Science.gov

Sample records for 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine popc bilayers

  1. Intermolecular interactions of lysobisphosphatidic acid with phosphatidylcholine in mixed bilayers.

    PubMed

    Holopainen, Juha M; Söderlund, Tim; Alakoskela, Juha-Matti; Säily, Matti; Eriksson, Ove; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2005-01-01

    Lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA) can be regarded to represent a unique derivative of phosphatidylglycerol. This lipid is highly enriched in late endosomes where it can comprise up to 10-15 mol% of all lipids and in these membranes, LBPA appears to be segregated into microdomains. We studied the thermotropic behavior of pure dioleoyl-LBPA mono- and bilayers using Langmuir-lipid monolayers, electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and fluorescence spectroscopy. LBPA formed metastable, liquid-expanded monolayers at an air/buffer interface, and its compression isotherms lacked any indication for structural phase transitions. Neat LBPA formed multilamellar vesicles with no structural transitions or phase transitions between 10 and 80 degrees C at a pH range of 3.0-7.4. We then proceeded to study mixed LBPA/dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers by DSC and fluorescence spectroscopy. Incorporating increasing amounts of LBPA (up to X(LBPA) (molar fraction)=0.10) decreased the co-operativity of the main transition for DPPC, and a decrease in the main phase transition as well as pretransition temperature of DPPC was observed yet with no effect on the enthalpy of this transition. In keeping with the DSC data for DPPC, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC)/LBPA mixed bilayers were more fluid, and no evidence for lateral phase segregation was observed. These results were confirmed using fluorescence microscopy of Langmuir-lipid films composed of POPC and LBPA up to X(LBPA)=0.50 with no evidence for lateral phase separation. As late endosomes are eminently acidic, we examined the effect of lowering pH on lateral organization of mixed PC/LBPA bilayers by DSC and fluorescence spectroscopy. Even at pH 3.0, we find no evidence of LBPA-induced microdomain formation at LBPA contents found in cellular organelles. PMID:15589226

  2. Temperature and Composition Dependence of the Interaction of δ-Lysin with Ternary Mixtures of Sphingomyelin/Cholesterol/POPC

    PubMed Central

    Pokorny, Antje; Yandek, Lindsay E.; Elegbede, Adekunle I.; Hinderliter, Anne; Almeida, Paulo F. F.

    2006-01-01

    The kinetics of carboxyfluorescein efflux induced by the amphipathic peptide δ-lysin from vesicles of porcine brain sphingomyelin (BSM), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC), and cholesterol (Chol) were investigated as a function of temperature and composition. Sphingomyelin (SM)/Chol mixtures form a liquid-ordered (Lo) phase whereas POPC exists in the liquid-disordered (Ld) phase at ambient temperature. δ-Lysin binds strongly to Ld and poorly to Lo phase. In BSM/Chol/POPC vesicles the rate of carboxyfluorescein efflux induced by δ-lysin increases as the POPC content decreases. This is explained by the increase of δ-lysin concentration in Ld domains, which enhances membrane perturbation by the peptide. Phase separations in the micrometer scale have been observed by fluorescence microscopy in SM/Chol/POPC mixtures for some SM, though not for BSM. Thus, δ-lysin must detect heterogeneities (domains) in BSM/Chol/POPC on a much smaller scale. Advantage was taken of the inverse variation of the efflux rate with the Ld content of BSM/Chol/POPC vesicles to estimate the Ld fraction in those mixtures. These results were combined with differential scanning calorimetry to obtain the BSM/Chol/POPC phase diagram as a function of temperature. PMID:16798807

  3. Macro-ripple phase formation in bilayers composed of galactosylceramide and phosphatidylcholine.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, R E; Anderson, W H; Kulkarni, V S

    1995-01-01

    As determined by freeze fracture electron microscopy, increasing levels of bovine brain galactosylceramide (GalCer) altered the surface structure of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayers by inducing a striking "macro-ripple" phase in the larger, multilamellar lipid vesicles at GalCer mole fractions between 0.4 and 0.8. The term "macro-ripple" phase was used to distinguish it from the P beta' ripple phase observed in saturated, symmetric-chain length phosphatidylcholines. Whereas the P beta' ripple phase displays two types of corrugations, one with a wavelength of 12-15 nm and the other with a wavelength of 25-35 nm, the macro-ripple phase occurring in GalCer/POPC dispersions was of one type with a wavelength of 100-110 nm. Also, in contrast to the extended linear arrays of adjacent ripples observed in the P beta' ripple phase, the macro-ripple phase of GalCer/POPC dispersions was interrupted frequently by packing defects resulting from double dislocations and various disclinations and, thus, appeared to be continuously twisting and turning. Control experiments verified that the macro-ripple phase was not an artifact of incomplete lipid mixing or demixing during preparation. Three different methods of lipid mixing were compared: a spray method of rapid solvent evaporation, a sublimation method of solvent removal, and solvent removal using a rotary evaporation apparatus. Control experiments also revealed that the macro-ripple phase was observed regardless of whether lipid specimens were prepared by either ultra-rapid or manual plunge freezing methods as well as either in the presence or absence of the cryo-protectant glycerol. The macro-ripple phase was always observed in mixtures that were fully annealed by incubation above the main thermal transition of both POPC and bovine brain GalCer before rapid freezing. If the GalCer mixed with POPC contained only nonhydroxy acyl chains or only 2-hydroxy acyl chains, then the occurrence of macro

  4. Nanomechanics of phospholipid bilayer failure under strip biaxial stretching using molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, M. A.; Horstemeyer, M. F.; Gwaltney, Steven R.; Stone, Tonya; LaPlaca, Michelle; Liao, Jun; Williams, Lakiesha; Prabhu, R.

    2016-06-01

    The current study presents a nanoscale in silico investigation of strain rate dependency of membrane (phospholipid bilayer) failure when placed under strip biaxial tension with two planar areas. The nanoscale simulations were conducted in the context of a multiscale modelling framework in which the macroscale damage (pore volume fraction) progression is delineated into pore nucleation (number density of pores), pore growth (size of pores), and pore coalescence (inverse of nearest neighbor distance) mechanisms. As such, the number density, area fraction, and nearest neighbor distances were quantified in association with the stress–strain behavior. Deformations of a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayer were performed using molecular dynamics to simulate mechanoporation of a neuronal cell membrane due to injury, which in turn can result in long-term detrimental effects that could ultimately lead to cell death. Structures with 72 and 144 phospholipids were subjected to strip biaxial tensile deformations at multiple strain rates. Formation of a water bridge through the phospholipid bilayer was the metric to indicate structural failure. Both the larger and smaller bilayers had similar behavior regarding pore nucleation and the strain rate effect on pore growth post water penetration. The applied strain rates, planar area, and cross-sectional area had no effect on the von Mises strains at which pores greater than 0.1 nm2 were detected (0.509  ±  7.8%) or the von Mises strain at failure (ε failure  =  0.68  ±  4.8%). Additionally, changes in bilayer planar and cross-sectional areas did not affect the stress response. However, as the strain rate increased from 2.0  ×  108 s‑1 to 1.0  ×  109 s‑1, the yield stress increased from 26.5 MPa to 66.7 MPa and the yield strain increased from 0.056 to 0.226.

  5. Structure and dynamics of POPC bilayers in water solutions of room temperature ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Benedetto, Antonio; Bingham, Richard J.; Ballone, Pietro

    2015-03-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations in the NPT ensemble have been carried out to investigate the effect of two room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), on stacks of phospholipid bilayers in water. We consider RTIL compounds consisting of chloride ([bmim][Cl]) and hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF{sub 6}]) salts of the 1-buthyl-3-methylimidazolium ([bmim]{sup +}) cation, while the phospholipid bilayer is made of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC). Our investigations focus on structural and dynamical properties of phospholipid and water molecules that could be probed by inelastic and quasi-elastic neutron scattering measurements. The results confirm the fast incorporation of [bmim]{sup +} into the lipid phase already observed in previous simulations, driven by the Coulomb attraction of the cation for the most electronegative oxygens in the POPC head group and by sizeable dispersion forces binding the neutral hydrocarbon tails of [bmim]{sup +} and of POPC. The [bmim]{sup +} absorption into the bilayer favours the penetration of water into POPC, causes a slight but systematic thinning of the bilayer, and further stabilises hydrogen bonds at the lipid/water interface that already in pure samples (no RTIL) display a lifetime much longer than in bulk water. On the other hand, the effect of RTILs on the diffusion constant of POPC (D{sub POPC}) does not reveal a clearly identifiable trend, since D{sub POPC} increases upon addition of [bmim][Cl] and decreases in the [bmim][PF{sub 6}] case. Moreover, because of screening, the electrostatic signature of each bilayer is only moderately affected by the addition of RTIL ions in solution. The analysis of long wavelength fluctuations of the bilayers shows that RTIL sorption causes a general decrease of the lipid/water interfacial tension and bending rigidity, pointing to the destabilizing effect of RTILs on lipid bilayers.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Studies of Transportan 10 (Tp10) Interacting with a POPC Lipid Bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Dunkin, Christina M.; Pokorny, Antje; Almeida, Paulo F.; Lee, Hee-Seung

    2011-01-01

    We performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations to study the nature of interactions between transportan 10 (tp10) and a zwitterionic POPC bilayer. Tp10 is an amphipathic cell-penetrating peptide with a net positive charge of +5 and is known to adopt an α-helical secondary structure on the surface of POPC membranes. The study showed that tp10 preferentially binds to the membrane surface with its hydrophobic side facing the hydrophobic lipid core. Such orientation allows Lys residues, with positively charged long side chains, to stay in the polar environment during the insertion process. The simulations revealed that the Lys–phosphate salt bridge is a key factor in determining the orientation of the peptide in the interfacial region as well as in stabilizing the peptide-membrane interaction. The electrostatic attraction between Lys and phosphate groups is also believed to be the main bottleneck for the translocation of tp10 across the membrane. PMID:21194203

  7. Behaviour of NBD-head group labelled phosphatidylethanolamines in POPC bilayers: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Filipe, Hugo A L; Santos, Lennon S; Prates Ramalho, J P; Moreno, Maria João; Loura, Luís M S

    2015-08-21

    A complete homologous series of fluorescent phosphatidylethanolamines (diCnPE), labelled at the head group with a 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazo-4-yl(NBD) fluorophore and inserted in 1-palmitoyl, 2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) bilayers, was studied using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. The longer-chained derivatives of NBD-diCnPE, with n = 14, 16, and 18, are commercially available, and widely used as fluorescent membrane probes. Properties such as location of atomic groups and acyl chain order parameters of both POPC and NBD-diCnPE, fluorophore orientation and hydrogen bonding, membrane electrostatic potential and lateral diffusion were calculated for all derivatives in the series. Most of these probes induce local disordering of POPC acyl chains, which is on the whole counterbalanced by ordering resulting from binding of sodium ions to lipid carbonyl/glycerol oxygen atoms. An exception is found for NBD-diC16PE, which displays optimal matching with POPC acyl chain length and induces a slight local ordering of phospholipid acyl chains. Compared to previously studied fatty amines, acyl chain-labelled phosphatidylcholines, and sterols bearing the same fluorescent tag, the chromophore in NBD-diCnPE locates in a similar region of the membrane (near the glycerol backbone/carbonyl region) but adopts a different orientation (with the NO2 group facing the interior of the bilayer). This modification leads to an inverted orientation of the P-N axis in the labelled lipid, which affects the interface properties, such as the membrane electrostatic potential and hydrogen bonding to lipid head group atoms. The implications of this study for the interpretation of the photophysical properties of NBD-diCnPE (complex fluorescence emission kinetics, differences with other NBD lipid probes) are discussed. PMID:26063509

  8. POPC Bilayers Supported on Nanoporous Substrates: Specific Effects of Silica-Type Surface Hydroxylation and Charge Density.

    PubMed

    Duro, Nalvi; Gjika, Marion; Siddiqui, Ahnaf; Scott, H Larry; Varma, Sameer

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology bring to the forefront a new class of extrinsic constraints for remodeling lipid bilayers. In this next-generation technology, membranes are supported over nanoporous substrates. The nanometer-sized pores in the substrate are too small for bilayers to follow the substrate topology; consequently, the bilayers hang over the pores. Experiments demonstrate that nanoporous substrates remodel lipid bilayers differently from continuous substrates. The underlying molecular mechanisms, however, remain largely undetermined. Here we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to probe the effects of silica-type hydroxylation and charge densities on adsorbed palmitoyl-oleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayers. We find that a 50% porous substrate decorated with a surface density of 4.6 hydroxyls/nm(2) adsorbs a POPC bilayer at a distance of 4.5 Å, a result consistent with neutron reflectivity experiments conducted on topologically similar silica constructs under highly acidic conditions. Although such an adsorption distance suggests that the interaction between the bilayer and the substrate will be buffered by water molecules, we find that the substrate does interact directly with the bilayer. The substrate modifies several properties of the bilayer-it dampens transverse lipid fluctuations, reduces lipid diffusion rates, and modifies transverse charge densities significantly. Additionally, it affects lipid properties differently in the two leaflets. Compared to substrates functionalized with sparser surface hydroxylation densities, this substrate adheres to bilayers at smaller distances and also remodels POPC more extensively, suggesting a direct correspondence between substrate hydrophilicity and membrane properties. A partial deprotonation of surface hydroxyls, as expected of a silica substrate under mildly acidic conditions, however, produces an inverse effect: it increases the substrate-bilayer distance, which we attribute to the formation of

  9. Cardanol as a replacement for cholesterol into the lipid bilayer of POPC liposomes.

    PubMed

    De Maria, Paolo; Filippone, Paolino; Fontana, Antonella; Gasbarri, Carla; Siani, Gabriella; Velluto, Diana

    2005-01-15

    Large unilamellar liposomes were prepared by hydration of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleylphosphatydilcholine (POPC) films and subsequent extrusion of the obtained liposomal suspension. Inclusion of cholesterol and cardanol brings about a stabilization of the membranes of the liposomes, as determined by their rates of release of entrapped 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein. The liposome breakdown was promoted by a non-ionic surfactant (Triton X-100) and the kinetic measurements were carried out by fluorimetry in water at 25 degrees C. Morphological analyses of giant POPC liposomes in the presence and in the absence of both guests were also performed. The results obtained suggest the use of cardanol (an easy available natural product) as a replacement for cholesterol as a new possibility for stabilizing liposomes in drug targetting. PMID:15620834

  10. Capsaicin interaction with TRPV1 channels in a lipid bilayer: molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Sonya M; Newstead, Simon; Swartz, Kenton J; Sansom, Mark S P

    2015-03-24

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) is a heat-sensitive ion channel also involved in pain sensation, and is the receptor for capsaicin, the active ingredient of hot chili peppers. The recent structures of TRPV1 revealed putative ligand density within the S1 to S4 voltage-sensor-like domain of the protein. However, questions remain regarding the dynamic role of the lipid bilayer in ligand binding to TRPV1. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to explore behavior of capsaicin in a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayer and with the target S1-S4 transmembrane helices of TRPV1. Equilibrium simulations reveal a preferred interfacial localization for capsaicin. We also observed a capsaicin molecule flipping from the extracellular to the intracellular leaflet, and subsequently able to access the intracellular TRPV1 binding site. Calculation of the potential of mean force (i.e., free energy profile) of capsaicin along the bilayer normal confirms that it prefers an interfacial localization. The free energy profile indicates that there is a nontrivial but surmountable barrier to the flipping of capsaicin between opposing leaflets of the bilayer. Molecular dynamics of the S1-S4 transmembrane helices of the TRPV1 in a lipid bilayer confirm that Y511, known to be crucial to capsaicin binding, has a distribution along the bilayer normal similar to that of the aromatic group of capsaicin. Simulations were conducted of the TRPV1 S1-S4 transmembrane helices in the presence of capsaicin placed in the aqueous phase, in the lipid, or docked to the protein. No stable interaction between ligand and protein was seen for simulations initiated with capsaicin in the bilayer. However, interactions were seen between TRPV1 and capsaicin starting from the cytosolic aqueous phase, and capsaicin remained stable in the majority of simulations from the docked pose. We discuss the significance of capsaicin flipping from the extracellular to the intracellular

  11. Model-free estimation of the effective correlation time for C-H bond reorientation in amphiphilic bilayers: 1H-13C solid-state NMR and MD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Tiago Mendes; Ollila, O. H. Samuli; Pigliapochi, Roberta; Dabkowska, Aleksandra P.; Topgaard, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations give atomically detailed information on structure and dynamics in amphiphilic bilayer systems on timescales up to about 1 μs. The reorientational dynamics of the C-H bonds is conventionally verified by measurements of 13C or 2H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) longitudinal relaxation rates R1, which are more sensitive to motional processes with correlation times close to the inverse Larmor frequency, typically around 1-10 ns on standard NMR instrumentation, and are thus less sensitive to the 10-1000 ns timescale motion that can be observed in the MD simulations. We propose an experimental procedure for atomically resolved model-free estimation of the C-H bond effective reorientational correlation time τe, which includes contributions from the entire range of all-atom MD timescales and that can be calculated directly from the MD trajectories. The approach is based on measurements of 13C R1 and R1ρ relaxation rates, as well as 1H-13C dipolar couplings, and is applicable to anisotropic liquid crystalline lipid or surfactant systems using a conventional solid-state NMR spectrometer and samples with natural isotopic composition. The procedure is demonstrated on a fully hydrated lamellar phase of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine, yielding values of τe from 0.1 ns for the methyl groups in the choline moiety and at the end of the acyl chains to 3 ns for the g1 methylene group of the glycerol backbone. MD simulations performed with a widely used united-atom force-field reproduce the τe-profile of the major part of the acyl chains but underestimate the dynamics of the glycerol backbone and adjacent molecular segments. The measurement of experimental τe-profiles can be used to study subtle effects on C-H bond reorientational motions in anisotropic liquid crystals, as well as to validate the C-H bond reorientation dynamics predicted in MD simulations of amphiphilic bilayers such as lipid membranes.

  12. Model-free estimation of the effective correlation time for C–H bond reorientation in amphiphilic bilayers: {sup 1}H–{sup 13}C solid-state NMR and MD simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Tiago Mendes; Ollila, O. H. Samuli; Pigliapochi, Roberta; Dabkowska, Aleksandra P.; Topgaard, Daniel

    2015-01-28

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations give atomically detailed information on structure and dynamics in amphiphilic bilayer systems on timescales up to about 1 μs. The reorientational dynamics of the C–H bonds is conventionally verified by measurements of {sup 13}C or {sup 2}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) longitudinal relaxation rates R{sub 1}, which are more sensitive to motional processes with correlation times close to the inverse Larmor frequency, typically around 1-10 ns on standard NMR instrumentation, and are thus less sensitive to the 10-1000 ns timescale motion that can be observed in the MD simulations. We propose an experimental procedure for atomically resolved model-free estimation of the C–H bond effective reorientational correlation time τ{sub e}, which includes contributions from the entire range of all-atom MD timescales and that can be calculated directly from the MD trajectories. The approach is based on measurements of {sup 13}C R{sub 1} and R{sub 1ρ} relaxation rates, as well as {sup 1}H−{sup 13}C dipolar couplings, and is applicable to anisotropic liquid crystalline lipid or surfactant systems using a conventional solid-state NMR spectrometer and samples with natural isotopic composition. The procedure is demonstrated on a fully hydrated lamellar phase of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine, yielding values of τ{sub e} from 0.1 ns for the methyl groups in the choline moiety and at the end of the acyl chains to 3 ns for the g{sub 1} methylene group of the glycerol backbone. MD simulations performed with a widely used united-atom force-field reproduce the τ{sub e}-profile of the major part of the acyl chains but underestimate the dynamics of the glycerol backbone and adjacent molecular segments. The measurement of experimental τ{sub e}-profiles can be used to study subtle effects on C–H bond reorientational motions in anisotropic liquid crystals, as well as to validate the C–H bond reorientation dynamics predicted in MD

  13. 25-Hydroxycholesterol Increases the Availability of Cholesterol in Phospholipid Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Brett N.; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Ory, Daniel S.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2011-02-01

    Side-chain oxysterols are enzymatically generated oxidation products of cholesterol that serve a central role in mediating cholesterol homeostasis. Recent work has shown that side-chain oxysterols, such as 25-hydroxycholesterol (25-HC), alter membrane structure in very different ways from cholesterol, suggesting a possible mechanism for how these oxysterols regulate cholesterol homeostasis. Here we extend our previous work, using molecular dynamics simulations of 25-HC and cholesterol mixtures in 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayers to examine interactions between 25-HC and cholesterol in the same bilayer. When added to cholesterol-containing membranes, 25-HC causes larger changes in membrane structure than when added to cholesterol-free membranes, demonstrating interactions between the two sterols. We also find that the presence of 25-HC changes the position, orientation, and solvent accessibility of cholesterol, shifting it into the water interface and therefore its availability to external acceptors. This is consistent with experimental results showing that oxysterols can trigger cholesterol trafficking from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum. These interactions provide a potential mechanism for 25-HC-mediated regulation of cholesterol trafficking and homeostasis through direct modulation of cholesterol availability.

  14. Bottom-up design and synthesis of limit size lipid nanoparticle systems with aqueous and triglyceride cores using millisecond microfluidic mixing.

    PubMed

    Zhigaltsev, Igor V; Belliveau, Nathan; Hafez, Ismail; Leung, Alex K K; Huft, Jens; Hansen, Carl; Cullis, Pieter R

    2012-02-21

    Limit size systems are defined as the smallest achievable aggregates compatible with the packing of the molecular constituents in a defined and energetically stable structure. Here we report the use of rapid microfluidic mixing for the controlled synthesis of two types of limit size lipid nanoparticle (LNP) systems, having either polar or nonpolar cores. Specifically, limit size LNP consisting of 1-palmitoyl, 2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC), cholesterol and the triglyceride triolein were synthesized by mixing a stream of ethanol containing dissolved lipid with an aqueous stream, employing a staggered herringbone micromixer. Millisecond mixing of aqueous and ethanol streams at high flow rate ratios (FRR) was used to rapidly increase the polarity of the medium, driving bottom-up synthesis of limit size LNP systems by spontaneous assembly. For POPC/triolein systems the limit size structures consisted of a hydrophobic core of triolein surrounded by a monolayer of POPC where the diameter could be rationally engineered over the range 20-80 nm by varying the POPC/triolein ratio. In the case of POPC and POPC/cholesterol (55/45; mol/mol) the limit size systems achieved were bilayer vesicles of approximately 20 and 40 nm diameter, respectively. We further show that doxorubicin, a representative weak base drug, can be efficiently loaded and retained in limit size POPC LNP, establishing potential utility as drug delivery systems. To our knowledge this is the first report of stable triglyceride emulsions in the 20-50 nm size range, and the first time vesicular systems in the 20-50 nm size range have been generated by a scalable manufacturing method. These results establish microfluidic mixing as a powerful and general approach to access novel LNP systems, with both polar or nonpolar core structures, in the sub-100 nm size range. PMID:22268499

  15. Production of limit size nanoliposomal systems with potential utility as ultra-small drug delivery agents.

    PubMed

    Zhigaltsev, Igor V; Tam, Ying K; Leung, Alex K K; Cullis, Pieter R

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies from this group have shown that limit size lipid-based systems - defined as the smallest achievable aggregates compatible with the packing properties of their molecular constituents - can be efficiently produced using rapid microfluidic mixing technique. In this work, it is shown that similar procedures can be employed for the production of homogeneously sized unilamellar vesicular systems of 30-40 nm size range. These vesicles can be remotely loaded with the protonable drug doxorubicin and exhibit adequate drug retention properties in vitro and in vivo. In particular, it is demonstrated that whereas sub-40 nm lipid nanoparticle (LNP) systems consisting entirely of long-chain saturated phosphatidylcholines cannot be produced, the presence of such lipids may have a beneficial effect on the retention properties of limit size systems consisting of mixed lipid components. Specifically, a 33-nm diameter doxorubicin-loaded LNP system composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC), 1,2-dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), cholesterol, and PEGylated lipid (DSPE-PEG2000) demonstrated adequate, stable drug retention in the circulation, with a half-life for drug release of ∼12 h. These results indicate that microfluidic mixing is the technique of choice for the production of bilayer LNP systems with sizes less than 50 nm that could lead to development of a novel class of ultra-small drug delivery vehicles. PMID:25856305

  16. Cholesterol-dependent partitioning of PtdIns(4,5)P2 into membrane domains by the N-terminal fragment of NAP-22 (neuronal axonal myristoylated membrane protein of 22 kDa).

    PubMed Central

    Epand, Richard M; Vuong, Phan; Yip, Christopher M; Maekawa, Shohei; Epand, Raquel F

    2004-01-01

    A myristoylated peptide corresponding to the N-terminus of NAP-22 (neuronal axonal myristoylated membrane protein of 22 kDa) causes the quenching of the fluorescence of BODIPY-TMR-labelled PtdIns(4,5) P2 in bilayers of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine containing 40 mol% cholesterol and 0.1 mol% BODIPY-PtdIns(4,5)2. Both fluorescence spectroscopy and total internal reflectance fluorescence microscopy revealed the cholesterol-dependent nature of PtdIns(4,5) P2-enriched membrane-domain formation. PMID:14989697

  17. Metastability of a Supercompressed Fluid Monolayer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ethan C.; Crane, Jonathan M.; Laderas, Ted G.; Hall, Stephen B.

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies showed that monomolecular films of extracted calf surfactant collapse at the equilibrium spreading pressure during quasi-static compressions but become metastable at much higher surface pressures when compressed faster than a threshold rate. To determine the mechanism by which the films become metastable, we studied single-component films of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC). Initial experiments confirmed similar metastability of POPC if compressed above a threshold rate. Measurements at different surface pressures then showed that rates of collapse, although initially increasing above the equilibrium spreading pressure, reached a sharply defined maximum and then slowed considerably. When heated, rapidly compressed films recovered their ability to collapse with no discontinuous change in area, arguing that the metastability does not reflect transition of the POPC film to a new phase. These observations indicate that in several respects, the supercompression of POPC monolayers resembles the supercooling of three-dimensional liquids toward a glass transition. PMID:14581205

  18. Formation of irreversibly bound annexin A1 protein domains on POPC/POPS solid supported membranes.

    PubMed

    Faiss, Simon; Kastl, Katja; Janshoff, Andreas; Steinem, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    The specific interaction of annexin A1 with phospholipid bilayers is scrutinized by means of scanning force and fluorescence microscopy, quartz crystal microbalance, ellipsometry, and modeled by dynamic Monte Carlo simulations. It was found that POPC/POPS bilayers exhibit phase separation in POPC- and POPS-enriched domains as a function of Ca2+ concentration. Annexin A1 interacts with POPC/POPS bilayers by forming irreversibly bound protein domains with monolayer thickness on POPS-enriched nanodomains, while the attachment of proteins to the POPC-enriched regions is fully reversible. A thorough kinetic analysis of the process reveals that both, the binding constant of annexin A1 at the POPC-rich areas as well as the irreversible adsorption rate to the POPS-rich domains increases with calcium ion concentration. Based on the thermodynamic and kinetic data, a possible mechanism of the annexin A1 membrane interaction can be proposed. PMID:18237543

  19. Formation of stable nanodiscs by bihelical apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptide.

    PubMed

    Kariyazono, Hirokazu; Nadai, Ryo; Miyajima, Rin; Takechi-Haraya, Yuki; Baba, Teruhiko; Shigenaga, Akira; Okuhira, Keiichiro; Otaka, Akira; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2016-02-01

    Nanodiscs are composed of scaffold protein or peptide such as apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and phospholipids. Although peptide-based nanodiscs have an advantage to modulate the size of nanodiscs by changing phospholipid/peptide ratios, they are usually less stable than apoA-I-based nanodiscs. In this study, we designed a novel nanodisc scaffold peptide (NSP) that has proline-punctuated bihelical amphipathic structure based on apoA-I mimetic peptides. NSP formed α-helical structure on 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC) nanodiscs prepared by cholate dialysis method. Dynamic light scattering measurements demonstrated that diameters of NSP nanodiscs vary depending upon POPC/NSP ratios. Comparison of thermal unfolding of nanodiscs monitored by circular dichroism measurements demonstrated that NSP forms much more stable nanodiscs with POPC than monohelical peptide, 4F, exhibiting comparable stability to apoA-I-POPC nanodiscs. Intrinsic Trp fluorescence measurements showed that Trp residues of NSP exhibit more hydrophobic environment than that of 4 F on nanodiscs, suggesting the stronger interaction of NSP with phospholipids. Thus, the bihelical structure of NSP appears to increase the stability of nanodiscs because of the enhanced interaction of peptides with phospholipids. In addition, NSP as well as 4F spontaneously solubilized POPC vesicles into nanodiscs without using detergent. These results indicate that bihelical NSP forms nanodiscs with comparable stability to apoA-I and has an ability to control the size of nanodiscs simply by changing phospholipid/peptide ratios. PMID:26780967

  20. Membrane Pore Formation by Amyloid beta (25-35) Peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Nabin; Tatulian, Suren

    Amyloid (A β) peptide contributes to Alzheimer's disease by a yet unidentified mechanism. One of the possible mechanisms of A β toxicity is formation of pores in cellular membranes. We have characterized the formation of pores in phospholipid membranes by the Aβ25 - 35 peptide (GSNKGAIIGLM) using fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and circular dichroism (CD) techniques. CD and FTIR identified formation of β-sheet structure upon incubation of the peptide in aqueous buffer for 2 hours. Unilamellar vesicles composed of a zwitterionic lipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC), and 70 % POPC plus 30 % of an acidic lipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG), are made in 30 mM CaCl2. Quin-2, a fluorophore that displays increased fluorescence upon Ca2+ binding, is added to the vesicles externally. Peptide addition results in increased Quin-2 fluorescence, which is interpreted by binding of the peptide to the vesicles, pore formation, and Ca2+ leakage. The positive and negative control measurements involve addition of a detergent, Triton X-100, which causes vesicle rupture and release of total calcium, and blank buffer, respectively.

  1. Direct Visualization of the Lateral Structure of Porcine Brain Cerebrosides/POPC Mixtures in Presence and Absence of Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Fidorra, Matthias; Heimburg, Thomas; Bagatolli, Luis A.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We studied the thermal behavior of membranes composed of mixtures of natural cerebrosides (from porcine brain) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) with and without cholesterol, using differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and confocal/multiphoton fluorescence microscopy. The POPC/cerebroside mixture display solid ordered/liquid disordered phase coexistence in a broad range of compositions and temperatures in agreement with previous results reported for POPC/(bovine brain)cerebrosides. The observed phase coexistence scenario consists of elongated, micrometer-sized cerebroside-rich solid ordered domains that span the bilayer, embedded in a POPC-rich liquid disordered phase. The data obtained from differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was in line with that obtained in the microscopy experiments for the binary mixture, except at very high cerebroside molar fractions (0.8–0.9) were some differences are observed. Cholesterol incorporation exerts strong changes on the lateral organization of POPC/porcine brain cerebroside membranes. At intermediate cholesterol concentrations (10–25 mol %) the solid ordered/liquid disordered phase coexistence scenario gradually transform to a solid ordered/liquid ordered one. Above 25 mol % of cholesterol two distinct regions with liquid ordered phase character are visualized in the membrane until a single liquid ordered phase forms at 40 mol % cholesterol. The observed cholesterol effect largely differs from that reported for POPC/porcine brain ceramide, reflecting the impact of the sphingolipids polar headgroup on the membrane lateral organization. PMID:19580752

  2. Prediction of binding free energy for adsorption of antimicrobial peptide lactoferricin B on a POPC membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivcharuk, Victor; Tomberli, Bruno; Tolokh, Igor S.; Gray, C. G.

    2008-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to study the interaction of a zwitterionic palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayer with the cationic antimicrobial peptide bovine lactoferricin (LFCinB) in a 100 mM NaCl solution at 310 K. The interaction of LFCinB with POPC is used as a model system for studying the details of membrane-peptide interactions, with the peptide selected because of its antimicrobial nature. Seventy-two 3 ns MD simulations, with six orientations of LFCinB at 12 different distances from a POPC membrane, are carried out to determine the potential of mean force (PMF) or free energy profile for the peptide as a function of the distance between LFCinB and the membrane surface. To calculate the PMF for this relatively large system a new variant of constrained MD and thermodynamic integration is developed. A simplified method for relating the PMF to the LFCinB-membrane binding free energy is described and used to predict a free energy of adsorption (or binding) of -1.05±0.39kcal/mol , and corresponding maximum binding force of about 20 pN, for LFCinB-POPC. The contributions of the ions-LFCinB and the water-LFCinB interactions to the PMF are discussed. The method developed will be a useful starting point for future work simulating peptides interacting with charged membranes and interactions involved in the penetration of membranes, features necessary to understand in order to rationally design peptides as potential alternatives to traditional antibiotics.

  3. Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate/polyphosphate complexes form voltage-activated Ca2+ channels in the plasma membranes of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Reusch, R N; Huang, R; Bramble, L L

    1995-09-01

    The lipidic polymer, poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB), is found in the plasma membranes of Escherichia col complexed to calcium polyphosphate (CaPPi). The composition, location, and putative structure of the polymer salt complexes led Reusch and Sadoff (1988) to propose that the complexes function as Ca2+ channels. Here we use bilayer patch-clamp techniques to demonstrate that voltage-activated Ca2+ channels composed of PHB and CaPPi are in the plasma membranes of E. coli. Single channel calcium currents were observed in vesicles of plasma membranes incorporated into planar bilayers of synthetic 1-palmitoyl, 2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine. The channels were extracted from cells and incorporated into bilayers, where they displayed many of the signal characteristics of protein Ca2+ channels: voltage-activated selective for divalent over monovalent cations, permeant to Ca2+, manner by La3+, Co2+, Cd2+, and Mg2+, in that order. The channel-active extract, purified by size exclusion chromatography, was found to contain only PHB and CaPPi. This composition was confirmed by the observation of comparable single channel currents with complexes reconstituted from synthetic CaPPi and PHB, isolated from E. coli. This is the first report of a biological non-proteinaceous calcium channel. We suggest that poly-3-hydroxybutyrate/calcium polyphosphate complexes are evolutionary antecedents of protein Ca2+ channels. PMID:8519976

  4. Effects of imidazolium-based ionic surfactants on the size and dynamics of phosphatidylcholine bilayers with saturated and unsaturated chains.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwankyu

    2015-07-01

    Imidazolium-based ionic surfactants of different sizes were simulated with 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) bilayers. Regardless of the phospholipid type, larger surfactants at higher concentrations more significantly insert into the bilayer and increase the bilayer-surface size, in agreement with experiments and previous simulations. Insertion of surfactants only slightly decreases the bilayer thickness, as also observed in experiments. Although the surfactant insertion and its effect on the bilayer size and thickness are similar in different types of bilayers, the volume fractions of surfactants in the bilayer are higher for DMPC bilayers than for POPC and DOPC bilayers. In particular, ionic surfactants with four hydrocarbons yield their volume fractions of 4.6% and 8.7%, respectively, in POPC and DMPC bilayers, in quantitative agreement with experimental values of ∼5% and ∼10%. Also, the inserted surfactants increase the lateral diffusivity of the bilayer, which depends on the bilayer type. These findings indicate that although the surfactant insertion does not depend on the bilayer type, the effects of surfactants on the volume fraction and bilayer dynamics occur more significantly in the DMPC bilayer because of the smaller area per lipid and shorter saturated tails, which helps explain the experimental observations regarding different volume fractions of surfactants in POPC and DMPC bilayers. PMID:26055631

  5. Cholesterol in condensed and fluid phosphatidylcholine monolayers studied by epifluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Worthman, L A; Nag, K; Davis, P J; Keough, K M

    1997-01-01

    Epifluorescence microscopy was used to investigate the effect of cholesterol on monolayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and 1 -palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC) at 21 +/- 2 degrees C using 1 mol% 1-palmitoyl-2-[12-[(7-nitro-2-1, 3-benzoxadizole-4-yl)amino]dodecanoyl]phosphatidylcholine (NBD-PC) as a fluorophore. Up to 30 mol% cholesterol in DPPC monolayers decreased the amounts of probe-excluded liquid-condensed (LC) phase at all surface pressures (pi), but did not effect the monolayers of POPC, which remained in the liquid-expanded (LE) phase at all pi. At low pi (2-5 mN/m), 10 mol% or more cholesterol in DPPC induced a lateral phase separation into dark probe-excluded and light probe-rich regions. In POPC monolayers, phase separation was observed at low pi when > or =40 mol% or more cholesterol was present. The lateral phase separation observed with increased cholesterol concentrations in these lipid monolayers may be a result of the segregation of cholesterol-rich domains in ordered fluid phases that preferentially exclude the fluorescent probe. With increasing pi, monolayers could be transformed from a heterogeneous dark and light appearance into a homogeneous fluorescent phase, in a manner that was dependent on pi and cholesterol content. The packing density of the acyl chains may be a determinant in the interaction of cholesterol with phosphatidylcholine (PC), because the transformations in monolayer surface texture were observed in phospholipid (PL)/sterol mixtures having similar molecular areas. At high pi (41 mN/m), elongated crystal-like structures were observed in monolayers containing 80-100 mol% cholesterol, and these structures grew in size when the monolayers were compressed after collapse. This observation could be associated with the segregation and crystallization of cholesterol after monolayer collapse. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:9168032

  6. Electric polarizability of lipid bilayers: The influence of the structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soussi, J.; Chalopin, Y.

    2015-10-01

    We have calculated the electric polarizability of two types of lipid bilayers, formed by 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2- oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) lipids. We demonstrate that despite the very similar chemical structures, the bilayers exhibit dramatically different terahertz infrared (IR) properties. We demonstrate that the chemical structure of the lipids influences the morphology of the bilayers, which in turn impacts their IR responses: interestingly, both structures exhibit a non-uniform absorption. For the case of DPPC, the infrared absorption is mostly driven by the hydrophilic heads, whereas for the POPC lipids, the absorption occurs predominately at the hydrophobic tails.

  7. Small-angle X-ray scattering of the cholesterol incorporation into human ApoA1-POPC discoidal particles.

    PubMed

    Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Pedersen, Martin Cramer; Arleth, Lise

    2015-07-21

    Structural and functional aspects of high-density lipoproteins have been studied for over half a century. Due to the plasticity of this highly complex system, new aspects continue to be discovered. Here, we present a structural study of the human Apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) and investigate the role of its N-terminal domain, the so-called globular domain of ApoA1, in discoidal complexes with phospholipids and increasing amounts of cholesterol. Using a combination of solution-based small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and molecular constrained data modeling, we show that the ApoA1-1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC)-based particles are disk shaped with an elliptical cross section and composed by a central lipid bilayer surrounded by two stabilizing ApoA1 proteins. This structure is very similar to the particles formed in the so-called nanodisc system, which is based on N-terminal truncated ApoA1 protein. Although it is commonly agreed that the nanodisc is plain disk shaped, several more advanced structures have been proposed for the full-length ApoA1 in combination with POPC and cholesterol. This prompted us to make a detailed comparative study of the ApoA1 and nanodisc systems upon cholesterol uptake. Based on the presented SAXS analysis it is found that the N-terminal domains of ApoA1-POPC-cholesterol particles are not globular but instead an integrated part of the protein belt stabilizing the particles. Upon incorporation of increasing amounts of cholesterol, the presence of the N-terminal domain allows the bilayer thickness to increase while maintaining an overall flat bilayer structure. This is contrasted by the energetically more strained and less favorable lens shape required to fit the SAXS data from the N-terminal truncated nanodisc system upon cholesterol incorporation. This suggests that the N-terminal domain of ApoA1 actively participates in the stabilization of the ApoA1-POPC-cholesterol discoidal particle and allows for a more optimal

  8. Multi-scale modeling of ternary-component lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumaneng, Paul

    The connection between membrane inhomogeneity and the structural basis of lipid rafts has sparked interest in the lateral organization of model lipid bilayers of two and three components. In an effort to investigate lateral organization in mixed bilayers, a self-consistent mean-field theoretical model is presented and applied to two important three-component bilayer mixtures. The model utilizes molecular dynamics simulations to estimate interaction parameters and to construct chain conformation libraries for utilization in a statistical mechanical treatment. The first application is to dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) - stearoyl sphingomyelin (SSM) - cholesterol mixtures. The compositional dependence of lateral organization in these mixtures is mapped onto a ternary plot. It is found that at some concentration ratios the bilayers separate spatially into regions of higher and lower chain order coinciding with areas enriched with SSM and DOPC respectively. In the second application, ternary mixtures of palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC) - palmitoyl sphingomyelin (PSM) - cholesterol are investigated. Again, results are organized onto a ternary plot. To examine the effect of the asymmetric chain structure of POPC on bilayer lateral inhomogeneity, POPC-POPC interactions with and without angular dependence are considered. Results are compared with experimental data and with results from the DOPC - SSM - cholesterol mixtures.

  9. The helical structure of surfactant peptide KL4 when bound to POPC

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Frank D.; Antharam, Vijay C.; Ganesh, Omjoy K.; Elliott, Doug W.; McNeill, Seth A.; Long, Joanna R.

    2009-01-01

    KL4 is a 21-residue peptide employed as a functional mimic of lung surfactant protein B which successfully lowers surface tension in the alveoli. A mechanistic understanding of how KL4 affects lipid properties has proven elusive as the secondary structure of KL4 in lipid preparations has not been determined at high resolution. The sequence of KL4 is based on the C-terminus of SP-B, a naturally occurring helical protein that binds to lipid interfaces. The spacing of the lysine residues in KL4 precludes the formation of a canonical amphipathic α-helix; qualitative measurements using Raman, CDc and FTIR spectroscopies have given conflicting results as to the secondary structure of the peptide as well as its orientation in the lipid environment. Here, we present a structural model of KL4 bound to lipid bilayers based on solid state NMR data. Double-quantum correlation experiments employing 13C-enriched peptides were used to quantitatively determine the backbone torsion angles in KL4 at several positions. These measurements, coupled with CD experiments, verify the helical nature of KL4 when bound to lipids, with (Φ, Ψ) angles that differ substantially from common values for α-helices of (-60, -45). The average torsion angles found for KL4 bound to POPC: POPG lipid vesicles are (-105, -30); this deviation from ideal α-helical structure allows KL4 to form an amphipathic helix at the lipid interface. PMID:18636713

  10. The helical structure of surfactant peptide KL4 when bound to POPC: POPG lipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Mills, Frank D; Antharam, Vijay C; Ganesh, Omjoy K; Elliott, Doug W; McNeill, Seth A; Long, Joanna R

    2008-08-12

    KL 4 is a 21-residue peptide employed as a functional mimic of lung surfactant protein B, which successfully lowers surface tension in the alveoli. A mechanistic understanding of how KL 4 affects lipid properties has proven elusive as the secondary structure of KL 4 in lipid preparations has not been determined at high resolution. The sequence of KL 4 is based on the C-terminus of SP-B, a naturally occurring helical protein that binds to lipid interfaces. The spacing of the lysine residues in KL 4 precludes the formation of a canonical amphipathic alpha-helix; qualitative measurements using Raman, CD, and FTIR spectroscopies have given conflicting results as to the secondary structure of the peptide as well as its orientation in the lipid environment. Here, we present a structural model of KL 4 bound to lipid bilayers based on solid state NMR data. Double-quantum correlation experiments employing (13)C-enriched peptides were used to quantitatively determine the backbone torsion angles in KL 4 at several positions. These measurements, coupled with CD experiments, verify the helical nature of KL 4 when bound to lipids, with (phi, psi) angles that differ substantially from common values for alpha-helices of (-60, -45). The average torsion angles found for KL 4 bound to POPC:POPG lipid vesicles are (-105, -30); this deviation from ideal alpha-helical structure allows KL 4 to form an amphipathic helix at the lipid interface. PMID:18636713

  11. Binding Orientations and Lipid Interactions of Human Amylin at Zwitterionic and Anionic Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Zhenyu; Jia, Yan; Wei, Guanghong

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the interaction of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) with lipids may facilitate hIAPP aggregation and cause the death of pancreatic islet β-cells. However, the detailed hIAPP-membrane interactions and the influences of lipid compositions are unclear. In this study, as a first step to understand the mechanism of membrane-mediated hIAPP aggregation, we investigate the binding behaviors of hIAPP monomer at zwitterionic palmitoyloleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayer by performing atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. The results are compared with those of hIAPP at anionic palmitoyloleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) bilayers. We find that the adsorption of hIAPP to POPC bilayer is mainly initiated from the C-terminal region and the peptide adopts a helical structure with multiple binding orientations, while the adsorption to POPG bilayer is mostly initiated from the N-terminal region and hIAPP displays one preferential binding orientation, with its hydrophobic residues exposed to water. hIAPP monomer inserts into POPC lipid bilayers more readily than into POPG bilayers. Peptide-lipid interaction analyses show that the different binding features of hIAPP at POPC and POPG bilayers are attributed to different magnitudes of electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding interactions with lipids. This study provides mechanistic insights into the different interaction behaviors of hIAPP with zwitterionic and anionic lipid bilayers. PMID:26649316

  12. Both idebenone and idebenol are localized near the lipid-water interface of the membrane and increase its fluidity.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Murcia, Victoria; Torrecillas, Alejandro; de Godos, Ana M; Corbalán-García, Senena; Gómez-Fernández, Juan C

    2016-06-01

    Idebenone is a synthetic analog of coenzyme Q; both share a quinone moiety but idebenone has a shorter lipophilic tail ending with a hydroxyl group. Differential scanning calorimetry experiments showed that both idebenone and idebenol widened and shifted the phase transition of 1,2-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) to a lower temperature and a phase separation with different concentrations of these molecules was observed. Also small angle X-ray diffraction and wide angle X-ray diffraction revealed that both, idebenone and idebenol, induced laterally separated phases in fluid membranes when included in DPPC membranes. Electronic profiles showed that both forms, idebenone and idebenol, reduced the thickness of the fluid membrane. (2)H NMR measurements showed that the order of the membrane decreased at all temperatures in the presence of idebenone or idebenol, the greatest disorder being observed in the segments of the acyl chains close to the lipid-water interface. (1)H NOESY MAS NMR spectra were obtained using 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine membranes and results pointed to a similar location in the membrane for both forms, with the benzoquinone or benzoquinol rings and their terminal hydroxyl group of the hydrophobic chain located near the lipid/water interface of the phospholipid bilayer and the terminal hydroxyl group of the hydrophobic chain of both compounds located at the lipid/water interface. Taken together, all these different locations might explain the different physiological behavior shown by the idebenone/idebenol compared with the ubiquinone-10/ubiquinol-10 pair in which both compounds are differently localized in the membrane. PMID:26926421

  13. Ionic conductivity of the aqueous layer separating a lipid bilayer membrane and a glass support.

    PubMed

    White, Ryan J; Zhang, Bo; Daniel, Susan; Tang, John M; Ervin, Eric N; Cremer, Paul S; White, Henry S

    2006-12-01

    The in-plane ionic conductivity of the approximately 1-nm-thick aqueous layer separating a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) bilayer membrane and a glass support was investigated. The aqueous layer conductivity was measured by tip-dip deposition of a POPC bilayer onto the surface of a 20- to 75-microm-thick glass membrane containing a single conical-shaped nanopore and recording the current-voltage (i-V) behavior of the glass membrane nanopore/POPC bilayer structure. The steady-state current across the glass membrane passes through the nanopore (45-480 nm radius) and spreads radially outward within the aqueous layer between the glass support and bilayer. This aqueous layer corresponds to the dominant resistance of the glass membrane nanopore/POPC bilayer structure. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching measurements using dye-labeled lipids verified that the POPC bilayer maintains a significant degree of fluidity on the glass membrane. The slopes of ohmic i-V curves yield an aqueous layer conductivity of (3 +/- 1) x 10(-3) Omega(-1) cm(-1) assuming a layer thickness of 1.0 nm. This conductivity is essentially independent of the concentration of KCl in the bulk solution (10-4 to 1 M) in contact with the membrane. The results indicate that the concentration and mobility of charge carriers in the aqueous layer between the glass support and bilayer are largely determined by the local structure of the glass/water/bilayer interface. PMID:17129059

  14. The impact of cell-penetrating peptides on membrane bilayer structure during binding and insertion.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Daniel J; Lee, Tzong-Hsien; Kulkarni, Ketav; Wilce, Jacqueline A; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the effect of penetratin and a truncated analogue on the bilayer structure using dual polarisation interferometry, to simultaneously measure changes in mass per unit area and birefringence (an optical parameter representing bilayer order) with high sensitivity during the binding and dissociation from the membrane. Specifically, we studied penetratin (RQIKIWFQNRRMKWKK), along with a shortened and biotinylated version known as R8K-biotin (RRMKWKKK(Biotin)-NH2). Overall both peptides bound only weakly to the neutral DMPC and POPC bilayers, while much higher binding was observed for the anionic DMPC/DMPG and POPC/POPG. The binding of penetratin to gel-phase DMPC/DMPG was adequately represented by a two-state model, whereas on the fluid-phase POPC/POPG it exhibited a distinctly different binding pattern, best represented by a three-state kinetic model. However, R8K-biotin did not bind well to DMPC/DMPG and showed a more transitory and superficial binding to POPC/POPG. Comparing the modelling results for both peptides binding to POPC/POPG suggests an important role for a securely bound intermediate prior to penetratin insertion and translocation. Overall these results further elucidate the mechanism of penetratin, and provide another example of the significance of the ability of DPI to measure structural changes and the use of kinetic analysis to investigate the stages of peptide-membrane interactions. PMID:27163492

  15. Combined influence of cholesterol and synthetic amphiphillic peptides upon bilayer thickness in model membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Nezil, F A; Bloom, M

    1992-01-01

    Deuterium (2H) NMR was used to study bilayer hydrophobic thickness and mechanical properties when cholesterol and/or synthetic amphiphillic polypeptides were added to deuterated POPC lipid bilayer membranes in the liquid-crystalline (fluid) phase. Smoothed acyl chain orientational order profiles were used to calculate bilayer hydrophobic thickness. Addition of 30 mol% cholesterol to POPC at 25 degrees C increased the bilayer thickness from 2.58 to 2.99 nm. The peptides were chosen to span the bilayers with more or less mismatch between the hydrophobic peptide length and membrane hydrophobic thickness. The average thickness of the pure lipid bilayers was significantly perturbed upon addition of peptide only in cases of large mismatch, being increased (decreased) when the peptide hydrophobic length was greater (less) than that of the pure bilayer, consistent with the "mattress" model of protein lipid interactions (Mouritsen, O.G., and M. Bloom. 1984. Biophys. J. 46:141-153). The experimental results were also used to examine the combined influence of the polypeptides and cholesterol on the orientational order profile and thickness expansivity of the membranes. A detailed model for the spatial distribution of POPC and cholesterol molecules in the bilayers was proposed to reconcile the general features of these measurements with micromechanical measurements of area expansivity in closely related systems. Experiments to test the model were proposed. PMID:1600079

  16. Molecular Interactions of Alzheimer Amyloid-β Oligomer with Neutral and Negatively Charged Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiang; Wang, Qiuming; Pan, Qingfen; Zhou, Feimeng; Zheng, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Interaction of p3 (Aβ17-42) peptides with cell membrane is crucial for the understanding of amyloid toxicity associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Such p3-membrane interactions are considered to induce the disruption of membrane permeability and integrity, but the exact mechanisms of how p3 aggregates, particularly small p3 oligomers, induce receptor-independent membrane disruption are not yet completely understood. Here, we investigate the adsorption, orientation, and surface interaction of the p3 pentamer with lipid bilayers composed of both pure zwitterionic POPC (palmitoyl-oleyl-phosphatidylcholine) and mixed anionic POPC/POPG (palmitoyl-oleyl-phosphatidylglycerol) (3:1) lipids using explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. MD simulation results show that the p3 pentamer has much stronger interactions with mixed POPC/POPG lipids than pure POPC lipids, consistent with experimental observation that Aβ adsorption and fibrililation are enhanced on anionic lipid bilayers. Although electrostatic interactions are main attractive forces to drive the p3 to adsorb on the bilayer surface, the adsorption of the p3 pentamer on the lipid bilayer with a preferential C-terminal β-strands facing toward the bilayer surface is a net outcome of different competitions between p3 peptides-lipid bilayer and ions-p3-bilayer interactions. More importantly, Ca2+ ions are found to form ionic bridges to associate negatively charged residues of p3 with anionic headgroups of the lipid bilayer, resulting in Aβ–Ca2+–PO4− complexes. Intensive Ca2+ bound to lipid bilayer and Ca2+ ionic bridges may lead to the alternation of Ca2+ hemostasis responsible for neuronal dysfunction and death. This work provides insights into the mutual structure, dynamics, and interactions of both Aβ peptides and lipid bilayer at the atomic level, which expand our understanding of the complex behavior of amyloid-induced membrane disruption. PMID:23493873

  17. Self-consistent mean-field model for palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine-palmitoyl sphingomyelin-cholesterol lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumaneng, Paul W.; Pandit, Sagar A.; Zhao, Guijun; Scott, H. L.

    2011-03-01

    The connection between membrane inhomogeneity and the structural basis of lipid rafts has sparked interest in the lateral organization of model lipid bilayers of two and three components. In an effort to investigate anisotropic lipid distribution in mixed bilayers, a self-consistent mean-field theoretical model is applied to palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC)-palmitoyl sphingomyelin (PSM)-cholesterol mixtures. The compositional dependence of lateral organization in these mixtures is mapped onto a ternary plot. The model utilizes molecular dynamics simulations to estimate interaction parameters and to construct chain conformation libraries. We find that at some concentration ratios the bilayers separate spatially into regions of higher and lower chain order coinciding with areas enriched with PSM and POPC, respectively. To examine the effect of the asymmetric chain structure of POPC on bilayer lateral inhomogeneity, we consider POPC-lipid interactions with and without angular dependence. Results are compared with experimental data and with results from a similar model for mixtures of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, steroyl sphingomyelin, and cholesterol.

  18. Association dynamics and linear and nonlinear optical properties of an N-acetylaladanamide probe in a POPC membrane.

    PubMed

    Murugan, N Arul; Apostolov, Rossen; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Kongsted, Jacob; Lindahl, Erik; Ågren, Hans

    2013-09-11

    Along with the growing evidence that relates membrane abnormalities to various diseases, biological membranes have been acknowledged as targets for therapy. Any such abnormality in the membrane structure alters the membrane potential which in principle can be captured by measuring properties of specific optical probes. There exists by now many molecular probes with absorption and fluorescence properties that are sensitive to local membrane structure and to the membrane potential. To suggest new high-performance optical probes for membrane-potential imaging it is important to understand in detail the membrane-induced structural changes in the probe, the membrane association dynamics of the probe, and its membrane-specific optical properties. To contribute to this effort, we here study an optical probe, N-acetylaladanamide (NAAA), in the presence of a POPC lipid bilayer using a multiscale integrated approach to assess the probe structure, dynamics, and optical properties in its membrane-bound status and in water solvent. We find that the probe eventually assimilates into the membrane with a specific orientation where the hydrophobic part of the probe is buried inside the lipid bilayer, while the hydrophilic part is exposed to the water solvent. The computed absorption maximum is red-shifted when compared to the gas phase. The computations of the two-photon absorption and second harmonic generation cross sections of the NAAA probe in its membrane-bound state which is of its first kind in the literature suggest that this probe can be used for imaging the membrane potential using nonlinear optical microscopy. PMID:23951997

  19. Octyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside partitioning into lipid bilayers: thermodynamics of binding and structural changes of the bilayer.

    PubMed Central

    Wenk, M R; Alt, T; Seelig, A; Seelig, J

    1997-01-01

    The interaction of the nonionic detergent octyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside (OG) with lipid bilayers was studied with high-sensitivity isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and solid-state 2H-NMR spectroscopy. The transfer of OG from the aqueous phase to lipid bilayers composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) can be investigated by employing detergent at concentrations below the critical micellar concentration; it can be defined by a surface partition equilibrium with a partition coefficient of K = 120 +/- 10 M-1, a molar binding enthalpy of delta H degrees D = 1.3 +/- 0.15 kcal/mol, and a free energy of binding of delta G degrees D = -5.2 kcal/mol. The heat of transfer is temperature dependent, with a molar heat capacity of delta CP = -75 cal K-1 mol-1. The large heat capacity and the near-zero delta H are typical for a hydrophobic binding equilibrium. The partition constant K decreased to approximately 100 M-1 for POPC membranes mixed with either negatively charged lipids or cholesterol, but was independent of membrane curvature. In contrast, a much larger variation was observed in the partition enthalpy. delta H degrees D increased by about 50% for large vesicles and by 75% for membranes containing 50 mol% cholesterol. Structural changes in the lipid bilayer were investigated with solid-state 2H-NMR. POPC was selectively deuterated at the headgroup segments and at different positions of the fatty acyl chains, and the measurement of the quadrupolar splittings provided information on the conformation and the order of the bilayer membrane. Addition of OG had almost no influence on the lipid headgroup region, even at concentrations close to bilayer disruption. In contrast, the fluctuations of fatty acyl chain segments located in the inner part of the bilayer increased strongly with increasing OG concentration. The 2H-NMR results demonstrate that the headgroup region is the most stable structural element of the lipid membrane, remaining intact

  20. On the microscopic and mesoscopic perturbations of lipid bilayers upon interaction with the MPER domain of the HIV glycoprotein gp41.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Rosario; Emendato, Alessandro; Vitiello, Giuseppe; De Santis, Augusta; Grimaldi, Manuela; D'Ursi, Anna Maria; Busi, Elena; Del Vecchio, Pompea; Petraccone, Luigi; D'Errico, Gerardino

    2016-08-01

    The effect of the 665-683 fragment of the HIV fusion glycoprotein 41, corresponding to the MPER domain of the protein and named gp41MPER, on the microscopic structure and mesoscopic arrangement of palmitoyl oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC) and POPC/sphingomyelin (SM)/cholesterol (CHOL) lipid bilayers is analyzed. The microscopic structuring of the bilayers has been studied by Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, using glycerophosphocholines spin-labelled in different positions along the acyl chain. Transitions of the bilayer liquid crystalline state have been also monitored by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Changes of the bilayers morphology have been studied by determining the dimension of the liposomes through Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) measurements. The results converge in showing that the sample preparation procedure, the bilayer composition and the peptide/lipid ratio critically tune the lipid response to the peptide/membrane interaction. When gp41MPER is added to preformed liposomes, it positions at the bilayer interface and the lipid perturbation is limited to the more external segments. In contrast, if the peptide is mixed with the lipids during the liposome preparation, it assumes a trans-membrane topology. This happens at all peptide/lipid ratios for fluid POPC bilayers, while in the case of rigid POPC/SM/CHOL membranes a minimum ratio has to be reached, thus suggesting peptide self-aggregation to occur. Peptide insertion results in a dramatic increase of the lipid ordering and bilayer stiffening, which reflect in significant changes in liposome average dimension and distribution. The biological implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:27179640

  1. Nonequilibrium patterns of cholesterol-rich chemical heterogenieties within single fluid supported phospholipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Sapuri-Butti, Annapoorna R; Li, Qijuan; Groves, Jay T; Parikh, Atul N

    2006-06-01

    We have developed a simple method to introduce cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-rich chemical heterogeneities into controlled densities and concentrations within predetermined regions of another distinct fluid phospholipid bilayer supported on a solid substrate. A contiguous primary phase--a fluid POPC bilayer displaying a well-defined array of lipid-free voids (e.g., 20-100 microm squares)--was first prepared on a clean glass surface by microcontact printing under water using a poly(dimethylsiloxane) stamp. The aqueous-phase primary bilayer pattern was subsequently incubated with secondary-phase small unilamellar vesicles composed of independent chemical compositions. Backfilling by comparable vesicles resulted in gradual mixing between the primary- and secondary-phase lipids, effacing the pattern. When the secondary vesicles consisted of phase-separating mixtures of cholesterol, sphingomyelin, and a phospholipid (2:1:1 POPC/sphingomyelin/cholesterol or 1:1:1 DOPC/sphingomyelin/cholesterol), well-defined spatial patterns of fluorescence, chemical compositions, and fluidities emerged. We conjecture that these patterns form because of the differences in the equilibration rates of the secondary liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases with the primary fluid POPC phase. The pattern stability depended strongly on the ambient-phase temperature, cholesterol concentration, and miscibility contrast between the two phases. When cholesterol concentration in the secondary vesicles was below 20 mol %, secondary intercalants gradually diffused within the primary POPC bilayer phase, ultimately dissolving the pattern in several minutes and presumably forming a new quasi-equilibrated lipid mixture. These phase domain micropatterns retain some properties of biological rafts including detergent resistance and phase mixing induced by selective cholesterol extraction. These patterns enable direct comparisons of cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-rich phase domains and fluid phospholipid

  2. Topologies, structures and parameter files for lipid simulations in GROMACS with the OPLS-aa force field: DPPC, POPC, DOPC, PEPC, and cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Kulig, Waldemar; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Róg, Tomasz

    2015-12-01

    In this data article we provide topologies and force field parameters files for molecular dynamics simulations of lipids in the OPLS-aa force field using the GROMACS package. This is the first systematic parameterization of lipid molecules in this force field. Topologies are provided for four phosphatidylcholines: saturated DPPC, mono-cis unsaturated POPC and DOPC, and mono-trans unsaturated PEPC. Parameterization of the phosphatidylcholines was achieved in two steps: first, we supplemented the OPLS force field parameters for DPPC with new parameters for torsion angles and van der Waals parameters for the carbon and hydrogen atoms in the acyl chains, as well as new partial atomic charges and parameters for torsion angles in the phosphatidylcholine and glycerol moieties [1]. Next, we derived parameters for the cis and trans double bonds and the neighboring them single bonds [2]. Additionally, we provide GROMACS input files with parameters describing simulation conditions (md.mdp), which are strongly recommended to be used with these lipids models. The data are associated with the research article "Cis and trans unsaturated phosphatidylcholine bilayers: a molecular dynamics simulation study" [2] and provided as supporting materials. PMID:26568975

  3. Effects of Dipole Potential Modifiers on Heterogenic Lipid Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Efimova, Svetlana S; Malev, Valery V; Ostroumova, Olga S

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we examine the ability of dipole modifiers, flavonoids, and RH dyes to affect the dipole potential (φ d) and phase separation in membranes composed of ternary mixtures of POPC with different sphingolipids and sterols. Changes in the steady-state conductance induced by cation-ionophore complexes have been measured to evaluate the changes in dipole potential of planar lipid bilayers. Confocal fluorescence microscopy has been employed to investigate lipid segregation in giant unilamellar vesicles. The effects of flavonoids on φ d depend on lipid composition and dipole modifier type. The effectiveness of RH dyes to increase φ d depends on sphingolipid type but is not influenced by sterol content. Tested modifiers lead to partial or complete disruption of gel domains in bilayers composed of POPC, sphingomyelin, and cholesterol. Substitution of cholesterol to ergosterol or 7-dehydrocholesterol leads to a loss of fluidizing effects of modifiers except phloretin. This may be due to various compositions of gel domains. The lack of influence of modifiers on phase scenario in vesicles composed of ternary mixtures of POPC, cholesterol, and phytosphingosine or sphinganine is related to an absence of gel-like phase. It was concluded that the membrane lateral heterogeneity affects the dipole-modifying abilities of the agents that influence the magnitude of φ d by intercalation into the bilayer and orientation of its own large dipole moments (phloretin and RH dyes). The efficacy of modifiers that do not penetrate deeply and affect φ d through water adsorption (phlorizin, quercetin, and myricetin) is not influenced by lateral heterogeneity of membrane. PMID:26454655

  4. Covalent attachment of functionalized lipid bilayers to planar waveguides for measuring protein binding to biomimetic membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Heyse, S.; Vogel, H.; Sänger, M.; Sigrist, H.

    1995-01-01

    A new method is presented for measuring sensitively the interactions between ligands and their membrane-bound receptors in situ using integrated optics, thus avoiding the need for additional labels. Phospholipid bilayers were attached covalently to waveguides by a novel protocol, which can in principle be used with any glass-like surface. In a first step, phospholipids carrying head-group thiols were covalently immobilized onto SiO2-TiO2 waveguide surfaces. This was accomplished by acylation of aminated waveguides with the heterobifunctional crosslinker N-succinimidyl-3-maleimidopropionate, followed by the formation of thioethers between the surface-grafted maleimides and the synthetic thiolipids. The surface-attached thiolipids served as hydrophobic templates and anchors for the deposition of a complete lipid bilayer either by fusion of lipid vesicles or by lipid self-assembly from mixed lipid/detergent micelles. The step-by-step lipid bilayer formation on the waveguide surface was monitored in situ by an integrated optics technique, allowing the simultaneous determination of optical thickness and one of the two refractive indices of the adsorbed organic layers. Surface coverages of 50-60% were calculated for thiolipid layers. Subsequent deposition of POPC resulted in an overall lipid layer thickness of 45-50 A, which corresponds to the thickness of a fluid bilayer membrane. Specific recognition reactions occurring at cell membrane surfaces were modeled by the incorporation of lipid-anchored receptor molecules into the supported bilayer membranes. (1) The outer POPC layer was doped with biotinylated phosphatidylethanolamine. Subsequent specific binding of streptavidin was optically monitored. (2) A lipopeptide was incorporated in the outer POPC monolayer. Membrane binding of monoclonal antibodies, which were directed against the peptide moiety of the lipopeptide, was optically detected. The specific antibody binding correlated well with the lipopepitde

  5. Phospholipid bilayer relaxation dynamics as revealed by the pulsed electron-electron double resonance of spin labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syryamina, V. N.; Dzuba, S. A.

    2012-10-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy in the form of pulsed electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR) was applied to 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) phospholipid bilayers containing lipids that were spin-labeled at different carbon positions along the lipid acyl chain. Pulsed ELDOR detects motionally induced spin flips of nitrogen nuclei in the nitroxide spin labels, which manifests itself as magnetization transfer (MT) in the nitroxide EPR spectrum. The MT effect was observed over a wide temperature range (100-225 K) on a microsecond time scale. In line with a previous study on molecular glasses [N. P. Isaev and S. A. Dzuba, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 094508 (2011), 10.1063/1.3633241], the motions that induce MT effect were suggested to have the same nature as those in dielectric secondary (β) Johari-Goldstein fast relaxation. The results were compared with literature dielectric relaxation data for POPC bilayers, revealing some common features. Molecular motions resulting in MT are faster for deeper spin labels in the membrane interior. The addition of cholesterol to the bilayer suppresses the lipid motions near the steroid nucleus and accelerates the lipid motions beyond the steroid nucleus, in the bilayer interior. This finding was attributed to the lipid acyl chains being more ordered near the steroid nucleus and less ordered in the bilayer interior. The motions are absent in dry lipids, indicating that the motions are determined by intermolecular interactions in the bilayer.

  6. Interleaflet mixing and coupling in liquid-disordered phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Capponi, Sara; Freites, J Alfredo; Tobias, Douglas J; White, Stephen H

    2016-02-01

    Organized as bilayers, phospholipids are the fundamental building blocks of cellular membranes and determine many of their biological functions. Interactions between the two leaflets of the bilayer (interleaflet coupling) have been implicated in the passage of information through membranes. However, physically, the meaning of interleaflet coupling is ill defined and lacks a structural basis. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of fluid phospholipid bilayers of five different lipids with differing degrees of acyl-chain asymmetry, we have examined interleaflet mixing to gain insights into coupling. Reasoning that the transbilayer distribution of terminal methyl groups is an appropriate measure of interleaflet mixing, we calculated the transbilayer distributions of the acyl chain terminal methyl groups for five lipids: dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC), stearoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (SOPC), oleoylmyristoylphosphatidylcholine (OMPC), and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). We observed in all cases very strong mixing across the bilayer midplane that diminished somewhat with increasing acyl-chain ordering defined by methylene order parameters. A hallmark of the interleaflet coupling idea is complementarity, which postulates that lipids with short alkyl chains in one leaflet will preferentially associate with lipids with long alkyl chains in the other leaflet. Our results suggest a much more complicated picture for thermally disordered bilayers that we call distributed complementarity, as measured by the difference in the peak positions of the sn-1 and sn-2 methyl distributions in the same leaflet. PMID:26657692

  7. Structure and stability of phospholipid bilayers hydrated by a room-temperature ionic liquid/water solution: a neutron reflectometry study.

    PubMed

    Benedetto, Antonio; Heinrich, Frank; Gonzalez, Miguel A; Fragneto, Giovanna; Watkins, Erik; Ballone, Pietro

    2014-10-23

    Neutron reflectometry (NR) measurements were carried out to probe the structure and stability of two model biomembranes consisting of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) phospholipid bilayers hydrated by water solutions of two prototypical room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), namely, 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium chloride ([bmim][Cl]) and choline chloride ([Chol][Cl]) at concentrations of 0.1 M and 0.5 M, respectively. The raw data were analyzed by fitting a distribution of scattering length densities arising from the different chemical species in the system. The results of this analysis show that (a) for all systems and concentrations that we considered, the thickness of the bilayers shrinks by ∼1 Å upon dissolving the ionic liquid into water and that (b) the RTIL ions enter the bilayer, finding their way to a preferred location in the lipid range that is nearly independent of the lipid and of the [bimim](+) or [Chol](+) choice. The volume fraction of RTIL sorbed in/on the bilayer, however, does depend on the lipid, but, again, is the same for [bmim][Cl] and for [Chol][Cl]. Thus, the RTIL occupies ∼5% of the bilayer volume in POPC, rising to ∼10% in DMPC. Repeating the measurements and data analysis after rinsing in pure water shows that the changes in the bilayer due to the RTIL sorption are irreversible and that a measurable amount of IL remains in the lipid fraction, that is, ∼2.5% of the bilayer volume in POPC and ∼8% in DMPC. PMID:25251987

  8. PMP1 18-38, a yeast plasma membrane protein fragment, binds phosphatidylserine from bilayer mixtures with phosphatidylcholine: a (2)H-NMR study.

    PubMed

    Roux, M; Beswick, V; Coïc, Y M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Sanson, A; Neumann, J M

    2000-11-01

    PMP1 is a 38-residue plasma membrane protein of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that regulates the activity of the H(+)-ATPase. The cytoplasmic domain conformation results in a specific interfacial distribution of five basic side chains, thought to strongly interact with anionic phospholipids. We have used the PMP1 18-38 fragment to carry out a deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance ((2)H-NMR) study for investigating the interactions between the PMP1 cytoplasmic domain and phosphatidylserines. For this purpose, mixed bilayers of 1-palmitoyl, 2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1-palmitoyl, 2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoserine (POPS) were used as model membranes (POPC/POPS 5:1, m/m). Spectra of headgroup- and chain-deuterated POPC and POPS phospholipids, POPC-d4, POPC-d31, POPS-d3, and POPS-d31, were recorded at different temperatures and for various concentrations of the PMP1 fragment. Data obtained from POPS deuterons revealed the formation of specific peptide-POPS complexes giving rise to a slow exchange between free and bound PS lipids, scarcely observed in solid-state NMR studies of lipid-peptide/protein interactions. The stoichiometry of the complex (8 POPS per peptide) was determined and its significance is discussed. The data obtained with headgroup-deuterated POPC were rationalized with a model that integrates the electrostatic perturbation induced by the cationic peptide on the negatively charged membrane interface, and a "spacer" effect due to the intercalation of POPS/PMP1f complexes between choline headgroups. PMID:11053135

  9. PMP1 18-38, a yeast plasma membrane protein fragment, binds phosphatidylserine from bilayer mixtures with phosphatidylcholine: a (2)H-NMR study.

