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Sample records for 1-second forced expiratory

  1. Peak expiratory flow rate as a surrogate for forced expiratory volume in 1 second in COPD severity classification in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Pothirat, Chaicharn; Chaiwong, Warawut; Phetsuk, Nittaya; Liwsrisakun, Chalerm; Bumroongkit, Chaiwat; Deesomchok, Athavudh; Theerakittikul, Theerakorn; Limsukon, Atikun

    2015-01-01

    Background There are limited studies directly comparing correlation and agreement between peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) for severity classification of COPD. However, clarifying the role of PEFR as a surrogate of COPD severity classification instead of FEV1 is essential in situations and areas where spirometry is not routinely available. Purpose To evaluate the agreement between FEV1 and PEFR using Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) severity classification criteria. Materials and methods This cross-sectional study included stable COPD patients. Both absolute values and % predicted FEV1 and % predicted PEFR were obtained from the same patients at a single visit. The severity of COPD was classified according to GOLD criteria. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used to examine the relationship between FEV1 and PEFR. The agreement of % predicted FEV1 and % predicted PEFR in assigning severity categories was calculated using Kappa statistic, and identification of the limits of agreement was by Bland–Altman analysis. Statistical significance was set at P-value <0.05. Results Three hundred stable COPD patients were enrolled; 195 (65.0%) male, mean age 70.4±9.4 years, and mean % predicted FEV1 51.4±20.1. Both correlations between the % predicted FEV1 and PEFR as well as the absolute values were strongly significant (r=0.76, P<0.001 and r=0.87, P<0.001, respectively). However, severity categories of airflow limitation based on % predicted FEV1 or PEFR intervals were concordant in only 179 patients (59.7%). The Kappa statistic for agreement was 0.41 (95% confidence interval, 0.34–0.48), suggesting unsatisfied agreement. The calculated limits of agreement were wide (+27.1% to −28.9%). Conclusion Although the correlation between FEV1 and PEFR measurements were strongly significant, the agreement between the two tests was unsatisfied and may influence inappropriate clinical decision making

  2. Prognostic value of forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Osamu; Yamazaki, Ryo; Sano, Akiko; Yamagata, Toshiyuki; Sano, Hiroyuki; Iwanaga, Takashi; Higashimoto, Yuji; Kume, Hiroaki; Tohda, Yuji

    2016-02-01

    Emphysema on high-resolution computed tomography of the chest is the recent focus in the general practice in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). However, adequate attention has not been paid to obstructive disorder. Therefore, we retrospectively evaluated the association between the degree of airway obstruction and longevity in IPF subjects, with a hypothesis that lower forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)/forced vital capacity (FVC) has an impact on prognosis. One hundred and fourteen consecutive IPF subjects who had been diagnosed with IPF and had undergone evaluation including pulmonary function test from January 2008 to May 2013 were included in the study. The relationship between baseline data and survival was examined. FEV1/FVC was widely distributed, ranging from 48.6% to 100%. On both univariate and multivariate Cox's regression analyses, lower FEV1/FVC was significantly associated with better survival (hazard ratio of 1.07 and 1.04 and 95% confidential interval of 1.03-1.10 and 1.01-1.08, respectively). Even on analysis with backward selection, FEV1/FVC remained a significant prognostic factor. FEV1/FVC is widely distributed and negatively predicts survival in IPF. A FEV1/FVC should be assessed in "real-world" general practice. Also, the effect of smoking on the clinical course of IPF should be investigated further.

  3. Use of forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second quality criteria for determining a valid test.

    PubMed

    Hankinson, John L; Eschenbacher, Bill; Townsend, Mary; Stocks, Janet; Quanjer, Philip H

    2015-05-01

    The 2005 American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) spirometry guidelines define valid tests as having three acceptable blows and a repeatable forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). The aim of this study was to determine how reviewer and computer-determined ATS/ERS quality could affect population reference values for FVC and FEV1. Spirometry results from 7777 normal subjects aged 8-80 years (NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) III) were assigned quality grades A to F for FVC and FEV1 by a computer and one reviewer (reviewer 1). Results from a subgroup of 1466 Caucasian adults (aged 19-80 years ) were reviewed by two additional reviewers. Mean deviations from NHANES III predicted for FVC and FEV1 were examined by quality grade (A to F). Reviewer 1 rejected (D and F grade) 5.2% of the 7777 test sessions and the computer rejected ∼16%, primarily due to end-of-test (EOT) failures. Within the subgroup, the computer rejected 11.5% of the results and the three reviewers rejected 3.7-5.9%. Average FEV1 and FVC were minimally influenced by grades A to C allocated by reviewer 1. Quality assessment of individual blows including EOT assessments should primarily be used as an aid to good quality during testing rather than for subsequently disregarding data. Reconsideration of EOT criteria and its application, and improved grading standards and training in over-reading are required. Present EOT criteria results in the exclusion of too many subjects while having minimal impact on predicted values.

  4. Use of forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second quality criteria for determining a valid test.

    PubMed

    Hankinson, John L; Eschenbacher, Bill; Townsend, Mary; Stocks, Janet; Quanjer, Philip H

    2015-05-01

    The 2005 American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) spirometry guidelines define valid tests as having three acceptable blows and a repeatable forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). The aim of this study was to determine how reviewer and computer-determined ATS/ERS quality could affect population reference values for FVC and FEV1. Spirometry results from 7777 normal subjects aged 8-80 years (NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) III) were assigned quality grades A to F for FVC and FEV1 by a computer and one reviewer (reviewer 1). Results from a subgroup of 1466 Caucasian adults (aged 19-80 years ) were reviewed by two additional reviewers. Mean deviations from NHANES III predicted for FVC and FEV1 were examined by quality grade (A to F). Reviewer 1 rejected (D and F grade) 5.2% of the 7777 test sessions and the computer rejected ∼16%, primarily due to end-of-test (EOT) failures. Within the subgroup, the computer rejected 11.5% of the results and the three reviewers rejected 3.7-5.9%. Average FEV1 and FVC were minimally influenced by grades A to C allocated by reviewer 1. Quality assessment of individual blows including EOT assessments should primarily be used as an aid to good quality during testing rather than for subsequently disregarding data. Reconsideration of EOT criteria and its application, and improved grading standards and training in over-reading are required. Present EOT criteria results in the exclusion of too many subjects while having minimal impact on predicted values. PMID:25537554

  5. Use of forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second quality criteria for determining a valid test

    PubMed Central

    Eschenbacher, Bill; Townsend, Mary; Stocks, Janet; Quanjer, Philip H.

    2014-01-01

    The 2005 American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) spirometry guidelines define valid tests as having three acceptable blows and a repeatable forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). The aim of this study was to determine how reviewer and computer-determined ATS/ERS quality could affect population reference values for FVC and FEV1. Spirometry results from 7777 normal subjects aged 8–80 years (NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) III) were assigned quality grades A to F for FVC and FEV1 by a computer and one reviewer (reviewer 1). Results from a subgroup of 1466 Caucasian adults (aged 19–80 years) were reviewed by two additional reviewers. Mean deviations from NHANES III predicted for FVC and FEV1 were examined by quality grade (A to F). Reviewer 1 rejected (D and F grade) 5.2% of the 7777 test sessions and the computer rejected ∼16%, primarily due to end-of-test (EOT) failures. Within the subgroup, the computer rejected 11.5% of the results and the three reviewers rejected 3.7–5.9%. Average FEV1 and FVC were minimally influenced by grades A to C allocated by reviewer 1. Quality assessment of individual blows including EOT assessments should primarily be used as an aid to good quality during testing rather than for subsequently disregarding data. Reconsideration of EOT criteria and its application, and improved grading standards and training in over-reading are required. Present EOT criteria results in the exclusion of too many subjects while having minimal impact on predicted values. PMID:25537554

  6. An epidemiologic investigation of forced expiratory volume at 1 second and respiratory symptoms among employees of a toluene diisocyanate production plant.

    PubMed

    Olsen, G W; Shellenberger, R; Bodner, K M; Flores, G H; Emmitte, J A; Bond, G G; Saunders, J H

    1989-08-01

    Pulmonary function tests were done and compared to current and past potential exposure levels of toluene diisocyanate (TDI) for 57 TDI manufacturing workers and 89 workers not exposed to TDI or other known respiratory hazards. The average TDI plant experience was 4.1 years (standard deviation = 2.8). Routine industrial hygiene measurements have shown TDI exposure below a time-weighted average of 0.005 parts per million and a short-term exposure level of 0.02 parts per million. A certified industrial hygienist ranked department and job classification by level of potential exposure to TDI (none, low, moderate, and high). A questionnaire was administered to determine the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and smoking habits. Using backward regression analysis, cumulative pack-years of cigarette smoking and prevalence of lower respiratory symptoms were statistically significant predictors of a standardized forced expiratory volume at 1 second observed v expected difference; however, TDI exposure, whether classified as current, highest career level, cumulative, or cumulative highest-to-date, was not associated with a decline in forced expiratory volume. PMID:2547915

  7. Hand grip strength is associated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second among subjects with COPD: report from a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Strandkvist, Viktor Johansson; Backman, Helena; Röding, Jenny; Stridsman, Caroline; Lindberg, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases and skeletal muscle dysfunction are common comorbidities in COPD. Hand grip strength (HGS) is related to general muscle strength and is associated with cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality, while the results from small selected COPD populations are contradictory. The aim of this population-based study was to compare HGS among the subjects with and without COPD, to evaluate HGS in relation to COPD severity, and to evaluate the impact of heart disease. Subjects and methods Data were collected from the Obstructive Lung disease in Northern Sweden COPD study, where the subjects with and without COPD have been invited to annual examinations since 2005. In 2009–2010, 441 subjects with COPD (postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1]/vital capacity <0.70) and 570 without COPD participated in structured interviews, spirometry, and measurements of HGS. Results The mean HGS was similar when comparing subjects with and without COPD, but those with heart disease had lower HGS than those without. When compared by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) grades, the subjects with GOLD 3–4 had lower HGS than those without COPD in both sexes (females 21.4 kg vs 26.9 kg, P=0.010; males 41.5 kg vs 46.3 kg, P=0.038), and the difference persisted also when adjusted for confounders. Among the subjects with COPD, HGS was associated with FEV1% of predicted value but not heart disease when adjusted for height, age, sex, and smoking habits, and the pattern was similar among males and females. Conclusion In this population-based study, the subjects with GOLD 3–4 had lower HGS than the subjects without COPD. Among those with COPD, HGS was associated with FEV1% of predicted value but not heart disease, and the pattern was similar in both sexes. PMID:27785009

  8. Rapid decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and the development of bronchitic symptoms among new Chinese coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.L.; Wu, Z.E.; Du, Q.G.; Peng, K.L.; Ya-Dong, U.; Li, S.K.; Han, G.H.; Petsonk, E.L.

    2007-10-15

    The objective was to investigate the relationship between the development of bronchitic symptoms and the early rapid decline of forced expiratory volume in I second (FEV1). A two-stage and a mixed model approach were used to analyze data from 260 newly hired Chinese coal miners who completed approximately 5 to 16 health surveys during 3 years. The proportion of miners with onset of bronchitic symptoms was significantly elevated after 11 months of underground mining. Miners with incident symptoms had greater declines in FEV1 compared with those who did not (- 65 vs - 23 mL/yr, P < 0. 05). At 24 months follow-up, FEV1 had declined an average 235 mL among the 26 miners who developed bronchitic symptoms and smoked, compared with a decline of 96 mL among the 132 nonsmoking miners without symptoms. Conclusions: Among new coal miners, a sharp early decline in FEV1 is associated with the development of bronchitic symptoms.

  9. [Comparision of forced expiratory time, recorded by two spirometers with flow sensors of various types, and acoustic duration of tracheal forced expiratory noises].

    PubMed

    Malaeva, V V; Pochekutova, I A; Korenbaum, V I

    2015-01-01

    In the sample of 44 volunteers forced expiratory time values obtained in spirometers, equipped with flow sensor of Lilly type and turbine flow sensor, and acoustic duration of tracheal forced expiratory noises are compared. It is shown that spirometric forced expiratory time is dependent on flow sensor type. Therefore it can't be used in diagnostic aims.

  10. Reference standards for forced expiratory indices in Chinese preschool children.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ting F; Liu, Tak C; Mak, Kwok K; Su, Xuefen; Sy, Hing Y; Li, Albert M; Lau, Joseph T F; Lum, Sooky; Wong, Gary W K

    2013-11-01

    Spirometric testing is traditionally achievable in children of school-age and beyond. Incorporation of interactive incentives motivates preschool children to facilitate measurement of forced expiratory indices. Validated spirometric reference standards are available for Caucasian preschoolers but lacking in Asians. We established spirometric references in Chinese children aged 2-7 years, who were recruited from 19 randomly selected nurseries and kindergartens in Hong Kong. Parents completed International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire, and children concurrently performed incentive spirometry on-site according to international guideline. Prediction equations for spirometric indices were formulated by linear regression. One thousand four hundred two (72.9%) of 1,922 consented children, with mean (SD) age 4.4 (1.0) years, successfully performed spirometry. Following exclusions due to medical and technical reasons, 895 (63.8%) children contributed spirometric data to our references. Girls had lower FEV0.5 , FEV0.75 , FEV1 , FVC, and PEF but similar FEF25-75 than boys, adjusted for age, weight, and standing height as covariates. Standing height was the most important predictor for FEV0.5 , FEV0.75 , FEV1 , FVC, and PEF in both boys (adjusted R(2) 0.525-0.734) and girls (adjusted R(2) 0.583-0.721), whereas the best prediction model for both gender is formed by standing height, weight, and age. At various standing heights, our preschoolers had FEV1 Z-scores 0.13-1.00 higher than those of collaborative Caucasian reference. This study justifies the need for ethnic-specific reference equations and presents spirometry references in young Chinese children. Their forced expiratory indices are determined by gender, age, weight and standing height, and standing height is the best anthropometric index to predict all spirometric indices.

  11. Prediction of Spirometric Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV1) Data Using Support Vector Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavitha, A.; Sujatha, C. M.; Ramakrishnan, S.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, prediction of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) in pulmonary function test is carried out using the spirometer and support vector regression analysis. Pulmonary function data are measured with flow volume spirometer from volunteers (N=175) using a standard data acquisition protocol. The acquired data are then used to predict FEV1. Support vector machines with polynomial kernel function with four different orders were employed to predict the values of FEV1. The performance is evaluated by computing the average prediction accuracy for normal and abnormal cases. Results show that support vector machines are capable of predicting FEV1 in both normal and abnormal cases and the average prediction accuracy for normal subjects was higher than that of abnormal subjects. Accuracy in prediction was found to be high for a regularization constant of C=10. Since FEV1 is the most significant parameter in the analysis of spirometric data, it appears that this method of assessment is useful in diagnosing the pulmonary abnormalities with incomplete data and data with poor recording.

