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Sample records for 1-phosphate sn-glycerol 3-phosphate

  1. Structure and Evolution of the Archaeal Lipid Synthesis Enzyme sn-Glycerol-1-phosphate Dehydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Vincenzo; Schofield, Linley R.; Zhang, Yanli; Sang, Carrie; Dey, Debjit; Hannus, Ingegerd M.; Martin, William F.; Sutherland-Smith, Andrew J.; Ronimus, Ron S.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most critical events in the origins of cellular life was the development of lipid membranes. Archaea use isoprenoid chains linked via ether bonds to sn-glycerol 1-phosphate (G1P), whereas bacteria and eukaryotes use fatty acids attached via ester bonds to enantiomeric sn-glycerol 3-phosphate. NAD(P)H-dependent G1P dehydrogenase (G1PDH) forms G1P and has been proposed to have played a crucial role in the speciation of the Archaea. We present here, to our knowledge, the first structures of archaeal G1PDH from the hyperthermophilic methanogen Methanocaldococcus jannaschii with bound substrate dihydroxyacetone phosphate, product G1P, NADPH, and Zn2+ cofactor. We also biochemically characterized the enzyme with respect to pH optimum, cation specificity, and kinetic parameters for dihydroxyacetone phosphate and NAD(P)H. The structures provide key evidence for the reaction mechanism in the stereospecific addition for the NAD(P)H-based pro-R hydrogen transfer and the coordination of the Zn2+ cofactor during catalysis. Structure-based phylogenetic analyses also provide insight into the origins of G1PDH. PMID:26175150

  2. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of the glpD gene encoding sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, H P; Po, C

    1994-01-01

    Nitrosoguanidine-induced Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants which were unable to utilize glycerol as a carbon source were isolated. By utilizing PAO104, a mutant defective in glycerol transport and sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (glpD), the glpD gene was cloned by a phage mini-D3112-based in vivo cloning method. The cloned gene was able to complement an Escherichia coli glpD mutant. Restriction analysis and recloning of DNA fragments located the glpD gene to a 1.6-kb EcoRI-SphI DNA fragment. In E. coli, a single 56,000-Da protein was expressed from the cloned DNA fragments. An in-frame glpD'-'lacZ translational fusion was isolated and used to determine the reading frame of glpD by sequencing across the fusion junction. The nucleotide sequence of a 1,792-bp fragment containing the glpD region was determined. The glpD gene encodes a protein containing 510 amino acids and with a predicted molecular weight of 56,150. Compared with the aerobic sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from E. coli, P. aeruginosa GlpD is 56% identical and 69% similar. A similar comparison with GlpD from Bacillus subtilis reveals 21% identity and 40% similarity. A flavin-binding domain near the amino terminus which shared the consensus sequence reported for other bacterial flavoproteins was identified. Images PMID:8157588

  3. Kinetic mechanism and order of substrate binding for sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase from squash (Cucurbita moschata).

    PubMed

    Hayman, Matthew W; Fawcett, Tony; Slabas, Antoni R

    2002-03-13

    sn-Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (G3PAT, EC 2.3.1.15), a component of glycerolipid biosynthesis, is an important enzyme in chilling sensitivity in plants. The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme from squash (Cucurbita moschata), without bound substrate, has been determined [Turnbull et al. (2001) Acta Crystallogr. D 57, 451-453; Turnbull et al. (2001) Structure 9, 347-353]. Here we report the kinetic mechanism of plastidial G3PAT from squash and the order of substrate binding using acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP) substrates. The reaction proceeds via a compulsory-ordered ternary complex with acyl-ACP binding before glycerol-3-phosphate. We have also determined that the reaction will proceed with C(4:0)-CoA, C(6:0)-CoA and C(12:0)-ACP substrates, allowing a wider choice of acyl groups for future co-crystallisation studies.

  4. Improved purification of sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its inhibition by ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, J.R.; Chen, S.M.; Osinchak, J.; Trumbore, M.

    1986-05-01

    An improved purification procedure yielded a homogeneous preparation of sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) from commercially available baker's yeast. The enzyme had an apparent molecular weight of 42,000 by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This differs from the 31,000 reported earlier on the basis of its elution from a calibrated Sepharose 6B column. When denatured by guanidine (6M) and chromatographed on a Sephadex G-100 column with 6M guanidine in 0.1M phosphate buffer, pH 6.5, containing 0.1M ..beta..-mercaptoethanol, GPD eluted with the approximately 42,000 mw proteins. S. cerevisiae GPD is an NAD-dependent oxidoreductase. With NADH as the variable substrate the GPD-catalyzed reduction of dihydroxacetone phosphate (DHAP) had a K/sub M/ of 0.018 mM and was competitively inhibited by ethanol. With DHAP as the variable substrate and NADH constant GPD catalyzed the reduction with a K/sub M/ of 0.37 mM and was noncompetitively inhibited by ethanol. The calculated K/sub i/ for the non-competitive inhibition was 3.4M. K/sub i/ for the competitive inhibition of NADH by ethanol varied with increasing concentrations of ethanol indicating a more complex mechanism than a truly competitive one.

  5. Esters of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, highly effective inhibitors of the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase of Trypanosoma brucei brucei.

    PubMed

    Grady, R W; Bienen, E J; Clarkson, A B

    1986-10-01

    Alkyl esters of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid are inhibitors of the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase system of Trypanosoma brucei brucei in vitro and have significant trypanocidal activity in vivo when combined with glycerol. While the parent acid has little inhibitory activity in vitro, the esters are highly active with activity increasing as the chain length of the esterifying alcohol increases. The n-dodecyl ester was more than 400 times as active as salicylhydroxamic acid and 15 times more active than the corresponding p-n-alkyloxybenzhydroxamic acid, one of the most active sn-glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase inhibitors previously reported. When combined with glycerol (to block an alternative pathway of glycolysis) and tested in vitro against intact parasites, this ester was 100 times more effective than salicylhydroxamic acid and 10 times more effective than p-n-dodecyloxybenzhydroxamic acid. It was also active against T. b. brucei in mice when combined with glycerol whereas the latter compound was not. Esters of 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid (gallic acid) were also highly active while those of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid were much less inhibitory and those of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid were inactive. A related compound, 2',4',5'-trihydroxybutyrophenone, was also active as predicted by its structure but was too toxic to be of interest as a drug candidate.

  6. Mapping of two ugp genes coding for the pho regulon-dependent sn-glycerol-3-phosphate transport system of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, H; Grussenmeyer, T; Boos, W

    1982-01-01

    Two genes, ugpA and ugpB, coding for a binding protein-dependent sn-glycerol-3-phosphate transport system, were mapped at 75.3 min on the Escherichia coli chromosome. A Tn10 insertion in ugpA resulted in loss of transport activity but still allowed the synthesis of the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate-binding protein. This Tn10 insertion was found to be linked by P1 transduction to pit, aroB, malA, asd, and livH with 2.5, 2.8, 25, 63.5, and 83% cotransduction frequency. An insertion of Mud (Ampr lac) in ugpB resulted in the loss of the binding protein. ugpB is closely linked to ugpA. It is either the structural gene for the binding protein or located proximal to it. The analysis of the crosses allowed the ordering of the markers in the clockwise direction as follows: aroB, malA, asd, ugpA, ugpB, livH, pit. Images PMID:6281238

  7. Cloning and characterization of murine 1-acyl-sn-glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferases and their regulation by PPARalpha in murine heart.

    PubMed

    Lu, Biao; Jiang, Yan J; Zhou, Yaling; Xu, Fred Y; Hatch, Grant M; Choy, Patrick C

    2005-01-15

    AGPAT (1-acyl-sn-glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase) exists in at least five isoforms in humans, termed as AGPAT1, AGPAT2, AGPAT3, AGPAT4 and AGPAT5. Although they catalyse the same biochemical reaction, their relative function, tissue expression and regulation are poorly understood. Linkage studies in humans have revealed that AGPAT2 contributes to glycerolipid synthesis and plays an important role in regulating lipid metabolism. We report the molecular cloning, tissue distribution, and enzyme characterization of mAGPATs (murine AGPATs) and regulation of cardiac mAGPATs by PPARalpha (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor alpha). mAGPATs demonstrated differential tissue expression profiles: mAGPAT1 and mAGPAT3 were ubiquitously expressed in most tissues, whereas mAGPAT2, mAGPAT4 and mAGPAT5 were expressed in a tissue-specific manner. mAGPAT2 expressed in in vitro transcription and translation reactions and in transfected COS-1 cells exhibited specificity for 1-acyl-sn-glycerol 3-phosphate. When amino acid sequences of five mAGPATs were compared, three highly conserved motifs were identified, including one novel motif/pattern KX2LX6GX12R. Cardiac mAGPAT activities were 25% lower (P<0.05) in PPARalpha null mice compared with wild-type. In addition, cardiac mAGPAT activities were 50% lower (P<0.05) in PPARalpha null mice fed clofibrate compared with clofibrate fed wild-type animals. This modulation of AGPAT activity was accompanied by significant enhancement/reduction of the mRNA levels of mAGPAT3/mAGPAT2 respectively. Finally, mRNA expression of cardiac mAGPAT3 appeared to be regulated by PPARalpha activation. We conclude that cardiac mAGPAT activity may be regulated by both the composition of mAGPAT isoforms and the levels of each isoform. PMID:15367102

  8. Three homologous genes encoding sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 4 exhibit different expression patterns and functional divergence in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xue; Truksa, Martin; Snyder, Crystal L; El-Mezawy, Aliaa; Shah, Saleh; Weselake, Randall J

    2011-02-01

    Brassica napus is an allotetraploid (AACC) formed from the fusion of two diploid progenitors, Brassica rapa (AA) and Brassica oleracea (CC). Polyploidy and genome-wide rearrangement during the evolution process have resulted in genes that are present as multiple homologs in the B. napus genome. In this study, three B. napus homologous genes encoding endoplasmic reticulum-bound sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 4 (GPAT4) were identified and characterized. Although the three GPAT4 homologs share a high sequence similarity, they exhibit different expression patterns and altered epigenetic features. Heterologous expression in yeast further revealed that the three BnGPAT4 homologs encoded functional GPAT enzymes but with different levels of polypeptide accumulation. Complementation of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) gpat4 gpat8 double mutant line with individual BnGPAT4 homologs suggested their physiological roles in cuticle formation. Analysis of gpat4 RNA interference lines of B. napus revealed that the BnGPAT4 deficiency resulted in reduced cutin content and altered stomatal structures in leaves. Our results revealed that the BnGPAT4 homologs have evolved into functionally divergent forms and play important roles in cutin synthesis and stomatal development.

  9. Cloning, heterologous expression and biochemical characterization of plastidial sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase from Helianthus annuus.

    PubMed

    Payá-Milans, Miriam; Venegas-Calerón, Mónica; Salas, Joaquín J; Garcés, Rafael; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2015-03-01

    The acyl-[acyl carrier protein]:sn-1-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT; E.C. 2.3.1.15) catalyzes the first step of glycerolipid assembly within the stroma of the chloroplast. In the present study, the sunflower (Helianthus annuus, L.) stromal GPAT was cloned, sequenced and characterized. We identified a single ORF of 1344base pairs that encoded a GPAT sharing strong sequence homology with the plastidial GPAT from Arabidopsis thaliana (ATS1, At1g32200). Gene expression studies showed that the highest transcript levels occurred in green tissues in which chloroplasts are abundant. The corresponding mature protein was heterologously overexpressed in Escherichia coli for purification and biochemical characterization. In vitro assays using radiolabelled acyl-ACPs and glycerol-3-phosphate as substrates revealed a strong preference for oleic versus palmitic acid, and weak activity towards stearic acid. The positional fatty acid composition of relevant chloroplast phospholipids from sunflower leaves did not reflect the in vitro GPAT specificity, suggesting a more complex scenario with mixed substrates at different concentrations, competition with other acyl-ACP consuming enzymatic reactions, etc. In summary, this study has confirmed the affinity of this enzyme which would partly explain the resistance to cold temperatures observed in sunflower plants.

  10. Repressor for the sn-glycerol 3-phosphate regulon of Escherichia coli K-12: primary structure and identification of the DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Zeng, G; Ye, S; Larson, T J

    1996-12-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the glpEGR operon of Escherichia coli was determined. The translational reading frame at the beginning, middle, and end of each gene was verified. The glpE gene encodes an acidic, cytoplasmic protein of 108 amino acids with a molecular weight of 12,082. The glpG gene encodes a basic, cytoplasmic membrane-associated protein of 276 amino acids with a molecular weight of 31,278. The functions of GlpE and GlpG are unknown. The glpR gene encodes the repressor for the glycerol 3-phosphate regulon, a protein predicted to contain 252 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 28,048. The amino acid sequence of the glp repressor was similar to several repressors of carbohydrate catabolic systems, including those of the glucitol (GutR), fucose (FucR), and deoxyribonucleoside (DeoR) systems of E. coli, as well as those of the lactose (LacR) and inositol (IolR) systems of gram-positive bacteria and agrocinopine (AccR) system of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. These repressors constitute a family of related proteins, all of which contain approximately 250 amino acids, possess a helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif near the amino terminus, and bind a sugar phosphate molecule as the inducing signal. The DNA recognition helix of the glp repressor and the nucleotide sequence of the glp operator were very similar to those of the deo system. The presumptive recognition helix of the glp repressor was changed by site-directed mutagenesis to match that of the deo repressor or, in a separate construct, to abolish DNA binding. Neither altered form of the glp repressor recognized the glp or deo operator, either in vivo or in vitro. However, both altered forms of the glp repressor were negatively dominant to the wild-type glp repressor, indicating that the inability to bind DNA with high affinity was due to alteration of the DNA-binding domain, not to an inability to oligomerize or instability of the altered repressors. For the first time, analysis of repressors

  11. Resveratrol plus ethanol counteract the ethanol-induced impairment of energy metabolism: ³¹P NMR study of ATP and sn-glycerol-3-phosphate on isolated and perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    Gallis, Jean-Louis; Serhan, Nizar; Gin, Henri; Couzigou, Patrice; Beauvieux, Marie-Christine

    2012-03-01

    The effects of trans-resveratrol (RSV) combined with ethanol (EtOH) were evaluated by (31)P NMR on total ATP and sn-glycerol-3-phosphate (sn-G3P) contents measured in real time in isolated and perfused whole liver of the rat. Mitochondrial ATP turnover was assessed by using specific inhibitors of glycolytic and mitochondrial ATP supply (iodacetate and KCN, respectively). In RSV alone, the slight decrease in ATP content (-14±5% of the initial content), sn-G3P content and ATP turnover were similar to those in the Krebs-Henseleit buffer control. Compared to control, EtOH alone (14 or 70 mmol/L) induced a decrease in ATP content (-24.95±2.95% of initial content, p<0.05) and an increase in sn-G3P (+158±22%), whereas ATP turnover tended to be increased. RSV (20 μmol/L) combined with EtOH, (i) maintained ATP content near 100%, (ii) induced a 1.6-fold increase in mitochondrial ATP turnover (p=0.049 and p=0.004 vs EtOH 14 and 70 mmol/L alone, respectively) and (iii) led to an increase in sn-G3P (+49±9% and +81±6% for 14 and 70 mmol/L EtOH, respectively). These improvements were obtained only when glycolysis was efficient at the time of addition of EtOH+RSV. Glycolysis inhibition by iodacetate (IAA) evidenced an almost 21% contribution of this pathway to ATP content. RSV alone or RSV+EtOH prevented the ATP decrease induced by IAA addition (p<0.05 vs control). This is the first demonstration of the combined effects of RSV and EtOH on liver energy metabolism. RSV increased (i) the flux of substrates through ATP producing pathways (glycolysis and phosphorylative oxidation) probably via the activation of AMPkinase, and (ii) maintained the glycolysis deviation to sn-G3P linked to NADH+H⁺ re-oxidation occurring during EtOH detoxication, thus reducing the energy cost due to the latter.

  12. Antioxidant behavior of 1-feruloyl-sn-glycerol and 1,3-diferuloyl-sn-glycerol in phospholipid liposomes 1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    1-Feruloyl-sn-glycerol (FG) and 1,3-diferuloyl-sn-glycerol (DFG) are two natural plant compounds that may be useful in cosmeceutical, food, and skin care applications because of excellent antioxidant properties. FG and DFG enzymatically synthesized through esterification of glycerol and soybean oil...

  13. Technological approach of 1-O-alkyl-sn-glycerols separation from Berryteuthis magister squid liver oil.

    PubMed

    Ermolenko, Ekaterina; Latyshev, Nikolay; Sultanov, Ruslan; Kasyanov, Sergey

    2016-03-01

    Biological active compounds, 1-O-alkyl-sn-glycerols (AG), were isolated from liver oil of the squid Berryteuthis magister. The main components of the initial lipids were 1-O-alkyl-2,3-diacyl-sn-glycerols (38.50 %) and triacylglycerols (24.26 %). The first step of separation was the alkaline hydrolysis of oil to form a lipid mixture consisting of AG, free fatty acids and cholesterol. AG were separated by double recrystallization from acetone at -20 °C and 1 °C. A simple procedure is proposed for obtaining AG with a purity of 99.22 %, the main component of which is chimyl alcohol (94.39 %). Purity and structure of the obtained products were confirmed by GC and GC-MS technique. Isolated AG may be used in nutrition and cosmetics. PMID:27570298

  14. Isolation of a GPD gene from Debaryomyces hansenii encoding a glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (NAD+).

    PubMed

    Thomé, Patricia E

    2004-01-30

    A gene homologous to GPD1, coding for glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (sn-glycerol 3-phosphate: NAD(+) oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.8), has been isolated from the halophilic yeast Debaryomyces hansenii by complementation of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gpd1 Delta mutant. DNA sequencing of the complementing genomic clone indicated the existence of an open reading frame encoding a protein with 369 amino acids. Comparative analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence showed high similarity to homologous genes described for other eukaryotic GPD enzymes. The sequence has been submitted to the GenBank database under Accession No. AY333427.

  15. Metabolism of L-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyananda, M.K.G.S.

    1985-01-01

    E. coli is able to incorporate L-glyceraldehyde and L-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate into phospholipids, L-(3-/sup 3/H)Glyceraldehyde was synthesized and the purity and the chemical identity of the product were checked by paper chromatography. L-(3-/sup 3/H)Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate was synthesized from L-(3-/sup 3/H)glyceraldehyde in a reaction catalyzed by glycerokinase. E. coli extract contains a new enzyme activity which catalyzes an NADPH dependent reduction of L-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate into sn-glycerol 3-phosphate. A procedure, specifically suitable for assaying the reductase activity in the crude extract, was developed. A more convenient spectrophotometric assay method was employed for the purified enzyme. At moderate concentrations sulfhydryl group inhibitors had no effect on the enzyme activity of L-GAP reductase. At 100..mu..M concentration Zn/sup +2/ inhibited the enzyme activity by about 30% while Mn/sup +2/ elevated the activity by about the same margin. Mg/sup +2/, Ca/sup +2/ and Fe/sup +2/ were without effect at this concentration. L-Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate is known to be bactericidal at 1.25 ..mu..M concentration and the D-enantiomer is without effect. Furthermore, methylglyoxal is known to be bactericidal at or above 0.5 mM concentration. Strains of E. coli resistant to 1 mM methylglyoxal were isolated. The cell extract prepared from the mutant possessed increased capacity to transform methylglyoxal into D-lactate via a glutathione dependent reaction. These mutants were less sensitive to 2.5 mM DL-GAP suggesting that conversion of L-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate into methylglyoxal may at least partly be responsible for the bactericidal activity of L-GAP.

  16. 1 -O-alkyl-2-(omega-oxo)acyl-sn-glycerols from shark oil and human milk fat are potential precursors of PAF mimics and GHB.

    PubMed

    Hartvigsen, Karsten; Ravandi, Amir; Harkewicz, Richard; Kamido, Hiroshi; Bukhave, Klaus; Hølmera, Gunhild; Kuksis, Arnis

    2006-07-01

    This study examines the feasibility that peroxidation and lipolysis of 1-O-alkyl-2,3-diacyl-sn-glycerols (DAGE) found in shark liver oil and human milk fat constitutes a potential source of dietary precursors of platelet activating factor (PAF) mimics and of gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB). Purified DAGE were converted into 1-O-alkyl-2-acyl-sn-glycerols by pancreatic lipase, without isomerization, and transformed into 1-O-alkyl-2-oxoacyl-sn-glycerols by mild autooxidation. The various core aldehydes without derivatization, as well as the corresponding dinitrophenylhydrazones, were characterized by chromatographic retention time and diagnostic ions by online electrospray mass spectrometry. Core aldehydes of oxidized shark liver oil yielded 23 molecular species of 1-O-alkyl-sn-glycerols with short-chain sn-2 oxoacyl groups, ranging from 4 to 13 carbons, some unsaturated. Autooxidation of human milk fat yielded 1-O-octadecyl-2-(9-oxo)nonanoyl-sn-glycerol, as the major core aldehyde. Because diradylglycerols with short fatty chains are absorbed in the intestine and react with cytidine diphosphate-choline in the enterocytes, it is concluded that formation of such PAF mimics as 1-O-alkyl-2-(omega-oxo)acyl-sn-glycerophosphocholine from unsaturated dietary DAGE is a realistic possibility. Likewise, a C4 core alcohol produced by aldol-keto reduction of a C4 core aldehyde constitutes a dietary precursor of the neuromodulator and recreational drug GHB, which has not been previously pointed out.

  17. Tigecycline resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii mediated by frameshift mutation in plsC, encoding 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Liu, L; Ji, J; Chen, Q; Hua, X; Jiang, Y; Feng, Y; Yu, Y

    2015-03-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important pathogen of healthcare-associated infections and shows multidrug resistance. With the increasing application of tigecycline, isolates resistant to this antibiotic are of growing concern clinically. However, the definitive mechanism of tigecycline resistance remains unclear. To explore the mechanism of tigecycline resistance in A. baumannii, a tigecycline-resistant strain was obtained by increasing the concentration of the antimicrobial in liquid culture. Three mutations were identified by the whole genome comparison, including one synonymous substitution in a hypothetical protein and a frameshift mutation in plsC and omp38. The plsC gene was confirmed to cause decreased susceptibility to tigecycline by a complementation experiment and cellular membrane change was detected by flow cytometry. By measuring the relative growth rate, the fitness cost of plsC was estimated to be approximately 8 %. In conclusion, plsC was found to play an important role in tigecycline resistance in A. baumannii. The minor fitness cost of plsC indicates a high risk of the emergence and development of tigecycline resistance in A. baumannii.

  18. 1,3-Diferuloyl-sn-glycerol from the biocatalytic transesterification of ethyl 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy cinnamic acid (ethyl ferulate) and soybean oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    1,3-Diferuloyl-sn-glycerol is a natural plant component found ubiquitously throughout the plant kingdom, possessing ultraviolet adsorbing and antioxidant properties. Diferuloyl glycerol was synthesized and isolated as a byproduct in up to 5% yield from the pilot plant scale packed-bed, biocatalytic...

  19. Structure of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, an essential monotopic membrane enzyme involved in respiration and metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Joanne I.; Chinte, Unmesh; Du, Shoucheng

    2008-04-02

    Sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GlpD) is an essential membrane enzyme, functioning at the central junction of respiration, glycolysis, and phospholipid biosynthesis. Its critical role is indicated by the multitiered regulatory mechanisms that stringently controls its expression and function. Once expressed, GlpD activity is regulated through lipid-enzyme interactions in Escherichia coli. Here, we report seven previously undescribed structures of the fully active E. coli GlpD, up to 1.75 {angstrom} resolution. In addition to elucidating the structure of the native enzyme, we have determined the structures of GlpD complexed with substrate analogues phosphoenolpyruvate, glyceric acid 2-phosphate, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, and product, dihydroxyacetone phosphate. These structural results reveal conformational states of the enzyme, delineating the residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis at the glycerol-3-phosphate site. Two probable mechanisms for catalyzing the dehydrogenation of glycerol-3-phosphate are envisioned, based on the conformational states of the complexes. To further correlate catalytic dehydrogenation to respiration, we have additionally determined the structures of GlpD bound with ubiquinone analogues menadione and 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide, identifying a hydrophobic plateau that is likely the ubiquinone-binding site. These structures illuminate probable mechanisms of catalysis and suggest how GlpD shuttles electrons into the respiratory pathway. Glycerol metabolism has been implicated in insulin signaling and perturbations in glycerol uptake and catabolism are linked to obesity in humans. Homologs of GlpD are found in practically all organisms, from prokaryotes to humans, with >45% consensus protein sequences, signifying that these structural results on the prokaryotic enzyme may be readily applied to the eukaryotic GlpD enzymes.

  20. Thermotropic phase properties of 1,2-di-O-tetradecyl-3-O-(3-O-methyl- beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-sn-glycerol.

    PubMed Central

    Trouard, T P; Mannock, D A; Lindblom, G; Rilfors, L; Akiyama, M; McElhaney, R N

    1994-01-01

    The hydration properties and the phase structure of 1,2-di-O-tetradecyl-3-O(3-O-methyl-beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-sn-glycerol (3-O-Me-beta-D-GlcDAIG) in water have been studied via differential scanning calorimetry, 1H-NMR and 2H-NMR spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Results indicate that this lipid forms a crystalline (Lc) phase up to temperatures of 60-70 degrees C, where a transition through a metastable reversed hexagonal (Hll) phase to a reversed micellar solution (L2) phase occurs. Experiments were carried out at water concentrations in a range from 0 to 35 wt%, which indicate that all phases are poorly hydrated, taking up < 5 mol water/mol lipid. The absence of a lamellar liquid crystalline (L alpha) phase and the low levels of hydration measured in the discernible phases suggest that the methylation of the saccharide moiety alters the hydrogen bonding properties of the headgroup in such a way that the 3-O-Me-beta-D-GlcDAIG headgroup cannot achieve the same level of hydration as the unmethylated form. Thus, in spite of the small increase in steric bulk resulting from methylation, there is an increase in the tendency of 3-O-Me-beta-D-GlcDAIG to form nonlamellar structures. A similar phase behavior has previously been observed for the Acholeplasma laidlawii A membrane lipid 1,2-diacyl-3-O-(6-O-acyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl)-sn-glycerol in water (Lindblom et al. 1993. J. Biol. Chem. 268:16198-16207). The phase behavior of the two lipids suggests that hydrophobic substitution of a hydroxyl group in the sugar ring of the glucopyranosylglycerols has a very strong effect on their physicochemical properties, i.e., headgroup hydration and the formation of different lipid aggregate structures. PMID:7811919

  1. A comparative monomolecular film study of 1,2-di-O-palmitoyl-3-O-(alpha- and beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-sn-glycerols.

    PubMed

    Asgharian, B; Cadenhead, D A; Mannock, D A; Lewis, R N; McElhaney, R N

    1989-08-22

    The polar headgroup contribution to monolayer behavior of dipalmitoylglucosylglycerol has been examined through studies of 1,2-di-O-palmitoyl-3-O-(alpha-D-glucopyranosyl)-sn-glycerol (di-16:0-alpha GlcDG) and 1,2-di-O-palmitoyl-3-O-(beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-sn-glycerol (di-16:0-beta GlcDG) in which the sugar headgroup is linked via an alpha or beta linkage to the diacylglycerol moiety. The results indicate that the limiting areas per molecule of the resultant condensed states are smaller than those of the corresponding phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) but larger than those of dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolmine (DPPE). In the expanded state, while the areas per molecule are similar to those of DPPC at low pressures, both glycolipids occupy smaller areas at higher pressures. The expanded-state areas of the glucolipids are also slightly greater than those of DPPE. The initial compressional phase transition pressure of the glucolipid liquid-expanded/liquid-condensed transition (pi t) is, however, less sensitive to temperature than are the pi t values of phospholipids. Both of these effects must relate to strong headgroup/water interactions, which, in turn, result in a stabilization of the liquid-expanded states. In the expanded states the alpha anomers are slightly less tightly packed than the beta anomers, as is indicated by the somewhat higher areas per molecule of the expanded states and the lower transition temperatures. These differences in chain-melting temperatures are slightly smaller than those observed in bilayers. While the areas per molecule of the dipalmitoyl glucolipids are greater than those of dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine, they nevertheless exhibit a greater tendency to form nonbilayer structures. Such observations indicate that other factors besides geometric shape play a role in bilayer/nonbilayer transitions.

  2. Altered regulation of lipid biosynthesis in a mutant of Arabidopsis deficient in chloroplast glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kunst, L.; Browse, J.; Somerville, C. )

    1988-06-01

    The leaf membrane lipids of many plant species, including Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., are synthesized by two complementary pathways that are associated with the chloroplast and the endoplasmic reticulum. By screening directly for alterations in lipid acyl-group composition, the authors have identified several mutants of Arabidopsis that lack the plastid pathway because of a deficiency in activity of the first enzyme in the plastid pathway of glycerolipid synthesis, acyl-ACP:sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase. The lesion results in an increased synthesis of lipids by the cytoplasmic pathway that largely compensates for the loss of the plastid pathway and provides nearly normal amounts of all the lipids required for chloroplast biogenesis. However, the fatty acid composition of the leaf membrane lipids of the mutants is altered because the acyltransferases associated with the two pathways normally exhibit different substrate specificities. The remarkable flexibility of the system provides an insight into the nature of the regulatory mechanisms that allocate lipids for membrane biogenesis.

  3. Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 4 is essential for the normal development of reproductive organs and the embryo in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xue; Chen, Guanqun; Truksa, Martin; Snyder, Crystal L; Shah, Saleh; Weselake, Randall J

    2014-08-01

    The enzyme sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 4 (GPAT4) is involved in the biosynthesis of plant lipid poly-esters. The present study further characterizes the enzymatic activities of three endoplasmic reticulum-bound GPAT4 isoforms of Brassica napus and examines their roles in the development of reproductive organs and the embryo. All three BnGPAT4 isoforms exhibited sn-2 acyltransferase and phosphatase activities with dicarboxylic acid-CoA as acyl donor. When non-substituted acyl-CoA was used as acyl donor, the rate of acylation was considerably lower and phosphatase activity was not manifested. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated down-regulation of all GPAT4 homologues in B. napus under the control of the napin promoter caused abnormal development of several reproductive organs and reduced seed set. Microscopic examination and reciprocal crosses revealed that both pollen grains and developing embryo sacs of the B. napus gpat4 lines were affected. The gpat4 mature embryos showed decreased cutin content and altered monomer composition. The defective embryo development further affected the oil body morphology, oil content, and fatty acid composition in gpat4 seeds. These results suggest that GPAT4 has a critical role in the development of reproductive organs and the seed of B. napus.

  4. Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 4 is essential for the normal development of reproductive organs and the embryo in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xue; Chen, Guanqun; Truksa, Martin; Snyder, Crystal L.; Shah, Saleh; Weselake, Randall J.

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 4 (GPAT4) is involved in the biosynthesis of plant lipid poly-esters. The present study further characterizes the enzymatic activities of three endoplasmic reticulum-bound GPAT4 isoforms of Brassica napus and examines their roles in the development of reproductive organs and the embryo. All three BnGPAT4 isoforms exhibited sn-2 acyltransferase and phosphatase activities with dicarboxylic acid-CoA as acyl donor. When non-substituted acyl-CoA was used as acyl donor, the rate of acylation was considerably lower and phosphatase activity was not manifested. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated down-regulation of all GPAT4 homologues in B. napus under the control of the napin promoter caused abnormal development of several reproductive organs and reduced seed set. Microscopic examination and reciprocal crosses revealed that both pollen grains and developing embryo sacs of the B. napus gpat4 lines were affected. The gpat4 mature embryos showed decreased cutin content and altered monomer composition. The defective embryo development further affected the oil body morphology, oil content, and fatty acid composition in gpat4 seeds. These results suggest that GPAT4 has a critical role in the development of reproductive organs and the seed of B. napus. PMID:24821955

  5. Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 4 is essential for the normal development of reproductive organs and the embryo in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xue; Chen, Guanqun; Truksa, Martin; Snyder, Crystal L; Shah, Saleh; Weselake, Randall J

    2014-08-01

    The enzyme sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 4 (GPAT4) is involved in the biosynthesis of plant lipid poly-esters. The present study further characterizes the enzymatic activities of three endoplasmic reticulum-bound GPAT4 isoforms of Brassica napus and examines their roles in the development of reproductive organs and the embryo. All three BnGPAT4 isoforms exhibited sn-2 acyltransferase and phosphatase activities with dicarboxylic acid-CoA as acyl donor. When non-substituted acyl-CoA was used as acyl donor, the rate of acylation was considerably lower and phosphatase activity was not manifested. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated down-regulation of all GPAT4 homologues in B. napus under the control of the napin promoter caused abnormal development of several reproductive organs and reduced seed set. Microscopic examination and reciprocal crosses revealed that both pollen grains and developing embryo sacs of the B. napus gpat4 lines were affected. The gpat4 mature embryos showed decreased cutin content and altered monomer composition. The defective embryo development further affected the oil body morphology, oil content, and fatty acid composition in gpat4 seeds. These results suggest that GPAT4 has a critical role in the development of reproductive organs and the seed of B. napus. PMID:24821955

  6. Escherichia coli mutants defective in membrane phospholipid synthesis: binding and metabolism of 1-oleoylglycerol 3-phosphate by a plsB deep rough mutant.

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, T M; Bell, R M

    1978-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli containing a defective sn-glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase are conditionally defective in the synthesis of acylglycerol phosphate (acylglycerol-P). Incubation of a deep rough derivative of one of these plsB strains with 1-[3H]oleoylglycerol-32P resulted in the binding of up to 70 nmol of oleoylglycerol-P per 100 nmol of cellular phospholipid. The binding was dependent on time, oleoylglycerol-P concentration, and the quantity of cells employed. The rate and extent of oleoylglycerol-P binding was affected by the deep rough mutation. The altered phospholipid composition due to oleoylglycerol-P binding was without consequence on cell growth and viability, but caused the appearance of intracellular multilamellar structures. Use of the double-labeled oleoylglycerol P demonstrated that the entire molecule was bound to the cell. Intact [3H]-oleoylglycerol-32P was converted to phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphotidyl-glycerol at a rate about 40% of that of de novo phospholipid synthesis. These data demonstrate the transmembrane movement of oleoylglycerol-P to the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane and suggest that it may become possible to supplement plsB strains of E. coli with acylglycerol-P's. Images PMID:353031

  7. Berberine treatment attenuates the palmitate-mediated inhibition of glucose uptake and consumption through increased 1,2,3-triacyl-sn-glycerol synthesis and accumulation in H9c2 cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wenguang; Chen, Li; Hatch, Grant M

    2016-04-01

    Dysfunction of lipid metabolism and accumulation of 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol (DAG) may be a key factor in the development of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. Berberine (BBR) is an isoquinoline alkaloid extract that has shown promise as a hypoglycemic agent in the management of diabetes in animal and human studies. However, its mechanism of action is not well understood. To determine the effect of BBR on lipid synthesis and its relationship to insulin resistance in H9c2 cardiomyocytes, we measured neutral lipid and phospholipid synthesis and their relationship to glucose uptake. Compared with controls, BBR treatment stimulated 2-[1,2-(3)H(N)]deoxy-D-glucose uptake and consumption in palmitate-mediated insulin resistant H9c2 cells. The mechanism was though an increase in protein kinase B (AKT) activity and GLUT-4 glucose transporter expression. DAG accumulated in palmitate-mediated insulin resistant H9c2 cells and treatment with BBR reduced this DAG accumulation and increased accumulation of 1,2,3-triacyl-sn-glycerol (TAG) compared to controls. Treatment of palmitate-mediated insulin resistant H9c2 cells with BBR increased [1,3-(3)H]glycerol and [1-(14)C]glucose incorporation into TAG and reduced their incorporation into DAG compared to control. In addition, BBR treatment of these cells increased [1-(14)C]palmitic acid incorporation into TAG and decreased its incorporation into DAG compared to controls. BBR treatment did not alter phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis. The mechanism for the BBR-mediated decreased precursor incorporation into DAG and increased incorporation into TAG in palmitate-incubated cells was an increase in DAG acyltransferase-2 activity and its expression and a decrease in TAG hydrolysis. Thus, BBR treatment attenuates palmitate-induced reduction in glucose uptake and consumption, in part, through reduction in cellular DAG levels and accumulation of TAG in H9c2 cells. PMID:26774040

  8. Berberine treatment attenuates the palmitate-mediated inhibition of glucose uptake and consumption through increased 1,2,3-triacyl-sn-glycerol synthesis and accumulation in H9c2 cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wenguang; Chen, Li; Hatch, Grant M

    2016-04-01

    Dysfunction of lipid metabolism and accumulation of 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol (DAG) may be a key factor in the development of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. Berberine (BBR) is an isoquinoline alkaloid extract that has shown promise as a hypoglycemic agent in the management of diabetes in animal and human studies. However, its mechanism of action is not well understood. To determine the effect of BBR on lipid synthesis and its relationship to insulin resistance in H9c2 cardiomyocytes, we measured neutral lipid and phospholipid synthesis and their relationship to glucose uptake. Compared with controls, BBR treatment stimulated 2-[1,2-(3)H(N)]deoxy-D-glucose uptake and consumption in palmitate-mediated insulin resistant H9c2 cells. The mechanism was though an increase in protein kinase B (AKT) activity and GLUT-4 glucose transporter expression. DAG accumulated in palmitate-mediated insulin resistant H9c2 cells and treatment with BBR reduced this DAG accumulation and increased accumulation of 1,2,3-triacyl-sn-glycerol (TAG) compared to controls. Treatment of palmitate-mediated insulin resistant H9c2 cells with BBR increased [1,3-(3)H]glycerol and [1-(14)C]glucose incorporation into TAG and reduced their incorporation into DAG compared to control. In addition, BBR treatment of these cells increased [1-(14)C]palmitic acid incorporation into TAG and decreased its incorporation into DAG compared to controls. BBR treatment did not alter phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis. The mechanism for the BBR-mediated decreased precursor incorporation into DAG and increased incorporation into TAG in palmitate-incubated cells was an increase in DAG acyltransferase-2 activity and its expression and a decrease in TAG hydrolysis. Thus, BBR treatment attenuates palmitate-induced reduction in glucose uptake and consumption, in part, through reduction in cellular DAG levels and accumulation of TAG in H9c2 cells.

  9. Two potential fish glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Raymond, James A

    2015-06-01

    Winter-acclimated rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax Mitchill) produce high levels of glycerol as an antifreeze. A common pathway to glycerol involves the enzyme glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase (GPP), but no GPP has yet been identified in fish or any other animal. Here, two phosphatases assembled from existing EST libraries (from winter-acclimated smelt and cold-acclimated smelt hepatocytes) were found to resemble a glycerol-associated phosphatase from a glycerol-producing alga, Dunaliella salina, and a recently discovered GPP from a bacterium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Recombinant proteins were generated and were found to have GPP activity on the order of a few μMol Pi/mg enzyme/min. The two enzymes have acidic pH optima (~5.5) similar to that previously determined for GPP activity in liver tissue, with about 1/3 of their peak activities at neutral pH. The two enzymes appear to account for the GPP activity of smelt liver, but due to their reduced activities at neutral pH, their contributions to glycerol production in vivo remain unclear. Similar enzymes may be active in a glycerol-producing insect, Dendroctonus ponderosae.

  10. Structure of RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase bound to substrate RNA.

    PubMed

    Desai, Kevin K; Bingman, Craig A; Cheng, Chin L; Phillips, George N; Raines, Ronald T

    2014-10-01

    RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase (RtcA) catalyzes the ATP-dependent cyclization of a 3'-phosphate to form a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate at RNA termini. Cyclization proceeds through RtcA-AMP and RNA(3')pp(5')A covalent intermediates, which are analogous to intermediates formed during catalysis by the tRNA ligase RtcB. Here we present a crystal structure of Pyrococcus horikoshii RtcA in complex with a 3'-phosphate terminated RNA and adenosine in the AMP-binding pocket. Our data reveal that RtcA recognizes substrate RNA by ensuring that the terminal 3'-phosphate makes a large contribution to RNA binding. Furthermore, the RNA 3'-phosphate is poised for in-line attack on the P-N bond that links the phosphorous atom of AMP to N(ε) of His307. Thus, we provide the first insights into RNA 3'-phosphate termini recognition and the mechanism of 3'-phosphate activation by an Rtc enzyme.

  11. Conversion of Glucose-1-Phosphate to 3-Keto-glucose-1-phosphate by Cells of Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Sakuzo

    1969-01-01

    Incubation of resting cells of Agrobacterium tumefaciens with glucose-1-phosphate resulted in the accumulation of a new sugar phosphate in the suspending medium. Approximately 80% of the glucose-1-phosphate consumed was converted to the new compound, which was identified as α-d-ribo-hexopyranosyl-3-ulose-1-phosphate (3-ketoglucose-1-phosphate). Both utilization of glucose-1-phosphate and accumulation of 3-ketoglucose-1-phosphate were inhibited by 2,4-dinitrophenol, polymyxin, and d-glucose, which are inhibitors of the glucoside transport system of this bacterium but are not inhibitors of d-glucoside-3-dehydrogenase, which is the 3-ketoglucose-1-phosphate-forming enzyme. Consequently, it was concluded that glucose-1-phosphate penetrates into intracellular space by means of an active transport system. The glucose-1-phosphate is converted to 3-ketoglucose-1-phosphate by d-glucoside-3-dehydrogenase, and the 3-ketoglucose-1-phosphate formed reaches the extracellular space by passing through the surface layer of the bacterium. PMID:4304223

  12. Specificities of the Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein (ACP) Thioesterase and Glycerol-3-Phosphate Acyltransferase for Octadecenoyl-ACP Isomers (Identification of a Petroselinoyl-ACP Thioesterase in Umbelliferae).

    PubMed Central

    Dormann, P.; Frentzen, M.; Ohlrogge, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to address the question: How specific for double bond position and conformation are plant enzymes that act on oleoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP)? Octadecenoyl-ACPs with cis double bonds at positions [delta]6, [delta]7, [delta]8, [delta]9, [delta]10, [delta]11, or [delta]12 and elaidyl (18:1[delta]9trans)-ACP were synthesized and used to characterize the substrate specificity of the acyl-ACP thioesterase and acyl-ACP:sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase. The two enzymes were found to be specific for the [delta]9 position of the double bond. The thioesterase was highly specific for the [delta]9 cis conformation, but the transferase was almost equally active with the cis and the trans isomer of 18:1[delta]9-ACP. In plants such as the Umbelliferae species coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) that accumulate petroselinic acid (18:1[delta]6cis) in their seed triacylglycerols, a high petroselinoyl-ACP thioesterase activity was found in addition to the oleoyl-ACP thioesterase. The two activities could be separated by anion-exchange chromatography, indicating that the petroselinoyl-ACP thioesterase is represented by a distinct polypeptide. PMID:12232130

  13. Sphingosine-1-phosphate metabolism: A structural perspective.

    PubMed

    Pulkoski-Gross, Michael J; Donaldson, Jane C; Obeid, Lina M

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids represent an important class of bioactive signaling lipids which have key roles in numerous cellular processes. Over the last few decades, the levels of bioactive sphingolipids and/or their metabolizing enzymes have been realized to be important factors involved in disease development and progression, most notably in cancer. Targeting sphingolipid-metabolizing enzymes in disease states has been the focus of many studies and has resulted in a number of pharmacological inhibitors, with some making it into the clinic as therapeutics. In order to better understand the regulation of sphingolipid-metabolizing enzymes as well as to develop much more potent and specific inhibitors, the field of sphingolipids has recently taken a turn toward structural biology. The last decade has seen the structural determination of a number of sphingolipid enzymes and effector proteins. In these terms, one of the most complete arms of the sphingolipid pathway is the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) arm. The structures of proteins involved in the function and regulation of S1P are being used to investigate further the regulation of said proteins as well as in the design and development of inhibitors as potential therapeutics.

  14. Sphingosine 1-phosphate in metabolic syndrome (Review).

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Lu, Hongwei; Yang, Jie; Xiang, Hong; Peng, Hui

    2016-10-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS), a clustering of components, is closely associated with the development and prognosis of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a lysophospholipid with paracrine and autocrine effects, which is associated with obesity, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and hypertension through extracellular and intracellular signals to achieve a variety of biological functions. However, there is controversy regarding the role of S1P in MetS; the specific role played by S1P remains unclear. It ameliorates abnormal energy metabolism and deviant adipogenesis and mediates inflammation in obesity. Despite the fact that sphingosine kinase (SphK)2/S1P increases the glucose‑stimulated insulin secretion of β-cells, more evidence showed that activation of the SphK1/S1P/S1P2R pathway inhibited the feedback loop of insulin secretion and sensitivity. The majority of S1P1R activation improves diabetes whereas S1P2R activation worsens the condition. In hyperlipidemia, S1P binds to high-density lipoprotein, low‑density lipoprotein and very low-density lipoprotein exerting different effects. Moreover, low concentrations of S1P lead to vasodilation whereas high concentrations of S1P result in vasocontraction of isolated arterioles. This review discusses the means by which different SphKs, S1P concentrations or S1P receptor subtypes results to diverse result in MetS, and then examines the role of S1P in MetS. PMID:27600830

  15. Essential fructosuria: increased levels of fructose 3-phosphate in erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Petersen, A; Steinmann, B; Gitzelmann, R

    1992-01-01

    Erythrocytes of 3 adult siblings with essential fructosuria contained 45-200 mumol/l fructose 3-phosphate (Fru-3-P), i.e. 3-15 times the concentration in normal controls. Sorbitol 3-phosphate was also increased, but to a lesser degree. An oral load with 50 g of fructose produced an additional 40 mumol/l increase of erythrocyte Fru-3-P after 5 h. The rate of Fru-3-P formation by red cells in vitro was normal. HbA1 and HbA1c were normal. The suspected pathogenetic role of Fru-3-P in diabetic complications is questioned.

  16. Synthesis of phosphonate and phostone analogues of ribose-1-phosphates

    PubMed Central

    Nasomjai, Pitak; Slawin, Alexandra M Z

    2009-01-01

    Summary The synthesis of phosphonate analogues of ribose-1-phosphate and 5-fluoro-5-deoxyribose-1-phosphate is described. Preparations of both the α- and β-phosphonate anomers are reported for the ribose and 5-fluoro-5-deoxyribose series and a synthesis of the corresponding cyclic phostones of each α-ribose is also reported. These compounds have been prepared as tools to probe the details of fluorometabolism in S. cattleya. PMID:19777136

  17. Distinct generation, pharmacology, and distribution of sphingosine 1-phosphate and dihydro-sphingosine 1-phosphate in human neural progenitor cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In-vivo and in-vitro studies suggest a crucial role for Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and its receptors in the development of the nervous system. Dihydrosphingosine 1-phosphate (dhS1P), a reduced form of S1P, is an active ligand at S1P receptors, but the pharmacology and physiology of dhS1P has not...

  18. Characterization of a novel sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor, Edg-8.

    PubMed

    Im, D S; Heise, C E; Ancellin, N; O'Dowd, B F; Shei, G J; Heavens, R P; Rigby, M R; Hla, T; Mandala, S; McAllister, G; George, S R; Lynch, K R

    2000-05-12

    Three G protein-coupled receptors (Edg-1, Edg-3, and Edg-5) for the lysolipid phosphoric acid mediator sphingosine 1-phosphate have been described by molecular cloning. Using a similar sequence that we found in the expressed sequence tag data base, we cloned and characterized of a fourth, high affinity, rat brain sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor, Edg-8. When HEK293T cells were co-transfected with Edg-8 and G protein DNAs, prepared membranes showed sphingosine 1- phosphate-dependent increases in [(35)S]guanosine 5'-(3-O-thio)triphosphate binding with an EC(50) of 90 nm. In a rat hepatoma Rh7777 cell line that exhibits modest endogenous responses to sphingosine 1-phosphate, this lipid mediator inhibited forskolin-driven rises in cAMP by greater than 90% when the cells were transfected with Edg-8 DNA (IC(50) 0.7 nm). This response is blocked fully by prior treatment of cultures with pertussis toxin, thus implicating signaling through G(i/o)alpha proteins. Furthermore, Xenopus oocytes exhibit a calcium response to sphingosine 1-phosphate after injection of Edg-8 mRNA, but only when oocytes are co-injected with chimeric G(q/i)alpha protein mRNA. Membranes from HEK293T and Rh7777 cell cultures expressing Edg-8 exhibited high affinity (K(D) = 2 nm) binding for radiolabeled sphingosine 1-phosphate. Rat Edg-8 RNA is expressed in spleen and throughout adult rat brain where in situ hybridization revealed it to be associated with white matter. Together our data demonstrate that Edg-8 is a high affinity sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor that couples to G(i/o)alpha proteins and is expressed predominantly by oligodendrocytes and/or fibrous astrocytes in the rat brain.

  19. Model of early self-replication based on covalent complementarity for a copolymer of glycerate-3-phosphate and glycerol-3-phosphate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1989-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate acts as the substrate in a model of early self-replication of a phosphodiester copolymer of glycerate-3-phosphate and glycerol-3-phosphate. This model of self-replication is based on covalent complementarity in which information transfer is mediated by a single covalent bond, in contrast to multiple weak interactions that establish complementarity in nucleic acid replication. This replication model is connected to contemporary biochemistry through its use of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, a central metabolite of glycolysis and photosynthesis.

  20. Functional characterization of the human 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate-O-acyltransferase isoform 10/glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase isoform 3

    PubMed Central

    Sukumaran, Suja; Barnes, Robert I; Garg, Abhimanyu; Agarwal, Anil K

    2016-01-01

    Synthesis of phospholipids can occur de novo or via remodeling of the existing phospholipids. Synthesis of triglycerides, a form of energy storage in cells, is an end product of these pathways. Several 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate-O-acyltransferases (AGPATs) acylate lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) at the sn-2 (carbon 2) position to produce phosphatidic acid (PA). These enzymes are involved in phospholipids and triglyceride synthesis through an evolutionary conserved process involving serial acylations of glycerol-3-phosphate. We cloned a cDNA predicted to be an AGPAT isoform (AGPAT10). This cDNA has been recently identified as glycerol-3-phosphate-O-acyltransferase isoform 3 (GPAT3). When this AGPAT10/GPAT3 cDNA was expressed in Chinese Hamster ovary cells, the protein product localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum. In vitro enzymatic activity using lysates of human embryonic kidney-293 cells infected with recombinant AGPAT10/GPAT3 adenovirus show that the protein has a robust AGPAT activity with an apparent Vmax of 2 nmol/min per mg protein, but lacks GPAT enzymatic activity. This AGPAT has similar substrate specificities for LPA and acyl-CoA as shown for another known isoform, AGPAT2. We further show that when overexpressed in human Huh-7 cells depleted of endogenous AGPAT activity by sh-RNA-AGPAT2-lentivirus, the protein again demonstrates AGPAT activity. These observations strongly suggest that the cDNA previously identified as GPAT3 has AGPAT activity and thus we prefer to identify this clone as AGPAT10 as well. PMID:19318427

  1. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    El Kadmiri, N; Slassi, I; El Moutawakil, B; Nadifi, S; Tadevosyan, A; Hachem, A; Soukri, A

    2014-12-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a ubiquitous enzyme that catalyzes the sixth step of glycolysis and thus, serves to break down glucose for energy production. Beyond the traditional aerobic metabolism of glucose, recent studies have highlighted additional roles played by GAPDH in non-metabolic processes, such as control of gene expression and redox post-translational modifications. Neuroproteomics have revealed high affinity interactions between GAPDH and Alzheimer's disease-associated proteins, including the β-amyloid, β-amyloid precursor protein and tau. This neuronal protein interaction may lead to impairment of the GAPDH glycolytic function in Alzheimer's disease and may be a forerunner of its participation in apoptosis. The present review examines the crucial implication of GAPDH in neurodegenerative processes and clarifies its role in apoptotic cell death.

  2. Synthesis of fluorinated agonist of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Aliouane, Lucie; Chao, Sovy; Brizuela, Leyre; Pfund, Emmanuel; Cuvillier, Olivier; Jean, Ludovic; Renard, Pierre-Yves; Lequeux, Thierry

    2014-09-01

    The bioactive metabolite sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a product of sphingosine kinases (SphKs), mediates diverse biological processes such as cell differentiation, proliferation, survival and angiogenesis. A fluorinated analogue of S1P receptor agonist has been synthesized by utilizing a ring opening reaction of oxacycles by a lithiated difluoromethylphosphonate anion as the key reaction. In vitro activity of this S1P analogue is also reported.

  3. Substrate specificity modification of the stromal glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Ferri, S R; Toguri, T

    1997-01-15

    The stromal glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferases (GPATs; EC 2.3.1.15) from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) and squash (Cucurbita moschata) were expressed in Escherichia coli and their activities with palmitoyl-CoA and oleoyl-CoA compared. The GPAT from squash, a chilling-sensitive plant, was found to have the greatest difference in activities between the two substrates, using palmitoyl-CoA over three times faster than oleoyl-CoA. In contrast, the enzyme from spinach, a chilling-tolerant plant, preferred oleoyl-CoA over palmitoyl-CoA. By using conserved restriction endonuclease sites each of the two genes was divided into three fragments of roughly equal size and recombined to create six different chimeras. All chimeras retained a large portion of their original activity but in most cases the specificity was greatly altered. The central third of the protein was found to contain the structural features which determine substrate specificity of the wild-type GPATs. Two of the chimeras, which have a spinach-derived central region and a squash-derived carboxyl region, were found to have greatly enhanced specificities for 18:1 acyl chains, potentially making them ideal for decreasing the level of saturation of plant membrane lipids through genetic engineering.

  4. Structure of rabbit-muscle glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Cowan-Jacob, Sandra W; Kaufmann, Markus; Anselmo, Anthony N; Stark, Wilhelm; Grütter, Markus G

    2003-12-01

    The crystal structure of the tetrameric form of D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) isolated from rabbit muscle was solved at 2.4 A resolution after careful dynamic light-scattering experiments to find a suitable buffer for crystallization trials. The refined model has a crystallographic R factor of 20.3%. Here, the first detailed model of a mammalian GAPDH is presented. The cofactor NAD(+) (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) is bound to two subunits of the tetrameric enzyme, which is consistent with the negative cooperativity of NAD(+) binding to this enzyme. The structure of rabbit-muscle GAPDH is of interest because it shares 91% sequence identity with the human enzyme; human GAPDH is a potential target for the development of anti-apoptotic drugs. In addition, differences in the cofactor-binding pocket compared with the homology-model structure of GAPDH from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum could be exploited in order to develop novel selective and potential antimalaria drugs.

  5. Interactions among p22, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and microtubules.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Josefa; Pearce, Sandy Timm; Zhao, Hu; Barroso, Margarida

    2004-12-01

    Previously, we have shown that p22, an EF-hand Ca2+-binding protein, interacts indirectly with microtubules in an N-myristoylation-dependent and Ca2+-independent manner. In the present study, we report that N-myristoylated p22 interacts with several microtubule-associated proteins within the 30-100 kDa range using overlay blots of microtubule pellets containing cytosolic proteins. One of those p22-binding partners, a 35-40 kDa microtubule-binding protein, has been identified by MS as GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase). Several lines of evidence suggest a functional relationship between GAPDH and p22. First, endogenous p22 interacts with GAPDH by immunoprecipitation. Secondly, p22 and GAPDH align along microtubule tracks in analogous punctate structures in BHK cells. Thirdly, GAPDH facilitates the p22-dependent interactions between microtubules and microsomal membranes, by increasing the ability of p22 to bind microtubules but not membranes. We have also shown a direct interaction between N-myristoylated p22 and GAPDH in vitro with a K(D) of approximately 0.5 microM. The removal of either the N-myristoyl group or the last six C-terminal amino acids abolishes the binding of p22 to GAPDH and reduces the ability of p22 to associate with microtubules. In summary, we report that GAPDH is involved in the ability of p22 to facilitate microtubule-membrane interactions by affecting the p22-microtubule, but not the p22-membrane, association. PMID:15312048

  6. THE HEME BINDING PROPERTIES OF GLYCERALDEHYDE-3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE

    PubMed Central

    Hannibal, Luciana; Collins, Daniel; Brassard, Julie; Chakravarti, Ritu; Vempati, Rajesh; Dorlet, Pierre; Santolini, Jérôme; Dawson, John H.; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2012-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a glycolytic enzyme that also functions in transcriptional regulation, oxidative stress, vesicular trafficking, and apoptosis. Because GAPDH is required for cellular heme insertion into inducible nitric oxide synthase (Chakravarti et al, PNAS 2010, 107(42):18004-9), we extensively characterized the heme binding properties of GAPDH. Substoichiometric amounts of ferric heme bound to GAPDH (1 heme per GAPDH tetramer) to form a low-spin complex with UV-visible maxima at 362, 418 and 537 nm, and when reduced to ferrous gave maxima at 424, 527 and 559 nm. Ferric heme association and dissociation rate constants at 10 °C were kon =17,800 M−1s−1 and koff1 = 7.0 × 10−3 s−1; koff2 = 3.3 × 10−4 s−1 respectively, giving approximate affinities of 19–390 nM. Ferrous heme bound more poorly to GAPDH and dissociated with a koff = 4.2 × 10−3 s−1. Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), resonance Raman (rR) and EPR spectroscopic data on the ferric, ferrous, and ferrous-CO complexes of GAPDH showed that the heme is bis-ligated with His as the proximal ligand. The distal ligand in ferric complex was not displaced by CN− or N3− but in ferrous complex was displaceable by CO at a rate of 1.75 s−1 (for [CO]>0.2 mM). Studies with heme analogs revealed selectivity toward the coordinating metal and porphyrin ring structure. GAPDH-heme was isolated from bacteria induced to express rabbit GAPDH in the presence of δ-amino levulinic acid. Our finding of heme binding to GAPDH expands the protein’s potential roles. The strength, selectivity, reversibility, and redox sensitivity of heme binding to GAPDH is consistent with it performing heme sensing or heme chaperone-like functions in cells. PMID:22957700

  7. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase is bound to the fibrous sheath of mammalian spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Westhoff, D; Kamp, G

    1997-08-01

    Evidence is provided that the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase is covalently linked to the fibrous sheath. The fibrous sheath is a typical structure of mammalian spermatozoa surrounding the axoneme in the principal piece of the flagellum. More than 90% of boar sperm glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity is sedimented after cell disintegration by centrifugation. Detergents, different salt concentrations or short term incubation with chymotrypsin do not solubilize the enzyme, whereas digestion with trypsin or elastase does. Short term incubation with trypsin (15 minutes) even resulted in an activation of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Purification on phenyl-Sepharose yielded a homogeneous glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase as judged from gel electrophoresis SDS-PAGE and native gradient PAGE. The molecular masses are 41.5 and 238 kDa, respectively, suggesting native glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase to be a hexamer. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies raised to purified glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase show a high specificity for mammalian spermatozoal glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, while other proteins of boar spermatozoa or the muscle glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase are not labelled. Immunogold staining performed in a post-embedding procedure reveals the localization of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase along the fibrous sheath in spermatozoa of boar, bull, rat, stallion and man. Other structures such as the cell membrane, dense fibres, the axoneme or the mitochondria are free of label. During the process of sperm maturation, most of the cytoplasm of the sperm midpiece is removed as droplets during the passage through the epididymis. The labelling of this cytoplasm, in immature boar spermatozoa and in the droplets, indicates that glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase is completely removed from the midpiece during sperm maturation in the epididymis. The inverse

  8. Heme binding properties of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Luciana; Collins, Daniel; Brassard, Julie; Chakravarti, Ritu; Vempati, Rajesh; Dorlet, Pierre; Santolini, Jérôme; Dawson, John H; Stuehr, Dennis J

    2012-10-30

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a glycolytic enzyme that also functions in transcriptional regulation, oxidative stress, vesicular trafficking, and apoptosis. Because GAPDH is required for the insertion of cellular heme into inducible nitric oxide synthase [Chakravarti, R., et al. (2010) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 18004-18009], we extensively characterized the heme binding properties of GAPDH. Substoichiometric amounts of ferric heme bound to GAPDH (one heme per GAPDH tetramer) to form a low-spin complex with UV-visible maxima at 362, 418, and 537 nm and when reduced to ferrous gave maxima at 424, 527, and 559 nm. Ferric heme association and dissociation rate constants at 10 °C were as follows: k(on) = 17800 M(-1) s(-1), k(off1) = 7.0 × 10(-3) s(-1), and k(off2) = 3.3 × 10(-4) s(-1) (giving approximate affinities of 19-390 nM). Ferrous heme bound more poorly to GAPDH and dissociated with a k(off) of 4.2 × 10(-3) s(-1). Magnetic circular dichroism, resonance Raman, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic data on the ferric, ferrous, and ferrous-CO complexes of GAPDH showed that the heme is bis-ligated with His as the proximal ligand. The distal ligand in the ferric complex was not displaced by CN(-) or N(3)(-) but in the ferrous complex could be displaced by CO at a rate of 1.75 s(-1) (for >0.2 mM CO). Studies with heme analogues revealed selectivity toward the coordinating metal and porphyrin ring structure. The GAPDH-heme complex was isolated from bacteria induced to express rabbit GAPDH in the presence of δ-aminolevulinic acid. Our finding of heme binding to GAPDH expands the protein's potential roles. The strength, selectivity, reversibility, and redox sensitivity of heme binding to GAPDH are consistent with it performing heme sensing or heme chaperone-like functions in cells.

  9. Modulators of the Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Mariangela; Guerrero, Miguel; Rosen, Hugh; Roberts, Edward

    2013-12-01

    The Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor (S1P-R) signaling system has proven to be of biological and medical importance in autoimmune settings. S1P1-R is a validated drug target for multiple sclerosis (MS) for which FTY720 (Fingolimod), a S1P1,3-5-R pan-agonist, was recently approved as the first orally active drug for the treatment of relapsing-remitting MS. Transient bradycardia and long half-life are the FTY720 critical pitfalls. This review provides the latest advances on next-generation S1P1-R modulators from 2012 up to date, with an overview of the chemical structures, structure-activity relationships, and relevant biological and clinical properties.

  10. A map of sphingosine 1-phosphate distribution in the spleen

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Perez, Willy D.; Fang, Victoria; Escalante-Alcalde, Diana; Cammer, Michael; Schwab, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of signaling lipids, many questions remain about their function because we have few tools to chart lipid gradients in vivo. Here we describe a sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) reporter mouse, and use this mouse to define S1P distribution in the spleen. Surprisingly, the presence of blood does not predict the concentration of signaling-available S1P. Large areas of the red pulp are S1P-low, while S1P can be sensed by cells inside the white pulp near the marginal sinus. Lipid phosphate phosphatase 3 maintains low S1P concentrations in the spleen, and enables efficient marginal zone B cell shuttling. The exquisitely tight regulation of S1P availability may explain how a single lipid can simultaneously orchestrate many immune cell movements. PMID:26502404

  11. Sphingosine 1-phosphate signaling impacts lymphocyte migration, inflammation and infection.

    PubMed

    Tiper, Irina V; East, James E; Subrahmanyam, Priyanka B; Webb, Tonya J

    2016-08-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a sphingosine containing lipid intermediate obtained from ceramide. S1P is known to be an important signaling molecule and plays multiple roles in the context of immunity. This lysophospholipid binds and activates G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) known as S1P receptors 1-5 (S1P1-5). Once activated, these GPCRs mediate signaling that can lead to alterations in cell proliferation, survival or migration, and can also have other effects such as promoting angiogenesis. In this review, we will present evidence demonstrating a role for S1P in lymphocyte migration, inflammation and infection, as well as in cancer. The therapeutic potential of targeting S1P receptors, kinases and lyase will also be discussed. PMID:27354294

  12. Sphingosine 1-phosphate counteracts insulin signaling in pancreatic β-cells via the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 2.

    PubMed

    Japtok, Lukasz; Schmitz, Elisabeth I; Fayyaz, Susann; Krämer, Stephanie; Hsu, Leigh J; Kleuser, Burkhard

    2015-08-01

    Glucolipotoxic stress has been identified as a key player in the progression of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction contributing to insulin resistance and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). It has been suggested that bioactive lipid intermediates, formed under lipotoxic conditions, are involved in these processes. Here, we show that sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) levels are not only increased in palmitate-stimulated pancreatic β-cells but also regulate β-cell homeostasis in a divergent manner. Although S1P possesses a prosurvival effect in β-cells, an enhanced level of the sphingolipid antagonizes insulin-mediated cell growth and survival via the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 2 (S1P2) followed by an inhibition of Akt-signaling. In an attempt to investigate the role of the S1P/S1P2 axis in vivo, the New Zealand obese (NZO) diabetic mouse model, characterized by β-cell loss under high-fat diet (HFD) conditions, was used. The occurrence of T2D was accompanied by an increase of plasma S1P levels. To examine whether S1P contributes to the morphologic changes of islets via S1P2, the receptor antagonist JTE-013 was administered. Most interestingly, JTE-013 rescued β-cell damage clearly indicating an important role of the S1P2 in β-cell homeostasis. Therefore, the present study provides a new therapeutic strategy to diminish β-cell dysfunction and the development of T2D. PMID:25911610

  13. Neurons and Oligodendrocytes Recycle Sphingosine 1-Phosphate to Ceramide

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jingdong; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Goya, Jonathan; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Dawson, Glyn

    2010-01-01

    Both cultured neonatal rat hippocampal neurons and differentiated oligodendrocytes rapidly metabolized exogenous C2- and C6-ceramides to sphingosine (Sph) and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) but only minimally to C16–24-ceramides. Dihydrosphinolipids were unaffected but were increased by exogenous C6-dihydroceramide. Conversely, quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry technology showed that exogenous S1P (0.25–10 μm) was rapidly metabolized to both Sph (a >200-fold increase) and predominantly C18-ceramide (a >2-fold increase). Longer treatments with either C2-ceramide (>2.5 μm) or S1P (10 μm) led to apoptotic cell death. Thus, there is an active sphingolipid salvage pathway in both neurons and oligodendrocytes. Staurosporine-induced cell death was shown to be associated with decreased S1P and increased Sph and C16/18-ceramide levels. The physiological significance of this observation was confirmed by the analysis of affected white matter and plaques from brains of multiple sclerosis patients in which reduced S1P and increased Sph and C16/18-ceramides were observed. PMID:20215115

  14. Antiapoptotic Agent Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Protects Vitrified Murine Ovarian Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yung-Chieh; Tzeng, Chii-Ruey; Wang, Chia-Woei; Hsu, Ming-I; Tan, Shun-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Significant follicle loss from frozen ovarian grafts is unavoidable. The authors evaluated the protective effects of the antiapoptotic agent sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) on vitrified ovarian grafts. Three-week-old sexually immature female FVB mice were divided into 4 groups, fresh, control without S1P, 0.5 mmol/L S1P, and 2 mmol/L S1P. The ovaries were pretreated with S1P for 1 hour and then cryopreserved by modified vitrification. The frozen–thawed ovaries were autotransplanted under the back muscles of mice for 10 days. Expression of apoptosis-related genes encoding caspase 3 and c-Myc was analyzed in the vitrified ovaries and 10 days after transplantation using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. To quantify the ovarian reserve, anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels and follicles were measured in the 10-day vitrified ovarian grafts. Caspase 3 and c-Myc messenger RNA did not differ significantly in the 4 groups after vitrification but was significantly upregulated in the control group after transplantation. The AMH levels and primordial follicle pool were significantly higher in the S1P-treated groups than in the control group but lower than that in the fresh group. The S1P protects vitrified ovarian grafts from ischemic reperfusion injury rather than from vitrification-associated process. PMID:23793475

  15. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor Modulators in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Subei, Adnan M.

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor modulators possess a unique mechanism of action as disease modifying therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS). Subtype 1 S1P receptors are expressed on the surfaces of lymphocytes and are important in regulating egression from lymph nodes. The S1P receptor modulators indirectly antagonize the receptor’s function and sequester lymphocytes in lymph nodes. Fingolimod was the first S1P agent approved in the United States in 2010 for relapsing MS after two phase 3 trials (FREEDOMS and TRANSFORMS) demonstrated potent efficacy, and good safety and tolerability. Post-marketing experience as well as a third phase 3 trial (FREEDOMS II) also showed favorable results. More selective S1P receptor agents: ponesimod (ACT128800), siponimod (BAF312), ozanimod (RPC1063), ceralifimod (ONO-4641), GSK2018682, and MT-1303 are still in relatively early stages of development, but phase 1 and 2 trials showed promising efficacy and safety. However, these observations have yet to be reproduced in phase 3 clinical trials. PMID:26239599

  16. Ceramide 1-phosphate stimulates glucose uptake in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ouro, Alberto; Arana, Lide; Gangoiti, Patricia; Rivera, Io-Guané; Ordoñez, Marta; Trueba, Miguel; Lankalapalli, Ravi S.; Bittman, Robert; Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) is mitogenic and antiapoptotic, and that it is implicated in the regulation of macrophage migration. These activities require high energy levels to be available in cells. Macrophages obtain most of their energy from glucose. In this work, we demonstrate that C1P enhances glucose uptake in RAW264.7 macrophages. The major glucose transporter involved in this action was found to be GLUT 3, as determined by measuring its translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. C1P-stimulated glucose uptake was blocked by selective inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) or Akt, also known as protein kinase B (PKB), and by specific siRNAs to silence the genes encoding for these kinases. C1P-stimulated glucose uptake was also inhibited by pertussis toxin (PTX) and by the siRNA that inhibited GLUT 3 expression. C1P increased the affinity of the glucose transporter for its substrate, and enhanced glucose metabolism to produce ATP. The latter action was also inhibited by PI3K- and Akt-selective inhibitors, PTX, or by specific siRNAs to inhibit GLUT 3 expression. PMID:23333242

  17. Ceramide and ceramide 1-phosphate in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Sphingolipids are essential components of cell membranes, and many of them regulate vital cell functions. In particular, ceramide plays crucial roles in cell signaling processes. Two major actions of ceramides are the promotion of cell cycle arrest and the induction of apoptosis. Phosphorylation of ceramide produces ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P), which has opposite effects to ceramide. C1P is mitogenic and has prosurvival properties. In addition, C1P is an important mediator of inflammatory responses, an action that takes place through stimulation of cytosolic phospholipase A2, and the subsequent release of arachidonic acid and prostaglandin formation. All of the former actions are thought to be mediated by intracellularly generated C1P. However, the recent observation that C1P stimulates macrophage chemotaxis implicates specific plasma membrane receptors that are coupled to Gi proteins. Hence, it can be concluded that C1P has dual actions in cells, as it can act as an intracellular second messenger to promote cell survival, or as an extracellular receptor agonist to stimulate cell migration. PMID:20137073

  18. Sphingosine 1-phosphate induced synthesis of glycocalyx on endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ye; Liu, Xiao-Heng; Tarbell, John; Fu, Bingmei

    2015-11-15

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) protects glycocalyx against shedding, playing important roles in endothelial functions. We previously found that glycocalyx on endothelial cells (ECs) was shed after plasma protein depletion. In the present study, we investigated the role of S1P on the recovery of glycocalyx, and tested whether it is mediated by phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway. After depletion of plasma protein, ECs were treated with S1P for another 6h. And then, the major components of glycocalyx including syndecan-1 with attached heparan sulfate (HS) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) on endothelial cells were detected using confocal fluorescence microscopy. Role of PI3K in the S1P-induced synthesis of glycocalyx was confirmed by using the PI3K inhibitor (LY294002). Syndecan-1 with attached HS and CS were degraded with duration of plasma protein depletion. S1P induced recovery of syndecan-1 with attached HS and CS. The PI3K inhibitor LY294002 abolished the effect of S1P on recovery of glycocalyx. Thus, S1P induced synthesis of glycocalyx on endothelial cells and it is mediated by PI3K pathway.

  19. Implication of sphingosin-1-phosphate in cardiovascular regulation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ningjun; Zhang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid metabolite generated by phosphorylation of sphingosine catalyzed by sphingosine kinase. S1P acts mainly through its high affinity G-protein-coupled receptors and participates in the regulation of multiple systems, including cardiovascular system. It has been shown that S1P signaling is involved in the regulation of cardiac chronotropy and inotropy and contributes to cardioprotection as well as cardiac remodeling; S1P signaling regulates vascular function, such as vascular tone and endothelial barrier, and possesses an anti-atherosclerotic effect; S1P signaling is also implicated in the regulation of blood pressure. Therefore, manipulation of S1P signaling may offer novel therapeutic approaches to cardiovascular diseases. As several S1P receptor modulators and sphingosine kinase inhibitors have been approved or under clinical trials for the treatment of other diseases, it may expedite the test and implementation of these S1P-based drugs in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27100508

  20. Resveratrol stimulates sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling of cathelicidin production.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyungho; Elias, Peter M; Hupe, Melanie; Borkowski, Andrew W; Gallo, Richard L; Shin, Kyong-Oh; Lee, Yong-Moon; Holleran, Walter M; Uchida, Yoshikazu

    2013-08-01

    We recently discovered a regulatory mechanism that stimulates the production of the multifunctional antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP). In response to subtoxic levels of ER stress, increased sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) production activates an NFκBC/EBPα-dependent pathway that enhances CAMP production in cultured human keratinocytes. As the multifunctional stilbenoid compound resveratrol (RESV) increases ceramide (Cer) levels, a precursor of S1P, we hypothesized and assessed whether RESV could exploit the same pathway to regulate CAMP production. Accordingly, RESV significantly increased Cer and S1P levels in cultured keratinocytes, paralleled by increased CAMP mRNA/protein expression. Furthermore, topical RESV also increased murine CAMP mRNA/protein expression in mouse skin. Conversely, blockade of Cer-->sphingosine-->S1P metabolic conversion, with specific inhibitors of ceramidase or sphingosine kinase, attenuated the expected RESV-mediated increase in CAMP expression. The RESV-induced increase in CAMP expression required both NF-κB and C/EBPα transactivation. Moreover, conditioned media from keratinocytes treated with RESV significantly suppressed Staphylococcus aureus growth. Finally, topical RESV, if not coapplied with a specific inhibitor of sphingosine kinase, blocked S. aureus invasion into murine skin. These results demonstrate that the dietary stilbenoid RESV stimulates S1P signaling of CAMP production through an NF-κB-->C/EBPα-dependent mechanism, leading to enhanced antimicrobial defense against exogenous microbial pathogens. PMID:23856934

  1. Sphingosine-1-phosphate transporters as targets for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Nagahashi, Masayuki; Takabe, Kazuaki; Terracina, Krista P; Soma, Daiki; Hirose, Yuki; Kobayashi, Takashi; Matsuda, Yasunobu; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a pleiotropic lipid mediator that regulates cell survival, migration, the recruitment of immune cells, angiogenesis, and lymphangiogenesis, all of which are involved in cancer progression. S1P is generated inside cancer cells by sphingosine kinases then exported outside of the cell into the tumor microenvironment where it binds to any of five G protein coupled receptors and proceeds to regulate a variety of functions. We have recently reported on the mechanisms underlying the "inside-out" signaling of S1P, its export through the plasma membrane, and its interaction with cell surface receptors. Membrane lipids, including S1P, do not spontaneously exchange through lipid bilayers since the polar head groups do not readily go through the hydrophobic interior of the plasma membrane. Instead, specific transporter proteins exist on the membrane to exchange these lipids. This review summarizes what is known regarding S1P transport through the cell membrane via ATP-binding cassette transporters and the spinster 2 transporter and discusses the roles for these transporters in cancer and in the tumor microenvironment. Based on our research and the emerging understanding of the role of S1P signaling in cancer and in the tumor microenvironment, S1P transporters and S1P signaling hold promise as new therapeutic targets for cancer drug development. PMID:25133174

  2. Sphingosine 1-phosphate in blood: function, metabolism, and fate.

    PubMed

    Thuy, Andreas V; Reimann, Christina-Maria; Hemdan, Nasr Y A; Gräler, Markus H

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a lipid metabolite and a ligand of five G protein-coupled cell surface receptors S1PR1 to S1PR5. These receptors are expressed on various cells and cell types of the immune, cardiovascular, respiratory, hepatic, reproductive, and neurologic systems, and S1P has an impact on many different pathophysiological conditions including autoimmune, cardiovascular, and neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, deafness, osteogenesis, and reproduction. While these diverse signalling properties of S1P have been extensively reviewed, the particular role of S1P in blood is still a matter of debate. Blood contains the highest S1P concentration of all body compartments, and several questions are still not sufficiently answered: Where does it come from and how is it metabolized? Why is the concentration of S1P in blood so high? Are minor changes of the high blood S1P concentrations physiologically relevant? Do blood cells and vascular endothelial cells that are constantly exposed to high blood S1P levels still respond to S1P via S1P receptors? Recent data reveal new insights into the functional role and the metabolic fate of blood-borne S1P. This review aims to summarize our current knowledge regarding the source, secretion, transportation, function, metabolism, and fate of S1P in blood. PMID:24977489

  3. Cytoplasmic sphingosine-1-phosphate pathway modulates neuronal autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Moruno Manchon, Jose Felix; Uzor, Ndidi-Ese; Dabaghian, Yuri; Furr-Stimming, Erin E.; Finkbeiner, Steven; Tsvetkov, Andrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an important homeostatic mechanism that eliminates long-lived proteins, protein aggregates and damaged organelles. Its dysregulation is involved in many neurodegenerative disorders. Autophagy is therefore a promising target for blunting neurodegeneration. We searched for novel autophagic pathways in primary neurons and identified the cytosolic sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) pathway as a regulator of neuronal autophagy. S1P, a bioactive lipid generated by sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) in the cytoplasm, is implicated in cell survival. We found that SK1 enhances flux through autophagy and that S1P-metabolizing enzymes decrease this flux. When autophagy is stimulated, SK1 relocalizes to endosomes/autophagosomes in neurons. Expression of a dominant-negative form of SK1 inhibits autophagosome synthesis. In a neuron model of Huntington’s disease, pharmacologically inhibiting S1P-lyase protected neurons from mutant huntingtin-induced neurotoxicity. These results identify the S1P pathway as a novel regulator of neuronal autophagy and provide a new target for developing therapies for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26477494

  4. Resveratrol Stimulates Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling of Cathelicidin Production

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyungho; Elias, Peter M.; Hupe, Melanie; Borkowski, Andrew W.; Gallo, Richard L.; Shin, Kyong-Oh; Lee, Yong-Moon; Holleran, Walter M.; Uchida, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    We recently discovered a regulatory mechanism that stimulates production of the multifunctional antimicrobial peptide, cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP). In response to subtoxic levels of ER stress, increased sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) production activates an NFκB→C/EBPα dependent pathway that enhances CAMP production in cultured human keratinocytes. Since the multifunctional stilbenoid compound, resveratrol (RESV), increases ceramide (Cer) levels, a precursor of S1P, we hypothesized and assessed whether RESV could exploit the same pathway to regulate CAMP production. Accordingly, RESV significantly increased Cer and S1P levels in cultured keratinocytes, paralleled by increased CAMP mRNA/protein expression. Furthermore, topical RESV also increased murine CAMP mRNA/protein expression in mouse skin. Conversely, blockade of Cer→sphingosine→S1P metabolic conversion, with specific inhibitors of ceramidase or sphingosine kinase, attenuated the expected RESV-mediated increase in CAMP expression. The RESV-induced increase in CAMP expression required both NF-κB and C/EBPα transactivation. Moreover, conditioned media from keratinocyte treated with RESV significantly suppressed Staphylococcus aureus growth. Finally, topical RESV, if not coapplied with a specific inhibitor of sphingosine kinase, blocked Staphylococcus aureus invasion into murine skin. These results demonstrate that the dietary stilbenoid, RESV, stimulates S1P signaling of CAMP production through an NF-κB→C/EBPα-dependent mechanism, leading to enhanced antimicrobial defense against exogenous microbial pathogens. PMID:23856934

  5. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315 Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. (a)...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315 Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. (a)...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315 Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. (a)...