    PubMed Central

    Roux, M; Beswick, V; Coïc, Y M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Sanson, A; Neumann, J M

    2000-01-01

    PMP1 is a 38-residue plasma membrane protein of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that regulates the activity of the H(+)-ATPase. The cytoplasmic domain conformation results in a specific interfacial distribution of five basic side chains, thought to strongly interact with anionic phospholipids. We have used the PMP1 18-38 fragment to carry out a deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance ((2)H-NMR) study for investigating the interactions between the PMP1 cytoplasmic domain and phosphatidylserines. For this purpose, mixed bilayers of 1-palmitoyl, 2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1-palmitoyl, 2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoserine (POPS) were used as model membranes (POPC/POPS 5:1, m/m). Spectra of headgroup- and chain-deuterated POPC and POPS phospholipids, POPC-d4, POPC-d31, POPS-d3, and POPS-d31, were recorded at different temperatures and for various concentrations of the PMP1 fragment. Data obtained from POPS deuterons revealed the formation of specific peptide-POPS complexes giving rise to a slow exchange between free and bound PS lipids, scarcely observed in solid-state NMR studies of lipid-peptide/protein interactions. The stoichiometry of the complex (8 POPS per peptide) was determined and its significance is discussed. The data obtained with headgroup-deuterated POPC were rationalized with a model that integrates the electrostatic perturbation induced by the cationic peptide on the negatively charged membrane interface, and a "spacer" effect due to the intercalation of POPS/PMP1f complexes between choline headgroups. PMID:11053135

  10. Naratriptan aggregation in lipid bilayers: perspectives from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Wood, Irene; Pickholz, Mónica

    2016-09-01

    In order to understand the interaction between naratriptan and a fully hydrated bilayer of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidyl-choline (POPC), we carried out molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations were performed considering neutral and protonated ionization states, starting from different initial conditions. At physiological pH, the protonated state of naratriptan is predominant. It is expected that neutral compounds could have larger membrane partition than charged compounds. However, for the specific case of triptans, it is difficult to study neutral species in membranes experimentally, making computer simulations an interesting tool. When the naratriptan molecules were originally placed in water, they partitioned between the bilayer/water interface and water phase, as has been described for similar compounds. From this condition, the drugs displayed low access to the hydrophobic environment, with no significant effects on bilayer organization. The molecules anchored in the interface, due mainly to the barrier function of the polar and oriented lipid heads. On the other hand, when placed inside the bilayer, both neutral and protonated naratriptan showed self-aggregation in the lipid tail environment. In particular, the protonated species exhibited a pore-like structure, dragging water through this environment. Graphical Abstract Different behaviour of Naratriptan and Sumatriptan, when the drugs were originally placed in the lipid core. PMID:27558798

  11. Evidence for superlattice arrangements in fluid phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylethanolamine bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, K H; Ruonala, M; Virtanen, J; Somerharju, P

    1997-01-01

    Recently, evidence for cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine (PC) molecules to adapt superlattice arrangements in fluid lipid bilayers has been presented. Whether superlattice arrangements exist in other biologically relevant lipid membranes, such as phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)/PC, is still speculative. In this study, we have examined the physical properties of fluid 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-PC (POPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-PE (POPE) binary mixtures as a function of the POPE mole fraction (X(PE)) using fluorescence and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. At 30 degrees C, i.e., above the Tm of POPE and POPC, deviations, or dips, as well as local data scattering in the excimer-to-monomer fluorescence intensity ratio of intramolecular excimer forming dipyrenylphosphatidylcholine probe in POPE/POPC mixtures were detected at X(PE) approximately 0.04, 0.11, 0.16, 0.26, 0.33, 0.51, 0.66, 0.75, 0.82, 0.91, and 0.94. The above critical values of X(PE) coincide (within +/-0.03) with the critical mole fractions X(HX,PE) or X(R,PE) predicted by a headgroup superlattice model, which assumes that the lipid headgroups form hexagonal or rectangular superlattice, respectively, in the bilayer. Other spectroscopic data, generalized polarization of Laurdan and infrared carbonyl and phosphate stretching frequency, were also collected. Similar agreements between some of the observed critical values of X(PE) from these data and the X(HX,PE) or X(R,PE) values were also found. However, all techniques yielded critical values of X(PE) (e.g., 0.42 and 0.58) that cannot be explained by the present headgroup superlattice model. The effective cross-sectional area of the PE headgroup is smaller than that of the acyl chains. Hence, the relief of "packing frustration" of PE in the presence of PC (larger headgroup than PE) may be one of the major mechanisms in driving the PE and PC components to superlattice-like lateral distributions in the bilayer. We propose that headgroup superlattices may

  12. Acyl chain composition and coexisting fluid phases in lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yongwen; Bradley, Miranda; Mitchell, Drake

    2011-10-01

    At room temperature phospholipid bilayers enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol may form a solid phase as well as two coexisting fluid phases. These are the standard fluid phase, or the liquid-disordered phase, ld, and the liquid-ordered phase, lo, which is commonly associated with lipid rafts. Ternary mixtures of palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphocholine (POPC; 16:0,18:1 PC), sphingomyelin (SPM), and cholesterol (Chol) form coexisting lo, ld and solid phases over a wide range of molar ratios. We are examining the ability of two fluorescent probes to detect these 2 phases: NBD linked to di-16:0 PE which partitions strongly into the lo phase and NBD linked to di-18:1 PE which partitions strongly into the ld phase. We are also examining the effect of the highly polyunsaturated phospholipid stearoyl-docosahexanoyl-phosphocholine (SDPC; 18:0, 22:6 PC) on the ternary phase diagram of POPC/SPM/Chol with particular focus on the functionally important lo/ld coexistence region. We report on the fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy decay dynamics of these two fluorescent probes.

  13. Interactions of the C-terminus of lung surfactant protein B with lipid bilayers are modulated by acyl chain saturation.

    PubMed

    Antharam, Vijay C; Farver, R Suzanne; Kuznetsova, Anna; Sippel, Katherine H; Mills, Frank D; Elliott, Douglas W; Sternin, Edward; Long, Joanna R

    2008-11-01

    Lung surfactant protein B (SP-B) is critical to minimizing surface tension in the alveoli. The C-terminus of SP-B, residues 59-80, has much of the surface activity of the full protein and serves as a template for the development of synthetic surfactant replacements. The molecular mechanisms responsible for its ability to restore lung compliance were investigated with circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry, and (31)P and (2)H solid-state NMR spectroscopy. SP-B(59-80) forms an amphipathic helix which alters lipid organization and acyl chain dynamics in fluid lamellar phase 4:1 DPPC:POPG and 3:1 POPC:POPG MLVs. At higher levels of SP-B(59-80) in the POPC:POPG lipid system a transition to a nonlamellar phase is observed while DPPC:POPG mixtures remain in a lamellar phase. Deuterium NMR shows an increase in acyl chain order in DPPC:POPG MLVs on addition of SP-B(59-80); in POPC:POPG MLVs, acyl chain order parameters decrease. Our results indicate SP-B(59-80) penetrates deeply into DPPC:POPG bilayers and binds more peripherally to POPC:POPG bilayers. Similar behavior has been observed for KL(4), a peptide mimetic of SP-B which was originally designed using SP-B(59-80) as a template and has been clinically demonstrated to be successful in treating respiratory distress syndrome. The ability of these helical peptides to differentially partition into lipid lamellae based on their degree of monounsaturation and subsequent changes in lipid dynamics suggest a mechanism for lipid organization and trafficking within the dynamic lung environment. PMID:18694722

  14. Hydration lubrication and shear-induced self-healing of lipid bilayer boundary lubricants in phosphatidylcholine dispersions.

    PubMed

    Sorkin, Raya; Kampf, Nir; Zhu, Linyi; Klein, Jacob

    2016-03-14

    Measurements of normal and shear (frictional) forces between mica surfaces across small unilamellar vesicle (SUV) dispersions of the phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipids DMPC (14:0), DPPC (16:0) and DSPC (18:0) and POPC (16:0, 18:1), at physiologically high pressures, are reported. We have previously studied the normal and shear forces between two opposing surfaces bearing PC vesicles across pure water and showed that liposome lubrication ability improved with increasing acyl chain length, and correlated strongly with the SUV structural integrity on the substrate surface (DSPC > DPPC > DMPC). In the current study, surprisingly, we discovered that this trend is reversed when the measurements are conducted in SUV dispersions, instead of pure water. In their corresponding SUV dispersion, DMPC SUVs ruptured and formed bilayers, which were able to provide reversible and reproducible lubrication with extremely low friction (μ < 10(-4)) up to pressures of 70-90 atm. Similarly, POPC SUVs also formed bilayers which exhibited low friction (μ < 10(-4)) up to pressures as high as 160 atm. DPPC and DSPC SUVs also provided good lubrication, but with slightly higher friction coefficients (μ = 10(-3)-10(-4)). We believe these differences originate from fast self-healing of the softer surface layers (which are in their liquid disordered phase, POPC, or close to it, DMPC), which renders the robustness of the DPPC or DSPC (both in their solid ordered phase) less important in these conditions. Under these circumstances, the enhanced hydration of the less densely packed POPC and DMPC surface layers is now believed to play an important role, and allows enhanced lubrication via the hydration lubrication mechanism. Our findings may have implications for the understanding of complex biological systems such us biolubrication of synovial joints. PMID:26861851

  15. Interactions of the C-terminus of pulmonary surfactant B with lipid bilayers are modulated by acyl chain saturation

    PubMed Central

    Antharam, Vijay C.; Farver, R. Suzanne; Kuznetsova, Anna; Sippel, Katherine H.; Mills, Frank D.; Elliott, Douglas W.; Sternin, Edward; Long, Joanna R.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Lung surfactant protein B (SP-B) is critical to minimizing surface tension in the alveoli. The C-terminus of SP-B, residues 59-80, has much of the surface activity of the full protein and serves as a template for the development of synthetic surfactant replacements. The molecular mechanisms responsible for its ability to restore lung compliance were investigated with circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry, and 31P and 2H solid-state NMR spectroscopy. SP-B59-80 forms an amphipathic helix which alters lipid organization and acyl chain dynamics in fluid lamellar phase 4:1 DPPC:POPG and 3:1 POPC:POPG MLVs. At higher levels of SP-B59-80 in the POPC:POPG lipid system a transition to a nonlamellar phase is observed while DPPC:POPG mixtures remain in a lamellar phase. Deuterium NMR shows an increase in acyl chain order in DPPC:POPG MLVs on addition of SP-B59-80; in POPC:POPG MLVs, acyl chain order parameters decrease. Our results indicate SP-B59-80 penetrates deeply into DPPC:POPG bilayers and binds more peripherally to POPC:POPG bilayers. Similar behavior has been observed for KL4, a peptide mimetic of SP-B which was originally designed using SP-B59-80 as a template and has been clinically demonstrated to be successful in treating respiratory distress syndrome. The ability of these helical peptides to differentially partition into lipid lamellae containing varying levels of monounsaturation and subsequent changes in lipid dynamics suggest a mechanism for lipid organization and trafficking within the dynamic lung environment. PMID:18694722

  16. Effect of Cholesterol on the Interaction of Cytochrome P450 Substrate Drug Chlorzoxazone with the Phosphatidylcholine Bilayer.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Ayumi; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Hikima, Takaaki; Takata, Masaki; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2016-07-19

    Many drugs are oxidized by membrane protein cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes during their metabolism process. CYPs are located mainly in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes. Recent studies have suggested that CYP substrate drugs first bind the lipid bilayers of ER membranes and then the drugs reach the active site of CYP by way of an access channel. The entrance of the channel is located in the hydrophobic regions of the lipid bilayers. One of the features of the ER membrane is a cholesterol content that is lower than those of other biomembranes. In this study, the cholesterol concentration dependence of the interaction of a CYP substrate drug, chlorzoxazone (CZX), with model membranes composed of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and cholesterol was examined via differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), UV-visible spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Experimental results indicated that CZX can bind to pure PC bilayers in the absence of cholesterol and that, by contrast, a high cholesterol concentration (30-50 mol %) tends to prevent CZX from binding to PC bilayers. Interestingly, the effect of cholesterol on the binding and insertion of CZX was biphasic. In the case of palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayers containing 5-10 mol % cholesterol, the CZX's binding and penetration into the bilayer were found to be greater than those with pure POPC bilayers. The concentration of 5-10 mol % nearly corresponds to the cholesterol concentration of ER membranes. The low cholesterol contents (12-20 mol %) of ER membranes might be the most suitable for the CYP drug metabolism process in ER membranes. PMID:27347790

  17. General model of phospholipid bilayers in fluid phase within the single chain mean field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yachong; Baulin, Vladimir A.; Pogodin, Sergey

    2014-05-07

    Coarse-grained model for saturated phospholipids: 1,2-didecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DCPC), 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLPC), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC), 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC), 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) and unsaturated phospholipids: 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), 1,2- dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) is introduced within the single chain mean field theory. A single set of parameters adjusted for DMPC bilayers gives an adequate description of equilibrium and mechanical properties of a range of saturated lipid molecules that differ only in length of their hydrophobic tails and unsaturated (POPC, DOPC) phospholipids which have double bonds in the tails. A double bond is modeled with a fixed angle of 120°, while the rest of the parameters are kept the same as saturated lipids. The thickness of the bilayer and its hydrophobic core, the compressibility, and the equilibrium area per lipid correspond to experimentally measured values for each lipid, changing linearly with the length of the tail. The model for unsaturated phospholipids also fetches main thermodynamical properties of the bilayers. This model is used for an accurate estimation of the free energies of the compressed or stretched bilayers in stacks or multilayers and gives reasonable estimates for free energies. The proposed model may further be used for studies of mixtures of lipids, small molecule inclusions, interactions of bilayers with embedded proteins.

  18. Estimation of activation energy for electroporation and pore growth rate in liquid crystalline and gel phases of lipid bilayers using molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Majhi, Amit Kumar; Kanchi, Subbarao; Venkataraman, V; Ayappa, K G; Maiti, Prabal K

    2015-11-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations of electroporation in POPC and DPPC lipid bilayers have been carried out at different temperatures ranging from 230 K to 350 K for varying electric fields. The dynamics of pore formation, including threshold field, pore initiation time, pore growth rate, and pore closure rate after the field is switched off, was studied in both the gel and liquid crystalline (Lα) phases of the bilayers. Using an Arrhenius model of pore initiation kinetics, the activation energy for pore opening was estimated to be 25.6 kJ mol(-1) and 32.6 kJ mol(-1) in the Lα phase of POPC and DPPC lipids respectively at a field strength of 0.32 V nm(-1). The activation energy decreases to 24.2 kJ mol(-1) and 23.7 kJ mol(-1) respectively at a higher field strength of 1.1 V nm(-1). At temperatures below the melting point, the activation energy in the gel phase of POPC and DPPC increases to 28.8 kJ mol(-1) and 34.4 kJ mol(-1) respectively at the same field of 1.1 V nm(-1). The pore closing time was found to be higher in the gel than in the Lα phase. The pore growth rate increases linearly with temperature and quadratically with field, consistent with viscosity limited growth models. PMID:26372335

  19. Behavior of Bilayer Leaflets in Asymmetric Model Membranes: Atomistic Simulation Studies.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jianhui; Nickels, Jonathan; Katsaras, John; Cheng, Xiaolin

    2016-08-25

    Spatial organization within lipid bilayers is an important feature for a range of biological processes. Leaflet compositional asymmetry and lateral lipid organization are just two of the ways in which membrane structure appears to be more complex than initially postulated by the fluid mosaic model. This raises the question of how the phase behavior in one bilayer leaflet may affect the apposing leaflet and how one begins to construct asymmetric model systems to investigate these interleaflet interactions. Here we report on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations (a total of 4.1 μs) of symmetric and asymmetric bilayer systems composed of liquid-ordered (Lo) or liquid-disordered (Ld) leaflets, based on the nanodomain-forming POPC/DSPC/cholesterol system. We begin by analyzing an asymmetric bilayer with leaflets derived from simulations of symmetric Lo and Ld bilayers. In this system, we observe that the properties of the Lo and Ld leaflets are similar to those of the Lo and Ld leaflets in corresponding symmetric systems. However, it is not obvious that mixing the equilibrium structures of their symmetric counterparts is the most appropriate way to construct asymmetric bilayers nor that these structures will manifest interleaflet couplings that lead to domain registry/antiregistry. We therefore constructed and simulated four additional asymmetric bilayer systems by systematically adding or removing lipids in the Ld leaflet to mimic potential density fluctuations. We find that the number of lipids in the Ld leaflet affects its own properties, as well as those of the apposing Lo leaflet. Collectively, the simulations reveal the presence of weak acyl chain interdigitation across bilayer leaflets, suggesting that interdigitation alone does not contribute significantly to the interleaflet coupling in nonphase-separated bilayers of this chemical composition. However, the properties of both leaflets appear to be sensitive to changes in in-plane lipid packing, possibly

  20. The modified fluorescence based vesicle fluctuation spectroscopy technique for determination of lipid bilayer bending properties.

    PubMed

    Drabik, Dominik; Przybyło, Magda; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Iglič, Aleš; Langner, Marek

    2016-02-01

    Lipid bilayer is the main constitutive element of biological membrane, which confines intracellular space. The mechanical properties of biological membranes may be characterized by various parameters including membrane stiffness or membrane bending rigidity, which can be measured using flicker noise spectroscopy. The flicker noise spectroscopy exploits the spontaneous thermal undulations of the membrane. The method is based on the quantitative analysis of a series of microscopic images captured during thermal membrane fluctuations. Thus, measured bending rigidity coefficient depends on the image quality as well as the selection of computational tools for image processing and mathematical model used. In this work scanning and spinning disc confocal microscopies were used to visualize fluctuating membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles. The bending rigidity coefficient was calculated for different acquisition modes, using different fluorescent probes and different image processing methods. It was shown that both imaging approaches gave similar bending coefficient values regardless of acquisition time. Using the developed methodology the effect of fluorescent probe type and aqueous phase composition on the value of the membrane bending rigidity coefficient was measured. Specifically it was found that the bending rigidity coefficient of DOPC bilayer in water is smaller than that determined for POPC membrane. It has been found that the POPC and DOPC bending rigidities coefficient in sucrose solution was lower than that in water. Fluorescence imaging makes possible the quantitative analysis of membrane mechanical properties of inhomogeneous membrane. PMID:26615919

  1. Possible Domain Formation In PE/PC Bilayers Containing High Cholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, Matthew; Hussain, Fazle; Huang, Juyang

    2015-03-01

    Cholesterol is a significant component of animal cell membranes, and its presence has the effects of not only adding rigidity to the lipid bilayer, but also leading to the formation of lipid domains. Two other lipids of interest are phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), which constitutes about 45 percent of the phospholipids found in human nervous tissues, and phosphatidylcholine (PC), which is found in every cell of the human body. The maximum solubility of cholesterol is the highest mole fraction of cholesterol that the lipid bilayer can retain, at which point cholesterol begins to precipitate out to form cholesterol monohydrate crystals. We have measured the maximum solubility of cholesterol in mixtures of 16:0-18:1PE and 16:0-18:1PC using a new light scattering technique, which utilizes the anisotropic nature of light scattering by cholesterol crystals. This new method is highly accurate and reproducible. Our results show that the maximum solubility of cholesterol increases linearly as a function of the molar ratio POPC/(POPE+POPC), which suggests possible domain formation in mixtures of PE and PC containing maximum amount of cholesterol.

  2. Low-visibility light-intensity laser-triggered release of entrapped calcein from 1,2-bis (tricosa-10,12-diynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes is mediated through a type I photoactivation pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yavlovich, Amichai; Viard, Mathias; Gupta, Kshitij; Sine, Jessica; Vu, Mylinh; Blumenthal, Robert; Tata, Darrell B; Puri, Anu

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported on the physical characteristics of photo-triggerable liposomes containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), and 1,2-bis (tricosa-10,12-diynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DC8,9PC) carrying a photo agent as their payload. When exposed to a low-intensity 514 nm wavelength (continuous-wave) laser light, these liposomes were observed to release entrapped calcein green (Cal-G; Ex/Em 490/517 nm) but not calcein blue (Cal-B; Ex/Em 360/460 nm). In this study, we have investigated the mechanism for the 514 nm laser-triggered release of the Cal-G payload using several scavengers that are known specifically to inhibit either type I or type II photoreaction pathways. Liposomes containing DPPC:DC8,9PC: distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DSPE)-polyethylene glycol (PEG)-2000 (86:10:04 mole ratio) were loaded either with fluorescent (calcein) or nonfluorescent (3H-inulin) aqueous markers. In addition, a non-photo-triggerable formulation (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine [POPC]:DC8,9PC:DSPE-PEG2000) was also studied with the same payloads. The 514 nm wavelength laser exposure on photo-triggerable liposomes resulted in the release of Cal-G but not that of Cal-B or 3H-inulin, suggesting an involvement of a photoactivated state of Cal-G due to the 514 nm laser exposure. Upon 514 nm laser exposures, substantial hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, ≈100 μM) levels were detected from only the Cal-G loaded photo-triggerable liposomes but not from Cal-B-loaded liposomes (≤10 μM H2O2). The Cal-G release from photo-triggerable liposomes was found to be significantly inhibited by ascorbic acid (AA), resulting in a 70%–80% reduction in Cal-G release. The extent of AA-mediated inhibition of Cal-G release from the liposomes also correlated with the consumption of AA. No AA consumption was detected in the 514 nm laserexposed Cal B-loaded liposomes, thus confirming a role of photoactivation of Cal-G in liposome destabilization. Inclusion of 100 mM K3Fe(CN)6 (a

  3. Importance of phospholipid bilayer integrity in the analysis of protein–lipid interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Drücker, Patrick; Gerke, Volker; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • We show long-term mechanical stabilization of solid supported bilayers. • Bilayer integrity is essential for the investigation of protein–lipid interactions. • Protein adsorption to a bilayer containing defects causes membrane destruction. - Abstract: The integrity of supported phospholipid bilayer membranes is of crucial importance for the investigation of lipid–protein interactions. Therefore we recorded the formation of supported membranes on SiO{sub 2} and mica by quartz crystal microbalance and controlled the integrity by atomic force microscopy. This study aims to analyze how membrane defects affect protein–lipid interactions. The experiments focused on a lipid mixture of POPC/DOPC/Chol/POPS/PI(4,5)P{sub 2} (37:20:20:20:3) and the binding of the peripheral membrane associated protein annexin A2. We found that formation of a continuous undisturbed bilayer is an indispensable precondition for a reliable determination and quantification of lipid–protein-interactions. If membrane defects were present, protein adsorption causes membrane disruption and lipid detachment on a support thus leading to false determination of binding constants. Our results obtained for PI(4,5)P{sub 2} and cholesterol containing supported membranes yield new knowledge to construct functional surfaces that may cover nanoporous substrates, form free standing membranes or may be used for lab-on-a-chip applications.

  4. The Lipid Bilayer Provides a Site for Cortisone Crystallization at High Cortisone Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Alsop, Richard J; Khondker, Adree; Hub, Jochen S; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2016-01-01

    Cortisone is an injected anti-inflammatory drug that can cause painful side effects known as "steroid flares" which are caused by cortisone crystallizing at the injection site. We used molecular dynamics simulations and X-ray diffraction to study the interaction of cortisone with model lipid membranes made of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) at drug concentrations from 0 mol% to 50 mol%. Cortisone was found to partition in the lipid bilayer and locate in the hydrophilic to hydrophobic interface of the membranes. Cortisone strongly affects the integrity of the membrane, as quantified by a decreased membrane thickness, increased area per lipid, and decreased lipid tail order parameters. At cortisone concentrations of more than 20 mol%, signals from crystallized cortisone were observed. These crystallites are embedded in the bilayers and orient with the membranes. While the cortisone molecules align parallel to the bilayers at low concentrations, they start to penetrate the hydrophobic core at higher concentrations. Trans-membrane crystallites start to nucleate when the membrane thickness has decreased such that cortisone molecules in the different leaflets can find partners from the opposite leaflet resulting in a non-zero density of cortisone molecules in the bilayer center. We suggest that the lipid bilayer provides a site for cortisone crystallization. PMID:26936102

  5. The Lipid Bilayer Provides a Site for Cortisone Crystallization at High Cortisone Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Alsop, Richard J.; Khondker, Adree; Hub, Jochen S.; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.

    2016-01-01

    Cortisone is an injected anti-inflammatory drug that can cause painful side effects known as “steroid flares” which are caused by cortisone crystallizing at the injection site. We used molecular dynamics simulations and X-ray diffraction to study the interaction of cortisone with model lipid membranes made of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) at drug concentrations from 0 mol% to 50 mol%. Cortisone was found to partition in the lipid bilayer and locate in the hydrophilic to hydrophobic interface of the membranes. Cortisone strongly affects the integrity of the membrane, as quantified by a decreased membrane thickness, increased area per lipid, and decreased lipid tail order parameters. At cortisone concentrations of more than 20 mol%, signals from crystallized cortisone were observed. These crystallites are embedded in the bilayers and orient with the membranes. While the cortisone molecules align parallel to the bilayers at low concentrations, they start to penetrate the hydrophobic core at higher concentrations. Trans-membrane crystallites start to nucleate when the membrane thickness has decreased such that cortisone molecules in the different leaflets can find partners from the opposite leaflet resulting in a non-zero density of cortisone molecules in the bilayer center. We suggest that the lipid bilayer provides a site for cortisone crystallization. PMID:26936102

  6. Pair interactions among ternary DPPC/POPC/cholesterol mixtures in liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Martí, Jordi; Calero, Carles

    2016-05-18

    Saturated phospholipids, unsaturated phospholipids, and cholesterol are essential components of cell membranes, making the understanding of their mutual interactions of great significance. We have performed microsecond molecular dynamics simulations on the ternary mixtures of DPPC/POPC/cholesterol to systematically examine lipid-lipid and cholesterol-lipid interactions in the liquid-ordered and the liquid-disordered phases. The results show that there exists a competition between the tighter packing of cholesterol-lipid and the looser packing of lipid-lipid as the membrane changes from the liquid-disordered phase to the liquid-ordered phase. Depending on the lipid saturation, the favor of lipid-lipid interactions is in the order of saturated-saturated > monounsaturated-monounsaturated > saturated-monounsaturated. Cholesterol-saturated lipid interactions are more favorable than cholesterol-monounsaturated lipid ones. The results are consistent with the push-pull forces derived from experiments and give general insights into the interactions among membrane components. PMID:27103534

  7. On the application of the MARTINI coarse-grained model to immersion of a protein in a phospholipid bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Ghulam; Nandekar, Prajwal P.; Yu, Xiaofeng; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2015-12-01

    An important step in the simulation of a membrane protein in a phospholipid bilayer is the correct immersion of the protein in the bilayer. Crystal structures are determined without the bilayer. Particularly for proteins with monotopic domains, it can be unclear how deeply and in which orientation the protein is being inserted in the membrane. We have previously developed a procedure combining coarse-grain (CG) with all-atom (AA) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to insert and simulate a cytochrome P450 (CYP) possessing an N-terminal transmembrane helix connected by a flexible linker region to a globular domain that dips into the membrane. The CG simulations provide a computationally efficient means to explore different orientations and conformations of the CYP in the membrane. Converged configurations obtained in the CG simulations are then refined in AA simulations. Here, we tested different variants of the MARTINI CG model, differing in the water model, the treatment of long-range non-bonded interactions, and the implementation (GROMACS 4.5.5 vs 5.0.4), for this purpose. We examined the behavior of the models for simulating a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) bilayer in water and for the immersion of CYP3A4 in a POPC bilayer, and compared the CG-MD results with the previously reported experimental and simulation results. We also tested the methodology on a set of four other CYPs. Finally, we propose an optimized protocol for modeling such protein-membrane systems that provides the most plausible configurations and is computationally efficient; this incorporates the standard non-polar water model and the GROMACS 5.0.4 implementation with a reaction field treatment of long-range interactions.

  8. On the application of the MARTINI coarse-grained model to immersion of a protein in a phospholipid bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Mustafa, Ghulam E-mail: rebecca.wade@h-its.org; Nandekar, Prajwal P.; Yu, Xiaofeng; Wade, Rebecca C. E-mail: rebecca.wade@h-its.org

    2015-12-28

    An important step in the simulation of a membrane protein in a phospholipid bilayer is the correct immersion of the protein in the bilayer. Crystal structures are determined without the bilayer. Particularly for proteins with monotopic domains, it can be unclear how deeply and in which orientation the protein is being inserted in the membrane. We have previously developed a procedure combining coarse-grain (CG) with all-atom (AA) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to insert and simulate a cytochrome P450 (CYP) possessing an N-terminal transmembrane helix connected by a flexible linker region to a globular domain that dips into the membrane. The CG simulations provide a computationally efficient means to explore different orientations and conformations of the CYP in the membrane. Converged configurations obtained in the CG simulations are then refined in AA simulations. Here, we tested different variants of the MARTINI CG model, differing in the water model, the treatment of long-range non-bonded interactions, and the implementation (GROMACS 4.5.5 vs 5.0.4), for this purpose. We examined the behavior of the models for simulating a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) bilayer in water and for the immersion of CYP3A4 in a POPC bilayer, and compared the CG-MD results with the previously reported experimental and simulation results. We also tested the methodology on a set of four other CYPs. Finally, we propose an optimized protocol for modeling such protein-membrane systems that provides the most plausible configurations and is computationally efficient; this incorporates the standard non-polar water model and the GROMACS 5.0.4 implementation with a reaction field treatment of long-range interactions.

  9. Effects and Location of Coplanar and Noncoplanar PCB in a Lipid Bilayer: A Solid-State NMR Study.

    PubMed

    Totland, Christian; Nerdal, Willy; Steinkopf, Signe

    2016-08-01

    Coplanar and noncoplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are known to have different routes and degree of toxicity. Here, the effects of noncoplanar PCB 52 and coplanar PCB 77 present at 2 mol % in a model system consisting of POPC liposomes (50% hydrated) are investigated by solid-state (13)C and (31)P NMR at 298 K. Both PCBs intercalate horizontally in the outer part of the bilayer, near the segments of the acyl chain close to the glycerol group. Despite similar membrane locations, the coplanar PCB 77 shows little effect on the bilayer properties overall, except for the four nearest neighboring lipids, while the effect of PCB 52 is more dramatic. The first ∼2 layers of lipids around each PCB 52 in the bilayer form a high fluidity lamellar phase, whereas lipids beyond these layers form a lamellar phase with a slight increase in fluidity compared to a bilayer without PCB 52. Further, a third high mobility domain is observed. The explanation for this is the interference of several high fluidity lamellar phases caused by interactions of PCB 52 molecules in different leaflets of the model bilayer. This causes formation of high curvature toroidal region in the bilayer and might induce formation of channels. PMID:27379686

  10. Using Micropatterned Lipid Bilayer Arrays to Measure the Effect of Membrane Composition on Merocyanine 540 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kathryn A.; Conboy, John C.

    2011-01-01

    The lipophilic dye merocyanine 540 (MC540) was used to model small molecule-membrane interactions using micropatterned lipid bilayer arrays (MLBAs) prepared using a 3D Continuous Flow Microspotter (CFM). Fluorescence microscopy was used to monitor MC540 binding to fifteen different bilayer compositions simultaneously. MC540 fluorescence was two times greater for bilayers composed of liquid-crystalline (l.c.) phase lipids (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC), 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC), 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (SOPC), and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC)) compared to bilayers in the gel phase (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC)). The effect cholesterol (CHO) had on MC540 binding to the membrane was found to be dependent on the lipid component; cholesterol decreased MC540 bindingin DMPC, DPPC and DSPC bilayers while having little to no effect on the remaining l.c. phase lipids. MC540 fluorescence was also lowered when 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine (sodium salt) (DOPS) was incorporated into DOPC bilayers. The increase in the surface charge density appears to decrease the occurrence of highly fluorescent monomers and increase the formation of weakly fluorescent dimers via electrostatic repulsion. This paper demonstrates that MLBAs are a useful tool for preparing high density reproducible bilayer arrays to study small molecule-membrane interactions in a high-throughput manner. PMID:21376014

  11. Improved Coarse-Grained Modeling of Cholesterol-Containing Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol trafficking, which is an essential function in mammalian cells, is intimately connected to molecular-scale interactions through cholesterol modulation of membrane structure and dynamics and interaction with membrane receptors. Since these effects of cholesterol occur on micro- to millisecond time scales, it is essential to develop accurate coarse-grained simulation models that can reach these time scales. Cholesterol has been shown experimentally to thicken the membrane and increase phospholipid tail order between 0 and 40% cholesterol, above which these effects plateau or slightly decrease. Here, we showed that the published MARTINI coarse-grained force-field for phospholipid (POPC) and cholesterol fails to capture these effects. Using reference atomistic simulations, we systematically modified POPC and cholesterol bonded parameters in MARTINI to improve its performance. We showed that the corrections to pseudobond angles between glycerol and the lipid tails and around the oleoyl double bond particle (the “angle-corrected model”) slightly improves the agreement of MARTINI with experimentally measured thermal, elastic, and dynamic properties of POPC membranes. The angle-corrected model improves prediction of the thickening and ordering effects up to 40% cholesterol but overestimates these effects at higher cholesterol concentration. In accordance with prior work that showed the cholesterol rough face methyl groups are important for limiting cholesterol self-association, we revised the coarse-grained representation of these methyl groups to better match cholesterol-cholesterol radial distribution functions from atomistic simulations. In addition, by using a finer-grained representation of the branched cholesterol tail than MARTINI, we improved predictions of lipid tail order and bilayer thickness across a wide range of concentrations. Finally, transferability testing shows that a model incorporating our revised parameters into DOPC outperforms other

  12. D IR Line Shapes for Determining the Structure of a Peptide in a Bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woys, Ann Marie; Lin, Y. S.; Skinner, J. S.; Zanni, M. T.; Reddy, A. S.; de Pablo, J. J.

    2010-06-01

    Structure of the antimicrobial peptide, ovispirin, on a lipid bilayer was determined using 2D IR spectroscopy and spectra calculated from molecular dynamics simulations. Ovispirin is an 18 residue amphipathic peptide that binds parallel to the membrane in a mostly alpha helical conformation. 15 of the 18 residues were ^1^3C^1^8O isotopically labeled on the backbone to isolate the amide I vibration at each position. 2D IR spectra were collected for each labeled peptide in 3:1 POPC/POPG vesicles, and peak width along the diagonal was measured. The diagonal line width is sensitive to the vibrator's electrostatic environment, which varies through the bilayer. We observe an oscillatory line width spanning 10 to 24 cm-1 and with a period of nearly 3.6 residues. To further investigate the position of ovispirin in a bilayer, molecular dynamics simulations determined the peptide depth to be just below the lipid headgroups. The trajectory of ovispirin at this depth was used to calculate 2D IR spectra, from which the diagonal line width is measured. Both experimental and simulated line widths are similar in periodicity and suggest a kink in the peptide backbone and the tilt in the bilayer. A. Woys, Y. S. Lin, A. S. Reddy, W. Xiong, J. J. de Pablo, J. S. Skinner, and M. T. Zanni, JACS 132, 2832-2838 (2010).

  13. Thermal annealing triggers collapse of biphasic supported lipid bilayers into multilayer islands.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Sean F; Sasaki, Darryl Y; Parikh, Atul N

    2014-05-01

    The collapse of phase-separating single, supported lipid bilayers, consisting of mixtures of a zwitterionic phospholipid (POPC) and an anionic lipid (DPPA) upon thermal annealing in the presence of ions is examined using a combination of scanning probe, epifluorescence, and ellipsometric microscopies. We find that thermal annealing in the presence of ions in the bathing medium induces an irreversible transition from domain-textured, single supported bilayers to one comprising islands of multibilayer stacks, whose lateral area decays with lamellarity, producing pyramidal staircase "mesa" topography. The higher order lamellae are almost invariably localized above the anionic-lipid rich, gel-phase domains in the parent bilayer and depends on the ions in the bathing medium. The collapse mechanism appears to involve synergistic influences of two independent mechanisms: (1) stabilization of the incipient headgroup-headgroup interface in the emergent multibilayer configuration facilitated by ions in the bath and (2) domain-boundary templated folding. This collapse mechanism is consistent with previous theoretical predictions of topography-induced rippling instability in collapsing lipid monolayers and suggests the role of the mismatch in height and/or spontaneous curvature at domain boundaries in the collapse of phase-separated single supported bilayers. PMID:24708440

  14. Probing the Huntingtin 1-17 Membrane Anchor on a Phospholipid Bilayer by Using All-Atom Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Sébastien; Binette, Vincent; Salnikov, Evgeniy S.; Bechinger, Burkhard; Mousseau, Normand

    2015-01-01

    Mislocalization and aggregation of the huntingtin protein are related to Huntington’s disease. Its first exon—more specifically the first 17 amino acids (Htt17)—is crucial for the physiological and pathological functions of huntingtin. It regulates huntingtin’s activity through posttranslational modifications and serves as an anchor to membrane-containing organelles of the cell. Recently, structure and orientation of the Htt17 membrane anchor were determined using a combined solution and solid-state NMR approach. This prompted us to refine this model by investigating the dynamics and thermodynamics of this membrane anchor on a POPC bilayer using all-atom, explicit solvent molecular dynamics and Hamiltonian replica exchange. Our simulations are combined with various experimental measurements to generate a high-resolution atomistic model for the huntingtin Htt17 membrane anchor on a POPC bilayer. More precisely, we observe that the single α-helix structure is more stable in the phospholipid membrane than the NMR model obtained in the presence of dodecylphosphocholine detergent micelles. The resulting Htt17 monomer has its hydrophobic plane oriented parallel to the bilayer surface. Our results further unveil the key residues interacting with the membrane in terms of hydrogen bonds, salt-bridges, and nonpolar contributions. We also observe that Htt17 equilibrates at a well-defined insertion depth and that it perturbs the physical properties—order parameter, thickness, and area per lipid—of the bilayer in a manner that could favor its dimerization. Overall, our observations reinforce and refine the NMR measurements on the Htt17 membrane anchor segment of huntingtin that is of fundamental importance to its biological functions. PMID:25762330

  15. Terminal lipophilization of a unique DNA dodecamer by various nucleolipid headgroups: Their incorporation into artificial lipid bilayers and hydrodynamic properties.

    PubMed

    Werz, Emma; Rosemeyer, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    A series of six cyanine-5-labeled oligonucleotides (LONs 10-15), each terminally lipophilized with different nucleolipid head groups, were synthesized using the recently prepared phosphoramidites 4b-9b. The insertion of the LONs within an artificial lipid bilayer, composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE), was studied by single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy with the help of an optically transparent microfluidic sample carrier with perfusion capabilities. The incorporation of the lipo-oligonucleotides into the bilayer was studied with respect to efficiency (maximal bilayer brightness) as well as stability against perfusion (final stable bilayer brightness). Attempts to correlate these parameters with the log P values of the corresponding nucleolipid head groups failed, a result which clearly demonstrates that not only the lipophilicity but mainly the chemical structure and topology of the head group is of decisive importance for the optimal interaction of a lipo-oligonucleotide with an artificial lipid bilayer. Moreover, fluorescence half-live and diffusion time values were measured to determine the diffusion coefficients of the lipo-oligonucleotides. PMID:26124894

  16. Modeling vitreous silica bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Avishek; Wilson, Mark; Sherrington, David; Thorpe, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The recent synthesis and imaging of bilayers of vitreous silica has led to a wealth of new information. We have modeled the experimentally-observed bilayer using a computer assembly procedure to form a network of corner-sharing tetrahedra, which is then mirror-reflected to form a bilayer. We show that the vitreous silica bilayer has additional macroscopic degrees of freedom iff there is a symmetry plane through the center of the bilayer going through the central layer of oxygen ions that join the upper and lower monolayers. We have computer-refined the experimental coordinates to determine the density, and other structural characteristics such as the Si-Si pair distribution function, Si-O-Si bond angle distribution and the Aboav-Weaire law.

  17. Structure of lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, John F.; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    The quantitative experimental uncertainty in the structure of fully hydrated, biologically relevant, fluid (Lα) phase lipid bilayers has been too large to provide a firm base for applications or for comparison with simulations. Many structural methods are reviewed including modern liquid crystallography of lipid bilayers that deals with the fully developed undulation fluctuations that occur in the Lα phase. These fluctuations degrade the higher order diffraction data in a way that, if unrecognized, leads to erroneous conclusions regarding bilayer structure. Diffraction measurements at high instrumental resolution provide a measure of these fluctuations. In addition to providing better structural determination, this opens a new window on interactions between bilayers, so the experimental determination of interbilayer interaction parameters is reviewed briefly. We introduce a new structural correction based on fluctuations that has not been included in any previous studies. Updated measurements, such as for the area compressibility modulus, are used to provide adjustments to many of the literature values of structural quantities. Since the gel (Lβ′) phase is valuable as a stepping stone for obtaining fluid phase results, a brief review is given of the lower temperature phases. The uncertainty in structural results for lipid bilayers is being reduced and best current values are provided for bilayers of five lipids. PMID:11063882

  18. Bilayer Graphene Electromechanical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagne, Alexandre; Storms, Matthew; Yigen, Serap; Reulet, Bertrand

    Bilayer graphene is an outstanding electromechanical system, and its electronic and mechanical properties, as well as their coupling, are widely tunable. To the best of our knowledge, simultaneous charge transport and mechanical spectroscopy (via RF mixing) has not been realized in bilayer graphene. We present data showing clear electromechanical resonances in three suspended bilayer devices whose length range from 1 to 2 microns. We first describe the low-temperature current annealing of the devices which is crucial to achieve the transconductance, I -VG , necessary to implement a RF mixing detection method. We describe our RF mixing circuit and data. We measure clear mechanical resonances ranging in frequency from 50 to 140 MHz. We show that we can smoothly tune the resonance frequencies of our bilayer resonators with mechanical strain applied via a backgate voltage. We measure quality factors up to 4000. We briefly discuss the effects of the RF driving power on the dispersion of the mechanical resonance. We aim to use these high quality mechanical resonance as a mechanical sensor of the bilayer quantum Hall phase transitions. We show initial data of a bilayer mechanical resonance as a function of magnetic field and quantum Hall phase transitions.

  19. The Effect of a C-Terminal Peptide of Surfactant Protein B (SP-B) on Oriented Lipid Bilayers, Characterized by Solid-State 2H- and 31P-NMR

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tran-Chin; McDonald, Mark; Morrow, Michael R.; Booth, Valerie

    2009-01-01

    SP-BCTERM, a cationic, helical peptide based on the essential lung surfactant protein B (SP-B), retains a significant fraction of the function of the full-length protein. Solid-state 2H- and 31P-NMR were used to examine the effects of SP-BCTERM on mechanically oriented lipid bilayer samples. SP-BCTERM modified the multilayer structure of bilayers composed of POPC, POPG, POPC/POPG, or bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES), even at relatively low peptide concentrations. The 31P spectra of BLES, which contains ∼1% SP-B, and POPC/POPG with 1% SP-BCTERM, look very similar, supporting a similarity in lipid interactions of SP-BCTERM and its parent protein, full-length SP-B. In the model systems, although the peptide interacted with both the oriented and unoriented fractions of the lipids, it interacted differently with the two fractions, as demonstrated by differences in lipid headgroup structure induced by the peptide. On the other hand, although SP-BCTERM induced similar disruptions in overall bilayer orientation in BLES, there was no evidence of lipid headgroup conformational changes in either the oriented or the unoriented fractions of the BLES samples. Notably, in the model lipid systems the peptide did not induce the formation of small, rapidly tumbling lipid structures, such as micelles, or of hexagonal phases, the observation of which would have provided support for functional mechanisms involving peptide-induced lipid flip-flop or stabilization of curved lipid structures, respectively. PMID:19413982

  20. Hydration behaviour of POPC/C(12)-Bet mixtures investigated by sorption gravimetry, (31)P NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, H; Weichert, H; Klose, G; Heremans, K

    2012-02-01

    The hydration behaviour of mixtures of the zwitterionic phospholipid 1-palmitoyl-2-oleolyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and the zwitterionic surfactant N,N-dimethyl-N-dodecyl-betain (C(12)-Bet) was investigated by sorption gravimetry, solid-state (31)P NMR-spectroscopy and small angle X-ray diffraction (SAXD). Negative excess hydration (dehydration) was found for almost all hydration degrees investigated. This behaviour is explained by the formation of an inner salt between the dipoles of phospholipid and surfactant headgroups that show a reverse sequence of partial charges with respect to the hydrocarbon backbone. The formation of an inner-salt most probably reduces potential water binding sites. Moreover, NMR data suggest that the incorporation of the zwitterionic surfactant into the phospholipid membrane is correlated with reorientation of the phosphate axis towards the membrane director as well as with reduced lateral and wobbling diffusion. PMID:22285958

  1. Observation of the simultaneous transport of Asian mineral dust aerosols with anthropogenic pollutants using a POPC during a long-lasting dust event in late spring 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiaole; Uno, Itsushi; Hara, Yukari; Kuribayashi, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Shigekazu; Shimohara, Takaaki; Wang, Zifa

    2015-03-01

    We observed a long-lasting dust event from 25 May to 2 June 2014, using a polarization optical particle counter (POPC). The transport of dust plumes over East Asia was verified on the basis of observations of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, a lidar network, and surface synoptic observation stations. Mixing of dust and anthropogenic pollutants was investigated according to the variation in the depolarization ratio as a function of particle size. The nonsphericity of dust particles varied due to the impact of anthropogenic pollutants on their pathway. In the coarse mode, dust particles always had a clear nonspherical configuration, although large amounts of nitrate were also present. Supermicron particles are occasionally present in a spherical configuration, possibly due to the complex mixing of natural dust and anthropogenic particles. Statistically, ~64% of the total nitrate mass was deemed to be transported from outside of Japan due to a trapping effect in the dust plume.

  2. Immobilized lipid-bilayer materials

    DOEpatents

    Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Loy, Douglas A.; Yamanaka, Stacey A.

    2000-01-01

    A method for preparing encapsulated lipid-bilayer materials in a silica matrix comprising preparing a silica sol, mixing a lipid-bilayer material in the silica sol and allowing the mixture to gel to form the encapsulated lipid-bilayer material. The mild processing conditions allow quantitative entrapment of pre-formed lipid-bilayer materials without modification to the material's spectral characteristics. The method allows for the immobilization of lipid membranes to surfaces. The encapsulated lipid-bilayer materials perform as sensitive optical sensors for the detection of analytes such as heavy metal ions and can be used as drug delivery systems and as separation devices.

  3. Importance of phospholipid bilayer integrity in the analysis of protein-lipid interactions.

    PubMed

    Drücker, Patrick; Gerke, Volker; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2014-10-10

    The integrity of supported phospholipid bilayer membranes is of crucial importance for the investigation of lipid-protein interactions. Therefore we recorded the formation of supported membranes on SiO2 and mica by quartz crystal microbalance and controlled the integrity by atomic force microscopy. This study aims to analyze how membrane defects affect protein-lipid interactions. The experiments focused on a lipid mixture of POPC/DOPC/Chol/POPS/PI(4,5)P2 (37:20:20:20:3) and the binding of the peripheral membrane associated protein annexin A2. We found that formation of a continuous undisturbed bilayer is an indispensable precondition for a reliable determination and quantification of lipid-protein-interactions. If membrane defects were present, protein adsorption causes membrane disruption and lipid detachment on a support thus leading to false determination of binding constants. Our results obtained for PI(4,5)P2 and cholesterol containing supported membranes yield new knowledge to construct functional surfaces that may cover nanoporous substrates, form free standing membranes or may be used for lab-on-a-chip applications. PMID:25264195

  4. In silico phase separation in the presence of GM1 in ternary and quaternary lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Basu, Ipsita; Mukhopadhyay, Chaitali

    2015-07-14

    Cell membranes are multi-component mixtures with structural and compositional heterogeneity exhibiting a complex phase behavior. Domains formed in cell membranes often known as "Rafts" are of immense importance. Using coarse grained molecular dynamics simulations, we have studied the spontaneous phase separation of the ternary (POPC [1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine]/cholesterol/GM1) and quaternary (POPC/PSM[palmitoyl sphingomyelin]/cholesterol/GM1) lipid bilayers into liquid ordered (Lo) and liquid disordered (Ld) domains due to self-aggregation of GM1 molecules and co-localization of cholesterol with GM1 in accordance with experiments. It is found that GM1 molecules have the ability to associate strongly with each other which leads to the formation of ordered domains in the lipid mixture and the interactions are through the head group and unsaturated tails present in GM1. Preference of cholesterol for association with GM1 over PSM is observed, the domains consisting of GM1 and cholesterol are formed even in the presence of PSM. PSM also forms small domains with cholesterol that are randomly distributed in the Ld phase. Estimation of dynamic quantities like diffusion coefficient also shows that cholesterol has the highest diffusion rate in the Ld phase which is further attributed to its flip flop ability. It is found that in the presence of PSM, cholesterol can undergo flip flop even in the Lo phase. This is accredited to the interaction of cholesterol with PSM from which it can be concluded that in the presence of PSM, the domains formed by GM1 are less tightly packed and less stable than that in the ternary mixture. PMID:26067631

  5. Partitioning of 2,6-Bis(1H-Benzimidazol-2-yl)pyridine Fluorophore into a Phospholipid Bilayer: Complementary Use of Fluorescence Quenching Studies and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Kyrychenko, Alexander; Sevriukov, Igor Yu.; Syzova, Zoya A.; Ladokhin, Alexey S.; Doroshenko, Andrey O.

    2014-01-01

    Successful use of fluorescence sensing in elucidating the biophysical properties of lipid membranes requires knowledge of the distribution and location of an emitting molecule in the bilayer. We report here that 2,6-bis(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)pyridine (BBP), which is almost non-fluorescent in aqueous solutions, reveals a strong emission enhancement in a hydrophobic environment of a phospholipid bilayer, making it interesting for fluorescence probing of water content in a lipid membrane. Comparing the fluorescence behavior of BBP in a wide variety of solvents with those in phospholipid vesicles, we suggest that the hydrogen bonding interactions between a BBP fluorophore and water molecules play a crucial role in the observed “light switch effect”. Therefore, the loss of water-induced fluorescence quenching inside a membrane are thought to be due to deep penetration of BBP into the hydrophobic, water-free region of a bilayer. Characterized by strong quenching by transition metal ions in solution, BBP also demonstrated significant shielding from the action of the quencher in the presence of phospholipid vesicles. We used the increase in fluorescence intensity, measured upon titration of probe molecules with lipid vesicles, to estimate the partition constant and the Gibbs free energy (ΔG) of transfer of BBP from aqueous buffer into a membrane. Partitioning BBP revealed strongly favorable ΔG, which depends only slightly on the lipid composition of a bilayer, varying in a range from -6.5 to -7.0 kcal/mol. To elucidate the binding interactions of the probe with a membrane on the molecular level, a distribution and favorable location of BBP in a POPC bilayer were modeled via atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using two different approaches: (i) free, diffusion-driven partitioning of the probe molecules into a bilayer and (ii) constrained umbrella sampling of a penetration profile of the dye molecule across a bilayer. Both of these MD approaches agreed with

  6. Fusogenic Alzheimer’s peptide fragment Aβ (29–42) in interaction with lipid bilayers: Secondary structure, dynamics, and specific interaction with phosphatidyl ethanolamine polar heads as revealed by solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Ravault, Stéphanie; Soubias, Olivier; Saurel, Olivier; Thomas, Annick; Brasseur, Robert; Milon, Alain

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of the native Alzheimer’s peptide C-terminal fragment Aβ (29–42), and two mutants (G33A and G37A) with neutral lipid bilayers made of POPC and POPE in a 9:1 molar ratio was investigated by solid-state NMR. This fragment and the lipid composition were selected because they represent the minimum requirement for the fusogenic activity of the Alzheimer’s peptide. The chemical shifts of alanine methyl isotropic carbon were determined by MAS NMR, and they clearly demonstrated that the major form of the peptide equilibrated in membrane is not in a helical conformation. 2H NMR, performed with acyl chain deuterated POPC, demonstrated that there is no perturbation of the acyl chain’s dynamics and of the lipid phase transition temperature. 2H NMR, performed with alanine methyl-deuterated peptide demonstrated that the peptide itself has a limited mobility below and above the lipid phase transition temperature (molecular order parameter equal to 0.94). MAS 31P NMR revealed a specific interaction with POPE polar head as seen by the enhancement of POPE phosphorus nuclei T2 relaxation. All these results are in favor of a β-sheet oligomeric association of the peptide at the bilayer interface, preferentially recruiting phosphatidyl ethanolamine polar heads. PMID:15840826

  7. Effect of Supporting Polyelectrolyte Multilayers and Deposition Conditions on the Formation of 1-Palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine/1-Palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine Lipid Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Wlodek, Magdalena; Szuwarzynski, Michal; Kolasinska-Sojka, Marta

    2015-09-29

    The formation of complete supported lipid bilayers by vesicle adsorption and rupture was studied in relation to deposition conditions of vesicles and underlying cushion formed from various polyelectrolytes. Lipid vesicles were formed from zwitterionic 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and negatively charged 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE) in phosphate buffer of various pH with or without NaCl addition. Polyelectrolyte multilayer films (PEM) were constructed by sequential adsorption of alternately charged polyelectrolytes from their solutions-layer-by-layer deposition (LBL). The mechanism of the formation of supported lipid bilayer on polyelectrolyte films was studied by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). QCM-D allowed following the adsorption kinetics while AFM measurements verified the morphology of lipid vesicles and isolated bilayer patches on the PEM cushions providing local topological images in terms of lateral organization. Additionally, polyelectrolyte cushions were characterized with ellipsometry to find thickness and swelling properties, and their roughness was determined using AFM. It has been demonstrated that the pH value and an addition of NaCl in the buffer solution as well as the type of the polyelectrolyte cushion influence the kinetics of bilayer formation and the quality of formed bilayer patches. PMID:26334376

  8. Tunneling Plasmonics in Bilayer Graphene.

    PubMed

    Fei, Z; Iwinski, E G; Ni, G X; Zhang, L M; Bao, W; Rodin, A S; Lee, Y; Wagner, M; Liu, M K; Dai, S; Goldflam, M D; Thiemens, M; Keilmann, F; Lau, C N; Castro-Neto, A H; Fogler, M M; Basov, D N

    2015-08-12

    We report experimental signatures of plasmonic effects due to electron tunneling between adjacent graphene layers. At subnanometer separation, such layers can form either a strongly coupled bilayer graphene with a Bernal stacking or a weakly coupled double-layer graphene with a random stacking order. Effects due to interlayer tunneling dominate in the former case but are negligible in the latter. We found through infrared nanoimaging that bilayer graphene supports plasmons with a higher degree of confinement compared to single- and double-layer graphene, a direct consequence of interlayer tunneling. Moreover, we were able to shut off plasmons in bilayer graphene through gating within a wide voltage range. Theoretical modeling indicates that such a plasmon-off region is directly linked to a gapped insulating state of bilayer graphene, yet another implication of interlayer tunneling. Our work uncovers essential plasmonic properties in bilayer graphene and suggests a possibility to achieve novel plasmonic functionalities in graphene few-layers. PMID:26222509

  9. Review of bilayer tablet technology.

    PubMed

    Abebe, Admassu; Akseli, Ilgaz; Sprockel, Omar; Kottala, Niranjan; Cuitiño, Alberto M

    2014-01-30

    Therapeutic strategies based on oral delivery of bilayer (and multilayer) tablets are gaining more acceptance among brand and generic products due to a confluence of factors including advanced delivery strategies, patient compliance and combination therapy. Successful manufacturing of these ever more complex systems needs to overcome a series of challenges from formulation design to tablet press monitoring and control. This article provides an overview of the state-of-the-art of bilayer tablet technology, highlighting the main benefits of this type of oral dosage forms while providing a description of current challenges and advances toward improving manufacturing practices and product quality. Several aspects relevant to bilayer tablet manufacturing are addressed including material properties, lubrication, layer ordering, layer thickness, layer weight control, as well as first and final compression forces. A section is also devoted to bilayer tablet characterization that present additional complexities associated with interfaces between layers. The available features of the manufacturing equipment for bilayer tablet production are also described indicating the different strategies for sensing and controls offered by bilayer tablet press manufacturers. Finally, a roadmap for bilayer tablet manufacturing is advanced as a guideline to formulation design and selection of process parameters and equipment. PMID:24370841

  10. Lipid bilayers on nano-templates

    DOEpatents

    Noy, Aleksandr; Artyukhin, Alexander B.; Bakajin, Olgica; Stoeve, Pieter

    2009-08-04

    A lipid bilayer on a nano-template comprising a nanotube or nanowire and a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire. One embodiment provides a method of fabricating a lipid bilayer on a nano-template comprising the steps of providing a nanotube or nanowire and forming a lipid bilayer around the polymer cushion. One embodiment provides a protein pore in the lipid bilayer. In one embodiment the protein pore is sensitive to specific agents

  11. Cholesterol's location in lipid bilayers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Marquardt, Drew; Kučerka, Norbert; Wassall, Stephen R.; Harroun, Thad A.; Katsaras, John

    2016-04-04

    It is well known that cholesterol modifies the physical properties of lipid bilayers. For example, the much studied liquid-ordered Lo phase contains rapidly diffusing lipids with their acyl chains in the all trans configuration, similar to gel phase bilayers. Moreover, the Lo phase is commonly associated with cholesterol-enriched lipid rafts, which are thought to serve as platforms for signaling proteins in the plasma membrane. Cholesterol's location in lipid bilayers has been studied extensively, and it has been shown – at least in some bilayers – to align differently from its canonical upright orientation, where its hydroxyl group is in themore » vicinity of the lipid–water interface. In this study we review recent works describing cholesterol's location in different model membrane systems with emphasis on results obtained from scattering, spectroscopic and molecular dynamics studies.« less

  12. Cholesterol's location in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, Drew; Kučerka, Norbert; Wassall, Stephen R; Harroun, Thad A; Katsaras, John

    2016-09-01

    It is well known that cholesterol modifies the physical properties of lipid bilayers. For example, the much studied liquid-ordered Lo phase contains rapidly diffusing lipids with their acyl chains in the all trans configuration, similar to gel phase bilayers. Moreover, the Lo phase is commonly associated with cholesterol-enriched lipid rafts, which are thought to serve as platforms for signaling proteins in the plasma membrane. Cholesterol's location in lipid bilayers has been studied extensively, and it has been shown - at least in some bilayers - to align differently from its canonical upright orientation, where its hydroxyl group is in the vicinity of the lipid-water interface. In this article we review recent works describing cholesterol's location in different model membrane systems with emphasis on results obtained from scattering, spectroscopic and molecular dynamics studies. PMID:27056099

  13. Life, death and membrane bilayers.

    PubMed

    Hulbert, A J

    2003-07-01

    Membrane bilayers are essential elements of life, and the synthesis of the hydrocarbons that make up membrane bilayers may have preceded the appearance of life on Earth. Membrane-associated processes are significant components of metabolism, and the acyl composition of membrane bilayers is associated with metabolic activity in a predictable manner. This has resulted in the "membrane pacemaker" theory of metabolism, which proposes that the relative balance between monounsaturated and long-chain polyunsaturated acyl chains in membrane bilayers is a fundamental determinant of metabolic rate of a species. The omega-3 polyunsaturated docosahexaenoate is an especially important component of membranes in this regard. Whilst it is suggested that the physical properties of membrane polyunsaturates are important with respect to their influence on metabolic rate, it is their chemistry that is important in aging. Membrane acyl composition is related to maximum lifespan in mammals and birds, probably via their role in lipid peroxidation. Calorie restriction modifies acyl composition of membrane bilayers and is associated with decreased membrane lipid peroxidation and lifespan extension. The membrane pacemaker theory of metabolism has given birth to the membrane pacemaker hypothesis of aging, which will require further investigation. PMID:12796449

  14. Fundamental Studies of Assembly and Mechanical Properties of Lipid Bilayer Membranes and Unilamellar Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi

    This dissertation work focuses on: (i) obtaining a phospholipid bilayer membrane (LBM)/conducting electrode system with low defect density and optimized rigidity; (ii) investigating vesicle stability and mechanical properties. LBM is a simplified yet representative cell membrane model. LBMs assembled on conductive surfaces can probe protein-LBM interactions activities electrochemically. Sterically stabilized vesicles could be used as cell models or for drug delivery. The main challenges for LBM assembly on gold are vesicles do not spontaneously rupture to form LBMs on gold and the roughness of the gold substrate has considerable influence on molecular film defect density. In this study, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) vesicles were functionalized with 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine- N-poly(ethylene glycol)-2000-N-[3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate] (DSPE-PEG-PDP) to yield stable LBMs on gold without surface modification. A template-stripping method was used to obtain atomically flat and pristine gold surfaces. The critical force to initiate vesicle rupture decreases with increasing DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration, indicating that gold-thiolate bonding between DSPE-PEG-PDP and gold substrates promotes LBM formation. Mechanical properties of LBMs and vesicles were investigated as a function of DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration via Atomic Force Microscopy. The elastic moduli of LBMs were determined with DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration ranging from 0mol% to 24mol% and were found to depend on PEG chain conformation. Incorporating DSPE-PEG-PDP molecules with PEG in mushroom conformation results in a decrease of LBM rigidity, while incorporating PEG in brush conformation leads to LBM stiffening. Contrarily, mechanical properties of functionalized vesicles did not vary significantly by varying DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration. LBM with tunable rigidity by adjusting DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration provides a versatile cell membrane model for studying protein or

  15. Interactions between human defensins and lipid bilayers: evidence for formation of multimeric pores.

    PubMed Central

    Wimley, W. C.; Selsted, M. E.; White, S. H.

    1994-01-01

    Defensins comprise a family of broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides that are stored in the cytoplasmic granules of mammalian neutrophils and Paneth cells of the small intestine. Neutrophil defensins are known to permeabilize cell membranes of susceptible microorganisms, but the mechanism of permeabilization is uncertain. We report here the results of an investigation of the mechanism by which HNP-2, one of 4 human neutrophil defensins, permeabilizes large unilamellar vesicles formed from the anionic lipid palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylglycerol (POPG). As observed by others, we find that HNP-2 (net charge = +3) cannot bind to vesicles formed from neutral lipids. The binding of HNP-2 to vesicles containing varying amounts of POPG and neutral (zwitterionic) palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC) demonstrates that binding is initiated through electrostatic interactions. Because vesicle aggregation and fusion can confound studies of the interaction of HNP-2 with vesicles, those processes were explored systematically by varying the concentrations of vesicles and HNP-2, and the POPG:POPC ratio. Vesicles (300 microM POPG) readily aggregated at HNP-2 concentrations above 1 microM, but no mixing of vesicle contents could be detected for concentrations as high as 2 microM despite the fact that intervesicular lipid mixing could be demonstrated. This indicates that if fusion of vesicles occurs, it is hemi-fusion, in which only the outer monolayers mix at bilayer contact sites. Under conditions of limited aggregation and intervesicular lipid mixing, the fractional leakage of small solutes is a sigmoidal function of peptide concentration. For 300 microM POPG vesicles, 50% of entrapped solute is released by 0.7 microM HNP-2. We introduce a simple method for determining whether leakage from vesicles is graded or all-or-none. We show by means of this fluorescence "requenching" method that native HNP-2 induces vesicle leakage in an all-or-none manner, whereas reduced HNP-2 induces

  16. Electromechanical oscillations in bilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Benameur, Muhammed M; Gargiulo, Fernando; Manzeli, Sajedeh; Autès, Gabriel; Tosun, Mahmut; Yazyev, Oleg V; Kis, Andras

    2015-01-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems constitute a class of devices lying at the interface between fundamental research and technological applications. Realizing nanoelectromechanical devices based on novel materials such as graphene allows studying their mechanical and electromechanical characteristics at the nanoscale and addressing fundamental questions such as electron-phonon interaction and bandgap engineering. In this work, we realize electromechanical devices using single and bilayer graphene and probe the interplay between their mechanical and electrical properties. We show that the deflection of monolayer graphene nanoribbons results in a linear increase in their electrical resistance. Surprisingly, we observe oscillations in the electromechanical response of bilayer graphene. The proposed theoretical model suggests that these oscillations arise from quantum mechanical interference in the transition region induced by sliding of individual graphene layers with respect to each other. Our work shows that bilayer graphene conceals unexpectedly rich and novel physics with promising potential in applications based on nanoelectromechanical systems. PMID:26481767

  17. Electromechanical oscillations in bilayer graphene

    PubMed Central

    Benameur, Muhammed M.; Gargiulo, Fernando; Manzeli, Sajedeh; Autès, Gabriel; Tosun, Mahmut; Yazyev, Oleg V.; Kis, Andras

    2015-01-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems constitute a class of devices lying at the interface between fundamental research and technological applications. Realizing nanoelectromechanical devices based on novel materials such as graphene allows studying their mechanical and electromechanical characteristics at the nanoscale and addressing fundamental questions such as electron–phonon interaction and bandgap engineering. In this work, we realize electromechanical devices using single and bilayer graphene and probe the interplay between their mechanical and electrical properties. We show that the deflection of monolayer graphene nanoribbons results in a linear increase in their electrical resistance. Surprisingly, we observe oscillations in the electromechanical response of bilayer graphene. The proposed theoretical model suggests that these oscillations arise from quantum mechanical interference in the transition region induced by sliding of individual graphene layers with respect to each other. Our work shows that bilayer graphene conceals unexpectedly rich and novel physics with promising potential in applications based on nanoelectromechanical systems. PMID:26481767

  18. Electromechanical oscillations in bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benameur, Muhammed M.; Gargiulo, Fernando; Manzeli, Sajedeh; Autès, Gabriel; Tosun, Mahmut; Yazyev, Oleg V.; Kis, Andras

    2015-10-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems constitute a class of devices lying at the interface between fundamental research and technological applications. Realizing nanoelectromechanical devices based on novel materials such as graphene allows studying their mechanical and electromechanical characteristics at the nanoscale and addressing fundamental questions such as electron-phonon interaction and bandgap engineering. In this work, we realize electromechanical devices using single and bilayer graphene and probe the interplay between their mechanical and electrical properties. We show that the deflection of monolayer graphene nanoribbons results in a linear increase in their electrical resistance. Surprisingly, we observe oscillations in the electromechanical response of bilayer graphene. The proposed theoretical model suggests that these oscillations arise from quantum mechanical interference in the transition region induced by sliding of individual graphene layers with respect to each other. Our work shows that bilayer graphene conceals unexpectedly rich and novel physics with promising potential in applications based on nanoelectromechanical systems.

  19. Surfactant transport on viscous bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matar, Omar; Craster, Richard; Warner, Mark

    2001-11-01

    We model the external delivery of surfactant to pulmonary airways, an integral part of Surfactant Replacement Therapy (SRT), a method of treatment of Respiratory Distress Syndrome in neonates. We examine the spreading dynamics of insoluble surfactant by Marangoni stresses along the mucus-perciliary liquid bilayers that line the inside of airways. The bilayer is modelled as a thin highly viscous mucus surface film (mucus) overlying a much less viscous perciliary liquid layer (PCL); this is appropriate for small airways. By exploiting this large viscosity constrast, a variant of standard lubrication theory is adopted wherein terms, which would have otherwise been neglected in the lubrication approximation, are promoted in order to model correctly the presence of the mucus. Inclusion of van der Waals forces in the model permit the study of the effect of this mucus 'skin' on the possibility of bilayer rupture, a potential cause of failure of SRT. We find that increasing the viscosity contrast and initial mucus layer thickness delays the onset of rupture, while increasing the relative significance of Marangoni stresses leads to more marked thinning and rapid bilayer rupture [1]. [1] O. K. Matar, R. V. Craster and M. R. Warner, submitted to J. Fluid Mech. (2001).

  20. Bilayer Effects of Antimalarial Compounds.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Nicole B; Andersen, Olaf S

    2015-01-01

    Because of the perpetual development of resistance to current therapies for malaria, the Medicines for Malaria Venture developed the Malaria Box to facilitate the drug development process. We tested the 80 most potent compounds from the box for bilayer-mediated effects on membrane protein conformational changes (a measure of likely toxicity) in a gramicidin-based stopped flow fluorescence assay. Among the Malaria Box compounds tested, four compounds altered membrane properties (p< 0.05); MMV007384 stood out as a potent bilayer-perturbing compound that is toxic in many cell-based assays, suggesting that testing for membrane perturbation could help identify toxic compounds. In any case, MMV007384 should be approached with caution, if at all. PMID:26551613

  1. Bilayer Effects of Antimalarial Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Nicole B.; Andersen, Olaf S.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the perpetual development of resistance to current therapies for malaria, the Medicines for Malaria Venture developed the Malaria Box to facilitate the drug development process. We tested the 80 most potent compounds from the box for bilayer-mediated effects on membrane protein conformational changes (a measure of likely toxicity) in a gramicidin-based stopped flow fluorescence assay. Among the Malaria Box compounds tested, four compounds altered membrane properties (p< 0.05); MMV007384 stood out as a potent bilayer-perturbing compound that is toxic in many cell-based assays, suggesting that testing for membrane perturbation could help identify toxic compounds. In any case, MMV007384 should be approached with caution, if at all. PMID:26551613

  2. Excitonic condensation in bilayer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jung-Jung

    Among the many examples of Bose condensation considered in physics, electron-hole-pair (exciton) condensation has maintained special interest because it has been difficult to realize experimentally, and because of controversy about condensate properties. In this thesis, we studied the various aspects of spontaneous symmetry broken state of exciton in bilayer using mean field theory. We calculated the photoluminescence of excitonic condensation created by laser. We developed a one-dimensional toy model of excitonic supercurrent using mean field theory plus non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) which give qualitatively consistent results with experiments. We proposed graphene bilayer as a novel system for excitonic condensation to occur and estimate it to exist even at temperature as high as room temperature.