  12. THE EFFECT OF SUBMAXIMAL INHALATION ON MEASURES DERIVED FROM FORCED EXPIRATORY SPIROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE EFFECT OF SUBMAXIMAL INHALATION ON MEASURES DERIVED FROM FORCED EXPIRATORY SPIROMETRY. William F. McDonnell Human Studies Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, RTP, NC 27711.
    Short-term exposure to ozone results in a neurally-mediated decrease in the ab...

  13. Low forced expiratory volume is associated with earlier death in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Kassim, Adetola A; Payne, Amanda B; Rodeghier, Mark; Macklin, Eric A; Strunk, Robert C; DeBaun, Michael R

    2015-09-24

    Pulmonary complications result in mortality in adults with sickle cell anemia (SCA). We tested the hypothesis that abnormal pulmonary function was associated with earlier death. A prospective cohort of adults with SCA, followed in the Cooperative Study for Sickle Cell Disease, was constructed using the first pulmonary function test at >21 years of age. Spirometry measures: forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), forced vital capacity, and total lung capacity were categorized based on age, gender, height, and race. Pulmonary function patterns were categorized based on the American Thoracic Society guidelines using both spirometry and lung volumes. A cohort of 430 adults with SCA, mean age 32.6 ± 9.5 (range, 21.0-67.8) years at time of first pulmonary function test, and a median follow-up of 5.5 years, was evaluated. A total of 63 deaths occurred. At baseline, 47% had normal, 29% restrictive, 8% obstructive, 2% mixed, and 14% nonspecific lung function patterns. In the final multivariable model, lower FEV1 percent predicted was associated with increased hazard ratio of death (HR per % predicted 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00-1.04; P = .037), as was older age (HR 1.07; 95% CI 1.04-1.10; P < .001), male sex (HR 2.09; 95% CI 1.20-3.65; P = .010), higher lactate dehydrogenase levels (HR per mg/dL 1.002; 95% CI 1.00-1.003; P = .015), and higher acute chest syndrome incidence rate (HR per event/year 10.4; 95% CI 3.11-34.8; P < .001). Presence of obstructive (HR 1.18; 95% CI: 0.44-3.20; P = .740) and restrictive (HR 1.31; 95% CI: 0.64-2.32; P = .557) pulmonary function patterns were not associated with earlier death. Understanding the pathophysiology of a low FEV1 percent predicted in individuals with SCA is warranted, enabling early intervention for those at risk. PMID:26261241

  14. The association of forced expiratory volume in one second and forced expiratory flow at 50% of the vital capacity, peak expiratory flow parameters, and blood eosinophil counts in exercise-induced bronchospasm in children with mild asthma

    PubMed Central

    Tahan, Fulya; Gungor, Hatice Eke

    2015-01-01

    Background Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), which describes acute airway narrowing that occurs as a result of exercise, is associated with eosinophilic airway inflammation, bronchial hyperresponsiveness. The forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) is the most commonly used spirometric test in the diagnosis of EIB in exercise challenge in asthma. Other parameters such as forced expiratory flow at 50% of the vital capacity (FEF50%) and peak expiratory flow (PEF) are used less often in the diagnosis of EIB. Objective The purpose of this study is to evaluate the association of FEV1 and FEF50%, PEF parameters, blood eosinophil counts in EIB in children with mild asthma. Methods Sixty-seven children (male: 39, female: 28) with mild asthma were included in this study. Pulmonary functions were assessed before and at 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 minutes after exercise. The values of spirometric FEV1, FEF50%, PEF, and blood eosinophil counts were evaluated in EIB in children with mild asthma. Results There was a positive correlation between FEV1 with FEF50% and PEF values (p<0.05; FEF50%, r=0.68; PEF, r=0.65). Also, a positive correlation was found between blood eosinophil counts and the values of spirometric FEV1, FEF50%, and PEF (p<0.05; FEV1, r=0.54; FEF50%, r=0.42; PEF, r=0.26). In addition to these correlations, in the exercise negative group for FEV1, the FEF50% and PEF values decreased more than the cutoff values in 3, and 2 patients, respectively. Conclusion According to the presented study, eosinophil may play a major role in the severity of EIB in mild asthma. FEF50% and PEF values can decrease in response to exercise without changes in FEV1 in mild asthmatic patients. PMID:25938074

  15. Association of the forced oscillation technique with negative expiratory pressure in COPD.

    PubMed

    Akita, Takefumi; Shirai, Toshihiro; Mori, Kazutaka; Shimoda, Yukiko; Suzuki, Takahito; Hayashi, Ichiro; Noguchi, Rie; Mochizuki, Eisuke; Sakurai, Shogo; Saigusa, Mika; Akamatsu, Taisuke; Yamamoto, Akito; Shishido, Yuichiro; Morita, Satoru; Asada, Kazuhiro; Suda, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    Expiratory flow limitation (EFL) during tidal breathing is common in patients with severe COPD, and a major determinant of dynamic hyperinflation and exercise limitation. The negative expiratory pressure (NEP) technique has been the gold standard to detect EFL, while the forced oscillation technique (FOT) has also been reported to detect it. However, the association of FOT with NEP is not fully understood. We assessed whether broadband frequency FOT would predict the presence of EFL measured by NEP. FOT, NEP, and spirometry were performed in 51 patients with COPD. The extent of emphysema was measured by high-resolution computed tomography and scored. Fifteen patients were classified into the EFL-positive group and 36 into the EFL-negative group. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, EFL was independently predicted by emphysema score, forced vital capacity, and whole-breath respiratory system reactance at 5Hz (X5). The receiver operator characteristic curve analysis revealed that inspiratory X5 best predicted EFL-positivity. X5-related forced oscillatory parameters are useful for detecting EFL in the management of COPD.

  16. Association of the forced oscillation technique with negative expiratory pressure in COPD.

    PubMed

    Akita, Takefumi; Shirai, Toshihiro; Mori, Kazutaka; Shimoda, Yukiko; Suzuki, Takahito; Hayashi, Ichiro; Noguchi, Rie; Mochizuki, Eisuke; Sakurai, Shogo; Saigusa, Mika; Akamatsu, Taisuke; Yamamoto, Akito; Shishido, Yuichiro; Morita, Satoru; Asada, Kazuhiro; Suda, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    Expiratory flow limitation (EFL) during tidal breathing is common in patients with severe COPD, and a major determinant of dynamic hyperinflation and exercise limitation. The negative expiratory pressure (NEP) technique has been the gold standard to detect EFL, while the forced oscillation technique (FOT) has also been reported to detect it. However, the association of FOT with NEP is not fully understood. We assessed whether broadband frequency FOT would predict the presence of EFL measured by NEP. FOT, NEP, and spirometry were performed in 51 patients with COPD. The extent of emphysema was measured by high-resolution computed tomography and scored. Fifteen patients were classified into the EFL-positive group and 36 into the EFL-negative group. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, EFL was independently predicted by emphysema score, forced vital capacity, and whole-breath respiratory system reactance at 5Hz (X5). The receiver operator characteristic curve analysis revealed that inspiratory X5 best predicted EFL-positivity. X5-related forced oscillatory parameters are useful for detecting EFL in the management of COPD. PMID:26369446

  17. Effect of airway inflation pressure on forced expiratory maneuvers from raised lung volume in infants.

    PubMed

    Lum, Sooky; Hoo, Ah-Fong; Stocks, Janet

    2002-02-01

    The raised lung volume technique is increasingly used to measure forced expiratory maneuvers in infants. However, there is no consensus regarding the optimal airway inflation pressure (P(inf)) required for such maneuvers, or the influence of small changes in P(inf) within and between infants. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of small differences (0.2-0.3 kPa) in P(inf) on forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expired volume in 0.5 sec (FEV(0.5)), and forced expired flow at 75% of vital capacity (FEF(75)), all derived from the raised volume rapid thoraco-abdominal compression (RVRTC) technique. Randomized paired forced expiratory maneuvers were obtained in 32 healthy infants ( 3.9-39.3 weeks old, 3.8-9.9 kg) with the safety pressure relief valve for P(inf) set to 2.7 kPa or 3.0 kPa (27 or 30 cm H(2)0). When mean (SD) P(inf) was increased by 8.4 (2.8)%, there was a significant (P < 0.01) increase in mean (SD) FVC, FEV(0.5), and FEF(75) by 5.8 (5.7)%, 6.1 (6)%, and 8.3 (16.2)%, respectively. In conclusion, relatively small differences in P(inf) will result in significant differences in FVC, FEV(0.5), and FEF(75) by RVRTC technique. Precision in setting and reporting the applied P(inf) is therefore essential, particularly if data are to be compared between centers.

  18. Effects of selection in a prospective study of forced expiratory volume in Vermont granite workers.

    PubMed

    Eisen, E A; Wegman, D H; Louis, T A

    1983-10-01

    Granite workers lost to follow-up during a 5-yr study of pulmonary function were examined. We found that in workers who had left the industry for other employment, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) values declined at a faster rate than in those who remained employed or retired during the study period. We investigated the application of a currently recommended repeatability criterion for pulmonary function tests by looking at different patterns of failing to satisfy the criterion (PFT-failure) over multiple testing sessions. Workers with persistent PFT-failure were found to have faster rates of FEV1 decline than did subjects with none or only intermittent failures. In a regression analysis, job termination was found to be more strongly associated with a steep FEV1 slope when it had been preceded by a pattern of persistent PFT-failure.

  19. Low forced expiratory flow rates and forceful exhalation as a cause for arterial gas embolism during submarine escape training: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hartge, Francis J; Bennett, Thomas L

    2015-01-01

    A 26-year-old male U.S. Navy submariner suffered an arterial gas embolism during pressurized submarine escape training. Routine pretraining medical screening revealed no history of asthma, pneumothorax or recent respiratory infection. Pulmonary function testing and posterioranterior/lateral chest X-ray were normal. He forcefully exhaled at the start of his ascent and developed neurological abnormalities including lightheadedness with lower extremity weakness and paresthesias after surfacing. He fully recovered after a U.S. Navy Treatment Table 6. This case represents the first report of an arterial gas embolism since the U.S. Navy resumed pressurized submarine escape training utilizing the Submarine Escape and Immersion Equipment suit. We discuss possible contributing factors and propose that his AGE was caused by pulmonary barotrauma due to a combination of low forced expiratory flow rates and an overly forceful exhalation during his ascent. PMID:26591983

  20. Annual decline in forced expiratory volume is steeper in aluminum potroom workers than in workers without exposure to potroom fumes

    PubMed Central

    Henneberger, Paul K.; Einvik, Gunnar; Virji, Mohammed Abbas; Bakke, Berit; Kongerud, Johny

    2016-01-01

    Background Aluminum potroom exposure is associated with increased mortality of COPD but the association between potroom exposure and annual decline in lung function is unknown. We have measured lung volumes annually using spirometry from 1986 to 1996. The objective was to compare annual decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (dFEV1) and forced vital capacity (dFVC). Methods The number of aluminum potroom workers was 4,546 (81% males) and the number of workers in the reference group was 651 (76% males). The number of spirometries in the index group and the references were 24,060 and 2,243, respectively. Results After adjustment for confounders, the difference in dFEV1 and dFVC between the index and reference groups were 13.5 (P < 0.001) and −8.0 (P = 0.060) ml/year. Conclusion Aluminum potroom operators have increased annual decline in FEV1 relative to a comparable group with non‐exposure to potroom fumes and gases. Am. J. Ind. Med. 59:322–329, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Industrial Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26853811

  1. Pulmonary function tests (maximum inspiratory pressure, maximum expiratory pressure, vital capacity, forced vital capacity) predict ventilator use in late-onset Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Erin M; Roberts, Mark; Mozaffar, Tahseen; Young, Peter; Quartel, Adrian; Berger, Kenneth I

    2016-02-01

    In patients with Late-Onset Pompe Disease (LOPD), progressive respiratory muscle involvement leads to reduced pulmonary function, with respiratory failure the most common cause of mortality. Early disease manifestations include sleep-disordered breathing, which can be treated with non-invasive ventilation; however, progressive diurnal deficits can require invasive ventilation. To determine if pulmonary function tests (PFTs) predict the thresholds for ventilation and wheelchair use, a systematic literature review identified cross-sectional clinical patient data (N = 174) that was classified into ventilation and wheelchair cohorts. PFTs included maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP), maximum expiratory pressure (MEP), forced vital capacity (FVC), and vital capacity (VC), with vital capacities measured in the upright (-U) and supine (-S) positions. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to calculate cut-points (CP) and area under the curve (AUC). For all ventilation and mobility thresholds tested, ROC analyses demonstrated AUC values from 86-89% for MIP, 72-96% for MEP, and 74-96% for all vital capacity metrics. Thus, PFTs are useful in predicting the thresholds for nighttime ventilation, daytime ventilation, and wheelchair use, with MIP and VC-U having both high AUC values and consistency. The PFT mobility CPs were low (MIP CP = 0.9 kPa, MEP, CP = 2.6 kPa, VC-U CP = 19% predicted), suggesting an endurance component associated with wheelchair use.

