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Sample records for 1-phosphate sn-glycerol 3-phosphate

  1. sn-Glycerol-3-phosphate transport in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Hengge, R; Larson, T J; Boos, W

    1983-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium contains a transport system for sn-glycerol-3-phosphate that is inducible by growth on glycerol and sn-glycerol-3-phosphate. In fully induced cells, the system exhibited an apparent Km of 50 microM and a Vmax of 2.2 nmol/min . 10(8) cells. The corresponding system in Escherichia coli exhibits, under comparable conditions, a Km of 14 microM and a Vmax of 2.2 nmol/min . 10(8) cells. Transport-defective mutants were isolated by selecting for resistance against the antibiotic fosfomycin. They mapped in glpT at 47 min in the S. typhimurium linkage map, 37% cotransducible with gyrA. In addition to the glpT-dependent system, S. typhimurium LT2 contains, like E. coli, a second, ugp-dependent transport system for sn-glycerol-3-phosphate that was derepressed by phosphate starvation. A S. typhimurium DNA bank containing EcoRI restriction fragments in phage lambda gt7 was used to clone the glpT gene in E. coli. Lysogens that were fully active in the transport of sn-glycerol-3-phosphate with a Km of 33 microM and a Vmax of 2.0 nmol/min . 10(8) cells were isolated in a delta glpT mutant of E. coli. The EcoRI fragment harboring glpT was 3.5 kilobases long and carried only part of glpQ, a gene distal to glpT but on the same operon. The fragment was subcloned in multicopy plasmid pACYC184. Strains carrying this hybrid plasmid produced large amounts of cytoplasmic membrane protein with an apparent molecular weight of 33,000, which was identified as the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate permease. Its properties were similar to the corresponding E. coli permease. The presence of the multicopy glpT hybrid plasmid had a strong influence on the synthesis or assembly of other cell envelope proteins of E. coli. For instance, the periplasmic ribose-binding protein was nearly absent. On the other hand, the quantity of an unidentified E. coli outer membrane protein usually present only in small amounts increased. Images PMID:6408060

  2. Direct nonchromatographic assay for 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Rajasekharan, R.; Ray, T.K.; Cronan, J.E. Jr.

    1988-09-01

    1-Acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (also called lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase) which catalyzes the acylation of 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate to phosphatidic acid is generally assayed by the use of a radioactive substrate followed by a time-consuming chromatographic separation of substrate and product. We report a direct and highly sensitive nonchromatographic assay for this enzyme based on the ability of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase to dephosphorylate 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate but not phosphatidic acid. This selective hydrolysis coupled with the use of /sup 32/P-labeled 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate as substrate permits measurement of the product, /sup 32/P-labeled phosphatidic acid by solvent extraction or precipitation. We also report a series of enzymatic reactions for the efficient conversion of /sup 32/Pi to /sup 32/P-labeled 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate.

  3. Novel Inhibitors of Mitochondrial sn-Glycerol 3-phosphate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Adam L.; Ashok, Deepthi; Sarantos, Melissa R.; Ng, Ryan; Shi, Tong; Gerencser, Akos A.; Hughes, Robert E.; Brand, Martin D.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial sn-glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (mGPDH) is a ubiquinone-linked enzyme in the mitochondrial inner membrane best characterized as part of the glycerol phosphate shuttle that transfers reducing equivalents from cytosolic NADH into the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Despite the widespread expression of mGPDH and the availability of mGPDH-null mice, the physiological role of this enzyme remains poorly defined in many tissues, likely because of compensatory pathways for cytosolic regeneration of NAD+ and mechanisms for glycerol phosphate metabolism. Here we describe a novel class of cell-permeant small-molecule inhibitors of mGPDH (iGP) discovered through small-molecule screening. Structure-activity analysis identified a core benzimidazole-phenyl-succinamide structure as being essential to inhibition of mGPDH while modifications to the benzimidazole ring system modulated both potency and off-target effects. Live-cell imaging provided evidence that iGPs penetrate cellular membranes. Two compounds (iGP-1 and iGP-5) were characterized further to determine potency and selectivity and found to be mixed inhibitors with IC50 and Ki values between ∼1–15 µM. These novel mGPDH inhibitors are unique tools to investigate the role of glycerol 3-phosphate metabolism in both isolated and intact systems. PMID:24587137

  4. Periplasmic protein related to the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate transport system of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Silhavy, T J; Hartig-Beecken, I; Boos, W

    1976-01-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of shock fluids of Escherichia coli K-12 revealed the presence of a periplasmic protein related to sn-glycerol-3-phosphate transport (GLPT) that is under the regulation of glpR, the regulatory gene of the glp regulon. Mutants selected for their resistance to phosphonomycin and found to be defective in sn-glycerol-3-phosphate transport either did not produce GLPT or produced it in reduced amounts. Other mutations exhibited no apparent effect of GLPT. Transductions of glpT+ nalA phage P1 into these mutants and selection for growth on sn-glycerol-3-phosphate revealed a 50% cotransduction frequency to nalA. Reversion of mutants taht did not produce GLPT to growth on sn-glycerol-3-phosphate resulted in strains that produce GLPT. This suggests a close relationship of GLPT to the glpT gene and to sn-glycerol-3-phosphate transport. Attempts to demonstrate binding activity of GLPT in crude shock fluid towards sn-glycerol-3-phosphate have failed so far. However, all shock fluids, independent of their GLPT content, exhibited an enzymatic activity that hydrolyzes under the conditions of the binding assay, 30 to 60% of the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate to glycerol and inorganic orthophosphate. Images PMID:770459

  5. Transport of 3,4-dihydroxybutyl-1-phosphonate, an analogue of sn-glycerol 3-phosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Leifer, Z; Engel, R; Tropp, B E

    1977-01-01

    3,4-Dihydroxybutyl-1-phosphonate (DHBP), an analogue of glycerol 3-phosphate, is actively transported by the sn-glycerol 3-phosphate transport system of Escherichia coli strain 8. The Km for the transport of DHBP is 200 microM. PMID:400804

  6. Structure and Evolution of the Archaeal Lipid Synthesis Enzyme sn-Glycerol-1-phosphate Dehydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Vincenzo; Schofield, Linley R.; Zhang, Yanli; Sang, Carrie; Dey, Debjit; Hannus, Ingegerd M.; Martin, William F.; Sutherland-Smith, Andrew J.; Ronimus, Ron S.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most critical events in the origins of cellular life was the development of lipid membranes. Archaea use isoprenoid chains linked via ether bonds to sn-glycerol 1-phosphate (G1P), whereas bacteria and eukaryotes use fatty acids attached via ester bonds to enantiomeric sn-glycerol 3-phosphate. NAD(P)H-dependent G1P dehydrogenase (G1PDH) forms G1P and has been proposed to have played a crucial role in the speciation of the Archaea. We present here, to our knowledge, the first structures of archaeal G1PDH from the hyperthermophilic methanogen Methanocaldococcus jannaschii with bound substrate dihydroxyacetone phosphate, product G1P, NADPH, and Zn2+ cofactor. We also biochemically characterized the enzyme with respect to pH optimum, cation specificity, and kinetic parameters for dihydroxyacetone phosphate and NAD(P)H. The structures provide key evidence for the reaction mechanism in the stereospecific addition for the NAD(P)H-based pro-R hydrogen transfer and the coordination of the Zn2+ cofactor during catalysis. Structure-based phylogenetic analyses also provide insight into the origins of G1PDH. PMID:26175150

  7. Structure and Evolution of the Archaeal Lipid Synthesis Enzyme sn-Glycerol-1-phosphate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Vincenzo; Schofield, Linley R; Zhang, Yanli; Sang, Carrie; Dey, Debjit; Hannus, Ingegerd M; Martin, William F; Sutherland-Smith, Andrew J; Ronimus, Ron S

    2015-08-28

    One of the most critical events in the origins of cellular life was the development of lipid membranes. Archaea use isoprenoid chains linked via ether bonds to sn-glycerol 1-phosphate (G1P), whereas bacteria and eukaryotes use fatty acids attached via ester bonds to enantiomeric sn-glycerol 3-phosphate. NAD(P)H-dependent G1P dehydrogenase (G1PDH) forms G1P and has been proposed to have played a crucial role in the speciation of the Archaea. We present here, to our knowledge, the first structures of archaeal G1PDH from the hyperthermophilic methanogen Methanocaldococcus jannaschii with bound substrate dihydroxyacetone phosphate, product G1P, NADPH, and Zn(2+) cofactor. We also biochemically characterized the enzyme with respect to pH optimum, cation specificity, and kinetic parameters for dihydroxyacetone phosphate and NAD(P)H. The structures provide key evidence for the reaction mechanism in the stereospecific addition for the NAD(P)H-based pro-R hydrogen transfer and the coordination of the Zn(2+) cofactor during catalysis. Structure-based phylogenetic analyses also provide insight into the origins of G1PDH. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. A second transport system for sn-glycerol-3-phosphate in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Argast, M; Ludtke, D; Silhavy, T J; Boos, W

    1978-01-01

    Strains containing phage Mucts inserted into glpT were isolated as fosfomycin-resistant clones. These mutants did not transport sn-glycerol-3-phosphate, and they lacked GLPT, a protein previously shown to be a product of the glpT operon. By plating these mutants on sn-glycerol-3-phosphate at 43 degrees C, we isolated revertants that regained the capacity to grow on G3P. Most of these revertants did not map in glpT and did not regain GLPT. These revertants exhibited a highly efficient uptake system for sn-glycerol-3-phosphate within an apparent Km of 5 micron. In addition, three new proteins (GP 1, 2, and 3) appeared in the periplasm of these revertants. None of these proteins were antigentically related to GLPT. However, like GLPT, GP1 exhibits abnormal behavior on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. GP 2 is an efficient binding protein. The new uptake system showed different characteristics than the system that is coded for by the glpT operon. It was inhibited neither by phosphate nor fosfomycin. So far, none of the systems that transport organic acids in Escherichia coli could be implicated in the new sn-glycerol-3-phosphate uptake activity. The mutation ugp+, which was responsible for the appearance of the new transport system and the appearance of GP 1, 2, and 3 in the periplasm was cotransducible with araD by phage P1 transduction and was recessive in merodiploids. Images PMID:363686

  9. Synthesis of sn-glycerol 3-phosphate, a key precursor of membrane lipids, in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Morbidoni, H R; de Mendoza, D; Cronan, J E

    1995-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis gpsA gene was cloned by complementation of an Escherichia coli gpsA strain auxotrophic for sn-glycerol 3-phosphate. The gene was sequenced and found to encode an NAD(P)H-dependent dihydroxyacetone phosphate reductase with a deduced molecular mass of 39.5 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence showed strong conservation with that of the E. coli homolog and to other procaryotic and eucaryotic dihydroxyacetone phosphate reductases. The physical location of gpsA on the B. subtilis chromosome was at about 200 degrees. Disruption of the chromosomal gpsA gene yielded B. subtilis strains auxotrophic for glycerol, indicating that the gpsA gene product is responsible for synthesis of the sn-glycerol 3-phosphate required for phospholipid synthesis. We also found that transformation of the classical B. subtilis glycerol auxotrophs with a gpsA-containing genomic fragment yielded transformants that grew in the absence of glycerol. In agreement with prior work, our attempts to determine the reductase activity in B. subtilis extracts were unsuccessful. However, expression of the B. subtilis gpsA gene in E. coli gave reductase activity that was only slightly inhibited by sn-glycerol 3-phosphate. Since the E. coli GpsA dihydroxyacetone phosphate reductase is very sensitive to allosteric inhibition by sn-glycerol 3-phosphate, these results indicate that the B. subtilis gpsA-encoded reductase differs from that of E. coli. It seems that B. subtilis regulates sn-glycerol 3-phosphate synthesis at the level of gene expression rather than through the E. coli mechanism of strong allosteric inhibition of an enzyme produced in excess. PMID:7592341

  10. Short-term hypothermia activates hepatic mitochondrial sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and thermogenic systems.

    PubMed

    Bobyleva, V; Pazienza, L; Muscatello, U; Kneer, N; Lardy, H

    2000-08-15

    The contribution of the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate (G-3-P) shuttle in the control of energy metabolism is well established. It is also known that its activity may be modulated by hormones involved in thermogenesis, such as thyroid hormones or dehydroepiandrosterone and its metabolites, that act by inducing de novo synthesis of mitochondrial G-3-P dehydrogenase (mGPDH). However, little is known as to the factors that may influence the activity without enzyme induction. In the present study we investigated the possible role of the G-3-P shuttle in the thermogenic response to different hypothermic stresses. It was found that a decrease of body temperature causes the liver rapidly to enhance mGPDH activity and G-3-P-dependent respiration. The enhancement, which does not result from de novo synthesis of enzymes, has the potential of increasing heat production both by decreased ATP synthesis during the oxidation of G-3-P and by activation of the glycolytic pathway.

  11. Glycerolipid biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: sn-glycerol-3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate acyltransferase activities.

    PubMed Central

    Schlossman, D M; Bell, R M

    1978-01-01

    Yeast acyl-coenzyme A:dihydroxyacetone-phosphate O-acyltransferase (DHAP acyltransferase; EC 2.3.1.42) was investigated to (i) determine whether its activity and that of acyl-coenzyme A:sn-glycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase (glycerol-P acyltransferase; EC 2.3.1.15) represent dual catalytic functions of a single membranous enzyme, (ii) estimate the relative contributions of the glycerol-P and DHAP pathways for yeast glycerolipid synthesis, and (iii) evaluate the suitability of yeast for future genetic investigations of the eucaryotic glycerol-P and DHAP acyltransferase activities. The membranous DHAP acyltransferase activity showed an apparent Km of 0.79 mM for DHAP, with a Vmax of 5.3 nmol/min per mg, whereas the glycerol-P acyltransferase activity showed an apparent Km of 0.05 mM for glycerol-P, with a Vmax of 3.4 nmol/min per mg. Glycerol-P was a competitive inhibitor (Ki, 0.07 mM) of the DHAP acyltransferase activity, and DHAP was a competitive inhibitor (Ki, 0.91 mM) of the glycerol-P acyltransferase activity. The two acyltransferase activities exhibited marked similarities in their pH dependence, acyl-coenzyme A chain length preference and substrate concentration dependencies, thermolability, and patterns of inactivation by N-ethylmaleimide, trypsin, and detergents. Thus, the data strongly suggest that yeast glycerol-P and DHAP acyltransferase activities represent dual catalytic functions of a single membrane-bound enzyme. Furthermore, since no acyl-DHAP oxidoreductase activity could be detected in yeast membranes, the DHAP pathway for glycerolipid synthesis may not operate in yeast. PMID:25265

  12. Unique coenzyme binding mode of hyperthermophilic archaeal sn-glycerol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase from Pyrobaculum calidifontis.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Junji; Yamamoto, Kaori; Yoneda, Kazunari; Ohshima, Toshihisa; Sakuraba, Haruhiko

    2016-12-01

    A gene encoding an sn-glycerol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase (G1PDH) was identified in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum calidifontis. The gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and its product was purified and characterized. In contrast to conventional G1PDHs, the expressed enzyme showed strong preference for NADH: the reaction rate (Vmax ) with NADPH was only 2.4% of that with NADH. The crystal structure of the enzyme was determined at a resolution of 2.45 Å. The asymmetric unit consisted of one homohexamer. Refinement of the structure and HPLC analysis showed the presence of the bound cofactor NADPH in subunits D, E, and F, even though it was not added in the crystallization procedure. The phosphate group at C2' of the adenine ribose of NADPH is tightly held through the five biased hydrogen bonds with Ser40 and Thr42. In comparison with the known G1PDH structure, the NADPH molecule was observed to be pushed away from the normal coenzyme binding site. Interestingly, the S40A/T42A double mutant enzyme acquired much higher reactivity than the wild-type enzyme with NADPH, which suggests that the biased interactions around the C2'-phosphate group make NADPH binding insufficient for catalysis. Our results provide a unique structural basis for coenzyme preference in NAD(P)-dependent dehydrogenases. Proteins 2016; 84:1786-1796. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The acylation of sn-glycerol 3-phosphate and the metabolism of phosphatidate in microsomal preparations from the developing cotyledons of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) seed.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, G; Stobart, A K; Stymne, S

    1985-09-01

    Microsomal preparations from the developing cotyledons of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius) catalysed the acylation of sn-glycerol 3-phosphate in the presence of acyl-CoA. The resulting phosphatidate was further utilized in the synthesis of diacyl- and tri-acylglycerol by the reactions of the so-called 'Kennedy pathway' [Kennedy (1961) Fed. Proc. Fed. Am. Soc. Exp. Biol. 20, 934-940]. Diacylglycerol equilibrated with the phosphatidylcholine pool when glycerol backbone, with the associated acyl groups, flowed from phosphatidate to triacylglycerol. The formation of diacylglycerol from phosphatidate through the action of a phosphatidate phosphohydrolase (phosphatidase) was substantially inhibited by EDTA and, under these conditions, phosphatidate accumulated in the microsomal membranes. The inhibition of the phosphatidase by EDTA was alleviated by Mg2+. The presence of Mg2+ in all incubation mixtures stimulated quite considerably the synthesis of triacylglycerol in vitro. Microsomal preparations incubated with acyl-CoA, sn-glycerol 3-phosphate and EDTA synthesized sufficient phosphatidate for the reliable analysis of its intramolecular fatty acid distribution. In the presence of mixed acyl-CoA substrates the sn-glycerol 3-phosphate was acylated exclusively in position 1 with the saturated fatty acids, palmitate and stearate. The polyunsaturated fatty acid linoleate was, however, utilized largely in the acylation of position 2 of sn-glycerol 3-phosphate. The affinity of the enzymes involved in the acylation of positions 1 and 2 of sn-glycerol 3-phosphate for specific species of acyl-CoA therefore governs the non-random distribution of the different acyl groups in the seed triacylglycerols. The acylation of sn-glycerol 3-phosphate in position 1 with saturated acyl components also accounts for the presence of these groups in position 1 of sn-phosphatidylcholine through the equilibration of diacylglycerol with the phosphatidylcholine pool, which occurs when phosphatidate

  14. The acylation of sn-glycerol 3-phosphate and the metabolism of phosphatidate in microsomal preparations from the developing cotyledons of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) seed.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, G; Stobart, A K; Stymne, S

    1985-01-01

    Microsomal preparations from the developing cotyledons of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius) catalysed the acylation of sn-glycerol 3-phosphate in the presence of acyl-CoA. The resulting phosphatidate was further utilized in the synthesis of diacyl- and tri-acylglycerol by the reactions of the so-called 'Kennedy pathway' [Kennedy (1961) Fed. Proc. Fed. Am. Soc. Exp. Biol. 20, 934-940]. Diacylglycerol equilibrated with the phosphatidylcholine pool when glycerol backbone, with the associated acyl groups, flowed from phosphatidate to triacylglycerol. The formation of diacylglycerol from phosphatidate through the action of a phosphatidate phosphohydrolase (phosphatidase) was substantially inhibited by EDTA and, under these conditions, phosphatidate accumulated in the microsomal membranes. The inhibition of the phosphatidase by EDTA was alleviated by Mg2+. The presence of Mg2+ in all incubation mixtures stimulated quite considerably the synthesis of triacylglycerol in vitro. Microsomal preparations incubated with acyl-CoA, sn-glycerol 3-phosphate and EDTA synthesized sufficient phosphatidate for the reliable analysis of its intramolecular fatty acid distribution. In the presence of mixed acyl-CoA substrates the sn-glycerol 3-phosphate was acylated exclusively in position 1 with the saturated fatty acids, palmitate and stearate. The polyunsaturated fatty acid linoleate was, however, utilized largely in the acylation of position 2 of sn-glycerol 3-phosphate. The affinity of the enzymes involved in the acylation of positions 1 and 2 of sn-glycerol 3-phosphate for specific species of acyl-CoA therefore governs the non-random distribution of the different acyl groups in the seed triacylglycerols. The acylation of sn-glycerol 3-phosphate in position 1 with saturated acyl components also accounts for the presence of these groups in position 1 of sn-phosphatidylcholine through the equilibration of diacylglycerol with the phosphatidylcholine pool, which occurs when phosphatidate

  15. Cloning of a coconut endosperm cDNA encoding a 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase that accepts medium-chain-length substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Knutzon, D S; Lardizabal, K D; Nelsen, J S; Bleibaum, J L; Davies, H M; Metz, J G

    1995-01-01

    Immature coconut (Cocos nucifera) endosperm contains a 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (LPAAT) activity that shows a preference for medium-chain-length fatty acyl-coenzyme A substrates (H.M. Davies, D.J. Hawkins, J.S. Nelsen [1995] Phytochemistry 39:989-996). Beginning with solubilized membrane preparations, we have used chromatographic separations to identify a polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 29 kD, whose presence in various column fractions correlates with the acyltransferase activity detected in those same fractions. Amino acid sequence data obtained from several peptides generated from this protein were used to isolate a full-length clone from a coconut endosperm cDNA library. Clone pCGN5503 contains a 1325-bp cDNA insert with an open reading frame encoding a 308-amino acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 34.8 kD. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of pCGN5503 to sequences in the data banks revealed significant homology to other putative LPAAT sequences. Expression of the coconut cDNA in Escherichia coli conferred upon those cells a novel LPAAT activity whose substrate activity profile matched that of the coconut enzyme. PMID:8552723

  16. Cloning, heterologous expression and biochemical characterization of plastidial sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase from Helianthus annuus.

    PubMed

    Payá-Milans, Miriam; Venegas-Calerón, Mónica; Salas, Joaquín J; Garcés, Rafael; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2015-03-01

    The acyl-[acyl carrier protein]:sn-1-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT; E.C. 2.3.1.15) catalyzes the first step of glycerolipid assembly within the stroma of the chloroplast. In the present study, the sunflower (Helianthus annuus, L.) stromal GPAT was cloned, sequenced and characterized. We identified a single ORF of 1344base pairs that encoded a GPAT sharing strong sequence homology with the plastidial GPAT from Arabidopsis thaliana (ATS1, At1g32200). Gene expression studies showed that the highest transcript levels occurred in green tissues in which chloroplasts are abundant. The corresponding mature protein was heterologously overexpressed in Escherichia coli for purification and biochemical characterization. In vitro assays using radiolabelled acyl-ACPs and glycerol-3-phosphate as substrates revealed a strong preference for oleic versus palmitic acid, and weak activity towards stearic acid. The positional fatty acid composition of relevant chloroplast phospholipids from sunflower leaves did not reflect the in vitro GPAT specificity, suggesting a more complex scenario with mixed substrates at different concentrations, competition with other acyl-ACP consuming enzymatic reactions, etc. In summary, this study has confirmed the affinity of this enzyme which would partly explain the resistance to cold temperatures observed in sunflower plants.

  17. Effect of diet and triiodothyronine on the activity of sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and on the metabolism of glucose and pyruvate by adipose tissue of obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Bray, G. A.; Mothon, Stella; Cohen, Andrea

    1969-01-01

    Lipogenesis and the metabolism of sn-glycerol-3-phosphate were studied in 23 fat biopsies from eight grossly obese patients. The first biopsy was obtained after a minimum of 12 days on a 3500 cal diet, the second biopsy after 2 wk on a 900 cal diet, and the third biopsy after an additional 2 wk on 900 cal supplemented with thiiodothyronine, 250 μg/day. Oxygen consumption and respiratory quotient declined during caloric restriction. Oxygen consumption was restored to the initial level during treatment with triiodothyronine, and the respiratory quotient rose somewhat. Lipogenesis from glucose and pyruvate was demonstrated in fat obtained from the first biopsy but could not be detected in the other biopsies. The incorporation of radioactivity from pyruvate into fatty acids was stimulated by the addition of glucose. Insulin stimulated lipogenesis in pieces of fat from the first biopsy, but isolated fat cells were unaffected by insulin. After caloric restriction no effects of insulin could be detected. The activity of both the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in homogenates of adipose tissue declined with caloric restriction. Treatment with triiodothyronine enhanced the activity of the mitochondrial sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase but did not affect the cytoplasmic enzyme. PMID:5796353

  18. Resveratrol plus ethanol counteract the ethanol-induced impairment of energy metabolism: ³¹P NMR study of ATP and sn-glycerol-3-phosphate on isolated and perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    Gallis, Jean-Louis; Serhan, Nizar; Gin, Henri; Couzigou, Patrice; Beauvieux, Marie-Christine

    2012-03-01

    The effects of trans-resveratrol (RSV) combined with ethanol (EtOH) were evaluated by (31)P NMR on total ATP and sn-glycerol-3-phosphate (sn-G3P) contents measured in real time in isolated and perfused whole liver of the rat. Mitochondrial ATP turnover was assessed by using specific inhibitors of glycolytic and mitochondrial ATP supply (iodacetate and KCN, respectively). In RSV alone, the slight decrease in ATP content (-14±5% of the initial content), sn-G3P content and ATP turnover were similar to those in the Krebs-Henseleit buffer control. Compared to control, EtOH alone (14 or 70 mmol/L) induced a decrease in ATP content (-24.95±2.95% of initial content, p<0.05) and an increase in sn-G3P (+158±22%), whereas ATP turnover tended to be increased. RSV (20 μmol/L) combined with EtOH, (i) maintained ATP content near 100%, (ii) induced a 1.6-fold increase in mitochondrial ATP turnover (p=0.049 and p=0.004 vs EtOH 14 and 70 mmol/L alone, respectively) and (iii) led to an increase in sn-G3P (+49±9% and +81±6% for 14 and 70 mmol/L EtOH, respectively). These improvements were obtained only when glycolysis was efficient at the time of addition of EtOH+RSV. Glycolysis inhibition by iodacetate (IAA) evidenced an almost 21% contribution of this pathway to ATP content. RSV alone or RSV+EtOH prevented the ATP decrease induced by IAA addition (p<0.05 vs control). This is the first demonstration of the combined effects of RSV and EtOH on liver energy metabolism. RSV increased (i) the flux of substrates through ATP producing pathways (glycolysis and phosphorylative oxidation) probably via the activation of AMPkinase, and (ii) maintained the glycolysis deviation to sn-G3P linked to NADH+H⁺ re-oxidation occurring during EtOH detoxication, thus reducing the energy cost due to the latter. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Conversion of 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerols to platelet activating factor and related phospholipids by rabbit platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, M.L.; Lee, T.; Cress, E.A.; Malone, B.; Fitzgerald, V.; Snyder, F.

    1984-10-15

    The metabolic pathway for 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerols, a recently discovered biologically active neutral lipid class, was elucidated in experiments conducted with rabbit platelets. The total lipid extract obtained from platelets incubated with 1-(1-,2-/sup 3/H)alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerols or 1-alkyl-2-(/sup 3/H)acetyl-sn-glycerols contained at least six metabolic products. The six metabolites, identified on the basis of chemical and enzymatic reactions combined with thin-layer or high-performance liquid chromatographic analyses, corresponded to 1-alkyl-sn-glycerols, 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphates, 1-alkyl-2-acyl(long-chain)-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamines, 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamines, 1-alkyl-2-acyl(long-chain)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines, and 1-alkyl-2-actyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines (platelet activating factor). These results indicate that the metabolic pathway for alkylacetylglycerols involves reaction steps catalyzed by the following enzymatic activities: choline- and ethanolamine- phosphotransferases, acetyl-hydrolase, an acyltransferase, and a phosphotransferase. The step responsible for the biosynthesis of platelet activating factor would appear to be the most important reaction in this pathway and this product could explain the hypotensive activities previously described for alkylacetyl-(or propionyl)-glycerols. Of particular interest was the preference exhibited for the utilization of the 1-hexadecyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol species in the formation of platelet activating factor.

  20. l-Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate, a Bactericidal Agent

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chu-Tay; Engel, Robert; Tropp, Burton E.

    1977-01-01

    At a concentration of 2.5 mM, dl-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate has a bactericidal effect upon Escherichia coli. The glycerol 3-phosphate transport system is required for the entry of the biologically active l-enantiomer. l-Glyceraldehyde must be phosphorylated by the cell to exert its full effect upon growth. The addition of dl-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate to a culture of E. coli caused no preferential inhibition of the accumulation of deoxyribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid, or phosphoglycerides, although protein accumulation was less affected. Studies with mutant strains ruled out catabolic glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, anabolic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate):sn-glycerol 3-phosphate oxidoreductase, and fructose 1,6-diphosphate aldolase as the primary sites of action. l-Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate is a competitive inhibitor of sn-glycerol 3-phosphate in the reactions catalyzed by acyl coenzyme A:sn-glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase (Ki of 1.8 mM) and cytidine 5′-diphosphate-diglyceride:sn-glycerol 3-phosphate phosphatidyltransferase (Ki of 2.7 mM). A Km mutant for the former enzyme was susceptible to the inhibitor. l-Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate does not affect acyl coenzyme A:lysophosphatidate acyltransferase activity. In vivo, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol accumulation are inhibited to the same extent by the addition of dl-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate to a culture of E. coli. PMID:319747

  1. Antioxidant behavior of 1-feruloyl-sn-glycerol and 1,3-diferuloyl-sn-glycerol in phospholipid liposomes 1

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    1-Feruloyl-sn-glycerol (FG) and 1,3-diferuloyl-sn-glycerol (DFG) are two natural plant compounds that may be useful in cosmeceutical, food, and skin care applications because of excellent antioxidant properties. FG and DFG enzymatically synthesized through esterification of glycerol and soybean oil...

  2. Synthesis and mass spectrometry of 1-acyl and 3-acyl-sn-glycerol carbonates.

    PubMed

    Oehlenschläger, J; Gercken, G

    1978-08-01

    sn-Glycerol-1,2-carbonate was prepared fromD-serine,sn-glycerol-2,3-carbonate fromL-serine, via 1-0- or 3-0-benzyl-sn-glycerol, respectively.sn-Glycerol-2,3-carbonate was also prepared fromD-mannitol orD-serine following thesn-glycerol-3-β,β,β-trichloroethylcarbonate route.sn-Glycerol-1,2-carbonate andsn-glycerol-2,3-carbonate were acylated with saturated and unsaturated fatty acid chlorides to form 3-acyl-sn-glycerol-1,2-carbonates and 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-2,3-carbonates, respectively. The mass spectra of the enantiomeric monoacyl-sn-glycerol carbonates showed molecular ions and acyl cations (RCO(+)) of high intensity. The heterocyclic dioxolan-2-one ring was remarkably stable during electron impact.

  3. Structure and polymorphism of saturated monoacid 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerols

    SciTech Connect

    Kodali, D.R.; Fahey, D.A.; Small, D.M. )

    1990-12-01

    The 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerols (1,2-DGs) are the predominant naturally occurring isomer found in cell membranes, lipid droplets, and lipoproteins. They are involved in the metabolism of monoacylglycerols, triacylglycerols, and phospholipids. The authors have undertaken a study of the physical properties of a homologous series of synthetic optically active diacylglycerols. Stereospecific 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerols were synthesized with saturated fatty acyl chains of 12, 16, 18, 22, and 24 carbons in length. Their polymorphic behavior was examined by differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray powder diffraction. The solvent-crystallized form for all the 1,2-DGs packs in the orthorhombic perpendicular subcell ({beta}{prime}) and melts with a single sharp endotherm to an isotropic liquid. On quenching, the C{sub 12}, C{sub 16} and C{sub 18} compounds pack in a hexagonal subcell ({alpha}), whereas the C{sub 22} and C{sub 24} pack in a pseudohexagonal subcell (sub-{alpha}). The sub-{alpha} phase reversibly converts to the {alpha} phase. The long spacings of these compounds in both the {alpha} and {beta}{prime} phases increase with chain length. In the {alpha} and {beta}{prime} phases, the acyl chain tilts were found to be 90{degree} and 62{degree} from the basal methyl plane. The polymorphic behavior of 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol is quite different from that of the corresponding monoacid saturated 1,3-diacylglycerols which form two {beta} phases with triclinic parallel subcells.

  4. Effect of chirality on monoacylglycerol ester monolayer characteristics: 3-monostearoyl-sn-glycerol.

    PubMed

    Vollhardt, D; Brezesinski, G

    2017-03-08

    The effect of chirality on the thermodynamic behavior, the morphological features, and the 2D lattice structures of 3-monostearoyl-sn-glycerol monolayers is studied. The present study focusses on the influence of the alkyl chain length on the chiral discrimination. Surface pressure-area (π-A) isotherms, Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), and particularly, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) are the experimental basis of the presented results. The π-A isotherms of the enantiomeric 3-monostearoyl-sn-glycerol monolayers measured between 25 and 38 °C resemble those of the racemic 1-monostearoyl-rac-glycerol monolayers, thus indicating small energetic differences between the enantiomeric and the racemic forms. The absolute ΔS values increase as the temperature decreases and thus, the ordering of the condensed phase increases at lower temperatures. The extrapolation to zero ΔS provides a critical temperature Tc of 42.1 °C (315.3 K), above which the monolayer cannot be compressed into the condensed state. Despite the great tendency of the 3-monostearoyl-sn-glycerol domains to develop irregular deviations in shape and inner texture, regular domains similar to those of the racemic monoacylglycerol esters are also formed. GIXD measurements performed over a large range of lateral pressures at four different temperatures (5, 10, 15 and 20 °C) indicate the dominance of the chiral nature. Contour plots with three clearly separated diffraction signals are observable in a large pressure range which is shifted to higher lateral pressures with increasing temperature. The comparison with the contour plots of the homologous 3-monopalmitoyl-sn-glycerol monolayers reveals the stronger dominance of the chiral nature with increasing alkyl chain length and thus, demonstrates the stronger influence of the lattice symmetry. The lattice data obtained by fitting the contour plots with 3 or 2 peaks demonstrate the resemblance to orthorhombic structures with NN tilted molecules at

  5. The binary phase behavior of 1,3-dilauroyl-2-stearoyl-sn-glycerol and 1,2-dilauroyl-3-stearoyl-sn-glycerol.

    PubMed

    Bouzidi, Laziz; Boodhoo, Marc V; Kutek, Tomas; Filip, Vladimir; Narine, Suresh S

    2010-06-01

    The binary phase behavior of purified 1,3-dilauroyl-2-stearoyl-sn-glycerol (LSL) and 1,2-dilauroyl-3-stearoyl-sn-glycerol (LLS) was investigated at a slow (0.1 degrees C/min) and a relatively fast (3.0 degrees C/min) cooling rate in terms of melting and crystallization, polymorphism, solid fat content (SFC), hardness and microstructure. Much of the behavior of the system is explained by its polymorphism and the influence of thermal processing. The alpha-form and the beta'-form of a double chain length structure were detected in the mixtures cooled at 3.0 degrees C/min, whereas only the beta'-form was detected in those cooled at 0.1 degrees C/min. X-ray diffraction data as well as thermodynamic data propose that the most stable phases are promoted by the symmetrical LSL. The measured trends in structural characteristics, thermal properties, SFC, relative hardness and microstructure delimit three groups of mixtures which imply a competition between the stabilizing effect of LSL and disordering introduced by kinetic effects: (a) LLS-rich mixtures with LSL molar fractions (X(LSL)) less than 0.3, (b) mixtures with X(LSL) clustered around 0.5 and (c) LSL-rich mixtures with X(LSL)>or=0.7. The balance between ordering and kinetic effects determines the polymorphism of the mixtures, which in turn determines the behavior of the LSL/LLS system. The kinetic phase diagram of the LSL/LLS binary system constructed using heating differential scanning calorimetry thermograms displayed a singularity at the 0.5(LSL) molar fraction which delimits two distinct behaviors: eutectic behavior in one region and monotectic behavior in the other. The molecular interactions, as depicted by a non-ideality parameter of mixing obtained from a thermodynamic model based on the Hildebrand equation, suggests an almost ideal mixing behavior and a moderate tendency to the formation of unlike-pairs in the liquid state. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The binary phase behavior of 1, 3-dipalmitoyl-2-stearoyl-sn-glycerol and 1, 2-dipalmitoyl-3-stearoyl-sn-glycerol.

    PubMed

    Boodhoo, M V; Bouzidi, L; Narine, S S

    2009-07-01

    The binary phase behavior of purified 1, 3-dipalmitoyl-2-stearoyl-sn-glycerol (PSP) and 1, 2-dipalmitoyl-3-stearoyl-sn-glycerol (PPS) was investigated at a very slow (0.1 degrees C/min) and a relatively fast (3.0 degrees C/min) cooling rate. Mixtures with molar fractions of 0.1 increments were studied in terms of melting and crystallization, polymorphism, solid fat content (SFC), hardness and microstructure. Only the alpha-form of a double chain length (DCL) structure was detected for all mixtures in both experiments. The kinetic phase diagram, constructed using heating DSC thermograms, displayed two distinct behaviors separated by a singularity at the 0.5(PSP) composition: a eutectic in the X(PSP)< or =0.5 and a monotectic in the X(PSP)< or =0.5 concentration region. The singularity was attributed to the formation of a 1:1 (mol:mol) molecular compound. Apart from the segment from 0.0(PSP) to the eutectic point, X(E), the simulation of the liquidus line using a model based on the Hildebrand equation suggested that the molecular interactions are strong and tend to favor the formation of unlike pairs in the liquid state and that the miscibility is not significantly dependent on cooling rate. The kinetic effects are manifest in all measured properties, particularly dramatically in the X(PSP)< or =X(E) concentration region. An analysis of induction time as measured by pulse nuclear magnetic resonance (pNMR) showed that PPS retards crystal growth, an effect which can explain the peculiarity of this concentration region. At both cooling rates, fit of the SFC (%) versus time curves to a modified form of the Avrami model revealed two common growth modes for all the mixtures. The polarized light microscope (PLM) of the PSP-PPS mixtures revealed networks made of spherulitic crystallites of size, growth direction and boundaries that are varied and sensitive to composition and cooling rate. The change in the microstructure and final SFC (%), particularly noticeable at

  7. A simplified procedure for the preparation of 2,3-O-isopropylidene-sn-glycerol from L-arabinose.

    PubMed

    Kanda, P; Wells, M A

    1980-02-01

    A new procedure for the preparation of 2,3-O-isopropylidene-sn-glycerol is described. L-arabinose is converted to its 4,5-monoisopropylidene diethyl mercaptal derivative. This compound is then subjected to periodate oxidation and borohydride reduction. Following neutralization, the aceton-glycerol is extracted from the aqueous solution into chloroform. Evaporation of the chloroform and subsequent distillation yielded pure 2,3-O-isopropylidene-sn-glycerol ([alpha]D22 = -14.5 degrees (in substance)) in an overall yield of 15-25%.

  8. Metabolism of L-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyananda, M.K.G.S.

    1985-01-01

    E. coli is able to incorporate L-glyceraldehyde and L-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate into phospholipids, L-(3-/sup 3/H)Glyceraldehyde was synthesized and the purity and the chemical identity of the product were checked by paper chromatography. L-(3-/sup 3/H)Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate was synthesized from L-(3-/sup 3/H)glyceraldehyde in a reaction catalyzed by glycerokinase. E. coli extract contains a new enzyme activity which catalyzes an NADPH dependent reduction of L-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate into sn-glycerol 3-phosphate. A procedure, specifically suitable for assaying the reductase activity in the crude extract, was developed. A more convenient spectrophotometric assay method was employed for the purified enzyme. At moderate concentrations sulfhydryl group inhibitors had no effect on the enzyme activity of L-GAP reductase. At 100..mu..M concentration Zn/sup +2/ inhibited the enzyme activity by about 30% while Mn/sup +2/ elevated the activity by about the same margin. Mg/sup +2/, Ca/sup +2/ and Fe/sup +2/ were without effect at this concentration. L-Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate is known to be bactericidal at 1.25 ..mu..M concentration and the D-enantiomer is without effect. Furthermore, methylglyoxal is known to be bactericidal at or above 0.5 mM concentration. Strains of E. coli resistant to 1 mM methylglyoxal were isolated. The cell extract prepared from the mutant possessed increased capacity to transform methylglyoxal into D-lactate via a glutathione dependent reaction. These mutants were less sensitive to 2.5 mM DL-GAP suggesting that conversion of L-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate into methylglyoxal may at least partly be responsible for the bactericidal activity of L-GAP.

  9. Metabolism of L-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyananda, M.K.G.S.; Engel, R.; Tropp, B.E.

    1987-06-01

    When either /sup 3/H-labeled L-glyceraldehyde or /sup 3/H-labeled L-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (GAP) was added to cultures of Escherichia coli, the phosphoglycerides were labeled. More than 81% of the label appeared in the backbone of the phosphoglycerides. Chromatographic analyses of the labeled phosphoglycerides revealed that the label was normally distributed into phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, and cardiolipin. These results suggest that L-glyceraldehyde is phosphorylated and the resultant L-GAP is converted into sn-glycerol 3-phosphate (G3P) before being incorporated into the bacterial phosphoglycerides. Cell-free bacterial extracts catalyzed an NADPH-dependent reduction of L-GAP to sn-G3P. The partially purified enzyme was specific for L-GAP and recognized neither D-GAP nor dihydroxyacetone phosphate as a substrate. NADH could not replace NADPH as a coenzyme. The L-GAP:NADPH oxidoreductase had an apparent K/sub m/ of 28 and 35 ..mu..M for L-GAP and NADPH, respectively. The enzyme was insensitive to sulfhydryl reagents and had a pH optimum of approximately 6.6. The phosphonic acid analog of GAP, 3-hydroxy-4-oxobutyl-1-phosphonate, was a substrate for the reductase, with an apparent K/sub m/ of 280 ..mu..M.

  10. 1,3-Diferuloyl-sn-glycerol from the biocatalytic transesterification of ethyl 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy cinnamic acid (ethyl ferulate) and soybean oil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    1,3-Diferuloyl-sn-glycerol is a natural plant component found ubiquitously throughout the plant kingdom, possessing ultraviolet adsorbing and antioxidant properties. Diferuloyl glycerol was synthesized and isolated as a byproduct in up to 5% yield from the pilot plant scale packed-bed, biocatalytic...

  11. Bidirectional roles of the brain 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol in the centrally administered vasopressin-induced adrenomedullary outflow in rats.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takahiro; Yokotani, Kunihiko

    2008-03-17

    Previously, we reported that intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered arginine-vasopressin evokes the secretion of noradrenaline and adrenaline from adrenal medulla through the brain phospholipase C- and diacylglycerol-mediated and cyclooxygenase-mediated mechanisms in rats. Diacylglycerol can be hydrolyzed by diacylglycerol lipase to 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol, which may be further degradated by monoacylglycerol lipase to free arachidonic acid, a representative substrate of cyclooxygenase. Recently, 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol has been recognized as a major endocannabinoid, which can modulate synaptic transmission in the brain. In the present experiment, therefore, we examined (1) a role of the brain 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol as a precursor of arachidonic acid in the centrally administered vasopressin-induced elevation of plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline, and (2) a regulatory role of the brain 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol as an endocannabinoid on the vasopressin-induced response, using urethane-anesthetized rats. The vasopressin (0.2 nmol/animal, i.c.v.)-induced elevation of plasma catecholamines was reduced by RHC-80267 (diacylglycerol lipase inhibitor) (1.3 and 2.6 micromol/animal, i.c.v.) and also reduced by MAFP (monoacylglycerol lipase inhibitor) (0.7 and 1.4 micromol/animal, i.c.v.). MAFP (1.4 micromol/animal, i.c.v.) also attenuated the 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol (0.5 micromol/animal, i.c.v.)-induced elevation of plasma catecholamines. AM 251 (cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist) (90 and 180 nmol/animal, i.c.v.) potentiated the vasopressin (0.2 nmol/animal, i.c.v.)-induced response, while AM 630 (cannabinoid CB(2) receptor antagonist) (198 and 793 nmol/animal, i.c.v.) was largely ineffective. In addition, WIN 55212-2 (cannabinoid CB receptor agonist) (188 and 470 nmol/animal, i.c.v.) dose-dependently reduced the vasopressin-induced response. These results suggest that the brain 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol generated from diacylglycerol plays a role

  12. Physical behavior of the hydrophobic core of membranes: properties of 1-stearoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycerol.

    PubMed

    Di, L; Small, D M

    1995-12-26

    Phospholipids containing a saturated fatty acid in the primary position and an unsaturated fatty acid in the secondary position are a major structural part of biological membranes. The mixed-chain hydrophobic core of the membranes is the diacylglycerol part. To better understand the core properties of membranes we have studied the physical behavior of 1-stearoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycerol (SLDG) by X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in the dry and hydrated states. Dry SLDG has four polymorphic phases: alpha (transition temperature, 11.6 degrees C; delta H = 7.5 kcal/mol); sub-alpha 1 (3.0 degrees C; 0.6 kcal/mol); sub-alpha 2(-1.0 degrees C; 0.5 kcal/mol); and beta' (16.1 degrees C; 15.4 kcal/mol). The alpha, sub-alpha 1, and sub-alpha 2 phases are metastable with a probable extended bilayer structure (d001 approximately 59.5 A). The chain packing of the alpha phase is hexagonal, while sub-alpha 1 and sub-alpha 2 have pseudohexagonal chain packing. The beta' phase has a tilted bilayer structure (46.9 A) with strong wide-angle diffractions, suggesting elements of orthorhombic perpendicular packing. Compared to saturated 1,2-diacylglycerols, SLDG packs much less efficiently, but, when compared to 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycerol, it appears to pack somewhat more efficiently. Thus polyunsaturated linoleate chains appear to pack marginally more effectively with the saturated stearate chains than do monounsaturated chains. SLDG hydrates with 0.5 mol of H2O, which prevents the beta' phase from forming. Only one hydrated alpha phase (alpha w) and two hydrated sub-alpha (sub-alpha w1, sub-alpha w2) phases are formed. These phases are similar in structure to the nonhydrated alpha phases, but the bilayer period is increased by about 2 A (d001 approximately 61.5 A). This causes minor changes in polymorphism, including lower melting temperatures and enthalpy. A comparison of diacylglycerols to phosphatidylcholines with the same chains shows that the

  13. Anaerobic energy-yielding reaction associated with transhydrogenation from glycerol 3-phosphate to fumarate by an Escherichia coli system.

    PubMed Central

    Miki, K; Lin, E C

    1975-01-01

    A particulate subcellular fraction from Escherichia coli K-12 induced in anaerobic sn-glycerol 3-phosphate (G3P) dehydrogenase and fumarate reductase can catalyze under anaerobic conditions the transfer of hydrogens from G3P to fumarate, with attendant generation of high-energy phosphate. The phsophorylation process is more sensitive than the transhydrogenation process to inhibition by the detergent Triton X-100. The same is true with respect to sensitivity to sodium azide, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone and N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. Such a preparation derived from cells with beta-galactoside permease can accumulate thiomethyl beta-D-galactoside anaerobically, and the accumulation can be stimulated twofold by adding G3P and fumarate. Mutants lacking the membrane-associated Mg2+-dependent adenosine triphosphatase cannot grow anaerobically on glycerol with fumarate as the hydrogen acceptor, although they can grow aerobically on glycerol alone. PMID:127785

  14. Anaerobic energy-yielding reaction associated with transhydrogenation from glycerol 3-phosphate to fumarate by an Escherichia coli system.

    PubMed

    Miki, K; Lin, E C

    1975-12-01

    A particulate subcellular fraction from Escherichia coli K-12 induced in anaerobic sn-glycerol 3-phosphate (G3P) dehydrogenase and fumarate reductase can catalyze under anaerobic conditions the transfer of hydrogens from G3P to fumarate, with attendant generation of high-energy phosphate. The phsophorylation process is more sensitive than the transhydrogenation process to inhibition by the detergent Triton X-100. The same is true with respect to sensitivity to sodium azide, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone and N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. Such a preparation derived from cells with beta-galactoside permease can accumulate thiomethyl beta-D-galactoside anaerobically, and the accumulation can be stimulated twofold by adding G3P and fumarate. Mutants lacking the membrane-associated Mg2+-dependent adenosine triphosphatase cannot grow anaerobically on glycerol with fumarate as the hydrogen acceptor, although they can grow aerobically on glycerol alone.

  15. Structure of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, an essential monotopic membrane enzyme involved in respiration and metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Joanne I.; Chinte, Unmesh; Du, Shoucheng

    2008-04-02

    Sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GlpD) is an essential membrane enzyme, functioning at the central junction of respiration, glycolysis, and phospholipid biosynthesis. Its critical role is indicated by the multitiered regulatory mechanisms that stringently controls its expression and function. Once expressed, GlpD activity is regulated through lipid-enzyme interactions in Escherichia coli. Here, we report seven previously undescribed structures of the fully active E. coli GlpD, up to 1.75 {angstrom} resolution. In addition to elucidating the structure of the native enzyme, we have determined the structures of GlpD complexed with substrate analogues phosphoenolpyruvate, glyceric acid 2-phosphate, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, and product, dihydroxyacetone phosphate. These structural results reveal conformational states of the enzyme, delineating the residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis at the glycerol-3-phosphate site. Two probable mechanisms for catalyzing the dehydrogenation of glycerol-3-phosphate are envisioned, based on the conformational states of the complexes. To further correlate catalytic dehydrogenation to respiration, we have additionally determined the structures of GlpD bound with ubiquinone analogues menadione and 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide, identifying a hydrophobic plateau that is likely the ubiquinone-binding site. These structures illuminate probable mechanisms of catalysis and suggest how GlpD shuttles electrons into the respiratory pathway. Glycerol metabolism has been implicated in insulin signaling and perturbations in glycerol uptake and catabolism are linked to obesity in humans. Homologs of GlpD are found in practically all organisms, from prokaryotes to humans, with >45% consensus protein sequences, signifying that these structural results on the prokaryotic enzyme may be readily applied to the eukaryotic GlpD enzymes.

  16. L-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from the insect Ceratitis capitata. Purfication, physicochemical and enzymic properties.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Sousa, J M; Gavilanes, J G; Municio, A M; Pérez-Aranda, A

    1977-03-15

    Soluble L-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (sn-glycerol-3-phosphate: NAD+ 2-oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.8) from the mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata has been purified 130-fold with an overall yield of about 40%. The final preparation had a specific activity of about 200 mumol NADH/min/mg protein. The enzyme preparation has been shown to be homogeneous throughout disc gel electrophoresis, dodecyl sulphate gel electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing and ultracentrifugation. The Km values for dihydroxyacetone phosphate, NADH, L-glycerol-3-phosphate and NAD+ were respectively 0.33, 0.018, 0.74 and 0.26 mM. L-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from the insect had a maximal activity around pH 6.6 for the oxidation of NADH and pH 10.0 for the reduction of NAD+. It was stable from pH 6.0 to pH 9.0 at 20 degrees C for 1 h and remained active after incubating at 30 degrees C for 30 min at pH 6.6. The enzyme was completely inactivated by incubating at 60 degrees C for 5 min. Enzyme stability versus ionic strength as well as the dependence of the reaction velocity on temperature are also reported. The active enzyme was found to have a minimum molecular weight of approx. 63 000. Molecular weight determinations by sodium dodecyl sulphate gel electrophoresis gave subunit weights of 33 500. The isoelectric point of the protein was determined by electrofocusing and found to be 5.75 +/- 0.05. The extinction coefficient at 278 nm was calculated by dry weight measurements to be E1cm 1mg/ml = 0.42 +/- 0.1. Sedimentation velocity studies on ultracentrifuge indicated a dependence of the sedimentation coefficient on the enzyme concentration. The amino acid composition of the enzyme was determined. The protein has no free N-terminal residue and the digestion with carboxypeptidases gave the C-terminal sequence: -ala-gly-ser. All these data are discussed in relation to the properties of the enzyme from other sources.

  17. 1,3-Diferuloyl-sn-glycerol from the biocatalytic transesterification of ethyl 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy cinnamic acid (ethyl ferulate) and soybean oil.

    PubMed

    Compton, David L; Laszlo, Joseph A

    2009-06-01

    1,3-Diferuloyl-sn-glycerol is found ubiquitously throughout the plant kingdom, possessing ultraviolet adsorbing and antioxidant properties. Diferuloyl glycerol was synthesized and isolated as a byproduct in up to 5% yield from a pilot plant scale packed-bed, biocatalytic transesterification of ethyl ferulate with soybean oil or mono- and diacylglycerols from soybean oil. The yield of the diferuloyl glycerol byproduct was directly proportional to the overall water concentration of the bioreactor. The isolated diferuloyl glycerol exhibited good ultraviolet adsorbing properties, 280-360 nm with a lambda(max) 322 nm, and compared well to the efficacy of commercial sunscreen active ingredients. The antioxidant capacity of diferuloyl glycerol (0.25-2.5 mM) was determined by its ability to scavenge 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radicals and was comparable to that of ferulic acid. At current pilot plant scale production capacity, 120 kg diferuloyl glycerol byproduct could be isolated per year.

  18. Thermotropic phase properties of 1,2-di-O-tetradecyl-3-O-(3-O-methyl- beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-sn-glycerol.

    PubMed Central

    Trouard, T P; Mannock, D A; Lindblom, G; Rilfors, L; Akiyama, M; McElhaney, R N

    1994-01-01

    The hydration properties and the phase structure of 1,2-di-O-tetradecyl-3-O(3-O-methyl-beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-sn-glycerol (3-O-Me-beta-D-GlcDAIG) in water have been studied via differential scanning calorimetry, 1H-NMR and 2H-NMR spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Results indicate that this lipid forms a crystalline (Lc) phase up to temperatures of 60-70 degrees C, where a transition through a metastable reversed hexagonal (Hll) phase to a reversed micellar solution (L2) phase occurs. Experiments were carried out at water concentrations in a range from 0 to 35 wt%, which indicate that all phases are poorly hydrated, taking up < 5 mol water/mol lipid. The absence of a lamellar liquid crystalline (L alpha) phase and the low levels of hydration measured in the discernible phases suggest that the methylation of the saccharide moiety alters the hydrogen bonding properties of the headgroup in such a way that the 3-O-Me-beta-D-GlcDAIG headgroup cannot achieve the same level of hydration as the unmethylated form. Thus, in spite of the small increase in steric bulk resulting from methylation, there is an increase in the tendency of 3-O-Me-beta-D-GlcDAIG to form nonlamellar structures. A similar phase behavior has previously been observed for the Acholeplasma laidlawii A membrane lipid 1,2-diacyl-3-O-(6-O-acyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl)-sn-glycerol in water (Lindblom et al. 1993. J. Biol. Chem. 268:16198-16207). The phase behavior of the two lipids suggests that hydrophobic substitution of a hydroxyl group in the sugar ring of the glucopyranosylglycerols has a very strong effect on their physicochemical properties, i.e., headgroup hydration and the formation of different lipid aggregate structures. PMID:7811919

  19. Intravitreal toxicology in rabbits of two preparations of 1-O-octadecyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphonoformate, a sustained-delivery anti-CMV drug.

    PubMed

    Cheng, L; Hostetler, K Y; Gardner, M F; Avila, C P; Bergeron-Lynn, G; Keefe, K S; Wiley, C A; Freeman, W R

    1999-06-01

    To determine intraocular toxicity and efficacy of the lipid prodrug of foscarnet, 1-O-octadecyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphonoformate (ODG-PFA), as a long-acting, nontoxic intravitreous injectable drug delivery system for cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis. ODG-PFA was synthesized by coupling the phosphonate residue of PFA to the 3 hydroxyl of 1-O-octadecyl-sn-glycerol and formulated as micelles and liposomes at concentrations so that, after injection into the rabbit vitreous, the resultant intravitreal concentrations were 0.2 mM, 0.63 mM, and 2 mM in micellar formulation and 0.02 mM, 0.063 mM, 0.2 mM, and 0.63 mM for liposomal formulation. The compounds were injected, and toxicology evaluations were performed. Intravitreal injections of micellar ODG-PFA resulted in aggregation of the material in vitreous and variable local retinal damage. Intravitreal injections of the liposomal ODG-PFA revealed even dispersion of the compounds and a clear vitreous, using final concentration in the vitreous of 0.2 mM. No intraocular toxicity was found with the 0.632 mM final concentration. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for CMV of ODG-PFA was 0.43+/-0.27 microM, and the therapeutic index of ODG-PFA after intravitreal injection was estimated to be 1470:1. Lipid-derivatized foscarnet liposome formulations may be a useful long-acting delivery system for the therapy of CMV retinitis.

  20. Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 4 is essential for the normal development of reproductive organs and the embryo in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xue; Chen, Guanqun; Truksa, Martin; Snyder, Crystal L; Shah, Saleh; Weselake, Randall J

    2014-08-01

    The enzyme sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 4 (GPAT4) is involved in the biosynthesis of plant lipid poly-esters. The present study further characterizes the enzymatic activities of three endoplasmic reticulum-bound GPAT4 isoforms of Brassica napus and examines their roles in the development of reproductive organs and the embryo. All three BnGPAT4 isoforms exhibited sn-2 acyltransferase and phosphatase activities with dicarboxylic acid-CoA as acyl donor. When non-substituted acyl-CoA was used as acyl donor, the rate of acylation was considerably lower and phosphatase activity was not manifested. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated down-regulation of all GPAT4 homologues in B. napus under the control of the napin promoter caused abnormal development of several reproductive organs and reduced seed set. Microscopic examination and reciprocal crosses revealed that both pollen grains and developing embryo sacs of the B. napus gpat4 lines were affected. The gpat4 mature embryos showed decreased cutin content and altered monomer composition. The defective embryo development further affected the oil body morphology, oil content, and fatty acid composition in gpat4 seeds. These results suggest that GPAT4 has a critical role in the development of reproductive organs and the seed of B. napus. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  1. Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 4 is essential for the normal development of reproductive organs and the embryo in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xue; Chen, Guanqun; Truksa, Martin; Snyder, Crystal L.; Shah, Saleh; Weselake, Randall J.

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 4 (GPAT4) is involved in the biosynthesis of plant lipid poly-esters. The present study further characterizes the enzymatic activities of three endoplasmic reticulum-bound GPAT4 isoforms of Brassica napus and examines their roles in the development of reproductive organs and the embryo. All three BnGPAT4 isoforms exhibited sn-2 acyltransferase and phosphatase activities with dicarboxylic acid-CoA as acyl donor. When non-substituted acyl-CoA was used as acyl donor, the rate of acylation was considerably lower and phosphatase activity was not manifested. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated down-regulation of all GPAT4 homologues in B. napus under the control of the napin promoter caused abnormal development of several reproductive organs and reduced seed set. Microscopic examination and reciprocal crosses revealed that both pollen grains and developing embryo sacs of the B. napus gpat4 lines were affected. The gpat4 mature embryos showed decreased cutin content and altered monomer composition. The defective embryo development further affected the oil body morphology, oil content, and fatty acid composition in gpat4 seeds. These results suggest that GPAT4 has a critical role in the development of reproductive organs and the seed of B. napus. PMID:24821955

  2. Effect of the Incorporation of Nanosized Titanium Dioxide on the Interfacial Properties of 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine Langmuir Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Eduardo; Santini, Eva; Ferrari, Michele; Liggieri, Libero; Ravera, Francesca

    2017-09-27

    The effect of the incorporation of hydrophilic titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles on the interfacial properties of Langmuir monolayers of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) has been evaluated combining interfacial thermodynamic studies, dilatational rheology, and Brewster angle microscopy (BAM). The results show that the TiO2 nanoparticles are able to penetrate DPPC layers, modifying the organization of the molecules and, consequently, the phase behavior and viscoelastic properties of the systems. Measurements of dilational viscoelasticity against the frequency have been performed, using the oscillatory barrier method, at different values of the surface pressure corresponding to different degrees of compression of the monolayer. The presence of TiO2 nanoparticles also affects the dynamic response of the monolayer modifying both the quasi-equilibrium dilatational elasticity and the high frequency limit of the viscoelastic modulus. The principal aim of this work is to understand the fundamental physicochemical bases related to the incorporation of specific nanoparticles of technological interest into the interfacial layer with biological relevance such as phospholipid layers. This can provide information on potential adverse effects of nanoparticles for health and the environment.

  3. Sphingosine 1-phosphate and cancer.

    PubMed

    Pyne, Nigel J; El Buri, Ashref; Adams, David R; Pyne, Susan

    2017-09-15

    The bioactive lipid, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is produced by phosphorylation of sphingosine and this is catalysed by two sphingosine kinase isoforms (SK1 and SK2). Here we discuss structural functional aspects of SK1 (which is a dimeric quaternary enzyme) that relate to coordinated coupling of membrane association with phosphorylation of Ser225 in the 'so-called' R-loop, catalytic activity and protein-protein interactions (e.g. TRAF2, PP2A and Gq). S1P formed by SK1 at the plasma-membrane is released from cells via S1P transporters to act on S1P receptors to promote tumorigenesis. We discuss here an additional novel mechanism that can operate between cancer cells and fibroblasts and which involves the release of the S1P receptor, S1P2 in exosomes from breast cancer cells that regulates ERK-1/2 signalling in fibroblasts. This novel mechanism of signalling might provide an explanation for the role of S1P2 in promoting metastasis of cancer cells and which is dependent on the micro-environmental niche. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. An ultraviolet spectrophotometric assay for the screening of sn-2-specific lipases using 1,3-O-dioleoyl-2-O-α-eleostearoyl-sn-glycerol as substrate.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Lilia D; Rodriguez, Jorge A; Leclaire, Julien; Buono, Gerard; Fotiadu, Frédéric; Carrière, Frédéric; Abousalham, Abdelkarim

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we propose a continuous assay for the screening of sn-2 lipases by using triacylglycerols (TAGs) from Aleurites fordii seed (tung oil) and a synthetic TAG containing the α-eleostearic acid at the sn-2 position and the oleic acid (OA) at the sn-1 and sn-3 positions [1,3-O-dioleoyl-2-O-α-eleostearoyl-sn-glycerol (sn-OEO)]. Each TAG was coated into a microplate well, and the lipase activity was measured by optical density increase at 272 nm due to transition of α-eleostearic acid from the adsorbed to the soluble state. The sn-1,3-regioselective lipases human pancreatic lipase (HPL), LIP2 lipase from Yarrowia lipolytica (YLLIP2), and a known sn-2 lipase, Candida antarctica lipase A (CALA) were used to validate this method. TLC analysis of lipolysis products showed that the lipases tested were able to hydrolyze the sn-OEO and the tung oil TAGs, but only CALA hydrolyzed the sn-2 position. The ratio of initial velocities on sn-OEO and tung oil TAGs was used to estimate the sn-2 preference of lipases. CALA was the enzyme with the highest ratio (0.22 ± 0.015), whereas HPL and YLLIP2 showed much lower ratios (0.072 ± 0.026 and 0.038 ± 0.016, respectively). This continuous sn-2 lipase assay is compatible with a high sample throughput and thus can be applied to the screening of sn-2 lipases.

  5. An ultraviolet spectrophotometric assay for the screening of sn-2-specific lipases using 1,3-O-dioleoyl-2-O-α-eleostearoyl-sn-glycerol as substrate

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Lilia D.; Rodriguez, Jorge A.; Leclaire, Julien; Buono, Gerard; Fotiadu, Frédéric; Carrière, Frédéric; Abousalham, Abdelkarim

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we propose a continuous assay for the screening of sn-2 lipases by using triacylglycerols (TAGs) from Aleurites fordii seed (tung oil) and a synthetic TAG containing the α-eleostearic acid at the sn-2 position and the oleic acid (OA) at the sn-1 and sn-3 positions [1,3-O-dioleoyl-2-O-α-eleostearoyl-sn-glycerol (sn-OEO)]. Each TAG was coated into a microplate well, and the lipase activity was measured by optical density increase at 272 nm due to transition of α-eleostearic acid from the adsorbed to the soluble state. The sn-1,3-regioselective lipases human pancreatic lipase (HPL), LIP2 lipase from Yarrowia lipolytica (YLLIP2), and a known sn-2 lipase, Candida antarctica lipase A (CALA) were used to validate this method. TLC analysis of lipolysis products showed that the lipases tested were able to hydrolyze the sn-OEO and the tung oil TAGs, but only CALA hydrolyzed the sn-2 position. The ratio of initial velocities on sn-OEO and tung oil TAGs was used to estimate the sn-2 preference of lipases. CALA was the enzyme with the highest ratio (0.22 ± 0.015), whereas HPL and YLLIP2 showed much lower ratios (0.072 ± 0.026 and 0.038 ± 0.016, respectively). This continuous sn-2 lipase assay is compatible with a high sample throughput and thus can be applied to the screening of sn-2 lipases. PMID:22114038

  6. Berberine treatment attenuates the palmitate-mediated inhibition of glucose uptake and consumption through increased 1,2,3-triacyl-sn-glycerol synthesis and accumulation in H9c2 cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wenguang; Chen, Li; Hatch, Grant M

    2016-04-01

    Dysfunction of lipid metabolism and accumulation of 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol (DAG) may be a key factor in the development of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. Berberine (BBR) is an isoquinoline alkaloid extract that has shown promise as a hypoglycemic agent in the management of diabetes in animal and human studies. However, its mechanism of action is not well understood. To determine the effect of BBR on lipid synthesis and its relationship to insulin resistance in H9c2 cardiomyocytes, we measured neutral lipid and phospholipid synthesis and their relationship to glucose uptake. Compared with controls, BBR treatment stimulated 2-[1,2-(3)H(N)]deoxy-D-glucose uptake and consumption in palmitate-mediated insulin resistant H9c2 cells. The mechanism was though an increase in protein kinase B (AKT) activity and GLUT-4 glucose transporter expression. DAG accumulated in palmitate-mediated insulin resistant H9c2 cells and treatment with BBR reduced this DAG accumulation and increased accumulation of 1,2,3-triacyl-sn-glycerol (TAG) compared to controls. Treatment of palmitate-mediated insulin resistant H9c2 cells with BBR increased [1,3-(3)H]glycerol and [1-(14)C]glucose incorporation into TAG and reduced their incorporation into DAG compared to control. In addition, BBR treatment of these cells increased [1-(14)C]palmitic acid incorporation into TAG and decreased its incorporation into DAG compared to controls. BBR treatment did not alter phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis. The mechanism for the BBR-mediated decreased precursor incorporation into DAG and increased incorporation into TAG in palmitate-incubated cells was an increase in DAG acyltransferase-2 activity and its expression and a decrease in TAG hydrolysis. Thus, BBR treatment attenuates palmitate-induced reduction in glucose uptake and consumption, in part, through reduction in cellular DAG levels and accumulation of TAG in H9c2 cells.

  7. Iodination of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jean O.; Harris, J. Ieuan

    1970-01-01

    1. A high degree of homology in the positions of tyrosine residues in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase from lobster and pig muscle, and from yeast, prompted an examination of the reactivity of tyrosine residues in the enzyme. 2. Iodination of the enzyme from lobster muscle with low concentrations of potassium tri-[125I]-iodide led to the identification of tyrosine residues of differing reactivity. Tyrosine-46 appeared to be the most reactive in the native enzyme. 3. When the monocarboxymethylated enzyme was briefly treated with small amounts of iodine, iodination could be confined almost entirely to tyrosine-46 in the lobster enzyme; tyrosine-39 or tyrosine-42, or both, were also beginning to react. 4. These three tyrosine residues were also those that reacted most readily in the carboxymethylated pig and yeast enzymes. 5. The difficulties in attaining specific reaction of the native enzyme are considered. 6. The differences between our results and those of other workers are discussed. ImagesPLATE 1PLATE 2 PMID:5530750

  8. Two potential fish glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Raymond, James A

    2015-06-01

    Winter-acclimated rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax Mitchill) produce high levels of glycerol as an antifreeze. A common pathway to glycerol involves the enzyme glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase (GPP), but no GPP has yet been identified in fish or any other animal. Here, two phosphatases assembled from existing EST libraries (from winter-acclimated smelt and cold-acclimated smelt hepatocytes) were found to resemble a glycerol-associated phosphatase from a glycerol-producing alga, Dunaliella salina, and a recently discovered GPP from a bacterium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Recombinant proteins were generated and were found to have GPP activity on the order of a few μMol Pi/mg enzyme/min. The two enzymes have acidic pH optima (~5.5) similar to that previously determined for GPP activity in liver tissue, with about 1/3 of their peak activities at neutral pH. The two enzymes appear to account for the GPP activity of smelt liver, but due to their reduced activities at neutral pH, their contributions to glycerol production in vivo remain unclear. Similar enzymes may be active in a glycerol-producing insect, Dendroctonus ponderosae.

  9. Structure of RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase bound to substrate RNA.

    PubMed

    Desai, Kevin K; Bingman, Craig A; Cheng, Chin L; Phillips, George N; Raines, Ronald T

    2014-10-01

    RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase (RtcA) catalyzes the ATP-dependent cyclization of a 3'-phosphate to form a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate at RNA termini. Cyclization proceeds through RtcA-AMP and RNA(3')pp(5')A covalent intermediates, which are analogous to intermediates formed during catalysis by the tRNA ligase RtcB. Here we present a crystal structure of Pyrococcus horikoshii RtcA in complex with a 3'-phosphate terminated RNA and adenosine in the AMP-binding pocket. Our data reveal that RtcA recognizes substrate RNA by ensuring that the terminal 3'-phosphate makes a large contribution to RNA binding. Furthermore, the RNA 3'-phosphate is poised for in-line attack on the P-N bond that links the phosphorous atom of AMP to N(ε) of His307. Thus, we provide the first insights into RNA 3'-phosphate termini recognition and the mechanism of 3'-phosphate activation by an Rtc enzyme. © 2014 Desai et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  10. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling in Endothelial Disorders.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Teresa

    2016-06-01

    Numerous preclinical studies indicate that sustained endothelial activation significantly contributes to tissue edema, perpetuates the inflammatory response, and exacerbates tissue injury ultimately resulting in organ failure. However, no specific therapies aimed at restoring endothelial function are available as yet. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is emerging as a potent modulator of endothelial function and endothelial responses to injury. Recent studies indicate that S1PR are attractive targets to treat not only disorders of the arterial endothelium but also microvascular dysfunction caused by ischemic or inflammatory injury. In this article, we will review the current knowledge of the role of S1P and its receptors in endothelial function in health and disease, and we will discuss the therapeutic potential of targeting S1PR not only for disorders of the arterial endothelium but also the microvasculature. The therapeutic targeting of S1PR in the endothelium could help to bridge the gap between biomedical research in vascular biology and clinical practice.

  11. Relationships between molecular structure and kinetic and thermodynamic controls in lipid systems. Part III. Crystallization and phase behavior of 1-palmitoyl-2,3-stearoyl-sn-glycerol (PSS) and tristearoylglycerol (SSS) binary system.

    PubMed

    Bouzidi, Laziz; Narine, Suresh S

    2012-01-01

    The phase behavior of 1-palmitoyl-2,3-distearoyl-sn-glycerol (PSS)/tristearoylglycerol (SSS) binary system was investigated in terms of polymorphism, crystallization and melting behavior, microstructure and solid fat content (SFC) using widely different constant cooling rates. Kinetic phase diagrams were experimentally determined from the DSC heating thermograms and analyzed using a thermodynamic model to account for non-ideality of mixing. The kinetic phase diagram presented a typical eutectic behavior with a eutectic point at the 0.5(PSS) mixture with a probable precipitation line from 0.5(PSS) to 1.0(PSS), regardless of the rate at which the sample was cooled. The eutectic temperature decreased only slightly with increasing cooling rate. PSS has a strong effect on the physical properties of the PSS-SSS mixtures. In fact, the overall phase behavior of the PSS-SSS binary system was determined, for a very large part, by the asymmetrical TAG. Moreover, PSS is a key driver of the high stability observed in crystal growth, polymorphism and phase development. Levels as low as 10% PSS, when cooled slowly, and 30% when cooled rapidly, were found to be sufficient to suppress the effect of thermal processing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Export and functions of sphingosine-1-phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Roger H.; Takabe, Kazuaki; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    The sphingolipid metabolite, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), has emerged as a critical player in a number of fundamental biological processes and is important in cancer, angiogenesis, wound healing, cardiovascular function, atherosclerosis, immunity and asthma, among others. Activation of sphingosine kinases, enzymes that catalyze the phosphorylation of sphingosine to S1P, by a variety of agonists, including growth factors, cytokines, hormones, and antigen, increases intracellular S1P. Many of the biological effects of S1P are mediated by its binding to five specific G protein-coupled receptors located on the cell surface in an autocrine and/or paracrine manner. Therefore, understanding the mechanism by which intracellularly generated S1P is released out of cells is both interesting and important. In this review, we will discuss how S1P is formed and released. We will focus particularly on the current knowledge of how the S1P gradient between tissues and blood is maintained, and the role of ABC transporters in S1P release. PMID:19268560

  13. Quantitative cytochemical measurement of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Henderson, B

    1976-08-25

    A system has been developed for the quantitative measurment of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in tissue sections. An obstacle to the histochemical study of this enzyme has been the fact that the substrate, gylceraldehyde 3-phosphate, is very unstable. In the present system a stable compound, fructose 1, 6-diphosphate, is used as the primary substrate and the demonsatration of the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity depends on the conversion of this compound into the specific substrate by the aldolase present in the tissue. The characteristics of the dehydrogenase activity resulting from the addition of fructose 1, 6-diphosphate, resemble closely the known properties of purified glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Use of polyvinyl alcohol in the reaction medium prevents release of enzymes from the sections, as occurs in aqueous media. Although in this study intrinsic aldolase activity was found to be adequate for the rapid conversion of fructose 1, 6-diphosphate into the specific substrate for the dehydrogenase, the use of exogenous aldolase may be of particular advantage in assessing the intergrity of the Embden-Meyerhof pathway.

  14. Toxic Neuronal Death by Glyeraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase and Mitochondria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    Neuroreport, 10(5), 1149-1153. Sioud, M., & Jespersen, L. (1996). Enhancement of hammerhead ribozyme catalysis by glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase...1996) Enhancemen t of hammerhead r ibozyme cata lysis by glycera ldehyde-3- phospha te dehydrogenase. J Mol Biol 257:775–789. Sirover MA (1997) Role of

  15. Synthesis of phosphonate and phostone analogues of ribose-1-phosphates

    PubMed Central

    Nasomjai, Pitak; Slawin, Alexandra M Z

    2009-01-01

    Summary The synthesis of phosphonate analogues of ribose-1-phosphate and 5-fluoro-5-deoxyribose-1-phosphate is described. Preparations of both the α- and β-phosphonate anomers are reported for the ribose and 5-fluoro-5-deoxyribose series and a synthesis of the corresponding cyclic phostones of each α-ribose is also reported. These compounds have been prepared as tools to probe the details of fluorometabolism in S. cattleya. PMID:19777136

  16. Distinct generation, pharmacology, and distribution of sphingosine 1-phosphate and dihydro-sphingosine 1-phosphate in human neural progenitor cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In-vivo and in-vitro studies suggest a crucial role for Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and its receptors in the development of the nervous system. Dihydrosphingosine 1-phosphate (dhS1P), a reduced form of S1P, is an active ligand at S1P receptors, but the pharmacology and physiology of dhS1P has not...

  17. Toxic Neuronal Death by Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrongenase and Mitochondria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-08-01

    Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and after a number of forms of toxic exposure. If unique elements in the signaling pathways for the PD or toxic apoptosis can be identified and their apoptosis signaling impeded, neuronal loss may be slowed or reduced in the conditions. The research proposed in this grant was designed to examine the role of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) in apoptotic neuronal signaling. Recent studies in postmortem brain have implicated GAPDH apoptosis signaling in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Propargylamines, with

  18. Catalytically active monomers of E. coli glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Levashov, P A; Muronetz, V I; Klyachko, N L; Nagradova, N K

    1998-04-01

    Monomeric forms of E. coli glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase have been prepared using two different experimental approaches: (1) covalent immobilization of a tetramer on a solid support via a single subunit with subsequent dissociation of non-covalently bound subunits in the presence of urea, and (2) entrapment of monomeric species into reversed micelles of Aerosol OT in octane. Isolated monomers were shown to be catalytically active, exhibiting KM values close to the parameters characteristic of the tetrameric forms. Like tetramers, isolated monomers did not use NADP7 as a coenzyme.

  19. Model of early self-replication based on covalent complementarity for a copolymer of glycerate-3-phosphate and glycerol-3-phosphate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1989-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate acts as the substrate in a model of early self-replication of a phosphodiester copolymer of glycerate-3-phosphate and glycerol-3-phosphate. This model of self-replication is based on covalent complementarity in which information transfer is mediated by a single covalent bond, in contrast to multiple weak interactions that establish complementarity in nucleic acid replication. This replication model is connected to contemporary biochemistry through its use of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, a central metabolite of glycolysis and photosynthesis.

