by chemical reconstruction of the iron core in an apoferritin shell as pathological model systems. The magnetic properties of samples were studied using SQUID magnetometry, while the size distribution was detected via dynamic light scattering. We have shown that MRI could represent the most advantageous method for distinguishing native ferritin from reconstructed ferritin which, after future standardisation, could then be suitable for the diagnostics of diseases associated with iron accumulation.

  4. Internal fixation of radiation-induced pathological fractures of the femur has a high rate of failure.

    PubMed

    Sternheim, A; Saidi, K; Lochab, J; O'Donnell, P W; Eward, W C; Griffin, A; Wunder, J S; Ferguson, P

    2013-08-01

    We investigated the clinical outcome of internal fixation for pathological fracture of the femur after primary excision of a soft-tissue sarcoma that had been treated with adjuvant radiotherapy. A review of our database identified 22 radiation-induced fractures of the femur in 22 patients (seven men, 15 women). We noted the mechanism of injury, fracture pattern and any complications after internal fixation, including nonunion, hardware failure, secondary fracture or deep infection. The mean age of the patients at primary excision of the tumour was 58.3 years (39 to 86). The mean time from primary excision to fracture was 73.2 months (2 to 195). The mean follow-up after fracture fixation was 65.9 months (12 to 205). Complications occurred in 19 patients (86%). Nonunion developed in 18 patients (82%), of whom 11 had a radiological nonunion at 12 months, five a nonunion and hardware failure and two an infected nonunion. One patient developed a second radiation-associated fracture of the femur after internal fixation and union of the initial fracture. A total of 13 patients (59%) underwent 24 revision operations. Internal fixation of a pathological fracture of the femur after radiotherapy for a soft-tissue sarcoma has an extremely high rate of complication and requires specialist attention.

  5. Glutathionylation of the L-type Ca2+ channel in oxidative stress-induced pathology of the heart.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Victoria P A; Hool, Livia C

    2014-10-22

    There is mounting evidence to suggest that protein glutathionylation is a key process contributing to the development of pathology. Glutathionylation occurs as a result of posttranslational modification of a protein and involves the addition of a glutathione moiety at cysteine residues. Such modification can occur on a number of proteins, and exerts a variety of functional consequences. The L-type Ca2+ channel has been identified as a glutathionylation target that participates in the development of cardiac pathology. Ca2+ influx via the L-type Ca2+ channel increases production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiomyocytes during periods of oxidative stress. This induces a persistent increase in channel open probability, and the resulting constitutive increase in Ca2+ influx amplifies the cross-talk between the mitochondria and the channel. Novel strategies utilising targeted peptide delivery to uncouple mitochondrial ROS and Ca2+ flux via the L-type Ca2+ channel following ischemia-reperfusion have delivered promising results, and have proven capable of restoring appropriate mitochondrial function in myocytes and in vivo.

  6. The pathology of experimentally induced cecal amebiasis in gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus). Liver changes and amebic liver abscess formation.

    PubMed Central

    Chadee, K.; Meerovitch, E.

    1985-01-01

    The pathogenesis of experimentally induced cecal amebiasis in gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) was studied from 5 to 60 days after inoculation. Ulcerative lesions were noted 10 to 60 days after inoculation. The sequential development of lesions was asynchronous and progressed from destruction of the interglandular epithelium and of glandular crypt elements to loss of mucosa and formation of granulomatous lesions in the submucosa involving the muscularis mucosae. Pathologic changes in the liver correlated with the formation of ulcerative cecal lesions. Subacute hepatic changes showed lymphocytic portal infiltrate, Kupffer cell hyperplasia, multinucleated giant cells, granuloma formation, and sinusoidal mononuclear and granulocytic infiltrates. Metastatic amebic liver abscesses occurred as early as 10 days after inoculation, and small abscesses were found in the portal areas of the right liver lobe. The sequential development and pathologic manifestation of the infection and the usefulness of the gerbil for the study of human intestinal amebiasis are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 PMID:4014436

  7. Treatment of pregnant BALB/c mice with sulphadoxine pyrimethamine or chloroquine abrogates Plasmodium berghei induced placental pathology.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Lalita; Shukla, Geeta

    2014-02-01

    Malaria infection during pregnancy is a risk factor for foetus survival and is associated with abortion, premature delivery and low birth weight of infants in malaria endemic regions. In these regions, prophylactic measures and treatment mainly rely on chloroquine and sulphadoxine pyrimethamine, but their efficacy in reducing the placental pathology has not been studied. Therefore, the present study was designed to assess the effectiveness of chloroquine and sulphadoxine pyrimethamine treatment in reducing the placental pathology of Plasmodium berghei infected BALB/c mice. It was observed that pregnant-infected mice, treated either with chloroquine or sulphadoxine pyrimethamine had significantly lower percent parasitaemia, 100% survival and delivered normally compared with untreated pregnant-infected mice. Interestingly, antimalarial treatment significantly reduced malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, measure of lipid peroxidation and number of apoptotic cells in the placentae of pregnant-infected treated mice. Histologically also no morphological and cellular alterations were observed in the placentae of pregnant-infected treated mice. Taken together, the study shows the effectiveness of chloroquine and sulphadoxine pyrimethamine treatment, when administered in second trimester in abrogating malaria induced oxidative stress, apoptosis and histopathological alterations in the placenta, leading to normal foetal development. © 2013.

  8. Gene therapy via inducible nitric oxide synthase: a tool for the treatment of a diverse range of pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Helen O; Coulter, Jonathan A; Robson, Tracy; Hirst, David G

    2008-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO(.)) is a reactive nitrogen radical produced by the NO synthase (NOS) enzymes; it affects a plethora of downstream physiological and pathological processes. The past two decades have seen an explosion in the understanding of the role of NO(.) biology, highlighting various protective and damaging modes of action. Much of the controversy surrounding the role of NO(.) relates to the differing concentrations generated by the three isoforms of NOS. Both calcium-dependent isoforms of the enzyme (endothelial and neuronal NOS) generate low-nanomolar/picomolar concentrations of NO(.). By contrast, the calcium-independent isoform (inducible NOS (iNOS)) generates high concentrations of NO(.), 2-3 orders of magnitude greater. This review summarizes the current literature in relation to iNOS gene therapy for the therapeutic benefit of various pathological conditions, including various states of vascular disease, wound healing, erectile dysfunction, renal dysfunction and oncology. The available data provide convincing evidence that manipulation of endogenous NO(.) using iNOS gene therapy can provide the basis for future clinical trials.

  9. Placental Pathology of Zika Virus: Viral Infection of the Placenta Induces Villous Stromal Macrophage (Hofbauer Cell) Proliferation and Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Avi Z; Yu, Weiying; Hill, D Ashley; Reyes, Christine A; Schwartz, David A

    2017-01-01

    -The placenta is an important component in understanding the fetal response to intrauterine Zika virus infection, but the pathologic changes in this organ remain largely unknown. Hofbauer cells are fetal-derived macrophages normally present in the chorionic villous stroma. They have been implicated in a variety of physiological and pathologic processes, in particular involving infectious agents. -To characterize the fetal and maternal responses and viral localization in the placenta following Zika virus transmission to an 11 weeks' gestation fetus. The clinical course was notable for prolonged viremia in the mother and extensive neuronal necrosis in the fetus. The fetus was delivered at 21 weeks' gestation after pregnancy termination. -The placenta was evaluated by using immunohistochemistry for inflammatory cells (macrophages/monocytes [Hofbauer cells], B and T lymphocytes) and proliferating cells, and an RNA probe to Zika virus. The fetal brain and the placenta were previously found to be positive for Zika virus RNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. -The placenta demonstrated prominently enlarged, hydropic chorionic villi with hyperplasia and focal proliferation of Hofbauer cells. The degree of Hofbauer cell hyperplasia gave an exaggerated immature appearance to the villi. No acute or chronic villitis, villous necrosis, remote necroinflammatory abnormalities, chorioamnionitis, funisitis, or hemorrhages were present. An RNA probe to Zika virus was positive in villous stromal cells, presumably Hofbauer cells. -Zika virus placental infection induces proliferation and prominent hyperplasia of Hofbauer cells in the chorionic villi but does not elicit villous necrosis or a maternal or fetal lymphoplasmacellular or acute inflammatory cell reaction.

  10. Glutathionylation of the L-type Ca2+ Channel in Oxidative Stress-Induced Pathology of the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Victoria P. A.; Hool, Livia C.

    2014-01-01

    There is mounting evidence to suggest that protein glutathionylation is a key process contributing to the development of pathology. Glutathionylation occurs as a result of posttranslational modification of a protein and involves the addition of a glutathione moiety at cysteine residues. Such modification can occur on a number of proteins, and exerts a variety of functional consequences. The L-type Ca2+ channel has been identified as a glutathionylation target that participates in the development of cardiac pathology. Ca2+ influx via the L-type Ca2+ channel increases production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiomyocytes during periods of oxidative stress. This induces a persistent increase in channel open probability, and the resulting constitutive increase in Ca2+ influx amplifies the cross-talk between the mitochondria and the channel. Novel strategies utilising targeted peptide delivery to uncouple mitochondrial ROS and Ca2+ flux via the L-type Ca2+ channel following ischemia-reperfusion have delivered promising results, and have proven capable of restoring appropriate mitochondrial function in myocytes and in vivo. PMID:25340983

  11. The Ability of Pandemic Influenza Virus Hemagglutinins to Induce Lower Respiratory Pathology is Associated with Decreased Surfactant Protein D Binding

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Li; Kash, John C.; Dugan, Vivien G.; Jagger, Brett W.; Lau, Yuk-Fai; Sheng, Zhong-Mei; Crouch, Erika C.; Hartshorn, Kevan L.; Taubenberger, Jeffery K.

    2011-01-01

    Pandemic influenza viral infections have been associated with viral pneumonia. Chimeric influenza viruses with the hemagglutinin segment of the 1918, 1957, 1968 or 2009 pandemic influenza viruses in the context of a seasonal H1N1 influenza genome were constructed to analyze the role of hemagglutinin (HA) in pathogenesis and cell tropism in a mouse model. We also explored whether there was an association between the ability of lung surfactant protein D (SP-D) to bind to the HA and the ability of the corresponding chimeric virus to infect bronchiolar and alveolar epithelial cells of the lower respiratory tract. Viruses expressing the hemagglutinin of pandemic viruses were associated with significant pathology in the lower respiratory tract, including acute inflammation, and showed low binding activity for SP-D. In contrast, the virus expressing the HA of a seasonal influenza strain induced only mild disease with little lung pathology in infected mice and exhibited strong in vitro binding to SP-D. PMID:21334038

  12. PEDF mediates pathological neovascularization by regulating macrophage recruitment and polarization in the mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Sha; Li, Changwei; Zhu, Yanji; Wang, Yanuo; Sui, Ailing; Zhong, Yisheng; Xie, Bing; Shen, Xi

    2017-02-17

    Macrophages have been demonstrated to play a proangiogenic role in retinal pathological vascular growth. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) works as a powerful endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor, but its role in macrophage recruitment and polarization is largely unknown. To explore the underlying mechanisms, we first evaluated macrophage polarization in the retinas of the oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) mouse model. Compared to that in normal controls, M1- and M2-like macrophages were all abundantly increased in the retinas of OIR mice. In addition, both M1 and M2 subtypes significantly promoted neovascularization in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we found that PEDF inhibited retinal neovascularization by dampening macrophage recruitment and polarization. Furthermore, PEDF inhibited macrophage polarization through adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) by regulating the activation of MAPKs and the Notch1 pathway, as we found that the phosphorylation of MAPKs, including p38MAPK, JNK and ERK, as well as the accumulation of Notch1 were essential for hypoxia-induced macrophage polarization, while PEDF significantly dampened M1 subtype-related iNOS and M2 subtype-related Arg-1 expression by inhibiting hypoxia-induced activation of Notch1 and MAPKs through ATGL. These findings reveal a protective role of PEDF against retinal neovascularization by regulating macrophage recruitment and polarization.

  13. PEDF mediates pathological neovascularization by regulating macrophage recruitment and polarization in the mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Sha; Li, Changwei; Zhu, Yanji; Wang, Yanuo; Sui, Ailing; Zhong, Yisheng; Xie, Bing; Shen, Xi

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages have been demonstrated to play a proangiogenic role in retinal pathological vascular growth. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) works as a powerful endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor, but its role in macrophage recruitment and polarization is largely unknown. To explore the underlying mechanisms, we first evaluated macrophage polarization in the retinas of the oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) mouse model. Compared to that in normal controls, M1- and M2-like macrophages were all abundantly increased in the retinas of OIR mice. In addition, both M1 and M2 subtypes significantly promoted neovascularization in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we found that PEDF inhibited retinal neovascularization by dampening macrophage recruitment and polarization. Furthermore, PEDF inhibited macrophage polarization through adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) by regulating the activation of MAPKs and the Notch1 pathway, as we found that the phosphorylation of MAPKs, including p38MAPK, JNK and ERK, as well as the accumulation of Notch1 were essential for hypoxia-induced macrophage polarization, while PEDF significantly dampened M1 subtype-related iNOS and M2 subtype-related Arg-1 expression by inhibiting hypoxia-induced activation of Notch1 and MAPKs through ATGL. These findings reveal a protective role of PEDF against retinal neovascularization by regulating macrophage recruitment and polarization. PMID:28211523

  14. The carboxy-terminal fragment of inhibitor-2 of protein phosphatase-2A induces Alzheimer disease pathology and cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaochuan; Blanchard, Julie; Kohlbrenner, Erik; Clement, Nathalie; Linden, R. Michael; Radu, Aurelian; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2010-01-01

    Development of rational therapeutic treatments of Alzheimer disease (AD) requires the elucidation of the etiopathogenic mechanisms of neurofibrillary degeneration and β-amyloidosis, the two hallmarks of this disease. Here we show, employing an adeno-associated virus serotype 1 (AAV1)-induced expression of the C-terminal fragment (I2CTF) of I2PP2A, also called SET, in rat brain, decrease in protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity, abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau, and neurodegeneration; littermates treated identically but with vector only, i.e., AAV1-enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP), served as a control. Furthermore, there was an increase in the level of activated glycogen synthase kinase-3β and enhanced expression of intraneuronal Aβ in AAV1-I2CTF animals. Morris water maze behavioral test revealed that infection with AAV1-I2CTF induced spatial reference memory and memory consolidation deficits and a decrease in the brain level of pSer133-CREB. These findings suggest a novel etiopathogenic mechanism of AD, which is initiated by the cleavage of I2PP2A, producing I2CTF, and describe a novel disease-relevant nontransgenic animal model of AD.—Wang, X., Blanchard, J., Kohlbrenner, E., Clement, N., Linden, R. M., Radu, A., Grundke-Iqbal, I., Iqbal, K. The carboxy-terminal fragment of inhibitor-2 of protein phosphatase-2A induces Alzheimer disease pathology and cognitive impairment. PMID:20651003

  15. Calcium and adenosine triphosphate control of cellular pathology: asparaginase-induced pancreatitis elicited via protease-activated receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shuang; Gerasimenko, Julia V.; Tsugorka, Tatiana; Gryshchenko, Oleksiy; Samarasinghe, Sujith; Gerasimenko, Oleg V.

    2016-01-01

    Exocytotic secretion of digestive enzymes from pancreatic acinar cells is elicited by physiological cytosolic Ca2+ signals, occurring as repetitive short-lasting spikes largely confined to the secretory granule region, that stimulate mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. By contrast, sustained global cytosolic Ca2+ elevations decrease ATP levels and cause necrosis, leading to the disease acute pancreatitis (AP). Toxic Ca2+ signals can be evoked by products of alcohol and fatty acids as well as bile acids. Here, we have investigated the mechanism by which l-asparaginase evokes AP. Asparaginase is an essential element in the successful treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, the most common type of cancer affecting children, but AP is a side-effect occurring in about 5–10% of cases. Like other pancreatitis-inducing agents, asparaginase evoked intracellular Ca2+ release followed by Ca2+ entry and also substantially reduced Ca2+ extrusion because of decreased intracellular ATP levels. The toxic Ca2+ signals caused extensive necrosis. The asparaginase-induced pathology depended on protease-activated receptor 2 and its inhibition prevented the toxic Ca2+ signals and necrosis. We tested the effects of inhibiting the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ entry by the Ca2+ channel inhibitor GSK-7975A. This markedly reduced asparaginase-induced Ca2+ entry and also protected effectively against the development of necrosis. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377732

  16. Neuronal gene expression in aluminum-induced neurofibrillary pathology: an in situ hybridization study.

    PubMed

    Chambers, C B; Muma, N A

    1997-01-01

    Alterations in cytoskeletal proteins such as the perikaryal accumulation of neurofilaments (NFs) occur in a number of human neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and may contribute to their debilitating effects. The administration of aluminum salts to rabbits induces the aberrant accumulation of NFs within the proximal axons and perikarya of vulnerable neurons and is one animal model which has been extensively studied in an attempt to gain insight into the mechanism(s) of NF perturbations in human disease. Previous studies using Northern blotting techniques to examine mRNA levels in the aluminum-induced neuropathy model have led to seemingly contradictory results. We have used in situ hybridization which provides the cellular resolution needed to: 1) determine whether there are generalized decreases in the levels of mRNA expression or decreases in mRNA encoding specific proteins; 2) determine whether alterations in mRNA levels occur specifically in neurons with NF accumulations; and 3) begin to resolve some of the apparent contradictions in the literature. A moderate dose of aluminum lactate administered on two consecutive days produced neurofibrillary tangles in spinal cord neurons seven days after the first dose. Polyadenylated mRNA levels were not altered in spinal cord neurons in aluminum-treated compared to saline-treated control animals or in tangle-bearing compared to non tangle-bearing neurons in aluminum-treated animals. Middle and high NF subunit (NFH) mRNA levels were not significantly different from polyadenylated mRNA levels in spinal cord neurons in aluminum-treated/control animals. NFH mRNA levels were decreased in neurons containing aluminum-induced NF accumulations. These results suggest that NFH gene expression may be down regulated by an inhibitory feedback mechanism induced by perikaryal accumulations of NFs. This inhibitory feedback regulation for NFH may have

  17. Effect of thiamine pyrophosphate on retinopathy induced by hyperglycemia in rats: A biochemical and pathological evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Cinici, Emine; Ahiskali, Ibrahim; Cetin, Nihal; Suleyman, Bahadir; Kukula, Osman; Altuner, Durdu; Coban, Abdulkadir; Balta, Hilal; Kuzucu, Mehmet; Suleyman, Halis

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Information is lacking on the protective effects of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) against hyperglycemia-induced retinopathy in rats. This study investigated the biochemical and histopathological aspects of the effect of TPP on hyperglycemia-induced retinopathy induced by alloxan in rats. Materials and Methods: The rats were separated into a diabetic TPP-administered group (DTPG), a diabetes control group (DCG) and a healthy group (HG). While the DTPG was given TPP, the DCG and HG were administered distilled water as a solvent at the same concentrations. This procedure was repeated daily for 3 months. At the end of this period, all of the rats were euthanized under thiopental sodium anesthesia, and biochemical and histopathological analyses of the ocular retinal tissues were performed. The results of the DTPG were compared with those of the DCG and HG. Results: TPP prevented hyperglycemia by increasing the amount of malondialdehyde and decreasing endogen antioxidants, including total glutathione, glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferase and superoxide dismutase. In addition, the amounts of the DNA oxidation product 8-hydroxyguanine were significantly lower in the retinas of the DTPG compared to the DCG. In the retinas of the DCG, there was a marked increase in vascular structures and congestion, in addition to edema. In contrast, little vascularization and edema were observed in the DTPG, and there was no congestion. The results suggest that TPP significantly reduced the degree of hyperglycemia-induced retinopathy. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that TPP may be useful for prophylaxis against diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27488151

  18. Systemic pathological effects induced by cobra (Naja naja) venom from geographically distinct origins of Indian peninsula.

    PubMed

    Shashidharamurthy, R; Mahadeswaraswamy, Y H; Ragupathi, L; Vishwanath, B S; Kemparaju, K

    2010-11-01

    Indian cobra (Naja naja) venom from different geographical locations varied in its composition and biochemical, pharmacological and immunological properties. Recently it has been shown that the variation in composition of venom from different geographical origin of Indian peninsula is due to the quantitative difference in the same components and also the presence of different biochemical entities with respect to their origin. This disparity in venom composition may be due to several environmental factors. However, very little is known about the systemic effects on vital organs caused by the venom due to regional variation. In the present investigation, the venom samples procured from eastern, western and southern regions were compared for histopathological effects on skeletal muscle and some vital organs (heart, lungs, liver and kidney) in the mouse model. All the three venom samples damaged vital organs such as cardiac muscle, gastrocnemius muscle, liver, lungs and kidneys; however, the extent of damage varied greatly. Eastern venom predominantly damaged cardiac muscle and kidney, western venom injured the liver and the southern venom affected the lung. In addition, the eastern venom caused the recruitment of a flux of inflammatory cells in the skeletal muscle unlike southern and western venom samples. These results suggest the diversity of target-specific toxins in all the three regional venoms. Thus, the study explores the possible variations in the pathological effects of cobra (Naja naja) venom samples on vital organs due to geographical distribution in the Indian subcontinent. It also emphasizes the importance of intra-specific variation of venom samples for the production of efficacious and region-specific therapeutic antivenom. Copyright © 2009. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  19. Reversible pathologic and cognitive phenotypes in an inducible model of Alzheimer-amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Melnikova, Tatiana; Fromholt, Susan; Kim, HyunSu; Lee, Deidre; Xu, Guilian; Price, Ashleigh; Moore, Brenda D.; Golde, Todd E.; Felsenstein, Kevin M.; Savonenko, Alena; Borchelt, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic mice that express mutant amyloid precursor protein (APPsi) using tet-Off vector systems provide an alternative model for assessing short- and long-term effects of Aβ-targeting therapies on phenotypes related to the deposition of Alzheimer-type amyloid. Here we use such a model, termed APPsi:tTA, to determine what phenotypes persist in mice with high amyloid burden after new production of APP/Aβ has been suppressed. We find that 12-13 month old APPsi:tTA mice are impaired in cognitive tasks that assess short- and long-term memories. Acutely suppressing new APPsi/Aβ production produced highly significant improvements in performance short-term spatial memory tasks; which upon continued suppression translated to superior performance in more demanding tasks that assess long-term spatial memory and working memory. Deficits in episodic-like memory and cognitive flexibility, however, were more persistent. Arresting mutant APPsi production caused a rapid decline in the brain levels of soluble APP ectodomains, full-length APP, and APP C-terminal fragments. As expected, amyloid deposits persisted after new APP/Aβ production was inhibited whereas, unexpectedly, we detected persistent pools of solubilizable, relatively mobile, Aβ42. Additionally, we observed persistent levels of Aβ immunoreactive entities that were of a size consistent with SDS-resistant oligomeric assemblies. Thus, in this model with significant amyloid pathology, a rapid amelioration of cognitive deficits was observed despite persistent levels of oligomeric Aβ assemblies and low, but detectable solubilizable Aβ42 peptides. These findings implicate complex relationships between accumulating Aβ and activities of APP, soluble APP ectodomains, and/or APP CTFs in mediating cognitive deficits in this model of amyloidosis. PMID:23447589

  20. Reversible pathologic and cognitive phenotypes in an inducible model of Alzheimer-amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Melnikova, Tatiana; Fromholt, Susan; Kim, HyunSu; Lee, Deidre; Xu, Guilian; Price, Ashleigh; Moore, Brenda D; Golde, Todd E; Felsenstein, Kevin M; Savonenko, Alena; Borchelt, David R

    2013-02-27

    Transgenic mice that express mutant amyloid precursor protein (APPsi) using tet-Off vector systems provide an alternative model for assessing short- and long-term effects of Aβ-targeting therapies on phenotypes related to the deposition of Alzheimer-type amyloid. Here we use such a model, termed APPsi:tTA, to determine what phenotypes persist in mice with high amyloid burden after new production of APP/Aβ has been suppressed. We find that 12- to 13-month-old APPsi:tTA mice are impaired in cognitive tasks that assess short- and long-term memories. Acutely suppressing new APPsi/Aβ production produced highly significant improvements in performing short-term spatial memory tasks, which upon continued suppression translated to superior performance in more demanding tasks that assess long-term spatial memory and working memory. Deficits in episodic-like memory and cognitive flexibility, however, were more persistent. Arresting mutant APPsi production caused a rapid decline in the brain levels of soluble APP ectodomains, full-length APP, and APP C-terminal fragments. As expected, amyloid deposits persisted after new APP/Aβ production was inhibited, whereas, unexpectedly, we detected persistent pools of solubilizable, relatively mobile, Aβ42. Additionally, we observed persistent levels of Aβ-immunoreactive entities that were of a size consistent with SDS-resistant oligomeric assemblies. Thus, in this model with significant amyloid pathology, a rapid amelioration of cognitive deficits was observed despite persistent levels of oligomeric Aβ assemblies and low, but detectable solubilizable Aβ42 peptides. These findings implicate complex relationships between accumulating Aβ and activities of APP, soluble APP ectodomains, and/or APP C-terminal fragments in mediating cognitive deficits in this model of amyloidosis.

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus-induced pathology favored by cellular transmission and activation

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.E.; Yoffe, B.; Bosworth, C.G.; Hollinger, F.B.; Rich, R.R.

    1988-03-01

    Epidemiological data suggest that transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) occurs primarily by transference of virally infected cells. However, the efficiency of lytic productive infection induced by HIV after transmission of cell-associated virus vs. free virus is difficult to assess. The present studies compare the extent of depletion of CD4+ (helper/inducer) T cells after mixing uninfected cells with either free HIV or irradiated HIV-infected allogeneic or autologous cells in vitro. Rapid CD4+ cellular depletion occurred only in cultures containing allogeneic infected cells or after addition of a nonspecific T cell activation signal to cultures with autologous infected cells. These in vitro observations strongly support the epidemiological implication that interactions between infected and uninfected cells are the most efficient means of transmission and HIV-induced cytopathology in vivo. They also provide direct support for the concept that immunological stimulation by foreign cells infected with HIV dramatically increases the likelihood of transmission. These in vitro observations suggest a model for the acquisition of HIV in vivo and the role of cellular activation in dissemination of the virus to uninfected cells in an infected individual.

  2. Honokiol inhibits pathological retinal neovascularization in oxygen-induced retinopathy mouse model.

    PubMed

    Vavilala, Divya Teja; O'Bryhim, Bliss E; Ponnaluri, V K Chaithanya; White, R Sid; Radel, Jeff; Symons, R C Andrew; Mukherji, Mridul

    2013-09-06

    Aberrant activation of the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) pathway is the underlying cause of retinal neovascularization, one of the most common causes of blindness worldwide. The HIF pathway also plays critical roles during tumor angiogenesis and cancer stem cell transformation. We have recently shown that honokiol is a potent inhibitor of the HIF pathway in a number of cancer and retinal pigment epithelial cell lines. Here we evaluate the safety and efficacy of honokiol, digoxin, and doxorubicin, three recently identified HIF inhibitors from natural sources. Our studies show that honokiol has a better safety to efficacy profile as a HIF inhibitor than digoxin and doxorubicin. Further, we show for the first time that daily intraperitoneal injection of honokiol starting at postnatal day (P) 12 in an oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) mouse model significantly reduced retinal neovascularization at P17. Administration of honokiol also prevents the oxygen-induced central retinal vaso-obliteration, characteristic feature of the OIR model. Additionally, honokiol enhanced physiological revascularization of the retinal vascular plexuses. Since honokiol suppresses multiple pathways activated by HIF, in addition to the VEGF signaling, it may provide advantages over current treatments utilizing specific VEGF antagonists for ocular neovascular diseases and cancers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Chronic inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammation prevents ischaemia-induced vascular pathology in type II diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ali; Choi, Soo-kyoung; Galan, Maria; Kassan, Modar; Partyka, Megan; Kadowitz, Philip; Henrion, Daniel; Trebak, Mohamed; Belmadani, Souad; Matrougui, Khalid

    2012-06-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and inflammation are important mechanisms that underlie many of the serious consequences of type II diabetes. However, the role of ER stress and inflammation in impaired ischaemia-induced neovascularization in type II diabetes is unknown. We studied ischaemia-induced neovascularization in the hind-limb of 4-week-old db - /db- mice and their controls treated with or without the ER stress inhibitor (tauroursodeoxycholic acid, TUDCA, 150 mg/kg per day) and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (anakinra, 0.5 µg/mouse per day) for 4 weeks. Blood pressure was similar in all groups of mice. Blood glucose, insulin levels, and body weight were reduced in db - /db- mice treated with TUDCA. Increased cholesterol and reduced adiponectin in db - /db- mice were restored by TUDCA and anakinra treatment. ER stress and inflammation in the ischaemic hind-limb in db - /db- mice were attenuated by TUDCA and anakinra treatment. Ischaemia-induced neovascularization and blood flow recovery were significantly reduced in db - /db- mice compared to control. Interestingly, neovascularization and blood flow recovery were restored in db - /db- mice treated with TUDCA or anakinra compared to non-treated db - /db- mice. TUDCA and anakinra enhanced eNOS-cGMP, VEGFR2, and reduced ERK1/2 MAP-kinase signalling, while endothelial progenitor cell number was similar in all groups of mice. Our findings demonstrate that the inhibition of ER stress and inflammation prevents impaired ischaemia-induced neovascularization in type II diabetic mice. Thus, ER stress and inflammation could be potential targets for a novel therapeutic approach to prevent impaired ischaemia-induced vascular pathology in type II diabetes.

  4. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Pulmonary Infection in Humanized Mice Induces Human Anti-RSV Immune Responses and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anurag; Wu, Wenzhu; Sung, Biin; Huang, Jing; Tsao, Tiffany; Li, Xiangming; Gomi, Rika; Tsuji, Moriya

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of lower respiratory tract disease, which causes high rates of morbidity and mortality in infants and the elderly. Models of human RSV pulmonary disease are needed to better understand RSV pathogenesis and to assess the efficacy of RSV vaccines. We assessed the RSV-specific human innate, humoral, and cellular immune responses in humanized mice (mice with a human immune system [HIS mice]) with functional human CD4+ T and B cells. These mice were generated by introduction of HLA class II genes, various human cytokines, and human B cell activation factor into immunodeficient NOD scid gamma (NSG) mice by the use of an adeno-associated virus vector, followed by engraftment of human hematopoietic stem cells. During the first 3 days of infection, HIS mice lost more weight and cleared RSV faster than NSG mice. Human chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 3 (CCL3) and human interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression was detected in the RSV-infected HIS mice. The pathological features induced by RSV infection in HIS mice included peribronchiolar inflammation, neutrophil predominance in the bronchioalveolar lavage fluid, and enhanced airway mucus production. Human anti-RSV IgG and RSV-neutralizing antibodies were detected in serum and human anti-RSV mucosal IgA was detected in bronchioalveolar lavage fluid for up to 6 weeks. RSV infection induced an RSV-specific human gamma interferon response in HIS mouse splenocytes. These results indicate that human immune cells can induce features of RSV lung disease, including mucus hyperplasia, in murine lungs and that HIS mice can be used to elicit human anti-RSV humoral and cellular immunity. IMPORTANCE Infections with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are common and can cause severe lung disease in infants and the elderly. The lack of a suitable animal model with disease features similar to those in humans has hampered efforts to predict the efficacy of novel anti-RSV therapies and

  5. Honokiol inhibits pathological retinal neovascularization in oxygen-induced retinopathy mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Vavilala, Divya Teja; O’Bryhim, Bliss E.; Ponnaluri, V.K. Chaithanya; White, R. Sid; Radel, Jeff; Symons, R.C. Andrew; Mukherji, Mridul

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Aberrant activation of HIF pathway is the underlying cause of ischemic neovascularization. •Honokiol has better therapeutic index as a HIF inhibitor than digoxin and doxorubicin. •Daily IP injection of honokiol in OIR mouse model reduced retinal neovascularization. •Honokiol also prevents vaso-obliteration, the characteristic feature of the OIR model. •Honokiol enhanced physiological revascularization of the retinal vascular plexuses. -- Abstract: Aberrant activation of the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) pathway is the underlying cause of retinal neovascularization, one of the most common causes of blindness worldwide. The HIF pathway also plays critical roles during tumor angiogenesis and cancer stem cell transformation. We have recently shown that honokiol is a potent inhibitor of the HIF pathway in a number of cancer and retinal pigment epithelial cell lines. Here we evaluate the safety and efficacy of honokiol, digoxin, and doxorubicin, three recently identified HIF inhibitors from natural sources. Our studies show that honokiol has a better safety to efficacy profile as a HIF inhibitor than digoxin and doxorubicin. Further, we show for the first time that daily intraperitoneal injection of honokiol starting at postnatal day (P) 12 in an oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) mouse model significantly reduced retinal neovascularization at P17. Administration of honokiol also prevents the oxygen-induced central retinal vaso-obliteration, characteristic feature of the OIR model. Additionally, honokiol enhanced physiological revascularization of the retinal vascular plexuses. Since honokiol suppresses multiple pathways activated by HIF, in addition to the VEGF signaling, it may provide advantages over current treatments utilizing specific VEGF antagonists for ocular neovascular diseases and cancers.

  6. Biliary albumin excretion induced by bile salts in rats is a pathological phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, M.; Kitani, K.; Kanai, S. )

    1989-09-01

    The bile to plasma 125I-albumin concentration ratio (B/P ratio) was examined before and during various bile salt infusions in male Wistar rats that had previously received iv injection of 125I-albumin. Endogenous rat albumin and IgG concentrations in the bile were also determined by a single radial immunodiffusion method. Taurocholate (TC) infusion (1.0 mumol/min/100 g body wt) significantly increased the bile flow rate in the first hr but the flow began to decline in the second hr. The B/P ratio as well as rat albumin (and IgG) excretion into the bile significantly increased as early as 15 min after the start of TC infusion, and the increase became more pronounced in the second hr, when the bile flow began to decrease. Infusion of taurochenodeoxycholate (TCDC, 0.4 mumol/min/100 g) caused a reduction in bile flow 15 min after the start of infusion but the B/P ratio increased 40 times at its peak compared with the basal value before the bile salt infusion. Simultaneous infusion of tauroursodeoxycholate (TUDC, 0.6 mumol/min/100 g) and TCDC not only abolished the cholestasis induced by TCDC but maintained stable choleresis as long as for 2 hr. During this choleretic period, the B/P ration never exceeded the basal value. The choleresis induced by either taurodehydrocholate (TDHC) or bucolome was not accompanied by enhanced albumin excretion. In rats given TDHC infusion, albumin excretion started to increase only after the bile flow began to decline following the initial choleretic period. The enhanced excretion of albumin induced by TC and TCDC is therefore suggested to be caused not by the choleresis per se but by a possible concomitant increase in the communication between sinusoids and bile canaliculi, which eventually leads to cholestasis.

  7. [Amiodaron neuropathy: clinical and pathological study of a new drug induced lipidosis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Dudognon, P; Hauw, J J; de Baecque, C; Derrida, J P; Escourolle, R; Nick, E J

    1979-01-01

    The authors report a case of amiodaron-induced neuropathy in a seventy one years old man. First signs appeared seventeen months after the treatment was started with 400 mg/day for one year and continued with 200 mg/day. Examination on the 29th month disclosed a severe sensory and motor deficit of the limbs with distal predominancy. Motor nerve conduction velocity was strongly impaired without modification of distal latencies. Fundi were normal. The patient improved quickly after drug withdrawal. The authors review the rare similar cases reported in the literature and attempt to describe the clinical caracteristics of amiodaron neuropathy. Qualitative and quantitative light and electron microscopical studies of nerve, muscle and skin biopsies, including teased fibers preparations were performed and they disclosed a marked reduction of the number of myelinated fibers. Wallerian degeneration predominated (31 p. 100) other segmental demyalination (25 p. 100). Numerous polymorphous lipid-laden lysosomes were present in Schwann cells, fibrocytes, pericytes, endothelial and muscle cells. These previously undescribed morphological findings are similar to those present in perhexiline maleate intoxications. We believe amiodaron neuropathy is a new neuropathy with drug-induced lipidosis.

  8. Minor pathological changes are induced by naltrexone-poly(DL-lactide) implants in pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Farid, W O; McCallum, D; Tait, R J; Dunlop, S A; Hulse, G K

    2009-12-15

    Oral naltrexone is used to treat alcohol and heroin dependence but is associated with poor patient compliance. Sustained-release preparations have been developed to overcome noncompliance. Many sustained-release preparations are composed of polymers combined with naltrexone. Limited data indicate that polymers induce variable levels of tissue reactivity and that naltrexone may increase this effect. A slow-release subcutaneous naltrexone-poly (DL-lactide) implant is currently being trialed to treat heroin dependence in Western Australia. A minority of women fall pregnant and, although tissue reactivity in nonpregnant humans is relatively minor, detailed chronological data during pregnancy are lacking. Histological changes in pregnant rats were assessed; a single active tablet containing poly[trans-3,6-dimethyl-1,4-dioxyane-2,5-dione] (DL-lactide) loaded with 25 mg of naltrexone was implanted subcutaneously, and tissue response was compared with inactive polymer implantation. Rats were timed mated at 13-26 days postimplant. Tissue assessment up to 75 days by a pathologist showed that naltrexone induced chronic inflammatory response in a dose-dependent manner, although still at a low level. Furthermore, for inactive implants, minimal foreign body reaction and fibrosis, together with low-level inflammation, suggested good long-term biocompatibility. We conclude that the Australian naltrexone-poly(DL-lactide) implant is tolerated in pregnant rats, reinforcing its potential role for managing alcohol and heroin dependence in pregnant humans.

  9. Radiation-Induced Central Nervous System Death - A study of the Pathologic Findings in Monkeys Irradiated with Massive Doses of Cobalt-60 (Gamma) Radiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1959-04-01

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Technical Information Service AD-AO36 168 RADIATION-INDUCED CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DEATH - A STUDY OF THE...ý." - ý " . :..’ýý.ý-. .. , . ý 4 ý .. -- ’ý.- -!:;:ý’,. 1,ý,-: WJiAUOK4KOUED CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM NT A Study of the Pathologic Findings in...University SCHOOL OF AVIATION MEDICINE, USAF Randolph AFB, Texas April 1959 7757-. AdIAIONH-INDUCED CENTRAL NEVOUS $Y$194 DUTH A Study of the Pathologic

  10. DNA Methylation Indicates Susceptibility to Isoproterenol-Induced Cardiac Pathology and Is Associated With Chromatin States

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haodong; Orozco, Luz; Wang, Jessica; Rau, Christoph D.; Rubbi, Liudmilla; Ren, Shuxun; Wang, Yibin; Pellegrini, Matteo; Lusis, Aldons J.; Vondriska, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Only a small portion of the known heritability of cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure can be explained based on single gene mutations. Chromatin structure and regulation provide a substrate through which genetic differences in non-coding regions may impact cellular function and response to disease, but the mechanisms are unknown. Objective We conducted genome-wide measurements of DNA methylation in different strains of mice that are susceptible and resistant to isoproterenol-induced dysfunction to test the hypothesis that this epigenetic mark may play a causal role in the development of heart failure. Methods and Results BALB/cJ and BUB/BnJ mice, determined to be susceptible and resistant to isoproterenol-induced heart failure respectively, were administered the drug for 3 weeks via osmotic minipump. Reduced representational bisulfite sequencing was then used to compare the differences between the cardiac DNA methylome in the basal state between strains and then following isoproterenol treatment. Single base resolution DNA methylation measurements were obtained and revealed a bimodal distribution of methylation in the heart, enriched in lone intergenic CpGs and depleted from CpG islands around genes. Isoproterenol induced global decreases in methylation in both strains; however, the basal methylation pattern between strains shows striking differences that may be predictive of disease progression prior to environmental stress. The global correlation between promoter methylation and gene expression (as measured by microarray) was modest and revealed itself only with focused analyses of transcription start site and gene body regions (in contrast to when gene methylation was examined in toto). Modules of co-methylated genes displayed correlation with other protein-based epigenetic marks supporting the hypothesis that chromatin modifications act in a combinatorial manner to specify transcriptional phenotypes in the heart. Conclusions This study

  11. Arsenic-Induced Genotoxicity and Genetic Susceptibility to Arsenic-Related Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Faita, Francesca; Cori, Liliana; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Andreassi, Maria Grazia

    2013-01-01

    The arsenic (As) exposure represents an important problem in many parts of the World. Indeed, it is estimated that over 100 million individuals are exposed to arsenic, mainly through a contamination of groundwaters. Chronic exposure to As is associated with adverse effects on human health such as cancers, cardiovascular diseases, neurological diseases and the rate of morbidity and mortality in populations exposed is alarming. The purpose of this review is to summarize the genotoxic effects of As in the cells as well as to discuss the importance of signaling and repair of arsenic-induced DNA damage. The current knowledge of specific polymorphisms in candidate genes that confer susceptibility to arsenic exposure is also reviewed. We also discuss the perspectives offered by the determination of biological markers of early effect on health, incorporating genetic polymorphisms, with biomarkers for exposure to better evaluate exposure-response clinical relationships as well as to develop novel preventative strategies for arsenic- health effects. PMID:23583964

  12. MIF Participates in Toxoplasma gondii-Induced Pathology Following Oral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Madi, Kalil; Feijó, Daniel F.; Assunção-Miranda, Iranaia; Souza, Heitor S. P.; Bozza, Marcelo T.

    2011-01-01

    Background Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is essential for controlling parasite burden and survival in a model of systemic Toxoplasma gondii infection. Peroral T. gondii infection induces small intestine necrosis and death in susceptible hosts, and in many aspects resembles inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Considering the critical role of MIF in the pathogenesis of IBD, we hypothesized that MIF participates in the inflammatory response induced by oral infection with T. gondii. Methodology/Principal Findings Mif deficient (Mif−/−) and wild-type mice in the C57Bl/6 background were orally infected with T. gondii strain ME49. Mif−/− mice had reduced lethality, ileal inflammation and tissue damage despite of an increased intestinal parasite load compared to wt mice. Lack of MIF caused a reduction of TNF-α, IL-12, IFN-γ and IL-23 and an increased expression of IL-22 in ileal mucosa. Moreover, suppressed pro-inflammatory responses at the ileal mucosa observed in Mif−/− mice was not due to upregulation of IL-4, IL-10 or TGF-β. MIF also affected the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) but not MMP-2 in the intestine of infected mice. Signs of systemic inflammation including the increased concentrations of inflammatory cytokines in the plasma and liver damage were less pronounced in Mif−/− mice compared to wild-type mice. Conclusion/Significance In conclusion, our data suggested that in susceptible hosts MIF controls T. gondii infection with the cost of increasing local and systemic inflammation, tissue damage and death. PMID:21977228

  13. Comparative molecular pathology of cadmium- and all-trans-retinoic acid-induced postaxial forelimb ectrodactyly

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Xiaoyan; Lee, Grace S.; Shimizu, Hirohito; Collins, Michael D.

    2007-11-15

    Cadmium chloride (CdCl{sub 2}) and all-trans-retinoic acid (RA) induce postaxial forelimb ectrodactyly in C57BL/6N mice when administered during early limb development, and co-administration yields a synergistic response suggesting a common final pathway to the defect. In the current study, forelimb buds from embryos given high maternal teratogenic doses of CdCl{sub 2} or RA, or the combination of both agents at low doses were collected at various time points after treatment on GD 9.5 and examined for cellular apoptosis, proliferation, and patterning genes. Some cellular perturbations detected in the developing limb bud were similar for both teratogens, whereas other alterations were unique to each agent. For example, at 12 and 18 h, CdCl{sub 2} treatment increased apoptotic cells in the mesenchyme underneath the apical ectodermal ridge (AER), whereas RA caused apoptosis in the AER and proximal mesenchyme. Further, the combined low-dose treatment increased cell death synergistically in all three regions. CdCl{sub 2} and the low-dose combined treatment inhibited mesenchymal proliferation at 12 h, which was associated with induction of p21{sup cip1} and inhibition of phospho-c-Jun. In contrast, RA did not inhibit mesenchymal proliferation and did not induce p21{sup cip1} expression or change c-Jun phosphorylation. All three treatment groups showed a delay in the patterning of distal chondrogenesis centers as indicated by Sox9 expression. There was also common inhibition in the expression of AER markers, Fgf8 and Fgf4, and the mesenchymal marker Msx1 involved in the maintenance of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Collectively, a model is hypothesized where limb patterning can be perturbed by insults to both ectoderm and mesoderm.

  14. Hydrogen Sulfide Ameliorates Homocysteine-Induced Alzheimer's Disease-Like Pathology, Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption, and Synaptic Disorder.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Pradip K; Kyles, Philip; Kalani, Anuradha; Tyagi, Neetu

    2016-05-01

    Elevated plasma total homocysteine (Hcy) level is associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). During transsulfuration pathways, Hcy is metabolized into hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which is a synaptic modulator, as well as a neuro-protective agent. However, the role of hydrogen sulfide, as well as N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation, in hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and synaptic dysfunction, leading to AD pathology is not clear. Therefore, we hypothesized that the inhibition of neuronal NMDA-R by H2S and MK801 mitigate the Hcy-induced BBB disruption and synapse dysfunction, in part by decreasing neuronal matrix degradation. Hcy intracerebral (IC) treatment significantly impaired cerebral blood flow (CBF), and cerebral circulation and memory function. Hcy treatment also decreases the expression of cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) in the brain along with increased expression of NMDA-R (NR1) and synaptosomal Ca(2+) indicating excitotoxicity. Additionally, we found that Hcy treatment increased protein and mRNA expression of intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9 and also increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity in the brain. The increased expression of ICAM-1, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and the decreased expression of vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin and claudin-5 indicates BBB disruption and vascular inflammation. Moreover, we also found decreased expression of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2), postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), synapse-associated protein 97 (SAP-97), synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25), synaptophysin, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) showing synapse dysfunction in the hippocampus. Furthermore, NaHS and MK801 treatment ameliorates BBB disruption, CBF, and synapse functions in the mice brain. These results demonstrate a neuro-protective effect of H2S over Hcy-induced

  15. Interferon Gamma-Dependent Intestinal Pathology Contributes to the Lethality in Bacterial Superantigen-Induced Toxic Shock Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tilahun, Ashenafi Y.; Holz, Marah; Wu, Tsung-Teh; David, Chella S.; Rajagopalan, Govindarajan

    2011-01-01

    Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) caused by the superantigen exotoxins of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes is characterized by robust T cell activation, profound elevation in systemic levels of multiple cytokines, including interferon-γ (IFN-γ), followed by multiple organ dysfunction and often death. As IFN-γ possesses pro- as well as anti-inflammatory properties, we delineated its role in the pathogenesis of TSS. Antibody-mediated in vivo neutralization of IFN-γ or targeted disruption of IFN-γ gene conferred significant protection from lethal TSS in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice. Following systemic high dose SEB challenge, whereas the HLA-DR3.IFN-γ+/+ mice became sick and succumbed to TSS, HLA-DR3.IFN-γ−/− mice appeared healthy and were significantly protected from SEB-induced lethality. SEB-induced systemic cytokine storm was significantly blunted in HLA-DR3.IFN-γ−/− transgenic mice. Serum concentrations of several cytokines (IL-4, IL-10, IL-12p40 and IL-17) and chemokines (KC, rantes, eotaxin and MCP-1) were significantly lower in HLA-DR3.IFN-γ−/− transgenic mice. However, SEB-induced T cell expansion in the spleens was unaffected and expansion of SEB-reactive TCR Vβ8+ CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was even more pronounced in HLA-DR3.IFN-γ−/− transgenic mice when compared to HLA-DR3.IFN-γ+/+ mice. A systematic histopathological examination of several vital organs revealed that both HLA-DR3.IFN-γ+/+ and HLA-DR3.IFN-γ−/− transgenic mice displayed comparable severe inflammatory changes in lungs, and liver during TSS. Remarkably, whereas the small intestines from HLA-DR3.IFN-γ+/+ transgenic mice displayed significant pathological changes during TSS, the architecture of small intestines in HLA-DR3.IFN-γ−/− transgenic mice was preserved. In concordance with these histopathological changes, the gut permeability to macromolecules was dramatically increased in HLA-DR3.IFN-γ+/+ but not HLA-DR3.IFN-γ−/− mice during TSS. Overall, IFN

  16. The pathology of lithium induced nephropathy: a case report and review, with emphasis on the demonstration of mast cells.

    PubMed

    B N, Kumarguru; M, Natarajan; Nagarajappa, A H

    2013-02-01

    Lithium is a psychotropic agent which is widely employed in the psychiatric practice throughout the world. The therapeutic index of lithium is low and an acute intoxication may appear, which may lead to death or a permanent disability. A frequent side effect of lithium is renal toxicity. The collecting tubules have been identified as the site of action of lithium, due to the down regulation of Acquaporin-2. The mast cells have been associated with a wide range of human renal diseases. They have been documented to be associated with interstitial fibrosis and an impaired renal function. We are reporting a case of a 42 year old male who was admitted with a history of an altered sensorium of short duration. He had bipolar disorder and was on lithium. Investigations revealed a severely compromised renal function. The patient's condition worsened and he expired. A necropsy was performed. The kidneys and the lungs were subjected to a histopathological examination. The kidneys showed a significant Chronic Tubulointerstitial Nephropathy [CTIN] and a considerable glomerular pathology. Toludine blue [1%] staining demonstrated mast cells in the interstitium and the connective tissue of the renal pelvis. This appears to be the first time that mast cells were demonstrated in a case of lithium induced nephropathy in humans. It may be hypothesized that mast cells may possibly play a role in lithium induced nephropathy as a concurrent mechanism.

  17. Enduring deficits in memory and neuronal pathology after blast-induced traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Sajja, Venkata Siva Sai Sujith; Hubbard, W. Brad; Hall, Christina S.; Ghoddoussi, Farhad; Galloway, Matthew P.; VandeVord, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Few preclinical studies have assessed the long-term neuropathology and behavioral deficits after sustaining blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT). Previous studies have shown extensive astrogliosis and cell death at acute stages (<7 days) but the temporal response at a chronic stage has yet to be ascertained. Here, we used behavioral assays, immmunohistochemistry and neurochemistry in limbic areas such as the amygdala (Amy), Hippocampus (Hipp), nucleus accumbens (Nac), and prefrontal cortex (PFC), to determine the long-term effects of a single blast exposure. Behavioral results identified elevated avoidance behavior and decreased short-term memory at either one or three months after a single blast event. At three months after BINT, markers for neurodegeneration (FJB) and microglia activation (Iba-1) increased while index of mature neurons (NeuN) significantly decreased in all brain regions examined. Gliosis (GFAP) increased in all regions except the Nac but only PFC was positive for apoptosis (caspase-3). At three months, tau was selectively elevated in the PFC and Hipp whereas α-synuclein transiently increased in the Hipp at one month after blast exposure. The composite neurochemical measure, myo-inositol+glycine/creatine, was consistently increased in each brain region three months following blast. Overall, a single blast event resulted in enduring long-term effects on behavior and neuropathological sequelae. PMID:26537106

  18. Experimental pneumococcal meningitis causes central nervous system pathology without inducing the 72-kd heat shock protein.

    PubMed Central

    Täuber, M. G.; Kennedy, S. L.; Tureen, J. H.; Lowenstein, D. H.

    1992-01-01

    We examined whether experimental pneumococcal meningitis induced the 72-kd heat shock protein (HSP72), a sensitive marker of neuronal stress in other models of central nervous system (CNS) injury. Brain injury was characterized by vasculitis, cerebritis, and abscess formation in the cortex of infected animals. The extent of these changes correlated with the size of the inoculum (P less than 0.003) and with pathophysiologic parameters of disease severity, i.e., cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lactate (r = 0.61, P less than 0.0001) and CSF glucose concentrations (r = -0.55, P less than 0.0001). Despite the presence of numerous cortical regions having morphologic evidence of injury, HSP72 was not detected in most animals. When present, only rare neurons were HSP72 positive. Western blot analysis of brain samples confirmed the paucity of HSP72 induction. The lack of neuronal HSP72 expression in this model suggests that at least some of the events leading to neuronal injury in meningitis are unique, when compared with CNS diseases associated with HSP72 induction. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1632471

  19. Effect of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) on pathological changes in dimethylhydrazine-induced rat colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Bobek, P; Galbavy, S; Ozdin, L

    1998-01-01

    The effect of 5% of dried oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) in the diet on the dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon carcinogenesis was studied in male Wistar rats. DMH in a dose of 20 mg/kg of body weight was applied to animals once a week during a period of 12 weeks. Mushroom diet was applied either after treatment with DMH for another 21 weeks or during the whole experiment. Mushroom diet reduced significantly the incidence of lymphoid hyperplasia foci when mushroom was supplemented during the whole experiment. Tumour lesions could be characterized either as carcinoma in situ, or as infiltrating adenocarcinoma. Mushroom diet did not affect significantly the incidence of tumours. Nevertheless, a reduction in total number of tumours was observed in both groups of animals fed mushroom diet. A significant reduction of the number of tumour foci of the type carcinoma in situ was observed in animals fed the oyster mushroom during the whole experiment. Also these animals had the significantly lower number of aberrant crypt foci. Mushroom diet reduced the ornithine decarboxylase activity in the colon and in the liver when oyster mushroom diet was administered during the whole experiment.