  2. Pulmonary function tests (maximum inspiratory pressure, maximum expiratory pressure, vital capacity, forced vital capacity) predict ventilator use in late-onset Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Erin M; Roberts, Mark; Mozaffar, Tahseen; Young, Peter; Quartel, Adrian; Berger, Kenneth I

    2016-02-01

    In patients with Late-Onset Pompe Disease (LOPD), progressive respiratory muscle involvement leads to reduced pulmonary function, with respiratory failure the most common cause of mortality. Early disease manifestations include sleep-disordered breathing, which can be treated with non-invasive ventilation; however, progressive diurnal deficits can require invasive ventilation. To determine if pulmonary function tests (PFTs) predict the thresholds for ventilation and wheelchair use, a systematic literature review identified cross-sectional clinical patient data (N = 174) that was classified into ventilation and wheelchair cohorts. PFTs included maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP), maximum expiratory pressure (MEP), forced vital capacity (FVC), and vital capacity (VC), with vital capacities measured in the upright (-U) and supine (-S) positions. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to calculate cut-points (CP) and area under the curve (AUC). For all ventilation and mobility thresholds tested, ROC analyses demonstrated AUC values from 86-89% for MIP, 72-96% for MEP, and 74-96% for all vital capacity metrics. Thus, PFTs are useful in predicting the thresholds for nighttime ventilation, daytime ventilation, and wheelchair use, with MIP and VC-U having both high AUC values and consistency. The PFT mobility CPs were low (MIP CP = 0.9 kPa, MEP, CP = 2.6 kPa, VC-U CP = 19% predicted), suggesting an endurance component associated with wheelchair use. PMID:26794303

  3. Expiratory flow limitation relates to symptoms during COPD exacerbations requiring hospital admission

    PubMed Central

    Jetmalani, Kanika; Timmins, Sophie; Brown, Nathan J; Diba, Chantale; Berend, Norbert; Salome, Cheryl M; Wen, Fu-Qiang; Chen, Peng; King, Gregory G; Farah, Claude S

    2015-01-01

    Background Expiratory flow limitation (EFL) is seen in some patients presenting with a COPD exacerbation; however, it is unclear how EFL relates to the clinical features of the exacerbation. We hypothesized that EFL when present contributes to symptoms and duration of recovery during a COPD exacerbation. Our aim was to compare changes in EFL with symptoms in subjects with and without flow-limited breathing admitted for a COPD exacerbation. Subjects and methods A total of 29 subjects with COPD were recruited within 48 hours of admission to West China Hospital for an acute exacerbation. Daily measurements of post-bronchodilator spirometry, resistance, and reactance using the forced oscillation technique and symptom (Borg) scores until discharge were made. Flow-limited breathing was defined as the difference between inspiratory and expiratory respiratory system reactance (EFL index) greater than 2.8 cmH2O·s·L−1. The physiological predictors of symptoms during recovery were determined by mixed-effect analysis. Results Nine subjects (31%) had flow-limited breathing on admission despite similar spirometry compared to subjects without flow-limited breathing. Spirometry and resistance measures did not change between enrolment and discharge. EFL index values improved in subjects with flow-limited breathing on admission, with resolution in four patients. In subjects with flow-limited breathing on admission, symptoms were related to inspiratory resistance and EFL index values. In subjects without flow-limited breathing, symptoms related to forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity. In the whole cohort, EFL index values at admission was related to duration of stay (Rs=0.4, P=0.03). Conclusion The presence of flow-limited breathing as well as abnormal respiratory system mechanics contribute independently to symptoms during COPD exacerbations. PMID:25999709

  4. Effect of expiratory muscle strength training on elderly cough function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaeock; Davenport, Paul; Sapienza, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Age-related loss of muscle strength, known as sarcopenia, in the expiratory muscles, along with reductions in lung elastic recoil and chest wall compliance decreases the intrathoacic airway pressure as well as expiratory flow rates and velocity, greatly impacting an elderly person's ability to generate the forces essential for cough. This study examined the effects of a 4-week expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) program on maximum expiratory pressure (MEP) and cough function in 18 healthy but sedentary elderly adults. MEP significantly increased after the EMST program from 77.14+/-20.20 to 110.83+/-26.11cmH(2)O. Parameters measured during reflexive coughs produced by capsaicin challenge, indicated that compression phase duration significantly decreased (from 0.35+/-0.19 to 0.16+/-0.17s), peak expiratory flow rate decreased (from 4.98+/-2.18 to 8.00+/-3.05l/s) and post-peak plateau integral amplitude significantly increased (from 3.49+/-2.46 to 6.83+/-4.16l/ss) with the EMST program. EMST seems to be an effective program to increase the expiratory muscle strength in the sedentary elderly, which contribute to an enhanced cough function. PMID:18457885

  5. Maximal expiratory flow volume curve in quarry workers.

    PubMed

    Subhashini, Arcot Sadagopa; Satchidhanandam, Natesa

    2002-01-01

    Maximal Expiratory Flow Volume (MEFV) curves were recorded with a computerized Spirometer (Med Spiror). Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), Forced Expiratory Volumes (FEV), mean and maximal flow rates were obtained in 25 quarry workers who were free from respiratory disorders and 20 healthy control subjects. All the functional values are lower in quarry workers than in the control subject, the largest reduction in quarry workers with a work duration of over 15 years, especially for FEF75. The effects are probably due to smoking rather than dust exposure.

  6. Modeling expiratory flow from excised tracheal tube laws.

    PubMed

    Aljuri, N; Freitag, L; Venegas, J G

    1999-11-01

    Flow limitation during forced exhalation and gas trapping during high-frequency ventilation are affected by upstream viscous losses and by the relationship between transmural pressure (Ptm) and cross-sectional area (A(tr)) of the airways, i.e., tube law (TL). Our objective was to test the validity of a simple lumped-parameter model of expiratory flow limitation, including the measured TL, static pressure recovery, and upstream viscous losses. To accomplish this objective, we assessed the TLs of various excised animal tracheae in controlled conditions of quasi-static (no flow) and steady forced expiratory flow. A(tr) was measured from digitized images of inner tracheal walls delineated by transillumination at an axial location defining the minimal area during forced expiratory flow. Tracheal TLs followed closely the exponential form proposed by Shapiro (A. H. Shapiro. J. Biomech. Eng. 99: 126-147, 1977) for elastic tubes: Ptm = K(p) [(A(tr)/A(tr0))(-n) - 1], where A(tr0) is A(tr) at Ptm = 0 and K(p) is a parametric factor related to the stiffness of the tube wall. Using these TLs, we found that the simple model of expiratory flow limitation described well the experimental data. Independent of upstream resistance, all tracheae with an exponent n < 2 experienced flow limitation, whereas a trachea with n > 2 did not. Upstream viscous losses, as expected, reduced maximal expiratory flow. The TL measured under steady-flow conditions was stiffer than that measured under expiratory no-flow conditions, only if a significant static pressure recovery from the choke point to atmosphere was assumed in the measurement.

  7. Physiological techniques for detecting expiratory flow limitation during tidal breathing.

    PubMed

    Koulouris, N G; Hardavella, G

    2011-09-01

    Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) often exhale along the same flow-volume curve during quiet breathing as they do during the forced expiratory vital capacity manoeuvre, and this has been taken as an indicator of expiratory flow limitation at rest (EFL(T)). Therefore, EFL(T), namely attainment of maximal expiratory flow during tidal expiration, occurs when an increase in transpulmonary pressure causes no increase in expiratory flow. EFL(T) leads to small airway injury and promotes dynamic pulmonary hyperinflation, with concurrent dyspnoea and exercise limitation. In fact, EFL(T) occurs commonly in COPD patients (mainly in Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease III and IV stage), in whom the latter symptoms are common, but is not exclusive to COPD, since it can also be detected in other pulmonary and nonpulmonary diseases like asthma, acute respiratory distress syndrome, heart failure and obesity, etc. The existing up to date physiological techniques of assessing EFL(T) are reviewed in the present work. Among the currently available techniques, the negative expiratory pressure has been validated in a wide variety of settings and disorders. Consequently, it should be regarded as a simple, noninvasive, practical and accurate new technique.

  8. Physiological techniques for detecting expiratory flow limitation during tidal breathing.

    PubMed

    Koulouris, N G; Hardavella, G

    2011-09-01

    Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) often exhale along the same flow-volume curve during quiet breathing as they do during the forced expiratory vital capacity manoeuvre, and this has been taken as an indicator of expiratory flow limitation at rest (EFL(T)). Therefore, EFL(T), namely attainment of maximal expiratory flow during tidal expiration, occurs when an increase in transpulmonary pressure causes no increase in expiratory flow. EFL(T) leads to small airway injury and promotes dynamic pulmonary hyperinflation, with concurrent dyspnoea and exercise limitation. In fact, EFL(T) occurs commonly in COPD patients (mainly in Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease III and IV stage), in whom the latter symptoms are common, but is not exclusive to COPD, since it can also be detected in other pulmonary and nonpulmonary diseases like asthma, acute respiratory distress syndrome, heart failure and obesity, etc. The existing up to date physiological techniques of assessing EFL(T) are reviewed in the present work. Among the currently available techniques, the negative expiratory pressure has been validated in a wide variety of settings and disorders. Consequently, it should be regarded as a simple, noninvasive, practical and accurate new technique. PMID:21881143

  9. Methods for Assessing Expiratory Flow Limitation during Tidal Breathing in COPD Patients.

    PubMed

    Koulouris, Nickolaos G; Kaltsakas, Georgios; Palamidas, Anastasios F; Gennimata, Sofia-Antiopi

    2012-01-01

    Patients with severe COPD often exhale along the same flow-volume curve during quite breathing as during forced expiratory vital capacity manoeuvre, and this has been taken as indicating expiratory flow limitation at rest (EFL(T)). Therefore, EFL(T), namely, attainment of maximal expiratory flow during tidal expiration, occurs when an increase in transpulmonary pressure causes no increase in expiratory flow. EFL(T) leads to small airway injury and promotes dynamic pulmonary hyperinflation with concurrent dyspnoea and exercise limitation. In fact, EFL(T) occurs commonly in COPD patients (mainly in GOLD III and IV stage) in whom the latter symptoms are common. The existing up-to-date physiological methods for assessing expiratory flow limitation (EFL(T)) are reviewed in the present work. Among the currently available techniques, the negative expiratory pressure (NEP) has been validated in a wide variety of settings and disorders. Consequently, it should be regarded as a simple, non invasive, most practical, and accurate new technique.

  10. Methods for Assessing Expiratory Flow Limitation during Tidal Breathing in COPD Patients.

    PubMed

    Koulouris, Nickolaos G; Kaltsakas, Georgios; Palamidas, Anastasios F; Gennimata, Sofia-Antiopi

    2012-01-01

    Patients with severe COPD often exhale along the same flow-volume curve during quite breathing as during forced expiratory vital capacity manoeuvre, and this has been taken as indicating expiratory flow limitation at rest (EFL(T)). Therefore, EFL(T), namely, attainment of maximal expiratory flow during tidal expiration, occurs when an increase in transpulmonary pressure causes no increase in expiratory flow. EFL(T) leads to small airway injury and promotes dynamic pulmonary hyperinflation with concurrent dyspnoea and exercise limitation. In fact, EFL(T) occurs commonly in COPD patients (mainly in GOLD III and IV stage) in whom the latter symptoms are common. The existing up-to-date physiological methods for assessing expiratory flow limitation (EFL(T)) are reviewed in the present work. Among the currently available techniques, the negative expiratory pressure (NEP) has been validated in a wide variety of settings and disorders. Consequently, it should be regarded as a simple, non invasive, most practical, and accurate new technique. PMID:23008769

  11. Expiratory muscle endurance in middle-aged healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Orozco-Levi, M; Gea, J; Ferrer, A; Mendez, R; Ramírez-Sarmiento, A; Maldonado, D; Broquetas, J

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate expiratory muscle endurance in middle-aged healthy subjects using incremental as well as constant expiratory loads, 14 healthy volunteers (51 +/- 16 years) were submitted to a specific endurance test, which was performed breathing against a threshold valve, and was divided into two parts. In part I, the load was progressively increased (50 g each 2 min) until task failure occurred. The mean mouth pressure generated against the highest load held for at least 60 sec was defined as the maximal expiratory sustainable pressure (Pth(max)). In part II, each subject breathed against a constant submaximal expiratory load (80% Pth(max)) until task failure occurred (expiratory endurance time or Tth(80)). Both parts of the test were repeated 24-48 h later. Progressive expiratory loading induced a linear increase in mouth expiratory pressure and the Pth(max) obtained was 141 +/- 43 cm H(2)O, representing 74 +/- 28% of the maximal expiratory pressure (PE(max)). Under constant loads, the Tth(80) was 17 +/- 9 min. At the end-point of both parts, the tension time index for expiratory muscles was dramatically increased (>0.25), and both EMG central frequency and PE(max) were decreased with no changes in maximal inspiratory pressure or inspiratory capacity. Extreme dyspnea was present in most of the subjects but no complications were observed. The endurance of expiratory muscles can be easily assessed in healthy subjects using this method, which has acceptable reproducibility and tolerance. PMID:11733852

  12. Volumetric expiratory high-resolution CT of the lung.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Mizuki; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2004-11-01

    We developed a volumetric expiratory high-resolution CT (HRCT) protocol that provides combined inspiratory and expiratory volumetric imaging of the lung without increasing radiation exposure, and conducted a preliminary feasibility assessment of this protocol to evaluate diffuse lung disease with small airway abnormalities. The volumetric expiratory high-resolution CT increased the detectability of the conducting airway to the areas of air trapping (P<0.0001), and added significant information about extent and distribution of air trapping (P<0.0001).

  13. Effects of forward head posture on forced vital capacity and respiratory muscles activity.

    PubMed

    Han, Jintae; Park, Soojin; Kim, Youngju; Choi, Yeonsung; Lyu, Hyeonnam

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of forward head posture on forced vital capacity and deep breathing. [Subjects] Twenty-six subjects, divided into the two groups (normal and forward head posture groups), participated in this study. [Methods] Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second were measured using respiratory function instrumentation that met the American Thoracic Society's recommendation for diagnostic spirometry. Accessory respiratory muscle activity during deep breathing was measured by electromyography. A Mann-Whitney test was used to compare the measure variables between the normal and forward head posture group. [Results] Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second were significantly lower in the forward head posture group than in the normal group. Accessory respiratory muscle activity was also lower in the forward head posture group than in the normal group. In particular, the sternocleidomastoid and pectoralis major activity of the forward head posture group was significantly lower than that of normal group. Activities of the other muscles were generally decreased with forward head posture, but were not significantly different between the two groups. [Conclusion] These results indicate that forward head posture could reduce vital capacity, possibly because of weakness or disharmony of the accessory respiratory muscles.

  14. Expiratory muscle control during vomiting - Role of brain stem expiratory neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. D.; Tan, L. K.

    1987-01-01

    The neural mechanisms controlling the muscles involved during vomiting were examined using decerebrated cats. In one experiment, the activity of the ventral respiratory group (VRG) expiratory (E) neurons was recorded during induced 'fictive vomiting' (i.e., a series of bursts of coactivation of abdominal and phrenic nerves that would be expected to produce expulsion in unparalyzed animals) and vomiting. In a second, abdominal muscle electromyographic and nerve activity were compared before and after sectioning the axons of descending VRG E neurons as they cross the midline between C1 and the obex (the procedure that is known to abolish expiratory modulation of internal intercostal muscle activity). The results of the study indicate that the abdominal muscles are controlled differently during respiration and vomiting.