  3. Elastic energy of polyhedral bilayer vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Haselwandter, Christoph A.; Phillips, Rob

    2011-01-01

    In recent experiments the spontaneous formation of hollow bilayer vesicles with polyhedral symmetry has been observed. On the basis of the experimental phenomenology it was suggested that the mechanism for the formation of bilayer polyhedra is minimization of elastic bending energy. Motivated by these experiments, we study the elastic bending energy of polyhedral bilayer vesicles. In agreement with experiments, and provided that excess amphiphiles exhibiting spontaneous curvature are present in sufficient quantity, we find that polyhedral bilayer vesicles can indeed be energetically favorable compared to spherical bilayer vesicles. Consistent with experimental observations we also find that the bending energy associated with the vertices of bilayer polyhedra can be locally reduced through the formation of pores. However, the stabilization of polyhedral bilayer vesicles over spherical bilayer vesicles relies crucially on molecular segregation of excess amphiphiles along the ridges rather than the vertices of bilayer polyhedra. Furthermore, our analysis implies that, contrary to what has been suggested on the basis of experiments, the icosahedron does not minimize elastic bending energy among arbitrary polyhedral shapes and sizes. Instead, we find that, for large polyhedron sizes, the snub dodecahedron and the snub cube both have lower total bending energies than the icosahedron. PMID:21797397

  4. Cholesterol Perturbs Lipid Bilayers Nonuniversally

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Jianjun; Mills, Thalia T.; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Nagle, John F.

    2008-05-16

    Cholesterol is well known to modulate the physical properties of biomembranes. Using modern x-ray scattering methods, we have studied the effects of cholesterol on the bending modulus K{sub C}, the thickness D{sub HH}, and the orientational order parameter S{sub xray} of lipid bilayers. We find that the effects are different for at least three classes of phospholipids characterized by different numbers of saturated hydrocarbon chains. Most strikingly, cholesterol strongly increases K{sub C} when both chains of the phospholipid are fully saturated but not at all when there are two monounsaturated chains.

  5. Alcohol's Effects on Lipid Bilayer Properties

    PubMed Central

    Ingólfsson, Helgi I.; Andersen, Olaf S.

    2011-01-01

    Alcohols are known modulators of lipid bilayer properties. Their biological effects have long been attributed to their bilayer-modifying effects, but alcohols can also alter protein function through direct protein interactions. This raises the question: Do alcohol's biological actions result predominantly from direct protein-alcohol interactions or from general changes in the membrane properties? The efficacy of alcohols of various chain lengths tends to exhibit a so-called cutoff effect (i.e., increasing potency with increased chain length, which that eventually levels off). The cutoff varies depending on the assay, and numerous mechanisms have been proposed such as: limited size of the alcohol-protein interaction site, limited alcohol solubility, and a chain-length-dependent lipid bilayer-alcohol interaction. To address these issues, we determined the bilayer-modifying potency of 27 aliphatic alcohols using a gramicidin-based fluorescence assay. All of the alcohols tested (with chain lengths of 1–16 carbons) alter the bilayer properties, as sensed by a bilayer-spanning channel. The bilayer-modifying potency of the short-chain alcohols scales linearly with their bilayer partitioning; the potency tapers off at higher chain lengths, and eventually changes sign for the longest-chain alcohols, demonstrating an alcohol cutoff effect in a system that has no alcohol-binding pocket. PMID:21843475

  6. Annular bilayer magnetoelectric composites: theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mingsen; Dong, Shuxiang

    2010-01-01

    The laminated bilayer magnetoelectric (ME) composites consist of magnetostrictive and piezoelectric layers are known to have giant ME coefficient due to the high coupling efficiency in bending mode. In our previous report, the bar-shaped bilayer composite has been investigated by using a magnetoelectric-coupling equivalent circuit. Here, we propose an annular bilayer ME composite, which consists of magnetostrictive and piezoelectric rings. This composite has a much lower resonance frequency of bending mode compared with its radial mode. In addition, the annular bilayer ME composite is expected to respond to vortex magnetic field as well as unidirectional magnetic field. In this paper, we investigate the annular bilayer ME composite by using impedance-matrix method and predict the ME coefficients as a function of geometric parameters of the composites. PMID:20178914

  7. Bandgap scaling in bilayer graphene antidot lattices.

    PubMed

    Petersen, René; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    2015-06-10

    On the basis of a tight binding model we reveal how the bandgap in bilayer graphene antidot lattices (GALs) follows a different scaling law than in monolayer GALs and we provide an explanation using the Dirac model. We show that previous findings regarding the criteria for the appearance of a bandgap in monolayer GALs are equally applicable to the bilayer case. Furthermore, we briefly investigate the optical properties of bilayer GALs and show that estimates of the bandgap using optical methods could lead to overestimates due to weak oscillator strength of the lowest transitions. Finally, we investigate the effect of imposing an electric field perpendicular to the bilayer GAL structure and find that the bandgap tunability may be extended as compared to pristine bilayer graphene. PMID:25989621

  8. "Nanocrystal bilayer for tandem catalysis"

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Huo, Ziyang; E.Habas, Susan E; Soejima, Tetsuro; Aliaga, Cesar E; Samorjai, Gabor A; Yang, Peidong

    2011-01-24

    Supported catalysts are widely used in industry and can be optimized by tuning the composition and interface of the metal nanoparticles and oxide supports. Rational design of metal-metal oxide interfaces in nanostructured catalysts is critical to achieve better reaction activities and selectivities. We introduce here a new class of nanocrystal tandem catalysts that have multiple metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. We utilized a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers of less than 10 nm on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO2-Pt and Pt-SiO2, can be used to catalyse two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO2-Pt interface catalysed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H2, which were subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalysed by the nearby Pt-SiO2 interface. Consequently, propanal was produced selectively from methanol and ethylene on the nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst. This new concept of nanocrystal tandem catalysis represents a powerful approach towards designing high-performance, multifunctional nanostructured catalysts

  9. Cholera toxin interactions with lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Tosteson, M T; Tosteson, D C; Rubnitz, J

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of the experiments described in this paper was to assess the binding of cholera toxin to bilayers containing its receptor, the monosialoganglioside, GMl. The assay was based on the fact that GMl confers on the bilayer a negative surface charge. The magnitude of this surface charge was estimated by measuring the electrical conductance (G) of the bilayers exposed to nonactin-K+ under conditions where G is directly proportional to the potassium concentration in the aqueous solutions immediatey adjacent to the membrane surface. When bilayers were formed from mixtures of GMl and glycerolmonooleate (GMO), it was found that the molar ratio of the lipids in the bilayer was the same as that in the membrane forming solution. It was further found that cholera toxin or the binding subunit of the toxin (choleragenoid) bind to GMO bilayers containing GMl (but not to GMO bilayers containing phosphatidyl serine or disialoganglioside GDla). The value of the apparent dissociation constant for the binding of choleragen to its receptor was found to be 10(-11) M, comparable to values found in intact cells. PMID:6933823

  10. Galactocerebroside-phospholipid interactions in bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Ruocco, M J; Shipley, G G; Oldfield, E

    1983-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and x-ray diffraction have been used to study the interaction of hydrated N-palmitoylgalactosylsphingosine (NPGS) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). For mixtures containing less than 23 mol% NPGS, complete miscibility of NPGS into hydrated DPPC bilayers is observed in both the bilayer gel and liquid-crystal phases. X-ray diffraction data demonstrate insignificant differences in the DPPC-bilayer gel-phase parameters on incorporation of up to 23 mol% NPGS. At greater than 23 mol% NPGS, additional high-temperature transitions occur, indicating phase separation of cerebroside. For these cerebroside concentrations, at 20 degrees C, x-ray diffraction shows two lamellar phases, hydrated DPPC-NPGS gel bilayers (d = 64 A) containing 23 mol% NPGS, and NPGS "crystal" bilayers (d = 55 A). On heating to temperatures greater than 45 degrees C, the mixed DPPC-NPGS bilayer phase undergoes chain melting, and on further increasing the temperature progressively more NPGS is incorporated into the liquid-crystal DPPC-NPGS bilayer phase. At temperatures greater than 82 degrees C (the transition temperature of hydrated NPGS), complete lipid miscibility is observed at all DPPC/NPGS molar ratios. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:6688367

  11. Phospholipid/aromatic thiol hybrid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Wang, Mingming; Ferguson, Matthew; Zhan, Wei

    2015-05-12

    Gold-supported hybrid bilayers comprising phospholipids and alkanethiols have been found to be highly useful in biomembrane mimicking as well as biosensing ever since their introduction by Plant in 1993 (Plant, A. L. Langmuir 1993, 9, 2764-2767). Generalizing the mechanism (i.e., hydrophobic/hydrophobic interaction) that primarily drives bilayer formation, we report here that such a bilayer structure can also be successfully obtained when aromatic thiols are employed in place of alkanethiols. Four aromatic thiols were studied here (thiophenol, 2-naphthalene thiol, biphenyl-4-thiol, and diphenylenevinylene methanethiol), all affording reliable bilayer formation when 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes were incubated with self-assembled monolayers of these thiols. Characterization of the resultant structures, using cyclic voltammetry, impedance analysis, and atomic force microscopy, confirms the bilayer formation. Significant differences in electrochemical blocking and mechanical characteristics of these new bilayers were identified in comparison to their alkanethiol counterparts. Taking advantage of these new features, we present a new scheme for the straightforward biorecognition of a lipolytic enzyme (phospholipase A2) using these phospholipid/aromatic thiol bilayers. PMID:25896646

  12. Fusion and fission of fluid amphiphilic bilayers.

    PubMed

    Gotter, Martin; Strey, Reinhard; Olsson, Ulf; Wennerström, Håkan

    2005-01-01

    The system water-oil (n-decane)-nonionic surfactant (C12E5) forms bilayer phases in a large concentration region, but, for a given oil-to-surfactant ratio, only in a narrow temperature range. In addition to the anisotropic lamellar phase (Lalpha) there is also, at slightly higher temperature, a sponge or L3-phase where the bilayers build up an isotropic structure extending macroscopically in three dimensions. In this phase the bilayer mid-surface has a mean curvature close to zero and a negative Euler characteristic. In this paper we study how the bilayers in the lamellar and the sponge phase respond dynamically to sudden temperature changes. The monolayer spontaneous curvature depends sensitively on temperature and a change of temperature thus provides a driving force for a change in bilayer topology. The equilibration therefore involves kinetic steps of fusion/fission of bilayers. Such dynamic processes have previously been monitored by temperature jump experiments using light scattering in the sponge phase. These experiments revealed an extraordinarily strong dependence of the relaxation time on the bilayer volume fraction phi. At phi < 0.1 the relaxation times are so slow that experiments using deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance (2H-NMR) appear feasible. We here report on the first experiments concerned with the dynamics of the macroscopic phase transition sponge-lamellae by 2H-NMR. We find that the sponge-to-lamellae transition occurs through a nucleation process followed by domain growth involving bilayer fission at domain boundaries. In contrast, the lamellae-to-sponge transformation apparently occurs through a succession of uncorrelated bilayer fusion events. PMID:15715316

  13. Berry phase transition in twisted bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, Johannes C.; Smirnov, Dmitri; Schmidt, Hennrik; Haug, Rolf J.

    2016-09-01

    The electronic dispersion of a graphene bilayer is highly dependent on rotational mismatch between layers and can be further manipulated by electrical gating. This allows for an unprecedented control over electronic properties and opens up the possibility of flexible band structure engineering. Here we present novel magnetotransport data in a twisted bilayer, crossing the energetic border between decoupled monolayers and coupled bilayer. In addition a transition in Berry phase between π and 2π is observed at intermediate magnetic fields. Analysis of Fermi velocities and gate induced charge carrier densities suggests an important role of strong layer asymmetry for the observed phenomena.

  14. Negative Coulomb Drag in Double Bilayer Graphene.

    PubMed

    Li, J I A; Taniguchi, T; Watanabe, K; Hone, J; Levchenko, A; Dean, C R

    2016-07-22

    We report on an experimental measurement of Coulomb drag in a double quantum well structure consisting of bilayer-bilayer graphene, separated by few layer hexagonal boron nitride. At low temperatures and intermediate densities, a novel negative drag response with an inverse sign is observed, distinct from the momentum and energy drag mechanisms previously reported in double monolayer graphene. By varying the device aspect ratio, the negative drag component is suppressed and a response consistent with pure momentum drag is recovered. In the momentum drag dominated regime, excellent quantitative agreement with the density and temperature dependence predicted for double bilayer graphene is found. PMID:27494491

  15. Electronic multicriticality in bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Vladimir; Throckmorton, Robert E.; Vafek, Oskar

    2012-08-01

    We map out the possible ordered states in bilayer graphene at the neutrality point by extending the previous renormalization group treatment of many-body instabilities to finite temperature, trigonal warping and externally applied perpendicular electric field. We were able to analytically determine all outcomes of the RG flow equations for the nine four-fermion coupling constants. While the full phase diagram exhibits a rich structure, we confirm that when forward scattering dominates, the only ordering tendency with divergent susceptibility at finite temperature is the nematic. At finite temperature, this result is stable with respect to small back and layer imbalance scattering; further increasing their strength leads to the layer antiferromagnet. We also determine conditions for other ordered states to appear and compare our results to the special cases of attractive and repulsive Hubbard models where exact results are available.

  16. The magnetic ratchet effect in bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Edward; Kheirabadi, Narjes; Fal'Ko, Vladimir

    Experiments have measured a magnetic ratchet effect for electrons in hydrogenated monolayer graphene, an effect in which a d.c. electric current is generated from an a.c. electric field in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field and spatial asymmetry. Here, we describe the theory of the magnetic ratchet effect in bilayer graphene. The Boltzmann kinetic equation is used to relate the d.c. current to the scattering probability of electrons in bilayer graphene. Taking into account details of the low-energy band structure of bilayer graphene, including interlayer hopping parameters, we compare contributions arising from gate- and disorder-induced spatial asymmetry, illustrating that bilayer and multilayer graphenes are natural candidates for the study of non-linear transport effects.

  17. Self healing nature of bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debroy, Sanghamitra; Pavan Kumar Miriyala, V.; Vijaya Sekhar, K.; Acharyya, Swati Ghosh; Acharyya, Amit

    2016-08-01

    The phenomenon of self healing of cracks in bilayer graphene sheet has been studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The bilayer graphene sheet was subjected to uniaxial tensile load resulting in initiation and propagation of cracks on exceeding the ultimate tensile strength. Subsequently, all forces acting on the sheet were removed and sheet was relaxed. The cracks formed in the graphene sheet healed without any external aid within 0.4 ps The phenomenon of self healing of the cracks in graphene sheet was found to be independent of the length of the crack, but occurred for critical crack opening distance less than 5 Å for AA stacked sheet and 13 Å for AB stacked bilayer graphene sheet. Self healing was observed for both AB (mixed stacking of armchair and zigzag graphene sheet) and AA (both sheets of similar orientation i.e. either armchair-armchair or zigzag-zigzag) stacking of bilayer graphene sheet.

  18. Dynamic Morphologies of Microscale Droplet Interface Bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Mruetusatorn, Prachya; Boreyko, Jonathan B; Sarles, Stephen A; Venkatesan, Guru; Hayes, Douglas G; Collier, Pat

    2014-01-01

    Droplet interface bilayers (DIBs) are a powerful platform for studying the dynamics of synthetic cellular membranes; however, very little has been done to exploit the unique dynamical features of DIBs. Here, we generate microscale droplet interface bilayers ( DIBs) by bringing together femtoliter-volume water droplets in a microfluidic oil channel, and characterize morphological changes of the DIBs as the droplets shrink due to evaporation. By varying the initial conditions of the system, we identify three distinct classes of dynamic morphology. (1) Buckling and Fission: When forming DIBs using the lipid-out method (lipids in oil phase), lipids in the shrinking monolayers continually pair together and slide into the bilayer to conserve their mass. As the bilayer continues to grow, it becomes confined, buckles, and eventually fissions one or more vesicles. (2) Uniform Shrinking: When using the lipid-in method (lipids in water phase) to form DIBs, lipids uniformly transfer from the monolayers and bilayer into vesicles contained inside the water droplets. (3) Stretching and Unzipping: Finally, when the droplets are pinned to the wall(s) of the microfluidic channel, the droplets become stretched during evaporation, culminating in the unzipping of the bilayer and droplet separation. These findings offer a better understanding of the dynamics of coupled lipid interfaces.

  19. Binding of divalent cations of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers and its effect on bilayer interaction.

    PubMed

    Lis, L J; Parsegian, V A; Rand, R P

    1981-03-31

    We have confirmed that CaCl2 swells the multilayer lattice formed by dipalmitolyphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) in an aqueous solution. Specifically, at room temperature 1 mM CaCl2 causes these lipid bilayers to increase their separation, dw, from 19 A in pure water to greater than 90 A. CaCl2 concentrations greater than 4 mM cause less swelling. We have measured the net repulsive force between the bilayers in 30 mM CaCl2 at T = 25 degrees C (below the acyl chain freezing temperature). For interbilayer separations between 30 and 90 A, the dominant repulsion between bilayers is probably electrostatic; Ca2+ binds to DPPc lecithin bilayers, imparting a charge to them. The addition of NaCl to CaCl2 solutions decreases this repulsion. For dw less than 20 A, the bilayer repulsion appears to be dominated by the "hydration forces" observed previously between both neutral and charged phospholipids. From the electrostatic repulsive force, we estimate the extent of Ca2+ binding to the bilayer surface. The desorption and bound Ca2+, apparent when bilayers are pushed together, is more rapid than one would expect if an association constant governed Ca2+ binding. The association affinity does not appear to be a fixed quantity but rather a sensitive function of ionic strength and bilayer separation. PMID:6164391

  20. RKKY interaction in bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Yawar; Moradian, Rostam

    2015-12-01

    We study the RKKY interaction between two magnetic impurities located on the same layer (intralayer case) or on different layers (interlayer case) in undoped bilayer graphene (BLG) in the four-bands model, by directly calculating the Green functions in the eigenvalues and eigenvectors representation. Our results show that both intra- and interlayer RKKY interactions between two magnetic impurities located on the same (opposite) sublattice are always ferromagnetic (antiferromagnetic). Furthermore we find unusual long-distance decay of the RKKY interaction in BLG. The intralyer RKKY interactions between two magnetic impurities located on the same sublattice, J AnAn(R) and J BnBn(R), decay closely as 1 /R6 and 1 /R2 at large impurity distances respectively, but when they are located on opposite sublattices the RKKY interactions exhibit 1 /R4 decays approximately. In the interlayer case, the RKKY interactions between two magnetic impurities located on the same sublattice show a decay close to 1 /R4 at large impurity distances, but if two magnetic impurities be on opposite sublattices the RKKY interactions, J A1B2(R) and J B1A2(R), decay closely as 1 /R6 and 1 /R2 respectively. Both intra- and interlayer RKKY interactions have anisotropic oscillatory factors which for intralayer case is equal to that for single layer graphene (SLG). Our results at weak and strong interlayer coupling limits reduce to the RKKY interaction of SLG and that of BLG in the two-bands approximation respectively.

  1. Poration of lipid bilayers by shock-induced nanobubble collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Amit; Vedadi, Mohammad; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2011-01-01

    We investigate molecular mechanisms of poration in lipid bilayers due to shock-induced collapse of nanobubbles. Our multimillion-atom molecular dynamics simulations reveal dynamics of nanobubble shrinkage and collapse, leading to the formation and penetration of nanojets into lipid bilayers. The nanojet impact generates shear flow of water on bilayer leaflets and pressure gradients across them, which transiently enhance the bilayer permeability by creating nanopores through which water molecules translocate rapidly across the bilayer. Effects of nanobubble size and temperature on the porosity of lipid bilayers are examined.

  2. Reversible Sheet–Turn Conformational Change of a Cell-Penetrating Peptide in Lipid Bilayers Studied by Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yongchao; Mani, Rajeswari; Doherty, Tim; Waring, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-bound conformation of a cell-penetrating peptide, penetratin, is investigated using solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The 13C chemical shifts of 13C, 15N-labeled residues in the peptide indicate a reversible conformational change from β-sheet at low temperature to coil-like at high temperature. This conformational change occurs for all residues examined between positions 3 and 13, at peptide/lipid molar ratios of 1:15 and 1:30, in membranes with 25–50% anionic lipids, and in both saturated DMPC/DMPG (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylchloline/1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylglycerol) membranes and unsaturated POPC/POPG (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylglycerol) membranes. Thus, it is an intrinsic property of penetratin. The coil state of the peptide has C– H order parameters of 0.23–0.52 for Cα and Cβ sites, indicating that the peptide backbone is unstructured. Moreover, chemical shift anisotropy lineshapes are uniaxially averaged, suggesting that the peptide backbone undergoes uniaxial rotation around the bilayer normal. These observations suggest that the dynamic state of penetratin at high temperature is a structured turn instead of an isotropic random coil. The thermodynamic parameters of this sheet–turn transition are extracted and compared to other membrane peptides reported to exhibit conformational changes. We suggest that the function of this turn conformation may be to reduce hydrophobic interactions with the lipid chains and facilitate penetratin translocation across the bilayer without causing permanent membrane damage. PMID:18656895

  3. Lipid Bilayers Covalently Anchored to Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Dayani, Yasaman; Malmstadt, Noah

    2012-01-01

    The unique physical and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes make them an exciting material for applications in various fields such as bioelectronics and biosensing. Due to the poor water solubility of carbon nanotubes, functionalization for such applications has been a challenge. Of particular need are functionalization methods for integrating carbon nanotubes with biomolecules and constructing novel hybrid nanostructures for bionanoelectronic applications. We present a novel method for the fabrication of dispersible, biocompatible carbon nanotube-based materials. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are covalently modified with primary amine-bearing phospholipids in a carbodiimide-activated reaction. These modified carbon nanotubes have good dispersibility in nonpolar solvents. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy shows peaks attributable to the formation of amide bonds between lipids and the nanotube surface. Simple sonication of lipid-modified nanotubes with other lipid molecules leads to the formation of a uniform lipid bilayer coating the nanotubes. These bilayer-coated nanotubes are highly dispersible and stable in aqueous solution. Confocal fluorescence microscopy shows labeled lipids on the surface of bilayer-modified nanotubes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows the morphology of dispersed bilayer-coated MWCNTs. Fluorescence quenching of lipid-coated MWCNTs confirms the bilayer configuration of the lipids on the nanotube surface and fluorescence anisotropy measurements show that the bilayer is fluid above the gel-to-liquid transition temperature. The membrane protein α-hemolysin spontaneously inserts into the MWCNT-supported bilayer, confirming the biomimetic membrane structure. These biomimetic nanostructures are a promising platform for the integration of carbon nanotube-based materials with biomolecules. PMID:22568448

  4. Micropatterned composite membranes of polymerized and fluid lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Morigaki, Kenichi; Kiyosue, Kazuyuki; Taguchi, Takahisa

    2004-08-31

    Micropatterned composite membranes of polymerized and fluid lipid bilayers were constructed on solid substrates. Lithographic photopolymerization of a diacetylene-containing phospholipid, 1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DiynePC), and subsequent removal of nonreacted monomers by a detergent solution (0.1 M sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)) yielded a patterned polymeric bilayer matrix on the substrate. Fluid lipid bilayers of phosphatidylcholine from egg yolk (egg-PC) were incorporated into the lipid-free wells surrounded by the polymeric bilayers through the process of fusion and reorganization of suspended small unilamellar vesicles. Spatial distribution of the fluid bilayers in the patterned bilayer depended on the degree of photopolymerization that in turn could be modulated by varying the applied UV irradiation dose. The polymeric bilayer domains blocked lateral diffusion of the fluid lipid bilayers and confined them in the defined areas (corrals), if the polymerization was conducted with a sufficiently large UV dose. On the other hand, lipid molecules of the fluid bilayers penetrated into the polymeric bilayer domains, if the UV dose was relatively small. A direct correlation was observed between the applied UV dose and the lateral diffusion coefficient of fluorescent marker molecules in the fluid bilayers embedded within the polymeric bilayer domains. Artificial control of lateral diffusion by polymeric bilayers may lead to the creation of complex and versatile biomimetic model membrane arrays. PMID:15323525

  5. Possible mechanism of adhesion in a mica supported phospholipid bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Pertsin, Alexander; Grunze, Michael

    2014-05-14

    Phospholipid bilayers supported on hydrophilic solids like silica and mica play a substantial role in fundamental studies and technological applications of phospholipid membranes. In both cases the molecular mechanism of adhesion between the bilayer and the support is of primary interest. Since the possibilities of experimental methods in this specific area are rather limited, the methods of computer simulation acquire great importance. In this paper we use the grand canonical Monte Carlo technique and an atomistic force field to simulate the behavior of a mica supported phospholipid bilayer in pure water as a function of the distance between the bilayer and the support. The simulation reveals a possible adhesion mechanism, where the adhesion is due to individual lipid molecules that protrude from the bilayer and form widely spaced links with the support. Simultaneously, the bilayer remains separated from the bilayer by a thin water interlayer which maintains the bilayer fluidity.

  6. Supported lipid bilayer/carbon nanotube hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinjian; Moran-Mirabal, Jose M.; Craighead, Harold G.; McEuen, Paul L.

    2007-03-01

    Carbon nanotube transistors combine molecular-scale dimensions with excellent electronic properties, offering unique opportunities for chemical and biological sensing. Here, we form supported lipid bilayers over single-walled carbon nanotube transistors. We first study the physical properties of the nanotube/supported lipid bilayer structure using fluorescence techniques. Whereas lipid molecules can diffuse freely across the nanotube, a membrane-bound protein (tetanus toxin) sees the nanotube as a barrier. Moreover, the size of the barrier depends on the diameter of the nanotube-with larger nanotubes presenting bigger obstacles to diffusion. We then demonstrate detection of protein binding (streptavidin) to the supported lipid bilayer using the nanotube transistor as a charge sensor. This system can be used as a platform to examine the interactions of single molecules with carbon nanotubes and has many potential applications for the study of molecular recognition and other biological processes occurring at cell membranes.

  7. Design of Asymmetric Peptide Bilayer Membranes.

    PubMed

    Li, Sha; Mehta, Anil K; Sidorov, Anton N; Orlando, Thomas M; Jiang, Zhigang; Anthony, Neil R; Lynn, David G

    2016-03-16

    Energetic insights emerging from the structural characterization of peptide cross-β assemblies have enabled the design and construction of robust asymmetric bilayer peptide membranes. Two peptides differing only in their N-terminal residue, phosphotyrosine vs lysine, coassemble as stacks of antiparallel β-sheets with precisely patterned charged lattices stabilizing the bilayer leaflet interface. Either homogeneous or mixed leaflet composition is possible, and both create nanotubes with dense negative external and positive internal solvent exposed surfaces. Cross-seeding peptide solutions with a preassembled peptide nanotube seed leads to domains of different leaflet architecture within single nanotubes. Architectural control over these cross-β assemblies, both across the bilayer membrane and along the nanotube length, provides access to highly ordered asymmetric membranes for the further construction of functional mesoscale assemblies. PMID:26942690

  8. Layer resolved capacitive probing of graphene bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibrov, Alexander; Parmentier, François; Li, Jia; Wang, Lei; Hunt, Benjamin; Dean, Cory; Hone, James; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Young, Andrea

    Compared to single layer graphene, graphene bilayers have an additional ``which-layer'' degree of freedom that can be controlled by an external electric field in a dual-gated device geometry. We describe capacitance measurements capable of directly probing this degree of freedom. By performing top gate, bottom gate, and penetration field capacitance measurements, we directly extract layer polarization of both Bernal and twisted bilayers. We will present measurements of hBN encapsulated bilayers at both zero and high magnetic field, focusing on the physics of the highly degenerate zero-energy Landau level in the high magnetic field limit where spin, valley, and layer degeneracy are all lifted by electronic interactions.

  9. Thermally activated conductivity in gapped bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushin, Maxim

    2012-05-01

    This is a theoretical study of electron transport in gated bilayer graphene —a novel semiconducting material with a tunable band gap. It is shown that the which-layer pseudospin coherence enhances the subgap conductivity and facilitates the thermally activated transport. The mechanism proposed can also lead to the non-monotonic conductivity vs. temperature dependence at a band gap size of the order of 10 meV. The effect can be observed in gapped bilayer graphene sandwiched in boron nitride where the electron-hole puddles and flexural phonons are strongly suppressed.

  10. Temperature effect on plasmons in bilayer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Digish K. Sharma, A. C.; Ashraf, S. S. Z.; Ambavale, S. K.

    2015-06-24

    We have theoretically investigated the plasmon dispersion and damping rate of doped bilayer graphene (BLG) at finite temperatures within the random phase approximation. Our computed results on plasmon dispersion show that plasmon frequency enhances with increasing temperatures in contrast to single layer graphene where it is suppressed. This can be attributed to the fact that the dynamic response of the electron gas or screening in bilayer graphene is different from that of single layer graphene. Further the temperature effect on damping rate is also discussed.

  11. Screened energy loss rate in bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Meenhaz; Ashraf, S. S. Z.; Ahmad, Afzal

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the energy relaxation of hot carriers in bilayer graphene through coupling to acoustic phonons interacting via the Deformation potential in the Boltzmann transport equation approach. We incorporate static screening in the estimation of the power loss rate as screening has a more functional role in bilayer graphene. It is observed that on the incorporation of screening the magnitude as well as the power exponent both is affected with the power exponent changed from T4 to T5.92 in the lower temperature range upto 3K and to T1.04 dependence in the higher temperature range that is 170-300K.

  12. Bi-layer steady state current cloak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lunwu

    2014-02-01

    We report that bi-layer copper and polystyrene cylinders can cloak steady current. We fabricated two hollow cylinders, the one made of copper, and the other made of polystyrene. Two hollow copper and polystyrene cylinders nested concentric bi-layer hollow copper and polystyrene cylinders. The background media are made of aluminum. Theory and experiment demonstrated that the electric potential gradients are parallel and equal outside the outer circle, the iso-potential lines are parallel outside the outer circle, and the electric potential is zero in the inner circle.

  13. Bilayer graphene quantum dot defined by topgates

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, André; Kaestner, Bernd; Hohls, Frank; Weimann, Thomas; Pierz, Klaus; Schumacher, Hans W.

    2014-06-21

    We investigate the application of nanoscale topgates on exfoliated bilayer graphene to define quantum dot devices. At temperatures below 500 mK, the conductance underneath the grounded gates is suppressed, which we attribute to nearest neighbour hopping and strain-induced piezoelectric fields. The gate-layout can thus be used to define resistive regions by tuning into the corresponding temperature range. We use this method to define a quantum dot structure in bilayer graphene showing Coulomb blockade oscillations consistent with the gate layout.

  14. Bright ion channels and lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Szymański, Wiktor; Yilmaz, Duygu; Koçer, Armağan; Feringa, Ben L

    2013-12-17

    If we look at a simple organism such as a zebrafish under a microscope, we would see many cells working in harmony. If we zoomed in, we would observe each unit performing its own tasks in a special aqueous environment isolated from the other units by a lipid bilayer approximately 5 nm thick. These confined units are social: they communicate with one another by sensing and responding to the chemical changes in their environment through receptors and ion channels. These channels control the highly specific and selective passage of ions from one side of the cell to the other and are embedded in lipid bilayers. The movement of ions through ion channels supports excitation and electrical signaling in the nervous system. Ion channels have fascinated scientists not only because of their specificity and selectivity, but also for their functions, the serious consequences when they malfunction, and the other potential applications of these molecules. Light is a useful trigger to control and manipulate ion channels externally. With the many state-of-the-art optical technologies available, light offers a high degree of spatial and temporal control, millisecond precision, and noninvasive intervention and does not change the chemical environment of the system of interest. In this Account, we discuss research toward the dynamic control of lipid bilayer assembly and channel function, particularly the transport across the lipid bilayer-ion channel barrier of cells using light. We first summarize the manipulation of ion channel activity with light to modulate the channel's natural activity. Based on the type of photoswitch employed, we can achieve novel functionalities with these channels, and control neural activity. Then we discuss the recent developments in light-induced transport through lipid bilayers. We focus on three different approaches: the incorporation of photoswitchable copolymers into the lipids, the doping of the lipid bilayer with photosensitive amphiphiles and the

  15. Phospholipid vesicle fusion on micropatterned polymeric bilayer substrates.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Takashi; Morigaki, Kenichi; Taguchi, Takahisa

    2006-09-01

    As an approach to create versatile model systems of the biological membrane we have recently developed a novel micropatterning strategy of substrate-supported planar lipid bilayers (SPBs) based on photolithographic polymerization of a diacetylene phospholipid, 1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. The micropatterned SPBs are composed of a polymeric bilayer matrix and embedded fluid lipid bilayers. In this study, we investigated the incorporation of fluid bilayers into micropatterned polymeric bilayer matrices through the adsorption and reorganization of phospholipid vesicles (vesicle fusion). Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy observation showed that vesicle fusion started at the boundary of polymeric bilayers and propagated into the central part of lipid-free regions. On the other hand, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring revealed that the transformation from adsorbed vesicles into SPBs was significantly accelerated for substrates with micropatterned polymeric bilayers. These results indicate that the edges of polymeric bilayers catalyze the formation of SPBs by destabilizing adsorbed vesicles and also support the premise that polymeric bilayers and embedded fluid bilayers are forming a continuous hybrid bilayer membrane, sealing energetically unfavorable bilayer edges. PMID:16766614

  16. Phase Behavior and Domain Size in Sphingomyelin-Containing Lipid Bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Petruzielo, Robin S; Heberle, Frederick A; Drazba, Paul; Katsaras, John; Feigenson, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Membrane raft size measurements are crucial to understanding the stability and functionality of rafts in cells. The challenge of accurately measuring raft size is evidenced by the disparate reports of domain sizes, which range from nanometers to microns for the ternary model membrane system sphingomyelin (SM)/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC)/cholesterol (Chol). Using F rster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), we established phase diagrams for porcine brain SM (bSM)/dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC)/Chol and bSM/POPC/Chol at 15 and 25 C. By combining two techniqueswith different spatial sensitivities, namely FRET and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS),we have significantly narrowed the uncertainty in domain size estimates for bSM/POPC/Chol mixtures. Compositional trends in FRET data revealed coexisting domains at 15 and 25 C for bothmixtures, while SANS measurements detected no domain formation for bSM/POPC/Chol. Together these results indicate that liquid domains in bSM/POPC/Chol are between 2 and 7 nmin radius at 25 C: that is, domains must be on the order of the 2 6 nmF rster distance of the FRET probes, but smaller than the ~7 nm minimum cluster size detectable with SANS. However, for palmitoyl SM (PSM)/POPC/Chol at a similar composition, SANS detected coexisting liquid domains. This increase in domain size upon replacing the natural SMcomponent (which consists of amixture of chain lengths) with synthetic PSM, suggests a role for SM chain length in modulating raft size in vivo.

  17. Sub-100 nm patterning of supported bilayers by nanoshaving lithography.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jinjun; Chen, Jixin; Cremer, Paul S

    2008-03-01

    Sub-100 nm wide supported phospholipid bilayers (SLBs) were patterned on a planar borosilicate substrate by AFM-based nanoshaving lithography. First, a bovine serum albumin monolayer was coated on the glass and then selectively removed in long strips by an AFM tip. The width of vacant strips could be controlled down to 15 nm. Bilayer lines could be formed within the vacant strips by vesicle fusion. It was found that stable bilayers formed by this method had a lower size limit of approximately 55 nm in width. This size limit stems from a balance between a favorable bilayer adhesion energy and an unfavorable bilayer edge energy. PMID:18257567

  18. Electronic properties of graphene-based bilayer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhkov, A. V.; Sboychakov, A. O.; Rakhmanov, A. L.; Nori, Franco

    2016-08-01

    This article reviews the theoretical and experimental work related to the electronic properties of bilayer graphene systems. Three types of bilayer stackings are discussed: the AA, AB, and twisted bilayer graphene. This review covers single-electron properties, effects of static electric and magnetic fields, bilayer-based mesoscopic systems, spin-orbit coupling, dc transport and optical response, as well as spontaneous symmetry violation and other interaction effects. The selection of the material aims to introduce the reader to the most commonly studied topics of theoretical and experimental research in bilayer graphene.

  19. Electromagnetic resonant modes of dielectric sphere bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Andueza, A. Pérez-Conde, J.; Sevilla, J.

    2015-05-28

    Sphere bilayers have been proposed as promising structures for electromagnetic management in photonic crystal devices. These arrangements are made of two intertwined subsets of spheres of different size and refractive index, one subset filling the interstitial sites of the other. We present a systematic study of the electromagnetic resonant modes of the bilayers, in comparison with those of the constituent subsets of spheres. Three samples were built with glass and Teflon spheres and their transmission spectra measured in the microwave range (10–25 GHz). Simulations with finite integration time-domain method are in good agreement with experiments. Results show that the bilayer presents the same resonances as one of the subsets but modified by the presence of the other in its resonant frequencies and in the electric field distributions. As this distortion is not very large, the number of resonances in a selected spectral region is determined by the dominant subset. The degree of freedom that offers the bilayer could be useful to fine tune the resonances of the structure for different applications. A map of modes useful to guide this design is also presented. Scale invariance of Maxwell equations allows the translation of these results in the microwave range to the visible region; hence, some possible applications are discussed in this framework.

  20. electric dipole superconductor in bilayer exciton system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qing-Feng; Jiang, Qing-Dong; Bao, Zhi-Qiang; Xie, X. C.

    Recently, it was reported that the bilayer exciton systems could exhibit many new phenomena, including the large bilayer counterflow conductivity, the Coulomb drag, etc. These phenomena imply the formation of exciton condensate superfluid state. On the other hand, it is now well known that the superconductor is the condensate superfluid state of the Cooper pairs, which can be viewed as electric monopoles. In other words, the superconductor state is the electric monopole condensate superfluid state. Thus, one may wonder whether there exists electric dipole superfluid state. In this talk, we point out that the exciton in a bilayer system can be considered as a charge neutral electric dipole. And we derive the London-type and Ginzburg-Landau-type equations of electric dipole superconductivity. From these equations, we discover the Meissner-type effect (against spatial variation of magnetic fields), and the dipole current Josephson effect. The frequency in the AC Josephson effect of the dipole current is equal to that in the normal (monopole) superconductor. These results can provide direct evidence for the formation of exciton superfluid state in the bilayer systems and pave new ways to obtain the electric dipole current. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support by NBRP of China (2012CB921303 and 2015CB921102) and NSF-China under Grants Nos. 11274364 and 11574007.

  1. Supported bilayer electrophoresis under controlled buffer conditions.

    PubMed

    Monson, Christopher F; Pace, Hudson P; Liu, Chunming; Cremer, Paul S

    2011-03-15

    A pH controlled flow cell device was constructed to allow electrophoretic movement of charged lipids and membrane associated proteins in supported phospholipid bilayers. The device isolated electrolysis products near the electrodes from the electrophoresis process within the bilayer. This allowed the pH over the bilayer region to remain within ±0.2 pH units or better over many hours at salt concentrations up to 10 mM. Using this setup, it was found that the electrophoretic mobility of a dye conjugated lipid (Texas Red 1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (TR-DHPE)) was essentially constant between pH 3.3 and 9.3. In contrast, streptavidin, which was bound to biotinylated lipids, shifted from migrating cathodically at acidic pH values to migrating anodically under basic conditions. This shift was due to the modulation of the net charge on the protein, which changed the electrophoretic forces experienced by the macromolecule. The addition of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) cushion beneath the bilayer or the increase in the ionic strength of the buffer solution resulted in a decrease of the electroosmotic force experienced by the streptavidin with little effect on the Texas Red-DHPE. As such, it was possible in part to control the electrophoretic and electroosmotic contributions to streptavidin independently of one another. PMID:21319743

  2. Electromagnetic resonant modes of dielectric sphere bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andueza, A.; Pérez-Conde, J.; Sevilla, J.

    2015-05-01

    Sphere bilayers have been proposed as promising structures for electromagnetic management in photonic crystal devices. These arrangements are made of two intertwined subsets of spheres of different size and refractive index, one subset filling the interstitial sites of the other. We present a systematic study of the electromagnetic resonant modes of the bilayers, in comparison with those of the constituent subsets of spheres. Three samples were built with glass and Teflon spheres and their transmission spectra measured in the microwave range (10-25 GHz). Simulations with finite integration time-domain method are in good agreement with experiments. Results show that the bilayer presents the same resonances as one of the subsets but modified by the presence of the other in its resonant frequencies and in the electric field distributions. As this distortion is not very large, the number of resonances in a selected spectral region is determined by the dominant subset. The degree of freedom that offers the bilayer could be useful to fine tune the resonances of the structure for different applications. A map of modes useful to guide this design is also presented. Scale invariance of Maxwell equations allows the translation of these results in the microwave range to the visible region; hence, some possible applications are discussed in this framework.

  3. Capillary wrinkling of thin bilayer polymeric sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jooyoung; Menon, Narayanan; Russell, Thomas

    We have investigated capillary force induced wrinkling on a floated polymeric bilayer thin sheet. The origin of the wrinkle pattern is compressional hoop stress caused by the capillary force of a water droplet placed on the floated polymeric thin sheet afore investigated. Herein, we study the effect of the differences of surface energy arising from the hydrophobicity of Polystyrene (PS Mw: 97 K, Contact Angle: 88 º) and the hydrophilicity of Poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA Mw: 99K, Contact Angle: 68 º) on two sides of a bilayer film. We measure the number and the length of the wrinkles by broadly varying the range of thicknesses of top (9 nm to 550 nm) and bottom layer (25 nm to 330 nm). At the same, there is only a small contrast in mechanical properties of the two layers (PS E = 3.4 GPa, and PMMA E = 3 GPa). The number of the wrinkles is not strongly affected by the composition (PS(Top)/PMMA(Bottom) or PMMA(Top)/PS(Bottom)) and the thickness of each and overall bilayer system. However, the length of the wrinkle is governed by the contact angle of the drop on the top layer of bilayer system. We also compare this to the wrinkle pattern obtained in monolayer systems over a wide range of thickness from PS and PMMA (7 nm to 1 μm). W.M. Keck Foundation.

  4. Chiral electron transport in CVD bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyunghoon; Eo, Yun Suk; Kurdak, Cagliyan; Zhong, Zhaohui

    2014-03-01

    Charge carriers in bilayer graphene have a parabolic energy spectrum. Due to this band structure they are massive quasiparticles having a finite density of state at zero energy like other non-relativistic charge carriers in conventional two dimensional materials. However, they are massive Dirac fermions which have a chiral nature similar to the case of massless Dirac fermions in single layer graphene. Coupling of pseudospin and motion of charge carrier via chirality can result in dramatic consequence for transport in bipolar regime like Klein tunneling, Fabry-Perot interference, collimation of charge carrier, Veslago lens, etc. However, little attention has been paid to chiral dependent electron transport in bilayer graphene. Here we study these properties by probing phase coherent transport behavior in CVD bilayer graphene devices with sub-200nm channel length. Complex Fabry-Perot interference patterns are observed in resonant cavities defined by local gating. By applying Fourier analysis technique, we successfully analyze and identify the origin of each individual interference pattern in bipolar and monopolar regime. Our initial results also hint at the observation of cloaking of electronic states against chiral electrons in bilayer graphene.

  5. Quantum theory of bilayer quantum Hall smectics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papa, Emiliano; Schliemann, John; MacDonald, A. H.; Fisher, Matthew P.

    2003-03-01

    Mean-field theory predicts that bilayer quantum Hall systems at odd integer total filling factors can have stripe ground states, in which the top Landau level is occupied alternately by electrons in one of the two layers. We report on an analysis of the properties of these states based on a coupled-Luttinger-liquid description that is able to account for quantum fluctuations of charge-density and position along each stripe edge. The soft modes associated with the broken symmetries of the stripe state lead to an unusual coupled-Luttinger-liquid system with strongly enhanced low-temperature heat capacity and strongly suppressed low-energy tunneling density of states. We assess the importance of the intralayer and interlayer backscattering terms in the microscopic Hamiltonian, which are absent in the Luttinger liquid description, by employing a perturbative renormalization group approach which rescales time and length along but not transverse to the stripes. With interlayer backscattering interactions present the Luttinger-liquid states are unstable either to an incompressible striped state that has spontaneous interlayer phase coherence and a sizable charge gap even at relatively large layer separations, or to Wigner crystal states. Our quantitative estimates of the gaps produced by backscattering interactions are summarized in Fig. 11 by a schematic phase diagram intended to represent predicted experimental findings in very high mobility bilayer systems at dilution refrigerator temperatures as a function of layer separation and bilayer density balance. We predict that the bilayer will form incompressible isotropic interlayer phase-coherent states for small layer separations, say d⩽1.5l. At larger interlayer spacings, however, the bilayer will tend to form one of several different anisotropic states depending on the layer charge balance, which we parametrize by the fractional filling factor ν contributed by one of the two layers. For large charge imbalances (

  6. Investigating the Structure of Multicomponent Gel-Phase Lipid Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Hartkamp, Remco; Moore, Timothy C; Iacovella, Christopher R; Thompson, Michael A; Bulsara, Pallav A; Moore, David J; McCabe, Clare

    2016-08-23

    Single- and multicomponent lipid bilayers of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DSPC), isostearyl isostearate, and heptadecanoyl heptadecanoate in the gel phase are studied via molecular dynamics simulations. It is shown that the structural properties of multicomponent bilayers can deviate strongly from the structures of their single-component counterparts. Specifically, the lipid mixtures are shown to adopt a compact packing by offsetting the positioning depths at which different lipid species are located in the bilayer. This packing mechanism affects the area per lipid, the bilayer height, and the chain tilt angles and has important consequences for other bilayer properties, such as interfacial hydrogen bonding and bilayer permeability. In particular, the simulations suggest that bilayers containing isostearyl isostearate or heptadecanoyl heptadecanoate are less permeable than pure 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine or DSPC bilayers. Furthermore, hydrogen-bond analysis shows that the residence times of lipid-water hydrogen bonds depend strongly on the bilayer composition, with longer residence times for bilayers that have a higher DSPC content. The findings illustrate and explain the fundamental differences between the properties of single- and multicomponent bilayers. PMID:27558724

  7. Repetitive formation of optically-observable planar lipid bilayers by rotating chambers on a microaperture.

    PubMed

    Tomoike, Fumiaki; Tonooka, Taishi; Osaki, Toshihisa; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2016-07-01

    Optical observation of a planar lipid bilayer is an effective method of lipid bilayer characterization. However, previous methods for optically observable lipid bilayer formation are unsuitable for repetitive formation of lipid bilayers. In this paper, we propose a system that facilitates repetitive formation of horizontal lipid bilayers via mechanical rotation of the rotating part. We show that multiple bilayers can be observed within a short period, and that the electrical and optical characteristics of a bilayer can be analyzed simultaneously. PMID:27256329

  8. The interaction of polyphenols with bilayers: conditions for increasing bilayer adhesion.

    PubMed

    Huh, N W; Porter, N A; McIntosh, T J; Simon, S A

    1996-12-01

    Because proteins and other molecules with a high polyphenol content are commonly involved in adhesion processes, we are investigating the interactions between polyphenols and biological materials. A naturally occurring polyphenol that binds a variety of proteins and lipids is tannic acid (TA), which contains five digallic acid residues covalently linked to a central D-glucose. A previous study has shown that TA increases the adhesion between apposing phosphatidylcholine (PC) bilayers and over a very narrow concentration range collapses the interbilayer fluid space from about 15 A to 5 A. To determine the chemical requirements a polyphenolic molecule must possess to increase bilayer adhesion, we have synthesized several simpler TA analogs that vary in their size, shape, and number of gallic acid and hydroxyl groups. X-ray diffraction, absorbance, binding, and differential scanning calorimetry measurements were used to investigate the interaction of these polyphenolic molecules with egg PC (EPC) and dipalmitoyl PC (DPPC) bilayers. Of these synthetic polyphenols, only penta-O-galloyl-alpha-D-glucose (PGG) was able to completely mimic the effects of TA by collapsing the interbilayer fluid space from 15 A to 5 A, decreasing the dipole potential by about 300 mV, increasing the transition enthalpy of DPPC liposomes, and inducing an interdigitated phase in DPPC. Binding studies indicated that the fluid space was reduced to 5 A at an EPC:PGG mole ratio of 5:1. We conclude that these polyphenols collapse the fluid space of PC bilayers because they 1) are amphipathic and partition into the bilayers interfacial region, 2) are long enough to span the interbilayer space, 3) contain several gallic acids distributed so that they can partition simultaneously into apposing bilayers, and 4) have sufficient gallic acid residues to interact with all lipid headgroups and cover the bilayer surface. Under these conditions we conclude that the polyphenols from interbilayer bridges. We

  9. The interaction of polyphenols with bilayers: conditions for increasing bilayer adhesion.

    PubMed Central

    Huh, N W; Porter, N A; McIntosh, T J; Simon, S A

    1996-01-01

    Because proteins and other molecules with a high polyphenol content are commonly involved in adhesion processes, we are investigating the interactions between polyphenols and biological materials. A naturally occurring polyphenol that binds a variety of proteins and lipids is tannic acid (TA), which contains five digallic acid residues covalently linked to a central D-glucose. A previous study has shown that TA increases the adhesion between apposing phosphatidylcholine (PC) bilayers and over a very narrow concentration range collapses the interbilayer fluid space from about 15 A to 5 A. To determine the chemical requirements a polyphenolic molecule must possess to increase bilayer adhesion, we have synthesized several simpler TA analogs that vary in their size, shape, and number of gallic acid and hydroxyl groups. X-ray diffraction, absorbance, binding, and differential scanning calorimetry measurements were used to investigate the interaction of these polyphenolic molecules with egg PC (EPC) and dipalmitoyl PC (DPPC) bilayers. Of these synthetic polyphenols, only penta-O-galloyl-alpha-D-glucose (PGG) was able to completely mimic the effects of TA by collapsing the interbilayer fluid space from 15 A to 5 A, decreasing the dipole potential by about 300 mV, increasing the transition enthalpy of DPPC liposomes, and inducing an interdigitated phase in DPPC. Binding studies indicated that the fluid space was reduced to 5 A at an EPC:PGG mole ratio of 5:1. We conclude that these polyphenols collapse the fluid space of PC bilayers because they 1) are amphipathic and partition into the bilayers interfacial region, 2) are long enough to span the interbilayer space, 3) contain several gallic acids distributed so that they can partition simultaneously into apposing bilayers, and 4) have sufficient gallic acid residues to interact with all lipid headgroups and cover the bilayer surface. Under these conditions we conclude that the polyphenols from interbilayer bridges. We

  10. Water Permeability of Asymmetric Planar Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Krylov, Andrey V.; Pohl, Peter; Zeidel, Mark L.; Hill, Warren G.

    2001-01-01

    To understand how plasma membranes may limit water flux, we have modeled the apical membrane of MDCK type 1 cells. Previous experiments demonstrated that liposomes designed to mimic the inner and outer leaflet of this membrane exhibited 18-fold lower water permeation for outer leaflet lipids than inner leaflet lipids (Hill, W.G., and M.L. Zeidel. 2000. J. Biol. Chem. 275:30176–30185), confirming that the outer leaflet is the primary barrier to permeation. If leaflets in a bilayer resist permeation independently, the following equation estimates single leaflet permeabilities: 1/PAB = 1/PA + 1/PB (Eq. l), where PAB is the permeability of a bilayer composed of leaflets A and B, PA is the permeability of leaflet A, and PB is the permeability of leaflet B. Using for the MDCK leaflet–specific liposomes gives an estimated value for the osmotic water permeability (Pf) of 4.6 × 10−4 cm/s (at 25°C) that correlated well with experimentally measured values in intact cells. We have now constructed both symmetric and asymmetric planar lipid bilayers that model the MDCK apical membrane. Water permeability across these bilayers was monitored in the immediate membrane vicinity using a Na+-sensitive scanning microelectrode and an osmotic gradient induced by addition of urea. The near-membrane concentration distribution of solute was used to calculate the velocity of water flow (Pohl, P., S.M. Saparov, and Y.N. Antonenko. 1997. Biophys. J. 72:1711–1718). At 36°C, Pf was 3.44 ± 0.35 × 10−3 cm/s for symmetrical inner leaflet membranes and 3.40 ± 0.34 × 10−4 cm/s for symmetrical exofacial membranes. From , the estimated permeability of an asymmetric membrane is 6.2 × 10−4 cm/s. Water permeability measured for the asymmetric planar bilayer was 6.7 ± 0.7 × 10−4 cm/s, which is within 10% of the calculated value. Direct experimental measurement of Pf for an asymmetric planar membrane confirms that leaflets in a bilayer offer independent and additive resistances to

  11. Polymer bilayer structure via inkjet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yajun; Friend, Richard H.

    2006-04-01

    We report the formation of a polymer bilayer structure by inkjet printing poly(9,9'-dioctylfluorene-co-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT) from p-xylene solution onto a poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-N-(4-butylphenyl)diphenylamine (TFB) thin film. Despite the compatibility of both polymers with the same organic solvent, a TFB layer under the later-deposited F8BT was directly observed through fluorescence microscopy. Micro-Raman spectroscopy reveals that this bottom layer is ˜10nm thick for a film made by inkjet printing F8BT onto a TFB film of ˜20nm thickness. The bilayer structure leads to enhanced efficiency for light-emitting diodes in comparison with devices made from spin-coated TFB:F8BT blend films.

  12. Driving skyrmions in a composite bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zidong; Grimson, Malcolm J.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic skyrmions and multiferroics are the most interesting objects in nanostructure science that have great potential in future spin-electronic technology. The study of multiferroic skyrmions has attracted much interest in recent years. This article reports magnetic Bloch skyrmions induced by an electric driving field in a composite bilayer (chiral-magnetic/ferroelectric bilayer) lattice. By using the spin dynamics method, we use a classical magnetic spin model and an electric pseudospin model, which are coupled by a strong magnetoelectric coupling in the dynamical simulations. Interestingly, we observe some skyrmionlike objects in the electric component either during the switching process or by applying a magnetic field, which is due to the connection between the electric and the magnetic structures.

  13. Atomic force microscopy of hydrated phosphatidylethanolamine bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Zasadzinski, J A; Helm, C A; Longo, M L; Weisenhorn, A L; Gould, S A; Hansma, P K

    1991-01-01

    We present images of the polar or headgroup regions of bilayers of dimyristoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), deposited by Langmuir-Blodgett deposition onto mica substrates at high surface pressures and imaged under water at room temperature with the optical lever atomic force microscope. The lattice structure of DMPE is visualized with sufficient resolution that the location of individual headgroups can be determined. The forces are sufficiently small that the same area can be repeatedly imaged with a minimum of damage. The DMPE molecules in the bilayer appear to have relatively good long-range orientational order, but rather short-range and poor positional order. These results are in good agreement with x-ray measurements of unsupported lipid monolayers on the water surface, and with electron diffraction of adsorbed monolayers. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:2049529

  14. The electronic properties of bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Edward; Koshino, Mikito

    2013-05-01

    We review the electronic properties of bilayer graphene, beginning with a description of the tight-binding model of bilayer graphene and the derivation of the effective Hamiltonian describing massive chiral quasiparticles in two parabolic bands at low energies. We take into account five tight-binding parameters of the Slonczewski-Weiss-McClure model of bulk graphite plus intra- and interlayer asymmetry between atomic sites which induce band gaps in the low-energy spectrum. The Hartree model of screening and band-gap opening due to interlayer asymmetry in the presence of external gates is presented. The tight-binding model is used to describe optical and transport properties including the integer quantum Hall effect, and we also discuss orbital magnetism, phonons and the influence of strain on electronic properties. We conclude with an overview of electronic interaction effects.

  15. How Bilayer Graphene Got a Bandgap

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Feng

    2009-01-01

    Graphene is the two-dimensional crystalline form of carbon, whose extraordinary electron mobility and other unique features hold great promise for nanoscale electronics and photonics. But theres a catch: graphene has no bandgap. Now Feng Wang and his colleagues at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley have engineered a bandgap in bilayer graphene that can be precisely controlled from 0 to 250 milli-electron volts, which is the energy of infrared radiation.

  16. Mechanism of alamethicin insertion into lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    He, K; Ludtke, S J; Heller, W T; Huang, H W

    1996-01-01

    Alamethicin adsorbs on the membrane surface at low peptide concentrations. However, above a critical peptide-to-lipid ratio (P/L), a fraction of the peptide molecules insert in the membrane. This critical ratio is lipid dependent. For diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine it is about 1/40. At even higher concentrations P/L > or = 1/15, all of the alamethicin inserts into the membrane and forms well-defined pores as detected by neutron in-plane scattering. A previous x-ray diffraction measurement showed that alamethicin adsorbed on the surface has the effect of thinning the bilayer in proportion to the peptide concentration. A theoretical study showed that the energy cost of membrane thinning can indeed lead to peptide insertion. This paper extends the previous studies to the high-concentration region P/L > 1/40. X-ray diffraction shows that the bilayer thickness increases with the peptide concentration for P/L > 1/23 as the insertion approaches 100%. The thickness change with the percentage of insertion is consistent with the assumption that the hydrocarbon region of the bilayer matches the hydrophobic region of the inserted peptide. The elastic energy of a lipid bilayer including both adsorption and insertion of peptide is discussed. The Gibbs free energy is calculated as a function of P/L and the percentage of insertion phi in a simplified one-dimensional model. The model exhibits an insertion phase transition in qualitative agreement with the data. We conclude that the membrane deformation energy is the major driving force for the alamethicin insertion transition. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8913604

  17. How Bilayer Graphene Got a Bandgap

    ScienceCinema

    Wang, Feng

    2013-05-29

    Graphene is the two-dimensional crystalline form of carbon, whose extraordinary electron mobility and other unique features hold great promise for nanoscale electronics and photonics. But theres a catch: graphene has no bandgap. Now Feng Wang and his colleagues at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley have engineered a bandgap in bilayer graphene that can be precisely controlled from 0 to 250 milli-electron volts, which is the energy of infrared radiation.

  18. How Bilayer Graphene Got a Bandgap

    ScienceCinema

    Feng Wang

    2010-01-08

    Graphene is the two-dimensional crystalline form of carbon, whose extraordinary electron mobility and other unique features hold great promise for nanoscale electronics and photonics. But theres a catch: graphene has no bandgap. Now Feng Wang and his colleagues at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley have engineered a bandgap in bilayer graphene that can be precisely controlled from 0 to 250 milli-electron volts, which is the energy of infrared radiation.

  19. How Bilayer Graphene Got a Bandgap

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Wang

    2009-06-02

    Graphene is the two-dimensional crystalline form of carbon, whose extraordinary electron mobility and other unique features hold great promise for nanoscale electronics and photonics. But theres a catch: graphene has no bandgap. Now Feng Wang and his colleagues at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley have engineered a bandgap in bilayer graphene that can be precisely controlled from 0 to 250 milli-electron volts, which is the energy of infrared radiation.

  20. Stability analysis of the pulmonary liquid bilayer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, David; Grotberg, James

    2010-11-01

    The lung consists of liquid-lined compliant airways that convey air to and from the alveoli where gas exchange takes place. Because the airways are coated with a bilayer consisting of a mucus layer on top of a periciliary fluid layer, a surface tension instability can generate flows within the bilayer and induce the formation of liquid plugs that block the passage of air. This is a problem for example with premature neonates whose lungs do not produce sufficient quantities of surfactant and suffer from respiratory distress syndrome. To study this instability a system of coupled nonlinear evolution equations are derived using lubrication theory for the thicknesses of the two liquid layers which are assumed to be Newtonian. A normal mode analysis is used to investigate the initial growth of the disturbances, and reveals how the grow rate is affected by the ratio of viscosities λ, film thicknesses η and surface tensions δ of the two layers which can change by disease. Numerical solutions of the evolution equations show that there is a critical bilayer thickness ɛc above which closure occurs, and that a more viscous and thicker layer compared to the periciliary layer closes more slowly. However, ɛcis weakly dependent on λ, η and δ. We also examine the potential impact of wall shear stress and normal stress on cell damage. This work is funded by NIH HL85156.

  1. Self-folding graphene-polymer bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Tao; Yoon, ChangKyu; Jin, Qianru; Li, Mingen; Liu, Zewen; Gracias, David H.

    2015-05-01

    In order to incorporate the extraordinary intrinsic thermal, electrical, mechanical, and optical properties of graphene with three dimensional (3D) flexible substrates, we introduce a solvent-driven self-folding approach using graphene-polymer bilayers. A polymer (SU-8) film was spin coated atop chemically vapor deposited graphene films on wafer substrates and graphene-polymer bilayers were patterned with or without metal electrodes using photolithography, thin film deposition, and etching. After patterning, the bilayers were released from the substrates and they self-folded to form fully integrated, curved, and folded structures. In contrast to planar graphene sensors on rigid substrates, we assembled curved and folded sensors that are flexible and they feature smaller form factors due to their 3D geometry and large surface areas due to their multiple rolled architectures. We believe that this approach could be used to assemble a range of high performance 3D electronic and optical devices of relevance to sensing, diagnostics, wearables, and energy harvesting.

  2. Crystallization in mass and charge asymmetric bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonitz, Michael; Ludwig, Patrick; Filinov, Alexei; Lozovik, Yurii; Stolz, Heinrich

    2007-11-01

    We consider Coulomb crystal formation in quantum electron-ion (hole) bilayers. Varying the mass ratio M of ions and electrons between 1 and 100 for a fixed layer separation d at low temperature and high density, one can tune the hole behavior from delocalized (quantum) to localized (quasi-classical) while the electrons remain delocalized all the time. While in 3D plasmas [1], ions crystallize if the mass ratio exceeds a critical value of Mcr˜80, in bilayers Mcr can be drastically reduced by properly choosing d and the in-layer particle density. The complicated overlap of correlation and quantum effects of both, electrons and holes, is fully taken care of by performing first-principle path integral Monte Carlo simulations. [1] M. Bonitz, V.S. Filinov, V.E. Fortov. P.R. Levashov, and H. Fehske, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 235006 (2005) and J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39, 4717 (2006). [2] P. Ludwig, A. Filinov, Yu. Lozovik, H. Stolz, and M. Bonitz, Crystallization in mass-asymmetric electron-hole bilayers, Contrib. Plasma Phys. (2007), ArXiv: cond-mat/0611556

  3. Self-folding graphene-polymer bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Tao; Yoon, ChangKyu; Jin, Qianru; Li, Mingen; Liu, Zewen; Gracias, David H.

    2015-05-18

    In order to incorporate the extraordinary intrinsic thermal, electrical, mechanical, and optical properties of graphene with three dimensional (3D) flexible substrates, we introduce a solvent-driven self-folding approach using graphene-polymer bilayers. A polymer (SU-8) film was spin coated atop chemically vapor deposited graphene films on wafer substrates and graphene-polymer bilayers were patterned with or without metal electrodes using photolithography, thin film deposition, and etching. After patterning, the bilayers were released from the substrates and they self-folded to form fully integrated, curved, and folded structures. In contrast to planar graphene sensors on rigid substrates, we assembled curved and folded sensors that are flexible and they feature smaller form factors due to their 3D geometry and large surface areas due to their multiple rolled architectures. We believe that this approach could be used to assemble a range of high performance 3D electronic and optical devices of relevance to sensing, diagnostics, wearables, and energy harvesting.

  4. Electronic structure theory of weakly interacting bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Shiang; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2016-06-01

    We derive electronic structure models for weakly interacting bilayers such as graphene-graphene and graphene-hexagonal boron nitride, based on density functional theory calculations followed by Wannier transformation of electronic states. These transferable interlayer coupling models can be applied to investigate the physics of bilayers with arbitrary translations and twists. The functional form, in addition to the dependence on the distance, includes the angular dependence that results from higher angular momentum components in the Wannier pz orbitals. We demonstrate the capabilities of the method by applying it to a rotated graphene bilayer, which produces the analytically predicted renormalization of the Fermi velocity, Van Hove singularities in the density of states, and moiré pattern of the electronic localization at small twist angles. We further extend the theory to obtain the effective couplings by integrating out neighboring layers. This approach is instrumental for the design of van der Walls heterostructures with desirable electronic features and transport properties and for the derivation of low-energy theories for graphene stacks, including proximity effects from other layers.

  5. Bilayer membrane interactions with nanofabricated scaffolds

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Collier, C. Patrick

    2015-07-29

    Membrane function is facilitated by lateral organization within the lipid bilayer, including phase-separation of lipids into more ordered domains (lipid rafts) and anchoring of the membrane to a cytoskeleton. These features have proven difficult to reproduce in model membrane systems such as black lipid membranes, unilamellar vesicles and supported bilayers. However, advances in micro/nanofabrication have resulted in more realistic synthetic models of membrane-cytoskeleton interactions that can help uncover the design rules responsible for biological membrane formation and organization. This review will focus on describing micro-/nanostructured scaffolds that can emulate the connections of a cellular membrane to an underlying “cytoskeleton”. Thismore » includes molecular-based scaffolds anchored to a solid substrate through surface chemistry, solid-state supports modified by material deposition, lithography and etching, the creation of micro/nanoporous arrays, integration with microfluidics, and droplet-based bilayers at interfaces. Lastly, model systems such as these are increasing our understanding of structure and organization in cell membranes, and how they result in the emergence of functionality at the nanoscale.« less

  6. Bilayer membrane interactions with nanofabricated scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, C. Patrick

    2015-07-29

    Membrane function is facilitated by lateral organization within the lipid bilayer, including phase-separation of lipids into more ordered domains (lipid rafts) and anchoring of the membrane to a cytoskeleton. These features have proven difficult to reproduce in model membrane systems such as black lipid membranes, unilamellar vesicles and supported bilayers. However, advances in micro/nanofabrication have resulted in more realistic synthetic models of membrane-cytoskeleton interactions that can help uncover the design rules responsible for biological membrane formation and organization. This review will focus on describing micro-/nanostructured scaffolds that can emulate the connections of a cellular membrane to an underlying “cytoskeleton”. This includes molecular-based scaffolds anchored to a solid substrate through surface chemistry, solid-state supports modified by material deposition, lithography and etching, the creation of micro/nanoporous arrays, integration with microfluidics, and droplet-based bilayers at interfaces. Lastly, model systems such as these are increasing our understanding of structure and organization in cell membranes, and how they result in the emergence of functionality at the nanoscale.

  7. Method of fabricating lipid bilayer membranes on solid supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Nam-Joon (Inventor); Frank, Curtis W. (Inventor); Glenn, Jeffrey S. (Inventor); Cheong, Kwang Ho (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of producing a planar lipid bilayer on a solid support. With this method, a solution of lipid vesicles is first deposited on the solid support. Next, the lipid vesicles are destabilized by adding an amphipathic peptide solution to the lipid vesicle solution. This destabilization leads to production of a planar lipid bilayer on the solid support. The present invention also provides a supported planar lipid bilayer, where the planar lipid bilayer is made of naturally occurring lipids and the solid support is made of unmodified gold or titanium oxide. Preferably, the supported planar lipid bilayer is continuous. The planar lipid bilayer may be made of any naturally occurring lipid or mixture of lipids, including, but not limited to phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinsitol, cardiolipin, cholesterol, and sphingomyelin.

  8. Automatable lipid bilayer formation for ion channel studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulos, Jason L.; Bang, Hyunwoo; Jeon, Tae-Joon; Schmidt, Jacob J.

    2008-08-01

    Transmembrane proteins and ion channels are important drug targets and have been explored as single molecule sensors. For these proteins to function normally they must be integrated within lipid bilayers; however, the labor and skill required to create artificial lipid bilayers have the limited the possible applications utilizing these proteins. In order to reduce the complexity and cost of lipid bilayer formation and measurement, we have modified a previously published lipid bilayer formation technique using mechanically contacted monolayers so that the process is automatable, requiring minimal operator input. Measurement electronics are integrated with the fluid handling system, greatly reducing the time and operator feedback characteristically required of traditional bilayer experiments. To demonstrate the biological functionality of the resultant bilayers and the system's capabilities as a membrane platform, the ion channel gramicidin A was incorporated and measured with this system.

  9. Molecular dynamics modelling of EGCG clusters on ceramide bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Jingjie; Cheng, Yuan; Li, Weifeng; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2015-12-31

    A novel method of atomistic modelling and characterization of both pure ceramide and mixed lipid bilayers is being developed, using only the General Amber ForceField. Lipid bilayers modelled as pure ceramides adopt hexagonal packing after equilibration, and the area per lipid and bilayer thickness are consistent with previously reported theoretical results. Mixed lipid bilayers are modelled as a combination of ceramides, cholesterol, and free fatty acids. This model is shown to be stable after equilibration. Green tea extract, also known as epigallocatechin-3-gallate, is introduced as a spherical cluster on the surface of the mixed lipid bilayer. It is demonstrated that the cluster is able to bind to the bilayers as a cluster without diffusing into the surrounding water.

  10. Molecular dynamics modelling of EGCG clusters on ceramide bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Jingjie; Cheng, Yuan; Li, Weifeng; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2015-12-01

    A novel method of atomistic modelling and characterization of both pure ceramide and mixed lipid bilayers is being developed, using only the General Amber ForceField. Lipid bilayers modelled as pure ceramides adopt hexagonal packing after equilibration, and the area per lipid and bilayer thickness are consistent with previously reported theoretical results. Mixed lipid bilayers are modelled as a combination of ceramides, cholesterol, and free fatty acids. This model is shown to be stable after equilibration. Green tea extract, also known as epigallocatechin-3-gallate, is introduced as a spherical cluster on the surface of the mixed lipid bilayer. It is demonstrated that the cluster is able to bind to the bilayers as a cluster without diffusing into the surrounding water.

  11. Bilayer splitting and c-axis coupling in CMR bilayer manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Jozwiak, Chris; Graf, Jeff; Zhou, Shuyun; Bostwick, Aaron; Rotenberg, Eli; Zheng, Hong; Mitchell, John; Lanzara, Alessandra

    2009-09-03

    By performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of the bilayer colossal magnetoresistive (CMR) manganite, La2-2xSr1+2xMn2O7, we provide the complete mapping of the Fermi-level spectral weight topology. Clear and unambiguous bilayer splitting of the in-plane 3dx2-y2 band, mapped throughout the Brillouin zone, and the full mapping of the 3d3z2-r2 band are reported. Peculiar doping and temperature dependencies of these bands imply that as transition from the ferromagnetic metallic phase approaches, either as a function of doping or temperature, coherence along the c-axis between planes within the bilayer is lost, resulting in reduced interplane coupling. These results suggest that interplane coupling plays a large role in the CMR transition.