  8. Influence of calcium on ceramide-1-phosphate monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Brezesinski, Gerald; Hill, Alexandra; Gericke, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Summary Ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P) plays an important role in several biological processes, being identified as a key regulator of many protein functions. For instance, it acts as a mediator of inflammatory responses. The mediation of the inflammation process happens due to the interaction of C1P with the C2 domain of cPLA2α, an effector protein that needs the presence of submicromolar concentrations of calcium ions. The aim of this study was to determine the phase behaviour and structural properties of C1P in the presence and absence of millimolar quantities of calcium in a well-defined pH environment. For that purpose, we used monomolecular films of C1P at the soft air/liquid interface with calcium ions in the subphase. The pH was varied to change the protonation degree of the C1P head group. We used surface pressure versus molecular area isotherms coupled with other monolayer techniques as Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), infrared reflection–absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD). The isotherms indicate that C1P monolayers are in a condensed state in the presence of calcium ions, regardless of the pH. At higher pH without calcium ions, the monolayer is in a liquid-expanded state due to repulsion between the negatively charged phosphate groups of the C1P molecules. When divalent calcium ions are added, they are able to bridge the highly charged phosphate groups, enhancing the regular arrangement of the head groups. Similar solidification of the monolayer structure can be seen in the presence of a 150 times larger concentration of monovalent sodium ions. Therefore, calcium ions have clearly a strong affinity for the phosphomonoester of C1P. PMID:26977381

  9. Nonreversible d-Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase of Plant Tissues 1

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, G. J.; Gibbs, Martin

    1973-01-01

    Preparations of TPN-linked nonreversible d-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.9), free of TPN-linked reversible d-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, have been obtained from green shoots, etiolated shoots, and cotyledons of pea (Pisum sativum), cotyledons of peanut (Arachis hypogea), and leaves of maize (Zea mays). The properties of the enzyme were similar from each of these sources: the Km values for d-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and TPN were about 20 μm and 3 μm, respectively. The enzyme activity was inhibited by l-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, d-erythrose 4-phosphate, and phosphohydroxypyruvate. Activity was found predominantly in photosynthetic and gluconeogenic tissues of higher plants. A light-induced, phytochrome-mediated increase of enzyme activity in a photosynthetic tissue (pea shoots) was demonstrated. Appearance of enzyme activity in a gluconeogenic tissue (endosperm of castor bean, Ricinus communis) coincided with the conversion of fat to carbohydrate during germination. In photosynthetic tissue, the enzyme is located outside the chloroplast, and at in vivo levels of triose-phosphates and pyridine nucleotides, the activity is probably greater than that of DPN-linked reversible d-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Several possible roles for the enzyme in plant carbohydrate metabolism are considered. PMID:16658509

  10. Sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase enzyme assay using a BODIPY-labeled substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Bandhuvula, Padmavathi; Li Zaiguo; Bittman, Robert; Saba, Julie D.

    2009-03-06

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase (SPL) is responsible for the irreversible catabolism of sphingosine 1-phosphate, which signals through five membrane receptors to mediate cell stress responses, angiogenesis, and lymphocyte trafficking. The standard assay for SPL activity utilizes a radioactive dihydrosphingosine 1-phosphate substrate and is expensive and cumbersome. In this study, we describe an SPL assay that employs an {omega}-labeled BODIPY-sphingosine 1-phosphate substrate, allowing fluorescent product detection by HPLC and incorporating advantages of the BODIPY fluorophore. The major aldehyde product is confirmed by reaction with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. The SPL-catalyzed reaction is linear over a 30 min time period and yields a K{sub m} of 35 {mu}M for BODIPY-sphingosine 1-phosphate.

  11. Sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase enzyme assay using a BODIPY-labeled substrate.

    PubMed

    Bandhuvula, Padmavathi; Li, Zaiguo; Bittman, Robert; Saba, Julie D

    2009-03-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase (SPL) is responsible for the irreversible catabolism of sphingosine 1-phosphate, which signals through five membrane receptors to mediate cell stress responses, angiogenesis, and lymphocyte trafficking. The standard assay for SPL activity utilizes a radioactive dihydrosphingosine 1-phosphate substrate and is expensive and cumbersome. In this study, we describe an SPL assay that employs an omega-labeled BODIPY-sphingosine 1-phosphate substrate, allowing fluorescent product detection by HPLC and incorporating advantages of the BODIPY fluorophore. The major aldehyde product is confirmed by reaction with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. The SPL-catalyzed reaction is linear over a 30 min time period and yields a K(m) of 35 microM for BODIPY-sphingosine 1-phosphate.

  12. Fructose metabolism in the human erythrocyte. Phosphorylation to fructose 3-phosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, A; Kappler, F; Szwergold, B S; Brown, T R

    1992-01-01

    In human erythrocytes, the first step in the metabolism of fructose is generally thought to be phosphorylation to fructose 6-phosphate catalysed by hexokinase. In variance with this assumption, we show here that fructose in these cells is metabolized primarily to fructose 3-phosphate by a specific 3-phosphokinase. This process has an overall estimated Km of 30 mM with respect to extracellular fructose and an apparent Vmax. of 0.6 mumol/h per ml. At a fixed concentration of fructose in the medium, the accumulation of fructose 3-phosphate was linearly dependent on the duration of incubation up to 5 h and was not affected by glucose. Once accumulated, fructose 3-phosphate appears to be degraded and/or relatively slowly metabolized, decreasing by only approximately 30% after a 12 h incubation in a fructose-free medium. PMID:1599419

  13. [The pentose phosphate pathway and NADP-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in some tissues of albino rat].

    PubMed

    Glushankov, E P; Epifanova, Iu E; Kolotilova, A I

    1976-10-01

    The NADP-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in liver, heart and skeletal muscle of rat was studied. The activity is found when glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate or ribose-5-phosphate in the presence of ATP are taken as substrates. The data obtained confirm that NADP-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase exists in skeletal muscle and demonstrate that it is found in heart muscle as well.

  14. [Activity of NADP-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in skeletal muscles of animals].

    PubMed

    Epifanova, Iu E; Glushankov, E P; Kolotilova, A I

    1978-01-01

    The NADP-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity was studied in sketetal muscles of the rat, rabbit and frog. The dehydrogenase activity in the skeletal muscles of the rat and rabbit was higher than that of the frog. The enzyme activity was found to depend upon the buffer, being higher in tris-HCl buffer than in triethanolamine buffer.

  15. Glycerol-3-phosphate is a critical mobile inducer of systemic immunity in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) is an important metabolite that contributes to the growth and disease-related physiologies of prokaryotes, plants, animals and humans alike. Here we show that G3P serves as the inducer of an important form of broad-spectrum immunity in plants, termed systemic acquired resi...

  16. Chemical and enzymatic methodologies for the synthesis of enantiomerically pure glyceraldehyde 3-phosphates.

    PubMed

    Gauss, Dominik; Schoenenberger, Bernhard; Wohlgemuth, Roland

    2014-05-01

    Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphates are important intermediates of many central metabolic pathways in a large number of living organisms. d-Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (d-GAP) is a key intermediate during glycolysis and can as well be found in a variety of other metabolic pathways. The opposite enantiomer, l-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (l-GAP), has been found in a few exciting new pathways. Here, improved syntheses of enantiomerically pure glyceraldehyde 3-phosphates are reported. While d-GAP was synthesized by periodate cleavage of d-fructose 6-phosphate, l-GAP was obtained by enzymatic phosphorylation of l-glyceraldehyde. (1)H- and (31)P NMR spectroscopy was applied in order to examine pH-dependent behavior of GAP over time and to identify potential degradation products. It was found that GAP is stable in acidic aqueous solution below pH 4. At pH 7, methylglyoxal is formed, whereas under alkaline conditions, the formation of lactic acid could be observed.

  17. EXPRESSION OF THE SPERMATOGENIC CELL-SPECIFIC GLYCERALDEHYDE 3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE (GAPDS) IN RAT TESTIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The spermatogenic cell-specific variant of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDS) has been cloned from a rat testis cDNA library and its pattern of expression determined. A 1417 nucleotide cDNA has been found to encode an enzyme with substantial homology to mouse GAPDS...

  18. Fusion of phospholipid vesicles induced by muscle glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in the absence of calcium.

    PubMed

    Morero, R D; Viñals, A L; Bloj, B; Farías, R N

    1985-04-01

    Ca2+-induced fusion of phospholipid vesicles (phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidic acid, 9:1 mol/mol) prepared by ethanolic injection was followed by five different procedures: resonance energy transfer, light scattering, electron microscopy, intermixing of aqueous content, and gel filtration through Sepharose 4-B. The five methods gave concordant results, showing that vesicles containing only 10% phosphatidic acid can be induced to fuse by millimolar concentrations of Ca2+. When the fusing capability of several soluble proteins was assayed, it was found that concanavalin A, bovine serum albumin, ribonuclease, and protease were inactive. On the other hand, lysozyme, L-lactic dehydrogenase, and muscle and yeast glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were capable of inducing vesicle fusion. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from rabbit muscle, the most extensively studied protein, proved to be very effective: 0.1 microM was enough to induce complete intermixing of bilayer phospholipid vesicles. Under conditions used in this work, fusion was accompanied by leakage of internal contents. The fusing capability of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase was not affected by 5 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. The Ca2+ concentration in the medium, as determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy, was 5 ppm. Heat-denatured enzyme was incapable of inducing fusion. We conclude that glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is a soluble protein inherently endowed with the capability of fusing phospholipid vesicles.

  19. Death and taxis: what non-mammalian models tell us about sphingosine-1-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Oskouian, Babak; Saba, Julie D

    2004-10-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a signaling molecule that regulates critical events including mammalian cell proliferation, survival, migration and cell-cell interactions. Most of these signals are triggered by engagement of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors of the Edg family. However, accumulating evidence derived from investigation of non-mammalian models that lack Edg receptors suggests that sphingosine-1-phosphate-like molecules can act through alternative mechanisms and thereby contribute to morphogenesis, development, reproduction and survival. This review provides an overview of sphingosine-1-phosphate metabolism, the isolation of genes in this pathway employing yeast genetics, the evidence for its influence on non-mammalian development, and the pertinence of these findings to human disease.

  20. Discovery of covalent inhibitors of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, a target for the treatment of malaria.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Stefano; Pinto, Andrea; Paredi, Gianluca; Tamborini, Lucia; De Micheli, Carlo; La Pietra, Valeria; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Conti, Paola; Mozzarelli, Andrea

    2014-09-11

    We developed a new class of covalent inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, a validated target for the treatment of malaria, by screening a small library of 3-bromo-isoxazoline derivatives that inactivate the enzyme through a covalent, selective bond to the catalytic cysteine, as demonstrated by mass spectrometry. Substituents on the isoxazolinic ring modulated the potency up to 20-fold, predominantly due to an electrostatic effect, as assessed by computational analysis. PMID:25137375

  1. The glycerol-3-phosphate permease GlpT is the only fosfomycin transporter in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-García, Alfredo; Rodríguez-Rojas, Alexandro; Guelfo, Javier R; Blázquez, Jesús

    2009-11-01

    Fosfomycin is transported into Escherichia coli via both glycerol-3-phosphate (GlpT) and a hexose phosphate transporter (UhpT). Consequently, the inactivation of either glpT or uhpT confers increased fosfomycin resistance in this species. The inactivation of other genes, including ptsI and cyaA, also confers significant fosfomycin resistance. It has been assumed that identical mechanisms are responsible for fosfomycin transport into Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells. The study of an ordered library of insertion mutants in P. aeruginosa PA14 demonstrated that only insertions in glpT confer significant resistance. To explore the uniqueness of this resistance target in P. aeruginosa, the linkage between fosfomycin resistance and the use of glycerol-3-phosphate was tested. Fosfomycin-resistant (Fos-R) mutants were obtained in LB and minimal medium containing glycerol as the sole carbon source at a frequency of 10(-6). However, no Fos-R mutants grew on plates containing fosfomycin and glycerol-3-phosphate instead of glycerol (mutant frequency, < or = 5 x 10(-11)). In addition, 10 out of 10 independent spontaneous Fos-R mutants, obtained on LB-fosfomycin, harbored mutations in glpT, and in all cases the sensitivity to fosfomycin was recovered upon complementation with the wild-type glpT gene. The analysis of these mutants provides additional insights into the structure-function relationship of glycerol-3-phosphate the transporter in P. aeruginosa. Studies with glucose-6-phosphate and different mutant derivatives strongly suggest that P. aeruginosa lacks a specific transport system for this sugar. Thus, glpT seems to be the only fosfomycin resistance mutational target in P. aeruginosa. The high frequency of Fos-R mutations and their apparent lack of fitness cost suggest that Fos-R variants will be obtained easily in vivo upon the fosfomycin treatment of P. aeruginosa infections.

  2. Crystal structure of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase from the ESKAPE pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Kristin A; Breen, Jennifer; Russo, Thomas A; Schultz, L Wayne; Umland, Timothy C

    2016-03-01

    The enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase catalyzes the sixth step of the seven-step shikimate pathway. Chorismate, the product of the pathway, is a precursor for the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids, siderophores and metabolites such as folate, ubiquinone and vitamin K. The shikimate pathway is present in bacteria, fungi, algae, plants and apicomplexan parasites, but is absent in humans. The EPSP synthase enzyme produces 5-enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate and phosphate from phosphoenolpyruvate and shikimate 3-phosphate via a transferase reaction, and is the target of the herbicide glyphosate. The Acinetobacter baumannii gene encoding EPSP synthase, aroA, has previously been demonstrated to be essential during host infection for the growth and survival of this clinically important drug-resistant ESKAPE pathogen. Prephenate dehydrogenase is also encoded by the bifunctional A. baumannii aroA gene, but its activity is dependent upon EPSP synthase since it operates downstream of the shikimate pathway. As part of an effort to evaluate new antimicrobial targets, recombinant A. baumannii EPSP (AbEPSP) synthase, comprising residues Ala301-Gln756 of the aroA gene product, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The crystal structure, determined to 2.37 Å resolution, is described in the context of a potential antimicrobial target and in comparison to EPSP synthases that are resistant or sensitive to the herbicide glyphosate. PMID:26919521

  3. Sphingomyelinase D Activity in Model Membranes: Structural Effects of in situ Generation of Ceramide-1-Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Roberto P.; Brewer, Jonathan; Wagner, Kerstin; Ramos-Cerrillo, Blanca; Duelund, Lars; Jernshøj, Kit Drescher; Olsen, Lars Folke; Bagatolli, Luis A.

    2012-01-01

    The toxicity of Loxosceles spider venom has been attributed to a rare enzyme, sphingomyelinase D, which transforms sphingomyelin to ceramide-1-phosphate. The bases of its inflammatory and dermonecrotic activity, however, remain unclear. In this work the effects of ceramide-1-phosphate on model membranes were studied both by in situ generation of this lipid using a recombinant sphingomyelinase D from the spider Loxosceles laeta and by pre-mixing it with sphingomyelin and cholesterol. The systems of choice were large unilamellar vesicles for bulk studies (enzyme kinetics, fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering) and giant unilamellar vesicles for fluorescence microscopy examination using a variety of fluorescent probes. The influence of membrane lateral structure on the kinetics of enzyme activity and the consequences of enzyme activity on the structure of target membranes containing sphingomyelin were examined. The findings indicate that: 1) ceramide-1-phosphate (particularly lauroyl ceramide-1-phosphate) can be incorporated into sphingomyelin bilayers in a concentration-dependent manner and generates coexistence of liquid disordered/solid ordered domains, 2) the activity of sphingomyelinase D is clearly influenced by the supramolecular organization of its substrate in membranes and, 3) in situ ceramide-1-phosphate generation by enzymatic activity profoundly alters the lateral structure and morphology of the target membranes. PMID:22558302

  4. Purification and properties of myo-inositol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase from germinating mung bean seeds.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, B; De, B P; Biswas, B B

    1984-01-01

    A novel enzyme, myo-inositol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase, which catalyzes the conversion of myo-inositol 1-phosphate to ribulose 5-phosphate has been purified 84-fold from mung bean seedling employing several common techniques. The molecular weight of this purified enzyme has been recorded as 88,500 by Sephadex G-200 column chromatography, and in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis one protein band containing three subunits of Mr 32,000 each was discernible. Km values for NAD+ and myo-inositol 1-phosphate have been recorded as 2.8 X 10(-4) and 5.0 X 10(-4) M, respectively. Production of NADH in myo-inositol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase reaction has also been evidenced by measurement of NADH fluorescence. Dehydrogenation and decarboxylation of myo-inositol 1-phosphate are mediated by the same enzyme. In fact, the rate of dehydrogenation corroborates with that of decarboxylation. Stoichiometry of this reaction suggests that for the production of 1 mol of ribulose 5-phosphate 2 mol of NAD+ are reduced.

  5. An EPSP synthase inhibitor joining shikimate 3-phosphate with glyphosate: synthesis and ligand binding studies.

    PubMed

    Marzabadi, M R; Gruys, K J; Pansegrau, P D; Walker, M C; Yuen, H K; Sikorski, J A

    1996-04-01

    A novel EPSP synthase inhibitor 4 has been designed and synthesized to probe the configurational details of glyphosate recognition in its herbicidal ternary complex with enzyme and shikimate 3-phosphate (S3P). A kinetic evaluation of the new 3-dephospho analog 12, as well as calorimetric and (31)P NMR spectroscopic studies of enzyme-bound 4, now provides a more precise quantitative definition for the molecular interactions of 4 with this enzyme. The very poor binding, relative to 4, displayed by the 3-dephospho analog 12 is indicative that 4 has a specific interaction with the S3P site. A comparison of Ki(calc) for 12 versus the Ki(app) for 4 indicates that the 3-phosphate group in 4 contributes about 4.8 kcal/mol to binding. This compares well with the 5.2 kcal/mol which the 3-phosphate group in S3P contributes to binding. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrates that 4 binds to free enzyme with an observed Kd of 0.53 +/- 0.04 microM. As such, 4 binds only 3-fold weaker than glyphosate and about 150-fold better than N-methylglyphosate. Consequently, 4 represents the most potent N-alkylglyphosate derivative identified to date. However, the resulting thermodynamic binding parameters clearly demonstrate that the formation of EPSPS x 4 is entropy driven like S3P. The binding characteristics of 4 are fully consistent with a primary interaction localized at the S3P subsite. Furthermore, (31)P NMR studies of enzyme-bound 4 confirm the expected interaction at the shikimate 3-phosphate site. However, the chemical shift observed for the phosphonate signal of EPSPS x 4 is in the opposite direction than that observed previously when glyphosate binds with enzyme and S3P. Therefore, when 4 occupies the S3P binding site, there is incomplete overlap at the glyphosate phosphonate subsite. As a glyphosate analog inhibitor, the potency of 4 most likely arises from predominant interactions which occur outside the normal glyphosate binding site. Consequently, 4 is best described

  6. Expression, purification and kinetic characterization of His-tagged glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Cheleski, Juliana; Freitas, Renato F; Wiggers, Helton José; Rocha, Josmar R; de Araújo, Ana Paula Ulian; Montanari, Carlos A

    2011-04-01

    Trypanosomes are flagellated protozoa responsible for serious parasitic diseases that have been classified by the World Health Organization as tropical sicknesses of major importance. One important drug target receiving considerable attention is the enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease (T. cruzi Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (TcGAPDH); EC 1.2.1.12). TcGAPDH is a key enzyme in the glycolytic pathway of T. cruzi and catalyzes the oxidative phosphorylation of D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (G3P) to 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate (1,3-BPG) coupled to the reduction of oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, (NAD(+)) to NADH, the reduced form. Herein, we describe the cloning of the T. cruzi gene for TcGAPDH into the pET-28a(+) vector, its expression as a tagged protein in Escherichia coli, purification and kinetic characterization. The His(6)-tagged TcGAPDH was purified by affinity chromatography. Enzyme activity assays for the recombinant His(6)-TcGAPDH were carried out spectrophotometrically to determine the kinetic parameters. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K(M)(app)) determined for D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and NAD(+) were 352±21 and 272±25 μM, respectively, which were consistent with the values for the untagged enzyme reported in the literature. We have demonstrated by the use of Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) that this vector modification resulted in activity preserved for a higher period. We also report here the use of response surface methodology (RSM) to determine the region of optimal conditions for enzyme activity. A quadratic model was developed by RSM to describe the enzyme activity in terms of pH and temperature as independent variables. According to the RMS contour plots and variance analysis, the maximum enzyme activity was at 29.1°C and pH 8.6. Above 37°C, the enzyme activity starts to fall, which may be related to previous

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A METHOD FOR QUANTITATING SPHINGOID BASE 1-PHOSPHATES IN BLOOD SPOTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red blood cells (RBC) accumulate, store and release sphingoid base 1-phosphates,important ligands for the extracellular receptors S1P1-5. The ability of RBC to accumulate these bioactive lipids is because, with the exception of sphingosine kinase, the enzymes responsible for metabolizing sphingosine...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. 862.1315 Section 862.1315 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... hereditary disease galactosemia (disorder of galactose metabolism) in infants. (b) Classification. Class II....

  9. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. 862.1315 Section 862.1315 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315...

  10. A comparison of sugar indicators enables a universal high-throughput sugar-1-phosphate nucleotidyltransferase assay

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Rocco; Thorson, Jon S.

    2008-01-01

    A systematic comparison of six sugar indicators for their sensitivity, specificity, cross reactivity and suitability in the context of crude lysates revealed para-hydroxybenzoic acid hydrazide (pHBH) to be best suited for application in a plate-based phosphatase-assisted universal sugar-1-phosphate nucleotidyltransferase assay. The addition of a general phosphatase to nucleotidyltransferase reaction aliquots enabled the conversion of remaining sugar-1-phosphate to free sugar, the concentration of which could be rapidly assessed via the pHBH assay. The assay was validated using the model glucose-1-phosphate thymidylyltransferase from Salmonella enterica (RmlA) and compared favorably to a previously reported HPLC assay. This coupled discontinuous assay is quantitative, high-throughput and robust; relies only on commercially available enzymes and reagents; does not require chromatography, specialized detectors (e.g. mass or evaporative light scattering detectors) or radioisotopes; and is capable of detecting less than 5 nmol of sugar-1-phosphate. It is anticipated this high throughput assay system will greatly facilitate nucleotidyltransferase mechanistic and directed evolution/engineering studies. PMID:18387352

  11. Expanding the molecular diversity and phenotypic spectrum of glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Shteyer, Eyal; Niceta, Marcello; Rizzo, Cristiano; Pode-Shakked, Ben; Chillemi, Giovanni; Bruselles, Alessandro; Semeraro, Michela; Barel, Ortal; Eyal, Eran; Kol, Nitzan; Haberman, Yael; Lahad, Avishai; Diomedi-Camassei, Francesca; Marek-Yagel, Dina; Rechavi, Gideon; Tartaglia, Marco; Anikster, Yair

    2016-09-01

    Transient infantile hypertriglyceridemia (HTGT1; OMIM #614480) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, which manifests in early infancy with transient hypertriglyceridemia, hepatomegaly, elevated liver enzymes, persistent fatty liver and hepatic fibrosis. This rare clinical entity is caused by inactivating mutations in the GPD1 gene, which encodes the cytosolic isoform of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Here we report on four patients from three unrelated families of diverse ethnic origins, who presented with hepatomegaly, liver steatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, with or without fasting ketotic hypoglycemia. Whole exome sequencing revealed the affected individuals to harbor deleterious biallelic mutations in the GPD1 gene, including the previously undescribed c.806G > A (p.Arg269Gln) and c.640T > C (p.Cys214Arg) mutations. The clinical features in three of our patients showed several differences compared to the original reports. One subject presented with recurrent episodes of fasting hypoglycemia along with hepatomegaly, hypetriglyceridemia, and elevated liver enzymes; the second showed a severe liver disease, with intrahepatic cholestasis associated with kidney involvement; finally, the third presented persistent hypertriglyceridemia at the age of 30 years. These findings expand the current knowledge of this rare disorder, both with regard to the phenotype and molecular basis. The enlarged phenotypic spectrum of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 deficiency can mimic other inborn errors of metabolism with liver involvement and should alert clinicians to recognize this entity by considering GPD1 mutations in appropriate clinical settings. PMID:27368975

  12. Cloning and characterization of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase encoding gene in Gracilaria/Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xueying; Sui, Zhenghong; Zhang, Xuecheng

    2006-04-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) plays important roles in various cellular processes. A cytosolic GAPDH encoding gene ( gpd) of Gracilaria/Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis was cloned and characterized. Deduced amino acid sequence of the enzyme of G. lemaneiformis had high homology with those of seven red algae. The 5'-untranslated regions of the GAPDHs encoding genes of these red algae varied greatly. GAPDHs of these red algae shared the highly conserved glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase active site ASCTTNCL. However, such active site of Cyanidium caldarium was different from those of the other six algae at the last two residues (CL to LF), thus the spatial structure of its GAPDH active center may be different from those of the other six. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that GAPDH of G. lemaneiformis might have undergone an evolution similar to those of Porphyra yezoensis, Chondrus crispus, and Gracilaria verrucosa. C. caldarium had a closer evolutionary relationship with Cyanidioschyzon merolae than with Cyanidium sp. Virtual Northern blot analysis revealed that gpd of G. lemaneiformis expressed constitutively, which suggested that it might be house-keeping and could be adapted as an inner control in gene expression analysis of G. lemaneiformis.

  13. Involvement of lysophosphatidic acid, sphingosine 1-phosphate and ceramide 1-phosphate in the metabolization of phosphatidic acid by lipid phosphate phosphatases in bovine rod outer segments.

    PubMed

    Pasquaré, Susana J; Salvador, Gabriela A; Giusto, Norma Maria

    2008-07-01

    The aim of the present research was to evaluate the generation of [2-3H]diacylglycerol ([2-3H]DAG) from [2-3H]-Phosphatidic acid ([2-3H]PA) by lipid phosphate phosphatases (LPPs) at different concentrations of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), and ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) in purified ROS obtained from dark-adapted retinas (DROS) or light-adapted retinas (BLROS) as well as in ROS membrane preparations depleted of soluble and peripheral proteins. Western blot analysis revealed the presence of LPP3 exclusively in all membrane preparations. Immunoblots of entire ROS and depleted ROS did not show dark-light differences in LPP3 levels. LPPs activities were diminished by 53% in BLROS with respect to DROS. The major competitive effect on PA hydrolysis was exerted by LPA and S1P in DROS and by C1P in BLROS. LPPs activities in depleted ROS were similar to the activity observed in entire DROS and BLROS, respectively. LPA, S1P and C1P competed at different extent in depleted DROS and BLROS. Sphingosine and ceramide inhibited LPPs activities in entire and depleted DROS. Ceramide also inhibited LPPs activities in entire and in depleted BLROS. Our findings are indicative of a different degree of competition between PA and LPA, S1P and C1P by LPPs depending on the illumination state of the retina. PMID:18288612

  14. beta-D-Glucose 1-phosphate. A structural unit and an immunological determinant of a glycan from streptococcal cell walls.

    PubMed

    Pazur, J H

    1982-01-25

    Glycose 1-phosphate moieties are emerging as important structural units of macromolecular substances imparting special biological functions to these molecules. In the present study, beta-D-glucose 1-phosphate moieties are shown to be structural units and immunological determinants of a bacterial glycan. The glycan is a tetraheteroglycan from the cell wall of Streptococcus faecalis, strain N and is composed of glucose, galactose, rhamnose, N-acetylgalactosamine, and phosphate. Several lines of evidence have been obtained for the presence of beta-D-glucose 1-phosphate units in the glycan, including the liberation of glucose by mild acid hydrolysis, the inhibition of the precipitin reaction by beta-D-glucose 1-phosphate, and the formation of levoglucosan on treatment of the glycan with alkali. Work on the preparation of affinity adsorbents for isolating the new types of antibodies directed at the beta-D-glucose 1-phosphate moieties is in progress. PMID:6172422

  15. Succination of proteins by fumarate: mechanism of inactivation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Blatnik, Matthew; Thorpe, Suzanne R; Baynes, John W

    2008-04-01

    S-(2-succinyl)cysteine (2SC) is a chemical modification of proteins formed by a Michael addition reaction between the Krebs cycle intermediate, fumarate, and thiol groups in protein--a process known as succination of protein. Succination causes irreversible inactivation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) in vitro. GAPDH was immunoprecipitated from muscle of diabetic rats, then analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectroscopy. Succination of GAPDH was increased in muscle of diabetic rats, and the extent of succination correlated strongly with the decrease in specific activity of the enzyme. We propose that 2SC is a biomarker of mitochondrial and oxidative stress in diabetes and that succination of GAPDH and other thiol proteins may provide the chemical link between glucotoxicity and the pathogenesis of diabetic complications.

  16. Atomic-level characterization of transport cycle thermodynamics in the glycerol-3-phosphate:phosphate antiporter

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Mahmoud; Enkavi, Giray; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2015-01-01

    Membrane transporters actively translocate their substrate by undergoing large-scale structural transitions between inward- (IF) and outward-facing (OF) states (‘alternating-access' mechanism). Despite extensive structural studies, atomic-level mechanistic details of such structural transitions, and as importantly, their coupling to chemical events supplying the energy, remain amongst the most elusive aspects of the function of these proteins. Here we present a quantitative, atomic-level description of the functional thermodynamic cycle for the glycerol-3-phosphate:phosphate antiporter GlpT by using a novel approach in reconstructing the free energy landscape governing the IF↔OF transition along a cyclic transition pathway involving both apo and substrate-bound states. Our results provide a fully atomic description of the complete transport process, offering a structural model for the alternating-access mechanism and substantiating the close coupling between global structural transitions and local chemical events. PMID:26417850

  17. Receptor protein kinase FERONIA controls leaf starch accumulation by interacting with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Wang, Long; Li, Chiyu; Liu, Ying; Zhu, Sirui; Qi, Yinyao; Liu, Xuanming; Lin, Qinglu; Luan, Sheng; Yu, Feng

    2015-09-11

    Cell expansion is coordinated by several cues, but available energy is the major factor determining growth. Receptor protein kinase FERONIA (FER) is a master regulator of cell expansion, but the details of its control mechanisms are not clear. Here we show that FER interacts with cytosolic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, GAPC1 and GAPC2), that catalyzes a key reaction in glycolysis, which contributes to energy production. When there is an FER deficiency, there are corresponding decreases in the enzyme activity of GAPDH and increased amounts of starch. More importantly, gapc1/2 mutants mimic fer4 mutants. These data indicate that FER regulated starch content is an evolutionarily conserved function in plants that connects the cell expansion and energy metabolism pathways.

  18. Characterization of a Novel Intestinal Glycerol-3-phosphate Acyltransferase Pathway and Its Role in Lipid Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Khatun, Irani; Clark, Ronald W; Vera, Nicholas B; Kou, Kou; Erion, Derek M; Coskran, Timothy; Bobrowski, Walter F; Okerberg, Carlin; Goodwin, Bryan

    2016-02-01

    Dietary triglycerides (TG) are absorbed by the enterocytes of the small intestine after luminal hydrolysis into monacylglycerol and fatty acids. Before secretion on chylomicrons, these lipids are reesterified into TG, primarily through the monoacylglycerol pathway. However, targeted deletion of the primary murine monoacylglycerol acyltransferase does not quantitatively affect lipid absorption, suggesting the existence of alternative pathways. Therefore, we investigated the role of the glycerol 3-phosphate pathway in dietary lipid absorption. The expression of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT3) was examined throughout the small intestine. To evaluate the role for GPAT3 in lipid absorption, mice harboring a disrupted GPAT3 gene (Gpat3(-/-)) were subjected to an oral lipid challenge and fed a Western-type diet to characterize the role in lipid and cholesterol homeostasis. Additional mechanistic studies were performed in primary enterocytes. GPAT3 was abundantly expressed in the apical surface of enterocytes in the small intestine. After an oral lipid bolus, Gpat3(-/-) mice exhibited attenuated plasma TG excursion and accumulated lipid in the enterocytes. Electron microscopy studies revealed a lack of lipids in the lamina propria and intercellular space in Gpat3(-/-) mice. Gpat3(-/-) enterocytes displayed a compensatory increase in the synthesis of phospholipid and cholesteryl ester. When fed a Western-type diet, hepatic TG and cholesteryl ester accumulation was significantly higher in Gpat3(-/-) mice compared with the wild-type mice accompanied by elevated levels of alanine aminotransferase, a marker of liver injury. Dysregulation of bile acid metabolism was also evident in Gpat3-null mice. These studies identify GPAT3 as a novel enzyme involved in intestinal lipid metabolism.

  19. A novel 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase from Rahnella aquatilis with significantly reduced glyphosate sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ri-He; Tian, Yong-Sheng; Xiong, Ai-Sheng; Zhao, Wei; Fu, Xiao-Yan; Han, Hong-Juan; Chen, Chen; Jin, Xiao-Fen; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2012-01-01

    The 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS; EC 2.5.1.19) is a key enzyme in the shikimate pathway for the production of aromatic amino acids and chorismate-derived secondary metabolites in plants, fungi, and microorganisms. It is also the target of the broad-spectrum herbicide glyphosate. Natural glyphosate resistance is generally thought to occur within microorganisms in a strong selective pressure condition. Rahnella aquatilis strain GR20, an antagonist against pathogenic agrobacterial strains of grape crown gall, was isolated from the rhizosphere of grape in glyphosate-contaminated vineyards. A novel gene encoding EPSPS was identified from the isolated bacterium by complementation of an Escherichia coli auxotrophic aroA mutant. The EPSPS, named AroA(R. aquatilis), was expressed and purified from E. coli, and key kinetic values were determined. The full-length enzyme exhibited higher tolerance to glyphosate than the E. coli EPSPS (AroA(E. coli)), while retaining high affinity for the substrate phosphoenolpyruvate. Transgenic plants of AroA(R. aquatilis) were also observed to be more resistant to glyphosate at a concentration of 5 mM than that of AroA(E. coli). To probe the sites contributing to increased tolerance to glyphosate, mutant R. aquatilis EPSPS enzymes were produced with the c-strand of subdomain 3 and the f-strand of subdomain 5 (Thr38Lys, Arg40Val, Arg222Gln, Ser224Val, Ile225Val, and Gln226Lys) substituted by the corresponding region of the E. coli EPSPS. The mutant enzyme exhibited greater sensitivity to glyphosate than the wild type R. aquatilis EPSPS with little change of affinity for its first substrate, shikimate-3-phosphate (S3P) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). The effect of the residues on subdomain 5 on glyphosate resistance was more obvious. PMID:22870190

  20. Characterization of a Novel Intestinal Glycerol-3-phosphate Acyltransferase Pathway and Its Role in Lipid Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Khatun, Irani; Clark, Ronald W; Vera, Nicholas B; Kou, Kou; Erion, Derek M; Coskran, Timothy; Bobrowski, Walter F; Okerberg, Carlin; Goodwin, Bryan

    2016-02-01

    Dietary triglycerides (TG) are absorbed by the enterocytes of the small intestine after luminal hydrolysis into monacylglycerol and fatty acids. Before secretion on chylomicrons, these lipids are reesterified into TG, primarily through the monoacylglycerol pathway. However, targeted deletion of the primary murine monoacylglycerol acyltransferase does not quantitatively affect lipid absorption, suggesting the existence of alternative pathways. Therefore, we investigated the role of the glycerol 3-phosphate pathway in dietary lipid absorption. The expression of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT3) was examined throughout the small intestine. To evaluate the role for GPAT3 in lipid absorption, mice harboring a disrupted GPAT3 gene (Gpat3(-/-)) were subjected to an oral lipid challenge and fed a Western-type diet to characterize the role in lipid and cholesterol homeostasis. Additional mechanistic studies were performed in primary enterocytes. GPAT3 was abundantly expressed in the apical surface of enterocytes in the small intestine. After an oral lipid bolus, Gpat3(-/-) mice exhibited attenuated plasma TG excursion and accumulated lipid in the enterocytes. Electron microscopy studies revealed a lack of lipids in the lamina propria and intercellular space in Gpat3(-/-) mice. Gpat3(-/-) enterocytes displayed a compensatory increase in the synthesis of phospholipid and cholesteryl ester. When fed a Western-type diet, hepatic TG and cholesteryl ester accumulation was significantly higher in Gpat3(-/-) mice compared with the wild-type mice accompanied by elevated levels of alanine aminotransferase, a marker of liver injury. Dysregulation of bile acid metabolism was also evident in Gpat3-null mice. These studies identify GPAT3 as a novel enzyme involved in intestinal lipid metabolism. PMID:26644473

  1. A novel 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase from Rahnella aquatilis with significantly reduced glyphosate sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ri-He; Tian, Yong-Sheng; Xiong, Ai-Sheng; Zhao, Wei; Fu, Xiao-Yan; Han, Hong-Juan; Chen, Chen; Jin, Xiao-Fen; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2012-01-01

    The 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS; EC 2.5.1.19) is a key enzyme in the shikimate pathway for the production of aromatic amino acids and chorismate-derived secondary metabolites in plants, fungi, and microorganisms. It is also the target of the broad-spectrum herbicide glyphosate. Natural glyphosate resistance is generally thought to occur within microorganisms in a strong selective pressure condition. Rahnella aquatilis strain GR20, an antagonist against pathogenic agrobacterial strains of grape crown gall, was isolated from the rhizosphere of grape in glyphosate-contaminated vineyards. A novel gene encoding EPSPS was identified from the isolated bacterium by complementation of an Escherichia coli auxotrophic aroA mutant. The EPSPS, named AroA(R. aquatilis), was expressed and purified from E. coli, and key kinetic values were determined. The full-length enzyme exhibited higher tolerance to glyphosate than the E. coli EPSPS (AroA(E. coli)), while retaining high affinity for the substrate phosphoenolpyruvate. Transgenic plants of AroA(R. aquatilis) were also observed to be more resistant to glyphosate at a concentration of 5 mM than that of AroA(E. coli). To probe the sites contributing to increased tolerance to glyphosate, mutant R. aquatilis EPSPS enzymes were produced with the c-strand of subdomain 3 and the f-strand of subdomain 5 (Thr38Lys, Arg40Val, Arg222Gln, Ser224Val, Ile225Val, and Gln226Lys) substituted by the corresponding region of the E. coli EPSPS. The mutant enzyme exhibited greater sensitivity to glyphosate than the wild type R. aquatilis EPSPS with little change of affinity for its first substrate, shikimate-3-phosphate (S3P) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). The effect of the residues on subdomain 5 on glyphosate resistance was more obvious.

  2. Studies of inositol 1-phosphate analogues as inhibitors of the phosphatidylinositol phosphate synthase in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Morii, Hiroyuki; Okauchi, Tatsuo; Nomiya, Hiroki; Ogawa, Midori; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Taniguchi, Hatsumi

    2013-03-01

    We previously reported a novel pathway for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylinositol in mycobacteria via phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) [Morii H., Ogawa, M., Fukuda, K., Taniguchi, H., and Koga, Y (2010) J. Biochem. 148, 593-602]. PIP synthase in the pathway is a promising target for the development of new anti-mycobacterium drugs. In the present study, we evaluated the characteristics of the PIP synthase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Four types of compounds were chemically synthesized based on the assumption that structural homologues of inositol 1-phosphate, a PIP synthase substrate, would act as PIP synthase inhibitors, and the results confirmed that all synthesized compounds inhibited PIP synthase activity. The phosphonate analogue of inositol 1-phosphate (Ino-C-P) had the greatest inhibitory effect among the synthesized compounds examined. Kinetic analysis indicated that Ino-C-P acted as a competitive inhibitor of inositol 1-phosphate. The IC(50) value for Ino-C-P inhibition of the PIP synthase activity was estimated to be 2.0 mM. Interestingly, Ino-C-P was utilized in the same manner as the normal PIP synthase substrate, leading to the synthesis of a phosphonate analogue of PIP (PI-C-P), which had a structure similar to that of the natural product, PIP. In addition, PI-C-P had high inhibitory activity against PIP synthase.

  3. Molecular cloning and characterization of L-galactose-1-phosphate phosphatase from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Shingo; Fujikawa, Yukichi; Tanaka, Nobukazu; Esaka, Muneharu

    2012-01-01

    L-Galactose-1-phosphate phosphatase (GPPase) is an enzyme involved in ascorbate biosynthesis in higher plants. We isolated a cDNA encoding GPPase from tobacco, and named it NtGPPase. The putative amino acid sequence of NtGPPase contained inositol monophosphatase motifs and metal binding sites. Recombinant NtGPPase hydrolyzed not only L-galactose-1-phosphate, but also myo-inositol-1-phosphate. The optimum pH for the GPPase activity of NtGPPase was 7.5. Its enzyme activity required Mg2+, and was inhibited by Li+ and Ca2+. Its fluorescence, fused with green fluorescence protein in onion cells and protoplasts of tobacco BY-2 cells, was observed in both the cytosol and nucleus. The expression of NtGPPase mRNA and protein was clearly correlated with L-ascorbic acid (AsA) contents of BY-2 cells during culture. The AsA contents of NtGPPase over expression lines were higher than those of empty lines at 13 d after subculture. This suggests that NtGPPase contributes slightly to AsA biosynthesis. PMID:22790939

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the glycerol-3-phosphate 1-acyltransferase from squash (Cucurbita moschata).

    PubMed

    Turnbull, A P; Rafferty, J B; Sedelnikova, S E; Slabas, A R; Schierer, T P; Kroon, J T; Nishida, I; Murata, N; Simon, J W; Rice, D W

    2001-03-01

    Glycerol-3-phosphate 1-acyltransferase (E.C. 2.3.1.15; G3PAT) catalyses the incorporation of an acyl group from either acyl-acyl carrier proteins (acylACPs) or acylCoAs into the sn-1 position of glycerol 3-phosphate to yield 1-acylglycerol 3-phosphate. Crystals of squash G3PAT have been obtained by the hanging-drop method of vapour diffusion using PEG 4000 as the precipitant. These crystals are most likely to belong to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with approximate unit-cell parameters a = 61.1, b = 65.1, c = 103.3 A, alpha = beta = gamma = 90 degrees and a monomer in the asymmetric unit. X-ray diffraction data to 1.9 A resolution have been collected in-house using a MAR 345 imaging-plate system.

  5. The cause of hepatic accumulation of fructose 1-phosphate on fructose loading

    PubMed Central

    Woods, H. F.; Eggleston, L. V.; Krebs, H. A.

    1970-01-01

    1. The changes in the metabolite content in freeze-clamped livers of fed rats occurring on perfusion with 10mm-d-fructose have been examined. 2. The most striking effects of fructose were an accumulation of fructose 1-phosphate, as already known, up to 8.7μmol/g of liver within 10min, a loss of total adenine nucleotides (up to 35% after 40min) with a decrease in the ATP content to 23% within 10min, a sevenfold rise in the concentration of IMP to 1.1μmol/g and an eightfold rise of α-glycerophosphate to 1.1μmol/g. 3. There was a transient decrease in Pi from 4.2 to 1.7μmol/g. Within 40min the Pi content recovered to the normal value, probably because of an uptake of Pi from the perfusion medium. 4. The degradation of the adenine nucleotides beyond the stage of AMP can be accounted for by the decrease of ATP and Pi. As ATP inhibits 5-nucleotidase, and as Pi inhibits AMP deaminase any AMP arising in the tissue is liable to undergo dephosphorylation or deamination under the conditions occurring after fructose loading. 5. The content of lactate increased to 4.3μmol/g at 80min; pyruvate also increased and the [lactate]/[pyruvate] ratio remained within physiological limits. 6. The concentration of free fructose within the liver remained much below that in the perfusion medium, indicating that the rate of penetration of fructose into the tissue was lower than the rate of utilization. 7. The fission of fructose 1-phosphate by liver aldolase is inhibited by several phosphorylated intermediates, especially by IMP. This inhibition is competitive with a Ki of 0.1mm. 8. The maximal rates of the enzymes synthesizing and splitting fructose 1-phosphate are about equal. The accumulation of fructose 1-phosphate on fructose loading is due to the inhibition of the fission of fructose 1-phosphate by the IMP arising from the degradation of the adenine nucleotides. PMID:5500310

  6. Modeling of glycerol-3-phosphate transporter suggests a potential 'tilt' mechanism involved in its function.

    PubMed

    Tsigelny, Igor F; Greenberg, Jerry; Kouznetsova, Valentina; Nigam, Sanjay K

    2008-10-01

    Many major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporters have similar 12-transmembrane alpha-helical topologies with two six-helix halves connected by a long loop. In humans, these transporters participate in key physiological processes and are also, as in the case of members of the organic anion transporter (OAT) family, of pharmaceutical interest. Recently, crystal structures of two bacterial representatives of the MFS family--the glycerol-3-phosphate transporter (GlpT) and lac-permease (LacY)--have been solved and, because of assumptions regarding the high structural conservation of this family, there is hope that the results can be applied to mammalian transporters as well. Based on crystallography, it has been suggested that a major conformational "switching" mechanism accounts for ligand transport by MFS proteins. This conformational switch would then allow periodic changes in the overall transporter configuration, resulting in its cyclic opening to the periplasm or cytoplasm. Following this lead, we have modeled a possible "switch" mechanism in GlpT, using the concept of rotation of protein domains as in the DynDom program17 and membranephilic constraints predicted by the MAPAS program.(23) We found that the minima of energies of intersubunit interactions support two alternate positions consistent with their transport properties. Thus, for GlpT, a "tilt" of 9 degrees -10 degrees rotation had the most favorable energetics of electrostatic interaction between the two halves of the transporter; moreover, this confirmation was sufficient to suggest transport of the ligand across the membrane. We conducted steered molecular dynamics simulations of the GlpT-ligand system to explore how glycerol-3-phosphate would be handled by the "tilted" structure, and obtained results generally consistent with experimental mutagenesis data. While biochemical data remain most consistent with a single-site alternating access model, our results raise the possibility that, while the

  7. Dengue Virus NS1 Protein Modulates Cellular Energy Metabolism by Increasing Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Allonso, Diego; Andrade, Iamara S.; Conde, Jonas N.; Coelho, Diego R.; Rocha, Daniele C. P.; da Silva, Manuela L.; Ventura, Gustavo T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue is one of the main public health concerns worldwide. Recent estimates indicate that over 390 million people are infected annually with the dengue virus (DENV), resulting in thousands of deaths. Among the DENV nonstructural proteins, the NS1 protein is the only one whose function during replication is still unknown. NS1 is a 46- to 55-kDa glycoprotein commonly found as both a membrane-associated homodimer and a soluble hexameric barrel-shaped lipoprotein. Despite its role in the pathogenic process, NS1 is essential for proper RNA accumulation and virus production. In the present study, we identified that glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) interacts with intracellular NS1. Molecular docking revealed that this interaction occurs through the hydrophobic protrusion of NS1 and the hydrophobic residues located at the opposite side of the catalytic site. Moreover, addition of purified recombinant NS1 enhanced the glycolytic activity of GAPDH in vitro. Interestingly, we observed that DENV infection promoted the relocalization of GAPDH to the perinuclear region, where NS1 is commonly found. Both DENV infection and expression of NS1 itself resulted in increased GAPDH activity. Our findings indicate that the NS1 protein acts to increase glycolytic flux and, consequently, energy production, which is consistent with the recent finding that DENV induces and requires glycolysis for proper replication. This is the first report to propose that NS1 is an important modulator of cellular energy metabolism. The data presented here provide new insights that may be useful for further drug design and the development of alternative antiviral therapies against DENV. IMPORTANCE Dengue represents a serious public health problem worldwide and is caused by infection with dengue virus (DENV). Estimates indicate that half of the global population is at risk of infection, with almost 400 million cases occurring per year. The NS1 glycoprotein is found in both the

  8. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Lyase Deficient Cells as a Tool to Study Protein Lipid Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gerl, Mathias J.; Bittl, Verena; Kirchner, Susanne; Sachsenheimer, Timo; Brunner, Hanna L.; Lüchtenborg, Christian; Özbalci, Cagakan; Wiedemann, Hannah; Wegehingel, Sabine; Nickel, Walter; Haberkant, Per; Schultz, Carsten; Krüger, Marcus; Brügger, Britta

    2016-01-01

    Cell membranes contain hundreds to thousands of individual lipid species that are of structural importance but also specifically interact with proteins. Due to their highly controlled synthesis and role in signaling events sphingolipids are an intensely studied class of lipids. In order to investigate their metabolism and to study proteins interacting with sphingolipids, metabolic labeling based on photoactivatable sphingoid bases is the most straightforward approach. In order to monitor protein-lipid-crosslink products, sphingosine derivatives containing a reporter moiety, such as a radiolabel or a clickable group, are used. In normal cells, degradation of sphingoid bases via action of the checkpoint enzyme sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase occurs at position C2-C3 of the sphingoid base and channels the resulting hexadecenal into the glycerolipid biosynthesis pathway. In case the functionalized sphingosine looses the reporter moiety during its degradation, specificity towards sphingolipid labeling is maintained. In case degradation of a sphingosine derivative does not remove either the photoactivatable or reporter group from the resulting hexadecenal, specificity towards sphingolipid labeling can be achieved by blocking sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase activity and thus preventing sphingosine derivatives to be channeled into the sphingolipid-to-glycerolipid metabolic pathway. Here we report an approach using clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated nuclease Cas9 to create a sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (SGPL1) HeLa knockout cell line to disrupt the sphingolipid-to-glycerolipid metabolic pathway. We found that the lipid and protein compositions as well as sphingolipid metabolism of SGPL1 knock-out HeLa cells only show little adaptations, which validates these cells as model systems to study transient protein-sphingolipid interactions. PMID:27100999

  9. GLYCERALDEHYDE 3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE-S, A SPERM-SPECIFIC GLYCOLYTIC ENZYME, IS REQUIRED FOR SPERM MOTILITY AND MALE FERTILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    While glycolysis is highly conserved, it is remarkable that several novel isozymes in this central metabolic pathway are found in mammalian sperm. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-S (GAPDS) is the product of a mouse gene expressed only during spermatogenesis and, like it...

  10. Enhanced resistance in Theobroma cacao against oomycete and fungal pathogens by secretion of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate-binding proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The internalization of oomycete and fungal pathogen effectors into host plant cells has been reported to be blocked by proteins that bind to the effectors’ cell entry receptor, phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI3P). This finding suggested a novel strategy for disease control by engineering plants ...

  11. New fluorinated agonists for targeting the sphingosin-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P(1)).

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Rizwan S; Keul, Petra; Schäfers, Michael; Levkau, Bodo; Haufe, Günter

    2015-11-15

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor type 1 (S1P1) is involved in fundamental biological processes such as regulation of immune cell trafficking, vascular barrier function and angiogenesis. This Letter presents multistep syntheses of various fluorine substituted 12-aryl analogues of the drug fingolimod (FTY720) and a seven-steps route to 2-amino-17,17-difluoro-2-(hydroxymethyl)heptadecan-1-ol. In vitro and in vivo tests proved all these compounds as potent S1P1 receptor agonists.

  12. Synthesis of arabinitol 1-phosphate and its use for characterization of arabinitol-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Soroka, Nikolai V; Kulminskaya, Anna A; Eneyskaya, Elena V; Shabalin, Konstantin A; Uffimtcev, Andrei V; Povelainen, Mira; Miasnikov, Andrei N; Neustroev, Kirill N

    2005-03-21

    D-arabinitol 1-phosphate (Ara-ol1-P), a substrate for D-arabinitol-phosphate dehydrogenase (APDH), was chemically synthesized from D-arabinonic acid in five steps (O-acetylation, chlorination, reduction, phosphorylation, and de-O-acetylation). Ara-ol1-P was used as a substrate for the characterization of APDH from Bacillus halodurans. APDH converts Ara-ol1-P to xylulose 5-phosphate in the oxidative reaction; both NAD(+) and NADP(+) were accepted as co-factors. Kinetic parameters for the oxidative and reductive reactions are consistent with a ternary complex mechanism.

  13. Effects of cell volume regulating osmolytes on glycerol 3-phosphate binding to triosephosphate isomerase.

    PubMed

    Gulotta, Miriam; Qiu, Linlin; Desamero, Ruel; Rösgen, Jörg; Bolen, D Wayne; Callender, Robert

    2007-09-01

    During cell volume regulation, intracellular concentration changes occur in both inorganic and organic osmolytes in order to balance the extracellular osmotic stress and maintain cell volume homeostasis. Generally, salt and urea increase the Km's of enzymes and trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) counteracts these effects by decreasing Km's. The hypothesis to account for these effects is that urea and salt shift the native state ensemble of the enzyme toward conformers that are substrate-binding incompetent (BI), while TMAO shifts the ensemble toward binding competent (BC) species. Km's are often complex assemblies of rate constants involving several elementary steps in catalysis, so to better understand osmolyte effects we have focused on a single elementary event, substrate binding. We test the conformational shift hypothesis by evaluating the effects of salt, urea, and TMAO on the mechanism of binding glycerol 3-phosphate, a substrate analogue, to yeast triosephosphate isomerase. Temperature-jump kinetic measurements promote a mechanism consistent with osmolyte-induced shifts in the [BI]/[BC] ratio of enzyme conformers. Importantly, salt significantly affects the binding constant through its effect on the activity coefficients of substrate, enzyme, and enzyme-substrate complex, and it is likely that TMAO and urea affect activity coefficients as well. Results indicate that the conformational shift hypothesis alone does not account for the effects of osmolytes on Km's. PMID:17696453

  14. Negative regulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate levels in early-to-late endosome conversion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kai; Jian, Youli; Sun, Xiaojuan; Yang, Chengkui; Gao, Zhiyang; Zhang, Zhili; Liu, Xuezhao; Li, Yang; Xu, Jing; Jing, Yudong; Mitani, Shohei; He, Sudan

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) plays a central role in endosome fusion, recycling, sorting, and early-to-late endosome conversion, but the mechanisms that determine how the correct endosomal PtdIns3P level is achieved remain largely elusive. Here we identify two new factors, SORF-1 and SORF-2, as essential PtdIns3P regulators in Caenorhabditis elegans. Loss of sorf-1 or sorf-2 leads to greatly elevated endosomal PtdIns3P, which drives excessive fusion of early endosomes. sorf-1 and sorf-2 function coordinately with Rab switching genes to inhibit synthesis of PtdIns3P, allowing its turnover for endosome conversion. SORF-1 and SORF-2 act in a complex with BEC-1/Beclin1, and their loss causes elevated activity of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) complex. In mammalian cells, inactivation of WDR91 and WDR81, the homologs of SORF-1 and SORF-2, induces Beclin1-dependent enlargement of PtdIns3P-enriched endosomes and defective degradation of epidermal growth factor receptor. WDR91 and WDR81 interact with Beclin1 and inhibit PI3K complex activity. These findings reveal a conserved mechanism that controls appropriate PtdIns3P levels in early-to-late endosome conversion. PMID:26783301

  15. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is regulated by ferredoxin-NADP reductase in the diatom Asterionella formosa.

    PubMed

    Mekhalfi, Malika; Puppo, Carine; Avilan, Luisana; Lebrun, Régine; Mansuelle, Pascal; Maberly, Stephen C; Gontero, Brigitte

    2014-07-01

    Diatoms are a widespread and ecologically important group of heterokont algae that contribute c. 20% to global productivity. Previous work has shown that regulation of their key Calvin cycle enzymes differs from that of the Plantae, and that in crude extracts, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) can be inhibited by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced (NADPH) under oxidizing conditions. The freshwater diatom, Asterionella formosa, was studied using enzyme kinetics, chromatography, surface plasmon resonance, mass spectrometry and sequence analysis to determine the mechanism behind this GAPDH inhibition. GAPDH interacted with ferredoxin-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) reductase (FNR) from the primary phase of photosynthesis, and the small chloroplast protein, CP12. Sequences of copurified GAPDH and FNR were highly homologous with published sequences. However, the widespread ternary complex among GAPDH, phosphoribulokinase and CP12 was absent. Activity measurements under oxidizing conditions showed that NADPH can inhibit GAPDH-CP12 in the presence of FNR, explaining the earlier observed inhibition within crude extracts. Diatom plastids have a distinctive metabolism, including the lack of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and so cannot produce NADPH in the dark. The observed down-regulation of GAPDH in the dark may allow NADPH to be rerouted towards other reductive processes contributing to their ecological success.

  16. Plastid-expressed 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase genes provide high level glyphosate tolerance in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Ye, G N; Hajdukiewicz, P T; Broyles, D; Rodriguez, D; Xu, C W; Nehra, N; Staub, J M

    2001-02-01

    Plastid transformation (transplastomic) technology has several potential advantages for biotechnological applications including the use of unmodified prokaryotic genes for engineering, potential high-level gene expression and gene containment due to maternal inheritance in most crop plants. However, the efficacy of a plastid-encoded trait may change depending on plastid number and tissue type. We report a feasibility study in tobacco plastids to achieve high-level herbicide resistance in both vegetative tissues and reproductive organs. We chose to test glyphosate resistance via over-expression in plastids of tolerant forms of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS). Immunological, enzymatic and whole-plant assays were used to prove the efficacy of three different prokaryotic (Achromobacter, Agrobacterium and Bacillus) EPSPS genes. Using the Agrobacterium strain CP4 EPSPS as a model we identified translational control sequences that direct a 10,000-fold range of protein accumulation (to >10% total soluble protein in leaves). Plastid-expressed EPSPS could provide very high levels of glyphosate resistance, although levels of resistance in vegetative and reproductive tissues differed depending on EPSPS accumulation levels, and correlated to the plastid abundance in these tissues. Paradoxically, higher levels of plastid-expressed EPSPS protein accumulation were apparently required for efficacy than from a similar nuclear-encoded gene. Nevertheless, the demonstration of high-level glyphosate tolerance in vegetative and reproductive organs using transplastomic technology provides a necessary step for transfer of this technology to other crop species.

  17. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-telomere association correlates with redox status in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Pariona-Llanos, Ricardo; Pavani, Raphael Souza; Reis, Marcelo; Noël, Vincent; Silber, Ariel Mariano; Armelin, Hugo Aguirre; Cano, Maria Isabel Nogueira; Elias, Maria Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a classical metabolic enzyme involved in energy production and plays a role in additional nuclear functions, including transcriptional control, recognition of misincorporated nucleotides in DNA and maintenance of telomere structure. Here, we show that the recombinant protein T. cruzi GAPDH (rTcGAPDH) binds single-stranded telomeric DNA. We demonstrate that the binding of GAPDH to telomeric DNA correlates with the balance between oxidized and reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides (NAD+/NADH). We observed that GAPDH-telomere association and NAD+/NADH balance changed throughout the T. cruzi life cycle. For example, in replicative epimastigote forms of T. cruzi, which show similar intracellular concentrations of NAD+ and NADH, GAPDH binds to telomeric DNA in vivo and this binding activity is inhibited by exogenous NAD+. In contrast, in the T. cruzi non-proliferative trypomastigote forms, which show higher NAD+ concentration, GAPDH was absent from telomeres. In addition, NAD+ abolishes physical interaction between recombinant GAPDH and synthetic telomere oligonucleotide in a cell free system, mimicking exogenous NAD+ that reduces GAPDH-telomere interaction in vivo. We propose that the balance in the NAD+/NADH ratio during T. cruzi life cycle homeostatically regulates GAPDH telomere association, suggesting that in trypanosomes redox status locally modulates GAPDH association with telomeric DNA. PMID:25775131

  18. Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase-Telomere Association Correlates with Redox Status in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Pariona-Llanos, Ricardo; Pavani, Raphael Souza; Reis, Marcelo; Noël, Vincent; Silber, Ariel Mariano; Armelin, Hugo Aguirre; Cano, Maria Isabel Nogueira; Elias, Maria Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a classical metabolic enzyme involved in energy production and plays a role in additional nuclear functions, including transcriptional control, recognition of misincorporated nucleotides in DNA and maintenance of telomere structure. Here, we show that the recombinant protein T. cruzi GAPDH (rTcGAPDH) binds single-stranded telomeric DNA. We demonstrate that the binding of GAPDH to telomeric DNA correlates with the balance between oxidized and reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides (NAD+/NADH). We observed that GAPDH-telomere association and NAD+/NADH balance changed throughout the T. cruzi life cycle. For example, in replicative epimastigote forms of T. cruzi, which show similar intracellular concentrations of NAD+ and NADH, GAPDH binds to telomeric DNA in vivo and this binding activity is inhibited by exogenous NAD+. In contrast, in the T. cruzi non-proliferative trypomastigote forms, which show higher NAD+ concentration, GAPDH was absent from telomeres. In addition, NAD+ abolishes physical interaction between recombinant GAPDH and synthetic telomere oligonucleotide in a cell free system, mimicking exogenous NAD+ that reduces GAPDH-telomere interaction in vivo. We propose that the balance in the NAD+/NADH ratio during T. cruzi life cycle homeostatically regulates GAPDH telomere association, suggesting that in trypanosomes redox status locally modulates GAPDH association with telomeric DNA. PMID:25775131

  19. Comparative molecular analysis of evolutionarily distant glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Sardina pilchardus and Octopus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Baibai, Tarik; Oukhattar, Laila; Mountassif, Driss; Assobhei, Omar; Serrano, Aurelio; Soukri, Abdelaziz

    2010-12-01

    The NAD(+)-dependent cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, EC 1.2.1.12), which is recognized as a key to central carbon metabolism in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis and as an important allozymic polymorphic biomarker, was purified from muscles of two marine species: the skeletal muscle of Sardina pilchardus Walbaum (Teleost, Clupeida) and the incompressible arm muscle of Octopus vulgaris (Mollusca, Cephalopoda). Comparative biochemical studies have revealed that they differ in their subunit molecular masses and in pI values. Partial cDNA sequences corresponding to an internal region of the GapC genes from Sardina and Octopus were obtained by polymerase chain reaction using degenerate primers designed from highly conserved protein motifs. Alignments of the deduced amino acid sequences were used to establish the 3D structures of the active site of two enzymes as well as the phylogenetic relationships of the sardine and octopus enzymes. These two enzymes are the first two GAPDHs characterized so far from teleost fish and cephalopod, respectively. Interestingly, phylogenetic analyses indicated that the sardina GAPDH is in a cluster with the archetypical enzymes from other vertebrates, while the octopus GAPDH comes together with other molluscan sequences in a distant basal assembly closer to bacterial and fungal orthologs, thus suggesting their different evolutionary scenarios.

  20. Assisted folding of D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase by trigger factor.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, G. C.; Li, Z. Y.; Zhou, J. M.; Fischer, G.

    2000-01-01

    The Escherichia coli trigger factor is a peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase that catalyzes proline-limited protein folding extremely well. Here, refolding of D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) in the presence of trigger factor was investigated. The regain of activity of GAPDH was markedly increased by trigger factor after either long- or short-term denaturation, and detectable aggregation of GAPDH intermediates was prevented. In both cases, time courses of refolding of GAPDH were decelerated by trigger factor. The reactivation yield of GAPDH showed a slow down-turn when molar ratios of trigger factor to GAPDH were above 5, due to tight binding between trigger factor and GAPDH intermediates. Such inactive bound GAPDH could be partially rescued from trigger factor by addition of reduced alphaLA as competitor, by further diluting the refolding mixture, or by disrupting hydrophobic interactions in the complexes. A model for trigger factor assisted refolding of GAPDH is proposed. We also suggest that assisted refolding of GAPDH is due mainly to the chaperone function of trigger factor. PMID:10892818

  1. Rat brain myo-inositol 3-phosphate synthase is a phosphoprotein.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, R N; Lakshmanan, J; Thangavel, M; Seelan, R S; Stagner, J I; Janckila, A J; Vadnal, R E; Casanova, M F; Parthasarathy, L K

    2013-06-01

    The therapeutic effects of lithium in bipolar disorder are poorly understood. Lithium decreases free inositol levels by inhibiting inositol monophosphatase 1 and myo-inositol 3-phosphate synthase (IPS). In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that IPS can be phosphorylated. This was evident when purified rat IPS was dephosphorylated by lambda protein phosphatase and analyzed by phospho-specific ProQ-Diamond staining and Western blot analysis. These techniques demonstrated a mobility shift consistent with IPS being phosphorylated. Mass spectral analysis revealed that Serine-524 (S524), which resides in the hinge region derived from exon 11 of the gene, is the site for phosphorylation. Further, an antibody generated against a synthetic peptide of IPS containing monophosphorylated-S524, was able to discriminate the phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated forms of IPS. The phosphoprotein is found in the brain and testis, but not in the intestine. The intestinal IPS isoform lacks the peptide bearing S524, and hence, cannot be phosphorylated. Evidences suggest that IPS is monophosphorylated at S524 and that the removal of this phosphate does not alter its enzymatic activity. These observations suggest a novel function for IPS in brain and other tissues. Future studies should resolve the functional role of phospho-IPS in brain inositol signaling.

  2. Structural and functional properties of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from a mammalian hibernator.

    PubMed

    de la Roche, Marc; Tessier, Shannon N; Storey, Kenneth B

    2012-02-01

    Glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH; E.C.1.1.1.8) was purified from liver and skeletal muscle of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludivicianus), a hibernating species. Native and subunit molecular masses of the dimeric enzyme were 77 and 40 kD, respectively, and both tissues contained a single isozyme with a pI of 6.4. Kinetic parameters of purified G3PDH from prairie dog liver and muscle were characterized at 22 and 5 °C and compared with rabbit muscle G3PDH. Substrate affinities for hibernator muscle G3PDH were stable (NAD) or increased significantly (K(m) G3P and DHAP decreased) at low temperature whereas K(m) NAD and DHAP of rabbit G3PDH increased. Prairie dog G3PDH showed greater conservation of K(m) G3P over a wide temperature range as well as greater thermal stability and resistance to chemical denaturation by guanidine hydrochloride than the rabbit enzyme. In addition, using the protein sequence of the hibernating thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) and bioinformatics tools, the deduced protein structure of G3PDH was compared between heterothermic and homeothermic mammals. Structural and functional characteristics of G3PDH from the hibernating species would support enzyme function over a wide range of core body temperatures over cycles of torpor and arousal. PMID:22180227

  3. The Inositol-3-Phosphate Synthase Biosynthetic Enzyme Has Distinct Catalytic and Metabolic Roles

    PubMed Central

    Frej, Anna D.; Clark, Jonathan; Le Roy, Caroline I.; Lilla, Sergio; Thomason, Peter A.; Otto, Grant P.; Churchill, Grant; Insall, Robert H.; Claus, Sandrine P.; Hawkins, Phillip; Stephens, Len

    2016-01-01

    Inositol levels, maintained by the biosynthetic enzyme inositol-3-phosphate synthase (Ino1), are altered in a range of disorders, including bipolar disorder and Alzheimer's disease. To date, most inositol studies have focused on the molecular and cellular effects of inositol depletion without considering Ino1 levels. Here we employ a simple eukaryote, Dictyostelium discoideum, to demonstrate distinct effects of loss of Ino1 and inositol depletion. We show that loss of Ino1 results in an inositol auxotrophy that can be rescued only partially by exogenous inositol. Removal of inositol supplementation from the ino1− mutant resulted in a rapid 56% reduction in inositol levels, triggering the induction of autophagy, reduced cytokinesis, and substrate adhesion. Inositol depletion also caused a dramatic generalized decrease in phosphoinositide levels that was rescued by inositol supplementation. However, loss of Ino1 triggered broad metabolic changes consistent with the induction of a catabolic state that was not rescued by inositol supplementation. These data suggest a metabolic role for Ino1 that is independent of inositol biosynthesis. To characterize this role, an Ino1 binding partner containing SEL1L1 domains (Q54IX5) and having homology to mammalian macromolecular complex adaptor proteins was identified. Our findings therefore identify a new role for Ino1, independent of inositol biosynthesis, with broad effects on cell metabolism. PMID:26951199

  4. Reciprocal Phosphorylation of Yeast Glycerol-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenases in Adaptation to Distinct Types of Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Jae; Jeschke, Grace R.; Roelants, Françoise M.; Thorner, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells have evolved mechanisms for ensuring growth and survival in the face of stress caused by a fluctuating environment. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has two homologous glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenases, Gpd1 and Gpd2, that are required to endure various stresses, including hyperosmotic shock and hypoxia. These enzymes are only partially redundant, and their unique functions were attributed previously to differential transcriptional regulation and localization. We find that Gpd1 and Gpd2 are negatively regulated through phosphorylation by distinct kinases under reciprocal conditions. Gpd2 is phosphorylated by the AMP-activated protein kinase Snf1 to curtail glycerol production when nutrients are limiting. Gpd1, in contrast, is a target of TORC2-dependent kinases Ypk1 and Ypk2. Inactivation of Ypk1 by hyperosmotic shock results in dephosphorylation and activation of Gpd1, accelerating recovery through increased glycerol production. Gpd1 dephosphorylation acts synergistically with its transcriptional upregulation, enabling long-term growth at high osmolarity. Phosphorylation of Gpd1 and Gpd2 by distinct kinases thereby enables rapid adaptation to specific stress conditions. Introduction of phosphorylation motifs targeted by distinct kinases provides a general mechanism for functional specialization of duplicated genes during evolution. PMID:22988299

  5. Phosphorylation regulates myo-inositol-3-phosphate synthase: a novel regulatory mechanism of inositol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Deranieh, Rania M; He, Quan; Caruso, Joseph A; Greenberg, Miriam L

    2013-09-13

    myo-Inositol-3-phosphate synthase (MIPS) plays a crucial role in inositol homeostasis. Transcription of the coding gene INO1 is highly regulated. However, regulation of the enzyme is not well defined. We previously showed that MIPS is indirectly inhibited by valproate, suggesting that the enzyme is post-translationally regulated. Using (32)Pi labeling and phosphoamino acid analysis, we show that yeast MIPS is a phosphoprotein. Mass spectrometry analysis identified five phosphosites, three of which are conserved in the human MIPS. Analysis of phosphorylation-deficient and phosphomimetic site mutants indicated that the three conserved sites in yeast (Ser-184, Ser-296, and Ser-374) and humans (Ser-177, Ser-279, and Ser-357) affect MIPS activity. Both S296A and S296D yeast mutants and S177A and S177D human mutants exhibited decreased enzymatic activity, suggesting that a serine residue is critical at that location. The phosphomimetic mutations S184D (human S279D) and S374D (human S357D) but not the phosphodeficient mutations decreased activity, suggesting that phosphorylation of these two sites is inhibitory. The double mutation S184A/S374A caused an increase in MIPS activity, conferred a growth advantage, and partially rescued sensitivity to valproate. Our findings identify a novel mechanism of regulation of inositol synthesis by phosphorylation of MIPS.

  6. Simple method for isolation of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase and the improvement of myofibril gel properties.

    PubMed

    Miyaguchi, Yuji; Sakamoto, Taro; Sasaki, Shun; Nakade, Koji; Tanabe, Manabu; Ichinoseki, Satoko; Numata, Masahiro; Kosai, Kiichi

    2011-02-01

    Porcine glycolytic enzyme, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PD) was prepared effectively by a combination of ethylene diamine tetra-acetate (EDTA) pretreatment and affinity purification. After salting out of porcine sarcoplasmic proteins (SP) with ammonium sulfate at 75% saturation, the obtained supernatant (SP-f3) was treated with EDTA, leaving G3PD in the supernatant (G3PD-E) and most other SPs in the precipitate. At that time, the separation of G3PD-E required more than 20 mmol/L EDTA. G3PD-E was then subjected to affinity purification by batchwise method using blue-sepharose CL-6B, and purified G3PD (G3PD-AP) was obtained using 2 mol/L potassium chloride (KCl) as an eluent. Texture analysis showed that the hardness, adhesiveness and gumminess of the myofibril gel at 0.2-mol/L NaCl increased with the addition of G3PD-AP. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the G3PD-AP reinforced the gel network of the myofibril. However, scanning electron micrograph analysis showed that the network-structure of the gel by the addition of G3PD-AP developed in a different manner from that by adding 0.6 mol/L NaCl. These results showed that glycolytic enzyme, G3PD, contributes to the improvement of the rheological properties of meat products.

  7. Catalysis of nitrite generation from nitroglycerin by glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH).

    PubMed

    Seabra, Amedea B; Ouellet, Marc; Antonic, Marija; Chrétien, Michelle N; English, Ann M

    2013-11-30

    Vascular relaxation to nitroglycerin (glyceryl trinitrate; GTN) requires its bioactivation by mechanisms that remain controversial. We report here that glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) catalyzes the release of nitrite from GTN. In assays containing dithiothreitol (DTT) and NAD(+), the GTN reductase activity of purified GAPDH produces nitrite and 1,2-GDN as the major products. A vmax of 2.6nmolmin(-)(1)mg(-)(1) was measured for nitrite production by GAPDH from rabbit muscle and a GTN KM of 1.2mM. Reductive denitration of GTN in the absence of DTT results in dose- and time-dependent inhibition of GAPDH dehydrogenase activity. Disulfiram, a thiol-modifying drug, inhibits both the dehydrogenase and GTN reductase activity of GAPDH, while DTT or tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine reverse the GTN-induced inhibition. Incubation of intact human erythrocytes or hemolysates with 2mM GTN for 60min results in 50% inhibition of GAPDH's dehydrogenase activity, indicating that GTN is taken up by these cells and that the dehydrogenase is a target of GTN. Thus, erythrocyte GAPDH may contribute to GTN bioactivation.

  8. Phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate is light-regulated and essential for survival in retinal rods

    PubMed Central

    He, Feng; Agosto, Melina A.; Anastassov, Ivan A.; Tse, Dennis Y.; Wu, Samuel M.; Wensel, Theodore G.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositides play important roles in numerous intracellular membrane pathways. Little is known about the regulation or function of these lipids in rod photoreceptor cells, which have highly active membrane dynamics. Using new assays with femtomole sensitivity, we determined that whereas levels of phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate were below detection limits, phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI(3)P) levels in rod inner/outer segments increased more than 30-fold after light exposure. This increase was blocked in a rod-specific knockout of the PI-3 kinase Vps34, resulting in failure of endosomal and autophagy-related membranes to fuse with lysosomes, and accumulation of abnormal membrane structures. At early ages, rods displayed normal morphology, rhodopsin trafficking, and light responses, but underwent progressive neurodegeneration with eventual loss of both rods and cones by twelve weeks. The degeneration is considerably faster than in rod knockouts of autophagy genes, indicating defects in endosome recycling or other PI(3)P-dependent membrane trafficking pathways are also essential for rod survival. PMID:27245220

  9. A glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase with eubacterial features in the amitochondriate eukaryote, Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Markos, A; Miretsky, A; Müller, M

    1993-12-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), localized in the cytosol of Trichomonas vaginalis, was partially purified. The enzyme is specific for NAD+ and is similar in most of its catalytic properties to glycolytic GAPDHs from other organisms. Its sensitivity to koningic acid is similar to levels observed in GAPDHs from eubacteria and two orders of magnitude lower than those observed for eukaryotic GAPDHs. The complete amino acid sequence of T. vaginalis GAPDH was derived from the N-terminal sequence of the purified protein and the deduced sequence of a cDNA clone. It showed great similarity to other eubacterial and eukaryotic GAPDH sequences. The sequence of the S-loop displayed a eubacterial signature. The overall sequence was more similar to eubacterial sequences than to cytosolic and glycosomal eukaryotic sequences. In phylogenetic trees obtained with distance matrix and parsimony methods T. vaginalis GAPDH clustered with its eubacterial homologs. GAPDHs of other amitochondriate protists, belonging to early branches of the eukaryotic lineage (Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba histolytica--Smith M.W. and Doolittle R.F., unpublished data in GenBank), showed typical eukaryotic signatures and clustered with other eukaryotic sequences, indicating that T. vaginalis GAPDH occupies an anomalous position, possibly due to horizontal gene transfer from a eubacterium.

  10. Occurrence of a multimeric high-molecular-weight glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in human serum.

    PubMed

    Kunjithapatham, Rani; Geschwind, Jean-Francois; Devine, Lauren; Boronina, Tatiana N; O'Meally, Robert N; Cole, Robert N; Torbenson, Michael S; Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Shanmugasundaram

    2015-04-01

    Cellular glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a phylogenetically conserved, ubiquitous enzyme that plays an indispensable role in energy metabolism. Although a wealth of information is available on cellular GAPDH, there is a clear paucity of data on its extracellular counterpart (i.e., the secreted or extracellular GAPDH). Here, we show that the extracellular GAPDH in human serum is a multimeric, high-molecular-weight, yet glycolytically active enzyme. The high-molecular-weight multimers of serum GAPDH were identified by immunodetection on one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis using multiple antibodies specific for various epitopes of GAPDH. Partial purification of serum GAPDH by DEAE Affigel affinity/ion exchange chromatography further established the multimeric composition of serum GAPDH. In vitro data demonstrated that human cell lines secrete a multimeric, high-molecular-weight enzyme similar to that of serum GAPDH. Furthermore, LC-MS/MS analysis of extracellular GAPDH from human cell lines confirmed the presence of unique peptides of GAPDH in the high-molecular-weight subunits. Furthermore, data from pulse-chase experiments established the presence of high-molecular-weight subunits in the secreted, extracellular GAPDH. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the presence of a high-molecular-weight, enzymatically active secretory GAPDH in human serum that may have a hitherto unknown function in humans.

  11. On the interaction between glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and airborne particles: Evidence for electrophilic species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinyashiki, Masaru; Rodriguez, Chester E.; Di Stefano, Emma W.; Sioutas, Constantinos; Delfino, Ralph J.; Kumagai, Yoshito; Froines, John R.; Cho, Arthur K.

    Many of the adverse health effects of airborne particulate matter (PM) have been attributed to the chemical properties of some of the large number of chemical species present in PM. Some PM component chemicals are capable of generating reactive oxygen species and eliciting a state of oxidative stress. In addition, however, PM can contain chemical species that elicit their effects through covalent bond formation with nucleophilic functions in the cell. In this manuscript, we report the presence of constituents with electrophilic properties in ambient and diesel exhaust particles, demonstrated by their ability to inhibit the thiol enzyme, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). GAPDH is irreversibly inactivated by electrophiles under anaerobic conditions by covalent bond formation. This inactivation can be blocked by the prior addition of a high concentration of dithiothreitol (DTT) as an alternate nucleophile. Addition of DTT after the reaction between the electrophile and GAPDH, however, does not reverse the inactivation. This property has been utilized to develop a procedure that provides a quantitative measure of electrophiles present in samples of ambient particles collected in the Los Angeles Basin and in diesel exhaust particles. The toxicity of electrophiles is the result of irreversible changes in biological molecules; recovery is dependent on resynthesis. If the resynthesis is slow, the irreversible effects can be cumulative and manifest themselves after chronic exposure to low levels of electrophiles.

  12. Glyphosate selected amplification of the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase gene in cultured carrot cells.

    PubMed

    Shyr, Y Y; Hepburn, A G; Widholm, J M

    1992-04-01

    CAR and C1, two carrot (Daucus carota L.) suspension cultures of different genotypes, were subjected to stepwise selection for tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate [(N-phosphonomethyl)glycine]. The specific activity of the target enzyme, 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS), as well as the mRNA level and copy number of the structural gene increased with each glyphosate selection step. Therefore, the tolerance to glyphosate is due to stepwise amplification of the EPSPS genes. During the amplification process, DNA rearrangement did not occur within the EPSPS gene of the CAR cell line but did occur during the selection step from 28 to 35 mM glyphosate for the C1 cell line, as determined by Southern hybridization of selected cell DNA following EcoRI restriction endonuclease digestion. Two cell lines derived from a previously selected glyphosate-tolerant cell line (PR), which also had undergone EPSPS gene amplification but have been maintained in glyphosate-free medium for 2 and 5 years, have lost 36 and 100% of the increased EPSPS activity, respectively. Southern blot analysis of these lines confirms that the amplified DNA is relatively stable in the absence of selection. These studies demonstrate that stepwise selection for glyphosate resistance reproducibly produces stepwise amplification of the EPSPS genes. The relative stability of this amplification indicates that the amplified genes are not extrachromosomal.

  13. Widespread occurrence of non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase among gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Iddar, Abdelghani; Valverde, Federico; Assobhei, Omar; Serrano, Aurelio; Soukri, Abdelaziz

    2005-12-01

    The non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDHN, NADP+-specific, EC 1.2.1.9) is present in green eukaryotes and some Streptococcus strains. The present report describes the results of activity and immunoblot analyses, which were used to generate the first survey of bacterial GAPDHN distribution in a number of Bacillus, Streptococcus and Clostridium strains. Putative gapN genes were identified after PCR amplification of partial 700-bp sequences using degenerate primers constructed from highly conserved protein regions. Alignment of the amino acid sequences of these fragments with those of known sequences from other eukaryotic and prokaryotic GAPDHNs, demonstrated the presence of conserved residues involved in catalytic activity that are not conserved in aldehyde dehydrogenases, a protein family closely linked to GAPDHNs. The results confirm that the basic structural features of the members of the GAPDHN family have been conserved throughout evolution and that no identity exists with phosphorylating GAPDHs. Furthermore, phylogenetic trees generated from multiple sequence alignments suggested a close relationship between plant and bacterial GAPDHN families.

  14. Structure of holo-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Palinurus versicolor refined at 2 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Song, S; Li, J; Lin, Z

    1998-07-01

    The crystal structure of holo-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Palinurus versicolor, South China sea lobster, was determined and refined at 2 A resolution to an R factor of 17.1% and reasonable stereochemistry. The structure refinement has not altered the overall structure of GAPDH from this lobster species. However, some local changes in conformation and the inclusion of ordered solvent model have resulted in a substantial improvement in the accuracy of the structure. Structure analysis reveals that the two subunits including NAD+ in the asymmetric unit are remarkably similar. The thermal differences between the two subunits found in some regions of the NAD+-binding domain may originate from different crystallographic environments rather than from an inherent molecular asymmetry. In this structure, the side chain of Arg194 does not point toward the active site but forms an ion pair with Asp293 from a neighboring subunit. Structural comparisons with other GAPDH's of known structure reveal that obvious contrast exists between mesophilic and thermophilic GAPDH mainly in the catalytic domain with significant conformational differences in the S-loop, beta7-strand and loop 120-125; the P-axis interface is more conserved than the R- and Q-axis interfaces and the catalytic domain is more conserved than the NAD+-binding domain. Some possible factors affecting the thermostability of this enzyme are tentatively analyzed by comparison with the highly refined structures of thermophilic enzymes.