  15. Effect of Training Frequency on Maximum Expiratory Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anand, Supraja; El-Bashiti, Nour; Sapienza, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effects of expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) frequency on maximum expiratory pressure (MEP). Method: We assigned 12 healthy participants to 2 groups of training frequency (3 days per week and 5 days per week). They completed a 4-week training program on an EMST trainer (Aspire Products, LLC). MEP was the primary…

  16. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  17. Effects of expiratory resistive loading on the sensation of dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Chonan, T; Altose, M D; Cherniack, N S

    1990-07-01

    To determine whether an increase in expiratory motor output accentuates the sensation of dyspnea (difficulty in breathing), the following experiments were undertaken. Ten normal subjects, in a series of 2-min trials, breathed freely (level I) or maintained a target tidal volume equal to (level II) or twice the control (level III) at a breathing frequency of 15/min (similar to the control frequency) with an inspiratory load, an expiratory load, and without loads under hyperoxic normocapnia. In tests at levels II and III, end-expiratory lung volume was maintained at functional residual capacity. A linear resistance of 25 cmH2O.1(-1).s was used for both inspiratory and expiratory loading; peak mouth pressure (Pm) was measured, and the intensity of dyspnea (psi) was assessed with a visual analog scale. The sensation of dyspnea increased significantly with the magnitude of expiratory Pm during expiratory loading (level II: Pm = 9.4 +/- 1.5 (SE) cmH2O, psi = 1.26 +/- 0.35; level III: Pm = 20.3 +/- 2.8 cmH2O, psi = 2.22 +/- 0.48) and with inspiratory Pm during inspiratory loading (level II: Pm = 9.7 +/- 1.2 cmH2O, psi = 1.35 +/- 0.38; level III: Pm = 23.9 +/- 3.0 cmH2O, psi = 2.69 +/- 0.60). However, at each level of breathing, neither the intensity of dyspnea nor the magnitude of peak Pm during loading was different between inspiratory and expiratory loading. The augmentation of dyspnea during expiratory loading was not explained simply by increases in inspiratory activity. The results indicate that heightened expiratory as well as inspiratory motor output causes comparable increases in the sensation of difficulty in breathing.

  18. Tidal expiratory flow limitation, dyspnoea and exercise capacity in patients with bilateral bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Koulouris, N G; Retsou, S; Kosmas, E; Dimakou, K; Malagari, K; Mantzikopoulos, G; Koutsoukou, A; Milic-Emili, J; Jordanoglou, J

    2003-05-01

    In this study the authors investigated whether expiratory flow limitation (FL) is present during tidal breathing in patients with bilateral bronchiectasis (BB) and whether it is related to the severity of chronic dyspnoea (Medical Research Council (MRC) dyspnoea scale), exercise capacity (maximal mechanical power output (WRmax)) and severity of the disease, as assessed by high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scoring. Lung function, MRC dyspnoea, HRCT score, WRmax and FL were assessed in 23 stable caucasian patients (six males) aged 56 +/- 17 yrs. FL was assessed at rest both in seated and supine positions. To detect FL, the negative expiratory pressure (NEP) technique was used. The degree of FL was rated using a five-point FL score. WRmax was measured using a cyclo-ergometer. According to the NEP technique, five patients were FL during resting breathing when supine but not seated, four were FL both seated and supine, and 14 were NFL both seated and supine. Furthermore, it was shown that: 1) in stable BB patients FL during resting breathing is common, especially in the supine position; 2) the degree of MRC dyspnoea is closely related to the five-point FL score; 3) WRmax (% pred) is more closely correlated with the MRC dyspnoea score than with the five-point FL score; and 4) HRCT score is closely related to forced expiratory volume in one second % pred but not five-point FL score. In conclusion, flow limitation is common at rest in sitting and supine positions in patients with bilateral bronchiectasis. Flow limitation and reduced exercise capacity are both associated with more severe dyspnoea. Finally, high-resolution computed tomography scoring correlates best with forced expiratory volume in one second.

  19. REPORTING PEAK EXPIRATORY FLOW IN OLDER PERSONS

    PubMed Central

    Vaz Fragoso, Carlos A.; Gahbauer, Evelyne A.; Van Ness, Peter H.; Gill, Thomas M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Peak expiratory flow (“peak flow”) predicts important outcomes in older persons. Nevertheless, its clinical application is uncertain because prior strategies for reporting peak flow may not be valid. We thus determined the frequency distribution of peak flow by the conventional strategy of percent predicted (%predicted) and by an alternative method termed standardized residual (SR) percentile, and evaluated how these two metrics relate to health status in older persons. Methods Participants included 754 community-living persons aged ≥ 70 years. Data included chronic conditions, frailty indicators, and peak flow. Results Mean age was 78.4 years, with 63.7% reporting a smoking history, 17.4% chronic lung disease, and 77.1% having one or more frailty indicators. Peak flow ≥ 80 %predicted was recorded in 67.5% of participants, whereas peak flow ≥ 80th SR-percentile was only noted in 15.9%. A graded relationship was observed between peak flow and health status, but %predicted yielded health risk at peak flows currently considered normal (80–100 %predicted), whereas SR-percentile conferred health risk only at severely reduced peak flows (< 50th SR-percentile). Conclusions Peak flow expressed as SR-percentile attains a frequency distribution more consistent with the characteristics of our elderly cohort, and establishes health risk at more appropriate levels of reduced peak flow. These findings establish the need for longitudinal studies based on SR-percentile to further evaluate the use of peak flow as a risk assessment tool in older persons, and to determine if pulmonary function, in general, is better reported in older persons as SR-percentile, rather than as %predicted. PMID:17921429

  20. Expiratory muscle fatigue does not regulate operating lung volumes during high-intensity exercise in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Bryan J; How, Stephen C; Romer, Lee M

    2013-06-01

    To determine whether expiratory muscle fatigue (EMF) is involved in regulating operating lung volumes during exercise, nine recreationally active subjects cycled at 90% of peak work rate to the limit of tolerance with prior induction of EMF (EMF-ex) and for a time equal to that achieved in EMF-ex without prior induction of EMF (ISO-ex). EMF was assessed by measuring changes in magnetically evoked gastric twitch pressure. Changes in end-expiratory and end-inspiratory lung volume (EELV and EILV) and the degree of expiratory flow limitation (EFL) were quantified using maximal expiratory flow-volume curves and inspiratory capacity maneuvers. Resistive breathing reduced gastric twitch pressure (-24 ± 14%, P = 0.004). During EMF-ex, EELV decreased from rest to the 3rd min of exercise [39 ± 8 vs. 27 ± 7% of forced vital capacity (FVC), P = 0.001] before increasing toward baseline (34 ± 8% of FVC end exercise, P = 0.073 vs. rest). EILV increased from rest to the 3rd min of exercise (54 ± 8 vs. 84 ± 9% of FVC, P = 0.006) and remained elevated to end exercise (88 ± 9% of FVC). Neither EELV (P = 0.18) nor EILV (P = 0.26) was different at any time point during EMF-ex vs. ISO-ex. Four subjects became expiratory flow limited during the final minute of EMF-ex and ISO-ex; the degree of EFL was not different between trials (37 ± 18 vs. 35 ± 16% of tidal volume, P = 0.38). At end exercise in both trials, EELV was greater in subjects without vs. subjects with EFL. These findings suggest that 1) contractile fatigue of the expiratory muscles in healthy humans does not regulate operating lung volumes during high-intensity sustained cycle exercise; and 2) factors other than "frank" EFL cause the terminal increase in EELV.

  1. Expiratory muscle fatigue does not regulate operating lung volumes during high-intensity exercise in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Bryan J; How, Stephen C; Romer, Lee M

    2013-06-01

    To determine whether expiratory muscle fatigue (EMF) is involved in regulating operating lung volumes during exercise, nine recreationally active subjects cycled at 90% of peak work rate to the limit of tolerance with prior induction of EMF (EMF-ex) and for a time equal to that achieved in EMF-ex without prior induction of EMF (ISO-ex). EMF was assessed by measuring changes in magnetically evoked gastric twitch pressure. Changes in end-expiratory and end-inspiratory lung volume (EELV and EILV) and the degree of expiratory flow limitation (EFL) were quantified using maximal expiratory flow-volume curves and inspiratory capacity maneuvers. Resistive breathing reduced gastric twitch pressure (-24 ± 14%, P = 0.004). During EMF-ex, EELV decreased from rest to the 3rd min of exercise [39 ± 8 vs. 27 ± 7% of forced vital capacity (FVC), P = 0.001] before increasing toward baseline (34 ± 8% of FVC end exercise, P = 0.073 vs. rest). EILV increased from rest to the 3rd min of exercise (54 ± 8 vs. 84 ± 9% of FVC, P = 0.006) and remained elevated to end exercise (88 ± 9% of FVC). Neither EELV (P = 0.18) nor EILV (P = 0.26) was different at any time point during EMF-ex vs. ISO-ex. Four subjects became expiratory flow limited during the final minute of EMF-ex and ISO-ex; the degree of EFL was not different between trials (37 ± 18 vs. 35 ± 16% of tidal volume, P = 0.38). At end exercise in both trials, EELV was greater in subjects without vs. subjects with EFL. These findings suggest that 1) contractile fatigue of the expiratory muscles in healthy humans does not regulate operating lung volumes during high-intensity sustained cycle exercise; and 2) factors other than "frank" EFL cause the terminal increase in EELV. PMID:23558390

  2. Measuring peak expiratory flow in general practice: comparison of mini Wright peak flow meter and turbine spirometer.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, K P; Mullee, M A

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare measurements of the peak expiratory flow rate taken by the mini Wright peak flow meter and the turbine spirometer. DESIGN--Pragmatic study with randomised order of use of recording instruments. Phase 1 compared a peak expiratory flow type expiration recorded by the mini Wright peak flow meter with an expiration to forced vital capacity recorded by the turbine spirometer. Phase 2 compared peak expiratory flow type expirations recorded by both meters. Reproducibility was assessed separately. SETTING--Routine surgeries at Aldermoor Health Centre, Southampton. SUBJECTS--212 Patients aged 4 to 78 presenting with asthma or obstructive airways disease. Each patient contributed only once to each phase (105 in phase 1, 107 in phase 2), but some entered both phases on separate occasions. Reproducibility was tested on a further 31 patients. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--95% Limits of agreement between measurements on the two meters. RESULTS--208 (98%) Of the readings taken by the mini Wright meter were higher than the corresponding readings taken by the turbine spirometer, but the 95% limits of agreement (mean difference (2 SD] were wide (1 to 173 l/min). Differences due to errors in reproducibility were not sufficient to predict this level of disagreement. Analysis by age, sex, order of use, and the type of expiration did not detect any significant differences. CONCLUSIONS--The two methods of measuring peak expiratory flow rate were not comparable. The mini Wright meter is likely to remain the preferred instrument in general practice. PMID:2142611

  3. Metals in Particulate Pollutants Affect Peak Expiratory Flow of Schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yun-Chul; Hwang, Seung-Sik; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Kyoung-Ho; Lee, Hyun-Jung; Lee, Kwan-Hee; Yu, Seung-Do; Kim, Dae-Seon

    2007-01-01

    Background The contribution of the metal components of particulate pollutants to acute respiratory effects has not been adequately evaluated. Moreover, little is known about the effects of genetic polymorphisms of xenobiotic metabolism on pulmonary function. Objectives This study was conducted to assess lung function decrement associated with metal components in particulate pollutants and genetic polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase M1 and T1. Methods We studied 43 schoolchildren who were in the 3rd to 6th grades. Each student measured peak expiratory flow rate three times a day for 42 days. Particulate air concentrations were monitored every day, and the concentrations of iron, manganese, lead, zinc, and aluminum in the particles were measured. Glutathione S-transferase M1 and T1 genetic polymorphisms were determined using DNA extracted from participant buccal washings. We used a mixed linear regression model to estimate the association between peak expiratory flow rate and particulate air pollutants. Results We found significant reduction in the peak expiratory flow rate after the children’s exposure to particulate pollutants. The effect was shown most significantly 1 day after exposure to the ambient particles. Manganese and lead in the particles also reduced the peak expiratory flow rate. Genetic polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase M1 and T1 did not significantly affect peak expiratory flow rate. Conclusions This study demonstrated that particulate pollutants and metals such as manganese and lead in the particles are associated with a decrement of peak expiratory flow rate. These effects were robust even with consideration of genetic polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase. PMID:17431494

  4. Assessment of ventilatory performance of athletes using the maximal expiratory flow-volume curve.

    PubMed

    Bertholon, J F; Carles, J; Teillac, A

    1986-04-01

    We carried out a maximum expiratory flow-volume curve (MEFV) and a spirometric recording with 67 athletes of different ages (15-27 years) and disciplines (rowers, kayakists, cyclists, swimmers) and with 20 adult and 13 adolescent nonathletic controls of matching ages. These recordings were repeated, with athletes only, after 6-10 months of training. Significant differences between the groups of adult athletes and the controls were observed for some parameters, the most discriminating of which were, in order, the peak expiratory flow (PEF), the forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), and the flow at 75% of the vital capacity (V75). The vital capacity (VC) itself was only higher in the rowers group. The adult athletes, when grouped together (n = 47), produced a higher flow at 50% of their VC (V50) than the control group (+15%, P less than 0.05) with no difference in the flow at 25% of VC (V25) nor in the VC. A study of the effects of training showed no evolution among high level athletes while increases of 14% of the PEF, 5% of the V75, and 7% of the FEV1 were found after 7-10 months of training in adolescents; the VC increased during that time by only 2.7%. The reproducibility of these ventilatory parameters after 6-8 months was studied with adult athletes. The upper limit of the variation (95% CLl) was 12% for the FEV1 and forced vital capacity (FVC), 18% for PEF, 21% for V75 and V50, and 40% for V25.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Positive expiratory pressure - Common clinical applications and physiological effects.