  20. The effect of dry needling and treadmill running on inducing pathological changes in rat Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bom Soo; Joo, Young Chae; Choi, Byung Hyune; Kim, Kil Hwan; Kang, Joon Soon; Park, So Ra

    2015-11-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a common degenerative condition without a definitive treatment. An adequate chronic animal model of Achilles tendinopathy has not yet been developed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the individual and combined effects of dry needling and treadmill running on the Achilles tendon of rats. Percutaneous dry needling, designed to physically replicate microrupture of collagen fibers in overloaded tendons, was performed on the right Achilles tendon of 80 Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were randomly divided into two groups: a treadmill group, which included rats that underwent daily uphill treadmill running (n = 40), and a cage group, which included rats that could move freely within their cages (n = 40). At the end of weeks 1 and 4, 20 rats from each group were sacrificed, and bilateral Achilles tendons were collected. The harvested tendons were subjected to mechanical testing and histological analysis. Dry needling induced histological and mechanical changes in the Achilles tendons at week 1, and the changes persisted at week 4. The needled Achilles tendons of the treadmill group tended to show more severe histological and mechanical changes than those of the cage group, although these differences were not statistically significant. Dry needling combined with free cage activity or treadmill running produced tendinopathy-like changes in rat Achilles tendons up to 4 weeks after injury. Dry needling is an easy procedure with a short induction period and a high success rate, suggesting it may have relevance in the design of an Achilles tendinopathy model.

  1. Pathology of non-thermal irreversible electroporation (N-TIRE)-induced ablation of the canine brain

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Paulo A.; Roberston, John L.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the neuropathologic features of normal canine brain ablated with non-thermal irreversible electroporation (N-TIRE). The parietal cerebral cortices of four dogs were treated with N-TIRE using a dose-escalation protocol with an additional dog receiving sham treatment. Animals were allowed to recover following N-TIRE ablation and the effects of treatment were monitored with clinical and magnetic resonance imaging examinations. Brains were subjected to histopathologic and ultrastructural assessment along with Bcl-2, caspase-3, and caspase-9 immunohistochemical staining following sacrifice 72 h post-treatment. Adverse clinical effects of N-TIRE were only observed in the dog treated at the upper energy tier. MRI and neuropathologic examinations indicated that N-TIRE ablation resulted in focal regions of severe cytoarchitectural and blood-brain-barrier disruption. Lesion size correlated to the intensity of the applied electrical field. N-TIRE-induced lesions were characterized by parenchymal necrosis and hemorrhage; however, large blood vessels were preserved. A transition zone containing parenchymal edema, perivascular inflammatory cuffs, and reactive gliosis was interspersed between the necrotic focus and normal neuropil. Apoptotic labeling indices were not different between the N-TIRE-treated and control brains. This study identified N-TIRE pulse parameters that can be used to safely create circumscribed foci of brain necrosis while selectively preserving major vascular structures. PMID:23820168

  2. Cruzipain induces autoantibodies against cardiac muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Functional and pathological implications.

    PubMed

    Sterin-Borda, Leonor; Giordanengo, Laura; Joensen, Lilian; Gea, Susana

    2003-09-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate whether cruzipain, a Trypanosoma cruzi immunodominant antigen, was able to induce antibodies reactive to the cardiac M(2) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M(2) mAChR). Immunization with cruzipain that was devoid of enzyme activity triggered IgG antibodies against cardiac M(2) mAChR. By radioligand competition assay we proved that the anti-cruzipain IgG fraction, purified from serum, inhibited binding of the specific M(2) mAChR radioligand [(3)H]quinuclidinyl benzilate. We also demonstrated that anti-cruzipain IgG reacted against the second extracellular loop of the M(2) mAChR. The corresponding affinity-purified serum anti-M(2)e2 IgG (reacting against a synthetic peptide corresponding to this loop in humans) displayed agonist-like activity associated with specific M(2) mAChR activation - increase of cGMP, inositol phosphate accumulation and nitric oxide synthase activity - triggering a decrease in myocardial contractility. Moreover, the same IgG fraction decreased heart frequency, related to inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity. These results imply that cruzipain plays a role in the production of antibodies against M(2) mAChR, which have been related to the pathogenesis of dysautonomic syndrome described in Chagas' disease.

  3. Computational Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Louis, David N.; Feldman, Michael; Carter, Alexis B.; Dighe, Anand S.; Pfeifer, John D.; Bry, Lynn; Almeida, Jonas S.; Saltz, Joel; Braun, Jonathan; Tomaszewski, John E.; Gilbertson, John R.; Sinard, John H.; Gerber, Georg K.; Galli, Stephen J.; Golden, Jeffrey A.; Becich, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Context We define the scope and needs within the new discipline of computational pathology, a discipline critical to the future of both the practice of pathology and, more broadly, medical practice in general. Objective To define the scope and needs of computational pathology. Data Sources A meeting was convened in Boston, Massachusetts, in July 2014 prior to the annual Association of Pathology Chairs meeting, and it was attended by a variety of pathologists, including individuals highly invested in pathology informatics as well as chairs of pathology departments. Conclusions The meeting made recommendations to promote computational pathology, including clearly defining the field and articulating its value propositions; asserting that the value propositions for health care systems must include means to incorporate robust computational approaches to implement data-driven methods that aid in guiding individual and population health care; leveraging computational pathology as a center for data interpretation in modern health care systems; stating that realizing the value proposition will require working with institutional administrations, other departments, and pathology colleagues; declaring that a robust pipeline should be fostered that trains and develops future computational pathologists, for those with both pathology and non-pathology backgrounds; and deciding that computational pathology should serve as a hub for data-related research in health care systems. The dissemination of these recommendations to pathology and bioinformatics departments should help facilitate the development of computational pathology. PMID:26098131

  4. Pathologic changes induced in respiratory tract mucosa by polycyclic hydrocarbons of differing carcinogenic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Topping, D. C.; Pal, B. C.; Martin, D. H.; Nelson, F. R.; Nettesheim, P.

    1978-01-01

    Seven aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons (PCHs) were investigated for their toxic effects on respiratory mucosa: benzo(e)pyrene (BeP), pyrene, anthracene, benz(a)anthracene(BaA), dibenz(a,c)anthracene(DBacA), benzo (a)pyrene (BaP), and dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA). The compounds were chosen because they comprise a spectrum of PCHs ranging from noncarcinogens, to initiators, to weak and strong carcinogens. All of them except DMBA are environmentally relevant chemicals. The chemicals were tested over an 8-week period. Heterotopic tracheal transplants were continously exposed and the histopathologic effects induced by the various PCHs were periodically assessed semiquantitatively. All PCHs exhibited varying degrees of toxicity for respiratory epithelium and submucosa. BeP clearly showed the least toxicity followed by pyrene and anthracene. BaA and DBacA caused marked epithelial and submucosal changes. In addition to epithelial hyperplasia, undifferentiated epithelium and squamous metaplasia developed. Marked mononuclear infiltration occurred in the subepithelial connective tissue. With BaP the epithelial and submucosal changes were similar but were much stronger. DMBA was the most toxic substance, causing epithelial necrosis followed by generalized keratinizing squamous metaplasia; the subepithelial changes consisted of an early acellular exudate and, later (at 8 weeks), marked condensation and hyalinization of the lamina propria. The toxic response pattern of the tracheal mucosa to carcinogenic agents was characterized by the chronicity of epithelial and connective tissue damage, as opposed to the short-lived hyperplastic and inflammatory response elicited by the noncarcinogens and weak initiators. Images Figure 2 Figure 1 PMID:102204

  5. Selective Activation of the Prostaglandin E2 Circuit in Chronic Injury-Induced Pathologic Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liclican, Elvira L.; Nguyen, Van; Sullivan, Aaron B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a prevalent and established mediator of inflammation and pain in numerous tissues and diseases. Distribution and expression of the four PGE2 receptors (EP1-EP4) can dictate whether PGE2 exerts an anti-inflammatory or a proinflammatory and/or a proangiogenic effect. The role and mechanism of endogenous PGE2 in the cornea, and the regulation of EP expression during a dynamic and complex inflammatory/reparative response remain to be clearly defined. Methods. Chronic or acute self-resolving inflammation was induced in mice by corneal suture or epithelial abrasion, respectively. Reepithelialization was monitored by fluorescein staining and neovascularization quantified by CD31/PECAM-1 immunofluorescence. PGE2 formation was analyzed by lipidomics and polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) infiltration quantified by myeloperoxidase activity. Expression of EPs and inflammatory/angiogenic mediators was assessed by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Mice eyes were treated with PGE2 (100 ng topically, three times a day) for up to 7 days. Results. COX-2, EP-2, and EP-4 expression was upregulated with chronic inflammation that correlated with increased corneal PGE2 formation and marked neovascularization. In contrast, acute abrasion injury did not alter PGE2 or EP levels. PGE2 treatment amplified PMN infiltration and the angiogenic response to chronic inflammation but did not affect wound healing or PMN infiltration after epithelial abrasion. Exacerbated inflammatory neovascularization with PGE2 treatment was independent of the VEGF circuit but was associated with a significant induction of the eotaxin-CCR3 axis. Conclusions. These findings place the corneal PGE2 circuit as an endogenous mediator of inflammatory neovascularization rather than general inflammation and demonstrate that chronic inflammation selectively regulates this circuit at the level of biosynthetic enzyme and receptor expression. PMID:20610836

  6. PreImplantation factor (PIF) therapy provides comprehensive protection against radiation induced pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Shainer, Reut; Almogi-Hazan, Osnat; Berger, Arye; Hinden, Liad; Mueller, Martin; Brodie, Chaya; Simillion, Cedric; Paidas, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS) may lead to cancer and death and has few effective countermeasures. Efficacy of synthetic PIF treatment was demonstrated in preclinical autoimmune and transplantation models. PIF protected against inflammation and mortality following lethal irradiation in allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) model. Herein, we demonstrate that PIF imparts comprehensive local and systemic protection against lethal and sub-lethal ARS in murine models. PIF treatment 2 h after lethal irradiation led to 100% survival and global hematopoietic recovery at 2 weeks after therapy. At 24 h after irradiation PIF restored hematopoiesis in a semi-allogeneic BMT model. PIF-preconditioning provided improved long-term engraftment. The direct effect of PIF on bone marrow cells was also demonstrated in vitro: PIF promoted pre-B cell differentiation and increased immunoregulatory properties of BM-derived mesenchymal stromal cells. PIF treatment also improved hematopoietic recovery and reduced systemic inflammatory cytokine production after sub-lethal radiation exposure. Here, PIF also prevented colonic crypt and basal membrane damage coupled with reduced nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) and increased (B7h1) expression. Global upper GI gene pathway analysis revealed PIF's involvement in protein-RNA interactions, mitochondrial oxidative pathways, and responses to cellular stress. Some effects may be attributed to PIF's influence on macrophage differentiation and function. PIF demonstrated a regulatory effect on irradiated macrophages and on classically activated M1 macrophages, reducing inflammatory gene expression (iNOS, Cox2), promoting protective (Arg1) gene expression and inducing pro-tolerance cytokine secretion. Notably, synthetic PIF is stable for long-term field use. Overall, clinical investigation of PIF for comprehensive ARS protection is warranted. PMID:27449294

  7. Morphologic evidence that analgesic-induced kidney pathology contributes to the progression of tumors of the renal pelvis.

    PubMed

    Stewart, J H; Hobbs, J B; McCredie, M R

    1999-10-15

    Whether phenacetin-containing analgesics cause renal pelvic tumors by virtue of the weak mutagenicity of phenacetin, or indirectly through local effects of analgesic-induced renal papillary scarring, is debated. Because phenacetin consumption ceased in New South Wales, Australia in 1975, cases of renal pelvic carcinoma seen 14-15 years later (many of which were associated with long-standing analgesic-induced renal papillary pathology) provided an opportunity to examine the temporal relation between phenacetin exposure and those histologic characteristics of the tumors and adjacent renal tissue that may implicate analgesics in their etiology. The authors conducted a "blinded" histopathologic review of tumors of the renal pelvis and adjacent noncancerous renal tissue from 100 cases for which epidemiologic data regarding risk factor exposure (specifically phenacetin-containing analgesics, tobacco, infection, and kidney stones) had been obtained in a population-based case-control study from New South Wales in 1989 and 1990. A history of consumption of phenacetin-containing analgesics was associated strongly with the presence and severity of diffuse renal papillary scarring, and less strongly with papillary calcification. The histologic grade of the renal pelvic tumors tended to rise significantly with consumption of phenacetin-containing analgesics in a dose-dependent fashion and with the degree of papillary scarring, but was not related to smoking. In multivariate analysis it was the degree of papillary scarring (to a greater extent than the amount of phenacetin consumption) that was associated significantly and strongly with a higher histologic grade. Only diffuse papillary calcification was associated significantly with squamous change in the renal pelvic tumors. Based on the results of the current study, the authors conclude that 1) in phenacetin-related tumors of the renal pelvis, the presence and severity of analgesic-induced renal papillary scarring correlates

  8. Effects of a low-level semiconductor gallium arsenide laser on local pathological alterations induced by Bothrops moojeni snake venom.

    PubMed

    Aranha de Sousa, Elziliam; Bittencourt, José Adolfo Homobono Machado; Seabra de Oliveira, Nayana Keyla; Correia Henriques, Shayanne Vanessa; dos Santos Picanço, Leide Caroline; Lobato, Camila Pena; Ribeiro, José Renato; Pereira, Washington Luiz Assunção; Carvalho, José Carlos Tavares; da Silva, Jocivânia Oliveira

    2013-10-01

    Antivenom therapy has been ineffective in neutralizing the tissue damage caused by snakebites. Among therapeutic strategies to minimize effects after envenoming, it was hypothesized that a low level laser would reduce complications and reduce the severity of local snake venom effects. In the current study, the effect of a low-level semiconductor gallium arsenide (GaAs) laser on the local pathological alterations induced by B. moojeni snake venom was investigated. The experimental groups consisted of five male mice, each administered either B. moojeni venom (VB), B. moojeni venom + antivenom (VAV), B. moojeni venom + laser (VL), B. moojeni venom + antivenom + laser (VAVL), or sterile saline solution (SSS) alone. Paw oedema was induced by intradermal administration of 0.05 mg kg(-1) of B. moojeni venom and was expressed in mm of directly induced oedema. Mice received by subcutaneous route 0.20 mg kg(-1) of venom for evaluating nociceptive activity and the time (in seconds) spent in licking and biting the injected paw was taken as an indicator of pain response. Inflammatory infiltration was determined by counting the number of leukocytes present in the gastrocnemius muscle after venom injection (0.10 mg kg(-1)). For histological examination of myonecrosis, venom (0.10 mg kg(-1)) was administered intramuscularly. The site of venom injection was irradiated by the GaAs laser and some animals received antivenom intraperitoneally. The results indicated that GaAs laser irradiation can help in reducing some local effects produced by the B. moojeni venom in mice, stimulating phagocytosis, proliferation of myoblasts and the regeneration of muscle fibers.

  9. Experimentally induced orchitis associated with Arcanobacterium pyogenes: clinical, ultrasonographic, seminological and pathological features.

    PubMed

    Gouletsou, P G; Fthenakis, G C; Cripps, P J; Papaioannou, N; Lainas, T; Psalla, D; Amiridis, G S

    2004-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe the features of experimentally induced orchitis associated with Arcanobacterium pyogenes and confirm the pathogenicity of the organism for the ovine testicle. One testicle of each of nine rams was inoculated with 1.3 +/- 10(4) colony-forming-units of an A. pyogenes isolate and regular clinical, ultrasonographic, bacteriological and seminological examinations were carried out up to 204 days after challenge. The rams were sequentially euthanatized 3, 6, 9, 18, 30, 50, 71, 113 and 204 days after challenge and a gross- and histopathological examination of their testicles was performed. All rams developed clinical orchitis and general signs. The initial ultrasonographic findings were changes of size and echogenicity of the genitalia, whilst in the long-standing phase they were wider appearance of the mediastinum testis, presence of hyperechogenic foci, changes of echogenicity of the genitalia and increased echogenicity of the scrotum and tunics. The following changes in semen evaluation parametres were recorded: the pH, the percentage of dead sperms, the percentage of abnormal sperms and the number of nonsperm round cells increased, whilst the mass motility, the individual motility and the sperm concentration decreased; the following sperm defects were observed: misshapen or piriform heads, sperms with coiled tails, sperms without tail and sperms with proximal cytoplasmic droplet; at the early stages neutrophils were the prevailing nonsperm round cell type, later the proportion of immature germ cells increased and in the long-standing phase there were enlogated spermatids and leucocytes; it is noteworthy that semen evaluation parametres were restored to normal at the late stages of the disease. A. pyogenes was consistently isolated from the semen samples after challenge, as well as from the dissected genitalia. The salient post-mortem findings were: initially, subcutaneous oedema, fluid into the vaginal cavity, congested and

  10. Prolonged Repetitive Head Trauma Induces a Singular Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy-Like Pathology in White Matter Despite Transient Behavioral Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Denise I; Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Kuhn, Donald M

    2016-11-01

    Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (rmTBI), resulting from insults caused by an external mechanical force that disrupts normal brain function, has been linked to the development of neurodegenerative diseases, such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy and Alzheimer disease; however, neither the severity nor frequency of head injury required to trigger adverse behavioral outcomes is well understood. In this study, the administration of 30 head impacts using two different weights to lightly anesthetized, completely unrestrained mice established a paradigm that simulates the highly repetitive nature of sports- and military-related head injury. As the number of head impacts increases, the time to recover consciousness diminishes; however, both the sensorimotor function and behavioral outcomes of impacted mice evolve during the ensuing weeks. Postmortem analyses reveal robust Alzheimer disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy-like conditions that manifest in a singular manner throughout the white matter concomitant with evidence of chronic oligodendrogenesis. Our data suggest that latency to recover the righting reflex may be an inadequate measure of injury severity and imply that exposure to repeated head impacts may mask the severity of an underlying and developing neuropathologic condition that does not manifest itself until long after head collisions cease. In addition, our data indicate that there is a cumulative and dose-dependent effect of repetitive head impacts that induces the neurobehavioral and neuropathologic outcomes seen in humans with a history of rmTBI. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Estrogen activation of microglia underlies the sexually dimorphic differences in Nf1 optic glioma-induced retinal pathology.

    PubMed

    Toonen, Joseph A; Solga, Anne C; Ma, Yu; Gutmann, David H

    2017-01-01

    Children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) develop low-grade brain tumors throughout the optic pathway. Nearly 50% of children with optic pathway gliomas (OPGs) experience visual impairment, and few regain their vision after chemotherapy. Recent studies have revealed that girls with optic nerve gliomas are five times more likely to lose vision and require treatment than boys. To determine the mechanism underlying this sexually dimorphic difference in clinical outcome, we leveraged Nf1 optic glioma (Nf1-OPG) mice. We demonstrate that female Nf1-OPG mice exhibit greater retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss and only females have retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thinning, despite mice of both sexes harboring tumors of identical volumes and proliferation. Female gonadal sex hormones are responsible for this sexual dimorphism, as ovariectomy, but not castration, of Nf1-OPG mice normalizes RGC survival and RNFL thickness. In addition, female Nf1-OPG mice have threefold more microglia than their male counterparts, and minocycline inhibition of microglia corrects the retinal pathology. Moreover, pharmacologic inhibition of microglial estrogen receptor-β (ERβ) function corrects the retinal abnormalities in female Nf1-OPG mice. Collectively, these studies establish that female gonadal sex hormones underlie the sexual dimorphic differences in Nf1 optic glioma-induced retinal dysfunction by operating at the level of tumor-associated microglial activation.

  12. Dietary fructose in pregnancy induces hyperglycemia, hypertension, and pathologic kidney and liver changes in a rodent model.

    PubMed

    Shortliffe, Linda M Dairiki; Hammam, Olfat; Han, Xiaoyuan; Kouba, Erik; Tsao, Philip S; Wang, Bingyin

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of pregnancies complicated by hyperglycemia and hypertension is increasing along with associated morbidities to mother and offspring. The high fructose diet is a well-studied model that induces hyperglycemia and hypertension in male rodents, but may not affect females. We hypothesized that the physiologic stress of pregnancy may alter metabolic responses to dietary fructose. In this study female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two gestational dietary groups: (1) 60% carbohydrate standard rat chow (Pregnant-S-controls) and (2) 60% fructose enriched chow (Pregnant-F). Body weight, blood pressure, blood glucose, triglycerides, and insulin were measured in pregnancy and during the post-partum period. Maternal organ weight and histological changes were also assessed after delivery. By midpregnancy Pregnant-F rats had increased weight, elevated blood pressure, higher fasting glucose, and elevated triglycerides compared with Pregnant-S rats. Both groups demonstrated elevated gestational insulin levels with signs of insulin resistance (increased HOMA-IR). Pregnant-F rats showed significant histopathologic hepatic steatosis and renal tubular changes characterized by tubular dilation and glomerulosclerosis. Our study provides a model in which dietary change during pregnancy can be examined. We demonstrate, moreover, that high dietary fructose ingestion in pregnant rats may result in profound systemic and pathologic changes not appreciated during routine pregnancy. Copyright © 2015 International Society for the Study of Hypertension in Pregnancy. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Application of a compact magnetic resonance imaging system for toxicologic pathology: evaluation of lithium-pilocarpine-induced rat brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Taketa, Yoshikazu; Shiotani, Motohiro; Tsuru, Yoshiharu; Kotani, Sadaharu; Osada, Yoshihide; Fukushima, Tatsuto; Inomata, Akira; Hosokawa, Satoru

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a useful noninvasive tool used to detect lesions in clinical and veterinary medicine. The present study evaluated the suitability of a new easy-to-use compact MRI platform (M2 permanent magnet system, Aspect Imaging, Shoham, Israel) for assisting with preclinical toxicologic pathology examination of lesions in the rat brain. In order to induce brain lesions, male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated once with lithium chloride (127 mg/kg, intraperitoneal [i.p.]) followed by pilocarpine (30 mg/kg, i.p.). One week after dosing, the perfused, fixed brains were collected, analyzed by the MRI system and examined histopathologically. MRI of the brain of treated rats revealed areas of high T1 and middle to low T2 signals, when compared with the controls, in the piriform cortex, lateral thalamic nucleus, posterior paraventricular thalamic nucleus and posterior hypothalamic nucleus of the cerebrum. The altered MRI signal areas were consistent with well-circumscribed foci of neuronal cell degeneration/necrosis accompanied by glial cell proliferation. The present data demonstrated that quick analysis of fixed organs by the MRI system can detect the presence and location of toxicologic lesions and provide useful temporal information for selection of appropriate sections for histopathologic examination before routine slide preparation, especially in complex and functionally heterogeneous organs such as the brain.

  14. Bone Marrow-Derived Endothelial Progenitor Cells Protect Against Scopolamine-Induced Alzheimer-Like Pathological Aberrations.

    PubMed

    Safar, Marwa M; Arab, Hany H; Rizk, Sherine M; El-Maraghy, Shohda A

    2016-04-01

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Patients with AD have displayed decreased circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) which repair and maintain the endothelial function. Transplantation of EPCs has emerged as a promising approach for the management of cerebrovascular diseases including ischemic stroke, however, its impact on AD has been poorly described. Thus, the current study aimed at investigating the effects of bone marrow-derived (BM) EPCs transplantation in repeated scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment, an experimental model that replicates biomarkers of AD. Intravenously transplanted BM-EPCs migrated into the brain of rats and improved the learning and memory deficits. Meanwhile, they mitigated the deposition of amyloid plaques and associated histopathological alterations. At the molecular levels, BM-EPCs blunted the increase of hippocampal amyloid beta protein (Aβ), amyloid precursor protein (APP) and reinstated the Aβ-degrading neprilysin together with downregulation of p-tau and its upstream glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). They also corrected the perturbations of neurotransmitter levels including restoration of acetylcholine and associated esterase along with dopamine, GABA, and the neuroexitatory glutamate. Furthermore, BM-EPCs induced behavioral recovery via boosting of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its upstream cAMP response element binding (CREB), suppression of the proinflammatory tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and upregulation of interleukin-10 (IL-10). BM-EPCs also augmented Nrf2 and seladin-1. Generally, these actions were analogous to those exerted by adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) and the reference anti-Alzheimer donepezil. For the first time, these findings highlight the beneficial actions of BM-EPCs against the memory

  15. CD8+ T Cells Induce Fatal Brainstem Pathology during Cerebral Malaria via Luminal Antigen-Specific Engagement of Brain Vasculature.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Phillip A; Hart, Geoffrey T; Russo, Matthew V; Nayak, Debasis; Yazew, Takele; Peña, Mirna; Khan, Shahid M; Janse, Chris J; Pierce, Susan K; McGavern, Dorian B

    2016-12-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a severe complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection that results in thousands of deaths each year, mostly in African children. The in vivo mechanisms underlying this fatal condition are not entirely understood. Using the animal model of experimental cerebral malaria (ECM), we sought mechanistic insights into the pathogenesis of CM. Fatal disease was associated with alterations in tight junction proteins, vascular breakdown in the meninges / parenchyma, edema, and ultimately neuronal cell death in the brainstem, which is consistent with cerebral herniation as a cause of death. At the peak of ECM, we revealed using intravital two-photon microscopy that myelomonocytic cells and parasite-specific CD8+ T cells associated primarily with the luminal surface of CNS blood vessels. Myelomonocytic cells participated in the removal of parasitized red blood cells (pRBCs) from cerebral blood vessels, but were not required for the disease. Interestingly, the majority of disease-inducing parasite-specific CD8+ T cells interacted with the lumen of brain vascular endothelial cells (ECs), where they were observed surveying, dividing, and arresting in a cognate peptide-MHC I dependent manner. These activities were critically dependent on IFN-γ, which was responsible for activating cerebrovascular ECs to upregulate adhesion and antigen-presenting molecules. Importantly, parasite-specific CD8+ T cell interactions with cerebral vessels were impaired in chimeric mice rendered unable to present EC antigens on MHC I, and these mice were in turn resistant to fatal brainstem pathology. Moreover, anti-adhesion molecule (LFA-1 / VLA-4) therapy prevented fatal disease by rapidly displacing luminal CD8+ T cells from cerebrovascular ECs without affecting extravascular T cells. These in vivo data demonstrate that parasite-specific CD8+ T cell-induced fatal vascular breakdown and subsequent neuronal death during ECM is associated with luminal, antigen

  16. CD8+ T Cells Induce Fatal Brainstem Pathology during Cerebral Malaria via Luminal Antigen-Specific Engagement of Brain Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Phillip A.; Hart, Geoffrey T.; Russo, Matthew V.; Nayak, Debasis; Yazew, Takele; Peña, Mirna; Khan, Shahid M.; Pierce, Susan K.; McGavern, Dorian B.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a severe complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection that results in thousands of deaths each year, mostly in African children. The in vivo mechanisms underlying this fatal condition are not entirely understood. Using the animal model of experimental cerebral malaria (ECM), we sought mechanistic insights into the pathogenesis of CM. Fatal disease was associated with alterations in tight junction proteins, vascular breakdown in the meninges / parenchyma, edema, and ultimately neuronal cell death in the brainstem, which is consistent with cerebral herniation as a cause of death. At the peak of ECM, we revealed using intravital two-photon microscopy that myelomonocytic cells and parasite-specific CD8+ T cells associated primarily with the luminal surface of CNS blood vessels. Myelomonocytic cells participated in the removal of parasitized red blood cells (pRBCs) from cerebral blood vessels, but were not required for the disease. Interestingly, the majority of disease-inducing parasite-specific CD8+ T cells interacted with the lumen of brain vascular endothelial cells (ECs), where they were observed surveying, dividing, and arresting in a cognate peptide-MHC I dependent manner. These activities were critically dependent on IFN-γ, which was responsible for activating cerebrovascular ECs to upregulate adhesion and antigen-presenting molecules. Importantly, parasite-specific CD8+ T cell interactions with cerebral vessels were impaired in chimeric mice rendered unable to present EC antigens on MHC I, and these mice were in turn resistant to fatal brainstem pathology. Moreover, anti-adhesion molecule (LFA-1 / VLA-4) therapy prevented fatal disease by rapidly displacing luminal CD8+ T cells from cerebrovascular ECs without affecting extravascular T cells. These in vivo data demonstrate that parasite-specific CD8+ T cell-induced fatal vascular breakdown and subsequent neuronal death during ECM is associated with luminal, antigen

  17. Intramuscular injection of α-synuclein induces CNS α-synuclein pathology and a rapid-onset motor phenotype in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Sacino, Amanda N.; Brooks, Mieu; Thomas, Michael A.; McKinney, Alex B.; Lee, Sooyeon; Regenhardt, Robert W.; McGarvey, Nicholas H.; Ayers, Jacob I.; Notterpek, Lucia; Borchelt, David R.; Golde, Todd E.; Giasson, Benoit I.

    2014-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that α-synuclein (αS) misfolding may begin in peripheral nerves and spread to the central nervous system (CNS), leading to Parkinson disease and related disorders. Although recent data suggest that αS pathology can spread within the mouse brain, there is no direct evidence for spread of disease from a peripheral site. In the present study, we show that hind limb intramuscular (IM) injection of αS can induce pathology in the CNS in the human Ala53Thr (M83) and wild-type (M20) αS transgenic (Tg) mouse models. Within 2–3 mo after IM injection in αS homozygous M83 Tg mice and 3–4 mo for hemizygous M83 Tg mice, these animals developed a rapid, synchronized, and predictable induction of widespread CNS αS inclusion pathology, accompanied by astrogliosis, microgliosis, and debilitating motor impairments. In M20 Tg mice, starting at 4 mo after IM injection, we observed αS inclusion pathology in the spinal cord, but motor function remained intact. Transection of the sciatic nerve in the M83 Tg mice significantly delayed the appearance of CNS pathology and motor symptoms, demonstrating the involvement of retrograde transport in inducing αS CNS inclusion pathology. Outside of scrapie-mediated prion disease, to our knowledge, this findiing is the first evidence that an entire neurodegenerative proteinopathy associated with a robust, lethal motor phenotype can be initiated by peripheral inoculation with a pathogenic protein. Furthermore, this facile, synchronized rapid-onset model of α-synucleinopathy will be highly valuable in testing disease-modifying therapies and dissecting the mechanism(s) that drive αS-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:25002524

  18. Intramuscular injection of α-synuclein induces CNS α-synuclein pathology and a rapid-onset motor phenotype in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Sacino, Amanda N; Brooks, Mieu; Thomas, Michael A; McKinney, Alex B; Lee, Sooyeon; Regenhardt, Robert W; McGarvey, Nicholas H; Ayers, Jacob I; Notterpek, Lucia; Borchelt, David R; Golde, Todd E; Giasson, Benoit I

    2014-07-22

    It has been hypothesized that α-synuclein (αS) misfolding may begin in peripheral nerves and spread to the central nervous system (CNS), leading to Parkinson disease and related disorders. Although recent data suggest that αS pathology can spread within the mouse brain, there is no direct evidence for spread of disease from a peripheral site. In the present study, we show that hind limb intramuscular (IM) injection of αS can induce pathology in the CNS in the human Ala53Thr (M83) and wild-type (M20) αS transgenic (Tg) mouse models. Within 2-3 mo after IM injection in αS homozygous M83 Tg mice and 3-4 mo for hemizygous M83 Tg mice, these animals developed a rapid, synchronized, and predictable induction of widespread CNS αS inclusion pathology, accompanied by astrogliosis, microgliosis, and debilitating motor impairments. In M20 Tg mice, starting at 4 mo after IM injection, we observed αS inclusion pathology in the spinal cord, but motor function remained intact. Transection of the sciatic nerve in the M83 Tg mice significantly delayed the appearance of CNS pathology and motor symptoms, demonstrating the involvement of retrograde transport in inducing αS CNS inclusion pathology. Outside of scrapie-mediated prion disease, to our knowledge, this findiing is the first evidence that an entire neurodegenerative proteinopathy associated with a robust, lethal motor phenotype can be initiated by peripheral inoculation with a pathogenic protein. Furthermore, this facile, synchronized rapid-onset model of α-synucleinopathy will be highly valuable in testing disease-modifying therapies and dissecting the mechanism(s) that drive αS-induced neurodegeneration.

  19. Alpinate Oxyphyllae Fructus Inhibits IGFII-Related Signaling Pathway to Attenuate Ang II-Induced Pathological Hypertrophy in H9c2 Cardiomyoblasts.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chuan-Te; Chang, Yung-Ming; Lin, Shu-Luan; Chen, Yueh-Sheng; Yeh, Yu-Lan; Padma, Viswanadha Vijaya; Tsai, Chin-Chuan; Chen, Ray-Jade; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2016-03-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a very important cardiovascular disease inducer and may cause cardiac pathological hypertrophy and remodeling. We evaluated a Chinese traditional medicine, alpinate oxyphyllae fructus (AOF), for therapeutic efficacy for treating Ang II-induced cardiac hypertrophy. AOF has been used to treat patients with various symptoms accompanying hypertension and cerebrovascular disorders in Korea. We investigated its protective effect against Ang II-induced cytoskeletal change and hypertrophy in H9c2 cells. The results showed that treating cells with Ang II resulted in pathological hypertrophy, such as increased expression of transcription factors NFAT-3/p-NFAT-3, hypertrophic response genes (atrial natriuretic peptide [ANP] and b-type natriuretic peptide [BNP]), and Gαq down-stream effectors (PLCβ3 and calcineurin). Pretreatment with AOF (60-100 μg/mL) led to significantly reduced hypertrophy. We also found that AOF pretreatment significantly suppressed the cardiac remodeling proteins, metalloproteinase (MMP9 and MMP2), and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), induced by Ang II challenge. In conclusion, we provide evidence that AOF protects against Ang II-induced pathological hypertrophy by specifically inhibiting the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) II/IIR-related signaling pathway in H9c2 cells. AOF might be a candidate for cardiac hypertrophy and ventricular remodeling prevention in chronic cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Allosuppressor- and allohelper-T cells in acute and chronic graft-vs. -host (GVH) disease. III. Different Lyt subsets of donor T cells induce different pathological syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Rolink, A.G.; Gleichmann, E.

    1983-08-01

    Previous work from this laboratory has led to the hypothesis that the stimulatory pathological symptoms of chronic graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD) are caused by alloreactive donor T helper (TH) cells, whereas the suppressive pathological symptoms of acute GVHD are caused by alloreactive T suppressor (TS) cells of the donor. We analyzed the Lyt phenotypes of B10 donor T cells required for the induction of either acute or chronic GVHD in H-2-different (B10 X DBA/2)F1 recipients. When nonirradiated F1 mice were used as the recipients, we found unseparated B10 T cells induced only a moderate formation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-like autoantibodies, but a high percentage of lethal GVHD (LGVHD). In contrast, Lyt-1+2- donor T cells were unable to induce LGVHD in these recipients but were capable of inducing a vigorous formation of SLE-like autoantibodies and severe immune-complex glomerulonephritis. Lyt-1-2+ T cells were incapable of inducing either acute or chronic GVHD. The sensitivity and accuracy of the GVH system were increased by using irradiated F1 mice as recipients and then comparing donor-cell inocula that contained similar numbers of T lymphocytes. Donor-cell inocula were used that had been tested for their allohelper and allosuppressor effects on F1 B cells in vitro. In the irradiated F1 recipients unseparated donor T cells were superior to T cell subsets in inducing LGVHD. In contrast Lyt-1+2- T cells, but neither unseparated T cells nor Lyt-1-2+ T cells, were capable of inducing a vigorous formation of SLE-like auto-antibodies. We conclude that the stimulatory pathological symptoms of chronic GVHD are caused by Lyt-1+2- allohelper T cells. In contrast, the development of the suppressive pathological symptoms of acute GVHD appears to involve alloreactive Lyt-1+2+ T suppressor cells.

  1. The pleiotropic effects of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) on the physiology and pathology of penile erection.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Cadavid, N F; Rajfer, J

    2005-01-01

    The contribution of the neuronal and endothelial isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (nNOS and eNOS, respectively) in the synthesis of nitric oxide as a mediator of penile erection, at the levels of both the penile corpora cavernosa and the hypothalamic regions that control the erectile response, are well established. More recently, the role of the third NOS isoform, the inducible NOS (iNOS), has also started to be elucidated. iNOS does not appear to intervene directly in physiological penile erection or in its central control, but its transcriptional induction is postulated to be a key factor in two opposite related pathological processes, namely neurotoxicity in critical related regions of the hypothalamus during senescence, and as a defense mechanism against the aging or injury-associated fibrosis in the penile corpora cavernosa, the media of the penile arteries, and the tunica albuginea. By counteracting fibrosis that impairs cavernosal smooth muscle compliance, iNOS would protect the erectile tissue. However, further studies are needed to conclusively evaluate these putative roles in the two organs involved in reproductive function. In addition, whether iNOS induction during aging is a major cause in the net loss of trabecular smooth muscle in the corpora cavernosa through apoptosis, remains to be elucidated. The overall evaluation of these conflicting effects is important in order to decide whether pharmacological iNOS induction, or alternatively NO donors or L-arginine, may constitute a valid approach to prevent or treat penile fibrosis and vasculogenic erectile dysfunction.

  2. Uphill running improves rat Achilles tendon tissue mechanical properties and alters gene expression without inducing pathological changes.

    PubMed

    Heinemeier, K M; Skovgaard, D; Bayer, M L; Qvortrup, K; Kjaer, A; Kjaer, M; Magnusson, S P; Kongsgaard, M

    2012-09-01

    Overuse Achilles tendinopathy is a common and challenging problem in sports medicine. Little is known about the etiology of this disorder, and the development of a good animal model for overuse tendinopathy is essential for advancing insight into the disease mechanisms. Our aim was to test a previously proposed rat model for Achilles tendon overuse. Ten adult male Sprague-Dawley rats ran on a treadmill with 10° incline, 1 h/day, 5 days/wk (17-20 m/min) for 12 wk and were compared with 12 control rats. Histological, mechanical, and gene-expression changes were measured on the Achilles tendons after the intervention, and local tendon glucose-uptake was measured before and after the intervention with positron emission tomography. No differences were detected between runners and controls in tissue histology or in glucose uptake, indicating that tendon pathology was not induced. Greater tendon tissue modulus (P < 0.005) and failure stress/body weight (P < 0.02) in runners compared with controls further supported that tendons successfully adapted to uphill running. Several genes of interest were regulated after 12 wk of running. Expression of collagen III and insulin-like growth factor I was increased, while collagen I was unchanged, and decreases were seen in noncollagen matrix components (fibromodulin and biglycan), matrix degrading enzymes, transforming growth factor-β1, and connective tissue growth factor. In conclusion, the tested model could not be validated as a model for Achilles tendinopathy, as the rats were able to adapt to 12 wk of uphill running without any signs of tendinopathy. Improved mechanical properties were observed, as well as changes in gene-expression that were distinctly different from what is seen in tendinopathy and in response to short-term tendon loading.

  3. Deficiency of cardiac Acyl-CoA synthetase-1 induces diastolic dysfunction, but pathologic hypertrophy is reversed by rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Paul, David S.; Grevengoed, Trisha J.; Pascual, Florencia; Ellis, Jessica M.; Willis, Monte S.; Coleman, Rosalind A.

    2014-01-01

    In mice with temporally-induced cardiac-specific deficiency of acyl-CoA synthetase-1 (Acsl1H−/−), the heart is unable to oxidize long-chain fatty acids and relies primarily on glucose for energy. These metabolic changes result in the development of both a spontaneous cardiac hypertrophy and increased phosphorylated S6 kinase (S6K), a substrate of the mechanistic target of rapamycin, mTOR. Doppler echocardiography revealed evidence of significant diastolic dysfunction, indicated by a reduced E/A ratio and increased mean performance index, although the deceleration time and the expression of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase and phospholambin showed no difference between genotypes. To determine the role of mTOR in the development of cardiac hypertrophy, we treated Acsl1H−/− mice with rapamycin. Six to eight week old Acsl1H−/− mice and their littermate controls were given i.p. tamoxifen to eliminate cardiac Acsl1, then concomitantly treated for 10 weeks with i.p. rapamycin or vehicle alone. Rapamycin completely blocked the enhanced ventricular S6K phosphorylation and cardiac hypertrophy and attenuated the expression of hypertrophy-associated fetal genes, including α-skeletal actin and B-type natriuretic peptide. mTOR activation of the related Acsl3 gene, usually associated with pathologic hypertrophy, was also attenuated in the Acsl1H−/− hearts, indicating that alternative pathways of fatty acid activation did not compensate for the loss of Acsl1. Compared to controls, Acsl1H−/− hearts exhibited an 8-fold higher uptake of 2-deoxy[1-14C]glucose and a 35% lower uptake of the fatty acid analog 2-bromo[1-14C]palmitate. These data indicate that Acsl1-deficiency causes diastolic dysfunction and that mTOR activation is linked to the development of cardiac hypertrophy in Acsl1H−/− mice. PMID:24631848

  4. Deficiency of cardiac Acyl-CoA synthetase-1 induces diastolic dysfunction, but pathologic hypertrophy is reversed by rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Paul, David S; Grevengoed, Trisha J; Pascual, Florencia; Ellis, Jessica M; Willis, Monte S; Coleman, Rosalind A

    2014-06-01

    In mice with temporally-induced cardiac-specific deficiency of acyl-CoA synthetase-1 (Acsl1(H-/-)), the heart is unable to oxidize long-chain fatty acids and relies primarily on glucose for energy. These metabolic changes result in the development of both a spontaneous cardiac hypertrophy and increased phosphorylated S6 kinase (S6K), a substrate of the mechanistic target of rapamycin, mTOR. Doppler echocardiography revealed evidence of significant diastolic dysfunction, indicated by a reduced E/A ratio and increased mean performance index, although the deceleration time and the expression of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase and phospholamban showed no difference between genotypes. To determine the role of mTOR in the development of cardiac hypertrophy, we treated Acsl1(H-/-) mice with rapamycin. Six to eight week old Acsl1(H-/-) mice and their littermate controls were given i.p. tamoxifen to eliminate cardiac Acsl1, then concomitantly treated for 10weeks with i.p. rapamycin or vehicle alone. Rapamycin completely blocked the enhanced ventricular S6K phosphorylation and cardiac hypertrophy and attenuated the expression of hypertrophy-associated fetal genes, including α-skeletal actin and B-type natriuretic peptide. mTOR activation of the related Acsl3 gene, usually associated with pathologic hypertrophy, was also attenuated in the Acsl1(H-/-) hearts, indicating that alternative pathways of fatty acid activation did not compensate for the loss of Acsl1. Compared to controls, Acsl1(H-/-) hearts exhibited an 8-fold higher uptake of 2-deoxy[1-(14)C]glucose and a 35% lower uptake of the fatty acid analog 2-bromo[1-(14)C]palmitate. These data indicate that Acsl1-deficiency causes diastolic dysfunction and that mTOR activation is linked to the development of cardiac hypertrophy in Acsl1(H-/-) mice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Virulence ranking of some Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis strains according to their ability to multiply in the lungs, induce lung pathology, and cause mortality in mice.

    PubMed

    Dunn, P L; North, R J

    1995-09-01

    Three virulent strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (H37Rv, Erdman, and NYH-27) and two virulent strains of M. bovis (Ravenel and Branch) were compared in terms of their growth rates in the livers and the lungs of mice, their ability to cause lung pathology, and the time taken for them to cause death. In immunocompetent mice, all strains caused an infection that progressed for 20 days or more and then underwent resolution in the liver but not in the lungs. In the lungs, infection persisted and induced progressive pathology. According to host survival time, Ravenel was the most virulent strain, followed, in decreasing order of virulence, by Branch, H37Rv, Erdman, and NYH-27. The much longer survival times of mice infected with M. tuberculosis strains allowed time for lung histopathology to change from a histiocytic alveolitis to a chronic fibroblastic fibrosis that eventually obliterated most of the lung architecture. By contrast, in mice infected with M. bovis strains, the alveolitis that developed during early infection was rapid and expansive enough to cause death before chronic lung pathology became evident. In mice depleted of CD4+ T cells, increased growth of all virulent strains induced necrotic exudative lung lesions that rapidly filled most of the alveolar sacs with inflammatory cells. These mice died much earlier than infected control mice did. Attenuated strains had longer population doubling times in vivo and failed to cause progressive disease or pathology in the lungs or livers of immunocompetent mice.

  6. Virulence ranking of some Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis strains according to their ability to multiply in the lungs, induce lung pathology, and cause mortality in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, P L; North, R J

    1995-01-01

    Three virulent strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (H37Rv, Erdman, and NYH-27) and two virulent strains of M. bovis (Ravenel and Branch) were compared in terms of their growth rates in the livers and the lungs of mice, their ability to cause lung pathology, and the time taken for them to cause death. In immunocompetent mice, all strains caused an infection that progressed for 20 days or more and then underwent resolution in the liver but not in the lungs. In the lungs, infection persisted and induced progressive pathology. According to host survival time, Ravenel was the most virulent strain, followed, in decreasing order of virulence, by Branch, H37Rv, Erdman, and NYH-27. The much longer survival times of mice infected with M. tuberculosis strains allowed time for lung histopathology to change from a histiocytic alveolitis to a chronic fibroblastic fibrosis that eventually obliterated most of the lung architecture. By contrast, in mice infected with M. bovis strains, the alveolitis that developed during early infection was rapid and expansive enough to cause death before chronic lung pathology became evident. In mice depleted of CD4+ T cells, increased growth of all virulent strains induced necrotic exudative lung lesions that rapidly filled most of the alveolar sacs with inflammatory cells. These mice died much earlier than infected control mice did. Attenuated strains had longer population doubling times in vivo and failed to cause progressive disease or pathology in the lungs or livers of immunocompetent mice. PMID:7642273

  7. Neurons Derived from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells of Patients with Down Syndrome Reproduce Early Stages of Alzheimer's Disease Type Pathology in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dashinimaev, Erdem B; Artyuhov, Alexander S; Bolshakov, Alexey P; Vorotelyak, Ekaterina A; Vasiliev, Andrey V

    2017-01-01

    People with Down syndrome (DS) are at high risk of developing pathology similar to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Modeling of this pathology in vitro may be useful for studying this phenomenon. In this study, we analyzed three different cultures of neural cells carrying trisomy of chromosome 21, which were generated by directed differentiation from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells). We report here that in vitro generated DS neural cells have abnormal metabolism of amyloid-β (Aβ) manifested by increased secretion and accumulation of Aβ granules of Aβ42 pathological isoform with upregulated expression of the APP gene. Additionally, we found increased expression levels of genes that are considered to be associated with AD (BACE2, RCAN1, ETS2, TMED10), as compared to healthy controls. Thus, the neural cells generated from induced pluripotent stem cells with DS reproduce initial cellular signs of AD-type pathology and can be useful tools for modeling and studying this variant of AD in vitro.

  8. Toxic effects of zearalenone on oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokines, biochemical and pathological changes induced by this toxin in the kidney of pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhiqiang; Liu, Min; Qu, Zhe; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Yin, Shutong; Shan, Anshan

    2014-03-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the toxic effects of zearalenone (ZEN) on oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokines, biochemical and pathological changes in the kidney of pregnant rats, and to explore the possible mechanism in ZEN induced kidney damage. The rats were fed a normal diet treated with 0.3, 48.5, 97.6 or 146 mg/kg ZEN in feed on gestation days (GDs) 0 through 7, and then all the rats were fed with a normal diet on GDs 8 through 20. The results showed that ZEN induced kidney dysfunction, oxidative damage, pathological changes and increased mRNA and protein expression of TLR4 and inflammatory cytokines in kidney in dose-dependent manner. The results indicated that ZEN caused kidney damage of pregnant rats and TLR4-mediated inflammatory reactions signal pathway was one of the mechanisms of ZEN mediated toxicity in kidney. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Caribbean and La Réunion Chikungunya Virus Isolates Differ in Their Capacity To Induce Proinflammatory Th1 and NK Cell Responses and Acute Joint Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Teck-Hui; Her, Zhisheng; Tan, Jeslin J. L.; Lum, Fok-Moon; Lee, Wendy W. L.; Chan, Yi-Hao; Ong, Ruo-Yan; Kam, Yiu-Wing; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Gallian, Pierre; Rénia, Laurent; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne arthralgic alphavirus that has garnered international attention as an important emerging pathogen since 2005. More recently, it invaded the Caribbean islands and the Western Hemisphere. Intriguingly, the current CHIKV outbreak in the Caribbean is caused by the Asian CHIKV genotype, which differs from the La Réunion LR2006 OPY1 isolate belonging to the Indian Ocean lineage. Here, we adopted a systematic and comparative approach against LR2006 OPY1 to characterize the pathogenicity of the Caribbean CNR20235 isolate and consequential host immune responses in mice. Ex vivo infection using primary mouse tail fibroblasts revealed a weaker replication efficiency by CNR20235 isolate. In the CHIKV mouse model, CNR20235 infection induced an enervated joint pathology characterized by moderate edema and swelling, independent of mononuclear cell infiltration. Based on systemic cytokine analysis, localized immunophenotyping, and gene expression profiles in the popliteal lymph node and inflamed joints, two pathogenic phases were defined for CHIKV infection: early acute (2 to 3 days postinfection [dpi]) and late acute (6 to 8 dpi). Reduced joint pathology during early acute phase of CNR20235 infection was associated with a weaker proinflammatory Th1 response and natural killer (NK) cell activity. The pathological role of NK cells was further demonstrated as depletion of NK cells reduced joint pathology in LR2006 OPY1. Taken together, this study provides evidence that the Caribbean CNR20235 isolate has an enfeebled replication and induces a less pathogenic response in the mammalian host. IMPORTANCE The introduction of CHIKV in the Americas has heightened the risk of large-scale outbreaks due to the close proximity between the United States and the Caribbean. The immunopathogenicity of the circulating Caribbean CHIKV isolate was explored, where it was demonstrated to exhibit reduced infectivity resulting in a weakened joint

  10. Cocaine Self-Administration Experience Induces Pathological Phasic Accumbens Dopamine Signals and Abnormal Incentive Behaviors in Drug-Abstinent Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuefei; Sugam, Jonathan A.; Carelli, Regina M.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic exposure to drugs of abuse is linked to long-lasting alterations in the function of limbic system structures, including the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Although cocaine acts via dopaminergic mechanisms within the NAc, less is known about whether phasic dopamine (DA) signaling in the NAc is altered in animals with cocaine self-administration experience or if these animals learn and interact normally with stimuli in their environment. Here, separate groups of rats self-administered either intravenous cocaine or water to a receptacle (controls), followed by 30 d of enforced abstinence. Next, all rats learned an appetitive Pavlovian discrimination and voltammetric recordings of real-time DA release were taken in either the NAc core or shell of cocaine and control subjects. Cocaine experience differentially impaired DA signaling in the core and shell relative to controls. Although phasic DA signals in the shell were essentially abolished for all stimuli, in the core, DA did not distinguish between cues and was abnormally biased toward reward delivery. Further, cocaine rats were unable to learn higher-order associations and even altered simple conditioned approach behaviors, displaying enhanced preoccupation with cue-associated stimuli (sign-tracking; ST) but diminished time at the food cup awaiting reward delivery (goal-tracking). Critically, whereas control DA signaling correlated with ST behaviors, cocaine experience abolished this relationship. These findings show that cocaine has persistent, differential, and pathological effects on both DA signaling and DA-dependent behaviors and suggest that psychostimulant experience may remodel the very circuits that bias organisms toward repeated relapse. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Relapsing to drug abuse despite periods of abstinence and sincere attempts to quit is one of the most pernicious facets of addiction. Unfortunately, little is known about how the dopamine (DA) system functions after periods of drug abstinence

  11. Oral pathology.

    PubMed

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2008-05-01

    Oral disease is exceedingly common in small animal patients. In addition, there is a very wide variety of pathologies that are encountered within the oral cavity. These conditions often cause significant pain and/or localized and systemic infection; however, the majority of these conditions have little to no obvious clinical signs. Therefore, diagnosis is not typically made until late in the disease course. Knowledge of these diseases will better equip the practitioner to effectively treat them. This article covers the more common forms of oral pathology in the dog and cat, excluding periodontal disease, which is covered in its own chapter. The various pathologies are presented in graphic form, and the etiology, clinical signs, recommended diagnostic tests, and treatment options are discussed. Pathologies that are covered include: persistent deciduous teeth, fractured teeth, intrinsically stained teeth, feline tooth resorption, caries, oral neoplasia, eosinophilic granuloma complex, lymphoplasmacytic gingivostomatitis, enamel hypoplasia, and "missing" teeth.

  12. Novel Genetic Models to Study the Role of Inflammation in Brain Injury-Induced Alzheimer’s Pathology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    extracellular deposition of the beta -amyloid peptide in senile plaques and intracellular aggregation of hyperphosphorylated, microtubule- associated protein...pathological events are not well characterized; however, they are often associated with neuroinflammation. Postinjury neuroinflammation is characterized by...aggregation of microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT). 2. Keywords Traumatic brain injury; Alzheimer’s disease; beta-amyloid; microtubule

  13. Histamine H3 Inverse Agonist BF 2649 or Antagonist with Partial H4 Agonist Activity Clobenpropit Reduces Amyloid Beta Peptide-Induced Brain Pathology in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Ranjana; Sharma, Aruna; Skaper, Stephen D; Muresanu, Dafin F; Lafuente, José Vicente; Castellani, Rudy J; Nozari, Ala; Sharma, Hari S

    2017-08-31

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the leading causes for disability and death affecting millions of people worldwide. Thus, novel therapeutic strategies are needed to reduce brain pathology associated with AD. In view of increasing awareness regarding involvement of histaminergic pathways in AD, we explored the role of one H3 receptor inverse agonist BF 2649 and one selective H3 receptor antagonist with partial H4 agonist activity in amyloid beta peptide (AβP) infusion-induced brain pathology in a rat model. AD-like pathology was produced by administering AβP (1-40) intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) in the left lateral ventricle (250 ng/10 μl, once daily) for 4 weeks. Control rats received saline. In separate group of rats, either BF 2649 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) or clobenpropit (1 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered once daily for 1 week after 3 weeks of AβP administration. After 30 days, blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, edema formation, neuronal, glial injuries, and AβP deposits were examined in the brain. A significant reduction in AβP deposits along with marked reduction in neuronal or glial reactions was seen in the drug-treated group. The BBB breakdown to Evans blue albumin and radioiodine in the cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus, and cerebellum was also significantly reduced in these drug-treated groups. Clobenpropit showed superior effects than the BF2649 in reducing brain pathology in AD. Taken together, our observations are the first to show that blockade of H3 and stimulation of H4 receptors are beneficial for the treatment of AD pathology, not reported earlier.