  12. Exciton and Trion Dynamics in Bilayer MoS2.

    PubMed

    Pei, Jiajie; Yang, Jiong; Xu, Renjing; Zeng, Yong-Hui; Myint, Ye Win; Zhang, Shuang; Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Qin, Qinghua; Wang, Xibin; Jiang, Wugui; Lu, Yuerui

    2015-12-22

    The control of exciton and triondynamics in bilayer MoS2 is demonstrated, via the comodulations by both temperature and electric field. The calculations here show that the band structure of bilayer MoS2 changes from indirect at room temperature toward direct nature as temperature decreases, which enables the electrical tunability of the K-K direct PL transition in bilayer MoS2 at low temperature. PMID:26542884

  13. Water Nucleation on Gold: Existence of a Unique Double Bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Hrbek, J.; Stacchiola, D.; Park, J.B.; Liu, P.; Ma, S.; Yang, F.; Starr, D.E.; Muller, E.; Sutter, P.

    2009-08-27

    Combining the results from experimental (STM and IRAS) and theoretical (DFT) studies of water adsorption on gold, we show that the Au(111) surface is hydrophobic. The weak interaction of water with Au induces the formation of a unique double bilayer, which itself is hydrophobic due to the internal locking of all hydrogen bonds within the bilayer and between the two bilayers of the water clusters.

  14. Approaches toward functional fluid supported lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Kevin Chun-I.

    Planar supported lipid bilayers (PSLBs) have attracted immense interest for their properties as model cell membranes and for potential applications in biosensors and lab-on-a-chip devices. Our study covers three aspects of the construction, characterization, and application of functional PSLBs. First, a combination of micro-fabrication, the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique, and fusion of extruded small unilamellar vesicle (E-SUVs) in sequence was used to create polymer-cushioned PSLBs in a microarray format. Random lipo-glycocopolymer mixed with L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine (egg PC) was compressed at the air-water interface and transferred onto the photoresist-patterned substrate by the LB technique to achieve spatially directed deposition. Construction of planar bilayers in an aqueous environment was subsequently completed by vesicle fusion. Epifluorescence microscopy, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), and electrophoresis-relaxation were employed to examine the resulting patterns as well as to verify the two-dimensional mobility of the supported membrane systems. This approach could possibly provide a useful route to create functional arrays of polymer-supported lipid bilayers. Second, we report the formation of fluid planar biomembranes on hydrophilic silica aerogels and xerogels. When the aerogel/xerogel was pre-hydrated and then allowed to incubate in egg PC E-SUV solution, lipid bilayers were formed due to the favorable interaction of vesicles with the hydroxyl-abundant silica surface. FRAP was used to determine the lateral diffusivity of membranes on aerogels. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) was used to monitor the kinetics of the irreversible adsorption and fusion of vesicles into bilayers on xerogel thin films. Finally, we compared the formation of PSLBs with and without incorporation of monosialoganglioside GM1 (GM1) as the antigen for in situ antibody binding. Quantifiable differences were observed in the

  15. Intercalation of small hydrophobic molecules in lipid bilayers containing cholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Worcester, D.L.; Hamacher, K.; Kaiser, H.; Kulasekere, R.; Torbet, J.

    1994-12-31

    Partitioning of small hydrophobic molecules into lipid bilayers containing cholesterol has been studied using the 2XC diffractometer at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. Locations of the compounds were determined by Fourier difference methods with data from both deuterated and undeuterated compounds introduced into the bilayers from the vapor phase. Data fitting procedures were developed for determining how well the compounds were localized. The compounds were found to be localized in a narrow region at the center of the hydrophobic layer, between the two halves of the bilayer. The structures are therefore intercalated structures with the long axis of the molecules in the plane of the bilayer.

  16. Intercalation of small hydrophobic molecules in lipid bilayers containing cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Worcester, D L; Hamacher, K; Kaiser, H; Kulasekere, R; Torbet, J

    1996-01-01

    Partitioning of small hydrophobic molecules into lipid bilayers containing cholesterol has been studied using the 2XC diffractometer at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. Locations of the compounds were determined by Fourier difference methods with data from both deuterated and undeuterated compounds introduced into the bilayers from the vapor phase. Data fitting procedures were developed for determining how well the compounds were localized. The compounds were found to be localized in a narrow region at the center of the hydrophobic layer, between the two halves of the bilayer. The structures are therefore intercalated structures with the long axis of the molecules in the plane of the bilayer. PMID:9031514

  17. Synthesis and sensing application of large scale bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung Ju; Yoo, Jung Hoon; Baek, Seung Jae; Park, Yung Woo

    2012-02-01

    We have synthesized large scale bilayer graphene by using Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) in atmospheric pressure. Bilayer graphene was grown by using CH4, H2 and Ar gases. The growth temperature was 1050^o. Conventional FET measurement shows ambipolar transfer characteristics. Results of Raman spectroscopy, Atomic Force microscope (AFM) and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) indicate the film is bilayer graphene. Especially, adlayer structure which interrupt uniformity was reduced in low methane flow condition. Furthermore, large size CVD bilayer graphene film can be investigated to apply sensor devices. By using conventional photolithography process, we have fabricated device array structure and studied sensing behavior.

  18. Functional One-Dimensional Lipid Bilayers on Carbon Nanotube Templates

    SciTech Connect

    Artyukhin, A; Shestakov, A; Harper, J; Bakajin, O; Stroeve, P; Noy, A

    2004-07-23

    We present one-dimensional (1-D) lipid bilayer structures that integrate carbon nanotubes with a key biological environment-phospholipid membrane. Our structures consist of lipid bilayers wrapped around carbon nanotubes modified with a hydrophilic polymer cushion layer. Despite high bilayer curvature, the lipid membrane maintains its fluidity and can sustain repeated damage-recovery cycles. We also present the first evidence of spontaneous insertion of pore-forming proteins into 1-D lipid bilayers. These structures could lead to the development of new classes of biosensors and bioelectronic devices.

  19. Selective transport of Pb2+ and Cd2+ across a phospholipid bilayer by a cyclohexanemonocarboxylic acid-capped 15-crown-5 ether.

    PubMed

    Hamidinia, Shawn A; Steinbaugh, Gregory E; Erdahl, Warren L; Taylor, Richard W; Pfeiffer, Douglas R

    2006-03-01

    A cyclohexanemonocarboxylic acid-capped 15-crown-5 ether was synthesized and found to be effective as an ionophore for Pb2+ and Cd2+, transporting them across a phospholipid bilayer membrane. Transport studies were carried out using 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycerophosphatidylcholine (POPC) vesicles containing the chelating indicator 2-([2-bis(carboxymethyl)amino-5-methylphenoxy]methyl)-6-methoxy-8-bis(carboxymethyl)aminoquinoline (Quin-2). Data obtained at pH 7.0 using this system, show that the synthetic ionophore transports divalent cations with the selectivity sequence Pb2+ > Cd2+ > Zn2+ > Mn2+ > Co2+ > Ni2+ > Ca2+ > Sr2+. Selectivity factors, based on the ratio of individual initial cation transport rates, are 280 (Pb2+/Ca2+), 62 (Pb2+/Zn2+), 68 (Cd2+/Ca2+), and 16 (Cd2+/Zn2+). Plots of log initial rate versus logM(n+) or log ionophore concentration suggest that Pb2+ and Cd2+ are transported primarily as a 1:1 cation-ionophore complex, but that complexes with other stoichiometries may also be present. The ionophore transports Pb2+ and Cd2+ by a predominantly electrogenic mechanism, based upon an enhanced rate of transport that is produced by agents which dissipate transmembrane potentials. The rate of Pb2+ transport shows a biphasic pH dependence with the maximum occurring at pH approximately 6.5. The high selectivity for Pb2+ and Cd2+ displayed by the cyclohexanecarboxylic acid-capped 15-crown-5 ether suggests potential applications of this ionophore for the treatment of Pb and Cd intoxication, and removal of these heavy metals from wastewater. PMID:16488017

  20. Direct in situ measurement of specific capacitance, monolayer tension, and bilayer tension in a droplet interface bilayer.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Graham J; Venkatesan, Guru A; Collier, C Patrick; Sarles, Stephen A

    2015-10-14

    Thickness and tension are important physical parameters of model cell membranes. However, traditional methods to measure these quantities require multiple experiments using separate equipment. This work introduces a new multi-step procedure for directly accessing in situ multiple physical properties of droplet interface bilayers (DIB), including specific capacitance (related to thickness), lipid monolayer tension in the Plateau-Gibbs border, and bilayer tension. The procedure employs a combination of mechanical manipulation of bilayer area followed by electrowetting of the capacitive interface to examine the sensitivities of bilayer capacitance to area and contact angle to voltage, respectively. These data allow for determining the specific capacitance of the membrane and surface tension of the lipid monolayer, which are then used to compute bilayer thickness and tension, respectively. The use of DIBs affords accurate optical imaging of the connected droplets in addition to electrical measurements of bilayer capacitance, and it allows for reversibly varying bilayer area. After validating the accuracy of the technique with diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhPC) DIBs in hexadecane, the method is applied herein to quantify separately the effects on membrane thickness and tension caused by varying the solvent in which the DIB is formed and introducing cholesterol into the bilayer. Because the technique relies only on capacitance measurements and optical images to determine both thickness and tension, this approach is specifically well-suited for studying the effects of peptides, biomolecules, natural and synthetic nanoparticles, and other species that accumulate within membranes without altering bilayer conductance. PMID:26289743

  1. Bilayer-thickness-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kahraman, Osman; Koch, Peter D; Klug, William S; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2016-04-01

    Hydrophobic thickness mismatch between integral membrane proteins and the surrounding lipid bilayer can produce lipid bilayer thickness deformations. Experiment and theory have shown that protein-induced lipid bilayer thickness deformations can yield energetically favorable bilayer-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins, and large-scale organization of integral membrane proteins into protein clusters in cell membranes. Within the continuum elasticity theory of membranes, the energy cost of protein-induced bilayer thickness deformations can be captured by considering compression and expansion of the bilayer hydrophobic core, membrane tension, and bilayer bending, resulting in biharmonic equilibrium equations describing the shape of lipid bilayers for a given set of bilayer-protein boundary conditions. Here we develop a combined analytic and numerical methodology for the solution of the equilibrium elastic equations associated with protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations. Our methodology allows accurate prediction of thickness-mediated protein interactions for arbitrary protein symmetries at arbitrary protein separations and relative orientations. We provide exact analytic solutions for cylindrical integral membrane proteins with constant and varying hydrophobic thickness, and develop perturbative analytic solutions for noncylindrical protein shapes. We complement these analytic solutions, and assess their accuracy, by developing both finite element and finite difference numerical solution schemes. We provide error estimates of our numerical solution schemes and systematically assess their convergence properties. Taken together, the work presented here puts into place an analytic and numerical framework which allows calculation of bilayer-mediated elastic interactions between integral membrane proteins for the complicated protein shapes suggested by structural biology and at the small protein separations most relevant for the crowded membrane

  2. Bilayer-thickness-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahraman, Osman; Koch, Peter D.; Klug, William S.; Haselwandter, Christoph A.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrophobic thickness mismatch between integral membrane proteins and the surrounding lipid bilayer can produce lipid bilayer thickness deformations. Experiment and theory have shown that protein-induced lipid bilayer thickness deformations can yield energetically favorable bilayer-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins, and large-scale organization of integral membrane proteins into protein clusters in cell membranes. Within the continuum elasticity theory of membranes, the energy cost of protein-induced bilayer thickness deformations can be captured by considering compression and expansion of the bilayer hydrophobic core, membrane tension, and bilayer bending, resulting in biharmonic equilibrium equations describing the shape of lipid bilayers for a given set of bilayer-protein boundary conditions. Here we develop a combined analytic and numerical methodology for the solution of the equilibrium elastic equations associated with protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations. Our methodology allows accurate prediction of thickness-mediated protein interactions for arbitrary protein symmetries at arbitrary protein separations and relative orientations. We provide exact analytic solutions for cylindrical integral membrane proteins with constant and varying hydrophobic thickness, and develop perturbative analytic solutions for noncylindrical protein shapes. We complement these analytic solutions, and assess their accuracy, by developing both finite element and finite difference numerical solution schemes. We provide error estimates of our numerical solution schemes and systematically assess their convergence properties. Taken together, the work presented here puts into place an analytic and numerical framework which allows calculation of bilayer-mediated elastic interactions between integral membrane proteins for the complicated protein shapes suggested by structural biology and at the small protein separations most relevant for the crowded membrane

  3. Effect of monoglycerides and fatty acids on a ceramide bilayer.

    PubMed

    Akinshina, Anna; Das, Chinmay; Noro, Massimo G

    2016-07-14

    Monoglycerides and unsaturated fatty acids, naturally present in trace amounts in the stratum corneum (top layer of skin) lipid matrix, are commonly used in pharmaceutical, cosmetic and health care formulations. However, a detailed molecular understanding of how the oil additives get incorporated into the skin lipids from topical application and, once incorporated, how they affect the properties and integrity of the lipid matrix remains unexplored. Using ceramide 2 bilayers as skin lipid surrogates, we use a series of molecular dynamics simulations with six different natural oil ingredients at multiple concentrations to investigate the effect of the oils on the properties and stability of the bilayers. The six oils: monoolein, monostearin, monoelaidin, oleic acid, stearic acid and linoleic acid - all having the same length of the alkyl chain, C18, but a varying degree of saturation, allow us to systematically address the effect of unsaturation in the additives. Our results show that at low oil concentration (∼5%) the mixed bilayers containing any of the oils and ceramide 2 (CER2) become more rigid than pure CER2 bilayers due to more efficient lipid packing. Better packing also results in the formation of larger numbers of hydrogen bonds between the lipids, which occurs at the expense of the hydrogen bonds between lipids and water. The mixed bilayers with saturated or trans-unsaturated oils remain stable over the whole range of oil concentration. In contrast, the presence of the oils with at least one cis-double bond leads to bilayer instability and complete loss of bilayer structure at the oil content of about 50-65%. Two cis-double bonds in the lipid tail induce bilayer disruption at even lower concentration (∼30%). The mixed bilayers remain in the gel phase (without melting to a fluid phase) until the phase transition to a non-bilayer phase occurs. We also demonstrate that the stability of the bilayer strongly correlates with the order parameter of the lipid

  4. Silica-based cationic bilayers as immunoadjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Lincopan, Nilton; Santana, Mariana RA; Faquim-Mauro, Eliana; da Costa, Maria Helena B; Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana M

    2009-01-01

    Background Silica particles cationized by dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB) bilayer were previously described. This work shows the efficiency of these particulates for antigen adsorption and presentation to the immune system and proves the concept that silica-based cationic bilayers exhibit better performance than alum regarding colloid stability and cellular immune responses for vaccine design. Results Firstly, the silica/DODAB assembly was characterized at 1 mM NaCl, pH 6.3 or 5 mM Tris.HCl, pH 7.4 and 0.1 mg/ml silica over a range of DODAB concentrations (0.001–1 mM) by means of dynamic light scattering for particle sizing and zeta-potential analysis. 0.05 mM DODAB is enough to produce cationic bilayer-covered particles with good colloid stability. Secondly, conditions for maximal adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) or a recombinant, heat-shock protein from Mycobacterium leprae (18 kDa-hsp) onto DODAB-covered or onto bare silica were determined. At maximal antigen adsorption, cellular immune responses in vivo from delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions determined by foot-pad swelling tests (DTH) and cytokines analysis evidenced the superior performance of the silica/DODAB adjuvant as compared to alum or antigens alone whereas humoral response from IgG in serum was equal to the one elicited by alum as adjuvant. Conclusion Cationized silica is a biocompatible, inexpensive, easily prepared and possibly general immunoadjuvant for antigen presentation which displays higher colloid stability than alum, better performance regarding cellular immune responses and employs very low, micromolar doses of cationic and toxic synthetic lipid. PMID:19152701

  5. Superlubricity in quasicrystalline twisted bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koren, Elad; Duerig, Urs

    2016-05-01

    The unique atomic positions in quasicrystals lead to peculiar self-similarity and fractal-like structural morphology. Accordingly, many of the material properties are supposed to manifest exceptional characteristics. In this Rapid Communication, we explain through numerical simulations the fundamental and peculiar aspects of quasicrystals wearless friction manifested in a 30° twisted bilayer graphene system. In particular, the sliding force exhibits a fractal structure with distinct area correlations due to the natural mixture between both periodic and aperiodic lateral modulations. In addition, zero power scaling of the sliding force with respect to the contact area is demonstrated for a geometric sequence of dodecagonal elements.

  6. DNA nanostructures interacting with lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Langecker, Martin; Arnaut, Vera; List, Jonathan; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: DNA has been previously shown to be useful as a material for the fabrication of static nanoscale objects, and also for the realization of dynamic molecular devices and machines. In many cases, nucleic acid assemblies directly mimic biological structures, for example, cytoskeletal filaments, enzyme scaffolds, or molecular motors, and many of the applications envisioned for such structures involve the study or imitation of biological processes, and even the interaction with living cells and organisms. An essential feature of biological systems is their elaborate structural organization and compartmentalization, and this most often involves membranous structures that are formed by dynamic assemblies of lipid molecules. Imitation of or interaction with biological systems using the tools of DNA nanotechnology thus ultimately and necessarily also involves interactions with lipid membrane structures, and thus the creation of DNA-lipid hybrid assemblies. Due to their differing chemical nature, however, highly charged nucleic acids and amphiphilic lipids do not seem the best match for the construction of such systems, and in fact they are rarely found in nature. In recent years, however, a large variety of lipid-interacting DNA conjugates were developed, which are now increasingly being applied also for the realization of DNA nanostructures interacting with lipid bilayer membranes. In this Account, we will present the current state of this emerging class of nanosystems. After a brief overview of the basic biophysical and biochemical properties of lipids and lipid bilayer membranes, we will discuss how DNA molecules can interact with lipid membranes through electrostatic interactions or via covalent modification with hydrophobic moieties. We will then show how such DNA-lipid interactions have been utilized for the realization of DNA nanostructures attached to or embedded within lipid bilayer membranes. Under certain conditions, DNA nanostructures remain mobile on

  7. Self-assembled lipid bilayer materials

    DOEpatents

    Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Waggoner, Tina A.; Last, Julie A.

    2005-11-08

    The present invention is a self-assembling material comprised of stacks of lipid bilayers formed in a columnar structure, where the assembly process is mediated and regulated by chemical recognition events. The material, through the chemical recognition interactions, has a self-regulating system that corrects the radial size of the assembly creating a uniform diameter throughout most of the structure. The materials form and are stable in aqueous solution. These materials are useful as structural elements for the architecture of materials and components in nanotechnology, efficient light harvesting systems for optical sensing, chemical processing centers, and drug delivery vehicles.

  8. Bilayer avalanche spin-diode logic

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Joseph S. Querlioz, Damien; Fadel, Eric R.; Wessels, Bruce W.; Sahakian, Alan V.

    2015-11-15

    A novel spintronic computing paradigm is proposed and analyzed in which InSb p-n bilayer avalanche spin-diodes are cascaded to efficiently perform complex logic operations. This spin-diode logic family uses control wires to generate magnetic fields that modulate the resistance of the spin-diodes, and currents through these devices control the resistance of cascaded devices. Electromagnetic simulations are performed to demonstrate the cascading mechanism, and guidelines are provided for the development of this innovative computing technology. This cascading scheme permits compact logic circuits with switching speeds determined by electromagnetic wave propagation rather than electron motion, enabling high-performance spintronic computing.

  9. Bilayer avalanche spin-diode logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Joseph S.; Fadel, Eric R.; Wessels, Bruce W.; Querlioz, Damien; Sahakian, Alan V.

    2015-11-01

    A novel spintronic computing paradigm is proposed and analyzed in which InSb p-n bilayer avalanche spin-diodes are cascaded to efficiently perform complex logic operations. This spin-diode logic family uses control wires to generate magnetic fields that modulate the resistance of the spin-diodes, and currents through these devices control the resistance of cascaded devices. Electromagnetic simulations are performed to demonstrate the cascading mechanism, and guidelines are provided for the development of this innovative computing technology. This cascading scheme permits compact logic circuits with switching speeds determined by electromagnetic wave propagation rather than electron motion, enabling high-performance spintronic computing.

  10. How antimicrobial peptides disrupt lipid bilayers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Durba

    2011-03-01

    The molecular basis for the activity of cyclic and linear antimicrobial peptides is analysed. We performed multi-scale molecular dynamics simulations and biophysical measurements to probe the interaction of antimicrobial peptides with model membranes. Two linear antimicrobial peptides, magainin and melittin and a cyclic one, BPC194 have been studied. We test different models to determine the generic and specific forces that lead to bilayer disruption. We probe whether interfacial stress or local membrane perturbation is more likely to lead to the porated state. We further analyse the reasons that determine specificity and increase of activity in antimicrobial peptides. The results provide detailed insight in the mode of action of antimicrobial peptides.

  11. Supported Lipid Bilayer/Carbon Nanotube Hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinjian; Moran-Mirabal, Jose; Craighead, Harold; McEuen, Paul

    2007-03-01

    We form supported lipid bilayers on single-walled carbon nanotubes and use this hybrid structure to probe the properties of lipid membranes and their functional constituents. We first demonstrate membrane continuity and lipid diffusion over the nanotube. A membrane-bound tetanus toxin protein, on the other hand, sees the nanotube as a diffusion barrier whose strength depends on the diameter of the nanotube. Finally, we present results on the electrical detection of specific binding of streptavidin to biotinylated lipids with nanotube field effect transistors. Possible techniques to extract dynamic information about the protein binding events will also be discussed.

  12. Giant magnetoresistance in bilayer graphene nanoflakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farghadan, Rouhollah; Farekiyan, Marzieh

    2016-09-01

    Coherent spin transport through bilayer graphene (BLG) nanoflakes sandwiched between two electrodes made of single-layer zigzag graphene nanoribbon was investigated by means of Landauer-Buttiker formalism. Application of a magnetic field only on BLG structure as a channel produces a perfect spin polarization in a large energy region. Moreover, the conductance could be strongly modulated by magnetization of the zigzag edge of AB-stacked BLG, and the junction, entirely made of carbon, produces a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) up to 100%. Intestinally, GMR and spin polarization could be tuned by varying BLG width and length. Generally, MR in a AB-stacked BLG strongly increases (decreases) with length (width).

  13. Lipid Bilayers: Clusters, Domains and Phases

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, David G.; Feigenson, Gerald W.

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter we discuss the complex mixing behavior of plasma membrane lipids. To do so, we first introduce the plasma membrane and membrane mixtures often used to model its complexity. We then discuss the nature of lipid phase behavior in bilayers and the distinction between these phases and other manifestations of nonrandom mixing found in one-phase mixtures, such as clusters, micelles, and microemulsions. Finally, we demonstrate the applicability of Gibbs phase diagrams to the study of increasingly complex model membrane systems, with a focus on phase coexistence, morphology and their implications for the cell plasma membrane. PMID:25658342

  14. Collective Excitations in Electron-Hole Bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Kalman, G. J.; Hartmann, P.; Donko, Z.; Golden, K. I.

    2007-06-08

    We report a combined analytic and molecular dynamics analysis of the collective mode spectrum of a bipolar (electron-hole) bilayer in the strong coupling classical limit. A robust, isotropic energy gap is identified in the out-of-phase spectra, generated by the combined effect of correlations and of the excitation of the bound dipoles. In the in-phase spectra we identify longitudinal and transverse acoustic modes wholly maintained by correlations. Strong nonlinear generation of higher harmonics of the fundamental dipole oscillation frequency and the transfer of harmonics between different modes is observed.

  15. Twisted bi-layer graphene: microscopic rainbows.

    PubMed

    Campos-Delgado, J; Algara-Siller, G; Santos, C N; Kaiser, U; Raskin, J-P

    2013-10-11

    Blue, pink, and yellow colorations appear from twisted bi-layer graphene (tBLG) when transferred to a SiO2 /Si substrate (SiO2 = 100 nm-thick). Raman and electron microscope studies reveal that these colorations appear for twist angles in the 9-15° range. Optical contrast simulations confirm that the observed colorations are related to the angle-dependent electronic properties of tBLG combined with the reflection that results from the layered structure tBLG/100 nm-thick SiO2 /Si. PMID:23606323

  16. Fabrication of bilayer tetrathiafulvalene integrated surface covalent organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wei-Long; Li, Shu-Ying; Yue, Jie-Yu; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Dong; Wan, Li-Jun

    2016-06-29

    A bilayer covalent organic framework (COF) of TTF-based building blocks was obtained by imine reaction between tetrathiafulvalene tetraaldehyde (4ATTF) and p-phenylenediamine (PPDA). Direct evidence for the eclipsed stacking of bilayer structure via π-π interaction between TTF units is provided by high resolution scanning tunneling microscopy. PMID:27314983

  17. Probing DPPC Bilayer Spreading on Chemically Modified Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogmeier, Jeff; English, Doug; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2003-03-01

    The diffusion dynamics of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipid bilayers on glass substrates were investigated in real time using fluorescence microscopy. DPPC doped with 0.1 molslip and mounted in a temperature controlled fluid chamber. Initially, micron-size, non-fluorescent voids were observed in the lipid bilayer. Upon raising the sample temperature above the fluid transition temperature of DPPC (Tm = 41°C), the micron-size dark voids were replaced by a fluid lipid bilayer phase, followed by spreading of the lipid bilayer across the glass substrate. Interestingly, as the solution returns to room temperature, the non-fluorescent patterns reappear at the original positions. We hypothesize that the non-flourescent voids are due to defects in the glass surface or dewetting caused by localized surface contamination. Future experiments include micropatterning the glass substrate with hydrophobic and/or hydrophilic polymers to tune the lipid bilayer diffusion properties.

  18. Lipid mobility in supported lipid bilayers by single molecule tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohram, Maryam; Shi, Xiaojun; Smith, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Phospholipid bilayers are the main component of cell membranes and their interaction with biomolecules in their immediate environment is critical for cellular functions. These interactions include the binding of polycationic polymers to lipid bilayers which affects many cell membrane events. As an alternative method of studying live cell membranes, we assemble a supported lipid bilayer and investigate its binding with polycationic polymers in vitro by fluorescently labeling the molecules of the supported lipid bilayer and tracking their mobility. In this work, we use single molecule tracking total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRF) to study phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) lipids with and without an adsorbed polycationic polymer, quaternized polyvinylpyridine (QPVP). Individual molecular trajectories are obtained from the experiment, and a Brownian diffusion model is used to determine diffusion coefficients through mean square displacements. Our results indicate a smaller diffusion coefficient for the supported lipid bilayers in the presence of QPVP in comparison to its absence, revealing that their binding causes a decrease in lateral mobility.

  19. Surface Viscosity, Diffusion, and Intermonolayer Friction: Simulating Sheared Amphiphilic Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Shkulipa, S. A.; den Otter, W. K.; Briels, W. J.

    2005-01-01

    The flow properties of an amphiphilic bilayer are studied in molecular dynamics simulations, by exposing a coarse grained model bilayer to two shear flows directed along the bilayer surface. The first field, with a vorticity perpendicular to the bilayer, induces a regular shear deformation, allowing a direct calculation of the surface viscosity. In experiments this property is measured indirectly, by relating it to the diffusion coefficient of a tracer particle through the Saffman-Einstein expression. The current calculations provide an independent test of this relation. The second flow field, with a vorticity parallel to the bilayer, causes the two constituent monolayers to slide past one another, yielding the interlayer friction coefficient. PMID:15894643

  20. Edge states of zigzag bilayer graphite nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhim, Jun-Won; Moon, Kyungsun

    2008-09-01

    The electronic structures of zigzag bilayer graphite nanoribbons (Z-BGNRs) with various ribbon widths N are studied within the tight binding approximation. Neglecting the inter-layer hopping amplitude γ4, which is an order of magnitude smaller than the other inter-layer hopping parameters, there exist two fixed Fermi points ± k* independent of the ribbon width with a peculiar energy dispersion near k* as ɛ(k)~ ± (k-k*)N. By investigating the edge states of Z-BGNRs, we notice that the trigonal warping of the bilayer graphene sheets is reflected in the edge state structure. With the inclusion of γ4, the above two Fermi points are not fixed but drift toward the vicinity of the Dirac point with increasing width N, as shown by the finite scaling method, and the peculiar dispersions change to parabolic ones. The edge magnetism of Z-BGNRs is also examined by solving the half-filled Hubbard Hamiltonian for the ribbon using the Hartree-Fock approximation. We have shown that within the same side of the edges, the edge spins are aligned ferromagnetically for the experimentally relevant set of parameters.

  1. Incoherent interlayer conduction in twisted bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngwook; Nam, S.-G.; Lee, H.-J.; Kim, Jun Sung; Yun, H.; Lee, S. W.; Son, M.; Choi, H. C.; Lee, D. S.; Kim, D. C.; Seo, S.

    2014-03-01

    Coherent motion of the electrons in the Bloch states often breaks down for the interlayer conduction in layered materials where the interlayer coupling is significantly reduced by e.g. large interlayer separation. Here, we report complete suppression of coherent conduction in twisted bilayer graphene even with an atomic length scale of layer separation. The interlayer conduction were investigated using a cross junction of monolayer graphene layers. The interlayer resistivity is much higher than the c-axis resistivity of Bernal-stacked graphite and exhibits strong dependence on temperature as well as on external electric fields. These results suggest that the graphene layers are significantly decoupled by rotation, and the incoherent electron tunneling is the main interlayer conduction channel. In this regime, the interlayer conduction is determined by the overlap of the Dirac Fermi surfaces (FS) from each layer. The angle dependence of the interlayer resistivity is found to be relatively strong at low temperatures, while it becomes moderate and monotonous at high temperatures. This demonstrates the importance of phonon-mediated conduction at high temperatures, which enhances the overlap between the momentum-mismatched FS's in twisted bilayer graphene.

  2. Millimeter-area, free standing, phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Beltramo, Peter J; Van Hooghten, Rob; Vermant, Jan

    2016-05-11

    Minimal model biomembrane studies have the potential to unlock the fundamental mechanisms of cellular function that govern the processes upon which life relies. However, existing methods to fabricate free-standing model membranes currently have significant limitations. Bilayer sizes are often tens of micrometers, decoupling curvature or substrate effects, orthogonal control over tension, and solvent exchange combined with microscopy techniques is not possible, which restricts the studies that can be performed. Here, we describe a versatile platform to generate free standing, planar, phospholipid bilayers with millimeter scale areas. The technique relies on an adapted thin-film balance apparatus allowing for the dynamic control of the nucleation and growth of a planar black lipid membrane in the center of an orifice surrounded by microfluidic channels. Success is demonstrated using several different lipid types, including mixtures that show the same temperature dependent phase separation as existing protocols, moreover, membranes are highly stable. Two advantages unique to the proposed method are the dynamic control of the membrane tension and the possibility to make extremely large area membranes. We demonstrate this by showing how a block polymer, F68, used in drug delivery increases the membrane compliance. Together, the results demonstrate a new paradigm for studying the mechanics, structure, and function of model membranes. PMID:27050618

  3. Transport of Ions through Vesicle Bilayers

    PubMed

    Kaiser; Hoffmann

    1996-12-01

    Stopped flow measurements to determine the permeability of vesicles are presented. The kinetics of the reaction between FeSCN2+ and F- ions is used to monitor the permeability of vesicles. Samples with vesicles that have been equilibrated with the iron complex are mixed with F- solutions. The reaction is followed by UV/VIS absorption. The influence of temperature and surfactant concentration on the membrane permeability of large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles was studied. A dramatic increase of the permeability of the LUVs is observed when 30 to 40 mol% of the surfactant OP-10 (main component of Triton X-100) is added to the lipid. It is assumed that the increased permeability is due to the stabilization of transient defects in the bilayers of the vesicles as shown previously by other groups. Furthermore, a strong binding of the iron (III) thiocyanate complex to the phospholipid is observed by UV/VIS spectroscopy and zeta-potential measurements. Additional experiments with vesicles from a fluorocarbon surfactant show a much higher permeability than the phospholipid system. Models for the diffusion of either the iron (III) complex or the fluoride ions through the vesicles bilayer are discussed for LUV as well as for vesicles from a fluorocarbon surfactant. The results indicate that the rate-determining step is the diffusion of the iron complex through the membrane. PMID:8954634

  4. Twisted bilayer graphene with interlayer potential asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Pilkyung; Son, Young-Woo; Koshino, Mikito

    A twisted stack of two graphene layers (twisted bilayer graphene) exhibits an extremely long potential period arising from the moiré interference between the layers. We investigate the band structure and optical absorption spectrum of twisted bilayer graphenes with changing interlayer bias and Fermi energy simultaneously. We show that the interlayer bias lifts the degeneracy of the superlattice Dirac point, while the amount of the Dirac point shift is significantly suppressed in small rotation angles, and even becomes opposite to the applied bias, by the interlayer interaction. In addition, we show that the spectroscopic features are highly sensitive to the interlayer bias and the Fermi energy, and widely tunable by the external field effect. P.M. acknowledges the support of NYU Shanghai and the NYU-ECNU Institute of Physics at NYU Shanghai. Y.-W.S. was supported by the NRF of Korea grant funded by the MSIP. M.K. was funded by JSPS Grantin-Aid for Scientific Research.

  5. Multiscale Modeling of Heterogeneous Lipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faller, Roland; Bennun-Serrano, Sandra; Dickey, Allison

    2005-03-01

    The first line of defense for a cell against intrusive molecules is the membrane which must be resilient to prevent unwanted molecules from passing through as a change in the intracellular ion balance could be detrimental. Experimentally, it has been shown that as chain length and concentration of alcohols near a membrane increase, the area per lipid expands, increasing the likelihood of permeation. Additionally, there is evidence for pattern formation in cell membranes due to the presence of various lipids. These patterns or rafts are believed to play important roles in cell signaling. Here, we use MD to study the interactions between alcohols and pure lipid bilayers as well as pattern formation in mixed membranes using atomistic and coarse-grained models. We characterize the effect of alcohol chain-length and concentration on the lipid bilayer through area per head group, order parameter, and density profile. We also examine the effects of lipid-alcohol interactions on membrane curvature with the CG model and find satisfactory system representation. We use a mixture of DLPC and DSPC as model system for phase separation. Different concentrations and temperatures are used to reproduce phase transitions. We obtain agreement with experiments for area per lipid head group and deuterium order parameter. At high DSPC concentrations phase separation into a gel and liquid state is found. Simulations confirm that increasing DLPC concentrations lower the transition temperature.

  6. Engineering Lipid Bilayer Membranes for Protein Studies

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Shuja; Dosoky, Noura Sayed; Williams, John Dalton

    2013-01-01

    Lipid membranes regulate the flow of nutrients and communication signaling between cells and protect the sub-cellular structures. Recent attempts to fabricate artificial systems using nanostructures that mimic the physiological properties of natural lipid bilayer membranes (LBM) fused with transmembrane proteins have helped demonstrate the importance of temperature, pH, ionic strength, adsorption behavior, conformational reorientation and surface density in cellular membranes which all affect the incorporation of proteins on solid surfaces. Much of this work is performed on artificial templates made of polymer sponges or porous materials based on alumina, mica, and porous silicon (PSi) surfaces. For example, porous silicon materials have high biocompatibility, biodegradability, and photoluminescence, which allow them to be used both as a support structure for lipid bilayers or a template to measure the electrochemical functionality of living cells grown over the surface as in vivo. The variety of these media, coupled with the complex physiological conditions present in living systems, warrant a summary and prospectus detailing which artificial systems provide the most promise for different biological conditions. This study summarizes the use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) data on artificial biological membranes that are closely matched with previously published biological systems using both black lipid membrane and patch clamp techniques. PMID:24185908

  7. Line tension of multicomponent bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghan, Ashkan; Pastor, Kyle A.; Shi, An-Chang

    2015-02-01

    The line tension or edge energy of bilayer membranes self-assembled from binary amphiphilic molecules is studied using self-consistent-field theory (SCFT). Specifically, solutions of the SCFT equations corresponding to an infinite membrane with a circular pore, or an open membrane, are obtained for a coarse-grained model in which the amphiphilic species and hydrophilic solvents are represented by A B and E D diblock copolymers and C homopolymers, respectively. The edge energy of the membrane is extracted from the free energy of the open membranes. Results for membranes composed of mixtures of symmetric and cone- or inverse cone-shaped amphiphilic molecules with neutral and/or repulsive interactions are obtained and analyzed. It is observed that an increase in the concentration of the cone-shaped species leads to a decrease of the line tension. In contrast, adding inverse cone-shaped copolymers results in an increase of the line tension. Furthermore, the density profile of the copolymers reveals that the line tension is regulated by the distribution of the amphiphiles at the bilayer edge.

  8. Phase transitions in planar bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    White, S H

    1975-01-01

    Temperature-dependent structural changes in planar bilayer membranes formed from glycerol monooleate (GMO) dispersed in various n-alkane solvents (C12-C17) have been studied using precise measurements of specific geometric capacitance (Cg). Cg generally increases as temperature (T) decreases. A change in the slope of Cg(T) occurs between 15 and 18 degrees C for all solvent systems examined. Measurements of the interfacial tension (gamma) of the bulk GMO-alkane dispersions against 0.1 M NaCl show that gamma generally decreases with decreasing temperature. The data can be fitted with two straight lines of different slope which intersect on the average at 17 degrees C. Pagano et al. (1973, Science (Wash. D.C.). 181:557) have shown using calorimetry that GMO has a phase transition at about 15 degrees C. Thus, the changes in Cg and gamma with temperature are likely to result from a GMO phase transition. A second structural change is observed to occur between 5 and 10 degrees C which has not been detected calorimetrically. Calculations of Cg based on various estimates of the hydrocarbon dielectric coefficient (epsilon-b) and/or hydrocarbon thickness (delta-b) leads to models for the structure of the bilayer above and below the phase transition temperature. PMID:1111634

  9. Microarrays of phospholipid bilayers generated by inkjet printing.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Misato; Imaishi, Hiromasa; Morigaki, Kenichi

    2013-05-28

    We report an efficient and reproducible method to generate a microarray of model biological membranes on a solid substrate by applying the inkjet printing technology. Although inkjet printing is currently widely used for industrial fabrication processes, including biological materials, printing lipid membranes remains technically challenging due to the hydrophobic nature of droplets and instability of the lipid bilayer structure against dehydration. In the present study, we printed lipids onto a glass substrate covered with a micropatterned membrane of a polymeric phospholipid bilayer. Polymeric bilayers were formed by the lithographic photopolymerization of a diacetylene-containing phospholipid, 1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DiynePC). After removal of nonpolymerized DiynePC with a detergent solution, natural lipid membranes were incorporated into the polymer-free regions (corrals) by using an electric-field-based inkjet printing device that can eject subfemtoliter volume droplets. To avoid rapid dehydration and destabilization, we preprinted an aqueous solution containing agarose and trehalose onto the corrals and subsequently printed lipid suspensions ("two-step-printing method"). After rinsing, stable lipid bilayer membranes were formed in the corrals. The bilayers were continuous and fluid as confirmed by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. We could introduce multiple bilayer patches having different lipid compositions into the neighboring corrals. The present results demonstrate that the combination of a patterned polymeric bilayer and inkjet printing technology enables efficient, reliable, and scalable generation of the model membrane microarrays having varied compositions. PMID:23627772

  10. Undoped GaAs bilayers for exciton condensation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilly, M. P.

    2005-03-01

    Experimental progress in transport studies of exciton condensation of in electron and hole bilayers at high magnetic fields [1,2] has shown this novel physics can be observed. Fabrication of the bipolar electron-hole bilayers for zero field studies of exciton condensation still remains elusive. We describe a series of experiments on undoped GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures with the motivation of making electron-hole bilayers. In these undoped devices, external electric fields induce carriers rather than the traditional doping techniques. Single layer electron (or hole) devices demonstrate a high mobility over a wide range of density. More recently, fully undoped bilayers have been made where the density in each layer is independently controlled with gates on the top and bottom of the bilayer. In this talk we present high field transport of undoped electron-electron bilayers, and describe recent progress towards extending the fabrication techniques to creating electron-hole bilayers for exciton condensation studies at zero magnetic field. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. 1. M. Kellogg, J. P. Eisenstein, L. N. Pfeiffer, and K. W. West, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 036801 (2004). 2. E. Tutoc, M. Shayegan, and D. A. Huse, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 036802 (2004).

  11. Solid supported lipid bilayers: From biophysical studies to sensor design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellana, Edward T.; Cremer, Paul S.

    2006-11-01

    The lipid bilayer is one of the most eloquent and important self-assembled structures in nature. It not only provides a protective container for cells and sub-cellular compartments, but also hosts much of the machinery for cellular communication and transport across the cell membrane. Solid supported lipid bilayers provide an excellent model system for studying the surface chemistry of the cell. Moreover, they are accessible to a wide variety of surface-specific analytical techniques. This makes it possible to investigate processes such as cell signaling, ligand-receptor interactions, enzymatic reactions occurring at the cell surface, as well as pathogen attack. In this review, the following membrane systems are discussed: black lipid membranes, solid supported lipid bilayers, hybrid lipid bilayers, and polymer cushioned lipid bilayers. Examples of how supported lipid membrane technology is interfaced with array based systems by photolithographic patterning, spatial addressing, microcontact printing, and microfluidic patterning are explored. Also, the use of supported lipid bilayers in microfluidic devices for the development of lab-on-a-chip based platforms is examined. Finally, the utility of lipid bilayers in nanotechnology and future directions in this area are discussed.

  12. Main phase transitions in supported lipid single-bilayer.

    PubMed

    Charrier, A; Thibaudau, F

    2005-08-01

    We have studied the phase transitions of a phospholipidic single-bilayer supported on a mica substrate by real-time temperature-controlled atomic force microscopy. We show the existence of two phase transitions in this bilayer that we attribute to two gel (L(beta))/fluid (L(alpha)) transitions, corresponding to the independent melting of each leaflet of the bilayer. The ratio of each phase with temperature and the large broadening of the transitions' widths have been interpreted through a basic thermodynamic framework in which the surface tension varies during the transitions. The experimental data can be fit with such a model using known thermodynamic parameters. PMID:15879467

  13. A circuit model for defective bilayer graphene transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umoh, Ime J.; Moktadir, Zakaria; Hang, Shuojin; Kazmierski, Tom J.; Mizuta, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the behaviour of a defective single-gate bilayer graphene transistor. Point defects were introduced into pristine graphene crystal structure using a tightly focused helium ion beam. The transfer characteristics of the exposed transistors were measured ex-situ for different defect concentrations. The channel peak resistance increased with increasing defect concentration whilst the on-off ratio showed a decreasing trend for both electrons and holes. To understand the electrical behaviour of the transistors, a circuit model for bilayer graphene is developed which shows a very good agreement when validated against experimental data. The model allowed parameter extraction of bilayer transistor and can be implemented in circuit level simulators.

  14. Interfacial Widths of Conjugated Polymer Bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    NCSU; UC Berkeley; UCSB; Advanced Light Source; Garcia, Andres; Yan, Hongping; Sohn, Karen E.; Hexemer, Alexander; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen; Bazan, Guillermo C.; Kramer, Edward J.; Ade, Harald

    2009-08-13

    The interfaces of conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE)/poly[2-methoxy-5-(2{prime}-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) bilayers cast from differential solvents are shown by resonant soft X-ray reflectivity (RSoXR) to be very smooth and sharp. The chemical interdiffusion due to casting is limited to less than 0.6 nm, and the interface created is thus nearly 'molecularly' sharp. These results demonstrate for the first time and with high precision that the nonpolar MEH-PPV layer is not much disturbed by casting the CPE layer from a polar solvent. A baseline is established for understanding the role of interfacial structure in determining the performance of CPE-based polymer light-emitting diodes. More broadly, we anticipate further applications of RSoXR as an important tool in achieving a deeper understanding of other multilayer organic optoelectronic devices, including multilayer photovoltaic devices.

  15. Asymmetric charge distributions in planar bilayer systems.

    PubMed Central

    McQuarrie, D A; Mulás, P

    1977-01-01

    Using the simple argument based on irreversible thermodynamics and the Gouy-Chapman theory of the double layer, we show that the equilibrium distribution of charged lipid molecules between the two surfaces of a bilayer is asymmetric if the two solutions bathing the surfaces have the same ionic strength but contain ions of different valencies. For example, if one bathing solution contains 0.10 M NaCl and the other contains 0.70 M NaCl and 0.10 M CaCl2, the ratio of charged lipid molecules of the two surfaces in a membrane that contains 50% total negative lipids is 1.46, leading to a transbilayer potential of 18 mV. A complete set of such numerical results is presented in four figures. PMID:836930

  16. Asymmetric charge distributions in planar bilayer systems.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, D A; Mulás, P

    1977-02-01

    Using the simple argument based on irreversible thermodynamics and the Gouy-Chapman theory of the double layer, we show that the equilibrium distribution of charged lipid molecules between the two surfaces of a bilayer is asymmetric if the two solutions bathing the surfaces have the same ionic strength but contain ions of different valencies. For example, if one bathing solution contains 0.10 M NaCl and the other contains 0.70 M NaCl and 0.10 M CaCl2, the ratio of charged lipid molecules of the two surfaces in a membrane that contains 50% total negative lipids is 1.46, leading to a transbilayer potential of 18 mV. A complete set of such numerical results is presented in four figures. PMID:836930

  17. Vortex Dynamics in Ferromagnetic/Superconducting Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, M. Z.; Adamus, Z.; Kończykowski, M.; Zhu, L. Y.; Chien, C. L.

    2008-07-01

    The dependence of vortex dynamics on the geometry of magnetic domain pattern is studied in the superconducting/ferromagnetic bilayers, in which niobium is a superconductor, and Co/Pt multilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy serves as a ferrromagnetic layer. Magnetic domain patterns with different density of domains per surface area and different domain size, w, are obtained for Co/Pt with different thickness of Pt. The dense patterns of domains with the size comparable to the magnetic penetration depth (w ≥ qλ) produce large vortex pinning and smooth vortex penetration, while less dense patterns with larger domains (w ≫ λ) enhance pinning less effectively and result in flux jumps during flux motion.

  18. Terahertz conductivity of twisted bilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xingquan; Shang, Jingzhi; Leaw, Jianing; Luo, Zhiqiang; Luo, Liyan; La-o-Vorakiat, Chan; Cheng, Liang; Cheong, S A; Su, Haibin; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Liu, Yanpeng; Loh, Kian Ping; Castro Neto, A H; Yu, Ting; Chia, Elbert E M

    2013-02-01

    Using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, the real part of optical conductivity [σ(1)(ω)] of twisted bilayer graphene was obtained at different temperatures (10-300 K) in the frequency range 0.3-3 THz. On top of a Drude-like response, we see a strong peak in σ(1)(ω) at ~2.7 THz. We analyze the overall Drude-like response using a disorder-dependent (unitary scattering) model, then attribute the peak at 2.7 THz to an enhanced density of states at that energy, which is caused by the presence of a van Hove singularity arising from a commensurate twisting of the two graphene layers. PMID:23432306

  19. Collective Dynamics of Complex Plasma Bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, P.; Donko, Z.; Kalman, G. J.; Kyrkos, S.; Golden, K. I.; Rosenberg, M.

    2009-12-11

    A classical dusty plasma experiment was performed using two different dust grain sizes to form a strongly coupled asymmetric bilayer (two closely spaced interacting monolayers) of two species of charged dust particles. The observation and analysis of the thermally excited particle oscillations revealed the collective mode structure and dispersion (wave propagation) in this system; in particular, the existence of the theoretically predicted k=0 energy (frequency) gap was verified. Equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations were performed to emulate the experiment, assuming Yukawa-type interparticle interaction. The simulations and analytic calculations based both on lattice summation and on the quasilocalized charge approximation approach are in good agreement with the experimental findings and help in identifying and characterizing the observed phenomena.

  20. Spin Hall Magnetoresistance in Metallic Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Junyeon; Sheng, Peng; Takahashi, Saburo; Mitani, Seiji; Hayashi, Masamitsu

    2016-03-01

    Spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) is studied in metallic bilayers that consist of a heavy metal (HM) layer and a ferromagnetic metal (FM) layer. We find a nearly tenfold increase of SMR in W /CoFeB compared to previously studied HM/ferromagnetic insulator systems. The SMR increases with decreasing temperature despite the negligible change in the W layer resistivity. A model is developed to account for the absorption of the longitudinal spin current to the FM layer, one of the key characteristics of a metallic ferromagnet. We find that the model not only quantitatively describes the HM layer thickness dependence of SMR, allowing accurate estimation of the spin Hall angle and the spin diffusion length of the HM layer, but also can account for the temperature dependence of SMR by assuming a temperature dependent spin polarization of the FM layer. These results illustrate the unique role a metallic ferromagnetic layer plays in defining spin transmission across the HM /FM interface.

  1. The use of virtual ground to control transmembrane voltages and measure bilayer currents in serial arrays of droplet interface bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarles, Stephen A.

    2013-09-01

    The droplet interface bilayer (DIB) is a simple technique for constructing a stable lipid bilayer at the interface of two lipid-encased water droplets submerged in oil. Networks of DIBs formed by connecting more than two droplets constitute a new form of modular biomolecular smart material, where the transduction properties of a single lipid bilayer can affect the actions performed at other interface bilayers in the network via diffusion through the aqueous environments of shared droplet connections. The passive electrical properties of a lipid bilayer and the arrangement of droplets that determine the paths for transport in the network require specific electrical control to stimulate and interrogate each bilayer. Here, we explore the use of virtual ground for electrodes inserted into specific droplets in the network and employ a multichannel patch clamp amplifier to characterize bilayer formation and ion-channel activity in a serial DIB array. Analysis of serial connections of DIBs is discussed to understand how assigning electrode connections to the measurement device can be used to measure activity across all lipid membranes within a network. Serial arrays of DIBs are assembled using the regulated attachment method within a multi-compartment flexible substrate, and wire-type electrodes inserted into each droplet compartment of the substrate enable the application of voltage and measurement of current in each droplet in the array.

  2. Direct in situ measurement of specific capacitance, monolayer tension, and bilayer tension in a droplet interface bilayer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Taylor, Graham J.; Venkatesan, Guru A.; Collier, C. Patrick; Sarles, Stephen A.

    2015-08-05

    In this study, thickness and tension are important physical parameters of model cell membranes. However, traditional methods to measure these quantities require multiple experiments using separate equipment. This work introduces a new multi-step procedure for directly accessing in situ multiple physical properties of droplet interface bilayers (DIB), including specific capacitance (related to thickness), lipid monolayer tension in the Plateau-Gibbs border, and bilayer tension. The procedure employs a combination of mechanical manipulation of bilayer area followed by electrowetting of the capacitive interface to examine the sensitivities of bilayer capacitance to area and contact angle to voltage, respectively. These data allow formore » determining the specific capacitance of the membrane and surface tension of the lipid monolayer, which are then used to compute bilayer thickness and tension, respectively. The use of DIBs affords accurate optical imaging of the connected droplets in addition to electrical measurements of bilayer capacitance, and it allows for reversibly varying bilayer area. After validating the accuracy of the technique with diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhPC) DIBs in hexadecane, the method is applied herein to quantify separately the effects on membrane thickness and tension caused by varying the solvent in which the DIB is formed and introducing cholesterol into the bilayer. Because the technique relies only on capacitance measurements and optical images to determine both thickness and tension, this approach is specifically well-suited for studying the effects of peptides, biomolecules, natural and synthetic nanoparticles, and other species that accumulate within membranes without altering bilayer conductance.« less

  3. Oxygen permeability of the lipid bilayer membrane made of calf lens lipids

    PubMed Central

    Widomska, Justyna; Raguz, Marija; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2007-01-01

    The oxygen permeability coefficient across the membrane made of the total lipid extract from the plasma membrane of calf lens was estimated from the profile of the oxygen transport parameter (local oxygen diffusion-concentration product) and compared with those estimated for membranes made of an equimolar 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine/cholesterol (POPC/Chol) mixture and of pure POPC. Profiles of the oxygen transport parameter were obtained by observing the collision of molecular oxygen with nitroxide radical spin labels placed at different depths in the membrane using the saturation-recovery EPR technique and were published by us earlier (J. Widomska, M. Raguz, J. Dillon, E. R. Gaillard, W. K. Subczynski, Biochim. Biophys. Acta. Epub 2007 March 20). At 35°C, the estimated oxygen permeability coefficients were 51.3, 49.7, and 157.4 cm/s for lens lipid, POPC/Chol, and POPC membranes, respectively (compared with 53.3 cm/s for a water layer with the same thickness as a membrane). Membrane permeability significantly decreases at lower temperatures. In the lens lipid membrane, resistance to the oxygen transport is located in and near the polar headgroup region of the membrane to the depth of the ninth carbon, which is approximately where the steroid-ring structure of cholesterol reaches into the membrane. In the central region of the membrane, oxygen transport is enhanced, significantly exceeding that in bulk water. It is concluded that the high level of cholesterol in lens lipids is responsible for these unique membrane properties. PMID:17662231

  4. The role of lamellate phospholipid bilayers in lubrication of joints.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Zenon; Urbaniak, Wiesław; Gadomski, Adam; Yusuf, Kehinde Q; Afara, Isaac O; Oloyede, Adekunle

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to determine the effect of progressive loss of the surface active phospholipids on the characteristics, and hence tribological function of articular cartilage. In accordance to Hill's hypothesis, 3-7 lipid bilayers at pH 7.4 operate as the solid lubricant in the cartilage-cartilage interface during physiological function. These bilayers are known to be depleted during cartilage degeneration. This study models this loss of phospholipid bilayers, studying experimentally both wet and dry cartilage surfaces, measuring surface wettability, and friction coefficient under a constant stress of 1.2 MPa. The results demonstrate that the friction coefficient increases gradually with loss of the phospholipid bilayers, and gains in value with decrease in wettability. PMID:23394101

  5. An engineered dimeric protein pore that spans adjacent lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Mantri, Shiksha; Sapra, K. Tanuj; Cheley, Stephen; Sharp, Thomas H.; Bayley, Hagan

    2013-01-01

    The bottom-up construction of artificial tissues is an underexplored area of synthetic biology. An important challenge is communication between constituent compartments of the engineered tissue and between the engineered tissue and additional compartments, including extracellular fluids, further engineered tissue and living cells. Here we present a dimeric transmembrane pore that can span two adjacent lipid bilayers and thereby allow aqueous compartments to communicate. Two heptameric staphylococcal α-hemolysin (αHL) pores were covalently linked in an aligned cap-to-cap orientation. The structure of the dimer, (α7)2, was confirmed by biochemical analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and single-channel electrical recording. We show that one of two β barrels of (α7)2 can insert into the lipid bilayer of a small unilamellar vesicle, while the other spans a planar lipid bilayer. (α7)2 pores spanning two bilayers were also observed by TEM. PMID:23591892

  6. Tethered and Polymer Supported Bilayer Lipid Membranes: Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Jakob; Köper, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Solid supported bilayer lipid membranes are model systems to mimic natural cell membranes in order to understand structural and functional properties of such systems. The use of a model system allows for the use of a wide variety of analytical tools including atomic force microscopy, impedance spectroscopy, neutron reflectometry, and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Among the large number of different types of model membranes polymer-supported and tethered lipid bilayers have been shown to be versatile and useful systems. Both systems consist of a lipid bilayer, which is de-coupled from an underlying support by a spacer cushion. Both systems will be reviewed, with an emphasis on the effect that the spacer moiety has on the bilayer properties. PMID:27249006

  7. Effect of impurity doping in gapped bilayer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Qi; Yan, Baoming; Jia, Zhenzhao; Niu, Jingjing; Yu, Dapeng; Wu, Xiaosong

    2015-10-19

    Impurity doping plays a pivotal role in semiconductor electronics. We study the doping effect in a two-dimensional semiconductor, gapped bilayer graphene. By employing in situ deposition of calcium on the bilayer graphene, dopants are controllably introduced. Low temperature transport results show a variable range hopping conduction near the charge neutrality point persisting up to 50 K, providing evidence for the impurity levels inside the gap. Our experiment confirms a predicted peculiar effect in the gapped bilayer graphene, i.e., formation of in-gap states even if the bare impurity level lies in the conduction band. The result provides perspective on the effect of doping and impurity levels in semiconducting bilayer graphene.

  8. Sub-wavelength antenna enhanced bilayer graphene tunable photodetector

    DOEpatents

    Beechem, III, Thomas Edwin; Howell, Stephen W.; Peters, David W.; Davids, Paul; Ohta, Taisuke

    2016-03-22

    The integration of bilayer graphene with an absorption enhancing sub-wavelength antenna provides an infrared photodetector capable of real-time spectral tuning without filters at nanosecond timescales.

  9. Interfacial exciplex formation in bilayers of conjugated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobuyasu, R. S.; Araujo, K. A. S.; Cury, L. A.; Jarrosson, T.; Serein-Spirau, F.; Lère-Porte, J.-P.; Dias, F. B.; Monkman, A. P.

    2013-10-01

    The donor-acceptor interactions in sequential bilayer and blend films are investigated. Steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) were measured to characterize the samples at different geometries of photoluminescence collection. At standard excitation, with the laser incidence at 45° of the normal direction of the sample surface, a band related to the aggregate states of donor molecules appears for both blend and bilayer at around 540 nm. For the PL spectra acquired from the edge of the bilayer, with the laser incidence made at normal direction of the sample surface (90° geometry), a new featureless band emission, red-shifted from donor and acceptor emission regions was observed and assigned as the emission from interfacial exciplex states. The conformational complexity coming from donor/acceptor interactions at the heterojunction interface of the bilayer is at the origin of this interfacial exciplex emission.

  10. Electronic properties of asymmetrically doped twisted graphene bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trambly de Laissardière, Guy; Namarvar, Omid Faizy; Mayou, Didier; Magaud, Laurence

    2016-06-01

    Rotated graphene bilayers form an exotic class of nanomaterials with fascinating electronic properties governed by the rotation angle θ . For large rotation angles, the electron eigenstates are restricted to one layer and the bilayer behaves like two decoupled graphene layers. At intermediate angles, Dirac cones are preserved but with a lower velocity and van Hove singularities are induced at energies where the two Dirac cones intersect. At very small angles, eigenstates become localized in peculiar moiré zones. We analyze here the effect of an asymmetric doping for a series of commensurate rotated bilayers on the basis of tight-binding calculations of their band dispersions, density of states, participation ratio, and diffusive properties. While a small doping level preserves the θ dependence of the rotated bilayer electronic structure, larger doping induces a further reduction of the band velocity in the same way as a further reduction of the rotation angle.

  11. Bilayer properties of hydroxytyrosol- and tyrosol-phosphatidylcholine lipids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol are the phytochemicals abundantly found in olive oil. Transphosphatidylation of tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol with dioleoylphosphocholine resulted in phospholipids with antioxidant properties. The ability of these phyto-phospholipids to form liposomes and supported bilayers w...

  12. Tethered and Polymer Supported Bilayer Lipid Membranes: Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Jakob; Köper, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Solid supported bilayer lipid membranes are model systems to mimic natural cell membranes in order to understand structural and functional properties of such systems. The use of a model system allows for the use of a wide variety of analytical tools including atomic force microscopy, impedance spectroscopy, neutron reflectometry, and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Among the large number of different types of model membranes polymer-supported and tethered lipid bilayers have been shown to be versatile and useful systems. Both systems consist of a lipid bilayer, which is de-coupled from an underlying support by a spacer cushion. Both systems will be reviewed, with an emphasis on the effect that the spacer moiety has on the bilayer properties. PMID:27249006

  13. Enhanced electrocaloric effect in composition gradient bilayer thick films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Ying; Yang, Lu; Qian, Xiaoshi; Zhang, Tian; Zhang, Q. M.

    2016-03-01

    We report the enhanced electrocaloric (EC) response over a broad temperature range in composition gradient Ba(ZrTi)O3 based bilayer thick films. A large EC temperature change of -4.9 K under an electric field of 10 MV/m around room temperature, large electrocaloric coefficient ΔT/ΔE = 0.49 × 10-6 K m V-1 were observed in the BaZr0.17Ti0.83O3/BaZr0.20Ti0.80O3 bilayer thick films, which are improved compared with BaZr0.20Ti0.80O3 and BaZr0.17Ti0.83O3 homogeneous bilayer films. The result reveals the potential of the composition gradient bilayer structure in improving the electrocaloric effect, which may provide an effective route to achieve large EC temperature change under a low electric field.

  14. Energy levels of hybrid monolayer-bilayer graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzakhani, M.; Zarenia, M.; Ketabi, S. A.; da Costa, D. R.; Peeters, F. M.

    2016-04-01

    Often real samples of graphene consist of islands of both monolayer and bilayer graphene. Bound states in such hybrid quantum dots are investigated for (i) a circular single-layer graphene quantum dot surrounded by an infinite bilayer graphene sheet and (ii) a circular bilayer graphene quantum dot surrounded by an infinite single-layer graphene. Using the continuum model and applying zigzag boundary conditions at the single-layer-bilayer graphene interface, we obtain analytical results for the energy levels and the corresponding wave spinors. Their dependence on perpendicular magnetic and electric fields are studied for both types of quantum dots. The energy levels exhibit characteristics of interface states, and we find anticrossings and closing of the energy gap in the presence of a bias potential.

  15. Molecular Dynamics of a Water-Lipid Bilayer Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Pohorille, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations of a glycerol 1-monooleate bilayer in water. The total length of analyzed trajectories is 5ns. The calculated width of the bilayer agrees well with the experimentally measured value. The interior of the membrane is in a highly disordered fluid state. Atomic density profile, orientational and conformational distribution functions, and order parameters indicate that disorder increases toward the center of the bilayer. Analysis of out-of-plane thermal fluctuations of the bilayer surfaces occurring at the time scale of the present calculations reveals that the distribution of modes agrees with predictions of the capillary wave model. Fluctuations of both bilayer surfaces are uncorrelated, yielding Gaussian distribution of instantaneous widths of the membrane. Fluctuations of the width produce transient thinning defects in the bilayer which occasionally span almost half of the membrane. The leading mechanism of these fluctuations is the orientational and conformational motion of head groups rather than vertical motion of the whole molecules. Water considerably penetrates the head group region of the bilayer but not its hydrocarbon core. The total net excess dipole moment of the interfacial water points toward the aqueous phase, but the water polarization profile is non-monotonic. Both water and head groups significantly contribute to the surface potential across the interface. The calculated sign of the surface potential is in agreement with that from experimental measurements, but the value is markedly overestimated. The structural and electrical properties of the water-bilayer system are discussed in relation to membrane functions, in particular transport of ions and nonelectrolytes across membranes.

  16. Enhancing magnetoelectric effect in multiferroic composite bilayers via flexoelectricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunli; Zhang, Lingli; Shen, Xudong; Chen, Weiqiu

    2016-04-01

    We employ the flexoelectricity to enhance the magnetoelectric (ME) (coupling) effect in multiferroic (MF) composites and structures. An analytical model is presented to predict the ME effect in a MF composite bilayer consisting of piezomagnetic and piezoelectric layers. The flexoelectric effect in the piezoelectric layer is taken into account. The static ME effect in the MF composite bilayer with free boundary conditions is investigated. The results indicate that flexoelectricity can dramatically enhance the ME effect in multiferroic composites and structures.

  17. Lipid Interactions and Organization in Complex Bilayer Membranes.

    PubMed

    Engberg, Oskar; Yasuda, Tomokazu; Hautala, Victor; Matsumori, Nobuaki; Nyholm, Thomas K M; Murata, Michio; Slotte, J Peter

    2016-04-12

    Bilayer lipids influence the lateral structure of the membranes, but the relationship between lipid properties and the lateral structure formed is not always understood. Model membrane studies on bilayers containing cholesterol and various phospholipids (PLs) suggest that high and low temperature melting PLs may segregate, especially in the presence of cholesterol. The effect of different PL headgroups on lateral structure of bilayers is also not clear. Here, we have examined the formation of lateral heterogeneity in increasingly complex (up to five-component) multilamellar bilayers. We have used time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy with domain-selective fluorescent probes (PL-conjugated trans-parinaric acid), and (2)H NMR spectroscopy with site or perdeuterated PLs. We have measured changes in bilayer order using such domain-selective probes both as a function of temperature and composition. Our results from time-resolved fluorescence and (2)H NMR showed that in ternary bilayers, acyl chain order and thermostability in sphingomyelin-rich domains were not affected to any greater extent by the headgroup structure of the monounsaturated PLs (phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, or phosphatidylserine) in the bilayer. In the complex five-component bilayers, we could not detect major differences between the different monounsaturated PLs regarding cholesterol-induced ordering. However, cholesterol clearly influenced deuterated N-palmitoyl sphingomyelin differently than the other deuterated PLs, suggesting that cholesterol favored N-palmitoyl sphingomyelin over the other PLs. Taken together, both the fluorescence spectroscopy and (2)H NMR data suggest that the complex five-component membranes displayed lateral heterogeneity, at least in the lower temperature regimen examined. PMID:27074681

  18. Chronopotentiometric studies of phosphatidylcholine bilayers modified by ergosterol.

    PubMed

    Naumowicz, Monika; Petelska, Aneta Dorota; Figaszewski, Zbigniew Artur

    2011-01-01

    We have monitored the effect of ergosterol on electrical capacitance and electrical resistance of the phosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes using chronopotentiometry method. The chronopotentiometric characteristic of the bilayers depends on constant-current flow through the membranes. For low current values, no electroporation takes place and the membrane voltage rises exponentially to a constant value described by the Ohm's law. Based on these kinds of chronopotentiometric curves, a method of the membrane capacitance and the membrane resistance calculations is presented. PMID:21641920

  19. Subterahertz excitations and magnetoelectric effects in hexaferrite-piezoelectric bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Ustinov, Alexey B.; Srinivasan, G.

    2008-10-06

    A frequency-agile hexaferrite-piezoelectric composite for potential device applications at subterahertz frequencies is studied. The bilayer is composed of aluminum substituted barium hexagonal ferrite (BaAl{sub 2}Fe{sub 10}O{sub 19}) and lead zirconate titanate (PZT). A dc electric field applied to PZT results in mechanical deformation of the ferrite, leading to a frequency shift in ferromagnetic resonance. The bilayer demonstrates magnetoelectric interaction coefficient of about 0.37 Oe cm/kV.

  20. Electrical perturbations of ultrathin bilayers: role of ionic conductive layer.

    PubMed

    Nazaripoor, Hadi; Koch, Charles R; Bhattacharjee, Subir

    2014-12-16

    The effect of electrostatic force on the dynamics, morphological evolution, and drainage time of ultrathin liquid bilayers (<100 nm) are investigated for perfect dielectric-perfect dielectric (PD-PD) and ionic liquid-perfect dielectric (IL-PD) bilayers. The weakly nonlinear "thin film" equation is solved numerically to obtain spatiotemporal evolution of the liquid-liquid interface responses to transverse electric field. In order to predict the electrostatic component of conjoining/disjoining pressure acting on the interface for IL-PD bilayers, an analytical model is developed using the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation. It is found that IL-PD bilayers with electric permittivity ratio of layers (lower to top), εr, greater than one remain stable under an applied electric field. An extensive numerical study is carried out to generate a map based on εr and the initial mean thickness of the lower layer. This map is used to predict the formation of various structures on PD-PD bilayer interface and provides a baseline for unstable IL-PD bilayers. The use of an ionic liquid (IL) layer is found to reduce the size of the structures, but results in polydispersed and disordered pillars spread over the domain. The numerical predictions follow similar trend of experimental observation of Lau and Russel. (Lau, C. Y.; Russel, W. B. Fundamental Limitations on Ordered Electrohydrodynamic Patterning; Macromolecules 2011, 44, 7746-7751). PMID:25419880

  1. Interface-mediation of lipid bilayer organization and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mize, Hannah E; Blanchard, G J

    2016-06-22

    We report on the morphology and dynamics of planar supported lipid bilayer structures as a function of pH and ionic strength of the aqueous overlayer. Supported lipid bilayers composed of three components (phosphocholine, sphingomyelin and cholesterol) are known to exhibit phase segregation, with the characteristic domain sizes dependent on the amount and identity of each constituent, and the composition of the aqueous overlayer in contact with the bilayer. We report on fluorescence anisotropy decay imaging measurements of a rhodamine chromophore tethered to the headgroup of a phosphoethanolamine, where anisotropy decay images were acquired as a function of solution overlayer pH and ionic strength. The data reveal a two-component anisotropy decay under all conditions, with the faster time constant being largely independent of pH and ionic strength and the slower component depending on pH and ionic strength in different manners. For liposomes of the same composition, a single exponential anisotropy decay was seen. We interpret this difference in terms of bilayer curvature and support surface-bilayer interactions, and the pH and ionic strength dependencies in terms of ionic screening and protonation in the bilayer headgroup region. PMID:27295126

  2. Predicting proton titration in cationic micelle and bilayer environments

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, Brian H.; Shen, Jana K.; Eike, David M.; Murch, Bruce P.; Koenig, Peter H.

    2014-08-28

    Knowledge of the protonation behavior of pH-sensitive molecules in micelles and bilayers has significant implications in consumer product development and biomedical applications. However, the calculation of pK{sub a}’s in such environments proves challenging using traditional structure-based calculations. Here we apply all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics with explicit ions and titratable water to calculate the pK{sub a} of a fatty acid molecule in a micelle of dodecyl trimethylammonium chloride and liquid as well as gel-phase bilayers of diethyl ester dimethylammonium chloride. Interestingly, the pK{sub a} of the fatty acid in the gel bilayer is 5.4, 0.4 units lower than that in the analogous liquid bilayer or micelle, despite the fact that the protonated carboxylic group is significantly more desolvated in the gel bilayer. This work illustrates the capability of all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics in capturing the delicate balance in the free energies of desolvation and Coulombic interactions. It also shows the importance of the explicit treatment of ions in sampling the protonation states. The ability to model dynamics of pH-responsive substrates in a bilayer environment is useful for improving fabric care products as well as our understanding of the side effects of anti-inflammatory drugs.

  3. Robustly Engineering Thermal Conductivity of Bilayer Graphene by Interlayer Bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Gao, Yufei; Chen, Yuli; Hu, Ming

    2016-02-01

    Graphene and its bilayer structure are the two-dimensional crystalline form of carbon, whose extraordinary electron mobility and other unique features hold great promise for nanoscale electronics and photonics. Their realistic applications in emerging nanoelectronics usually call for thermal transport manipulation in a controllable and precise manner. In this paper we systematically studied the effect of interlayer covalent bonding, in particular different interlay bonding arrangement, on the thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. It is revealed that, the thermal conductivity of randomly bonded bilayer graphene decreases monotonically with the increase of interlayer bonding density, however, for the regularly bonded bilayer graphene structure the thermal conductivity possesses unexpectedly non-monotonic dependence on the interlayer bonding density. The results suggest that the thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene depends not only on the interlayer bonding density, but also on the detailed topological configuration of the interlayer bonding. The underlying mechanism for this abnormal phenomenon is identified by means of phonon spectral energy density, participation ratio and mode weight factor analysis. The large tunability of thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene through rational interlayer bonding arrangement paves the way to achieve other desired properties for potential nanoelectronics applications involving graphene layers.