    PubMed

    Fagevik Olsén, Monika; Lannefors, Louise; Westerdahl, Elisabeth

    2015-03-01

    Breathing out against resistance, in order to achieve positive expiratory pressure (PEP), is applied by many patient groups. Pursed lips breathing and a variety of devices can be used to create the resistance giving the increased expiratory pressure. Effects on pulmonary outcomes have been discussed in several publications, but the expected underlying physiology of the effect is seldom discussed. The aim of this article is to describe the purpose, performance, clinical application and underlying physiology of PEP when it is used to increase lung volumes, decrease hyperinflation or improve airway clearance. In clinical practice, the instruction how to use an expiratory resistance is of major importance since it varies. Different breathing patterns during PEP increase or reduce expiratory flow, result in movement of EPP centrally or peripherally and can increase or decrease lung volume. It is therefore necessary to give the right instructions to obtain the desired effects. As the different PEP techniques are being used by diverse patient groups it is not possible to give standard instructions. Based on the information given in this article the instructions have to be adjusted to give the optimal effect. There is no consensus regarding optimal treatment frequency and number of cycles included in each treatment session and must also be individualized. In future research, more precise descriptions are needed about physiological aims and specific instructions of how the treatments have been performed to assure as good treatment quality as possible and to be able to evaluate and compare treatment effects. PMID:25573419

  6. Examination of Strength Training and Detraining Effects in Expiratory Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Susan; Davenport, Paul; Sapienza, Christine

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine strength gains following expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) and to determine detraining effects when the training stimulus is removed. Method: Thirty-two healthy participants were enrolled in an EMST program. Sixteen participants trained for 4 weeks (Group 1) and 16 participants trained…

  7. Unidirectional Expiratory Valve Method to Assess Maximal Inspiratory Pressure in Individuals without Artificial Airway

    PubMed Central

    Grams, Samantha Torres; Kimoto, Karen Yumi Mota; Azevedo, Elen Moda de Oliveira; Lança, Marina; de Albuquerque, André Luis Pereira; de Brito, Christina May Moran; Yamaguti, Wellington Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Maximal Inspiratory Pressure (MIP) is considered an effective method to estimate strength of inspiratory muscles, but still leads to false positive diagnosis. Although MIP assessment with unidirectional expiratory valve method has been used in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation, no previous studies investigated the application of this method in subjects without artificial airway. Objectives This study aimed to compare the MIP values assessed by standard method (MIPsta) and by unidirectional expiratory valve method (MIPuni) in subjects with spontaneous breathing without artificial airway. MIPuni reproducibility was also evaluated. Methods This was a crossover design study, and 31 subjects performed MIPsta and MIPuni in a random order. MIPsta measured MIP maintaining negative pressure for at least one second after forceful expiration. MIPuni evaluated MIP using a unidirectional expiratory valve attached to a face mask and was conducted by two evaluators (A and B) at two moments (Tests 1 and 2) to determine interobserver and intraobserver reproducibility of MIP values. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC[2,1]) was used to determine intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility. Results The mean values for MIPuni were 14.3% higher (-117.3 ± 24.8 cmH2O) than the mean values for MIPsta (-102.5 ± 23.9 cmH2O) (p<0.001). Interobserver reproducibility assessment showed very high correlation for Test 1 (ICC[2,1] = 0.91), and high correlation for Test 2 (ICC[2,1] = 0.88). The assessment of the intraobserver reproducibility showed high correlation for evaluator A (ICC[2,1] = 0.86) and evaluator B (ICC[2,1] = 0.77). Conclusions MIPuni presented higher values when compared with MIPsta and proved to be reproducible in subjects with spontaneous breathing without artificial airway. PMID:26360255

  8. INTERIOR VIEW OF BATHROOM 1, SECOND FLOOR. NOTE THE ORIGINAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF BATHROOM 1, SECOND FLOOR. NOTE THE ORIGINAL MOSAIC PATTERN FLOOR TILE, TILE WAINSCOT, CERAMIC ACCESSORIES, AND SINGLE-PANEL DOOR TO LINEN CLOSET. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST. - Hickam Field, Officers' Housing Type K, 304 Sixth Street, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  9. Effects of divided doses of a bronchodilator aerosol and the intervening time interval on the forced expiration.

    PubMed

    Hidinger, K G; Bake, B

    1986-01-01

    Twelve patients with bronchial asthma participated in a blind, randomized, crossover study comparing the effects of 500 micrograms terbutaline in one inhalation, 125 micrograms in four inhalations taken in rapid succession, and 125 micrograms in four inhalations taken with an intervening time interval of 30 min. There were no significant differences between the three modes of inhalation of 500 micrograms terbutaline in any of the spirometric variables, i.e., 1-second forced expiratory volume, forced vital capacity, and maximal airflows when 50 and 75% of the forced vital capacity was exhaled from the total lung capacity. However, there were neither any significant differences between the levels of bronchodilation reached after administration of 500 micrograms and 2 or 3 X 125 micrograms terbutaline with an intervening time interval of 30 min. The time interval between the divided doses was possibly too long to achieve maximum accumulated effect of the four divided doses.

  10. Expiratory flow limitation definition, mechanisms, methods, and significance.

    PubMed

    Tantucci, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    When expiratory flow is maximal during tidal breathing and cannot be increased unless operative lung volumes move towards total lung capacity, tidal expiratory flow limitation (EFL) is said to occur. EFL represents a severe mechanical constraint caused by different mechanisms and observed in different conditions, but it is more relevant in terms of prevalence and negative consequences in obstructive lung diseases and particularly in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although in COPD patients EFL more commonly develops during exercise, in more advanced disorder it can be present at rest, before in supine position, and then in seated-sitting position. In any circumstances EFL predisposes to pulmonary dynamic hyperinflation and its unfavorable effects such as increased elastic work of breathing, inspiratory muscles dysfunction, and progressive neuroventilatory dissociation, leading to reduced exercise tolerance, marked breathlessness during effort, and severe chronic dyspnea.

  11. Expiratory flow limitation definition, mechanisms, methods, and significance.

    PubMed

    Tantucci, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    When expiratory flow is maximal during tidal breathing and cannot be increased unless operative lung volumes move towards total lung capacity, tidal expiratory flow limitation (EFL) is said to occur. EFL represents a severe mechanical constraint caused by different mechanisms and observed in different conditions, but it is more relevant in terms of prevalence and negative consequences in obstructive lung diseases and particularly in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although in COPD patients EFL more commonly develops during exercise, in more advanced disorder it can be present at rest, before in supine position, and then in seated-sitting position. In any circumstances EFL predisposes to pulmonary dynamic hyperinflation and its unfavorable effects such as increased elastic work of breathing, inspiratory muscles dysfunction, and progressive neuroventilatory dissociation, leading to reduced exercise tolerance, marked breathlessness during effort, and severe chronic dyspnea. PMID:23606962

  12. Effects of expiratory flow resistance on inspiratory work of breathing.

    PubMed

    Banner, M J; Downs, J B; Kirby, R R; Smith, R A; Boysen, P G; Lampotang, S

    1988-04-01

    To minimize work of breathing, airway pressure should not fluctuate during spontaneous breathing with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). However, flow resistance in the inspiratory limb of the breathing circuit and an inadequate continuous gas flow rate result in airway pressure fluctuation and increased work of breathing. Flow resistance of the expiratory pressure/exhalation valve also directly affects the level of airway pressure during spontaneous inhalation with CPAP (the greater the resistance of the valve, the greater the decrease in airway pressure and work of breathing). We compared this effect with three types of expiratory pressure valves: a threshold resistor with low resistance to flow, an inflatable balloon (mushroom) valve with moderate resistance to flow, and a variable-orifice flow resistor with a high resistance to flow. Work increased up to threefold with the balloon valve and more than tenfold with the flow resistor compared with the threshold resistor. To apply CPAP, expiratory pressure valves with low resistance to flow should be used to minimize fluctuations in airway pressure and, thus, in the work of spontaneous breathing. PMID:3280260

  13. Respiratory failure due to expiratory central airway collapse.

    PubMed

    Murgu, Septimiu D; Cherrison, Lawrence J; Colt, Henri G

    2007-06-01

    We report a patient with respiratory failure due to expiratory central airway collapse successfully treated with airway stents. A 74-year-old male with obesity and obstructive sleep apnea had recurrent episodes of acute respiratory failure. Noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation failed because of patient intolerance and lack of improvement, and soon after he stopped using the noninvasive ventilator he developed severe respiratory failure that required a tracheostomy. He was transferred to our institution one month later. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy revealed diffuse expiratory central airway collapse of both main bronchi and the lower two thirds of the trachea, caused by bulging of the posterior airway membrane. During rigid bronchoscopy we inserted studded silicone stents in the right and left mainstem bronchi and in the distal trachea. The patient was weaned from mechanical ventilation 72 hours later and discharged to a long-term care facility. Expiratory central airway collapse should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with respiratory failure, especially when weaning from mechanical ventilation is difficult. PMID:17521465

  14. Expiratory muscle endurance in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Sarmiento, A; Orozco-Levi, M; Barreiro, E; Mendez, R; Ferrer, A; Broquetas, J; Gea, J

    2002-01-01

    Background: A reduction in expiratory muscle (ExM) endurance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may have clinically relevant implications. This study was carried out to evaluate ExM endurance in patients with COPD. Methods: Twenty three patients with COPD (FEV1 35 (14)% predicted) and 14 matched controls were studied. ExM endurance was assessed using a method based on the use of an expiratory threshold valve which includes two steps. In step 1 the load is progressively increased (50 g every 2 minutes) until task failure is reached, and the pressure generated against the highest tolerated load is defined as the maximal expiratory sustainable pressure (Pthmax). In step 2 subjects breathe against a submaximal constant load (80% of Pthmax) and the time elapsed until task failure is termed the expiratory endurance time (Tth80). In addition, the strength of peripheral muscles (handgrip, HGS) and respiratory muscles (maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures, PImax and PEmax, respectively) was evaluated. Results: Patients with COPD had lower ExM strength and endurance than controls: PEmax 64 (19)% predicted v 84 (14)% predicted (mean difference 20%; 95% confidence intervals (CI) 14 to 39); Pthmax 52 (27) v 151 (46) cm H2O (mean difference 99, 95% CI 74 to 123); and Tth80 9.4 (6.3) v 14.2 (7.4) min (mean difference 4.8, 95% CI 1.0 to 10.4; p<0.01 for all). Interestingly, ExM endurance directly correlated with both the severity of airways obstruction (Pthmax with FEV1, r=0.794, p<0.01) and the reduction in strength observed in different muscle groups (Pthmax with HG, PImax or PEmax, r=0.550, p<0.05; r=0.583, p<0.001; and r=0.584, p<0.001, respectively). Conclusions: ExM endurance is decreased in patients with COPD. This impairment is proportional to the severity of the disease and is associated with lower strength in different muscle groups. This suggests that systemic effects are implicated in the impairment observed in ExM function. PMID

  15. Inspiratory and expiratory aerosol deposition in the upper airway.

    PubMed

    Verbanck, S; Kalsi, H S; Biddiscombe, M F; Agnihotri, V; Belkassem, B; Lacor, C; Usmani, O S

    2011-02-01

    Aerosol deposition efficiency (DE) in the extrathoracic airways during mouth breathing is currently documented only for the inspiratory phase of respiration, and there is a need for quantification of expiratory DE. Our aim was to study both inspiratory and expiratory DE in a realistic upper airway geometry. This was done experimentally on a physical upper airway cast by scintigraphy, and numerically by computational fluid dynamic simulations using a Reynolds Averaged Navier?Stokes (RANS) method with a k-? SST turbulence model coupled with a stochastic Lagrangian approach. Experiments and simulations were carried out for particle sizes (3 and 6 μm) and flow rates (30 and 60 L/min) spanning the ranges of Stokes (Stk) and Reynolds (Re) number pertinent to therapeutic and environmental aerosols. We showed that inspiratory total deposition data obtained by scintigraphy fell onto a previously published deposition curve representative of a range of upper airway geometries. We also found that expiratory and inspiratory DE curves were almost identical. Finally, DE in different compartments of the upper airway model showed a very different distribution pattern of aerosol deposition during inspiration and expiration, with preferential deposition in oral and pharyngeal compartments, respectively. These compartmental deposition patterns were very consistent and only slightly dependent on particle size or flow rate. Total deposition for inspiration and expiration was reasonably well-mimicked by the RANS simulation method we employed, and more convincingly so in the upper range of the Stk and Re number. However, compartmental deposition patterns showed discrepancies between experiments and RANS simulations, particularly during expiration.

  16. Expiratory flow limitation in compressed air divers and oxygen divers.

    PubMed

    Tetzlaff, K; Friege, L; Reuter, M; Haber, J; Mutzbauer, T; Neubauer, B

    1998-10-01

    Divers are exposed to dense gases under hyperbaric and hyperoxic conditions and, therefore, may be at risk of developing respiratory disease. Long-term effects on respiratory function have been found in commercial divers who perform deep dives. This study was conducted to detect possible lung function changes in scuba divers who dive in shallow water using compressed air or oxygen as a breathing gas. A cross-sectional sample of 180 healthy male divers (152 air divers and 28 oxygen divers) and 34 healthy male controls underwent a diving medical examination including body plethysmography, diffusion capacity measurement and a cold-air isocapnic hyperventilation test (CAIH). Air divers and oxygen divers had a lower mid-expiratory flow at 25% of vital capacity (MEF25) than controls (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively). Oxygen divers also had a decreased mid-expiratory flow at 50% of vital capacity (MEF50) (p<0.05). Divers' groups and controls did not differ with respect to age, smoking or medical history. The prevalence of airway hyperresponsiveness to CAIH was 1.4% (n=3 divers). MEF25 and MEF50 were inversely related to years of diving (p<0.01 and p<0.001, respectively). The pattern of lung function changes obtained in scuba divers is consistent with small airways dysfunction and the association between diving exposure and lung function changes may indicate long-term effects on respiratory function.

  17. Infant ventilator design: performance during expiratory limb occlusion.

    PubMed

    Hall, M W; Peevy, K J

    1983-01-01

    We examined the specifications and design of the inspiratory pressure regulating valve of 8 continuous flow, pressure-limited infant ventilators. Two pressure regulating designs are currently available; one placing the primary pressure regulating valve on the inspiratory limb, the other placing it on the expiratory limb. Seven ventilators incorporate the latter design to limit inspiratory pressure and must have a safety pressure-relief valve located on the inspiratory limb to vent pressure in case of circuit occlusion. These pressure-relief valves are generally set by the manufacturer far in excess of pressures normally used for infant ventilation. Alarm systems are often absent or inadequate to warn of high pressure conditions during circuit obstruction. A case report detailing the fatal complication of prolonged excessive airway pressure during circuit occlusion is presented. Improvements in the pressure-relief valve designs currently available are possible, and may be necessary to provide adequate protection from barotrauma. The majority of infant ventilators currently available expose the patient to unnecessary excessive airway pressures in the case of expiratory limb occlusion, and the lack of alarm systems may leave the operator unaware of malfunction.