  14. Mechanisms for virus-induced liver disease: tumor necrosis factor-mediated pathology independent of natural killer and T cells during murine cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Orange, J S; Salazar-Mather, T P; Opal, S M; Biron, C A

    1997-01-01

    The contribution of endogenous NK cells and cytokines to virus-induced liver pathology was evaluated during murine cytomegalovirus infections of mice. In immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice, the virus induced a self-limited liver disease characterized by hepatitis, with focal inflammation, and large grossly visible subcapsular necrotic foci. The inflammatory foci were most numerous and contained the greatest number of cells 3 days after infection; they colocalized with areas of viral antigen expression. The largest number of necrotic foci was found 2 days after infection. Overall hepatic damage, assessed as increased expression of liver enzymes in serum, accompanied the development of inflammatory and necrotic foci. Experiments with neutralizing antibodies demonstrated that although virus-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) can have antiviral effects, it also mediated significant liver pathology. TNF was required for development of hepatic necrotic foci and increased levels of liver enzymes in serum but not for increased numbers of inflammatory foci. The necrotic foci and liver enzyme indications of pathology occurred independently of NK and T cells, because mice rendered NK-cell deficient by treatment with antibodies, T- and B-cell-deficient Rag-/- mice, and NK- and T-cell-deficient E26 mice all manifested both parameters of disease. Development of necrotic foci and maximally increased levels of liver enzymes in serum also were TNF dependent in NK-cell-deficient mice. Moreover, in the immunodeficient E26 mice, virus-induced liver disease was progressive, with eventual death of the host, and neutralization of TNF significantly increased longevity. These results establish conditions separating hepatitis from significant liver damage and demonstrate a cytokine-mediated component to viral pathogenesis. PMID:9371583

  15. The beneficial effects of doxycycline, an inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases, on sulfur mustard-induced ocular pathologies depend on the injury stage.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, Vered; Dachir, Shlomit; Cohen, Maayan; Gutman, Hila; Cohen, Liat; Fishbine, Eliezer; Brandeis, Rachel; Turetz, Joseph; Amir, Adina; Gore, Ariel; Kadar, Tamar

    2014-08-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) induces acute ocular lesions, including erosions and inflammation that may be followed by delayed injuries expressed by epithelial defects and neovascularization (NV). Based on the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) activity, we evaluated the clinical and biochemical effects of topical treatment with doxycycline, an MMP inhibitor, targeted to the various injury stages. Rabbit eyes were exposed to SM vapor. A clinical follow-up was carried out up to 2 months. Tear fluid and cornea samples were collected at different time points for measurements of MMPs activity by zymography. Efficacy of a post-exposure topical doxycycline (2 mg/ml in phosphate buffer saline, ×4/d), targeted to the different phases of the clinical injury, was evaluated. Elevated MMP-9 and MMP-2 activities were found in all corneas during the acute injury and in vascularized corneas during the delayed pathology. In the tear fluid, high MMP-9 activity and negligible MMP-2 activity were found in all the exposed eyes until after the appearance of the delayed pathology symptoms. Prolonged doxycycline treatment reduced MMP-9 activity in the tear fluid. During the acute phase, doxycycline treatment reduced corneal MMP-9 activity and the severity of the injury. Targeting the delayed pathology, doxycycline was clinically efficient only when treatment began before NV appearance. This in vivo study showed the involvement of MMP-9 and MMP-2 during different phases of the SM-induced ocular injury, and the potential of doxycycline treatment as a post exposure measure for reducing the acute injury and as a preventive therapy for ameliorating the delayed pathology. The tear fluid provided a non-invasive method for continuous follow-up of MMPs activity and revealed additional beneficial aspects of injury and the treatment.

  16. Tau Pathology Induces Excitatory Neuron Loss, Grid Cell Dysfunction, and Spatial Memory Deficits Reminiscent of Early Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hongjun; Rodriguez, Gustavo A; Herman, Mathieu; Emrani, Sheina; Nahmani, Eden; Barrett, Geoffrey; Figueroa, Helen Y; Goldberg, Eliana; Hussaini, S Abid; Duff, Karen E

    2017-02-08

    The earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are characterized by the formation of mature tangles in the entorhinal cortex and disorientation and confusion when navigating familiar places. The medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) contains specialized neurons called grid cells that form part of the spatial navigation system. Here we show in a transgenic mouse model expressing mutant human tau predominantly in the EC that the formation of mature tangles in old mice was associated with excitatory cell loss and deficits in grid cell function, including destabilized grid fields and reduced firing rates, as well as altered network activity. Overt tau pathology in the aged mice was accompanied by spatial memory deficits. Therefore, tau pathology initiated in the entorhinal cortex could lead to deficits in grid cell firing and underlie the deterioration of spatial cognition seen in human AD.

  17. Persistent neuroleptic-induced rigidity and dystonia in AIDS dementia complex: a clinico-pathological case report.

    PubMed

    Factor, S A; Podskalny, G D; Barron, K D

    1994-12-01

    Patients with AIDS dementia complex (ADC) appear to have an increased likelihood of developing acute onset parkinsonism and dystonia when treated with dopamine antagonists. It has been hypothesized, based on clinical evidence, that hypersensitivity to these drugs in ADC is probably related to direct invasion of the basal ganglia by the HIV virus and a secondary alteration in dopaminergic mechanisms. We report the first pathological description of a patient with ADC who developed acute onset, generalized rigidity and dystonia after a brief trial of low dose neuroleptic therapy administered for psychotic symptoms. An unusual clinical feature of this case was the persistence of his movement disorder. Pathological examination revealed a generalized encephalitic process with substantial neuronal loss observed primarily in the medial and lateral globus pallidus. Correlation with a current model of basal ganglia pathophysiology and other disorders with pallidal lesions is discussed. Clinical and pathological features of this case confirm the previous contention and indicate that dopamine antagonists should be utilized with extreme caution in patients with ADC.

  18. Caffeine protects against oxidative stress and Alzheimer’s disease-like pathology in rabbit hippocampus induced by cholesterol-enriched diet

    PubMed Central

    Prasanthi, Jaya R.P.; Dasari, Bhanu; Marwarha, Gurdeep; Larson, Tyler; Chen, Xuesong; Geiger, Jonathan D.; Ghribi, Othman

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol has been linked to the pathogenesis of sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD) as a risk factor increasing β-amyloid (Aβ) and oxidative stress levels. Caffeine has anti-oxidant properties and has been demonstrated to reduce Aβ levels in transgenic mouse models of familial AD. However, the effects of caffeine on cholesterol-induced sporadic AD pathology have not been determined. In the present study, we determined the effects of caffeine on Aβ levels, tau phosphorylation, oxidative stress generation, and caffeine-target receptors in rabbits fed a 2% cholesterol-enriched diet, a model system for sporadic AD. Our results showed that the cholesterol-enriched diet increased levels of Aβ, tau phosphorylation as well as oxidative stress measured as increased levels of reactive oxygen species, isoprostanes, glutathione depletion, and increased levels of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress marker proteins. Additionally, the cholesterol-enriched diet reduced levels of adenosine A1 (A1R) but not ryanodine (RyR) or adenosine A2A (A2AR) receptors. Caffeine, administered at 0.5 mg and 30 mg/day in the drinking water, reduced cholesterol-induced increase in Aβ, phosphorylated tau and oxidative stress levels, and reversed cholesterol-induced decrease in A1R levels. Our results suggest that even very low doses of caffeine might protect against sporadic AD-like pathology. PMID:20638472

  19. Type 2 diabetes-induced neuronal pathology in the piriform cortex of the rat is reversed by the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin-4

    PubMed Central

    Lietzau, Grazyna; Nyström, Thomas; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Darsalia, Vladimer; Patrone, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients often present olfactory dysfunction. However, the histopathological basis behind this has not been previously shown. Since the piriform cortex plays a crucial role in olfaction, we hypothesize that pathological changes in this brain area can occur in T2D patients along aging. Thus, we determined potential neuropathology in the piriform cortex of T2D rats, along aging. Furthermore, we determined the potential therapeutic role of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP1-R) agonist exendin-4 to counteract the identified T2D-induced neuropathology. Young-adult and middle-aged T2D Goto-Kakizaki rats were compared to age-matched Wistars. Additional Goto-Kakizaki rats were treated for six weeks with exendin-4/vehicle before sacrifice. Potential T2D-induced neuropathology was assessed by quantifying NeuN-positive neurons and Calbindin-D28k-positive interneurons by immunohistochemistry and stereology methods. We also quantitatively measured Calbindin-D28k neuronal morphology and JNK phosphorylation-mediated cellular stress. PI3K/AKT signalling was assessed by immunohistochemistry, and potential apoptosis by TUNEL. We show T2D-induced neuronal pathology in the piriform cortex along aging, characterized by atypical nuclear NeuN staining and increased JNK phosphorylation, without apoptosis. We also demonstrate the specific vulnerability of Calbindin-D28k interneurons. Finally, chronic treatment with exendin-4 substantially reversed the identified neuronal pathology in correlation with decreased JNK and increased AKT phosphorylation. Our results reveal the histopathological basis to explain T2D olfactory dysfunction. We also show that the identified T2D-neuropathology can be counteracted by GLP-1R activation supporting recent research promoting the use of GLP-1R agonists against brain diseases. Whether the identified neuropathology could represent an early hallmark of cognitive decline in T2D remains to be determined. PMID:26744321

  20. Systemic overexpression of growth hormone (GH) in transgenic FVB/N inbred mice: an optimized model for holistic studies of molecular mechanisms underlying GH-induced kidney pathology.

    PubMed

    von Waldthausen, Dagmar C; Schneider, Marlon R; Renner-Müller, Ingrid; Rauleder, Dirk N; Herbach, Nadja; Aigner, Bernhard; Wanke, Rüdiger; Wolf, Eckhard

    2008-08-01

    Transgenic mice overexpressing growth hormone (GH) display a plethora of phenotypic alterations and provide unique models for studying and influencing consequences of chronic GH excess. Since the first report on GH transgenic mice was published in 1982, many different mouse models overexpressing GH from various species at different levels and with different tissue specificities were established, most of them on random-bred or hybrid genetic background. We have generated a new transgenic mouse model on FVB/N inbred background, expressing bovine (b) GH under the control of the chicken beta-actin promoter (cbetaa). cbetaa-bGH transgenic mice exhibit ubiquitous expression of bGH mRNA and protein and circulating bGH levels in the range of several microg/ml, resulting in markedly stimulated growth and the characteristic spectrum of pathological lesions which were described in previous GH overexpressing mouse models. Importantly, a consistent sequence of renal alterations is observed, mimicking progressive kidney disease in human patients. The novel, genetically standardized GH transgenic mouse model is ideal for holistic transcriptome and proteome studies aiming at the identification of the molecular mechanisms underlying GH-induced pathological alterations especially in the kidney. Moreover, genetically defined cbetaa-bGH mice facilitate random mutagenesis screens for modifier genes which influence the effects of chronic GH excess and associated pathological lesions.

  1. Melatonin protects against the pathological cardiac hypertrophy induced by transverse aortic constriction through activating PGC-1β: In vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Mengen; Liu, Zhenhua; Zhang, Bin; Jing, Lin; Li, Buying; Li, Kaifeng; Chen, Xiuju; Zhang, Meng; Yu, Bo; Ren, Kai; Yang, Yang; Yi, Wei; Yang, Jian; Liu, Jincheng; Yi, Dinghua; Liang, Hongliang; Jin, Zhenxiao; Reiter, Russel J; Duan, Weixun; Yu, Shiqiang

    2017-10-01

    Melatonin, a circadian molecule secreted by the pineal gland, confers a protective role against cardiac hypertrophy induced by hyperthyroidism, chronic hypoxia, and isoproterenol. However, its role against pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and the underlying mechanisms remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the pharmacological effects of melatonin on pathological cardiac hypertrophy induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). Male C57BL/6 mice underwent TAC or sham surgery at day 0 and were then treated with melatonin (20 mg/kg/day, via drinking water) for 4 or 8 weeks. The 8-week survival rate following TAC surgery was significantly increased by melatonin. Melatonin treatment for 8 weeks markedly ameliorated cardiac hypertrophy. Compared with the TAC group, melatonin treatment for both 4 and 8 weeks reduced pulmonary congestion, upregulated the expression level of α-myosin heavy chain, downregulated the expression level of β-myosin heavy chain and atrial natriuretic peptide, and attenuated the degree of cardiac fibrosis. In addition, melatonin treatment slowed the deterioration of cardiac contractile function caused by pressure overload. These effects of melatonin were accompanied by a significant upregulation in the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma co-activator-1 beta (PGC-1β) and the inhibition of oxidative stress. In vitro studies showed that melatonin also protects against angiotensin II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and oxidative stress, which were largely abolished by knocking down the expression of PGC-1β using small interfering RNA. In summary, our results demonstrate that melatonin protects against pathological cardiac hypertrophy induced by pressure overload through activating PGC-1β. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Inguinoscrotal pathology

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Luis; Leonard, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Infants, children, and adolescents with inguinoscrotal pathology comprise a significant proportion of emergency department and outpatient visits. Visits to the emergency department primarily comprise individuals presenting with scrotal pain due to testicular torsion or torsion of the testicular appendages. At such time, immediate urological consultation is sought. Outpatient visits comprise those individuals with undescended testes, hydroceles, and varicoceles. Rare, but important problems, such as pediatric testicular tumours, may also present in the office setting. Many of these outpatient visits are to primary care physicians, who should have an appreciation of the timing and need for referral. The purpose of this review is to familiarize the general urologist and primary care physician with these varied pathologies and give insight into their assessment and management. Some of these same conditions are seen in adult patients, but there are some significant differences in their management in the pediatric group. In addition, the utility of imaging studies, such as ultrasound, are discussed within each pathological entity. It is hoped that this overview will assist our general urology and primary care colleagues in patient management for diverse inguinoscrotal pathologies. PMID:28265317

  3. Prolonged diet induced obesity has minimal effects towards brain pathology in mouse model of cerebral amyloid angiopathy: implications for studying obesity-brain interactions in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Le; Dasuri, Kalavathi; Fernandez-Kim, Sun-Ok; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J; Freeman, Linnea R; Pepping, Jennifer K; Beckett, Tina L; Murphy, M Paul; Keller, Jeffrey N

    2013-09-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) occurs in nearly every individual with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Down's syndrome, and is the second largest cause of intracerebral hemorrhage. Mouse models of CAA have demonstrated evidence for increased gliosis contributing to CAA pathology. Nearly two thirds of Americans are overweight or obese, with little known about the effects of obesity on the brain, although increasingly the vasculature appears to be a principle target of obesity effects on the brain. In the current study we describe for the first time whether diet induced obesity (DIO) modulates glial reactivity, amyloid levels, and inflammatory signaling in a mouse model of CAA. In these studies we identify surprisingly that DIO does not significantly increase Aβ levels, astrocyte (GFAP) or microglial (IBA-1) gliosis in the CAA mice. However, within the hippocampal gyri a localized increase in reactive microglia were increased in the CA1 and stratum oriens relative to CAA mice on a control diet. DIO was observed to selectively increase IL-6 in CAA mice, with IL-1β and TNF-α not increased in CAA mice in response to DIO. Taken together, these data show that prolonged DIO has only modest effects towards Aβ in a mouse model of CAA, but appears to elevate some localized microglial reactivity within the hippocampal gyri and selective markers of inflammatory signaling. These data are consistent with the majority of the existing literature in other models of Aβ pathology, which surprisingly show a mixed profile of DIO effects towards pathological processes in mouse models of neurodegenerative disease. The importance for considering the potential impact of ceiling effects in pathology within mouse models of Aβ pathogenesis, and the current experimental limitations for DIO in mice to fully replicate metabolic dysfunction present in human obesity, are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Animal Models of Disease.

  4. Clinical aspects and pathology of Alexander disease, and morphological and functional alteration of astrocytes induced by GFAP mutation.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tomokatsu; Nakagawa, Masanori

    2012-08-01

    Alexander disease (AxD) is pathologically characterized by the presence of Rosenthal fibers (RF), which are made up of GFAP, αB-crystallin and heat shock protein 27, in the cytoplasm of perivascular and subpial astrocyte endfeet. Since GFAP mutation has been confirmed in reported cases of AxD, clinical or experimental research is being conducted on the relationship between GFAP mutation and the onset pathology as well as the clinical form. We conducted a nationwide survey and a clinical study, and classified AxD into three types: cerebral AxD (type 1), which primarily has an infantile onset with presence of seizures, psychomotor developmental retardation, macrocephaly, and abnormalities in the superior frontal cerebral white matter observed in a brain MRI; bulbospinal AxD (type 2), which primarily has an adult onset with presence of muscle weakness, hyperreflexia, bulbar or pseudobulbar symptoms, signal abnormalities, and atrophy observed in an MRI of the medulla oblongata and upper cervical spinal cord; and an intermediate form (type 3) which has the characteristics of both. A research on GFAP mutations and aggregate formation concluded that GFAP mutations decreased the solubility of GFAP. According to our cell model experiment, the formation of mutant GFAP aggravates depending on the site of the GFAP mutation. Furthermore, there is a possibility that polymorphism in the GFAP promoter gene regulates the degree to which GFAP is expressed; it may have an effect on clinical heterogeneity. Recent research using cell and animal models suggests that the pathology of AxD involves not only mere functional abnormalities in intermediate filaments but also functional abnormalities in astrocytes as well as in neurons. Clarification of the glia-neuron interactions will prove the disease to be very interesting.

  5. Overexpression of Parkinson’s Disease-Associated Mutation LRRK2 G2019S in Mouse Forebrain Induces Behavioral Deficits and α-Synuclein Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Grima, Jonathan C.; Chen, Guanxing; Swing, Debbie; Tessarollo, Lino

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene have been identified as an unambiguous cause of late-onset, autosomal-dominant familial Parkinson’s disease (PD) and LRRK2 mutations are the strongest genetic risk factor for sporadic PD known to date. A number of transgenic mice expressing wild-type or mutant LRRK2 have been described with varying degrees of LRRK2-related abnormalities and modest pathologies. None of these studies directly addressed the role of the kinase domain in the changes observed and none of the mice present with robust features of the human disease. In an attempt to address these issues, we created a conditional LRRK2 G2019S (LRRK2 GS) mutant and a functionally negative control, LRRK2 G2019S/D1994A (LRRK2 GS/DA). Expression of LRRK2 GS or LRRK2 GS/DA was conditionally controlled using the tet-off system in which the presence of tetracycline-transactivator protein (tTA) with a CAMKIIα promoter (CAMKIIα-tTA) induced expression of TetP-LRRK2 GS or TetP-LRRK2 GS/DA in the mouse forebrain. Overexpression of LRRK2 GS in mouse forebrain induced behavioral deficits and α-synuclein pathology in a kinase-dependent manner. Similar to other genetically engineered LRRK2 GS mice, there was no significant loss of dopaminergic neurons. These mice provide an important new tool to study neurobiological changes associated with the increased kinase activity from the LRRK2 G2019S mutation, which may ultimately lead to a better understanding of not only the physiologic actions of LRRK2, but also potential pathologic actions that underlie LRRK2 GS-associated PD. PMID:28321439

  6. Myelin injury induces axonal transport impairment but not AD-like pathology in the hippocampus of cuprizone-fed mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Junjun; Zhou, Hong; Bai, Feng; Ren, Qingguo; Zhang, Zhijun

    2016-01-01

    Both multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are progressive neurological disorders with myelin injury and memory impairment. However, whether myelin impairment could cause AD-like neurological pathology remains unclear. To explore neurological pathology following myelin injury, we assessed cognitive function, the expression of myelin proteins, axonal transport-associated proteins, axonal structural proteins, synapse-associated proteins, tau and beta amyloid and the status of neurons, using the cuprizone mouse model of demyelination. We found the mild impairment of learning ability in cuprizone-fed mice and the decreased expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) in the hippocampus. And anti-LINGO-1 improved learning ability and partly restored MBP level. Furthermore, we also found kinesin light chain (KLC), neurofilament light chain (NFL) and neurofilament heavy chain (NF200) were declined in demyelinated hippocampus, which could be partly improved by treatment with anti-LINGO-1. However, we did not observe the increased expression of beta amyloid, hyperphosphorylation of tau and loss of neurons in demyelinated hippocampus. Our results suggest that demyelination might lead to the impairment of neuronal transport, but not cause increased level of hyperphosphorylated tau and beta amyloid. Our research demonstrates remyelination might be an effective pathway to recover the function of neuronal axons and cognition in MS. PMID:27129150

  7. [Normal mourning and pathological mourning].

    PubMed

    Souris, M

    1994-01-01

    The mourning's function and the usual phases of this process are described. Complicated and pathological kinds of mournings are analysed, as well as their inducing circumstances. Adequate behaviours about the therapeutic relation are discussed.

  8. [Biochemical and pathological analysis of mice with type 2 diabetes mellitus induced by high-fat diet and low-dose streptozotocin injections].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Weisen; Huang, Yuanjian; Shao, Congwen; Liang, Baohuan; Wei, Cheng; Xu, Wanfu; Su, Yaru

    2014-07-01

    To analyze the biochemical and pathological changes in mice with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) induced by high-fat diet combined with low-dose streptozotocin (STZ) injections. C57BL/6J mice were divided randomly into normal control group (NC group), high-fat diet group (HC group) and high-fat diet plus STZ group (HC+STZ group). The mice were fed on normal chow or a high-fat diet for 1 month before two introperitoneal injections of STZ (40 mg/kg) or citrate buffer with an interval of 24 h as appropriate. Fasting blood glucose (FBG) was detected every week for 4 weeks, and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed one month after the injections, after which the biochemical profiles, islet and liver were evaluated by immunohistochemical and pathological analysis. In HC+STZ group, FBG was above the cutoff value (13.89 mmol/L) in 75% of the mice at 1 week after STZ injections and in all the mice at two weeks except for the death of 1 mouse, with a success rate of modeling of 91.3%. FBG in HC group, though slightly higher than that in NC group, remained normal (6.8 mmol/L). The body weight in HC+STZ and HC groups was significantly higher than that in NC group after feeding but without obvious increases after the injections (P<0.01). Blood glucose in HC+STZ group at 0.5 to 2 h after OGTT and the area under curve (AUC) were higher than those in NC and HC groups (P<0.01); the AUC in HC group was a also higher than that in NC group (P<0.05). Plasma creatinine was significantly higher in HC+STZ group than in NC (P<0.01) and HC (P<0.05) groups. Insulin secretion by the islets decreased obviously in HC+STZ and HC group. The mice in HC+STZ group showed atrophy, fibrosis, and vacuolization in the islets with mild fatty liver but no visible renal pathologies. High-fat diet and low-dose STZ injections can induce T2DM in mice with very similar biochemical and pathological changes to human T2DM and with such complications as fatty liver.

  9. Antagonism of the interferon-induced OAS-RNase L pathway by murine coronavirus ns2 protein is required for virus replication and liver pathology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ling; Jha, Babal K; Wu, Ashley; Elliott, Ruth; Ziebuhr, John; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Silverman, Robert H; Weiss, Susan R

    2012-06-14

    Many viruses induce hepatitis in humans, highlighting the need to understand the underlying mechanisms of virus-induced liver pathology. The murine coronavirus, mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), causes acute hepatitis in its natural host and provides a useful model for understanding virus interaction with liver cells. The MHV accessory protein, ns2, antagonizes the type I interferon response and promotes hepatitis. We show that ns2 has 2',5'-phosphodiesterase activity, which blocks the interferon inducible 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS)-RNase L pathway to facilitate hepatitis development. Ns2 cleaves 2',5'-oligoadenylate, the product of OAS, to prevent activation of the cellular endoribonuclease RNase L and consequently block viral RNA degradation. An ns2 mutant virus was unable to replicate in the liver or induce hepatitis in wild-type mice, but was highly pathogenic in RNase L deficient mice. Thus, RNase L is a critical cellular factor for protection against viral infection of the liver and the resulting hepatitis.

  10. Cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) IVA as a potential signature molecule in cigarette smoke condensate induced pathologies in alveolar epithelial lineages.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Subodh K; Sharma, Sanjeev K; Farooque, Abdullah; Kaushik, Gaurav; Kaur, Balwinder; Pathak, Chander M; Dwarakanath, Bilikere S; Khanduja, Krishan L

    2016-08-15

    Smoking is one of the leading causes of millions of deaths worldwide. During cigarette smoking, most affected and highly exposed cells are the alveolar epithelium and generated oxidative stress in these cells leads to death and damage. Several studies suggested that oxidative stress causes membrane remodeling via Phospholipase A2s but in the case of cigarette smokers, mechanistically study is not yet fully defined. In view of present perspective, we evaluated the involvement of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) IVA as therapeutic target in cigarette smoke induced pathologies in transformed type I and type II alveolar epithelial cells. Transformed type I (WI26) and type II (A549) alveolar epithelial cells were used for the present study. Cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) was prepared from most commonly used cigarette (Gold Flake with filter) by the Indian population. CSC-induced molecular changes were evaluated through cell viability using MTT assay, reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurement using 2,7 dichlorodihydrofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA), cell membrane integrity using fluorescein diacetate (FDA) and ethidium bromide (EtBr) staining, super oxide dismutase (SOD) levels, cPLA2 activity and molecular involvement of specific cPLA2s at selected 24 h time period. CSC-induced response on both type of epithelial cells shown significantly reduction in cell viability, declined membrane integrity, with differential escalation of ROS levels in the range of 1.5-15 folds and pointedly increased cPLA2 activity (p < 0.05). Likewise, we observed distinction antioxidant potential in these two types of lineages as type I cells had considerably higher SOD levels when compared to type II cells (p < 0.05). Further molecular expression of all cPLA2s increased significantly in a dose dependent manner, specifically cytosolic phospholipase A2 IVA with maximum manifestation of 3.8 folds. Interestingly, CSC-induced ROS levels and cPLA2s expression were relatively higher in A

  11. Gene Expression Profile Change and Associated Physiological and Pathological Effects in Mouse Liver Induced by Fasting and Refeeding

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Xu, Xiang; Zhou, Ben; He, Zhishui; Zhai, Qiwei

    2011-01-01

    Food availability regulates basal metabolism and progression of many diseases, and liver plays an important role in these processes. The effects of food availability on digital gene expression profile, physiological and pathological functions in liver are yet to be further elucidated. In this study, we applied high-throughput sequencing technology to detect digital gene expression profile of mouse liver in fed, fasted and refed states. Totally 12162 genes were detected, and 2305 genes were significantly regulated by food availability. Biological process and pathway analysis showed that fasting mainly affected lipid and carboxylic acid metabolic processes in liver. Moreover, the genes regulated by fasting and refeeding in liver were mainly enriched in lipid metabolic process or fatty acid metabolism. Network analysis demonstrated that fasting mainly regulated Drug Metabolism, Small Molecule Biochemistry and Endocrine System Development and Function, and the networks including Lipid Metabolism, Small Molecule Biochemistry and Gene Expression were affected by refeeding. In addition, FunDo analysis showed that liver cancer and diabetes mellitus were most likely to be affected by food availability. This study provides the digital gene expression profile of mouse liver regulated by food availability, and demonstrates the main biological processes, pathways, gene networks and potential hepatic diseases regulated by fasting and refeeding. These results show that food availability mainly regulates hepatic lipid metabolism and is highly correlated with liver-related diseases including liver cancer and diabetes. PMID:22096593

  12. An entirely automated method to score DSS-induced colitis in mice by digital image analysis of pathology slides

    PubMed Central

    Kozlowski, Cleopatra; Jeet, Surinder; Beyer, Joseph; Guerrero, Steve; Lesch, Justin; Wang, Xiaoting; DeVoss, Jason; Diehl, Lauri

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The DSS (dextran sulfate sodium) model of colitis is a mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease. Microscopic symptoms include loss of crypt cells from the gut lining and infiltration of inflammatory cells into the colon. An experienced pathologist requires several hours per study to score histological changes in selected regions of the mouse gut. In order to increase the efficiency of scoring, Definiens Developer software was used to devise an entirely automated method to quantify histological changes in the whole H&E slide. When the algorithm was applied to slides from historical drug-discovery studies, automated scores classified 88% of drug candidates in the same way as pathologists’ scores. In addition, another automated image analysis method was developed to quantify colon-infiltrating macrophages, neutrophils, B cells and T cells in immunohistochemical stains of serial sections of the H&E slides. The timing of neutrophil and macrophage infiltration had the highest correlation to pathological changes, whereas T and B cell infiltration occurred later. Thus, automated image analysis enables quantitative comparisons between tissue morphology changes and cell-infiltration dynamics. PMID:23580198

  13. Triosephosphate isomerase I170V alters catalytic site, enhances stability and induces pathology in a Drosophila model of TPI deficiency

    DOE PAGES

    Roland, Bartholomew P.; Amrich, Christopher G.; Kammerer, Charles J.; ...

    2014-10-16

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) is a glycolytic enzyme which homodimerizes for full catalytic activity. Mutations of the TPI gene elicit a disease known as TPI Deficiency, a glycolytic enzymopathy noted for its unique severity of neurological symptoms. Evidence suggests that TPI Deficiency pathogenesis may be due to conformational changes of the protein, likely affecting dimerization and protein stability. In this report, we genetically and physically characterize a human disease-associated TPI mutation caused by an I170V substitution. Human TPII170V elicits behavioral abnormalities in Drosophila. An examination of hTPII170V enzyme kinetics revealed this substitution reduced catalytic turnover, while assessments of thermal stability demonstratedmore » an increase in enzyme stability. Furthermore, the crystal structure of the homodimeric I170V mutant reveals changes in the geometry of critical residues within the catalytic pocket. In the end, collectively these data reveal new observations of the structural and kinetic determinants of TPI deficiency pathology, providing new insights into disease pathogenesis.« less

  14. Serial evaluation of physiologic, pathological, and behavioral changes related to disease progression of experimentally induced Mannheimia haemolytica pneumonia in postweaned calves.

    PubMed

    Hanzlicek, Gregg A; White, Brad J; Mosier, Derek; Renter, David G; Anderson, David E

    2010-03-01

    To determine the usefulness of physiologic, behavioral, and pathological changes as objective indicators of early respiratory disease in calves with Mannheimia haemolytica pneumonia. 14 crossbred beef steers. Disease was experimentally induced in healthy calves through endoscopic pulmonary inoculation of M haemolytica. Calves were necropsied on days 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, and 9 after inoculation. Physical examination variables (rectal temperature, heart rate, and respiration characteristics), clinical illness score, and degree of activity were assessed 3 times daily beginning 4 days prior to inoculation and continuing throughout the study. Twice before inoculation and on days 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, and 9, arterial blood gas measurements, serum biochemical analyses, and CBCs were performed. Pedometers and accelerometers were used to monitor cattle behavior and activity throughout the trial. All calves became clinically ill after inoculation and had gross and histopathologic signs of bronchopneumonia. No variable was a reliable indicator of disease progression as judged by percentage of pulmonary involvement. However, activity as measured by total steps taken in a 24-hour period was lower after versus before disease induction. This single-pathogen challenge model successfully yielded clinical signs and pathological effects consistent with naturally acquired respiratory disease. Routine laboratory variables and subjective measures were not reliable indicators of lung involvement or the progression of pneumonia. However, activity, objectively measured with pedometers and accelerometers, appeared to be a promising indicator for early recognition of bovine respiratory disease.

  15. Differential patterns of spinal cord pathology induced by MP4, MOG peptide 35-55, and PLP peptide 178-191 in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Kuerten, Stefanie; Gruppe, Traugott L; Laurentius, Laura-Maria; Kirch, Christiane; Tary-Lehmann, Magdalena; Lehmann, Paul V; Addicks, Klaus

    2011-06-01

    In this study we demonstrate that experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced by the MBP-PLP fusion protein MP4, MOG peptide 35-55, or PLP peptide 178-191 in C57BL/6 mice, respectively, displays distinct features of CNS pathology. Major differences between the three models resided in (i) the region-/tract-specificity and disseminated nature of spinal cord degeneration, (ii) the extent and kinetics of demyelination, and (iii) the involvement of motoneurons in the disease. In contrast, axonal damage was present in all models and to a similar extent, proposing this feature as a possible morphological correlate for the comparable chronic clinical course of the disease induced by the three antigens. The data suggest that the antigen targeted in autoimmune encephalomyelitis is crucial to the induction of differential histopathological disease manifestations. The use of MP4-, MOG:35-55-, and PLP:178-191-induced EAE on the C57BL/6 background can be a valuable tool when it comes to reproducing and studying the structural-morphological diversity of multiple sclerosis.

  16. Extraintestinal Helminth Infection Limits Pathology and Proinflammatory Cytokine Expression during DSS-Induced Ulcerative Colitis: A Role for Alternatively Activated Macrophages and Prostaglandins.

    PubMed

    Ledesma-Soto, Yadira; Callejas, Blanca E; Terrazas, César A; Reyes, Jose L; Espinoza-Jiménez, Arlett; González, Marisol I; León-Cabrera, Sonia; Morales, Rosario; Olguín, Jonadab E; Saavedra, Rafael; Oghumu, Steve; Satoskar, Abhay R; Terrazas, Luis I

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation of the intestinal mucosa is characteristic of inflammatory bowel diseases such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Helminth parasites have developed immunomodulatory strategies that may impact the outcome of several inflammatory diseases. Therefore, we investigated whether Taenia crassiceps infection is able to decrease the inflammatory effects of dextran sulfate sodium- (DSS-) induced ulcerative colitis in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. Preinfection significantly reduced the manifestations of DSS-induced colitis, as weight loss and shortened colon length, and decreased the disease activity index independently of the genetic background of the mice. Taenia infection decreased systemic levels of proinflammatory cytokines while increasing levels of IL-4 and IL-10, and the inflammatory infiltrate into the colon was also markedly reduced. RT-PCR assays from colon showed that T. crassiceps-infected mice displayed increased expression of Arginase-1 but decreased expression of iNOS compared to DSS-treated uninfected mice. The percentages of T regulatory cells were not increased. The adoptive transfer of alternatively activated macrophages (AAMФs) from infected mice into mice with DSS-induced colitis reduced the severity of colon inflammation. Administration of indomethacin abrogated the anticolitic effect of Taenia. Thus, T. crassiceps infection limits the pathology of ulcerative colitis by suppressing inflammatory responses mechanistically associated with AAMФs and prostaglandins.

  17. Ameliorative Effects of Antioxidants on the Hippocampal Accumulation of Pathologic Tau in a Rat Model of Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaoping; West, Matthew B.; Cheng, Weihua; Ewert, Donald L.; Li, Wei; Saunders, Debra; Towner, Rheal A.; Floyd, Robert A.; Kopke, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can lead to early onset dementia and other related neurodegenerative diseases. We previously demonstrated that damage to the central auditory pathway resulting from blast-induced TBI (bTBI) could be significantly attenuated by a combinatorial antioxidant treatment regimen. In the current study, we examined the localization patterns of normal Tau and the potential blast-induced accumulation of neurotoxic variants of this microtubule-associated protein that are believed to potentiate the neurodegenerative effects associated with synaptic dysfunction in the hippocampus following three successive blast overpressure exposures in nontransgenic rats. We observed a marked increase in the number of both hyperphosphorylated and oligomeric Tau-positive hilar mossy cells and somatic accumulation of endogenous Tau in oligodendrocytes in the hippocampus. Remarkably, a combinatorial regimen of 2,4-disulfonyl α-phenyl tertiary butyl nitrone (HPN-07) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) resulted in striking reductions in the numbers of both mossy cells and oligodendrocytes positively labeled for these pathological Tau immunoreactivity patterns in response to bTBI. This treatment strategy represents a promising therapeutic approach for simultaneously reducing or eliminating both primary auditory injury and nonauditory changes associated with bTBI-induced hippocampal neurodegeneration. PMID:27034735

  18. Extraintestinal Helminth Infection Limits Pathology and Proinflammatory Cytokine Expression during DSS-Induced Ulcerative Colitis: A Role for Alternatively Activated Macrophages and Prostaglandins

    PubMed Central

    Ledesma-Soto, Yadira; Callejas, Blanca E.; Terrazas, César A.; Reyes, Jose L.; Espinoza-Jiménez, Arlett; González, Marisol I.; León-Cabrera, Sonia; Morales, Rosario; Olguín, Jonadab E.; Saavedra, Rafael; Oghumu, Steve; Satoskar, Abhay R.; Terrazas, Luis I.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation of the intestinal mucosa is characteristic of inflammatory bowel diseases such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Helminth parasites have developed immunomodulatory strategies that may impact the outcome of several inflammatory diseases. Therefore, we investigated whether Taenia crassiceps infection is able to decrease the inflammatory effects of dextran sulfate sodium- (DSS-) induced ulcerative colitis in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. Preinfection significantly reduced the manifestations of DSS-induced colitis, as weight loss and shortened colon length, and decreased the disease activity index independently of the genetic background of the mice. Taenia infection decreased systemic levels of proinflammatory cytokines while increasing levels of IL-4 and IL-10, and the inflammatory infiltrate into the colon was also markedly reduced. RT-PCR assays from colon showed that T. crassiceps-infected mice displayed increased expression of Arginase-1 but decreased expression of iNOS compared to DSS-treated uninfected mice. The percentages of T regulatory cells were not increased. The adoptive transfer of alternatively activated macrophages (AAMФs) from infected mice into mice with DSS-induced colitis reduced the severity of colon inflammation. Administration of indomethacin abrogated the anticolitic effect of Taenia. Thus, T. crassiceps infection limits the pathology of ulcerative colitis by suppressing inflammatory responses mechanistically associated with AAMФs and prostaglandins. PMID:26090422

  19. Electron microscopical investigation on aldrin-induced hepatocyte pathology in Rana catesbeiana, with special emphasis on peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    de Brito-Gitirana, L; Miguel, N C

    2000-08-01

    We examined the effect of aldrin on hepatocyte ultrastructure in liver of Rana catesbeiana. The frogs were experimentally exposed to chemical substance and liver fragments processed for routine transmission electron microscopy. Hepatic peroxisomes were visualized after incubation with alkaline 3,3'-diaminobezidine (DAB) method. Ultrastructural analysis revealed progressive hepatocyte changes induced by this drug. After 2-weeks, in the hepatocytes the nuclear envelop and the cisternae of both smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum (SER und RER, respectively) were unusually enlarged. Reduction of glycogen granules associated with an increased frequency of lysosomes was observed. Normal appearing peroxisomes were present in clusters. Lipid droplets were also visualuzed. After 4-weeks, there was a new increase of glcogen associated with a great number of mitochondria and peroxisomes. Moreover, SER und RER were still dilated. Intracellular lipid inclusions became more abundant. These results suggest that the aldrin 250 induces ultrastructural changes in the hepatocyte of Rana catesbeiana.

  20. An evaluation of the clinical pathologic findings in experimentally induced urinary bladder rupture in pre-ruminant calves.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, D G; MacWilliams, P S

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to study the biochemical abnormalities that develop over time in preruminant calves with experimentally induced uroperitoneum. Uroperitoneum was produced by incising the bladder via a standing left flank laparotomy. Serum and peritoneal concentrations sodium, chloride, potassium, phosphate and creatinine were determined at 0, 2, 4, 8, 24, and 40 h. Serum creatinine concentration was increased by 8 h post-bladder rupture. Peritoneal concentrations of potassium and phosphate were significantly elevated 2 h after bladder rupture and peritoneal creatinine was significantly elevated by 4 h. Serum to peritoneal fluid ratios for potassium, phosphate and creatinine exceeded 2:1 within 2 h of bladder rupture. Pre-ruminant calves with experimentally induced uroperitoneum did not become hyperkalemic during the 40 h experiment. PMID:9553714

  1. Heat-stress and light-stress induce different cellular pathologies in the symbiotic dinoflagellate during coral bleaching.

    PubMed

    Downs, C A; McDougall, Kathleen E; Woodley, Cheryl M; Fauth, John E; Richmond, Robert H; Kushmaro, Ariel; Gibb, Stuart W; Loya, Yossi; Ostrander, Gary K; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti

    2013-01-01

    Coral bleaching is a significant contributor to the worldwide degradation of coral reefs and is indicative of the termination of symbiosis between the coral host and its symbiotic algae (dinoflagellate; Symbiodinium sp. complex), usually by expulsion or xenophagy (symbiophagy) of its dinoflagellates. Herein, we provide evidence that during the earliest stages of environmentally induced bleaching, heat stress and light stress generate distinctly different pathomorphological changes in the chloroplasts, while a combined heat- and light-stress exposure induces both pathomorphologies; suggesting that these stressors act on the dinoflagellate by different mechanisms. Within the first 48 hours of a heat stress (32°C) under low-light conditions, heat stress induced decomposition of thylakoid structures before observation of extensive oxidative damage; thus it is the disorganization of the thylakoids that creates the conditions allowing photo-oxidative-stress. Conversely, during the first 48 hours of a light stress (2007 µmoles m(-2) s(-1) PAR) at 25°C, condensation or fusion of multiple thylakoid lamellae occurred coincidently with levels of oxidative damage products, implying that photo-oxidative stress causes the structural membrane damage within the chloroplasts. Exposure to combined heat- and light-stresses induced both pathomorphologies, confirming that these stressors acted on the dinoflagellate via different mechanisms. Within 72 hours of exposure to heat and/or light stresses, homeostatic processes (e.g., heat-shock protein and anti-oxidant enzyme response) were evident in the remaining intact dinoflagellates, regardless of the initiating stressor. Understanding the sequence of events during bleaching when triggered by different environmental stressors is important for predicting both severity and consequences of coral bleaching.

  2. Heat-Stress and Light-Stress Induce Different Cellular Pathologies in the Symbiotic Dinoflagellate during Coral Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Downs, C. A.; McDougall, Kathleen E.; Woodley, Cheryl M.; Fauth, John E.; Richmond, Robert H.; Kushmaro, Ariel; Gibb, Stuart W.; Loya, Yossi; Ostrander, Gary K.; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti

    2013-01-01

    Coral bleaching is a significant contributor to the worldwide degradation of coral reefs and is indicative of the termination of symbiosis between the coral host and its symbiotic algae (dinoflagellate; Symbiodinium sp. complex), usually by expulsion or xenophagy (symbiophagy) of its dinoflagellates. Herein, we provide evidence that during the earliest stages of environmentally induced bleaching, heat stress and light stress generate distinctly different pathomorphological changes in the chloroplasts, while a combined heat- and light-stress exposure induces both pathomorphologies; suggesting that these stressors act on the dinoflagellate by different mechanisms. Within the first 48 hours of a heat stress (32°C) under low-light conditions, heat stress induced decomposition of thylakoid structures before observation of extensive oxidative damage; thus it is the disorganization of the thylakoids that creates the conditions allowing photo-oxidative-stress. Conversely, during the first 48 hours of a light stress (2007 µmoles m−2 s−1 PAR) at 25°C, condensation or fusion of multiple thylakoid lamellae occurred coincidently with levels of oxidative damage products, implying that photo-oxidative stress causes the structural membrane damage within the chloroplasts. Exposure to combined heat- and light-stresses induced both pathomorphologies, confirming that these stressors acted on the dinoflagellate via different mechanisms. Within 72 hours of exposure to heat and/or light stresses, homeostatic processes (e.g., heat-shock protein and anti-oxidant enzyme response) were evident in the remaining intact dinoflagellates, regardless of the initiating stressor. Understanding the sequence of events during bleaching when triggered by different environmental stressors is important for predicting both severity and consequences of coral bleaching. PMID:24324575

  3. Short-term oral administration of a product derived from a probiotic, Clostridium butyricum induced no pathological effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Araki, Yoshio; Andoh, Akira; Fujiyama, Yoshihide; Takizawa, Jyou; Takizawa, Wataru; Bamba, Tadao

    2002-02-01

    Recent studies have suggested that short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) exert a therapeutic effect on some human and experimental animal diseases. In a previous study, we showed that Clostridium butyricum produces high levels of SCFAs in the culture system used. In addition, an additive based on yogurt was effective in eliminating and masking the odor derived from SCFAs in the product. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects for oral administration of the product, which was derived from Clostridium butyricum and contains a high level of SCFAs, in rats. Male and female Wistar Hannover GALAS rats, 5 weeks old, were allowed a mixture of the standard diet plus the product derived from Clostridium butyricum (50% w/w) with 0.1% additive for 17 days (n=6). The control rats were also allowed a standard diet plus tap water (50% w/w) with 0.1% additive (n=6). After 17 days, a laparotomy was performed. A hemocyte count, and biochemical and electrolyte analyses were subsequently carried out. The esophagus, stomach, small intestine, cecum and large intestine were investigated macroscopically and microscopically. Results showed that the rats grew normally for the duration of the experimental period. In particular, the body weights of the product-fed male rats were significantly increased as compared to those of the control-fed male rats. There were no significant differences in the organic weight between the product-fed and control-fed rats, except for a significantly increased weight of the small intestine in the product-fed female rats. No pathological abnormalities were found in the hemocyte count, the biochemical and electrolyte analyses, or the macroscopic and microscopic findings. It is possible that this novel product with the additive exerts therapeutic effects on some gastrointestinal disorders.

  4. Administration of NaHS Attenuates Footshock-Induced Pathologies and Emotional and Cognitive Dysfunction in Triple Transgenic Alzheimer’s Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hei-Jen; Chen, Shu-Ling; Hsieh-Li, Hsiu Mei

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by progressive cognitive decline and neuropsychiatric symptoms. Increasing evidence indicates that environmental risk factors in young adults may accelerate cognitive loss in AD and that Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) may represent an innovative treatment to slow the progression of AD. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of NaHS, an H2S donor, in a triple transgenic AD mouse model (3×Tg-AD) under footshock with situational reminders (SRs). Inescapable footshock with SRs induced anxiety and cognitive dysfunction as well as a decrease in the levels of plasma H2S and GSH and an increase in IL-6 levels in 3×Tg-AD mice. Under footshock with SR stimulus, amyloid deposition, tau protein hyperphosphorylation, and microgliosis were highly increased in the stress-responsive brain structures, including the hippocampus and amygdala, of the AD mice. Oxidative stress, inflammatory response, and β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) levels were also increased, and the level of inactivated glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) (pSer9) was decreased in the hippocampi of AD mice subjected to footshock with SRs. Furthermore, the numbers of cholinergic neurons in the medial septum/diagonal band of Broca (MS/DB) and noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC) were also decreased in the 3×Tg-AD mice under footshock with SRs. These biochemical hallmarks and pathological presentations were all alleviated by the semi-acute administration of NaHS in the AD mice. Together, these findings suggest that footshock with SRs induces the impairment of spatial cognition and emotion, which involve pathological changes in the peripheral and central systems, including the hippocampus, MS/DB, LC, and BLA, and that the administration of NaHS may be a candidate strategy to ameliorate the progression of neurodegeneration. PMID:26635562

  5. Pathological gambling.

    PubMed

    Hollander, E; Buchalter, A J; DeCaria, C M

    2000-09-01

    With increasing access to gambling facilities through casinos, the Internet, and other venues, PG is a rapidly emerging mental health concern. This impulse-control disorder tends to be comorbid with a wide range of other disorders and is reportedly associated with a high rate of suicide. For most gamblers, gambling is a form of entertainment, but for many individuals, the activity leads to far-reaching disruption of family and work. The personal and societal financial ramifications are severe, and many individuals with PG end up in the criminal justice system. An understanding of the neurobiology of PG is beginning to surface. 5-HT is linked to behavioral initiation and disinhibition, which are important in the onset of the gambling cycle and the difficulty in ceasing the behavior. Norepinephrine is associated with the arousal and risk taking in patients with PG. Dopamine is linked to positive and negative reward, the addictive component of this disorder. Effective treatment strategies for pathological gamblers are emerging. Potentially useful pharmacologic agents include SRIs (clomipramine and fluvoxamine), mood stabilizers for pathological gamblers with comorbid bipolar disorders (lithium), and naltrexone. Cognitive-behavioral psychotherapies offer promising results in the treatment of patients with this disorder. To devise prevention and early-intervention programs, research is needed to identify specific features of the individuals at risk for gambling problems. Education targeting vulnerable youth that show early signs of gambling behavior may be worthwhile and should be investigated further. Funding is necessary to support these endeavors, so perhaps a portion of tax revenues generated from the gambling industry should go toward specialized treatment facilities, educational efforts, and research into the neurobiology and treatment of PG.

  6. Cyclic mechanical strain induces NO production in human patellar tendon fibroblasts--a possible role for remodelling and pathological transformation.

    PubMed

    van Griensven, Martijn; Zeichen, Johannes; Skutek, Michael; Barkhausen, Tanja; Krettek, Christian; Bosch, Ulrich

    2003-03-01

    The mechanism by which tendon fibroblasts can detect strain forces and respond to them is fairly unknown. Nitric oxide (NO) is a messenger molecule that among others can respond to shear stress in endothelial cells. Therefore, it was investigated whether cyclic mechanical strain induces NO in vitro in human patellar tendon fibroblasts. Human patellar tendon fibroblasts were cultured from remnants of patellar tendon transplants after reconstructive surgery. Fibroblasts were cultured on elastic silicone dishes. The cells were longitudinally strained (5%, 1 Hz) for 15' or 60'. As a control, no strain was applied. The experiments were finished after 0', 5', 15', and 30'. NO was determined using the Griess reaction. 15' strain showed at 0' and 5' 200% activation, which thereafter at 15' and 30' returned to normal levels. 60' strain showed a biphasic pattern. At 5' and 30', NO levels were increased to 175%. At 15', NO measurement displayed 120% increased levels. Mechanical strain induces NO production by tendon fibroblasts. Therefore, NO produced by tendon fibroblasts, as a response to alteration in their mechanical microenvironment, could modulate fibroblast function. The results of our study suggests that strain-related adaptive changes may, at least in part, be controlled by a process in which strain-related NO production from the fibroblast network may play a pivotal role. Moreover, these are basic findings that are important for further unravelling pathophysiology of tendon diseases.

  7. [Experimental studies of physiological and pathological effects induced by systemic hypoxia and the hypoxia-reoxygenation model in rats].

    PubMed

    Kagoshima, M; Tsubata, Y; Shimada, H

    1995-08-01

    We attempted to make a basic model to investigate a series of factors that induce histological changes in systemic hypoxia-reoxygenation injuries. At first, we set the experimental conditions for hypoxia and the hypoxia-reoxygenation models as follows: respiration volume: 1.5 ml/stroke, respiratory frequency: 80 times/min, oxygen concentration: 14%. Next, Male SPF Wistar rats were anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium. For artificial ventilation, a cannula was inserted in the trachea and connected to the rodent ventilator through two flow meters to allow mixing of 100%N2 and 95%O2-5%CO2 gases at a desired ratio. The influence of hypoxia-reoxygenation was studied and evaluated histologically and biochemically. The rats were placed under the hypoxic condition for either 3 or 6 hr. Then, oxygen partial pressure was restored to 21% followed by reoxygenation for either 3 or 6 hr. Then the rats were sacrificed, and the pituitary, adrenals, heart, stomach and kidneys were removed. The results were as follows: 1) GPT activities were increased by a load of hypoxia, but no influence of reoxygenation was detected. 2) Under the condition of experimental hypoxia, the weights of the pituitary and adrenals increased significantly. 3) The histological findings indicated that 6-hr hypoxia followed by 3-hr reoxygenation induced hypoxia-reoxygenation injuries mostly affecting the anterior pituitary and adrenal medulla.

  8. Pathological Evaluation of Radiation-Induced Vascular Lesions of the Brain: Distinct from De Novo Cavernous Hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Yoon Jin; Nahm, Ji Hae; Ko, Ji Eun; Shin, Hyun Joo; Chang, Jong-Hee; Cho, Nam Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to evaluate the histologic and radiologic findings of vascular lesions after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) categorized as radiation-induced cavernous hemangioma (RICH). Materials and Methods Among 89 patients who underwent neurosurgery for cavernous hemangioma, eight RICHs from 7 patients and 10 de novo CHs from 10 patients were selected for histopathological and radiological comparison. Results Histologically, RICHs showed hematoma-like gross appearance. Microscopically, RICH exhibited a hematoma-like area accompanied by proliferation of thin-walled vasculature with fibrin deposits and infiltrating foamy macrophages. In contrast, CHs demonstrated localized malformed vasculature containing fresh and old clotted blood on gross examination. Typically, CHs consisted of thick, ectatic hyalinized vessels lined by endothelium under a light microscope. Magnetic resonance imaging of RICHs revealed some overlapping but distinct features with CHs, including enhancing cystic and solid components with absence or incomplete popcorn-like appearance and partial hemosiderin rims. Conclusion Together with histologic and radiologic findings, RICH may result from blood-filled space after tissue destruction by SRS, accompanied with radiation-induced reactive changes rather than vascular malformation. Thus, the term "RICH" would be inappropriate, because it is more likely to be an inactive organizing hematoma rather than proliferation of malformed vasculature. PMID:26446658

  9. Diffusion kurtosis imaging probes cortical alterations and white matter pathology following cuprizone induced demyelination and spontaneous remyelination.

