Science.gov

Sample records for 1-s integration time

  1. WINDII observations and TIME-GCM simulations of O(1S) polar spirals during geomagnetic disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Gordon G.; Roble, Raymond G.; Cho, Young-Min

    2013-05-01

    daytime O(1S) emission at 557.7 nm observed at 250 km with the Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) is dominantly excited by photoelectron impact on atomic oxygen, so the volume emission rate is normally a measure of the atomic oxygen concentration. Daily polar maps of the 250 km volume emission rate during geomagnetic disturbances display polar spirals extending out of the auroral region and down to the equator. Since the local time is fixed for a given latitude for a single day, the spiral maps form a spatio-temporal pattern in which the longitudinal variations cannot be distinguished from those in universal time. Simulations for 2 January 1993 implemented with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM) using the equivalent satellite perspective show a remarkably similar spiral pattern. Hourly universal time simulations reveal a rapid equatorward expansion of the spirals during this modest geomagnetic event of Kp = 4.7, which are mirrored in the meridional and vertical winds. Simulations of the electron density show that the emission within the spirals is caused by the recombination of O2+ ions with electrons, and not the atomic oxygen enhancement itself. All of this strongly suggests that the spirals are in fact large-scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDs), and comparisons of the WINDII data made with TID observations reported in the literature, including those made on the same day, support this conclusion. The TIME-GCM simulations suggest that a component of the spirals originates in the lower atmosphere and appears at thermospheric heights.

  2. Recognition of disturbances with specified morphology in time series: Part 2. Spikes on 1-s magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, A. A.; Agayan, S. M.; Gvishiani, A. D.; Bogoutdinov, Sh. R.; Chulliat, A.

    2012-05-01

    Preliminary magnetograms contain different types of temporal anthropogenic disturbances: spikes, baseline jumps, drifts, etc. These disturbances should be identified and filtered out during the preprocessing of the preliminary records for the definitive data. As of now, at the geomagnetic observatories, such filtering is carried out manually. Most of the disturbances in the records sampled every second are spikes, which are much more abundant than those on the magnetograms sampled every minute. Another important feature of the 1-s magnetograms is the presence of a plenty of specific disturbances caused by short-period geomagnetic pulsations, which must be retained in the definitive records. Thus, creating an instrument for formalized and unified recognition of spikes on the preliminary 1-s magnetograms would largely solve the problem of labor-consuming manual preprocessing of the magnetic records. In the context of this idea, in the present paper, we focus on recognition of the spikes on the 1-s magnetograms as a key point of the problem. We describe here the new algorithm of pattern recognition, SPs, which is capable of automatically identifying the spikes on the 1-s magnetograms with a low probability of missed events and false alarms. The algorithm was verified on the real magnetic data recorded at the French observatory located on Easter Island in the Pacific.

  3. Time Integrating Optical Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    diode source modulation, and (b) acousto - lit X)= l,(t)l(t - x / v). ( 2 ) optic deflector modulation for SSS example. F,,r double sideband modulation 1... 2 -1 2.1.2 Acousto - Optic Time-Integrating Correlator . ...... .. 2 -3 2.1.3 Noncoherent Space Integrating Correlator ......... . . 2 -6 2.1.4...device limitation. Acousto - optic devices ] are available with time-bandwidth product much greater than the number of resolvable image samples. 1- 2 I i

  4. Feature integration across space, time, and orientation

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Thomas U.; Öğmen, Haluk; Herzog, Michael H.

    2012-01-01

    The perception of a visual target can be strongly influenced by flanking stimuli. In static displays, performance on the target improves when the distance to the flanking elements increases- proposedly because feature pooling and integration vanishes with distance. Here, we studied feature integration with dynamic stimuli. We show that features of single elements presented within a continuous motion stream are integrated largely independent of spatial distance (and orientation). Hence, space based models of feature integration cannot be extended to dynamic stimuli. We suggest that feature integration is guided by perceptual grouping operations that maintain the identity of perceptual objects over space and time. PMID:19968428

  5. A dynamic network involving M1-S1, SII-insular, medial insular, and cingulate cortices controls muscular activity during an isometric contraction reaction time task.

    PubMed

    Jouanin, Jean-Claude; Pérès, Michel; Ducorps, Antoine; Renault, Bernard

    2009-02-01

    Magnetoencephalographic, electromyographic (EMG), work, and reaction time (RT) were recorded from nine subjects during visually triggered intermittent isometric contractions of the middle finger under two conditions: unloaded and loaded (30% of maximal voluntary contraction). The effect of muscle fatigue was studied over three consecutive periods under both conditions. In the loaded condition, the motor evoked field triggered by the EMG onset decreased with fatigue, whereas movement-evoked fields (MEFs) increased (P < 0.01). Fatigue was demonstrated in the loaded condition, since (i) RT increased due to an increase in the electromechanical delay (P < 0.002); (ii) work decreased from Periods 1 to 3 (P < 0.005), while (iii) the myoelectric RMS amplitude of both flexor digitorum superficialis and extensor muscles increased (P < 0.003) and (iv) during Period 3, the spectral deflection of the EMG median frequency of the FDS muscle decreased (P < 0.001). In the unloaded condition and at the beginning of the loaded condition, a parallel network including M1-S1, posterior SII-insular, and posterior cingulate cortices accounted for the MEF activities. However, under the effect of fatigue, medial insular and posterior cingulate cortices drove this network. Moreover, changes in the location of insular and M1-S1 activations were significantly correlated with muscle fatigue (increase of RMS-EMG; P < 0.03 and P < 0.01, respectively). These results demonstrate that a plastic network controls the strength of the motor command as fatigue occurs: sensory information, pain, and exhaustion act through activation of the medial insular and posterior cingulate cortices to decrease the motor command in order to preserve muscle efficiency and integrity.

  6. Local-time representation of path integrals.

    PubMed

    Jizba, Petr; Zatloukal, Václav

    2015-12-01

    We derive a local-time path-integral representation for a generic one-dimensional time-independent system. In particular, we show how to rephrase the matrix elements of the Bloch density matrix as a path integral over x-dependent local-time profiles. The latter quantify the time that the sample paths x(t) in the Feynman path integral spend in the vicinity of an arbitrary point x. Generalization of the local-time representation that includes arbitrary functionals of the local time is also provided. We argue that the results obtained represent a powerful alternative to the traditional Feynman-Kac formula, particularly in the high- and low-temperature regimes. To illustrate this point, we apply our local-time representation to analyze the asymptotic behavior of the Bloch density matrix at low temperatures. Further salient issues, such as connections with the Sturm-Liouville theory and the Rayleigh-Ritz variational principle, are also discussed.

  7. Multirate Time Integration for Compressible Atmospheric Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wensch, Joerg; Galant, Alexander; Knoth, Oswald

    2008-09-01

    We generalise split-explicit Runge-Kutta methods utilised in atmospheric dynamics simulation where fast sub-processes (sound waves) are integrated by small time steps. The inclusion of fixed tendencies of previous stages leads to an improvement of the stability barrier for the acoustics equation by a factor of two. Order and stability analysis is based on the assumption of exact integration of fast subprocesses.

  8. High resolution integrated study of microfossil assemblages in Sapropel S1, S3 and S5: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negri, Alessandra; Morigi, Caterina; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Keller, Joerg

    2016-04-01

    The Eastern Mediterranean late Neogene to Quaternary sedimentary record is characterized by the widespread and distinctly periodical occurrence of organic carbon-rich layers, called sapropels. The deposition of sapropels is related to significant changes in climate, in the pattern of water circulation and in the biogeochemical cycles. The primary cause triggering the formation of sapropels has been debated ever since their discovery: productivity in the surface waters and organic matter preservation at the sea-floor due to hypoxia or anoxia have been indicated as the two major contributing factors operating either separately or combined. Moreover, each sapropel seems to have its own peculiar feature, likely attributed to the different climate forcing and the different response of productivity and preservation to the water column parameters. Here we present preliminary data from core M25/4 12, located in the Ionian Sea, containing a continuous record of the sapropels deposited in the last 330 ka (S1 to S10, excluding S2). We analysed the microfossil assemblages in sapropels S1 (10 ka BP), S3 (80 ka BP) and S5 (125 ka BP) at a multi-centennial time resolution to get insights into the climatic and oceanographical features leading to their deposition and the role of productivity and preservation.

  9. Variational time integrators in computational solid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lew, Adrian Jose

    This thesis develops the theory and implementation of variational integrators for computational solid mechanics problems, and to some extent, for fluid mechanics problems as well. Variational integrators for finite dimensional mechanical systems are succinctly reviewed, and used as the foundations for the extension to continuum systems. The latter is accomplished by way of a space-tune formulation for Lagrangian continuum mechanics that unifies the derivation of tyre balance of linear momentum, energy and configurational forces, all of there as Euler-Lagrange equations of an extended Hamilton's principle. In this formulation, energy conservation and the path independence of the J- and L-integrals are conserved quantities emanating from Noether's theorem. Variational integrators for continuum mechanics are constructed by mimicking this variational structure, and a discrete Noether's theorem for rather general space-tune discretizations is presented. Additionally, the algorithms are automatically (multi)symplectic, and the (multi)symplectic form is uniquely defined by the theory. For instance, in nonlinear elastodynamics the algorithms exactly preserve linear and angular momenta, whenever the continuous system does. A class of variational algorithms is constructed, termed asynchronous variational integrators (AVI), which permit: the selection of independent time steps in each element of a finite element mesh, and the local time steps need riot bear an integral relation to each other. The conservation properties of both synchronous and asynchronous variational integrators are discussed in detail. In particular, AVI are found to nearly conserve energy both locally and globally, a distinguishing feature of variational integrators. The possibility of adapting the elemental time step to exactly satisfy the local energy balance equation, obtained from the extended variational principle, is analyzed. The AVI are also extended to include dissipative systems. The excellent

  10. Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). Engineering Test Report: Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A1, S/N 109

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, A.

    2000-01-01

    This is the Engineering Test Report, Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A1, S/N 109, for the Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A).

  11. Universal Hitting Time Statistics for Integrable Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettmann, Carl P.; Marklof, Jens; Strömbergsson, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    The perceived randomness in the time evolution of "chaotic" dynamical systems can be characterized by universal probabilistic limit laws, which do not depend on the fine features of the individual system. One important example is the Poisson law for the times at which a particle with random initial data hits a small set. This was proved in various settings for dynamical systems with strong mixing properties. The key result of the present study is that, despite the absence of mixing, the hitting times of integrable flows also satisfy universal limit laws which are, however, not Poisson. We describe the limit distributions for "generic" integrable flows and a natural class of target sets, and illustrate our findings with two examples: the dynamics in central force fields and ellipse billiards. The convergence of the hitting time process follows from a new equidistribution theorem in the space of lattices, which is of independent interest. Its proof exploits Ratner's measure classification theorem for unipotent flows, and extends earlier work of Elkies and McMullen.

  12. Integrated Planning for Telepresence with Time Delays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Mark D.; Rabe, Kenneth J.

    2006-01-01

    Teleoperation of remote robotic systems over time delays in the range of 2-10 seconds poses a unique set of challenges. In the context of a supervisory control system for the JSC Robonaut humanoid robot, we have developed an 'intelligent assistant' that integrates an Artificial Intelligence planner (JSHOP2) with execution monitoring of the state of both the human supervisor and the remote robot. The assistant reasons simultaneously about the world state on both sides of the time delay, which represents a novel application of this technology. The purpose of the assistant is to provide advice to the human supervisor about current and future activities, derived from a sequence of high-level goals to be achieved. To do this, the assistant must simultaneously monitor and react to various data sources, including actions taken by the supervisor who is issuing commands to the robot (e.g. with a data glove), actions taken by the robot, and the environment of the robot, both as currently perceived over the time delay, along with the current sequence of goals. We have developed a 'leader/follower' software architecture to handle the dual time-shifted streams of execution feedback. In this paper we describe the integrated planner and its executive, and how it operates in normal and anomaly situations.

  13. Mixed time slicing in path integral simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Ryan P.; Zwickl, Jill; Shushkov, Philip; Tully, John C.

    2011-02-01

    A simple and efficient scheme is presented for using different time slices for different degrees of freedom in path integral calculations. This method bridges the gap between full quantization and the standard mixed quantum-classical (MQC) scheme and, therefore, still provides quantum mechanical effects in the less-quantized variables. Underlying the algorithm is the notion that time slices (beads) may be "collapsed" in a manner that preserves quantization in the less quantum mechanical degrees of freedom. The method is shown to be analogous to multiple-time step integration techniques in classical molecular dynamics. The algorithm and its associated error are demonstrated on model systems containing coupled high- and low-frequency modes; results indicate that convergence of quantum mechanical observables can be achieved with disparate bead numbers in the different modes. Cost estimates indicate that this procedure, much like the MQC method, is most efficient for only a relatively few quantum mechanical degrees of freedom, such as proton transfer. In this regime, however, the cost of a fully quantum mechanical simulation is determined by the quantization of the least quantum mechanical degrees of freedom.

  14. Integrated Planning for Telepresence with Time Delays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Mark D.; Rabe, Kenneth J.

    2006-01-01

    Integrated planning and execution of teleoperations in space with time delays is shown. The topics include: 1) The Problem; 2) Future Robot Surgery? 3) Approach Overview; 4) Robonaut; 5) Normal Planning and Execution; 6) Planner Context; 7) Implementation; 8) Use of JSHOP2; 9) Monitoring and Testing GUI; 10) Normal sequence: first the supervisor acts; 11) then the robot; 12) Robot might be late; 13) Supervisor can work ahead; 14) Deviations from Plan; 15) Robot State Change Example; 16) Accomplished goals skipped in replan; 17) Planning continuity; 18) Supervisor Deviation From Plan; 19) Intentional Deviation; and 20) Infeasible states.

  15. Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). Performance Verification Report: METSAT (S/N) AMSU-A1 Receiver Assemblies P/N 1356429-1 S/N F06 and P/N 1356409-1 S/N F06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is the Performance Verification Report, METSAT (S/N 109) AMSU-A1 Receiver Assemblies, P/N 1356429-1 S/N F06 and P/N 1356409 S/N F06, for the Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A).

  16. Integrated Planning for Telepresence With Time Delays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Mark; Rabe, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    A conceptual "intelligent assistant" and an artificial-intelligence computer program that implements the intelligent assistant have been developed to improve control exerted by a human supervisor over a robot that is so distant that communication between the human and the robot involves significant signal-propagation delays. The goal of the effort is not only to help the human supervisor monitor and control the state of the robot, but also to improve the efficiency of the robot by allowing the supervisor to "work ahead". The intelligent assistant is an integrated combination of an artificial-intelligence planner and a monitor of states of both the human supervisor and the remote robot. The novelty of the system lies in the way it uses the planner to reason about the states at both ends of the time delay. The purpose served by the assistant is to provide advice to the human supervisor about current and future activities, derived from a sequence of high-level goals to be achieved.

  17. Technology Integration Enhancing Science: Things Take Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shane, Patricia M.; Wojnowski, Brenda S.

    2005-01-01

    This article offers a detailed description and discussion of Project TIES, a professional development program that allows K-8 teachers to make the transition from a traditional classroom to one where technology is embedded and becomes an integral part of teaching and learning. Project TIES (Technology Integration Enhancing Science), a four-year…

  18. Numerical Integration: One Step at a Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yajun; Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2016-01-01

    This article looks at the effects that adding a single extra subdivision has on the level of accuracy of some common numerical integration routines. Instead of automatically doubling the number of subdivisions for a numerical integration rule, we investigate what happens with a systematic method of judiciously selecting one extra subdivision for…

  19. Time, Dynamics and Chaos: Integrating Poincare's 'Non-Integrable Systems'

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Prigogine, I.

    1990-10-01

    This report discusses the nature of time. The author attempts to resolve the conflict between the concept of time reversibility in classical and quantum mechanics with the macroscopic world's irreversibility of time. (LSP)

  20. Time, dynamics and chaos. Integrating Poincare's "non-integrable systems"

    SciTech Connect

    Prigogine, I.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the nature of time. The author attempts to resolve the conflict between the concept of time reversibility in classical and quantum mechanics with the macroscopic world's irreversibility of time. (LSP)

  1. 40 CFR 147.3109 - Timing of mechanical integrity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Timing of mechanical integrity test... Certain Oklahoma Indian Tribes § 147.3109 Timing of mechanical integrity test. The demonstrations of mechanical integrity required by § 146.14(b)(2) of this chapter prior to approval for the operation of...

  2. 40 CFR 147.3109 - Timing of mechanical integrity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Timing of mechanical integrity test... Certain Oklahoma Indian Tribes § 147.3109 Timing of mechanical integrity test. The demonstrations of mechanical integrity required by § 146.14(b)(2) of this chapter prior to approval for the operation of...

  3. 40 CFR 147.3109 - Timing of mechanical integrity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Timing of mechanical integrity test... Certain Oklahoma Indian Tribes § 147.3109 Timing of mechanical integrity test. The demonstrations of mechanical integrity required by § 146.14(b)(2) of this chapter prior to approval for the operation of...

  4. 40 CFR 147.3109 - Timing of mechanical integrity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Timing of mechanical integrity test... Certain Oklahoma Indian Tribes § 147.3109 Timing of mechanical integrity test. The demonstrations of mechanical integrity required by § 146.14(b)(2) of this chapter prior to approval for the operation of...

  5. 40 CFR 147.3109 - Timing of mechanical integrity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Timing of mechanical integrity test... Certain Oklahoma Indian Tribes § 147.3109 Timing of mechanical integrity test. The demonstrations of mechanical integrity required by § 146.14(b)(2) of this chapter prior to approval for the operation of...

  6. Change Over Time: Integrating the American Army.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugan, Tim

    2002-01-01

    Describes a unit that focuses on the integration of African Americans into the U.S. Armed forces during World War II. Utilizes primary sources spanning the years 1938-1945. Provides information and Web site addresses for the documents, discussion questions, and information on assessment. (CMK)

  7. Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). Performance Verification Report: METSAT (S/N 108) AMSU-A1 Receiver Assemblies, P/N 1356429-1 S/N F05 and P/N 1356409-1 S/N F05

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haigh, R.; Krimchansky, S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This is the Performance Verification Report, METSAT (S/N 108) AMSU-A1 Receiver Assemblies P/N 1356429-1 S/N F05 and P/N 1356409-1 S/N F05, for the Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). The ATP for the AMSU-A Receiver Subsystem, AE-26002/6A, is prepared to describe in detail the configuration of the test setups and the procedures of the tests to verify that the receiver subsystem meets the specifications as required either in the AMSU-A Instrument Performance and Operation Specifications, S-480-80, or in AMSU-A Receiver Subsystem Specifications, AE-26608, derived by the Aerojet System Engineering. Test results that verify the conformance to the specifications demonstrate the acceptability of that particular receiver subsystem.

  8. A Developmental Study of Shape Integration Over Space and Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enns, James T.; Girgus, Joan S.

    1986-01-01

    Three experiments with observers aged 6 to 21 years of age examined the integration of shape information over successive glances. Results indicated age-related improvements in the sequential integration of shape information, both when integration occurs through successive glimpses over space and when information is separated only in time. (HOD)

  9. Integrated method for chaotic time series analysis

    DOEpatents

    Hively, L.M.; Ng, E.G.

    1998-09-29

    Methods and apparatus for automatically detecting differences between similar but different states in a nonlinear process monitor nonlinear data are disclosed. Steps include: acquiring the data; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; and determining by comparison whether differences between similar but different states are indicated. 8 figs.

  10. Integrated method for chaotic time series analysis

    DOEpatents

    Hively, Lee M.; Ng, Esmond G.

    1998-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for automatically detecting differences between similar but different states in a nonlinear process monitor nonlinear data. Steps include: acquiring the data; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; and determining by comparison whether differences between similar but different states are indicated.

  11. Calculation of plantar pressure time integral, an alternative approach.

    PubMed

    Melai, Tom; IJzerman, T Herman; Schaper, Nicolaas C; de Lange, Ton L H; Willems, Paul J B; Meijer, Kenneth; Lieverse, Aloysius G; Savelberg, Hans H C M

    2011-07-01

    In plantar pressure measurement, both peak pressure and pressure time integral are used as variables to assess plantar loading. However, pressure time integral shows a high concordance with peak pressure. Many researchers and clinicians use Novel software (Novel GmbH Inc., Munich, Germany) that calculates this variable as the summation of the products of peak pressure and duration per time sample, which is not a genuine integral of pressure over time. Therefore, an alternative calculation method was introduced. The aim of this study was to explore the relevance of this alternative method, in different populations. Plantar pressure variables were measured in 76 people with diabetic polyneuropathy, 33 diabetic controls without polyneuropathy and 19 healthy subjects. Peak pressure and pressure time integral were obtained using Novel software. The quotient of the genuine force time integral over contact area was obtained as the alternative pressure time integral calculation. This new alternative method correlated less with peak pressure than the pressure time integral as calculated by Novel. The two methods differed significantly and these differences varied between the foot sole areas and between groups. The largest differences were found under the metatarsal heads in the group with diabetic polyneuropathy. From a theoretical perspective, the alternative approach provides a more valid calculation of the pressure time integral. In addition, this study showed that the alternative calculation is of added value, along peak pressure calculation, to interpret adapted plantar pressures patterns in particular in patients at risk for foot ulceration.

  12. Optimization Integrator for Large Time Steps.

    PubMed

    Gast, Theodore F; Schroeder, Craig; Stomakhin, Alexey; Jiang, Chenfanfu; Teran, Joseph M

    2015-10-01

    Practical time steps in today's state-of-the-art simulators typically rely on Newton's method to solve large systems of nonlinear equations. In practice, this works well for small time steps but is unreliable at large time steps at or near the frame rate, particularly for difficult or stiff simulations. We show that recasting backward Euler as a minimization problem allows Newton's method to be stabilized by standard optimization techniques with some novel improvements of our own. The resulting solver is capable of solving even the toughest simulations at the [Formula: see text] frame rate and beyond. We show how simple collisions can be incorporated directly into the solver through constrained minimization without sacrificing efficiency. We also present novel penalty collision formulations for self collisions and collisions against scripted bodies designed for the unique demands of this solver. Finally, we show that these techniques improve the behavior of Material Point Method (MPM) simulations by recasting it as an optimization problem.

  13. Finite difference schemes for long-time integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haras, Zigo; Taasan, Shlomo

    1993-01-01

    Finite difference schemes for the evaluation of first and second derivatives are presented. These second order compact schemes were designed for long-time integration of evolution equations by solving a quadratic constrained minimization problem. The quadratic cost function measures the global truncation error while taking into account the initial data. The resulting schemes are applicable for integration times fourfold, or more, longer than similar previously studied schemes. A similar approach was used to obtain improved integration schemes.

  14. Ubiquitous time variability of integrated stellar populations.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Charlie; van Dokkum, Pieter G; Choi, Jieun

    2015-11-26

    Long-period variable stars arise in the final stages of the asymptotic giant branch phase of stellar evolution. They have periods of up to about 1,000 days and amplitudes that can exceed a factor of three in the I-band flux. These stars pulsate predominantly in their fundamental mode, which is a function of mass and radius, and so the pulsation periods are sensitive to the age of the underlying stellar population. The overall number of long-period variables in a population is directly related to their lifetimes, which is difficult to predict from first principles because of uncertainties associated with stellar mass-loss and convective mixing. The time variability of these stars has not previously been taken into account when modelling the spectral energy distributions of galaxies. Here we construct time-dependent stellar population models that include the effects of long-period variable stars, and report the ubiquitous detection of this expected 'pixel shimmer' in the massive metal-rich galaxy M87. The pixel light curves display a variety of behaviours. The observed variation of 0.1 to 1 per cent is very well matched to the predictions of our models. The data provide a strong constraint on the properties of variable stars in an old and metal-rich stellar population, and we infer that the lifetime of long-period variables in M87 is shorter by approximately 30 per cent compared to predictions from the latest stellar evolution models.

  15. A long time low drift integrator with temperature control.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Donglai; Yan, Xiaolan; Zhang, Enchao; Pan, Shimin

    2016-10-01

    The output of an operational amplifier always contains signals that could not have been predicted, even with knowledge of the input and an accurately determined closed-loop transfer function. These signals lead to integrator zero-drift over time. A new type of integrator system with a long-term low-drift characteristic has therefore been designed. The integrator system is composed of a temperature control module and an integrator module. The aluminum printed circuit board of the integrator is glued to a thermoelectric cooler to maintain the electronic components at a stable temperature. The integration drift is automatically compensated using an analog-to-digital converter/proportional integration/digital-to-analog converter control circuit. Performance testing in a standard magnet shows that the proposed integrator, which has an integration time constant of 10 ms, has a low integration drift (<5 mV) over 1000 s after repeated measurements. The integrator can be used for magnetic flux measurements in most tokamaks and in the wire rope nondestructive test.

  16. A long time low drift integrator with temperature control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Donglai; Yan, Xiaolan; Zhang, Enchao; Pan, Shimin

    2016-10-01

    The output of an operational amplifier always contains signals that could not have been predicted, even with knowledge of the input and an accurately determined closed-loop transfer function. These signals lead to integrator zero-drift over time. A new type of integrator system with a long-term low-drift characteristic has therefore been designed. The integrator system is composed of a temperature control module and an integrator module. The aluminum printed circuit board of the integrator is glued to a thermoelectric cooler to maintain the electronic components at a stable temperature. The integration drift is automatically compensated using an analog-to-digital converter/proportional integration/digital-to-analog converter control circuit. Performance testing in a standard magnet shows that the proposed integrator, which has an integration time constant of 10 ms, has a low integration drift (<5 mV) over 1000 s after repeated measurements. The integrator can be used for magnetic flux measurements in most tokamaks and in the wire rope nondestructive test.

  17. GaAs-based photorefractive time-integrating correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Duncan T. H.; Luke, Keung L.; Cheng, Li-Jen

    1992-01-01

    A potential application of the photorefractive time-integrating correlator is the real-time radar jamming interference rejection system, using the adaptive filter method; a fast photorefractive crystal is needed for adapting a rapidly changing jamming signal. An effort is presently made to demonstrate and characterize a GaAs-based photorefractive time-integrating correlator, since GaAs crystals are 2-3 orders of magnitude faster than most other alternatives.

  18. The Time Course of Anticipatory Constraint Integration

    PubMed Central

    Kukona, Anuenue; Fang, Shin-Yi; Aicher, Karen A.; Chen, Helen; Magnuson, James S.

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that as listeners hear sentences describing events in a scene, their eye movements anticipate upcoming linguistic items predicted by the unfolding relationship between scene and sentence. While this may reflect active prediction based on structural or contextual expectations, the influence of local thematic priming between words has not been fully examined. In Experiment 1, we presented verbs (e.g., arrest) in active (Subject-Verb-Object) sentences with displays containing verb-related patients (e.g., crook) and agents (e.g., policeman). We examined patient and agent fixations following the verb, after the agent role had been filled by another entity, but prior to bottom-up specification of the object. Participants were nearly as likely to fixate agents “anticipatorily” as patients, even though the agent role was already filled. However, the slight patient advantage suggested simultaneous influences of both local priming and active prediction. In Experiment 2, using passives (Object-Verb-Subject), we found stronger, but still graded influences of role prediction when more time elapsed between verb and target, and more syntactic cues were available. We interpret anticipatory fixations as emerging from constraint-based processes that involve both non-predictive thematic priming and active prediction. PMID:21237450

  19. A Compact Bulk Acousto-Optic Time Integrating Correlator.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    AD-A156 668 A COMPACT BULK ACOUSTO - OPTIC TIME INTEGRATING 1/1 CORRELATOR(U) ELECTRONICS RESEARCH LAB ADELAIDE (AUSTRALIA) D A FOGG NOV 84 ERL-9323-TR...DEFENCE RESEARCH CENTRE SALISBURY SOUTH AUSTRALIA TECHNICAL REPORT ER L-0323-TR A COMPACT BULK ACOUSTO - OPTIC TIME INTEGRATING CORRELATOR D.A.B. FOGG...LABORATORY TECHNICAL REPORT ERL-0323-TR A COMPACT BULK ACOUSTO - OPTIC TIME INTEGRATING CORRELATOR D.A.B. Fogg SUMMARY This report describes the design and

  20. Higher order time integration methods for two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kees, Christopher E.; Miller, Cass T.

    Time integration methods that adapt in both the order of approximation and time step have been shown to provide efficient solutions to Richards' equation. In this work, we extend the same method of lines approach to solve a set of two-phase flow formulations and address some mass conservation issues from the previous work. We analyze these formulations and the nonlinear systems that result from applying the integration methods, placing particular emphasis on their index, range of applicability, and mass conservation characteristics. We conduct numerical experiments to study the behavior of the numerical models for three test problems. We demonstrate that higher order integration in time is more efficient than standard low-order methods for a variety of practical grids and integration tolerances, that the adaptive scheme successfully varies the step size in response to changing conditions, and that mass balance can be maintained efficiently using variable-order integration and an appropriately chosen numerical model formulation.

  1. Transit light curves with finite integration time: Fisher information analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Ellen M.; Rogers, Leslie A.

    2014-10-10

    Kepler has revolutionized the study of transiting planets with its unprecedented photometric precision on more than 150,000 target stars. Most of the transiting planet candidates detected by Kepler have been observed as long-cadence targets with 30 minute integration times, and the upcoming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite will record full frame images with a similar integration time. Integrations of 30 minutes affect the transit shape, particularly for small planets and in cases of low signal to noise. Using the Fisher information matrix technique, we derive analytic approximations for the variances and covariances on the transit parameters obtained from fitting light curve photometry collected with a finite integration time. We find that binning the light curve can significantly increase the uncertainties and covariances on the inferred parameters when comparing scenarios with constant total signal to noise (constant total integration time in the absence of read noise). Uncertainties on the transit ingress/egress time increase by a factor of 34 for Earth-size planets and 3.4 for Jupiter-size planets around Sun-like stars for integration times of 30 minutes compared to instantaneously sampled light curves. Similarly, uncertainties on the mid-transit time for Earth and Jupiter-size planets increase by factors of 3.9 and 1.4. Uncertainties on the transit depth are largely unaffected by finite integration times. While correlations among the transit depth, ingress duration, and transit duration all increase in magnitude with longer integration times, the mid-transit time remains uncorrelated with the other parameters. We provide code in Python and Mathematica for predicting the variances and covariances at www.its.caltech.edu/∼eprice.

  2. Exponential Methods for the Time Integration of Schroedinger Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Cano, B.; Gonzalez-Pachon, A.

    2010-09-30

    We consider exponential methods of second order in time in order to integrate the cubic nonlinear Schroedinger equation. We are interested in taking profit of the special structure of this equation. Therefore, we look at symmetry, symplecticity and approximation of invariants of the proposed methods. That will allow to integrate till long times with reasonable accuracy. Computational efficiency is also our aim. Therefore, we make numerical computations in order to compare the methods considered and so as to conclude that explicit Lawson schemes projected on the norm of the solution are an efficient tool to integrate this equation.

  3. Designing for Knowledge Integration: The Impact of Instructional Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Douglas; Linn, Marcia C.

    2003-01-01

    Science educators face constant tradeoffs between allocating time to important topics and including more topics in the curriculum. We study 3,000 students experiencing 4 increasingly streamlined versions of a computer-enhanced middle school thermodynamics curriculum to investigate the impact of instructional time on knowledge integration.…

  4. Time perception impairs sensory-motor integration in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Marina; Chaves, Fernanda; Teixeira, Silmar; Carvalho, Diana; Peressutti, Caroline; Bittencourt, Juliana; Velasques, Bruna; Menéndez-González, Manuel; Cagy, Mauricio; Piedade, Roberto; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Machado, Sergio; Ribeiro, Pedro; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2013-10-16

    It is well known that perception and estimation of time are fundamental for the relationship between humans and their environment. However, this temporal information processing is inefficient in patients with Parkinson' disease (PD), resulting in temporal judgment deficits. In general, the pathophysiology of PD has been described as a dysfunction in the basal ganglia, which is a multisensory integration station. Thus, a deficit in the sensorimotor integration process could explain many of the Parkinson symptoms, such as changes in time perception. This physiological distortion may be better understood if we analyze the neurobiological model of interval timing, expressed within the conceptual framework of a traditional information-processing model called "Scalar Expectancy Theory". Therefore, in this review we discuss the pathophysiology and sensorimotor integration process in PD, the theories and neural basic mechanisms involved in temporal processing, and the main clinical findings about the impact of time perception in PD.

  5. Long-term planetary integration with individual time steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Prasenjit; Tremaine, Scott

    1994-11-01

    We describe an algorithm for long-term planetary orbit integrations, including the dominant post-Newtonian effects, that employs individual time steps for each planet. The algorithm is symplectic and exhibits short-term errors that are O(epsilon(Omega2)(tau 2) where tau is the time step, Omega is a typical orbital frequency, and epsilon much less than 1 is a typical planetary mass in solar units. By a special starting procedure long-term errors over an integration interval T can be reduced to O(epsilon2(Omega3)(tau2)T. A sample 0.8 Myr integration of the nine planets illustrates that Pluto can have a time step more than 100 times Mercury's, without dominating the positional error. Our algorithm is applicable to other N-body systems.

  6. Single-shot photonic time-intensity integration based on a time-spectrum convolution system.

    PubMed

    Malacarne, Antonio; Ashrafi, Reza; Li, Ming; LaRochelle, Sophie; Yao, Jianping; Azaña, José

    2012-04-15

    Real-time and single-shot ultra-fast photonic time-intensity integration of arbitrary temporal waveforms is proposed and demonstrated. The intensity-integration concept is based on a time-spectrum convolution system, where the use of a multi-wavelength laser with a flat envelope, employed as the incoherent broadband source, enables single-shot operation. The experimental implementation is based on optical intensity modulation of the multi-wavelength laser with the input waveform, followed by linear dispersion. In particular, photonic temporal intensity integration with a processing bandwidth of 36.8 GHz over an integration time window of 1.24 ns is verified by experimentally measuring the integration of an ultra-short microwave pulse and an arbitrary microwave waveform.

  7. ARTEMIS: Ares Real Time Environments for Modeling, Integration, and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Ryan; Walker, David

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of ARTEMIS in the development and testing of the ARES launch vehicles. Ares Real Time Environment for Modeling, Simulation and Integration (ARTEMIS) is the real time simulation supporting Ares I hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) testing. ARTEMIS accurately models all Ares/Orion/Ground subsystems which interact with Ares avionics components from pre-launch through orbit insertion The ARTEMIS System integration Lab, and the STIF architecture is reviewed. The functional components of ARTEMIS are outlined. An overview of the models and a block diagram is presented.

  8. Integration time in space experiments to test the equivalence principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobili, A. M.; Pegna, R.; Shao, M.; Turyshev, S. G.; Catastini, G.; Anselmi, A.; Spero, R.; Doravari, S.; Comandi, G. L.; Lucchesi, D. M.; De Michele, A.

    2014-02-01

    The integration time required by space experiments to perform high accuracy tests of the universality of free fall and the weak equivalence principle is a crucial issue. It is inversely proportional to the square of the acceleration to be measured, which is extremely small; the duration of the mission is a severe limitation and experiments in space lack repeatability. An exceedingly long integration time can therefore rule out a mission target. We have evaluated the integration time due to thermal noise from gas damping, Johnson noise and eddy currents—which are independent of the signal frequency—and to internal damping, which is known to decrease with increasing frequency. It is found that at low frequencies thermal noise from internal damping dominates. In the "Galileo Galilei" proposed space experiment to test the equivalence principle to 10-17 the rapid rotation of the satellite (1 Hz) up-converts the signal to a frequency region where thermal noise from internal damping is lower than gas damping and only a factor 2 higher than Johnson noise, with a total integration time of 2.4 to 3.5 hours even in a very conservative estimate. With an adequate readout and additional care in reducing systematics the test could be improved by another order of magnitude, close to 10-18, requiring a hundred times longer—still affordable—integration time of 10 to 14.6 days. μSCOPE, a similar room temperature mission under construction by the French space agency to be launched in 2015, aims at a 10-15 test with an estimated integration time of 1.4 days. Space tests using cold atoms and atom interferometry have been proposed to be performed on the space station (Q-WEP, to 10-14) and on a dedicated mission (STE-QUEST, to 10-15 like μSCOPE). In this case integration is required in order to reduce single shot noise. European Space Agency funded studies report an integration time of several months and a few years respectively.

  9. Contour Integration over Time: Psychophysical and fMRI Evidence.

    PubMed

    Kuai, Shu-Guang; Li, Wu; Yu, Cong; Kourtzi, Zoe

    2016-05-30

    The brain integrates discrete but collinear stimuli to perceive global contours. Previous contour integration (CI) studies mainly focus on integration over space, and CI is attributed to either V1 long-range connections or contour processing in high-visual areas that top-down modulate V1 responses. Here, we show that CI also occurs over time in a design that minimizes the roles of V1 long-range interactions. We use tilted contours embedded in random orientation noise and moving horizontally behind a fixed vertical slit. Individual contour elements traveling up/down within the slit would be encoded over time by parallel, rather than aligned, V1 neurons. However, we find robust contour detection even when the slit permits only one viewable contour element. Similar to CI over space, CI over time also obeys the rule of collinearity. fMRI evidence shows that while CI over space engages visual areas as early as V1, CI over time mainly engages higher dorsal and ventral visual areas involved in shape processing, as well as posterior parietal regions involved in visual memory that can represent the orientation of temporally integrated contours. These results suggest at least partially dissociable mechanisms for implementing the Gestalt rule of continuity in CI over space and time.

  10. AH-1S communication switch integration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haworth, Loran; Szoboszlay, Zoltan; Shively, Robert; Bick, Frank J.

    1989-01-01

    The C-6533/ARC communication system as installed on the test AH-1E Cobra helicopter was modified to allow discrete radio selection of all aircraft radios at the cyclic radio/intercommunication system switch. The current Cobra-fleet use of the C-6533 system is cumbersome, particularly during low-altitude operations. Operationally, the current system C-6533 configuration and design requires the pilot to estimate when he can safely remove his hand from an active flight control to select radios during low-altitude flight. The pilot must then physically remove his hand from the flight control, look inside the cockpit to select and verify the radio selection and then effect the selected radio transmission by activating the radio/ICS switch on the cyclic. This condition is potentially hazardous, especially during low-level flight at night in degraded weather. To improve pilot performance, communications effectiveness, and safety, manprint principles were utilized in the selection of a design modification. The modified C-6533 design was kept as basic as possible for potential Cobra-fleet modification. The communications system was modified and the design was subsequently flight-tested by the U.S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate and NASA at the NASA Ames Research Center, Mountain View, California. The design modification enables the Cobra pilot to maintain hands-on flight controls while selecting radios during nap-of-the-Earth (NOE) flight without looking inside the cockpit which resulted in reduced pilot workload ratings, better pilot handling quality ratings and increased flight safety for the NOE flight environment.

  11. AH-1S Communication Switch Integration Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    Aircraft Wiring Harnesses Included on the first sheet of the drawing set is the modification to the aircraft wire harness: a. Unsolder wire 1C6533-2B22...the electrical wiring in the interface unit 2.5 hr to modify and fabricate the aircraft wiring harnesses Alternative Designs If all the transmitter...SlA-REAR. " C, CHANGES TO AIRCRAFT WIRING HARNESSES MODIFICATION OF PILOTS COCKPIT: 1.) UNSOLDER WIRE 1C6533-2B22 FROM PIN L OF CONNECTOR 4A3J1

  12. Analysis of a Real-Time Separation Assurance System with Integrated Time-in-Trail Spacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aweiss, Arwa S.; Farrahi, Amir H.; Lauderdale, Todd A.; Thipphavong, Adam S.; Lee, Chu H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation and analysis of an integrated ground-based separation assurance and time-based metering prototype system into the Center-TRACON Automation System. The integration of this new capability accommodates constraints in four-dimensions: position (x-y), altitude, and meter-fix crossing time. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of the integrated system and its ability to handle traffic levels up to twice that of today. Results suggest that the integrated system reduces the number and magnitude of time-in-trail spacing violations. This benefit was achieved without adversely affecting the resolution success rate of the system. Also, the data suggest that the integrated system is relatively insensitive to an increase in traffic of twice the current levels.

  13. Orientation, Evaluation, and Integration of Part-Time Nursing Faculty.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Joanne S

    2015-07-10

    This study helps to quantify and describe orientation, evaluation, and integration practices pertaining to part-time clinical nursing faculty teaching in prelicensure nursing education programs. A researcher designed Web-based survey was used to collect information from a convenience sample of part-time clinical nursing faculty teaching in prelicensure nursing programs. Survey questions focused on the amount and type of orientation, evaluation, and integration practices. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze results. Respondents reported on average four hours of orientation, with close to half reporting no more than two hours. Evaluative feedback was received much more often from students than from full-time faculty. Most respondents reported receiving some degree of mentoring and that it was easy to get help from full-time faculty. Respondents reported being most informed about student evaluation procedures, grading, and the steps to take when students are not meeting course objectives, and less informed about changes to ongoing curriculum and policy.

  14. A general time element for orbit integration in Cartesian coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janin, G.; Bond, V. R.

    1981-01-01

    Two techniques are discussed for increasing the accuracy of the numerical integration of eccentric orbits in Cartesian coordinates. One involves the use of an independent variable different from time; this increases the efficiency of the numerical integration. The other uses a time element, which reduces the in-track error. A general expression is given of a time element valid for an arbitrary independent variable. It is pointed out that this time element makes it possible to switch the independent variable merely by applying a scaling factor; there is no need to change the differential equations of the motion. Eccentric, true, and elliptic anomalies are used as independent variables in the case of a transfer orbit for a geosynchronous orbit. The elliptic anomaly is shown to perform much better than the other classical anomalies.

  15. The Weight of Time: Affordances for an Integrated Magnitude System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Aitao; Mo, Lei; Hodges, Bert H.

    2011-01-01

    In five experiments we explored the effects of weight on time in different action contexts to test the hypothesis that an integrated magnitude system is tuned to affordances. Larger magnitudes generally seem longer; however, Lu and colleagues (2009) found that if numbers were presented as weights in a range heavy enough to affect lifting, the…

  16. Photochemistry of the water dimer: time-dependent quantum wave-packet description of the dynamics at the S1-S0 conical intersection.

    PubMed

    Chmura, Bartosz; Lan, Zhenggang; Rode, Michal F; Sobolewski, Andrzej L

    2009-10-07

    The photoinduced electron-driven proton-transfer dynamics of the water-dimer system has been investigated by time-dependent quantum wave-packet calculations. The main nuclear degrees of freedom driving the system from the Frank-Condon region to the S(0)-S(1) conical intersection are the distance between the oxygen atoms and the displacement of the hydrogen atom from the oxygen-oxygen bond center. Two important coupling modes have been investigated: Rotation of the H-donating water dangling proton and asymmetric stretching of the H-accepting water dangling protons' O(a)H bonds. Potential energy surfaces of the ground and lowest excited electronic states have been constructed on the basis of ab initio calculations. The time-dependent quantum wave-packet propagation has been employed within the (2 + 1)-dimensional systems for the description of the nonadiabatic dynamics of water dimer. The effects of the initial vibrational state of the system on the electronic population transfer and dissociation dynamics are presented. To approximate the photochemical behavior of water dimer in bulk water, we add a boundary condition into the (2 + 1)-dimensional systems to simulate the existence of water bulk. The results provide insight into the mechanisms of excited state deactivation of the water-dimer system in gas phase and in bulk water through the electron-driven proton-transfer process.

  17. Perioperative time course of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), its tissue inhibitor TIMP-1 & S100B protein in carotid surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Bálint; Woth, Gábor; Mérei, Ákos; Nagy, Lilla; Lantos, János; Menyhei, Gábor; Bogár, Lajos; Mühl, Diána

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Ischaemic stroke is a life burdening disease for which carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is considered a gold standard intervention. Pro-inflammatory markers like matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their inhibitors (TIMPs) and S-100 Beta (S100B) may have a role in the early inflammation and cognitive decline following CEA. This study was aimed to describe the perioperative time courses and correlations between of MMP-9, TIMP-1 and S100B following CEA. Methods: Fifty four patients scheduled for CEA were enrolled. Blood samples were collected at four time points, T1: preoperative, T2: 60 min after cross-clamp release, T3: first postoperative morning, T4: third postoperative morning. Twenty atherosclerotic patients were included as controls. Plasma MMP-9, TIMP-1 and S100B levels were estimated by ELISA. Results: TIMP-1 was decreased significantly in the CEA group (P<0.01). Plasma MMP-9 was elevated and remained elevated from T1-4 in the CEA group (P<0.05) with a marked elevation in T3 compared to T1 (P<0.05). MMP-9/TIMP-1 was elevated in the CEA group and increased further by T2 and T3 (P<0.05). S100B was elevated on T2 and decreased on T3-4 compared to T1. Interpretation & conclusions: Our study provides information on the dynamic changes of MMP-9-TIMP-1 system and S100B in the perioperative period. Preoperative reduction of TIMP-1 might be predictive for shunt requirement but future studies are required for verification. PMID:27121520

  18. PBO Integrated Real-Time Observing Sites at Volcanic Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mencin, D.; Jackson, M.; Borsa, A.; Feaux, K.; Smith, S.

    2009-05-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory, an element of NSF's EarthScope program, has six integrated observatories in Yellowstone and four on Mt St Helens. These observatories consist of some combination of borehole strainmeters, borehole seismometers, GPS, tiltmeters, pore pressure, thermal measurements and meteorological data. Data from all these instruments have highly variable data rates and formats, all synchronized to GPS time which can cause significant congestion of precious communication resources. PBO has been experimenting with integrating these data streams to both maximize efficiency and minimize latency through the use of software that combines the streams, like Antelope, and VPN technologies.

  19. Integrated nanophotonics of parity-time symmetry (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Liang

    2016-09-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetry is a fundamental notion in quantum field theories and opens a new paradigm of non-Hermitian photonics. Instead of counteracting optical losses in integrated photonics, we start from an opposite viewpoint to strategically manipulate optical losses by the concept of PT symmetry. In this talk, I will discuss harnessing PT symmetry using the state-of-the-art integrated nanophotonics technology for novel optoelectronic functionalities. I will present unidirectional reflectionless light transport and coherent light control on a passive silicon platform and effective control of cavity resonant modes for stable lasing actions on an active III-V semiconductor platform.

  20. A general time element using Cartesian coordinates: Eccentric orbit integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janin, G.

    1980-01-01

    A general time element, valid with any arbitrary independent variables, and used with Cartesian coordinates for the integration of the elliptic motion in orbits, is examined. The derivation of the time element from a set of canonical elements of the Delaunay type, developed in the extended phase space, is presented. The application of the method using an example of a transfer orbit for a geosynchronous mission is presented. The eccentric and elliptic anomaly are utilized as the independent variable. The reduction of the in track error resulting from using Cartesian coordinates with the time element is reported.

  1. Practical measures of integrated information for time-series data.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Adam B; Seth, Anil K

    2011-01-20

    A recent measure of 'integrated information', Φ(DM), quantifies the extent to which a system generates more information than the sum of its parts as it transitions between states, possibly reflecting levels of consciousness generated by neural systems. However, Φ(DM) is defined only for discrete Markov systems, which are unusual in biology; as a result, Φ(DM) can rarely be measured in practice. Here, we describe two new measures, Φ(E) and Φ(AR), that overcome these limitations and are easy to apply to time-series data. We use simulations to demonstrate the in-practice applicability of our measures, and to explore their properties. Our results provide new opportunities for examining information integration in real and model systems and carry implications for relations between integrated information, consciousness, and other neurocognitive processes. However, our findings pose challenges for theories that ascribe physical meaning to the measured quantities.

  2. HMC algorithm with multiple time scale integration and mass preconditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbach, C.; Jansen, K.; Shindler, A.; Wenger, U.

    2006-01-01

    We present a variant of the HMC algorithm with mass preconditioning (Hasenbusch acceleration) and multiple time scale integration. We have tested this variant for standard Wilson fermions at β=5.6 and at pion masses ranging from 380 to 680 MeV. We show that in this situation its performance is comparable to the recently proposed HMC variant with domain decomposition as preconditioner. We give an update of the "Berlin Wall" figure, comparing the performance of our variant of the HMC algorithm to other published performance data. Advantages of the HMC algorithm with mass preconditioning and multiple time scale integration are that it is straightforward to implement and can be used in combination with a wide variety of lattice Dirac operators.

  3. Timing Analysis with INTEGRAL: Comparing Different Reconstruction Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinberg, V.; Kreykenboehm, I.; Fuerst, F.; Wilms, J.; Pottschmidt, K.; Bel, M. Cadolle; Rodriquez, J.; Marcu, D. M.; Suchy, S.; Markowitz, A.; Nowak, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    INTEGRAL is one of the few instruments capable of detecting X-rays above 20keV. It is therefore in principle well suited for studying X-ray variability in this regime. Because INTEGRAL uses coded mask instruments for imaging, the reconstruction of light curves of X-ray sources is highly non-trivial. We present results from the comparison of two commonly employed algorithms, which primarily measure flux from mask deconvolution (ii-lc-extract) and from calculating the pixel illuminated fraction (ii-light). Both methods agree well for timescales above about 10 s, the highest time resolution for which image reconstruction is possible. For higher time resolution, ii-light produces meaningful results, although the overall variance of the lightcurves is not preserved.

  4. Real-time Space-time Integration in GIScience and Geography.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Douglas B

    2013-01-01

    Space-time integration has long been the topic of study and speculation in geography. However, in recent years an entirely new form of space-time integration has become possible in GIS and GIScience: real-time space-time integration and interaction. While real-time spatiotemporal data is now being generated almost ubiquitously, and its applications in research and commerce are widespread and rapidly accelerating, the ability to continuously create and interact with fused space-time data in geography and GIScience is a recent phenomenon, made possible by the invention and development of real-time interactive (RTI) GPS/GIS technology and functionality in the late 1980s and early 1990s. This innovation has since functioned as a core change agent in geography, cartography, GIScience and many related fields, profoundly realigning traditional relationships and structures, expanding research horizons, and transforming the ways geographic data is now collected, mapped, modeled, and used, both in geography and in science and society more broadly. Real-time space-time interactive functionality remains today the underlying process generating the current explosion of fused spatiotemporal data, new geographic research initiatives, and myriad geospatial applications in governments, businesses, and society. This essay addresses briefly the development of these real-time space-time functions and capabilities; their impact on geography, cartography, and GIScience; and some implications for how discovery and change can occur in geography and GIScience, and how we might foster continued innovation in these fields.

  5. Real-time Space-time Integration in GIScience and Geography

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Douglas B.

    2013-01-01

    Space-time integration has long been the topic of study and speculation in geography. However, in recent years an entirely new form of space-time integration has become possible in GIS and GIScience: real-time space-time integration and interaction. While real-time spatiotemporal data is now being generated almost ubiquitously, and its applications in research and commerce are widespread and rapidly accelerating, the ability to continuously create and interact with fused space-time data in geography and GIScience is a recent phenomenon, made possible by the invention and development of real-time interactive (RTI) GPS/GIS technology and functionality in the late 1980s and early 1990s. This innovation has since functioned as a core change agent in geography, cartography, GIScience and many related fields, profoundly realigning traditional relationships and structures, expanding research horizons, and transforming the ways geographic data is now collected, mapped, modeled, and used, both in geography and in science and society more broadly. Real-time space-time interactive functionality remains today the underlying process generating the current explosion of fused spatiotemporal data, new geographic research initiatives, and myriad geospatial applications in governments, businesses, and society. This essay addresses briefly the development of these real-time space-time functions and capabilities; their impact on geography, cartography, and GIScience; and some implications for how discovery and change can occur in geography and GIScience, and how we might foster continued innovation in these fields. PMID:24587490

  6. Time-integrated charge asymmetries at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Cheu, E.; /Arizona U.

    2006-10-01

    We have measured the time-integrated charge asymmetries in dimuon events and semileptonic B{sub s} decays. These results are the most precise semileptonic charge asymmetries in B decays to date. We combine these results with measurements from the decay B{sub s} {yields} J/{psi}{phi} to determine the CP-violating phase {phi}{sub s}. They find {phi}{sub s} = -0.56{sub -0.41}{sup +0.44}.

  7. Linearized path integral approach for calculating nonadiabatic time correlation functions.

    PubMed

    Bonella, Sara; Montemayor, Daniel; Coker, David F

    2005-05-10

    We show that quantum time correlation functions including electronically nonadiabatic effects can be computed by using an approach in which their path integral expression is linearized in the difference between forward and backward nuclear paths while the electronic component of the amplitude, represented in the mapping formulation, can be computed exactly, leading to classical-like equations of motion for all degrees of freedom. The efficiency of this approach is demonstrated in some simple model applications.

  8. Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). Performance Verification Report, METSAT (S/N:107) AMSU-A1 Receiver Assemblies: P/N 1356429-1, S/N:F04, P/N 1356409-1,S/N F04

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pines, D.

    1999-01-01

    This is the Performance Verification Report, METSAT (S/N: 107) AMSU-A1 Receiver Assemblies, P/N 1356429-1, SIN: F04, P/N 1356409- 1, S/N: F04, for the Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). The AMSU-A receiver subsystem comprises two separated receiver assemblies; AMSU-A1 and AMSU-A2 (P/N 1356441-1). The AMSU-A1 receiver contains 13 channels and the AMSU-A2 receiver 2 channels. The AMSU-A receiver assembly is further divided into two parts; AMSU-A I - I (P/N 13 5 6429- 1) and AMSU-A 1 -2 (P/N 1356409-1), which contain 9 and 4 channels, respectively. The AMSU-A receiver subsystem is located in between the antenna and signal processing subsystems of the AMSU-A instrument and comprises the RF and IF components from isolators to attenuators. It receives the RF signals from the antenna subsystem, down-converts the RF signals to IF signals, amplifies and defines the IF signals to proper power level and frequency bandwidth as specified for each channel, and inputs the IF signals to the signal processing subsystem. The test reports for the METSAT AMSU-A receiver subsystem are prepared separately for Al and A2 receivers so that each receiver stands alone during integration of instruments into the spacecraft. This test report presents the test data of the N4ETSAT AMSU-A1 Flight Model No. 4 (FM-4) receiver subsystem. The tests are performed per the Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) for the AMSU-A Receiver Subsystem, AE-26002/6A. The functional performance tests are conducted either at the component or subsystem level. While the component-level tests are performed over the entire operating temperature range predicted by thermal analysis, most subsystem-level tests are conducted at ambient temperature only. Key performances (bandpass characteristics and noise figure) of the receiver subsystem are verified over the operating temperature.

  9. Hamiltonian time integrators for Vlasov-Maxwell equations

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yang; Xiao, Jianyuan; Zhang, Ruili; Liu, Jian; Qin, Hong; Sun, Yajuan

    2015-12-15

    Hamiltonian time integrators for the Vlasov-Maxwell equations are developed by a Hamiltonian splitting technique. The Hamiltonian functional is split into five parts, which produces five exactly solvable subsystems. Each subsystem is a Hamiltonian system equipped with the Morrison-Marsden-Weinstein Poisson bracket. Compositions of the exact solutions provide Poisson structure preserving/Hamiltonian methods of arbitrary high order for the Vlasov-Maxwell equations. They are then accurate and conservative over a long time because of the Poisson-preserving nature.

  10. Hamiltonian time integrators for Vlasov-Maxwell equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yang; Qin, Hong; Sun, Yajuan; Xiao, Jianyuan; Zhang, Ruili; Liu, Jian

    2015-12-01

    Hamiltonian time integrators for the Vlasov-Maxwell equations are developed by a Hamiltonian splitting technique. The Hamiltonian functional is split into five parts, which produces five exactly solvable subsystems. Each subsystem is a Hamiltonian system equipped with the Morrison-Marsden-Weinstein Poisson bracket. Compositions of the exact solutions provide Poisson structure preserving/Hamiltonian methods of arbitrary high order for the Vlasov-Maxwell equations. They are then accurate and conservative over a long time because of the Poisson-preserving nature.

  11. Integration of Real-Time Data Into Building Automation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mark J. Stunder; Perry Sebastian; Brenda A. Chube; Michael D. Koontz

    2003-04-16

    The project goal was to investigate the possibility of using predictive real-time information from the Internet as an input to building management system algorithms. The objectives were to identify the types of information most valuable to commercial and residential building owners, managers, and system designers. To comprehensively investigate and document currently available electronic real-time information suitable for use in building management systems. Verify the reliability of the information and recommend accreditation methods for data and providers. Assess methodologies to automatically retrieve and utilize the information. Characterize equipment required to implement automated integration. Demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of using the information in building management systems. Identify evolutionary control strategies.

  12. Voyages Through Time: Integrated science for high schools, Pamela Harman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harman, Pamela; Devore, Edna

    Investigating the origin and evolution of the universe and life is a compelling theme for teaching science. It engages students in the key questions about change and the evidence for change over time, and offers a unifying theme for integrated science. "Voyages Through Time" is a high school integrated science curriculum on the theme of evolution. Six modules comprise the year-long course: Cosmic Evolution, Planetary Evolution, Origin of Life, Evolution of Life, and Evolution of Technology. A brief overview of the curriculum is presented. Participants conduct one or two activities representative of the six modules. Each workshop participant receives a sampler CD-ROM with a comprehensive overview of the curriculum, standards, and resources including complete lessons for use in the classroom. "Voyages Through Time" is being developed by a US team of scientists, educators, writers, and classroom teachers and students led by the SETI Institute partnered with NASA Ames Research Center, California Academy of Sciences and San Francisco State University. In 2000-2001 school year, "Voyages Through Time" was pilot tested (trialed) in high school classrooms in the San Francisco Bay Area, California. Following revisions, the curriculum was field tested (trialed) in 28 US states in more than 90 schools August 2001-June 2002. The final version is expected to be ready for publication by the beginning of 2003. "Voyages Through Time" is funded by the National Science Foundation (IMD # 9730693), NASA Astrobiology Institute, NASA Fundamental Biology, The Foundation for Microbiology, Educate America, and the Hewlett-Packard Company.

  13. On noise in time-delay integration CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levski, Deyan; Choubey, Bhaskar

    2016-05-01

    Time delay integration sensors are of increasing interest in CMOS processes owing to their low cost, power and ability to integrate with other circuit readout blocks. This paper presents an analysis of the noise contributors in current day CMOS Time-Delay-Integration image sensors with various readout architectures. An analysis of charge versus voltage domain readout modes is presented, followed by a noise classification of the existing Analog Accumulator Readout (AAR) and Digital Accumulator Readout (DAR) schemes for TDI imaging. The analysis and classification of existing readout schemes include, pipelined charge transfer, buffered direct injection, voltage as well as current-mode analog accumulators and all-digital accumulator techniques. Time-Delay-Integration imaging modes in CMOS processes typically use an N-number of readout steps, equivalent to the number of TDI pixel stages. In CMOS TDI sensors, where voltage domain readout is used, the requirements over speed and noise of the ADC readout chain are increased due to accumulation of the dominant voltage readout and ADC noise with every stage N. Until this day, the latter is the primary reason for a leap-back of CMOS TDI sensors as compared to their CCD counterparts. Moreover, most commercial CMOS TDI implementations are still based on a charge-domain readout, mimicking a CCD-like operation mode. Thus, having a good understanding of each noise contributor in the signal chain, as well as its magnitude in different readout architectures, is vital for the design of future generation low-noise CMOS TDI image sensors based on a voltage domain readout. This paper gives a quantitative classification of all major noise sources for all popular implementations in the literature.

  14. Plasticity and tuning of the time course of analog persistent firing in a neural integrator

    PubMed Central

    Major, Guy; Baker, Robert; Aksay, Emre; Seung, H. Sebastian; Tank, David W.

    2004-01-01

    In a companion paper, we reported that the goldfish oculomotor neural integrator could be trained to instability or leak by rotating the visual surround with a velocity proportional to +/- horizontal eye position, respectively. Here we analyze changes in the firing rate behavior of neurons in area I in the caudal brainstem, a central component of the oculomotor neural integrator. Persistent firing could be detuned to instability and leak, respectively, along with fixation behavior. Prolonged training could reduce the time constant of persistent firing of some cells by more than an order of magnitude, to <1 s. Normal visual feedback gradually retuned persistent firing of integrator neurons toward stability, along with fixation behavior. In animals with unstable fixations, approximately half of the eye position-related cells had upward or unstable firing rate drift. In animals with leaky fixations, two-thirds of the eye position-related cells showed leaky firing drift. The remaining eye position-related cells, generally those with lower eye position thresholds, showed a more complex pattern of history-dependent/predictive firing rate drift in relation to eye drift. These complex drift cells often showed a drop in maximum persistent firing rate after training to leak. Despite this diversity, firing drift and the degree of instability or leak in firing rates were broadly correlated with fixation performance. The presence, strength, and reversibility of this plasticity demonstrate that, in this system, visual feedback plays a vital role in gradually tuning the time course of persistent neural firing. PMID:15136747

  15. Quantum stopping times stochastic integral in the interacting Fock space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yuanbao

    2015-08-01

    Following the ideas of Hudson [J. Funct. Anal. 34(2), 266-281 (1979)] and Parthasarathy and Sinha [Probab. Theory Relat. Fields 73, 317-349 (1987)], we define a quantum stopping time (QST, for short) τ in the interacting Fock space (IFS, for short), Γ, over L2(ℝ+), which is actually a spectral measure in [0, ∞] such that τ([0, t]) is an adapted process. Motivated by Parthasarathy and Sinha [Probab. Theory Relat. Fields 73, 317-349 (1987)] and Applebaum [J. Funct. Anal. 65, 273-291 (1986)], we also develop a corresponding quantum stopping time stochastic integral (QSTSI, for abbreviations) on the IFS over a subspace of L2(ℝ+) equipped with a filtration. As an application, such integral provides a useful tool for proving that Γ admits a strong factorisation, i.e., Γ = Γτ] ⊗ Γ[τ, where Γτ] and Γ[τ stand for the part "before τ" and the part "after τ," respectively. Additionally, this integral also gives rise to a natural composition operation among QST to make the space of all QSTs a semigroup.

  16. Quantum stopping times stochastic integral in the interacting Fock space

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yuanbao

    2015-08-15

    Following the ideas of Hudson [J. Funct. Anal. 34(2), 266-281 (1979)] and Parthasarathy and Sinha [Probab. Theory Relat. Fields 73, 317-349 (1987)], we define a quantum stopping time (QST, for short) τ in the interacting Fock space (IFS, for short), Γ, over L{sup 2}(ℝ{sup +}), which is actually a spectral measure in [0, ∞] such that τ([0, t]) is an adapted process. Motivated by Parthasarathy and Sinha [Probab. Theory Relat. Fields 73, 317-349 (1987)] and Applebaum [J. Funct. Anal. 65, 273-291 (1986)], we also develop a corresponding quantum stopping time stochastic integral (QSTSI, for abbreviations) on the IFS over a subspace of L{sup 2}(ℝ{sup +}) equipped with a filtration. As an application, such integral provides a useful tool for proving that Γ admits a strong factorisation, i.e., Γ = Γ{sub τ]} ⊗ Γ{sub [τ}, where Γ{sub τ]} and Γ{sub [τ} stand for the part “before τ” and the part “after τ,” respectively. Additionally, this integral also gives rise to a natural composition operation among QST to make the space of all QSTs a semigroup.