  18. Assessment of maximal expiratory pressure in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, I; Slutsky, A S; Rebuck, A S; McClean, P A; Boucher, R; Szeinberg, A; Zamel, N

    1988-05-01

    Maximal static expiratory pressure developed at the mouth (PEmax) provides a useful clinical index of expiratory muscle function; however, the range of normal values among laboratories shows considerable variation. We examined the hypothesis that the wide variability could be attributable to the differences in technique among laboratories. We measured PEmax at functional residual capacity (PEmax FRC) in 28 healthy subjects using the following five techniques: 1) using a scuba-type mouthpiece with the cheeks supported by the hands ("hands on"), 2) without supporting the cheeks ("no hands"), 3) using a rigid, circular mouthpiece (2.8 cm ID, "tube"), 4) using the scuba-type mouthpiece but with the cheeks supported by an observer ("other hands"), and 5) using a large-bore circular mouthpiece (4.1 cm ID, "new tube"). Mean PEmax FRC obtained with hands on was significantly higher than no-hands and tube methods. PEmax FRC values obtained by the other-hands and new-tube maneuvers were similar to the hands-on maneuver. We conclude that the technique used to measure PEmax FRC can significantly affect the results and suggest that it should be measured using a large-bore circular mouthpiece or a scuba-diving mouthpiece with the cheeks supported.

  19. Mechanical insufflation-exsufflation. Comparison of peak expiratory flows with manually assisted and unassisted coughing techniques.

    PubMed

    Bach, J R

    1993-11-01

    Pulmonary complications are major causes of morbidity and mortality for patients with severe expiratory muscle weakness. The purpose of this study was to compare peak cough expiratory flows (PCEFs) during unassisted and assisted coughing and review the long-term use of mechanical insufflation-exsufflation (MI-E) for 46 neuromuscular ventilator users. These individuals used noninvasive methods of ventilatory support for a mean of 21.1 h/d for 17.3 +/- 15.5 years. They relied on manually assisted coughing and/or MI-E during periods of productive airway secretion. They reported a mean of 0.7 +/- 1.2 cases of pneumonia and other serious pulmonary complications and 2.8 +/- 5.6 hospitalizations during the 16.4-year period and no complications of MI-E. A sample of 21 of these patients with a mean forced vital capacity of 490 +/- 370 ml had a mean maximum insufflation capacity (MIC) achieved by a combination of air stacking of ventilator insufflations and glossopharyngeal breathing of 1,670 +/- 540 ml. The PCEFs for this sample were: following an unassisted inspiration, 1.81 +/- 1.03 L/s; following a MIC maneuver, 3.37 +/- 1.07 L/s; with manual assistance by abdominal compression following a MIC maneuver, 4.27 +/- 1.29 L/s; and with MI-E, 7.47 +/- 1.02 L/s. Each PCEF was significantly greater than the preceding, respectively (p < 0.01). We conclude that manually assisted coughing and MI-E are effective and safe methods for facilitating airway secretion clearance for neuromuscular ventilator users who would otherwise be managed by endotracheal suctioning. Severely decreased MIC, but not necessarily vital capacity, is an indication for tracheostomy.

  20. Effects of an aging pulmonary system on expiratory flow limitation and dyspnoea during exercise in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Wilkie, Sabrina S; Guenette, Jordan A; Dominelli, Paolo B; Sheel, A William

    2012-06-01

    Aging related changes in pulmonary function may make older women (OW) more susceptible to expiratory flow limitation (EFL) and lead to higher dyspnoea ratings during exercise relative to young women (YW). Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to compare sensory responses and EFL susceptibility and magnitude in 8 YW (29 ± 7 years) and 8 healthy OW (64 ± 3 years) matched for percentage-predicted forced vital capacity (% predicted FVC) and % predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s. EFL was calculated as the percent overlap between tidal flow-volume loops during maximal exercise and the maximal expiratory flow-volume (MEFV) curve. Peak oxygen consumption (V'O(2peak)) was lower in the OW compared to the YW (29.4 ± 3.6 vs. 49.1 ± 8.9 ml kg(-1) min(-1), P < 0.05) as was maximal ventilation (73.7 ± 18.4 vs. 108.7 ± 14.1 l min(-1), P < 0.05). EFL at maximal exercise was present in 2 of 8 YW and in 5 of 8 OW. There were no significant differences in the magnitude of EFL between OW (23 ± 24, range: 0-69 %EFL) and YW (9 ± 18, range: 0-46 %EFL, P = 0.21). The magnitude of EFL in OW was inversely related to % predicted FVC (r = -0.69, P = 0.06), but this relationships was not observed in the YW (r = -0.23, P = 0.59). The OW consistently reported greater dyspnoea and leg discomfort for any given absolute work rate, but not when work was expressed as a percentage of maximum. Reduced ventilatory and exercise capacities may cause OW to be more susceptible to EFL during exercise and experience greater dyspnoea relative to YW for a standardized physical task.

  1. Effects of an aging pulmonary system on expiratory flow limitation and dyspnoea during exercise in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Wilkie, Sabrina S; Guenette, Jordan A; Dominelli, Paolo B; Sheel, A William

    2012-06-01

    Aging related changes in pulmonary function may make older women (OW) more susceptible to expiratory flow limitation (EFL) and lead to higher dyspnoea ratings during exercise relative to young women (YW). Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to compare sensory responses and EFL susceptibility and magnitude in 8 YW (29 ± 7 years) and 8 healthy OW (64 ± 3 years) matched for percentage-predicted forced vital capacity (% predicted FVC) and % predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s. EFL was calculated as the percent overlap between tidal flow-volume loops during maximal exercise and the maximal expiratory flow-volume (MEFV) curve. Peak oxygen consumption (V'O(2peak)) was lower in the OW compared to the YW (29.4 ± 3.6 vs. 49.1 ± 8.9 ml kg(-1) min(-1), P < 0.05) as was maximal ventilation (73.7 ± 18.4 vs. 108.7 ± 14.1 l min(-1), P < 0.05). EFL at maximal exercise was present in 2 of 8 YW and in 5 of 8 OW. There were no significant differences in the magnitude of EFL between OW (23 ± 24, range: 0-69 %EFL) and YW (9 ± 18, range: 0-46 %EFL, P = 0.21). The magnitude of EFL in OW was inversely related to % predicted FVC (r = -0.69, P = 0.06), but this relationships was not observed in the YW (r = -0.23, P = 0.59). The OW consistently reported greater dyspnoea and leg discomfort for any given absolute work rate, but not when work was expressed as a percentage of maximum. Reduced ventilatory and exercise capacities may cause OW to be more susceptible to EFL during exercise and experience greater dyspnoea relative to YW for a standardized physical task. PMID:21971945

  2. 21 CFR 868.5965 - Positive end expiratory pressure breathing attachment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... attachment. 868.5965 Section 868.5965 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Positive end expiratory pressure breathing attachment. (a) Identification. A positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) breathing attachment is a device attached to a ventilator that is used to elevate...

  3. 21 CFR 868.5965 - Positive end expiratory pressure breathing attachment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... in a patient's lungs above atmospheric pressure at the end of exhalation. (b) Classification. Class... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Positive end expiratory pressure breathing... Positive end expiratory pressure breathing attachment. (a) Identification. A positive end...

  4. 21 CFR 868.5965 - Positive end expiratory pressure breathing attachment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... in a patient's lungs above atmospheric pressure at the end of exhalation. (b) Classification. Class... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Positive end expiratory pressure breathing... Positive end expiratory pressure breathing attachment. (a) Identification. A positive end...

  5. 21 CFR 868.5965 - Positive end expiratory pressure breathing attachment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... in a patient's lungs above atmospheric pressure at the end of exhalation. (b) Classification. Class... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Positive end expiratory pressure breathing... Positive end expiratory pressure breathing attachment. (a) Identification. A positive end...

  6. 21 CFR 868.5965 - Positive end expiratory pressure breathing attachment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... in a patient's lungs above atmospheric pressure at the end of exhalation. (b) Classification. Class... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Positive end expiratory pressure breathing... Positive end expiratory pressure breathing attachment. (a) Identification. A positive end...

  7. Control of abdominal and expiratory intercostal muscle activity during vomiting - Role of ventral respiratory group expiratory neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Alan D.; Tan, L. K.; Suzuki, Ichiro

    1987-01-01

    The role of ventral respiratory group (VRG) expiratory (E) neurons in the control of abdominal and internal intercostal muscle activity during vomiting was investigated in cats. Two series of experiments were performed: in one, the activity of VRG E neurons was recorded during fictive vomiting in cats that were decerebrated, paralyzed, and artificially ventilated; in the second, the abdominal muscle activity during vomiting was compared before and after sectioning the axons of descending VRG E neurons in decerebrate spontaneously breathing cats. The results show that about two-thirds of VRG E neurons that project at least as far caudally as the lower thoracic cord contribute to internal intercostal muscle activity during vomiting. The remaining VRG E neurons contribute to abdominal muscle activation. As shown by severing the axons of the VRG E neurons, other, as yet unidenified, inputs (either descending from the brain stem or arising from spinal reflexes) can also produce abdominal muscle activation.

  8. Analysis of heart rate variability in individuals subjected to different positive end expiratory pressure levels using expiratory positive airway pressure

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Thiago Lorentz; Costa, Ivan Peres; Kawaguchi, Leandro Yukio Alves; de Carvalho, Flávio Aimbire Soares; de Carvalho, Regiane Albertini

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The increase in the number of studies has led to greater security in the application of this method and the determination of its effectiveness in adults.. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate heart rate variability in healthy individuals submitted to different levels of positive expiratory pressure using an expiratory positive airway pressure (EPAP) device. Material and methods The study involved 27 healthy male individuals ranging in age from 20 to 35 years. Patient histories were taken and the subjects were submitted to a physical examination. The volunteers were monitored using the Polar 810s® and submitted to the EPAP experiment. Analyses were performed on variables of the frequency domain. Sympathetic and parasympathetic bands and their relationship with sympathovagal response were also analyzed. Results The mean value of this variable was 526.89 (55.50) ms2 in the first period, 2811.0 (721.10) ms2 in the fourth period and 726.52 (123.41) ms2 in the fifth period. Regarding the parasympathetic area, significant differences were detected when Periods 1 and 5 (no load) were compared with periods in which the individuals were subjected to the use of the therapy. Sympathetic and parasympathetic areas together, a significant difference was detected regarding the sympathetic/parasympathetic ratio in the comparison between Periods 1 and 4 (p < 0.01) as well as Periods 2 and 4 (p < 0.05). Conclusions The findings of the present study suggest that the therapeutic use of EPAP significantly alters the parameters of heart rate variability in the frequency domain, highlighting the importance of monitoring and care during the practice of EPAP. PMID:24049524

  9. Tracheobronchomalacia/excessive dynamic airway collapse in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with persistent expiratory wheeze: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Sindhwani, Girish; Sodhi, Rakhee; Saini, Manju; Jethani, Varuna; Khanduri, Sushant; Singh, Baltej

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tracheobronchomalacia (TBM) refers to a condition in which structural integrity of cartilaginous wall of trachea is lost. Excessive dynamic airway collapse (EDAC) is characterized by excessive invagination of posterior wall of trachea. In both these conditions, airway lumen gets compromised, especially during expiration, which can lead to symptoms such as breathlessness, cough, and wheezing. Both these conditions can be present in obstructive lung diseases; TBM due to chronic airway inflammation and EDAC due to dynamic compressive forces during expiration. The present study was planned with the hypothesis that TBM/EDAC could also produce expiratory wheeze in patients with obstructive airway disorders. Hence, prevalence and factors affecting presence of this entity in patients with obstructive airway diseases were the aims and objectives of this study. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five patients with obstructive airway disorders (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD] or bronchial asthma), who were stable on medical management, but having persistent expiratory wheezing, were included in the study. They were evaluated for TBM/EDAC by bronchoscopy and computed tomographic scan of chest. The presence of TBM/EDAC was correlated with variables including age, sex, body mass index (BMI), smoking index, level of dyspnea, and severity of disease. Results: Mean age of the patients was 62.7 ± 7.81 years. Out of 25 patients, 14 were males. TBM/EDAC was found in 40% of study subjects. Age, sex, BMI, severity of disease, frequency of exacerbations and radiological findings etc., were not found to have any association with presence of TBM/EDAC. Conclusion: TBM/EDAC is common in patients with obstructive airway disorders and should be evaluated in these patients, especially with persistent expiratory wheezing as diagnosis of this entity could provide another treatment option in these patients with persistent symptoms despite medical management. PMID:27578929

  10. Inhomogeneous response of expiratory muscle activity to cold block of the ventral medullary surface.

    PubMed

    Chonan, T; Okabe, S; Hida, W; Izumiyama, T; Kikuchi, Y; Takishima, T

    1991-11-01

    We assessed the effects of cooling the ventral medullary surface (VMS) on the activity of chest wall and abdominal expiratory muscles in eight anesthetized artificially ventilated dogs after vagotomy and denervation of the carotid sinus nerves. Electromyograms (EMGs) of the triangularis sterni, internal intercostal, abdominal external oblique, abdominal internal oblique, and transversus abdominis muscles were measured with EMG of the diaphragm as an index of inspiratory activity. Bilateral localized cooling (2 x 2 mm) in the thermosensitive intermediate part of the VMS produced temperature-dependent reduction in the EMG of diaphragm and abdominal muscles. The rib cage expiratory EMGs were little affected at 25 degrees C; their amplitudes decreased at lower VMS temperatures (less than 20 degrees C) but by significantly fewer degrees than the diaphragmatic and abdominal expiratory EMGs at a constant VMS temperature. With moderate to severe cooling (less than 20 degrees C) diaphragmatic EMG disappeared, but rib cage expiratory EMGs became tonic and resumed a phasic pattern shortly before the recovery of diaphragmatic EMG during rewarming of the VMS. These results indicate that the effects of cooling the VMS differ between the activity of rib cage and abdominal expiratory muscles. This variability may be due to inhomogeneous inputs from the VMS to expiratory motoneurons or to a different responsiveness of various expiratory motoneurons to the same input either from the VMS or the inspiratory neurons.