  4. Rigidification of neutral lipid bilayers in the presence of salts.

    PubMed

    Pabst, Georg; Hodzic, Aden; Strancar, Janez; Danner, Sabine; Rappolt, Michael; Laggner, Peter

    2007-10-15

    We studied the influence of sodium and calcium chloride on the global and local membrane properties of fluid palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayers, applying synchrotron small-angle x-ray diffraction, spin-labeling electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry, as well as simultaneous density and acoustic measurements. The salt concentration was varied over a wide range from 0 to 5 M. We found that NaCl leads to a continuous swelling of the bilayers, whereas the behavior of the bilayer separation dW in the presence of CaCl2 is more complex, showing an initial large dW value, which decreased upon further addition of salt and finally increased again in the high concentration regime. This can be understood by a change of balance between electrostatic and van der Waals interactions. We were further able to show that both salts lead to a significant increase of order within the lipid bilayer, leading to a decrease of bilayer elasticity and shift of main phase transition temperature. This effect is more pronounced for Ca2+, and occurs mainly in the high salt-concentration regime. Thus, we were able to reconcile previous controversies between molecular dynamics simulations and x-ray diffraction experiments regarding the effect of salts on neutral lipid bilayers. PMID:17586572

  5. Lipid domains in supported lipid bilayer for atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wan-Chen; Blanchette, Craig D; Ratto, Timothy V; Longo, Marjorie L

    2007-01-01

    Phase-separated supported lipid bilayers have been widely used to study the phase behavior of multicomponent lipid mixtures. One of the primary advantages of using supported lipid bilayers is that the two-dimensional platform of this model membrane system readily allows lipid-phase separation to be characterized by high-resolution imaging techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM). In addition, when supported lipid bilayers have been functionalized with a specific ligand, protein-membrane interactions can also be imaged and characterized through AFM. It has been recently demonstrated that when the technique of vesicle fusion is used to prepare supported lipid bilayers, the thermal history of the vesicles before deposition and the supported lipid bilayers after formation will have significant effects on the final phase-separated domain structures. In this chapter, three methods of vesicle preparations as well as three deposition conditions will be presented. Also, the techniques and strategies of using AFM to image multicomponent phase-separated supported lipid bilayers and protein binding will be discussed. PMID:17951756

  6. Microporous device for local electric recordings on model lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufeld, Theresa; Steinem, Claudia; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2015-01-01

    A powerful approach for characterizing lipid membranes and embedded proteins is the reconstitution of model lipid bilayers. The extreme fragility of 5 nm thick bilayers is a challenge for device design and requires a trade off of stability against accessibility. We here present a microporous lab-on-chip device that allows us to form stable, solvent-free lipid bilayers from giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) in a geometry that provides a unique set of access possibilities. The device is constructed around a micro-fabricated silicon chip with clusters of 1 µm-diameter pores and provides optical access to the lipid bilayers for high-NA epifluorescence imaging. At the same time, solvent exchange is possible on both sides of the lipid bilayer. Complete coverage can be achieved with GUVs, so that voltages can be applied across the lipid bilayer and single-channel currents can be measured using external or integrated silver/silver chloride electrodes. We describe the micro-fabrication by standard cleanroom techniques and the characterization of the device by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and impedance spectroscopy. In proof-of-concept experiments we demonstrate that the device is capable of low-noise, single-ion-channel recordings. Electronic Supplementary Information (ESI) available: See DOI: 10.1039/b000000x/

  7. Predicting proton titration in cationic micelle and bilayer environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, Brian H.; Eike, David M.; Murch, Bruce P.; Koenig, Peter H.; Shen, Jana K.

    2014-08-01

    Knowledge of the protonation behavior of pH-sensitive molecules in micelles and bilayers has significant implications in consumer product development and biomedical applications. However, the calculation of pKa's in such environments proves challenging using traditional structure-based calculations. Here we apply all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics with explicit ions and titratable water to calculate the pKa of a fatty acid molecule in a micelle of dodecyl trimethylammonium chloride and liquid as well as gel-phase bilayers of diethyl ester dimethylammonium chloride. Interestingly, the pKa of the fatty acid in the gel bilayer is 5.4, 0.4 units lower than that in the analogous liquid bilayer or micelle, despite the fact that the protonated carboxylic group is significantly more desolvated in the gel bilayer. This work illustrates the capability of all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics in capturing the delicate balance in the free energies of desolvation and Coulombic interactions. It also shows the importance of the explicit treatment of ions in sampling the protonation states. The ability to model dynamics of pH-responsive substrates in a bilayer environment is useful for improving fabric care products as well as our understanding of the side effects of anti-inflammatory drugs.

  8. Different oxidized phospholipid molecules unequally affect bilayer packing.

    PubMed

    Megli, Francesco M; Russo, Luciana

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain more detailed knowledge about the effect of the presence of defined oxidized phospholipid molecules in phospholipid bilayers. After chromatographic and mass spectrometry analysis, the previously used product of the Fenton reaction with unsaturated lecithins proved to consist of a plethora of oxidatively modified lecithins, useless either for the detailed study of the effects brought about in the bilayer or as the source of defined oxidized phospholipid molecules. The latter, particularly 2-(omega-carboxyacyl)- and 2-(n-hydroperoxyacyl)-lecithins, can be more conveniently prepared by chemical or enzymatic synthesis rather than by chemical or physical oxidation. The effect of those molecules and of commercially available 12-hydroxy-stearic and dodecanedioic acid was studied in planar supported phospholipid bilayers (SPBs) by use of EPR spectrometry. The SPBs also contained 2-(5-doxylstearoyl)-lecithin as the spin probe, and the EPR spectral anisotropy loss, indicative of bilayer disordering, was measured as a function of the molar percentage of oxidized lipid. Most oxidized lipid molecules examined in this study were able to induce bilayer disordering, while hydroperoxyl group-bearing acyl chains appeared to be much less effective. It is concluded that the effects of different oxidized phospholipids on phospholipid bilayer structure cannot be generalized, as happens with batch-oxidized phospholipids, and that the use of defined oxidized phospholipid molecular species for membrane oxidative stress guarantees a more reliable and detailed response. PMID:18054893

  9. Robustly Engineering Thermal Conductivity of Bilayer Graphene by Interlayer Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Gao, Yufei; Chen, Yuli; Hu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Graphene and its bilayer structure are the two-dimensional crystalline form of carbon, whose extraordinary electron mobility and other unique features hold great promise for nanoscale electronics and photonics. Their realistic applications in emerging nanoelectronics usually call for thermal transport manipulation in a controllable and precise manner. In this paper we systematically studied the effect of interlayer covalent bonding, in particular different interlay bonding arrangement, on the thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. It is revealed that, the thermal conductivity of randomly bonded bilayer graphene decreases monotonically with the increase of interlayer bonding density, however, for the regularly bonded bilayer graphene structure the thermal conductivity possesses unexpectedly non-monotonic dependence on the interlayer bonding density. The results suggest that the thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene depends not only on the interlayer bonding density, but also on the detailed topological configuration of the interlayer bonding. The underlying mechanism for this abnormal phenomenon is identified by means of phonon spectral energy density, participation ratio and mode weight factor analysis. The large tunability of thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene through rational interlayer bonding arrangement paves the way to achieve other desired properties for potential nanoelectronics applications involving graphene layers. PMID:26911859

  10. Mechanism of unassisted ion transport across membrane bilayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.

    1996-01-01

    To establish how charged species move from water to the nonpolar membrane interior and to determine the energetic and structural effects accompanying this process, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of the transport of Na+ and Cl- across a lipid bilayer located between two water lamellae. The total length of molecular dynamics trajectories generated for each ion was 10 ns. Our simulations demonstrate that permeation of ions into the membrane is accompanied by the formation of deep, asymmetric thinning defects in the bilayer, whereby polar lipid head groups and water penetrate the nonpolar membrane interior. Once the ion crosses the midplane of the bilayer the deformation "switches sides"; the initial defect slowly relaxes, and a defect forms in the outgoing side of the bilayer. As a result, the ion remains well solvated during the process; the total number of oxygen atoms from water and lipid head groups in the first solvation shell remains constant. A similar membrane deformation is formed when the ion is instantaneously inserted into the interior of the bilayer. The formation of defects considerably lowers the free energy barrier to transfer of the ion across the bilayer and, consequently, increases the permeabilities of the membrane to ions, compared to the rigid, planar structure, by approximately 14 orders of magnitude. Our results have implications for drug delivery using liposomes and peptide insertion into membranes.

  11. Structure and Stability of the Spinach Aquaporin SoPIP2;1 in Detergent Micelles and Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Plasencia, Inés; Survery, Sabeen; Ibragimova, Sania; Hansen, Jesper S.; Kjellbom, Per; Helix-Nielsen, Claus; Johanson, Urban; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    2011-01-01

    Background SoPIP2;1 constitutes one of the major integral proteins in spinach leaf plasma membranes and belongs to the aquaporin family. SoPIP2;1 is a highly permeable and selective water channel that has been successfully overexpressed and purified with high yields. In order to optimize reconstitution of the purified protein into biomimetic systems, we have here for the first time characterized the structural stability of SoPIP2;1. Methodology/Principal Finding We have characterized the protein structural stability after purification and after reconstitution into detergent micelles and proteoliposomes using circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. The structure of SoPIP2;1 was analyzed either with the protein solubilized with octyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (OG) or reconstituted into lipid membranes formed by E. coli lipids, diphytanoylphosphatidylcholine (DPhPC), or reconstituted into lipid membranes formed from mixtures of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPE), 1-palmitoyl-2oleoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (POPE), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylserine (POPS), and ergosterol. Generally, SoPIP2;1 secondary structure was found to be predominantly α-helical in accordance with crystallographic data. The protein has a high thermal structural stability in detergent solutions, with an irreversible thermal unfolding occurring at a melting temperature of 58°C. Incorporation of the protein into lipid membranes increases the structural stability as evidenced by an increased melting temperature of up to 70°C. Conclusion/Significance The results of this study provide insights into SoPIP2;1 stability in various host membranes and suggest suitable choices of detergent and lipid composition for reconstitution of SoPIP2;1 into biomimetic membranes for biotechnological applications. PMID:21339815

  12. Localized plasmons in bilayer graphene nanodisks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weihua; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2016-04-01

    We study localized plasmonic excitations in bilayer graphene (BLG) nanodisks, comparing AA-stacked and AB-stacked BLG and contrasting the results to the case of two monolayers without electronic hybridization. The electrodynamic response of the BLG electron gas is described in terms of a spatially homogeneous surface conductivity, and an efficient alternative two-dimensional electrostatic approach is employed to carry out all the numerical calculations of plasmon resonances. Due to unique electronic band structures, the resonance frequency of the traditional dipolar plasmonic mode in the AA-stacked BLG nanodisk is roughly doping independent in the low-doping regime, while the mode is highly damped as the Fermi level approaches the interlayer hopping energy γ associated with tunneling of electrons between the two layers. In addition to the traditional dipolar mode, we find that the AB-stacked BLG nanodisk also hosts a new plasmonic mode with energy larger than γ . This mode can be tuned by either the doping level or structural size, and, furthermore, this mode can dominate the plasmonic response for realistic structural conditions.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of sphingomyelin bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Bruzik, K.S.; Sobon, B.; Salamonczyk, G.M. )

    1990-04-24

    Bilayers of D-erythro-(N-stearoylsphingosyl)-1-phosphocholine (C{sub l8}-SPM), previously characterized by differential scanning calorimetry in various phases, were studied by means of wide-line {sup 31}P, {sup 2}H, high-resolution {sup 13}C CP-MAS, and {sup 1}H MAS NMR. The fully relaxed gel phase of C{sub 18}-SPM at temperatures below 306 K displayed {sup 31}P NMR spectra characteristic of the rigid phase with frozen rotation of the phosphocholine head group. Three other gel phases existing in the temperature range 306-318 K displayed spectra with incompletely averaged axially symmetric powder line shapes and were difficult to differentiate on the basis of their {sup 31}P NMR spectra. The gel-to-gel transition at 306 K was found to be fully reversible. The main phase transition at 318 K resulted in the formation of the liquid-crystalline phase for which spectra with axially symmetric line shapes of uniform width were obtained, regardless of the nature of the starting gel phase. {sup 13}C CP-MAS NMR spectra revealed significant differences in the molecular dynamics of sphingomyelin in various phases. All carbon atoms of the polar head group in the liquid-crystalline phase gave rise to a separate resonance lines. Numerous carbon atom signals were doubled in the stable phase, demonstrating the existence of two slowly interconverting conformers.

  14. Exceptional Optoelectronic Properties of Hydrogenated Bilayer Silicene

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Bing; Yoon, Mina; Smith, Sean C; Wei, Su-Huai; Deng, Hui-Xiong; Liu, Feng; Lee, Hoonkyung; Sumpter, Bobby G

    2014-01-01

    Silicon is arguably the best electronic material, but not as good an optoelectronic material. By employing first-principles calculations and the cluster-expansion approach, we discover that hydrogenated bilayer silicene (BS) shows promising potential as a new kind of optoelectronic material. Most significantly, hydrogenation converts the intrinsic BS, a strongly indirect semiconductor, into a direct-gap semiconductor with a widely tunable bandgap. At low hydrogen concentrations, four ground states of single- and double-side hydrogenated BS are characterized with dipole-allowed direct (or quasidirect) bandgaps in the desirable range from 1 to 1.5 eV, suitable for solar applications. At high hydrogen concentrations, three well-ordered double-side hydrogenated BS structures exhibit direct (or quasidirect) bandgaps in the color range of red, green, and blue, affording white light-emitting diodes. Our findings open opportunities to search for new silicon-based light-absorption and light-emitting materials for earth-abundant, high-efficiency, optoelectronic applications.

  15. Detection of bilayer lipid with graphene nanoribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Elnaz; Buntat, Zolkafle; Afroozeh, Abdolkarim; Zeinalinezhad, Alireza; Nilashi, Mehrbakhsh

    2015-09-01

    Single-layer graphene consists of sp 2-bonded carbon atoms arranged in a two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal lattice comprising a thin layer of single carbon atoms. Owing to its special characteristics including electrical, physical, and optical properties, graphene is considered more suitable for sensor applications than other materials. Moreover, it is possible to produce biosensors using electrolyte-gated field-effect transistors based on graphene (GFETs) to identify the alterations in charged lipid membrane properties. This paper illustrates how membrane thickness and electrical charge can result in a monolayer GFET, with emphasis on conductance variation. It is proposed that the thickness and electrical charge of the lipid bilayer are functions of carrier density, and equations relating these suitable control parameters were derived. Adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) has been incorporated to obtain other model for conductance characteristic. The comparison between the analytical models and ANFIS with the experimental data extracted from previous work show an acceptable agreement. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Spin Hall Magnetoresistance in Metallic Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junyeon; Sheng, Peng; Takahashi, Saburo; Mitani, Seiji; Hayashi, Masamitsu

    2016-03-01

    Spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) is studied in metallic bilayers that consist of a heavy metal (HM) layer and a ferromagnetic metal (FM) layer. We find a nearly tenfold increase of SMR in W/CoFeB compared to previously studied HM/ferromagnetic insulator systems. The SMR increases with decreasing temperature despite the negligible change in the W layer resistivity. A model is developed to account for the absorption of the longitudinal spin current to the FM layer, one of the key characteristics of a metallic ferromagnet. We find that the model not only quantitatively describes the HM layer thickness dependence of SMR, allowing accurate estimation of the spin Hall angle and the spin diffusion length of the HM layer, but also can account for the temperature dependence of SMR by assuming a temperature dependent spin polarization of the FM layer. These results illustrate the unique role a metallic ferromagnetic layer plays in defining spin transmission across the HM/FM interface. PMID:26991195

  17. Thermoelectric power in a bilayer graphene device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yung-Yu, Chien; Hongtao, Yuan; Chang-Ran, Wang; Chun-Hsuan, Lin; Wei-Li, Lee; Geballe LaboratoryAdvanced Materials Collaboration; Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan Team

    2014-03-01

    There have been great interests on band gap engineering in a bilayer graphene (BLG) device, where inversion symmetry breaking by a perpendicular electric field can give rise to a sizable band gap. In our previous works, we have demonstrated a large enhancement in the thermoelectric power (TEP) associated with the band gap opening in a dual-gated BLG device. It is, therefore, an interesting question to ask whether even larger TEP can be achieved with a larger perpendicular electric field applied. We explored such possibility by utilizing the ionic liquid gating technique in BLG devices. By controlling the side gate voltage of ionic liquid and the bottom gate voltage via SiO2/Si substrate, large increase of the sheet resistance at charge neutral point was observed suggesting the opening of a band gap. At T = 120 K, TEP increases by more than 44% with a side gate voltage of ~ 1V. The influence of charge puddles to TEP using ionic liquid gating will be discussed.

  18. Magnetic Irreversibility in VO2/Ni Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Venta, Jose; Lauzier, Josh; Sutton, Logan

    The temperature dependence of the coercivity and magnetization of VO2/Ni bilayers was studied. VO2 exhibits a well-known Structural Phase Transition (SPT) at 330-340 K, from a low temperature monoclinic (M) to a high temperature rutile (R) structure. The SPT of VO2 induces an inverse magnetoelastic effect that strongly modifies the coercivity and magnetization of the Ni films. In addition, the growth conditions allow tuning of the magnetic properties. Ni films deposited on top of VO2 (M) show an irreversible change in the coercivity after the first cycle through the high temperature phase, with a corresponding change in the surface morphology of VO2. On the other hand, the Ni films grown on top of VO2 (R) do not show this irreversibility. These results indicate that properties of magnetic films are strongly affected by the strain induced by materials that undergo SPT and that it is possible to control the magnetic properties by tuning the growth conditions.

  19. Control cell adhesion with dynamic bilayer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourouklis, Andreas; Lerum, Ronald; Bermudez, Harry

    2012-02-01

    Interfacially-directed assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers was employed to create ultrathin films having the potential to correlate the dynamics of ECM cues with cell adhesion and cytoskeletally-generated forces. The mobility of the polymeric bilayer films were tuned by the incorporation of hydrophobic homopolymer chains, which are thought to reduce interlayer friction. Labeling of the block copolymer chains with an adhesive peptide ligand (RGD) provided a specific means to study integrin-mediated cellular processes and the corresponding mechanotransduction. By seeding anchorage-dependent cells on ``dynamic'' (laterally mobile) and ``static'' films that display the same amount of RGD, we have found that cells recognize the difference in RGD diffusivity and develop distinct responses over time. We intend to examine changes in cell response by controlling the extent of cytoskeletally-generated forces and the assembly dynamics of focal adhesion complexes. Such films provide a unique platform to unveil the biomechanical signals related with ECM dynamics, and may ultimately facilitate a deeper understanding of cellular processes.

  20. Specific RNA binding to ordered phospholipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Janas, Tadeusz; Janas, Teresa; Yarus, Michael

    2006-01-01

    We have studied RNA binding to vesicles bounded by ordered and disordered phospholipid membranes. A positive correlation exists between bilayer order and RNA affinity. In particular, structure-dependent RNA binding appears for rafted (liquid-ordered) domains in sphingomyelin-cholesterol-1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine vesicles. Binding to more highly ordered gel phase membranes is stronger, but much less RNA structure-dependent. All modes of RNA-membrane association seem to be electrostatic and headgroup directed. Fluorometry on 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes indicates that bound RNA broadens the gel-fluid melting transition, and reduces lipid headgroup order, as detected via fluorometric measurement of intramembrane electric fields. RNA preference for rafted lipid was visualized and confirmed using multiple fluorophores that allow fluorescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy on RNA molecules closely associated with ordered lipid patches within giant vesicles. Accordingly, both RNA structure and membrane order could modulate biological RNA–membrane interactions. PMID:16641318

  1. Structural Proton Diffusion along Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Serowy, Steffen; Saparov, Sapar M.; Antonenko, Yuri N.; Kozlovsky, Wladas; Hagen, Volker; Pohl, Peter

    2003-01-01

    For H+ transport between protein pumps, lateral diffusion along membrane surfaces represents the most efficient pathway. Along lipid bilayers, we measured a diffusion coefficient of 5.8 × 10−5 cm2 s−1. It is too large to be accounted for by vehicle diffusion, considering proton transport by acid carriers. Such a speed of migration is accomplished only by the Grotthuss mechanism involving the chemical exchange of hydrogen nuclei between hydrogen-bonded water molecules on the membrane surface, and the subsequent reorganization of the hydrogen-bonded network. Reconstitution of H+-binding sites on the membrane surface decreased the velocity of H+ diffusion. In the absence of immobile buffers, structural (Grotthuss) diffusion occurred over a distance of 100 μm as shown by microelectrode aided measurements of the spatial proton distribution in the immediate membrane vicinity and spatially resolved fluorescence measurements of interfacial pH. The efficiency of the anomalously fast lateral diffusion decreased gradually with an increase in mobile buffer concentration suggesting that structural diffusion is physiologically important for distances of ∼10 nm. PMID:12547784

  2. Terahertz conductivity of twisted bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, Elbert E. M.; Zou, Xingquan; Shang, Jingzhi; Leaw, Jianing; Luo, Zhiqiang; Luo, Liyan; Cheong, Siew Ann; Su, Haibin; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Castro Neto, A. H.; Yu, Ting

    2013-03-01

    Using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, the real part of optical conductivity [σ1 (ω) ] of twisted bilayer graphene was obtained at different temperatures (10 - 300 K) in the frequency range 0.3 - 3 THz. On top of a Drude-like response, we see a strong and narrow peak in σ1 (ω) at ~2.7 THz. We analyze the overall Drude-like response using a disorder-dependent (unitary scattering) model, then attribute the peak at 2.7 THz to an enhanced density of states at that energy, that is caused by the presence of van Hove singularities arising from a commensurate twisting of the two graphene layers. Singapore MOE AcRF Tier 2 (ARC 23/08), NRF-CRP (NRF-CRP4-2008-04), NNSA of the U.S. DOE at LANL (DE-AC52-06NA25396), LANL LDRD Program, NRF-CRP (R-144-000-295-281), DOE DE-FG02-08ER46512, ONR MURI N00014-09-1-1063.

  3. Properties of bilayer contacts to porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallach, D.; Torres-Costa, V.; García-Pelayo, L.; Climent-Font, A.; Martín-Palma, R. J.; Barreiros-das-Santos, M.; Sporer, C.; Samitier, J.; Manso, M.

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the present work is the growth by PVD techniques and ulterior characterization of electrical contacts to columnar porous silicon (PSi) as an approach to reliable PSi sensor devices. Contacts consist of a NiCr (40:60) and Au bilayer on the PSi surface deposited by magnetron sputtering. These structures show a good adhesion to the rough surface of columnar PSi. The morphology of these electrical contacts is characterized by electron microscopy and their crystalline structure by X-ray diffraction. Compositional profiles are determined by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, which demonstrate that the infiltration of NiCr into the PSi is at the origin of the metallic thin film adhesion improvement. I- V characteristics and impedance spectroscopy measurements show that this configuration provides rectifying electrical contacts to PSi, for which a simple equivalent circuit based on one resistor and two capacitors can be modeled. These results further support the use of PSi electrical structures for sensing purposes.

  4. Investigation of the elastic properties of a lipid bilayer by fluorescence interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Dong; Lin, Hsiang-Ku; Noruzifar, Ehsan; Pryadko, Leonid; Zandi, Roya; Mohideen, Umar

    2012-02-01

    Freestanding curved lipid bilayers were formed on micron diameter wells fabricated on a silicon chip. The height profile of the lipid bilayers was measured using fluorescence interference contrast microscopy. Dark and bright rings resulted from the interference of emission from the fluorophores in the lipid bilayers with the same light reflected from the bottom surface of the well. By changing the osmotic pressure difference across the bilayers, the relationship between the pressure and the membrane curvature was studied. By using Helfrich theory, the surface tension of the bilayer was extracted. The influence of detergents and antibiotics on the elastic property of lipid bilayers was also investigated.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Hydrophilic Pores in Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Leontiadou, Hari; Mark, Alan E.; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrophilic pores are formed in peptide free lipid bilayers under mechanical stress. It has been proposed that the transport of ionic species across such membranes is largely determined by the existence of such meta-stable hydrophilic pores. To study the properties of these structures and understand the mechanism by which pore expansion leads to membrane rupture, a series of molecular dynamics simulations of a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer have been conducted. The system was simulated in two different states; first, as a bilayer containing a meta-stable pore and second, as an equilibrated bilayer without a pore. Surface tension in both cases was applied to study the formation and stability of hydrophilic pores inside the bilayers. It is observed that below a critical threshold tension of ∼38 mN/m the pores are stabilized. The minimum radius at which a pore can be stabilized is 0.7 nm. Based on the critical threshold tension the line tension of the bilayer was estimated to be ∼3 × 10−11 N, in good agreement with experimental measurements. The flux of water molecules through these stabilized pores was analyzed, and the structure and size of the pores characterized. When the lateral pressure exceeds the threshold tension, the pores become unstable and start to expand causing the rupture of the membrane. In the simulations the mechanical threshold tension necessary to cause rupture of the membrane on a nanosecond timescale is much higher in the case of the equilibrated bilayers, as compared with membranes containing preexisting pores. PMID:15041656

  6. Micropatterned, multicomponent supported lipid bilayers for cellular systems.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debjit; Kam, Lance C

    2014-01-01

    Lipid bilayer membranes are a central structural feature of living cells, providing a wide range of functions including partitioning of organelles, mediating cell interaction with the environment, and modulating intracellular signaling processes. By capturing the fluidity of the natural membranes in a reductionist in vitro model, substrate supported lipid bilayers have emerged as a compelling model system for these structures. Furthermore, the ability to control the composition and mobility of this system at micro- and nanoscales inspired several new routes of biological and biotechnological investigation. Here, we describe key methods used to create multicomponent lipid bilayers, discuss design considerations important to making these systems, and demonstrate this process in the specific context of understanding juxtacrine cell signaling. Different fabrication techniques were combined to first pattern a surface with barriers to lipid diffusion and then spatially control the exposure of this surface to lipid vesicles, leading to local formation of bilayers of different composition. This multicomponent system was used as a platform for to mimic the natural organization of T cells and antigen presenting cells by presenting ligands to the T cell receptor and lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 that are tethered to separate, closely juxtaposed regions of bilayer. Other technologies like using photochemical polymerization of lipids to pattern bilayers have also been discussed. The information gathered from evaluating membrane interactions in patterned lipid bilayers may lead to the development of membrane-based biomedical devices for conducting novel cell-based assays and potentially high-throughput drug screens targeting membranes or membrane-associated components. PMID:24484657

  7. Hydrophobic Coupling of Lipid Bilayer Energetics to Channel Function

    PubMed Central

    Goforth, Robyn L.; Chi, Aung K.; Greathouse, Denise V.; Providence, Lyndon L.; Koeppe, Roger E.; Andersen, Olaf S.

    2003-01-01

    The hydrophobic coupling between membrane-spanning proteins and the lipid bilayer core causes the bilayer thickness to vary locally as proteins and other “defects” are embedded in the bilayer. These bilayer deformations incur an energetic cost that, in principle, could couple membrane proteins to each other, causing them to associate in the plane of the membrane and thereby coupling them functionally. We demonstrate the existence of such bilayer-mediated coupling at the single-molecule level using single-barreled as well as double-barreled gramicidin channels in which two gramicidin subunits are covalently linked by a water-soluble, flexible linker. When a covalently attached pair of gramicidin subunits associates with a second attached pair to form a double-barreled channel, the lifetime of both channels in the assembly increases from hundreds of milliseconds to a hundred seconds—and the conductance of each channel in the side-by-side pair is almost 10% higher than the conductance of the corresponding single-barreled channels. The double-barreled channels are stabilized some 100,000-fold relative to their single-barreled counterparts. This stabilization arises from: first, the local increase in monomer concentration around a single-barreled channel formed by two covalently linked gramicidins, which increases the rate of double-barreled channel formation; and second, from the increased lifetime of the double-barreled channels. The latter result suggests that the two barrels of the construct associate laterally. The underlying cause for this lateral association most likely is the bilayer deformation energy associated with channel formation. More generally, the results suggest that the mechanical properties of the host bilayer may cause the kinetics of membrane protein conformational transitions to depend on the conformational states of the neighboring proteins. PMID:12719487

  8. Elastic deformation and failure of lipid bilayer membranes containing cholesterol.

    PubMed Central

    Needham, D; Nunn, R S

    1990-01-01

    Giant bilayer vesicles were reconstituted from several lipids and lipid/cholesterol (CHOL) mixtures: stearolyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (SOPC), bovine sphingomyelin (BSM), diarachidonylphosphatidylcholine (DAPC), SOPC/CHOL, BSM/CHOL, DAPC/CHOL, and extracted red blood cell (RBC) lipids with native cholesterol. Single-walled vesicles were manipulated by micropipette suction and several membrane material properties were determined. The properties measured were the elastic area compressibility modulus K, the critical areal strain alpha c, and the tensile strength tau lys, from which the failure energy or membrane toughness Tf was calculated. The elastic area expansion moduli for these lipid and lipid/cholesterol bilayers ranged from 57 dyn/cm for DAPC to 1,734 dyn/cm for BSM/CHOL. The SOPC/CHOL series and RBC lipids had intermediate values. The results indicated that the presence of cholesterol is the single most influential factor in increasing bilayer cohesion, but only for lipids where both chains are saturated, or mono- or diunsaturated. Multiple unsaturation in both lipid chains inhibits the condensing effect of cholesterol in bilayers. The SOPC/CHOL system was studied in more detail. The area expansion modulus showed a nonlinear increase with increasing cholesterol concentration up to a constant plateau, indicating a saturation limit for cholesterol in the bilayer phase of approximately 55 mol% CHOL. The membrane compressibility was modeled by a property-averaging composite theory involving two bilayer components, namely, uncomplexed lipid and a lipid/cholesterol complex of stoichiometry 1/1.22. The area expansion modulus of this molecular composite membrane was evaluated by a combination of the expansion moduli of each component scaled by their area fractions in the bilayer. Bilayer toughness, which is the energy stored in the bilayer at failure, showed a maximum value at approximately 40 mol% CHOL. This breakdown energy was found to be only a fraction of the

  9. Hydrogel-Stabilized Droplet Bilayers for High Speed Solution Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Shiv A.; Portman, Alexander; Salazar, Carl S.; Schmidt, Jacob J.

    2013-01-01

    Many applications utilizing artificial lipid bilayers require the ability to exchange the bilayer's solution environment. However, because of the instability of the bilayer, the rate of solution exchange is limited, which significantly hinders the measurement rate and throughput. We have developed an artificial bilayer system that can withstand high flow speeds, up to 2.1 m/s, by supporting the bilayer with a hydrogel. We demonstrated the ability to measure during flow by measuring the conductance of gramicidin-A channels while switching between solutions of two different compositions, recording a time to measure 90% change in current of approximately 2.7 seconds at a flow rate of 0.1 m/s. We also demonstrated a potential application of this system by measuring the conductance modulation of the rat TRPM8 ion channel by an agonist and antagonist at varying concentrations, obtaining 7-point IC50 and EC50 values in approximately 7 minutes and 4-point values within 4 minutes. PMID:24190577

  10. Hydrogel-Stabilized Droplet Bilayers for High Speed Solution Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Shiv A.; Portman, Alexander; Salazar, Carl S.; Schmidt, Jacob J.

    2013-11-01

    Many applications utilizing artificial lipid bilayers require the ability to exchange the bilayer's solution environment. However, because of the instability of the bilayer, the rate of solution exchange is limited, which significantly hinders the measurement rate and throughput. We have developed an artificial bilayer system that can withstand high flow speeds, up to 2.1 m/s, by supporting the bilayer with a hydrogel. We demonstrated the ability to measure during flow by measuring the conductance of gramicidin-A channels while switching between solutions of two different compositions, recording a time to measure 90% change in current of approximately 2.7 seconds at a flow rate of 0.1 m/s. We also demonstrated a potential application of this system by measuring the conductance modulation of the rat TRPM8 ion channel by an agonist and antagonist at varying concentrations, obtaining 7-point IC50 and EC50 values in approximately 7 minutes and 4-point values within 4 minutes.

  11. Anomalous conductivity noise in gapped bilayer graphene heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aamir, Mohammed Ali; Karnatak, Paritosh; Sai, T. Phanindra; Ghosh, Arindam

    Bilayer graphene has unique electronic properties - it has a tunable band gap and also, valley symmetry and pseudospin degree of freedom like its single layer counterpart. In this work, we present a study of conductance fluctuations in dual gated bilayer graphene heterostructures by varying the Fermi energy and the band gap independently. At a fixed band gap, we find that the conductance fluctuations obtained by Fermi energy ensemble sampling increase rapidly as the Fermi energy is tuned to charge neutrality point (CNP) whereas the time-dependent conductance fluctuations diminish rapidly. This discrepancy is completely absent at higher number densities, where the transport is expected to be through the 2D bulk of the bilayer system. This observation indicates that near the CNP, electrical transport is highly sensitive to Fermi energy, but becomes progressively immune to time-varying disorder. A possible explanation may involve transport via edge states which becomes the dominant conduction mechanism when the bilayer graphene is gapped and Fermi energy is situated close to the CNP, thereby causing a dimensional crossover from 2D to 1D transport. Our experiment outlines a possible experimental protocol to probe intrinsic topological states in gapped bilayer graphene.

  12. Atomistic mechanisms for bilayer growth of graphene on metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Cui, Ping; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Gao, Yanfei; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2015-01-01

    Epitaxial growth on metal substrates has been shown to be the most powerful approach in producing large-scale high-quality monolayer graphene, yet it remains a major challenge to realize uniform bilayer graphene growth. Here we carry out a comparative study of the atomistic mechanisms for bilayer graphene growth on the (111) surfaces of Cu and Ni, using multiscale approaches combining first-principles calculations and rate-equation analysis. We first show that the relatively weak graphene-Cu interaction enhances the lateral diffusion and effective nucleation of C atoms underneath the graphene island, thereby making it more feasible to grow bilayer graphene on Cu. In contrast, the stronger graphene-Ni interaction suppresses the lateral mobility and dimerization of C atoms underneath the graphene, making it unlikely to achieve controlled growth of bilayer graphene on Ni. We then determine the critical graphene size beyond which nucleation of the second layer will take place. Intriguingly, the critical size exhibits an effective inverse "Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier" effect, becoming smaller for faster C migration from the Cu surface to the graphene-Cu interface sites across the graphene edge. These findings allow us to propose a novel alternating growth scheme to realize mass production of bilayer graphene.

  13. Naphthalene Derivatives Induce Acyl Chain Interdigitation in Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Md Arif; Raghunathan, V A

    2016-01-14

    The interdigitated phase of the lipid bilayer results when acyl chains from opposing monolayers fully interpenetrate such that the terminal methyl groups of the respective lipid chains are located at the interfacial region on the opposite sides of the bilayer. Usually, chain interdigitation is not encountered in a symmetric chain phosphatidylcholine (PC) membrane but can be induced under certain special conditions. In this article, we elucidate the contribution of small amphiphatic molecules in altering the physical properties of a symmetric chain PC bilayer membrane, which results in acyl chain interdigitation. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we have carried out a systematic investigation of the physical interactions of three naphthalene derivatives containing hydroxyl groups: β-naphthol, 2,3-dihydroxynaphthalene, and 2,7-dihydroxynaphthalene, with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers. On the basis of the diffraction patterns, we have determined the temperature-composition phase diagrams of these binary mixtures. The present study not only enables us to gain insight into the role played by small molecules in altering the packing arrangement of the acyl chains of the constituting PC lipids of the bilayer but also brings to light some important features that have not yet been reported hitherto. One such feature is the stabilization of the enigmatic asymmetric ripple phase over a wide temperature and concentration range. The results presented here strongly point toward a clear correlation between chain interdigitation and the stability of the ripple phase. PMID:26687052

  14. Biophysical implications of lipid bilayer rheometry for mechanosensitive channels.

    PubMed

    Bavi, Navid; Nakayama, Yoshitaka; Bavi, Omid; Cox, Charles D; Qin, Qing-Hua; Martinac, Boris

    2014-09-23

    The lipid bilayer plays a crucial role in gating of mechanosensitive (MS) channels. Hence it is imperative to elucidate the rheological properties of lipid membranes. Herein we introduce a framework to characterize the mechanical properties of lipid bilayers by combining micropipette aspiration (MA) with theoretical modeling. Our results reveal that excised liposome patch fluorometry is superior to traditional cell-attached MA for measuring the intrinsic mechanical properties of lipid bilayers. The computational results also indicate that unlike the uniform bilayer tension estimated by Laplace's law, bilayer tension is not uniform across the membrane patch area. Instead, the highest tension is seen at the apex of the patch and the lowest tension is encountered near the pipette wall. More importantly, there is only a negligible difference between the stress profiles of the outer and inner monolayers in the cell-attached configuration, whereas a substantial difference (∼30%) is observed in the excised configuration. Our results have far-reaching consequences for the biophysical studies of MS channels and ion channels in general, using the patch-clamp technique, and begin to unravel the difference in activity seen between MS channels in different experimental paradigms. PMID:25201991

  15. Spatially Indirect Exciton Condensates in Double Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jung-Jung; MacDonald, Allan H.

    Many-body interaction effects have a strong influence on the low-energy electronic properties of graphene bilayers because of the nearly quadratic dispersion at the K/K' band-crossing points. In the single graphene bilayer systems, the ground state has an energy gap thought to be a consequence of spin-density wave order and other competing ordered states are believed to be nearby in energy. In systems with two closely spacing bilayer, spatially indirect exciton states are expected in neutral systems with inter-bilayer charge transfer. This transfer can be achieved by applying either a vertical electrical displacement fields or an interbilayer potential bias. Here we report that the different combinations of displacement field and potential bias can give rise to different types of indirect exciton condensate states that are distinguished by the two-dimensional momentum dependence of the spontaneous inter-bilayer coherence. In general a displacement field prefers an excitonic condensate in which the phase coherence between the inner two layers of the four layer system, while the potential bias prefers momentum-independent coherence between remote layers. The complete phase diagram reported exhibits excitonic coherence states mentioned above, and more interestingly, their mixtures.

  16. Modeling Nanoparticle Wrapping or Translocation in Bilayer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Emily M.; Bahrami, Amir H.; Weikl, Thomas R.; Hall, Carol K.

    2015-01-01

    The spontaneous wrapping of nanoparticles by membranes is of increasing interest as nanoparticles become more prevalent in consumer products and hence more likely to enter the human body. We introduce a simulations-based tool that can be used to visualize the molecular level interaction between nanoparticles and bilayer membranes. By combining LIME, an intermediate resolution, implicit solvent model for phospholipids, with discontinuous molecular dynamics (DMD), we are able to simulate the wrapping or embedding of nanoparticles by 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayer membranes. Simulations of hydrophilic nanoparticles with diameters from 10Å to 250Å show that hydrophilic nanoparticles with diameters greater than 20Å become wrapped while the nanoparticle with a diameter of 10Å does not . Instead this smaller particle became embedded in the bilayer surface where it could interact with the hydrophilic head groups of the lipid molecules. We also investigate the interaction between a DPPC bilayer and hydrophobic nanoparticles with diameters 10Å to 40Å. These nanoparticles do not undergo the wrapping process; instead they directly penetrate the membrane and embed themselves within the inner hydrophobic core of the bilayers. PMID:26260123

  17. Atomistic mechanisms for bilayer growth of graphene on metal substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei; Cui, Ping; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Gao, Yanfei; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2015-01-08

    Epitaxial growth on metal substrates has been shown to be the most powerful approach in producing large-scale high-quality monolayer graphene, yet it remains a major challenge to realize uniform bilayer graphene growth. Here we carry out a comparative study of the atomistic mechanisms for bilayer graphene growth on the (111) surfaces of Cu and Ni, using multiscale approaches combining first-principles calculations and rate-equation analysis. We first show that the relatively weak graphene-Cu interaction enhances the lateral diffusion and effective nucleation of C atoms underneath the graphene island, thereby making it more feasible to grow bilayer graphene on Cu. In contrast, the stronger graphene-Ni interaction suppresses the lateral mobility and dimerization of C atoms underneath the graphene, making it unlikely to achieve controlled growth of bilayer graphene on Ni. We then determine the critical graphene size beyond which nucleation of the second layer will take place. Intriguingly, the critical size exhibits an effective inverse "Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier" effect, becoming smaller for faster C migration from the Cu surface to the graphene-Cu interface sites across the graphene edge. Lastly, these findings allow us to propose a novel alternating growth scheme to realize mass production of bilayer graphene.

  18. Atomistic mechanisms for bilayer growth of graphene on metal substrates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Wei; Cui, Ping; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Gao, Yanfei; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2015-01-08

    Epitaxial growth on metal substrates has been shown to be the most powerful approach in producing large-scale high-quality monolayer graphene, yet it remains a major challenge to realize uniform bilayer graphene growth. Here we carry out a comparative study of the atomistic mechanisms for bilayer graphene growth on the (111) surfaces of Cu and Ni, using multiscale approaches combining first-principles calculations and rate-equation analysis. We first show that the relatively weak graphene-Cu interaction enhances the lateral diffusion and effective nucleation of C atoms underneath the graphene island, thereby making it more feasible to grow bilayer graphene on Cu. In contrast,more » the stronger graphene-Ni interaction suppresses the lateral mobility and dimerization of C atoms underneath the graphene, making it unlikely to achieve controlled growth of bilayer graphene on Ni. We then determine the critical graphene size beyond which nucleation of the second layer will take place. Intriguingly, the critical size exhibits an effective inverse "Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier" effect, becoming smaller for faster C migration from the Cu surface to the graphene-Cu interface sites across the graphene edge. Lastly, these findings allow us to propose a novel alternating growth scheme to realize mass production of bilayer graphene.« less

  19. Assessment of pseudo-bilayer structures in the heterogate germanium electron-hole bilayer tunnel field-effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, J. L. Alper, C.; Ionescu, A. M.; Medina-Bailón, C.; Gámiz, F.

    2015-06-29

    We investigate the effect of pseudo-bilayer configurations at low operating voltages (≤0.5 V) in the heterogate germanium electron-hole bilayer tunnel field-effect transistor (HG-EHBTFET) compared to the traditional bilayer structures of EHBTFETs arising from semiclassical simulations where the inversion layers for electrons and holes featured very symmetric profiles with similar concentration levels at the ON-state. Pseudo-bilayer layouts are attained by inducing a certain asymmetry between the top and the bottom gates so that even though the hole inversion layer is formed at the bottom of the channel, the top gate voltage remains below the required value to trigger the formation of the inversion layer for electrons. Resulting benefits from this setup are improved electrostatic control on the channel, enhanced gate-to-gate efficiency, and higher I{sub ON} levels. Furthermore, pseudo-bilayer configurations alleviate the difficulties derived from confining very high opposite carrier concentrations in very thin structures.

  20. Neutron diffraction studies of amphipathic helices in phospholipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, J.P.; Gilchrist, P.J.; Duff, K.C.; Saxena, A.M.

    1994-12-31

    The structural feature which is thought to facilitate the interaction of many peptides with phospholipid bilayers is the ability to fold into an amphipathic helix. In most cases the exact location and orientation of this helix with respect to the membrane is not known, and may vary with factors such as pH and phospholipid content of the bilayer. The growing interest in this area is stimulated by indications that similar interactions can contribute to the binding of certain hormones to their cell-surface receptors. We have been using the techniques of neutron diffraction from stacked phospholipid bilayers in an attempt to investigate this phenomenon with a number of membrane-active peptides. Here we report some of our findings with three of these: the bee venom melittin; the hormone calcitonin; and a synthetic peptide representing the ion channel fragment of influenza A M2 protein.

  1. Anomalous Spectral Features of a Neutral Bilayer Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, C.-M.; Xie, L.F.; Pachoud, A.; Moser, H.O.; Chen, W.; Wee, A.T.S.; Castro Neto, A.H.; Tsuei, K.-D.; Özyilmaz, B.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene and its bilayer are two-dimensional systems predicted to show exciting many-body effects near the neutrality point. The ideal tool to investigate spectrum reconstruction effects is angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) as it probes directly the band structure with information about both energy and momentum. Here we reveal, by studying undoped exfoliated bilayer graphene with ARPES, two essential aspects of its many-body physics: the electron-phonon scattering rate has an anisotropic k-dependence and the type of electronic liquid is non-Fermi liquid. The latter behavior is evident from an observed electron-electron scattering rate that scales linearly with energy from 100 meV to 600 meV and that is associated with the proximity of bilayer graphene to a two-dimensional quantum critical point of competing orders. PMID:25985064

  2. Electronic transport in B-N substituted bilayer graphene nanojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giofré, Daniele; Ceresoli, Davide; Fratesi, Guido; Trioni, Mario I.

    2016-05-01

    We investigated a suspended bilayer graphene where the bottom/top layer is doped by boron/nitrogen substitutional atoms. By using density functional theory calculations, we found that at high dopant concentration (one B-N pair every 32 C atoms), the electronic structure of the bilayer does not depend on the B-N distance but on the relative occupation of the bilayer graphene sublattices by B and N. The presence of the dopants and the consequent charge transfer establish a built-in electric field between the layers, giving rise to an energy gap. We further investigated the electronic transport properties and found that intralayer current is weakly influenced by the presence of these dopants while the interlayer one is enhanced for biases, allowing an easy tunneling between layers. This effect leads to current rectification in asymmetric junctions.

  3. Interaction driven quantum Hall effect in artificially stacked graphene bilayers.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Siddique, Salma; Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Ramay, Shahid Mahmood; Nam, Jungtae; Kim, Keun Soo; Eom, Jonghwa

    2016-01-01

    The honeycomb lattice structure of graphene gives rise to its exceptional electronic properties of linear dispersion relation and its chiral nature of charge carriers. The exceptional electronic properties of graphene stem from linear dispersion relation and chiral nature of charge carries, originating from its honeycomb lattice structure. Here, we address the quantum Hall effect in artificially stacked graphene bilayers and single layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The quantum Hall plateaus started to appear more than 3 T and became clearer at higher magnetic fields up to 9 T. Shubnikov-de Hass oscillations were manifestly observed in graphene bilayers texture. These unusual plateaus may have been due to the layers interaction in artificially stacked graphene bilayers. Our study initiates the understanding of interactions between artificially stacked graphene layers. PMID:27098387

  4. Molecular-dynamics simulation of a ceramide bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, Sagar A.; Scott, H. Larry

    2006-01-01

    Ceramide is the simplest lipid in the biologically important class of glycosphingolipids. Ceramide is an important signaling molecule and a major component of the strateum corneum layer in the skin. In order to begin to understand the biophysical properties of ceramide, we have carried out a molecular-dynamics simulation of a hydrated 16:0 ceramide lipid bilayer at 368K (5° above the main phase transition). In this paper we describe the simulation and present the resulting properties of the bilayer. We compare the properties of the simulated ceramide bilayer to an earlier simulation of 18:0 sphingomyelin, and we discuss the results as they relate to experimental data for ceramide and other sphingolipids. The most significant differences arise at the lipid/water interface, where the lack of a large ceramide polar group leads to a different electron density and a different electrostatic potential but, surprisingly, not a different overall "dipole potential," when ceramide is compared to sphingomyelin.

  5. Hydrophobic actuation of a DNA origami bilayer structure.

    PubMed

    List, Jonathan; Weber, Michael; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2014-04-14

    Amphiphilic compounds have a strong tendency to form aggregates in aqueous solutions. It is shown that such aggregation can be utilized to fold cholesterol-modified, single-layered DNA origami structures into sandwich-like bilayer structures, which hide the cholesterol modifications in their interior. The DNA bilayer structures unfold after addition of the surfactant Tween 80, and also in the presence of lipid bilayer membranes, with opening kinetics well described by stretched exponentials. It is also demonstrated that by combination with an appropriate lock and key mechanism, hydrophobic actuation of DNA sandwiches can be made conditional on the presence of an additional molecular input such as a specific DNA sequence. PMID:24616083

  6. Magnetoelectric Effects in hexagonal ferrite-PZT bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathe, V. M.; Srinivasan, G.

    2008-03-01

    Magnetoelectric (ME) bilayers consisting of magnetostrictive and a piezoelectric layer are of interest for studies on the nature of ME interactions and useful technologies. Co2Z and Zn2Y are well known hexagonal ferrites with easy plane or uniaxial anisotropy. PZT has high piezoelectric coefficient. This study is on samples with Co2Z or Zn2Y as a magnetostrictive layer and PZT as a piezoelectric layer to form magnetoelectric bilayers. Low frequency (100 Hz) ME coefficient was measured over 0-17 kOe for various orientations of bilayers in a plane parallel to ac and bias magnetic fields. We measured a strong dependence of the ME voltage coefficients on magneitude and orientation of the bias field. The data are compared with theory. VLM gratefully acknowledge the award of a BOYSCAST fellowship and a FAST TRACK fellowship by DST, India. The research was supported by NSF grants.

  7. CO adsorption on a silica bilayer supported on Ru(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlexer, Philomena; Pacchioni, Gianfranco; Włodarczyk, Radosław; Sauer, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    Silica bilayers are built up of two layers of corner sharing SiO4-tetrahedra and constitute an inert ultra-thin membrane supported on the Ru(0001) surface. We have investigated the adsorption of CO on that system using DFT with inclusion of dispersion corrections. The molecules adsorb at the interface between the SiO2 film and Ru(0001) surface. The estimated barrier for diffusion of CO through the silica bilayer is around 0.5 eV. The CO bond length, the C-O stretching frequency and the silica-ruthenium distance depend strongly on the CO coverage. The band observed at 2051 cm- 1 in previous experiments can be assigned to a CO coverage of around 0.5 ML on Ru(0001), with the silica bilayer floating above the CO molecules.

  8. Electro-absorption of silicene and bilayer graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelsalam, Hazem; Talaat, Mohamed H.; Lukyanchuk, Igor; Portnoi, M. E.; Saroka, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    We study numerically the optical properties of low-buckled silicene and AB-stacked bilayer graphene quantum dots subjected to an external electric field, which is normal to their surface. Within the tight-binding model, the optical absorption is calculated for quantum dots, of triangular and hexagonal shapes, with zigzag and armchair edge terminations. We show that in triangular silicene clusters with zigzag edges a rich and widely tunable infrared absorption peak structure originates from transitions involving zero energy states. The edge of absorption in silicene quantum dots undergoes red shift in the external electric field for triangular clusters, whereas blue shift takes place for hexagonal ones. In small clusters of bilayer graphene with zigzag edges the edge of absorption undergoes blue/red shift for triangular/hexagonal geometry. In armchair clusters of silicene blue shift of the absorption edge takes place for both cluster shapes, while red shift is inherent for both shapes of the bilayer graphene quantum dots.

  9. Interaction driven quantum Hall effect in artificially stacked graphene bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Siddique, Salma; Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Ramay, Shahid Mahmood; Nam, Jungtae; Kim, Keun Soo; Eom, Jonghwa

    2016-01-01

    The honeycomb lattice structure of graphene gives rise to its exceptional electronic properties of linear dispersion relation and its chiral nature of charge carriers. The exceptional electronic properties of graphene stem from linear dispersion relation and chiral nature of charge carries, originating from its honeycomb lattice structure. Here, we address the quantum Hall effect in artificially stacked graphene bilayers and single layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The quantum Hall plateaus started to appear more than 3 T and became clearer at higher magnetic fields up to 9 T. Shubnikov-de Hass oscillations were manifestly observed in graphene bilayers texture. These unusual plateaus may have been due to the layers interaction in artificially stacked graphene bilayers. Our study initiates the understanding of interactions between artificially stacked graphene layers. PMID:27098387

  10. The InN epitaxy via controlling In bilayer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The method of In bilayer pre-deposition and penetrated nitridation had been proposed, which had been proven to have many advantages theoretically. To study the growth behavior of this method experimentally, various pulse times of trimethylindium supply were used to get the optimal indium bilayer controlling by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy. The results revealed that the InN film quality became better as the thickness of the top indium atomic layers was close to bilayer. A following tuning of nitridation process enhanced the quality of InN film further, which means that a moderate, stable, and slow nitridation process by NH3 flow also plays the key role in growing better-quality InN film. Meanwhile, the biaxial strain of InN film was gradually relaxing when the flatness was increasingly improved. PMID:24393422

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Phospholipid Bilayers with Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Hofsäß, Christofer; Lindahl, Erik; Edholm, Olle

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the microscopic interactions between cholesterol and lipids in biological membranes, we have performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations of large membranes with different levels of cholesterol content. The simulations extend to 10 ns, and were performed with hydrated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers. The bilayers contain 1024 lipids of which 0–40% were cholesterol and the rest DPPC. The effects of cholesterol on the structure and mesoscopic dynamics of the bilayer were monitored as a function of cholesterol concentration. The main effects observed are a significant ordering of the DPPC chains (as monitored by NMR type order parameters), a reduced fraction of gauche bonds, a reduced surface area per lipid, less undulations—corresponding to an increased bending modulus for the membrane, smaller area fluctuations, and a reduced lateral diffusion of DPPC-lipids as well as cholesterols. PMID:12668428

  12. Sodium chloride's effect on self-assembly of diphenylalanine bilayer.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Junpyo; Lee, Myeongsang; Na, Sungsoo

    2016-07-15

    Understanding self-assembling peptides becomes essential in nanotechnology, thereby providing a bottom-up method for fabrication of nanostructures. Diphenylalanine constitutes an outstanding building block that can be assembled into various nanostructures, including two-dimensional bilayers or nanotubes, exhibiting superb mechanical properties. It is known that the effect of the ions is critical in conformational and chemical interactions of bilayers or membranes. In this study, we analyzed the effect of sodium chloride on diphenylalanine bilayer using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, and calculated the bending Young's modulus and the torsional modulus by applying normal modal analysis using an elastic network model. The results showed that sodium chloride dramatically increases the assembling efficiency and stability, thereby promising to allow the precise design and control of the fabrication process and properties of bio-inspired materials. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27241039

  13. Intermonolayer Friction and Surface Shear Viscosity of Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    den Otter, W. K.; Shkulipa, S. A.

    2007-01-01

    The flow behavior of lipid bilayer membranes is characterized by a surface viscosity for in-plane shear deformations, and an intermonolayer friction coefficient for slip between the two leaflets of the bilayer. Both properties have been studied for a variety of coarse-grained double-tailed model lipids, using equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. For lipids with two identical tails, the surface shear viscosity rises rapidly with tail length, while the intermonolayer friction coefficient is less sensitive to the tail length. Interdigitation of lipid tails across the bilayer midsurface, as observed for lipids with two distinct tails, strongly enhances the intermonolayer friction coefficient, but hardly affects the surface shear viscosity. The simulation results are compared against the available experimental data. PMID:17468168

  14. Anomalous spectral features of a neutral bilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Cheng, C-M; Xie, L F; Pachoud, A; Moser, H O; Chen, W; Wee, A T S; Castro Neto, A H; Tsuei, K-D; Özyilmaz, B

    2015-01-01

    Graphene and its bilayer are two-dimensional systems predicted to show exciting many-body effects near the neutrality point. The ideal tool to investigate spectrum reconstruction effects is angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) as it probes directly the band structure with information about both energy and momentum. Here we reveal, by studying undoped exfoliated bilayer graphene with ARPES, two essential aspects of its many-body physics: the electron-phonon scattering rate has an anisotropic k-dependence and the type of electronic liquid is non-Fermi liquid. The latter behavior is evident from an observed electron-electron scattering rate that scales linearly with energy from 100 meV to 600 meV and that is associated with the proximity of bilayer graphene to a two-dimensional quantum critical point of competing orders. PMID:25985064

  15. Nonlocal transport in dual-gated bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazaki, Yuya; Yamamoto, Michihisa; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Tarucha, Seigo

    2014-03-01

    We report nonlocal transport measurement of biased bilayer graphene. Dual gated bilayer graphene Hall bars sandwiched between two h-BN insulating layers were prepared using the transfer technique with PMMA thin flims. We measured both local and non-local transport at temperatures between 1.5 K and 200 K. We found enhancement of the nonlocal resistance near the charge neutrality point when we increase the perpendicular electric field. Observed nonlocal resistance at 70K is much larger than what is expected as the Ohmic contribution from van der Pauw formula with measured local resistivity. This observation indicates additional contribution to the nonlocal transport in biased bilayer graphene. We present temperature and displacement field dependence of the nonlocal resistance and discuss its origin in terms of valley Hall effect and transport through disordered edge states.

  16. Engineering electromagnetic responses of bilayered metamaterials based on Fano resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jinhui; Liu, Ran; Na, Bo; Xu, Yiqun; Zhu, Zheng; Wang, Yuekun; Ma, Huifeng; Cui, Tiejun

    2013-08-01

    We numerically and experimentally demonstrate engineered electromagnetic responses from a single-peak Fano resonance to a fast roll-off behavior by using planar metamaterials, which are constructed by bilayered asymmetrically split rings (ASRs) with twist angles of 0° and 180°. Since each single-layer ASR metamaterial reveals a Fano-type resonance, the dramatic transmission properties are resulted from the hybridization of electromagnetic resonances due to the near-field coupling between two Fano resonances and the far-field retardation effect of the bilayered metamaterials. The surface currents and charges distributions provide an insight into deep understanding of in-phase and out-of-phase coupling of two Fano resonances. The measured and simulated results of bilayered metamaterials agree well to each other. Especially, the proposed metamaterials can be exploited to design metamaterial-based devices in the THz and optical ranges like filters and sensors.

  17. Manipulating interface states in monolayer–bilayer graphene planar junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fang; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Jun

    2016-05-01

    We report on transport properties of monolayer–bilayer graphene planar junctions in a magnetic field. Due to its unique geometry, the edge and interface states can be independently manipulated by either interlayer potential or Zeeman field, and the conductance exhibits interesting quantized behaviors. In the hybrid graphene junction, the quantum Hall (QH) conductance is no longer antisymmetric with respect to the charge neutrality point. When the Zeeman field is considered, a quantum spin Hall (QSH) phase is found in the monolayer region while the weak-QSH phase stays in the bilayer region. In the presence of both interlayer potential and Zeeman field, the bilayer region hosts a QSH phase, whereas the monolayer region is still in a QH phase, leading to a spin-polarized current in the interface. In particular, the QSH phase remains robust against the disorder.

  18. Interaction driven quantum Hall effect in artificially stacked graphene bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Siddique, Salma; Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Ramay, Shahid Mahmood; Nam, Jungtae; Kim, Keun Soo; Eom, Jonghwa

    2016-04-01

    The honeycomb lattice structure of graphene gives rise to its exceptional electronic properties of linear dispersion relation and its chiral nature of charge carriers. The exceptional electronic properties of graphene stem from linear dispersion relation and chiral nature of charge carries, originating from its honeycomb lattice structure. Here, we address the quantum Hall effect in artificially stacked graphene bilayers and single layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The quantum Hall plateaus started to appear more than 3 T and became clearer at higher magnetic fields up to 9 T. Shubnikov-de Hass oscillations were manifestly observed in graphene bilayers texture. These unusual plateaus may have been due to the layers interaction in artificially stacked graphene bilayers. Our study initiates the understanding of interactions between artificially stacked graphene layers.

  19. Linear magnetoresistance in mosaic-like bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisslinger, Ferdinand; Ott, Christian; Heide, Christian; Kampert, Erik; Butz, Benjamin; Spiecker, Erdmann; Shallcross, Sam; Weber, Heiko B.

    2015-08-01

    The magnetoresistance of conductors usually has a quadratic dependence on magnetic field, however, examples exist of non-saturating linear behaviour in diverse materials. Assigning a specific microscopic mechanism to this unusual phenomenon is obscured by the co-occurrence and interplay of doping, mobility fluctuations and a polycrystalline structure. Bilayer graphene has virtually no doping fluctuations, yet provides a built-in mosaic tiling due to the dense network of partial dislocations. We present magnetotransport measurements of epitaxial bilayer graphene that exhibits a strong and reproducible linear magnetoresistance that persists to B = 62 T at and above room temperature, decorated by quantum interference effects at low temperatures. Partial dislocations thus have a profound impact on the transport properties in bilayer graphene, a system that is frequently assumed to be dislocation-free. It further provides a clear and tractable model system for studying the unusual properties of mosaic conductors.

  20. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Lipid Bilayers and Tubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, Linda S.; Yuan, Jing; Pramudya, Yohannes; Nguyen, Lam T.

    2007-03-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are found in a variety of biological membranes and have been implicated with lipid raft formation and possible function, typical molecules include DHA (Docosahexanoic Acid) and AA (Alphalinoleic Acid) which have been the focus of considerable attention in recent years. We are interested in the phase behavior of these molecules in the lipid bilayer. The addition of lipid molecules with polyunsaturated chains has a clear effect on the fluidity and curvature of the membrane and we investigate the effects the addition of polyunsaturated lipids on bilayer structure and tubule formation. Self-assembled cylindrical lipid tubules have attracted considerable attention because of their interesting structures and potential technological applications. Using x-ray diffraction techniques, Atomic Force Microscopy and confocal fluorescence imaging, both symmetric and mixed chain lipids were incorporated into model membranes and the effects on bilayer structure and tubule formation investigated.

  1. Edge State and Intrinsic Hole Doping in Bilayer Phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osada, Toshihito

    2015-01-01

    Using a simple LCAO model by Harrison, we have qualitatively studied the edge state of bilayer phosphorene, which is a unit structure of the layered crystal of black phosphorus. This model successfully reproduces the isolated edge state in the bulk gap in monolayer phosphorene. In bilayer phosphorene, however, it shows that edge states are almost buried in the valence band and there is no isolated midgap edge state at the zigzag edge. Since the buried edge state works as acceptor, holes are doped from the edge state into the bulk. This gives a possible explanation for p-type conduction in undoped black phosphorus. Under the vertical electric field, the intrinsic hole doping is reduced because a part of edge states move into the gap. These features of bilayer phosphorene might be better suited for device application.

  2. Manipulating lipid bilayer material properties using biologically active amphipathic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafuzzaman, Md; Lampson, M. A.; Greathouse, D. V.; Koeppe, R. E., II; Andersen, O. S.

    2006-07-01

    Lipid bilayers are elastic bodies with properties that can be manipulated/controlled by the adsorption of amphipathic molecules. The resulting changes in bilayer elasticity have been shown to regulate integral membrane protein function. To further understand the amphiphile-induced modulation of bilayer material properties (thickness, intrinsic monolayer curvature and elastic moduli), we examined how an enantiomeric pair of viral anti-fusion peptides (AFPs)—Z-Gly-D-Phe and Z-Gly-Phe, where Z denotes a benzyloxycarbonyl group, as well as Z-Phe-Tyr and Z-D-Phe-Phe-Gly—alters the function of enantiomeric pairs of gramicidin channels of different lengths in planar bilayers. For both short and long channels, the channel lifetimes and appearance frequencies increase as linear functions of the aqueous AFP concentration, with no apparent effect on the single-channel conductance. These changes in channel function do not depend on the chirality of the channels or the AFPs. At pH 7.0, the relative changes in channel lifetimes do not vary when the channel length is varied, indicating that these compounds exert their effects primarily by causing a positive-going change in the intrinsic monolayer curvature. At pH 4.0, the AFPs are more potent than at pH 7.0 and have greater effects on the shorter channels, indicating that these compounds now change the bilayer elastic moduli. When AFPs of different anti-fusion potencies are compared, the rank order of the anti-fusion activity and the channel-modifying activity is similar, but the relative changes in anti-fusion potency are larger than the changes in channel-modifying activity. We conclude that gramicidin channels are useful as molecular force transducers to probe the influence of small amphiphiles upon lipid bilayer material properties.

  3. Prediction of superconductivity in Li-intercalated bilayer phosphorene

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, G. Q.; Xing, Z. W.; Xing, D. Y.

    2015-03-16

    It is shown that bilayer phosphorene can be transformed from a direct-gap semiconductor to a BCS superconductor by intercalating Li atoms. For the Li-intercalated bilayer phosphorene, we find that the electron occupation of Li-derived band is small and superconductivity is intrinsic. With increasing the intercalation of Li atoms, both increased metallicity and strong electron-phonon coupling are favorable for the enhancement of superconductivity. The obtained electron-phonon coupling λ can be larger than 1 and the superconducting temperature T{sub c} can be increased up to 16.5 K, suggesting that phosphorene may be a good candidate for a nanoscale superconductor.

  4. Interactions between lipid bilayers and inorganic material surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mager, Morgan Douglas

    Because of their unique biological and material properties, lipid bilayers have been extensively studied for use in biosensor and drug delivery applications. In the past, these systems have mostly taken the form of bulk solutions. More recently, researchers have integrated bilayers with chip-based architectures to take advantage of advanced optical, scanning probe and electronic characterization. These applications typically involve the creation of hybrid devices with inorganic and bilayer components, both of which affect the final device performance. In particular, the properties of supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are known to depend on the substrate chemistry and topography as well as the lipid used. In spite of the large body of work involving these systems, there is still much that remains unknown about the formation and ultimate structure of the interface between these very different materials. One outstanding question in the study of SLBs is the role that the bilayer deposition method plays in determining the bilayer properties. In this work, we have developed a new method for forming and patterning lipid bilayers: bubble collapse deposition (BCD). This method is similar to an in situ version of Langmuir-Blodgett deposition, and offers unique possibilities for the fabrication of lipid-based devices. Briefly, a lipid monolayer is "inked" onto the surface of an air bubble. This bubble is then brought down on a solid support and the air is withdrawn. This withdrawal of air shrinks the bubble, which causes the monolayer to fold over on itself and redeposit on the surface as a bilayer. With BCD, we have demonstrated the first SLB formation on alumina using uncharged lipids. Using this system, we have measured a previously unobserved enhanced hydrodynamic coupling at the alumina surface. We have also used BCD to produce a hybrid lipid-gated chemical delivery device with potentially sub-cellular spatial resolution. Because of the unique material properties of the

  5. Enhanced Configurational Entropy in High-Density Nanoconfined Bilayer Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsetti, Fabiano; Zubeltzu, Jon; Artacho, Emilio

    2016-02-01

    A novel kind of crystal order in high-density nanoconfined bilayer ice is proposed from molecular dynamics and density-functional theory simulations. A first-order transition is observed between a low-temperature proton-ordered solid and a high-temperature proton-disordered solid. The latter is shown to possess crystalline order for the oxygen positions, arranged on a close-packed triangular lattice with A A stacking. Uniquely among the ice phases, the triangular bilayer is characterized by two levels of disorder (for the bonding network and for the protons) which results in a configurational entropy twice that of bulk ice.

  6. Graphene Monolayer Rotation on Ni(111) Facilities Bilayer Graphene Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Batzill M.; Sutter P.; Dahal, A.; Addou, R.

    2012-06-11

    Synthesis of bilayer graphene by chemical vapor deposition is of importance for graphene-based field effect devices. Here, we demonstrate that bilayer graphene preferentially grows by carbon-segregation under graphene sheets that are rotated relative to a Ni(111) substrate. Rotated graphene monolayer films can be synthesized at growth temperatures above 650 C on a Ni(111) thin-film. The segregated second graphene layer is in registry with the Ni(111) substrate and this suppresses further C-segregation, effectively self-limiting graphene formation to two layers.

  7. Structure and metastability of N-lignocerylgalactosylsphingosine (cerebroside) bilayers.

    PubMed

    Reed, R A; Shipley, G G

    1987-01-26

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction have been used to study hydrated N-lignocerylgalactosylsphingosine (NLGS) bilayers. DSC of fully hydrated NLGS shows an endothermic transition at 69-70 degrees C, immediately followed by an exothermic transition at 72-73 degrees C; further heating shows a high-temperature (Tc = 82 degrees C), high-enthalpy (delta H = 15.3 kcal/mol NLGS) transition. Heating to 75 degrees C, cooling to 20 degrees C and subsequent reheating shows no transitions at 69-73 degrees C; only the high-temperature (82 degrees C), high-enthalpy (15.3 kcal/mol) transition. Two exothermic transitions are observed on cooling; for the upper transition its temperature (about 65 degrees C) and enthalpy (about 6 kcal/mol NLGS) are essentially independent of cooling rate, whereas the lower transition exhibits marked changes in both temperature (30----60 degrees C) and enthalpy (2.2----9.5 kcal/mol NLGS) as the cooling rate decreases from 40 to 0.625 Cdeg/min. On reheating, the enthalpy of the 69-70 degrees C transition is dependent on the previous cooling rate. The DSC data provide clear evidence of conversions between metastable and stable forms. X-ray diffraction data recorded at 26, 75 and 93 degrees C show clearly that NLGS bilayer phases are present at all temperatures. The X-ray diffraction pattern at 75 degrees C shows a bilayer periodicity d = 65.4 A, and a number of sharp reflections in the wide-angle region indicative of a crystalline chain packing mode. This stable bilayer form converts to a liquid-crystal bilayer phase; at 93 degrees C, the bilayer periodicity d = 59.1 A, and a diffuse reflection at 1/4.6 A-1 is observed. The diffraction pattern at 22 degrees C represents a combination of the stable and metastable low-temperature bilayer forms. NLGS exhibits a complex pattern of thermotropic changes related to conversions between metastable (gel), stable (crystalline) and liquid-crystalline bilayer phases. The structure and

  8. Enhanced Configurational Entropy in High-Density Nanoconfined Bilayer Ice.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, Fabiano; Zubeltzu, Jon; Artacho, Emilio

    2016-02-26

    A novel kind of crystal order in high-density nanoconfined bilayer ice is proposed from molecular dynamics and density-functional theory simulations. A first-order transition is observed between a low-temperature proton-ordered solid and a high-temperature proton-disordered solid. The latter is shown to possess crystalline order for the oxygen positions, arranged on a close-packed triangular lattice with AA stacking. Uniquely among the ice phases, the triangular bilayer is characterized by two levels of disorder (for the bonding network and for the protons) which results in a configurational entropy twice that of bulk ice. PMID:26967426

  9. Electronic band structure of magnetic bilayer graphene superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, C. Huy; Nguyen, T. Thuong

    2014-09-28

    Electronic band structure of the bilayer graphene superlattices with δ-function magnetic barriers and zero average magnetic flux is studied within the four-band continuum model, using the transfer matrix method. The periodic magnetic potential effects on the zero-energy touching point between the lowest conduction and the highest valence minibands of pristine bilayer graphene are exactly analyzed. Magnetic potential is shown also to generate the finite-energy touching points between higher minibands at the edges of Brillouin zone. The positions of these points and the related dispersions are determined in the case of symmetric potentials.

  10. Efficient tunable generic model for self-assembling fluid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deserno, Markus

    2005-03-01

    We present a new model for the simulation of generic lipid bilayers in the mesoscopic regime (between a few nanometers and many tens of nanometers), which is very robust, versatile, and extremely efficient, since it avoids the need for an embedding solvent. Based entirely on simple pair potentials, it features a wide region of unassisted self assembly into fluid bilayers without the need for careful parameter tuning. The resulting membranes display the correct continuum elastic behavior with bending constants in the experimentally relevant range. It can be readily used to study events like bilayer fusion, bilayer melting, lipid mixtures, rafts, and protein-bilayer interactions.