  17. Time to trust: longitudinal integrated clerkships and entrustable professional activities.

    PubMed

    Hirsh, David A; Holmboe, Eric S; ten Cate, Olle

    2014-02-01

    Medical education shaped by the learning sciences can better serve medical students, residents, faculty, health care institutions, and patients. With increasing innovation in undergraduate and graduate medical education and more focused attention on educational principles and how people learn, this era of educational transformation offers promise. Principles manifest in "educational continuity" are informing changes in educational structures and venues and are enriching new discourse in educational pedagogy, assessment, and scholarship. The articles by Myhre and colleagues and Woloschuk and colleagues in this issue, along with mounting evidence preceding these works, should reassure that principle-driven innovation in medical education is not only possible but can be achieved safely. In this commentary, the authors draw from these works and the wider literature on longitudinal integrated educational design. They suggest that the confluences of movements for longitudinal integrated clerkships and entrustable professional activities open new possibilities for other educational and practice advancements in quality and safety. With the advent of competency-based education, explicit milestones, and improved assessment regimens, overseers will increasingly evaluate students, trainees, and other learners on their ability rather than relying solely on time spent in an activity. The authors suggest that, for such oversight to have the most value, assessors and learners need adequate oversight time, and redesign of educational models will serve this operational imperative. As education leaders are reassessing old medical school and training models, rotational blocks, and other barriers to progress, the authors explore the dynamic interplay between longitudinal integrated learning models and entrustment.

  18. Development of Visuo-Auditory Integration in Space and Time

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Monica; Sandini, Giulio; Burr, David

    2012-01-01

    Adults integrate multisensory information optimally (e.g., Ernst and Banks, 2002) while children do not integrate multisensory visual-haptic cues until 8–10 years of age (e.g., Gori et al., 2008). Before that age strong unisensory dominance occurs for size and orientation visual-haptic judgments, possibly reflecting a process of cross-sensory calibration between modalities. It is widely recognized that audition dominates time perception, while vision dominates space perception. Within the framework of the cross-sensory calibration hypothesis, we investigate visual-auditory integration in both space and time with child-friendly spatial and temporal bisection tasks. Unimodal and bimodal (conflictual and not) audio-visual thresholds and PSEs were measured and compared with the Bayesian predictions. In the temporal domain, we found that both in children and adults, audition dominates the bimodal visuo-auditory task both in perceived time and precision thresholds. On the contrary, in the visual-auditory spatial task, children younger than 12 years of age show clear visual dominance (for PSEs), and bimodal thresholds higher than the Bayesian prediction. Only in the adult group did bimodal thresholds become optimal. In agreement with previous studies, our results suggest that also visual-auditory adult-like behavior develops late. We suggest that the visual dominance for space and the auditory dominance for time could reflect a cross-sensory comparison of vision in the spatial visuo-audio task and a cross-sensory comparison of audition in the temporal visuo-audio task. PMID:23060759

  19. Time Triggered Protocol (TTP) for Integration Modular Avionics (IMA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwaltney, David A.; Bauer, Guenther; Jakovljevic, Mirko; Gagea,Leonard; Motzet, Guenter

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation is a review of the Time Triggered Protocol, designed to work with NASA's Integrated Safety-Critical Advanced Avionics Communication and Control (ISAACC) system. ISAACC is the product of the Propulsion High-Impact Avionics Technologies (PHIAT) project at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) during FY03 to the end of FY05. The goal is an avionics architecture suitable for control and monitoring of safety critical systems of manned spacecraft. It must be scalable to allow its use in robotic vehicles or launch pad and propulsion test stand monitoring and control systems. The developed IMA should have: a common power supply and rugged chassis for a set of modules, many upgradeable software functions on one module (i.e. processing unit Reduced weight, straightforward update and system integration. It is also important that it have Partitioning and a Memory Management Unit (MMU)

  20. Time delay and integration detectors using charge transfer devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, D. H.; White, M. H.; Turly, A. P.

    1981-07-01

    An imaging system comprises a multi-channel matrix array of CCD devices wherein a number of sensor cells (pixels) in each channel are subdivided and operated in discrete intercoupled groups of subarrays with a readout CCD shift register terminating each end of the channels. Clock voltages, applied to the subarrays, selectively cause charge signal flow in each subarray in either direction independent of the other subarrays. By selective application of four phase clock voltages, either one, two or all three of the sections subarray sections cause charge signal flow in one direction, while the remainder cause charge signal flow in the opposite direction. This creates a form of selective electronic exposure control which provides an effective variable time delay and integration of three, six or nine sensor cells or integration stages. The device is constructed on a semiconductor sustrate with a buried channel and is adapted for front surface imaging through transparent doped tin oxide gates.

  1. Integrated Project Scheduling and Staff Assignment with Controllable Processing Times

    PubMed Central

    Framinan, Jose M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses a decision problem related to simultaneously scheduling the tasks in a project and assigning the staff to these tasks, taking into account that a task can be performed only by employees with certain skills, and that the length of each task depends on the number of employees assigned. This type of problems usually appears in service companies, where both tasks scheduling and staff assignment are closely related. An integer programming model for the problem is proposed, together with some extensions to cope with different situations. Additionally, the advantages of the controllable processing times approach are compared with the fixed processing times. Due to the complexity of the integrated model, a simple GRASP algorithm is implemented in order to obtain good, approximate solutions in short computation times. PMID:24895672

  2. FLRW cosmology in Weyl-integrable space-time

    SciTech Connect

    Gannouji, Radouane; Nandan, Hemwati; Dadhich, Naresh E-mail: hntheory@yahoo.co.in

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the Weyl space-time extension of general relativity (GR) for studying the FLRW cosmology through focusing and defocusing of the geodesic congruences. We have derived the equations of evolution for expansion, shear and rotation in the Weyl space-time. In particular, we consider the Starobinsky modification, f(R) = R+βR{sup 2}−2Λ, of gravity in the Einstein-Palatini formalism, which turns out to reduce to the Weyl integrable space-time (WIST) with the Weyl vector being a gradient. The modified Raychaudhuri equation takes the form of the Hill-type equation which is then analysed to study the formation of the caustics. In this model, it is possible to have a Big Bang singularity free cyclic Universe but unfortunately the periodicity turns out to be extremely short.

  3. Error and timing analysis of multiple time-step integration methods for molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Guowen; Deng, Yuefan; Glimm, James; Martyna, Glenn

    2007-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of biomolecules performed using multiple time-step integration methods are hampered by resonance instabilities. We analyze the properties of a simple 1D linear system integrated with the symplectic reference system propagator MTS (r-RESPA) technique following earlier work by others. A closed form expression for the time step dependent Hamiltonian which corresponds to r-RESPA integration of the model is derived. This permits us to present an analytic formula for the dependence of the integration accuracy on short-range force cutoff range. A detailed analysis of the force decomposition for the standard Ewald summation method is then given as the Ewald method is a good candidate to achieve high scaling on modern massively parallel machines. We test the new analysis on a realistic system, a protein in water. Under Langevin dynamics with a weak friction coefficient ( ζ=1 ps) to maintain temperature control and using the SHAKE algorithm to freeze out high frequency vibrations, we show that the 5 fs resonance barrier present when all degrees of freedom are unconstrained is postponed to ≈12 fs. An iso-error boundary with respect to the short-range cutoff range and multiple time step size agrees well with the analytical results which are valid due to dominance of the high frequency modes in determining integrator accuracy. Using r-RESPA to treat the long range interactions results in a 6× increase in efficiency for the decomposition described in the text.

  4. Time Step Rescaling Recovers Continuous-Time Dynamical Properties for Discrete-Time Langevin Integration of Nonequilibrium Systems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    When simulating molecular systems using deterministic equations of motion (e.g., Newtonian dynamics), such equations are generally numerically integrated according to a well-developed set of algorithms that share commonly agreed-upon desirable properties. However, for stochastic equations of motion (e.g., Langevin dynamics), there is still broad disagreement over which integration algorithms are most appropriate. While multiple desiderata have been proposed throughout the literature, consensus on which criteria are important is absent, and no published integration scheme satisfies all desiderata simultaneously. Additional nontrivial complications stem from simulating systems driven out of equilibrium using existing stochastic integration schemes in conjunction with recently developed nonequilibrium fluctuation theorems. Here, we examine a family of discrete time integration schemes for Langevin dynamics, assessing how each member satisfies a variety of desiderata that have been enumerated in prior efforts to construct suitable Langevin integrators. We show that the incorporation of a novel time step rescaling in the deterministic updates of position and velocity can correct a number of dynamical defects in these integrators. Finally, we identify a particular splitting (related to the velocity Verlet discretization) that has essentially universally appropriate properties for the simulation of Langevin dynamics for molecular systems in equilibrium, nonequilibrium, and path sampling contexts. PMID:24555448

  5. Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in time varying vacuum model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y. T.; Gui, Y. X.; Xu, L. X.; Lu, J. B.

    2010-04-15

    The integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect is an important implication for dark energy. In this paper, we have calculated the power spectrum of the ISW effect in the time varying vacuum cosmological model, where the model parameter {beta}=4.407 is obtained by the observational constraint of the growth rate. It is found that the source of the ISW effect is not only affected by the different evolutions of the Hubble function H(a) and the dimensionless matter density {Omega}{sub m}(a), but also by the different growth function D{sub +}(a), all of which are changed due to the presence of a matter production term in the time varying vacuum model. However, the difference of the ISW effect in the {Lambda}(t)CDM model and the {Lambda}CDM model is lessened to a certain extent because of the integration from the time of last scattering to the present. It is implied that the observations of the galaxies with high redshift are required to distinguish the two models.

  6. Geometric integrators for multiple time-scale simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Zhidong; Leimkuhler, Ben

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, we review and extend recent research on averaging integrators for multiple time-scale simulation such as are needed for physical N-body problems including molecular dynamics, materials modelling and celestial mechanics. A number of methods have been proposed for direct numerical integration of multiscale problems with special structure, such as the mollified impulse method (Garcia-Archilla, Sanz-Serna and Skeel 1999 SIAM J. Sci. Comput. 20 930-63) and the reversible averaging method (Leimkuhler and Reich 2001 J. Comput. Phys. 171 95-114). Features of problems of interest, such as thermostatted coarse-grained molecular dynamics, require extension of the standard framework. At the same time, in some applications the computation of averages plays a crucial role, but the available methods have deficiencies in this regard. We demonstrate that a new approach based on the introduction of shadow variables, which mirror physical variables, has promised for broadening the usefulness of multiscale methods and enhancing accuracy of or simplifying computation of averages. The shadow variables must be computed from an auxiliary equation. While a geometric integrator in the extended space is possible, in practice we observe enhanced long-term energy behaviour only through use of a variant of the method which controls drift of the shadow variables using dissipation and sacrifices the formal geometric properties such as time-reversibility and volume preservation in the enlarged phase space, stabilizing the corresponding properties in the physical variables. The method is applied to a gravitational three-body problem as well as a partially thermostatted model problem for a dilute gas of diatomic molecules.

  7. Comparison of time integration methods for the evolution of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degraaf, W.

    In the simulation of the evolution of elliptical galaxies, Leap-Frog is currently the most frequently used time integration method. The question is whether other methods perform better than this classical method. Improvements may also be expected from the use of variable step-lengths. We compare Leap-Frog with several other methods, namely: a fourth-order Nystrom method, a symplectic method, and DOPRI-five and eight. DOPRI uses variable steps of its own accord. For the other methods we construct a variable step procedure ourselves. The comparison of the methods is carried out in three Hamiltonian test problems.

  8. Algorithmic properties of the midpoint predictor-corrector time integrator.

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, William J.; Love, Edward; Scovazzi, Guglielmo

    2009-03-01

    Algorithmic properties of the midpoint predictor-corrector time integration algorithm are examined. In the case of a finite number of iterations, the errors in angular momentum conservation and incremental objectivity are controlled by the number of iterations performed. Exact angular momentum conservation and exact incremental objectivity are achieved in the limit of an infinite number of iterations. A complete stability and dispersion analysis of the linearized algorithm is detailed. The main observation is that stability depends critically on the number of iterations performed.

  9. Plant succession as an integrator of contrasting ecological time scales.

    PubMed

    Walker, Lawrence R; Wardle, David A

    2014-09-01

    Ecologists have studied plant succession for over a hundred years, yet our understanding of the nature of this process is incomplete, particularly in relation to its response to new human perturbations and the need to manipulate it during ecological restoration. We demonstrate how plant succession can be understood better when it is placed in the broadest possible temporal context. We further show how plant succession can be central to the development of a framework that integrates a spectrum of ecological processes, which occur over time scales ranging from seconds to millions of years. This novel framework helps us understand the impacts of human perturbations on successional trajectories, ecosystem recovery, and global environmental change.

  10. Linear Time Invariant Models for Integrated Flight and Rotor Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olcer, Fahri Ersel

    2011-12-01

    Recent developments on individual blade control (IBC) and physics based reduced order models of various on-blade control (OBC) actuation concepts are opening up opportunities to explore innovative rotor control strategies for improved rotor aerodynamic performance, reduced vibration and BVI noise, and improved rotor stability, etc. Further, recent developments in computationally efficient algorithms for the extraction of Linear Time Invariant (LTI) models are providing a convenient framework for exploring integrated flight and rotor control, while accounting for the important couplings that exist between body and low frequency rotor response and high frequency rotor response. Formulation of linear time invariant (LTI) models of a nonlinear system about a periodic equilibrium using the harmonic domain representation of LTI model states has been studied in the literature. This thesis presents an alternative method and a computationally efficient scheme for implementation of the developed method for extraction of linear time invariant (LTI) models from a helicopter nonlinear model in forward flight. The fidelity of the extracted LTI models is evaluated using response comparisons between the extracted LTI models and the nonlinear model in both time and frequency domains. Moreover, the fidelity of stability properties is studied through the eigenvalue and eigenvector comparisons between LTI and LTP models by making use of the Floquet Transition Matrix. For time domain evaluations, individual blade control (IBC) and On-Blade Control (OBC) inputs that have been tried in the literature for vibration and noise control studies are used. For frequency domain evaluations, frequency sweep inputs are used to obtain frequency responses of fixed system hub loads to a single blade IBC input. The evaluation results demonstrate the fidelity of the extracted LTI models, and thus, establish the validity of the LTI model extraction process for use in integrated flight and rotor control

  11. Integral ceramic superstructure evaluation using time domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Bradu, Adrian; Topala, Florin I.; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2014-02-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive low coherence interferometry technique that includes several technologies (and the corresponding devices and components), such as illumination and detection, interferometry, scanning, adaptive optics, microscopy and endoscopy. From its large area of applications, we consider in this paper a critical aspect in dentistry - to be investigated with a Time Domain (TD) OCT system. The clinical situation of an edentulous mandible is considered; it can be solved by inserting 2 to 6 implants. On these implants a mesostructure will be manufactured and on it a superstructure is needed. This superstructure can be integral ceramic; in this case materials defects could be trapped inside the ceramic layers and those defects could lead to fractures of the entire superstructure. In this paper we demonstrate that a TD-OCT imaging system has the potential to properly evaluate the presence of the defects inside the ceramic layers and those defects can be fixed before inserting the prosthesis inside the oral cavity. Three integral ceramic superstructures were developed by using a CAD/CAM technology. After the milling, the ceramic layers were applied on the core. All the three samples were evaluated by a TD-OCT system working at 1300 nm. For two of the superstructures evaluated, no defects were found in the most stressed areas. The third superstructure presented four ceramic defects in the mentioned areas. Because of those defects the superstructure may fracture. The integral ceramic prosthesis was send back to the dental laboratory to fix the problems related to the material defects found. Thus, TD-OCT proved to be a valuable method for diagnosing the ceramic defects inside the integral ceramic superstructures in order to prevent fractures at this level.

  12. Decorrelating Clutter Statistics for Long Integration Time SAR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leanza, Antonio; Monti Guarnieri, Andrea; Recchia, Andrea; Broquetas Ibars, Antoni; Ruiz Rodon, Josep

    2015-05-01

    It is presented an experiment aimed to assess and eventually complement the Billingsley Internal Clutter Motion (ICM) model for long integration time SAR imaging. Exploiting a real-aperture rotating antenna Ground-Based RADAR, observations of rural areas in different periods of the year have been performed. The collected data, obtained from two different acquisition modes, have been processed to obtain short-term and long-term clutter de-correlation analysis. The results obtained revealed interesting aspects of the phenomenon. In particular, it can be observed that the process is non-stationary with time, say minutes to hours, and that DC/AC ratio follows a day/night characteristic. Moreover, the results showed values of the AC component decay rate β higher than the foreseen ones in the considered spectral interval, which is quite below the one analyzed in the Billingsley experiment.

  13. Time Triggered Protocol (TTP) for Integrated Modular Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motzet, Guenter; Gwaltney, David A.; Bauer, Guenther; Jakovljevic, Mirko; Gagea, Leonard

    2006-01-01

    Traditional avionics computing systems are federated, with each system provided on a number of dedicated hardware units. Federated applications are physically separated from one another and analysis of the systems is undertaken individually. Integrated Modular Avionics (IMA) takes these federated functions and integrates them on a common computing platform in a tightly deterministic distributed real-time network of computing modules in which the different applications can run. IMA supports different levels of criticality in the same computing resource and provides a platform for implementation of fault tolerance through hardware and application redundancy. Modular implementation has distinct benefits in design, testing and system maintainability. This paper covers the requirements for fault tolerant bus systems used to provide reliable communication between IMA computing modules. An overview of the Time Triggered Protocol (TTP) specification and implementation as a reliable solution for IMA systems is presented. Application examples in aircraft avionics and a development system for future space application are covered. The commercially available TTP controller can be also be implemented in an FPGA and the results from implementation studies are covered. Finally future direction for the application of TTP and related development activities are presented.

  14. Hybrid integrated optic modules for real-time signal processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, C. S.

    1984-01-01

    The most recent progress on four relatively new hybrid integrated optic device modules in LiNbO3 waveguides and one in YIG/GGG waveguide that are currently being studied are discussed. The five hybrid modules include a time-integrating acoustooptic correlator, a channel waveguide acoustooptic frequency shifter/modulator, an electrooptic channel waveguide total internal reflection moculator/switch, an electrooptic analog-to-digital converter using a Fabry-Perot modulator array, and a noncollinear magnetooptic modulator using magnetostatic surface waves. All of these devices possess the desirable characteristics of very large bandwidth (GHz or higher), very small substrate size along the optical path (typically 1.5 cm or less), single-mode optical propagation, and low drive power requirement. The devices utilize either acoustooptic, electrooptic or magnetooptic effects in planar or channel waveguides and, therefore, act as efficient interface devices between a light wave and temporal signals. Major areas of application lie in wideband multichannel optical real-time signal processing and communications. Some of the specific applications include spectral analysis and correlation of radio frequency (RF) signals, fiber-optic sensing, optical computing and multiport switching/routing, and analog-to-digital conversion of wide RF signals.

  15. A unified discontinuous Galerkin framework for time integration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shan; Wei, G W

    2014-05-15

    We introduce a new discontinuous Galerkin approach for time integration. On the basis of the method of weighted residual, numerical quadratures are employed in the finite element time discretization to account for general nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Many different conditions, including explicit, implicit, and symplectic conditions, are enforced for the test functions in the variational analysis to obtain desirable features of the resulting time-stepping scheme. The proposed discontinuous Galerkin approach provides a unified framework to derive various time-stepping schemes, such as low-order one-step methods, Runge-Kutta methods, and multistep methods. On the basis of the proposed framework, several explicit Runge-Kutta methods of different orders are constructed. The derivation of symplectic Runge-Kutta methods has also been realized. The proposed framework allows the optimization of new schemes in terms of several characteristics, such as accuracy, sparseness, and stability. The accuracy optimization is performed on the basis of an analytical form of the error estimation function for a linear test initial value problem. Schemes with higher formal order of accuracy are found to provide more accurate solutions. We have also explored the optimization potential of sparseness, which is related to the general compressive sensing in signal/imaging processing. Two critical dimensions of the stability region, that is, maximal intervals along the imaginary and negative real axes, are employed as the criteria for stability optimization. This gives the largest Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy time steps in solving hyperbolic and parabolic partial differential equations, respectively. Numerical experiments are conducted to validate the optimized time-stepping schemes.

  16. A unified discontinuous Galerkin framework for time integration

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shan; Wei, G. W.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new discontinuous Galerkin approach for time integration. On the basis of the method of weighted residual, numerical quadratures are employed in the finite element time discretization to account for general nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Many different conditions, including explicit, implicit, and symplectic conditions, are enforced for the test functions in the variational analysis to obtain desirable features of the resulting time-stepping scheme. The proposed discontinuous Galerkin approach provides a unified framework to derive various time-stepping schemes, such as low-order one-step methods, Runge–Kutta methods, and multistep methods. On the basis of the proposed framework, several explicit Runge–Kutta methods of different orders are constructed. The derivation of symplectic Runge–Kutta methods has also been realized. The proposed framework allows the optimization of new schemes in terms of several characteristics, such as accuracy, sparseness, and stability. The accuracy optimization is performed on the basis of an analytical form of the error estimation function for a linear test initial value problem. Schemes with higher formal order of accuracy are found to provide more accurate solutions. We have also explored the optimization potential of sparseness, which is related to the general compressive sensing in signal/imaging processing. Two critical dimensions of the stability region, that is, maximal intervals along the imaginary and negative real axes, are employed as the criteria for stability optimization. This gives the largest Courant–Friedrichs–Lewy time steps in solving hyperbolic and parabolic partial differential equations, respectively. Numerical experiments are conducted to validate the optimized time-stepping schemes. PMID:25382889

  17. Time integrative passive sampling: how well do chemcatchers integrate fluctuating pollutant concentrations?

    PubMed

    Shaw, Melanie; Mueller, Jochen F

    2009-03-01

    Many environments are subject to periodic fluctuations in pollutant concentrations. Passive samplers, which can provide time weighted average concentrations integrated over the period of deployment, are ideally suited as monitoring tools for these environments. However, the potential for fluctuating concentrations to limit the integrative period of sampling needs to be investigated before sampling data from these environments can be interpreted with confidence. In this study, Chemcatchers using SDB-RPS Empore disks as the sorbent phase were exposed to herbicides for 28 days in a calibration chamber. A pulsed event of 10-fold greater concentrations was introduced on day 5 and returned to background concentrations over a period of 3 days. Observed uptake was compared with that predicted by a first order uptake model and by the reduced form of this model describing a strictly integrative response for samplers deployed with two surfaces exposed (two-sided naked), with one surface exposed (one-sided naked) and with a polyethersulfone membrane. Membrane covered samplers predicted time weighted average water concentrations within a factor 0.7-1.2 after 28 days exposure, while one- and two-sided naked samplers under predicted the average by a factor 1.9-2.2 and 2.4-3.2, respectively. First order modeling predicted uptake in membrane covered and one-sided naked samplers and was therefore applied to predict sampler response to several fluctuating concentration event scenarios.

  18. What is the right time for path integrals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Eric; Bach, Roger; Batelaan, Herman

    2013-05-01

    The Feynman path integral formulation of quantum mechanics has proven to be a powerful tool for calculations in matter optics. It is natural to introduce the path integral in the context of Young's double slit experiment for matter waves as Feynman did, perhaps after discussing the analogous situation for optics. While intuitive, this approach can lead to a pedagogical misrepresentation of the theory, namely in the phase accumulated along single free-particle trajectories. How is the use of the accumulated phase, 2 πL /λdB , along a path of length L justified? The free-particle action gives a phase that differs by a factor of two. The guiding principle that interference occurs only for two paths that are indistinguishable from one another provides a correct solution: interfering paths must originate and terminate at equal times. We will present several simple thought experiments to illustrate incorrect and correct methods for determining phase shifts. We gratefully acknowledge support from NSF and the DoE GAANN. We thank Ron Cappelletti for interesting discussions.

  19. Orthogonally referenced integrated ensemble for navigation and timing

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Stephen Fulton; Moore, James Anthony

    2014-04-01

    An orthogonally referenced integrated ensemble for navigation and timing includes a dual-polyhedral oscillator array, including an outer sensing array of oscillators and an inner clock array of oscillators situated inside the outer sensing array. The outer sensing array includes a first pair of sensing oscillators situated along a first axis of the outer sensing array, a second pair of sensing oscillators situated along a second axis of the outer sensing array, and a third pair of sensing oscillators situated along a third axis of the outer sensing array. The inner clock array of oscillators includes a first pair of clock oscillators situated along a first axis of the inner clock array, a second pair of clock oscillators situated along a second axis of the inner clock array, and a third pair of clock oscillators situated along a third axis of the inner clock array.

  20. Orthogonally referenced integrated ensemble for navigation and timing

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Stephen Fulton; Moore, James Anthony

    2013-02-26

    An orthogonally referenced integrated ensemble for navigation and timing includes a dual-polyhedral oscillator array, including an outer sensing array of oscillators and an inner clock array of oscillators situated inside the outer sensing array. The outer sensing array includes a first pair of sensing oscillators situated along a first axis of the outer sensing array, a second pair of sensing oscillators situated along a second axis of the outer sensing array, and a third pair of sensing oscillators situated along a third axis of the outer sensing array. The inner clock array of oscillators includes a first pair of clock oscillators situated along a first axis of the inner clock array, a second pair of clock oscillators situated along a second axis of the inner clock array, and a third pair of clock oscillators situated along a third axis of the inner clock array.

  1. Pneumatic oscillator circuits for timing and control of integrated microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Philip N; Nguyen, Transon V; Hui, Elliot E

    2013-11-05

    Frequency references are fundamental to most digital systems, providing the basis for process synchronization, timing of outputs, and waveform synthesis. Recently, there has been growing interest in digital logic systems that are constructed out of microfluidics rather than electronics, as a possible means toward fully integrated laboratory-on-a-chip systems that do not require any external control apparatus. However, the full realization of this goal has not been possible due to the lack of on-chip frequency references, thus requiring timing signals to be provided from off-chip. Although microfluidic oscillators have been demonstrated, there have been no reported efforts to characterize, model, or optimize timing accuracy, which is the fundamental metric of a clock. Here, we report pneumatic ring oscillator circuits built from microfluidic valves and channels. Further, we present a compressible-flow analysis that differs fundamentally from conventional circuit theory, and we show the utility of this physically based model for the optimization of oscillator stability. Finally, we leverage microfluidic clocks to demonstrate circuits for the generation of phase-shifted waveforms, self-driving peristaltic pumps, and frequency division. Thus, pneumatic oscillators can serve as on-chip frequency references for microfluidic digital logic circuits. On-chip clocks and pumps both constitute critical building blocks on the path toward achieving autonomous laboratory-on-a-chip devices.

  2. Efficient Fully Implicit Time Integration Methods for Modeling Cardiac Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Donald J.; Henriquez, Craig S.

    2013-01-01

    Implicit methods are well known to have greater stability than explicit methods for stiff systems, but they often are not used in practice due to perceived computational complexity. This paper applies the Backward Euler method and a second-order one-step two-stage composite backward differentiation formula (C-BDF2) for the monodomain equations arising from mathematically modeling the electrical activity of the heart. The C-BDF2 scheme is an L-stable implicit time integration method and easily implementable. It uses the simplest Forward Euler and Backward Euler methods as fundamental building blocks. The nonlinear system resulting from application of the Backward Euler method for the monodomain equations is solved for the first time by a nonlinear elimination method, which eliminates local and non-symmetric components by using a Jacobian-free Newton solver, called Newton-Krylov solver. Unlike other fully implicit methods proposed for the monodomain equations in the literature, the Jacobian of the global system after the nonlinear elimination has much smaller size, is symmetric and possibly positive definite, which can be solved efficiently by standard optimal solvers. Numerical results are presented demonstrating that the C-BDF2 scheme can yield accurate results with less CPU times than explicit methods for both a single patch and spatially extended domains. PMID:19126449

  3. Challenges of Integrated Modeling Across Space and Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagers, B.; Donchyts, G.; Baart, F.; Schellekens, J.; Winsemius, H.

    2015-12-01

    New data collection methods combined with rapid advances in processing technologies enabled by increases in data processing and storage capabilities are causing an significant shift in our modeling capabilities. Freely available global data sets allow us to build more quickly models for bigger areas. By linking the right data, models, and tools we gain significant insight at scales that hadn't considered possible a few decades ago. However, by increasing the spatial extent of our models, we risk missing regionally important critical elements by limitations of model resolution, processes selected, or blind spots in our big data world. At the same time we are pushing the time scales of our models from events and seasonal scale out to decades, centuries, or millennia to simulate the dynamics of the earth surface under varying external conditions. Also here we simplify and ignore to gain performance to resolve bigger time and space domains; are we including all the relevant elements in our models? These elements are often easy to spot from the right perspective. However, what is that perspective when you try to comprehend the results of baffling integrated global models and the amount of data is overwhelming? At the same time we want to know results with an ever increasing accuracy and detail: Will my house flood? Can we reduce flood risk, increase shipping capacity here, and at the same time reduce the maintenance costs by optimizing our dredging strategy? Can we build a number of interoperable cyberinfrastructures that when combined address all these questions? This presentation gives an overview of our work in this field at Deltares, and the main challenges that we foresee.

  4. Integrating Real-time Earthquakes into Natural Hazard Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlong, K. P.; Benz, H. M.; Whitlock, J. S.; Bittenbinder, A. N.; Bogaert, B. B.

    2001-12-01

    Natural hazard courses are playing an increasingly important role in college and university earth science curricula. Students' intrinsic curiosity about the subject and the potential to make the course relevant to the interests of both science and non-science students make natural hazards courses popular additions to a department's offerings. However, one vital aspect of "real-life" natural hazard management that has not translated well into the classroom is the real-time nature of both events and response. The lack of a way to entrain students into the event/response mode has made implementing such real-time activities into classroom activities problematic. Although a variety of web sites provide near real-time postings of natural hazards, students essentially learn of the event after the fact. This is particularly true for earthquakes and other events with few precursors. As a result, the "time factor" and personal responsibility associated with natural hazard response is lost to the students. We have integrated the real-time aspects of earthquake response into two natural hazard courses at Penn State (a 'general education' course for non-science majors, and an upper-level course for science majors) by implementing a modification of the USGS Earthworm system. The Earthworm Database Management System (E-DBMS) catalogs current global seismic activity. It provides earthquake professionals with real-time email/cell phone alerts of global seismic activity and access to the data for review/revision purposes. We have modified this system so that real-time response can be used to address specific scientific, policy, and social questions in our classes. As a prototype of using the E-DBMS in courses, we have established an Earthworm server at Penn State. This server receives national and global seismic network data and, in turn, transmits the tailored alerts to "on-duty" students (e-mail, pager/cell phone notification). These students are responsible to react to the alarm

  5. Integration time for the perception of depth from motion parallax

    PubMed Central

    Nawrot, Mark; Stroyan, Keith

    2012-01-01

    The perception of depth from relative motion is believed to be a slow process that “builds-up” over a period of observation. However, in the case of motion parallax, the potential accuracy of the depth estimate suffers as the observer translates during the viewing period. Our recent quantitative model for the perception of depth from motion parallax proposes that relative object depth (d) can be determined from retinal image motion (dθ/dt), pursuit eye movement (dα/dt), and fixation distance (f) by the formula: d/f ≈ dθ/dα. Given the model’s dynamics, it is important to know the integration time required by the visual system to recover dα and dθ, and then estimate d. Knowing the minimum integration time reveals the incumbent error in this process. A depth-phase discrimination task was used to determine the time necessary to perceive depth-sign from motion parallax. Observers remained stationary and viewed a briefly translating random-dot motion parallax stimulus. Stimulus duration varied between trials. Fixation on the translating stimulus was monitored and enforced with an eye-tracker. The study found that relative depth discrimination can be performed with presentations as brief as 16.6 msec, with only two stimulus frames providing both retinal image motion and the stimulus window motion for pursuit (mean range = 16.6–33.2 msec). This was found for conditions in which, prior to stimulus presentation, the eye was engaged in ongoing pursuit or the eye was stationary. A large high-contrast masking stimulus disrupted depth-discrimination for stimulus presentations less than 70-75 msec in both pursuit and stationary conditions. This interval might be linked to ocular-following response eye-movement latencies. We conclude that neural mechanisms serving depth from motion parallax generate a depth estimate much more quickly than previously believed. We propose that additional sluggishness might be due to the visual system’s attempt to determine the

  6. Integration time for the perception of depth from motion parallax.

    PubMed

    Nawrot, Mark; Stroyan, Keith

    2012-04-15

    The perception of depth from relative motion is believed to be a slow process that "builds-up" over a period of observation. However, in the case of motion parallax, the potential accuracy of the depth estimate suffers as the observer translates during the viewing period. Our recent quantitative model for the perception of depth from motion parallax proposes that relative object depth (d) can be determined from retinal image motion (dθ/dt), pursuit eye movement (dα/dt), and fixation distance (f) by the formula: d/f≈dθ/dα. Given the model's dynamics, it is important to know the integration time required by the visual system to recover dα and dθ, and then estimate d. Knowing the minimum integration time reveals the incumbent error in this process. A depth-phase discrimination task was used to determine the time necessary to perceive depth-sign from motion parallax. Observers remained stationary and viewed a briefly translating random-dot motion parallax stimulus. Stimulus duration varied between trials. Fixation on the translating stimulus was monitored and enforced with an eye-tracker. The study found that relative depth discrimination can be performed with presentations as brief as 16.6 ms, with only two stimulus frames providing both retinal image motion and the stimulus window motion for pursuit (mean range=16.6-33.2 ms). This was found for conditions in which, prior to stimulus presentation, the eye was engaged in ongoing pursuit or the eye was stationary. A large high-contrast masking stimulus disrupted depth-discrimination for stimulus presentations less than 70-75 ms in both pursuit and stationary conditions. This interval might be linked to ocular-following response eye-movement latencies. We conclude that neural mechanisms serving depth from motion parallax generate a depth estimate much more quickly than previously believed. We propose that additional sluggishness might be due to the visual system's attempt to determine the maximum dθ/dα ratio

  7. Compact time- and space-integrating SAR processor: performance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, Michael W.; Levy, James J.; Michael, Robert R., Jr.; Christensen, Marc P.

    1995-06-01

    Progress made during the previous 12 months toward the fabrication and test of a flight demonstration prototype of the acousto-optic time- and space-integrating real-time SAR image formation processor is reported. Compact, rugged, and low-power analog optical signal processing techniques are used for the most computationally taxing portions of the SAR imaging problem to overcome the size and power consumption limitations of electronic approaches. Flexibility and performance are maintained by the use of digital electronics for the critical low-complexity filter generation and output image processing functions. The results reported for this year include tests of a laboratory version of the RAPID SAR concept on phase history data generated from real SAR high-resolution imagery; a description of the new compact 2D acousto-optic scanner that has a 2D space bandwidth product approaching 106 sports, specified and procured for NEOS Technologies during the last year; and a design and layout of the optical module portion of the flight-worthy prototype.

  8. Testing Gravity Against Early Time Integrated Sachs-Wolfe Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengjie; /Shanghai, Astron. Observ. /Fermilab

    2005-11-01

    A generic prediction of general relativity is that the cosmological linear density growth factor D is scale independent. But in general, modified gravities do not preserve this signature. A scale dependent D can cause time variation in gravitational potential at high redshifts and provides a new cosmological test of gravity, through early time integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect-large scale structure (LSS) cross correlation. We demonstrate the power of this test for a class of f(R) gravity, with the form f(R) = {lambda}{sub 1}H{sub 0}{sup 2} exp(-R/{lambda}{sub 2}H{sub 0}{sup 2}). Such f(R) gravity, even with degenerate expansion history to {Lambda}CDM, can produce detectable ISW effect at z {approx}> 3 and l {approx}> 20. Null-detection of such effect would constrain {lambda}{sub 2} to be {lambda}{sub 2} > 1000 at > 95% confidence level. On the other hand, robust detection of ISW-LSS cross correlation at high z will severely challenge general relativity.

  9. Integrated Planning: Consolidating Annual Facility Planning - More Time for Execution

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, J. G.; R., L. Morton; Ramirez, C.; Morris, P. S.; McSwain, J. T.

    2011-02-02

    Previously, annual planning for Readiness in Technical Base and Facilities (RTBF) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) was fragmented, disconnected, circular, and occurred constantly throughout the fiscal year (FY) comprising 9 of the 12 months, reducing the focus on implementation and execution. This required constant “looking back” instead of “looking forward.” In FY 2009, annual planning was consolidated into one comprehensive integrated plan (IP) for each facility/project, which comprised annual task planning/outyear budgeting, AMPs, and investment planning (i.e., TYIP). In FY 2010, the Risk Management Plans were added to the IPs. The integrated planning process achieved the following: 1) Eliminated fragmented, circular, planning and moved the plan to be more forward-looking; 2) Achieved a 90% reduction in schedule planning timeframe from 40 weeks (9 months) to 6 weeks; 3) Achieved an 80% reduction in cost from just under $1.0M to just over $200K, for a cost savings of nearly $800K (reduced combined effort from over 200 person-weeks to less than 40); 4) Reduced the number of plans generated from 21 plans (1 per facility per plan) per year to 8 plans per year (1 per facility plus 1 program-level IP); 5) Eliminated redundancy in common content between plans and improved consistency and overall quality; 6) Reduced the preparation time and cost of the FY 2010 SEP by 50% due to information provided in the IP; 7) Met the requirements for annual task planning, annual maintenance planning, ten-year investment planning, and risk management plans.

  10. Ephemeral clonal integration in Calathea marantifolia (Marantaceae): Evidence of diminished integration over time.

    PubMed

    Matlaga, David P; da S L Sternberg, Leonel

    2009-02-01

    A major advantage of clonal growth forms is the intergenerational transfer of resources through vascular connections (clonal integration). Connections linking ramets can be persistent or ephemeral. For species with ephemeral connections, whether the extent of clonal integration changes over time is unclear. To address this issue, we tracked water movement using an isotopic label and assessed the demographic performance of parent and offspring ramets over time in a severing experiment. Our study system was the understory herb Calathea marantifolia, which has parent ramets that produce vegetative bulbils (clonal offspring) that pass through distinct pre- and post-rooting stages. Little water was transported between parents and offspring, and the direction of movement was primarily from parent to pre-rooting offspring. Anatomical observations of inter-ramet connections showed that vascular bundles were twice as abundant in parent stems compared to inter-ramet connections. Severing inter-ramet connections reduced the growth of offspring ramets but not parents. Survival of pre-rooting offspring was reduced by 10% due to severing, but post-rooting offspring were not affected. Our results suggest that offspring ramets of C. marantifolia are weaned from their parent as they progress from pre- to post-rooting stages.

  11. 3D Vectorial Time Domain Computational Integrated Photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Kallman, J S; Bond, T C; Koning, J M; Stowell, M L

    2007-02-16

    The design of integrated photonic structures poses considerable challenges. 3D-Time-Domain design tools are fundamental in enabling technologies such as all-optical logic, photonic bandgap sensors, THz imaging, and fast radiation diagnostics. Such technologies are essential to LLNL and WFO sponsors for a broad range of applications: encryption for communications and surveillance sensors (NSA, NAI and IDIV/PAT); high density optical interconnects for high-performance computing (ASCI); high-bandwidth instrumentation for NIF diagnostics; micro-sensor development for weapon miniaturization within the Stockpile Stewardship and DNT programs; and applications within HSO for CBNP detection devices. While there exist a number of photonics simulation tools on the market, they primarily model devices of interest to the communications industry. We saw the need to extend our previous software to match the Laboratory's unique emerging needs. These include modeling novel material effects (such as those of radiation induced carrier concentrations on refractive index) and device configurations (RadTracker bulk optics with radiation induced details, Optical Logic edge emitting lasers with lateral optical inputs). In addition we foresaw significant advantages to expanding our own internal simulation codes: parallel supercomputing could be incorporated from the start, and the simulation source code would be accessible for modification and extension. This work addressed Engineering's Simulation Technology Focus Area, specifically photonics. Problems addressed from the Engineering roadmap of the time included modeling the Auston switch (an important THz source/receiver), modeling Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs, which had been envisioned as part of fast radiation sensors), and multi-scale modeling of optical systems (for a variety of applications). We proposed to develop novel techniques to numerically solve the 3D multi-scale propagation problem for both the microchip

  12. Minimizing the area required for time constants in integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    When a medium- or large-scale integrated circuit is designed, efforts are usually made to avoid the use of resistor-capacitor time constant generators. The capacitor needed for this circuit usually takes up more surface area on the chip than several resistors and transistors. When the use of this network is unavoidable, the designer usually makes an effort to see that the choice of resistor and capacitor combinations is such that a minimum amount of surface area is consumed. The optimum ratio of resistance to capacitance that will result in this minimum area is equal to the ratio of resistance to capacitance which may be obtained from a unit of surface area for the particular process being used. The minimum area required is a function of the square root of the reciprocal of the products of the resistance and capacitance per unit area. This minimum occurs when the area required by the resistor is equal to the area required by the capacitor.

  13. Optimal Real-time Dispatch for Integrated Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Ryan Michael

    2007-05-31

    This report describes the development and application of a dispatch optimization algorithm for integrated energy systems (IES) comprised of on-site cogeneration of heat and electricity, energy storage devices, and demand response opportunities. This work is intended to aid commercial and industrial sites in making use of modern computing power and optimization algorithms to make informed, near-optimal decisions under significant uncertainty and complex objective functions. The optimization algorithm uses a finite set of randomly generated future scenarios to approximate the true, stochastic future; constraints are included that prevent solutions to this approximate problem from deviating from solutions to the actual problem. The algorithm is then expressed as a mixed integer linear program, to which a powerful commercial solver is applied. A case study of United States Postal Service Processing and Distribution Centers (P&DC) in four cities and under three different electricity tariff structures is conducted to (1) determine the added value of optimal control to a cogeneration system over current, heuristic control strategies; (2) determine the value of limited electric load curtailment opportunities, with and without cogeneration; and (3) determine the trade-off between least-cost and least-carbon operations of a cogeneration system. Key results for the P&DC sites studied include (1) in locations where the average electricity and natural gas prices suggest a marginally profitable cogeneration system, optimal control can add up to 67% to the value of the cogeneration system; optimal control adds less value in locations where cogeneration is more clearly profitable; (2) optimal control under real-time pricing is (a) more complicated than under typical time-of-use tariffs and (b) at times necessary to make cogeneration economic at all; (3) limited electric load curtailment opportunities can be more valuable as a compliment to the cogeneration system than alone; and

  14. Neuromuscular fatigue following isometric contractions with similar torque time integral.

    PubMed

    Rozand, V; Cattagni, T; Theurel, J; Martin, A; Lepers, R

    2015-01-01

    Torque time integral (TTI) is the combination of intensity and duration of a contraction. The aim of this study was to compare neuromuscular alterations following different isometric sub-maximal contractions of the knee extensor muscles but with similar TTI. Sixteen participants performed 3 sustained contractions at different intensities (25%, 50%, and 75% of Maximal Voluntary Contraction (MVC) torque) with different durations (68.5±33.4 s, 35.1±16.8 s and 24.8±12.9 s, respectively) but similar TTI value. MVC torque, maximal voluntary activation level (VAL), M-wave characteristics and potentiated doublet amplitude were assessed before and immediately after the sustained contractions. EMG activity of the vastus lateralis (VL) and -rectus femoris (RF) muscles was recorded during the sustained contractions. MVC torque reduction was similar in the 3 conditions after the exercise (-23.4±2.7%). VAL decreased significantly in a similar extent (-3.1±1.3%) after the 3 sustained contractions. Potentiated doublet amplitude was similarly reduced in the 3 conditions (-19.7±1.5%), but VL and RF M-wave amplitudes remained unchanged. EMG activity of VL and RF muscles increased in the same extent during the 3 contractions (VL: 54.5±40.4%; RF: 53.1±48.7%). These results suggest that central and peripheral alterations accounting for muscle fatigue are similar following isometric contractions with similar TTI. TTI should be considered in the exploration of muscle fatigue during sustained isometric contractions.

  15. Source integrals of multipole moments for static space-times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Pastora, J. L.; Martín-Martín, J.; Ruiz, E.

    2016-11-01

    The definition of Komar for the mass of a relativistic source is used as a starting point to introduce volume integrals for relativistic multipole moments. A certain generalisation of the classical Gauss theorem is used to rewrite these multipole moments as integrals over a surface at infinity. It is shown that this generalisation leads to asymptotic relativistic multipole moments, recovering the multipoles of Geroch or Thorne, when the integrals are evaluated in asympotically cartesian harmonic coordinates. Relationships between this result and the Thorne definition and the classical theory of moments are shown.

  16. Design and validation of a novel Cartesian biomechanical testing system with coordinated 6DOF real-time load control: application to the lumbar spine (L1-S, L4-L5).

    PubMed

    Kelly, Brian P; Bennett, Charles R

    2013-07-26

    Robotic methods applied to in-vitro biomechanical testing potentially offer more comprehensive evaluations however, standard position control algorithms make real-time load control problematic. This paper describes and evaluates a novel custom developed Cartesian force controlled biomechanical testing system with coordinated 6 degree of freedom (DOF) real-time load control. A custom developed 6-DOF serial manipulator with cascaded force over position control algorithms was designed, assembled, and programmed. Dial gauge tests assessed accuracy of custom linear axes. Standard test input and tuning procedures refined control performance. Two single motion segment units (L4-L5) and lumbar (L1-S) spine segments were tested under continuous pure moment application in flexion-extension, left-right lateral bending and axial rotation to 8Nm under full 6-DOF load control. Mean load control tracking errors between commanded and experimental loads were computed. Global spinal ranges of motion were compared to previously published values for standard non-robotic protocols. Individual linear and rotational axis position control accuracies were equal to or less than 6.35μm and 0.0167° respectively. Pilot pure bending tests demonstrated stable load control performance, as well as load rates, rotational velocities, and ranges of motion comparable to those for standard non-robotic in-vitro tests. Tracking errors for zero commanded forces and all moment controlled axes were less than 0.81±0.68N and 0.18±0.19Nm over all tests, respectively. The Cartesian based system simplified control application and demonstrated robust position and load control that was not limited to single axis or zero commanded loads. In addition to emulating standard biomechanical tests, the novel Cartesian force controlled testing system developed is a promising tool for biomechanical assessments with coordinated dynamic load application and coupled motion response in 6DOF.

  17. National Ignition Facility sub-system design requirements integrated timing system SSDR 1.5.3

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedwald, J.; Van Aersau, P.; Bliss, E.

    1996-08-26

    This System Design Requirement document establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Integrated Timing System, WBS 1.5.3 which is part of the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS). The Integrated Timing System provides all temporally-critical hardware triggers to components and equipment in other NIF systems.

  18. Photonic temporal integration of broadband intensity waveforms over long operation time windows.

    PubMed

    Asghari, Mohammad H; Park, Yongwoo; Azaña, José

    2011-09-15

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel design for temporal integration of microwave and optical intensity waveforms with combined high processing speed and a long operation time window. It is based on concatenating in series a discrete-time (low-speed) photonic integrator and a high-speed analog time-limited intensity integrator. This scheme is demonstrated here using a cascaded fiber-based interferometers' system (as a passive eight-point discrete-time integrator) and an analog time-limited intensity integrator. The latter is based on temporal intensity modulation of the input waveform with a rectangular-like incoherent energy spectrum followed by linear dispersion. Using this setup, we experimentally achieve accurate time integration of intensity signals with ~36 GHz bandwidths over an operation time window of ~4 ns, corresponding to a processing time-bandwidth product of >144.

  19. Integration of neutron time-of-flight single-crystal Bragg peaks in reciprocal space

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Arthur J; Joergensen, Mads; Wang, Xiaoping; Mikkelson, Ruth L; Mikkelson, Dennis J; Lynch, Vickie E; Peterson, Peter F; Green, Mark L; Hoffmann, Christina

    2014-01-01

    The intensity of single crystal Bragg peaks obtained by mapping neutron time-of-flight event data into reciprocal space and integrating in various ways are compared. These include spherical integration with a fixed radius, ellipsoid fitting and integrating of the peak intensity and one-dimensional peak profile fitting. In comparison to intensities obtained by integrating in real detector histogram space, the data integrated in reciprocal space results in better agreement factors and more accurate atomic parameters. Furthermore, structure refinement using integrated intensities from one-dimensional profile fitting is demonstrated to be more accurate than simple peak-minus-background integration.

  20. Multigrid time-accurate integration of Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnone, Andrea; Liou, Meng-Sing; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1993-01-01

    Efficient acceleration techniques typical of explicit steady-state solvers are extended to time-accurate calculations. Stability restrictions are greatly reduced by means of a fully implicit time discretization. A four-stage Runge-Kutta scheme with local time stepping, residual smoothing, and multigridding is used instead of traditional time-expensive factorizations. Some applications to natural and forced unsteady viscous flows show the capability of the procedure.

  1. Advanced time integration algorithms for dislocation dynamics simulations of work hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sills, Ryan B.; Aghaei, Amin; Cai, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Efficient time integration is a necessity for dislocation dynamics simulations of work hardening to achieve experimentally relevant strains. In this work, an efficient time integration scheme using a high order explicit method with time step subcycling and a newly-developed collision detection algorithm are evaluated. First, time integrator performance is examined for an annihilating Frank-Read source, showing the effects of dislocation line collision. The integrator with subcycling is found to significantly out-perform other integration schemes. The performance of the time integration and collision detection algorithms is then tested in a work hardening simulation. The new algorithms show a 100-fold speed-up relative to traditional schemes. Subcycling is shown to improve efficiency significantly while maintaining an accurate solution, and the new collision algorithm allows an arbitrarily large time step size without missing collisions.

  2. Advanced time integration algorithms for dislocation dynamics simulations of work hardening

    DOE PAGES

    Sills, Ryan B.; Aghaei, Amin; Cai, Wei

    2016-04-25

    Efficient time integration is a necessity for dislocation dynamics simulations of work hardening to achieve experimentally relevant strains. In this work, an efficient time integration scheme using a high order explicit method with time step subcycling and a newly-developed collision detection algorithm are evaluated. First, time integrator performance is examined for an annihilating Frank–Read source, showing the effects of dislocation line collision. The integrator with subcycling is found to significantly out-perform other integration schemes. The performance of the time integration and collision detection algorithms is then tested in a work hardening simulation. The new algorithms show a 100-fold speed-up relativemore » to traditional schemes. As a result, subcycling is shown to improve efficiency significantly while maintaining an accurate solution, and the new collision algorithm allows an arbitrarily large time step size without missing collisions.« less

  3. Advanced time integration algorithms for dislocation dynamics simulations of work hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Sills, Ryan B.; Aghaei, Amin; Cai, Wei

    2016-04-25

    Efficient time integration is a necessity for dislocation dynamics simulations of work hardening to achieve experimentally relevant strains. In this work, an efficient time integration scheme using a high order explicit method with time step subcycling and a newly-developed collision detection algorithm are evaluated. First, time integrator performance is examined for an annihilating Frank–Read source, showing the effects of dislocation line collision. The integrator with subcycling is found to significantly out-perform other integration schemes. The performance of the time integration and collision detection algorithms is then tested in a work hardening simulation. The new algorithms show a 100-fold speed-up relative to traditional schemes. As a result, subcycling is shown to improve efficiency significantly while maintaining an accurate solution, and the new collision algorithm allows an arbitrarily large time step size without missing collisions.

  4. Photonic integrated circuit as a picosecond pulse timing discriminator.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Arthur James; Zhuang, Leimeng

    2016-04-18

    We report the first experimental demonstration of a compact on-chip optical pulse timing discriminator that is able to provide an output voltage proportional to the relative timing of two 60-ps input pulses on separate paths. The output voltage is intrinsically low-pass-filtered, so the discriminator forms an interface between high-speed optics and low-speed electronics. Potential applications include timing synchronization of multiple pulse trains as a precursor for optical time-division multiplexing, and compact rangefinders with millimeter dimensions.

  5. Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). Engineering Test Report: Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A1, S/N 108 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, A.

    2000-01-01

    This is the Engineering Test Report, Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A1 SIN 108, for the Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A).

  6. Data rate management and real time operation: recursive adaptive frame integration of limited data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafailov, Michael K.

    2006-08-01

    Recursive Limited Frame Integration was proposed as a way to improve frame integration performance and mitigate issues related to high data rate needed to support conventional frame integration. The technique uses two thresholds -one tuned for optimum probability of detection, the other to manage required false alarm rate, and places integration process between those thresholds. This configuration allows a non-linear integration process that, along with Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) gain, provides system designers more capability where cost, weight, or power considerations limit system data rate, processing, or memory capability. However, Recursive Frame Integration Limited may have performance issues when single-frame SNR is really low. Recursive Adaptive Limited Frame Integration was proposed as a means to improve limited integration performance with really low single-frame SNR. It combines the benefits of nonlinear recursive limited frame integration and adaptive thresholds with a kind of conventional frame integration. Adding the third threshold may help in managing real time operations. In the paper the Recursive Frame Integration is presented in form of multiple parallel recursive integration. Such an approach can help not only in data rate management but in mitigation of low single frame SNR issue for Recursive Integration as well as in real time operations with frame integration.

  7. Overcoming time-integration errors in SINDA's FWDBCK solution routine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skladany, J. T.; Costello, F. A.

    1984-01-01

    The FWDBCK time step, which is usually chosen intuitively to achieve adequate accuracy at reasonable computational costs, can in fact lead to large errors. NASA observed such errors in solving cryogenic problems on the COBE spacecraft, but a similar error is also demonstrated for a single node radiating to space. An algorithm has been developed for selecting the time step during the course of the simulation. The error incurred when the time derivative is replaced by the FWDBCK time difference can be estimated from the Taylor-Series expression for the temperature. The algorithm selects the time step to keep this error small. The efficacy of the method is demonstrated on the COBE and single-node problems.

  8. Formulation of an explicit-multiple-time-step time integration method for use in a global primitive equation grid model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    With appropriate modifications, a recently proposed explicit-multiple-time-step scheme (EMTSS) is incorporated into the UCLA model. In this scheme, the linearized terms in the governing equations that generate the gravity waves are split into different vertical modes. Each mode is integrated with an optimal time step, and at periodic intervals these modes are recombined. The other terms are integrated with a time step dictated by the CFL condition for low-frequency waves. This large time step requires a special modification of the advective terms in the polar region to maintain stability. Test runs for 72 h show that EMTSS is a stable, efficient and accurate scheme.

  9. Multiple time step integrators in ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Luehr, Nathan; Martínez, Todd J.; Markland, Thomas E.

    2014-02-28

    Multiple time-scale algorithms exploit the natural separation of time-scales in chemical systems to greatly accelerate the efficiency of molecular dynamics simulations. Although the utility of these methods in systems where the interactions are described by empirical potentials is now well established, their application to ab initio molecular dynamics calculations has been limited by difficulties associated with splitting the ab initio potential into fast and slowly varying components. Here we present two schemes that enable efficient time-scale separation in ab initio calculations: one based on fragment decomposition and the other on range separation of the Coulomb operator in the electronic Hamiltonian. We demonstrate for both water clusters and a solvated hydroxide ion that multiple time-scale molecular dynamics allows for outer time steps of 2.5 fs, which are as large as those obtained when such schemes are applied to empirical potentials, while still allowing for bonds to be broken and reformed throughout the dynamics. This permits computational speedups of up to 4.4x, compared to standard Born-Oppenheimer ab initio molecular dynamics with a 0.5 fs time step, while maintaining the same energy conservation and accuracy.

  10. Integrated Formal Analysis of Timed-Triggered Ethernet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutertre, Bruno; Shankar, Nstarajan; Owre, Sam

    2012-01-01

    We present new results related to the verification of the Timed-Triggered Ethernet (TTE) clock synchronization protocol. This work extends previous verification of TTE based on model checking. We identify a suboptimal design choice in a compression function used in clock synchronization, and propose an improvement. We compare the original design and the improved definition using the SAL model checker.

  11. Optimal Perceived Timing: Integrating Sensory Information with Dynamically Updated Expectations

    PubMed Central

    Di Luca, Massimiliano; Rhodes, Darren

    2016-01-01

    The environment has a temporal structure, and knowing when a stimulus will appear translates into increased perceptual performance. Here we investigated how the human brain exploits temporal regularity in stimulus sequences for perception. We find that the timing of stimuli that occasionally deviate from a regularly paced sequence is perceptually distorted. Stimuli presented earlier than expected are perceptually delayed, whereas stimuli presented on time and later than expected are perceptually accelerated. This result suggests that the brain regularizes slightly deviant stimuli with an asymmetry that leads to the perceptual acceleration of expected stimuli. We present a Bayesian model for the combination of dynamically-updated expectations, in the form of a priori probability of encountering future stimuli, with incoming sensory information. The asymmetries in the results are accounted for by the asymmetries in the distributions involved in the computational process. PMID:27385184

  12. Design of time-pulse coded optoelectronic neuronal elements for nonlinear transformation and integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasilenko, Vladimir G.; Nikolsky, Alexander I.; Lazarev, Alexander A.; Lazareva, Maria V.

    2008-03-01

    In the paper the actuality of neurophysiologically motivated neuron arrays with flexibly programmable functions and operations with possibility to select required accuracy and type of nonlinear transformation and learning are shown. We consider neurons design and simulation results of multichannel spatio-time algebraic accumulation - integration of optical signals. Advantages for nonlinear transformation and summation - integration are shown. The offered circuits are simple and can have intellectual properties such as learning and adaptation. The integrator-neuron is based on CMOS current mirrors and comparators. The performance: consumable power - 100...500 μW, signal period- 0.1...1ms, input optical signals power - 0.2...20 μW time delays - less 1μs, the number of optical signals - 2...10, integration time - 10...100 of signal periods, accuracy or integration error - about 1%. Various modifications of the neuron-integrators with improved performance and for different applications are considered in the paper.

  13. Life-history syndromes: integrating dispersal through space and time.

    PubMed

    Buoro, Mathieu; Carlson, Stephanie M

    2014-06-01

    Recent research has highlighted interdependencies between dispersal and other life-history traits, i.e. dispersal syndromes, thereby revealing constraints on the evolution of dispersal and opportunities for improved ability to predict dispersal by considering suites of dispersal-related traits. This review adds to the growing list of life-history traits linked to spatial dispersal by emphasising the interdependence between dispersal through space and time, i.e. life-history diversity that distributes individuals into separate reproductive events. We reviewed the literature that has simultaneously investigated spatial and temporal dispersal to examine the prediction that traits of these two dispersal strategies are negatively correlated. Our results suggest that negative covariation is widely anticipated from theory. Empirical studies often reported evidence of weak negative covariation, although more complicated patterns were also evident, including across levels of biological organisation. Existing literature has largely focused on plants with dormancy capability, one or two phases of the dispersal process (emigration and/or transfer) and a single level of biological organisation (theory: individual; empirical: species). We highlight patterns of covariation across levels of organisation and conclude with a discussion of the consequences of dispersal through space and time and future research areas that should improve our understanding of dispersal-related life-history syndromes.

  14. Integrated active sensor system for real time vibration monitoring.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qijie; Yan, Xiaoqin; Liao, Xinqin; Cao, Shiyao; Lu, Shengnan; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Yue

    2015-11-05

    We report a self-powered, lightweight and cost-effective active sensor system for vibration monitoring with multiplexed operation based on contact electrification between sensor and detected objects. The as-fabricated sensor matrix is capable of monitoring and mapping the vibration state of large amounts of units. The monitoring contents include: on-off state, vibration frequency and vibration amplitude of each unit. The active sensor system delivers a detection range of 0-60 Hz, high accuracy (relative error below 0.42%), long-term stability (10000 cycles). On the time dimension, the sensor can provide the vibration process memory by recording the outputs of the sensor system in an extend period of time. Besides, the developed sensor system can realize detection under contact mode and non-contact mode. Its high performance is not sensitive to the shape or the conductivity of the detected object. With these features, the active sensor system has great potential in automatic control, remote operation, surveillance and security systems.

  15. Integrated active sensor system for real time vibration monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Qijie; Yan, Xiaoqin; Liao, Xinqin; Cao, Shiyao; Lu, Shengnan; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    We report a self-powered, lightweight and cost-effective active sensor system for vibration monitoring with multiplexed operation based on contact electrification between sensor and detected objects. The as-fabricated sensor matrix is capable of monitoring and mapping the vibration state of large amounts of units. The monitoring contents include: on-off state, vibration frequency and vibration amplitude of each unit. The active sensor system delivers a detection range of 0–60 Hz, high accuracy (relative error below 0.42%), long-term stability (10000 cycles). On the time dimension, the sensor can provide the vibration process memory by recording the outputs of the sensor system in an extend period of time. Besides, the developed sensor system can realize detection under contact mode and non-contact mode. Its high performance is not sensitive to the shape or the conductivity of the detected object. With these features, the active sensor system has great potential in automatic control, remote operation, surveillance and security systems. PMID:26538293

  16. hp-Adaptive time integration based on the BDF for viscous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, A.; Etienne, S.; Pelletier, D.; Garon, A.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a procedure based on the Backward Differentiation Formulas of order 1 to 5 to obtain efficient time integration of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The adaptive algorithm performs both stepsize and order selections to control respectively the solution accuracy and the computational efficiency of the time integration process. The stepsize selection (h-adaptivity) is based on a local error estimate and an error controller to guarantee that the numerical solution accuracy is within a user prescribed tolerance. The order selection (p-adaptivity) relies on the idea that low-accuracy solutions can be computed efficiently by low order time integrators while accurate solutions require high order time integrators to keep computational time low. The selection is based on a stability test that detects growing numerical noise and deems a method of order p stable if there is no method of lower order that delivers the same solution accuracy for a larger stepsize. Hence, it guarantees both that (1) the used method of integration operates inside of its stability region and (2) the time integration procedure is computationally efficient. The proposed time integration procedure also features a time-step rejection and quarantine mechanisms, a modified Newton method with a predictor and dense output techniques to compute solution at off-step points.

  17. Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). Performance Verification Report: METSAT Phase Locked Oscillator Assembly, P/N 1334360-1, S/N's F03 and F04

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pines, D.