    PubMed

    Guglielmetti, C; Veraart, J; Roelant, E; Mai, Z; Daans, J; Van Audekerke, J; Naeyaert, M; Vanhoutte, G; Delgado Y Palacios, R; Praet, J; Fieremans, E; Ponsaerts, P; Sijbers, J; Van der Linden, A; Verhoye, M

    2016-01-15

    Although MRI is the gold standard for the diagnosis and monitoring of multiple sclerosis (MS), current conventional MRI techniques often fail to detect cortical alterations and provide little information about gliosis, axonal damage and myelin status of lesioned areas. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) provide sensitive and complementary measures of the neural tissue microstructure. Additionally, specific white matter tract integrity (WMTI) metrics modelling the diffusion in white matter were recently derived. In the current study we used the well-characterized cuprizone mouse model of central nervous system demyelination to assess the temporal evolution of diffusion tensor (DT), diffusion kurtosis tensor (DK) and WMTI-derived metrics following acute inflammatory demyelination and spontaneous remyelination. While DT-derived metrics were unable to detect cuprizone induced cortical alterations, the mean kurtosis (MK) and radial kurtosis (RK) were found decreased under cuprizone administration, as compared to age-matched controls, in both the motor and somatosensory cortices. The MK remained decreased in the motor cortices at the end of the recovery period, reflecting long lasting impairment of myelination. In white matter, DT, DK and WMTI-derived metrics enabled the detection of cuprizone induced changes differentially according to the stage and the severity of the lesion. More specifically, the MK, the RK and the axonal water fraction (AWF) were the most sensitive for the detection of cuprizone induced changes in the genu of the corpus callosum, a region less affected by cuprizone administration. Additionally, microgliosis was associated with an increase of MK and RK during the acute inflammatory demyelination phase. In regions undergoing severe demyelination, namely the body and splenium of the corpus callosum, DT-derived metrics, notably the mean diffusion (MD) and radial diffusion (RD), were among the best discriminators between

  10. Diffusion kurtosis imaging probes cortical alterations and white matter pathology following cuprizone induced demyelination and spontaneous remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Guglielmetti, C.; Veraart, J.; Roelant, E.; Mai, Z.; Daans, J.; Van Audekerke, J.; Naeyaert, M.; Vanhoutte, G.; Delgado y Palacios, R.; Praet, J.; Fieremans, E.; Ponsaerts, P.; Sijbers, J.; Van der Linden, A.; Verhoye, M.

    2016-01-01

    Although MRI is the gold standard for the diagnosis and monitoring of multiple sclerosis (MS), current conventional MRI techniques often fail to detect cortical alterations and provide little information about gliosis, axonal damage and myelin status of lesioned areas. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) provide sensitive and complementary measures of the neural tissue microstructure. Additionally, specific white matter tract integrity (WMTI) metrics modelling the diffusion in white matter were recently derived. In the current study we used the well-characterized cuprizone mouse model of central nervous system demyelination to assess the temporal evolution of diffusion tensor (DT), diffusion kurtosis tensor (DK) and WMTI-derived metrics following acute inflammatory demyelination and spontaneous remyelination. While DT-derived metrics were unable to detect cuprizone induced cortical alterations, the mean kurtosis (MK) and radial kurtosis (RK) were found decreased under cuprizone administration, as compared to age-matched controls, in both the motor and somatosensory cortices. The MK remained decreased in the motor cortices at the end of the recovery period, reflecting long lasting impairment of myelination. In white matter, DT, DK and WMTI-derived metrics enabled the detection of cuprizone induced changes differentially according to the stage and the severity of the lesion. More specifically, MK, RK and the axonal water fraction (AWF) were the most sensitive for the detection of cuprizone induced changes in the genu of the corpus callosum, a region less affected by cuprizone administration. Additionally, microgliosis was associated with an increase of MK and RK during the acute inflammatory demyelination phase. In regions undergoing severe demyelination, namely the body and splenium of the corpus callosum, DT-derived metrics, notably the mean diffusion (MD) and radial diffusion (RD), were among the best discriminators between

  11. PEDF and its roles in physiological and pathological conditions: implication in diabetic and hypoxia-induced angiogenic diseases.

    PubMed

    He, Xuemin; Cheng, Rui; Benyajati, Siribhinya; Ma, Jian-xing

    2015-06-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a broadly expressed multifunctional member of the serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) family. This widely studied protein plays critical roles in many physiological and pathophysiological processes, including neuroprotection, angiogenesis, fibrogenesis and inflammation. The present review summarizes the temporal and spatial distribution patterns of PEDF in a variety of developing and adult organs, and discusses its functions in maintaining physiological homoeostasis. The major focus of the present review is to discuss the implication of PEDF in diabetic and hypoxia-induced angiogenesis, and the pathways mediating PEDF's effects under these conditions. Furthermore, the regulatory mechanisms of PEDF expression, function and degradation are also reviewed. Finally, the therapeutic potential of PEDF as an anti-angiogenic drug is briefly summarized.

  12. Acupuncture-induced changes in functional connectivity of the primary somatosensory cortex varied with pathological stages of Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoxuan; Zhu, Yifang; Li, Chuanfu; Park, Kyungmo; Mohamed, Abdalla Z; Wu, Hongli; Xu, Chunsheng; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Linying; Yang, Jun; Qiu, Bensheng

    2014-10-01

    Bell's palsy is the most common cause of acute facial nerve paralysis. In China, Bell's palsy is frequently treated with acupuncture. However, its efficacy and underlying mechanism are still controversial. In this study, we used functional MRI to investigate the effect of acupuncture on the functional connectivity of the brain in Bell's palsy patients and healthy individuals. The patients were further grouped according to disease duration and facial motor performance. The results of resting-state functional MRI connectivity show that acupuncture induces significant connectivity changes in the primary somatosensory region of both early and late recovery groups, but no significant changes in either the healthy control group or the recovered group. In the recovery group, the changes also varied with regions and disease duration. Therefore, we propose that the effect of acupuncture stimulation may depend on the functional connectivity status of patients with Bell's palsy.

  13. Inclusion body disease of cranes: comparison of pathologic findings in cranes with acquired vs. experimentally induced disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuh, J.C.; Sileo, L.; Siegfried, L.M.; Yuill, Thomas M.

    1986-01-01

    Inclusion body disease of cranes was the cause of death in 17 immature and mature cranes of 5 different species in Wisconsin. A herpesvirus of unknown origin was the apparent cause. An isolate of this herpesvirus was used to experimentally infect 3 species of cranes. Macroscopic and microscopic lesions associated with naturally acquired and experimentally induced disease were essentially identical. Multifocal hepatic and splenic necrosis was found in all cranes evaluated. Necrosis of the gastrointestinal tract, thymus, and bursa of Fabricius also was seen in some of the cranes. Eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies often were commonly associated with hepatic lesions, sometimes with the splenic lesions, and rarely with the thymic or gastrointestinal tract lesions. The lesions of this inclusion body disease were similar to those reported for cranes in Austria from which a crane herpesvirus was isolated.

  14. Pathology of ochratoxin A-induced nephrotoxicity in Japanese quail and its protection by sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.).

    PubMed

    Patial, V; Asrani, R K; Patil, R D; Ledoux, D R; Rottinghaus, G E

    2013-12-01

    The present study was designed to study the protective effect of sea buckthorn (SBT) against renal damage induced by ochratoxin A (OTA) in Japanese quail. Day-old quail chicks were divided into six groups and fed a basal quail chick mash containing 2% SBT leaf powder (group SX), OTA at a dietary level of 3 ppm (group OX), 25 ppm L-beta-phenylalanine (Phe) plus 3 ppm OTA (group OP), 2% dietary level of SBT leaf powder plus 3 ppm OTA (group OS), SBT leaf extract at a level of 10%/L of drinking water plus 3 ppm OTA (group OSS), and a standard toxin-free feed (group CX, control) for 21 days. OTA at 3 ppm level in diet grossly revealed mild to moderate renal swelling in OX birds, and the severity was less in the case of OS, OSS, and OP birds. Microscopically, degenerative, necrotic, and inflammatory changes were observed in OX birds, but the changes were less severe in OS, OSS, and OP birds. Ultrastructural studies revealed remarkable and consistent changes in the proximal convoluted tubules (PCTs), with severe damage of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum in OX birds, whereas SBT-treated birds (groups OS, OSS) had mild changes in mitochondria. A moderate to marked increase in number of peroxisomes in the cytoplasm of PCTs was a consistent finding in the Phe- and SBT-treated groups kept on OTA in comparison to the group fed OTA alone. In conclusion, the inclusion of 2% SBT leaf powder in feed and SBT leaf extract in water provided partial protection against OTA-induced nephropathy in Japanese quail.

  15. Early maturation and distinct tau pathology in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons from patients with MAPT mutations.

    PubMed

    Iovino, Mariangela; Agathou, Sylvia; González-Rueda, Ana; Del Castillo Velasco-Herrera, Martin; Borroni, Barbara; Alberici, Antonella; Lynch, Timothy; O'Dowd, Sean; Geti, Imbisaat; Gaffney, Daniel; Vallier, Ludovic; Paulsen, Ole; Káradóttir, Ragnhildur Thóra; Spillantini, Maria Grazia

    2015-11-01

    Tauopathies, such as Alzheimer's disease, some cases of frontotemporal dementia, corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy, are characterized by aggregates of the microtubule-associated protein tau, which are linked to neuronal death and disease development and can be caused by mutations in the MAPT gene. Six tau isoforms are present in the adult human brain and they differ by the presence of 3(3R) or 4(4R) C-terminal repeats. Only the shortest 3R isoform is present in foetal brain. MAPT mutations found in human disease affect tau binding to microtubules or the 3R:4R isoform ratio by altering exon 10 splicing. We have differentiated neurons from induced pluripotent stem cells derived from fibroblasts of controls and patients with N279K and P301L MAPT mutations. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons recapitulate developmental tau expression, showing the adult brain tau isoforms after several months in culture. Both N279K and P301L neurons exhibit earlier electrophysiological maturation and altered mitochondrial transport compared to controls. Specifically, the N279K neurons show abnormally premature developmental 4R tau expression, including changes in the 3R:4R isoform ratio and AT100-hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates, while P301L neurons are characterized by contorted processes with varicosity-like structures, some containing both alpha-synuclein and 4R tau. The previously unreported faster maturation of MAPT mutant human neurons, the developmental expression of 4R tau and the morphological alterations may contribute to disease development.

  16. 2-Deoxy-D-Glucose Treatment Induces Ketogenesis, Sustains Mitochondrial Function, and Reduces Pathology in Female Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jia; Chen, Shuhua; Mao, Zisu; Cadenas, Enrique; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that mitochondrial bioenergetic deficits preceded Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology in the female triple-transgenic AD (3xTgAD) mouse model. In parallel, 3xTgAD mice exhibited elevated expression of ketogenic markers, indicating a compensatory mechanism for energy production in brain. This compensatory response to generate an alternative fuel source was temporary and diminished with disease progression. To determine whether this compensatory alternative fuel system could be sustained, we investigated the impact of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), a compound known to induce ketogenesis, on bioenergetic function and AD pathology burden in brain. 6-month-old female 3xTgAD mice were fed either a regular diet (AIN-93G) or a diet containing 0.04% 2-DG for 7 weeks. 2-DG diet significantly increased serum ketone body level and brain expression of enzymes required for ketone body metabolism. The 2-DG-induced maintenance of mitochondrial bioenergetics was paralleled by simultaneous reduction in oxidative stress. Further, 2-DG treated mice exhibited a significant reduction of both amyloid precursor protein (APP) and amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers, which was paralleled by significantly increased α-secretase and decreased γ-secretase expression, indicating that 2-DG induced a shift towards a non-amyloidogenic pathway. In addition, 2-DG increased expression of genes involved in Aβ clearance pathways, degradation, sequestering, and transport. Concomitant with increased bioenergetic capacity and reduced β-amyloid burden, 2-DG significantly increased expression of neurotrophic growth factors, BDNF and NGF. Results of these analyses demonstrate that dietary 2-DG treatment increased ketogenesis and ketone metabolism, enhanced mitochondrial bioenergetic capacity, reduced β-amyloid generation and increased mechanisms of β-amyloid clearance. Further, these data link bioenergetic capacity with β-amyloid generation and demonstrate that β-amyloid burden was

  17. Preventing Effect of L-Type Calcium Channel Blockade on Electrophysiological Alterations in Dentate Gyrus Granule Cells Induced by Entorhinal Amyloid Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Pourbadie, Hamid Gholami; Naderi, Nima; Mehranfard, Nasrin; Janahmadi, Mahyar; Khodagholi, Fariba; Motamedi, Fereshteh

    2015-01-01

    The entorhinal cortex (EC) is one of the earliest affected brain regions in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). EC-amyloid pathology induces synaptic failure in the dentate gyrus (DG) with resultant behavioral impairment, but there is little known about its impact on neuronal properties in the DG. It is believed that calcium dyshomeostasis plays a pivotal role in the etiology of AD. Here, the effect of the EC amyloid pathogenesis on cellular properties of DG granule cells and also possible neuroprotective role of L-type calcium channel blockers (CCBs), nimodipine and isradipine, were investigated. The amyloid beta (Aβ) 1–42 was injected bilaterally into the EC of male rats and one week later, electrophysiological properties of DG granule cells were assessed. Voltage clamp recording revealed appearance of giant sIPSC in combination with a decrease in sEPSC frequency which was partially reversed by CCBs in granule cells from Aβ treated rats. EC amyloid pathogenesis induced a significant reduction of input resistance (Rin) accompanied by a profound decreased excitability in the DG granule cells. However, daily administration of CCBs, isradipine or nimodipine (i.c.v. for 6 days), almost preserved the normal excitability against Aβ. In conclusion, lower tendency to fire AP along with reduced Rin suggest that DG granule cells might undergo an alteration in the membrane ion channel activities which finally lead to the behavioral deficits observed in animal models and patients with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:25689857

  18. CNS-targeted production of IL-17A induces glial activation, microvascular pathology and enhances the neuroinflammatory response to systemic endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Julian; Krauthausen, Marius; Hofer, Markus J; Heneka, Michael T; Campbell, Iain L; Müller, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-17A (IL-17A) is a key cytokine modulating the course of inflammatory diseases. Whereas effector functions of IL-17A like induction of antimicrobial peptides and leukocyte infiltration could clearly be demonstrated for peripheral organs, CNS specific effects are not well defined and appear controversial. To further clarify the functional significance of IL-17A in the CNS, we generated a transgenic mouse line with astrocyte-restricted expression of the IL-17A gene. GFAP/IL-17A transgenic mice develop normally and do not show any signs of neurological dysfunction. However, histological characterization revealed astrocytosis and activation of microglia. Demyelination, neurodegeneration or prominent tissue damage was not observed but a vascular pathology mimicking microangiopathic features was evident. Histological and flow cytometric analysis demonstrated the absence of parenchymal infiltration of immune cells into the CNS of GFAP/IL-17A transgenic mice. In GFAP/IL-17A mice, LPS-induced endotoxemia led to a more pronounced microglial activation with expansion of a distinct CD45(high)/CD11b(+) population and increased induction of proinflammatory cytokines compared with controls. Our data argues against a direct role of IL-17A in mediating tissue damage during neuroinflammation. More likely IL-17A acts as a modulating factor in the network of induced cytokines. This novel mouse model will be a very useful tool to further characterize the role of IL-17A in neuroinflammatory disease models.

  19. Cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase prevents diabetes-induced pathological changes by inhibiting NF-κB signaling activation in the heart.

    PubMed

    Cong, Weitao; Ruan, Dandan; Xuan, Yuanhu; Niu, Chao; Tao, Youli; Wang, Yang; Zhan, Kungao; Cai, Lu; Jin, Litai; Tan, Yi

    2015-12-01

    Catalase is an antioxidant enzyme that specifically catabolizes hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Overexpression of catalase via a heart-specific promoter (CAT-TG) was reported to reduce diabetes-induced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and further prevent diabetes-induced pathological abnormalities, including cardiac structural derangement and left ventricular abnormity in mice. However, the mechanism by which catalase overexpression protects heart function remains unclear. This study found that activation of a ROS-dependent NF-κB signaling pathway was downregulated in hearts of diabetic mice overexpressing catalase. In addition, catalase overexpression inhibited the significant increase in nitration levels of key enzymes involved in energy metabolism, including α-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase E1 component (α-KGD) and ATP synthase α and β subunits (ATP-α and ATP-β). To assess the effects of the NF-κB pathway activation on heart function, Bay11-7082, an inhibitor of the NF-κB signaling pathway, was injected into diabetic mice, protecting mice against the development of cardiac damage and increased nitrative modifications of key enzymes involved in energy metabolism. In conclusion, these findings demonstrated that catalase protects mouse hearts against diabetic cardiomyopathy, partially by suppressing NF-κB-dependent inflammatory responses and associated protein nitration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Maladjusted host immune responses induce experimental cerebral malaria-like pathology in a murine Borrelia and Plasmodium co-infection model.

    PubMed

    Normark, Johan; Nelson, Maria; Engström, Patrik; Andersson, Marie; Björk, Rafael; Moritz, Thomas; Fahlgren, Anna; Bergström, Sven

    2014-01-01

    In the Plasmodium infected host, a balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory responses is required to clear the parasites without inducing major host pathology. Clinical reports suggest that bacterial infection in conjunction with malaria aggravates disease and raises both mortality and morbidity in these patients. In this study, we investigated the immune responses in BALB/c mice, co-infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 parasites and the relapsing fever bacterium Borrelia duttonii. In contrast to single infections, we identified in the co-infected mice a reduction of L-Arginine levels in the serum. It indicated diminished bioavailability of NO, which argued for a dysfunctional endothelium. Consistent with this, we observed increased sequestration of CD8+ cells in the brain as well over expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM by brain endothelial cells. Co-infected mice further showed an increased inflammatory response through IL-1β and TNF-α, as well as inability to down regulate the same through IL-10. In addition we found loss of synchronicity of pro- and anti-inflammatory signals seen in dendritic cells and macrophages, as well as increased numbers of regulatory T-cells. Our study shows that a situation mimicking experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) is induced in co-infected mice due to loss of timing and control over regulatory mechanisms in antigen presenting cells.

  1. Effect of vitamin E nutritional supplementation on the pathological changes induced in the ileum of rabbits by experimental infection with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tsalie, E; Kouzi, K; Poutahidis, T; Abas, Z; Sarris, K; Iliadis, N; Kaldrymidou, E

    2006-05-01

    A well-established rabbit model of enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) disease was used to examine whether vitamin E (VE) nutritional supplementation had an effect on the pathological changes induced in the bowel by EPEC. Quantitative methods were used to evaluate the influence of VE on bacterial colonization, intestinal mucosal architecture and inflammation, and intestinal epithelial proliferation and apoptosis. VE did not affect EPEC colonization and did not give significant protection against EPEC-induced changes and diarrhoea. Although VE had no effect on the EPEC-related increase of enterocyte apoptosis, it clearly contributed to an acceleration of epithelial cell proliferation in the ileal crypts. This finding may explain why ileal morphometry undertaken in this study showed that VE ameliorated somewhat the effects of EPEC on intestinal mucosal architecture. Quantitative studies on inflammatory cells in the intestinal mucosa revealed that VE nutritional supplementation resulted in an increased neutrophilic and mononuclear inflammatory cell response to EPEC infection, which did not contribute, however, to the clearance of infection.

  2. Effects of hydro-ethanol extract of Citrullus colocynthis on blood glucose levels and pathology of organs in alloxan-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Oryan, Ahmad; Hashemnia, Mohammad; Hamidi, Ahmad-Reza; Mohammadalipour, Adel

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluated the differential effects of ethanol extraction of Citrullus colocynthis (C. colocynthis) on the blood glucose concentration and pathology of pancreas, liver, lungs, kidney and gastrointestinal tract in the alloxan induced diabetes in rats. Methods Diabetes mellitus was induced in 20 adult female Albino rats, using intraperitoneal injection of 120 mg/kg alloxan. The diabetic rats were randomly assigned into two equal groups. The first group was treated with the extract of C. colocynthis seed (300 mg/kg) and the rats of the second group, as an untreated diabetic group, received ordinary diet. Ten non diabetic rats remained as a normal control group. Results The results of this study indicate that C. colocynthis was able to reduce blood glucose significantly compared with the control diabetic group (P<0.05). Histopathologically, alloxan resulted in severe necrotic changes in the pancreatic islets, especially in the central area of the islets. Tissue sections of the pancreas in the treated rats demonstrated enhanced regeneration of B cells and increased size of pancreatic islets. Liver of the treated diabetic rats revealed significant improvement of the hepatic tissue compared to those of the untreated diabetic rats. Conclusions The present study indicated a significant anti-hyperglycemic effect of C. colocynthis seed and supported its traditional usage in treatment of diabetes mellitus.

  3. Nicotine and pathological angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jieun; Cooke, John P

    2012-11-27

    This paper describes the role of endothelial nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) in diseases where pathological angiogenesis plays a role. An extensive review of the literature was performed, focusing on studies that investigated the effect of nicotine upon angiogenesis. Nicotine induces pathological angiogenesis at clinically relevant concentrations (i.e. at tissue and plasma concentrations similar to those of a light to moderate smoker). Nicotine promotes endothelial cell migration, proliferation, survival, tube formation and nitric oxide (NO) production in vitro, mimicking the effect of other angiogenic growth factors. These in vitro findings indicate that there may be an angiogenic component to the pathophysiology of major tobacco related diseases such as carcinoma, atherosclerosis, and age-related macular degeneration. Indeed, nicotine stimulates pathological angiogenesis in pre-clinical models of these disorders. Subsequently, it has been demonstrated that nicotine stimulates nAChRs on the endothelium to induce angiogenic processes, that these nAChRs are largely of the α7 homomeric type, and that there are synergistic interactions between the nAChRs and angiogenic growth factor receptors at the phosphoproteomic and genomic levels. These findings are of potential clinical relevance, and provide mechanistic insights into tobacco-related disease. Furthermore, these findings may lead to novel therapies for diseases characterized by insufficient or inappropriate angiogenesis. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Sleep deprivation induces pathological changes in rat masticatory muscles: role of Toll like signaling pathway and atrophy.

    PubMed

    Yujra, Veronica Quispe; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira; Mônico-Neto, Marcos; Pisani, Luciana Pellegrini; Santamarina, Aline Boveto; Quintana, Hannaniah Tardivo; de Oliveira, Flavia; Oshima, Celina Tizuko Fujiyama; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2017-08-31

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the toll like signaling pathway and atrophy after sleep deprivation (SD) in rat masticatory muscles: masseter and temporal. A total of twenty-four animals was distributed into three groups: Control group (CTL, n = 8), subjected to SD for 96 hours (SD96, n = 8) and subjected to SD for 96 hours more 96 hours of sleep recovery (SD96 + R, n = 8). Histopathological analysis revealed the presence of acute inflammatory cells, congested vessels, fibrosis and high cellularity in the skeletal muscle fibers from masseter and temporal submitted to SD. These morphological alterations were not observed in the control group since neither inflammatory cells nor congested vessels were observed to this group. In the group SD96 + R, the absence of inflammation was noticed to the masseter only. In this group, COX-2 and TNF-alpha downregulation were detected when comparing to control group. MyD88 and pIKK decreased in SD96 and SD96+ R groups being pNFKBp50 downregulatated in SD96 + R. MyD88 expression increased in rats submitted to SD96 and SD96 + R in temporal when compared to control group. On the other hand, pIKK decreased the protein expression in groups SD96 and SD96 + R while pNFKBp50 showed a decreased protein expression in group SD96 only. The activation of atrophy by means of MAFbx upregulation was detected in temporal muscle in SD96 and SD96 + R when compared to control. In summary, our results show that SD is able to induce morphological alterations in rat masticatory muscles. Toll like signaling pathway and atrophy play important roles in ethiopathogenesis induced by SD, being dependent of skeletal muscle type. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. GSK-3β-induced Tau pathology drives hippocampal neuronal cell death in Huntington's disease: involvement of astrocyte–neuron interactions

    PubMed Central

    L'Episcopo, F; Drouin-Ouellet, J; Tirolo, C; Pulvirenti, A; Giugno, R; Testa, N; Caniglia, S; Serapide, M F; Cisbani, G; Barker, R A; Cicchetti, F; Marchetti, B

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) has emerged as a critical factor in several pathways involved in hippocampal neuronal maintenance and function. In Huntington's disease (HD), there are early hippocampal deficits both in patients and transgenic mouse models, which prompted us to investigate whether disease-specific changes in GSK-3β expression may underlie these abnormalities. Thirty-three postmortem hippocampal samples from HD patients (neuropathological grades 2–4) and age- and sex-matched normal control cases were analyzed using real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCRs (qPCRs) and immunohistochemistry. In vitro and in vivo studies looking at hippocampal pathology and GSK-3β were also undertaken in transgenic R6/2 and wild-type mice. We identified a disease and stage-dependent upregulation of GSK-3β mRNA and protein levels in the HD hippocampus, with the active isoform pGSK-3β-Tyr216 being strongly expressed in dentate gyrus (DG) neurons and astrocytes at a time when phosphorylation of Tau at the AT8 epitope was also present in these same neurons. This upregulation of pGSK-3β-Tyr216 was also found in the R6/2 hippocampus in vivo and linked to the increased vulnerability of primary hippocampal neurons in vitro. In addition, the increased expression of GSK-3β in the astrocytes of R6/2 mice appeared to be the main driver of Tau phosphorylation and caspase3 activation-induced neuronal death, at least in part via an exacerbated production of major proinflammatory mediators. This stage-dependent overactivation of GSK-3β in HD-affected hippocampal neurons and astrocytes therefore points to GSK-3β as being a critical factor in the pathological development of this condition. As such, therapeutic targeting of this pathway may help ameliorate neuronal dysfunction in HD. PMID:27124580

  6. GSK-3β-induced Tau pathology drives hippocampal neuronal cell death in Huntington's disease: involvement of astrocyte-neuron interactions.

    PubMed

    L'Episcopo, F; Drouin-Ouellet, J; Tirolo, C; Pulvirenti, A; Giugno, R; Testa, N; Caniglia, S; Serapide, M F; Cisbani, G; Barker, R A; Cicchetti, F; Marchetti, B

    2016-04-28

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) has emerged as a critical factor in several pathways involved in hippocampal neuronal maintenance and function. In Huntington's disease (HD), there are early hippocampal deficits both in patients and transgenic mouse models, which prompted us to investigate whether disease-specific changes in GSK-3β expression may underlie these abnormalities. Thirty-three postmortem hippocampal samples from HD patients (neuropathological grades 2-4) and age- and sex-matched normal control cases were analyzed using real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCRs (qPCRs) and immunohistochemistry. In vitro and in vivo studies looking at hippocampal pathology and GSK-3β were also undertaken in transgenic R6/2 and wild-type mice. We identified a disease and stage-dependent upregulation of GSK-3β mRNA and protein levels in the HD hippocampus, with the active isoform pGSK-3β-Tyr(216) being strongly expressed in dentate gyrus (DG) neurons and astrocytes at a time when phosphorylation of Tau at the AT8 epitope was also present in these same neurons. This upregulation of pGSK-3β-Tyr(216) was also found in the R6/2 hippocampus in vivo and linked to the increased vulnerability of primary hippocampal neurons in vitro. In addition, the increased expression of GSK-3β in the astrocytes of R6/2 mice appeared to be the main driver of Tau phosphorylation and caspase3 activation-induced neuronal death, at least in part via an exacerbated production of major proinflammatory mediators. This stage-dependent overactivation of GSK-3β in HD-affected hippocampal neurons and astrocytes therefore points to GSK-3β as being a critical factor in the pathological development of this condition. As such, therapeutic targeting of this pathway may help ameliorate neuronal dysfunction in HD.

  7. HSF1 and NF-κB p65 participate in the process of exercise preconditioning attenuating pressure overload-induced pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tongyi; Zhang, Ben; Yang, Fan; Cai, Chengliang; Wang, Guokun; Han, Qingqi; Zou, Liangjian

    2015-05-08

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy, often accompanied by hypertension, aortic stenosis and valvular defects, is typically associated with myocyte remodeling and cardiac dysfunction. Exercise preconditioning (EP) has been proven to enhance the tolerance of the myocardium to cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, the effects of EP in pathological cardiac hypertrophy are rarely reported. 10-wk-old male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 80) were randomly divided into four groups: sham, TAC, EP + sham and EP + TAC. Two EP groups were subjected to 4 weeks of treadmill training, and the EP + TAC and TAC groups were followed by TAC operations. The sham and EP + sham groups underwent the same operation without aortic constriction. Eight weeks after the surgery, we evaluated the effects of EP by echocardiography, morphology, and histology and observed the expressions of the associated proteins. Compared with the respective control groups, hypertrophy-related indicators were significantly increased in the TAC and EP + TAC groups (p < 0.05). However, between the TAC and EP + TAC groups, all of these changes were effectively inhibited by EP treatment (p < 0.05). Furthermore, EP treatment upregulated the expression of HSF1 and HSP70, increased the HSF1 levels in the nuclear fraction, inhibited the expression of the NF-κB p65 subunit, decreased the NF-κB p65 subunit levels in the nuclear fraction, and reduced the IL2 levels in the myocardia of rats. EP could effectively reduce the cardiac hypertrophic responses induced by TAC and may play a protective role by upregulating the expressions of HSF1 and HSP70, activating HSF1 and then inhibiting the expression of NF-κB p65 and nuclear translocation.

  8. Pathological and ultrastructural changes in cultured cells induced by venom from the ectoparasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis (Walker) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae).

    PubMed

    Rivers, David B; Uçkan, Fevzi; Ergin, Ekrem; Keefer, Donald A

    2010-12-01

    The ectoparasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis produces a proteinaceous venom that induces death in fly hosts by non-paralytic mechanisms. Previous in vitro assays have suggested that the primary cause of cell and tissue death is oncosis, a non-programmed cell death (PCD) pathway characterized by cellular swelling and lysis. However, ultrastructural analyses of BTI-TN-5B1 cells exposed to LC(99) doses of wasp venom revealed cellular changes more consistent with apoptosis and/or non-apoptotic PCD than oncosis or necrosis: By 3h after incubation with venom, susceptible cells displayed indentations in the nuclear membranes, large nucleoli, and extensive vacuolization throughout the cytoplasm. In the vast majority of venom treated cells, annexin V bound to the plasma membrane surface within 15 min after treatment, a characteristic consistent with translocation of phosphatidylserine to the cell surface during the early stages of apoptosis. Likewise, mitochondrial transmembrane potential was depressed in cells within 15 min in venom-treated cells, an event that occurred in the absence of mitochondrial swelling or rupturing of cristae. Active caspase 3 was detected by fluorescent labeling in nearly all venom treated cells 3h after exposure to venom, and in turn, the potent caspase 3 inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK attenuated the morphological changes elicited by wasp venom and afforded protection to BTI-TN-5B1-4 cells.

  9. Meso 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and monoisoamyl DMSA effect on gallium arsenide induced pathological liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Flora, S J S; Dubey, Rupa; Kannan, G M; Chauhan, R S; Pant, B P; Jaiswal, D K

    2002-06-07

    The effect of meso 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and monoisoamyl DMSA (MiADMSA) on gallium arsenide (GaAs) induced liver damage was studied. The oral feeding rat model was used in this study. The animals were exposed to 10 mg/kg GaAs, orally, once daily, 5 days a week for 24 weeks and treated thereafter with single oral daily dose of either 0.3 mmol/kg DMSA or MiADMSA for two course of 5 days treatment. The animals were sacrificed thereafter. Lipid peroxidation was assessed by measuring liver thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS). Liver damage was assessed by number of biochemical variables and by light microscopy. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) beside reduced glutathione (GSH) concentration was measured in blood. Exposure to GaAs produced a significant reduction in GSH while, increased the oxidized glutathione (GSSG) concentration. Hepatic glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase activity increased significantly while level of serum transaminase increased moderately. Gallium arsenide exposure also produced marked hepatic histopathological lesions. Overall, treatment with MiADMSA proved to be better than DMSA in the mobilization of arsenic and in the turnover of some of the above mentioned GaAs sensitive biochemical alterations. Histopathological lesions also, responded more favorably to chelation treatment with MiADMSA than DMSA.

  10. Catalase prevents elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) induced by alcohol in cultured canine cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells: Possible relationship to alcohol-induced stroke and brain pathology.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyan; Liu, Weimin; Altura, Bella T; Altura, Burton M

    2003-01-15

    Several studies have suggested that alcohol-induced brain injury is associated with generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The recent findings, that antioxidants (Vitamin E and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC)) prevent intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) overload in cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells, induced by alcohol, demonstrate indirectly that ROS formation is related to cerebral vascular injury. The present experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that catalase, an hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) scavenging enzyme, can prevent or ameliorate alcohol-induced elevation of [Ca(2+)](i). Preincubation of cultured canine cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells with catalase (20-1000 units/ml) didn't produce any apparent changes from controls in resting levels of [Ca(2+)](i) after 1-3 days. Exposure of the cerebral vascular cells to culture media containing 10-100mM ethanol resulted in significant rises in [Ca(2+)](i) (p<0.01). Although exposure of these cells to a low concentration of catalase (20 units/ml) failed to prevent the increased level of [Ca(2+)](i) induced by ethanol, concomitant addition of higher concentrations of catalase (100-1000 units/ml) and ethanol (10-100mM) inhibited or ameliorated the rises of [Ca(2+)](i) induced by ethanol either at 24h or at 3 days, in a concentration-dependent manner. Catalase, in the range of 100-200 units/ml, inhibited approximately 50% of the [Ca(2+)](i) increases caused by ethanol in the first 24h. Catalase at a concentration of 1000 units/ml inhibited completely excessive [Ca(2+)](i) accumulation. The present results when viewed in light of other recently published data suggest that H(2)O(2) generation may be one of the earliest events triggered by alcohol in alcohol-induced brain-vascular damage, neurobehavioral actions and stroke.

  11. Neuropathic pain and Nerve Growth Factor in Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy: prospective clinical-pathological study.

    PubMed

    Velasco, R; Navarro, X; Gil-Gil, M; Herrando-Grabulosa, M; Calls, A; Bruna, J

    2017-08-07

    Neuropathic pain can be present in patients developing chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). Nerve growth factor (NGF) is trophic to small sensory fibers and regulates nociception. We investigated the changes in serum NGF and intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD) in skin biopsies of cancer patients receiving neurotoxic chemotherapy in a single-center prospective observational study. Patients were evaluated before and after chemotherapy administration. CIPN was graded with Total Neuropathy Score(©), nerve conduction studies, and NCI-CTCAE scale. Neuropathic pain was defined according to the EORTC QLQ-CIPN20 questionnaire. Neuropathic pain was present in 13 of 60 patients (21%), who reported shooting or burning pain in the hands (n=9) and the feet (n=12). Patients displaying painful CIPN presented higher NGF after treatment compared to patients with painless or absent CIPN (8.7±11.9 vs 2.5±1.4 pg/mL, p=0.016). The change of NGF significantly correlated with neuropathic pain. Patients with painful CIPN did not show significant loss of IEFND compared to patients with painless or absent CIPN (6.16±3.86 vs 8.37±4.82, p=0.12). No correlation between IEFND and NGF was observed. Serum NGF increases in cancer patients receiving taxane or platinum with painful CIPN, suggesting that it might be a potential biomarker of presence and severity of neuropathic pain in this population. Long-term comprehensive studies to better define the course of NGF in relation with neurological outcomes would be helpful in the further design of therapies for CIPN related neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Protease activated receptor 4 limits bacterial growth and lung pathology during late stage Streptococcus pneumoniae induced pneumonia in mice.

    PubMed

    de Stoppelaar, S F; Van't Veer, C; van den Boogaard, F E; Nieuwland, R; Hoogendijk, A J; de Boer, O J; Roelofs, J J T H; van der Poll, T

    2013-09-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common causative pathogen of pneumonia and sepsis. Pneumonia and sepsis are associated with enhanced activation of coagulation, resulting in the production of several host-derived proteases at the primary site of infection and in the circulation. Serine proteases cleave protease activated receptors (PARs), which form a molecular link between coagulation and inflammation. PAR4 is one of four subtypes of PARs and is widely expressed by multiple cell types in the respiratory tract implicated in pulmonary inflammation, by immune cells and by platelets. In mice, mouse (m)PAR4 is the only thrombin receptor expressed by platelets. We here sought to determine the contribution of mPAR4 to the host response during pneumococcal pneumonia. Pneumonia was induced by intranasal inoculation with S. pneumoniae in mPAR4-deficient (par4-/-) and wild-type mice. Mice were sacrificed after 6, 24 or 48 hours (h). Blood, lungs, liver and spleen were collected for analyses. Ex vivo stimulation assays were performed with S. pneumoniae and mPAR4 activating peptides. At 48 h after infection, higher bacterial loads were found in the lungs and blood of par4-/- mice (p < 0.05), accompanied by higher histopathology scores and increased cytokine levels (p < 0.05) in the lungs. Ex vivo, co-stimulation with mPAR4 activating peptide enhanced the whole blood cytokine response to S. pneumoniae. Thrombin inhibition resulted in decreased cytokine release after S. pneumoniae stimulation in human whole blood. Our findings suggest that mPAR4 contributes to antibacterial defence during murine pneumococcal pneumonia.

  13. Toxico-pathological changes induced by cypermethrin in broiler chicks: their attenuation with Vitamin E and selenium.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Faiza; Khan, Ahrar; Khan, Muhammad Zargham; Sharaf, Summaira; Gul, Shafia Tahseen; Saleemi, Muhammad Kashif

    2010-07-01

    Ninety 1-day old broiler chicks of mixed gender (as hatched) procured from a local hatchery were randomly divided into five equal groups. All the treatments were given through crop tubing. Groups 1-4 received cypermethrin (CY) (600mgkg(-1)b. wt.) daily for 30 days. In addition to CY (group 1), groups 2-4 received Vit E (150mgkg(-1)b. wt.), Se (0.25mgkg(-1)b. wt.), and Vit E (150mgkg(-1)b. wt.)+Se (0.25mgkg(-1)b. wt.), respectively. Group 5 served as control andreceived normal saline (2mlkg(-1)b. wt.) for 30 days. Randomly selected six broiler chicks from each group were slaughtered at experimental days 10, 20 and 30 for the collection of serum/plasma and morbid tissues. Absolute organ weights were recorded. Total plasma proteins, fibrinogen and creatinine were significantly (P<0.05) increased while alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and urea decreased significantly (P<0.05) in CY-treated group when compared with the control group. Kidneys were swollen grossly in treated broiler chicks. In liver, necrosis of hepatocytes, cytoplasmic vacuolation, bile duct hyperplasia and mononuclear cellular infiltration were observed. In kidneys, necrosis of tubular epithelial cells, cytoplasmic vacuolation, cellular infiltration and atrophy of glomeruli were observed. Sub-arachnoid space was much dilated in CY-treated broiler chicks. It can be concluded that CY induces biochemical and histopathological alterations in broilers chicks; however, these toxic effects can be ameliorated by Vit E or Se. Combination of Vit E and Se was more effective in ameliorating toxic effects of cypermethrin in broilers chicks.

  14. Trehalose protects from aggravation of amyloid pathology induced by isoflurane anesthesia in APP(swe) mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Perucho, Juan; Casarejos, Maria J; Gomez, Ana; Solano, Rosa M; de Yébenes, Justo Garcia; Mena, Maria A

    2012-03-01

    There is an open controversy about the role of surgery and anesthesia in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Clinical studies have shown a high prevalence of these procedures in subjects with AD but the interpretation of these studies is difficult because of the co-existence of multiple variables. Experimental studies in vitro and in vivo have shown that small molecular weight volatile anesthetics enhance amyloidogenesis in vitro and produce behavioral deficits and brain lesions similar to those found in patients with AD. We examined the effect of co-treatment with trehalose on isoflurane-induced amyloidogenesis in mice. WT and APP(swe) mice, of 11 months of age, were exposed to 1% isoflurane, 3 times, for 1.5 hours each time and sacrificed 24 hours after their last exposure to isoflurane. The right hemi-brain was used for histological analysis and the contra-lateral hemi-brain used for biochemical studies. In this study, we have shown that repetitive exposure to isoflurane in pre-symptomatic mature APP(swe) mice increases apoptosis in hippocampus and cerebral cortex, enhances astrogliosis and the expression of GFAP and that these effects are prevented by co-treatment with trehalose, a disaccharide with known effects as enhancer of autophagy. We have also confirmed that in our model the co-treatment with trehalose increases the expression of autophagic markers as well as the expression of chaperones. Cotreatment with trehalose reduces the levels of β amyloid peptide aggregates, tau plaques and levels of phospho-tau. Our study, therefore, provides new therapeutic avenues that could help to prevent the putative pro-amyloidogenic properties of small volatile anesthetics.

  15. Global gene expression profiling of dimethylnitrosamine-induced liver fibrosis: from pathological and biochemical data to microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Su, Li-Jen; Hsu, Shih-Lan; Yang, Jyh-Shyue; Tseng, Huei-Hun; Huang, Shiu-Feng; Huang, Chi-Ying F

    2006-01-01

    The development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is generally preceded by cirrhosis, which occurs at the end stage of fibrosis. This is a common and potentially lethal problem of chronic liver disease in Asia. The development of microarrays permits us to monitor transcriptomes on a genome-wide scale; this has dramatically speeded up a comprehensive understanding of the disease process. Here we used dimethylnitrosamine (DMN), a nongenotoxic hepatotoxin, to induce rat necroinflammatory and hepatic fibrosis. During the 6-week time course, histopathological, biochemical, and quantitative RT-PCR analyses confirmed the incidence of necroinflammatory and hepatic fibrosis in this established rat model system. Using the Affymetrix microarray chip, 256 differentially expressed genes were identified from the liver injury samples. Hierarchical clustering of gene expression using a gene ontology database allowed the identification of several stage-specific characters and functionally related clusters that encode proteins related to metabolism, cell growth/maintenance, and response to external challenge. Among these genes, we classified 44 potential necroinflammatory-related genes and 62 potential fibrosis-related markers or drug targets based on histopathological scores. We also compared the results with other data on well-known markers and various other microarray datasets that are available. In conclusion, we believe that the molecular picture of necroinflammatory and hepatic fibrosis from this study may provide novel biological insights into the development of early liver damage molecular classifiers than can be used for basic research and in clinical applications. A public accessible website is available at http://LiverFibrosis.nchc.org.tw:8080/LF.

  16. The effects of crocin, insulin and their co-administration on the heart function and pathology in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Farshid, Amir Abbas; Tamaddonfard, Esmaeal; Moradi-Arzeloo, Masoumeh; Mirzakhani, Navideh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Crocin is a saffron constituent with a potent anti-oxidant activity. The present study investigated the effects of crocin and insulin treatments (alone or in combination) on cardiac function and pathology in diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 50 mg/kg). Thereafter, crocin (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg, i.p.), subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of insulin (4 IU/kg) and their combination were administered for eight weeks. Blood glucose level and whole heart and body weights were measured. Electrocardiography (ECG) was carried out using the lead II. Serum concentrations of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine kinase-MB isoenzyme (CK-MB), and the heart tissue malodialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) contents were determined. The heart lesions were evaluated by light microscopy. Results: STZ decreased body weight and increased whole heart weight/body weight ratio. It also decreased heart rate, and increased RR and QT intervals and T wave amplitude. STZ increased blood glucose, serum LDH and CK-MB levels, augmented heart tissue MDA content, decreased SOD content of heart tissue, and produced hemorrhages, degeneration, interstitial edema, and fibroblastic proliferation in the heart tissue. Crocin (10 and 20 mg/kg, i.p.), insulin (4 IU/kg, s.c.) and their combination (5 mg/kg of crocin with 4 IU/kg of insulin) treatments recovered the ECG, biochemical and histopathological changes induced by STZ. Conclusion: The results showed cardioprotective effects of crocin and insulin in STZ-induced diabetic rats. The antioxidant and anti-hyperglycemic properties of crocin and insulin may be involved in their cardioprotective actions. PMID:28078246

  17. Lower activation-induced T-cell apoptosis is related to the pathological immune response in secondary infection with hetero-serotype dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wang; Yan, Huacheng; Ma, Yuling; Yu, Tiantian; Guo, Hongxia; Kuang, Yuchan; Ren, Ruiwen; Li, Jintao

    2016-03-01

    The available evidence suggests that dengue virus-specific T lymphocytes and cytokine storm play a pivotal role in the immunopathogenesis of plasma leakage. Investigations are underway to identify the immune profiles associated with increased or decreased risk for severe disease. In this study, CD14+ cells from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients who recovered from DENV-1 infection were infected with DENV-1 or DENV-2 and co-cultured with memory T cells. We found that secondary infection with DENV-2 suppresses the cell reproductive capacity but forms more cell clones and more functional cells to produce more proinflammatory factors (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12 and IL-17) and less regulatory cytokines (IL-10, TGF-β) which results in higher viral replication compared to secondary infection with DENV-1. Memory dengue virus-specific T cells which are induced in a primary dengue virus infection are reactivated by the heterologous serotype of dengue virus and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) during a secondary infection. Dramatically, less apoptosis and more continuous activation of T cells in secondary infection with hetero-serotype DENV were observed. This discovery which has not been reported previously may be the reasonable and vital interpretation for the cytokine storm and severe symptoms observed in secondary infection with DENV. In summary, secondary infection with hetero-serotype DENV elicits the relatively pathological immune response while secondary infection with homologous-serotype DENV induces the relatively protective immune response by activation-induced cell death (AICD) of T cells.

  18. HSF1 and NF-κB p65 participate in the process of exercise preconditioning attenuating pressure overload-induced pathological cardiac hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tongyi; Zhang, Ben; Yang, Fan; Cai, Chengliang; Wang, Guokun; Han, Qingqi; Zou, Liangjian

    2015-05-08

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy, often accompanied by hypertension, aortic stenosis and valvular defects, is typically associated with myocyte remodeling and cardiac dysfunction. Exercise preconditioning (EP) has been proven to enhance the tolerance of the myocardium to cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, the effects of EP in pathological cardiac hypertrophy are rarely reported. 10-wk-old male Sprague–Dawley rats (n = 80) were randomly divided into four groups: sham, TAC, EP + sham and EP + TAC. Two EP groups were subjected to 4 weeks of treadmill training, and the EP + TAC and TAC groups were followed by TAC operations. The sham and EP + sham groups underwent the same operation without aortic constriction. Eight weeks after the surgery, we evaluated the effects of EP by echocardiography, morphology, and histology and observed the expressions of the associated proteins. Compared with the respective control groups, hypertrophy-related indicators were significantly increased in the TAC and EP + TAC groups (p < 0.05). However, between the TAC and EP + TAC groups, all of these changes were effectively inhibited by EP treatment (p < 0.05). Furthermore, EP treatment upregulated the expression of HSF1 and HSP70, increased the HSF1 levels in the nuclear fraction, inhibited the expression of the NF-κB p65 subunit, decreased the NF-κB p65 subunit levels in the nuclear fraction, and reduced the IL2 levels in the myocardia of rats. EP could effectively reduce the cardiac hypertrophic responses induced by TAC and may play a protective role by upregulating the expressions of HSF1 and HSP70, activating HSF1 and then inhibiting the expression of NF-κB p65 and nuclear translocation. - Highlights: • EP could effectively reduce the cardiac hypertrophic responses induced by TAC. • EP may play a protective role by upregulating the expressions of HSF1 and HSP70 and then activating HSF1. • EP may play a protective role by inhibiting the expression

  19. Targeting the annexin 1-formyl peptide receptor 2/ALX pathway affords protection against bacterial LPS-induced pathologic changes in the murine adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Buss, Nicholas A P S; Gavins, Felicity N E; Cover, Patricia O; Terron, Andrea; Buckingham, Julia C

    2015-07-01

    Hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical dysfunction contributes to morbidity and mortality in a high proportion of patients with sepsis. Here, we provide new insights into the underlying adrenal pathology. Using a murine model of endotoxemia (LPS injection), we demonstrate that adrenal insufficiency is triggered early in the disease. LPS induced a local inflammatory response in the adrenal gland within 4 hours of administration, coupled with increased expression of mRNAs for annexin A1 (AnxA1) and the formyl peptide receptors [(Fprs) 1, 2, and 3], a loss of lipid droplets in cortical cells (index of availability of cholesterol, the substrate for steroidogenesis), and a failure to mount a steroidogenic response to ACTH. Deletion of AnxA1 or Fpr2/3 in mice prevented lipid droplet loss, but not leukocyte infiltration. LPS increased adrenal myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 and TLR2 mRNA expression, but not lymphocyte antigen 96 or TLR4. By contrast, neutrophil depletion prevented leukocyte infiltration and increased AnxA1, Fpr1, and Fpr3 mRNAs but had no impact on lipid droplet loss. Our novel data demonstrate that AnxA1 and Fpr2 have a critical role in the manifestation of adrenal insufficiency in this model, through regulation of cholesterol ester storage, suggesting that pharmacologic interventions targeting the AnxA1/FPR/ALX pathway may provide a new approach for the maintenance of adrenal steroidogenesis in sepsis. © FASEB.

  20. Oral Administration of Resveratrol Alleviates Osteoarthritis Pathology in C57BL/6J Mice Model Induced by a High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Mengqi; Li, Xingyao; Yu, Xiaolu; Liu, Xudan; Xu, Xiaolei; He, Jianyi; Gu, Hailun

    2017-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with osteoarthritis (OA) due to increased mass and metabolic factors which are independent of the biomechanical contribution to joint load. Resveratrol, a natural polyphenolic compound, exerts protective effects on OA through its anti-inflammatory property. However, the mechanism of resveratrol on obesity-related OA is unclear. To investigate the effect and possible mechanism of oral resveratrol on obesity-related OA, we fed C57BL/6J mice with a high-fat diet (HFD) for 16 weeks to establish obesity-related OA model; then two doses (22.5 mg/kg and 45 mg/kg) of resveratrol were given by gavage for additional 12 weeks. Mice with HFD significantly increased body weights compared to the control mice, while resveratrol treatment did not cause obvious weight loss. Histological assessments showed that resveratrol at 45 mg/kg significantly improved OA symptoms. Levels of serum IL-1β and leptin were decreased by resveratrol treatment and positively correlated with Mankin scores. Moreover, resveratrol significantly inhibited the expression of TLR4 and TRAF6 in cartilage. These results suggest that HFD induced obesity can lead to the occurrence of OA, and resveratrol may alleviate OA pathology by decreasing the levels of systematic inflammation and/or inhibiting TLR4 signaling pathway in cartilage. Thus, resveratrol might be a promising therapeutic treatment for obesity-related OA. PMID:28250578

  1. Metabolomic Profiling of Pompe Disease-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes Reveals That Oxidative Stress Is Associated With Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle Pathology.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yohei; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Higuchi, Takashi; Shimada, Yohta; Ida, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Toya

    2016-08-18

    : Pompe disease (PD) is a lysosomal storage disease that is caused by a deficiency of the acid α-glucosidase, which results in glycogen accumulation in the lysosome. The major clinical symptoms of PD include skeletal muscle weakness, respiratory failure, and cardiac hypertrophy. Based on its severity and symptom onset, PD is classified into infantile and late-onset forms. Lysosomal accumulation of glycogen can promote many types of cellular dysfunction, such as autophagic dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and abnormal calcium signaling within skeletal muscle. However, the disease mechanism underlying PD cardiomyopathy is not fully understood. Several researchers have shown that PD induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes successfully replicate the disease phenotype and are useful disease models. We have analyzed the metabolomic profile of late-onset PD iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes and found that oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are likely associated with cardiac complications. Furthermore, we have validated that these disease-specific changes were also observed in the cardiomyocytes and skeletal muscle of a genetically engineered murine PD model. Oxidative stress may contribute to skeletal muscle and cardiomyocyte dysfunction in PD mice; however, NF-E2-related factor 2 was downregulated in cardiomyocytes and skeletal muscle, despite evidence of oxidative stress. We hypothesized that oxidative stress and an impaired antioxidative stress response mechanism may underlie the molecular pathology of late-onset PD.

  2. Role of the thymus in streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis and hepatic granuloma formation. Comparative studies of pathology and cell wall distribution in athymic and euthymic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, J B; Malone, D G; Wahl, S M; Calandra, G B; Wilder, R L

    1985-01-01

    Systemic administration of an aqueous suspension of group A streptococcal cell wall fragments to susceptible rats induces acute and chronic polyarthritis, as well as noncaseating hepatic granulomas. To gain insight into the role of the thymus in the pathogenesis of this experimental model, pathologic responses and cell wall tissue distribution were compared in congenitally athymic rats (rnu/rnu) and their euthymic littermates (NIH/rnu). Within 24 h, both rat strains developed acute arthritis, characterized by polymorphonuclear leukocytic exudate in the synovium and joint spaces. This acute process was maximal at day 3 and gradually subsided. Beginning 2-3 wk after injection, the euthymic, but not the athymic, rats developed the typical exacerbation of arthritis, characterized by synovial cell hyperplasia with villus formation and T helper/inducer lymphocyte-rich mononuclear cell infiltration. This process eventually resulted in marginal erosions and destruction of periarticular bone and cartilage. Parallel development of acute and chronic hepatic lesions was observed. Bacterial cell wall antigen distribution and persistence were similar in the athymic and euthymic rats. Cell wall antigens were demonstrated in the cytoplasm of cells within subchondral bone marrow, synovium, liver, and spleen, coincident with the development of the acute lesions, and persisted in these sites, although in decreasing amounts, for the duration of the experiment. Our findings provide evidence that the acute and chronic phases of the experimental model are mechanistically distinct. The thymus and functional thymus derived-lymphocytes appear not to be required for the development of the acute exudative disease but are essential for the development of chronic proliferative and erosive disease. Induction of disease is dependent upon cell wall dissemination to and persistence in the affected tissues. Images PMID:3876354

  3. Building a better analgesic: multifunctional compounds that address injury-induced pathology to enhance analgesic efficacy while eliminating unwanted side effects.