  11. Interaction of gramicidin with DPPC/DODAB bilayer fragments.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Camilla A; Olivares-Ortega, Constanza; Soto-Arriaza, Marco A; Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana M

    2012-12-01

    The interaction between the antimicrobial peptide gramicidin (Gr) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB) 1:1 large unilamellar vesicles (LVs) or bilayer fragments (BFs) was evaluated by means of several techniques. The major methods were: 1) Gr intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy; 2) dynamic light scattering for sizing and zeta-potential analysis; 3) determination of the bilayer phase transition from extrinsic fluorescence of bilayer probes; 4) pictures of the dispersions for evaluation of coloidal stability over a range of time and NaCl concentration. For Gr in LVs, the Gr dimeric channel conformation is suggested from: 1) CD and intrinsic fluorescence spectra similar to those in trifluoroethanol (TFE); 2) KCl or glucose permeation through the LVs/Gr bilayer. For Gr in BFs, the intertwined dimeric, non-channel Gr conformation is evidenced by CD and intrinsic fluorescence spectra similar to those in ethanol. Both LVs and BFs shield Gr tryptophans against quenching by acrylamide but the Stern-Volmer quenching constant was slightly higher for Gr in BFs confirming that the peptide is more exposed to the water phase in BFs than in LVs. The DPPC/DODAB/Gr supramolecular assemblies may predict the behavior of other antimicrobial peptides in assemblies with lipids. PMID:22960286

  12. Dynamics and instabilities of lipid bilayer membrane shapes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zheng; Baumgart, Tobias

    2014-06-01

    Biological membranes undergo constant shape remodeling involving the formation of highly curved structures. The lipid bilayer represents the fundamental architecture of the cellular membrane with its shapes determined by the Helfrich curvature bending energy. However, the dynamics of bilayer shape transitions, especially their modulation by membrane proteins, and the resulting shape instabilities, are still not well understood. Here, we review in a unifying manner several theories that describe the fluctuations (i.e. undulations) of bilayer shapes as well as their local coupling with lipid or protein density variation. The coupling between local membrane curvature and lipid density gives rise to a 'slipping mode' in addition to the conventional 'bending mode' for damping the membrane fluctuation. This leads to a number of interesting experimental phenomena regarding bilayer shape dynamics. More importantly, curvature-inducing proteins can couple with membrane shape and eventually render the membrane unstable. A criterion for membrane shape instability is derived from a linear stability analysis. The instability criterion reemphasizes the importance of membrane tension in regulating the stability and dynamics of membrane geometry. Recent progresses in understanding the role of membrane tension in regulating dynamical cellular processes are also reviewed. Protein density is emphasized as a key factor in regulating membrane shape transitions: a threshold density of curvature coupling proteins is required for inducing membrane morphology transitions. PMID:24529968

  13. Hot carrier relaxation of Dirac fermions in bilayer epitaxial graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Alexander-Webber, J. A.; Janssen, T. J. B. M.; Tzalenchuk, A.; Yager, T.; Lara-Avila, S.; Kubatkin, S.; Myers-Ward, R. L.; Wheeler, V. D.; Gaskill, D. K.; Nicholas, R. J.

    2015-04-01

    Energy relaxation of hot Dirac fermions in bilayer epitaxial graphene is experimentally investigated by magnetotransport measurements on Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations and weak localization. The hot-electron energy loss rate is found to follow the predicted Bloch-Grüneisen power-law behaviour of T4 at carrier temperatures from 1.4 K up to ˜100 K, due to electron-acoustic phonon interactions with a deformation potential coupling constant of 22 eV. A carrier density dependence n_e-1.5 in the scaling of the T4 power law is observed in bilayer graphene, in contrast to the n_e-0.5 dependence in monolayer graphene, leading to a crossover in the energy loss rate as a function of carrier density between these two systems. The electron-phonon relaxation time in bilayer graphene is also shown to be strongly carrier density dependent, while it remains constant for a wide range of carrier densities in monolayer graphene. Our results and comparisons between the bilayer and monolayer exhibit a more comprehensive picture of hot carrier dynamics in graphene systems.

  14. Dielectric screening and plasmon resonances in bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarra, M.; Sindona, A.; Gravina, M.; Silkin, V. M.; Pitarke, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    The plasmon structure of intrinsic and extrinsic bilayer graphene is investigated in the framework of ab initio time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) at the level of the random-phase approximation (RPA). A two-step scheme is adopted, where the electronic ground state of a periodically repeated slab of bilayer graphene is first determined with full inclusion of the anisotropic band structure and the interlayer interaction; a Dyson-like equation is then solved self-consistently in order to calculate the so-called density-response function of the many-electron system. A two-dimensional correction is subsequently applied in order to eliminate the artificial interaction between the replicas. The energy range below ˜30 eV is explored, focusing on the spectrum of single-particle excitations and plasmon resonances induced by external electrons or photons. The high-energy loss features of the π and σ +π plasmons, particularly their anisotropic dispersions, are predicted and discussed in relation with previous calculations and experiments performed on monolayer and bilayer graphene. At the low-energy end, the energy-loss function is found to be (i) very sensitive to the injected charge carrier density in doped bilayer graphene and (ii) highly anisotropic. Furthermore, various plasmon modes are predicted to exist and are analyzed with reference to the design of novel nanodevices.

  15. Negative terahertz conductivity in disordered graphene bilayers with population inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Svintsov, D.; Otsuji, T.; Ryzhii, V.; Mitin, V.; Shur, M. S.

    2015-03-16

    The gapless energy band spectra make the structures based on graphene and graphene bilayer with the population inversion to be promising media for the interband terahertz (THz) lasing. However, a strong intraband absorption at THz frequencies still poses a challenge for efficient THz lasing. In this paper, we show that in the pumped graphene bilayer, the indirect interband radiative transitions accompanied by scattering of carriers by disorder can provide a substantial negative contribution to the THz conductivity (together with the direct interband transitions). In the graphene bilayer on high-κ substrates with point charged defects, these transitions substantially compensate the losses due to the intraband (Drude) absorption. We also demonstrate that the indirect interband contribution to the THz conductivity in a graphene bilayer with the extended defects (such as the charged impurity clusters) can surpass by several times the fundamental limit associated with the direct interband transitions, and the Drude conductivity as well. These predictions can affect the strategy of the graphene-based THz laser implementation.

  16. Atomistic Simulations of Pore Formation and Closure in Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, W. F. Drew; Sapay, Nicolas; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cellular membranes separate distinct aqueous compartments, but can be breached by transient hydrophilic pores. A large energetic cost prevents pore formation, which is largely dependent on the composition and structure of the lipid bilayer. The softness of bilayers and the disordered structure of pores make their characterization difficult. We use molecular-dynamics simulations with atomistic detail to study the thermodynamics, kinetics, and mechanism of pore formation and closure in DLPC, DMPC, and DPPC bilayers, with pore formation free energies of 17, 45, and 78 kJ/mol, respectively. By using atomistic computer simulations, we are able to determine not only the free energy for pore formation, but also the enthalpy and entropy, which yields what is believed to be significant new insights in the molecular driving forces behind membrane defects. The free energy cost for pore formation is due to a large unfavorable entropic contribution and a favorable change in enthalpy. Changes in hydrogen bonding patterns occur, with increased lipid-water interactions, and fewer water-water hydrogen bonds, but the total number of overall hydrogen bonds is constant. Equilibrium pore formation is directly observed in the thin DLPC lipid bilayer. Multiple long timescale simulations of pore closure are used to predict pore lifetimes. Our results are important for biological applications, including the activity of antimicrobial peptides and a better understanding of membrane protein folding, and improve our understanding of the fundamental physicochemical nature of membranes. PMID:24411253

  17. Lipid Bilayer Membrane Perturbation by Embedded Nanopores: A Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Fandiño, Rebeca; Piñeiro, Ángel; Trick, Jemma L; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-03-22

    A macromolecular nanopore inserted into a membrane may perturb the dynamic organization of the surrounding lipid bilayer. To better understand the nature of such perturbations, we have undertaken a systematic molecular dynamics simulation study of lipid bilayer structure and dynamics around three different classes of nanopore: a carbon nanotube, three related cyclic peptide nanotubes differing in the nature of their external surfaces, and a model of a β-barrel nanopore protein. Periodic spatial distributions of several lipid properties as a function of distance from the nanopore were observed. This was especially clear for the carbon nanotube system, for which the density of lipids, the bilayer thickness, the projection of lipid head-to-tail vectors onto the membrane plane, and lipid lateral diffusion coefficients exhibited undulatory behavior as a function of the distance from the surface of the channel. Overall, the differences in lipid behavior as a function of the nanopore structure reveal local adaptation of the bilayer structure and dynamics to different embedded nanopore structures. Both the local structure and dynamic behavior of lipids around membrane-embedded nanopores are sensitive to the geometry and nature of the outer surface of the macromolecule/molecular assembly forming the pore. PMID:26943498

  18. Forming lipid bilayer membrane arrays on micropatterned polyelectrolyte film surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Lei; Wang, Xuejing; Qi, Guodong; Han, Xiaojun

    2013-07-01

    A novel method of forming lipid bilayer membrane arrays on micropatterned polyelectrolyte film surfaces is introduced. Polyelectrolyte films were fabricated by the layer-by-layer technique on a silicon oxide surface modified with a 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) monolayer. The surface pK(a) value of the APTES monolayer was determined by cyclic voltammetry to be approximately 5.61, on the basis of which a pH value of 2.0 was chosen for layer-by-layer assembly. Micropatterned polyelectrolyte films were obtained by deep-UV (254 nm) photolysis though a mask. Absorbed fluorescent latex beads were used to visualize the patterned surfaces. Lipid bilayer arrays were fabricated on the micropatterned surfaces by immersing the patterned substrates into a solution containing egg phosphatidylcholine vesicles. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching studies yielded a lateral diffusion coefficient for probe molecules of 1.31±0.17 μm(2) s(-1) in the bilayer region, and migration of the lipid NBD PE in bilayer lipid membrane arrays was observed in an electric field. PMID:23695862

  19. Polydimethylsiloxane bilayer films with an embedded spontaneous curvature.

    PubMed

    Egunov, A I; Korvink, J G; Luchnikov, V A

    2016-01-01

    Elastomer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) films with embedded in-plane gradient stress are created by making PDMS/(PDMS + silicone oil) crosslinked bilayers and extracting the oil in a suitable organic solvent bath. The collapse of the elastomer after oil extraction generates differential stress in the films that is manifested through their out-of-plane deformation. The curvature κ of narrow stripes of the bilayer, which is composed of layers of approximately equal thicknesses and elasticity moduli, is satisfactorily described by the simple relationship κ = 1.5δH(-1), where δ is the mechanical strain, and H is the total thickness of the bilayer. Curvature mapping of triangular PDMS plates reveals the existence of spherical and cylindrical types of deformation at different locations of the plates. Various 3D-shaped objects can be formed by the self-folding of appropriately designed 2D patterns that are cut from the films, or by nonuniform distribution of the collapsing layer. Thin PDMS bilayers with embedded stress roll up into microtubes of almost perfect cylindrical shape when released in a controlled manner from a substrate. PMID:26539638

  20. Magnetoresistance of heavy and light metal/ferromagnet bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Avci, Can Onur; Garello, Kevin; Mendil, Johannes; Ghosh, Abhijit; Blasakis, Nicolas; Gabureac, Mihai; Trassin, Morgan; Fiebig, Manfred; Gambardella, Pietro

    2015-11-09

    We studied the magnetoresistance of normal metal (NM)/ferromagnet (FM) bilayers in the linear and nonlinear (current-dependent) regimes and compared it with the amplitude of the spin-orbit torques and thermally induced electric fields. Our experiments reveal that the magnetoresistance of the heavy NM/Co bilayers (NM = Ta, W, and Pt) is phenomenologically similar to the spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) of YIG/Pt, but has a much larger anisotropy of the order of 0.5%, which increases with the atomic number of the NM. This SMR-like behavior is absent in light NM/Co bilayers (NM = Ti and Cu), which present the standard anisotropic magnetoresistance expected from polycrystalline FM layers. In the Ta, W, and Pt/Co bilayers, we find an additional magnetoresistance directly proportional to the current and to the transverse component of the magnetization. This so-called unidirectional SMR, of the order of 0.005%, is largest in W and correlates with the amplitude of the antidamping spin-orbit torque. The unidirectional SMR is below the accuracy of our measurements in YIG/Pt.

  1. Preparation and evaluation of a nonproprietary bilayer skin substitute.

    PubMed

    Bertolami, C N; Shetty, V; Milavec, J E; Ellis, D G; Cherrick, H M

    1991-06-01

    Cross-linked, allogeneic, telopeptide-depleted dermal grafts were lyophilized and laminated with silicone rubber elastomer. Resultant bilayers were studied for incorporation into the wound site and capacity to inhibit cutaneous wound contraction in experimental animals. Bilateral full-thickness skin wounds were made in 20 male New Zealand white rabbits. One side was grafted with the processed graft, while the contralateral side remained ungrafted as a control wound. Over 63 days, wound sites were analyzed at intervals on the basis of the extent and rate of wound contraction and by histologic examination. Cutaneous wounds successfully incorporated graft matrix and were significantly inhibited in their rate and extent of wound contraction. Notably, by day 63, grafted wounds retained 71 percent of their original area, whereas ungrafted control wounds retained only 16 percent of their original area. There were no graft rejections, and the bilayer graft's dermal analogue appeared to function as a biodegradable template that physically conformed neodermis to a preestablished pattern while counteracting contractile forces. This investigation suggests that, in experimental animals, the success of bilayer dermal grafts is less dependent on highly specialized and complex preparative techniques than typically has been presumed and that relatively simple, previously published, nonproprietary techniques, when adapted to a bilayer format, yield acceptable results as defined in terms of biocompatibility, capacity for graft incorporation, and inhibition of wound contraction. PMID:1852021

  2. Observation of Low Energy Raman Modes in Twisted Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Rui; Chung, Ting-Fung; Delaney, Conor; Keiser, Courtney; Jauregui, Luis A.; Shand, Paul M.; Chancey, C. C.; Wang, Yanan; Bao, Jiming; Chen, Yong P.

    2013-08-01

    Two new Raman modes below 100 cm^-1 are observed in twisted bilayer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The two modes are observed in a small range of twisting angle at which the intensity of the G Raman peak is strongly enhanced, indicating that these low energy modes and the G Raman mode share the same resonance enhancement mechanism, as a function of twisting angle. The 94 cm^-1 mode (measured with a 532 nm laser excitation) is assigned to the fundamental layer breathing vibration (ZO (prime) mode) mediated by the twisted bilayer graphene lattice, which lacks long-range translational symmetry. The dependence of this modes frequency and linewidth on the rotational angle can be explained by the double resonance Raman process which is different from the previously-identified Raman processes activated by twisted bilayer graphene superlattice. The dependence also reveals the strong impact of electronic-band overlaps of the two graphene layers. Another new mode at 52 cm^-1, not observed previously in the bilayer graphene system, is tentatively attributed to a torsion mode in which the bottom and top graphene layers rotate out-of-phase in the plane.

  3. Anthrax toxin-induced rupture of artificial lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Nablo, Brian J; Panchal, Rekha G; Bavari, Sina; Nguyen, Tam L; Gussio, Rick; Ribot, Wil; Friedlander, Art; Chabot, Donald; Reiner, Joseph E; Robertson, Joseph W F; Balijepalli, Arvind; Halverson, Kelly M; Kasianowicz, John J

    2013-08-14

    We demonstrate experimentally that anthrax toxin complexes rupture artificial lipid bilayer membranes when isolated from the blood of infected animals. When the solution pH is temporally acidified to mimic that process in endosomes, recombinant anthrax toxin forms an irreversibly bound complex, which also destabilizes membranes. The results suggest an alternative mechanism for the translocation of anthrax toxin into the cytoplasm. PMID:23947891

  4. Thermal stability of Mo/Au bilayers for TES applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Borderías, María; Fernández-Martínez, Iván; Fàbrega, Lourdes; Camón, Agustín; Gil, Oscar; González-Arrabal, Raquel; Sesé, Javier; Costa-Krämer, José Luis; Warot-Fonrose, Bénédicte; Serin, Virginie; Briones, Fernando

    2012-09-01

    Mo/Au bilayers are among the most suitable materials to be used as transition-edge sensors (TES) in cryogenic microcalorimeters and bolometers, developed, among other fields, for space missions. For this purpose the thermal stability of TES at temperatures below 150 °C is a critical issue. We report on the dependence of functional properties (superconducting critical temperature, residual resistance and α) as well as on microstructure, chemical composition and interface quality for optimized high quality Mo/Au bilayers on annealing temperature and time. Data show that the functional properties of the bilayers remain stable at T < 150 °C, but changes in microstructure, interface quality and functional properties were observed for layers heated at T ≥ 200 °C. Microstructural and chemical composition data suggest that the measured changes in residual resistance ratio (RRR) and TC at T ≥ 200 °C are mainly due to an increase in the average Au grain size and to Au migration along the Mo grain boundaries at the Au/Mo interface. A way to stabilize the functional properties of the Mo/Au bilayers against temperature enhancements is proposed.

  5. Normal and Frictional Interactions between Liposome-Bearing Biomacromolecular Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Klein, Jacob

    2016-08-01

    Highly efficient lubricating boundary layers at biosurfaces such as cartilage have been proposed to comprise phospholipids complexed with biomacromolecules exposed at the surfaces. To gain insight into this, a systematic study on the normal and frictional forces between surfaces bearing a sequentially deposited model alginate-on-chitosan bilayer, bearing different adsorbed phosphatidylcholine (PC) liposomes, was carried out using a surface force balance. Structures of the resulting surface complexes were determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and cryo-scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM). The liposome/lipid-polymer complexes could maintain their integrity up to high pressures in terms of both normal and shear interactions between the surfaces, which were repeatable, reproducible, and revealed very low friction (coefficient of friction μ down to 10(-3)-10(-4), depending on the PC used) up to pressures of hundreds of atm. We attribute this remarkable lubrication capability ultimately to hydration lubrication acting at the hydrated phosphocholine headgroups of the PC lipids, either exposed at the liposome surfaces or through complexation with the polyelectrolyte bilayer. Values of μ, while low, were roughly an order of magnitude higher than for the same PC vesicles adsorbed on bare mica, a difference attributed to their lower density on the bilayer; the bilayer, however, stabilized the PC-vesicles far better than bare mica against rupture and shear at high compressions and sliding. PMID:27409248

  6. Anthrax toxin-induced rupture of artificial lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nablo, Brian J.; Panchal, Rekha G.; Bavari, Sina; Nguyen, Tam L.; Gussio, Rick; Ribot, Wil; Friedlander, Art; Chabot, Donald; Reiner, Joseph E.; Robertson, Joseph W. F.; Balijepalli, Arvind; Halverson, Kelly M.; Kasianowicz, John J.

    2013-08-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that anthrax toxin complexes rupture artificial lipid bilayer membranes when isolated from the blood of infected animals. When the solution pH is temporally acidified to mimic that process in endosomes, recombinant anthrax toxin forms an irreversibly bound complex, which also destabilizes membranes. The results suggest an alternative mechanism for the translocation of anthrax toxin into the cytoplasm.

  7. Super-Sensitive and Robust Biosensors from Supported Polymer Bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Paxton, Walter F.

    2015-09-01

    Biological organisms are potentially the most sensitive and selective biological detection systems known, yet we are currently severely limited in our ability to exploit biological interactions in sensory devices, due in part to the limited stability of biological systems and derived materials. This proposal addresses an important aspect of integrating biological sensory materials in a solid state device. If successful, such technology could enable entirely new classes of robust biosensors that could be miniaturized and deployed in the field. The critical aims of the proposed work were 1) the calibration of a more versatile approach to measuring pH, 2) the use of this method to monitor pH changes caused by the light-induced pumping of protons across vesicles with bacteriorhodopsin integrated into the membranes (either polymer or lipid); 3) the preparation of bilayer assemblies on platinum surfaces; 4) the enhanced detection of lightinduced pH changes driven by bR-loaded supported bilayers. I have developed a methodology that may enable that at interfaces and developed a methodology to characterize the functionality of bilayer membranes with reconstituted membrane proteins. The integrity of the supported bilayer films however must be optimized prior to the full realization of the work originally envisioned in the original proposal. Nevertheless, the work performed on this project and the encouraging results it has produced has demonstrated that these goals are challenging yet within reach.

  8. Coupled Diffusion in Lipid Bilayers upon Close Approach

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Biomembrane interfaces create regions of slowed water dynamics in their vicinity. When two lipid bilayers come together, this effect is further accentuated, and the associated slowdown can affect the dynamics of larger-scale processes such as membrane fusion. We have used molecular dynamics simulations to examine how lipid and water dynamics are affected as two lipid bilayers approach each other. These two interacting fluid systems, lipid and water, both slow and become coupled when the lipid membranes are separated by a thin water layer. We show in particular that the water dynamics become glassy, and diffusion of lipids in the apposed leaflets becomes coupled across the water layer, while the “outer” leaflets remain unaffected. This dynamic coupling between bilayers appears mediated by lipid–water–lipid hydrogen bonding, as it occurs at bilayer separations where water–lipid hydrogen bonds become more common than water–water hydrogen bonds. We further show that such coupling occurs in simulations of vesicle–vesicle fusion prior to the fusion event itself. Such altered dynamics at membrane–membrane interfaces may both stabilize the interfacial contact and slow fusion stalk formation within the interface region. PMID:25535654

  9. Partition, orientation and mobility of ubiquinones in a lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Galassi, Vanesa Viviana; Arantes, Guilherme Menegon

    2015-12-01

    Ubiquinone is the universal mobile charge carrier involved in biological electron transfer processes. Its redox properties and biological function depend on the molecular partition and lateral diffusion over biological membranes. However, ubiquinone localization and dynamics within lipid bilayers are long debated and still uncertain. Here we present molecular dynamics simulations of several ubiquinone homologs with variable isoprenoid tail lengths complexed to phosphatidylcholine bilayers. Initially, a new force-field parametrization for ubiquinone is derived from and compared to high level quantum chemical data. Free energy profiles for ubiquinone insertion in the lipid bilayer are obtained with the new force-field. The profiles allow for the determination of the equilibrium location of ubiquinone in the membrane as well as for the validation of the simulation model by direct comparison with experimental partition coefficients. A detailed analysis of structural properties and interactions shows that the ubiquinone polar head group is localized at the water-bilayer interface at the same depth of the lipid glycerol groups and oriented normal to the membrane plane. Both the localization and orientation of ubiquinone head groups do not change significantly when increasing the number of isoprenoid units. The isoprenoid tail is extended and packed with the lipid acyl chains. For ubiquinones with long tails, the terminal isoprenoid units have high flexibility. Calculated ubiquinone diffusion coefficients are similar to that found for the phosphatidylcholine lipid. These results may have further implications for the mechanisms of ubiquinone transport and binding to respiratory and photosynthetic protein complexes. PMID:26255075

  10. Registered and Antiregistered Phase Separation of Mixed Amphiphilic Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, John J.; Olmsted, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    We derive a mean-field free energy for the phase behavior of coupled bilayer leaflets, which is implicated in cellular processes and important to the design of artificial membranes. Our model accounts for amphiphile-level structural features, particularly hydrophobic mismatch, which promotes antiregistration, in competition with the direct transmidplane coupling usually studied, which promotes registration. We show that the phase diagram of coupled leaflets allows multiple metastable coexistences, and we illustrate the kinetic implications of this with a detailed study of a bilayer of equimolar overall composition. For approximate parameters estimated to apply to phospholipids, equilibrium coexistence is typically registered, but metastable antiregistered phases can be kinetically favored by hydrophobic mismatch. Thus, a bilayer in the spinodal region can require nucleation to equilibrate, in a novel manifestation of Ostwald’s rule of stages. Our results provide a framework for understanding disparate existing observations in the literature, elucidating a subtle competition of couplings and a key role for phase-transition kinetics in bilayer phase behavior. PMID:25902436

  11. Near-perfect bilayer growth of Pb on Ge(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murat Özer, M.; Weitering, Hanno H.

    2004-03-01

    Understanding electrical transport through nanostructures requires almost perfect control of their structure and morphology, which can sometimes be achieved via self assembly. Quantum size effects in metallic nanostructures appear to be a strong driving force for self assembly. Quantum growth of Pb on Si(111) has attracted considerable attention in recent years and evidence exists that flat-topped islands with strongly preferred heights can be kinetically stabilized at moderately low temperatures because of quantum size effects. Although the electronic properties of free-standing Pb films should oscillate with bilayer periodicity, so far there has been no evidence of large-scale bilayer-by-bilayer growth on metallic or semiconducting substrates. We show that Pb films can be grown in a near-perfect bilayer growth mode on Ge(111). The films are atomically flat over macroscopic distances. Vertical step heights were also probed with STM and indicate that atomic-layer relaxations in two-dimensional thin films are substantially different from those in flat-topped islands. These films offer perfect opportunity to investigate the fundamentals of transport in relation to the quantum size effect and atomic-scale properties of thin film nanostructures. This worked is supported by the National Science Foundation under Contract No. DMR 0244570. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  12. Metal ion binding to phospholipid bilayers evaluated by microaffinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ross, Eric E; Hoag, Christian; Pfeifer, Zach; Lundeen, Christopher; Owens, Sarah

    2016-06-17

    Group I and II ion binding to phospholipid membranes was evaluated by affinity chromatography utilizing a new stationary phase system based on lipid bilayers supported within large-pore particles composed of Stöber silica spheres. Using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer for detection, robust determination of binding selectivity within group II ions is achieved with capillary columns containing nanomole quantities of lipid and using picomoles of metal analyte. Columns with a unique lipid formulation can be prepared within three hours using a solvent-casting assembly method. The observable thermotropic phase behavior of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine has a significant effect on alkaline metal binding and demonstrates the dynamic nature of the supported bilayers. Of the group I ions, only lithium exhibits retention with neutral phosphatidylcholine bilayer stationary phases. A comparison of Stöber-based supports with two commercially available large-pore silicas reveals the effect that particle structure has on analyte accessibility to the bilayer surface as evaluated by retention per supported lipid mass. PMID:27189434

  13. The Effects of Polyunsaturated Lipid Components on bilayer Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramudya, Y.; Kiss, A.; Nguyen, Lam T.; Yuan, J.; Hirst, Linda S.

    2007-03-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), such as DHA (Docosahexanoic Acid) and AA (Alphalinoleic Acid) have been the focus of much research attention in recent years, due to their apparent health benefits and effects on cell physiology. They are found in a variety of biological membranes and have been implicated with lipid raft formation and possible function, particularly in the retinal rod cells and the central nervous system. In this work lipid bilayer structure has been investigated in lipid mixtures, incorporating polyunsaturated fatty acid moieties. The structural effects of increasing concentrations of both symmetric and asymmetric PUFA materials on the bilayer structure are investigated via synchrotron x-ray diffraction on solution samples. We observe bilayer spacings to increase with the percentage of unsaturated fatty acid lipid in the membrane, whilst the degree of ordering significantly decreases. In fact above 20% of fatty acid, well defined bilayers are no longer observed to form. Evidence of phase separation can be clearly seen from these x-ray results and in combination with AFM measurements.

  14. Dynamics and instabilities of lipid bilayer membrane shapes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zheng; Baumgart, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes undergo constant shape remodeling involving the formation of highly curved structures. The lipid bilayer represents the fundamental architecture of the cellular membrane with its shapes determined by the Helfrich curvature bending energy. However, the dynamics of bilayer shape transitions, especially their modulation by membrane proteins, and the resulting shape instabilities, are still not well understood. Here, we review in a unifying manner several theories that describe the fluctuations (i.e. undulations) of bilayer shapes as well as their local coupling with lipid or protein density variation. The coupling between local membrane curvature and lipid density gives rise to a ‘slipping mode’ in addition to the conventional ‘bending mode’ for damping the membrane fluctuation. This leads to a number of interesting experimental phenomena regarding bilayer shape dynamics. More importantly, curvature-inducing proteins can couple with membrane shape and eventually render the membrane unstable. A criterion for membrane shape instability is derived from a linear stability analysis. The instability criterion reemphasizes the importance of membrane tension in regulating the stability and dynamics of membrane geometry. Recent progresses in understanding the role of membrane tension in regulating dynamical cellular processes are also reviewed. Protein density is emphasized as a key factor in regulating membrane shape transitions: a threshold density of curvature coupling proteins is required for inducing membrane morphology transitions. PMID:24529968

  15. A comparison of DMPC- and DLPE-based lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Damodaran, K V; Merz, K M

    1994-01-01

    A 250 ps molecular dynamics simulation of the dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC)-based lipid bilayer, including explicit water molecules, is reported. The solvent environment of the head groups and other structural properties of the bilayer have been analyzed and compared with experimental results as well as our previous simulation of the dilauroylphosphatidylethanolamine (DLPE)-based bilayer. From this comparison we find that the solvent structure around the DMPC head group (clathrate shell) is significantly different than that around the DLPE head group (typical hydrogen bonding interactions). We have modeled the probable relationship between the different solvent environments around the R-N(CH3)3+ (DMPC) and R-NH3+ (DLPE) head groups and the different interlammelar distances in these systems by performing potential of mean force (PMF) simulations on two N(CH3)4+ and NH4+ ions in water. From the PMF simulations it appears that the differences in the hydration of the DMPC and DLPE head groups is not responsible for the differences in the hydration force observed for these systems. We also find that the orientational polarization of DLPE and DMPC is similar, which suggests that solvent polarization is not responsible for the differences in the hydration repulsion behavior observed in these systems. We also examined the order parameters for DMPC and found them to be in reasonable agreement with experiment. Given the different characteristics of the DLPE and DMPC head groups, we suggest an explanation of the differences in the interlammellar spacings of bilayers composed of these like-charged lipids. From our DLPE simulations we find that the R-NH3+ head groups can interact with the nonesterified oxygens of the phosphate group in an intraleaflet or an interleaflet manner. For the latter a "cross link" between two leaflets can be formed, which causes a stabilization of the interlamellar spacings at fairly short distances. Moreover, due to the strong intraleaflet

  16. Direct in situ measurement of specific capacitance, monolayer tension, and bilayer tension in a droplet interface bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Graham J.; Venkatesan, Guru A.; Collier, C. Patrick; Sarles, Stephen A.

    2015-08-05

    In this study, thickness and tension are important physical parameters of model cell membranes. However, traditional methods to measure these quantities require multiple experiments using separate equipment. This work introduces a new multi-step procedure for directly accessing in situ multiple physical properties of droplet interface bilayers (DIB), including specific capacitance (related to thickness), lipid monolayer tension in the Plateau-Gibbs border, and bilayer tension. The procedure employs a combination of mechanical manipulation of bilayer area followed by electrowetting of the capacitive interface to examine the sensitivities of bilayer capacitance to area and contact angle to voltage, respectively. These data allow for determining the specific capacitance of the membrane and surface tension of the lipid monolayer, which are then used to compute bilayer thickness and tension, respectively. The use of DIBs affords accurate optical imaging of the connected droplets in addition to electrical measurements of bilayer capacitance, and it allows for reversibly varying bilayer area. After validating the accuracy of the technique with diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhPC) DIBs in hexadecane, the method is applied herein to quantify separately the effects on membrane thickness and tension caused by varying the solvent in which the DIB is formed and introducing cholesterol into the bilayer. Because the technique relies only on capacitance measurements and optical images to determine both thickness and tension, this approach is specifically well-suited for studying the effects of peptides, biomolecules, natural and synthetic nanoparticles, and other species that accumulate within membranes without altering bilayer conductance.

  17. Bilayer Approaches for Nanoparticle Phase Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kini, Gautam Chandrakanth

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are often synthesized in organic solvents due to advantages of superior size and shape control obtainable in a non-polar environment. However, many applications featuring NPs require them to be in aqueous media. To transfer NPs from oil to water, surfactants with amphiphilic (hydrophobic and hydrophilic) groups have been widely used. A popular phase-transfer approach involves formation of oil-in-water emulsions upon which the oil storing the NPs is boiled off. In the process, surfactants form bilayers with hydrophobic groups on the NPs rendering them water-dispersible. This transfer route however is limited in that NPs aggregate to form clusters which results in poor colloidal stability and for the specific case of quantum dots (QDs), adversely impacts optical properties. It has ever since remained a challenge to devise approaches that transfer NPs from oil to water as single particles without compromising NP stability and properties. We have discovered that by simple addition of salt to water during the step of emulsion formation, NP transfer efficiency can be greatly enhanced in "salty-micelles" of surfactants. The strength of this approach lies in its simplicity and generic nature in that the transfer scheme is valid for different NP, surfactant and salt types. Using a model system with cadmium selenide (CdSe) QDs as NPs, Aerosol-OT (AOT) as the surfactant and NaCl as the salt in water, we found >90% of CdSe QDs transferred in salty-micelles of AOT which was significantly higher than the 45-55% QDs that transferred in deionized-water (DI-water) micelles of AOT. In the salty-micelle environment, QDs were found to exist predominantly as single NPs with narrow size distribution, as established by light scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy. The effects of salt were in lowering aqueous solubility of AOT through "salting-out" action and in screening repulsions between like-charged head groups of AOT molecules

  18. CuO{sub 2} bilayer containing magnetic impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Bandte, C.; Appel, J.

    1995-05-01

    The effect of magnetic impurities between the two planes of a CuO{sub 2} bilayer on the superconducting properties is considered. To this end a previously introduced model for a CuO{sub 2} bilayer with finite lateral size {ital L} is used. This system undergoes a bona fide transition (crossover) from two-dimensional to zero-dimensional behavior as the temperature decreases below a size-dependent value {ital T}{sub {ital c}}{sup *}. The model is an attempt to explain experimental findings on YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}/PrBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} and Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8}/Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CuO{sub 6} superlattices which seem to indicate that a single CuO{sub 2} bilayer can still exhibit superconducting behavior. {ital T}{sub {ital c}}{sup *} is found to decrease with increasing impurity concentration. This could be a hint at the microscopic origin of the measured {ital T}{sub {ital c}} depression in Tl{sub 2{minus}{ital x}}Sm{sub {ital x}}Ba{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub {ital y}} with increasing {ital x}. The recently discovered paramagnetic Meissner effect cannot be described by the CuO{sub 2} bilayer model with magnetic impurities, although the Josephson term in the free-energy functional changes sign for sufficiently high impurity concentration, i.e., the bilayer behaves like a {pi} junction.

  19. Structure and interactive properties of highly fluorinated phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, T J; Simon, S A; Vierling, P; Santaella, C; Ravily, V

    1996-01-01

    Because liposomes containing fluoroalkylated phospholipids are being developed for in vivo drug delivery, the structure and interactive properties of several fluoroalkylated glycerophosphocholines (PCs) were investigated by x-ray diffraction/osmotic stress, dipole potential, and hydrophobic ion binding measurements. The lipids included PCs with highly fluorinated tails on both alkyl chains and PCs with one hydrocarbon chain and one fluoroalkylated chain. Electron density profiles showed high electron density peaks in the center of the bilayer corresponding to the fluorine atoms. The height and width of these high density peaks varied systematically, depending on the number of fluorines and their position on the alkyl chains, and on whether the bilayer was in the gel or liquid crystalline phase. Wide-angle diffraction showed that in both gel and liquid crystalline bilayers the distance between adjacent alkyl chains was greater in fluoroalkylated PCs than in analogous hydrocarbon PCs. For interbilayer separations of less than about 8 A, pressure-distance relations for fluoroalkylated PCs were similar to those previously obtained from PC bilayers with hydrocarbon chains. However, for bilayer separations greater than 8A, the total repulsive pressure depended on whether the fluoroalkylated PC was in a gel or liquid-crystalline phase. We argue that these pressure-distance relations contain contributions from both hydration and entropic repulsive pressures. Dipole potentials ranged from -680 mV for PCs with both chains fluoroalkylated to -180 mV for PCs with one chain fluoroalkylated, compared to +415 mV for egg PC. The change in dipole potential as a function of subphase concentration of tetraphenyl-boron was much larger for egg PC than for fluorinated PC monolayers, indicating that the fluorine atoms modified the binding of this hydrophobic anion. Thus, compared to conventional liposomes, liposomes made from fluoroalkylated PCs have different binding properties, which

  20. Cholesterol enhances surface water diffusion of phospholipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Kausik, Ravinath; Han, Songi; Olijve, Luuk L. C.

    2014-12-14

    Elucidating the physical effect of cholesterol (Chol) on biological membranes is necessary towards rationalizing their structural and functional role in cell membranes. One of the debated questions is the role of hydration water in Chol-embedding lipid membranes, for which only little direct experimental data are available. Here, we study the hydration dynamics in a series of Chol-rich and depleted bilayer systems using an approach termed {sup 1}H Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP) NMR relaxometry that enables the sensitive and selective determination of water diffusion within 5–10 Å of a nitroxide-based spin label, positioned off the surface of the polar headgroups or within the nonpolar core of lipid membranes. The Chol-rich membrane systems were prepared from mixtures of Chol, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and/or dioctadecyl phosphatidylcholine lipid that are known to form liquid-ordered, raft-like, domains. Our data reveal that the translational diffusion of local water on the surface and within the hydrocarbon volume of the bilayer is significantly altered, but in opposite directions: accelerated on the membrane surface and dramatically slowed in the bilayer interior with increasing Chol content. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) lineshape analysis shows looser packing of lipid headgroups and concurrently tighter packing in the bilayer core with increasing Chol content, with the effects peaking at lipid compositions reported to form lipid rafts. The complementary capability of ODNP and EPR to site-specifically probe the hydration dynamics and lipid ordering in lipid membrane systems extends the current understanding of how Chol may regulate biological processes. One possible role of Chol is the facilitation of interactions between biological constituents and the lipid membrane through the weakening or disruption of strong hydrogen-bond networks of the surface hydration layers that otherwise exert stronger repulsive forces, as reflected in

  1. Cholesterol enhances surface water diffusion of phospholipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Olijve, Luuk L. C.; Kausik, Ravinath; Han, Songi

    2014-12-01

    Elucidating the physical effect of cholesterol (Chol) on biological membranes is necessary towards rationalizing their structural and functional role in cell membranes. One of the debated questions is the role of hydration water in Chol-embedding lipid membranes, for which only little direct experimental data are available. Here, we study the hydration dynamics in a series of Chol-rich and depleted bilayer systems using an approach termed 1H Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP) NMR relaxometry that enables the sensitive and selective determination of water diffusion within 5-10 Å of a nitroxide-based spin label, positioned off the surface of the polar headgroups or within the nonpolar core of lipid membranes. The Chol-rich membrane systems were prepared from mixtures of Chol, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and/or dioctadecyl phosphatidylcholine lipid that are known to form liquid-ordered, raft-like, domains. Our data reveal that the translational diffusion of local water on the surface and within the hydrocarbon volume of the bilayer is significantly altered, but in opposite directions: accelerated on the membrane surface and dramatically slowed in the bilayer interior with increasing Chol content. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) lineshape analysis shows looser packing of lipid headgroups and concurrently tighter packing in the bilayer core with increasing Chol content, with the effects peaking at lipid compositions reported to form lipid rafts. The complementary capability of ODNP and EPR to site-specifically probe the hydration dynamics and lipid ordering in lipid membrane systems extends the current understanding of how Chol may regulate biological processes. One possible role of Chol is the facilitation of interactions between biological constituents and the lipid membrane through the weakening or disruption of strong hydrogen-bond networks of the surface hydration layers that otherwise exert stronger repulsive forces, as reflected in faster

  2. Structure and properties of mixed-chain phosphatidylcholine bilayers.

    PubMed

    Shah, J; Sripada, P K; Shipley, G G

    1990-05-01

    The structural and thermotropic properties of the hydrated mixed-chain phosphatidylcholines (PCs), C(8):C(18)-PC and C(10):C(18)-PC, have been studied by X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. For fully hydrated C(8):C(18)-PC, the reversible chain melting transition is observed at 9.9 degrees C (delta H = 7.3 kcal/mol). X-ray diffraction at 0 degrees C (below the chain melting transition) shows a small bilayer repeat distance, d = 51.0 A, and a sharp, symmetric wide-angle reflection at 4.1 A, characteristic of a mixed interdigitated bilayer gel phase [see McIntosh, T. J., Simon, S. A., Ellington, J. C., Jr., & Porter, N. A. (1984) Biochemistry 23, 4038-4044; Hui, S. W., Mason, J. T., & Huang, C. (1984) Biochemistry 23, 5570-5577]. At 30 degrees C (above the chain melting transition), a diffuse band is observed at 4.5 A characteristic of an L alpha phase but with an increased bilayer periodicity, d = 61 A. Both the calculated lipid bilayer thickness (d1) and that determined directly from electron density profiles (dp-p) show unusual increases as a consequence of chain melting. In contrast, fully hydrated C(10):C(18)-PC shows an asymmetric endothermic transition at 11.8 degrees C. Below the chain melting transition, two lamellar phases are present, corresponding to coexisting interdigitated (d = 52.3 A) and noninterdigitated (d = 62.5 A) bilayer gel phases. The relative amounts of these phases depend upon the low-temperature incubation and/or hydration conditions, suggesting conversions, albeit kinetically complex, between metastable, and stable phases. The different behavior of C(8):C(18)-PC and C(10):C(18)-PC, as well as their positional isomers, is rationalized in terms of the molecular conformation of PC. PMID:2361142

  3. Investigating Hydrophilic Pores in Model Lipid Bilayers using Molecular Simulations: Correlating Bilayer Properties with Pore Formation Thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yuan; Sinha, Sudipta Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Cell-penetrating and antimicrobial peptides show remarkable ability to translocate across physiological membranes. Along with factors such as electric potential induced-perturbations of membrane structure and surface tension effects, experiments invoke pore-like membrane configurations during the solute transfer process into vesicles and cells. The initiation and formation of pores are associated with a non-trivial free energy cost, thus necessitating consideration of the factors associated with pore formation and attendant free energetics. Due to experimental and modeling challenges related to the long timescales of the translocation process, we use umbrella-sampling molecular dynamics simulations with a lipid-density based order parameter to investigate membrane pore-formation free energy employing Martini coarse-grained models. We investigate structure and thermodynamic features of the pore in 18 lipids spanning a range of head-groups, charge states, acyl chain lengths and saturation. We probe the dependence of pore-formation barriers on area per lipid, lipid bilayer thickness, membrane bending rigidities in three different lipid classes. The pore formation free energy in pure bilayers and peptide translocating scenarios are significantly coupled with bilayer thickness. Thicker bilayers require more reversible work to create pores. Pore formation free energy is higher in peptide-lipid systems relative to the peptide-free lipid systems due to penalties to maintain solvation of charged hydrophilic solutes within the membrane environment. PMID:25614183

  4. van der Waals bilayer energetics: Generalized stacking-fault energy of graphene, boron nitride, and graphene/boron nitride bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Songsong; Han, Jian; Dai, Shuyang; Sun, Jianwei; Srolovitz, David J.

    2015-10-01

    The structure, thermodynamics, and band gaps in graphene/graphene, boron nitride/boron nitride, and graphene/boron nitride bilayers are determined using several different corrections to first-principles approaches to account for the dispersion interactions. While the density functional dispersion correction, van der Waals density functional, meta-generalized gradient approximation, and adiabatic fluctuation-dissipation theorem methods (ACFDT-RPA) all lead to qualitatively similar predictions, the best accuracy is obtained through the application of the computationally expensive ACFDT-RPA method. We present an accurate ACFDT-RPA-based method to determine bilayer structure, generalized stacking-fault energy (GSFE), and band gaps as a function of the relative translation states of the two layers. The GSFE data clearly identify all of the stable and metastable bilayer translations as well as the barriers between them. This is key for predicting the sliding, formation, and adhesion energies for homo- and hetero-bilayers, as well as for the determination of defects in such multilayer van der Waals systems. These, in turn, provide an accurate approach for determining and manipulating the spatial variation of electronic structure.

  5. Stability analysis of a bilayer contained within a cylindrical tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yuanyuan

    Airways in the lung are coated with a liquid bilayer consisting of a serous layer adjacent to a more viscous mucus layer which is contiguous with the air core. An instability due to surface tension at the interfaces may lead to the formation of a liquid plug that blocks the passage of air. This is known as airway closure. A stability analysis is carried out for the case when a Newtonian and immiscible liquid bilayer coats a compliant tube in the presence of an insoluble surfactant monolayer at the mucus-gas interface. A surface active material such as surfactant lowers the surface tension and also generates a surface stress at the interface, both of which are stabilizing, while the wall compliance may accelerate the formation of the liquid bridge. A system of nonlinear coupled equations for the deflections of the interfaces and the surfactant concentration is derived by using an extended lubrication theory analysis. A linear stability study using normal modes is conducted by linearizing the nonlinear evolution equations. A linear eigenvalue problem for the perturbation amplitudes is obtained. Non-trivial solutions are obtained provided the determinant of a linear system is singular. A fourth order polynomial for the growth rate of the disturbances is derived, whose coefficients depend on the wavenumber of the perturbation, the wall characteristics, the Marangoni number, the thickness of the bilayer, the aspect thickness ratio, the viscosity ratio of two liquid layers, and the surface tension ratio. Both stabilizing and destabilizing effects of various system parameters are investigated. A classical lubrication theory model is also derived for cases where a bilayer coats a rigid tube with insoluble surfactant along the liquid-gas interface, and a bilayer coating in a compliant tube with a clean liquid-gas interface. Results serve as a validation of the extended lubrication theory model. The accuracy of the extended lubrication theory model as the bilayer thickness

  6. High Yield Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth of High Quality Large-Area AB Stacked Bilayer Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lixin; Zhou, Hailong; Cheng, Rui; Yu, Woo Jong; Liu, Yuan; Chen, Yu; Shaw, Jonathan; Zhong, Xing; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2012-01-01

    Bernal stacked (AB stacked) bilayer graphene is of significant interest for functional electronic and photonic devices due to the feasibility to continuously tune its band gap with a vertical electrical field. Mechanical exfoliation can be used to produce AB stacked bilayer graphene flakes but typically with the sizes limited to a few micrometers. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been recently explored for the synthesis of bilayer graphene but usually with limited coverage and a mixture of AB and randomly stacked structures. Herein we report a rational approach to produce large-area high quality AB stacked bilayer graphene. We show that the self-limiting effect of graphene growth on Cu foil can be broken by using a high H2/CH4 ratio in a low pressure CVD process to enable the continued growth of bilayer graphene. A high temperature and low pressure nucleation step is found to be critical for the formation of bilayer graphene nuclei with high AB stacking ratio. A rational design of a two-step CVD process is developed for the growth of bilayer graphene with high AB stacking ratio (up to 90 %) and high coverage (up to 99 %). The electrical transport studies demonstrated that devices made of the as-grown bilayer graphene exhibit typical characteristics of AB stacked bilayer graphene with the highest carrier mobility exceeding 4,000 cm2/V·s at room temperature, comparable to that of the exfoliated bilayer graphene. PMID:22906199

  7. Volatile anesthetics inhibit sodium channels without altering bulk lipid bilayer properties

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, R. Lea; Lee, William; Schultz, Margaret F.; Ingólfsson, Helgi I.

    2014-01-01

    Although general anesthetics are clinically important and widely used, their molecular mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. Volatile anesthetics such as isoflurane (ISO) are thought to alter neuronal function by depressing excitatory and facilitating inhibitory neurotransmission through direct interactions with specific protein targets, including voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav). Many anesthetics alter lipid bilayer properties, suggesting that ion channel function might also be altered indirectly through effects on the lipid bilayer. We compared the effects of ISO and of a series of fluorobenzene (FB) model volatile anesthetics on Nav function and lipid bilayer properties. We examined the effects of these agents on Nav in neuronal cells using whole-cell electrophysiology, and on lipid bilayer properties using a gramicidin-based fluorescence assay, which is a functional assay for detecting changes in lipid bilayer properties sensed by a bilayer-spanning ion channel. At clinically relevant concentrations (defined by the minimum alveolar concentration), both the FBs and ISO produced prepulse-dependent inhibition of Nav and shifted the voltage dependence of inactivation toward more hyperpolarized potentials without affecting lipid bilayer properties, as sensed by gramicidin channels. Only at supra-anesthetic (toxic) concentrations did ISO alter lipid bilayer properties. These results suggest that clinically relevant concentrations of volatile anesthetics alter Nav function through direct interactions with the channel protein with little, if any, contribution from changes in bulk lipid bilayer properties. Our findings further suggest that changes in lipid bilayer properties are not involved in clinical anesthesia. PMID:25385786

  8. The Alzheimer's disease Aβ peptide binds to the anionic DMPS lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Lockhart, Christopher; Klimov, Dmitri K

    2016-06-01

    We have applied isobaric-isothermal replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) and the all-atom explicit water model to study binding of Aβ10-40 peptide to the anionic DMPS bilayer. To provide comparison with a zwitterionic bilayer, we used our previous REMD simulations probing binding of the same peptide to the DMPC bilayer. Using two sets of simulations, we comparatively analyzed the equilibrium Aβ conformational ensemble, peptide-bilayer interactions, and changes in the bilayer structure induced by Aβ binding. Our results are six-fold. (1) Binding to the DMPS bilayer triggers the formation of stable helix in the Aβ C-terminal, although the helix-inducing effect caused by DMPS lipids is weaker than that of DMPC. (2) Compared to the DMPC-bound Aβ monomer, the anionic bilayer weakens intrapeptide interactions, particularly, formed by charged amino acids. (3) Binding of Aβ peptide to the DMPS bilayer is primarily governed by electrostatic interactions between charged amino acids and charged lipid groups. In contrast, these interactions play minor role in Aβ binding to the DMPC bilayer. (4) Aβ peptide generally resides on the DMPS bilayer surface causing relatively minor bilayer thinning. The opposite scenario applies to Aβ binding to the DMPC bilayer. (5) In contrast to DMPC simulations, Aβ largely expels anionic lipids from its binding "footprint" forming a ring of charged amino acids mixed with charged lipid groups around the peptide. (6) Aβ binding disorders proximal DMPS lipids more strongly than their DMPC counterparts. Our simulations show that Aβ monomers fail to perturb anionic or zwitterionic bilayers across both leaflets. PMID:26947182

  9. Collective Lipid Bilayer Dynamics Excited by Surface Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusch, T.; Schülein, F. J. R.; Nicolas, J. D.; Osterhoff, M.; Beerlink, A.; Krenner, H. J.; Müller, M.; Wixforth, A.; Salditt, T.

    2014-09-01

    We use standing surface acoustic waves to induce coherent phonons in model lipid multilayers deposited on a piezoelectric surface. Probing the structure by phase-controlled stroboscopic x-ray pulses we find that the internal lipid bilayer electron density profile oscillates in response to the externally driven motion of the lipid film. The structural response to the well-controlled motion is a strong indication that bilayer structure and membrane fluctuations are intrinsically coupled, even though these structural changes are averaged out in equilibrium and time integrating measurements. Here the effects are revealed by a timing scheme with temporal resolution on the picosecond scale in combination with the sub-nm spatial resolution, enabled by high brilliance synchrotron x-ray reflectivity.

  10. Supported Lipid Bilayer Technology for the Study of Cellular Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Crites, Travis J.; Maddox, Michael; Padhan, Kartika; Muller, James; Eigsti, Calvin; Varma, Rajat

    2015-01-01

    Glass-supported lipid bilayers presenting freely diffusing proteins have served as a powerful tool for studying cell-cell interfaces, in particular, T cell–antigen presenting cell (APC) interactions, using optical microscopy. Here we expand upon existing protocols and describe the preparation of liposomes by an extrusion method, and describe how this system can be used to study immune synapse formation by Jurkat cells. We also present a method for forming such lipid bilayers on silica beads for the study of signaling responses by population methods, such as western blotting, flow cytometry, and gene-expression analysis. Finally, we describe how to design and prepare transmembrane-anchored protein-laden liposomes, following expression in suspension CHO (CHOs) cells, a mammalian expression system alternative to insect and bacterial cell lines, which do not produce mammalian glycosylation patterns. Such transmembrane-anchored proteins may have many novel applications in cell biology and immunology. PMID:26331983

  11. Electrical oscillation in Pt/VO{sub 2} bilayer strips

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ying; Qi, Long; Xu, Yanjun; Wu, Yihong; Chai, Jianwei; Wang, Shijie; Yang, Yumeng; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2015-02-14

    We report on the observation of stable electrical oscillation in Pt/vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) bilayer strips, in which the Pt overlayer serves the dual purposes of heating up the VO{sub 2} and weakening the electric field in the VO{sub 2} layer. Systematic measurements in an ultrahigh vacuum nanoprobe system show that the oscillation frequency increases with the bias current and/or with decreasing device dimension. In contrast to most VO{sub 2}-based oscillators reported to date, which are electrically triggered, current-induced Joule heating in the Pt overlayer is found to play a dominant role in the generation of oscillation in Pt/VO{sub 2} bilayers. A simple model involving thermally triggered transition of VO{sub 2} on a heat sink is able to account for the experimental observations. The results in this work provide an alternative view of the triggering mechanism in VO{sub 2}-based oscillators.

  12. First-principles modeling hydrogenation of bilayered boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Wang; Peng, Zhang; Xiang-Mei, Duan

    2016-05-01

    We have investigated the structural and electronic characteristics of hydrogenated boron-nitride bilayer (H–BNBN–H) using first-principles calculations. The results show that hydrogenation can significantly reduce the energy gap of the BN–BN into the visible-light region. Interestingly, the electric field induced by the interface dipoles helps to promote the formation of well-separated electron–hole pairs, as demonstrated by the charge distribution of the VBM and CBM. Moreover, the applied bias voltage on the vertical direction of the bilayer could modulate the band gap, resulting in transition from semiconductor to metal. We conclude that H–BNBN–H could improve the solar energy conversion efficiency, which may provide a new way for tuning the electronic devices to meet different environments and demands. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11574167).

  13. Laser induced thermal-wave fields in bilayered spherical solids.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guangxi; Chen, Zhifeng; Wang, Chinhua; Mandelis, Andreas

    2009-03-01

    We present a theoretical model for evaluating solid bilayered spherical samples (surfaces) that are heated by a frequency modulated light beam generating thermal waves. The Green's function method is used as it provides a way of evaluating thermal-wave fields of bilayered spherical structures with arbitrary intensity distributions of incident laser beams. The specific thermal-wave Green's function corresponding to the composite structure has been derived. The characteristics of the thermal-wave field with respect to the thermal diffusivity of the material, the diameter of the sample, the size of the incident beam, and the polar angle at which the thermal-wave field is measured on the surface are presented. Experimental results obtained with laser infrared photothermal radiometry are fitted to the theory and the thermal diffusivities of steel spheres are deduced. PMID:19334944

  14. Concentration fluctuations and phase transitions in coupled modulated bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Yuichi; Komura, Shigeyuki; Andelman, David

    2012-08-01

    We consider the formation of finite-size domains in lipid bilayers consisting of saturated and hybrid lipids. First, we describe a monolayer model that includes a coupling between a compositional scalar field and a two-dimensional vectorial order parameter. Such a coupling yields an effective two-dimensional microemulsion free energy for the lipid monolayer, and its characteristic length of compositional modulations can be considered as the origin of finite-size domains in biological membranes. Next, we consider a coupled bilayer composed of two modulated monolayers and discuss the static and dynamic properties of concentration fluctuations above the transition temperature. We also investigate the micro-phase separation below the transition temperature and compare the micro-phase separated structures with statics and dynamics of concentration fluctuations above the transition.

  15. Bilayer structures optimization as antireflective coating for silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccon, S.; Zuppella, P.; Corso, A. J.; Pelizzo, M. G.

    2014-10-01

    The optimization of a silicon solar cell involves also the design of a proper antireflective coating (AR). We have considered different bilayer structures. The use of bilayers is oriented to have an antireflective effect on a broader range of wavelengths compared to single film AR. The materials considered include silicon oxide, magnesium fluoride, silicon nitride and titanium oxide. The thickness of each film in each structure has been optimized by theoretical calculations in order to minimize the weighted reflectivity, Rw. This is calculated taking into account the optical reflectivity, the internal quantum efficiency of the silicon solar cell and the solar flux on all the range of wavelengths of interest. Some of these optimized structures have been realized by e-beam vapor deposition as first tests. The improved optical performance of the samples have been verified at the UV-vis-NIR spectrophotometer.

  16. Unusual magnetic properties of superconducting Bi/Ni bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hexin; Jin, Xiaofeng; Jin Group Team

    Superconductivity and ferromagnetism are two incompatible phenomena. However, the interaction between them attracts numerous physicists' interests for both theoretical and experimental purposes. Recently, increasing experimental discoveries reveal unconventional effects in superconductor and ferromagnet hybrids, which stimulates a new field called superconducting spintronics. In present work, we report various intriguing magnetic properties of an unexpected superconducting bilayer consisting of non-superconducting Bi and ferromagnetic Ni. A large spontaneous magnetization is induced when the temperature is decreased below the superconductivity transition temperature, which indicates a complex interaction between superconductivity and ferromagnetism in this bilayer. The zero field cooling results show normal Meissner effect while the field cooling results show paramagnetic Meissner effect. Besides, magnetic hysteresis loops in low temperatures show flux pinning and flux jumping effects. Our findings pave the way for exploring unconventional superconductivity coupled to ferromagnetism and potential applications in superconducting spintronics.

  17. Mechanical properties of lipid bilayers and regulation of mechanosensitive function

    PubMed Central

    Balleza, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Material properties of lipid bilayers, including thickness, intrinsic curvature and compressibility regulate the function of mechanosensitive (MS) channels. This regulation is dependent on phospholipid composition, lateral packing and organization within the membrane. Therefore, a more complete framework to understand the functioning of MS channels requires insights into bilayer structure, thermodynamics and phospholipid structure, as well as lipid-protein interactions. Phospholipids and MS channels interact with each other mainly through electrostatic forces and hydrophobic matching, which are also crucial for antimicrobial peptides. They are excellent models for studying the formation and stabilization of membrane pores. Importantly, they perform equivalent responses as MS channels: (1) tilting in response to tension and (2) dissipation of osmotic gradients. Lessons learned from pore forming peptides could enrich our knowledge of mechanisms of action and evolution of these channels. Here, the current state of the art is presented and general principles of membrane regulation of mechanosensitive function are discussed. PMID:22790280

  18. Evolution of interlayer coupling in twisted molybdenum disulfide bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kaihui; Zhang, Liming; Cao, Ting; Jin, Chenhao; Qiu, Diana; Zhou, Qin; Zettl, Alex; Yang, Peidong; Louie, Steve G.; Wang, Feng

    2014-09-01

    Van der Waals coupling is emerging as a powerful method to engineer physical properties of atomically thin two-dimensional materials. In coupled graphene-graphene and graphene-boron nitride layers, interesting physical phenomena ranging from Fermi velocity renormalization to Hofstadter’s butterfly pattern have been demonstrated. Atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides, another family of two-dimensional-layered semiconductors, can show distinct coupling phenomena. Here we demonstrate the evolution of interlayer coupling with twist angles in as-grown molybdenum disulfide bilayers. We find that the indirect bandgap size varies appreciably with the stacking configuration: it shows the largest redshift for AA- and AB-stacked bilayers, and a significantly smaller but constant redshift for all other twist angles. Our observations, together with ab initio calculations, reveal that this evolution of interlayer coupling originates from the repulsive steric effects that leads to different interlayer separations between the two molybdenum disulfide layers in different stacking configurations.

  19. On the stability of foams made with surfactant bilayer phases.

    PubMed

    Briceño-Ahumada, Zenaida; Maldonado, Amir; Impéror-Clerc, Marianne; Langevin, Dominique

    2016-02-01

    The stability of foams made with sponge phases (L3 phases) and lamellar phases (L(α) phases), both containing surfactant bilayers, has been investigated. The extreme stability of foams made with lamellar phases seems essentially due to the high viscosity of the foaming solution, which slows down gravity drainage. Moreover, the foams start draining only when the buoyancy stress overcomes the yield stress of the L(α) phase. The bubble growth associated with gas transfer is unusual: it follows a power law with an exponent smaller than those corresponding to Ostwald ripening (wet foams) and to coarsening (dry foams). The foams made with sponge phases are in turn very unstable, even less stable than pure surfactant foams made with glycerol solutions having the same viscosity. The fact that the surfactant bilayers in the sponge phase have a negative Gaussian curvature could facilitate bubble coalescence. PMID:26647140

  20. Ferromagnetic resonance of exchange-coupled perpendicularly magnetized bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devolder, Thibaut

    2016-04-01

    Strong ferromagnetic interlayer exchange couplings J in perpendicularly magnetized systems are becoming increasingly desirable for applications. We study whether ferromagnetic interlayer exchange couplings can be measured by a combination of broadband ferromagnetic resonance methods and magnetometry hysteresis loops. For this, we model the switching and the eigenexcitations in bilayer systems comprising a soft layer coupled to a thicker harder layer that possesses higher perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. For large J > 0, the switching fields are essentially independent of J but the frequency of the optical eigenmode of the bilayer and the linewidth of the acoustical and optical eigenmode are directly sensitive to the coupling. We derive a corpus of compact analytical expressions to analyze these frequencies, their linewidth and discuss the meaning thereof. We illustrate this corpus on a system mimicking the fixed layers of a magnetic tunnel junction meant for spin torque applications.

  1. From helical state to chiral state in ferromagnetic bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lei; Zhou, Yuan; Zhang, Jun

    2015-06-01

    We explore topological phases in biased ferromagnetic bilayer graphene, formed by bilayer graphene subjected to an external ferromagnetic exchange field, under a magnetic field. The most likely way to obtain a variety of distinct broken symmetry topological phases is proposed by means of ferromagnetic exchange field. Both spin-filtered quantum Hall and quantum spin Hall (QSH) phases are found. Edge modes in this QSH phase carry charge, spin and valley currents. When both time reversal and inversion symmetries are broken, the QSH phase remains robust against weak disorder. Moreover, topological phase transition from helical phase to chiral phase can be driven by simply tuning bias voltage or Fermi energy. A few possible experimental realizations are also discussed.

  2. Layer Anti-Ferromagnetism on Bilayer Honeycomb Lattice

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hong-Shuai; Chen, Yao-Hua; Lin, Heng-Fu; Liu, Hai-Di; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Bilayer honeycomb lattice, with inter-layer tunneling energy, has a parabolic dispersion relation, and the inter-layer hopping can cause the charge imbalance between two sublattices. Here, we investigate the metal-insulator and magnetic phase transitions on the strongly correlated bilayer honeycomb lattice by cellular dynamical mean-field theory combined with continuous time quantum Monte Carlo method. The procedures of magnetic spontaneous symmetry breaking on dimer and non-dimer sites are different, causing a novel phase transition between normal anti-ferromagnet and layer anti-ferromagnet. The whole phase diagrams about the magnetism, temperature, interaction and inter-layer hopping are obtained. Finally, we propose an experimental protocol to observe these phenomena in future optical lattice experiments. PMID:24947369

  3. Bilayer graphene: physics and application outlook in photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hugen

    2015-05-01

    Layered materials, such as graphene, transition metal dichacogenides and black phosphorus have attracted lots of attention recently. They are emerging novel materials in electronics and photonics, with tremendous potential in revolutionizing the traditional electronics and photonics industry. Marrying layered material to the nanophotonics is being proved fruitful. With the recent emphasis and development of metasurfaces in nanophotonics, atomically thin materials can find their unique position and strength in this field. In this article, I will focus on one specific two dimensional material: bilayer graphene. Basic physics will be reviewed, such as band-gap opening, electron-phonon interaction, phonon-plasmon interaction and Fano resonances in the optical response. Moreover, I will review the application of bilayer graphene as a sensitive and fast photodetector. An outlook will be given in the final part of the paper.

  4. Electron diffraction studies on CVD grown bi-layered graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingam, Kiran; Karakaya, Mehmet; Podila, Ramakrishna; Quin, Haijun; Rao, Apparao; Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC USA 29634. Team; Advanced Materials Research Laboratories, Clemson University, Anderson, SC USA 29625 Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Graphene has generated enormous interest in the scientific community due to its peculiar properties like electron mobility, thermal conductivity etc. Several recent reports on exfoliated graphene emphasized the role of layer stacking on the electronic and optical properties of graphene in case of bi-layered and few layered graphene and several synthesis techniques like chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on Copper foils are employed to prepare graphene for applications at a large scale. However, a correlated study pertinent to the stacking order in CVD grown graphene is still unclear. In this work, using a combination of Raman spectroscopy and selected area electron diffraction analysis we analyzed the preferred misorientation angles in a CVD grown bi-layered graphene and also the role of Cu crystal facets on the graphene stacking order will be presented.

  5. Asymmetric bilayer graphene nanoribbon MOSFETs for analog and digital electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinarvand, A.; Ahmadi, V.; Darvish, Gh.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a new structure was proposed for bilayer graphene nanoribbon field-effect transistor (BGNFET) mainly to enhance the electrical characteristics in analog and digital applications. The proposed device uses two metallic gates on the top and bottom of a bilayer graphene nanoribbon, which is surrounded by SiO2 and connected to heavily doped source/drain contacts. Electrical properties of the proposed device were explored using fully self-consistent solution of Poisson and Schrödinger equations based on the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. Significant improvements in the electrical behavior was seen in the simulation results for gates asymmetrically biased. The comparison with graphene nanoribbon FET showed that the proposed structure benefited from higher intrinsic voltage gain and cut-off frequency and improved switching characteristics such as delay and Ion/Ioff ratio.

  6. Lipid Bilayer Membrane-Triggered Presynaptic Vesicle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The formation of functional synapses on artificial substrates is a very important step in the development of engineered in vitro neural networks. Spherical supported bilayer lipid membranes (SS-BLMs) are used here as a novel substrate to demonstrate presynaptic vesicle accumulation at an in vitro synaptic junction. Confocal fluorescence microscopy, cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments have been used to characterize the SS-BLMs. Conventional immunocytochemistry combined with confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to observe the formation of presynaptic vesicles at the neuron−SS-BLM contacts. These results indicate that lipid phases may play a role in the observed phenomenon, in addition to the chemical and electrostatic interactions between the neurons and SS-BLMs. The biocompatibility of lipid bilayers along with their membrane tunability makes the suggested approach a useful “toolkit” for many neuroengineering applications including artificial synapse formation and synaptogenesis in vivo. PMID:22778819

  7. Non-perturbative approach to the quantum Hall bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanovic, Milica; Papic, Zlatko

    2008-03-01

    We study the disordering of the superfluid phase in the quantum Hall bilayer at the filling factor one with increasing distance between the layers. We find that the possibilities for ground state wave functions that describe the superfluid at an arbitrary distance fall into two universality classes. They correspond to (1) Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) (2D XY) model of superfluid disordering in the presence of charged impurities and (2) λ transition (3D XY) model in a translatory invariant quantum Hall bilayer system. The BKT type of disordering likely ends with unbinding of created pairs of neutral fermionic vortices (in a transition reminiscent of the one reported in Champagne et al.). In the translatory invariant system the ensuing quantum phase transition proceeds via condensation of loops of elementary charged vortices - merons into a topological phase associated with the toric code model.

  8. Quantum Monte Carlo study of bilayer ionic Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Mi

    The interaction-driven insulator-to-metal transition has been reported in the ionic Hubbard model (IHM) for intermediate interaction U, which poses fundamental interest in the correlated electronic systems. Here we use determinant quantum Monte Carlo to study the interplay of interlayer hybridization V and two types of intralayer staggered potentials: one with the same (in-phase) and the other with a π-phase shift (anti-phase) potential in two layers termed as ``bilayer ionic Hubbard model''. We demonstrate that the interaction-driven Insulator-Metal transition extends to bilayer IHM with finite V for both types of staggered potentials. Besides, the system with in-phase potential is prone to metallic phase with turning on interlayer hybridization while that with anti-phase potential tends to insulators with stronger charge density order. The author thanks CSCS, Lugano, Switzerland for computing facilities.

  9. Quantum Monte Carlo study of bilayer ionic Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, M.; Schulthess, T. C.

    2016-04-01

    The interaction-driven insulator-to-metal transition has been reported in the ionic Hubbard model (IHM) for moderate interaction U , while its metallic phase only occupies a narrow region in the phase diagram. To explore the enlargement of the metallic regime, we extend the ionic Hubbard model to two coupled layers and study the interplay of interlayer hybridization V and two types of intralayer staggered potentials Δ : one with the same (in-phase) and the other with a π -phase shift (antiphase) potential between layers. Our determinant quantum Monte Carlo (DQMC) simulations at lowest accessible temperatures demonstrate that the interaction-driven metallic phase between Mott and band insulators expands in the Δ -V phase diagram of bilayer IHM only for in-phase ionic potentials; while antiphase potential always induces an insulator with charge density order. This implies possible further extension of the ionic Hubbard model from the bilayer case here to a realistic three-dimensional model.

  10. Spin rectification by orbital polarization in Bi-bilayer nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Jin, Kyung-Hwan; Jhi, Seung-Hoon

    2016-03-16

    We investigate the edge states of quantum spin-Hall phase Bi(111) bilayer nano-ribbons (BNRs) and their spin-rectifying effect using first-principles calculations and a non-equilibrium transport method. As low-dimensional materials, BNRs have tunable electronic properties, which are not only dependent on the edge shape, chemical passivation, or external electric fields but also governed by geometrical deformation. Depending on the passivation types, the interaction of the helical edge states in BNRs exhibits various patterns, enabling the valley engineering of the Dirac cones. In addition, the spin texture of the Dirac state is significantly tuned by edge passivation, external electric fields and geometric deformations. We demonstrate that curved BNRs can be used as the spin valves to rectify the electric currents via the edge states. Our results provide a practical way of utilizing two-dimensional topological insulator Bi bilayers for spintronic devices. PMID:26947010

  11. AA-stacked bilayer square ice between graphene layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobrino Fernandez Mario, M.; Neek-Amal, M.; Peeters, F. M.

    2015-12-01

    Water confined between two graphene layers with a separation of a few Å forms a layered two-dimensional ice structure. Using large scale molecular dynamics simulations with the adoptable ReaxFF interatomic potential we found that flat monolayer ice with a rhombic-square structure nucleates between the graphene layers which is nonpolar and nonferroelectric. We provide different energetic considerations and H-bonding results that explain the interlayer and intralayer properties of two-dimensional ice. The controversial AA stacking found experimentally [Algara-Siller et al., Nature (London) 519, 443 (2015), 10.1038/nature14295] is consistent with our minimum-energy crystal structure of bilayer ice. Furthermore, we predict that an odd number of layers of ice has the same lattice structure as monolayer ice, while an even number of ice layers exhibits the square ice AA stacking of bilayer ice.