    1998-01-01

    Two Flight Model AMSU-A Phase Locked Oscillators (P/N 1348360-1, S/Ns F03 and F04) have been tested per AES Test Procedure AE-26758. The tests included vibration testing, thermal cycle testing, AM/FM Noise testing, and full functional testing. EMI/REO 2 Testing was not performed. (See test data for S/N F01). Both AMSU-A Phase Locked Oscillators satisfactorily passed all performance requirements of the AE-26633 Product specification. During thermal cycling of PLO serial number F03, the oven and data logger momentarily lost power, including a loss of data. The unit did not experience any thermal stress. TAR 003134 describes the corrective action. Prior to testing PLO serial number FO4, power was applied to the unit. (+15v,-15v) the unit did not display the proper phase lock. Upon test equipment check out a connector was found to be defective. TAR 003133 describes the corrective action. After completion of testing of PLO serial number F04 was installed into Receiver Assembly F02. Upon testing F02 Receiver Assembly the unit was found not to phase lock at ambient temperature. Removal of PLO Assembly F04 was required. R2 was the real issue. Solithane was secondary. Troubleshooting revealed excessive solithane on inner PLL Assembly cover inhibiting optimum grounding. Also, R2 was reselected which increased the lock range from -30 C to +60 C. TAR 002737 describes the corrective action.

  18. A novel class of highly efficient and accurate time-integrators in nonlinear computational mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuechuan; Atluri, Satya N.

    2017-01-01

    A new class of time-integrators is presented for strongly nonlinear dynamical systems. These algorithms are far superior to the currently common time integrators in computational efficiency and accuracy. These three algorithms are based on a local variational iteration method applied over a finite interval of time. By using Chebyshev polynomials as trial functions and Dirac-Delta functions as the test functions over the finite time interval, the three algorithms are developed into three different discrete time-integrators through the collocation method. These time integrators are labeled as Chebyshev local iterative collocation methods. Through examples of the forced Duffing oscillator, the Lorenz system, and the multiple coupled Duffing equations (which arise as semi-discrete equations for beams, plates and shells undergoing large deformations), it is shown that the new algorithms are far superior to the 4th order Runge-Kutta and ODE45 of MATLAB, in predicting the chaotic responses of strongly nonlinear dynamical systems.

  19. Velocity time integral for right upper pulmonary vein in VLBW infants with patent ductus arteriosus

    PubMed Central

    Lista, Gianluca; Bianchi, Silvia; Mannarino, Savina; Schena, Federico; Castoldi, Francesca; Stronati, Mauro; Mosca, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Early diagnosis of significant patent ductus arteriosus reduces the risk of clinical worsening in very low birth weight infants. Echocardiographic patent ductus arteriosus shunt flow pattern can be used to predict significant patent ductus arteriosus. Pulmonary venous flow, expressed as vein velocity time integral, is correlated to ductus arteriosus closure. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between significant reductions in vein velocity time integral and non-significant patent ductus arteriosus in the first week of life. METHODS: A multicenter, prospective, observational study was conducted to evaluate very low birth weight infants (<1500 g) on respiratory support. Echocardiography was used to evaluate vein velocity time integral on days 1 and 4 of life. The relationship between vein velocity time integral and other parameters was studied. RESULTS: In total, 98 very low birth weight infants on respiratory support were studied. On day 1 of life, vein velocity time integral was similar in patients with open or closed ductus. The mean vein velocity time integral significantly reduced in the first four days of life. On the fourth day of life, there was less of a reduction in patients with patent ductus compared to those with closed patent ductus arteriosus and the difference was significant. CONCLUSIONS: A significant reduction in vein velocity time integral in the first days of life is associated with ductus closure. This parameter correlates well with other echocardiographic parameters and may aid in the diagnosis and management of patent ductus arteriosus. PMID:27759846

  20. Integrated Monitoring of Mola mola Behaviour in Space and Time

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Lara L.; López-Castejón, Francisco; Gilabert, Javier; Relvas, Paulo; Couto, Ana; Queiroz, Nuno; Caldas, Renato; Dias, Paulo Sousa; Dias, Hugo; Faria, Margarida; Ferreira, Filipe; Ferreira, António Sérgio; Fortuna, João; Gomes, Ricardo Joel; Loureiro, Bruno; Martins, Ricardo; Madureira, Luis; Neiva, Jorge; Oliveira, Marina; Pereira, João; Pinto, José; Py, Frederic; Queirós, Hugo; Silva, Daniel; Sujit, P. B.; Zolich, Artur; Johansen, Tor Arne; de Sousa, João Borges; Rajan, Kanna

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, ocean sunfish movements have been monitored worldwide using various satellite tracking methods. This study reports the near-real time monitoring of fine-scale (< 10 m) behaviour of sunfish. The study was conducted in southern Portugal in May 2014 and involved satellite tags and underwater and surface robotic vehicles to measure both the movements and the contextual environment of the fish. A total of four individuals were tracked using custom-made GPS satellite tags providing geolocation estimates of fine-scale resolution. These accurate positions further informed sunfish areas of restricted search (ARS), which were directly correlated to steep thermal frontal zones. Simultaneously, and for two different occasions, an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) video-recorded the path of the tracked fish and detected buoyant particles in the water column. Importantly, the densities of these particles were also directly correlated to steep thermal gradients. Thus, both sunfish foraging behaviour (ARS) and possibly prey densities, were found to be influenced by analogous environmental conditions. In addition, the dynamic structure of the water transited by the tracked individuals was described by a Lagrangian modelling approach. The model informed the distribution of zooplankton in the region, both horizontally and in the water column, and the resultant simulated densities positively correlated with sunfish ARS behaviour estimator (rs = 0.184, p<0.001). The model also revealed that tracked fish opportunistically displace with respect to subsurface current flow. Thus, we show how physical forcing and current structure provide a rationale for a predator’s fine-scale behaviour observed over a two weeks in May 2014. PMID:27494028

  1. Integrated Monitoring of Mola mola Behaviour in Space and Time.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Lara L; López-Castejón, Francisco; Gilabert, Javier; Relvas, Paulo; Couto, Ana; Queiroz, Nuno; Caldas, Renato; Dias, Paulo Sousa; Dias, Hugo; Faria, Margarida; Ferreira, Filipe; Ferreira, António Sérgio; Fortuna, João; Gomes, Ricardo Joel; Loureiro, Bruno; Martins, Ricardo; Madureira, Luis; Neiva, Jorge; Oliveira, Marina; Pereira, João; Pinto, José; Py, Frederic; Queirós, Hugo; Silva, Daniel; Sujit, P B; Zolich, Artur; Johansen, Tor Arne; de Sousa, João Borges; Rajan, Kanna

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, ocean sunfish movements have been monitored worldwide using various satellite tracking methods. This study reports the near-real time monitoring of fine-scale (< 10 m) behaviour of sunfish. The study was conducted in southern Portugal in May 2014 and involved satellite tags and underwater and surface robotic vehicles to measure both the movements and the contextual environment of the fish. A total of four individuals were tracked using custom-made GPS satellite tags providing geolocation estimates of fine-scale resolution. These accurate positions further informed sunfish areas of restricted search (ARS), which were directly correlated to steep thermal frontal zones. Simultaneously, and for two different occasions, an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) video-recorded the path of the tracked fish and detected buoyant particles in the water column. Importantly, the densities of these particles were also directly correlated to steep thermal gradients. Thus, both sunfish foraging behaviour (ARS) and possibly prey densities, were found to be influenced by analogous environmental conditions. In addition, the dynamic structure of the water transited by the tracked individuals was described by a Lagrangian modelling approach. The model informed the distribution of zooplankton in the region, both horizontally and in the water column, and the resultant simulated densities positively correlated with sunfish ARS behaviour estimator (rs = 0.184, p<0.001). The model also revealed that tracked fish opportunistically displace with respect to subsurface current flow. Thus, we show how physical forcing and current structure provide a rationale for a predator's fine-scale behaviour observed over a two weeks in May 2014.

  2. A new explicit variable time-integration self-starting methodology for computational structural dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; D'Costa, Joseph F.

    1992-01-01

    A new explicit variable time-integration methodology and architecture which possesses self-starting attributes, eliminates the need to involve acceleration computations, and which has improved accuracy characteristics in comparison to the traditional central-difference-type formulations customarily advocated is described for applicability to computational structural dynamics. To sharpen the focus of the present study, an explicit variable time-integration architecture which is relatively simple, yet effective, is described. Unlike variable explicit time-integration formulations adopted in the past, the present self-starting variable time-integration architecture and implementation aspects facilitate a simplified representation and a straightforward and effective approach for combining finite element meshes requiring different time steps in a single analysis. Numerical test cases are provided which demonstrate the applicability of the proposed formulations.

  3. Finite-time control of DC-DC buck converters via integral terminal sliding modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Chian-Song; Shen, Chih-Teng

    2012-05-01

    This article presents novel terminal sliding modes for finite-time output tracking control of DC-DC buck converters. Instead of using traditional singular terminal sliding mode, two integral terminal sliding modes are introduced for robust output voltage tracking of uncertain buck converters. Different from traditional sliding mode control (SMC), the proposed controller assures finite convergence time for the tracking error and integral tracking error. Furthermore, the singular problem in traditional terminal SMC is removed from this article. When considering worse modelling, adaptive integral terminal SMC is derived to guarantee finite-time convergence under more relaxed stability conditions. In addition, several experiments show better start-up performance and robustness.

  4. A Comparative Study of Acousto-Optic Time-Integrating Correlators for Adaptive Jamming Cancellation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    This final report presents a comparative study of the space-integrating and time-integrating configurations of an acousto - optic correlator...systematically evaluate all existing acousto - optic correlator architectures and to determine which would be most suitable for adaptive jamming

  5. Seeking the Optimal Time for Integrated Curriculum in Jinan University School of Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Sanqiang; Cheng, Xin; Zhou, Yanghai; Li, Ke; Yang, Xuesong

    2017-01-01

    The curricular integration of the basic sciences and clinical medicine has been conducted for over 40 years and proved to increase medical students' study interests and clinical reasoning. However, there is still no solid data suggesting what time, freshmen or year 3, is optimal to begin with the integrated curriculum. In this study, the…

  6. IDENTIFICATION OF TIME-INTEGRATED SAMPLING AND MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES TO SUPPORT HUMAN EXPOSURE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate exposure classification tools are required to link exposure with health effects in epidemiological studies. Long-term, time-integrated exposure measures would be desirable to address the problem of developing appropriate residential childhood exposure classifications. ...

  7. Integrating Databases with Maps: The Delivery of Cultural Data through TimeMap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ian

    TimeMap is a unique integration of database management, metadata and interactive maps, designed to contextualise and deliver cultural data through maps. TimeMap extends conventional maps with the time dimension, creating and animating maps "on-the-fly"; delivers them as a kiosk application or embedded in Web pages; links flexibly to…

  8. A new heterogeneous asynchronous explicit-implicit time integrator for nonsmooth dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekak, Fatima-Ezzahra; Brun, Michael; Gravouil, Anthony; Depale, Bruno

    2017-03-01

    In computational structural dynamics, particularly in the presence of nonsmooth behavior, the choice of the time-step and the time integrator has a critical impact on the feasibility of the simulation. Furthermore, in some cases, as in the case of a bridge crane under seismic loading, multiple time-scales coexist in the same problem. In that case, the use of multi-time scale methods is suitable. Here, we propose a new explicit-implicit heterogeneous asynchronous time integrator (HATI) for nonsmooth transient dynamics with frictionless unilateral contacts and impacts. Furthermore, we present a new explicit time integrator for contact/impact problems where the contact constraints are enforced using a Lagrange multiplier method. In other words, the aim of this paper consists in using an explicit time integrator with a fine time scale in the contact area for reproducing high frequency phenomena, while an implicit time integrator is adopted in the other parts in order to reproduce much low frequency phenomena and to optimize the CPU time. In a first step, the explicit time integrator is tested on a one-dimensional example and compared to Moreau-Jean's event-capturing schemes. The explicit algorithm is found to be very accurate and the scheme has generally a higher order of convergence than Moreau-Jean's schemes and provides also an excellent energy behavior. Then, the two time scales explicit-implicit HATI is applied to the numerical example of a bridge crane under seismic loading. The results are validated in comparison to a fine scale full explicit computation. The energy dissipated in the implicit-explicit interface is well controlled and the computational time is lower than a full-explicit simulation.

  9. Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A(AMSU-A). Performance Verification Report: METSAT AMSU-A2 Receiver Assembly, (P/N 1356441-1, S.N F04) S/N 107

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapper, R.

    1998-01-01

    The AMSU-A receiver subsystem comprises two separated receiver assemblies; AMSU-Al and AMSU-A2(PN1356441-1). The AMSU-A1 receiver contains 13 channels and the AMSU-A2 receiver 2 channels. The AMSU-AL receiver assembly is further divided into two parts; AMSU-A 1-1 (P/N 1356429-1) and AMSU-A 1-2 (P/N 1356409-1), which contain 9 and 4 channels, respectively. The AMSU-A receiver subsystem stands in between the antenna and signal processing subsystems of the AMSU-A instrument and comprises the RF and IF components from RF isolators to IF attenuators. It receives the RF signals from the antenna subsystem, down-converts the RF signals to IF signals, amplifies and defines the IF signals to proper power level and frequency bandwidth as specified for each channel, and inputs the IF signals to the signal processing subsystem. The test reports for the METSAT AMSU-A receiver subsystem are prepared separately for the A1 and A2 receivers so that each receiver stands alone during integration of instruments into the spacecraft. This test report presents the test data of the METSAT AMSU-A2 Flight Model No.4 (FM4) receiver. The tests are performed per the Acceptance Test Procedure for the AMSU-A Receiver Subsystem, AE-26002/6A. The functional performance tests are conducted either at the component or subsystem level. While the component-level tests are performed over the entire operating temperature range predicted by thermal analysis, the subsystem-level tests are conducted at ambient temperature only.

  10. Time series analysis of the developed financial markets' integration using visibility graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Enyu; Small, Michael; Feng, Gang

    2014-09-01

    A time series representing the developed financial markets' segmentation from 1973 to 2012 is studied. The time series reveals an obvious market integration trend. To further uncover the features of this time series, we divide it into seven windows and generate seven visibility graphs. The measuring capabilities of the visibility graphs provide means to quantitatively analyze the original time series. It is found that the important historical incidents that influenced market integration coincide with variations in the measured graphical node degree. Through the measure of neighborhood span, the frequencies of the historical incidents are disclosed. Moreover, it is also found that large "cycles" and significant noise in the time series are linked to large and small communities in the generated visibility graphs. For large cycles, how historical incidents significantly affected market integration is distinguished by density and compactness of the corresponding communities.

  11. A Time Integration Algorithm Based on the State Transition Matrix for Structures with Time Varying and Nonlinear Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    A variable order method of integrating the structural dynamics equations that is based on the state transition matrix has been developed. The method has been evaluated for linear time variant and nonlinear systems of equations. When the time variation of the system can be modeled exactly by a polynomial it produces nearly exact solutions for a wide range of time step sizes. Solutions of a model nonlinear dynamic response exhibiting chaotic behavior have been computed. Accuracy of the method has been demonstrated by comparison with solutions obtained by established methods.

  12. Integrated RFA/OCT catheter for real-time guidance of cardiac RFA therapy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaoyong; Blumenthal, Colin; Dosluoglu, Deniz; Wang, Yves T.; Jenkins, Michael W.; Souza, Rakesh; Snyder, Christopher; Arruda, Mauricio; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2016-03-01

    Currently, cardiac radiofrequency ablation is guided by indirect signals. We demonstrate an integrated radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) probe for directly monitoring of the RFA procedure with OCT images in real time. The integrated RFA/OCT probe is modified from a standard commercial RFA catheter, and a newly designed and fabricated miniature forward-viewing cone-scanning OCT probe is integrated into the modified probe. The OCT system is verified with the human finger images, and the results show the integrated RFA/OCT probe can acquire high quality OCT images. The radiofrequency energy delivering function of the integrated probe is verified by comparing the RFA lesion sizes with standard commercial RFA probe. For the standard commercial probe, the average width and depth of the 10 lesions were 3.5 mm and 1.8 mm respectively. For the integrated RFA/OCT probe, the average width and depth of the 10 lesions were 3.6 mm and 1.7 mm respectively. The lesions created by the two probes are indistinguishable in size. This demonstrates that our glass window in the integrated probe has little effect on the RF energy delivery. And the integrated probe is used to monitoring the cardiac RFA procedure in real time. The results show that the RFA lesion formation can be confirmed by the loss of birefringence in the heart tissue. The system can potentially in vivo image of the cardiac wall to aid RFA therapy for cardiac arrhythmias.

  13. Explicit analytic approximations for time-dependent solutions of the generalized integrated Michaelis-Menten equation.

    PubMed

    Goličnik, Marko

    2011-04-15

    Various explicit reformulations of time-dependent solutions for the classical two-step irreversible Michaelis-Menten enzyme reaction model have been described recently. In the current study, I present further improvements in terms of a generalized integrated form of the Michaelis-Menten equation for computation of substrate or product concentrations as functions of time for more real-world, enzyme-catalyzed reactions affected by the product. The explicit equations presented here can be considered as a simpler and useful alternative to the exact solution for the generalized integrated Michaelis-Menten equation when fitted to time course data using standard curve-fitting software.

  14. An Approach to Integrate a Space-Time GIS Data Model with High Performance Computers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dali; Zhao, Ziliang; Shaw, Shih-Lung

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we describe an approach to integrate a Space-Time GIS data model on a high performance computing platform. The Space-Time GIS data model has been developed on a desktop computing environment. We use the Space-Time GIS data model to generate GIS module, which organizes a series of remote sensing data. We are in the process of porting the GIS module into an HPC environment, in which the GIS modules handle large dataset directly via parallel file system. Although it is an ongoing project, authors hope this effort can inspire further discussions on the integration of GIS on high performance computing platforms.

  15. Building a better leapfrog. [an algorithm for ensuring time symmetry in any integration scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hut, Piet; Makino, Jun; Mcmillan, Steve

    1995-01-01

    In stellar dynamical computer simulations, as well as other types of simulations using particles, time step size is often held constant in order to guarantee a high degree of energy conservation. In many applications, allowing the time step size to change in time can offer a great saving in computational cost, but variable-size time steps usually imply a substantial degradation in energy conservation. We present a meta-algorithm' for choosing time steps in such a way as to guarantee time symmetry in any integration scheme, thus allowing vastly improved energy conservation for orbital calculations with variable time steps. We apply the algorithm to the familiar leapfrog scheme, and generalize to higher order integration schemes, showing how the stability properties of the fixed-step leapfrog scheme can be extended to higher order, variable-step integrators such as the Hermite method. We illustrate the remarkable properties of these time-symmetric integrators for the case of a highly eccentric elliptical Kepler orbit and discuss applications to more complex problems.

  16. How to Make Additional Time Matter: Integrating Individualized Tutorials into an Extended Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence on the effect of extending the school day is decidedly mixed because of the stark differences in how schools use additional time. In this paper, I focus narrowly on the effect of additional time used for individualized tutorials. In 2005, MATCH Charter Public High School integrated two hours of tutorials throughout an extended day. The…

  17. Creating a Campus Culture of Integrity: Comparing the Perspectives of Full- and Part-Time Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudd, Suzanne S.; Apgar, Caroline; Bronson, Eric Franklyn; Lee, Renee Gravois

    2009-01-01

    Part-time faculty play an important role in creating a culture of integrity on campus, yet they face a number of structural constraints. This paper seeks to improve our understanding of the potentially unique experiences of part-time faculty with academic misconduct and suggests ways to more effectively involve them in campus-wide academic…

  18. Time perception impairs sensory-motor integration in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that perception and estimation of time are fundamental for the relationship between humans and their environment. However, this temporal information processing is inefficient in patients with Parkinson’ disease (PD), resulting in temporal judgment deficits. In general, the pathophysiology of PD has been described as a dysfunction in the basal ganglia, which is a multisensory integration station. Thus, a deficit in the sensorimotor integration process could explain many of the Parkinson symptoms, such as changes in time perception. This physiological distortion may be better understood if we analyze the neurobiological model of interval timing, expressed within the conceptual framework of a traditional information-processing model called “Scalar Expectancy Theory”. Therefore, in this review we discuss the pathophysiology and sensorimotor integration process in PD, the theories and neural basic mechanisms involved in temporal processing, and the main clinical findings about the impact of time perception in PD. PMID:24131660

  19. Third-order symplectic integration method with inverse time dispersion transform for long-term simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yingjie; Zhang, Jinhai; Yao, Zhenxing

    2016-06-01

    The symplectic integration method is popular in high-accuracy numerical simulations when discretizing temporal derivatives; however, it still suffers from time-dispersion error when the temporal interval is coarse, especially for long-term simulations and large-scale models. We employ the inverse time dispersion transform (ITDT) to the third-order symplectic integration method to reduce the time-dispersion error. First, we adopt the pseudospectral algorithm for the spatial discretization and the third-order symplectic integration method for the temporal discretization. Then, we apply the ITDT to eliminate time-dispersion error from the synthetic data. As a post-processing method, the ITDT can be easily cascaded in traditional numerical simulations. We implement the ITDT in one typical exiting third-order symplectic scheme and compare its performances with the performances of the conventional second-order scheme and the rapid expansion method. Theoretical analyses and numerical experiments show that the ITDT can significantly reduce the time-dispersion error, especially for long travel times. The implementation of the ITDT requires some additional computations on correcting the time-dispersion error, but it allows us to use the maximum temporal interval under stability conditions; thus, its final computational efficiency would be higher than that of the traditional symplectic integration method for long-term simulations. With the aid of the ITDT, we can obtain much more accurate simulation results but with a lower computational cost.

  20. A point implicit time integration technique for slow transient flow problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kadioglu, Samet Y.; Berry, Ray A.; Martineau, Richard C.

    2015-05-01

    We introduce a point implicit time integration technique for slow transient flow problems. The method treats the solution variables of interest (that can be located at cell centers, cell edges, or cell nodes) implicitly and the rest of the information related to same or other variables are handled explicitly. The method does not require implicit iteration; instead it time advances the solutions in a similar spirit to explicit methods, except it involves a few additional function(s) evaluation steps. Moreover, the method is unconditionally stable, as a fully implicit method would be. This new approach exhibits the simplicity of implementation of explicit methods and the stability of implicit methods. It is specifically designed for slow transient flow problems of long duration wherein one would like to perform time integrations with very large time steps. Because the method can be time inaccurate for fast transient problems, particularly with larger time steps, an appropriate solution strategy for a problem that evolves from a fast to a slow transient would be to integrate the fast transient with an explicit or semi-implicit technique and then switch to this point implicit method as soon as the time variation slows sufficiently. We have solved several test problems that result from scalar or systems of flow equations. Our findings indicate the new method can integrate slow transient problems very efficiently; and its implementation is very robust.

  1. Neural Integration Underlying a Time-Compensated Sun Compass in the Migratory Monarch Butterfly.

    PubMed

    Shlizerman, Eli; Phillips-Portillo, James; Forger, Daniel B; Reppert, Steven M

    2016-04-13

    Migrating eastern North American monarch butterflies use a time-compensated sun compass to adjust their flight to the southwest direction. Although the antennal genetic circadian clock and the azimuth of the sun are instrumental for proper function of the compass, it is unclear how these signals are represented on a neuronal level and how they are integrated to produce flight control. To address these questions, we constructed a receptive field model of the compound eye that encodes the solar azimuth. We then derived a neural circuit model that integrates azimuthal and circadian signals to correct flight direction. The model demonstrates an integration mechanism, which produces robust trajectories reaching the southwest regardless of the time of day and includes a configuration for remigration. Comparison of model simulations with flight trajectories of butterflies in a flight simulator shows analogous behaviors and affirms the prediction that midday is the optimal time for migratory flight.

  2. Non-electrical-power temperature-time integrating sensor for RFID based on microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Mike; Hoffmann, Martin

    2011-06-01

    The integration of RFID tags into packages offers the opportunity to combine logistic advantages of the technology with monitoring different parameters from inside the package at the same time. An essential demand for enhanced product safety especially in pharmacy or food industry is the monitoring of the time-temperature-integral. Thus, completely passive time-temperature-integrators (TTI) requiring no battery, microprocessor nor data logging devices are developed. TTI representing the sterilization process inside an autoclave system is a demanding challenge: a temperature of at least 120 °C have to be maintained over 45 minutes to assure that no unwanted organism remains. Due to increased temperature, the viscosity of a fluid changes and thus the speed of the fluid inside the channel increases. The filled length of the channel represents the time temperature integral affecting the system. Measurements as well as simulations allow drawing conclusions about the influence of the geometrical parameters of the system and provide the possibility of adaptation. Thus a completely passive sensor element for monitoring an integral parameter with waiving of external electrical power supply and data processing technology is demonstrated. Furthermore, it is shown how to adjust the specific TTI parameters of the sensor to different applications and needs by modifying the geometrical parameters of the system.

  3. Time-resolved imaging on a realistic tissue phantom: {mu}{ital {sub s}}{bold {prime}}{bold {mu}}{ital {sub a}} images versus time-integrated images

    SciTech Connect

    Cubeddu, R.; Pifferi, A.; Taroni, P.; Torricelli, A.; Valentini, G.

    1996-08-01

    A method is proposed by which we construct images through turbid media, plotting directly either the transport-scattering coefficient {mu}{sub s}{prime} or the absorption coefficient {mu}{sub a}. These optical parameters are obtained from the best fit of the time-resolved transmittance curves with a diffusion model. Measurements were performed with a time-correlated single-photon counting system on realistic tissue phantoms simulating a tumor mass within a breast. Images were obtained with an incident power of {lt}1 mW and an acquisition time of 1 s/point. Comparison of {mu}{sub s}{prime} and {mu}{sub a} images with time-integrated images constructed from the same experimental data shows that the fitting method discriminates between scattering and absorption inhomogeneities and improves image quality for scattering but not for absorption inhomogeneities. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  4. Constrained time-optimal control of double-integrator system and its application in MPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehér, Marek; Straka, Ondřej; Šmídl, Václav

    2017-01-01

    The paper deals with the design of a time-optimal controller for systems subject to both state and control constraints. The focus is laid on a double-integrator system, for which the time-to-go function is calculated. The function is then used as a part of a model predictive control criterion where it represents the long-horizon part. The designed model predictive control algorithm is then used in a constrained control problem of permanent magnet synchronous motor model, which behavior can be approximated by a double integrator model. Accomplishments of the control goals are illustrated in a numerical example.

  5. Two-time coherence of pulse trains and the integrated degree of temporal coherence.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Rahul; Friberg, Ari T; Genty, Göery; Turunen, Jari

    2015-09-01

    We examine the temporal coherence properties of trains of nonidentical short optical pulses in the framework of the second-order coherence theory of nonstationary light. Considering Michelson's interferometric measurement of temporal coherence, we demonstrate that time-resolved interferograms reveal the full two-time temporal coherence function of the partially coherent pulse train. We also show that the result given by the time-integrated Michelson interferogram equals the true degree of temporal coherence only when the pulse train is quasi-stationary, i.e., the coherence time is a small fraction of the pulse duration. True two-time and integrated coherence functions produced by specific models representing perturbed trains of mode-locked pulses and supercontinuum pulse trains produced in nonlinear fibers are illustrated.

  6. Application of modified integration rule to time-domain finite-element acoustic simulation of rooms.

    PubMed

    Okuzono, Takeshi; Otsuru, Toru; Tomiku, Reiji; Okamoto, Noriko

    2012-08-01

    The applicability of the modified integration rule for time-domain finite-element analysis is tested in sound field analysis of rooms involving rectangular elements, distorted elements, and finite impedance boundary conditions. Dispersion error analysis in three dimensions is conducted to evaluate the dispersion error in time-domain finite-element analysis using eight-node hexahedral elements. The results of analysis confirmed that fourth-order accuracy with respect to dispersion error is obtainable using the Fox-Goodwin method (FG) with a modified integration rule, even for rectangular elements. The stability condition in three-dimensional analysis using the modified integration rule is also presented. Numerical experiments demonstrate that FG with a modified integration rule performs much better than FG with the conventional integration rule for problems with rectangular elements, distorted elements, and with finite impedance boundary conditions. Further, as another advantage, numerical results revealed that the use of modified integration rule engenders faster convergence of the iterative solver than a conventional rule for problems with the same degrees of freedom.

  7. Simulation of Accurate Vibrationally Resolved Electronic Spectra: the Integrated Time-Dependent and Time-Independent Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiardi, Alberto; Barone, Vincenzo; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien

    2014-06-01

    Two parallel theories including Franck-Condon, Herzberg-Teller and Duschinsky (i.e., mode mixing) effects, allowing different approximations for the description of excited state PES have been developed in order to simulate realistic, asymmetric, electronic spectra line-shapes taking into account the vibrational structure: the so-called sum-over-states or time-independent (TI) method and the alternative time-dependent (TD) approach, which exploits the properties of the Fourier transform. The integrated TI-TD procedure included within a general purpose QM code [1,2], allows to compute one photon absorption, fluorescence, phosphorescence, electronic circular dichroism, circularly polarized luminescence and resonance Raman spectra. Combining both approaches, which use a single set of starting data, permits to profit from their respective advantages and minimize their respective limits: the time-dependent route automatically includes all vibrational states and, possibly, temperature effects, while the time-independent route allows to identify and assign single vibronic transitions. Interpretation, analysis and assignment of experimental spectra based on integrated TI-TD vibronic computations will be illustrated for challenging cases of medium-sized open-shell systems in the gas and condensed phases with inclusion of leading anharmonic effects. 1. V. Barone, A. Baiardi, M. Biczysko, J. Bloino, C. Cappelli, F. Lipparini Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys, 14, 12404, (2012) 2. A. Baiardi, V. Barone, J. Bloino J. Chem. Theory Comput., 9, 4097-4115 (2013)

  8. N1s and O1s double ionization of the NO and N{sub 2}O molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hedin, L.; Zhaunerchyk, V.; Karlsson, L.; Pernestål, K.; Feifel, R.; Tashiro, M.; Ehara, M.; Linusson, P.; Eland, J. H. D.; Ueda, K.

    2014-01-28

    Single-site N1s and O1s double core ionisation of the NO and N{sub 2}O molecules has been studied using a magnetic bottle many-electron coincidence time-of-flight spectrometer at photon energies of 1100 eV and 1300 eV. The double core hole energies obtained for NO are 904.8 eV (N1s{sup −2}) and 1179.4 eV (O1s{sup −2}). The corresponding energies obtained for N{sub 2}O are 896.9 eV (terminal N1s{sup −2}), 906.5 eV (central N1s{sup −2}), and 1174.1 eV (O1s{sup −2}). The ratio between the double and single ionisation energies are in all cases close or equal to 2.20. Large chemical shifts are observed in some cases which suggest that reorganisation of the electrons upon the double ionization is significant. Δ-self-consistent field and complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) calculations were performed for both molecules and they are in good agreement with these results. Auger spectra of N{sub 2}O, associated with the decay of the terminal and central N1s{sup −2} as well as with the O1s{sup −2} dicationic states, were extracted showing the two electrons emitted as a result of filling the double core holes. The spectra, which are interpreted using CASSCF and complete active space configuration interaction calculations, show atomic-like character. The cross section ratio between double and single core hole creation was estimated as 1.6 × 10{sup −3} for nitrogen at 1100 eV and as 1.3 × 10{sup −3} for oxygen at 1300 eV.

  9. Timing of Formal Phase Safety Reviews for Large-Scale Integrated Hazard Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massie, Michael J.; Morris, A. Terry

    2010-01-01

    Integrated hazard analysis (IHA) is a process used to identify and control unacceptable risk. As such, it does not occur in a vacuum. IHA approaches must be tailored to fit the system being analyzed. Physical, resource, organizational and temporal constraints on large-scale integrated systems impose additional direct or derived requirements on the IHA. The timing and interaction between engineering and safety organizations can provide either benefits or hindrances to the overall end product. The traditional approach for formal phase safety review timing and content, which generally works well for small- to moderate-scale systems, does not work well for very large-scale integrated systems. This paper proposes a modified approach to timing and content of formal phase safety reviews for IHA. Details of the tailoring process for IHA will describe how to avoid temporary disconnects in major milestone reviews and how to maintain a cohesive end-to-end integration story particularly for systems where the integrator inherently has little to no insight into lower level systems. The proposal has the advantage of allowing the hazard analysis development process to occur as technical data normally matures.

  10. Digital readout integrated circuit (DROIC) implementing time delay and integration (TDI) for scanning type infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPAs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceylan, Omer; Shafique, Atia; Burak, Abdurrahman; Caliskan, Can; Yazici, Melik; Abbasi, Shahbaz; Galioglu, Arman; Kayahan, Huseyin; Gurbuz, Yasar

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a digital readout integrated circuit (DROIC) implementing time delay and integration (TDI) for scanning type infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPAs) with a charge handling capacity of 44.8 Me- while achieving quantization noise of 198 e- and power consumption of 14.35 mW. Conventional pulse frequency modulation (PFM) method is supported by a single slope ramp ADC technique to have a very low quantization noise together with a low power consumption. The proposed digital TDI ROIC converts the photocurrent into digital domain in two phases; in the first phase, most significant bits (MSBs) are generated by the conventional PFM technique in the charge domain, while in the second phase least significant bits (LSBs) are generated by a single slope ramp ADC in the time domain. A 90 × 8 prototype has been fabricated and verified, showing a significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 51 dB for low illumination levels (280,000 collected electrons), which is attributed to the TDI implementation method and very low quantization noise due to the single slope ADC implemented for LSBs. Proposed digital TDI ROIC proves the benefit of digital readouts for scanning arrays enabling smaller pixel pitches, better SNR for the low illumination levels and lower power consumption compared to analog TDI readouts for scanning arrays.

  11. A study of pile-up in integrated time-correlated single photon counting systems.

    PubMed

    Arlt, Jochen; Tyndall, David; Rae, Bruce R; Li, David D-U; Richardson, Justin A; Henderson, Robert K

    2013-10-01

    Recent demonstration of highly integrated, solid-state, time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) systems in CMOS technology is set to provide significant increases in performance over existing bulky, expensive hardware. Arrays of single photon single photon avalanche diode (SPAD) detectors, timing channels, and signal processing can be integrated on a single silicon chip with a degree of parallelism and computational speed that is unattainable by discrete photomultiplier tube and photon counting card solutions. New multi-channel, multi-detector TCSPC sensor architectures with greatly enhanced throughput due to minimal detector transit (dead) time or timing channel dead time are now feasible. In this paper, we study the potential for future integrated, solid-state TCSPC sensors to exceed the photon pile-up limit through analytic formula and simulation. The results are validated using a 10% fill factor SPAD array and an 8-channel, 52 ps resolution time-to-digital conversion architecture with embedded lifetime estimation. It is demonstrated that pile-up insensitive acquisition is attainable at greater than 10 times the pulse repetition rate providing over 60 dB of extended dynamic range to the TCSPC technique. Our results predict future CMOS TCSPC sensors capable of live-cell transient observations in confocal scanning microscopy, improved resolution of near-infrared optical tomography systems, and fluorescence lifetime activated cell sorting.

  12. A study of pile-up in integrated time-correlated single photon counting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arlt, Jochen; Tyndall, David; Rae, Bruce R.; Li, David D.-U.; Richardson, Justin A.; Henderson, Robert K.

    2013-10-01

    Recent demonstration of highly integrated, solid-state, time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) systems in CMOS technology is set to provide significant increases in performance over existing bulky, expensive hardware. Arrays of single photon single photon avalanche diode (SPAD) detectors, timing channels, and signal processing can be integrated on a single silicon chip with a degree of parallelism and computational speed that is unattainable by discrete photomultiplier tube and photon counting card solutions. New multi-channel, multi-detector TCSPC sensor architectures with greatly enhanced throughput due to minimal detector transit (dead) time or timing channel dead time are now feasible. In this paper, we study the potential for future integrated, solid-state TCSPC sensors to exceed the photon pile-up limit through analytic formula and simulation. The results are validated using a 10% fill factor SPAD array and an 8-channel, 52 ps resolution time-to-digital conversion architecture with embedded lifetime estimation. It is demonstrated that pile-up insensitive acquisition is attainable at greater than 10 times the pulse repetition rate providing over 60 dB of extended dynamic range to the TCSPC technique. Our results predict future CMOS TCSPC sensors capable of live-cell transient observations in confocal scanning microscopy, improved resolution of near-infrared optical tomography systems, and fluorescence lifetime activated cell sorting.

  13. Further results on stabilization for interval time-delay systems via new integral inequality approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhichen; Bai, Yan; Huang, Congzhi; Yan, Huaicheng

    2017-02-06

    This paper investigates the stability and stabilization problems for interval time-delay systems. By introducing a new delay partitioning approach, various Lyapunov-Krasovskii functionals with triple-integral terms are established to make full use of system information. In order to reduce the conservatism, improved integral inequalities are developed for estimation of double integrals, which show remarkable outperformance over the Jensen and Wirtinger ones. Particularly, the relationship between the time-delay and each subinterval is taken into consideration. The resulting stability criteria are less conservative than some recent methods. Based on the derived condition, the state-feedback controller design approach is also given. Finally, the numerical examples and the application to inverted pendulum system are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

  14. Time and space integrating acousto-optic folded spectrum processing for SETI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, K.; Psaltis, D.

    1986-01-01

    Time and space integrating folded spectrum techniques utilizing acousto-optic devices (AOD) as 1-D input transducers are investigated for a potential application as wideband, high resolution, large processing gain spectrum analyzers in the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence (SETI) program. The space integrating Fourier transform performed by a lens channels the coarse spectral components diffracted from an AOD onto an array of time integrating narrowband fine resolution spectrum analyzers. The pulsing action of a laser diode samples the interferometrically detected output, aliasing the fine resolution components to baseband, as required for the subsequent charge coupled devices (CCD) processing. The raster scan mechanism incorporated into the readout of the CCD detector array is used to unfold the 2-D transform, reproducing the desired high resolution Fourier transform of the input signal.

  15. An Integral Method for Determining Induced Voltage in Time-Varying Wire Inductors

    SciTech Connect

    Fasenfest, B; White, D; Rockway, J

    2005-05-27

    This report documents the creation of software tools to model time-varying wire inductors. The class of inductors studied consists of arbitrary wire shapes in nonmagnetic material. When the wire structures are deformed, the inductance changes, and a voltage is induced. This voltage is of interest, for instance when the inductor is used to measure or sense a shockwave. An integral technique, which only requires integrating over the wire segments, is used to find the inductance at each time step, with backwards-difference approximations being used on successive time steps to determine the voltage. This method allows for arbitrary time-varying wire structures. It was tested for several canonical problems and used to model a double helix solenoid compressed by a shockwave.

  16. Distributed finite-time containment control for double-integrator multiagent systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangyu; Li, Shihua; Shi, Peng

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, the distributed finite-time containment control problem for double-integrator multiagent systems with multiple leaders and external disturbances is discussed. In the presence of multiple dynamic leaders, by utilizing the homogeneous control technique, a distributed finite-time observer is developed for the followers to estimate the weighted average of the leaders' velocities at first. Then, based on the estimates and the generalized adding a power integrator approach, distributed finite-time containment control algorithms are designed to guarantee that the states of the followers converge to the dynamic convex hull spanned by those of the leaders in finite time. Moreover, as a special case of multiple dynamic leaders with zero velocities, the proposed containment control algorithms also work for the case of multiple stationary leaders without using the distributed observer. Simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control algorithms.

  17. Partnerships for Learning: Promising Practices in Integrating School and Out-of-School Time Program Supports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Family Research Project, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Across the country many schools and communities are trying to create and support efforts to institutionalize partnerships for learning, including those that rethink the use of time across the school day and year, and across the developmental continuum. Referred to by different terms--integrated, expanded, or complementary learning--the concept has…

  18. The Estimation of Theta in the Integrated Moving Average Time-Series Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Gerald R.

    Through Monte Carlo procedures, three different techniques for estimating the parameter theta (proportion of the "shocks" remaining in the system) in the Integrated Moving Average (0,1,1) time-series model are compared in terms of (1) the accuracy of the estimates, (2) the independence of the estimates from the true value of theta, and…

  19. Violation of Homogeneity of Variance Assumption in the Integrated Moving Averages Time Series Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gullickson, Arlen R.; And Others

    This study is an analysis of the robustness of the Box-Tiao integrated moving averages model for analysis of time series quasi experiments. One of the assumptions underlying the Box-Tiao model is that all N values of alpha subscript t come from the same population which has a variance sigma squared. The robustness was studied only in terms of…

  20. Development of a Combined Real Time Monitoring and Integration Analysis System for Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Kentaro; Iizuka, Atsushi; Inoue, Yasuo; Mizukoshi, Atsushi; Noguchi, Miyuki; Yamasaki, Akihiro; Yanagisawa, Yukio

    2010-01-01

    A combined integration analysis and real time monitoring (Peak Capture System) system was developed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Individual integration analysis and real time monitoring can be used to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze VOCs in the atmosphere and in indoor environments and determine the variation in total VOC (TVOC) concentration with time, respectively. In the Peak Capture System, real time monitoring was used to predict future elevations in the TVOC concentration (peak), and this was used an indicator of when to collect (capture) ambient air samples for integration analysis. This enabled qualitative and quantitative analysis of VOCs when the TVOC concentration was high. We developed an algorithm to predict variation in the TVOC concentration, and constructed an automatic system to initiate air sampling for integration analysis. With the system, auto-sampling and analysis of VOCs in a conventional house were conducted. In comparison with background concentrations, the results of peak analysis enabled identification of compounds whose concentration rose. This also enabled an evaluation of possible VOC emission sources. PMID:21317996

  1. Three-dimensional viscoelastic time-domain finite-difference seismic modelling using the staggered Adams-Bashforth time integrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlen, Thomas; Wittkamp, Florian

    2016-03-01

    We analyse the performance of a higher order accurate staggered viscoelastic time-domain finite-difference method, in which the staggered Adams-Bashforth (ABS) third-order and fourth-order accurate time integrators are used for temporal discretization. ABS is a multistep method that uses previously calculated wavefields to increase the order of accuracy in time. The analysis shows that the numerical dispersion is much lower than that of the widely used second-order leapfrog method. Numerical dissipation is introduced by the ABS method which is significantly smaller for fourth-order than third-order accuracy. In 1-D and 3-D simulation experiments, we verify the convincing improvements of simulation accuracy of the fourth-order ABS method. In a realistic elastic 3-D scenario, the computing time reduces by a factor of approximately 2.4, whereas the memory requirements increase by approximately a factor of 2.2. The ABS method thus provides an alternative strategy to increase the simulation accuracy in time by investing computer memory instead of computing time.

  2. Integration of real-time 3D image acquisition and multiview 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoxing; Geng, Zheng; Li, Tuotuo; Li, Wei; Wang, Jingyi; Liu, Yongchun

    2014-03-01

    Seamless integration of 3D acquisition and 3D display systems offers enhanced experience in 3D visualization of the real world objects or scenes. The vivid representation of captured 3D objects displayed on a glasses-free 3D display screen could bring the realistic viewing experience to viewers as if they are viewing real-world scene. Although the technologies in 3D acquisition and 3D display have advanced rapidly in recent years, effort is lacking in studying the seamless integration of these two different aspects of 3D technologies. In this paper, we describe our recent progress on integrating a light-field 3D acquisition system and an autostereoscopic multiview 3D display for real-time light field capture and display. This paper focuses on both the architecture design and the implementation of the hardware and the software of this integrated 3D system. A prototype of the integrated 3D system is built to demonstrate the real-time 3D acquisition and 3D display capability of our proposed system.

  3. The duration of uncertain times: audiovisual information about intervals is integrated in a statistically optimal fashion.

    PubMed

    Hartcher-O'Brien, Jess; Di Luca, Massimiliano; Ernst, Marc O

    2014-01-01

    Often multisensory information is integrated in a statistically optimal fashion where each sensory source is weighted according to its precision. This integration scheme isstatistically optimal because it theoretically results in unbiased perceptual estimates with the highest precisionpossible.There is a current lack of consensus about how the nervous system processes multiple sensory cues to elapsed time.In order to shed light upon this, we adopt a computational approach to pinpoint the integration strategy underlying duration estimationof audio/visual stimuli. One of the assumptions of our computational approach is that the multisensory signals redundantly specify the same stimulus property. Our results clearly show that despite claims to the contrary, perceived duration is the result of an optimal weighting process, similar to that adopted for estimates of space. That is, participants weight the audio and visual information to arrive at the most precise, single duration estimate possible. The work also disentangles how different integration strategies - i.e. consideringthe time of onset/offset ofsignals - might alter the final estimate. As such we provide the first concrete evidence of an optimal integration strategy in human duration estimates.

  4. Discrete integration of continuous Kalman filtering equations for time invariant second-order structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Belvin, W. Keith

    1990-01-01

    A general form for the first-order representation of the continuous second-order linear structural-dynamics equations is introduced to derive a corresponding form of first-order continuous Kalman filtering equations. Time integration of the resulting equations is carried out via a set of linear multistep integration formulas. It is shown that a judicious combined selection of computational paths and the undetermined matrices introduced in the general form of the first-order linear structural systems leads to a class of second-order discrete Kalman filtering equations involving only symmetric sparse N x N solution matrices.

  5. Integrable equations of the infinite nonlinear Schrödinger equation hierarchy with time variable coefficients.

    PubMed

    Kedziora, D J; Ankiewicz, A; Chowdury, A; Akhmediev, N

    2015-10-01

    We present an infinite nonlinear Schrödinger equation hierarchy of integrable equations, together with the recurrence relations defining it. To demonstrate integrability, we present the Lax pairs for the whole hierarchy, specify its Darboux transformations and provide several examples of solutions. These resulting wavefunctions are given in exact analytical form. We then show that the Lax pair and Darboux transformation formalisms still apply in this scheme when the coefficients in the hierarchy depend on the propagation variable (e.g., time). This extension thus allows for the construction of complicated solutions within a greatly diversified domain of generalised nonlinear systems.

  6. Numerical integration of the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation in generic time-discretization schemes.

    PubMed

    Romá, Federico; Cugliandolo, Leticia F; Lozano, Gustavo S

    2014-08-01

    We introduce a numerical method to integrate the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation in spherical coordinates for generic discretization schemes. This method conserves the magnetization modulus and ensures the approach to equilibrium under the expected conditions. We test the algorithm on a benchmark problem: the dynamics of a uniformly magnetized ellipsoid. We investigate the influence of various parameters, and in particular, we analyze the efficiency of the numerical integration, in terms of the number of steps needed to reach a chosen long time with a given accuracy.

  7. Parallel streams versus integrated timing in multilimb pattern generation: A test of Korte's Third Law.

    PubMed

    Jagacinski, Richard J; Rizzi, Emanuele; Kim, Tae Hoon; Lavender, Steven A; Speller, Lassiter F; Klapp, Stuart T

    2016-11-01

    Skilled drummers performed a 4:3:2 polyrhythm with 2 hands and 1 foot. For each pair of limbs patterns of temporal covariation were used to infer relatively independent parallel streams versus integrated timing relationships. Parallel timing was more prevalent between hand and foot than between the 2 hands, and parallel timing generally increased with tapping rate. Different combinations of integrated and parallel timing were found among the 3 limbs. A second experiment used a wider range of tapping rates and explored 3:2 tapping with 2 hands, 2 feet, or hand and foot. The latter 2 limb pairs resulted in greater prevalence of parallel timing. These results can be interpreted in terms of a Gestalt principle of grouping known as Korte's Third Law, which can be extended from the perceptual domain to the perceptual-motor domain. This principle indicates that perceived velocity is a key factor in determining whether a sequence of events is represented as a single integrated pattern or as multiple parallel patterns. The present results put disparate previous findings on bimanual polyrhythmic tapping and rhythmic aspects of the golf swing under a common theoretical perspective. (PsycINFO Database Record

  8. Tuning of IMC based PID controllers for integrating systems with time delay.

    PubMed

    Kumar, D B Santosh; Padma Sree, R

    2016-07-01

    Design of Proportional Integral and Derivative (PID) controllers based on IMC principles for various types of integrating systems with time delay is proposed. PID parameters are given in terms of process model parameters and a tuning parameter. The tuning parameter is IMC filter time constant. In the present work, the IMC filter (Q) is chosen in such a manner that the order of the denominator of IMC controller is one less than the order of the numerator. The IMC filter time constant (λ) is tuned in such a way that a good compromise is made between performance and robustness for both servo and regulatory problems. To improve servo response of the controller a set point filter is designed such that the closed loop response is similar to that of first order plus time delay system. The proposed controller design method is applied to various transfer function models and to the non-linear model equations of jacketed CSTR to demonstrate its applicability and effectiveness. The performance of the proposed controller is compared with the recently reported methods in terms of IAE and ITAE. The smooth functioning of the controller is determined in terms of total variation and compared with recently reported methods. Simulation studies are carried out on various integrating systems with time delay to show the effectiveness and superiority of the proposed controllers.

  9. Note: Fully integrated 3.2 Gbps quantum random number generator with real-time extraction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Guang; Nie, You-Qi; Zhou, Hongyi; Liang, Hao; Ma, Xiongfeng; Zhang, Jun; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-07-01

    We present a real-time and fully integrated quantum random number generator (QRNG) by measuring laser phase fluctuations. The QRNG scheme based on laser phase fluctuations is featured for its capability of generating ultra-high-speed random numbers. However, the speed bottleneck of a practical QRNG lies on the limited speed of randomness extraction. To close the gap between the fast randomness generation and the slow post-processing, we propose a pipeline extraction algorithm based on Toeplitz matrix hashing and implement it in a high-speed field-programmable gate array. Further, all the QRNG components are integrated into a module, including a compact and actively stabilized interferometer, high-speed data acquisition, and real-time data post-processing and transmission. The final generation rate of the QRNG module with real-time extraction can reach 3.2 Gbps.

  10. 5D Data Modelling: Full Integration of 2D/3D Space, Time and Scale Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oosterom, Peter; Stoter, Jantien

    This paper proposes an approach for data modelling in five dimensions. Apart from three dimensions for geometrical representation and a fourth dimension for time, we identify scale as fifth dimensional characteristic. Considering scale as an extra dimension of geographic information, fully integrated with the other dimensions, is new. Through a formal definition of geographic data in a conceptual 5D continuum, the data can be handled by one integrated approach assuring consistency across scale and time dimensions. Because the approach is new and challenging, we choose to step-wise studying several combinations of the five dimensions, ultimately resulting in the optimal 5D model. We also propose to apply mathematical theories on multidimensional modelling to well established principles of multidimensional modelling in the geo-information domain. The result is a conceptual full partition of the 3Dspace+time+scale space (i.e. no overlaps, no gaps) realised in a 5D data model implemented in a Database Management System.

  11. Feature integration with random forests for real-time human activity recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Hirokatsu; Hashimoto, Kiyoshi; Aoki, Yoshimitsu

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents an approach for real-time human activity recognition. Three different kinds of features (flow, shape, and a keypoint-based feature) are applied in activity recognition. We use random forests for feature integration and activity classification. A forest is created at each feature that performs as a weak classifier. The international classification of functioning, disability and health (ICF) proposed by WHO is applied in order to set the novel definition in activity recognition. Experiments on human activity recognition using the proposed framework show - 99.2% (Weizmann action dataset), 95.5% (KTH human actions dataset), and 54.6% (UCF50 dataset) recognition accuracy with a real-time processing speed. The feature integration and activity-class definition allow us to accomplish high-accuracy recognition match for the state-of-the-art in real-time.

  12. Note: Fully integrated 3.2 Gbps quantum random number generator with real-time extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Guang; Nie, You-Qi; Zhou, Hongyi; Liang, Hao; Ma, Xiongfeng; Zhang, Jun; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-07-01

    We present a real-time and fully integrated quantum random number generator (QRNG) by measuring laser phase fluctuations. The QRNG scheme based on laser phase fluctuations is featured for its capability of generating ultra-high-speed random numbers. However, the speed bottleneck of a practical QRNG lies on the limited speed of randomness extraction. To close the gap between the fast randomness generation and the slow post-processing, we propose a pipeline extraction algorithm based on Toeplitz matrix hashing and implement it in a high-speed field-programmable gate array. Further, all the QRNG components are integrated into a module, including a compact and actively stabilized interferometer, high-speed data acquisition, and real-time data post-processing and transmission. The final generation rate of the QRNG module with real-time extraction can reach 3.2 Gbps.

  13. Molecular radiotherapy: The NUKFIT software for calculating the time-integrated activity coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Kletting, P.; Schimmel, S.; Luster, M.; Kestler, H. A.; Hänscheid, H.; Fernández, M.; Lassmann, M.; Bröer, J. H.; Nosske, D.; Glatting, G.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Calculation of the time-integrated activity coefficient (residence time) is a crucial step in dosimetry for molecular radiotherapy. However, available software is deficient in that it is either not tailored for the use in molecular radiotherapy and/or does not include all required estimation methods. The aim of this work was therefore the development and programming of an algorithm which allows for an objective and reproducible determination of the time-integrated activity coefficient and its standard error.Methods: The algorithm includes the selection of a set of fitting functions from predefined sums of exponentials and the choice of an error model for the used data. To estimate the values of the adjustable parameters an objective function, depending on the data, the parameters of the error model, the fitting function and (if required and available) Bayesian information, is minimized. To increase reproducibility and user-friendliness the starting values are automatically determined using a combination of curve stripping and random search. Visual inspection, the coefficient of determination, the standard error of the fitted parameters, and the correlation matrix are provided to evaluate the quality of the fit. The functions which are most supported by the data are determined using the corrected Akaike information criterion. The time-integrated activity coefficient is estimated by analytically integrating the fitted functions. Its standard error is determined assuming Gaussian error propagation. The software was implemented using MATLAB.Results: To validate the proper implementation of the objective function and the fit functions, the results of NUKFIT and SAAM numerical, a commercially available software tool, were compared. The automatic search for starting values was successfully tested for reproducibility. The quality criteria applied in conjunction with the Akaike information criterion allowed the selection of suitable functions. Function fit

  14. Accurate Detection of Interaural Time Differences by a Population of Slowly Integrating Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilkov, Viacheslav A.; Tikidji-Hamburyan, Ruben A.

    2012-03-01

    For localization of a sound source, animals and humans process the microsecond interaural time differences of arriving sound waves. How nervous systems, consisting of elements with time constants of about and more than 1 ms, can reach such high precision is still an open question. In this Letter we present a hypothesis and show theoretical and computational evidence that a rather large population of slowly integrating neurons with inhibitory and excitatory inputs (EI neurons) can detect minute temporal disparities in input signals which are significantly less than any time constant in the system.

  15. Percolation of clusters with a residence time in the bond definition: Integral equation theory.

    PubMed

    Zarragoicoechea, Guillermo J; Pugnaloni, Luis A; Lado, Fred; Lomba, Enrique; Vericat, Fernando

    2005-03-01

    We consider the clustering and percolation of continuum systems whose particles interact via the Lennard-Jones pair potential. A cluster definition is used according to which two particles are considered directly connected (bonded) at time t if they remain within a distance d, the connectivity distance, during at least a time of duration tau, the residence time. An integral equation for the corresponding pair connectedness function, recently proposed by two of the authors [Phys. Rev. E 61, R6067 (2000)], is solved using the orthogonal polynomial approach developed by another of the authors [Phys. Rev. E 55, 426 (1997)]. We compare our results with those obtained by molecular dynamics simulations.

  16. Comparison of Fixed and Variable Time Step Trajectory Integration Methods for Cislunar Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, ichael W.; Thrasher, Stephen W.

    2007-01-01

    Due to the nonlinear nature of the Earth-Moon-Sun three-body problem and non-spherical gravity, CEV cislunar targeting algorithms will require many propagations in their search for a desired trajectory. For on-board targeting especially, the algorithm must have a simple, fast, and accurate propagator to calculate a trajectory with reasonable computation time, and still be robust enough to remain stable in the various flight regimes that the CEV will experience. This paper compares Cowell s method with a fourth-order Runge- Kutta integrator (RK4), Encke s method with a fourth-order Runge-Kutta- Nystr m integrator (RKN4), and a method known as Multi-Conic. Additionally, the study includes the Bond-Gottlieb 14-element method (BG14) and extends the investigation of Encke-Nystrom methods to integrators of higher order and with variable step size.

  17. On the Assessment of Acoustic Scattering and Shielding by Time Domain Boundary Integral Equation Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Fang Q.; Pizzo, Michelle E.; Nark, Douglas M.

    2016-01-01

    Based on the time domain boundary integral equation formulation of the linear convective wave equation, a computational tool dubbed Time Domain Fast Acoustic Scattering Toolkit (TD-FAST) has recently been under development. The time domain approach has a distinct advantage that the solutions at all frequencies are obtained in a single computation. In this paper, the formulation of the integral equation, as well as its stabilization by the Burton-Miller type reformulation, is extended to cases of a constant mean flow in an arbitrary direction. In addition, a "Source Surface" is also introduced in the formulation that can be employed to encapsulate regions of noise sources and to facilitate coupling with CFD simulations. This is particularly useful for applications where the noise sources are not easily described by analytical source terms. Numerical examples are presented to assess the accuracy of the formulation, including a computation of noise shielding by a thin barrier motivated by recent Historical Baseline F31A31 open rotor noise shielding experiments. Furthermore, spatial resolution requirements of the time domain boundary element method are also assessed using point per wavelength metrics. It is found that, using only constant basis functions and high-order quadrature for surface integration, relative errors of less than 2% may be obtained when the surface spatial resolution is 5 points-per-wavelength (PPW) or 25 points-per-wavelength squared (PPW2).

  18. Technical note: A device for obtaining time-integrated samples of ruminal fluid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corley, R. N.; Murphy, M.R.; Lucena, J.; Panno, S.V.

    1999-01-01

    A device was adapted to allow for time-integrated sampling of fluid from the rumen via a cannula. The sampler consisted of a cup-shaped ceramic filter positioned in the ventral rumen of a cannulated cow and attached to a tube through which fluid entering the filter was removed continuously using a peristaltic pump. Rate of ruminal fluid removal using the device was monitored over two 36-h periods (at 6-h intervals) and was not affected (P > .05) by time, indicating that the system was not susceptible to clogging during this period. Two cows having ad libitum access to a totally mixed ration were used in a split-block design to evaluate the utility of the system for obtaining time-integrated samples of ruminal fluid. Ruminal fluid VFA concentration and pattern in samples collected in two replicated 8-h periods by the time-integrated sampler (at 1-h intervals) were compared with composite samples collected using a conventional suction-strainer device (at 30-min intervals). Each 8-h collection period started 2 h before or 6 h after feeding. Results indicated that total VFA concentration was not affected (P > .05) by the sampling method. Volatile fatty acid patterns were likewise unaffected (P > .05) except that acetate was 2.5% higher (P < .05) in samples collected 2 h before feeding and valerate was 5% higher (P < .05) in samples collected 6 h after feeding by the suction-strainer device. Although significant, these differences were not considered physiologically important. We concluded that use of the ceramic filter improved the sampling of ruminal fluid by simplifying the technique and allowing time-integrated samples to be obtained.

  19. During Running in Place, Grid Cells Integrate Elapsed Time and Distance Run.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Benjamin J; Brandon, Mark P; Robinson, Robert J; Connerney, Michael A; Hasselmo, Michael E; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2015-11-04

    The spatial scale of grid cells may be provided by self-generated motion information or by external sensory information from environmental cues. To determine whether grid cell activity reflects distance traveled or elapsed time independent of external information, we recorded grid cells as animals ran in place on a treadmill. Grid cell activity was only weakly influenced by location, but most grid cells and other neurons recorded from the same electrodes strongly signaled a combination of distance and time, with some signaling only distance or time. Grid cells were more sharply tuned to time and distance than non-grid cells. Many grid cells exhibited multiple firing fields during treadmill running, parallel to the periodic firing fields observed in open fields, suggesting a common mode of information processing. These observations indicate that, in the absence of external dynamic cues, grid cells integrate self-generated distance and time information to encode a representation of experience.

  20. Integrated real-time neurofeedback system to raise the frontal lobe activity: design and implementation.

    PubMed

    Gil, Yeongjoon; Li, Gang; Lee, Jungtae

    2009-01-01

    The anti-social behaviors of the people who are characteristic of abnormal action have seriously affected our society. Recent years, with the development of brain science, the features of human's abnormal action have been identified by means of the low frontal lobe activities. However, in many countries, the corresponding systems for identification and treatment are in an insufficient situation. Thus, in this paper, an integrated portable and real-time neurofeedback system assisted by EEG has been developed. The algorithm for this system has been developed and its performance has been verified by the fMRI experiment. Through the experiment, we ensured that the subjects controlled and checked their frontal lobe activities by themselves via the integrated real-time neurofeedback system. And then, the potential human's abnormal action could be not only early detected, but also eased via neurofeedback system. Therefore, we expected that our system can be more benefit to individuals and society.

  1. An integrated optimal control algorithm for discrete-time nonlinear stochastic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kek, Sie Long; Lay Teo, Kok; Mohd Ismail, A. A.

    2010-12-01

    Consider a discrete-time nonlinear system with random disturbances appearing in the real plant and the output channel where the randomly perturbed output is measurable. An iterative procedure based on the linear quadratic Gaussian optimal control model is developed for solving the optimal control of this stochastic system. The optimal state estimate provided by Kalman filtering theory and the optimal control law obtained from the linear quadratic regulator problem are then integrated into the dynamic integrated system optimisation and parameter estimation algorithm. The iterative solutions of the optimal control problem for the model obtained converge to the solution of the original optimal control problem of the discrete-time nonlinear system, despite model-reality differences, when the convergence is achieved. An illustrative example is solved using the method proposed. The results obtained show the effectiveness of the algorithm proposed.

  2. 50 Gbit/s real-time test environment for integrated photonic DQPSK receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Föhn, T.; Fischer, C.; Berroth, M.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper an FPGA-based test system for high-speed transmission experiments with integrated photonic receivers is presented. Pseudorandom binary sequences are generated inside the FPGA and encoded as either differential quadrature phase shift keying (DQPSK) or quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) signals. The DQPSK encoder uses a 64-fold parallel-prefix-layers architecture for real-time operation which allows for a maximum internal encoder data rate of 64 Gbit/s. Two-fold parallel data streams of I and Q signals suitable for driving an optical IQ-modulator can be transmitted and received by four 12.5 Gbit/s transceivers. Integrated bit error testers are used to determine bit error rates in real-time.

  3. First-passage times in integrate-and-fire neurons with stochastic thresholds.

    PubMed

    Braun, Wilhelm; Matthews, Paul C; Thul, Rüdiger

    2015-05-01

    We consider a leaky integrate-and-fire neuron with deterministic subthreshold dynamics and a firing threshold that evolves as an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. The formulation of this minimal model is motivated by the experimentally observed widespread variation of neural firing thresholds. We show numerically that the mean first-passage time can depend nonmonotonically on the noise amplitude. For sufficiently large values of the correlation time of the stochastic threshold the mean first-passage time is maximal for nonvanishing noise. We provide an explanation for this effect by analytically transforming the original model into a first-passage-time problem for Brownian motion. This transformation also allows for a perturbative calculation of the first-passage-time histograms. In turn this provides quantitative insights into the mechanisms that lead to the nonmonotonic behavior of the mean first-passage time. The perturbation expansion is in excellent agreement with direct numerical simulations. The approach developed here can be applied to any deterministic subthreshold dynamics and any Gauss-Markov processes for the firing threshold. This opens up the possibility to incorporate biophysically detailed components into the subthreshold dynamics, rendering our approach a powerful framework that sits between traditional integrate-and-fire models and complex mechanistic descriptions of neural dynamics.