    PubMed

    Largent-Milnes, T M; Brookshire, S W; Skinner, D P; Hanlon, K E; Giuvelis, D; Yamamoto, T; Davis, P; Campos, C R; Nair, P; Deekonda, S; Bilsky, E J; Porreca, F; Hruby, V J; Vanderah, T W

    2013-10-01

    The most highly abused prescription drugs are opioids used for the treatment of pain. Physician-reported drug-seeking behavior has resulted in a significant health concern among doctors trying to adequately treat pain while limiting the misuse or diversion of pain medications. In addition to abuse liability, opioid use is associated with unwanted side effects that complicate pain management, including opioid-induced emesis and constipation. This has resulted in restricting long-term doses of opioids and inadequate treatment of both acute and chronic debilitating pain, demonstrating a compelling need for novel analgesics. Recent reports indicate that adaptations in endogenous substance P/neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1) are induced by chronic pain and sustained opioid exposure, and these changes may contribute to processes responsible for opioid abuse liability, emesis, and analgesic tolerance. Here, we describe a multifunctional mu-/delta-opioid agonist/NK1 antagonist compound [Tyr-d-Ala-Gly-Phe-Met-Pro-Leu-Trp-NH-Bn(CF3)2 (TY027)] that has a preclinical profile of excellent antinociceptive efficacy, low abuse liability, and no opioid-related emesis or constipation. In rodent models of acute and neuropathic pain, TY027 demonstrates analgesic efficacy following central or systemic administration with a plasma half-life of more than 4 hours and central nervous system penetration. These data demonstrate that an innovative opioid designed to contest the pathology created by chronic pain and sustained opioids results in antinociceptive efficacy in rodent models, with significantly fewer side effects than morphine. Such rationally designed, multitargeted compounds are a promising therapeutic approach in treating patients who suffer from acute and chronic pain.

  4. Evening primrose oil and celecoxib inhibited pathological angiogenesis, inflammation, and oxidative stress in adjuvant-induced arthritis: novel role of angiopoietin-1.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, R M; Moustafa, Y M; El-Azab, M F

    2014-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by overproduction of inflammatory mediators along with undermined oxidative defensive mechanisms. Pathological angiogenesis was found to play a critical role in the progression of this disease. The current study was carried out to evaluate the anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant effects of evening primrose oil (EPO), rich in gamma linolenic acid (GLA), either alone or in combination with aspirin or celecoxib, on adjuvant-induced arthritis. Arthritis was induced by subcutaneous injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in the right hind paw of male albino rats. All treatments were administered orally from day 0 (EPO, 5 g/kg b.w.) or day 4 (celecoxib, 5 mg/kg; aspirin, 150 mg/kg) till day 27 after CFA injection. In the arthritic group, the results revealed significant decrease in the body weight and increase in ankle circumference, plasma angiopoietin-1 (ANG-1) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels. Anti-oxidant status was suppressed as manifested by significant decline in reduced glutathione content along with decreased enzymatic activity of superoxide dismutase and increased lipid peroxidation. Oral administration of EPO exerted normalization of body weight, ANG-1, and TNF-α levels with restoration of activity as shown by reduced malondialdehyde levels. Moreover, histopathological examination demonstrated that EPO significantly reduced the synovial hyperplasia and inflammatory cells invasion in joint tissues, an effect that was enhanced by combination with aspirin or celecoxib. The joint use of GLA-rich natural oils, which possess anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant activities, with traditional analgesics represents a promising strategy to restrain the progression of rheumatoid arthritis.

  5. Building a Better Analgesic: Multifunctional Compounds that Address Injury-Induced Pathology to Enhance Analgesic Efficacy while Eliminating Unwanted Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Largent-Milnes, T. M.; Brookshire, S. W.; Skinner, D. P.; Hanlon, K. E.; Giuvelis, D.; Yamamoto, T.; Davis, P.; Campos, C. R.; Nair, P.; Deekonda, S.; Bilsky, E. J.; Porreca, F.; Hruby, V. J.

    2013-01-01

    The most highly abused prescription drugs are opioids used for the treatment of pain. Physician-reported drug-seeking behavior has resulted in a significant health concern among doctors trying to adequately treat pain while limiting the misuse or diversion of pain medications. In addition to abuse liability, opioid use is associated with unwanted side effects that complicate pain management, including opioid-induced emesis and constipation. This has resulted in restricting long-term doses of opioids and inadequate treatment of both acute and chronic debilitating pain, demonstrating a compelling need for novel analgesics. Recent reports indicate that adaptations in endogenous substance P/neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1) are induced by chronic pain and sustained opioid exposure, and these changes may contribute to processes responsible for opioid abuse liability, emesis, and analgesic tolerance. Here, we describe a multifunctional mu-/delta-opioid agonist/NK1 antagonist compound [Tyr-d-Ala-Gly-Phe-Met-Pro-Leu-Trp-NH-Bn(CF3)2 (TY027)] that has a preclinical profile of excellent antinociceptive efficacy, low abuse liability, and no opioid-related emesis or constipation. In rodent models of acute and neuropathic pain, TY027 demonstrates analgesic efficacy following central or systemic administration with a plasma half-life of more than 4 hours and central nervous system penetration. These data demonstrate that an innovative opioid designed to contest the pathology created by chronic pain and sustained opioids results in antinociceptive efficacy in rodent models, with significantly fewer side effects than morphine. Such rationally designed, multitargeted compounds are a promising therapeutic approach in treating patients who suffer from acute and chronic pain. PMID:23860305

  6. Curriculum Guidelines for Pathology and Oral Pathology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Guidelines for dental school pathology courses describe the interrelationships of general, systemic, and oral pathology; primary educational goals; prerequisites; a core curriculum outline and behavioral objectives for each type of pathology. Notes on sequencing, faculty, facilities, and occupational hazards are included. (MSE)

  7. Clinico-pathological features and somatic gene alterations in refractory ceramic fibre-induced murine mesothelioma reveal mineral fibre-induced mesothelioma identities

    PubMed Central

    Andujar, Pascal; Lecomte, Céline; Renier, Annie; Fleury-Feith, Jocelyne; Kheuang, Laurence; Daubriac, Julien; Janin, Anne; Jaurand, Marie-Claude

    2007-01-01

    Although human malignant mesothelioma (HMM) is mainly caused by asbestos exposure, refractory ceramic fibres (RCFs) have been classified as possibly carcinogenic to humans on the basis of their biological effects in rodents’ lung and pleura and in cultured cells. Hence, further investigations are needed to clarify the mechanism of fibre-induced carcinogenicity and to prevent use of harmful particles. In a previous study, mesotheliomas were found in hemizygous Nf2 (Nf2+/−) mice exposed to asbestos fibres, and showed similar alterations in genes at the Ink4 locus and in Trp53 as described in HMM. Here we found that Nf2+/− mice developed mesotheliomas after intra-peritoneal inoculation of a RCF sample (RCF1). Clinical features in exposed mice were similar to those observed in HMM, showing association between ascite and mesothelioma. Early passages of 12 mesothelioma cell cultures from ascites developed in RCF1-exposed Nf2+/− mice demonstrated frequent inactivation by deletion of genes at the Ink4 locus, and low rate of Trp53 point and insertion mutations. Nf2 gene was inactivated in all cultures. In most cases, co-inactivation of genes at the Ink4 locus and Nf2 was found and, at a lower rate, of Trp53 and Nf2. These results are the first to identify mutations in RCF-induced mesothelioma. They suggest that nf2 mutation is complementary of p15Ink4b, p16Ink4a and p19Arf or p53 mutations and show similar profile of gene alterations resulting from exposure to ceramic or asbestos fibres in Nf2+/− mice, also consistent with the one found in HMM. These somatic genetic changes define different pathways of mesothelial cell transformation. PMID:17272307

  8. Clinico-pathological features and somatic gene alterations in refractory ceramic fibre-induced murine mesothelioma reveal mineral fibre-induced mesothelioma identities.

    PubMed

    Andujar, Pascal; Lecomte, Céline; Renier, Annie; Fleury-Feith, Jocelyne; Kheuang, Laurence; Daubriac, Julien; Janin, Anne; Jaurand, Marie-Claude

    2007-07-01

    Although human malignant mesothelioma (HMM) is mainly caused by asbestos exposure, refractory ceramic fibres (RCFs) have been classified as possibly carcinogenic to humans on the basis of their biological effects in rodents' lung and pleura and in cultured cells. Hence, further investigations are needed to clarify the mechanism of fibre-induced carcinogenicity and to prevent use of harmful particles. In a previous study, mesotheliomas were found in hemizygous Nf2 (Nf2(+/-)) mice exposed to asbestos fibres, and showed similar alterations in genes at the Ink4 locus and in Trp53 as described in HMM. Here we found that Nf2(+/-) mice developed mesotheliomas after intra-peritoneal inoculation of a RCF sample (RCF1). Clinical features in exposed mice were similar to those observed in HMM, showing association between ascite and mesothelioma. Early passages of 12 mesothelioma cell cultures from ascites developed in RCF1-exposed Nf2(+/-) mice demonstrated frequent inactivation by deletion of genes at the Ink4 locus, and low rate of Trp53 point and insertion mutations. Nf2 gene was inactivated in all cultures. In most cases, co-inactivation of genes at the Ink4 locus and Nf2 was found and, at a lower rate, of Trp53 and Nf2. These results are the first to identify mutations in RCF-induced mesothelioma. They suggest that nf2 mutation is complementary of p15(Ink4b), p16(Ink4a) and p19(Arf) or p53 mutations and show similar profile of gene alterations resulting from exposure to ceramic or asbestos fibres in Nf2(+/-) mice, also consistent with the one found in HMM. These somatic genetic changes define different pathways of mesothelial cell transformation.

  9. Early-stage atherosclerosis in poloxamer 407-induced hyperlipidemic mice: pathological features and changes in the lipid composition of serum lipoprotein fractions and subfractions.

    PubMed

    Korolenko, Tatyana A; Johnston, Thomas P; Tuzikov, Fedor V; Tuzikova, Natalia A; Pupyshev, Alexandr B; Spiridonov, Victor K; Goncharova, Natalya V; Maiborodin, Igor V; Zhukova, Natalia A

    2016-01-22

    , biochemical and physiological changes documented in the present study using poloxamer 407-treated mice are related to the symptoms of early atherosclerosis in humans, it is suggested that the poloxamer 407-induced mouse model of hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis might prove beneficial as an experimental animal model with which to evaluate the pathological features observed in early-stage atherosclerosis.

  10. Yucca schidigera can promote rabbit growth, fecundity, affect the release of hormones in vivo and in vitro, induce pathological changes in liver, and reduce ovarian resistance to benzene.

    PubMed

    Földešiová, Martina; Baláži, Andrej; Chrastinová, Ľubica; Pivko, Juraj; Kotwica, Jan; Harrath, Abdel Halim; Chrenek, Peter; Sirotkin, Alexander V

    2017-08-01

    fecundity), which may be due to the promotion of P4, OT, and PGF release. It could, however, induce some pathological changes in the liver and reduce resistance of ovaries to the environmental contaminant benzene. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Pathological Impairment, Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis of Thymus and Bursa of Fabricius Induced by Aflatoxin-Contaminated Corn in Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xi; Bai, Shiping; Ding, Xuemei; Zhang, Keying

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the comparative effects of aflatoxin-contaminated corn on the thymus and bursa of Fabricius (BF) in chickens by detecting histopathological lesions, cell cycle phase distribution and apoptosis. A total of 900 COBB500 male broilers were randomly allocated into five groups. The experiment lasted for six weeks and the five dietary treatments consisted of uncontaminated corn (control), 25% contaminated corn, 50% contaminated corn, 75% contaminated corn and 100% contaminated corn groups. The gross changes showed the decreased size of the thymus and BF, as well as the pale color of the BF in the broilers after aflatoxin contaminated diet exposure. There were more nuclear debris in the thymus and BF of birds in the 50%, 75%, and 100% contaminated corn groups, but the pathological impairments of the BF were more obvious than those of the thymus, which showed as more obvious lymphocyte depletion and the proliferation of reticulocytes and fibroblasts. At 21 days of age, the percentage of thymocytes and BF cells in the G2M phase was increased in a dose-dependent manner in the four AFB-contaminated corn groups. However, at 42 days of age, dietary AFB1 induced cell cycle perturbation at the G0G1 phase in thymocytes, but at the G2M phase in BF cells. The increased percentage of apoptotic cells in the thymus and BF were similarly observed in the AFB groups. According to these results, the severity of histopathological lesions may be correlated with the different sensitivity of the two central immune organs when exposed to AFB; different arrested cell cycle phases suggest that different mechanisms may be involved in the lesions of the thymus and BF, which need to be further researched. PMID:28098787

  12. Enhanced Ca²⁺ influx from STIM1-Orai1 induces muscle pathology in mouse models of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Goonasekera, Sanjeewa A; Davis, Jennifer; Kwong, Jennifer Q; Accornero, Federica; Wei-LaPierre, Lan; Sargent, Michelle A; Dirksen, Robert T; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2014-07-15

    Muscular dystrophy is a progressive muscle wasting disease that is thought to be initiated by unregulated Ca(2+) influx into myofibers leading to their death. Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) through sarcolemmal Ca(2+) selective Orai1 channels in complex with STIM1 in the sarcoplasmic reticulum is one such potential disease mechanism for pathologic Ca(2+) entry. Here, we generated a mouse model of STIM1 overexpression in skeletal muscle to determine whether this type of Ca(2+) entry could induce muscular dystrophy. Myofibers from muscle-specific STIM1 transgenic mice showed a significant increase in SOCE in skeletal muscle, modeling an observed increase in the same current in dystrophic myofibers. Histological and biochemical analysis of STIM1 transgenic mice showed fulminant muscle disease characterized by myofiber necrosis, swollen mitochondria, infiltration of inflammatory cells, enhanced interstitial fibrosis and elevated serum creatine kinase levels. This dystrophic-like disease in STIM1 transgenic mice was abrogated by crossing in a transgene expressing a dominant-negative Orai1 (dnOrai1) mutant. The dnOrai1 transgene also significantly reduced the severity of muscular dystrophy in both mdx (dystrophin mutant mice) and δ-sarcoglycan-deficient (Sgcd(-/-)) mouse models of disease. Hence, Ca(2+) influx across an unstable sarcolemma due to increased activity of a STIM1-Orai1 complex is a disease determinant in muscular dystrophy, and hence, SOCE represents a potential therapeutic target. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Forensic Pathology Education in Pathology Residency

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Wayne K.; Domen, Ronald E.

    2017-01-01

    Forensic pathology is a fundamental part of anatomic pathology training during pathology residency. However, the lack of information on forensic teaching suggests the highly variable nature of forensic education. A survey of pathology residency program directors was performed to determine key aspects of their respective forensic rotations and curriculum. A total of 38.3% of programs from across the country responded, and the survey results show 5.6% don’t require a forensic pathology rotation. In those that do, most forensic pathology rotations are 4 weeks long, are done at a medical examiner’s office, and require set prerequisites. A total of 21.1% of responding programs have residents who are not receiving documented evaluations for this rotation. While 39.6% of programs have a defined forensics curriculum, as many as 15% do not. Furthermore, nearly 43% of programs place no limit on counting forensic autopsies when applying for pathology board examinations. Our survey confirmed the inconsistent nature of forensic pathology training in resident education. Additionally, our curriculum was reorganized to create a more robust educational experience. A pre- and post-forensic lecture quiz and Resident In-Service Examination scores were analyzed to determine our curriculum’s impact and effectiveness. Analysis of our pre- and post-lecture quiz showed an improved overall average as well as an increase in Resident In-Service Examination scores, indicating improved general forensic pathology knowledge. Using this knowledge, along with changes in our curriculum, we generated a number of recommendations for improving forensic pathology education in pathology residency. PMID:28913415

  14. Autoantibody response and pregnancy-related pathology induced by combined LPS and tetanus toxoid hyperimmunization in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Petrušić, Vladimir; Todorović, Nevena; Živković, Irena; Dimitrijević, Rajna; Muhandes, Lina; Rajnpreht, Irena; Dimitrijević, Ljiljana

    2015-03-01

    Recent data concerning antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) induction have shown that β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI) binds lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which results in conformational changes, exposition of a cryptic epitope and possible pathological anti-β2GPI antibody production. In order to investigate the effects of LPS on the induction of APS-related pathology, we performed hyperimmunization of BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice with LPS, alone or in combination with tetanus toxoid (TTd), a protein structurally similar to β2GPI. We report that, although high affinity pathological anti-β2GPI antibodies were produced in all groups of animals, the reproductive pathology was recorded only in mice that received both LPS and TTd, implying on the important roles of both infections and molecular mimicry in APS pathogenesis. Moreover, APS-related reproductive pathology was more pronounced in BALB/c (lowered fertility and fecundity) than C57BL/6 mice (lowered fecundity), which correlated well with the disruption in natural antibody network observed in BALB/c mouse strain.

  15. The molecular pathology of noroviruses.

    PubMed

    Karst, Stephanie M; Zhu, Shu; Goodfellow, Ian G

    2015-01-01

    Norovirus infection in humans typically results in acute gastroenteritis but may also occur in many animal species. Noroviruses are recognized as one of the most common causes of acute gastroenteritis in the world, being responsible for almost 20% of all cases. Despite their prevalence and impact, our knowledge of the norovirus life cycle and the pathological processes associated with norovirus-induced disease is limited. Whilst infection of the intestine is the norm, extraintestinal spread and associated pathologies have also been described. In addition, long-term chronic infections are now recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the immunocompromised. This review aims to summarize the current state of knowledge with respect to norovirus pathology and the underlying mechanisms that have been characterized to date.

  16. Updates of pathologic myopia.

    PubMed

    Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko; Lai, Timothy Y Y; Lai, Chi-Chun; Cheung, Chiu Ming Gemmy

    2016-05-01

    Complications from pathologic myopia are a major cause of visual impairment and blindness, especially in east Asia. The eyes with pathologic myopia may develop loss of the best-corrected vision due to various pathologies in the macula, peripheral retina and the optic nerve. Despite its importance, the definition of pathologic myopia has been inconsistent. The refractive error or axial length alone often does not adequately reflect the 'pathologic myopia'. Posterior staphyloma, which is a hallmark lesion of pathologic myopia, can occur also in non-highly myopic eyes. Recently a revised classification system for myopic maculopathy has been proposed to standardize the definition among epidemiological studies. In this META-PM (meta analyses of pathologic myopia) study classification, pathologic myopia was defined as the eyes having chorioretinal atrophy equal to or more severe than diffuse atrophy. In addition, the advent of new imaging technologies such as optical coherence tomography (OCT) and three dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D MRI) has enabled the detailed observation of various pathologies specific to pathologic myopia. New therapeutic approaches including intravitreal injections of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents and the advance of vitreoretinal surgeries have greatly improved the prognosis of patients with pathologic myopia. The purpose of this review article is to provide an update on topics related to the field of pathologic myopia, and to outline the remaining issues which need to be solved in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Once again: theoretical pathology].

    PubMed

    Bleyl, U

    2010-07-01

    Theoretical pathology refers to the attempt to reintroduce methodical approaches from the humanities, philosophical logic and "gestalt philosophy" into medical research and pathology. Diseases, in particular disease entities and more complex polypathogenetic mechanisms of disease, have a "gestalt quality" due to the significance of their pathophysiologic coherence: they have a "gestalt". The Research group Theoretical Pathology at the Academy of Science in Heidelberg are credited with having revitalized the philosophical notion of "gestalt" for morphological and pathological diagnostics. Gestalt means interrelated schemes of pathophysiological significance in the mind of the diagnostician. In pathology, additive and associative diagnostic are simply not possible without considering the notion of synthetic entities in Kant's logic.

  18. Stratification of HPV-Induced Cervical Pathology using the Virally-Encoded Molecular Marker E4 in Combination with p16 or MCM

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Heather; Soneji, Yasmina; Van Baars, Romy; Arora, Rupali; Jenkins, David; van de Sandt, Miekel; Wu, Zhonglin; Quint, Wim; Jach, Robert; Okon, Krzysztof; Huras, Hubert; Singer, Albert; Doorbar, John

    2015-01-01

    High-risk HPV types cause cervical lesions of varying severity, ranging from transient productive infections to high-grade neoplasia. Disease stratification requires the examination of lesional pathology, and possibly also the detection of biomarkers. P16INK4a and MCM are established surrogates of high-risk HPV E6/E7 activity, and can be extensively expressed in high-grade lesions. Here we have combined these two cellular biomarkers with detection of the abundant HPV-encoded E4 protein in order to identify both productive and transforming lesions. This approach has allowed us to distinguish true papillomavirus infections from similar pathologies, and has allowed us to divide the heterogeneous CIN2 category into those that are CIN1-like and express E4, and those that more closely resemble non-productive CIN3. To achieve this, 530 lesional areas were evaluated according to standard pathology criteria and by using a multiple staining approach that allows us to superimpose biomarker patterns either singly or in combination onto an annotated haematoxylin & eosin image. Conventional grading of neoplasia was established by review panel, and compared directly to the composite molecular pathology visualised on the same tissue section. The detection of E4 coincided with the onset of vacuolation, becoming abundant in koilocytes as the MCM marker declined and cells lost their defined nuclear margins as visualised by standard H&E staining. Of the dual marker approaches, p16INK4a and E4 appeared most promising, with E4 generally identifying areas of low-grade disease even when p16INK4a was present. Extensive p16INK4a expression usually coincided with an absence of E4 expression or its focal retention in sporadic cells within the lesion. Our results suggest that a straightforward molecular evaluation of HPV life-cycle deregulation in cervical neoplasia may help improve disease stratification, and that this can be achieved using complementary molecular biomarker pairs such as MCM

  19. Stratification of HPV-induced cervical pathology using the virally encoded molecular marker E4 in combination with p16 or MCM.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Heather; Soneji, Yasmina; Van Baars, Romy; Arora, Rupali; Jenkins, David; van de Sandt, Miekel; Wu, Zhonglin; Quint, Wim; Jach, Robert; Okon, Krzysztof; Huras, Hubert; Singer, Albert; Doorbar, John

    2015-07-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types cause cervical lesions of varying severity, ranging from transient productive infections to high-grade neoplasia. Disease stratification requires the examination of lesional pathology, and possibly also the detection of biomarkers. P16(INK4a) and MCM are established surrogates of high-risk HPV E6/E7 activity, and can be extensively expressed in high-grade lesions. Here we have combined these two cellular biomarkers with detection of the abundant HPV-encoded E4 protein in order to identify both productive and transforming lesions. This approach has allowed us to distinguish true papillomavirus infections from similar pathologies, and has allowed us to divide the heterogeneous CIN2 category into those that are CIN1-like and express E4, and those that more closely resemble nonproductive CIN3. To achieve this, 530 lesional areas were evaluated according to standard pathology criteria and by using a multiple staining approach that allows us to superimpose biomarker patterns either singly or in combination onto an annotated hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) image. Conventional grading of neoplasia was established by review panel, and compared directly with the composite molecular pathology visualized on the same tissue section. The detection of E4 coincided with the onset of vacuolation, becoming abundant in koilocytes as the MCM marker declined and cells lost their defined nuclear margins as visualized by standard H&E staining. Of the dual marker approaches, p16(INK4a) and E4 appeared most promising, with E4 generally identifying areas of low-grade disease even when p16(INK4a) was present. Extensive p16(INK4a) expression usually coincided with an absence of E4 expression or its focal retention in sporadic cells within the lesion. Our results suggest that a straightforward molecular evaluation of HPV life-cycle deregulation in cervical neoplasia may help improve disease stratification, and that this can be achieved using complementary

  20. Physiological and pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Ippei; Minamino, Tohru

    2016-08-01

    The heart must continuously pump blood to supply the body with oxygen and nutrients. To maintain the high energy consumption required by this role, the heart is equipped with multiple complex biological systems that allow adaptation to changes of systemic demand. The processes of growth (hypertrophy), angiogenesis, and metabolic plasticity are critically involved in maintenance of cardiac homeostasis. Cardiac hypertrophy is classified as physiological when it is associated with normal cardiac function or as pathological when associated with cardiac dysfunction. Physiological hypertrophy of the heart occurs in response to normal growth of children or during pregnancy, as well as in athletes. In contrast, pathological hypertrophy is induced by factors such as prolonged and abnormal hemodynamic stress, due to hypertension, myocardial infarction etc. Pathological hypertrophy is associated with fibrosis, capillary rarefaction, increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and cellular dysfunction (impairment of signaling, suppression of autophagy, and abnormal cardiomyocyte/non-cardiomyocyte interactions), as well as undesirable epigenetic changes, with these complex responses leading to maladaptive cardiac remodeling and heart failure. This review describes the key molecules and cellular responses involved in physiological/pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Handheld computing in pathology

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung; Parwani, Anil; Satyanarayanan, Mahadev; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2012-01-01

    Handheld computing has had many applications in medicine, but relatively few in pathology. Most reported uses of handhelds in pathology have been limited to experimental endeavors in telemedicine or education. With recent advances in handheld hardware and software, along with concurrent advances in whole-slide imaging (WSI), new opportunities and challenges have presented themselves. This review addresses the current state of handheld hardware and software, provides a history of handheld devices in medicine focusing on pathology, and presents future use cases for such handhelds in pathology. PMID:22616027

  2. Digital imaging in pathology.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung; Pantanowitz, Liron; Parwani, Anil Vasdev

    2012-12-01

    Advances in computing speed and power have made a pure digital work flow for pathology. New technologies such as whole slide imaging (WSI), multispectral image analysis, and algorithmic image searching seem poised to fundamentally change the way in which pathology is practiced. This article provides the practicing pathologist with a primer on digital imaging. Building on this primer, the current state of the art concerning digital imaging in pathology is described. Emphasis is placed on WSI and its ramifications, showing how it is useful in both anatomic (histology, cytopathology) and clinical (hematopathology) pathology. Future trends are also extrapolated.

  3. Pathology in Greece.

    PubMed

    Sakellariou, S; Patsouris, E

    2015-11-01

    Pathology is the field of medicine that studies diseases. Ancient Greece hosted some of the earliest societies that laid the structural foundations of pathology. Initially, knowledge was based on observations but later on the key elements of pathology were established based on the dissection of animals and the autopsy of human cadavers. Christianized Greece under Ottoman rule (1453-1821) was not conducive to the development of pathology. After liberation, however, a series of events took place that paved the way for the establishment and further development of the specialty. The appointment in 1849 of two Professors of Pathology at the Medical School of Athens for didactical purposes proved to be the most important step in fostering the field of pathology in modern Greece. Presently in Greece there are seven university departments and 74 pathology laboratories in public hospitals, employing 415 specialized pathologists and 90 residents. The First Department of Pathology at the Medical School of Athens University is the oldest (1849) and largest in Greece, encompassing most pathology subspecialties.

  4. Alzheimer’s disease AdvaxCpG- adjuvanted MultiTEP-based dual and single vaccines induce high-titer antibodies against various forms of tau and Aβ pathological molecules

    PubMed Central

    Davtyan, Hayk; Zagorski, Karen; Rajapaksha, Harinda; Hovakimyan, Armine; Davtyan, Arpine; Petrushina, Irina; Kazarian, Konstantin; Cribbs, David H.; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Agadjanyan, Michael G.; Ghochikyan, Anahit

    2016-01-01

    Although β-amyloid (Aβ) may be the primary driver of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathology, accumulation of pathological tau correlates with dementia in AD patients. Thus, the prevention/inhibition of AD may require vaccine/s targeting Aβ and tau simultaneously or sequentially. Since high antibody titers are required for AD vaccine efficacy, we have decided to generate vaccines, targeting Aβ (AV-1959R), Tau (AV-1980R) or Aβ/tau (AV-1953R) B cell epitopes, based on immunogenic MultiTEP platform and evaluate the immunogenicity of these vaccines formulated with AdvaxCpG, delta inulin, Alhydrogel®, Montanide-ISA51, Montanide-ISA720, MPLA-SM pharmaceutical grade adjuvants. Formulation of AV-1959R in AdvaxCpG induced the highest cellular and humoral immune responses in mice. The dual-epitope vaccine, AV-1953R, or the combination of AV-1959R and AV-1980R vaccines formulated with AdvaxCpG induced robust antibody responses against various forms of both, Aβ and tau pathological molecules. While anti-Aβ antibody titers after AV-1953R immunization were similar to that in mice vaccinated with AV-1959R or AV-1959R/AV-1980R combination, anti-tau titers were significantly lower after AV-1953R injection when compared to the AV-1980R or AV-1959R/AV-1980R. In silico 3D-modeling provided insight into the differences in immunogenicity of these vaccine constructs. In sum, AV-1959R and AV-1980R formulated with AdvaxCpG adjuvant were identified as promising immunogenic vaccines for ongoing pre-clinical assessment and future human clinical trials. PMID:27363809

  5. TiO2-Nanowired Delivery of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Thwarts Diabetes- Induced Exacerbation of Brain Pathology in Heat Stroke: An Experimental Study in the Rat Using Morphological and Biochemical Approaches.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Hari S; Feng, Lianyuan; Lafuente, José V; Muresanu, Dafin F; Tian, Zhenrong R; Patnaik, Ranjana; Sharma, Aruna

    2015-01-01

    We have shown previously that heat stroke produced by whole body hyperthermia (WBH) for 4 h at 38°C in diabetic rats exacerbates blood-brain barrier breakdown, brain edema formation and neuronal cell injury as compared to healthy animals after identical heat exposure. In this combination of diabetes and WBH, normal therapeutic measures do not induce sufficient neuroprotection. Thus, we investigated whether nanowired mesenchymal cells (MSCs) when delivered systemically may have better therapeutic effects on brain damage in diabetic rats after WBH. Diabetes induced by streptozotocin administration (75 mg/kg, i.p, daily for 3 days) in rats resulted in clinical symptoms of the disease within 4 to 6 weeks (blood glucose level 20 to 30 mmoles/l as compared to saline control groups (4 to 6 mmoles/l). When subjected to WBH, these diabetic rats showed a 4-to 6-fold exacerbation of blood-brain barrier breakdown to Evans blue and radioiodine, along with brain edema formation and neuronal cell injury. Intravenous administration of rat MSCs (1x10(6)) to diabetic rats one week before WBH slightly reduced brain pathology, whereas TiO2 nanowired MSCs administered in an identical manner resulted in almost complete neuroprotection. On the other hand, MSCs alone significantly reduced brain pathology in saline-treated rats after WBH. These observations indicate that nanowired delivery of stem cells has superior therapeutic potential in heat stroke with diabetes, pointing to novel clinical perspectives in the future.

  6. A chlamydial type III-secreted effector protein (Tarp) is predominantly recognized by antibodies from humans infected with Chlamydia trachomatis and induces protective immunity against upper genital tract pathologies in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Chen, Lili; Chen, Fan; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Yingqian; Baseman, Joel; Perdue, Sondra; Yeh, I-Tien; Shain, Rochelle; Holland, Martin; Bailey, Robin; Mabey, David; Yu, Ping; Zhong, Guangming

    2009-05-14

    Chlamydia trachomatis genome is predicted to encode a type III secretion system consisting of more than 40 open reading frames (ORFs). To test whether these ORFs are expressed and immunogenic during chlamydial infection in humans, we expressed 55 chlamydial ORFs covering all putative type III secretion components plus control molecules as fusion proteins and measured the reactivity of these fusion proteins with antibodies from patients infected with C. trachomatis in the urogenital tract (24 antisera) or in the ocular tissue (8 antisera). Forty-five of the 55 proteins were recognized by at least 1 of the 32 human antisera, suggesting that these proteins are both expressed and immunogenic during chlamydial infection in humans. Tarp, a putative type III secretion effector protein, was identified as a novel immunodominant antigen due to its reactivity with the human antisera at high frequency and titer. The expression and immunogenicity of Tarp were confirmed in cell culture and mouse systems. Tarp was mainly associated with the infectious form of chlamydial organisms and became undetectable between 13 and 24 h during the infection cycle in cell culture. Mice intravaginally infected with C. muridarum developed Tarp-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. More importantly, immunization of mice with Tarp induced Th1-dominant immunity that significantly reduced the shedding of live organisms from the lower genital tract and attenuated inflammatory pathologies in the fallopian tube tissues. These observations have demonstrated that Tarp, an immunodominant antigen identified by human antisera, can induce protective immunity against chlamydial infection and pathology in mice.

  7. Alzheimer's disease like pathology induced six weeks after aggregated amyloid-beta injection in rats: increased oxidative stress and impaired long-term memory with anxiety-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sheetal; Verma, Sonia; Kapoor, Monika; Saini, Avneet; Nehru, Bimla

    2016-09-01

    Amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide deposition into insoluble plaques is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but soluble oligomeric Aβ is considered to be more potent and has been hypothesized to directly impair learning and memory. Also, evidences from some clinical studies indicated that Aβ oligomer formation is the major cause for early AD onset. However, the biochemical mechanism involved in the oligomer-induced toxicity is not very well addressed. So, thise present study was undertaken to study the effects of single intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of protofibrillar Aβ 1-42 on the behavioral and biochemical profile in rats. Rats were divided into two groups (n = 8 per group): (1) sham control group and (2) Aβ 1-42 injected group. A single dose of protofibrillar Aβ 1-42 (5 ul) through icv injection was bilaterally administered into the dorsal hippocampus, while sham control animals were administered with 5 µl of vehicle. The results demonstrated that the protofibrillar Aβ significantly inhibited long-term memory retention and increased anxiety levels as shown by the behavioral studies. The amyloid deposits were present inside the brain even six weeks after injection as confirmed by thioflavin-T staining and the neurodegeneration induced by these deposits was confirmed by Nissl's staining in hippocampal and cortical regions. The amyloid aggregates induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, acetylcholinesterase activity, nitrite levels, lipid peroxidation, and inhibited antioxidant enzyme activity in hippocampus, cortex, and striatum regions of rat brain after six weeks. The present study indicated that protofibrillar Aβ 1-42 injection altered long term memory, induced anxiety-like behavior and also developed Alzheimer's disease like pathology in rats.

  8. Pathological Significance of Mitochondrial Glycation

    PubMed Central

    Pun, Pamela Boon Li; Murphy, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Glycation, the nonenzymatic glycosylation of biomolecules, is commonly observed in diabetes and ageing. Reactive dicarbonyl species such as methylglyoxal and glyoxal are thought to be major physiological precursors of glycation. Because these dicarbonyls tend to be formed intracellularly, the levels of advanced glycation end products on cellular proteins are higher than on extracellular ones. The formation of glycation adducts within cells can have severe functional consequences such as inhibition of protein activity and promotion of DNA mutations. Although several lines of evidence suggest that there are specific mitochondrial targets of glycation, and mitochondrial dysfunction itself has been implicated in disease and ageing, it is unclear if glycation of biomolecules specifically within mitochondria induces dysfunction and contributes to disease pathology. We discuss here the possibility that mitochondrial glycation contributes to disease, focussing on diabetes, ageing, cancer, and neurodegeneration, and highlight the current limitations in our understanding of the pathological significance of mitochondrial glycation. PMID:22778743

  9. Opportunities in Speech Pathology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Parley W.

    The importance of speech is discussed and speech pathology is described. Types of communication disorders considered are articulation disorders, aphasia, facial deformity, hearing loss, stuttering, delayed speech, voice disorders, and cerebral palsy; examples of five disorders are given. Speech pathology is investigated from these aspects: the…

  10. Radiographic pathology for technologists

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, J.D.; Kowalczyk, N.

    1988-01-01

    This book explains the fundamentals of disease mechanisms and relates this to the practice of radiologic science. Each chapter begins with a discussion of normal anatomy and physiology, then covers pathology and demonstrates how the pathology appears on film. Imaging modalities such as computed tomography, MRI, and ultrasound are also discussed. Clinical case studies are included.

  11. Pathology annual. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Fechner, R.E.; Rosen, P.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 11 selections. Some of the titles are: Applications of in situ DNA hybridization technology to diagnostic surgical pathology; Neoplasms associated with immune deficiencies; Chronic gastritis: The pathologists's role; Necrosis in lymph nodes; Pathologic changes of osteochondrodysplasia in infancy: A review; and Immunoglobulin light chain nephropathies.

  12. Updates in ophthalmic pathology.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Pia R; Grossniklaus, Hans E

    2017-05-01

    Ophthalmic pathology has a long history and rich heritage in the field of ophthalmology. This review article highlights updates in ophthalmic pathology that have developed significantly through the years because of the efforts of committed individuals and the confluence of technology such as molecular biology and digital pathology. This is an exciting period in the history of ocular pathology, with cutting-edge techniques paving the way for new developments in diagnostics, therapeutics, and research. Collaborations between ocular oncologists and pathologists allow for improved and comprehensive patient care. Ophthalmic pathology continues to be a relevant specialty that is important in the understanding and clinical management of ocular disease, education of eye care providers, and overall advancement of the field.

  13. Chronic restraint stress induces mechanical and cold allodynia, and enhances inflammatory pain in rat: Relevance to human stress-associated painful pathologies.

    PubMed

    Bardin, L; Malfetes, N; Newman-Tancredi, A; Depoortère, R

    2009-12-28

    Whereas acute stress often results in analgesia, chronic stress can trigger hyperalgesia/allodynia. This influence of long-term stress on nociception is relevant to numerous painful pathologies, such as fibromyalgia (FM), characterized by diffuse muscular pain (hyperalgesia) and/or tenderness (allodynia). Hence, there is a need for pre-clinical models integrating a chronic-stress dimension to the study of pain. Here, we assessed the effects of protracted/intermittent stress produced by daily, 1h restraint periods in cylinders, 4 days/week over 5 weeks, on eight models of hyperalgesia and allodynia in rats. This type of stress potentiated chemical hyperalgesia in the formalin model (160 and 76% increase of pain score above controls, during the early and late phases, respectively). It also produced thermal allodynia in response to cold (paw acetone test: 200% increase of allodynia score during week 3-5) and heat (42 degrees C tail immersion test: 15% decrease of withdrawal threshold, from week 2 onward). This stress also resulted in mechanical allodynia in the von Frey filaments model (60% decrease in threshold during week 2-5). However, such a stress regimen had no influence in the Randall-Selitto test of mechanical hyperalgesia, and in the tail immersion models of cold (4 degrees C) or hot (48 degrees C) thermal hyperalgesia, as well as cold (15 degrees C) allodynia. This model of prolonged/intermittent restraint stress may be useful in investigating the mechanisms linking stress and pain, and provide an assay to assess the potential therapeutic efficacy of drugs targeted against painful pathologies with a strong stress component, including but not restricted to FM.

  14. High-fat diet-induced deregulation of hippocampal insulin signaling and mitochondrial homeostasis deficiences contribute to Alzheimer disease pathology in rodents.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Dmitry; Pedrós, Ignacio; Artiach, Gonzalo; Sureda, Francesc X; Barroso, Emma; Pallàs, Mercè; Casadesús, Gemma; Beas-Zarate, Carlos; Carro, Eva; Ferrer, Isidro; Vazquez-Carrera, Manuel; Folch, Jaume; Camins, Antoni

    2015-09-01

    Global obesity is a pandemic status, estimated to affect over 2 billion people, that has resulted in an enormous strain on healthcare systems worldwide. The situation is compounded by the fact that apart from the direct costs associated with overweight pathology, obesity presents itself with a number of comorbidities, including an increased risk for the development of neurodegenerative disorders. Alzheimer disease (AD), the main cause of senile dementia, is no exception. Spectacular failure of the pharmaceutical industry to come up with effective AD treatment strategies is forcing the broader scientific community to rethink the underlying molecular mechanisms leading to cognitive decline. To this end, the emphasis is once again placed on the experimental animal models of the disease. In the current study, we have focused on the effects of a high-fat diet (HFD) on hippocampal-dependent memory in C57/Bl6 Wild-type (WT) and APPswe/PS1dE9 (APP/PS1) mice, a well-established mouse model of familial AD. Our results indicate that the continuous HFD administration starting at the time of weaning is sufficient to produce β-amyloid-independent, hippocampal-dependent memory deficits measured by a 2-object novel-object recognition test (NOR) in mice as early as 6months of age. Furthermore, the resulting metabolic syndrome appears to have direct effects on brain insulin regulation and mitochondrial function. We have observed pathological changes related to both the proximal and distal insulin signaling pathway in the brains of HFD-fed WT and APP/PS1 mice. These changes are accompanied by a significantly reduced OXPHOS metabolism, suggesting that mitochondria play an important role in hippocampus-dependent memory formation and retention in both the HFD-treated and AD-like rodents at a relatively young age.

  15. Th1, Th2 and Th17 Effector T Cell-Induced Autoimmune Gastritis Differs in Pathological Pattern and in Susceptibility to Suppression by Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stummvoll, Georg H.; DiPaolo, Richard J.; Huter, Eva N.; Davidson, Todd S.; Glass, Deborah; Ward, Jerrold M.; Shevach, Ethan M.

    2008-01-01

    Th cells can be subdivided into IFNγ-secreting Th1, IL-4/IL-5 secreting Th2, and IL-17 secreting Th17 cells. We have evaluated the capacity of fully differentiated Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells derived from a mouse bearing a transgenic TCR specific for the gastric parietal cell antigen, H/K ATPase, to induce autoimmune gastritis after transfer to immunodeficient recipients. We have also determined the susceptibility of the disease induced by each of the effector T cell types to suppression by polyclonal regulatory T cells (Treg) in vivo. Each type of effector cell induced autoimmune gastritis with distinct histological patterns. Th17 cells induced the most destructive disease with cellular infiltrates composed primarily of eosinophils accompanied by high levels of serum IgE. Polyclonal Treg could suppress the capacity of Th1 cells, moderately suppress Th2 cells, but could only suppress Th17 induced disease at early time points. The major effect of the Treg was to inhibit the expansion of the effector T cells. However, effector cells isolated from protected animals were not anergic and were fully competent to proliferate and produce effector cytokines ex vivo. The strong inhibitory effect of polyclonal Treg on the capacity of some types of differentiated effector cells to induce disease provides an experimental basis for the clinical use of polyclonal Treg in the treatment of autoimmune disease in man. PMID:18641328

  16. Th1, Th2, and Th17 effector T cell-induced autoimmune gastritis differs in pathological pattern and in susceptibility to suppression by regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Stummvoll, Georg H; DiPaolo, Richard J; Huter, Eva N; Davidson, Todd S; Glass, Deborah; Ward, Jerrold M; Shevach, Ethan M

    2008-08-01

    Th cells can be subdivided into IFN-gamma-secreting Th1, IL-4/IL-5-secreting Th2, and IL-17-secreting Th17 cells. We have evaluated the capacity of fully differentiated Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells derived from a mouse bearing a transgenic TCR specific for the gastric parietal cell antigen, H(+)K(+)-ATPase, to induce autoimmune gastritis after transfer to immunodeficient recipients. We have also determined the susceptibility of the disease induced by each of the effector T cell types to suppression by polyclonal regulatory T cells (Treg) in vivo. Each type of effector cell induced autoimmune gastritis with distinct histological patterns. Th17 cells induced the most destructive disease with cellular infiltrates composed primarily of eosinophils accompanied by high levels of serum IgE. Polyclonal Treg could suppress the capacity of Th1 cells, could moderately suppress Th2 cells, but could suppress Th17-induced disease only at early time points. The major effect of the Treg was to inhibit the expansion of the effector T cells. However, effector cells isolated from protected animals were not anergic and were fully competent to proliferate and produce effector cytokines ex vivo. The strong inhibitory effect of polyclonal Treg on the capacity of some types of differentiated effector cells to induce disease provides an experimental basis for the clinical use of polyclonal Treg in the treatment of autoimmune disease in humans.

  17. [Pathology- a new revival].

    PubMed

    Barshack, Iris

    2013-06-01

    The field of pathology has undergone considerable change in recent years. The editor and editorial board of this journal are to be commended for their decision to devote a special issue to the field of pathology. Pathology deals with the characterization, investigation, and diagnosis of disease and disease processes and as such, has Long been considered one of the foundations of medicine. It is a rich and multi-faceted field which has retained its breadth of scope in the face of ever-increasing specialization and sub-specialization in medicine. In addition to its classic roles in autopsy, case description, and the diagnosis of pathoLogic processes, new and innovative spheres of activity are becoming integral to the field, especially in the realm of molecular pathology. Pathology is a Leading player in the new age of "personalized cancer therapy", where pathologists are responsible not only for diagnosing disease in the tissue, but also for conducting additional tests which may predict its response to specific drug therapies. In this context, moLecular pathology has become essential to the field both in the provision of cLinical service and research. To fully implement this trend, we are witness to the rise of tissue collection and tissue banking initiatives for both diagnostic and research purposes. A national tissue banking project in Israel has recently received considerable attention.

  18. [Pathological gambling: literature revue].

    PubMed

    Filteau, M J; Baruch, P; Vincent, P

    1992-03-01

    This paper summarizes the current literature on pathological gambling. Interest in gambling has been present in every society but treated as an object of sociopolitical or literary interest. It is only from the beginning of this century that psychiatry began to look at pathological gambling, first with Freud and his writing on Dostoïevsky then with other theories like the learning theory, studies on substance dependence, the links with affective syndromes and the psychobiological studies. These studies are presented and discussed. Finally, the authors offer some guidelines for an approach to a pathological gambler.

  19. Retroviruses and human pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Gallo, R.C.; Stehelin, D.; Varnier, O.E.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains four sections, each consisting of several papers. The section headings are: Retroviruses and the Murine Model System;Retroviruses and the Vertebrate Model System;Retroviruses and Human Pathology;and Retroviruses and Oncogenes.

  20. Co-Infection With Intestinal Helminths Markedly Reduces Proinflammatory Cytokines And Disease Severity In Natural And Induced High-Pathology Schistosomiasis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infection with the trematode helminth Schistosoma mansoni results in a parasite egg-induced, CD4 T cell-mediated, hepato-intestinal granulomatous and fibrosing inflammation that varies greatly in severity, with a higher frequency of milder forms typical in endemic areas. One possible explanation is...

  1. The Protective Role of microRNA-200c in Alzheimer's Disease Pathologies Is Induced by Beta Amyloid-Triggered Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qi; Ye, Xiaoyang; Xiong, Yi; Zhu, Haili; Miao, Jianting; Zhang, Wei; Wan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that repress the expression of their target proteins. The roles of microRNAs in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are not clear. In this study we show that miR-200c represses the expression of PTEN protein. PTEN downregulation by miR-200c supports the survival and differentiation of cultured neurons. AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease signified by beta amyloid (Aβ) peptide aggregation and deposition. In a mouse model of AD that is induced by APPswe and PS1ΔE9 double transgenes, we found Aβ deposition results in neuronal ER stress that induces miR200c. Pharmacological blockade of ER stress inhibited Aβ-induced miR-200c overexpression in AD brains. MiR-200c was detected in the serum of both AD mice and human AD patients. These findings suggest that miR-200c functions as part of the neuronal cell-intrinsic adaptive machinery, and supports neuronal survival and differentiation in response to Aβ induced ER-stress by downregulating PTEN. PMID:28008308

  2. Carbon nanotube and asbestos exposures induce overlapping but distinct profiles of lung pathology in non-swiss Albino CF-1 mice

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Evan A.; Carreira, Vinicius S.; Birch, M. Eileen; Yadav, Jagjit S.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging as important occupational and environmental toxicants owing to their increasing prevalence and potential to be inhaled as airborne particles. CNTs are a concern because of their similarities to asbestos, which include fibrous morphology, high aspect ratio, and biopersistence. Limitations in research models have made it difficult to experimentally ascertain the risk of CNT exposures to humans and whether these may lead to lung diseases classically associated with asbestos, such as mesothelioma and fibrosis. In this study we sought to comprehensively compare profiles of lung pathology in mice following repeated exposures to multi-wall CNTs or crocidolite asbestos (CA). We show that both exposures resulted in granulomatous inflammation and increased interstitial collagen, CA exposures caused predominantly bronchoalveolar hyperplasia whereas CNT exposures caused alveolar hyperplasia of type II pneumocytes (T2Ps). T2Ps isolated from CNT-exposed lungs were found to have upregulated proinflammatory genes, including IL-1ß, in contrast to those from CA-exposed. Immunostaining in tissue showed that while both toxicants increased IL-1ß protein expression in lung cells, T2P-specific IL-1ß increases were greater following CNT exposure. These results suggest related but distinct mechanisms of action by CNTs versus asbestos which may lead to different outcomes in the two exposure types. PMID:26839332

  3. Osteoarthritis-like pathologic changes in the knee joint induced by environmental disruption of circadian rhythms is potentiated by a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Kc, Ranjan; Li, Xin; Forsyth, Christopher B; Voigt, Robin M; Summa, Keith C; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Tryniszewska, Beata; Keshavarzian, Ali; Turek, Fred W; Meng, Qing-Jun; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2015-11-20

    A variety of environmental factors contribute to progressive development of osteoarthritis (OA). Environmental factors that upset circadian rhythms have been linked to various diseases. Our recent work establishes chronic environmental circadian disruption - analogous to rotating shiftwork-associated disruption of circadian rhythms in humans - as a novel risk factor for the development of OA. Evidence suggests shift workers are prone to obesity and also show altered eating habits (i.e., increased preference for high-fat containing food). In the present study, we investigated the impact of chronic circadian rhythm disruption in combination with a high-fat diet (HFD) on progression of OA in a mouse model. Our study demonstrates that when mice with chronically circadian rhythms were fed a HFD, there was a significant proteoglycan (PG) loss and fibrillation in knee joint as well as increased activation of the expression of the catabolic mediators involved in cartilage homeostasis. Our results, for the first time, provide the evidence that environmental disruption of circadian rhythms plus HFD potentiate OA-like pathological changes in the mouse joints. Thus, our findings may open new perspectives on the interactions of chronic circadian rhythms disruption with diet in the development of OA and may have potential clinical implications.

  4. Simulation of 'pathologic' changes in ICG waveforms resulting from superposition of the 'preejection' and ejection waves induced by left ventricular contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermishkin, V. V.; Kolesnikov, V. A.; Lukoshkova, E. V.; Sonina, R. S.

    2013-04-01

    The impedance cardiography (ICG) is widely used for beat-to-beat noninvasive evaluation of the left ventricular stroke volume and contractility. It implies the correct determination of the ejection start and end points and the amplitudes of certain peaks in the differentiated impedance cardiogram. An accurate identification of ejection onset by ICG is often problematic, especially in the cardiologic patients, due to peculiar waveforms. Using a simple theoretical model, we tested the hypothesis that two major processes are responsible for the formation of impedance systolic wave: (1) the changes in the heart geometry and surrounding vessels produced by ventricular contraction, which occur during the isovolumic phase and precede ejection, and (2) expansion of aorta and adjacent arteries during the ejection phase. The former process initiates the preejection wave WpE and the latter triggers the ejection wave WEj. The model predicts a potential mechanism of generating the abnormal shapes of dZ/dt due to the presence of preejection waves and explains the related errors in ICG time and amplitude parameters. An appropriate decomposition method is a promising way to avoid the masking effects of these waves and a further step to correct determination of the onset of ejection and the corresponding peak amplitudes from 'pathologically shaped' ICG signals.

  5. NKG2D mediates NK cell hyperresponsiveness and influenza-induced pathologies in a mouse model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Wortham, Brian W; Eppert, Bryan L; Motz, Greg T; Flury, Jennifer L; Orozco-Levi, Mauricio; Hoebe, Kasper; Panos, Ralph J; Maxfield, Melissa; Glasser, Stephan W; Senft, Albert P; Raulet, David H; Borchers, Michael T

    2012-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by peribronchial and perivascular inflammation and largely irreversible airflow obstruction. Acute disease exacerbations, due frequently to viral infections, lead to enhanced disease symptoms and contribute to long-term progression of COPD pathology. Previously, we demonstrated that NK cells from cigarette smoke (CS)-exposed mice exhibit enhanced effector functions in response to stimulating cytokines or TLR ligands. In this article, we show that the activating receptor NKG2D is a key mediator for CS-stimulated NK cell hyperresponsiveness, because CS-exposed NKG2D-deficient mice (Klrk1(-/-)) did not exhibit enhanced effector functions as assessed by cytokine responsiveness. NK cell cytotoxicity against MHC class I-deficient targets was not affected in a COPD model. However, NK cells from CS-exposed mice exhibit greater cytotoxic activity toward cells that express the NKG2D ligand RAET1ε. We also demonstrate that NKG2D-deficient mice exhibit diminished airway damage and reduced inflammation in a model of viral COPD exacerbation, which do not affect viral clearance. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of NKG2D(+) NK cells into CS-exposed, influenza-infected NKG2D-deficient mice recapitulated the phenotypes observed in CS-exposed, influenza-infected wild-type mice. Our findings indicate that NKG2D stimulation during long-term CS exposure is a central pathway in the development of NK cell hyperresponsiveness and influenza-mediated exacerbations of COPD.

  6. Triosephosphate isomerase I170V alters catalytic site, enhances stability and induces pathology in a Drosophila model of TPI deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Roland, Bartholomew P.; Amrich, Christopher G.; Kammerer, Charles J.; Stuchul, Kimberly A.; Larsen, Samantha B.; Rode, Sascha; Aslam, Anoshe A.; Heroux, Annie; Wetzel, Ronald; VanDemark, Andrew P.; Palladino, Michael J.

    2014-10-16

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) is a glycolytic enzyme which homodimerizes for full catalytic activity. Mutations of the TPI gene elicit a disease known as TPI Deficiency, a glycolytic enzymopathy noted for its unique severity of neurological symptoms. Evidence suggests that TPI Deficiency pathogenesis may be due to conformational changes of the protein, likely affecting dimerization and protein stability. In this report, we genetically and physically characterize a human disease-associated TPI mutation caused by an I170V substitution. Human TPII170V elicits behavioral abnormalities in Drosophila. An examination of hTPII170V enzyme kinetics revealed this substitution reduced catalytic turnover, while assessments of thermal stability demonstrated an increase in enzyme stability. Furthermore, the crystal structure of the homodimeric I170V mutant reveals changes in the geometry of critical residues within the catalytic pocket. In the end, collectively these data reveal new observations of the structural and kinetic determinants of TPI deficiency pathology, providing new insights into disease pathogenesis.