  15. Isolation and some properties of glycated D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from rabbit muscle.

    PubMed Central

    He, R Q; Yang, M D; Zheng, X; Zhou, J X

    1995-01-01

    Glycated D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases (GAPDH) from rabbit muscle and human erythrocytes have been investigated. The specific activity of the non-glycated GAPDH from rabbit muscle is approx. 180 units. (One unit is defined as the specific activity required to convert 1 microM of substrate/min per mg of enzyme.) The activity of the glycated enzyme, consisting of two sugars per tetramer, is lower than that of the non-glycated GAPDH. Non-enzymic transamination of the N-termini of glycated GAPDH (gGAPDH) indicates that they are not blocked by glycation. The rate of modification of thiols (Cys-149) with 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) was greater for the glycated than the non-glycated enzymes. The rate of modification of amino groups of Lys residues of gGAPDH with o-phthalaldehyde was greater for the non-glycated enzyme. In 0.18 M guanidine-HC1 solution, the emission intensity at 410 nm of a fluorescent NAD+ derivative introduced into the active site decreased to 80%, whereas that of gGAPDH decreased to 50%. This suggests that the glycated sites are near the active site; glycation of the enzyme leads to a change of the microenvironment of Cys-149, alters the conformation of the active site and decreases the activity. Images Figure 1 PMID:7619048

  16. Involvement of sphingosine-1-phosphate and S1P1 in angiogenesis: analyses using a new S1P1 antagonist of non-sphingosine-1-phosphate analog.

    PubMed

    Yonesu, Kiyoaki; Kawase, Yumi; Inoue, Tatsuya; Takagi, Nana; Tsuchida, Jun; Takuwa, Yoh; Kumakura, Seiichiro; Nara, Futoshi

    2009-03-15

    Chemical lead 2 (CL2) is the first non-sphingosine-1-phosphate (Sph-1-P) analog type antagonist of endothelial differentiation gene-1 (Edg-1/S1P(1)), which is a member of the Sph-1-P receptor family. CL2 inhibits [(3)H]Sph-1-P/S1P(1) binding and shows concentration-dependent inhibition activity against both intracellular cAMP concentration decrease and cell invasion induced by the Sph-1-P/S1P(1) pathway. It also inhibits normal tube formation in an angiogenesis culture model, indicating that CL2 has anti-angiogenesis activity. This compound improved the disease conditions in two angiogenic models in vivo. It significantly inhibited angiogenesis induced by vascular endothelial growth factor in a rabbit cornea model as well as the swelling of mouse feet in an anti-type II collagen antibody-induced arthritis model. These results indicate that the Sph-1-P/S1P(1) pathway would have an important role in disease-related angiogenesis, especially in the processes of migration/invasion and tube formation. In addition, CL2 would be a powerful tool for the pharmacological study of the mechanisms of the Sph-1-P/S1P(1) pathway in rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes retinopathy, and solid tumor growth processes. PMID:19150609

  17. Endocytosis of Ligand-Activated Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor 1 Mediated by the Clathrin-Pathway.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Patrick M; Kang, Yuan-Lin; Kirchhausen, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1) is one of five G protein-coupled receptors activated by the lipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). Stimulation of S1PR1 by binding S1P or the synthetic agonist FTY720P results in rapid desensitization, associated in part with depletion of receptor from the cell surface. We report here combining spinning disc confocal fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry to show that rapid internalization of activated S1PR1 relies on a functional clathrin-mediated endocytic pathway. Uptake of activated S1PR1 was strongly inhibited in cells disrupted in their clathrin-mediated endocytosis by depleting clathrin or AP-2 or by treating cells with dynasore-OH. The uptake of activated S1P1R was strongly inhibited in cells lacking both β-arrestin 1 and β-arrestin 2, indicating that activated S1PR1 follows the canonical route of endocytosis for G-protein coupled receptor's (GPCR)'s.

  18. The roles of bile acids and sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling in the hepatobiliary diseases.

    PubMed

    Nagahashi, Masayuki; Yuza, Kizuki; Hirose, Yuki; Nakajima, Masato; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Hait, Nitai C; Hylemon, Phillip B; Zhou, Huiping; Takabe, Kazuaki; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2016-09-01

    Based on research carried out over the last decade, it has become increasingly evident that bile acids act not only as detergents, but also as important signaling molecules that exert various biological effects via activation of specific nuclear receptors and cell signaling pathways. Bile acids also regulate the expression of numerous genes encoding enzymes and proteins involved in the synthesis and metabolism of bile acids, glucose, fatty acids, and lipoproteins, as well as energy metabolism. Receptors activated by bile acids include, farnesoid X receptor α, pregnane X receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein-coupled receptors, TGR5, muscarinic receptor 2, and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor (S1PR)2. The ligand of S1PR2, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), is a bioactive lipid mediator that regulates various physiological and pathophysiological cellular processes. We have recently reported that conjugated bile acids, via S1PR2, activate and upregulate nuclear sphingosine kinase 2, increase nuclear S1P, and induce genes encoding enzymes and transporters involved in lipid and sterol metabolism in the liver. Here, we discuss the role of bile acids and S1P signaling in the regulation of hepatic lipid metabolism and in hepatobiliary diseases. PMID:27459945

  19. Prolonging Survival of Corneal Transplantation by Selective Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor 1 Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Min; Liu, Yong; Xiao, Yang; Han, Gencheng; Jia, Liang; Wang, Liqiang; Lei, Tian; Huang, Yifei

    2014-01-01

    Corneal transplantation is the most used therapy for eye disorders. Although the cornea is somewhat an immune privileged organ, immune rejection is still the major problem that reduces the success rate. Therefore, effective chemical drugs that regulate immunoreactions are needed to improve the outcome of corneal transplantations. Here, a sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) selective agonist was systematically evaluated in mouse allogeneic corneal transplantation and compared with the commonly used immunosuppressive agents. Compared with CsA and the non-selective sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonist FTY720, the S1P1 selective agonist can prolong the survival corneal transplantation for more than 30 days with a low immune response. More importantly, the optimal dose of the S1P1 selective agonist was much less than non-selective S1P receptor agonist FTY720, which would reduce the dose-dependent toxicity in drug application. Then we analyzed the mechanisms of the selected S1P1 selective agonist on the immunosuppression. The results shown that the S1P1 selective agonist could regulate the distribution of the immune cells with less CD4+ T cells and enhanced Treg cells in the allograft, moreover the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines TGF-β1 and IL-10 unregulated which can reduce the immunoreactions. These findings suggest that S1P1 selective agonist may be a more appropriate immunosuppressive compound to effectively prolong mouse allogeneic corneal grafts survival. PMID:25216235

  20. Structure and catalytic mechanism of L-rhamnulose-1-phosphate aldolase.

    PubMed

    Kroemer, Markus; Merkel, Iris; Schulz, Georg E

    2003-09-16

    The structure of L-rhamnulose-1-phosphate aldolase has been established at 1.35 A resolution in a crystal form that was obtained by a surface mutation and has one subunit of the C(4)-symmetric tetramer in the asymmetric unit. It confirms an earlier 2.7 A resolution structure which was determined in a complicated crystal form with 20 subunits per asymmetric unit. The chain fold and the active center are similar to those of L-fuculose-1-phosphate aldolase and L-ribulose-5-phosphate 4-epimerase. The active center similarity is supported by a structural comparison of all three enzymes and by the binding mode of the inhibitor phosphoglycolohydroxamate at the site of the product dihydroxyacetone phosphate for the two aldolases. The sensitivity of the catalytic rate to several mutations and a comparison with the established mechanism of the related aldolase give rise to a putative catalytic mechanism. This mechanism involves the same binding mode of the second product L-lactaldehyde in both aldolases, except for a 180 degrees flip of the aldehyde group distinguishing between the two epimers rhamnulose and fuculose. The N-terminal domain exhibits a correlated anisotropic mobility that channels the isotropic Brownian motion into a directed movement of the catalytic base and the substrate phosphate on the N-domain toward the zinc ion and the lactaldehyde on the C-terminal domain. We suggest that this movement supports the catalysis mechanically.

  1. Migration of germline progenitor cells is directed by sphingosine-1-phosphate signalling in a basal chordate.

    PubMed

    Kassmer, Susannah H; Rodriguez, Delany; Langenbacher, Adam D; Bui, Connor; De Tomaso, Anthony W

    2015-01-01

    The colonial ascidian Botryllus schlosseri continuously regenerates entire bodies in an asexual budding process. The germ line of the newly developing bodies is derived from migrating germ cell precursors, but the signals governing this homing process are unknown. Here we show that germ cell precursors can be prospectively isolated based on expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase and integrin alpha-6, and that these cells express germ cell markers such as vasa, pumilio and piwi, as well as sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor. In vitro, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) stimulates migration of germ cells, which depends on integrin alpha-6 activity. In vivo, S1P signalling is essential for homing of germ cells to newly developing bodies. S1P is generated by sphingosine kinase in the developing germ cell niche and degraded by lipid phosphate phosphatase in somatic tissues. These results demonstrate a previously unknown role of the S1P signalling pathway in germ cell migration in the ascidian Botryllus schlosseri. PMID:26456232

  2. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Sphingosine Kinase Substrates as Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor Prodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Foss, Frank W.; Mathews, Thomas P.; Kharel, Yugesh; Kennedy, Perry C.; Snyder, Ashley H.; Davis, Michael D.; Lynch, Kevin R.; Macdonald, Timothy L.

    2009-01-01

    In the search for bioactive sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor ligands, a series of 2-amino-2-heterocyclic-propanols were synthesized. These molecules were discovered to be substrates of human-sphingosine kinases 1 and 2 (SPHK1 and SPHK2). When phosphorylated, the resultant phosphates showed varied activities at the five sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors (S1P1–5). Agonism at S1P1 was displayed in vivo by induction of lymphopenia. A stereochemical preference of the quaternary carbon was crucial for phosphorylation by the kinases and alters binding affinities at the S1P receptors. Oxazole and oxadiazole compounds are superior kinase substrates to FTY720, the prototypical prodrug immunomodulator, fingolimod (FTY720). The oxazole-derived structure was the most active for human SPHK2. Imidazole analogues were less active substrates for SPHKs, but more potent and selective agonists of the S1P1 receptor; additionally, the imidazole class of compounds rendered mice lymphopenic. PMID:19632123

  3. Allosteric competitive inhibitors of the glucose-1-phosphate thymidylyltransferase (RmlA) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Alphey, Magnus S; Pirrie, Lisa; Torrie, Leah S; Boulkeroua, Wassila Abdelli; Gardiner, Mary; Sarkar, Aurijit; Maringer, Marko; Oehlmann, Wulf; Brenk, Ruth; Scherman, Michael S; McNeil, Michael; Rejzek, Martin; Field, Robert A; Singh, Mahavir; Gray, David; Westwood, Nicholas J; Naismith, James H

    2013-02-15

    Glucose-1-phosphate thymidylyltransferase (RmlA) catalyzes the condensation of glucose-1-phosphate (G1P) with deoxy-thymidine triphosphate (dTTP) to yield dTDP-d-glucose and pyrophosphate. This is the first step in the l-rhamnose biosynthetic pathway. l-Rhamnose is an important component of the cell wall of many microorganisms, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here we describe the first nanomolar inhibitors of P. aeruginosa RmlA. These thymine analogues were identified by high-throughput screening and subsequently optimized by a combination of protein crystallography, in silico screening, and synthetic chemistry. Some of the inhibitors show inhibitory activity against M. tuberculosis. The inhibitors do not bind at the active site of RmlA but bind at a second site remote from the active site. Despite this, the compounds act as competitive inhibitors of G1P but with high cooperativity. This novel behavior was probed by structural analysis, which suggests that the inhibitors work by preventing RmlA from undergoing the conformational change key to its ordered bi-bi mechanism.

  4. Molecular basis of classic galactosemia from the structure of human galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    McCorvie, Thomas J.; Kopec, Jolanta; Pey, Angel L.; Fitzpatrick, Fiona; Patel, Dipali; Chalk, Rod; Shrestha, Leela; Yue, Wyatt W.

    2016-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a potentially lethal disease caused by the dysfunction of galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT). Over 300 disease-associated GALT mutations have been reported, with the majority being missense changes, although a better understanding of their underlying molecular effects has been hindered by the lack of structural information for the human enzyme. Here, we present the 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of human GALT (hGALT) ternary complex, revealing a homodimer arrangement that contains a covalent uridylylated intermediate and glucose-1-phosphate in the active site, as well as a structural zinc-binding site, per monomer. hGALT reveals significant structural differences from bacterial GALT homologues in metal ligation and dimer interactions, and therefore is a zbetter model for understanding the molecular consequences of disease mutations. Both uridylylation and zinc binding influence the stability and aggregation tendency of hGALT. This has implications for disease-associated variants where p.Gln188Arg, the most commonly detected, increases the rate of aggregation in the absence of zinc likely due to its reduced ability to form the uridylylated intermediate. As such our structure serves as a template in the future design of pharmacological chaperone therapies and opens new concepts about the roles of metal binding and activity in protein misfolding by disease-associated mutants. PMID:27005423

  5. Migration of germline progenitor cells is directed by sphingosine-1-phosphate signalling in a basal chordate

    PubMed Central

    Kassmer, Susannah H.; Rodriguez, Delany; Langenbacher, Adam D.; Bui, Connor; De Tomaso, Anthony W.

    2015-01-01

    The colonial ascidian Botryllus schlosseri continuously regenerates entire bodies in an asexual budding process. The germ line of the newly developing bodies is derived from migrating germ cell precursors, but the signals governing this homing process are unknown. Here we show that germ cell precursors can be prospectively isolated based on expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase and integrin alpha-6, and that these cells express germ cell markers such as vasa, pumilio and piwi, as well as sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor. In vitro, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) stimulates migration of germ cells, which depends on integrin alpha-6 activity. In vivo, S1P signalling is essential for homing of germ cells to newly developing bodies. S1P is generated by sphingosine kinase in the developing germ cell niche and degraded by lipid phosphate phosphatase in somatic tissues. These results demonstrate a previously unknown role of the S1P signalling pathway in germ cell migration in the ascidian Botryllus schlosseri. PMID:26456232

  6. Carnosine prevents glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate-mediated inhibition of aspartate aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Swearengin, T A; Fitzgerald, C; Seidler, N W

    1999-08-01

    Post-mitotic tissues, such as the heart, exhibit high concentrations (20 mM) of carnosine (beta-alanyl-l-histidine). Carnosine may have aldehyde scavenging properties. We tested this hypothesis by examining its protective effects against inhibition of enzyme activity by glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (Glyc3P). Glyc3P is a potentially toxic triose; Glyc3P inhibits the cardiac aspartate aminotransferase (cAAT) by non-enzymatic glycosylation (or glycation) of the protein. cAAT requires pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PyP) for catalysis. We observed that carnosine (20 mM) completely prevents the inhibition of cAAT activity by Glyc3P (5 mM) after brief incubation (30 min at 37 degrees C). After a prolonged incubation (3.25 h) of cAAT with Glyc3P (0.5 mM) at 37 degrees C, the protection by carnosine (20 mM) persisted but PyP availability was affected. In the absence of PyP from the assay medium, cAAT activities (plus Glyc3P) were 95 +/- 18.2 micromol/min per mg protein (mean +/- SD), minus carnosine and 100 +/- 2.4, plus carnosine; control activity was 172 +/- 3.9. When PyP (1.0 microM) was included in the assay medium, cAAT activities (plus Glyc3P) were 93 +/- 14.8, minus carnosine and 151 +/- 16.8, plus carnosine, P < 0. 001; control activity was 180 +/- 17.7. These data, which showed carnosine moderating the effects of both Glyc3P and PyP, suggest that carnosine may be an endogenous aldehyde scavenger.

  7. Disruption of NAD+ binding site in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase affects its intranuclear interactions

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Manali; Krynetskaia, Natalia; Mishra, Anurag; Barrero, Carlos; Merali, Salim; Gothe, Scott A; Krynetskiy, Evgeny

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To characterize phosphorylation of human glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and mobility of GAPDH in cancer cells treated with chemotherapeutic agents. METHODS: We used proteomics analysis to detect and characterize phosphorylation sites within human GAPDH. Site-specific mutagenesis and alanine scanning was then performed to evaluate functional significance of phosphorylation sites in the GAPDH polypeptide chain. Enzymatic properties of mutated GAPDH variants were assessed using kinetic studies. Intranuclear dynamics parameters (diffusion coefficient and the immobile fraction) were estimated using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments and confocal microscopy. Molecular modeling experiments were performed to estimate the effects of mutations on NAD+ cofactor binding. RESULTS: Using MALDI-TOF analysis, we identified novel phosphorylation sites within the NAD+ binding center of GAPDH at Y94, S98, and T99. Using polyclonal antibody specific to phospho-T99-containing peptide within GAPDH, we demonstrated accumulation of phospho-T99-GAPDH in the nuclear fractions of A549, HCT116, and SW48 cancer cells after cytotoxic stress. We performed site-mutagenesis, and estimated enzymatic properties, intranuclear distribution, and intranuclear mobility of GAPDH mutated variants. Site-mutagenesis at positions S98 and T99 in the NAD+ binding center reduced enzymatic activity of GAPDH due to decreased affinity to NAD+ (Km = 741 ± 257 μmol/L in T99I vs 57 ± 11.1 µmol/L in wild type GAPDH. Molecular modeling experiments revealed the effect of mutations on NAD+ binding with GAPDH. FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photo bleaching) analysis showed that mutations in NAD+ binding center of GAPDH abrogated its intranuclear interactions. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest an important functional role of phosphorylated amino acids in the NAD+ binding center in GAPDH interactions with its intranuclear partners. PMID:26629320

  8. Overexpression of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase gene improves chilling tolerance in tomato.

    PubMed

    Sui, Na; Li, Meng; Zhao, Shi-Jie; Li, Feng; Liang, Hui; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2007-10-01

    A tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase gene (LeGPAT) was isolated. The deduced amino acid sequence revealed that LeGPAT contained four acyltransferase domains, showing high identities with GPAT in other plant species. A GFP fusion protein of LeGPAT was targeted to chloroplast in cowpea mesophyll protoplast. RNA gel blot showed that the mRNA accumulation of LeGPAT in the wild type (WT) was induced by chilling temperature. Higher expression levels were observed when tomato leaves were exposed to 4 degrees C for 4 h. RNA gel and western blot analysis confirmed that the sense gene LeGPAT was transferred into the tomato genome and overexpressed under the control of 35S-CaMV. Although tomato is classified as a chilling-sensitive plant, LeGPAT exhibited selectivity to 18:1 over 16:0. Overexpression of LeGPAT increased total activity of LeGPAT and cis-unsaturated fatty acids in PG in thylakoid membrane. Chilling treatment induced less ion leakage from the transgenic plants than from the WT. The photosynthetic rate and the maximal photochemical efficiency of PS II (Fv/Fm) in transgenic plants decreased more slowly during chilling stress and recovered faster than in WT under optimal conditions. The oxidizable P700 in both WT and transgenic plants decreased obviously at chilling temperature under low irradiance, but the oxidizable P700 recovered faster in transgenic plants than in the WT. These results indicate that overexpression of LeGPAT increased the levels of PG cis-unsaturated fatty acids in thylakoid membrane, which was beneficial for the recovery of chilling-induced PS I photoinhibition in tomato.

  9. The glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of Candida albicans is a surface antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Navarro, I; Gil, M L; Casanova, M; O'Connor, J E; Martínez, J P; Gozalbo, D

    1997-01-01

    A lambda gt11 cDNA library from Candida albicans ATCC 26555 was screened by using pooled sera from two patients with systemic candidiasis and five neutropenic patients with high levels of anti-C. albicans immunoglobulin M antibodies. Seven clones were isolated from 60,000 recombinant phages. The most reactive one contained a 0.9-kb cDNA encoding a polypeptide immunoreactive only with sera from patients with systemic candidiasis. The whole gene was isolated from a genomic library by using the cDNA as a probe. The nucleotide sequence of the coding region showed homology (78 to 79%) to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae TDH1 to TDH3 genes coding for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and their amino acid sequences showed 76% identity; thus, this gene has been named C. albicans TDH1. A rabbit polyclonal antiserum against the purified cytosolic C. albicans GAPDH (polyclonal antibody [PAb] anti-CA-GAPDH) was used to identify the GAPDH in the beta-mercaptoethanol extracts containing cell wall moieties. Indirect immunofluorescence demonstrated the presence of GAPDH at the C. albicans cell surface, particularly on the blastoconidia. Semiquantitative flow cytometry analysis showed the sensitivity of this GAPDH form to trypsin and its resistance to be removed with 2 M NaCl or 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate. The decrease in fluorescence in the presence of soluble GAPDH indicates the specificity of the labelling. In addition, a dose-dependent GAPDH enzymatic activity was detected in intact blastoconidia and germ tube cells. This activity was reduced by pretreatment of the cells with trypsin, formaldehyde, and PAb anti-CA-GAPDH. These observations indicate that an immunogenic, enzymatically active cell wall-associated form of the glycolytic enzyme GAPDH is found at the cell surface of C. albicans cells. PMID:9260938

  10. Glyphosate inhibition of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate synthease from suspension-cultured cells of Nicotiana silvestris

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, J.L.; Gaines, C.G.; Jensen, R.A.

    1984-07-01

    Treatment of isogenic suspension-cultured cells of Nicotiana silvestris Speg, et Comes with glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) led to elevated levels of intracellular shikimate (364-fold increase by 1.0 millimolar glyphosate). In the presence of glyphosate, it is likely that most molecules of shikimate originate from the action of 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate (DAHP) synthase-Mn since this isozyme, in contrast to the DAHP synthase-Co isozyme, is insensitive to inhibition by glyphosate. 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase (EC 2.5.1.19) from N. silvestris was sensitive to micromolar concentrations of glyphosate and possessed a single inhibitor binding site. Rigorous kinetic studies of EPSP synthase required resolution from the multiple phosphatase activities present in crude extracts, a result achieved by ion-exchange column chromatography. Although EPSP synthase exhibited a broad pH profile (50% of maximal activity between pH 6.2 and 8.5), sensitivity to glyphosate increased dramatically with increasing pH within this range. In accordance with these data and the pK/sub a/ values of glyphosate, it is likely that the ionic form of glyphosate inhibiting EPSP synthase is COO/sup -/CH/sub 2/NH/sub 2//sup +/CH/sub 2/PO/sub 3//sup 2 -/, and that a completely ionized phosphono group is essential for inhibition. At pH 7.0, inhibition was competitive with respect to phosphoenolpyruvate (K/sub i/ = 1.25 micromolar) and uncompetitive with respect to shikimate-3-P (K/sub i/ = 18.3 micromolar). All data were consistent with a mechanism of inhibition in which glyphosate competes with PEP for binding to an (enzyme:shikimate-3-P) complex and ultimately forms the dead-end complex of (enzyme:shikimate-3-P:glyphosate). 36 references, 8 figures, 1 table.

  11. Identification of some ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes by PCR amplification of their gpd (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) genes.

    PubMed

    Kreuzinger, N; Podeu, R; Gruber, F; Göbl, F; Kubicek, C P

    1996-09-01

    Degenerated oligonucleotide primers designed to flank an approximately 1.2-kb fragment of the gene encoding glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gpd) from ascomycetes and basidiomycetes were used to amplify the corresponding gpd fragments from several species of the ectomycorrhizal fungal taxa Boletus, Amanita, and Lactarius. Those from B. edulis, A. muscaria, and L. deterrimus were cloned and sequenced. The respective nucleotide sequences of these gene fragments showed a moderate degree of similarity (72 to 76%) in the protein-encoding regions and only a low degree of similarity in the introns (56 to 66%). Introns, where present, occurred at conserved positions, but the respective positions and numbers of introns in a given taxon varied. The amplified fragment from a given taxon could be distinguished from that of others by both restriction nuclease cleavage analysis and Southern hybridization. A procedure for labeling DNA probes with fluorescein-12-dUTP by PCR was developed. These probes were used in a nonradioactive hybridization assay, with which the gene could be detected in 2 ng of chromosomal DNA of L. deterrimus on slot blots. Taxon-specific amplification was achieved by the design of specific oligonucleotide primers. The application of the gpd gene for the identification of mycorrhizal fungi under field conditions was demonstrated, with Picea abies (spruce) mycorrhizal roots harvested from a northern alpine forest area as well as from a plant-breeding nursery. The interference by inhibitory substances, which sometimes occurred in the DNA extracted from the root-fungus mixture, could be overcome by using very diluted concentrations of template DNA for a first round of PCR amplification followed by a second round with nested oligonucleotide primers. We conclude that gpd can be used to detect ectomycorrhizal fungi during symbiotic interaction. PMID:8795234

  12. Oxidative modifications of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase regulate metabolic reprogramming of stored red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Reisz, Julie A; Wither, Matthew J; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Nemkov, Travis; Issaian, Aaron; Yoshida, Tatsuro; Dunham, Andrew J; Hill, Ryan C; Hansen, Kirk C; D'Alessandro, Angelo

    2016-09-22

    Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) plays a key regulatory function in glucose oxidation by mediating fluxes through glycolysis or the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) in an oxidative stress-dependent fashion. Previous studies documented metabolic reprogramming in stored red blood cells (RBCs) and oxidation of GAPDH at functional residues upon exposure to pro-oxidants diamide and H2O2 Here we hypothesize that routine storage of erythrocyte concentrates promotes metabolic modulation of stored RBCs by targeting functional thiol residues of GAPDH. Progressive increases in PPP/glycolysis ratios were determined via metabolic flux analysis after spiking (13)C1,2,3-glucose in erythrocyte concentrates stored in Additive Solution-3 under blood bank conditions for up to 42 days. Proteomics analyses revealed a storage-dependent oxidation of GAPDH at functional Cys152, 156, 247, and His179. Activity loss by oxidation occurred with increasing storage duration and was progressively irreversible. Irreversibly oxidized GAPDH accumulated in stored erythrocyte membranes and supernatants through storage day 42. By combining state-of-the-art ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry metabolic flux analysis with redox and switch-tag proteomics, we identify for the first time ex vivo functionally relevant reversible and irreversible (sulfinic acid; Cys to dehydroalanine) oxidations of GAPDH without exogenous supplementation of excess pro-oxidant compounds in clinically relevant blood products. Oxidative and metabolic lesions, exacerbated by storage under hyperoxic conditions, were ameliorated by hypoxic storage. Storage-dependent reversible oxidation of GAPDH represents a mechanistic adaptation in stored erythrocytes to promote PPP activation and generate reducing equivalents. Removal of irreversibly oxidized, functionally compromised GAPDH identifies enhanced vesiculation as a self-protective mechanism in ex vivo aging erythrocytes.

  13. Diacylglycerol pyrophosphate binds and inhibits the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in barley aleurone.

    PubMed

    Astorquiza, Paula Luján; Usorach, Javier; Racagni, Graciela; Villasuso, Ana Laura

    2016-04-01

    The aleurona cell is a model that allows the study of the antagonistic effect of gibberellic acid (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA). Previous results of our laboratory demonstrated the involvement of phospholipids during the response to ABA and GA. ABA modulates the levels of diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid and diacylglycerol pyrophosphate (DAG, PA, DGPP) through the activities of phosphatidate phosphatases, phospholipase D, diacylglycerol kinase and phosphatidate kinase (PAP, PLD, DGK and PAK). PA and DGPP are key phospholipids in the response to ABA, since both are capable of modifying the hydrolitic activity of the aleurona. Nevertheless, little is known about the mechanism of action of these phospholipids during the ABA signal. DGPP is an anionic phospholipid with a pyrophosphate group attached to diacylglycerol. The ionization of the pyrophosphate group may be important to allow electrostatic interactions between DGPP and proteins. To understand how DGPP mediates cell functions in barley aleurone, we used a DGPP affinity membrane assay to isolate DGPP-binding proteins from Hordeum vulgare, followed by mass spectrometric sequencing. A cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, EC 1.2.1.12) was identified for being bound to DGPP. To validate our method, the relatively abundant GAPDH was characterized with respect to its lipid-binding properties, by fat western blot. GAPDH antibody interacts with proteins that only bind to DGPP and PA. We also observed that ABA treatment increased GAPDH abundance and enzyme activity. The presence of phospholipids during GAPDH reaction modulated the GAPDH activity in ABA treated aleurone. These data suggest that DGPP binds to GAPDH and this DGPP and GAPDH interaction provides new evidences in the study of DGPP-mediated ABA responses in barley aleurone.

  14. Diacylglycerol pyrophosphate binds and inhibits the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in barley aleurone.

    PubMed

    Astorquiza, Paula Luján; Usorach, Javier; Racagni, Graciela; Villasuso, Ana Laura

    2016-04-01

    The aleurona cell is a model that allows the study of the antagonistic effect of gibberellic acid (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA). Previous results of our laboratory demonstrated the involvement of phospholipids during the response to ABA and GA. ABA modulates the levels of diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid and diacylglycerol pyrophosphate (DAG, PA, DGPP) through the activities of phosphatidate phosphatases, phospholipase D, diacylglycerol kinase and phosphatidate kinase (PAP, PLD, DGK and PAK). PA and DGPP are key phospholipids in the response to ABA, since both are capable of modifying the hydrolitic activity of the aleurona. Nevertheless, little is known about the mechanism of action of these phospholipids during the ABA signal. DGPP is an anionic phospholipid with a pyrophosphate group attached to diacylglycerol. The ionization of the pyrophosphate group may be important to allow electrostatic interactions between DGPP and proteins. To understand how DGPP mediates cell functions in barley aleurone, we used a DGPP affinity membrane assay to isolate DGPP-binding proteins from Hordeum vulgare, followed by mass spectrometric sequencing. A cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, EC 1.2.1.12) was identified for being bound to DGPP. To validate our method, the relatively abundant GAPDH was characterized with respect to its lipid-binding properties, by fat western blot. GAPDH antibody interacts with proteins that only bind to DGPP and PA. We also observed that ABA treatment increased GAPDH abundance and enzyme activity. The presence of phospholipids during GAPDH reaction modulated the GAPDH activity in ABA treated aleurone. These data suggest that DGPP binds to GAPDH and this DGPP and GAPDH interaction provides new evidences in the study of DGPP-mediated ABA responses in barley aleurone. PMID:26866974

  15. Negative homotropic cooperativity and affinity heterogeneity: preparation of yeast glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase with maximal affinity homogeneity.

    PubMed Central

    Gennis, L S

    1976-01-01

    A three-step procedure including affinity chromatography on NAD+-azobenzamidopropyl-Sepharose has been designed for the purification of yeast glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase [D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate: NAD+ oxidoreductase (phosphorylating), EC 1.2.1.12] with maximized specific activity and maximized homogeneity with respect to affinity for the coenzyme, NAD+.Binding isotherms allow the analysis of cooperativity patterns that disclose both the average ligand affinity in the system and the distribution of ligands among the sites, only for systems with complete affinity homogeneity. The presence of affinity heterogeneity, resulting from multiple oligomeric species differing only in their affinity for coenzyme, gives rise to isotherms which falsely manifest apparent negative cooperativity. A method for distinguishing negative homotropic cooperativity from affinity heterogeneity is suggested. PMID:186779

  16. Controlled release of sphingosine-1-phosphate agonist with gelatin hydrogels for macrophage recruitment.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masahiro; Saito, Takashi; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study is to design a drug delivery system (DDS) for the in vivo promotion of macrophage recruitment. As the drug, a water-insoluble agonist of sphingosine-1-phosphate type 1 receptor (SEW2871) was selected. SEW2871 (SEW) was water-solubilized by micelle formation with gelatin grafted by L-lactic acid oligomer. SEW micelles were mixed with gelatin, followed by dehydrothermal crosslinking of gelatin to obtain gelatin hydrogels incorporating SEW micelles. SEW was released from the hydrogels incorporating SEW micelles in vitro and in vivo. The water-solubilized SEW showed in vitro macrophage migration activity. When implanted into the back subcutis or the skin wound defect of mice, the hydrogel incorporating SEW micelles promoted macrophage migration toward the tissue around the implanted site to a significantly great extent compared with SEW-free hydrogel and that mixed with SEW micelles. The hydrogel is a promising DDS to enhance macrophage recruitment in vivo. PMID:25038462

  17. Sphingosine-1 Phosphate: A New Modulator of Immune Plasticity in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Yamila I.; Campos, Ludmila E.; Castro, Melina G.; Aladhami, Ahmed; Oskeritzian, Carole A.; Alvarez, Sergio E.

    2016-01-01

    In the last 15 years, increasing evidences demonstrate a strong link between sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and both normal physiology and progression of different diseases, including cancer and inflammation. Indeed, numerous studies show that tissue levels of this sphingolipid metabolite are augmented in many cancers, affecting survival, proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastatic spread. Recent insights into the possible role of S1P as a therapeutic target has attracted enormous attention and opened new opportunities in this evolving field. In this review, we will focus on the role of S1P in cancer, with particular emphasis in new developments that highlight the many functions of this sphingolipid in the tumor microenvironment. We will discuss how S1P modulates phenotypic plasticity of macrophages and mast cells, tumor-induced immune evasion, differentiation and survival of immune cells in the tumor milieu, interaction between cancer and stromal cells, and hypoxic response. PMID:27800303

  18. Delivery of sphingosine 1-phosphate from poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Wacker, Bradley K.; Scott, Evan A.; Kaneda, Megan M.; Alford, Shannon K.; Elbert, Donald L.

    2008-01-01

    While protein growth factors promote therapeutic angiogenesis, delivery of lipid factors such as sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) may provide better stabilization of newly formed vessels. We developed a biomaterial for the controlled delivery of S1P, a bioactive lipid released from activated platelets. Multi-arm poly(ethylene glycol)-vinyl sulfone was crosslinked with albumin, a lipid-transporting protein, to form hydrogels. The rate of S1P release from the materials followed Fickian kinetics and was dependent upon the presence of lipid carriers in the release solution. Delivery of S1P from RGD-modified hydrogels increased the cell migration speed of endothelial cells growing on the materials. The materials also induced angiogenesis in the chorioallantoic membrane assay. Our data demonstrate that the storage and release of lipid factors provides a new route for the induction of angiogenesis by artificial materials. PMID:16602758

  19. Sphingosine 1-phosphate signalling through the G-protein-coupled receptor Edg-1.

    PubMed Central

    Zondag, G C; Postma, F R; Etten, I V; Verlaan, I; Moolenaar, W H

    1998-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) are structurally related lipid mediators that act on distinct G-protein-coupled receptors to evoke similar responses, including Ca2+ mobilization, adenylate cyclase inhibition, and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation. However, little is still known about the respective receptors. A recently cloned putative LPA receptor (Vzg-1/Edg-2) is similar to an orphan Gi-coupled receptor termed Edg-1. Here we show that expression of Edg-1 in Sf9 and COS-7 cells results in inhibition of adenylate cyclase and activation of MAP kinase (Gi-mediated), but not Ca2+ mobilization, in response to S1P. These responses are specific in that (i) S1P action is not mimicked by LPA, and (ii) Vzg-1/Edg-2 cannot substitute for Edg-1. Thus the Edg-1 receptor is capable of mediating a subset of the cellular responses to S1P. PMID:9480864

  20. Highly selective and potent agonists of sphingosine-1-phosphate 1 (S1P1) receptor.

    PubMed

    Vachal, Petr; Toth, Leslie M; Hale, Jeffrey J; Yan, Lin; Mills, Sander G; Chrebet, Gary L; Koehane, Carol A; Hajdu, Richard; Milligan, James A; Rosenbach, Mark J; Mandala, Suzanne

    2006-07-15

    Novel series of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonists were developed through a systematic SAR aimed to achieve high selectivity for a single member of the S1P family of receptors, S1P1. The optimized structure represents a highly S1P1-selective and efficacious agonist: S1P1/S1P2, S1P1/S1P3, S1P1/S1P4>10,000-fold, S1P1/S1P5>600-fold, while EC50 (S1P1) <0.2 nM. In vivo experiments are consistent with S1P1 receptor agonism alone being sufficient for achieving desired lymphocyte-lowering effect.

  1. Atheroprotective role of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P).

    PubMed

    Potì, Francesco; Simoni, Manuela; Nofer, Jerzy-Roch

    2014-08-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies documented an inverse relationship between plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels and the extent of atherosclerotic disease. However, clinical interventions targeting HDL cholesterol failed to show clinical benefits with respect to cardiovascular risk reduction, suggesting that HDL components distinct from cholesterol may account for anti-atherogenic effects attributed to this lipoprotein. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-a lysosphingolipid exerting its biological activity via binding to specific G protein-coupled receptors and regulating a wide array of biological responses in a variety of different organs and tissues including the cardiovascular system-has been identified as an integral constituent of HDL particles. In the present review, we discuss current evidence from epidemiological studies, experimental approaches in vitro, and animal models of atherosclerosis, suggesting that S1P contributes to atheroprotective effects exerted by HDL particles. PMID:24891400

  2. Evaluation of commercial antibodies against human sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Talmont, Franck; Moulédous, Lionel

    2014-05-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1), also called endothelial differentiation gene 1, plays an important role in migration, proliferation, and survival of several types of cells including endothelial cells and lymphocytes and is involved in multiple sclerosis. Two commercial rabbit anti-S1P1 antibodies (polyclonal and monoclonal) were tested on CHO cells expressing S1P1 receptors fused to the green fluorescent protein at the C-terminal end and on Pichia pastoris and HEK cells expressing cmyc-tagged S1P1. Polyclonal antibodies did not give any signal by Western blot, immunofluorescence, and flow cytofluorometry. Monoclonal antibodies were able to reveal an unspecific band by Western blot performed on various cell types. Consequently, in our hands and using our protocols, we show that these antibodies did not specifically detect S1P1 receptors.

  3. Sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase in development and disease: sphingolipid metabolism takes flight.

    PubMed

    Fyrst, Henrik; Saba, Julie D

    2008-09-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (SPL) is a highly conserved enzyme that catalyses the final step of sphingolipid degradation, namely the irreversible cleavage of the carbon chain at positions 2-3 of a long-chain base phosphate (LCBP), thereby yielding a long-chain aldehyde and phosphoethanolamine. LCBPs are potent signaling molecules involved in cell proliferation, survival, migration, cell-cell interactions and cell stress responses. Therefore, tight regulation of LCBP signaling is required for proper cell function, and perturbations of this system can lead to alterations in biological processes including development, reproduction and physiology. SPL is a key enzyme in regulating the intracellular and circulating levels of LCBPs and is, therefore, gaining attention as a putative target for pharmacological intervention. This review provides an overview of our current understanding of SPL structure and function, mechanisms involved in SPL regulation and the role of SPL in development and disease.

  4. Molecular and biochemical characterization of mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase from the model brown alga Ectocarpus sp.

    PubMed

    Bonin, Patricia; Groisillier, Agnès; Raimbault, Alice; Guibert, Anaïs; Boyen, Catherine; Tonon, Thierry

    2015-09-01

    The sugar alcohol mannitol is important in the food, pharmaceutical, medical and chemical industries. It is one of the most commonly occurring polyols in nature, with the exception of Archaea and animals. It has a range of physiological roles, including as carbon storage, compatible solute, and osmolyte. Mannitol is present in large amounts in brown algae, where its synthesis involved two steps: a mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase (M1PDH) catalyzes a reversible reaction between fructose-6-phosphate (F6P) and mannitol-1-phosphate (M1P) (EC 1.1.1.17), and a mannitol-1-phosphatase hydrolyzes M1P to mannitol (EC 3.1.3.22). Analysis of the model brown alga Ectocarpus sp. genome provided three candidate genes for M1PDH activities. We report here the sequence analysis of Ectocarpus M1PDHs (EsM1PDHs), and the biochemical characterization of the recombinant catalytic domain of EsM1PDH1 (EsM1PDH1cat). Ectocarpus M1PDHs are representatives of a new type of modular M1PDHs among the polyol-specific long-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (PSLDRs). The N-terminal domain of EsM1PDH1 was not necessary for enzymatic activity. Determination of kinetic parameters indicated that EsM1PDH1cat displayed higher catalytic efficiency for F6P reduction compared to M1P oxidation. Both activities were influenced by NaCl concentration and inhibited by the thioreactive compound pHMB. These observations were completed by measurement of endogenous M1PDH activity and of EsM1PDH gene expression during one diurnal cycle. No significant changes in enzyme activity were monitored between day and night, although transcription of two out of three genes was altered, suggesting different levels of regulation for this key metabolic pathway in brown algal physiology. PMID:26232554

  5. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 reporter mice reveal receptor activation sites in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Mari; Tucker, Ana E.; Tran, Jennifer; Bergner, Jennifer B.; Turner, Ewa M.; Proia, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the GPCR sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) by sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) regulates key physiological processes. S1P1 activation also has been implicated in pathologic processes, including autoimmunity and inflammation; however, the in vivo sites of S1P1 activation under normal and disease conditions are unclear. Here, we describe the development of a mouse model that allows in vivo evaluation of S1P1 activation. These mice, known as S1P1 GFP signaling mice, produce a S1P1 fusion protein containing a transcription factor linked by a protease cleavage site at the C terminus as well as a β-arrestin/protease fusion protein. Activated S1P1 recruits the β-arrestin/protease, resulting in the release of the transcription factor, which stimulates the expression of a GFP reporter gene. Under normal conditions, S1P1 was activated in endothelial cells of lymphoid tissues and in cells in the marginal zone of the spleen, while administration of an S1P1 agonist promoted S1P1 activation in endothelial cells and hepatocytes. In S1P1 GFP signaling mice, LPS-mediated systemic inflammation activated S1P1 in endothelial cells and hepatocytes via hematopoietically derived S1P. These data demonstrate that S1P1 GFP signaling mice can be used to evaluate S1P1 activation and S1P1-active compounds in vivo. Furthermore, this strategy could be potentially applied to any GPCR to identify sites of receptor activation during normal physiology and disease. PMID:24667638

  6. Sphingosine 1-phosphate-mediated α1B-adrenoceptor desensitization and phosphorylation. Direct and paracrine/autocrine actions

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Badillo, Jean A.; Molina-Muñoz, Tzindilú; Romero-Ávila, M. Teresa; Vázquez-Macías, Aleida; Rivera, Richard; Chun, Jerold; García-Sáinz, J. Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate-induced α1B-adrenergic receptor desensitization and phosphorylation was studied in rat-1 fibroblasts stably expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged adrenoceptors. Sphingosine-1-phosphate induced adrenoceptor desensitization and phosphorylation through a signaling cascade that involved phosphoinositide 3-kinase and protein kinase C activities. The autocrine/paracrine role of sphingosine-1-phosphate was also studied. It was observed that activation of receptor tyrosine kinases, such as insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-I) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors increased sphingosine kinase activity. Such activation and consequent production of sphingosine-1-phosphate appears to be functionally relevant in IGF-I- and EGF-induced α1B-adrenoceptor phosphorylation and desensitization as evidenced by the following facts: a) expression of a catalytically inactive (dominant-negative) mutant of sphingosine kinase 1 or b) S1P1 receptor knockdown markedly reduced this growth factor action. This action of sphingosine-1-phosphate involves EGF receptor transactivation. In addition, taking advantage of the presence of the eGFP tag in the receptor construction, we showed that S1P was capable of inducing α1B-adrenergic receptor internalization and that its autocrine/paracrine generation was relevant for internalization induced by IGF-I. Four distinct hormone receptors and two autocrine/paracrine mediators participate in IGF-I receptor- α1B-adrenergic receptor crosstalk. PMID:22019450

  7. Sulfur mustard induced nuclear translocation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GAPDH).

    PubMed

    Steinritz, Dirk; Weber, Jana; Balszuweit, Frank; Thiermann, Horst; Schmidt, Annette

    2013-12-01

    Sulfur Mustard (SM) is a vesicant chemical warfare agent, which is acutely toxic to a variety of organ systems including skin, eyes, respiratory system and bone marrow. The underlying molecular pathomechanism was mainly attributed to the alkylating properties of SM. However, recent studies have revealed that cellular responses to SM exposure are of more complex nature and include increased protein expression and protein modifications that can be used as biomarkers. In order to confirm already known biomarkers, to detect potential new ones and to further elucidate the pathomechanism of SM, we conducted large-scale proteomic experiments based on a human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) exposed to SM. Surprisingly, our analysis identified glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as one of the up-regulated proteins after exposure of HaCaT cells to SM. In this paper we demonstrate the sulfur mustard induced nuclear translocation of GAPDH in HaCaT cells by 2D gel-electrophoresis (2D GE), immunocytochemistry (ICC), Western Blot (WB) and a combination thereof. 2D GE in combination with MALDI-TOF MS/MS analysis identified GAPDH as an up-regulated protein after SM exposure. Immunocytochemistry revealed a distinct nuclear translocation of GAPDH after exposure to 300μM SM. This finding was confirmed by fractionated WB analysis. 2D GE and subsequent immunoblot staining of GAPDH demonstrated two different spot locations of GAPH (pI 7.0 and pI 8.5) that are related to cytosolic or nuclear GAPDH respectively. After exposure to 300μM SM a significant increase of nuclear GAPDH at pI 8.5 occurred. Nuclear GAPDH has been associated with apoptosis, detection of structural DNA alterations, DNA repair and regulation of genomic integrity and telomere structure. The results of our study add new aspects to the pathophysiology of sulfur mustard toxicity, yet further studies will be necessary to reveal the specific function of nuclear GAPDH in the pathomechanism of sulfur mustard

  8. The Glycerol-3-Phosphate Acyltransferase TbGAT is Dispensable for Viability and the Synthesis of Glycerolipids in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nipul; Pirani, Karim A; Zhu, Tongtong; Cheung-See-Kit, Melanie; Lee, Sungsu; Chen, Daniel G; Zufferey, Rachel

    2016-09-01

    Glycerolipids are the main constituents of biological membranes in Trypanosoma brucei, which causes sleeping sickness in humans. Importantly, they occur as a structural component of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol lipid anchor of the abundant cell surface glycoproteins procyclin in procyclic forms and variant surface glycoprotein in bloodstream form, that play crucial roles for the development of the parasite in the insect vector and the mammalian host, respectively. The present work reports the characterization of the glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase TbGAT that initiates the biosynthesis of ester glycerolipids. TbGAT restored glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity when expressed in a Leishmania major deletion strain lacking this activity and exhibited preference for medium length, unsaturated fatty acyl-CoAs. TbGAT localized to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane with its N-terminal domain facing the cytosol. Despite that a TbGAT null mutant in T. brucei procyclic forms lacked glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity, it remained viable and exhibited similar growth rate as the wild type. TbGAT was dispensable for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, and GPI-anchored protein procyclin. However, the null mutant exhibited a slight decrease in phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis that was compensated with a modest increase in production of ether phosphatidylcholine. Our data suggest that an alternative initial acyltransferase takes over TbGAT's function in its absence. PMID:26909872

  9. The Glycerol-3-Phosphate Acyltransferase TbGAT is Dispensable for Viability and the Synthesis of Glycerolipids in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nipul; Pirani, Karim A; Zhu, Tongtong; Cheung-See-Kit, Melanie; Lee, Sungsu; Chen, Daniel G; Zufferey, Rachel

    2016-09-01

    Glycerolipids are the main constituents of biological membranes in Trypanosoma brucei, which causes sleeping sickness in humans. Importantly, they occur as a structural component of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol lipid anchor of the abundant cell surface glycoproteins procyclin in procyclic forms and variant surface glycoprotein in bloodstream form, that play crucial roles for the development of the parasite in the insect vector and the mammalian host, respectively. The present work reports the characterization of the glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase TbGAT that initiates the biosynthesis of ester glycerolipids. TbGAT restored glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity when expressed in a Leishmania major deletion strain lacking this activity and exhibited preference for medium length, unsaturated fatty acyl-CoAs. TbGAT localized to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane with its N-terminal domain facing the cytosol. Despite that a TbGAT null mutant in T. brucei procyclic forms lacked glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity, it remained viable and exhibited similar growth rate as the wild type. TbGAT was dispensable for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, and GPI-anchored protein procyclin. However, the null mutant exhibited a slight decrease in phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis that was compensated with a modest increase in production of ether phosphatidylcholine. Our data suggest that an alternative initial acyltransferase takes over TbGAT's function in its absence.

  10. Inhibitors of acetyltransferase domain of N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate-uridyltransferase/glucosamine-1-phosphate-acetyltransferase (GlmU). Part 1: Hit to lead evaluation of a novel arylsulfonamide series.

    PubMed

    Green, Oluyinka M; McKenzie, Andrew R; Shapiro, Adam B; Otterbein, Ludovic; Ni, Haihong; Patten, Arthur; Stokes, Suzanne; Albert, Robert; Kawatkar, Sameer; Breed, Jason

    2012-02-15

    A novel arylsulfonamide-containing series of compounds represented by 1, discovered by highthroughput screening, inhibit the acetyltransferase domain of N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate-uridyltransferase/glucosamine-1-phosphate-acetyltransferase (GlmU). X-ray structure determination confirmed that inhibitor binds at the site occupied by acetyl-CoA, indicating that series is competitive with this substrate. This letter documents our early hit-to-lead evaluation of the chemical series and some of the findings that led to improvement in in-vitro potency against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial isozymes, exemplified by compound 40.

  11. Birth of Archaeal Cells: Molecular Phylogenetic Analyses of G1P Dehydrogenase, G3P Dehydrogenases, and Glycerol Kinase Suggest Derived Features of Archaeal Membranes Having G1P Polar Lipids

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria and Eukarya have cell membranes with sn-glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P), whereas archaeal membranes contain sn-glycerol-1-phosphate (G1P). Determining the time at which cells with either G3P-lipid membranes or G1P-lipid membranes appeared is important for understanding the early evolution of terrestrial life. To clarify this issue, we reconstructed molecular phylogenetic trees of G1PDH (G1P dehydrogenase; EgsA/AraM) which is responsible for G1P synthesis and G3PDHs (G3P dehydrogenase; GpsA and GlpA/GlpD) and glycerol kinase (GlpK) which is responsible for G3P synthesis. Together with the distribution of these protein-encoding genes among archaeal and bacterial groups, our phylogenetic analyses suggested that GlpA/GlpD in the Commonote (the last universal common ancestor of all extant life with a cellular form, Commonote commonote) acquired EgsA (G1PDH) from the archaeal common ancestor (Commonote archaea) and acquired GpsA and GlpK from a bacterial common ancestor (Commonote bacteria). In our scenario based on this study, the Commonote probably possessed a G3P-lipid membrane synthesized enzymatically, after which the archaeal lineage acquired G1PDH followed by the replacement of a G3P-lipid membrane with a G1P-lipid membrane. PMID:27774041

  12. Biosynthesis of archaeal membrane ether lipids

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Samta; Caforio, Antonella; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2014-01-01

    A vital function of the cell membrane in all living organism is to maintain the membrane permeability barrier and fluidity. The composition of the phospholipid bilayer is distinct in archaea when compared to bacteria and eukarya. In archaea, isoprenoid hydrocarbon side chains are linked via an ether bond to the sn-glycerol-1-phosphate backbone. In bacteria and eukarya on the other hand, fatty acid side chains are linked via an ester bond to the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate backbone. The polar head groups are globally shared in the three domains of life. The unique membrane lipids of archaea have been implicated not only in the survival and adaptation of the organisms to extreme environments but also to form the basis of the membrane composition of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). In nature, a diverse range of archaeal lipids is found, the most common are the diether (or archaeol) and the tetraether (or caldarchaeol) lipids that form a monolayer. Variations in chain length, cyclization and other modifications lead to diversification of these lipids. The biosynthesis of these lipids is not yet well understood however progress in the last decade has led to a comprehensive understanding of the biosynthesis of archaeol. This review describes the current knowledge of the biosynthetic pathway of archaeal ether lipids; insights on the stability and robustness of archaeal lipid membranes; and evolutionary aspects of the lipid divide and the LUCA. It examines recent advances made in the field of pathway reconstruction in bacteria. PMID:25505460

  13. Sphingosine-1-phosphate, regulated by FSH and VEGF, stimulates granulosa cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Coronado, C G; Guzmán, A; Rodríguez, A; Mondragón, J A; Romano, M C; Gutiérrez, C G; Rosales-Torres, A M

    2016-09-15

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive polar sphingolipid which stimulates proliferation, growth and survival in various cell types. In the ovary S1P has been shown protect the granulosa cells and oocytes from insults such as oxidative stress and radiotherapy, and S1P concentrations are greater in healthy than atretic large follicles. Hence, we postulate that S1P is fundamental in follicle development and that it is activated in ovarian granulosa cells in response to FSH and VEGF. To test this hypothesis we set out: i) to evaluate the effect of FSH and VEGF on S1P synthesis in cultured bovine granulosa cells and ii) to analyse the effect of S1P on proliferation and survival of bovine granulosa cells in vitro. Seventy five thousand bovine granulosa cells from healthy medium-sized (4-7mm) follicles were cultured in 96-well plates in McCoy's 5a medium containing 10ng/mL of insulin and 1ng/mL of LR-IGF-I at 37°C in a 5% CO2/air atmosphere at 37°C. Granulosa cell production of S1P was tested in response to treatment with FSH (0, 0.1, 1 and 10ng/mL) and VEGF (0, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100ng/mL) and measured by HPLC. Granulosa cells produced S1P at 48 and 96h, with the maximum production observed with 1ng/mL of FSH. Likewise, 0.01ng/mL of VEGF stimulated S1P production at 48, but not 96h of culture. Further, the granulosa cell expression of sphingosine kinase-1 (SK1), responsible for S1P synthesis, was demonstrated by Western blot after 48h of culture. FSH increased the expression of phosphorylated SK1 (P<0.05) and the addition of a SK1 inhibitor reduced the constitutive and FSH-stimulated S1P synthesis (P<0.05). Sphingosine-1-phosphate had a biphasic effect on granulosa cell number after culture. At low concentration S1P (0.1μM) increased granulosa cell number after 48h of culture (P<0.05) and the proportion of cells in the G2 and M phase of the cell cycle (P<0.05), whereas higher concentrations decreased cell number (10μM; P<0.05) by an increase (P<0.05) in the

  14. Role of sphingolipids in murine radiation-induced lung injury: protection by sphingosine 1-phosphate analogs

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Biji; Jacobson, Jeffrey R.; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Huang, Yong; Sun, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Yutong; Gerhold, Lynnette M.; Siegler, Jessica; Evenoski, Carrie; Wang, Ting; Zhou, Tong; Zaidi, Rafe; Moreno-Vinasco, Liliana; Bittman, Robert; Chen, Chin Tu; LaRiviere, Patrick J.; Sammani, Saad; Lussier, Yves A.; Dudek, Steven M.; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2011-01-01

    Clinically significant radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common toxicity in patients administered thoracic radiotherapy. Although the molecular etiology is poorly understood, we previously characterized a murine model of RILI in which alterations in lung barrier integrity surfaced as a potentially important pathobiological event and genome-wide lung gene mRNA levels identified dysregulation of sphingolipid metabolic pathway genes. We hypothesized that sphingolipid signaling components serve as modulators and novel therapeutic targets of RILI. Sphingolipid involvement in murine RILI was confirmed by radiation-induced increases in lung expression of sphingosine kinase (SphK) isoforms 1 and 2 and increases in the ratio of ceramide to sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and dihydro-S1P (DHS1P) levels in plasma, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and lung tissue. Mice with a targeted deletion of SphK1 (SphK1−/−) or with reduced expression of S1P receptors (S1PR1+/−, S1PR2−/−, and S1PR3−/−) exhibited marked RILI susceptibility. Finally, studies of 3 potent vascular barrier-protective S1P analogs, FTY720, (S)-FTY720-phosphonate (fTyS), and SEW-2871, identified significant RILI attenuation and radiation-induced gene dysregulation by the phosphonate analog, fTyS (0.1 and 1 mg/kg i.p., 2×/wk) and to a lesser degree by SEW-2871 (1 mg/kg i.p., 2×/wk), compared with those in controls. These results support the targeting of S1P signaling as a novel therapeutic strategy in RILI.—Mathew, B., Jacobson, J. R., Berdyshev, E., Huang, Y., Sun, X., Zhao, Y., Gerhold, L. M., Siegler, J., Evenoski, C., Wang, T., Zhou, T., Zaidi, R., Moreno-Vinasco, L., Bittman, R., Chen, C. T., LaRiviere, P. J., Sammani, S., Lussier, Y. A., Dudek, S. M., Natarajan, V., Weichselbaum, R. R., Garcia, J. G. N. Role of sphingolipids in murine radiation-induced lung injury: protection by sphingosine 1-phosphate analogs. PMID:21712494

  15. Quantification of Galactose-1-Phosphate Uridyltransferase Enzyme Activity by Liquid Chromatography–Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yijun; Ptolemy, Adam S.; Harmonay, Lauren; Kellogg, Mark; Berry, Gerard T.

    2013-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of galactosemia usually involves the measurement of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) activity. Traditional radioactive and fluorescent GALT assays are nonspecific, laborious, and/or lack sufficient analytical sensitivity. We developed a liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)–based assay for GALT enzyme activity measurement. Method Our assay used stable isotope-labeled α-galactose-1-phosphate ([13C6]-Gal-1-P) as an enzyme substrate. Sample cleanup and separation were achieved by reversed-phase ion-pair chromatography, and the enzymatic product, isotope-labeled uridine diphosphate galactose ([13C6]-UDPGal), was detected by MS/MS at mass transition (571 > 323) and quantified by use of [13C6]-Glu-1-P (265 > 79) as an internal standard. Results The method yielded a mean (SD) GALT enzyme activity of 23.8 (3.8) µmol · (gHgb)−1 · h−1 in erythrocyte extracts from 71 controls. The limit of quantification was 0.04 µmol · (g Hgb)−1 · h−1 (0.2% of normal control value). Intraassay imprecision was determined at 4 different levels (100%, 25%, 5%, and 0.2% of the normal control values), and the CVs were calculated to be 2.1%, 2.5%, 4.6%, and 9.7%, respectively (n = 3). Interassay imprecision CVs were 4.5%, 6.7%, 8.2%, and 13.2% (n = 5), respectively. The assay recoveries at the 4 levels were higher than 90%. The apparent Km of the 2 substrates, Gal-1-P and UDPGlc, were determined to be 0.38 mmol/L and 0.071 mmol/L, respectively. The assay in erythrocytes of 33 patients with classical galactosemia revealed no detectable activity. Conclusions This LC-MS/MS–based assay for GALT enzyme activity will be useful for the diagnosis and study of biochemically heterogeneous patients with galactosemia, especially those with uncommon genotypes and detectable but low residual activities. PMID:20348403

  16. Emerging role of sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nema, Rajeev; Vishwakarma, Supriya; Agarwal, Rahul; Panday, Rajendra Kumar; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most frequent cancer type, with an annual incidence of approximately half a million people worldwide. It has a high recurrence rate and an extremely low survival rate. This is due to limited availability of effective therapies to reduce the rate of recurrence, resulting in high morbidity and mortality of patients with advanced stages of the disease. HNSCC often develops resistance to chemotherapy and targeted drug therapy. Thus, to overcome the problem of drug resistance, there is a need to explore novel drug targets. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid involved in inflammation, tumor progression, and angiogenesis. S1P is synthesized intracellularly by two sphingosine kinases (SphKs). It can be exported to the extracellular space, where it can activate a family of G-protein-coupled receptors. Alternatively, S1P can act as an intracellular second messenger. SphK1 regulates tumor progression, invasion, metastasis, and chemoresistance in HNSCC. SphK1 expression is highly elevated in advanced stage HNSCC tumors and correlates with poor survival. In this article, we review current knowledge regarding the role of S1P receptors and enzymes of S1P metabolism in HNSCC carcinogenesis. Furthermore, we summarize the current perspectives on therapeutic approaches for targeting S1P pathway for treating HNSCC. PMID:27330306

  17. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor-2 Antagonists: Therapeutic Potential and Potential Risks

    PubMed Central

    Blankenbach, Kira V.; Schwalm, Stephanie; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Meyer zu Heringdorf, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling system with its specific G-protein-coupled S1P receptors, the enzymes of S1P metabolism and the S1P transporters, offers a multitude of promising targets for drug development. Until today, drug development in this area has nearly exclusively focused on (functional) antagonists at the S1P1 receptor, which cause a unique phenotype of immunomodulation. Accordingly, the first-in class S1P1 receptor modulator, fingolimod, has been approved for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, and novel S1P1 receptor (functional) antagonists are being developed for autoimmune and inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, lupus erythematodes, or polymyositis. Besides the S1P1 receptor, also S1P2 and S1P3 are widely expressed and regulate many diverse functions throughout the body. The S1P2 receptor, in particular, often exerts cellular functions which are opposed to the functions of the S1P1 receptor. As a consequence, antagonists at the S1P2 receptor have the potential to be useful in a contrasting context and different areas of indication compared to S1P1 antagonists. The present review will focus on the therapeutic potential of S1P2 receptor antagonists and discuss their opportunities as well as their potential risks. Open questions and areas which require further investigations will be emphasized in particular. PMID:27445808

  18. Modification of the 1-Phosphate Group during Biosynthesis of Capnocytophaga canimorsus Lipid A.

    PubMed

    Renzi, Francesco; Zähringer, Ulrich; Chandler, Courtney E; Ernst, Robert K; Cornelis, Guy R; Ittig, Simon J

    2015-12-07

    Capnocytophaga canimorsus, a commensal bacterium of dog's mouth flora causing severe infections in humans after dog bites or scratches, has a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (endotoxin) with low-inflammatory lipid A. In particular, it contains a phosphoethanolamine (P-Etn) instead of a free phosphate group at the C-1 position of the lipid A backbone, usually present in highly toxic enterobacterial Gram-negative lipid A. Here we show that the C. canimorsus genome comprises a single operon encoding a lipid A 1-phosphatase (LpxE) and a lipid A 1 P-Etn transferase (EptA). This suggests that lipid A is modified during biosynthesis after completing acylation of the backbone by removal of the 1-phosphate and subsequent addition of an P-Etn group. As endotoxicity of lipid A is known to depend largely on the degree of unsubstituted or unmodified phosphate residues, deletion of lpxE or eptA led to mutants lacking the P-Etn group, with consequently increased endotoxicity and decreased resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMP). Consistent with the proposed sequential biosynthetic mechanism, the endotoxicity and CAMP resistance of a double deletion mutant of lpxE-eptA was similar to that of a single lpxE mutant. Finally, the proposed enzymatic activities of LpxE and EptA based on sequence similarity could be successfully validated by mass spectrometry (MS)-based analysis of lipid A isolated from the corresponding deletion mutant strains.

  19. Modification of the 1-Phosphate Group during Biosynthesis of Capnocytophaga canimorsus Lipid A

    PubMed Central

    Renzi, Francesco; Zähringer, Ulrich; Chandler, Courtney E.; Ernst, Robert K.; Cornelis, Guy R.

    2015-01-01

    Capnocytophaga canimorsus, a commensal bacterium of dog's mouth flora causing severe infections in humans after dog bites or scratches, has a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (endotoxin) with low-inflammatory lipid A. In particular, it contains a phosphoethanolamine (P-Etn) instead of a free phosphate group at the C-1 position of the lipid A backbone, usually present in highly toxic enterobacterial Gram-negative lipid A. Here we show that the C. canimorsus genome comprises a single operon encoding a lipid A 1-phosphatase (LpxE) and a lipid A 1 P-Etn transferase (EptA). This suggests that lipid A is modified during biosynthesis after completing acylation of the backbone by removal of the 1-phosphate and subsequent addition of an P-Etn group. As endotoxicity of lipid A is known to depend largely on the degree of unsubstituted or unmodified phosphate residues, deletion of lpxE or eptA led to mutants lacking the P-Etn group, with consequently increased endotoxicity and decreased resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMP). Consistent with the proposed sequential biosynthetic mechanism, the endotoxicity and CAMP resistance of a double deletion mutant of lpxE-eptA was similar to that of a single lpxE mutant. Finally, the proposed enzymatic activities of LpxE and EptA based on sequence similarity could be successfully validated by mass spectrometry (MS)-based analysis of lipid A isolated from the corresponding deletion mutant strains. PMID:26644381

  20. Hit-to-lead evaluation of a novel class of sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dinges, Jurgen; Harris, Christopher M; Wallace, Grier A; Argiriadi, Maria A; Queeney, Kara L; Perron, Denise C; Dominguez, Eric; Kebede, Tegest; Desino, Kelly E; Patel, Hetal; Vasudevan, Anil

    2016-05-01

    Inhibition of sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase has recently been proposed as a potential treatment option for inflammatory disorders such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease. In this report we describe our hit-to-lead evaluation of the isoxazolecarboxamide 6, a high-throughput screening hit (in vitro IC50=1.0 μM, cell IC50=1.8 μM), as a novel S1P lyase inhibitor. We were able to establish basic structure-activity relationships around 6 and succeeded in obtaining X-ray structural information which enabled structure-based design. With the discovery of 28, enzyme activity was quickly improved to IC50=120 nM and cell potency to IC50=230 nM. The main liability in the established isoxazolecarboxamide hit series was determined to be metabolic stability. In particular we identified that future lead-optimization efforts to overcome this problem should focus on blocking the N-dealkylation on the secondary amine. PMID:27020302

  1. Tumor Necrosis Factor/Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling Augments Resistance Artery Myogenic Tone in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sauvé, Meghan; Hui, Sonya K; Dinh, Danny D; Foltz, Warren D; Momen, Abdul; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Offermanns, Stefan; Husain, Mansoor; Kroetsch, Jeffrey T; Lidington, Darcy; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes strongly associates with microvascular complications that ultimately promote multiorgan failure. Altered myogenic responsiveness compromises tissue perfusion, aggravates hypertension, and sets the stage for later permanent structural changes to the microcirculation. We demonstrate that skeletal muscle resistance arteries isolated from patients with diabetes have augmented myogenic tone, despite reasonable blood glucose control. To understand the mechanisms, we titrated a standard diabetes mouse model (high-fat diet plus streptozotocin [HFD/STZ]) to induce a mild increase in blood glucose levels. HFD/STZ treatment induced a progressive myogenic tone augmentation in mesenteric and olfactory cerebral arteries; neither HFD nor STZ alone had an effect on blood glucose or resistance artery myogenic tone. Using gene deletion models that eliminate tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or sphingosine kinase 1, we demonstrate that vascular smooth muscle cell TNF drives the elevation of myogenic tone via enhanced sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling. Therapeutically antagonizing TNF (etanercept) or S1P (JTE013) signaling corrects this defect. Our investigation concludes that vascular smooth muscle cell TNF augments resistance artery myogenic vasoconstriction in a diabetes model that induces a small elevation of blood glucose. Our data demonstrate that microvascular reactivity is an early disease marker and advocate establishing therapies that strategically target the microcirculation. PMID:27207546

  2. Rational nanoconjugation improves biocatalytic performance of enzymes: aldol addition catalyzed by immobilized rhamnulose-1-phosphate aldolase.

    PubMed

    Ardao, Inés; Comenge, Joan; Benaiges, M Dolors; Álvaro, Gregorio; Puntes, Víctor F

    2012-04-17

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are attractive materials for the immobilization of enzymes due to several advantages such as high enzyme loading, absence of internal diffusion limitations, and Brownian motion in solution, compared to the conventional immobilization onto porous macroscopic supports. The affinity of AuNPs to different groups present at the protein surface enables direct enzyme binding to the nanoparticle without the need of any coupling agent. Enzyme activity and stability appear to be improved when the biocatalyst is immobilized onto AuNPs. Rhamnulose-1-phosphate aldolase (RhuA) was selected as model enzyme for the immobilization onto AuNPs. The enzyme loading was characterized by four different techniques: surface plasmon resonance (SPR) shift and intensity, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). AuNPs-RhuA complexes were further applied as biocatalyst of the aldol addition reaction between dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) and (S)-Cbz-alaninal during two reaction cycles. In these conditions, an improved reaction yield and selectivity, together with a fourfold activity enhancement were observed, as compared to soluble RhuA. PMID:22428999

  3. Hematopoietic Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Lyase Deficiency Decreases Atherosclerotic Lesion Development in LDL-Receptor Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bot, Martine; Van Veldhoven, Paul P.; de Jager, Saskia C. A.; Johnson, Jason; Nijstad, Niels; Van Santbrink, Peter J.; Westra, Marijke M.; Van Der Hoeven, Gerd; Gijbels, Marion J.; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Varga, Georg; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Kuiper, Johan; Van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Nofer, Jerzy-Roch

    2013-01-01

    Aims Altered sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) homeostasis and signaling is implicated in various inflammatory diseases including atherosclerosis. As S1P levels are tightly controlled by S1P lyase, we investigated the impact of hematopoietic S1P lyase (Sgpl1−/−) deficiency on leukocyte subsets relevant to atherosclerosis. Methods and Results LDL receptor deficient mice that were transplanted with Sgpl1−/− bone marrow showed disrupted S1P gradients translating into lymphopenia and abrogated lymphocyte mitogenic and cytokine response as compared to controls. Remarkably however, Sgpl1−/− chimeras displayed mild monocytosis, due to impeded stromal retention and myelopoiesis, and plasma cytokine and macrophage expression patterns, that were largely compatible with classical macrophage activation. Collectively these two phenotypic features of Sgpl1 deficiency culminated in diminished atherogenic response. Conclusions Here we not only firmly establish the critical role of hematopoietic S1P lyase in controlling S1P levels and T cell trafficking in blood and lymphoid tissue, but also identify leukocyte Sgpl1 as critical factor in monocyte macrophage differentiation and function. Its, partly counterbalancing, pro- and anti-inflammatory activity spectrum imply that intervention in S1P lyase function in inflammatory disorders such as atherosclerosis should be considered with caution. PMID:23700419

  4. Amphiphilic degradable polymers for immobilization and sustained delivery of sphingosine 1-phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Song, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Controlled delivery of angiogenic factor sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) represents a promising strategy for promoting vascularization during tissue repair and regeneration. In this study, we developed an amphiphilic biodegradable polymer platform for the stable encapsulation and sustained release of S1P. Mimicking the interaction between amphiphilic S1P and its binding proteins, a series of polymers with hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) core and lipophilic flanking segments of polylactide and/or poly(alkylated lactide) with different alkyl chain lengths were synthesized. These polymers were electrospun into fibrous meshes, and loaded with S1P in generally high loading efficiencies (>90%). Sustained S1P release from these scaffolds could be tuned by adjusting the alkyl chain length, blockiness and lipophilic block length, achieving 35-55% and 45-80% accumulative releases in the first 8 h and by 7 days, respectively. Furthermore, using endothelial cell tube formation assay and chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay, we showed that the different S1P loading doses and release kinetics translated into distinct pro-angiogenic outcomes. These results suggest that these amphiphilic polymers are effective delivery vehicles for S1P and may be explored as tissue engineering scaffolds where the delivery of lipophilic or amphiphilic bioactive factors are desired. PMID:24631657

  5. Effects of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 phosphorylation in response to FTY720 during neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yingxiang; Garris, Christopher S.; Moreno, Monica A.; Griffin, Christina W.; Han, May H.

    2016-01-01

    Fingolimod (FTY720, Gilenya), a sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor (S1PR) modulator, is one of the first-line immunomodulatory therapies for treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). Human S1PR1 variants have been reported to have functional heterogeneity in vitro, suggesting that S1PR1 function may influence FTY720 efficacy. In this study, we examined the influence of S1PR1 phosphorylation on response to FTY720 in neuroinflammation. We found that mice carrying a phosphorylation-defective S1pr1 gene [S1PR1(S5A) mice] were refractory to FTY720 treatment in MOG35-55-immunized and Th17-mediated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) models. Long-term treatment with FTY720 induced significant lymphopenia and suppressed Th17 response in the peripheral immune system via downregulating STAT3 phosphorylation in both WT and S1PR1(S5A) mice. However, FTY720 did not effectively prevent neuroinflammation in the S1PR1(S5A) EAE mice as a result of encephalitogenic cells expressing C-C chemokine receptor 6 (CCR6). Combined treatment with FTY720 and anti-CCR6 delayed disease progression in S1PR1(S5A) EAE mice, suggesting that CCR6-mediated cell trafficking can overcome the effects of FTY720. This work may have translational relevance regarding FTY720 efficacy in MS patients and suggests that cell type–specific therapies may enhance therapeutic efficacy in MS.

  6. Scintillation Proximity Assay to Detect the Changes in Cellular Dihydrosphingosine 1-Phosphate Levels.

    PubMed

    Ohtoyo, Mamoru; Tamura, Masakazu; Machinaga, Nobuo; Muro, Fumihito; Hashimoto, Ryuji

    2016-10-01

    Compounds that modulate the activity of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)-metabolizing enzymes are expected to be potential therapeutic agents for various diseases. Investigation of their potencies requires not only cell-free but also cell-based assays in which intracellular accumulation/depletion of S1P could be monitored. However, conventional methods have limitations to their simplicity, mainly due to the necessity of a separation process that separates S1P from its related substances. Here, we describe a method utilizing a scintillation proximity assay (SPA) for semi-quantifying intracellular [(3)H]-labeled dihydroS1P ([(3)H]dhS1P), which is also a substrate for S1P-metabolizing enzymes. We found that uncoated yttrium silicate SPA beads could selectively bind to and detect [(3)H]dhS1P rather than [(3)H]dihydrosphingosine (the non-phosphorylated form of [(3)H]dhS1P). Based on this, we developed a novel cell-based assay system which does not require any organic solvent extraction or chromatographic separation, and confirmed its practicality by using siRNA targeting S1P lyase (S1PL) and known S1PL inhibitors as models. Our results demonstrated that this assay is useful for rapid and easy evaluation of S1PL inhibitors, and could be potentially applicable for all compounds that modulate the activity of S1P-metabolizing enzymes. PMID:27585475

  7. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 3 promotes leukocyte rolling by mobilizing endothelial P-selectin.

    PubMed

    Nussbaum, Claudia; Bannenberg, Sarah; Keul, Petra; Gräler, Markus H; Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano F; Korhonen, Hanna; von Wnuck Lipinski, Karin; Heusch, Gerd; de Castro Faria Neto, Hugo C; Rohwedder, Ina; Göthert, Joachim R; Prasad, Vysakh Pushpa; Haufe, Günter; Lange-Sperandio, Baerbel; Offermanns, Stefan; Sperandio, Markus; Levkau, Bodo

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) participates in inflammation; however, its role in leukocyte rolling is still unclear. Here we use intravital microscopy in inflamed mouse cremaster muscle venules and human endothelial cells to show that S1P contributes to P-selectin-dependent leukocyte rolling through endothelial S1P receptor 3 (S1P3) and Gαq, PLCβ and Ca(2+). Intra-arterial S1P administration increases leukocyte rolling, while S1P3 deficiency or inhibition dramatically reduces it. Mast cells involved in triggering rolling also release S1P that mobilizes P-selectin through S1P3. Histamine and epinephrine require S1P3 for full-scale effect accomplishing it by stimulating sphingosine kinase 1 (Sphk1). In a counter-regulatory manner, S1P1 inhibits cAMP-stimulated Sphk1 and blocks rolling as observed in endothelial-specific S1P1(-/-) mice. In agreement with a dominant pro-rolling effect of S1P3, FTY720 inhibits rolling in control and S1P1(-/-) but not in S1P3(-/-) mice. Our findings identify S1P as a direct and indirect contributor to leukocyte rolling and characterize the receptors mediating its action.

  8. Amphiphilic degradable polymers for immobilization and sustained delivery of sphingosine 1-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Song, Jie

    2014-07-01

    Controlled delivery of the angiogenic factor sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) represents a promising strategy for promoting vascularization during tissue repair and regeneration. In this study, we developed an amphiphilic biodegradable polymer platform for the stable encapsulation and sustained release of S1P. Mimicking the interaction between amphiphilic S1P and its binding proteins, a series of polymers with hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) core and lipophilic flanking segments of polylactide and/or poly(alkylated lactide) with different alkyl chain lengths were synthesized. These polymers were electrospun into fibrous meshes, and loaded with S1P in generally high loading efficiencies (>90%). Sustained S1P release from these scaffolds could be tuned by adjusting the alkyl chain length, blockiness and lipophilic block length, achieving 35-55% and 45-80% accumulative releases in the first 8h and by 7 days, respectively. Furthermore, using endothelial cell tube formation assay and chicken chorioallantoic membrane assay, we showed that the different S1P loading doses and release kinetics translated into distinct pro-angiogenic outcomes. These results suggest that these amphiphilic polymers are effective delivery vehicles for S1P and may be explored as tissue engineering scaffolds where the delivery of lipophilic or amphiphilic bioactive factors is desired.

  9. Sphingosine-1-phosphate promotes erythrocyte glycolysis and oxygen release for adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kaiqi; Zhang, Yujin; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Nemkov, Travis; Song, Anren; Wu, Hongyu; Liu, Hong; Adebiyi, Morayo; Huang, Aji; Wen, Yuan E.; Bogdanov, Mikhail V.; Vila, Alejandro; O'Brien, John; Kellems, Rodney E.; Dowhan, William; Subudhi, Andrew W.; Jameson-Van Houten, Sonja; Julian, Colleen G.; Lovering, Andrew T.; Safo, Martin; Hansen, Kirk C.; Roach, Robert C.; Xia, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive signalling lipid highly enriched in mature erythrocytes, with unknown functions pertaining to erythrocyte physiology. Here by employing nonbiased high-throughput metabolomic profiling, we show that erythrocyte S1P levels rapidly increase in 21 healthy lowland volunteers at 5,260 m altitude on day 1 and continue increasing to 16 days with concurrently elevated erythrocyte sphingonisne kinase 1 (Sphk1) activity and haemoglobin (Hb) oxygen (O2) release capacity. Mouse genetic studies show that elevated erythrocyte Sphk1-induced S1P protects against tissue hypoxia by inducing O2 release. Mechanistically, we show that intracellular S1P promotes deoxygenated Hb anchoring to the membrane, enhances the release of membrane-bound glycolytic enzymes to the cytosol, induces glycolysis and thus the production of 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (2,3-BPG), an erythrocyte-specific glycolytic intermediate, which facilitates O2 release. Altogether, we reveal S1P as an intracellular hypoxia-responsive biolipid promoting erythrocyte glycolysis, O2 delivery and thus new therapeutic opportunities to counteract tissue hypoxia. PMID:27417539

  10. Fluid shear stress modulates cell migration induced by sphingosine 1-phosphate and vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Shannon K; Wacker, Bradley K; Kaneda, Megan M; Elbert, Donald L

    2005-08-01

    The rational design of drug delivery systems requires the ability to predict the environment-specific responses of target cells to the delivered drug. Here we describe the in vitro effects of fluid shear stress, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) on the migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Endothelial cell migration into a scrape wound was enhanced in S1P- or VEGF-stimulated HUVEC by the addition of fluid shear stress. In both cases, scrape wound closure rates were near a maximal value that was not exceeded when cells were exposed to all three factors. We also found that cell migration into a scrape wound due to S1P stimulation was correlated with the S1P1 mRNA concentration, in systems where cell migration was not already near maximal. The present work represents our initial steps toward predicting cell migration based upon the activation state of the receptors and enzymes involved in the chemokinetic response. These results also illustrate the importance of context-dependent analysis of cell signaling cascades.

  11. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors are essential mediators of eyelid closure during embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Herr, Deron R; Lee, Chang-Wook; Wang, Wei; Ware, Adam; Rivera, Richard; Chun, Jerold

    2013-10-11

    The fetal development of the mammalian eyelid involves the expansion of the epithelium over the developing cornea, fusion into a continuous sheet covering the eye, and a splitting event several weeks later that results in the formation of the upper and lower eyelids. Recent studies have revealed a significant number of molecular signaling components that are essential mediators of eyelid development. Receptor-mediated sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling is known to influence diverse biological processes, but its involvement in eyelid development has not been reported. Here, we show that two S1P receptors, S1P2 and S1P3, are collectively essential mediators of eyelid closure during murine development. Homozygous deletion of the gene encoding either receptor has no apparent effect on eyelid development, but double-null embryos are born with an "eyes open at birth" defect due to a delay in epithelial sheet extension. Both receptors are expressed in the advancing epithelial sheet during the critical period of extension. Fibroblasts derived from double-null embryos have a deficient response to epidermal growth factor, suggesting that S1P2 and S1P3 modulate this essential signaling pathway during eyelid closure.

  12. The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor agonist FTY720 is neuroprotective after cuprizone-induced CNS demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Slowik, A; Schmidt, T; Beyer, C; Amor, S; Clarner, T; Kipp, M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Modulation of the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor is an approved treatment for relapsing multiple sclerosis because of its anti-inflammatory effect of retaining lymphocytes within the lymph nodes. Here, we evaluated the potential of an agonist at this receptor, FTY720 (fingolimod), to activate the promyelinating pathways within the brain to encourage remyelination and neuroprotection. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH In this study, we used the cuprizone model in male C57BL/6 mice and tested the promyelinating and neuroprotective effects of FTY720 after acute and chronic toxin-induced experimental demyelination. We used histological, immunohistochemical and gene expression methods. KEY RESULTS The midline of the corpus callosum was severely demyelinated after acute and chronic cuprizone-induced demyelination. Robust endogenous remyelination was evident after acute, but impaired after chronic, demyelination. FTY720 treatment modestly accelerated myelin recovery after acute but not chronic cuprizone exposure. Markers of gliosis (astrocyte and microglia activation) were not affected by FTY720 treatment. Remarkably, the accumulation of amyloid precursor protein-positive spheroids in axons was less distinct in FTY720-treated animals, indicating that this compound alleviated ongoing axonal damage. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS We show that even during endogenous remyelination, axonal degeneration continued at a low level, accumulating over time. This continuous neurodegenerative process was ameliorated by FTY720 treatment. FTY720 preserved CNS integrity by direct interaction with brain resident cells, the actions of which are still to be defined. PMID:25220526

  13. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor agonist FTY720-phosphate causes marginal zone B cell displacement.