  4. Determination of electron-impact transfer rate coefficients between argon 1s2 and 1s3 states by laser pump-probe technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, E. A. D.; Hübner, S.; van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.; Kroesen, G. M. W.; Sadeghi, N.

    2013-10-01

    In a microwave argon plasma, the electron-impact population transfers between the first four excited states of argon are studied by time-resolved laser pump-probe technique. Metastable atoms in the 1s5 state (in Paschen's notation) are selectively pumped up to the 2p3 state, with a nanosecond pulsed dye laser tuned to the 706 nm argon transition and the temporal response of the densities in the 1s3, 1s4 and 1s5 states are monitored by time-resolved laser diode absorption. The electron density and temperature are also measured by Thomson scattering along the plasma column for different pressures. The rate coefficient measured for the 1s3 to 1s2 state transfer, for which only rough estimations exist in the literature is found to be 9 × 10-13 m3 s-1, almost five times larger than the value commonly assumed.

  5. Constantly stirred sorbent and continuous flow integrative sampler: new integrative samplers for the time weighted average water monitoring.

    PubMed

    Llorca, Julio; Gutiérrez, Cristina; Capilla, Elisabeth; Tortajada, Rafael; Sanjuán, Lorena; Fuentes, Alicia; Valor, Ignacio

    2009-07-31

    Two innovative integrative samplers have been developed enabling high sampling rates unaffected by turbulences (thus avoiding the use of performance reference compounds) and with negligible lag time values. The first, called the constantly stirred sorbent (CSS) consists of a rotator head that holds the sorbent. The rotation speed given to the head generates a constant turbulence around the sorbent making it independent of the external hydrodynamics. The second, called the continuous flow integrative sampler (CFIS) consists of a small peristaltic pump which produces a constant flow through a glass cell. The sorbent is located inside this cell. Although different sorbents can be used, poly(dimethylsiloxane) PDMS under the commercial twister format (typically used for stir bar sorptive extraction) was evaluated for the sampling of six polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and three organochlorine pesticides. These new devices have many analogies with passive samplers but cannot truly be defined as such since they need a small energy supply of around 0.5 W supplied by a battery. Sampling rates from 181 x 10(-3) to 791 x 10(-3) L/day were obtained with CSS and 18 x 10(-3) to 53 x 10(-3) with CFIS. Limits of detection for these devices are in the range from 0.3 to 544 pg/L with a precision below 20%. An in field evaluation for both devices was carried out for a 5 days sampling period in the outlet of a waste water treatment plant with comparable results to those obtained with a classical sampling method.

  6. Study of time-accurate integration of the variable-density Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaoyi; Pantano, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    We present several theoretical elements that affect time-consistent integration of the low-Mach number approximation of variable-density Navier-Stokes equations. The goal is for velocity, pressure, density, and scalars to achieve uniform order of accuracy, consistent with the time integrator being used. We show examples of second-order (using Crank-Nicolson and Adams-Bashforth) and third-order (using additive semi-implicit Runge-Kutta) uniform convergence with the proposed conceptual framework. Furthermore, the consistent approach can be extended to other time integrators. In addition, the method is formulated using approximate/incomplete factorization methods for easy incorporation in existing solvers. One of the observed benefits of the proposed approach is improved stability, even for large density difference, in comparison with other existing formulations. A linearized stability analysis is also carried out for some test problems to better understand the behavior of the approach. This work was supported in part by the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, under award no. DE-NA0002382 and the California Institute of Technology.

  7. Focusing of synthetic aperture radar ocean images with long integration times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasilingam, Dayalan P.; Hayt, David W.; Shemdin, Omar H.

    1991-09-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images obtained in the SAR and X Band Ocean Nonlinearities: Chesapeake Light Tower (SAXON:CLT) experiment are processed with long integration times (6 s) and analyzed to study the effects of focusing. Two images with near-azimuth-traveling waves were chosen for the study. The first image consists of relatively short wavelength wind waves traveling in the same general direction as the aircraft. The second image consists of a long Atlantic swell traveling in the opposite direction to the aircraft. At these long integration times the image spectral intensities are found to be sensitive to the focus setting. The spectral intensity at the optimum focus is 400% of that at zero focus for the first image and 167% for the second image. The focusing curves for both images agree well with those predicted by a model developed by several groups and referred to here as the "consensus" model. This model predicts an optimum focus setting that is equal to one half of the effective phase speed of the dominant wave in the azimuth direction. The velocity bunching model underpredicts the optimum focus setting significantly. The study concludes that in long-integration-time SAR processing of surface waves, such as the spotlight mode, the image contrast is sensitively dependent on the focus setting and that the optimum focus setting is given by one half of the effective phase speed of the dominant surface wave.

  8. Constrained adiabatic trajectory method: a global integrator for explicitly time-dependent Hamiltonians.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, A; Jolicard, G; Viennot, D; Killingbeck, J P

    2012-01-07

    The constrained adiabatic trajectory method (CATM) is reexamined as an integrator for the Schrödinger equation. An initial discussion places the CATM in the context of the different integrators used in the literature for time-independent or explicitly time-dependent Hamiltonians. The emphasis is put on adiabatic processes and within this adiabatic framework the interdependence between the CATM, the wave operator, the Floquet, and the (t, t') theories is presented in detail. Two points are then more particularly analyzed and illustrated by a numerical calculation describing the H(2)(+) ion submitted to a laser pulse. The first point is the ability of the CATM to dilate the Hamiltonian spectrum and thus to make the perturbative treatment of the equations defining the wave function possible, possibly by using a Krylov subspace approach as a complement. The second point is the ability of the CATM to handle extremely complex time-dependencies, such as those which appear when interaction representations are used to integrate the system.

  9. Architecture for an integrated real-time air combat and sensor network simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criswell, Evans A.; Rushing, John; Lin, Hong; Graves, Sara

    2007-04-01

    An architecture for an integrated air combat and sensor network simulation is presented. The architecture integrates two components: a parallel real-time sensor fusion and target tracking simulation, and an air combat simulation. By integrating these two simulations, it becomes possible to experiment with scenarios in which one or both sides in a battle have very large numbers of primitive passive sensors, and to assess the likely effects of those sensors on the outcome of the battle. Modern Air Power is a real-time theater-level air combat simulation that is currently being used as a part of the USAF Air and Space Basic Course (ASBC). The simulation includes a variety of scenarios from the Vietnam war to the present day, and also includes several hypothetical future scenarios. Modern Air Power includes a scenario editor, an order of battle editor, and full AI customization features that make it possible to quickly construct scenarios for any conflict of interest. The scenario editor makes it possible to place a wide variety of sensors including both high fidelity sensors such as radars, and primitive passive sensors that provide only very limited information. The parallel real-time sensor network simulation is capable of handling very large numbers of sensors on a computing cluster of modest size. It can fuse information provided by disparate sensors to detect and track targets, and produce target tracks.

  10. A Time-Adaptive Integrator Based on Radau Methods for Advection Diffusion Reaction PDEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Pinto, S.; Perez-Rodriguez, S.

    2009-09-01

    The numerical integration of time-dependent PDEs, especially of Advection Diffusion Reaction type, for two and three spatial variables (in short, 2D and 3D problems) in the MoL framework is considered. The spatial discretization is made by using Finite Differences and the time integration is carried out by means of the L-stable, third order formula known as the two stage Radau IIA method. The main point for the solution of the large dimensional ODEs is not to solve the stage values of the Radau method until convergence (because the convergence is very slow on the stiff components), but only giving a very few iterations and take as advancing solution the latter stage value computed. The iterations are carried out by using the Approximate Matrix Factorization (AMF) coupled to a Newton-type iteration (SNI) as indicated in [5], which turns out in an acceptably cheap iteration, like Alternating Directions Methods (ADI) of Peaceman and Rachford (1955). Some stability results for the whole process (AMF)-(SNI) and a local error estimate for an adaptive time-integration are also given. Numerical results on two standard PDEs are presented and some conclusions about our method and other well-known solvers are drawn.

  11. Assessing time-integrated dissolved concentrations and predicting toxicity of metals during diel cycling in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balistrieri, Laurie S.; Nimick, David A.; Mebane, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Evaluating water quality and the health of aquatic organisms is challenging in systems with systematic diel (24 hour) or less predictable runoff-induced changes in water composition. To advance our understanding of how to evaluate environmental health in these dynamic systems, field studies of diel cycling were conducted in two streams (Silver Bow Creek and High Ore Creek) affected by historical mining activities in southwestern Montana. A combination of sampling and modeling tools were used to assess the toxicity of metals in these systems. Diffusive Gradients in Thin Films (DGT) samplers were deployed at multiple time intervals during diel sampling to confirm that DGT integrates time-varying concentrations of dissolved metals. Thermodynamic speciation calculations using site specific water compositions, including time-integrated dissolved metal concentrations determined from DGT, and a competitive, multiple-metal biotic ligand model incorporated into the Windemere Humic Aqueous Model Version 6.0 (WHAM VI) were used to determine the chemical speciation of dissolved metals and biotic ligands. The model results were combined with previously collected toxicity data on cutthroat trout to derive a relationship that predicts the relative survivability of these fish at a given site. This integrative approach may prove useful for assessing water quality and toxicity of metals to aquatic organisms in dynamic systems and evaluating whether potential changes in environmental health of aquatic systems are due to anthropogenic activities or natural variability.

  12. Development of the Semi-implicit Time Integration in KIM-SH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NAM, H.

    2015-12-01

    The Korea Institute of Atmospheric Prediction Systems (KIAPS) was founded in 2011 by the Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) to develop Korea's own global Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) system as nine year (2011-2019) project. The KIM-SH is a KIAPS integrated model-spectral element based in the HOMME. In KIM-SH, the explicit schemes are employed. We introduce the three- and two-time-level semi-implicit scheme in KIM-SH as the time integration. Explicit schemes however have a tendancy to be unstable and require very small timesteps while semi-implicit schemes are very stable and can have much larger timesteps.We define the linear and reference values, then by definition of semi-implicit scheme, we apply the linear solver as GMRES. The numerical results from experiments will be introduced with the current development status of the time integration in KIM-SH. Several numerical examples are shown to confirm the efficiency and reliability of the proposed schemes.

  13. A 7.5 ps single-shot precision integrated time counter with segmented delay line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klepacki, K.; Szplet, R.; Pelka, R.

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes the design and test results of time interval counter featuring the single-shot precision of 7.5 ps root mean square (rms) and measurement range of 1 ms. These parameters have been achieved by combining direct counting method with a two-stage interpolation within a single clock period. Both stages of interpolation are based on the use of tapped delay lines stabilized by delay locked loop mechanism. In the first stage, a coarse resolution is obtained with the aid of high frequency multiphase clock, while in the second stage a sub-gate delay resolution is achieved with the use of differential delay line. To reduce the nonlinearities of conversion and to improve the precision of measurement, a novel segmented delay line is proposed. An important feature of this segmented delay line is partial overlapping of measurement range and resulting enhancement of both resolution and precision of time interval counter. The maximum integral nonlinearity error of the fine-stage interpolators does not exceed 16 ps and 14 ps in START and STOP interpolators, respectively. These errors have been identified by statistical calibration procedure and corrected to achieve single-shot precision better than 7.5 ps (rms). The time counter is integrated in a single ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) chip using a standard cost-effective 0.35 μm CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) process.

  14. A 7.5 ps single-shot precision integrated time counter with segmented delay line.

    PubMed

    Klepacki, K; Szplet, R; Pelka, R

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes the design and test results of time interval counter featuring the single-shot precision of 7.5 ps root mean square (rms) and measurement range of 1 ms. These parameters have been achieved by combining direct counting method with a two-stage interpolation within a single clock period. Both stages of interpolation are based on the use of tapped delay lines stabilized by delay locked loop mechanism. In the first stage, a coarse resolution is obtained with the aid of high frequency multiphase clock, while in the second stage a sub-gate delay resolution is achieved with the use of differential delay line. To reduce the nonlinearities of conversion and to improve the precision of measurement, a novel segmented delay line is proposed. An important feature of this segmented delay line is partial overlapping of measurement range and resulting enhancement of both resolution and precision of time interval counter. The maximum integral nonlinearity error of the fine-stage interpolators does not exceed 16 ps and 14 ps in START and STOP interpolators, respectively. These errors have been identified by statistical calibration procedure and corrected to achieve single-shot precision better than 7.5 ps (rms). The time counter is integrated in a single ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) chip using a standard cost-effective 0.35 μm CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) process.

  15. Visuomotor integration is associated with zero time-lag synchronization among cortical areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelfsema, Pieter R.; Engel, Andreas K.; König, Peter; Singer, Wolf

    1997-01-01

    INFORMATION processing in the cerebral cortex invariably involves the activation of millions of neurons that are widely distributed over its various areas. These distributed activity patterns need to be integrated into coherent representational states. A candidate mechanism for the integration and coordination of neuronal activity between different brain regions is synchronization on a fine temporal scale1-3. In the visual cortex, synchronization occurs selectively between the responses of neurons that represent related features2-5 and that need to be integrated for the generation of coherent percepts; neurons in other areas of the cerebral cortex also synchronize their discharges6-10. However, little is known about the patterns and the behavioural correlates of synchrony among widely separated cortical regions. Here we report that synchronization occurs between areas of the visual and parietal cortex, and between areas of the parietal and motor cortex, in the awake cat. When cats responded to a sudden change of a visual pattern, neuronal activity in cortical areas exhibited synchrony without time lags; this synchrony was particularly strong between areas subserving related functions. During reward and inter-trial episodes, zero-time-lag synchrony was lost and replaced by interactions exhibiting large and unsystematic time lags.

  16. Designing driver assistance systems with crossmodal signals: multisensory integration rules for saccadic reaction times apply.

    PubMed

    Steenken, Rike; Weber, Lars; Colonius, Hans; Diederich, Adele

    2014-01-01

    Modern driver assistance systems make increasing use of auditory and tactile signals in order to reduce the driver's visual information load. This entails potential crossmodal interaction effects that need to be taken into account in designing an optimal system. Here we show that saccadic reaction times to visual targets (cockpit or outside mirror), presented in a driving simulator environment and accompanied by auditory or tactile accessories, follow some well-known spatiotemporal rules of multisensory integration, usually found under confined laboratory conditions. Auditory nontargets speed up reaction time by about 80 ms. The effect tends to be maximal when the nontarget is presented 50 ms before the target and when target and nontarget are spatially coincident. The effect of a tactile nontarget (vibrating steering wheel) was less pronounced and not spatially specific. It is shown that the average reaction times are well-described by the stochastic "time window of integration" model for multisensory integration developed by the authors. This two-stage model postulates that crossmodal interaction occurs only if the peripheral processes from the different sensory modalities terminate within a fixed temporal interval, and that the amount of crossmodal interaction manifests itself in an increase or decrease of second stage processing time. A qualitative test is consistent with the model prediction that the probability of interaction, but not the amount of crossmodal interaction, depends on target-nontarget onset asynchrony. A quantitative model fit yields estimates of individual participants' parameters, including the size of the time window. Some consequences for the design of driver assistance systems are discussed.

  17. Extending molecular simulation time scales: Parallel in time integrations for high-level quantum chemistry and complex force representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bylaska, Eric J.; Weare, Jonathan Q.; Weare, John H.

    2013-08-01

    Parallel in time simulation algorithms are presented and applied to conventional molecular dynamics (MD) and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) models of realistic complexity. Assuming that a forward time integrator, f (e.g., Verlet algorithm), is available to propagate the system from time ti (trajectory positions and velocities xi = (ri, vi)) to time ti + 1 (xi + 1) by xi + 1 = fi(xi), the dynamics problem spanning an interval from t0…tM can be transformed into a root finding problem, F(X) = [xi - f(x(i - 1)]i = 1, M = 0, for the trajectory variables. The root finding problem is solved using a variety of root finding techniques, including quasi-Newton and preconditioned quasi-Newton schemes that are all unconditionally convergent. The algorithms are parallelized by assigning a processor to each time-step entry in the columns of F(X). The relation of this approach to other recently proposed parallel in time methods is discussed, and the effectiveness of various approaches to solving the root finding problem is tested. We demonstrate that more efficient dynamical models based on simplified interactions or coarsening time-steps provide preconditioners for the root finding problem. However, for MD and AIMD simulations, such preconditioners are not required to obtain reasonable convergence and their cost must be considered in the performance of the algorithm. The parallel in time algorithms developed are tested by applying them to MD and AIMD simulations of size and complexity similar to those encountered in present day applications. These include a 1000 Si atom MD simulation using Stillinger-Weber potentials, and a HCl + 4H2O AIMD simulation at the MP2 level. The maximum speedup (serial execution time/parallel execution time) obtained by parallelizing the Stillinger-Weber MD simulation was nearly 3.0. For the AIMD MP2 simulations, the algorithms achieved speedups of up to 14.3. The parallel in time algorithms can be implemented in a distributed computing

  18. Extending molecular simulation time scales: Parallel in time integrations for high-level quantum chemistry and complex force representations

    SciTech Connect

    Bylaska, Eric J.; Weare, Jonathan Q.; Weare, John H.

    2013-08-21

    Parallel in time simulation algorithms are presented and applied to conventional molecular dynamics (MD) and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) models of realistic complexity. Assuming that a forward time integrator, f (e.g., Verlet algorithm), is available to propagate the system from time t{sub i} (trajectory positions and velocities x{sub i} = (r{sub i}, v{sub i})) to time t{sub i+1} (x{sub i+1}) by x{sub i+1} = f{sub i}(x{sub i}), the dynamics problem spanning an interval from t{sub 0}…t{sub M} can be transformed into a root finding problem, F(X) = [x{sub i} − f(x{sub (i−1})]{sub i} {sub =1,M} = 0, for the trajectory variables. The root finding problem is solved using a variety of root finding techniques, including quasi-Newton and preconditioned quasi-Newton schemes that are all unconditionally convergent. The algorithms are parallelized by assigning a processor to each time-step entry in the columns of F(X). The relation of this approach to other recently proposed parallel in time methods is discussed, and the effectiveness of various approaches to solving the root finding problem is tested. We demonstrate that more efficient dynamical models based on simplified interactions or coarsening time-steps provide preconditioners for the root finding problem. However, for MD and AIMD simulations, such preconditioners are not required to obtain reasonable convergence and their cost must be considered in the performance of the algorithm. The parallel in time algorithms developed are tested by applying them to MD and AIMD simulations of size and complexity similar to those encountered in present day applications. These include a 1000 Si atom MD simulation using Stillinger-Weber potentials, and a HCl + 4H{sub 2}O AIMD simulation at the MP2 level. The maximum speedup ((serial execution time)/(parallel execution time) ) obtained by parallelizing the Stillinger-Weber MD simulation was nearly 3.0. For the AIMD MP2 simulations, the algorithms achieved speedups of up

  19. Method and apparatus for monitoring the integrity of a geomembrane liner using time domain reflectometry

    DOEpatents

    Morrison, John L.

    2001-04-24

    Leaks are detected in a multi-layered geomembrane liner by a two-dimensional time domain reflectometry (TDR) technique. The TDR geomembrane liner is constructed with an electrically conductive detection layer positioned between two electrically non-conductive dielectric layers, which are each positioned between the detection layer and an electrically conductive reference layer. The integrity of the TDR geomembrane liner is determined by generating electrical pulses within the detection layer and measuring the time delay for any reflected electrical energy caused by absorption of moisture by a dielectric layer.

  20. A 0.18-µm CMOS Array Sensor for Integrated Time-Resolved Fluorescence Detection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ta-chien D.; Sorgenfrei, Sebastian; Gong, Ping; Levicky, Rastislav; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the design of an active, integrated CMOS sensor array for fluorescence applications which enables time-gated, time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The 64-by-64 array is sensitive to photon densities as low as 8.8 × 106 photons/cm2 with 64-point averaging and, through a differential pixel design, has a measured impulse response of better than 800 ps. Applications include both active microarrays and high-frame-rate imagers for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. PMID:20436922

  1. Estimation of convective rain volumes utilizing the are-time-integral technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, L. Ronald; Smith, Paul L.

    1990-01-01

    Interest in the possibility of developing useful estimates of convective rainfall with Area-Time Integral (ATI) methods is increasing. The basis of the ATI technique is the observed strong correlation between rainfall volumes and ATI values. This means that rainfall can be estimated by just determining the ATI values, if previous knowledge of the relationship to rain volume is available to calibrate the technique. Examples are provided of the application of the ATI approach to gage, radar, and satellite measurements. For radar data, the degree of transferability in time and among geographical areas is examined. Recent results on transferability of the satellite ATI calculations are presented.

  2. Method and Apparatus for Monitoring the Integrity of a Geomembrane Liner using time Domain Reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, John L.

    1998-11-09

    Leaks are detected in a multi-layered geomembrane liner by a two-dimensional time domain reflectometry (TDR) technique. The TDR geomembrane liner is constructed with an electrically conductive detection layer positioned between two electrically non-conductive dielectric layers, which are each positioned between the detection layer and an electrically conductive reference layer. The integrity of the TDR geomembrane liner is determined by generating electrical pulses within the detection layer and measuring the time delay for any reflected electrical energy caused by absorption of moisture by a dielectric layer.

  3. An integrated real-time diagnostic concept using expert systems, qualitative reasoning and quantitative analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.M.; Lee, K.Y.; Kumara, S.; Levine, S.H.

    1989-01-01

    An approach for an integrated real-time diagnostic system is being developed for inclusion as an integral part of a power plant automatic control system. In order to participate in control decisions and automatic closed loop operation, the diagnostic system must operate in real-time. Thus far, an expert system with real-time capabilities has been developed and installed on a subsystem at the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) in Idaho, USA. Real-time simulation testing of advanced power plant concepts at the Pennsylvania State University has been developed and was used to support the expert system development and installation at EBR-II. Recently, the US National Science Foundation (NSF) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) have funded a Penn State research program to further enhance application of real-time diagnostic systems by pursuing implementation in a distributed power plant computer system including microprocessor based controllers. This paper summarizes past, current, planned, and possible future approaches to power plant diagnostic systems research at Penn State. 34 refs., 9 figs.

  4. Time-reversal symmetric resolution of unity without background integrals in open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, Naomichi; Ordonez, Gonzalo

    2014-12-15

    We present a new complete set of states for a class of open quantum systems, to be used in expansion of the Green’s function and the time-evolution operator. A remarkable feature of the complete set is that it observes time-reversal symmetry in the sense that it contains decaying states (resonant states) and growing states (anti-resonant states) parallelly. We can thereby pinpoint the occurrence of the breaking of time-reversal symmetry at the choice of whether we solve Schrödinger equation as an initial-condition problem or a terminal-condition problem. Another feature of the complete set is that in the subspace of the central scattering area of the system, it consists of contributions of all states with point spectra but does not contain any background integrals. In computing the time evolution, we can clearly see contribution of which point spectrum produces which time dependence. In the whole infinite state space, the complete set does contain an integral but it is over unperturbed eigenstates of the environmental area of the system and hence can be calculated analytically. We demonstrate the usefulness of the complete set by computing explicitly the survival probability and the escaping probability as well as the dynamics of wave packets. The origin of each term of matrix elements is clear in our formulation, particularly, the exponential decays due to the resonance poles.

  5. Night-Time Noise Index Based on the Integration of Awakening Potential.

    PubMed

    Tagusari, Junta; Takashima, Tomoya; Furukawa, Satoshi; Matsui, Toshihito

    2016-03-01

    Sleep disturbance induced by night-time noise is a serious environmental problem that can cause adverse health effects, such as hypertension and ischemic heart disease. Night-time noise indices are used to facilitate the enforcement of permitted noise levels during night-time. However, existing night-time noise indices, such as sound exposure level (SEL), maximum sound level (LA max) and night equivalent level (L night) are selected mainly because of practical reasons. Therefore, this study proposes a noise index based on neurophysiological determinants of the awakening process. These determinants have revealed that the potential on awakening is likely integrated into the brainstem that dominates wakefulness and sleep. From this evidence, a night-time noise index, N awake,year, was redefined based on the integration of the awakening potential unit (p unit) estimated from the existing dose-response relationships of awakening. The newly-defined index considers the total number of awakenings and covers a wide-range and number of noise events. We also presented examples of its applicability to traffic noise. Although further studies are needed, it may reveal a reasonable dose-response relationship between sleep disturbance and adverse health effects and provide a consistent explanation for the risks of different sound sources where the characteristics of noise exposure are quite different.

  6. A systematic method for constructing time discretizations of integrable lattice systems: local equations of motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchida, Takayuki

    2010-10-01

    We propose a new method for discretizing the time variable in integrable lattice systems while maintaining the locality of the equations of motion. The method is based on the zero-curvature (Lax pair) representation and the lowest-order 'conservation laws'. In contrast to the pioneering work of Ablowitz and Ladik, our method allows the auxiliary dependent variables appearing in the stage of time discretization to be expressed locally in terms of the original dependent variables. The time-discretized lattice systems have the same set of conserved quantities and the same structures of the solutions as the continuous-time lattice systems; only the time evolution of the parameters in the solutions that correspond to the angle variables is discretized. The effectiveness of our method is illustrated using examples such as the Toda lattice, the Volterra lattice, the modified Volterra lattice, the Ablowitz-Ladik lattice (an integrable semi-discrete nonlinear Schrödinger system) and the lattice Heisenberg ferromagnet model. For the modified Volterra lattice, we also present its ultradiscrete analogue.

  7. Extending molecular simulation time scales: Parallel in time integrations for high-level quantum chemistry and complex force representations.

    PubMed

    Bylaska, Eric J; Weare, Jonathan Q; Weare, John H

    2013-08-21

    Parallel in time simulation algorithms are presented and applied to conventional molecular dynamics (MD) and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) models of realistic complexity. Assuming that a forward time integrator, f (e.g., Verlet algorithm), is available to propagate the system from time ti (trajectory positions and velocities xi = (ri, vi)) to time ti + 1 (xi + 1) by xi + 1 = fi(xi), the dynamics problem spanning an interval from t0[ellipsis (horizontal)]tM can be transformed into a root finding problem, F(X) = [xi - f(x(i - 1)]i = 1, M = 0, for the trajectory variables. The root finding problem is solved using a variety of root finding techniques, including quasi-Newton and preconditioned quasi-Newton schemes that are all unconditionally convergent. The algorithms are parallelized by assigning a processor to each time-step entry in the columns of F(X). The relation of this approach to other recently proposed parallel in time methods is discussed, and the effectiveness of various approaches to solving the root finding problem is tested. We demonstrate that more efficient dynamical models based on simplified interactions or coarsening time-steps provide preconditioners for the root finding problem. However, for MD and AIMD simulations, such preconditioners are not required to obtain reasonable convergence and their cost must be considered in the performance of the algorithm. The parallel in time algorithms developed are tested by applying them to MD and AIMD simulations of size and complexity similar to those encountered in present day applications. These include a 1000 Si atom MD simulation using Stillinger-Weber potentials, and a HCl + 4H2O AIMD simulation at the MP2 level. The maximum speedup (serial execution/timeparallel execution time) obtained by parallelizing the Stillinger-Weber MD simulation was nearly 3.0. For the AIMD MP2 simulations, the algorithms achieved speedups of up to 14.3. The parallel in time algorithms can be implemented in a

  8. Integration of domain and resource-based reasoning for real-time control in dynamic environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Keith; Whitebread, Kenneth R.; Kendus, Michael; Cromarty, Andrew S.

    1993-01-01

    A real-time software controller that successfully integrates domain-based and resource-based control reasoning to perform task execution in a dynamically changing environment is described. The design of the controller is based on the concept of partitioning the process to be controlled into a set of tasks, each of which achieves some process goal. It is assumed that, in general, there are multiple ways (tasks) to achieve a goal. The controller dynamically determines current goals and their current criticality, choosing and scheduling tasks to achieve those goals in the time available. It incorporates rule-based goal reasoning, a TMS-based criticality propagation mechanism, and a real-time scheduler. The controller has been used to build a knowledge-based situation assessment system that formed a major component of a real-time, distributed, cooperative problem solving system built under DARPA contract. It is also being employed in other applications now in progress.

  9. Integrating and Visualizing Tropical Cyclone Data Using the Real Time Mission Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, H. Michael; Blakeslee, Richard; Conover, Helen; Hall, John; He, Yubin; Regner, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    The Real Time Mission Monitor (RTMM) is a visualization and information system that fuses multiple Earth science data sources, to enable real time decision-making for airborne and ground validation experiments. Developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, RTMM is a situational awareness, decision-support system that integrates satellite imagery, radar, surface and airborne instrument data sets, model output parameters, lightning location observations, aircraft navigation data, soundings, and other applicable Earth science data sets. The integration and delivery of this information is made possible using data acquisition systems, network communication links, network server resources, and visualizations through the Google Earth virtual globe application. RTMM is extremely valuable for optimizing individual Earth science airborne field experiments. Flight planners, scientists, and managers appreciate the contributions that RTMM makes to their flight projects. A broad spectrum of interdisciplinary scientists used RTMM during field campaigns including the hurricane-focused 2006 NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (NAMMA), 2007 NOAA-NASA Aerosonde Hurricane Noel flight, 2007 Tropical Composition, Cloud, and Climate Coupling (TC4), plus a soil moisture (SMAP-VEX) and two arctic research experiments (ARCTAS) in 2008. Improving and evolving RTMM is a continuous process. RTMM recently integrated the Waypoint Planning Tool, a Java-based application that enables aircraft mission scientists to easily develop a pre-mission flight plan through an interactive point-and-click interface. Individual flight legs are automatically calculated "on the fly". The resultant flight plan is then immediately posted to the Google Earth-based RTMM for interested scientists to view the planned flight track and subsequently compare it to the actual real time flight progress. We are planning additional capabilities to RTMM including collaborations with the Jet Propulsion

  10. The effect of ageing on multisensory integration for the control of movement timing.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Mark T; Wing, Alan M; Welchman, Andrew E

    2011-09-01

    Previously, it has been shown that synchronising actions with periodic pacing stimuli are unaffected by ageing. However, synchronisation often requires combining evidence across multiple sources of timing information. We have previously shown the brain integrates multisensory cues to achieve a best estimate of the events in time and subsequently reduces variability in synchronised movements (Elliott et al. in Eur J Neurosci 31(10):1828-1835, 2010). Yet, it is unclear if sensory integration of temporal cues in older adults is degraded and whether this leads to reduced synchronisation performance. Here, we test for age-related changes when synchronising actions to multisensory temporal cues. We compared synchronisation performance between young (N = 15, aged 18-37 years) and older adults (N = 15, aged 63-80 years) using a finger-tapping task to auditory and tactile metronomes presented unimodally and bimodally. We added temporal jitter to the auditory metronome to determine whether participants would integrate auditory and tactile signals, with reduced weighting of the auditory metronome as its reliability decreased under bimodal conditions. We found that older adults matched the performance of young adults when synchronising to an isochronous auditory or tactile metronome. When the temporal regularity of the auditory metronome was reduced, older adults' performance was degraded to a greater extent than the young adults in both unimodal and bimodal conditions. However, proportionally both groups showed similar improvements in synchronisation performance in bimodal conditions compared with the equivalent, auditory-only conditions. We conclude that while older adults become more variable in synchronising to less regular beats, they do not show any deficit in the integration of multisensory temporal cues, suggesting that using multisensory information may help mitigate any deficits in coordinating actions to complex timing cues.

  11. Integrity monitoring in real-time precise point positioning in the presence of ionospheric disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wezka, K.; Galas, R.

    2013-12-01

    Ionospheric disturbances are characterized as fast and random variability in the ionosphere. Those phenomena are difficult to predict, detect and model. Occurrence of some strong ionospheric disturbances can cause, inter alia degradation and interruption of GNSS signals. Therefore they are especially harmful for real-time applications, as for example Precise Point Positioning (PPP) in real time, where one of the most important requirements is to ensure the high level of reliability. In such applications verification and confirmation of a high trust degree towards the estimated coordinates is a very critical issue. In one of the previous papers (K. Wezka, 2012 -Identification of system performance parameters and their usability) two sets of parameters have been proposed for enhance reliability of the PPP. The first one for data quality control (QC) of the raw GNSS observations and the second one for examination of the quality, robustness and performance of various processing approaches (strategies). To the second group the following parameters has been proposed: accuracy, precision, availability, integrity and convergence time. In consideration of perturbation of GNSS signal resulting from sudden ionospheric disturbances, one of the most important demands is effective autonomous integrity monitoring. The poster presents first preliminary results of the applicability of the proposed parameters in order to ensure the high level of reliability/integrity of GNSS observations and positioning results under the presence of strong ionospheric anomalies. The data-set from continuously operated GNSS station located at high latitude, where ionospheric disturbances occur more frequently, were used for the analysis. Various selected Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) approaches for quality control of the GNSS observables are applied to the data sets recorded under different (low/quite and high) ionospheric activities. Based on those analyses the usability of the

  12. Higher-order time integration of Coulomb collisions in a plasma using Langevin equations

    DOE PAGES

    Dimits, A. M.; Cohen, B. I.; Caflisch, R. E.; ...

    2013-02-08

    The extension of Langevin-equation Monte-Carlo algorithms for Coulomb collisions from the conventional Euler-Maruyama time integration to the next higher order of accuracy, the Milstein scheme, has been developed, implemented, and tested. This extension proceeds via a formulation of the angular scattering directly as stochastic differential equations in the two fixed-frame spherical-coordinate velocity variables. Results from the numerical implementation show the expected improvement [O(Δt) vs. O(Δt1/2)] in the strong convergence rate both for the speed |v| and angular components of the scattering. An important result is that this improved convergence is achieved for the angular component of the scattering if andmore » only if the “area-integral” terms in the Milstein scheme are included. The resulting Milstein scheme is of value as a step towards algorithms with both improved accuracy and efficiency. These include both algorithms with improved convergence in the averages (weak convergence) and multi-time-level schemes. The latter have been shown to give a greatly reduced cost for a given overall error level when compared with conventional Monte-Carlo schemes, and their performance is improved considerably when the Milstein algorithm is used for the underlying time advance versus the Euler-Maruyama algorithm. A new method for sampling the area integrals is given which is a simplification of an earlier direct method and which retains high accuracy. Lastly, this method, while being useful in its own right because of its relative simplicity, is also expected to considerably reduce the computational requirements for the direct conditional sampling of the area integrals that is needed for adaptive strong integration.« less

  13. Higher-order time integration of Coulomb collisions in a plasma using Langevin equations

    SciTech Connect

    Dimits, A. M.; Cohen, B. I.; Caflisch, R. E.; Rosin, M. S.; Ricketson, L. F.

    2013-02-08

    The extension of Langevin-equation Monte-Carlo algorithms for Coulomb collisions from the conventional Euler-Maruyama time integration to the next higher order of accuracy, the Milstein scheme, has been developed, implemented, and tested. This extension proceeds via a formulation of the angular scattering directly as stochastic differential equations in the two fixed-frame spherical-coordinate velocity variables. Results from the numerical implementation show the expected improvement [O(Δt) vs. O(Δt1/2)] in the strong convergence rate both for the speed |v| and angular components of the scattering. An important result is that this improved convergence is achieved for the angular component of the scattering if and only if the “area-integral” terms in the Milstein scheme are included. The resulting Milstein scheme is of value as a step towards algorithms with both improved accuracy and efficiency. These include both algorithms with improved convergence in the averages (weak convergence) and multi-time-level schemes. The latter have been shown to give a greatly reduced cost for a given overall error level when compared with conventional Monte-Carlo schemes, and their performance is improved considerably when the Milstein algorithm is used for the underlying time advance versus the Euler-Maruyama algorithm. A new method for sampling the area integrals is given which is a simplification of an earlier direct method and which retains high accuracy. Lastly, this method, while being useful in its own right because of its relative simplicity, is also expected to considerably reduce the computational requirements for the direct conditional sampling of the area integrals that is needed for adaptive strong integration.

  14. Integrating Smartphone Technology at the Time of Discharge from a Child and Adolescent Inpatient Psychiatry Unit

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Jonathan M.; Sukhera, Javeed; Taylor-Gates, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Objective As smartphone technology becomes an increasingly important part of youth mental health, there has been little to no examination of how to effectively integrate smartphone-based safety planning with inpatient care. Our study sought to examine whether or not we could effectively integrate smartphone-based safety planning into the discharge process on a child and adolescent inpatient psychiatry unit. Method Staff members completed a survey to determine the extent of smartphone ownership in a population of admitted child and adolescent inpatients. In addition to quantifying smartphone ownership, the survey also tracked whether youth would integrate their previously-established safety plan with a specific safety planning application on their smartphone (Be Safe) at the time of discharge. Results Sixty-six percent (50/76) of discharged youth owned a smartphone, which is consistent with prior reports of high smartphone ownership in adult psychiatric populations. A minority of youth (18%) downloaded the Be Safe app prior to discharge, with most (68%) suggesting they would download the app after discharge. Notably, all patients who downloaded the app prior to discharge were on their first admission to a psychiatric inpatient unit. Conclusion Child and adolescent psychiatric inpatients have a clear interest in smartphone-based safety planning. Our results suggest that integrating smartphone-related interventions earlier in an admission might improve access before discharge. This highlights the tension between restricting and incorporating smartphone access for child and adolescent inpatients and may inform future study in this area. PMID:28331503

  15. Integral reinforcement learning for continuous-time input-affine nonlinear systems with simultaneous invariant explorations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Young; Park, Jin Bae; Choi, Yoon Ho

    2015-05-01

    This paper focuses on a class of reinforcement learning (RL) algorithms, named integral RL (I-RL), that solve continuous-time (CT) nonlinear optimal control problems with input-affine system dynamics. First, we extend the concepts of exploration, integral temporal difference, and invariant admissibility to the target CT nonlinear system that is governed by a control policy plus a probing signal called an exploration. Then, we show input-to-state stability (ISS) and invariant admissibility of the closed-loop systems with the policies generated by integral policy iteration (I-PI) or invariantly admissible PI (IA-PI) method. Based on these, three online I-RL algorithms named explorized I-PI and integral Q -learning I, II are proposed, all of which generate the same convergent sequences as I-PI and IA-PI under the required excitation condition on the exploration. All the proposed methods are partially or completely model free, and can simultaneously explore the state space in a stable manner during the online learning processes. ISS, invariant admissibility, and convergence properties of the proposed methods are also investigated, and related with these, we show the design principles of the exploration for safe learning. Neural-network-based implementation methods for the proposed schemes are also presented in this paper. Finally, several numerical simulations are carried out to verify the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  16. Extending molecular simulation time scales: Parallel in time integrations for high-level quantum chemistry and complex force representations

    SciTech Connect

    Bylaska, Eric J.; Weare, Jonathan Q.; Weare, John H.

    2013-08-21

    Parallel in time simulation algorithms are presented and applied to conventional molecular dynamics (MD) and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) models of realistic complexity. Assuming that a forward time integrator, f , (e.g. Verlet algorithm) is available to propagate the system from time ti (trajectory positions and velocities xi = (ri; vi)) to time ti+1 (xi+1) by xi+1 = fi(xi), the dynamics problem spanning an interval from t0 : : : tM can be transformed into a root finding problem, F(X) = [xi - f (x(i-1)]i=1;M = 0, for the trajectory variables. The root finding problem is solved using a variety of optimization techniques, including quasi-Newton and preconditioned quasi-Newton optimization schemes that are all unconditionally convergent. The algorithms are parallelized by assigning a processor to each time-step entry in the columns of F(X). The relation of this approach to other recently proposed parallel in time methods is discussed and the effectiveness of various approaches to solving the root finding problem are tested. We demonstrate that more efficient dynamical models based on simplified interactions or coarsening time-steps provide preconditioners for the root finding problem. However, for MD and AIMD simulations such preconditioners are not required to obtain reasonable convergence and their cost must be considered in the performance of the algorithm. The parallel in time algorithms developed are tested by applying them to MD and AIMD simulations of size and complexity similar to those encountered in present day applications. These include a 1000 Si atom MD simulation using Stillinger-Weber potentials, and a HCl+4H2O AIMD simulation at the MP2 level. The maximum speedup obtained by parallelizing the Stillinger-Weber MD simulation was nearly 3.0. For the AIMD MP2 simulations the algorithms achieved speedups of up to 14.3. The parallel in time algorithms can be implemented in a distributed computing environment using very slow TCP/IP networks. Scripts

  17. Comparing numerical integration schemes for time-continuous car-following models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiber, Martin; Kanagaraj, Venkatesan

    2015-02-01

    When simulating trajectories by integrating time-continuous car-following models, standard integration schemes such as the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method (RK4) are rarely used while the simple Euler method is popular among researchers. We compare four explicit methods both analytically and numerically: Euler's method, ballistic update, Heun's method (trapezoidal rule), and the standard RK4. As performance metrics, we plot the global discretization error as a function of the numerical complexity. We tested the methods on several time-continuous car-following models in several multi-vehicle simulation scenarios with and without discontinuities such as stops or a discontinuous behavior of an external leader. We find that the theoretical advantage of RK4 (consistency order 4) only plays a role if both the acceleration function of the model and the trajectory of the leader are sufficiently often differentiable. Otherwise, we obtain lower (and often fractional) consistency orders. Although, to our knowledge, Heun's method has never been used for integrating car-following models, it turns out to be the best scheme for many practical situations. The ballistic update always prevails over Euler's method although both are of first order.

  18. Integration of real-time 3D capture, reconstruction, and light-field display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoxing; Geng, Zheng; Li, Tuotuo; Pei, Renjing; Liu, Yongchun; Zhang, Xiao

    2015-03-01

    Effective integration of 3D acquisition, reconstruction (modeling) and display technologies into a seamless systems provides augmented experience of visualizing and analyzing real objects and scenes with realistic 3D sensation. Applications can be found in medical imaging, gaming, virtual or augmented reality and hybrid simulations. Although 3D acquisition, reconstruction, and display technologies have gained significant momentum in recent years, there seems a lack of attention on synergistically combining these components into a "end-to-end" 3D visualization system. We designed, built and tested an integrated 3D visualization system that is able to capture in real-time 3D light-field images, perform 3D reconstruction to build 3D model of the objects, and display the 3D model on a large autostereoscopic screen. In this article, we will present our system architecture and component designs, hardware/software implementations, and experimental results. We will elaborate on our recent progress on sparse camera array light-field 3D acquisition, real-time dense 3D reconstruction, and autostereoscopic multi-view 3D display. A prototype is finally presented with test results to illustrate the effectiveness of our proposed integrated 3D visualization system.

  19. FPGA-based real-time embedded system for RISS/GPS integrated navigation.

    PubMed

    Abdelfatah, Walid Farid; Georgy, Jacques; Iqbal, Umar; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2012-01-01

    Navigation algorithms integrating measurements from multi-sensor systems overcome the problems that arise from using GPS navigation systems in standalone mode. Algorithms which integrate the data from 2D low-cost reduced inertial sensor system (RISS), consisting of a gyroscope and an odometer or wheel encoders, along with a GPS receiver via a Kalman filter has proved to be worthy in providing a consistent and more reliable navigation solution compared to standalone GPS receivers. It has been also shown to be beneficial, especially in GPS-denied environments such as urban canyons and tunnels. The main objective of this paper is to narrow the idea-to-implementation gap that follows the algorithm development by realizing a low-cost real-time embedded navigation system capable of computing the data-fused positioning solution. The role of the developed system is to synchronize the measurements from the three sensors, relative to the pulse per second signal generated from the GPS, after which the navigation algorithm is applied to the synchronized measurements to compute the navigation solution in real-time. Employing a customizable soft-core processor on an FPGA in the kernel of the navigation system, provided the flexibility for communicating with the various sensors and the computation capability required by the Kalman filter integration algorithm.

  20. FPGA-Based Real-Time Embedded System for RISS/GPS Integrated Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Abdelfatah, Walid Farid; Georgy, Jacques; Iqbal, Umar; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2012-01-01

    Navigation algorithms integrating measurements from multi-sensor systems overcome the problems that arise from using GPS navigation systems in standalone mode. Algorithms which integrate the data from 2D low-cost reduced inertial sensor system (RISS), consisting of a gyroscope and an odometer or wheel encoders, along with a GPS receiver via a Kalman filter has proved to be worthy in providing a consistent and more reliable navigation solution compared to standalone GPS receivers. It has been also shown to be beneficial, especially in GPS-denied environments such as urban canyons and tunnels. The main objective of this paper is to narrow the idea-to-implementation gap that follows the algorithm development by realizing a low-cost real-time embedded navigation system capable of computing the data-fused positioning solution. The role of the developed system is to synchronize the measurements from the three sensors, relative to the pulse per second signal generated from the GPS, after which the navigation algorithm is applied to the synchronized measurements to compute the navigation solution in real-time. Employing a customizable soft-core processor on an FPGA in the kernel of the navigation system, provided the flexibility for communicating with the various sensors and the computation capability required by the Kalman filter integration algorithm. PMID:22368460

  1. Probing the time course of head-motion cues integration during auditory scene analysis.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hirohito M; Toshima, Iwaki; Pressnitzer, Daniel; Kashino, Makio

    2014-01-01

    The perceptual organization of auditory scenes is a hard but important problem to solve for human listeners. It is thus likely that cues from several modalities are pooled for auditory scene analysis, including sensory-motor cues related to the active exploration of the scene. We previously reported a strong effect of head motion on auditory streaming. Streaming refers to an experimental paradigm where listeners hear sequences of pure tones, and rate their perception of one or more subjective sources called streams. To disentangle the effects of head motion (changes in acoustic cues at the ear, subjective location cues, and motor cues), we used a robotic telepresence system, Telehead. We found that head motion induced perceptual reorganization even when the acoustic scene had not changed. Here we reanalyzed the same data to probe the time course of sensory-motor integration. We show that motor cues had a different time course compared to acoustic or subjective location cues: motor cues impacted perceptual organization earlier and for a shorter time than other cues, with successive positive and negative contributions to streaming. An additional experiment controlled for the effects of volitional anticipatory components, and found that arm or leg movements did not have any impact on scene analysis. These data provide a first investigation of the time course of the complex integration of sensory-motor cues in an auditory scene analysis task, and they suggest a loose temporal coupling between the different mechanisms involved.

  2. On the integration of fields and quanta in time dependent backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Esteban; Koch, Benjamin; Palma, Gonzalo

    2014-05-01

    Field theories with global continuous symmetries may admit configurations in which time translation invariance is broken by the movement of homogeneous background fields evolving along the flat directions implied by the symmetries. In this context, the field fluctuations along the broken symmetry are well parametrized by a Goldstone boson field that may non-trivially interact with other fields present in the theory. These interactions violate Lorentz invariance as a result of the broken time translation invariance of the background, producing a mixing between the field content and the particle spectrum of the theory. In this article we study the effects of such interactions on the low energy dynamics of the Goldstone boson quanta, paying special attention to the role of the particle spectrum of the theory. By studying the particular case of a canonical two-field model with a mexican-hat potential, we analyze the derivation of the low energy effective field theory for the Goldstone boson, and discuss in detail the distinction between integrating fields v/s integrating quanta, to finally conclude that they are equivalent. In addition, we discuss the implications of our analysis for the study of systems where time translation invariance is broken, such as cosmic inflation and time crystals.

  3. Higher Order Time Integration Schemes for the Unsteady Navier-Stokes Equations on Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jothiprasad, Giridhar; Mavriplis, Dimitri J.; Caughey, David A.

    2002-01-01

    The rapid increase in available computational power over the last decade has enabled higher resolution flow simulations and more widespread use of unstructured grid methods for complex geometries. While much of this effort has been focused on steady-state calculations in the aerodynamics community, the need to accurately predict off-design conditions, which may involve substantial amounts of flow separation, points to the need to efficiently simulate unsteady flow fields. Accurate unsteady flow simulations can easily require several orders of magnitude more computational effort than a corresponding steady-state simulation. For this reason, techniques for improving the efficiency of unsteady flow simulations are required in order to make such calculations feasible in the foreseeable future. The purpose of this work is to investigate possible reductions in computer time due to the choice of an efficient time-integration scheme from a series of schemes differing in the order of time-accuracy, and by the use of more efficient techniques to solve the nonlinear equations which arise while using implicit time-integration schemes. This investigation is carried out in the context of a two-dimensional unstructured mesh laminar Navier-Stokes solver.

  4. Equilibrium and Response Properties of the Integrate-and-Fire Neuron in Discrete Time

    PubMed Central

    Helias, Moritz; Deger, Moritz; Diesmann, Markus; Rotter, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The integrate-and-fire neuron with exponential postsynaptic potentials is a frequently employed model to study neural networks. Simulations in discrete time still have highest performance at moderate numerical errors, which makes them first choice for long-term simulations of plastic networks. Here we extend the population density approach to investigate how the equilibrium and response properties of the leaky integrate-and-fire neuron are affected by time discretization. We present a novel analytical treatment of the boundary condition at threshold, taking both discretization of time and finite synaptic weights into account. We uncover an increased membrane potential density just below threshold as the decisive property that explains the deviations found between simulations and the classical diffusion approximation. Temporal discretization and finite synaptic weights both contribute to this effect. Our treatment improves the standard formula to calculate the neuron's equilibrium firing rate. Direct solution of the Markov process describing the evolution of the membrane potential density confirms our analysis and yields a method to calculate the firing rate exactly. Knowing the shape of the membrane potential distribution near threshold enables us to devise the transient response properties of the neuron model to synaptic input. We find a pronounced non-linear fast response component that has not been described by the prevailing continuous time theory for Gaussian white noise input. PMID:20130755

  5. Asynchronous Periodic Edge-Event Triggered Control for Double-Integrator Networks With Communication Time Delays.

    PubMed

    Duan, Gaopeng; Xiao, Feng; Wang, Long

    2017-01-23

    This paper focuses on the average consensus of double-integrator networked systems based on the asynchronous periodic edge-event triggered control. The asynchronous property lies in the edge event-detecting procedure. For different edges, their event detections are performed at different times and the corresponding events occur independently of each other. When an event is activated, the two adjacent agents connected by the corresponding link sample their relative state information and update their controllers. The application of incidence matrix facilitates the transformation of control objects from the agent-based to the edge-based. Practically, due to the constraints of network bandwidth and communication distance, agents usually cannot receive the instantaneous information of some others, which has an impact on the system performance. Hence, it is necessary to investigate the presence of communication time delays. For double-integrator multiagent systems with and without communication time delays, the average state consensus can be asynchronously achieved by designing appropriate parameters under the proposed event-detecting rules. The presented results specify the relationship among the maximum allowable time delays, interaction topologies, and event-detecting periods. Furthermore, the proposed protocols have the advantages of reduced communication costs and controller-updating costs. Simulation examples are given to illustrate the proposed theoretical results.

  6. Enhanced studies on a composite time integration scheme in linear and non-linear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klarmann, S.; Wagner, W.

    2015-03-01

    In Bathe and Baig (Comput Struct 83:2513-2524, 2005), Bathe (Comput Struct 85:437-445, 2007), Bathe and Noh (Comput Struct 98-99:1-6, 2012) Bathe et al. have proposed a composite implicit time integration scheme for non-linear dynamic problems. This paper is aimed at the further investigation of the scheme's behaviour for use in case of linear and non-linear problems. Therefore, the examination of the amplification matrix of the scheme will be extended in order to get in addition the properties for linear calculations. Besides, it will be demonstrated that the integration scheme also has an impact on some of these properties when used for non-linear calculations. In conclusion, a recommendation for the only selectable parameter of the scheme will be given for application in case of geometrically non-linear calculations.

  7. A PI tuning rule for integrating plus dead time processes with parametric uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Mercader, Pedro; Baños, Alfonso

    2017-03-01

    A novel method to tune a Proportional-Integral (PI) compensator for an integrating plus dead time (IPDT) process, in presence of interval parametric uncertainty, is presented. The design is based on optimization of load disturbance rejection with constraints on the magnitude of the sensitivity and complementary sensitivity functions, that must be satisfied for any element belonging to a set of plants. Instead of solving this problem with a brute force approach (grid the uncertainty set), we prove that this problem can be solved by considering only two plants. That lets us to obtain a tuning rule, after using some approximations. To conclude, some examples will be given in order to elucidate the usefulness of the proposed tuning rule.

  8. Saturations-based nonlinear controllers with integral term: validation in real-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatorre, A. G.; Castillo, P.; Mondié, S.

    2016-05-01

    Popular saturations-based nonlinear controller usually include proportional and derivative components of the state or output. The fact that in many applications, these components do not suffice to insure the convergence to the desired output values, motivate the addition of an integral term. In this paper, three configurations of nonlinear controllers based on saturation functions are improved with an integral component. The stability of the three algorithms is analysed using the Lyapunov theory. Simulation results validate the proposed control laws when they are applied to nonlinear systems with constant and unknown perturbations. Real-time experiments realised with a quad-rotor aerial vehicle and a hovercraft vehicle show that the proposed scheme can follow autonomously some trajectories, and that it could be robust with respect to delays.

  9. Kinetic Analysis of Parallel-Consecutive First-Order Reactions with a Reversible Step: Concentration-Time Integrals Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mucientes, A. E.; de la Pena, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    The concentration-time integrals method has been used to solve kinetic equations of parallel-consecutive first-order reactions with a reversible step. This method involves the determination of the area under the curve for the concentration of a given species against time. Computer techniques are used to integrate experimental curves and the method…

  10. Time-varying spatial data integration and visualization: 4 Dimensions Environmental Observations Platform (4-DEOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paciello, Rossana; Coviello, Irina; Filizzola, Carolina; Genzano, Nicola; Lisi, Mariano; Mazzeo, Giuseppe; Pergola, Nicola; Sileo, Giancanio; Tramutoli, Valerio

    2014-05-01

    In environmental studies the integration of heterogeneous and time-varying data, is a very common requirement for investigating and possibly visualize correlations among physical parameters underlying the dynamics of complex phenomena. Datasets used in such kind of applications has often different spatial and temporal resolutions. In some case superimposition of asynchronous layers is required. Traditionally the platforms used to perform spatio-temporal visual data analyses allow to overlay spatial data, managing the time using 'snapshot' data model, each stack of layers being labeled with different time. But this kind of architecture does not incorporate the temporal indexing neither the third spatial dimension which is usually given as an independent additional layer. Conversely, the full representation of a generic environmental parameter P(x,y,z,t) in the 4D space-time domain could allow to handle asynchronous datasets as well as less traditional data-products (e.g. vertical sections, punctual time-series, etc.) . In this paper we present the 4 Dimensions Environmental Observation Platform (4-DEOS), a system based on a web services architecture Client-Broker-Server. This platform is a new open source solution for both a timely access and an easy integration and visualization of heterogeneous (maps, vertical profiles or sections, punctual time series, etc.) asynchronous, geospatial products. The innovative aspect of the 4-DEOS system is that users can analyze data/products individually moving through time, having also the possibility to stop the display of some data/products and focus on other parameters for better studying their temporal evolution. This platform gives the opportunity to choose between two distinct display modes for time interval or for single instant. Users can choose to visualize data/products in two ways: i) showing each parameter in a dedicated window or ii) visualize all parameters overlapped in a single window. A sliding time bar, allows

  11. Timely integration of safeguards and security with projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.; Blount, P. M.; Garcia, S. W.; Gonzales, R. L.; Salazar, J. B.; Campbell, C. H.

    2004-01-01

    The Safeguards and Security (S&S) Requirements Integration Team at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has developed and implemented an innovative management process that will be described in detail. This process systematically integrates S&S planning into construction, facility modifications or upgrades, mission changes, and operational projects. It extends and expands the opportunities provided by the DOE project management manual, DOE M 413.3-1. Through a series of LANL documents, a process is defined and implemented that formally identifies an S&S professional to oversee, coordinate, facilitate, and communicate among the identified S&S organizations and the project organizations over the life cycle of the project. The derived benefits, namely (1) elimination/reduction of re-work or costly retrofitting, (2) overall project cost savings because of timely and improved planning, (3) formal documentation, and (4) support of Integrated Safeguards and Security Management at LANL, will be discussed. How many times, during the construction of a new facility or the modification of an existing facility, have the persons responsible for the project waited until the last possible minute or until after construction is completed to approach the security organizations for their help in safeguarding and securing the facility? It's almost like, 'Oh, by the way, do we need access control and a fence around this building and just what are we going to do with our classified anyway?' Not only is it usually difficult; it's also typically expensive to retrofit or plan for safeguards and security after the fact. Safeguards and security organizations are often blamed for budget overruns and delays in facility occupancy and program startup, but these problems are usually due to poor front-end planning. In an effort to help projects engage safeguards and security in the pre-conceptual or conceptual stages, we implemented a high level formality of operations. We established institutional

  12. Time-Dependent and Time-Integrated Angular Analysis of B -> phi Ks pi0 and B -> phi K+ pi-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V

    2008-08-04

    We perform a time-dependent and time-integrated angular analysis of the B{sup 0} {yields} {psi}K*(892){sup 0}, {psi}K*{sub 2}(1430{sup 0}), and {psi}(K{pi}){sub S-wave}{sup 0} decays with the final sample of about 465 million B{bar B} pairs recorded with the BABAR detector. Overall, twelve parameters are measured for the vector-vector decay, nine parameters for the vector-tensor decay, and three parameters for the vector-scalar decay, including the branching fractions, CP-violation parameters, and parameters sensitive to final state interaction. We use the dependence on the K{pi} invariant mass of the interference between the scalar and vector or tensor components to resolve discrete ambiguities of the strong and weak phases. We use the time-evolution of the B {yields} {psi}K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} channel to extract the CP-violation phase difference {Delta}{phi}{sub 00} = 0.28 {+-} 0.42 {+-} 0.04 between the B and {bar B} decay amplitudes. When the B {yields} {psi}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} channel is included, the fractions of longitudinal polarization f{sub L} of the vector-vector and vector-tensor decay modes are measured to be 0.494 {+-} 0.034 {+-} 0.013 and 0.901{sub -0.058}{sup +0.046} {+-} 0.037, respectively. This polarization pattern requires the presence of a helicity-plus amplitude in the vector-vector decay from a presently unknown source.

  13. Black-and-white hole as a space-time with integrable singularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strokov, Vladimir N.; Lukash, Vladimir N.; Mikheeva, Elena V.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the problem of singularities in general relativity and emphasize the distinction that should be made between what is understood to be mathematical and physical singularities. We revise examples of space-times that conventionally contain a singularity which, in a sense, does not manifest itself physically. A special attention is paid to the case of integrable singularities for which we propose a well-defined mathematical procedure used to extend the space-time beyond the singularity. We argue that this type of singularity may connect the interior of a black hole with a newly born universe (a space-time referred to as black-and-white hole) giving a resolution to the problem of initial high density and symmetry of the universe. We exemplify by presenting toy models of eternal and astrophysical black-and-white holes.

  14. Integrated multi-channel receiver for a pulsed time-of-flight laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan; Liu, Ruqing; Zhu, Jingguo

    2015-04-01

    An integrated multi-channel receiver for a pulsed time-of-flight (TOF) laser rangefinder has been designed in this paper. The receiver chip as an important component of the laser radar device has been implemented in a 0.18um CMOS process. It consists of sixteen channels and every channel includes preamplifier, amplifier stages, high-pass filter and a timing discriminator which contains a timing comparator and a noise comparator. Each signal paths is independent of other channels. Based on the simulations, the bandwidth and transimpedance of the amplifier channel are 652MHz, 99dBΩ. Under the simulation condition of TT corner and 27°C, the propagation delay of the discriminator is 2.15ns and the propagation delay dispersion is 223ps. The power consumption during continuous measurement is 810mW, and the operating temperature range of the device is -10~60°C.

  15. Time travel paradoxes, path integrals, and the many worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, Allen

    2004-06-01

    We consider two approaches to evading paradoxes in quantum mechanics with closed timelike curves. In a model similar to Politzer’s, assuming pure states and using path integrals, we show that the problems of paradoxes and of unitarity violation are related; preserving unitarity avoids paradoxes by modifying the time evolution so that improbable events become certain. Deutsch has argued, using the density matrix, that paradoxes do not occur in the “many worlds interpretation.” We find that in this approach account must be taken of the resolution time of the device that detects objects emerging from a wormhole or other time machine. When this is done one finds that this approach is viable only if macroscopic objects traversing a wormhole interact with it so strongly that they are broken into microscopic fragments.

  16. Integrating SAR with Optical and Thermal Remote Sensing for Operational Near Real-Time Volcano Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, F. J.; Webley, P.; Dehn, J.; Arko, S. A.; McAlpin, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions are among the most significant hazards to human society, capable of triggering natural disasters on regional to global scales. In the last decade, remote sensing techniques have become established in operational forecasting, monitoring, and managing of volcanic hazards. Monitoring organizations, like the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), are nowadays heavily relying on remote sensing data from a variety of optical and thermal sensors to provide time-critical hazard information. Despite the high utilization of these remote sensing data to detect and monitor volcanic eruptions, the presence of clouds and a dependence on solar illumination often limit their impact on decision making processes. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems are widely believed to be superior to optical sensors in operational monitoring situations, due to the weather and illumination independence of their observations and the sensitivity of SAR to surface changes and deformation. Despite these benefits, the contributions of SAR to operational volcano monitoring have been limited in the past due to (1) high SAR data costs, (2) traditionally long data processing times, and (3) the low temporal sampling frequencies inherent to most SAR systems. In this study, we present improved data access, data processing, and data integration techniques that mitigate some of the above mentioned limitations and allow, for the first time, a meaningful integration of SAR into operational volcano monitoring systems. We will introduce a new database interface that was developed in cooperation with the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) and allows for rapid and seamless data access to all of ASF's SAR data holdings. We will also present processing techniques that improve the temporal frequency with which hazard-related products can be produced. These techniques take advantage of modern signal processing technology as well as new radiometric normalization schemes, both enabling the combination of

  17. Integrated survival analysis using an event-time approach in a Bayesian framework

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, Daniel P.; Dreitz, VJ; Heisey, Dennis M.