  11. Expiratory muscle training and sensation of respiratory effort during exercise in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, S.; Sato, M.; Okubo, T.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The sensation of respiratory effort may increase as expiratory muscles become fatigued during expiratory loading. A study was performed to determine whether expiratory muscle training (EMT) affects the sensation of respiratory effort during exercise in healthy subjects. METHODS--Six subjects performed EMT for 15 minutes twice daily for four weeks using a pressure threshold device; another six subjects served as a control group. The expiratory threshold was set at 30% of the individual's maximum expiratory mouth pressure (PEmax). The sensation of respiratory effort was evaluated during a progressive exercise test using the Borg scale. RESULTS--After EMT PEmax increased by 25% in the training group. The Borg score increased as exercise grade increased before and after EMT, but scores for each grade were lower after EMT. Minute ventilation during exercise decreased after EMT, as did the breathing frequency during exercise, while the expiratory time increased. Although there was no difference in the relationship between Borg score and minute ventilation before or after EMT, the curve shifted to a lower Borg score after EMT. There were no changes in PEmax, Borg score, minute ventilation, or breathing pattern after the four week study period in the control group. CONCLUSION--These findings suggest that EMT increases expiratory muscle strength and reduces the sensation of respiratory effort during exercise, presumably by reducing minute ventilation. PMID:7785008

  12. Pontine respiratory activity involved in inspiratory/expiratory phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Mörschel, Michael; Dutschmann, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    Control of the timing of the inspiratory/expiratory (IE) phase transition is a hallmark of respiratory pattern formation. In principle, sensory feedback from pulmonary stretch receptors (Breuer–Hering reflex, BHR) is seen as the major controller for the IE phase transition, while pontine-based control of IE phase transition by both the pontine Kölliker–Fuse nucleus (KF) and parabrachial complex is seen as a secondary or backup mechanism. However, previous studies have shown that the BHR can habituate in vivo. Thus, habituation reduces sensory feedback, so the role of the pons, and specifically the KF, for IE phase transition may increase dramatically. Pontine-mediated control of the IE phase transition is not completely understood. In the present review, we discuss existing models for ponto-medullary interaction that may be involved in the control of inspiratory duration and IE transition. We also present intracellular recordings of pontine respiratory units derived from an in situ intra-arterially perfused brainstem preparation of rats. With the absence of lung inflation, this preparation generates a normal respiratory pattern and many of the recorded pontine units demonstrated phasic respiratory-related activity. The analysis of changes in membrane potentials of pontine respiratory neurons has allowed us to propose a number of pontine-medullary interactions not considered before. The involvement of these putative interactions in pontine-mediated control of IE phase transitions is discussed. PMID:19651653

  13. Wall motion in expiratory flow limitation: choke and flutter.

    PubMed

    Webster, P M; Sawatzky, R P; Hoffstein, V; Leblanc, R; Hinchey, M J; Sullivan, P A

    1985-10-01

    Limitation of expiratory airflow from mammalian airways is currently understood to be due to choking at wave speed (S. V. Dawson and E. A. Elliott. J. Appl. Physiol. 43: 498-515, 1977). A critical weakness of the theory is the lack of a mechanism for the dissipation of energy when effort exceeds that needed for maximal flow. We have observed substantial wall motion with flow limitation in a physical model of a trachea. Therefore we have examined a simple two-dimensional mathematical model, designed to approximate the behavior of the physical model of the trachea, to try to identify a relationship between flow limitation and wall oscillation. The model matches wave-speed predictions when only long waves are considered. The model predicts that aerodynamic flutter will occur in the zone of supercritical flow described in wave-speed theory. Aerodynamic flutter in the zone of supercritical flow provides a potential mechanism for the energy dissipation necessary for transition from supercritical to subcritical flow and explains the high-frequency pure tone heard with flow limitation. PMID:4055608

  14. Maximal mid-expiratory flow is a surrogate marker of lung clearance index for assessment of adults with bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Wei-jie; Yuan, Jing-jing; Gao, Yong-hua; Li, Hui-min; Zheng, Jin-ping; Chen, Rong-chang; Zhong, Nan-shan

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the comparative diagnostic value of lung clearance index (LCI) and maximal mid-expiratory flow (MMEF) in bronchiectasis. We compared the diagnostic performance, correlation and concordance with clinical variables, and changes of LCI and MMEF% predicted during bronchiectasis exacerbations (BEs). Patients with stable bronchiectasis underwent history inquiry, chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), multiple-breath nitrogen wash-out test, spirometry and sputum culture. Patients who experienced BEs underwent these measurements during onset of BEs and 1 week following antibiotics therapy. Sensitivity analyses were performed in mild, moderate and severe bronchiectasis. We recruited 110 bronchiectasis patients between March 2014 and September 2015. LCI demonstrated similar diagnostic value with MMEF% predicted in discriminating moderate-to-severe from mild bronchiectasis. LCI negatively correlated with MMEF% predicted. Both parameters had similar concordance in reflecting clinical characteristics of bronchiectasis and correlated significantly with forced expiratory flow in one second, age, HRCT score, Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization, cystic bronchiectasis, ventilation heterogeneity and bilateral bronchiectasis. In exacerbation cohort (n = 22), changes in LCI and MMEF% predicted were equally minimal during BEs and following antibiotics therapy. In sensitivity analyses, both parameters had similar diagnostic value and correlation with clinical variables. MMEF% predicted is a surrogate of LCI for assessing bronchiectasis severity. PMID:27339787

  15. Wave-speed limitation on expiratory flow-a unifying concept.

    PubMed

    Dawson, S V; Elliott, E A

    1977-09-01

    The mechanism limiting forced expiratory flow is explained on the basis that a local flow velocity reaches the local speed of wave propagation at a point, called the choke point, in intrathoracic airways. This theoretical approach to the "waterfall effect" leads to selection of the analogy of constricted open-channel flow to apply to the elastic network of airway tubes. Quantitative results are derived for the case of negligible friction by use of the Bernoulli principle. Shapes predicted for the maximum-flow static recoil curves depend only upon the nature of the pressure-area curve at the choke point in the case of negligible friction; and the magnitude of the critical rate of flow depends on reference values of cross-sectional area and elastic modulus at the choke point, on gas density, and on the static recoil pressure. The present theoretical results are used to interpret previous experiments, but quantitative applicability is limited because of frictional effects and lack of knowledge of choke point conditions. PMID:914721

  16. Improving the ketchup bottle method with positive expiratory pressure, PEP, in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Falk, M; Kelstrup, M; Andersen, J B; Kinoshita, T; Falk, P; Støvring, S; Gøthgen, I

    1984-08-01

    We studied the acute effects of 4 different chest physical therapy regimens using a randomised cross-over design in 14 patients with cystic fibrosis. Treatment A consisted of postural drainage, percussion and vibration; treatment B of postural drainage and periodic application of a face mask with positive expiratory pressure (PEP); treatment C of PEP in the sitting position; treatment D of the forced expiration technique in the sitting position. In terms of sputum expectorated, treatments B and C were superior to treatment D and especially to treatment A (p less than 0.05). Skin oxygen tension, PSO2 was monitored continuously during and for 35 min after treatment. A substantial and prolonged decay in PSO2 was observed during treatment A, quite different from other patterns seen. During and even following treatment C, an increase in PSO2 was noted. PEP was well accepted by the patients, who preferred treatment C, and we suggest it is incorporated in chest physical therapy regimens if the therapeutic objective is to increase expectoration. PMID:6381081

  17. Dysanapsis ratio as a predictor for expiratory flow limitation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joshua R; Rosenkranz, Sara K; Harms, Craig A

    2014-07-01

    To determine the efficacy of the dysanapsis ratio (DR) in predicting expiratory flow limitation during exercise, 146 subjects (73 men, 73 women) performed standard pulmonary function and maximal incremental exercise tests. Tidal flow-volume loops were recorded at maximal exercise with maximal flow-volume loops measured pre- and post-exercise. Men had larger (p<0.05) lung volumes, flow rates, and V˙O2max compared to women, but DR was similar (0.21±0.05 vs. 0.20±0.06, respectively, p>0.05). V˙O2max was not different (p>0.05) between the EFL subjects compared to the non-EFL subjects for both men and women. Men with EFL compared to non-EFL men had smaller FVC (5.16±0.89L vs. 5.67±0.86L, p<0.05) and DR (0.19±0.05 vs. 0.23±0.04, p<0.05). Similarly, women with EFL compared to non-EFL had significantly smaller DR (0.18±0.05 vs. 0.24±0.05), but similar FVC (3.88±0.52 vs. 4.12±0.64, p>0.05). A DR threshold was not determined; however, a DR continuum exists with increasing DR leading to decreased prevalence of EFL. In conclusion, DR is effective in determining the likelihood of EFL at maximal exercise.

  18. Maximal oxygen uptake validation in children with expiratory flow limitation.

    PubMed

    Robben, Katherine E; Poole, David C; Harms, Craig A

    2013-02-01

    A two-test protocol (incremental/ramp (IWT) + supramaximal constant-load (CWR)) to affirm max and obviate reliance on secondary criteria has only been validated in highly fit children. In girls (n = 15) and boys (n = 12) with a wide range of VO2max (17-47 ml/kg/min), we hypothesized that this procedure would evince a VO2-WR plateau and unambiguous VO2max even in the presence of expiratory flow limitation (EFL). A plateau in the VO2-work rate relationship occurred in 75% of subjects irrespective of EFL There was a range in RER at max exercise for girls (0.97-1.14; mean 1.06 ± 0.04) and boys (0.98-1.09; mean 1.03 ± 0.03) such that 3/15 girls and 2/12 boys did not achieve the criterion RER. Moreover, in girls with RER > 1.0 it would have been possible to achieve this criterion at 78% VO2max. Boys achieved 92% VO2max at RER = 1.0. This was true also for HRmax where 8/15 girls' and 6/12 boys' VO2max would have been rejected based on HRmax being < 90% of age-predicted HRmax. In those who achieved the HRmax criterion, it represented a VO2 of 86% (girls) and 87% (boys) VO2max. We conclude that this two-test protocol confirms VO2max in children across a threefold range of VO2max irrespective of EFL and circumvents reliance on secondary criteria.

  19. Positive end expiratory pressure in acute and chronic respiratory distress.

    PubMed

    Greenough, A; Chan, V; Hird, M F

    1992-03-01

    The optimum level of positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) was determined in 16 infants with respiratory distress syndrome (median gestational age 29 weeks, median postnatal age 1 day) and in 16 infants with chronic respiratory distress (median gestational age 25 weeks, median postnatal age 15 days). All infants were studied at a PEEP sequence of 3, 0, 3, 6, and 3 cm H2O, all other ventilator parameters being kept constant. Each PEEP level was maintained for 20 minutes and at the end of each period arterial blood gas was checked. During acute respiratory distress syndrome there were no significant changes in oxygenation but arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2) significantly decreased from a mean of 4.93 kPa at 3 cm H2O to 4.40 kPa at 0 cm H2O and increased to a mean of 5.87 kPa at 6 cm H2O. In the infants with chronic respiratory distress, oxygenation fell from a mean of 8.66 kPa at 3 cm H2O to 6.40 kPa at 0 cm H2O and improved at 6 cm H2O to a mean of 10.50 kPa. There were no significant changes in PaCO2. We conclude that addition of PEEP, up to 6 cm H2O, may be useful even after the first week of life. High levels of PEEP, however, have previously been reported, in certain infants, to result in circulatory disturbance. It is therefore important to assess the use of 6 cm H2O PEEP in a controlled study of longer term clinical outcome.

  20. Positive end expiratory pressure in acute and chronic respiratory distress.

    PubMed Central

    Greenough, A; Chan, V; Hird, M F

    1992-01-01

    The optimum level of positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) was determined in 16 infants with respiratory distress syndrome (median gestational age 29 weeks, median postnatal age 1 day) and in 16 infants with chronic respiratory distress (median gestational age 25 weeks, median postnatal age 15 days). All infants were studied at a PEEP sequence of 3, 0, 3, 6, and 3 cm H2O, all other ventilator parameters being kept constant. Each PEEP level was maintained for 20 minutes and at the end of each period arterial blood gas was checked. During acute respiratory distress syndrome there were no significant changes in oxygenation but arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2) significantly decreased from a mean of 4.93 kPa at 3 cm H2O to 4.40 kPa at 0 cm H2O and increased to a mean of 5.87 kPa at 6 cm H2O. In the infants with chronic respiratory distress, oxygenation fell from a mean of 8.66 kPa at 3 cm H2O to 6.40 kPa at 0 cm H2O and improved at 6 cm H2O to a mean of 10.50 kPa. There were no significant changes in PaCO2. We conclude that addition of PEEP, up to 6 cm H2O, may be useful even after the first week of life. High levels of PEEP, however, have previously been reported, in certain infants, to result in circulatory disturbance. It is therefore important to assess the use of 6 cm H2O PEEP in a controlled study of longer term clinical outcome. PMID:1575557

  1. Maximal oxygen uptake validation in children with expiratory flow limitation.

    PubMed

    Robben, Katherine E; Poole, David C; Harms, Craig A

    2013-02-01

    A two-test protocol (incremental/ramp (IWT) + supramaximal constant-load (CWR)) to affirm max and obviate reliance on secondary criteria has only been validated in highly fit children. In girls (n = 15) and boys (n = 12) with a wide range of VO2max (17-47 ml/kg/min), we hypothesized that this procedure would evince a VO2-WR plateau and unambiguous VO2max even in the presence of expiratory flow limitation (EFL). A plateau in the VO2-work rate relationship occurred in 75% of subjects irrespective of EFL There was a range in RER at max exercise for girls (0.97-1.14; mean 1.06 ± 0.04) and boys (0.98-1.09; mean 1.03 ± 0.03) such that 3/15 girls and 2/12 boys did not achieve the criterion RER. Moreover, in girls with RER > 1.0 it would have been possible to achieve this criterion at 78% VO2max. Boys achieved 92% VO2max at RER = 1.0. This was true also for HRmax where 8/15 girls' and 6/12 boys' VO2max would have been rejected based on HRmax being < 90% of age-predicted HRmax. In those who achieved the HRmax criterion, it represented a VO2 of 86% (girls) and 87% (boys) VO2max. We conclude that this two-test protocol confirms VO2max in children across a threefold range of VO2max irrespective of EFL and circumvents reliance on secondary criteria. PMID:23406709

  2. Dysanapsis ratio as a predictor for expiratory flow limitation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joshua R; Rosenkranz, Sara K; Harms, Craig A

    2014-07-01

    To determine the efficacy of the dysanapsis ratio (DR) in predicting expiratory flow limitation during exercise, 146 subjects (73 men, 73 women) performed standard pulmonary function and maximal incremental exercise tests. Tidal flow-volume loops were recorded at maximal exercise with maximal flow-volume loops measured pre- and post-exercise. Men had larger (p<0.05) lung volumes, flow rates, and V˙O2max compared to women, but DR was similar (0.21±0.05 vs. 0.20±0.06, respectively, p>0.05). V˙O2max was not different (p>0.05) between the EFL subjects compared to the non-EFL subjects for both men and women. Men with EFL compared to non-EFL men had smaller FVC (5.16±0.89L vs. 5.67±0.86L, p<0.05) and DR (0.19±0.05 vs. 0.23±0.04, p<0.05). Similarly, women with EFL compared to non-EFL had significantly smaller DR (0.18±0.05 vs. 0.24±0.05), but similar FVC (3.88±0.52 vs. 4.12±0.64, p>0.05). A DR threshold was not determined; however, a DR continuum exists with increasing DR leading to decreased prevalence of EFL. In conclusion, DR is effective in determining the likelihood of EFL at maximal exercise. PMID:24726854