    PubMed

    Vora, Kalpit A; Nichols, Elizabeth; Porter, Gene; Cui, Yan; Keohane, Carol Ann; Hajdu, Richard; Hale, Jeffery; Neway, William; Zaller, Dennis; Mandala, Suzanne

    2005-08-01

    FTY720 is an immunosuppressive agent that modulates lymphocyte trafficking. It is phosphorylated in vivo to FTY720-phosphate (FTY-P) and binds to a family of G protein-coupled receptors recognizing sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) as the natural ligand. It has previously been reported that FTY-P blocks egress of lymphocytes from the thymus and lymph nodes, resulting in peripheral blood lymphopenia. We now report that FTY-P also causes displacement of marginal zone (MZ) B cells to the splenic follicles, an effect that is similar to that observed after in vivo administration of lipopolysaccharide. This effect is specific to B cells in the MZ, as treatment with FTY-P does not cause redistribution of the resident macrophage population. A small but statistically significant decrease in the expression of beta1 integrin on MZ B cells was observed with FTY-P treatment. The redistribution of MZ B cells from the MZ sinuses does not abolish the ability of these cells to respond to the T-independent antigen, trinitrophenol-Ficoll. It has been proposed that the displacement of MZ B cells to the follicles is an indication of cell activation. Consistent with this, FTY-P caused an increase in percentage of MZ B cells expressing activation markers CD9, CD1d, and CD24. These results suggest that S1P receptors on MZ B cells are responsible for their mobilization to follicles.

  14. A novel role of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor S1pr1 in mouse thrombopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Orban, Martin; Lorenz, Michael; Barocke, Verena; Braun, Daniel; Urtz, Nicole; Schulz, Christian; von Brühl, Marie-Luise; Tirniceriu, Anca; Gaertner, Florian; Proia, Richard L.; Graf, Thomas; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian; Montanez, Eloi; Prinz, Marco; Müller, Alexandra; von Baumgarten, Louisa; Billich, Andreas; Sixt, Michael; Fässler, Reinhard; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Junt, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Millions of platelets are produced each hour by bone marrow (BM) megakaryocytes (MKs). MKs extend transendothelial proplatelet (PP) extensions into BM sinusoids and shed new platelets into the blood. The mechanisms that control platelet generation remain incompletely understood. Using conditional mutants and intravital multiphoton microscopy, we show here that the lipid mediator sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) serves as a critical directional cue guiding the elongation of megakaryocytic PP extensions from the interstitium into BM sinusoids and triggering the subsequent shedding of PPs into the blood. Correspondingly, mice lacking the S1P receptor S1pr1 develop severe thrombocytopenia caused by both formation of aberrant extravascular PPs and defective intravascular PP shedding. In contrast, activation of S1pr1 signaling leads to the prompt release of new platelets into the circulating blood. Collectively, our findings uncover a novel function of the S1P–S1pr1 axis as master regulator of efficient thrombopoiesis and might raise new therapeutic options for patients with thrombocytopenia. PMID:23148237

  15. Regulation of autotaxin expression and secretion by lysophosphatidate and sphingosine 1-phosphate[S

    PubMed Central

    Benesch, Matthew G. K.; Zhao, Yuan Y.; Curtis, Jonathan M.; McMullen, Todd P. W.; Brindley, David N.

    2015-01-01

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a secreted enzyme, which produces extracellular lysophosphatidate (LPA) from lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). LPA activates six G protein-coupled receptors and this is essential for vasculogenesis during embryonic development. ATX is also involved in wound healing and inflammation, and in tumor growth, metastasis, and chemo-resistance. It is, therefore, important to understand how ATX is regulated. It was proposed that ATX activity is inhibited by its product LPA, or a related lipid called sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). We now show that this apparent inhibition is ineffective at the high concentrations of LPC that occur in vivo. Instead, feedback regulation by LPA and S1P is mediated by inhibition of ATX expression resulting from phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase activation. Inhibiting ATX activity in mice with ONO-8430506 severely decreased plasma LPA concentrations and increased ATX mRNA in adipose tissue, which is a major site of ATX production. Consequently, the amount of inhibitor-bound ATX protein in the plasma increased. We, therefore, demonstrate the concept that accumulation of LPA in the circulation decreases ATX production. However, this feedback regulation can be overcome by the inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α or interleukin 1β. This enables high LPA and ATX levels to coexist in inflammatory conditions. The results are discussed in terms of ATX regulation in wound healing and cancer. PMID:25896349

  16. Enhanced sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 expression underlies female CNS autoimmunity susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Orengo, Lillian; Daniels, Brian P.; Dorsey, Denise; Basak, Sarah Alison; Grajales-Reyes, José G.; McCandless, Erin E.; Piccio, Laura; Schmidt, Robert E.; Cross, Anne H.; Crosby, Seth D.; Klein, Robyn S.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease of the CNS that is characterized by BBB dysfunction and has a much higher incidence in females. Compared with other strains of mice, EAE in the SJL mouse strain models multiple features of MS, including an enhanced sensitivity of female mice to disease; however, the molecular mechanisms that underlie the sex- and strain-dependent differences in disease susceptibility have not been described. We identified sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2) as a sex- and strain-specific, disease-modifying molecule that regulates BBB permeability by destabilizing adherens junctions. S1PR2 expression was increased in disease-susceptible regions of the CNS of both female SJL EAE mice and female patients with MS compared with their male counterparts. Pharmacological blockade or lack of S1PR2 signaling decreased EAE disease severity as the result of enhanced endothelial barrier function. Enhanced S1PR2 signaling in an in vitro BBB model altered adherens junction formation via activation of Rho/ROCK, CDC42, and caveolin endocytosis-dependent pathways, resulting in loss of apicobasal polarity and relocation of abluminal CXCL12 to vessel lumina. Furthermore, S1PR2-dependent BBB disruption and CXCL12 relocation were observed in vivo. These results identify a link between S1PR2 signaling and BBB polarity and implicate S1PR2 in sex-specific patterns of disease during CNS autoimmunity. PMID:24812668

  17. Emerging role of sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nema, Rajeev; Vishwakarma, Supriya; Agarwal, Rahul; Panday, Rajendra Kumar; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most frequent cancer type, with an annual incidence of approximately half a million people worldwide. It has a high recurrence rate and an extremely low survival rate. This is due to limited availability of effective therapies to reduce the rate of recurrence, resulting in high morbidity and mortality of patients with advanced stages of the disease. HNSCC often develops resistance to chemotherapy and targeted drug therapy. Thus, to overcome the problem of drug resistance, there is a need to explore novel drug targets. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid involved in inflammation, tumor progression, and angiogenesis. S1P is synthesized intracellularly by two sphingosine kinases (SphKs). It can be exported to the extracellular space, where it can activate a family of G-protein-coupled receptors. Alternatively, S1P can act as an intracellular second messenger. SphK1 regulates tumor progression, invasion, metastasis, and chemoresistance in HNSCC. SphK1 expression is highly elevated in advanced stage HNSCC tumors and correlates with poor survival. In this article, we review current knowledge regarding the role of S1P receptors and enzymes of S1P metabolism in HNSCC carcinogenesis. Furthermore, we summarize the current perspectives on therapeutic approaches for targeting S1P pathway for treating HNSCC. PMID:27330306

  18. Extracellular Matrix Rigidity-dependent Sphingosine-1-phosphate Secretion Regulates Metastatic Cancer Cell Invasion and Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Panseon; Kim, Daehwan; You, Eunae; Jung, Jangho; Oh, Somi; Kim, Jaehyun; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Rhee, Sangmyung

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic interaction between cancer cells and the surrounding microenvironment is critical for cancer progression via changes in cellular behavior including alteration of secreted molecules. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the influence exerted by the cancer microenvironment on secretion of molecules during cancer progression remain largely unknown. In this study, we report that secretion of spingsine-1-phosphate (S1P) and its regulator, SphK1 expression is dependent of the substrate rigidity, which is critical for the balance between cancer cell invasion and adhesion. Conditioned media (CM) of MDA-MB-231, an aggressive breast cancer cell obtained from soft substrate (~0.5 kPa) induced chemo-attractive invasion, while CM obtained from stiff substrate (~2.5 kPa) increased cell adhesion instead. We found that the expression of SphK1 is upregulated in the stiff substrate, resulting in an increase in S1P levels in the CM. We also found that upregulation of SphK1 expression in the stiff substrate is dominant in metastatic cancer cells but not in primary cancer cells. These results suggest that alterations in the mechanical environment of the ECM surrounding the tumor cells actively regulate cellular properties such as secretion, which in turn, may contribute to cancer progression. PMID:26877098

  19. Sphingosine-1-phosphate inhibits the adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Moon, Myung-Hee; Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Park, Sang-Youel

    2014-10-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a pluripotent lipid mediator that transmits signals through G-protein-coupled receptors to control diverse biological processes. The novel biological activity of S1P in the adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes was identified in the present study. S1P significantly decreased lipid accumulation in maturing preadipocytes in a dose‑dependent manner. In order to understand the anti‑adipogenic effects of S1P, preadipocytes were treated with S1P, and the change in the expression of several adipogenic transcription factors and enzymes was investigated using quantitative RT-PCR. S1P downregulated the transcriptional levels of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins and adiponectin, which are markers of adipogenic differentiation. The effects of S1P on the levels of mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) signals in preadipocytes were also investigated. The activation of JNK and p38 were downregulated by S1P treatment in human preadipocytes. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that S1P alters fat mass by directly affecting adipogenesis. This is mediated by the downregulation of adipogenic transcription factors and by inactivation of the JNK and p38 MAPK pathways. Thus, selective targeting of the S1P receptors and sphingosine kinases may have clinical applications for the treatment of obesity. PMID:25050633

  20. Regulation of autotaxin expression and secretion by lysophosphatidate and sphingosine 1-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Benesch, Matthew G K; Zhao, Yuan Y; Curtis, Jonathan M; McMullen, Todd P W; Brindley, David N

    2015-06-01

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a secreted enzyme, which produces extracellular lysophosphatidate (LPA) from lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). LPA activates six G protein-coupled receptors and this is essential for vasculogenesis during embryonic development. ATX is also involved in wound healing and inflammation, and in tumor growth, metastasis, and chemo-resistance. It is, therefore, important to understand how ATX is regulated. It was proposed that ATX activity is inhibited by its product LPA, or a related lipid called sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). We now show that this apparent inhibition is ineffective at the high concentrations of LPC that occur in vivo. Instead, feedback regulation by LPA and S1P is mediated by inhibition of ATX expression resulting from phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase activation. Inhibiting ATX activity in mice with ONO-8430506 severely decreased plasma LPA concentrations and increased ATX mRNA in adipose tissue, which is a major site of ATX production. Consequently, the amount of inhibitor-bound ATX protein in the plasma increased. We, therefore, demonstrate the concept that accumulation of LPA in the circulation decreases ATX production. However, this feedback regulation can be overcome by the inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α or interleukin 1β. This enables high LPA and ATX levels to coexist in inflammatory conditions. The results are discussed in terms of ATX regulation in wound healing and cancer. PMID:25896349

  1. Sphingosine kinase 1/sphingosine 1-phosphate signalling pathway as a potential therapeutic target of pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Xi-Qian; Li, Yan-Li; Zhang, Yu-Xuan; Xiao, Yi; Li, Zhi-Dong; Liu, Li-Qiong; Zhou, Yu-Shan; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Liu, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Li-Hui; Zhuang, Min; Chen, Yan-Ping; Ouyang, Sheng-Rong; Wu, Xu-Wei; Yang, Jiao

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is characterized by extensive vascular remodelling, leading to increased pulmonary vascular resistance and eventual death due to right heart failure. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension involves vascular endothelial dysfunction and disordered vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and migration, but the exact processes remain unknown. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lysophospholipid involved in a wide spectrum of biological processes. S1P has been shown to regulate VSMC proliferation and migration and vascular tension via a family of five S1P G-protein-coupled receptors (S1P1-SIP5). S1P has been shown to have both a vasoconstrictive and vasodilating effect. The S1P receptors S1P1 and S1P3 promote, while S1P2 inhibits VSMC proliferation and migration in vitro in response to S1P. Moreover, it has been reported recently that sphingosine kinase 1 and S1P2 inhibitors might be useful therapeutic agents in the treatment of empirical pulmonary hypertension. The sphingosine kinase 1/S1P signalling pathways may play a role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. Modulation of this pathway may offer novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26550106

  2. Sphingosine kinase 1/sphingosine 1-phosphate signalling pathway as a potential therapeutic target of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Xing, Xi-Qian; Li, Yan-Li; Zhang, Yu-Xuan; Xiao, Yi; Li, Zhi-Dong; Liu, Li-Qiong; Zhou, Yu-Shan; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Liu, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Li-Hui; Zhuang, Min; Chen, Yan-Ping; Ouyang, Sheng-Rong; Wu, Xu-Wei; Yang, Jiao

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is characterized by extensive vascular remodelling, leading to increased pulmonary vascular resistance and eventual death due to right heart failure. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension involves vascular endothelial dysfunction and disordered vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and migration, but the exact processes remain unknown. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lysophospholipid involved in a wide spectrum of biological processes. S1P has been shown to regulate VSMC proliferation and migration and vascular tension via a family of five S1P G-protein-coupled receptors (S1P1-SIP5). S1P has been shown to have both a vasoconstrictive and vasodilating effect. The S1P receptors S1P1 and S1P3 promote, while S1P2 inhibits VSMC proliferation and migration in vitro in response to S1P. Moreover, it has been reported recently that sphingosine kinase 1 and S1P2 inhibitors might be useful therapeutic agents in the treatment of empirical pulmonary hypertension. The sphingosine kinase 1/S1P signalling pathways may play a role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. Modulation of this pathway may offer novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26550106

  3. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate and Its Receptors: A Mutual Link between Blood Coagulation and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan-Thakur, Shailaja; Böhm, Andreas; Jedlitschky, Gabriele; Schrör, Karsten; Rauch, Bernhard H.

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a versatile lipid signaling molecule and key regulator in vascular inflammation. S1P is secreted by platelets, monocytes, and vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. It binds specifically to a family of G-protein-coupled receptors, S1P receptors 1 to 5, resulting in downstream signaling and numerous cellular effects. S1P modulates cell proliferation and migration, and mediates proinflammatory responses and apoptosis. In the vascular barrier, S1P regulates permeability and endothelial reactions and recruitment of monocytes and may modulate atherosclerosis. Only recently has S1P emerged as a critical mediator which directly links the coagulation factor system to vascular inflammation. The multifunctional proteases thrombin and FXa regulate local S1P availability and interact with S1P signaling at multiple levels in various vascular cell types. Differential expression patterns and intracellular signaling pathways of each receptor enable S1P to exert its widespread functions. Although a vast amount of information is available about the functions of S1P and its receptors in the regulation of physiological and pathophysiological conditions, S1P-mediated mechanisms in the vasculature remain to be elucidated. This review summarizes recent findings regarding the role of S1P and its receptors in vascular wall and blood cells, which link the coagulation system to inflammatory responses in the vasculature. PMID:26604433

  4. Antenna domain mobility and enzymatic reaction of L-rhamnulose-1-phosphate aldolase.

    PubMed

    Grueninger, Dirk; Schulz, Georg E

    2008-01-15

    The enzyme l-rhamnulose-1-phosphate aldolase from Escherichia coli participates in the degradation pathway of l-rhamnose, a ubiquitous deoxy-hexose. It is a homotetramer of the rare C4-symmetric type with N-terminal domains protruding like antennas from the main body. A mobility analysis of the enzyme gave rise to the hypothesis that an anisotropic thermal antenna motion may support the catalysis (Kroemer et al., Biochemistry 42, 10560, 2003). We checked this hypothesis by generating four single mutants and one disulfide bridge that were designed to reduce the mobility of the antenna domain without disturbing the chain-fold or the active center. The catalytic rates of the mutants revealed activity reductions that correlated well with the expected antenna fixation. Among these mutants, K15W was crystallized, structurally elucidated, and used as a guide for modeling the others. The structure confirmed the design because the mutation introduced a tight nonpolar contact to a neighboring subunit that fixed the antenna but did not affect the main chain. The fixation was confirmed by a comparison of the anisotropic B-factors describing the mobility of the domains. It turned out that the distinctly anisotropic mobility of the wild-type antenna domain has become isotropic in K15W, in agreement with the design. We suggest that, like K15W, the other mutations also followed the design, validating the correlation between antenna mobility and activity. This correlation suggests that the domain mobility facilitates the reaction.

  5. Potential signaling pathway involved in sphingosine-1-phosphate-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZENG, YE; YAO, XING-HONG; YAN, ZHI-PING; LIU, JING-XIA; LIU, XIAO-HENG

    2016-01-01

    The developmental process of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurs when epithelial cells acquire invasive mesenchymal cell characteristics, and the activation of this process has been indicated to be involved in tumor progression. EMT could be induced by growth factors, cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a biologically-active lipid that plays an important role in cancer metastasis. S1P also contributes to the activation of EMT. However, the mechanism underlying S1P-induced EMT is unclear. Increased evidence has demonstrated that the cell surface glycocalyx is closed associated with S1P and plays an important role in tumor progression, suggesting that S1P-induced EMT could be Snail-MMP signaling-dependent. Thus, we hypothesize that an S1P-glycocalyx-Snail-MMP signaling axis mediates S1P-induced EMT. This is an essential step towards improved understanding of the underlying mechanism involved in S1P-regulted EMT, and the development of novel diagnostic and anticancer therapeutic strategies. PMID:27347154

  6. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling Regulates Myogenic Responsiveness in Human Resistance Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Slack, Daniel L.; Burnstein, Marcus J.; Errett, Lee; Bonneau, Daniel; Latter, David; Rotstein, Ori D.; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian; Lidington, Darcy; Voigtlaender-Bolz, Julia

    2015-01-01

    We recently identified sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) as prominent regulators of myogenic responsiveness in rodent resistance arteries. However, since rodent models frequently exhibit limitations with respect to human applicability, translation is necessary to validate the relevance of this signaling network for clinical application. We therefore investigated the significance of these regulatory elements in human mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries. Mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries were isolated from patient tissue specimens collected during colonic or cardiac bypass surgery. Pressure myography assessments confirmed endothelial integrity, as well as stable phenylephrine and myogenic responses. Both human mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries (i) express critical S1P signaling elements, (ii) constrict in response to S1P and (iii) lose myogenic responsiveness following S1P receptor antagonism (JTE013). However, while human mesenteric arteries express CFTR, human skeletal muscle resistance arteries do not express detectable levels of CFTR protein. Consequently, modulating CFTR activity enhances myogenic responsiveness only in human mesenteric resistance arteries. We conclude that human mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries are a reliable and consistent model for translational studies. We demonstrate that the core elements of an S1P-dependent signaling network translate to human mesenteric resistance arteries. Clear species and vascular bed variations are evident, reinforcing the critical need for further translational study. PMID:26367262

  7. Sphingosine-1-phosphate Maintains Normal Vascular Permeability by Preserving Endothelial Surface Glycocalyx in Intact Microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Zeng, Min; Fan, Jie; Tarbell, John, M.; Curry, Fitz-Roy E.; Fu, Bingmei M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) was found to protect the endothelial surface glycocalyx (ESG) by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity-dependent shedding of ESG in cultured endothelial cell studies. We aimed to further test that S1P contributes to the maintenance of normal vascular permeability by protecting the ESG in intact microvessels. Methods We quantified the ESG in post-capillary venules of rat mesentery and measured the vascular permeability to albumin in the presence and absence of 1 μM S1P. We also measured permeability to albumin in the presence of MMP inhibitors and compared the measured permeability with those predicted by a transport model for the inter-endothelial cleft. Results We found that in the absence of S1P, the fluorescence intensity of the FITC-anti-heparan sulfate labeled ESG was ~10% of that in the presence of S1P, while the measured permeability to albumin was ~6.5 fold that in the presence of S1P. Similar results were observed with MMP inhibition. The predictions by the mathematical model further confirmed that S1P maintains microvascular permeability by preserving ESG. Conclusions Our results show that S1P contributes to the maintenance of normal vascular permeability by protecting the ESG in intact microvessels, consistent with parallel observation in cultured endothelial monolayers. PMID:27015105

  8. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling in Immune Cells and Inflammation: Roles and Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Masayo; Aoki, Hiroaki; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Hait, Nitai C.; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid metabolite involved in many critical cell processes. It is produced by the phosphorylation of sphingosine by sphingosine kinases (SphKs) and exported out of cells via transporters such as spinster homolog 2 (Spns2). S1P regulates diverse physiological processes by binding to specific G protein-binding receptors, S1P receptors (S1PRs) 1–5, through a process coined as “inside-out signaling.” The S1P concentration gradient between various tissues promotes S1PR1-dependent migration of T cells from secondary lymphoid organs into the lymphatic and blood circulation. S1P suppresses T cell egress from and promotes retention in inflamed peripheral tissues. S1PR1 in T and B cells as well as Spns2 in endothelial cells contributes to lymphocyte trafficking. FTY720 (Fingolimod) is a functional antagonist of S1PRs that induces systemic lymphopenia by suppression of lymphocyte egress from lymphoid organs. In this review, we summarize previous findings and new discoveries about the importance of S1P and S1PR signaling in the recruitment of immune cells and lymphocyte retention in inflamed tissues. We also discuss the role of S1P-S1PR1 axis in inflammatory diseases and wound healing. PMID:26966342

  9. Identification of a Second Two-Component Signal Transduction System That Controls Fosfomycin Tolerance and Glycerol-3-Phosphate Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Kurabayashi, Kumiko; Hirakawa, Yuko; Tanimoto, Koichi; Tomita, Haruyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Particular interest in fosfomycin has resurfaced because it is a highly beneficial antibiotic for the treatment of refractory infectious diseases caused by pathogens that are resistant to other commonly used antibiotics. The biological cost to cells of resistance to fosfomycin because of chromosomal mutation is high. We previously found that a bacterial two-component system, CpxAR, induces fosfomycin tolerance in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7. This mechanism does not rely on irreversible genetic modification and allows EHEC to relieve the fitness burden that results from fosfomycin resistance in the absence of fosfomycin. Here we show that another two-component system, TorSRT, which was originally characterized as a regulatory system for anaerobic respiration utilizing trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), also induces fosfomycin tolerance. Activation of the Tor regulatory pathway by overexpression of torR, which encodes the response regulator, or addition of TMAO increased fosfomycin tolerance in EHEC. We also show that phosphorylated TorR directly represses the expression of glpT, a gene that encodes a symporter of fosfomycin and glycerol-3-phosphate, and activation of the TorR protein results in the reduced uptake of fosfomycin by cells. However, cells in which the Tor pathway was activated had an impaired growth phenotype when cultured with glycerol-3-phosphate as a carbon substrate. These observations suggest that the TorSRT pathway is the second two-component system to reversibly control fosfomycin tolerance and glycerol-3-phosphate uptake in EHEC, and this may be beneficial for bacteria by alleviating the biological cost. We expect that this mechanism could be a potential target to enhance the utility of fosfomycin as chemotherapy against multidrug-resistant pathogens. PMID:25512306

  10. Regulation of glycolysis and l-glycerol 3-phosphate concentration in rat epididymal adipose tissue in vitro. Role of phosphofructokinase

    PubMed Central

    Halperin, M. L.; Denton, R. M.

    1969-01-01

    1. Attempts were made to define the role of phosphofructokinase in glycolytic control and the factors regulating the concentration of l-glycerol 3-phosphate in rat epididymal fat pads incubated in vitro. 2. Glycolysis rates were altered by anoxia or by additions of insulin, adrenaline or both to the incubation medium, and the changes in rate were related to changes in the steady-state concentrations of hexose phosphates, adenine nucleotides, l-glycerol 3-phosphate and citrate in the whole tissue. Measurements were also made of the lactate/pyruvate concentration ratio in the medium after incubation. 3. The mass-action ratios of phosphofructokinase, calculated from the whole-tissue concentrations of products and substrates, were less than 0·1% of the value of the ratio at pH7·4 at equilibrium. 4. Only in the presence of adrenaline could the observed stimulation of glycolytic flux be related to a possible activation of phosphofructokinase since, in this situation, the concentration of one substrate, fructose 6-phosphate, was not altered and the concentration of the other, ATP, was decreased. Increased glycolytic flux in the presence of insulin may be explained by an observed increase in the concentration of the substrate, fructose 6-phosphate. Under anaerobic conditions, glycolytic flux was decreased but this did not appear to be the result of inhibition of phosphofructokinase, since the concentrations of both substrates, fructose 6-phosphate and ATP, were decreased. The changes in glycolytic flux with insulin and anoxia may be secondary to changes in the rate of glucose uptake. 5. Changes in l-glycerol 3-phosphate concentration appear to be related both to changes in the concentration of dihydroxyacetone phosphate and to changes in the NADH/NAD+ concentration ratio in the cytoplasm. They do not seem to be related directly to alterations in glycolytic rate. PMID:4308837

  11. Regulation of Specific Functions of Glial Cells in Somatic Hybrids, II. Control of Inducibility of Glycerol-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Richard L.; Benda, Philippe

    1970-01-01

    Glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.8) is induced when glial cells are exposed to hydrocortisone in vitro. In contrast, the enzyme activity in fibroblasts is not affected by the steroid. In an attempt to elucidate the mechanisms controlling inducibility, hybrids between glial cells and fibroblasts were studied. It was found that the activity of the enzyme does not increase when the hybrids are exposed to hydrocortisone. It was also shown that inducibility and the noninduced activity of enzyme are controlled independently. Comparisons of S-100 and glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase activity in the hybrids suggest that all the specialized functions characteristics of glial cells are not coordinately controlled. PMID:4321349

  12. Characterization and partial purification of acyl-CoA:glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase from sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) developing seeds.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-López, Noemí; Garcés, Rafael; Harwood, John L; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2010-01-01

    The glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT, EC 2.3.1.15) from sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) microsomes has been characterised and partially purified. The in vitro determination of activity was optimized, and the maximum value for GPAT activity identified between 15 and 20 days after flowering. The apparent Michaelis-Menten K(m) for the glycerol 3-phosphate was 354 muM. The preferred substrates were palmitoyl-CoA = linoleoyl-CoA > oleoyl-CoA with the lowest activity using stearoyl-CoA. High solubilisation was achieved using 0.75% Tween80 and the solubilised GPAT was partially purified by ion-exchange chromatography using a Hi-Trap DEAE FF column, followed by gel filtration chromatography using a Superose 12 HR column. The fraction containing the GPAT activity was analysed by SDS-PAGE and contained a major band of 60.1 kDa. Finally, evidence is provided which shows the role of GPAT in the asymmetrical distribution, between positions sn-1 and sn-3, of saturated fatty acids in highly saturated sunflower triacylglycerols. This work provides background information on the sunflower endoplasmic reticulum GPAT which may prove valuable for future modification of oil deposition in this important crop.

  13. Low-interference washing-free electrochemical immunosensor using glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase as an enzyme label.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Gorachand; Park, Seonhwa; Singh, Amardeep; Seo, Jeongwook; Kim, Sinyoung; Yang, Haesik

    2015-04-01

    In washing-free electrochemical detection, various redox and reactive species cause significant interference. To minimize this interference, we report a washing-free electrochemical immunosensor using flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) and glycerol-3-phosphate (GP) as an enzyme label and its substrate, respectively, because the reaction of FAD-dependent dehydrogenases with dissolved O2 is slow and the level of GP preexisting in blood is low (<0.1 mM). A combination of a low electrocatalytic indium-tin oxide (ITO) electrode and fast electron-mediating Ru(NH3)6(3+) is employed to obtain a high signal-to-background ratio via proximity-dependent electron mediation of Ru(NH3)6(3+) between the ITO electrode and the GPDH label. Electrochemical oxidation of GPDH-generated Ru(NH3)6(2+) is performed at 0.05 V vs Ag/AgCl, at which point the electrochemical interference is very low. When a washing-free immunosensor is applied to cardiac troponin I detection in human serum, the calculated detection limit is approximately 10 pg/mL, indicating that the immunosensor is very sensitive in spite of the use of washing-free detection with a short detection period (10 min for incubation and 100 s for electrochemical measurement). The low-interference washing-free electrochemical immunosensor shows good promise for fast and simple point-of-care testing.

  14. Metabolic engineering of enhanced glycerol-3-phosphate synthesis to increase lipid production in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi; Xiong, Xiaochao; Sa, Na; Roje, Sanja; Chen, Shulin

    2016-07-01

    With the growing attention to global warming and energy sustainability, biosynthesis of lipids by photosynthetic microorganisms has attracted more interest for the production of renewable transportation fuels. Recently, the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has been widely used for biofuel production through metabolic engineering because of its efficient photosynthesis and well-developed genetic tools. In lipid biosynthesis, glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) is a key node for both CO2 fixation and lipid metabolism in cyanobacteria. However, few studies have explored the use of G3P synthesis to improve photosynthetic lipid production. In this study, metabolic engineering combined with flux balance analysis (FBA) was conducted to reveal the effect of G3P synthesis on lipid production. Heterologous genes that encoded glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) were engineered into Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 to enhance G3P supply and lipid production. The resultant recombinant Synechocystis produced higher levels of lipids without a significant reduction in cell growth. Compared with the wild-type strain, lipid content and productivity of the engineered cyanobacteria increased by up to 36 and 31 %, respectively, under autotrophic conditions. Lipid production under mixotrophic conditions of the engineered cyanobacteria was also investigated. This work demonstrated that enhanced G3P synthesis was an important factor in photosynthetic lipid production and that introducing heterologous GPD and DGAT genes was an effective strategy to increase lipid production in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. PMID:27154348

  15. Metabolic engineering of enhanced glycerol-3-phosphate synthesis to increase lipid production in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi; Xiong, Xiaochao; Sa, Na; Roje, Sanja; Chen, Shulin

    2016-07-01

    With the growing attention to global warming and energy sustainability, biosynthesis of lipids by photosynthetic microorganisms has attracted more interest for the production of renewable transportation fuels. Recently, the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has been widely used for biofuel production through metabolic engineering because of its efficient photosynthesis and well-developed genetic tools. In lipid biosynthesis, glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) is a key node for both CO2 fixation and lipid metabolism in cyanobacteria. However, few studies have explored the use of G3P synthesis to improve photosynthetic lipid production. In this study, metabolic engineering combined with flux balance analysis (FBA) was conducted to reveal the effect of G3P synthesis on lipid production. Heterologous genes that encoded glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) were engineered into Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 to enhance G3P supply and lipid production. The resultant recombinant Synechocystis produced higher levels of lipids without a significant reduction in cell growth. Compared with the wild-type strain, lipid content and productivity of the engineered cyanobacteria increased by up to 36 and 31 %, respectively, under autotrophic conditions. Lipid production under mixotrophic conditions of the engineered cyanobacteria was also investigated. This work demonstrated that enhanced G3P synthesis was an important factor in photosynthetic lipid production and that introducing heterologous GPD and DGAT genes was an effective strategy to increase lipid production in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

  16. Structural basis for regulation of stability and activity in glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases. Differential scanning calorimetry and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Makshakova, Olga N; Semenyuk, Pavel I; Kuravsky, Mikhail L; Ermakova, Elena A; Zuev, Yuriy F; Muronetz, Vladimir I

    2015-05-01

    Tissue specific isoforms of human glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, somatic (GAPD) and sperm-specific (GAPDS), have been reported to display different levels of both stability and catalytic activity. Here we apply MD simulations to investigate molecular basis of this phenomenon. The protein is a tetramer where each subunit consists of two domains - catalytic and NAD-binding one. We demonstrated key residues responsible for intersubunit and interdomain interactions. Effect of several residues was studied by point mutations. Overall we considered three mutations (Glu96Gln, Glu244Gln and Asp311Asn) disrupting GAPDS-specific salt bridges. Comparison of calculated interaction energies with calorimetric enthalpies confirmed that intersubunit interactions were responsible for enhanced thermostability of GAPDS whereas interdomain interactions had indirect influence on intersubunit contacts. Mutation Asp311Asn was around 10Å far from the active center and corresponded to the closest natural substitution in the isoenzymes. MD simulations revealed that this residue had slight interaction with catalytic residues but influenced the hydrogen bond net and dynamics in active site. These effects can be responsible for a strong influence of this residue on catalytic activity. Overall, our results provide new insight into glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase structure-function relationships and can be used for the engineering of mutant proteins with modified properties and for development of new inhibitors with indirect influence on the catalytic site. PMID:25869789

  17. Membrane Organization and Ionization Behavior of the Minor but Crucial Lipid Ceramide-1-Phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Kooijman, Edgar E.; Sot, Jesus; Montes, L.-Ruth; Alonso, Alicia; Gericke, Arne; de Kruijff, Ben; Kumar, Satyendra; Goni, Felix M.

    2008-08-06

    Ceramide-1-phosphate (Cer-1-P), one of the simplest of all sphingophospholipids, occurs in minor amounts in biological membranes. Yet recent evidence suggests important roles of this lipid as a novel second messenger with crucial tasks in cell survival and inflammatory responses. We present a detailed description of the physical chemistry of this hitherto little explored membrane lipid. At full hydration Cer-1-P forms a highly organized subgel (crystalline) bilayer phase (L{sub c}) at low temperature, which transforms into a regular gel phase (L{sub {beta}}) at {approx}45 C, with the gel to fluid phase transition (L{sub {beta}}-L{sub {alpha}}) occurring at {approx}65 C. When incorporated at 5mol % in a phosphatidylcholine bilayer, the pK{sub a2} of Cer-1-P, 7.39{+-}0.03, lies within the physiological pH range. Inclusion of phosphatidylethanolamine in the phosphatidylcholine bilayer, at equimolar ratio, dramatically reduces the pK{sub a2} to 6.64{+-}0.03. We explain these results in light of the novel electrostatic/hydrogen bond switch model described recently for phosphatidic acid. In mixtures with dielaidoylphosphatidylethanolamine, small concentrations of Cer-1-P cause a large reduction of the lamellar-to-inverted hexagonal phase transition temperature, suggesting that Cer-1-P induces, like phosphatidic acid, negative membrane curvature in these types of lipid mixtures. These properties place Cer-1-P in a class more akin to certain glycerophospholipids (phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidic acid) than to any other sphingolipid. In particular, the similarities and differences between ceramide and Cer-1-P may be relevant in explaining some of their physiological roles.

  18. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 transmits estrogens' effects in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sukocheva, Olga; Wadham, Carol; Gamble, Jennifer; Xia, Pu

    2015-12-01

    We have previously reported that the steroid hormone estrogens stimulate activation of sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors in breast cancer cells. Both estrogens and S1P are potent biological modulators of endothelial function in vasculature able to activate multiple effectors, including endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). In this study we report that treatment of endothelial cells (ECs) with 17β-estradiol (E2) resulted in a rapid, transient, and dose-dependent increase in SphK activity and increased S1P production. The effect was not reproduced by the inactive E2 analogue 17α-E2. Expression of the dominant-negative mutant SphK1(G82D) or transfection of SphK1-targeted siRNA in ECs caused not only a defect in SphK activation by E2, but also a significant inhibition of E2-induced activation of Akt/eNOS. Furthermore, E2 treatment induced internalization of plasma membrane S1P1 receptor, accompanied with an increase in the amount of cytosolic S1P1. By down-regulating S1P1 receptor expression, the S1P1-specific antisense oligonucleotides significantly inhibited E2-induced activation of Akt/eNOS in ECs. E2-induced EC migration and tube formation were also inhibited by S1P1 down-regulation. Thus, the findings indicate an important role of the SphK1/S1P1 pathway in mediating estrogen signaling and its actions in vasculature.

  19. Chemical Hypoxia Brings to Light Altered Autocrine Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signalling in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chenqi; Moreno-Nieves, Uriel; Di Battista, John A.; Fernandes, Maria J.; Touaibia, Mohamed; Bourgoin, Sylvain G.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests a role for sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in various aspects of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis. In this study we compared the effect of chemical hypoxia induced by cobalt chloride (CoCl2) on the expression of S1P metabolic enzymes and cytokine/chemokine secretion in normal fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) and RAFLS. RAFLS incubated with CoCl2, but not S1P, produced less IL-8 and MCP-1 than normal FLS. Furthermore, incubation with the S1P2 and S1P3 receptor antagonists, JTE-013 and CAY10444, reduced CoCl2-mediated chemokine production in normal FLS but not in RAFLS. RAFLS showed lower levels of intracellular S1P and enhanced mRNA expression of S1P phosphatase 1 (SGPP1) and S1P lyase (SPL), the enzymes that are involved in intracellular S1P degradation, when compared to normal FLS. Incubation with CoCl2 decreased SGPP1 mRNA and protein and SPL mRNA as well. Inhibition of SPL enhanced CoCl2-mediated cytokine/chemokine release and restored autocrine activation of S1P2 and S1P3 receptors in RAFLS. The results suggest that the sphingolipid pathway regulating the intracellular levels of S1P is dysregulated in RAFLS and has a significant impact on cell autocrine activation by S1P. Altered sphingolipid metabolism in FLS from patients with advanced RA raises the issue of synovial cell burnout due to chronic inflammation. PMID:26556954

  20. Sphingosine-1-phosphate mediates epidermal growth factor-induced muscle satellite cell activation.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Yosuke; Ohashi, Kazuya; Wada, Eiji; Yuasa, Yuki; Shiozuka, Masataka; Nonomura, Yoshiaki; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2014-08-01

    Skeletal muscle can regenerate repeatedly due to the presence of resident stem cells, called satellite cells. Because satellite cells are usually quiescent, they must be activated before participating in muscle regeneration in response to stimuli such as injury, overloading, and stretch. Although satellite cell activation is a crucial step in muscle regeneration, little is known of the molecular mechanisms controlling this process. Recent work showed that the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) plays crucial roles in the activation, proliferation, and differentiation of muscle satellite cells. We investigated the role of growth factors in S1P-mediated satellite cell activation. We found that epidermal growth factor (EGF) in combination with insulin induced proliferation of quiescent undifferentiated mouse myoblast C2C12 cells, which are also known as reserve cells, in serum-free conditions. Sphingosine kinase activity increased when reserve cells were stimulated with EGF. Treatment of reserve cells with the D-erythro-N,N-dimethylsphingosine, Sphingosine Kinase Inhibitor, or siRNA duplexes specific for sphingosine kinase 1, suppressed EGF-induced C2C12 activation. We also present the evidence showing the S1P receptor S1P2 is involved in EGF-induced reserve cell activation. Moreover, we demonstrated a combination of insulin and EGF promoted activation of satellite cells on single myofibers in a manner dependent on SPHK and S1P2. Taken together, our observations show that EGF-induced satellite cell activation is mediated by S1P and its receptor.

  1. Sphingosine kinase 1 activation enhances epidermal innate immunity through sphingosine-1-phosphate stimulation of cathelicidin production

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Se Kyoo; Kim, Young Il; Shin, Kyong-Oh; Kim, Bong-Woo; Lee, Sin Hee; Jeon, Jeong Eun; Kim, Hyun Jong; Lee, Yong-Moon; Mauro, Theodora M.; Elias, Peter M.; Uchida, Yoshikazu; Park, Kyungho

    2015-01-01

    Background The ceramide metabolite, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), regulates multiple cellular functions in keratinocytes (KC). We recently discovered that production of a key innate immune element, cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP), is stimulated via a NF-κB-dependent mechanism that is activated by S1P when S1P is generated by sphingosine kinase (SPHK) 1. Objective We investigated whether pharmacological modulation of SPHK1 activity, using a novel synthetic SPHK1 activator, (S)-Methyl 2-(hexanamide)-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl) propanoate (MHP), stimulates CAMP expression. Methods MHP-mediated changes in both S1P and CAMP downstream mediators were analyzed in normal cultured human KC by qRT-PCR, Western immunoblot, ELISA, confocal microscopy for immunohistochemistry, HPLC and ESI-LC/MS/MS, and microbial pathogen invasion/colonization in a human epidermal organotypic model. Results Treatment with MHP directly activated SPHK1 and increased cellular S1P content in normal cultured human KC. Because MHP did not inhibit S1P lyase activity, which hydrolyses S1P, augumented S1P levels could be attributed to increased synthesis rather than blockade of S1P degradation. Next, we found that exogenous MHP significantly stimulated CAMP mRNA and protein production in KC, increases that were significantly suppressed by siRNA directed against SPHK1, but not by a scrambled control siRNA. NF-κB activation, assessed by nuclear translocation of NF-κB, occurred in cells following incubation with MHP. Conversely, pretreatment with a specific inhibitor of SPHK1 decreased MHP-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB, and significantly attenuated the MHP-mediated increase in CAMP production. Finally, topical MHP significantly suppressed invasion of the virulent Staphylococcus aureus into murine skin explants. Conclusion MHP activation of SPHK1, a target enzyme of CAMP production, can stimulate innate immunity. PMID:26113114

  2. Sphingosine-1-phosphate is involved in the occlusive arteriopathy of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sachindra R.; Bastola, Mrigendra M.; McLendon, Jared M.; Oka, Masahiko; Fagan, Karen A.; McMurtry, Ivan F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite several advances in the pathobiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), its pathogenesis is not completely understood. Current therapy improves symptoms but has disappointing effects on survival. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a lysophospholipid synthesized by sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) and SphK2. Considering the regulatory roles of S1P in several tissues leading to vasoconstriction, inflammation, proliferation, and fibrosis, we investigated whether S1P plays a role in the pathogenesis of PAH. To test this hypothesis, we used plasma samples and lung tissue from patients with idiopathic PAH (IPAH) and the Sugen5416/hypoxia/normoxia rat model of occlusive PAH. Our study revealed an increase in the plasma concentration of S1P in patients with IPAH and in early and late stages of PAH in rats. We observed increased expression of both SphK1 and SphK2 in the remodeled pulmonary arteries of patients with IPAH and PAH rats. Exogenous S1P stimulated the proliferation of cultured rat pulmonary arterial endothelial and smooth-muscle cells. We also found that 3 weeks of treatment of late-stage PAH rats with an SphK1 inhibitor reduced the increased plasma levels of S1P and the occlusive pulmonary arteriopathy. Although inhibition of SphK1 improved cardiac index and the total pulmonary artery resistance index, it did not reduce right ventricular systolic pressure or right ventricular hypertrophy. Our study supports that S1P is involved in the pathogenesis of occlusive arteriopathy in PAH and provides further evidence that S1P signaling may be a novel therapeutic target. PMID:27683614

  3. Molecular mechanism of sphingosine-1-phosphate action in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Tran, Diem-Hang; Hait, Nitai C; Sperber, Henrik; Qi, Junlin; Fischer, Karin; Ieronimakis, Nick; Pantoja, Mario; Hays, Aislinn; Allegood, Jeremy; Reyes, Morayma; Spiegel, Sarah; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal muscle-wasting disease. Studies in Drosophila showed that genetic increase of the levels of the bioactive sphingolipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) or delivery of 2-acetyl-5-tetrahydroxybutyl imidazole (THI), an S1P lyase inhibitor, suppresses dystrophic muscle degeneration. In the dystrophic mouse (mdx), upregulation of S1P by THI increases regeneration and muscle force. S1P can act as a ligand for S1P receptors and as a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. Because Drosophila has no identified S1P receptors and DMD correlates with increased HDAC2 levels, we tested whether S1P action in muscle involves HDAC inhibition. Here we show that beneficial effects of THI treatment in mdx mice correlate with significantly increased nuclear S1P, decreased HDAC activity and increased acetylation of specific histone residues. Importantly, the HDAC2 target microRNA genes miR-29 and miR-1 are significantly upregulated, correlating with the downregulation of the miR-29 target Col1a1 in the diaphragm of THI-treated mdx mice. Further gene expression analysis revealed a significant THI-dependent decrease in inflammatory genes and increase in metabolic genes. Accordingly, S1P levels and functional mitochondrial activity are increased after THI treatment of differentiating C2C12 cells. S1P increases the capacity of the muscle cell to use fatty acids as an energy source, suggesting that THI treatment could be beneficial for the maintenance of energy metabolism in mdx muscles.

  4. Sphingosine-1-phosphate is involved in the occlusive arteriopathy of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gairhe, Salina; Joshi, Sachindra R; Bastola, Mrigendra M; McLendon, Jared M; Oka, Masahiko; Fagan, Karen A; McMurtry, Ivan F

    2016-09-01

    Despite several advances in the pathobiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), its pathogenesis is not completely understood. Current therapy improves symptoms but has disappointing effects on survival. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a lysophospholipid synthesized by sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) and SphK2. Considering the regulatory roles of S1P in several tissues leading to vasoconstriction, inflammation, proliferation, and fibrosis, we investigated whether S1P plays a role in the pathogenesis of PAH. To test this hypothesis, we used plasma samples and lung tissue from patients with idiopathic PAH (IPAH) and the Sugen5416/hypoxia/normoxia rat model of occlusive PAH. Our study revealed an increase in the plasma concentration of S1P in patients with IPAH and in early and late stages of PAH in rats. We observed increased expression of both SphK1 and SphK2 in the remodeled pulmonary arteries of patients with IPAH and PAH rats. Exogenous S1P stimulated the proliferation of cultured rat pulmonary arterial endothelial and smooth-muscle cells. We also found that 3 weeks of treatment of late-stage PAH rats with an SphK1 inhibitor reduced the increased plasma levels of S1P and the occlusive pulmonary arteriopathy. Although inhibition of SphK1 improved cardiac index and the total pulmonary artery resistance index, it did not reduce right ventricular systolic pressure or right ventricular hypertrophy. Our study supports that S1P is involved in the pathogenesis of occlusive arteriopathy in PAH and provides further evidence that S1P signaling may be a novel therapeutic target. PMID:27683614

  5. Elevation of serum sphingosine-1-phosphate attenuates impaired cardiac function in experimental sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Coldewey, Sina M.; Benetti, Elisa; Collino, Massimo; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Sponholz, Christoph; Bauer, Michael; Huwiler, Andrea; Thiemermann, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Serum levels of the lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) are reduced in septic patients and are inversely associated with disease severity. We show that serum S1P is reduced in human sepsis and in murine models of sepsis. We then investigated whether pharmacological or genetic approaches that alter serum S1P may attenuate cardiac dysfunction and whether S1P signaling might serve as a novel theragnostic tool in sepsis. Mice were challenged with lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan (LPS/PepG). LPS/PepG resulted in an impaired systolic contractility and reduced serum S1P. Administration of the immunomodulator FTY720 increased serum S1P, improved impaired systolic contractility and activated the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-pathway in the heart. Cardioprotective effects of FTY720 were abolished following administration of a S1P receptor 2 (S1P2) antagonist or a PI3K inhibitor. Sphingosine kinase-2 deficient mice had higher endogenous S1P levels and the LPS/PepG-induced impaired systolic contractility was attenuated in comparison with wild-type mice. Cardioprotective effects of FTY720 were confirmed in polymicrobial sepsis. We show here for the first time that the impaired left ventricular systolic contractility in experimental sepsis is attenuated by FTY720. Mechanistically, our results indicate that activation of S1P2 by increased serum S1P and the subsequent activation of the PI3K-Akt survival pathway significantly contributes to the observed cardioprotective effect of FTY720. PMID:27277195

  6. Effects of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 phosphorylation in response to FTY720 during neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yingxiang; Garris, Christopher S.; Moreno, Monica A.; Griffin, Christina W.; Han, May H.

    2016-01-01

    Fingolimod (FTY720, Gilenya), a sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor (S1PR) modulator, is one of the first-line immunomodulatory therapies for treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). Human S1PR1 variants have been reported to have functional heterogeneity in vitro, suggesting that S1PR1 function may influence FTY720 efficacy. In this study, we examined the influence of S1PR1 phosphorylation on response to FTY720 in neuroinflammation. We found that mice carrying a phosphorylation-defective S1pr1 gene [S1PR1(S5A) mice] were refractory to FTY720 treatment in MOG35-55-immunized and Th17-mediated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) models. Long-term treatment with FTY720 induced significant lymphopenia and suppressed Th17 response in the peripheral immune system via downregulating STAT3 phosphorylation in both WT and S1PR1(S5A) mice. However, FTY720 did not effectively prevent neuroinflammation in the S1PR1(S5A) EAE mice as a result of encephalitogenic cells expressing C-C chemokine receptor 6 (CCR6). Combined treatment with FTY720 and anti-CCR6 delayed disease progression in S1PR1(S5A) EAE mice, suggesting that CCR6-mediated cell trafficking can overcome the effects of FTY720. This work may have translational relevance regarding FTY720 efficacy in MS patients and suggests that cell type–specific therapies may enhance therapeutic efficacy in MS. PMID:27699272

  7. Sphingosine 1-phosphate signaling pathway in inner ear biology. New therapeutic strategies for hearing loss?

    PubMed

    Romero-Guevara, Ricardo; Cencetti, Francesca; Donati, Chiara; Bruni, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent conditions around the world, in particular among people over 60 years old. Thus, an increase of this affection is predicted as result of the aging process in our population. In this context, it is important to further explore the function of molecular targets involved in the biology of inner ear sensory cells to better individuate new candidates for therapeutic application. One of the main causes of deafness resides into the premature death of hair cells and auditory neurons. In this regard, neurotrophins and growth factors such as insulin like growth factor are known to be beneficial by favoring the survival of these cells. An elevated number of published data in the last 20 years have individuated sphingolipids not only as structural components of biological membranes but also as critical regulators of key biological processes, including cell survival. Ceramide, formed by catabolism of sphingomyelin (SM) and other complex sphingolipids, is a strong inducer of apoptotic pathway, whereas sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), generated by cleavage of ceramide to sphingosine and phosphorylation catalyzed by two distinct sphingosine kinase (SK) enzymes, stimulates cell survival. Interestingly S1P, by acting as intracellular mediator or as ligand of a family of five distinct S1P receptors (S1P1-S1P5), is a very powerful bioactive sphingolipid, capable of triggering also other diverse cellular responses such as cell migration, proliferation and differentiation, and is critically involved in the development and homeostasis of several organs and tissues. Although new interesting data have become available, the information on S1P pathway and other sphingolipids in the biology of the inner ear is limited. Nonetheless, there are several lines of evidence implicating these signaling molecules during neurogenesis in other cell populations. In this review, we discuss the role of S1P during inner ear development, also as guidance for future

  8. Implication of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 in ceramide 1-phosphate-stimulated macrophage migration.

    PubMed

    Ordoñez, Marta; Rivera, Io-Guané; Presa, Natalia; Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Cell migration is a complex biological function involved in both physiologic and pathologic processes. Although this is a subject of intense investigation, the mechanisms by which cell migration is regulated are not completely understood. In this study we show that the bioactive sphingolipid ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P), which is involved in inflammatory responses, causes upregulation of metalloproteinases (MMP) -2 and -9 in J774A.1 macrophages. This effect was shown to be dependent on stimulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and extracellularly regulated kinases 1-2 (ERK1-2) as demonstrated by treating the cells with specific siRNA to knockdown the p85 regulatory subunit of PI3K, or ERK1-2. Inhibition of MMP-2 or MMP-9 pharmacologically or with specific siRNA to silence the genes encoding these MMPs abrogated C1P-stimulated macrophage migration. Also, C1P induced actin polymerization and potently increased phosphorylation of the focal adhesion protein paxillin, which are essential factors in the regulation of cell migration. As expected, blockade of paxillin activation with specific siRNA significantly reduced actin polymerization. In addition, inhibition of actin polymerization with cytochalasin D completely blocked C1P-induced MMP-2 and -9 expression as well as C1P-stimulated macrophage migration. It was also observed that pertussis toxin (Ptx) inhibited Akt, ERK1-2, and paxillin phosphorylation, and completely blocked cell migration. The latter findings support the notion that C1P-stimulated macrophage migration is a receptor mediated effect, and point to MMP-2 and -9 as possible therapeutic targets to control inflammation.

  9. Activated platelets release sphingosine 1-phosphate and induce hypersensitivity to noxious heat stimuli in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Weth, Daniela; Benetti, Camilla; Rauch, Caroline; Gstraunthaler, Gerhard; Schmidt, Helmut; Geisslinger, Gerd; Sabbadini, Roger; Proia, Richard L.; Kress, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    At the site of injury activated platelets release various mediators, one of which is sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). It was the aim of this study to explore whether activated human platelets had a pronociceptive effect in an in vivo mouse model and whether this effect was based on the release of S1P and subsequent activation of neuronal S1P receptors 1 or 3. Human platelets were prepared in different concentrations (105/μl, 106/μl, 107/μl) and assessed in mice with different genetic backgrounds (WT, S1P1fl/fl, SNS-S1P1−/−, S1P3−/−). Intracutaneous injections of activated human platelets induced a significant, dose-dependent hypersensitivity to noxious thermal stimulation. The degree of heat hypersensitivity correlated with the platelet concentration as well as the platelet S1P content and the amount of S1P released upon platelet activation as measured with LC MS/MS. Despite the significant correlations between S1P and platelet count, no difference in paw withdrawal latency (PWL) was observed in mice with a global null mutation of the S1P3 receptor or a conditional deletion of the S1P1 receptor in nociceptive primary afferents. Furthermore, neutralization of S1P with a selective anti-S1P antibody did not abolish platelet induced heat hypersensitivity. Our results suggest that activated platelets release S1P and induce heat hypersensitivity in vivo. However, the platelet induced heat hypersensitivity was caused by mediators other than S1P. PMID:25954148

  10. Sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase downregulation promotes colon carcinogenesis through STAT3-activated microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Degagné, Emilie; Pandurangan, Ashok; Bandhuvula, Padmavathi; Kumar, Ashok; Eltanawy, Abeer; Zhang, Meng; Yoshinaga, Yuko; Nefedov, Mikhail; de Jong, Pieter J.; Fong, Loren G.; Young, Stephen G.; Bittman, Robert; Ahmedi, Yasmin; Saba, Julie D.

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence supports a link between inflammation and cancer; however, mediators of the transition between inflammation and carcinogenesis remain incompletely understood. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) lyase (SPL) irreversibly degrades the bioactive sphingolipid S1P and is highly expressed in enterocytes but downregulated in colon cancer. Here, we investigated the role of SPL in colitis-associated cancer (CAC). We generated mice with intestinal epithelium-specific Sgpl1 deletion and chemically induced colitis and tumor formation in these animals. Compared with control animals, mice lacking intestinal SPL exhibited greater disease activity, colon shortening, cytokine levels, S1P accumulation, tumors, STAT3 activation, STAT3-activated microRNAs (miRNAs), and suppression of miR-targeted anti-oncogene products. This phenotype was attenuated by STAT3 inhibition. In fibroblasts, silencing SPL promoted tumorigenic transformation through a pathway involving extracellular transport of S1P through S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (SPNS2), S1P receptor activation, JAK2/STAT3-dependent miR-181b-1 induction, and silencing of miR-181b-1 target cylindromatosis (CYLD). Colon biopsies from patients with inflammatory bowel disease revealed enhanced S1P and STAT3 signaling. In mice with chemical-induced CAC, oral administration of plant-type sphingolipids called sphingadienes increased colonic SPL levels and reduced S1P levels, STAT3 signaling, cytokine levels, and tumorigenesis, indicating that SPL prevents transformation and carcinogenesis. Together, our results suggest that dietary sphingolipids can augment or prevent colon cancer, depending upon whether they are metabolized to S1P or promote S1P metabolism through the actions of SPL. PMID:25347472

  11. Impairment of Angiogenic Sphingosine Kinase-1/Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptors Pathway in Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Dobierzewska, Aneta; Palominos, Macarena; Sanchez, Marianela; Dyhr, Michael; Helgert, Katja; Venegas-Araneda, Pia; Tong, Stephen; Illanes, Sebastian E.

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE), is a serious pregnancy disorder characterized in the early gestation by shallow trophoblast invasion, impaired placental neo-angiogenesis, placental hypoxia and ischemia, which leads to maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Here we hypothesized that angiogenic sphingosine kinase-1 (SPHK1)/sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors pathway is impaired in PE. We found that SPHK1 mRNA and protein expression are down-regulated in term placentae and term chorionic villous explants from patients with PE or severe PE (PES), compared with controls. Moreover, mRNA expression of angiogenic S1PR1 and S1PR3 receptors were decreased in placental samples of PE and PES patients, whereas anti-angiogenic S1PR2 was up-regulated in chorionic villous tissue of PES subjects, pointing to its potential atherogenic and inflammatory properties. Furthermore, in in vitro (JAR cells) and ex vivo (chorionic villous explants) models of placental hypoxia, SPHK1 mRNA and protein were strongly up-regulated under low oxygen tension (1% 02). In contrast, there was no change in SPHK1 expression under the conditions of placental physiological hypoxia (8% 02). In both models, nuclear protein levels of HIF1A were increased at 1% 02 during the time course, but there was no up-regulation at 8% 02, suggesting that SPHK1 and HIF1A might be the part of the same canonical pathway during hypoxia and that both contribute to placental neovascularization during early gestation. Taken together, this study suggest the SPHK1 pathway may play a role in the human early placentation process and may be involved in the pathogenesis of PE. PMID:27284992

  12. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor 2 Regulates Proinflammatory Cytokine Production and Osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2) couples with the Gi, Gq, and G12/13 group of proteins, which modulate an array of cellular signaling pathways and affect immune responses to multiple stimuli. In this study, we demonstrated that knockdown of S1PR2 by a specific S1PR2 shRNA lentiviral vector significantly inhibited IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α protein levels induced by oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans) in murine bone marrow-derived monocytes and macrophages (BMMs) compared with controls. In addition, knockdown of S1PR2 by the S1PR2 shRNA lentiviral vector suppressed p-PI3K, p-ERK, p-JNK, p-p38, and p-NF-κBp65 protein expressions induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans. Furthermore, bone marrow cells treated with the S1PR2 shRNA lentiviral vector inhibited osteoclastogenesis induced by RANKL compared with controls. The S1PR2 shRNA suppressed the mRNA levels of six osteoclastogenic factors including nuclear factor of activated T-cells cytoplasmic calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1), cathepsin K (Ctsk), acid phosphatase 5 (Acp5), osteoclast-associated receptor (Oscar), dendritic cells specific transmembrane protein (Dcstamp), and osteoclast stimulatory transmembrane protein (Ocstamp) in bone marrow cells. We conclude that S1PR2 plays an essential role in modulating proinflammatory cytokine production and osteoclastogenesis. Blocking S1PR2 signaling might be a novel therapeutic strategy to treat inflammatory bone loss diseases. PMID:27224249

  13. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Elicits Receptor-Dependent Calcium Signaling in Retinal Amacrine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Crousillac, Scott; Colonna, Jeremy; McMains, Emily; Dewey, Jill Sayes

    2009-01-01

    Evidence is emerging indicating that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) participates in signaling in the retina. To determine whether S1P might be involved in signaling in the inner retina specifically, we examine the effects of this sphingolipid on cultured retinal amacrine cells. Whole cell voltage-clamp recordings reveal that S1P activates a cation current that is dependent on signaling through Gi and phospholipase C. These observations are consistent with the involvement of members of the S1P receptor family of G-protein-coupled receptors in the production of the current. Immunocytochemistry and PCR amplification provide evidence for the expression of S1P1R and S1P3R in amacrine cells. The receptor-mediated channel activity is shown to be highly sensitive to blockade by lanthanides consistent with the behavior of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels. PCR products amplified from amacrine cells reveal that TRPCs 1 and 3–7 channel subunits have the potential to be expressed. Because TRPC channels provide a Ca2+ entry pathway, we asked whether S1P caused cytosolic Ca2+ elevations in amacrine cells. We show that S1P-dependent Ca2+ elevations do occur in these cells and that they might be mediated by S1P1R and S1P3R. The Ca2+ elevations are partially due to release from internal stores, but the largest contribution is from influx across the plasma membrane. The effect of inhibition of sphingosine kinase suggests that the production of cytosolic S1P underlies the sustained nature of the Ca2+ elevations. Elucidation of the downstream effects of these signals will provide clues to the role of S1P in regulating inner retinal function. PMID:19776367

  14. Apolipoprotein M modulates erythrocyte efflux and tubular reabsorption of sphingosine-1-phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, Iryna; Park, Rebekka; Othman, Alaa; Rohrer, Lucia; Hornemann, Thorsten; Stoffel, Markus; Devuyst, Olivier; von Eckardstein, Arnold

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) mediates several cytoprotective functions of HDL. apoM acts as a S1P binding protein in HDL. Erythrocytes are the major source of S1P in plasma. After glomerular filtration, apoM is endocytosed in the proximal renal tubules. Human or murine HDL elicited time- and dose-dependent S1P efflux from erythrocytes. Compared with HDL of wild-type (wt) mice, S1P efflux was enhanced in the presence of HDL from apoM transgenic mice, but not diminished in the presence of HDL from apoM knockout (Apom−/−) mice. Artificially reconstituted and apoM-free HDL also effectively induced S1P efflux from erythrocytes. S1P and apoM were not measurable in the urine of wt mice. Apom−/− mice excreted significant amounts of S1P. apoM was detected in the urine of mice with defective tubular endocytosis because of knockout of the LDL receptor-related protein, chloride-proton exchanger ClC-5 (Clcn5−/−), or the cysteine transporter cystinosin. Urinary levels of S1P were significantly elevated in Clcn5−/− mice. In contrast to Apom−/− mice, these mice showed normal plasma concentrations for apoM and S1P. In conclusion, HDL facilitates S1P efflux from erythrocytes by both apoM-dependent and apoM-independent mechanisms. Moreover, apoM facilitates tubular reabsorption of S1P from the urine, however, with no impact on S1P plasma concentrations. PMID:24950692

  15. Sphingosine-1-phosphate protects endothelial glycocalyx by inhibiting syndecan-1 shedding.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ye; Adamson, Roger H; Curry, Fitz-Roy E; Tarbell, John M

    2014-02-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are covered by a surface glycocalyx layer that forms part of the barrier and mechanosensing functions of the blood-tissue interface. Removal of albumin in bathing media induces collapse or shedding of the glycocalyx. The electrostatic interaction between arginine residues on albumin, and negatively charged glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the glycocalyx have been hypothesized to stabilize the glycocalyx structure. Because albumin is one of the primary carriers of the phospholipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), we evaluated the alternate hypothesis that S1P, acting via S1P1 receptors, plays the primary role in stabilizing the endothelial glycocalyx. Using confocal microscopy on rat fat-pad ECs, we demonstrated that heparan sulfate (HS), chondroitin sulfate (CS), and ectodomain of syndecan-1 were shed from the endothelial cell surface after removal of plasma protein but were retained in the presence of S1P at concentrations of >100 nM. S1P1 receptor antagonism abolished the protection of the glycocalyx by S1P and plasma proteins. S1P reduced GAGs released after removal of plasma protein. The mechanism of protection from loss of glycocalyx components by S1P-dependent pathways was shown to be suppression of metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. General inhibition of MMPs protected against loss of CS and syndecan-1. Specific inhibition of MMP-9 and MMP-13 protected against CS loss. We conclude that S1P plays a critical role in protecting the glycocalyx via S1P1 and inhibits the protease activity-dependent shedding of CS, HS, and the syndecan-1 ectodomain. Our results provide new insight into the role for S1P in protecting the glycocalyx and maintaining vascular homeostasis.

  16. Glucose-1-phosphate transport into protoplasts and chloroplasts from leaves of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Fettke, Joerg; Malinova, Irina; Albrecht, Tanja; Hejazi, Mahdi; Steup, Martin

    2011-04-01

    Almost all glucosyl transfer reactions rely on glucose-1-phosphate (Glc-1-P) that either immediately acts as glucosyl donor or as substrate for the synthesis of the more widely used Glc dinucleotides, ADPglucose or UDPglucose. In this communication, we have analyzed two Glc-1-P-related processes: the carbon flux from externally supplied Glc-1-P to starch by either mesophyll protoplasts or intact chloroplasts from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). When intact protoplasts or chloroplasts are incubated with [U-(14)C]Glc-1-P, starch is rapidly labeled. Incorporation into starch is unaffected by the addition of unlabeled Glc-6-P or Glc, indicating a selective flux from Glc-1-P to starch. However, illuminated protoplasts incorporate less (14)C into starch when unlabeled bicarbonate is supplied in addition to the (14)C-labeled Glc-1-P. Mesophyll protoplasts incubated with [U-(14)C]Glc-1-P incorporate (14)C into the plastidial pool of adenosine diphosphoglucose. Protoplasts prepared from leaves of mutants of Arabidopsis that lack either the plastidial phosphorylase or the phosphoglucomutase isozyme incorporate (14)C derived from external Glc-1-P into starch, but incorporation into starch is insignificant when protoplasts from a mutant possessing a highly reduced ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase activity are studied. Thus, the path of assimilatory starch biosynthesis initiated by extraplastidial Glc-1-P leads to the plastidial pool of adenosine diphosphoglucose, and at this intermediate it is fused with the Calvin cycle-driven route. Mutants lacking the plastidial phosphoglucomutase contain a small yet significant amount of transitory starch.

  17. Subfertility and growth restriction in a new galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) - deficient mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Manshu; Siddiqi, Anwer; Witt, Benjamin; Yuzyuk, Tatiana; Johnson, Britt; Fraser, Nisa; Chen, Wyman; Rascon, Rafael; Yin, Xue; Goli, Harish; Bodamer, Olaf A; Lai, Kent

    2014-01-01

    The first GalT gene knockout (KO) mouse model for Classic Galactosemia (OMIM 230400) accumulated some galactose and its metabolites upon galactose challenge, but was seemingly fertile and symptom free. Here we constructed a new GalT gene-trapped mouse model by injecting GalT gene-trapped mouse embryonic stem cells into blastocysts, which were later implanted into pseudo-pregnant females. High percentage GalT gene-trapped chimera obtained were used to generate heterozygous and subsequently, homozygous GalT gene-trapped mice. Biochemical assays confirmed total absence of galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) activity in the homozygotes. Although the homozygous GalT gene-trapped females could conceive and give birth when fed with normal chow, they had smaller litter size (P=0.02) and longer time-to-pregnancy (P=0.013) than their wild-type littermates. Follicle-stimulating hormone levels of the mutant female mice were not significantly different from the age-matched, wild-type females, but histological examination of the ovaries revealed fewer follicles in the homozygous mutants (P=0.007). Administration of a high-galactose (40% w/w) diet to lactating homozygous GalT gene-trapped females led to lethality in over 70% of the homozygous GalT gene-trapped pups before weaning. Cerebral edema, abnormal changes in the Purkinje and the outer granular cell layers of the cerebellum, as well as lower blood GSH/GSSG ratio were identified in the galactose-intoxicated pups. Finally, reduced growth was observed in GalT gene-trapped pups fed with normal chow and all pups fed with high-galactose (20% w/w) diet. This new mouse model presents several of the complications of Classic Galactosemia and will be useful to investigate pathogenesis and new therapies. PMID:24549051

  18. Fructose 1-Phosphate Is the Preferred Effector of the Metabolic Regulator Cra of Pseudomonas putida*

    PubMed Central

    Chavarría, Max; Santiago, César; Platero, Raúl; Krell, Tino; Casasnovas, José M.; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2011-01-01

    The catabolite repressor/activator (Cra) protein is a global sensor and regulator of carbon fluxes through the central metabolic pathways of Gram-negative bacteria. To examine the nature of the effector (or effectors) that signal such fluxes to the protein of Pseudomonas putida, the Cra factor of this soil microorganism has been purified and characterized and its three-dimensional structure determined. Analytical ultracentrifugation, gel filtration, and mobility shift assays showed that the effector-free Cra is a dimer that binds an operator DNA sequence in the promoter region of the fruBKA cluster. Furthermore, fructose 1-phosphate (F1P) was found to most efficiently dissociate the Cra-DNA complex. Thermodynamic parameters of the F1P-Cra-DNA interaction calculated by isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the factor associates tightly to the DNA sequence 5′-TTAAACGTTTCA-3′ (KD = 26.3 ± 3.1 nm) and that F1P binds the protein with an apparent stoichiometry of 1.06 ± 0.06 molecules per Cra monomer and a KD of 209 ± 20 nm. Other possible effectors, like fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, did not display a significant affinity for the regulator under the assay conditions. Moreover, the structure of Cra and its co-crystal with F1P at a 2-Å resolution revealed that F1P fits optimally the geometry of the effector pocket. Our results thus single out F1P as the preferred metabolic effector of the Cra protein of P. putida. PMID:21239488

  19. Sphingosine 1-phosphate induced anti-atherogenic and atheroprotective M2 macrophage polarization through IL-4.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Jin; Lee, Kyoung-Pil; Kang, Saeromi; Lee, Jaewon; Sato, Koichi; Chung, Hae Young; Okajima, Fumikazu; Im, Dong-Soon

    2014-10-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) has been implicated in anti-atherogenic properties of high-density lipoproteins. However, the roles and signaling of S1P in macrophages, the main contributor to atherosclerosis, have not been well studied. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage phenotypes may influence the development of atherosclerosis. Therefore, we investigated the effects of S1P on macrophage phenotypes, especially on M2 polarization and its signaling in relation to the anti-atherogenic properties of S1P. It was found that S1P induced anti-inflammatory M2 polarization via IL-4 secretion and its signaling, and induced IL-4Rα and IL-2Rγ. In addition, down-stream signalings, such as, stat-6 phosphorylation, SOCS1 induction, and SOCS3 suppression were also observed in macrophages in response to S1P. Furthermore, S1P-induced ERK activation, and the inhibitions of p38 MAPK and JNK were found to be key signals for IL-4 induction. Moreover, the anti-atherogenic effect of S1P in HDL was confirmed by the observation that oxidized LDL-induced lipid accumulation was attenuated in S1P-treated M2 macrophages. Furthermore, the atheroprotective effect of S1P was demonstrated by its anti-apoptotic effect on S1P-treated macrophages. The present study shows that S1P-induced M2 polarization of macrophages could be mediated via IL-4 signaling, and suggests that M2 polarization by S1P is responsible for the anti-atherogenic and atheroprotective properties of high-density lipoproteins in vivo.

  20. Elevation of serum sphingosine-1-phosphate attenuates impaired cardiac function in experimental sepsis.

    PubMed

    Coldewey, Sina M; Benetti, Elisa; Collino, Massimo; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Sponholz, Christoph; Bauer, Michael; Huwiler, Andrea; Thiemermann, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Serum levels of the lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) are reduced in septic patients and are inversely associated with disease severity. We show that serum S1P is reduced in human sepsis and in murine models of sepsis. We then investigated whether pharmacological or genetic approaches that alter serum S1P may attenuate cardiac dysfunction and whether S1P signaling might serve as a novel theragnostic tool in sepsis. Mice were challenged with lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan (LPS/PepG). LPS/PepG resulted in an impaired systolic contractility and reduced serum S1P. Administration of the immunomodulator FTY720 increased serum S1P, improved impaired systolic contractility and activated the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-pathway in the heart. Cardioprotective effects of FTY720 were abolished following administration of a S1P receptor 2 (S1P2) antagonist or a PI3K inhibitor. Sphingosine kinase-2 deficient mice had higher endogenous S1P levels and the LPS/PepG-induced impaired systolic contractility was attenuated in comparison with wild-type mice. Cardioprotective effects of FTY720 were confirmed in polymicrobial sepsis. We show here for the first time that the impaired left ventricular systolic contractility in experimental sepsis is attenuated by FTY720. Mechanistically, our results indicate that activation of S1P2 by increased serum S1P and the subsequent activation of the PI3K-Akt survival pathway significantly contributes to the observed cardioprotective effect of FTY720. PMID:27277195

  1. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 agonism attenuates lung ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Matthew L.; Sharma, Ashish K.; Zhao, Yunge; Charles, Eric J.; Huerter, Mary E.; Johnston, William F.; Kron, Irving L.; Lynch, Kevin R.

    2015-01-01

    Outcomes for lung transplantation are the worst of any solid organ, and ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) limits both short- and long-term outcomes. Presently no therapeutic agents are available to prevent IRI. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) modulates immune function through binding to a set of G protein-coupled receptors (S1PR1-5). Although S1P has been shown to attenuate lung IRI, the S1P receptors responsible for protection have not been defined. The present study tests the hypothesis that protection from lung IRI is primarily mediated through S1PR1 activation. Mice were treated with either vehicle, FTY720 (a nonselective S1P receptor agonist), or VPC01091 (a selective S1PR1 agonist and S1PR3 antagonist) before left lung IR. Function, vascular permeability, cytokine expression, neutrophil infiltration, and myeloperoxidase levels were measured in lungs. After IR, both FTY720 and VPC01091 significantly improved lung function (reduced pulmonary artery pressure and increased pulmonary compliance) vs. vehicle control. In addition, FTY720 and VPC01091 significantly reduced vascular permeability, expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-17, IL-12/IL-23 p40, CC chemokine ligand-2, and TNF-α), myeloperoxidase levels, and neutrophil infiltration compared with control. No significant differences were observed between VPC01091 and FTY720 treatment groups. VPC01091 did not significantly affect elevated invariant natural killer T cell infiltration after IR, and administration of an S1PR1 antagonist reversed VPC01091-mediated protection after IR. In conclusion, VPC01091 and FTY720 provide comparable protection from lung injury and dysfunction after IR. These findings suggest that S1P-mediated protection from IRI is mediated by S1PR1 activation, independent of S1PR3, and that selective S1PR1 agonists may provide a novel therapeutic strategy to prevent lung IRI. PMID:25910934

  2. Glucose-1-Phosphate Transport into Protoplasts and Chloroplasts from Leaves of Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Fettke, Joerg; Malinova, Irina; Albrecht, Tanja; Hejazi, Mahdi; Steup, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Almost all glucosyl transfer reactions rely on glucose-1-phosphate (Glc-1-P) that either immediately acts as glucosyl donor or as substrate for the synthesis of the more widely used Glc dinucleotides, ADPglucose or UDPglucose. In this communication, we have analyzed two Glc-1-P-related processes: the carbon flux from externally supplied Glc-1-P to starch by either mesophyll protoplasts or intact chloroplasts from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). When intact protoplasts or chloroplasts are incubated with [U-14C]Glc-1-P, starch is rapidly labeled. Incorporation into starch is unaffected by the addition of unlabeled Glc-6-P or Glc, indicating a selective flux from Glc-1-P to starch. However, illuminated protoplasts incorporate less 14C into starch when unlabeled bicarbonate is supplied in addition to the 14C-labeled Glc-1-P. Mesophyll protoplasts incubated with [U-14C]Glc-1-P incorporate 14C into the plastidial pool of adenosine diphosphoglucose. Protoplasts prepared from leaves of mutants of Arabidopsis that lack either the plastidial phosphorylase or the phosphoglucomutase isozyme incorporate 14C derived from external Glc-1-P into starch, but incorporation into starch is insignificant when protoplasts from a mutant possessing a highly reduced ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase activity are studied. Thus, the path of assimilatory starch biosynthesis initiated by extraplastidial Glc-1-P leads to the plastidial pool of adenosine diphosphoglucose, and at this intermediate it is fused with the Calvin cycle-driven route. Mutants lacking the plastidial phosphoglucomutase contain a small yet significant amount of transitory starch. PMID:21115809

  3. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 agonism attenuates lung ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Stone, Matthew L; Sharma, Ashish K; Zhao, Yunge; Charles, Eric J; Huerter, Mary E; Johnston, William F; Kron, Irving L; Lynch, Kevin R; Laubach, Victor E

    2015-06-15

    Outcomes for lung transplantation are the worst of any solid organ, and ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) limits both short- and long-term outcomes. Presently no therapeutic agents are available to prevent IRI. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) modulates immune function through binding to a set of G protein-coupled receptors (S1PR1-5). Although S1P has been shown to attenuate lung IRI, the S1P receptors responsible for protection have not been defined. The present study tests the hypothesis that protection from lung IRI is primarily mediated through S1PR1 activation. Mice were treated with either vehicle, FTY720 (a nonselective S1P receptor agonist), or VPC01091 (a selective S1PR1 agonist and S1PR3 antagonist) before left lung IR. Function, vascular permeability, cytokine expression, neutrophil infiltration, and myeloperoxidase levels were measured in lungs. After IR, both FTY720 and VPC01091 significantly improved lung function (reduced pulmonary artery pressure and increased pulmonary compliance) vs. vehicle control. In addition, FTY720 and VPC01091 significantly reduced vascular permeability, expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-17, IL-12/IL-23 p40, CC chemokine ligand-2, and TNF-α), myeloperoxidase levels, and neutrophil infiltration compared with control. No significant differences were observed between VPC01091 and FTY720 treatment groups. VPC01091 did not significantly affect elevated invariant natural killer T cell infiltration after IR, and administration of an S1PR1 antagonist reversed VPC01091-mediated protection after IR. In conclusion, VPC01091 and FTY720 provide comparable protection from lung injury and dysfunction after IR. These findings suggest that S1P-mediated protection from IRI is mediated by S1PR1 activation, independent of S1PR3, and that selective S1PR1 agonists may provide a novel therapeutic strategy to prevent lung IRI. PMID:25910934

  4. A novel lipid natriuretic factor in the renal medulla: sphingosine-1-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qing; Xia, Min; Wang, Zhengchao; Li, Pin-Lan; Li, Ningjun

    2011-07-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid metabolite formed by phosphorylation of sphingosine. S1P has been indicated to play a significant role in the cardiovascular system. It has been shown that the enzymes for S1P metabolism are expressed in the kidneys. The present study characterized the expression of S1P receptors in the kidneys and determined the role of S1P in the control of renal hemodynamics and sodium excretion. Real-time RT-PCR analyses showed that S1P receptors S1P1, S1P2, and S1P3 were most abundantly expressed in the renal medulla. Immunohistochemistry revealed that all three types of S1P receptors were mainly located in collecting ducts. Intramedullary infusion of FTY720, an S1P agonist, produced a dramatic increase in sodium excretion by twofold and a small but significant increase in medullary blood flow (16%). Administration of W146, an S1P1 antagonist, into the renal medulla blocked the effect of FTY720 and decreased the sodium excretion by 37% when infused alone. The antagonists of S1P2 and S1P3 had no effect. FTY720 produced additive natriuretic effects in combination with different sodium transporter inhibitors except amiloride, an epithelial sodium channel blocker. In the presence of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor l-NAME, FTY720 still increased sodium excretion. These data suggest that S1P produces natriuretic effects via activation of S1P1 in the renal medulla and this natriuretic effect may be through inhibition of epithelial sodium channel, which is nitric oxide independent. It is concluded that S1P is a novel diuretic factor in the renal medulla and may be an important regulator of sodium homeostasis.

  5. Sphingosine 1-phosphate signaling pathway in inner ear biology. New therapeutic strategies for hearing loss?

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Guevara, Ricardo; Cencetti, Francesca; Donati, Chiara; Bruni, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent conditions around the world, in particular among people over 60 years old. Thus, an increase of this affection is predicted as result of the aging process in our population. In this context, it is important to further explore the function of molecular targets involved in the biology of inner ear sensory cells to better individuate new candidates for therapeutic application. One of the main causes of deafness resides into the premature death of hair cells and auditory neurons. In this regard, neurotrophins and growth factors such as insulin like growth factor are known to be beneficial by favoring the survival of these cells. An elevated number of published data in the last 20 years have individuated sphingolipids not only as structural components of biological membranes but also as critical regulators of key biological processes, including cell survival. Ceramide, formed by catabolism of sphingomyelin (SM) and other complex sphingolipids, is a strong inducer of apoptotic pathway, whereas sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), generated by cleavage of ceramide to sphingosine and phosphorylation catalyzed by two distinct sphingosine kinase (SK) enzymes, stimulates cell survival. Interestingly S1P, by acting as intracellular mediator or as ligand of a family of five distinct S1P receptors (S1P1–S1P5), is a very powerful bioactive sphingolipid, capable of triggering also other diverse cellular responses such as cell migration, proliferation and differentiation, and is critically involved in the development and homeostasis of several organs and tissues. Although new interesting data have become available, the information on S1P pathway and other sphingolipids in the biology of the inner ear is limited. Nonetheless, there are several lines of evidence implicating these signaling molecules during neurogenesis in other cell populations. In this review, we discuss the role of S1P during inner ear development, also as guidance for future

  6. Sphingosine-1-phosphate is involved in the occlusive arteriopathy of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sachindra R.; Bastola, Mrigendra M.; McLendon, Jared M.; Oka, Masahiko; Fagan, Karen A.; McMurtry, Ivan F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite several advances in the pathobiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), its pathogenesis is not completely understood. Current therapy improves symptoms but has disappointing effects on survival. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a lysophospholipid synthesized by sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) and SphK2. Considering the regulatory roles of S1P in several tissues leading to vasoconstriction, inflammation, proliferation, and fibrosis, we investigated whether S1P plays a role in the pathogenesis of PAH. To test this hypothesis, we used plasma samples and lung tissue from patients with idiopathic PAH (IPAH) and the Sugen5416/hypoxia/normoxia rat model of occlusive PAH. Our study revealed an increase in the plasma concentration of S1P in patients with IPAH and in early and late stages of PAH in rats. We observed increased expression of both SphK1 and SphK2 in the remodeled pulmonary arteries of patients with IPAH and PAH rats. Exogenous S1P stimulated the proliferation of cultured rat pulmonary arterial endothelial and smooth-muscle cells. We also found that 3 weeks of treatment of late-stage PAH rats with an SphK1 inhibitor reduced the increased plasma levels of S1P and the occlusive pulmonary arteriopathy. Although inhibition of SphK1 improved cardiac index and the total pulmonary artery resistance index, it did not reduce right ventricular systolic pressure or right ventricular hypertrophy. Our study supports that S1P is involved in the pathogenesis of occlusive arteriopathy in PAH and provides further evidence that S1P signaling may be a novel therapeutic target.