    2015-01-01

    Event-time or continuous-time statistical approaches have been applied throughout the biostatistical literature and have led to numerous scientific advances. However, these techniques have traditionally relied on knowing failure times. This has limited application of these analyses, particularly, within the ecological field where fates of marked animals may be unknown. To address these limitations, we developed an integrated approach within a Bayesian framework to estimate hazard rates in the face of unknown fates. We combine failure/survival times from individuals whose fates are known and times of which are interval-censored with information from those whose fates are unknown, and model the process of detecting animals with unknown fates. This provides the foundation for our integrated model and permits necessary parameter estimation. We provide the Bayesian model, its derivation, and use simulation techniques to investigate the properties and performance of our approach under several scenarios. Lastly, we apply our estimation technique using a piece-wise constant hazard function to investigate the effects of year, age, chick size and sex, sex of the tending adult, and nesting habitat on mortality hazard rates of the endangered mountain plover (Charadrius montanus) chicks. Traditional models were inappropriate for this analysis because fates of some individual chicks were unknown due to failed radio transmitters. Simulations revealed biases of posterior mean estimates were minimal (≤ 4.95%), and posterior distributions behaved as expected with RMSE of the estimates decreasing as sample sizes, detection probability, and survival increased. We determined mortality hazard rates for plover chicks were highest at <5 days old and were lower for chicks with larger birth weights and/or whose nest was within agricultural habitats. Based on its performance, our approach greatly expands the range of problems for which event-time analyses can be used by eliminating the

  18. Designing Driver Assistance Systems with Crossmodal Signals: Multisensory Integration Rules for Saccadic Reaction Times Apply

    PubMed Central

    Steenken, Rike; Weber, Lars; Colonius, Hans; Diederich, Adele

    2014-01-01

    Modern driver assistance systems make increasing use of auditory and tactile signals in order to reduce the driver's visual information load. This entails potential crossmodal interaction effects that need to be taken into account in designing an optimal system. Here we show that saccadic reaction times to visual targets (cockpit or outside mirror), presented in a driving simulator environment and accompanied by auditory or tactile accessories, follow some well-known spatiotemporal rules of multisensory integration, usually found under confined laboratory conditions. Auditory nontargets speed up reaction time by about 80 ms. The effect tends to be maximal when the nontarget is presented 50 ms before the target and when target and nontarget are spatially coincident. The effect of a tactile nontarget (vibrating steering wheel) was less pronounced and not spatially specific. It is shown that the average reaction times are well-described by the stochastic “time window of integration” model for multisensory integration developed by the authors. This two-stage model postulates that crossmodal interaction occurs only if the peripheral processes from the different sensory modalities terminate within a fixed temporal interval, and that the amount of crossmodal interaction manifests itself in an increase or decrease of second stage processing time. A qualitative test is consistent with the model prediction that the probability of interaction, but not the amount of crossmodal interaction, depends on target–nontarget onset asynchrony. A quantitative model fit yields estimates of individual participants' parameters, including the size of the time window. Some consequences for the design of driver assistance systems are discussed. PMID:24800823

  19. Integrated survival analysis using an event-time approach in a Bayesian framework

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Daniel P; Dreitz, Victoria J; Heisey, Dennis M

    2015-01-01

    Event-time or continuous-time statistical approaches have been applied throughout the biostatistical literature and have led to numerous scientific advances. However, these techniques have traditionally relied on knowing failure times. This has limited application of these analyses, particularly, within the ecological field where fates of marked animals may be unknown. To address these limitations, we developed an integrated approach within a Bayesian framework to estimate hazard rates in the face of unknown fates. We combine failure/survival times from individuals whose fates are known and times of which are interval-censored with information from those whose fates are unknown, and model the process of detecting animals with unknown fates. This provides the foundation for our integrated model and permits necessary parameter estimation. We provide the Bayesian model, its derivation, and use simulation techniques to investigate the properties and performance of our approach under several scenarios. Lastly, we apply our estimation technique using a piece-wise constant hazard function to investigate the effects of year, age, chick size and sex, sex of the tending adult, and nesting habitat on mortality hazard rates of the endangered mountain plover (Charadrius montanus) chicks. Traditional models were inappropriate for this analysis because fates of some individual chicks were unknown due to failed radio transmitters. Simulations revealed biases of posterior mean estimates were minimal (≤ 4.95%), and posterior distributions behaved as expected with RMSE of the estimates decreasing as sample sizes, detection probability, and survival increased. We determined mortality hazard rates for plover chicks were highest at <5 days old and were lower for chicks with larger birth weights and/or whose nest was within agricultural habitats. Based on its performance, our approach greatly expands the range of problems for which event-time analyses can be used by eliminating the

  20. Time to Integrate to Nest Test Evaluation in a Mouse DSS-Colitis Model

    PubMed Central

    Häger, Christine; Keubler, Lydia M.; Biernot, Svenja; Dietrich, Jana; Buchheister, Stephanie; Buettner, Manuela; Bleich, André

    2015-01-01

    Severity assessment in laboratory animals is an important issue regarding the implementation of the 3R concept into biomedical research and pivotal in current EU regulations. In mouse models of inflammatory bowel disease severity assessment is usually undertaken by clinical scoring, especially by monitoring reduction of body weight. This requires daily observance and handling of each mouse, which is time consuming, stressful for the animal and necessitates an experienced observer. The time to integrate to nest test (TINT) is an easily applicable test detecting disturbed welfare by measuring the time interval mice need to integrate nesting material to an existing nest. Here, TINT was utilized to assess severity in a mouse DSS-colitis model. TINT results depended on the group size of mice maintained per cage with most consistent time intervals measured when co-housing 4 to 5 mice. Colitis was induced with 1% or 1.5% DSS in group-housed WT and Cd14-deficient mice. Higher clinical scores and loss of body weight were detected in 1.5% compared to 1% DSS treated mice. TINT time intervals showed no dose dependent differences. However, increased clinical scores, body weight reductions, and increased TINT time intervals were detected in Cd14-/- compared to WT mice revealing mouse strain related differences. Therefore, TINT is an easily applicable method for severity assessment in a mouse colitis model detecting CD14 related differences, but not dose dependent differences. As TINT revealed most consistent results in group-housed mice, we recommend utilization as an additional method substituting clinical monitoring of the individual mouse. PMID:26637175

  1. Time to Integrate to Nest Test Evaluation in a Mouse DSS-Colitis Model.

    PubMed

    Häger, Christine; Keubler, Lydia M; Biernot, Svenja; Dietrich, Jana; Buchheister, Stephanie; Buettner, Manuela; Bleich, André

    2015-01-01

    Severity assessment in laboratory animals is an important issue regarding the implementation of the 3R concept into biomedical research and pivotal in current EU regulations. In mouse models of inflammatory bowel disease severity assessment is usually undertaken by clinical scoring, especially by monitoring reduction of body weight. This requires daily observance and handling of each mouse, which is time consuming, stressful for the animal and necessitates an experienced observer. The time to integrate to nest test (TINT) is an easily applicable test detecting disturbed welfare by measuring the time interval mice need to integrate nesting material to an existing nest. Here, TINT was utilized to assess severity in a mouse DSS-colitis model. TINT results depended on the group size of mice maintained per cage with most consistent time intervals measured when co-housing 4 to 5 mice. Colitis was induced with 1% or 1.5% DSS in group-housed WT and Cd14-deficient mice. Higher clinical scores and loss of body weight were detected in 1.5% compared to 1% DSS treated mice. TINT time intervals showed no dose dependent differences. However, increased clinical scores, body weight reductions, and increased TINT time intervals were detected in Cd14-/- compared to WT mice revealing mouse strain related differences. Therefore, TINT is an easily applicable method for severity assessment in a mouse colitis model detecting CD14 related differences, but not dose dependent differences. As TINT revealed most consistent results in group-housed mice, we recommend utilization as an additional method substituting clinical monitoring of the individual mouse.

  2. Automatic layout of integrated-optics time-of-flight circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennett-Fogg, Ruth D.

    1995-04-01

    This work describes the architecture and algorithms used in the computer aided design tool developed for the automatic layout of integrated optic, time of flight circuit designs. This is similar to the layout of electronic VLSI circuits, where total wire length and chip area minimization are the major goals. Likewise, total wire length and chip area minimization are also the goals in the layout of time of flight circuits. However, there are two major differences between the layout of time of flight circuits and VLSI circuits. First, the interconnection lengths of time of flight designs are exactly specified in order to achieve the necessary delays for signal synchronization. Secondly, the switching elements are 120 times longer than they are wide. This highly astigmatic aspect ratio causes severe constraints on how and where the switches are placed. The assumed development of integrated corner turning mirrors allows the use of a parallel, row based device placement architecture and a rectangular, fixed grid track system for the connecting paths. The layout process proceeds in two steps. The first step involves the use of a partial circuit graph representation to place the elements in rows, oriented in the direction of the signal flow. After iterative improvement of the placement, the second step proceeds with the routing of the connecting paths. The main problem in the automatic layout of time of flight circuits is achieving the correct path lengths without overlapping previously routed paths. This problem is solved by taking advantage of a certain degree of variability present in each path, allowing the use of simple heuristics to circumvent previously routed paths.

  3. Integrated Modeling of Time Evolving 3D Kinetic MHD Equilibria and NTV Torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, N. C.; Park, J.-K.; Grierson, B. A.; Haskey, S. R.; Nazikian, R.; Cui, L.; Smith, S. P.; Meneghini, O.

    2016-10-01

    New analysis tools and integrated modeling of plasma dynamics developed in the OMFIT framework are used to study kinetic MHD equilibria evolution on the transport time scale. The experimentally observed profile dynamics following the application of 3D error fields are described using a new OMFITprofiles workflow that directly addresses the need for rapid and comprehensive analysis of dynamic equilibria for next-step theory validation. The workflow treats all diagnostic data as fundamentally time dependent, provides physics-based manipulations such as ELM phase data selection, and is consistent across multiple machines - including DIII-D and NSTX-U. The seamless integration of tokamak data and simulation is demonstrated by using the self-consistent kinetic EFIT equilibria and profiles as input into 2D particle, momentum and energy transport calculations using TRANSP as well as 3D kinetic MHD equilibrium stability and neoclassical transport modeling using General Perturbed Equilibrium Code (GPEC). The result is a smooth kinetic stability and NTV torque evolution over transport time scales. Work supported by DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  4. Multiparameter radar study of rainfall: Potential application to area-time integral studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raghavan, R.; Chandrasekar, V.

    1994-01-01

    Multiparameter radars measure one or more additional parameters in addition to the coventional reflectivity factor. The combination of radar observations from a multiparameter radar is used to study the time evolution of rainstorms. A technique is presented to self-consistently compare the area-time integral (ATI) and rainfall volume estimates from convective storms, using two different measurements from a multiparameter radar. Rainfall volumes for the lifetime of individual storms are computed using the reflectivity at S band (10-cm wavelength) as well as one-way specific attenuation at X band (3-cm wavelength). Area-time integrals are computed by summing all areas in each radar snapshot having reflectivities (S band) in excess of a preselected threshold. The multiparameter radar data used in this study were acquired by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) CP-2 radar during the Cooperative Huntsville Meteorological Experiment (COHMEX) and the Convection and Precipitation/Electrification Experiment (CaPE), respectively. ATI studies were accomplished in this work using multiparameter radar data acquired during the lifetime of six convective events that occurred in the COHMEX radar coverage area. A case study from the COMHEX field campaign (20 July 1986) was selected to depict the various stages in the evolution of a storm over which the ATI and rainfall volume computations were performed using multiparameter radar data. Another case study from the CaPE field campaign (12 August 1991) was used to demonstrate the evolution of a convective cell based on differential reflectivity observations.

  5. Decomposition-order effects of time integrator on ensemble averages for the Nosé-Hoover thermostat.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Satoru G; Morishita, Tetsuya; Okumura, Hisashi

    2013-08-14

    Decomposition-order dependence of time development integrator on ensemble averages for the Nosé-Hoover dynamics is discussed. Six integrators were employed for comparison, which were extensions of the velocity-Verlet or position-Verlet algorithm. Molecular dynamics simulations by these integrators were performed for liquid-argon systems with several different time steps and system sizes. The obtained ensemble averages of temperature and potential energy were shifted from correct values depending on the integrators. These shifts increased in proportion to the square of the time step. Furthermore, the shifts could not be removed by increasing the number of argon atoms. We show the origin of these ensemble-average shifts analytically. Our discussion can be applied not only to the liquid-argon system but also to all MD simulations with the Nosé-Hoover thermostat. Our recommended integrators among the six integrators are presented to obtain correct ensemble averages.

  6. Data Integration in Support of a Real-Time Biosurveillance Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, S. L.; Scott, G. I.; Miglarese, J. V.

    2008-12-01

    Recent emergency and security events from both human and natural causes have increased the urgency for multidisciplinary data integration. For example, understanding natural resource mortalities on any given day and time of year may result in the timely identification of an intentional biological or chemical act, as well as assist in the development of recovery and restoration plans. The South Carolina Environmental Surveillance Network (ESN) is a real-time surveillance network of coastal-zone wildlife mortality incidents (e.g. fish kills, bird kills, animal disease outbreaks, harmful algal blooms, marine mammal strandings, etc.) that (1) notifies participating network science and regulatory experts of incidents; (2) allows for quick assessments of potential links between and among mortalities and (3) provides a mechanism to alert the emergency management community of incidents that could impact commerce and public health. The ESN data management system relies on a resource-based (or RESTful) approach and includes a Web mapping application that provides access to both real-time and historical data, as well as data flow that analyzes event co-occurrence and provides for email notification of a number of state and federal partners. Notably, it is not simply the occurrence, but the co-occurrence of these events that can signal emergency conditions; thus the real value of the ESN is in its integration of data streams across state and federal administrative lines that have historically provided barriers to data and information flow. In our experience, two recurring types of obstacles to data system integration are particularly challenging. One is the cultural tendency for an agency or agent to maintain tight control over data that they have collected. The second is the reluctance of Information Technology (IT) managers to allow remote access to data systems under their control, regardless of security measures taken. The ESN development has thus far been successful due

  7. Toward Integrated Operator Interface for Advanced Teleoperation under Time-Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, Antal K.; Fiorini, Paolo; Kim, Won Soo; Schenker, Paul

    1994-01-01

    This paper briefly describes an Advanced Teleoperator (ATOP) system and its control station where a variety of computer-based operator interface devices and techniques are integrated into a functional setting, accommodating a primary operator and secondary operators. Computer graphics is a key operator interface component in the control station where new types of manual interface devices also are employed. The results of some generic and applications task experiments are summarized, including the performance of a simulated remote satellite servicing task, carried out under four to eight seconds communications time delay, using satellite TV and Internet computer communication links. In conclusion, the paper highlights the lessons learned so far,.

  8. An integrated, subsurface characterization system for real-time, in-situ field analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgart, C.W.; Creager, J.; Mathes, J.; Pounds, T.; VanDeusen, A.; Warthen, B.

    1996-02-01

    This paper describes current efforts at AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T) to develop and field an in-situ, data analysis platform to acquire, process, and display site survey data in near real-time. In past years, FM and T has performed a number of site survey tasks. Each of these surveys was unique in application as well as in the type of data processing and analysis that was required to extract and visualize useful site characterization information. However, common to each of these surveys were the following specific computational and operational requirements: (1) a capability to acquire, process, and visualize the site survey data in the field; (2) a capability to perform all processing in a timely fashion (ideally real-time); and (3) a technique for correlating (or fusing) data streams from multiple sensors. Two more general, but no less important, requirements include system architecture modularity and positioning capability. Potential applications include: survey, evaluation, and remediation of numerous Department of Defense and Department of Energy waste sites; real-time detection and characterization of unexploded ordnance and landmines; survey, evaluation, and remediation of industrial waste sites; location of underground utility lines; and providing law enforcement agencies with real-time surveys of crime scenes. The paper describes an integrated data acquisition, processing, and visualization platform that is capable of performing in-situ data processing, interpretation, and visualization in real-time.

  9. Automatic layout of integrated-optic time-of-flight circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogg, Ruth D.

    1996-11-01

    This work describes the architecture and algorithms used in the computer-aided design tool developed for the automatic layout of integrated-optic, time-of-flight circuit designs. As in VLSI circuit layout, total wire length and chip area minimization are the goals in the layout of time-of-flight circuits. However, there are two major differences between the layout of time of flight circuits and VLSI circuits. First, the interconnection lengths of time-of-flight designs are exactly specified in order to achieve the necessary delays for signal synchronization. SEcondly, the switching elements are 120 times longer than they are wide. This highly astigmatic aspect ratio causes severe constraints on how and where the switches are placed. Assuming the continued development of corner turning mirrors allows the use of a parallel, row-based device placement architecture and a rectangular, fixed-grid track system for the connecting paths. The layout process proceeds in two steps. The first step involves the use of a partial circuit graph representation to place the elements in rows, oriented in the direction of the signal flow. After iterative improvement of the placement, the second step proceeds with the routing of the connecting paths. The main problem in the automatic layout of time-of-flight circuits is achieving the correct path lengths without overlapping previously routed paths. This problem is solved by taking advantage of a certain degree of variability present in each path, allowing the use of simple heuristics to circumvent previously routed paths.

  10. Real-time feedback control of pH within microfluidics using integrated sensing and actuation.

    PubMed

    Welch, David; Christen, Jennifer Blain

    2014-03-21

    We demonstrate a microfluidic system which applies engineering feedback principles to control the pH of a solution with a high degree of precision. The system utilizes an extended-gate ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (ISFET) along with an integrated pseudo-reference electrode to monitor pH values within a microfluidic reaction chamber. The monitored reaction chamber has an approximate volume of 90 nL. The pH value is controlled by adjusting the flow through two input channels using a pulse-width modulated signal applied to on-chip integrated valves. We demonstrate real-time control of pH through the feedback-controlled stepping of 0.14 pH increments in both the increasing and decreasing direction. The system converges to the pH setpoint within approximately 20 seconds of a step change. The integration of feedback theory into a microfluidic environment is a necessary step for achieving complete control over the microenvironment.

  11. Integration of hospitals: is it time for similar changes in Georgia?

    PubMed

    Skhvitaridze, Natia; Pitskhelauri, Nato; Nikolaishvili, Irakli

    2012-01-01

    Health care is the most difficult and dynamic industry where the expenditure has grown almost four times during the past 20 years. Constantly, there are demands for expenditure cuts, for effectiveness, for quality improvement and evaluation of economic risks. All the precise and sophisticated strategic decisions taken by hospitals are to guarantee maximum profits from scarce resources and good service from an organization in unstable environmental conditions. From the different development alternatives, hospitals might prefer a horizontal and vertical integration. The integration of stationary hospitals into a network is convenient from a financial and economic point of view. Benefits are also expected in other areas, such as economies of scale, the improvement of human resources organization as well as the management and service offering. Consequently, expenses will be reduced and incomes will grow. However, there are some important questions about integration to be discussed in this research, including: Is Georgia's health care sector ready for reform, are the qualitative and quantitative improvements achievable, and what is the main motivation?

  12. A simple method of independent treatment time verification in gamma knife radiosurgery using integral dose

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Jianyue; Drzymala, Robert; Li Zuofeng

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a simple independent dose calculation method to verify treatment plans for Leksell Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Our approach uses the total integral dose within the skull as an end point for comparison. The total integral dose is computed using a spreadsheet and is compared to that obtained from Leksell GammaPlan registered . It is calculated as the sum of the integral doses of 201 beams, each passing through a cylindrical volume. The average length of the cylinders is estimated from the Skull-Scaler measurement data taken before treatment. Correction factors are applied to the length of the cylinder depending on the location of a shot in the skull. The radius of the cylinder corresponds to the collimator aperture of the helmet, with a correction factor for the beam penumbra and scattering. We have tested our simple spreadsheet program using treatment plans of 40 patients treated with Gamma Knife registered in our center. These patients differ in geometry, size, lesion locations, collimator helmet, and treatment complexities. Results show that differences between our calculations and treatment planning results are typically within {+-}3%, with a maximum difference of {+-}3.8%. We demonstrate that our spreadsheet program is a convenient and effective independent method to verify treatment planning irradiation times prior to implementation of Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

  13. A fault detection scheme for linear discrete-time systems with an integrated online performance evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Steven X.; Shen, Bo; Wang, Zidong; Zhong, Maiying

    2014-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the design of the fault detection systems, into which a residual generation, evaluation and threshold are integrated, for linear discrete time-varying processes over a finite horizon. In the proposed design scheme, the residual generation is realised in the context of H∞ fault estimation with a prescribed attenuation level. This attenuation level is minimised by using the Krein-space linear estimation theory and, subsequently, an H∞ fault estimator with the minimum attenuation level is designed in terms of the solution to a set of Riccati-like recursions. For the residual evaluation and decision making purpose, the false alarm rate and fault detection rate indicators are introduced in the norm-based framework, which is integrated into the decision making procedure. For the online computations of the false alarm rate and fault detection rate indicators, further estimates delivered by the H∞ fault estimator are applied without additional (online) computations. By means of checking the change in the false alarm rate and fault detection rate indicators, a decision is then made. In this way, the fault detection performance can be significantly improved. Finally, one application example is exploited to demonstrate the application of the proposed integrated fault detection and performance evaluation schemes.

  14. An integrated device with high performance multi-function generators and time-to-digital convertors.

    PubMed

    Qin, X; Shi, Z; Xie, Y; Wang, L; Rong, X; Jia, W; Zhang, W; Du, J

    2017-01-01

    A highly integrated, high performance, and re-configurable device, which is designed for the Nitrogen-Vacancy (N-V) center based quantum applications, is reported. The digital compartment of the device is fully implemented in a Field-Programmable-Gate-Array (FPGA). The digital compartment is designed to manage the multi-function digital waveform generation and the time-to-digital convertors. The device provides two arbitrary-waveform-generator channels which operate at a 1 Gsps sampling rate with a maximum bandwidth of 500 MHz. There are twelve pulse channels integrated in the device with a 50 ps time resolution in both duration and delay. The pulse channels operate with the 3.3 V transistor-transistor logic. The FPGA-based time-to-digital convertor provides a 23-ps time measurement precision. A data accumulation module, which can record the input count rate and the distributions of the time measurement, is also available. A digital-to-analog convertor board is implemented as the analog compartment, which converts the digital waveforms to analog signals with 500 MHz lowpass filters. All the input and output channels of the device are equipped with 50 Ω SubMiniature version A termination. The hardware design is modularized thus it can be easily upgraded with compatible components. The device is suitable to be applied in the quantum technologies based on the N-V centers, as well as in other quantum solid state systems, such as quantum dots, phosphorus doped in silicon, and defect spins in silicon carbide.

  15. An integrated device with high performance multi-function generators and time-to-digital convertors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, X.; Shi, Z.; Xie, Y.; Wang, L.; Rong, X.; Jia, W.; Zhang, W.; Du, J.

    2017-01-01

    A highly integrated, high performance, and re-configurable device, which is designed for the Nitrogen-Vacancy (N-V) center based quantum applications, is reported. The digital compartment of the device is fully implemented in a Field-Programmable-Gate-Array (FPGA). The digital compartment is designed to manage the multi-function digital waveform generation and the time-to-digital convertors. The device provides two arbitrary-waveform-generator channels which operate at a 1 Gsps sampling rate with a maximum bandwidth of 500 MHz. There are twelve pulse channels integrated in the device with a 50 ps time resolution in both duration and delay. The pulse channels operate with the 3.3 V transistor-transistor logic. The FPGA-based time-to-digital convertor provides a 23-ps time measurement precision. A data accumulation module, which can record the input count rate and the distributions of the time measurement, is also available. A digital-to-analog convertor board is implemented as the analog compartment, which converts the digital waveforms to analog signals with 500 MHz lowpass filters. All the input and output channels of the device are equipped with 50 Ω SubMiniature version A termination. The hardware design is modularized thus it can be easily upgraded with compatible components. The device is suitable to be applied in the quantum technologies based on the N-V centers, as well as in other quantum solid state systems, such as quantum dots, phosphorus doped in silicon, and defect spins in silicon carbide.

  16. In a Time of Change: Integrating the Arts and Humanities with Climate Change Science in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, M.; Golux, S.; Franzen, K.

    2011-12-01

    The arts and humanities have a powerful capacity to create lines of communication between the public, policy and scientific spheres. A growing network of visual and performing artists, writers and scientists has been actively working together since 2007 to integrate scientific and artistic perspectives on climate change in interior Alaska. These efforts have involved field workshops and collaborative creative processes culminating in public performances and a visual art exhibit. The most recent multimedia event was entitled In a Time of Change: Envisioning the Future, and challenged artists and scientists to consider future scenarios of climate change. This event included a public performance featuring original theatre, modern dance, Alaska Native Dance, poetry and music that was presented concurrently with an art exhibit featuring original works by 24 Alaskan visual artists. A related effort targeted K12 students, through an early college course entitled Climate Change and Creative Expression, which was offered to high school students at a predominantly Alaska Native charter school and integrated climate change science, creative writing, theatre and dance. Our program at Bonanza Creek Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site is just one of many successful efforts to integrate arts and humanities with science within and beyond the NSF LTER Program. The efforts of various LTER sites to engage the arts and humanities with science, the public and policymakers have successfully generated excitement, facilitated mutual understanding, and promoted meaningful dialogue on issues facing science and society. The future outlook for integration of arts and humanities with science appears promising, with increasing interest from artists, scientists and scientific funding agencies.

  17. Advances in the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale--Developments and Integration with the Geologic Time Scale and Future Directions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissman, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    We celebrate the 50th anniversary of the publication of the Vine-Matthews/Morley-Larochelle hypothesis (Vine and Matthews, Nature, 1963, v. 199, #4897, p. 947-949), which integrated marine magnetic anomaly data with a rapidly evolving terrestrial-based geomagnetic polarity time scale (GPTS). The five decades of research since 1963 have witnessed the expansion and refinement of the GPTS, to the point where ages of magnetochron boundaries, in particular in the Cenozoic, can be estimated with uncertainties better than 0.1%. This has come about by integrating high precision geochronology, cyclostratigraphy at different time scales, and magnetic polarity data of increased quality, allowing extension of the GPTS back into the Paleozoic. The definition of a high resolution GPTS across time intervals of major events in Earth history has been of particular interest, as a specific magnetochron boundary correlated across several localities represents a singular global datum. A prime example is the end Permian, when some 80 percent of genus-level extinctions and a range of 75 to 96 percent species- level extinctions took place in the marine environment, depending upon clade. Much our understanding of the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB) is based on relatively slowly deposited marine sequences in Europe and Asia, yet a growing body of observations from continental sequences demonstrates a similar extinction event and new polarity data from some of these sequences are critical to refining the GPTS across the PTB and testing synchronicity of marine and terrestrial events. The data show that the end-Permian ecological crisis and the conodont calibrated biostratigraphic PTB both followed a key polarity reversal between a short interval (subchron) of reverse polarity to a considerably longer (chron) of normal polarity. Central European Basin strata (continental Permian and epicontinental Triassic) yield high-quality magnetic polarity stratigraphic records (Szurlies et al., 2003

  18. Real-time fast physical random number generator with a photonic integrated circuit.

    PubMed

    Ugajin, Kazusa; Terashima, Yuta; Iwakawa, Kento; Uchida, Atsushi; Harayama, Takahisa; Yoshimura, Kazuyuki; Inubushi, Masanobu

    2017-03-20

    Random number generators are essential for applications in information security and numerical simulations. Most optical-chaos-based random number generators produce random bit sequences by offline post-processing with large optical components. We demonstrate a real-time hardware implementation of a fast physical random number generator with a photonic integrated circuit and a field programmable gate array (FPGA) electronic board. We generate 1-Tbit random bit sequences and evaluate their statistical randomness using NIST Special Publication 800-22 and TestU01. All of the BigCrush tests in TestU01 are passed using 410-Gbit random bit sequences. A maximum real-time generation rate of 21.1 Gb/s is achieved for random bit sequences in binary format stored in a computer, which can be directly used for applications involving secret keys in cryptography and random seeds in large-scale numerical simulations.

  19. Adaptive Mesh Refinement and Adaptive Time Integration for Electrical Wave Propagation on the Purkinje System.

    PubMed

    Ying, Wenjun; Henriquez, Craig S

    2015-01-01

    A both space and time adaptive algorithm is presented for simulating electrical wave propagation in the Purkinje system of the heart. The equations governing the distribution of electric potential over the system are solved in time with the method of lines. At each timestep, by an operator splitting technique, the space-dependent but linear diffusion part and the nonlinear but space-independent reactions part in the partial differential equations are integrated separately with implicit schemes, which have better stability and allow larger timesteps than explicit ones. The linear diffusion equation on each edge of the system is spatially discretized with the continuous piecewise linear finite element method. The adaptive algorithm can automatically recognize when and where the electrical wave starts to leave or enter the computational domain due to external current/voltage stimulation, self-excitation, or local change of membrane properties. Numerical examples demonstrating efficiency and accuracy of the adaptive algorithm are presented.

  20. Compact time- and space-integrating SAR processor: design and development status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, Michael W.; Levy, James J.; Christensen, Marc P.; Michael, Robert R., Jr.; Mock, Michael M.

    1994-06-01

    Progress toward a flight demonstration of the acousto-optic time- and space- integrating real-time SAR image formation processor program is reported. The concept overcomes the size and power consumption limitations of electronic approaches by using compact, rugged, and low-power analog optical signal processing techniques for the most computationally taxing portions of the SAR imaging problem. Flexibility and performance are maintained by the use of digital electronics for the critical low-complexity filter generation and output image processing functions. The results reported include tests of a laboratory version of the concept, a description of the compact optical design that will be implemented, and an overview of the electronic interface and controller modules of the flight-test system.

  1. Fresnel integrals and irreversible energy transfer in an oscillatory system with time-dependent parameters.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, Agnessa; Manevitch, Leonid I; Kosevich, Yuriy A

    2011-02-01

    We demonstrate that in significant limiting cases the problem of irreversible energy transfer in an oscillatory system with time-dependent parameters can be efficiently solved in terms of the Fresnel integrals. For definiteness, we consider a system of two weakly coupled linear oscillators in which the first oscillator with constant parameters is excited by an initial impulse, whereas the coupled oscillator with a slowly varying frequency is initially at rest but then acts as an energy trap. We show that the evolution equations of the slow passage through resonance are identical to the equations of the Landau-Zener tunneling problem, and therefore, the suggested asymptotic solution of the classical problem provides a simple analytic description of the quantum Landau-Zener tunneling with arbitrary initial conditions over a finite time interval. A correctness of approximations is confirmed by numerical simulations.

  2. Adaptive Mesh Refinement and Adaptive Time Integration for Electrical Wave Propagation on the Purkinje System

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Wenjun; Henriquez, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    A both space and time adaptive algorithm is presented for simulating electrical wave propagation in the Purkinje system of the heart. The equations governing the distribution of electric potential over the system are solved in time with the method of lines. At each timestep, by an operator splitting technique, the space-dependent but linear diffusion part and the nonlinear but space-independent reactions part in the partial differential equations are integrated separately with implicit schemes, which have better stability and allow larger timesteps than explicit ones. The linear diffusion equation on each edge of the system is spatially discretized with the continuous piecewise linear finite element method. The adaptive algorithm can automatically recognize when and where the electrical wave starts to leave or enter the computational domain due to external current/voltage stimulation, self-excitation, or local change of membrane properties. Numerical examples demonstrating efficiency and accuracy of the adaptive algorithm are presented. PMID:26581455

  3. An integrated model of choices and response times in absolute identification.

    PubMed

    Brown, Scott D; Marley, A A J; Donkin, Christopher; Heathcote, Andrew

    2008-04-01

    Recent theoretical developments in the field of absolute identification have stressed differences between relative and absolute processes, that is, whether stimulus magnitudes are judged relative to a shorter term context provided by recently presented stimuli or a longer term context provided by the entire set of stimuli. The authors developed a model (SAMBA: selective attention, mapping, and ballistic accumulation) that integrates shorter and longer term memory processes and accounts for both the choices made and the associated response time distributions, including sequential effects in each. The model's predictions arise as a consequence of its architecture and require estimation of only a few parameters with values that are consistent across numerous data sets. The authors show that SAMBA provides a quantitative account of benchmark choice phenomena in classical absolute identification experiments and in contemporary data involving both choice and response time.

  4. Simulation of a Real-Time Local Data Integration System over East-Central Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) simulated a real-time configuration of a Local Data Integration System (LDIS) using data from 15-28 February 1999. The objectives were to assess the utility of a simulated real-time LDIS, evaluate and extrapolate system performance to identify the hardware necessary to run a real-time LDIS, and determine the sensitivities of LDIS. The ultimate goal for running LDIS is to generate analysis products that enhance short-range (less than 6 h) weather forecasts issued in support of the 45th Weather Squadron, Spaceflight Meteorology Group, and Melbourne National Weather Service operational requirements. The simulation used the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (ADAS) software on an IBM RS/6000 workstation with a 67-MHz processor. This configuration ran in real-time, but not sufficiently fast for operational requirements. Thus, the AMU recommends a workstation with a 200-MHz processor and 512 megabytes of memory to run the AMU's configuration of LDIS in real-time. This report presents results from two case studies and several data sensitivity experiments. ADAS demonstrates utility through its ability to depict high-resolution cloud and wind features in a variety of weather situations. The sensitivity experiments illustrate the influence of disparate data on the resulting ADAS analyses.

  5. Semi-implicit time integration for P{sub N} thermal radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    McClarren, Ryan G. Evans, Thomas M.; Lowrie, Robert B.; Densmore, Jeffery D.

    2008-08-10

    Implicit time integration involving the solution of large systems of equations is the current paradigm for time-dependent radiative transfer. In this paper we present a semi-implicit, linear discontinuous Galerkin method for the spherical harmonics (P{sub N}) equations for thermal radiative transfer in planar geometry. Our method is novel in that the material coupling terms are treated implicitly (via linearizing the emission source) and the streaming operator is treated explicitly using a second-order accurate Runge-Kutta method. The benefit of this approach is that each time step only involves the solution of equations that are local to each cell. This benefit comes at the cost of having the time step limited by a CFL condition based on the speed of light. To guarantee positivity and avoid artificial oscillations, we use a slope-limiting technique. We present analysis and numerical results that show the method is robust in the diffusion limit when the photon mean-free path is not resolved by the spatial mesh. Also, in the diffusion limit the time step restriction relaxes to a less restrictive explicit diffusion CFL condition. We demonstrate with numerical results that away from the diffusion limit our method demonstrates second-order error convergence as the spatial mesh is refined with a fixed CFL number.

  6. On-chip time resolved detection of quantum dot emission using integrated superconducting single photon detectors.

    PubMed

    Reithmaier, G; Lichtmannecker, S; Reichert, T; Hasch, P; Müller, K; Bichler, M; Gross, R; Finley, J J

    2013-01-01

    We report the routing of quantum light emitted by self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots (QDs) into the optical modes of a GaAs ridge waveguide and its efficient detection on-chip via evanescent coupling to NbN superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SSPDs). The waveguide coupled SSPDs primarily detect QD luminescence, with scattered photons from the excitation laser onto the proximal detector being negligible by comparison. The SSPD detection efficiency from the evanescently coupled waveguide modes is shown to be two orders of magnitude larger when compared with operation under normal incidence illumination, due to the much longer optical interaction length. Furthermore, in-situ time resolved measurements performed using the integrated detector show an average QD spontaneous emission lifetime of 0.95 ns, measured with a timing jitter of only 72 ps. The performance metrics of the SSPD integrated directly onto GaAs nano-photonic hardware confirms the strong potential for on-chip few-photon quantum optics using such semiconductor-superconductor hybrid systems.

  7. Automated/integrated real-time clinical decision support in acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Stuart L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Health information technology (HIT) advancements have resulted in recent increased sophistication of the electronic health record (EHR), whereby patient demographic, physiological and laboratory data can be extracted real-time and integrated into clinical decision support (CDS). Recent findings The implementation of HIT advancements into CDS in the renal realm have been focused mainly on assessment of kidney function, to guide medication dosing in the setting of reduced function, or to reactively detect acute kidney injury (AKI), heralded by an abrupt increase in serum creatinine. More recent work has combined risk stratification algorithms to guide proactive diagnostic or therapeutic intervention to prevent AKI or reduce its severity. Summary Early, real-time identification and notification to health care providers of patients at risk for, or with, acute or chronic kidney disease can drive simple interventions to reduce harm. Similarly, screening patients at risk for AKI with these platforms to alert research personnel will lead to improve study subject recruitment. However, sole reliance on EHR generated alerts without active health care team integration and assessment represents a major barrier to the realization of the potential of CDS to improve health care quality and outcomes. PMID:26539921

  8. On the spectral stability of time integration algorithms for a class of constrained dynamics problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhat, Charbel; Crivelli, Luis; Geradin, Michel

    1993-01-01

    Incomplete field formulations have recently been the subject of intense research because of their potential in coupled analysis of independently modeled substructures, adaptive refinement, domain decomposition, and parallel processing. This paper discusses the design and analysis of time-integration algorithms for these formulations and emphasizes the treatment of their inter-subdomain constraint equations. These constraints are shown to introduce a destabilizing effect in the dynamic system that can be analyzed by investigating the behavior of the time-integration algorithm at infinite and zero frequencies. Three different approaches for constructing penalty-free unconditionally stable second-order accurate solution procedures for this class of hybrid formulations are presented, discussed and illustrated with numerical examples. The theoretical results presented in this paper also apply to a large family of nonlinear multibody dynamics formulations. Some of the algorithms outlined herein are important alternatives to the popular technique consisting of transforming differential/algebraic equations into ordinary differential equations via the introduction of a stabilization term that depends on arbitrary constants and that influences the computed so1ution.

  9. Integrated microscopy for real-time imaging of mechanotransduction studies in live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trache, Andreea; Lim, Soon-Mi

    2009-05-01

    Mechanical force is an important stimulus and determinant of many vascular smooth muscle cell functions including contraction, proliferation, migration, and cell attachment. Transmission of force from outside the cell through focal adhesions controls the dynamics of these adhesion sites and initiates intracellular signaling cascades that alter cellular behavior. To understand the mechanism by which living cells sense mechanical forces, and how they respond and adapt to their environment, a critical first step is to develop a new technology to investigate cellular behavior at subcellular level that integrates an atomic force microscope (AFM) with total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) and fast-spinning disk (FSD) confocal microscopy, providing high spatial and temporal resolution. AFM uses a nanosensor to measure the cell surface topography and can apply and measure mechanical force with high precision. TIRF microscopy is an optical imaging technique that provides high-contrast images with high z-resolution of fluorescently labeled molecules in the immediate vicinity of the cell-coverslip interface. FSD confocal microscopy allows rapid 3-D imaging throughout the cell in real time. The integrated system is broadly applicable across a wide range of molecular dynamic studies in any adherent live cells, allowing direct optical imaging of cell responses to mechanical stimulation in real time.

  10. Integrating roots into a whole plant network of flowering time genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Bouché, Frédéric; D’Aloia, Maria; Tocquin, Pierre; Lobet, Guillaume; Detry, Nathalie; Périlleux, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Molecular data concerning the involvement of roots in the genetic pathways regulating floral transition are lacking. In this study, we performed global analyses of the root transcriptome in Arabidopsis in order to identify flowering time genes that are expressed in the roots and genes that are differentially expressed in the roots during the induction of flowering. Data mining of public microarray experiments uncovered that about 200 genes whose mutations are reported to alter flowering time are expressed in the roots (i.e. were detected in more than 50% of the microarrays). However, only a few flowering integrator genes passed the analysis cutoff. Comparison of root transcriptome in short days and during synchronized induction of flowering by a single 22-h long day revealed that 595 genes were differentially expressed. Enrichment analyses of differentially expressed genes in root tissues, gene ontology categories, and cis-regulatory elements converged towards sugar signaling. We concluded that roots are integrated in systemic signaling, whereby carbon supply coordinates growth at the whole plant level during the induction of flowering. This coordination could involve the root circadian clock and cytokinin biosynthesis as a feed forward loop towards the shoot. PMID:27352932

  11. Is perceived angular displacement the time integral of perceived angular velocity?

    PubMed

    Mergner, T; Rumberger, A; Becker, W

    1996-01-01

    Estimates of rotational self-displacement and self-velocity have been used interchangeably in vestibular psycho-physics to characterize vestibular ego-motion perception. However, the assumption underlying this indiscriminate use has never been tested. The assumption holds that the two estimates are equivalent, with the displacement estimates reflecting the time integral of the signal underlying the velocity estimate. We tested this hypothesis by directly comparing displacement and velocity estimates. Two groups of healthy young subjects (2 x n = 15) were presented with the same vestibular stimuli (horizontal whole body rotations in the dark in the form of velocity steps of 5, 10, 20, and 40 degrees/s with 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 s duration, yielding position ramps of 5, 10, 20, 40, 80, 160, and 320 degrees total displacement). The first subject group estimated peak velocity, and the second group estimated total displacement, both groups using a comparable psychophysical procedure (Stevens' magnitude estimation). The experimentally obtained velocity estimates were used to predict the displacement estimates. To this end, the velocity signal was assumed to decay exponentially from the reported peak value (reflecting the dynamics of peripheral and early central vestibular mechanisms) and was mathematically integrated. Predicted and measured displacement estimates were similar when a time constant of 20 s was assumed, which is in good agreement with earlier studies. We conclude that vestibular displacement estimates can, indeed, be considered equivalent to vestibular velocity estimates, at least for the stimulus parameters used.

  12. Time-filtered leapfrog integration of Maxwell equations using unstaggered temporal grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalov, A.; Moustaoui, M.

    2016-11-01

    A finite-difference time-domain method for integration of Maxwell equations is presented. The computational algorithm is based on the leapfrog time stepping scheme with unstaggered temporal grids. It uses a fourth-order implicit time filter that reduces computational modes and fourth-order finite difference approximations for spatial derivatives. The method can be applied within both staggered and collocated spatial grids. It has the advantage of allowing explicit treatment of terms involving electric current density and application of selective numerical smoothing which can be used to smooth out errors generated by finite differencing. In addition, the method does not require iteration of the electric constitutive relation in nonlinear electromagnetic propagation problems. The numerical method is shown to be effective and stable when employed within Perfectly Matched Layers (PML). Stability analysis demonstrates that the proposed method is effective in stabilizing and controlling numerical instabilities of computational modes arising in wave propagation problems with physical damping and artificial smoothing terms while maintaining higher accuracy for the physical modes. Comparison of simulation results obtained from the proposed method and those computed by the classical time filtered leapfrog, where Maxwell equations are integrated for a lossy medium, within PML regions and for Kerr-nonlinear media show that the proposed method is robust and accurate. The performance of the computational algorithm is also verified by analyzing parametric four wave mixing in an optical nonlinear Kerr medium. The algorithm is found to accurately predict frequencies and amplitudes of nonlinearly converted waves under realistic conditions proposed in the literature.

  13. Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalyn, Brenda

    2006-01-01

    Integrated learning is an exciting adventure for both teachers and students. It is not uncommon to observe the integration of academic subjects such as math, science, and language arts. However, educators need to recognize that movement experiences in physical education also can be linked to academic curricula and, may even lead the…

  14. Derivation and implementation of the boundary integral formula for the convective acoustic wave equation in time domain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Woo; Lee, Duck Joo

    2014-12-01

    Kirchhoff's formula for the convective wave equation is derived using the generalized function theory. The generalized convective wave equation for a stationary surface is obtained, and the integral formulation, the convective Kirchhoff's formula, is derived. The formula has a similar form to the classical Kirchhoff's formula, but an additional term appears due to a moving medium effect. For convenience, the additional term is manipulated to a final form as the classical Kirchhoff's formula. The frequency domain boundary integral can be obtained from the current time domain boundary integral form. The derived formula is verified by comparison with the analytic solution of source in the uniform flow. The formula is also utilized as a boundary integral equation. Time domain boundary element method (BEM) analysis using the boundary integral equation is conducted, and the results show good agreement with the analytical solution. The formula derived here can be useful for sound radiation and scattering by arbitrary bodies in a moving medium in the time domain.

  15. Integration of the ATLAS FE-I4 Pixel Chip in the Mini Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Thibodeaux, Mayra; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Kadyk, John; Oliver-Mallory, Kelsey

    2013-04-01

    This project deals with development of readout for a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) prototype. This is a type of detector proposed for direct detection of dark matter (WIMPS) with direction information. The TPC is a gaseous charged particle tracking detector composed of a field cage and a gas avalanche detector. The latter is made of two Gas Electron Multipliers in series, illuminating a pixel readout integrated circuit, which measures the distribution in position and time of the output charge. We are testing the TPC prototype, filled with ArCO2 gas, using a Fe-55 x-ray source and cosmic rays. The present prototype uses an FE-I3 chip for readout. This chip was developed about 10 years ago and is presently in use within the ATLAS pixel detector at the LHC. The aim of this work is to upgrade the TPC prototype to use an FE-I4 chip. The FE-I4 has an active area of 336 mm^2 and 26880 pixels, over nine times the number of pixels in the FE-I3 chip, and an active area about six times as much. The FE-I4 chip represents the state of the art of pixel detector readout, and is presently being used to build an upgrade of the ATLAS pixel detector.

  16. Clutter interference and the integration time of echoes in the echolocating bat, Eptesicus fuscus.

    PubMed

    Simmons, J A; Freedman, E G; Stevenson, S B; Chen, L; Wohlgenant, T J

    1989-10-01

    The ability of the echolocating bat, Eptesicus fuscus, to detect a sonar target is affected by the presence of other targets along the same axis at slightly different ranges. If echoes from one target arrive at about the same delay as echoes from another target, clutter interference occurs and one set of echoes masks the other. Although the bat's sonar emissions and the echoes themselves are 2 to 5 ms long, echoes (of approximately equal sensation levels--around 15 dB SL) only interfere with each other if they arrive within 200 to 400 microseconds of the same arrival time. This figure is an estimate of the integration time of the bat's sonar receiver for echoes. The fine structure of the clutter-interference data reflects the reinforcement and cancellation of echoes according to their time separation. When clutter interference first occurs, the waveforms of test and cluttering echoes already overlap for much of their duration. The masking effect underlying clutter interference appears specifically due to overlap, not between raw echo waveforms, but between the patterns of mechanical excitation created when echoes pass through bandpass filters equivalent to auditory-nerve tuning curves. While the time scale of clutter interference is substantially shorter than the duration of echo waveforms, it still is much longer than the eventual width of a target's range-axis image expressed in terms of echo delay.

  17. An integrated DBP for streams with (m, k)-firm real-time guarantee.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi; Chen, Ji-Ming; Sun, You-Xian

    2004-07-01

    (m, k)-firm real-time or weakly hard real-time (WHRT) guarantee is becoming attractive as it closes the gap between hard and soft (or probabilistic) real-time guarantee, and enables finer granularity of real-time QoS through adjusting m and k. For multiple streams with (m, k)-firm constraint sharing a single server, an on-line priority assignment policy based on the most recent k-length history of each stream called distance based priority (DBP) has been proposed to assign priority. In case of priority equality among these head-of-queue instances, Earliest Deadline First (EDF) is used. Under the context of WHRT schedule theory, DBP is the most popular, gets much attention and has many applications due to its straightforward priority assignment policy and easy implementation. However, DBP combined with EDF cannot always provide good performance, mainly because the initial DBP does not underline the rich information on deadline met/missed distribution, specially streams in various failure states which will travel different distances to restore success states. Considering how to effectively restore the success state of each individual stream from a failure state, an integrated DBP utilizing deadline met/missed distribution is proposed in this paper. Simulation results validated the performance improvement of this proposal.

  18. Integrated micro-optofluidic platform for real-time detection of airborne microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jeongan; Kang, Miran; Jung, Jae Hee

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate an integrated micro-optofluidic platform for real-time, continuous detection and quantification of airborne microorganisms. Measurements of the fluorescence and light scattering from single particles in a microfluidic channel are used to determine the total particle number concentration and the microorganism number concentration in real-time. The system performance is examined by evaluating standard particle measurements with various sample flow rates and the ratios of fluorescent to non-fluorescent particles. To apply this method to real-time detection of airborne microorganisms, airborne Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Staphylococcus epidermidis cells were introduced into the micro-optofluidic platform via bioaerosol generation, and a liquid-type particle collection setup was used. We demonstrate successful discrimination of SYTO82-dyed fluorescent bacterial cells from other residue particles in a continuous and real-time manner. In comparison with traditional microscopy cell counting and colony culture methods, this micro-optofluidic platform is not only more accurate in terms of the detection efficiency for airborne microorganisms but it also provides additional information on the total particle number concentration.

  19. Microfluidics-integrated time-lapse imaging for analysis of cellular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Dirk R; Underhill, Gregory H; Resnikoff, Joshua; Mendelson, Avital; Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Shah, Jagesh V

    2010-06-01

    An understanding of the mechanisms regulating cellular responses has recently been augmented by innovations enabling the observation of phenotypes at high spatio-temporal resolution. Technologies such as microfluidics have sought to expand the throughput of these methods, although assimilation with advanced imaging strategies has been limited. Here, we describe the pairing of high resolution time-lapse imaging with microfluidic multiplexing for the analysis of cellular dynamics, utilizing a design selected for facile fabrication and operation, and integration with microscopy instrumentation. This modular, medium-throughput platform enables the long-term imaging of living cells at high numerical aperture (via oil immersion) by using a conserved 96-well, approximately 6 x 5 mm(2) imaging area with a variable input/output channel design chosen for the number of cell types and microenvironments under investigation. In the validation of this system, we examined fundamental features of cell cycle progression, including mitotic kinetics and spindle orientation dynamics, through the high-resolution parallel analysis of model cell lines subjected to anti-mitotic agents. We additionally explored the self-renewal kinetics of mouse embryonic stem cells, and demonstrate the ability to dynamically assess and manipulate stem cell proliferation, detect rare cell events, and measure extended time-scale correlations. We achieved an experimental throughput of >900 cells/experiment, each observed at >40x magnification for up to 120 h. Overall, these studies illustrate the capacity to probe cellular functions and yield dynamic information in time and space through the integration of a simple, modular, microfluidics-based imaging platform.

  20. Real-Time Baseline Error Estimation and Correction for GNSS/Strong Motion Seismometer Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. Y. N.; Groves, P. D.; Ziebart, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate and rapid estimation of permanent surface displacement is required immediately after a slip event for earthquake monitoring or tsunami early warning. It is difficult to achieve the necessary accuracy and precision at high- and low-frequencies using GNSS or seismometry alone. GNSS and seismic sensors can be integrated to overcome the limitations of each. Kalman filter algorithms with displacement and velocity states have been developed to combine GNSS and accelerometer observations to obtain the optimal displacement solutions. However, the sawtooth-like phenomena caused by the bias or tilting of the sensor decrease the accuracy of the displacement estimates. A three-dimensional Kalman filter algorithm with an additional baseline error state has been developed. An experiment with both a GNSS receiver and a strong motion seismometer mounted on a movable platform and subjected to known displacements was carried out. The results clearly show that the additional baseline error state enables the Kalman filter to estimate the instrument's sensor bias and tilt effects and correct the state estimates in real time. Furthermore, the proposed Kalman filter algorithm has been validated with data sets from the 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah Earthquake. The results indicate that the additional baseline error state can not only eliminate the linear and quadratic drifts but also reduce the sawtooth-like effects from the displacement solutions. The conventional zero-mean baseline-corrected results cannot show the permanent displacements after an earthquake; the two-state Kalman filter can only provide stable and optimal solutions if the strong motion seismometer had not been moved or tilted by the earthquake. Yet the proposed Kalman filter can achieve the precise and accurate displacements by estimating and correcting for the baseline error at each epoch. The integration filters out noise-like distortions and thus improves the real-time detection and measurement capability

  1. Time And Temperature Dependent Micromechanical Properties Of Solder Joints For 3D-Package Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roellig, Mike; Meier, Karsten; Metasch, Rene

    2010-11-01

    The recent development of 3D-integrated electronic packages is characterized by the need to increase the diversity of functions and to miniaturize. Currently many 3D-integration concepts are being developed and all of them demand new materials, new designs and new processing technologies. The combination of simulation and experimental investigation becomes increasingly accepted since simulations help to shorten the R&D cycle time and reduce costs. Numerical calculations like the Finite-Element-Method are strong tools to calculate stress conditions in electronic packages resulting from thermal strains due to the manufacturing process and environmental loads. It is essential for the application of numerical calculations that the material data is accurate and describes sufficiently the physical behaviour. The developed machine allows the measurement of time and temperature dependent micromechanical properties of solder joints. Solder joints, which are used to mechanically and electrically connect different packages, are physically measured as they leave the process. This allows accounting for process influences, which may change material properties. Additionally, joint sizes and metallurgical interactions between solder and under bump metallization can be respected by this particular measurement. The measurement allows the determination of material properties within a temperature range of 20° C-200° C. Further, the time dependent creep deformation can be measured within a strain-rate range of 10-31/s-10-81/s. Solder alloys based on Sn-Ag/Sn-Ag-Cu with additionally impurities and joint sizes down to O/ 200 μm were investigated. To finish the material characterization process the material model coefficient were extracted by FEM-Simulation to increase the accuracy of data.

  2. An integrated approach using high time-resolved tools to study the origin of aerosols.

    PubMed

    Di Gilio, A; de Gennaro, G; Dambruoso, P; Ventrella, G

    2015-10-15

    Long-range transport of natural and/or anthropogenic particles can contribute significantly to PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations and some European cities often fail to comply with PM daily limit values due to the additional impact of particles from remote sources. For this reason, reliable methodologies to identify long-range transport (LRT) events would be useful to better understand air pollution phenomena and support proper decision-making. This study explores the potential of an integrated and high time-resolved monitoring approach for the identification and characterization of local, regional and long-range transport events of high PM. In particular, the goal of this work was also the identification of time-limited event. For this purpose, a high time-resolved monitoring campaign was carried out at an urban background site in Bari (southern Italy) for about 20 days (1st-20th October 2011). The integration of collected data as the hourly measurements of inorganic ions in PM2.5 and their gas precursors and of the natural radioactivity, in addition to the analyses of aerosol maps and hourly back trajectories (BT), provided useful information for the identification and chemical characterization of local sources and trans-boundary intrusions. Non-sea salt (nss) sulfate levels were found to increase when air masses came from northeastern Europe and higher dispersive conditions of the atmosphere were detected. Instead, higher nitrate and lower nss-sulfate concentrations were registered in correspondence with air mass stagnation and attributed to local traffic source. In some cases, combinations of local and trans-boundary sources were observed. Finally, statistical investigations such as the principal component analysis (PCA) applied on hourly ion concentrations and the cluster analyses, the Potential Source Contribution Function (PSCF) and the Concentration Weighted Trajectory (CWT) models computed on hourly back-trajectories enabled to complete a cognitive framework

  3. Neuronal Spike Timing Adaptation Described with a Fractional Leaky Integrate-and-Fire Model

    PubMed Central

    Teka, Wondimu; Marinov, Toma M.; Santamaria, Fidel

    2014-01-01

    The voltage trace of neuronal activities can follow multiple timescale dynamics that arise from correlated membrane conductances. Such processes can result in power-law behavior in which the membrane voltage cannot be characterized with a single time constant. The emergent effect of these membrane correlations is a non-Markovian process that can be modeled with a fractional derivative. A fractional derivative is a non-local process in which the value of the variable is determined by integrating a temporal weighted voltage trace, also called the memory trace. Here we developed and analyzed a fractional leaky integrate-and-fire model in which the exponent of the fractional derivative can vary from 0 to 1, with 1 representing the normal derivative. As the exponent of the fractional derivative decreases, the weights of the voltage trace increase. Thus, the value of the voltage is increasingly correlated with the trajectory of the voltage in the past. By varying only the fractional exponent, our model can reproduce upward and downward spike adaptations found experimentally in neocortical pyramidal cells and tectal neurons in vitro. The model also produces spikes with longer first-spike latency and high inter-spike variability with power-law distribution. We further analyze spike adaptation and the responses to noisy and oscillatory input. The fractional model generates reliable spike patterns in response to noisy input. Overall, the spiking activity of the fractional leaky integrate-and-fire model deviates from the spiking activity of the Markovian model and reflects the temporal accumulated intrinsic membrane dynamics that affect the response of the neuron to external stimulation. PMID:24675903

  4. Independent or integrated processing of interaural time and level differences in human auditory cortex?

    PubMed

    Altmann, Christian F; Terada, Satoshi; Kashino, Makio; Goto, Kazuhiro; Mima, Tatsuya; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Furukawa, Shigeto

    2014-06-01

    Sound localization in the horizontal plane is mainly determined by interaural time differences (ITD) and interaural level differences (ILD). Both cues result in an estimate of sound source location and in many real-life situations these two cues are roughly congruent. When stimulating listeners with headphones it is possible to counterbalance the two cues, so called ITD/ILD trading. This phenomenon speaks for integrated ITD/ILD processing at the behavioral level. However, it is unclear at what stages of the auditory processing stream ITD and ILD cues are integrated to provide a unified percept of sound lateralization. Therefore, we set out to test with human electroencephalography for integrated versus independent ITD/ILD processing at the level of preattentive cortical processing by measuring the mismatch negativity (MMN) to changes in sound lateralization. We presented a series of diotic standards (perceived at a midline position) that were interrupted by deviants that entailed either a change in a) ITD only, b) ILD only, c) congruent ITD and ILD, or d) counterbalanced ITD/ILD (ITD/ILD trading). The sound stimuli were either i) pure tones with a frequency of 500 Hz, or ii) amplitude modulated tones with a carrier frequency of 4000 Hz and a modulation frequency of 125 Hz. We observed significant MMN for the ITD/ILD traded deviants in case of the 500 Hz pure tones, and for the 4000 Hz amplitude-modulated tone. This speaks for independent processing of ITD and ILD at the level of the MMN within auditory cortex. However, the combined ITD/ILD cues elicited smaller MMN than the sum of the MMN induced in response to ITD and ILD cues presented in isolation for 500 Hz, but not 4000 Hz, suggesting independent processing for the higher frequency only. Thus, the two markers for independent processing - additivity and cue-conflict - resulted in contradicting conclusions with a dissociation between the lower (500 Hz) and higher frequency (4000 Hz) bands.

  5. Neuronal spike timing adaptation described with a fractional leaky integrate-and-fire model.

    PubMed

    Teka, Wondimu; Marinov, Toma M; Santamaria, Fidel

    2014-03-01

    The voltage trace of neuronal activities can follow multiple timescale dynamics that arise from correlated membrane conductances. Such processes can result in power-law behavior in which the membrane voltage cannot be characterized with a single time constant. The emergent effect of these membrane correlations is a non-Markovian process that can be modeled with a fractional derivative. A fractional derivative is a non-local process in which the value of the variable is determined by integrating a temporal weighted voltage trace, also called the memory trace. Here we developed and analyzed a fractional leaky integrate-and-fire model in which the exponent of the fractional derivative can vary from 0 to 1, with 1 representing the normal derivative. As the exponent of the fractional derivative decreases, the weights of the voltage trace increase. Thus, the value of the voltage is increasingly correlated with the trajectory of the voltage in the past. By varying only the fractional exponent, our model can reproduce upward and downward spike adaptations found experimentally in neocortical pyramidal cells and tectal neurons in vitro. The model also produces spikes with longer first-spike latency and high inter-spike variability with power-law distribution. We further analyze spike adaptation and the responses to noisy and oscillatory input. The fractional model generates reliable spike patterns in response to noisy input. Overall, the spiking activity of the fractional leaky integrate-and-fire model deviates from the spiking activity of the Markovian model and reflects the temporal accumulated intrinsic membrane dynamics that affect the response of the neuron to external stimulation.

  6. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian structures in an integrable hierarchy and space-time duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avan, Jean; Caudrelier, Vincent; Doikou, Anastasia; Kundu, Anjan

    2016-01-01

    We define and illustrate the novel notion of dual integrable hierarchies, on the example of the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) hierarchy. For each integrable nonlinear evolution equation (NLEE) in the hierarchy, dual integrable structures are characterized by the fact that the zero-curvature representation of the NLEE can be realized by two Hamiltonian formulations stemming from two distinct choices of the configuration space, yielding two inequivalent Poisson structures on the corresponding phase space and two distinct Hamiltonians. This is fundamentally different from the standard bi-Hamiltonian or generally multitime structure. The first formulation chooses purely space-dependent fields as configuration space; it yields the standard Poisson structure for NLS. The other one is new: it chooses purely time-dependent fields as configuration space and yields a different Poisson structure at each level of the hierarchy. The corresponding NLEE becomes a space evolution equation. We emphasize the role of the Lagrangian formulation as a unifying framework for deriving both Poisson structures, using ideas from covariant field theory. One of our main results is to show that the two matrices of the Lax pair satisfy the same form of ultralocal Poisson algebra (up to a sign) characterized by an r-matrix structure, whereas traditionally only one of them is involved in the classical r-matrix method. We construct explicit dual hierarchies of Hamiltonians, and Lax representations of the triggered dynamics, from the monodromy matrices of either Lax matrix. An appealing procedure to build a multi-dimensional lattice of Lax pair, through successive uses of the dual Poisson structures, is briefly introduced.

  7. Compact VLSI neural computer integrated with active pixel sensor for real-time ATR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Wai-Chi; Udomkesmalee, Gabriel; Alkalai, Leon

    1997-04-01

    A compact VLSI neural computer integrated with an active pixel sensor has been under development to mimic what is inherent in biological vision systems. This electronic eye- brain computer is targeted for real-time machine vision applications which require both high-bandwidth communication and high-performance computing for data sensing, synergy of multiple types of sensory information, feature extraction, target detection, target recognition, and control functions. The neural computer is based on a composite structure which combines Annealing Cellular Neural Network (ACNN) and Hierarchical Self-Organization Neural Network (HSONN). The ACNN architecture is a programmable and scalable multi- dimensional array of annealing neurons which are locally connected with their local neurons. Meanwhile, the HSONN adopts a hierarchical structure with nonlinear basis functions. The ACNN+HSONN neural computer is effectively designed to perform programmable functions for machine vision processing in all levels with its embedded host processor. It provides a two order-of-magnitude increase in computation power over the state-of-the-art microcomputer and DSP microelectronics. A compact current-mode VLSI design feasibility of the ACNN+HSONN neural computer is demonstrated by a 3D 16X8X9-cube neural processor chip design in a 2-micrometers CMOS technology. Integration of this neural computer as one slice of a 4'X4' multichip module into the 3D MCM based avionics architecture for NASA's New Millennium Program is also described.

  8. Near real-time, on-the-move multisensor integration and computing framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnette, Chris; Schneider, Matt; Agarwal, Sanjeev; Deterline, Diane; Geyer, Chris; Phan, Chung D.; Lydic, Richard M.; Green, Kevin; Swett, Bruce

    2015-05-01

    Implanted mines and improvised devices are a persistent threat to Warfighters. Current Army countermine missions for route clearance need on-the-move standoff detection to improve the rate of advance. Vehicle-based forward looking sensors such as electro-optical and infrared (EO/IR) devices can be used to identify potential threats in near real-time (NRT) at safe standoff distance to support route clearance missions. The MOVERS (Micro-Cloud for Operational, Vehicle-Based EO-IR Reconnaissance System) is a vehicle-based multi-sensor integration and exploitation system that ingests and processes video and imagery data captured from forward-looking EO/IR and thermal sensors, and also generates target/feature alerts, using the Video Processing and Exploitation Framework (VPEF) "plug and play" video processing toolset. The MOVERS Framework provides an extensible, flexible, and scalable computing and multi-sensor integration GOTS framework that enables the capability to add more vehicles, sensors, processors or displays, and a service architecture that provides low-latency raw video and metadata streams as well as a command and control interface. Functionality in the framework is exposed through the MOVERS SDK which decouples the implementation of the service and client from the specific communication protocols.