  7. The Effects of Taoren-Honghua Herb Pair on Pathological Microvessel and Angiogenesis-Associated Signaling Pathway in Mice Model of CCl4-Induced Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Shengyan; Yue, Lifeng; Shi, Mengmeng; Peng, Ying; Xu, Yangxinzi; Wang, Xinrong; Li, Qian; Kang, Zhijun; Li, Hanjing; Wang, Yanhui

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver disease is one of the most common diseases that threaten human health. Effective treatment is still lacking in western medicine. Semen Persicae (Taoren) and Flos Carthami (Honghua) are known to relieve acute hepatic injury and inflammation, improve microcirculation, and reduce tissue fiber. The aim of our study is to investigate the potential mechanisms of Taoren-Honghua Herb Pair (THHP) in murine model of chronic liver disease caused by Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4). Mice were randomly divided into seven groups: (1) blank, (2) model, (3) control (colchicine, 0.1 mg/kg), (4) THHP (5.53, 2.67, and 1.33 g/kg), and (5) Tao Hong Siwu Decoction (THSWD) (8.50 g/kg). Histological change and microvessels density were examined by microscopy. Hepatic function, serum fibrosis related factors, and hepatic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were measured with ELISA. VEGF, kinase insert domain-containing receptor (KDR), Flt-1, and Akt mRNA expression in hepatic tissue were determined with PCR. Tissues of Akt, pAkt, KDR, and Flt-1 were measured with western blotting. Data from this study showed that THHP improved hepatic function and restrained the hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. Its role in inhibiting pathological angiogenesis and hepatic fibrogenesis may be through affecting the angiogenesis-associated VEGF and its upstream and downstream signaling pathways. PMID:27293456

  8. Inhalation of Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin A induces IFN-gamma and CD8 T cell-dependent airway and interstitial lung pathology in mice.

    PubMed

    Muralimohan, Guruprasaadh; Rossi, Robert J; Guernsey, Linda A; Thrall, Roger S; Vella, Anthony T

    2008-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a primary source of bacterial superantigen (SAg), is known to colonize the human respiratory tract and has been implicated in airway inflammation. Studies have documented a role for SAgs in respiratory disorders, such as nasal polyps, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic rhinosinusitis, and asthma. However, cellular and molecular mediators involved in SAg-mediated pulmonary disease have not been clearly identified. In this study, we investigated the effect of intranasal staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) exposure on murine lung. The pathological features in the lung resulting from SEA exposure had characteristics of both obstructive and restrictive pulmonary disorders. There was also an increase in bronchoalveolar lavage protein concentration and cellularity following SEA challenge. Massive CD8(+)Vbeta3(+) T cell accumulation observed in the lung was dependent on CD4 T cell help, both for recruitment and for IFN-gamma synthesis. The primary source of IFN-gamma synthesis was CD8 T cells, and depletion of these cells abrogated disease. IFN-gamma deficiency also prevented SEA-mediated disease, and this was by enhancing early recruitment of neutrophils as detected in the bronchoalveolar lavage. Thus, IFN-gamma appeared to selectively aid the recruitment of T cells to the lungs while preventing the neutrophil accumulation. Therefore, our results show that IFN-gamma-producing CD8 T cells mediated pulmonary alveolitis and inflammation, which were dependent upon CD4 T cells for their recruitment to the lung.

  9. The pathology of sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Gal, Anthony A; Koss, Michael N

    2002-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic disease characterized by a nonnecrotizing granulomatous inflammatory process that can progress through various stages of activity. The distinctive histology of sarcoidosis is often associated with various morphologic findings in the lung and other organs. The rare variants, necrotizing sarcoidal granulomas and nodular sarcoidosis, share some of the histologic features of typical sarcoidosis, but may have different clinical and pathologic manifestations. The clinician and pathologist should be aware of the diverse pathologic appearances of sarcoidosis.

  10. Renal pathology in reptiles.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Peernel

    2006-01-01

    The class of Reptilia varies widely. Both the gross morphology and microscopic anatomy of the kidneys are specific for each species. In each species of reptile, the physiology of the renal system has adapted to the specific conditions of life, including, among other factors, the type of food, environmental temperature, and the availability of water. The pathology of the kidneys in reptiles has been poorly studied, but in recent years a number of investigators have specifically studied reptilian renal pathology.

  11. Digital pathology for education.

    PubMed

    Huisman, André

    2012-01-01

    The use of digital slides for educational purposes (both for medical students and during pathology traineeships) will eventually accelerate the acceptance of digital pathology in general. This chapter describes the advantages of using digital slides especially for education. Also the requirements for using digital slides for this purpose are evaluated, including software requirements, the slide scanner and the IT infrastructure needed to provide a robust infrastructure to end users.

  12. Colorectal carcinoma: Pathologic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Matthew; Ravula, Sreelakshmi; Tatishchev, Sergei F.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is one of the most common cancers and one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in the United States. Pathologic examination of biopsy, polypectomy and resection specimens is crucial to appropriate patient managemnt, prognosis assessment and family counseling. Molecular testing plays an increasingly important role in the era of personalized medicine. This review article focuses on the histopathology and molecular pathology of colorectal carcinoma and its precursor lesions, with an emphasis on their clinical relevance. PMID:22943008

  13. Antibiotic-induced perturbations in microbial diversity during post-natal development alters amyloid pathology in an aged APPSWE/PS1ΔE9 murine model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Minter, Myles R; Hinterleitner, Reinhard; Meisel, Marlies; Zhang, Can; Leone, Vanessa; Zhang, Xiaoqiong; Oyler-Castrillo, Paul; Zhang, Xulun; Musch, Mark W; Shen, Xunuo; Jabri, Bana; Chang, Eugene B; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Sisodia, Sangram S

    2017-09-05

    Recent evidence suggests the commensal microbiome regulates host immunity and influences brain function; findings that have ramifications for neurodegenerative diseases. In the context of Alzheimer's disease (AD), we previously reported that perturbations in microbial diversity induced by life-long combinatorial antibiotic (ABX) selection pressure in the APPSWE/PS1ΔE9 mouse model of amyloidosis is commensurate with reductions in amyloid-β (Aβ) plaque pathology and plaque-localised gliosis. Considering microbiota-host interactions, specifically during early post-natal development, are critical for immune- and neuro-development we now examine the impact of microbial community perturbations induced by acute ABX exposure exclusively during this period in APPSWE/PS1ΔE9 mice. We show that early post-natal (P) ABX treatment (P14-P21) results in long-term alterations of gut microbial genera (predominantly Lachnospiraceae and S24-7) and reduction in brain Aβ deposition in aged APPSWE/PS1ΔE9 mice. These mice exhibit elevated levels of blood- and brain-resident Foxp3(+) T-regulatory cells and display an alteration in the inflammatory milieu of the serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Finally, we confirm that plaque-localised microglia and astrocytes are reduced in ABX-exposed mice. These findings suggest that ABX-induced microbial diversity perturbations during post-natal stages of development coincide with altered host immunity mechanisms and amyloidosis in a murine model of AD.

  14. Cigarette smoke induced genotoxicity and respiratory tract pathology: evidence to support reduced exposure time and animal numbers in tobacco product testing

    PubMed Central

    Dalrymple, Annette; Ordoñez, Patricia; Thorne, David; Walker, David; Camacho, Oscar M.; Büttner, Ansgar; Dillon, Debbie; Meredith, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Many laboratories are working to develop in vitro models that will replace in vivo tests, but occasionally there remains a regulatory expectation of some in vivo testing. Historically, cigarettes have been tested in vivo for 90 days. Recently, methods to reduce and refine animal use have been explored. This study investigated the potential of reducing animal cigarette smoke (CS) exposure to 3 or 6 weeks, and the feasibility of separate lung lobes for histopathology or the Comet assay. Rats were exposed to sham air or CS (1 or 2 h) for 3 or 6 weeks. Respiratory tissues were processed for histopathological evaluation, and Alveolar type II cells (AEC II) isolated for the Comet assay. Blood was collected for Pig-a and micronucleus quantification. Histopathological analyses demonstrated exposure effects, which were generally dependent on CS dose (1 or 2 h, 5 days/week). Comet analysis identified that DNA damage increased in AEC II following 3 or 6 weeks CS exposure, and the level at 6 weeks was higher than 3 weeks. Pig-a mutation or micronucleus levels were not increased. In conclusion, this study showed that 3 weeks of CS exposure was sufficient to observe respiratory tract pathology and DNA damage in isolated AEC II. Differences between the 3 and 6 week data imply that DNA damage in the lung is cumulative. Reducing exposure time, plus analyzing separate lung lobes for DNA damage or histopathology, supports a strategy to reduce and refine animal use in tobacco product testing and is aligned to the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement). PMID:27160659

  15. Cigarette smoke induced genotoxicity and respiratory tract pathology: evidence to support reduced exposure time and animal numbers in tobacco product testing.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, Annette; Ordoñez, Patricia; Thorne, David; Walker, David; Camacho, Oscar M; Büttner, Ansgar; Dillon, Debbie; Meredith, Clive

    2016-06-01

    Many laboratories are working to develop in vitro models that will replace in vivo tests, but occasionally there remains a regulatory expectation of some in vivo testing. Historically, cigarettes have been tested in vivo for 90 days. Recently, methods to reduce and refine animal use have been explored. This study investigated the potential of reducing animal cigarette smoke (CS) exposure to 3 or 6 weeks, and the feasibility of separate lung lobes for histopathology or the Comet assay. Rats were exposed to sham air or CS (1 or 2 h) for 3 or 6 weeks. Respiratory tissues were processed for histopathological evaluation, and Alveolar type II cells (AEC II) isolated for the Comet assay. Blood was collected for Pig-a and micronucleus quantification. Histopathological analyses demonstrated exposure effects, which were generally dependent on CS dose (1 or 2 h, 5 days/week). Comet analysis identified that DNA damage increased in AEC II following 3 or 6 weeks CS exposure, and the level at 6 weeks was higher than 3 weeks. Pig-a mutation or micronucleus levels were not increased. In conclusion, this study showed that 3 weeks of CS exposure was sufficient to observe respiratory tract pathology and DNA damage in isolated AEC II. Differences between the 3 and 6 week data imply that DNA damage in the lung is cumulative. Reducing exposure time, plus analyzing separate lung lobes for DNA damage or histopathology, supports a strategy to reduce and refine animal use in tobacco product testing and is aligned to the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement).

  16. Extrastriatal dopaminergic abnormalities of DA homeostasis in Parkinson's patients with medication-induced pathological gambling: a [11C] FLB-457 and PET study.

    PubMed

    Ray, Nicola J; Miyasaki, Janis M; Zurowski, Mateusz; Ko, Ji Hyun; Cho, Sang Soo; Pellecchia, Giovanna; Antonelli, Francesca; Houle, Sylvain; Lang, Anthony E; Strafella, Antonio P

    2012-12-01

    Impulse control disorders such as pathological gambling (PG) are a serious and common adverse effect of dopamine (DA) replacement medication in Parkinson's disease (PD). Patients with PG have increased impulsivity and abnormalities in striatal DA, in common with behavioural and substance addictions in the non-PD population. To date, no studies have investigated the role of extrastriatal dopaminergic abnormalities in PD patients with PG. We used the PET radiotracer, [11C] FLB-457, with high-affinity for extrastriatal DA D2/3 receptors. 14 PD patients on DA agonists were imaged while they performed a gambling task involving real monetary reward and a control task. Trait impulsivity was measured with the Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS). Seven of the patients had a history of PG that developed subsequent to DA agonist medication. Change in [11C] FLB-457 binding potential (BP) during gambling was reduced in PD with PG patients in the midbrain, where D2/D3 receptors are dominated by autoreceptors. The degree of change in [11C] FLB-457 binding in this region correlated with impulsivity. In the cortex, [11C] FLB-457 BP was significantly greater in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in PD patients with PG during the control task, and binding in this region was also correlated with impulsivity. Our findings provide the first evidence that PD patients with PG have dysfunctional activation of DA autoreceptors in the midbrain and low DA tone in the ACC. Thus, altered striatal and cortical DA homeostasis may incur vulnerability for the development of PG in PD, linked with the impulsive personality trait.

  17. Clearance of pathological antibodies using biomimetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Copp, Jonathan A.; Fang, Ronnie H.; Luk, Brian T.; Hu, Che-Ming J.; Gao, Weiwei; Zhang, Kang; Zhang, Liangfang

    2014-01-01

    Pathological antibodies have been demonstrated to play a key role in type II immune hypersensitivity reactions, resulting in the destruction of healthy tissues and leading to considerable morbidity for the patient. Unfortunately, current treatments present significant iatrogenic risk while still falling short for many patients in achieving clinical remission. In the present work, we explored the capability of target cell membrane-coated nanoparticles to abrogate the effect of pathological antibodies in an effort to minimize disease burden, without the need for drug-based immune suppression. Inspired by antibody-driven pathology, we used intact RBC membranes stabilized by biodegradable polymeric nanoparticle cores to serve as an alternative target for pathological antibodies in an antibody-induced anemia disease model. Through both in vitro and in vivo studies, we demonstrated efficacy of RBC membrane-cloaked nanoparticles to bind and neutralize anti-RBC polyclonal IgG effectively, and thus preserve circulating RBCs. PMID:25197051

  18. Overview of Glutamatergic Dysregulation in Central Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Miladinovic, Tanya; Nashed, Mina G.; Singh, Gurmit

    2015-01-01

    As the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, glutamate plays a key role in many central pathologies, including gliomas, psychiatric, neurodevelopmental, and neurodegenerative disorders. Post-mortem and serological studies have implicated glutamatergic dysregulation in these pathologies, and pharmacological modulation of glutamate receptors and transporters has provided further validation for the involvement of glutamate. Furthermore, efforts from genetic, in vitro, and animal studies are actively elucidating the specific glutamatergic mechanisms that contribute to the aetiology of central pathologies. However, details regarding specific mechanisms remain sparse and progress in effectively modulating glutamate to alleviate symptoms or inhibit disease states has been relatively slow. In this report, we review what is currently known about glutamate signalling in central pathologies. We also discuss glutamate’s mediating role in comorbidities, specifically cancer-induced bone pain and depression. PMID:26569330

  19. Muscle wasting associated with pathologic change is a risk factor for the exacerbation of joint swelling in collagen-induced arthritis in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Horai, Naoto; Nagaoka, Takaharu; Higuchi, Itsuro; Kasai, Hayato; Yoshioka, Takako; Umekita, Yoshihisa; Fukuzaki, Koichiro; Nagata, Ryoichi; Miyata, Atsuro; Abeyama, Kazuhiro

    2013-07-09

    Not only joint destruction but also muscle wasting due to rheumatoid cachexia has been problem in terms of quality of life of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the present study, we performed histopathological examination and assessed relationships between characteristic parameters relating to muscle and joint swelling in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model using cynomolgus monkeys (CMs). Female CMs were used and CIA was induced by twice immunizations using bovine type II collagen with Freund's complete adjuvant. Arthritis level was evaluated from the degree of swelling at the peripheral joints of the fore and hind limbs. Food consumption, body weight, and serum biochemical parameters were measured sequentially. Five or 6 animals per time point were sacrificed at 2, 3, 5 and 9 weeks after the first immunization to obtain quadriceps femoris specimens for histopathology. Pimonidazole hydrochloride was intravenously administered to determine tissue hypoxia in skeletal muscle. Gradual joint swelling was observed and the maximum arthritis score was noted at Week 5. In histopathology, necrosis of muscle fiber in the quadriceps femoris was observed only at Week 2 and the most significant findings such as degeneration, atrophy, and regeneration of muscle fiber were mainly observed at Week 5. Food consumption was decreased up to Week 4 but recovered thereafter. Body weight decreased up to Week 5 and did not completely recover thereafter. A biphasic increase in serum cortisol was also observed at Weeks 2 and 5. Histopathology showed that muscle lesions were mainly composed of degeneration and atrophy of the muscle fibers, and ATPase staining revealed that the changes were more pronounced in type II muscle fiber than type I muscle fiber. In the pimonidazole experiment, mosaic pattern in skeletal muscle was demonstrated in the intact animal, but not the CIA animal. Increased arthritis score was accompanied by a decrease in serum creatinine, a marker that

  20. Clinical pathologic profiles of dogs and turkeys with congestive heart failure, either noninduced or induced by rapid ventricular pacing, and turkeys with furazolidone toxicosis.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, P J; O'Grady, M; Lumsden, J H; Holmberg, D L; Shen, H; Weiler, J E; Horn, R D; Mirsalimi, S M; Julian, R J

    1993-01-01

    Characteristic alterations in the serum and urine biochemical profiles of Doberman Pinschers with congestive heart failure (CHF) resulting from idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy were determined. We compared these alterations with those observed in 2 other models of CHF: rate overload induced by rapid ventricular pacing in dogs, and biventricular hypertrophy and dilatation induced in turkey poults by furazolidone toxicosis. Serum and urine biochemical changes in both models of CHF in dogs were mild to moderate in degree, and were moderately consistent. They could be attributed to secondary neurohumoral, hepatic, and renal effects of heart failure. The most marked and consistent changes observed were mildly decreased anion gap that developed, in part, because of decreased serum sodium concentration, moderately increased catecholamine concentrations, moderate lactaciduria, hyposthenuria, and mildly increased urea concentrations and liver enzyme activities. In birds with furazolidone cardiomyopathy, we observed mild increases in serum urate concentration, liver and muscle enzyme activities, but moderately increased sodium concentration with decreased chloride concentration. In the pacing and furazolidone models, in which CHF was rapidly induced, moderate to marked hypoproteinemia was attributable to decreases in albumin and globulin concentrations. Using the avian model we found that the hypoproteinemia could be largely attributed to blood volume expansion, and to a lesser extent, inanition. Development of hypoalbuminemia during rapid ventricular pacing and furazolidone treatment may contribute to the effects of rate overload or drug toxicity in the pathogenesis of CHF, because hypoalbuminemia may contribute to altered hemodynamics and neuroendocrine system activation. Our data indicate that clinical biochemical analysis of serum and urine may be useful for assessing progression of CHF.

  1. Eponyms in forensic pathology.

    PubMed

    Nečas, Pavel; Hejna, Petr

    2012-12-01

    The phenomenon of eponymous terms in forensic pathology is described in this paper. The authors analyzed representative textbooks (monographs) dealing with forensic pathology in both English and German and identified several eponymous terms. The paper aims to present to the reader the most important eponymous terms in forensic pathology. Included in the paper are the following terms: Beckwith's Sign, Casper's Rule, Krönlein's Shot, Lichtenberg's Figures, Nysten's Law, Paltauf's Spots, Puppe's Rule, Sehrt's Sign, Simon's Sign, Sveshnikov's Sign, Tardieu's Spots, Wischnewski Spots, Wydler's Sign. The spread of eponymous terms throughout various languages is mentioned. The linguistic basis of such terms as well as their advantages and disadvantages in specialist fields, and indeed in even wider circles, is discussed. The authors state that the main function of these terms is to facilitate the open flow of unambiguous information among scholars. Eponymous terms in forensic pathology are characteristic for the German speaking countries and for all countries influenced by the German school of forensic pathology. Their usage in the Anglo-Saxon world is much less widespread, meaning they do not occur very often in English monographs and textbooks.

  2. Role of leukocytes in ethanol-induced microvascular injury in the rat brain in situ: potential role in alcohol brain pathology and stroke.

    PubMed

    Altura, Burton M; Gebrewold, Asefa; Zhang, Aimin; Altura, Bella T

    2002-07-12

    Effects of acute and chronic alcohol ethanol administration on in vivo microvascular-leukocyte dynamics was studied in brains of naive and leukocyte-depleted rats by direct, quantitative intravital high-resolution TV microscopy, fluorescence microscopy and myeloperoxidase staining. Administration of alcohol produced dose-dependent venular vasospasm, and rolling and adherence of leukocytes to venular walls; leukocyte velocity concomitantly decreased. Intermediate to high doses of ethanol resulted in infiltration of leukocytes and macrophages across venular walls, and concentration-dependent increases in myeloperoxidase staining in parenchyma, and rupture of postcapillary venules with focal hemorrhages. Use of phosphorus 31-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy on intact animals revealed that the latter were associated with whole brain losses in intracellular levels of ATP and phosphocreatine with concomitant rises in intracellular inorganic phosphate and hydrogen ion concentration. Vinblastine-depletion of circulating leukocytes prevented or ameliorated greatly the alcohol-induced microvascular damage and proinflammatory-like reactions. These new results, when viewed in light of other recent findings, suggest that alcohol-induced cerebral vascular and brain damage is dependent, to a large extent, on recruitment of leukocytes.

  3. Pathology of radiation myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Burns, R. J.; Jones, A. N.; Robertson, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    After nothing the rarity of papers describing the pathology of delayed radiation necrosis of the spinal cord, the clinical and pathological findings from four cases are presented. The main pathological features are asymmetric demyelination of the lateral columns and to a lesser degree the posterior and anterior columns of white matter, with coagulative necrosis at the level of irradiation which affected the grey matter to a lesser degree. There is ascending and descending secondary tract degeneration, and poor glial response in the lesions themselves. Vascular changes, mainly hyalilne thickening of arteriolar walls, are present, but not in degree sufficient to explain the primary lesion. The discussion of the pathogenesis of the myelopathy weighs the merits of a primary vascular lesion against those of a primary effect of the radiation on neural tissue. The latter is favoured. Images PMID:4647860

  4. [Gunshot wounds: forensic pathology].

    PubMed

    Lorin de la Grandmaison, Geoffroy

    2012-02-01

    Gunshot wounds are among the most complex traumatic lesions encountered in forensic pathology. At the time of autopsy, careful scrutiny of the wounds is essential for correct interpretation of the lesions. Complementary pathological analysis has many interests: differentiation between entrance and exit wounds, estimation of firing distance, differentiation between vital and post mortem wounds and wounds dating. In case of multiple headshots, neuropathological examination can provide arguments for or against suicide. Sampling of gunshot wounds at autopsy must be systematic. Pathological data should be confronted respectively to autopsy and death scene investigation data and also ballistic studies. Forensic pathologist must be aware of the limits of optic microscopy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Reactive microglia drive tau pathology and contribute to the spreading of pathological tau in the brain.

    PubMed

    Maphis, Nicole; Xu, Guixiang; Kokiko-Cochran, Olga N; Jiang, Shanya; Cardona, Astrid; Ransohoff, Richard M; Lamb, Bruce T; Bhaskar, Kiran

    2015-06-01

    Pathological aggregation of tau is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies. We have previously shown that the deficiency of the microglial fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1) led to the acceleration of tau pathology and memory impairment in an hTau mouse model of tauopathy. Here, we show that microglia drive tau pathology in a cell-autonomous manner. First, tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation occur as early as 2 months of age in hTauCx3cr1(-/-) mice. Second, CD45(+) microglial activation correlates with the spatial memory deficit and spread of tau pathology in the anatomically connected regions of the hippocampus. Third, adoptive transfer of purified microglia derived from hTauCx3cr1(-/-) mice induces tau hyperphosphorylation within the brains of non-transgenic recipient mice. Finally, inclusion of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (Kineret®) in the adoptive transfer inoculum significantly reduces microglia-induced tau pathology. Together, our results suggest that reactive microglia are sufficient to drive tau pathology and correlate with the spread of pathological tau in the brain.

  6. Docosahexaenoic acid promotes dopaminergic differentiation in induced pluripotent stem cells and inhibits teratoma formation in rats with Parkinson-like pathology.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yuh-Lih; Chen, Shih-Jen; Kao, Chung-Lan; Hung, Shih-Chieh; Ding, Dah-Ching; Yu, Cheng-Chia; Chen, Yi-Jen; Ku, Hung-Hai; Lin, Chin-Po; Lee, Kun-Hsiung; Chen, Yu-Chih; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Hsu, Chuan-Chih; Chen, Liang-Kung; Li, Hsin-Yang; Chiou, Shih-Hwa

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the degeneration of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the midbrain. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have shown potential for differentiation and may become a resource of functional neurons for the treatment of PD. However, teratoma formation is a major concern for transplantation-based therapies. This study examined whether functional neurons could be efficiently generated from iPS cells using a five-step induction procedure combined with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) treatment. We demonstrated that DHA, a ligand for the RXR/Nurr1 heterodimer, significantly activated expression of the Nurr1 gene and the Nurr1-related pathway in iPS cells. DHA treatment facilitated iPS differentiation into tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons in vitro and in vivo and functionally increased dopamine release in transplanted grafts in PD-like animals. Furthermore, DHA dramatically upregulated the endogenous expression levels of neuroprotective genes (Bcl-2, Bcl-xl, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor) and protected against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced apoptosis in iPS-derived neuronal precursor cells. DHA-treated iPS cells significantly improved the behavior of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-treated PD-like rats compared to control or eicosapentaenoic acid-treated group. Importantly, the in vivo experiment suggests that DHA induces the differentiation of functional dopaminergic precursors and improves the abnormal behavior of 6-OHDA-treated PD-like rats by 4 months after transplantation. Furthermore, we found that DHA treatment in iPS cell-grafted rats significantly downregulated the mRNA expression of embryonic stem cell-specific genes (Oct-4 and c-Myc) in the graft and effectively blocked teratoma formation. Importantly, 3 Tesla-magnetic resonance imaging and ex vivo green fluorescence protein imaging revealed that no teratomas were present

  7. Image management in pathology.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, D S; Doolittle, M

    1996-04-01

    Much of the diagnostic work in pathology, especially surgical pathology and cytology, involves the interpretation of images. Recent advances in digital imaging technologies and telecommunications will allow pathologists to use image-based information in ways that are not possible using conventional glass slides alone. We are entering an age in which image-based information can be more easily and widely shared, both locally and globally. In this article, some of the digital technologies that can allow pathologists to make more effective use of diagnostic images will be discussed.

  8. Reinforcement pathology and obesity.

    PubMed

    Carr, Katelyn A; Daniel, Tinuke Oluyomi; Lin, Henry; Epstein, Leonard H

    2011-09-01

    Obesity is, in part, a result of positive energy balance or energy intake exceeding physiological needs. Excess energy intake is determined by a series of food choices over time. These choices involve both motivational and executive function processes. Problems arise when there is excessive motivation to eat and low impulse control, a situation we have termed reinforcement pathology. Motivational and executive function processes have also been implicated in the development of drug dependence and addiction. In this review we discuss the application of reinforcement pathology to obesity, and implications of this approach for obesity treatment.

  9. Complexity and forensic pathology.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard Martin

    2015-12-01

    It has become increasingly apparent that nonlinearity and complexity are the norm in human physiological systems, the relevance of which is informing an enhanced understanding of basic pathological processes such as inflammation, the host response to severe trauma, and critical illness. This article will explore how an understanding of nonlinear systems and complexity might inform the study of the pathophysiology of deaths of medicolegal interest, and how 'complexity thinking' might usefully be incorporated into modern forensic medicine and forensic pathology research, education and practice.

  10. Subcutaneous liraglutide ameliorates methylglyoxal-induced Alzheimer-like tau pathology and cognitive impairment by modulating tau hyperphosphorylation and glycogen synthase kinase-3β

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Liqin; Chen, Zhou; Wang, Yanping; Liu, Xiaoying; Liu, Xiaohong; Ke, Linfang; Zheng, Zhongjie; Lin, Xiaowei; Zhou, Yu; Wu, Lijuan; Liu, Libin

    2017-01-01

    Memory deterioration and synapse damage with accumulation of β-amyloid and hyperphosphorylated tau are hallmark lesions of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Methylglyoxal (MG), a key intermediate of glucose metabolism, is elevated in AD brains and modifies Aβ42, increasing misfolding and leading to the accumulation of senile plaques. Liraglutide, an analog of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), is neurotrophic and neuroprotective. However, whether liraglutide can protect against AD-like memory-related deficits and tau hyperphosphorylation caused by MG in vivo is not known. Here, we report that MG induces tau hyperphosphorylation and causes ultrastructural hippocampal damage and cognitive impairment in C57BL/6J mice. Liraglutide reduced these effects via activation of the protein kinase B and glycogen synthase kinase-3β pathways. Our data reveal that liraglutide may alleviate AD-like cognitive impairment by decreasing the phosphorylation of tau. PMID:28337257

  11. Acupuncture-induced changes in functional connectivity of the primary somatosensory cortex varied with pathological stages of Bell’s palsy

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaoxuan; Zhu, Yifang; Park, Kyungmo; Mohamed, Abdalla Z.; Wu, Hongli; Xu, Chunsheng; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Linying; Yang, Jun; Qiu, Bensheng

    2014-01-01

    Bell’s palsy is the most common cause of acute facial nerve paralysis. In China, Bell’s palsy is frequently treated with acupuncture. However, its efficacy and underlying mechanism are still controversial. In this study, we used functional MRI to investigate the effect of acupuncture on the functional connectivity of the brain in Bell’s palsy patients and healthy individuals. The patients were further grouped according to disease duration and facial motor performance. The results of resting-state functional MRI connectivity show that acupuncture induces significant connectivity changes in the primary somatosensory region of both early and late recovery groups, but no significant changes in either the healthy control group or the recovered group. In the recovery group, the changes also varied with regions and disease duration. Therefore, we propose that the effect of acupuncture stimulation may depend on the functional connectivity status of patients with Bell’s palsy. PMID:25121624

  12. Immunostimulatory probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 and Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 do not induce pathological inflammation in mouse model of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J S; Gill, H S

    2005-08-15

    The possibility that intestinal microflora contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases has raised issues regarding the safety of probiotic organisms, especially those with immunostimulating properties, in individuals with such immune dysfunctions. In this study, the effect of consumption of probiotic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001(HN001) and Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 (HN019) on the induction and progression of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) was investigated in CBA/CaH (H-2k) mice. HN001 or HN019 in skim milk were fed to mice daily (1-1.5 x 10(8) cfu/mouse/day) for 5 to 9 weeks. A mild form of EAT was induced by subcutaneous injection of mouse thyroglobulin (MTg) with either Freund's adjuvant (complete and incomplete, CFA and IFA) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The proliferative responses of spleen lymphocyte to MTg stimulation in vitro and the presence (and degree) of mononuclear cell infiltration in thyroid gland tissues were examined to assess the development and severity of EAT. The levels of serum anti-MTg antibodies (IgG1 and IgG2a) and spleen weight index were determined to detect the presence of autoimmune responses of mice receiving MTg. Results showed that 8 weeks after immunization, 16.67-50% of the mice developed mild EAT with lymphocyte infiltration in the thyroid glands. Probiotic feeding did not induce full-blown EAT. There were no differences in spleen weight index or the proliferative spleenocytes in response to PMA between mice that received MTg alone and mice that received MTg and probiotic LAB strains.

  13. Vaccination with prion peptide-displaying papillomavirus-like particles induces autoantibodies to normal prion protein that interfere with pathologic prion protein production in infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Handisurya, Alessandra; Gilch, Sabine; Winter, Dorian; Shafti-Keramat, Saeed; Maurer, Dieter; Schätzl, Hermann M.; Kirnbauer, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders caused by proteinaceous infectious pathogens termed prions (PrPSc). To date, there is no prophylaxis or therapy available for these transmissible encephalopathies. Passive immunization with monclonal antibodies recognizing the normal host-encoded prion protein (PrPC) has been reported to abolish PrPSc infectivity and to delay onset of disease. Because of established immunologic tolerance against the widely expressed PrPC, active immunization appears to be difficult to achieve. To overcome this limitation, papillomavirus-like particles were generated that display a nine amino acid B-cell epitope, DWEDRYYRE, of the murine/rat prion protein in an immunogenic capsid surface loop, by insertion into the L1 major capsid protein of bovine papillomavirus type 1. The PrP peptide was selected on the basis of its previously suggested central role in prion pathogenesis. Immunization with PrP–virus-like particles induced high-titer antibodies to PrP in rabbit and in rat, without inducing overt adverse effects. As determined by peptide-specific ELISA, rabbit immune sera recognized the inserted murine/rat epitope and also cross-reacted with the homologous rabbit/human epitope differing in one amino acid residue. In contrast, rat immune sera recognized the murine/rat peptide only. Sera of both species reacted with PrPC in its native conformation in mouse brain and on rat pheochromocytoma cells, as determined by immunoprecipitation and fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis. Importantly, rabbit anti-PrP serum contained high-affinity antibody that inhibited de novo synthesis of PrPSc in prion-infected cells. If also effective in vivo, PrP–virus-like particle vaccination opens a unique possibility for immunologic prevention of currently fatal and incurable pri-on-mediated diseases. PMID:17313482

  14. Vaccination with prion peptide-displaying papillomavirus-like particles induces autoantibodies to normal prion protein that interfere with pathologic prion protein production in infected cells.

    PubMed

    Handisurya, Alessandra; Gilch, Sabine; Winter, Dorian; Shafti-Keramat, Saeed; Maurer, Dieter; Schätzl, Hermann M; Kirnbauer, Reinhard

    2007-04-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders caused by proteinaceous infectious pathogens termed prions (PrP(Sc)). To date, there is no prophylaxis or therapy available for these transmissible encephalopathies. Passive immunization with monclonal antibodies recognizing the normal host-encoded prion protein (PrP(C)) has been reported to abolish PrP(Sc) infectivity and to delay onset of disease. Because of established immunologic tolerance against the widely expressed PrP(C), active immunization appears to be difficult to achieve. To overcome this limitation, papillomavirus-like particles were generated that display a nine amino acid B-cell epitope, DWEDRYYRE, of the murine/rat prion protein in an immunogenic capsid surface loop, by insertion into the L1 major capsid protein of bovine papillomavirus type 1. The PrP peptide was selected on the basis of its previously suggested central role in prion pathogenesis. Immunization with PrP-virus-like particles induced high-titer antibodies to PrP in rabbit and in rat, without inducing overt adverse effects. As determined by peptide-specific ELISA, rabbit immune sera recognized the inserted murine/rat epitope and also cross-reacted with the homologous rabbit/human epitope differing in one amino acid residue. In contrast, rat immune sera recognized the murine/rat peptide only. Sera of both species reacted with PrP(C) in its native conformation in mouse brain and on rat pheochromocytoma cells, as determined by immunoprecipitation and fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis. Importantly, rabbit anti-PrP serum contained high-affinity antibody that inhibited de novo synthesis of PrP(Sc) in prion-infected cells. If also effective in vivo, PrP-virus-like particle vaccination opens a unique possibility for immunologic prevention of currently fatal and incurable prion-mediated diseases.

  15. A requirement for the Vgamma1+ subset of peripheral gammadelta T cells in the control of the systemic growth of Toxoplasma gondii and infection-induced pathology.

    PubMed

    Egan, Charlotte E; Dalton, Jane E; Andrew, Elizabeth M; Smith, Judith E; Gubbels, Marc-Jan; Striepen, Boris; Carding, Simon R

    2005-12-15

    gammadelta T cells are a diverse population of T cells that are widely distributed and are a common feature of pathogen-induced immune responses. It is not clear, however, whether different populations of gammadelta T cells have specific functions, and what factors determine the functional properties of individual populations. A murine model of peroral Toxoplasma gondii infection was used to determine the contribution Vgamma1+ intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) vs systemic Vgamma1+ T cells make to the acute and chronic stages of the host immune response, and whether the macrophage cytocidal activity of Vgamma1+ T cells described in bacterial infections is seen in other, unrelated infectious disease models. In response to oral infection with virulent type 1 or avirulent type II strains of T. gondii, TCR-delta-/- mice rapidly developed severe ileitis. In contrast, in mice deficient in Vgamma1+ T cells and IELs and wild-type mice, inflammation was delayed in onset and less severe. The protective effect of (Vgamma1-) IELs to Toxoplasma infection was unrelated to their cytolytic and cytokine (Th1)-producing capabilities. Systemic Vgamma1+ T cells were shown to play an essential role in limiting parasite growth and inflammation in peripheral tissues and, in particular, in the CNS, that was associated with their ability to efficiently kill parasite-elicited and infected macrophages. These findings suggest that macrophage cytocidal activity of Vgamma1+ T cells may be a universal feature of pathogen-induced immune responses and that microenvironmental factors influence the involvement and function of gammadelta T cells in the host response to infection.

  16. Pathological Gambling Subtypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vachon, David D.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Although pathological gambling (PG) is regarded in the 4th edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (American Psychiatric Association, 1994) as a unitary diagnostic construct, it is likely composed of distinct subtypes. In the current report, the authors used cluster analyses of personality traits with a…

  17. Pathology of hereditary nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, V. V.

    1968-01-01

    This report describes the renal pathology in three siblings with hereditary nephritis. All three cases showed combined features of chronic glomerulonephritis, pyelonephritis, and interstitial nephritis. Foam cells were seen in only one case. These findings support the contention of Krickstein, Gloor, and Balogh (1966) that the renal changes in hereditary nephritis are those of a mixed nephritis. Images PMID:5717545

  18. Next-Generation Pathology.

    PubMed

    Caie, Peter D; Harrison, David J

    2016-01-01

    The field of pathology is rapidly transforming from a semiquantitative and empirical science toward a big data discipline. Large data sets from across multiple omics fields may now be extracted from a patient's tissue sample. Tissue is, however, complex, heterogeneous, and prone to artifact. A reductionist view of tissue and disease progression, which does not take this complexity into account, may lead to single biomarkers failing in clinical trials. The integration of standardized multi-omics big data and the retention of valuable information on spatial heterogeneity are imperative to model complex disease mechanisms. Mathematical modeling through systems pathology approaches is the ideal medium to distill the significant information from these large, multi-parametric, and hierarchical data sets. Systems pathology may also predict the dynamical response of disease progression or response to therapy regimens from a static tissue sample. Next-generation pathology will incorporate big data with systems medicine in order to personalize clinical practice for both prognostic and predictive patient care.

  19. Applied pathology for radiographers

    SciTech Connect

    Laudicina, P.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents a basic text for the student of radiologic sciences. It includes most of the pathology recommended by the ASRT Curriculum Guide. Radiographic technique and positioning are examined when relevant to obtaining quality radiographs of specific disease conditions. Brief overviews of these conditions include background etiology, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. Many illustrations are included to enhance understanding.

  20. Pathological Gambling Subtypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vachon, David D.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Although pathological gambling (PG) is regarded in the 4th edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (American Psychiatric Association, 1994) as a unitary diagnostic construct, it is likely composed of distinct subtypes. In the current report, the authors used cluster analyses of personality traits with a…

  1. Pathology of Extranodal Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Heckendorn, Emily; Auerbach, Aaron

    2016-07-01

    An overview of the pathology of extranodal lymphoma is presented. The emphasis of this presentation is on the classification system of extranodal lymphomas, including both B-cell and T-cell lymphomas, based on their morphology, phenotype, and molecular alterations.

  2. Human, viral or mutant human IL-10 expressed after local adenovirus-mediated gene transfer are equally effective in ameliorating disease pathology in a rabbit knee model of antigen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Keravala, Annahita; Lechman, Eric R; Nash, Joan; Mi, Zhibao; Robbins, Paul D

    2006-01-01

    IL-10 is a Th2 cytokine important for inhibiting cell-mediated immunity while promoting humoral responses. Human IL-10 (hIL-10) has anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive as well as immunostimulatory characteristics, whereas viral IL-10 (vIL-10), a homologue of hIL-10 encoded by Epstein Barr virus (EBV), lacks several immunostimulatory functions. The immunostimulatory characteristic of hIL-10 has been attributed to a single amino acid, isoleucine at position 87, which in vIL-10 is alanine. A mutant hIL-10 in which isoleucine has been substituted (mut.hIL-10) is biologically active with only immunosuppressive, but not immunostimulatory, functions, making it a potentially superior therapeutic for inflammatory diseases. To compare the efficacy of mut.hIL-10 with hIL-10 and vIL-10 in blocking the progression of rheumatoid arthritis, we used replication defective adenoviral vectors to deliver intra-articularly the gene encoding hIL-10, vIL-10 or mut.hIL-10 to antigen-induced arthritic (AIA) knee joints in rabbits. Intra-articular expression of hIL-10, vIL-10, and mut.hIL-10 resulted in significant improvement of the pathology in the treated joints to similar levels. These observed changes included a significant reduction in intra-articular leukocytosis and the degree of synovitis, as well as normalization of cartilage matrix metabolism. Our results suggest that hIL-10, vIL-10, and mut.hIL-10 are all equally therapeutic in the rabbit AIA model for treating disease pathology.

  3. Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor is required for amyloid pathology in brain endothelial cells induced by Glycoprotein 120, methamphetamine and nicotine

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liqun; Yu, Jingyi; Li, Li; Zhang, Bao; Liu, Lingjuan; Wu, Chun-Hua; Jong, Ambrose; Mao, Ding-An; Huang, Sheng-He

    2017-01-01

    One of the most challenging issues in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) caused by HIV-1 virotoxins and drug abuse is the lack of understanding the underlying mechanisms that are commonly associated with disorders of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which mainly consists of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC). Here, we hypothesized that Glycoprotein 120 (gp120), methamphetamine (METH) and nicotine (NT) can enhance amyloid-beta (Aβ) accumulation in BMEC through Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR). Both in vitro (human BMEC) (HBMEC) and in vivo (mice) models of BBB were used to dissect the role of α7 nAChR in up-regulation of Aβ induced by gp120, METH and NT. Aβ release from and transport across HBMEC were significantly increased by these factors. Methyllycaconitine (MLA), an antagonist of α7 nAChR, could efficiently block these pathogenic effects. Furthermore, our animal data showed that these factors could significantly increase the levels of Aβ, Tau and Ubiquitin C-Terminal Hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) in mouse cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and Aβ in the mouse brains. These pathogenicities were significantly reduced by MLA, suggesting that α7 nAChR may play an important role in neuropathology caused by gp120, METH and NT, which are the major pathogenic factors contributing to the pathogenesis of HAND. PMID:28074940

  4. Time-Dependent, HIV-Tat-Induced Perturbation of Human Neurons In Vitro: Towards a Model for the Molecular Pathology of HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gurwitz, Kim T.; Burman, Richard J.; Murugan, Brandon D.; Garnett, Shaun; Ganief, Tariq; Soares, Nelson C.; Raimondo, Joseph V.; Blackburn, Jonathan M.

    2017-01-01

    A significant proportion of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV)-positive individuals are affected by the cognitive, motor and behavioral dysfunction that characterizes HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). While the molecular etiology of HAND remains largely uncharacterized, HIV transactivator of transcription (HIV-Tat) is thought to be an important etiological cause. Here we have used mass spectrometry (MS)-based discovery proteomics to identify the quantitative, cell-wide changes that occur when non-transformed, differentiated human neurons are treated with HIV-Tat over time. We identified over 4000 protein groups (false discovery rate <0.01) in this system with 131, 118 and 45 protein groups differentially expressed at 6, 24 and 48 h post treatment, respectively. Alterations in the expression of proteins involved in gene expression and cytoskeletal maintenance were particularly evident. In tandem with proteomic evidence of cytoskeletal dysregulation we observed HIV-Tat induced functional alterations, including a reduction of neuronal intrinsic excitability as assessed by patch-clamp electrophysiology. Our findings may be relevant for understanding in vivo molecular mechanisms in HAND. PMID:28611588

  5. The Class 6 Semaphorin SEMA6A Is Induced by Interferon-γ and Defines an Activation Status of Langerhans Cells Observed in Pathological Situations

    PubMed Central

    Gautier, Gregory; de Saint-Vis, Blandine; Sénéchal, Brigitte; Pin, Jean-Jacques; Bates, Elizabeth E.M.; Caux, Christophe; Geissmann, Frédéric; Garrone, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Originally implicated in axon guidance, semaphorins represent a large family of molecules that are now known to be expressed in the immune system. Among different semaphorins tested by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in human immune cells, the expression of class 6 transmembrane semaphorin SEMA6A was restricted to dendritic cells (DCs). Using in-house generated monoclonal antibodies, SEMA6A expression appeared further restricted to Langerhans cells (LCs). In vivo, SEMA6A mRNA was expressed in freshly isolated skin LCs but SEMA6A protein was not detectable on normal skin and tonsillar epithelium. Of interest, SEMA6A protein was strongly expressed on skin and bone LCs and on LCs in draining lymph nodes from patients with LC histiocytosis or dermatopathic lymphadenitis, respectively, representing two inflammatory conditions in which LCs display an immature DC-LAMPlow, CD83low, and CCR7+ phenotype. SEMA6A expression was low in resting LCs generated in vitro and was enhanced by interferon (IFN)-γ but not by interleukin-4, interleukin-10, IFN-α/β, or lipopolysaccharide. Most IFN-γ-induced SEMA6A-positive cells remained immature with low CD83 and DC-LAMP/CD208 expression, but they expressed CCR7 and responded to macrophage inflammatory protein-3β (MIP-3β/CCL19). The expression of SEMA6A, for which the ligand and function remain unknown, may therefore identify an alternative IFN-γ-dependent activation status of LCs in vivo. PMID:16436660

  6. Tannoid principles of Emblica officinalis renovate cognitive deficits and attenuate amyloid pathologies against aluminum chloride induced rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Justin Thenmozhi, Arokiasamy; Dhivyabharathi, Mathiyazahan; William Raja, Tharsius Raja; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    Emblica officinalis is mentioned as a maharasayana in many Ayurvedic texts and promotes intelligence, memory, freedom from disease, longevity, and strength of the senses. The present study has been designed to explore the memory-enhancing effect of the tannoid principles of E. officinalis (EoT) at the biochemical, anatomical, behavioral, and molecular levels against aluminum chloride (AlCl3) induced Alzheimer's disease (AD) in rats. Aluminum is reported to have an important role in the etiology, pathogenesis, and development of AD. Male Wistar rats were divided into control, AlCl3 treated, AlCl3 and EoT (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg bw) co-treated, and EoT (200 mg/kg bw) alone treated groups. In control and experimental rats, behavior tests including water maze and open field test, estimation of aluminum, assay of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, and expression of amyloidogenic proteins were performed. Intraperitonial injection of AlCl3 (100 mg/kg bw) for 60 days significantly elevated the concentration of aluminum (Al), activity of AChE and protein expressions of amyloid precursor protein, A-beta1-42, beta-, and gamma-secretases as compared to control group in hippocampus and cortex. Co-administration of EoT orally to AlCl3 rats for 60 days significantly revert back the Al concentration, AChE activity, and A-beta synthesis-related molecules in the studied brain regions. The spatial learning, memory, and locomotor impairments observed in AlCl3 treated rats were significantly attenuated by EoT. Therefore, EoT may be a promising therapy in ameliorating neurotoxicity of aluminum, however further studies are warranted to elucidate the exact mechanism of action of EoT.

  7. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-induced change in intestinal function and pathology: evidence for the involvement of arylhydrocarbon receptor-mediated alteration of glucose transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Takumi; Kan-o, Shoko; Mutoh, Junpei; Takeda, Shuso; Ishii, Yuji; Hashiguchi, Isamu; Akamine, Akifumi; Yamada, Hideyuki . E-mail: yamada@xenoba.phar.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2005-05-15

    Although numerous studies have been performed to clarify the mechanism(s) underlying the toxicological responses induced by dioxins, their effect on the intestine is less well understood. To address this issue, we examined the effect of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on the pathology and function of the intestine in arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-sensitive (C57BL/6J) and -less-sensitive (DBA/2J) mice. A single oral administration of TCDD (100 {mu}g/kg) to C57BL/6J mice produced changes in villous structure and nuclear/cytoplasm ratio in the epithelial cells of the intestine. Furthermore, in an oral glucose tolerance test, the serum glucose level was significantly increased in the C57BL/6J mouse but not in the DBA/2J mouse by TCDD treatment. In agreement with this, the expression of intestinal mRNAs coding sodium-glucose co-transporter 1 (SGLT1) and glucose transporter type 2 were increased only in C57BL/6J mice by TCDD. The increase in the former transporter was also confirmed from its protein level. The glucose level in the intestinal contents is thought to be one of the factors contributing to SGLT1 induction. Concerning with this, the intestinal activity of sucrase and lactase was significantly increased only in C57BL/6J mice by TCDD. These results suggest that while TCDD produces initial damage to the intestinal epithelium, the tissues induce SGLT1 to facilitate the absorption of glucose, which is expected, at least partially, to combat the wasting syndrome induced by TCDD. The data provided here also suggest that AhR is involved in the mechanism of SGLT1 induction.

  8. Pathologic pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Debra; Dhall, Deepti; Yu, Run

    2011-01-01

    Pathologic hyperplasia of various pancreatic endocrine cells is rare but has been long known. β cell hyperplasia contributes to persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy, which is commonly caused by mutations in the islet ATP-sensitive potassium channel, and to non-insulinoma pancreatogenous hypoglycemia in adults, which may or may not be associated with bariatric surgery. α cell hyperplasia may cause glucagonoma syndrome or induce pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. An inactivating mutation of the glucagon receptor causes α cell hyperplasia and asymptomatic hyperglucagonemia. Pancreatic polypeptide cell hyperplasia has been described without a clearly-characterized clinical syndrome and hyperplasia of other endocrine cells inside the pancreas has not been reported to our knowledge. Based on morphological evidence, the main pathogenetic mechanism for pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia is increased endocrine cell neogenesis from exocrine ductal epithelium. Pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia should be considered in the diagnosis and management of hypoglycemia, elevated islet hormone levels, and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Further studies of pathologic pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia will likely yield insights into the pathogenesis and treatment of diabetes and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:21245985

  9. Validation: the new challenge for pathology.

    PubMed

    Cardiff, Robert D; Rosner, Andrea; Hogarth, Michael A; Galvez, Jose J; Borowsky, Alexander D; Gregg, Jeffrey P

    2004-01-01

    Modern pathologists have been challenged to "validate" mouse models of human cancer. Validation requires matching of morphological attributes of the model to human disease. Computers can assist in the validation process. However, adequate controlled, computer-readable vocabularies that can match terms do not currently exist in mouse pathology. Further, current standard diagnostic terminologies do not include the new concepts discussed here such as pathway pathology and mammary intraepithelial neoplasia. The terminologies must be revised and improved to meet the challenge. Human medicine has traditionally used "guilt-by-association" to validate interpretations of disease. Experimental pathology uses experimental verification exemplified by "test-by-transplantation." Genetically Engineered Mice (GEM) develop unique tumor phenotypes bringing new structural-functional insights and reevaluation of concepts. Novel GEM-related tumors appear in all organ systems but mouse models of human breast cancer are prototypes. For example, mammary tumors induced by Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV), chemical, radiation or other carcinogenic stimuli have limited phenotypes. These "spontaneous" or induced mammary tumors have never resembled human breast cancers. GEM tumors created with genes associated with human cancer are strikingly different. GEM tumors have unique histological phenotypes. Depending on the genes, the tumors may: 1) resemble MMTV-induced tumors, 2) display "signature" phenotypes, and 3) mimic human breast cancers. The phenotypes can be placed into structural and functional clusters with shared characteristics leading to the concepts of Pathway Pathology: tumor phenotype reflects the genotype.

  10. Attenuation of cold stress-induced exacerbation of cardiac and adipose tissue pathology and metabolic disorders in a rat model of metabolic syndrome by the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU486

    PubMed Central

    Nagasawa, K; Matsuura, N; Takeshita, Y; Ito, S; Sano, Y; Yamada, Y; Uchinaka, A; Murohara, T; Nagata, K

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Chronic stress affects the central nervous system as well as endocrine, metabolic and immune systems. However, the effects of cold stress on cardiovascular and metabolic disorders in metabolic syndrome (MetS) have remained unclear. We recently characterized DahlS.Z-Leprfa/Leprfa (DS/obese) rats, derived from a cross between Dahl salt-sensitive and Zucker rats, as a new animal model of MetS. We have now investigated the effects of chronic cold stress and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) blockade on cardiac and adipose tissue pathology as well as on metabolic parameters in this model. Methods: DS/obese rats were exposed to cold stress (immersion in ice-cold water to a depth of 1–2 cm for 2 h per day) with or without subcutaneous injection of the GR antagonist RU486 (2 mg kg−1day−1) for 4 weeks beginning at 9 weeks of age. Age-matched homozygous lean (DahlS.Z-Lepr+/Lepr+) littermates served as a control. Results: Chronic cold stress exacerbated hypertension as well as left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction in DS/obese rats in a manner sensitive to RU486 treatment. Cold stress with or without RU486 did not affect body weight or fat mass. In contrast, cold stress further increased cardiac oxidative stress as well as macrophage infiltration and proinflammatory gene expression in LV and visceral fat tissue, with all of these effects being attenuated by RU486. Cold stress also further increased GR and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 mRNA and protein abundance in LV and visceral adipose tissue, and these effects were again inhibited by RU486. In addition, RU486 ameliorated the stress-induced aggravation of dyslipidemia, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in DS/obese rats. Conclusions: Our results implicate GR signaling in cold stress-induced exacerbation of cardiac and adipose tissue pathology as well as of abnormal glucose and lipid metabolism in a rat model of MetS. PMID:27110688

  11. Defining error in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Sirota, Ronald L

    2006-05-01

    Although much has been said and written about medical error and about error in pathology since the publication of the Institute of Medicine's report on medical error in 1999, precise definitions of what constitutes error in anatomic pathology do not exist for the specialty. Without better definitions, it is impossible to accurately judge errors in pathology. The lack of standardized definitions has implications for patient care and for the legal judgment of malpractice. To review the goals of anatomic pathology, to discuss the problems inherent in applying these goals to the judgment of error in pathology, to offer definitions of major and minor errors in pathology, and to discuss error in anatomic pathology in relation to the classic laboratory test cycle. Existing literature. Definitions for major and minor error in anatomic pathology are proffered, and anatomic pathology error is characterized in the classic test cycle.