  7. Origins, distribution and expression of the Duarte-2 (D2) allele of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Amanda E.; Sanders, Rebecca D.; Garza, Kerry R.; McGaha, Lee Anne; Bean, Lora J. H.; Coffee, Bradford W.; Thomas, James W.; Cutler, David J.; Kurtkaya, Natalie L.; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L.

    2009-01-01

    Duarte galactosemia is a mild to asymptomatic condition that results from partial impairment of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT). Patients with Duarte galactosemia demonstrate reduced GALT activity and carry one profoundly impaired GALT allele (G) along with a second, partially impaired GALT allele (Duarte-2, D2). Molecular studies reveal at least five sequence changes on D2 alleles: a p.N314D missense substitution, three intronic base changes and a 4 bp deletion in the 5′ proximal sequence. The four non-coding sequence changes are unique to D2. The p.N314D substitution, however, is not; it is found together with a silent polymorphism, p.L218(TTA), on functionally normal Duarte-1 alleles (D1, also called Los Angeles or LA alleles). The HapMap database reveals that p.N314D is a common human variant, and cross-species comparisons implicate D314 as the ancestral allele. The p.N314D substitution is also functionally neutral in mammalian cell and yeast expression studies. In contrast, the 4 bp 5′ deletion characteristic of D2 alleles appears to be functionally impaired in reporter gene transfection studies. Here we present allele-specific qRT–PCR evidence that D2 alleles express less mRNA in vivo than their wild-type counterparts; the difference is small but statistically significant. Furthermore, we characterize the prevalence of the 4 bp deletion in GG, NN and DG populations; the deletion appears exclusive to D2 alleles. Combined, these data strongly implicate the 4 bp 5′ deletion as a causal mutation in Duarte galactosemia and suggest that direct tests for this deletion, as proposed here, could enhance or supplant current tests, which define D2 alleles on the basis of the presence and absence of linked coding sequence polymorphisms. PMID:19224951

  8. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Induces the Migration and Angiogenesis of Epcs Through the Akt Signaling Pathway via Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor 3/Platelet-Derived Growth Factor Receptor-β.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hang; Cai, Ke-Yin; Li, Wei; Huang, Hao

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a fundamental role in neoangiogenesis and tumor angiogenesis. Through the sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 3 (S1PR3), sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) can stimulate the functional capacity of EPCs. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-beta (PDGFR-β) contributes to the migration and angiogenesis of EPCs. This study aimed to investigate whether S1P induces the migration and angiogenesis of EPCs through the S1PR3/PDGFR-β/Akt signaling pathway. We used the Transwell system and the Chemicon In Vitro Angiogenesis Assay Kit with CAY10444 (an S1PR3 antagonist), AG1295 (a PDGFR kinase inhibitor) and sc-221226 (an Akt inhibitor) to examine the role of the S1PR3/PDGFR-β/Akt pathway in the S1Pinduced migration and angiogenesis of EPCs.

  9. Synthesis and Physicochemical Characterization of D-Tagatose-1-phosphate: The Substrate of the Tagatose-1-Phosphate Kinase TagK in the PTS-mediated D-Tagatose Catabolic Pathway of Bacillus licheniformis

    PubMed Central

    Van der Heiden, Edwige; Delmarcelle, Michaël; Simon, Patricia; Counson, Melody; Galleni, Moreno; Freedberg, Darón I.; Thompson, John; Joris, Bernard; Battistel, Marcos D.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first enzymatic synthesis of D-tagatose-1-phosphate (Tag-1P) by the multi-component PEP-dependent:tag-PTS present in tagatose-grown cells of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Physicochemical characterization by 31P and 1H NMR spectroscopy reveals that, in solution, this derivative is primarily in the pyranose form. Tag-1P was used to characterize the putative tagatose-1-phosphate kinase (TagK) of the Bacillus licheniformis PTS-mediated D-Tagatose catabolic Pathway (Bli-TagP). For this purpose, a soluble protein fusion was obtained with the 6 His-tagged trigger factor (TFHis6) of Escherichia coli. The active fusion enzyme was named TagK-TFHis6. Tag-1P and D-fructose-1-phosphate (Fru-1P) are substrates for the TagK-TFHis6 enzyme, whereas the isomeric derivatives D-tagatose-6-phosphate (Tag-6P) and D-fructose-6-phosphate (Fru-6P) are inhibitors. Studies of catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) reveal that the enzyme specificity is markedly in favor of Tag-1P as substrate. Importantly, we show in vivo that the transfer of the phosphate moiety from PEP to the B. licheniformis tagatose-specific enzyme II (EIITag) in E.coli is inefficient. The capability of the PTS general cytoplasmic components of B. subtilis, HPr and EI, to restore the phosphate transfer is demonstrated. PMID:26159072

  10. Sphingosine-1-phosphate mediates epidermal growth factor-induced muscle satellite cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, Yosuke Ohashi, Kazuya; Wada, Eiji; Yuasa, Yuki; Shiozuka, Masataka; Nonomura, Yoshiaki; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2014-08-01

    Skeletal muscle can regenerate repeatedly due to the presence of resident stem cells, called satellite cells. Because satellite cells are usually quiescent, they must be activated before participating in muscle regeneration in response to stimuli such as injury, overloading, and stretch. Although satellite cell activation is a crucial step in muscle regeneration, little is known of the molecular mechanisms controlling this process. Recent work showed that the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) plays crucial roles in the activation, proliferation, and differentiation of muscle satellite cells. We investigated the role of growth factors in S1P-mediated satellite cell activation. We found that epidermal growth factor (EGF) in combination with insulin induced proliferation of quiescent undifferentiated mouse myoblast C2C12 cells, which are also known as reserve cells, in serum-free conditions. Sphingosine kinase activity increased when reserve cells were stimulated with EGF. Treatment of reserve cells with the D-erythro-N,N-dimethylsphingosine, Sphingosine Kinase Inhibitor, or siRNA duplexes specific for sphingosine kinase 1, suppressed EGF-induced C2C12 activation. We also present the evidence showing the S1P receptor S1P2 is involved in EGF-induced reserve cell activation. Moreover, we demonstrated a combination of insulin and EGF promoted activation of satellite cells on single myofibers in a manner dependent on SPHK and S1P2. Taken together, our observations show that EGF-induced satellite cell activation is mediated by S1P and its receptor. - Highlights: • EGF in combination with insulin induces proliferation of quiescent C2C12 cells. • Sphingosine kinase activity increases when reserve cells are stimulated with EGF. • EGF-induced activation of reserve cells is dependent on sphingosine kinase and ERK. • The S1P receptor S1P2 is involved in EGF-induced reserve cell activation. • EGF-induced reserve cell activation is mediated by S1P and its

  11. Pseudomonas-derived ceramidase induces production of inflammatory mediators from human keratinocytes via sphingosine-1-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Oizumi, Ami; Nakayama, Hitoshi; Okino, Nozomu; Iwahara, Chihiro; Kina, Katsunari; Matsumoto, Ryo; Ogawa, Hideoki; Takamori, Kenji; Ito, Makoto; Suga, Yasushi; Iwabuchi, Kazuhisa

    2014-01-01

    Ceramide is important for water retention and permeability barrier functions in the stratum corneum, and plays a key role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD). A Pseudomonas aeruginosa-derived neutral ceramidase (PaCDase) isolated from a patient with AD was shown to effectively degrade ceramide in the presence of Staphylococcus aureus-derived lipids or neutral detergents. However, the effect of ceramide metabolites on the functions of differentiating keratinocytes is poorly understood. We found that the ceramide metabolite sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) stimulated the production of inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α and IL-8 from three-dimensionally cultured human primary keratinocytes (termed "3D keratinocytes"), which form a stratum corneum. PaCDase alone did not affect TNF-α gene expression in 3D keratinocytes. In the presence of the detergent Triton X-100, which damages stratum corneum structure, PaCDase, but not heat-inactivated PaCDase or PaCDase-inactive mutant, induced the production of TNF-α, endothelin-1, and IL-8, indicating that this production was dependent on ceramidase activity. Among various ceramide metabolites, sphingosine and S1P enhanced the gene expression of TNF-α, endothelin-1, and IL-8. The PaCDase-enhanced expression of these genes was inhibited by a sphingosine kinase inhibitor and by an S1P receptor antagonist VPC 23019. The TNF-α-binding antibody infliximab suppressed the PaCDase-induced upregulation of IL-8, but not TNF-α, mRNA. PaCDase induced NF-κB p65 phosphorylation. The NF-κB inhibitor curcumin significantly inhibited PaCDase-induced expression of IL-8 and endothelin-1. VPC 23019 and infliximab inhibited PaCDase-induced NF-κB p65 phosphorylation and reduction in the protein level of the NF-κB inhibitor IκBα. Collectively, these findings suggest that (i) 3D keratinocytes produce S1P from sphingosine, which is produced through the hydrolysis of ceramide by PaCDase, (ii) S1P induces the production of TNF-α via S

  12. Electrophysiological and functional effects of sphingosine-1-phosphate in mouse ventricular fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Benamer, Najate; Bois, Patrick

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} In cardiac fibroblasts, SUR2/Kir6.1 channel is activated by S1P via the S1P3R. {yields} S1P increases cell proliferation through SUR2/Kir6.1 activation. {yields} S1P decreases collagen and IL-6 secretion through SUR2/Kir6.1 activation. {yields} S1P stimulates fibroblast migration independently from SUR2/Kir6.1 channel. -- Abstract: The aim of this study was to characterize the effects of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) on cardiac ventricular fibroblasts. Impacts of S1P on fibroblast excitability, cell migration, proliferation and secretion were characterized. The patch-clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration was used to study the S1P-induced current from mouse ventricular fibroblasts. The expression level of the S1P receptor during cell culture duration was evaluated by western-blot. Fibroblast proliferation and migration were quantified using the methylene blue assay and the Boyden chamber technique, respectively. Finally, fibroblast secretion properties were estimated by quantification of the IL-6 and collagen levels using ELISA and SIRCOL collagen assays, respectively. We found that S1P activated SUR2/Kir6.1 channel and that this effect was sensitive to specific inhibition of the S1P receptor of type 3 (S1P3R). In contrast, S1P1R receptor inhibition had no effect. Moreover, the S1P-induced current increased with cell culture duration whereas S1P3R expression level remained constant. The activation of SUR2/Kir6.1 channel by S1P via S1P3R stimulated cell proliferation and decreased IL-6 and collagen secretions. S1P also stimulated fibroblast migration via S1P3R but independently from SUR2/Kir6.1 channel activation. This study demonstrates that S1P, via S1P3R, affects cardiac ventricular fibroblasts function independently or through activation of SUR2/Kir6.1 channel. The latter effect occurs after fibroblasts differentiate into myofibroblasts, opening a new potential therapeutic strategy to modulate fibrosis after cardiac

  13. Genetics of the ceramide/sphingosine-1-phosphate rheostat in blood pressure regulation and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    network using the epistatic values revealed that only 17% of the interactions detected were in the direct metabolic pathway, the remaining jumping one or more intermediates. Conclusions This study established the components of the ceramide/sphingosine-1-phosphate rheostat as central to blood pressure regulation. The results in addition confirm that epistasis is of paramount importance and is most conspicuous in the regulation of the rheostat network. Finally, it is shown that applying a simple case-control approach with single gene association analysis is bound to fail, short of identifying a few potential genes with small effects. PMID:21569466

  14. Functional variants of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 gene associate with asthma susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoguang; Ma, Shwu-Fan; Wade, Michael S.; Flores, Carlos; Pino-Yanes, Maria; Moitra, Jaideep; Ober, Carole; Kittles, Rick; Husain, Aliya N.; Ford, Jean G.; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2012-01-01

    Background The genetic mechanisms underlying asthma remain unclear. Increased permeability of the microvasculature is a feature of asthma and the sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor, S1PR1, is an essential participant regulating lung vascular integrity and responses to lung inflammation. Objective We explored the contribution of polymorphisms in the S1PR1 gene (S1PR1) to asthma susceptibility. Methods A combination of gene re-sequencing for SNP discovery, case-control association, functional evaluation of associated SNPs, and protein immunochemistry studies was utilized. Results Immunohistochemistry studies demonstrated significantly decreased S1PR1 protein expression in pulmonary vessels in asthmatic lungs compared to non-asthmatic individuals (p<0.05). Direct DNA sequencing of 27 multiethnic samples identified 39 S1PR1 variants (18 novel SNPs). Association studies were performed based on genotyping results from cosmopolitan tagging SNPs in three case-control cohorts from Chicago and New York totaling 1061 subjects (502 cases and 559 controls). Promoter SNP rs2038366 (−1557G/T) was found to be associated with asthma (p=0.03) in European Americans. In African Americans, an association was found for both asthma and severe asthma for intronic SNP rs3753194 (c.−164+170A/G) (p=0.006 and p=0.040, respectively) and for promoter SNP rs59317557 (−532C/G) with severe asthma (p=0.028). Consistent with predicted in silico functionality, alleles of promoter SNPs rs2038366 (−1557G/T) and rs59317557 (−532C/G) influenced the activity of a luciferase S1PR1 reporter vector in transfected endothelial cells exposed to growth factors (EGF, PDGF, VEGF) known to be increased in asthmatic airways. Conclusion These data provide strong support for a role for S1PR1 gene variants in asthma susceptibility and severity. Clinical Implications Our results indicate S1PR1 is a novel asthma candidate gene and an attractive target for future therapeutic strategies. Capsule summary This study

  15. Heterologous desensitization of the sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors by purinoceptor activation in renal mesangial cells

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Cuiyan; Ren, Shuyu; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Huwiler, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is considered a potent mitogen for mesangial cells and activates the classical mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade via S1P receptors. In this study, we show that S1P signalling is rapidly desensitized upon S1P receptor activation. A complete loss of S1P sensitivity occurs after 10 min of S1P pretreatment and remains for at least 8 h. A similar desensitization is also seen with the S1P mimetic FTY720-phosphate, but not with the nonphosphorylated FTY720, nor with sphingosine or ceramide. Prestimulating the cells with extracellular ATP or UTP, which bind to and activate P2Y receptors on mesangial cells, a similar rapid desensitization of the S1P receptor occurs, suggesting a heterologous desensitization of S1P receptors by P2Y receptor activation. Furthermore, adenosine binding to P1 receptors triggers a similar desensitization. In contrast, two other growth factors, PDGF-BB and TGFβ2, have no significant effect on S1P-induced MAPK activation. S1P also triggers increased inositol trisphosphate (IP3) formation, which is completely abolished by S1P pretreatment but only partially by ATP pretreatment, suggesting that IP3 formation and MAPK activation stimulated by S1P involve different receptor subtypes. Increasing intracellular cAMP levels by forskolin pretreatment has a similar effect on desensitization as adenosine. Moreover, a selective A3 adenosine receptor agonist, which couples to phospholipase C and increases IP3 formation, exerted a similar effect. Pretreatment of cells with various protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors prior to ATP prestimulation and subsequent S1P stimulation leads to a differential reversal of the ATP effect. Whereas the broad-spectrum protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine potently reverses the effect, the PKC-α inhibitor CGP41251, the PKC-δ inhibitor rottlerin and calphostin C show only a partial reversal at maximal concentrations. Suramin, which is reported as a selective S1P3 receptor antagonist

  16. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor activation enhances BMP-2-induced osteoblast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Chieri; Iwasaki, Tsuyoshi; Kitano, Sachie; Tsunemi, Sachi; Sano, Hajime

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the role of S1P signaling for osteoblast differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both S1P and FTY enhanced BMP-2-stimulated osteoblast differentiation by C2C12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P signaling enhanced BMP-2-stimulated Smad and ERK phosphorylation by C2C12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MEK/ERK signaling is a pathway underlying S1P signaling for osteoblast differentiation. -- Abstract: We previously demonstrated that sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor-mediated signaling induced proliferation and prostaglandin productions by synovial cells from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. In the present study we investigated the role of S1P receptor-mediated signaling for osteoblast differentiation. We investigated osteoblast differentiation using C2C12 myoblasts, a cell line derived from murine satellite cells. Osteoblast differentiation was induced by the treatment of bone morphogenic protein (BMP)-2 in the presence or absence of either S1P or FTY720 (FTY), a high-affinity agonist of S1P receptors. Osteoblast differentiation was determined by osteoblast-specific transcription factor, Runx2 mRNA expression, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteocalcin production by the cells. Smad1/5/8 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation was examined by Western blotting. Osteocalcin production by C2C12 cells were determined by ELISA. Runx2 expression and ALP activity by BMP-2-stimulated C2C12 cells were enhanced by addition of either S1P or FTY. Both S1P and FTY enhanced BMP-2-induced ERK1/2 and Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation. The effect of FTY was stronger than that of S1P. S1P receptor-mediated signaling on osteoblast differentiation was inhibited by addition of mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase (MEK) 1/2 inhibitor, indicating that the S1P receptor-mediated MEK1/2-ERK1/2 signaling pathway enhanced BMP-2-Smad signaling. These results indicate that S1P

  17. MECHANISMS OF SPHINGOSINE-1-PHOSPHATE INDUCED AKT DEPENDENT SMOOTH MUSCLE CELL MIGRATION

    PubMed Central

    Roztocil, Elisa; Nicholl, Suzanne M.; Davies, Mark G.

    2008-01-01

    Background Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S-1-P) is a bioactive sphingolipid released from activated platelets, which stimulates migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in vitro. S-1-P will activate akt, which can regulate multiple cellular functions including cell migration. Akt activation is downstream of phosphatidyl-inositol 3′ kinase (PI3-K) and Phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1). Objective To examine the regulation of akt signaling during smooth muscle cell migration in response to S-1-P. Methods Murine arterial SMCs were cultured in vitro. Linear wound and Boyden microchemotaxis assays of migration were performed in the presence of S-1-P with and without an akt inhibitor (aktI). Assays were performed for PI3-K, PDK1, akt and GSK3β activation in the presence of various inhibitors and after transfection with the Gβγ inhibitor. βARKCT. Results S-1-P induced time dependent PI3-K, PDK1 and akt activation. The migratory responses in both assays to S-1-P were blocked by akt inhibitor (aktI). Activation of akt and dephosphorylation of its downstream kinase, GSK3 β, were inhibited by aktI. Inhibition of PI3-K with LY294002 significantly reduced both PI3-K and akt activation. Inhibition of G βγ inhibited akt activation through a reduction in both PI3-K and PDK1 activation. While inhibition of the ras with manumycin A had no effect, inhibition of rho with C3 limited both PI3K and akt activation. PDK1 responses were unchanged by inhibition of GTPases. Inhibition of reactive oxygen species generation with N-acetylcysteine and of EGFR with AG1478 inhibited PDK1 activation in response to S-1-P. Conclusion S-1-P mediated migration is akt dependent. S-1-P mediated akt phosphorylation is controlled by G βγ dependent, PI3-K activation, which requires the GTPase rho and Gβγ. PDK1 activation requires Gβγ reactive oxygen species generation and EGFR activation. PMID:19081473

  18. Glucose 1-phosphate is efficiently taken up by potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber parenchyma cells and converted to reserve starch granules.

    PubMed

    Fettke, Joerg; Albrecht, Tanja; Hejazi, Mahdi; Mahlow, Sebastian; Nakamura, Yasunori; Steup, Martin

    2010-02-01

    Reserve starch is an important plant product but the actual biosynthetic process is not yet fully understood. Potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber discs from various transgenic plants were used to analyse the conversion of external sugars or sugar derivatives to starch. By using in vitro assays, a direct glucosyl transfer from glucose 1-phosphate to native starch granules as mediated by recombinant plastidial phosphorylase was analysed. Compared with labelled glucose, glucose 6-phosphate or sucrose, tuber discs converted externally supplied [(14)C]glucose 1-phosphate into starch at a much higher rate. Likewise, tuber discs from transgenic lines with a strongly reduced expression of cytosolic phosphoglucomutase, phosphorylase or transglucosidase converted glucose 1-phosphate to starch with the same or even an increased rate compared with the wild-type. Similar results were obtained with transgenic potato lines possessing a strongly reduced activity of both the cytosolic and the plastidial phosphoglucomutase. Starch labelling was, however, significantly diminished in transgenic lines, with a reduced concentration of the plastidial phosphorylase isozymes. Two distinct paths of reserve starch biosynthesis are proposed that explain, at a biochemical level, the phenotype of several transgenic plant lines.

  19. Characterization of the highly active fragment of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene promoter for recombinant protein expression in Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chaomin; Zheng, Liesheng; Zhu, Jihong; Chen, Liguo; Ma, Aimin

    2015-03-01

    Developing efficient native promoters is important for improving recombinant protein expression by fungal genetic engineering. The promoter region of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene in Pleurotus ostreatus (Pogpd) was isolated and optimized by upstream truncation. The activities of these promoters with different lengths were further confirmed by fluorescence, quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. A truncated Pogpd-P2 fragment (795 bp) drove enhanced green fluorescence protein (egfp) gene expression in P. ostreatus much more efficiently than full-length Pogpd-P1. Further truncating Pogpd-P2 to 603, 403 and 231 bp reduced the eGFP expression significantly. However, the 403-bp fragment between -356 bp and the start codon was the minimal but sufficient promoter element for eGFP expression. Compact native promoters for genetic engineering of P. ostreatus were successfully developed and validated in this study. This will broaden the preexisting repertoire of fungal promoters for biotechnology application. PMID:25743073

  20. Mutagenesis of squash (Cucurbita moschata) glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) to produce an enzyme with altered substrate selectivity.

    PubMed

    Hayman, M W; Fawcett, T; Schierer, T F; Simon, J W; Kroon, J T; Gilroy, J S; Rice, D W; Rafferty, J; Turnbull, A P; Sedelnikova, S E; Slabas, A R

    2000-12-01

    In an attempt to rationalize the relationship between structure and substrate selectivity of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT, 1AT, EC 2.3.1.15) we have cloned a number of cDNAs into the pET overexpression system using a PCR-based approach. Following assay of the recombinant enzyme we noted that the substrate selectivity of the squash (Cucurbita moschata) enzyme had altered dramatically. This form of GPAT has now been crystallized and its full three-dimensional structure elucidated. Since we now have two forms of the enzyme that display different substrate selectivities this should provide a powerful tool to determine the basis of the selectivity changes. Kinetic and structural analyses are currently being performed to rationalize the changes which have taken place.

  1. Over-expression of PsGPD, a mushroom glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene, enhances salt tolerance in rice plants.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jung-Il; Lim, Hye-Min; Siddiqui, Zamin Shaheed; Park, Sung-Han; Kim, A-Ram; Kwon, Taek-Ryoun; Lee, Seong-Kon; Park, Soo-Chul; Jeong, Mi-Jeong; Lee, Gang-Seob

    2014-08-01

    Transgenic potatoes expressing glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD), isolated from the oyster mushroom, Pleurotus sajor-caju, had increased tolerance to salt stress (Jeong et al. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 278:192-196, 2000). To examine the physiological mechanisms enhancing salt tolerance in GPD-transgenic rice plants, the salt tolerance of five GPD transgenic rice lines (T1-T5) derived from Dongjin rice cultivar were evaluated in a fixed 150 mM saline environment in comparison to two known wild-type rice cultivars, Dongjin (salt sensitive) and Pokali (salt tolerant). Transgenic lines, T2, T3, and T5, had a substantial increase in biomass and relative water content compared to Dongjin. Stomatal conductance and osmotic potential were higher in the GPD transgenic lines and were similar to those in Pokali. The results are discussed based on the comparative physiological response of GPD transgenic lines with those of the salt-sensitive and salt-tolerant rice cultivars.

  2. A novel glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) promoter for expressing transgenes in the halotolerant alga Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yanlong; Li, Shenke; Allen, George; Feng, Shuying; Xue, Lexun

    2012-05-01

    A major challenge for efficient transgene expression in Dunaliella salina is to find strong endogenous promoters to drive the transgene expression. In the present study, a novel glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) promoter was cloned and used to drive expressions of the bialaphos resistance (bar) gene and of the N-terminal fragment of human canstatin (Can-N). The results showed that the bar gene was transcribed by the GAPDH promoter and integrated into the genome of the transformants of D. salina. Furthermore, the PCR identification, Southern and western blots indicated that Can-N was expressed in transgenic D. salina, demonstrating that the promoter of the D. salina GAPDH gene is suitable for driving expression of heterologous genes in transgenic D. salina.

  3. Homocysteine induces glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase acetylation and apoptosis in the neuroblastoma cell line Neuro2a.

    PubMed

    Fang, M; Jin, A; Zhao, Y; Liu, X

    2016-02-01

    High plasma levels of homocysteine (Hcy) promote the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the mechanism by which Hcy mediates neurotoxicity has not been elucidated. We observed that upon incubation with Hcy, the viability of a neuroblastoma cell line Neuro2a declined in a dose-dependent manner, and apoptosis was induced within 48 h. The median effective concentration (EC50) of Hcy was approximately 5 mM. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) nuclear translocation and acylation has been implicated in the regulation of apoptosis. We found that nuclear translocation and acetylation of GAPDH increased in the presence of 5 mM Hcy and that higher levels of acetyltransferase p300/CBP were detected in Neuro2a cells. These findings implicate the involvement of GAPDH in the mechanism whereby Hcy induces apoptosis in neurons. This study highlights a potentially important pathway in neurodegenerative disorders, and a novel target pathway for neuroprotective therapy. PMID:26785692

  4. Homocysteine induces glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase acetylation and apoptosis in the neuroblastoma cell line Neuro2a

    PubMed Central

    Fang, M.; Jin, A.; Zhao, Y.; Liu, X.

    2016-01-01

    High plasma levels of homocysteine (Hcy) promote the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the mechanism by which Hcy mediates neurotoxicity has not been elucidated. We observed that upon incubation with Hcy, the viability of a neuroblastoma cell line Neuro2a declined in a dose-dependent manner, and apoptosis was induced within 48 h. The median effective concentration (EC50) of Hcy was approximately 5 mM. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) nuclear translocation and acylation has been implicated in the regulation of apoptosis. We found that nuclear translocation and acetylation of GAPDH increased in the presence of 5 mM Hcy and that higher levels of acetyltransferase p300/CBP were detected in Neuro2a cells. These findings implicate the involvement of GAPDH in the mechanism whereby Hcy induces apoptosis in neurons. This study highlights a potentially important pathway in neurodegenerative disorders, and a novel target pathway for neuroprotective therapy. PMID:26785692

  5. The sweet side of RNA regulation: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase as a noncanonical RNA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    White, Michael R; Garcin, Elsa D

    2016-01-01

    The glycolytic protein, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), has a vast array of extraglycolytic cellular functions, including interactions with nucleic acids. GAPDH has been implicated in the translocation of transfer RNA (tRNA), the regulation of cellular messenger RNA (mRNA) stability and translation, as well as the regulation of replication and gene expression of many single-stranded RNA viruses. A growing body of evidence supports GAPDH-RNA interactions serving as part of a larger coordination between intermediary metabolism and RNA biogenesis. Despite the established role of GAPDH in nucleic acid regulation, it is still unclear how and where GAPDH binds to its RNA targets, highlighted by the absence of any conserved RNA-binding sequences. This review will summarize our current understanding of GAPDH-mediated regulation of RNA function. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:53-70. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1315 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  6. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase augments the intercellular transmission and toxicity of polyglutamine aggregates in a cell model of Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Mikhaylova, Elena R; Lazarev, Vladimir F; Nikotina, Alina D; Margulis, Boris A; Guzhova, Irina V

    2016-03-01

    The common feature of Huntington disease is the accumulation of oligomers or aggregates of mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT), which causes the death of a subset of striatal neuronal populations. The cytotoxic species can leave neurons and migrate to other groups of cells penetrating and damaging them in a prion-like manner. We hypothesized that the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), previously shown to elevate the aggregation of mHTT, is associated with an increased efficiency of intercellular propagation of mHTT. GAPDH, on its own or together with polyglutamine species, was shown to be released into the extracellular milieu mainly from dying cells as assessed by a novel enzyme immunoassay, western blotting, and ultrafiltration. The conditioned medium of cells with growing GAPDH-polyQ aggregates was toxic to naïve cells, whereas depletion of the aggregates from the medium lowered this cytotoxicity. The GAPDH component of the aggregates was found to increase their toxicity by two-fold in comparison with polyQ alone. Furthermore, GAPDH-polyQ complexes were shown to penetrate acceptor cells and to increase the capacity of polyQ to prionize its intracellular homolog containing a repeat of 25 glutamine residues. Finally, inhibitors of intracellular transport showed that polyQ-GAPDH complexes, as well as GAPDH itself, penetrated cells using clathrin-mediated endocytosis. This suggested a pivotal role of the enzyme in the intercellular transmission of Huntington disease pathogenicity. In conclusion, GAPDH occurring in complexes with polyglutamine strengthens the prion-like activity and toxicity of the migrating aggregates. Aggregating polygluatmine tracts were shown to release from the cells over-expressing mutant huntingtin in a complex with glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). The enzyme enhances the intracellular transport of aggregates to healthy cells, prionization of normal cellular proteins and finally cell death, thus

  7. Citrin/mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase double knock-out mice recapitulate features of human citrin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Saheki, Takeyori; Iijima, Mikio; Li, Meng Xian; Kobayashi, Keiko; Horiuchi, Masahisa; Ushikai, Miharu; Okumura, Fumihiko; Meng, Xiao Jian; Inoue, Ituro; Tajima, Atsushi; Moriyama, Mitsuaki; Eto, Kazuhiro; Kadowaki, Takashi; Sinasac, David S; Tsui, Lap-Chee; Tsuji, Mihoko; Okano, Akira; Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi

    2007-08-24

    Citrin is the liver-type mitochondrial aspartate-glutamate carrier that participates in urea, protein, and nucleotide biosynthetic pathways by supplying aspartate from mitochondria to the cytosol. Citrin also plays a role in transporting cytosolic NADH reducing equivalents into mitochondria as a component of the malate-aspartate shuttle. In humans, loss-of-function mutations in the SLC25A13 gene encoding citrin cause both adult-onset type II citrullinemia and neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis, collectively referred to as human citrin deficiency. Citrin knock-out mice fail to display features of human citrin deficiency. Based on the hypothesis that an enhanced glycerol phosphate shuttle activity may be compensating for the loss of citrin function in the mouse, we have generated mice with a combined disruption of the genes for citrin and mitochondrial glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. The resulting double knock-out mice demonstrated citrullinemia, hyperammonemia that was further elevated by oral sucrose administration, hypoglycemia, and a fatty liver, all features of human citrin deficiency. An increased hepatic lactate/pyruvate ratio in the double knock-out mice compared with controls was also further elevated by the oral sucrose administration, suggesting that an altered cytosolic NADH/NAD(+) ratio is closely associated with the hyperammonemia observed. Microarray analyses identified over 100 genes that were differentially expressed in the double knock-out mice compared with wild-type controls, revealing genes potentially involved in compensatory or downstream effects of the combined mutations. Together, our data indicate that the more severe phenotype present in the citrin/mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase double knock-out mice represents a more accurate model of human citrin deficiency than citrin knock-out mice.

  8. Fluorimetric analysis of the binding characteristics of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase with substrates in Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yu; Xu, Hui; Xie, Li; Yi, Yi; Yu, Yingpeng; Feng, Shunli; Qiao, Dairong; Cao, Yi

    2014-09-01

    A general model of the catalytic mechanism for 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPs) has already been proposed. But whether shikimate-3-phosphate (S3P) alone can cause EPSPs' conformation changes, and whether the binding site of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and glyphosate is the same are still in debate. In this paper, DsaroA gene amplified and cloned from Dunaliella salina (our laboratory's early study) was used for DsEPSPs expression and purification. Then the DsEPSP conformation changes as it bind with different substrates were detected by fluorimetry. The results show that we obtained the DsEPSPs by prokaryotic expression and purification, and the S3P binding with DsEPSPs alone cannot cause DsEPSPs to form "close" conformation directly. However, when S3P exits, DsEPSPs did have a trend to change to the "close" conformation. Then the "close" conformation can be formed completely with the addition of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) or glyphosate. The inorganic phosphorus can help S3P to induce two domains of DsEPSPs to form "close" conformation. Besides, when DsEPSPs binds with S3P, in 295 nm, only the intensity of emission peak decreases, however, in 280 nm, not only the peak intensity reduces but also the blue-shift phenomenon takes place. The reason for blue-shift phenomenon was the distribution of aromatic amino acids in EPSPs. EPSPs is a good target for novel antibiotics and herbicides, because of shikimic acid pathway is only present in plants and microorganisms, completely absent in mammals, fish, birds, reptiles, and insects. The results demonstrate that the binding of substrates to EPSPs causes a conformational change from an open form to a closed form, that might be important for designing of novel antimicrobial and herbicidal agents that block closure of the enzyme.

  9. Effects of salinities on the gene expression of a (NAD+)-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Lao, Yong-Min; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2011-03-01

    Glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3pdh) is a key enzyme in the pathway of glycerol synthesis, which converts dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) to glycerol-3-phosphate. In this study, the effects of salinity changes on variation of cell shape and single cell glycerol content of Dunaliella salina were observed, and the effects of salinity changes on the gene expressions of a (NAD+)-dependent G3pdh (EC1.1.1.8) among G3pdh isozymes in D. salina were detected by real-time quantitative PCR. Results showed that the changes of shape and volume of D. salina cell cultured chronically at various salinities were minor, but when the salinity was changed rapidly, the variations of cell shape and cell volume of D. salina were significant, which were recovered basically after 2h except treating by high salinity. Also, it was found some lipid globules in the surface of D. salina cells when the salinity increased from 2.0 to 4.0-5.0 M NaCl rapidly. When D. salina was cultured chronically at various salinities, the accumulation of single cell glycerol increased with increased salinity, and D. salina also could rapidly decrease or increase single cell glycerol contents to adapt to hypoosmotic or hyperosmotic shock. The expression level of G3pdh in D. salina grown at various salinities was significantly inversely correlated to the salinity, but there was no significant correlation between the expression level of G3pdh and salinity after 2 h of treatment by hyperosmotic or hypoosmotic shock.

  10. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor-1 Selective Agonist Enhances Collateral Growth and Protects against Subsequent Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ichijo, Masahiko; Ishibashi, Satoru; Li, Fuying; Yui, Daishi; Miki, Kazunori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Yokota, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Collateral growth after acute occlusion of an intracranial artery is triggered by increasing shear stress in preexisting collateral pathways. Recently, sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-1 (S1PR1) on endothelial cells was reported to be essential in sensing fluid shear stress. Here, we evaluated the expression of S1PR1 in the hypoperfused mouse brain and investigated the effect of a selective S1PR1 agonist on leptomeningeal collateral growth and subsequent ischemic damage after focal ischemia. Methods In C57Bl/6 mice (n = 133) subjected to unilateral common carotid occlusion (CCAO) and sham surgery. The first series examined the time course of collateral growth, cell proliferation, and S1PR1 expression in the leptomeningeal arteries after CCAO. The second series examined the relationship between pharmacological regulation of S1PR1 and collateral growth of leptomeningeal anastomoses. Animals were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: LtCCAO and daily intraperitoneal (ip) injection for 7 days of an S1PR1 selective agonist (SEW2871, 5 mg/kg/day); sham surgery and daily ip injection for 7 days of SEW2871 after surgery; LtCCAO and daily ip injection for 7 days of SEW2871 and an S1PR1 inverse agonist (VPC23019, 0.5 mg/kg); LtCCAO and daily ip injection of DMSO for 7 days after surgery; and sham surgery and daily ip injection of DMSO for 7 days. Leptomeningeal anastomoses were visualized 14 days after LtCCAO by latex perfusion method, and a set of animals underwent subsequent permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) 7days after the treatment termination. Neurological functions 1hour, 1, 4, and 7days and infarction volume 7days after pMCAO were evaluated. Results In parallel with the increase in S1PR1 mRNA levels, S1PR1 expression colocalized with endothelial cell markers in the leptomeningeal arteries, increased markedly on the side of the CCAO, and peaked 7 days after CCAO. Mitotic cell numbers in the leptomeningeal arteries

  11. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of an NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Helicobacter pylori

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Paul R.; Evans, Daniel; Greenwood, Jacqueline A.; Moody, Peter C. E.

    2008-08-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase A has been cloned, expressed and purified. Apoprotein crystals have been grown which diffracted to 1.75 Å resolution and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}; holo crystals were grown in the presence of NADP, diffracted to 2.6 Å resolution and belonged to space group P3{sub 2}. The classical glycolytic pathway contains an NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, with NADP-dependent forms reserved for photosynthetic organisms and archaea. Here, the cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of an NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Helicobacter pylori is reported; crystals of the protein were grown both in the presence and the absence of NADP.

  12. Synergy between Sphingosine 1-Phosphate and Lipopolysaccharide Signaling Promotes an Inflammatory, Angiogenic and Osteogenic Response in Human Aortic Valve Interstitial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Onecha, Esther; Maeso, Patricia; Crespo, Mariano Sánchez; Román, José Alberto San; García-Rodríguez, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Given that the bioactive lipid sphingosine 1-phosphate is involved in cardiovascular pathophysiology, and since lipid accumulation and inflammation are hallmarks of calcific aortic stenosis, the role of sphingosine 1-phosphate on the pro-inflammatory/pro-osteogenic pathways in human interstitial cells from aortic and pulmonary valves was investigated. Real-time PCR showed sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor expression in aortic valve interstitial cells. Exposure of cells to sphingosine 1-phosphate induced pro-inflammatory responses characterized by interleukin-6, interleukin-8, and cyclooxygenase-2 up-regulations, as observed by ELISA and Western blot. Strikingly, cell treatment with sphingosine 1-phosphate plus lipopolysaccharide resulted in the synergistic induction of cyclooxygenase-2, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1, as well as the secretion of prostaglandin E2, the soluble form of the intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and the pro-angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor-A. Remarkably, the synergistic effect was significantly higher in aortic valve interstitial cells from stenotic than control valves, and was drastically lower in cells from pulmonary valves, which rarely undergo stenosis. siRNA and pharmacological analysis revealed the involvement of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors 1/3 and Toll-like receptor-4, and downstream signaling through p38/MAPK, protein kinase C, and NF-κB. As regards pro-osteogenic pathways, sphingosine 1-phosphate induced calcium deposition and the expression of the calcification markers bone morphogenetic protein-2 and alkaline phosphatase, and enhanced the effect of lipopolysaccharide, an effect that was partially blocked by inhibition of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors 3/2 signaling. In conclusion, the interplay between sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors and Toll-like receptor 4 signaling leads to a cooperative up-regulation of inflammatory, angiogenic, and osteogenic pathways in aortic valve interstitial cells

  13. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (GAPOR) and nonphosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPN), key enzymes of the respective modified Embden-Meyerhof pathways in the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeota Pyrobaculum aerophilum and Aeropyrum pernix.

    PubMed

    Reher, Matthias; Gebhard, Susanne; Schönheit, Peter

    2007-08-01

    The growth of Pyrobaculum aerophilum on yeast extract and nitrate was stimulated by the addition of maltose. Extracts of maltose/yeast extract/nitrate-grown cells contained all enzyme activities of a modified Embden-Meyerhof (EM) pathway, including ATP-dependent glucokinase, phosphoglucose isomerase, ATP-dependent 6-phosphofructokinase, fructose-1,6-phosphate aldolase, triose-phosphate isomerase, GAPOR, phosphoglycerate mutase, enolase and pyruvate kinase. The activity of GAPOR was stimulated about fourfold by maltose, indicating a role in sugar degradation. GAPOR was purified 200-fold to homogeneity and characterized as a 67 kDa monomeric, extremely thermostable protein. The enzyme showed high specificity for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and did not use glyceraldehyde, acetaldehyde or formaldehyde as substrates. By matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight analysis of the purified enzyme, ORF PA1029 was identified as a coding gene, gapor, in the sequenced genome of Pyrobaculum aerophilum. The data indicate that the (micro)aerophilic Pyrobaculum aerophilum contains a functional GAPOR as part of a modified EM pathway. Cells of the strictly aerobic crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix also contain enzyme activities of a modified EM pathway similar to that of Pyrobaculum aerophilum, except that a GAPN activity replaces GAPOR activity.

  14. The interactions of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a potential site for toxic actions.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Chester E; Fukuto, Jon M; Taguchi, Keiko; Froines, John; Cho, Arthur K

    2005-06-30

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) catalyzes the oxidative phosphorylation of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate to 1,3-diphosphoglycerate, one of the precursors for glycolytic ATP biosynthesis. The enzyme contains an active site cysteine thiolate, which is critical for its catalytic function. As part of a continuing study of the interactions of quinones with biological systems, we have examined the susceptibility of GAPDH to inactivation by 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (9,10-PQ). In a previous study of quinone toxicity, this quinone, whose actions have been exclusively attributed to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, caused a reduction in the glycolytic activity of GAPDH under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, indicating indirect and possible direct actions on this enzyme. In this study, the effects of 9,10-PQ on GAPDH were examined in detail under aerobic and anaerobic conditions so that the role of oxygen could be distinguished from the direct effects of the quinone. The results indicate that, in the presence of the reducing agent DTT, GAPDH inhibition by 9,10-PQ under aerobic conditions was mostly indirect and comparable to the direct actions of exogenously-added H2O2 on this enzyme. GAPDH was also inhibited by 9,10-PQ anaerobically, but in a somewhat more complex manner. This quinone, which is not considered an electrophile, inhibited GAPDH in a time-dependent manner, consistent with irreversible modification and comparable to the electrophilic actions of 1,4-benzoquinone (1,4-BQ). Analysis of the anaerobic inactivation kinetics for the two quinones revealed comparable inactivation rate constants (k(inac)), but a much lower inhibitor binding constant (K(i)) for 1,4-BQ. Protection and thiol titration studies suggest that these quinones bind to the NAD+ binding site and modify the catalytic thiol from this site. Thus, 9,10-PQ inhibits GAPDH by two distinct mechanisms: through ROS generation that results in the oxidization of GAPDH thiols, and by an

  15. The role of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 in the progression of fatty liver after acute ethanol administration in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Tomoki; Morita, Akihito; Mori, Nobuko; Miura, Shinji

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Ethanol administration increased GPD1 mRNA expression. • Ethanol administration increased glucose incorporation into TG glycerol moieties. • No increase in hepatic TG levels was observed in ethanol-injected GPD1 null mice. • We propose that GPD1 is required for ethanol-induced TG accumulation in the liver. - Abstract: Acute ethanol consumption leads to the accumulation of triglycerides (TGs) in hepatocytes. The increase in lipogenesis and reduction of fatty acid oxidation are implicated as the mechanisms underlying ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation. Although glycerol-3-phosphate (Gro3P), formed by glycerol kinase (GYK) or glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 (GPD1), is also required for TG synthesis, the roles of GYK and GPD1 have been the subject of some debate. In this study, we examine (1) the expression of genes involved in Gro3P production in the liver of C57BL/6J mice in the context of hepatic TG accumulation after acute ethanol intake, and (2) the role of GPD1 in the progression of ethanol-induced fatty liver using GPD1 null mice. As a result, in C57BL/6J mice, ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation began within 2 h and was 1.7-fold greater than that observed in the control group after 6 h. The up-regulation of GPD1 began 2 h after administering ethanol, and significantly increased 6 h later with the concomitant escalation in the glycolytic gene expression. The incorporation of {sup 14}C-labelled glucose into TG glycerol moieties increased during the same period. On the other hand, in GPD1 null mice carrying normal GYK activity, no significant increase in hepatic TG level was observed after acute ethanol intake. In conclusion, GPD1 and glycolytic gene expression is up-regulated by ethanol, and GPD1-mediated incorporation of glucose into TG glycerol moieties together with increased lipogenesis, is suggested to play an important role in ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation.

  16. Enzymatic synthesis of rare sugars with L-rhamnulose-1-phosphate aldolase from Thermotoga maritima MSB8.

    PubMed

    Li, Zijie; Wu, Xiaoru; Cai, Li; Duan, Shenglin; Liu, Jia; Yuan, Peng; Nakanishi, Hideki; Gao, Xiao-Dong

    2015-09-15

    L-Rhamnulose-1-phosphate aldolase from a thermophilic source (Thermotoga maritima MSB8) (RhaDT.mari) was heterologously overexpressed in Escherichia coli and the stereoselectivity of this enzyme with or without Nus tag was investigated. We also applied this enzyme to the synthesis of rare sugars D-psicose, D-sorbose, L-tagatose and L-fructose using our one-pot four-enzyme system. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first use of RhaD from a thermophilic source for rare sugar synthesis and the temperature tolerance of this enzyme paves the path for large scale fermentation.

  17. Exploring amino acids derivatives as potent, selective, and direct agonists of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor subtype-1.

    PubMed

    Evindar, Ghotas; Deng, Hongfeng; Bernier, Sylvie G; Doyle, Elisabeth; Lorusso, Jeanine; Morgan, Barry A; Westlin, William F

    2013-01-15

    In the quest to discover a potent and selective class of direct agonists to the sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor, we explored the carboxylate functional group as a replacement to previously reported lead phosphates. This has led to the discovery of potent and selective direct agonists with moderate to substantial in vivo lymphopenia. The previously reported selectivity enhancing moiety (SEM) and selectivity enhancing orientation (SEO) in the phenylamide and phenylimidazole scaffolds were crucial to obtaining selectivity for S1P receptor subtype 1 over 3. PMID:23245510

  18. Bioactive lipids sphingosine-1-phosphate and ceramide-1-phosphate are pro-metastatic factors in human rhabdomyosarcomas cell lines, and their tissue level increases in response to radio/chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Gabriela; Bryndza, Ewa; Abdel-Latif, Ahmed; Ratajczak, Janina; Maj, Magdalena; Tarnowski, Maciej; Klyachkin, Yurij; Houghton, Peter; Morris, Andrew J.; Vater, Axel; Klussmann, Sven; Kucia, Magdalena; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z.

    2013-01-01

    We observed that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P) strongly enhance in vitro motility and adhesion of human rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cells. This effect was observed at physiological concentrations of both bioactive lipids, which are present in biological fluids, and is much stronger than the effects observed in response to known RMS pro-metastatic factors such as stromal derived factors-1 (SDF-1) or hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF). We also present novel evidence that the levels of S1P and C1P increase in several organs after γ-irradiation or chemotherapy, which indicates induction of an unwanted pro-metastatic environment related to treatment. Most importantly, we found that the metastasis of RMS cells in response to S1P can be effectively inhibited in vivo with the S1P-specific binder NOX-S93 that is based on a high affinity Spiegelmer. We propose that bioactive lipids play a previously underappreciated role in dissemination of RMS and the unwanted side effects of radio/chemotherapy by creating a pro-metastatic microenvironment. Therefore, an anti-metastatic treatment with specific S1P-binding scavenger such as NOX-S93 could become a part of standard radio/chemotherapy. PMID:23615526

  19. Morphological and metabolic changes in transgenic wheat with altered glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase or acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase activities.

    PubMed

    Edlin, D A; Kille, P; Wilkinson, M D; Jones, H D; Harwood, J L

    2000-12-01

    We have transformed varieties of wheat with a Pisum sativum glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase gene, and also with an Arabidopsis thaliana acyl-ACP thioesterase gene. Morphological (growth, organelle development) and metabolic changes (fatty acid labelling of chloroplast and non-chloroplast lipids) have been observed in transgenics with altered gene expression for either enzyme. PMID:11171169

  20. SIRT1 interacts with and protects glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from nuclear translocation: Implications for cell survival after irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Hyun-Yoo; Woo, Seon Rang; Shen, Yan-Nan; Yun, Mi Yong; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Park, Eun-Ran; Kim, Su-Hyeon; Park, Jeong-Eun; Ju, Yeun-Jin; Hong, Sung Hee; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Joon; Lee, Kee-Ho

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 serves to retain GAPDH in the cytosol, preventing GAPDH nuclear translocation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer When SIRT1 is depleted, GAPDH translocation occurs even in the absence of stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upon irradiation, SIRT1 interacts with GAPDH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 prevents irradiation-induced nuclear translocation of GAPDH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 presence rather than activity is essential for inhibiting GAPDH translocation. -- Abstract: Upon apoptotic stimulation, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a cytosolic enzyme normally active in glycolysis, translocates into the nucleus and activates an apoptotic cascade therein. In the present work, we show that SIRT1 prevents nuclear translocation of GAPDH via interaction with GAPDH. SIRT1 depletion triggered nuclear translocation of cytosolic GAPDH even in the absence of apoptotic stress. Such translocation was not, however, observed when SIRT1 enzymatic activity was inhibited, indicating that SIRT1 protein per se, rather than the deacetylase activity of the protein, is required to inhibit GAPDH translocation. Upon irradiation, SIRT1 prevented irradiation-induced nuclear translocation of GAPDH, accompanied by interaction of SIRT1 and GAPDH. Thus, SIRT1 functions to retain GAPDH in the cytosol, protecting the enzyme from nuclear translocation via interaction with these two proteins. This serves as a mechanism whereby SIRT1 regulates cell survival upon induction of apoptotic stress by means that include irradiation.

  1. The glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene of Moniliophthoraperniciosa, the causal agent of witches' broom disease of Theobroma cacao.

    PubMed

    Lima, Juliana O; Pereira, Jorge F; Rincones, Johana; Barau, Joan G; Araújo, Elza F; Pereira, Gonçalo A G; Queiroz, Marisa V

    2009-04-01

    This report describes the cloning, sequence and expression analysis of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) gene of Moniliophthora perniciosa, the most important pathogen of cocoa in Brazil. Southern blot analysis revealed the presence of a single copy of the GAPDH gene in the M. perniciosa genome (MpGAPDH). The complete MpGAPDH coding sequence contained 1,461 bp with eight introns that were conserved in the GAPDH genes of other basidiomycete species. The cis-elements in the promoter region of the MpGAPDH gene were similar to those of other basidiomycetes. Likewise, the MpGAPDH gene encoded a putative 339 amino acid protein that shared significant sequence similarity with other GAPDH proteins in fungi, plants, and metazoans. Phylogenetic analyses clustered the MPGAPDH protein with other homobasidiomycete fungi of the family Tricholomataceae. Expression analysis of the MpGAPDH gene by real-time PCR showed that this gene was more expressed (~1.3X) in the saprotrophic stage of this hemibiotrophic plant pathogen than in the biotrophic stage when grown in cacao extracts.

  2. Export of malaria proteins requires co-translational processing of the PEXEL motif independent of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate binding

    PubMed Central

    Boddey, Justin A.; O'Neill, Matthew T.; Lopaticki, Sash; Carvalho, Teresa G.; Hodder, Anthony N.; Nebl, Thomas; Wawra, Stephan; van West, Pieter; Ebrahimzadeh, Zeinab; Richard, Dave; Flemming, Sven; Spielmann, Tobias; Przyborski, Jude; Babon, Jeff J.; Cowman, Alan F.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum exports proteins into erythrocytes using the Plasmodium export element (PEXEL) motif, which is cleaved in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by plasmepsin V (PMV). A recent study reported that phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI(3)P) concentrated in the ER binds to PEXEL motifs and is required for export independent of PMV, and that PEXEL motifs are functionally interchangeable with RxLR motifs of oomycete effectors. Here we show that the PEXEL does not bind PI(3)P, and that this lipid is not concentrated in the ER. We find that RxLR motifs cannot mediate export in P. falciparum. Parasites expressing a mutated version of KAHRP, with the PEXEL motif repositioned near the signal sequence, prevented PMV cleavage. This mutant possessed the putative PI(3)P-binding residues but is not exported. Reinstatement of PEXEL to its original location restores processing by PMV and export. These results challenge the PI(3)P hypothesis and provide evidence that PEXEL position is conserved for co-translational processing and export. PMID:26832821

  3. Human and pneumococcal cell surface glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) proteins are both ligands of human C1q protein.

    PubMed

    Terrasse, Rémi; Tacnet-Delorme, Pascale; Moriscot, Christine; Pérard, Julien; Schoehn, Guy; Vernet, Thierry; Thielens, Nicole M; Di Guilmi, Anne Marie; Frachet, Philippe

    2012-12-14

    C1q, a key component of the classical complement pathway, is a major player in the response to microbial infection and has been shown to detect noxious altered-self substances such as apoptotic cells. In this work, using complementary experimental approaches, we identified the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as a C1q partner when exposed at the surface of human pathogenic bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae and human apoptotic cells. The membrane-associated GAPDH on HeLa cells bound the globular regions of C1q as demonstrated by pulldown and cell surface co-localization experiments. Pneumococcal strains deficient in surface-exposed GAPDH harbored a decreased level of C1q recognition when compared with the wild-type strains. Both recombinant human and pneumococcal GAPDHs interacted avidly with C1q as measured by surface plasmon resonance experiments (K(D) = 0.34-2.17 nm). In addition, GAPDH-C1q complexes were observed by transmission electron microscopy after cross-linking. The purified pneumococcal GAPDH protein activated C1 in an in vitro assay unlike the human form. Deposition of C1q, C3b, and C4b from human serum at the surface of pneumococcal cells was dependent on the presence of surface-exposed GAPDH. This ability of C1q to sense both human and bacterial GAPDHs sheds new insights on the role of this important defense collagen molecule in modulating the immune response. PMID:23086952

  4. An investigation of the nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide-induced 'tightening' of the structure of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, H H; Hollaway, M R

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was made of the effect of NAD+ analogues on subunit interactions in yeast and rabbit muscle glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenases by using the subunit exchange (hybridization) method described previously [e.g. see Osborne & Hollaway (1975) Biochem. J. 151, 37-45]. The ligands ATP, ITP, ADP, AMP, cyclic AMP and ADP-ribose like NADH, all caused an apparent weakening of intramolecular subunit interactions, whereas NAD+ caused an apparent increase in the stability of the tetrameric enzyme molecules. A mixture of NMN and AMP, although it did not simulate completely the NAD+-induced 'tightening' of the enzyme structure, did result in a more than 20-fold decrease in the rate of subunit exchange compared with that in the presence of AMP alone. These results show that occupancy of the NMN subsite of the enzyme NAD+-binding site is insufficient in itself to give the marked tightening of the enzyme structure induced by NAD+. The 'tightening' effect is specific in that it seems to require a phosphodiester link between NMN and ADP-ribose. These effects are discussed in terms of the detailed X-ray structure of the lobster holoenzyme [Buehner et al. (1974) J. Mol. Biol. 90, 25-49]. Images PLATE 1 PLATE 2 PMID:183744

  5. An unusual effect of NADP+ on the thermostability of the nonphosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Arutyunov, Denis; Schmalhausen, Elena; Orlov, Victor; Rahuel-Clermont, Sophie; Nagradova, Natalia; Branlant, Guy; Muronetz, Vladimir

    2013-10-01

    Adiabatic differential scanning calorimetry was used to investigate the effect of NADP+ on the irreversible thermal denaturation of the nonphosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPN) from Streptococcus mutans. The GAPN-NADP+ binary complex showed a strongly decreased thermal stability, with a difference of about 20 °C between the temperatures of the thermal transition peak maxima of the complex and the free protein. This finding was similar to the previously described thermal destabilization of GAPN upon binding of inorganic phosphate to the substrate binding site and can be interpreted as the shift of the equilibrium between 2 conformers of tetrameric GAPN upon addition of the coenzyme. Single amino acid substitution, known to abolish the NADP+ binding, cancelled the calorimetric effect of the coenzyme. GAPN thermal inactivation was considerably decelerated in the presence of NADP+ showing that the apparent change in stability of the active centre can be the opposite to that of the whole protein molecule. NADP+ could also reactivate the inactive GAPN* species, obtained by the heating of the apoenzyme below the thermal denaturation transition temperature. These effects may reflect a mechanism that provides GAPN the sufficient flexibility for the earlier observed profound active site reorganizations required during the catalytic cycle. The elevated thermal stability of the apoenzyme may, in turn, be important for maintaining a constant level of active GAPN--an enzyme that is known to be crucial for the effective supply of the reducing equivalents in S. mutans and its ability to grow under aerobic conditions.

  6. Detection of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase messenger RNA using a peptide nucleic acid probe in paraffin-embedded archival specimens.

    PubMed

    Hiroyasu, Makoto; Akatsuka, Shinya; Shirase, Tomoyuki; Toda, Yoshinobu; Hiai, Hiroshi; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2004-04-01

    Although the human genome project has been completed, the functions of many genes remain undetermined. In situ hybridization (ISH) is a key method for identifying cells in which a given messenger RNA is transcribed. Paraffin-embedded specimens remain precious materials for research, but preservation of high-quality RNA in these specimens is not expected unless ample caution was taken during fixation. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is a recently developed hybrid molecule with genetic information that has high stability and high affinity to the complementary DNA or RNA. We applied a PNA probe to mRNA ISH of liver specimens obtained by autopsy and embedded in paraffin 28-48 years ago. An 18-mer PNA probe for glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase was used. Staining was then analyzed in association with morphology by hematoxylin and eosin staining, and with the time between death of the patient and tissue fixation. Notably, specimens fixed with formalin and embedded in paraffin 48 years ago yielded excellent results if the time before fixation was short enough (<8 h). There was a significant inverse correlation between the intensity of ISH staining and the time before fixation. Oligonucleotide PNA probe, albeit at high cost, would increase the value of paraffin-embedded specimens in storage for use in human medical research.

  7. Over-expression of PsGPD, a mushroom glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene, enhances salt tolerance in rice plants.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jung-Il; Lim, Hye-Min; Siddiqui, Zamin Shaheed; Park, Sung-Han; Kim, A-Ram; Kwon, Taek-Ryoun; Lee, Seong-Kon; Park, Soo-Chul; Jeong, Mi-Jeong; Lee, Gang-Seob

    2014-08-01

    Transgenic potatoes expressing glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD), isolated from the oyster mushroom, Pleurotus sajor-caju, had increased tolerance to salt stress (Jeong et al. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 278:192-196, 2000). To examine the physiological mechanisms enhancing salt tolerance in GPD-transgenic rice plants, the salt tolerance of five GPD transgenic rice lines (T1-T5) derived from Dongjin rice cultivar were evaluated in a fixed 150 mM saline environment in comparison to two known wild-type rice cultivars, Dongjin (salt sensitive) and Pokali (salt tolerant). Transgenic lines, T2, T3, and T5, had a substantial increase in biomass and relative water content compared to Dongjin. Stomatal conductance and osmotic potential were higher in the GPD transgenic lines and were similar to those in Pokali. The results are discussed based on the comparative physiological response of GPD transgenic lines with those of the salt-sensitive and salt-tolerant rice cultivars. PMID:24737077

  8. Cloning and characterization of a NAD+-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene from Candida glycerinogenes, an industrial glycerol producer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xianzhong; Fang, Huiying; Rao, Zhiming; Shen, Wei; Zhuge, Bin; Wang, Zhengxiang; Zhuge, Jian

    2008-08-01

    The osmotolerant yeast Candida glycerinogenes produces glycerol as a major metabolite on an industrial scale, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We cloned and characterized a 4900-bp genomic fragment containing the CgGPD gene encoding a glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase homologous to GPD genes in other yeasts using degenerate primers in conjunction with inverse PCR. Sequence analysis revealed a 1167-bp open reading frame encoding a putative peptide of 388 deduced amino acids with a molecular mass of 42 695 Da. The CgGPD gene consisted of an N-terminal NAD(+)-binding domain and a central catalytic domain, whereas seven stress response elements were found in the upstream region. Functional analysis revealed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae gpd1Delta and gpd1Delta/gpd2Delta osmosensitive mutants transformed with CgGPD were restored to the wild-type phenotype when cultured in high osmolarity media, suggesting that it is a functional GPD protein. Transformants also accumulated glycerol intracellularly and GPD-specific activity increased significantly when stressed with NaCl, whereas the S. cerevisiae mutants transformed with the empty plasmid showed only slight increases. The full-length CgGPD gene sequence including upstream and downstream regions has been deposited in GenBank under accession no. EU186536.

  9. Structural Characterization of Heparin-induced Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate Dehydrogenase Protofibrils Preventing α-Synuclein Oligomeric Species Toxicity*

    PubMed Central

    Ávila, César L.; Torres-Bugeau, Clarisa M.; Barbosa, Leandro R. S.; Sales, Elisa Morandé; Ouidja, Mohand O.; Socías, Sergio B.; Celej, M. Soledad; Raisman-Vozari, Rita; Papy-Garcia, Dulce; Itri, Rosangela; Chehín, Rosana N.

    2014-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a multifunctional enzyme that has been associated with neurodegenerative diseases. GAPDH colocalizes with α-synuclein in amyloid aggregates in post-mortem tissue of patients with sporadic Parkinson disease and promotes the formation of Lewy body-like inclusions in cell culture. In a previous work, we showed that glycosaminoglycan-induced GAPDH prefibrillar species accelerate the conversion of α-synuclein to fibrils. However, it remains to be determined whether the interplay among glycosaminoglycans, GAPDH, and α-synuclein has a role in pathological states. Here, we demonstrate that the toxic effect exerted by α-synuclein oligomers in dopaminergic cell culture is abolished in the presence of GAPDH prefibrillar species. Structural analysis of prefibrillar GAPDH performed by small angle x-ray scattering showed a particle compatible with a protofibril. This protofibril is shaped as a cylinder 22 nm long and a cross-section diameter of 12 nm. Using biocomputational techniques, we obtained the first all-atom model of the GAPDH protofibril, which was validated by cross-linking coupled to mass spectrometry experiments. Because GAPDH can be secreted outside the cell where glycosaminoglycans are present, it seems plausible that GAPDH protofibrils could be assembled in the extracellular space kidnapping α-synuclein toxic oligomers. Thus, the role of GAPDH protofibrils in neuronal proteostasis must be considered. The data reported here could open alternative ways in the development of therapeutic strategies against synucleinopathies like Parkinson disease. PMID:24671416

  10. Autophagy and endosomal trafficking inhibition by Vibrio cholerae MARTX toxin phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate-specific phospholipase A1 activity.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shivani; Kim, Hyunjin; Chan, Robin B; Agarwal, Shivangi; Williamson, Rebecca; Cho, Wonhwa; Paolo, Gilbert Di; Paolo, Gilbert D; Satchell, Karla J F

    2015-10-26

    Vibrio cholerae, responsible for acute gastroenteritis secretes a large multifunctional-autoprocessing repeat-in-toxin (MARTX) toxin linked to evasion of host immune system, facilitating colonization of small intestine. Unlike other effector domains of the multifunctional toxin that target cytoskeleton, the function of alpha-beta hydrolase (ABH) remained elusive. This study demonstrates that ABH is an esterase/lipase with catalytic Ser-His-Asp triad. ABH binds with high affinity to phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) and cleaves the fatty acid in PtdIns3P at the sn1 position in vitro making it the first PtdIns3P-specific phospholipase A1 (PLA1). Expression of ABH in vivo reduces intracellular PtdIns3P levels and its PtdIns3P-specific PLA1 activity blocks endosomal and autophagic pathways. In accordance with recent studies acknowledging the potential of extracellular pathogens to evade or exploit autophagy to prevent their clearance and facilitate survival, this is the first report highlighting the role of ABH in inhibiting autophagy and endosomal trafficking induced by extracellular V. cholerae.

  11. Autophagy and endosomal trafficking inhibition by Vibrio cholerae MARTX toxin phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate-specific phospholipase A1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Shivani; Kim, Hyunjin; Chan, Robin B.; Agarwal, Shivangi; Williamson, Rebecca; Cho, Wonhwa; Paolo, Gilbert D.; Satchell, Karla J. F.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, responsible for acute gastroenteritis secretes a large multifunctional-autoprocessing repeat-in-toxin (MARTX) toxin linked to evasion of host immune system, facilitating colonization of small intestine. Unlike other effector domains of the multifunctional toxin that target cytoskeleton, the function of alpha-beta hydrolase (ABH) remained elusive. This study demonstrates that ABH is an esterase/lipase with catalytic Ser–His–Asp triad. ABH binds with high affinity to phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) and cleaves the fatty acid in PtdIns3P at the sn1 position in vitro making it the first PtdIns3P-specific phospholipase A1 (PLA1). Expression of ABH in vivo reduces intracellular PtdIns3P levels and its PtdIns3P-specific PLA1 activity blocks endosomal and autophagic pathways. In accordance with recent studies acknowledging the potential of extracellular pathogens to evade or exploit autophagy to prevent their clearance and facilitate survival, this is the first report highlighting the role of ABH in inhibiting autophagy and endosomal trafficking induced by extracellular V. cholerae. PMID:26498860

  12. Sequence analysis and structural characterization of a glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene from the phytopathogenic fungus Eremothecium ashbyi.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Sudeshna; Chandra, T S

    2011-02-01

    Eremothecium ashbyi is a phytopathogenic fungus infesting cotton, soybeans and several other plants. This highly flavinogenic fungus has been phylogenetically characterized, but the genetic aspects of its central metabolic and riboflavin biosynthetic pathways are unknown. An ORF of 996 bp was obtained from E. ashbyi by using degenerate primers for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) through reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and 5'-3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE-PCR). This nucleotide sequence had a high similarity of 88% with GPD sequence of Ashbya gossypii. The putative GPD peptide of 331-aa had a high similarity of 85% with the GPD sequence from other ascomycetes. The ORF had an unusually strong codon bias with 5 amino acids showing strict preference of a single codon. The theoretical molecular weight for the putative peptide was 35.58 kDa with an estimated pI of 5.7. A neighbor-joining tree showed that the putative peptide from E. ashbyi displayed the highest similarity to GPD of A. gossypii. The gene sequence is available at the GenBank, accession number EU717696. Homology modeling done with Kluyveromyces marxianus GPD (PDB: 2I5P) as template indicated high structural similarity. PMID:20820924

  13. Secreted multifunctional Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase sequesters lactoferrin and iron into cells via a non-canonical pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Anoop S.; Rawat, Pooja; Malhotra, Himanshu; Sheokand, Navdeep; Kumar, Manoj; Patidar, Anil; Chaudhary, Surbhi; Jakhar, Priyanka; Raje, Chaaya I.; Raje, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    Lactoferrin is a crucial nutritionally important pleiotropic molecule and iron an essential trace metal for all life. The current paradigm is that living organisms have evolved specific membrane anchored receptors along with iron carrier molecules for regulated absorption, transport, storage and mobilization of these vital nutrients. We present evidence for the existence of non-canonical pathway whereby cells actively forage these vital resources from beyond their physical boundaries, by secreting the multifunctional housekeeping enzyme Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) into the extracellular milieu. This effect’s an autocrine/paracrine acquisition of target ligand into the cell. Internalization by this route is extensively favoured even by cells that express surface receptors for lactoferrin and involves urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). We also demonstrate the operation of this phenomenon during inflammation, as an arm of the innate immune response where lactoferrin denies iron to invading microorganisms by chelating it and then itself being sequestered into surrounding host cells by GAPDH. PMID:26672975

  14. Purification and properties of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from the skeletal muscle of the hibernating ground squirrel, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus.

    PubMed

    Bell, Ryan A V; Smith, Jeffrey C; Storey, Kenneth B

    2014-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from the skeletal muscle of euthermic and torpid Ictidomys tridecemlineatus was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity using a novel method involving Blue-agarose and Phenyl-agarose chromatography. Kinetic analysis of the enzymes isolated from the two conditions suggested the existence of two structurally distinct proteins, with GAPDH V max being 40-60% less for the enzyme from the torpid condition (in both glycolytic and gluconeogenic directions) as compared to the euthermic enzyme form. Thermal denaturation, in part determined by differential scanning fluorimetry, revealed that purified GAPDH from the torpid animals was significantly more stable that the enzyme from the euthermic condition. Mass spectrometry combined with Western blot analyses of purified GAPDH indicate that the cellular GAPDH population is extensively modified, with posttranslational phosphorylation, acetylation and methylation being detected. Global reduction in GAPDH tyrosine phosphorylation during torpor as well as site specific alterations in methylation sites suggests that that the stable changes observed in kinetic and structural GAPDH properties may be due to posttranslational modification of this enzyme during torpor. Taken together, these results suggest a stable suppression of GAPDH (possibly by some reversible posttranslational modification) during ground squirrel torpor, which likely contributes to the overall reduction in carbohydrate metabolism when these animals switch to lipid fuels during dormancy.

  15. Nuclear translocation and accumulation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase involved in diclazuril-induced apoptosis in Eimeria tenella (E. tenella).

    PubMed

    Wang, Congcong; Han, Chunzhou; Li, Tao; Yang, Dehao; Shen, Xiaojiong; Fan, Yinxin; Xu, Yang; Zheng, Wenli; Fei, Chenzhong; Zhang, Lifang; Xue, Feiqun

    2013-01-01

    In mammalian cells, GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) has recently been shown to be implicated in numerous apoptotic paradigms, especially in neuronal apoptosis, and has been demonstrated to play a vital role in some neurodegenerative disorders. However, this phenomenon has not been reported in protists. In the present study, we report for the first time that such a mechanism is involved in diclazuril-induced apoptosis in Eimeria tenella (E. tenella). We found that upon treatment of parasites with diclazuril, the expression levels of GAPDH transcript and protein were significantly increased in second-generation merozoites. Then, we examined the subcellular localization of GAPDH by fluorescence microscopy and Western blot analysis. The results show that a considerable amount of GAPDH protein appeared in the nucleus within diclazuril-treated second-generation merozoites; in contrast, the control group had very low levels of GAPDH in the nucleus. The glycolytic activity of GAPDH was kinetically analyzed in different subcellular fractions. A substantial decrease (48.5%) in glycolytic activity of GAPDH in the nucleus was displayed. Moreover, the activities of caspases-3, -9, and -8 were measured in cell extracts using specific caspase substrates. The data show significant increases in caspase-3 and caspase-9 activities in the diclazuril-treated group.

  16. Tandem amplification of a chromosomal segment harboring 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase locus confers glyphosate resistance in Kochia scoparia.

    PubMed

    Jugulam, Mithila; Niehues, Kindsey; Godar, Amar S; Koo, Dal-Hoe; Danilova, Tatiana; Friebe, Bernd; Sehgal, Sunish; Varanasi, Vijay K; Wiersma, Andrew; Westra, Philip; Stahlman, Phillip W; Gill, Bikram S

    2014-11-01

    Recent rapid evolution and spread of resistance to the most extensively used herbicide, glyphosate, is a major threat to global crop production. Genetic mechanisms by which weeds evolve resistance to herbicides largely determine the level of resistance and the rate of evolution of resistance. In a previous study, we determined that glyphosate resistance in Kochia scoparia is due to the amplification of the 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-Phosphate Synthase (EPSPS) gene, the enzyme target of glyphosate. Here, we investigated the genomic organization of the amplified EPSPS copies using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and extended DNA fiber (Fiber FISH) on K. scoparia chromosomes. In both glyphosate-resistant K. scoparia populations tested (GR1 and GR2), FISH results displayed a single and prominent hybridization site of the EPSPS gene localized on the distal end of one pair of homologous metaphase chromosomes compared with a faint hybridization site in glyphosate-susceptible samples (GS1 and GS2). Fiber FISH displayed 10 copies of the EPSPS gene (approximately 5 kb) arranged in tandem configuration approximately 40 to 70 kb apart, with one copy in an inverted orientation in GR2. In agreement with FISH results, segregation of EPSPS copies followed single-locus inheritance in GR1 population. This is the first report of tandem target gene amplification conferring field-evolved herbicide resistance in weed populations.

  17. Mutation by DNA shuffling of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase from Malus domestica for improved glyphosate resistance.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yong-Sheng; Xu, Jing; Peng, Ri-He; Xiong, Ai-Sheng; Xu, Hu; Zhao, Wei; Fu, Xiao-Yan; Han, Hong-Juan; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2013-09-01

    A new 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene from Malus domestica (MdEPSPS) was cloned and characterized by rapid amplification of cDNA ends to identify an EPSPS gene appropriate for the development of transgenic glyphosate-tolerant plants. However, wild-type MdEPSPS is not suitable for the development of transgenic glyphosate-tolerant plants because of its poor glyphosate resistance. Thus, we performed DNA shuffling on MdEPSPS, and one highly glyphosate-resistant mutant with mutations in eight amino acids (N63D, N86S, T101A, A187T, D230G, H317R, Y399R and C413A.) was identified after five rounds of DNA shuffling and screening. Among the eight amino acid substitutions on this mutant, only two residue changes (T101A and A187T) were identified by site-directed mutagenesis as essential and additive in altering glyphosate resistance, which was further confirmed by kinetic analyses. The single-site A187T mutation has also never been previously reported as an important residue for glyphosate resistance. Furthermore, transgenic rice was used to confirm the potential of MdEPSPS mutant in developing glyphosate-resistant crops.

  18. Improvement of glyphosate resistance through concurrent mutations in three amino acids of the Ochrobactrum 5-enopyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yong-Sheng; Xu, Jing; Xiong, Ai-Sheng; Zhao, Wei; Fu, Xiao-Yan; Peng, Ri-He; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2011-12-01

    A mutant of 5-enopyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase from Ochrobactrum anthropi was identified after four rounds of DNA shuffling and screening. Its ability to restore the growth of the mutant ER2799 cell on an M9 minimal medium containing 300 mM glyphosate led to its identification. The mutant had mutations in seven amino acids: E145G, N163H, N267S, P318R, M377V, M425T, and P438L. Among these mutations, N267S, P318R, and M425T have never been previously reported as important residues for glyphosate resistance. However, in the present study they were found by site-directed mutagenesis to collectively contribute to the improvement of glyphosate tolerance. Kinetic analyses of these three mutants demonstrated that the effectiveness of these three individual amino acid alterations on glyphosate tolerance was in the order P318R > M425T > N267S. The results of the kinetic analyses combined with a three-dimensional structure modeling of the location of P318R and M425T demonstrate that the lower hemisphere's upper surface is possibly another important region for glyphosate resistance. Furthermore, the transgenic Arabidopsis was obtained to confirm the potential of the mutant in developing glyphosate-resistant crops.

  19. A novel 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase shows high glyphosate tolerance in Escherichia coli and tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Cao, Gaoyi; Liu, Yunjun; Zhang, Shengxue; Yang, Xuewen; Chen, Rongrong; Zhang, Yuwen; Lu, Wei; Liu, Yan; Wang, Jianhua; Lin, Min; Wang, Guoying

    2012-01-01

    A key enzyme in the shikimate pathway, 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) is the primary target of the broad-spectrum herbicide glyphosate. Identification of new aroA genes coding for EPSPS with a high level of glyphosate tolerance is essential for the development of glyphosate-tolerant crops. In the present study, the glyphosate tolerance of five bacterial aroA genes was evaluated in the E. coli aroA-defective strain ER2799 and in transgenic tobacco plants. All five aroA genes could complement the aroA-defective strain ER2799, and AM79 aroA showed the highest glyphosate tolerance. Although glyphosate treatment inhibited the growth of both WT and transgenic tobacco plants, transgenic plants expressing AM79 aroA tolerated higher concentration of glyphosate and had a higher fresh weight and survival rate than plants expressing other aroA genes. When treated with high concentration of glyphosate, lower shikimate content was detected in the leaves of transgenic plants expressing AM79 aroA than transgenic plants expressing other aroA genes. These results suggest that AM79 aroA could be a good candidate for the development of transgenic glyphosate-tolerant crops.

  20. Tandem amplification of a chromosomal segment harboring 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase locus confers glyphosate resistance in Kochia scoparia.

    PubMed

    Jugulam, Mithila; Niehues, Kindsey; Godar, Amar S; Koo, Dal-Hoe; Danilova, Tatiana; Friebe, Bernd; Sehgal, Sunish; Varanasi, Vijay K; Wiersma, Andrew; Westra, Philip; Stahlman, Phillip W; Gill, Bikram S

    2014-11-01

    Recent rapid evolution and spread of resistance to the most extensively used herbicide, glyphosate, is a major threat to global crop production. Genetic mechanisms by which weeds evolve resistance to herbicides largely determine the level of resistance and the rate of evolution of resistance. In a previous study, we determined that glyphosate resistance in Kochia scoparia is due to the amplification of the 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-Phosphate Synthase (EPSPS) gene, the enzyme target of glyphosate. Here, we investigated the genomic organization of the amplified EPSPS copies using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and extended DNA fiber (Fiber FISH) on K. scoparia chromosomes. In both glyphosate-resistant K. scoparia populations tested (GR1 and GR2), FISH results displayed a single and prominent hybridization site of the EPSPS gene localized on the distal end of one pair of homologous metaphase chromosomes compared with a faint hybridization site in glyphosate-susceptible samples (GS1 and GS2). Fiber FISH displayed 10 copies of the EPSPS gene (approximately 5 kb) arranged in tandem configuration approximately 40 to 70 kb apart, with one copy in an inverted orientation in GR2. In agreement with FISH results, segregation of EPSPS copies followed single-locus inheritance in GR1 population. This is the first report of tandem target gene amplification conferring field-evolved herbicide resistance in weed populations. PMID:25037215

  1. Identification of a mammalian glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase: Role in metabolism and signaling in pancreatic β-cells and hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mugabo, Yves; Zhao, Shangang; Seifried, Annegrit; Gezzar, Sari; Al-Mass, Anfal; Zhang, Dongwei; Lamontagne, Julien; Attane, Camille; Poursharifi, Pegah; Iglesias, José; Joly, Erik; Peyot, Marie-Line; Gohla, Antje; Madiraju, S. R. Murthy; Prentki, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Obesity, and the associated disturbed glycerolipid/fatty acid (GL/FA) cycle, contribute to insulin resistance, islet β-cell failure, and type 2 diabetes. Flux through the GL/FA cycle is regulated by the availability of glycerol-3-phosphate (Gro3P) and fatty acyl-CoA. We describe here a mammalian Gro3P phosphatase (G3PP), which was not known to exist in mammalian cells, that can directly hydrolyze Gro3P to glycerol. We identified that mammalian phosphoglycolate phosphatase, with an uncertain function, acts in fact as a G3PP. We found that G3PP, by controlling Gro3P levels, regulates glycolysis and glucose oxidation, cellular redox and ATP production, gluconeogenesis, glycerolipid synthesis, and fatty acid oxidation in pancreatic islet β-cells and hepatocytes, and that glucose stimulated insulin secretion and the response to metabolic stress, e.g., glucolipotoxicity, in β-cells. In vivo overexpression of G3PP in rat liver lowers body weight gain and hepatic glucose production from glycerol and elevates plasma HDL levels. G3PP is expressed at various levels in different tissues, and its expression varies according to the nutritional state in some tissues. As Gro3P lies at the crossroads of glucose, lipid, and energy metabolism, control of its availability by G3PP adds a key level of metabolic regulation in mammalian cells, and G3PP offers a potential target for type 2 diabetes and cardiometabolic disorders. PMID:26755581

  2. Altered chloroplast structure and function in a mutant of Arabidopsis deficient in plastid glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kunst, L.; Somerville, C. ); Browse, J. )

    1989-07-01

    Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana deficient in plastid glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity have altered chloroplast membrane lipid composition. This caused an increase in the number of regions of appressed membrane per chloroplast and a decrease in the average number of thylakoid membranes in the appressed regions. The net effect was a significant decrease in the ratio of appressed to nonappressed membranes. A comparison of 77 K fluorescence emission spectra of thylakoid membranes from the mutant and wild type indicated that the ultrastructural changes were associated with an altered distribution of excitation energy transfer from antenna chlorophyll to photosystem II and photosystem I in the mutant. The changes in leaf lipid composition did not significantly affect growth or development of the mutant under standard conditions. However, at temperatures above 28{degree}C the mutant grew slightly more rapidly than the wild type, and measurements of temperature-induced fluorescence yield enhancement suggested an increased thermal stability of the photosynthetic apparatus of the mutant. These effects are consistent with other evidence suggesting that membrane lipid composition is an important determinant of chloroplast structure but has relatively minor direct effects on the function of the membrane proteins associated with photosynthetic electron transport.

  3. In silico peptide prediction for antibody generation to recognize 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) in genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Marani, Mariela M; Costa, Joana; Mafra, Isabel; Oliveira, Maria Beatriz P P; Camperi, Silvia A; Leite, José Roberto de Souza Almeida

    2015-03-01

    For the prospective immunorecognition of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (CP4-EPSPS) as a biomarker protein expressed by transgenic soybean, an extensive in silico evaluation of the referred protein was performed. The main objective of this study was the selection of a set of peptides that could function as potential immunogens for the production of novel antibodies against CP4-EPSPS protein. For this purpose, the protein was in silico cleaved with trypsin/chymotrypsin and the resultant peptides were extensively analyzed for further selection of the best candidates for antibody production. The analysis enabled the successful proposal of four peptides with potential immunogenicity for their future use as screening biomarkers of genetically modified organisms. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to select and define potential linear epitopes for the immunization of animals and, subsequently, to generate adequate antibodies for CP4-EPSPS recognition. The present work will be followed by the synthesis of the candidate peptides to be incubated in animals for antibody generation and potential applicability for the development of an immunosensor for CP4-EPSPS detection.