  12. Formation and finite element analysis of tethered bilayer lipid structures.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Kwang Joo; Valincius, Gintaras; Liao, Wei-Ching; Hu, Xin; Wen, Xuejin; Lee, Andrew; Yu, Bo; Vanderah, David J; Lu, Wu; Lee, L James

    2010-12-01

    Rapid solvent exchange of an ethanolic solution of diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhyPC) in the presence of a mixed self-assembled monolayer (SAM) [thiolipid/β-mercaptoethanol (βME) (3/7 mol/mol) on Au] shows a transition from densely packed tethered bilayer lipid membranes [(dp)tBLMs], to loosely packed tethered bilayer lipid membranes [(lp)tBLMs], and tethered bilayer liposome nanoparticles (tBLNs) with decreasing DPhyPC concentration. The tethered lipidic constructs in the aqueous medium were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Finite element analysis (FEA) was applied to interpret spectral EIS features without referring to equivalent circuit modeling. Using structural data obtained earlier from neutron reflectometry and dielectric constants of lipid bilayers, we reproduced experimentally observed features of the electrochemical impedance (EI) spectra of complex surface constructs involving small pinhole defects, large membrane-free patches, and bound liposomes. We demonstrated by FEA that highly insulating (dp)tBLMs with low-defect density exhibit EI spectra in the shape of a perfect semicircle with or without low-frequency upward "tails" in the Cole-Cole representation. Such EI spectra were observed at DPhyPC concentrations of >5 × 10(-3) mol L(-1). While AFM was not able to visualize very small lateral defects in such films, EI spectra unambiguously signaled their presence by increased low frequency "tails". Using FEA we demonstrate that films with large diameter visible defects (>25 nm by AFM) produce EI spectral features consisting of two semicircles of comparable size. Such films were typically obtained at DPhyPC concentrations of <5 × 10(-3) mol L(-1). At DPhyPC concentrations of <1.0 × 10(-3) mol L(-1) the planar bilayer structures were replaced by ellipsoidal liposomes with diameters ranging from 50 to 500 nm as observed in AFM images. Despite the distinct surface morphology change, the EI

  13. Wrinkled bilayer graphene with wafer scale mechanical strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikael, Solomon; Seo, Jung-Hun; Javadi, Alireza; Gong, Shaoqin; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2016-05-01

    Wafer-scale strained bilayer graphene is demonstrated by employing a silicon nitride (Si3N4) stressor layer. Different magnitudes of compressive stress up to 840 MPa were engineered by adjusting the Si3N4 deposition recipes, and different strain conditions were analyzed using Raman spectroscopy. The strained graphene displayed significant G peak shifts and G peak splitting with 16.2 cm-1 and 23.0 cm-1 of the G band and two-dimensional band shift, which corresponds to 0.26% of strain. Raman mapping of large regions of the graphene films found that the largest shifts/splitting occurred near the bilayer regions of the graphene films. The significance of our approach lies in the fact that it can be performed in a conventional microfabrication process, i.e., the plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system, and thus easily implemented for large scale production.

  14. Self-avoiding walks on a bilayer Bethe lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Pablo; Stilck, Jürgen F.

    2014-04-01

    We propose and study a model of polymer chains in a bilayer. Each chain is confined in one of the layers and polymer bonds on first neighbor edges in different layers interact. We also define and comment on results for a model with interactions between monomers on first neighbor sites of different layers. The thermodynamic properties of the model are studied in the grand-canonical formalism and both layers are considered to be Cayley trees. In the core region of the trees, which we call a bilayer Bethe lattice, we find a very rich phase diagram in the parameter space defined by the two activities of monomers and the Boltzmann factor associated with the interlayer interaction between bonds or monomers. In addition to critical and coexistence surfaces, there are tricritical, bicritical and critical endpoint lines, as well as higher order multicritical points.

  15. Anomalous Hall effect in YIG|Pt bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Sibylle Schlitz, Richard; Geprägs, Stephan; Opel, Matthias; Huebl, Hans; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.; Gross, Rudolf

    2015-03-30

    We measure the ordinary and the anomalous Hall effect in a set of yttrium iron garnet|platinum (YIG|Pt) bilayers via magnetization orientation dependent magnetoresistance experiments. Our data show that the presence of the ferrimagnetic insulator YIG leads to an anomalous Hall effect like voltage in Pt, which is sensitive to both Pt thickness and temperature. Interpretation of the experimental findings in terms of the spin Hall anomalous Hall effect indicates that the imaginary part of the spin mixing conductance G{sub i} plays a crucial role in YIG|Pt bilayers. In particular, our data suggest a sign change in G{sub i} between 10 K and 300 K. Additionally, we report a higher order Hall effect contribution, which appears in thin Pt films on YIG at low temperatures.

  16. Josephson inplane and tunneling currents in bilayer quantum Hall system

    SciTech Connect

    Ezawa, Z. F.; Tsitsishvili, G.; Sawada, A.

    2013-12-04

    A Bose-Einstein condensation is formed by composite bosons in the quantum Hall state. A composite boson carries the fundamental charge (–e). We investigate Josephson tunneling of such charges in the bilayer quantum Hall system at the total filling ν = 1. We show the existence of the critical current for the tunneling current to be coherent and dissipationless in tunneling experiments with various geometries.

  17. Molecular dynamics investigations of PRODAN in a DLPC bilayer.

    PubMed

    Nitschke, William K; Vequi-Suplicy, Cíntia C; Coutinho, Kaline; Stassen, Hubert

    2012-03-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations have been performed to identify preferred positions of the fluorescent probe PRODAN in a fully hydrated DLPC bilayer in the fluid phase. In addition to the intramolecular charge-transfer first vertical excited state, we considered different charge distributions for the electronic ground state of the PRODAN molecule by distinct atomic charge models corresponding to the probe molecule in vacuum as well as polarized in a weak and a strong dielectric solvent (cyclohexane and water). Independent on the charge distribution model of PRODAN, we observed a preferential orientation of this molecule in the bilayer with the dimethylamino group pointing toward the membrane's center and the carbonyl oxygen toward the membrane's interface. However, changing the charge distribution model of PRODAN, independent of its initial position in the equilibrated DLPC membrane, we observed different preferential positions. For the ground state representation without polarization and the in-cyclohexane polarization, the probe maintains its position close to the membrane's center. Considering the in-water polarization model, the probe approaches more of the polar headgroup region of the bilayer, with a strong structural correlation with the choline group, exposing its oxygen atom to water molecules. PRODAN's representation of the first vertical excited state with the in-water polarization also approaches the polar region of the membrane with the oxygen atom exposed to the bilayer's hydration shell. However, this model presents a stronger structural correlation with the phosphate groups than the ground state. Therefore, we conclude that the orientation of the PRODAN molecule inside the DLPC membrane is well-defined, but its position is very sensitive to the effect of the medium polarization included here by different models for the atomic charge distribution of the probe. PMID:22329741

  18. High-Precision Twist-Controlled Bilayer and Trilayer Graphene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu-Dong; Xin, Wei; Jiang, Wen-Shuai; Liu, Zhi-Bo; Chen, Yongsheng; Tian, Jian-Guo

    2016-04-01

    Twist-controlled bilayer graphene (tBLG) and double-twisted trilayer graphene (DTTG) with high precision are fabricated and their controllable optoelectronic properties are investigated for the first time. The successful fabrication of tBLG and DTTG with designated θ provides an attractive starting point for systematic studies of interlayer coupling in misoriented few-layer graphene systems with well-defined geometry. PMID:26822255

  19. Comparative evaluation of single and bilayered lamotrigine floating tablets

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, PK; Sridhar, M; Shruthi, B

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to prepare lamotrigine (LM) bilayered and single layered floating tablets and to compare their release profiles. Materials and Methods: LM floating tablets were prepared by direct compression method. Drug, hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose K4M, lactose monohydrate and polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 constitute controlled release layer components and floating layer components includes polymers and sodium bicarbonate. The prepared tablets were evaluated for physicochemical parameters such as hardness, friability, weight variation, thickness, floating lag time (FLT), floating time, in vitro buoyancy study, in vitro release studies. The drug-polymer interaction was studied by fourier transform infrared and differential scanning calorimetry. Results and Discussion: The FLT of all the formulations were within the prescribed limits (<3 min). When ethyl cellulose was used as floating layer component, tablets showed good buoyancy effect but eroded within 6-8 h. Hence it was replaced with hydroxypropyl cellulose -M hydrophilic polymer, which showed good FLT and floating duration for 16 h. Formulation LFC4 was found to be optimized with dissolution profile of zero order kinetics showing fickian diffusion. A comparative study of bilayered and single layered tablets of LM showed a highest similarity factor of 83.03, difference factor of 2.74 and t-test (P < 0.05) indicates that there is no significant difference between them. Conclusion: Though bilayered tablet possess many advantages, single layered tablet would be economical, cost-effective and reproducible for large scale production in the industry. However, the results of present study demonstrated that the in vitro development of bilayered gastro retentive floating tablets with controlled drug release profile for LM is feasible. PMID:24167788

  20. Lipid Bilayer Phase Transition: Density Measurements and Theory

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The overall change of density for dipalmitoyl lecithin bilayers agrees with a general order-disorder theory and yields about seven gauche rotations per molecule for the biologically relevant high-temperature phase. The shape of the curve of density against temperature is similar to the result of an exact calculation on a specific model, which gives a 3/2-order phase transition. PMID:4519637

  1. Sponge mesoporous silica formation using disordered phospholipid bilayers as template.

    PubMed

    Galarneau, Anne; Sartori, Federica; Cangiotti, Michela; Mineva, Tzonka; Di Renzo, Francesco; Ottaviani, M Francesca

    2010-02-18

    Lecithin/dodecylamine/lactose mixtures in ethanol/aqueous media led to the formation of sponge mesoporous silica (SMS) materials by means of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) as silica source. SMS materials show a "sponge-mesoporous" porosity with a pore diameter of about 5-6 nm, in accordance to the length of a lecithin bilayer. SMS synthesis was developed to create a new class of powerful biocatalysts able to efficiently encapsulate enzymes by adding a porosity control to the classical sol-gel synthesis and by using phospholipids and lactose as protecting agents for the enzymes. In the present study, the formation of SMS was investigated by using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) probes inserted inside phospholipid bilayers. The influence of progressive addition of each component (ethanol, dodecylamine, lactose, TEOS) on phospholipid bilayers was first examined; then, the time evolution of EPR spectra during SMS synthesis was studied. Parameters informative of mobility, structure, order, and polarity around the probes were extracted by computer analysis of the EPR line shape. The results were discussed on the basis of solids characterization by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen isotherm, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The results, together with the well-known ability of ethanol to promote membrane hemifusion, suggested that the templating structure is a bicontinuous phospholipid bilayer phase, shaped as a gyroid, resulting of multiple membrane hemifusions induced by the high alcohol content used in SMS synthesis. SMS synthesis was compared to hexagonal mesoporous silica (HMS) synthesis accomplished by adding TEOS to a dodecylamine/EtOH/water mixture. EPR evidenced the difference between HMS and SMS synthesis; the latter uses an already organized but slowly growing mesophase of phospholipids, never observed before, whereas the former shows a progressive elongation of micelles into wormlike structures. SMS-type materials represent a new

  2. Electrochemical characterization of bilayer lipid membrane-semiconductor junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xiao Kang; Baral, S.; Fendler, J.H. )

    1990-03-08

    Three different systems of glyceryl monooleate (GMO), bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) supported semiconductor particles have been prepared and characterized. A single composition of particulate semiconductor deposited only on one side of the BLM constituted system A, two different compositions of particulate semiconductors sequentially deposited on the same side of the BLM represented system B, and two different compositions of particulate semiconductors deposited on the opposite sides of the BLM made up system C.

  3. Strain solitons and topological defects in bilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Alden, Jonathan S; Tsen, Adam W; Huang, Pinshane Y; Hovden, Robert; Brown, Lola; Park, Jiwoong; Muller, David A; McEuen, Paul L

    2013-07-01

    Bilayer graphene has been a subject of intense study in recent years. The interlayer registry between the layers can have dramatic effects on the electronic properties: for example, in the presence of a perpendicular electric field, a band gap appears in the electronic spectrum of so-called Bernal-stacked graphene [Oostinga JB, et al. (2007) Nature Materials 7:151-157]. This band gap is intimately tied to a structural spontaneous symmetry breaking in bilayer graphene, where one of the graphene layers shifts by an atomic spacing with respect to the other. This shift can happen in multiple directions, resulting in multiple stacking domains with soliton-like structural boundaries between them. Theorists have recently proposed that novel electronic states exist at these boundaries [Vaezi A, et al. (2013) arXiv:1301.1690; Zhang F, et al. (2013) arXiv:1301.4205], but very little is known about their structural properties. Here we use electron microscopy to measure with nanoscale and atomic resolution the widths, motion, and topological structure of soliton boundaries and related topological defects in bilayer graphene. We find that each soliton consists of an atomic-scale registry shift between the two graphene layers occurring over 6-11 nm. We infer the minimal energy barrier to interlayer translation and observe soliton motion during in situ heating above 1,000 °C. The abundance of these structures across a variety of samples, as well as their unusual properties, suggests that they will have substantial effects on the electronic and mechanical properties of bilayer graphene. PMID:23798395

  4. Strain solitons and topological defects in bilayer graphene

    PubMed Central

    Alden, Jonathan S.; Tsen, Adam W.; Huang, Pinshane Y.; Hovden, Robert; Brown, Lola; Park, Jiwoong; Muller, David A.; McEuen, Paul L.

    2013-01-01

    Bilayer graphene has been a subject of intense study in recent years. The interlayer registry between the layers can have dramatic effects on the electronic properties: for example, in the presence of a perpendicular electric field, a band gap appears in the electronic spectrum of so-called Bernal-stacked graphene [Oostinga JB, et al. (2007) Nature Materials 7:151–157]. This band gap is intimately tied to a structural spontaneous symmetry breaking in bilayer graphene, where one of the graphene layers shifts by an atomic spacing with respect to the other. This shift can happen in multiple directions, resulting in multiple stacking domains with soliton-like structural boundaries between them. Theorists have recently proposed that novel electronic states exist at these boundaries [Vaezi A, et al. (2013) arXiv:1301.1690; Zhang F, et al. (2013) arXiv:1301.4205], but very little is known about their structural properties. Here we use electron microscopy to measure with nanoscale and atomic resolution the widths, motion, and topological structure of soliton boundaries and related topological defects in bilayer graphene. We find that each soliton consists of an atomic-scale registry shift between the two graphene layers occurring over 6–11 nm. We infer the minimal energy barrier to interlayer translation and observe soliton motion during in situ heating above 1,000 °C. The abundance of these structures across a variety of samples, as well as their unusual properties, suggests that they will have substantial effects on the electronic and mechanical properties of bilayer graphene. PMID:23798395

  5. Quantum Hall effect in bilayer system with array of antidots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagnossin, I. R.; Gusev, G. M.; Sotomayor, N. M.; Seabra, A. C.; Quivy, A. A.; Lamas, T. E.; Portal, J. C.

    2007-04-01

    We have studied the Quantum Hall effect in a bilayer system modulated by gate-controlled antidot lattice potential. The Hall resistance shows plateaus which are quantized to anomalous multiplies of h/e2. We suggest that this complex behavior is due to the nature of the edge-states in double quantum well (DQW) structures coupled to an array of antidots: these plateaus may be originated from the coexistence of normal and counter-rotating edge-states in different layers.

  6. Supported lipid bilayer membranes for water purification by reverse osmosis.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Yair; Berman, Amir; Freger, Viatcheslav

    2010-05-18

    Some biological plasma membranes pass water with a permeability and selectivity largely exceeding those of commercial membranes for water desalination using specialized trans-membrane proteins aquaporins. However, highly selective transport of water through aquaporins is usually driven by an osmotic rather mechanical pressure, which is not as attractive from the engineering point of view. The feasibility of adopting biomimetic membranes for water purification driven by a mechanical pressure, i.e., filtration is explored in this paper. Toward this goal, it is proposed to use a commercial nanofiltration (NF) membrane as a support for biomimetic lipid bilayer membranes to render them robust enough to withstand the required pressures. It is shown in this paper for the first time that by properly tuning molecular interactions supported phospholipid bilayers (SPB) can be prepared on a commercial NF membrane. The presence of SPB on the surface was verified and quantified by several spectroscopic and microscopic techniques, which showed morphology close to the desired one with very few defects. As an ultimate test it is shown that hydraulic permeability of the SPB supported on the NF membrane (NTR-7450) approaches the values deduced from the typical osmotic permeabilities of intact continuous bilayers. This permeability was unaffected by the trans-membrane flow of water and by repeatedly releasing and reapplying a 10 bar pressure. Along with a parallel demonstration that aquaporins could be incorporated in a similar bilayer on mica, this demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed approach. The prepared SPB structure may be used as a platform for preparing biomimetic filtration membranes with superior performance based on aquaporins. The concept of SPBs on permeable substrates of the present type may also be useful in the future for studying transport of various molecules through trans-membrane proteins. PMID:20099798

  7. Collective Modes in Strongly Coupled Electronic Bilayer Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Kalman, G.; Valtchinov, V.; Valtchinov, V.; Golden, K.I.

    1999-04-01

    We present the first reliable calculation of the collective mode structure of a strongly coupled electronic bilayer. The calculation is based on a classical model through the 3rd frequency-moment-sum rule preserving quasi-localized-charge approximation, using the recently calculated hypernetted-chain pair correlation functions. The out-of-phase spectrum shows an energy gap at k=0 and the absence of a previously conjectured dynamical instability. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Optimizing non-Pb radiation shielding materials using bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    McCaffrey, J. P.; Mainegra-Hing, E.; Shen, H.

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to demonstrate that the weight of non-Pb radiation shielding materials can be minimized by structuring the material as a bilayer composed of different metal-powder-embedded elastomer layers. Methods: Measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) calculations were performed to study the attenuation properties of several non-Pb metal bilayers over the x-ray energy range 30-150 keV. Metals for the layers were chosen on the basis of low cost, nontoxicity, and complementary photoelectric absorption characteristics. The EGSnrc user code cavity.cpp was used to calculate the resultant x-ray fluence spectra after attenuation by these metal layers. Air kerma attenuation was measured using commercially manufactured metal/elastomer test layers. These layers were irradiated using the primary standard calibration beams at the Institute for National Measurement Standards in Ottawa, Canada utilizing the six x-ray beam qualities recommended in the German Standard DIN 6857. Both the measurements and the calculations were designed to approximate surface irradiation as well as penetrating radiation at 10 mm depth in soft tissue. The MC modeling point and the position of the measurement detector for surface irradiation were both directly against the downstream face of the attenuating material, as recommended in DIN 6857. Results: The low-Z upstream/high-Z downstream ordering of the metal bilayers provided substantially more attenuation than the reverse order. Optimal percentages of each metal in each bilayer were determined for each x-ray radiation beam quality. Conclusions: Depending on the x-ray quality, appropriate choices of two complementary metal-embedded elastomer layers can decrease the weight of radiation shielding garments by up to 25% compared to Pb-based elastomer garments while providing equivalent attenuation.

  9. Twisted bilayer blue phosphorene: A direct band gap semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina, D. A.; Duque, C. A.; Correa, J. D.; Suárez Morell, Eric

    2016-09-01

    We report that two rotated layers of blue phosphorene behave as a direct band gap semiconductor. The optical spectrum shows absorption peaks in the visible region of the spectrum and in addition the energy of these peaks can be tuned with the rotational angle. These findings makes twisted bilayer blue phosphorene a strong candidate as a solar cell or photodetection device. Our results are based on ab initio calculations of several rotated blue phosphorene layers.

  10. Interaction of β(3) /β(2) -peptides, consisting of Val-Ala-Leu segments, with POPC giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) and white blood cancer cells (U937)--a new type of cell-penetrating peptides, and a surprising chain-length dependence of their vesicle- and cell-lysing activity.

    PubMed

    Kolesinska, Beata; Eyer, Klaus; Robinson, Tom; Dittrich, Petra S; Beck, Albert K; Seebach, Dieter; Walde, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Many years ago, β(2) /β(3) -peptides, consisting of alternatively arranged β(2) - and β(3) h-amino-acid residues, have been found to undergo folding to a unique type of helix, the 10/12-helix, and to exhibit non-polar, lipophilic properties (Helv. Chim. Acta 1997, 80, 2033). We have now synthesized such 'mixed' hexa-, nona-, dodeca-, and octadecapeptides, consisting of Val-Ala-Leu triads, with N-terminal fluorescein (FAM) labels, i.e., 1-4, and studied their interactions with POPC (=1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) and with human white blood cancer cells U937. The methods used were microfluidic technology, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), a flow-cytometry assay, a membrane-toxicity assay with the dehydrogenase G6PDH as enzymatic reporter, and visual microscopy observations. All β(3) /β(2) -peptide derivatives penetrate the GUVs and/or the cells. As shown with the isomeric β(3) /β(2) -, β(3) -, and β(2) -nonamers, 2, 5, and 6, respectively, the derivatives 5 and 6 consisting exclusively of β(3) - or β(2) -amino-acid residues, respectively, interact neither with the vesicles nor with the cells. Depending on the method of investigation and on the pretreatment of the cells, the β(3) /β(2) -nonamer and/or the β(3) /β(2) -dodecamer derivative, 2 and/or 3, respectively, cause a surprising disintegration or lysis of the GUVs and cells, comparable with the action of tensides, viral fusion peptides, and host-defense antimicrobial peptides. Possible sources of the chain-length-dependent destructive potential of the β(3) /β(2) -nona- and β(3) /β(2) -dodecapeptide derivatives, and a possible relationship with the phosphate-to-phosphate and hydrocarbon thicknesses of GUVs, and eukaryotic cells are discussed. Further investigations with other types of GUVs and of eukaryotic or prokaryotic cells will be necessary to elucidate the mechanism(s) of interaction of 'mixed' β(3) /β(2) -peptides with

  11. Lipid headgroups mediate organization and dynamics in bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenough, Kelly P.; Blanchard, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy decay dynamics of the tethered chromophore NBD in unilamellar vesicles comprised of phosphoglycerol and phosphocholine lipids with C 12 and C 18 saturated acyl chains, with or without cholesterol and/or sphingomyelin. For the phosphocholine vesicles, we use the chromophore 2-(12-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)dodecanoyl-1-hexadecanoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (NBD-PC), and for the phosphoglycerol vesicles, we use the chromophore 2-(12-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)dodecanoyl-1-hexadecanoyl- sn-glycero-3-[phospho- rac-(1-glycerol)] (NBD-PG). The addition of cholesterol and/or sphingomyelin to the PC vesicles restricts the chromophore environment, in agreement with the known rigidizing effect of cholesterol on PC membranes. The PG systems do not exhibit an analogous effect with the addition of cholesterol and/or sphingomyelin. The motional freedom of the NBD chromophore is, in general, more restricted in the PC bilayers than it is in the PG bilayers, and we understand this behavior in the context of the role of the lipid headgroups in mediating bilayer organization.

  12. NMR Structures of Membrane Proteins in Phospholipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Radoicic, Jasmina; Lu, George J.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins have always presented technical challenges for structural studies because of their requirement for a lipid environment. Multiple approaches exist including X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy that can give significant insights into their structure and function. However, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is unique in that it offers the possibility of determining the structures of unmodified membrane proteins in their native environment of phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. Furthermore, NMR enables the characterization of the structure and dynamics of backbone and side chain sites of the proteins alone and in complexes with both small molecules and other biopolymers. The learning curve has been steep for the field as most initial studies were performed under non-native environments using modified proteins until ultimately progress in both techniques and instrumentation led to the possibility of examining unmodified membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. This review aims to provide an overview of the development and application of NMR to membrane proteins. It highlights some of the most significant structural milestones that have been reached by NMR spectroscopy of membrane proteins; especially those accomplished with the proteins in phospholipid bilayer environments where they function. PMID:25032938

  13. Thermoelectric Power in Bilayer Graphene Device with Ionic Liquid Gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Yung-Yu; Yuan, Hongtao; Wang, Chang-Ran; Lee, Wei-Li

    2016-02-01

    The quest for materials showing large thermoelectric power has long been one of the important subjects in material science and technology. Such materials have great potential for thermoelectric cooling and also high figure of merit ZT thermoelectric applications. We have fabricated bilayer graphene devices with ionic-liquid gating in order to tune its band gap via application of a perpendicular electric field on a bilayer graphene. By keeping the Fermi level at charge neutral point during the cool-down, we found that the charge puddles effect can be greatly reduced and thus largely improve the transport properties at low T in graphene-based devices using ionic liquid gating. At (Vig, Vbg) = (-1 V, +23 V), a band gap of about 36.6 ± 3 meV forms, and a nearly 40% enhancement of thermoelectric power at T = 120 K is clearly observed. Our works demonstrate the feasibility of band gap tuning in a bilayer graphene using ionic liquid gating. We also remark on the significant influence of the charge puddles effect in ionic-liquid-based devices.

  14. Self-consistent perturbation theory for two dimensional twisted bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirodkar, Sharmila N.; Tritsaris, Georgios A.; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    Theoretical modeling and ab-initio simulations of two dimensional heterostructures with arbitrary angles of rotation between layers involve unrealistically large and expensive calculations. To overcome this shortcoming, we develop a methodology for weakly interacting heterostructures that treats the effect of one layer on the other as perturbation, and restricts the calculations to their primitive cells. Thus, avoiding computationally expensive supercells. We start by approximating the interaction potential between the twisted bilayers to that of a hypothetical configuration (viz. ideally stacked untwisted layers), which produces band structures in reasonable agreement with full-scale ab-initio calculations for commensurate and twisted bilayers of graphene (Gr) and Gr/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) heterostructures. We then self-consistently calculate the charge density and hence, interaction potential of the heterostructures. In this work, we test our model for bilayers of various combinations of Gr, h-BN and transition metal dichalcogenides, and discuss the advantages and shortcomings of the self-consistently calculated interaction potential. Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA.

  15. Phase and surface properties of lipid bilayers containing neoglycolipids.

    PubMed

    Luzardo, M C; Bernik, D L; Pazos, I F; Figueroa, S; Lanio, M E; Vérez, V; Disalvo, E A

    1999-03-01

    The physical properties conferred to DPPC bilayers by including neoglycolipids composed by two different trisaccharides: mannose-mannose-mannose (3M) and glucose-mannose-glucose (GMG) attached to a cholesterol (cho) and a distearylglycerol (diC18) lipid moiety by a spacer were evaluated by means of the measurement of the electrokinetic potential and interfacial fluorescent probes. The phase properties measured with diphenylhexatriene (DPH) were correlated with the surface properties measured with merocyanine 540, dansyl, and Laurdan probes. The results show that the surface properties of large unilamellar vesicles depend on the sugar exposure to the water phase and also on the hydrocarbon moiety by which it is anchored to the bilayer. The combination of the cholesterol moiety with the saccharide attenuates the cooperativity decrease induced by the cholesterol moiety without the sugar portion. The neoglycolipid GMG-diC18 promotes opposite effects affecting slightly the cooperativity at the hydrocarbon core of DPPC and displacing the phase transition temperature to higher values. The presence of neoglycolipid with diC18 introduces defects in the packing at the interface of the membrane in the gel state. It is concluded that a relatively low proportion of neoglycolipids affects significantly the interfacial properties of DPPC bilayers in large unilamellar vesicles in the absence of changes at the membrane bulk at 25 degrees C. PMID:10049501

  16. Single-Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy using Phospholipid Bilayer Nanodiscs

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Abhinav; Trexler, Adam J.; Koo, Peter; Miranker, Andrew D.; Atkins, William M.; Rhoades, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Nanodiscs are a new class of model membranes that are being used to solubilize and study a range of integral membrane proteins and membrane-associated proteins. Unlike other model membranes, the Nanodisc bilayer is bounded by a scaffold protein coat that confers enhanced stability and a narrow particle size distribution. The bilayer diameter can be precisely controlled by changing the diameter of the protein coat. All these properties make Nanodiscs excellent model membranes for single molecule fluorescence applications. In this chapter, we describe our work using Nanodiscs to apply total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM), fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to study the integral membrane protein cytochrome P450 3A4 and the membrane-binding proteins islet amyloid popypeptide (IAPP) and α-synuclein, respectively. The monodisperse size distribution of Nanodiscs enhances control over the oligomeric state of the membrane protein of interest, and also facilitates accurate solution-based measurements. Nanodiscs also comprise an excellent system to stably immobilize integral membrane proteins in a bilayer without covalent modification, enabling a range of surface-based experiments where accurate localization of the protein of interest is required. PMID:20580961

  17. Local membrane mechanics of pore-spanning bilayers.

    PubMed

    Mey, Ingo; Stephan, Milena; Schmitt, Eva K; Müller, Martin Michael; Ben Amar, Martine; Steinem, Claudia; Janshoff, Andreas

    2009-05-27

    The mechanical behavior of lipid bilayers spanning the pores of highly ordered porous silicon substrates was scrutinized by local indentation experiments as a function of surface functionalization, lipid composition, solvent content, indentation velocity, and pore radius. Solvent-containing nano black lipid membranes (nano-BLMs) as well as solvent-free pore-spanning bilayers were imaged by fluorescence and atomic force microscopy prior to force curve acquisition, which allows distinguishing between membrane-covered and uncovered pores. Force indentation curves on pore-spanning bilayers attached to functionalized hydrophobic porous silicon substrates reveal a predominately linear response that is mainly attributed to prestress in the membranes. This is in agreement with the observation that indentation leads to membrane lysis well below 5% area dilatation. However, membrane bending and lateral tension dominate over prestress and stretching if solvent-free supported membranes obtained from spreading giant liposomes on hydrophilic porous silicon are indented. An elastic regime diagram is presented that readily allows determining the dominant contribution to the mechanical response upon indentation as a function of load and pore radius. PMID:19453196

  18. Computer modelling studies of the bilayer/water interface.

    PubMed

    Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Baczynski, Krzysztof; Markiewicz, Michal; Murzyn, Krzysztof

    2016-10-01

    This review summarises high resolution studies on the interface of lamellar lipid bilayers composed of the most typical lipid molecules which constitute the lipid matrix of biomembranes. The presented results were obtained predominantly by computer modelling methods. Whenever possible, the results were compared with experimental results obtained for similar systems. The first and main section of the review is concerned with the bilayer-water interface and is divided into four subsections. The first describes the simplest case, where the interface consists only of lipid head groups and water molecules and focuses on interactions between the lipid heads and water molecules; the second describes the interface containing also mono- and divalent ions and concentrates on lipid-ion interactions; the third describes direct inter-lipid interactions. These three subsections are followed by a discussion on the network of direct and indirect inter-lipid interactions at the bilayer interface. The second section summarises recent computer simulation studies on the interactions of antibacterial membrane active compounds with various models of the bacterial outer membrane. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:26825705

  19. Amphotericin B induced interdigitation of apolipoprotein stabilized nanodisk bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T; Weers, P M; Sulchek, T; Hoeprich, P D; Ryan, R O

    2006-12-07

    Amphotericin B nanodisks (AMB-ND) are ternary complexes of AMB, phospholipid (PL) and apolipoprotein organized as discrete nanometer scale disk-shaped bilayers. In gel filtration chromatography experiments, empty ND lacking AMB elute as a single population of particles with a molecular weight in the range of 200 kDa. AMB-ND formulated at a 4:1 PL:AMB weight ratio, separated into two peaks. Peak 1 eluted at the position of control ND lacking AMB while the second peak, containing all of the AMB present in the original sample, eluted in the void volume. When ND prepared with increased AMB (1:1 phospholipid:AMB molar ratio) were subjected to gel filtration chromatography, an increased proportion of phospholipid and apolipoprotein were recovered in the void volume with the AMB. Prior to gel filtration the AMB-ND sample could be passed through a 0.22 {micro}m filter without loss of AMB while the voided material was lost. Native gel electrophoresis studies corroborated the gel permeation chromatography data. Far UV circular dichroism analyses revealed that apoA-I associated with AMB-ND denatures at a lower guanidine HCl concentration than apoA-I associated with ND lacking AMB. Atomic force microscopy revealed that AMB induces compression of the ND bilayer thickness consistent with bilayer interdigitation, a phenomenon that is likely related to the ability of AMB to induce pore formation in susceptible membranes.

  20. Viscoelastic changes measured in partially suspended single bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Imad Younus; Mechler, Adam

    2015-07-21

    For studies involving biomimetic phospholipid membrane systems, such as membrane-protein interactions, it is crucial that the supported membrane is biomimetic in its physical properties as well as in its composition. Two often overlooked aspects of biomimicry are the need for unrestrained lipid mobility, reflected in the viscoelastic properties of the membrane, and sufficient space between the membrane and the support for the insertion of transmembrane proteins. Here we show for a series of DMPC-based membranes that a partially suspended single bilayer membrane can be formed on functionalized gold surface without tethering. These membranes exhibit sufficient freedom of motion to represent the viscoelastic properties of a free lamellar bilayer membrane as demonstrated by determining the phase transition temperatures of these single bilayer membranes from the viscosity change upon chain melting using the dissipation signal of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D). Atomic force microscopy imaging confirmed confluent, smooth membrane coverage of the QCM-D sensor that completely obscured the roughness of the sputtered gold surface. High-force AFM imaging was able to push membrane patches into the valleys of the gold morphology, confirming the inherently suspended nature of the MPA supported membrane. We show that the correlation between frequency and dissipation changes in the QCM-D sensograms is a sensitive indicator of the morphology of the membrane. PMID:26073288

  1. Microporous device for local electric recordings on lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufeld, Theresa; Battle, Christopher; Weichbrodt, Conrad; Steinem, Claudia; Schmidt, Christoph

    2012-02-01

    Many methods for artificial membrane formation are available. We focus on the reconstitution of lipid bilayers on porous substrates combining the stability of solid supports and the accessibility of both sides of the bilayer of the classical BLM which is necessary for low noise electric experiments. Most commercially available porous substrates however are not suitable for electric experiments or a combination of several measuring techniques. Therefore, we designed a microporous substrate, which meets several demands: We wanted to have the possibility to perform multiple experiments in one, so we chose to divide the device into several individually addressable arrays of pores with separate electrolyte compartments and integrated electronic connections. Also, to perform electrical and fluorescence experiments at the same time, we designed a PDMS sample chamber so that the substrate is accessible to a microscope objective. By having separated electrolyte compartments, we are also able to exchange solutions or introduce chemicals throughout the experiment. Bilayer formation can be probed by impedance spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy. The function of inserted ion channels can be measured by current recordings.

  2. Exciton-polariton condensation in transition metal dichalcogenide bilayer heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ki Hoon; Jeong, Jae-Seung; Min, Hongki; Chung, Suk Bum

    For the bilayer heterostructure system in an optical microcavity, the interplay of the Coulomb interaction and the electron-photon coupling can lead to the emergence of quasiparticles consisting of the spatially indirect exciton and cavity photons known as dipolariton, which can form the Bose-Einstein condensate above a threshold density. Additional physics comes into play when each layer of the bilayer system consists of the transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) monolayer. The TMD monolayer band structure in the low energy spectrum has two valley components with nontrivial Berry phase, which gives rise to a selection rule in the exciton-polariton coupling, e.g. the exciton from one (the other) valley can couple only to the clockwise (counter-clockwise) polarized photon. We investigate possible condensate phases of exciton-polariton in the bilayer TMD microcavity changing relevant parameters such as detuning, excitation density and interlayer distance. This work was supported in part by the Institute for Basic Science of Korea (IBS) under Grant IBS-R009-Y1 and by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) under the Basic Science Research Program Grant No. 2015R1D1A1A01058071.

  3. Twinning and twisting of tri- and bilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lola; Hovden, Robert; Huang, Pinshane; Wojcik, Michal; Muller, David A; Park, Jiwoong

    2012-03-14

    The electronic, optical, and mechanical properties of bilayer and trilayer graphene vary with their structure, including the stacking order and relative twist, providing novel ways to realize useful characteristics not available to single layer graphene. However, developing controlled growth of bilayer and trilayer graphene requires efficient large-scale characterization of multilayer graphene structures. Here, we use dark-field transmission electron microscopy for rapid and accurate determination of key structural parameters (twist angle, stacking order, and interlayer spacing) of few-layer CVD graphene. We image the long-range atomic registry for oriented bilayer and trilayer graphene, find that it conforms exclusively to either Bernal or rhombohedral stacking, and determine their relative abundances. In contrast, our data on twisted multilayers suggest the absence of such long-range atomic registry. The atomic registry and its absence are consistent with the two different strain-induced deformations we observe; by tilting the samples to break mirror symmetry, we find a high density of twinned domains in oriented multilayer graphene, where multiple domains of two different stacking configurations coexist, connected by discrete twin boundaries. In contrast, individual layers in twisted regions continuously stretch and shear independently, forming elaborate Moiré patterns. These results, and the twist angle distribution in our CVD graphene, can be understood in terms of an angle-dependent interlayer potential model. PMID:22329410

  4. Monolayer curvature stabilizes nanoscale raft domains in mixed lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Meinhardt, Sebastian; Vink, Richard L. C.; Schmid, Friederike

    2013-01-01

    According to the lipid raft hypothesis, biological lipid membranes are laterally heterogeneous and filled with nanoscale ordered “raft” domains, which are believed to play an important role for the organization of proteins in membranes. However, the mechanisms stabilizing such small rafts are not clear, and even their existence is sometimes questioned. Here, we report the observation of raft-like structures in a coarse-grained molecular model for multicomponent lipid bilayers. On small scales, our membranes demix into a liquid ordered (lo) phase and a liquid disordered (ld) phase. On large scales, phase separation is suppressed and gives way to a microemulsion-type state that contains nanometer-sized lo domains in an ld environment. Furthermore, we introduce a mechanism that generates rafts of finite size by a coupling between monolayer curvature and local composition. We show that mismatch between the spontaneous curvatures of monolayers in the lo and ld phases induces elastic interactions, which reduce the line tension between the lo and ld phases and can stabilize raft domains with a characteristic size of the order of a few nanometers. Our findings suggest that rafts in multicomponent bilayers might be closely related to the modulated ripple phase in one-component bilayers. PMID:23487780

  5. Supercurrent reversal in Josephson junctions based on bilayer graphene flakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rameshti, Babak Zare; Zareyan, Malek; Moghaddam, Ali G.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the Josephson effect in a bilayer graphene flake contacted by two monolayer sheets deposited by superconducting electrodes. It is found that when the electrodes are attached to the different layers of the bilayer, the Josephson current is in a π state, if the bilayer region is undoped and there is no vertical bias. Applying doping or bias to the junction reveals π -0 transitions which can be controlled by varying the temperature and the junction length. The supercurrent reversal here is very different from the ferromagnetic Josephson junctions where the spin degree of freedom plays the key role. We argue that the scattering processes accompanied by layer and sublattice index change give rise to the scattering phases, the effect of which varies with doping and bias. Such scattering phases are responsible for the π -0 transitions. On the other hand, if both of the electrodes are coupled to the same layer of the flake or the flake has AA stacking instead of common AB, the junction will be always in 0 state since the layer or sublattice index is not changed.

  6. Effects of Phospholipase A2 Inhibitors on Bilayer Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Dubinin, Mikhail V; Astashev, Maxim E; Penkov, Nikita V; Gudkov, Sergey V; Dyachenko, Igor A; Samartsev, Victor N; Belosludtsev, Konstantin N

    2016-06-01

    The work examines the effect of inhibitors of cytosolic Ca(2+)-dependent and Ca(2+)-independent phospholipases A2 on bilayer lipid membranes. It was established that trifluoroperazine (TFP) and, to a lesser extent, arachidonyl trifluoromethyl ketone (AACOCF3) and palmitoyl trifluoromethyl ketone (PACOCF3) were able to permeabilize artificial lipid membranes (BLM and liposomes). It was shown that AACOCF3 lowered the temperature of phase transition of DMPC liposomes, inducing disordering of the hydrophobic region of lipid bilayer. TFP disordered membranes both in the hydrophobic region and in the region of hydrophilic heads, this being accompanied by changes in the membrane permeability: appearance of a channel-like BLM activity and leakage of sulforhodamine B from liposomes. In contrast to AACOCF3 and TFP, PACOCF3 increased membrane orderliness in the hydrophobic region (heightened the temperature of phase transition of DMPC liposomes) and in the region of lipid heads. The effectiveness of AACOCF3 and PACOCF3 as inductors of BLM and liposome permeabilization was considerably lower comparatively to TFP. As revealed by dynamic light scattering, incorporation of TFP, AACOCF3 and PACOCF3 into the membrane of liposomes resulted in the increase of the average size of particles in the suspension, presumably due to their aggregation or fusion. The paper discusses possible mechanisms of the influence of phospholipase A2 inhibitors on bilayer lipid membranes. PMID:26762382

  7. Dewetting pathways and morphology of unstable thin liquid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2008-09-18

    Three-dimensional long-wave nonlinear analysis of the instabilities engendered by van der Waals forces in a thin (<100 nm) viscous bilayer resting on a rigid substrate is presented. The bilayers are classified based on the macroscopic dewetting behavior of the films, and the three-dimensional morphological evolutions of the films are studied in each case. The dewetting of the bilayers is initiated by one of the two basic modes at the interfaces: in-phase "bending" and out-of-phase "squeezing". We show that the thicknesses, surface energies, and viscosities of the films have significant influence on the mode selection, pathway, of dewetting, and the final morphology of dewetting. Different equilibrium morphologies are obtained by tuning the nature and the strength of the intermolecular forces present at the films, which include: (i) an array of channels and ridges in the lower layer with the upper liquid embedded inside the channels, (ii) islands in the lower layer with the upper layer embedded in the interstitial spaces, and (iii) the lower layer droplets encapsulated by the upper layer. PMID:18717533

  8. Soliton-dependent plasmon reflection at bilayer graphene domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lili; Shi, Zhiwen; Zeng, Bo; Wang, Sheng; Kang, Ji-Hun; Joshi, Trinity; Jin, Chenhao; Ju, Long; Kim, Jonghwan; Lyu, Tairu; Shen, Yuen-Ron; Crommie, Michael; Gao, Hong-Jun; Wang, Feng

    2016-08-01

    Layer-stacking domain walls in bilayer graphene are emerging as a fascinating one-dimensional system that features stacking solitons structurally and quantum valley Hall boundary states electronically. The interactions between electrons in the 2D graphene domains and the one-dimensional domain-wall solitons can lead to further new quantum phenomena. Domain-wall solitons of varied local structures exist along different crystallographic orientations, which can exhibit distinct electrical, mechanical and optical properties. Here we report soliton-dependent 2D graphene plasmon reflection at different 1D domain-wall solitons in bilayer graphene using near-field infrared nanoscopy. We observe various domain-wall structures in mechanically exfoliated graphene bilayers, including network-forming triangular lattices, individual straight or bent lines, and even closed circles. The near-field infrared contrast of domain-wall solitons arises from plasmon reflection at domain walls, and exhibits markedly different behaviours at the tensile- and shear-type domain-wall solitons. In addition, the plasmon reflection at domain walls exhibits a peculiar dependence on electrostatic gating. Our study demonstrates the unusual and tunable coupling between 2D graphene plasmons and domain-wall solitons.

  9. Hybrid bilayer plasmonic metasurface efficiently manipulates visible light.

    PubMed

    Qin, Fei; Ding, Lu; Zhang, Lei; Monticone, Francesco; Chum, Chan Choy; Deng, Jie; Mei, Shengtao; Li, Ying; Teng, Jinghua; Hong, Minghui; Zhang, Shuang; Alù, Andrea; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Metasurfaces operating in the cross-polarization scheme have shown an interesting degree of control over the wavefront of transmitted light. Nevertheless, their inherently low efficiency in visible light raises certain concerns for practical applications. Without sacrificing the ultrathin flat design, we propose a bilayer plasmonic metasurface operating at visible frequencies, obtained by coupling a nanoantenna-based metasurface with its complementary Babinet-inverted copy. By breaking the radiation symmetry because of the finite, yet small, thickness of the proposed structure and benefitting from properly tailored intra- and interlayer couplings, such coupled bilayer metasurface experimentally yields a conversion efficiency of 17%, significantly larger than that of earlier single-layer designs, as well as an extinction ratio larger than 0 dB, meaning that anomalous refraction dominates the transmission response. Our finding shows that metallic metasurface can counterintuitively manipulate the visible light as efficiently as dielectric metasurface (~20% in conversion efficiency in Lin et al.'s study), although the metal's ohmic loss is much higher than dielectrics. Our hybrid bilayer design, still being ultrathin (~λ/6), is found to obey generalized Snell's law even in the presence of strong couplings. It is capable of efficiently manipulating visible light over a broad bandwidth and can be realized with a facile one-step nanofabrication process. PMID:26767195

  10. Spatial arrangement of selected fluorescence labels in lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Zygmunt H

    2013-08-01

    The method for the determination the orientation factor κ(2), spatial arrangement and depth position of fluorescence labels located in hydrophilic layers of vesicles bilayer from resonance energy transfer (RET) data is presented. The method is based on the broadened Wolber and Hudson RET model in two dimensions (Biophys J. 1979). The vesicles were labeled with N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)-1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (NBD-PE) as the donor and N-(Lissamine rhodamine B sulfonyl) 1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (NRh-PE) as the acceptor. It was found that in basic environment sodium dithionite quenches fluorescence of both labels located in outer leaflet of bilayer. Therefore, RET data prior to and following dithionite treatment were compared and the donor-acceptor cis and trans distances of the closest approach as well as cis and trans Förster radii R0, and orientation factors κ(2) for cis RET equal to 0.61±0.06 and for trans RET equal to 0.17±0.01 were assigned. Knowing the κ(2) data, the spatial arrangement of NBD and NRh labels as dipoles in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer were described. PMID:23727616

  11. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin cytotoxicity occurs through bilayer destabilization

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Angela C.; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen; Du, Yurong; Stefano, Frank P.; Kieba, Irene R.; Epand, Raquel F.; Kakalis, Lazaros; Yeagle, Philip L.; Epand, Richard M.; Lally, Edward T.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The Gram-negative bacterium, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, is a common inhabitant of the human upper aerodigestive tract. The organism produces an RTX (Repeats in ToXin) toxin (LtxA) that kills human white blood cells. LtxA is believed to be a membrane-damaging toxin, but details of the cell surface interaction for this and several other RTX toxins have yet to be elucidated. Initial morphological studies suggested that LtxA was bending the target cell membrane. Because the ability of a membrane to bend is a function of its lipid composition, we assessed the proficiency of LtxA to release of a fluorescent dye from a panel of liposomes composed of various lipids. Liposomes composed of lipids that form nonlamellar phases were susceptible to LtxA-induced damage while liposomes composed of lipids that do not form non-bilayer structures were not. Differential scanning calorimetry demonstrated that the toxin decreased the temperature at which the lipid transitions from a bilayer to a nonlamellar phase, while 31P nuclear magnetic resonance studies showed that the LtxA-induced transition from a bilayer to an inverted hexagonal phase occurs through the formation of an isotropic intermediate phase. These results indicate that LtxA cytotoxicity occurs through a process of membrane destabilization. PMID:22309134

  12. Optical rectification at visible frequency in biased bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hipolito, F.; Pereira, Vitor M.

    2015-03-01

    The second order response of the electrical current to an electromagnetic field is analyzed within the framework of non-equilibrium many-body perturbation theory for the case of a two-dimensional electronic system such as graphene and its bilayer. The absence of inversion symmetry in a biased graphene bilayer allows a finite DC response in second order to an AC electromagnetic wave. The induced DC current is evaluated for biased bilayer at finite temperature, and its tunability is analyzed as a function of electron density, which can be experimentally varied by means of a global gate voltage applied to the sample. Both intrinsic and photon drag microscopic processes are considered, as they contribute on similar footing to the photocurrent in general. However, the dependencies of these two contributions on the polarization state of the incident light are different, which allows the manipulation of the relative contribution of intrinsic versus photon drag contributions by tuning the experimental parameters. For example, the photocurrent emerging from circularly polarized light stems entirely from photon drag, as the circular photogalvanic effect is forbidden by the C3 rotation symmetry of the honeycomb lattice.

  13. Electronic properties and the quantum Hall effect in bilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Fal'ko, Vladimir I

    2008-01-28

    In this paper, I review the quantum Hall effect (QHE) and far-infra red (FIR) absorption properties of bilayer graphene in a strong magnetic field. This includes a derivation of the effective low-energy Hamiltonian for this system and the consequences of this Hamiltonian for the sequencing of the Landau levels in the material: the form of this effective Hamiltonian gives rise to the presence of a level with doubled degeneracy at zero energy. The effect of a potential difference between the layer of a bilayer is also investigated. It is found that there is a density-dependent gap near the K points in the band structure. The consequences of this gap on the QHE are then described. Also, the magneto-absorption spectrum is investigated and an experiment proposed to distinguish between model groundstates of the bilayer QHE system based on the different absorption characteristics of right- and left-handed polarization of FIR light. Finally, the effects of trigonal warping are taken into account in the absorption picture. PMID:18024357

  14. Voltage-dependent capacitance in lipid bilayers made from monolayers.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, O; Latorre, R

    1978-01-01

    Electrocompression has been measured in lipid bilayers made by apposition of two monolayers. The capacitance C(V), as a function of membrane potential, V, was found to be well described by C(V) = C(O) [1 + alpha(V + delta psi)2] where C(O) is the capacitance at V = O, alpha is the fractional increase in capacitance per square volt, and delta psi is the surface potential difference. In lipid bilayers made from monolayers alpha has a value of 0.02 V-2, which is ca. 500-fold smaller than the value found in solvent containing membranes. In asymmetric bilayers made of one neutral and one negatively charged monolayer, delta psi values were found to be those expected from independent measurements of surface charge density. If the fractional increase in capacitance found here is a good approximation to that of biological membranes, nonlinear capacitative charge displacement derived from electrostriction is expected to be less than 1% of the total gating charge displacement found in squid axons. PMID:620076

  15. Amphotericin B induces interdigitation of apolipoprotein stabilized nanodisk bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thanh-Son; Weers, Paul M.M.; Raussens, Vincent; Wang, Zhen; Ren, Gang; Sulchek, Todd; Hoeprich, Paul D.; Ryan, and Robert O.

    2008-01-01

    Amphotericin B nanodisks (AMB-ND) are ternary complexes of AMB, phospholipid and apolipoprotein organized as discrete nanometer scale disk-shaped bilayers. In gel filtration chromatography experiments, empty ND lacking AMB elute as a single population of particles with a molecular weight in the range of 200 kDa. AMB-ND formulated at a 4:1 phospholipid:AMB weight ratio separated into two peaks. One peak eluted at the position of control ND lacking AMB while the second peak, containing all of the AMB present in the original sample, eluted in the void volume. When ND prepared with increased AMB were subjected to gel filtration chromatography an increased proportion of phospholipid and apolipoprotein was recovered in the void volume with AMB. Native gradient gel electrophoresis corroborated the gel filtration chromatography data and electron microscopy studies revealed an AMB concentration dependent heterogeneity in ND particle size. Stability studies revealed that introduction of AMB into ND decreases the ability of apoA-I to resist denaturation. Atomic force microscopy experiments showed that AMB induces compression of ND bilayer thickness while infrared spectroscopy analysis revealed the presence of AMB does not induce extreme lipid disorder or alter the mean angle of the molecular axis along fatty acyl chain of ND phospholipids. Taken together the results are consistent with AMB induced bilayer interdigitation, a phenomenon that likely contributes to AMB dependent pore formation in susceptible membranes. PMID:17980702

  16. Hybrid bilayer plasmonic metasurface efficiently manipulates visible light

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Fei; Ding, Lu; Zhang, Lei; Monticone, Francesco; Chum, Chan Choy; Deng, Jie; Mei, Shengtao; Li, Ying; Teng, Jinghua; Hong, Minghui; Zhang, Shuang; Alù, Andrea; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Metasurfaces operating in the cross-polarization scheme have shown an interesting degree of control over the wavefront of transmitted light. Nevertheless, their inherently low efficiency in visible light raises certain concerns for practical applications. Without sacrificing the ultrathin flat design, we propose a bilayer plasmonic metasurface operating at visible frequencies, obtained by coupling a nanoantenna-based metasurface with its complementary Babinet-inverted copy. By breaking the radiation symmetry because of the finite, yet small, thickness of the proposed structure and benefitting from properly tailored intra- and interlayer couplings, such coupled bilayer metasurface experimentally yields a conversion efficiency of 17%, significantly larger than that of earlier single-layer designs, as well as an extinction ratio larger than 0 dB, meaning that anomalous refraction dominates the transmission response. Our finding shows that metallic metasurface can counterintuitively manipulate the visible light as efficiently as dielectric metasurface (~20% in conversion efficiency in Lin et al.’s study), although the metal’s ohmic loss is much higher than dielectrics. Our hybrid bilayer design, still being ultrathin (~λ/6), is found to obey generalized Snell’s law even in the presence of strong couplings. It is capable of efficiently manipulating visible light over a broad bandwidth and can be realized with a facile one-step nanofabrication process. PMID:26767195

  17. Thermoelectric Power in Bilayer Graphene Device with Ionic Liquid Gating

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Yung-Yu; Yuan, Hongtao; Wang, Chang-Ran; Lee, Wei-Li

    2016-01-01

    The quest for materials showing large thermoelectric power has long been one of the important subjects in material science and technology. Such materials have great potential for thermoelectric cooling and also high figure of merit ZT thermoelectric applications. We have fabricated bilayer graphene devices with ionic-liquid gating in order to tune its band gap via application of a perpendicular electric field on a bilayer graphene. By keeping the Fermi level at charge neutral point during the cool-down, we found that the charge puddles effect can be greatly reduced and thus largely improve the transport properties at low T in graphene-based devices using ionic liquid gating. At (Vig, Vbg) = (−1 V, +23 V), a band gap of about 36.6 ± 3 meV forms, and a nearly 40% enhancement of thermoelectric power at T = 120 K is clearly observed. Our works demonstrate the feasibility of band gap tuning in a bilayer graphene using ionic liquid gating. We also remark on the significant influence of the charge puddles effect in ionic-liquid-based devices. PMID:26852799

  18. TARP phosphorylation regulates synaptic AMPA receptors through lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Sumioka, Akio; Yan, Dan; Tomita, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Summary Neurons use neurotransmitters to communicate across synapses, constructing neural circuits in the brain. AMPA-type glutamate receptors are the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter receptors mediating fast synaptic transmission. AMPA receptors localize at synapses by forming protein complexes with transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) and PSD-95-like MAGUKs. Among the three classes of ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPA-, NMDA, kainate-type), AMPA receptor activity is most regulatable by neuronal activity to adjust synaptic strength. Here, we mutated the prototypical TARP, stargazin, and found that TARP phosphorylation regulates synaptic AMPA receptor activity in vivo. We also found that stargazin interacts with negatively-charged lipid bilayers in its phosphorylation dependent manner, and that the lipid interaction inhibited stargazin binding to PSD-95. Cationic lipids dissociated stargazin from lipid bilayers and enhanced synaptic AMPA receptor activity in a stargazin phosphorylation-dependent manner. Thus, TARP phosphorylation plays a critical role in regulating AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission via a lipid bilayer interaction. PMID:20547132

  19. Graphene Monoxide Bilayer As a High-Performance on/off Switching Media for Nanoelectronics.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jungwook; Yun, Kyung-Han; Chung, Yong-Chae

    2016-04-27

    The geometries and electronic characteristics of the graphene monoxide (GMO) bilayer are predicted via density functional theory (DFT) calculations. All the possible sequences of the GMO bilayer show the typical interlayer bonding characteristics of two-dimensional bilayer systems with a weak van der Waals interaction. The band gap energies of the GMO bilayers are predicted to be adequate for electronic device application, indicating slightly smaller energy gaps (0.418-0.448 eV) compared to the energy gap of the monolayer (0.536 eV). Above all, in light of the band gap engineering, the band gap of the GMO bilayer responds to the external electric field sensitively. As a result, a semiconductor-metal transition occurs at a small critical electric field (EC = 0.22-0.30 V/Å). It is therefore confirmed that the GMO bilayer is a strong candidate for nanoelectronics. PMID:27046262

  20. Towards Tunable Band Gap and Tunable Dirac Point in Bilayer Graphene with Molecular Doping

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Woo Jong; Liao, Lei; Chae, Sang Hoon; Lee, Young Hee; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2011-01-01

    The bilayer graphene has attracted considerable attention for potential applications in future electronics and optoelectronics because of the feasibility to tune its band gap with a vertical displacement field to break the inversion symmetry. Surface chemical doping in bilayer graphene can induce an additional offset voltage to fundamentally affect the vertical displacement field and band-gap opening in bilayer graphene. In this study, we investigate the effect of chemical molecular doping on band-gap opening in bilayer graphene devices with single or dual gate modulation. Chemical doping with benzyl viologen molecules modulates the displacement field to allow the opening of a transport band gap and the increase of the on/off ratio in the bilayer graphene transistors. Additionally, Fermi energy level in the opened gap can be rationally controlled by the amount of molecular doping to obtain bilayer graphene transistors with tunable Dirac points, which can be readily configured into functional devices such as complementary inverters. PMID:21985035

  1. Electrowetting on dielectric-based microfluidics for integrated lipid bilayer formation and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulos, Jason L.; Nelson, Wyatt C.; Jeon, Tae-Joon; Kim, Chang-Jin ``Cj''; Schmidt, Jacob J.

    2009-07-01

    We present a microfluidic platform for the formation and electrical measurement of lipid bilayer membranes. Using electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD), two or more aqueous droplets surrounded by a lipid-containing organic phase were manipulated into contact to form a lipid bilayer at their interface. Thin-film Ag/AgCl electrodes integrated into the device enabled electrical measurement of membrane formation and the incorporation of gramicidin channels of two bilayers in parallel.

  2. The assembly and use of tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs).

    PubMed

    Cranfield, Charles; Carne, Sonia; Martinac, Boris; Cornell, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Because they are firmly held in place, tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs) are considerably more robust than supported lipid bilayers such as black lipid membranes (BLMs) (Cornell et al. Nature 387(6633): 580-583, 1997). Here we describe the procedures required to assemble and test tethered lipid bilayers that can incorporate various lipid species, peptides, and ion channel proteins. PMID:25331126

  3. Single DNA molecules on freestanding and supported cationic lipid bilayers: diverse conformational dynamics controlled by the local bilayer properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herold, Christoph; Schwille, Petra; Petrov, Eugene P.

    2016-02-01

    We present experimental results on the interaction of DNA macromolecules with cationic lipid membranes with different properties, including freestanding membranes in the fluid and gel state, and supported lipid membranes in the fluid state and under conditions of fluid-gel phase coexistence. We observe diverse conformational dynamics of membrane-bound DNA molecules controlled by the local properties of the lipid bilayer. In case of fluid-state freestanding lipid membranes, the behaviour of DNA on the membrane is controlled by the membrane charge density: whereas DNA bound to weakly charged membranes predominantly behaves as a 2D random coil, an increase in the membrane charge density leads to membrane-driven irreversible DNA collapse and formation of subresolution-sized DNA globules. On the other hand, electrostatic binding of DNA macromolecules to gel-state freestanding membranes leads to completely arrested diffusion and conformational dynamics of membrane-adsorbed DNA. A drastically different picture is observed in case of DNA interaction with supported cationic lipid bilayers: When the supported bilayer is in the fluid state, membrane-bound DNA molecules undergo 2D translational Brownian motion and conformational fluctuations, irrespectively of the charge density of the supported bilayer. At the same time, when the supported cationic membrane shows fluid-gel phase coexistence, membrane-bound DNA molecules are strongly attracted to micrometre-sized gel-phase domains enriched with the cationic lipid, which results in 2D compaction of the membrane-bound macromolecules. This DNA compaction, however, is fully reversible, and disappears as soon as the membrane is heated above the fluid-gel coexistence. We also discuss possible biological implications of our experimental findings.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of melittin in a dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Bernèche, S; Nina, M; Roux, B

    1998-01-01

    Molecular dynamics trajectories of melittin in an explicit dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer are generated to study the details of lipid-protein interactions at the microscopic level. Melittin, a small amphipathic peptide found in bee venom, is known to have a pronounced effect on the lysis of membranes. The peptide is initially set parallel to the membrane-solution interfacial region in an alpha-helical conformation with unprotonated N-terminus. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and polarized attenuated total internal reflectance Fourier transform infrared (PATIR-FTIR) properties of melittin are calculated from the trajectory to characterize the orientation of the peptide relative to the bilayer. The residue Lys7 located in the hydrophobic moiety of the helix and residues Lys23, Arg24, Gln25, and Gln26 at the C-terminus hydrophilic form hydrogen bonds with water molecules and with the ester carbonyl groups of the lipids, suggesting their important contribution to the stability of the helix in the bilayer. Lipid acyl chains are closely packed around melittin, contributing to the stable association with the membrane. Calculated density profiles and order parameters of the lipid acyl chains averaged over the molecular dynamics trajectory indicate that melittin has effects on both layers of the membrane. The presence of melittin in the upper layer causes a local thinning of the bilayer that favors the penetration of water through the lower layer. The energetic factors involved in the association of melittin at the membrane surface are characterized using an implicit mean-field model in which the membrane and the surrounding solvent are represented as structureless continuum dielectric material. The results obtained by solving the Poisson-Bolztmann equation numerically are in qualitative agreement with the detailed dynamics. The influence of the protonation state of the N-terminus of melittin is examined. After 600 ps, the N-terminus of melittin

  5. Effects of interfacial roughness on phonon transport in bilayer silicon thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weiyu; Yang, Juekuan; Wei, Zhiyong; Liu, Chenhan; Bi, Kedong; Xu, Dongyan; Li, Deyu; Chen, Yunfei

    2015-10-01

    We report on molecular dynamics studies of phonon (lattice vibrations) transport in bilayer silicon thin films stuck together via van der Waals interactions. Results indicate that for bilayer thin films with an atomically smooth interface, the in-plane thermal conductivity of the bilayer films is the same as that of a single layer; however, the in-plane thermal conductivity of bilayer films is higher than that of single films if roughness is introduced at the interface. These observations are explained by the effects of interfacial roughness on phonon specularity parameters for transmitted and reflected phonons.

  6. Anomalously robust valley polarization and valley coherence in bilayer WS2

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bairen; Zeng, Hualing; Dai, Junfeng; Gong, Zhirui; Cui, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    We report the observation of anomalously robust valley polarization and valley coherence in bilayer WS2. The polarization of the photoluminescence from bilayer WS2 follows that of the excitation source with both circular and linear polarization, and remains even at room temperature. The near-unity circular polarization of the luminescence reveals the coupling of spin, layer, and valley degree of freedom in bilayer system, and the linearly polarized photoluminescence manifests quantum coherence between the two inequivalent band extrema in momentum space, namely, the valley quantum coherence in atomically thin bilayer WS2. This observation provides insight into quantum manipulation in atomically thin semiconductors. PMID:25071178

  7. Scattering Studies of Hydrophobic Monomers in Liposomal Bilayers: An Expanding Shell Model of Monomer Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Andrew; Dergunov, Sergey; Ganus, Bill; Thomas, Zachary; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Urban, Volker S; Liu, Yun; Porcar, Lionel; Pinkhassik, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Hydrophobic monomers partially phase separate from saturated lipids when loaded into lipid bilayers in amounts exceeding a 1:1 monomer/lipid molar ratio. This conclusion is based on the agreement between two independent methods of examining the structure of monomer-loaded bilayers. Complete phase separation of monomers from lipids would result in an increase in bilayer thickness and a slight increase in the diameter of liposomes. A homogeneous distribution of monomers within the bilayer would not change the bilayer thickness and would lead to an increase in the liposome diameter. The increase in bilayer thickness, measured by the combination of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), was approximately half of what was predicted for complete phase separation. The increase in liposome diameter, measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS), was intermediate between values predicted for a homogeneous distribution and complete phase separation. Combined SANS, SAXS, and DLS data suggest that at a 1.2 monomer/lipid ratio approximately half of the monomers are located in an interstitial layer sandwiched between lipid sheets. These results expand our understanding of using self-assembled bilayers as scaffolds for the directed covalent assembly of organic nanomaterials. In particular, the partial phase separation of monomers from lipids corroborates the successful creation of nanothin polymer materials with uniform imprinted nanopores. Pore-forming templates do not need to span the lipid bilayer to create a pore in the bilayer-templated films.

  8. Scattering Studies of Hydrophobic Monomers in Liposomal Bilayers: An Expanding shell Model of Monomer Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Andrew G; Dergunov, Sergey; Ganus, Bill; Thomas, Zachary P; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Urban, Volker S; Liu, Yun; Porcar, Lionel; Pinkhassik, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Hydrophobic monomers partially phase separate from saturated lipids when loaded into lipid bilayers in amounts exceeding a 1:1 monomer/lipid molar ratio. This conclusion is based on the agreement between two independent methods of examining the structure of monomer-loaded bilayers. Complete phase separation of monomers from lipids would result in an increase in bilayer thickness and a slight increase in the diameter of liposomes. A homogeneous distribution of monomers within the bilayer would not change the bilayer thickness and would lead to an increase in the liposome diameter. The increase in bilayer thickness, measured by the combination of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), was approximately half of what was predicted for complete phase separation. The increase in liposome diameter, measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS), was intermediate between values predicted for a homogeneous distribution and complete phase separation. Combined SANS, SAXS, and DLS data suggest that at a 1.2 monomer/lipid ratio approximately half of the monomers are located in an interstitial layer sandwiched between lipid sheets. These results expand our understanding of using self-assembled bilayers as scaffolds for the directed covalent assembly of organic nanomaterials. In particular, the partial phase separation of monomers from lipids corroborates the successful creation of nanothin polymer materials with uniform imprinted nanopores. Pore-forming templates do not need to span the lipid bilayer to create a pore in the bilayer-templated films.

  9. Polymerized lipid bilayers on a solid substrate: morphologies and obstruction of lateral diffusion.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Takashi; Inaba, Takehiko; Tatsu, Yoshiro; Tero, Ryugo; Urisu, Tsuneo; Morigaki, Kenichi

    2009-01-01

    Substrate supported planar lipid bilayers (SPBs) are versatile models of the biological membrane in biophysical studies and biomedical applications. We previously developed a methodology for generating SPBs composed of polymeric and fluid phospholipid bilayers by using a photopolymerizable diacetylene phospholipid (DiynePC). Polymeric bilayers could be generated with micropatterns by conventional photolithography, and the degree of polymerization could be controlled by modulating UV irradiation doses. After removing nonreacted monomers, fluid lipid membranes could be integrated with polymeric bilayers. Herein, we report on a quantitative study of the morphology of polymeric bilayer domains and their obstruction toward lateral diffusion of membrane-associated molecules. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) observations revealed that polymerized DiynePC bilayers were formed as nanometer-sized domains. The ratio of polymeric and fluid bilayers could be modulated quantitatively by changing the UV irradiation dose for photopolymerization. Lateral diffusion coefficients of lipid molecules in fluid bilayers were measured by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and correlated with the amount of polymeric bilayer domains on the substrate. Controlled domain structures, lipid compositions, and lateral mobility in the model membranes should allow us to fabricate model membranes that mimic complex features of biological membranes with well-defined structures and physicochemical properties. PMID:19067577

  10. Shaped Apertures in Photoresist Films Enhance the Lifetime and Mechanical Stability of Suspended Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Kalsi, Sumit; Powl, Andrew M.; Wallace, B.A.; Morgan, Hywel; de Planque, Maurits R.R.

    2014-01-01

    Planar lipid bilayers suspended in apertures provide a controlled environment for ion channel studies. However, short lifetimes and poor mechanical stability of suspended bilayers limit the experimental throughput of bilayer electrophysiology experiments. Although bilayers are more stable in smaller apertures, ion channel incorporation through vesicle fusion with the suspended bilayer becomes increasingly difficult. In an alternative bilayer stabilization approach, we have developed shaped apertures in SU8 photoresist that have tapered sidewalls and a minimum diameter between 60 and 100 μm. Bilayers formed at the thin tip of these shaped apertures, either with the painting or the folding method, display drastically increased lifetimes, typically >20 h, and mechanical stability, being able to withstand extensive perturbation of the buffer solution. Single-channel electrical recordings of the peptide alamethicin and of the proteoliposome-delivered potassium channel KcsA demonstrate channel conductance with low noise, made possible by the small capacitance of the 50 μm thick SU8 septum, which is only thinned around the aperture, and unimpeded proteoliposome fusion, enabled by the large aperture diameter. We anticipate that these shaped apertures with micrometer edge thickness can substantially enhance the throughput of channel characterization by bilayer lipid membrane electrophysiology, especially in combination with automated parallel bilayer platforms. PMID:24739164

  11. Stability of C(12)E(j) Bilayers Probed with Adhesive Droplets.

    PubMed

    Astafyeva, Ksenia; Urbach, Wladimir; Garroum, Nabil; Taulier, Nicolas; Thiam, Abdou R

    2015-06-23

    The stability of model surfactant bilayers from the poly(ethylene glycol) mono-n-dodecyl ether (C12Ej) family was probed. The surfactant bilayers were formed by the adhesion of emulsion droplets. We generated C12Ej bilayers by forming water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions with saline water droplets, covered by the surfactant, in a silicone and octane oil mixture. Using microfluidics, we studied the stability of those bilayers. C12E1 allowed only short-lived bilayers whereas C12E2 bilayers were stable over a wide range of oil mixtures. At high C12E2 concentration, a two-phase region was displayed in the phase diagram: bilayers formed by the adhesion of two water droplets and Janus-like particles consisting of adhering aqueous and amphiphilic droplets. C12E8 and C12E25 did not mediate bilayer formation and caused phase inversion leading to o/w emulsion. With intermediate C12E4 and C12E5 surfactants, both w/o and o/w emulsions were unstable. We provided the titration of the C12E2 bilayer with C12E4 and C12E5 to study and predict their stability behavior. PMID:26035626

  12. Permeation of halide anions through phospholipid bilayers occurs by the solubility-diffusion mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paula, S.; Volkov, A. G.; Deamer, D. W.

    1998-01-01

    Two alternative mechanisms are frequently used to describe ionic permeation of lipid bilayers. In the first, ions partition into the hydrophobic phase and then diffuse across (the solubility-diffusion mechanism). The second mechanism assumes that ions traverse the bilayer through transient hydrophilic defects caused by thermal fluctuations (the pore mechanism). The theoretical predictions made by both models were tested for halide anions by measuring the permeability coefficients for chloride, bromide, and iodide as a function of bilayer thickness, ionic radius, and sign of charge. To vary the bilayer thickness systematically, liposomes were prepared from monounsaturated phosphatidylcholines (PC) with chain lengths between 16 and 24 carbon atoms. The fluorescent dye MQAE (N-(ethoxycarbonylmethyl)-6-methoxyquinolinium bromide) served as an indicator for halide concentration inside the liposomes and was used to follow the kinetics of halide flux across the bilayer membranes. The observed permeability coefficients ranged from 10(-9) to 10(-7) cm/s and increased as the bilayer thickness was reduced. Bromide was found to permeate approximately six times faster than chloride through bilayers of identical thickness, and iodide permeated three to four times faster than bromide. The dependence of the halide permeability coefficients on bilayer thickness and on ionic size were consistent with permeation of hydrated ions by a solubility-diffusion mechanism rather than through transient pores. Halide permeation therefore differs from that of a monovalent cation such as potassium, which has been accounted for by a combination of the two mechanisms depending on bilayer thickness.