  12. Pathology informatics fellowship training: Focus on molecular pathology

    PubMed Central

    Mandelker, Diana; Lee, Roy E.; Platt, Mia Y.; Riedlinger, Gregory; Quinn, Andrew; Rao, Luigi K. F.; Klepeis, Veronica E.; Mahowald, Michael; Lane, William J.; Beckwith, Bruce A.; Baron, Jason M.; McClintock, David S.; Kuo, Frank C.; Lebo, Matthew S.; Gilbertson, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pathology informatics is both emerging as a distinct subspecialty and simultaneously becoming deeply integrated within the breadth of pathology practice. As specialists, pathology informaticians need a broad skill set, including aptitude with information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management. Currently, many of those seeking training in pathology informatics additionally choose training in a second subspecialty. Combining pathology informatics training with molecular pathology is a natural extension, as molecular pathology is a subspecialty with high potential for application of modern biomedical informatics techniques. Methods and Results: Pathology informatics and molecular pathology fellows and faculty evaluated the current fellowship program's core curriculum topics and subtopics for relevance to molecular pathology. By focusing on the overlap between the two disciplines, a structured curriculum consisting of didactics, operational rotations, and research projects was developed for those fellows interested in both pathology informatics and molecular pathology. Conclusions: The scope of molecular diagnostics is expanding dramatically as technology advances and our understanding of disease extends to the genetic level. Here, we highlight many of the informatics challenges facing molecular pathology today, and outline specific informatics principles necessary for the training of future molecular pathologists. PMID:24843823

  13. [Molecular diagnostics in pathology].

    PubMed

    Stenzinger, A; Penzel, R; Endris, V; Weichert, W

    2013-05-01

    Tissue-based molecular diagnostics is a fast growing diagnostic field, which already complements morphologic classifications in many cases. Pathology based molecular diagnosis is performed almost exclusively on paraffin embedded material and always in conjunction with histopathology. Besides the classic field of tissue based detection of pathogenic organisms such as bacteria, viruses and fungi, molecular diagnostics of tumor tissue is one of the current hot topics in oncology. In this context the detection of predictive molecular biomarkers, such as specific mutations, allows patient stratification for individually tailored treatment strategies and thereby is one of the key components of individualized patient care in oncology. The rapidly growing number of clinically relevant predictive biomarkers together with impressive technical advances, specifically the development of massive parallel sequencing, will modify the care of patients with malignant diseases. Pathology, therefore, has returned in the very center of interdisciplinary patient care.

  14. The pathology of paraphrenia.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Manuel F

    2010-06-01

    The term paraphrenia refers to a condition characterized by a strong delusional component with preservation of thought and personality. Most affected patients are women. Although a late age at onset (> 60 years) has been proposed in the literature, evidence for this assertion remains debatable. Deterioration of cognitive functions occurs very slowly but may lead to mild dementia over a period of years. Pathological studies indicate the presence of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), primarily within the entorhinal cortex. Compared with the severity of neuritic changes, amyloid deposition remains scant. Pyramidal cells affected by NFTs appear to be preserved. Both the clinical history and neuropathology of paraphrenia are similar to those aspects described for NFT-predominant senile dementia. Risk factors, including organic lesions, may precipitate an earlier onset of symptomatology in patients exhibiting this pathology. Many of the symptoms in paraphrenia can be explained by involvement of the entorhinal cortex.

  15. [Pathological gambling: risk factors].

    PubMed

    Bouju, G; Grall-Bronnec, M; Landreat-Guillou, M; Venisse, J-L

    2011-09-01

    In France, consumption of gambling games increased by 148% between 1960 and 2005. In 2004, gamblers lost approximately 0.9% of household income, compared to 0.4% in 1960. This represents approximately 134 Euros per year and per head. In spite of this important increase, the level remains lower than the European average (1%). However, gambling practices may continue to escalate in France in the next few years, particularly with the recent announce of the legalisation of online games and sports betting. With the spread of legalised gambling, pathological gambling rates may increase in France in the next years, in response to more widely available and more attractive gambling opportunities. In this context, there is a need for better understanding of the risk factors that are implicated in the development and maintenance of pathological gambling. This paper briefly describes the major risk factors for pathological gambling by examining the recent published literature available during the first quarter of 2008. This documentary basis was collected by Inserm for the collective expert report procedure on Gambling (contexts and addictions). Seventy-two articles focusing on risk factors for pathological gambling were considered in this review. Only 47 of them were taken into account for analysis. The selection of these 47 publications was based on the guide on literature analysis established by the French National Agency for Accreditation and Assessment in Health (ANAES, 2000). Some publications from more recent literature have also been added, mostly about Internet gambling. We identify three major types of risk factors implicated in gambling problems: some of them are related to the subject (individual factors), others are related to the object of the addiction, here the gambling activity by itself (structural factors), and the last are related to environment (contextual or situational factors). Thus, the development and maintenance of pathological gambling seems to be

  16. [Czech eponyms in pathology].

    PubMed

    Steiner, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    The 24th European Congress of Pathology taking place in Prague is an opportunity to remind our society of the Czech names appearing as eponyms in pathological terminology: Karel Rokitanský - R. protuberance in dermoid cyst; R. thrombogenic theory of atherosclerosis; Mayer - R. - Küster - Hauser - Winckel syndrome (congenital malformation of the vagina and uterus); Václav Treitz - T. duodenal ligament; T. retroperitoneal hernia; T. uremic colitis; Vilém Dušan Lambl - L. excrescences of heart valves; Lamblia (Giardia) intestinalis, and also the foundation of urological cytology; Stanislav Provázek - Prowazek - Halberstädter bodies (trachoma), Rickettsia Prowazeki (typhus fever); Josef Vaněk - V. tumor (gastric inflammatory fibroid polyp), and also discovery of the etiology of pneumocystic pneumonia; Otto Jírovec - Pneumocystis Jiroveci; Blahoslav Bednář - B. tumor (pigmented dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans).

  17. Envy's pathology: Historical contexts.

    PubMed

    Minou, Lina

    2017-01-01

    This article is concerned with the physicality of envy primarily in early -modern, but also in eighteenth-century health contexts. The discussion brings together descriptions of the effects of envy on the body of the envier, mainly from works of physiology and health preservation, but also from literary and spiritual writings. These depictions of envy are studied beyond their symbolism and with a view to establish whether they are meaningful according to the medical theories of the time in which they occur. The discussion begins by acknowledging the status of envy as a 'disease' and looks to the specific ways in which the discourse of envy conveys this sense. I find that in the early modern discourse envy is always pathological, that is, it is experienced as disease and signifies disease in general and several diseases in particular. Moreover, envy is uniquely placed to convey pathology on account of its being connected to inherently pathogenic elements of the humoural theory. Specifically, envy is physiologically connected to melancholy, and the way it is presented comes close to attributes assigned to black bile. In addition, envy realizes pathology, the occurrence of disease in the body, by impairing the vital process of digestion and thus depriving the person from proper nourishment and sustenance. The analysis further considers how this impairment of the body fits with the physiological manifestation of envy as 'corrosion' and 'consumption'. Finding commonalities with other maladies mediated by these physiological signs the article concludes by considering the function of pathology in the conception of early modern envy.

  18. Envy's pathology: Historical contexts

    PubMed Central

    Minou, Lina

    2017-01-01

    This article is concerned with the physicality of envy primarily in early –modern, but also in eighteenth-century health contexts. The discussion brings together descriptions of the effects of envy on the body of the envier, mainly from works of physiology and health preservation, but also from literary and spiritual writings. These depictions of envy are studied beyond their symbolism and with a view to establish whether they are meaningful according to the medical theories of the time in which they occur. The discussion begins by acknowledging the status of envy as a ‘disease’ and looks to the specific ways in which the discourse of envy conveys this sense. I find that in the early modern discourse envy is always pathological, that is, it is experienced as disease and signifies disease in general and several diseases in particular. Moreover, envy is uniquely placed to convey pathology on account of its being connected to inherently pathogenic elements of the humoural theory. Specifically, envy is physiologically connected to melancholy, and the way it is presented comes close to attributes assigned to black bile. In addition, envy realizes pathology, the occurrence of disease in the body, by impairing the vital process of digestion and thus depriving the person from proper nourishment and sustenance. The analysis further considers how this impairment of the body fits with the physiological manifestation of envy as ‘corrosion’ and ‘consumption’. Finding commonalities with other maladies mediated by these physiological signs the article concludes by considering the function of pathology in the conception of early modern envy. PMID:28748219

  19. Mutant copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) induces protein secretion pathway alterations and exosome release in astrocytes: implications for disease spreading and motor neuron pathology in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Basso, Manuela; Pozzi, Silvia; Tortarolo, Massimo; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Bisighini, Cinzia; Pasetto, Laura; Spaltro, Gabriella; Lidonnici, Dario; Gensano, Francesco; Battaglia, Elisa; Bendotti, Caterina; Bonetto, Valentina

    2013-05-31

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is the most common motor neuron disease and is still incurable. The mechanisms leading to the selective motor neuron vulnerability are still not known. The interplay between motor neurons and astrocytes is crucial in the outcome of the disease. We show that mutant copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) overexpression in primary astrocyte cultures is associated with decreased levels of proteins involved in secretory pathways. This is linked to a general reduction of total secreted proteins, except for specific enrichment in a number of proteins in the media, such as mutant SOD1 and valosin-containing protein (VCP)/p97. Because there was also an increase in exosome release, we can deduce that astrocytes expressing mutant SOD1 activate unconventional secretory pathways, possibly as a protective mechanism. This may help limit the formation of intracellular aggregates and overcome mutant SOD1 toxicity. We also found that astrocyte-derived exosomes efficiently transfer mutant SOD1 to spinal neurons and induce selective motor neuron death. We conclude that the expression of mutant SOD1 has a substantial impact on astrocyte protein secretion pathways, contributing to motor neuron pathology and disease spread.

  20. From the Cover: Aloin, a Component of the Aloe Vera Plant Leaf, Induces Pathological Changes and Modulates the Composition of Microbiota in the Large Intestines of F344/N Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Boudreau, Mary D; Olson, Greg R; Tryndyak, Volodymyr P; Bryant, Matthew S; Felton, Robert P; Beland, Frederick A

    2017-08-01

    In a previous study, the oral administration of an Aloe vera whole leaf extract induced dose-related mucosal and goblet cell hyperplasia in the rat colon after 13 weeks and colon cancer after 2 years. The primary goal of this study was to determine whether or not the administration of aloin, a component of the Aloe vera plant leaf, would replicate the pathophysiological effects that were observed in rats in the previous study with an Aloe vera whole leaf extract. Groups of 10 male F344/N rats were administered aloin at 0, 6.95, 13.9, 27.8, 55.7, 111, 223, and 446 mg/kg drinking water for 13 weeks. At the end of study, rat feces were collected, and the composition of fecal bacteria was investigated by next generation sequencing of the PCR-amplified V3/V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene. At necropsy, blood was collected by cardiac puncture and organs and sections of the large intestine were collected for histopathology. Aloin induced dose-related increased incidences and severities of mucosal and goblet cell hyperplasia that extended from the cecum to the rectum, with increased incidences and severities detected at aloin doses ≥55.7 mg/kg drinking water. Analysis of the 16S rRNA metagenomics sequencing data revealed marked shifts in the structure of the gut microbiota in aloin-treated rats at each taxonomic rank. This study highlights the similarities in effects observed for aloin and the Aloe vera whole leaf extract, and points to a potential mechanism of action to explain the observed pathological changes via modulation of the gut microbiota composition. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  1. American Society for Clinical Pathology

    MedlinePlus

    ... ASCP Selects ArborMetrix to Drive Patient-Centric National Pathology Quality Registry ePolicy News August 2017 July 2017 ... Measure Copyright © 2017 by American Society for Clinical Pathology. All Rights Reserved. Terms of Use About ASCP ...

  2. Tripartite motif 32 prevents pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lijuan; Huang, Jia; Ji, Yanxiao; Zhang, Xiaojing; Wang, Pixiao; Deng, Keqiong; Jiang, Xi; Ma, Genshan; Li, Hongliang

    2016-05-01

    TRIM32 (tripartite motif 32) is widely accepted to be an E3 ligase that interacts with and eventually ubiquitylates multiple substrates. TRIM32 mutants have been associated with LGMD-2H (limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2H). However, whether TRIM32 is involved in cardiac hypertrophy induced by biomechanical stresses and neurohumoral mediators remains unclear. We generated mice and isolated NRCMs (neonatal rat cardiomyocytes) that overexpressed or were deficient in TRIM32 to investigate the effect of TRIM32 on AB (aortic banding) or AngII (angiotensin II)-mediated cardiac hypertrophy. Echocardiography and both pathological and molecular analyses were used to determine the extent of cardiac hypertrophy and subsequent fibrosis. Our results showed that overexpression of TRIM32 in the heart significantly alleviated the hypertrophic response induced by pressure overload, whereas TRIM32 deficiency dramatically aggravated pathological cardiac remodelling. Similar results were also found in cultured NRCMs incubated with AngII. Mechanistically, the present study suggests that TRIM32 exerts cardioprotective action by interruption of Akt- but not MAPK (mitogen-dependent protein kinase)-dependent signalling pathways. Additionally, inactivation of Akt by LY294002 offset the exacerbated hypertrophic response induced by AB in TRIM32-deficient mice. In conclusion, the present study indicates that TRIM32 plays a protective role in AB-induced pathological cardiac remodelling by blocking Akt-dependent signalling. Therefore TRIM32 could be a novel therapeutic target for the prevention of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. © 2016 The Author(s).

  3. Pathology Gross Photography: The Beginning of Digital Pathology.

    PubMed

    Rampy, B Alan; Glassy, Eric F

    2015-06-01

    The underutilized practice of photographing anatomic pathology specimens from surgical pathology and autopsies is an invaluable benefit to patients, clinicians, pathologists, and students. Photographic documentation of clinical specimens is essential for the effective practice of pathology. When considering what specimens to photograph, all grossly evident pathology, absent yet expected pathologic features, and gross-only specimens should be thoroughly documented. Specimen preparation prior to photography includes proper lighting and background, wiping surfaces of blood, removing material such as tubes or bandages, orienting the specimen in a logical fashion, framing the specimen to fill the screen, positioning of probes, and using the right-sized scale. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Types of pathological gamblers].

    PubMed

    Balázs, Hedvig; Kun, Bernadette; Demetrovics, Zsolt

    2009-01-01

    Beginning with the end of the total and later on the partial state ban on gambling in Hungary, an increasingly intensive revival of gambling can be observed together with a widening scope of offers. Parallel to the growing popularity of controlled, social and recreational forms of gambling, the spread of excessive, problematic and pathological gambling requiring therapeutic intervention is also present. Both from the perspective of research and clinical practice the following questions are raised. Whether there exist subtypes of problematic or pathological gamblers with specific personality characteristics and therefore needs for specific types of treatment, and if it is worth differentiating between gamblers according to their preferences towards specific types of gambling. One stream of research with the objective of finding subtypes of gambling examines pathological gamblers in general, independent of their gambling preferences. These authors describe subgroups with typical psychological characteristics and they present various possible functions of gambling. On the other hand, data is available supporting that persons with unlike dominant preferences towards different types of gambling can be characterized by dissimilar demographic and psychological indices as well. Authors in these studies present typologies created according to various different aspects in details. Based on studies aiming to create a typology of gambling addicted patients and discover their motives, we can assume that the escape gambler and the impulsive gambler types can most unequivocally be differentiated. Besides these, studies suggest the existence of two other types of gamblers; normal and ones seeking the experience of dissociation. On the personality characteristics of gamblers playing specific types of games, however, there is little data available yet.

  5. Pathologic and physiologic phimosis

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Thomas B.; Pike, John G.; Leonard, Michael P.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review the differences between physiologic and pathologic phimosis, review proper foreskin care, and discuss when it is appropriate to seek consultation regarding a phimotic foreskin. SOURCES OF INFORMATION This paper is based on selected findings from a MEDLINE search for literature on phimosis and circumcision referrals and on our experience at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Urology Clinic. MeSH headings used in our MEDLINE search included “phimosis,” “referral and consultation,” and “circumcision.” Most of the available articles about phimosis and foreskin referrals were retrospective reviews and cohort studies (levels II and III evidence). MAIN MESSAGE Phimosis is defined as the inability to retract the foreskin. Differentiating between physiologic and pathologic phimosis is important, as the former is managed conservatively and the latter requires surgical intervention. Great anxiety exists among patients and parentsregarding non-retractile foreskins. Most phimosis referrals seen in pediatric urology clinics are normal physiologically phimotic foreskins. Referrals of patients with physiologic phimosis to urology clinics can create anxiety about the need for surgery among patients and parents, while unnecessarily expanding the waiting list for specialty assessment. Uncircumcised penises require no special care. With normal washing, using soap and water, and gentle retraction during urination and bathing, most foreskins will become retractile over time. CONCLUSION Physiologic phimosis is often seen by family physicians. These patients and their parents require reassurance of normalcy and reinforcement of proper preputial hygiene. Consultation should be sought when evidence of pathologic phimosis is present, as this requires surgical management. PMID:17872680

  6. Thumb ultrasound: Technique and pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jatinder P; Kumar, Shwetam; Kathiria, Atman V; Harjai, Rachit; Jawed, Akram; Gupta, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is ideally suited for the assessment of complex anatomy and pathologies of the thumb. Focused and dynamic thumb ultrasound can provide a rapid real-time diagnosis and can be used for guided treatment in certain clinical situations. We present a simplified approach to scanning technique for thumb-related pathologies and illustrate a spectrum of common and uncommon pathologies encountered. PMID:27857468

  7. Formaldehyde in pathology departments.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, R P

    1983-01-01

    Toxic effects of formaldehyde in humans are discussed in relation to occupational exposure and tolerance to this agent. Carcinogenic and mutagenic properties of formaldehyde have been reported in animals and this has led to concern about a possible role in human cancer. The current state of affairs is reviewed in the light of a lack of direct evidence linking formaldehyde with cancer in man and in relation to recommended exposure levels. It is important to employ effective means of containment and practical methods for reducing exposure to formaldehyde in pathology departments and post-mortem rooms are described. Images PMID:6223948

  8. Eye pathologies in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Mansoor, Nyaish; Mansoor, Tihami; Ahmed, Mansoor

    2016-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, newborn assessment incorporates a screening eye examination for any structural abnormalities, observation of neonate's visual behaviour and direct ophthalmoscopy examination looking for red reflex. Early identification and immediate management of eye related pathologies should commence soon after birth as early diagnosis and prompt intervention may have significant impact on the prognosis for many potentially blinding but treatable disorders such as congenital cataracts and retinoblastoma. If left undetected and untreated, such problems may potentially lead to irreversible damage to the vision which persists into adulthood resulting in lack of self-confidence together with difficulties in educational attainment and job opportunities. PMID:28003988

  9. Marketing the pathology practice.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, E N

    1995-07-01

    Effective marketing of the pathology practice is essential in the face of an increasingly competitive market. Successful marketing begins with a market-driven planning process. As opposed to the traditional planning process used in health care organizations, a market-driven approach is externally driven. Implementing a market-driven plan also requires recognition of the definition of the service. Each market to which pathologists direct their service defines the service differently. Recognition of these different service definitions and creation of a product to meet these needs could lead to competitive advantages in the marketplace.

  10. [Benchmarking in pathological anatomy].

    PubMed

    Dalla, Palma P; Chisté, K; Guarrera, M G; Gardini, G; Gelli, M C; Coccolini, M; Egarter Vigl, E; Girardi, F; Vineis, C; Casassa, F; Gangemi, P; Quaceci, A

    2003-06-01

    Data from five different Institution of Pathological Anatomy Hospital Services are presented in order to show one (the benchmark) of the multiple existing ways to approach the budget problem and the macroeconomic management of our Services. The aim of this work is not to show the "best" way to work in terms of cost-efficacy but only a methods to compare our results with others. Nevertheless from this study is possible also to make some considerations about medical and technical workload in different services with different habits.

  11. Pathology of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vijgen, Sandrine; Terris, Benoit

    2017-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCC) is a primary carcinoma of the liver with increasing significance and major pathogenic, clinical and therapeutic challenges. Classically, it arises from malignant transformation of cholangiocytes bordering small portal bile duct (BD) to second-order segmental large BDs. It has three major macroscopic growth pattern [mass-forming (MF), periductal infiltrative (PI), and intraductal growth (IG)] and histologically is a desmoplastic stroma-rich adenocarcinoma with cholangiocyte differentiation. Recent data pointed out noteworthy degree of heterogeneity in regards of their epidemiology and risk factors, pathological and molecular features, pathogenesis, clinical behaviors and treatment. Notably, several histological variants are described and can coexist within the same tumor. Several different cells of origin have also been depicted in a fraction of iCCs, amongst which malignant transformation of ductules, of hepatic stem/progenitor cells, of periductal glands or through oncogenic reprogramming of adult hepatocytes. A degree of pathological overlap with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) may be observed in a portion of iCC. A series of precursor lesions are today characterized and emphasize the existence of a multistep carcinogenesis process. Overall, these new data have brought up in proposal of new histological or molecular classifications, which could soon replace current anatomic-based classification and could have major impact on establishment of prognosis and on development of novel target treatment approaches. PMID:28261592

  12. Exosomes in liver pathology

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Keisaku; Meng, Fanyin; Glaser, Shannon; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are small (~100 nm) membrane-bound extracellular vesicles released by various types of cells into biological fluids. They contain proteins, mRNAs and miRNAs as cargo. Different cell types can take up exosomes by endocytosis and the cargo contained within them can be transferred horizontally to these recipient cells. Exosomal proteins and miRNAs can be functional and regulate physiological cell events modifying the microenvironment in target cells, a key event of liver pathology. Exosome-mediated cell-cell communication can alter tumor growth, cell migration, anti-viral infection and hepatocyte regeneration, indicating that exosomes have great potential development as diagnostic or therapeutic tools. Analyses of circulating total or exosomal miRNAs have identified a large number of candidate miRNAs that are regulated in liver diseases, and the diagnostic testing using single or multiple miRNAs shows good sensitivity and specificity. Some candidate miRNAs have been identified to play an important role in various liver disorders. This review summarizes recent findings on the role of extracellular vesicles in liver diseases and their diagnostic and therapeutic potential, mainly focusing on exosomes but also includes microvesicles in liver pathology. PMID:26988731

  13. [(Impending) pathological fracture].

    PubMed

    Sutter, P M; Regazzoni, P

    2002-01-01

    Pathological fractures will be encountered in increasing frequency due to more patients with cancer, surviving a longer period. The skeleton is the third most frequent localization for metastases. Breast cancer is still the most common primary tumor, but bone metastases from lung cancer seem to be diagnosed more and more. Despite of finding metastases most often in the spinal column, fractures are seen mostly at the femoral site. A pathological fracture and, in almost all cases, an impending fracture are absolute indication for operation. An exact definition of an "impending fracture" is still lacking; it is widely accepted, that 50 per cent of bone mass must be destroyed before visualization in X-ray is possible, thus defining an impending fracture. The score system by Mirels estimates the fracture risk by means of four parameters (localization, per cent of destructed bone mass, type of metastasis, pain). Improving quality of life, relieving pain, preferably with a single operation and a short length of stay are the goals of (operative) treatment. For fractures of the proximal femur, prosthetic replacement, for fractures of the subtrochanteric region or the shaft, intramedullary nails are recommended. Postoperative radiation therapy possibly avoids tumor progression. In patient with a good long term prognosis, tumor should be removed locally aggressive.

  14. Nanotechnology: Toxicologic Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Hubbs, Ann F.; Sargent, Linda M.; Porter, Dale W.; Sager, Tina M.; Chen, Bean T.; Frazer, David G.; Castranova, Vincent; Sriram, Krishnan; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.; Reynolds, Steven H.; Battelli, Lori A.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; McKinney, Walter; Fluharty, Kara L.; Mercer, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology involves technology, science, and engineering in dimensions less than 100 nm. A virtually infinite number of potential nanoscale products can be produced from many different molecules and their combinations. The exponentially increasing number of nanoscale products will solve critical needs in engineering, science, and medicine. However, the virtually infinite number of potential nanotechnology products is a challenge for toxicologic pathologists. Because of their size, nanoparticulates can have therapeutic and toxic effects distinct from micron-sized particulates of the same composition. In the nanoscale, distinct intercellular and intracellular translocation pathways may provide a different distribution than that obtained by micron-sized particulates. Nanoparticulates interact with subcellular structures including microtubules, actin filaments, centrosomes, and chromatin; interactions that may be facilitated in the nanoscale. Features that distinguish nanoparticulates from fine particulates include increased surface area per unit mass and quantum effects. In addition, some nanotechnology products, including the fullerenes, have a novel and reactive surface. Augmented microscopic procedures including enhanced dark-field imaging, immunofluorescence, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and confocal microscopy are useful when evaluating nanoparticulate toxicologic pathology. Thus, the pathology assessment is facilitated by understanding the unique features at the nanoscale and the tools that can assist in evaluating nanotoxicology studies. PMID:23389777

  15. Tracking in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Pantanowitz, Liron; Mackinnon, Alexander C; Sinard, John H

    2013-12-01

    Bar code-based tracking solutions, long present in clinical pathology laboratories, have recently made an appearance in anatomic pathology (AP) laboratories. Tracking of AP "assets" (specimens, blocks, slides) can enhance laboratory efficiency, promote patient safety, and improve patient care. Routing of excess clinical material into research laboratories and biorepositories are other avenues that can benefit from tracking of AP assets. Implementing tracking is not as simple as installing software and turning it on. Not all tracking solutions are alike. Careful analysis of laboratory workflow is needed before implementing tracking to assure that this solution will meet the needs of the laboratory. Such analysis will likely uncover practices that may need to be modified before a tracking system can be deployed. Costs that go beyond simply that of purchasing software will be incurred and need to be considered in the budgeting process. Finally, people, not technology, are the key to assuring quality. Tracking will require significant changes in workflow and an overall change in the culture of the laboratory. Preparation, training, buy-in, and accountability of the people involved are crucial to the success of this process. This article reviews the benefits, available technology, underlying principles, and implementation of tracking solutions for the AP and research laboratory.

  16. Pathology of liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Centeno, Barbara A

    2006-01-01

    The liver is the most frequent site of metastatic disease, and metastatic disease to the liver is far more common than primary liver carcinoma in the United States. Pathologic evaluation of biopsy samples is key to establishing a correct diagnosis for patient management. Morphologic and immunoperoxidase studies, which are the standard for pathologic practice, accurately classify most tumors. Subclassification of carcinoma of unknown primary remains problematic. The author reviewed the literature for articles pertaining to liver biopsy, diagnosis of specific tumor types, utility of immunohistochemical markers, and microarray and proteomic analysis. Sampling of liver lesions is best accomplished by combining fine-needle aspiration and needle core biopsy. Many malignancies have distinct morphologic and immunohistochemical patterns and can be correctly subclassified. Adenocarcinoma of unknown primary remains enigmatic since current immunohistochemical markers for this differential diagnosis lack specificity. Microarray analysis and proteomic analysis of tumors can provide distinct gene or protein expression profiles, respectively, for tumor classification. These technologies can be used with fine-needle aspiration and needle core biopsy samples. Most metastatic malignancies in the liver may be correctly diagnosed using standard morphology and immunohistochemical techniques. However, subtyping of some carcinomas and identification of site of unknown primary remains problematic. New technologies may help to further refine our diagnostic capabilities.

  17. The pathology of AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Macher, A M

    1988-01-01

    The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a devastating new disease caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This retrovirus causes profound immunoincompetence in its infected hosts, who are thereafter susceptible to develop myriad severe and relapsing protozoal, fungal, bacterial, viral, and arthropodal opportunistic infections, as well as unusual malignancies. The more than 50,000 patients who have developed AIDS in the United States have produced a sudden unexpected deluge of diagnostic dilemmas that are stressing laboratories of pathology everywhere. This paper describes the gross and microscopic pathology of the numerous complications in patients infected by HIV: (a) the prodromal AIDS-related complex with persistent generalized lymphadenopathy, (b) lymphoid infiltration of salivary gland and lung, including the complex of lymphoid interstitial pneumonitis-pulmonary lymphoid hyperplasia, (c) extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, (d) multifocal mucocutaneous and visceral Kaposi's sarcoma, (e) small cell undifferentiated (oat cell) carcinomas, (f) protozoal infections caused by Pneumocystis carinii, Toxoplasma gondii, Acanthamoeba, Cryptosporidium species (sp.), and Isospora belli, (g) the causes of chronic enteritis, (h) mycotic infections caused by Candida sp., Cryptococcus neoformans, Histoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioides immitis, and Sporothrix schenckii, (i) bacterial infections caused by Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare, M. tuberculosis, M. kansasii, Nocardia sp., Listeria monocytogenes, Legionella sp., Treponema pallidum, and others, (j) viral infections caused by cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex and zoster, polyomavirus (progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy), hepatitis B, molluscum contagiosum, and papillomavirus, (k) oral hairy leukoplakia, (l) subacute encephalopathy, and (m) Norwegian scabies. PMID:2836878

  18. Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents

    PubMed Central

    Karcher, Donald S.; Harrison, James H.; Sinard, John H.; Riben, Michael W.; Boyer, Philip J.; Plath, Sue; Thompson, Arlene; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-01-01

    Context: Recognition of the importance of informatics to the practice of pathology has surged. Training residents in pathology informatics has been a daunting task for most residency programs in the United States because faculty often lacks experience and training resources. Nevertheless, developing resident competence in informatics is essential for the future of pathology as a specialty. Objective: To develop and deliver a pathology informatics curriculum and instructional framework that guides pathology residency programs in training residents in critical pathology informatics knowledge and skills, and meets Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Informatics Milestones. Design: The College of American Pathologists, Association of Pathology Chairs, and Association for Pathology Informatics formed a partnership and expert work group to identify critical pathology informatics training outcomes and to create a highly adaptable curriculum and instructional approach, supported by a multiyear change management strategy. Results: Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents (PIER) is a rigorous approach for educating all pathology residents in important pathology informatics knowledge and skills. PIER includes an instructional resource guide and toolkit for incorporating informatics training into residency programs that vary in needs, size, settings, and resources. PIER is available at http://www.apcprods.org/PIER (accessed April 6, 2016). Conclusions: PIER is an important contribution to informatics training in pathology residency programs. PIER introduces pathology trainees to broadly useful informatics concepts and tools that are relevant to practice. PIER provides residency program directors with a means to implement a standardized informatics training curriculum, to adapt the approach to local program needs, and to evaluate resident performance and progress over time. PMID:28725772

  19. Pathological findings in homocystinuria

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, J. B.; Carson, Nina A. J.; Neill, D. W.

    1964-01-01

    Pathological findings are described in four cases of a new aminoaciduria in which homocystine is excreted in the urine. All the patients were mentally retarded children. Three of them presented diagnostic features of Marfan's syndrome. Necropsy on one case and biopsy findings in the others are described. Fatty change occurs in the liver. The most striking lesions are vascular. Metachromatic medial degeneration of the aorta and of the elastic arteries in the necropsied case are considered in relation to Marfan's syndrome. Other changes, particularly thrombosis which is prevalent in homocystinuria, suggest the possibility of a platelet defect. The findings are discussed in respect of an upset in the metabolism of sulphur-containing amino-acids and with particular reference to Marfan's syndrome. Images PMID:14195630

  20. Pathology of sea otters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipscomb, T.P.; Harris, Richard K.; Rebar, A.H.; Ballachey, Brenda E.; Haebler, Romona J.; Loughlin, Thomas R.

    1994-01-01

    In the months following the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS), 994 sea otters (Enhydra lutris) from oil-spill-affected areas died (Doroff et al. 1993). Carcasses collected from these areas and otters that died in rehabilitation centers are included in this number. The actual number that died was probably much greater.Within days of the spill, the Exxon Company (USA) funded an effort to rehabilitate oil-contaminated sea otters (Davis 1990). Initially, clinical veterinarians working on the rehabilitation effort performed partial necropsies on some of the sea otters that died. Soon, veterinary pathologists from the University of Alaska and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency provided assistance. Later, rehabilitation centers were constructed and other veterinarians with special training in pathology were hired by Exxon to provide diagnostic support.In late April 1989, veterinary pathologists from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) assumed responsibility for pathologic evaluation of oil-spill-affected sea otters. The USFWS requested assistance from veterinary pathologists of the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP) in June 1989. Eventually, as part of the Natural Resources Damage Assessment program, AFIP veterinary pathologists were asked to carry out histopathological studies of the tissue specimens collected by all parties and to perform necropsies on carcasses that had been collected and frozen. A veterinary clinical pathologist was requested to assess hematology and clinical chemistry findings in otters that had been held in the rehabilitation centers.In spite of the best efforts of many dedicated people working under extremely difficult conditions, there are significant limitations in the pathological studies. The absence of a detailed necropsy protocol and of full documentation of necropsy findings during the first several weeks after the spill resulted in important data being lost. Often, samples of all major organs were not collected. In some

  1. Peroxisome morphology in pathology.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, D; Castro, I; Fahimi, H D; Schrader, M

    2012-06-01

    Peroxisomes are remarkably dynamic and versatile organelles that are essential for human health and development. They respond to physiological changes in the cellular environment by adapting their morphology, number, enzyme content and metabolic functions accordingly. With the discovery of the first key peroxisomal morphology proteins, the investigation of peroxisomal shape, distribution and dynamics has become an exciting new field in cell biology and biomedical sciences because of its relation to organelle functionality and its impact on developmental and physiological processes. In this review, we summarize recent findings on peroxisome biology, dynamics and the modulation of peroxisome morphology, especially in mammals. Furthermore, we discuss the roles of peroxisome dynamics and morphology in cell pathology and present recent examples for alterations in peroxisome morphology under disease conditions. Besides defects in the peroxisomal morphology machinery, we also address peroxisome biogenesis disorders, alterations of peroxisome number during carcinogenesis and liver cirrhosis, and morphological alterations of peroxisomes during viral infection.

  2. Pathological aspects of cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Esposito*, I.

    2008-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CC) arises from the biliary epithelium and in most cases represents adenocarcinoma. Pathomorphological evaluation is of decisive impact for the prognosis and management of CC. Morphological subtyping (histotype; hilar vs peripheral type), TNM classification, lymphatic spread, and resection margin status are of prognostic relevance. Distinction from hepatic metastases may be aided by immunohistology and clinico-pathological correlation. There is convincing evidence of the development of CC via premalignant lesions, especially biliary intraepithelial neoplasia, although further knowledge about the biology and diagnostic definition of these lesions has to be accumulated. Currently, there are no established molecular markers of prognosis or therapeutic target structures to be evaluated at the tissue level. Future progress is needed and expected in novel differential diagnostic and predictive markers, in uniform definition of resection margin status and further understanding of molecular and morphological changes in the development of CC. PMID:18773061

  3. No pain, no pathology?

    PubMed

    Sharma, Devesh; Govind, Abha

    2012-10-26

    A 22-year-old girl who had a background of reflux nephropathy and urinary tact infection presented during the night with renal angle pain and vomiting. She was treated on the emergency department (ED) pyelonephritis protocol and admitted to the short stay ward. When reviewed the next morning she was aymptomatic and feeling better. It seemed likely that she would be discharged but an ED ultrasound showed right-sided hydronephrosis and some fluid between the liver and the right kidney. CT examination confirmed the suspicion of renal tract obstruction and ruptured calyx. An 8 mm calculus was found to be the cause of the pathology. Urgent urological review was organised and the system formally decompressed with a J-J stent inserted cystoscopically later that day.

  4. Pathology of oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Aoife; Sheahan, Kieran

    2012-05-01

    Endoscopic oesophageal biopsies are common in daily pathology practice. Inflammation and damage of the oesophageal mucosa is known as oesophagitis and is common worldwide. A variety of physical, chemical and infectious agents cause oesophagitis. The oesophagus has a limited range of responses to a wide variety of injuries, and so histopathological features of different diseases often overlap. The pathologist is reliant on the endoscopist for the 'macroscopic description' of the oesophagus. Access to the endoscopic images enhances the pathologist's overall interpretation of the case. Correlating clinical, endoscopic and microscopic findings may be crucial in arriving at the correct diagnosis. In this review, we present clinicopathological descriptions of the major types of oesophagitis. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  5. No pain, no pathology?

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Devesh; Govind, Abha

    2012-01-01

    A 22-year-old girl who had a background of reflux nephropathy and urinary tact infection presented during the night with renal angle pain and vomiting. She was treated on the emergency department (ED) pyelonephritis protocol and admitted to the short stay ward. When reviewed the next morning she was aymptomatic and feeling better. It seemed likely that she would be discharged but an ED ultrasound showed right-sided hydronephrosis and some fluid between the liver and the right kidney. CT examination confirmed the suspicion of renal tract obstruction and ruptured calyx. An 8 mm calculus was found to be the cause of the pathology. Urgent urological review was organised and the system formally decompressed with a J–J stent inserted cystoscopically later that day. PMID:23104632

  6. Nontraditional applications in clinical pathology.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Holly L; Register, Thomas C; Tripathi, Niraj K; Bolliger, Anne Provencher; Everds, Nancy; Zelmanovic, David; Poitout, Florence; Bounous, Denise I; Wescott, Debra; Ramaiah, Shashi K

    2014-10-01

    Most published reviews of preclinical toxicological clinical pathology focus on the fundamental aspects of hematology, clinical chemistry, coagulation, and urinalysis in routine toxicology animal species, for example, rats, mice, dogs, and nonhuman primates. The objective of this continuing education course was to present and discuss contemporary examples of nonroutine applications of clinical pathology endpoints used in the drug development setting. Area experts discussed bone turnover markers of laboratory animal species, clinical pathology of pregnant and growing laboratory animals, clinical pathology of nonroutine laboratory animal species, and unique applications of the Siemens Advia(®) hematology analyzer. This article is a summary based on a presentation given at the 31st Annual Symposium of the Society of Toxicologic Pathology, during the Continuing Education Course titled "Nontraditional Applications of Clinical Pathology in Drug Discovery and Preclinical Toxicology."

  7. Rural pathology under the microscope.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Helen; Dupal, Philip

    2009-08-01

    There is little discussion about the crisis in the pathology and medical science workforce despite the implications it has for the whole health system. The crisis has greater implications for rural and remote locations because of the range of skills and multidisciplinary approach required in these areas. Recognition of the clinical significance and organisational importance of the sector is required as is recognition of the unique characteristics of rural and remote pathology and greater support for rural and remote pathology practitioners.

  8. Recommendations for pathology peer review.

    PubMed

    Morton, Daniel; Sellers, Rani S; Barale-Thomas, Erio; Bolon, Brad; George, Catherine; Hardisty, Jerry F; Irizarry, Armando; McKay, Jennifer S; Odin, Marielle; Teranishi, Munehiro

    2010-12-01

    Pathology peer review verifies and improves the accuracy and quality of pathology diagnoses and interpretations. Pathology peer review is recommended when important risk assessment or business decisions are based on nonclinical studies. For pathology peer review conducted before study completion, the peer-review pathologist reviews sufficient slides and pathology data to assist the study pathologist in refining pathology diagnoses and interpretations. Materials to be reviewed are selected by the peer-review pathologist. Consultations with additional experts or a formal (documented) pathology working group may be used to resolve discrepancies. The study pathologist is solely responsible for the content of the final pathology data and report, makes changes resulting from peer-review discussions, initiates the audit trail for microscopic observations after all changes resulting from peer-review have been made, and signs the final pathologist's report. The peer-review pathologist creates a signed peer-review memo describing the peer-review process and confirming that the study pathologist's report accurately and appropriately reflects the pathology data. The study pathologist also may sign a statement of consensus. It is not necessary to archive working notes created during the peer-review process.

  9. [Diagnostic significance of pathologic synkinesis for detection of pyramidal pathology].

    PubMed

    Baliasnyĭ, M M

    1991-01-01

    Five types of pathological synkinesis (++blepharo-ocular, ++blepharo-facial, ++bucco-manual, ++digito-digital on the hands, ++pedo-digital) are described. They are of definite importance for revealing pyramidal pathology including its early stages as well as for objective evaluation and observation of the time-course of changes in the illness.

  10. Rabies: ocular pathology.

    PubMed Central

    Haltia, M; Tarkkanen, A; Kivelä, T

    1989-01-01

    Ocular pathology in the first European case of human bat-borne rabies is described. The patient was a 30-year-old bat scientist who seven weeks after bat bite developed neurological symptoms and died 23 days later. Rabies virus antigens were detected in brain smears. After extensive virological studies the virus turned out to be a rabies-related virus, closely resembling the Duvenhage virus isolated from bats in South Africa in 1980. By light microscopy focal chronic inflammatory infiltration of the ciliary body and of the choroid was found. PAS-positive exudate was seen in the subretinal and in the outer plexiform layers of the retina, and retinal veins showed endothelial damage and perivascular inflammation. Many of the retinal ganglion cells were destroyed. The presence of rabies-related viral antigen in the retinal ganglion cells was shown by positive cytoplasmic immunofluorescence, though electron microscopy failed to identify definite viral structures in the retina. By immunohistochemistry glial fibrillary acidic protein was observed in the Müller's cells, which are normally negative for this antigen but express it as a reactive change when the retina is damaged. Synaptophysin, a constituent of presynaptic vesicles of normal retinal neurons, was not detected in the retina. Images PMID:2920157

  11. Macrophage polarization in pathology.

    PubMed

    Sica, Antonio; Erreni, Marco; Allavena, Paola; Porta, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    Macrophages are cells of the innate immunity constituting the mononuclear phagocyte system and endowed with remarkable different roles essential for defense mechanisms, development of tissues, and homeostasis. They derive from hematopoietic precursors and since the early steps of fetal life populate peripheral tissues, a process continuing throughout adult life. Although present essentially in every organ/tissue, macrophages are more abundant in the gastro-intestinal tract, liver, spleen, upper airways, and brain. They have phagocytic and bactericidal activity and produce inflammatory cytokines that are important to drive adaptive immune responses. Macrophage functions are settled in response to microenvironmental signals, which drive the acquisition of polarized programs, whose extremes are simplified in the M1 and M2 dichotomy. Functional skewing of monocyte/macrophage polarization occurs in physiological conditions (e.g., ontogenesis and pregnancy), as well as in pathology (allergic and chronic inflammation, tissue repair, infection, and cancer) and is now considered a key determinant of disease development and/or regression. Here, we will review evidence supporting a dynamic skewing of macrophage functions in disease, which may provide a basis for macrophage-centered therapeutic strategies.

  12. Forest pathology in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, D.E.

    2003-01-01

    Native Hawaiian forests are characterised by a high degree of endemism, including pathogens as well as their hosts. With the exceptions of koa (Acacia koa Gray), possibly maile (Alyxia oliviformis Gaud.), and, in the past, sandalwood (Santalum spp.), forest species are of little commercial value. On the other hand, these forests are immensely important from a cultural, ecological, and evolutionary standpoint. Forest disease research was lacking during the mid-twentieth century, but increased markedly with the recognition of ohia (Metrosideros polymorpha Gaud.) decline in the 1970s. Because many pathogens are themselves endemic, or are assumed to be, having evolved with their hosts, research emphasis in natural areas is on understanding host-parasite interactions and evolutionary influences, rather than disease control. Aside from management of native forests, attempts at establishing a commercial forest industry have included importation of several species of pine, Araucaria, and Eucalyptus as timber crops, and of numerous ornamentals. Diseases of these species have been introduced with their hosts. The attacking of native species by introduced pathogens is problematic - for example, Armillaria mellea (Vahl ex Fr.) Que??l. on koa and mamane (Sophora chrysophylla (Salisb.) Seem.). Much work remains to be done in both native and commercial aspects of Hawaiian forest pathology.

  13. Pathology of bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Domingo, M; Vidal, E; Marco, A

    2014-10-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is a chronic granulomatous caseous-necrotising inflammatory process that mainly affects the lungs and their draining lymph nodes (Ln.). The pathological changes associated with bTB infection reflect the interplay between the host defence mechanisms and the mycobacterial virulence factors and the balance between the immunologic protective responses and the damaging inflammatory processes. Inhalation is the most common infection route and causes lesions of the nasopharynx and lower respiratory tract, including its associated lymph nodes. The initial infection (primary complex) may be followed by chronic (post-primary) tuberculosis or may be generalised. Goat tuberculosis often produces liquefactive necrosis and caverns, similarly to human TB. The assessment of the severity of TB lesions is crucial for vaccine trials. Semi-quantitative gross lesion scoring systems have been developed for cattle, but imaging technology has allowed the development of more standardised, objective, and quantitative methods, such as multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), which provides quantitative measures of lesion volume.

  14. Functions of Autophagy in Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenhua; Wang, Jian; Yang, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy is the response of heart to various biomechanical and physiopathological stimuli, such as aging, myocardial ischemia and hypertension. However, a long-term exposure to the stress makes heart progress to heart failure. Autophagy is a dynamic self-degradative process necessary for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Accumulating evidence has revealed a tight link between cardiomyocyte autophagy and cardiac hypertrophy. Sophisticatedly regulated autophagy protects heart from various physiological and pathological stimuli by degradating and recycling of protein aggregates, lipid drops, or organelles. Here we review the recent progresses concerning the functions of autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy induced by various hypertrophic stimuli. Moreover, the therapeutic strategies targeting autophagy for cardiac hypertrophy will also be discussed. PMID:25999790

  15. [Molecular Pathological Aspects in Visceral Surgery].

    PubMed

    Unger, T; Sändig, I; Wittekind, C

    2016-04-01

    New insights gained in the field of molecular medicine have led to fundamental progress in the diagnosis and treatment of tumour patients. Individualised treatment has been essentially facilitated by molecular diagnostics, which, by identifying and interpreting characteristic genetic alterations (biomarkers) in single cells and tissues, provide specific information to confirm the diagnosis and support the treatment of numerous diseases. Particularly with regard to the use of new targeted drugs, which often require the presence or absence of specific target structures or genetic alterations to induce response, the molecular pathological determination of predictive biomarkers plays an increasing role and helps clinicians to decide on optimal therapies for individual patients. The aim of this review is to highlight general aspects of molecular tumour pathology for relevant tumour entities and to present available targeted therapies.

  16. Pathology related to chronic arsenic exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Centeno, Jose A; Mullick, Florabel G; Martinez, Leonor; Page, Norbert P; Gibb, Herman; Longfellow, David; Thompson, Claudia; Ladich, Elena R

    2002-01-01

    Millions now suffer the effects of chronic arseniasis related to environmental arsenic exposure. The biological mechanisms responsible for arsenic-induced toxicity and especially chronic effects, including cancer, are not well known. The U.S. Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP) is participating in an international research effort to improve this understanding by the development of the International Tissue and Tumor Repository for Chronic Arsenosis (ITTRCA). The ITTRCA obtains, archives, and makes available for research purposes, tissues from subjects exposed to arsenic. We provide here a short overview of arsenic-induced pathology, briefly describe arsenic-induced lesions in the skin and liver, and present five case reports from the ITTRCA. Arsenic-induced skin pathology includes hyperkeratosis, pigmentation changes, Bowen disease, squamous cell carcinoma, and basal cell carcinomas. A unique spectrum of skin lesions, known as arsenical keratosis, is rather characteristic of chronic arseniasis. Bowen disease, or squamous cell carcinoma in situ of the skin, has been well documented as a consequence of arsenical exposure. A spectrum of liver lesions has also been attributed to chronic arseniasis. Of these, hepatocellular carcinoma, angiosarcoma, cirrhosis, and hepatoportal sclerosis have been associated with arsenic exposure. We present case reports that relate to these health conditions, namely, squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, and Bowen disease of the skin and hepatocellular carcinoma and angiosarcoma of the liver. Four patients had been treated with arsenical medications for such conditions as asthma, psoriasis, and syphilis, and one case occurred in a boy chronically exposed to arsenic in drinking water. PMID:12426152

  17. Regression of Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy: Signaling Pathways and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jianglong; Kang, Y. James

    2012-01-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy is a key risk factor for heart failure. It is associated with increased interstitial fibrosis, cell death and cardiac dysfunction. The progression of pathological cardiac hypertrophy has long been considered as irreversible. However, recent clinical observations and experimental studies have produced evidence showing the reversal of pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Left ventricle assist devices used in heart failure patients for bridging to transplantation not only improve peripheral circulation but also often cause reverse remodeling of the geometry and recovery of the function of the heart. Dietary supplementation with physiologically relevant levels of copper can reverse pathological cardiac hypertrophy in mice. Angiogenesis is essential and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a constitutive factor for the regression. The action of VEGF is mediated by VEGF receptor-1, whose activation is linked to cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase-1 (PKG-1) signaling pathways, and inhibition of cyclic GMP degradation leads to regression of pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Most of these pathways are regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor. Potential therapeutic targets for promoting the regression include: promotion of angiogenesis, selective enhancement of VEGF receptor-1 signaling pathways, stimulation of PKG-1 pathways, and sustention of hypoxia-inducible factor transcriptional activity. More exciting insights into the regression of pathological cardiac hypertrophy are emerging. The time of translating the concept of regression of pathological cardiac hypertrophy to clinical practice is coming. PMID:22750195

  18. Pathology of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Makoto; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Aoki, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a serious health and socioeconomic issue all over the world, affecting more than 300 million individuals. The disease is considered as an inflammatory disease in the airway, leading to airway hyperresponsiveness, obstruction, mucus hyper-production and airway wall remodeling. The presence of airway inflammation in asthmatic patients has been found in the nineteenth century. As the information in patients with asthma increase, paradigm change in immunology and molecular biology have resulted in an extensive evaluation of inflammatory cells and mediators involved in the pathophysiology of asthma. Moreover, it is recognized that airway remodeling into detail, characterized by thickening of the airway wall, can be profound consequences on the mechanics of airway narrowing and contribute to the chronic progression of the disease. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition plays an important role in airway remodeling. These epithelial and mesenchymal cells cause persistence of the inflammatory infiltration and induce histological changes in the airway wall, increasing thickness of the basement membrane, collagen deposition and smooth muscle hypertrophy and hyperplasia. Resulting of airway inflammation, airway remodeling leads to the airway wall thickening and induces increased airway smooth muscle mass, which generate asthmatic symptoms. Asthma is classically recognized as the typical Th2 disease, with increased IgE levels and eosinophilic inflammation in the airway. Emerging Th2 cytokines modulates the airway inflammation, which induces airway remodeling. Biological agents, which have specific molecular targets for these Th2 cytokines, are available and clinical trials for asthma are ongoing. However, the relatively simple paradigm has been doubted because of the realization that strategies designed to suppress Th2 function are not effective enough for all patients in the clinical trials. In the future, it is required to understand more details for phenotypes of

  19. [Cholesterolemia and pathology: update].

    PubMed

    Schlienger, J L; Goichot, B; Pradignac, A

    1998-03-01

    The relationship between plasma cholesterol levels and disease is more complex than presumed. If the pathogenic role of hypercholesterolemia in ischemic myocardial disease is now undoubted, the deleterious effect of hypocholesterolemia induced by diet or drugs, mainly on cancer mortality and violent death, is still controversial. In a prognostic point of view it seems that the degree of diminution of cholesterol levels is more important than hypocholesterolemia itself. Several hypothesis were formulated; however, hypocholesterolemia does not appear as a causal factor. A prudent approach of hypercholesterolemia remains desirable but without special alterations of the recent recommendations concerning the management of hypercholesterolemia.

  20. Pathology of peliosis.

    PubMed

    Tsokos, Michael; Erbersdobler, Andreas

    2005-04-20

    Peliosis is a pathological entity characterized by the gross appearance of multiple cyst-like, blood-filled cavities within parenchymatous organs. Peliosis has been related to several underlying debilitating illnesses such as tuberculosis, hematological malignancies, the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and post-transplant immunodeficiency, as well as intravenous drug abuse, chronic alcoholism, and in conjunction with the intake of oral contraceptives or steroids. The classical pathoanatomical concept is based upon the opinion that peliosis exclusively develops in organs belonging to the mononuclear phagocytic system (liver, spleen, bone marrow, and lymph nodes). However, a paucity of studies indicates that other organs such as lungs, parathyroid glands, and kidneys may be affected too. Concerning the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms of onset and maintenance of peliosis, the morphological data obtained by different investigators suggest that there is more than one path of formal pathogenesis (e.g., congenital malformation of vessels manifesting under altered local intravascular pressure conditions, acquired vascular disorder triggered by toxic noxae, active proliferation of vessels corresponding to the benign end on the spectrum of neoplastic vascular lesions). In the liver, at gross inspection, the peliotic lesions give the cut sections a "swiss cheese" appearance. Microscopically, two different types of peliosis can be distinguished in the liver: (1) "parenchymal peliosis" consisting of irregular cavities that are neither lined by sinusoidal cells nor by fibrous tissue, and (2) "phlebectatic peliosis" characterized by regular, spherical cavities lined by endothelium and/or fibrosis. One of the differential diagnoses that most closely resembles peliosis hepatis is secondary hepatic congestion due to veno-occlusive disease or the Budd-Chiari syndrome. In the spleen, the peliotic lesions may be arranged sporadically, disseminated, or in clusters in an

  1. [Corticotherapy and mucocutaneous pathology].