  20. Green tea catechins: inhibitors of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Kao, Chung-Cheng; Wu, Bo-Tsung; Tsuei, Yi-Wei; Shih, Li-Jane; Kuo, Yu-Liang; Kao, Yung-Hsi

    2010-05-01

    Green tea catechins, especially (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), are known to regulate obesity and fat accumulation. We performed a kinetic analysis in a cell-free system to determine the mode of inhibition of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH; EC 1.1.1.8) by EGCG. GPDH catalyzes the beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-dependent reduction of dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) to yield glycerol-3-phosphate, which serves as one of the major precursors of triacylglycerols. We found that EGCG dose-dependently inhibited GPDH activity at a concentration of approximately 20 muM for 50 % inhibition. The IC (50) values of other green tea catechins, such as (-)-epicatechin, (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate, and (-)-epigallocatechin, were all above 100 microM. This suggests a catechin type-dependent effect. Based on double-reciprocal plots of the kinetic data, EGCG was a noncompetitive inhibitor of the GPDH substrates, NADH and DHAP, with respective inhibition constants (Ki) of 18 and 31 microM. Results of this study possibly support previous studies that EGCG mediates fat content. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart. New York.

  1. Sphingosine-1 phosphate: a new player in osteoimmunology.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Brendan F

    2009-03-01

    Osteoclasts, the cells that degrade bone, differentiate from bone marrow-derived myeloid precursors. Recent work by Ishii et al. shows that sphingosine-1 phosphate in blood attracts osteoclast precursors into the bloodstream to keep them away from bone surfaces. These findings point to a novel mechanism to inhibit bone degradation and prevent bone loss.

  2. Dihydropyrazine-induced inactivation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Takechi, Shinji; Nakahara, Kazuhide; Yamaguchi, Tadatoshi

    2010-01-01

    Dihydropyrazine (DHP), which is produced during the Maillard reaction, generates radicals that not only cause breakage of chromosomal DNA leading to mutagenic lesions but also induce oxidative damage to cellular proteins. In the present study, we show that three DHP derivatives, which generated superoxide anions, caused inhibition of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). SH-compounds, such as cysteine, dithiothreitol (DTT), 2-mercaptoethanol, 2-mercaptoethylamine, and N-acetyl-cysteine, suppressed the inhibition of GAPDH by DHP in vitro, although the effect of DHP on GAPDH was not reversed by DTT. In addition, DHP-exposed Escherichia coli showed almost unaffected growth on plates containing a rich medium, but poor growth on plates containing M9 synthetic medium with glucose as the sole carbon source. Furthermore, DHP-exposed E. coli exhibited reduced GAPDH activity. These findings indicate that DHP disturbs the glycolytic pathway by inhibiting GAPDH activity.

  3. Revealing a signaling role of phytosphingosine-1-phosphate in yeast.

    PubMed

    Cowart, L Ashley; Shotwell, Matthew; Worley, Mitchell L; Richards, Adam J; Montefusco, David J; Hannun, Yusuf A; Lu, Xinghua

    2010-01-01

    Sphingolipids including sphingosine-1-phosphate and ceramide participate in numerous cell programs through signaling mechanisms. This class of lipids has important functions in stress responses; however, determining which sphingolipid mediates specific events has remained encumbered by the numerous metabolic interconnections of sphingolipids, such that modulating a specific lipid of interest through manipulating metabolic enzymes causes 'ripple effects', which change levels of many other lipids. Here, we develop a method of integrative analysis for genomic, transcriptomic, and lipidomic data to address this previously intractable problem. This method revealed a specific signaling role for phytosphingosine-1-phosphate, a lipid with no previously defined specific function in yeast, in regulating genes required for mitochondrial respiration through the HAP complex transcription factor. This approach could be applied to extract meaningful biological information from a similar experimental design that produces multiple sets of high-throughput data.

  4. Revealing a signaling role of phytosphingosine-1-phosphate in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cowart, L Ashley; Shotwell, Matthew; Worley, Mitchell L; Richards, Adam J; Montefusco, David J; Hannun, Yusuf A; Lu, Xinghua

    2010-01-01

    Sphingolipids including sphingosine-1-phosphate and ceramide participate in numerous cell programs through signaling mechanisms. This class of lipids has important functions in stress responses; however, determining which sphingolipid mediates specific events has remained encumbered by the numerous metabolic interconnections of sphingolipids, such that modulating a specific lipid of interest through manipulating metabolic enzymes causes ‘ripple effects', which change levels of many other lipids. Here, we develop a method of integrative analysis for genomic, transcriptomic, and lipidomic data to address this previously intractable problem. This method revealed a specific signaling role for phytosphingosine-1-phosphate, a lipid with no previously defined specific function in yeast, in regulating genes required for mitochondrial respiration through the HAP complex transcription factor. This approach could be applied to extract meaningful biological information from a similar experimental design that produces multiple sets of high-throughput data. PMID:20160710

  5. Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 2 is essential for normal spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Fabiani, Maria B; Montanaro, Mauro A; Stringa, Pablo; Lacunza, Ezequiel; Cattaneo, Elizabeth R; Santana, Marianela; Pellon-Maison, Magali; Gonzalez-Baro, Maria R

    2017-08-30

    Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferases (GPATs) catalyze the first and rate-limiting step in the de novo glycerolipid synthesis. The GPAT2 isoform differs from the other isoforms because its expression is restricted to male germ cells and cancer cells. It has been recently reported that GPAT2 expression in mouse testis fluctuates during sexual maturation and that it is regulated by epigenetic mechanisms in combination with vitamin A derivatives. Despite progress made in this field, information about GPAT2 role in the developing male germ cells remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to confirm the hypothesis that GPAT2 is required for the normal physiology of testes and male germ cell maturation. The gene was silenced in vivo by inoculating lentiviral particles carrying the sequence of a short-hairpin RNA targeting Gpat2 mRNA into mouse testis. Histological and gene expression analysis showed impaired spermatogenesis and arrest at the pachytene stage. Defects in reproductive fitness were also observed, and the analysis of apoptosis-related gene expression demonstrated the activation of apoptosis in Gpat2-silenced germ cells. These findings indicate that GPAT2 protein is necessary for the normal development of male gonocytes, and that its absence triggers apoptotic mechanisms, thereby decreasing the number of dividing germ cells. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  6. Mechanism of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase inactivation by tyrosine nitration

    PubMed Central

    Palamalai, Vikram; Miyagi, Masaru

    2010-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a multifaceted protein that is involved in numerous processes including glycolysis, translational silencing, transcriptional regulation of specific genes, and acting as a nitric oxide sensor. The precise mechanism on how GAPDH is targeted to these different roles is unclear but believed to involve specific posttranslational modification to the protein. Numerous studies have demonstrated that GAPDH is a target for tyrosine nitration. However, the site of modification and the molecular consequence have not been defined. Rabbit GAPDH with a reversibly protected catalytic cysteine was nitrated in vitro with tetranitromethane, resulting in complete loss of GAPDH catalytic activity. Nitration was estimated as 0.32 mol of nitrotyrosine residue per mole of GAPDH. Mass spectrometry analysis of nitrated GAPDH indicated that Tyr311 and Tyr317 were the sole sites of nitration. The X-ray crystal structure revealed that the distances between Tyr311 and Tyr317 and the cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) were less than 7.2 and 3.7 Å, respectively, implying that nitration of these two residues may affect NAD+ binding. This possibility was assessed using an NAD+ binding assay, which showed that nitrated GAPDH was incapable of binding NAD+. Thus, these results strongly suggest that Tyr311 and Tyr317 nitration prohibits NAD+ binding, leading to the loss of catalytic activity. PMID:20014444

  7. [Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors: from biology to physiopathology].

    PubMed

    Cuvillier, Olivier

    2012-11-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) mediates critical physiological responses by its binding to G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) subtypes, known as S1P receptors. Five distinct mammalian S1P receptors, designated S1P1-5 have been identified, each with a different cellular pattern of expression which influences the responses to S1P. In this review, we briefly outline our understanding of the modes of action and the roles of S1P receptors in the regulation of physiological and pathological functions in the cardiovascular, immune and central nervous system.

  8. Characterization of mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase in notothenioid fishes.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Kelly A; Grove, Theresa J; Oldham, Corey A; O'Brien, Kristin M

    2017-02-01

    Hearts of Antarctic icefishes (suborder Notothenioidei, family Channichthyidae) have higher densities of mitochondria, and mitochondria have higher densities of phospholipids, compared to red-blooded notothenioids. Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in glycerolipid biosynthesis. There are four isoforms of GPAT in vertebrates; GPAT1 and GPAT2 are localized to the outer mitochondrial membrane, whereas GPAT3 and GPAT4 are localized to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. We hypothesized that transcript levels of GPAT1 and/or GPAT2 would mirror densities of mitochondrial phospholipids and be higher in the icefish Chaenocephalus aceratus compared to the red-blooded species Notothenia coriiceps. Transcript levels of GPAT1 were quantified in heart ventricles and liver using qRT-PCR. Additionally, GPAT1 cDNA was sequenced in the Antarctic notothenioids, C. aceratus and N. coriiceps, and in the sub-Antarctic notothenioid, Eleginops maclovinus, to identify amino acid substitutions that may maintain GPAT1 function at cold temperature. Transcript levels of GPAT1 were higher in liver compared to heart ventricles but were not significantly different between the two species. In contrast, transcripts of GPAT2 were only detected in ventricle where they were 6.6-fold higher in C. aceratus compared to N. coriiceps. These data suggest GPAT1 may be more important for synthesizing triacylglycerol, whereas GPAT2 may regulate synthesis of phospholipids. GPAT1 amino acid sequences are highly conserved among the three notothenioids with 97.9-98.7% identity. Four amino acid substitutions within the cytosolic region of Antarctic notothenioid GPAT1 may maintain conformational changes necessary for binding and catalysis at cold temperature.

  9. Testis-specific glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase: origin and evolution.

    PubMed

    Kuravsky, Mikhail L; Aleshin, Vladimir V; Frishman, Dmitrij; Muronetz, Vladimir I

    2011-06-10

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPD) catalyses one of the glycolytic reactions and is also involved in a number of non-glycolytic processes, such as endocytosis, DNA excision repair, and induction of apoptosis. Mammals are known to possess two homologous GAPD isoenzymes: GAPD-1, a well-studied protein found in all somatic cells, and GAPD-2, which is expressed solely in testis. GAPD-2 supplies energy required for the movement of spermatozoa and is tightly bound to the sperm tail cytoskeleton by the additional N-terminal proline-rich domain absent in GAPD-1. In this study we investigate the evolutionary history of GAPD and gain some insights into specialization of GAPD-2 as a testis-specific protein. A dataset of GAPD sequences was assembled from public databases and used for phylogeny reconstruction by means of the Bayesian method. Since resolution in some clades of the obtained tree was too low, syntenic analysis was carried out to define the evolutionary history of GAPD more precisely. The performed selection tests showed that selective pressure varies across lineages and isoenzymes, as well as across different regions of the same sequences. The obtained results suggest that GAPD-1 and GAPD-2 emerged after duplication during the early evolution of chordates. GAPD-2 was subsequently lost by most lineages except lizards, mammals, as well as cartilaginous and bony fishes. In reptilians and mammals, GAPD-2 specialized to a testis-specific protein and acquired the novel N-terminal proline-rich domain anchoring the protein in the sperm tail cytoskeleton. This domain is likely to have originated by exonization of a microsatellite genomic region. Recognition of the proline-rich domain by cytoskeletal proteins seems to be unspecific. Besides testis, GAPD-2 of lizards was also found in some regenerating tissues, but it lacks the proline-rich domain due to tissue-specific alternative splicing.

  10. THE HEME BINDING PROPERTIES OF GLYCERALDEHYDE-3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE

    PubMed Central

    Hannibal, Luciana; Collins, Daniel; Brassard, Julie; Chakravarti, Ritu; Vempati, Rajesh; Dorlet, Pierre; Santolini, Jérôme; Dawson, John H.; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2012-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a glycolytic enzyme that also functions in transcriptional regulation, oxidative stress, vesicular trafficking, and apoptosis. Because GAPDH is required for cellular heme insertion into inducible nitric oxide synthase (Chakravarti et al, PNAS 2010, 107(42):18004-9), we extensively characterized the heme binding properties of GAPDH. Substoichiometric amounts of ferric heme bound to GAPDH (1 heme per GAPDH tetramer) to form a low-spin complex with UV-visible maxima at 362, 418 and 537 nm, and when reduced to ferrous gave maxima at 424, 527 and 559 nm. Ferric heme association and dissociation rate constants at 10 °C were kon =17,800 M−1s−1 and koff1 = 7.0 × 10−3 s−1; koff2 = 3.3 × 10−4 s−1 respectively, giving approximate affinities of 19–390 nM. Ferrous heme bound more poorly to GAPDH and dissociated with a koff = 4.2 × 10−3 s−1. Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), resonance Raman (rR) and EPR spectroscopic data on the ferric, ferrous, and ferrous-CO complexes of GAPDH showed that the heme is bis-ligated with His as the proximal ligand. The distal ligand in ferric complex was not displaced by CN− or N3− but in ferrous complex was displaceable by CO at a rate of 1.75 s−1 (for [CO]>0.2 mM). Studies with heme analogs revealed selectivity toward the coordinating metal and porphyrin ring structure. GAPDH-heme was isolated from bacteria induced to express rabbit GAPDH in the presence of δ-amino levulinic acid. Our finding of heme binding to GAPDH expands the protein’s potential roles. The strength, selectivity, reversibility, and redox sensitivity of heme binding to GAPDH is consistent with it performing heme sensing or heme chaperone-like functions in cells. PMID:22957700

  11. Buformin suppresses the expression of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Yano, Akiko; Kubota, Masafumi; Iguchi, Kazuhiro; Usui, Shigeyuki; Hirano, Kazuyuki

    2006-05-01

    The biguanides metformin and buformin, which are clinically used for diabetes mellitus, are known to improve resistance to insulin in patients. Biguanides were reported to cause lactic acidosis as a side effect. Since the mechanism of the side effect still remains obscure, we have examined genes whose expression changes by treating HepG2 cells with buformin in order to elucidate the mechanisms of the side effect. A subtraction cDNA library was constructed by the method of suppressive subtractive hybridization and the screening of the library was performed with cDNA probes prepared from HepG2 cells treated with or without buformin for 12 h. The expression of the gene and the protein obtained by the screening was monitored by real-time RT-PCR with specific primers and Western blotting with specific antibody. The amounts of ATP and NAD+ were determined with luciferase and alcohol dehydrogenase, respectively. We found that expression of the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPD) gene was suppressed by treating HepG2 cells with 0.25 mM buformin for 12 h as a result of the library screening. The decrease in the expression depended on the treatment period. The amount of GAPD protein also decreased simultaneously with the suppression of the gene expression by the treatment with buformin. The amount of ATP and NAD+ in the HepG2 cells treated with buformin decreased to 10 and 20% of the control, respectively. These observations imply that the biguanide causes deactivation of the glycolytic pathway and subsequently the accumulation of pyruvate and NADH and a decrease in NAD+. Therefore, the reaction equilibrium catalyzed by lactate dehydrogenase leans towards lactate production and this may result in lactic acidosis.

  12. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test... Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315 Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. (a) Identification. A galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system is a device intended to measure the activity...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test... Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315 Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. (a) Identification. A galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system is a device intended to measure the activity...

  14. Sphingosine-1-phosphate stimulates rat primary chondrocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Lee, Ha Young; Kwak, Jong-Young; Park, Joo-In; Yun, Jeanho; Bae, Yoe-Sik . E-mail: yoesik@donga.ac.kr

    2006-06-23

    Rat primary chondrocytes express the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor, S1P{sub 2}, S1P{sub 3}, S1P{sub 4}, but not S1P{sub 1}. When chondrocytes were stimulated with S1P or phytosphingosine-1-phosphate (PhS1P, an S1P{sub 1}- and S1P{sub 4}-selective agonist), phospholipase C-mediated cytosolic calcium increase was dramatically induced. S1P and PhS1P also stimulated two kinds of mitogen-activated protein kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 kinase in chondrocytes. In terms of the two phospholipids-mediated functional modulation of chondrocytes, S1P and PhS1P stimulated cellular proliferation. The two phospholipids-induced chondrocyte proliferations were almost completely blocked by PD98059 but not by SB203580, suggesting that ERK but not p38 kinase is essentially required for the proliferation. Pertussis toxin almost completely inhibited the two phospholipids-induced cellular proliferation and ERK activation, indicating the crucial role of G{sub i} protein. This study demonstrates the physiological role of two important phospholipids (S1P and PhS1P) on the modulation of rat primary chondrocyte proliferation, and the crucial role played by ERK in the process.

  15. Facile enzymatic synthesis of sugar 1-phosphates as substrates for phosphorylases using anomeric kinases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Nishimoto, Mamoru; Kitaoka, Motomitsu

    2015-01-12

    Three sugar 1-phosphates that are donor substrates for phosphorylases were produced at the gram scale from phosphoenolpyruvic acid and the corresponding sugars by the combined action of pyruvate kinase and the corresponding anomeric kinases in good yields. These sugar 1-phosphates were purified through two electrodialysis steps. α-D-Galactose 1-phosphate was finally isolated as crystals of dipotassium salts. α-D-Mannose 1-phosphate and 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-α-D-glucose 1-phosphate were isolated as crystals of bis(cyclohexylammonium) salts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The complex of Sphingomonas elodea ATCC 31461 glucose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase with glucose-1-phosphate reveals a novel quaternary structure, unique among nucleoside diphosphate-sugar pyrophosphorylase members.

    PubMed

    Aragão, David; Fialho, Arsénio M; Marques, Ana R; Mitchell, Edward P; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Frazão, Carlos

    2007-06-01

    Gellan gum is a widely used commercial material, available in many different forms. Its economic importance has led to studies into the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharide gellan gum, which is industrially prepared in high yields using Sphingomonas elodea ATCC 31461. Glucose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase mediates the reversible conversion of glucose-1-phosphate and UTP into UDP-glucose and pyrophosphate, which is a key step in the biosynthetic pathway of gellan gums. Here we present the X-ray crystal structure of the glucose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase from S. elodea. The S. elodea enzyme shares strong monomeric similarity with glucose-1-phosphate thymidylyltransferase, several structures of which are known, although the quaternary structures of the active enzymes are rather different. A detailed comparison between S. elodea glucose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase and available thymidylyltransferases is described and shows remarkable structural similarities, despite the low sequence identities between the two divergent groups of proteins.

  17. Ceramide-1-Phosphate in Phagocytosis and Calcium Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Hinkovska-Galcheva, Vania; Shayman, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Sphingolipids are well established sources of important signaling molecules. For example, ceramide (Cer) has been described as a potent inhibitor of cell growth and inducer of apoptosis. In contrast, ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) has been reported to have mitogenic properties and to inhibit apoptosis. Our understanding of the distinct biological roles of C1P in the regulation of DNA synthesis, inflammation, membrane fusion, and intracellular Ca2+ increase has rapidly expanded. C1P is a bioactive sphingolipid formed by the phosphorylation of ceramide catalyzed by ceramide kinase (CERK). This chapter specifically focuses on the role of C1P in phagocytosis and Ca2+ homeostasis. Studies of the metabolism of C1P during phagocytosis, may lead to a better understanding of its role in signaling. Potentially, the inhibition of CERK and C1P formation may be a therapeutic target for inflammation. PMID:20919651

  18. Modulators of the Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Mariangela; Guerrero, Miguel; Rosen, Hugh; Roberts, Edward

    2013-12-01

    The Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor (S1P-R) signaling system has proven to be of biological and medical importance in autoimmune settings. S1P1-R is a validated drug target for multiple sclerosis (MS) for which FTY720 (Fingolimod), a S1P1,3-5-R pan-agonist, was recently approved as the first orally active drug for the treatment of relapsing-remitting MS. Transient bradycardia and long half-life are the FTY720 critical pitfalls. This review provides the latest advances on next-generation S1P1-R modulators from 2012 up to date, with an overview of the chemical structures, structure-activity relationships, and relevant biological and clinical properties.

  19. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Li, Yuan; Johansson-Lindbom, Bengt; Coskun, Mehmet

    2017-04-01

    An unmet medical need exists for the development of targeted therapies for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with easily administered and stable oral drugs, particularly as most patients on biologics [i.e., tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors and anti-integrins] are either primary non-responders or lose responsiveness during maintenance treatment. A new class of small molecules, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor modulators, has recently shown efficacy in IBD. Here we provide an overview of the mechanism of action of this novel treatment principle in the context of intestinal inflammation. The remarkable impact of therapeutic modulation of the S1P/S1P receptor axis reflects the complexity of the pathogenesis of IBD and the fact that S1P receptor modulation may be a logical therapeutic approach for the future management of IBD.

  20. Determination of strain-specific wall teichoic acid structures in Lactobacillus plantarum reveals diverse α-D-glucosyl substitutions and high structural uniformity of the repeating units.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Satoru; Furihata, Kazuo; Tanaka, Naoto; Satoh, Eiichi; Nukada, Tomoo; Okada, Sanae

    2012-11-01

    The structural diversity of wall teichoic acid (WTA) was investigated using biochemical and NMR analyses among 19 strains of Lactobacillus plantarum, of which seven were previously established to contain a glycerol-type backbone, whereas the remaining 12 strains possess ribitol-containing WTA. Despite the fact that the WTAs consisted of identical components, namely phosphoric acid, alditol (glycerol or ribitol) and glucose, comparative analysis of the (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra indicated the presence of six different structures, based on the observed differences in the anomeric signals of glucose residues. To determine the six WTA structures, their repeating units were prepared by alkaline hydrolysis, followed by fractionation on HPLC, and analysis by NMR spectroscopy using synthetic molecules as a reference. The structures of the six isolates were established as 1-α-D-glucosyl-sn-glycerol 3-phosphate, 1-α-D-kojibiosyl-sn-glycerol 3-phosphate, 1-α-D-nigerosyl-sn-glycerol 3-phosphate, 4-α-D-kojibiosylribitol 1-phosphate and 1,5-linked di-(2,4-di-α-D-glucosylribitol) phosphate. The backbone structures appeared to be 3,6'-linked poly(1-α-D-glucosyl-sn-glycerol phosphate) for the glycerol-type WTA and 1,5-linked poly(ribitol phosphate) for the ribitol-containing WTA. Moreover, in the analysis of the alkaline hydrolysates on HPLC, only single structures of repeating units were released from each WTA, indicating the high structural uniformity of the WTA in each strain. Notably, analyses of lipoteichoic acid isolated from representative strains harbouring the six different WTAs revealed the universal presence of a 1,3-linked poly(glycerol phosphate) chain, substituted at C-2 of the glycerol residues with glucose residues. These findings provide fundamental information on WTA structural variability in Lb. plantarum, which seems likely to play a pivotal role in the physiology of this bacterial species.

  1. The role of sphingosine-1-phosphate in the tumor microenvironment and its clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Masato; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Rashid, Omar M; Takabe, Kazuaki; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2017-04-01

    Elucidating the interaction between cancer and non-cancer cells, such as blood vessels, immune cells, and other stromal cells, in the tumor microenvironment is imperative in understanding the mechanisms underlying cancer progression and metastasis, which is expected to lead to the development of new therapeutics. Sphingosine-1-phosphate is a bioactive lipid mediator that promotes cell survival, proliferation, migration, angiogenesis/lymphangiogenesis, and immune responsiveness, which are all factors involved in cancer progression. Sphingosine-1-phosphate is generated inside cancer cells by sphingosine kinases and then exported into the tumor microenvironment. Although sphingosine-1-phosphate is anticipated to play an important role in the tumor microenvironment and cancer progression, determining sphingosine-1-phosphate levels in the tumor microenvironment has been difficult due to a lack of established methods. We have recently developed a method to measure sphingosine-1-phosphate levels in the interstitial fluid that bathes cancer cells in the tumor microenvironment, and reported that high levels of sphingosine-1-phosphate exist in the tumor interstitial fluid. Importantly, sphingosine-1-phosphate can be secreted from cancer cells and non-cancer components such as immune cells and vascular/lymphatic endothelial cells in the tumor microenvironment. Furthermore, sphingosine-1-phosphate affects both cancer and non-cancer cells in the tumor microenvironment promoting cancer progression. Here, we review the roles of sphingosine-1-phosphate in the interaction between cancer and non-cancer cells in tumor microenvironment, and discuss future possibilities for targeted therapies against sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling for cancer patients.

  2. Biosynthesis of Ether-Type Polar Lipids in Archaea and Evolutionary Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Yosuke; Morii, Hiroyuki

    2007-01-01

    This review deals with the in vitro biosynthesis of the characteristics of polar lipids in archaea along with preceding in vivo studies. Isoprenoid chains are synthesized through the classical mevalonate pathway, as in eucarya, with minor modifications in some archaeal species. Most enzymes involved in the pathway have been identified enzymatically and/or genomically. Three of the relevant enzymes are found in enzyme families different from the known enzymes. The order of reactions in the phospholipid synthesis pathway (glycerophosphate backbone formation, linking of glycerophosphate with two radyl chains, activation by CDP, and attachment of common polar head groups) is analogous to that of bacteria. sn-Glycerol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase is responsible for the formation of the sn-glycerol-1-phosphate backbone of phospholipids in all archaea. After the formation of two ether bonds, CDP-archaeol acts as a common precursor of various archaeal phospholipid syntheses. Various phospholipid-synthesizing enzymes from archaea and bacteria belong to the same large CDP-alcohol phosphatidyltransferase family. In short, the first halves of the phospholipid synthesis pathways play a role in synthesis of the characteristic structures of archaeal and bacterial phospholipids, respectively. In the second halves of the pathways, the polar head group-attaching reactions and enzymes are homologous in both domains. These are regarded as revealing the hybrid nature of phospholipid biosynthesis. Precells proposed by Wächtershäuser are differentiated into archaea and bacteria by spontaneous segregation of enantiomeric phospholipid membranes (with sn-glycerol-1-phosphate and sn-glycerol-3-phosphate backbones) and the fusion and fission of precells. Considering the nature of the phospholipid synthesis pathways, we here propose that common phospholipid polar head groups were present in precells before the differentiation into archaea and bacteria. PMID:17347520

  3. Uptake of glycerol 3-phosphate and some of its analogs by the hexose phosphate transport system of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Guth, A; Engel, R; Tropp, B E

    1980-01-01

    The hexose phosphate transport system transported glycerol 3-phosphate and its analogs 3,4-dihydroxybutyl-1-phosphonate, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, and 3-hydroxy-4-oxobutyl-1-phosphonate. PMID:6995450

  4. 40 CFR 174.523 - CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase in all plants; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate... CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of the CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase enzyme...

  5. 40 CFR 174.523 - CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase in all plants; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate... CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of the CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase enzyme...

  6. 40 CFR 174.523 - CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase in all plants; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate... CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of the CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase enzyme...

  7. 40 CFR 174.523 - CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase in all plants; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate... CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of the CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase enzyme...

  8. 40 CFR 174.523 - CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase in all plants; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate... CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of the CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase enzyme...

  9. Phosphatidic acid inhibits ceramide 1-phosphate-stimulated macrophage migration.

    PubMed

    Ouro, Alberto; Arana, Lide; Rivera, Io-Guané; Ordoñez, Marta; Gomez-Larrauri, Ana; Presa, Natalia; Simón, Jorge; Trueba, Miguel; Gangoiti, Patricia; Bittman, Robert; Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio

    2014-12-15

    Ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) was recently demonstrated to potently induce cell migration. This action could only be observed when C1P was applied exogenously to cells in culture, and was inhibited by pertussis toxin. However, the mechanisms involved in this process are poorly understood. In this work, we found that phosphatidic acid (PA), which is structurally related to C1P, displaced radiolabeled C1P from its membrane-binding site and inhibited C1P-stimulated macrophage migration. This effect was independent of the saturated fatty acid chain length or the presence of a double bond in each of the fatty acyl chains of PA. Treatment of RAW264.7 macrophages with exogenous phospholipase D (PLD), an enzyme that produces PA from membrane phospholipids, also inhibited C1P-stimulated cell migration. Likewise, PA or exogenous PLD inhibited C1P-stimulated extracellularly regulated kinases (ERK) 1 and 2 phosphorylation, leading to inhibition of cell migration. However, PA did not inhibit C1P-stimulated Akt phosphorylation. It is concluded that PA is a physiological regulator of C1P-stimulated macrophage migration. These actions of PA may have important implications in the control of pathophysiological functions that are regulated by C1P, including inflammation and various cellular processes associated with cell migration such as organogenesis or tumor metastasis.

  10. Cytoplasmic sphingosine-1-phosphate pathway modulates neuronal autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Moruno Manchon, Jose Felix; Uzor, Ndidi-Ese; Dabaghian, Yuri; Furr-Stimming, Erin E.; Finkbeiner, Steven; Tsvetkov, Andrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an important homeostatic mechanism that eliminates long-lived proteins, protein aggregates and damaged organelles. Its dysregulation is involved in many neurodegenerative disorders. Autophagy is therefore a promising target for blunting neurodegeneration. We searched for novel autophagic pathways in primary neurons and identified the cytosolic sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) pathway as a regulator of neuronal autophagy. S1P, a bioactive lipid generated by sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) in the cytoplasm, is implicated in cell survival. We found that SK1 enhances flux through autophagy and that S1P-metabolizing enzymes decrease this flux. When autophagy is stimulated, SK1 relocalizes to endosomes/autophagosomes in neurons. Expression of a dominant-negative form of SK1 inhibits autophagosome synthesis. In a neuron model of Huntington’s disease, pharmacologically inhibiting S1P-lyase protected neurons from mutant huntingtin-induced neurotoxicity. These results identify the S1P pathway as a novel regulator of neuronal autophagy and provide a new target for developing therapies for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26477494

  11. SPHINGOSINE-1-PHOSPHATE RECEPTORS MEDIATE NEUROMODULATORY FUNCTIONS IN THE CNS

    PubMed Central

    Sim-Selley, Laura J.; Goforth, Paulette B.; Mba, Mba U.; Macdonald, Timothy L.; Lynch, Kevin R.; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah; Satin, Leslie S.; Welch, Sandra P.; Selley, Dana E.

    2009-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate is a ubiquitous, lipophilic cellular mediator that acts in part by activation of G-protein-coupled receptors. Modulation of S1P signaling is an emerging pharmacotherapeutic target for immunomodulatory drugs. Although multiple S1P receptor types exist in the CNS, little is known about their function. Here we report that S1P stimulated G- protein activity in the CNS, and results from [35S]GTPγS autoradiography using the S1P1-selective agonist SEW2871 and the S1P1/3-selective antagonist VPC44116 show that in several regions a majority of this activity is mediated by S1P1 receptors. S1P receptor activation inhibited glutamatergic neurotransmission as determined by electrophysiological recordings in cortical neurons in vitro, and this effect was mimicked by SEW2871 and inhibited by VPC44116. Moreover, central administration of S1P produced in vivo effects resembling the actions of cannabinoids, including thermal antinociception, hypothermia, catalepsy and hypolocomotion, but these actions were independent of CB1 receptors. At least one of the central effects of S1P, thermal antinociception, is also at least partly S1P1 receptor mediated because it was produced by SEW2871 and attenuated by VPC44116. These results indicate that CNS S1P receptors are part of a physiologically relevant and widespread neuromodulatory system, and that the S1P1 receptor contributes to S1P-mediated antinociception. PMID:19493165

  12. Vascular and Immunobiology of the Circulatory Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Yanagida, Keisuke; Hla, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Vertebrates are endowed with a closed circulatory system, the evolution of which required novel structural and regulatory changes. Furthermore, immune cell trafficking paradigms adapted to the barriers imposed by the closed circulatory system. How did such changes occur mechanistically? We propose that spatial compartmentalization of the lipid mediator sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) may be one such mechanism. In vertebrates, S1P is spatially compartmentalized in the blood and lymphatic circulation, thus comprising a sharp S1P gradient across the endothelial barrier. Circulatory S1P has critical roles in maturation and homeostasis of the vascular system as well as in immune cell trafficking. Physiological functions of S1P are tightly linked to shear stress, the key biophysical stimulus from blood flow. Thus, circulatory S1P confinement could be a primordial strategy of vertebrates in the development of a closed circulatory system. This review discusses the cellular and molecular basis of the S1P gradients and aims to interpret its physiological significance as a key feature of the closed circulatory system. PMID:27813829

  13. Endogenous galactose formation in galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Schadewaldt, Peter; Kamalanathan, Loganathan; Hammen, Hans-Werner; Kotzka, Jorg; Wendel, Udo

    2014-12-01

    Patients with classical galactosaemia (galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) deficiency) manifest clinical complications despite strict dietary galactose restriction. Therefore the significance of endogenous galactose production has been assessed. Previous in vivo studies primarily focused on patients homozygous for the most common genetic variant Q188R but little is known about other genetic variants. In the present study the endogenous galactose release in a group of non-Q188R homozygous galactosaemic patients (n = 17; 4-34 years) exhibiting comparably low residual GALT activity in red blood cells was investigated. Primed continuous infusion studies with D-[1-(13)C]galactose as substrate were conducted under post-absorptive conditions and in good metabolic control. The results demonstrate that all patients exhibiting residual GALT activity of <1.5% of control showed a comparable pathological pattern of increased endogenous galactose release irrespective of the underlying genetic variations. Possible implications of the findings towards a more differentiated dietary regimen in galactosaemia are discussed.

  14. Implication of sphingosin-1-phosphate in cardiovascular regulation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ningjun; Zhang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid metabolite generated by phosphorylation of sphingosine catalyzed by sphingosine kinase. S1P acts mainly through its high affinity G-protein-coupled receptors and participates in the regulation of multiple systems, including cardiovascular system. It has been shown that S1P signaling is involved in the regulation of cardiac chronotropy and inotropy and contributes to cardioprotection as well as cardiac remodeling; S1P signaling regulates vascular function, such as vascular tone and endothelial barrier, and possesses an anti-atherosclerotic effect; S1P signaling is also implicated in the regulation of blood pressure. Therefore, manipulation of S1P signaling may offer novel therapeutic approaches to cardiovascular diseases. As several S1P receptor modulators and sphingosine kinase inhibitors have been approved or under clinical trials for the treatment of other diseases, it may expedite the test and implementation of these S1P-based drugs in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27100508

  15. Ceramide and ceramide 1-phosphate in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Sphingolipids are essential components of cell membranes, and many of them regulate vital cell functions. In particular, ceramide plays crucial roles in cell signaling processes. Two major actions of ceramides are the promotion of cell cycle arrest and the induction of apoptosis. Phosphorylation of ceramide produces ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P), which has opposite effects to ceramide. C1P is mitogenic and has prosurvival properties. In addition, C1P is an important mediator of inflammatory responses, an action that takes place through stimulation of cytosolic phospholipase A2, and the subsequent release of arachidonic acid and prostaglandin formation. All of the former actions are thought to be mediated by intracellularly generated C1P. However, the recent observation that C1P stimulates macrophage chemotaxis implicates specific plasma membrane receptors that are coupled to Gi proteins. Hence, it can be concluded that C1P has dual actions in cells, as it can act as an intracellular second messenger to promote cell survival, or as an extracellular receptor agonist to stimulate cell migration. PMID:20137073

  16. Ceramide 1-phosphate stimulates glucose uptake in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ouro, Alberto; Arana, Lide; Gangoiti, Patricia; Rivera, Io-Guané; Ordoñez, Marta; Trueba, Miguel; Lankalapalli, Ravi S.; Bittman, Robert; Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) is mitogenic and antiapoptotic, and that it is implicated in the regulation of macrophage migration. These activities require high energy levels to be available in cells. Macrophages obtain most of their energy from glucose. In this work, we demonstrate that C1P enhances glucose uptake in RAW264.7 macrophages. The major glucose transporter involved in this action was found to be GLUT 3, as determined by measuring its translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. C1P-stimulated glucose uptake was blocked by selective inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) or Akt, also known as protein kinase B (PKB), and by specific siRNAs to silence the genes encoding for these kinases. C1P-stimulated glucose uptake was also inhibited by pertussis toxin (PTX) and by the siRNA that inhibited GLUT 3 expression. C1P increased the affinity of the glucose transporter for its substrate, and enhanced glucose metabolism to produce ATP. The latter action was also inhibited by PI3K- and Akt-selective inhibitors, PTX, or by specific siRNAs to inhibit GLUT 3 expression. PMID:23333242

  17. The role of sphingosine 1-phosphate in immunity and sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Gräler, Markus H

    2012-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a lipid metabolite with intra- and extracellular signalling properties. It activates five G protein-coupled cell surface receptors designated S1P-receptors type 1-5 (S1P1-5) that transmit extracellular signals into cells, and it modulates intracellular signalling as a cofactor. The analysis of sphingosine kinases (SphK) type 1 and 2, the key enzymes for S1P production, in different infection models point to an important role for the activation of different immune cells like macrophages, mast cells, and dendritic cells. S1P additionally influences local and systemic lymphocyte circulation and positioning, the vascular tone, and blood pressure. Modulation of S1P-mediated signalling pathways therefore results either in local immune cell activation or systemic immune suppression, or both. Pharmacological approaches that modulate certain S1P-mediated signalling pathways while leaving others untouched appear to be promising new avenues for next generation pharmaceuticals. This review summarizes current strategies to modulate S1P signalling for immune intervention with the clear focus on the specificity of the different principles applied. Known local and systemic effects of S1P on immunity are discussed as potential pharmaceutical targets to combat immune and autoimmune diseases and sepsis. PMID:23885318

  18. Sphingosine kinase and sphingosine-1-phosphate in liver pathobiology.

    PubMed

    Rohrbach, Timothy; Maceyka, Michael; Spiegel, Sarah

    2017-10-01

    Over 20 years ago, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) was discovered to be a bioactive signaling molecule. Subsequent studies later identified two related kinases, sphingosine kinase 1 and 2, which are responsible for the phosphorylation of sphingosine to S1P. Many stimuli increase sphingosine kinase activity and S1P production and secretion. Outside the cell, S1P can bind to and activate five S1P-specific G protein-coupled receptors (S1PR1-5) to regulate many important cellular and physiological processes in an autocrine or paracrine manner. S1P is found in high concentrations in the blood where it functions to control vascular integrity and trafficking of lymphocytes. Obesity increases blood S1P levels in humans and mice. With the world wide increase in obesity linked to consumption of high-fat, high-sugar diets, S1P is emerging as an accomplice in liver pathobiology, including acute liver failure, metabolic syndrome, control of blood lipid and glucose homeostasis, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and liver fibrosis. Here, we review recent research on the importance of sphingosine kinases, S1P, and S1PRs in liver pathobiology, with a focus on exciting insights for new therapeutic modalities that target S1P signaling axes for a variety of liver diseases.

  19. Pharmacology of the sphingosine-1-phosphate signalling system.

    PubMed

    Zu Heringdorf, Dagmar Meyer; Ihlefeld, Katja; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2013-01-01

    The recent success of FTY720 (Fingolimod, Gilenya(®)), which has been approved for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and is the first-in-class sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor modulating drug, has boosted the interest in further drug development in this area. Several selective S1P1 receptor-modulating drugs are being investigated in clinical trials for the treatment of diverse autoimmune disorders. Sphingosine kinase inhibitors are under development for the treatment of cancer, aberrant angiogenesis and inflammatory diseases; an inhibitor of SK2 with relatively low affinity is being analysed in patients with advanced solid tumours. While an indirect S1P lyase inhibitor has just failed the proof of concept in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, S1P lyase is still a promising target for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Another approach is the development of S1P-scavenging or -clearing agents, including a monoclonal S1P antibody that has successfully passed phase I clinical trials and will be further developed for age-related macular degeneration.

  20. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate: A Novel Target for Lung Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Sabira; Harikumar, K. B.

    2017-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is involved in a wide range of cellular processes, which include proliferation, apoptosis, lymphocyte egress, endothelial barrier function, angiogenesis, and inflammation. S1P is produced by two isoenzymes, namely, sphingosine kinase 1 and 2 (SphK1 and 2) and once produced, S1P can act both in an autocrine and paracrine manner. S1P can be dephosphorylated back to sphingosine by two phosphatases (SGPP 1 and 2) or can be irreversibly cleaved by S1P lyase. S1P has a diverse range of functions, which is mediated in a receptor dependent, through G-protein coupled receptors (S1PR1–5) or receptor independent manner, through intracellular targets such as HDACs and TRAF2. The involvement of S1P signaling has been confirmed in various disease conditions including lung diseases. The SphK inhibitors and S1PR modulators are currently under clinical trials for different pathophysiological conditions. There is a significant effort in targeting various components of S1P signaling for several diseases. This review focuses on the ways in which S1P signaling can be therapeutically targeted in lung disorders. PMID:28352271

  1. Resveratrol Stimulates Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling of Cathelicidin Production

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyungho; Elias, Peter M.; Hupe, Melanie; Borkowski, Andrew W.; Gallo, Richard L.; Shin, Kyong-Oh; Lee, Yong-Moon; Holleran, Walter M.; Uchida, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    We recently discovered a regulatory mechanism that stimulates production of the multifunctional antimicrobial peptide, cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP). In response to subtoxic levels of ER stress, increased sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) production activates an NFκB→C/EBPα dependent pathway that enhances CAMP production in cultured human keratinocytes. Since the multifunctional stilbenoid compound, resveratrol (RESV), increases ceramide (Cer) levels, a precursor of S1P, we hypothesized and assessed whether RESV could exploit the same pathway to regulate CAMP production. Accordingly, RESV significantly increased Cer and S1P levels in cultured keratinocytes, paralleled by increased CAMP mRNA/protein expression. Furthermore, topical RESV also increased murine CAMP mRNA/protein expression in mouse skin. Conversely, blockade of Cer→sphingosine→S1P metabolic conversion, with specific inhibitors of ceramidase or sphingosine kinase, attenuated the expected RESV-mediated increase in CAMP expression. The RESV-induced increase in CAMP expression required both NF-κB and C/EBPα transactivation. Moreover, conditioned media from keratinocyte treated with RESV significantly suppressed Staphylococcus aureus growth. Finally, topical RESV, if not coapplied with a specific inhibitor of sphingosine kinase, blocked Staphylococcus aureus invasion into murine skin. These results demonstrate that the dietary stilbenoid, RESV, stimulates S1P signaling of CAMP production through an NF-κB→C/EBPα-dependent mechanism, leading to enhanced antimicrobial defense against exogenous microbial pathogens. PMID:23856934

  2. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors modulate intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Rapizzi, Elena; Donati, Chiara; Cencetti, Francesca; Pinton, Paolo; Rizzuto, Rosario; Bruni, Paola

    2007-02-09

    Ligation of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) to a set of specific receptors named S1P receptors (S1PRs) regulates important biological processes. Although the ability of S1P to increase cytosolic Ca2+ in various cell types is well known, the role of the individual S1PRs has not been fully characterized. Here, we provide a complete analysis of S1P-dependent intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis in HeLa cells. Overexpression of S1P2, or S1P3, but not S1P1, leads to a significant increase in cytosolic and mitochondrial [Ca2+] in response to S1P challenge. Moreover, cells ectopically expressing S1P2, or S1P3 exhibited an appreciable decrease of the free Ca2+ concentration in the endoplasmic reticulum, dependent on stimulation of receptors by S1P endogenously present in the culture medium which was accompanied by a reduced susceptibility to C2-ceramide-induced cell death. These results demonstrate a differential contribution of individual S1PRs to Ca2+ homeostasis and its possible implication in the regulation of cell survival.

  3. Divergent role of sphingosine 1-phosphate on insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Fayyaz, Susann; Japtok, Lukasz; Kleuser, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a complex metabolic disorder in which insulin-sensitive tissues fail to respond to the physiological action of insulin. There is a strong correlation of insulin resistance and the development of type 2 diabetes both reaching epidemic proportions. Dysfunctional lipid metabolism is a hallmark of insulin resistance and a risk factor for several cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. Numerous studies in humans and rodents have shown that insulin resistance is associated with elevations of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) in the plasma. Moreover, bioactive lipid intermediates such as diacylglycerol (DAG) and ceramides appear to accumulate in response to NEFA, which may interact with insulin signaling. However, recent work has also indicated that sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a breakdown product of ceramide, modulate insulin signaling in different cell types. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge about S1P and insulin signaling in insulin sensitive cells. A specific focus is put on the action of S1P on hepatocytes, pancreatic β-cells and skeletal muscle cells. In particular, modulation of S1P-signaling can be considered as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

  4. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor Modulators and Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soo-Jin; Im, Dong-Soon

    2017-01-01

    Initial discovery on sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) as an intracellular second messenger was faced unexpectedly with roles of S1P as a first messenger, which subsequently resulted in cloning of its G protein-coupled receptors, S1P1–5. The molecular identification of S1P receptors opened up a new avenue for pathophysiological research on this lipid mediator. Cellular and molecular in vitro studies and in vivo studies on gene deficient mice have elucidated cellular signaling pathways and the pathophysiological meanings of S1P receptors. Another unexpected finding that fingolimod (FTY720) modulates S1P receptors accelerated drug discovery in this field. Fingolimod was approved as a first-in-class, orally active drug for relapsing multiple sclerosis in 2010, and its applications in other disease conditions are currently under clinical trials. In addition, more selective S1P receptor modulators with better pharmacokinetic profiles and fewer side effects are under development. Some of them are being clinically tested in the contexts of multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune and inflammatory disorders, such as, psoriasis, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, polymyositis, dermatomyositis, liver failure, renal failure, acute stroke, and transplant rejection. In this review, the authors discuss the state of the art regarding the status of drug discovery efforts targeting S1P receptors and place emphasis on potential clinical applications. PMID:28035084

  5. Vascular and Immunobiology of the Circulatory Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Gradient.

    PubMed

    Yanagida, Keisuke; Hla, Timothy

    2017-02-10

    Vertebrates are endowed with a closed circulatory system, the evolution of which required novel structural and regulatory changes. Furthermore, immune cell trafficking paradigms adapted to the barriers imposed by the closed circulatory system. How did such changes occur mechanistically? We propose that spatial compartmentalization of the lipid mediator sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) may be one such mechanism. In vertebrates, S1P is spatially compartmentalized in the blood and lymphatic circulation, thus comprising a sharp S1P gradient across the endothelial barrier. Circulatory S1P has critical roles in maturation and homeostasis of the vascular system as well as in immune cell trafficking. Physiological functions of S1P are tightly linked to shear stress, the key biophysical stimulus from blood flow. Thus, circulatory S1P confinement could be a primordial strategy of vertebrates in the development of a closed circulatory system. This review discusses the cellular and molecular basis of the S1P gradients and aims to interpret its physiological significance as a key feature of the closed circulatory system.

  6. Enhancement of Neoangiogenesis and Follicle Survival by Sphingosine-1-Phosphate in Human Ovarian Tissue Xenotransplants

    PubMed Central

    Oktay, Kutluk

    2011-01-01

    Ovarian transplantation is one of the key approaches to restoring fertility in women who became menopausal as a result of cancer treatments. A major limitation of human ovarian transplants is massive follicular loss during revascularization. Here we investigated whether sphingosine-1-phosphate or its receptor agonists could enhance neoangiogenesis and follicle survival in ovarian transplants in a xenograft model. Human ovarian tissue xenografts in severe-combined-immunodeficient mice were treated with sphingosine-1-phosphate, its analogs, or vehicle for 1–10 days. We found that sphingosine-1-phosphate treatment increased vascular density in ovarian transplants significantly whereas FTY720 and SEW2871 had the opposite effect. In addition, sphingosine-1-phosphate accelerated the angiogenic process compared to vehicle-treated controls. Furthermore, sphingosine-1-phosphate treatment was associated with a significant proliferation of ovarian stromal cell as well as reduced necrosis and tissue hypoxia compared to the vehicle-treated controls. This resulted in a significantly lower percentage of apoptotic follicles in sphingosine-1-phosphate-treated transplants. We conclude that while sphingosine-1-phosphate promotes neoangiogenesis in ovarian transplants and reduces ischemic reperfusion injury, sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor agonists appear to functionally antagonize this process. Sphingosine-1-phosphate holds great promise to clinically enhance the survival and longevity of human autologous ovarian transplants. PMID:21559342

  7. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315 Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. (a) Identification...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315 Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. (a) Identification...

  9. SPHINGOSINE KINASE TYPE 2 INHIBITION ELEVATES CIRCULATING SPHINGOSINE 1-PHOSPHATE

    PubMed Central

    Kharel, Yugesh; Raje, Mithun; Gao, Ming; Gellett, Amanda M.; Tomsig, Jose L.; Lynch, Kevin R.; Santos, Webster L.

    2012-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a pleiotropic lipid mediator involved in numerous cellular and physiological functions. Notable among these are cell survival and migration as well as lymphocyte trafficking. S1P, which exerts its effects via five G protein coupled receptors (S1P1-5), is formed by the action of two sphingosine kinases (SphKs). While SphK1 is the more intensively studied isotype, SphK2 is unique in it nuclear localization and has been reported to oppose some of the actions ascribed to SphK1. While several scaffolds of SphK1 inhibitors have been described, there is a scarcity of selective SphK2 inhibitors that are necessary to evaluate the downstream effects of inhibition of this isotype. Herein we report a cationic amphiphilic small molecule that is a selective SphK2 inhibitor. In the course of characterizing this compound in wild type and SphK null mice we discovered that administration of the inhibitor to wild type mice resulted in a rapid increase in blood S1P, which is in contrast to our SphK1 inhibitor that drives circulating S1P levels down. Using a cohort of F2 hybrid mice, we confirmed, compared to wild type mice, that circulating S1P levels were higher in SphK2 null mice and lower in SphK1 null mice. Thus both SphK1 and SphK2 inhibitors recapitulate the blood S1P levels observed in the corresponding null mice. Moreover, circulating S1P levels mirror SphK2 inhibitor levels providing a convenient biomarker of target engagement. PMID:22747486

  10. Cardiovascular effects of sphingosine-1-phosphate and other sphingomyelin metabolites.

    PubMed

    Alewijnse, Astrid E; Peters, Stephan L M; Michel, Martin C

    2004-11-01

    Upon various stimuli, cells metabolize sphingomyelin from the cellular plasma membrane to form sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) or ceramide. The latter can be further metabolized to sphingosine and then sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). Apart from local formation, S1P and SPC are major constituents of blood plasma. All four sphingomyelin metabolites (SMM) can act upon intracellular targets, and at least S1P and probably also SPC can additionally act upon G-protein-coupled receptors. While the molecular identity of the SPC receptors remains unclear, several subtypes of S1P receptors have been cloned and their distribution in cardiovascular tissues is described. In the heart SMM can alter intracellular Ca(2+) release, particularly via the ryanodine receptor, and conductance of various ion channels in the plasma membrane, particularly I(K(Ach)). While the various SMM differ somewhat in their effects, the above alterations of ion homeostasis result in reduced cardiac function in most cases, and ceramide and/or sphingosine may be the mediators of the negative inotropic effects of tumour necrosis factor. In the vasculature, SMM mainly act as acute vasoconstrictors in most vessels, but ceramide can be a vasodilator. SMM-induced vasoconstriction involves mobilization of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores, influx of extracellular Ca(2+) via L-type channels and activation of a rho-kinase. Extended exposure to SMM, particularly S1P, promotes several stages of the angiogenic process like endothelial cell activation, migration, proliferation, tube formation and vascular maturation. We propose that SMM are an important class of endogenous modulators of cardiovascular function. British Journal of Pharmacology (2004).

  11. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 3 mediates sphingosine-1-phosphate induced release of weibel-palade bodies from endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    van Hooren, Kathinka W E M; Spijkers, Léon J A; van Breevoort, Dorothee; Fernandez-Borja, Mar; Bierings, Ruben; van Buul, Jaap D; Alewijnse, Astrid E; Peters, Stephan L M; Voorberg, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is an agonist for five distinct G-protein coupled receptors, that is released by platelets, mast cells, erythrocytes and endothelial cells. S1P promotes endothelial cell barrier function and induces release of endothelial cell-specific storage-organelles designated Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs). S1P-mediated enhancement of endothelial cell barrier function is dependent on S1P receptor 1 (S1PR1) mediated signaling events that result in the activation of the small GTPase Rac1. Recently, we have reported that Rac1 regulates epinephrine-induced WPB exocytosis following its activation by phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate-dependent Rac exchange factor 1 (PREX1). S1P has also been described to induce WPB exocytosis. Here, we confirm that S1P induces release of WPBs using von Willebrand factor (VWF) as a marker. Using siRNA mediated knockdown of gene expression we show that S1PR1 is not involved in S1P-mediated release of WPBs. In contrast depletion of the S1PR3 greatly reduced S1P-induced release of VWF. S1P-mediated enhancement of endothelial barrier function was not affected by S1PR3-depletion whereas it was greatly impaired in cells lacking S1PR1. The Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632 completely abrogated S1P-mediated release of VWF. Also, the calcium chelator BAPTA-AM significantly reduced S1P-induced release of VWF. Our findings indicate that S1P-induced release of haemostatic, inflammatory and angiogenic components stored within WPBs depends on the S1PR3.

  12. Sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase enzyme assay using a BODIPY-labeled substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Bandhuvula, Padmavathi; Li Zaiguo; Bittman, Robert; Saba, Julie D.

    2009-03-06

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase (SPL) is responsible for the irreversible catabolism of sphingosine 1-phosphate, which signals through five membrane receptors to mediate cell stress responses, angiogenesis, and lymphocyte trafficking. The standard assay for SPL activity utilizes a radioactive dihydrosphingosine 1-phosphate substrate and is expensive and cumbersome. In this study, we describe an SPL assay that employs an {omega}-labeled BODIPY-sphingosine 1-phosphate substrate, allowing fluorescent product detection by HPLC and incorporating advantages of the BODIPY fluorophore. The major aldehyde product is confirmed by reaction with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. The SPL-catalyzed reaction is linear over a 30 min time period and yields a K{sub m} of 35 {mu}M for BODIPY-sphingosine 1-phosphate.

  13. Enzyme-enzyme interaction in the chloroplast: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, triose phosphate isomerase and aldolase.

    PubMed

    Anderson, L E; Goldhaber-Gordon, I M; Li, D; Tang, X Y; Xiang, M; Prakash, N

    1995-01-01

    Apparent physical interaction between pea chloroplast (Pisum sativum L.) glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.13) and aldolase (EC 4.1.2.13) is seen in phase-partitioning, fluorescent-anisotropy and isoelectric-focusing experiments. Similarly, results obtained in phase-partitioning and isoelectric-focusing experiments indicate physical interaction between aldolase and triose-phosphate isomerase (EC 5.3.1.1). Kinetic experiments suggest that both aldolase-bound glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate can act as substrate for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. These results are consistent with the notion that there is interaction between these three enzymes both during photosynthetic CO2 fixation and during glycolysis in the chloroplast.

  14. Mapping of a genetic locus that affects glycerol 3-phosphate transport in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, V

    1978-01-01

    Two types of fosfomycin-resistant mutants of Bacillus subtilis were isolated. Mutants of the first type (GlpT mutants) were resistant to at least 200 microgram of fosfomycin per ml and failed to take up exogenous glycerol 3-phosphate. Mutants of the second type were resistant to lower concentrations of fosfomycin and transported glycerol-3-phosphate as efficiently as wild-type bacteria. The glpT mutations, but not the mutations in the second type of fosfomycin-resistant mutants, map in the cysA-aroI region of the B. subtilis chromosome. PMID:415047

  15. Glycerol-3-phosphate is a critical mobile inducer of systemic immunity in plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) is an important metabolite that contributes to the growth and disease-related physiologies of prokaryotes, plants, animals and humans alike. Here we show that G3P serves as the inducer of an important form of broad-spectrum immunity in plants, termed systemic acquired resi...

  16. EXPRESSION OF THE SPERMATOGENIC CELL-SPECIFIC GLYCERALDEHYDE 3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE (GAPDS) IN RAT TESTIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The spermatogenic cell-specific variant of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDS) has been cloned from a rat testis cDNA library and its pattern of expression determined. A 1417 nucleotide cDNA has been found to encode an enzyme with substantial homology to mouse GAPDS...

  17. Chemical and enzymatic methodologies for the synthesis of enantiomerically pure glyceraldehyde 3-phosphates.

    PubMed

    Gauss, Dominik; Schoenenberger, Bernhard; Wohlgemuth, Roland

    2014-05-07

    Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphates are important intermediates of many central metabolic pathways in a large number of living organisms. d-Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (d-GAP) is a key intermediate during glycolysis and can as well be found in a variety of other metabolic pathways. The opposite enantiomer, l-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (l-GAP), has been found in a few exciting new pathways. Here, improved syntheses of enantiomerically pure glyceraldehyde 3-phosphates are reported. While d-GAP was synthesized by periodate cleavage of d-fructose 6-phosphate, l-GAP was obtained by enzymatic phosphorylation of l-glyceraldehyde. (1)H- and (31)P NMR spectroscopy was applied in order to examine pH-dependent behavior of GAP over time and to identify potential degradation products. It was found that GAP is stable in acidic aqueous solution below pH 4. At pH 7, methylglyoxal is formed, whereas under alkaline conditions, the formation of lactic acid could be observed.

  18. EXPRESSION OF THE SPERMATOGENIC CELL-SPECIFIC GLYCERALDEHYDE 3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE (GAPDS) IN RAT TESTIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The spermatogenic cell-specific variant of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDS) has been cloned from a rat testis cDNA library and its pattern of expression determined. A 1417 nucleotide cDNA has been found to encode an enzyme with substantial homology to mouse GAPDS...

  19. Phosphate closes the solution structure of the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Borges, Júlio C; Pereira, José H; Vasconcelos, Igor B; dos Santos, Giovanni C; Olivieri, Johnny R; Ramos, Carlos H I; Palma, Mário S; Basso, Luiz A; Santos, Diógenes S; de Azevedo, Walter F

    2006-08-15

    The 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase catalyses the sixth step of the shikimate pathway that is responsible for synthesizing aromatic compounds and is absent in mammals, which makes it a potential target for drugs development against microbial diseases. Here, we report the phosphate binding effects at the structure of the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This enzyme is formed by two similar domains that close on each other induced by ligand binding, showing the occurrence of a large conformation change. We have monitored the phosphate binding effects using analytical ultracentrifugation, small angle X-ray scattering and, circular dichroism techniques. The low resolution results showed that the enzyme in the presence of phosphate clearly presented a more compact structure. Thermal-induced unfolding experiments followed by circular dichroism suggested that phosphate rigidified the enzyme. Summarizing, these data suggested that the phosphate itself is able to induce conformational change resulting in the closure movement in the M. tuberculosis 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase.

  20. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary structure determination of glucose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (UgpG) from Sphingomonas elodea ATCC 31461 bound to glucose-1-phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Aragão, D.; Marques, A. R.; Frazão, C.; Enguita, F. J.; Carrondo, M. A.; Fialho, A. M.; Sá-Correia, I.; Mitchell, E. P.

    2006-01-01

    The cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of glucose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (UgpG) from Sphingomonas elodea ATCC 31461 bound to glucose-1-phosphate are reported. Diffraction data sets were obtained from seven crystal forms in five different space groups, with highest resolutions ranging from 4.20 to 2.65 Å. The phase problem was solved for a P21 crystal form using multiple isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering from an osmium derivative and a SeMet derivative. The best native crystal in space group P21 has unit-cell parameters a = 105.5, b = 85.7, c = 151.8 Å, β = 105.2°. Model building and refinement are currently under way. PMID:16946483

  1. Characterization of the human and mouse sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor, S1P5 (Edg-8): structure-activity relationship of sphingosine1-phosphate receptors.

    PubMed

    Im, D S; Clemens, J; Macdonald, T L; Lynch, K R

    2001-11-20

    Five G protein-coupled receptors (S1P(1)/Edg-1, S1P(3)/Edg-3, S1P(2)/Edg-5, S1P(4)/Edg-6, and S1P(5)/Edg-8) for the intercellular lipid mediator sphingosine 1-phosphate have been cloned and characterized. We found human and mouse sequences closely related to rat S1P(5) (97% identical amino acids) and report now the characterization of the human and mouse S1P(5) gene products as encoding sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors. When HEK293T cells were cotransfected with S1P(5) and G protein DNAs, prepared membranes showed sphingosine 1-phosphate concentration-dependent increases in [gamma-(35)S]GTP binding (EC(50) = 12.7 nM). The lipid mediator inhibited forskolin-driven rises in cAMP by greater than 80% after introduction of the mouse or human S1P(5) DNAs into rat hepatoma RH7777 cells (IC(50) = 0.22 nM). This response is blocked fully by prior treatment of cultures with pertussis toxin, thus implicating signaling through G(i/o)alpha proteins. Northern blot analysis showed high expression of human S1P(5) mRNA in spleen, corpus collosum, peripheral blood leukocytes, placenta, lung, aorta, and fetal tissues. Mouse S1P(5) mRNA is also expressed in spleen and brain. Finally, we found that one enantiomer of a sphingosine 1-phosphate analogue wherein the 3-hydroxyl and 4,5-olefin are replaced by an amide functionality shows some selectivity as an agonist S1P(1) and S1P(3) vs S1P(2) and S1P(5).

  2. Sphingomyelinase D activity in model membranes: structural effects of in situ generation of ceramide-1-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Stock, Roberto P; Brewer, Jonathan; Wagner, Kerstin; Ramos-Cerrillo, Blanca; Duelund, Lars; Jernshøj, Kit Drescher; Olsen, Lars Folke; Bagatolli, Luis A

    2012-01-01

    The toxicity of Loxosceles spider venom has been attributed to a rare enzyme, sphingomyelinase D, which transforms sphingomyelin to ceramide-1-phosphate. The bases of its inflammatory and dermonecrotic activity, however, remain unclear. In this work the effects of ceramide-1-phosphate on model membranes were studied both by in situ generation of this lipid using a recombinant sphingomyelinase D from the spider Loxosceles laeta and by pre-mixing it with sphingomyelin and cholesterol. The systems of choice were large unilamellar vesicles for bulk studies (enzyme kinetics, fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering) and giant unilamellar vesicles for fluorescence microscopy examination using a variety of fluorescent probes. The influence of membrane lateral structure on the kinetics of enzyme activity and the consequences of enzyme activity on the structure of target membranes containing sphingomyelin were examined. The findings indicate that: 1) ceramide-1-phosphate (particularly lauroyl ceramide-1-phosphate) can be incorporated into sphingomyelin bilayers in a concentration-dependent manner and generates coexistence of liquid disordered/solid ordered domains, 2) the activity of sphingomyelinase D is clearly influenced by the supramolecular organization of its substrate in membranes and, 3) in situ ceramide-1-phosphate generation by enzymatic activity profoundly alters the lateral structure and morphology of the target membranes.

  3. Sphingomyelinase D Activity in Model Membranes: Structural Effects of in situ Generation of Ceramide-1-Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Roberto P.; Brewer, Jonathan; Wagner, Kerstin; Ramos-Cerrillo, Blanca; Duelund, Lars; Jernshøj, Kit Drescher; Olsen, Lars Folke; Bagatolli, Luis A.

    2012-01-01

    The toxicity of Loxosceles spider venom has been attributed to a rare enzyme, sphingomyelinase D, which transforms sphingomyelin to ceramide-1-phosphate. The bases of its inflammatory and dermonecrotic activity, however, remain unclear. In this work the effects of ceramide-1-phosphate on model membranes were studied both by in situ generation of this lipid using a recombinant sphingomyelinase D from the spider Loxosceles laeta and by pre-mixing it with sphingomyelin and cholesterol. The systems of choice were large unilamellar vesicles for bulk studies (enzyme kinetics, fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering) and giant unilamellar vesicles for fluorescence microscopy examination using a variety of fluorescent probes. The influence of membrane lateral structure on the kinetics of enzyme activity and the consequences of enzyme activity on the structure of target membranes containing sphingomyelin were examined. The findings indicate that: 1) ceramide-1-phosphate (particularly lauroyl ceramide-1-phosphate) can be incorporated into sphingomyelin bilayers in a concentration-dependent manner and generates coexistence of liquid disordered/solid ordered domains, 2) the activity of sphingomyelinase D is clearly influenced by the supramolecular organization of its substrate in membranes and, 3) in situ ceramide-1-phosphate generation by enzymatic activity profoundly alters the lateral structure and morphology of the target membranes. PMID:22558302

  4. Purification and properties of myo-inositol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase from germinating mung bean seeds.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, B; De, B P; Biswas, B B

    1984-01-01

    A novel enzyme, myo-inositol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase, which catalyzes the conversion of myo-inositol 1-phosphate to ribulose 5-phosphate has been purified 84-fold from mung bean seedling employing several common techniques. The molecular weight of this purified enzyme has been recorded as 88,500 by Sephadex G-200 column chromatography, and in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis one protein band containing three subunits of Mr 32,000 each was discernible. Km values for NAD+ and myo-inositol 1-phosphate have been recorded as 2.8 X 10(-4) and 5.0 X 10(-4) M, respectively. Production of NADH in myo-inositol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase reaction has also been evidenced by measurement of NADH fluorescence. Dehydrogenation and decarboxylation of myo-inositol 1-phosphate are mediated by the same enzyme. In fact, the rate of dehydrogenation corroborates with that of decarboxylation. Stoichiometry of this reaction suggests that for the production of 1 mol of ribulose 5-phosphate 2 mol of NAD+ are reduced.

  5. Suppression of ceramide-mediated programmed cell death by sphingosine-1-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Cuvillier, O; Pirianov, G; Kleuser, B; Vanek, P G; Coso, O A; Gutkind, S; Spiegel, S

    1996-06-27

    Ceramide is an important regulatory participant of programmed cell death (apoptosis) induced by tumour-necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and Fas ligand, members of the TNF superfamily. Conversely, sphingosine and sphingosine-1-phosphate, which are metabolites of ceramide, induce mitogenesis and have been implicated as second messengers in cellular proliferation induced by platelet-derived growth factor and serum. Here we report that sphingosine-1-phosphate prevents the appearance of the key features of apoptosis, namely intranucleosomal DNA fragmentation and morphological changes, which result from increased concentrations of ceramide. Furthermore, inhibition of ceramide-mediated apoptosis by activation of protein kinase C results from stimulation of sphingosine kinase and the concomitant increase in intracellular sphingosine-1-phosphate. Finally sphingosine-1-phosphate not only stimulates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway, it counteracts the ceramide-induced activation of stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK/JNK). Thus, the balance between the intracellular levels of ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate and their regulatory effects on different family members of mitogen-activated protein kinases determines the fate of the cell.

  6. Targeting Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Axis in Obesity-Promoted Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0071 TITLE: Targeting Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Axis in Obesity -Promoted Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Target ing Sphi ngosine- 1- Phosphat e Axi s i n Obesity - Promot ed Sb. GRANT NUMBER Br east Cancer W81XWH- 14- 1- 007 1 Sc...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Obesity , which induces l ow- g r ade inflammation , is a known r isk facto r f o r wo r se p r ognosis in many cancer s

  7. An EPSP synthase inhibitor joining shikimate 3-phosphate with glyphosate: synthesis and ligand binding studies.

    PubMed

    Marzabadi, M R; Gruys, K J; Pansegrau, P D; Walker, M C; Yuen, H K; Sikorski, J A

    1996-04-02

    A novel EPSP synthase inhibitor 4 has been designed and synthesized to probe the configurational details of glyphosate recognition in its herbicidal ternary complex with enzyme and shikimate 3-phosphate (S3P). A kinetic evaluation of the new 3-dephospho analog 12, as well as calorimetric and (31)P NMR spectroscopic studies of enzyme-bound 4, now provides a more precise quantitative definition for the molecular interactions of 4 with this enzyme. The very poor binding, relative to 4, displayed by the 3-dephospho analog 12 is indicative that 4 has a specific interaction with the S3P site. A comparison of Ki(calc) for 12 versus the Ki(app) for 4 indicates that the 3-phosphate group in 4 contributes about 4.8 kcal/mol to binding. This compares well with the 5.2 kcal/mol which the 3-phosphate group in S3P contributes to binding. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrates that 4 binds to free enzyme with an observed Kd of 0.53 +/- 0.04 microM. As such, 4 binds only 3-fold weaker than glyphosate and about 150-fold better than N-methylglyphosate. Consequently, 4 represents the most potent N-alkylglyphosate derivative identified to date. However, the resulting thermodynamic binding parameters clearly demonstrate that the formation of EPSPS x 4 is entropy driven like S3P. The binding characteristics of 4 are fully consistent with a primary interaction localized at the S3P subsite. Furthermore, (31)P NMR studies of enzyme-bound 4 confirm the expected interaction at the shikimate 3-phosphate site. However, the chemical shift observed for the phosphonate signal of EPSPS x 4 is in the opposite direction than that observed previously when glyphosate binds with enzyme and S3P. Therefore, when 4 occupies the S3P binding site, there is incomplete overlap at the glyphosate phosphonate subsite. As a glyphosate analog inhibitor, the potency of 4 most likely arises from predominant interactions which occur outside the normal glyphosate binding site. Consequently, 4 is best described

  8. Cloning and characterization of 5-enopyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase from Pantoea sp.

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Cao, Y P

    2015-12-29

    The shikimate pathway enzyme 5-enopyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) is the target of the broad spectrum herbicide glyphosate. A novel aroA gene encoding an EPSPS from Pantoea sp was identified and subcloned into the pET-28a vector to construct the recombinant pET-AroAPantoea sp plasmid. Amino acid sequence analysis indicated that AroAPantoea sp is a class I AroA enzyme. When expressed in Escherichia coli, it conveyed high tolerance to glyphosate. AroAPantoea sp may be used to generate transgenic glyphosate-tolerant plants.

  9. Functional characterization of 5-enopyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase from Alkaliphilus metalliredigens in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xing, Xiao-Juan; Tian, Yong-Sheng; Peng, Ri-He; Xu, Jing; Zhao, Wei; Yao, Quan-Hong; Sun, Sheng

    2014-10-01

    Although a large number of AroA enzymes (EPSPS: 5-enopyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase) have been identified, cloned, and tested for glyphosate resistance, only two AroA variants, derived from Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain CP4 and Zea mays, have been utilized to produce the commercial glyphosate-resistant crops. Here, we have used a PCR-based twostep DNA synthesis method to synthesize an aroA gene (aroAA. metalliredigens) from Alkaliphilus metalliredigens, encoding a new EPSPS. Furthermore, transgenic Arabidopsis with the new aroAA. metalliredigens gene was obtained to confirm the potential of the novel aroA gene in developing glyphosate-resistant crops.

  10. Relationship between a stress membrane protein of Oenococcus oeni and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Carreté, Ramon; Reguant, Cristina; Bordons, Albert; Constantí, Magda

    2005-10-01

    The goal of this study was to analyze how the profiles of membrane proteins of Oenococcus oeni change under particular stress conditions of wine. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis protein profiles of membrane fraction showed that a 40-kDa protein was overexpressed in the presence of SO2. The sequence of its N-terminal fragment showed a significant identity with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases (GAPDHs), but the protein showed no GAPDH activity. This sequence was compared with those of other GAPDHs with ClustalW alignment, and it was found to be somewhat similar to that of the cell-wall and membrane proteins of other lactic acid bacteria.

  11. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. 862.1315 Section 862.1315 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A METHOD FOR QUANTITATING SPHINGOID BASE 1-PHOSPHATES IN BLOOD SPOTS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Red blood cells (RBC) accumulate, store and release sphingoid base 1-phosphates,important ligands for the extracellular receptors S1P1-5. The ability of RBC to accumulate these bioactive lipids is because, with the exception of sphingosine kinase, the enzymes responsible for metabolizing sphingosine...

  13. A comparison of sugar indicators enables a universal high-throughput sugar-1-phosphate nucleotidyltransferase assay.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Rocco; Thorson, Jon S

    2008-06-15

    A systematic comparison of six sugar indicators for their sensitivity, specificity, cross-reactivity, and suitability in the context of crude lysates revealed para-hydroxybenzoic acid hydrazide (pHBH) to be best suited for application in a plate-based phosphatase-assisted universal sugar-1-phosphate nucleotidyltransferase assay. The addition of a general phosphatase to nucleotidyltransferase reaction aliquots enabled the conversion of remaining sugar-1-phosphate to free sugar, the concentration of which could be rapidly assessed via the pHBH assay. The assay was validated using the model glucose-1-phosphate thymidylyltransferase from Salmonella enterica (RmlA) and compared favorably with a previously reported HPLC assay. This coupled discontinuous assay is quantitative, high throughput, and robust; relies only on commercially available enzymes and reagents; does not require chromatography, specialized detectors (e.g., mass or evaporative light scattering detectors), or radioisotopes; and is capable of detecting less than 5 nmol of sugar-1-phosphate. It is anticipated that this high-throughput assay system will greatly facilitate nucleotidyltransferase mechanistic and directed evolution/engineering studies.

  14. Characterization of an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant lacking a cytosolic non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Rius, Sebastián P; Casati, Paula; Iglesias, Alberto A; Gomez-Casati, Diego F

    2006-08-01

    Non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde- 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (NP-GAPDH) is a conserved cytosolic protein found in higher plants. In photosynthetic cells, the enzyme is involved in a shuttle transfer mechanism to export NADPH from the chloroplast to the cytosol. To investigate the role of this enzyme in plant tissues, we characterized a mutant from Arabidopsis thaliana having an insertion at the NP-GAPDH gene locus. The homozygous mutant was determined to be null respect to NP-GAPDH, as it exhibited undetectable levels of both transcription of NP-GAPDH mRNA, protein expression and enzyme activity. Transcriptome analysis demonstrated that the insertion mutant plant shows altered expression of several enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism. Significantly, cytosolic phosphorylating (NAD-dependent) glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA levels are induced in the mutant, which correlates with an increase in enzyme activity. mRNA levels and enzymatic activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase were also elevated, correlating with an increase in NADPH concentration. Moreover, increased ROS levels were measured in the mutant plants. Down-regulation of several glycolytic and photosynthetic genes suggests that NP-GAPDH is important for the efficiency of both metabolic processes. The results presented demonstrate that NP-GAPDH has a relevant role in plant growth and development.

  15. Influence of heavy metals on glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase interactions in Chironomus riparius larvae.

    PubMed

    Wai, Isaac; Chong, King; Ho, Wing Shing

    2013-08-01

    Some aquatic organisms can live in contaminated environment due to their adaptable defense mechanism related to their inducible detoxification and excretion. A recent study showed glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) can modulate different cellular activities including transcription activation and detoxification. In the present study, the authors report on experiments to test the GAPDH activity of Chironomus riparius toward heavy metals. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase was isolated and purified from C. riparius. The kinetics of the enzyme was measured. The results showed that GAPDH was inhibited by heavy metals including Co(2+) , Cu(2+) , Fe(2+) , Ni(2+) , Pb(2+) , but was activated by zinc ions. The kinetics study of the enzyme showed maximum initial velocity (Vmax) of GAPDH increased by 50%. In addition, the substrate and cofactor affinity increased in the presence of zinc. The GAPDH from C. riparius had maximum activities at pH 8.5 and 37 °C. The protein sequence analysis shows that there are 2 additional cysteine and histidine residues in the conserved region of GAPDH from C. riparius, which is believed to play an important role in the interactions with heavy metals. The results suggest that exposure to zinc could modulate GAPDH, which could be related to response of antioxidant defense to other heavy metals.

  16. Cloning and characterization of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase encoding gene in Gracilaria/Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xueying, Ren; Zhenghong, Sui; Xuecheng, Zhang

    2006-04-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) plays important roles in various cellular processes. A cytosolic GAPDH encoding gene ( gpd) of Gracilaria/Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis was cloned and characterized. Deduced amino acid sequence of the enzyme of G. lemaneiformis had high homology with those of seven red algae. The 5'-untranslated regions of the GAPDHs encoding genes of these red algae varied greatly. GAPDHs of these red algae shared the highly conserved glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase active site ASCTTNCL. However, such active site of Cyanidium caldarium was different from those of the other six algae at the last two residues (CL to LF), thus the spatial structure of its GAPDH active center may be different from those of the other six. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that GAPDH of G. lemaneiformis might have undergone an evolution similar to those of Porphyra yezoensis, Chondrus crispus, and Gracilaria verrucosa. C. caldarium had a closer evolutionary relationship with Cyanidioschyzon merolae than with Cyanidium sp. Virtual Northern blot analysis revealed that gpd of G. lemaneiformis expressed constitutively, which suggested that it might be house-keeping and could be adapted as an inner control in gene expression analysis of G. lemaneiformis.