  4. Identification of a sphingolipid-specific phospholipase D activity associated with the generation of phytoceramide-1-phosphate in cabbage leaves.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tamotsu; Kida, Takashi; Imai, Hiroyuki; Morishige, Jun-ichi; Yamashita, Ryouhei; Matsuoka, Hisatsugu; Uozumi, Sachika; Satouchi, Kiyoshi; Nagano, Minoru; Tokumura, Akira

    2013-08-01

    The structure and biosynthetic route for an unidentified lipid (lipid X) detected by TLC of cabbage (Brassica oleracea) lipids was determined. Lipid X is a phospholipid that is resistant to mild alkali and detectable by MALDI-TOF MS as an adduct with Phos-tag, a phosphate-capture zinc complex. Various α-hydroxy fatty acids (16:0, 22:0, 24:0 and 24:1) were detected by GC-MS of fatty acid methyl esters prepared from lipid X. The deacyl derivative of lipid X was determined to be 4-hydroxysphingenine (dehydrophytosphingosine)-1-phosphate by MALDI-TOF MS with Phos-tag. From these results, lipid X was determined to be phytoceramide-1-phosphate (PC1P) with an α-hydroxy fatty acid. When cabbage homogenates were incubated, PC1P was formed, with a concomitant decrease in the amount of glycosylinositol phosphoceramide (GIPC). The formation of PC1P from GIPC was confirmed by treatment of purified cabbage GIPC with a membrane fraction of cabbage homogenates. Using a partially purified enzyme fraction, we found that the enzyme hydrolyzes GIPC specifically, but not glycerophospholipids and sphingomyelin. Arabidopsis thaliana also had this enzyme activity. From these results, we conclude that a previously uncharacterized phospholipase D activity that specifically hydrolyzes GIPC produces PC1P in brassicaceous plants. PMID:23738625

  5. β-Glucose-1-Phosphate, a Possible Mediator for Polysaccharide Formation in Maltose-Assimilating Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Sjöberg, Annelie; Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel

    1989-01-01

    Homolactic fermentation of glucose and heterolactic fermentation of maltose with Lactococcus lactis 65.1 were confirmed. When moles of glucose were compared, the uptake rates of the two carbon sources were similar. The intracellular concentration of fructose-1,6-diphosphate (FDP) in maltose-assimilating cells was half of that in glucose-assimilating cells. Similarly, formation of FDP and lactate from maltose by extracts of maltose-grown cells was half of that formed from glucose by extracts of glucose-grown cells, indicating a difference in the utilization of the two carbon sources for energy metabolism. Concentrations of adenine nucleotides were similar in both types of cells. Glucose-1-phosphate was found in extracts of maltose-grown cells given maltose and, in addition, an inducible and low β-specific phosphoglucomutase activity was observed. β-Glucose-1-phosphate was not metabolized by cell extracts to either FDP or lactate, suggesting an alternative metabolic route. The amount of [14C]maltose incorporated into the cell material of maltose-grown cells was four times greater than that of [14C]glucose incorporated into the cell material of glucose-grown cells. The intracellular concentration of UTP was lower in maltose-assimilating cells than in glucose-assimilating cells. Cells grown on maltose were more spherical and less fragile than cells grown on glucose. Images PMID:16347948

  6. A limitation of the continuous spectrophotometric assay for the measurement of myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinyi; Hernick, Marcy

    2011-10-15

    Myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase (MIPS) catalyzes the conversion of glucose-6-phosphate to myo-inositol-1-phosphate. The reaction catalyzed by MIPS is the first step in the biosynthesis of inositol and inositol-containing molecules that serve important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Consequently, MIPS is a target for the development of therapeutic agents for the treatment of infectious diseases and bipolar disorder. We recently reported a continuous spectrophotometric method for measuring MIPS activity using a coupled assay that allows the rapid characterization of MIPS in a multiwell plate format. Here we validate the continuous assay as a high-throughput alternative for measuring MIPS activity and report on one limitation of this assay-the inability to examine the effect of divalent metal ions (at high concentrations) on MIPS activity. In addition, we demonstrate that the activity of MIPS from Arabidopsis thaliana is moderately enhanced by the addition Mg(2+) and is not enhanced by other divalent metal ions (Zn(2+) and Mn(2+)), consistent with what has been observed for other eukaryotic MIPS enzymes. Our findings suggest that the continuous assay is better suited for characterizing eukaryotic MIPS enzymes that require monovalent cations as cofactors than for characterizing bacterial or archeal MIPS enzymes that require divalent metal ions as cofactors. PMID:21729692

  7. Role of two different glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases in controlling the reversible Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway in Thermoproteus tenax: regulation on protein and transcript level.

    PubMed

    Brunner, N A; Siebers, B; Hensel, R

    2001-04-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeum Thermoproteus tenax uses a variant of the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway as the main route for carbohydrate metabolism. This variant is characterized by a reversible nonallosteric PPi-dependent phosphofructokinase and two glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases differing in cosubstrate specificity, phosphate dependence, and allosteric behavior. Although the nonphosphorylating NAD+-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPN; E.C. 1.2.1.8) fulfills exclusively catabolic purposes, the phosphorylating NADP+-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (NADP+-GAPDH; E.C. 1.2.1.13) exhibits anabolic features. The gene encoding the NADP+-GAPDH was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The deduced protein sequence displayed 47%-53% sequence identity to archaeal phosphorylating GAPDHs. The kinetic parameters of the NADP+-GAPDH showed a clear preference for the reductive reaction with a 5-fold-higher specific activity in the reductive reaction as compared to the oxidative reaction and a 20-fold-lower Km for 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate as compared to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate. Contrary to GAPN, the enzyme is not allosterically regulated. The coding gene overlaps by 1 bp with a preceding open reading frame coding for 3-phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK; E.C. 2.7.2.3). Northern analyses identified mono- and bicistronic messages of both genes in an equimolar ratio. Transcript levels and specific activity of NADP+-GAPDH and PGK were 3- to 4-fold higher under autotrophic conditions as compared to heterotrophic conditions, whereas transcript abundance and specific activity of GAPN remained constant in autotrophically and heterotrophically grown cells. The different regulation of the two counteracting glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases is discussed with respect to the flux control of the T. tenax-specific EMP variant.

  8. LtpD is a novel Legionella pneumophila effector that binds phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate and inositol monophosphatase IMPA1.

    PubMed

    Harding, Clare R; Mattheis, Corinna; Mousnier, Aurélie; Oates, Clare V; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Frankel, Gad; Schroeder, Gunnar N

    2013-11-01

    The Dot/Icm type IV secretion system (T4SS) of Legionella pneumophila is crucial for the pathogen to survive in protozoa and cause human disease. Although more than 275 effector proteins are delivered into the host cell by the T4SS, the function of the majority is unknown. Here we have characterized the Dot/Icm effector LtpD. During infection, LtpD localized to the cytoplasmic face of the membrane of the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). In A549 lung epithelial cells, ectopically expressed LtpD localized to large vesicular structures that contained markers of endosomal compartments. Systematic analysis of LtpD fragments identified an internal 17-kDa fragment, LtpD471-626, which was essential for targeting ectopically expressed LtpD to vesicular structures and for the association of translocated LtpD with the LCV. LtpD471-626 bound directly to phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PtdIns(3)P] in vitro and colocalized with the PtdIns(3)P markers FYVE and SetA in cotransfected cells. LtpD was also found to bind the host cell enzyme inositol (myo)-1 (or 4)-monophosphatase 1, an important phosphatase involved in phosphoinositide production. Analysis of the role of LtpD in infection showed that LtpD is involved in bacterial replication in THP-1 macrophages, the larvae of Galleria mellonella, and mouse lungs. Together, these data suggest that LtpD is a novel phosphoinositide-binding L. pneumophila effector that has a role in intracellular bacterial replication.

  9. LtpD Is a Novel Legionella pneumophila Effector That Binds Phosphatidylinositol 3-Phosphate and Inositol Monophosphatase IMPA1

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Clare R.; Mattheis, Corinna; Mousnier, Aurélie; Oates, Clare V.; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; Schroeder, Gunnar N.

    2013-01-01

    The Dot/Icm type IV secretion system (T4SS) of Legionella pneumophila is crucial for the pathogen to survive in protozoa and cause human disease. Although more than 275 effector proteins are delivered into the host cell by the T4SS, the function of the majority is unknown. Here we have characterized the Dot/Icm effector LtpD. During infection, LtpD localized to the cytoplasmic face of the membrane of the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). In A549 lung epithelial cells, ectopically expressed LtpD localized to large vesicular structures that contained markers of endosomal compartments. Systematic analysis of LtpD fragments identified an internal 17-kDa fragment, LtpD471-626, which was essential for targeting ectopically expressed LtpD to vesicular structures and for the association of translocated LtpD with the LCV. LtpD471-626 bound directly to phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PtdIns(3)P] in vitro and colocalized with the PtdIns(3)P markers FYVE and SetA in cotransfected cells. LtpD was also found to bind the host cell enzyme inositol (myo)-1 (or 4)-monophosphatase 1, an important phosphatase involved in phosphoinositide production. Analysis of the role of LtpD in infection showed that LtpD is involved in bacterial replication in THP-1 macrophages, the larvae of Galleria mellonella, and mouse lungs. Together, these data suggest that LtpD is a novel phosphoinositide-binding L. pneumophila effector that has a role in intracellular bacterial replication. PMID:24002062

  10. The Glycerol-3-Phosphate Acyltransferase GPAT6 from Tomato Plays a Central Role in Fruit Cutin Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Petit, Johann; Bres, Cécile; Mauxion, Jean-Philippe; Tai, Fabienne Wong Jun; Martin, Laetitia B B; Fich, Eric A; Joubès, Jérôme; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Domergue, Frédéric; Rothan, Christophe

    2016-06-01

    The thick cuticle covering and embedding the epidermal cells of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit acts not only as a protective barrier against pathogens and water loss but also influences quality traits such as brightness and postharvest shelf-life. In a recent study, we screened a mutant collection of the miniature tomato cultivar Micro-Tom and isolated several glossy fruit mutants in which the abundance of cutin, the polyester component of the cuticle, was strongly reduced. We employed a newly developed mapping-by-sequencing strategy to identify the causal mutation underlying the cutin deficiency in a mutant thereafter named gpat6-a (for glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase6). To this end, a backcross population (BC1F2) segregating for the glossy trait was phenotyped. Individuals displaying either a wild-type or a glossy fruit trait were then pooled into bulked populations and submitted to whole-genome sequencing prior to mutation frequency analysis. This revealed that the causal point mutation in the gpat6-a mutant introduces a charged amino acid adjacent to the active site of a GPAT6 enzyme. We further showed that this mutation completely abolished the GPAT activity of the recombinant protein. The gpat6-a mutant showed perturbed pollen formation but, unlike a gpat6 mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), was not male sterile. The most striking phenotype was observed in the mutant fruit, where cuticle thickness, composition, and properties were altered. RNA sequencing analysis highlighted the main processes and pathways that were affected by the mutation at the transcriptional level, which included those associated with lipid, secondary metabolite, and cell wall biosynthesis. PMID:27208295

  11. Active site cysteine-null glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) rescues nitric oxide-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takeya; Nakajima, Hidemitsu; Nakatsuji, Masatoshi; Itakura, Masanori; Kaneshige, Akihiro; Azuma, Yasu-Taka; Inui, Takashi; Takeuchi, Tadayoshi

    2016-02-29

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a homotetrameric enzyme involved in a key step of glycolysis, also has a role in mediating cell death under nitrosative stress. Our previous reports suggest that nitric oxide-induced intramolecular disulfide-bonding GAPDH aggregation, which occurs through oxidation of the active site cysteine (Cys-152), participates in a mechanism to account for nitric oxide-induced death signaling in some neurodegenerative/neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we demonstrate a rescue strategy for nitric oxide-induced cell death accompanied by GAPDH aggregation in a mutant with a substitution of Cys-152 to alanine (C152A-GAPDH). Pre-incubation of purified wild-type GAPDH with C152A-GAPDH under exposure to nitric oxide inhibited wild-type GAPDH aggregation in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro. Several lines of structural analysis revealed that C152A-GAPDH extensively interfered with nitric oxide-induced GAPDH-amyloidogenesis. Overexpression of doxycycline-inducible C152A-GAPDH in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma significantly rescued nitric oxide-induced death, concomitant with the decreased formation of GAPDH aggregates. Further, both co-immunoprecipitation assays and simulation models revealed a heterotetramer composed of one dimer each of wild-type GAPDH and C152A-GAPDH. These results suggest that the C152A-GAPDH mutant acts as a dominant-negative molecule against GAPDH aggregation via the formation of this GAPDH heterotetramer. This study may contribute to a new therapeutic approach utilizing C152A-GAPDH against brain damage in nitrosative stress-related disorders.

  12. Crystal Structure of CTP: Glycerol-3-Phosphate Cytidylyl Tranferase from Staphylococcus Aurues: Examination of Structural Basis for Kinetic Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Fong,D.; Yim, V.; D'elia, M.; Brown, E.; Berghuis, A.

    2006-01-01

    Integrity of the cell wall is essential for bacterial survival, and as a consequence components involved in its biosynthesis can potentially be exploited as targets for antibiotics. One such potential target is CTP:glycerol-3-phosphate cytidylyltransferase. This enzyme (TarD{sub Sa} in Staphylococcus aureus and TagD{sub Bs} in Bacillus subtilis) catalyzes the formation of CDP-glycerol, which is used for the assembly of linkages between peptidoglycan and teichoic acid polymer in Gram-positive bacteria. Intriguingly, despite the high sequence identity between TarD{sub Sa} and TagD{sub Bs} (69% identity), kinetic studies show that these two enzymes differ markedly in their kinetic mechanism and activity. To examine the basis for the disparate enzymological properties, we have determined the crystal structure of TarD{sub Sa} in the apo state to 3 Angstroms resolution, and performed equilibrium sedimentation analysis. Comparison of the structure with that of CTP- and CDP-glycerol-bound TagD{sub Bs} crystal structures reveals that the overall structure of TarD{sub Sa} is essentially the same as that of TagD{sub Bs}, except in the C-terminus, where it forms a helix in TagD{sub Bs} but is disordered in the apo TarDSa structure. In addition, TarD{sub Sa} can exist both as a tetramer and as a dimer, unlike TagD{sub Bs}, which is a dimer. These observations shed light on the structural basis for the differing kinetic characteristics between TarD{sub Sa} and TagD{sub Bs}.

  13. Glycerol-3-phosphate Acyltransferase Isoform-4 (GPAT4) Limits Oxidation of Exogenous Fatty Acids in Brown Adipocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Daniel E.; Grevengoed, Trisha J.; Klett, Eric L.; Coleman, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase-4 (GPAT4) null pups grew poorly during the suckling period and, as adults, were protected from high fat diet-induced obesity. To determine why Gpat4−/− mice failed to gain weight during these two periods of high fat feeding, we examined energy metabolism. Compared with controls, the metabolic rate of Gpat4−/− mice fed a 45% fat diet was 12% higher. Core body temperature was 1 ºC higher after high fat feeding. Food intake, fat absorption, and activity were similar in both genotypes. Impaired weight gain in Gpat4−/− mice did not result from increased heat loss, because both cold tolerance and response to a β3-adrenergic agonist were similar in both genotypes. Because GPAT4 comprises 65% of the total GPAT activity in brown adipose tissue (BAT), we characterized BAT function. A 45% fat diet increased the Gpat4−/− BAT expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPAR) target genes, Cpt1α, Pgc1α, and Ucp1, and BAT mitochondria oxidized oleate and pyruvate at higher rates than controls, suggesting that fatty acid signaling and flux through the TCA cycle were enhanced. To assess the role of GPAT4 directly, neonatal BAT preadipocytes were differentiated to adipocytes. Compared with controls, Gpat4−/− brown adipocytes incorporated 33% less fatty acid into triacylglycerol and 46% more into the pathway of β-oxidation. The increased oxidation rate was due solely to an increase in the oxidation of exogenous fatty acids. These data suggest that in the absence of cold exposure, GPAT4 limits excessive fatty acid oxidation and the detrimental induction of a hypermetabolic state. PMID:25918168

  14. Differential methylation of the gene encoding myo-inositol 3-phosphate synthase (Isyna1) in rat tissues

    PubMed Central

    Seelan, Ratnam S; Pisano, M Michele; Greene, Robert M; Casanova, Manuel F; Parthasarathy, Ranga N

    2011-01-01

    Aims Myo-inositol levels are frequently altered in several brain disorders. Myo-inositol 3-phosphate synthase, encoded by the Isyna1 gene, catalyzes the synthesis of myo-inositol in cells. Very little is known about the mechanisms regulating Isyna1 expression in brain and other tissues. In this study, we have examined the role of DNA methylation in regulating Isyna1 expression in rat tissues. Materials & methods Transfection analysis using in vitro methylated promoter constructs, Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA from various tissues digested with a methylation-sensitive enzyme and CpG methylation profiling of genomic DNA from different tissues were used to determine differential methylation of Isyna1 in tissues. Transfection analysis using plasmids harboring mutated CpG residues in the 5’-upstream region of Isyna1 was used to identify critical residues mediating promoter activity. Results The −700 bp to −500 bp region (region 1) of Isyna1 exhibited increased methylation in brain cortex compared with other tissues; it also exhibited sex-specific methylation differences between matched male and female brain cortices. Mutation analysis identified one CpG residue in region 1 necessary for promoter activity in neuronal cells. A tissue-specific differentially methylated region (T-DMR) was found to be localized between +450 bp and +650 bp (region 3). This DMR was comparatively highly methylated in spleen, moderately methylated in brain cortex and poorly methylated in testis, consistent with mRNA levels observed in these tissues. Conclusion Rat Isyna1 exhibits tissue-specific DNA methylation. Brain DNA was uniquely methylated in the 5’-upstream region and displayed gender specificity. A T-DMR was identified within the gene body of Isyna1. These findings suggest that Isyna1 is regulated, in part, by DNA methylation and that significant alterations in methylation patterns during development could have a major impact on inositol phosphate synthase expression in

  15. Transient Infantile Hypertriglyceridemia, Fatty Liver, and Hepatic Fibrosis Caused by Mutated GPD1, Encoding Glycerol-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase 1

    PubMed Central

    Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Zevit, Noam; Zahav, Adi Har; Guo, Liang; Parathath, Saj; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; McIntyre, Adam D.; Wang, Jian; Albin-Kaplanski, Adi; Hartman, Corina; Marom, Daphna; Zeharia, Avraham; Badir, Abir; Shoerman, Oded; Simon, Amos J.; Rechavi, Gideon; Shohat, Mordechai; Hegele, Robert A.; Fisher, Edward A.; Shamir, Raanan

    2012-01-01

    The molecular basis for primary hereditary hypertriglyceridemia has been identified in fewer than 5% of cases. Investigation of monogenic dyslipidemias has the potential to expose key metabolic pathways. We describe a hitherto unreported disease in ten individuals manifesting as moderate to severe transient childhood hypertriglyceridemia and fatty liver followed by hepatic fibrosis and the identification of the mutated gene responsible for this condition. We performed SNP array-based homozygosity mapping and found a single large continuous segment of homozygosity on chromosomal region 12q13.12. The candidate region contained 35 genes that are listed in Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) and 27 other genes. We performed candidate gene sequencing and screened both clinically affected individuals (children and adults with hypertriglyceridemia) and also a healthy cohort for mutations in GPD1, which encodes glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1. Mutation analysis revealed a homozygous splicing mutation, c.361−1G>C, which resulted in an aberrantly spliced mRNA in the ten affected individuals. This mutation is predicted to result in a truncated protein lacking essential conserved residues, including a functional site responsible for initial substrate recognition. Functional consequences of the mutation were evaluated by measuring intracellular concentrations of cholesterol and triglyceride as well as triglyceride secretion in HepG2 (hepatocellular carcinoma) human cells lines overexpressing normal and mutant GPD1 cDNA. Overexpression of mutant GPD1 in HepG2 cells, in comparison to overexpression of wild-type GPD1, resulted in increased secretion of triglycerides (p = 0.01). This finding supports the pathogenicity of the identified mutation. PMID:22226083

  16. The Glycerol-3-Phosphate Acyltransferase GPAT6 from Tomato Plays a Central Role in Fruit Cutin Biosynthesis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Johann; Mauxion, Jean-Philippe; Tai, Fabienne Wong Jun; Fich, Eric A.; Joubès, Jérôme; Rothan, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The thick cuticle covering and embedding the epidermal cells of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit acts not only as a protective barrier against pathogens and water loss but also influences quality traits such as brightness and postharvest shelf-life. In a recent study, we screened a mutant collection of the miniature tomato cultivar Micro-Tom and isolated several glossy fruit mutants in which the abundance of cutin, the polyester component of the cuticle, was strongly reduced. We employed a newly developed mapping-by-sequencing strategy to identify the causal mutation underlying the cutin deficiency in a mutant thereafter named gpat6-a (for glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase6). To this end, a backcross population (BC1F2) segregating for the glossy trait was phenotyped. Individuals displaying either a wild-type or a glossy fruit trait were then pooled into bulked populations and submitted to whole-genome sequencing prior to mutation frequency analysis. This revealed that the causal point mutation in the gpat6-a mutant introduces a charged amino acid adjacent to the active site of a GPAT6 enzyme. We further showed that this mutation completely abolished the GPAT activity of the recombinant protein. The gpat6-a mutant showed perturbed pollen formation but, unlike a gpat6 mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), was not male sterile. The most striking phenotype was observed in the mutant fruit, where cuticle thickness, composition, and properties were altered. RNA sequencing analysis highlighted the main processes and pathways that were affected by the mutation at the transcriptional level, which included those associated with lipid, secondary metabolite, and cell wall biosynthesis. PMID:27208295

  17. Pharmacological glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase inhibition decreases food intake and adiposity and increases insulin sensitivity in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Kuhajda, Francis P; Aja, Susan; Tu, Yajun; Han, Wan Fang; Medghalchi, Susan M; El Meskini, Rajaa; Landree, Leslie E; Peterson, Jonathan M; Daniels, Khadija; Wong, Kody; Wydysh, Edward A; Townsend, Craig A; Ronnett, Gabriele V

    2011-07-01

    Storage of excess calories as triglycerides is central to obesity and its associated disorders. Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferases (GPATs) catalyze the initial step in acylglyceride syntheses, including triglyceride synthesis. We utilized a novel small-molecule GPAT inhibitor, FSG67, to investigate metabolic consequences of systemic pharmacological GPAT inhibition in lean and diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. FSG67 administered intraperitoneally decreased body weight and energy intake, without producing conditioned taste aversion. Daily FSG67 (5 mg/kg, 15.3 μmol/kg) produced gradual 12% weight loss in DIO mice beyond that due to transient 9- to 10-day hypophagia (6% weight loss in pair-fed controls). Continued FSG67 maintained the weight loss despite return to baseline energy intake. Weight was lost specifically from fat mass. Indirect calorimetry showed partial protection by FSG67 against decreased rates of oxygen consumption seen with hypophagia. Despite low respiratory exchange ratio due to a high-fat diet, FSG67-treated mice showed further decreased respiratory exchange ratio, beyond pair-fed controls, indicating enhanced fat oxidation. Chronic FSG67 increased glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in DIO mice. Chronic FSG67 decreased gene expression for lipogenic enzymes in white adipose tissue and liver and decreased lipid accumulation in white adipose, brown adipose, and liver tissues without signs of damage. RT-PCR showed decreased gene expression for orexigenic hypothalamic neuropeptides AgRP or NPY after acute and chronic systemic FSG67. FSG67 given intracerebroventricularly (100 and 320 nmol icv) produced 24-h weight loss and feeding suppression, indicating contributions from direct central nervous system sites of action. Together, these data point to GPAT as a new potential therapeutic target for the management of obesity and its comorbidities. PMID:21490364

  18. Phylogenetically-based variation in the regulation of the Calvin cycle enzymes, phosphoribulokinase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, in algae.

    PubMed

    Maberly, Stephen C; Courcelle, Carine; Groben, Rene; Gontero, Brigitte

    2010-03-01

    Aquatic photosynthesis is responsible for about half of the global production and is undertaken by a huge phylogenetic diversity of algae that are poorly studied. The diversity of redox-regulation of phosphoribulokinase (PRK) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was investigated in a wide range of algal groups under standard conditions. Redox-regulation of PRK was greatest in chlorophytes, low or absent in a red alga and most chromalveolates, and linked to the number of amino acids between two regulatory cysteine residues. GAPDH regulation was not strongly-related to the different forms of this enzyme and was less variable than for PRK. Addition of recombinant CP12, a protein that forms a complex with PRK and GAPDH, to crude extracts inhibited GAPDH and PRK inversely in the Plantae, but in most chromalveolates had little effect on GAPDH and inhibited or stimulated PRK depending on the species. Patterns of enzyme regulation were used to produce a phylogenetic tree in which cryptophytes and haptophytes, at the base of the chromalveolates, formed a distinct clade. A second clade comprised only chromalveolates. A third clade comprised a mixture of Plantae, an excavate and three chromalveolates: a marine diatom and two others (a xanthophyte and eustigmatophyte) that are distinguished by a low content of chlorophyll c and a lack of fucoxanthin. Regulation of both enzymes was greater in freshwater than in marine taxa, possibly because most freshwaters are more dynamic than oceans. This work highlights the importance of understanding enzyme regulation in diverse algae if their ecology and productivity is to be understood.

  19. Cell cycle regulation of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase/uracil DNA glycosylase gene in normal human cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mansur, N R; Meyer-Siegler, K; Wurzer, J C; Sirover, M A

    1993-01-01

    The cell cycle regulation of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH)/uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) gene was examined in normal human cells. Steady state RNA levels were monitored by Northern blot analysis using a plasmid (pChug 20.1) which contained the 1.3 kb GAPDH/UDG cDNA. The biosynthesis of the 37 kDa GAPDH/UDG protein was determined using an anti-human placental GAPDH/UDG monoclonal antibody to immunoprecipitate the radiolabeled protein. Increases in steady state GAPDH/UDG mRNA levels were cell cycle specific. A biphasic pattern was observed resulting in a 19-fold increase in the amount of GAPDH/UDG mRNA. The biosynthesis of the 37 kDa GAPDH/UDG protein displayed a similar biphasic regulation with a 7-fold increase. Pulse-chase experiments revealed a remarkably short half life of less than 1 hr. for the newly synthesized 37 kDa protein, comparable to that previously documented for a number of oncogenes. GAPDH/UDG mRNA levels were markedly reduced at 24 hr. when DNA synthesis was maximal. These results define the GAPDH/UDG gene as cell cycle regulated with a characteristic temporal sequence of expression in relation to DNA synthesis. The cell cycle synthesis of a labile 37 kDa monomer suggests a possible regulatory function for this multidimensional protein. Further, modulation of the GAPDH/UDG gene in the cell cycle may preclude its use as a reporter gene when the proliferative state of the cell is not kept constant. Images PMID:8451199

  20. The Glycerol-3-Phosphate Acyltransferase GPAT6 from Tomato Plays a Central Role in Fruit Cutin Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Petit, Johann; Bres, Cécile; Mauxion, Jean-Philippe; Tai, Fabienne Wong Jun; Martin, Laetitia B B; Fich, Eric A; Joubès, Jérôme; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Domergue, Frédéric; Rothan, Christophe

    2016-06-01

    The thick cuticle covering and embedding the epidermal cells of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit acts not only as a protective barrier against pathogens and water loss but also influences quality traits such as brightness and postharvest shelf-life. In a recent study, we screened a mutant collection of the miniature tomato cultivar Micro-Tom and isolated several glossy fruit mutants in which the abundance of cutin, the polyester component of the cuticle, was strongly reduced. We employed a newly developed mapping-by-sequencing strategy to identify the causal mutation underlying the cutin deficiency in a mutant thereafter named gpat6-a (for glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase6). To this end, a backcross population (BC1F2) segregating for the glossy trait was phenotyped. Individuals displaying either a wild-type or a glossy fruit trait were then pooled into bulked populations and submitted to whole-genome sequencing prior to mutation frequency analysis. This revealed that the causal point mutation in the gpat6-a mutant introduces a charged amino acid adjacent to the active site of a GPAT6 enzyme. We further showed that this mutation completely abolished the GPAT activity of the recombinant protein. The gpat6-a mutant showed perturbed pollen formation but, unlike a gpat6 mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), was not male sterile. The most striking phenotype was observed in the mutant fruit, where cuticle thickness, composition, and properties were altered. RNA sequencing analysis highlighted the main processes and pathways that were affected by the mutation at the transcriptional level, which included those associated with lipid, secondary metabolite, and cell wall biosynthesis.

  1. A monoclonal antibody that inhibits translation in Sf21 cell lysates is specific for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Van Meter, Kipp E; Stuart, Melissa K

    2008-11-01

    Monoclonal antibody (Mab) 8B7 was shown in a previous study to inhibit protein translation in lysates of Sf21 cells. The antibody was thought to be specific for a 60-kDa form of elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1alpha), primarily because the antigen immunoprecipitated by Mab 8B7 cross-reacted with Mab CBP-KK1, an antibody generated to EF-1alpha from Trypanosoma brucei. The purpose of the current study was to investigate further the antigenic specificity of Mab 8B7. The concentration of the 60-kDa antigen relative to total cellular protein proved insufficient for its definitive identification. However, subcellular fractionation of Sf21 cells yielded an additional protein of 37 kDa in the cytosolic and microsomal fractions that was reactive with Mab 8B7. The 37-kDa protein could be easily visualized by colloidal Coomassie Blue G-250 staining as a series of pI 6.9-8.4 spots on two-dimensional gels. Excision of an abundant immunoreactive spot enabled identification of the protein as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) and protein database searching. Subsequent immunoblotting of purified rabbit skeletal muscle GAPDH with Mab 8B7 confirmed the antibody's specificity for GAPDH. Besides the pivotal role GAPDH plays in glycolysis, the enzyme has a number of noncanonical functions, including binding to mRNA and tRNA. The ability of Mab 8B7 to disrupt these lesser-known functions of GAPDH may account for the antibody's inhibitory effect on in vitro translation. PMID:18850593

  2. Translocation of the precursor of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase into chloroplasts of higher plants in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Della-Cioppa, Guy; Bauer, S. Christopher; Klein, Barbara K.; Shah, Dilip M.; Fraley, Robert T.; Kishore, Ganesh M.

    1986-01-01

    5-enolPyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSP synthase; 3-phosphoshikimate 1-carboxyvinyl-transferase; EC 2.5.1.19) is a chloroplast-localized enzyme of the shikimate pathway in plants. This enzyme is the target for the nonselective herbicide glyphosate (N-phosphonomethylglycine). We have previously isolated a full-length cDNA clone of EPSP synthase from Petunia hybrida. DNA sequence analysis suggested that the enzyme is synthesized as a cytosolic precursor (pre-EPSP synthase) with an amino-terminal transit peptide. Based on the known amino terminus of the mature enzyme, and the 5′ open reading frame of the cDNA, the transit peptide of pre-EPSP synthase would be maximally 72 amino acids long. To confirm this prediction and to assay directly for translocation of pre-EPSP synthase into chloroplasts in vitro, we cloned the full-length cDNA into an SP6 transcription system to produce large amounts of mRNA for in vitro translation. The translation products, when analyzed by NaDodSO4/PAGE autoradiography, indicate a relative molecular mass for pre-EPSP synthase of ≈55 kDa. Uptake studies with intact chloroplasts, in vitro, indicate that pre-EPSP synthase was rapidly taken up into chloroplasts and proteolytically cleaved to the mature ≈48-kDa enzyme. The transit peptide was shown to be essential for import of the precursor enzyme into the chloroplast. To our knowledge, post-translational import into chloroplasts of a precursor enzyme involved in amino acid biosynthesis has not been reported previously. Furthermore, enzymatic analysis of translation products indicates that pre-EPSP synthase is catalytically active and has a similar sensitivity to the herbicide glyphosate as the mature enzyme. To our knowledge, pre-EPSP synthase represents the only example of a catalytically competent chloroplast-precursor enzyme. Images PMID:16593759

  3. Hydron transfer catalyzed by triosephosphate isomerase. Products of isomerization of (R)-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate in D2O.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue, Annmarie C; Amyes, Tina L; Richard, John P

    2005-02-22

    The product distributions for the reactions of (R)-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (GAP) in D(2)O at pD 7.5-7.9 catalyzed by triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) from chicken and rabbit muscle were determined by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Three products were observed from the reactions catalyzed by TIM: dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) from isomerization with intramolecular transfer of hydrogen (49% of the enzymatic products), [1(R)-(2)H]-DHAP from isomerization with incorporation of deuterium from D(2)O into C-1 of DHAP (31% of the enzymatic products), and [2(R)-(2)H]-GAP from incorporation of deuterium from D(2)O into C-2 of GAP (21% of the enzymatic products). The similar yields of [1(R)-(2)H]-DHAP and [2(R)-(2)H]-GAP from partitioning of the enzyme-bound enediol(ate) intermediate between hydron transfer to C-1 and C-2 is consistent with earlier results, which showed that there are similar barriers for conversion of this intermediate to the alpha-hydroxy ketone and aldehyde products (Knowles, J. R., and Albery, W. J. (1977) Acc. Chem. Res. 10, 105-111). However, the observation that the TIM-catalyzed isomerization of GAP in D(2)O proceeds with 49% intramolecular transfer of the (1)H label from substrate to product DHAP stands in sharp contrast with the

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of fluorinated fingolimod (FTY720) analogues for sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor molecular imaging by positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Rizwan S; Schilson, Stefanie S; Wagner, Stefan; Hermann, Sven; Keul, Petra; Levkau, Bodo; Schäfers, Michael; Haufe, Günter

    2015-04-23

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a lysophospholipid that evokes a variety of biological responses via stimulation of a set of cognate G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): S1P1-S1P5. S1P and its receptors (S1PRs) play important roles in the immune, cardiovascular, and central nervous systems and have also been implicated in carcinogenesis. Recently, the S1P analogue Fingolimod (FTY720) has been approved for the treatment of patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis. This work presents the synthesis of various fluorinated structural analogues of FTY720, their in vitro and in vivo biological testing, and their development and application as [(18)F]radiotracers for the study of S1PR biodistribution and imaging in mice using small-animal positron emission tomography (PET).

  5. Expression of LPP3 in Bergmann glia is required for proper cerebellar sphingosine-1-phosphate metabolism/signaling and development

    PubMed Central

    López-Juárez, Alejandro; Morales-Lázaro, Sara; Sánchez-Sánchez, Roberto; Sunkara, Manjula; Lomelí, Hilda; Velasco, Iván; Morris, Andrew J.; Escalante-Alcalde, Diana

    2011-01-01

    Bioactive lipids serve as intracellular and extracellular mediators in cell signaling in normal and pathological conditions. Here we describe that an important regulator of some of these lipids, the lipid phosphate phosphatase-3 (LPP3), is abundantly expressed in specific plasma membrane domains of Bergmann glia (BG), a specialized type of astrocyte with key roles in cerebellum development and physiology. Mice selectively lacking expression of LPP3/Ppap2b in the nervous system are viable and fertile but exhibit defects in postnatal cerebellum development and modifications in the cytoarchitecture and arrangement of BG with a mild non-progressive motor coordination defect. Lipid and gene profiling studies in combination with pharmacological treatments suggest that most of these effects are associated with alterations in sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) metabolism and signaling. Altogether our data indicate that LPP3 participates in several aspects of neuron-glia communication required for proper cerebellum development. PMID:21319224

  6. Expression of LPP3 in Bergmann glia is required for proper cerebellar sphingosine-1-phosphate metabolism/signaling and development.

    PubMed

    López-Juárez, Alejandro; Morales-Lázaro, Sara; Sánchez-Sánchez, Roberto; Sunkara, Manjula; Lomelí, Hilda; Velasco, Iván; Morris, Andrew J; Escalante-Alcalde, Diana

    2011-04-01

    Bioactive lipids serve as intracellular and extracellular mediators in cell signaling in normal and pathological conditions. Here we describe that an important regulator of some of these lipids, the lipid phosphate phosphatase-3 (LPP3), is abundantly expressed in specific plasma membrane domains of Bergmann glia (BG), a specialized type of astrocyte with key roles in cerebellum development and physiology. Mice selectively lacking expression of LPP3/Ppap2b in the nervous system are viable and fertile but exhibit defects in postnatal cerebellum development and modifications in the cytoarchitecture and arrangement of BG with a mild non-progressive motor coordination defect. Lipid and gene profiling studies in combination with pharmacological treatments suggest that most of these effects are associated with alterations in sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) metabolism and signaling. Altogether our data indicate that LPP3 participates in several aspects of neuron-glia communication required for proper cerebellum development.

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of fluorinated fingolimod (FTY720) analogues for sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor molecular imaging by positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Rizwan S; Schilson, Stefanie S; Wagner, Stefan; Hermann, Sven; Keul, Petra; Levkau, Bodo; Schäfers, Michael; Haufe, Günter

    2015-04-23

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a lysophospholipid that evokes a variety of biological responses via stimulation of a set of cognate G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): S1P1-S1P5. S1P and its receptors (S1PRs) play important roles in the immune, cardiovascular, and central nervous systems and have also been implicated in carcinogenesis. Recently, the S1P analogue Fingolimod (FTY720) has been approved for the treatment of patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis. This work presents the synthesis of various fluorinated structural analogues of FTY720, their in vitro and in vivo biological testing, and their development and application as [(18)F]radiotracers for the study of S1PR biodistribution and imaging in mice using small-animal positron emission tomography (PET). PMID:25826109

  8. Studies on the inhibition of sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase by stabilized reaction intermediates and stereodefined azido phosphates.

    PubMed

    Sanllehí, Pol; Abad, José-Luís; Bujons, Jordi; Casas, Josefina; Delgado, Antonio

    2016-11-10

    Two kinds of inhibitors of the PLP-dependent enzyme sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase have been designed and tested on the bacterial (StS1PL) and the human (hS1PL) enzymes. Amino phosphates 1, 12, and 32, mimicking the intermediate aldimines of the catalytic process, were weak inhibitors on both enzyme sources. On the other hand, a series of stereodefined azido phosphates, resulting from the replacement of the amino group of the natural substrates with an azido group, afforded competitive inhibitors in the low micromolar range on both enzyme sources. This similar behavior represents an experimental evidence of the reported structural similarities for both enzymes at their active site level. Interestingly, the anti-isomers of the non-natural enantiomeric series where the most potent inhibitors on hS1PL.

  9. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of glucose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GalU) from Erwinia amylovora

    PubMed Central

    Toccafondi, Mirco; Cianci, Michele; Benini, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Glucose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase from Erwinia amylovora CFPB1430 was expressed as a His-tag fusion protein in Escherichia coli. After tag removal, the purified protein was crystallized from 100 mM Tris pH 8.5, 2 M ammonium sulfate, 5% ethylene glycol. Diffraction data sets were collected to a maximum resolution of 2.46 Å using synchrotron radiation. The crystals belonged to the hexagonal space group P62, with unit-cell parameters a = 80.67, b = 80.67, c = 169.18. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using the structure of the E. coli enzyme as a search model. PMID:25195902

  10. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a key factor for stimulation of macrophage proliferation by ceramide 1-phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Arana, Lide; Gangoiti, Patricia; Ouro, Alberto; Rivera, Io-Guane; Ordonez, Marta; Trueba, Miguel; Lankalapalli, Ravi S.; Bittman, Robert; Gomez-Munoz, Antonio

    2012-02-15

    We previously demonstrated that ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) is mitogenic for fibroblasts and macrophages. However, the mechanisms involved in this action were only partially described. Here, we demonstrate that C1P stimulates reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages, and that ROS are required for the mitogenic effect of C1P. ROS production was dependent upon prior activation of NADPH oxidase by C1P, which was determined by measuring phosphorylation of the p40phox subunit and translocation of p47phox from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. In addition, C1P activated cytosolic calcium-dependent phospholipase A{sub 2} and protein kinase C-{alpha}, and NADPH oxidase activation was blocked by selective inhibitors of these enzymes. These inhibitors, and inhibitors of ROS production, blocked the mitogenic effect of C1P. By using BHNB-C1P (a photolabile caged-C1P analog), we demonstrate that all of these C1P actions are caused by intracellular C1P. It can be concluded that the enzyme responsible for C1P-stimulated ROS generation in bone marrow-derived macrophages is NADPH oxidase, and that this enzyme is downstream of PKC-{alpha} and cPLA{sub 2}-{alpha} in this pathway. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) stimulates reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The enzyme responsible for ROS generation by C1P in macrophages is NADPH oxidase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NADPH oxidase lies downstream of cPLA{sub 2}-{alpha} and PKC-{alpha} in this pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROS generation is essential for the stimulation of macrophage proliferation by C1P.

  11. Functional characterization of UDP-glucose:undecaprenyl-phosphate glucose-1-phosphate transferases of Escherichia coli and Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kinnari B; Toh, Evelyn; Fernandez, Ximena B; Hanuszkiewicz, Anna; Hardy, Gail G; Brun, Yves V; Bernards, Mark A; Valvano, Miguel A

    2012-05-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 WcaJ and the Caulobacter crescentus HfsE, PssY, and PssZ enzymes are predicted to initiate the synthesis of colanic acid (CA) capsule and holdfast polysaccharide, respectively. These proteins belong to a prokaryotic family of membrane enzymes that catalyze the formation of a phosphoanhydride bond joining a hexose-1-phosphate with undecaprenyl phosphate (Und-P). In this study, in vivo complementation assays of an E. coli K-12 wcaJ mutant demonstrated that WcaJ and PssY can complement CA synthesis. Furthermore, WcaJ can restore holdfast production in C. crescentus. In vitro transferase assays demonstrated that both WcaJ and PssY utilize UDP-glucose but not UDP-galactose. However, in a strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium deficient in the WbaP O antigen initiating galactosyltransferase, complementation with WcaJ or PssY resulted in O-antigen production. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) revealed the attachment of both CA and O-antigen molecules to lipid A-core oligosaccharide (OS). Therefore, while UDP-glucose is the preferred substrate of WcaJ and PssY, these enzymes can also utilize UDP-galactose. This unexpected feature of WcaJ and PssY may help to map specific residues responsible for the nucleotide diphosphate specificity of these or similar enzymes. Also, the reconstitution of O-antigen synthesis in Salmonella, CA capsule synthesis in E. coli, and holdfast synthesis provide biological assays of high sensitivity to examine the sugar-1-phosphate transferase specificity of heterologous proteins.

  12. Ultra Fast and Sensitive Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry Based Assay for Galactose-1-Phosphate Uridylyltransferase and Galactokinase Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yijun; Ptolemy, Adam S.; Harmonay, Lauren; Kellogg, Mark; Berry, Gerard T.

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of transferase and galactokinase deficiency galactosemia usually involves the measurement of erythrocyte galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) and galactokinase (GALK) enzyme activity, respectively. The current gold standard assays for these enzymes are radioactive assays, which are laborious and/or incapable of measuring low enzyme activities. To further our knowledge of genotype-phenotype relationships, we had developed an assay for GALT activity alone using LC-MS/MS. In this study we generated a robust and sensitive LC-MS/MS based GALT and GALK assay using a novel normal phase chromatographic condition. We improved upon our earlier assay by drastically reducing the instrument run time and eliminating the use of an ion pairing reagent. Stable isotope labeled substrates were utilized in the GALT and GALK assays. The enzymatic products ([13C6]-uridine diphosphate galactose in GALT assay and [13C6]-galactose-1-phosphate in GALK assay) were quantified in a 3 min LC-MS/MS run. The assays were sensitive enough to allow for the quantification of enzyme activities as low as 0.2% and 0.3% of normal control values in the GALT and GALK assays, respectively. Thirty-three samples from non-galactosemic patients were assayed to have erythrocyte GALT activity of 23.4 ± 4.2 and GALK activity of 1.8 ± 0.47 (mean ± SD) µmol·(g Hgb) −1·hr−1. Erythrocyte GALT activities in a cohort of 16 patients with classic galactosemia were measured: 4 patients had GALT activity less than 1% of normal control values and the remaining 12 had no detectable GALT activity. No GALK activity was detected in a GALK deficient sample we analzyed. Lastly, we tested the feasibility of adapting this LC-MS/MS based GALT/GALK assay as a newborn screening (NBS) test. PMID:20863731

  13. Ultra fast and sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry based assay for galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase and galactokinase deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Li, Yijun; Ptolemy, Adam S; Harmonay, Lauren; Kellogg, Mark; Berry, Gerard T

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of transferase and galactokinase deficiency galactosemia usually involves the measurement of erythrocyte galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) and galactokinase (GALK) enzyme activity, respectively. The current gold standard assays for these enzymes are radioactive assays, which are laborious and/or incapable of measuring low enzyme activities. To further our knowledge of genotype-phenotype relationships, we had developed an assay for GALT activity alone using LC-MS/MS. In this study we generated a robust and sensitive LC-MS/MS based GALT and GALK assay using a novel normal phase chromatographic condition. We improved upon our earlier assay by drastically reducing the instrument run time and eliminating the use of an ion pairing reagent. Stable isotope labeled substrates were utilized in the GALT and GALK assays. The enzymatic products ([(13)C(6)]-uridine diphosphate galactose in GALT assay and [(13)C(6)]-galactose-1-phosphate in GALK assay) were quantified in a 3 min LC-MS/MS run. The assays were sensitive enough to allow for the quantification of enzyme activities as low as 0.2% and 0.3% of normal control values in the GALT and GALK assays, respectively. Thirty-three samples from non-galactosemic patients were assayed to have erythrocyte GALT activity of 23.4±4.2 and GALK activity of 1.8±0.47 (mean±SD) μmol⋅(g Hgb)(-1) h(-1). Erythrocyte GALT activities in a cohort of 16 patients with classic or severe galactosemia were measured: 4 patients had GALT activity less than 1% of normal control values and the remaining 12 had no detectable GALT activity. No GALK activity was detected in a GALK deficient sample we analyzed. Lastly, we tested the feasibility of adapting this LC-MS/MS based GALT/GALK assay as a newborn screening (NBS) test.

  14. Ultra fast and sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry based assay for galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase and galactokinase deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Li, Yijun; Ptolemy, Adam S; Harmonay, Lauren; Kellogg, Mark; Berry, Gerard T

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of transferase and galactokinase deficiency galactosemia usually involves the measurement of erythrocyte galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) and galactokinase (GALK) enzyme activity, respectively. The current gold standard assays for these enzymes are radioactive assays, which are laborious and/or incapable of measuring low enzyme activities. To further our knowledge of genotype-phenotype relationships, we had developed an assay for GALT activity alone using LC-MS/MS. In this study we generated a robust and sensitive LC-MS/MS based GALT and GALK assay using a novel normal phase chromatographic condition. We improved upon our earlier assay by drastically reducing the instrument run time and eliminating the use of an ion pairing reagent. Stable isotope labeled substrates were utilized in the GALT and GALK assays. The enzymatic products ([(13)C(6)]-uridine diphosphate galactose in GALT assay and [(13)C(6)]-galactose-1-phosphate in GALK assay) were quantified in a 3 min LC-MS/MS run. The assays were sensitive enough to allow for the quantification of enzyme activities as low as 0.2% and 0.3% of normal control values in the GALT and GALK assays, respectively. Thirty-three samples from non-galactosemic patients were assayed to have erythrocyte GALT activity of 23.4±4.2 and GALK activity of 1.8±0.47 (mean±SD) μmol⋅(g Hgb)(-1) h(-1). Erythrocyte GALT activities in a cohort of 16 patients with classic or severe galactosemia were measured: 4 patients had GALT activity less than 1% of normal control values and the remaining 12 had no detectable GALT activity. No GALK activity was detected in a GALK deficient sample we analyzed. Lastly, we tested the feasibility of adapting this LC-MS/MS based GALT/GALK assay as a newborn screening (NBS) test. PMID:20863731

  15. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of an NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Helicobacter pylori

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Paul R.; Mohammad, Shabaz; Melrose, Helen J.; Moody, Peter C. E.

    2008-08-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase B from H. pylori has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized in the presence of NAD. Crystals of GAPDHB diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution and belonged to space group P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 166.1, c = 253.1 Å. Helicobacter pylori is a dangerous human pathogen that resides in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Little is known about its metabolism and with the onset of antibiotic resistance new treatments are required. In this study, the expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction of an NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from H. pylori are reported.

  16. Inhibition of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase by plasma and serum ultrafiltrates due in part to a low-molecular-weight, nonpeptide material.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, P L; Turfus, I M

    1975-05-01

    In an attempt to verify the existence in the blood of a diabetogenic peptide (somantin) derived from growth hormone, ultrafiltrates from plasma and serum from normal and diabetic subjects were prepared. The freeze-dried residues of these ultrafiltrates inhibited glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase as somantin is claimed to do. However, the behavior of the inhibitory material on gel filtration on Sephadex G-10 indicated a molecular weight well below 700, rather than the considerably larger size claimed for somantin. The inhibitory material did not adsorb to Dowex 50W cation exchange resin at pH 2.5, while over 95 percent of ninhydrin-positive material was retained. Acid hydrolysis of the inhibitory material did not abolish its activity. Because of the presence of this low-molecular-weight, nonpeptide inhibitory material, inhibition of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase by a simple ultrafiltrate of plasma or serum is probably not a definitive measure of somantin. PMID:1128227

  17. Antibodies to inactive conformations of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase inactivate the apo- and holoforms of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Arutiunova, E I; Pleten, A P; Nagradova, N K; Muronetz, V I

    2006-06-01

    Polyclonal antibodies produced after the immunization of a rabbit with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from Bacillus stearothermophilus were used to isolate two types of antibodies interacting with different non-native forms of the antigen. Type I antibodies were purified using Sepharose-bound apo-GAPDH that was treated with glutaraldehyde to stabilize the enzyme in the tetrameric form. Type II antibodies were isolated using immobilized denatured monomers of the enzyme. It was shown that the type I antibodies bound to the native holo- and apoforms of the enzyme with the ratio of one antibody molecule per GAPDH tetramer. While interacting with the native holoenzyme, the type I antibodies induce a time-dependent decrease in its activity by 80-90%. In the case of the apoenzyme, the decrease in the activity constitutes only 25%, this indicating that only one subunit of the tetramer is inactivated. Differential scanning calorimetry experiments showed that the formation of the complex between both forms of the enzyme and the type I antibodies resulted in a shift of the maximum of the thermal capacity curves (T(m) value) to lower temperatures. The extremely stable holoenzyme was affected to the greatest extent, the shift of the T(m) value constituting approximately 20 degrees C. We assume that the formation of the complex between the holo- or apo-GAPDH and the type I antibody results in time-dependent conformational changes in the enzyme molecule. Thus, the antibodies induce the structural rearrangements yielding the conformation that is identical to the structure of the antigen used for the selection of the antibodies (i.e., inactive). The interaction of the antibodies with the apo-GAPDH results in the inactivation of the subunit directly bound to the antibody. Virtually complete inactivation of the holoenzyme by the antibodies is likely due to the transmission of the conformational changes through the intersubunit contacts. The type II antibodies, which

  18. The ferredoxin-dependent conversion of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus represents a novel site of glycolytic regulation.

    PubMed

    van der Oost, J; Schut, G; Kengen, S W; Hagen, W R; Thomm, M; de Vos, W M

    1998-10-23

    The fermentative conversion of glucose in anaerobic hyperthermophilic Archaea is a variant of the classical Embden-Meyerhof pathway found in Bacteria and Eukarya. A major difference of the archaeal glycolytic pathway concerns the conversion of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, this reaction is catalyzed by an unique enzyme, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (GAPOR). Here, we report the isolation, characterization, and transcriptional analysis of the GAPOR-encoding gene. GAPOR is related to a family of ferredoxin-dependent tungsten enzymes in (hyper)thermophilic Archaea and, in addition, to a hypothetical protein in Escherichia coli. Electron paramagnetic resonance analysis of the purified P. furiosus GAPOR protein confirms the anticipated involvement of tungsten in catalysis. During glycolysis in P. furiosus, GAPOR gene expression is induced, whereas the activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is repressed. It is discussed that this unprecedented unidirectional reaction couple in the pyrococcal glycolysis and gluconeogenesis gives rise to a novel site of glycolytic regulation that might be widespread among Archaea.

  19. Post-transcriptional modification of the poly(A) length of galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase mRNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, C A; Bostian, K A; Halvorson, H O

    1980-01-01

    Thermal elution poly(U)-Sepharose chromatography was utilized to fractionate yeast mRNA based on poly(A) size. Analysis of the in vitro translation products of the fractionated RNAs in a wheat-embryo cell-free protein synthesis system shows a heterogeneous but equal distribution of these abundant translatable mRNAs in the different poly(A) size classes. By comparing the translational activity of inducible galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase mRNA, which can be monitored as a function of age, to contitutive mRNAs, we demonstrate that initially galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase mRNA has a uniformly large poly(A) tail which becomes heterogeneous and shorter with age in the cytoplasm. These observations are consistent with the previously observed cytoplasmic poly(A) catabolism in yeast and with cytoplasmic post-transcriptional modification of the poly(A) length of galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase mRNA. Images PMID:6255420

  20. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 mediates endothelial cells dysfunction by PI3K-Akt pathway under high glucose condition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weihua; Liu, Bin; Liu, Shaojun; Zhang, Jingzhi; Lin, Shuangfeng

    2016-04-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is believed the early stage of development of diabetic cardiovascular complications. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) regulates various biological activities by binding to sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors (S1PRs) including S1PR1-S1PR5. In the present study, the role of S1P receptors in S1P-induced human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) dysfunction under high glucose condition was investigated and the underlying mechanism was explored. S1PR1-S1PR5 mRNA levels were detected by quantitative Real-time PCR. NO level and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN)-endothelial cells adhesion were measured by nitrate reductase and myeloperoxidase colorimetric method, respectively. Protein levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1(ICAM-1), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt were measured by Western blot analysis. S1PR2 were found the predominant S1P receptor expressed in HCAECs exposed to high glucose. NO level and eNOS activity were remarkably decreased, while PMN adhesion, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 protein levels were increased significantly by S1P treatment in HCAECs exposed to high glucose and normal glucose. Blockage of S1PR2 with specific antagonist JTE-013 and small interfering RNA (siRNA) resulted in enhanced NO level and eNOS activity as well as decreased PMN adhesion, reduced protein levels of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 induced by S1P. Furthermore, Phosphor-PI3K and phosphor-Akt level were markedly increased by S1PR2 blockade in S1P-treated cells exposed to high glucose, which were suppressed by PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. In conclusion, S1P/S1PR2 mediated endothelial dysfunction partly by inhibiting PI3K/Akt signaling pathway under high glucose condition. S1PR2 blockage could ameliorate endothelial dysfunction which might provide a potential therapeutic strategy for diabetic vascular complications. PMID:26921757

  1. Mechanistic characterization of the tetraacyldisaccharide-1-phosphate 4'-kinase LpxK involved in lipid A biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Emptage, Ryan P; Pemble, Charles W; York, John D; Raetz, Christian R H; Zhou, Pei

    2013-04-01

    The sixth step in the lipid A biosynthetic pathway involves phosphorylation of the tetraacyldisaccharide-1-phosphate (DSMP) intermediate by the cytosol-facing inner membrane kinase LpxK, a member of the P-loop-containing nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) hydrolase superfamily. We report the kinetic characterization of LpxK from Aquifex aeolicus and the crystal structures of LpxK in complex with ATP in a precatalytic binding state, the ATP analogue AMP-PCP in the closed catalytically competent conformation, and a chloride anion revealing an inhibitory conformation of the nucleotide-binding P-loop. We demonstrate that LpxK activity in vitro requires the presence of a detergent micelle and formation of a ternary LpxK-ATP/Mg(2+)-DSMP complex. Using steady-state kinetics, we have identified crucial active site residues, leading to the proposal that the interaction of D99 with H261 acts to increase the pKa of the imidazole moiety, which in turn serves as the catalytic base to deprotonate the 4'-hydroxyl of the DSMP substrate. The fact that an analogous mechanism has not yet been observed for other P-loop kinases highlights LpxK as a distinct member of the P-loop kinase family, a notion that is also reflected through its localization at the membrane, lipid substrate, and overall structure.

  2. Mutagenesis of the Glucose-1-Phosphate-Binding Site of Potato Tuber ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase1

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yingbin; Ballicora, Miguel A.; Preiss, Jack

    1998-01-01

    Lysine (Lys)-195 in the homotetrameric ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (ADPGlc PPase) from Escherichia coli was shown previously to be involved in the binding of the substrate glucose-1-phosphate (Glc-1-P). This residue is highly conserved in the ADPGlc PPase family. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to investigate the function of this conserved Lys residue in the large and small subunits of the heterotetrameric potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber enzyme. The apparent affinity for Glc-1-P of the wild-type enzyme decreased 135- to 550-fold by changing Lys-198 of the small subunit to arginine, alanine, or glutamic acid, suggesting that both the charge and the size of this residue influence Glc-1-P binding. These mutations had little effect on the kinetic constants for the other substrates (ATP and Mg2+ or ADP-Glc and inorganic phosphate), activator (3-phosphoglycerate), inhibitor (inorganic phosphate), or on the thermal stability. Mutagenesis of the corresponding Lys (Lys-213) in the large subunit had no effect on the apparent affinity for Glc-1-P by substitution with arginine, alanine, or glutamic acid. A double mutant, SK198RLK213R, was also obtained that had a 100-fold reduction of the apparent affinity for Glc-1-P. The data indicate that Lys-198 in the small subunit is directly involved in the binding of Glc-1-P, whereas they appear to exclude a direct role of Lys-213 in the large subunit in the interaction with this substrate. PMID:9662541

  3. Bacterial versus human sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (S1PL) in the design of potential S1PL inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sanllehí, Pol; Abad, José-Luis; Casas, Josefina; Bujons, Jordi; Delgado, Antonio

    2016-09-15

    A series of potential active-site sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (S1PL) inhibitors have been designed from scaffolds 1 and 2, arising from virtual screening using the X-ray structures of the bacterial (StS1PL) and the human (hS1PL) enzymes. Both enzymes are very similar at the active site, as confirmed by the similar experimental kinetic constants shown by the fluorogenic substrate RBM13 in both cases. However, the docking scoring functions used probably overestimated the weight of electrostatic interactions between the ligands and key active-site residues in the protein environment, which may account for the modest activity found for the designed inhibitors. In addition, the possibility that the inhibitors do not reach the enzyme active site should not be overlooked. Finally, since both enzymes show remarkable structural differences at the access channel and in the proximity to the active site cavity, caution should be taken when designing inhibitors acting around that area, as evidenced by the much lower activity found in StS1PL for the potent hS1PL inhibitor D. PMID:27475537

  4. Critical role of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-2 in the disruption of cerebrovascular integrity in experimental stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gab Seok; Yang, Li; Zhang, Guoqi; Zhao, Honggang; Selim, Magdy; McCullough, Louise D.; Kluk, Michael J.; Sanchez, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    The use and effectiveness of current stroke reperfusion therapies are limited by the complications of reperfusion injury, which include increased cerebrovascular permeability and haemorrhagic transformation. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is emerging as a potent modulator of vascular integrity via its receptors (S1PR). By using genetic approaches and a S1PR2 antagonist (JTE013), here we show that S1PR2 plays a critical role in the induction of cerebrovascular permeability, development of intracerebral haemorrhage and neurovascular injury in experimental stroke. In addition, inhibition of S1PR2 results in decreased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 activity in vivo and lower gelatinase activity in cerebral microvessels. S1PR2 immunopositivity is detected only in the ischemic microvessels of wild-type mice and in the cerebrovascular endothelium of human brain autopsy samples. In vitro, S1PR2 potently regulates the responses of the brain endothelium to ischaemic and inflammatory injury. Therapeutic targeting of this novel pathway could have important translational relevance to stroke patients. PMID:26243335

  5. Sphingosine-1-phosphate induces human endothelial VEGF and MMP-2 production via transcription factor ZNF580: Novel insights into angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Hui-Yan; Wei, Shu-Ping; Xu, Rui-Cheng; Xu, Peng-Xiao; Zhang, Wen-Cheng

    2010-05-07

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-induced migration and proliferation of endothelial cells are critical for angiogenesis. C2H2-zinc finger (ZNF) proteins usually play an essential role in altering gene expression and regulating the angiogenesis. The aim of this study is to investigate whether a novel human C2H2-zinc finger gene ZNF580 (Gene ID: 51157) is involved in the migration and proliferation of endothelial cells stimulated by S1P. Our study shows that EAhy926 endothelial cells express S1P1, S1P3 and S1P5 receptors. Furthermore, S1P upregulates both ZNF580 mRNA and protein levels in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. SB203580, the specific inhibitor of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) pathway, blocks the S1P-induced upregulation of ZNF580. Moreover, overexpression/downexpression of ZNF580 in EAhy926 cells leads to the enhancement/decrease of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression as well as the migration and proliferation of EAhy926 endothelial cells. These results elucidate the important role that ZNF580 plays in the process of migration and proliferation of endothelial cells, which provides a foundation for a novel approach to regulate angiogenesis.

  6. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Secreted Sphingosine 1-Phosphate (S1P) Exerts a Stimulatory Effect on Skeletal Myoblast Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Alessia; Anderloni, Giulia; Pierucci, Federica; Matteini, Francesca; Chellini, Flaminia; Zecchi Orlandini, Sandra; Meacci, Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    Bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have the potential to significantly contribute to skeletal muscle healing through the secretion of paracrine factors that support proliferation and enhance participation of the endogenous muscle stem cells in the process of repair/regeneration. However, MSC-derived trophic molecules have been poorly characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate paracrine signaling effects of MSCs on skeletal myoblasts. It was found, using a biochemical and morphological approach that sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a natural bioactive lipid exerting a broad range of muscle cell responses, is secreted by MSCs and represents an important factor by which these cells exert their stimulatory effects on C2C12 myoblast and satellite cell proliferation. Indeed, exposure to conditioned medium obtained from MSCs cultured in the presence of the selective sphingosine kinase inhibitor (iSK), blocked increased cell proliferation caused by the conditioned medium from untreated MSCs, and the addition of exogenous S1P in the conditioned medium from MSCs pre-treated with iSK further increased myoblast proliferation. Finally, we also demonstrated that the myoblast response to MSC-secreted vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) involves the release of S1P from C2C12 cells. Our data may have important implications in the optimization of cell-based strategies to promote skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:25264785

  7. Isolation and developmental expression analysis of L-myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase in four Actinidia species.

    PubMed

    Cui, Meng; Liang, Dong; Wu, Shan; Ma, Fengwang; Lei, Yushan

    2013-12-01

    Myo-inositol (MI) is an important polyol involved in cellular signal transduction, auxin storage, osmotic regulation, and membrane formation. It also serves as a precursor for the production of pinitol, ascorbic acid, and members of the raffinose family. The first committed step for MI formation is catalyzed by L-myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase (MIPS). We isolated MIPS cDNA sequences from Actinidia eriantha, Actinidia rufa, and Actinidia arguta and compared them with that of Actinidia deliciosa. Each comprised 1533 bp, encoding 510 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 56.5 KDa. The MIPS protein was highly conserved in Actinidia, sharing 98.94% identity among species. The MIPS gene was expressed in the flowers, leaves, petioles, and carpopodia. Similarly high levels of expression were detected in the young fruit of all four species. Overall activity of the enzyme was also maximal in young fruit, indicating that this developmental stage is the key point for MI synthesis in Actinidia. Among the four species, A. arguta had the greatest concentration of MI as well as the highest ratios of MI:sucrose and MI:glucose+fructose. This suggests that conversion to MI from carbohydrates was most efficient in A. arguta during early fruit development.

  8. The Adipose Mesenchymal Stem Cell Secretome Inhibits Inflammatory Responses of Microglia: Evidence for an Involvement of Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signalling.

    PubMed

    Marfia, Giovanni; Navone, Stefania Elena; Hadi, Loubna Abdel; Paroni, Moira; Berno, Valeria; Beretta, Matteo; Gualtierotti, Roberta; Ingegnoli, Francesca; Levi, Vincenzo; Miozzo, Monica; Geginat, Jens; Fassina, Lorenzo; Rampini, Paolo; Tremolada, Carlo; Riboni, Laura; Campanella, Rolando

    2016-07-15

    Central nervous system (CNS) inflammation is primarily driven by microglial cells which secrete proinflammatory cytokines and undergo proliferation upon activation, as it occurs in neurodegenerative diseases. Uncontrolled or prolonged CNS inflammation is potentially harmful and can result in cellular damage. Recently, many studies have focused on human adipose tissue as an attractive source of cytokines with immunosuppressive properties that potentially modulate inflammation. Our study aimed to evaluate if different methods of human tissue collection could affect adipose mesenchymal stem cell (ADSC)-derived cytokine secretion and investigate the effects of ADSC secretome in modulating microglia activation and the possible implication of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in these effects. Our results demonstrate that the conditioned medium (CM) of ADSCs isolated by two different processing methods (lipoaspirate and Lipogems) significantly inhibited the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced effects on microglia activation, including microglial expression of CD68, cytokine secretion, proliferation, and migration. Pulse studies with radiolabeled sphingosine demonstrated that LPS treatment of resting microglia induced a significant increase of both cellular and extracellular S1P. Moreover, and of relevance, FTY720, a functional antagonist of S1P receptor, inhibited the multiple LPS-induced proinflammatory effects on microglia, and S1P suppressed the anti-inflammatory effect of ADSC-CM. This suggests that LPS-mediated microglial activation is countered by ADSC-CM through the modulation of sphingosine kinase/S1P signalling. PMID:27217090

  9. Periodic nanostructuring of Er/Yb-codoped IOG1 phosphate glass by using ultraviolet laser-assisted selective chemical etching

    SciTech Connect

    Pappas, C.; Pissadakis, S.

    2006-12-01

    The patterning of submicron period ({approx_equal}500 nm) Bragg reflectors in the Er/Yb-codoped IOG1 Schott, phosphate glass is demonstrated. A high yield patterning technique is presented, wherein high volume damage is induced into the glass matrix by exposure to intense ultraviolet 213 nm, 150 ps Nd:YAG laser radiation and, subsequently, a chemical development in potassium hydroxide (KOH)/ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) aqueous solution selectively etches the exposed areas. The electronic changes induced by the 213 nm ultraviolet irradiation are examined by employing spectrophotometric measurements, while an estimation of the refractive index changes recorded is provided by applying Kramers-Kronig transformation to the absorption change data. In addition, real time diffraction efficiency measurements were obtained during the formation of the volume damage grating. After the exposure, the growth of the relief grating pattern in time was measured at fixed time intervals and the dependence of the grating depth on the etching time and exposure conditions is presented. The gratings fabricated are examined by atomic and scanning electron microscopies to reveal the relief topology of the structures. Gratings with average depth of 120 nm and excellent surface quality were fabricated by exposing the IOG1 phosphate glass to 36 000 pulses of 208 mJ/cm{sup 2} energy density, followed by developing in the KOH/EDTA agent for 6 min.

  10. Involvement of sphingosine 1-phosphate (SIP)/S1P3 signaling in cholestasis-induced liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Changyong; Jiang, Xiangming; Yang, Lin; Liu, Xihong; Yue, Shi; Li, Liying

    2009-10-01

    Bioactive sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and S1P receptors (S1PRs) have been implicated in many critical cellular events, including inflammation, cancer, and angiogenesis. However, the role of S1P/S1PR signaling in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis has not been well documented. In this study, we found that S1P levels and S1P(3) receptor expression in liver tissue were markedly up-regulated in a mouse model of cholestasis-induced liver fibrosis. In addition, the S1P(3) receptor was also expressed in green fluorescent protein transgenic bone marrow (BM)-derived cells found in the damaged liver of transplanted chimeric mice that underwent bile duct ligation. Silencing of S1P(3) expression significantly inhibited S1P-induced BM cell migration in vitro. Furthermore, a selective S1P(3) receptor antagonist, suramin, markedly reduced the number of BM-derived cells during cholestasis. Interestingly, suramin administration clearly ameliorated bile duct ligation-induced hepatic fibrosis, as demonstrated by attenuated deposition of collagen type I and III, reduced smooth muscle alpha-actin expression, and decreased total hydroxyproline content. In conclusion, our data suggest that S1P/S1P(3) signaling plays an important role in cholestasis-induced liver fibrosis through mediating the homing of BM cells. Modulation of S1PR activity may therefore represent a new antifibrotic strategy.

  11. Altered expression of sphingosine kinase 1 and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 in mouse hippocampus after kainic acid treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Jeon, Byeong Tak; Jeong, Eun Ae; Kim, Joon Soo; Cho, Yong Woon; Kim, Hyun Joon; Kang, Sang Soo; Cho, Gyeong Jae; Choi, Wan Sung; Roh, Gu Seob

    2010-03-12

    Kainic acid (KA) induces hippocampal cell death and astrocyte proliferation. There are reports that sphingosine kinase (SPHK)1 and sphingosine-1- phosphate (S1P) receptor 1 (S1P{sub 1}) signaling axis controls astrocyte proliferation. Here we examined the temporal changes of SPHK1/S1P{sub 1} in mouse hippocampus during KA-induced hippocampal cell death. Mice were killed at 2, 6, 24, or 48 h after KA (30 mg/kg) injection. There was an increase in Fluoro-Jade B-positive cells in the hippocampus of KA-treated mice with temporal changes of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression. The lowest level of SPHK1 protein expression was found 2 h after KA treatment. Six hours after KA treatment, the expression of SPHK1 and S1P{sub 1} proteins steadily increased in the hippocampus. In immunohistochemical analysis, SPHK1 and S1P{sub 1} are more immunoreactive in astrocytes within the hippocampus of KA-treated mice than in hippocampus of control mice. These results indicate that SPHK1/S1P{sub 1} signaling axis may play an important role in astrocytes proliferation during KA-induced excitotoxicity.

  12. Choline phosphate potentiates sphingosine-1-phosphate-induced Raf-1 kinase activation dependent of Ras--phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael; Han, Sang Seop

    2002-04-01

    In NIH3T3 cells, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) caused a significant increase of Raf-1 kinase activity as early as 2 min. Interestingly, choline phosphate (ChoP) produced synergistic increase of S1P-stimulated Raf-1 kinase activation in the presence of ATP while showing additive effect in the absence of ATP. However, Raf-1 kinase activation induced by S1P decreased in the presence of ATP when applied alone. The overexpression of N-terminal fragment of Raf-1 (RfI) to inhibit Raf--Ras interaction caused the inhibition of S1P-induced Raf-1 kinase activation. Also, wortmannin, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, exhibited inhibitory effects on S1P-induced activation of Raf-1 kinase. In addition, we demonstrated that the chemical antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine attenuated Raf-1 activation induced by S1P, suggesting that H(2)O(2) may be required for the signalling pathway leading to Raf-1 activation. This H(2)O(2)-induced Raf-1 kinase activation was also blocked by inhibition of Ras--PI3K signalling pathway using alpha-hydroxyfarnesylphosphonic acid and wortmannin. Taken together, these results indicate that S1P-induced Raf-1 kinase activation is mediated by H(2)O(2) stimulation of Ras--PI3K pathway, and is enhanced by ChoP in the presence of ATP.

  13. Identification of the orphan GPCR, P2Y(10) receptor as the sphingosine-1-phosphate and lysophosphatidic acid receptor.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masanori; Shiraishi, Akira; Tabata, Kenichi; Fujita, Norihisa

    2008-07-11

    Phylogenetic analysis of transmembrane regions of GPCRs using PHYLIP indicated that the orphan receptor P2Y(10) receptor was classified into the cluster consisting nucleotide and lipid receptors. Based on the results, we studied the abilities of nucleotides and lipids to activate the P2Y(10) receptors. As a result, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) evoked intracellular Ca(2+) increases in the CHO cells stably expressing the P2Y(10) fused with a G(16alpha) protein. These Ca(2+) responses were inhibited by S1P receptor and LPA receptor antagonists. The introduction of siRNA designed for P2Y(10) receptor into the P2Y(10)-CHO cells effectively blocked both S1P- and LPA-induced Ca(2+) increases. RT-PCR analysis showed that the mouse P2Y(10) was expressed in reproductive organs, brain, lung and skeletal muscle, suggesting the receptor plays physiological roles throughout the whole body. In conclusion, the P2Y(10) receptor is the first receptor identified as a dual lysophospholipid receptor. PMID:18466763

  14. Critical Role of Spns2, a Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Transporter, in Lung Cancer Cell Survival and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Eric; Dasgupta, Somsankar; Jiang, Xue; Zhao, Xiaying; Zhu, Gu; He, Qian; Dinkins, Michael; Bieberich, Erhard; Wang, Guanghu

    2014-01-01

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) transporter Spns2 regulates myocardial precursor migration in zebrafish and lymphocyte trafficking in mice. However, its function in cancer has not been investigated. We show here that ectopic Spns2 expression induced apoptosis and its knockdown enhanced cell migration in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Metabolically, Spns2 expression increased the extracellular S1P level while its knockdown the intracellular. Pharmacological inhibition of S1P synthesis abolished the augmented cell migration mediated by Spns2 knockdown, indicating that intracellular S1P plays a key role in this process. Cell signaling studies indicated that Spns2 expression impaired GSK-3β and Stat3 mediated pro-survival pathways. Conversely, these pathways were activated by Spns2 knockdown, which explains the increased cell migration since they are also crucial for migration. Alterations of Spns2 were found to affect several enzymes involved in S1P metabolism, including sphingosine kinases, S1P phosphatases, and S1P lyase 1. Genetically, Spns2 mRNA level was found to be reduced in advanced lung cancer (LC) patients as quantified by using a small scale qPCR array. These data show for the first time that Spns2 plays key roles in regulating the cellular functions in NSCLC cells, and that its down-regulation is a potential risk factor for LC. PMID:25330231

  15. Aldo-keto Reductase Family 1 Member B 10 Mediates Liver Cancer Cell Proliferation through Sphingosine-1-Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Junfei; Liao, Weijia; Yao, Wenmin; Zhu, Rongping; Li, Yulan; He, Songqing

    2016-01-01

    AKR1B10 is involved in hepatocarcinogenesis via modulation of fatty acid and lipid synthesis. AKR1B10 inhibition results in apoptosis of tumor cells whose lipids, especially phospholipids, were decreased by over 50%, suggesting involvement of phospholipids like sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in AKR1B10’s oncogenic function. Using a co-culture system, we found that co-culture of QSG-7701 (human hepatocyte) with HepG2 (hepatoma cell line) increases QSG-7701’s proliferation, in which AKR1B10-S1P signaling plays a pivotal role. Consistent with previous findings, AKR1B10 mRNA and protein levels were higher in primary hepatocellular carcinoma (PHC) tissues than in peri-tumor tissues. Interestingly, the level of S1P was also higher in PHC tissues than in peri-tumor tissues. After analyzing the correlation between AKR1B10 mRNA expression in PHC tissues and the clinical data, we found that AKR1B10 mRNA expression was associated with serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage, and lymph node metastasis, but not with other clinicopathologic variables. A higher AKR1B10 mRNA expression level is related to a shorter DFS (disease free survival) and OS (overall survival), serving as an independent predictor of DFS and OS in PHC patients with surgical resection. PMID:26948042

  16. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate/Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor 2 Axis Can Promote Mouse and Human Primary Mast Cell Angiogenic Potential through Upregulation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A and Matrix Metalloproteinase-2

    PubMed Central

    Chumanevich, Alena; Wedman, Piper; Oskeritzian, Carole A.

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells (MC) are present in most vascularized tissues around the vasculature likely exerting immunomodulatory functions. Endowed with diverse mediators, resident MC represent first-line fine-tuners of local microenvironment. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) functions as a pluripotent signaling sphingolipid metabolite in health and disease. S1P formation occurs at low levels in resting MC and is upregulated upon activation. Its export can result in type 2 S1P receptor- (S1PR2-) mediated stimulation of MC, further fueling inflammation. However, the role of S1PR2 ligation in proangiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor- (VEGF-) A and matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP-) 2 release from MC is unknown. Using a preclinical MC-dependent model of acute allergic responses and in vitro stimulated primary mouse bone marrow-derived MC (BMMC) or human primary skin MC, we report that S1P signaling resulted in substantial amount of VEGF-A release. Similar experiments using S1pr2-deficient mice or BMMC or selective S1P receptor agonists or antagonists demonstrated that S1P/S1PR2 ligation on MC is important for VEGF-A secretion. Further, we show that S1P stimulation triggered transcriptional upregulation of VEGF-A and MMP-2 mRNA in human but not in mouse MC. S1P exposure also triggered MMP-2 secretion from human MC. These studies identify a novel proangiogenic axis encompassing MC/S1P/S1PR2 likely relevant to inflammation. PMID:26884643

  17. Characterization and site-directed mutagenesis of a novel class II 5-enopyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase from the deep-sea bacterium Alcanivorax sp. L27.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Yi, Licong; Lin, Yongjun; Zhang, Lili; Shao, Zongze; Liu, Ziduo

    2014-09-01

    The 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) is a key enzyme in the aromatic amino acid biosynthetic pathway in microorganisms and plants, which catalyzes the formation of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) from shikimate-3-phosphate (S3P) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). In this study, a novel AroA-encoding gene was identified from the deep sea bacterium Alcanivorax sp. L27 through screening the genomic library and termed as AroAA.sp. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that AroAA.sp (1317 bp and 438 amino acids) is a class II AroA. This enzyme exhibited considerable activity between pH 5.5 and pH 8.0 and notable activity at low temperatures. The KM for PEP and IC50 [glyphosate] values (the concentration of glyphosate that inhibited enzyme activity by 50%) of AroAA.sp were 78 μM and 1.5 mM, respectively. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the G100A mutant had a 30-fold increase in the IC50 [glyphosate] value; while the L105P mutant showed only 20% catalytic activity compared to wild-type AroAA.sp. The specific activity of the wild-type AroAA.sp, the G100A mutant and the L105P mutant were 7.78 U/mg, 7.26 U/mg and 1.76 U/mg, respectively. This is the first report showing that the G100A mutant of AroA displays considerably improved glyphosate resistance and demonstrates that Leu105 is essential for the enzyme's activity.

  18. Characterization and site-directed mutagenesis of a novel class II 5-enopyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase from the deep-sea bacterium Alcanivorax sp. L27.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Yi, Licong; Lin, Yongjun; Zhang, Lili; Shao, Zongze; Liu, Ziduo

    2014-09-01

    The 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) is a key enzyme in the aromatic amino acid biosynthetic pathway in microorganisms and plants, which catalyzes the formation of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) from shikimate-3-phosphate (S3P) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). In this study, a novel AroA-encoding gene was identified from the deep sea bacterium Alcanivorax sp. L27 through screening the genomic library and termed as AroAA.sp. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that AroAA.sp (1317 bp and 438 amino acids) is a class II AroA. This enzyme exhibited considerable activity between pH 5.5 and pH 8.0 and notable activity at low temperatures. The KM for PEP and IC50 [glyphosate] values (the concentration of glyphosate that inhibited enzyme activity by 50%) of AroAA.sp were 78 μM and 1.5 mM, respectively. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the G100A mutant had a 30-fold increase in the IC50 [glyphosate] value; while the L105P mutant showed only 20% catalytic activity compared to wild-type AroAA.sp. The specific activity of the wild-type AroAA.sp, the G100A mutant and the L105P mutant were 7.78 U/mg, 7.26 U/mg and 1.76 U/mg, respectively. This is the first report showing that the G100A mutant of AroA displays considerably improved glyphosate resistance and demonstrates that Leu105 is essential for the enzyme's activity. PMID:25039062

  19. Heterologous expression of glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene [DhGPD1] from the osmotolerant yeast Debaryomyces hansenii in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Thomé, Patricia E

    2005-08-01

    The role for the gene encoding glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (DhGPD1) from the osmotolerant yeast Debaryomyces hansenii, in glycerol production and halotolerance, was studied through its heterologous expression in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain deficient in glycerol synthesis (gpd1Delta). The expression of the DhGPD1 gene in the gpd1Delta background restored glycerol production and halotolerance to wild type levels, corroborating its role in the salt-induced production of glycerol. Although the gene was functional in S. cerevisiae, its heterologous expression was not efficient, suggesting that the regulatory mechanism may not be shared by these two yeasts.

  20. Engineering in vivo gradients of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor ligands for localized microvascular remodeling and inflammatory cell positioning.