  9. An integrated runtime and compile-time approach for parallelizing structured and block structured applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Gagan; Sussman, Alan; Saltz, Joel

    1993-01-01

    Scientific and engineering applications often involve structured meshes. These meshes may be nested (for multigrid codes) and/or irregularly coupled (called multiblock or irregularly coupled regular mesh problems). A combined runtime and compile-time approach for parallelizing these applications on distributed memory parallel machines in an efficient and machine-independent fashion was described. A runtime library which can be used to port these applications on distributed memory machines was designed and implemented. The library is currently implemented on several different systems. To further ease the task of application programmers, methods were developed for integrating this runtime library with compilers for HPK-like parallel programming languages. How this runtime library was integrated with the Fortran 90D compiler being developed at Syracuse University is discussed. Experimental results to demonstrate the efficacy of our approach are presented. A multiblock Navier-Stokes solver template and a multigrid code were experimented with. Our experimental results show that our primitives have low runtime communication overheads. Further, the compiler parallelized codes perform within 20 percent of the code parallelized by manually inserting calls to the runtime library.

  10. Evolutionary time-scale of the begomoviruses: evidence from integrated sequences in the Nicotiana genome.

    PubMed

    Lefeuvre, Pierre; Harkins, Gordon W; Lett, Jean-Michel; Briddon, Rob W; Chase, Mark W; Moury, Benoit; Martin, Darren P

    2011-01-01

    Despite having single stranded DNA genomes that are replicated by host DNA polymerases, viruses in the family Geminiviridae are apparently evolving as rapidly as some RNA viruses. The observed substitution rates of geminiviruses in the genera Begomovirus and Mastrevirus are so high that the entire family could conceivably have originated less than a million years ago (MYA). However, the existence of geminivirus related DNA (GRD) integrated within the genomes of various Nicotiana species suggests that the geminiviruses probably originated >10 MYA. Some have even suggested that a distinct New-World (NW) lineage of begomoviruses may have arisen following the separation by continental drift of African and American proto-begomoviruses ∼110 MYA. We evaluate these various geminivirus origin hypotheses using Bayesian coalescent-based approaches to date firstly the Nicotiana GRD integration events, and then the divergence of the NW and Old-World (OW) begomoviruses. Besides rejecting the possibility of a<2 MYA OW-NW begomovirus split, we could also discount that it may have occurred concomitantly with the breakup of Gondwanaland 110 MYA. Although we could only confidently narrow the date of the split down to between 2 and 80 MYA, the most plausible (and best supported) date for the split is between 20 and 30 MYA--a time when global cooling ended the dispersal of temperate species between Asia and North America via the Beringian land bridge.

  11. Integral equations with modified fundamental solution in time-harmonic electromagnetic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jost, Gabriele

    The exterior boundary-value problem for time-harmonic EM reflection from a perfect conductor is investigated analytically. The technique developed by Ursell (1973 and 1974) and Jones (1974) for the scalar Helmholtz equation, based on the addition of outgoing waves to the fundamental free-space solution, is extended to overcome the problem of nonuniqueness in the case of the reduced Maxwell equations. The reduction of the boundary-value problem to a Fredholm integral equation of the second kind and the coefficient selection criteria are explained in detail, and numerical results showing the dependence of the condition number on the frequency are presented in extensive graphs. The present approach is found to be well suited to small wave numbers.

  12. Integrated sorting, concentration and real time PCR based detection system for sensitive detection of microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Monalisha; Singh, Deepak; Singh, Himanshu; Kant, Rishi; Gupta, Ankur; Pandey, Shashank Shekhar; Mandal, Swarnasri; Ramanathan, Gurunath; Bhattacharya, Shantanu

    2013-01-01

    The extremely low limit of detection (LOD) posed by global food and water safety standards necessitates the need to perform a rapid process of integrated detection with high specificity, sensitivity and repeatability. The work reported in this article shows a microchip platform which carries out an ensemble of protocols which are otherwise carried in a molecular biology laboratory to achieve the global safety standards. The various steps in the microchip include pre-concentration of specific microorganisms from samples and a highly specific real time molecular identification utilizing a q-PCR process. The microchip process utilizes a high sensitivity antibody based recognition and an electric field mediated capture enabling an overall low LOD. The whole process of counting, sorting and molecular identification is performed in less than 4 hours for highly dilute samples. PMID:24253282

  13. Evidence for CP violation in time-integrated D0→h(-)h(+) decay rates.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellan Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Arrabito, L; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Bailey, D S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chiapolini, N; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Constantin, F; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Cowan, G A; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Lorenzi, F; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Estève, L; Falabella, A; Fanchini, E; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harji, R; Harnew, N; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Holubyev, K; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Koopman, R; Koppenburg, P; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kruzelecki, K; Kucharczyk, M; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Maynard, B; Mazurov, A; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Messi, R; Miglioranzi, S; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Musy, M; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Nedos, M; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, K; Palacios, J; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Paterson, S K; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrella, A; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Navarro, A Puig; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, A C; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'jampens, S; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urquijo, P; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Voss, H; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yushchenko, O; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zverev, E; Zvyagin, A

    2012-03-16

    A search for time-integrated CP violation in D(0)→h(-)h(+) (h=K, π) decays is presented using 0.62 fb(-1) of data collected by LHCb in 2011. The flavor of the charm meson is determined by the charge of the slow pion in the D(*+)→D(0)π(+) and D(*-)→D[over ¯](0)π(-) decay chains. The difference in CP asymmetry between D(0)→K(-)K(+) and D(0)→π(-)π(+), ΔA(CP)≡A(CP)(K(-)K(+))-A(CP)(π(-)π(+)), is measured to be [-0.82±0.21(stat)±0.11(syst)]%. This differs from the hypothesis of CP conservation by 3.5 standard deviations.

  14. Real-Time Tracking of Parental Histones Reveals Their Contribution to Chromatin Integrity Following DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Adam, Salomé; Dabin, Juliette; Chevallier, Odile; Leroy, Olivier; Baldeyron, Céline; Corpet, Armelle; Lomonte, Patrick; Renaud, Olivier; Almouzni, Geneviève; Polo, Sophie E

    2016-10-06

    Chromatin integrity is critical for cell function and identity but is challenged by DNA damage. To understand how chromatin architecture and the information that it conveys are preserved or altered following genotoxic stress, we established a system for real-time tracking of parental histones, which characterize the pre-damage chromatin state. Focusing on histone H3 dynamics after local UVC irradiation in human cells, we demonstrate that parental histones rapidly redistribute around damaged regions by a dual mechanism combining chromatin opening and histone mobilization on chromatin. Importantly, parental histones almost entirely recover and mix with new histones in repairing chromatin. Our data further define a close coordination of parental histone dynamics with DNA repair progression through the damage sensor DDB2 (DNA damage-binding protein 2). We speculate that this mechanism may contribute to maintaining a memory of the original chromatin landscape and may help preserve epigenome stability in response to DNA damage.

  15. Acousto-optical post-processor time-integrating correlator calibration updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, P.

    1992-02-01

    The acousto-optical signal processing facility and time integrating correlator system has been updated to allow proper handling of multiple peaks and to increase the readout rate. These modifications are described. In the supervisor task, a phase shift dialog box has been added to the phase shift menu items. This dialog box allows the operator to limit the area examined while searching for peaks or to specify the peak location directly. An amplitude offset calibration dialog box has been added to the amplitude offset menu item. This dialog box allows the operator to limit the area examined during the amplitude offset calibration, which is designed to perform calculations on a portion of the correlogram that does not contain a peak. In addition, the interface between the photodetector and personal computer has been modified to double the maximum pixel clock rate to 10 MHz.

  16. Evidence for CP Violation in Time-Integrated D0→h-h+ Decay Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellan Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Adrover, C.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A., Jr.; Amato, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderson, J.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Arrabito, L.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Bailey, D. S.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Bates, A.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benayoun, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blanks, C.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bobrov, A.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Büchler-Germann, A.; Burducea, I.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chiapolini, N.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Constantin, F.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Corti, G.; Cowan, G. A.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; de Bonis, I.; de Capua, S.; de Cian, M.; de Lorenzi, F.; de Miranda, J. M.; de Paula, L.; de Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Buono, L.; Deplano, C.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dickens, J.; Dijkstra, H.; Diniz Batista, P.; Domingo Bonal, F.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhardt, S.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Elsasser, Ch.; Elsby, D.; Esperante Pereira, D.; Estève, L.; Falabella, A.; Fanchini, E.; Färber, C.; Fardell, G.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Fave, V.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furcas, S.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garnier, J.-C.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauvin, N.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gibson, V.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harji, R.; Harnew, N.; Harrison, J.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hicks, E.; Holubyev, K.; Hopchev, P.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Huston, R. S.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Ilten, P.; Imong, J.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jahjah Hussein, M.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Jaton, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Jost, B.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Keaveney, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kerzel, U.; Ketel, T.; Keune, A.; Khanji, B.; Kim, Y. M.; Knecht, M.; Koopman, R.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kruzelecki, K.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Li, L.; Li Gioi, L.; Lieng, M.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; von Loeben, J.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lopez-March, N.; Lu, H.; Luisier, J.; Mac Raighne, A.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Magnin, J.; Malde, S.; Mamunur, R. M. D.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mangiafave, N.; Marconi, U.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martin, L.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinez Santos, D.; Massafferri, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matveev, M.; Maurice, E.; Maynard, B.; Mazurov, A.; McGregor, G.; McNulty, R.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Merkel, J.; Messi, R.; Miglioranzi, S.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morawski, P.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Musy, M.; Mylroie-Smith, J.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Nedos, M.; Needham, M.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Nikitin, N.; Nomerotski, A.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Pal, K.; Palacios, J.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Paterson, S. K.; Patrick, G. N.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perego, D. L.; Perez Trigo, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pessina, G.; Petrella, A.; Petrolini, A.; Phan, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pie Valls, B.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Plackett, R.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Qian, W.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reid, M. M.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Rinnert, K.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodrigues, F.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogers, G. J.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Rosello, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salzmann, C.; Sannino, M.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santinelli, R.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schaack, P.; Schiller, M.; Schleich, S.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shatalov, P.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, A. C.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Sobczak, K.; Soler, F. J. P.; Solomin, A.; Soomro, F.; Souza de Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Subbiah, V. K.; Swientek, S.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tran, M. T.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Urquijo, P.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Viaud, B.; Videau, I.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Visniakov, J.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Voss, H.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Webber, A. D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wishahi, J.; Witek, M.; Witzeling, W.; Wotton, S. A.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, F.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Young, R.; Yushchenko, O.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zverev, E.; Zvyagin, A.

    2012-03-01

    A search for time-integrated CP violation in D0→h-h+ (h=K, π) decays is presented using 0.62fb-1 of data collected by LHCb in 2011. The flavor of the charm meson is determined by the charge of the slow pion in the D*+→D0π+ and D*-→D¯0π- decay chains. The difference in CP asymmetry between D0→K-K+ and D0→π-π+, ΔACP≡ACP(K-K+)-ACP(π-π+), is measured to be [-0.82±0.21(stat)±0.11(syst)]%. This differs from the hypothesis of CP conservation by 3.5 standard deviations.

  17. Integration of Kepler with ROADNet: Visual Dataflow Design with Real-time Geophysical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricke, T. T.; Ludaescher, B.; Altintas, I.; Lindquist, K. G.; Hansen, T. S.; Rajasekar, A.; Vernon, F. L.; Orcutt, J.

    2004-12-01

    The ROADNet project concentrates real-time data from a wide variety of signal domains, providing a reliable platform to store and transport these data. Ptolemy is a general purpose visual programming environment in which work flows on data streams can be constructed by connecting general purpose components. The Kepler scientific workflow system extends Ptolemy to approach design and automation of scientific data analysis tasks. In this work we discuss our integration of ROADNet (and the Antelope platform on which ROADNet is based in part) with the Ptolemy environment. We have produced interface components that allow someone using the Kepler scientific workflow system to readily use ROADNet data resources. Presently we have working components to gather real-time waveform and image data from ROADNet object ring buffers, and we are working to provide the ability to perform Datascope database queries from Kepler. The Kepler project, including the Antelope interface, is entirely free and open-source, and will run on any platform where Java is available. We discuss existing applications in addition to possible future directions, such as coherent array processing, event detection, and online stream processing. A major advantage of the Ptolemy environment is the ease with which it may be used for rapid prototyping of analyses by even inexperienced users. For instance, a user can drag-and-drop an Orb Waveform Source component and several general purpose analysis and display components, connect them visually, and immediately perform an analysis on real-time data.

  18. Opportunities for integrating deliberate and time-sensitive joint depolyment planning in USTRANSCOM component commands

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.

    1988-05-02

    The Decision System Research Section of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is assisting the Deployment Directorate (formerly the Joint Deployment Agency) of the US Transportation Command (USTRANSCOM) in identifying and evaluating opportunities for improving the automation support used in deliberate and time-critical deployment planning. USTRANSCOM, which is a unified command (i.e., personnel are drawn from all services), was created in the fall of 1987 to consolidate the functions of the former Military Transportation Operating Agencies (the Military Airlift Command, the Military Traffic Management Command, and the Military Sealift Command). An important factor justifying creation of USTRANSCOM, was the possibility of combining and improving coordination in deployment planning between the organizations responsible for strategic transportation activities during times of crisis. This report, the second in a series to be produced in the course of the ORNL study, presents three possibilities for integrating deliberate and time-sensitive planning. Two proposals recommended for use by MTMC and MSC build on cooperative planning initiatives already in progress in the two commands. A unique application of relative probabilistic measures is a key element in a proposal for improving MTMC/MAC airlift planning. 35 refs., 1 tab.

  19. Alpha: A real-time decentralized operating system for mission-oriented system integration and operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, E. Douglas

    1988-01-01

    Alpha is a new kind of operating system that is unique in two highly significant ways. First, it is decentralized transparently providing reliable resource management across physically dispersed nodes, so that distributed applications programming can be done largely as though it were centralized. And second, it provides comprehensive, high technology support for real-time system integration and operation, an application area which consists predominately of aperiodic activities having critical time constraints such as deadlines. Alpha is extremely adaptable so that it can be easily optimized for a wide range of problem-specific functionality, performance, and cost. Alpha is the first systems effort of the Archons Project, and the prototype was created at Carnegie-Mellon University directly on modified Sun multiprocessor workstation hardware. It has been demonstrated with a real-time C(sup 2) application. Continuing research is leading to a series of enhanced follow-ons to Alpha; these are portable but initially hosted on Concurrent's MASSCOMP line of multiprocessor products.

  20. A model-based technique for integrated real-time profile control in the JET tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laborde, L.; Mazon, D.; Moreau, D.; Murari, A.; Felton, R.; Zabeo, L.; Albanese, R.; Ariola, M.; Bucalossi, J.; Crisanti, F.; de Baar, M.; de Tommasi, G.; de Vries, P.; Joffrin, E.; Lennholm, M.; Litaudon, X.; Pironti, A.; Tala, T.; Tuccillo, A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a new technique which has been implemented on the JET tokamak to investigate integrated real-time control of several plasma profiles simultaneously (such as current, temperature and pressure) and reports the results of the first experimental tests. The profiles are handled through their projection on a suitable basis of functions according to the Galerkin scheme. Their response to three actuators (heating and current drive powers injected in the plasma) is linearized in an experimentally deduced multi-input multi-output model. The singular value decomposition of this model operator allows us to design a distributed-parameter real-time controller which maximizes the steady state decoupling of the multiple feedback loops. It enables us to control several coupled profiles simultaneously, with some degree of fuzziness to let the plasma evolve towards an accessible non-linear state which is the closest to the requested one, despite a limited number of actuators. The first experiments using these techniques show that different current and electron temperature profiles can be obtained and sustained by the controller during a closed-loop operation time window. Future improvements and perspectives are briefly mentioned.

  1. Studies of the accuracy of time integration methods for reaction-diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ropp, David L.; Shadid, John N.; Ober, Curtis C.

    2004-03-01

    In this study we present numerical experiments of time integration methods applied to systems of reaction-diffusion equations. Our main interest is in evaluating the relative accuracy and asymptotic order of accuracy of the methods on problems which exhibit an approximate balance between the competing component time scales. Nearly balanced systems can produce a significant coupling of the physical mechanisms and introduce a slow dynamical time scale of interest. These problems provide a challenging test for this evaluation and tend to reveal subtle differences between the various methods. The methods we consider include first- and second-order semi-implicit, fully implicit, and operator-splitting techniques. The test problems include a prototype propagating nonlinear reaction-diffusion wave, a non-equilibrium radiation-diffusion system, a Brusselator chemical dynamics system and a blow-up example. In this evaluation we demonstrate a "split personality" for the operator-splitting methods that we consider. While operator-splitting methods often obtain very good accuracy, they can also manifest a serious degradation in accuracy due to stability problems.

  2. Tissue integrity, costs and time associated with different agents for histological bone preparation.

    PubMed

    Abrantes, Adelino António Artur; Rafacho, Alex; Rivero, Elena Riet Correa; Mariano, Fernanda Viviane; Siqueira, Filipe Modolo; Gondak, Rogério Oliveira

    2017-04-01

    The selection of an appropriate demineralizing solution in pathology laboratories depends on several factors such as the preservation of cellularity, urgency of diagnostic and financial costs. The aim of this study was to test different decalcification bone procedures in order to establish the best value of these in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded samples. Femurs were removed from 13 adult male Wistar rats to obtain 130 bone disks randomly divided into five groups that were demineralized in different concentrations of nitric acid (Group I); formic acid (Group II); acetic acid (Group III); EDTA, pH7.4 (Group IV) and Morsés solution (Group V). Serial, 3-μm-thick sections were obtained and stained with hematoxylin-eosin to calculate the percentage of osteocyte-occupied lacunae. The sections were also stained with Masson's trichrome in conjunction with picrosirius red under polarized light followed by a semi-quantitative analysis to verify the adjacent muscle-to-bone integrity and preservation of collagen fibres. The highest percentage of osteocyte-occupied lacunae was found with 10% acetic acid solution (95.64 ± 0.95%) and Group I (nitric acid) demanded the shorter time (0.8-5.7days). Of all solutions, 5% nitric acid incurred the lowest cost to achieve complete demineralization compared with other solutions (p < .001). Group IV (EDTA) had the highest integrity of muscle and collagen type I and III (P < 0.01). Demineralization with 10% acetic acid was the most effective at preserving bone tissue, while 5% EDTA was the best at maintaining collagen and adjacent muscle to bone. In conclusion, nitric acid at 5% showed the most efficient result as it balanced both time and cost as a demineralizing solution.

  3. Direct time integration of Maxwell's equations in nonlinear dispersive media for propagation and scattering of femtosecond electromagnetic solitons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, Peter M.; Taflove, Allen

    1992-01-01

    The initial results for femtosecond electromagnetic soliton propagation and collision obtained from first principles, i.e., by a direct time integration of Maxwell's equations are reported. The time integration efficiently implements linear and nonlinear convolutions for the electric polarization and can take into account such quantum effects as Kerr and Raman interactions. The present approach is robust and should permit the modeling of 2D and 3D optical soliton propagation, scattering, and switching from the full-vector Maxwell's equations.

  4. Custom single-photon avalanche diode with integrated front-end for parallel photon timing applications.

    PubMed

    Cammi, C; Panzeri, F; Gulinatti, A; Rech, I; Ghioni, M

    2012-03-01

    Emerged as a solid state alternative to photo multiplier tubes (PMTs), single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) are nowadays widely used in the field of single-photon timing applications. Custom technology SPADs assure remarkable performance, in particular a 10 counts/s dark count rate (DCR) at low temperature, a high photon detection efficiency (PDE) with a 50% peak at 550 nm and a 30 ps (full width at half maximum, FWHM) temporal resolution, even with large area devices, have been obtained. Over the past few years, the birth of novel techniques of analysis has led to the parallelization of the measurement systems and to a consequent increasing demand for the development of monolithic arrays of detectors. Unfortunately, the implementation of a multidimensional system is a challenging task from the electrical point of view; in particular, the avalanche current pick-up circuit, used to obtain the previously reported performance, has to be modified in order to enable high parallel temporal resolution, while minimizing the electrical crosstalk probability between channels. In the past, the problem has been solved by integrating the front-end electronics next to the photodetector, in order to reduce the parasitic capacitances and consequently the filtering action on the current signal of the SPAD, leading to an improvement of the timing jitter at higher threshold. This solution has been implemented by using standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technologies, which, however, do not allow a complete control on the SPAD structure; for this reason the intrinsic performance of CMOS SPADs, such as DCR, PDE, and afterpulsing probability, are worse than those attainable with custom detectors. In this paper, we propose a pixel architecture, which enables the development of custom SPAD arrays in which every channel maintains the performance of the best single photodetector. The system relies on the integration of the timing signal pick-up circuit next to the

  5. Enhanced IMC based PID controller design for non-minimum phase (NMP) integrating processes with time delays.

    PubMed

    Ghousiya Begum, K; Seshagiri Rao, A; Radhakrishnan, T K

    2017-03-18

    Internal model control (IMC) with optimal H2 minimization framework is proposed in this paper for design of proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers. The controller design is addressed for integrating and double integrating time delay processes with right half plane (RHP) zeros. Blaschke product is used to derive the optimal controller. There is a single adjustable closed loop tuning parameter for controller design. Systematic guidelines are provided for selection of this tuning parameter based on maximum sensitivity. Simulation studies have been carried out on various integrating time delay processes to show the advantages of the proposed method. The proposed controller provides enhanced closed loop performances when compared to recently reported methods in the literature. Quantitative comparative analysis has been carried out using the performance indices, Integral Absolute Error (IAE) and Total Variation (TV).

  6. Time-varying volatility in Malaysian stock exchange: An empirical study using multiple-volatility-shift fractionally integrated model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Chin Wen

    2008-02-01

    This article investigated the influences of structural breaks on the fractionally integrated time-varying volatility model in the Malaysian stock markets which included the Kuala Lumpur composite index and four major sectoral indices. A fractionally integrated time-varying volatility model combined with sudden changes is developed to study the possibility of structural change in the empirical data sets. Our empirical results showed substantial reduction in fractional differencing parameters after the inclusion of structural change during the Asian financial and currency crises. Moreover, the fractionally integrated model with sudden change in volatility performed better in the estimation and specification evaluations.

  7. Real time hardware implementation of power converters for grid integration of distributed generation and STATCOM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaithwa, Ishan

    Deployment of smart grid technologies is accelerating. Smart grid enables bidirectional flows of energy and energy-related communications. The future electricity grid will look very different from today's power system. Large variable renewable energy sources will provide a greater portion of electricity, small DERs and energy storage systems will become more common, and utilities will operate many different kinds of energy efficiency. All of these changes will add complexity to the grid and require operators to be able to respond to fast dynamic changes to maintain system stability and security. This thesis investigates advanced control technology for grid integration of renewable energy sources and STATCOM systems by verifying them on real time hardware experiments using two different systems: d SPACE and OPAL RT. Three controls: conventional, direct vector control and the intelligent Neural network control were first simulated using Matlab to check the stability and safety of the system and were then implemented on real time hardware using the d SPACE and OPAL RT systems. The thesis then shows how dynamic-programming (DP) methods employed to train the neural networks are better than any other controllers where, an optimal control strategy is developed to ensure effective power delivery and to improve system stability. Through real time hardware implementation it is proved that the neural vector control approach produces the fastest response time, low overshoot, and, the best performance compared to the conventional standard vector control method and DCC vector control technique. Finally the entrepreneurial approach taken to drive the technologies from the lab to market via ORANGE ELECTRIC is discussed in brief.

  8. An integrated microfluidic sensor for real-time detection of RNA in seawater using preserved reagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsaloglou, M.-N.; Loukas, C. M.; Ruano-López, J. M.; Morgan, H.; Mowlem, M. C.

    2012-04-01

    Quantitation of RNA sequences coding either for key metabolic proteins or highly conserved ribosomal subunits can provide insight on cell abundance, speciation and viability. Nucleic sequence-based amplification (NASBA) is an isothermal alternative to traditional nucleic acid amplification methods, such as quantitative PCR. We present here an integrated microfluidic sensor for cell concentration and lysis, RNA extraction/purification and quantitative RNA detection for environmental applications. The portable system uses pre-loaded reagents, stored as a gel on a disposable microfluidic cartridge, which is manufactured using low-cost injection moulding. The NASBA reaction is monitored real-time using a bespoke control unit which includes: an external fluorescence detector, three peristaltic micro-pumps, two heaters and temperature sensors, a battery, seven pin actuated micro-motors (or valve actuators), and an automatic cartridge insertion mechanism. The system has USB connectivity and none of the expensive components require replacing between reactions. Long-term storage of reagents is critically important for any diagnostic tool that will be used in the field, whether for medical or environmental analysis and has not been previously demonstrated for NASBA reagents on-chip. We have shown effective amplification, for as little as 500 cells of the toxic microalga Karenia brevis using reagents which had been preserved as a gel for 45 days. This is the first reported real-time isothermal RNA amplification using with on-chip preservation. Annealing of primers, amplification at 41 °C and real-time fluorescence detection using, also for the first time, an internal control and sequence-specific molecular beacons was all performed on our microfluidic sensor. Our results show excellent promise as a future quantitative tool of in situ phytoplankton analysis and other environmental applications, where long-term reagent storage and low power consumption is essential.

  9. EMBEDDED LENSING TIME DELAYS, THE FERMAT POTENTIAL, AND THE INTEGRATED SACHS–WOLFE EFFECT

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bin; Kantowski, Ronald; Dai, Xinyu

    2015-05-01

    We derive the Fermat potential for a spherically symmetric lens embedded in a Friedman–Lemaître–Robertson–Walker cosmology and use it to investigate the late-time integrated Sachs–Wolfe (ISW) effect, i.e., secondary temperature fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) caused by individual large-scale clusters and voids. We present a simple analytical expression for the temperature fluctuation in the CMB across such a lens as a derivative of the lens’ Fermat potential. This formalism is applicable to both linear and nonlinear density evolution scenarios, to arbitrarily large density contrasts, and to all open and closed background cosmologies. It is much simpler to use and makes the same predictions as conventional approaches. In this approach the total temperature fluctuation can be split into a time-delay part and an evolutionary part. Both parts must be included for cosmic structures that evolve and both can be equally important. We present very simple ISW models for cosmic voids and galaxy clusters to illustrate the ease of use of our formalism. We use the Fermat potentials of simple cosmic void models to compare predicted ISW effects with those recently extracted from WMAP and Planck data by stacking large cosmic voids using the aperture photometry method. If voids in the local universe with large density contrasts are no longer evolving we find that the time delay contribution alone predicts values consistent with the measurements. However, we find that for voids still evolving linearly, the evolutionary contribution cancels a significant part of the time delay contribution and results in predicted signals that are much smaller than recently observed.

  10. Real-time integrated process supervision for autotuners and modified cerebellar model articulation controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, Abdul; Quek, H. C.; Lim, B. H.

    1998-10-01

    This paper presents the use of a micro-controller-based Integrated Process Supervision as a tool for investigate work in expert control. Two different control theories integrated within process serve as examples of structured approach to expert control. The Integrated Process Supervision is a refinement of the Expert Control Architecture as proposed by Karl J. Astrom by allowing integration of several control techniques in a single generic framework. Specifically, the paper presents the result for experiments performed on an implementation of the Integrated Process Supervision on a PC and micro-controller environment. Autotuning techniques were first integrated within the process supervision. Three Autotuners based on specification of phase and amplitude margins were investigated. A modified version of Cerebellar MOdel Articulation Controller was then implemented in IPS as a direct controller. Results collected verify its integration in the integrated process supervision and also provide evidence of improved performance as compared to Autotuning.

  11. Integrating timescales with time-transfer functions: a practical approach for an INTIMATE database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronk Ramsey, Christopher; Albert, Paul; Blockley, Simon; Hardiman, Mark; Lane, Christine; Macleod, Alison; Matthews, Ian P.; Muscheler, Raimund; Palmer, Adrian; Staff, Richard A.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the INTIMATE project is to integrate palaeo-climate information from terrestrial, ice and marine records so that the timing of environmental response to climate forcing can be compared in both space and time. One of the key difficulties in doing this is the range of different methods of dating that can be used across different disciplines. For this reason, one of the main outputs of INTIMATE has been to use an event-stratigraphic approach which enables researchers to co-register synchronous events (such as the deposition of tephra from major volcanic eruptions) in different archives (Blockley et al., 2012). However, this only partly solves the problem, because it gives information only at particular short intervals where such information is present. Between these points the ability to compare different records is necessarily less precise chronologically. What is needed therefore is a way to quantify the uncertainties in the correlations between different records, even if they are dated by different methods, and make maximum use of the information available that links different records. This paper outlines the design of a database that is intended to provide integration of timescales and associated environmental proxy information. The database allows for the fact that all timescales have their own limitations, which should be quantified in terms of the uncertainties quoted. It also makes use of the fact that each timescale has strengths in terms of describing the data directly associated with it. For this reason the approach taken allows users to look at data on any timescale that can in some way be related to the data of interest, rather than specifying a specific timescale or timescales which should always be used. The information going into the database is primarily: proxy information (principally from sediments and ice cores) against depth, age depth models against reference chronologies (typically IntCal or ice core), and time-transfer functions

  12. Integrated approach to estimate the ocean's time variable dynamic topography including its covariance matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Silvia; Brockmann, Jan Martin; Schuh, Wolf-Dieter

    2015-04-01

    The ocean's dynamic topography as the difference between the sea surface and the geoid reflects many characteristics of the general ocean circulation. Consequently, it provides valuable information for evaluating or tuning ocean circulation models. The sea surface is directly observed by satellite radar altimetry while the geoid cannot be observed directly. The satellite-based gravity field determination requires different measurement principles (satellite-to-satellite tracking (e.g. GRACE), satellite-gravity-gradiometry (GOCE)). In addition, hydrographic measurements (salinity, temperature and pressure; near-surface velocities) provide information on the dynamic topography. The observation types have different representations and spatial as well as temporal resolutions. Therefore, the determination of the dynamic topography is not straightforward. Furthermore, the integration of the dynamic topography into ocean circulation models requires not only the dynamic topography itself but also its inverse covariance matrix on the ocean model grid. We developed a rigorous combination method in which the dynamic topography is parameterized in space as well as in time. The altimetric sea surface heights are expressed as a sum of geoid heights represented in terms of spherical harmonics and the dynamic topography parameterized by a finite element method which can be directly related to the particular ocean model grid. Besides the difficult task of combining altimetry data with a gravity field model, a major aspect is the consistent combination of satellite data and in-situ observations. The particular characteristics and the signal content of the different observations must be adequately considered requiring the introduction of auxiliary parameters. Within our model the individual observation groups are combined in terms of normal equations considering their full covariance information; i.e. a rigorous variance/covariance propagation from the original measurements to the

  13. Real Time Integration of Field Data Into a GIS Platform for the Management of Hydrological Emergencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangiameli, M.; Mussumeci, G.

    2013-01-01

    A wide series of events requires immediate availability of information and field data to be provided to decision-makers. An example is the necessity of quickly transferring the information acquired from monitoring and alerting sensors or the data of the reconnaissance of damage after a disastrous event to an Emergency Operations Center. To this purpose, we developed an integrated GIS and WebGIS system to dynamically create and populate via Web a database with spatial features. In particular, this work concerns the gathering and transmission of spatial data and related information to the desktop GIS so that they can be displayed and analyzed in real time to characterize the operational scenario and to decide the rescue interventions. As basic software, we used only free and open source: QuantumGIS and Grass as Desktop GIS, Map Server with PMapper application for the Web-Gis functionality and PostGreSQL/PostGIS as Data Base Management System (DBMS). The approach has been designed, developed and successfully tested in the management of GIS-based navigation of an autonomous robot, both to map its trajectories and to assign optimal paths. This paper presents the application of our system to a simulated hydrological event that could interest the province of Catania, in Sicily. In particular, assuming that more teams draw up an inventory of the damage, we highlight the benefits of real-time transmission of the information collected from the field to headquarters.

  14. Single-shot observation of optical rogue waves in integrable turbulence using time microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Suret, Pierre; Koussaifi, Rebecca El; Tikan, Alexey; Evain, Clément; Randoux, Stéphane; Szwaj, Christophe; Bielawski, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Optical fibres are favourable tabletop laboratories to investigate both coherent and incoherent nonlinear waves. In particular, exact solutions of the one-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation such as fundamental solitons or solitons on finite background can be generated by launching periodic, specifically designed coherent waves in optical fibres. It is an open fundamental question to know whether these coherent structures can emerge from the nonlinear propagation of random waves. However the typical sub-picosecond timescale prevented—up to now—time-resolved observations of the awaited dynamics. Here, we report temporal ‘snapshots' of random light using a specially designed ‘time-microscope'. Ultrafast structures having peak powers much larger than the average optical power are generated from the propagation of partially coherent waves in optical fibre and are recorded with 250 femtoseconds resolution. Our experiment demonstrates the central role played by ‘breather-like' structures such as the Peregrine soliton in the emergence of heavy-tailed statistics in integrable turbulence. PMID:27713416

  15. ICESAT Laser Altimeter Pointing, Ranging and Timing Calibration from Integrated Residual Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthcke, Scott B.; Rowlands, D. D.; Carabajal, C. C.; Harding, D. H.; Bufton, J. L.; Williams, T. A.

    2003-01-01

    On January 12, 2003 the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) was successfully placed into orbit. The ICESat mission carries the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), which has a primary measurement of short-pulse laser- ranging to the Earth s surface at 1064nm wavelength at a rate of 40 pulses per second. The instrument has collected precise elevation measurements of the ice sheets, sea ice roughness and thickness, ocean and land surface elevations and surface reflectivity. The accurate geolocation of GLAS s surface returns, the spots from which the laser energy reflects on the Earth s surface, is a critical issue in the scientific application of these data. Pointing, ranging, timing and orbit errors must be compensated to accurately geolocate the laser altimeter surface returns. Towards this end, the laser range observations can be fully exploited in an integrated residual analysis to accurately calibrate these geolocation/instrument parameters. ICESat laser altimeter data have been simultaneously processed as direct altimetry from ocean sweeps along with dynamic crossovers in order to calibrate pointing, ranging and timing. The calibration methodology and current calibration results are discussed along with future efforts.

  16. Real-time monitoring of suspension cell-cell communication using an integrated microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Yue, Wanqing; Li, Cheuk-Wing; Yao, Xinsheng; Cai, Guoping; Yang, Mengsu

    2010-09-07

    For the first time, we have developed a microfluidic device for on-chip monitoring of suspension cell-cell communication from stimulated to recipient HL-60 cells. A deformable PDMS membrane was developed as a compressive component to perform cell entrapment and exert different modes of mechanical stimulation. The number of cells trapped by this component could be modulated by flushing excessive cells towards the device outlet. The trapped cells could be triggered to release mediators by mechanical stimulation. Sandbag microstructures were used to immobilize recipient cells at well-defined positions. These recipient cells were evoked by mediators released from mechanically stimulated cells trapped in the compressive component. Normally closed microvalves were integrated to provide continuous-flow and static environment. We studied cell-cell communication between stimulated (in compressive component) and recipient (in sandbag structures) cells. Calcium oscillations were observed in some recipient cells only when a low number of cells were stimulated. Different mechanical stimulation and flow environment were also employed to study their impact on the behavior of cell-cell communication. We observed that both the duration and intensity of intracellular calcium responses increased in persistent stimulation and decreased in flowing environment. This microdevice may open up new avenues for real-time monitoring of suspension cell-cell communication, which propagates via gap-junction independent mechanism, with multiple variables under control.

  17. Issues in the timing of integrated early interventions: contributions from nutrition, neuroscience and psychological research

    PubMed Central

    Wachs, Theodore D.; Georgieff, Michael; Cusick, Sarah; McEwen, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    A central issue when designing multi-dimensional biological and psychosocial interventions for children who are exposed to multiple developmental risks is identification of the age period(s) in which such interventions will have the strongest and longest lasting impact (sensitive periods). In this paper we review nutritional, neuroscience and psychological evidence on this issue. Nutritional evidence is used to identify nutrient sensitive periods of age-linked dimensions of brain development, with specific reference to iron deficiency. Neuroscience evidence is used to assess the importance of timing of exposures to environmental stressors for maintaining neural, neuroendocrine and immune systems integrity. Psychological evidence illustrates the sensitivity of cognitive and social-emotional development to contextual risk and protective influences encountered at different ages. Evidence reviewed documents that the early years of life are a sensitive period where biological or psychosocial interventions or exposure to risk or protective contextual influences can produce unique long-term influences upon human brain, neuroendocrine and cognitive or psychosocial development. However, the evidence does not identify the early years as the sole sensitive time period within which to have a significant influence upon development. Choice of age(s) to initiate interventions should be based on what outcomes are targeted and what interventions are used. PMID:24354763

  18. Photothermal damage is correlated to the delivery rate of time-integrated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, Michael L.; Noojin, Gary D.; Gamboa, B. Giovanna; Ahmed, Elharith M.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2016-03-01

    Photothermal damage rate processes in biological tissues are usually characterized by a kinetics approach. This stems from experimental data that show how the transformation of a specified biological property of cells or biomolecule (plating efficiency for viability, change in birefringence, tensile strength, etc.) is dependent upon both time and temperature. However, kinetic methods require determination of kinetic rate constants and knowledge of substrate or product concentrations during the reaction. To better understand photothermal damage processes we have identified temperature histories of cultured retinal cells receiving minimum lethal thermal doses for a variety of laser and culture parameters. These "threshold" temperature histories are of interest because they inherently contain information regarding the fundamental thermal dose requirements for damage in individual cells. We introduce the notion of time-integrated temperature (Tint) as an accumulated thermal dose (ATD) with units of °C s. Damaging photothermal exposure raises the rate of ATD accumulation from that of the ambient (e.g. 37 °C) to one that correlates with cell death (e.g. 52 °C). The degree of rapid increase in ATD (ΔATD) during photothermal exposure depends strongly on the laser exposure duration and the ambient temperature.

  19. Elucidating dynamic metabolic physiology through network integration of quantitative time-course metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Bordbar, Aarash; Yurkovich, James T; Paglia, Giuseppe; Rolfsson, Ottar; Sigurjónsson, Ólafur E; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2017-04-07

    The increasing availability of metabolomics data necessitates novel methods for deeper data analysis and interpretation. We present a flux balance analysis method that allows for the computation of dynamic intracellular metabolic changes at the cellular scale through integration of time-course absolute quantitative metabolomics. This approach, termed "unsteady-state flux balance analysis" (uFBA), is applied to four cellular systems: three dynamic and one steady-state as a negative control. uFBA and FBA predictions are contrasted, and uFBA is found to be more accurate in predicting dynamic metabolic flux states for red blood cells, platelets, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Notably, only uFBA predicts that stored red blood cells metabolize TCA intermediates to regenerate important cofactors, such as ATP, NADH, and NADPH. These pathway usage predictions were subsequently validated through (13)C isotopic labeling and metabolic flux analysis in stored red blood cells. Utilizing time-course metabolomics data, uFBA provides an accurate method to predict metabolic physiology at the cellular scale for dynamic systems.

  20. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system for real-time monitoring of integrated-constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Dzakpasu, Mawuli; Scholz, Miklas; McCarthy, Valerie; Jordan, Siobhán; Sani, Abdulkadir

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring large-scale treatment wetlands is costly and time-consuming, but required by regulators. Some analytical results are available only after 5 days or even longer. Thus, adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) models were developed to predict the effluent concentrations of 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) and NH4-N from a full-scale integrated constructed wetland (ICW) treating domestic wastewater. The ANFIS models were developed and validated with a 4-year data set from the ICW system. Cost-effective, quicker and easier to measure variables were selected as the possible predictors based on their goodness of correlation with the outputs. A self-organizing neural network was applied to extract the most relevant input variables from all the possible input variables. Fuzzy subtractive clustering was used to identify the architecture of the ANFIS models and to optimize fuzzy rules, overall, improving the network performance. According to the findings, ANFIS could predict the effluent quality variation quite strongly. Effluent BOD5 and NH4-N concentrations were predicted relatively accurately by other effluent water quality parameters, which can be measured within a few hours. The simulated effluent BOD5 and NH4-N concentrations well fitted the measured concentrations, which was also supported by relatively low mean squared error. Thus, ANFIS can be useful for real-time monitoring and control of ICW systems.

  1. Elucidating dynamic metabolic physiology through network integration of quantitative time-course metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Bordbar, Aarash; Yurkovich, James T.; Paglia, Giuseppe; Rolfsson, Ottar; Sigurjónsson, Ólafur E.; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2017-01-01

    The increasing availability of metabolomics data necessitates novel methods for deeper data analysis and interpretation. We present a flux balance analysis method that allows for the computation of dynamic intracellular metabolic changes at the cellular scale through integration of time-course absolute quantitative metabolomics. This approach, termed “unsteady-state flux balance analysis” (uFBA), is applied to four cellular systems: three dynamic and one steady-state as a negative control. uFBA and FBA predictions are contrasted, and uFBA is found to be more accurate in predicting dynamic metabolic flux states for red blood cells, platelets, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Notably, only uFBA predicts that stored red blood cells metabolize TCA intermediates to regenerate important cofactors, such as ATP, NADH, and NADPH. These pathway usage predictions were subsequently validated through 13C isotopic labeling and metabolic flux analysis in stored red blood cells. Utilizing time-course metabolomics data, uFBA provides an accurate method to predict metabolic physiology at the cellular scale for dynamic systems. PMID:28387366

  2. Higher Order Time Integration Schemes for the Unsteady Navier-Stokes Equations on Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jothiprasad, Giridhar; Mavriplis, Dimitri J.; Caughey, David A.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The efficiency gains obtained using higher-order implicit Runge-Kutta schemes as compared with the second-order accurate backward difference schemes for the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations are investigated. Three different algorithms for solving the nonlinear system of equations arising at each timestep are presented. The first algorithm (NMG) is a pseudo-time-stepping scheme which employs a non-linear full approximation storage (FAS) agglomeration multigrid method to accelerate convergence. The other two algorithms are based on Inexact Newton's methods. The linear system arising at each Newton step is solved using iterative/Krylov techniques and left preconditioning is used to accelerate convergence of the linear solvers. One of the methods (LMG) uses Richardson's iterative scheme for solving the linear system at each Newton step while the other (PGMRES) uses the Generalized Minimal Residual method. Results demonstrating the relative superiority of these Newton's methods based schemes are presented. Efficiency gains as high as 10 are obtained by combining the higher-order time integration schemes with the more efficient nonlinear solvers.

  3. Active ultrasonic joint integrity adjudication for real-time structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Erik H.; Kennel, Matthew B.; Fasel, Timothy R.; Todd, Michael D.; Stabb, Mark C.; Arritt, Brandon J.

    2008-03-01

    The Operationally Responsive Space (ORS) strategy hinges, in part, on realizing technologies which can facilitate the rapid deployment of satellites. Presently, preflight qualification testing and vehicle integration processes are time consumptive and pose as two significant hurdles which must be overcome to effectively enhance US space asset deployment responsiveness. There is a growing demand for innovative embedded Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) technologies which can be seamlessly incorporated onto payload hardware and function in parallel with satellite construction to mitigate lengthy preflight checkout procedures. In this effort our work is focused on the development of a joint connectivity monitoring algorithm which can detect, locate, and assess preload in bolted joint assemblies. Our technology leverages inexpensive, lightweight, flexible thin-film macro-fiber composite (MFC) sensor/actuators with a novel online, data-driven signal processing algorithm. This algorithm inherently relies upon Chaotic Guided Ultrasonic Waves (CGUW) and a novel cross-prediction error classification technique. The efficacy of the monitoring algorithm is evaluated through a series of numerical simulations and experimentally in two test configurations. We conclude with a discussion surrounding further development of this approach into a commercial product as a real-time flight readiness indicator.

  4. [Development of auditory-visual spatial integration using saccadic response time as the index].

    PubMed

    Kato, Masaharu; Konishi, Kaoru; Kurosawa, Makiko; Konishi, Yukuo

    2006-05-01

    We measured saccadic response time (SRT) to investigate developmental changes related to spatially aligned or misaligned auditory and visual stimuli responses. We exposed 4-, 5-, and 11-month-old infants to ipsilateral or contralateral auditory-visual stimuli and monitored their eye movements using an electro-oculographic (EOG) system. The SRT analyses revealed four main results. First, saccades were triggered by visual stimuli but not always triggered by auditory stimuli. Second, SRTs became shorter as the children grew older. Third, SRTs for the ipsilateral and visual-only conditions were the same in all infants. Fourth, SRTs for the contralateral condition were longer than for the ipsilateral and visual-only conditions in 11-month-old infants but were the same for all three conditions in 4- and 5-month-old infants. These findings suggest that infants acquire the function of auditory-visual spatial integration underlying saccadic eye movement between the ages of 5 and 11 months. The dependency of SRTs on the spatial configuration of auditory and visual stimuli can be explained by cortical control of the superior colliculus. Our finding of no differences in SRTs between the ipsilateral and visual-only conditions suggests that there are multiple pathways for controlling the superior colliculus and that these pathways have different developmental time courses.

  5. Single-shot observation of optical rogue waves in integrable turbulence using time microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suret, Pierre; Koussaifi, Rebecca El; Tikan, Alexey; Evain, Clément; Randoux, Stéphane; Szwaj, Christophe; Bielawski, Serge

    2016-10-01

    Optical fibres are favourable tabletop laboratories to investigate both coherent and incoherent nonlinear waves. In particular, exact solutions of the one-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation such as fundamental solitons or solitons on finite background can be generated by launching periodic, specifically designed coherent waves in optical fibres. It is an open fundamental question to know whether these coherent structures can emerge from the nonlinear propagation of random waves. However the typical sub-picosecond timescale prevented--up to now--time-resolved observations of the awaited dynamics. Here, we report temporal `snapshots' of random light using a specially designed `time-microscope'. Ultrafast structures having peak powers much larger than the average optical power are generated from the propagation of partially coherent waves in optical fibre and are recorded with 250 femtoseconds resolution. Our experiment demonstrates the central role played by `breather-like' structures such as the Peregrine soliton in the emergence of heavy-tailed statistics in integrable turbulence.

  6. The electro-mechanical integration of the NA62 GigaTracker time tagging pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, M.; Kluge, A.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Carassiti, V.; Ceccucci, A.; Daguin, J.; Fiorini, M.; Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Mapelli, A.; Marchetto, F.; Noy, M.; Nuessle, G.; Perktold, L.; Petagna, P.; Riedler, P.

    2010-12-01

    The NA62 GigaTracker is a low mass time tagging hybrid pixel detector operating in a beam with a particle rate of 750 MHz. It consists of three stations with a sensor size of 60 × 27mm2 containing 18000 pixels, each 300 × 300μm2. The active area is connected to a matrix of 2 × 5 pixel ASICs, which time tag the arrival of the particles with a binning of 100 ps. The detector operates in vacuum at -20 to 0°C and the material budget per station must be below 0.5% X0. Due to the high radiation environment of 2 × 1014 1 MeV neutron equivalent cm-2/yr-1 it is planned to exchange the detector modules regularly. The low material budget, cooling requirements and the request for easy module access has driven the electro-mechanical integration of the GigaTracker, which is presented in this paper.

  7. Real-Time Data and Network Integration in the southern Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragato, P.; Costa, G.; Horn, N.; Michelini, A.; Mocnik, G.; Zivcic, M.

    2003-04-01

    Earthquakes in the South-Eastern Alpine region are concentrated at or close to the borders between Slovenia, Austria and Italy. This area has experienced several destructive earthquakes in the past -the most recent examples are represented by the 1976 Ferrule and the 1998 Bovec-Krn Mountain earthquakes. There are different seismic networks operating in these regions supporting monitoring, alerting, research and educational activities. The example of the Bovec-Krn Mountain earthquake (M_{W} = 5.6), located within the Slovenian borders but just a few kilometers away from Austria and Friuli Venezia Giulia region in Italy, demonstrated that the integration of services provided by the neighboring networks is essential for a rapid and efficient intervention. The feasibility of a real-time data exchange between the seismological stations operating in the Austria-Slovenia-Italy border region was demonstrated within the scope of two workshops in Trieste and Udine (Italy) in September 2001. As a tangible result of this close collaboration, an international scientific agreement for "real-time" seismological data exchange in the Alpe-Adria region among the Zentralanstalt f& uml;ur Meteorologie und Geodynamik, Hauptabteilung Geophysik, Wien, & uml;Osterreich, the Agencija Republike Slovenije za okolje, urad za seizmologijo, Ljubljana, Slovenija, the Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita' degli Studi di Trieste, Italy and the Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale - OGS, Italy, has formally been signed in January 2002. Since then, the real- or near real-time data exchange is an ongoing effort of the above-mentioned agencies in Austria, Slovenia and Italy using Antelope software package, produced by BRTT, and the SeisComP package developed by the Geofon and MEREDIAN projects. Currently, the data from more than 15 stations are exchanged between the seismological centers. We will present the status of the data exchange, the mechanisms involved and

  8. Designing Adaptive Low-Dissipative High Order Schemes for Long-Time Integrations. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Helen C.; Sjoegreen, B.; Mansour, Nagi N. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A general framework for the design of adaptive low-dissipative high order schemes is presented. It encompasses a rather complete treatment of the numerical approach based on four integrated design criteria: (1) For stability considerations, condition the governing equations before the application of the appropriate numerical scheme whenever it is possible; (2) For consistency, compatible schemes that possess stability properties, including physical and numerical boundary condition treatments, similar to those of the discrete analogue of the continuum are preferred; (3) For the minimization of numerical dissipation contamination, efficient and adaptive numerical dissipation control to further improve nonlinear stability and accuracy should be used; and (4) For practical considerations, the numerical approach should be efficient and applicable to general geometries, and an efficient and reliable dynamic grid adaptation should be used if necessary. These design criteria are, in general, very useful to a wide spectrum of flow simulations. However, the demand on the overall numerical approach for nonlinear stability and accuracy is much more stringent for long-time integration of complex multiscale viscous shock/shear/turbulence/acoustics interactions and numerical combustion. Robust classical numerical methods for less complex flow physics are not suitable or practical for such applications. The present approach is designed expressly to address such flow problems, especially unsteady flows. The minimization of employing very fine grids to overcome the production of spurious numerical solutions and/or instability due to under-resolved grids is also sought. The incremental studies to illustrate the performance of the approach are summarized. Extensive testing and full implementation of the approach is forthcoming. The results shown so far are very encouraging.

  9. It is time to integrate: the temporal dynamics of object motion and texture motion integration in multiple object tracking.

    PubMed

    Huff, Markus; Papenmeier, Frank

    2013-01-14

    In multiple-object tracking, participants can track several moving objects among identical distractors. It has recently been shown that the human visual system uses motion information in order to keep track of targets (St. Clair et al., Journal of Vision, 10(4), 1-13). Texture on the surface of an object that moved in the opposite direction to the object itself impaired tracking performance. In this study, we examined the temporal interval at which texture motion and object motion is integrated in dynamic scenes. In two multiple-object tracking experiments, we manipulated the texture motion on the objects: The texture either moved in the same direction as the objects, in the opposite direction, or alternated between the same and opposite direction at varying intervals. In Experiment 1, we show that the integration of object motion and texture motion can take place at intervals as short as 100 ms. In Experiment 2, we show that there is a linear relationship between the proportion of opposite texture motion and tracking performance. We suggest that texture motion might cause shifts in perceived object locations, thus influencing tracking performance.

  10. An integrated portable hand-held analyser for real-time isothermal nucleic acid amplification.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew C; Steimle, George; Ivanov, Stan; Holly, Mark; Fries, David P

    2007-08-29

    A compact hand-held heated fluorometric instrument for performing real-time isothermal nucleic acid amplification and detection is described. The optoelectronic instrument combines a Printed Circuit Board/Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (PCB/MEMS) reaction detection/chamber containing an integrated resistive heater with attached miniature LED light source and photo-detector and a disposable glass waveguide capillary to enable a mini-fluorometer. The fluorometer is fabricated and assembled in planar geometry, rolled into a tubular format and packaged with custom control electronics to form the hand-held reactor. Positive or negative results for each reaction are displayed to the user using an LED interface. Reaction data is stored in FLASH memory for retrieval via an in-built USB connection. Operating on one disposable 3 V lithium battery >12, 60 min reactions can be performed. Maximum dimensions of the system are 150 mm (h) x 48 mm (d) x 40 mm (w), the total instrument weight (with battery) is 140 g. The system produces comparable results to laboratory instrumentation when performing a real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) reaction, and also displayed comparable precision, accuracy and resolution to laboratory-based real-time nucleic acid amplification instrumentation. A good linear response (R2 = 0.948) to fluorescein gradients ranging from 0.5 to 10 microM was also obtained from the instrument indicating that it may be utilized for other fluorometric assays. This instrument enables an inexpensive, compact approach to in-field genetic screening, providing results comparable to laboratory equipment with rapid user feedback as to the status of the reaction.

  11. Rain rate modeling of 1-min from various integration times in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Sujan; Park, Jung-Jin; Choi, Dong-You

    2016-01-01

    Rain plays a major impairment factor for propagation of electromagnetic waves in atmosphere for systems operating at frequencies above 10 GHz. Several effects are noted such as depolarization, scintillation, interference due to scattering and extra attenuation which seems to increase with frequency. To mitigate its effect in satellite communication, knowledge of local rainfall statistics is necessary which act as milestone for design of radio link. Rain attenuation is best visualize by the 1-min rainfall rate statistic but the measurement of this rain rate distribution is rare on a worldwide basis and observation of rain rate are done with longer integration times typically 30 min or more. In this paper, efforts have been made to develop model that can convert rain rate complementary cumulative distribution function to shorter integration times. The average relative error margin of about 5, 14, 43, 71 and 115 % are noted for 5 to 1-, 10 to 1-, 20 to 1, 30 to 1- and 60 to 1-min respectively from ITU-R P.837-6 method which have been analyzed in further section of this article. The empirical natures of conversion methods as such Segal method, Burgueno's method, Chebil and Rahman method and Logarithmic model are studied along with the proposed new model that seems to be applicable in derivation of 1-min rain rate of the South Korea rain rate statistics. International Telecommunication Union-Radio communication Sector (ITU-R) has developed a recommendation ITU-R P.837-6 that enables the user to estimate the local 1-min rainfall rate statistical distribution which is compared with calculated 1-min rain rate distribution from experimental 1-min rainfall accumulation. Unfortunately, ITU-R P.837-6 estimated 1-min values show greater error percentages. In order to get better approximation of local 1-min rain rate estimation, a novel method is proposed and it's efficiency have been compared with rainfall rate statistics obtained from nine different locations in the South

  12. Model Integration for Real-Time Flood Forecasting Inundation Mapping for Nashville Tributaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charley, W.; Moran, B.; LaRosa, J.

    2012-12-01

    In May of 2010, between 14 and 19 inches of rain fell on the Nashville metro area in two days, quickly overwhelming tributaries to the Cumberland River and causing wide-spread, serious flooding. Tractor-trailers and houses were seen floating down Mill Creek, a primary tributary in the south eastern area of Nashville. Twenty-six people died and over 2 billion dollars in damage occurred as a result of the flood. Since that time, several other significant rainfall events have occurred in the area. Emergency responders were unable to deliver aid or preventive measures to areas under threat of flooding (or under water) in time to reduce damages because they could not identify those areas far enough in advance of the floods. Nashville Metro Water, the National Weather Service, the US Geological Survey and the US Army Corps of Engineers established a joint venture to seek ways to better forecast short-term flood events in the region. One component of this effort was a pilot project to compute and display real time inundation maps for Mill Creek, a 108 square-mile basin to the south east of Nashville. HEC-RTS (Real-Time Simulation) was used to assimilate and integrate the hydrologic model HEC-HMS with the hydraulics model HEC-RAS and the inundation mapping program HEC-RAS Mapper. The USGS, along with the other agencies, installed additional precipitation and flow/stage gages in the area. Measurements are recorded every 5-30 minutes and are posted on the USGS NWIS database, which are downloaded by HEC-RTS. Using this data in combination with QPFs (Quantitative Precipitation Forecasts) from the NWS, HEC-RTS applies HEC-HMS and HEC-RAS to estimate current and forecast stage hydrographs. The peak stages are read by HEC-RAS Mapper to compute inundation depths for 6 by 6 foot grid cells. HEC-RTS displays the inundation on a high resolution MrSid aerial photo, along with subbasin boundary, street and various other layers. When a user zooms in and "mouses" over a cell, the

  13. Direct time integration of Maxwell's equations in two-dimensional dielectric waveguides for propagation and scattering of femtosecond electromagnetic solitons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, Rose M.; Goorjian, Peter M.; Taflove, Allen

    1993-01-01

    We present what are to our knowledge first-time calculations from vector nonlinear Maxwell's equations of femtosecond soliton propagation and scattering, including carrier waves, in two-dimensional dielectric waveguides. The time integration efficiently implements linear and nonlinear convolutions for the electric polarization, and the nonlinear convolution accounts for two quantum effects, the Kerr and Raman interactions. By retaining the optical carrier, the new method solves for fundamental quantities - optical electric and magnetic fields in space and time - rather than a nonphysical envelope function. It has the potential to provide an unprecedented two- and three-dimensional modeling capability for millimeter-scale integrated-optical circuits with submicrometer engineered inhomogeneities.

  14. Real-time energy measurement of high repetition rate ultrashort laser pulses using pulse integration and FPGA processing.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qi-Jie; Yang, Dong-Xu; Wang, Jian; Feng, Yi; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Chen, Teng-Yun

    2016-11-01

    Real-time energy measurement using pulse integration method for high repetition rate ultrashort laser pulses based on FPGA (Field-Programmable Gate Array) and high-speed pipeline ADC (Analog-to-Digital Convertor) is introduced in this paper. There are two parts contained in this method: pulse integration and real-time data processing. The pulse integration circuit will convert the pulse to the step type signals which are linear to the laser pulse energy. Through the real-time data processing part, the amplitude of the step signals will be obtained by ADC sampling and conducting calculation in real time in FPGA. The test result shows that the method with good linearity (4.770%) and without pulse measurement missing is suitable for ultrashort laser pulses with high repetition rate up to 100 MHz.

  15. Short-time asymptotics of a rigorous path integral for N = 1 supersymmetric quantum mechanics on a Riemannian manifold

    SciTech Connect

    Fine, Dana S.; Sawin, Stephen

    2014-06-15

    Following Feynman's prescription for constructing a path integral representation of the propagator of a quantum theory, a short-time approximation to the propagator for imaginary-time, N = 1 supersymmetric quantum mechanics on a compact, even-dimensional Riemannian manifold is constructed. The path integral is interpreted as the limit of products, determined by a partition of a finite time interval, of this approximate propagator. The limit under refinements of the partition is shown to converge uniformly to the heat kernel for the Laplace-de Rham operator on forms. A version of the steepest descent approximation to the path integral is obtained, and shown to give the expected short-time behavior of the supertrace of the heat kernel.

  16. Real-time energy measurement of high repetition rate ultrashort laser pulses using pulse integration and FPGA processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qi-jie; Yang, Dong-xu; Wang, Jian; Feng, Yi; Zhang, Hong-fei; Chen, Teng-yun

    2016-11-01

    Real-time energy measurement using pulse integration method for high repetition rate ultrashort laser pulses based on FPGA (Field-Programmable Gate Array) and high-speed pipeline ADC (Analog-to-Digital Convertor) is introduced in this paper. There are two parts contained in this method: pulse integration and real-time data processing. The pulse integration circuit will convert the pulse to the step type signals which are linear to the laser pulse energy. Through the real-time data processing part, the amplitude of the step signals will be obtained by ADC sampling and conducting calculation in real time in FPGA. The test result shows that the method with good linearity (4.770%) and without pulse measurement missing is suitable for ultrashort laser pulses with high repetition rate up to 100 MHz.

  17. Precision frequency measurement of 1S0-3P1 intercombination lines of Sr isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Gao, Feng; Ye-Bing, Wang; Xiao, Tian; Jie, Ren; Ben-Quan, Lu; Qin-Fang, Xu; Yu-Lin, Xie; Hong, Chang

    2015-01-01

    We report on frequency measurement of the intercombination (5s2)1S0-(5s5p)3P1 transition of the four natural isotopes of strontium, including 88Sr (82.58%), 87Sr (7.0%), 86Sr (9.86%), and 84Sr (0.56%). A narrow-linewidth laser that is locked to an ultra-low expansion (ULE) optical cavity with a finesse of 12000 is evaluated at a linewidth of 200 Hz with a fractional frequency drift of 2.8×10-13 at an integration time of 1 s. The fluorescence collector and detector are specially designed, based on a thermal atomic beam. Using a double-pass acousto-optic modulator (AOM) combined with a fiber and laser power stabilization configuration to detune the laser frequency enables high signal-to-noise ratios and precision saturated spectra to be obtained for the six transition lines, which allows us to determine the transition frequency precisely. The optical frequency is measured using an optical frequency synthesizer referenced to an H maser. Both the statistical values and the final values, including the corrections and uncertainties, are derived for a comparison with the values given in other works. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61127901) and the Key Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. KJZD-EW-W02).

  18. An integral quality monitoring system for real-time verification of intensity modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Mohammad K.; Norrlinger, Bernhard D.; Smale, Jason R.; Heaton, Robert K.; Galbraith, Duncan; Fan, Cary; Jaffray, David A.