  17. Moonlighting glycolytic protein glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH): an evolutionarily conserved plasminogen receptor on mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Anoop Singh; Kumar, Manoj; Chaudhary, Surbhi; Patidar, Anil; Dhiman, Asmita; Sheokand, Navdeep; Malhotra, Himanshu; Raje, Chaaya Iyengar; Raje, Manoj

    2017-03-15

    Prokaryotic pathogens establish infection in mammals by capturing the proteolytic enzyme plasminogen (Plg) onto their surface to digest host extracellular matrix (ECM). One of the bacterial surface Plg receptors is the multifunctional glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). In a defensive response, the host mounts an inflammatory response, which involves infiltration of leukocytes to sites of inflammation. This requires macrophage exit from the blood and migration across basement membranes, a phenomenon dependent on proteolytic remodeling of the ECM utilizing Plg. The ability of Plg to facilitate inflammatory cell recruitment critically depends on receptors on the surface of phagocyte cells. Utilizing a combination of biochemical, cellular, knockdown, and in vivo approaches, we demonstrated that upon inflammation, macrophages recruit GAPDH onto their surface to carry out the same task of capturing Plg to digest ECM to aid rapid phagocyte migration and combat the invading pathogens. We propose that GAPDH is an ancient, evolutionarily conserved receptor that plays a key role in the Plg-dependent regulation of macrophage recruitment in the inflammatory response to microbial aggression, thus pitting prokaryotic GAPDH against mammalian GAPDH, with both involved in a conserved role of Plg activation on the surface of their respective cells, to conflicting ends.-Chauhan, A. S., Kumar, M., Chaudhary, S., Patidar, A., Dhiman, A., Sheokand, N., Malhotra, H., Raje, C. I., Raje, M. Moonlighting glycolytic protein glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH): an evolutionarily conserved plasminogen receptor on mammalian cells.

  18. Conformational and activity changes during guanidine denaturation of D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Xie, G F; Tsou, C L

    1987-01-05

    Changes in intrinsic protein fluorescence of lobster muscle D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate: NAD+ oxidoreductase (phosphorylating), EC 1.2.1.12) have been compared with inactivation of the enzyme during denaturation in guanidine solutions. The holoenzyme is completely inactivated at guanidine concentrations less than 0.5 M and this is accompanied by a red shift of the emission maximum at 335 nm and a marked decrease in intensity of the intrinsic fluorescence. At 0.5 M guanidine, the inactivation is a slow process, with a first-order rate constant of 2.4 X 10(-3) s-1. A further red shift in the emission maximum and a decrease in intensity occur at guanidine concentrations higher than 1.5 M. The emission peak at 410 nm of the fluorescent NAD derivative introduced at the active site of this enzyme (Tsou, C.L. et al. (1983) Biochem. Soc. Trans. 11, 425-429) shows both a red shift and a marked decrease in intensity at the same guanidine concentration required to bring about the inactivation and the initial changes in the intrinsic fluorescence of the holoenzyme. It appears that treatment by low guanidine concentrations leads to both complete inactivation and perturbation of the active site conformation and that a tryptophan residue is situated at or near the active site.

  19. Preanalytical standardization of sphingosine-1-phosphate, sphinganine-1-phosphate and sphingosine analysis in human plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ceglarek, Uta; Dittrich, Julia; Helmschrodt, Christin; Wagner, Kristin; Nofer, Jerzy-Roch; Thiery, Joachim; Becker, Susen

    2014-08-05

    Preanalytical standardization is required for a reliable quantification of the signaling molecules sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), sphinganine-1-phosphate (SA1P) and sphingosine (SPH). Methanolic protein precipitation of 15μL EDTA-plasma was applied prior to analysis. Sphingolipids were separated in 3min by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC, SeQuant™ ZIC®-HILIC column) followed by tandem mass spectrometry. Stability of analytes in whole blood and plasma was investigated. Sphingolipid concentrations were determined in human plasma (n=50) and mice deficient in sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) and 2 (SK2) (n=5). Storing EDTA whole blood >60min after blood withdrawal at room temperature resulted in an increase in S1P and SPH concentrations of ≥25%. Significant changes in SPH levels of +37% were observed after 60min of storage of EDTA plasma at room temperature. Repeated freeze-thaw cycles of EDTA plasma resulted in increased S1P and SPH levels. Concentrations in human EDTA plasma were between 55.5 and 145.2ng/mL for S1P and between 8.9 and 35.3ng/mL for SA1P. Concentrations of S1P were 36% lower and 96% higher in EDTA-plasma from SK1- and SK2-deficient mice, respectively, compared to the wild type. Preanalytical standardization is a precondition for the analysis of sphingolipids in human blood. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Folding domains and intramolecular ionic interactions of lysine residues in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, J M; Perham, R N

    1977-01-01

    1. Treatment with methyl acetimidate was used to probe the topography of several tetrameric glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenases, in particular the holoenzymes from rabbit muscle and Bacillus stearothermophilus. During the course of the reaction with the rabbit muscle enzyme, the number of amino groups fell rapidly from the starting value of 27 per subunit to a value of approx. five per subunit. This number could be lowered further to values between one and two per subunit by a second treatment with methyl acetimidate. The enzyme remained tetrameric throughout and retained 50% of its initial catalytic activity at the end of the experiment. 2. Use of methyl [1-14C]acetimidate and small-scale methods of protein chemistry showed that only one amino group per subunit, that of lysine-306, was completely unavailable for reaction with imido ester in the native enzyme. This results is consistent with the structure of the highly homologous glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase of lobster muscle deduced from X-ray-crystallographic analysis, since lysine-306 can be seen to form an intrachain ion-pair with aspartic acid-241 in the hydrophobic environment of a subunit-subunit interface. 3. Several other amino groups in the rabbit muscle enzyme that reacted only slowly with the reagent were also identified chemically. These were found to be located entirely in the C-terminal half of the polypeptides chain, which comprises a folding domain associated with catalytic activity and subunit contact in the three-dimensional structure. Slow reaction of these 'surface' amino groups with methyl acetimidate is attributed to intramolecular ionic interactions of the amino groups with neighbouring side-chain carboxyl groups, a conclusion that is compatible with the reported three-dimensional structure and with the dependence of the reaction of ionic stength. 4. Very similar results were obtained with the enzymes from B. stearothermophilus and from ox muscle and ox liver, supporting

  1. Epidermal growth factor-induced cellular invasion requires sphingosine-1-phosphate/sphingosine-1-phosphate 2 receptor-mediated ezrin activation

    PubMed Central

    Orr Gandy, K. Alexa; Adada, Mohamad; Canals, Daniel; Carroll, Brittany; Roddy, Patrick; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Obeid, Lina M.

    2013-01-01

    Ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins link cortical actin to the plasma membrane and coordinate cellular events that require cytoskeletal rearrangement, including cell division, migration, and invasion. While ERM proteins are involved in many important cellular events, the mechanisms regulating their function are not completely understood. Our laboratory previously identified reciprocal roles for the sphingolipids ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in the regulation of ERM proteins. We recently showed that ceramide-induced activation of PP1α leads to dephosphorylation and inactivation of ERM proteins, while S1P results in phosphorylation and activation of ERM proteins. Following these findings, we aimed to examine known inducers of the SK/S1P pathway and evaluate their ability to regulate ERM proteins. We examined EGF, a known inducer of the SK/S1P pathway, for its ability to regulate the ERM family of proteins. We found that EGF induces ERM c-terminal threonine phosphorylation via activation of the SK/S1P pathway, as this was prevented by siRNA knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of SK. Using pharmacological, as well as genetic, knockdown approaches, we determined that EGF induces ERM phosphorylation via activation of S1PR2. In addition, EGF led to cell polarization in the form of lamellipodia, and this occurred through a mechanism involving S1PR2-mediated phosphorylation of ezrin T567. EGF-induced cellular invasion was also found to be dependent on S1PR2-induced T567 ezrin phosphorylation, such that S1PR2 antagonist, JTE-013, and expression of a dominant-negative ezrin mutant prevented cellular invasion toward EGF. In this work, a novel mechanism of EGF-stimulated invasion is unveiled, whereby S1P-mediated activation of S1PR2 and phosphorylation of ezrin T567 is required.—Orr Gandy, K. A., Adada, M., Canals, D., Carroll, B., Roddy, P., Hannun, Y. A., Obeid, L. M. Epidermal growth factor-induced cellular invasion requires sphingosine-1-phosphate

  2. Receptor protein kinase FERONIA controls leaf starch accumulation by interacting with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Wang, Long; Li, Chiyu; Liu, Ying; Zhu, Sirui; Qi, Yinyao; Liu, Xuanming; Lin, Qinglu; Luan, Sheng; Yu, Feng

    2015-09-11

    Cell expansion is coordinated by several cues, but available energy is the major factor determining growth. Receptor protein kinase FERONIA (FER) is a master regulator of cell expansion, but the details of its control mechanisms are not clear. Here we show that FER interacts with cytosolic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, GAPC1 and GAPC2), that catalyzes a key reaction in glycolysis, which contributes to energy production. When there is an FER deficiency, there are corresponding decreases in the enzyme activity of GAPDH and increased amounts of starch. More importantly, gapc1/2 mutants mimic fer4 mutants. These data indicate that FER regulated starch content is an evolutionarily conserved function in plants that connects the cell expansion and energy metabolism pathways.

  3. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a specific substrate of yeast metacaspase.

    PubMed

    Silva, A; Almeida, B; Sampaio-Marques, B; Reis, M I R; Ohlmeier, S; Rodrigues, F; Vale, A do; Ludovico, P

    2011-12-01

    Yeast metacaspase (Yca1p) is required for the execution of apoptosis upon a wide range of stimuli. However, the specific degradome of this yeast protease has not been unraveled so far. By combining different methodologies described as requisites for a protein to be considered a protease substrate, such as digestome analysis, cleavage of recombinant GAPDH by metacaspase and evaluation of protein levels in vivo, we show that upon H(2)O(2)-induced apoptosis, the metabolic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a specific target of metacaspase. Nitric oxide (NO) signaling, which mediates H(2)O(2)-induced apoptosis, is required for metacaspase specific GAPDH cleavage. In conclusion, in this work we identified GAPDH as the first direct yeast metacaspase substrate described so far. Although mammalian caspases and yeast metacaspase apparently have distinct target cleavage sites, GAPDH arises as a common substrate for these proteases.

  4. Succination of proteins by fumarate: mechanism of inactivation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Blatnik, Matthew; Thorpe, Suzanne R; Baynes, John W

    2008-04-01

    S-(2-succinyl)cysteine (2SC) is a chemical modification of proteins formed by a Michael addition reaction between the Krebs cycle intermediate, fumarate, and thiol groups in protein--a process known as succination of protein. Succination causes irreversible inactivation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) in vitro. GAPDH was immunoprecipitated from muscle of diabetic rats, then analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectroscopy. Succination of GAPDH was increased in muscle of diabetic rats, and the extent of succination correlated strongly with the decrease in specific activity of the enzyme. We propose that 2SC is a biomarker of mitochondrial and oxidative stress in diabetes and that succination of GAPDH and other thiol proteins may provide the chemical link between glucotoxicity and the pathogenesis of diabetic complications.

  5. Atomic-level characterization of transport cycle thermodynamics in the glycerol-3-phosphate:phosphate antiporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Mahmoud; Enkavi, Giray; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2015-09-01

    Membrane transporters actively translocate their substrate by undergoing large-scale structural transitions between inward- (IF) and outward-facing (OF) states (`alternating-access' mechanism). Despite extensive structural studies, atomic-level mechanistic details of such structural transitions, and as importantly, their coupling to chemical events supplying the energy, remain amongst the most elusive aspects of the function of these proteins. Here we present a quantitative, atomic-level description of the functional thermodynamic cycle for the glycerol-3-phosphate:phosphate antiporter GlpT by using a novel approach in reconstructing the free energy landscape governing the IF<-->OF transition along a cyclic transition pathway involving both apo and substrate-bound states. Our results provide a fully atomic description of the complete transport process, offering a structural model for the alternating-access mechanism and substantiating the close coupling between global structural transitions and local chemical events.

  6. Molecular cloning and characterization of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene from Penicillium expansum PE-12.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T; Qi, Z; Yu, Q S; Tang, K X

    2013-07-15

    Penicillium expansum produces large amounts of lipase, which is widely used in laundry detergent and leather industry. We isolated the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (PeGPD) from P. expansum PE-12 through reverse transcriptase PCR and 5'-3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE-PCR). The gene is 1266 bp long, including an ORF of 1014 bp, encoding a polypeptide chain of 337 amino acids. A phylogenetic tree based on GPD proteins showed that P. expansum is close to Aspergillus species, but comparatively distant from P. marneffei. Southern blot results revealed a single copy of PeGPD, and expression analysis gave evidence of high expression levels. PeGPD genes have potential for genetic engineering of P. expansum for industrial lipase production.

  7. Succination of Proteins by Fumarate: Mechanism of Inactivation of Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Blatnik, Matthew; Thorpe, Suzanne R.; Baynes, John W.

    2008-01-01

    S-(2-succinyl)cysteine (2SC) is a chemical modification of proteins formed by a Michael addition reaction between the Krebs cycle intermediate, fumarate, and thiol groups in protein—a process known as succination of protein. Succination causes irreversible inactivation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) in vitro. GAPDH was immunoprecipitated from muscle of diabetic rats, then analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization–mass spectroscopy. Succination of GAPDH was increased in muscle of diabetic rats, and the extent of succination correlated strongly with the decrease in specific activity of the enzyme. We propose that 2SC is a biomarker of mitochondrial and oxidative stress in diabetes and that succination of GAPDH and other thiol proteins may provide the chemical link between glucotoxicity and the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. PMID:18448829

  8. Daily Variations in the Glycerol-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Isoforms Expression in Triatoma infestans Flight Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Stroppa, María M.; Carriazo, Carlota S.; Gerez de Burgos, Nelia M.; Garcia, Beatríz A.

    2014-01-01

    Triatoma infestans, the main vector of Chagas disease, is a blood-sucking insect. Flight dispersal of adults is the most important mechanism for reinfestation of houses after insecticide spraying. Flight muscles have two glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) isoforms: GPDH-1 is involved in flight metabolism and GPDH-2 provides lipid precursors. In this study, we explored the profile of GPDH expression in females and males adult flight muscles under light/dark cycle, constant light, and constant dark conditions. Under constant dark conditions, GPDH-1 flight muscles of T. infestans showed a rhythmic pattern of transcription synchronous with a rhythmic profile of activity suggesting regulation by the endogenous circadian clock. Otherwise, the GPDH-2 expression analysis showed no regulation by the endogenous clock, but showed that an external factor, such as the dark/light period, was necessary for synchronization of GPDH-2 transcription and activity. PMID:24914000

  9. Atomic-level characterization of transport cycle thermodynamics in the glycerol-3-phosphate:phosphate antiporter

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Mahmoud; Enkavi, Giray; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2015-01-01

    Membrane transporters actively translocate their substrate by undergoing large-scale structural transitions between inward- (IF) and outward-facing (OF) states (‘alternating-access' mechanism). Despite extensive structural studies, atomic-level mechanistic details of such structural transitions, and as importantly, their coupling to chemical events supplying the energy, remain amongst the most elusive aspects of the function of these proteins. Here we present a quantitative, atomic-level description of the functional thermodynamic cycle for the glycerol-3-phosphate:phosphate antiporter GlpT by using a novel approach in reconstructing the free energy landscape governing the IF↔OF transition along a cyclic transition pathway involving both apo and substrate-bound states. Our results provide a fully atomic description of the complete transport process, offering a structural model for the alternating-access mechanism and substantiating the close coupling between global structural transitions and local chemical events. PMID:26417850

  10. Chemical synthesis of D-ribo-phytosphingosine-1-phosphate, a potential modulator of cellular processes.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Wilson, W K; Schroepfer, G J

    1999-01-01

    d-erythro -Sphingosine-1-phosphate (2), an intermediate in sphingosine metabolism, shows a diversity of biological activities. Comparable roles might be anticipated for d-ribo -phytosphingosine-1-phosphate (1). We describe an efficient three-step chemical synthesis of 1 from d-ribo -phytosphingosine. Our approach is based on standard phosphoramidite methodology and on the finding of Boumendjel and Miller ( J. Lipid Res. 1994. 35: 2305-2311) that sphingosine can be monophosphorylated at the 1-hydroxyl without protection of the 3-hydroxyl. However, we were unable to duplicate their reported synthesis of 2 without important modifications in reagents and reaction conditions. Under the reported conditions for preparing 2, we obtained a cyclic carbamate (14), which we have isolated and identified. The structures of 1 and the cyclic carbamate 14 were elucidated by a combination of mass spectrometry and 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  11. Sperm-Specific Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase - An Evolutionary Acquisition of Mammals.

    PubMed

    Muronetz, V I; Kuravsky, M L; Barinova, K V; Schmalhausen, E V

    2015-12-01

    This review is focused on the mammalian sperm-specific glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDS). GAPDS plays the major role in the production of energy required for sperm cell movement and does not perform non-glycolytic functions that are characteristic of the somatic isoenzyme of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. The GAPDS sequence is composed of 408 amino acid residues and includes an additional N-terminal region of 72 a.a. that binds the protein to the sperm tail cytoskeleton. GAPDS is present only in the sperm cells of mammals and lizards, possibly providing them with certain evolutionary advantages in reproduction. In this review, studies concerning the problems of GAPDS isolation, its catalytic properties, and its structural features are described in detail. GAPDS is much more stable compared to the somatic isoenzyme, perhaps due to the necessity of maintaining the enzyme function in the absence of protein expression. The site-directed mutagenesis approach revealed the two GAPDS-specific proline residues, as well as three salt bridges, which seem to be the basis of the increased stability of this protein. As distinct from the somatic isoenzyme, GAPDS exhibits positive cooperativity in binding of the coenzyme NAD+. The key role in transduction of structural changes induced by NAD+ is played by the salt bridge D311-H124. Disruption of this salt bridge cancels GAPDS cooperativity and twofold increases its enzymatic activity instead. The expression of GAPDS was detected in some melanoma cells as well. Its role in the development of certain pathologies, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, is discussed.

  12. Evidence for ligand-induced conformational changes in rabbit-muscle glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Henis, Y I; Levitzki, A; Gafni, A

    1979-07-01

    The tetrameric glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from rabbit muscle binds NAD+ and some of its analogues in a negatively cooperative manner, whereas other NAD+ analogues bind non-cooperatively to this enzyme. Subsequent to alkylation of a fraction of the active sites of the enzyme with the fluorescent SH reagent N-iodoacetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)-ethylenediamine, it was found that the alkylated sites bind NAD+ and NAD+ analogues with a markedly reduced affinity as compared with non-alkylated sites. It was therefore feasible to measure the fluorescence and the circular polarization of the luminescence of the enzyme-bound alkyl groups as a function of binding of NAD+ and of NAD+ analogues to the non-alkylated sites. The changes observed indicate that ligand binding to the non-alkylated sites induces changes in the fluorescence properties of the alkyl groups bound to neighbouring subunits, most likely through the protein moiety. The nature of these changes appears to depend on the structure of the coenzyme analogue. The binding of the non-cooperative binders acetyl-pyridine--adenine dinucleotide, ATP and ADP-ribose induce different conformational changes in the neighbouring vacant subunit, as monitored by the spectroscopic properties of the bound alkyl group. These results in conjunction with other data support the view that the negative cooperativity in NAD+ binding to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase results from ligand-induced conformational changes. Furthermore, these results further support the view that subtle structural changes in the coenzyme molecule determine the nature of the conformational changes induced within the enzyme tetramer.

  13. Lysine post-translational modification of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase regulates hepatic and systemic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bond, Simon T; Howlett, Kirsten F; Kowalski, Greg M; Mason, Shaun; Connor, Timothy; Cooper, Adrian; Streltsov, Victor; Bruce, Clinton R; Walder, Ken R; McGee, Sean L

    2017-03-03

    Reciprocal regulation of hepatic glycolysis and gluconeogenesis contributes to systemic metabolic homeostasis. Recent evidence from lower order organisms has found that reversible post-translational modification of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), particularly acetylation, contributes to the reciprocal regulation of glycolysis/gluconeogenesis. However, whether this occurs in mammalian hepatocytes in vitro or in vivo is unknown. Several proteomics studies have identified 4 lysine residues in critical regions of mammalian GAPDH that are altered by multiple post-translational modifications. In FAO hepatoma cells, mutation of all 4 lysine residues (4K-R GAPDH) to mimic their unmodified state reduced GAPDH glycolytic activity and glycolytic flux and increased gluconeogenic GAPDH activity and glucose production. Hepatic expression of 4K-R GAPDH in mice increased GAPDH gluconeogenic activity and the contribution of gluconeogenesis to endogenous glucose production in the unfed state. Consistent with the increased reliance on the energy-consuming gluconeogenic pathway, plasma free fatty acids and ketones were elevated in mice expressing 4K-R GAPDH, suggesting enhanced lipolysis and hepatic fatty acid oxidation. In normal mice, food withholding and refeeding, as well as hormonal regulators of reciprocal glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, such as insulin, glucagon, and norepinephrine, had no effect on global GAPDH acetylation. However, GAPDH acetylation was reduced in obese and type 2 diabetic db/db mice. These findings show that post-translational modification of GAPDH lysine residues regulates hepatic and systemic metabolism, revealing an unappreciated role for hepatic GAPDH in substrate selection and utilization.-Bond, S. T., Howlett, K. F., Kowalski, G. M., Mason, S., Connor, T., Cooper, A., Streltsov, V., Bruce, C. R., Walder, K. R., McGee, S. L. Lysine post-translational modification of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase regulates hepatic and systemic

  14. A Novel 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-Phosphate Synthase from Rahnella aquatilis with Significantly Reduced Glyphosate Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Ai-Sheng; Zhao, Wei; Fu, Xiao-Yan; Han, Hong-Juan; Chen, Chen; Jin, Xiao-Fen; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2012-01-01

    The 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS; EC 2.5.1.19) is a key enzyme in the shikimate pathway for the production of aromatic amino acids and chorismate-derived secondary metabolites in plants, fungi, and microorganisms. It is also the target of the broad-spectrum herbicide glyphosate. Natural glyphosate resistance is generally thought to occur within microorganisms in a strong selective pressure condition. Rahnella aquatilis strain GR20, an antagonist against pathogenic agrobacterial strains of grape crown gall, was isolated from the rhizosphere of grape in glyphosate-contaminated vineyards. A novel gene encoding EPSPS was identified from the isolated bacterium by complementation of an Escherichia coli auxotrophic aroA mutant. The EPSPS, named AroAR.aquatilis, was expressed and purified from E. coli, and key kinetic values were determined. The full-length enzyme exhibited higher tolerance to glyphosate than the E. coli EPSPS (AroAE.coli), while retaining high affinity for the substrate phosphoenolpyruvate. Transgenic plants of AroAR.aquatilis were also observed to be more resistant to glyphosate at a concentration of 5 mM than that of AroAE.coli. To probe the sites contributing to increased tolerance to glyphosate, mutant R.aquatilis EPSPS enzymes were produced with the c-strand of subdomain 3 and the f-strand of subdomain 5 (Thr38Lys, Arg40Val, Arg222Gln, Ser224Val, Ile225Val, and Gln226Lys) substituted by the corresponding region of the E. coli EPSPS. The mutant enzyme exhibited greater sensitivity to glyphosate than the wild type R.aquatilis EPSPS with little change of affinity for its first substrate, shikimate-3-phosphate (S3P) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). The effect of the residues on subdomain 5 on glyphosate resistance was more obvious. PMID:22870190

  15. Periplasmic Cleavage and Modification of the 1-Phosphate Group of Helicobacter pylori Lipid A*

    PubMed Central

    Tran, An X.; Karbarz, Mark J.; Wang, Xiaoyuan; Raetz, Christian R. H.; McGrath, Sara C.; Cotter, Robert J.; Trent, M. Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria modify the lipid A portion of their lipopolysaccharide to help evade the host innate immune response. Modification of the negatively charged phosphate groups of lipid A aids in resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides targeting the bacterial cell surface. The lipid A of Helicobacter pylori contains a phosphoethanolamine (pEtN) unit directly linked to the 1-position of the disaccharide backbone. This is in contrast to the pEtN units found in other pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria, which are attached to the lipid A phosphate group to form a pyrophosphate linkage. This study describes two enzymes involved in the periplasmic modification of the 1-phosphate group of H. pylori lipid A. By using an in vitro assay system, we demonstrate the presence of lipid A 1-phosphatase activity in membranes of H. pylori. In an attempt to identify genes encoding possible lipid A phosphatases, we cloned four putative orthologs of Escherichia coli pgpB, the phosphatidylglycerol-phosphate phosphatase, from H. pylori 26695. One of these orthologs, Hp0021, is the structural gene for the lipid A 1-phosphatase and is required for removal of the 1-phosphate group from mature lipid A in an in vitro assay system. Heterologous expression of Hp0021 in E. coli resulted in the highly selective removal of the 1-phosphate group from E. coli lipid A, as demonstrated by mass spectrometry. We also identified the structural gene for the H. pylori lipid A pEtN transferase (Hp0022). Mass spectrometric analysis of the lipid A isolated from E. coli expressing Hp0021 and Hp0022 shows the addition of a single pEtN group at the 1-position, confirming that Hp0022 is responsible for the addition of a pEtN unit at the 1-position in H. pylori lipid A. In summary, we demonstrate that modification of the 1-phosphate group of H. pylori lipid A requires two enzymatic steps. PMID:15489235

  16. Acid Ceramidase Promotes Nuclear Export of PTEN through Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Mediated Akt Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Beckham, Thomas H.; Cheng, Joseph C.; Lu, Ping; Marrison, S. Tucker; Norris, James S.; Liu, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor PTEN is now understood to regulate cellular processes at the cytoplasmic membrane, where it classically regulates PI3K signaling, as well as in the nucleus where multiple roles in controlling cell cycle and genome stability have been elucidated. Mechanisms that dictate nuclear import and, less extensively, nuclear export of PTEN have been described, however the relevance of these processes in disease states, particularly cancer, remain largely unknown. We investigated the impact of acid ceramidase on the nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of PTEN. Immunohistochemical analysis of a human prostate tissue microarray revealed that nuclear PTEN was lost in patients whose tumors had elevated acid ceramidase. We found that acid ceramidase promotes a reduction in nuclear PTEN that is dependent upon sphingosine 1-phosphate-mediated activation of Akt. We were further able to show that sphingosine 1-phosphate promotes formation of a complex between Crm1 and PTEN, and that leptomycin B prevents acid ceramidase and sphingosine 1-phosphate mediated loss of nuclear PTEN, suggesting an active exportin-mediated event. To investigate whether the tumor promoting aspects of acid ceramidase in prostate cancer depend upon its ability to export PTEN from the nucleus, we used enforced nuclear expression of PTEN to study docetaxel-induced apoptosis and cell killing, proliferation, and xenoengraftment. Interestingly, while acid ceramidase was able to protect cells expressing wild type PTEN from docetaxel, promote proliferation and xenoengraftment, acid ceramidase had no impact in cells expressing PTEN-NLS. These findings suggest that acid ceramidase, through sphingosine 1-phosphate, promotes nuclear export of PTEN as a means of promoting tumor formation, cell proliferation, and resistance to therapy. PMID:24098536

  17. Phytosphingosine 1-phosphate: a high affinity ligand for the S1P(4)/Edg-6 receptor.

    PubMed

    Candelore, Mari Rios; Wright, Michael J; Tota, Laurie M; Milligan, James; Shei, Gan-ju; Bergstrom, James D; Mandala, Suzanne M

    2002-09-27

    It has been reported recently that the phosphorylated form of the immunomodulator FTY720 activates sphingosine 1-phosphate G protein-coupled receptors. Therefore, understanding the biology of this new class of receptors will be important in clarifying the immunological function of bioactive lysosphingolipid ligands. The S1P(4) receptor has generated interest due to its lymphoid tissue distribution. While the S1P(4) receptor binds the prototypical ligand, S1P, a survey of other lysosphingolipids demonstrated that 4D-hydroxysphinganine 1-phosphate, more commonly known as phytosphingosine 1-phosphate (PhS1P), binds to S1P(4) with higher affinity. Using radiolabeled S1P (S133P), the affinity of PhS1P for the S1P(4) receptor is 1.6nM, while that of S1P is nearly 50-fold lower (119+/-20nM). Radiolabeled PhS1P proved to be superior to S133P in routine binding assays due to improved signal-to-noise ratio. The present study demonstrates the utility of a novel radiolabeled probe, PhS133P, for in vitro studies of the S1P(4) receptor pharmacology.

  18. The structural and molecular biology of type I galactosemia: Enzymology of galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase.

    PubMed

    McCorvie, Thomas J; Timson, David J

    2011-09-01

    Reduced galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) activity is associated with the genetic disease type I galactosemia. This results in an increase in the cellular concentration of galactose 1-phosphate. The accumulation of this toxic metabolite, combined with aberrant glycoprotein and glycolipid biosynthesis, is likely to be the major factor in molecular pathology. The mechanism of GALT was established through classical enzymological methods to be a substituted enzyme in which the reaction with UDP-glucose results in the formation of a covalent, UMP-histidine adduct in the active site. The uridylated enzyme can then react with galactose 1-phosphate to form UDP-galactose. The structure of the enzyme from Escherichia coli reveals a homodimer containing one zinc (II) and one iron (II) ion per subunit. This enzymological and structural knowledge provides the basis for understanding the biochemistry of this critical step in the Leloir pathway. However, a high-resolution crystal structure of human GALT is required to assist greater understanding of the effects of disease-associated mutations.

  19. Studies of inositol 1-phosphate analogues as inhibitors of the phosphatidylinositol phosphate synthase in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Morii, Hiroyuki; Okauchi, Tatsuo; Nomiya, Hiroki; Ogawa, Midori; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Taniguchi, Hatsumi

    2013-03-01

    We previously reported a novel pathway for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylinositol in mycobacteria via phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) [Morii H., Ogawa, M., Fukuda, K., Taniguchi, H., and Koga, Y (2010) J. Biochem. 148, 593-602]. PIP synthase in the pathway is a promising target for the development of new anti-mycobacterium drugs. In the present study, we evaluated the characteristics of the PIP synthase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Four types of compounds were chemically synthesized based on the assumption that structural homologues of inositol 1-phosphate, a PIP synthase substrate, would act as PIP synthase inhibitors, and the results confirmed that all synthesized compounds inhibited PIP synthase activity. The phosphonate analogue of inositol 1-phosphate (Ino-C-P) had the greatest inhibitory effect among the synthesized compounds examined. Kinetic analysis indicated that Ino-C-P acted as a competitive inhibitor of inositol 1-phosphate. The IC(50) value for Ino-C-P inhibition of the PIP synthase activity was estimated to be 2.0 mM. Interestingly, Ino-C-P was utilized in the same manner as the normal PIP synthase substrate, leading to the synthesis of a phosphonate analogue of PIP (PI-C-P), which had a structure similar to that of the natural product, PIP. In addition, PI-C-P had high inhibitory activity against PIP synthase.

  20. Stomatal closure induced by phytosphingosine-1-phosphate and sphingosine-1-phosphate depends on nitric oxide and pH of guard cells in Pisum sativum.

    PubMed

    Puli, Mallikarjuna Rao; Rajsheel, Pidakala; Aswani, Vetcha; Agurla, Srinivas; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki; Raghavendra, Agepati S

    2016-10-01

    Phyto-S1P and S1P induced stomatal closure in epidermis of pea ( Pisum sativum ) by raising the levels of NO and pH in guard cells. Phosphosphingolipids, such as phytosphingosine-1-phosphate (phyto-S1P) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), are important signaling components during drought stress. The biosynthesis of phyto-S1P or S1P is mediated by sphingosine kinases (SPHKs). Although phyto-S1P and S1P are known to be signaling components in higher plants, their ability to induce stomatal closure has been ambiguous. We evaluated in detail the effects of phyto-S1P, S1P and SPHK inhibitors on signaling events leading to stomatal closure in the epidermis of Pisum sativum. Phyto-S1P or S1P induced stomatal closure, along with a marked rise in nitric oxide (NO) and cytoplasmic pH of guard cells, as in case of ABA. Two SPHK inhibitors, DL-threo dihydrosphingosine and N',N'-dimethylsphingosine, restricted ABA-induced stomatal closure and prevented the increase of NO or pH by ABA. Modulators of NO or pH impaired both stomatal closure and increase in NO or pH by phyto-S1P/S1P. The stomatal closure by phyto-S1P/S1P was mediated by phospholipase D and phosphatidic acid (PA). When present, PA elevated the levels of pH, but not NO of guard cells. Our results demonstrate that stomatal closure induced by phyto-S1P and S1P depends on rise in pH as well as NO of guard cells. A scheme of signaling events initiated by phyto-S1P/S1P, and converging to cause stomatal closure, is proposed.

  1. Isolation of a FAD-GPDH gene encoding a mitochondrial FAD-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wanggui; Cao, Yi; Sun, Xiaofei; Huang, Fei; He, Qinghua; Qiao, Dairong; Bai, Linhan

    2007-06-01

    The mitochondrial FAD-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (FAD-GPDH), recently reported in plants, has been detailed in yeast and animal systems. It oxidizes glycerol-3-phosphate (G-3-P) to dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) on the outer surface of mitochondrial inner membrane. A cDNA encoding the Dunaliella salina mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (DsFAD-GPDH) has been cloned and sequenced. The full length cDNA is 2791 bp, with an open reading frame (ORF) encoding 650 predicted amino acids, which show strong homology to reported FAD-GPDHs and have an apparent mitochondrial targeting sequence in the N-terminal. The sequence has been submitted to the GenBank database under Accession No. DQ916107. Results of Real-Time Quantitative PCR and enzymatic assays show that expression of DsFAD-GPDH is enhanced at first by salt treatment, and repressed by oxygen deficiency and cold stress.

  2. Modeling of glycerol-3-phosphate transporter suggests a potential 'tilt' mechanism involved in its function.

    PubMed

    Tsigelny, Igor F; Greenberg, Jerry; Kouznetsova, Valentina; Nigam, Sanjay K

    2008-10-01

    Many major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporters have similar 12-transmembrane alpha-helical topologies with two six-helix halves connected by a long loop. In humans, these transporters participate in key physiological processes and are also, as in the case of members of the organic anion transporter (OAT) family, of pharmaceutical interest. Recently, crystal structures of two bacterial representatives of the MFS family--the glycerol-3-phosphate transporter (GlpT) and lac-permease (LacY)--have been solved and, because of assumptions regarding the high structural conservation of this family, there is hope that the results can be applied to mammalian transporters as well. Based on crystallography, it has been suggested that a major conformational "switching" mechanism accounts for ligand transport by MFS proteins. This conformational switch would then allow periodic changes in the overall transporter configuration, resulting in its cyclic opening to the periplasm or cytoplasm. Following this lead, we have modeled a possible "switch" mechanism in GlpT, using the concept of rotation of protein domains as in the DynDom program17 and membranephilic constraints predicted by the MAPAS program.(23) We found that the minima of energies of intersubunit interactions support two alternate positions consistent with their transport properties. Thus, for GlpT, a "tilt" of 9 degrees -10 degrees rotation had the most favorable energetics of electrostatic interaction between the two halves of the transporter; moreover, this confirmation was sufficient to suggest transport of the ligand across the membrane. We conducted steered molecular dynamics simulations of the GlpT-ligand system to explore how glycerol-3-phosphate would be handled by the "tilted" structure, and obtained results generally consistent with experimental mutagenesis data. While biochemical data remain most consistent with a single-site alternating access model, our results raise the possibility that, while the

  3. Dengue Virus NS1 Protein Modulates Cellular Energy Metabolism by Increasing Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Allonso, Diego; Andrade, Iamara S.; Conde, Jonas N.; Coelho, Diego R.; Rocha, Daniele C. P.; da Silva, Manuela L.; Ventura, Gustavo T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue is one of the main public health concerns worldwide. Recent estimates indicate that over 390 million people are infected annually with the dengue virus (DENV), resulting in thousands of deaths. Among the DENV nonstructural proteins, the NS1 protein is the only one whose function during replication is still unknown. NS1 is a 46- to 55-kDa glycoprotein commonly found as both a membrane-associated homodimer and a soluble hexameric barrel-shaped lipoprotein. Despite its role in the pathogenic process, NS1 is essential for proper RNA accumulation and virus production. In the present study, we identified that glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) interacts with intracellular NS1. Molecular docking revealed that this interaction occurs through the hydrophobic protrusion of NS1 and the hydrophobic residues located at the opposite side of the catalytic site. Moreover, addition of purified recombinant NS1 enhanced the glycolytic activity of GAPDH in vitro. Interestingly, we observed that DENV infection promoted the relocalization of GAPDH to the perinuclear region, where NS1 is commonly found. Both DENV infection and expression of NS1 itself resulted in increased GAPDH activity. Our findings indicate that the NS1 protein acts to increase glycolytic flux and, consequently, energy production, which is consistent with the recent finding that DENV induces and requires glycolysis for proper replication. This is the first report to propose that NS1 is an important modulator of cellular energy metabolism. The data presented here provide new insights that may be useful for further drug design and the development of alternative antiviral therapies against DENV. IMPORTANCE Dengue represents a serious public health problem worldwide and is caused by infection with dengue virus (DENV). Estimates indicate that half of the global population is at risk of infection, with almost 400 million cases occurring per year. The NS1 glycoprotein is found in both the

  4. Dengue Virus NS1 Protein Modulates Cellular Energy Metabolism by Increasing Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Activity.

    PubMed

    Allonso, Diego; Andrade, Iamara S; Conde, Jonas N; Coelho, Diego R; Rocha, Daniele C P; da Silva, Manuela L; Ventura, Gustavo T; Silva, Emiliana M; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo

    2015-12-01

    Dengue is one of the main public health concerns worldwide. Recent estimates indicate that over 390 million people are infected annually with the dengue virus (DENV), resulting in thousands of deaths. Among the DENV nonstructural proteins, the NS1 protein is the only one whose function during replication is still unknown. NS1 is a 46- to 55-kDa glycoprotein commonly found as both a membrane-associated homodimer and a soluble hexameric barrel-shaped lipoprotein. Despite its role in the pathogenic process, NS1 is essential for proper RNA accumulation and virus production. In the present study, we identified that glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) interacts with intracellular NS1. Molecular docking revealed that this interaction occurs through the hydrophobic protrusion of NS1 and the hydrophobic residues located at the opposite side of the catalytic site. Moreover, addition of purified recombinant NS1 enhanced the glycolytic activity of GAPDH in vitro. Interestingly, we observed that DENV infection promoted the relocalization of GAPDH to the perinuclear region, where NS1 is commonly found. Both DENV infection and expression of NS1 itself resulted in increased GAPDH activity. Our findings indicate that the NS1 protein acts to increase glycolytic flux and, consequently, energy production, which is consistent with the recent finding that DENV induces and requires glycolysis for proper replication. This is the first report to propose that NS1 is an important modulator of cellular energy metabolism. The data presented here provide new insights that may be useful for further drug design and the development of alternative antiviral therapies against DENV. Dengue represents a serious public health problem worldwide and is caused by infection with dengue virus (DENV). Estimates indicate that half of the global population is at risk of infection, with almost 400 million cases occurring per year. The NS1 glycoprotein is found in both the intracellular and the

  5. Glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 deficiency induces compensatory amino acid metabolism during fasting in mice.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tomoki; Yoshida, Yuma; Morita, Akihito; Mori, Nobuko; Miura, Shinji

    2016-11-01

    Glucose is used as an energy source in many organs and obtained from dietary carbohydrates. However, when the external energy supply is interrupted, e.g., during fasting, carbohydrates preserved in the liver and glycogenic precursors derived from other organs are used to maintain blood glucose levels. Glycerol and glycogenic amino acids derived from adipocytes and skeletal muscles are utilized as glycogenic precursors. Glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 (GPD1), an NAD(+)/NADH-dependent enzyme present in the cytosol, catalyzes the reversible conversion of glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) to dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP). Since G3P is one of the substrates utilized for gluconeogenesis in the liver, the conversion of G3P to DHAP by GPD1 is essential for maintaining blood glucose levels during fasting. We focused on GPD1 and examined its roles in gluconeogenesis during fasting. Using GPD1 null model BALB/cHeA mice (HeA mice), we measured gluconeogenesis from glycerol and the change of blood glucose levels under fasting conditions. We also measured gene expression related to gluconeogenesis in the liver and protein metabolism in skeletal muscle. BALB/cBy mice (By mice) were used as a control. The blood glucose levels in the HeA mice were lower than that in the By mice after glycerol administration. Although lack of GPD1 inhibited gluconeogenesis from glycerol, blood glucose levels in the HeA mice after 1-4h of fasting were significantly higher than that in the By mice. Muscle protein synthesis in HeA mice was significantly lower than that in the By mice. Moreover, blood alanine levels and usage of alanine for gluconeogenesis in the liver were significantly higher in the HeA mice than that in the By mice. Although these data indicate that a lack of GPD1 inhibits gluconeogenesis from glycerol, chronic GPD1 deficiency may induce an adaptation that enhances gluconeogenesis from glycogenic amino acids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ceramide and ceramide 1-phosphate are negative regulators of TNF-α production induced by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Józefowski, Szczepan; Czerkies, Maciej; Łukasik, Anna; Bielawska, Alicja; Bielawski, Jacek; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna; Sobota, Andrzej

    2010-12-01

    LPS is a constituent of cell walls of Gram-negative bacteria that, acting through the CD14/TLR4 receptor complex, causes strong proinflammatory activation of macrophages. In murine peritoneal macrophages and J774 cells, LPS at 1-2 ng/ml induced maximal TNF-α and MIP-2 release, and higher LPS concentrations were less effective, which suggested a negative control of LPS action. While studying the mechanism of this negative regulation, we found that in J774 cells, LPS activated both acid sphingomyelinase and neutral sphingomyelinase and moderately elevated ceramide, ceramide 1-phosphate, and sphingosine levels. Lowering of the acid sphingomyelinase and neutral sphingomyelinase activities using inhibitors or gene silencing upregulated TNF-α and MIP-2 production in J774 cells and macrophages. Accordingly, treatment of those cells with exogenous C8-ceramide diminished TNF-α and MIP-2 production after LPS stimulation. Exposure of J774 cells to bacterial sphingomyelinase or interference with ceramide hydrolysis using inhibitors of ceramidases also lowered the LPS-induced TNF-α production. The latter result indicates that ceramide rather than sphingosine suppresses TNF-α and MIP-2 production. Of these two cytokines, only TNF-α was negatively regulated by ceramide 1-phosphate as was indicated by upregulated TNF-α production after silencing of ceramide kinase gene expression. None of the above treatments diminished NO or RANTES production induced by LPS. Together the data indicate that ceramide negatively regulates production of TNF-α and MIP-2 in response to LPS with the former being sensitive to ceramide 1-phosphate as well. We hypothesize that the ceramide-mediated anti-inflammatory pathway may play a role in preventing endotoxic shock and in limiting inflammation.

  7. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Lyase Deficient Cells as a Tool to Study Protein Lipid Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gerl, Mathias J.; Bittl, Verena; Kirchner, Susanne; Sachsenheimer, Timo; Brunner, Hanna L.; Lüchtenborg, Christian; Özbalci, Cagakan; Wiedemann, Hannah; Wegehingel, Sabine; Nickel, Walter; Haberkant, Per; Schultz, Carsten; Krüger, Marcus; Brügger, Britta

    2016-01-01

    Cell membranes contain hundreds to thousands of individual lipid species that are of structural importance but also specifically interact with proteins. Due to their highly controlled synthesis and role in signaling events sphingolipids are an intensely studied class of lipids. In order to investigate their metabolism and to study proteins interacting with sphingolipids, metabolic labeling based on photoactivatable sphingoid bases is the most straightforward approach. In order to monitor protein-lipid-crosslink products, sphingosine derivatives containing a reporter moiety, such as a radiolabel or a clickable group, are used. In normal cells, degradation of sphingoid bases via action of the checkpoint enzyme sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase occurs at position C2-C3 of the sphingoid base and channels the resulting hexadecenal into the glycerolipid biosynthesis pathway. In case the functionalized sphingosine looses the reporter moiety during its degradation, specificity towards sphingolipid labeling is maintained. In case degradation of a sphingosine derivative does not remove either the photoactivatable or reporter group from the resulting hexadecenal, specificity towards sphingolipid labeling can be achieved by blocking sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase activity and thus preventing sphingosine derivatives to be channeled into the sphingolipid-to-glycerolipid metabolic pathway. Here we report an approach using clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated nuclease Cas9 to create a sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (SGPL1) HeLa knockout cell line to disrupt the sphingolipid-to-glycerolipid metabolic pathway. We found that the lipid and protein compositions as well as sphingolipid metabolism of SGPL1 knock-out HeLa cells only show little adaptations, which validates these cells as model systems to study transient protein-sphingolipid interactions. PMID:27100999

  8. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Lyase Deficient Cells as a Tool to Study Protein Lipid Interactions.

    PubMed

    Gerl, Mathias J; Bittl, Verena; Kirchner, Susanne; Sachsenheimer, Timo; Brunner, Hanna L; Lüchtenborg, Christian; Özbalci, Cagakan; Wiedemann, Hannah; Wegehingel, Sabine; Nickel, Walter; Haberkant, Per; Schultz, Carsten; Krüger, Marcus; Brügger, Britta

    2016-01-01

    Cell membranes contain hundreds to thousands of individual lipid species that are of structural importance but also specifically interact with proteins. Due to their highly controlled synthesis and role in signaling events sphingolipids are an intensely studied class of lipids. In order to investigate their metabolism and to study proteins interacting with sphingolipids, metabolic labeling based on photoactivatable sphingoid bases is the most straightforward approach. In order to monitor protein-lipid-crosslink products, sphingosine derivatives containing a reporter moiety, such as a radiolabel or a clickable group, are used. In normal cells, degradation of sphingoid bases via action of the checkpoint enzyme sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase occurs at position C2-C3 of the sphingoid base and channels the resulting hexadecenal into the glycerolipid biosynthesis pathway. In case the functionalized sphingosine looses the reporter moiety during its degradation, specificity towards sphingolipid labeling is maintained. In case degradation of a sphingosine derivative does not remove either the photoactivatable or reporter group from the resulting hexadecenal, specificity towards sphingolipid labeling can be achieved by blocking sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase activity and thus preventing sphingosine derivatives to be channeled into the sphingolipid-to-glycerolipid metabolic pathway. Here we report an approach using clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated nuclease Cas9 to create a sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (SGPL1) HeLa knockout cell line to disrupt the sphingolipid-to-glycerolipid metabolic pathway. We found that the lipid and protein compositions as well as sphingolipid metabolism of SGPL1 knock-out HeLa cells only show little adaptations, which validates these cells as model systems to study transient protein-sphingolipid interactions.

  9. Structure of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from the archaeal hyperthermophile Methanocaldococcus jannaschii

    PubMed Central

    Malay, Ali D.; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Ellis, Mark J.; Antonyuk, Svetlana V.; Strange, Richard W.; Hasnain, S. Samar; Shinkai, Akeo; Padmanabhan, Balasundaram; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2009-01-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (Mj-GAPDH) was determined to 1.81 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 83.4, b = 152.0, c = 118.6 Å. The structure was solved by molecular replacement and was refined to a final R factor of 17.1% (R free = 19.8%). The final structure included the cofactor NADP+ at the nucleotide-binding site and featured unoccupied inorganic and substrate phosphate-binding sites. A comparison with GAPDH structures from mesophilic sources suggested that Mj-GAPDH is stabilized by extensive electrostatic interactions between the C-terminal α-helices and various distal loop regions, which are likely to contribute to thermal stability. The key phosphate-binding residues in the active site of Mj-GAPDH are conserved in other archaeal GAPDH proteins. These residues undergo a conformational shift in response to occupancy of the inorganic phosphate site. PMID:20054117

  10. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase: a universal internal control for Western blots in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yonghong; Wu, Min; He, Guowei; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Weiguang; Gao, Yan; Li, Zhihui; Wang, Zhaoyan; Zhang, Chenggang

    2012-04-01

    In the current study, we examined the expression level of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) protein in a number of organisms and the stability of GAPDH under various conditions. Our results revealed that GAPDH is present in multiple Escherichia coli strains, the yeast strain GS115, Caenorhabditis elegans, rat PC12 cells, and both mouse and rat brain. Furthermore, GAPDH was stably expressed under different concentrations of inducer and at different times of induction in E. coli (BL21) cells and yeast GS115 cells. Stable expression of GAPDH protein was also observed in C.elegans and PC12 cells that were treated with different concentrations of paraquat or sodium sulfite, respectively. In addition, we were able to detect and identify the endogenous gapA protein in E.coli via immunoprecipitation and MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. Endogenous gapA protein and exogenously expressed (subcloned) GAPDH proteins were detected in E. coli BL21 but not for gapC. With the exception of gapC in E. coli, the various isoforms of GAPDH possessed enzymatic activity. Finally, sequence analysis revealed that the GAPDH proteins were 76% identical, with the exception of E. coli gapC. Taken together, our results indicate that GAPDH could be universally used as an internal control for the Western blot analysis of prokaryotic and eukaryotic samples. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-telomere association correlates with redox status in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Pariona-Llanos, Ricardo; Pavani, Raphael Souza; Reis, Marcelo; Noël, Vincent; Silber, Ariel Mariano; Armelin, Hugo Aguirre; Cano, Maria Isabel Nogueira; Elias, Maria Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a classical metabolic enzyme involved in energy production and plays a role in additional nuclear functions, including transcriptional control, recognition of misincorporated nucleotides in DNA and maintenance of telomere structure. Here, we show that the recombinant protein T. cruzi GAPDH (rTcGAPDH) binds single-stranded telomeric DNA. We demonstrate that the binding of GAPDH to telomeric DNA correlates with the balance between oxidized and reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides (NAD+/NADH). We observed that GAPDH-telomere association and NAD+/NADH balance changed throughout the T. cruzi life cycle. For example, in replicative epimastigote forms of T. cruzi, which show similar intracellular concentrations of NAD+ and NADH, GAPDH binds to telomeric DNA in vivo and this binding activity is inhibited by exogenous NAD+. In contrast, in the T. cruzi non-proliferative trypomastigote forms, which show higher NAD+ concentration, GAPDH was absent from telomeres. In addition, NAD+ abolishes physical interaction between recombinant GAPDH and synthetic telomere oligonucleotide in a cell free system, mimicking exogenous NAD+ that reduces GAPDH-telomere interaction in vivo. We propose that the balance in the NAD+/NADH ratio during T. cruzi life cycle homeostatically regulates GAPDH telomere association, suggesting that in trypanosomes redox status locally modulates GAPDH association with telomeric DNA.

  12. Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase-Telomere Association Correlates with Redox Status in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Pariona-Llanos, Ricardo; Pavani, Raphael Souza; Reis, Marcelo; Noël, Vincent; Silber, Ariel Mariano; Armelin, Hugo Aguirre; Cano, Maria Isabel Nogueira; Elias, Maria Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a classical metabolic enzyme involved in energy production and plays a role in additional nuclear functions, including transcriptional control, recognition of misincorporated nucleotides in DNA and maintenance of telomere structure. Here, we show that the recombinant protein T. cruzi GAPDH (rTcGAPDH) binds single-stranded telomeric DNA. We demonstrate that the binding of GAPDH to telomeric DNA correlates with the balance between oxidized and reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides (NAD+/NADH). We observed that GAPDH-telomere association and NAD+/NADH balance changed throughout the T. cruzi life cycle. For example, in replicative epimastigote forms of T. cruzi, which show similar intracellular concentrations of NAD+ and NADH, GAPDH binds to telomeric DNA in vivo and this binding activity is inhibited by exogenous NAD+. In contrast, in the T. cruzi non-proliferative trypomastigote forms, which show higher NAD+ concentration, GAPDH was absent from telomeres. In addition, NAD+ abolishes physical interaction between recombinant GAPDH and synthetic telomere oligonucleotide in a cell free system, mimicking exogenous NAD+ that reduces GAPDH-telomere interaction in vivo. We propose that the balance in the NAD+/NADH ratio during T. cruzi life cycle homeostatically regulates GAPDH telomere association, suggesting that in trypanosomes redox status locally modulates GAPDH association with telomeric DNA. PMID:25775131

  13. Plastid-expressed 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase genes provide high level glyphosate tolerance in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Ye, G N; Hajdukiewicz, P T; Broyles, D; Rodriguez, D; Xu, C W; Nehra, N; Staub, J M

    2001-02-01

    Plastid transformation (transplastomic) technology has several potential advantages for biotechnological applications including the use of unmodified prokaryotic genes for engineering, potential high-level gene expression and gene containment due to maternal inheritance in most crop plants. However, the efficacy of a plastid-encoded trait may change depending on plastid number and tissue type. We report a feasibility study in tobacco plastids to achieve high-level herbicide resistance in both vegetative tissues and reproductive organs. We chose to test glyphosate resistance via over-expression in plastids of tolerant forms of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS). Immunological, enzymatic and whole-plant assays were used to prove the efficacy of three different prokaryotic (Achromobacter, Agrobacterium and Bacillus) EPSPS genes. Using the Agrobacterium strain CP4 EPSPS as a model we identified translational control sequences that direct a 10,000-fold range of protein accumulation (to >10% total soluble protein in leaves). Plastid-expressed EPSPS could provide very high levels of glyphosate resistance, although levels of resistance in vegetative and reproductive tissues differed depending on EPSPS accumulation levels, and correlated to the plastid abundance in these tissues. Paradoxically, higher levels of plastid-expressed EPSPS protein accumulation were apparently required for efficacy than from a similar nuclear-encoded gene. Nevertheless, the demonstration of high-level glyphosate tolerance in vegetative and reproductive organs using transplastomic technology provides a necessary step for transfer of this technology to other crop species.

  14. U(VI) Sequestration in Hydroxyapatite Produced by Microbial Glycerol 3-Phosphate Metabolism▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Konishi, Hiromi; Xu, Huifang; Roden, Eric E.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the potential for removal of U(VI) from solution via precipitation of U(VI)-bearing calcium-phosphate (Ca-P) minerals coupled to microbial hydrolysis of glycerol phosphate compounds. We evaluated this process in circumneutral-pH groundwater from Area 2 of the U.S. Department of Energy Field Research Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Area 2 groundwater contains high concentrations of dissolved calcium (ca. 4 mM), and thus, release of phosphate during glycerol phosphate metabolism has the potential to create conditions favorable for U(VI) sequestration in Ca-P minerals. Microbial enumeration and isolation studies verified the presence of aerobic and nitrate-reducing glycerol 3-phosphate (G3P)-metabolizing microorganisms in Area 2 sediments. Coprecipitation of U(VI) with Ca-P minerals coupled to microbial G3P hydrolysis was demonstrated in artificial groundwater under aerobic and nitrate-reducing conditions. Transmission electron microscopy analysis and mineral-washing experiments demonstrated that U(VI) was incorporated into the structure of the insoluble Ca-P mineral hydroxyapatite [Ca5(PO4)3OH]. Our results support the idea that U(VI) can be effectively removed from solution in contaminated aquifers through stimulation of microbial organophosphate metabolism. PMID:19633115

  15. Identification of Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Sequence and Expression Profiles in Tree Shrew (Tupaia belangeri)

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yu; Wang, Yingjun; Smith, Wanli W.; Leng, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri) diverged from the primate order (Primates) and are classified as Scandentia, a separate taxonomic group of mammals. The tree shrew has been suggested to use an animal model to study human disease but the genomic sequences of tree shrew is largely unidentified. Here we identified the full-length cDNA sequence of a housekeeping gene, Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH), in tree shrew. We further constructed a phylogenetic family tree base on GAPDH molecules of various organisms and compared GAPDH sequences with human and other small experimental animals. These study revealed that tree shrew was closer to human than mouse, rat, rabbit and guinea pig. The Quantitative Reverse Transcription PCR and western blot analysis further demonstrated that GAPDH expressed in various tissues in tree shrew as a general conservative housekeeping proteins as in human. Our findings provide the novel genetic knowledge of the tree shrew and strong evidences that tree shrew can be an experimental model system to study human disorders. PMID:24887411

  16. Occurrence of a multimeric high-molecular-weight glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in human serum.

    PubMed

    Kunjithapatham, Rani; Geschwind, Jean-Francois; Devine, Lauren; Boronina, Tatiana N; O'Meally, Robert N; Cole, Robert N; Torbenson, Michael S; Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Shanmugasundaram

    2015-04-03

    Cellular glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a phylogenetically conserved, ubiquitous enzyme that plays an indispensable role in energy metabolism. Although a wealth of information is available on cellular GAPDH, there is a clear paucity of data on its extracellular counterpart (i.e., the secreted or extracellular GAPDH). Here, we show that the extracellular GAPDH in human serum is a multimeric, high-molecular-weight, yet glycolytically active enzyme. The high-molecular-weight multimers of serum GAPDH were identified by immunodetection on one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis using multiple antibodies specific for various epitopes of GAPDH. Partial purification of serum GAPDH by DEAE Affigel affinity/ion exchange chromatography further established the multimeric composition of serum GAPDH. In vitro data demonstrated that human cell lines secrete a multimeric, high-molecular-weight enzyme similar to that of serum GAPDH. Furthermore, LC-MS/MS analysis of extracellular GAPDH from human cell lines confirmed the presence of unique peptides of GAPDH in the high-molecular-weight subunits. Furthermore, data from pulse-chase experiments established the presence of high-molecular-weight subunits in the secreted, extracellular GAPDH. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the presence of a high-molecular-weight, enzymatically active secretory GAPDH in human serum that may have a hitherto unknown function in humans.

  17. Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase-Encoding Gene as a Useful Taxonomic Tool for Staphylococcus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Yugueros, Javier; Temprano, Alejandro; Berzal, Beatriz; Sánchez, María; Hernanz, Carmen; Luengo, José María; Naharro, Germán

    2000-01-01

    The gap gene of Staphylococcus aureus, encoding glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, was used as a target to amplify a 933-bp DNA fragment by PCR with a pair of primers 26 and 25 nucleotides in length. PCR products, detected by agarose gel electrophoresis, were also amplified from 12 Staphylococcus spp. analyzed previously. Hybridization with an internal 279-bp DNA fragment probe was positive in all PCR-positive samples. No PCR products were amplified when other gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial genera were analyzed using the same pair of primers. AluI digestion of PCR-generated products gave 12 different restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns, one for each species analyzed. However, we could detect two intraspecies RFLP patterns in Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus hominis, and Staphylococcus simulans which were different from the other species. An identical RFLP pattern was observed for 112 S. aureus isolates from humans, cows, and sheep. The sensitivity of the PCR assays was very high, with a detection limit for S. aureus cells of 20 CFU when cells were suspended in saline. PCR amplification of the gap gene has the potential for rapid identification of at least 12 species belonging to the genus Staphylococcus, as it is highly specific. PMID:11101563

  18. Comparative molecular analysis of evolutionarily distant glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Sardina pilchardus and Octopus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Baibai, Tarik; Oukhattar, Laila; Mountassif, Driss; Assobhei, Omar; Serrano, Aurelio; Soukri, Abdelaziz

    2010-12-01

    The NAD(+)-dependent cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, EC 1.2.1.12), which is recognized as a key to central carbon metabolism in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis and as an important allozymic polymorphic biomarker, was purified from muscles of two marine species: the skeletal muscle of Sardina pilchardus Walbaum (Teleost, Clupeida) and the incompressible arm muscle of Octopus vulgaris (Mollusca, Cephalopoda). Comparative biochemical studies have revealed that they differ in their subunit molecular masses and in pI values. Partial cDNA sequences corresponding to an internal region of the GapC genes from Sardina and Octopus were obtained by polymerase chain reaction using degenerate primers designed from highly conserved protein motifs. Alignments of the deduced amino acid sequences were used to establish the 3D structures of the active site of two enzymes as well as the phylogenetic relationships of the sardine and octopus enzymes. These two enzymes are the first two GAPDHs characterized so far from teleost fish and cephalopod, respectively. Interestingly, phylogenetic analyses indicated that the sardina GAPDH is in a cluster with the archetypical enzymes from other vertebrates, while the octopus GAPDH comes together with other molluscan sequences in a distant basal assembly closer to bacterial and fungal orthologs, thus suggesting their different evolutionary scenarios.

  19. Phosphatidic Acid Binds to Cytosolic Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate Dehydrogenase and Promotes Its Cleavage in Arabidopsis *

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Chul; Guo, Liang; Wang, Xuemin

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidic acid (PA) is a class of lipid messengers involved in a variety of physiological processes. To understand how PA mediates cell functions in plants, we used a PA affinity membrane assay to isolate PA-binding proteins from Camelina sativa followed by mass spectrometric sequencing. A cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPC) was identified to bind to PA, and detailed analysis was carried out subsequently using GAPC1 and GAPC1 from Arabidopsis. The PA and GAPC binding was abolished by the cation zinc whereas oxidation of GAPCs promoted the PA binding. PA had little impact on the GAPC catalytic activity in vitro, but the PA treatment of Arabidopsis seedlings induced proteolytic cleavage of GAPC2 and inhibited Arabidopsis seedling growth. The extent of PA inhibition was greater in GAPC-overexpressing than wild-type seedlings, but the greater PA inhibition was abolished by application of zinc to the seedling. The PA treatment also reduced the expression of genes involved in PA synthesis and utilization, and the PA-reduced gene expression was partially recovered by zinc treatment. These data suggest that PA binds to oxidized GAPDH and promotes its cleavage and that the PA and GAPC interaction may provide a signaling link coordinating carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. PMID:23504314

  20. Phosphoinositol 3-phosphate acts as a timer for reactive oxygen species production in the phagosome.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhi Min; Bouchab, Leïla; Hudik, Elodie; Le Bars, Romain; Nüsse, Oliver; Dupré-Crochet, Sophie

    2017-01-17

    Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the phagosome by the NADPH oxidase is critical for mammalian immune defense against microbial infections and phosphoinositides are important regulators in this process. Phosphoinositol 3-phosphate (PI(3)P) regulates ROS production at the phagosome via p40(phox) by an unknown mechanism. This study tested the hypothesis that PI(3)P controls ROS production by regulating the presence of p40(phox) and p67(phox) at the phagosomal membrane. Pharmacologic inhibition of PI(3)P synthesis at the phagosome decreased the ROS production both in differentiated PLB-985 cells and human neutrophils. It also releases p67(phox), the key cytosolic subunit of the oxidase, and p40(phox) from the phagosome. The knockdown of the PI(3)P phosphatase MTM1 or Rubicon or both increases the level of PI(3)P at the phagosome. That increase enhances ROS production inside the phagosome and triggers an extended accumulation of p67(phox) at the phagosome. Furthermore, the overexpression of MTM1 at the phagosomal membrane induces the disappearance of PI(3)P from the phagosome and prevents sustained ROS production. In conclusion, PI(3)P, indeed, regulates ROS production by maintaining p40(phox) and p67(phox) at the phagosomal membrane.

  1. Expression of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase is enhanced in Leishmania spp naturally resistant to nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Rios, M C; Silva, W R T; Azevedo, A F; Santos, P L; Teixeira, S A; Muscará, M N; Thomazzi, S M; Almeida, R P; Fernandes, R P M; Scher, R

    2015-06-29

    Leishmania spp are the causative agents of a spectrum of diseases termed leishmaniasis that affect mammals, including humans and dogs. Although reactive nitrogen species are employed in the control of parasitism by the immune system, it is known that Leishmania can withstand this oxidative stress. As the mechanism by which these species are resistant to nitric oxide (NO) is poorly understood, the main objective of this study was to evaluate the expression of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) in Leishmania amazonensis and Leishmania chagasi promastigotes showing natural resistance to NO. GAPDH transcript levels were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction amplification, and GAPDH activity (assessed by levels of NADH oxidation) was measured by spectrophotometry. The level of nitration in total protein was assessed by immunoblotting. The results demonstrated an increase in GAPDH expression in resistant isolates of both species compared to susceptible isolates. The increase in GAPDH expression led to an increase in the activity of GAPDH in L. amazonensis human isolates resistant to NO. The pattern of protein nitration did not differ between sensitive and resistant isolates. Our results suggest that changes in expression of GAPDH may be responsible, at least in part, to natural resistance to NO found in human and canine Leishmania spp.

  2. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase-encoding gene as a useful taxonomic tool for Staphylococcus spp.

    PubMed

    Yugueros, J; Temprano, A; Berzal, B; Sánchez, M; Hernanz, C; Luengo, J M; Naharro, G

    2000-12-01

    The gap gene of Staphylococcus aureus, encoding glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, was used as a target to amplify a 933-bp DNA fragment by PCR with a pair of primers 26 and 25 nucleotides in length. PCR products, detected by agarose gel electrophoresis, were also amplified from 12 Staphylococcus spp. analyzed previously. Hybridization with an internal 279-bp DNA fragment probe was positive in all PCR-positive samples. No PCR products were amplified when other gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial genera were analyzed using the same pair of primers. AluI digestion of PCR-generated products gave 12 different restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns, one for each species analyzed. However, we could detect two intraspecies RFLP patterns in Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus hominis, and Staphylococcus simulans which were different from the other species. An identical RFLP pattern was observed for 112 S. aureus isolates from humans, cows, and sheep. The sensitivity of the PCR assays was very high, with a detection limit for S. aureus cells of 20 CFU when cells were suspended in saline. PCR amplification of the gap gene has the potential for rapid identification of at least 12 species belonging to the genus Staphylococcus, as it is highly specific.

  3. Bioreaction Engineering Leading to Efficient Synthesis of L-Glyceraldehyd-3-Phosphate.

    PubMed

    Molla, Getachew S; Kinfu, Birhanu M; Chow, Jennifer; Streit, Wolfgang; Wohlgemuth, Roland; Liese, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Enantiopure L-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (L-GAP) is a useful building block in natural biological and synthetic processes. A biocatalytic process using glycerol kinase from Cellulomonas sp. (EC 2.7.1.30) catalyzed phosphorylation of L-glyceraldehyde (L-GA) by ATP is used for the synthesis of L-GAP. L-GAP has a half-life of 6.86 h under reaction conditions. The activity of this enzyme depends on the Mg(2+) to ATP molar ratio showing maximum activity at the optimum molar ratio of 0.7. A kinetic model is developed and validated showing a 2D correlation of 99.9% between experimental and numerical data matrices. The enzyme exhibits inhibition by ADP, AMP, methylglyoxal and Ca(2+) , but not by L-GAP and inorganic orthophosphate. Moreover, equal amount of Ca(2+) exerts a different degree of inhibition relative to the activity without the addition of Ca(2+) depending on the Mg(2+) to ATP molar ratio. If the Mg(2+) to ATP molar ratio is set to be at the optimum value or less, inorganic hexametaphosphate (PPi6) suppresses the enzyme activity; otherwise PPi6 enhances the enzyme activity. Based on reaction engineering parameters such as conversion, selectivity and specific productivity, evaluation of different reactor types reveals that batchwise operation via stirred-tank reactor is the most efficient process for the synthesis of L-GAP.

  4. Inactivation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of human malignant cells by methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Ray, M; Basu, N; Ray, S

    1997-12-01

    The effect of methylglyoxal on the activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GA3PD) of several normal human tissues and benign and malignant tumors has been tested. Methylglyoxal inactivated GA3PD of all the malignant cells (47 samples) and the degree of inactivation was in the range of 25-90%, but it had no inhibitory effect on this enzyme from several normal cells (24 samples) and benign tumors (13 samples). When the effect of methylglyoxal on other two dehydrogenases namely glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and L-lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) of similar cells was tested as controls it has been observed that methylglyoxal has some inactivating effect on G6PD of all the normal, benign and malignant samples tested, whereas, LDH remained completely unaffected. These studies indicate that the inactivating effect of methylglyoxal on GA3PD specifically of the malignant cells may be a common feature of all the malignant cells, and this phenomenon can be used as a simple and rapid device for the detection of malignancy.

  5. Structural Basis of Substrate Selectivity in the Glycerol-3-Phosphate: Phosphate Antiporter GlpT

    PubMed Central

    Law, Christopher J.; Enkavi, Giray; Wang, Da-Neng; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Major facilitators represent the largest superfamily of secondary active transporter proteins and catalyze the transport of an enormous variety of small solute molecules across biological membranes. However, individual superfamily members, although they may be architecturally similar, exhibit strict specificity toward the substrates they transport. The structural basis of this specificity is poorly understood. A member of the major facilitator superfamily is the glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) transporter (GlpT) from the Escherichia coli inner membrane. GlpT is an antiporter that transports G3P into the cell in exchange for inorganic phosphate (Pi). By combining large-scale molecular-dynamics simulations, mutagenesis, substrate-binding affinity, and transport activity assays on GlpT, we were able to identify key amino acid residues that confer substrate specificity upon this protein. Our studies suggest that only a few amino acid residues that line the transporter lumen act as specificity determinants. Whereas R45, K80, H165, and, to a lesser extent Y38, Y42, and Y76 contribute to recognition of both free Pi and the phosphate moiety of G3P, the residues N162, Y266, and Y393 function in recognition of only the glycerol moiety of G3P. It is the latter interactions that give the transporter a higher affinity to G3P over Pi. PMID:19720022

  6. Lactobacillus reuteri glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase functions in adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Ming; Wang, Hai-Feng; Gao, Kan; Wang, Cong; Liu, Li; Liu, Jian-Xin

    2015-05-01

    This study was aimed to identify key surface proteins mediating the adhesion of lactobacilli to intestinal epithelial cells. By using Caco-2 and IPEC-J2 cells labeled with sulfo-NHS-biotin in the western blotting, a protein band of an approximately 37 kDa was detected on the surface layer of Lactobacillus reuteri strains ZJ616, ZJ617, ZJ621, and ZJ623 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Mass spectrometry analysis using the adhesion-related protein from L. reuteri ZJ617 showed that it was 100% homologous to the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) of L. reuteri JCM 1112 (GenBank: YP_001841377). The ability of L. reuteri ZJ617 to adhere to epithelial cells decreased significantly by treatment with LiCl or by blocking with an anti-GAPDH antibody, in comparison with the untreated strain (p < 0.05). Immunoelectron microscopic and immunofluorescence analyses confirmed that GAPDH is located on the surface layer of L. reuteri ZJ617. The results indicated that the GAPDH protein of L. reuteri ZJ617 acts as an adhesion component that plays an important role in binding to the intestinal epithelial cells.

  7. The influence of cytosolic phosphorylating glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPC) on potato tuber metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza; Biemelt, Sophia; Peisker, Martin; Lytovchenko, Anna; Fernie, Alisdair R; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the importance of cytosolic phosphorylating glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPC) in potato carbohydrate metabolism. For this purpose, the cytosolic isoform of phosphorylating GAPC was cloned and used for an antisense approach to generate transgenic potato plants that exhibited constitutively decreased GAPDH activity. Potato lines with decreased activities of phosphorylating GAPC exhibited no major changes in either whole-plant or tuber morphology. However, the levels of 3-phosphoglycerate were decreased in leaves of the transformants. A broad metabolic phenotyping of tubers from the transformants revealed an increase in sucrose and UDPglucose content, a decrease in the glycolytic intermediates 3-phosphoglycerate and phosphoenolpyruvate but little change in the levels of other metabolites. Moreover, the transformants displayed no differences in cold sweetening with respect to the wild type. Taken together these data suggest that phosphorylating GAPC plays only a minor role in the regulation of potato metabolism. The results presented here are discussed in relation to current models regarding primary metabolism in the potato tuber parenchyma.

  8. The Inositol-3-Phosphate Synthase Biosynthetic Enzyme Has Distinct Catalytic and Metabolic Roles

    PubMed Central

    Frej, Anna D.; Clark, Jonathan; Le Roy, Caroline I.; Lilla, Sergio; Thomason, Peter A.; Otto, Grant P.; Churchill, Grant; Insall, Robert H.; Claus, Sandrine P.; Hawkins, Phillip; Stephens, Len

    2016-01-01

    Inositol levels, maintained by the biosynthetic enzyme inositol-3-phosphate synthase (Ino1), are altered in a range of disorders, including bipolar disorder and Alzheimer's disease. To date, most inositol studies have focused on the molecular and cellular effects of inositol depletion without considering Ino1 levels. Here we employ a simple eukaryote, Dictyostelium discoideum, to demonstrate distinct effects of loss of Ino1 and inositol depletion. We show that loss of Ino1 results in an inositol auxotrophy that can be rescued only partially by exogenous inositol. Removal of inositol supplementation from the ino1− mutant resulted in a rapid 56% reduction in inositol levels, triggering the induction of autophagy, reduced cytokinesis, and substrate adhesion. Inositol depletion also caused a dramatic generalized decrease in phosphoinositide levels that was rescued by inositol supplementation. However, loss of Ino1 triggered broad metabolic changes consistent with the induction of a catabolic state that was not rescued by inositol supplementation. These data suggest a metabolic role for Ino1 that is independent of inositol biosynthesis. To characterize this role, an Ino1 binding partner containing SEL1L1 domains (Q54IX5) and having homology to mammalian macromolecular complex adaptor proteins was identified. Our findings therefore identify a new role for Ino1, independent of inositol biosynthesis, with broad effects on cell metabolism. PMID:26951199

  9. Negative regulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate levels in early-to-late endosome conversion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kai; Jian, Youli; Sun, Xiaojuan; Yang, Chengkui; Gao, Zhiyang; Zhang, Zhili; Liu, Xuezhao; Li, Yang; Xu, Jing; Jing, Yudong; Mitani, Shohei; He, Sudan

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) plays a central role in endosome fusion, recycling, sorting, and early-to-late endosome conversion, but the mechanisms that determine how the correct endosomal PtdIns3P level is achieved remain largely elusive. Here we identify two new factors, SORF-1 and SORF-2, as essential PtdIns3P regulators in Caenorhabditis elegans. Loss of sorf-1 or sorf-2 leads to greatly elevated endosomal PtdIns3P, which drives excessive fusion of early endosomes. sorf-1 and sorf-2 function coordinately with Rab switching genes to inhibit synthesis of PtdIns3P, allowing its turnover for endosome conversion. SORF-1 and SORF-2 act in a complex with BEC-1/Beclin1, and their loss causes elevated activity of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) complex. In mammalian cells, inactivation of WDR91 and WDR81, the homologs of SORF-1 and SORF-2, induces Beclin1-dependent enlargement of PtdIns3P-enriched endosomes and defective degradation of epidermal growth factor receptor. WDR91 and WDR81 interact with Beclin1 and inhibit PI3K complex activity. These findings reveal a conserved mechanism that controls appropriate PtdIns3P levels in early-to-late endosome conversion. PMID:26783301

  10. A glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase homolog in Borrelia burgdorferi and Borrelia hermsii.

    PubMed Central

    Anda, P; Gebbia, J A; Backenson, P B; Coleman, J L; Benach, J L

    1996-01-01

    A polyreactive monoclonal antibody recognized a 38.5-kDa polypeptide with amino-terminal sequence identity to conserved regions of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) in Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease agent, and Borrelia hermsii, an agent of American relapsing fever. This monoclonal antibody also recognized GAPDH from other pathogenic spirochetes and other prokaryotes and eukaryotes as well. GAPDH activity was detected in sonicates of both B. burgdorferi and B. hermsii but not in live, intact organisms, indicating the possibility of a subsurface localization for the Borrelia GAPDH activity. Degenerate primers constructed from highly conserved regions of gapdh of other prokaryotes successfully amplified this gene homolog in both B. burgdorferi and B. hermsii. Nuclei acid and deduced amino acid sequence analysis of the 838-bp probes for each borrelia indicated 93.9% identity between B. burgdorferi and B. hermsii at the amino acid level. Amino acid identities of B. burgdorferi and B. hermsii with Bacillus stearothermophilus were 59.2% and 58.8% respectively. Southern hybridization studies indicated that the gene encoding GAPDH is located on the chromosome of each borrella. In other bacterial species, GAPDH has other functions in addition to its traditional enzymatic role in the glycolytic pathway. GAPDH may play a similar role in borrelias. PMID:8557349

  11. Endosomal Phosphatidylinositol 3-Phosphate Promotes Gephyrin Clustering and GABAergic Neurotransmission at Inhibitory Postsynapses*♦

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Hong Jun; Subramanian, Devaraj; Paraskevopoulou, Foteini; Mueller, Rainer; Schultz, Carsten; Brose, Nils; Rhee, Jeong-Seop; Betz, Heinrich

    2017-01-01

    The formation of neuronal synapses and the dynamic regulation of their efficacy depend on the proper assembly of the postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptor apparatus. Receptor recruitment to inhibitory GABAergic postsynapses requires the scaffold protein gephyrin and the guanine nucleotide exchange factor collybistin (Cb). In vitro, the pleckstrin homology domain of Cb binds phosphoinositides, specifically phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P). However, whether PI3P is required for inhibitory postsynapse formation is currently unknown. Here, we investigated the role of PI3P at developing GABAergic postsynapses by using a membrane-permeant PI3P derivative, time-lapse confocal imaging, electrophysiology, as well as knockdown and overexpression of PI3P-metabolizing enzymes. Our results provide the first in cellula evidence that PI3P located at early/sorting endosomes regulates the postsynaptic clustering of gephyrin and GABAA receptors and the strength of inhibitory, but not excitatory, postsynapses in cultured hippocampal neurons. In human embryonic kidney 293 cells, stimulation of gephyrin cluster formation by PI3P depends on Cb. We therefore conclude that the endosomal pool of PI3P, generated by the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, is important for the Cb-mediated recruitment of gephyrin and GABAA receptors to developing inhibitory postsynapses and thus the formation of postsynaptic membrane specializations. PMID:27941024

  12. Degradation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase induced by acetylleucine chloromethyl ketone in U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Mitsune; Tsuchiya, Yukihiro; Chikuma, Toshiyuki; Hojo, Hiroshi

    2002-05-15

    We examined whether any changes were induced in cellular proteins by an inhibitor of acylpeptide hydrolase (ACPH) (EC 3.4.19.1), acetylleucine chloromethyl ketone (ALCK), which was shown in our previous report to induce apoptosis of human U937 cells. Extract prepared from U937 cells in 0.05% Triton X-100-PBS was incubated with ALCK at 37 degrees, and then analyzed using SDS-PAGE. A 36kDa protein in the cell extract was decreased markedly during the incubation period. This protein was purified and identified as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, EC 1.2.1.12) by its specific enzyme activity, N-terminal amino acid sequence, and Western blotting. Incubation of purified GAPDH with ALCK resulted in a decrease of GAPDH activity, but not in a decrease in the amount of GAPDH. The ALCK-induced GAPDH decrease in the cell extract was abrogated by co-incubation with a serine protease inhibitor, diisopropyl fluorophosphate, suggesting that GAPDH was first inactivated by ALCK, and subsequently degraded by a serine protease(s). GAPDH degradation was also observed in U937 cell cultures in the presence of ALCK. The significance of GAPDH inhibition in the apoptotic process is discussed.