  13. Phase behavior and permeability properties of phospholipid bilayers containing a short-chain phospholipid permeability enhancer.

    PubMed

    Risbo, J; Jørgensen, K; Sperotto, M M; Mouritsen, O G

    1997-10-01

    The thermodynamic phase behavior and trans-bilayer permeability properties of multilamellar phospholipid vesicles containing a short-chain DC10PC phospholipid permeability enhancer have been studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry and fluorescence spectroscopy. The calorimetric scans of DC14PC lipid bilayer vesicles incorporated with high concentrations of DC10PC demonstrate a distinct influence on the lipid bilayer thermodynamics manifested as a pronounced freezing-point depression and a narrow phase coexistence region. Increasing amounts of DC10PC lead to a progressive lowering of the melting enthalpy, implying a mixing behavior of the DC10PC in the bilayer matrix similar to that of a substitutional impurity. The phase behavior of the DC10PC-DC14PC mixture is supported by fluorescence polarization measurements which, furthermore, in the low-temperature gel phase reveal a non-monotonic concentration-dependent influence on the structural bilayer properties; small concentrations of DC10PC induce a disordering of the acyl chains, whereas higher concentrations lead to an ordering. Irreversible fluorescence quench measurements demonstrate a substantial increase in the trans-bilayer permeability over broad temperature and composition ranges. At temperatures corresponding to the peak positions of the heat capacity, a maximum in the trans-bilayer permeability is observed. The influence of DC10PC on the lipid bilayer thermodynamics and the associated permeability properties is discussed in terms of microscopic effects on the lateral lipid organization and heterogeneity of the bilayer. PMID:9370247

  14. Positively charged supported lipid bilayer formation on gold surfaces for neuronal cell culture.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung-Eun; Greben, Kyrylo; Wördenweber, Roger; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Supported lipid bilayers are widely used as cell membrane models and sensor platforms, but the usage on gold surface needs additional surface modification or optimized experimental conditions. In this work, the authors show lipid bilayer formation on plasma activated gold surfaces in physiological conditions without any other modification if at least 30% positively charged lipids are present. Details of bilayer formation from small unilamellar vesicles were monitored using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation in both basic and acidic environment. The authors also confirmed that this positively charged bilayer system can sustain primary cortical neuron growth and lipid transfer. This method will provide simple means to construct biomimetic interface on gold electrodes. PMID:27052005

  15. Phase Behavior of Dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol Bilayer Membrane in Saline Water Under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Saeko; Goto, Masaki; Tamai, Nobutake; Matsuki, Hitoshi

    The phase transitions of dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) bilayer membrane in the aqueous NaCl solution were observed by means of an optical method under atmospheric and high pressures. The temperature-pressure phase diagram of the DPPG bilayer showed that the phase behavior of the DPPG bilayer was similar to that of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer except for the interdigitated gel (LβI) phase. Comparing the phase diagram with the diagram obtained in a phosphate buffer, it turned out that the formation of the LβI phase is suppressed by the shielding effect of NaCl on the repulsive interaction among polar headgroups.

  16. Surface tension effects on the phase transition of a DPPC bilayer with and without protein: a molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xian; Qin, Shanshan; Lu, Diannan; Liu, Zheng

    2014-05-14

    While the surface tension of a cell membrane, or a plasma membrane, regulates cell functions, little is known about its effect on the conformational changes of the lipid bilayer and hence the resulting changes in the cell membrane. To obtain some insights into the phase transition of the lipid bilayer as a function of surface tension, we used a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayer as a model lipid bilayer and aquaporin (AqpZ), a transmembrane channel protein for water, as a model embedded protein. A coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation was applied to illustrate the phase transition behavior of the pure DPPC bilayer and aquaporin-embedded DPPC bilayer under different surface tensions. It was shown that an increased surface tension reduced the phase transition temperature of the DPPC bilayer. As for the DPPC bilayer in gel form, no significant changes occurred in the structure of the bilayer in response to the surface tension. Once in a liquid crystal state, both the structure and properties of the DPPC bilayer, such as area per lipid, lipid order parameters, bilayer thickness and lateral diffusion coefficients, were responsive to the magnitude of surface tension in a linear way. The presence of aquaporin attenuated the compact alignment of the lipid bilayer, hindered the parallel movement, and thus made the DPPC bilayer less sensitive to the surface tension. PMID:24668218

  17. The Influence of Lipid Bilayer Physicochemical Properties on Gramicidin A Conformer Preferences.

    PubMed

    Patrick, John W; Gamez, Roberto C; Russell, David H

    2016-04-26

    The conformational preferences adopted by gramicidin A (GA) dimers inserted into phospholipid bilayers are reported as a function of the bilayer cholesterol content, temperature, and incubation time. Through use of vesicle capture-freeze drying methodology, GA dimers were captured in lipid bilayers and the conformational preferences of the complex were analyzed using ion mobility-mass spectrometry. Perturbations that affect the physicochemical interactions in the lipid bilayer such as cholesterol incorporation, temperature, and incubation time directly alter the conformer preferences of the complex. Regardless of bilayer cholesterol concentration, the antiparallel double helix (ADH) conformation was observed to be most abundant for GA dimers in bilayers composed of lipids with 12 to 22 carbon acyl chains. Incorporation of cholesterol into lipid bilayers yields increased bilayer thickness and rigidity, and an increased abundance of parallel double helix (PDH) and single-stranded head-to-head (SSHH) dimers were observed. Bilayers prepared using 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, a lipid with 12 carbon acyl chains, yielded a nascent conformer that decreased in abundance as a function of bilayer cholesterol content. High resolution ion mobility-mass spectrometry data revealed two peaks in the ADH region suggesting that ADH populations are composed of two distinct conformers. The conformer preferences of GA dimers from 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayers were significantly different for samples incubated at 4°C vs. 60°C; increased cholesterol content yielded more PDH and SSHH at 60°C. The addition of cholesterol as well as incubating samples of 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine at 60°C for 24-72 h yielded an increase in PDH and SSHH abundance. PMID:27119642

  18. Kinematics, material symmetry, and energy densities for lipid bilayers with spontaneous curvature

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Mohsen; Seguin, Brian; Fried, Eliot

    2013-01-01

    Continuum mechanical tools are used to describe the deformation, energy density, and material symmetry of a lipid bilayer with spontaneous curvature. In contrast to conventional approaches in which lipid bilayers are modeled by material surfaces, here we rely on a three-dimensional approach in which a lipid bilayer is modeling by a shell-like body with finite thickness. In this setting, the interface between the leaflets of a lipid bilayer is assumed to coincide with the mid-surface of the corresponding shell-like body. The three-dimensional deformation gradient is found to involve the curvature tensors of the mid-surface in the spontaneous and the deformed states, the deformation gradient of the mid-surface, and the transverse deformation. Attention is also given to the coherency of the leaflets and to the area compatibility of closed lipid bilayers (i.e., vesicles). A hyperelastic constitutive theory for lipid bilayers in the liquid phase is developed. In combination, the requirements of frame-indifference and material symmetry yield a representation for the energy density of a lipid bilayer. This representation shows that three scalar invariants suffice to describe the constitutive response of a lipid bilayer exhibiting in-plane fluidity and transverse isotropy. In addition to exploring the geometrical and physical properties of these invariants, fundamental constitutively-associated kinematical quantities are emphasized. On this basis, the effect on the energy density of assuming that the lipid bilayer is incompressible is considered. Lastly, a dimension reduction argument is used to extract an areal energy density per unit area from the three-dimensional energy density. This step explains the origin of spontaneous curvature in the areal energy density. Importantly, along with a standard contribution associated with the natural curvature of lipid bilayer, our analysis indicates that constitutive asymmetry between the leaflets of the lipid bilayer gives rise to

  19. Assembly of RNA nanostructures on supported lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Dabkowska, Aleksandra P.; Michanek, Agnes; Jaeger, Luc; Rabe, Michael; Chworos, Arkadiusz; Höök, Fredrik; Nylander, Tommy; Sparr, Emma

    2014-01-01

    The assembly of nucleic acid nanostructures with controlled size and shape has large impact in the fields of nanotechnology, nanomedicine and synthetic biology. The directed arrangement of nanostructures at interfaces is important for many applications. In spite of this, the use of laterally mobile lipid bilayers to control RNA three-dimensional nanostructure formation on surfaces remains largely unexplored. Here, we direct the self-assembly of RNA building blocks into three-dimensional structures of RNA on fluid lipid bilayers composed of cationic 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) or mixtures of zwitterionic 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) and cationic sphingosine. We demonstrate the stepwise supramolecular assembly of discrete building blocks through specific and selective RNA-RNA interactions, based on results from quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D), ellipsometry, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRF) experiments. The assembly can be controlled to give a densely packed single layer of RNA polyhedrons at the fluid lipid bilayer surface. We show that assembly of the 3D structure can be modulated by sequence specific interactions, surface charge and changes in the salt composition and concentration. In addition, the tertiary structure of the RNA polyhedron can be controllably switched from an extended structure to one that is dense and compact. The versatile approach to building up three-dimensional structures of RNA does not require modification of the surface or the RNA molecules, and can be used as a bottom-up means of nanofabrication of functionalized bio-mimicking surfaces. PMID:25417592

  20. Cholesterol-induced modifications in lipid bilayers: a simulation study.

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, S W; Jakobsson, Eric; Mashl, R Jay; Scott, H Larry

    2002-01-01

    We present analysis of new configurational bias Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulation data for bilayers of dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline and cholesterol for dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline:cholesterol ratios of 24:1, 47:3, 11.5:1, 8:1, 7:1, 4:1, 3:1, 2:1, and 1:1, using long molecular dynamics runs and interspersed configurational bias Monte Carlo to ensure equilibration and enhance sampling. In all cases with cholesterol concentrations above 12.5% the area per molecule of the heterogeneous membrane varied linearly with cholesterol fraction. By extrapolation to pure cholesterol, we find the cross-sectional area of cholesterol in these mixtures is approximately 22.3 A(2). From the slope of the area/molecule relationship, we also find that the phospholipid in these mixtures is in a liquid ordered state with an average cross-sectional area per lipid of 50.7 A(2), slightly above the molecular area of a pure phospholipid gel. For lower concentrations of cholesterol, the molecular area rises above the straight line, indicating the "melting" of at least some of the phospholipid into a fluid state. Analysis of the lateral distribution of cholesterol molecules in the leaflets reveals peaks in radial distributions of cholesterols at multiples of approximately 5 A. These peaks grow in size as the simulation progresses, suggesting a tendency for small subunits of one lipid plus one cholesterol, hydrogen bonded together, to act as one composite particle, and perhaps to aggregate with other composites. Our results are consistent with experimentally observed effects of cholesterol, including the condensation effect of cholesterol in phospholipid monolayers and the tendency of cholesterol-rich domains to form in cholesterol-lipid bilayers. We are continuing to analyze this tendency on longer timescales and for larger bilayer patches. PMID:12324406

  1. Study on temperature-dependent carrier transport for bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yali; Li, Weilong; Qi, Mei; Li, Xiaojun; Zhou, Yixuan; Ren, Zhaoyu

    2015-05-01

    In order to investigate the temperature-dependent carrier transport property of the bilayer graphene, graphene films were synthesized on Cu foils by a home-built chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with C2H2. Samples regularity, transmittance (T) and layer number were analyzed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) images, transmittance spectra and Raman spectra. Van Der Pauw method was used for resistivity measurements and Hall measurements at different temperatures. The results indicated that the sheet resistance (Rs), carrier density (n), and mobility (μ) were 1096.20 Ω/sq, 0.75×1012 cm-2, and 7579.66 cm2 V-1 s-1 at room temperature, respectively. When the temperature increased from 0 °C to 240 °C, carrier density (n) increased from 0.66×1012 cm-2 to 1.55×1012 cm-2, sheet resistance (Rs) decreased from 1215.55 Ω/sq to 560.77 Ω/sq, and mobility (μ) oscillated around a constant value 7773.99 cm2 V-1 s-1. The decrease of the sheet resistance (Rs) indicated that the conductive capability of the bilayer graphene film increased with the temperature. The significant cause of the increase of carrier density (n) was the thermal activation of carriers from defects and unconscious doping states. Because the main influence on the carrier mobility (μ) was the lattice defect scattering and a small amount of impurity scattering, the carrier mobility (μ) was temperature-independent for the bilayer graphene.

  2. Dielectric properties, screening and compressibility for bilayer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrkos, Stamatios

    We examine the dielectric properties, screening and compressibility for charged particle bilayer systems. In the process, we first review the screening problem of a charged impurity in a one component plasma in 3D, 2D and bilayer systems within the framework of the linear response theory, both for weak and strong coupling. In the weakly coupled domain, the approach is based on the RPA response matrix. The behavior that emerges is marked by an unexpected nonmonotonic dependence of the screened charges and potential on the layer separation. In the strong coupling domain we use the link provided by the classical fluctuation dissipation theorem between the response matrix and the structure function matrix that was independently calculated by W. L. Slattery, et al. and S. Chakravatry et al . What emerges is a screening scenario where one layer exhibits an overscreening and the other an antiscreening behavior. To go beyond the linear response approximation, we also examine, within the RPA approach, higher order (quadratic) contributions to the screening both in 2D and 3D, based on the quadratic density response previously calculated by J. M. Rommel. These contributions are expected to play an important role at higher coupling or higher Z values. Finally, since the response function and the screening behavior are intimately linked to the isothermal compressibility of the system, we examine the inverse compressibility matrix and its properties for a bilayer system, both within the Debye approximation and for strongly coupled systems. The later as based on previously obtained hypernetted chain (HNC) and molecular dynamics results by G. D. Doolen and Z. Donko.

  3. Super-resolution microscopy of lipid bilayer phases.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chinkuei; Hochstrasser, Robin M

    2011-04-01

    Sub-diffraction optical imaging with nanometer resolution of lipid phase-separated regions is reported. Merocyanine 540, a probe whose fluorescence is sensitive to the lipid phase, is combined with super-resolution imaging to distinguish the liquid- and gel-phase nanoscale domains of lipid bilayers supported on glass. The monomer-dimer equilibrium of MC540 in membranes is deemed responsible for the population difference of single-molecule fluorescence bursts in the different phase regions. The extension of this method to other binary or ternary lipid models or natural systems provides a promising new super-resolution strategy. PMID:21405121

  4. Lipid Bilayer Vesicle Dynamics in AC Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Lane; Vlahovska, Petia; Miksis, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Vesicles are closed, fluid-filled lipid bilayers which are mechanically similar to biological cells and which undergo shape transitions in the presence of electric fields. Here we model the vesicle membrane as an infinitely thin, capacitive, area-incompressible interface with the surrounding fluids acting as charge-advecting leaky dielectrics. We then implement the boundary integral method to numerically investigate the dynamics of a vesicle in various AC electric field profiles. Our numerical results are then compared with recent small deformation theory and experimental data. We also note our observation of a new theoretical vesicle behavior that has yet to be observed experimentally.

  5. Superior thermal conductivity in suspended bilayer hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chengru; Guo, Jie; Dong, Lan; Aiyiti, Adili; Xu, Xiangfan; Li, Baowen

    2016-05-01

    We reported the basal-plane thermal conductivity in exfoliated bilayer hexagonal boron nitride h-BN that was measured using suspended prepatterned microstructures. The h-BN sample suitable for thermal measurements was fabricated by dry-transfer method, whose sample quality, due to less polymer residues on surfaces, is believed to be superior to that of PMMA-mediated samples. The measured room temperature thermal conductivity is around 484 Wm‑1K‑1(+141 Wm‑1K‑1/ ‑24 Wm‑1K‑1) which exceeds that in bulk h-BN, providing experimental observation of the thickness-dependent thermal conductivity in suspended few-layer h-BN.

  6. Lipid bilayer array for simultaneous recording of ion channel activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano-Iwata, Ayumi; Nasu, Tomohiro; Oshima, Azusa; Kimura, Yasuo; Niwano, Michio

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes an array of stable and reduced-solvent bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) formed in microfabricated silicon chips. BLMs were first vertically formed simultaneously and then turned 90° in order to realize a horizontal BLM array. Since the present BLMs are mechanically stable and robust, the BLMs survive this relatively tough process. Typically, a ˜60% yield in simultaneous BLM formation over 9 sites was obtained. Parallel recordings of gramicidin channel activities from different BLMs were demonstrated. The present system has great potential as a platform of BLM-based high throughput drug screening for ion channel proteins.

  7. A transverse Ising bilayer film with an antiferromagnetic spin configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneyoshi, T.

    2015-10-01

    The phase diagrams and temperature dependences of magnetizations in a transverse Ising bilayer film with an antiferromagnetic spin configuration are studied by the uses of the effective-field theory (EFT) with correlations, in order to clarify whether the appearance of a compensation point is possible below the transition temperature in the system. From these investigations, we have found a lot of characteristic phenomena in these properties, when the value of an interlayer coupling takes a large value, such as the reentrant phenomenon free from the disorder-induced frustration and the novel types of magnetization curve with a compensation point.

  8. Electronic Bloch oscillation in bilayer graphene gradient superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Hemeng; Li, Changan; Song, Yun; Ma, Tianxing; Wang, Li-Gang; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2014-08-18

    We investigate the electronic Bloch oscillation in bilayer graphene gradient superlattices using transfer matrix method. By introducing two kinds of gradient potentials of square barriers along electrons propagation direction, we find that Bloch oscillations up to terahertz can occur. Wannier-Stark ladders, as the counterpart of Bloch oscillation, are obtained as a series of equidistant transmission peaks, and the localization of the electronic wave function is also signature of Bloch oscillation. Furthermore, the period of Bloch oscillation decreases linearly with increasing gradient of barrier potentials.

  9. Emerging activity in bilayered dispersions with wake-mediated interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartnick, Jörg; Kaiser, Andreas; Löwen, Hartmut; Ivlev, Alexei V.

    2016-06-01

    In a bilayered system of particles with wake-mediated interactions, the action-reaction symmetry for the effective forces between particles of different layers is broken. Under quite general conditions we show that, if the interaction nonreciprocity exceeds a certain threshold, this creates an active dispersion of self-propelled clusters of Brownian particles. The emerging activity promotes unusual melting scenarios and an enormous diffusivity in the dense fluid. Our results are obtained by computer simulation and analytical theory and can be verified in experiments with colloidal dispersions and complex plasmas.

  10. Topological Textures in a Ferromagnet-Superconductor Bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdin, Serkan; Lyuksyutov, Igor F.; Pokrovsky, Valery L.; Vinokur, Valeri M.

    2002-01-01

    The homogeneous state of a ferromagnet-superconductor bilayer (FSB) with the magnetization perpendicular to the layer can be unstable with respect to the formation of vortices in the superconducting layer. The developing topological instability in the FSB leads to formation of domains in which the direction of the magnetization in the magnetic film and the direction of vorticity in the superconducting film alternate together. This is a new, combined topological structure, which does not appear in isolated layers. Equilibrium domains can appear in the FSB even if the single magnetic film is in a monodomain state.

  11. Topological textures in a ferromagnet-superconductor bilayer.

    SciTech Connect

    Erdin, S.; Lyuksyutov, I. F.; Pokrovsky, V. L.; Vinokur, V. M.; Materials Science Division; Texas A&M Univ.; Landau Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2002-01-07

    The homogeneous state of a ferromagnet-superconductor bilayer (FSB) with the magnetization perpendicular to the layer can be unstable with respect to the formation of vortices in the superconducting layer. The developing topological instability in the FSB leads to formation of domains in which the direction of the magnetization in the magnetic film and the direction of vorticity in the superconducting film alternate together. This is a new, combined topological structure, which does not appear in isolated layers. Equilibrium domains can appear in the FSB even if the single magnetic film is in a monodomain state.

  12. Negative terahertz conductivity in remotely doped graphene bilayer heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhii, V.; Ryzhii, M.; Mitin, V.; Shur, M. S.; Otsuji, T.

    2015-11-14

    Injection or optical generation of electrons and holes in graphene bilayers (GBLs) can result in the interband population inversion enabling the terahertz (THz) radiation lasing. The intraband radiative processes compete with the interband transitions. We demonstrate that remote doping enhances the indirect interband generation of photons in the proposed GBL heterostructures. Therefore, such remote doping helps to surpass the intraband (Drude) absorption, and results in large absolute values of the negative dynamic THz conductivity in a wide range of frequencies at elevated (including room) temperatures. The remotely doped GBL heterostructure THz lasers are expected to achieve higher THz gain compared with previously proposed GBL-based THz lasers.

  13. Cooperative multiscale aging in a ferromagnet/antiferromagnet bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urazhdin, S.; Danilenko, U.

    2015-11-01

    Anisotropic magnetoresistance measurements show that the magnetization state in epitaxial Ni80Fe20/Fe50Mn50 bilayers exhibits aging over a wide range of temperatures and magnetic fields. The observed power-law time dependence indicates that aging is characterized by a wide range of activation time scales. Aging characteristics are also inconsistent with a superposition of independent activation barriers expected for Arrhenius-type relaxation. The observed effects indicate a fundamental connection with the critical phenomena in complex condensed matter systems.

  14. Giant Frictional Drag in Double Bilayer Graphene Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kayoung; Xue, Jiamin; Dillen, David C.; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Tutuc, Emanuel

    2016-07-01

    We study the frictional drag between carriers in two bilayer graphene flakes separated by a 2-5 nm thick hexagonal boron nitride dielectric. At temperatures (T ) lower than ˜10 K , we observe a large anomalous negative drag emerging predominantly near the drag layer charge neutrality. The anomalous drag resistivity increases dramatically with reducing T , and becomes comparable to the layer resistivity at the lowest T =1.5 K . At low T the drag resistivity exhibits a breakdown of layer reciprocity. A comparison of the drag resistivity and the drag layer Peltier coefficient suggests a thermoelectric origin of this anomalous drag.

  15. Inverse Proximity Effect in Superconductor-ferromagnet Bilayer Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Jing

    2010-04-05

    Measurements of the polar Kerr effect using a zero-area-loop Sagnac magnetometer on Pb/Ni and Al/(Co-Pd) proximity-effect bilayers show unambiguous evidence for the 'inverse proximity effect,' in which the ferromagnet (F) induces a finite magnetization in the superconducting (S) layer. To avoid probing the magnetic effects in the ferromagnet, the superconducting layer was prepared much thicker than the light's optical penetration depth. The sign and size of the effect, as well as its temperature dependence agree with recent predictions by Bergeret et al.[1].

  16. Giant Frictional Drag in Double Bilayer Graphene Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kayoung; Xue, Jiamin; Dillen, David C; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Tutuc, Emanuel

    2016-07-22

    We study the frictional drag between carriers in two bilayer graphene flakes separated by a 2-5 nm thick hexagonal boron nitride dielectric. At temperatures (T) lower than ∼10  K, we observe a large anomalous negative drag emerging predominantly near the drag layer charge neutrality. The anomalous drag resistivity increases dramatically with reducing T, and becomes comparable to the layer resistivity at the lowest T=1.5  K. At low T the drag resistivity exhibits a breakdown of layer reciprocity. A comparison of the drag resistivity and the drag layer Peltier coefficient suggests a thermoelectric origin of this anomalous drag. PMID:27494492

  17. Band Structure Asymmetry of Bilayer Graphene Revealed by Infrared Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.Q.; Henriksen, E.A.; Jiang, Z.; Hao, Zhao; Martin, Michael C.; Kim, P.; Stormer, H.L.; Basov, Dimitri N.

    2008-12-10

    We report on infrared spectroscopy of bilayer graphene integrated in gated structures. We observe a significant asymmetry in the optical conductivity upon electrostatic doping of electrons and holes. We show that this finding arises from a marked asymmetry between the valence and conduction bands, which is mainly due to the inequivalence of the two sublattices within the graphene layer and the next-nearest-neighbor interlayer coupling. From the conductivity data, the energy difference of the two sublattices and the interlayer coupling energy are directly determined.

  18. Quantum localization in bilayer Heisenberg antiferromagnets with site dilution.

    PubMed

    Roscilde, Tommaso; Haas, Stephan

    2005-11-11

    The field-induced antiferromagnetic ordering in systems of weakly coupled S = 1/2 dimers at zero temperature can be described as a Bose-Einstein condensation of triplet quasiparticles (singlet quasiholes) in the ground state. For the case of a Heisenberg bilayer, it is here shown how the above picture is altered in the presence of site dilution of the magnetic lattice. Geometric randomness leads to quantum localization of the quasiparticles or quasiholes and to an extended Bose-glass phase in a realistic disordered model. This localization phenomenon drives the system towards a quantum-disordered phase well before the classical geometric percolation threshold is reached. PMID:16384096

  19. Quantum Hall States and Phase Diagram of Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Junji

    2013-03-01

    The quantum Hall states of bilayer graphene for filling factor ν from 0 to 4 are investigated using lowest Landau level approximation. A critical line in the E⊥B plane for both the ν = 0 and 1 case is found. This line separates the (partially) spin polarized and (partially) layer polarized phases in the ν = 0 (1) case. The gaps for all ν are found to scale linearly with B. The existence of phase separation line, the linearity of the gaps, and the hierarchy for gaps of different ν agree well with experiments.

  20. Flux Penetration in a Ferromagnetic/Superconducting Bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamus, Z.; Cieplak, M. Z.; Abal-Oshev, A.; Kończykowski, M.; Cheng, X. M.; Zhu, L. Y.; Chien, C. L.

    2007-01-01

    An array of miniature Hall sensors is used to study the magnetic flux penetration in a ferromagnetic/superconducting bilayer consisting of Nb as a superconducting layer and Co/Pt multilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy as a ferromagnetic layer, separated by an amorphous Si layer to avoid the proximity effect. It is found that the magnetic domains in the ferromagnetic layer create a large edge barrier in the superconducting layer which delays flux penetration. The smooth flux profiles observed in the absence of magnetic pinning change into terraced profiles in the presence of domains.

  1. Crystalline silicon growth in nickel/a-silicon bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Mohiddon, Md Ahamad; Naidu, K. Lakshun; Dalba, G.; Rocca, F.; Krishna, M. Ghanashyam

    2013-02-05

    The effect of substrate temperature on amorphous Silicon crystallization, mediated by metal impurity is reported. Bilayers of Ni(200nm)/Si(400nm) are deposited on fused silica substrate by electron beam evaporator at 200 and 500 Degree-Sign C. Raman mapping shows that, 2 to 5 micron size crystalline silicon clusters are distributed over the entire surface of the sample. X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies demonstrate silicon crystallizes over the metal silicide seeds and grow with the annealing temperature.

  2. Ferromagnetic resonance in exchange coupled bilayer films with stress anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Rong, Jianhong; Yun, Guohong; Wang, Dong; Bao, Lingbo

    2016-07-01

    Ferromagnetic resonance frequency and magnetic susceptibility in ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic bilayer films with stress anisotropy are investigated using a ferromagnetic resonance method. In-plane anisotropy, weak and strong perpendicular anisotropy are taken into account in this theoretical model. The effect of stress anisotropy has been investigated; it was found that the resonance frequencies all increase for in-plane and weak perpendicular anisotropy, as the stress anisotropy field increases. In addition, the stress anisotropy field does not obviously affect the magnetic susceptibility for saturation field.

  3. d+id' Chiral Superconductivity in Bilayer Silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Liu, Cheng-Cheng; Wu, Kehui; Yang, Fan; Yao, Yugui

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the structure and physical properties of the undoped bilayer silicene through first-principles calculations and find the system is intrinsically metallic with sizable pocket Fermi surfaces. When realistic electron-electron interaction turns on, the system is identified as a chiral d+id' topological superconductor mediated by the strong spin fluctuation on the border of the antiferromagnetic spin density wave order. Moreover, the tunable Fermi pocket area via strain makes it possible to adjust the spin density wave critical interaction strength near the real one and enables a high superconducting critical temperature.

  4. Low-energy theory for the graphene twist bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weckbecker, D.; Shallcross, S.; Fleischmann, M.; Ray, N.; Sharma, S.; Pankratov, O.

    2016-01-01

    The graphene twist bilayer represents the prototypical system for investigating the stacking degree of freedom in few-layer graphenes. The electronic structure of this system changes qualitatively as a function of angle, from a large-angle limit in which the two layers are essentially decoupled—with the exception of a 28-atom commensuration unit cell for which the layers are coupled on an energy scale of ≈8 meV —to a small-angle strong-coupling limit. Despite sustained investigation, a fully satisfactory theory of the twist bilayer remains elusive. The outstanding problems are (i) to find a theoretically unified description of the large- and small-angle limits, and (ii) to demonstrate agreement between the low-energy effective Hamiltonian and, for instance, ab initio or tight-binding calculations. In this article, we develop a low-energy theory that in the large-angle limit reproduces the symmetry-derived Hamiltonians of Mele [Phys. Rev. B 81, 161405 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevB.81.161405], and in the small-angle limit shows almost perfect agreement with tight-binding calculations. The small-angle effective Hamiltonian is that of Bistritzer and MacDonald [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. (U.S.A.) 108, 12233 (2011), 10.1073/pnas.1108174108], but with the momentum scale Δ K , the difference of the momenta of the unrotated and rotated special points, replaced by a coupling momentum scale g(c )=8/π √{3 }a sinθ/2 . Using this small-angle Hamiltonian, we are able to determine the complete behavior as a function of angle, finding a complex small-angle clustering of van Hove singularities in the density of states (DOS) that after a "zero-mode" peak regime between 0 .90°<θ <0 .15° limits θ <0 .05° to a DOS that is essentially that of a superposition DOS of all bilayer stacking possibilities. In this regime, the Dirac spectrum is entirely destroyed by hybridization for -0.25

  5. Cholesterol-induced effects on the viscoelasticity of monoglyceride bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Crilly, J F; Earnshaw, J C

    1983-01-01

    Changes in the viscoelastic properties of glycerol monooleate bilayers resulting from the incorporation of cholesterol into the membranes have been measured. The interface tension increases with the cholesterol concentration, reaching saturation for a 4.2:1 mole ratio of cholesterol:lipid in the film-forming solution. Incorporation of cholesterol in the membrane causes the appearance of a large intrinsic viscosity; this also increases with the sterol content of the membrane. Molecular models of lipid-sterol interactions and packing are considered to explain both the observed changes in membrane properties and similarities with comparable lipid systems. PMID:6838963

  6. Properties of ganglioside GM1 in phosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Reed, R A; Shipley, G G

    1996-03-01

    Gangliosides have been shown to function as cell surface receptors, as well as participating in cell growth, differentiation, and transformation. In spite of their multiple biological functions, relatively little is known about their structure and physical properties in membrane systems. The thermotropic and structural properties of ganglioside GM1 alone and in a binary system with 1,2-dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) have been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and x-ray diffraction. By DSC hydrated GM1 undergoes a broad endothermic transition TM = 26 degrees C (delta H = 1.7 kcal/mol GM1). X-ray diffraction below (-2 degrees C) and above (51 degrees C) this transition indicates a micellar structure with changes occurring only in the wide angle region of the diffraction pattern (relatively sharp reflection at 1/4.12 A-1 at -2 degrees C; more diffuse reflection at 1/4.41 A-1 at 51 degrees C). In hydrated binary mixtures with DPPC, incorporation of GM1 (0-30 mol%; zone 1) decreases the enthalpy of the DPPC pretransition at low molar compositions while increasing the TM of both the pre- and main transitions (limiting values, 39 and 44 degrees C, respectively). X-ray diffraction studies indicate the presence of a single bilayer gel phase in zone 1 that can undergo chain melting to an L alpha bilayer phase. A detailed hydration study of GM1 (5.7 mol %)/DPPC indicated a conversion of the DPPC bilayer gel phase to an infinite swelling system in zone 1 due to the presence of the negatively charged sialic acid moiety of GM1. At 30-61 mol % GM1 (zone 2), two calorimetric transitions are observed at 44 and 47 degrees C, suggesting the presence of two phases. The lower transition reflects the bilayer gel --> L alpha transition (zone 1), whereas the upper transition appears to be a consequence of the formation of a nonbilayer, micellar or hexagonal phase, although the structure of this phase has not been defined by x-ray diffraction. At > 61 mol % GM

  7. Electronic Structure and Optical Properties of Twisted Bilayer Black Phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ting; Li, Zhenglu; Qiu, Diana Y.; Louie, Steven G.

    Using first-principles calculations, we find that the electronic structure and optical properties of bilayer black phosphorus can be modified significantly through changing the interlayer twist angle. We demonstrate the origin of these twist angle dependent effects, and connect our predicted results to experimental measurements. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR15-1508412, and the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources have been provided by DOE at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's NERSC facility.

  8. The Coulomb excitations of Bernal bilayer graphene under external fields

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jhao-Ying; Lin, Ming-Fa

    2014-03-31

    We study the field effects on the Coulomb excitation spectrum of Bernal bilayer graphene by using the tight-binding model and the random-phase approximation. The electric field opens the band gap and creates the saddle points, the latter brings about a prominent interband plasmon. On the other hand, the magnetic field induces the dispersionless Landau levels (LLs) that causes the inter-LL plasmons. The two kinds of field-induced plasmon modes can be further tuned by the magnitude of momentum transfer and the field strength. The predicted results may be further validated by the inelastic light-scattering or high-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELLS)

  9. The Interaction of Melittin with Dimyristoyl Phosphatidylcholine-Dimyristoyl Phosphatidylserine Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rai, Durgesh K.; Qian, Shuo; Heller, William T.

    2016-08-13

    We report that membrane-active peptides (MAPs), which interact directly with the lipid bilayer of a cell and include toxins and host defense peptides, display lipid composition-dependent activity. Phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids are anionic lipids that are found throughout the cellular membranes of most eukaryotic organisms where they serve as both a functional component and as a precursor to phosphatidylethanolamine lipids. The inner leaflet of the plasma membrane contains more PS than the outer one, and the asymmetry is actively maintained. Here, the impact of the MAP melittin on the structure of lipid bilayer vesicles made of a mixture of phosphatidylcholine andmore » phosphatidylserine was studied. Small-angle neutron scattering of the MAP associated with selectively deuterium-labeled lipid bilayer vesicles revealed how the thickness and lipid composition of phosphatidylserine-containing vesicles change in response to melittin. The peptide thickens the lipid bilayer for concentrations up to P/L = 1/500, but membrane thinning results when P/L = 1/200. The thickness transition is accompanied by a large change in the distribution of DMPS between the leaflets of the bilayer. The change in composition is driven by electrostatic interactions, while the change in bilayer thickness is driven by changes in the interaction of the peptide with the headgroup region of the lipid bilayer. Lastly, the results provide new information about lipid-specific interactions that take place in mixed composition lipid bilayer membranes.« less

  10. Synergistic action of thermoresponsive and hygroresponsive elements elicits rapid and directional response of a bilayer actuator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lidong; Desta, Israel; Naumov, Panče

    2016-05-21

    A bilayer actuator composed of thermoresponsive and thermo/hygroresponsive elements is developed, which undergoes fast, directional and autonomous curling with a speed of up to 0.7 m s(-1) and recovers its shape by hydration. In situ tensile testing of the thermal response of individual layers provided insights into the mechanism of actuation of thermo/hygromorphic bilayers. PMID:26997588

  11. High Resistivity Lipid Bilayers Assembled on Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Cushions: An Impedance Study.

    PubMed

    Diamanti, Eleftheria; Gregurec, Danijela; Rodríguez-Presa, María José; Gervasi, Claudio A; Azzaroni, Omar; Moya, Sergio E

    2016-06-28

    Supported membranes on top of polymer cushions are interesting models of biomembranes as cell membranes are supported on a polymer network of proteins and sugars. In this work lipid vesicles formed by a mixture of 30% 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and 70% 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine (DOPS) are assembled on top of a polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) cushion of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and poly(styrene sodium sulfonate) (PSS). The assembly results in the formation of a bilayer on top of the PEM as proven by means of the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation technique (QCM-D) and by cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). The electrical properties of the bilayer are studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The bilayer supported on the PEMs shows a high resistance, on the order of 10(7) Ω cm(2), which is indicative of a continuous, dense bilayer. Such resistance is comparable with the resistance of black lipid membranes. This is the first time that such values are obtained for lipid bilayers supported on PEMs. The assembly of polyelectrolytes on top of a lipid bilayer decreases the resistance of the bilayer up to 2 orders of magnitude. The assembly of the polyelectrolytes on the lipids induces defects or pores in the bilayer which in turn prompts a decrease in the measured resistance. PMID:27267089

  12. Electrospun bilayer fibrous scaffolds for enhanced cell infiltration and vascularization in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pu, Juan; Yuan, Falei; Li, Song; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos

    2015-02-01

    Bilayer poly(L-lactic acid) fibrous scaffolds consisting of a thin aligned-fiber layer (AFL) and a relatively thick random-fiber layer (RFL) were fabricated by an electrospinning technique, which uses two slowly rotating parallel disks as the collector. The morphology and structure of the bilayer scaffolds were examined by high-magnification scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy. The bilayer scaffolds demonstrated a gradual variation in through-thickness porosity and fiber alignment and an average porosity much higher than that of conventionally electrospun scaffolds (controls) with randomly distributed fibers. The biocompatibility and biological performance of the bilayer fibrous scaffolds were evaluated by in vivo experiments involving subcutaneous scaffold implantation in Sprague-Dawley rats, followed by histology and immunohistochemistry studies. The results illustrate the potential of the bilayer scaffolds to overcome major limitations of conventionally electrospun scaffolds associated with intrinsically small pores, low porosity and, consequently, poor cell infiltration. The significantly higher porosity and larger pore size of RFL enhances cell motility through the scaffold thickness, whereas the relatively dense structure of AFL provides the scaffold with the necessary mechanical strength. The bilayer scaffolds show more than two times higher cell infiltration than controls during implantation in vivo. The unique structure of the bilayer scaffolds promotes collagen fiber deposition, cell proliferation, and ingrowth of smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells in vivo. The results of this study illustrate the high prospect of the fabricated bilayer fibrous scaffolds in tissue engineering and regeneration. PMID:25463495

  13. Alginate based bilayer hydrocolloid films as potential slow-release modern wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Thu, Hnin-Ei; Zulfakar, Mohd Hanif; Ng, Shiow-Fern

    2012-09-15

    The aims of this research were to develop a novel bilayer hydrocolloid film based on alginate and to investigate its potential as slow-release wound healing vehicle. The bilayer is composed of an upper layer impregnated with model drug (ibuprofen) and a drug-free lower layer, which acted as a rate-controlling membrane. The thickness uniformity, solvent loss, moisture vapour transmission rate (MVTR), hydration rate, morphology, rheology, mechanical properties, in vitro drug release and in vivo wound healing profiles were investigated. A smooth bilayer film with two homogenous distinct layers was produced. The characterisation results showed that bilayer has superior mechanical and rheological properties than the single layer films. The bilayers also showed low MVTR, slower hydration rate and lower drug flux in vitro compared to single layer inferring that bilayer may be useful for treating low suppurating wounds and suitable for slow release application on wound surfaces. The bilayers also provided a significant higher healing rate in vivo, with well-formed epidermis with faster granulation tissue formation when compared to the controls. In conclusions, a novel alginate-based bilayer hydrocolloid film was developed and results suggested that they can be exploited as slow-release wound dressings. PMID:22643226

  14. Effect of fatty acids on phase behavior of hydrated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer: saturated versus unsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Inoue, T; Yanagihara, S; Misono, Y; Suzuki, M

    2001-02-01

    The effect of some fatty acids on the phase behavior of hydrated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer was investigated with special interest in possible difference between saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. The phase behavior of hydrated DPPC bilayer was followed by a differential scanning calorimetry and a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The addition of palmitic acid (PA) increased the bilayer phase transition temperature with the increase of the PA content in the mixture. In addition, DPPC molecules in gel phase bilayer became more rigid in the presence of PA compared with those in the absence of PA. This effect of PA on the phase behavior of hydrated DPPC bilayer is common to other saturated fatty acids, stearic acid, myristic acid, and also to unsaturated fatty acid with trans double bond, elaidic acid. Contrary to these fatty acids, oleic acid (OA), the unsaturated fatty acid with cis double bond in the acyl chain, exhibited quite different behavior. The effect of OA on the bilayer phase transition temperature was rather small, although a slight decrease in the temperature was appreciable. Furthermore, the IR spectral results demonstrated that the perturbing effect of OA on the gel phase bilayer of DPPC was quite small. These results mean that OA does not disturb the hydrated DPPC bilayer significantly. PMID:11269932

  15. Removal of the mechanoprotective influence of the cytoskeleton reveals PIEZO1 is gated by bilayer tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Charles D.; Bae, Chilman; Ziegler, Lynn; Hartley, Silas; Nikolova-Krstevski, Vesna; Rohde, Paul R.; Ng, Chai-Ann; Sachs, Frederick; Gottlieb, Philip A.; Martinac, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Mechanosensitive ion channels are force-transducing enzymes that couple mechanical stimuli to ion flux. Understanding the gating mechanism of mechanosensitive channels is challenging because the stimulus seen by the channel reflects forces shared between the membrane, cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix. Here we examine whether the mechanosensitive channel PIEZO1 is activated by force-transmission through the bilayer. To achieve this, we generate HEK293 cell membrane blebs largely free of cytoskeleton. Using the bacterial channel MscL, we calibrate the bilayer tension demonstrating that activation of MscL in blebs is identical to that in reconstituted bilayers. Utilizing a novel PIEZO1-GFP fusion, we then show PIEZO1 is activated by bilayer tension in bleb membranes, gating at lower pressures indicative of removal of the cortical cytoskeleton and the mechanoprotection it provides. Thus, PIEZO1 channels must sense force directly transmitted through the bilayer.

  16. Removal of the mechanoprotective influence of the cytoskeleton reveals PIEZO1 is gated by bilayer tension

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Charles D.; Bae, Chilman; Ziegler, Lynn; Hartley, Silas; Nikolova-Krstevski, Vesna; Rohde, Paul R.; Ng, Chai-Ann; Sachs, Frederick; Gottlieb, Philip A.; Martinac, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Mechanosensitive ion channels are force-transducing enzymes that couple mechanical stimuli to ion flux. Understanding the gating mechanism of mechanosensitive channels is challenging because the stimulus seen by the channel reflects forces shared between the membrane, cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix. Here we examine whether the mechanosensitive channel PIEZO1 is activated by force-transmission through the bilayer. To achieve this, we generate HEK293 cell membrane blebs largely free of cytoskeleton. Using the bacterial channel MscL, we calibrate the bilayer tension demonstrating that activation of MscL in blebs is identical to that in reconstituted bilayers. Utilizing a novel PIEZO1–GFP fusion, we then show PIEZO1 is activated by bilayer tension in bleb membranes, gating at lower pressures indicative of removal of the cortical cytoskeleton and the mechanoprotection it provides. Thus, PIEZO1 channels must sense force directly transmitted through the bilayer. PMID:26785635

  17. Kinetics of symmetry and asymmetry in a phase-separating bilayer membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, J. J.; Olmsted, P. D.

    2015-11-01

    We simulate a phase-separating bilayer in which the leaflets experience a direct coupling favoring local compositional symmetry ("registered" bilayer phases), and an indirect coupling due to hydrophobic mismatch that favors strong local asymmetry ("antiregistered" bilayer phases). For wide ranges of overall leaflet compositions, multiple competing states are possible. For estimated physical parameters, a quenched bilayer may first evolve toward a metastable state more asymmetric than if the leaflets were uncorrelated; subsequently, it must nucleate to reach its equilibrium, more symmetric, state. These phase-transition kinetics exhibit characteristic signatures through which fundamental and opposing interleaflet interactions may be probed. We emphasize how bilayer phase diagrams with a separate axis for each leaflet can account for overall and local symmetry or asymmetry, and capture a range of observations in the experiment and simulation literature.

  18. Filament networks attached to membranes: cytoskeletal pressure and local bilayer deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auth, Thorsten; Safran, S. A.; Gov, Nir S.

    2007-11-01

    Several cell types, among them red blood cells, have a cortical, two-dimensional (2D) network of filaments sparsely attached to their lipid bilayer. In many mammalian cells, this 2D polymer network is connected to an underlying 3D, more rigid cytoskeleton. In this paper, we consider the pressure exerted by the thermally fluctuating, cortical network of filaments on the bilayer and predict the bilayer deformations that are induced by this pressure. We treat the filaments as flexible polymers and calculate the pressure that a network of such linear chains exerts on the bilayer; we then minimize the bilayer shape in order to predict the resulting local deformations. We compare our predictions with membrane deformations observed in electron micrographs of red blood cells. The polymer pressure along with the resulting membrane deformation can lead to compartmentalization, regulate in-plane diffusion and may influence protein sorting as well as transmit signals to the polymerization of the underlying 3D cytoskeleton.

  19. Dynamical thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene in the presence of bias voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezania, H.; Yarmohammadi, M.

    2016-01-01

    We study dynamical thermal conductivity of doped biased bilayer graphene for both AA and AB-stacking in the context of tight binding model Hamiltonian. The effects of bias voltage and chemical potential on the behavior of dynamical thermal conductivity are discussed for different stacking of bilayer graphene. Green's function approach has been implemented to find the behavior of thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene within linear response theory. We have found that thermal conductivity decreases with chemical potential for different values of temperature and frequency. Also thermal conductivity of AB stacked bilayer graphene versus bias voltage includes a peak for each value of chemical potential. Furthermore we study the frequency dependence of thermal conductivity of AA stacked bilayer graphene for different values of temperature and bias voltage.

  20. Interaction of Ionic Liquids with a Lipid Bilayer: A Biophysical Study of Ionic Liquid Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Jing, Benxin; Lan, Nan; Qiu, Jie; Zhu, Yingxi

    2016-03-17

    Ionic liquids (ILs) have been widely considered and used as "green solvents" for more than two decades. However, their ecotoxicity results have contradicted this view, as ILs, particularly hydrophobic ones, are reported to exhibit high toxicity. Yet the origin of their toxicology remains unclear. In this work, we have investigated the interaction of amphiphilic ILs with a lipid bilayer as a model cell membrane to understand their cytotoxicity at a molecular level. By employing fluorescence imaging and light and X-ray scattering techniques, we have found that amphiphilic ILs could disrupt the lipid bilayer by IL insertion, end-capping the hydrophobic edge of the lipid bilayer, and eventually disintegrating the lipid bilayer at high IL concentration. The insertion of ILs to cause the swelling of the lipid bilayer shows strong dependence on the hydrophobicity of IL cationic alky chain and anions and is strongly correlated with the reported IL cytotoxicity. PMID:26910537

  1. Specific heat of twisted bilayer graphene: Engineering phonons by atomic plane rotations

    SciTech Connect

    Nika, Denis L.; Cocemasov, Alexandr I.; Balandin, Alexander A.

    2014-07-21

    We have studied the phonon specific heat in single-layer, bilayer, and twisted bilayer graphene. The calculations were performed using the Born-von Karman model of lattice dynamics for intralayer atomic interactions and spherically symmetric interatomic potential for interlayer interactions. We found that at temperature T < 15 K, specific heat varies with temperature as T{sup n}, where n = 1 for graphene, n = 1.6 for bilayer graphene, and n = 1.3 for the twisted bilayer graphene. The phonon specific heat reveals an intriguing dependence on the twist angle in bilayer graphene, which is particularly pronounced at low temperature. The results suggest a possibility of phonon engineering of thermal properties of layered materials by twisting the atomic planes.

  2. Volatile anesthetics inhibit sodium channels without altering bulk lipid bilayer properties.

    PubMed

    Herold, Karl F; Sanford, R Lea; Lee, William; Schultz, Margaret F; Ingólfsson, Helgi I; Andersen, Olaf S; Hemmings, Hugh C

    2014-12-01

    Although general anesthetics are clinically important and widely used, their molecular mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. Volatile anesthetics such as isoflurane (ISO) are thought to alter neuronal function by depressing excitatory and facilitating inhibitory neurotransmission through direct interactions with specific protein targets, including voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(v)). Many anesthetics alter lipid bilayer properties, suggesting that ion channel function might also be altered indirectly through effects on the lipid bilayer. We compared the effects of ISO and of a series of fluorobenzene (FB) model volatile anesthetics on Na(v) function and lipid bilayer properties. We examined the effects of these agents on Na(v) in neuronal cells using whole-cell electrophysiology, and on lipid bilayer properties using a gramicidin-based fluorescence assay, which is a functional assay for detecting changes in lipid bilayer properties sensed by a bilayer-spanning ion channel. At clinically relevant concentrations (defined by the minimum alveolar concentration), both the FBs and ISO produced prepulse-dependent inhibition of Na(v) and shifted the voltage dependence of inactivation toward more hyperpolarized potentials without affecting lipid bilayer properties, as sensed by gramicidin channels. Only at supra-anesthetic (toxic) concentrations did ISO alter lipid bilayer properties. These results suggest that clinically relevant concentrations of volatile anesthetics alter Na(v) function through direct interactions with the channel protein with little, if any, contribution from changes in bulk lipid bilayer properties. Our findings further suggest that changes in lipid bilayer properties are not involved in clinical anesthesia. PMID:25385786

  3. Optimizing planar lipid bilayer single-channel recordings for high resolution with rapid voltage steps.

    PubMed Central

    Wonderlin, W F; Finkel, A; French, R J

    1990-01-01

    We describe two enhancements of the planar bilayer recording method which enable low-noise recordings of single-channel currents activated by voltage steps in planar bilayers formed on apertures in partitions separating two open chambers. First, we have refined a simple and effective procedure for making small bilayer apertures (25-80 micrograms diam) in plastic cups. These apertures combine the favorable properties of very thin edges, good mechanical strength, and low stray capacitance. In addition to enabling formation of small, low-capacitance bilayers, this aperture design also minimizes the access resistance to the bilayer, thereby improving the low-noise performance. Second, we have used a patch-clamp headstage modified to provide logic-controlled switching between a high-gain (50 G omega) feedback resistor for high-resolution recording and a low-gain (50 M omega) feedback resistor for rapid charging of the bilayer capacitance. The gain is switched from high to low before a voltage step and then back to high gain 25 microseconds after the step. With digital subtraction of the residual currents produced by the gain switching and electrostrictive changes in bilayer capacitance, we can achieve a steady current baseline within 1 ms after the voltage step. These enhancements broaden the range of experimental applications for the planar bilayer method by combining the high resolution previously attained only with small bilayers formed on pipette tips with the flexibility of experimental design possible with planar bilayers in open chambers. We illustrate application of these methods with recordings of the voltage-step activation of a voltage-gated potassium channel. PMID:1698470

  4. Droplet-interface-bilayer assays in microfluidic passive networks

    PubMed Central

    Schlicht, Bárbara; Zagnoni, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Basic biophysical studies and pharmacological processes can be investigated by mimicking the intracellular and extracellular environments across an artificial cell membrane construct. The ability to reproduce in vitro simplified scenarios found in live cell membranes in an automated manner has great potential for a variety of synthetic biology and compound screening applications. Here, we present a fully integrated microfluidic system for the production of artificial lipid bilayers based on the miniaturisation of droplet-interface-bilayer (DIB) techniques. The platform uses a microfluidic design that enables the controlled positioning and storage of phospholipid-stabilized water-in-oil droplets, leading successfully to the scalable and automated formation of arrays of DIBs to mimic cell membrane processes. To ensure robustness of operation, we have investigated how lipid concentration, immiscible phase flow velocities and the device geometrical parameters affect the system performance. Finally, we produced proof-of-concept data showing that diffusive transport of molecules and ions across on-chip DIBs can be studied and quantified using fluorescence-based assays. PMID:25909686

  5. Graphene quantum dots: localized states, edges and bilayer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensslin, Klaus

    2014-03-01

    Graphene quantum dots show Coulomb blockade, excited states and their orbital and spin properties have been investigated in high magnetic fields. Most quantum dots fabricated to date are fabricated with electron beam lithography and dry etching which generally leads to uncontrolled and probably rough edges. We demonstrate that devices with reduced bulk disorder fabricated on BN substrates display similar localized states as those fabricated on the more standard SiO2 substrates. For a highly symmetric quantum dot with short tunnel barriers the experimentally detected transport features can be explained by three localized states, 1 in the dot and 2 in the constrictions. A way to overcome edge roughness and the localized states related to this are bilayer devices where a band gap can be induced by suitable top and back gate voltages. By placing bilayer graphene between two BN layers high electronic quality can be achieved as documented by the observation of broken symmetry states in the quantum Hall regime. We discuss how this method can be exploited to achieve smoother and better tunable graphene quantum devices. This work was done in collaboration with D. Bischoff, P. Simonet, A. Varlet, Y. Tian, and T. Ihn.

  6. Nonlocal Drag of Magnons in a Ferromagnetic Bilayer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianyu; Vignale, G; Flatté, Michael E

    2016-06-10

    Quantized spin waves, or magnons, in a magnetic insulator are assumed to interact weakly with the surroundings, and to flow with little dissipation or drag, producing exceptionally long diffusion lengths and relaxation times. In analogy to Coulomb drag in bilayer two-dimensional electron gases, in which the contribution of the Coulomb interaction to the electric resistivity is studied by measuring the interlayer resistivity (transresistivity), we predict a nonlocal drag of magnons in a ferromagnetic bilayer structure based on semiclassical Boltzmann equations. Nonlocal magnon drag depends on magnetic dipolar interactions between the layers and manifests in the magnon current transresistivity and the magnon thermal transresistivity, whereby a magnon current in one layer induces a chemical potential gradient and/or a temperature gradient in the other layer. The largest drag effect occurs when the magnon current flows parallel to the magnetization; however, for oblique magnon currents a large transverse current of magnons emerges. We examine the effect for practical parameters, and find that the predicted induced temperature gradient is readily observable. PMID:27341254

  7. Melittin-induced cholesterol reorganization in lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Qian, Shuo; Heller, William T

    2015-10-01

    The peptide melittin, a 26 amino acid, cationic peptide from honey bee (Apis mellifera) venom, disrupts lipid bilayer membranes in a concentration-dependent manner. Rather than interacting with a specific receptor, the peptide interacts directly with the lipid matrix of the membrane in a manner dependent on the lipid composition. Here, a small-angle neutron scattering study of the interaction of melittin with lipid bilayers made of mixtures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and cholesterol (Chol) is presented. Through the use of deuterium-labeled DMPC, changes in the distribution of the lipid and cholesterol in unilamellar vesicles were observed for peptide concentrations below those that cause pores to form. In addition to disrupting the in-plane organization of Chol, melittin produces vesicles having inner and outer leaflet compositions that depend on the lipid-Chol molar ratio and on the peptide concentration. The changes seen at high cholesterol and low peptide concentration are similar to those produced by alamethicin (Qian, S. et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 2014, 118, 11200-11208), which points to an underlying physical mechanism driving the redistribution of Chol, but melittin displays an additional effect not seen with alamethicin. A model for how the peptide drives the redistribution of Chol is proposed. The results suggest that redistribution of the lipids in a target cell membrane by membrane active peptides takes places as a prelude to the lysis of the cell. PMID:26074009

  8. Multiscale modeling of droplet interface bilayer membrane networks.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Eric C; Farimani, Amir B; Aluru, Narayana R; Philen, Michael K

    2015-11-01

    Droplet interface bilayer (DIB) networks are considered for the development of stimuli-responsive membrane-based materials inspired by cellular mechanics. These DIB networks are often modeled as combinations of electrical circuit analogues, creating complex networks of capacitors and resistors that mimic the biomolecular structures. These empirical models are capable of replicating data from electrophysiology experiments, but these models do not accurately capture the underlying physical phenomena and consequently do not allow for simulations of material functionalities beyond the voltage-clamp or current-clamp conditions. The work presented here provides a more robust description of DIB network behavior through the development of a hierarchical multiscale model, recognizing that the macroscopic network properties are functions of their underlying molecular structure. The result of this research is a modeling methodology based on controlled exchanges across the interfaces of neighboring droplets. This methodology is validated against experimental data, and an extension case is provided to demonstrate possible future applications of droplet interface bilayer networks. PMID:26594262

  9. Melittin-induced cholesterol reorganization in lipid bilayer membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Shuo; Heller, William T.

    2015-06-12

    The peptide melittin, a 26 amino acid, cationic peptide from honey bee (Apis mellifera) venom, disrupts lipid bilayer membranes in a concentration-dependent manner. Rather than interacting with a specific receptor, the peptide interacts directly with the lipid matrix of the membrane in a manner dependent on the lipid composition. Here, a small-angle neutron scattering study of the interaction of melittin with lipid bilayers made of mixtures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and cholesterol (Chol) is presented. Through the use of deuterium-labeled DMPC, changes in the distribution of the lipid and cholesterol in unilamellar vesicles were observed for peptide concentrations below those that cause pores to form. In addition to disrupting the in-plane organization of Chol, melittin produces vesicles having inner and outer leaflet compositions that depend on the lipid–Chol molar ratio and on the peptide concentration. The changes seen at high cholesterol and low peptide concentration are similar to those produced by alamethicin (Qian, S. et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 2014, 118, 11200–11208), which points to an underlying physical mechanism driving the redistribution of Chol, but melittin displays an additional effect not seen with alamethicin. Furthermore, a model for how the peptide drives the redistribution of Chol is proposed. The results suggest that redistribution of the lipids in a target cell membrane by membrane active peptides takes places as a prelude to the lysis of the cell.

  10. Nonlocal Drag of Magnons in a Ferromagnetic Bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tianyu; Vignale, G.; Flatté, Michael E.

    2016-06-01

    Quantized spin waves, or magnons, in a magnetic insulator are assumed to interact weakly with the surroundings, and to flow with little dissipation or drag, producing exceptionally long diffusion lengths and relaxation times. In analogy to Coulomb drag in bilayer two-dimensional electron gases, in which the contribution of the Coulomb interaction to the electric resistivity is studied by measuring the interlayer resistivity (transresistivity), we predict a nonlocal drag of magnons in a ferromagnetic bilayer structure based on semiclassical Boltzmann equations. Nonlocal magnon drag depends on magnetic dipolar interactions between the layers and manifests in the magnon current transresistivity and the magnon thermal transresistivity, whereby a magnon current in one layer induces a chemical potential gradient and/or a temperature gradient in the other layer. The largest drag effect occurs when the magnon current flows parallel to the magnetization; however, for oblique magnon currents a large transverse current of magnons emerges. We examine the effect for practical parameters, and find that the predicted induced temperature gradient is readily observable.

  11. Low-field carrier transport properties in biased bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo

    2014-07-01

    Based on a semiclassical Boltzmann transport equation in random phase approximation, we develop a theoretical model to understand low-field carrier transport in biased bilayer graphene, which takes into account the charged impurity scattering, acoustic phonon scattering, and surface polar phonon scattering as three main scattering mechanisms. The surface polar optical phonon scattering of carriers in supported bilayer graphene is thoroughly studied using the Rode iteration method. By considering the metal-BLG contact resistance as the only one free fitting parameter, we find that the carrier density dependence of the calculated total conductivity agrees well with that observed in experiment under different temperatures. The conductivity results also suggest that in high carrier density range, the metal-BLG contact resistance can be a significant factor in determining the BLG conductivity at low temperature, and both acoustic phonon scattering and surface polar phonon scattering play important roles at higher temperature, especially for BLG samples with a low doping concentration, which can compete with charged impurity scattering.

  12. Fibonacci anyons from Abelian bilayer quantum Hall states.

    PubMed

    Vaezi, Abolhassan; Barkeshli, Maissam

    2014-12-01

    The possibility of realizing non-Abelian statistics and utilizing it for topological quantum computation (TQC) has generated widespread interest. However, the non-Abelian statistics that can be realized in most accessible proposals is not powerful enough for universal TQC. In this Letter, we consider a simple bilayer fractional quantum Hall system with the 1/3 Laughlin state in each layer. We show that interlayer tunneling can drive a transition to an exotic non-Abelian state that contains the famous "Fibonacci" anyon, whose non-Abelian statistics is powerful enough for universal TQC. Our analysis rests on startling agreements from a variety of distinct methods, including thin torus limits, effective field theories, and coupled wire constructions. We provide evidence that the transition can be continuous, at which point the charge gap remains open while the neutral gap closes. This raises the question of whether these exotic phases may have already been realized at ν=2/3 in bilayers, as past experiments may not have definitively ruled them out. PMID:25526149

  13. Melittin-induced cholesterol reorganization in lipid bilayer membranes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Qian, Shuo; Heller, William T.

    2015-06-12

    The peptide melittin, a 26 amino acid, cationic peptide from honey bee (Apis mellifera) venom, disrupts lipid bilayer membranes in a concentration-dependent manner. Rather than interacting with a specific receptor, the peptide interacts directly with the lipid matrix of the membrane in a manner dependent on the lipid composition. Here, a small-angle neutron scattering study of the interaction of melittin with lipid bilayers made of mixtures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and cholesterol (Chol) is presented. Through the use of deuterium-labeled DMPC, changes in the distribution of the lipid and cholesterol in unilamellar vesicles were observed for peptide concentrations below those thatmore » cause pores to form. In addition to disrupting the in-plane organization of Chol, melittin produces vesicles having inner and outer leaflet compositions that depend on the lipid–Chol molar ratio and on the peptide concentration. The changes seen at high cholesterol and low peptide concentration are similar to those produced by alamethicin (Qian, S. et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 2014, 118, 11200–11208), which points to an underlying physical mechanism driving the redistribution of Chol, but melittin displays an additional effect not seen with alamethicin. Furthermore, a model for how the peptide drives the redistribution of Chol is proposed. The results suggest that redistribution of the lipids in a target cell membrane by membrane active peptides takes places as a prelude to the lysis of the cell.« less

  14. Structural studies of lipid-protein interactions on cushioned bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S. K.; Mukhopadhyay, M. K.; Ma, Y.; Lopez, I.; Bera, S.; Lurio, L. B.; Chakrabarti, A.; Kim, J. E.; Sanyal, M. K.; Sinha, S. K.

    2013-03-01

    Biological membranes are heterogeneous and dynamical organizations of lipids and proteins, which perform functions fundamental to cell survival. Lipid-protein interactions control these functions by influencing folding and stability of integral or peripheral membrane proteins. Further, the incorporation or adsorption of these proteins into the membrane can in turn influence the lipid bilayer properties. In spite of some progress in understanding this process, a detailed structural analysis is lacking. Towards a better understanding of this interaction, we have performed an advanced interface sensitive scattering experiment using synchrotron x-rays. To accurately mimic the biological membranes with their natural thermal fluctuations and in-plane mobility of lipid molecules, polymer cushioned lipid bilayers have been used. This study shows that the adsorption of peripheral membrane proteinspectrindepends on the lipid headgroups, exhibiting different types of binding to phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamie (PE). Further, the interaction of outer membrane protein A (OMP-A), an integral membrane protein is sensitive to the thermodynamic phase of the lipids. A detailed physical modeling of the lipid-protein interactions is under way.

  15. Conducting polymer supported bilayer lipid membrane reconstituted with alamethicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Salinas, Sergio; Baba Sundaresan, Vishnu

    2011-09-01

    Ionic electroactive polymers and bioderived materials have been independently demonstrated as actuators, sensors and energy harvesting devices. In an electroactive polymer, the applied electric field between the cathode and anode drives ion transport between the electrodes, impregnated electrolyte and the bulk of the polymer to generate force and displacement. Similarly, in a bioderived material an input stimulus (electrical, chemoelectrical or chemical) applied across the protein in a bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) displaces ions across the membrane barrier and enables sensing and actuation functions. This paper presents a novel architecture for a device that integrates the ionic function of an electroactive polymer and a bioderived material into a thin-film laminated device combining their unique advantages. A conducting polymer (PPy(DBS)) is used as the electroactive polymer and alamethicin-bound bilayer lipid membrane is used as the bioderived material in the thin-film laminated device. Owing to the configuration of the laminated device, the protein regulates the ionic concentration in the conducting polymer and regulates the electrochemical doping/undoping process in the polymer. By electrically connecting the conducting polymer across its thickness, this arrangement provides a mechanism external to the polymer besides electrical field that can control the electrical, mechanical and/or optical properties of the conducting polymer. This paper also presents the fabrication and characterization of the integrated ionic device and presents a template for the development of a novel category of electroactive ionic devices.

  16. Dynamic and mechanical properties of supported lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsing-Lun; Tsao, Heng-Kwong; Sheng, Yu-Jane

    2016-04-21

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) offer an excellent model system for investigating the physico-chemical properties of the cell membrane. In this work, dynamic and mechanical properties of SLBs are explored by dissipative particle dynamics simulations for lipids with different architectures (chain length, kink, and asymmetry associated with lipid tails). It is found that the lateral diffusivity (Dx) and flip-flop rate (FF) grow with increasing temperature in both gel and liquid phases and can be described by an Arrhenius-like expression. Three regimes can be clearly identified for symmetric and asymmetric saturated lipids but only two regimes are observed for kinked lipids. Both Dx and FF grow with decreasing tail length and increasing number of kinks. The stretching (KA) and apparent bending (KB) moduli exhibit concave upward curves with temperature and the minima are attained at Tm. In general, the minima of KA and KB decrease with the chain length and increase with number of kinks. The typical relation among the bending modulus, area stretching modulus, and bilayer thickness is still followed, KB = βKAh(2) and β is much smaller in the gel phase. The dynamic and mechanical properties of lipids with asymmetric tails are found to situate between their symmetric counterparts. PMID:27389237

  17. Assembly of RNA nanostructures on supported lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabkowska, Aleksandra P.; Michanek, Agnes; Jaeger, Luc; Rabe, Michael; Chworos, Arkadiusz; Höök, Fredrik; Nylander, Tommy; Sparr, Emma

    2014-12-01

    The assembly of nucleic acid nanostructures with controlled size and shape has large impact in the fields of nanotechnology, nanomedicine and synthetic biology. The directed arrangement of nano-structures at interfaces is important for many applications. In spite of this, the use of laterally mobile lipid bilayers to control RNA three-dimensional nanostructure formation on surfaces remains largely unexplored. Here, we direct the self-assembly of RNA building blocks into three-dimensional structures of RNA on fluid lipid bilayers composed of cationic 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) or mixtures of zwitterionic 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) and cationic sphingosine. We demonstrate the stepwise supramolecular assembly of discrete building blocks through specific and selective RNA-RNA interactions, based on results from quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D), ellipsometry, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRF) experiments. The assembly can be controlled to give a densely packed single layer of RNA polyhedrons at the fluid lipid bilayer surface. We show that assembly of the 3D structure can be modulated by sequence specific interactions, surface charge and changes in the salt composition and concentration. In addition, the tertiary structure of the RNA polyhedron can be controllably switched from an extended structure to one that is dense and compact. The versatile approach to building up three-dimensional structures of RNA does not require modification of the surface or the RNA molecules, and can be used as a bottom-up means of nanofabrication of functionalized bio-mimicking surfaces.The assembly of nucleic acid nanostructures with controlled size and shape has large impact in the fields of nanotechnology, nanomedicine and synthetic biology. The directed arrangement of nano-structures at interfaces is important for many applications. In spite of

  18. Periodic barrier structure in AA-stacked bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redouani, Ilham; Jellal, Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    We study the charge carriers transport in an AA-stacked bilayer graphene modulated by a lateral one-dimensional multibarrier structure. We investigate the band structures of our system, that is made up of two shifted Dirac cones, for finite and zero gap. We use the boundary conditions to explicitly determine the transmission probability of each individual cone (τ =+/- 1) for single, double and finite periodic barrier structure. We find that the Klein tunneling is only possible when the band structure is gapless and can occur at normal incidence as a result of the Dirac nature of the quasiparticles. We observe that the band structure of the barriers can have more than one Dirac points for finite periodic barrier. The resonance peaks appear in the transmission probability, which correspond to the positions of new cones index like associated with τ =+/- 1. Two conductance channels through different cones (τ =+/- 1) are found where the total conductance has been studied and compared to the cases of single layer and AB-stacked bilayer graphene.

  19. Scaling laws of van Hove singularities in twisted bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jeil; Dasilva, Ashley; Wang, Yang; Wong, Dillon; Crommie, Michael; Adam, Shaffique; MacDonald, Allan H.

    2014-03-01

    Van Hove singularities (vHS) appear in twisted coupled bilayer graphene at saddle points in the band structure. The lowest energy vHS can be associated with the overlap between the displaced Dirac cones of the top and bottom layers, resulting in an approximately linear increase of its position in energy with increasing twist angle. This picture, which is applicable in the perturbative regime for moderately large twist angles, sees departures in the small angle limit due to non-perturbative coupling between the layers. Using a theory for twisted bilayer graphene [1] that incorporates all the relevant interlayer coupling compatible with momentum conservation of k-vectors of the top and bottom layers we explore the scaling laws of the vHS for sufficiently small twist angles and long period moire superlattices. We analyze the localization properties of their wave functions through their local density of states (LDOS) paying particular attention to the behavior of the states corresponding to higher energy van Hove singularities. We comment on our results in light of the experimental DOS and LDOS maps obtained through scanning tunneling microscopy. This work is supported by the Singapore National Research Foundation under its Fellowship program (NRF-NRFF2012-01).

  20. van Hove Singularity Enhanced Photochemical Reactivity of Twisted Bilayer Graphene.

    PubMed

    Liao, Lei; Wang, Huan; Peng, Han; Yin, Jianbo; Koh, Ai Leen; Chen, Yulin; Xie, Qin; Peng, Hailin; Liu, Zhongfan

    2015-08-12

    Twisted bilayer graphene (tBLG) exhibits van Hove singularities (VHSs) in the density of states that can be tuned by changing the twist angle (θ), sparking various novel physical phenomena. Much effort has been devoted to investigate the θ-dependent physical properties of tBLG. Yet, the chemical properties of tBLG with VHSs, especially the chemical reactivity, remain unexplored. Here we report the first systematic study on the chemistry of tBLG through the photochemical reaction between graphene and benzoyl peroxide. Twisted bilayer graphene exhibits θ-dependent reactivity, and remarkably enhanced reactivity is obtained when the energy of incident laser matches with the energy interval of the VHSs of tBLG. This work provides an insight on the chemistry of tBLG, and the successful enhancement of chemical reactivity derived from VHS is highly beneficial for the controllable chemical modification of tBLG as well as the development of tBLG based devices. PMID:26151687