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: To develop an independent and on-line beam monitoring system, which can validate the accuracy of segment-by-segment energy fluence delivery for each treatment field. The system is also intended to be utilized for pretreatment dosimetric quality assurance of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), on-line image-guided adaptive radiation therapy, and volumetric modulated arc therapy. Methods: The system, referred to as the integral quality monitor (IQM), utilizes an area integrating energy fluence monitoring sensor (AIMS) positioned between the final beam shaping device [i.e., multileaf collimator (MLC)] and the patient. The prototype AIMS consists of a novel spatially sensitive large area ionization chamber with a gradient along the direction of the MLC motion. The signal from the AIMS provides a simple output for each beam segment, which is compared in real time to the expected value. The prototype ionization chamber, with a physical area of 22x22 cm{sup 2}, has been constructed out of aluminum with the electrode separations varying linearly from 2 to 20 mm. A calculation method has been developed to predict AIMS signals based on an elementwise integration technique, which takes into account various predetermined factors, including the spatial response function of the chamber, MLC characteristics, beam transmission through the secondary jaws, and field size factors. The influence of the ionization chamber on the beam has been evaluated in terms of transmission, surface dose, beam profiles, and depth dose. The sensitivity of the system was tested by introducing small deviations in leaf positions. A small set of IMRT fields for prostate and head and neck plans was used to evaluate the system. The ionization chamber and the data acquisition software systems were interfaced to two different types of linear accelerators: Elekta Synergy and Varian iX. Results: For a 10x10 cm{sup 2} field, the chamber attenuates the beam intensity by 7% and 5% for 6 and 18

  19. The fossil record of phenotypic integration and modularity: A deep-time perspective on developmental and evolutionary dynamics.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Anjali; Binder, Wendy J; Meachen, Julie; O'Keefe, F Robin

    2015-04-21

    Variation is the raw material for natural selection, but the factors shaping variation are still poorly understood. Genetic and developmental interactions can direct variation, but there has been little synthesis of these effects with the extrinsic factors that can shape biodiversity over large scales. The study of phenotypic integration and modularity has the capacity to unify these aspects of evolutionary study by estimating genetic and developmental interactions through the quantitative analysis of morphology, allowing for combined assessment of intrinsic and extrinsic effects. Data from the fossil record in particular are central to our understanding of phenotypic integration and modularity because they provide the only information on deep-time developmental and evolutionary dynamics, including trends in trait relationships and their role in shaping organismal diversity. Here, we demonstrate the important perspective on phenotypic integration provided by the fossil record with a study of Smilodon fatalis (saber-toothed cats) and Canis dirus (dire wolves). We quantified temporal trends in size, variance, phenotypic integration, and direct developmental integration (fluctuating asymmetry) through 27,000 y of Late Pleistocene climate change. Both S. fatalis and C. dirus showed a gradual decrease in magnitude of phenotypic integration and an increase in variance and the correlation between fluctuating asymmetry and overall integration through time, suggesting that developmental integration mediated morphological response to environmental change in the later populations of these species. These results are consistent with experimental studies and represent, to our knowledge, the first deep-time validation of the importance of developmental integration in stabilizing morphological evolution through periods of environmental change.

  20. Soil Contamination, Advanced integrated characterisation and time-lapse Monitoring, SoilCAM project highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, H. K.; Van Der Zee, S. E.; Wehrer, M.; Godio, A.; Pedersen, L. B.; Tsocano, G.

    2013-12-01

    measurements indicate where the remaining crude oil can be found. Water samples from multilevel samplers reveal crude oil present in emulsion in the zone of groundwater fluctuations, highlighting the importance of colloidal transport. Modelling of multiphase flow of the fluctuating groundwater level explains the lack of horizontal displacement of the plume in the area. Geochemistry of the groundwater clearly indicates degradation of hydrocarbons under iron- and sulphate reducing conditions, but changes were too slow to be mapped by time-lapse geophysical measurements during the project period. MODFLOW was used to simulate the regional groundwater flow and transport in the area. Highlights of the results from both test sites will be presented as an integrated overview. Snow removal at Oslo airport

  1. Integrative stratigraphy during extreme environmental changes and biotic recovery time: The Early Triassic in Indian Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richoz, Sylvain; Krystyn, Leopold; Algeo, Thomas; Bhargava, Om

    2014-05-01

    The understanding of extreme environmental changes as major extinction events, perturbations of global biogeochemical cycles or rapid climate shifts is based on a precise timing of the different events. But especially in such moving environments exact correlations are difficult to establish what underlines the necessity of an integrated stratigraphy by using all tools at disposition. A Lower Triassic section at Mud in the Spiti Valley (Western Himalaya, India) is a candidate section for the GSSP of the Induan-Olenekian Boundary (IOB). The succession was deposited in a deep-shelf setting on the southern margin of the Neotethys Ocean. The section contains abundant fossils allowing a very precise regional biostratigraphy and displays no signs of sedimentary breaks. Analysis of pelagic faunas proves a significant, two-step radiation phase in ammonoids and conodonts close to the Induan-Olenekian boundary. These diversifications are coupled with a short-termed positive δ13Ccarb excursion of global evidence. The Spiti δ13Ccarb excursion displays, however, different amplitude and biostratigraphic position than in other relevant sections for this time interval. In this study, we analyzed δ13Ccarb, δ13Corg, and δ15Norg as well as major, trace, and REE concentrations for a 16-m-thick interval spanning the mid-Griesbachian to early Spathian substages, to better constrains the chain of events. Prior to the first radiation step, high difference gradient between the δ13Ccarb values of tempestite beds with shallow carbonate and carbonate originated in deeper water is interpreted as a sign of a stratified water column. This effect disappears with the onset of better oxygenated conditions at the time of the ammonoid-conodont radiation, which correspond as well to δ13Ccarb, δ13Corg and δ15Norg positive excursions. A decrease in Mo and U concentrations occurring at the same point suggests a shift toward locally less reducing conditions. The second step coincided with the

  2. A mixed time integration method for large scale acoustic fluid-structure interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, M.A.; Wineman, S.J.; Goudreau, G.L.; Foch, J.D.

    1994-07-18

    The transient, coupled, interaction of sound with structures is a process in which an acoustic fluid surrounding an elastic body contributes to the effective inertia and elasticity of the body. Conversely, the presence of an elastic body in an acoustic medium influences the behavior of propagating disturbances. This paper details the application of a mixed explicit-implicit time integration algorithm to the fully coupled acoustic fluidstructure interaction problem. Based upon a dispersion analysis of the semi-discrete wave equation a second-order, explicit scheme for solving the wave equation is developed. The combination of a highly vectorized, explicit, acoustic fluid solver with an implicit structural code for linear elastodynamics has resulted in a simulation tool, PING, for acoustic fluid-structure interaction. PING`s execution rates range from 1{mu}s/Element/{delta}t for rigid scattering to 10{mu}s/Element/{delta}t for fully coupled problems. Several examples of PING`s application to 3-D problems serve in part to validate the code, and also to demonstrate the capability to treat complex geometry, acoustic fluid-structure problems which require high resolution meshes.

  3. T cells translate individual, quantal activation into collective, analog cytokine responses via time-integrated feedbacks

    PubMed Central

    Tkach, Karen E; Barik, Debashis; Voisinne, Guillaume; Malandro, Nicole; Hathorn, Matthew M; Cotari, Jesse W; Vogel, Robert; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd; Krichevsky, Oleg; Altan-Bonnet, Grégoire

    2014-01-01

    Variability within isogenic T cell populations yields heterogeneous ‘local’ signaling responses to shared antigenic stimuli, but responding clones may communicate ‘global’ antigen load through paracrine messengers, such as cytokines. Such coordination of individual cell responses within multicellular populations is critical for accurate collective reactions to shared environmental cues. However, cytokine production may saturate as a function of antigen input, or be dominated by the precursor frequency of antigen-specific T cells. Surprisingly, we found that T cells scale their collective output of IL-2 to total antigen input over a large dynamic range, independently of population size. Through experimental quantitation and computational modeling, we demonstrate that this scaling is enforced by an inhibitory cross-talk between antigen and IL-2 signaling, and a nonlinear acceleration of IL-2 secretion per cell. Our study reveals how time-integration of these regulatory loops within individual cell signaling generates scaled collective responses and can be leveraged for immune monitoring. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01944.001 PMID:24719192

  4. Multiple-Time Step Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Based on Two-Electron Integral Screening.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Shervin; Steele, Ryan P

    2015-03-10

    A multiple-timestep ab initio molecular dynamics scheme based on varying the two-electron integral screening method used in Hartree-Fock or density functional theory calculations is presented. Although screening is motivated by numerical considerations, it is also related to separations in the length- and timescales characterizing forces in a molecular system: Loose thresholds are sufficient to describe fast motions over short distances, while tight thresholds may be employed for larger length scales and longer times, leading to a practical acceleration of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Standard screening approaches can lead, however, to significant discontinuities in (and inconsistencies between) the energy and gradient when the screening threshold is loose, making them inappropriate for use in dynamics. To remedy this problem, a consistent window-screening method that smooths these discontinuities is devised. Further algorithmic improvements reuse electronic-structure information within the dynamics step and enhance efficiency relative to a naı̈ve multiple-timestepping protocol. The resulting scheme is shown to realize meaningful reductions in the cost of Hartree-Fock and B3LYP simulations of a moderately large system, the protonated sarcosine/glycine dipeptide embedded in a 19-water cluster.

  5. Integration of real time quality control systems in a welding process

    SciTech Connect

    Nava-Ruediger, E.; Houlot, M.

    1997-04-01

    The automation of laser welding processes requires the control of the various process components as well as the control of the laser-material interaction. These systems are essential for ensuring the quality of the weld seam as they are able to react to dynamic fluctuations during the process. During the process various phenomena occur which are potential sources of diagnostic signals: these include thermal, electrical, optical, mechanical and acoustic events. This paper presents the development of an integrated real-time system based on the monitoring of several of these phenomena that provide complementary information for the detection of different defect types. A system based on the use of infrared photodiodes has been validated and successfully applied to the detection of the appearance of geometric defects such as sagging or misalignment in the weld seam. A complementary system to monitor the airborne acoustic signals of the process is under development and the experimental results for defining the acoustic pattern of welding defects are presented.

  6. Focal plane resolution and overlapped array time delay and integrate imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grycewicz, Thomas J.; Cota, Stephen A.; Lomheim, Terrence S.; Kalman, Linda S.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper we model sub-pixel image registration for a generic earth-observing satellite system with a focal plane using two offset time delay and integrate (TDI) arrays in the focal plane to improve the achievable ground resolution over the resolution achievable with a single array. The modeling process starts with a high-resolution image as ground truth. The Parameterized Image Chain Analysis & Simulation Software (PICASSO) modeling tool is used to degrade the images to match the optical transfer function, sampling, and noise characteristics of the target system. The model outputs a pair of images with a separation close to the nominal half-pixel separation between the overlapped arrays. A registration estimation algorithm is used to measure the offset for image reconstruction. The two images are aligned and summed on a grid with twice the capture resolution. We compare the resolution in images between the inputs before overlap, the reconstructed image, and a simulation for the image which would have been captured on a focal plane with twice the resolution. We find the performance to always be better than the lower resolution baseline, and to approach the performance of the high-resolution array in the ideal case. We show that the overlapped array imager significantly outperforms both the conventional high- and low-resolution imagers in conditions with high image smear.

  7. Integrated Interventional Devices For Real Time 3D Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Stephen W.; Lee, Warren; Gentry, Kenneth L.; Pua, Eric C.; Light, Edward D.

    2006-05-01

    Two recent advances have expanded the potential of medical ultrasound: the introduction of real-time 3-D ultrasound imaging with catheter, transesophageal and laparoscopic probes and the development of interventional ultrasound therapeutic systems for focused ultrasound surgery, ablation and ultrasound enhanced drug delivery. This work describes devices combining both technologies. A series of transducer probes have been designed, fabricated and tested including: 1) a 12 French side scanning catheter incorporating a 64 element matrix array for imaging at 5MHz and a piston ablation transducer operating at 10 MHz. 2) a 14 Fr forward-scanning catheter integrating a 112 element 2-D array for imaging at 5 MHz encircled by an ablation annulus operating at 10 MHz. Finite element modeling was then used to simulate catheter annular and linear phased array transducers for ablation. 3) Linear phased array transducers were built to confirm the finite element analysis at 4 and 8 MHz including a mechanically focused 86 element 9 MHz array which transmits an ISPTA of 29.3 W/cm2 and creates a lesion in 2 minutes. 4) 2-D arrays of 504 channels operating at 5 MHz have been developed for transesophageal and laparascopic 3D imaging as well as therapeutic heating. All the devices image the heart anatomy including atria, valves, septa and en face views of the pulmonary veins.

  8. Towards damage detection using blind source separation integrated with time-varying auto-regressive modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musafere, F.; Sadhu, A.; Liu, K.

    2016-01-01

    In the last few decades, structural health monitoring (SHM) has been an indispensable subject in the field of vibration engineering. With the aid of modern sensing technology, SHM has garnered significant attention towards diagnosis and risk management of large-scale civil structures and mechanical systems. In SHM, system identification is one of major building blocks through which unknown system parameters are extracted from vibration data of the structures. Such system information is then utilized to detect the damage instant, and its severity to rehabilitate and prolong the existing health of the structures. In recent years, blind source separation (BSS) algorithm has become one of the newly emerging advanced signal processing techniques for output-only system identification of civil structures. In this paper, a novel damage detection technique is proposed by integrating BSS with the time-varying auto-regressive modeling to identify the instant and severity of damage. The proposed method is validated using a suite of numerical studies and experimental models followed by a full-scale structure.

  9. Novel real-time volumetric tool segmentation algorithm for intraoperative microscope integrated OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viehland, Christian; Keller, Brenton; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar; Cunefare, David; Shen, Liangbo; Toth, Cynthia; Farsiu, Sina; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2016-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows for micron scale imaging of the human retina and cornea. Current generation research and commercial intrasurgical OCT prototypes are limited to live B-scan imaging. Our group has developed an intraoperative microscope integrated OCT system capable of live 4D imaging. With a heads up display (HUD) 4D imaging allows for dynamic intrasurgical visualization of tool tissue interaction and surgical maneuvers. Currently our system relies on operator based manual tracking to correct for patient motion and motion caused by the surgeon, to track the surgical tool, and to display the correct B-scan to display on the HUD. Even when tracking only bulk motion, the operator sometimes lags behind and the surgical region of interest can drift out of the OCT field of view. To facilitate imaging we report on the development of a fast volume based tool segmentation algorithm. The algorithm is based on a previously reported volume rendering algorithm and can identify both the tool and retinal surface. The algorithm requires 45 ms per volume for segmentation and can be used to actively place the B-scan across the tool tissue interface. Alternatively, real-time tool segmentation can be used to allow the surgeon to use the surgical tool as an interactive B-scan pointer.

  10. Stability and accuracy of free surface time integration in viscous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Ian; Buffett, Bruce; Heister, Timo

    2017-01-01

    Geodynamic simulations increasingly rely on models with a true free surface to investigate questions of dynamic topography, tectonic deformation, gravity perturbations, and global mantle convection. However, implementations of free surface boundary conditions have proven challenging from a standpoint of accuracy, robustness, and stability. In particular, time integration of a free surface tends to suffer from a numerical instability that manifests as sloshing surface motions, also known as the "drunken sailor" instability. This instability severely limits stable timestep sizes to those much smaller than can be used in geodynamic simulations without a free surface. Several schemes have been proposed in the literature to deal with these instabilities. Here we analyze the problem of creeping viscous flow with a free surface and discuss the origin of these instabilities. We demonstrate their cause and how existing stabilization schemes work to damp them out. We also propose a new scheme for removing instabilities from free surface calculations. It does not require modifications to the system matrix, nor additional variables, but is instead an explicit scheme based on nonstandard finite differences. It relies on a single stabilization parameter which may be identified with the smallest relaxation timescale of the free surface. Finally, we present numerical results to show the effectiveness of the new approach and discuss the free surface implementation in the open source, community based mantle convection software ASPECT.

  11. Local Discontinuous Galerkin Approximations And Variable Step Size, Variable Order Time Integration For Richards' Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Farthing, M. W.; Dawson, C. N.; Miller, C. T.

    2004-12-01

    Numerical simulation of Richards' equation continues to be difficult. It is highly nonlinear under common constitutive relations and exhibits sharp fronts in both the pressure head and volume fraction for many problems of interest. For a number of multiphase flow problems, the use of variable order and variable step size temporal discretizations has shown some advantages. However, the spatial discretizations commonly used for variably saturated flow are dominated by nonadaptive, low-order finite difference and finite element methods. Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element methods have received significant attention in a number of fields for hyperbolic PDE's and, more recently, for elliptic and parabolic problems. DG approaches like the local discontinuous Galerkin (LDG) method are appealing for modeling subsurface flow since they can lead to velocity fields that are locally mass-conservative without the need for auxiliary variables or alternative meshes. DG discretizations are also inherently local and so better-suited for unstructured meshes and h-p adaption strategies than traditional methods. While some work has been done recently for multiphase subsurface flow, there are a range of issues related to the performance of DG methods for highly nonlinear parabolic problems like Richards' equation that have not been investigated fully. In this work, we consider the combination of higher order adaptive time integration with an LDG spatial discretization for Richards' equation. We compare this approach to standard low-order methods for a series of test problems and consider a number of issues including the methods' relative accuracy and computational efficiency.

  12. Neutron intensity modulation and time-focusing with integrated Larmor and resonant frequency techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jinkui Hamilton, William A.; Robertson, J. L.; Crow, Lowell; Lee, Sung-Woo; Kang, Yoon W.

    2015-09-14

    The analysis of neutron diffraction experiments often assumes that neutrons are elastically scattered from the sample. However, there is growing evidence that a significant fraction of the detected neutrons is in fact inelastically scattered, especially from soft materials and aqueous samples. Ignoring these inelastic contributions gives rise to inaccurate experimental results. To date, there has been no simple method with broad applicability for inelastic signal separation in neutron diffraction experiments. Here, we present a simple and robust method that we believe could be suited for this purpose. We use two radio frequency resonant spin flippers integrated with a Larmor precession field to modulate the neutron intensity and to encode the inelastic scattering information into the neutron data. All three components contribute to the spin encoding. The Larmor field serves several additional purposes. Its usage facilitates neutron time-focusing, eliminates the need for stringent magnetic shielding, and allows for compact setups. The scheme is robust, simple, and flexible. We believe that, with further improvements, it has the potential of adding inelastic signal discrimination capabilities to many existing diffraction instruments in the future.

  13. Time delay and integration imaging for inspection and profilometry of moving objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marokkey, Sajan R.; Tay, C. J.; Shang, H. M.; Asundi, Anand K.

    1997-09-01

    Dynamic inspection of moving objects is a significant task in industrial machine vision systems. A CCD camera operating in time delay and integration (TDI) mode is equivalent to a digital drum camera, providing possibilities for dynamic inspection of moving objects (either rotating or translating on industrial platforms). We report some advances in the application of TDI cameras for the inspection and profiling of moving objects. The method is based on conventional light projection systems that are widely used in industry. The TDI system generates an on-line scanning moire display that could assist operators to identify defects on objects such as dents. Conventional projection systems use mechanical or interferometric types of fringe projections, which is not desirable in the industrial environment. The TDI system makes use of temporal modulation of a laser diode, which could be easily controlled by a PC or by the output ports in vision systems. In addition to the details of system implementation, we also describe two algorithms for unwrapping the deformation or shape profile of the test object based on the fast Fourier transform and sinusoidal fitting of the recorded patterns.

  14. Decision Consequence Model (DCM): Integrating environmental data and analysis into real time decision making

    SciTech Connect

    Cimorelli, A.J.; Stahl, C.H.; Chow, A.H.; Fernandez, C.

    1999-07-01

    A critical evaluation of the many environmental issues facing EPA Region 3 has established five major priorities: (1) ozone pollution (and its precursors); (2) impacts of acidification (acid deposition and acid mine drainage); (3) eutrophication of the Chesapeake Bay from atmospheric nitrogen deposition; (4) Cities/Urban Environment (ozone, particulate matter (PM), air toxics are some of the air components); and (5) Climate Change. Recognizing the complex nature of the systems controlling these issues, Region III's Air Protection Division (APD) is developing a decision support tool, i.e., the Decision Consequence Model (DCM), that will integrate and automate the analysis of environmental impacts in a manner that allows them to holistically address these regional priorities. Using this tool the authors intend to consider the interdependency of pollutants and their environmental impacts in order to support real-time decision making. The purpose of this paper is to outline the basic concept of the DCM and to present an example set of environmental indicators to illustrate how the DCM will be used to evaluate environmental impacts. The authors will discuss their process of indicator development, and present an example suite of indicators to provide a concrete example of the concepts presented above and, to illustrate the utility of the DCM to simultaneously evaluate multiple effects of a single pollutant. They will discuss the type of indicators chosen for this example as well as the general criteria the DCM indicators must satisfy. The framework that was developed to construct the indicators is discussed and used to calculate the example indicators. The yearly magnitudes of these example indicators are calculated for various multi-year periods to show their behavior over time.

  15. Real-time Feynman path integral with Picard–Lefschetz theory and its applications to quantum tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Tanizaki, Yuya; Koike, Takayuki

    2014-12-15

    Picard–Lefschetz theory is applied to path integrals of quantum mechanics, in order to compute real-time dynamics directly. After discussing basic properties of real-time path integrals on Lefschetz thimbles, we demonstrate its computational method in a concrete way by solving three simple examples of quantum mechanics. It is applied to quantum mechanics of a double-well potential, and quantum tunneling is discussed. We identify all of the complex saddle points of the classical action, and their properties are discussed in detail. However a big theoretical difficulty turns out to appear in rewriting the original path integral into a sum of path integrals on Lefschetz thimbles. We discuss generality of that problem and mention its importance. Real-time tunneling processes are shown to be described by those complex saddle points, and thus semi-classical description of real-time quantum tunneling becomes possible on solid ground if we could solve that problem. - Highlights: • Real-time path integral is studied based on Picard–Lefschetz theory. • Lucid demonstration is given through simple examples of quantum mechanics. • This technique is applied to quantum mechanics of the double-well potential. • Difficulty for practical applications is revealed, and we discuss its generality. • Quantum tunneling is shown to be closely related to complex classical solutions.

  16. An analytical method for PID controller tuning with specified gain and phase margins for integral plus time delay processes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wuhua; Xiao, Gaoxi; Li, Xiumin

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, an analytical method is proposed for proportional-integral/proportional-derivative/proportional-integral-derivative (PI/PD/PID) controller tuning with specified gain and phase margins (GPMs) for integral plus time delay (IPTD) processes. Explicit formulas are also obtained for estimating the GPMs resulting from given PI/PD/PID controllers. The proposed method indicates a general form of the PID parameters and unifies a large number of existing rules as PI/PD/PID controller tuning with various GPM specifications. The GPMs realized by existing PID tuning rules are computed and documented as a reference for control engineers to tune the PID controllers.

  17. The Performance Analysis of a Real-Time Integrated INS/GPS Vehicle Navigation System with Abnormal GPS Measurement Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Kai-Wei; Duong, Thanh Trung; Liao, Jhen-Kai

    2013-01-01

    The integration of an Inertial Navigation System (INS) and the Global Positioning System (GPS) is common in mobile mapping and navigation applications to seamlessly determine the position, velocity, and orientation of the mobile platform. In most INS/GPS integrated architectures, the GPS is considered to be an accurate reference with which to correct for the systematic errors of the inertial sensors, which are composed of biases, scale factors and drift. However, the GPS receiver may produce abnormal pseudo-range errors mainly caused by ionospheric delay, tropospheric delay and the multipath effect. These errors degrade the overall position accuracy of an integrated system that uses conventional INS/GPS integration strategies such as loosely coupled (LC) and tightly coupled (TC) schemes. Conventional tightly coupled INS/GPS integration schemes apply the Klobuchar model and the Hopfield model to reduce pseudo-range delays caused by ionospheric delay and tropospheric delay, respectively, but do not address the multipath problem. However, the multipath effect (from reflected GPS signals) affects the position error far more significantly in a consumer-grade GPS receiver than in an expensive, geodetic-grade GPS receiver. To avoid this problem, a new integrated INS/GPS architecture is proposed. The proposed method is described and applied in a real-time integrated system with two integration strategies, namely, loosely coupled and tightly coupled schemes, respectively. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, field tests with various scenarios are conducted and the results are compared with a reliable reference system. PMID:23955434

  18. The performance analysis of a real-time integrated INS/GPS vehicle navigation system with abnormal GPS measurement elimination.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Kai-Wei; Duong, Thanh Trung; Liao, Jhen-Kai

    2013-08-15

    The integration of an Inertial Navigation System (INS) and the Global Positioning System (GPS) is common in mobile mapping and navigation applications to seamlessly determine the position, velocity, and orientation of the mobile platform. In most INS/GPS integrated architectures, the GPS is considered to be an accurate reference with which to correct for the systematic errors of the inertial sensors, which are composed of biases, scale factors and drift. However, the GPS receiver may produce abnormal pseudo-range errors mainly caused by ionospheric delay, tropospheric delay and the multipath effect. These errors degrade the overall position accuracy of an integrated system that uses conventional INS/GPS integration strategies such as loosely coupled (LC) and tightly coupled (TC) schemes. Conventional tightly coupled INS/GPS integration schemes apply the Klobuchar model and the Hopfield model to reduce pseudo-range delays caused by ionospheric delay and tropospheric delay, respectively, but do not address the multipath problem. However, the multipath effect (from reflected GPS signals) affects the position error far more significantly in a consumer-grade GPS receiver than in an expensive, geodetic-grade GPS receiver. To avoid this problem, a new integrated INS/GPS architecture is proposed. The proposed method is described and applied in a real-time integrated system with two integration strategies, namely, loosely coupled and tightly coupled schemes, respectively. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, field tests with various scenarios are conducted and the results are compared with a reliable reference system.

  19. Measuring fragmentation in dissociative identity disorder: the integration measure and relationship to switching and time in therapy

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, M. Rose; Chu, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Some people with dissociative identity disorder (DID) have very little communication or awareness among the parts of their identity, while others experience a great deal of cooperation among alternate identities. Previous research on this topic has been sparse. Currently, there is no empirical measure of integration versus fragmentation in a person with DID. In this study, we report the development of such a measure. Objective The goal of this study was to pilot the integration measure (IM) and to address its psychometric properties and relationships to other measures. The IM is the first standardized measure of integration in DID. Method Eleven women with DID participated in an experiment that included a variety of tasks. They filled out questionnaires about trauma and dissociation as well as the IM. They also provided verbal results about switching among alternate identities during the study sessions. Results Participants switched among identities an average of 5.8 times during the first session, and switching was highly correlated with trauma. Integration was related to switching, though this relationship may be non-linear. Integration was not related to time in psychotherapy. Conclusions The IM provides a useful beginning to quantify and study integration and fragmentation in DID. Directions for future research are also discussed, including expanding the IM from this pilot. The IM may be useful in treatment settings to assess progress or change over time. PMID:24396569

  20. Measurement of the 1s2s 1S0-1s2p 3P1 intercombination interval in helium-like silicon.

    PubMed

    Redshaw, M; Myers, E G

    2002-01-14

    Using Doppler-tuned fast-beam laser spectroscopy the 1s2s 1S0-1s2p 3P1 intercombination interval in 28Si12+ has been measured to be 7230.5(2) cm(-1). The experiment made use of a single-frequency Nd:YAG (1.319 microm) laser and a high-finesse optical buildup cavity. The result provides a precision test of modern relativistic and QED atomic theory.

  1. Integration of the real-time tracking gradiometer (RTG) aboard the autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) Morpheus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, George I.; Matthews, Robert; Wynn, Michael

    2001-10-01

    In keeping with the Navy's policy to remove humans from harms way, the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) is replacing human divers for many missions. The Advanced Marine Systems Lab at Florida Atlantic University (FAU) has developed a small, magnetically friendly, modular plastic AUV called Morpheus designed for coastal applications and especially suited for very shallow water (VSW) mine reconnaissance. Currently employed sensor technologies on AUVs have certain deficiencies and limitations when used across the wide gamut of naval targets and environments, and a strong requirement exists for a sensor or sensors to fill these niches. The Real-time Tracking Gradiometer (RTG) selected for this integration is truly such a niche sensor because its capabilities are not degraded by media interfaces or environmental conditions. It is an experimental prototype fluxgate magnetometer array developed by Quantum Magnetics for the Coastal Systems Station (CSS) and was designed to be man portable and self contained. While limited by physics in detection range, it is capable of detecting ferrous targets under the worst environmental conditions, even when the target is buried. While not having the range of sonar, the RTG does not respond to the false alarms that are indicated by sonar, and since it is capable of also providing range and bearing information, it provides an invaluable niche filling classification tool. The placing of any magnetic sensing system on a conventional AUV is a non-trivial problem. The standard AUV is designed around materials and components that were selected to maximize performance without regard to the magnetic properties of the materials used in its fabrication. To minimize the degradation of sensor performance caused by the platform, several steps must be taken. These include; the substitution of nonferrous components for ferrous, maximizing the separation between the sensor and magnetic field sources, minimizing current loops and using auxiliary

  2. Choreographing Change One Step at a Time: Integrating Technology in Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falba, Christy J.; Zehm, Stanley J.; Bean, Tom; Markos, Patricia A.; Dixon, Juli K; McKinney, Marilyn

    The papers presented as part of this symposium explore several aspects of integrating technology in teacher education. The title paper, presented by Christy J. Falba, reports on a study to investigate the process and progress of integrating technology into university level teacher education courses from the perspective of the university…

  3. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a 'special divergence-free' property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Ref. [11], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Ref. [35], appears to work very well.

  4. A new approach to calculate charge carrier transport mobility in organic molecular crystals from imaginary time path integral simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Linze; Shi, Qiang

    2015-05-07

    We present a new non-perturbative method to calculate the charge carrier mobility using the imaginary time path integral approach, which is based on the Kubo formula for the conductivity, and a saddle point approximation to perform the analytic continuation. The new method is first tested using a benchmark calculation from the numerical exact hierarchical equations of motion method. Imaginary time path integral Monte Carlo simulations are then performed to explore the temperature dependence of charge carrier delocalization and mobility in organic molecular crystals (OMCs) within the Holstein and Holstein-Peierls models. The effects of nonlocal electron-phonon interaction on mobility in different charge transport regimes are also investigated.

  5. Time integrated optical emission studies of the laser produced germanium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Javed; Ahmed, R.; Baig, M. A.

    2017-04-01

    We present new time integrated data on the optical emission spectra of laser produced germanium plasma using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm), power density up to about 5  ×  109 W cm‑2 in conjunction with a set of five spectrometers covering a spectral range from 200 nm to 720 nm. Well resolved structure due to the 4p5s  →  4p2 transition array of neutral germanium and a few multiplets of singly ionized germanium have been observed. Plasma temperature has been determined in the range (9000–11 000) K using four different techniques; two line ratio method, Boltzmann plot, Saha–Boltzmann plot and Marotta’s technique whereas electron density has been deduced from the Stark broadened line profiles in the range (0.5–5.0)  ×  1017 cm‑3, depending on the laser pulse energy to produce the germanium plasma. Full width at half maximum (FWHM) of a number of neutral and singly ionized germanium lines have been extracted by the Lorentzian fit to the experimentally observed line profiles. In addition, we have compared the experimentally measured relative line strengths for the 4p5s 3P0,1,2  →  4p2 3P0,1,2 multiplet with that calculated in the LS-coupling scheme revealing that the intermediate coupling scheme is more appropriate for the level designations in germanium.

  6. Tradeoffs of integrating real-time tracking into IGRT for prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X; Bourland, J D; Yuan, Y; Zhuang, T; O'Daniel, J; Thongphiew, D; Wu, Q J; Das, S K; Yoo, S; Yin, F F

    2009-09-07

    This study investigated the integration of the Calypso real-time tracking system, based on implanted ferromagnetic transponders and a detector array, into the current process for image-guided radiation treatment (IGRT) of prostate cancer at our institution. The current IGRT process includes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for prostate delineation, CT simulation for treatment planning, daily on-board kV and CBCT imaging for target alignment, and MRI/MRS for post-treatment assessment. This study assesses (1) magnetic-field-induced displacement and radio-frequency (RF)-induced heating of transponders during MRI at 1.5 T and 3 T, and (2) image artifacts caused by transponders and the detector array in phantom and patient cases with the different imaging systems. A tissue-equivalent phantom mimicking prostate tissue stiffness was constructed and implanted with three operational transponders prior to phantom solidification. The measurements show that the Calypso system is safe with all the imaging systems. Transponder position displacements due to the MR field are minimal (<1.0 mm) for both 1.5 T and 3 T MRI scanners, and the temperature variation due to MRI RF heating is <0.2 degrees C. The visibility of transponders and bony anatomy was not affected on the OBI kV and CT images. Image quality degradation caused by the detector antenna array is observed in the CBCT image. Image artifacts are most significant with the gradient echo sequence in the MR images, producing null signals surrounding the transponders with radii approximately 1.5 cm and length approximately 4 cm. Thus, Calypso transponders can preclude the use of MRI/MRS in post-treatment assessment. Modifications of the clinical flow are required to accommodate and minimize the substantial MRI artifacts induced by the Calypso transponders.

  7. Jade-1S phosphorylation induced by CK1α contributes to cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Borgal, Lori; Rinschen, Markus M; Dafinger, Claudia; Liebrecht, Valérie I; Abken, Hinrich; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    The PHD zinc finger protein Jade-1S is a component of the HBO1 histone acetyltransferase complex and binds chromatin in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Jade-1S also acts as an E3 ubiquitin ligase for the canonical Wnt effector protein β-catenin and is influenced by CK1α-mediated phosphorylation. To further elucidate the functional impact of this phosphorylation, we used a stable, low-level expression system to express either wild-type or mutant Jade-1S lacking the N-terminal CK1α phosphorylation motif. Interactome analyses revealed that the Jade-1S mutant unable to be phosphorylated by CK1α has an increased binding affinity to proteins involved in chromatin remodelling, histone deacetylation, transcriptional repression, and ribosome biogenesis. Interestingly, cells expressing the mutant displayed an elongated cell shape and a delay in cell cycle progression. Finally, phosphoproteomic analyses allowed identification of a Jade-1S site phosphorylated in the presence of CK1α but closely resembling a PLK1 phosphorylation motif. Our data suggest that Jade-1S phosphorylation at an N-terminal CK1α motif creates a PLK1 phospho-binding domain. We propose CK1α phosphorylation of Jade 1S to serve as a molecular switch, turning off chromatin remodelling functions of Jade-1S and allowing timely cell cycle progression. As Jade-1S protein expression in the kidney is altered upon renal injury, this could contribute to understanding mechanisms underlying epithelial injury repair.

  8. TIME-INTEGRATED EXPOSURE MEASURES TO IMPROVE THE PREDICTIVE POWER OF EXPOSURE CLASSIFICATION FOR EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate exposure classification tools are required to link exposure with health effects in epidemiological studies. Although long-term integrated exposure measurements are a critical component of exposure assessment, the ability to include these measurements into epidemiologic...

  9. A New Semi-Implicit Time Integration Scheme for the Time-Dependent Atmospheric Boundary Layer Environment (ABLE) Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Stokes system and implemented as a time-dependent, finite-volume, convection -diffusion scheme in a new direct numerical simulation code. The model was......interpolation for convection kinetics (QUICK) finite-volume convection -diffusion scheme (Versteeg and Malalasekera 2007) modified to allow non-uniform grid

  10. Real Time Motion Detection Based on the Spatio-Temporal Median Filter using GPU Integral Histograms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    histogram is extensible to higher dimen- sions and different bin structures. The integral histogram at position (x, y) in the image holds the histogram for...syncthreads(); // write the transposed matrix tile to global memory xIndex = blockIdx.z * BLOCK_DIM + threadIdx.x; yIndex = blockIdx.y * BLOCK_DIM...bank conflict shared memory and guaranties that global reads and writes are coalesced. Our GPU integral histogram implementation benefits from

  11. Time Series Analyses of Integrated Terminal Weather System Effects on System Airport Efficiency Ratings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    provide a suite of weather informational products for improving air terminal planning, capacity, and safety” (evans & Ducot , 1994, p . 449) . in...intervention is the integrated Terminal Weather System (iTWS) . evans and Ducot (1994) described iTWS as being designed to “provide a suite of...and Aerospace Meteorology. hyannis, MA . evans, J .e . & Ducot , e .r . (1994) . The integrated termi- nal weather system (iTWS) . The Lincoln

  12. Integration of the mammalian shoulder girdle within populations and over evolutionary time.

    PubMed

    Sears, K E; Bianchi, C; Powers, L; Beck, A L

    2013-07-01

    Morphological integration has the potential to link morphological variation within populations with morphological evolution among species. This study begins to investigate this link by comparing integration among shoulder girdle elements (e.g. scapular blade, glenoid, coracoid, etc.) during the origin and evolution of therian mammals, and within modern bat, opossum and mouse populations. In this study, correlations among skeletal elements and patterns of allometry are used as proxies for integration. Results suggest that shoulder girdle elements tended to vary and evolve independently during the origin of mammals and subsequent radiation of placentals, consistent with the elements' distinct developmental and evolutionary origins. This finding suggests that skeletal element correlations, and therefore integration, can be conserved over large taxonomic and temporal scales. However, marsupials display a different pattern in which shoulder girdle elements tend to be more integrated, with the exception of the coracoid. This finding is consistent with a shift in the pattern of skeletal element integration coincident with the appearance of the marsupial mode of reproduction. This finding provides further evidence that development can play a significant role in the establishment of patterns of skeletal element correlation and that patterns of skeletal element correlation can themselves evolve when faced with sufficient selective pressures.

  13. Time-interval for integration of stabilizing haptic and visual information in subjects balancing under static and dynamic conditions.

    PubMed

    Honeine, Jean-Louis; Schieppati, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining equilibrium is basically a sensorimotor integration task. The central nervous system (CNS) continually and selectively weights and rapidly integrates sensory inputs from multiple sources, and coordinates multiple outputs. The weighting process is based on the availability and accuracy of afferent signals at a given instant, on the time-period required to process each input, and possibly on the plasticity of the relevant pathways. The likelihood that sensory inflow changes while balancing under static or dynamic conditions is high, because subjects can pass from a dark to a well-lit environment or from a tactile-guided stabilization to loss of haptic inflow. This review article presents recent data on the temporal events accompanying sensory transition, on which basic information is fragmentary. The processing time from sensory shift to reaching a new steady state includes the time to (a) subtract or integrate sensory inputs; (b) move from allocentric to egocentric reference or vice versa; and (c) adjust the calibration of motor activity in time and amplitude to the new sensory set. We present examples of processes of integration of posture-stabilizing information, and of the respective sensorimotor time-intervals while allowing or occluding vision or adding or subtracting tactile information. These intervals are short, in the order of 1-2 s for different postural conditions, modalities and deliberate or passive shift. They are just longer for haptic than visual shift, just shorter on withdrawal than on addition of stabilizing input, and on deliberate than unexpected mode. The delays are the shortest (for haptic shift) in blind subjects. Since automatic balance stabilization may be vulnerable to sensory-integration delays and to interference from concurrent cognitive tasks in patients with sensorimotor problems, insight into the processing time for balance control represents a critical step in the design of new balance- and locomotion training devices.

  14. Time-interval for integration of stabilizing haptic and visual information in subjects balancing under static and dynamic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Honeine, Jean-Louis; Schieppati, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining equilibrium is basically a sensorimotor integration task. The central nervous system (CNS) continually and selectively weights and rapidly integrates sensory inputs from multiple sources, and coordinates multiple outputs. The weighting process is based on the availability and accuracy of afferent signals at a given instant, on the time-period required to process each input, and possibly on the plasticity of the relevant pathways. The likelihood that sensory inflow changes while balancing under static or dynamic conditions is high, because subjects can pass from a dark to a well-lit environment or from a tactile-guided stabilization to loss of haptic inflow. This review article presents recent data on the temporal events accompanying sensory transition, on which basic information is fragmentary. The processing time from sensory shift to reaching a new steady state includes the time to (a) subtract or integrate sensory inputs; (b) move from allocentric to egocentric reference or vice versa; and (c) adjust the calibration of motor activity in time and amplitude to the new sensory set. We present examples of processes of integration of posture-stabilizing information, and of the respective sensorimotor time-intervals while allowing or occluding vision or adding or subtracting tactile information. These intervals are short, in the order of 1–2 s for different postural conditions, modalities and deliberate or passive shift. They are just longer for haptic than visual shift, just shorter on withdrawal than on addition of stabilizing input, and on deliberate than unexpected mode. The delays are the shortest (for haptic shift) in blind subjects. Since automatic balance stabilization may be vulnerable to sensory-integration delays and to interference from concurrent cognitive tasks in patients with sensorimotor problems, insight into the processing time for balance control represents a critical step in the design of new balance- and locomotion training devices

  15. Excitation and Ionization in H(1s)-H(1s) Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Merle E.; Ritchie, A. Burke

    1999-07-15

    Hydrogen atom - hydrogen atom scattering is a prototype for many of the fundamental principles of atomic collisions. In this work we present an approximation to the H+H system for scattering in the intermediate energy regime of 1 to 100 keV. The approximation ignores electron exchange and two-electron excitation by assuming that one of the atoms is frozen in the 1s state. We allow for the evolution of the active electron by numerically solving the 3D Schroedinger equation. The results capture many features of the problem and are in harmony with recent theoretical studies. Excitation and ionization cross sections are computed and compared to other theory and experiment. New insight into the mechanism of excitation and ionization is inferred from the solutions.

  16. Adaptice-step time integration package for stiff, nonstiff and multi-rate systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs)

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-01

    ARKode is part of a software family called SUNDIALS: SUite of Nonlinear and Differential/ALgebraic equation Solvers [1]. The ARKode solver library provides an adaptive-step time integration package for stiff, nonstiff and multi-rate systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) using Runge Kutta methods [2].

  17. The Influence of Orientation, Integration, and Evaluation on Intent to Stay in Part-Time Clinical Nursing Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Joanne S.

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which orientation, evaluation, and integration practices, along with other select job aspects and demographic characteristics, were correlated with and explained intent to stay among part-time clinical nursing faculty. A conceptual model was developed and tested. A researcher…

  18. A new generation of real-time DOS technology for mission-oriented system integration and operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, E. Douglas

    1988-01-01

    Information is given on system integration and operation (SIO) requirements and a new generation of technical approaches for SIO. Real-time, distribution, survivability, and adaptability requirements and technical approaches are covered. An Alpha operating system program management overview is outlined.

  19. On time discretizations for spectral methods. [numerical integration of Fourier and Chebyshev methods for dynamic partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlieb, D.; Turkel, E.

    1980-01-01

    New methods are introduced for the time integration of the Fourier and Chebyshev methods of solution for dynamic differential equations. These methods are unconditionally stable, even though no matrix inversions are required. Time steps are chosen by accuracy requirements alone. For the Fourier method both leapfrog and Runge-Kutta methods are considered. For the Chebyshev method only Runge-Kutta schemes are tested. Numerical calculations are presented to verify the analytic results. Applications to the shallow water equations are presented.

  20. Real-Time Integrity Monitoring of Stored Geo-Spatial Data Using Forward-Looking Remote Sensing Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Steven D.; Harrah, Steven D.; deHaag, Maarten Uijt

    2002-01-01

    Terrain Awareness and Warning Systems (TAWS) and Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) provide pilots with displays of stored geo-spatial data (e.g. terrain, obstacles, and/or features). As comprehensive validation is impractical, these databases typically have no quantifiable level of integrity. This lack of a quantifiable integrity level is one of the constraints that has limited certification and operational approval of TAWS/SVS to "advisory-only" systems for civil aviation. Previous work demonstrated the feasibility of using a real-time monitor to bound database integrity by using downward-looking remote sensing technology (i.e. radar altimeters). This paper describes an extension of the integrity monitor concept to include a forward-looking sensor to cover additional classes of terrain database faults and to reduce the exposure time associated with integrity threats. An operational concept is presented that combines established feature extraction techniques with a statistical assessment of similarity measures between the sensed and stored features using principles from classical detection theory. Finally, an implementation is presented that uses existing commercial-off-the-shelf weather radar sensor technology.

  1. Time-delay-and-integration charge-coupled devices using tin oxide gate technology. [for Landsat MSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, L. L.; Mccann, D. H.; Tracy, R. A.; Kub, F. J.; White, M. H.

    1978-01-01

    Doped tin oxide gates are used in a time-delay-and-integration (TDI) CCD scheme in an effort to develop a stable transparent gate technology. Design characteristics of the system are discussed, including 2 sections of 10 by 9 integration stages, four-phase buried channel construction, and 10 input parallel-in/serial-out output shift register at a video rate of 1.25 MHz. A quantum efficiency of 65% with smooth spectral response is attained by front surface imaging. The suitability of the system for the Landsat program is discussed in terms of TDI-CCD operating parameters.

  2. An adiabatic linearized path integral approach for quantum time correlation functions: electronic transport in metal-molten salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Causo, Maria Serena; Ciccotti, Giovanni; Montemayor, Daniel; Bonella, Sara; Coker, David F

    2005-04-14

    We generalize the linearized path integral approach to evaluate quantum time correlation functions for systems best described by a set of nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom, restricting ourselves to the adiabatic approximation. If the operators in the correlation function are nondiagonal in the electronic states, then this adiabatic linearized path integral approximation for the thermal averaged quantum dynamics presents interesting and distinctive features, which we derive and explore in this paper. The capability of these approximations to accurately reproduce the behavior of physical systems is demonstrated by calculating the diffusion constant for an excess electron in a metal-molten salt solution.

  3. The Design and Implementation of the Integrated Timing System to be Used in the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, G.W.; Wiedwald, J.D.; Sewall, N.; Lagin, L.

    1999-12-07

    The National Ignition Facility, or NIF, currently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will contain the world's most powerful laser. By the year 2003 the NIF laser will be a research tool allowing scientists a glimpse into plasma interactions that are equivalent to those found in the center of the sun. Every eight hours the NIF will generate 1.8 MJ of 351-nm light carried by 192 pulsed laser beams and focus it onto a pea-sized target. This will result in a fusion reaction between two isotopes of hydrogen, creating for a few hundred picoseconds stellar conditions. Synchronizing the beams and diagnosing the fusion reaction requires generation and delivery of over 1000 precisely timed triggers to a multitude of systems. The NIF Integrated Timing System (ITS) was developed to provide reliable, accurately timed triggers that allow each client system to operate independently during periods of shot preparation and maintenance, yet be coordinated to a few tens of picoseconds during the experiment. The ITS applies technologies developed for fiber communications and Two-Way Time Transfer, and integrates them by way of a computer communications network to achieve distributed control, dynamically configurable coordination and independent among timing channels, and integrated self-diagnostics.

  4. All-Speed Methods and Long-Duration Time Integration for Incorporation into the 7-Equation Two-Phase Model

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Berry; S. Y. Kadioglu

    2012-05-01

    The numerical simulation of multiphase flows in Light Water (Nuclear) Reactors, LWRs, for normal, accident, and off-normal operation, and for operational optimization must cover a huge disparity of transient time durations, from milliseconds to years. In addition, our recent work has shown that the application of classical Riemann approaches, which pervade modern computational fluid dynamics (CFD), suffer numerical accuracy degradation, especially for compressible liquid flows. In this setting, all-speed or Mach uniform methods are need which can be accurately and efficiently integrated over a very large range of time scales. Thus we need a multi-time-scale integration approach to compliment our previously documented multi-spatial-scale approach to multiphase flow modeling [1]. This report briefly summarizes our efforts in these areas.

  5. Integrating Health and Sustainability: The Higher Education Sector as a Timely Catalyst

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orme, J.; Dooris, M.

    2010-01-01

    Higher education is an influential sector with enormous potential to impact positively on health and sustainability. The purpose of this paper was to explore its emergent role as a key setting for promoting health and sustainability and for addressing their challenges in an integrated and coherent way. Acknowledging both the relative narrowness of…

  6. Integrating Modern Times through Student Team Presentations: A Case Study on Interdisciplinary Team Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oitzinger, Jane H.; Kallgren, Daniel C.

    2004-01-01

    This case study of a team-taught learning community that integrates American history and literature focuses on student team presentations. We argue for the need to train students to learn actively, and we describe strategies for teaching students how to prepare for and present interdisciplinary team presentations. One finding is that training…

  7. Real-time label-free biosensing with integrated planar waveguide ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohlström, Hans; Gylfason, Kristinn B.; Hill, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    We review the use of planar integrated optical waveguide ring resonators for label free bio-sensing and present recent results from two European biosensor collaborations: SABIO and InTopSens. Planar waveguide ring resonators are attractive for label-free biosensing due to their small footprint, high Q-factors, and compatibility with on-chip optics and microfluidics. This enables integrated sensor arrays for compact labs-on-chip. One application of label-free sensor arrays is for point-of-care medical diagnostics. Bringing such powerful tools to the single medical practitioner is an important step towards personalized medicine, but requires addressing a number of issues: improving limit of detection, managing the influence of temperature, parallelization of the measurement for higher throughput and on-chip referencing, efficient light-coupling strategies to simplify alignment, and packaging of the optical chip and integration with microfluidics. From the SABIO project we report refractive index measurement and label-free biosensing in an 8-channel slotwaveguide ring resonator sensor array, within a compact cartridge with integrated microfluidics. The sensors show a volume sensing detection limit of 5 x 10-6 RIU and a surface sensing detection limit of 0.9 pg/mm2. From the InTopSens project we report early results on silicon-on-insulator racetrack resonators.

  8. International standards for research integrity: An idea whose time has come?

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B

    2009-07-01

    A movement to promulgate international ethics standards covering areas of conduct other than research with human subjects has now begun to gain momentum. This commentary explains why it is important to develop international research integrity standards and some of the problems that must be overcome to bring them to fruition.

  9. Time and band limiting for matrix valued functions: an integral and a commuting differential operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünbaum, F. A.; Pacharoni, I.; Zurrián, I.

    2017-02-01

    The problem of recovering a signal of finite duration from a piece of its Fourier transform was solved at Bell Labs in the 1960’s, by exploiting a ‘miracle’: a certain naturally appearing integral operator commutes with an explicit differential one. Here we show that this same miracle holds in a matrix valued version of the same problem.

  10. INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS FOR RESEARCH INTEGRITY: AN IDEA WHOSE TIME HAS COME?

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B.

    2014-01-01

    A movement to promulgate international ethics standards covering areas of conduct other than research with human subjects has now begun to gain momentum. This commentary explains why it is important to develop international research integrity standards and some of the problems that must be overcome to bring them to fruition. PMID:20183162

  11. Time and Money Explain Social Class Differences in Students' Social Integration at University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Mark; Wright, Chrysalis L.

    2017-01-01

    Working-class students tend to be less socially integrated at university than middle-class students. The present research investigated two potential reasons for this working-class social exclusion effect. First, working-class students may have fewer finances available to participate in social activities. Second, working-class students tend to be…

  12. A single-vendor and a single-buyer integrated inventory model with ordering cost reduction dependent on lead time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayashree, M.; Uthayakumar, R.

    2017-03-01

    Lead time is one of the major limits that affect planning at every stage of the supply chain system. In this paper, we study a continuous review inventory model. This paper investigates the ordering cost reductions are dependent on lead time. This study addressed two-echelon supply chain problem consisting of a single vendor and a single buyer. The main contribution of this study is that the integrated total cost of the single vendor and the single buyer integrated system is analyzed by adopting two different (linear and logarithmic) types ordering cost reductions act dependent on lead time. In both cases, we develop effective solution procedures for finding the optimal solution and then illustrative numerical examples are given to illustrate the results. The solution procedure is to determine the optimal solutions of order quantity, ordering cost, lead time and the number of deliveries from the single vendor and the single buyer in one production run, so that the integrated total cost incurred has the minimum value. Ordering cost reduction is the main aspect of the proposed model. A numerical example is given to validate the model. Numerical example solved by using Matlab software. The mathematical model is solved analytically by minimizing the integrated total cost. Furthermore, the sensitivity analysis is included and the numerical examples are given to illustrate the results. The results obtained in this paper are illustrated with the help of numerical examples. The sensitivity of the proposed model has been checked with respect to the various major parameters of the system. Results reveal that the proposed integrated inventory model is more applicable for the supply chain manufacturing system. For each case, an algorithm procedure of finding the optimal solution is developed. Finally, the graphical representation is presented to illustrate the proposed model and also include the computer flowchart in each model.

  13. A method to predict thermospheric mass density response to geomagnetic disturbances using time-integrated auroral electrojet index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iipponen, Juho; Laitinen, Tiera

    2015-07-01

    Using the thermospheric mass density measurements from the European Space Agency's Gravity field and steady state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite, we develop a new empirical geomagnetic disturbance time correction based on integrating the auroral electrojet (AE) index. For this, a US Naval Research Laboratory Mass Spectrometer and Incoherent Scatter Radar (NRLMSISE-00) model with no geomagnetic parametrization is subtracted from the GOCE densities, and the regressions between the time-integrated AE index and density residuals are computed as a function of latitude, solar time, and day of year. When we add this correction to the quiet time reference NRLMSISE-00 model, it increases the model's disturbance time correlation with the 270 km normalized GOCE densities from 0.71 to 0.86. We assess the effect of integrating thermospheric density proxies with respect to time using both geomagnetic and solar indices and discover that the integration of AE, ap, and the epsilon parameter significantly increase their correlation with the orbit-averaged GOCE densities. We compare the predictions of our empirical correction with the NRLMSISE-00 and Jacchia-Bowman (JB2008) models, and significant deviations from the measurements are discovered. The NRLMSISE-00 is confirmed to generally underestimate the density enhancement, and the latitudinal shape of the predicted response shows too low enhancements at middle latitudes. Even though these are not issues for the JB2008 model, it performs weaker than the NRLMSISE-00 at reproducing the orbit-averaged densities. This unexpected result is attributed to the weakness of the ap parametrization, which is used in the model during smaller disturbances.

  14. A 3D profile function suitable for integration of neutron time-of-flight single crystal diffraction peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmann, Matthias J.

    2017-03-01

    A 3D profile function is presented suitable to integrate reflections arising in time-of-flight (TOF) single crystal neutron diffraction experiments. In order to account for the large asymmetry of the peak shape in the TOF direction, a 3D Gaussian ellipsoid in the pixel (x, z) and time-of-flight coordinates is convoluted with a rising and falling exponential along the time-of-flight direction. An analytic expression is derived, making it suitable for least-squares fitting. The application of this function in detector space or reciprocal space is straightforward.

  15. An efficient algorithm based on splitting for the time integration of the Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanes, Sergio; Casas, Fernando; Murua, Ander

    2015-12-01

    We present a practical algorithm based on symplectic splitting methods intended for the numerical integration in time of the Schrödinger equation when the Hamiltonian operator is either time-independent or changes slowly with time. In the later case, the evolution operator can be effectively approximated in a step-by-step manner: first divide the time integration interval in sufficiently short subintervals, and then successively solve a Schrödinger equation with a different time-independent Hamiltonian operator in each of these subintervals. When discretized in space, the Schrödinger equation with the time-independent Hamiltonian operator obtained for each time subinterval can be recast as a classical linear autonomous Hamiltonian system corresponding to a system of coupled harmonic oscillators. The particular structure of this linear system allows us to construct a set of highly efficient schemes optimized for different precision requirements and time intervals. Sharp local error bounds are obtained for the solution of the linear autonomous Hamiltonian system considered in each time subinterval. Our schemes can be considered, in this setting, as polynomial approximations to the matrix exponential in a similar way as methods based on Chebyshev and Taylor polynomials. The theoretical analysis, supported by numerical experiments performed for different time-independent Hamiltonians, indicates that the new methods are more efficient than schemes based on Chebyshev polynomials for all tolerances and time interval lengths. The algorithm we present automatically selects, for each time subinterval, the most efficient splitting scheme (among several new optimized splitting methods) for a prescribed error tolerance and given estimates of the upper and lower bounds of the eigenvalues of the discretized version of the Hamiltonian operator.

  16. A Search for Invisible Decays of the Upsilon(1S)

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-10-17

    We search for invisible decays of the {Upsilon}(1S) meson using a sample of 91.4 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) mesons collected at the BABAR/PEP-II B Factory. We select events containing the decay {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {Upsilon}(1S) and search for evidence of an undetectable {Upsilon}(1S) decay recoiling against the dipion system. We set an upper limit on the branching fraction {Beta}({Upsilon}(1S) {yields} invisible) < 3.0 x 10{sup ?4} at the 90% confidence level.

  17. Search for invisible decays of the {upsilon}(1S) resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, P.; Cawlfield, C.; Eisenstein, B. I.; Karliner, I.; Kim, D.; Lowrey, N.; Naik, P.; Selen, M.; White, E. J.; Wiss, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Shepherd, M. R.; Besson, D.; Pedlar, T. K.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Hietala, J.; Kubota, Y.; Klein, T.; Lang, B. W.

    2007-02-01

    We present a measurement of the branching fraction of invisible {upsilon}(1S) decays, using 1.2 fb{sup -1} of data collected at the {upsilon}(2S) resonance with the CLEO III detector at CESR. After subtracting expected backgrounds from events that pass selection criteria for invisible {upsilon}(1S) decay in {upsilon}(2S){yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{upsilon}(1S), we deduce a 90% C.L. upper limit of B[{upsilon}(1S){yields}invisible]<0.39%.

  18. Weak- and hyperfine-interaction-induced 1s2s 1S0 → 1s2 1S0 E1 transition rates of He-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laima, Radžiūtė; Erikas, Gaidamauskas; Gediminas, Gaigalas; Li, Ji-Guang; Dong, Chen-Zhong; Jönsson, Per

    2015-04-01

    Weak- and hyperfine-interaction-induced 1s2s 1S0 → 1s2 1S0 E1 transition rates for the isoelectronic sequence of He-like ions have been calculated using the multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock (MCDHF) and relativistic configuration interaction methods. The results should be helpful for the future experimental investigations of parity non-conservation effects. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11274254, 11147108, 10979007, U1331122, and U1332206) and in part by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB922200).

  19. Existence of short-time approximations of any polynomial order for the computation of density matrices by path integral methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predescu, Cristian

    2004-05-01

    In this paper I provide significant mathematical evidence in support of the existence of direct short-time approximations of any polynomial order for the computation of density matrices of physical systems described by arbitrarily smooth and bounded from below potentials. While for Theorem 2, which is “experimental,” I only provide a “physicist’s” proof, I believe the present development is mathematically sound. As a verification, I explicitly construct two short-time approximations to the density matrix having convergence orders 3 and 4, respectively. Furthermore, in Appendix B, I derive the convergence constant for the trapezoidal Trotter path integral technique. The convergence orders and constants are then verified by numerical simulations. While the two short-time approximations constructed are of sure interest to physicists and chemists involved in Monte Carlo path integral simulations, the present paper is also aimed at the mathematical community, who might find the results interesting and worth exploring. I conclude the paper by discussing the implications of the present findings with respect to the solvability of the dynamical sign problem appearing in real-time Feynman path integral simulations.

  20. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a "special divergence-free" (SDF) property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Feng and Shang [Numer. Math. 71, 451 (1995)], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Richardson and Finn [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 014004 (2012

  1. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    DOE PAGES

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a 'special divergence-free' property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. Wemore » also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Ref. [11], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Ref. [35], appears to work very well.« less

  2. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-15

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a “special divergence-free” (SDF) property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Feng and Shang [Numer. Math. 71, 451 (1995)], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Richardson and Finn [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 014004 (2012

  3. Integrated Real-Time Control and Imaging System for Microbiorobotics and Nanobiostructures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-11

    Helmholtz Coil system that consisted of a 3D - printed holder that housed six epoxy-wound copper coils, and (2) a galvanotatic system that consisted of...schematic of approximate Helmholtz Coil system (f) Final 3D printed coil system integrated within the PRIOR Scientific H117 programmable motorized...Eclipse Andor Ixon3 Motorized Turrets and Objectives Digital Light Innovations Dli 4120 Discovery System 3D Printed Magnetic and Electric Field

  4. Integration of a Motion Capture System into a Spacecraft Simulator for Real-Time Attitude Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-16

    on a low-friction spherical air bearing . It is designed to test the behavior of integrated hardware and software for at- titude determination and...radiation pressure and air drag), but air- bearing testbeds like the Attitude Control System Proving Ground (ACSPG) offer low-disturbance torque...1999. ISBN 9781881883104. [2] Jana L. Schwartz, Mason A. Peck, and Christopher D. Hall. Historical Review of Air- Bearing Spacecraft Simula- tors

  5. Time to accelerate integration of human factors and ergonomics in patient safety.

    PubMed

    Gurses, Ayse P; Ozok, A Ant; Pronovost, Peter J

    2012-04-01

    Progress toward improving patient safety has been slow despite engagement of the health care community in improvement efforts. A potential reason for this sluggish pace is the inadequate integration of human factors and ergonomics principles and methods in these efforts. Patient safety problems are complex and rarely caused by one factor or component of a work system. Thus, health care would benefit from human factors and ergonomics evaluations to systematically identify the problems, prioritize the right ones, and develop effective and practical solutions. This paper gives an overview of the discipline of human factors and ergonomics and describes its role in improving patient safety. We provide examples of how human factors and ergonomics principles and methods have improved both care processes and patient outcomes. We provide five major recommendations to better integrate human factors and ergonomics in patient safety improvement efforts: build capacity among health care workers to understand human factors and ergonomics, create market forces that demand the integration of human factors and ergonomics design principles into medical technologies, increase the number of human factors and ergonomic practitioners in health care organizations, expand investments in improvement efforts informed by human factors and ergonomics, and support interdisciplinary research to improve patient safety. In conclusion, human factors and ergonomics must play a more prominent role in health care if we want to increase the pace in improving patient safety.

  6. Doing Your Own Time: Peer Integration, Aggression and Mental Health in Dutch Male Detainment Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Kreager, Derek A.; Palmen, Hanneke; Dirkzwager, Anja J.E.; Nieuwbeerta, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background Prior research demonstrates a strong positive association between social integration (e.g., strong social ties) and individual health. However, researchers also emphasize that this correlation may vary by context and potentially reverse direction under certain conditions. In this study, we draw on competing criminological theories of peer relations to examine if social integration, measured by trust in peers, is positively or negatively associated with violence and mental health of men detained in pre-trial confinement facilities. Methods We test our hypotheses with peer network and health data from 502 Dutch male pre-trial detainees. Results Results suggest that peer trust has no direct association with reported rates of peer aggression while detained and low peer trust is generally protective for mental health. Conclusions Our study thus adds to a small body of literature finding that social integration within certain correctional settings may not operate in the same way that it does in the general population and may actually contribute to adverse mental health outcomes. PMID:26794247

  7. Integrated planning problem in supply chains with time-varying delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hai-ying; Liu, Da-cheng; Ding, Hua; Guo, Fu

    2011-10-01

    We consider a serial supply chain consisting of a raw material supplier, a manufacturer, a distribution centre and a retailer in the presence of time-varying delivery between manufacturer facility and the retailer warehouse. Delivery time functions are developed based on practical data analysis and the cost models for both linear and non-linear delivery time functions are derived. Analytic solution for system with linear delivery times is derived and a search algorithm for system with non-linear delivery times is established. Finally, sensitivity analysis is made to help decision makers achieve a lower total cost in practice.