  13. D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Properties of the enzyme modified at arginine residues.

    PubMed

    Nagradova, N K; Schmalhausen, E V; Levashov, P A; Asryants, R A; Muronetz, V I

    1996-01-01

    Examination of the properties of Escherichia coli and rabbit muscle D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDHs) modified by 2,3-butanedione has shown that both tetrameric enzymes are stabilized, on selective modification of arginine residues (probably Arg 231), in an asymmetric state with only two active centers capable of performing the dehydrogenase reaction. The functionally incompetent active centers can be alkylated by iodoacetate or iodoacetamide in the case of E. coli enzyme, but are inaccessible for these reagents in the case of rabbit muscle D-GPDH. These results are consistent with the idea that the two homologous enzymes share common principles of the protein design, but differ somewhat in their active centers geometries. Modification of the arginine procedures marked changes in the shape of the charge transfer complex spectrum in the region of 300-370 nm, suggestive of the alterations in the microenvironment of the nicotinamide ring of NAD(+), although the coenzyme binding characteristics remain largely unaltered. On arginine modification, the enzyme becomes insensitive to the effect of AMP on the kinetic parameters of p-nitrophenyl acetate hydrolysis reaction.

  14. Isolation of a functional, insulin regulatable glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander-Bridges, M.; Ramaika, C.; Lomanto, M.; Florence, B.; Ercolani, L.

    1987-05-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a glycolytic enzyme which is regulated by insulin in 3T3 adipocytes and liver. They have isolated a 10 Kb BAM fragment which contains the entire GAPDH coding sequence and 1 Kb of the 5' flanking region. This clone has been mapped and sequenced to show the presence of a TATAA box; ATG, TAA, ATAA sites; and introns. When transiently expressed in L cells, the gene encodes a full length mRNA and functional protein. Thus, they have isolated a functional gene and not a pseudogene. When the gene is expressed in insulin-sensitive cells, the human GAPDH mRNA level was increased 3-fold in H35 hepatoma cells similar to the fold effect seen for endogenous rat mRNA in the same experiment. A 600 bp fragment of the GAPDH gene 5' flanking sequence was subcloned into a vector containing the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene and cotransfected with the neomycin-resistant gene in H35 hepatoma cells to select stable lines. RNA isolated from control- and insulin-treated transfected cells show an appropriately sized S1 nuclease-protected fragment indicating that both the control species and insulin-stimulated species are primed off the GAPDH protomer. These studies indicate that insulin regulates GAPDH gene expression through an interaction with specific DNA sequences in rat hepatoma cells.

  15. Structure and kinetic characterization of human sperm-specific glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, GAPDS.

    PubMed

    Chaikuad, Apirat; Shafqat, Naeem; Al-Mokhtar, Ruby; Cameron, Gus; Clarke, Anthony R; Brady, R Leo; Oppermann, Udo; Frayne, Jan; Yue, Wyatt W

    2011-04-15

    hGAPDS (human sperm-specific glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) is a glycolytic enzyme essential for the survival of spermatozoa, and constitutes a potential target for non-hormonal contraception. However, enzyme characterization of GAPDS has been hampered by the difficulty in producing soluble recombinant protein. In the present study, we have overexpressed in Escherichia coli a highly soluble form of hGAPDS truncated at the N-terminus (hGAPDSΔN), and crystallized the homotetrameric enzyme in two ligand complexes. The hGAPDSΔN-NAD+-phosphate structure maps the two anion-recognition sites within the catalytic pocket that correspond to the conserved Ps site and the newly recognized Pi site identified in other organisms. The hGAPDSΔN-NAD+-glycerol structure shows serendipitous binding of glycerol at the Ps and new Pi sites, demonstrating the propensity of these anion-recognition sites to bind non-physiologically relevant ligands. A comparison of kinetic profiles between hGAPDSΔN and its somatic equivalent reveals a 3-fold increase in catalytic efficiency for hGAPDSΔN. This may be attributable to subtle amino acid substitutions peripheral to the active centre that influence the charge properties and protonation states of catalytic residues. Our data therefore elucidate structural and kinetic features of hGAPDS that might provide insightful information towards inhibitor development.

  16. Chemical Synthesis and Molecular Recognition of Phosphatase-Resistant Analogues of Phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yong; Lee, Stephanie A.; Kutateladze, Tatiana G.; Sbrissa, Diego; Shisheva, Assia; Prestwich, Glenn D.

    2008-01-01

    The remodeling of phosphatidylinositol polyphosphates in cellular membranes by phosphatases and kinases orchestrates the signaling by these lipids in space and time. In order to provide chemical tools to study of the changes in cell physiology mediated by these lipids, three new metabolically-stabilized (ms) analogues of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PtdIns(3)P were synthesized. We describe herein the total asymmetric synthesis of 3-methylphosphonate, 3-monofluoromethylphosphonate and 3-phosphorothioate analogues of PtdIns(3)P. From differentially protected D-myo-inositol key intermediates, a versatile phosphoramidite reagent was employed in the synthesis of PtdIns(3)P analogues with diacylglyceryl moieties containing dioleoyl, dipalmitoyl and dibutyryl chains. In addition, we introduce a new phosphorlyation reagent, monofluoromethylphosphonyl chloride, which has general applications for the preparation of “pKa-matched” monofluorophosphonates. These ms-PtdIns(3)P analogues exhibited reduced binding activities with 15N-labelled FYVE and PX domains, as significant 1H and 15N chemical shift changes in the FYVE domain were induced by titrating ms-PtdIns(3)Ps into membrane-mimetic dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles. In addition, the PtdIns(3)P analogues with dioleyl and dipalmitoyl chains were substrates for the 5-kinase enzyme PIKfyve; the corresponding phosphorylated ms-PI(3,5)P2 products were detected by radio-TLC analysis. PMID:16417379

  17. Evidence for thiol/disulfide exchange reactions between tubulin and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Landino, Lisa M; Hagedorn, Tara D; Kennett, Kelly L

    2014-12-01

    While thiol redox reactions are a common mechanism to regulate protein structure and function, protein disulfide bond formation is a marker of oxidative stress that has been linked to neurodegeneration. Both tubulin and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) contain multiple cysteines that have been identified as targets for oxidation to disulfides, S-nitrosation and S-glutathionylation. We show that GAPDH is one of three prominent brain microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs), in addition to MAP-2 and tau, with reactive cysteines. We detected a threefold to fourfold increase in tubulin cysteine oxidation by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of rabbit muscle GAPDH by 5-iodoacetamidofluorescein labeling and by Western blot detection of higher molecular weight inter-chain tubulin disulfides. In thiol/disulfide exchange experiments, tubulin restored ∼50% of oxidized GAPDH cysteines and the equilibrium favored reduced GAPDH. Further, we report that oxidized GAPDH is repaired by the thioredoxin reductase system (TRS). Restoration of GAPDH activity after reduction by both tubulin and the TRS was time-dependent suggesting conformational changes near the active site cysteine149. The addition of brain MAPs to oxidized tubulin reduced tubulin disulfides and labeling of MAP-2 and of GAPDH decreased. Because the extent of tubulin repair of oxidized GAPDH was dependent on buffer strength, we conclude that electrostatics influence thiol/disulfide exchange between the two proteins. The novel interactions presented herein may protect GAPDH from inhibition under oxidative stress conditions.

  18. Cytosolic phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases affect Arabidopsis cellular metabolism and promote seed oil accumulation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liang; Ma, Fangfang; Wei, Fang; Fanella, Brian; Allen, Doug K; Wang, Xuemin

    2014-07-01

    The cytosolic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPC) catalyzes a key reaction in glycolysis, but its contribution to plant metabolism and growth are not well defined. Here, we show that two cytosolic GAPCs play important roles in cellular metabolism and seed oil accumulation. Knockout or overexpression of GAPCs caused significant changes in the level of intermediates in the glycolytic pathway and the ratios of ATP/ADP and NAD(P)H/NAD(P). Two double knockout seeds had ∼3% of dry weight decrease in oil content compared with that of the wild type. In transgenic seeds under the constitutive 35S promoter, oil content was increased up to 42% of dry weight compared with 36% in the wild type and the fatty acid composition was altered; however, these transgenic lines exhibited decreased fertility. Seed-specific overexpression lines had >3% increase in seed oil without compromised seed yield or fecundity. The results demonstrate that GAPC levels play important roles in the overall cellular production of reductants, energy, and carbohydrate metabolites and that GAPC levels are directly correlated with seed oil accumulation. Changes in cellular metabolites and cofactor levels highlight the complexity and tolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana cells to the metabolic perturbation. Further implications for metabolic engineering of seed oil production are discussed. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  19. Effector-induced dissociation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase discriminated by urea solvation.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, V; Krusteva, N; Atanasov, B

    1995-08-01

    The dissociation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPD) from pig muscle in water solutions (0.1 M phosphate, pH 7) at increased urea concentrations was studied by means of frontal-gel chromatography, intrinsic (TRP) fluorescence, differential absorption spectroscopy and selective chemical modification at TRP0193. The results are in agreement with a consecutive two-step model of dissociation of the tetramer and the dimer (C*T = 0.42 M urea < C*D = 1.39 M urea). The binding effector(s) destabilizes the oligomeric structures (delta GT changes from -1.00 to -0.54 kcal/mol; delta GD from -2.30 to -1.22 kcal/mol). The introduction of the bulky Koshland-reagent group to TRP-193 at the subunit-subunit interface leads to a decrease of the stability with delta delta G approximate to 1 kcal/mol, owing to TRP-193...TYR-39...TYR-92 cluster destruction. By using lobster GAPD atomic coordinates (PDB file 1GPD) and pig muscle GAPD amino-acid sequence, a tentative molecular model was constructed and the subunit contacts in terms of the Lee-Richard static accessibilities were described. A detailed analysis of the dissociation as a transfer of the buried residues from the molecular interface to the urea solutions was performed.

  20. Nucleotide variability in the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase gene from Eleusine indica (L.) Gaertn.

    PubMed

    Chong, J L; Wickneswari, R; Ismail, B S; Salmijah, S

    2008-02-01

    This study reports the results of the partial DNA sequence analysis of the 5-enolpyruvyl-shikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene in glyphosate-resistant (R) and glyphosate-susceptible (S) biotypes of Eleusine indica (L.) Gaertn from Peninsular Malaysia. Sequencing results revealed point mutation at nucleotide position 875 in the R biotypes of Bidor, Chaah and Temerloh. In the Chaah R population, substitution of cytosine (C) to adenine (A) resulted in the change of threonine (Thr106) to proline (Pro106) and from C to thymidine (T) in the Bidor R population, leading to serine (Ser106) from Pro106. As for the Temerloh R, C was substituted by T resulting in the change of Pro106 to Ser106. A new mutation previously undetected in the Temerloh R was revealed with C being substituted with A, resulting in the change of Pro106 to Thr106 indicating multiple founding events rather than to the spread of a single resistant allele. There was no point mutation recorded at nucleotide position 875 previously demonstrated to play a pivotal role in conferring glyphosate resistance to E. indica for the Lenggeng, Kuala Selangor, Melaka R populations. Thus, there may be another resistance mechanism yet undiscovered in the resistant Lenggeng, Kuala Selangor and Melaka populations.

  1. The Role of Sphingosine-1-Phosphate and its Receptors in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, John J.; Spiegel, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Summary Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid metabolite that plays important roles in allergic responses, including asthma and anaphylaxis, the incidence of which is rising worldwide especially in industrialized urban populations. In this review, we will discuss how S1P is formed and released, and how it acts at many cellular levels, including mast cells, the airway epithelium, airway smooth muscle and many immune cells. Since the actions of S1P on all of these cells could exacerbate allergic responses, the proteins that synthesize, release and respond to S1P offer plausible targets for a new generation of antiinflammatory therapeutics. PMID:18389100

  2. Enhanced resistance in Theobroma cacao against oomycete and fungal pathogens by secretion of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate-binding proteins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The internalization of oomycete and fungal pathogen effectors into host plant cells has been reported to be blocked by proteins that bind to the effectors’ cell entry receptor, phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI3P). This finding suggested a novel strategy for disease control by engineering plants ...

  3. GLYCERALDEHYDE 3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE-S, A SPERM-SPECIFIC GLYCOLYTIC ENZYME, IS REQUIRED FOR SPERM MOTILITY AND MALE FERTILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    While glycolysis is highly conserved, it is remarkable that several novel isozymes in this central metabolic pathway are found in mammalian sperm. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-S (GAPDS) is the product of a mouse gene expressed only during spermatogenesis and, like it...

  4. GLYCERALDEHYDE 3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE-S, A SPERM-SPECIFIC GLYCOLYTIC ENZYME, IS REQUIRED FOR SPERM MOTILITY AND MALE FERTILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    While glycolysis is highly conserved, it is remarkable that several novel isozymes in this central metabolic pathway are found in mammalian sperm. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-S (GAPDS) is the product of a mouse gene expressed only during spermatogenesis and, like it...

  5. Isolation from Ochrobactrum anthropi of a Novel Class II 5-Enopyruvylshikimate-3-Phosphate Synthase with High Tolerance to Glyphosate▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yong-Sheng; Xiong, Ai-Sheng; Xu, Jing; Zhao, Wei; Gao, Feng; Fu, Xiao-Yan; Xu, Hu; Zheng, Jian-Li; Peng, Ri-He; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2010-01-01

    Applying the genomic library construction process and colony screening, a novel aroA gene encoding 5-enopyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase from Ochrobactrum anthropi was identified, cloned, and overexpressed, and the enzyme was purified to homogeneity. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis was employed to assess the role of single amino acid residues in glyphosate resistance. PMID:20601515

  6. Isolation from Ochrobactrum anthropi of a novel class II 5-enopyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase with high tolerance to glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yong-Sheng; Xiong, Ai-Sheng; Xu, Jing; Zhao, Wei; Gao, Feng; Fu, Xiao-Yan; Xu, Hu; Zheng, Jian-Li; Peng, Ri-He; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2010-09-01

    Applying the genomic library construction process and colony screening, a novel aroA gene encoding 5-enopyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase from Ochrobactrum anthropi was identified, cloned, and overexpressed, and the enzyme was purified to homogeneity. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis was employed to assess the role of single amino acid residues in glyphosate resistance.

  7. Modulators of Sphingosine-1-phosphate Pathway Biology: Recent Advances of Sphingosine-1-phosphate Receptor 1 (S1P1) Agonists and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Dyckman, Alaric J

    2017-07-13

    The sphingoid base derived class of lipids (sphingolipids) is a family of interconverting molecules that play key roles in numerous structural and signaling processes. The biosynthetic pathway of the sphingolipids affords many opportunities for therapeutic intervention: targeting the ligands directly, targeting the various proteins involved in the interconversion of the ligands, or targeting the receptors that respond to the ligands. The focus of this article is on the most advanced of the sphingosine-related therapeutics, agonists of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1). The diverse structural classes of S1P1 agonists will be discussed and the status of compounds of clinical relevance will be detailed. An examination of how potential safety concerns are being navigated with compounds currently under clinical evaluation is followed by a discussion of the novel methods being explored to identify next-generation S1P1 agonists with improved safety profiles. Finally, therapeutic opportunities for sphingosine-related targets outside of S1P1 are touched upon.

  8. N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine (glyphosate) tolerance in Euglena gracilis acquired by either overproduced or resistant 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Reinbothe, S; Nelles, A; Parthier, B

    1991-06-01

    Photoautotrophic cells of Euglena gracilis can be adapted to N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine (glyphosate) by cultivation in media with progressively higher concentrations of the herbicide. Two different mechanisms of tolerance to the herbicide were observed. One is characterized by the overproduction and 40-fold accumulation of the target enzyme. 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase, in cells adapted to 6 mM N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine. The other is connected with a herbicide-insensitive enzyme. No evidence was obtained for the involvement of the putative multifunctional arom protein previously reported to be involved in the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids in Euglena. Cells adapted to N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine excreted shikimate and shikimate 3-phosphate into the medium: the amounts depended on the actual concentration of the herbicide. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and determination of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase activity in crude extracts, as well as after separation by non-denaturing gel electrophoresis, revealed that the overproduction of the enzyme in adapted cells correlates with the accumulation of a 59-kDa protein. Overproduction of this 59-kDa protein resulted from a selectively increased level of a mRNA coding for a 64.5-kDa polypeptide which appeared in adapted cells, as shown by cell-free translation in the wheat germ system. In contrast to this quantitative, adaptive type of tolerance, the second mechanism causing tolerance to N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine in the Euglena cell line NR 6/50 was probably related to a qualitatively altered 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase, which could not be inhibited by even 2 mM N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine in vitro. In agreement with this observation, the putatively mutated cell line excreted neither shikimate nor shikimate 3-phosphate into the growth medium containing N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine, even if cultivated in the presence of 20 mM or 50 mM N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine.

  9. Sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase mutations cause primary adrenal insufficiency and steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Rathi; Hadjidemetriou, Irene; Meimaridou, Eirini; Buonocore, Federica; Saleem, Moin; Hurcombe, Jenny; Bierzynska, Agnieszka; Barbagelata, Eliana; Bergadá, Ignacio; Cassinelli, Hamilton; Das, Urmi; Krone, Ruth; Hacihamdioglu, Bulent; Sari, Erkan; Yesilkaya, Ediz; Storr, Helen L.; Clemente, Maria; Fernandez-Cancio, Monica; Camats, Nuria; Ram, Nanik; Achermann, John C.; Van Veldhoven, Paul P.; Guasti, Leonardo; Braslavsky, Debora; Guran, Tulay; Metherell, Louise A.

    2017-01-01

    Primary adrenal insufficiency is life threatening and can present alone or in combination with other comorbidities. Here, we have described a primary adrenal insufficiency syndrome and steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome caused by loss-of-function mutations in sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (SGPL1). SGPL1 executes the final decisive step of the sphingolipid breakdown pathway, mediating the irreversible cleavage of the lipid-signaling molecule sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). Mutations in other upstream components of the pathway lead to harmful accumulation of lysosomal sphingolipid species, which are associated with a series of conditions known as the sphingolipidoses. In this work, we have identified 4 different homozygous mutations, c.665G>A (p.R222Q), c.1633_1635delTTC (p.F545del), c.261+1G>A (p.S65Rfs*6), and c.7dupA (p.S3Kfs*11), in 5 families with the condition. In total, 8 patients were investigated, some of whom also manifested other features, including ichthyosis, primary hypothyroidism, neurological symptoms, and cryptorchidism. Sgpl1–/– mice recapitulated the main characteristics of the human disease with abnormal adrenal and renal morphology. Sgpl1–/– mice displayed disrupted adrenocortical zonation and defective expression of steroidogenic enzymes as well as renal histology in keeping with a glomerular phenotype. In summary, we have identified SGPL1 mutations in humans that perhaps represent a distinct multisystemic disorder of sphingolipid metabolism. PMID:28165343

  10. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 3 influences cell cycle progression in muscle satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Fortier, Mathieu; Figeac, Nicolas; White, Robert B; Knopp, Paul; Zammit, Peter S

    2013-10-15

    Skeletal muscle retains a resident stem cell population called satellite cells, which are mitotically quiescent in mature muscle, but can be activated to produce myoblast progeny for muscle homeostasis, hypertrophy and repair. We have previously shown that satellite cell activation is partially controlled by the bioactive phospholipid, sphingosine-1-phosphate, and that S1P biosynthesis is required for muscle regeneration. Here we investigate the role of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 3 (S1PR3) in regulating murine satellite cell function. S1PR3 levels were high in quiescent myogenic cells before falling during entry into cell cycle. Retrovirally-mediated constitutive expression of S1PR3 led to suppressed cell cycle progression in satellite cells, but did not overtly affect the myogenic program. Conversely, satellite cells isolated from S1PR3-null mice exhibited enhanced proliferation ex-vivo. In vivo, acute cardiotoxin-induced muscle regeneration was enhanced in S1PR3-null mice, with bigger muscle fibres compared to control mice. Importantly, genetically deleting S1PR3 in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy produced a less severe muscle dystrophic phenotype, than when signalling though S1PR3 was operational. In conclusion, signalling though S1PR3 suppresses cell cycle progression to regulate function in muscle satellite cells.

  11. Structure and function of sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase, a key enzyme of sphingolipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bourquin, Florence; Riezman, Howard; Capitani, Guido; Grütter, Markus G

    2010-08-11

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (SPL), a key enzyme of sphingolipid metabolism, catalyzes the irreversible degradation of sphingoid base phosphates. Its main substrate sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) acts both extracellularly, by binding G protein-coupled receptors of the lysophospholipid receptor family, and inside the cell, as a second messenger. There, S1P takes part in regulating various cellular processes and its levels are tightly regulated. SPL is a pivotal enzyme regulating S1P intracellular concentrations and a promising drug target for the design of immunosuppressants. We structurally and functionally characterized yeast SPL (Dpl1p) and its first prokaryotic homolog, from Symbiobacterium thermophilum. The Dpl1p structure served as a basis for a very reliable model of Homo sapiens SPL. The above results, together with in vitro and in vivo studies of SPL mutants, reveal which residues are involved in activity and substrate binding and pave the way to studies aimed at controlling the activity of this pivotal enzyme.

  12. Molecular basis of classic galactosemia from the structure of human galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase.

    PubMed

    McCorvie, Thomas J; Kopec, Jolanta; Pey, Angel L; Fitzpatrick, Fiona; Patel, Dipali; Chalk, Rod; Shrestha, Leela; Yue, Wyatt W

    2016-06-01

    Classic galactosemia is a potentially lethal disease caused by the dysfunction of galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT). Over 300 disease-associated GALT mutations have been reported, with the majority being missense changes, although a better understanding of their underlying molecular effects has been hindered by the lack of structural information for the human enzyme. Here, we present the 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of human GALT (hGALT) ternary complex, revealing a homodimer arrangement that contains a covalent uridylylated intermediate and glucose-1-phosphate in the active site, as well as a structural zinc-binding site, per monomer. hGALT reveals significant structural differences from bacterial GALT homologues in metal ligation and dimer interactions, and therefore is a zbetter model for understanding the molecular consequences of disease mutations. Both uridylylation and zinc binding influence the stability and aggregation tendency of hGALT. This has implications for disease-associated variants where p.Gln188Arg, the most commonly detected, increases the rate of aggregation in the absence of zinc likely due to its reduced ability to form the uridylylated intermediate. As such our structure serves as a template in the future design of pharmacological chaperone therapies and opens new concepts about the roles of metal binding and activity in protein misfolding by disease-associated mutants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. Sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase mutations cause primary adrenal insufficiency and steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rathi; Hadjidemetriou, Irene; Maharaj, Avinaash; Meimaridou, Eirini; Buonocore, Federica; Saleem, Moin; Hurcombe, Jenny; Bierzynska, Agnieszka; Barbagelata, Eliana; Bergadá, Ignacio; Cassinelli, Hamilton; Das, Urmi; Krone, Ruth; Hacihamdioglu, Bulent; Sari, Erkan; Yesilkaya, Ediz; Storr, Helen L; Clemente, Maria; Fernandez-Cancio, Monica; Camats, Nuria; Ram, Nanik; Achermann, John C; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Guasti, Leonardo; Braslavsky, Debora; Guran, Tulay; Metherell, Louise A

    2017-03-01

    Primary adrenal insufficiency is life threatening and can present alone or in combination with other comorbidities. Here, we have described a primary adrenal insufficiency syndrome and steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome caused by loss-of-function mutations in sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (SGPL1). SGPL1 executes the final decisive step of the sphingolipid breakdown pathway, mediating the irreversible cleavage of the lipid-signaling molecule sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). Mutations in other upstream components of the pathway lead to harmful accumulation of lysosomal sphingolipid species, which are associated with a series of conditions known as the sphingolipidoses. In this work, we have identified 4 different homozygous mutations, c.665G>A (p.R222Q), c.1633_1635delTTC (p.F545del), c.261+1G>A (p.S65Rfs*6), and c.7dupA (p.S3Kfs*11), in 5 families with the condition. In total, 8 patients were investigated, some of whom also manifested other features, including ichthyosis, primary hypothyroidism, neurological symptoms, and cryptorchidism. Sgpl1-/- mice recapitulated the main characteristics of the human disease with abnormal adrenal and renal morphology. Sgpl1-/- mice displayed disrupted adrenocortical zonation and defective expression of steroidogenic enzymes as well as renal histology in keeping with a glomerular phenotype. In summary, we have identified SGPL1 mutations in humans that perhaps represent a distinct multisystemic disorder of sphingolipid metabolism.

  14. PAM mediates sustained inhibition of cAMP signaling by sphingosine-1-phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Pierre, Sandra C; Häusler, Julia; Birod, Kerstin; Geisslinger, Gerd; Scholich, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    PAM (Protein Associated with Myc) is an almost ubiquitously expressed protein that is one of the most potent inhibitors of adenylyl cyclase activity known so far. Here we show that PAM is localized at the endoplasmic reticulum in HeLa cells and that upon serum treatment PAM is recruited to the plasma membrane, causing an inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity. We purified the serum factor that induced PAM translocation and identified it as sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). Within 15 min after incubation with S1P, PAM appeared at the plasma membrane and was detectable for up to 120 min. Sphingosine-1-phosphate induced adenylyl cyclase inhibition in two phases: an initial (1–10 min) and a late (20–240 min) phase. The initial adenylyl cyclase inhibition was Gi-mediated and PAM independent. In the late phase, adenylyl cyclase inhibition was PAM dependent and attenuated cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling by various cAMP-elevating signals. This makes PAM the longest lasting nontranscriptional regulator of adenylyl cyclase activity known to date and presents a novel mechanism for the temporal regulation of cAMP signaling. PMID:15257286

  15. Identification of acyl-CoA synthetases involved in the mammalian sphingosine 1-phosphate metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Ohkuni, Aya; Ohno, Yusuke; Kihara, Akio

    2013-12-13

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) plays important roles both as a bioactive lipid molecule and an intermediate of the sphingolipid-to-glycerophospholipid metabolic pathway. To identify human acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSs) involved in S1P metabolism, we cloned all 26 human ACS genes and examined their abilities to restore deficient sphingolipid-to-glycerophospholipid metabolism in a yeast mutant lacking two ACS genes, FAA1 and FAA4. Here, in addition to the previously identified ACSL family members (ACSL1, 3, 4, 5, and 6), we found that ACSVL1, ACSVL4, and ACSBG1 also restored metabolism. All 8 ACSs were localized either exclusively or partly to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where S1P metabolism takes place. We previously proposed the entire S1P metabolic pathway from results obtained using yeast cells, i.e., S1P is metabolized to glycerophospholipids via trans-2-hexadecenal, trans-2-hexadecenoic acid, trans-2-hexadecenoyl-CoA, and palmitoyl-CoA. However, as S1P is not a naturally occurring long-chain base 1-phosphate in yeast, the validity of this pathway required further verification using mammalian cells. In the present study, we treated HeLa cells with the ACS inhibitor triacsin C and found that inhibition of ACSs resulted in accumulation of trans-2-hexadecenoic acid as in ACS mutant yeast. From these results, we conclude that S1P is metabolized by a common pathway in eukaryotes.

  16. Prolonging Survival of Corneal Transplantation by Selective Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor 1 Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Min; Liu, Yong; Xiao, Yang; Han, Gencheng; Jia, Liang; Wang, Liqiang; Lei, Tian; Huang, Yifei

    2014-01-01

    Corneal transplantation is the most used therapy for eye disorders. Although the cornea is somewhat an immune privileged organ, immune rejection is still the major problem that reduces the success rate. Therefore, effective chemical drugs that regulate immunoreactions are needed to improve the outcome of corneal transplantations. Here, a sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) selective agonist was systematically evaluated in mouse allogeneic corneal transplantation and compared with the commonly used immunosuppressive agents. Compared with CsA and the non-selective sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonist FTY720, the S1P1 selective agonist can prolong the survival corneal transplantation for more than 30 days with a low immune response. More importantly, the optimal dose of the S1P1 selective agonist was much less than non-selective S1P receptor agonist FTY720, which would reduce the dose-dependent toxicity in drug application. Then we analyzed the mechanisms of the selected S1P1 selective agonist on the immunosuppression. The results shown that the S1P1 selective agonist could regulate the distribution of the immune cells with less CD4+ T cells and enhanced Treg cells in the allograft, moreover the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines TGF-β1 and IL-10 unregulated which can reduce the immunoreactions. These findings suggest that S1P1 selective agonist may be a more appropriate immunosuppressive compound to effectively prolong mouse allogeneic corneal grafts survival. PMID:25216235

  17. [Biological assay for galactose-1 phosphate measurement application in subjects with galactosemia].

    PubMed

    Braham, Imene; Charfeddine, Bassem; Ben Othmene, Leila; Neffati, Souhir; Mtar, Aida; Ben Abdallah, Jihene; Ali Smach, Med; Dridi, Hedi; Limem, Khalifa

    2012-01-01

    Congenital galactosemia is a hereditary, autosomal recessive and metabolic disease. It is linked to an enzyme deficiency, more commonly known by the deficiency of galactose-1- phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT), which is responsible for an accumulation of galactose-1- phosphate in the blood. Clinical symptoms appear early in infancy from the second week of life. They generally manifested by some disorders within liver, kidney, eye, gastrointestinal, neurological and also with cataracts. Currently, the clinical diagnosis remains difficult hence the importance of further investigations based on effective biological assessments to highlight the disease. The diagnosis of galactosemia is made by the laboratory test. The latter includes the determination of Gal-1-P which is done by a fluorometric method spot test. This study was conducted in order to assess the repeatability, reproducibility, accuracy, and effectiveness of the techniques used. We have found the CV for a repeatability (CV = 5 %), reproducibility (CV = 4 %) which confirms the accuracy of the method proceeded in this study. This method allows us to have a degree of inaccuracy less than 1%. According to the study of the effectiveness of "spot test", we found that our technique is specific (Sp = 93 %) and sensitive (Se = 83 %).

  18. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 3 influences cell cycle progression in muscle satellite cells

    PubMed Central

    Fortier, Mathieu; Figeac, Nicolas; White, Robert B.; Knopp, Paul; Zammit, Peter S.

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle retains a resident stem cell population called satellite cells, which are mitotically quiescent in mature muscle, but can be activated to produce myoblast progeny for muscle homeostasis, hypertrophy and repair. We have previously shown that satellite cell activation is partially controlled by the bioactive phospholipid, sphingosine-1-phosphate, and that S1P biosynthesis is required for muscle regeneration. Here we investigate the role of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 3 (S1PR3) in regulating murine satellite cell function. S1PR3 levels were high in quiescent myogenic cells before falling during entry into cell cycle. Retrovirally-mediated constitutive expression of S1PR3 led to suppressed cell cycle progression in satellite cells, but did not overtly affect the myogenic program. Conversely, satellite cells isolated from S1PR3-null mice exhibited enhanced proliferation ex-vivo. In vivo, acute cardiotoxin-induced muscle regeneration was enhanced in S1PR3-null mice, with bigger muscle fibres compared to control mice. Importantly, genetically deleting S1PR3 in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy produced a less severe muscle dystrophic phenotype, than when signalling though S1PR3 was operational. In conclusion, signalling though S1PR3 suppresses cell cycle progression to regulate function in muscle satellite cells. PMID:23911934

  19. Molecular basis of classic galactosemia from the structure of human galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    McCorvie, Thomas J.; Kopec, Jolanta; Pey, Angel L.; Fitzpatrick, Fiona; Patel, Dipali; Chalk, Rod; Shrestha, Leela; Yue, Wyatt W.

    2016-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a potentially lethal disease caused by the dysfunction of galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT). Over 300 disease-associated GALT mutations have been reported, with the majority being missense changes, although a better understanding of their underlying molecular effects has been hindered by the lack of structural information for the human enzyme. Here, we present the 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of human GALT (hGALT) ternary complex, revealing a homodimer arrangement that contains a covalent uridylylated intermediate and glucose-1-phosphate in the active site, as well as a structural zinc-binding site, per monomer. hGALT reveals significant structural differences from bacterial GALT homologues in metal ligation and dimer interactions, and therefore is a zbetter model for understanding the molecular consequences of disease mutations. Both uridylylation and zinc binding influence the stability and aggregation tendency of hGALT. This has implications for disease-associated variants where p.Gln188Arg, the most commonly detected, increases the rate of aggregation in the absence of zinc likely due to its reduced ability to form the uridylylated intermediate. As such our structure serves as a template in the future design of pharmacological chaperone therapies and opens new concepts about the roles of metal binding and activity in protein misfolding by disease-associated mutants. PMID:27005423

  20. Recombinant expression of a functional myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase (MIPS) in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinyi; Hernick, Marcy

    2015-10-01

    Myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase (MIPS, E.C. 5.5.1.4) catalyzes the first step in inositol production-the conversion of glucose-6-phosphate (Glc-6P) to myo-inositol-1-phosphate. While the three dimensional structure of MIPS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been solved, biochemical studies examining the in vitro activity have not been reported to date. Herein we report the in vitro activity of mycobacterial MIPS expressed in E. coli and Mycobacterium smegmatis. Recombinant expression in E. coli yields a soluble protein capable of binding the NAD(+) cofactor; however, it has no significant activity with the Glc-6P substrate. In contrast, recombinant expression in M. smegmatis mc(2)4517 yields a functionally active protein. Examination of structural data suggests that MtMIPS expressed in E. coli adopts a fold that is missing a key helix containing two critical (conserved) Lys side chains, which likely explains the inability of the E. coli expressed protein to bind and turnover the Glc-6P substrate. Recombinant expression in M. smegmatis may yield a protein that adopts a fold in which this key helix is formed enabling proper positioning of important side chains, thereby allowing for Glc-6P substrate binding and turnover. Detailed mechanistic studies may be feasible following optimization of the recombinant MIPS expression protocol in M. smegmatis.

  1. Glycerol-3-phosphate metabolism plays a role in stress response in the red alga Pyropia haitanensis.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xiao-Juan; Yang, Rui; Luo, Qi-Jun; Chen, Juan-Juan; Chen, Hai-Min; Yan, Xiao-Jun

    2015-04-01

    Glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) has been suggested as a novel regulator of plant defense signaling, however, its role in algal resistance remains largely unknown. The glycerol kinase (also designated as NHO1) and NAD-dependent G3P dehydrogenase (GPDH) are two key enzymes involved in the G3P biosynthesis. In our study, we cloned the full-length cDNA of NHO1 (NHO1Ph ) and GPDH (GPDHP h ) from the red alga Pyropia haitanensis (denoted as NHO1Ph and GPDHP h ) and examined their expression level under flagellin peptide 22 (flg22) stimulation or heat stress. We also measured the level of G3P and floridoside (a downstream product of G3P in P. haitanensis) under flg22 stimulation or heat stress. Both NHO1Ph and GPDHP h shared high sequence identity and structural conservation with their orthologs from different species, especially from red algae. Phylogenetic analysis showed that NHO1s and GPDHs from red algae were closely related to those from animals. Under flg22 stimulation or heat stress, the expression levels of NHO1Ph and GPDHP h were up-regulated, G3P levels increased, and the contents of floridoside decreased. But the floridoside level increased in the recovery period after heat stress. Taken together, we found that G3P metabolism was associated with the flg22-induced defense response and heat stress response in P. haitanensis, indicating the general conservation of defense response in angiosperms and algae. Furthermore, floridoside might also participate in the stress resistance of P. haitanensis. © 2015 Phycological Society of America.

  2. Cellular recovery of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and thiol status after exposure to hydroperoxides

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, A.E.; Reed, D.J. )

    1990-01-01

    The activity of the thiol-dependent enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD), in vertebrate cells, was modulated by a change in the intracellular thiol:disulfide redox status. Human lung carcinoma cells (A549) were incubated with 1-120 mM H2O2, 1-120 mM t-butyl hydroperoxide, 1-6 mM ethacrynic acid, or 0.1-10 mM N-ethylmaleimide for 5 min. Loss of reduced protein thiols, as measured by binding of the thiol reagent iodoacetic acid to GPD, and loss of GPD enzymatic activity occurred in a dose-dependent manner. Incubation of the cells, following oxidative treatment, in saline for 30 min or with 20 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) partially reversed both changes in GPD. The enzymatic recovery of GPD activity was observed either without addition of thiols to the medium or by incubation of a sonicated cell mixture with 2 mM cysteine, cystine, cysteamine, or glutathione (GSH); GSSG had no effect. Treatment of cells with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) to decrease cellular GSH by varying amounts caused a dose-related increase in sensitivity of GPD activity to inactivation by H2O2 and decreased cellular ability for subsequent recovery. GPD responded in a similar fashion with oxidative treatment of another lung carcinoma cell line (A427) as well as normal lung tissue from human and rat. These findings indicate that the cellular thiol redox status can be important in determining GPD enzymatic activity.

  3. Oxidation of an Exposed Methionine Instigates the Aggregation of Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate Dehydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Samson, Andre L.; Knaupp, Anja S.; Kass, Itamar; Kleifeld, Oded; Marijanovic, Emilia M.; Hughes, Victoria A.; Lupton, Chris J.; Buckle, Ashley M.; Bottomley, Stephen P.; Medcalf, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a ubiquitous and abundant protein that participates in cellular energy production. GAPDH normally exists in a soluble form; however, following necrosis, GAPDH and numerous other intracellular proteins convert into an insoluble disulfide-cross-linked state via the process of “nucleocytoplasmic coagulation.” Here, free radical-induced aggregation of GAPDH was studied as an in vitro model of nucleocytoplasmic coagulation. Despite the fact that disulfide cross-linking is a prominent feature of GAPDH aggregation, our data show that it is not a primary rate-determining step. To identify the true instigating event of GAPDH misfolding, we mapped the post-translational modifications that arise during its aggregation. Solvent accessibility and energy calculations of the mapped modifications within the context of the high resolution native GAPDH structure suggested that oxidation of methionine 46 may instigate aggregation. We confirmed this by mutating methionine 46 to leucine, which rendered GAPDH highly resistant to free radical-induced aggregation. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that oxidation of methionine 46 triggers a local increase in the conformational plasticity of GAPDH that likely promotes further oxidation and eventual aggregation. Hence, methionine 46 represents a “linchpin” whereby its oxidation is a primary event permissive for the subsequent misfolding, aggregation, and disulfide cross-linking of GAPDH. A critical role for linchpin residues in nucleocytoplasmic coagulation and other forms of free radical-induced protein misfolding should now be investigated. Furthermore, because disulfide-cross-linked aggregates of GAPDH arise in many disorders and because methionine 46 is irrelevant to native GAPDH function, mutation of methionine 46 in models of disease should allow the unequivocal assessment of whether GAPDH aggregation influences disease progression. PMID:25086035

  4. Amperometric triglyceride bionanosensor based on nanoparticles of lipase, glycerol kinase, glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase.

    PubMed

    Pundir, C S; Aggarwal, V

    2017-01-15

    The nanoparticles (NPs) aggregates of lipase from porcine pancreas, glycerol kinase (GK) from Cellulomonas sp. and glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase (GPO) from Aerococcus viridanss were prepared by desolvation and glutaraldehyde crosslinking and functionalized by cysteamine. These enzyme nanoparticles (ENPs) were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infra red (FTIR) spectroscopy. The functionalzed ENPs aggregates were co-immobilized covalently onto polycrystalline Au electrode through thiolated bond. An improved amperometric triglyceride (TG) bionanosensor was constructed using this ENPs modified Au electrode as working electrode. Biosensor showed optimum current at 1.2 V within 5s, at pH 6.5 and 35 °C.A linear relationship was obtained between current (mA) and triolein concentration in lower concentration range,10-100 mg/dL and higher concentration range, 100-500 mg/dL. Limit of detection (LOD) of bionanosensor was 1.0 μg/ml. Percent analytical recovery of added trolein (50 and 100 mg/dL) in serum was 95.2 ± 0.5 and 96.0 ± 0.17. Within and between batch coefficients of variation (CV) were 2.33% and 2.15% respectively. A good correlation (R(2) = 0.99) was obtained between TG values in sera measured by present biosensor and standard enzymic colorimetric method with the regression equation: y= (0.993x + 0.967). ENPs/Au electrode was used 180 times over a period of 3 months with 50% loss in its initial activity, when stored dry at 4 °C.

  5. Inhibition of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in tissues of the rat by acrylamide and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Vyas, I; Lowndes, H E; Howland, R D

    1985-01-01

    In previous investigations acrylamide was found to inhibit several enzymes of glycolysis both in vitro and in vivo. The present study examines the characteristics of the in vitro inhibition of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and compares the in vivo effects of acrylamide on GAPDH activity to other analogs. Inhibition of GAPDH produced by acrylamide was characteristic of an irreversible or slowly reversible mechanism. In vivo, GAPDH activity was determined in sciatic nerve, brain, skeletal muscle and liver after cumulative doses of 250, 350 or 500 mg/kg of acrylamide. Specific activities were significantly lower in extensor muscle and liver after the 250 mg/kg dose. Activities in brain and sciatic nerve tended to be decreased but the differences were not statistically significant. Specific activity of GAPDH was decreased in medulla pons, cerebellum and the rest of the brain after a 350 mg/kg cumulative dose of acrylamide, although protein concentrations were not different from those in controls. The maximum decrease was about 20%. Treatment with acrylamide, methylene-bis-acrylamide (non-neurotoxic), or N-isopropylacrylamide (neurotoxic) significantly decreased the weight of the cortex and associated brain areas as well as general body weights. No signs of developing neuropathy were observed during treatment with methylene-bis-acrylamide to a cumulative dose (8.1 mmoles/kg) equivalent to that of acrylamide causing frank paralysis. Although the compound exhibited some ability to inhibit GAPDH in vitro, no decrease in GAPDH activity was found in rat brain. Treatment with N-isopropylacrylamide resulted in progressive neurologic impairment. After treatment to a cumulative dose of the compound causing a severe hind-limb paralysis (9.2 mmoles/kg), a small but significant decrease in GAPDH was found in the three areas of brain examined.

  6. Vaccine efficacy of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from Edwardsiella ictaluri against E. tarda in tilapia.

    PubMed

    Trung Cao, Thanh; Tsai, Ming-An; Yang, Chung-Da; Wang, Pei-Chyi; Kuo, Tsun-Yung; Gabriel Chen, Hsu-Chung; Chen, Shih-Chu

    2014-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), derived from the outer-membrane protein (OMP) fraction, has been used as a potential candidate for vaccine development. The gene-encoding 37 kDa GAPDH outer membrane protein (OMP) from Edwardsiella ictaluri was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), Western blotting, and nucleotide and amino acid sequencing were used to analyze the expressed antigenic protein and gene encoding this protein. Comparative DNA and protein sequence analysis of GAPDH from E. ictaluri GAPDHs from several Gram-negative bacterial species within the Enterobacteriaceae family revealed that the GAPDHs within this group are highly conserved and share a sequence similarity of 75-100% with E. ictaluri GDPDH. Rabbit antiserum raised against the E. ictaluri recombinant GAPDH (rGAPDH) protein recognized purified GADPH, indicating that it has a strong immunogenicity. Tilapia fish were intraperitoneally immunized with formalin-killed E. ictaluri whole cells, and rGAPDH (30 μg fish(-1)) from E. ictaluri, both of which were emulsified in ISA 763A adjuvant. At 3 months after immunization, fish were challenged with the E. tarda strain to assess vaccine efficacy; the relative percent survival (RPS) values were found to exceed 71.4%. The specific mean antibody titer log2 level of groups vaccinated with rGAPDH at 3 months was significantly higher than that of non-vaccinated fish (control group). Therefore, this recombinant protein can be considered a multi-purpose candidate vaccine against several pathogenic bacteria.

  7. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH) Aggregation Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction during Oxidative Stress-induced Cell Death*

    PubMed Central

    Itakura, Masanori; Kubo, Takeya; Kaneshige, Akihiro; Harada, Naoki; Izawa, Takeshi; Azuma, Yasu-Taka; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Yamaji, Ryouichi; Takeuchi, Tadayoshi

    2017-01-01

    Glycolytic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a multifunctional protein that also mediates cell death under oxidative stress. We reported previously that the active-site cysteine (Cys-152) of GAPDH plays an essential role in oxidative stress-induced aggregation of GAPDH associated with cell death, and a C152A-GAPDH mutant rescues nitric oxide (NO)-induced cell death by interfering with the aggregation of wild type (WT)-GAPDH. However, the detailed mechanism underlying GAPDH aggregate-induced cell death remains elusive. Here we report that NO-induced GAPDH aggregation specifically causes mitochondrial dysfunction. First, we observed a correlation between NO-induced GAPDH aggregation and mitochondrial dysfunction, when GAPDH aggregation occurred at mitochondria in SH-SY5Y cells. In isolated mitochondria, aggregates of WT-GAPDH directly induced mitochondrial swelling and depolarization, whereas mixtures containing aggregates of C152A-GAPDH reduced mitochondrial dysfunction. Additionally, treatment with cyclosporin A improved WT-GAPDH aggregate-induced swelling and depolarization. In doxycycline-inducible SH-SY5Y cells, overexpression of WT-GAPDH augmented NO-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and increased mitochondrial GAPDH aggregation, whereas induced overexpression of C152A-GAPDH significantly suppressed mitochondrial impairment. Further, NO-induced cytochrome c release into the cytosol and nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria were both augmented in cells overexpressing WT-GAPDH but ameliorated in C152A-GAPDH-overexpressing cells. Interestingly, GAPDH aggregates induced necrotic cell death via a permeability transition pore (PTP) opening. The expression of either WT- or C152A-GAPDH did not affect other cell death pathways associated with protein aggregation, such as proteasome inhibition, gene expression induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress, or autophagy. Collectively, these results suggest that NO-induced GAPDH

  8. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate Dehydrogenase Aggregates Accelerate Amyloid-β Amyloidogenesis in Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Itakura, Masanori; Nakajima, Hidemitsu; Kubo, Takeya; Semi, Yuko; Kume, Satoshi; Higashida, Shusaku; Kaneshige, Akihiro; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Harada, Naoki; Kita, Akinori; Azuma, Yasu-Taka; Yamaji, Ryoichi; Inui, Takashi; Takeuchi, Tadayoshi

    2015-10-23

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of neurons and formation of pathological extracellular deposits induced by amyloid-β peptide (Aβ). Numerous studies have established Aβ amyloidogenesis as a hallmark of AD pathogenesis, particularly with respect to mitochondrial dysfunction. We have previously shown that glycolytic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) forms amyloid-like aggregates upon exposure to oxidative stress and that these aggregates contribute to neuronal cell death. Here, we report that GAPDH aggregates accelerate Aβ amyloidogenesis and subsequent neuronal cell death both in vitro and in vivo. Co-incubation of Aβ40 with small amounts of GAPDH aggregates significantly enhanced Aβ40 amyloidogenesis, as assessed by in vitro thioflavin-T assays. Similarly, structural analyses using Congo red staining, circular dichroism, and atomic force microscopy revealed that GAPDH aggregates induced Aβ40 amyloidogenesis. In PC12 cells, GAPDH aggregates augmented Aβ40-induced cell death, concomitant with disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, mice injected intracerebroventricularly with Aβ40 co-incubated with GAPDH aggregates exhibited Aβ40-induced pyramidal cell death and gliosis in the hippocampal CA3 region. These observations were accompanied by nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor and cytosolic release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. Finally, in the 3×Tg-AD mouse model of AD, GAPDH/Aβ co-aggregation and mitochondrial dysfunction were consistently detected in an age-dependent manner, and Aβ aggregate formation was attenuated by GAPDH siRNA treatment. Thus, this study suggests that GAPDH aggregates accelerate Aβ amyloidogenesis, subsequently leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal cell death in the pathogenesis of AD. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Glyphosate inhibition of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate synthease from suspension-cultured cells of Nicotiana silvestris

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, J.L.; Gaines, C.G.; Jensen, R.A.

    1984-07-01

    Treatment of isogenic suspension-cultured cells of Nicotiana silvestris Speg, et Comes with glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) led to elevated levels of intracellular shikimate (364-fold increase by 1.0 millimolar glyphosate). In the presence of glyphosate, it is likely that most molecules of shikimate originate from the action of 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate (DAHP) synthase-Mn since this isozyme, in contrast to the DAHP synthase-Co isozyme, is insensitive to inhibition by glyphosate. 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase (EC 2.5.1.19) from N. silvestris was sensitive to micromolar concentrations of glyphosate and possessed a single inhibitor binding site. Rigorous kinetic studies of EPSP synthase required resolution from the multiple phosphatase activities present in crude extracts, a result achieved by ion-exchange column chromatography. Although EPSP synthase exhibited a broad pH profile (50% of maximal activity between pH 6.2 and 8.5), sensitivity to glyphosate increased dramatically with increasing pH within this range. In accordance with these data and the pK/sub a/ values of glyphosate, it is likely that the ionic form of glyphosate inhibiting EPSP synthase is COO/sup -/CH/sub 2/NH/sub 2//sup +/CH/sub 2/PO/sub 3//sup 2 -/, and that a completely ionized phosphono group is essential for inhibition. At pH 7.0, inhibition was competitive with respect to phosphoenolpyruvate (K/sub i/ = 1.25 micromolar) and uncompetitive with respect to shikimate-3-P (K/sub i/ = 18.3 micromolar). All data were consistent with a mechanism of inhibition in which glyphosate competes with PEP for binding to an (enzyme:shikimate-3-P) complex and ultimately forms the dead-end complex of (enzyme:shikimate-3-P:glyphosate). 36 references, 8 figures, 1 table.

  10. Real-time amplification of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene for quality control of leukopoor platelets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ding-Ping; Sun, Chien-Feng; Ning, Hsiao-Chen; Peng, Chien-Ting; Wang, Wei-Ting; Tseng, Ching-Ping

    2014-02-01

    Leukoreduction of blood products is crucial to prevent white blood cell (WBC)-associated complications during transfusion. Of the widely accepted methods for quantifying WBCs in blood components, Nageotte hemocytometry is time-consuming and laborious whereas a specialized instrument is required for flow cytometry. A reliable and affordable method to assess WBC count in blood products is of particular interest. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) gene was developed for quantifying WBCs in leukopoor platelets (LPPs). After normalization by the cell-free prefiltrated and postfiltrated plasma DNA, the relative copy number of GAPDH gene in the platelet (PLT) concentrate and its corresponding LPPs was calculated according to the equation of 2(-ΔΔCt) of which Ct is defined as the threshold cycle. The percentage and the number of WBCs that remained in LPPs were consequently determined. This method was compared to Nageotte hemocytometry and was validated by using serially diluted PLT concentrate and 10 pairs of PLT concentrate-LPP samples. Consistent with the removal of WBCs after filtration, the Ct values for the LPP samples were increased when compared to their corresponding PLT concentrate. As revealed by real-time PCR of GAPDH gene, there is a correlation between the calculated and theoretical WBC count in the serially diluted PLT concentrate (correlation coefficient, 0.9532). The WBC counts for the 10 LPP samples were comparable between Nageotte and real-time PCR method and were all below 3.3 × 10(6) WBCs/L. The real-time PCR method we report in this study is applicable for routine quality assurance during leukoreduction process. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  11. Thioredoxin-dependent regulation of photosynthetic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase: autonomous vs. CP12-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Trost, P; Fermani, S; Marri, L; Zaffagnini, M; Falini, G; Scagliarini, S; Pupillo, P; Sparla, F

    2006-09-01

    Regulation of the Calvin-Benson cycle under varying light/dark conditions is a common property of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms and photosynthetic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is one of the targets of this complex regulatory system. In cyanobacteria and most algae, photosynthetic GAPDH is a homotetramer of GapA subunits which do not contain regulatory domains. In these organisms, dark-inhibition of the Calvin-Benson cycle involves the formation of a kinetically inhibited supramolecular complex between GAPDH, the regulatory peptide CP12 and phosphoribulokinase. Conditions prevailing in the dark, i.e. oxidation of thioredoxins and low NADP(H)/NAD(H) ratio promote aggregation. Although this regulatory system has been inherited in higher plants, these phototrophs contain in addition a second type of GAPDH subunits (GapB) resulting from the fusion of GapA with the C-terminal half of CP12. Heterotetrameric A(2)B(2)-GAPDH constitutes the major photosynthetic GAPDH isoform of higher plants chloroplasts and coexists with CP12 and A(4)-GAPDH. GapB subunits of A(2)B(2)-GAPDH have inherited from CP12 a regulatory domain (CTE for C-terminal extension) which makes the enzyme sensitive to thioredoxins and pyridine nucleotides, resembling the GAPDH/CP12/PRK system. The two systems are similar in other respects: oxidizing conditions and low NADP(H)/NAD(H) ratios promote aggregation of A(2)B(2)-GAPDH into strongly inactivated A(8)B(8)-GAPDH hexadecamers, and both CP12 and CTE specifically affect the NADPH-dependent activity of GAPDH. The alternative, lower activity with NADH is always unaffected. Based on the crystal structure of spinach A(4)-GAPDH and the analysis of site-specific mutants, a model of the autonomous (CP12-independent) regulatory mechanism of A(2)B(2)-GAPDH is proposed. Both CP12 and CTE seem to regulate different photosynthetic GAPDH isoforms according to a common and ancient molecular mechanism.

  12. Halophilic class I aldolase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase: some salt-dependent structural features.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, G; Altekar, W

    1993-01-26

    Aldolase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from the extremely halophilic archaebacterium Haloarcula vallismortis are stable only in high concentrations of KCl present within the physiological environment. Data concerning the structural changes in the two enzymes as a result of lowering of salt concentration and changes in pH were obtained by monitoring the intrinsic protein fluorescence in the presence of quenchers. When the KCl concentrations were lowered below 2 M or in the presence of 6 M guanidine hydrochloride, the emission maximum shifted to a longer wavelength, indicating enhanced exposure of tryptophyl residues to the solvent. The spectral characteristics of the two proteins in guanidine hydrochloride and 0.4 M KCl were identical. However, these denatured states appear to be different than those observed after acid denaturation. Further perturbation of fluorescence was observed due to I-, and application of the Stern-Volmer law showed that the total fluorescence was available to the quenchers only in 0.4 M KCl solutions. The unfolding of proteins in 0.4 M KCl was a gradual process which was accompanied by a time-dependent loss in enzyme activity. The activity loss was complete within 30 min for aldolase whereas in the case of GAPDH nearly 3 h was required for the destruction of activity. For both enzymes, inactivation and protein denaturation were strongly correlated. The data on activity and thermostability measurements of the two enzymes in varying concentrations of KCl and potassium phosphate revealed that though both proteins are halophilic, the forces in the maintenance of their stability could be different.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate Dehydrogenase Aggregates Accelerate Amyloid-β Amyloidogenesis in Alzheimer Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Itakura, Masanori; Nakajima, Hidemitsu; Kubo, Takeya; Semi, Yuko; Kume, Satoshi; Higashida, Shusaku; Kaneshige, Akihiro; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Harada, Naoki; Kita, Akinori; Azuma, Yasu-Taka; Yamaji, Ryoichi; Inui, Takashi; Takeuchi, Tadayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of neurons and formation of pathological extracellular deposits induced by amyloid-β peptide (Aβ). Numerous studies have established Aβ amyloidogenesis as a hallmark of AD pathogenesis, particularly with respect to mitochondrial dysfunction. We have previously shown that glycolytic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) forms amyloid-like aggregates upon exposure to oxidative stress and that these aggregates contribute to neuronal cell death. Here, we report that GAPDH aggregates accelerate Aβ amyloidogenesis and subsequent neuronal cell death both in vitro and in vivo. Co-incubation of Aβ40 with small amounts of GAPDH aggregates significantly enhanced Aβ40 amyloidogenesis, as assessed by in vitro thioflavin-T assays. Similarly, structural analyses using Congo red staining, circular dichroism, and atomic force microscopy revealed that GAPDH aggregates induced Aβ40 amyloidogenesis. In PC12 cells, GAPDH aggregates augmented Aβ40-induced cell death, concomitant with disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, mice injected intracerebroventricularly with Aβ40 co-incubated with GAPDH aggregates exhibited Aβ40-induced pyramidal cell death and gliosis in the hippocampal CA3 region. These observations were accompanied by nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor and cytosolic release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. Finally, in the 3×Tg-AD mouse model of AD, GAPDH/Aβ co-aggregation and mitochondrial dysfunction were consistently detected in an age-dependent manner, and Aβ aggregate formation was attenuated by GAPDH siRNA treatment. Thus, this study suggests that GAPDH aggregates accelerate Aβ amyloidogenesis, subsequently leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal cell death in the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:26359500

  14. Transition state analysis of enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase (AroA)-catalyzed EPSP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Lou, Meiyan; Burger, Steven K; Gilpin, Meghann E; Gawuga, Vivian; Capretta, Alfredo; Berti, Paul J

    2012-08-08

    Proton transfer to carbon atoms is a significant catalytic challenge because of the large intrinsic energetic barrier and the frequently unfavorable thermodynamics. The main catalytic challenge for enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate synthase (EPSP synthase, AroA) is protonating the methylene carbon atom of phosphoenolpyruvate, or EPSP, in the reverse reaction. We performed transition state analysis using kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) on AroA-catalyzed EPSP hydrolysis, which also begins with a methylene carbon (C3) protonation, as an analog of AroA's reverse reaction. As part of this analysis, an inorganic phosphate scavenging system was developed to remove phosphate which, though present in microscopic amounts in solution, is ubiquitous. The reaction was stepwise, with irreversible C3 protonation to form an EPSP cation intermediate; that is, an AH(‡)*AN mechanism. The large experimental 3-(14)C KIE, 1.032 ± 0.005, indicated strong coupling of C3 with the motion of the transferring proton. Calculated 3-(14)C KIEs for computational transition state models revealed that the transition state occurs early during C3-H(+) bond formation, with a C3-H(+) bond order of ≈0.24. The observed solvent deuterium KIE, 0.97 ± 0.04, was the lowest observed to date for this type of reaction, but consistent with a very early transition state. The large 2-(14)C KIE reflected an "electrostatic sandwich" formed by Asp313 and Glu341 to stabilize the positive charge at C2. In shifting the transition state earlier than the acid-catalyzed reaction, AroA effected a large Hammond shift, indicating that a significant part of AroA's catalytic strategy is to stabilize the positive charge in the EPSP cation. A computational model containing all the charged amino acid residues in the AroA active site close to the reactive center showed a similar Hammond shift relative to the small transition state models.

  15. The Plastidial Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Is Critical for Viable Pollen Development in Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Cascales-Miñana, Borja; Irles-Segura, Asunción; Mateu, Isabel; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Segura, Juan; Ros, Roc

    2010-01-01

    Plant metabolism is highly coordinated with development. However, an understanding of the whole picture of metabolism and its interactions with plant development is scarce. In this work, we show that the deficiency in the plastidial glycolytic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPCp) leads to male sterility in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Pollen from homozygous gapcp double mutant plants (gapcp1gapcp2) displayed shrunken and collapsed forms and were unable to germinate when cultured in vitro. The pollen alterations observed in gapcp1gapcp2 were attributed to a disorganized tapetum layer. Accordingly, the expression of several of the genes involved in tapetum development was down-regulated in gapcp1gapcp2. The fertility of gapcp1gapcp2 was rescued by transforming this mutant with a construct carrying the GAPCp1 cDNA under the control of its native promoter (pGAPCp1::GAPCp1c). However, the GAPCp1 or GAPCp2 cDNA under the control of the 35S promoter (p35S::GAPCp), which is poorly expressed in the tapetum, did not complement the mutant fertility. Mutant GAPCp isoforms deficient in the catalytic activity of the enzyme were unable to complement the sterile phenotype of gapcp1gapcp2, thus confirming that both the expression and catalytic activity of GAPCp in anthers are necessary for mature pollen development. A metabolomic study in flower buds indicated that the most important difference between the sterile (gapcp1gapcp2, gapcp1gapcp2-p35S::GAPCp) and the fertile (wild-type plants, gapcp1gapcp2-pGAPCp1::GAPCp1c) lines was the increase in the signaling molecule trehalose. This work corroborates the importance of plastidial glycolysis in plant metabolism and provides evidence for the crucial role of GAPCps in pollen development. It additionally brings new insights into the complex interactions between metabolism and development. PMID:20107025

  16. TGF-β/SMAD3 Pathway Stimulates Sphingosine-1 Phosphate Receptor 3 Expression: IMPLICATION OF SPHINGOSINE-1 PHOSPHATE RECEPTOR 3 IN LUNG ADENOCARCINOMA PROGRESSION.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiawei; Liu, Jingjing; Lee, Jen-Fu; Zhang, Wenliang; Kandouz, Mustapha; VanHecke, Garrett C; Chen, Shiyou; Ahn, Young-Hoon; Lonardo, Fulvio; Lee, Menq-Jer

    2016-12-30

    Previously, we showed that levels of sphingosine-1 phosphate receptor 3 (S1PR3) are increased in a panel of cultured human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines, and that S1PR3-mediated signaling pathways regulate proliferation, soft agar growth, and invasion of human lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro In the present study, we examine S1PR3 levels in human lung adenocarcinoma specimens. cDNA array and tumor microarray analysis shows that mRNA and protein levels of S1PR3 are significantly increased in human lung adenocarcinomas when compared with normal lung epithelial cells. Promoter analysis shows 16 candidate SMAD3 binding sites in the promoter region of S1PR3. ChIP indicates that TGF-β treatment stimulates the binding of SMAD3 to the promoter region of S1PR3. Luciferase reporter assay demonstrates that SMAD3 transactivates S1PR3 promoter. TGF-β stimulation or ectopic expression of TGF-β up-regulates S1PR3 levels in vitro and ex vivo Pharmacologic inhibition of TGF-β receptor or SMAD3 abrogates the TGF-β-stimulated S1PR3 up-regulation. Moreover, S1PR3 knockdown dramatically inhibits tumor growth and lung metastasis, whereas ectopic expression of S1PR3 promotes the growth of human lung adenocarcinoma cells in animals. Pharmacological inhibition of S1PR3 profoundly inhibits the growth of lung carcinoma in mice. Our studies suggest that levels of S1PR3 are up-regulated in human lung adenocarcinomas, at least in part due to the TGF-β/SMAD3 signaling axis. Furthermore, S1PR3 activity promotes the progression of human lung adenocarcinomas. Therefore, S1PR3 may represent a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of deadly lung adenocarcinomas. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. The sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor: A novel therapeutic target for multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Mao-Draayer, Yang; Sarazin, Jeffrey; Fox, David; Schiopu, Elena

    2017-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a prototype autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Currently, there is no drug that provides a cure for MS. To date, all immunotherapeutic drugs target relapsing remitting MS (RR-MS); it remains a daunting medical challenge in MS to develop therapy for secondary progressive MS (SP-MS). Since the approval of the non-selective sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor modulator FTY720 (fingolimod [Gilenya®]) for RR-MS in 2010, there have been many emerging studies with various selective S1P receptor modulators in other autoimmune conditions. In this article, we will review how S1P receptor may be a promising therapeutic target for SP-MS and other autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis, polymyositis and lupus.

  18. Sphingosine-1 Phosphate: A New Modulator of Immune Plasticity in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Yamila I.; Campos, Ludmila E.; Castro, Melina G.; Aladhami, Ahmed; Oskeritzian, Carole A.; Alvarez, Sergio E.

    2016-01-01

    In the last 15 years, increasing evidences demonstrate a strong link between sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and both normal physiology and progression of different diseases, including cancer and inflammation. Indeed, numerous studies show that tissue levels of this sphingolipid metabolite are augmented in many cancers, affecting survival, proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastatic spread. Recent insights into the possible role of S1P as a therapeutic target has attracted enormous attention and opened new opportunities in this evolving field. In this review, we will focus on the role of S1P in cancer, with particular emphasis in new developments that highlight the many functions of this sphingolipid in the tumor microenvironment. We will discuss how S1P modulates phenotypic plasticity of macrophages and mast cells, tumor-induced immune evasion, differentiation and survival of immune cells in the tumor milieu, interaction between cancer and stromal cells, and hypoxic response. PMID:27800303

  19. Expanding the Nucleotide and Sugar 1-Phosphate Promiscuity of Nucleotidyltransferase RmlA via Directed Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Moretti, Rocco; Chang, Aram; Peltier-Pain, Pauline; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Thorson, Jon S.

    2012-03-15

    Directed evolution is a valuable technique to improve enzyme activity in the absence of a priori structural knowledge, which can be typically enhanced via structure-guided strategies. In this study, a combination of both whole-gene error-prone polymerase chain reaction and site-saturation mutagenesis enabled the rapid identification of mutations that improved RmlA activity toward non-native substrates. These mutations have been shown to improve activities over 10-fold for several targeted substrates, including non-native pyrimidine- and purine-based NTPs as well as non-native d- and l-sugars (both a- and b-isomers). This study highlights the first broadly applicable high throughput sugar-1-phosphate nucleotidyltransferase screen and the first proof of concept for the directed evolution of this enzyme class toward the identification of uniquely permissive RmlA variants.

  20. Synthesis of octa- and dodecamers of D-ribitol-1-phosphate and their protein conjugates.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Anikó; Hoogerhout, Peter; Zomer, Gijsbert; Kubler-Kielb, Joanna; Schneerson, Rachel; Robbins, John B; Pozsgay, Vince

    2006-09-04

    The bacterial cell-wall-associated teichoic acids contain predominantly D-ribitol residues interconnected by phosphodiester linkages. Because of their location, these antigens may be vaccine candidates as part of conjugate vaccines. Here, we describe the synthesis of extended oligomers of D-ribitol-1-phosphate linked to a spacer having an amino group at its terminus. The synthesis utilized a fully protected D-ribitol-phosphoramidite that was oligomerized in a stepwise fashion followed by deprotection. The free oligomers were connected to bovine serum albumin using oxime chemistry. Thus, the ribitol phosphate oligomers were converted into keto derivatives, and the albumin counterpart was decorated with aminooxy groups. Reaction of the functionalized saccharide and protein moieties afforded conjugates having up to 20 ribitol phosphate chains.

  1. A polymer of N-acetylglucosamine 1-phosphate in the wall of Staphylococcus lactis 2102

    PubMed Central

    Archibald, A. R.; Stafford, G. H.

    1972-01-01

    1. Walls of Staphylococcus lactis 2102 contain about 40% of a phosphorylated polysaccharide, which was isolated by extraction with cold trichloroacetic acid, with dilute NaOH, and also by digestion with a Flavobacterium peptidase. 2. The purified polymer contained equimolar proportions of N-acetylglucosamine and phosphate as its sole constituents and was readily hydrolysed under gentle acidic conditions to N-acetylglucosamine 6-phosphate. 3. Studies on the intact polymer showed that it is linear and that adjacent acetamido sugar units are joined by phosphodiester bonds between their 1- and 6-positions, the glycosidic linkages having the α-configuration. This polymer is thus the simplest of the known microbial wall polymers possessing sugar 1-phosphate linkages. 4. Alkali degradation of the extracted polymer proceeds predominantly in a stepwise manner from the reducing end, but evidence was obtained for the direct hydrolysis of some of the inter-unit phosphodiester groups. PMID:4352714

  2. A chromogenic substrate for phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C: 4-nitrophenyl myo-inositol-1-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Shashidhar, M S; Volwerk, J J; Griffith, O H; Keana, J F

    1991-12-01

    A chromogenic water-soluble substrate for phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C was synthesized starting from myo-inositol employing isopropylidene and 4-methoxytetrahydropyranyl protecting groups. In this analogue of phosphatidylinositol, 4-nitrophenol replaces the diacylglycerol moiety, resulting in synthetic, racemic 4-nitrophenyl myo-inositol-1-phosphate. Using this synthetic substrate a rapid, convenient and sensitive spectrophotometric assay for the phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus was developed. Initial rates of the cleavage of the nitrophenol substrate were linear with time and the amount of enzyme used. At pH 7.0, specific activities for the B. cereus enzyme were 77 and 150 mumol substrate cleaved min-1 (mg protein)-1 at substrate concentrations of 1 and 2 mM, respectively. Under these conditions, less than 50 ng quantities of enzyme were easily detected. The chromogenic substrate was stable during long term storage (6 months) as a solid at -20 degrees C.

  3. Highly selective and potent agonists of sphingosine-1-phosphate 1 (S1P1) receptor.

    PubMed

    Vachal, Petr; Toth, Leslie M; Hale, Jeffrey J; Yan, Lin; Mills, Sander G; Chrebet, Gary L; Koehane, Carol A; Hajdu, Richard; Milligan, James A; Rosenbach, Mark J; Mandala, Suzanne

    2006-07-15

    Novel series of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonists were developed through a systematic SAR aimed to achieve high selectivity for a single member of the S1P family of receptors, S1P1. The optimized structure represents a highly S1P1-selective and efficacious agonist: S1P1/S1P2, S1P1/S1P3, S1P1/S1P4>10,000-fold, S1P1/S1P5>600-fold, while EC50 (S1P1) <0.2 nM. In vivo experiments are consistent with S1P1 receptor agonism alone being sufficient for achieving desired lymphocyte-lowering effect.

  4. Sphingosine 1-phosphate regulates cytoskeleton dynamics: implications in its biological response.

    PubMed

    Donati, Chiara; Bruni, Paola

    2006-12-01

    The bioactive sphingolipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) elicits robust cytoskeletal rearrangement in a large variety of cell systems, mainly acting through a panel of specific cell surface receptors, named S1P receptors. Recent studies have begun to delineate the molecular mechanisms involved in the complex process responsible for cytoskeletal rearrangement following S1P ligation to its receptors. Notably, changes of cell shape and/or motility induced by S1P via cytoskeletal remodelling are functional to the biological action exerted by S1P which appears to be highly cell-specific. This review focuses on the current knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms of cytoskeleton dynamics elicited by S1P, with special emphasis on the relationship between cytoskeletal remodelling and the biological effects evoked by the sphingolipid in various cell types.

  5. Catalytic action of fuculose 1-phosphate aldolase (class II) as derived from structure-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Joerger, A C; Gosse, C; Fessner, W D; Schulz, G E

    2000-05-23

    Previous analyses established the structures of unligated L-fuculose 1-phosphate aldolase and of the enzyme ligated with an inhibitor mimicking the substrate dihydroxyacetone phosphate. These data allowed us to suggest a catalytic mechanism. On the basis of this proposal, numerous mutations were now introduced at the active center and tested with respect to their catalytic rates and their product distributions. For several mutants, the structures were determined. The results demonstrate the catalytic importance of some particular residues in defined conformations and in the mobile C-terminal chain end. Moreover, they led to a modification of the proposed mechanism. The effect of some mutations on enantioselectivity and on the ratio of diastereomer formation indicates clearly the binding site of the aldehyde moiety in relation to the other substrate dihydroxyacetone phosphate.

  6. PCR-mediated recombination of the amplification products of the Hibiscus tiliaceus cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed

    Wu, Linghui; Tang, Tian; Zhou, Renchao; Shi, Suhua

    2007-03-31

    PCR-mediated recombination describes the process of in vitro chimera formation from related template sequences present in a single PCR amplification. The high levels of genetic redundancy in eukaryotic genomes should make recombination artifacts occur readily. However, few evolutionary biologists adequately consider this phenomenon when studying gene lineages. The cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (GapC), which encodes a NADP-dependent nonphosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in the cytosol, is a classical low-copy nuclear gene marker and is commonly used in molecular evolutionary studies. Here, we report on the occurrence of PCR-mediated recombination in the GapC gene family of Hibiscus tiliaceus. The study suggests that recombinant areas appear to be correlated with DNA template secondary structures. Our observations highlight that recombination artifacts should be considered when studying specific and allelic phylogenies. The authors suggest that nested PCR be used to suppress PCR-mediated recombination.

  7. Arsenite release on enzymic transformation of arsonomethyl substrate analogues: a potentially lethal synthesis by glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Mutenda, E K; Sparkes, M J; Dixon, H B

    1995-09-15

    The isosteric arsenical analogue of glycerol 3-phosphate, 3,4-dihydroxybutylarsonic acid, is a good substrate for rabbit muscle glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Its oxidation is accompanied by release of arsenite. This release seems to be due to a spontaneous elimination of arsenite by 3-oxoalkylarsonic acids, as it is also observed in (1) the oxidation of 3-hydroxypropylarsonic acid by yeast alcohol dehydrogenase, (2) treatment of 3,4-dihydroxybutylarsonic acid with periodate and (3) nonenzymic transamination of the glutamate analogue 2-amino-4-arsonobutyric acid. Enzymic formation of 3-oxoalkylarsonic acids in cells can therefore be lethal, as arsenite is poisonous to most organisms because of its high affinity for dithiols such as dihydrolipoyl groups.