    PubMed

    Ogle, Molly E; Sefcik, Lauren S; Awojoodu, Anthony O; Chiappa, Nathan F; Lynch, Kevin; Peirce-Cottler, Shayn; Botchwey, Edward A

    2014-11-01

    Biomaterial-mediated controlled release of soluble signaling molecules is a tissue engineering approach to spatially control processes of inflammation, microvascular remodeling and host cell recruitment, and to generate biochemical gradients in vivo. Lipid mediators, such as sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), are recognized for their essential roles in spatial guidance, signaling and highly regulated endogenous gradients. S1P and pharmacological analogs such as FTY720 are therapeutically attractive targets for their critical roles in the trafficking of cells between blood and tissue spaces, both physiologically and pathophysiologically. However, the interaction of locally delivered sphingolipids with the complex metabolic networks controlling the flux of lipid species in inflamed tissue has yet to be elucidated. In this study, complementary in vitro and in vivo approaches are investigated to identify relationships between polymer composition, drug release kinetics, S1P metabolic activity, signaling gradients and spatial positioning of circulating cells around poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) biomaterials. Results demonstrate that biomaterial-based gradients of S1P are short-lived in the tissue due to degradation by S1P lyase, an enzyme that irreversibly degrades intracellular S1P. On the other hand, in vivo gradients of the more stable compound, FTY720, enhance microvascular remodeling by selectively recruiting an anti-inflammatory subset of monocytes (S1P3(high)) to the biomaterial. Results highlight the need to better understand the endogenous balance of lipid import/export machinery and lipid kinase/phosphatase activity in order to design biomaterial products that spatially control the innate immune environment to maximize regenerative potential. PMID:25128750

  1. Sphingosine 1-phosphate, a bioactive sphingolipid abundantly stored in platelets, is a normal constituent of human plasma and serum.

    PubMed

    Yatomi, Y; Igarashi, Y; Yang, L; Hisano, N; Qi, R; Asazuma, N; Satoh, K; Ozaki, Y; Kume, S

    1997-05-01

    Although sphingosine 1-phosphate (Sph-1-P) is reportedly involved in diverse cellular processes and the physiological roles of this bioactive sphingolipid have been strongly suggested, few studies have revealed the presence of Sph-1-P in human samples, including body fluids and cells, under physiological conditions. In this study, we identified Sph-1-P as a normal constituent of human plasma and serum. The Sph-1-P levels in plasma and serum were 191+/-79 and 484+/-82 pmol/ml (mean+/-SD, n=8), respectively. Furthermore, when Sph-1-P was measured in paired plasma and serum samples obtained from 6 healthy adults, the serum Sph-1-P/plasma Sph-1-P ratio was found to be 2.65+/-1.26 (mean+/-SD). It is most likely that the source of discharged Sph-1-P during blood clotting is platelets, because platelets abundantly store Sph-1-P compared with other blood cells, and release part of their stored Sph-1-P extracellularly upon stimulation. We also studied Sph-1-P-related metabolism in plasma. [3H]Sph was stable and not metabolized at all in plasma, but was rapidly incorporated into platelets and metabolized mainly to Sph-1-P in platelet-rich plasma. [3H]Sph-1-P was found to be unchanged in plasma, revealing that plasma does not contain the enzymes needed for Sph-1-P degradation. In summary, platelets can convert Sph into Sph-1-P, and are storage sites for the latter in the blood. In view of the diverse biological effects of Sph-1-P, the release of Sph-1-P from activated platelets may be involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes, including thrombosis, hemostasis, atherosclerosis and wound healing.

  2. Evidence for a link between histone deacetylation and Ca²+ homoeostasis in sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase-deficient fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ihlefeld, Katja; Claas, Ralf Frederik; Koch, Alexander; Pfeilschifter, Josef M; Meyer Zu Heringdorf, Dagmar

    2012-11-01

    Embryonic fibroblasts from S1P (sphingosine-1-phosphate) lyase-deficient mice [Sgpl1-/- MEFs (mouse embryonic fibroblasts)] are characterized by intracellular accumulation of S1P, elevated cytosolic [Ca2+]i and enhanced Ca2+ storage. Since S1P, produced by sphingosine kinase 2 in the nucleus of MCF-7 cells, inhibited HDACs (histone deacetylases) [Hait, Allegood, Maceyka, Strub, Harikumar, Singh, Luo, Marmorstein, Kordula, Milstein et al. (2009) Science 325, 1254-1257], in the present study we analysed whether S1P accumulated in the nuclei of S1P lyase-deficient MEFs and caused HDAC inhibition. Interestingly, nuclear concentrations of S1P were disproportionally elevated in Sgpl1-/- MEFs. HDAC activity was reduced, acetylation of histone 3-Lys9 was increased and the HDAC-regulated gene p21 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor was up-regulated in these cells. Furthermore, the expression of HDAC1 and HDAC3 was reduced in Sgpl1-/- MEFs. In wild-type MEFs, acetylation of histone 3-Lys9 was increased by the S1P lyase inhibitor 4-deoxypyridoxine. The non-specific HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A elevated basal [Ca2+]i and enhanced Ca2+ storage, whereas the HDAC1/2/3 inhibitor MGCD0103 elevated basal [Ca2+]i without influence on Ca2+ storage in wild-type MEFs. Overexpression of HDAC1 or HDAC2 reduced the elevated basal [Ca2+]i in Sgpl1-/- MEFs. Taken together, S1P lyase-deficiency was associated with elevated nuclear S1P levels, reduced HDAC activity and down-regulation of HDAC isoenzymes. The decreased HDAC activity in turn contributed to the dysregulation of Ca2+ homoeostasis, particularly to the elevated basal [Ca2+]i, in Sgpl1-/- MEFs.

  3. The Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Lyase (LegS2) Contributes to the Restriction of Legionella pneumophila in Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Abu Khweek, Arwa; Kanneganti, Apurva; C. Guttridge D, Denis; Amer, Amal O.

    2016-01-01

    L. pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, a human illness characterized by severe pneumonia. In contrast to those derived from humans, macrophages derived from most mouse strains restrict L. pneumophila replication. The restriction of L. pneumophila replication has been shown to require bacterial flagellin, a component of the type IV secretion system as well as the cytosolic NOD-like receptor (NLR) Nlrc4/ Ipaf. These events lead to caspase-1 activation which, in turn, activates caspase-7. Following caspase-7 activation, the phagosome-containing L. pneumophila fuses with the lysosome, resulting in the restriction of L. pneumophila growth. The LegS2 effector is injected by the type IV secretion system and functions as a sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase. It is homologous to the eukaryotic sphingosine lyase (SPL), an enzyme required in the terminal steps of sphingolipid metabolism. Herein, we show that mice Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophages (BMDMs) and human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages (hMDMs) are more permissive to L. pneumophila legS2 mutants than wild-type (WT) strains. This permissiveness to L. pneumophila legS2 is neither attributed to abolished caspase-1, caspase-7 or caspase-3 activation, nor due to the impairment of phagosome-lysosome fusion. Instead, an infection with the legS2 mutant resulted in the reduction of some inflammatory cytokines and their corresponding mRNA; this effect is mediated by the inhibition of the nuclear transcription factor kappa-B (NF-κB). Moreover, BMDMs infected with L. pneumophila legS2 mutant showed elongated mitochondria that resembles mitochondrial fusion. Therefore, the absence of LegS2 effector is associated with reduced NF-κB activation and atypical morphology of mitochondria. PMID:26741365

  4. Sphingosine 1-phosphate is a ligand for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ that regulates neoangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Parham, Kate A; Zebol, Julia R; Tooley, Katie L; Sun, Wai Y; Moldenhauer, Lachlan M; Cockshell, Michaelia P; Gliddon, Briony L; Moretti, Paul A; Tigyi, Gabor; Pitson, Stuart M; Bonder, Claudine S

    2015-09-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid that can function both extracellularly and intracellularly to mediate a variety of cellular processes. Using lipid affinity matrices and a radiolabeled lipid binding assay, we reveal that S1P directly interacts with the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ. Herein, we show that S1P treatment of human endothelial cells (ECs) activated a luciferase-tagged PPARγ-specific gene reporter by ∼12-fold, independent of the S1P receptors. More specifically, in silico docking, gene reporter, and binding assays revealed that His323 of the PPARγ ligand binding domain is important for binding to S1P. PPARγ functions when associated with coregulatory proteins, and herein we identify that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1 (PGC1)β binds to PPARγ in ECs and their progenitors (nonadherent endothelial forming cells) and that the formation of this PPARγ:PGC1β complex is increased in response to S1P. ECs treated with S1P selectively regulated known PPARγ target genes with PGC1β and plasminogen-activated inhibitor-1 being increased, no change to adipocyte fatty acid binding protein 2 and suppression of CD36. S1P-induced in vitro tube formation was significantly attenuated in the presence of the PPARγ antagonist GW9662, and in vivo application of GW9662 also reduced vascular development in Matrigel plugs. Interestingly, activation of PPARγ by the synthetic ligand troglitazone also reduced tube formation in vitro and in vivo. To support this, Sphk1(-/-)Sphk2(+/-) mice, with low circulating S1P levels, demonstrated a similar reduction in vascular development. Taken together, our data reveal that the transcription factor, PPARγ, is a bona fide intracellular target for S1P and thus suggest that the S1P:PPARγ:PGC1β complex may be a useful target to manipulate neovascularization.

  5. The Therapeutic Effects of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Primed with Sphingosine-1 Phosphate on Pulmonary Artery Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyunsook; Kim, Kang-Hyun; Lim, Jisun; Kim, You-Sun; Heo, Jinbeom; Choi, Jongjin; Jeong, Jaeho; Kim, YongHwan; Kim, Seong Who; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Choo, Myung-Soo; Son, Jaekyoung; Kim, Su Jung; Yoo, Hyun Ju; Oh, Wonil; Choi, Soo Jin

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell (SC) therapy has become a potential treatment modality for pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH), but the efficacy of human SC and priming effects have not yet been established. The mobilization and homing of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are modulated by priming factors that include a bioactive lipid, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), which stimulates CXCR4 receptor kinase signaling. Here, we show that priming human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with S1P enhances their therapeutic efficacy in PAH. Human MSCs, similar to HSCs, showed stronger chemoattraction to S1P in transwell assays. Concomitantly, MSCs treated with 0.2 μM S1P showed increased phosphorylation of both MAPKp42/44 and AKT protein compared with nonprimed MSCs. Furthermore, S1P-primed MSCs potentiated colony forming unit-fibroblast, anti-inflammatory, and angiogenic activities of MSCs in culture. In a PAH animal model induced by subcutaneously injected monocrotaline, administration of human cord blood-derived MSCs (hCB-MSCs) or S1P-primed cells significantly attenuated the elevated right ventricular systolic pressure. Notably, S1P-primed CB-MSCs, but not unprimed hCB-MSCs, also elicited a significant reduction in the right ventricular weight ratio and pulmonary vascular wall thickness. S1P-primed MSCs enhanced the expression of several genes responsible for stem cell trafficking and angiogenesis, increasing the density of blood vessels in the damaged lungs. Thus, this study demonstrates that human MSCs have potential utility for the treatment of PAH, and that S1P priming increases the effects of SC therapy by enhancing cardiac and vascular remodeling. By optimizing this protocol in future studies, SC therapy might form a basis for clinical trials to treat human PAH. PMID:25761906

  6. Berberine Preconditioning Protects Neurons Against Ischemia via Sphingosine-1-Phosphate and Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1[Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qichun; Bian, Huimin; Guo, Liwei; Zhu, Huaxu

    2016-01-01

    Berberine exerts neuroprotective and modulates hypoxia inducible factor-1-alpha (HIF-1[Formula: see text]. Based on the role of HIF-1[Formula: see text] in hypoxia preconditioning and association between HIF-1[Formula: see text] and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), we hypothesized that berberine preconditioning (BP) would ameliorate the cerebral injury induced by ischemia through activating the system of HIF-1[Formula: see text] and S1P. Adult male rats with middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and rat primary cortical neurons treated with oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) with BP at 24[Formula: see text]h (40[Formula: see text]mg/kg) and 2[Formula: see text]h (10[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]mol/L), respectively, were used to determine the neuroprotective effects. The HIF-1[Formula: see text] accumulation, and S1P metabolism were assayed in the berberine-preconditioned neurons, and the HIF-1[Formula: see text]-mediated transcriptional modulation of sphingosine kinases (Sphk) 1 and 2 was analyzed using chromatin immunoprecipitation and real-time polymerase chain reaction. BP significantly prevented cerebral ischemic injury in the MCAO rats at 24[Formula: see text]h and 72[Formula: see text]h following ischemia/reperfusion. In OGD-treated neurons, BP enhanced HIF-1[Formula: see text] accumulation with activation of PI3K/Akt, and induced S1P production by activating Sphk2 via the promotion of HIF-1[Formula: see text]-mediated Sphk2 transcription. In conclusion, BP activated endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms associated with the S1P/HIF-1 pathway and helped protect neuronal cells against hypoxia/ischemia.

  7. Melatonin inhibits the sphingosine kinase 1/sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling pathway in rabbits with fulminant hepatitis of viral origin.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Irene; San-Miguel, Beatriz; Sánchez, Diana I; González-Fernández, Bárbara; Álvarez, Marcelino; González-Gallego, Javier; Tuñón, María J

    2016-09-01

    The sphingosine kinase (SphK)1/sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) pathway is involved in multiple biological processes, including liver diseases. This study investigate whether modulation of the SphK1/S1P system associates to the beneficial effects of melatonin in an animal model of acute liver failure (ALF) induced by the rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV). Rabbits were experimentally infected with 2 × 10(4) hemagglutination units of a RHDV isolate and received 20 mg/kg of melatonin at 0, 12, and 24 hr postinfection. Liver mRNA levels, protein concentration, and immunohistochemical labeling for SphK1 increased in RHDV-infected rabbits. S1P production and protein expression of the S1PR1 receptor were significantly elevated following RHDV infection. These effects were significantly reduced by melatonin. Rabbits also exhibited increased expression of toll-like receptor (TLR)4, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p50 and p65 subunits, and phosphorylated inhibitor of kappa B (IκB)α. Melatonin administration significantly inhibited those changes and induced a decreased immunoreactivity for RHDV viral VP60 antigen in the liver. Results obtained indicate that the SphK1/S1P system activates in parallel to viral replication and the inflammatory process induced by the virus. Inhibition of the lipid signaling pathway by the indole reveals novel molecular pathways that may account for the protective effect of melatonin in this animal model of ALF, and supports the potential of melatonin as an antiviral agent. PMID:27101794

  8. Elevated nuclear sphingoid base-1-phosphates and decreased histone deacetylase activity after fumonisin B1 treatment in mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Nicole M; Riley, Ronald T; Showker, Jency L; Voss, Kenneth A; Sachs, Andrew J; Maddox, Joyce R; Gelineau-van Waes, Janee B

    2016-05-01

    Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is a mycotoxin produced by a common fungal contaminant of corn. Administration of FB1 to pregnant LM/Bc mice induces exencephaly in embryos, and ingestion of FB1-contaminated food during early pregnancy is associated with increased risk for neural tube defects (NTDs) in humans. FB1 inhibits ceramide synthase enzymes in sphingolipid biosynthesis, causing sphinganine (Sa) and bioactive sphinganine-1-phosphate (Sa1P) accumulation in blood, cells, and tissues. Sphingosine kinases (Sphk) phosphorylate Sa to form Sa1P. Upon activation, Sphk1 associates primarily with the plasma membrane, while Sphk2 is found predominantly in the nucleus. In cells over-expressing Sphk2, accumulation of Sa1P in the nuclear compartment inhibits histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity, causing increased acetylation of histone lysine residues. In this study, FB1 treatment in LM/Bc mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) resulted in significant accumulation of Sa1P in nuclear extracts relative to cytoplasmic extracts. Elevated nuclear Sa1P corresponded to decreased histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and increased histone acetylation at H2BK12, H3K9, H3K18, and H3K23. Treatment of LM/Bc MEFs with a selective Sphk1 inhibitor, PF-543, or with ABC294640, a selective Sphk2 inhibitor, significantly reduced nuclear Sa1P accumulation after FB1, although Sa1P levels remained significantly increased relative to basal levels. Concurrent treatment with both PF-543 and ABC294640 prevented nuclear accumulation of Sa1P in response to FB1. Other HDAC inhibitors are known to cause NTDs, so these results suggest that FB1-induced disruption of sphingolipid metabolism leading to nuclear Sa1P accumulation, HDAC inhibition, and histone hyperacetylation is a potential mechanism for FB1-induced NTDs. PMID:26905748

  9. Evidence for the involvement of sphingosine-1-phosphate in the homing and engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells to bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Adamiak, Mateusz; Borkowska, Sylwia; Wysoczynski, Marcin; Suszynska, Malwina; Kucia, Magda; Rokosh, Gregg; Abdel-Latif, Ahmed; Ratajczak, Janina; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z.

    2015-01-01

    The α-chemokine stromal-derived factor 1 (SDF-1), which binds to the CXCR4 receptor, directs migration and homing of CXCR4+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) to bone marrow (BM) stem cell niches. Nevertheless, it is also known that CXCR4−/− fetal liver-derived hematopoietic stem cells engraft into BM and that blockade of CXCR4 by its antagonist AMD3100 does not prevent engraftment of HSPCs. Because of this finding of SDF-1-CXCR4-independent BM homing, the unique role of SDF-1 in HSPC homing has recently been challenged. While SDF-1 is the only chemokine that chemoattracts HSPCs, other chemoattractants for these cells have recently been described, including the bioactive phosphosphingolipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). To address the potential role of S1P in homing of HSPCs to BM, we performed hematopoietic transplants into mice deficient in BM-expressed sphingosine kinase 1 (Sphk1−/−) using hematopoietic cells from normal control mice as well as cells from mice in which floxed CXCR4 (CXCR4fl/fl) was conditionally deleted. We observed the presence of a homing and engraftment defect in HSPCs of Sphk1−/− mice that was particularly profound after transplantation of CXCR4−/− BM cells. Thus, our results indicate that BM-microenvironment-expressed S1P plays a role in homing of HSPCs. They also support the concept that, in addition to the SDF-1-CXCR4 axis, other chemotactic axes are also involved in homing and engraftment of HSPCs. PMID:26299919

  10. Lysophosphatidic Acid and Sphingosine-1-Phosphate: A Concise Review of Biological Function and Applications for Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Binder, Bernard Y K; Williams, Priscilla A; Silva, Eduardo A; Leach, J Kent

    2015-12-01

    The presentation and controlled release of bioactive signals to direct cellular growth and differentiation represents a widely used strategy in tissue engineering. Historically, work in this field has primarily focused on the delivery of large cytokines and growth factors, which can be costly to manufacture and difficult to deliver in a sustained manner. There has been a marked increase over the past decade in the pursuit of lipid mediators due to their wide range of effects over multiple cell types, low cost, and ease of scale-up. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) are two bioactive lysophospholipids (LPLs) that have gained attention for use as pharmacological agents in tissue engineering applications. While these lipids can have similar effects on cellular response, they possess distinct chemical backbones, mechanisms of synthesis and degradation, and signaling pathways using a discrete set of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). LPA and S1P predominantly act extracellularly on their GPCRs and can directly regulate cell survival, differentiation, cytokine secretion, proliferation, and migration--each of the important functions that must be considered in regenerative medicine. In addition to these potent physiological functions, these LPLs play pivotal roles in a number of pathophysiological processes. To capitalize on the promise of these molecules in tissue engineering, these lipids have been incorporated into biomaterials for in vivo delivery. Here, we survey the effects of LPA and S1P on both cellular- and tissue-level phenotypes, with an eye toward regulating stem/progenitor cell growth and differentiation. In particular, we examine work that has translational applications for cell-based tissue engineering strategies in promoting cell survival, bone and cartilage engineering, and therapeutic angiogenesis.

  11. Sorbitol production from lactose by engineered Lactobacillus casei deficient in sorbitol transport system and mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    De Boeck, Reinout; Sarmiento-Rubiano, Luz Adriana; Nadal, Inmaculada; Monedero, Vicente; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Yebra, María J

    2010-02-01

    Sorbitol is a sugar alcohol largely used in the food industry as a low-calorie sweetener. We have previously described a sorbitol-producing Lactobacillus casei (strain BL232) in which the gutF gene, encoding a sorbitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, was expressed from the lactose operon. Here, a complete deletion of the ldh1 gene, encoding the main L-lactate dehydrogenase, was performed in strain BL232. In a resting cell system with glucose, the new strain, named BL251, accumulated sorbitol in the medium that was rapidly metabolized after glucose exhaustion. Reutilization of produced sorbitol was prevented by deleting the gutB gene of the phosphoenolpyruvate: sorbitol phosphotransferase system (PTS(Gut)) in BL251. These results showed that the PTS(Gut) did not mediate sorbitol excretion from the cells, but it was responsible for uptake and reutilization of the synthesized sorbitol. A further improvement in sorbitol production was achieved by inactivation of the mtlD gene, encoding a mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase. The new strain BL300 (lac::gutF Deltaldh1 DeltagutB mtlD) showed an increase in sorbitol production whereas no mannitol synthesis was detected, avoiding thus a polyol mixture. This strain was able to convert lactose, the main sugar from milk, into sorbitol, either using a resting cell system or in growing cells under pH control. A conversion rate of 9.4% of lactose into sorbitol was obtained using an optimized fed-batch system and whey permeate, a waste product of the dairy industry, as substrate.

  12. GlmU (N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase) bound to three magnesium ions and ATP at the active site

    PubMed Central

    Vithani, Neha; Bais, Vaibhav; Prakash, Balaji

    2014-01-01

    N-Acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GlmU), a bifunctional enzyme exclusive to prokaryotes, belongs to the family of sugar nucleotidyltransferases (SNTs). The enzyme binds GlcNAc-1-P and UTP, and catalyzes a uridyltransfer reaction to synthesize UDP-GlcNAc, an important precursor for cell-wall biosynthesis. As many SNTs are known to utilize a broad range of substrates, substrate specificity in GlmU was probed using biochemical and structural studies. The enzymatic assays reported here demonstrate that GlmU is specific for its natural substrates UTP and GlcNAc-1-P. The crystal structure of GlmU bound to ATP and GlcNAc-1-P provides molecular details for the inability of the enzyme to utilize ATP for the nucleotidyltransfer reaction. ATP binding results in an inactive pre-catalytic enzyme–substrate complex, where it adopts an unusual conformation such that the reaction cannot be catalyzed; here, ATP is shown to be bound together with three Mg2+ ions. Overall, this structure represents the binding of an inhibitory molecule at the active site and can potentially be used to develop new inhibitors of the enzyme. Further, similar to DNA/RNA polymerases, GlmU was recently recognized to utilize two metal ions, MgA 2+ and MgB 2+, to catalyze the uridyltransfer reaction. Interestingly, displacement of MgB 2+ from its usual catalytically competent position, as noted in the crystal structure of RNA polymerase in an inactive state, was considered to be a key factor inhibiting the reaction. Surprisingly, in the current structure of GlmU MgB 2+ is similarly displaced; this raises the possibility that an analogous inhibitory mechanism may be operative in GlmU. PMID:24915076

  13. AN EMERGING ROLE FOR THE LIPID MEDIATOR SPHINGOSINE-1-PHOSPHATE IN MAST CELL EFFECTOR FUNCTION AND ALLERGIC DISEASE*

    PubMed Central

    Olivera, Ana; Rivera, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) plays important roles regulating functions of diverse biological systems, including the immune system. S1P affects immune cell function mostly by acting through its receptors at the cell membrane but it can also induce S1P receptor-independent responses in the cells where it is generated. S1P produced in allergically stimulated mast cells mediates degranulation, cytokine and lipid mediator production, and migration of mast cells towards antigen by mechanisms that are both S1P receptor-dependent and independent. Even in the absence of an antigen challenge, the differentiation and responsiveness of mast cells can be affected by chronic exposure to elevated S1P from a non-mast cell source, which may occur under pathophysiological conditions, potentially leading to the hyper-responsiveness of mast cells. The role of S1P extends beyond the regulation of the function of mast cells to the regulation of the surrounding or distal environment. S1P is exported out of antigen-stimulated mast cells and into the extracellular space and the resulting S1P gradient within the tissue may influence diverse surrounding tissue cells and several aspects of the allergic disease, such as inflammation or tissue remodeling. Furthermore, recent findings indicate that vasoactive mediators released systemically by mast cells induce the production of S1P in non-hematopoietic compartments, where it plays a role in regulating the vascular tone and reducing the hypotension characteristic of the anaphylactic shock and thus helping the recovery. The dual actions of S1P, promoting the immediate response of mast cells, while controlling the systemic consequences of mast cell activity will be discussed in detail. PMID:21713655

  14. Tissue Distribution Dynamics of Human NK Cells Inferred from Peripheral Blood Depletion Kinetics after Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor Blockade.

    PubMed

    Mehling, M; Burgener, A-V; Brinkmann, V; Bantug, G R; Dimeloe, S; Hoenger, G; Kappos, L; Hess, C

    2015-11-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cell subsets differentially distribute throughout the organism. While CD56(dim) and CD56(bright) NK cell subsets similarly reside in the bone marrow (BM), the CD56(dim) population predominantly accumulates in non-lymphoid tissues and the CD56(bright) counterpart in lymphoid tissue (LT). The dynamics with which these NK cell subsets redistribute to tissues remains unexplored. Here, we studied individuals newly exposed to fingolimod, a drug that efficiently blocks sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-directed lymphocyte - including NK cell - egress from tissue to blood. During an observation period of 6h peripheral blood depletion of CD56(bright) NK cells was observed 3 h after first dose of fingolimod, with 40-50% depletion after 6 h, while a decrease of the numbers of CD56(dim) NK cells did not reach the level of statistical significance. In vitro, CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells responded comparably to the BM-homing chemokine CXCL12, while CD56(bright) NK cells migrated more efficiently in gradients of the LT-homing chemokines CCL19 and CCL21. In conjuncture with these in vitro studies, the indirectly observed subset-specific depletion kinetics from blood are compatible with preferential and more rapid redistribution of CD56(bright) NK cells from blood to peripheral tissue such as LT and possibly also the inflamed central nervous system. These data shed light on an unexplored level at which access of NK cells to LT, and thus, for example antigen-presenting cells, is regulated.

  15. Sorbitol production from lactose by engineered Lactobacillus casei deficient in sorbitol transport system and mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    De Boeck, Reinout; Sarmiento-Rubiano, Luz Adriana; Nadal, Inmaculada; Monedero, Vicente; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Yebra, María J

    2010-02-01

    Sorbitol is a sugar alcohol largely used in the food industry as a low-calorie sweetener. We have previously described a sorbitol-producing Lactobacillus casei (strain BL232) in which the gutF gene, encoding a sorbitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, was expressed from the lactose operon. Here, a complete deletion of the ldh1 gene, encoding the main L-lactate dehydrogenase, was performed in strain BL232. In a resting cell system with glucose, the new strain, named BL251, accumulated sorbitol in the medium that was rapidly metabolized after glucose exhaustion. Reutilization of produced sorbitol was prevented by deleting the gutB gene of the phosphoenolpyruvate: sorbitol phosphotransferase system (PTS(Gut)) in BL251. These results showed that the PTS(Gut) did not mediate sorbitol excretion from the cells, but it was responsible for uptake and reutilization of the synthesized sorbitol. A further improvement in sorbitol production was achieved by inactivation of the mtlD gene, encoding a mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase. The new strain BL300 (lac::gutF Deltaldh1 DeltagutB mtlD) showed an increase in sorbitol production whereas no mannitol synthesis was detected, avoiding thus a polyol mixture. This strain was able to convert lactose, the main sugar from milk, into sorbitol, either using a resting cell system or in growing cells under pH control. A conversion rate of 9.4% of lactose into sorbitol was obtained using an optimized fed-batch system and whey permeate, a waste product of the dairy industry, as substrate. PMID:19784641

  16. Lysophosphatidic Acid and Sphingosine-1-Phosphate: A Concise Review of Biological Function and Applications for Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Binder, Bernard Y K; Williams, Priscilla A; Silva, Eduardo A; Leach, J Kent

    2015-12-01

    The presentation and controlled release of bioactive signals to direct cellular growth and differentiation represents a widely used strategy in tissue engineering. Historically, work in this field has primarily focused on the delivery of large cytokines and growth factors, which can be costly to manufacture and difficult to deliver in a sustained manner. There has been a marked increase over the past decade in the pursuit of lipid mediators due to their wide range of effects over multiple cell types, low cost, and ease of scale-up. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) are two bioactive lysophospholipids (LPLs) that have gained attention for use as pharmacological agents in tissue engineering applications. While these lipids can have similar effects on cellular response, they possess distinct chemical backbones, mechanisms of synthesis and degradation, and signaling pathways using a discrete set of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). LPA and S1P predominantly act extracellularly on their GPCRs and can directly regulate cell survival, differentiation, cytokine secretion, proliferation, and migration--each of the important functions that must be considered in regenerative medicine. In addition to these potent physiological functions, these LPLs play pivotal roles in a number of pathophysiological processes. To capitalize on the promise of these molecules in tissue engineering, these lipids have been incorporated into biomaterials for in vivo delivery. Here, we survey the effects of LPA and S1P on both cellular- and tissue-level phenotypes, with an eye toward regulating stem/progenitor cell growth and differentiation. In particular, we examine work that has translational applications for cell-based tissue engineering strategies in promoting cell survival, bone and cartilage engineering, and therapeutic angiogenesis. PMID:26035484

  17. Sphingosine 1-phosphate and its carrier apolipoprotein M in human sepsis and in Escherichia coli sepsis in baboons.

    PubMed

    Frej, Cecilia; Linder, Adam; Happonen, Kaisa E; Taylor, Fletcher B; Lupu, Florea; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2016-06-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is an important regulator of vascular integrity and immune cell migration, carried in plasma by high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated apolipoprotein M (apoM) and by albumin. In sepsis, the protein and lipid composition of HDL changes dramatically. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in S1P and its carrier protein apoM during sepsis. For this purpose, plasma samples from both human sepsis patients and from an experimental Escherichia coli sepsis model in baboons were used. In the human sepsis cohort, previously studied for apoM, plasma demonstrated disease-severity correlated decreased S1P levels, the profile mimicking that of plasma apoM. In the baboons, a similar disease-severity dependent decrease in plasma levels of S1P and apoM was observed. In the lethal E. coli baboon sepsis, S1P decreased already within 6-8 hrs, whereas the apoM decrease was seen later at 12-24 hrs. Gel filtration chromatography of plasma from severe human or baboon sepsis on Superose 6 demonstrated an almost complete loss of S1P and apoM in the HDL fractions. S1P plasma concentrations correlated with the platelet count but not with erythrocytes or white blood cells. The liver mRNA levels of apoM and apoA1 decreased strongly upon sepsis induction and after 12 hr both were almost completely lost. In conclusion, during septic challenge, the plasma levels of S1P drop to very low levels. Moreover, the liver synthesis of apoM decreases severely and the plasma levels of apoM are reduced. Possibly, the decrease in S1P contributes to the decreased endothelial barrier function observed in sepsis. PMID:26990127

  18. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 antagonist JTE-013 increases the excitability of sensory neurons independently of the receptor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Chi, Xian Xuan; Xie, Wenrui; Strong, J. A.; Zhang, J.-M.

    2012-01-01

    Previously we demonstrated that sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1) played a prominent, but not exclusive, role in enhancing the excitability of small-diameter sensory neurons, suggesting that other S1PRs can modulate neuronal excitability. To examine the potential role of S1PR2 in regulating neuronal excitability we used the established selective antagonist of S1PR2, JTE-013. Here we report that exposure to JTE-013 alone produced a significant increase in excitability in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in 70–80% of recorded neurons. Internal perfusion of sensory neurons with guanosine 5′-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP-β-S) via the recording pipette inhibited the sensitization produced by JTE-013 as well as prostaglandin E2. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin or the selective S1PR1 antagonist W146 blocked the sensitization produced by JTE-013. These results indicate that JTE-013 might act as an agonist at other G protein-coupled receptors. In neurons that were sensitized by JTE-013, single-cell RT-PCR studies demonstrated that these neurons did not express the mRNA for S1PR2. In behavioral studies, injection of JTE-013 into the rat's hindpaw produced a significant increase in the mechanical sensitivity in the ipsilateral, but not contralateral, paw. Injection of JTE-013 did not affect the withdrawal latency to thermal stimulation. Thus JTE-013 augments neuronal excitability independently of S1PR2 by unknown mechanisms that may involve activation of other G protein-coupled receptors such as S1PR1. Clearly, further studies are warranted to establish the causal nature of this increased sensitivity, and future studies of neuronal function using JTE-013 should be interpreted with caution. PMID:22673325

  19. Berberine Preconditioning Protects Neurons Against Ischemia via Sphingosine-1-Phosphate and Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1[Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qichun; Bian, Huimin; Guo, Liwei; Zhu, Huaxu

    2016-01-01

    Berberine exerts neuroprotective and modulates hypoxia inducible factor-1-alpha (HIF-1[Formula: see text]. Based on the role of HIF-1[Formula: see text] in hypoxia preconditioning and association between HIF-1[Formula: see text] and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), we hypothesized that berberine preconditioning (BP) would ameliorate the cerebral injury induced by ischemia through activating the system of HIF-1[Formula: see text] and S1P. Adult male rats with middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and rat primary cortical neurons treated with oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) with BP at 24[Formula: see text]h (40[Formula: see text]mg/kg) and 2[Formula: see text]h (10[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]mol/L), respectively, were used to determine the neuroprotective effects. The HIF-1[Formula: see text] accumulation, and S1P metabolism were assayed in the berberine-preconditioned neurons, and the HIF-1[Formula: see text]-mediated transcriptional modulation of sphingosine kinases (Sphk) 1 and 2 was analyzed using chromatin immunoprecipitation and real-time polymerase chain reaction. BP significantly prevented cerebral ischemic injury in the MCAO rats at 24[Formula: see text]h and 72[Formula: see text]h following ischemia/reperfusion. In OGD-treated neurons, BP enhanced HIF-1[Formula: see text] accumulation with activation of PI3K/Akt, and induced S1P production by activating Sphk2 via the promotion of HIF-1[Formula: see text]-mediated Sphk2 transcription. In conclusion, BP activated endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms associated with the S1P/HIF-1 pathway and helped protect neuronal cells against hypoxia/ischemia. PMID:27430910

  20. Sphingosine-1-phosphate in inflammatory bowel disease and colitis-associated colon cancer: the fat’s in the fire

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jung H.; Saba, Julie D.

    2015-01-01

    Colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC) is a pathological condition defined by the development of colon cancer in patients afflicted by Crohn’s disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC), two idiopathic diseases of the gut which together comprise the disease group called inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). When IBD involves the colon, affected patients face an increased risk of developing colon cancer compared to the general population. The phenomenon of CAC represents one of the most convincing forms of evidence linking the processes of inflammation, oxidative stress and carcinogenesis. A greater understanding of the molecular events driving CAC could reveal new strategies to treat IBD and reduce the incidence of CAC. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid produced through degradation of endogenous and dietary mammalian sphingolipids containing the long chain base sphingosine. S1P signals through a family of five G protein-coupled receptors. In addition, it activates nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), two transcriptional regulators that serve as master switches in inflammation and carcinogenesis. Through these and other mechanisms, a causal role for S1P in inflammatory conditions including colitis and CAC has been implicated. In contrast to S1P, dietary sphingolipids called sphingadienes derived from plant food sources cannot be converted to S1P and exhibit anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive activities, reducing colitis and CAC in mouse models. In this review, we summarize recent findings implicating S1P signaling and metabolism in the pathogenesis of IBD and CAC. The potential role of oxidative stress in modulating S1P is also discussed. Further, we propose the hypothesis that dietary sphingolipids may promote or prevent CAC depending on their ability to be converted to S1P. PMID:27011900

  1. Safety evaluation of the double mutant 5-enol pyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (2mEPSPS) from maize that confers tolerance to glyphosate herbicide in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Herouet-Guicheney, Corinne; Rouquié, David; Freyssinet, Martine; Currier, Thomas; Martone, Aris; Zhou, Junguo; Bates, Elizabeth E M; Ferullo, Jean-Marc; Hendrickx, Koen; Rouan, Dominique

    2009-07-01

    Glyphosate tolerance can be conferred by decreasing the herbicide's ability to inhibit the enzyme 5-enol pyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase, which is essential for the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids in all plants, fungi, and bacteria. Glyphosate tolerance is based upon the expression of the double mutant 5-enol pyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (2mEPSPS) protein. The 2mEPSPS protein, with a lower binding affinity for glyphosate, is highly resistant to the inhibition by glyphosate and thus allows sufficient enzyme activity for the plants to grow in the presence of herbicides that contain glyphosate. Based on both a review of published literature and experimental studies, the potential safety concerns related to the transgenic 2mEPSPS protein were assessed. The safety evaluation supports that the expressed protein is innocuous. The 2mEPSPS enzyme does not possess any of the properties associated with known toxins or allergens, including a lack of amino acid sequence similarity to known toxins and allergens, a rapid degradation in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids, and no adverse effects in mice after intravenous or oral administration (at 10 or 2000 mg/kg body weight, respectively). In conclusion, there is a reasonable certainty of no harm resulting from the inclusion of the 2mEPSPS protein in human food or in animal feed.

  2. The specific role of plastidial glycolysis in photosynthetic and heterotrophic cells under scrutiny through the study of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Anoman, Armand Djoro; Flores-Tornero, María; Rosa-Telléz, Sara; Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Segura, Juan; Ros, Roc

    2016-01-01

    The cellular compartmentalization of metabolic processes is an important feature in plants where the same pathways could be simultaneously active in different compartments. Plant glycolysis occurs in the cytosol and plastids of green and non-green cells in which the requirements of energy and precursors may be completely different. Because of this, the relevance of plastidial glycolysis could be very different depending on the cell type. In the associated study, we investigated the function of plastidial glycolysis in photosynthetic and heterotrophic cells by specifically driving the expression of plastidial glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPCp) in a glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase double mutant background (gapcp1gapcp2). We showed that GAPCp is not functionally significant in photosynthetic cells, while it plays a crucial function in heterotrophic cells. We also showed that (i) GAPCp activity expression in root tips is necessary for primary root growth, (ii) its expression in heterotrophic cells of aerial parts and roots is necessary for plant growth and development, and (iii) GAPCp is an important metabolic connector of carbon and nitrogen metabolism through the phosphorylated pathway of serine biosynthesis (PPSB). We discuss here the role that this pathway could play in the control of plant growth and development. PMID:26953506

  3. Safety evaluation of the double mutant 5-enol pyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (2mEPSPS) from maize that confers tolerance to glyphosate herbicide in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Herouet-Guicheney, Corinne; Rouquié, David; Freyssinet, Martine; Currier, Thomas; Martone, Aris; Zhou, Junguo; Bates, Elizabeth E M; Ferullo, Jean-Marc; Hendrickx, Koen; Rouan, Dominique

    2009-07-01

    Glyphosate tolerance can be conferred by decreasing the herbicide's ability to inhibit the enzyme 5-enol pyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase, which is essential for the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids in all plants, fungi, and bacteria. Glyphosate tolerance is based upon the expression of the double mutant 5-enol pyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (2mEPSPS) protein. The 2mEPSPS protein, with a lower binding affinity for glyphosate, is highly resistant to the inhibition by glyphosate and thus allows sufficient enzyme activity for the plants to grow in the presence of herbicides that contain glyphosate. Based on both a review of published literature and experimental studies, the potential safety concerns related to the transgenic 2mEPSPS protein were assessed. The safety evaluation supports that the expressed protein is innocuous. The 2mEPSPS enzyme does not possess any of the properties associated with known toxins or allergens, including a lack of amino acid sequence similarity to known toxins and allergens, a rapid degradation in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids, and no adverse effects in mice after intravenous or oral administration (at 10 or 2000 mg/kg body weight, respectively). In conclusion, there is a reasonable certainty of no harm resulting from the inclusion of the 2mEPSPS protein in human food or in animal feed. PMID:19303906

  4. Overexpression of ACC gene from oleaginous yeast Lipomyces starkeyi enhanced the lipid accumulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with increased levels of glycerol 3-phosphate substrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiancai; Xu, Ronghua; Wang, Ruling; Haque, Mohammad Enamul; Liu, Aizhong

    2016-06-01

    The conversion of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA by acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) is the rate-limiting step in fatty acid biosynthesis. In this study, a gene coding for ACC was isolated and characterized from an oleaginous yeast, Lipomyces starkeyi. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis of L. starkeyi acetyl-CoA carboxylase gene (LsACC1) showed that the expression levels were upregulated with the fast accumulation of lipids. The LsACC1 was co-overexpressed with the glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (GPD1), which regulates lipids biosynthesis by supplying another substrates glycerol 3-phosphate for storage lipid assembly, in the non-oleaginous yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Further, the S. cerevisiae acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ScACC1) was transferred with GPD1 and its function was analyzed in comparison with LsACC1. The results showed that overexpressed LsACC1 and GPD1 resulted in a 63% increase in S. cerevisiae. This study gives new data in understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of fatty acids and lipid biosynthesis in yeasts.

  5. Molecular clone and expression of a NAD+-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase isozyme gene from the halotolerant alga Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ma; He, Li-Hong; Yu, Tu-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Glycerol is an important osmotically compatible solute in Dunaliella. Glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH) is a key enzyme in the pathway of glycerol synthesis, which converts dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) to glycerol-3-phosphate. Generally, the glycerol-DHAP cycle pathway, which is driven by G3PDH, is considered as the rate-limiting enzyme to regulate the glycerol level under osmotic shocks. Considering the peculiarity in osmoregulation, the cDNA of a NAD(+)-dependent G3PDH was isolated from D. salina using RACE and RT-PCR approaches in this study. Results indicated that the length of the cDNA sequence of G3PDH was 2,100 bp encoding a 699 amino acid deduced polypeptide whose computational molecular weight was 76.6 kDa. Conserved domain analysis revealed that the G3PDH protein has two independent functional domains, SerB and G3PDH domains. It was predicted that the G3PDH was a nonsecretory protein and may be located in the chloroplast of D. salina. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the D. salina G3PDH had a closer relationship with the G3PDHs from the Dunaliella genus than with those from other species. In addition, the cDNA was subsequently subcloned in the pET-32a(+) vector and was transformed into E. coli strain BL21 (DE3), a expression protein with 100 kDa was identified, which was consistent with the theoretical value.

  6. Comparison of glycerolipid biosynthesis in non-green plastids from sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cells and cauliflower (Brassica oleracea) buds.

    PubMed

    Alban, C; Joyard, J; Douce, R

    1989-05-01

    The availability of methods to fractionate non-green plastids and to prepare their limiting envelope membranes [Alban, Joyard & Douce (1988) Plant Physiol. 88, 709-717] allowed a detailed analysis of the biosynthesis of lysophosphatidic acid, phosphatidic acid, diacylglycerol and monogalactosyl-diacylglycerol (MGDG) in two different types of non-green starch-containing plastids: plastids isolated from cauliflower buds and amyloplasts isolated from sycamore cells. An enzyme [acyl-ACP (acyl carrier protein):sn-glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase) recovered in the soluble fraction of non-green plastids transfers oleic acid from oleoyl-ACP to the sn-1 position of sn-glycerol 3-phosphate to form lysophosphatidic acid. Then a membrane-bound enzyme (acyl-ACP:monoacyl-sn-glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase), localized in the envelope membrane, catalyses the acylation of the available sn-2 position of 1-oleoyl-sn-glycerol 3-phosphate by palmitic acid from palmitoyl-ACP. Therefore both the soluble phase and the envelope membranes are necessary for acylation of sn-glycerol 3-phosphate. The major difference between cauliflower (Brassica oleracea) and sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) membranes is the very low level of phosphatidate phosphatase activity in sycamore envelope membrane. Therefore, very little diacylglycerol is available for MGDG synthesis in sycamore, compared with cauliflower. These findings are consistent with the similarities and differences described in lipid metabolism of mature chloroplasts from 'C18:3' and 'C16:3' plants (those with MGDG containing C18:3 and C16:3 fatty acids). Sycamore contains only C18 fatty acids in MGDG, and the envelope membranes from sycamore amyloplasts have a low phosphatidate phosphatase activity and therefore the enzymes of the Kornberg-Pricer pathway have a low efficiency of incorporation of sn-glycerol 3-phosphate into MGDG. By contrast, cauliflower contains MGDG with C16:3 fatty acid, and the incorporation of sn-glycerol 3

  7. Potent and Selective Agonists of Sphingosine 1-Phosphate 1 (S1P1): Discovery and SAR of a Novel Isoxazole Based Series.

    PubMed

    Watterson, Scott H; Guo, Junqing; Spergel, Steve H; Langevine, Charles M; Moquin, Robert V; Shen, Ding Ren; Yarde, Melissa; Cvijic, Mary Ellen; Banas, Dana; Liu, Richard; Suchard, Suzanne J; Gillooly, Kathleen; Taylor, Tracy; Rex-Rabe, Sandra; Shuster, David J; McIntyre, Kim W; Cornelius, Georgia; D'Arienzo, Celia; Marino, Anthony; Balimane, Praveen; Warrack, Bethanne; Salter-Cid, Luisa; McKinnon, Murray; Barrish, Joel C; Carter, Percy H; Pitts, William J; Xie, Jenny; Dyckman, Alaric J

    2016-03-24

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is the endogenous ligand for the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors (S1P1-5) and evokes a variety of cellular responses through their stimulation. The interaction of S1P with the S1P receptors plays a fundamental physiological role in a number of processes including vascular development and stabilization, lymphocyte migration, and proliferation. Agonism of S1P1, in particular, has been shown to play a significant role in lymphocyte trafficking from the thymus and secondary lymphoid organs, resulting in immunosuppression. This article will detail the discovery and SAR of a potent and selective series of isoxazole based full agonists of S1P1. Isoxazole 6d demonstrated impressive efficacy when administered orally in a rat model of arthritis and in a mouse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of multiple sclerosis. PMID:26924461

  8. Sphingosine-1-phosphate mediates proliferation maintaining the multipotency of human adult bone marrow and adipose tissue-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoli; H'ng, Shiau-Chen; Leong, David T; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Melendez, Alirio J

    2010-08-01

    High renewal and maintenance of multipotency of human adult stem cells (hSCs), are a prerequisite for experimental analysis as well as for potential clinical usages. The most widely used strategy for hSC culture and proliferation is using serum. However, serum is poorly defined and has a considerable degree of inter-batch variation, which makes it difficult for large-scale mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) expansion in homogeneous culture conditions. Moreover, it is often observed that cells grown in serum-containing media spontaneously differentiate into unknown and/or undesired phenotypes. Another way of maintaining hSC development is using cytokines and/or tissue-specific growth factors; this is a very expensive approach and can lead to early unwanted differentiation. In order to circumvent these issues, we investigated the role of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), in the growth and multipotency maintenance of human bone marrow and adipose tissue-derived MSCs. We show that S1P induces growth, and in combination with reduced serum, or with the growth factors FGF and platelet-derived growth factor-AB, S1P has an enhancing effect on growth. We also show that the MSCs cultured in S1P-supplemented media are able to maintain their differentiation potential for at least as long as that for cells grown in the usual serum-containing media. This is shown by the ability of cells grown in S1P-containing media to be able to undergo osteogenic as well as adipogenic differentiation. This is of interest, since S1P is a relatively inexpensive natural product, which can be obtained in homogeneous high-purity batches: this will minimize costs and potentially reduce the unwanted side effects observed with serum. Taken together, S1P is able to induce proliferation while maintaining the multipotency of different human stem cells, suggesting a potential for S1P in developing serum-free or serum-reduced defined medium for adult stem cell cultures.

  9. Nephrokeli, a Chinese Herbal Formula, May Improve IgA Nephropathy through Regulation of the Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yifei; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Xianwen; Cai, Xiaofan; Chen, Yiping; Deng, Yueyi

    2015-01-01

    Nephrokeli (NPKL) is a Chinese herbal formula that has been used to treat patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN) for improvement of proteinuria and kidney injury. However, the mechanism remains unclear. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and its receptors S1PR2 and S1PR3 are known to play an important role in kidney disease. Here, we tested whether NPKL is able to regulate the S1P pathway in the kidney of IgAN rats. Four groups of rats were included in the study: Control, IgAN, IgAN treated with losartan, and IgAN treated with NPKL. The IgAN model was generated by injection of bovine serum albumin and staphylococcus enterotoxin B. We found that IgAN rats had increased staining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in the mesangial area and increased mRNA and protein levels of S1PR2 and S1PR3 in the kidney compared to control rats. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a downstream growth factor in the S1P pathway, was also elevated in the kidney of IgAN rats. Treatment with either NPKL or losartan was able to reduce PCNA staining and the expression of both S1PR2 and S1PR3 in the kidney of IgAN rats. However, NPKL (but not losartan treatment) reduced the expression of CTGF in the kidney of IgAN rats. In addition, we treated rat mesangial cells with sera collected from either NPKL-treated rats or control rats and found that NPKL-serum was able to reduce S1P-induced mesangial cell proliferation and the expression of S1PR2/S1PR3 and CTGF. NPKL also attenuates expression of fibrosis, inflammation, and oxidative stress markers in the kidney of IgAN rats. Our studies provide the mechanism by which NPKL attenuates kidney injury in IgAN rats. PMID:25633986

  10. Chitosan/glucose 1-phosphate as new stable in situ forming depot system for controlled drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Supper, Stephanie; Anton, Nicolas; Boisclair, Julie; Seidel, Nina; Riemenschnitter, Marc; Curdy, Catherine; Vandamme, Thierry

    2014-10-01

    Chitosan (CS)-based thermosensitive solutions that turn into semi-solid hydrogels upon injection at body temperature have increasingly drawn attention over the last decades as an attractive new type of in situ forming depot (ISFD) drug delivery system. Despite the great potential of the standard CS/β-glycerophosphate (β-GP) thermogelling solutions, their lack of stability over time at room temperature as well as at refrigerated conditions renders them unsuitable as ready-to-use drug product. In the present study, we investigated Glucose-1-Phosphate (G1-P) as an alternative gelling agent for improving the stability of CS-based ISFD solutions. The in vitro release performance of CS/G1-P formulations was assessed using several model compounds. Furthermore, the local tolerance of subcutaneously implanted CS/G1-P hydrogels was investigated by histological examination over three weeks. The thermogelling potential of CS/G1-P solutions, determined by rheology, is dependent on the polymer molecular weight (Mw) and concentration as well as on the G1-P concentration. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements confirmed that sol/gel transition takes place at around body temperature and is not fully thermo-reversible. The long term storage stability was evaluated through the appearance, pH, viscosity and gelation time at 37°C of the solution. The results emphasized an enhanced stability of the CS/G1-P system compared to the standard CS/β-GP. CS solution with 0.40 mmol/g G1-P is stable for at least 9 months at 2-8°C, versus less than 1 month when using β-GP as gelling agent. Furthermore, the solution is easy to inject, as evidenced from injectability evaluation using 23-30 G needles. In vitro release experiments showed a sustained release over days to weeks for hydrophilic model compounds, demonstrating thereby that CS/G1-P may be suitable for the prolonged delivery of drugs. The inflammatory reaction observed in the tissue surrounding the hydrogel in rats was a

  11. Developmental delay in a Streptomyces venezuelae glgE null mutant is associated with the accumulation of α-maltose 1-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Miah, Farzana; Bibb, Maureen J; Barclay, J Elaine; Findlay, Kim C; Bornemann, Stephen

    2016-07-01

    The GlgE pathway is thought to be responsible for the conversion of trehalose into a glycogen-like α-glucan polymer in bacteria. Trehalose is first converted to maltose, which is phosphorylated by maltose kinase Pep2 to give α-maltose 1-phosphate. This is the donor substrate of the maltosyl transferase GlgE that is known to extend α-1,4-linked maltooligosaccharides, which are thought to be branched with α-1,6 linkages. The genome of Streptomyces venezuelae contains all the genes coding for the GlgE pathway enzymes but none of those of related pathways, including glgC and glgA of the glycogen pathway. This provides an opportunity to study the GlgE pathway in isolation. The genes of the GlgE pathway were upregulated at the onset of sporulation, consistent with the known timing of α-glucan deposition. A constructed ΔglgE null mutant strain was viable but showed a delayed developmental phenotype when grown on maltose, giving less cell mass and delayed sporulation. Pre-spore cells and spores of the mutant were frequently double the length of those of the wild-type, implying impaired cross-wall formation, and spores showed reduced tolerance to stress. The mutant accumulated α-maltose 1-phosphate and maltose but no α-glucan. Therefore, the GlgE pathway is necessary and sufficient for polymer biosynthesis. Growth of the ΔglgE mutant on galactose and that of a Δpep2 mutant on maltose were analysed. In both cases, neither accumulation of α-maltose 1-phosphate/α-glucan nor a developmental delay was observed. Thus, high levels of α-maltose 1-phosphate are responsible for the developmental phenotype of the ΔglgE mutant, rather than the lack of α-glucan.

  12. The 2',4'-dihydroxychalcone could be explored to develop new inhibitors against the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Leishmania species.

    PubMed

    Passalacqua, Thais G; Torres, Fábio A E; Nogueira, Camila T; de Almeida, Leticia; Del Cistia, Mayara L; dos Santos, Mariana B; Regasini, Luis O; Graminha, Márcia A S; Marchetto, Reinaldo; Zottis, Aderson

    2015-09-01

    The enzyme glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH) from Leishmania species is considered as an attractive target to design new antileishmanial drugs and a previous in silico study reported on the importance of chalcones to achieve its inhibition. Here, we report the identification of a synthetic chalcone in our in vitro assays with promastigote cells from Leishmania amazonensis, its biological activity in animal models, and docking followed by molecular dynamics simulation to investigate the molecular interactions and structural patterns that are crucial to achieve the inhibition complex between this compound and G3PDH. A molecular fragment of this natural product derivative can provide new inhibitors with increased potency and selectivity. PMID:26169126

  13. Replacing Escherichia coli NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) with a NADP-dependent enzyme from Clostridium acetobutylicum facilitates NADPH dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Irene; Zhu, Jiangfeng; Lin, Henry; Bennett, George N; San, Ka-Yiu

    2008-11-01

    Reactions requiring reducing equivalents, NAD(P)H, are of enormous importance for the synthesis of industrially valuable compounds such as carotenoids, polymers, antibiotics and chiral alcohols among others. The use of whole-cell biocatalysis can reduce process cost by acting as catalyst and cofactor regenerator at the same time; however, product yields might be limited by cofactor availability within the cell. Thus, our study focussed on the genetic manipulation of a whole-cell system by modifying metabolic pathways and enzymes to improve the overall production process. In the present work, we genetically engineered an Escherichia coli strain to increase NADPH availability to improve the productivity of products that require NADPH in its biosynthesis. The approach involved an alteration of the glycolysis step where glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAP) is oxidized to 1,3 bisphophoglycerate (1,3-BPG). This reaction is catalyzed by NAD-dependent endogenous glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) encoded by the gapA gene. We constructed a recombinant E. coli strain by replacing the native NAD-dependent gapA gene with a NADP-dependent GAPDH from Clostridium acetobutylicum, encoded by the gene gapC. The beauty of this approach is that the recombinant E. coli strain produces 2 mol of NADPH, instead of NADH, per mole of glucose consumed. Metabolic flux analysis showed that the flux through the pentose phosphate (PP) pathway, one of the main pathways that produce NADPH, was reduced significantly in the recombinant strain when compared to that of the parent strain. The effectiveness of the NADPH enhancing system was tested using the production of lycopene and epsilon-caprolactone as model systems using two different background strains. The recombinant strains, with increased NADPH availability, consistently showed significant higher productivity than the parent strains.

  14. The investigation of substrate-induced changes in subunit interactions in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenases by measurement of the kinetics and thermodynamics of subunit exchange.

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, H H; Hollaway, M R

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was made of changes in subunit interactions in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase on binding NAD+, NADH and other substrates by using the previously developed method of measurement of rates and extent of subunit exchange between the rabbit enzyme (R4), yeast enzyme (Y4) and rabbit-yeast hybrid (R2Y2) [Osborne & Hollaway (1974) Biochem. J. 143, 651-662]. The free energy of activation for the conversion of tetramer into dimer for the rabbit enzyme (R4 leads to 2R2) is increased by at least 12kJ/mol in the presence of NAD+. This increase is interpreted in terms of an NAD+-induced 'tightening' of the tetrameric structure probably involving increased interaction at the subunit interfaces across the QR plane of the molecule [see Buehner et al. (1974) J. Mol. Biol. 82, 563-585]. This tightening of the structure only occurs on binding the third NAD+ molecule to a given enzyme molecule. Conversely, binding of NADH causes a decrease in the free energy of activation for the R4 leads to 2R2 and Y4 leads to 2Y2 conversions by at least 10kJ/mol. This is interpreted as a NADH-induced 'loosening' of the structures arising from decreased interactions across the subunit interfaces involving the QR dissociation plane. In the presence of NADH the increase in the rate of subunit exchange is such that it is not possible to separate the hybrid from the other species if electrophoresis is carried out with NADH in the separation media. In the presence of a mixture of NADH and NAD+ the effect of NAD+ on subunit exchange is dominant. The results are discussed in terms of the known co-operativty between binding sites in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenases. Images PLATE 1(a) PLATE 1(b) PLATE 2(a) PLATE 2(b) PLATE 2(c) PMID:174555

  15. Site-Directed Mutagenesis from Arg195 to His of a Microalgal Putatively Chloroplastidial Glycerol-3-Phosphate Acyltransferase Causes an Increase in Phospholipid Levels in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Long-Ling; Li, Hui; Yan, Xiao-Jun; Xu, Ji-Lin; Zhou, Zhi-Gang

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the contribution of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) to the first acylation of glycerol-3-phosphate (G-3-P), the present study focused on a functional analysis of the GPAT gene from Lobosphaera incisa (designated as LiGPAT). A full-length cDNA of LiGPAT consisting of a 1,305-bp ORF, a 1,652-bp 5′-UTR, and a 354-bp 3′-UTR, was cloned. The ORF encoded a 434-amino acid peptide, of which 63 residues at the N-terminus defined a chloroplast transit peptide. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogeny analysis of GPAT homologs provided the convincible bioinformatics evidence that LiGPAT was localized to chloroplasts. Considering the conservation of His among the G-3-P binding sites from chloroplastidial GPATs and the substitution of His by Arg at position 195 in the LiGPAT mature protein (designated mLiGPAT), we established the heterologous expression of either mLiGPAT or its mutant (Arg195His) (sdmLiGPAT) in the GPAT-deficient yeast mutant gat1Δ. Lipid profile analyses of these transgenic yeasts not only validated the acylation function of LiGPAT but also indicated that the site-directed mutagenesis from Arg195 to His led to an increase in the phospholipid level in yeast. Semi-quantitative analysis of mLiGPAT and sdmLiGPAT, together with the structural superimposition of their G-3-P binding sites, indicated that the increased enzymatic activity was caused by the enlarged accessible surface of the phosphate group binding pocket when Arg195 was mutated to His. Thus, the potential of genetic manipulation of GPAT to increase the glycerolipid level in L. incisa and other microalgae would be of great interest. PMID:27014309

  16. Replacing Escherichia coli NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) with a NADP-dependent enzyme from Clostridium acetobutylicum facilitates NADPH dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Irene; Zhu, Jiangfeng; Lin, Henry; Bennett, George N; San, Ka-Yiu

    2008-11-01

    Reactions requiring reducing equivalents, NAD(P)H, are of enormous importance for the synthesis of industrially valuable compounds such as carotenoids, polymers, antibiotics and chiral alcohols among others. The use of whole-cell biocatalysis can reduce process cost by acting as catalyst and cofactor regenerator at the same time; however, product yields might be limited by cofactor availability within the cell. Thus, our study focussed on the genetic manipulation of a whole-cell system by modifying metabolic pathways and enzymes to improve the overall production process. In the present work, we genetically engineered an Escherichia coli strain to increase NADPH availability to improve the productivity of products that require NADPH in its biosynthesis. The approach involved an alteration of the glycolysis step where glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAP) is oxidized to 1,3 bisphophoglycerate (1,3-BPG). This reaction is catalyzed by NAD-dependent endogenous glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) encoded by the gapA gene. We constructed a recombinant E. coli strain by replacing the native NAD-dependent gapA gene with a NADP-dependent GAPDH from Clostridium acetobutylicum, encoded by the gene gapC. The beauty of this approach is that the recombinant E. coli strain produces 2 mol of NADPH, instead of NADH, per mole of glucose consumed. Metabolic flux analysis showed that the flux through the pentose phosphate (PP) pathway, one of the main pathways that produce NADPH, was reduced significantly in the recombinant strain when compared to that of the parent strain. The effectiveness of the NADPH enhancing system was tested using the production of lycopene and epsilon-caprolactone as model systems using two different background strains. The recombinant strains, with increased NADPH availability, consistently showed significant higher productivity than the parent strains. PMID:18852061

  17. Inactivation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase by a reactive metabolite of acetaminophen and mass spectral characterization of an arylated active site peptide.

    PubMed

    Dietze, E C; Schäfer, A; Omichinski, J G; Nelson, S D

    1997-10-01

    Acetaminophen (4'-hydroxyacetanilide, APAP) is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic drug that can cause hepatic necrosis under some circumstances via cytochrome P450-mediated oxidation to a reactive metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). Although the mechanism of hepatocellular injury caused by APAP is not fully understood, it is known that NAPQI forms covalent adducts with several hepatocellular proteins. Reported here is the identification of one of these proteins as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase [GAPDH, D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate: NAD+ oxidoreductase (phosphorylating), EC 1.2.1.12]. Two hours after the administration of hepatotoxic doses of [14C]APAP to mice, at a time prior to overt cell damage, hepatocellular GAPDH activity was significantly decreased concurrent with the formation of a 14C-labeled GAPDH adduct. A nonhepatotoxic regioisomer of APAP, 3'-hydroxyacetanilide (AMAP), was found to decrease GAPDH activity to a lesser extent than APAP, and radiolabel from [14C]AMAP bound to a lesser extent to GAPDH at a time when its overall binding to hepatocellular proteins was almost equivalent to that of APAP. In order to determine the nature of the covalent adduct between GAPDH and APAP, its major reactive and toxic metabolite, NAPQI, was incubated with purified porcine muscle GAPDH. Microsequencing analysis and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS) with collision-induced dissociation (CID) were used to characterize one of the adducts as APAP bound to the cysteinyl sulfhydryl group of Cys-149 in the active site peptide of GAPDH. PMID:9348431

  18. The class II phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate kinase PIK3C2A promotes Shigella flexneri dissemination through formation of vacuole-like protrusions.

    PubMed

    Dragoi, Ana-Maria; Agaisse, Hervé

    2015-04-01

    Intracellular pathogens such as Shigella flexneri and Listeria monocytogenes achieve dissemination in the intestinal epithelium by displaying actin-based motility in the cytosol of infected cells. As they reach the cell periphery, motile bacteria form plasma membrane protrusions that resolve into vacuoles in adjacent cells, through a poorly understood mechanism. Here, we report on the role of the class II phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate kinase PIK3C2A in S. flexneri dissemination. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that PIK3C2A was required for the resolution of protrusions into vacuoles through the formation of an intermediate membrane-bound compartment that we refer to as a vacuole-like protrusion (VLP). Genetic rescue of PIK3C2A depletion with RNA interference (RNAi)-resistant cDNA constructs demonstrated that VLP formation required the activity of PIK3C2A in primary infected cells. PIK3C2A expression was required for production of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PtdIns(3)P] at the plasma membrane surrounding protrusions. PtdIns(3)P production was not observed in the protrusions formed by L. monocytogenes, whose dissemination did not rely on PIK3C2A. PIK3C2A-mediated PtdIns(3)P production in S. flexneri protrusions was regulated by host cell tyrosine kinase signaling and relied on the integrity of the S. flexneri type 3 secretion system (T3SS). We suggest a model of S. flexneri dissemination in which the formation of VLPs is mediated by the PIK3C2A-dependent production of the signaling lipid PtdIns(3)P in the protrusion membrane, which relies on the T3SS-dependent activation of tyrosine kinase signaling in protrusions.

  19. Synthesis and biological evaluation of phosphoramidate prodrugs of two analogues of 2-deoxy-d-ribose-1-phosphate directed to the discovery of two carbasugars as new potential anti-HIV leads.

    PubMed

    Hamon, Nadège; Slusarczyk, Magdalena; Serpi, Michaela; Balzarini, Jan; McGuigan, Christopher

    2015-02-15

    2-Deoxy-α-d-ribose-1-phosphate is of great interest as it is involved in the biosynthesis and/or catabolic degradation of several nucleoside analogues of biological and therapeutic relevance. However due to the lack of a stabilising group at its 2-position, it is difficult to synthesize stable prodrugs of this compound. In order to overcome this lack of stability, the synthesis of carbasugar analogues of 2-deoxyribose-1-phosphate was envisioned. Herein the preparation of a series of prodrugs of two carbocyclic analogues of 2-deoxyribose-1-phosphate using the phosphoramidate ProTide technology, along with their biological evaluation against HIV and cancer cell proliferation, is reported.

  20. Structural Insight into How Streptomyces coelicolor Maltosyl Transferase GlgE Binds α-Maltose 1-Phosphate and Forms a Maltosyl-enzyme Intermediate

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    GlgE (EC 2.4.99.16) is an α-maltose 1-phosphate:(1→4)-α-d-glucan 4-α-d-maltosyltransferase of the CAZy glycoside hydrolase 13_3 family. It is the defining enzyme of a bacterial α-glucan biosynthetic pathway and is a genetically validated anti-tuberculosis target. It catalyzes the α-retaining transfer of maltosyl units from α-maltose 1-phosphate to maltooligosaccharides and is predicted to use a double-displacement mechanism. Evidence of this mechanism was obtained using a combination of site-directed mutagenesis of Streptomyces coelicolor GlgE isoform I, substrate analogues, protein crystallography, and mass spectrometry. The X-ray structures of α-maltose 1-phosphate bound to a D394A mutein and a β-2-deoxy-2-fluoromaltosyl-enzyme intermediate with a E423A mutein were determined. There are few examples of CAZy glycoside hydrolase family 13 members that have had their glycosyl-enzyme intermediate structures determined, and none before now have been obtained with a 2-deoxy-2-fluoro substrate analogue. The covalent modification of Asp394 was confirmed using mass spectrometry. A similar modification of wild-type GlgE proteins from S. coelicolor and Mycobacterium tuberculosis was also observed. Small-angle X-ray scattering of the M. tuberculosis enzyme revealed a homodimeric assembly similar to that of the S. coelicolor enzyme but with slightly differently oriented monomers. The deeper understanding of the structure–function relationships of S. coelicolor GlgE will aid the development of inhibitors of the M. tuberculosis enzyme. PMID:24689960

  1. Physiological aggregation of maltodextrin phosphorylase from Pyrococcus furiosus and its application in a process of batch starch degradation to alpha-D-glucose-1-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Nahálka, Jozef

    2008-04-01

    Maltodextrin phosphorylase from Pyrococcus furiosus (PF1535) was fused with the cellulose-binding domain of Clostridium cellulovorans serving as an aggregation module. After molecular cloning of the corresponding gene fusion construct and controlled expression in Escherichia coli BL21, 83% of total maltodextrin phosphorylase activity (0.24 U/mg of dry cell weight) was displayed in active inclusion bodies. These active inclusion bodies were easily isolated by nonionic detergent treatment and directly used for maltodextrin conversion to alpha-D-glucose-1-phosphate in a repetitive batch mode. Only 10% of enzyme activity was lost after ten conversion cycles at optimum conditions.

  2. The identification of (3R,4S)-5-fluoro-5-deoxy-D-ribulose-1-phosphate as an intermediate in fluorometabolite biosynthesis in Streptomyces cattleya.

    PubMed

    Onega, Mayca; McGlinchey, Ryan P; Deng, Hai; Hamilton, John T G; O'Hagan, David

    2007-10-01

    (3R,4S)-5-Fluoro-5-deoxy-D-ribulose-1-phosphate (5-FDRulP) has been identified as the third fluorinated intermediate on the biosynthetic pathway to fluoroacetate and 4-fluorothreonine in Streptomyces cattleya. 5-FDRulP is generated after formation of 5'-fluoro-5'-deoxyadenosine (5'-FDA) and then phosphorolysis of 5'-FDA to 5-fluoro-5-deoxy-D-ribose-1-phosphate (5-FDRP) by the action of a purine nucleoside phosphorylase. An isomerase mediates the conversion of 5-FDRP to 5-FDRulP. The identity of the (3R,4S) diastereoisomer of 5-FDRulP was established by comparative (19)F{(1)H} NMR studies whereby 5-FDRulP that accumulated in a cell free extract of S. cattleya, was treated with a phytase to generate the non-phosphorylated sugar, 5-fluoro-5-deoxy-D-ribulose (5-FDRul). This S. cattleya product was compared to the product of an in-vitro biotransformation where separately 5-fluoro-5-deoxy-D-ribose and 5-fluoro-5-deoxy-D-xylose were converted to 5-fluoro-5-deoxy-D-ribulose and 5-fluoro-5-deoxy-D-xylulose respectively by the action of glucose isomerase. It was demonstrated that 5-fluoro-5-deoxy-D-ribose gave the identical diastereoisomer to that observed from 5-FDRulP.

  3. Comparison of the regulation, metabolic functions, and roles in virulence of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase homologues gapA and gapB in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Purves, Joanne; Cockayne, Alan; Moody, Peter C E; Morrissey, Julie A

    2010-12-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus contains two glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) homologues known as GapA and GapB. GapA has been characterized as a functional GAPDH protein, but currently there is no biological evidence for the role of GapB in metabolism in S. aureus. In this study we show through a number of complementary methods that S. aureus GapA is essential for glycolysis while GapB is essential in gluconeogenesis. These proteins are reciprocally regulated in response to glucose concentrations, and both are influenced by the glycolysis regulator protein GapR, which is the first demonstration of the role of this regulator in S. aureus and the first indication that GapR homologues control genes other than those within the glycolytic operon. Furthermore, we show that both GapA and GapB are important in the pathogenesis of S. aureus in a Galleria mellonella model of infection, showing for the first time in any bacteria that both glycolysis and gluconeogenesis have important roles in virulence.

  4. A novel 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase transgene for glyphosate resistance stimulates growth and fecundity in weedy rice (Oryza sativa) without herbicide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Xia, Hui; Yang, Xiao; Xu, Ting; Si, Hong Jiang; Cai, Xing Xing; Wang, Feng; Su, Jun; Snow, Allison A; Lu, Bao-Rong

    2014-04-01

    Understanding evolutionary interactions among crops and weeds can facilitate effective weed management. For example, gene flow from crops to their wild or weedy relatives can lead to rapid evolution in recipient populations. In rice (Oryza sativa), transgenic herbicide resistance is expected to spread to conspecific weedy rice (Oryza sativa f. spontanea) via hybridization. Here, we studied fitness effects of transgenic over-expression of a native 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (epsps) gene developed to confer glyphosate resistance in rice. Controlling for genetic background, we examined physiological traits and field performance of crop-weed hybrid lineages that segregated for the presence or absence of this novel epsps transgene. Surprisingly, we found that transgenic F2 crop-weed hybrids produced 48-125% more seeds per plant than nontransgenic controls in monoculture- and mixed-planting designs without glyphosate application. Transgenic plants also had greater EPSPS protein levels, tryptophan concentrations, photosynthetic rates, and per cent seed germination compared with nontransgenic controls. Our findings suggest that over-expression of a native rice epsps gene can lead to fitness advantages, even without exposure to glyphosate. We hypothesize that over-expressed epsps may be useful to breeders and, if deployed, could result in fitness benefits in weedy relatives following transgene introgression.

  5. Apicoplast-Localized Lysophosphatidic Acid Precursor Assembly Is Required for Bulk Phospholipid Synthesis in Toxoplasma gondii and Relies on an Algal/Plant-Like Glycerol 3-Phosphate Acyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Amiar, Souad; MacRae, James I; Callahan, Damien L; Dubois, David; van Dooren, Giel G; Shears, Melanie J; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Maréchal, Eric; McConville, Malcolm J; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Yamaryo-Botté, Yoshiki; Botté, Cyrille Y

    2016-08-01

    Most apicomplexan parasites possess a non-photosynthetic plastid (the apicoplast), which harbors enzymes for a number of metabolic pathways, including a prokaryotic type II fatty acid synthesis (FASII) pathway. In Toxoplasma gondii, the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, the FASII pathway is essential for parasite growth and infectivity. However, little is known about the fate of fatty acids synthesized by FASII. In this study, we have investigated the function of a plant-like glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase (TgATS1) that localizes to the T. gondii apicoplast. Knock-down of TgATS1 resulted in significantly reduced incorporation of FASII-synthesized fatty acids into phosphatidic acid and downstream phospholipids and a severe defect in intracellular parasite replication and survival. Lipidomic analysis demonstrated that lipid precursors are made in, and exported from, the apicoplast for de novo biosynthesis of bulk phospholipids. This study reveals that the apicoplast-located FASII and ATS1, which are primarily used to generate plastid galactolipids in plants and algae, instead generate bulk phospholipids for membrane biogenesis in T. gondii. PMID:27490259

  6. Ectopic expression of myo-inositol 3-phosphate synthase induces a wide range of metabolic changes and confers salt tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Kusuda, Hiroki; Koga, Wataru; Kusano, Miyako; Oikawa, Akira; Saito, Kazuki; Hirai, Masami Yokota; Yoshida, Kaoru T

    2015-03-01

    Salt stress is an important factor that limits crop production worldwide. The salt tolerance of plants is a complex biological process mediated by changes in gene expression and metabolite composition. The enzyme myo-inositol 3-phosphate synthase (MIPS; EC 5.5.1.4) catalyzes the first step of myo-inositol biosynthesis, and overexpression of the MIPS gene enhances salt stress tolerance in several plant species. In this study, we performed metabolite profiling of both MIPS-overexpressing and wild-type rice. The enhanced salt stress tolerance of MIPS-overexpressing plants was clear based on growth and the metabolites under salt stress. We found that constitutive overexpression of the rice MIPS gene resulted in a wide range of metabolic changes. This study demonstrates for the first time that overexpression of the MIPS gene increases various metabolites responsible for protecting plants from abiotic stress. Activation of both basal metabolism, such as glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and inositol metabolism is induced in MIPS-overexpressing plants. We discuss the relationship between the metabolic changes and the improved salt tolerance observed in transgenic rice.

  7. Aromatic hydrocarbons upregulate glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and induce changes in actin cytoskeleton. Role of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR).

    PubMed

    Reyes-Hernández, O D; Mejía-García, A; Sánchez-Ocampo, E M; Castro-Muñozledo, F; Hernández-Muñoz, R; Elizondo, G

    2009-12-21

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a multifunctional enzyme involved in several cellular functions including glycolysis, membrane transport, microtubule assembly, DNA replication and repair, nuclear RNA export, apoptosis, and the detection of nitric oxide stress. Therefore, modifications in the regulatory ability and function of GAPDH may alter cellular homeostasis. We report here that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and beta-naphthoflavone, which are well-known ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), increase GAPDH mRNA levels in vivo and in vitro, respectively. These compounds fail to induce GAPDH transcription in an AhR-null mouse model, suggesting that the increase in GAPDH level is dependent upon AhR activation. To analyse the consequences of AhR ligands on GAPDH function, mice were treated with TCDD and the level of liver activity of GAPDH was determined. The results showed that TCDD treatment increased GAPDH activity. On the other hand, treatment of Hepa-1 cells with beta-naphthoflavone leads to an increase in microfilament density when compared to untreated cultures. Collectively, these results suggest that AhR ligands, such as polycyclic hydrocarbons, can modify GAPDH expression and, therefore, have the potential to alter the multiple functions of this enzyme.

  8. Cis-acting elements essential for light regulation of the nuclear gene encoding the A subunit of chloroplast glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Park, S C; Kwon, H B; Shih, M C

    1996-01-01

    We report the characterization of cis-acting elements involved in light regulation of the nuclear gene (GapA) that encodes the A subunit of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our previous deletion analyses indicate that the -277 to -195 upstream region of GapA is essential for light induction of the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. This region contains three direct repeats with the consensus sequence 5'-CAAATGAA(A/G)A-3' (Gap boxes). Our results show that 2-bp substitutions of the last four nucleotides (AA or GA) of the Gap boxes by CC abolish light induction of the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene in vivo and affect binding of the Gap box binding factor in vitro. We have also identified an additional cis-acting element, AE (Activation Element) box, that is involved in regulation of GapA. A combination of a Gap box trimer and an AE box dimer can confer light responsiveness of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter containing the -92 to +6 upstream sequence, whereas oligomers of Gap boxes or AE boxes alone cannot confer light responsiveness on the same promoter. These results suggest that Gap boxes and AE boxes function together as the light-responsive element of GapA. PMID:8972600

  9. Two glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase isogenes from Candida versatilis SN-18 play an important role in glycerol biosynthesis under osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Mizushima, Daiki; Iwata, Hisashi; Ishimaki, Yuki; Ogihara, Jun; Kato, Jun; Kasumi, Takafumi

    2016-05-01

    Two isogenes of glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) from Candida versatilis SN-18 were cloned and sequenced. These intronless genes (Cagpd1 and Cagpd2) were both predicted to encode a 378 amino acid polypeptide, and the deduced amino acid sequences mutually showed 76% identity. Interestingly, Cagpd1 and Cagpd2 were located tandemly in a locus of genomic DNA within a 262 bp interval. To our knowledge, this represents a novel instance of isogenic genes relating to glucose metabolism. The stress response element (STRE) was found respectively at -93 to -89 bp upstream of the 5'end of Cagpd1 and -707 to -703 bp upstream of Cagpd2, indicating that these genes are involved in osmotic stress response. In heterologous expression using a gpd1Δgpd2Δ double deletion mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Cagpd1 and Cagpd2 transformants complemented the function of GPD, with Cagpd2 being much more effective than Cagpd1 in promoting growth and glycerol synthesis. Phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequences suggested that Cagpd1p and Cagpd2p are NADP(+)-dependent GPDs (EC 1.1.1.94). However, crude enzyme extract from Cagpd1 and Cagpd2 transformants showed GPD activity with only NAD(+) as cofactor. Hence, both Cagpd1p and Cagpd2p are likely NAD(+)-dependent GPDs (EC 1.1.1.8), similar to GPDs from S. cerevisiae and Candida magnoliae. PMID:26906228

  10. Plastidial Glycolytic Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Is an Important Determinant in the Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism of Heterotrophic Cells in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Anoman, Armand D; Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Rosa-Téllez, Sara; Flores-Tornero, María; Serrano, Ramón; Bueso, Eduardo; Fernie, Alisdair R; Segura, Juan; Ros, Roc

    2015-11-01

    This study functionally characterizes the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plastidial glycolytic isoforms of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPCp) in photosynthetic and heterotrophic cells. We expressed the enzyme in gapcp double mutants (gapcp1gapcp2) under the control of photosynthetic (Rubisco small subunit RBCS2B [RBCS]) or heterotrophic (phosphate transporter PHT1.2 [PHT]) cell-specific promoters. Expression of GAPCp1 under the control of RBCS in gapcp1gapcp2 had no significant effect on the metabolite profile or growth in the aerial part (AP). GAPCp1 expression under the control of the PHT promoter clearly affected Arabidopsis development by increasing the number of lateral roots and having a major effect on AP growth and metabolite profile. Our results indicate that GAPCp1 is not functionally important in photosynthetic cells but plays a fundamental role in roots and in heterotrophic cells of the AP. Specifically, GAPCp activity may be required in root meristems and the root cap for normal primary root growth. Transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses indicate that the lack of GAPCp activity affects nitrogen and carbon metabolism as well as mineral nutrition and that glycerate and glutamine are the main metabolites responding to GAPCp activity. Thus, GAPCp could be an important metabolic connector of glycolysis with other pathways, such as the phosphorylated pathway of serine biosynthesis, the ammonium assimilation pathway, or the metabolism of γ-aminobutyrate, which in turn affect plant development. PMID:26134167

  11. Cloning and heterologous overexpression of three gap genes encoding different glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases from the plant pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000.

    PubMed

    Elkhalfi, Bouchra; Araya-Garay, José Miguel; Rodríguez-Castro, Jorge; Rey-Méndez, Manuel; Soukri, Abdelaziz; Serrano Delgado, Aurelio

    2013-06-01

    The gammaproteobacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 is the causal agent of bacterial speck, a common disease of tomato. The mode of infection of this pathogen is not well understood, but according to molecular biological, genomic and proteomic data it produces a number of proteins that may promote infection and draw nutrients from the plant. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a major enzyme of carbon metabolism that was reported to be a surface antigen and virulence factor in other pathogenic microorganisms, but its possible role in the infection process of P. syringae has so far not been studied. Whole-genome sequence analyses revealed the occurrence in this phytopathogenic bacterium of three paralogous gap genes encoding distinct GAPDHs, namely two class I enzymes having different molecular mass subunits and one class III bifunctional D-erythrose-4-phosphate dehydrogenase/GAPDH enzyme. By using genome bioinformatics data, as well as alignments of both DNA and deduced protein sequences, the three gap genes of P. syringae were one-step cloned with a His-Tag in pET21a vector using a PCR-based strategy, and its expression optimized in Escherichia coli BL21 to achieve high yield of the heterologous proteins. In accordance with their distinct molecular phylogenies, these bacterial gap genes encode functional GAPDHs of diverse molecular masses and nicotinamide-coenzyme specificities, suggesting specific metabolic and/or cellular roles. PMID:23507306

  12. A de novo NADPH generation pathway for improving lysine production of Corynebacterium glutamicum by rational design of the coenzyme specificity of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Bommareddy, Rajesh Reddy; Chen, Zhen; Rappert, Sugima; Zeng, An-Ping

    2014-09-01

    Engineering the cofactor availability is a common strategy of metabolic engineering to improve the production of many industrially important compounds. In this work, a de novo NADPH generation pathway is proposed by altering the coenzyme specificity of a native NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) to NADP, which consequently has the potential to produce additional NADPH in the glycolytic pathway. Specifically, the coenzyme specificity of GAPDH of Corynebacterium glutamicum is systematically manipulated by rational protein design and the effect of the manipulation for cellular metabolism and lysine production is evaluated. By a combinatorial modification of four key residues within the coenzyme binding sites, different GAPDH mutants with varied coenzyme specificity were constructed. While increasing the catalytic efficiency of GAPDH towards NADP enhanced lysine production in all of the tested mutants, the most significant improvement of lysine production (~60%) was achieved with the mutant showing similar preference towards both NAD and NADP. Metabolic flux analysis with (13)C isotope studies confirmed that there was no significant change of flux towards the pentose phosphate pathway and the increased lysine yield was mainly attributed to the NADPH generated by the mutated GAPDH. The present study highlights the importance of protein engineering as a key strategy in de novo pathway design and overproduction of desired products.