  8. The novel function of JADE1S in cytokinesis of epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Siriwardana, Nirodhini S; Meyer, Rosana D; Panchenko, Maria V

    2015-01-01

    JADE1 belongs to a small family of PHD zinc finger proteins that interacts with histone acetyl transferase (HAT) HBO1 and is associated with chromatin. We recently reported JADE1 chromatin shuttling and phosphorylation during G2/M to G1 transition, which was sensitive to Aurora A inhibition. In the current study we examined mechanisms of the cell cycle regulation by the small isoform of JADE1 protein, JADE1S, and report data showing that JADE1S has a novel function in the regulation of cytokinesis. Using FACS assays, we show that, JADE1S depletion facilitated rates of G1-cells accumulation in synchronously dividing HeLa cell cultures. Depletion of JADE1S protein in asynchronously dividing cells decreased the proportion of cytokinetic cells, and increased the proportion of multi-nuclear cells, indicative of premature and failed cytokinesis. In contrast, moderate overexpression of JADE1S increased the number of cytokinetic cells in time- and dose- dependent manner, indicating cytokinetic delay. Pharmacological inhibition of Aurora B kinase resulted in the release of JADE1S-mediated cytokinetic delay and allowed progression of abscission in cells over-expressing JADE1S. Finally, we show that JADE1S protein localized to centrosomes in interphase and mitotic cells, while during cytokinesis JADE1S localized to the midbody. Neither JADE1L nor partner of JADE1, HAT HBO1 was localized to the centrosomes or midbodies. Our study identifies the novel role for JADE1S in regulation of cytokinesis and suggests function in Aurora B kinase-mediated cytokinesis checkpoint. PMID:26151225

  9. The Green's matrix and the boundary integral equations for analysis of time-harmonic dynamics of elastic helical springs.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Sergey V

    2011-03-01

    Helical springs serve as vibration isolators in virtually any suspension system. Various exact and approximate methods may be employed to determine the eigenfrequencies of vibrations of these structural elements and their dynamic transfer functions. The method of boundary integral equations is a meaningful alternative to obtain exact solutions of problems of the time-harmonic dynamics of elastic springs in the framework of Bernoulli-Euler beam theory. In this paper, the derivations of the Green's matrix, of the Somigliana's identities, and of the boundary integral equations are presented. The vibrational power transmission in an infinitely long spring is analyzed by means of the Green's matrix. The eigenfrequencies and the dynamic transfer functions are found by solving the boundary integral equations. In the course of analysis, the essential features and advantages of the method of boundary integral equations are highlighted. The reported analytical results may be used to study the time-harmonic motion in any wave guide governed by a system of linear differential equations in a single spatial coordinate along its axis.

  10. An Improved Integral Inequality to Stability Analysis of Genetic Regulatory Networks With Interval Time-Varying Delays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian; Wu, Ligang; Cui, Shaochun

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on stability analysis for a class of genetic regulatory networks with interval time-varying delays. An improved integral inequality concerning on double-integral items is first established. Then, we use the improved integral inequality to deal with the resultant double-integral items in the derivative of the involved Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional. As a result, a delay-range-dependent and delay-rate-dependent asymptotical stability criterion is established for genetic regulatory networks with differential time-varying delays. Furthermore, it is theoretically proven that the stability criterion proposed here is less conservative than the corresponding one in [Neurocomputing, 2012, 93: 19-26]. Based on the obtained result, another stability criterion is given under the case that the information of the derivatives of delays is unknown. Finally, the effectiveness of the approach proposed in this paper is illustrated by a pair of numerical examples which give the comparisons of stability criteria proposed in this paper and some literature.

  11. Integral representation of exact solutions for the correlation times of rotators in periodic potentials - derivation of asymptotic expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffey, W. T.; Crothers, D. S. F.; Waldron, J. T.

    1994-03-01

    The derivation of asymptotic expansions from the exact solution of the three term recurrence relations arising in the study of the Brownian movement in a periodic potential is discussed. The discussion is illustrated by showing how the exact formulae for the longitudinal and transverse correlation times of a single axis rotator with two equivalent sites, which have been previously given as a series of products of modified Bessel functions, may be rendered in integral form using Watson's integral formula for the product of two modified Bessel functions. The method of steepest descents is applied to these solutions in order to obtain rigourous asymptotic formulae for the correlation times in the high potential barrier limit. The analogous results for rotation in three dimensions in the Maier-Saupe potential are treated briefly.

  12. Further development towards a new virtual-pulse time integral methodology for general nonlinear transient thermal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamma, K. K.; Chen, X.; Sha, D.

    1993-01-01

    New developments describing the theoretical basis towards an effective virtual-pulse time integral procedure are presented for general nonlinear transient heat transfer problems. To validate the proposed methodology of computation, numerical test examples are given and comparisons are drawn with the implicit second-order accurate Crank-Nicolson technique. The proposed method shows superior or improved accuracy and stability characteristics for the models tested.

  13. Computer simulation of the thermal environment of large-scale integrated circuits - Computer time-saving techniques.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. R.; Blum, H. A.

    1971-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the computer costs for both the steady-state and transient thermal responses of large-scale integrated circuits (LSI) when metal is present within the substrate. For the more cost-sensitive transient case, an extrapolation technique for computer time savings is compared with the accuracy loss in this study. This approach could be useful for design-cost planning.

  14. Infinite-time average of local fields in an integrable quantum field theory after a quantum quench.

    PubMed

    Mussardo, G

    2013-09-06

    The infinite-time average of the expectation values of local fields of any interacting quantum theory after a global quench process are key quantities for matching theoretical and experimental results. For quantum integrable field theories, we show that they can be obtained by an ensemble average that employs a particular limit of the form factors of local fields and quantities extracted by the generalized Bethe ansatz.

  15. Method for Visually Integrating Multiple Data Acquisition Technologies for Real Time and Retrospective Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogart, Edward H. (Inventor); Pope, Alan T. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A system for display on a single video display terminal of multiple physiological measurements is provided. A subject is monitored by a plurality of instruments which feed data to a computer programmed to receive data, calculate data products such as index of engagement and heart rate, and display the data in a graphical format simultaneously on a single video display terminal. In addition live video representing the view of the subject and the experimental setup may also be integrated into the single data display. The display may be recorded on a standard video tape recorder for retrospective analysis.

  16. White Matter Integrity of Specific Dentato-Thalamo-Cortical Pathways is Associated with Learning Gains in Precise Movement Timing.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Robert; Wessel, Maximilian J; Zimerman, Máximo; Timmermann, Jan E; Gerloff, Christian; Hummel, Friedhelm C

    2015-07-01

    The dentato-thalamo-cortical tract (DTCT) connects the lateral cerebellum with contralateral motor and nonmotor areas, such as the primary motor cortex (M1), the ventral premotor cortex (PMv), and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). As the acquisition of precisely timed finger movements requires the interplay between these brain regions, the structural integrity of the underlying connections might explain variance in behavior. Diffusion tensor imaging was used to 1) reconstruct the DTCT connecting the dentate nucleus with M1, PMv, and DLPFC and 2) examine to which extent their microstructural integrity (tract-related fractional anisotropy) relates to learning gains in a motor-sequence learning paradigm consisting of a synchronization and continuation part. Continuous DTCT were reconstructed from the dentate nucleus to all cortical target areas. We found that the microstructural integrity of the DTCT connecting the left dentate nucleus with the right DLPFC was associated with better early consolidation in rhythm continuation (R = -0.69, P = 0.02). The present data further advances the knowledge about a right-hemispheric timing network in the human brain with the DLPFC as an important node contributing to learning gains in precise movement timing.

  17. A family of time-staggered schemes for integrating hybrid DPD models for polymers: Algorithms and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Symeonidis, Vasileios; Karniadakis, George Em . E-mail: gk@dam.brown.edu

    2006-10-10

    We propose new schemes for integrating the stochastic differential equations of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) in simulations of dilute polymer solutions. The hybrid DPD models consist of hard potentials that describe the microscopic dynamics of polymers and soft potentials that describe the mesoscopic dynamics of the solvent. In particular, we develop extensions to the velocity-Verlet and Lowe's approaches - two representative DPD time-integrators - following a subcycling procedure whereby the solvent is advanced with a timestep much larger than the one employed in the polymer time-integration. The introduction of relaxation parameters allows optimization studies for accuracy while maintaining the low computational complexity of standard DPD algorithms. We demonstrate through equilibrium simulations that a 10-fold gain in efficiency can be obtained with the time-staggered algorithms without loss of accuracy compared to the non-staggered schemes. We then apply the new approach to investigate the scaling response of polymers in equilibrium as well as the dynamics of {lambda}-phage DNA molecules subjected to shear.

  18. A family of time-staggered schemes for integrating hybrid DPD models for polymers: Algorithms and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symeonidis, Vasileios; Karniadakis, George Em

    2006-10-01

    We propose new schemes for integrating the stochastic differential equations of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) in simulations of dilute polymer solutions. The hybrid DPD models consist of hard potentials that describe the microscopic dynamics of polymers and soft potentials that describe the mesoscopic dynamics of the solvent. In particular, we develop extensions to the velocity-Verlet and Lowe's approaches - two representative DPD time-integrators - following a subcycling procedure whereby the solvent is advanced with a timestep much larger than the one employed in the polymer time-integration. The introduction of relaxation parameters allows optimization studies for accuracy while maintaining the low computational complexity of standard DPD algorithms. We demonstrate through equilibrium simulations that a 10-fold gain in efficiency can be obtained with the time-staggered algorithms without loss of accuracy compared to the non-staggered schemes. We then apply the new approach to investigate the scaling response of polymers in equilibrium as well as the dynamics of λ-phage DNA molecules subjected to shear.

  19. Technology Professional Development and Instructional Technology Integration among Part-Time Faculty at Illinois Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roohani, Behnam

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on exploring Illinois community college faculty development coordinators' perceptions about how they are implementing faculty technology professional development programs and providing technical support for part-time faculty in the Illinois community college systems. Also examined were part-time faculty perceptions of the degree…

  20. Integral definition of transition time in the Landau-Zener model

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Yue; Wu Biao

    2010-02-15

    We give a general definition for the transition time in the Landau-Zener model. This definition allows us to compute numerically the Landau-Zener transition time at any sweeping rate without ambiguity in both diabatic and adiabatic bases. With this new definition, analytical results are obtained in both the adiabatic limit and the sudden limit.

  1. Integrating random matrix theory predictions with short-time dynamical effects in chaotic systems.

    PubMed

    Smith, A Matthew; Kaplan, Lev

    2010-07-01

    We discuss a modification to random matrix theory eigenstate statistics that systematically takes into account the nonuniversal short-time behavior of chaotic systems. The method avoids diagonalization of the Hamiltonian; instead it requires only knowledge of short-time dynamics for a chaotic system or ensemble of similar systems. Standard random matrix theory and semiclassical predictions are recovered in the limits of zero Ehrenfest time and infinite Heisenberg time, respectively. As examples, we discuss wave-function autocorrelations and cross correlations, and show that significant improvement in accuracy is obtained for simple chaotic systems where comparison can be made with brute-force diagonalization. The accuracy of the method persists even when the short-time dynamics of the system or ensemble is known only in a classical approximation. Further improvement in the rate of convergence is obtained when the method is combined with the correlation function bootstrapping approach introduced previously.

  2. Integrating health and sustainability: the higher education sector as a timely catalyst.

    PubMed

    Orme, J; Dooris, M

    2010-06-01

    Higher education is an influential sector with enormous potential to impact positively on health and sustainability. The purpose of this paper was to explore its emergent role as a key setting for promoting health and sustainability and for addressing their challenges in an integrated and coherent way. Acknowledging both the relative narrowness of the environmental focus that has to date characterized and driven universities' work in relation to sustainability and the demonstrable value of adopting a whole-system approach, this paper will explore the concept of 'Healthy Universities' as a means of furthering debate and facilitating synergy between public health, sustainable development and climate change. Higher education represents one large-scale sector with a unique combination of roles that can be harnessed to focus and mobilize its education, knowledge exchange, research, corporate responsibility and future shaping agendas to achieve significant impacts in this area. It is the growing commitment to embedding health and well-being within the mainstream business of higher education coupled with the expectation that universities will act sustainably in all that they do that provides the perfect springboard to influence a process of 'co-ordinated action' to address climate change and impact positively on the integrated health and sustainability agenda.

  3. Time-varying formation control for double-integrator multi-agent systems with jointly connected topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xiwang; Han, Liang; Li, Qingdong; Ren, Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Time-varying formation analysis and design problems for double-integrator multi-agent systems with jointly connected topologies are investigated. Different from the previous work on formation control, in this paper, the formation is specified by time-varying piecewise continuously differentiable vectors and the topology can be disconnected at any time instant. First, a distributed formation control protocol is constructed using local neighbour-to-neighbour information. In the case where the switching topology is jointly connected, necessary and sufficient conditions for double-integrator multi-agent systems to achieve time-varying formations are proposed, where the formation feasibility constraint is also derived. To describe the macroscopic movement of the whole formation, explicit expressions of the formation reference are presented, the motion modes of which can be partially assigned. Moreover, an approach to design the formation control protocol is given, which is fully distributed and requires no global information about the topology. Finally, the obtained theoretical results are applied to deal with the time-varying formation control problems of multi-vehicle systems.

  4. Calculating Exchange Times in a Scottish Fjord Using a Two-dimensional, Laterally-integrated Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillibrand, P. A.

    2001-10-01

    In order to assess the potential impact of pollutants, particularly soluble wastes discharged by the mariculture industry, on the fjordic sea loch environment in Scotland, simple management models have been developed which estimate steady-state concentrations based on the quantities of effluent released and the residence time of such material within a loch. These models make various simplifications about the hydrodynamic characteristics of Scottish sea lochs, the most important of which is the concept of an exchange time which parametrizes the rate at which pollutants are removed from the system. Exchange times for individual lochs are calculated using the tidal prism method, which has some well-known shortcomings. In this paper, a two-dimensional laterally-integrated circulation model is used to investigate the exchange characteristics of Loch Fyne and its sub-basins. By simulating the transport of a passive, conservative tracer, the turnover times for the loch, two sub-basins and various depth layers are calculated. By varying the starting time of the tracer simulations, the variability in the exchange times is examined. The results from the circulation model are compared with the estimates given by the tidal prism method. The results show that the tidal prism method consistently underestimates the exchange times, although the predicted times tend to lie within the range of the simulated times. Including a simple return flow factor into the tidal prism estimate leads to significant improvements in the comparison.

  5. Extrastriate visual areas integrate form features over space and time to construct representations of stationary and rigidly rotating objects

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, J. Daniel; Kohler, Peter J.; Tse, Peter U.; Caplovitz, Gideon Paul

    2016-01-01

    When an object moves behind a bush, for example, its visible fragments are revealed at different times and locations across the visual field. Nonetheless, a whole moving object is perceived. Unlike traditional modal and amodal completion mechanisms known to support spatial form integration when all parts of a stimulus are simultaneously visible, relatively little is known about the neural substrates of the spatiotemporal form integration processes involved in generating coherent object representations from a succession visible fragments. We use fMRI to identify brain regions involved in two mechanisms supporting the representation of stationary and rigidly rotating objects whose form features are shown in succession: Spatiotemporal Form Integration (STFI) and Position Updating. STFI allows past and present form cues to be integrated over space and time into a coherent object even when the object is not visible in any given frame. STFI can occur whether or not the object is moving. Position updating allows us to perceive a moving object, whether rigidly rotating or translating, even when its form features are revealed at different times and locations in space. Our results suggest that STFI is mediated by visual regions beyond V1 and V2. Moreover, while widespread cortical activation has been observed for other motion percepts derived solely from form-based analyses (Krekelberg, Vatakis, & Kourtzi, 2005; Tse, 2006), increased responses for the position updating that leads to rigidly rotating object representations were only observed in visual areas KO and possibly hMT+, indicating that this is a distinct and highly specialized type of processing. PMID:26226075

  6. Decoding a bistable percept with integrated time-frequency representation of single-trial local field potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhisong; Logothetis, Nikos K.; Liang, Hualou

    2008-12-01

    Bistable perception emerges when a stimulus under continuous view is perceived as the alternation of two mutually exclusive states. Such a stimulus provides a unique opportunity for understanding the neural basis of visual perception because it dissociates the perception from the visual input. In this paper we analyze the dynamic activity of local field potential (LFP), simultaneously collected from multiple channels in the middle temporal (MT) visual cortex of a macaque monkey, for decoding its bistable structure-from-motion (SFM) perception. Based on the observation that the discriminative information of neuronal population activity evolves and accumulates over time, we propose to select features from the integrated time-frequency representation of LFP using a relaxation (RELAX) algorithm and a sequential forward selection (SFS) algorithm with maximizing the Mahalanobis distance as the criterion function. The integrated-spectrogram based feature selection is much more robust and can achieve significantly better features than the instantaneous-spectrogram based feature selection. We exploit the support vector machines (SVM) classifier and the linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier based on the selected features to decode the reported perception on a single trial basis. Our results demonstrate the excellent performance of the integrated-spectrogram based feature selection and suggest that the features in the gamma frequency band (30-100 Hz) of LFP within specific temporal windows carry the most discriminative information for decoding bistable perception. The proposed integrated-spectrogram based feature selection approach may have potential for a myriad of applications involving multivariable time series such as brain-computer interfaces (BCI).

  7. Effects of Phonation Time and Magnitude Dose on Vocal Fold Epithelial Genes, Barrier Integrity, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Tsuyoshi; Valenzuela, Carla V.; Novaleski, Carolyn K.; Van Deusen, Mark; Mitchell, Joshua R.; Garrett, C. Gaelyn; Sivasankar, M. Preeti; Rousseau, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of increasing time and magnitude doses of vibration exposure on transcription of the vocal fold's junctional proteins, structural alterations, and functional tissue outcomes. Study Design Animal study. Methods 100 New Zealand White breeder rabbits were studied. Dependent variables were measured in response to increasing time doses (30, 60, or 120 minutes) and magnitude doses (control, modal intensity, and raised intensity) of vibration exposure. Messenger RNA expression of occludin, zonula occluden-1 (ZO-1), E-cadherin, β-catenin, interleukin 1β (IL-1β), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), transforming growth factor β-1 (TGFβ1), and fibronectin were measured. Tissue structural alterations were assessed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Transepithelial resistance was used to measure functional tissue outcomes. Results Occludin gene expression was downregulated in vocal folds exposed to 120 minute time doses of raised intensity phonation, relative to control, and modal intensity phonation. ZO-1 gene expression was upregulated following a 120 minute time dose of modal intensity phonation, compared to control, and downregulated after a 120 minute time dose of raised intensity phonation, compared to modal intensity phonation. E-cadherin gene expression was downregulated after a120 minute time dose of raised intensity phonation, compared to control and modal intensity phonation. TEM revealed extensive desquamation of the stratified squamous epithelial cells with increasing time and magnitude doses of vibration exposure. A general observation of lower transepithelial resistance measures was made in tissues exposed to raised intensity phonation, compared to all other groups. Conclusions This study provides evidence of vocal fold tissue responses to varying time and magnitude doses of vibration exposure. Level of Evidence N/A PMID:25073715

  8. Integral Length and Time Scales of Velocity, Heat and Mass At and Near a Turbulent Free Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, G. M.; Zappa, C. J.; Variano, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    Turbulence enhances both heat and CO2 gas exchange at a free surface. At the air-water interface, heat and mass transport is controlled by a thin thermal/diffusive boundary layer. Turbulence in the flow acts to thin the heat and mass boundary layers, thereby increasing the rate at which surface water is mixed into the bulk. Surface water is typically cool, and mixing replaces it with warmer water from the bulk. In our experiment, and in many environmental cases, the surface has a higher concentration of dissolved CO2 and carbonate species. . The dissolved gas is transported between the surface and bulk in a similar way to the heat. Because of this similarity, attempts are often made to find and exploit a relationship between the heat and mass transfer. Using a laboratory tank, which generates turbulence with very low mean shear flow, we measured heat and mass transfer by using infrared imagery to map the two-dimensional surface temperature field and by using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) to map the two-dimensional subsurface CO2 flux. In addition, particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to measure subsurface velocity fields. A comparative analysis of these results allows us to determine the similarities and differences between heat, mass, and momentum transport at a free surface. This will contribute to the use of one quantity to predict transport of the others. The setup used here, i.e., turbulence with very low mean shear at the surface, allows us to evaluate the turbulent components of interfacial flux in a way that can be applied equally well to flows created by wind, waves, or current. Here, we quantify the integral length and time scales of the surface temperature and sub-surface CO2 and velocity measurements. Initial analysis shows that the integral length scales of temperature at the surface are significantly smaller than the sub-surface velocity scales. However, the integral scale of sub-surface velocity decreases approaching the surface. The

  9. Neural Basis of the Time Window for Subjective Motor-Auditory Integration

    PubMed Central

    Toida, Koichi; Ueno, Kanako; Shimada, Sotaro

    2016-01-01

    Temporal contiguity between an action and corresponding auditory feedback is crucial to the perception of self-generated sound. However, the neural mechanisms underlying motor–auditory temporal integration are unclear. Here, we conducted four experiments with an oddball paradigm to examine the specific event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by delayed auditory feedback for a self-generated action. The first experiment confirmed that a pitch-deviant auditory stimulus elicits mismatch negativity (MMN) and P300, both when it is generated passively and by the participant’s action. In our second and third experiments, we investigated the ERP components elicited by delayed auditory feedback for a self-generated action. We found that delayed auditory feedback elicited an enhancement of P2 (enhanced-P2) and a N300 component, which were apparently different from the MMN and P300 components observed in the first experiment. We further investigated the sensitivity of the enhanced-P2 and N300 to delay length in our fourth experiment. Strikingly, the amplitude of the N300 increased as a function of the delay length. Additionally, the N300 amplitude was significantly correlated with the conscious detection of the delay (the 50% detection point was around 200 ms), and hence reduction in the feeling of authorship of the sound (the sense of agency). In contrast, the enhanced-P2 was most prominent in short-delay (≤200 ms) conditions and diminished in long-delay conditions. Our results suggest that different neural mechanisms are employed for the processing of temporally deviant and pitch-deviant auditory feedback. Additionally, the temporal window for subjective motor–auditory integration is likely about 200 ms, as indicated by these auditory ERP components. PMID:26779000

  10. The two-loop sunrise integral around four space-time dimensions and generalisations of the Clausen and Glaisher functions towards the elliptic case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Luise; Bogner, Christian; Weinzierl, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    We present the result for the finite part of the two-loop sunrise integral with unequal masses in four space-time dimensions in terms of the O ( ɛ0) -part and the O ( ɛ1) -part of the sunrise integral around two space-time dimensions. The latter two integrals are given in terms of elliptic generalisations of Clausen and Glaisher functions. Interesting aspects of the result for the O ( ɛ1 ) -part of the sunrise integral around two space-time dimensions are the occurrence of depth two elliptic objects and the weights of the individual terms.

  11. Effect of real-time weighted integration system for rapid calculation of functional images in clinical positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Iida, Hidehiro; Bloomfield, P.M.; Miura, Shuichi

    1995-03-01

    A system has been developed to rapidly calculate images of parametric rate constants, without acquiring dynamic frame data for clinical positron emission tomography (PET). This method is based on the weighted-integration algorithms for the two- and three-compartment models, and hardware developments (real-time operation and a large cache memory system) in a PET scanner, Headtome-IV, which enables the acquisition of multiple sinograms with independent weight integration functions. Following the administration of the radio-tracer, the scan is initiated to collect multiple time-weighted, integrated sinograms with three different weight functions. These sinograms are reconstructed and the images, with the arterial blood data, are inserted into the operational equations to provide parametric rate constant images. The implementation of this method has been checked in H{sub 2} {sup 15}O and {sup 18}F-fluorophenylalanine ({sup 18}FPhe) studies based on a two-compartment model, and in a {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}FDG) study based on the three-compartment model. A volunteer study, completed for each compound, yielded results consistent with those produced by existing nonlinear fitting methods. Thus, this system has been developed capable of generating rapidly quantitative, physiological images, without dynamic data acquisition, which will be of great advantage to PET in the clinical environment. This system would also be of great advantage in the new generation high-resolution PET tomography, which acquire data in a 3-D, septaless mode.

  12. Protein analysis using real-time PCR instrumentation: incorporation in an integrated, inquiry-based project.

    PubMed

    Southard, Jonathan N

    2014-01-01

    Instrumentation for real-time PCR is used primarily for amplification and quantitation of nucleic acids. The capability to measure fluorescence while controlling temperature in multiple samples can also be applied to the analysis of proteins. Conformational stability and changes in stability due to ligand binding are easily assessed. Protein structure studies possible with a real-time PCR instrument address core topics in biochemistry and have valuable high-throughput applications in the fields of drug discovery and protein engineering. Protein analysis using real-time PCR instrumentation has been incorporated in an undergraduate laboratory project based on previously described projects. Students express, purify, and characterize a protein. Based on literature research and analysis using bioinformatics tools, they select a specific mutation to investigate. They then attempt to express, purify, and characterize their mutated protein. Thermal denaturation using a real-time PCR instrument is the primary tool used to compare the wild-type and mutated proteins. Alternative means for incorporation of protein analysis by real-time PCR instrumentation into laboratory experiences and additional modes of analysis are also described.

  13. Integrated microdevice for long-term automated perfusion culture without shear stress and real-time electrochemical monitoring of cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin-Mei; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Shu-Hui; Chen, Shi-Jing; Guo, Shi-Shang; Français, Olivier; Cheng, Jie-Ke; Huang, Wei-Hua

    2011-12-15

    Electrochemical techniques based on ultramicroelectrodes (UMEs) play a significant role in real-time monitoring of chemical messengers' release from single cells. Conversely, precise monitoring of cells in vitro strongly depends on the adequate construction of cellular physiological microenvironment. In this paper, we developed a multilayer microdevice which integrated high aspect ratio poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic device for long-term automated perfusion culture of cells without shear stress and an independently addressable microelectrodes array (IAMEA) for electrochemical monitoring of the cultured cells in real time. Novel design using high aspect ratio between circular "moat" and ring-shaped micropillar array surrounding cell culture chamber combined with automated "circular-centre" and "bottom-up" perfusion model successfully provided continuous fresh medium and a stable and uniform microenvironment for cells. Two weeks automated culture of human umbilical endothelial cell line (ECV304) and neuronal differentiation of rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells have been realized using this device. Furthermore, the quantal release of dopamine from individual PC12 cells during their culture or propagation process was amperometrically monitored in real time. The multifunctional microdevice developed in this paper integrated cellular microenvironment construction and real-time monitoring of cells during their physiological process, and would possibly provide a versatile platform for cell-based biomedical analysis.

  14. Enabling fast, stable and accurate peridynamic computations using multi-time-step integration

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, P.; Parks, M. L.; Prakash, A.

    2016-04-13

    Peridynamics is a nonlocal extension of classical continuum mechanics that is well-suited for solving problems with discontinuities such as cracks. This paper extends the peridynamic formulation to decompose a problem domain into a number of smaller overlapping subdomains and to enable the use of different time steps in different subdomains. This approach allows regions of interest to be isolated and solved at a small time step for increased accuracy while the rest of the problem domain can be solved at a larger time step for greater computational efficiency. Lastly, performance of the proposed method in terms of stability, accuracy, and computational cost is examined and several numerical examples are presented to corroborate the findings.

  15. Accelerating Time Integration for the Shallow Water Equations on the Sphere Using GPUs

    SciTech Connect

    Archibald, R.; Evans, K. J.; Salinger, A.

    2015-06-01

    The push towards larger and larger computational platforms has made it possible for climate simulations to resolve climate dynamics across multiple spatial and temporal scales. This direction in climate simulation has created a strong need to develop scalable time-stepping methods capable of accelerating throughput on high performance computing. This work details the recent advances in the implementation of implicit time stepping on a spectral element cube-sphere grid using graphical processing units (GPU) based machines. We demonstrate how solvers in the Trilinos project are interfaced with ACME and GPU kernels can significantly increase computational speed of the residual calculations in the implicit time stepping method for the shallow water equations on the sphere. We show the optimization gains and data structure reorganization that facilitates the performance improvements.

  16. Enabling fast, stable and accurate peridynamic computations using multi-time-step integration

    DOE PAGES

    Lindsay, P.; Parks, M. L.; Prakash, A.

    2016-04-13

    Peridynamics is a nonlocal extension of classical continuum mechanics that is well-suited for solving problems with discontinuities such as cracks. This paper extends the peridynamic formulation to decompose a problem domain into a number of smaller overlapping subdomains and to enable the use of different time steps in different subdomains. This approach allows regions of interest to be isolated and solved at a small time step for increased accuracy while the rest of the problem domain can be solved at a larger time step for greater computational efficiency. Lastly, performance of the proposed method in terms of stability, accuracy, andmore » computational cost is examined and several numerical examples are presented to corroborate the findings.« less

  17. Accelerating Time Integration for the Shallow Water Equations on the Sphere Using GPUs

    DOE PAGES

    Archibald, R.; Evans, K. J.; Salinger, A.

    2015-06-01

    The push towards larger and larger computational platforms has made it possible for climate simulations to resolve climate dynamics across multiple spatial and temporal scales. This direction in climate simulation has created a strong need to develop scalable time-stepping methods capable of accelerating throughput on high performance computing. This work details the recent advances in the implementation of implicit time stepping on a spectral element cube-sphere grid using graphical processing units (GPU) based machines. We demonstrate how solvers in the Trilinos project are interfaced with ACME and GPU kernels can significantly increase computational speed of the residual calculations in themore » implicit time stepping method for the shallow water equations on the sphere. We show the optimization gains and data structure reorganization that facilitates the performance improvements.« less

  18. Biological spacetime and the temporal integration of functional modules: a case study of dento-gnathic developmental timing.

    PubMed

    Boughner, Julia C; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt

    2008-01-01

    For the individual, coordination between tooth and jaw development is important to proper food acquisition and ingestion later in life. Among and within species, variation in dental and gnathic size, shape, and, in the case of teeth, number, must be mutually accommodating and functionally compatible. For these reasons, the development and evolution of these two systems should be closely integrated. Furthermore, the timing of dental development correlates tightly with life history events such as weaning. This correlation hints at a central regulation of the developmental timing of multiple systems that have tandem effects on physiology and behaviour. Important work on embryonic oral development continues to tease apart the molecular mechanisms that pattern jaw identity and establish tooth morphology and position in the alveolar bone. Still very poorly understood is what underlies rates and periods of gene activity such that pre- and postnatal tooth and jaw development are coordinated. Recent literature suggests at least some level of autonomy between permanent tooth and mandibular ontogenetic timing. However, whether the timing of these various signaling pathways is directly regulated or is an outcome of the pathways themselves is untested. Here, we review what is currently known about the embryonic signaling pathways that regulate tooth and jaw development in the context of time rather than space, as has been traditional. We hypothesize that the timing of mandibular and dental development is not directly mediated by a common factor but is an indirect outcome of strong selection for coordinated molecular pathways and growth trajectories. The mandible and lower jaw dentition is a powerful model with which to investigate the mechanisms that facilitate morphological change-in this case, the development and evolution-of organs that are closely integrated in terms of function, space and time.

  19. Multirate Particle-in-Cell Time Integration Techniques of Vlasov-Maxwell Equations for Collisionless Kinetic Plasma Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Guangye; Chacon, Luis; Knoll, Dana Alan; Barnes, Daniel C

    2015-07-31

    A multi-rate PIC formulation was developed that employs large timesteps for slow field evolution, and small (adaptive) timesteps for particle orbit integrations. Implementation is based on a JFNK solver with nonlinear elimination and moment preconditioning. The approach is free of numerical instabilities (ωpeΔt >>1, and Δx >> λD), and requires many fewer dofs (vs. explicit PIC) for comparable accuracy in challenging problems. Significant gains (vs. conventional explicit PIC) may be possible for large scale simulations. The paper is organized as follows: Vlasov-Maxwell Particle-in-cell (PIC) methods for plasmas; Explicit, semi-implicit, and implicit time integrations; Implicit PIC formulation (Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) with nonlinear elimination allows different treatments of disparate scales, discrete conservation properties (energy, charge, canonical momentum, etc.)); Some numerical examples; and Summary.

  20. Lax representations and integrable time discretizations of the DDKdV, DDmKdV, and DDHOKdV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zuonong; Huang, Hongci; Xue, Weimin

    1999-02-01

    From a proper 2 × 2 discrete isospectral problem, a new differential-difference integrable equation in Lax sense is proposed by a discrete zero curvature equation. The DDKdV (differential-difference DdV equation) proposed by Ohta and Hirota and DDCDGKS (DD Caudrey-Dodd-Gibbon-Kotera-Sawada equation) are rederived. Some other new discrete KdV equations, discrete mKdV equations and discrete high order KdV equations which converge to the corresponding continuous soliton equations in the continuum limit are obtained. Integrable time discretizations of the DDKdV, DDmKdV (differential-difference mKdV equation) and DDHOKdV (differential-difference high order KdV equations) are given.

  1. Timing of Pubertal Maturation in Girls: An Integrated Life History Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Bruce J.

    2004-01-01

    Life history theory provides a metatheoretical framework for the study of pubertal timing from an evolutionary-developmental perspective. The current article reviews 5 middle-level theories-energetics theory, stress-suppression theory, psychosocial acceleration theory, paternal investment theory, and child development theory-each of which applies…

  2. Integrating Real-Time Antecedent Rubrics via Blackboard™ into a Community College General Psychology Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goomas, David

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported on the innovative and effective delivery of online course content by community colleges, but not much has been done on how learning management systems (LMS) can deliver real-time (immediate data delivery) antecedents that inform students of performance requirements. This pilot study used Blackboard's™ interactive…

  3. Integrating space and time in visual search: how the preview benefit is modulated by stereoscopic depth.

    PubMed

    Dent, Kevin; Braithwaite, Jason J; He, Xun; Humphreys, Glyn W

    2012-07-15

    We examined visual search for letters that were distributed across both 3 dimensional space, and time. In Experiment 1, when participants had foreknowledge of the depth plane and time interval where targets could appear, search was more efficient if the items could be segmented either by depth or by time (with a 1000 ms preview), and there were increased benefits when the two cues (depth and time) were combined. In Experiments 2 and 3 the target depth plane was always unknown to the participant. In this case, depth cues alone did not facilitate search, though they continued to increase the preview benefit. In Experiment 4 new items in preview search could fall at the same depth as preview items or a new depth. There was a substantial cost to search if the target appeared at a previewed depth. Experiment 5 showed that this cost remained even when participants knew the target would appear at the old depth on 75% of trials. The results indicate that spatial (depth) and temporal cues combine to enhance visual segmentation and selection, and this is accomplished by inhibition of distractors in irrelevant depth planes.

  4. Time-integrated measurements of $\\gamma$ at the Tevatron and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Squillacioti, Paola

    2010-12-01

    The measurement of CP-violating asymmetries and branching ratios of B {yields} DK modes allows a theoretically-clean extraction of the CKM angle {gamma}. We report recent CDF measurements with Cabibbo suppressed ({pi}{pi}, KK) or doubly Cabibbo suppressed (K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) D decays. These measurements are performed for the first time in hadron collisions.

  5. Protein Analysis Using Real-Time PCR Instrumentation: Incorporation in an Integrated, Inquiry-Based Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southard, Jonathan N.

    2014-01-01

    Instrumentation for real-time PCR is used primarily for amplification and quantitation of nucleic acids. The capability to measure fluorescence while controlling temperature in multiple samples can also be applied to the analysis of proteins. Conformational stability and changes in stability due to ligand binding are easily assessed. Protein…

  6. AN "INJURY-TIME INTEGRAL" MODEL FOR RELATING ACUTE TO CHRONIC INJURY TO PHOSGENE

    EPA Science Inventory


    ABSTRACT
    The present study compares acute and subchronic episodic exposures to phosgene to test the applicability of the "concentration x time" (C x T) product as a measure of exposure dose, and to relate acute toxicity and adaptive responses to chronic toxicity. Rats (m...

  7. The Elastic Body Model: A Pedagogical Approach Integrating Real Time Measurements and Modelling Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazio, C.; Guastella, I.; Tarantino, G.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a pedagogical approach to elastic body movement based on measurements of the contact times between a metallic rod and small bodies colliding with it and on modelling of the experimental results by using a microcomputer-based laboratory and simulation tools. The experiments and modelling activities have been built in the…

  8. Integrated payload and mission planning, phase 3. Volume 3: Ground real-time mission operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    The payloads tentatively planned to fly on the first two Spacelab missions were analyzed to examine the cost relationships of providing mission operations support from onboard vs the ground-based Payload Operations Control Center (POCC). The quantitative results indicate that use of a POCC, with data processing capability, to support real-time mission operations is the most cost effective case.

  9. Sensori-motor integration during stance: time adaptation of control mechanisms on adding or removing vision.

    PubMed

    Sozzi, Stefania; Monti, Alberto; De Nunzio, Alessandro Marco; Do, Manh-Cuong; Schieppati, Marco

    2011-04-01

    Sudden addition or removal of visual information can be particularly critical to balance control. The promptness of adaptation of stance control mechanisms is quantified by the latency at which body oscillation and postural muscle activity vary after a shift in visual condition. In the present study, volunteers stood on a force platform with feet parallel or in tandem. Shifts in visual condition were produced by electronic spectacles. Ground reaction force (center of foot pressure, CoP) and EMG of leg postural muscles were acquired, and latency of CoP and EMG changes estimated by t-tests on the averaged traces. Time-to-reach steady-state was estimated by means of an exponential model. On allowing or occluding vision, decrements and increments in CoP position and oscillation occurred within about 2s. These were preceded by changes in muscle activity, regardless of visual-shift direction, foot position or front or rear leg in tandem. These time intervals were longer than simple reaction-time responses. The time course of recovery to steady-state was about 3s, shorter for oscillation than position. The capacity of modifying balance control at very short intervals both during quiet standing and under more critical balance conditions speaks in favor of a necessary coupling between vision, postural reference, and postural muscle activity, and of the swiftness of this sensory reweighing process.

  10. Integrating Evidence-Based Practice into a Therapeutic Exercise Course: Real-Time Patient Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popp, Jennifer K.

    2014-01-01

    Athletic training students need real-time patient experiences in order to transfer the knowledge and skills learned in the classroom into clinical practice. The objective is to present a description of an assignment that could be incorporated into a therapeutic exercise course giving the student an opportunity to evaluate a patient, design a…

  11. Essential tremor, the cerebellum, and motor timing: towards integrating them into one complex entity.

    PubMed

    Bareš, Martin; Husárová, Ivica; Lungu, Ovidiu V

    2012-01-01

    Essential tremor (ET) is the most common movement disorder in humans. It is characterized by a postural and kinetic tremor most commonly affecting the forearms and hands. Isolated head tremor has been found in 1-10% of patients, suggesting that ET may be a composite of several phenotypes. The exact pathophysiology of ET is still unknown. ET has been repeatedly shown as a disorder of mild cerebellar degeneration, particularly in postmortem studies. Clinical observations, electrophysiological, volumetric and functional imaging studies all reinforce the fact that the cerebellum is involved in the generation of ET. However, crucial debate exists as to whether ET is a neurodegenerative disease. Data suggesting that it is neurodegenerative include postmortem findings of pathological abnormalities in the brainstem and cerebellum, white matter changes on diffusion tensor imaging, and clinical studies demonstrating an association with cognitive and gait changes. There is also conflicting evidence against ET as a neurodegenerative disease: the improvement of gait abnormalities with ethanol administration, lack of gray matter volume loss on voxel-based morphometry, failure to confirm the prominent presence of Lewy bodies in the locus ceruleus, and other pathological findings. To clarify this issue, future research is needed to describe the mechanism of cellular changes in the ET brain and to understand the order in which they occur. The cerebellum has been shown to be involved in the timing of movement and sensation, acting as an internal timing system that provides the temporal representation of salient events spanning hundreds of milliseconds. It has been reported that cerebellar timing function is altered in patients with ET, showing an increased variability of rhythmic hand movements as well as diminished performance during predictive motor timing task. Based on current knowledge and observations, we argue that ET is essentially linked with cerebellar degeneration, or at

  12. Near Real Time Integration of Satellite and Radar Data for Probabilistic Nearcasting of Severe Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilone, D.; Quinn, P.; Mitchell, A. E.; Baynes, K.; Shum, D.

    2014-12-01

    This talk introduces the audience to some of the very real challenges associated with visualizing data from disparate data sources as encountered during the development of real world applications. In addition to the fundamental challenges of dealing with the data and imagery, this talk discusses usability problems encountered while trying to provide interactive and user-friendly visualization tools. At the end of this talk the audience will be aware of some of the pitfalls of data visualization along with tools and techniques to help mitigate them. There are many sources of variable resolution visualizations of science data available to application developers including NASA's Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS), however integrating and leveraging visualizations in modern applications faces a number of challenges, including: - Varying visualized Earth "tile sizes" resulting in challenges merging disparate sources - Multiple visualization frameworks and toolkits with varying strengths and weaknesses - Global composite imagery vs. imagery matching EOSDIS granule distribution - Challenges visualizing geographically overlapping data with different temporal bounds - User interaction with overlapping or collocated data - Complex data boundaries and shapes combined with multi-orbit data and polar projections - Discovering the availability of visualizations and the specific parameters, color palettes, and configurations used to produce them In addition to discussing the challenges and approaches involved in visualizing disparate data, we will discuss solutions and components we'll be making available as open source to encourage reuse and accelerate application development.

  13. Off-policy integral reinforcement learning optimal tracking control for continuous-time chaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qing-Lai; Song, Rui-Zhuo; Sun, Qiu-Ye; Xiao, Wen-Dong

    2015-09-01

    This paper estimates an off-policy integral reinforcement learning (IRL) algorithm to obtain the optimal tracking control of unknown chaotic systems. Off-policy IRL can learn the solution of the HJB equation from the system data generated by an arbitrary control. Moreover, off-policy IRL can be regarded as a direct learning method, which avoids the identification of system dynamics. In this paper, the performance index function is first given based on the system tracking error and control error. For solving the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) equation, an off-policy IRL algorithm is proposed. It is proven that the iterative control makes the tracking error system asymptotically stable, and the iterative performance index function is convergent. Simulation study demonstrates the effectiveness of the developed tracking control method. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61304079 and 61374105), the Beijing Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant Nos. 4132078 and 4143065), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2013M530527), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. FRF-TP-14-119A2), and the Open Research Project from State Key Laboratory of Management and Control for Complex Systems, China (Grant No. 20150104).

  14. Is It Time To Consider Global Sharing of Integral Physics Data?

    SciTech Connect

    Harold F. McFarlane

    2005-10-01

    The innocent days of the Atoms for Peace program vanished with the suicide attack on the World Trade Center in New York City that occurred while the GLOBAL 2001 international nuclear fuel cycle conference was convened in Paris. Today’s reality is that maintaining an inventory of unirradiated highly enriched uranium or plutonium for critical experiments requires a facility to accept substantial security cost and intrusion. In the context of a large collection of benchmark integral experiments collected over several decades and the ongoing rapid advances in computer modeling and simulation, there seems to be ample incentive to reduce both the number of facilities and material inventory quantities worldwide. As a result of ongoing nonproliferation initiatives, there are viable programs that will accept highly enriched uranium for down blending into commercial fuel. Nevertheless, there are formidable hurdles to overcome before national institutions will voluntarily give up existing nuclear research capabilities. GLOBAL 2005 was the appropriate forum to begin fostering a new spirit of cooperation that could lead to improved international security and better use of precious research and development resources, while ensuring access to existing and future critical experiment data.

  15. Active quench and reset integrated circuit with novel hold-off time control logic for Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shijie; Morrison, Alan P

    2012-09-15

    This Letter presents an active quench-and-reset circuit for Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GM-APDs). The integrated circuit was fabricated using a conventional 0.35 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor process. Experimental results show that the circuit is capable of linearly setting the hold-off time from several nanoseconds to microseconds with a resolution of 6.5 ns. This allows the selection of the optimal afterpulse-free hold-off time for the GM-APD via external digital inputs or additional signal processing circuitry. Moreover, this circuit resets the APD automatically following the end of the hold-off period, thus simplifying the control for the end user. Results also show that a minimum dead time of 28.4 ns is achieved, demonstrating a saturated photon-counting rate of 35.2 Mcounts/s.

  16. A computationally-efficient, semi-implicit, iterative method for the time-integration of reacting flows with stiff chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savard, B.; Xuan, Y.; Bobbitt, B.; Blanquart, G.

    2015-08-01

    A semi-implicit preconditioned iterative method is proposed for the time-integration of the stiff chemistry in simulations of unsteady reacting flows, such as turbulent flames, using detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms. Emphasis is placed on the simultaneous treatment of convection, diffusion, and chemistry, without using operator splitting techniques. The preconditioner corresponds to an approximation of the diagonal of the chemical Jacobian. Upon convergence of the sub-iterations, the fully-implicit, second-order time-accurate, Crank-Nicolson formulation is recovered. Performance of the proposed method is tested theoretically and numerically on one-dimensional laminar and three-dimensional high Karlovitz turbulent premixed n-heptane/air flames. The species lifetimes contained in the diagonal preconditioner are found to capture all critical small chemical timescales, such that the largest stable time step size for the simulation of the turbulent flame with the proposed method is limited by the convective CFL, rather than chemistry. The theoretical and numerical stability limits are in good agreement and are independent of the number of sub-iterations. The results indicate that the overall procedure is second-order accurate in time, free of lagging errors, and the cost per iteration is similar to that of an explicit time integration. The theoretical analysis is extended to a wide range of flames (premixed and non-premixed), unburnt conditions, fuels, and chemical mechanisms. In all cases, the proposed method is found (theoretically) to be stable and to provide good convergence rate for the sub-iterations up to a time step size larger than 1 μs. This makes the proposed method ideal for the simulation of turbulent flames.

  17. A comparison of methods for calculating O(1S) lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, G. B.; Reid, J. S.

    It is shown theoretically and with simulated data that O(1S) lifetimes determined by the cross-spectral method (Paulson and Shepherd, 1965) are significant overestimates. A comparison is made of the cross-spectral and impulse function analysis (Burns and Reid, 1984) methods using photometric data collected at Macquarie Island (54.5 deg S, 159.0 deg E geographic). The results support the view that the O(1S) state is excited predominantly by an indirect process.

  18. Applying real-time operations to integrate and evaluate Space Station Freedom design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, George; Winkler, David

    1990-01-01

    During its 30 year lifetime, Space Station Freedom will provide unique opportunities for a variety of research, commercial and space exploration activities. The diversity of Freedom's on-orbit operations and the partitioning of the spacecraft's flight elements and systems requires consideration of operations early in the design development. This paper presents a method for defining a structured relationship between Space Station Freedom real-time operations and system functionality, and discusses how this relationship can be used when evaluating the spacecraft design.

  19. Neural network training by integration of adjoint systems of equations forward in time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomarian, Nikzad (Inventor); Barhen, Jacob (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for supervised neural learning of time dependent trajectories exploits the concepts of adjoint operators to enable computation of the gradient of an objective functional with respect to the various parameters of the network architecture in a highly efficient manner. Specifically, it combines the advantage of dramatic reductions in computational complexity inherent in adjoint methods with the ability to solve two adjoint systems of equations together forward in time. Not only is a large amount of computation and storage saved, but the handling of real-time applications becomes also possible. The invention has been applied it to two examples of representative complexity which have recently been analyzed in the open literature and demonstrated that a circular trajectory can be learned in approximately 200 iterations compared to the 12000 reported in the literature. A figure eight trajectory was achieved in under 500 iterations compared to 20000 previously required. The trajectories computed using our new method are much closer to the target trajectories than was reported in previous studies.

  20. Neural Network Training by Integration of Adjoint Systems of Equations Forward in Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomarian, Nikzad (Inventor); Barhen, Jacob (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for supervised neural learning of time dependent trajectories exploits the concepts of adjoint operators to enable computation of the gradient of an objective functional with respect to the various parameters of the network architecture in a highly efficient manner. Specifically. it combines the advantage of dramatic reductions in computational complexity inherent in adjoint methods with the ability to solve two adjoint systems of equations together forward in time. Not only is a large amount of computation and storage saved. but the handling of real-time applications becomes also possible. The invention has been applied it to two examples of representative complexity which have recently been analyzed in the open literature and demonstrated that a circular trajectory can be learned in approximately 200 iterations compared to the 12000 reported in the literature. A figure eight trajectory was achieved in under 500 iterations compared to 20000 previously required. Tbc trajectories computed using our new method are much closer to the target trajectories than was reported in previous studies.

  1. Optimum timing for integrated pest management: modelling rates of pesticide application and natural enemy releases.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sanyi; Tang, Guangyao; Cheke, Robert A

    2010-05-21

    Many factors including pest natural enemy ratios, starting densities, timings of natural enemy releases, dosages and timings of insecticide applications and instantaneous killing rates of pesticides on both pests and natural enemies can affect the success of IPM control programmes. To address how such factors influence successful pest control, hybrid impulsive pest-natural enemy models with different frequencies of pesticide sprays and natural enemy releases were proposed and analyzed. With releasing both more or less frequent than the sprays, a stability threshold condition for a pest eradication periodic solution is provided. Moreover, the effects of times of spraying pesticides (or releasing natural enemies) and control tactics on the threshold condition were investigated with regard to the extent of depression or resurgence resulting from pulses of pesticide applications. Multiple attractors from which the pest population oscillates with different amplitudes can coexist for a wide range of parameters and the switch-like transitions among these attractors showed that varying dosages and frequencies of insecticide applications and the numbers of natural enemies released are crucial. To see how the pesticide applications could be reduced, we developed a model involving periodic releases of natural enemies with chemical control applied only when the densities of the pest reached the given Economic Threshold. The results indicate that the pest outbreak period or frequency largely depends on the initial densities and the control tactics.

  2. Signal coupling and signal integrity in multi-strip resistive plate chambers used for timing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Diaz, Diego; Chen, Huangshan; Wang, Yi

    2011-08-01

    We have systematically studied the transmission of electrical signals along several 2-strip Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) in the frequency range f=0.1-3.5 GHz. Such a range was chosen to fully cover the bandwidth associated to the very short rise-times of signals originated in RPCs used for sub-100 ps timing applications. This work conveys experimental evidence of the dominant role of modal dispersion in counters built at the 1 m scale, a fact that results in large cross-talk levels and strong signal shaping. It is shown that modal dispersion appears in RPCs due to their inherent unbalance between capacitive and inductive coupling. A practical way to restore this symmetry has been introduced (hereafter 'electrostatic compensation'), allowing for a cross-talk suppression factor up to ×12 and a rise-time reduction by 200 ps. Under conditions of compensation the signal transmission is only limited by dielectric losses, yielding a length-dependent cutoff frequency of around 1 GHz for propagation along 2 m in typical float glass-based RPCs. It is further shown that 'electrostatic compensation' can be achieved for an arbitrary number of strips as long as the nature of the coupling is 'short-range', that is an almost exact assumption for typical strip-line RPCs. This work extends the bandwidth of previous studies by a factor of×20.

  3. Integrating fossil preservation biases in the selection of calibrations for molecular divergence time estimation.

    PubMed

    Dornburg, Alex; Beaulieu, Jeremy M; Oliver, Jeffrey C; Near, Thomas J

    2011-07-01

    The selection of fossil data to use as calibration age priors in molecular divergence time estimates inherently links neontological methods with paleontological theory. However, few neontological studies have taken into account the possibility of a taphonomic bias in the fossil record when developing approaches to fossil calibration selection. The Sppil-Rongis effect may bias the first appearance of a lineage toward the recent causing most objective calibration selection approaches to erroneously exclude appropriate calibrations or to incorporate multiple calibrations that are too young to accurately represent the divergence times of target lineages. Using turtles as a case study, we develop a Bayesian extension to the fossil selection approach developed by Marshall (2008. A simple method for bracketing absolute divergence times on molecular phylogenies using multiple fossil calibrations points. Am. Nat. 171:726-742) that takes into account this taphonomic bias. Our method has the advantage of identifying calibrations that may bias age estimates to be too recent while incorporating uncertainty in phylogenetic parameter estimates such as tree topology and branch lengths. Additionally, this method is easily adapted to assess the consistency of potential calibrations to any one calibration in the candidate pool.

  4. Integrated automated nanomanipulation and real-time cellular surface imaging for mechanical properties characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami, Sohrab; Zareian, Ramin; Jalili, Nader

    2012-10-01

    Surface microscopy of individual biological cells is essential for determining the patterns of cell migration to study the tumor formation or metastasis. This paper presents a correlated and effective theoretical and experimental technique to automatically address the biophysical and mechanical properties and acquire live images of biological cells which are of interest in studying cancer. In the theoretical part, a distributed-parameters model as the comprehensive representation of the microcantilever is presented along with a model of the contact force as a function of the indentation depth and mechanical properties of the biological sample. Analysis of the transfer function of the whole system in the frequency domain is carried out to characterize the stiffness and damping coefficients of the sample. In the experimental section, unlike the conventional atomic force microscope techniques basically using the laser for determining the deflection of microcantilever's tip, a piezoresistive microcantilever serving as a force sensor is implemented to produce the appropriate voltage and measure the deflection of the microcantilever. A micromanipulator robotic system is integrated with the MATLAB® and programmed in such a way to automatically control the microcantilever mounted on the tip of the micromanipulator to achieve the topography of biological samples including the human corneal cells. For this purpose, the human primary corneal fibroblasts are extracted and adhered on a sterilized culture dish and prepared to attain their topographical image. The proposed methodology herein allows an approach to obtain 2D quality images of cells being comparatively cost effective and extendable to obtain 3D images of individual cells. The characterized mechanical properties of the human corneal cell are furthermore established by comparing and validating the phase shift of the theoretical and experimental results of the frequency response.

  5. Integrated automated nanomanipulation and real-time cellular surface imaging for mechanical properties characterization.

    PubMed

    Eslami, Sohrab; Zareian, Ramin; Jalili, Nader

    2012-10-01

    Surface microscopy of individual biological cells is essential for determining the patterns of cell migration to study the tumor formation or metastasis. This paper presents a correlated and effective theoretical and experimental technique to automatically address the biophysical and mechanical properties and acquire live images of biological cells which are of interest in studying cancer. In the theoretical part, a distributed-parameters model as the comprehensive representation of the microcantilever is presented along with a model of the contact force as a function of the indentation depth and mechanical properties of the biological sample. Analysis of the transfer function of the whole system in the frequency domain is carried out to characterize the stiffness and damping coefficients of the sample. In the experimental section, unlike the conventional atomic force microscope techniques basically using the laser for determining the deflection of microcantilever's tip, a piezoresistive microcantilever serving as a force sensor is implemented to produce the appropriate voltage and measure the deflection of the microcantilever. A micromanipulator robotic system is integrated with the MATLAB(®) and programmed in such a way to automatically control the microcantilever mounted on the tip of the micromanipulator to achieve the topography of biological samples including the human corneal cells. For this purpose, the human primary corneal fibroblasts are extracted and adhered on a sterilized culture dish and prepared to attain their topographical image. The proposed methodology herein allows an approach to obtain 2D quality images of cells being comparatively cost effective and extendable to obtain 3D images of individual cells. The characterized mechanical properties of the human corneal cell are furthermore established by comparing and validating the phase shift of the theoretical and experimental results of the frequency response.

  6. ABSOLUTE TIMING OF THE CRAB PULSAR WITH THE INTEGRAL/SPI TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Molkov, S.; Jourdain, E.; Roques, J. P.

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the pulse shape evolution of the Crab pulsar emission in the hard X-ray domain of the electromagnetic spectrum. In particular, we have studied the alignment of the Crab pulsar phase profiles measured in the hard X-rays and in other wavebands. To obtain the hard X-ray pulse profiles, we have used six years (2003-2009, with a total exposure of about 4 Ms) of publicly available data of the SPI telescope on-board the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory observatory, folded with the pulsar time solution derived from the Jodrell Bank Crab Pulsar Monthly Ephemeris. We found that the main pulse in the hard X-ray 20-100 keV energy band leads the radio one by 8.18 +- 0.46 milliperiods in phase, or 275 +- 15 mus in time. Quoted errors represent only statistical uncertainties. Our systematic error is estimated to be approx40 mus and is mainly caused by the radio measurement uncertainties. In hard X-rays, the average distance between the main pulse and interpulse on the phase plane is 0.3989 +- 0.0009. To compare our findings in hard X-rays with the soft 2-20 keV X-ray band, we have used data of quasi-simultaneous Crab observations with the proportional counter array monitor on-board the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer mission. The time lag and the pulses separation values measured in the 3-20 keV band are 0.00933 +- 0.00016 (corresponding to 310 +- 6 mus) and 0.40016 +- 0.00028 parts of the cycle, respectively. While the pulse separation values measured in soft X-rays and hard X-rays agree, the time lags are statistically different. Additional analysis show that the delay between the radio and X-ray signals varies with energy in the 2-300 keV energy range. We explain such a behavior as due to the superposition of two independent components responsible for the Crab pulsed emission in this energy band.

  7. Are interaural time and level differences represented by independent or integrated codes in the human auditory cortex?

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Barrie A; Krumbholz, Katrin

    2014-02-01

    Sound localization is important for orienting and focusing attention and for segregating sounds from different sources in the environment. In humans, horizontal sound localization mainly relies on interaural differences in sound arrival time and sound level. Despite their perceptual importance, the neural processing of interaural time and level differences (ITDs and ILDs) remains poorly understood. Animal studies suggest that, in the brainstem, ITDs and ILDs are processed independently by different specialized circuits. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether, at higher processing levels, they remain independent or are integrated into a common code of sound laterality. For that, we measured late auditory cortical potentials in response to changes in sound lateralization elicited by perceptually matched changes in ITD and/or ILD. The responses to the ITD and ILD changes exhibited significant morphological differences. At the same time, however, they originated from overlapping areas of the cortex and showed clear evidence for functional coupling. These results suggest that the auditory cortex contains an integrated code of sound laterality, but also retains independent information about ITD and ILD cues. This cue-related information might be used to assess how consistent the cues are, and thus, how likely they would have arisen from the same source.

  8. Spectroscopy by Integration of Frequency and Time Domain Information (SIFT) for Fast Acquisition of High Resolution Dark Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Matsuki, Yoh; Eddy, Matthew T.; Herzfeld, Judith

    2009-01-01

    A simple and effective method, SIFT (Spectroscopy by Integrating Frequency and Time domain information) is introduced for processing non-uniformly sampled multidimensional NMR data. Applying the computationally efficient Gerchberg-Papoulis (G-P) algorithm, used previously in picture processing and medical imaging, SIFT supplements data at non-uniform points in the time domain with the information carried by known “dark” points (i.e. empty regions) in the frequency domain. We demonstrate that this rapid integration not only removes the severe pseudo-noise characteristic of the Fourier transforms of non-uniformly sampled data, but also provides a robust procedure for using frequency information to replace time measurements. The latter can be used to avoid unnecessary sampling in sampling-limited experiments and the former can be used to take advantage of the ability of non-uniformly sampled data to minimize trade-offs between the signal-to-noise ratio and the resolution in sensitivity-limited experiments. Processing 2D and 3D datasets takes about 0.1 and 2 min, respectively, on a personal computer. With these several attractive features, SIFT offers a novel, model-independent, flexible, and user-friendly tool for efficient and accurate processing of multidimensional NMR data. PMID:19284727

  9. Spectroscopy by integration of frequency and time domain information for fast acquisition of high-resolution dark spectra.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Yoh; Eddy, Matthew T; Herzfeld, Judith

    2009-04-08

    A simple and effective method, SIFT (spectroscopy by integration of frequency and time domain information), is introduced for processing nonuniformly sampled multidimensional NMR data. Applying the computationally efficient Gerchberg-Papoulis (G-P) algorithm, used previously in picture processing and medical imaging, SIFT supplements data at nonuniform points in the time domain with the information carried by known "dark" points (i.e., empty regions) in the frequency domain. We demonstrate that this rapid integration not only removes the severe pseudonoise characteristic of the Fourier transforms of nonuniformly sampled data, but also provides a robust procedure for using frequency information to replace time measurements. The latter can be used to avoid unnecessary sampling in sampling-limited experiments, and the former can be used to take advantage of the ability of nonuniformly sampled data to minimize trade-offs between the signal-to-noise ratio and the resolution in sensitivity-limited experiments. Processing 2D and 3D data sets takes about 0.1 and 2 min, respectively, on a personal computer. With these several attractive features, SIFT offers a novel, model-independent, flexible, and user-friendly tool for efficient and accurate processing of multidimensional NMR data.

  10. Modeling the Impact of Integrating HIV and Outpatient Health Services on Patient Waiting Times in an Urban Health Clinic in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Deo, Sarang; Topp, Stephanie M.; Garcia, Ariel; Soldner, Mallory; Yagci Sokat, Kezban; Chipukuma, Julien; Wamulume, Chibesa S.; Reid, Stewart E.; Swann, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Background Rapid scale up of HIV treatment programs in sub-Saharan Africa has refueled the long-standing health policy debate regarding the merits and drawbacks of vertical and integrated system. Recent pilots of integrating outpatient and HIV services have shown an improvement in some patient outcomes but deterioration in waiting times, which can lead to worse health outcomes in the long run. Methods A pilot intervention involving integration of outpatient and HIV services in an urban primary care facility in Lusaka, Zambia was studied. Data on waiting time of patients during two seven-day periods before and six months after the integration were collected using a time and motion study. Statistical tests were conducted to investigate whether the two observation periods differed in operational details such as staffing, patient arrival rates, mix of patients etc. A discrete event simulation model was constructed to facilitate a fair comparison of waiting times before and after integration. The simulation model was also used to develop alternative configurations of integration and to estimate the resulting waiting times. Results Comparison of raw data showed that waiting times increased by 32% and 36% after integration for OPD and ART patients respectively (p<0.01). Using simulation modeling, we found that a large portion of this increase could be explained by changes in operational conditions before and after integration such as reduced staff availability (p<0.01) and longer breaks between consecutive patients (p<0.05). Controlling for these differences, integration of services, per se, would have resulted in a significant decrease in waiting times for OPD and a moderate decrease for HIV services. Conclusions Integrating health services has the potential of reducing waiting times due to more efficient use of resources. However, one needs to ensure that other operational factors such as staff availability are not adversely affected due to integration. PMID:22545108

  11. Extrastriate Visual Areas Integrate Form Features over Space and Time to Construct Representations of Stationary and Rigidly Rotating Objects.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, J Daniel; Kohler, Peter J; Tse, Peter U; Caplovitz, Gideon Paul

    2015-11-01

    When an object moves behind a bush, for example, its visible fragments are revealed at different times and locations across the visual field. Nonetheless, a whole moving object is perceived. Unlike traditional modal and amodal completion mechanisms known to support spatial form integration when all parts of a stimulus are simultaneously visible, relatively little is known about the neural substrates of the spatiotemporal form integration (STFI) processes involved in generating coherent object representations from a succession visible fragments. We used fMRI to identify brain regions involved in two mechanisms supporting the representation of stationary and rigidly rotating objects whose form features are shown in succession: STFI and position updating. STFI allows past and present form cues to be integrated over space and time into a coherent object even when the object is not visible in any given frame. STFI can occur whether or not the object is moving. Position updating allows us to perceive a moving object, whether rigidly rotating or translating, even when its form features are revealed at different times and locations in space. Our results suggest that STFI is mediated by visual regions beyond V1 and V2. Moreover, although widespread cortical activation has been observed for other motion percepts derived solely from form-based analyses [Tse, P. U. Neural correlates of transformational apparent motion. Neuroimage, 31, 766-773, 2006; Krekelberg, B., Vatakis, A., & Kourtzi, Z. Implied motion from form in the human visual cortex. Journal of Neurophysiology, 94, 4373-4386, 2005], increased responses for the position updating that lead to rigidly rotating object representations were only observed in visual areas KO and possibly hMT+, indicating that this is a distinct and highly specialized type of processing.

  12. Integra