  8. Different signaling pathway between sphingosine-1-phosphate and lysophosphatidic acid in Xenopus oocytes: functional coupling of the sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor to PLC-xbeta in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Noh, S J; Kim, M J; Shim, S; Han, J K

    1998-08-01

    In Xenopus oocytes, both sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) activate Ca2+-dependent oscillatory Cl- currents by acting through membrane-bound receptors. External application of 50 microM S1P elicited a long-lasting oscillatory current that continued over 30 min from the beginning of oscillation, with 300 nA (n = 11) as a usual maximum peak of current, whereas 1-microM LPA treatment showed only transiently oscillating but more vigorous current responses, with 2,800 nA (n = 18) as a maximum peak amplitude. Both phospholipid-induced Ca2+-dependent Cl- currents were observed in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, were blocked by intracellular injection of the Ca2+ chelator, EGTA, and could not be elicited by treatment with thapsigargin, an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ ATPase. Intracellular Ca2+ release appeared to be from inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive Ca2+ store, because Cl- currents were blocked by heparin injection. Pretreatment with the aminosteroid, U-73122, an inhibitor of G protein-mediated phospholipase C (PLC) activation, to oocytes inhibited the current responses evoked both by S1P and LPA. However, when they were injected with 10 ng of antisense oligonucleotide (AS-ODN) against Xenopus phospholipase C (PLC-xbeta), oocytes could not respond to S1P application, whereas they responded normally to LPA, indicating that the S1P signaling pathway goes through PLC-xbeta, whereas LPA signaling goes through another unknown PLC. To determine the types of G proteins involved, we introduced AS-ODNs against four types of G-protein alpha subunits that were identified in Xenopus laevis; G(q)alpha, G11alpha, G0alpha, and G(i1)alpha. Among AS-ODNs against the G alphas tested, AS-G(q)alpha and AS-G(i1)alpha to S1P and AS-G(q)alpha and AS-G11alpha to LPA specifically reduced current responses, respectively, to about 20-30% of controls. These results demonstrate that LPA and S1P, although they have similar structural

  9. Sulfur mustard induced nuclear translocation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GAPDH).

    PubMed

    Steinritz, Dirk; Weber, Jana; Balszuweit, Frank; Thiermann, Horst; Schmidt, Annette

    2013-12-05

    Sulfur Mustard (SM) is a vesicant chemical warfare agent, which is acutely toxic to a variety of organ systems including skin, eyes, respiratory system and bone marrow. The underlying molecular pathomechanism was mainly attributed to the alkylating properties of SM. However, recent studies have revealed that cellular responses to SM exposure are of more complex nature and include increased protein expression and protein modifications that can be used as biomarkers. In order to confirm already known biomarkers, to detect potential new ones and to further elucidate the pathomechanism of SM, we conducted large-scale proteomic experiments based on a human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) exposed to SM. Surprisingly, our analysis identified glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as one of the up-regulated proteins after exposure of HaCaT cells to SM. In this paper we demonstrate the sulfur mustard induced nuclear translocation of GAPDH in HaCaT cells by 2D gel-electrophoresis (2D GE), immunocytochemistry (ICC), Western Blot (WB) and a combination thereof. 2D GE in combination with MALDI-TOF MS/MS analysis identified GAPDH as an up-regulated protein after SM exposure. Immunocytochemistry revealed a distinct nuclear translocation of GAPDH after exposure to 300μM SM. This finding was confirmed by fractionated WB analysis. 2D GE and subsequent immunoblot staining of GAPDH demonstrated two different spot locations of GAPH (pI 7.0 and pI 8.5) that are related to cytosolic or nuclear GAPDH respectively. After exposure to 300μM SM a significant increase of nuclear GAPDH at pI 8.5 occurred. Nuclear GAPDH has been associated with apoptosis, detection of structural DNA alterations, DNA repair and regulation of genomic integrity and telomere structure. The results of our study add new aspects to the pathophysiology of sulfur mustard toxicity, yet further studies will be necessary to reveal the specific function of nuclear GAPDH in the pathomechanism of sulfur mustard.

  10. Glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase/PGP: Role in intermediate metabolism and target for cardiometabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Possik, Elite; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Prentki, Marc

    2017-08-04

    Metabolic diseases, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome arise because of disturbances in glucose and fat metabolism, which impact associated physiological events such as insulin secretion and action, fat storage and oxidation. Even though, decades of research has contributed to our current understanding of the components involved in glucose and fat metabolism and their regulation, that led to the development of many therapeutics, there are still many unanswered questions. Glycerol-3-phosphate (Gro3P), which is formed during glycolysis, is at the intersection of glucose and fat metabolism, and the availability of this metabolite can regulate energy and intermediary metabolism in mammalian cells. During the course of evolution, mammalian cells are assumed to have lost the capacity to directly hydrolyze Gro3P to glycerol, until the recent discovery from our laboratory showing that a previously known mammalian enzyme, phosphoglycolate phosphatase (PGP), can function as Gro3P phosphatase (G3PP) and regulate this metabolite levels. Emerging evidence indicates that G3PP/PGP is an evolutionarily conserved "multi-tasking" enzyme that belongs to the superfamily of haloacid dehalogenase-like phosphatase enzymes, and is capable of hydrolyzing Gro3P, an abundant physiologically relevant substrate, as well as other metabolites including 2-phosphoglycolate, 4-phospherythronate and 2-phospholactate, which are present in much smaller amounts in cells, under normal conditions. G3PP, by regulating Gro3P levels, plays a critical role in intermediary metabolism, including glycolysis, glucose oxidation, cellular redox and ATP production, gluconeogenesis, esterification of fatty acids towards glycerolipid synthesis and fatty acid oxidation. Because of G3PP's ability to regulate energy and intermediary metabolism as well as physiological functions such as insulin secretion, hepatic glucose production, and fat synthesis, storage and oxidation, the pathophysiological

  11. Effects of lactate dehydrogenase suppression and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase overexpression on cellular metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Dae-won; Cho, Il Taeg; Kim, Tae Soo; Bae, Gun Won; Kim, Ik-Hwan; Kim, Ick Young

    2006-03-01

    In order to conduct a physiological functional study of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH), we engineered a CHO dhfr(-) cell, by overexpressing either the anti-sense LDH-A RNA (anti-LDH cells) or GPDH (GP3 cells), or both (GP3/anti-LDH cells). LDH activity in the cell cytosol, and lactate content and pHe change in the growth media were found to decrease according to the order: cell lines GP3/anti-LDH > anti-LDH > GP3 > CHO. Intracellular ATP contents, representing the extent of respiration rate, also decreased, according to a rank order as follows: GP3 > CHO > GP3/anti-LDH > anti-LDH. We also attempted to identify and characterize any physiological changes occurring in the cells which harbored diverse metabolic pathways. First, anti-LDH cells with heightened respiration rates were found to display a higher degree of sensitivity to the prooxidant tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBOOH), and the mitochondrial complex III inhibitor, antimycin A, than the GPDH-expressing cells (GP3 and GP3/anti-LDH), which have a lower respiration rate. Second, the anti-sense LDH-A RNA-expressing cells (anti-LDH and GP3/anti-LDH) evidenced a higher degree of resistance to apoptosis by cell-cell contact inhibition, and a faster doubling time ( approximately 19 h compared with approximately 26 h) than the CHO and GP3 cells. Additionally, cell growth in an extended culture under HCO(3) (-)-free conditions to induce a steep acidification could be maintained with the anti-sense LDH-A RNA-expressing cells, but could not be maintained with the CHO and GP3 cells. Third, we observed that the most appropriate cell line for the optical production of a certain therapeutic protein (Tissue-Plasminogen Activator) was the GP3/anti-LDH cells. Collectively, our data indicate a variety of physiological roles for LDH and GPDH, including cellular acidosis, oxidoresistance, apoptosis by both acidosis and cell-cell contact inhibition, cell growth, and the generation of

  12. RNAi mediated down regulation of myo-inositol-3-phosphate synthase to generate low phytate rice.

    PubMed

    Ali, Nusrat; Paul, Soumitra; Gayen, Dipak; Sarkar, Sailendra Nath; Datta, Swapan K; Datta, Karabi

    2013-05-15

    Phytic acid (InsP6) is considered as the major source of phosphorus and inositol phosphates in cereal grains. Reduction of phytic acid level in cereal grains is desirable in view of its antinutrient properties to maximize mineral bioavailability and minimize the load of phosphorus waste management. We report here RNAi mediated seed-specific silencing of myo-inositol-3-phosphate synthase (MIPS) gene catalyzing the first step of phytic acid biosynthesis in rice. Moreover, we also studied the possible implications of MIPS silencing on myo-inositol and related metabolism, since, first step of phytic acid biosynthesis is also the rate limiting step of myo-inositol synthesis, catalyzed by MIPS. The resulting transgenic rice plants (T3) showed a 4.59 fold down regulation in MIPS gene expression, which corresponds to a significant decrease in phytate levels and a simultaneous increment in the amount of inorganic phosphate in the seeds. A diminution in the myo-inositol content of transgenic plants was also observed due to disruption of the first step of phytic acid biosynthetic pathway, which further reduced the level of ascorbate and altered abscisic acid (ABA) sensitivity of the transgenic plants. In addition, our results shows that in the transgenic plants, the lower phytate levels has led to an increment of divalent cations, of which a 1.6 fold increase in the iron concentration in milled rice seeds was noteworthy. This increase could be attributed to reduced chelation of divalent metal (iron) cations, which may correlate to higher iron bioavailability in the endosperm of rice grains. The present study evidently suggests that seed-specific silencing of MIPS in transgenic rice plants can yield substantial reduction in levels of phytic acid along with an increase in inorganic phosphate content. However, it was also demonstrated that the low phytate seeds had an undesirable diminution in levels of myo-inositol and ascorbate, which probably led to sensitiveness of seeds to

  13. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase negatively regulates human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Host proteins are incorporated inside human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virions during assembly and can either positively or negatively regulate HIV-1 infection. Although the identification efficiency of host proteins is improved by mass spectrometry, how those host proteins affect HIV-1 replication has not yet been fully clarified. Results In this study, we show that virion-associated glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) does not allosterically inactivate HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) but decreases the efficiency of reverse transcription reactions by decreasing the packaging efficiency of lysyl-tRNA synthetase (LysRS) and tRNALys3 into HIV-1 virions. Two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis demonstrated that some isozymes of GAPDH with different isoelectric points were expressed in HIV-1-producing CEM/LAV-1 cells, and a proportion of GAPDH was selectively incorporated into the virions. Suppression of GAPDH expression by RNA interference in CEM/LAV-1 cells resulted in decreased GAPDH packaging inside the virions, and the GAPDH-packaging-defective virus maintained at least control levels of viral production but increased the infectivity. Quantitative analysis of reverse transcription products indicated that the levels of early cDNA products of the GAPDH-packaging-defective virus were higher than those of the control virus owing to the higher packaging efficiencies of LysRS and tRNALys3 into the virions rather than the GAPDH-dependent negative allosteric modulation for RT. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation assay using an anti-GAPDH antibody showed that GAPDH directly interacted with Pr55gag and p160gag-pol and the overexpression of LysRS in HIV-1-producing cells resulted in a decrease in the efficiency of GAPDH packaging in HIV particles. In contrast, the viruses produced from cells expressing a high level of GAPDH showed decreased infectivity in TZM-bl cells and reverse transcription efficiency in TZM-bl cells and peripheral blood

  14. Resistance of Francisella Novicida to Fosmidomycin Associated with Mutations in the Glycerol-3-Phosphate Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, Ryan S.; McKenney, Elizabeth S.; van Hoek, Monique L.

    2012-01-01

    The methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway is essential in most prokaryotes and some lower eukaryotes but absent from human cells, and is a validated target for antimicrobial drug development. The formation of MEP is catalyzed by 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR). MEP pathway genes have been identified in many category A and B biothreat agents, including Francisella tularensis, which causes the zoonosis tularemia. Fosmidomycin (Fos) inhibits purified Francisella DXR. This compound also inhibits the growth of F. tularensis NIH B38, F. novicida and F. tularensis subsp. holarctica LVS bacteria. Related compounds such as FR900098 and the lipophilic prodrug of FR900098 (compound 1) have been developed to improve the bioavailability of these DXR inhibitors. In performing disk-inhibition assays with these compounds, we observed breakthrough colonies of F. novicida in the presence of Fos, suggesting spontaneous development of Fos resistance (FosR). FosR bacteria had decreased sensitivity to both Fos and FR900098. The two most likely targets for the development of mutants would be the DXR enzyme itself or the glycerol-3-phosphate transporter (GlpT) that allows entry of Fos into the bacteria. Sensitivity of FosR F. novicida bacteria to compound 1 was not abated suggesting that spontaneous resistance is not due to mutation of DXR. We thus predicted that the glpT transporter may be mutated leading to this resistant phenotype. Supporting this, transposon insertion mutants at the glpT locus were also found to be resistant to Fos. DNA sequencing of four different spontaneous FosR colonies demonstrated a variety of deletions in the glpT coding region. The overall frequency of FosR mutations in F. novicida was determined to be 6.3 × 10−8. Thus we conclude that one mechanism of resistance of F. novicida to Fos is caused by mutations in GlpT. This is the first description of spontaneous mutations in Francisella leading to FosR. PMID:22905031

  15. Thermal unfolding of phosphorylating D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase studied by differential scanning calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Levashov, P; Orlov, V; Boschi-Muller, S; Talfournier, F; Asryants, R; Bulatnikov, I; Muronetz, V; Branlant, G; Nagradova, N

    1999-08-17

    Thermal unfolding parameters were determined for a two-domain tetrameric enzyme, phosphorylating D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and for its isolated NAD(+)-binding domain. At pH 8.0, the transition temperatures (t(max)) for the apoforms of the native Bacillus stearothermophilus GAPDH and the isolated domain were 78.3 degrees C and 61.9 degrees C, with calorimetric enthalpies (DeltaH(cal)) of 4415 and 437 kJ/mol (or 30.7 and 22.1 J/g), respectively. In the presence of nearly saturating NAD(+) concentrations, the t(max) and the DeltaH(cal) increased by 13.6 degrees C and by 2365 kJ/mol, respectively, for the native apoenzyme, and by 2.8 degrees C and 109 kJ/mol for the isolated domain. These results indicate that interdomain interactions are essential for NAD(+) to produce its stabilizing effect on the structure of the native enzyme. The thermal stability of the isolated NAD(+)-binding domain increased considerably upon transition from pH 6.0 to 8.0. By contrast, native GAPDH exhibited greater stability at pH 6.0; similar pH-dependencies of thermal stability were displayed by GAPDHs isolated from rabbit muscle and Escherichia coli. The binding of NAD(+) to rabbit muscle apoenzyme increased t(max) and DeltaH(cal) and diminished the widths of the DSC curves; the effect was found to grow progressively with increasing coenzyme concentrations. Alkylation of the essential Cys149 with iodoacetamide destabilized the apoenzyme and altered the effect of NAD(+). Replacement of Cys149 by Ser or by Ala in the B. stearothermophilus GAPDH produced some stabilization, the effect of added NAD(+) being basically similar to that observed with the wild-type enzyme. These data indicate that neither the ion pairing between Cys149 and His176 nor the charge transfer interaction between Cys149 and NAD(+) make any significant contribution to the stabilization of the enzyme's native tertiary structure and the accomplishment of NAD(+)-induced conformational changes. The H

  16. Arabidopsis Sphingosine Kinase and the Effects of Phytosphingosine-1-Phosphate on Stomatal Aperture1[w

    PubMed Central

    Coursol, Sylvie; Le Stunff, Hervé; Lynch, Daniel V.; Gilroy, Simon; Assmann, Sarah M.; Spiegel, Sarah

    2005-01-01

    Sphingolipids are a major component of membrane lipids and their metabolite sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a potent lipid mediator in animal cells. Recently, we have shown that the enzyme responsible for S1P production, sphingosine kinase (SphK), is stimulated by the phytohormone abscisic acid in guard cells of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and that S1P is effective in regulating guard cell turgor. We have now characterized SphK from Arabidopsis leaves. SphK activity was mainly associated with the membrane fraction and phosphorylated predominantly the Δ4-unsaturated long-chain sphingoid bases sphingosine (Sph) and 4,8-sphingadienine, and to a lesser extent, the saturated long-chain sphingoid bases dihydrosphingosine and phytosphingosine (Phyto-Sph). 4-Hydroxy-8-sphingenine, which is a major sphingoid base in complex glycosphingolipids from Arabidopsis leaves, was a relatively poor substrate compared with the corresponding saturated Phyto-Sph. In contrast, mammalian SphK1 efficiently phosphorylated Sph, dihydrosphingosine, and 4,8-sphingadienine, but not the 4-hydroxylated long-chain bases Phyto-Sph and 4-hydroxy-8-sphingenine. Surface dilution kinetic analysis of Arabidopsis SphK with Sph presented in mixed Triton X-100 micelles indicated that SphK associates with the micellar surface and then with the substrate presented on the surface. In addition, measurements of SphK activity under different assay conditions combined with phylogenetic analysis suggest that multiple isoforms of SphK may be expressed in Arabidopsis. Importantly, we found that phytosphingosine-1-phosphate, similar to S1P, regulates stomatal apertures and that its action is impaired in guard cells of Arabidopsis plants harboring T-DNA null mutations in the sole prototypical G-protein α-subunit gene, GPA1. PMID:15665242

  17. Arabidopsis sphingosine kinase and the effects of phytosphingosine-1-phosphate on stomatal aperture.

    PubMed

    Coursol, Sylvie; Le Stunff, Hervé; Lynch, Daniel V; Gilroy, Simon; Assmann, Sarah M; Spiegel, Sarah

    2005-02-01

    Sphingolipids are a major component of membrane lipids and their metabolite sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a potent lipid mediator in animal cells. Recently, we have shown that the enzyme responsible for S1P production, sphingosine kinase (SphK), is stimulated by the phytohormone abscisic acid in guard cells of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and that S1P is effective in regulating guard cell turgor. We have now characterized SphK from Arabidopsis leaves. SphK activity was mainly associated with the membrane fraction and phosphorylated predominantly the Delta4-unsaturated long-chain sphingoid bases sphingosine (Sph) and 4,8-sphingadienine, and to a lesser extent, the saturated long-chain sphingoid bases dihydrosphingosine and phytosphingosine (Phyto-Sph). 4-Hydroxy-8-sphingenine, which is a major sphingoid base in complex glycosphingolipids from Arabidopsis leaves, was a relatively poor substrate compared with the corresponding saturated Phyto-Sph. In contrast, mammalian SphK1 efficiently phosphorylated Sph, dihydrosphingosine, and 4,8-sphingadienine, but not the 4-hydroxylated long-chain bases Phyto-Sph and 4-hydroxy-8-sphingenine. Surface dilution kinetic analysis of Arabidopsis SphK with Sph presented in mixed Triton X-100 micelles indicated that SphK associates with the micellar surface and then with the substrate presented on the surface. In addition, measurements of SphK activity under different assay conditions combined with phylogenetic analysis suggest that multiple isoforms of SphK may be expressed in Arabidopsis. Importantly, we found that phytosphingosine-1-phosphate, similar to S1P, regulates stomatal apertures and that its action is impaired in guard cells of Arabidopsis plants harboring T-DNA null mutations in the sole prototypical G-protein alpha-subunit gene, GPA1.

  18. Sphingosine-1-phosphate mediates AKT/ERK maintenance of dental pulp homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Pan, H Y; Yang, H; Shao, M Y; Xu, J; Zhang, P; Cheng, R; Hu, T

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the cell status of dental pulp cells (DPCs) in a sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-induced microinflammation environment and the possible mechanisms of cell homoeostasis maintenance by S1P. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor (S1PR) expression was examined in DPCs within a local S1P-induced microinflammation model established using 1 μmol L(-1) S1P. U0126 [extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor], LY294002 (AKT inhibitor) and Y27632 (ROCK inhibitor) were used to inhibit corresponding signalling pathways of DPCs. CCK8 and cell cycle analysis tested cell proliferation. Immunofluorescence staining JC-1 detected changes of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). Tests for apoptosis and the apoptosis-related proteins Bax and Bcl-2 were assessed by flow cytometry and western blot analysis, respectively. Expressions of ERK and AKT were evaluated by western blot analysis. The results were analysed using the Student's t-test and the significance level set at P < 0.05. Expressions of S1PR1, S1PR2 and S1PR3 in DPCs differed amongst individuals. DPCs maintained self-homoeostasis in response to S1P-induced microinflammation via S1PRs. During this repair process, ERK, AKT and ROCK had a short-term complementary interaction at 60 min, but then AKT and ERK gradually played decisive roles after 24 h in proliferation enhancement and apoptosis inhibition, respectively (P > 0.05). The AKT-ERK balance may determine whether DPC homoeostasis in S1P-induced microinflammation is maintained by synergistic regulation of cell growth and apoptosis. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Caged ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) analogs: Novel tools for studying C1P biology.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio; Gangoiti, Patricia; Rivera, Io-Guané; Presa, Natalia; Gomez-Larrauri, Ana; Ordoñez, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid metabolite that is produced in cells by the action of ceramide kinase (CerK) acting upon ceramide, and is also found in the circulation. C1P was first demonstrated to be mitogenic and antiapoptotic in different cell types, and was later shown to induce cell migration. Understanding the precise mechanisms by which C1P exerts its biological effects has been possible using specific photosensitive caged C1P analogues synthesized by Robert Bittman's group. These compounds are cell permeable, bypass cell plasma membrane receptors, and can be released into the cytosol upon light irradiation, thereby allowing precise determination of the intracellular mechanisms of actions of C1P. Two derivatives of N-palmitoyl-ceramide 1-phosphate have been used in most studies. In one C1P derivative the cage was 7-(N,N-diethylamino)coumarin (DECM-C1P) while in the other it was a 4-bromo-5-hydroxy-2-nitrobenzhydryl moiety (BHNB-C1P). The uncaging process released C1P in the cytosol, and this was accompanied by stimulation of cell proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis, and production of low levels of reactive oxygen species. However, intracellular accumulation of C1P did not affect chemotaxis. The caged C1P analogues allowed distinction between the extracellular events evoked by C1P, as for example through interaction with a putative cell-surface receptor, from its intracellular effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Sphingosine 1-phosphate, present in serum-derived lipoproteins, activates matriptase.

    PubMed

    Benaud, Christelle; Oberst, Michael; Hobson, John P; Spiegel, Sarah; Dickson, Robert B; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2002-03-22

    We describe here a novel biological function of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P): the activation of a serine protease, matriptase. Matriptase is a type II integral membrane serine protease, expressed on the surface of a variety of epithelial cells; it may play an important role in tissue remodeling. We have previously reported that the activation of matriptase is regulated by serum. We have now identified the bioactive component from serum. First, the activity was observed to co-purify with lipoproteins by conventional liquid chromatography and immunoaffinity chromatography. The ability of lipoproteins to induce the activation of matriptase was further confirmed with commercial preparations of low density lipoprotein (LDL) and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL). Next, we observed that the bioactive component of LDL is associated with the phospholipid components of LDL. Fractionation of lipid components of LDL by thin layer chromatography (TLC) revealed that the bioactive component of LDL comigrates with S1P. Nanomolar concentrations of commercially obtained S1P were then observed to induce the rapid activation of matriptase on the surfaces of nontransformed human mammary epithelial cells. Other structurally related sphingolipids, including dihydro-S1P, ceramide 1-phosphates, and sphingosine phosphocholine as well as lysophosphatidic acid, can also induce the activation of matriptase, but at significantly higher concentrations than S1P. Furthermore, S1P-dependent matriptase activation is dependent on Ca(2+) but not via G(i) protein-coupled receptors. Our results demonstrate that bioactive phospholipids can function as nonprotein activators of a cell surface protease, suggesting a possible mechanistic link between S1P and normal and possibly pathologic tissue remodeling.

  1. Low sphingosine-1-phosphate plasma levels are predictive for increased mortality in patients with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Michael; Scholz, Markus; Seehofer, Daniel; Berg, Thomas; Engelmann, Cornelius; Thiery, Joachim; Ceglarek, Uta

    2017-01-01

    Background & aim The association of circulating sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive lipid involved in various cellular processes, and related metabolites such as sphinganine-1-phosphate (SA1P) and sphingosine (SPH) with mortality in patients with end-stage liver disease is investigated in the presented study. S1P as a bioactive lipid mediator, is involved in several cellular processes, however, in end-stage liver disease its role is not understood. Methods The study cohort consisted of 95 patients with end-stage liver disease and available information on one-year outcome. The median MELD (Model for end-stage liver disease) score was 12.41 (Range 6.43–39.63). The quantification of sphingolipids in citrated plasma specimen was performed after methanolic protein precipitation followed by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometric detection. Results S1P and SA1P displayed significant correlations with the MELD score. Patients with circulating S1P levels below the lowest tertile (110.68 ng/ml) showed the poorest one-year survival rate of only 57.1%, whereas one-year survival rate in patients with S1P plasma levels above 165.67 ng/ml was 93.8%. In a multivariate cox regression analysis including platelet counts, concentrations of hemoglobin and MELD score, S1P remained a significant predictor for three-month and one-year mortality. Conclusions Low plasma S1P concentrations are highly significantly associated with prognosis in end-stage liver disease. This association is independent of the stage of liver disease. Further studies should be performed to investigate S1P, its role in the pathophysiology of liver diseases and its potential for therapeutic interventions. PMID:28334008

  2. Arsenic Requires Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Type 1 Receptors to Induce Angiogenic Genes and Endothelial Cell Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Adam C.; Klei, Linda R.; Stolz, Donna B.; Barchowsky, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic in drinking water is a major public health concern as it increases risk and incidence of cardiovascular disease and cancer. Arsenic exposure affects multiple vascular beds, promoting liver sinusoidal capillarization and portal hypertension, ischemic heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, and tumor angiogenesis. While Rac1-GTPase and NADPH oxidase activities are essential for arsenic-stimulated endothelial cell signaling for angiogenesis or liver sinusoid capillarization, the mechanism for initiating these effects is unknown. We found that arsenic-stimulated cell signaling and angiogenic gene expression in human microvascular endothelial cells were Pertussis toxin sensitive, indicating a G-protein coupled signaling pathway. Incubating human microvascular endothelial cells with the sphingosine-1-phosphate type 1 receptor (S1P1) inhibitor VPC23019 or performing small interfering RNA knockdown of S1P1 blocked arsenic-stimulated HMVEC angiogenic gene expression and tube formation, but did not affect induction of either HMOX1 or IL8. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) defenestrate and capillarize in response to aging and environmental oxidant stresses. We found that S1P1 was enriched on LSECs in vivo and in primary cell culture and that VPC23019 inhibited both sphingosine-1-phosphate-stimulated and arsenic-stimulated LSEC oxidant generation and defenestration. These studies identified novel roles for S1P1 in mediating arsenic stimulation of both angiogenesis and pathogenic LSEC capillarization, as well as demonstrating a role for S1P1 in mediating environmental responses in the liver vasculature, providing possible mechanistic insight into arsenic-induced vascular pathogenesis and disease. PMID:19349368

  3. Advance in the Study of the Mechanisms Regulated by Sphingosine-1-Phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Fei; Kong, Xiangqian; Luo, Cheng

    2010-09-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid messenger in the cells that regulate gene expression and NF-KB signal pathway through unknown mechanisms. Recently, Cheng Luo, associate professor of DDDC in Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, whose project was funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China, joined in a research team led by Professor Sarah Spiegel of Virginia Commonwealth University. The team continuously made significant breakthroughs in understanding the regulation mechanism of Sphingosine-1-Phosphate. In September 2009, in a paper published on SCIENCE magazine (Science 2009, 325: 1254-7), they firstly demonstrated that S1P is a physiologically important regulator of histone deacetylases (HDACs), HDACs are direct intracellular targets of S1P. Furthermore, they identified the mechanism that S1P regulates gene expression through regulating the activity of HDACs. In June 24th, 2010, in another paper to be published on NATURE magazine (Nature 2010, June 24th, advance online publication) which reports the regulation of NF-KB signaling pathway by S1P. They demonstrate that S1P is the missing cofactor for TRAF2 (tumour-necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 2) and indicate a new paradigm for the regulation of lysine-63-linked poly-ubiquitination. The study also highlight the key role of SphK1 and its product S1P in TNF-α signalling and the canonical NF-KB activation pathway, and then play crucial role in inflammatory, antiapoptotic and immune processes. The identification of new mechanisms by which S1P regulates gene expression and TNF and NF-KB signaling pathway will light up the road to develop novel inhibitors that might be useful for treatment of cancer and inflammatory diseases.

  4. Redundant Systems of Phosphatidic Acid Biosynthesis via Acylation of Glycerol-3-Phosphate or Dihydroxyacetone Phosphate in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Athenstaedt, Karin; Weys, Sabine; Paltauf, Fritz; Daum, Günther

    1999-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae lipid particles harbor two acyltransferases, Gat1p and Slc1p, which catalyze subsequent steps of acylation required for the formation of phosphatidic acid. Both enzymes are also components of the endoplasmic reticulum, but this compartment contains additional acyltransferase(s) involved in the biosynthesis of phosphatidic acid (K. Athenstaedt and G. Daum, J. Bacteriol. 179:7611–7616, 1997). Using the gat1 mutant strain TTA1, we show here that Gat1p present in both subcellular fractions accepts glycerol-3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate as a substrate. Similarly, the additional acyltransferase(s) present in the endoplasmic reticulum can acylate both precursors. In contrast, yeast mitochondria harbor an enzyme(s) that significantly prefers dihydroxyacetone phosphate as a substrate for acylation, suggesting that at least one additional independent acyltransferase is present in this organelle. Surprisingly, enzymatic activity of 1-acyldihydroxyacetone phosphate reductase, which is required for the conversion of 1-acyldihydroxyacetone phosphate to 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate (lysophosphatidic acid), is detectable only in lipid particles and the endoplasmic reticulum and not in mitochondria. In vivo labeling of wild-type cells with [2-3H, U-14C]glycerol revealed that both glycerol-3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate can be incorporated as a backbone of glycerolipids. In the gat1 mutant and the 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase slc1 mutant, the dihydroxyacetone phosphate pathway of phosphatidic acid biosynthesis is slightly preferred as compared to the wild type. Thus, mutations of the major acyltransferases Gat1p and Slc1p lead to an increased contribution of mitochondrial acyltransferase(s) to glycerolipid synthesis due to their substrate preference for dihydroxyacetone phosphate. PMID:10049376

  5. Sphingosine 1-phosphate-mediated α1B-adrenoceptor desensitization and phosphorylation. Direct and paracrine/autocrine actions

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Badillo, Jean A.; Molina-Muñoz, Tzindilú; Romero-Ávila, M. Teresa; Vázquez-Macías, Aleida; Rivera, Richard; Chun, Jerold; García-Sáinz, J. Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate-induced α1B-adrenergic receptor desensitization and phosphorylation was studied in rat-1 fibroblasts stably expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged adrenoceptors. Sphingosine-1-phosphate induced adrenoceptor desensitization and phosphorylation through a signaling cascade that involved phosphoinositide 3-kinase and protein kinase C activities. The autocrine/paracrine role of sphingosine-1-phosphate was also studied. It was observed that activation of receptor tyrosine kinases, such as insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-I) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors increased sphingosine kinase activity. Such activation and consequent production of sphingosine-1-phosphate appears to be functionally relevant in IGF-I- and EGF-induced α1B-adrenoceptor phosphorylation and desensitization as evidenced by the following facts: a) expression of a catalytically inactive (dominant-negative) mutant of sphingosine kinase 1 or b) S1P1 receptor knockdown markedly reduced this growth factor action. This action of sphingosine-1-phosphate involves EGF receptor transactivation. In addition, taking advantage of the presence of the eGFP tag in the receptor construction, we showed that S1P was capable of inducing α1B-adrenergic receptor internalization and that its autocrine/paracrine generation was relevant for internalization induced by IGF-I. Four distinct hormone receptors and two autocrine/paracrine mediators participate in IGF-I receptor- α1B-adrenergic receptor crosstalk. PMID:22019450

  6. Cloning and expression of glucose-1-phosphate thymidylyltransferase gene (schS6) from Streptomyces sp. SCC-2136.

    PubMed

    Han, Ji-Man; Kim, Su-Min; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Yoo, Jin-Cheol

    2007-04-01

    The deoxysugar biosynthetic gene cluster of Sch 47554/Sch 47555 was cloned from Streptomyces sp. SCC-2136. One of the ORFs, schS6, appeared to encode glucose-1-phosphate thymidylyltransferase, which converts dTTP and glucose-1-phosphate to TDP-D-glucose and pyrophosphate. The dTDP-D-glucose is a key metabolite in prokaryotics as a precursor for a large number of modified deoxysugars, and these deoxysugars are a major part of various antibiotics, ranging from glycosides to macrolides. SchS6 was expressed in E. coli vector pSCHS6 and the expressed protein was purified to apparent homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation and Ni-NTA affinity column chromatography. The specific activity of the purified enzyme increased 4.7-fold with 17.5% recovery. It migrated as a single band on SDS-PAGE with an apparent molecular mass of 56 kDa. The purified protein showed glucose-1-phosphate thymidylyltransferase activity, catalyzing a reversible bimolecular group transfer reaction. In the forward reaction, the highest activity was obtained with combination of dTTP and alpha-D-glucose-1-phosphate, and only 12% of that activity was obtained with the substrates UTP/alpha-D-glucose-1-phosphate. In the opposite direction, the purified protein was highly specific for dTDP-D-glucose and pyrophosphate.

  7. 4-Hydroxy-2-Nonenal-Modified Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Is Degraded by Cathepsin G in Rat Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Yukihiro; Okada, Go; Kobayashi, Shigeki; Chikuma, Toshiyuki; Hojo, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Degradation of oxidized or oxidatively modified proteins is an essential part of the antioxidant defenses of cells. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal, a major reactive aldehyde formed by lipid peroxidation, causes many types of cellular damage. It has been reported that 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-modified proteins are degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway or, in some cases, by the lysosomal pathway. However, our previous studies using U937 cells showed that 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-modified glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is degraded by cathepsin G. In the present study, we isolated the 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-modified glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase-degrading enzyme from rat neutrophils to an active protein fraction of 28 kDa. Using the specific antibody, the 28 kDa protein was identified as cathepsin G. Moreover, the degradation activity was inhibited by cathepsin G inhibitors. These results suggest that cathepsin G plays a crucial role in the degradation of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-modified glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. PMID:21904640

  8. The Effect of 3% Phosphate Ascorbyl Gel on Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Enamel treated with 35% Hydrogen Peroxide.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Milena de Fátima Schalcher; Silva, Alice Carvalho; Franco, Marcela Mayana Pereira; Silva, Ana Paula Brito; Bramante, Fausto da Silva; da Silva, Monica Barros; Lima, Darlon Martins; Pereira, Adriana de Fátima Vasconcelos

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of 3% phosphate ascorbyl gel (PA) in different times onto the microshear bond strength of composite resin (CR) to bovine enamel treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP). Thirty enamel blocks of bovine incisors were made and divided into 5 groups (n = 6) with three specimens per group (n = 18), according to treatment: G1= No bleaching + CR; G2 = HP + CR after 15d; G3 = HP + CR after 24 hours; G4 = HP + PA (15 min) + CR after 24 hours; G5 = HP + PA (2 hours) + CR after 24 hours. The resin cylinders were made by Tygon matrices. Microshear bond strength test was performed using universal testing machine with a 50N load at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. Fracture modes were assessed by a stereomicroscope 40 ×. Microshear bond strength values were submitted to the analysis of variance (ANOVA) one-way and Tukey test (p < 0.05). G1 had significant results when compared to G3 and G5 (p < 0.01). However, G2, G3, G4 and G5 have showed no significant differences among groups (p > 0.05). Failure modes were categorized into adhesive (90%) and mixed (10%). The use of 3% phosphate ascorbyl gel for 15 minutes was able to improve bond strength of composite resin to bleached bovine enamel, but when 3% phosphate ascorbyl gel was applied during 40 minutes it negatively interfered in the adhesion of the resin to bleached bovine enamel.

  9. The Glycerol-3-Phosphate Acyltransferase TbGAT is Dispensable for Viability and the Synthesis of Glycerolipids in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nipul; Pirani, Karim A; Zhu, Tongtong; Cheung-See-Kit, Melanie; Lee, Sungsu; Chen, Daniel G; Zufferey, Rachel

    2016-09-01

    Glycerolipids are the main constituents of biological membranes in Trypanosoma brucei, which causes sleeping sickness in humans. Importantly, they occur as a structural component of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol lipid anchor of the abundant cell surface glycoproteins procyclin in procyclic forms and variant surface glycoprotein in bloodstream form, that play crucial roles for the development of the parasite in the insect vector and the mammalian host, respectively. The present work reports the characterization of the glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase TbGAT that initiates the biosynthesis of ester glycerolipids. TbGAT restored glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity when expressed in a Leishmania major deletion strain lacking this activity and exhibited preference for medium length, unsaturated fatty acyl-CoAs. TbGAT localized to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane with its N-terminal domain facing the cytosol. Despite that a TbGAT null mutant in T. brucei procyclic forms lacked glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity, it remained viable and exhibited similar growth rate as the wild type. TbGAT was dispensable for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, and GPI-anchored protein procyclin. However, the null mutant exhibited a slight decrease in phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis that was compensated with a modest increase in production of ether phosphatidylcholine. Our data suggest that an alternative initial acyltransferase takes over TbGAT's function in its absence. © 2016 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2016 International Society of Protistologists.

  10. The Glycerol-3-Phosphate Acyltransferase TbGAT Is Dispensable for Viability and the Synthesis of Glycerolipids in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nipul; Pirani, Karim A.; Zhu, Tongtong; Cheung-See-Kit, Melanie; Lee, Sungsu; Chen, Daniel G.; Zufferey, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Glycerolipids are the main constituents of biological membranes in Trypanosoma brucei, which causes sleeping sickness in humans. Importantly, they occur as a structural component of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol lipid anchor of the abundant cell surface glycoproteins procyclin in procyclic forms and variant surface glycoprotein in bloodstream form, that play crucial roles for the development of the parasite in the insect vector and the mammalian host, respectively. The present work reports the characterization of the glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase TbGAT that initiates the biosynthesis of ester glycerolipids. TbGAT restored glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity when expressed in a Leishmania major deletion strain lacking this activity and exhibited preference for medium length, unsaturated fatty acyl-CoAs. TbGAT localized to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane with its N-terminal domain facing the cytosol. Despite that a TbGAT null mutant in T. brucei procyclic forms lacked glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity, it remained viable and exhibited similar growth rate as the wild type. TbGAT was dispensable for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine and GPI-anchored protein procyclin. However, the null mutant exhibited a slight decrease in phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis that was compensated with a modest increase in production of ether phosphatidylcholine. Our data suggest that an alternative initial acyltransferase takes over TbGAT’s function in its absence. PMID:26909872

  11. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate and Sphingosine Kinase Are Involved in a Novel Signaling Pathway Leading to Acrosomal Exocytosis*

    PubMed Central

    Suhaiman, Laila; De Blas, Gerardo A.; Obeid, Lina M.; Darszon, Alberto; Mayorga, Luis S.; Belmonte, Silvia A.

    2010-01-01

    Regulated secretion is a central issue for the specific function of many cells; for instance, mammalian sperm acrosomal exocytosis is essential for egg fertilization. Sphingosine 1-phosphate is a bioactive sphingolipid that regulates crucial physiological processes. Here we report that this lipid triggers acrosomal exocytosis in human sperm by a mechanism involving a Gi-coupled receptor. Real-time imaging showed a remarkable increase of cytosolic calcium upon activation with sphingosine 1-phosphate and pharmacological experiments indicate that the process requires extracellular calcium influx through voltage and store-operated calcium channels and efflux from intracellular stores through inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-sensitive calcium channels. Sphingosine 1-phosphate-induced exocytosis requires phospholipase C and protein kinase C activation. We investigated possible sources of the lipid. Western blot indicates that sphingosine kinase 1 is present in spermatozoa. Indirect immunofluorescence showed that phorbol ester, a potent protein kinase C activator that can also trigger acrosomal exocytosis, redistributes sphingosine kinase 1 to the acrosomal region. Functional assays showed that phorbol ester-induced exocytosis depends on the activation of sphingosine kinase 1. Furthermore, incorporation of 32P to sphingosine demonstrates that cells treated with the phorbol ester increase their sphingosine kinase activity that yields sphingosine 1-phosphate. We present here the first evidence indicating that human spermatozoa produce sphingosine 1-phosphate when challenged with an exocytic stimulus. These observations point to a new role of sphingosine 1-phosphate in a signaling cascade that facilitates acrosome reaction providing some clues about novel lipid molecules involved in exocytosis. PMID:20236935

  12. Biosynthesis of archaeal membrane ether lipids

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Samta; Caforio, Antonella; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2014-01-01

    A vital function of the cell membrane in all living organism is to maintain the membrane permeability barrier and fluidity. The composition of the phospholipid bilayer is distinct in archaea when compared to bacteria and eukarya. In archaea, isoprenoid hydrocarbon side chains are linked via an ether bond to the sn-glycerol-1-phosphate backbone. In bacteria and eukarya on the other hand, fatty acid side chains are linked via an ester bond to the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate backbone. The polar head groups are globally shared in the three domains of life. The unique membrane lipids of archaea have been implicated not only in the survival and adaptation of the organisms to extreme environments but also to form the basis of the membrane composition of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). In nature, a diverse range of archaeal lipids is found, the most common are the diether (or archaeol) and the tetraether (or caldarchaeol) lipids that form a monolayer. Variations in chain length, cyclization and other modifications lead to diversification of these lipids. The biosynthesis of these lipids is not yet well understood however progress in the last decade has led to a comprehensive understanding of the biosynthesis of archaeol. This review describes the current knowledge of the biosynthetic pathway of archaeal ether lipids; insights on the stability and robustness of archaeal lipid membranes; and evolutionary aspects of the lipid divide and the LUCA. It examines recent advances made in the field of pathway reconstruction in bacteria. PMID:25505460

  13. Birth of Archaeal Cells: Molecular Phylogenetic Analyses of G1P Dehydrogenase, G3P Dehydrogenases, and Glycerol Kinase Suggest Derived Features of Archaeal Membranes Having G1P Polar Lipids

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria and Eukarya have cell membranes with sn-glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P), whereas archaeal membranes contain sn-glycerol-1-phosphate (G1P). Determining the time at which cells with either G3P-lipid membranes or G1P-lipid membranes appeared is important for understanding the early evolution of terrestrial life. To clarify this issue, we reconstructed molecular phylogenetic trees of G1PDH (G1P dehydrogenase; EgsA/AraM) which is responsible for G1P synthesis and G3PDHs (G3P dehydrogenase; GpsA and GlpA/GlpD) and glycerol kinase (GlpK) which is responsible for G3P synthesis. Together with the distribution of these protein-encoding genes among archaeal and bacterial groups, our phylogenetic analyses suggested that GlpA/GlpD in the Commonote (the last universal common ancestor of all extant life with a cellular form, Commonote commonote) acquired EgsA (G1PDH) from the archaeal common ancestor (Commonote archaea) and acquired GpsA and GlpK from a bacterial common ancestor (Commonote bacteria). In our scenario based on this study, the Commonote probably possessed a G3P-lipid membrane synthesized enzymatically, after which the archaeal lineage acquired G1PDH followed by the replacement of a G3P-lipid membrane with a G1P-lipid membrane. PMID:27774041

  14. Biosynthesis of archaeal membrane ether lipids.

    PubMed

    Jain, Samta; Caforio, Antonella; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2014-01-01

    A vital function of the cell membrane in all living organism is to maintain the membrane permeability barrier and fluidity. The composition of the phospholipid bilayer is distinct in archaea when compared to bacteria and eukarya. In archaea, isoprenoid hydrocarbon side chains are linked via an ether bond to the sn-glycerol-1-phosphate backbone. In bacteria and eukarya on the other hand, fatty acid side chains are linked via an ester bond to the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate backbone. The polar head groups are globally shared in the three domains of life. The unique membrane lipids of archaea have been implicated not only in the survival and adaptation of the organisms to extreme environments but also to form the basis of the membrane composition of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). In nature, a diverse range of archaeal lipids is found, the most common are the diether (or archaeol) and the tetraether (or caldarchaeol) lipids that form a monolayer. Variations in chain length, cyclization and other modifications lead to diversification of these lipids. The biosynthesis of these lipids is not yet well understood however progress in the last decade has led to a comprehensive understanding of the biosynthesis of archaeol. This review describes the current knowledge of the biosynthetic pathway of archaeal ether lipids; insights on the stability and robustness of archaeal lipid membranes; and evolutionary aspects of the lipid divide and the LUCA. It examines recent advances made in the field of pathway reconstruction in bacteria.

  15. Sphingosine-1-phosphate, regulated by FSH and VEGF, stimulates granulosa cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Coronado, C G; Guzmán, A; Rodríguez, A; Mondragón, J A; Romano, M C; Gutiérrez, C G; Rosales-Torres, A M

    2016-09-15

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive polar sphingolipid which stimulates proliferation, growth and survival in various cell types. In the ovary S1P has been shown protect the granulosa cells and oocytes from insults such as oxidative stress and radiotherapy, and S1P concentrations are greater in healthy than atretic large follicles. Hence, we postulate that S1P is fundamental in follicle development and that it is activated in ovarian granulosa cells in response to FSH and VEGF. To test this hypothesis we set out: i) to evaluate the effect of FSH and VEGF on S1P synthesis in cultured bovine granulosa cells and ii) to analyse the effect of S1P on proliferation and survival of bovine granulosa cells in vitro. Seventy five thousand bovine granulosa cells from healthy medium-sized (4-7mm) follicles were cultured in 96-well plates in McCoy's 5a medium containing 10ng/mL of insulin and 1ng/mL of LR-IGF-I at 37°C in a 5% CO2/air atmosphere at 37°C. Granulosa cell production of S1P was tested in response to treatment with FSH (0, 0.1, 1 and 10ng/mL) and VEGF (0, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100ng/mL) and measured by HPLC. Granulosa cells produced S1P at 48 and 96h, with the maximum production observed with 1ng/mL of FSH. Likewise, 0.01ng/mL of VEGF stimulated S1P production at 48, but not 96h of culture. Further, the granulosa cell expression of sphingosine kinase-1 (SK1), responsible for S1P synthesis, was demonstrated by Western blot after 48h of culture. FSH increased the expression of phosphorylated SK1 (P<0.05) and the addition of a SK1 inhibitor reduced the constitutive and FSH-stimulated S1P synthesis (P<0.05). Sphingosine-1-phosphate had a biphasic effect on granulosa cell number after culture. At low concentration S1P (0.1μM) increased granulosa cell number after 48h of culture (P<0.05) and the proportion of cells in the G2 and M phase of the cell cycle (P<0.05), whereas higher concentrations decreased cell number (10μM; P<0.05) by an increase (P<0.05) in the

  16. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Prevents Egress of Hematopoietic Stem Cells From Liver to Reduce Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    King, Andrew; Houlihan, Diarmaid D; Kavanagh, Dean; Haldar, Debashis; Luu, Nguyet; Owen, Andrew; Suresh, Shankar; Than, Nwe Ni; Reynolds, Gary; Penny, Jasmine; Sumption, Henry; Ramachandran, Prakash; Henderson, Neil C; Kalia, Neena; Frampton, Jon; Adams, David H; Newsome, Philip N

    2017-07-01

    There is growing interest in the use of bone marrow cells to treat liver fibrosis, however, little is known about their antifibrotic efficacy or the identity of their effector cell(s). Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) mediates egress of immune cells from the lymphoid organs into the lymphatic vessels; we investigated its role in the response of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to liver fibrosis in mice. Purified (c-kit+/sca1+/lin-) HSCs were infused repeatedly into mice undergoing fibrotic liver injury. Chronic liver injury was induced in BoyJ mice by injection of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) or placement on a methionine-choline-deficient diet. Some mice were irradiated and given transplants of bone marrow cells from C57BL6 mice, with or without the S1P antagonist FTY720; we then studied HSC mobilization and localization. Migration of HSC lines was quantified in Transwell assays. Levels of S1P in liver, bone marrow, and lymph fluid were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Liver tissues were collected and analyzed by immunohistochemical quantitative polymerase chain reaction and sphingosine kinase activity assays. We performed quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses of the expression of sphingosine kinase 1 and 2, sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase 1, and sphingosine-1-phosphate phosphatase 1 in normal human liver and cirrhotic liver from patients with alcohol-related liver disease (n = 6). Infusions of HSCs into mice with liver injury reduced liver scarring based on picrosirius red staining (49.7% reduction in mice given HSCs vs control mice; P < .001), and hepatic hydroxyproline content (328 mg/g in mice given HSCs vs 428 mg/g in control mice; P < .01). HSC infusion also reduced hepatic expression of α-smooth muscle actin (0.19 ± 0.007-fold compared with controls; P < .0001) and collagen type I α 1 chain (0.29 ± 0.17-fold compared with controls; P < .0001). These antifibrotic effects were maintained with infusion of lymphoid progenitors that

  17. Inhibition of sphingosine-1-phosphate phosphatase 1 promotes cancer cells migration in gastric cancer: Clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang Y; Li, Lin; Wang, Xiao H; Wen, Xian Z; Ji, Ke; Ye, Lin; Cai, Jun; Jiang, Wen G; Ji, Jia F

    2015-10-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) plays an important role in regulating many biological processes. Sphingosine-1-phosphate phosphatase 1 (SGPP1) can dephosphorylate S1P into sphingosine and tip the balance of sphingosine-S1P. Increased levels of sphingosine leads to a decrease in the ability of cell invasion as well as an increase in the ability of cell apoptosis. However, little is known regarding the effects of SGPP1 in gastric cancer. The present study examined the function of SGPP1 on gastric cancer cell lines as well as its clinical relevance in gastric cancer progression. Using immunohistochemistry and RT-qPCR techniques, the clinical significance of SGPP1 expression was analyzed in 288 paraffin-embedded gastric tissue specimens and 219 fresh gastric tissues, respectively. Transgenes encoding ribozymes to specifically target human SGPP1 (pEF-SGPP1) was constructed. Human gastric cancer cell lines (AGS and HGC27) were transfected with pEF-SGPP1 transgene and examined by functional analysis. SGPP1 was downregulated in gastric cancer tissues, compared with adjacent normal gastric tissues (p=0.034). SGPP1 mRNA levels in gastric cancer tissues were significantly decreased when compared with their adjacent non-cancerous tissues (p<0.001). Weakly expressed SGPP1 was positively correlated with the lymph node metastasis (p=0.005) and distant metastasis (p=0.031). Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed that patients with SGPP1 positive expression had a significant increase in overall survival (OS) (p=0.034) and progression-free survival (PFS) (p=0.041). Multivariate analysis indicated the expression of SGPP1 was an independent prognostic factor in gastric cancer patients (p=0.041). In vitro experiments showed that knockdown of SGPP1 resulted in an increase in the invasion (2-fold) and migration (5-fold) of AGS and HGC27. The two gastric cancer cells transfected with pEF-SGPP1 exhibited a slower rate of growth with less adhesion. Thus, our findings provided evidence that

  18. Quantification of Galactose-1-Phosphate Uridyltransferase Enzyme Activity by Liquid Chromatography–Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yijun; Ptolemy, Adam S.; Harmonay, Lauren; Kellogg, Mark; Berry, Gerard T.

    2013-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of galactosemia usually involves the measurement of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) activity. Traditional radioactive and fluorescent GALT assays are nonspecific, laborious, and/or lack sufficient analytical sensitivity. We developed a liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)–based assay for GALT enzyme activity measurement. Method Our assay used stable isotope-labeled α-galactose-1-phosphate ([13C6]-Gal-1-P) as an enzyme substrate. Sample cleanup and separation were achieved by reversed-phase ion-pair chromatography, and the enzymatic product, isotope-labeled uridine diphosphate galactose ([13C6]-UDPGal), was detected by MS/MS at mass transition (571 > 323) and quantified by use of [13C6]-Glu-1-P (265 > 79) as an internal standard. Results The method yielded a mean (SD) GALT enzyme activity of 23.8 (3.8) µmol · (gHgb)−1 · h−1 in erythrocyte extracts from 71 controls. The limit of quantification was 0.04 µmol · (g Hgb)−1 · h−1 (0.2% of normal control value). Intraassay imprecision was determined at 4 different levels (100%, 25%, 5%, and 0.2% of the normal control values), and the CVs were calculated to be 2.1%, 2.5%, 4.6%, and 9.7%, respectively (n = 3). Interassay imprecision CVs were 4.5%, 6.7%, 8.2%, and 13.2% (n = 5), respectively. The assay recoveries at the 4 levels were higher than 90%. The apparent Km of the 2 substrates, Gal-1-P and UDPGlc, were determined to be 0.38 mmol/L and 0.071 mmol/L, respectively. The assay in erythrocytes of 33 patients with classical galactosemia revealed no detectable activity. Conclusions This LC-MS/MS–based assay for GALT enzyme activity will be useful for the diagnosis and study of biochemically heterogeneous patients with galactosemia, especially those with uncommon genotypes and detectable but low residual activities. PMID:20348403

  19. Quantification of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase enzyme activity by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Yijun; Ptolemy, Adam S; Harmonay, Lauren; Kellogg, Mark; Berry, Gerard T

    2010-05-01

    The diagnosis of galactosemia usually involves the measurement of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) activity. Traditional radioactive and fluorescent GALT assays are nonspecific, laborious, and/or lack sufficient analytical sensitivity. We developed a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based assay for GALT enzyme activity measurement. Our assay used stable isotope-labeled alpha- galactose-1-phosphate ([(13)C(6)]-Gal-1-P) as an enzyme substrate. Sample cleanup and separation were achieved by reversed-phase ion-pair chromatography, and the enzymatic product, isotope-labeled uridine diphosphate galactose ([(13)C(6)]-UDPGal), was detected by MS/MS at mass transition (571 > 323) and quantified by use of [(13)C(6)]-Glu-1-P (265 > 79) as an internal standard. The method yielded a mean (SD) GALT enzyme activity of 23.8 (3.8) mumol x (g Hgb)(-1) x h(-1) in erythrocyte extracts from 71 controls. The limit of quantification was 0.04 micromol x (g Hgb)(-1) x h(-1) (0.2% of normal control value). Intraassay imprecision was determined at 4 different levels (100%, 25%, 5%, and 0.2% of the normal control values), and the CVs were calculated to be 2.1%, 2.5%, 4.6%, and 9.7%, respectively (n = 3). Interassay imprecision CVs were 4.5%, 6.7%, 8.2%, and 13.2% (n = 5), respectively. The assay recoveries at the 4 levels were higher than 90%. The apparent K(m) of the 2 substrates, Gal-1-P and UDPGlc, were determined to be 0.38 mmol/L and 0.071 mmol/L, respectively. The assay in erythrocytes of 33 patients with classical galactosemia revealed no detectable activity. This LC-MS/MS-based assay for GALT enzyme activity will be useful for the diagnosis and study of biochemically heterogeneous patients with galactosemia, especially those with uncommon genotypes and detectable but low residual activities.

  20. The sphingosine-1-phosphate transporter Spns2 expressed on endothelial cells regulates lymphocyte trafficking in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fukuhara, Shigetomo; Simmons, Szandor; Kawamura, Shunsuke; Inoue, Asuka; Orba, Yasuko; Tokudome, Takeshi; Sunden, Yuji; Arai, Yuji; Moriwaki, Kazumasa; Ishida, Junji; Uemura, Akiyoshi; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Abe, Takaya; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Hirashima, Masanori; Sawa, Hirofumi; Aoki, Junken; Ishii, Masaru; Mochizuki, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    The bioactive lysophospholipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) promotes the egress of newly formed T cells from the thymus and the release of immature B cells from the bone marrow. It has remained unclear, however, where and how S1P is released. Here, we show that in mice, the S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (Spns2) is responsible for the egress of mature T cells and immature B cells from the thymus and bone marrow, respectively. Global Spns2-KO mice exhibited marked accumulation of mature T cells in thymi and decreased numbers of peripheral T cells in blood and secondary lymphoid organs. Mature recirculating B cells were reduced in frequency in the bone marrow as well as in blood and secondary lymphoid organs. Bone marrow reconstitution studies revealed that Spns2 was not involved in S1P release from blood cells and suggested a role for Spns2 in other cells. Consistent with these data, endothelia-specific deletion of Spns2 resulted in defects of lymphocyte egress similar to those observed in the global Spns2-KO mice. These data suggest that Spns2 functions in ECs to establish the S1P gradient required for T and B cells to egress from their respective primary lymphoid organs. Furthermore, Spns2 could be a therapeutic target for a broad array of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. PMID:22406534

  1. The sphingosine-1-phosphate transporter Spns2 expressed on endothelial cells regulates lymphocyte trafficking in mice.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Shigetomo; Simmons, Szandor; Kawamura, Shunsuke; Inoue, Asuka; Orba, Yasuko; Tokudome, Takeshi; Sunden, Yuji; Arai, Yuji; Moriwaki, Kazumasa; Ishida, Junji; Uemura, Akiyoshi; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Abe, Takaya; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Hirashima, Masanori; Sawa, Hirofumi; Aoki, Junken; Ishii, Masaru; Mochizuki, Naoki

    2012-04-01

    The bioactive lysophospholipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) promotes the egress of newly formed T cells from the thymus and the release of immature B cells from the bone marrow. It has remained unclear, however, where and how S1P is released. Here, we show that in mice, the S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (Spns2) is responsible for the egress of mature T cells and immature B cells from the thymus and bone marrow, respectively. Global Spns2-KO mice exhibited marked accumulation of mature T cells in thymi and decreased numbers of peripheral T cells in blood and secondary lymphoid organs. Mature recirculating B cells were reduced in frequency in the bone marrow as well as in blood and secondary lymphoid organs. Bone marrow reconstitution studies revealed that Spns2 was not involved in S1P release from blood cells and suggested a role for Spns2 in other cells. Consistent with these data, endothelia-specific deletion of Spns2 resulted in defects of lymphocyte egress similar to those observed in the global Spns2-KO mice. These data suggest that Spns2 functions in ECs to establish the S1P gradient required for T and B cells to egress from their respective primary lymphoid organs. Furthermore, Spns2 could be a therapeutic target for a broad array of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  2. Deficiency of sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase impairs lysosomal metabolism of the amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Ilker; Tamboli, Irfan Y; Glebov, Konstantin; Richter, Josefine; Fell, Lisa H; Grimm, Marcus O; Haupenthal, Viola J; Hartmann, Tobias; Gräler, Markus H; van Echten-Deckert, Gerhild; Walter, Jochen

    2014-06-13

    Progressive accumulation of the amyloid β protein in extracellular plaques is a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer disease. Amyloid β is generated during sequential cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretases. In addition to the proteolytic processing by secretases, APP is also metabolized by lysosomal proteases. Here, we show that accumulation of intracellular sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) impairs the metabolism of APP. Cells lacking functional S1P-lyase, which degrades intracellular S1P, strongly accumulate full-length APP and its potentially amyloidogenic C-terminal fragments (CTFs) as compared with cells expressing the functional enzyme. By cell biological and biochemical methods, we demonstrate that intracellular inhibition of S1P-lyase impairs the degradation of APP and CTFs in lysosomal compartments and also decreases the activity of γ-secretase. Interestingly, the strong accumulation of APP and CTFs in S1P-lyase-deficient cells was reversed by selective mobilization of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum or lysosomes. Intracellular accumulation of S1P also impairs maturation of cathepsin D and degradation of Lamp-2, indicating a general impairment of lysosomal activity. Together, these data demonstrate that S1P-lyase plays a critical role in the regulation of lysosomal activity and the metabolism of APP.

  3. Abluminal Stimulation of Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptors 1 and 3 Promotes and Stabilizes Endothelial Sprout Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Steven M.; Awojoodu, Anthony O.

    2015-01-01

    Local delivery of lipid mediators has become a promising new approach for therapeutic angiogenesis and regenerative medicine. In this study, we investigated how gradient stimulation (either abluminal/distal or luminal/proximal) of engineered microvessels with sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor-subtype-targeted molecules affects endothelial sprout growth using a microfluidic device. Our studies show that distal stimulation of microvessels with FTY720, an S1P1/3 selective agonist, promotes both arterial and venular sprout growth, whereas proximal stimulation does not. Using novel pharmacological antagonists of S1P receptor subtypes, we further show that S1P3 functionality is necessary for VEGF-induced sprouting, and confirmed these findings ex vivo using a murine aortic ring assay from S1P3-deficient mice. S1P3 agonist stimulation enhanced vascular stability in both cell types via upregulation of the interendothelial junction protein VE-cadherin. Lastly, S1P3 activation under flow promoted endothelial sprouting and branching while decreasing migratory cell fate in the microfluidic device. We used an in vivo murine dorsal skinfold window chamber model to confirm S1P3's role in neovascular branching. Together, these data suggest that a distal transendothelial gradient of S1P1/3-targeted drugs is an effective technique for both enhancing and stabilizing capillary morphogenesis in angiogenic applications. PMID:25315888

  4. Phytosphingosine-1-Phosphate Is a Signaling Molecule Involved in Miconazole Resistance in Sessile Candida albicans Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbosch, Davy; Bink, Anna; Govaert, Gilmer; Cammue, Bruno P. A.; Nelis, Hans J.; Thevissen, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has shown that 1% to 10% of sessile Candida albicans cells survive treatment with high doses of miconazole (a fungicidal imidazole). In the present study, we investigated the involvement of sphingolipid biosynthetic intermediates in this survival. We observed that the LCB4 gene, coding for the enzyme that catalyzes the phosphorylation of dihydrosphingosine and phytosphingosine, is important in governing the miconazole resistance of sessile Saccharomyces cerevisiae and C. albicans cells. The addition of 10 nM phytosphingosine-1-phosphate (PHS-1-P) drastically reduced the intracellular miconazole concentration and significantly increased the miconazole resistance of a hypersusceptible C. albicans heterozygous LCB4/lcb4 mutant, indicating a protective effect of PHS-1-P against miconazole-induced cell death in sessile cells. At this concentration of PHS-1-P, we did not observe any effect on the fluidity of the cytoplasmic membrane. The protective effect of PHS-1-P was not observed when the efflux pumps were inhibited or when tested in a mutant without functional efflux systems. Also, the addition of PHS-1-P during miconazole treatment increased the expression levels of genes coding for efflux pumps, leading to the hypothesis that PHS-1-P acts as a signaling molecule and enhances the efflux of miconazole in sessile C. albicans cells. PMID:22354293

  5. Phytosphingosine-1-phosphate is a signaling molecule involved in miconazole resistance in sessile Candida albicans cells.

    PubMed

    Vandenbosch, Davy; Bink, Anna; Govaert, Gilmer; Cammue, Bruno P A; Nelis, Hans J; Thevissen, Karin; Coenye, Tom

    2012-05-01

    Previous research has shown that 1% to 10% of sessile Candida albicans cells survive treatment with high doses of miconazole (a fungicidal imidazole). In the present study, we investigated the involvement of sphingolipid biosynthetic intermediates in this survival. We observed that the LCB4 gene, coding for the enzyme that catalyzes the phosphorylation of dihydrosphingosine and phytosphingosine, is important in governing the miconazole resistance of sessile Saccharomyces cerevisiae and C. albicans cells. The addition of 10 nM phytosphingosine-1-phosphate (PHS-1-P) drastically reduced the intracellular miconazole concentration and significantly increased the miconazole resistance of a hypersusceptible C. albicans heterozygous LCB4/lcb4 mutant, indicating a protective effect of PHS-1-P against miconazole-induced cell death in sessile cells. At this concentration of PHS-1-P, we did not observe any effect on the fluidity of the cytoplasmic membrane. The protective effect of PHS-1-P was not observed when the efflux pumps were inhibited or when tested in a mutant without functional efflux systems. Also, the addition of PHS-1-P during miconazole treatment increased the expression levels of genes coding for efflux pumps, leading to the hypothesis that PHS-1-P acts as a signaling molecule and enhances the efflux of miconazole in sessile C. albicans cells.

  6. Sphingosine-1-phosphate modulators in inflammatory skin diseases - lining up for clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Thieme, Markus; Zillikens, Detlef; Sadik, Christian D

    2017-03-01

    The bioactive lysophospholipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is best known for its activity as T-cell-active chemoattractant regulating the egress of T cells from the lymph node and, consequently, the availability of T cells for migration into peripheral tissues. This physiological role of S1P is exploited by the drug fingolimod, a first-line therapy for multiple sclerosis, which "detains" T cells in the lymph nodes. In recent year, it has been elucidated that S1P exerts regulatory functions far beyond T-cell egress from the lymph node. Thus, it additionally regulates, among others, homing of several immune cell populations into peripheral tissues under inflammatory conditions. In addition, evidence, mostly derived from mouse models, has accumulated that S1P may be involved in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory skin disorder and that S1P receptor modulators applied topically are effective in treating skin diseases. These recent developments highlight the pharmacological modulation of the S1P/S1P receptor system as a potential new therapeutic strategy for a plethora of inflammatory skin diseases. The impact of S1P receptor modulation on inflammatory skin diseases next requires testing in human patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Platelet-derived sphingosine-1-phosphate and inflammation: from basic mechanisms to clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Vito, Clara Di; Hadi, Loubna Abdel; Navone, Stefania Elena; Marfia, Giovanni; Campanella, Rolando; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Riboni, Laura

    2016-07-01

    Beyond key functions in hemostasis and thrombosis, platelets are recognized as key players of inflammation, an underlying feature of a variety of diseases. In this regard, platelets act as a circulating source of several pro- and anti-inflammatory molecules, which are secreted from their intracellular stores upon activation. Among them, mounting evidence highlights a crucial role of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a multifunctional sphingoid mediator. S1P-induced pleiotropic effects include those crucial in inflammatory processes, such as the maintenance of the endothelial barrier integrity, and leukocyte activation and recruitment at the injured site. This review outlines the peculiar features and molecular mechanisms that allow platelets for acting as a unique factory that produces and stores S1P in large quantities. A particular emphasis is placed on the autocrine and paracrine roles of S1P derived from the "inflamed" platelets, highlighting the role of its cross-talk with endothelial and blood cells involved in inflammation, and the mechanisms of its contribution to the development and progression of inflammatory diseases. Finally, potential clinical implications of platelet-derived S1P as diagnostic tool of inflammatory severity, and as therapeutic target in inflammation are discussed.

  8. Emerging biology of sphingosine-1-phosphate: its role in pathogenesis and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Proia, Richard L.; Hla, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Membrane sphingolipids are metabolized to sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive lipid mediator that regulates many processes in vertebrate development, physiology, and pathology. Once exported out of cells by cell-specific transporters, chaperone-bound S1P is spatially compartmentalized in the circulatory system. Extracellular S1P interacts with five GPCRs that are widely expressed and transduce intracellular signals to regulate cellular behavior, such as migration, adhesion, survival, and proliferation. While many organ systems are affected, S1P signaling is essential for vascular development, neurogenesis, and lymphocyte trafficking. Recently, a pharmacological S1P receptor antagonist has won approval to control autoimmune neuroinflammation in multiple sclerosis. The availability of pharmacological tools as well as mouse genetic models has revealed several physiological actions of S1P and begun to shed light on its pathological roles. The unique mode of signaling of this lysophospholipid mediator is providing novel opportunities for therapeutic intervention, with possibilities to target not only GPCRs but also transporters, metabolic enzymes, and chaperones. PMID:25831442

  9. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor 2 Regulates the Migration, Proliferation, and Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Price, S Tucker; Beckham, Thomas H; Cheng, Joseph C; Lu, Ping; Liu, Xiang; Norris, James S

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a multipotent cell population acquired most prominently from bone marrow with the capacity to differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, adipocytes, and others. MSCs demonstrate the capacity to home to sites of injury and contribute to tissue repair. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a biologically active sphingolipid impacting proliferation, apoptosis, inflammation, and angiogenesis with changes in S1P concentration providing significant implications for various disease conditions including cancer, diabetes, and cardiac disease. These functions are primarily mediated by interactions with 5 G-protein coupled S1P receptors (S1PR1-5). In this paper, we demonstrate that inhibition of S1PR2 results in increased MSC clonogenicity, migration, and proliferation; features dependent on Erk phosphorylation. Furthermore, decreased S1PR2 expression decreases the differentiation of MSCs into adipocytes and mature osteoblasts that may be the result of increased expression of MSC pluripotency factors including Nanog, Sox-9, and Oct-4. Inhibition of S1PR1 and S1PR3 in contrast does not impact MSC migration or Erk activation although increased proliferation is observed. In the study, we describe the essential role of S1PR2 in MSC differentiation pathways through modification of pluripotency factors. We propose a MAPK dependent mechanism through S1PR2 inhibition that promotes equally multipotent MSC proliferation. PMID:27275017

  10. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor-2 Antagonists: Therapeutic Potential and Potential Risks

    PubMed Central

    Blankenbach, Kira V.; Schwalm, Stephanie; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Meyer zu Heringdorf, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling system with its specific G-protein-coupled S1P receptors, the enzymes of S1P metabolism and the S1P transporters, offers a multitude of promising targets for drug development. Until today, drug development in this area has nearly exclusively focused on (functional) antagonists at the S1P1 receptor, which cause a unique phenotype of immunomodulation. Accordingly, the first-in class S1P1 receptor modulator, fingolimod, has been approved for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, and novel S1P1 receptor (functional) antagonists are being developed for autoimmune and inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, lupus erythematodes, or polymyositis. Besides the S1P1 receptor, also S1P2 and S1P3 are widely expressed and regulate many diverse functions throughout the body. The S1P2 receptor, in particular, often exerts cellular functions which are opposed to the functions of the S1P1 receptor. As a consequence, antagonists at the S1P2 receptor have the potential to be useful in a contrasting context and different areas of indication compared to S1P1 antagonists. The present review will focus on the therapeutic potential of S1P2 receptor antagonists and discuss their opportunities as well as their potential risks. Open questions and areas which require further investigations will be emphasized in particular. PMID:27445808

  11. Disodium cromoglycate inhibits asthma-like features induced by sphingosine-1-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Roviezzo, Fiorentina; Sorrentino, Rosalinda; Iacono, Valentina Mattera; Brancaleone, Vincenzo; Terlizzi, Michela; Riemma, Maria Antonietta; Bertolino, Antonio; Rossi, Antonietta; Matteis, Maria; Spaziano, Giuseppe; Pinto, Aldo; D'Agostino, Bruno; Cirino, Giuseppe

    2016-11-01

    Compelling evidence suggests the involvement of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in the pathogenesis of asthma. The systemic administration of S1P causes asthma like features in the mouse involving mast cells. In this study we investigated whether disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), administered as a preventative treatment as in human therapy, could affect S1P effects on airways. BALB/c mice, treated with DSCG, received subcutaneous administration of S1P. Bronchi and pulmonary tissues were collected and functional, molecular and cellular studies were performed. DSCG inhibited S1P-induced airway hyper-reactivity as well as pulmonary inflammation. DSCG decreased the recruitment of solely mast cells and B cells in the lung. IgE serum levels, prostaglandin D2, mucus production and IL-13 were also reduced when mice were pretreated with DSCG. S1P induced pulmonary expression of CD23 on T and B cells, that was reversed by DSCG. Conversely, S1P failed to upregulate CD23 in mast cell-deficient Kit (W-sh/W-sh) mice. In conclusion we have shown that DSCG inhibits S1P-induced asthma like features in the mouse. This beneficial effect is due to a regulatory action on mast cell activity, and in turn to an inhibition of IgE-dependent T and B cells responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor agonist ameliorates animal model of vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Miyabe, Chie; Miyabe, Yoshishige; Komiya, Takaki; Shioya, Hiroki; Miura, Noriko N; Takahashi, Kei; Ohno, Naohito; Tsuboi, Ryoji; Luster, Andrew D; Kawai, Shinichi; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Nanki, Toshihiro

    2017-04-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid that binds to cell surface receptors (S1P1-5). In this study, we examined the effect of S1P1 agonist, ONO-W061, on murine Candida albicans water-soluble fraction (CAWS)-induced vasculitis. Mice were administered ONO-W061, and the number of peripheral blood cells was counted. Vasculitis was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of CAWS. Expression of S1P receptors and CXCL1 was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. ONO-W061 was orally administered, and vasculitis was evaluated histologically. Number of neutrophils, macrophages and T cells in the vasculitis tissue was counted using flow cytometry. Production of chemokines from S1P-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was measured by ELISA. Number of peripheral blood lymphocytes was decreased by ONO-W061. Expression of CXCL1 and S1P1 was enhanced in CAWS-induced vasculitis tissue. Vasculitis score, CXCL1 and number of neutrophils in the vasculitis tissue were lower in ONO-W061-treated mice. Treatment of HUVECs with S1P upregulated the production of CXCL1 and IL-8 in vitro, and this was inhibited by ONO-W061. ONO-W061 significantly improved CAWS-induced vasculitis. This effect may be partly exerted through the inhibited production of chemokines by endothelial cells, which in turn could induce neutrophil recruitment into inflamed vessels.

  13. Enhanced sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 expression underlies female CNS autoimmunity susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Orengo, Lillian; Daniels, Brian P.; Dorsey, Denise; Basak, Sarah Alison; Grajales-Reyes, José G.; McCandless, Erin E.; Piccio, Laura; Schmidt, Robert E.; Cross, Anne H.; Crosby, Seth D.; Klein, Robyn S.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease of the CNS that is characterized by BBB dysfunction and has a much higher incidence in females. Compared with other strains of mice, EAE in the SJL mouse strain models multiple features of MS, including an enhanced sensitivity of female mice to disease; however, the molecular mechanisms that underlie the sex- and strain-dependent differences in disease susceptibility have not been described. We identified sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2) as a sex- and strain-specific, disease-modifying molecule that regulates BBB permeability by destabilizing adherens junctions. S1PR2 expression was increased in disease-susceptible regions of the CNS of both female SJL EAE mice and female patients with MS compared with their male counterparts. Pharmacological blockade or lack of S1PR2 signaling decreased EAE disease severity as the result of enhanced endothelial barrier function. Enhanced S1PR2 signaling in an in vitro BBB model altered adherens junction formation via activation of Rho/ROCK, CDC42, and caveolin endocytosis-dependent pathways, resulting in loss of apicobasal polarity and relocation of abluminal CXCL12 to vessel lumina. Furthermore, S1PR2-dependent BBB disruption and CXCL12 relocation were observed in vivo. These results identify a link between S1PR2 signaling and BBB polarity and implicate S1PR2 in sex-specific patterns of disease during CNS autoimmunity. PMID:24812668

  14. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors are essential mediators of eyelid closure during embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Herr, Deron R; Lee, Chang-Wook; Wang, Wei; Ware, Adam; Rivera, Richard; Chun, Jerold

    2013-10-11

    The fetal development of the mammalian eyelid involves the expansion of the epithelium over the developing cornea, fusion into a continuous sheet covering the eye, and a splitting event several weeks later that results in the formation of the upper and lower eyelids. Recent studies have revealed a significant number of molecular signaling components that are essential mediators of eyelid development. Receptor-mediated sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling is known to influence diverse biological processes, but its involvement in eyelid development has not been reported. Here, we show that two S1P receptors, S1P2 and S1P3, are collectively essential mediators of eyelid closure during murine development. Homozygous deletion of the gene encoding either receptor has no apparent effect on eyelid development, but double-null embryos are born with an "eyes open at birth" defect due to a delay in epithelial sheet extension. Both receptors are expressed in the advancing epithelial sheet during the critical period of extension. Fibroblasts derived from double-null embryos have a deficient response to epidermal growth factor, suggesting that S1P2 and S1P3 modulate this essential signaling pathway during eyelid closure.

  15. Sphingosine-1-phosphate Phosphatase 2 Regulates Pancreatic Islet β-Cell Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Yoshimitsu; Allende, Maria L; Mizukami, Hiroki; Cook, Emily K; Gavrilova, Oksana; Tuymetova, Galina; Clarke, Benjamin A; Chen, Weiping; Olivera, Ana; Proia, Richard L

    2016-06-03

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a sphingolipid metabolite that regulates basic cell functions through metabolic and signaling pathways. Intracellular metabolism of S1P is controlled, in part, by two homologous S1P phosphatases (SPPases), 1 and 2, which are encoded by the Sgpp1 and Sgpp2 genes, respectively. SPPase activity is needed for efficient recycling of sphingosine into the sphingolipid synthesis pathway. SPPase 1 is important for skin homeostasis, but little is known about the functional role of SPPase 2. To identify the functions of SPPase 2 in vivo, we studied mice with the Sgpp2 gene deleted. In contrast to Sgpp1(-/-) mice, Sgpp2(-/-) mice had normal skin and were viable into adulthood. Unexpectedly, WT mice expressed Sgpp2 mRNA at high levels in pancreatic islets when compared with other tissues. Sgpp2(-/-) mice had normal pancreatic islet size; however, they exhibited defective adaptive β-cell proliferation that was demonstrated after treatment with either a high-fat diet or the β-cell-specific toxin, streptozotocin. Importantly, β-cells from untreated Sgpp2(-/-) mice showed significantly increased expression of proteins characteristic of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response compared with β-cells from WT mice, indicating a basal islet defect. Our results show that Sgpp2 deletion causes β-cell endoplasmic reticulum stress, which is a known cause of β-cell dysfunction, and reveal a juncture in the sphingolipid recycling pathway that could impact the development of diabetes.

  16. Inhibition of Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors in ischemia reperfusion injured autoimmunity-prone mice.