    PubMed

    Kuffer, R

    1975-01-01

    The tremendous advances in treatment brought about by corticotherapy applied to cutaneo-mucosal pathology should not be allowed to obscure the fact that its action is merely palliative, that it should only be proceeded with after careful diagnosis and that it may trigger undesirable side-effects. General corticotherapy is definitely indicated in certain serious dermatoses (e.g. pemphigus vulgaris) in large doses at the beginning of the course of treatment which often has to be kept up indefinitely; it is in these patients that the most serious accidents occur. It is also indicated in other dermatoses (e.g. lichen planus) in smaller doses and in separate courses, generally triggering incidents and accidents of a less serious nature which to a certain extent seem to be attenuated by taking the drug on alternate days. It is counter-indicated in one particular condition: psoriasis. Corticotherapy by intra- and sub-lesional local injection is most useful in the treatment of certain localised skin lesions (e.g. cheloids) and of the oral mucosa (e.g. erosive lichen planus). Either a few drops are injected or a larger quantity in a suspension of microcrystals. Complications have sometimes been observed in the skin (leukoderma, dermoepidermatrophia and, particularly, amaurosis), but never so far after sub-mucosal injections. Local corticotherapy by external application, very widely used in the form of ointments, creams and lotions for numerous cutaneous conditions may cause various more or less serious local side-effects, the systemic effects with depression of the hypophyso-adrenal axis, only seem to occur to any extent with occlusive dressings. It can also be used in the treatment of some conditions of the oral mucosa (e.g. some forms of lichen planus, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid) by means of either a corticosteroid incorporated into a special excipient which adheres to the mucous membrane or in tablets of 17-betamethasone valerate which gradually break up in the

  2. Digital pathology and anatomic pathology laboratory information system integration to support digital pathology sign-out.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huazhang; Birsa, Joe; Farahani, Navid; Hartman, Douglas J; Piccoli, Anthony; O'Leary, Matthew; McHugh, Jeffrey; Nyman, Mark; Stratman, Curtis; Kvarnstrom, Vanja; Yousem, Samuel; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-01-01

    The adoption of digital pathology offers benefits over labor-intensive, time-consuming, and error-prone manual processes. However, because most workflow and laboratory transactions are centered around the anatomical pathology laboratory information system (APLIS), adoption of digital pathology ideally requires integration with the APLIS. A digital pathology system (DPS) integrated with the APLIS was recently implemented at our institution for diagnostic use. We demonstrate how such integration supports digital workflow to sign-out anatomical pathology cases. Workflow begins when pathology cases get accessioned into the APLIS (CoPathPlus). Glass slides from these cases are then digitized (Omnyx VL120 scanner) and automatically uploaded into the DPS (Omnyx(®) Integrated Digital Pathology (IDP) software v.1.3). The APLIS transmits case data to the DPS via a publishing web service. The DPS associates scanned images with the correct case using barcode labels on slides and information received from the APLIS. When pathologists remotely open a case in the DPS, additional information (e.g. gross pathology details, prior cases) gets retrieved from the APLIS through a query web service. Following validation of this integration, pathologists at our institution have signed out more than 1000 surgical pathology cases in a production environment. Integration between the APLIS and DPS enabled pathologists to review digital slides while simultaneously having access to pertinent case metadata. The introduction of a digital workflow eliminated costly manual tasks involving matching of glass slides and avoided delays waiting for glass slides to be delivered. Integrating the DPS and APLIS were instrumental for successfully implementing a digital solution at our institution for pathology sign-out. The integration streamlined our digital sign-out workflow, diminished the potential for human error related to matching slides, and improved the sign-out experience for pathologists.

  3. Digital pathology and anatomic pathology laboratory information system integration to support digital pathology sign-out

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Huazhang; Birsa, Joe; Farahani, Navid; Hartman, Douglas J.; Piccoli, Anthony; O’Leary, Matthew; McHugh, Jeffrey; Nyman, Mark; Stratman, Curtis; Kvarnstrom, Vanja; Yousem, Samuel; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-01-01

    Background: The adoption of digital pathology offers benefits over labor-intensive, time-consuming, and error-prone manual processes. However, because most workflow and laboratory transactions are centered around the anatomical pathology laboratory information system (APLIS), adoption of digital pathology ideally requires integration with the APLIS. A digital pathology system (DPS) integrated with the APLIS was recently implemented at our institution for diagnostic use. We demonstrate how such integration supports digital workflow to sign-out anatomical pathology cases. Methods: Workflow begins when pathology cases get accessioned into the APLIS (CoPathPlus). Glass slides from these cases are then digitized (Omnyx VL120 scanner) and automatically uploaded into the DPS (Omnyx® Integrated Digital Pathology (IDP) software v.1.3). The APLIS transmits case data to the DPS via a publishing web service. The DPS associates scanned images with the correct case using barcode labels on slides and information received from the APLIS. When pathologists remotely open a case in the DPS, additional information (e.g. gross pathology details, prior cases) gets retrieved from the APLIS through a query web service. Results: Following validation of this integration, pathologists at our institution have signed out more than 1000 surgical pathology cases in a production environment. Integration between the APLIS and DPS enabled pathologists to review digital slides while simultaneously having access to pertinent case metadata. The introduction of a digital workflow eliminated costly manual tasks involving matching of glass slides and avoided delays waiting for glass slides to be delivered. Conclusion: Integrating the DPS and APLIS were instrumental for successfully implementing a digital solution at our institution for pathology sign-out. The integration streamlined our digital sign-out workflow, diminished the potential for human error related to matching slides, and improved the sign

  4. Utilization management in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Lewandrowski, Kent; Black-Schaffer, Steven

    2014-01-01

    There is relatively little published literature concerning utilization management in anatomic pathology. Nonetheless there are many utilization management opportunities that currently exist and are well recognized. Some of these impact only the cost structure within the pathology department itself whereas others reduce charges for third party payers. Utilization management may result in medical legal liabilities for breaching the standard of care. For this reason it will be important for pathology professional societies to develop national utilization guidelines to assist individual practices in implementing a medically sound approach to utilization management. © 2013.

  5. Meckel on developmental pathology.

    PubMed

    Opitz, John M; Schultka, Rüdiger; Göbbel, Luminita

    2006-01-15

    cartilage named after him, and as having interpreted, correctly, the developmental nature of the "Meckel" diverticulum. It is virtually unknown that Meckel also first enuntiated the concept and distinction between primary and secondary malformations/anomalies, introduced the notion of heredity into the causal analysis of congenital anomalies, was the father of syndromology (the Meckel syndrome), had a clear understanding of pleiotropy and heterogeneity, and can unequivocally be regarded as the father of developmental pathology. In hindsight, and inspite of much professional success, Meckel emerges as a tragic figure in the history of biology, his life cut short at 52 without an ability to incorporate cell theory and the embryological insights of his younger contemporaries into his intellectual edifice which might have made it possible for him to finally and clearly see "analogy" (now homology), of which he was the greatest expert in his era, as incontrovertible evidence for descent. In that case, Darwin and Haeckel might have even had the courtesy of a tip-of-the-hat in Meckel's direction. Published 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. [Epigenetic mechanisms in physiologic and pathologic pregnancies].

    PubMed

    Joó, József Gábor; Karabélyos, Csaba; Héjja, Hajnalka; Kornya, László; Rigó, János

    2014-04-13

    Epigenetic factors are nowadays in the focus of scientific interest in medicine including obstetrics. The environment in utero and early neonatal life may induce a permanent response in the fetus and the newborn leading to enhanced susceptibility to later diseases. There is now growing evidence that the effects of developmental programming may also manifest themselves in the next generations without further suboptimal exposure. The so-called fetal programming may also highlight a tight connection between pathological conditions in pregnancy, environmental factors and the development of chronic diseases in adulthood. Investigation of epigenetic factors may yield new possibilities for the prevention of chronic diseases affecting a significant part of the population.

  7. [Pathology of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease].

    PubMed

    Oka, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Although genetic testing is available, nerve biopsy is useful in selected patients for the diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). These are sporadic cases of hereditary neuropathy, or familial cases in which genetic testing is negative. CMT is caused by mutations of various genes. The pathological features of CMT have mostly been investigated using nerve biopsy, which may shed light on the presumed functions of mutated gene products. PMP22 duplication in CMT1A induces numerous large onion bulb lesions (OB). Compared to chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, the differential features of CMT1A are patchy distribution of OB and non-inflammatory lesions. CMT1B also manifests as OB, but presents abnormal compaction of myelin sheaths caused by uncompacted myelin or excessive myelin folding. CMT2 includes axonal neuropathies and many causative genes have been found. CMT2A (MFN2 mutation) shows abnormal mitochondria with a spherical morphology instead of tubular in the longitudinal direction. CMT4 consists of autosomal recessive forms with demyelinating pathology. Most subtypes have mutations of genes relating to myelin maintenance, and pathologically, they show abnormal folding of the myelin structure.

  8. Pathology of chronic mountain sickness

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Stella, Javier; Krüger, Hever; Recavarren, Sixto

    1973-01-01

    Arias-Stella, J., Krüger, H., and Recavarren, S. (1973).Thorax, 28, 701-708. Pathology of chronic mountain sickness. Pathological data on chronic mountain sickness are scarce due to the fact that the disease is ameliorated or cured by descent to a low altitude. In this report we describe a case of chronic mountain sickness occurring in a woman of 48 years at Cerro de Pasco (4,300 m above sea level). The necropsy findings are compared with the limited pathological observations reported by others. It is apparent from our findings that in fatal cases the main changes are located within the pulmonary circulation. So far histological studies have been reported only in cases of the secondary form of chronic mountain sickness. The basic pathology of the primary form (Monge's disease) remains to be defined. Images PMID:4787982

  9. [Methods and methodology of pathology].

    PubMed

    Lushnikov, E F

    2016-01-01

    The lecture gives the state-of-the-art of the methodology of human pathology that is an area of the scientific and practice activity of specialists to produce and systematize objective knowledge of pathology and to use the knowledge in clinical medicine. It considers the objects and subjects of an investigation, materials and methods of a pathologist, and the results of his/her work.

  10. Error detection in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Zarbo, Richard J; Meier, Frederick A; Raab, Stephen S

    2005-10-01

    To define the magnitude of error occurring in anatomic pathology, to propose a scheme to classify such errors so their influence on clinical outcomes can be evaluated, and to identify quality assurance procedures able to reduce the frequency of errors. (a) Peer-reviewed literature search via PubMed for studies from single institutions and multi-institutional College of American Pathologists Q-Probes studies of anatomic pathology error detection and prevention practices; (b) structured evaluation of defects in surgical pathology reports uncovered in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine of the Henry Ford Health System in 2001-2003, using a newly validated error taxonomy scheme; and (c) comparative review of anatomic pathology quality assurance procedures proposed to reduce error. Marked differences in both definitions of error and pathology practice make comparison of error detection and prevention procedures among publications from individual institutions impossible. Q-Probes studies further suggest that observer redundancy reduces diagnostic variation and interpretive error, which ranges from 1.2 to 50 errors per 1000 cases; however, it is unclear which forms of such redundancy are the most efficient in uncovering diagnostic error. The proposed error taxonomy tested has shown a very good interobserver agreement of 91.4% (kappa = 0.8780; 95% confidence limit, 0.8416-0.9144), when applied to amended reports, and suggests a distribution of errors among identification, specimen, interpretation, and reporting variables. Presently, there are no standardized tools for defining error in anatomic pathology, so it cannot be reliably measured nor can its clinical impact be assessed. The authors propose a standardized error classification that would permit measurement of error frequencies, clinical impact of errors, and the effect of error reduction and prevention efforts. In particular, the value of double-reading, case conferences, and consultations (the

  11. Clinical pathology of alcohol.

    PubMed Central

    Marks, V

    1983-01-01

    There is good though not conclusive evidence that a small to modest average daily intake of alcohol--that is, 20-30 g/day is associated with increased longevity due mainly to a reduction in death from cardiovascular disease. Larger average daily alcohol intakes--especially those in excess of 60 g/day for men and 40 g/day for women--are associated with gradually increasing morbidity and mortality rates from a variety of diseases. Alcohol may be unrecognised as the cause of somatic disease, which can occur without overt psychosocial evidence of alcohol abuse, unless the index of suspicion is high and a thorough drink history obtained. Laboratory tests for the detection and/or confirmation of alcohol abuse are useful but subject to serious limitations being neither as sensitive nor specific as sometimes believed. The value of random blood and/or breath alcohol measurements, in outpatients, as an aid to diagnosis of alcohol-induced organic disease is probably not sufficiently appreciated and, though relatively insensitive, is highly specific. PMID:6339563

  12. Clowns Benefit Children Hospitalized for Respiratory Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Bertini, Mario; Isola, Elena; Paolone, Giuseppe; Curcio, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    The study aims at evaluating health-generating function of humor therapy in a hospital ward hosting children suffering from respiratory pathologies. The main scope of this study is to investigate possible positive effects of the presence of a clown on both the clinical evolution of the on-going disease, and on some physiological and pain parameters. Forty-three children with respiratory pathologies participated in the study: 21 of them belonged to the experimental group (EG) and 22 children to the control group (CG). During their hospitalization, the children of the EG interacted with two clowns who were experienced in the field of pediatric intervention. All participants were evaluated with respect to clinical progress and to a series of physiological and pain measures both before and after the clown interaction. When compared with the CG, EG children showed an earlier disappearance of the pathological symptoms. Moreover, the interaction of the clown with the children led to a statistically significant lowering of diastolic blood pressure, respiratory frequency and temperature in the EG as compared with the control group. The other two parameters of systolic pressure and heart frequency yielded results in the same direction, without reaching statistical significance. A similar health-inducing effect of clown presence was observed on pain parameters, both by self evaluation and assessment by nurses. Taken together, our data indicate that the presence of clowns in the ward has a possible health-inducing effect. Thus, humor can be seen as an easy-to-use, inexpensive and natural therapeutic modality to be used within different therapeutic settings. PMID:21785637

  13. Clowns benefit children hospitalized for respiratory pathologies.

    PubMed

    Bertini, Mario; Isola, Elena; Paolone, Giuseppe; Curcio, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    The study aims at evaluating health-generating function of humor therapy in a hospital ward hosting children suffering from respiratory pathologies. The main scope of this study is to investigate possible positive effects of the presence of a clown on both the clinical evolution of the on-going disease, and on some physiological and pain parameters. Forty-three children with respiratory pathologies participated in the study: 21 of them belonged to the experimental group (EG) and 22 children to the control group (CG). During their hospitalization, the children of the EG interacted with two clowns who were experienced in the field of pediatric intervention. All participants were evaluated with respect to clinical progress and to a series of physiological and pain measures both before and after the clown interaction. When compared with the CG, EG children showed an earlier disappearance of the pathological symptoms. Moreover, the interaction of the clown with the children led to a statistically significant lowering of diastolic blood pressure, respiratory frequency and temperature in the EG as compared with the control group. The other two parameters of systolic pressure and heart frequency yielded results in the same direction, without reaching statistical significance. A similar health-inducing effect of clown presence was observed on pain parameters, both by self evaluation and assessment by nurses. Taken together, our data indicate that the presence of clowns in the ward has a possible health-inducing effect. Thus, humor can be seen as an easy-to-use, inexpensive and natural therapeutic modality to be used within different therapeutic settings.

  14. Immune profiling of BALB/C and C57BL/6 mice reveals a correlation between Ureaplasma parvum-Induced fetal inflammatory response syndrome-like pathology and increased placental expression of TLR2 and CD14.

    PubMed

    Allam, Ayman B; von Chamier, Maria; Brown, Mary B; Reyes, Leticia

    2014-03-01

    Both BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice are susceptible to intrauterine infection with Ureaplasma parvum, but only protypical TH2/M2 BALB/c mice develop severe chorioamnionitis, fetal infection, and fetal inflammatory response syndrome-like (FIRS) pathology. Microscopy, gene expression analysis, and ELISA were used to identify placental innate immune responses relevant to macrophage polarity, severe chorioamnionitis, and fetal infection. Both mouse strains exhibited a pro-M2 cytokine profile at the maternal/fetal interface. In BALB/c mice, expression of CD14 and TLRs 1, 2, 6 was increased in infected placentas; TLR2 and CD14 were localized to neutrophils. Increased TLR2/CD14 was also observed in BALB/c syncytiotrophoblasts in tissues with pathological evidence of FIRS. In contrast, expression in C57BL/6 placentas was either unchanged or down-regulated. Our findings show a link between increased syncytiotrophoblast expression of CD14/TLR2 and FIRS-like pathology in BALB/c mice. Functional studies are required to determine if CD14 is contributing to fetal morbidity during chorioamnionitis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Domoic Acid Toxicologic Pathology: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Pulido, Olga M.

    2008-01-01

    Domoic acid was identified as the toxin responsible for an outbreak of human poisoning that occurred in Canada in 1987 following consumption of contaminated blue mussels [Mytilus edulis]. The poisoning was characterized by a constellation of clinical symptoms and signs. Among the most prominent features described was memory impairment which led to the name Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning [ASP]. Domoic acid is produced by certain marine organisms, such as the red alga Chondria armata and planktonic diatom of the genus Pseudo-nitzschia. Since 1987, monitoring programs have been successful in preventing other human incidents of ASP. However, there are documented cases of domoic acid intoxication in wild animals and outbreaks of coastal water contamination in many regions world-wide. Hence domoic acid continues to pose a global risk to the health and safety of humans and wildlife. Several mechanisms have been implicated as mediators for the effects of domoic acid. Of particular importance is the role played by glutamate receptors as mediators of excitatory neurotransmission and the demonstration of a wide distribution of these receptors outside the central nervous system, prompting the attention to other tissues as potential target sites. The aim of this document is to provide a comprehensive review of ASP, DOM induced pathology including ultrastructural changes associated to subchronic oral exposure, and discussion of key proposed mechanisms of cell/tissue injury involved in DOM induced brain pathology and considerations relevant to food safety and human health. PMID:18728725

  16. Communication skills in diagnostic pathology.

    PubMed

    Lehr, Hans-Anton; Bosman, Fred T

    2016-01-01

    Communication is an essential element of good medical practice also in pathology. In contrast to technical or diagnostic skills, communication skills are not easy to define, teach, or assess. Rules almost do not exist. In this paper, which has a rather personal character and cannot be taken as a set of guidelines, important aspects of communication in pathology are explored. This includes what should be communicated to the pathologist on the pathology request form, communication between pathologists during internal (interpathologist) consultation, communication around frozen section diagnoses, modalities of communication of a final diagnosis, with whom and how critical and unexpected findings should be communicated, (in-)adequate routes of communication for pathology diagnoses, who will (or might) receive pathology reports, and what should be communicated and how in case of an error or a technical problem. An earlier more formal description of what the responsibilities are of a pathologist as communicator and as collaborator in a medical team is added in separate tables. The intention of the paper is to stimulate reflection and discussion rather than to formulate strict rules.

  17. [Pathological buying -- a literature review].

    PubMed

    Müller, Astrid; Reinecker, Hans; Jacobi, Corinna; Reisch, Lucia; de Zwaan, Martina

    2005-01-01

    This review summarizes the literature on pathological buying published during the past 15 years. Pathological or compulsive buying is defined as frequent preoccupation with buying or impulses to buy that are experienced as irresistible, intrusive, and/or senseless. The buying behavior causes marked distress, interferes with social functioning, and often results in financial problems. Studies on the phenomenology, diagnosis, classification, comorbidity, epidemiology, and treatment are presented. Pathological buying should be diagnosed as impulse control disorder not otherwise specified (ICD-10 F63.9). Psychiatric comorbidity is frequent, particulary mood, anxiety, substance use, eating, impulse control and obsessive-compulsive disorders. The positive results of pharmacological treatment with antidepressants (usually SSRI) and opioid antagonists could not be confirmed in controlled trials. A disorder specific cognitive-behavioral group treatment manual was published in USA. A controlled study is currently conducted in USA and since 2003 at the Department of Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy at the University Hospital Erlangen.

  18. Shame regulation in personality pathology.

    PubMed

    Schoenleber, Michelle; Berenbaum, Howard

    2012-05-01

    Drawing on extant work on shame and emotion regulation, this article proposes that three broad forms of maladaptive shame regulation strategies are fundamental in much of personality pathology: Prevention (e.g., dependence, fantasy), used preemptively, lessens potential for shame; Escape (e.g., social withdrawal, misdirection) reduces current or imminent shame; Aggression, used after shame begins, refocuses shame into anger directed at the self (e.g., physical self-harm) or others (e.g., verbal aggression). This article focuses on the contributions of shame regulation to the development and maintenance of personality pathology, highlighting how various maladaptive shame regulation strategies may lead to personality pathology symptoms, associated features, and dimensions. Consideration is also given to the possible shame-related constructs necessitating emotion regulation (e.g., shame aversion and proneness) and the points in the emotion process when regulation can occur.

  19. The neurobiology of pathological gambling.

    PubMed

    Potenza, M N

    2001-07-01

    Despite relatively high prevalence rates and significant morbidity and mortality associated with pathological gambling (PG), our understanding of the neurobiological basis of PG lags in comparison to that for other psychiatric illnesses of comparable magnitude. An improved understanding of the neurobiology of PG would facilitate targeted investigations into more effective treatments. Emerging data suggest shared neurobiological features determine in part pathological gambling and substance use disorders. These findings both challenge current conceptualizations of addictions and provide a substantial basis of knowledge on which to design investigations into the understanding and treatment of pathological gambling. The findings that substance use disorders and the behavioral "addiction" of PG share common causative features raise the question as to what extent other compulsive disorders (eg, compulsive shopping, compulsive sexual behaviors, compulsive computer use) might be biologically related.

  20. Pathology of human diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Malik, R A

    2014-01-01

    Pathologic study of a disease provides insights into the precise mechanisms and targets of damage and may provide insights into new therapies. The main targets in diabetic neuropathy are myelinated and unmyelinated fibers as dysfunction and damage to them explains the symptoms of painful neuropathy and the major end points of foot ulceration and amputation as well as mortality. Demyelination and axonal degeneration are established hallmarks of the pathology of human diabetic neuropathy and were derived from pioneering light and electronmicroscopic studies of sural nerve biopsies in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Additional abnormalities, which are relevant to the pathogenesis of human diabetic neuropathy, include pathology of the microvessels and extracellular space. Intraepidermal and sudomotor nerve quantification in skin biopsies provides a minimally invasive means for the detection of early nerve damage. Studies of muscle biopsies are limited and show significant alterations in the expression of neurotrophins, but limited changes in muscle fiber size and capillary density.

  1. [Treatment prevalence in pathological gambling].

    PubMed

    Queri, S; Erbas, B; Soyka, M

    2007-08-01

    Based on American studies lifetime prevalence of 'Pathological Gambling' (ICD-10, F 63.0) in Germany can be estimated at 0.5 %. That means about 400,000 gamblers requiring treatment. Epidemiological studies showed that only a little proportion is actually seeking treatment. Reliable knowledge about treatment prevalence does not exist for Germany. The study at hand using secondary data was performed to validate the estimation of the 'Deutsche Suchthilfestatistik' regarding inpatient and outpatient treatment prevalence in 'Pathological Gambling' with data from service providers (cost unit). The analysis proves the estimation of the German Addiction Statistics ('Deutsche Suchthilfestatistik') that the inpatient treatment prevalence has considerably risen. In spite of the consideration that treatment of pathological gambling is not limited to specialized hospitals there is still a considerable gap between estimated prevalence and treatment prevalence.

  2. [Pathology of the vitreomacular interface].

    PubMed

    Pop, Monica; Gheorghe, Alina

    2014-01-01

    Vitreous role in the pathophysiology of retinal diseases has increased importantly over the recent years. This was possible using Optical Coherence Tomography which reviewed the way the vitreoretinal interface should be looked at and defined and classified new pathologies such as Vitreoretinal Traction Syndrome. Vitreous is not an empty space but an important anatomical structure with role in ocular physiology. With age biochemical changes occur so that vitreous starts to liquefy. Once the vitreous is liquefied (sinchisis) it collapses and passes in the retrohialoid space (sineresis). In complete PVD besides sinchisis there is a weakness of the adherence between the posterior cortex and ILM with total detachment of posterior cortex. Abnormal adhesions are associated with incomplete PVD. The definition and understanting of vitreoretinal pathology is an active and continuous process, PVD being the trigger of a lot of retinal pathologies: epiretinal membrane, macular hole, tractional macular oedema, VMTS, myopic traction maculopathy, exacerbations of exudative ARMD.

  3. Digital pathology in nephrology clinical trials, research, and pathology practice.

    PubMed

    Barisoni, Laura; Hodgin, Jeffrey B

    2017-08-30

    In this review, we will discuss (i) how the recent advancements in digital technology and computational engineering are currently applied to nephropathology in the setting of clinical research, trials, and practice; (ii) the benefits of the new digital environment; (iii) how recognizing its challenges provides opportunities for transformation; and (iv) nephropathology in the upcoming era of kidney precision and predictive medicine. Recent studies highlighted how new standardized protocols facilitate the harmonization of digital pathology database infrastructure and morphologic, morphometric, and computer-aided quantitative analyses. Digital pathology enables robust protocols for clinical trials and research, with the potential to identify previously underused or unrecognized clinically useful parameters. The integration of digital pathology with molecular signatures is leading the way to establishing clinically relevant morpho-omic taxonomies of renal diseases. The introduction of digital pathology in clinical research and trials, and the progressive implementation of the modern software ecosystem, opens opportunities for the development of new predictive diagnostic paradigms and computer-aided algorithms, transforming the practice of renal disease into a modern computational science.

  4. Medical careers in pathology, 1977.

    PubMed Central

    Baron, D N

    1979-01-01

    A survey has been made, mainly covering the second half of 1977, of career grade posts and senior training posts in pathology in the United Kingdom. The survey included all disciplines of pathology and all types of employment--National Health Service, medical school, and many others. The survey also examined the number of applicants for advertised posts and the number of posts left vacant. There were variations between disciplines and between regions; microbiology and Northern Ireland had most failures in filling posts. Overall about 3% of career grade posts, and 15% of training grade posts, were left unfilled. PMID:429573

  5. Molecular Biomarkers of Knee Pathology.

    PubMed

    Cuellar, Vanessa; Strauss, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The identification of biomarkers has become increasingly important in our fundamental understanding of the molecular basis for disease and subsequently in the advancement of modern medicine. Biomarkers have been identified in a plethora of normal and pathologic conditions and are most often found in blood, tissue, or synovial fluid. Orthopaedic research has more recently focused on biomarkers of cartilage and joint diseases, with an emphasis on understanding the molecular underpinnings of their pathophysiology. This article focuses on the biomarkers identified to date in several select knee pathologies and how further research can contribute to new diagnostic tools and targeted therapeutics.

  6. Optimal breast cancer pathology manifesto.

    PubMed

    Tot, T; Viale, G; Rutgers, E; Bergsten-Nordström, E; Costa, A

    2015-11-01

    This manifesto was prepared by a European Breast Cancer (EBC) Council working group and launched at the European Breast Cancer Conference in Glasgow on 20 March 2014. It sets out optimal technical and organisational requirements for a breast cancer pathology service, in the light of concerns about variability and lack of patient-centred focus. It is not a guideline about how pathology services should be performed. It is a call for all in the cancer community--pathologists, oncologists, patient advocates, health administrators and policymakers--to check that services are available that serve the needs of patients in a high quality, timely way.

  7. [Nitric oxide in dengue pathology].

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Ortega, M

    1998-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a multifunctional molecule that is involved in citotoxic as well as citoprotective processes, it's synthesis is highly regulated by the cell because an alteration in NO production is associated with a variety of pathologies, such as Septic, Anaphylactic and Hemorrhagic Shock. The clinical feature of dengue virus infection has a spectrum that goes from mild, dengue fever, to a severe disease, dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock. Here, some evidences are discussed that links NO with the pathology of the severe disease cause by dengue virus.

  8. 27 CFR 22.107 - Pathological laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pathological laboratories... Pathological laboratories. (a) Pathological laboratories, not operated by a hospital or sanitarium, may... sanitariums. If a pathological laboratory does not exclusively conduct analyses or tests for hospitals...

  9. 27 CFR 22.107 - Pathological laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pathological laboratories... Pathological laboratories. (a) Pathological laboratories, not operated by a hospital or sanitarium, may... sanitariums. If a pathological laboratory does not exclusively conduct analyses or tests for hospitals...

  10. 27 CFR 22.107 - Pathological laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pathological laboratories... Pathological laboratories. (a) Pathological laboratories, not operated by a hospital or sanitarium, may... sanitariums. If a pathological laboratory does not exclusively conduct analyses or tests for hospitals...

  11. 27 CFR 22.107 - Pathological laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pathological laboratories... Pathological laboratories. (a) Pathological laboratories, not operated by a hospital or sanitarium, may... sanitariums. If a pathological laboratory does not exclusively conduct analyses or tests for hospitals...

  12. 27 CFR 22.107 - Pathological laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pathological laboratories... Pathological laboratories. (a) Pathological laboratories, not operated by a hospital or sanitarium, may... sanitariums. If a pathological laboratory does not exclusively conduct analyses or tests for hospitals...

  13. Mathematical Pathologies as Pathways into Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sriraman, Bharath; Dickman, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the role of mathematical pathologies as a means of fostering creativity in the classroom is discussed. In particular, it delves into what constitutes a mathematical pathology, examines historical mathematical pathologies as well as pathologies in contemporary classrooms, and indicates how the Lakatosian heuristic can be used to…

  14. Cognitive Deterioration and Associated Pathology Induced by Chronic Low-Level Aluminum Ingestion in a Translational Rat Model Provides an Explanation of Alzheimer's Disease, Tests for Susceptibility and Avenues for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Walton, J. R.

    2012-01-01

    A translational aging rat model for chronic aluminum (Al) neurotoxicity mimics human Al exposure by ingesting Al, throughout middle age and old age, in equivalent amounts to those ingested by Americans from their food, water, and Al additives. Most rats that consumed Al in an amount equivalent to the high end of the human total dietary Al range developed severe cognitive deterioration in old age. High-stage Al accumulation occurred in the entorhinal cortical cells of origin for the perforant pathway and hippocampal CA1 cells, resulting in microtubule depletion and dendritic dieback. Analogous pathological change in humans leads to destruction of the perforant pathway and Alzheimer's disease dementia. The hippocampus is thereby isolated from neocortical input and output normally mediated by the entorhinal cortex. Additional evidence is presented that Al is involved in the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, amyloid plaques, granulovacuolar degeneration, and other pathological changes of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The shared characteristics indicate that AD is a human form of chronic Al neurotoxicity. This translational animal model provides fresh strategies for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of AD. PMID:22928148

  15. THE PATHOLOGY OF MENTAL RETARDATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CROME, L.; STERN, J.

    DATA FROM RECENT COMPREHENSIVE STUDIES OF THE PATHOLOGY OF MENTAL RETARDATION ARE ASSEMBLED, INCLUDING MATERIAL ON ETIOLOGY, MORPHOLOGY, BIOCHEMISTRY, AND LABORATORY DIAGNOSIS. AREAS COVERED ARE (1) GENETIC CAUSES OF MENTAL RETARDATION, (2) DISORDERS OF GESTATION, (3) BIRTH INJURY, (4) GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS OF POSTNATAL CAUSES OF MENTAL…

  16. Surgical pathology of urologic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Javadpour, N.; Barsky, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    This text details recent advances in methods for detecting, diagnosing, and managing genitourinary diseases. Included are chapters on imaging techniques (including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and ultrasound; tumor markers (such as alphafetoprotein, human chorionic gonadotropin, prostatic specific antigen, and T-antigens); immunocytochemistry; pediatric urologic pathology; and other key topics.

  17. Learning Biology with Plant Pathology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Juliet E.

    This monograph contains 10 plant pathology experiments that were written to correspond to portions of a biology curriculum. Each experiment is suitable to a biology topic and designed to encourage exploration of those biological concepts being taught. Experiments include: (1) The Symptoms and Signs of Disease; (2) Koch's Postulates; (3)…

  18. THE PATHOLOGY OF MENTAL RETARDATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CROME, L.; STERN, J.

    DATA FROM RECENT COMPREHENSIVE STUDIES OF THE PATHOLOGY OF MENTAL RETARDATION ARE ASSEMBLED, INCLUDING MATERIAL ON ETIOLOGY, MORPHOLOGY, BIOCHEMISTRY, AND LABORATORY DIAGNOSIS. AREAS COVERED ARE (1) GENETIC CAUSES OF MENTAL RETARDATION, (2) DISORDERS OF GESTATION, (3) BIRTH INJURY, (4) GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS OF POSTNATAL CAUSES OF MENTAL…

  19. Protection by Neuroglobin Expression in Brain Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Baez, Eliana; Echeverria, Valentina; Cabezas, Ricardo; Ávila-Rodriguez, Marco; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Barreto, George E.

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes play an important role in physiological, metabolic, and structural functions, and when impaired, they can be involved in various pathologies including Alzheimer, focal ischemic stroke, and traumatic brain injury. These disorders involve an imbalance in the blood flow and nutrients such as glucose and lactate, leading to biochemical and molecular changes that cause neuronal damage, which is followed by loss of cognitive and motor functions. Previous studies have shown that astrocytes are more resilient than neurons during brain insults as a consequence of their more effective antioxidant systems, transporters, and enzymes, which made them less susceptible to excitotoxicity. In addition, astrocytes synthesize and release different protective molecules for neurons, including neuroglobin, a member of the globin family of proteins. After brain injury, neuroglobin expression is induced in astrocytes. Since neuroglobin promotes neuronal survival, its increased expression in astrocytes after brain injury may represent an endogenous neuroprotective mechanism. Here, we review the role of neuroglobin in the central nervous system, its relationship with different pathologies, and the role of different factors that regulate its expression in astrocytes. PMID:27672379

  20. Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus: Infection and Pathology.

    PubMed

    Bohmwald, Karen; Espinoza, Janyra A; Rey-Jurado, Emma; Gómez, Roberto S; González, Pablo A; Bueno, Susan M; Riedel, Claudia A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2016-08-01

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is by far the major cause of acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRTIs) worldwide in infants and children younger than 2 years. The overwhelming number of hospitalizations due to hRSV-induced ALRTI each year is due, at least in part, to the lack of licensed vaccines against this virus. Thus, hRSV infection is considered a major public health problem and economic burden in most countries. The lung pathology developed in hRSV-infected individuals is characterized by an exacerbated proinflammatory and unbalanced Th2-type immune response. In addition to the adverse effects in airway tissues, hRSV infection can also cause neurologic manifestations in the host, such as seizures and encephalopathy. Although the origins of these extrapulmonary symptoms remain unclear, studies with patients suffering from neurological alterations suggest an involvement of the inflammatory response against hRSV. Furthermore, hRSV has evolved numerous mechanisms to modulate and evade the immune response in the host. Several studies have focused on elucidating the interactions between hRSV virulence factors and the host immune system, to rationally design new vaccines and therapies against this virus. Here, we discuss about the infection, pathology, and immune response triggered by hRSV in the host.

  1. Quality in pathology laboratory practice.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, S

    1995-06-01

    Quality refers not only to analytical quality control, a traditional area of laboratory excellence, but to the entire science of quality management. As measures of quality, structural indicators refer to staffing and physical facilities, process indicators to the institutions operations and, perhaps most importantly, outcome indicators address the ultimate patient care uses that pathology information is put to. Comparison of performance to peer laboratories, external quality control, is a practical, if limited, yardstick of performance. Customer satisfaction and turn-around-time of tests are receiving more recent attention as quality measures. Blood banking, because of its inherently complex cycle from donor phlebotomy to product infusion, requires special considerations with regard to quality management. Reporting of anatomical pathology, where the only gold standard is a consensus of experts, also does not lend itself to classical numerical quality assessment.

  2. Hairy cell leukemia: diagnostic pathology.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Robert W; Bethel, Kelly J

    2006-10-01

    The pathology of HCL has been reviewed with a focus on the diagnostic hematopathology of this rare, but fascinating, disease. The discrimination of HCL from other B-cell lymphoproliferations, particularly HCL-V and SMZL, has been emphasized. The unique responsiveness of HCL to 2-CdA and other chemotherapeutic agents makes this distinction critical. Fortunately, HCL has consistent cytologic, histologic, cytochemical, and immunologic features that make classification reliable and reproducible. Less straightforward is the differential diagnosis of SMZL and HCL-V, problematic because of the rarity of both disorders, lack of discriminating evidence-based criteria, and perhaps a biologic kinship between these two disorders that share many clinical and pathologic features. Fortunately, this is not a clinically critical distinction.

  3. Noise reduction for vocal pathologies.

    PubMed

    Matassini, L; Manfredi, C

    2002-01-01

    A noise reduction scheme, particularly suited for the correction of vocal pathologies, is proposed. The filter makes use of concepts originated within the theory of dynamical systems and deterministic chaos. In particular, the idea of embedding scalar data in order to reconstruct a phase space is of fundamental importance here. Furthermore, the concept of an attractor as a result of dynamical constraints is exploited. In order to perform noise reduction one needs redundancy and the human voice provides it even within a phoneme, namely the smallest structural unit of speech. Due to several repetitions of a pattern called pitch inside a phoneme, separation between the pure voice signal and the noise is possible, provided the latter is uncorrelated with the former. With a proper parameter tuning, different kinds of noise can be removed. We describe the idea behind the noise reduction algorithm and present applications to vocal pathologies.

  4. Rotator cuff and subacromial pathology.

    PubMed

    Yablon, Corrie M; Jacobson, Jon A

    2015-07-01

    Both MRI and ultrasound (US) demonstrate equivalent accuracy in the evaluation of the rotator cuff. Both modalities have their advantages, disadvantages, and pitfalls. Radiography is an important complementary modality in that it can demonstrate occult sources of shoulder pain. MRI is recommended for the evaluation of shoulder pain in patients < 40 years of age because labral pathology is frequently identified. However, in patients > 40 years, US should be the first-line modality because the incidence of rotator cuff pathology increases with age. US is useful to guide procedures such as subacromial injection and calcific tendinosis lavage. Radiologists should be knowledgeable of both MRI and US of the shoulder to tailor these examinations to the specific needs of their patients. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  5. Interleukin-22: immunobiology and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Dudakov, Jarrod A.; Hanash, Alan M.; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-22 (IL-22) is a recently described IL-10 family cytokine that is produced by T-helper (Th)-17 cells, γδ T cells, NKT cells and newly described innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). Knowledge of IL-22 biology has rapidly evolved since its discovery in 2000, and a role for IL-22 has been identified in numerous tissues including the intestines, lung, liver, kidney, thymus, pancreas and skin. IL-22 primarily targets non-hematopoietic epithelial and stromal cells where it can promote proliferation and play a role in tissue regeneration. In addition, IL-22 regulates host defense at barrier surfaces. However, IL-22 has also been linked to several conditions involving inflammatory tissue pathology. In this review, we will assess the current understanding of this cytokine, including its physiologic and pathologic effects on epithelial cell function. PMID:25706098

  6. Pathological fear of cot death.

    PubMed

    Weightman, H; Dalal, B M; Brockington, I F

    1998-01-01

    Cot death (sudden infant death syndrome) is one of the most common causes of death in the first year of life. Four cases with a pathological fear of cot death are presented. All the patients were depressed and in 2 cases the fear of cot death had an obsessional quality. In all cases there were complications during pregnancy (miscarriage, threatened abortion, recurrent vomiting in last trimester). In 1 case, the patient knew 3 mothers who had suffered cot deaths; in another, the infant was gravely ill in the neonatal period. Pathological fear of cot death can be recognised by the presence of two central features - overvigilance and excessive nocturnal checking of the baby's breathing. Therapeutic interventions are discussed.

  7. Pathology effects at radiation doses below those causing increased mortality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnes, Bruce A.; Gavrilova, Natalia; Grahn, Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Mortality data from experiments conducted at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) on the long-term effects of external whole-body irradiation on B6CF(1) mice were used to investigate radiation-induced effects at intermediate doses of (60)Co gamma rays or fission-spectrum neutrons either delivered as a single exposure or protracted over 60 once-weekly exposures. Kaplan-Meier analyses were used to identify the lowest dose in the ANL data (within radiation quality, pattern of exposure, and sex) at which radiation-induced mortality caused by primary tumors could be detected (approximately 1-2 Gy for gamma rays and 10-15 cGy for neutrons). Doses at and below these levels were then examined for radiation-induced shifts in the spectrum of pathology detected at death. To do this, specific pathology events were pooled into larger assemblages based on whether they were cancer, cardiovascular disease or non-neoplastic diseases detected within the lungs and pleura, liver and biliary tract, reproductive organs, or urinary tract. Cancer and cardiovascular disease were further subdivided into categories based on whether they caused death, contributed to death, or were simply observed at death. Counts of how often events falling within each of these combined pathology categories occurred within a mouse were then used as predictor variables in logistic regression to determine whether irradiated mice could be distinguished from control mice. Increased pathology burdens were detected in irradiated mice at doses lower than those causing detectable shifts in mortality-22 cGy for gamma rays and 2 cGy for neutrons. These findings suggest that (1) models based on mortality data alone may underestimate radiation effects, (2) radiation may have adverse health consequences (i.e. elevated health risks) even when mortality risks are not detected, and (3) radiation-induced pathologies other than cancer do occur, and they involve multiple organ systems.

  8. Legal billing for pathology services.

    PubMed

    Glaser, David M; Bennett, Katherine J

    2007-02-01

    Minnesota physicians recently debated whether primary care physicians can legally and ethically "mark up" or add to the fees charged by a pathologist when submitting bills for pathology services to third-party payers. This article explores the relevant federal and state laws and offers the conclusion that both federal and state law allow for such a mark-up if it reflects reasonable compensation for additional work and risk assumed by the primary care provider group.

  9. Prostate Cancer Pathology Resource Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Research 63, 4196-4203 (2003). 8. Xu, J., Stolk, J.A., Zhang, X., Silva, S.J., Houghton, R.L., Matsumura, M., Vedvick, T.S., Leslie , K.B., Badaro, R...American Journal of Pathology 178, 1824-1834 (2010). 12. Koh, C.M., Iwata, T., Zheng, Q., Bethel , C., Yegnasubramanian, S. & De Marzo, A.M. Myc enforces

  10. [The normal and the pathological].

    PubMed

    Hofmann, B

    1995-12-10

    The main problem of modern health care is to express its goals and its limits. To do this it is necessary to answer the fundamental question: what is normal and what is pathological? The French physician and philosopher Georges Canguilhem has tried to answer this question. He claims that for medicine, the difference between these fundamentals is determined by normativity and not by science. In doing this he wishes to save the autonomy of the individual patient and to delimit medicine from science.

  11. Pathology of glomerular deposition diseases.

    PubMed

    Joh, Kensuke

    2007-09-01

    In routine diagnosis on renal biopsy, one of the confusing fields for pathological diagnoses is the glomerulopathies with fibrillary structure. The primary glomerulopathies with a deposit of ultrastructural fibrillary structure, which are negative for Congo-red stain but positive for immunoglobulins, include fibrillary glomerulonephritis and immunotactoid glomerulopathy. Several paraproteinemias including cryoglobulinemia, monoclonal gammopathy, and light chain deposition disease as well as hematopoietic disorders including plasmacytoma, plasma cell dyscrasia, and B cell lymphoproliferative disorders involve glomerulopathy with an ultrastructural fibrillary structure. A rare glomerulopathy with fibrillary structure that stains negative for Congo-red as well as for immunoglobulins has been also reported. The pathological diagnoses of these glomerulopathies can include either glomerular diseases, or paraproteinemic diseases, or hematopoietic diseases. The terminology is still confusing when glomerular diseases can be combined with paraproteinemic diseases and/or hematopoietic diseases. Therefore, the generic term, 'glomerular deposition disease' (GDD), has been proposed by pathologists with a requirement for clinicians to detect autoantibodies, paraproteins as well as to carry out a bone marrow check. An attempt has been made to rearrange the diseases with related disorders of fibrillary deposits, based on detailed clinical and pathological finding and to elucidate the correlation between GDD, paraproteinemia, and hematopoietic disorder.

  12. Pathologic classification of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tervaert, Thijs W Cohen; Mooyaart, Antien L; Amann, Kerstin; Cohen, Arthur H; Cook, H Terence; Drachenberg, Cinthia B; Ferrario, Franco; Fogo, Agnes B; Haas, Mark; de Heer, Emile; Joh, Kensuke; Noël, Laure H; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Seshan, Surya V; Bajema, Ingeborg M; Bruijn, Jan A

    2010-04-01

    Although pathologic classifications exist for several renal diseases, including IgA nephropathy, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, and lupus nephritis, a uniform classification for diabetic nephropathy is lacking. Our aim, commissioned by the Research Committee of the Renal Pathology Society, was to develop a consensus classification combining type1 and type 2 diabetic nephropathies. Such a classification should discriminate lesions by various degrees of severity that would be easy to use internationally in clinical practice. We divide diabetic nephropathy into four hierarchical glomerular lesions with a separate evaluation for degrees of interstitial and vascular involvement. Biopsies diagnosed as diabetic nephropathy are classified as follows: Class I, glomerular basement membrane thickening: isolated glomerular basement membrane thickening and only mild, nonspecific changes by light microscopy that do not meet the criteria of classes II through IV. Class II, mesangial expansion, mild (IIa) or severe (IIb): glomeruli classified as mild or severe mesangial expansion but without nodular sclerosis (Kimmelstiel-Wilson lesions) or global glomerulosclerosis in more than 50% of glomeruli. Class III, nodular sclerosis (Kimmelstiel-Wilson lesions): at least one glomerulus with nodular increase in mesangial matrix (Kimmelstiel-Wilson) without changes described in class IV. Class IV, advanced diabetic glomerulosclerosis: more than 50% global glomerulosclerosis with other clinical or pathologic evidence that sclerosis is attributable to diabetic nephropathy. A good interobserver reproducibility for the four classes of DN was shown (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.84) in a test of this classification.

  13. Diagnostic pathology in 2012: development of digital pathology in an open access journal.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Klaus

    2013-01-10

    Herein we describe and interpret the digital world of diagnostic surgical pathology, and take the in Pathology leading Open Access Journal Diagnostic Pathology as example. http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1944221953867351.

  14. Ultrastructural pathology and immunohistochemistry of mustard gas lesion

    SciTech Connect

    Petrali, J.P.; Oglesby, S.B.; Hamilton, T.A.; Mills, K.R.

    1993-05-13

    The ultrastructural pathology of sulfur mustard gas (HD) skin toxicity has been characterized for several in vivo and in vitro model systems. In animal models, the pathology involves the latent lethal targeting of skin basal cells, a disabling of hemidesmosomes and a progressive edema of the lamina lucida, all of which contribute to the formation of characteristic microblisters at the dermal-epidermal junction. However, the effects of HD toxicity on structural proteins of extracellular domains of the dermal-epidermal junction have not been elucidated. We are beginning an immunohistochemical study of these domains in the hairless guinea pig and summarize here the time course effects of HD of three structural proteins: bullous pemphigoid antigen, laminin and Type IV collagen. The results of this combined ultrastructural and immunohistochemical study indicate that proteins of extracellular matrices of the basement membrane are antigenically altered during the development of HD-induced skin pathology and may contribute to the formation of microblisters.

  15. Crucial Contributions by T Lymphocytes (Effector, Regulatory, and Checkpoint Inhibitor) and Cytokines (TH1, TH2, and TH17) to a Pathological Complete Response Induced by Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Women with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Chandan; Eremin, Jennifer M.; Cowley, Gerard; Ilyas, Mohammed; Eremin, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    The tumour microenvironment consists of malignant cells, stroma, and immune cells. Prominent tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in breast cancer are associated with a good prognosis and are predictors of a pathological complete response (pCR) with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). The contribution of different T effector/regulatory cells and cytokines to tumour cell death with NAC requires further characterisation and was investigated in this study. Breast tumours from 33 women with large and locally advanced breast cancers undergoing NAC were immunohistochemically (intratumoural, stromal) assessed for T cell subsets and cytokine expression using labelled antibodies, employing established semiquantitative methods. Prominent levels of TILs and CD4+, CD8+, and CTLA-4+ (stromal) T cells and CD8+ : FOXP3+ ratios were associated with a significant pCR; no association was seen with FOXP3+, CTLA-4+ (intratumoural), and PD-1+ T cells. NAC significantly reduced CD4+, FOXP3+, CTLA-4+ (stromal) (concurrently blood FOXP3+, CTLA-4+ Tregs), and PD-1+ T cells; no reduction was seen with CD8+ and CTLA-4+ (intratumoural) T cells. High post-NAC tumour levels of FOXP3+ T cells, IL-10, and IL-17 were associated with a failed pCR. Our study has characterised further the contribution of T effector/regulatory cells and cytokines to tumour cell death with NAC. PMID:27777963

  16. Evaluation and treatment of pathological gambling.

    PubMed

    González-Ibáñez, Angels; Rosel, Pilar; Moreno, Isabel

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this article was to describe a model for evaluating and implementing cognitive-behavioral treatment for pathological gambling. The model takes into account the fact that pathological gamblers form a heterogeneous group with varied biopsychosocial characteristics.

  17. Beyond acute appendicitis: imaging and pathologic spectrum of appendiceal pathology.

    PubMed

    Gaetke-Udager, Kara; Maturen, Katherine E; Hammer, Suntrea G

    2014-10-01

    While acute appendicitis is a common and important clinical problem, a variety of other disease processes can affect the appendix. Simple and perforated appendicitis, tip appendicitis, and stump appendicitis share a common clinical presentation including anorexia, right lower quadrant pain, and fever. By imaging, most cases of acute appendicitis exhibit luminal dilation, wall thickening, and periappendiceal inflammatory stranding. In tip appendicitis, these changes are isolated to the distal appendix, often with an obstructing appendicolith. Perforated appendicitis can exhibit mural discontinuity, periappendiceal abscess, and/or extraluminal appendicoliths. After appendectomy, the appendiceal remnant or "stump" can become inflamed, often necessitating repeat surgery. Inflammatory bowel disease can involve the terminal ileum, secondarily involving the appendix, or may primarily involve the appendix. Patient symptoms can be chronic in such cases, and mucosal hyperenhancement is a pronounced imaging feature. In asymptomatic patients without appendiceal inflammation, the appendix can be dilated by intraluminal material such as inspissated succus in cystic fibrosis or mucus from benign appendiceal mucocele. Finally, neoplasms such as typical appendiceal carcinoid tumor and mucinous adenocarcinoma can involve the appendix. Carcinoids are often small and incidentally discovered at pathologic examination, while malignant mucinous adenocarcinoma tends to present with advanced disease including pseudomyxoma peritonei. Cecal cancers can also obstruct the appendiceal lumen and cause acute appendicitis; an astute radiologist can recognize this prospectively and facilitate definitive resection (right hemicolectomy) at the time of surgery. Attention to mural features, cecal configuration, and periappendiceal inflammation is essential to the correct prospective diagnosis of complicated appendicitis and less common appendiceal pathologies.

  18. Radiologic-pathologic correlation of musculoskeletal lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, T.M.

    1987-01-01

    This atlas correlates the pathologic and radiologic features of a wide variety of lesions of the bone and soft tissue. Multiple imaging techniques are illustrated with an emphasis on plain radiographs. The author stresses the interpretation of radiographic images in terms of underlying pathology rather than as isolated images. Illustrations of plain radiographs and other radiographic imaging techniques are correlated with numerous micro- and macroscopic pathologic illustrations showing typical histologic and gross pathologic features.

  19. ERP-based detection of brain pathology in rat models for preclinical Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouriziabari, Seyed Berdia

    Early pathological features of Alzheimer's disease (AD) include the accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau protein (HP-tau) in the entorhinal cortex and progressive loss of basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic neurons. These pathologies are known to remain asymptomatic for many years before AD is clinically diagnosed; however, they may induce aberrant brain processing which can be captured as an abnormality in event-related potentials (ERPs). Here, we examined cortical ERPs while a differential associative learning paradigm was applied to adult male rats with entorhinal HP-tau, pharmacological blockade of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, or both conditions. Despite no impairment in differential associative and reversal learning, each pathological feature induced distinct abnormality in cortical ERPs to an extent that was sufficient for machine classifiers to accurately detect a specific type of pathology based on these ERP features. These results highlight a potential use of ERPs during differential associative learning as a biomarker for asymptomatic AD pathology.

  20. Pathological buying and partnership status.

    PubMed

    Müller, Astrid; de Zwaan, Martina; Mitchell, James E; Zimmermann, Tanja

    2016-05-30

    This pilot study investigated the partnership status and the level of pathological buying (PB) in 157 female patients with PB and 1153 women from a German population-based sample. Slightly more than half of both samples were currently living with a partner. The results suggest a protective effect of being in a couple relationship in the representative sample. In contrast, having a partner was not related to the severity of PB among patients. Future studies should address the question of whether the characteristics and quality of partnership have an impact on the severity and course of PB, and vice versa.

  1. Microprobe analysis in human pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.; Kupke, K.G.; Ingram, P.; Roggli, V.L.; Shelburne, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    This tutorial paper reviews the literature on the application of microprobe analysis to practical problems in diagnostic human pathology. The goal is to allow the reader ready access to the literature on specific clinical problems. Specimen preparation and commonly encountered artifacts are also considered. It is concluded that energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis and back-scattered electron imaging are at present the most generally useful microprobe techniques for clinical work, and are no longer solely research tools. The findings often have diagnostic, therapeutic, and/or legal implications. 332 references.

  2. Henipavirus: a review of laboratory animal pathology.

    PubMed

    Williamson, M M; Torres-Velez, F J

    2010-09-01

    The genus Henipavirus contains two members-Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV)-and each can cause fatal disease in humans and animals. HeV and Niv are currently classified as biosafety level 4, and NiV is classified as a category C priority pathogen. The aim of this article is to discuss the pathology of laboratory animal models of henipavirus infection and to assess their suitability as animal models for the development and testing of human therapeutics and vaccines. There has been considerable progress in the development of animal models for henipavirus disease. Suitable animal models include the golden hamster, ferrets, cats, and pigs, which develop disease resembling that observed in humans. Guinea pigs are a less reliable model for henipavirus disease, but they do develop henipavirus-induced encephalitis. Because human efficacy studies with henipaviruses are not permitted, animal studies are critical for the development of antiviral therapeutics and vaccines. Current research indicates that passive immunotherapy using monoclonal antibodies is protective of ferrets against NiV infection and that passive immunotherapy using NiV antibodies protects hamsters from HeV. Recombinant vaccines have been used to protect cats and pigs against NiV infection. Ribavirin and 6-aza-uridine were able to delay but not prevent NiV-induced mortality in hamsters. Further research is needed to develop a model and therapy for late-onset henipavirus encephalitis.

  3. Role of mitochondria in parvovirus pathology.

    PubMed

    Nykky, Jonna; Vuento, Matti; Gilbert, Leona

    2014-01-01

    Proper functioning of the mitochondria is crucial for the survival of the cell. Viruses are able to interfere with mitochondrial functions as they infect the host cell. Parvo