  13. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Phosphate 5-Kinase, FAB1/PIKfyve Kinase Mediates Endosome Maturation to Establish Endosome-Cortical Microtubule Interaction in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Tomoko; Munnik, Teun; Sato, Masa H.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(3,5)P2] is an important lipid in membrane trafficking in animal and yeast systems; however, its role is still largely obscure in plants. Here, we demonstrate that the phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate 5-kinase, formation of aploid and binucleate cells1 (FAB1)/FYVE finger-containing phosphoinositide kinase (PIKfyve), and its product, PtdIns(3,5)P2, are essential for the maturation process of endosomes to mediate cortical microtubule association of endosomes, thereby controlling proper PIN-FORMED protein trafficking in young cortical and stele cells of root. We found that FAB1 predominantly localizes on the Sorting Nexin1 (SNX1)-residing late endosomes, and a loss of FAB1 function causes the release of late endosomal proteins, Ara7, and SNX1 from the endosome membrane, indicating that FAB1, or its product PtdIns(3,5)P2, mediates the maturation process of the late endosomes. We also found that loss of FAB1 function causes the release of endosomes from cortical microtubules and disturbs proper cortical microtubule organization. PMID:26353760

  14. Apicoplast-Localized Lysophosphatidic Acid Precursor Assembly Is Required for Bulk Phospholipid Synthesis in Toxoplasma gondii and Relies on an Algal/Plant-Like Glycerol 3-Phosphate Acyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Damien L.; Dubois, David; van Dooren, Giel G.; Shears, Melanie J.; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Maréchal, Eric; McConville, Malcolm J.; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Yamaryo-Botté, Yoshiki; Botté, Cyrille Y.

    2016-01-01

    Most apicomplexan parasites possess a non-photosynthetic plastid (the apicoplast), which harbors enzymes for a number of metabolic pathways, including a prokaryotic type II fatty acid synthesis (FASII) pathway. In Toxoplasma gondii, the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, the FASII pathway is essential for parasite growth and infectivity. However, little is known about the fate of fatty acids synthesized by FASII. In this study, we have investigated the function of a plant-like glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase (TgATS1) that localizes to the T. gondii apicoplast. Knock-down of TgATS1 resulted in significantly reduced incorporation of FASII-synthesized fatty acids into phosphatidic acid and downstream phospholipids and a severe defect in intracellular parasite replication and survival. Lipidomic analysis demonstrated that lipid precursors are made in, and exported from, the apicoplast for de novo biosynthesis of bulk phospholipids. This study reveals that the apicoplast-located FASII and ATS1, which are primarily used to generate plastid galactolipids in plants and algae, instead generate bulk phospholipids for membrane biogenesis in T. gondii. PMID:27490259

  15. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Streptococcus agalactiae NEM316

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Revathi; Ponnuraj, Karthe

    2014-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is an essential enzyme involved in glycolysis. Despite lacking the secretory signal sequence, this cytosolic enzyme has been found localized at the surface of several bacteria and fungi. As a surface protein, GAPDH exhibits various adhesive functions, thereby facilitating colonization and invasion of host tissues. Streptococcus agalactiae, also known as group B streptococcus (GBS), binds onto the host using its surface adhesins and causes sepsis and pneumonia in neonates. GAPDH is one of the surface adhesins of GBS binding to human plasminogen and is a virulent factor associated with host colonization. Although the surface-associated GAPDH has been shown to bind to a variety of host extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules in various bacteria, the molecular mechanism underlying their interaction is not fully understood. To investigate this, structural studies on GAPDH of S. agalactiae were initiated. The gapC gene of S. agalactiae NEM316 encoding GAPDH protein was cloned into pET-28a vector, overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) cells and purified to homogeneity. The purified protein was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The GAPDH crystals obtained in two different crystallization conditions diffracted to 2.8 and 2.6 Å resolution, belonging to two different space groups P21 and P212121, respectively. The structure was solved by molecular replacement and structure refinement is now in progress. PMID:25005093

  16. Targeted gene disruption of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in Colletotrichum gloeosporioides reveals evidence that glycerol is a significant transferred nutrient from host plant to fungal pathogen.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yangdou; Shen, Wenyun; Dauk, Melanie; Wang, Feng; Selvaraj, Gopalan; Zou, Jitao

    2004-01-01

    Unidirectional transfer of nutrients from plant host to pathogen represents a most revealing aspect of the parasitic lifestyle of plant pathogens. Whereas much effort has been focused on sugars and amino acids, the identification of other significant metabolites is equally important for comprehensive characterization of metabolic interactions between plants and biotrophic fungal pathogens. Employing a strategy of targeted gene disruption, we generated a mutant strain (gpdhDelta) defective in glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in a hemibiotrophic plant pathogen, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f.sp. malvae. The gpdhDelta strain had severe defects in carbon utilization as it could use neither glucose nor amino acids for sustained growth. Although the mutant mycelia were able to grow on potato dextrose agar medium, they displayed arrhythmicity in growth and failure to conidiate. The metabolic defect of gpdhDelta could be entirely ameliorated by glycerol in chemically defined minimal medium. Furthermore, glycerol was the one and only metabolite that could restore rhythmic growth and conidiation of gpdhDelta. Despite the profound defects in carbon source utilization, in planta the gpdhDelta strain exhibited normal pathogenicity, proceeded normally in its life cycle, and produced abundant conidia. Analysis of plant tissues at the peripheral zone of fungal infection sites revealed a time-dependent reduction in glycerol content. This study provides strong evidence for a role of glycerol as a significant transferred metabolite from plant to fungal pathogen.

  17. Regulation of cyclic electron flow in C₃ plants: differential effects of limiting photosynthesis at ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Livingston, Aaron K; Kanazawa, Atsuko; Cruz, Jeffrey A; Kramer, David M

    2010-11-01

    Cyclic electron flow around photosystem I (CEF1) is thought to augment chloroplast ATP production to meet metabolic needs. Very little is known about the induction and regulation of CEF1. We investigated the effects on CEF1 of antisense suppression of the Calvin-Benson enzymes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gapR), and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) small subunit (SSU), in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Wisconsin 38). The gapR, but not ssuR, mutants showed substantial increases in CEF1, demonstrating that specific intermediates, rather than slowing of assimilation, induce CEF1. Both types of mutant showed increases in steady-state transthylakoid proton motive force (pmf) and subsequent activation of the photoprotective q(E) response. With gapR, the increased pmf was caused both by up-regulation of CEF1 and down-regulation of the ATP synthase. In ssuR, the increased pmf was attributed entirely to a decrease in ATP synthase activity, as previously seen in wild-type plants when CO₂ levels were decreased. Comparison of major stromal metabolites in gapR, ssuR and hcef1, a mutant with decreased fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase activity, showed that neither the ATP/ADP ratio, nor major Calvin-Benson cycle intermediates can directly account for the activation of CEF1, suggesting that chloroplast redox status or reactive oxygen species regulate CEF1.

  18. Divergent properties and phylogeny of cyanobacterial 5-enol-pyruvyl-shikimate-3-phosphate synthases: evidence for horizontal gene transfer in the Nostocales.

    PubMed

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Bertazzini, Michele; Barillaro, Donatella; Rippka, Rosmarie

    2015-01-01

    As it represents the target of the successful herbicide glyphosate, great attention has been paid to the shikimate pathway enzyme 5-enol-pyruvyl-shikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase. However, inconsistent results have been reported concerning the sensitivity of the enzyme from cyanobacteria, and consequent inhibitory effects on cyanobacterial growth. The properties of EPSP synthase were investigated in a set of 42 strains representative of the large morphological diversity of these prokaryotes. Publicly available protein sequences were analyzed, and related to enzymatic features. In most cases, the native protein showed an unusual homodimeric composition and a general sensitivity to micromolar doses of glyphosate. By contrast, eight out of 15 Nostocales strains were found to possess a monomeric EPSP synthase, whose activity was inhibited only at concentrations exceeding 1 mM. Sequence analysis showed that these two forms are only distantly related, the latter clustering separately in a clade composed of diverse bacterial phyla. The results are consistent with the occurrence of a horizontal gene transfer event involving an evolutionarily distant organism. Moreover, data suggest that the existence of class I (glyphosate-sensitive) and class II (glyphosate-tolerant) EPSP synthases representing two distinct phylogenetic clades is an oversimplification because of the limited number of analyzed samples. PMID:25229999

  19. Possible role of NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in growth promotion of Arabidopsis seedlings by low levels of selenium.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Toru; Fukui, Yuki

    2015-01-01

    We explored functional significance of selenium (Se) in Arabidopsis physiology. Se at very low concentrations in cultivation exerted a considerable positive effect on Arabidopsis growth with no indication of oxidative stress, whereas Se at higher concentrations significantly suppressed the growth and brought serious oxidative damage. Respiration, ATP levels, and the activity of NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (NAD-GAPDH) were enhanced in Arabidopsis grown in the medium containing 1.0 μM Se. Addition of an inhibitor of glutathione (GSH) synthesis to the medium abolished both of the Se-dependent growth promotion and NAD-GAPDH up-regulation. Assay of NAD-GAPDH purified from seedlings subjected to Se interventions raised the possibility of a direct connection between the activity of this enzyme and Arabidopsis growth. These results reveal that trace amounts of Se accelerate Arabidopsis growth, and suggest that this pro-growth effect of Se arises enhancing mitochondrial performance in a GSH-dependent manner, in which NAD-GAPDH may serve as a key regulator.

  20. Arabidopsis AtGPAT1, a Member of the Membrane-Bound Glycerol-3-Phosphate Acyltransferase Gene Family, Is Essential for Tapetum Differentiation and Male Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhifu; Xia, Qun; Dauk, Melanie; Shen, Wenyun; Selvaraj, Gopalan; Zou, Jitao

    2003-01-01

    Membrane-bound glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT; EC 2.3.1.15) mediates the initial step of glycerolipid biosynthesis in the extraplastidic compartments of plant cells. Here, we report the molecular characterization of a novel GPAT gene family from Arabidopsis, designated AtGPAT. The corresponding polypeptides possess transmembrane domains and GPAT activity when expressed heterologously in a yeast lipid mutant. The functional significance of one isoform, AtGPAT1, is the focus of the present study. Disruption of the AtGPAT1 gene causes a massive pollen development arrest, and subsequent introduction of the gene into the mutant plant rescues the phenotype, illustrating a pivotal role for AtGPAT1 in pollen development. Microscopic examinations revealed that the gene lesion results in a perturbed degeneration of the tapetum, which is associated with altered endoplasmic reticulum profiles and reduced secretion. In addition to the sporophytic effect, AtGPAT1 also exerts a gametophytic effect on pollen performance, as the competitive ability of a pollen grain to pollinate is dependent on the presence of an AtGPAT1 gene. Deficiency in AtGPAT1 correlates with several fatty acid composition changes in flower tissues and seeds. Unexpectedly, however, a loss of AtGPAT1 causes no significant change in seed oil content. PMID:12897259

  1. The tigA gene is a transcriptional fusion of glycolytic genes encoding triose-phosphate isomerase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in oomycota.

    PubMed Central

    Unkles, S E; Logsdon, J M; Robison, K; Kinghorn, J R; Duncan, J M

    1997-01-01

    Genes encoding triose-phosphate isomerase (TPI) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) are fused and form a single transcriptional unit (tigA) in Phytophthora species, members of the order Pythiales in the phylum Oomycota. This is the first demonstration of glycolytic gene fusion in eukaryotes and the first case of a TPI-GAPDH fusion in any organism. The tigA gene from Phytophthora infestans has a typical Oomycota transcriptional start point consensus sequence and, in common with most Phytophthora genes, has no introns. Furthermore, Southern and PCR analyses suggest that the same organization exists in other closely related genera, such as Pythium, from the same order (Oomycota), as well as more distantly related genera, Saprolegnia and Achlya, in the order Saprolegniales. Evidence is provided that in P. infestans, there is at least one other discrete copy of a GAPDH-encoding gene but not of a TPI-encoding gene. Finally, a phylogenetic analysis of TPI does not place Phytophthora within the assemblage of crown eukaryotes and suggests TPI may not be particularly useful for resolving relationships among major eukaryotic groups. PMID:9352934

  2. Reconstructed Ancestral Myo-Inositol-3-Phosphate Synthases Indicate That Ancestors of the Thermococcales and Thermotoga Species Were More Thermophilic than Their Descendants

    PubMed Central

    Butzin, Nicholas C.; Lapierre, Pascal; Green, Anna G.; Swithers, Kristen S.; Gogarten, J. Peter; Noll, Kenneth M.

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial genomes of Thermotoga species show evidence of significant interdomain horizontal gene transfer from the Archaea. Members of this genus acquired many genes from the Thermococcales, which grow at higher temperatures than Thermotoga species. In order to study the functional history of an interdomain horizontally acquired gene we used ancestral sequence reconstruction to examine the thermal characteristics of reconstructed ancestral proteins of the Thermotoga lineage and its archaeal donors. Several ancestral sequence reconstruction methods were used to determine the possible sequences of the ancestral Thermotoga and Archaea myo-inositol-3-phosphate synthase (MIPS). These sequences were predicted to be more thermostable than the extant proteins using an established sequence composition method. We verified these computational predictions by measuring the activities and thermostabilities of purified proteins from the Thermotoga and the Thermococcales species, and eight ancestral reconstructed proteins. We found that the ancestral proteins from both the archaeal donor and the Thermotoga most recent common ancestor recipient were more thermostable than their descendants. We show that there is a correlation between the thermostability of MIPS protein and the optimal growth temperature (OGT) of its host, which suggests that the OGT of the ancestors of these species of Archaea and the Thermotoga grew at higher OGTs than their descendants. PMID:24391933

  3. Transgenic tobacco simultaneously overexpressing glyphosate N-acetyltransferase and 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase are more resistant to glyphosate than those containing one gene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunjun; Cao, Gaoyi; Chen, Rongrong; Zhang, Shengxue; Ren, Yuan; Lu, Wei; Wang, Jianhua; Wang, Guoying

    2015-08-01

    5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) and glyphosate N-acetyltransferase (GAT) can detoxify glyphosate by alleviating the suppression of shikimate pathway. In this study, we obtained transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing AM79 aroA, GAT, and both of them, respectively, to evaluate whether overexpression of both genes could confer transgenic plants with higher glyphosate resistance. The transgenic plants harboring GAT or AM79 aroA, respectively, showed good glyphosate resistance. As expected, the hybrid plants containing both GAT and AM79 aroA exhibited improved glyphosate resistance than the transgenic plants overexpressing only a single gene. When grown on media with high concentration of glyphosate, seedlings containing a single gene were severely inhibited, whereas plants expressing both genes were affected less. When transgenic plants grown in the greenhouse were sprayed with glyphosate, less damage was observed for the plants containing both genes. Metabolomics analysis showed that transgenic plants containing two genes could maintain the metabolism balance better than those containing one gene after glyphosate treatment. Glyphosate treatment did not lead to a huge increase of shikimate contents of tobacco leaves in transgenic plants overexpressing two genes, whereas significant increase of shikimate contents in transgenic plants containing only a single gene was observed. These results demonstrated that pyramiding both aroA and GAT in transgenic plants can enhance glyphosate resistance, and this strategy can be used for the development of transgenic glyphosate-resistant crops.

  4. A novel 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase transgene for glyphosate resistance stimulates growth and fecundity in weedy rice (Oryza sativa) without herbicide

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Xia, Hui; Yang, Xiao; Xu, Ting; Si, Hong Jiang; Cai, Xing Xing; Wang, Feng; Su, Jun; Snow, Allison A; Lu, Bao-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Understanding evolutionary interactions among crops and weeds can facilitate effective weed management. For example, gene flow from crops to their wild or weedy relatives can lead to rapid evolution in recipient populations. In rice (Oryza sativa), transgenic herbicide resistance is expected to spread to conspecific weedy rice (Oryza sativa f. spontanea) via hybridization. Here, we studied fitness effects of transgenic over-expression of a native 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (epsps) gene developed to confer glyphosate resistance in rice. Controlling for genetic background, we examined physiological traits and field performance of crop–weed hybrid lineages that segregated for the presence or absence of this novel epsps transgene. Surprisingly, we found that transgenic F2 crop–weed hybrids produced 48–125% more seeds per plant than nontransgenic controls in monoculture- and mixed-planting designs without glyphosate application. Transgenic plants also had greater EPSPS protein levels, tryptophan concentrations, photosynthetic rates, and per cent seed germination compared with nontransgenic controls. Our findings suggest that over-expression of a native rice epsps gene can lead to fitness advantages, even without exposure to glyphosate. We hypothesize that over-expressed epsps may be useful to breeders and, if deployed, could result in fitness benefits in weedy relatives following transgene introgression. PMID:23905647

  5. Development and Implementation of a High Throughput Screen for the Human Sperm-Specific Isoform of Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDHS).

    PubMed

    Sexton, Jonathan Z; Danshina, Polina V; Lamson, David R; Hughes, Mark; House, Alan J; Yeh, Li-An; O'Brien, Deborah A; Williams, Kevin P

    2011-01-01

    Glycolytic isozymes that are restricted to the male germline are potential targets for the development of reversible, non-hormonal male contraceptives. GAPDHS, the sperm-specific isoform of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, is an essential enzyme for glycolysis making it an attractive target for rational drug design. Toward this goal, we have optimized and validated a high-throughput spectrophotometric assay for GAPDHS in 384-well format. The assay was stable over time and tolerant to DMSO. Whole plate validation experiments yielded Z' values >0.8 indicating a robust assay for HTS. Two compounds were identified and confirmed from a test screen of the Prestwick collection. This assay was used to screen a diverse chemical library and identified fourteen small molecules that modulated the activity of recombinant purified GAPDHS with confirmed IC50 values ranging from 1.8 to 42 µM. These compounds may provide useful scaffolds as molecular tools to probe the role of GAPDHS in sperm motility and long term to develop potent and selective GAPDHS inhibitors leading to novel contraceptive agents. PMID:21760877

  6. The complete sequence of a full length cDNA for human liver glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase: evidence for multiple mRNA species.

    PubMed Central

    Arcari, P; Martinelli, R; Salvatore, F

    1984-01-01

    A recombinant M13 clone (O42) containing a 65 b.p. cDNA fragment from human fetal liver mRNA coding for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase has been identified and it has been used to isolate from a full-length human adult liver cDNA library a recombinant clone, pG1, which has been subcloned in M13 phage and completely sequenced with the chain terminator method. Besides the coding region of 1008 b.p., the cDNA sequence includes 60 nucleotides at the 5'-end and 204 nucleotides at the 3'-end up to the polyA tail. Hybridization of pG1 to human liver total RNA shows only one band about the size of pG1 cDNA. A much stronger hybridization signal was observed using RNA derived from human hepatocarcinoma and kidney carcinoma cell lines. Sequence homology between clone 042 and the homologous region of clone pG1 is 86%. On the other hand, homology among the translated sequences and the known human muscle protein sequence ranges between 77 and 90%; these data demonstrate the existence of more than one gene coding for G3PD. Southern blot of human DNA, digested with several restriction enzymes, also indicate that several homologous sequences are present in the human genome. Images PMID:6096821

  7. ATP-driven transhydrogenation and ionization of water in a reconstituted glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases (phosphorylating and non-phosphorylating) model system.

    PubMed

    Serrano, A; Mateos, M I; Losada, M

    1993-12-30

    In an unbuffered medium, an intense acidification occurs during the oxidation of D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (G3P) to 3-phospho-D-glycerate (PGA) catalyzed by NADP(+)-specific non-phosphorylating G3P dehydrogenase, an enzyme that photosynthetic eukaryotic cells contain exclusively in their cytosol. The true enzymatic character of this proton release is the consequence of the following redox/acid-base reaction: G3P + NADP+ + H2O-->PGA + NADPH + 2H+. When the well-established ATP-dependent reduction of PGA to G3P, catalyzed by PGA kinase and NAD(+)-specific phosphorylating G3P dehydrogenase, was coupled through the intermediate G3P to the above reverse oxidation reaction, a transient alkalinization of the medium followed by its acidification accompanied transhydrogenation from NADH to NADP+. The significance of the observed endergonic transhydrogenation and ionization of water at the expense of the chemical energy of ATP in this reconstituted enzyme system as well as its relevance for the export of reducing power (H-) across the chloroplast membrane and the maintenance of the pH gradient that exists between the stroma and the cytosol are discussed. PMID:8280152

  8. Evolutionary engineering of a glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase-negative, acetate-reducing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain enables anaerobic growth at high glucose concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Guadalupe-Medina, Víctor; Metz, Benjamin; Oud, Bart; van Der Graaf, Charlotte M; Mans, Robert; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2014-01-01

    Glycerol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is required for redox-cofactor balancing in anaerobic cultures, causes yield reduction in industrial bioethanol production. Recently, glycerol formation in anaerobic S. cerevisiae cultures was eliminated by expressing Escherichia coli (acetylating) acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (encoded by mhpF) and simultaneously deleting the GPD1 and GPD2 genes encoding glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, thus coupling NADH reoxidation to reduction of acetate to ethanol. Gpd– strains are, however, sensitive to high sugar concentrations, which complicates industrial implementation of this metabolic engineering concept. In this study, laboratory evolution was used to improve osmotolerance of a Gpd– mhpF-expressing S. cerevisiae strain. Serial batch cultivation at increasing osmotic pressure enabled isolation of an evolved strain that grew anaerobically at 1 M glucose, at a specific growth rate of 0.12 h−1. The evolved strain produced glycerol at low concentrations (0.64 ± 0.33 g l−1). However, these glycerol concentrations were below 10% of those observed with a Gpd+ reference strain. Consequently, the ethanol yield on sugar increased from 79% of the theoretical maximum in the reference strain to 92% for the evolved strains. Genetic analysis indicated that osmotolerance under aerobic conditions required a single dominant chromosomal mutation, and one further mutation in the plasmid-borne mhpF gene for anaerobic growth. PMID:24004455

  9. A H2 very high frequency capacitively coupled plasma inactivates glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase(GapDH) more efficiently than UV photons and heat combined

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapelmann, Katharina; Lackmann, Jan-Wilm; Buerger, Ines; Bandow, Julia Elisabeth; Awakowicz, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Plasma sterilization is a promising alternative to commonly used sterilization techniques, because the conventional methods suffer from certain limitations, e.g. incompatibility with heat-sensitive materials, or use of toxic agents. However, plasma-based sterilization mechanisms are not fully understood yet. A low-pressure very high frequency capacitively coupled plasma is used to investigate the impact of a hydrogen discharge on the protein glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GapDH). GapDH is an enzyme of glycolysis. As a part of the central metabolism, it occurs in nearly all organisms from bacteria to humans. The plasma is investigated with absolutely calibrated optical emission spectroscopy in order to identify and to quantify plasma components that can contribute to enzyme inactivation. The contribution of UV photons and heat to GapDH inactivation is investigated separately, and neither seems to be a major factor. In order to investigate the mechanisms of GapDH inactivation by the hydrogen discharge, samples are investigated for etching, induction of amino acid backbone breaks, and chemical modifications. While neither etching nor strand breaks are observed, chemical modifications occur at different amino acid residues of GapDH. Deamidations of asparagines as well as methionine and cysteine oxidations are detected after VHF-CCP treatment. In particular, oxidation of the cysteine in the active centre is known to lead to GapDH inactivation.

  10. Adaptation of the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase Gpd1 to high salinities in the extremely halotolerant Hortaea werneckii and halophilic Wallemia ichthyophaga.

    PubMed

    Lenassi, Metka; Zajc, Janja; Gostinčar, Cene; Gorjan, Alenka; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina; Plemenitaš, Ana

    2011-10-01

    We report the first identification and characterisation of the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) genes from extremely halophilic fungi. The black ascomycetous yeast Hortaea werneckii and the non-melanised basidiomycetous fungus Wallemia ichthyophaga inhabit similar hypersaline environments, yet they have two different strategies of haloadaptation through Gpd1-regulated glycerol synthesis. The extremely halotolerant H. werneckii codes for two salt-inducible GPD1 genes that show similar gene transcription regulation and have 98% amino-acid sequence identity between paralogues; however, they have distinct effects when expressed heterologously in Saccharomyces cerevisiae gpd mutants. Only the HwGpd1B isoform complements the function of Gpd in the gpd1 mutant, whereas none of the Gpd1 isoforms can rescue the salt sensitivity of the gpd1gpd2 double mutant. The obligate halophile W. ichthyophaga codes for only one GPD1 orthologue, the transcription of which is less affected by salt when compared to the H. werneckii homologues. Heterologous expression of WiGPD1 in S. cerevisiae recovers halotolerance of the gpd1 and gpd1gpd2 mutant strains, which is probably due to the overall high amino-acid similarity of the Gpd1 protein in W. ichthyophaga and S. cerevisiae. Phylogenetic analysis of amino-acid sequences reveals that the evolutionary origins of all of these three novel enzymes correspond to the phylogeny of the fungal species from which the genes were identified.

  11. Phosphorus-31, sup 15 N, and sup 13 C NMR of glyphosate: Comparison of pH titrations to the herbicidal dead-end complex with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Castellino, S.; Leo, G.C.; Sammons, R.D.; Sikorski, J.A. )

    1989-05-02

    The herbicidal dead-end ternary complex (E{sup S3P}{sub Glyph}) of glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) and the substrate shikimate 3-phosphate (S3P) has been characterized by {sup 31}P, {sup 15}N, and {sup 13}C NMR. The NMR spectra of EPSPS-bound glyphosate show unique chemical shifts ({delta}) for each of the three nuclei. By {sup 31}P NMR, glyphosate in the dead-end complex is a distinct species 3.5 ppm downfield from free glyphosate. The {sup 13}C signal of glyphosate in the dead-end complex is shifted 4 ppm downfield from that of free glyphosate. The {sup 15}N signal for glyphosate (99%) in the dead-end complex is 5 ppm further downfield than that of any free zwitterionic species and 10 ppm downfield from that of the average free species at pH 10.1. The structures of each ionic state of glyphosate are modeled with force field calculations by using MacroModel. A correlation is made for the {sup 31}P {delta} and the C-P-O bond angle, and the {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N {delta} values are postulated to be related to C-C-O and C-N-C bond angles, respectively. The downfield {sup 31}P chemical shift perturbation for S3P in the EPSPS binary complex is consistent with ionization of the 3-phosphate of S3P upon binding. Comparison with the S3P {sup 31}P {delta} vs pH titration curve specifies predominantly the dianion of the 3-phosphate in the E{sup S3P} binary complex, while the E{sup S3P}{sub Glyph} complex indicates net protonation at the 3-phosphate. Chemical shift perturbations of this latter type may be explained by changes in the O-P-O bond angle.

  12. DNA vaccine encoding the moonlighting protein Onchocerca volvulus glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Ov-GAPDH) leads to partial protection in a mouse model of human filariasis.

    PubMed

    Steisslinger, Vera; Korten, Simone; Brattig, Norbert W; Erttmann, Klaus D

    2015-10-26

    River blindness, caused by the filarial parasite Onchocerca volvulus, is a major socio-economic and public health problem in Sub-Saharan Africa. In January 2015, The Onchocerciasis Vaccine for Africa (TOVA) Initiative has been launched with the aim of providing new tools to complement mass drug administration (MDA) of ivermectin, thereby promoting elimination of onchocerciasis in Africa. In this context we here present Onchocerca volvulus glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Ov-GAPDH) as a possible DNA vaccine candidate. We report that in a laboratory model for filariasis, immunization with Ov-GAPDH led to a significant reduction of adult worm load and microfilaraemia in BALB/c mice after challenge infection with the filarial parasite Litomosoides sigmodontis. Mice were either vaccinated with Ov-GAPDH.DNA plasmid (Ov-pGAPDH.DNA) alone or in combination with recombinantly expressed Ov-GAPDH protein (Ov-rGAPDH). During the following challenge infection of immunized and control mice with L. sigmodontis, those formulations which included the DNA plasmid, led to a significant reduction of adult worm loads (up to 57% median reduction) and microfilaraemia (up to 94% reduction) in immunized animals. In a further experiment, immunization with a mixture of four overlapping, synthetic Ov-GAPDH peptides (Ov-GAPDHpept), with alum as adjuvant, did not significantly reduce worm loads. Our results indicate that DNA vaccination with Ov-GAPDH has protective potential against filarial challenge infection in the mouse model. This suggests a transfer of the approach into the cattle Onchocerca ochengi model, where it is possible to investigate the effects of this vaccination in the context of a natural host-parasite relationship. PMID:26320419

  13. Ablation of succinate production from glucose metabolism in the procyclic trypanosomes induces metabolic switches to the glycerol 3-phosphate/dihydroxyacetone phosphate shuttle and to proline metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ebikeme, Charles; Hubert, Jane; Biran, Marc; Gouspillou, Gilles; Morand, Pauline; Plazolles, Nicolas; Guegan, Fabien; Diolez, Philippe; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Portais, Jean-Charles; Bringaud, Frédéric

    2010-10-15

    Trypanosoma brucei is a parasitic protist that undergoes a complex life cycle during transmission from its mammalian host (bloodstream forms) to the midgut of its insect vector (procyclic form). In both parasitic forms, most glycolytic steps take place within specialized peroxisomes, called glycosomes. Here, we studied metabolic adaptations in procyclic trypanosome mutants affected in their maintenance of the glycosomal redox balance. T. brucei can theoretically use three strategies to maintain the glycosomal NAD(+)/NADH balance as follows: (i) the glycosomal succinic fermentation branch; (ii) the glycerol 3-phosphate (Gly-3-P)/dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) shuttle that transfers reducing equivalents to the mitochondrion; and (iii) the glycosomal glycerol production pathway. We showed a hierarchy in the use of these glycosomal NADH-consuming pathways by determining metabolic perturbations and adaptations in single and double mutant cell lines using a combination of NMR, ion chromatography-MS/MS, and HPLC approaches. Although functional, the Gly-3-P/DHAP shuttle is primarily used when the preferred succinate fermentation pathway is abolished in the Δpepck knock-out mutant cell line. In the absence of these two pathways (Δpepck/(RNAi)FAD-GPDH.i mutant), glycerol production is used but with a 16-fold reduced glycolytic flux. In addition, the Δpepck mutant cell line shows a 3.3-fold reduced glycolytic flux compensated by an increase of proline metabolism. The inability of the Δpepck mutant to maintain a high glycolytic flux demonstrates that the Gly-3-P/DHAP shuttle is not adapted to the procyclic trypanosome context. In contrast, this shuttle was shown earlier to be the only way used by the bloodstream forms of T. brucei to sustain their high glycolytic flux.

  14. Evolution of a double amino acid substitution in the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase in Eleusine indica conferring high-level glyphosate resistance.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qin; Jalaludin, Adam; Han, Heping; Chen, Ming; Sammons, R Douglas; Powles, Stephen B

    2015-04-01

    Glyphosate is the most important and widely used herbicide in world agriculture. Intensive glyphosate selection has resulted in the widespread evolution of glyphosate-resistant weed populations, threatening the sustainability of this valuable once-in-a-century agrochemical. Field-evolved glyphosate resistance due to known resistance mechanisms is generally low to modest. Here, working with a highly glyphosate-resistant Eleusine indica population, we identified a double amino acid substitution (T102I+P106S [TIPS]) in the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene in glyphosate-resistant individuals. This TIPS mutation recreates the biotechnology-engineered commercial first generation glyphosate-tolerant EPSPS in corn (Zea mays) and now in other crops. In E. indica, the naturally evolved TIPS mutants are highly (more than 180-fold) resistant to glyphosate compared with the wild type and more resistant (more than 32-fold) than the previously known P106S mutants. The E. indica TIPS EPSPS showed very high-level (2,647-fold) in vitro resistance to glyphosate relative to the wild type and is more resistant (600-fold) than the P106S variant. The evolution of the TIPS mutation in crop fields under glyphosate selection is likely a sequential event, with the P106S mutation being selected first and fixed, followed by the T102I mutation to create the highly resistant TIPS EPSPS. The sequential evolution of the TIPS mutation endowing high-level glyphosate resistance is an important mechanism by which plants adapt to intense herbicide selection and a dramatic example of evolution in action. PMID:25717039

  15. Evolution of a Double Amino Acid Substitution in the 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-Phosphate Synthase in Eleusine indica Conferring High-Level Glyphosate Resistance1

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qin; Jalaludin, Adam; Han, Heping; Chen, Ming; Sammons, R. Douglas; Powles, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Glyphosate is the most important and widely used herbicide in world agriculture. Intensive glyphosate selection has resulted in the widespread evolution of glyphosate-resistant weed populations, threatening the sustainability of this valuable once-in-a-century agrochemical. Field-evolved glyphosate resistance due to known resistance mechanisms is generally low to modest. Here, working with a highly glyphosate-resistant Eleusine indica population, we identified a double amino acid substitution (T102I + P106S [TIPS]) in the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene in glyphosate-resistant individuals. This TIPS mutation recreates the biotechnology-engineered commercial first generation glyphosate-tolerant EPSPS in corn (Zea mays) and now in other crops. In E. indica, the naturally evolved TIPS mutants are highly (more than 180-fold) resistant to glyphosate compared with the wild type and more resistant (more than 32-fold) than the previously known P106S mutants. The E. indica TIPS EPSPS showed very high-level (2,647-fold) in vitro resistance to glyphosate relative to the wild type and is more resistant (600-fold) than the P106S variant. The evolution of the TIPS mutation in crop fields under glyphosate selection is likely a sequential event, with the P106S mutation being selected first and fixed, followed by the T102I mutation to create the highly resistant TIPS EPSPS. The sequential evolution of the TIPS mutation endowing high-level glyphosate resistance is an important mechanism by which plants adapt to intense herbicide selection and a dramatic example of evolution in action. PMID:25717039

  16. Misfolded forms of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase interact with GroEL and inhibit chaperonin-assisted folding of the wild-type enzyme.

    PubMed

    Polyakova, Oxana V; Roitel, Olivier; Asryants, Regina A; Poliakov, Alexei A; Branlant, Guy; Muronetz, Vladimir I

    2005-04-01

    We studied the interaction of chaperonin GroEL with different misfolded forms of tetrameric phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH): (1) GAPDH from rabbit muscles with all SH-groups modified by 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate); (2) O-R-type dimers of mutant GAPDH from Bacillus stearothermophilus with amino acid substitutions Y283V, D282G, and Y283V/W84F, and (3) O-P-type dimers of mutant GAPDH from B. stearothermophilus with amino acid substitutions Y46G/S48G and Y46G/R52G. It was shown that chemically modified GAPDH and the O-R-type mutant dimers bound to GroEL with 1:1 stoichiometry and dissociation constants K(d) of 0.4 and 0.9 muM, respectively. A striking feature of the resulting complexes with GroEL was their stability in the presence of Mg-ATP. Chemically modified GAPDH and the O-R-type mutant dimers inhibited GroEL-assisted refolding of urea-denatured wild-type GAPDH from B. stearothermophilus but did not affect its spontaneous reactivation. In contrast to the O-R-dimers, the O-P-type mutant dimers neither bound nor affected GroEL-assisted refolding of the wild-type GAPDH. Thus, we suggest that interaction of GroEL with certain types of misfolded proteins can result in the formation of stable complexes and the impairment of chaperonin activity. PMID:15741339

  17. Misfolded forms of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase interact with GroEL and inhibit chaperonin-assisted folding of the wild-type enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Polyakova, Oxana V.; Roitel, Olivier; Asryants, Regina A.; Poliakov, Alexei A.; Branlant, Guy; Muronetz, Vladimir I.

    2005-01-01

    We studied the interaction of chaperonin GroEL with different misfolded forms of tetrameric phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH): (1) GAPDH from rabbit muscles with all SH-groups modified by 5,5′-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate); (2) O-R-type dimers of mutant GAPDH from Bacillus stearothermophilus with amino acid substitutions Y283V, D282G, and Y283V/W84F, and (3) O-P-type dimers of mutant GAPDH from B. stearothermophilus with amino acid substitutions Y46G/S48G and Y46G/R52G. It was shown that chemically modified GAPDH and the O-R-type mutant dimers bound to GroEL with 1:1 stoichiometry and dissociation constants Kd of 0.4 and 0.9 μM, respectively. A striking feature of the resulting complexes with GroEL was their stability in the presence of Mg-ATP. Chemically modified GAPDH and the O-R-type mutant dimers inhibited GroEL-assisted refolding of urea-denatured wild-type GAPDH from B. stearothermophilus but did not affect its spontaneous reactivation. In contrast to the O-R-dimers, the O-P-type mutant dimers neither bound nor affected GroEL-assisted refolding of the wild-type GAPDH. Thus, we suggest that interaction of GroEL with certain types of misfolded proteins can result in the formation of stable complexes and the impairment of chaperonin activity. PMID:15741339

  18. Covalent immobilization of lipase, glycerol kinase, glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase & horseradish peroxidase onto plasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) strip & its application in serum triglyceride determination

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Nidhi; Narang, Jagriti; Pundir, Chandra Shekhar

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Reusable biostrip consisting enzymes immobilized onto alkylamine glass beads affixed on plasticized PVC strip for determination of triglyceride (TG) suffers from high cost of beads and their detachments during washings for reuse, leading to loss of activity. The purpose of this study was to develop a cheaper and stable biostrip for investigation of TG levels in serum. Methods: A reusable enzyme-strip was prepared for TG determination by co-immobilizing lipase, glycerol kinase (GK), glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase (GPO) and peroxidase (HRP) directly onto plasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) strip through glutaraldehyde coupling. The method was evaluated by studying its recovery, precision and reusability. Results: The enzyme-strip showed optimum activity at pH 7.0, 35°C and a linear relationship between its activity and triolein concentration in the range 0.1 to 15 mM. The strip was used for determination of serum TG. The detection limit of the method was 0.1 mM. Analytical recovery of added triolein was 96 per cent. Within and between batch coefficients of variation (CV) were 2.2 and 3.7 per cent, respectively. A good correlation (r=0.99) was found between TG values by standard enzymic colrimetric method employing free enzymes and the present method. The strip lost 50 per cent of its initial activity after its 200 uses during the span of 100 days, when stored at 4°C. Interpretation & conclusions: The nitrating acidic treatment of plasticized PVC strip led to glutaraldehyde coupling of four enzymes used for enzymic colourimetric determination of serum TG. The strip provided 200 reuses of enzymes with only 50 per cent loss of its initial activity. The method could be used for preparation of other enzyme strips also. PMID:24927348

  19. Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH) Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitor Reveals a Non-catalytic Role for GAPDH Oligomerization in Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Qvit, Nir; Joshi, Amit U; Cunningham, Anna D; Ferreira, Julio C B; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2016-06-24

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), an important glycolytic enzyme, has a non-catalytic (thus a non-canonical) role in inducing mitochondrial elimination under oxidative stress. We recently demonstrated that phosphorylation of GAPDH by δ protein kinase C (δPKC) inhibits this GAPDH-dependent mitochondrial elimination. δPKC phosphorylation of GAPDH correlates with increased cell injury following oxidative stress, suggesting that inhibiting GAPDH phosphorylation should decrease cell injury. Using rational design, we identified pseudo-GAPDH (ψGAPDH) peptide, an inhibitor of δPKC-mediated GAPDH phosphorylation that does not inhibit the phosphorylation of other δPKC substrates. Unexpectedly, ψGAPDH decreased mitochondrial elimination and increased cardiac damage in an animal model of heart attack. Either treatment with ψGAPDH or direct phosphorylation of GAPDH by δPKC decreased GAPDH tetramerization, which corresponded to reduced GAPDH glycolytic activity in vitro and ex vivo Taken together, our study identified the potential mechanism by which oxidative stress inhibits the protective GAPDH-mediated elimination of damaged mitochondria. Our study also identified a pharmacological tool, ψGAPDH peptide, with interesting properties. ψGAPDH peptide is an inhibitor of the interaction between δPKC and GAPDH and of the resulting phosphorylation of GAPDH by δPKC. ψGAPDH peptide is also an inhibitor of GAPDH oligomerization and thus an inhibitor of GAPDH glycolytic activity. Finally, we found that ψGAPDH peptide is an inhibitor of the elimination of damaged mitochondria. We discuss how this unique property of increasing cell damage following oxidative stress suggests a potential use for ψGAPDH peptide-based therapy. PMID:27129213

  20. Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase-4-deficient mice are protected from diet-induced insulin resistance by the enhanced association of mTOR and rictor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chongben; Cooper, Daniel E; Grevengoed, Trisha J; Li, Lei O; Klett, Eric L; Eaton, James M; Harris, Thurl E; Coleman, Rosalind A

    2014-08-01

    Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) activity is highly induced in obese individuals with insulin resistance, suggesting a correlation between GPAT function, triacylglycerol accumulation, and insulin resistance. We asked whether microsomal GPAT4, an isoform regulated by insulin, might contribute to the development of hepatic insulin resistance. Compared with control mice fed a high fat diet, Gpat4(-/-) mice were more glucose tolerant and were protected from insulin resistance. Overexpression of GPAT4 in mouse hepatocytes impaired insulin-suppressed gluconeogenesis and insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis. Impaired glucose homeostasis was coupled to inhibited insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt(Ser⁴⁷³) and Akt(Thr³⁰⁸). GPAT4 overexpression inhibited rictor's association with the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) activity. Compared with overexpressed GPAT3 in mouse hepatocytes, GPAT4 overexpression increased phosphatidic acid (PA), especially di16:0-PA. Conversely, in Gpat4(-/-) hepatocytes, both mTOR/rictor association and mTORC2 activity increased, and the content of PA in Gpat4(-/-) hepatocytes was lower than in controls, with the greatest decrease in 16:0-PA species. Compared with controls, liver and skeletal muscle from Gpat4(-/-)-deficient mice fed a high-fat diet were more insulin sensitive and had a lower hepatic content of di16:0-PA. Taken together, these data demonstrate that a GPAT4-derived lipid signal, likely di16:0-PA, impairs insulin signaling in mouse liver and contributes to hepatic insulin resistance. PMID:24939733

  1. Nrbf2 Protein Suppresses Autophagy by Modulating Atg14L Protein-containing Beclin 1-Vps34 Complex Architecture and Reducing Intracellular Phosphatidylinositol-3 Phosphate Levels*

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yu; Morris, Deanna H.; Jin, Lin; Patel, Mittul S.; Karunakaran, Senthil K.; Fu, You-Jun; Matuszak, Emily A.; Weiss, Heidi L.; Chait, Brian T.; Wang, Qing Jun

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a tightly regulated lysosomal degradation pathway for maintaining cellular homeostasis and responding to stresses. Beclin 1 and its interacting proteins, including the class III phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase Vps34, play crucial roles in autophagy regulation in mammals. We identified nuclear receptor binding factor 2 (Nrbf2) as a Beclin 1-interacting protein from Becn1−/−;Becn1-EGFP/+ mouse liver and brain. We also found that Nrbf2-Beclin 1 interaction required the N terminus of Nrbf2. We next used the human retinal pigment epithelial cell line RPE-1 as a model system and showed that transiently knocking down Nrbf2 by siRNA increased autophagic flux under both nutrient-rich and starvation conditions. To investigate the mechanism by which Nrbf2 regulates autophagy, we demonstrated that Nrbf2 interacted and colocalized with Atg14L, suggesting that Nrbf2 is a component of the Atg14L-containing Beclin 1-Vps34 complex. Moreover, ectopically expressed Nrbf2 formed cytosolic puncta that were positive for isolation membrane markers. These results suggest that Nrbf2 is involved in autophagosome biogenesis. Furthermore, we showed that Nrbf2 deficiency led to increased intracellular phosphatidylinositol-3 phosphate levels and diminished Atg14L-Vps34/Vps15 interactions, suggesting that Nrbf2-mediated Atg14L-Vps34/Vps15 interactions likely inhibit Vps34 activity. Therefore, we propose that Nrbf2 may interact with the Atg14L-containing Beclin 1-Vps34 protein complex to modulate protein-protein interactions within the complex, leading to suppression of Vps34 activity, autophagosome biogenesis, and autophagic flux. This work reveals a novel aspect of the intricate mechanism for the Beclin 1-Vps34 protein-protein interaction network to achieve precise control of autophagy. PMID:25086043

  2. Inter-species variation in the oligomeric states of the higher plant Calvin cycle enzymes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and phosphoribulokinase.

    PubMed

    Howard, Thomas P; Lloyd, Julie C; Raines, Christine A

    2011-07-01

    In darkened leaves the Calvin cycle enzymes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK) form a regulatory multi-enzyme complex with the small chloroplast protein CP12. GAPDH also forms a high molecular weight regulatory mono-enzyme complex. Given that there are different reports as to the number and subunit composition of these complexes and that enzyme regulatory mechanisms are known to vary between species, it was reasoned that protein-protein interactions may also vary between species. Here, this variation is investigated. This study shows that two different tetramers of GAPDH (an A2B2 heterotetramer and an A4 homotetramer) have the capacity to form part of the PRK/GAPDH/CP12 complex. The role of the PRK/GAPDH/CP12 complex is not simply to regulate the 'non-regulatory' A4 GAPDH tetramer. This study also demonstrates that the abundance and nature of PRK/GAPDH/CP12 interactions are not equal in all species and that whilst NAD enhances complex formation in some species, this is not sufficient for complex formation in others. Furthermore, it is shown that the GAPDH mono-enzyme complex is more abundant as a 2(A2B2) complex, rather than the larger 4(A2B2) complex. This smaller complex is sensitive to cellular metabolites indicating that it is an important regulatory isoform of GAPDH. This comparative study has highlighted considerable heterogeneity in PRK and GAPDH protein interactions between closely related species and the possible underlying physiological basis for this is discussed.

  3. d-myo-Inositol-3-Phosphate Affects Phosphatidylinositol-Mediated Endomembrane Function in Arabidopsis and Is Essential for Auxin-Regulated Embryogenesis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yu; Qin, Genji; Zhang, Jun; Liang, Yuan; Song, Yingqi; Zhao, Meiping; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Aoyama, Takashi; Liu, Jingjing; Gu, Hongya; Qu, Li-Jia

    2011-01-01

    In animal cells, myo-inositol is an important regulatory molecule in several physiological and biochemical processes, including signal transduction and membrane biogenesis. However, the fundamental biological functions of myo-inositol are still far from clear in plants. Here, we report the genetic characterization of three Arabidopsis thaliana genes encoding d-myo-inositol-3-phosphate synthase (MIPS), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in de novo synthesis of myo-inositol. Each of the three MIPS genes rescued the yeast ino1 mutant, which is defective in yeast MIPS gene INO1, and they had different dynamic expression patterns during Arabidopsis embryo development. Although single mips mutants showed no obvious phenotypes, the mips1 mips2 double mutant and the mips1 mips2 mips3 triple mutant were embryo lethal, whereas the mips1 mips3 and mips1 mips2+/− double mutants had abnormal embryos. The mips phenotypes resembled those of auxin mutants. Indeed, the double and triple mips mutants displayed abnormal expression patterns of DR5:green fluorescent protein, an auxin-responsive fusion protein, and they had altered PIN1 subcellular localization. Also, membrane trafficking was affected in mips1 mips3. Interestingly, overexpression of PHOSPHATIDYLINOSITOL SYNTHASE2, which converts myo-inositol to membrane phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns), largely rescued the cotyledon and endomembrane defects in mips1 mips3. We conclude that myo-inositol serves as the main substrate for synthesizing PtdIns and phosphatidylinositides, which are essential for endomembrane structure and trafficking and thus for auxin-regulated embryogenesis. PMID:21505066

  4. Evolution of a double amino acid substitution in the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase in Eleusine indica conferring high-level glyphosate resistance.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qin; Jalaludin, Adam; Han, Heping; Chen, Ming; Sammons, R Douglas; Powles, Stephen B

    2015-04-01

    Glyphosate is the most important and widely used herbicide in world agriculture. Intensive glyphosate selection has resulted in the widespread evolution of glyphosate-resistant weed populations, threatening the sustainability of this valuable once-in-a-century agrochemical. Field-evolved glyphosate resistance due to known resistance mechanisms is generally low to modest. Here, working with a highly glyphosate-resistant Eleusine indica population, we identified a double amino acid substitution (T102I+P106S [TIPS]) in the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene in glyphosate-resistant individuals. This TIPS mutation recreates the biotechnology-engineered commercial first generation glyphosate-tolerant EPSPS in corn (Zea mays) and now in other crops. In E. indica, the naturally evolved TIPS mutants are highly (more than 180-fold) resistant to glyphosate compared with the wild type and more resistant (more than 32-fold) than the previously known P106S mutants. The E. indica TIPS EPSPS showed very high-level (2,647-fold) in vitro resistance to glyphosate relative to the wild type and is more resistant (600-fold) than the P106S variant. The evolution of the TIPS mutation in crop fields under glyphosate selection is likely a sequential event, with the P106S mutation being selected first and fixed, followed by the T102I mutation to create the highly resistant TIPS EPSPS. The sequential evolution of the TIPS mutation endowing high-level glyphosate resistance is an important mechanism by which plants adapt to intense herbicide selection and a dramatic example of evolution in action.

  5. Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase-4-deficient mice are protected from diet-induced insulin resistance by the enhanced association of mTOR and rictor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chongben; Cooper, Daniel E; Grevengoed, Trisha J; Li, Lei O; Klett, Eric L; Eaton, James M; Harris, Thurl E; Coleman, Rosalind A

    2014-08-01

    Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) activity is highly induced in obese individuals with insulin resistance, suggesting a correlation between GPAT function, triacylglycerol accumulation, and insulin resistance. We asked whether microsomal GPAT4, an isoform regulated by insulin, might contribute to the development of hepatic insulin resistance. Compared with control mice fed a high fat diet, Gpat4(-/-) mice were more glucose tolerant and were protected from insulin resistance. Overexpression of GPAT4 in mouse hepatocytes impaired insulin-suppressed gluconeogenesis and insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis. Impaired glucose homeostasis was coupled to inhibited insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt(Ser⁴⁷³) and Akt(Thr³⁰⁸). GPAT4 overexpression inhibited rictor's association with the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) activity. Compared with overexpressed GPAT3 in mouse hepatocytes, GPAT4 overexpression increased phosphatidic acid (PA), especially di16:0-PA. Conversely, in Gpat4(-/-) hepatocytes, both mTOR/rictor association and mTORC2 activity increased, and the content of PA in Gpat4(-/-) hepatocytes was lower than in controls, with the greatest decrease in 16:0-PA species. Compared with controls, liver and skeletal muscle from Gpat4(-/-)-deficient mice fed a high-fat diet were more insulin sensitive and had a lower hepatic content of di16:0-PA. Taken together, these data demonstrate that a GPAT4-derived lipid signal, likely di16:0-PA, impairs insulin signaling in mouse liver and contributes to hepatic insulin resistance.

  6. Insulin activates glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (de novo phosphatidic acid synthesis) through a phospholipid-derived mediator. Apparent involvement of Gi alpha and activation of a phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Vila, M C; Milligan, G; Standaert, M L; Farese, R V

    1990-09-18

    We studied the mechanism whereby insulin activates de novo phosphatidic acid synthesis in BC3H-1 myocytes. Insulin rapidly activated glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (G3PAT) in intact and cell-free preparations of myocytes in a dose-related manner. The apparent Km of the enzyme was decreased by treatment with insulin, whereas the Vmax was unaffected. No activation was found by ACTH, insulin-like growth factor-I, angiotensin II, or phenylephrine, but epidermal growth factor, which, like insulin, is known to activate de novo phosphatidic acid synthesis in intact myocytes, also stimulated G3PAT activity. In homogenates or membrane fractions, the effect of insulin on G3PAT was fully mimicked by nonspecific or phosphatidylinositol (PI)-specific phospholipase C (PLC). An antiserum raised against PI-glycan-PLC completely blocked the effect of insulin on G3PAT. Although the above findings suggested involvement of a PLC in insulin-induced activation of G3PAT, neither diacylglycerol nor protein kinase C activation appeared to be involved. On the other hand, insulin stimulated the release of a cytosolic factor, which activated membrane-associated G3PAT. This cytosolic factor had a molecular weight of less than 5K as determined by Sephadex G-25 chromatography. NaF, a phosphatase inhibitor, blocked the activation of G3PAT by insulin, suggesting involvement of a phosphatase. Insulin-induced activation of G3PAT was also blocked by pretreatment of intact myocytes with pertussis toxin and by prior addition, to homogenates, of an antiserum that recognizes the C-terminal decapeptide of Gi alpha.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Proteome analysis of a Lactococcus lactis strain overexpressing gapA suggests that the gene product is an auxiliary glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Willemoës, Martin; Kilstrup, Mogens; Roepstorff, Peter; Hammer, Karin

    2002-08-01

    The sequence of the genome from the Lactococcus lactis subspecies lactis strain IL1403 shows the presence of two reading frames, gapA and gapB, putatively encoding glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Previous proteomic analysis of the L. lactis subspecies cremoris strain MG1363 has revealed two neighbouring protein spots, GapBI and GapBII, with amino terminal sequences identical to the product of gapA from the L. lactis subspecies cremoris strain LM0230 and that of the two IL1403 sequences. In order to assign the two protein spots to their respective genes we constructed an L. lactis strain that overexpessed the gapA gene derived from MG1363 upon nisin induction. Compared to the wild-type, the overexpressing strain had a 3.4-fold elevated level of specific GAPDH activity when grown in the presence of nisin. In both MG1363 and the gapA overexpressing strain the GAPDH activity was specific for NAD. No NADP dependent activity was detected. Proteome analysis of the gapA overexpressing strain revealed two new protein spots, GapAI and GapAII, not previously detected in proteome analysis of MG1363. Results from mass spectrometry analysis of GapA and GapB and comparison with the deduced protein sequences for the GAPDH isozymes from the genome sequence of strain IL1403 allowed us to assign GapA and GapB to their apparent IL1403 homologues encoded by gapA and gapB, respectively. Furthermore, we suggest that a homologue of a gapB product, represented by GapB, is the main source of GAPDH activity in L. lactis during normal growth.

  8. DNA vaccine encoding the moonlighting protein Onchocerca volvulus glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Ov-GAPDH) leads to partial protection in a mouse model of human filariasis.

    PubMed

    Steisslinger, Vera; Korten, Simone; Brattig, Norbert W; Erttmann, Klaus D

    2015-10-26

    River blindness, caused by the filarial parasite Onchocerca volvulus, is a major socio-economic and public health problem in Sub-Saharan Africa. In January 2015, The Onchocerciasis Vaccine for Africa (TOVA) Initiative has been launched with the aim of providing new tools to complement mass drug administration (MDA) of ivermectin, thereby promoting elimination of onchocerciasis in Africa. In this context we here present Onchocerca volvulus glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Ov-GAPDH) as a possible DNA vaccine candidate. We report that in a laboratory model for filariasis, immunization with Ov-GAPDH led to a significant reduction of adult worm load and microfilaraemia in BALB/c mice after challenge infection with the filarial parasite Litomosoides sigmodontis. Mice were either vaccinated with Ov-GAPDH.DNA plasmid (Ov-pGAPDH.DNA) alone or in combination with recombinantly expressed Ov-GAPDH protein (Ov-rGAPDH). During the following challenge infection of immunized and control mice with L. sigmodontis, those formulations which included the DNA plasmid, led to a significant reduction of adult worm loads (up to 57% median reduction) and microfilaraemia (up to 94% reduction) in immunized animals. In a further experiment, immunization with a mixture of four overlapping, synthetic Ov-GAPDH peptides (Ov-GAPDHpept), with alum as adjuvant, did not significantly reduce worm loads. Our results indicate that DNA vaccination with Ov-GAPDH has protective potential against filarial challenge infection in the mouse model. This suggests a transfer of the approach into the cattle Onchocerca ochengi model, where it is possible to investigate the effects of this vaccination in the context of a natural host-parasite relationship.

  9. Using a Personal Glucose Meter and Alkaline Phosphatase for Point-of-Care Quantification of Galactose-1-Phosphate Uridyltransferase in Clinical Galactosemia Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Xiang, Yu; Novak, Donna E; Hoganson, George E; Zhu, Junjie; Lu, Yi

    2015-10-01

    The personal glucose meter (PGM) was recently shown to be a general meter to detect many targets. Most studies, however, focus on transforming either target binding or enzymatic activity that cleaves an artificial substrate into the production of glucose. More importantly, almost all reports exhibit their methods by using artificial samples, such as buffers or serum samples spiked with the targets. To expand the technology to even broader targets and to validate its potential in authentic, more complex clinical samples, we herein report expansion of the PGM method by using alkaline phosphatase (ALP) that links the enzymatic activity of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase to the production of glucose, which allows point-of-care galactosemia diagnosis in authentic human clinical samples. Given the presence of ALP in numerous enzymatic assays for clinical diagnostics, the methods demonstrated herein advance the field closer to point-of-care detection of a wide range of targets in real clinical samples.

  10. Modulation of Intrathymic Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Levels Promotes Escape of Immature Thymocytes to the Periphery with a Potential Proinflammatory Role in Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Flávia Nardy, Ana; Santos, Leonardo; Freire-de-Lima, Célio Geraldo; Morrot, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) system regulates both thymic and lymph nodes T cell egress which is essential for producing and maintaining the recycling T cell repertoire. Infection with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi induces a hormonal systemic deregulation that has impact in the thymic S1P homeostasis that ultimately promotes the premature exit of immature CD4−CD8− T cells expressing TCR and proinflamatory cytokines to peripheral lymphoid organs, where they may interfere with adaptive immune responses. In what follows, we review recent findings revealing escape of these immature T cells exhibiting an activation profile to peripheral compartments of the immune system in both experimental murine and human models of Chagas disease. PMID:26347020

  11. Sphingosine 1-phosphate induces platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 phosphorylation in human endothelial cells through cSrc and Fyn.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Ting; Chen, Shee-Uan; Chou, Chia-Hong; Lee, Hsinyu

    2008-08-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a multifunctional phospholipid which acts through a specific family of G protein-coupled receptors. Platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) form trans-homophilic binding at lateral cell border. Upon stimulation, its cytoplasmic tyrosine residues could be phosphorylated and interact with various downstream signaling molecules. In this study, we demonstrated that S1P induced PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation in human umbilical cord vein cells (HUVECs). By pharmacological inhibitors, it was suggested that G(i) and Src family kinases were involved in PECAM-1 phosphorylation. Moreover, cSrc and Fyn siRNA significantly suppressed S1P-induced PECAM-1 phosphorylation. These results suggested that S1P-induced PECAM-1 phosphorylation through G(i) and subsequent cSrc and Fyn. Our findings provide further understanding of S1P and PECAM-1 signaling as well as their functions in endothelial cells. PMID:18502612

  12. Sphingosine-1-phosphate-enhanced Wnt5a promotes osteogenic differentiation in C3H10T1/2 cells.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yoko; Kobayashi, Mari; Matsuzaki, Etsuko; Higashi, Katsumasa; Takahashi-Yanaga, Fumi; Takano, Aiko; Hirata, Masato; Nishimura, Fusanori

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the involvement of Wnt signaling in sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-enhanced osteogenic differentiation of C3H10T1/2 pluripotent stem cells. We found that S1P enhanced the expression of Wnt5a and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 or 6 (LRP5/6) during osteogenic differentiation. Wnt5a-neutralizing antibody inhibited S1P-enhanced expression of LRP5/6 and alkaline phosphatase, which are essential for osteogenic differentiation. Conversely, S1P did not affect endogenous canonical Wnt signaling. Taken together, S1P-enhanced Wnt5a promotes LRP5/6 expression, resulting in the trigger of osteogenic differentiation of C3H10T1/2 cells. These findings suggest a potential beneficial role for S1P in bone regeneration. PMID:27486054

  13. Sphingosine-1-phosphate-enhanced Wnt5a promotes osteogenic differentiation in C3H10T1/2 cells.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yoko; Kobayashi, Mari; Matsuzaki, Etsuko; Higashi, Katsumasa; Takahashi-Yanaga, Fumi; Takano, Aiko; Hirata, Masato; Nishimura, Fusanori

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the involvement of Wnt signaling in sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-enhanced osteogenic differentiation of C3H10T1/2 pluripotent stem cells. We found that S1P enhanced the expression of Wnt5a and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 or 6 (LRP5/6) during osteogenic differentiation. Wnt5a-neutralizing antibody inhibited S1P-enhanced expression of LRP5/6 and alkaline phosphatase, which are essential for osteogenic differentiation. Conversely, S1P did not affect endogenous canonical Wnt signaling. Taken together, S1P-enhanced Wnt5a promotes LRP5/6 expression, resulting in the trigger of osteogenic differentiation of C3H10T1/2 cells. These findings suggest a potential beneficial role for S1P in bone regeneration.

  14. Cytokine storm plays a direct role in the morbidity and mortality from influenza virus infection and is chemically treatable with a single sphingosine-1-phosphate agonist molecule.

    PubMed

    Oldstone, Michael B A; Rosen, Hugh

    2014-01-01

    Cytokine storm defines a dysregulation of and an excessively exaggerated immune response most often accompanying selected viral infections and several autoimmune diseases. Newly emerging and re-emerging infections of the respiratory tract, especially influenza, SARS, and hantavirus post considerable medical problems. Their morbidities and mortalities are often a direct result of cytokine storm. This chapter visits primarily influenza virus infection and resultant cytokine storm. It provides the compelling evidence that illuminates cytokine storm in influenza pathogenesis and the clear findings that cytokine storm is chemically tractable by therapy directed toward sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor (S1PR) modulation, specifically S1P1R agonist therapy. The mechanism(s) of how S1P1R signaling works and the pathways involved are subjects of this review.

  15. Animal Model of Respiratory Syncytial Virus: CD8+ T Cells Cause a Cytokine Storm That Is Chemically Tractable by Sphingosine-1-Phosphate 1 Receptor Agonist Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Kevin B.; Teijaro, John R.; Brock, Linda G.; Fremgen, Daniel M.; Collins, Peter L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cytokine storm is an intensified, dysregulated, tissue-injurious inflammatory response driven by cytokine and immune cell components. The cytokine storm during influenza virus infection, whereby the amplified innate immune response is primarily responsible for pulmonary damage, has been well characterized. Now we describe a novel event where virus-specific T cells induce a cytokine storm. The paramyxovirus pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) is a model of human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV). Unexpectedly, when C57BL/6 mice were infected with PVM, the innate inflammatory response was undetectable until day 5 postinfection, at which time CD8+ T cells infiltrated into the lung, initiating a cytokine storm by their production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Administration of an immunomodulatory sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor 1 (S1P1R) agonist significantly inhibited PVM-elicited cytokine storm by blunting the PVM-specific CD8+ T cell response, resulting in diminished pulmonary disease and enhanced survival. IMPORTANCE A dysregulated overly exuberant immune response, termed a “cytokine storm,” accompanies virus-induced acute respiratory diseases (VARV), is primarily responsible for the accompanying high morbidity and mortality, and can be controlled therapeutically in influenza virus infection of mice and ferrets by administration of sphingosine-1-phosphate 1 receptor (S1P1R) agonists. Here, two novel findings are recorded. First, in contrast to influenza infection, where the cytokine storm is initiated early by the innate immune system, for pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), a model of RSV, the cytokine storm is initiated late in infection by the adaptive immune response: specifically, by virus-specific CD8 T cells via their release of IFN-γ and TNF-α. Blockading these cytokines with neutralizing antibodies blunts the cytokine storm and protects the host. Second, PVM infection is controlled by administration

  16. Phosphoryl transfer from α-d-glucose 1-phosphate catalyzed by Escherichia coli sugar-phosphate phosphatases of two protein superfamily types.

    PubMed

    Wildberger, Patricia; Pfeiffer, Martin; Brecker, Lothar; Rechberger, Gerald N; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2015-03-01

    The Cori ester α-d-glucose 1-phosphate (αGlc 1-P) is a high-energy intermediate of cellular carbohydrate metabolism. Its glycosidic phosphomonoester moiety primes αGlc 1-P for flexible exploitation in glucosyl and phosphoryl transfer reactions. Two structurally and mechanistically distinct sugar-phosphate phosphatases from Escherichia coli were characterized in this study for utilization of αGlc 1-P as a phosphoryl donor substrate. The agp gene encodes a periplasmic αGlc 1-P phosphatase (Agp) belonging to the histidine acid phosphatase family. Had13 is from the haloacid dehydrogenase-like phosphatase family. Cytoplasmic expression of Agp (in E. coli Origami B) gave a functional enzyme preparation (kcat for phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to water, 40 s(-1)) that was shown by mass spectrometry to exhibit no free cysteines and the native intramolecular disulfide bond between Cys(189) and Cys(195). Enzymatic phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to water in H2 (18)O solvent proceeded with complete (18)O label incorporation into the phosphate released, consistent with catalytic reaction through O-1-P, but not C-1-O, bond cleavage. Hydrolase activity of both enzymes was not restricted to a glycosidic phosphomonoester substrate, and d-glucose 6-phosphate was converted with a kcat similar to that of αGlc 1-P. By examining phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to an acceptor substrate other than water (d-fructose or d-glucose), we discovered that Agp exhibited pronounced synthetic activity, unlike Had13, which utilized αGlc 1-P mainly for phosphoryl transfer to water. By applying d-fructose in 10-fold molar excess over αGlc 1-P (20 mM), enzymatic conversion furnished d-fructose 1-phosphate as the main product in a 55% overall yield. Agp is a promising biocatalyst for use in transphosphorylation from αGlc 1-P. PMID:25527541

  17. Identification and characterization of a mirror-image oligonucleotide that binds and neutralizes sphingosine 1-phosphate, a central mediator of angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Purschke, Werner G; Hoehlig, Kai; Buchner, Klaus; Zboralski, Dirk; Schwoebel, Frank; Vater, Axel; Klussmann, Sven

    2014-08-15

    The sphingolipid S1P (sphingosine 1-phosphate) is known to be involved in a number of pathophysiological conditions such as cancer, autoimmune diseases and fibrosis. It acts extracellularly through a set of five G-protein-coupled receptors, but its intracellular actions are also well documented. Employing in vitro selection techniques, we identified an L-aptamer (Spiegelmer®) to S1P designated NOX-S93. The binding affinity of NOX-S93 to S1P had a Kd value of 4.3 nM. The Spiegelmer® shows equal binding to dihydro-S1P, but no cross-reactivity to the related lipids sphingosine, lysophosphatidic acid, ceramide, ceramide-1-phosphate or sphingosine phosphocholine. In stably transfected CHO (Chinese-hamster ovary) cell lines expressing the S1P receptors S1PR1 or S1PR3, NOX-S93 inhibits S1P-mediated β-arrestin recruitment and intracellular calcium release respectively, with IC50 values in the low nanomolar range. The pro-angiogenic activity of S1P, and of the growth factors VEGF-A (vascular endothelial growth factor-A), FGF-2 (fibroblast growth factor-2) and IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor-1), was effectively blocked by NOX-S93 in a cellular angiogenesis assay employing primary human endothelial cells. These data provide further evidence for the relevance of extracellular S1P as a central mediator of angiogenesis, suggesting pharmacological S1P neutralization as a promising treatment alternative to current anti-angiogenesis approaches. PMID:24832383

  18. HDL-bound sphingosine 1-phosphate acts as a biased agonist for the endothelial cell receptor S1P1 to limit vascular inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Galvani, Sylvain; Sanson, Marie; Blaho, Victoria A.; Swendeman, Steven L.; Obinata, Hideru; Conger, Heather; Dahlbäck, Björn; Kono, Mari; Proia, Richard L.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Hla, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) is abundant in endothelial cells, where it regulates vascular development and microvascular barrier function. In investigating the role of endothelial cell S1P1 in adult mice, we found that the endothelial S1P1 signal was enhanced in regions of the arterial vasculature experiencing inflammation. The abundance of proinflammatory adhesion proteins, such as ICAM-1, was enhanced in mice with endothelial cell–specific deletion of S1pr1 and suppressed in mice with endothelial cell–specific overexpression of S1pr1, suggesting a protective function of S1P1 in vascular disease. The chaperones ApoM+HDL (HDL) or albumin bind to sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in the circulation; therefore, we tested the effects of S1P bound to each chaperone on S1P1 signaling in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Exposure of HUVECs to ApoM+HDL-S1P, but not to albumin-S1P, promoted the formation of a cell surface S1P1–β-arrestin 2 complex and attenuated the ability of the proinflammatory cytokine TNFα to activate NF-κB and increase ICAM-1 abundance. Although S1P bound to either chaperone induced MAPK activation, albumin-S1P triggered greater Gi activation and receptor endocytosis. Endothelial cell–specific deletion of S1pr1 in the hypercholesterolemic Apoe−/− mouse model of atherosclerosis enhanced atherosclerotic lesion formation in the descending aorta. We propose that the ability of ApoM+HDL to act as a biased agonist on S1P1 inhibits vascular inflammation, which may partially explain the cardiovascular protective functions of HDL. PMID:26268607

  19. Functional complementation of an Escherichia coli gap mutant supports an amphibolic role for NAD(P)-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    PubMed Central

    Valverde, F; Losada, M; Serrano, A

    1997-01-01

    The gap-2 gene, encoding the NAD(P)-dependent D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH2) of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803, was cloned by functional complementation of an Escherichia coli gap mutant with a genomic DNA library; this is the first time that this cloning strategy has been used for a GAPDH involved in photosynthetic carbon assimilation. The Synechocystis DNA region able to complement the E. coli gap mutant was narrowed down to 3 kb and fully sequenced. A single complete open reading frame of 1,011 bp encoding a protein of 337 amino acids was found and identified as the putative gap-2 gene identified in the complete genome sequence of this organism. Determination of the transcriptional start point, identification of putative promoter and terminator sites, and orientation of the truncated flanking genes suggested the gap-2 transcript should be monocystronic, a possibility further confirmed by Northern blot studies. Both natural and recombinant homotetrameric GAPDH2s were purified and found to exhibit virtually identical physicochemical and kinetic properties. The recombinant GAPDH2 showed the dual pyridine nucleotide specificity characteristic of the native cyanobacterial enzyme, and similar ratios of NAD- to NADP-dependent activities were found in cell extracts from Synechocystis as well as in those from the complemented E. coli clones. The deduced amino acid sequence of Synechocystis GAPDH2 presented a high degree of identity with sequences of the chloroplastic NADP-dependent enzymes. In agreement with this result, immunoblot analysis using monospecific antibodies raised against GAPDH2 showed the presence of the 38-kDa GAPDH subunit not only in crude extracts from the gap-2-expressing E. coli clones and all cyanobacteria that were tested but also in those from eukaryotic microalgae and plants. Western and Northern blot experiments showed that gap-2 is conspicuously expressed, although at different levels, in Synechocystis

  20. The Atg18-Atg2 Complex Is Recruited to Autophagic Membranes via Phosphatidylinositol 3-Phosphate and Exerts an Essential Function*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Obara, Keisuke; Sekito, Takayuki; Niimi, Kaori; Ohsumi, Yoshinori

    2008-01-01

    Atg18 is essential for both autophagy and the regulation of vacuolar morphology. The latter process is mediated by phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate binding, which is dispensable for autophagy. Atg18 also binds to phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns(3)P) in vitro. Here, we investigate the relationship between PtdIns(3)P-binding of Atg18 and autophagy. Using an Atg18 variant, Atg18(FTTG), which is unable to bind phosphoinositides, we found that PtdIns(3)P binding of Atg18 is essential for full activity in both selective and nonselective autophagy. Atg18(FTTG) formed a complex with Atg2 in a normal manner, and Atg18-Atg2 complex formation occurred in cells in the absence of PtdIns(3)P, indicating that Atg18-Atg2 complex formation is independent of PtdIns(3)P-binding of Atg18. Atg18 localized to endosomes, the vacuolar membrane, and autophagic membranes, whereas Atg18(FTTG) did not localize to these structures. The localization of Atg2 to autophagic membranes was also lost in Atg18(FTTG) cells. These data indicate that PtdIns(3)P-binding of Atg18 is involved in directing the Atg18-Atg2 complex to autophagic membranes. Connection of a 2×FYVE domain, a specific PtdIns(3)P-binding domain, to the C terminus of Atg18(FTTG) restored the localization of Atg18-Atg2 to autophagic membranes and full autophagic activity, indicating that PtdIns(3)P-binding by Atg18 is dispensable for the function of the Atg18-Atg2 complex but is required for its localization. This also suggests that PtdIns(3)P does not act allosterically on Atg18. Taken together, Atg18 forms a complex with Atg2 irrespective of PtdIns(3)P binding, associates tightly to autophagic membranes by interacting with PtdIns(3)P, and plays an essential role. PMID:18586673

  1. Identification of a light-responsive region of the nuclear gene encoding the B subunit of chloroplast glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, H B; Park, S C; Peng, H P; Goodman, H M; Dewdney, J; Shih, M C

    1994-01-01

    We report here the identification of a cis-acting region involved in light regulation of the nuclear gene (GapB) encoding the B subunit of chloroplast glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results show that a 664-bp GapB promoter fragment is sufficient to confer light induction and organ-specific expression of the Escherichia coli beta-glucuronidase reporter gene (Gus) in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. Deletion analysis indicates that the -261 to -173 upstream region of the GapB gene is essential for light induction. This region contains four direct repeats with the consensus sequence 5'-ATGAA(A/G)A-3' (Gap boxes). Deletion of all four repeats abolishes light induction completely. In addition, we have linked a 109-bp (-263 to -152) GapB upstream fragment containing the four direct repeats in two orientations to the -92 to +6 upstream sequence of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S basal promoter. The resulting chimeric promoters are able to confer light induction and to enhance leaf-specific expression of the Gus reporter gene in transgenic tobacco plants. Based on these results we conclude that Gap boxes are essential for light regulation and organ-specific expression of the GapB gene in A. thaliana. Using gel mobility shift assays we have also identified a nuclear factor from tobacco that interacts with GapA and GapB DNA fragments containing these Gap boxes. Competition assays indicate that Gap boxes are the binding sites for this factor. Although this binding activity is present in nuclear extracts from leaves and roots of light-grown or dark-treated tobacco plants, the activity is less abundant in nuclear extracts prepared from leaves of dark-treated plants or from roots of greenhouse-grown plants. In addition, our data show that this binding factor is distinct from the GT-1 factor, which binds to Box II and Box III within the light-responsive element of the RbcS-3A gene of pea. PMID:8029358

  2. Phosphoryl Transfer from α-d-Glucose 1-Phosphate Catalyzed by Escherichia coli Sugar-Phosphate Phosphatases of Two Protein Superfamily Types

    PubMed Central

    Wildberger, Patricia; Pfeiffer, Martin; Brecker, Lothar; Rechberger, Gerald N.; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    The Cori ester α-d-glucose 1-phosphate (αGlc 1-P) is a high-energy intermediate of cellular carbohydrate metabolism. Its glycosidic phosphomonoester moiety primes αGlc 1-P for flexible exploitation in glucosyl and phosphoryl transfer reactions. Two structurally and mechanistically distinct sugar-phosphate phosphatases from Escherichia coli were characterized in this study for utilization of αGlc 1-P as a phosphoryl donor substrate. The agp gene encodes a periplasmic αGlc 1-P phosphatase (Agp) belonging to the histidine acid phosphatase family. Had13 is from the haloacid dehydrogenase-like phosphatase family. Cytoplasmic expression of Agp (in E. coli Origami B) gave a functional enzyme preparation (kcat for phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to water, 40 s−1) that was shown by mass spectrometry to exhibit no free cysteines and the native intramolecular disulfide bond between Cys189 and Cys195. Enzymatic phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to water in H218O solvent proceeded with complete 18O label incorporation into the phosphate released, consistent with catalytic reaction through O-1–P, but not C-1–O, bond cleavage. Hydrolase activity of both enzymes was not restricted to a glycosidic phosphomonoester substrate, and d-glucose 6-phosphate was converted with a kcat similar to that of αGlc 1-P. By examining phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to an acceptor substrate other than water (d-fructose or d-glucose), we discovered that Agp exhibited pronounced synthetic activity, unlike Had13, which utilized αGlc 1-P mainly for phosphoryl transfer to water. By applying d-fructose in 10-fold molar excess over αGlc 1-P (20 mM), enzymatic conversion furnished d-fructose 1-phosphate as the main product in a 55% overall yield. Agp is a promising biocatalyst for use in transphosphorylation from αGlc 1-P. PMID:25527541

  3. Analysis of Onset Mechanisms of a Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor Modulator Fingolimod-Induced Atrioventricular Conduction Block and QT-Interval Prolongation

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, Yukihiro; Nakamura, Yuji; Kitahara, Ken; Harada, Takuma; Kato, Kazuhiko; Ninomiya, Tomohisa; Cao, Xin; Ohara, Hiroshi; Izumi-Nakaseko, Hiroko; Suzuki, Kokichi; Ando, Kentaro; and others

    2014-11-15

    Fingolimod, a sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor subtype 1, 3, 4 and 5 modulator, has been used for the treatment of patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis, but atrioventricular conduction block and/or QT-interval prolongation have been reported in some patients after the first dose. In this study, we directly compared the electropharmacological profiles of fingolimod with those of siponimod, a modulator of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 1 and 5, using in vivo guinea-pig model and in vitro human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) assay to better understand the onset mechanisms of the clinically observed adverse events. Fingolimod (0.01 and 0.1 mg/kg) or siponimod (0.001 and 0.01 mg/kg) was intravenously infused over 10 min to the halothane-anaesthetized guinea pigs (n = 4), whereas the effects of fingolimod (1 μmol/L) and siponimod (1 μmol/L) on hERG current were examined (n = 3). The high doses of fingolimod and siponimod induced atrioventricular conduction block, whereas the low dose of siponimod prolonged PR interval, which was not observed by that of fingolimod. The high dose of fingolimod prolonged QT interval, which was not observed by either dose of siponimod. Meanwhile, fingolimod significantly inhibited hERG current, which was not observed by siponimod. These results suggest that S1P receptor subtype 1 in the heart could be one of the candidates for fingolimod- and siponimod-induced atrioventricular conduction block since S1P receptor subtype 5 is localized at the brain, and that direct I{sub Kr} inhibition may play a key role in fingolimod-induced QT-interval prolongation. - Highlights: • Fingolimod and siponimod are S1P{sub 1,3,4,5} and S1P{sub 1,5} receptor modulators, respectively. • Fingolimod and siponimod induced AV block in the halothane-anesthetized guinea pigs. • S1P{sub 1} in the hearts may be the target of fingolimod- and siponimod-induced AV block. • Fingolimod directly inhibited hERG current, which was not

  4. Arabidopsis accelerated-cell-death11, ACD11, is a ceramide-1-phosphate transfer protein and intermediary regulator of phytoceramide levels

    PubMed Central

    Simanshu, Dhirendra K.; Zhai, Xiuhong; Munch, David; Hofius, Daniel; Markham, Jonathan E.; Bielawski, Jacek; Bielawska, Alicja; Malinina, Lucy; Molotkovsky, Julian G.; Mundy, John W.; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Brown, Rhoderick E.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The accelerated-cell-death11 (acd11) mutant of Arabidopsis provides a genetic model for studying immune response activation and localized cellular suicide that halts pathogen spread during infection in plants. Here, we elucidate ACD11 structure/function and show that acd11 disruption dramatically alters the in vivo balance of sphingolipid mediators that regulate eukaryotic programmed cell death. In acd11 mutants, normally low ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P) levels become elevated, but the relatively abundant cell death inducer, phytoceramide, rises acutely. ACD11 exhibits selective intermembrane transfer of C1P and phyto-C1P. Crystal structures establish C1P binding via a surface-localized, phosphate headgroup recognition center connected to an interior hydrophobic pocket that adaptively ensheaths lipid chains via a cleft-like gating mechanism. Point mutation mapping confirms functional involvement of binding-site residues. A π-helix (π-bulge) near the lipid-binding cleft distinguishes apo-ACD11 from other GLTP-folds. The global two-layer, α-helically-dominated, ‘sandwich’ topology displaying C1P-selective binding identifies ACD11 as the plant prototype of a new GLTP-fold subfamily. PMID:24412362

  5. Genetic basis for biosynthesis of the (alpha 1-->4)-linked N-acetyl-D-glucosamine 1-phosphate capsule of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup X.