    PubMed

    Edison, Jess; Frattalone, Sharon; Tracy, Christopher; Woodard, Geoffrey E; Butts, Melissa; Moratz, C M

    2017-01-01

    B6.MRL/lpr mice, an autoimmune strain, have an accelerated injury time course, increased intensity of tissue damage, and increased CD4+ T cell infiltration in the mesenteric ischemia/reperfusion injury model. In this study, the mechanism by which CD4+ T cells were recruited into injured tissue was addressed. Fingolimod (FTY720) was utilized to assess the role of infiltrating CD4+ T cells. FTY720 treatment was more effective in attenuating injury in B6.MRL/lpr mice then in control mice. Reduced CD4+ cell infiltration and tissue injury correlated with decreased neutrophil infiltration and pro-inflammatory cytokine generation. Inhibiting downstream Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor signaling, specifically GαI mediated signaling, did not inhibit injury, suggesting differential utilization of the S1P receptors between control and MRL/lpr strains. Analysis of S1P receptor expression exposed a predominance of S1P2 in the B6.MRL/lpr strain. Reliance on alternate S1P receptors in the autoimmune strain will alter the progress of inflammation and tissue injury.

  17. Alginate-Chitosan Hydrogels Provide a Sustained Gradient of Sphingosine-1-Phosphate for Therapeutic Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Priscilla A; Campbell, Kevin T; Gharaviram, Hessam; Madrigal, Justin L; Silva, Eduardo A

    2017-04-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive lipid, is a potent candidate for treatment of ischemic vascular disease. However, designing biomaterial systems for the controlled release of S1P to achieve therapeutic angiogenesis presents both biological and engineering challenges. Thus, the objective of this study was to design a hydrogel system that provides controlled and sustained release of S1P to establish local concentration gradients that promote neovascularization. Alginate hydrogels have been extensively studied and characterized for delivery of proangiogenic factors. We sought to explore if chitosan (0, 0.1, 0.5, or 1%) incorporation could be used as a means to control S1P release from alginate hydrogels. With increasing chitosan incorporation, hydrogels exhibited significantly denser pore structure and stiffer material properties. While 0.1 and 0.5% chitosan gels demonstrated slower respective release of S1P, release from 1% chitosan gels was similar to alginate gels alone. Furthermore, 0.5% chitosan gels induced greater sprouting and directed migration of outgrowth endothelial cells (OECs) in response to released S1P under hypoxia in vitro. Overall, this report presents a platform for a novel alginate-chitosan hydrogel of controlled composition and in situ gelation properties that can be used to control lipid release for therapeutic applications.

  18. Sphingosine 1-phosphate, a diffusible calcium influx factor mediating store-operated calcium entry.

    PubMed

    Itagaki, Kiyoshi; Hauser, Carl J

    2003-07-25

    Store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) is a fundamental mechanism of calcium signaling. The mechanisms linking store depletion to SOCE remain controversial, hypothetically involving both diffusible messengers and conformational coupling of stores to channels. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid that can signal via cell surface G-protein-coupled receptors, but S1P can also act as a second messenger, mobilizing calcium directly via unknown mechanisms. We show here that S1P opens calcium entry channels in human neutrophils (PMNs) and HL60 cells without prior store depletion, independent of G-proteins and of phospholipase C. S1P-mediated entry has the typical divalent cation permeability profile and inhibitor profile of SOCE in PMNs, is fully inhibited by 1 microm Gd3+, and is independent of [Ca2+]i. Depletion of PMN calcium stores by thapsigargin induces S1P synthesis. Inhibition of S1P synthesis by dimethylsphingosine blocks thapsigargin-, ionomycin-, and platelet-activating factor-mediated SOCE despite normal store depletion. We propose that S1P is a "calcium influx factor," linking calcium store depletion to downstream SOCE.

  19. The molecular basis of ceramide-1-phosphate recognition by C2 domains[S

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Katherine E.; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Vora, Mohsin; Chalfant, Charles E.; Lu, Hui; Stahelin, Robert V.

    2013-01-01

    Group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2α), which harbors an N-terminal lipid binding C2 domain and a C-terminal lipase domain, produces arachidonic acid from the sn-2 position of zwitterionic lipids such as phosphatidylcholine. The C2 domain has been shown to bind zwitterionic lipids, but more recently, the anionic phosphomonoester sphingolipid metabolite ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P) has emerged as a potent bioactive lipid with high affinity for a cationic patch in the C2 domain β-groove. To systematically analyze the role that C1P plays in promoting the binding of cPLA2α-C2 to biological membranes, we employed biophysical measurements and cellular translocation studies along with mutagenesis. Biophysical and cellular translocation studies demonstrate that C1P specificity is mediated by Arg59, Arg61, and His62 (an RxRH sequence) in the C2 domain. Computational studies using molecular dynamics simulations confirm the origin of C1P specificity, which results in a spatial shift of the C2 domain upon membrane docking to coordinate the small C1P headgroup. Additionally, the hydroxyl group on the sphingosine backbone plays an important role in the interaction with the C2 domain, further demonstrating the selectivity of the C2 domain for C1P over phosphatidic acid. Taken together, this is the first study demonstrating the molecular origin of C1P recognition. PMID:23277511

  20. Sphingosine-1-phosphate promotes erythrocyte glycolysis and oxygen release for adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kaiqi; Zhang, Yujin; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Nemkov, Travis; Song, Anren; Wu, Hongyu; Liu, Hong; Adebiyi, Morayo; Huang, Aji; Wen, Yuan E.; Bogdanov, Mikhail V.; Vila, Alejandro; O'Brien, John; Kellems, Rodney E.; Dowhan, William; Subudhi, Andrew W.; Jameson-Van Houten, Sonja; Julian, Colleen G.; Lovering, Andrew T.; Safo, Martin; Hansen, Kirk C.; Roach, Robert C.; Xia, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive signalling lipid highly enriched in mature erythrocytes, with unknown functions pertaining to erythrocyte physiology. Here by employing nonbiased high-throughput metabolomic profiling, we show that erythrocyte S1P levels rapidly increase in 21 healthy lowland volunteers at 5,260 m altitude on day 1 and continue increasing to 16 days with concurrently elevated erythrocyte sphingonisne kinase 1 (Sphk1) activity and haemoglobin (Hb) oxygen (O2) release capacity. Mouse genetic studies show that elevated erythrocyte Sphk1-induced S1P protects against tissue hypoxia by inducing O2 release. Mechanistically, we show that intracellular S1P promotes deoxygenated Hb anchoring to the membrane, enhances the release of membrane-bound glycolytic enzymes to the cytosol, induces glycolysis and thus the production of 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (2,3-BPG), an erythrocyte-specific glycolytic intermediate, which facilitates O2 release. Altogether, we reveal S1P as an intracellular hypoxia-responsive biolipid promoting erythrocyte glycolysis, O2 delivery and thus new therapeutic opportunities to counteract tissue hypoxia. PMID:27417539

  1. Emerging role of sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nema, Rajeev; Vishwakarma, Supriya; Agarwal, Rahul; Panday, Rajendra Kumar; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most frequent cancer type, with an annual incidence of approximately half a million people worldwide. It has a high recurrence rate and an extremely low survival rate. This is due to limited availability of effective therapies to reduce the rate of recurrence, resulting in high morbidity and mortality of patients with advanced stages of the disease. HNSCC often develops resistance to chemotherapy and targeted drug therapy. Thus, to overcome the problem of drug resistance, there is a need to explore novel drug targets. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid involved in inflammation, tumor progression, and angiogenesis. S1P is synthesized intracellularly by two sphingosine kinases (SphKs). It can be exported to the extracellular space, where it can activate a family of G-protein-coupled receptors. Alternatively, S1P can act as an intracellular second messenger. SphK1 regulates tumor progression, invasion, metastasis, and chemoresistance in HNSCC. SphK1 expression is highly elevated in advanced stage HNSCC tumors and correlates with poor survival. In this article, we review current knowledge regarding the role of S1P receptors and enzymes of S1P metabolism in HNSCC carcinogenesis. Furthermore, we summarize the current perspectives on therapeutic approaches for targeting S1P pathway for treating HNSCC. PMID:27330306

  2. Impaired T-cell responses to sphingosine-1-phosphate in HIV-1 infected lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Mudd, Joseph C.; Murphy, Patrick; Manion, Maura; Debernardo, Robert; Hardacre, Jeffrey; Ammori, John; Hardy, Gareth A.; Harding, Clifford V.; Mahabaleshwar, Ganapati H.; Jain, Mukesh K.; Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Brooks, Ari D.; Lewis, Sharon; Schacker, Timothy W.; Anderson, Jodi; Haddad, Elias K.; Cubas, Rafael A.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Sieg, Scott F.

    2013-01-01

    The determinants of HIV-1-associated lymphadenopathy are poorly understood. We hypothesized that lymphocytes could be sequestered in the HIV-1+ lymph node (LN) through impairments in sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) responsiveness. To test this hypothesis, we developed novel assays for S1P-induced Akt phosphorylation and actin polymerization. In the HIV-1+ LN, naïve CD4 T cells and central memory CD4 and CD8 T cells had impaired Akt phosphorylation in response to S1P, whereas actin polymerization responses to S1P were impaired dramatically in all LN maturation subsets. These defects were improved with antiretroviral therapy. LN T cells expressing CD69 were unable to respond to S1P in either assay, yet impaired S1P responses were also seen in HIV-1+ LN T cells lacking CD69 expression. Microbial elements, HIV-1, and interferon α – putative drivers of HIV-1associated immune activation all tended to increase CD69 expression and reduce T-cell responses to S1P in vitro. Impairment in T-cell egress from lymph nodes through decreased S1P responsiveness may contribute to HIV-1-associated LN enlargement and to immune dysregulation in a key organ of immune homeostasis. PMID:23422746

  3. Hematopoietic Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Lyase Deficiency Decreases Atherosclerotic Lesion Development in LDL-Receptor Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bot, Martine; Van Veldhoven, Paul P.; de Jager, Saskia C. A.; Johnson, Jason; Nijstad, Niels; Van Santbrink, Peter J.; Westra, Marijke M.; Van Der Hoeven, Gerd; Gijbels, Marion J.; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Varga, Georg; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Kuiper, Johan; Van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Nofer, Jerzy-Roch

    2013-01-01

    Aims Altered sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) homeostasis and signaling is implicated in various inflammatory diseases including atherosclerosis. As S1P levels are tightly controlled by S1P lyase, we investigated the impact of hematopoietic S1P lyase (Sgpl1−/−) deficiency on leukocyte subsets relevant to atherosclerosis. Methods and Results LDL receptor deficient mice that were transplanted with Sgpl1−/− bone marrow showed disrupted S1P gradients translating into lymphopenia and abrogated lymphocyte mitogenic and cytokine response as compared to controls. Remarkably however, Sgpl1−/− chimeras displayed mild monocytosis, due to impeded stromal retention and myelopoiesis, and plasma cytokine and macrophage expression patterns, that were largely compatible with classical macrophage activation. Collectively these two phenotypic features of Sgpl1 deficiency culminated in diminished atherogenic response. Conclusions Here we not only firmly establish the critical role of hematopoietic S1P lyase in controlling S1P levels and T cell trafficking in blood and lymphoid tissue, but also identify leukocyte Sgpl1 as critical factor in monocyte macrophage differentiation and function. Its, partly counterbalancing, pro- and anti-inflammatory activity spectrum imply that intervention in S1P lyase function in inflammatory disorders such as atherosclerosis should be considered with caution. PMID:23700419

  4. Abluminal stimulation of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors 1 and 3 promotes and stabilizes endothelial sprout formation.

    PubMed

    Das, Anusuya; Lenz, Steven M; Awojoodu, Anthony O; Botchwey, Edward A

    2015-01-01

    Local delivery of lipid mediators has become a promising new approach for therapeutic angiogenesis and regenerative medicine. In this study, we investigated how gradient stimulation (either abluminal/distal or luminal/proximal) of engineered microvessels with sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor-subtype-targeted molecules affects endothelial sprout growth using a microfluidic device. Our studies show that distal stimulation of microvessels with FTY720, an S1P1/3 selective agonist, promotes both arterial and venular sprout growth, whereas proximal stimulation does not. Using novel pharmacological antagonists of S1P receptor subtypes, we further show that S1P3 functionality is necessary for VEGF-induced sprouting, and confirmed these findings ex vivo using a murine aortic ring assay from S1P3-deficient mice. S1P3 agonist stimulation enhanced vascular stability in both cell types via upregulation of the interendothelial junction protein VE-cadherin. Lastly, S1P3 activation under flow promoted endothelial sprouting and branching while decreasing migratory cell fate in the microfluidic device. We used an in vivo murine dorsal skinfold window chamber model to confirm S1P3's role in neovascular branching. Together, these data suggest that a distal transendothelial gradient of S1P1/3-targeted drugs is an effective technique for both enhancing and stabilizing capillary morphogenesis in angiogenic applications.

  5. Sphingosine-1-phosphate inhibits the adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Moon, Myung-Hee; Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Park, Sang-Youel

    2014-10-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a pluripotent lipid mediator that transmits signals through G-protein-coupled receptors to control diverse biological processes. The novel biological activity of S1P in the adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes was identified in the present study. S1P significantly decreased lipid accumulation in maturing preadipocytes in a dose‑dependent manner. In order to understand the anti‑adipogenic effects of S1P, preadipocytes were treated with S1P, and the change in the expression of several adipogenic transcription factors and enzymes was investigated using quantitative RT-PCR. S1P downregulated the transcriptional levels of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins and adiponectin, which are markers of adipogenic differentiation. The effects of S1P on the levels of mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) signals in preadipocytes were also investigated. The activation of JNK and p38 were downregulated by S1P treatment in human preadipocytes. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that S1P alters fat mass by directly affecting adipogenesis. This is mediated by the downregulation of adipogenic transcription factors and by inactivation of the JNK and p38 MAPK pathways. Thus, selective targeting of the S1P receptors and sphingosine kinases may have clinical applications for the treatment of obesity.

  6. Ceramide-1-phosphate protection of cochlear hair cells against cisplatin ototoxicity.

    PubMed

    Le, Quang; Tabuchi, Keiji; Hara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P) is a phosphorylated form of ceramide. While ceramide is known to be an inducer of apoptosis of cochlear hair cells in cisplatin ototoxicity, little is known about the function of C1P in cochlear diseases. The present study was designed to examine whether C1P could protect cochlear hair cells against cisplatin ototoxicity. Explants of cochlear basal turns collected from C57BL/6J mice at postnatal days 3-5 were used in all experiments. Cochlear explants were exposed to 5 or 10 μM cisplatin for 48 h to assess the effects of C1P, NVP-231 (a ceramide kinase inhibitor), or ceramide. Western blotting of pAkt/Akt and pMAPK/MAPK was examined to check whether this pathway was modulated by C1P. C1P activated the Akt and MAPK pathway and significantly reduced cochlear cell death induced by cisplatin. Coadministration of cisplatin and ceramide significantly increased cochlear hair cell death. In addition, when treating cochlear hair cells with NVP-231 in the presence of cisplatin or ceramide, a remarkable increase in apoptosis of hair cells was observed. The present findings confirmed the protective effects of C1P in the cisplatin ototoxicity. The balance between ceramide and C1P may play a critical role in the determination of hair cell fate in cisplatin ototoxicity.

  7. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Signaling and Its Pharmacological Modulation in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Philip; O'Sullivan, Catherine; Gergely, Peter

    2017-09-21

    Allogeneic haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is increasingly used to treat haematological malignant diseases via the graft-versus-leukaemia (GvL) or graft-versus-tumour effects. Although improvements in infectious disease prophylaxis, immunosuppressive treatments, supportive care, and molecular based tissue typing have contributed to enhanced outcomes, acute graft-versus-host disease and other transplant related complications still contribute to high mortality and significantly limit the more widespread use of HSCT. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a zwitterionic lysophospholipid that has been implicated as a crucial signaling regulator in many physiological and pathophysiological processes including multiple cell types such as macrophages, dendritic cells, T cells, T regulatory cells and endothelial cells. Recent data suggested important roles for S1P signaling in engraftment, graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), GvL and other processes that occur during and after HSCT. Based on such data, pharmacological intervention via S1P modulation may have the potential to improve patient outcome by regulating GvHD and enhancing engraftment while permitting effective GvL.

  8. Inclusion bodies of fuculose-1-phosphate aldolase as stable and reusable biocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Sans, Cristina; García-Fruitós, Elena; Ferraz, Rosa M; González-Montalbán, Núria; Rinas, Ursula; López-Santín, Josep; Villaverde, Antonio; Álvaro, Gregorio

    2012-01-01

    Fuculose-1-phosphate aldolase (FucA) has been produced in Escherichia coli as active inclusion bodies (IBs) in batch cultures. The activity of insoluble FucA has been modulated by a proper selection of producing strain, culture media, and process conditions. In some cases, when an optimized defined medium was used, FucA IBs were more active (in terms of specific activity) than the soluble protein version obtained in the same process with a conventional defined medium, supporting the concept that solubility and conformational quality are independent protein parameters. FucA IBs have been tested as biocatalysts, either directly or immobilized into Lentikat beads, in an aldolic reaction between DHAP and (S)-Cbz-alaninal, obtaining product yields ranging from 65 to 76%. The production of an active aldolase as IBs, the possibility of tailoring IBs properties by both genetic and process approaches, and the reusability of IBs by further entrapment in appropriate matrices fully support the principle of using self-assembled enzymatic clusters as tunable mechanically stable and functional biocatalysts. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  9. A novel method to quantify sphingosine 1-phosphate by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong-Moon; Venkataraman, Krishnan; Hwang, Sun-Il; Han, David K.; Hla, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a lysophospholipid mediator that signals through G protein-coupled receptors, regulates a wide plethora of biological responses such as angiogenesis and immune cell trafficking. Detection and quantification of S1P in biological samples is challenging due to its unique physicochemical nature and occurrence in trace quantities. In this report, we describe a new method to selectively enrich S1P and dihydro-S1P from biological samples by the Fe3+ gel immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). The eluted S1P from IMAC was dephosphorylated, derivatized with o-phthalaldehyde (OPA), and detected by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to a fluorescence detector. IMAC purification of S1P was linear for a wide range of S1P concentration. Using this assay, secretion of endogenous S1P from endothelial cells, fibroblasts and colon cancer cells was demonstrated. We also show that dihydro-S1P was the major sphingoid base phosphate secreted from HUVEC over expressed with Sphk1 cDNA. Pharmcological antagonists of ABC transporters, glyburide and MK-571 attenuated endogenous S1P release. This assay was also used to demonstrate that plasma S1P levels were not altered in mice deficient for ABC transporters, Abca1, Abca7 and Abcc1/Mrp1. IMAC-based affinity-enrichment coupled with a HPLC-based separation and detection system is a rapid and sensitive method to accurately quantify S1P. PMID:17991617

  10. Mutations in sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase cause nephrosis with ichthyosis and adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Lovric, Svjetlana; Goncalves, Sara; Gee, Heon Yung; Oskouian, Babak; Srinivas, Honnappa; Choi, Won-Il; Shril, Shirlee; Ashraf, Shazia; Tan, Weizhen; Rao, Jia; Airik, Merlin; Schapiro, David; Braun, Daniela A; Sadowski, Carolin E; Widmeier, Eugen; Jobst-Schwan, Tilman; Schmidt, Johanna Magdalena; Girik, Vladimir; Capitani, Guido; Suh, Jung H; Lachaussée, Noëlle; Arrondel, Christelle; Patat, Julie; Gribouval, Olivier; Furlano, Monica; Boyer, Olivia; Schmitt, Alain; Vuiblet, Vincent; Hashmi, Seema; Wilcken, Rainer; Bernier, Francois P; Innes, A Micheil; Parboosingh, Jillian S; Lamont, Ryan E; Midgley, Julian P; Wright, Nicola; Majewski, Jacek; Zenker, Martin; Schaefer, Franz; Kuss, Navina; Greil, Johann; Giese, Thomas; Schwarz, Klaus; Catheline, Vilain; Schanze, Denny; Franke, Ingolf; Sznajer, Yves; Truant, Anne S; Adams, Brigitte; Désir, Julie; Biemann, Ronald; Pei, York; Ars, Elisabet; Lloberas, Nuria; Madrid, Alvaro; Dharnidharka, Vikas R; Connolly, Anne M; Willing, Marcia C; Cooper, Megan A; Lifton, Richard P; Simons, Matias; Riezman, Howard; Antignac, Corinne; Saba, Julie D; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2017-03-01

    Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) causes 15% of chronic kidney disease cases. A mutation in 1 of over 40 monogenic genes can be detected in approximately 30% of individuals with SRNS whose symptoms manifest before 25 years of age. However, in many patients, the genetic etiology remains unknown. Here, we have performed whole exome sequencing to identify recessive causes of SRNS. In 7 families with SRNS and facultative ichthyosis, adrenal insufficiency, immunodeficiency, and neurological defects, we identified 9 different recessive mutations in SGPL1, which encodes sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) lyase. All mutations resulted in reduced or absent SGPL1 protein and/or enzyme activity. Overexpression of cDNA representing SGPL1 mutations resulted in subcellular mislocalization of SGPL1. Furthermore, expression of WT human SGPL1 rescued growth of SGPL1-deficient dpl1Δ yeast strains, whereas expression of disease-associated variants did not. Immunofluorescence revealed SGPL1 expression in mouse podocytes and mesangial cells. Knockdown of Sgpl1 in rat mesangial cells inhibited cell migration, which was partially rescued by VPC23109, an S1P receptor antagonist. In Drosophila, Sply mutants, which lack SGPL1, displayed a phenotype reminiscent of nephrotic syndrome in nephrocytes. WT Sply, but not the disease-associated variants, rescued this phenotype. Together, these results indicate that SGPL1 mutations cause a syndromic form of SRNS.

  11. Nitrophenide (Megasul) blocks Eimeria tenella development by inhibiting the mannitol cycle enzyme mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Allocco, J J; Nare, B; Myers, R W; Feiglin, M; Schmatz, D M; Profous-Juchelka, H

    2001-12-01

    Unsporulated oocysts of the protozoan parasite Eimeria tenella contain high levels of mannitol, which is thought to be the principal energy source for the process of sporulation. Biosynthesis and utilization of this sugar alcohol occurs via a metabolic pathway known as the mannitol cycle. Here, results are presented that suggest that 3-nitrophenyl disulfide (nitrophenide, Megasul), an anticoccidial drug commercially used in the 1950s, inhibits mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase (M1PDH), which catalyzes the committed enzymatic step in the mannitol cycle. Treatment of E. tenella-infected chickens with nitrophenide resulted in a 90% reduction in oocyst shedding. The remaining oocysts displayed significant morphological abnormalities and were largely incapable of further development. Nitrophenide treatment did not affect parasite asexual reproduction, suggesting specificity for the sexual stage of the life cycle. Isolated oocysts from chickens treated with nitrophenide exhibited a dose-dependent reduction in mannitol, suggesting in vivo inhibition of parasite mannitol biosynthesis. Nitrophenide-mediated inhibition of MIPDH was observed in vitro using purified native enzyme. Moreover, MIPDH activity immunoprecipitated from E. tenella-infected cecal tissues was significantly lower in nitrophenide-treated compared with untreated chickens. Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry showed that parasites from nitrophenide-treated and untreated chickens contained similar enzyme levels. These data suggest that nitrophenide blocks parasite development at the sexual stages by targeting M1PDH. Thus, targeting of the mannitol cycle with drugs could provide an avenue for controlling the spread of E. tenella in commercial production facilities by preventing oocyst shedding.

  12. Assessment of ataxia phenotype in a new mouse model of galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) deficiency.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wyman; Caston, Rose; Balakrishnan, Bijina; Siddiqi, Anwer; Parmar, Kamalpreet; Tang, Manshu; Feng, Merry; Lai, Kent

    2017-01-01

    Despite adequate dietary management, patients with classic galactosemia continue to have increased risks of cognitive deficits, speech dyspraxia, primary ovarian insufficiency, and abnormal motor development. A recent evaluation of a new galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT)-deficient mouse model revealed reduced fertility and growth restriction. These phenotypes resemble those seen in human patients. In this study, we further assess the fidelity of this new mouse model by examining the animals for the manifestation of a common neurological sequela in human patients: cerebellar ataxia. The balance, grip strength, and motor coordination of GALT-deficient and wild-type mice were tested using a modified rotarod. The results were compared to composite phenotype scoring tests, typically used to evaluate neurological and motor impairment. The data demonstrated abnormalities with varying severity in the GALT-deficient mice. Mice of different ages were used to reveal the progressive nature of motor impairment. The varying severity and age-dependent impairments seen in the animal model agree with reports on human patients. Finally, measurements of the cerebellar granular and molecular layers suggested that mutant mice experience cerebellar hypoplasia, which could have resulted from the down-regulation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  13. Role of sphingosine 1-phosphate in trafficking and mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bendall, Linda J; Basnett, Jordan

    2013-07-01

    The 'mobilization' of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) out of the bone marrow and into the peripheral blood is used clinically to obtain HSCs for transplantation. Although generally successful, mobilization protocols remain imperfect and the mechanisms involved are not fully understood. This review discusses the latest findings in respect to the mechanisms involved in the egress of HSCs from the bone marrow into the circulation and the potential for these recent developments to improve mobilization procedures. It has recently become apparent that the bioactive lipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) plays an active role in attracting HSCs into the peripheral blood. S1P is the first factor identified that provides a chemoattractant gradient promoting the movement of HSCs into the peripheral blood. Drugs that mimic S1P are available with others in development, raising the possibility of increasing the strength of the egress signal and thereby improving the efficacy of mobilization procedures. S1P is the first egress factor described for HSCs, but the details of the underlying biology are only just emerging. Although manipulating the S1P axis to enhance mobilization protocols is an exciting possibility, much needs to be learned before improvements in mobilization strategies can be realized.

  14. A Novel Role of a Lipid Species, Sphingosine-1-Phosphate, in Epithelial Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyungho; Elias, Peter M.; Shin, Kyoung-Oh; Lee, Yong-Moon; Hupe, Melanie; Borkowski, Andrew W.; Gallo, Richard L.; Saba, Julie; Holleran, Walter M.

    2013-01-01

    A variety of external perturbations can induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, followed by stimulation of epithelial cells to produce an innate immune element, the cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP). ER stress also increases production of the proapoptotic lipid ceramide and its antiapoptotic metabolite, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). We demonstrate here that S1P mediates ER stress-induced CAMP generation. Cellular ceramide and S1P levels rose in parallel with CAMP levels following addition of either exogenous cell-permeating ceramide (C2Cer), which increases S1P production, or thapsigargin (an ER stressor), applied to cultured human skin keratinocytes or topically to mouse skin. Knockdown of S1P lyase, which catabolizes S1P, enhanced ER stress-induced CAMP production in cultured cells and mouse skin. These and additional inhibitor studies show that S1P is responsible for ER stress-induced upregulation of CAMP expression. Increased CAMP expression is likely mediated via S1P-dependent NF-κB–C/EBPα activation. Finally, lysates of both ER-stressed and S1P-stimulated cells blocked growth of virulent Staphylococcus aureus in vitro, and topical C2Cer and LL-37 inhibited invasion of Staphylococcus aureus into murine skin. These studies suggest that S1P generation resulting in increased CAMP production comprises a novel regulatory mechanism of epithelial innate immune responses to external perturbations, pointing to a new therapeutic approach to enhance antimicrobial defense. PMID:23230267

  15. “Inside-Out” Signaling of Sphingosine-1-Phosphate: Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    TAKABE, KAZUAKI; PAUGH, STEVEN W.; MILSTIEN, SHELDON; SPIEGEL, SARAH

    2009-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid metabolite involved in many critical cellular processes including proliferation, survival, and migration, as well as angiogenesis and allergic responses. S1P levels inside cells are tightly regulated by the balance between its synthesis by sphingosine kinases and degradation. S1P is interconvertible with ceramide, which is a critical mediator of apoptosis. It has been postulated that the ratio between S1P and ceramide determines cell fate. Activation of sphingosine kinase by a variety of agonists increases intracellular S1P, which in turn can function intracellularly as a second messenger or be secreted out of the cell and act extracellularly by binding to and signaling through S1P receptors in autocrine and/or paracrine manners. Recent studies suggest that this “inside-out” signaling by S1P may play a role in many human diseases, including cancer, atherosclerosis, inflammation, and autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis. In this review we summarize metabolism of S1P, mechanisms of sphingosine kinase activation, and S1P receptors and their downstream signaling pathways and examine relationships to multiple disease processes. In particular, we describe recent preclinical and clinical trials of therapies targeting S1P signaling, including 2-amino-2-propane-1,3-diol hydrochloride (FTY720, fingolimod), S1P receptor agonists, sphingosine kinase inhibitors, and anti-S1P monoclonal antibody. PMID:18552276

  16. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Induces Differentiation of Mesoangioblasts towards Smooth Muscle. A Role for GATA6

    PubMed Central

    Donati, Chiara; Marseglia, Giuseppina; Magi, Alberto; Serratì, Simona; Cencetti, Francesca; Bernacchioni, Caterina; Nannetti, Genni; Benelli, Matteo; Brunelli, Silvia; Torricelli, Francesca; Cossu, Giulio; Bruni, Paola

    2011-01-01

    Different cells can contribute to repair following vascular injury by differentiating into smooth muscle (SM) cells; however the extracellular signals involved are presently poorly characterized. Mesoangioblasts are progenitor cells capable of differentiating into various mesoderm cell types including SM cells. In this study the biological action exerted by the pleiotropic sphingolipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in human mesoangioblasts has been initially investigated by cDNA microarray analysis. Obtained data confirmed the anti-apoptotic action of this sphingolipid and identified for the first time a strong differentiating action toward SM cells. Quantitative mRNA and protein analysis corroborated the microarray results demonstrating enhanced expression of myogenic marker proteins and regulation of the expression of transcription factor GATA6 and its co-regulator, LMCD1. Importantly, GATA6 up-regulation induced by S1P was responsible for the enhanced expression of SM-specific contractile proteins. Moreover, by specific gene silencing experiments GATA6 was critical in the pro-differentiating activity of the cytokine TGFβ. Finally, the pharmacological inhibition of endogenous S1P formation in response to TGFβ abrogated GATA6 up-regulation, supporting the view that the S1P pathway plays a physiological role in mediating the pro-myogenic effect of TGFβ. This study individuates GATA6 as novel player in the complex transcriptional regulation of mesoangioblast differentiation into SM cells and highlights a role for S1P to favour vascular regeneration. PMID:21629665

  17. Genetic elevation of Sphingosine 1-phosphate suppresses dystrophic muscle phenotypes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Pantoja, Mario; Fischer, Karin A.; Ieronimakis, Nicholas; Reyes, Morayma; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal genetic disease characterized by the loss of muscle integrity and function over time. Using Drosophila, we show that dystrophic muscle phenotypes can be significantly suppressed by a reduction of wunen, a homolog of lipid phosphate phosphatase 3, which in higher animals can dephosphorylate a range of phospholipids. Our suppression analyses include assessing the localization of Projectin protein, a titin homolog, in sarcomeres as well as muscle morphology and functional movement assays. We hypothesize that wunen-based suppression is through the elevation of the bioactive lipid Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), which promotes cell proliferation and differentiation in many tissues, including muscle. We confirm the role of S1P in suppression by genetically altering S1P levels via reduction of S1P lyase (Sply) and by upregulating the serine palmitoyl-CoA transferase catalytic subunit gene lace, the first gene in the de novo sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway and find that these manipulations also reduce muscle degeneration. Furthermore, we show that reduction of spinster (which encodes a major facilitator family transporter, homologs of which in higher animals have been shown to transport S1P) can also suppress dystrophic muscle degeneration. Finally, administration to adult flies of pharmacological agents reported to elevate S1P signaling significantly suppresses dystrophic muscle phenotypes. Our data suggest that localized intracellular S1P elevation promotes the suppression of muscle wasting in flies. PMID:23154413

  18. Structures of l-fuculose-1-phosphate aldolase mutants outlining motions during catalysis.

    PubMed

    Joerger, A C; Mueller-Dieckmann, C; Schulz, G E

    2000-11-03

    The crystal structures of l-fuculose-1-phosphate aldolase (FucA) with and without a ligated analogue of dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) and of a number of active center mutants have resulted in a model of the catalytic mechanism. This model has now been confirmed by structural analyses of further mutations at the zinc coordination sphere and at the phosphate site. In addition, these mutants have revealed new aspects of the catalysis: the hydroxyl group of Tyr113' (from a neighboring subunit), which sits just outside the zinc coordination sphere, steers DHAP towards a productive binding mode at the zinc ion; Glu73 contacts zinc in between the two ligand positions intended for the DHAP oxygen atoms and thus avoids blocking of these positions by a tetrahedrally coordinated hydroxy ion; the FucA polypeptide does not assume its minimum energy state but oscillates between two states of elevated energy as demonstrated by a mutant in a minimum energy state. The back and forth motion involves a mobile loop connecting the phosphate site with intersubunit motions and thus with the Brownian motion of the solvent. The phosphate group is bound strongly at a given distance to the zinc ion, which prevents the formation of too tight a DHAP:zinc complex. This observation explains our failure to find mutants that accept phosphate-free substitutes for DHAP. The FucA zinc coordination sphere is compared with that of carbonic anhydrase. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  19. Sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase ablation disrupts presynaptic architecture and function via an ubiquitin- proteasome mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Mitroi, Daniel N.; Deutschmann, André U.; Raucamp, Maren; Karunakaran, Indulekha; Glebov, Konstantine; Hans, Michael; Walter, Jochen; Saba, Julie; Gräler, Markus; Ehninger, Dan; Sopova, Elena; Shupliakov, Oleg; Swandulla, Dieter; van Echten-Deckert, Gerhild

    2016-01-01

    The bioactive lipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a degradation product of sphingolipids that are particularly abundant in neurons. We have shown previously that neuronal S1P accumulation is toxic leading to ER-stress and an increase in intracellular calcium. To clarify the neuronal function of S1P, we generated brain-specific knockout mouse models in which S1P-lyase (SPL), the enzyme responsible for irreversible S1P cleavage was inactivated. Constitutive ablation of SPL in the brain (SPLfl/fl/Nes) but not postnatal neuronal forebrain-restricted SPL deletion (SPLfl/fl/CaMK) caused marked accumulation of S1P. Hence, altered presynaptic architecture including a significant decrease in number and density of synaptic vesicles, decreased expression of several presynaptic proteins, and impaired synaptic short term plasticity were observed in hippocampal neurons from SPLfl/fl/Nes mice. Accordingly, these mice displayed cognitive deficits. At the molecular level, an activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) was detected which resulted in a decreased expression of the deubiquitinating enzyme USP14 and several presynaptic proteins. Upon inhibition of proteasomal activity, USP14 levels, expression of presynaptic proteins and synaptic function were restored. These findings identify S1P metabolism as a novel player in modulating synaptic architecture and plasticity. PMID:27883090

  20. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling Regulates Myogenic Responsiveness in Human Resistance Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Slack, Daniel L.; Burnstein, Marcus J.; Errett, Lee; Bonneau, Daniel; Latter, David; Rotstein, Ori D.; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian; Lidington, Darcy; Voigtlaender-Bolz, Julia

    2015-01-01

    We recently identified sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) as prominent regulators of myogenic responsiveness in rodent resistance arteries. However, since rodent models frequently exhibit limitations with respect to human applicability, translation is necessary to validate the relevance of this signaling network for clinical application. We therefore investigated the significance of these regulatory elements in human mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries. Mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries were isolated from patient tissue specimens collected during colonic or cardiac bypass surgery. Pressure myography assessments confirmed endothelial integrity, as well as stable phenylephrine and myogenic responses. Both human mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries (i) express critical S1P signaling elements, (ii) constrict in response to S1P and (iii) lose myogenic responsiveness following S1P receptor antagonism (JTE013). However, while human mesenteric arteries express CFTR, human skeletal muscle resistance arteries do not express detectable levels of CFTR protein. Consequently, modulating CFTR activity enhances myogenic responsiveness only in human mesenteric resistance arteries. We conclude that human mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries are a reliable and consistent model for translational studies. We demonstrate that the core elements of an S1P-dependent signaling network translate to human mesenteric resistance arteries. Clear species and vascular bed variations are evident, reinforcing the critical need for further translational study. PMID:26367262

  1. Identification of a second two-component signal transduction system that controls fosfomycin tolerance and glycerol-3-phosphate uptake.

    PubMed

    Kurabayashi, Kumiko; Hirakawa, Yuko; Tanimoto, Koichi; Tomita, Haruyoshi; Hirakawa, Hidetada

    2015-03-01

    Particular interest in fosfomycin has resurfaced because it is a highly beneficial antibiotic for the treatment of refractory infectious diseases caused by pathogens that are resistant to other commonly used antibiotics. The biological cost to cells of resistance to fosfomycin because of chromosomal mutation is high. We previously found that a bacterial two-component system, CpxAR, induces fosfomycin tolerance in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7. This mechanism does not rely on irreversible genetic modification and allows EHEC to relieve the fitness burden that results from fosfomycin resistance in the absence of fosfomycin. Here we show that another two-component system, TorSRT, which was originally characterized as a regulatory system for anaerobic respiration utilizing trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), also induces fosfomycin tolerance. Activation of the Tor regulatory pathway by overexpression of torR, which encodes the response regulator, or addition of TMAO increased fosfomycin tolerance in EHEC. We also show that phosphorylated TorR directly represses the expression of glpT, a gene that encodes a symporter of fosfomycin and glycerol-3-phosphate, and activation of the TorR protein results in the reduced uptake of fosfomycin by cells. However, cells in which the Tor pathway was activated had an impaired growth phenotype when cultured with glycerol-3-phosphate as a carbon substrate. These observations suggest that the TorSRT pathway is the second two-component system to reversibly control fosfomycin tolerance and glycerol-3-phosphate uptake in EHEC, and this may be beneficial for bacteria by alleviating the biological cost. We expect that this mechanism could be a potential target to enhance the utility of fosfomycin as chemotherapy against multidrug-resistant pathogens. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Disparate evolution of yeasts and filamentous fungi indicated by phylogenetic analysis of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase genes.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, T L

    1989-01-01

    Genes encoding glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.12) from several evolutionarily disparate organisms were used to construct a phylogenetic tree by evolutionary parsimony. The GAPDH tree indicates that, in contrast to the presently accepted taxonomy of fungi, the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii evolved separately from the filamentous ascomycetes (such as Aspergillus nidulans) with which these yeasts are classified. According to this tree, the Saccharomyces-like yeasts evolved very early in the course of eukaryotic evolution, whereas both ascomycete and basidiomycete filamentous fungi diverged much later through a common ancestor. PMID:2674943

  3. Activated platelets release sphingosine 1-phosphate and induce hypersensitivity to noxious heat stimuli in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Weth, Daniela; Benetti, Camilla; Rauch, Caroline; Gstraunthaler, Gerhard; Schmidt, Helmut; Geisslinger, Gerd; Sabbadini, Roger; Proia, Richard L.; Kress, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    At the site of injury activated platelets release various mediators, one of which is sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). It was the aim of this study to explore whether activated human platelets had a pronociceptive effect in an in vivo mouse model and whether this effect was based on the release of S1P and subsequent activation of neuronal S1P receptors 1 or 3. Human platelets were prepared in different concentrations (105/μl, 106/μl, 107/μl) and assessed in mice with different genetic backgrounds (WT, S1P1fl/fl, SNS-S1P1−/−, S1P3−/−). Intracutaneous injections of activated human platelets induced a significant, dose-dependent hypersensitivity to noxious thermal stimulation. The degree of heat hypersensitivity correlated with the platelet concentration as well as the platelet S1P content and the amount of S1P released upon platelet activation as measured with LC MS/MS. Despite the significant correlations between S1P and platelet count, no difference in paw withdrawal latency (PWL) was observed in mice with a global null mutation of the S1P3 receptor or a conditional deletion of the S1P1 receptor in nociceptive primary afferents. Furthermore, neutralization of S1P with a selective anti-S1P antibody did not abolish platelet induced heat hypersensitivity. Our results suggest that activated platelets release S1P and induce heat hypersensitivity in vivo. However, the platelet induced heat hypersensitivity was caused by mediators other than S1P. PMID:25954148

  4. Serum-Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Concentrations Are Inversely Associated with Atherosclerotic Diseases in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Geissen, Markus; Schwedhelm, Edzard; Winkler, Martin S.; Geffken, Maria; Peine, Sven; Schoen, Gerhard; Debus, E. Sebastian; Larena-Avellaneda, Axel; Daum, Guenter

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Atherosclerotic changes of arteries are the leading cause for deaths in cardiovascular disease and greatly impair patient’s quality of life. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a signaling sphingolipid that regulates potentially pro-as well as anti-atherogenic processes. Here, we investigate whether serum-S1P concentrations are associated with peripheral artery disease (PAD) and carotid stenosis (CS). Methods and Results Serum was sampled from blood donors (controls, N = 174) and from atherosclerotic patients (N = 132) who presented to the hospital with either clinically relevant PAD (N = 102) or CS (N = 30). From all subjects, serum-S1P was measured by mass spectrometry and blood parameters were determined by routine laboratory assays. When compared to controls, atherosclerotic patients before invasive treatment to restore blood flow showed significantly lower serum-S1P levels. This difference cannot be explained by risk factors for atherosclerosis (old age, male gender, hypertension, hypercholesteremia, obesity, diabetes or smoking) or comorbidities (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, kidney insufficiency or arrhythmia). Receiver operating characteristic curves suggest that S1P has more power to indicate atherosclerosis (PAD and CS) than high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C). In 35 patients, serum-S1P was measured again between one and six months after treatment. In this group, serum-S1P concentrations rose after treatment independent of whether patients had PAD or CS, or whether they underwent open or endovascular surgery. Post-treatment S1P levels were highly associated to platelet numbers measured pre-treatment. Conclusions Our study shows that PAD and CS in humans is associated with decreased serum-S1P concentrations and that S1P may possess higher accuracy to indicate these diseases than HDL-C. PMID:27973607

  5. Sphingosine 1-phosphate interacts with Survivin pathway to enhance tumorigenesis in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tabasinezhad, Maryam; Ghaedi, Hamid; Qanbari, Parisa; Mohseni, Mahsa; Sabzichi, Mehdi; Samadi, Nasser

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Degradation of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), as a bioactive lipid, or deregulation of its production involves in tumor progression, metastasis and chemoresistance. Since the tumor progression effects of S1P and its mechanism in chronic lymphoblastic leukemia and non-small cell lung cancer is not fully understood, we investigated the role and one of the mechanisms of S1P in tumor progression of SKW3 and H1299 cells. Materials and Methods: The effects of S1P on proliferation, invasion and migration was studied using MTT assay, soft-agar colony forming assay and trans-well migration assay, respectively. In order to find out the mechanisms of S1P action, the role of S1P on expression of Survivin gene was assessed by real-time RT-PCR. Results: Our results demonstrated that although invasion was shown only in H1299 cells, low concentration of S1P, especially at 1 μM, mediated proliferation and migration in both cell lines. In addition, these effects of S1P in tumor progression are S1P receptor-dependent, and Survivin plays a key role in S1P tumorigenesis. Conclusion: Our results confirmed the involvement of S1P and its receptors in tumor progression of SKW3 and H1299. We also investigated another mechanism of S1P involved in cell survival, tumor progression, and Survivin signaling. In conclusion, data demonstrated the importance of this molecule as a target for designing new anticancer drugs such as anti-S1P monoclonal antibody for inhibiting major downstream signaling, which plays significant role in tumorigenesis. PMID:26557971

  6. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor Subtypes Differentially Regulate Smooth Muscle Cell Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Wamhoff, Brian R.; Lynch, Kevin R.; Macdonald, Timothy L.; Owens, Gary K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective The role of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors in acute vascular injury and smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotypic modulation is not completely resolved. Methods and Results S1P receptor antagonists were used to test the hypothesis that specific S1P receptor subtypes differentially regulate SMC phenotypic modulation. In response to acute balloon injury of the rat carotid artery, S1P1/S1P3 receptor mRNA levels were transiently increased at 48 hours whereas S1P2 receptor expression was decreased. S1P2 expression was reinduced and increased at 7 to 10 days postinjury. Daily intraperitoneal injection of the S1P1/S1P3 antagonist VPC44116 decreased neointimal hyperplasia by ≈50%. In vitro, pharmacological inhibition of S1P1/S1P3 receptors with VPC25239 attenuated S1P-induced proliferation of rat aortic SMCs. Conversely, inhibition of S1P2 with JTE013 potentiated S1P-induced proliferation. Inhibition of S1P1/S1P3 resulted in S1P-induced activation of the SMC differentiation marker genes SMα-actin and SMMHC, whereas inhibition of S1P2 attenuated this response. S1P2-dependent activation of SMα-actin and SMMHC was shown to be mediated by L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and subsequent RhoA/Rho kinase– dependent SRF enrichment of CArG box promoter regions. Conclusion Results provide evidence that S1P1/S1P3 receptors promote, whereas S1P2 receptors antagonize, SMC proliferation and phenotypic modulation in vitro in response to S1P, or in vivo after vascular injury. PMID:18535287

  7. Sphingosine-1-phosphate is involved in the occlusive arteriopathy of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sachindra R.; Bastola, Mrigendra M.; McLendon, Jared M.; Oka, Masahiko; Fagan, Karen A.; McMurtry, Ivan F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite several advances in the pathobiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), its pathogenesis is not completely understood. Current therapy improves symptoms but has disappointing effects on survival. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a lysophospholipid synthesized by sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) and SphK2. Considering the regulatory roles of S1P in several tissues leading to vasoconstriction, inflammation, proliferation, and fibrosis, we investigated whether S1P plays a role in the pathogenesis of PAH. To test this hypothesis, we used plasma samples and lung tissue from patients with idiopathic PAH (IPAH) and the Sugen5416/hypoxia/normoxia rat model of occlusive PAH. Our study revealed an increase in the plasma concentration of S1P in patients with IPAH and in early and late stages of PAH in rats. We observed increased expression of both SphK1 and SphK2 in the remodeled pulmonary arteries of patients with IPAH and PAH rats. Exogenous S1P stimulated the proliferation of cultured rat pulmonary arterial endothelial and smooth-muscle cells. We also found that 3 weeks of treatment of late-stage PAH rats with an SphK1 inhibitor reduced the increased plasma levels of S1P and the occlusive pulmonary arteriopathy. Although inhibition of SphK1 improved cardiac index and the total pulmonary artery resistance index, it did not reduce right ventricular systolic pressure or right ventricular hypertrophy. Our study supports that S1P is involved in the pathogenesis of occlusive arteriopathy in PAH and provides further evidence that S1P signaling may be a novel therapeutic target. PMID:27683614

  8. The Role of Sphingosine-1-phosphate Transporter Spns2 in Immune System Function

    PubMed Central

    Nijnik, Anastasia; Clare, Simon; Hale, Christine; Chen, Jing; Raisen, Claire; Mottram, Lynda; Lucas, Mark; Estabel, Jeanne; Ryder, Edward; Adissu, Hibret; Adams, Niels C.; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; White, Jacqueline K.; Steel, Karen P.; Dougan, Gordon; Hancock, Robert E.W.

    2012-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is lipid messenger involved in the regulation of embryonic development, immune system functions, and many other physiological processes. However the mechanisms of S1P transport across cellular membranes remain poorly understood with several ATP-binding cassette family members and the spinster 2 (Spns2) member of the major facilitator superfamily known to mediate S1P transport in cell culture. Spns2 was also shown to control S1P activities in zebrafish in vivo and to play a critical role in zebrafish cardiovascular development. However the in vivo roles of Spns2 in mammals and its involvement in the different S1P-dependent physiological processes have not been investigated. Here we characterized Spns2-null mouse line carrying the Spns2tm1a(KOMP)Wtsi allele (Spns2tm1a). The Spns2tm1a/tm1a animals were viable, indicating a divergence in Spns2 function from its zebrafish orthologue. However the immunological phenotype of the Spns2tm1a/tm1a mice closely mimicked the phenotypes of partial S1P deficiency and impaired S1P-dependent lymphocyte trafficking, with a depletion of lymphocytes in circulation, an increase in mature single-positive T cells in the thymus, and a selective reduction in mature B cells in the spleen and bone marrow. Spns2 activity in the non-hematopoietic cells was critical for normal lymphocyte development and localization. Overall Spns2tm1a/tm1a resulted in impaired humoral immune responses to immunization. This work thus demonstrated a physiological role for Spns2 in mammalian immune system functions but not in cardiovascular development. Other components of the S1P signaling network are investigated as drug targets for immunosuppressive therapy, but the selective action of Spns2 may present an advantage in this regard. PMID:22664872

  9. Sphingosine Kinases and Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptors: Signaling and Actions in the Cardiovascular System.

    PubMed

    Cannavo, Alessandro; Liccardo, Daniela; Komici, Klara; Corbi, Graziamaria; de Lucia, Claudio; Femminella, Grazia D; Elia, Andrea; Bencivenga, Leonardo; Ferrara, Nicola; Koch, Walter J; Paolocci, Nazareno; Rengo, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    The sphingosine kinases 1 and 2 (SphK1 and 2) catalyze the phosphorylation of the lipid, sphingosine, generating the signal transmitter, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). The activation of such kinases and the subsequent S1P generation and secretion in the blood serum of mammals represent a major checkpoint in many cellular signaling cascades. In fact, activating the SphK/S1P system is critical for cell motility and proliferation, cytoskeletal organization, cell growth, survival, and response to stress. In the cardiovascular system, the physiological effects of S1P intervene through the binding and activation of a family of five highly selective G protein-coupled receptors, called S1PR1-5. Importantly, SphK/S1P signal is present on both vascular and myocardial cells. S1P is a well-recognized survival factor in many tissues. Therefore, it is not surprising that the last two decades have seen a flourishing of interest and investigative efforts directed to obtain additional mechanistic insights into the signaling, as well as the biological activity of this phospholipid, and of its receptors, especially in the cardiovascular system. Here, we will provide an up-to-date account on the structure and function of sphingosine kinases, discussing the generation, release, and function of S1P. Keeping the bull's eye on the cardiovascular system, we will review the structure and signaling cascades and biological actions emanating from the stimulation of different S1P receptors. We will end this article with a summary of the most recent, experimental and clinical observations targeting S1PRs and SphKs as possible new therapeutic avenues for cardiovascular disorders, such as heart failure.

  10. Exogenous Ceramide-1-phosphate Reduces Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated Cytokine Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Hankins, Jody L.; Fox, Todd E.; Barth, Brian M.; Unrath, Kellee A.; Kester, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is a component of the innate immune system that recognizes a diverse group of molecular structures, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria. TLR4 signaling ultimately leads to activation of the transcription factor, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), and the production of cytokines. Ceramide is a bioactive sphingolipid that has been suggested to regulate TLR4-induced NF-κB signaling, although reports on the role of ceramide in TLR4 activation conflict. We investigated the possibility that ceramide metabolites, such as ceramide-1-phosphate (C-1-P), may explain these discrepancies. We now report that exogenous C-1-P, but not ceramide, reduces NF-κB-mediated gene transcription in HEK 293 cells stably transfected with human TLR4, CD14, and MD-2. We demonstrate that inhibition of NF-κB by exogenous C-1-P is dose-dependent and specific to TLR4 in a reporter assay. We further demonstrate a requirement for both the phosphate moiety and the sphingoid backbone to inhibit LPS-activated NF-κB transcription. Specifically, C-1-P prevents the degradation of IκB, the phosphorylation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB, and LPS-stimulated MAPK activation. The functional consequence of C-1-P inhibition of NF-κB is a reduction in LPS-mediated cytokine release from HEK 293 TLR4-expressing cells and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Taken together, these data demonstrate that C-1-P may function as an anti-inflammatory lipid mediator of immune response. PMID:22065582

  11. Cardiac preconditioning with sphingosine-1-phosphate requires activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3

    PubMed Central

    Kelly-Laubscher, Roisin F; King, Jonathan C; Hacking, Damian; Somers, Sarin; Hastie, Samantha; Stewart, Tessa; Imamdin, Aqeela; Maarman, Gerald; Pedretti, Sarah; Lecour, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aims Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a cardioprotective agent. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT-3) is a key mediator of many cardioprotective agents. We aimed to explore whether STAT-3 is a key mediator in S1P-induced preconditioning. Methods Langendorff-perfused hearts from Wistar rats and wild-type or cardiomyocyte-specific STAT-3 knockout mice were pre-treated with S1P (10 nmol/l), with or without the STAT-3 pathway inhibitor AG490, before an ischaemia–reperfusion insult. Triphenyltetrazolium chloride and Evans blue staining were used for the determination of infarct size. Western blot analysis was carried out on the S1P pre-treated hearts for detection of cytosolic, nuclear and mitochondrial phosphorylated and total STAT-3 proteins. Results Pre-treatment with S1P decreased the infarct size in isolated rat (5 ± 3% vs control 26 ± 8%, p < 0.01) and wild-type mouse hearts (13 ± 1% vs control 33 ± 3%, p < 0.05). This protective effect was abolished in the rat hearts pre-treated with AG490 (30 ± 10%, p = ns vs control) and in the hearts from STAT-3 knockout mice (35 ± 4% vs control 30 ± 3%, p = ns). Levels of phosphorylated STAT-3 were significantly increased in both the nuclear (p < 0.05 vs control) and mitochondrial (p < 0.05 vs control) fractions in the S1P pre-treated hearts, but remained unchanged in the cytosolic fraction (p = ns vs control). Conclusion These novel results demonstrate that pharmacological preconditioning with S1P in the isolated heart is mediated by activation of mitochondrial and nuclear STAT-3, therefore suggesting that S1P may be a novel therapeutic target to modulate mitochondrial and nuclear function in cardiovascular disease in order to protect the heart against ischaemia–reperfusion. PMID:25000441

  12. Effects of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 phosphorylation in response to FTY720 during neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yingxiang; Garris, Christopher S.; Moreno, Monica A.; Griffin, Christina W.; Han, May H.

    2016-01-01

    Fingolimod (FTY720, Gilenya), a sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor (S1PR) modulator, is one of the first-line immunomodulatory therapies for treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). Human S1PR1 variants have been reported to have functional heterogeneity in vitro, suggesting that S1PR1 function may influence FTY720 efficacy. In this study, we examined the influence of S1PR1 phosphorylation on response to FTY720 in neuroinflammation. We found that mice carrying a phosphorylation-defective S1pr1 gene [S1PR1(S5A) mice] were refractory to FTY720 treatment in MOG35-55-immunized and Th17-mediated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) models. Long-term treatment with FTY720 induced significant lymphopenia and suppressed Th17 response in the peripheral immune system via downregulating STAT3 phosphorylation in both WT and S1PR1(S5A) mice. However, FTY720 did not effectively prevent neuroinflammation in the S1PR1(S5A) EAE mice as a result of encephalitogenic cells expressing C-C chemokine receptor 6 (CCR6). Combined treatment with FTY720 and anti-CCR6 delayed disease progression in S1PR1(S5A) EAE mice, suggesting that CCR6-mediated cell trafficking can overcome the effects of FTY720. This work may have translational relevance regarding FTY720 efficacy in MS patients and suggests that cell type–specific therapies may enhance therapeutic efficacy in MS. PMID:27699272

  13. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Signaling as a Target in Hepatic Fibrosis Therapy.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, Bárbara; Sánchez, Diana I; González-Gallego, Javier; Tuñón, María J

    2017-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is an excess production of extracellular matrix proteins as a result of chronic liver disease which leads to cell death and organ dysfunction. The key cells involved in fibrogenesis are resident hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) which are termed myofibroblasts after activation, acquiring contractile, proliferative, migratory and secretory capability. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid with well-established effects on angiogenesis, carcinogenesis and immunity. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that this metabolite is involved in the profibrotic inflammatory process through the regulation of pleiotropic cell responses, such as vascular permeability, leukocyte infiltration, cell survival, migration, proliferation and HSCs differentiation to myofibroblasts. S1P is synthesized by sphingosine kinases (SphKs) and many of its actions are mediated by S1P specific cell surface receptors (S1P1-5), although different intracellular targets of S1P have been identified. Modulation of SphKs/S1P/S1P receptors signaling is known to result in beneficial effects on various in vivo and in vitro models of liver fibrosis. Thus, a better knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in the modulation of the S1P pathway could help to improve liver fibrosis therapy. In this review, we analyze the effects of the S1P axis on the fibrogenic process, and the involvement of a range of inhibitors or approaches targeting enzymes related to S1P in the abrogation of pathological fibrogenesis. All in all, targeting this pathway offers therapeutic potential in the treatment of hepatic fibrosis.

  14. Vehicle-dependent Effects of Sphingosine 1-phosphate on Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Chiharu; Kurano, Makoto; Nishikawa, Masako; Kano, Kuniyuki; Dohi, Tomotaka; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Daida, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Tomo; Aoki, Junken; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2017-09-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) has been suggested to be a positive regulator of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) in adipocytes, while some studies are not consistent with this prothrombotic property of S1P. Since S1P is bound to apolipoprotein M (apoM) on HDL or to albumin in plasma, we compared the properties of these two forms on the PAI-1 induction. We investigated the associations of S1P, apoM, and PAI-1 concentrations in the plasma of normal coronary artery (NCA), stable angina pectoris (SAP), and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) subjects (n=32, 71, and 38, respectively). Then, we compared the effects of S1P with various vehicles on the PAI-1 expression in 3T3L1 adipocytes. We also investigated the modulation of the PAI-1 levels in mice infected with adenovirus coding apoM. Among ACS subjects, the PAI-1 level was positively correlated with the S1P level, but not the apoM level. In adipocytes, S1P bound to an apoM-rich vehicle induced PAI-1 expression to a lesser extent than the control vehicle, while S1P bound to an apoM-depleted vehicle induced PAI-1 expression to a greater extent than the control vehicle in 3T3L1 adipocytes. Additionally, apoM overexpression in mice failed to modulate the plasma PAI-1 level and the adipose PAI-1 expression level. S1P bound to albumin increased PAI-1 expression through the S1P receptor 2-Rho/ROCK-NFκB pathway. S1P bound to albumin, but not to apoM, induces PAI-1 expression in adipocytes, indicating that S1P can exert different properties on the pathogenesis of vascular diseases, depending on its vehicle.

  15. Impairment of Angiogenic Sphingosine Kinase-1/Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptors Pathway in Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Dobierzewska, Aneta; Palominos, Macarena; Sanchez, Marianela; Dyhr, Michael; Helgert, Katja; Venegas-Araneda, Pia; Tong, Stephen; Illanes, Sebastian E.

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE), is a serious pregnancy disorder characterized in the early gestation by shallow trophoblast invasion, impaired placental neo-angiogenesis, placental hypoxia and ischemia, which leads to maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Here we hypothesized that angiogenic sphingosine kinase-1 (SPHK1)/sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors pathway is impaired in PE. We found that SPHK1 mRNA and protein expression are down-regulated in term placentae and term chorionic villous explants from patients with PE or severe PE (PES), compared with controls. Moreover, mRNA expression of angiogenic S1PR1 and S1PR3 receptors were decreased in placental samples of PE and PES patients, whereas anti-angiogenic S1PR2 was up-regulated in chorionic villous tissue of PES subjects, pointing to its potential atherogenic and inflammatory properties. Furthermore, in in vitro (JAR cells) and ex vivo (chorionic villous explants) models of placental hypoxia, SPHK1 mRNA and protein were strongly up-regulated under low oxygen tension (1% 02). In contrast, there was no change in SPHK1 expression under the conditions of placental physiological hypoxia (8% 02). In both models, nuclear protein levels of HIF1A were increased at 1% 02 during the time course, but there was no up-regulation at 8% 02, suggesting that SPHK1 and HIF1A might be the part of the same canonical pathway during hypoxia and that both contribute to placental neovascularization during early gestation. Taken together, this study suggest the SPHK1 pathway may play a role in the human early placentation process and may be involved in the pathogenesis of PE. PMID:27284992

  16. Pancreas lineage allocation and specification are regulated by sphingosine-1-phosphate signalling.

    PubMed

    Serafimidis, Ioannis; Rodriguez-Aznar, Eva; Lesche, Mathias; Yoshioka, Kazuaki; Takuwa, Yoh; Dahl, Andreas; Pan, Duojia; Gavalas, Anthony

    2017-03-01

    During development, progenitor expansion, lineage allocation, and implementation of differentiation programs need to be tightly coordinated so that different cell types are generated in the correct numbers for appropriate tissue size and function. Pancreatic dysfunction results in some of the most debilitating and fatal diseases, including pancreatic cancer and diabetes. Several transcription factors regulating pancreas lineage specification have been identified, and Notch signalling has been implicated in lineage allocation, but it remains unclear how these processes are coordinated. Using a combination of genetic approaches, organotypic cultures of embryonic pancreata, and genomics, we found that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1p), signalling through the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) S1pr2, plays a key role in pancreas development linking lineage allocation and specification. S1pr2 signalling promotes progenitor survival as well as acinar and endocrine specification. S1pr2-mediated stabilisation of the yes-associated protein (YAP) is essential for endocrine specification, thus linking a regulator of progenitor growth with specification. YAP stabilisation and endocrine cell specification rely on Gαi subunits, revealing an unexpected specificity of selected GPCR intracellular signalling components. Finally, we found that S1pr2 signalling posttranscriptionally attenuates Notch signalling levels, thus regulating lineage allocation. Both S1pr2-mediated YAP stabilisation and Notch attenuation are necessary for the specification of the endocrine lineage. These findings identify S1p signalling as a novel key pathway coordinating cell survival, lineage allocation, and specification and linking these processes by regulating YAP levels and Notch signalling. Understanding lineage allocation and specification in the pancreas will shed light in the origins of pancreatic diseases and may suggest novel therapeutic approaches.

  17. Misfolding of galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase can result in type I galactosemia

    PubMed Central

    McCorvie, Thomas J; Gleason, Tyler J; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L; Timson, David J

    2013-01-01

    Type I galactosemia is a genetic disorder that is caused by the impairment of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT; EC 2.7.7.12). Although a large number of mutations have been detected through genetic screening of the human GALT (hGALT) locus, for many it is not known how they cause their effects. The majority of these mutations are missense, with predicted substitutions scattered throughout the enzyme structure and thus causing impairment by other means rather than direct alterations to the active site. To clarify the fundamental, molecular basis of hGALT impairment we studied five disease-associated variants p.D28Y, p.L74P, p.F171S, p.F194L and p.R333G using both a yeast model and purified, recombinant proteins. In a yeast expression system there was a correlation between lysate activity and the ability to rescue growth in the presence of galactose, except for p.R333G. Kinetic analysis of the purified proteins quantified each variant’s level of enzymatic impairment and demonstrated that this was largely due to altered substrate binding. Increased surface hydrophobicity, altered thermal stability and changes in proteolytic sensitivity were also detected. Our results demonstrate that hGALT requires a level of flexibility to function optimally and that altered folding is the underlying reason of impairment in all the variants tested here. This indicates that misfolding is a common, molecular basis of hGALT deficiency and suggests the potential of pharmacological chaperones and proteostasis regulators as novel therapeutic approaches for type I galactosemia. PMID:23583749

  18. Sphingosine-1-phosphate mediates epidermal growth factor-induced muscle satellite cell activation.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Yosuke; Ohashi, Kazuya; Wada, Eiji; Yuasa, Yuki; Shiozuka, Masataka; Nonomura, Yoshiaki; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2014-08-01

    Skeletal muscle can regenerate repeatedly due to the presence of resident stem cells, called satellite cells. Because satellite cells are usually quiescent, they must be activated before participating in muscle regeneration in response to stimuli such as injury, overloading, and stretch. Although satellite cell activation is a crucial step in muscle regeneration, little is known of the molecular mechanisms controlling this process. Recent work showed that the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) plays crucial roles in the activation, proliferation, and differentiation of muscle satellite cells. We investigated the role of growth factors in S1P-mediated satellite cell activation. We found that epidermal growth factor (EGF) in combination with insulin induced proliferation of quiescent undifferentiated mouse myoblast C2C12 cells, which are also known as reserve cells, in serum-free conditions. Sphingosine kinase activity increased when reserve cells were stimulated with EGF. Treatment of reserve cells with the D-erythro-N,N-dimethylsphingosine, Sphingosine Kinase Inhibitor, or siRNA duplexes specific for sphingosine kinase 1, suppressed EGF-induced C2C12 activation. We also present the evidence showing the S1P receptor S1P2 is involved in EGF-induced reserve cell activation. Moreover, we demonstrated a combination of insulin and EGF promoted activation of satellite cells on single myofibers in a manner dependent on SPHK and S1P2. Taken together, our observations show that EGF-induced satellite cell activation is mediated by S1P and its receptor.

  19. Conjugated bile acids promote cholangiocarcinoma cell invasive growth through activation of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Runping; Zhao, Renping; Zhou, Xiqiao; Liang, Xiuyin; Campbell, Deanna JW; Zhang, Xiaoxuan; Zhang, Luyong; Shi, Ruihua; Wang, Guangji; Pandak, William M; Sirica, Alphonse E; Hylemon, Phillip B; Zhou, Huiping

    2014-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is an often fatal primary malignancy of the intra- and extrahepatic biliary tract that is commonly associated with chronic cholestasis and significantly elevated levels of primary and conjugated bile acids (CBAs), which are correlated with bile duct obstruction (BDO). BDO has also recently been shown to promote CCA progression. However, whereas there is increasing evidence linking chronic cholestasis and abnormal bile acid profiles to CCA development and progression, the specific mechanisms by which bile acids may be acting to promote cholangiocarcinogenesis and invasive biliary tumor growth have not been fully established. Recent studies have shown that CBAs, but not free bile acids, stimulate CCA cell growth, and that an imbalance in the ratio of free to CBAs may play an important role in the tumorigenesis of CCA. Also, CBAs are able to activate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2- and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B (AKT)-signaling pathways through sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2) in rodent hepatocytes. In the current study, we demonstrate S1PR2 to be highly expressed in rat and human CCA cells, as well as in human CCA tissues. We further show that CBAs activate the ERK1/2- and AKT-signaling pathways and significantly stimulate CCA cell growth and invasion in vitro. Taurocholate (TCA)-mediated CCA cell proliferation, migration, and invasion were significantly inhibited by JTE-013, a chemical antagonist of S1PR2, or by lentiviral short hairpin RNA silencing of S1PR2. In a novel organotypic rat CCA coculture model, TCA was further found to significantly increase the growth of CCA cell spheroidal/“duct-like” structures, which was blocked by treatment with JTE-013. Conclusion: Our collective data support the hypothesis that CBAs promote CCA cell-invasive growth through S1PR2. PMID:24700501

  20. Role for Peroxynitrite in Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Induced Hyperalgesia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Tim; Finley, Amanda; Chen, Zhoumou; Salvemini, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is an important mediator of inflammation recently shown in in vitro studies to increase the excitability of small diameter sensory neurons at least in part via activation of the S1P1 receptor subtype. Activation of S1PR1 has been reported to increase the formation of NADPH oxidase-derived superoxide (O2•−) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-derived nitric oxide (NO). This process favors the formation of peroxynitrite (ONOO−, PN), a potent mediator of hyperalgesia associated with peripheral and central sensitization. The aims of our study were to determine whether S1P causes peripheral sensitization and thermal hyperalgesia via S1PR1 activation and PN formation. Intraplantar injection of S1P in rats led to a time-dependent development of thermal hyperalgesia that was blocked by the S1PR1 antagonist, W146 but not its inactive enantiomer, W140. The hyperalgesic effects of S1P were mimicked by intraplantar injection of the well characterized S1PR1 agonist, SEW2871. The development of S1P-induced hyperalgesia was blocked by apocynin, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, L-NAME, a non-selective NOS inhibitor and by the potent PN decomposition catalysts (FeTM-4-PyP5+ and MnTE-2-PyP5+). Our findings provide mechanistic insight into the signaling pathways engaged by S1P in the development of hyperalgesia and highlight the contribution of the S1P1 receptor-to-PN signaling in this process. PMID:21239112

  1. Implication of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 in ceramide 1-phosphate-stimulated macrophage migration.

    PubMed

    Ordoñez, Marta; Rivera, Io-Guané; Presa, Natalia; Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Cell migration is a complex biological function involved in both physiologic and pathologic processes. Although this is a subject of intense investigation, the mechanisms by which cell migration is regulated are not completely understood. In this study we show that the bioactive sphingolipid ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P), which is involved in inflammatory responses, causes upregulation of metalloproteinases (MMP) -2 and -9 in J774A.1 macrophages. This effect was shown to be dependent on stimulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and extracellularly regulated kinases 1-2 (ERK1-2) as demonstrated by treating the cells with specific siRNA to knockdown the p85 regulatory subunit of PI3K, or ERK1-2. Inhibition of MMP-2 or MMP-9 pharmacologically or with specific siRNA to silence the genes encoding these MMPs abrogated C1P-stimulated macrophage migration. Also, C1P induced actin polymerization and potently increased phosphorylation of the focal adhesion protein paxillin, which are essential factors in the regulation of cell migration. As expected, blockade of paxillin activation with specific siRNA significantly reduced actin polymerization. In addition, inhibition of actin polymerization with cytochalasin D completely blocked C1P-induced MMP-2 and -9 expression as well as C1P-stimulated macrophage migration. It was also observed that pertussis toxin (Ptx) inhibited Akt, ERK1-2, and paxillin phosphorylation, and completely blocked cell migration. The latter findings support the notion that C1P-stimulated macrophage migration is a receptor mediated effect, and point to MMP-2 and -9 as possible therapeutic targets to control inflammation.

  2. Glucose-1-Phosphate Transport into Protoplasts and Chloroplasts from Leaves of Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Fettke, Joerg; Malinova, Irina; Albrecht, Tanja; Hejazi, Mahdi; Steup, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Almost all glucosyl transfer reactions rely on glucose-1-phosphate (Glc-1-P) that either immediately acts as glucosyl donor or as substrate for the synthesis of the more widely used Glc dinucleotides, ADPglucose or UDPglucose. In this communication, we have analyzed two Glc-1-P-related processes: the carbon flux from externally supplied Glc-1-P to starch by either mesophyll protoplasts or intact chloroplasts from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). When intact protoplasts or chloroplasts are incubated with [U-14C]Glc-1-P, starch is rapidly labeled. Incorporation into starch is unaffected by the addition of unlabeled Glc-6-P or Glc, indicating a selective flux from Glc-1-P to starch. However, illuminated protoplasts incorporate less 14C into starch when unlabeled bicarbonate is supplied in addition to the 14C-labeled Glc-1-P. Mesophyll protoplasts incubated with [U-14C]Glc-1-P incorporate 14C into the plastidial pool of adenosine diphosphoglucose. Protoplasts prepared from leaves of mutants of Arabidopsis that lack either the plastidial phosphorylase or the phosphoglucomutase isozyme incorporate 14C derived from external Glc-1-P into starch, but incorporation into starch is insignificant when protoplasts from a mutant possessing a highly reduced ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase activity are studied. Thus, the path of assimilatory starch biosynthesis initiated by extraplastidial Glc-1-P leads to the plastidial pool of adenosine diphosphoglucose, and at this intermediate it is fused with the Calvin cycle-driven route. Mutants lacking the plastidial phosphoglucomutase contain a small yet significant amount of transitory starch. PMID:21115809

  3. Sphingomyelinase D/Ceramide 1-Phosphate in Cell Survival and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Io-Guané; Ordoñez, Marta; Presa, Natalia; Gomez-Larrauri, Ana; Simón, Jorge; Trueba, Miguel; Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids are major constituents of biological membranes of eukaryotic cells. Many studies have shown that sphingomyelin (SM) is a major phospholipid in cell bilayers and is mainly localized to the plasma membrane of cells, where it serves both as a building block for cell architecture and as a precursor of bioactive sphingolipids. In particular, upregulation of (C-type) sphingomyelinases will produce ceramide, which regulates many physiological functions including apoptosis, senescence, or cell differentiation. Interestingly, the venom of some arthropodes including spiders of the genus Loxosceles, or the toxins of some bacteria such as Corynebacterium tuberculosis, or Vibrio damsela possess high levels of D-type sphingomyelinase (SMase D). This enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of SM to yield ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P), which promotes cell growth and survival and is a potent pro-inflammatory agent in different cell types. In particular, C1P stimulates cytosolic phospholipase A2 leading to arachidonic acid release and the subsequent formation of eicosanoids, actions that are all associated to the promotion of inflammation. In addition, C1P potently stimulates macrophage migration, which has also been associated to inflammatory responses. Interestingly, this action required the interaction of C1P with a specific plasma membrane receptor, whereas accumulation of intracellular C1P failed to stimulate chemotaxis. The C1P receptor is coupled to Gi proteins and activates of the PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK1-2 pathways upon ligation with C1P. The proposed review will address novel aspects on the control of inflammatory responses by C1P and will highlight the molecular mechanisms whereby C1P exerts these actions. PMID:25938271

  4. Sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase downregulation promotes colon carcinogenesis through STAT3-activated microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Degagné, Emilie; Pandurangan, Ashok; Bandhuvula, Padmavathi; Kumar, Ashok; Eltanawy, Abeer; Zhang, Meng; Yoshinaga, Yuko; Nefedov, Mikhail; de Jong, Pieter J; Fong, Loren G; Young, Stephen G; Bittman, Robert; Ahmedi, Yasmin; Saba, Julie D

    2014-12-01

    Growing evidence supports a link between inflammation and cancer; however, mediators of the transition between inflammation and carcinogenesis remain incompletely understood. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) lyase (SPL) irreversibly degrades the bioactive sphingolipid S1P and is highly expressed in enterocytes but downregulated in colon cancer. Here, we investigated the role of SPL in colitis-associated cancer (CAC). We generated mice with intestinal epithelium-specific Sgpl1 deletion and chemically induced colitis and tumor formation in these animals. Compared with control animals, mice lacking intestinal SPL exhibited greater disease activity, colon shortening, cytokine levels, S1P accumulation, tumors, STAT3 activation, STAT3-activated microRNAs (miRNAs), and suppression of miR-targeted anti-oncogene products. This phenotype was attenuated by STAT3 inhibition. In fibroblasts, silencing SPL promoted tumorigenic transformation through a pathway involving extracellular transport of S1P through S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (SPNS2), S1P receptor activation, JAK2/STAT3-dependent miR-181b-1 induction, and silencing of miR-181b-1 target cylindromatosis (CYLD). Colon biopsies from patients with inflammatory bowel disease revealed enhanced S1P and STAT3 signaling. In mice with chemical-induced CAC, oral administration of plant-type sphingolipids called sphingadienes increased colonic SPL levels and reduced S1P levels, STAT3 signaling, cytokine levels, and tumorigenesis, indicating that SPL prevents transformation and carcinogenesis. Together, our results suggest that dietary sphingolipids can augment or prevent colon cancer, depending upon whether they are metabolized to S1P or promote S1P metabolism through the actions of SPL.

  5. Therapeutic Impact of Sphingosine 1-phosphate Receptor Signaling in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Candido, Kristina; Soufi, Henry; Bandyopadhyay, Mausumi; Dasgupta, Subhajit

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a female predominant autoimmune demyelinating disease of central nervous system. The proper etiology is not clear. The existing therapies with interferon beta (Betaseron, Rebif), glatiramer acetate (copolymer 1, copaxone) are found to be promising for MS patients. The alpha-4 integrin antagonist monoclonal antibody Natalizumab has been found to decrease brain inflammation in relapsing-remitting MS via inhibition of alpha-4 beta- 1 integrinmediated mode of action of antigen -primed T cells to enter into central nervous system through blood brain barrier. The advancement of drug development introduced prospects of CD52 monoclonal antibody Alemtuzumab and CD20 monoclonal antibody Rituximab in MS therapy. The benefit versus risk ratios of these therapeutic monoclonal antibodies are currently under clinical trial. The ongoing researches demonstrated the importance of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor statins, NF-κBp65 inhibitor NBD peptide, and antagonist of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), animal model for MS. Recently, the clinical trials indicated the therapeutic prospect of G-protein coupled sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor (S1PR) in MS patients. Recent studies showed remyelination through selective activation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. In the context, role of S1PR-mediated signals following interaction with natural ligand S1P and agonist Fingolimod (FTY720) gain profound therapeutic importance in prevention of demyelination in MS brain. The S1PR agonist Fingolimod (FTY 720) has recently been approved by Food and Drug Administration for MS therapy. In the review, we provided an insight on S1PR mode of action in the aspect of treatment of autoimmune disorder, re-myelination and regeneration of axons in damaged central nervous system in multiple sclerosis.

  6. Sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling and biological activities in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Takuwa, Yoh; Okamoto, Yasuo; Yoshioka, Kazuaki; Takuwa, Noriko

    2008-09-01

    The plasma lysophospholipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is produced exclusively by sphingosine kinase (SPHK) 1 and SPHK2 in vivo, and plays diverse biological and pathophysiological roles by acting largely through three members of the G protein-coupled S1P receptors, S1P1, S1P2 and S1P3. S1P1 expressed on endothelial cells mediates embryonic vascular maturation and maintains vascular integrity by contributing to eNOS activation, inhibiting vascular permeability and inducing endothelial cell chemotaxis via Gi-coupled mechanisms. By contrast, S1P2, is expressed in high levels on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and certain types of tumor cells, inhibiting Rac and cell migration via a G(12/13)-and Rho-dependent mechanism. In rat neointimal VSMCs, S1P1 is upregulated to mediate local production of platelet-derived growth factor, which is a key player in vascular remodeling. S1P3 expressed on endothelial cells also mediates chemotaxis toward S1P and vasorelaxation via NO production in certain vascular bed, playing protective roles for vascular integrity. S1P3 expressed on VSMCs and cardiac sinoatrial node cells mediates vasopressor and negative chronotropic effect, respectively. In addition, S1P3, together with S1P2 and SPHK1, is suggested to play a protective role against acute myocardial ischemia. However, our recent work indicates that overexpressed SPHK1 is involved in cardiomyocyte degeneration and fibrosis in vivo, in part through S1P activation of the S1P3 signaling. We also demonstrated that exogenously administered S1P accelerates neovascularization and blood flow recovery in ischemic limbs, suggesting its usefulness for angiogenic therapy. These results provide evidence for S1P receptor subtype-specific pharmacological intervention as a novel therapeutic approach to cardiovascular diseases and cancer.

  7. Characterization of homologous sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase isoforms in the bacterial pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei[S

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Christopher J.; Marles-Wright, Jon; Custodio, Rafael; Lowther, Jonathan; Kennedy, Amanda J.; Pollock, Jacob; Clarke, David J.; Brown, Alan R.; Campopiano, Dominic J.

    2017-01-01

    Sphingolipids (SLs) are ubiquitous elements in eukaryotic membranes and are also found in some bacterial and viral species. As well as playing an integral structural role, SLs also act as potent signaling molecules involved in numerous cellular pathways and have been linked to many human diseases. A central SL signaling molecule is sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), whose breakdown is catalyzed by S1P lyase (S1PL), a pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the cleavage of S1P to (2E)-hexadecenal (2E-HEX) and phosphoethanolamine. Here, we show that the pathogenic bacterium, Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243, encodes two homologous proteins (S1PL2021 and S1PL2025) that display moderate sequence identity to known eukaryotic and prokaryotic S1PLs. Using an established MS-based methodology, we show that recombinant S1PL2021 is catalytically active. We also used recombinant human fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase to develop a spectrophotometric enzyme-coupled assay to detect 2E-HEX formation and measure the kinetic constants of the two B. pseudomallei S1PL isoforms. Furthermore, we determined the X-ray crystal structure of the PLP-bound form of S1PL2021 at 2.1 Å resolution revealing that the enzyme displays a conserved structural fold and active site architecture comparable with known S1PLs. The combined data suggest that B. pseudomallei has the potential to degrade host SLs in a S1PL-dependent manner. PMID:27784725

  8. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Signaling as a Target in Hepatic Fibrosis Therapy

    PubMed Central

    González-Fernández, Bárbara; Sánchez, Diana I.; González-Gallego, Javier; Tuñón, María J.

    2017-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is an excess production of extracellular matrix proteins as a result of chronic liver disease which leads to cell death and organ dysfunction. The key cells involved in fibrogenesis are resident hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) which are termed myofibroblasts after activation, acquiring contractile, proliferative, migratory and secretory capability. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid with well-established effects on angiogenesis, carcinogenesis and immunity. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that this metabolite is involved in the profibrotic inflammatory process through the regulation of pleiotropic cell responses, such as vascular permeability, leukocyte infiltration, cell survival, migration, proliferation and HSCs differentiation to myofibroblasts. S1P is synthesized by sphingosine kinases (SphKs) and many of its actions are mediated by S1P specific cell surface receptors (S1P1-5), although different intracellular targets of S1P have been identified. Modulation of SphKs/S1P/S1P receptors signaling is known to result in beneficial effects on various in vivo and in vitro models of liver fibrosis. Thus, a better knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in the modulation of the S1P pathway could help to improve liver fibrosis therapy. In this review, we analyze the effects of the S1P axis on the fibrogenic process, and the involvement of a range of inhibitors or approaches targeting enzymes related to S1P in the abrogation of pathological fibrogenesis. All in all, targeting this pathway offers therapeutic potential in the treatment of hepatic fibrosis. PMID:28890699

  9. Valproic acid enforces the priming effect of sphingosine-1 phosphate on human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jisun; Lee, Seungun; Ju, Hyein; Kim, Yonghwan; Heo, Jinbeom; Lee, Hye-Yeon; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Son, Jaekyoung; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Kim, In-Gyu; Shin, Dong-Myung

    2017-09-01

    Engraftment and homing of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are modulated by priming factors including the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), by stimulating CXCR4 receptor signaling cascades. However, limited in vivo efficacy and the remaining priming molecules prior to administration of MSCs can provoke concerns regarding the efficiency and safety of MSC priming. Here, we showed that valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, enforced the priming effect of S1P at a low dosage for human umbilical cord-derived MSCs (UC-MSCs). A DNA-methylation inhibitor, 5-azacytidine (5-Aza), and VPA increased the expression of CXCR4 in UC-MSCs. In particular, UC-MSCs primed with a suboptimal dose (50 nM) of S1P in combination with 0.5 mM VPA (VPA+S1P priming), but not 1 µM 5-Aza, significantly improved the migration activity in response to stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) concomitant with the activation of both MAPKp42/44 and AKT signaling cascades. Both epigenetic regulatory compounds had little influence on cell surface marker phenotypes and the multi-potency of UC-MSCs. In contrast, VPA+S1P priming of UC-MSCs potentiated the proliferation, colony forming unit-fibroblast, and anti-inflammatory activities, which were severely inhibited in the case of 5-Aza treatment. Accordingly, the VPA+S1P-primed UC-MSCs exhibited upregulation of a subset of genes related to stem cell migration and anti-inflammation response. Thus, the present study demonstrated that VPA enables MSC priming with S1P at a low dosage by enhancing their migration and other therapeutic beneficial activities. This priming strategy for MSCs may provide a more efficient and safe application of MSCs for treating a variety of intractable disorders.

  10. Induction of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 by sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mei-Hong; Harel, Miriam; Hla, Timothy; Ferrer, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Background/Purpose Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood. Preliminary data derived from a human angiogenesis array in NB showed that the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) induced the secretion of several angiogenesis-related proteins including the important inflammatory factor chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2). In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of S1P-induced CCL2 expression in NB. Methods Quantitative real-time PCR and CCL2 ELISA were conducted to detect the mRNA expression and protein secretion of CCL2 in NB cells. Gain and loss of function studies were performed by using specific S1PR antagonists, adenoviral transduction and siRNA transfection. Macrophage F4/80 receptor in NB xenografts was detected by quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry staining. Results S1P induced CCL2 mRNA expression and protein secretion in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in NB cells. Blockade of S1P2 signaling using the selective S1P2 antagonist JTE-013 inhibited S1P-induced CCL2 expression. Overexpression of S1P2 by adenoviral transduction increased CCL2 secretion while knockdown of S1P2 by siRNA transfection decreased S1P-induced CCL2 secretion in NB cells. Macrophage infiltration, as detected by F4/80 staining, was significantly decreased in JTE-013-treated NB xenografts. Conclusions Taken together, our data for the first time demonstrate that S1P induced the macrophage-recruiting factor CCL2 expression in NB cells via S1P2, providing new insights into the complicated functions of S1P2 in cancer. PMID:25092091

  11. Chemical Hypoxia Brings to Light Altered Autocrine Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signalling in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chenqi; Moreno-Nieves, Uriel; Di Battista, John A.; Fernandes, Maria J.; Touaibia, Mohamed; Bourgoin, Sylvain G.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests a role for sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in various aspects of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis. In this study we compared the effect of chemical hypoxia induced by cobalt chloride (CoCl2) on the expression of S1P metabolic enzymes and cytokine/chemokine secretion in normal fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) and RAFLS. RAFLS incubated with CoCl2, but not S1P, produced less IL-8 and MCP-1 than normal FLS. Furthermore, incubation with the S1P2 and S1P3 receptor antagonists, JTE-013 and CAY10444, reduced CoCl2-mediated chemokine production in normal FLS but not in RAFLS. RAFLS showed lower levels of intracellular S1P and enhanced mRNA expression of S1P phosphatase 1 (SGPP1) and S1P lyase (SPL), the enzymes that are involved in intracellular S1P degradation, when compared to normal FLS. Incubation with CoCl2 decreased SGPP1 mRNA and protein and SPL mRNA as well. Inhibition of SPL enhanced CoCl2-mediated cytokine/chemokine release and restored autocrine activation of S1P2 and S1P3 receptors in RAFLS. The results suggest that the sphingolipid pathway regulating the intracellular levels of S1P is dysregulated in RAFLS and has a significant impact on cell autocrine activation by S1P. Altered sphingolipid metabolism in FLS from patients with advanced RA raises the issue of synovial cell burnout due to chronic inflammation. PMID:26556954

  12. The immunosuppressant FTY720 inhibits tumor angiogenesis via the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Gerald; Guba, Markus; Ischenko, Ivan; Papyan, Armine; Joka, Mareile; Schrepfer, Sabine; Bruns, Christiane J; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Heeschen, Christopher; Graeb, Christian

    2007-05-01

    FTY720, a sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) analog, acts as an immunosuppressant through trapping of T cells in secondary lymphoid tissues. FTY720 was also shown to prevent tumor growth and to inhibit vascular permeability. The MTT proliferation assay illustrated that endothelial cells are more susceptible to the anti-proliferative effect of FTY720 than Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC1) cells. In a spheroid angiogenesis model, FTY720 potently inhibited the sprouting activity of VEGF-A-stimulated endothelial cells even at concentrations that apparently had no anti-proliferative effect. Mechanistically, the anti-angiogenic effect of the general S1P receptor agonist FTY720 was mimicked by the specific S1P1 receptor agonist SEW2871. Moreover, the anti-angiogenic effect of FTY720 was abrogated in the presence of CXCR4-neutralizing antibodies. This indicates that the effect was at least in part mediated by the S1P1 receptor and involved transactivation of the CXCR4 chemokine receptor. Additionally, we could illustrate in a coculture spheroid model, employing endothelial and smooth muscle cells (SMCs), that the latter confer a strong protective effect regarding the action of FTY720 upon the endothelial cells. In a subcutaneous LLC1 tumor model, the anti-angiogenic capacity translated into a reduced tumor size in syngeneic C57BL/6 mice. Consistently, in the Matrigel plug in vivo assay, 10 mg/kg/d FTY720 resulted in a strong inhibition of angiogenesis as demonstrated by a reduced capillary density. Thus, in organ transplant patients, FTY720 may prove efficacious in preventing graft rejection as well as tumor development.

  13. Sphingosine 1-phosphate axis: a new leader actor in skeletal muscle biology.

    PubMed

    Donati, Chiara; Cencetti, Francesca; Bruni, Paola

    2013-11-25

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid involved in the regulation of biological processes such as proliferation, differentiation, motility, and survival. Here we review the role of S1P in the biology and homeostasis of skeletal muscle. S1P derives from the catabolism of sphingomyelin and is produced by sphingosine phosphorylation catalyzed by sphingosine kinase (SK). S1P can act either intracellularly or extracellularly through specific ligation to its five G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) named S1P receptors (S1PR). Many experimental findings obtained in the last 20 years demonstrate that S1P and its metabolism play a multifaceted role in the regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration. Indeed, this lipid is known to activate muscle-resident satellite cells, regulating their proliferation and differentiation, as well as mesenchymal progenitors such as mesoangioblasts that originate outside skeletal muscle, both involved in tissue repair following an injury or disease. The molecular mechanism of action of S1P in skeletal muscle cell precursors is highly complex, especially because S1P axis is under the control of a number of growth factors and cytokines, canonical regulators of skeletal muscle biology. Moreover, this lipid is crucially involved in the regulation of skeletal muscle contractile properties, responsiveness to insulin, fatigue resistance and tropism. Overall, on the basis of these findings S1P signaling appears to be an appealing pharmacological target for improving skeletal muscle repair. Nevertheless, further understanding is required on the regulation of S1P downstream signaling pathways and the expression of S1PR. This article will resume our current knowledge on S1P signaling in skeletal muscle, hopefully stimulating further investigation in the field, aimed at individuating novel molecular targets for ameliorating skeletal muscle regeneration and reducing fibrosis of the tissue after a trauma or due to skeletal muscle diseases.

  14. A sphingosine 1-phosphate 1 receptor agonist modulates brain death-induced neurogenic pulmonary injury.

    PubMed

    Sammani, Saad; Park, Ki-Sung; Zaidi, Syed R; Mathew, Biji; Wang, Ting; Huang, Yong; Zhou, Tong; Lussier, Yves A; Husain, Aliya N; Moreno-Vinasco, Liliana; Vigneswaran, Wickii T; Garcia, Joe G N

    2011-11-01

    Lung transplantation remains the only viable therapy for patients with end-stage lung disease. However, the full utilization of this strategy is severely compromised by a lack of donor lung availability. The vast majority of donor lungs available for transplantation are from individuals after brain death (BD). Unfortunately, the early autonomic storm that accompanies BD often results in neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE), producing varying degrees of lung injury or leading to primary graft dysfunction after transplantation. We demonstrated that sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/analogues, which are major barrier-enhancing agents, reduce vascular permeability via the S1P1 receptor, S1PR1. Because primary lung graft dysfunction is induced by lung vascular endothelial cell barrier dysfunction, we hypothesized that the S1PR1 agonist, SEW-2871, may attenuate NPE when administered to the donor shortly after BD. Significant lung injury was observed after BD, with increases of approximately 60% in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) total protein, cell counts, and lung tissue wet/dry (W/D) weight ratios. In contrast, rats receiving SEW-2871 (0.1 mg/kg) 15 minutes after BD and assessed after 4 hours exhibited significant lung protection (∼ 50% reduction, P = 0.01), as reflected by reduced BAL protein/albumin, cytokines, cellularity, and lung tissue wet/dry weight ratio. Microarray analysis at 4 hours revealed a global impact of both BD and SEW on lung gene expression, with a differential gene expression of enriched immune-response/inflammation pathways across all groups. Overall, SEW served to attenuate the BD-mediated up-regulation of gene expression. Two potential biomarkers, TNF and chemokine CC motif receptor-like 2, exhibited gene array dysregulation. We conclude that SEW-2871 significantly attenuates BD-induced lung injury, and may serve as a potential candidate to improve human donor availability.

  15. Membrane Organization and Ionization Behavior of the Minor but Crucial Lipid Ceramide-1-Phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Kooijman, Edgar E.; Sot, Jesus; Montes, L.-Ruth; Alonso, Alicia; Gericke, Arne; de Kruijff, Ben; Kumar, Satyendra; Goni, Felix M.

    2008-08-06

    Ceramide-1-phosphate (Cer-1-P), one of the simplest of all sphingophospholipids, occurs in minor amounts in biological membranes. Yet recent evidence suggests important roles of this lipid as a novel second messenger with crucial tasks in cell survival and inflammatory responses. We present a detailed description of the physical chemistry of this hitherto little explored membrane lipid. At full hydration Cer-1-P forms a highly organized subgel (crystalline) bilayer phase (L{sub c}) at low temperature, which transforms into a regular gel phase (L{sub {beta}}) at {approx}45 C, with the gel to fluid phase transition (L{sub {beta}}-L{sub {alpha}}) occurring at {approx}65 C. When incorporated at 5mol % in a phosphatidylcholine bilayer, the pK{sub a2} of Cer-1-P, 7.39{+-}0.03, lies within the physiological pH range. Inclusion of phosphatidylethanolamine in the phosphatidylcholine bilayer, at equimolar ratio, dramatically reduces the pK{sub a2} to 6.64{+-}0.03. We explain these results in light of the novel electrostatic/hydrogen bond switch model described recently for phosphatidic acid. In mixtures with dielaidoylphosphatidylethanolamine, small concentrations of Cer-1-P cause a large reduction of the lamellar-to-inverted hexagonal phase transition temperature, suggesting that Cer-1-P induces, like phosphatidic acid, negative membrane curvature in these types of lipid mixtures. These properties place Cer-1-P in a class more akin to certain glycerophospholipids (phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidic acid) than to any other sphingolipid. In particular, the similarities and differences between ceramide and Cer-1-P may be relevant in explaining some of their physiological roles.

  16. Sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase downregulation promotes colon carcinogenesis through STAT3-activated microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Degagné, Emilie; Pandurangan, Ashok; Bandhuvula, Padmavathi; Kumar, Ashok; Eltanawy, Abeer; Zhang, Meng; Yoshinaga, Yuko; Nefedov, Mikhail; de Jong, Pieter J.; Fong, Loren G.; Young, Stephen G.; Bittman, Robert; Ahmedi, Yasmin; Saba, Julie D.

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence supports a link between inflammation and cancer; however, mediators of the transition between inflammation and carcinogenesis remain incompletely understood. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) lyase (SPL) irreversibly degrades the bioactive sphingolipid S1P and is highly expressed in enterocytes but downregulated in colon cancer. Here, we investigated the role of SPL in colitis-associated cancer (CAC). We generated mice with intestinal epithelium-specific Sgpl1 deletion and chemically induced colitis and tumor formation in these animals. Compared with control animals, mice lacking intestinal SPL exhibited greater disease activity, colon shortening, cytokine levels, S1P accumulation, tumors, STAT3 activation, STAT3-activated microRNAs (miRNAs), and suppression of miR-targeted anti-oncogene products. This phenotype was attenuated by STAT3 inhibition. In fibroblasts, silencing SPL promoted tumorigenic transformation through a pathway involving extracellular transport of S1P through S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (SPNS2), S1P receptor activation, JAK2/STAT3-dependent miR-181b-1 induction, and silencing of miR-181b-1 target cylindromatosis (CYLD). Colon biopsies from patients with inflammatory bowel disease revealed enhanced S1P and STAT3 signaling. In mice with chemical-induced CAC, oral administration of plant-type sphingolipids called sphingadienes increased colonic SPL levels and reduced S1P levels, STAT3 signaling, cytokine levels, and tumorigenesis, indicating that SPL prevents transformation and carcinogenesis. Together, our results suggest that dietary sphingolipids can augment or prevent colon cancer, depending upon whether they are metabolized to S1P or promote S1P metabolism through the actions of SPL. PMID:25347472

  17. Galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase dried blood spot quality control materials for newborn screening tests.

    PubMed

    Adam, Barbara W; Flores, Sharon R; Hou, Yu; Allen, Todd W; De Jesus, Victor R

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to prepare dried-blood-spot (DBS) quality control (QC) materials for galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT), to evaluate their stability during storage and use, and to evaluate their performance in five DBS GALT test methods. We prepared and characterized GALT-normal and GALT-deficient DBS materials and compared GALT activities in DBSs after predetermined storage intervals at controlled temperatures and humidities. External evaluators documented the suitability of the DBS QC materials for use in five GALT test methods. GALT activity losses from DBSs stored in low (<30%) humidity for 14 days at 45°C, 35 days at 37°C, 91 days at room temperature, 182 days at 4°C, and 367 days at -20°C were 54%, 53%, 52% 23%, and 7% respectively. In paired DBSs stored in high humidity (>50%) for identical intervals, losses were: 45°C-68%; 37°C-79%; room temperature-72%, and 4°C-63%. GALT activities in DBSs stored at 4°C were stable throughout 19 excursions to room temperature. Twenty-five of 26 external evaluators, using five different GALT test methods, classified the GALT-deficient DBSs as "outside normal limits". All evaluators classified the GALT-normal DBSs as "within normal limits". Most of the GALT activity loss from DBSs stored at elevated or room temperature was attributable to the effects of storage temperature. Most of the loss from DBSs stored at 4°C was attributable to the effects of elevated humidity. Loss from DBSs stored at -20°C was insignificant. The DBS materials were suitable for monitoring performance of all five GALT test methods. Copyright © 2014 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. All rights reserved.

  18. Galactose-1-phosphate Uridyltransferase Dried Blood Spot Quality Control Materials for Newborn Screening Tests

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Barbara W.; Flores, Sharon R.; Hou, Yu; Allen, Todd W.; De Jesus, Victor R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to prepare dried-blood-spot (DBS) quality control (QC) materials for galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT), to evaluate their stability during storage and use, and to evaluate their performance in five DBS GALT test methods. Design and Methods We prepared and characterized GALT-normal and GALT-deficient DBS materials and compared GALT activities in DBSs after predetermined storage intervals at controlled temperatures and humidities. External evaluators documented the suitability of the DBS QC materials for use in five GALT test methods. Results GALT activity losses from DBSs stored in low (<30%) humidity for 14 days at 45°C, 35 days at 37°C, 91 days at room temperature, 182 days at 4°C, and 367 days at −20°C were 54%, 53%, 52% 23%, and 7% respectively. In paired DBSs stored in high humidity (>50%) for identical intervals, losses were: 45°C—68%; 37°C—79%; room temperature—72%, and 4°C—63%. GALT activities in DBSs stored at 4°C were stable throughout 19 excursions to room temperature. Twenty-five of 26 external evaluators, using five different GALT test methods, classified the GALT-deficient DBSs as “outside normal limits”. All evaluators classified the GALT-normal DBSs as “within normal limits”. Conclusions Most of the GALT activity loss from DBSs stored at elevated or room temperature was attributable to the effects of storage temperature. Most of the loss from DBSs stored at 4°C was attributable to the effects of elevated humidity. Loss from DBSs stored at −20°C was insignificant. The DBS materials were suitable for monitoring performance of all five GALT test methods. PMID:25528144

  19. Sphingosine 1-phosphate signaling pathway in inner ear biology. New therapeutic strategies for hearing loss?

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Guevara, Ricardo; Cencetti, Francesca; Donati, Chiara; Bruni, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent conditions around the world, in particular among people over 60 years old. Thus, an increase of this affection is predicted as result of the aging process in our population. In this context, it is important to further explore the function of molecular targets involved in the biology of inner ear sensory cells to better individuate new candidates for therapeutic application. One of the main causes of deafness resides into the premature death of hair cells and auditory neurons. In this regard, neurotrophins and growth factors such as insulin like growth factor are known to be beneficial by favoring the survival of these cells. An elevated number of published data in the last 20 years have individuated sphingolipids not only as structural components of biological membranes but also as critical regulators of key biological processes, including cell survival. Ceramide, formed by catabolism of sphingomyelin (SM) and other complex sphingolipids, is a strong inducer of apoptotic pathway, whereas sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), generated by cleavage of ceramide to sphingosine and phosphorylation catalyzed by two distinct sphingosine kinase (SK) enzymes, stimulates cell survival. Interestingly S1P, by acting as intracellular mediator or as ligand of a family of five distinct S1P receptors (S1P1–S1P5), is a very powerful bioactive sphingolipid, capable of triggering also other diverse cellular responses such as cell migration, proliferation and differentiation, and is critically involved in the development and homeostasis of several organs and tissues. Although new interesting data have become available, the information on S1P pathway and other sphingolipids in the biology of the inner ear is limited. Nonetheless, there are several lines of evidence implicating these signaling molecules during neurogenesis in other cell populations. In this review, we discuss the role of S1P during inner ear development, also as guidance for future

  20. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Enhancement of Cortical Actomyosin Organization in Cultured Human Schlemm's Canal Endothelial Cell Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Sumida, Grant M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Perfusion of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in whole eye organ culture models decreases outflow facility, whereas S1P promotes stress fiber formation and contractility in cultured trabecular meshwork (TM) cells. Because of S1P's known effect of increasing barrier function in endothelial cells, the authors hypothesized that Schlemm's canal (SC) cells in culture respond to S1P by increasing actomyosin organization at the cell cortex. Methods. Using primary cultures of human SC cells, the authors determined S1P activation of the GTP-binding proteins, RhoA and Rac (1,2,3). Time- and dose-dependent myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation in response to S1P and total expression of MLC were determined. Immunocytochemistry after S1P treatment was used to monitor filamentous actin (F-actin) and phospho-MLC organization and the localization of β-catenin, a component of adherens junctions. TM and human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers were used as controls. Results. S1P (1 μM) activated RhoA and Rac after 5- and 30-minute treatments. S1P increased MLC phosphorylation with a similar time- and dose-dependent response in SC (EC50 = 0.83 μM) compared with TM (EC50 = 1.33 μM), though MLC expression was significantly greater in TM. In response to 1 μM S1P treatment, phospho-MLC concentrated in the SC cell periphery, coincident with cortical actin assembly and recruitment of β-catenin to the cell periphery. Conclusions. Results obtained in this study support the hypothesis that S1P increases actomyosin organization at the SC cell cortex and promotes intercellular junctions at the level of the inner wall of SC to increase transendothelial resistance and in part explains the S1P-induced decrease of outflow facility in organ culture. PMID:20592229

  1. Misfolding of galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase can result in type I galactosemia.

    PubMed

    McCorvie, Thomas J; Gleason, Tyler J; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L; Timson, David J

    2013-08-01

    Type I galactosemia is a genetic disorder that is caused by the impairment of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT; EC 2.7.7.12). Although a large number of mutations have been detected through genetic screening of the human GALT (hGALT) locus, for many it is not known how they cause their effects. The majority of these mutations are missense, with predicted substitutions scattered throughout the enzyme structure and thus causing impairment by other means rather than direct alterations to the active site. To clarify the fundamental, molecular basis of hGALT impairment we studied five disease-associated variants p.D28Y, p.L74P, p.F171S, p.F194L and p.R333G using both a yeast model and purified, recombinant proteins. In a yeast expression system there was a correlation between lysate activity and the ability to rescue growth in the presence of galactose, except for p.R333G. Kinetic analysis of the purified proteins quantified each variant's level of enzymatic impairment and demonstrated that this was largely due to altered substrate binding. Increased surface hydrophobicity, altered thermal stability and changes in proteolytic sensitivity were also detected. Our results demonstrate that hGALT requires a level of flexibility to function optimally and that altered folding is the underlying reason of impairment in all the variants tested here. This indicates that misfolding is a common, molecular basis of hGALT deficiency and suggests the potential of pharmacological chaperones and proteostasis regulators as novel therapeutic approaches for type I galactosemia.

  2. The role of the sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling pathway in osteocyte mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-Ning; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Chao; Han, Elizabeth S; Yu, Xue; Lidington, Darcy; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian; You, Lidan

    2015-10-01

    Osteocytes are proposed to be the mechanosensory cells that translate mechanical loading into biochemical signals during the process of bone adaptation. The lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) has been reported to play a role in the mechanotransduction process of blood vessels and also in the dynamic control of bone mineral homeostasis. Nevertheless, the potential role of S1P in bone mechanotransduction has yet to be elucidated. In this study, we hypothesized that a S1P cascade is involved in the activation of osteocytes in response to loading-induced oscillatory fluid flow (OFF) in bone. MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like cells express the necessary components of a functional S1P cascade. To examine the involvement of S1P signaling in osteocyte mechanotransduction, we applied OFF (1 Pa, 1 Hz) to osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cells under conditions where the S1P signaling pathway was modulated. We found that decreased endogenous S1P levels significantly suppressed the OFF-induced intracellular calcium response. Addition of extracellular S1P to MLO-Y4 cells enhanced the synthesis and release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) under static cells and amplified OFF-induced PGE2 release. The stimulatory effect of OFF on the gene expression levels of osteoprotegerin (OPG) and receptor activator for nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) was S1P dependent. Furthermore, the S1P2 receptor subtype was shown to be involved in OFF-induced PGE2 synthesis and release, as well as down-regulation of RANKL/OPG gene expression ratio. In summary, our data suggest that S1P cascade is involved in OFF-induced mechanotransduction in MLO-Y4 cells and that extracellular S1P exerts its effect partly through S1P2 receptors.

  3. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor-1 Enhances Mitochondrial Function and Reduces Cisplatin-Induced Tubule Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rosin, Diane L.; Chroscicki, Piotr; Lee, Sangju; Dondeti, Krishna; Ye, Hong; Kinsey, Gilbert R.; Stevens, Brian K.; Jobin, Katarzyna; Kenwood, Brandon M.; Hoehn, Kyle L.; Lynch, Kevin R.; Okusa, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), the natural sphingolipid ligand for a family of five G protein– coupled receptors (S1P1–S1P5Rs), regulates cell survival and lymphocyte circulation. We have shown that the pan-S1PR agonist, FTY720, attenuates kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury by directly activating S1P1 on proximal tubule (PT) cells, independent of the canonical lymphopenic effects of S1P1 activation on B and T cells. FTY720 also reduces cisplatin-induced AKI. Therefore, in this study, we used conditional PT-S1P1-null (PepckCreS1pr1fl/fl) and control (PepckCreS1pr1w/wt) mice to determine whether the protective effect of FTY720 in AKI is mediated by PT-S1P1. Cisplatin induced more renal injury in PT-S1P1-null mice than in controls. Although FTY720 produced lymphopenia in both control and PT-S1P1-null mice, it reduced injury only in control mice. Furthermore, the increase in proinflammatory cytokine (CXCL1, MCP-1, TNF-α, and IL-6) expression and infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages induced by cisplatin treatment was attenuated by FTY720 in control mice but not in PT-S1P1-null mice. Similarly, S1P1 deletion rendered cultured PT cells more susceptible to cisplatin-induced injury, whereas S1P1 overexpression protected PT cells from injury and preserved mitochondrial function. We conclude that S1P1 may have an important role in stabilizing mitochondrial function and that FTY720 administration represents a novel strategy in the prevention of cisplatin-induced AKI. PMID:25145931

  4. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Elicits Receptor-Dependent Calcium Signaling in Retinal Amacrine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Crousillac, Scott; Colonna, Jeremy; McMains, Emily; Dewey, Jill Sayes

    2009-01-01

    Evidence is emerging indicating that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) participates in signaling in the retina. To determine whether S1P might be involved in signaling in the inner retina specifically, we examine the effects of this sphingolipid on cultured retinal amacrine cells. Whole cell voltage-clamp recordings reveal that S1P activates a cation current that is dependent on signaling through Gi and phospholipase C. These observations are consistent with the involvement of members of the S1P receptor family of G-protein-coupled receptors in the production of the current. Immunocytochemistry and PCR amplification provide evidence for the expression of S1P1R and S1P3R in amacrine cells. The receptor-mediated channel activity is shown to be highly sensitive to blockade by lanthanides consistent with the behavior of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels. PCR products amplified from amacrine cells reveal that TRPCs 1 and 3–7 channel subunits have the potential to be expressed. Because TRPC channels provide a Ca2+ entry pathway, we asked whether S1P caused cytosolic Ca2+ elevations in amacrine cells. We show that S1P-dependent Ca2+ elevations do occur in these cells and that they might be mediated by S1P1R and S1P3R. The Ca2+ elevations are partially due to release from internal stores, but the largest contribution is from influx across the plasma membrane. The effect of inhibition of sphingosine kinase suggests that the production of cytosolic S1P underlies the sustained nature of the Ca2+ elevations. Elucidation of the downstream effects of these signals will provide clues to the role of S1P in regulating inner retinal function. PMID:19776367

  5. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Evokes Unique Segment-Specific Vasoconstriction of the Renal Microvasculature

    PubMed Central

    Singletary, Sean T.; Cook, Anthony K.; Hobbs, Janet L.; Pollock, Jennifer S.; Inscho, Edward W.

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive sphingolipid metabolite, has been implicated in regulating vascular tone and participating in chronic and acute kidney injury. However, little is known about the role of S1P in the renal microcirculation. Here, we directly assessed the vasoresponsiveness of preglomerular and postglomerular microvascular segments to exogenous S1P using the in vitro blood-perfused juxtamedullary nephron preparation. Superfusion of S1P (0.001–10 μM) evoked concentration-dependent vasoconstriction in preglomerular microvessels, predominantly afferent arterioles. After administration of 10 μM S1P, the diameter of afferent arterioles decreased to 35%±5% of the control diameter, whereas the diameters of interlobular and arcuate arteries declined to 50%±12% and 68%±6% of the control diameter, respectively. Notably, efferent arterioles did not respond to S1P. The S1P receptor agonists FTY720 and FTY720-phosphate and the specific S1P1 receptor agonist SEW2871 each evoked modest afferent arteriolar vasoconstriction. Conversely, S1P2 receptor inhibition with JTE-013 significantly attenuated S1P-mediated afferent arteriolar vasoconstriction. Moreover, blockade of L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels with diltiazem or nifedipine attenuated S1P-mediated vasoconstriction. Intravenous injection of S1P in anesthetized rats reduced renal blood flow dose dependently. Western blotting and immunofluorescence revealed S1P1 and S1P2 receptor expression in isolated preglomerular microvessels and microvascular smooth muscle cells. These data demonstrate that S1P evokes segmentally distinct preglomerular vasoconstriction via activation of S1P1 and/or S1P2 receptors, partially via L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels. Accordingly, S1P may have a novel function in regulating afferent arteriolar resistance under physiologic conditions. PMID:24578134

  6. Sphingosine-1-phosphate evokes unique segment-specific vasoconstriction of the renal microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zhengrong; Singletary, Sean T; Cook, Anthony K; Hobbs, Janet L; Pollock, Jennifer S; Inscho, Edward W

    2014-08-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive sphingolipid metabolite, has been implicated in regulating vascular tone and participating in chronic and acute kidney injury. However, little is known about the role of S1P in the renal microcirculation. Here, we directly assessed the vasoresponsiveness of preglomerular and postglomerular microvascular segments to exogenous S1P using the in vitro blood-perfused juxtamedullary nephron preparation. Superfusion of S1P (0.001-10 μM) evoked concentration-dependent vasoconstriction in preglomerular microvessels, predominantly afferent arterioles. After administration of 10 μM S1P, the diameter of afferent arterioles decreased to 35%±5% of the control diameter, whereas the diameters of interlobular and arcuate arteries declined to 50%±12% and 68%±6% of the control diameter, respectively. Notably, efferent arterioles did not respond to S1P. The S1P receptor agonists FTY720 and FTY720-phosphate and the specific S1P1 receptor agonist SEW2871 each evoked modest afferent arteriolar vasoconstriction. Conversely, S1P2 receptor inhibition with JTE-013 significantly attenuated S1P-mediated afferent arteriolar vasoconstriction. Moreover, blockade of L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels with diltiazem or nifedipine attenuated S1P-mediated vasoconstriction. Intravenous injection of S1P in anesthetized rats reduced renal blood flow dose dependently. Western blotting and immunofluorescence revealed S1P1 and S1P2 receptor expression in isolated preglomerular microvessels and microvascular smooth muscle cells. These data demonstrate that S1P evokes segmentally distinct preglomerular vasoconstriction via activation of S1P1 and/or S1P2 receptors, partially via L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels. Accordingly, S1P may have a novel function in regulating afferent arteriolar resistance under physiologic conditions. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  7. Pancreas lineage allocation and specification are regulated by sphingosine-1-phosphate signalling

    PubMed Central

    Serafimidis, Ioannis; Rodriguez-Aznar, Eva; Lesche, Mathias; Yoshioka, Kazuaki; Takuwa, Yoh; Dahl, Andreas; Pan, Duojia; Gavalas, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    During development, progenitor expansion, lineage allocation, and implementation of differentiation programs need to be tightly coordinated so that different cell types are generated in the correct numbers for appropriate tissue size and function. Pancreatic dysfunction results in some of the most debilitating and fatal diseases, including pancreatic cancer and diabetes. Several transcription factors regulating pancreas lineage specification have been identified, and Notch signalling has been implicated in lineage allocation, but it remains unclear how these processes are coordinated. Using a combination of genetic approaches, organotypic cultures of embryonic pancreata, and genomics, we found that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1p), signalling through the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) S1pr2, plays a key role in pancreas development linking lineage allocation and specification. S1pr2 signalling promotes progenitor survival as well as acinar and endocrine specification. S1pr2-mediated stabilisation of the yes-associated protein (YAP) is essential for endocrine specification, thus linking a regulator of progenitor growth with specification. YAP stabilisation and endocrine cell specification rely on Gαi subunits, revealing an unexpected specificity of selected GPCR intracellular signalling components. Finally, we found that S1pr2 signalling posttranscriptionally attenuates Notch signalling levels, thus regulating lineage allocation. Both S1pr2-mediated YAP stabilisation and Notch attenuation are necessary for the specification of the endocrine lineage. These findings identify S1p signalling as a novel key pathway coordinating cell survival, lineage allocation, and specification and linking these processes by regulating YAP levels and Notch signalling. Understanding lineage allocation and specification in the pancreas will shed light in the origins of pancreatic diseases and may suggest novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:28248965

  8. Characterization and partial purification of acyl-CoA:glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase from sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) developing seeds.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-López, Noemí; Garcés, Rafael; Harwood, John L; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2010-01-01

    The glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT, EC 2.3.1.15) from sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) microsomes has been characterised and partially purified. The in vitro determination of activity was optimized, and the maximum value for GPAT activity identified between 15 and 20 days after flowering. The apparent Michaelis-Menten K(m) for the glycerol 3-phosphate was 354 muM. The preferred substrates were palmitoyl-CoA = linoleoyl-CoA > oleoyl-CoA with the lowest activity using stearoyl-CoA. High solubilisation was achieved using 0.75% Tween80 and the solubilised GPAT was partially purified by ion-exchange chromatography using a Hi-Trap DEAE FF column, followed by gel filtration chromatography using a Superose 12 HR column. The fraction containing the GPAT activity was analysed by SDS-PAGE and contained a major band of 60.1 kDa. Finally, evidence is provided which shows the role of GPAT in the asymmetrical distribution, between positions sn-1 and sn-3, of saturated fatty acids in highly saturated sunflower triacylglycerols. This work provides background information on the sunflower endoplasmic reticulum GPAT which may prove valuable for future modification of oil deposition in this important crop.

  9. Crystal Structures of Group B Streptococcus Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: Apo-Form, Binary and Ternary Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Schormann, Norbert; Ayres, Chapelle A.; Fry, Alexandra; Green, Todd J.; Banerjee, Surajit; Ulett, Glen C.

    2016-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase or GAPDH is an evolutionarily conserved glycolytic enzyme. It catalyzes the two step oxidative phosphorylation of D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate into 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate using inorganic phosphate and NAD+ as cofactor. GAPDH of Group B Streptococcus is a major virulence factor and a potential vaccine candidate. Moreover, since GAPDH activity is essential for bacterial growth it may serve as a possible drug target. Crystal structures of Group B Streptococcus GAPDH in the apo-form, two different binary complexes and the ternary complex are described here. The two binary complexes contained NAD+ bound to 2 (mixed-holo) or 4 (holo) subunits of the tetrameric protein. The structure of the mixed-holo complex reveals the effects of NAD+ binding on the conformation of the protein. In the ternary complex, the phosphate group of the substrate was bound to the new Pi site in all four subunits. Comparison with the structure of human GAPDH showed several differences near the adenosyl binding pocket in Group B Streptococcus GAPDH. The structures also reveal at least three surface-exposed areas that differ in amino acid sequence compared to the corresponding areas of human GAPDH. PMID:27875551

  10. A critical role of plastidial glycolytic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in the control of plant metabolism and development

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Cascales-Miñana, Borja; Alaiz, Manuel; Segura, Juan

    2010-01-01

    Glycolysis is a central metabolic pathway that provides energy and generates precursors for the synthesis of primary metabolites such as amino acids and fatty acids.1–3 In plants, glycolysis occurs in the cytosol and plastids, which complicates the understanding of this essential process.1 As a result, the contribution of each glycolytic pathway to the specific primary metabolite production and the degree of integration of both pathways is still unresolved. The glycolytic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) catalyzes the conversion of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate to 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate. Both cytosolic (GAPCs) and plastidial (GAPCps) GAPDH activities have been described biochemically. But, up to now, little attention had been paid to GAPCps, probably because they have been considered as “minor isoforms” that catalyze a reversible reaction in plastids where it has been assumed that key glycolytic intermediates are in equilibrium with the cytosol. In the associated study,4 we have elucidated the crucial role of Arabidopsis GAPCps in the control of primary metabolism in plants. GAPCps deficiency affects amino acid and sugar metabolism and impairs plant development. Specifically, GAPCp deficiency affects the serine supply to roots, provoking a drastic phenotype of arrested root development. Also, we show that the phosphorylated serine biosynthesis pathway is critical to supply serine to non-photosynthetic organs such as roots. These studies provide new insights of the contribution of plastidial glycolysis to plant metabolism and evidence the complex interactions existing between metabolism and development. PMID:20592814

  11. Metabolic engineering of enhanced glycerol-3-phosphate synthesis to increase lipid production in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi; Xiong, Xiaochao; Sa, Na; Roje, Sanja; Chen, Shulin

    2016-07-01

    With the growing attention to global warming and energy sustainability, biosynthesis of lipids by photosynthetic microorganisms has attracted more interest for the production of renewable transportation fuels. Recently, the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has been widely used for biofuel production through metabolic engineering because of its efficient photosynthesis and well-developed genetic tools. In lipid biosynthesis, glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) is a key node for both CO2 fixation and lipid metabolism in cyanobacteria. However, few studies have explored the use of G3P synthesis to improve photosynthetic lipid production. In this study, metabolic engineering combined with flux balance analysis (FBA) was conducted to reveal the effect of G3P synthesis on lipid production. Heterologous genes that encoded glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) were engineered into Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 to enhance G3P supply and lipid production. The resultant recombinant Synechocystis produced higher levels of lipids without a significant reduction in cell growth. Compared with the wild-type strain, lipid content and productivity of the engineered cyanobacteria increased by up to 36 and 31 %, respectively, under autotrophic conditions. Lipid production under mixotrophic conditions of the engineered cyanobacteria was also investigated. This work demonstrated that enhanced G3P synthesis was an important factor in photosynthetic lipid production and that introducing heterologous GPD and DGAT genes was an effective strategy to increase lipid production in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

  12. Synergistic interaction of glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and ArsJ, a novel organoarsenical efflux permease, confers arsenate resistance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Garbinski, Luis D; Rosen, Barry P

    2016-06-01

    Microbial biotransformations are major contributors to the arsenic biogeocycle. In parallel with transformations of inorganic arsenic, organoarsenicals pathways have recently been recognized as important components of global cycling of arsenic. The well-characterized pathway of resistance to arsenate is reduction coupled to arsenite efflux. Here, we describe a new pathway of arsenate resistance involving biosynthesis and extrusion of an unusual pentavalent organoarsenical. A number of arsenic resistance (ars) operons have two genes of unknown function that are linked in these operons. One, gapdh, encodes the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. The other, arsJ, encodes a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) protein. The two genes were cloned from the chromosome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. When expressed together, but not alone, in Escherichia coli, gapdh and arsJ specifically conferred resistance to arsenate and decreased accumulation of As(V). Everted membrane vesicles from cells expressing arsJ accumulated As(V) in the presence of purified GAPDH, D-glceraldehylde 3-phosphate (G3P) and NAD(+) . GAPDH forms the unstable organoarsenical 1-arseno-3-phosphoglycerate (1As3PGA). We propose that ArsJ is an efflux permease that extrudes 1As3PGA from cells, where it rapidly dissociates into As(V) and 3-phosphoglycerate (3PGA), creating a novel pathway of arsenate resistance. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Structural basis for regulation of stability and activity in glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases. Differential scanning calorimetry and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Makshakova, Olga N; Semenyuk, Pavel I; Kuravsky, Mikhail L; Ermakova, Elena A; Zuev, Yuriy F; Muronetz, Vladimir I

    2015-05-01

    Tissue specific isoforms of human glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, somatic (GAPD) and sperm-specific (GAPDS), have been reported to display different levels of both stability and catalytic activity. Here we apply MD simulations to investigate molecular basis of this phenomenon. The protein is a tetramer where each subunit consists of two domains - catalytic and NAD-binding one. We demonstrated key residues responsible for intersubunit and interdomain interactions. Effect of several residues was studied by point mutations. Overall we considered three mutations (Glu96Gln, Glu244Gln and Asp311Asn) disrupting GAPDS-specific salt bridges. Comparison of calculated interaction energies with calorimetric enthalpies confirmed that intersubunit interactions were responsible for enhanced thermostability of GAPDS whereas interdomain interactions had indirect influence on intersubunit contacts. Mutation Asp311Asn was around 10Å far from the active center and corresponded to the closest natural substitution in the isoenzymes. MD simulations revealed that this residue had slight interaction with catalytic residues but influenced the hydrogen bond net and dynamics in active site. These effects can be responsible for a strong influence of this residue on catalytic activity. Overall, our results provide new insight into glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase structure-function relationships and can be used for the engineering of mutant proteins with modified properties and for development of new inhibitors with indirect influence on the catalytic site. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cloning and characterization of CmGPD1, the Candida magnoliae homologue of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Kim, Myoung-Dong; Ryu, Yeon-Woo; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2008-12-01

    Glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) plays a central role in glycerol metabolism. A genomic CmGPD1 gene encoding NADH-dependent GPDH was isolated from Candida magnoliae producing a significant amount of glycerol. The gene encodes a polypeptide of 360 amino acids, which shows high homology with known NADH-dependent GPDHs of other species. The CmGPD1 gene was expressed in recombinant Escherichia coli with the maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion system and purified to homogeneity using simple affinity chromatography. The purified CmGpd1p without the MBP fusion displayed an apparent molecular mass of 40 kDa on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis. The CmGpd1p enzyme exhibited a K(cat)/K(m) value of 195 min(-1) mM(-1) for dihydroxyacetone phosphate whereas K(cat)/K(m) for glycerol-3-phosphate is 0.385 min(-1) mM(-1). In a complementation study, CmGpd1p rescued the ability of glycerol synthesis and salt tolerance in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae GPD1DeltaGPD2Delta mutant strain. The overall results indicated that CmGPD1 encodes a functional homologue of S. cerevisiae GPDH.

  15. Crystal Structures of Group B Streptococcus Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: Apo-Form, Binary and Ternary Complexes.

    PubMed

    Schormann, Norbert; Ayres, Chapelle A; Fry, Alexandra; Green, Todd J; Banerjee, Surajit; Ulett, Glen C; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2016-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase or GAPDH is an evolutionarily conserved glycolytic enzyme. It catalyzes the two step oxidative phosphorylation of D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate into 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate using inorganic phosphate and NAD+ as cofactor. GAPDH of Group B Streptococcus is a major virulence factor and a potential vaccine candidate. Moreover, since GAPDH activity is essential for bacterial growth it may serve as a possible drug target. Crystal structures of Group B Streptococcus GAPDH in the apo-form, two different binary complexes and the ternary complex are described here. The two binary complexes contained NAD+ bound to 2 (mixed-holo) or 4 (holo) subunits of the tetrameric protein. The structure of the mixed-holo complex reveals the effects of NAD+ binding on the conformation of the protein. In the ternary complex, the phosphate group of the substrate was bound to the new Pi site in all four subunits. Comparison with the structure of human GAPDH showed several differences near the adenosyl binding pocket in Group B Streptococcus GAPDH. The structures also reveal at least three surface-exposed areas that differ in amino acid sequence compared to the corresponding areas of human GAPDH.

  16. Cloning and characterisation of the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene of Candida bombicola and use of its promoter.

    PubMed

    Van Bogaert, Inge N A; De Maeseneire, Sofie L; Develter, Dirk; Soetaert, Wim; Vandamme, Erick J

    2008-10-01

    The glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (GPD) of the sophorolipid producing yeast Candida bombicola was isolated using degenerated PCR and genome walking. The obtained 3,740 bp contain the 1,008 bases of the coding sequence and 1,613 and 783 bp of the upstream and downstream regions, respectively. The corresponding protein shows high homology to the other known GPD genes and is 74% identical to the gyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of Yarrowia lipolytica. The particular interest in the C. bombicola GPD gene sequence originates from the potential use of its promoter for high and constitutive expression of homologous and heterologous genes. Southern blot analysis did not give any indication for the presence of multiple GPD genes and it can therefore be expected that the promoter can be used for efficient and high expression. This hypothesis was further confirmed by the biased codon usage in the GPD gene. GDP promoter fragments of different lengths were used to construct hygromycin resistance cassettes. The constructs were used for the transformation of C. bombicola and all of them, even the ones with only 190 bp of the GPD promoter, were able to render the cells resistant to hygromycin. The efficacy of a short GPD promoter can be a convenient characteristic for the construction of compact expression cassettes or vectors for C. bombicola. The GenBank accession number of the sequence described in this article is EU315245.

  17. Synthesis and Physicochemical Characterization of D-Tagatose-1-phosphate: The Substrate of the Tagatose-1-Phosphate Kinase TagK in the PTS-mediated D-Tagatose Catabolic Pathway of Bacillus licheniformis

    PubMed Central

    Van der Heiden, Edwige; Delmarcelle, Michaël; Simon, Patricia; Counson, Melody; Galleni, Moreno; Freedberg, Darón I.; Thompson, John; Joris, Bernard; Battistel, Marcos D.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first enzymatic synthesis of D-tagatose-1-phosphate (Tag-1P) by the multi-component PEP-dependent:tag-PTS present in tagatose-grown cells of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Physicochemical characterization by 31P and 1H NMR spectroscopy reveals that, in solution, this derivative is primarily in the pyranose form. Tag-1P was used to characterize the putative tagatose-1-phosphate kinase (TagK) of the Bacillus licheniformis PTS-mediated D-Tagatose catabolic Pathway (Bli-TagP). For this purpose, a soluble protein fusion was obtained with the 6 His-tagged trigger factor (TFHis6) of Escherichia coli. The active fusion enzyme was named TagK-TFHis6. Tag-1P and D-fructose-1-phosphate (Fru-1P) are substrates for the TagK-TFHis6 enzyme, whereas the isomeric derivatives D-tagatose-6-phosphate (Tag-6P) and D-fructose-6-phosphate (Fru-6P) are inhibitors. Studies of catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) reveal that the enzyme specificity is markedly in favor of Tag-1P as substrate. Importantly, we show in vivo that the transfer of the phosphate moiety from PEP to the B. licheniformis tagatose-specific enzyme II (EIITag) in E.coli is inefficient. The capability of the PTS general cytoplasmic components of B. subtilis, HPr and EI, to restore the phosphate transfer is demonstrated. PMID:26159072

  18. Synthesis and Physicochemical Characterization of D-Tagatose-1-Phosphate: The Substrate of the Tagatose-1-Phosphate Kinase in the Phosphotransferase System-Mediated D-Tagatose Catabolic Pathway of Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed

    Van der Heiden, Edwige; Delmarcelle, Michaël; Simon, Patricia; Counson, Melody; Galleni, Moreno; Freedberg, Darón I; Thompson, John; Joris, Bernard; Battistel, Marcos D

    2015-01-01

    We report the first enzymatic synthesis of D-tagatose-1-phosphate (Tag-1P) by the multicomponent phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PEP-PTS) present in tagatose-grown cells of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Physicochemical characterization by (31)P and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals that, in solution, this derivative is primarily in the pyranose form. Tag-1P was used to characterize the putative tagatose-1-phosphate kinase (TagK) of the Bacillus licheniformis PTS-mediated D-tagatose catabolic pathway (Bli-TagP). For this purpose, a soluble protein fusion was obtained with the 6 His-tagged trigger factor (TF(His6)) of Escherichia coli. The active fusion enzyme was named TagK-TF(His6). Tag-1P and D-fructose-1-phosphate are substrates for the TagK-TF(His6) enzyme, whereas the isomeric derivatives D-tagatose-6-phosphate and D-fructose-6-phosphate are inhibitors. Studies of catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) reveal that the enzyme specificity is markedly in favor of Tag-1P as the substrate. Importantly, we show in vivo that the transfer of the phosphate moiety from PEP to the B. licheniformis tagatose-specific Enzyme II in E. coli is inefficient. The capability of the PTS general cytoplasmic components of B. subtilis, HPr and Enzyme I to restore the phosphate transfer is demonstrated. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Mechanism for increased hepatic glycerol synthesis in the citrin/mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase double-knockout mouse: Urine glycerol and glycerol 3-phosphate as potential diagnostic markers of human citrin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Mitsuaki; Fujimoto, Yuki; Rikimaru, Shizuka; Ushikai, Miharu; Kuroda, Eishi; Kawabe, Kenji; Takano, Katsura; Asakawa, Akihiro; Inui, Akio; Eto, Kazuhiro; Kadowaki, Takashi; Sinasac, David S; Okano, Yoshiyuki; Yazaki, Masahide; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi; Zhang, Chunhua; Song, Yuan-Zong; Sakamoto, Osamu; Kure, Shigeo; Mitsubuchi, Hiroshi; Endo, Fumio; Horiuchi, Masahisa; Nakamura, Yoichi; Yamamura, Ken-Ichi; Saheki, Takeyori

    2015-09-01

    The mitochondrial aspartate-glutamate carrier isoform 2 (citrin) and mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (mGPD) double-knockout mouse has been a useful model of human citrin deficiency. One of the most prominent findings has been markedly increased hepatic glycerol 3-phosphate (G3P) following oral administration of a sucrose solution. We aimed to investigate whether this change is detectable outside of the liver, and to explore the mechanism underlying the increased hepatic G3P in these mice. We measured G3P and its metabolite glycerol in plasma and urine of the mice under various conditions. Glycerol synthesis from fructose was also studied using the liver perfusion system. The citrin/mGPD double-knockout mice showed increased urine G3P and glycerol under normal, fed conditions. We also found increased plasma glycerol under fasted conditions, while oral administration of different carbohydrates or ethanol led to substantially increased plasma glycerol. Fructose infusion to the perfused liver of the double-knockout mice augmented hepatic glycerol synthesis, and was accompanied by a concomitant increase in the lactate/pyruvate (L/P) ratio. Co-infusion of either pyruvate or phenazine methosulfate, a cytosolic oxidant, with fructose corrected the high L/P ratio, leading to reduced glycerol synthesis. Overall, these findings suggest that hepatic glycerol synthesis is cytosolic NADH/NAD(+) ratio-dependent and reveal a likely regulatory mechanism for hepatic glycerol synthesis following a high carbohydrate load in citrin-deficient patients. Therefore, urine G3P and glycerol may represent potential diagnostic markers for human citrin deficiency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate as an Amphipathic Metabolite: Its Properties in Aqueous and Membrane Environments

    PubMed Central

    García-Pacios, Marcos; Collado, M. Isabel; Busto, Jon V.; Sot, Jesús; Alonso, Alicia; Arrondo, José-Luis R.; Goñi, Félix M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is currently considered to be an important signaling molecule in cell metabolism. We studied a number of relevant biophysical properties of S1P, using mainly Langmuir balance, differential scanning calorimetry, 31P-NMR, and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. We found that, at variance with other, structurally related sphingolipids that are very hydrophobic, S1P may occur in either an aqueous dispersion or a bilayer environment. S1P behaves in aqueous media as a soluble amphiphile, with a critical micelle concentration of ≈12 μM. Micelles give rise to larger aggregates (in the micrometer size range) at and above a 1 mM concentration. The aggregates display a thermotropic transition at ∼60°C, presumably due to the formation of smaller structures at the higher temperatures. S1P can also be studied in mixtures with phospholipids. Studies with dielaidoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DEPE) or deuterated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) show that S1P modifies the gel-fluid transition of the glycerophospholipids, shifting it to lower temperatures and decreasing the transition enthalpy. Low (<10 mol %) concentrations of S1P also have a clear effect on the lamellar-to-inverted hexagonal transition of DEPE, i.e., they increase the transition temperature and stabilize the lamellar versus the inverted hexagonal phase. IR spectroscopy of natural S1P mixed with deuterated DPPC allows the independent observation of transitions in each molecule, and demonstrates the existence of molecular interactions between S1P and the phospholipid at the polar headgroup level that lead to increased hydration of the carbonyl group. The combination of calorimetric, IR, and NMR data allowed the construction of a temperature-composition diagram (“partial phase diagram”) to facilitate a comparative study of the properties of S1P and other related lipids (ceramide and sphingosine) in membranes. In conclusion, two important differences between S1P and ceramide

  1. Pseudomonas-Derived Ceramidase Induces Production of Inflammatory Mediators from Human Keratinocytes via Sphingosine-1-Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Oizumi, Ami; Nakayama, Hitoshi; Okino, Nozomu; Iwahara, Chihiro; Kina, Katsunari; Matsumoto, Ryo; Ogawa, Hideoki; Takamori, Kenji; Ito, Makoto; Suga, Yasushi; Iwabuchi, Kazuhisa

    2014-01-01

    Ceramide is important for water retention and permeability barrier functions in the stratum corneum, and plays a key role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD). A Pseudomonas aeruginosa-derived neutral ceramidase (PaCDase) isolated from a patient with AD was shown to effectively degrade ceramide in the presence of Staphylococcus aureus-derived lipids or neutral detergents. However, the effect of ceramide metabolites on the functions of differentiating keratinocytes is poorly understood. We found that the ceramide metabolite sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) stimulated the production of inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α and IL-8 from three-dimensionally cultured human primary keratinocytes (termed “3D keratinocytes”), which form a stratum corneum. PaCDase alone did not affect TNF-α gene expression in 3D keratinocytes. In the presence of the detergent Triton X-100, which damages stratum corneum structure, PaCDase, but not heat-inactivated PaCDase or PaCDase-inactive mutant, induced the production of TNF-α, endothelin-1, and IL-8, indicating that this production was dependent on ceramidase activity. Among various ceramide metabolites, sphingosine and S1P enhanced the gene expression of TNF-α, endothelin-1, and IL-8. The PaCDase-enhanced expression of these genes was inhibited by a sphingosine kinase inhibitor and by an S1P receptor antagonist VPC 23019. The TNF-α-binding antibody infliximab suppressed the PaCDase-induced upregulation of IL-8, but not TNF-α, mRNA. PaCDase induced NF-κB p65 phosphorylation. The NF-κB inhibitor curcumin significantly inhibited PaCDase-induced expression of IL-8 and endothelin-1. VPC 23019 and infliximab inhibited PaCDase-induced NF-κB p65 phosphorylation and reduction in the protein level of the NF-κB inhibitor IκBα. Collectively, these findings suggest that (i) 3D keratinocytes produce S1P from sphingosine, which is produced through the hydrolysis of ceramide by PaCDase, (ii) S1P induces the production of TNF

  2. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor activation enhances BMP-2-induced osteoblast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Chieri; Iwasaki, Tsuyoshi; Kitano, Sachie; Tsunemi, Sachi; Sano, Hajime

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the role of S1P signaling for osteoblast differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both S1P and FTY enhanced BMP-2-stimulated osteoblast differentiation by C2C12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P signaling enhanced BMP-2-stimulated Smad and ERK phosphorylation by C2C12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MEK/ERK signaling is a pathway underlying S1P signaling for osteoblast differentiation. -- Abstract: We previously demonstrated that sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor-mediated signaling induced proliferation and prostaglandin productions by synovial cells from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. In the present study we investigated the role of S1P receptor-mediated signaling for osteoblast differentiation. We investigated osteoblast differentiation using C2C12 myoblasts, a cell line derived from murine satellite cells. Osteoblast differentiation was induced by the treatment of bone morphogenic protein (BMP)-2 in the presence or absence of either S1P or FTY720 (FTY), a high-affinity agonist of S1P receptors. Osteoblast differentiation was determined by osteoblast-specific transcription factor, Runx2 mRNA expression, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteocalcin production by the cells. Smad1/5/8 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation was examined by Western blotting. Osteocalcin production by C2C12 cells were determined by ELISA. Runx2 expression and ALP activity by BMP-2-stimulated C2C12 cells were enhanced by addition of either S1P or FTY. Both S1P and FTY enhanced BMP-2-induced ERK1/2 and Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation. The effect of FTY was stronger than that of S1P. S1P receptor-mediated signaling on osteoblast differentiation was inhibited by addition of mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase (MEK) 1/2 inhibitor, indicating that the S1P receptor-mediated MEK1/2-ERK1/2 signaling pathway enhanced BMP-2-Smad signaling. These results indicate that S1P

  3. Characterization of a Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor Antagonist ProdrugS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Perry C.; Zhu, Ran; Huang, Tao; Tomsig, Jose L.; Mathews, Thomas P.; David, Marion; Peyruchaud, Olivier; Macdonald, Timothy L.

    2011-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a phospholipid that binds to a set of G protein-coupled receptors (S1P1–S1P5) to initiate an array of signaling cascades that affect cell survival, differentiation, proliferation, and migration. On a larger physiological scale, the effects of S1P on immune cell trafficking, vascular barrier integrity, angiogenesis, and heart rate have also been observed. An impetus for the characterization of S1P-initiated signaling effects came with the discovery that FTY720 [fingolimod; 2-amino-2-(2-[4-octylphenyl]ethyl)-1,3-propanediol] modulates the immune system by acting as an agonist at S1P1. In the course of structure-activity relationship studies to better understand the functional chemical space around FTY720, we discovered conformationally constrained FTY720 analogs that behave as S1P receptor type-selective antagonists. Here, we present a pharmacological profile of a lead S1P1/3 antagonist prodrug, 1-(hydroxymethyl)-3-(3-octylphenyl)cyclobutane (VPC03090). VPC03090 is phosphorylated by sphingosine kinase 2 to form the competitive antagonist species 3-(3-octylphenyl)-1-(phosphonooxymethyl)cyclobutane (VPC03090-P) as observed in guanosine 5′-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate binding assays, with effects on downstream S1P receptor signaling confirmed by Western blot and calcium mobilization assays. Oral dosing of VPC03090 results in an approximate 1:1 phosphorylated/alcohol species ratio with a half-life of 30 h in mice. Because aberrant S1P signaling has been implicated in carcinogenesis, we applied VPC03090 in an immunocompetent mouse mammary cancer model to assess its antineoplastic potential. Treatment with VPC03090 significantly inhibited the growth of 4T1 primary tumors in mice. This result calls to attention the value of S1P receptor antagonists as not only research tools but also potential therapeutic agents. PMID:21632869

  4. Role of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors, sphingosine kinases and sphingosine in cancer and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pyne, Nigel J; McNaughton, Melissa; Boomkamp, Stephanie; MacRitchie, Neil; Evangelisti, Cecilia; Martelli, Alberto M; Jiang, Hui-Rong; Ubhi, Satvir; Pyne, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase (there are two isoforms, SK1 and SK2) catalyses the formation of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive lipid that can be released from cells to activate a family of G protein-coupled receptors, termed S1P1-5. In addition, S1P can bind to intracellular target proteins, such as HDAC1/2, to induce cell responses. There is increasing evidence of a role for S1P receptors (e.g. S1P4) and SK1 in cancer, where high expression of these proteins in ER negative breast cancer patient tumours is linked with poor prognosis. Indeed, evidence will be presented here to demonstrate that S1P4 is functionally linked with SK1 and the oncogene HER2 (ErbB2) to regulate mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and growth of breast cancer cells. Although much emphasis is placed on SK1 in terms of involvement in oncogenesis, evidence will also be presented for a role of SK2 in both T-cell and B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In patient T-ALL lymphoblasts and T-ALL cell lines, we have demonstrated that SK2 inhibitors promote T-ALL cell death via autophagy and induce suppression of c-myc and PI3K/AKT pathways. We will also present evidence demonstrating that certain SK inhibitors promote oxidative stress and protein turnover via proteasomal degradative pathways linked with induction of p53-and p21-induced growth arrest. In addition, the SK1 inhibitor, PF-543 exacerbates disease progression in an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mouse model indicating that SK1 functions in an anti-inflammatory manner. Indeed, sphingosine, which accumulates upon inhibition of SK1 activity, and sphingosine-like compounds promote activation of the inflammasome, which is linked with multiple sclerosis, to stimulate formation of the pro-inflammatory mediator, IL-1β. Such compounds could be exploited to produce antagonists that diminish exaggerated inflammation in disease. The therapeutic potential of modifying the SK-S1P receptor pathway in cancer and inflammation will

  5. Sphingosine-1-phosphate mediates epidermal growth factor-induced muscle satellite cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, Yosuke Ohashi, Kazuya; Wada, Eiji; Yuasa, Yuki; Shiozuka, Masataka; Nonomura, Yoshiaki; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2014-08-01

    Skeletal muscle can regenerate repeatedly due to the presence of resident stem cells, called satellite cells. Because satellite cells are usually quiescent, they must be activated before participating in muscle regeneration in response to stimuli such as injury, overloading, and stretch. Although satellite cell activation is a crucial step in muscle regeneration, little is known of the molecular mechanisms controlling this process. Recent work showed that the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) plays crucial roles in the activation, proliferation, and differentiation of muscle satellite cells. We investigated the role of growth factors in S1P-mediated satellite cell activation. We found that epidermal growth factor (EGF) in combination with insulin induced proliferation of quiescent undifferentiated mouse myoblast C2C12 cells, which are also known as reserve cells, in serum-free conditions. Sphingosine kinase activity increased when reserve cells were stimulated with EGF. Treatment of reserve cells with the D-erythro-N,N-dimethylsphingosine, Sphingosine Kinase Inhibitor, or siRNA duplexes specific for sphingosine kinase 1, suppressed EGF-induced C2C12 activation. We also present the evidence showing the S1P receptor S1P2 is involved in EGF-induced reserve cell activation. Moreover, we demonstrated a combination of insulin and EGF promoted activation of satellite cells on single myofibers in a manner dependent on SPHK and S1P2. Taken together, our observations show that EGF-induced satellite cell activation is mediated by S1P and its receptor. - Highlights: • EGF in combination with insulin induces proliferation of quiescent C2C12 cells. • Sphingosine kinase activity increases when reserve cells are stimulated with EGF. • EGF-induced activation of reserve cells is dependent on sphingosine kinase and ERK. • The S1P receptor S1P2 is involved in EGF-induced reserve cell activation. • EGF-induced reserve cell activation is mediated by S1P and its

  6. Electrophysiological and functional effects of sphingosine-1-phosphate in mouse ventricular fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Benamer, Najate; Bois, Patrick

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} In cardiac fibroblasts, SUR2/Kir6.1 channel is activated by S1P via the S1P3R. {yields} S1P increases cell proliferation through SUR2/Kir6.1 activation. {yields} S1P decreases collagen and IL-6 secretion through SUR2/Kir6.1 activation. {yields} S1P stimulates fibroblast migration independently from SUR2/Kir6.1 channel. -- Abstract: The aim of this study was to characterize the effects of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) on cardiac ventricular fibroblasts. Impacts of S1P on fibroblast excitability, cell migration, proliferation and secretion were characterized. The patch-clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration was used to study the S1P-induced current from mouse ventricular fibroblasts. The expression level of the S1P receptor during cell culture duration was evaluated by western-blot. Fibroblast proliferation and migration were quantified using the methylene blue assay and the Boyden chamber technique, respectively. Finally, fibroblast secretion properties were estimated by quantification of the IL-6 and collagen levels using ELISA and SIRCOL collagen assays, respectively. We found that S1P activated SUR2/Kir6.1 channel and that this effect was sensitive to specific inhibition of the S1P receptor of type 3 (S1P3R). In contrast, S1P1R receptor inhibition had no effect. Moreover, the S1P-induced current increased with cell culture duration whereas S1P3R expression level remained constant. The activation of SUR2/Kir6.1 channel by S1P via S1P3R stimulated cell proliferation and decreased IL-6 and collagen secretions. S1P also stimulated fibroblast migration via S1P3R but independently from SUR2/Kir6.1 channel activation. This study demonstrates that S1P, via S1P3R, affects cardiac ventricular fibroblasts function independently or through activation of SUR2/Kir6.1 channel. The latter effect occurs after fibroblasts differentiate into myofibroblasts, opening a new potential therapeutic strategy to modulate fibrosis after cardiac

  7. myo-Inositol 1-Phosphate Synthase Inhibition and Control of Uridine Diphosphate-d-glucuronic Acid Biosynthesis in Plants 12

    PubMed Central

    Loewus, Mary W.; Loewus, Frank

    1974-01-01

    Of the eight intermediates associated with the two pathways of UDP-d-glucuronic acid biosynthesis found in plants, only d-glucuronic acid inhibited myo-inositol 1-phosphate synthase (EC 5.5.1.4), formerly referred to as d-glucose 6-phosphate cycloaldolase. Inhibition was competitive. An attempt to demonstrate over-all reversibility of the synthase indicated that it was less than 5% reversible, if at all. PMID:16658890

  8. Measurement of Lysophosphatidic Acid and Sphingosine-1-Phosphate by Liquid Chromatography-Coupled Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Maria P; Halder, Suchismita; Smyth, Susan S; Morris, Andrew J

    2017-08-03

    Lysophosphatidic acids and sphingosine-1-phosphate are bioactive lipids that regulate diverse cellular and physiological processes through actions that are largely mediated by cell surface receptors. The roles played by these lipids in multiple disease processes make the enzymes and receptors involved in their synthesis, inactivation, and signaling attractive targets for pharmacological therapies. In this chapter we describe methods for sensitive accurate quantitation of LPA and S1P levels in biological fluids using liquid chromatography-coupled electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

  9. PhotoImmunoNanoTherapy Reveals an Anticancer Role for Sphingosine Kinase 2 and Dihydrosphingosine-1-Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Brian M.; Shanmugavelandy, Sriram S.; Kaiser, James M.; McGovern, Christopher; Altnoğlu, Erhan İ.; Haakenson, Jeremy K.; Hengst, Jeremy A.; Gilius, Evan L.; Knupp, Sarah A.; Fox, Todd E.; Smith, Jill P.; Ritty, Timothy M.; Adair, James H.; Kester, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-associated inflammation mediates the development of a systemic immunosuppressive milieu that is a major obstacle to effective treatment of cancer. Inflammation has been shown to promote the systemic expansion of immature myeloid cells which have been shown to exert immunosuppressive activity in laboratory models of cancer as well as cancer patients. Consequentially, significant effort is underway toward the development of therapies that decrease tumor-associated inflammation and immunosuppressive cells. The current study demonstrated that a previously described deep tissue imaging modality, which utilized indocyanine green-loaded calcium phosphosilicate nanoparticles (ICG-CPSNPs), could be utilized as an immunoregulatory agent. The theranostic application of ICG-CPSNPs as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy was shown to block tumor growth in murine models of breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, and metastatic osteosarcoma by decreasing inflammation-expanded immature myeloid cells. Therefore, this therapeutic modality was termed PhotoImmunoNanoTherapy. As phosphorylated sphingolipid metabolites have been shown to have immunomodulatory roles, it was hypothesized that the reduction of immature myeloid cells by PhotoImmunoNanoTherapy was dependent upon bioactive sphingolipids. Mechanistically, PhotoImmunoNanoTherapy induced a sphingosine kinase 2-dependent increase in sphingosine-1-phosphate and dihydrosphingosine-1-phosphate. Furthermore, dihydrosphingosine-1-phosphate was shown to selectively abrogate myeloid lineage cells while concomitantly allowing the expansion of lymphocytes that exerted an antitumor effect. Collectively, these findings revealed that PhotoImmunoNanoTherapy, utilizing the novel nontoxic theranostic agent ICG-CPSNP, can decrease tumor-associated inflammation and immature myeloid cells in a sphingosine kinase 2-dependent manner. These findings further defined a novel myeloid regulatory role for dihydrosphingosine-1-phosphate. Photo

  10. Glucose 1-phosphate is efficiently taken up by potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber parenchyma cells and converted to reserve starch granules.

    PubMed

    Fettke, Joerg; Albrecht, Tanja; Hejazi, Mahdi; Mahlow, Sebastian; Nakamura, Yasunori; Steup, Martin

    2010-02-01

    Reserve starch is an important plant product but the actual biosynthetic process is not yet fully understood. Potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber discs from various transgenic plants were used to analyse the conversion of external sugars or sugar derivatives to starch. By using in vitro assays, a direct glucosyl transfer from glucose 1-phosphate to native starch granules as mediated by recombinant plastidial phosphorylase was analysed. Compared with labelled glucose, glucose 6-phosphate or sucrose, tuber discs converted externally supplied [(14)C]glucose 1-phosphate into starch at a much higher rate. Likewise, tuber discs from transgenic lines with a strongly reduced expression of cytosolic phosphoglucomutase, phosphorylase or transglucosidase converted glucose 1-phosphate to starch with the same or even an increased rate compared with the wild-type. Similar results were obtained with transgenic potato lines possessing a strongly reduced activity of both the cytosolic and the plastidial phosphoglucomutase. Starch labelling was, however, significantly diminished in transgenic lines, with a reduced concentration of the plastidial phosphorylase isozymes. Two distinct paths of reserve starch biosynthesis are proposed that explain, at a biochemical level, the phenotype of several transgenic plant lines.

  11. Mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenases/phosphatases: a family of novel bifunctional enzymes for bacterial adaptation to osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Sand, Miriam; Rodrigues, Marta; González, José M; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Santos, Helena; Müller, Volker; Averhoff, Beate

    2015-03-01

    The nutritionally versatile soil bacterium Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 copes with salt stress by the accumulation of compatible solutes, a strategy that is widespread in nature. This bacterium synthesizes the sugar alcohol mannitol de novo in response to osmotic stress. In a previous study, we identified MtlD, a mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase, which is essential for mannitol biosynthesis and which catalyses the first step in mannitol biosynthesis, the reduction of fructose-6-phosphate (F-6-P) to the intermediate mannitol-1-phosphate (Mtl-1-P). Until now, the identity of the second enzyme, the phosphatase that catalyses the dephosphorylation of Mtl-1-P to mannitol, was elusive. Here we show that MtlD has a unique sequence among known mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenases with a haloacid dehalogenase (HAD)-like phosphatase domain at the N-terminus. This domain is indeed shown to have a phosphatase activity. Phosphatase activity is strictly Mg(2+) dependent. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis revealed that purified MtlD catalyses not only reduction of F-6-P but also dephosphorylation of Mtl-1-P. MtlD of A. baylyi is the first bifunctional enzyme of mannitol biosynthesis that combines Mtl-1-P dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities in a single polypeptide chain. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the bifunctional enzyme is widespread among Acinetobacter strains but only rarely present in other phylogenetic tribes.

  12. Characterization of two proteins of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine clinical mastitis with homology to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Goji, Noriko; Potter, Andrew A; Perez-Casal, Jose

    2004-04-19

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common causative agent of bovine mastitis and vaccines developed to control this disease showed limited protection due in part to the lack of common antigens among the mastitis isolates. We isolated and identified two genes encoding proteins with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) activity from a S. aureus strain isolated from bovine clinical mastitis. The GapB and GapC proteins share considerable homology to the GapB and GapC products of human strains of S. aureus. These two proteins could be distinguished by their different GAPDH activities and binding to bovine transferrin properties. Both gapB and gapC genes were conserved in 11 strains tested, and the GapC protein was present on the surface of all S. aureus strains.

  13. Autonomous folding of the excised coenzyme-binding domain of D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed Central

    Jecht, M.; Tomschy, A.; Kirschner, K.; Jaenicke, R.

    1994-01-01

    An important question in protein folding is whether compact substructures or domains are autonomous units of folding and assembly. The protomer of the tetrameric D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima has a complex coenzyme-binding domain, in which residues 1-146 form a compact substructure with the last 31 residues (313-333). Here it is shown that the gene of a single-chain protein can be expressed in Escherichia coli after deleting the 163 codons corresponding to the interspersed catalytic domain (150-312). The purified gene product is a soluble, monomeric protein that binds both NAD+ and NADH strongly and possesses the same unfolding transition induced by guanidinium chloride as the native tetramer. The autonomous folding of the coenzyme-binding domain has interesting implications for the folding, assembly, function, and evolution of the native enzyme. PMID:8019412

  14. The sweet side of RNA regulation: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase as a noncanonical RNA-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    White, Michael R.; Garcin, Elsa D.

    2016-01-01

    The glycolytic protein, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), has a vast array of extraglycolytic cellular functions, including interactions with nucleic acids. GAPDH has been implicated in the translocation of transfer RNA (tRNA), the regulation of cellular messenger RNA (mRNA) stability and translation, as well as the regulation of replication and gene expression of many single-stranded RNA viruses. A growing body of evidence supports GAPDH–RNA interactions serving as part of a larger coordination between intermediary metabolism and RNA biogenesis. Despite the established role of GAPDH in nucleic acid regulation, it is still unclear how and where GAPDH binds to its RNA targets, highlighted by the absence of any conserved RNA-binding sequences. This review will summarize our current understanding of GAPDH-mediated regulation of RNA function. PMID:26564736

  15. Analysis of l-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase mutants in Drosophila melanogaster: complementation for intracellular degradation of the mutant polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Bewley, G C; DeZurik, J M; Pagelson, G

    1980-01-01

    Null and low activity alleles at the genetic locus coding for L-Glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (alpha-GPDH, NAD+ oxidoreductase, E.C. 1.1.1.8) in Drosophila melanogaster have been analyzed by a combination of rocket immunoelectrophoresis, interallelic complementation, and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In addition to proving information on the molecular weight, charged state, and steady state level of CRM in each of these mutants, it is suggested that each mutation has resulted in a genetic lesion within the structural element, Gpdh+. CRM levels appear to be the result of differential sensitivity to the normal intracellular degradative process and the CRM- mutants represent "hypersensitive" alleles, such that the mutant polypeptide does not accumulate in the intracellular environment.

  16. Cytoplastic Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenases Interact with ATG3 to Negatively Regulate Autophagy and Immunity in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shaojie; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Xiyin; Jia, Qi; Zhao, Jinping; Bai, Fan; Hong, Yiguo; Liu, Yule

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy as a conserved catabolic pathway can respond to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and plays an important role in degrading oxidized proteins in plants under various stress conditions. However, how ROS regulates autophagy in response to oxidative stresses is largely unknown. Here, we show that autophagy-related protein 3 (ATG3) interacts with the cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases (GAPCs) to regulate autophagy in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. We found that oxidative stress inhibits the interaction of ATG3 with GAPCs. Silencing of GAPCs significantly activates ATG3-dependent autophagy, while overexpression of GAPCs suppresses autophagy in N. benthamiana plants. Moreover, silencing of GAPCs enhances N gene-mediated cell death and plant resistance against both incompatible pathogens Tobacco mosaic virus and Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000, as well as compatible pathogen P. syringae pv tabaci. These results indicate that GAPCs have multiple functions in the regulation of autophagy, hypersensitive response, and plant innate immunity. PMID:25829441

  17. Non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is post-translationally phosphorylated in heterotrophic cells of wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    Bustos, Diego M; Iglesias, Alberto A

    2002-10-23

    In wheat, non-phosphorylating, NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPN) was found to be encoded by one gene giving rise to a single protein. However, Western blots revealed two different subunits of about 58 and 60 kDa in endosperm and shoots. The latter was attributed to in vivo phosphorylation of shoot GAPN. No modification occurred in leaves, where the enzyme is composed by a single 58 kDa polypeptide. GAPN partially purified from shoots and endosperm was dephosphorylated in vitro with alkaline phosphatase. Phosphorylated GAPN exhibited similar affinity for substrates but a lower V(max) compared to the non-phosphorylated enzyme. Results suggest that reversible phosphorylation of GAPN could regulate NADPH production in the cytosol of heterotrophic plant cells.

  18. Homocysteine induces glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase acetylation and apoptosis in the neuroblastoma cell line Neuro2a

    PubMed Central

    Fang, M.; Jin, A.; Zhao, Y.; Liu, X.

    2016-01-01

    High plasma levels of homocysteine (Hcy) promote the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the mechanism by which Hcy mediates neurotoxicity has not been elucidated. We observed that upon incubation with Hcy, the viability of a neuroblastoma cell line Neuro2a declined in a dose-dependent manner, and apoptosis was induced within 48 h. The median effective concentration (EC50) of Hcy was approximately 5 mM. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) nuclear translocation and acylation has been implicated in the regulation of apoptosis. We found that nuclear translocation and acetylation of GAPDH increased in the presence of 5 mM Hcy and that higher levels of acetyltransferase p300/CBP were detected in Neuro2a cells. These findings implicate the involvement of GAPDH in the mechanism whereby Hcy induces apoptosis in neurons. This study highlights a potentially important pathway in neurodegenerative disorders, and a novel target pathway for neuroprotective therapy. PMID:26785692

  19. Genome-wide identification and characterization of Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase genes family in wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lingfeng; Deng, Rong; Guo, Ziping; Yang, Shushen; Deng, Xiping

    2016-03-16

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a central enzyme in glycolysi, we performed genome-wide identification of GAPDH genes in wheat and analyzed their structural characteristics and expression patterns under abiotic stress in wheat. A total of 22 GAPDH genes were identified in wheat cv. Chinese spring; the phylogenetic and structure analysis showed that these GAPDH genes could be divided into four distinct subfamilies. The expression profiles of GAPDH genes showed tissue specificity all over plant development stages. The qRT-PCR results revealed that wheat GAPDHs were involved in several abiotic stress response. Wheat carried 22 GAPDH genes, representing four types of plant GAPDHs (gapA/B, gapC, gapCp and gapN). Whole genome duplication and segmental duplication might account for the expansion of wheat GAPDHs. Expression analysis implied that GAPDHs play roles in plants abiotic stress tolerance.

  20. Over-expression of PsGPD, a mushroom glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene, enhances salt tolerance in rice plants.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jung-Il; Lim, Hye-Min; Siddiqui, Zamin Shaheed; Park, Sung-Han; Kim, A-Ram; Kwon, Taek-Ryoun; Lee, Seong-Kon; Park, Soo-Chul; Jeong, Mi-Jeong; Lee, Gang-Seob

    2014-08-01

    Transgenic potatoes expressing glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD), isolated from the oyster mushroom, Pleurotus sajor-caju, had increased tolerance to salt stress (Jeong et al. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 278:192-196, 2000). To examine the physiological mechanisms enhancing salt tolerance in GPD-transgenic rice plants, the salt tolerance of five GPD transgenic rice lines (T1-T5) derived from Dongjin rice cultivar were evaluated in a fixed 150 mM saline environment in comparison to two known wild-type rice cultivars, Dongjin (salt sensitive) and Pokali (salt tolerant). Transgenic lines, T2, T3, and T5, had a substantial increase in biomass and relative water content compared to Dongjin. Stomatal conductance and osmotic potential were higher in the GPD transgenic lines and were similar to those in Pokali. The results are discussed based on the comparative physiological response of GPD transgenic lines with those of the salt-sensitive and salt-tolerant rice cultivars.

  1. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase augments the intercellular transmission and toxicity of polyglutamine aggregates in a cell model of Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Mikhaylova, Elena R; Lazarev, Vladimir F; Nikotina, Alina D; Margulis, Boris A; Guzhova, Irina V

    2016-03-01

    The common feature of Huntington disease is the accumulation of oligomers or aggregates of mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT), which causes the death of a subset of striatal neuronal populations. The cytotoxic species can leave neurons and migrate to other groups of cells penetrating and damaging them in a prion-like manner. We hypothesized that the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), previously shown to elevate the aggregation of mHTT, is associated with an increased efficiency of intercellular propagation of mHTT. GAPDH, on its own or together with polyglutamine species, was shown to be released into the extracellular milieu mainly from dying cells as assessed by a novel enzyme immunoassay, western blotting, and ultrafiltration. The conditioned medium of cells with growing GAPDH-polyQ aggregates was toxic to naïve cells, whereas depletion of the aggregates from the medium lowered this cytotoxicity. The GAPDH component of the aggregates was found to increase their toxicity by two-fold in comparison with polyQ alone. Furthermore, GAPDH-polyQ complexes were shown to penetrate acceptor cells and to increase the capacity of polyQ to prionize its intracellular homolog containing a repeat of 25 glutamine residues. Finally, inhibitors of intracellular transport showed that polyQ-GAPDH complexes, as well as GAPDH itself, penetrated cells using clathrin-mediated endocytosis. This suggested a pivotal role of the enzyme in the intercellular transmission of Huntington disease pathogenicity. In conclusion, GAPDH occurring in complexes with polyglutamine strengthens the prion-like activity and toxicity of the migrating aggregates. Aggregating polygluatmine tracts were shown to release from the cells over-expressing mutant huntingtin in a complex with glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). The enzyme enhances the intracellular transport of aggregates to healthy cells, prionization of normal cellular proteins and finally cell death, thus

  2. Catalytic residues and an electrostatic sandwich that promote enolpyruvyl shikimate 3-phosphate synthase (AroA) catalysis.

    PubMed

    Berti, Paul J; Chindemi, Paul

    2009-05-05

    Enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate synthase (EPSP synthase, AroA) catalyzes the sixth step in aromatic amino acid biosynthesis. It forms EPSP from shikimate 3-phosphate (S3P) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) in an addition/elimination reaction that proceeds through a tetrahedral intermediate. In spite of numerous mechanistic studies, the catalytic roles of specific amino acid residues remain an open question. Recent experimental evidence for cationic intermediates or cationic transition states, and a consideration of the catalytic imperative, have guided this study on the catalytic roles of Lys22 (K22), Asp313 (D313), and Glu341 (E341). Steady-state and pre-steady-state kinetics and protein stability studies showed that mutations of D313 and E341 caused k(cat) to decrease up to 30,000-fold and 76,000-fold, respectively, while the effects on K(M) were modest, never more than 40-fold. Thus, both are identified as catalytic residues. In an active site that is overwhelmingly positively charged, the D313 and E341 side chains are positioned to form an "electrostatic sandwich" around the positive charge at C2 in cationic intermediates/transition states, stabilizing them and thereby promoting catalysis. Mutation of K22 showed large effects on K(M,S3P) (100-fold), K(M,PEP) (>760-fold), and up to 120-fold on k(cat). Thus, K22 had roles in both substrate-binding and transition-state stabilization. These results support the identification of E341 and K22 as general acid/base catalytic residues.

  3. Citrin/mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase double knock-out mice recapitulate features of human citrin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Saheki, Takeyori; Iijima, Mikio; Li, Meng Xian; Kobayashi, Keiko; Horiuchi, Masahisa; Ushikai, Miharu; Okumura, Fumihiko; Meng, Xiao Jian; Inoue, Ituro; Tajima, Atsushi; Moriyama, Mitsuaki; Eto, Kazuhiro; Kadowaki, Takashi; Sinasac, David S; Tsui, Lap-Chee; Tsuji, Mihoko; Okano, Akira; Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi

    2007-08-24

    Citrin is the liver-type mitochondrial aspartate-glutamate carrier that participates in urea, protein, and nucleotide biosynthetic pathways by supplying aspartate from mitochondria to the cytosol. Citrin also plays a role in transporting cytosolic NADH reducing equivalents into mitochondria as a component of the malate-aspartate shuttle. In humans, loss-of-function mutations in the SLC25A13 gene encoding citrin cause both adult-onset type II citrullinemia and neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis, collectively referred to as human citrin deficiency. Citrin knock-out mice fail to display features of human citrin deficiency. Based on the hypothesis that an enhanced glycerol phosphate shuttle activity may be compensating for the loss of citrin function in the mouse, we have generated mice with a combined disruption of the genes for citrin and mitochondrial glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. The resulting double knock-out mice demonstrated citrullinemia, hyperammonemia that was further elevated by oral sucrose administration, hypoglycemia, and a fatty liver, all features of human citrin deficiency. An increased hepatic lactate/pyruvate ratio in the double knock-out mice compared with controls was also further elevated by the oral sucrose administration, suggesting that an altered cytosolic NADH/NAD(+) ratio is closely associated with the hyperammonemia observed. Microarray analyses identified over 100 genes that were differentially expressed in the double knock-out mice compared with wild-type controls, revealing genes potentially involved in compensatory or downstream effects of the combined mutations. Together, our data indicate that the more severe phenotype present in the citrin/mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase double knock-out mice represents a more accurate model of human citrin deficiency than citrin knock-out mice.

  4. Hydrogen Sulfide Regulates the Cytosolic/Nuclear Partitioning of Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase by Enhancing its Nuclear Localization.

    PubMed

    Aroca, Angeles; Schneider, Markus; Scheibe, Renate; Gotor, Cecilia; Romero, Luis C

    2017-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is an important signaling molecule comparable with nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide in plants. The underlying mechanism of its action is unknown, although it has been proposed to be S-sulfhydration. This post-translational modification converts the thiol groups of cysteines within proteins to persulfides, resulting in functional changes of the proteins. In Arabidopsis thaliana, S-sulfhydrated proteins have been identified, including the cytosolic isoforms of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase GapC1 and GapC2. In this work, we studied the regulation of sulfide on the subcellular localization of these proteins using two different approaches. We generated GapC1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and GapC2-GFP transgenic plants in both the wild type and the des1 mutant defective in the l-cysteine desulfhydrase DES1, responsible for the generation of sulfide in the cytosol. The GFP signal was detected in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of epidermal cells, although with reduced nuclear localization in des1 compared with the wild type, and exogenous sulfide treatment resulted in similar signals in nuclei in both backgrounds. The second approach consisted of the immunoblot analysis of the GapC endogenous proteins in enriched nuclear and cytosolic protein extracts, and similar results were obtained. A significant reduction in the total amount of GapC in des1 in comparison with the wild type was determined and exogenous sulfide significantly increased the protein levels in the nuclei in both plants, with a stronger response in the wild type. Moreover, the presence of an S-sulfhydrated cysteine residue on GapC1 was demonstrated by mass spectrometry. We conclude that sulfide enhances the nuclear localization of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. cDNA, genomic sequence cloning and overexpression of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (GAPDH) from the Giant Panda.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wan-Ru; Hou, Yi-Ling; Du, Yu-Jie; Zhang, Tian; Hao, Yan-Zhe

    2010-01-01

    GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) is a key enzyme of the glycolytic pathway and it is related to the occurrence of some diseases. The cDNA and the genomic sequence of GAPDH were cloned successfully from the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) using the RT-PCR technology and Touchdown-PCR, respectively. Both sequences were analyzed preliminarily. The cDNA of GAPDH cloned from the Giant Panda is 1191 bp in size, contains an open reading frame of 1002 bp encoding 333 amino acids. The genomic sequence is 3941 bp in length and was found to possess 10 exons and 9 introns. Alignment analysis indicates that the nucleotide sequence and the deduced amino acid sequence are highly conserved in some mammalian species, including Homo sapiens, Mu musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Canis lupus familiaris and Bos taurus. The homologies for the nucleotide sequences of the Giant Panda GAPDH to that of these species are 90.67, 90.92, 90.62, 95.01 and 92.32% respectively, while the homologies for the amino acid sequences are 94.93, 95.5, 95.8, 98.8 and 97.0%. Primary structure analysis revealed that the molecular weight of the putative GAPDH protein is 35.7899 kDa with a theoretical pI of 8.21. Topology prediction showed that there is one Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase active site, two N-glycosylation sites, four Casein kinase II phosphorylation sites, seven Protein kinase C phosphorylation sites and eight N-myristoylation sites in the GAPDH protein of the Giant Panda. The GAPDH gene was overexpressed in E. coli BL21. The results indicated that the fusion of GAPDH with the N-terminally His-tagged form gave rise to the accumulation of an expected 43 kDa polypeptide. The SDS-PAGE analysis also showed that the recombinant GAPDH was soluble and thus could be used for further functional studies.

  6. The role of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 in the progression of fatty liver after acute ethanol administration in mice.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tomoki; Morita, Akihito; Mori, Nobuko; Miura, Shinji

    2014-02-21

    Acute ethanol consumption leads to the accumulation of triglycerides (TGs) in hepatocytes. The increase in lipogenesis and reduction of fatty acid oxidation are implicated as the mechanisms underlying ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation. Although glycerol-3-phosphate (Gro3P), formed by glycerol kinase (GYK) or glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 (GPD1), is also required for TG synthesis, the roles of GYK and GPD1 have been the subject of some debate. In this study, we examine (1) the expression of genes involved in Gro3P production in the liver of C57BL/6J mice in the context of hepatic TG accumulation after acute ethanol intake, and (2) the role of GPD1 in the progression of ethanol-induced fatty liver using GPD1 null mice. As a result, in C57BL/6J mice, ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation began within 2h and was 1.7-fold greater than that observed in the control group after 6h. The up-regulation of GPD1 began 2h after administering ethanol, and significantly increased 6h later with the concomitant escalation in the glycolytic gene expression. The incorporation of (14)C-labelled glucose into TG glycerol moieties increased during the same period. On the other hand, in GPD1 null mice carrying normal GYK activity, no significant increase in hepatic TG level was observed after acute ethanol intake. In conclusion, GPD1 and glycolytic gene expression is up-regulated by ethanol, and GPD1-mediated incorporation of glucose into TG glycerol moieties together with increased lipogenesis, is suggested to play an important role in ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation.

  7. Purification and properties of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from the liver of the hibernating ground squirrel, Urocitellus richardsonii.

    PubMed

    Ruberto, Anthony A; Childers, Christine L; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-12-01

    Cytosolic glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH, EC 1.1.1.8) is an important branch point enzyme connecting lipid metabolism and carbohydrate metabolism. We investigated the dynamic nature of G3PDH by purifying the enzyme from the liver of Richardson's ground squirrel (Urocitellus richardsonii), a hibernating species, and analyzing its structural and functional changes during hibernation. Kinetic parameters of purified G3PDH from ground squirrel liver were characterized at 37, 22 and 5°C and compared between euthermic and hibernating states. Relative to euthermic liver G3PDH, hibernator liver G3PDH had a decreased affinity for its substrate, glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P), at 37°C and 22°C. However, at 5°C, there was a significant increase in the affinity for G3P in the hibernating form of the enzyme, relative to the euthermic form. Furthermore, the structure of G3PDH in the species' hibernating state showed greater thermal stability compared to its structure in the euthermic state. Western blot analysis revealed greater tyrosine phosphorylation in hibernator G3PDH as compared to euthermic G3PDH. In addition, using the protein sequence of the hibernating thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) and bioinformatics tools, a three-dimensional model of G3PDH was built to identify the potential phosphorylation site ((83)Tyr) responsible for the differential phosphorylation between euthermic and hibernator G3PDH. The structural and functional changes in G3PDH support the enzyme's function at a low core body temperature experienced during the species hibernating season. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor-1 Selective Agonist Enhances Collateral Growth and Protects against Subsequent Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ichijo, Masahiko; Ishibashi, Satoru; Li, Fuying; Yui, Daishi; Miki, Kazunori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Yokota, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Collateral growth after acute occlusion of an intracranial artery is triggered by increasing shear stress in preexisting collateral pathways. Recently, sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-1 (S1PR1) on endothelial cells was reported to be essential in sensing fluid shear stress. Here, we evaluated the expression of S1PR1 in the hypoperfused mouse brain and investigated the effect of a selective S1PR1 agonist on leptomeningeal collateral growth and subsequent ischemic damage after focal ischemia. Methods In C57Bl/6 mice (n = 133) subjected to unilateral common carotid occlusion (CCAO) and sham surgery. The first series examined the time course of collateral growth, cell proliferation, and S1PR1 expression in the leptomeningeal arteries after CCAO. The second series examined the relationship between pharmacological regulation of S1PR1 and collateral growth of leptomeningeal anastomoses. Animals were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: LtCCAO and daily intraperitoneal (ip) injection for 7 days of an S1PR1 selective agonist (SEW2871, 5 mg/kg/day); sham surgery and daily ip injection for 7 days of SEW2871 after surgery; LtCCAO and daily ip injection for 7 days of SEW2871 and an S1PR1 inverse agonist (VPC23019, 0.5 mg/kg); LtCCAO and daily ip injection of DMSO for 7 days after surgery; and sham surgery and daily ip injection of DMSO for 7 days. Leptomeningeal anastomoses were visualized 14 days after LtCCAO by latex perfusion method, and a set of animals underwent subsequent permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) 7days after the treatment termination. Neurological functions 1hour, 1, 4, and 7days and infarction volume 7days after pMCAO were evaluated. Results In parallel with the increase in S1PR1 mRNA levels, S1PR1 expression colocalized with endothelial cell markers in the leptomeningeal arteries, increased markedly on the side of the CCAO, and peaked 7 days after CCAO. Mitotic cell numbers in the leptomeningeal arteries

  9. Manipulating Endothelial Progenitor Cell Homing with Sphingosine-1-Phosphate for Terapeutic Angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Priscilla Anne

    Ischemic vascular diseases are the main cause of mortality worldwide and yet current therapies only delay disease progression and improve quality of life without addressing the fundamental problem of tissue loss. Within the field of tissue engineering, therapeutic angiogenesis provides a promising approach to alternatively provide new blood vessel formation via spatiotemporally controlled delivery of proangiogenic agents. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive lysophospholipid that is upregulated under ischemic conditions, has recently gained great enthusiasm as a potential mediator in neovascularization strategies given its essential roles in promoting both neovessel formation and stabilization, and cellular trafficking along highly regulated endogenous gradients. Herein, the governing hypothesis guiding this dissertation is that local biomaterial-controlled delivery of S1P may be used to enhance migration and recruitment of vascular progenitor cells for enhanced therapeutic angiogenesis within ischemic tissue. The initial work in this dissertation investigated the effect of hypoxia on the angiogenic response of both mature and progenitor endothelial cells to S1P stimulation in vitro. Outgrowth endothelial cells (OECs) were isolated from human umbilical cord blood to provide a clinically relevant source of vascular progenitor cells for the studies conducted within this dissertation. S1P stimulation promoted angiogenic activity of both ECs and OECs under both ambient and hypoxic (1%) oxygen tensions. Furthermore, dual therapy with the combination of S1P and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) further enhanced cellular responses. Interestingly, hypoxia substantially augmented the functional response of OECs to S1P, resulting in 25-fold and 6.5-fold increases in directed migration and sprouting, respectively. Thus, these studies highlighted the potential for S1P as a therapeutic agent for treatment of ischemic diseases. An injectable biomaterial system

  10. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of an NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Helicobacter pylori

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Paul R.; Evans, Daniel; Greenwood, Jacqueline A.; Moody, Peter C. E.

    2008-08-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase A has been cloned, expressed and purified. Apoprotein crystals have been grown which diffracted to 1.75 Å resolution and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}; holo crystals were grown in the presence of NADP, diffracted to 2.6 Å resolution and belonged to space group P3{sub 2}. The classical glycolytic pathway contains an NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, with NADP-dependent forms reserved for photosynthetic organisms and archaea. Here, the cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of an NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Helicobacter pylori is reported; crystals of the protein were grown both in the presence and the absence of NADP.

  11. Synergy between Sphingosine 1-Phosphate and Lipopolysaccharide Signaling Promotes an Inflammatory, Angiogenic and Osteogenic Response in Human Aortic Valve Interstitial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Onecha, Esther; Maeso, Patricia; Crespo, Mariano Sánchez; Román, José Alberto San; García-Rodríguez, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Given that the bioactive lipid sphingosine 1-phosphate is involved in cardiovascular pathophysiology, and since lipid accumulation and inflammation are hallmarks of calcific aortic stenosis, the role of sphingosine 1-phosphate on the pro-inflammatory/pro-osteogenic pathways in human interstitial cells from aortic and pulmonary valves was investigated. Real-time PCR showed sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor expression in aortic valve interstitial cells. Exposure of cells to sphingosine 1-phosphate induced pro-inflammatory responses characterized by interleukin-6, interleukin-8, and cyclooxygenase-2 up-regulations, as observed by ELISA and Western blot. Strikingly, cell treatment with sphingosine 1-phosphate plus lipopolysaccharide resulted in the synergistic induction of cyclooxygenase-2, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1, as well as the secretion of prostaglandin E2, the soluble form of the intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and the pro-angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor-A. Remarkably, the synergistic effect was significantly higher in aortic valve interstitial cells from stenotic than control valves, and was drastically lower in cells from pulmonary valves, which rarely undergo stenosis. siRNA and pharmacological analysis revealed the involvement of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors 1/3 and Toll-like receptor-4, and downstream signaling through p38/MAPK, protein kinase C, and NF-κB. As regards pro-osteogenic pathways, sphingosine 1-phosphate induced calcium deposition and the expression of the calcification markers bone morphogenetic protein-2 and alkaline phosphatase, and enhanced the effect of lipopolysaccharide, an effect that was partially blocked by inhibition of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors 3/2 signaling. In conclusion, the interplay between sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors and Toll-like receptor 4 signaling leads to a cooperative up-regulation of inflammatory, angiogenic, and osteogenic pathways in aortic valve interstitial cells

  12. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (GAPOR) and nonphosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPN), key enzymes of the respective modified Embden-Meyerhof pathways in the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeota Pyrobaculum aerophilum and Aeropyrum pernix.

    PubMed

    Reher, Matthias; Gebhard, Susanne; Schönheit, Peter

    2007-08-01

    The growth of Pyrobaculum aerophilum on yeast extract and nitrate was stimulated by the addition of maltose. Extracts of maltose/yeast extract/nitrate-grown cells contained all enzyme activities of a modified Embden-Meyerhof (EM) pathway, including ATP-dependent glucokinase, phosphoglucose isomerase, ATP-dependent 6-phosphofructokinase, fructose-1,6-phosphate aldolase, triose-phosphate isomerase, GAPOR, phosphoglycerate mutase, enolase and pyruvate kinase. The activity of GAPOR was stimulated about fourfold by maltose, indicating a role in sugar degradation. GAPOR was purified 200-fold to homogeneity and characterized as a 67 kDa monomeric, extremely thermostable protein. The enzyme showed high specificity for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and did not use glyceraldehyde, acetaldehyde or formaldehyde as substrates. By matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight analysis of the purified enzyme, ORF PA1029 was identified as a coding gene, gapor, in the sequenced genome of Pyrobaculum aerophilum. The data indicate that the (micro)aerophilic Pyrobaculum aerophilum contains a functional GAPOR as part of a modified EM pathway. Cells of the strictly aerobic crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix also contain enzyme activities of a modified EM pathway similar to that of Pyrobaculum aerophilum, except that a GAPN activity replaces GAPOR activity.

  13. Modeling of Glycerol-3-Phosphate Transporter Suggests a Potential ‘Tilt’ Mechanism involved in its Function

    PubMed Central

    Tsigelny, Igor F.; Greenberg, Jerry; Kouznetsova, Valentina; Nigam, Sanjay K.

    2009-01-01

    Many major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporters have similar 12-transmembrane α-helical topologies with two six-helix halves connected by a long loop. In humans, these transporters participate in key physiological processes and are also, as in the case of members of the organic anion transporter (OAT) family, of pharmaceutical interest. Recently, crystal structures of two bacterial representatives of the MFS family — the glycerol-3-phosphate transporter (GlpT) and lac-permease (LacY) — have been solved and, because of assumptions regarding the high structural conservation of this family, there is hope that the results can be applied to mammalian transporters as well. Based on crystallography, it has been suggested that a major conformational “switching” mechanism accounts for ligand transport by MFS proteins. This conformational switch would then allow periodic changes in the overall transporter configuration, resulting in its cyclic opening to the periplasm or cytoplasm. Following this lead, we have modeled a possible “switch” mechanism in GlpT, using the concept of rotation of protein domains as in the DynDom program17 and membranephilic constraints predicted by the MAPAS program.23 We found that the minima of energies of intersubunit interactions support two alternate positions consistent with their transport properties. Thus, for GlpT, a “tilt” of 9°–10° rotation had the most favorable energetics of electrostatic interaction between the two halves of the transporter; moreover, this confirmation was sufficient to suggest transport of the ligand across the membrane. We conducted steered molecular dynamics simulations of the GlpT-ligand system to explore how glycerol-3-phosphate would be handled by the “tilted” structure, and obtained results generally consistent with experimental mutagenesis data. While biochemical data remain most consistent with a single-site alternating access model, our results raise the possibility that, while

  14. The role of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 in the progression of fatty liver after acute ethanol administration in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Tomoki; Morita, Akihito; Mori, Nobuko; Miura, Shinji

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Ethanol administration increased GPD1 mRNA expression. • Ethanol administration increased glucose incorporation into TG glycerol moieties. • No increase in hepatic TG levels was observed in ethanol-injected GPD1 null mice. • We propose that GPD1 is required for ethanol-induced TG accumulation in the liver. - Abstract: Acute ethanol consumption leads to the accumulation of triglycerides (TGs) in hepatocytes. The increase in lipogenesis and reduction of fatty acid oxidation are implicated as the mechanisms underlying ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation. Although glycerol-3-phosphate (Gro3P), formed by glycerol kinase (GYK) or glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 (GPD1), is also required for TG synthesis, the roles of GYK and GPD1 have been the subject of some debate. In this study, we examine (1) the expression of genes involved in Gro3P production in the liver of C57BL/6J mice in the context of hepatic TG accumulation after acute ethanol intake, and (2) the role of GPD1 in the progression of ethanol-induced fatty liver using GPD1 null mice. As a result, in C57BL/6J mice, ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation began within 2 h and was 1.7-fold greater than that observed in the control group after 6 h. The up-regulation of GPD1 began 2 h after administering ethanol, and significantly increased 6 h later with the concomitant escalation in the glycolytic gene expression. The incorporation of {sup 14}C-labelled glucose into TG glycerol moieties increased during the same period. On the other hand, in GPD1 null mice carrying normal GYK activity, no significant increase in hepatic TG level was observed after acute ethanol intake. In conclusion, GPD1 and glycolytic gene expression is up-regulated by ethanol, and GPD1-mediated incorporation of glucose into TG glycerol moieties together with increased lipogenesis, is suggested to play an important role in ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation.

  15. Neuroprotective role of sphingosine-1-phosphate in L-BMAA treated neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y).

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Sáez, Emma; de Munck García, Estefanía; Arahuetes Portero, Rosa María; Vicente, Francisca; Ortiz-López, Francisco Javier; Cantizani, Juan; Gómez Miguel, Begoña

    2015-04-23

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid which regulates proliferation, cell migration, survival and differentiation by specific receptors activation. We studied its effects on L-BMAA treated neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y), an amino acid that can trigger neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinson dementia complex (ALS/PDC). We found that S1P protects from necrosis and prevents the GSK3 increasing as long as the PI3K/AKT pathway is active. Moreover, GSK3 inhibition protects against neuronal death caused by L-BMAA.

  16. Enzymatic synthesis of rare sugars with L-rhamnulose-1-phosphate aldolase from Thermotoga maritima MSB8.

    PubMed

    Li, Zijie; Wu, Xiaoru; Cai, Li; Duan, Shenglin; Liu, Jia; Yuan, Peng; Nakanishi, Hideki; Gao, Xiao-Dong

    2015-09-15

    L-Rhamnulose-1-phosphate aldolase from a thermophilic source (Thermotoga maritima MSB8) (RhaDT.mari) was heterologously overexpressed in Escherichia coli and the stereoselectivity of this enzyme with or without Nus tag was investigated. We also applied this enzyme to the synthesis of rare sugars D-psicose, D-sorbose, L-tagatose and L-fructose using our one-pot four-enzyme system. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first use of RhaD from a thermophilic source for rare sugar synthesis and the temperature tolerance of this enzyme paves the path for large scale fermentation.

  17. Iminosugar C-Glycoside Analogues of α-d-GlcNAc-1-Phosphate: Synthesis and Bacterial Transglycosylase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We herein describe the first synthesis of iminosugar C-glycosides of α-d-GlcNAc-1-phosphate in 10 steps starting from unprotected d-GlcNAc. A diastereoselective intramolecular iodoamination–cyclization as the key step was employed to construct the central piperidine ring of the iminosugar and the C-glycosidic structure of α-d-GlcNAc. Finally, the iminosugar phosphonate and its elongated phosphate analogue were accessed. These phosphorus-containing iminosugars were coupled efficiently with lipophilic monophosphates to give lipid-linked pyrophosphate derivatives, which are lipid II mimetics endowed with potent inhibitory properties toward bacterial transglycosylases (TGase). PMID:25137529

  18. Comparative studies of effects of dehydroepiandrosterone on rat and chicken liver.

    PubMed

    Bobyleva, V; Kneer, N; Bellei, M; Battelli, D; Muscatello, U; Lardy, H

    1993-01-01

    1. An attempt to identify the cause of decrease of gain in body weight during dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) treatment was made comparing the effects of hormone treatment on chickens and rats. 2. Chickens treated with DHEA for 7-10 days do not change their weight gain with respect to controls although their mitochondrial respiration and peroxisomal catalase (index of peroxisomal mass) were increased. 3. Liver cytosolic malic enzyme and sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were depressed in chickens treated with DHEA in comparison with activities in untreated controls. DHEA treatment did not increase the activity of mitochondrial sn-glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. 4. In contrast to rat liver cytosolic sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase this enzyme in chicken liver was inactive with NADPH.

  19. Phosphate Tether-Mediated Ring-Closing Metathesis for the Generation of Medium to Large, P-Stereogenic Bicyclo[n.3.1]phosphates.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Soma; Markley, Jana L; Chegondi, Rambabu; Hanson, Paul R

    2015-09-02

    A phosphate tether-mediated ring-closing metathesis study towards the synthesis of P-stereogenic bicyclo[6.3.1]-, bicyclo[7.3.1]-, and bicyclo[8.3.1]phosphates is reported. This study demonstrates expanded utility of phosphate tether-mediated desymmetrization of C2-symmetric, 1,3-anti-diol dienes in generating complex medium to large, P-stereogenic bicyclo[n.3.1]phosphates..

  20. Export of malaria proteins requires co-translational processing of the PEXEL motif independent of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate binding

    PubMed Central

    Boddey, Justin A.; O'Neill, Matthew T.; Lopaticki, Sash; Carvalho, Teresa G.; Hodder, Anthony N.; Nebl, Thomas; Wawra, Stephan; van West, Pieter; Ebrahimzadeh, Zeinab; Richard, Dave; Flemming, Sven; Spielmann, Tobias; Przyborski, Jude; Babon, Jeff J.; Cowman, Alan F.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum exports proteins into erythrocytes using the Plasmodium export element (PEXEL) motif, which is cleaved in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by plasmepsin V (PMV). A recent study reported that phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI(3)P) concentrated in the ER binds to PEXEL motifs and is required for export independent of PMV, and that PEXEL motifs are functionally interchangeable with RxLR motifs of oomycete effectors. Here we show that the PEXEL does not bind PI(3)P, and that this lipid is not concentrated in the ER. We find that RxLR motifs cannot mediate export in P. falciparum. Parasites expressing a mutated version of KAHRP, with the PEXEL motif repositioned near the signal sequence, prevented PMV cleavage. This mutant possessed the putative PI(3)P-binding residues but is not exported. Reinstatement of PEXEL to its original location restores processing by PMV and export. These results challenge the PI(3)P hypothesis and provide evidence that PEXEL position is conserved for co-translational processing and export. PMID:26832821

  1. Constitutive Optimized Production of Streptokinase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Utilizing Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Promoter of Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Vellanki, Ravi N.; Doddapaneni, Kiran K.; Anubrolu, Naveen; Mangamoori, Lakshmi N.

    2013-01-01

    A novel expression vector constructed from genes of Pichia pastoris was applied for heterologous gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Recombinant streptokinase (SK) was synthesized by cloning the region encoding mature SK under the control of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAP) promoter of Pichia pastoris in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. SK was intracellularly expressed constitutively, as evidenced by lyticase-nitroanilide and caseinolytic assays. The functional activity was confirmed by plasminogen activation assay and in vitro clot lysis assay. Stability and absence of toxicity to the host with the recombinant expression vector as evidenced by southern analysis and growth profile indicate the application of this expression system for large-scale production of SK. Two-stage statistical approach, Plackett-Burman (PB) design and response surface methodology (RSM) was used for SK production medium optimization. In the first stage, carbon and organic nitrogen sources were qualitatively screened by PB design and in the second stage there was quantitative optimization of four process variables, yeast extract, dextrose, pH, and temperature, by RSM. PB design resulted in dextrose and peptone as best carbon and nitrogen sources for SK production. RSM method, proved as an efficient technique for optimizing process conditions which resulted in 110% increase in SK production, 2352 IU/mL, than for unoptimized conditions. PMID:24171161

  2. Early hypergravity exposure effects calbindin-D28k and inositol-3-phosphate expression in Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Bouët, Valentine; Dijk, Freark; Ijkema-Paassen, Jos; Wubbels, René J; van der Want, Johannes J; Gramsbergen, Albert

    In this study the effects of hypergravity were analyzed on cerebellar Purkinje cells during early development in rats. The cerebellum is a key structure in the control and the adaptation of posture and anti-gravity activities. This holds particularly when external conditions are modified. Three groups of rats were conceived, born and reared in hypergravity (2g). At postnatal day 5 (P5), P10 or P15, they were exposed to normal gravity and at P40, the cerebella were investigated on the expression of calbindin-D28k and inositol-3-phosphate (IP3) in Purkinje cells. Control animals were bred in the same conditions but at 1g. Immunoreactivity of Purkinje cells was studied in lobules III and IX of the vermis. Lobule IX of the vermis is one of the targets of primary otolithic vestibular projections, and lobule III served as a control, being much less related with vestibular inputs. The results show that hypergravity induces a decrease in calbindin and IP3 labeling in 20% of Purkinje cells of lobule IX without any change in lobule III. Animals transferred from 2g to 1g at P5 or P10 showed the most pronounced effects and much less at P15. This study demonstrates that early development of the cerebellum is highly sensitive to changes in gravity. Ages until P10 are critical for the development of vestibulo-cerebellar connections, and in particularly the calcium signaling in Purkinje cells.

  3. Characterization of the highly active fragment of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene promoter for recombinant protein expression in Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chaomin; Zheng, Liesheng; Zhu, Jihong; Chen, Liguo; Ma, Aimin

    2015-03-01

    Developing efficient native promoters is important for improving recombinant protein expression by fungal genetic engineering. The promoter region of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene in Pleurotus ostreatus (Pogpd) was isolated and optimized by upstream truncation. The activities of these promoters with different lengths were further confirmed by fluorescence, quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. A truncated Pogpd-P2 fragment (795 bp) drove enhanced green fluorescence protein (egfp) gene expression in P. ostreatus much more efficiently than full-length Pogpd-P1. Further truncating Pogpd-P2 to 603, 403 and 231 bp reduced the eGFP expression significantly. However, the 403-bp fragment between -356 bp and the start codon was the minimal but sufficient promoter element for eGFP expression. Compact native promoters for genetic engineering of P. ostreatus were successfully developed and validated in this study. This will broaden the preexisting repertoire of fungal promoters for biotechnology application. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate 5-kinase (PIKfyve) is an AMPK target participating in contraction-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Lai, Yu-Chiang; Hill, Elaine V; Tyteca, Donatienne; Carpentier, Sarah; Ingvaldsen, Ada; Vertommen, Didier; Lantier, Louise; Foretz, Marc; Dequiedt, Franck; Courtoy, Pierre J; Erneux, Christophe; Viollet, Benoît; Shepherd, Peter R; Tavaré, Jeremy M; Jensen, Jørgen; Rider, Mark H

    2013-10-15

    PIKfyve (FYVE domain-containing phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate 5-kinase), the lipid kinase that phosphorylates PtdIns3P to PtdIns(3,5)P2, has been implicated in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. We investigated whether PIKfyve could also be involved in contraction/AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase)-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. Incubation of rat epitrochlearis muscles with YM201636, a selective PIKfyve inhibitor, reduced contraction- and AICAriboside (5-amino-4-imidazolecarboxamide riboside)-stimulated glucose uptake. Consistently, PIKfyve knockdown in C2C12 myotubes reduced AICAriboside-stimulated glucose transport. Furthermore, muscle contraction increased PtdIns(3,5)P2 levels and PIKfyve phosphorylation. AMPK phosphorylated PIKfyve at Ser307 both in vitro and in intact cells. Following subcellular fractionation, PIKfyve recovery in a crude intracellular membrane fraction was increased in contracting versus resting muscles. Also in opossum kidney cells, wild-type, but not S307A mutant, PIKfyve was recruited to endosomal vesicles in response to AMPK activation. We propose that PIKfyve activity is required for the stimulation of skeletal muscle glucose uptake by contraction/AMPK activation. PIKfyve is a new AMPK substrate whose phosphorylation at Ser307 could promote PIKfyve translocation to endosomes for PtdIns(3,5)P2 synthesis to facilitate GLUT4 (glucose transporter 4) translocation.

  5. Increased mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase protein and enzyme activity in rat epididymal fat upon cessation of wheel running.

    PubMed

    Kump, David S; Laye, Matthew J; Booth, Frank W

    2006-03-01

    Triacylglycerol synthesis in rat epididymal fat overshoots sedentary levels at 10, 29, and 53 h of physical inactivity after 21 days of wheel running. The purposes of the present study were to determine 1) whether this effect is also observed after an acute bout of physical activity and 2) what enzymatic changes might contribute to this effect. We show that more than one bout of physical activity, such as that which occurs with 21 days of wheel running, is necessary for palmitic acid incorporation into triacylglyceride (triglyceride synthesis) to overshoot sedentary values, which suggests that pretranslational mechanisms may be responsible for this overshoot effect. Ten hours after 21 days of wheel running, activity of the mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase-1 (mtGPAT1) isoform, a key regulator of triacylglycerol synthesis, overshot sedentary values by 48% and remained higher than sedentary values at 29 and 53 h of reduced physical activity. The overshoot in mtGPAT1 activity was accompanied by an increase in mtGPAT protein level. Cyclic AMP response element-binding protein-binding protein level was higher in sedentary 29 h after 21 days of wheel running. AMP kinase-alpha Thr(172) phosphorylation was increased immediately after treadmill running, but decreased to sedentary values by 5 h after activity. Casein kinase-2alpha protein level and activity were unchanged. We conclude that an increase in mtGPAT protein might contribute to the overshoot in triacylglycerol synthesis.

  6. Glycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase is required for PBAN-induced sex pheromone biosynthesis in Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Du, Mengfang; Liu, Xiaoguang; Liu, Xiaoming; Yin, Xinming; Han, Shuangyin; Song, Qisheng; An, Shiheng

    2015-01-29

    Female moths employ their own pheromone blends as a communicational medium in mating behavior. The biosynthesis and release of sex pheromone in female moths are regulated by pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN) and the corresponding action of PBAN has been well elucidated in Bombyx mori. However, very little is known about the molecular mechanism regarding the biosynthesis of sex pheromone precursor. In this study, quantitative proteomics was utilized to comprehensively elucidate the expression dynamics of pheromone glands (PGs) during development. Proteomic analysis revealed a serial of differentially expressed sex pheromone biosynthesis-associated proteins at the different time points of B. mori development. Most interestingly B. mori glycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase (BmGPAT) was found to be expressed during the key periods of sex pheromone biosynthesis. RNAi knockdown of BmGPAT confirmed the important function of this protein in the biosynthesis of sex pheromone precursor, triacylglcerol (TAG), and subsequently PBAN-induced production of sex pheromone, bombykol. Behavioral analysis showed that RNAi knockdown of GPAT significantly impaired the ability of females to attract males. Our findings indicate that GPAT acts to regulate the biosynthesis of sex pheromone precursor, TAG, thus influencing PBAN-induced sex pheromone production and subsequent mating behavior.

  7. Glyphosate-resistant goosegrass. Identification of a mutation in the target enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Baerson, Scott R; Rodriguez, Damian J; Tran, Minhtien; Feng, Yongmei; Biest, Nancy A; Dill, Gerald M

    2002-07-01

    The spontaneous occurrence of resistance to the herbicide glyphosate in weed species has been an extremely infrequent event, despite over 20 years of extensive use. Recently, a glyphosate-resistant biotype of goosegrass (Eleusine indica) was identified in Malaysia exhibiting an LD(50) value approximately 2- to 4-fold greater than the sensitive biotype collected from the same region. A comparison of the inhibition of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) activity by glyphosate in extracts prepared from the resistant (R) and sensitive (S) biotypes revealed an approximately 5-fold higher IC(50)(glyphosate) for the (R) biotype. Sequence comparisons of the predicted EPSPS mature protein coding regions from both biotypes revealed four single-nucleotide differences, two of which result in amino acid changes. One of these changes, a proline to serine substitution at position 106 in the (R) biotype, corresponds to a substitution previously identified in a glyphosate-insensitive EPSPS enzyme from Salmonella typhimurium. Kinetic data generated for the recombinant enzymes suggests that the second substitution identified in the (R) EPSPS does not contribute significantly to its reduced glyphosate sensitivity. Escherichia coli aroA- (EPSPS deficient) strains expressing the mature EPSPS enzyme from the (R) biotype exhibited an approximately 3-fold increase in glyphosate tolerance relative to strains expressing the mature EPSPS from the (S) biotype. These results provide the first evidence for an altered EPSPS enzyme as an underlying component of evolved glyphosate resistance in any plant species.

  8. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase protein and mRNA are both differentially expressed in adult chickens but not chick embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Milner, R J; Brow, M D; Cleveland, D W; Shinnick, T M; Sutcliffe, J G

    1983-01-01

    We have determined the 679 nucleotide sequence of a cDNA clone which, by hybridization-translation experiments, corresponds to a 36K chick brain protein. Our studies provide a partial amino acid sequence for this protein, identifying it as chicken glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Antisera raised against purified chicken GAPDH reacted with a 36K protein present in chick brain extracts and estimated to be the fourth most prevalent protein, as determined by either Coomassie Blue staining or by in vitro translation of chick brain mRNA. The amounts of GAPDH mRNA in chick brain, liver and muscle and adult chicken brain are similar, whereas the relative amount of adult chicken muscle GPDH mRNA is greatly elevated and that of adult liver lowered. The GAPDH protein levels showed a similar variation between tissues, suggesting that the levels of GAPDH protein are largely regulated by the amount of available GAPDH mRNA. The chicken GAPDH clone does not hybridize to rat mRNA, even though GAPDH is one of the most evolutionarily conserved proteins, indicating that selection pressures are heavier at the primary protein sequence level than at the nucleic acid sequence level for this gene, a situation contrasting to that of the tubulins. Images PMID:6687938

  9. SIRT1 interacts with and protects glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from nuclear translocation: Implications for cell survival after irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Hyun-Yoo; Woo, Seon Rang; Shen, Yan-Nan; Yun, Mi Yong; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Park, Eun-Ran; Kim, Su-Hyeon; Park, Jeong-Eun; Ju, Yeun-Jin; Hong, Sung Hee; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Joon; Lee, Kee-Ho

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 serves to retain GAPDH in the cytosol, preventing GAPDH nuclear translocation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer When SIRT1 is depleted, GAPDH translocation occurs even in the absence of stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upon irradiation, SIRT1 interacts with GAPDH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 prevents irradiation-induced nuclear translocation of GAPDH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 presence rather than activity is essential for inhibiting GAPDH translocation. -- Abstract: Upon apoptotic stimulation, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a cytosolic enzyme normally active in glycolysis, translocates into the nucleus and activates an apoptotic cascade therein. In the present work, we show that SIRT1 prevents nuclear translocation of GAPDH via interaction with GAPDH. SIRT1 depletion triggered nuclear translocation of cytosolic GAPDH even in the absence of apoptotic stress. Such translocation was not, however, observed when SIRT1 enzymatic activity was inhibited, indicating that SIRT1 protein per se, rather than the deacetylase activity of the protein, is required to inhibit GAPDH translocation. Upon irradiation, SIRT1 prevented irradiation-induced nuclear translocation of GAPDH, accompanied by interaction of SIRT1 and GAPDH. Thus, SIRT1 functions to retain GAPDH in the cytosol, protecting the enzyme from nuclear translocation via interaction with these two proteins. This serves as a mechanism whereby SIRT1 regulates cell survival upon induction of apoptotic stress by means that include irradiation.

  10. Chemical mechanism of glycerol 3-phosphate phosphatase: pH-dependent changes in the rate-limiting step.

    PubMed

    Larrouy-Maumus, Gérald; Kelly, Geoff; de Carvalho, Luiz Pedro Sório

    2014-01-14

    The halo-acid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily comprises a large number of enzymes that share a conserved core domain responsible for a diverse array of chemical transformations (e.g., phosphonatase, dehalogenase, phosphohexomutase, and phosphatase) and a cap domain that controls substrate specificity. Phosphate hydrolysis is thought to proceed via an aspartyl-phosphate intermediate, and X-ray crystallography has shown that protein active site conformational changes are required for catalytic competency. Using a combination of steady-state and pre-steady-state kinetics, pL-rate studies, solvent kinetic isotope effects, (18)O molecular isotope exchange, and partition experiments, we provide a detailed description of the chemical mechanism of a glycerol 3-phosphate phosphatase. This phosphatase has been recently recognized as a rate-limiting factor in lipid polar head recycling in Mycobacterium tuberculosis [Larrouy-Maumus, G., et al. (2013) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 110 (28), 11320-11325]. Our results clearly establish the existence of an aspartyl-phosphate intermediate in this newly discovered member of the HAD superfamily. No ionizable groups are rate-limiting from pH 5.5 to 9.5, consistent with the pK values of the catalytic aspartate residues. The formation and decay of this intermediate are partially rate-limiting below pH 7.0, and a conformational change preceding catalysis is rate-limiting above pH 7.0.

  11. Autophagy and endosomal trafficking inhibition by Vibrio cholerae MARTX toxin phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate-specific phospholipase A1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Shivani; Kim, Hyunjin; Chan, Robin B.; Agarwal, Shivangi; Williamson, Rebecca; Cho, Wonhwa; Paolo, Gilbert D.; Satchell, Karla J. F.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, responsible for acute gastroenteritis secretes a large multifunctional-autoprocessing repeat-in-toxin (MARTX) toxin linked to evasion of host immune system, facilitating colonization of small intestine. Unlike other effector domains of the multifunctional toxin that target cytoskeleton, the function of alpha-beta hydrolase (ABH) remained elusive. This study demonstrates that ABH is an esterase/lipase with catalytic Ser–His–Asp triad. ABH binds with high affinity to phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) and cleaves the fatty acid in PtdIns3P at the sn1 position in vitro making it the first PtdIns3P-specific phospholipase A1 (PLA1). Expression of ABH in vivo reduces intracellular PtdIns3P levels and its PtdIns3P-specific PLA1 activity blocks endosomal and autophagic pathways. In accordance with recent studies acknowledging the potential of extracellular pathogens to evade or exploit autophagy to prevent their clearance and facilitate survival, this is the first report highlighting the role of ABH in inhibiting autophagy and endosomal trafficking induced by extracellular V. cholerae. PMID:26498860

  12. The glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase homologue is differentially regulated in phases of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis: molecular and phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Mônica S; Cunha Passos, Daniela A; Felipe, M Sueli S; Jesuíno, Rosália S A; Pereira, Maristela; de Almeida Soares, Célia M

    2004-07-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) plays important roles in various cellular processes. Here we report the sequence and analysis of a novel developmentally regulated gene and cDNA (Pbgadph), encoding a GAPDH homologue (PbGAPDH), of the pathogenic dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. We have analyzed the protein, the cDNA and genomic sequences to provide insights into the structure, function, and potential regulation of PbGAPDH. That Pbgapdh encodes PbGAPDH was demonstrated by micro-sequencing of the native protein homologue isolated from the fungus proteome. The deduced amino acid sequence of Pbgapdh showed identity to those of from other species (88-76%). Phylogenetic analysis indicated that GAPDH could be useful for the determination of evolutionary relationships. Expression of the Pbgapdh gene and the cognate protein were developmentally regulated in phases of P. brasiliensis, with a higher expression in the yeast parasitic phase and was induced during the transition from mycelium to yeast and decreased during the reverse process, transition from yeast to mycelium.

  13. The influence of oxygen on radiation-induced structural and functional changes in glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodacka, Aleksandra; Serafin, Eligiusz; Bubinski, Michal; Krokosz, Anita; Puchala, Mieczyslaw

    2012-07-01

    Proteins are major targets for oxidative damage due to their abundance in cells and high reactivity with free radicals. In the present study we examined the influence of oxygen on radiation-induced inactivation and structural changes of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). We chose these two enzymes because they occur at high concentrations and participate in the most important processes in organisms; furthermore, they show considerable similarity in their structure. Protein solutions were irradiated with X-rays in doses ranging from 0.1 to 0.7 kGy, in air and N2O. The much higher radiation inactivation of GAPDH as compared to LDH is correlated with substantially greater structural changes in this protein, mainly involving the loss of free thiol groups (-SH). Of lesser importance in the differentiation of the radiosensitivity of the studied enzymes are tryptophan residues. Molecular oxygen, present during irradiation, increased to a significantly greater extent the inactivation and structural changes of GAPDH than that of LDH. The results suggest that the greater effect of oxygen on GAPDH is due to the higher efficiency of the superoxide radical, the higher amount of hydroperoxides generated, and the higher degree of unfolding of this protein.

  14. Enhanced resistance in Theobroma cacao against oomycete and fungal pathogens by secretion of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Helliwell, Emily E; Vega-Arreguín, Julio; Shi, Zi; Bailey, Bryan; Xiao, Shunyuan; Maximova, Siela N; Tyler, Brett M; Guiltinan, Mark J

    2016-03-01

    The internalization of some oomycete and fungal pathogen effectors into host plant cells has been reported to be blocked by proteins that bind to the effectors' cell entry receptor, phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI3P). This finding suggested a novel strategy for disease control by engineering plants to secrete PI3P-binding proteins. In this study, we tested this strategy using the chocolate tree Theobroma cacao. Transient expression and secretion of four different PI3P-binding proteins in detached leaves of T. cacao greatly reduced infection by two oomycete pathogens, Phytophthora tropicalis and Phytophthora palmivora, which cause black pod disease. Lesion size and pathogen growth were reduced by up to 85%. Resistance was not conferred by proteins lacking a secretory leader, by proteins with mutations in their PI3P-binding site, or by a secreted PI4P-binding protein. Stably transformed, transgenic T. cacao plants expressing two different PI3P-binding proteins showed substantially enhanced resistance to both P. tropicalis and P. palmivora, as well as to the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum theobromicola. These results demonstrate that secretion of PI3P-binding proteins is an effective way to increase disease resistance in T. cacao, and potentially in other plants, against a broad spectrum of pathogens. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. In silico peptide prediction for antibody generation to recognize 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) in genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Marani, Mariela M; Costa, Joana; Mafra, Isabel; Oliveira, Maria Beatriz P P; Camperi, Silvia A; Leite, José Roberto de Souza Almeida

    2015-03-01

    For the prospective immunorecognition of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (CP4-EPSPS) as a biomarker protein expressed by transgenic soybean, an extensive in silico evaluation of the referred protein was performed. The main objective of this study was the selection of a set of peptides that could function as potential immunogens for the production of novel antibodies against CP4-EPSPS protein. For this purpose, the protein was in silico cleaved with trypsin/chymotrypsin and the resultant peptides were extensively analyzed for further selection of the best candidates for antibody production. The analysis enabled the successful proposal of four peptides with potential immunogenicity for their future use as screening biomarkers of genetically modified organisms. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to select and define potential linear epitopes for the immunization of animals and, subsequently, to generate adequate antibodies for CP4-EPSPS recognition. The present work will be followed by the synthesis of the candidate peptides to be incubated in animals for antibody generation and potential applicability for the development of an immunosensor for CP4-EPSPS detection.

  16. Molecular basis for covalent inhibition of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase by a 2-phenoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone small molecule.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Stefano; Uliassi, Elisa; Zaffagnini, Mirko; Prati, Federica; Bergamini, Christian; Amorati, Riccardo; Paredi, Gianluca; Margiotta, Marilena; Conti, Paola; Costi, Maria Paola; Kaiser, Marcel; Cavalli, Andrea; Fato, Romana; Bolognesi, Maria Laura

    2017-01-12

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) has recently gained attention as an antiprotozoan and anticancer drug target. We have previously identified 2-phenoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone as an inhibitor of both Trypanosoma brucei and human GAPDH. Herein, through multiple chemical, biochemical, and biological studies, and through the design of analogs, we confirmed the formation of a covalent adduct, we clarified the inhibition mechanism, and we demonstrated antitrypanosomal, antiplasmodial, and cytotoxic activities in cell cultures. The overall results lent support to the hypothesis that 2-phenoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone binds the GAPDH catalytic cysteine covalently through a phenolate displacement mechanism. By investigating the reactivity of 2-phenoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone and its analogs with four GAPDH homologs, we showed that the covalent inhibition is not preceded by the formation of a strong non-covalent complex. However, an up to fivefold difference in inactivation rates among homologs hinted at structural or electrostatic differences of their active sites that could be exploited to further design kinetically selective inhibitors. Moreover, we preliminarily showed that 2-phenoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone displays selectivity for GAPDHs over two other cysteine-dependent enzymes, supporting its suitability as a warhead starting fragment for the design of novel inhibitors.

  17. Identification of a mammalian glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase: Role in metabolism and signaling in pancreatic β-cells and hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Mugabo, Yves; Zhao, Shangang; Seifried, Annegrit; Gezzar, Sari; Al-Mass, Anfal; Zhang, Dongwei; Lamontagne, Julien; Attane, Camille; Poursharifi, Pegah; Iglesias, José; Joly, Erik; Peyot, Marie-Line; Gohla, Antje; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Prentki, Marc

    2016-01-26

    Obesity, and the associated disturbed glycerolipid/fatty acid (GL/FA) cycle, contribute to insulin resistance, islet β-cell failure, and type 2 diabetes. Flux through the GL/FA cycle is regulated by the availability of glycerol-3-phosphate (Gro3P) and fatty acyl-CoA. We describe here a mammalian Gro3P phosphatase (G3PP), which was not known to exist in mammalian cells, that can directly hydrolyze Gro3P to glycerol. We identified that mammalian phosphoglycolate phosphatase, with an uncertain function, acts in fact as a G3PP. We found that G3PP, by controlling Gro3P levels, regulates glycolysis and glucose oxidation, cellular redox and ATP production, gluconeogenesis, glycerolipid synthesis, and fatty acid oxidation in pancreatic islet β-cells and hepatocytes, and that glucose stimulated insulin secretion and the response to metabolic stress, e.g., glucolipotoxicity, in β-cells. In vivo overexpression of G3PP in rat liver lowers body weight gain and hepatic glucose production from glycerol and elevates plasma HDL levels. G3PP is expressed at various levels in different tissues, and its expression varies according to the nutritional state in some tissues. As Gro3P lies at the crossroads of glucose, lipid, and energy metabolism, control of its availability by G3PP adds a key level of metabolic regulation in mammalian cells, and G3PP offers a potential target for type 2 diabetes and cardiometabolic disorders.

  18. Deficiency of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 1 decreases triacylglycerol storage and induces fatty acid oxidation in insect fat body.

    PubMed

    Alves-Bezerra, Michele; Ramos, Isabela B; De Paula, Iron F; Maya-Monteiro, Clarissa M; Klett, Eric L; Coleman, Rosalind A; Gondim, Katia C

    2017-03-01

    Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferases (GPAT) catalyze the initial and rate-limiting step for the de novo synthesis of triacylglycerol (TAG). Four mammalian GPAT isoforms have been identified: the mitochondria-associated GPAT1 and 2, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated GPAT3 and 4. In the insect Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of Chagas' disease, we previously predicted a mitochondrial-like isoform (RhoprGPAT1) from genomic data. In the current study, we clone the RhoprGPAT1 coding sequence and identify an ER-associated GPAT (RhoprGPAT4) as the second isoform in the insect. RhoprGPAT1 contributes 15% of the total GPAT activity in anterior midgut, 50% in posterior midgut and fat body, and 70% in the ovary. The RhoprGpat1 gene is the predominant transcript in the midgut and fat body. To evaluate the physiological relevance of RhoprGPAT1, we generate RhoprGPAT1-deficient insects. The knockdown of RhoprGpat1 results in 50% and 65% decrease in TAG content in the posterior midgut and fat body, respectively. RhoprGpat1-deficient insects also exhibits impaired lipid droplet expansion and a 2-fold increase in fatty acid β-oxidation rates in the fat body. We propose that the RhoprGPAT1 mitochondrial-like isoform is required to channel fatty acyl chains towards TAG synthesis and away from β-oxidation. Such a process is crucial for the insect lipid homeostasis.

  19. Tandem amplification of a chromosomal segment harboring 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase locus confers glyphosate resistance in Kochia scoparia.

    PubMed

    Jugulam, Mithila; Niehues, Kindsey; Godar, Amar S; Koo, Dal-Hoe; Danilova, Tatiana; Friebe, Bernd; Sehgal, Sunish; Varanasi, Vijay K; Wiersma, Andrew; Westra, Philip; Stahlman, Phillip W; Gill, Bikram S

    2014-11-01

    Recent rapid evolution and spread of resistance to the most extensively used herbicide, glyphosate, is a major threat to global crop production. Genetic mechanisms by which weeds evolve resistance to herbicides largely determine the level of resistance and the rate of evolution of resistance. In a previous study, we determined that glyphosate resistance in Kochia scoparia is due to the amplification of the 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-Phosphate Synthase (EPSPS) gene, the enzyme target of glyphosate. Here, we investigated the genomic organization of the amplified EPSPS copies using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and extended DNA fiber (Fiber FISH) on K. scoparia chromosomes. In both glyphosate-resistant K. scoparia populations tested (GR1 and GR2), FISH results displayed a single and prominent hybridization site of the EPSPS gene localized on the distal end of one pair of homologous metaphase chromosomes compared with a faint hybridization site in glyphosate-susceptible samples (GS1 and GS2). Fiber FISH displayed 10 copies of the EPSPS gene (approximately 5 kb) arranged in tandem configuration approximately 40 to 70 kb apart, with one copy in an inverted orientation in GR2. In agreement with FISH results, segregation of EPSPS copies followed single-locus inheritance in GR1 population. This is the first report of tandem target gene amplification conferring field-evolved herbicide resistance in weed populations. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Mutation by DNA shuffling of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase from Malus domestica for improved glyphosate resistance.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yong-Sheng; Xu, Jing; Peng, Ri-He; Xiong, Ai-Sheng; Xu, Hu; Zhao, Wei; Fu, Xiao-Yan; Han, Hong-Juan; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2013-09-01

    A new 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene from Malus domestica (MdEPSPS) was cloned and characterized by rapid amplification of cDNA ends to identify an EPSPS gene appropriate for the development of transgenic glyphosate-tolerant plants. However, wild-type MdEPSPS is not suitable for the development of transgenic glyphosate-tolerant plants because of its poor glyphosate resistance. Thus, we performed DNA shuffling on MdEPSPS, and one highly glyphosate-resistant mutant with mutations in eight amino acids (N63D, N86S, T101A, A187T, D230G, H317R, Y399R and C413A.) was identified after five rounds of DNA shuffling and screening. Among the eight amino acid substitutions on this mutant, only two residue changes (T101A and A187T) were identified by site-directed mutagenesis as essential and additive in altering glyphosate resistance, which was further confirmed by kinetic analyses. The single-site A187T mutation has also never been previously reported as an important residue for glyphosate resistance. Furthermore, transgenic rice was used to confirm the potential of MdEPSPS mutant in developing glyphosate-resistant crops.

  1. Insulin regulation of protein biosynthesis in differentiated 3T3 adipocytes. Regulation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, M.; Curtis, G.; Avruch, J.; Goodman, H.M.

    1985-10-05

    The effect of insulin on protein biosynthesis was examined in differentiated 3T3-L1 and 3T3-F442A adipocytes. Insulin altered the relative rate of synthesis of specific proteins independent of its ability to hasten conversion of the fibroblast (preadipocyte) phenotype to the adipocyte phenotype. Although more than one pattern of response to insulin was observed, the authors focused on the induction of a Mr 33,000 protein which was identified as the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Exposure of 3T3 adipocytes to insulin throughout differentiation specifically increased GAPDH activity and protein content by 2- to 3-fold as compared to 3T3 adipocytes differentiated in the absence of insulin. These changes in enzyme activity and content could be accounted for by a 4-fold increase in the relative rate of synthesis of GAPDH and a 9-fold increase in hybridizable mRNA levels. Within 2 h of insulin addition to 3T3 adipocytes differentiated in the absence of hormone, hybridizable GAPDH mRNA levels increased 3-fold, and within 24 h GAPDH mRNA levels increased 8-fold, and (TVS) methionine incorporation into GAPDH protein increased 5-fold. These studies demonstrate that insulin, as the sole hormonal perturbant, can increase the synthesis of certain 3T3 adipocyte proteins by altering the cellular content of a specific mRNA.

  2. Altered chloroplast structure and function in a mutant of Arabidopsis deficient in plastid glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kunst, L.; Somerville, C. ); Browse, J. )

    1989-07-01

    Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana deficient in plastid glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity have altered chloroplast membrane lipid composition. This caused an increase in the number of regions of appressed membrane per chloroplast and a decrease in the average number of thylakoid membranes in the appressed regions. The net effect was a significant decrease in the ratio of appressed to nonappressed membranes. A comparison of 77 K fluorescence emission spectra of thylakoid membranes from the mutant and wild type indicated that the ultrastructural changes were associated with an altered distribution of excitation energy transfer from antenna chlorophyll to photosystem II and photosystem I in the mutant. The changes in leaf lipid composition did not significantly affect growth or development of the mutant under standard conditions. However, at temperatures above 28{degree}C the mutant grew slightly more rapidly than the wild type, and measurements of temperature-induced fluorescence yield enhancement suggested an increased thermal stability of the photosynthetic apparatus of the mutant. These effects are consistent with other evidence suggesting that membrane lipid composition is an important determinant of chloroplast structure but has relatively minor direct effects on the function of the membrane proteins associated with photosynthetic electron transport.

  3. The glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene of Moniliophthoraperniciosa, the causal agent of witches' broom disease of Theobroma cacao

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the cloning, sequence and expression analysis of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) gene of Moniliophthora perniciosa, the most important pathogen of cocoa in Brazil. Southern blot analysis revealed the presence of a single copy of the GAPDH gene in the M. perniciosa genome (MpGAPDH). The complete MpGAPDH coding sequence contained 1,461 bp with eight introns that were conserved in the GAPDH genes of other basidiomycete species. The cis-elements in the promoter region of the MpGAPDH gene were similar to those of other basidiomycetes. Likewise, the MpGAPDH gene encoded a putative 339 amino acid protein that shared significant sequence similarity with other GAPDH proteins in fungi, plants, and metazoans. Phylogenetic analyses clustered the MPGAPDH protein with other homobasidiomycete fungi of the family Tricholomataceae. Expression analysis of the MpGAPDH gene by real-time PCR showed that this gene was more expressed (~1.3X) in the saprotrophic stage of this hemibiotrophic plant pathogen than in the biotrophic stage when grown in cacao extracts. PMID:21637692

  4. Photolabeling identifies an interaction between phosphatidylcholine and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Gut2p) in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Marjolein J F W; van Voorst, Frank; Ploeger, Ginette E J; Larsen, Peter Mose; Larsen, Martin R; de Kroon, Anton I P M; de Kruijff, Ben

    2002-05-07

    In search of mitochondrial proteins interacting with phosphatidylcholine (PC), a photolabeling approach was applied, in which photoactivatable probes were incorporated into isolated yeast mitochondria. Only a limited number of proteins were labeled upon photoactivation, using either the PC analogue [125I]TID-PC or the small hydrophobic probe [125I]TID-BE. The most prominent difference was the very specific labeling of a 70 kDa protein by [125I]TID-PC. Mass spectrometric analysis of a tryptic digest of the corresponding 2D-gel spot identified the protein as the GUT2 gene product, the FAD-dependent mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. This was confirmed by the lack of specific labeling in mitochondria from a gut2 deletion strain. Only under conditions where the inner membrane was accessible to the probe, Gut2p was labeled by [125I]TID-PC, in parallel with increased labeling of the phosphate carrier (P(i)C) in the inner membrane. A hemagglutinin-tagged version of Gut2p was shown to be membrane-bound. Carbonate extraction released the protein from the membrane, whereas a high concentration of NaCl did not, demonstrating that Gut2p is a peripheral membrane protein bound to the inner membrane via hydrophobic interactions. The significance of the observed interactions between Gut2p and PC is discussed.

  5. Nuclear translocation and accumulation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase involved in diclazuril-induced apoptosis in Eimeria tenella (E. tenella).

    PubMed

    Wang, Congcong; Han, Chunzhou; Li, Tao; Yang, Dehao; Shen, Xiaojiong; Fan, Yinxin; Xu, Yang; Zheng, Wenli; Fei, Chenzhong; Zhang, Lifang; Xue, Feiqun

    2013-05-07

    In mammalian cells, GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) has recently been shown to be implicated in numerous apoptotic paradigms, especially in neuronal apoptosis, and has been demonstrated to play a vital role in some neurodegenerative disorders. However, this phenomenon has not been reported in protists. In the present study, we report for the first time that such a mechanism is involved in diclazuril-induced apoptosis in Eimeria tenella (E. tenella). We found that upon treatment of parasites with diclazuril, the expression levels of GAPDH transcript and protein were significantly increased in second-generation merozoites. Then, we examined the subcellular localization of GAPDH by fluorescence microscopy and Western blot analysis. The results show that a considerable amount of GAPDH protein appeared in the nucleus within diclazuril-treated second-generation merozoites; in contrast, the control group had very low levels of GAPDH in the nucleus. The glycolytic activity of GAPDH was kinetically analyzed in different subcellular fractions. A substantial decrease (48.5%) in glycolytic activity of GAPDH in the nucleus was displayed. Moreover, the activities of caspases-3, -9, and -8 were measured in cell extracts using specific caspase substrates. The data show significant increases in caspase-3 and caspase-9 activities in the diclazuril-treated group.

  6. Nuclear translocation and accumulation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase involved in diclazuril-induced apoptosis in Eimeria tenella (E. tenella)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In mammalian cells, GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) has recently been shown to be implicated in numerous apoptotic paradigms, especially in neuronal apoptosis, and has been demonstrated to play a vital role in some neurodegenerative disorders. However, this phenomenon has not been reported in protists. In the present study, we report for the first time that such a mechanism is involved in diclazuril-induced apoptosis in Eimeria tenella (E. tenella). We found that upon treatment of parasites with diclazuril, the expression levels of GAPDH transcript and protein were significantly increased in second-generation merozoites. Then, we examined the subcellular localization of GAPDH by fluorescence microscopy and Western blot analysis. The results show that a considerable amount of GAPDH protein appeared in the nucleus within diclazuril-treated second-generation merozoites; in contrast, the control group had very low levels of GAPDH in the nucleus. The glycolytic activity of GAPDH was kinetically analyzed in different subcellular fractions. A substantial decrease (48.5%) in glycolytic activity of GAPDH in the nucleus was displayed. Moreover, the activities of caspases-3, -9, and −8 were measured in cell extracts using specific caspase substrates. The data show significant increases in caspase-3 and caspase-9 activities in the diclazuril-treated group. PMID:23651214

  7. Autophagosome formation from membrane compartments enriched in phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate and dynamically connected to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Axe, Elizabeth L; Walker, Simon A; Manifava, Maria; Chandra, Priya; Roderick, H Llewelyn; Habermann, Anja; Griffiths, Gareth; Ktistakis, Nicholas T

    2008-08-25

    Autophagy is the engulfment of cytosol and organelles by double-membrane vesicles termed autophagosomes. Autophagosome formation is known to require phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI(3)P) and occurs near the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but the exact mechanisms are unknown. We show that double FYVE domain-containing protein 1, a PI(3)P-binding protein with unusual localization on ER and Golgi membranes, translocates in response to amino acid starvation to a punctate compartment partially colocalized with autophagosomal proteins. Translocation is dependent on Vps34 and beclin function. Other PI(3)P-binding probes targeted to the ER show the same starvation-induced translocation that is dependent on PI(3)P formation and recognition. Live imaging experiments show that this punctate compartment forms near Vps34-containing vesicles, is in dynamic equilibrium with the ER, and provides a membrane platform for accumulation of autophagosomal proteins, expansion of autophagosomal membranes, and emergence of fully formed autophagosomes. This PI(3)P-enriched compartment may be involved in autophagosome biogenesis. Its dynamic relationship with the ER is consistent with the idea that the ER may provide important components for autophagosome formation.

  8. Fatty acid synthesis and generation of glycerol-3-phosphate in brown adipose tissue from rats fed a cafeteria diet.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Valéria E; Frasson, Danúbia; Martins-Santos, Maria E S; Navegantes, Luiz C C; Galban, Victor D; Garófalo, Maria A R; Kettelhut, Isis C; Migliorini, Renato H

    2008-07-01

    In vivo fatty acid synthesis and the pathways of glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) production were investigated in brown adipose tissue (BAT) from rats fed a cafeteria diet for 3 weeks. In spite of BAT activation, the diet promoted an increase in the carcass fatty acid content. Plasma insulin levels were markedly increased in cafeteria diet-fed rats. Two insulin-sensitive processes, in vivo fatty acid synthesis and in vivo glucose uptake (which was used to evaluate G3P generation via glycolysis) were increased in BAT from rats fed the cafeteria diet. Direct glycerol phosphorylation, evaluated by glycerokinase (GyK) activity and incorporation of [U-14C]glycerol into triacylglycerol (TAG)-glycerol, was also markedly increased in BAT from these rats. In contrast, the cafeteria diet induced a marked reduction of BAT glyceroneogenesis, evaluated by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-C activity and incorporation of [1-14C]pyruvate into TAG-glycerol. BAT denervation resulted in an approximately 50% reduction of GyK activity, but did not significantly affect BAT in vivo fatty acid synthesis, in vivo glucose uptake, or glyceroneogenesis. The data suggest that the supply of G3P for BAT TAG synthesis can be adjusted independently from the sympathetic nervous system and solely by reciprocal changes in the generation of G3P via glycolysis and via glyceroneogenesis, with no participation of direct phosphorylation of glycerol by GyK.

  9. A Novel 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-Phosphate Synthase Shows High Glyphosate Tolerance in Escherichia coli and Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shengxue; Yang, Xuewen; Chen, Rongrong; Zhang, Yuwen; Lu, Wei; Liu, Yan; Wang, Jianhua; Lin, Min; Wang, Guoying

    2012-01-01

    A key enzyme in the shikimate pathway, 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) is the primary target of the broad-spectrum herbicide glyphosate. Identification of new aroA genes coding for EPSPS with a high level of glyphosate tolerance is essential for the development of glyphosate-tolerant crops. In the present study, the glyphosate tolerance of five bacterial aroA genes was evaluated in the E. coli aroA-defective strain ER2799 and in transgenic tobacco plants. All five aroA genes could complement the aroA-defective strain ER2799, and AM79 aroA showed the highest glyphosate tolerance. Although glyphosate treatment inhibited the growth of both WT and transgenic tobacco plants, transgenic plants expressing AM79 aroA tolerated higher concentration of glyphosate and had a higher fresh weight and survival rate than plants expressing other aroA genes. When treated with high concentration of glyphosate, lower shikimate content was detected in the leaves of transgenic plants expressing AM79 aroA than transgenic plants expressing other aroA genes. These results suggest that AM79 aroA could be a good candidate for the development of transgenic glyphosate-tolerant crops. PMID:22715408

  10. Improvement of Glyphosate Resistance through Concurrent Mutations in Three Amino Acids of the Ochrobactrum 5-Enopyruvylshikimate-3-Phosphate Synthase ▿

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yong-Sheng; Xu, Jing; Xiong, Ai-Sheng; Zhao, Wei; Fu, Xiao-Yan; Peng, Ri-He; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2011-01-01

    A mutant of 5-enopyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase from Ochrobactrum anthropi was identified after four rounds of DNA shuffling and screening. Its ability to restore the growth of the mutant ER2799 cell on an M9 minimal medium containing 300 mM glyphosate led to its identification. The mutant had mutations in seven amino acids: E145G, N163H, N267S, P318R, M377V, M425T, and P438L. Among these mutations, N267S, P318R, and M425T have never been previously reported as important residues for glyphosate resistance. However, in the present study they were found by site-directed mutagenesis to collectively contribute to the improvement of glyphosate tolerance. Kinetic analyses of these three mutants demonstrated that the effectiveness of these three individual amino acid alterations on glyphosate tolerance was in the order P318R > M425T > N267S. The results of the kinetic analyses combined with a three-dimensional structure modeling of the location of P318R and M425T demonstrate that the lower hemisphere's upper surface is possibly another important region for glyphosate resistance. Furthermore, the transgenic Arabidopsis was obtained to confirm the potential of the mutant in developing glyphosate-resistant crops. PMID:21948846

  11. Glycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase is required for PBAN-induced sex pheromone biosynthesis in Bombyx mori<