  3. Paired inspiratory-expiratory chest CT scans to assess for small airways disease in COPD

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gas trapping quantified on chest CT scans has been proposed as a surrogate for small airway disease in COPD. We sought to determine if measurements using paired inspiratory and expiratory CT scans may be better able to separate gas trapping due to emphysema from gas trapping due to small airway disease. Methods Smokers with and without COPD from the COPDGene Study underwent inspiratory and expiratory chest CT scans. Emphysema was quantified by the percent of lung with attenuation < −950HU on inspiratory CT. Four gas trapping measures were defined: (1) Exp−856, the percent of lung < −856HU on expiratory imaging; (2) E/I MLA, the ratio of expiratory to inspiratory mean lung attenuation; (3) RVC856-950, the difference between expiratory and inspiratory lung volumes with attenuation between −856 and −950 HU; and (4) Residuals from the regression of Exp−856 on percent emphysema. Results In 8517 subjects with complete data, Exp−856 was highly correlated with emphysema. The measures based on paired inspiratory and expiratory CT scans were less strongly correlated with emphysema. Exp−856, E/I MLA and RVC856-950 were predictive of spirometry, exercise capacity and quality of life in all subjects and in subjects without emphysema. In subjects with severe emphysema, E/I MLA and RVC856-950 showed the highest correlations with clinical variables. Conclusions Quantitative measures based on paired inspiratory and expiratory chest CT scans can be used as markers of small airway disease in smokers with and without COPD, but this will require that future studies acquire both inspiratory and expiratory CT scans. PMID:23566024

  4. Sympathetic vasomotor outflow and blood pressure increase during exercise with expiratory resistance.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Keisho; Itoh, Yuka; Saito, Mitsuru; Koike, Teruhiko; Ishida, Koji

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the effect of increasing expiratory muscle work on sympathetic vasoconstrictor outflow and arterial blood pressure (BP) during dynamic exercise. We hypothesized that expiratory muscle fatigue would elicit increases in sympathetic vasomotor outflow and BP during submaximal exercise. The subjects performed four submaximal exercise tests; two were maximal expiratory pressure (PE max) tests and two were muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) tests. In each test, the subjects performed two 10-min exercises at 40% peak oxygen uptake using a cycle ergometer in a semirecumbent position [spontaneous breathing for 5 min and voluntary hyperpnoea with and without expiratory resistive breathing for 5 min (breathing frequency: 60 breaths/min, inspiratory and expiratory times were set at 0.5 sec)]. PE max was estimated before and immediately after exercises. MSNA was recorded via microneurography of the right median nerve at the elbow. PE max decreased following exercise with expiratory resistive breathing, while no change was found without resistance. A progressive increase in MSNA burst frequency (BF) appeared during exercise with expiratory resistance (MSNA BF, without resistance: +22 ± 5%, with resistance: +44 ± 8%, P < 0.05), accompanied by an augmentation of BP (mean BP, without resistance: +5 ± 2%, with resistance: +29 ± 5%, P < 0.05). These results suggest that an enhancement of expiratory muscle activity leads to increases in sympathetic vasomotor outflow and BP during dynamic leg exercise. PMID:26019293

  5. Sympathetic vasomotor outflow and blood pressure increase during exercise with expiratory resistance

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Keisho; Itoh, Yuka; Saito, Mitsuru; Koike, Teruhiko; Ishida, Koji

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the effect of increasing expiratory muscle work on sympathetic vasoconstrictor outflow and arterial blood pressure (BP) during dynamic exercise. We hypothesized that expiratory muscle fatigue would elicit increases in sympathetic vasomotor outflow and BP during submaximal exercise. The subjects performed four submaximal exercise tests; two were maximal expiratory pressure (PEmax) tests and two were muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) tests. In each test, the subjects performed two 10-min exercises at 40% peak oxygen uptake using a cycle ergometer in a semirecumbent position [spontaneous breathing for 5 min and voluntary hyperpnoea with and without expiratory resistive breathing for 5 min (breathing frequency: 60 breaths/min, inspiratory and expiratory times were set at 0.5 sec)]. PEmax was estimated before and immediately after exercises. MSNA was recorded via microneurography of the right median nerve at the elbow. PEmax decreased following exercise with expiratory resistive breathing, while no change was found without resistance. A progressive increase in MSNA burst frequency (BF) appeared during exercise with expiratory resistance (MSNA BF, without resistance: +22 ± 5%, with resistance: +44 ± 8%, P < 0.05), accompanied by an augmentation of BP (mean BP, without resistance: +5 ± 2%, with resistance: +29 ± 5%, P < 0.05). These results suggest that an enhancement of expiratory muscle activity leads to increases in sympathetic vasomotor outflow and BP during dynamic leg exercise. PMID:26019293

  6. Time course of expiratory propofol after bolus injection as measured by ion molecule reaction mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hornuss, Cyrill; Wiepcke, Dirk; Praun, Siegfried; Dolch, Michael E; Apfel, Christian C; Schelling, Gustav

    2012-04-01

    Propofol in exhaled breath can be detected and monitored in real time by ion molecule reaction mass spectrometry (IMR-MS). In addition, propofol concentration in exhaled breath is tightly correlated with propofol concentration in plasma. Therefore, real-time monitoring of expiratory propofol could be useful for titrating intravenous anesthesia, but only if concentration changes in plasma can be determined in exhaled breath without significant delay. To evaluate the utility of IMR-MS during non-steady-state conditions, we measured the time course of both expiratory propofol concentration and the processed electroencephalography (EEG) as a surrogate outcome for propofol effect after an IV bolus induction of propofol. Twenty-one patients scheduled for routine surgery were observed after a bolus of 2.5 mg kg(-1) propofol for induction of anesthesia. Expiratory propofol was measured using IMR-MS and the cerebral propofol effect was estimated using the bispectral index (BIS). Primary endpoints were time to detection of expiratory propofol and time to onset of propofol's effect on BIS, and the secondary endpoint was time to peak effect (highest expiratory propofol or lowest BIS). Expiratory propofol and changes in BIS were first detected at 43 ± 21 and 49 ± 11 s after bolus injection, respectively (P = 0.29). Peak propofol concentrations (9.2 ± 2.4 parts-per-billion) and lowest BIS values (23 ± 4) were reached after 208 ± 57 and 219 ± 62 s, respectively (P = 0.57). Expiratory propofol concentrations measured by IMR-MS have similar times to detection and peak concentrations compared with propofol effect as measured by the processed EEG (BIS). This suggests that expiratory propofol concentrations may be useful for titrating intravenous anesthesia.

  7. Validation of a protocol to evaluate maximal expiratory pressure using a pressure transducer and a signal conditioner.

    PubMed

    Soares, Viviane; Rodrigues, Fábio B; Vieira, Marcus F; Silva, Maria Sebastiana

    2011-09-01

    The respiratory muscles can present fatigue and even chronic inability to generate force. So, reliable devices are necessary to their evaluation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the MEP (Maximal Expiratory Pressure) values of individuals between 20 and 25 years old and to validate a protocol using a pressure transducer and a signal conditioner comparing it with the digital manometer. We evaluated the MEP of 10 participants. They remained seated and made six respiratory maneuvers from Total Lung Capacity (TLC) to Residual Volume (RV). The results in the study showed no statistically significant differences when compared to values reported in the literature, and that the pressure transducer provides reliable values for MEP. PMID:21969962

  8. Functional assessment of expiratory flow pattern in feline lower airway disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chung-Hui; Lee, Jih-Jong; Liu, Chen-Hsuan

    2014-08-01

    Feline lower airway disease (FLAD) is a chronic respiratory disease of which there is a lack of information on functional assessment in current veterinary medicine. The purposes of this study were to investigate expiratory pattern and evaluate the diagnostic utility of functional parameters in cats with FLAD. Thirty-three client-owned cats (23 FLAD cats and 10 control cats) were studied. Under quiet tidal breathing, pseudo-tidal breathing flow-volume loop (pTBFVL) was obtained from a barometric whole body plethysmography (BWBP) device. There were significant differences in the shapes of expiratory, but not inspiratory, curves between FLAD and control cats. The incidence of the presence of concave expiratory curve indicating lower airway obstruction was 74% in FLAD cats. To assess the diagnostic utility of pTBFVL indices in cats with FLAD, area under the receiver-operator curve was 0.86 for PEF/EF50 (peak expiratory flow divided by expiratory flow at end expiratory volume plus 50% tidal volume); a cuff-off value of PEF/EF50 >1.51 distinguished normal from FLAD (73.9% sensitivity, 100% specificity). There were no significant differences in traditionally measured BWBP parameters (ie, enhanced pause) between cats with and without FLAD in the present study. In conclusion, underlying change on expiratory flow pattern during natural tidal breathing existed in FLAD cats, and selected pTBFVL indices were useful in discriminating FLAD from normal cats. Tidal breathing pattern depicted by pseudoflow-pseudovolume loops from a BWBP system could be a non-invasive tool for functional assessment in client-owned cats. PMID:24327372

  9. Abdominal muscle activity during breathing with and without inspiratory and expiratory loads in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Mesquita Montes, António; Baptista, João; Crasto, Carlos; de Melo, Cristina Argel; Santos, Rita; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo

    2016-10-01

    Central Nervous System modulates the motor activities of all trunk muscles to concurrently regulate the intra-abdominal and intra-thoracic pressures. The study aims to evaluate the effect of inspiratory and expiratory loads on abdominal muscle activity during breathing in healthy subjects. Twenty-three higher education students (21.09±1.56years; 8males) breathed at a same rhythm (inspiration: two seconds; expiration: four seconds) without load and with 10% of the maximal inspiratory or expiratory pressures, in standing. Surface electromyography was performed to assess the activation intensity of rectus abdominis, external oblique and transversus abdominis/internal oblique muscles, during inspiration and expiration. During inspiration, transversus abdominis/internal oblique activation intensity was significantly lower with inspiratory load when compared to without load (p=0.009) and expiratory load (p=0.002). During expiration, the activation intensity of all abdominal muscles was significantly higher with expiratory load when compared to without load (p<0.05). The activation intensity of external oblique (p=0.036) and transversus abdominis/internal oblique (p=0.022) was significantly higher with inspiratory load when compared to without load. Transversus abdominis/internal oblique activation intensity was significantly higher with expiratory load when compared to inspiratory load (p<0.001). Transversus abdominis/internal oblique seems to be the most relevant muscle to modulate the intra-abdominal pressure for the breathing mechanics. PMID:27434376

  10. Abdominal expiratory activity in the rat brainstem-spinal cord in situ: patterns, origins and implications for respiratory rhythm generation.

    PubMed

    Abdala, A P L; Rybak, I A; Smith, J C; Paton, J F R

    2009-07-15

    We studied respiratory neural activity generated during expiration. Motoneuronal activity was recorded simultaneously from abdominal (AbN), phrenic (PN), hypoglossal (HN) and central vagus nerves from neonatal and juvenile rats in situ. During eupnoeic activity, low-amplitude post-inspiratory (post-I) discharge was only present in AbN motor outflow. Expression of AbN late-expiratory (late-E) activity, preceding PN bursts, occurred during hypercapnia. Biphasic expiratory (biphasic-E) activity with pre-inspiratory (pre-I) and post-I discharges occurred only during eucapnic anoxia or hypercapnic anoxia. Late-E activity generated during hypercapnia (7-10% CO(2)) was abolished with pontine transections or chemical suppression of retrotrapezoid nucleus/ventrolateral parafacial (RTN/vlPF). AbN late-E activity during hypercapnia is coupled with augmented pre-I discharge in HN, truncated PN burst, and was quiescent during inspiration. Our data suggest that the pons provides a necessary excitatory drive to an additional neural oscillatory mechanism that is only activated under conditions of high respiratory drive to generate late-E activity destined for AbN motoneurones. This mechanism may arise from neurons located in the RTN/vlPF or the latter may relay late-E activity generated elsewhere. We hypothesize that this oscillatory mechanism is not a necessary component of the respiratory central pattern generator but constitutes a defensive mechanism activated under critical metabolic conditions to provide forced expiration and reduced upper airway resistance simultaneously. Possible interactions of this oscillator with components of the brainstem respiratory network are discussed.

  11. Accuracy of forced oscillation technique to assess lung function in geriatric COPD population

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Hoi Nam; Tseng, Cee Zhung Steven; Wong, King Ying; Yee, Kwok Sang; Ng, Lai Yun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Performing lung function test in geriatric patients has never been an easy task. With well-established evidence indicating impaired small airway function and air trapping in patients with geriatric COPD, utilizing forced oscillation technique (FOT) as a supplementary tool may aid in the assessment of lung function in this population. Aims To study the use of FOT in the assessment of airflow limitation and air trapping in geriatric COPD patients. Study design A cross-sectional study in a public hospital in Hong Kong. ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT01553812. Methods Geriatric patients who had spirometry-diagnosed COPD were recruited, with both FOT and plethysmography performed. “Resistance” and “reactance” FOT parameters were compared to plethysmography for the assessment of air trapping and airflow limitation. Results In total, 158 COPD subjects with a mean age of 71.9±0.7 years and percentage of forced expiratory volume in 1 second of 53.4±1.7 L were recruited. FOT values had a good correlation (r=0.4–0.7) to spirometric data. In general, X values (reactance) were better than R values (resistance), showing a higher correlation with spirometric data in airflow limitation (r=0.07–0.49 vs 0.61–0.67), small airway (r=0.05–0.48 vs 0.56–0.65), and lung volume (r=0.12–0.29 vs 0.43–0.49). In addition, resonance frequency (Fres) and frequency dependence (FDep) could well identify the severe type (percentage of forced expiratory volume in 1 second <50%) of COPD with high sensitivity (0.76, 0.71) and specificity (0.72, 0.64) (area under the curve: 0.8 and 0.77, respectively). Moreover, X values could stratify different severities of air trapping, while R values could not. Conclusion FOT may act as a simple and accurate tool in the assessment of severity of airflow limitation, small and central airway function, and air trapping in patients with geriatric COPD who have difficulties performing conventional lung function test. Moreover, reactance

  12. Management of mechanical ventilation in brain injury: hyperventilation and positive end-expiratory pressure.

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Abreu, Matheus; Almeida, Mônica Lajana de

    2009-03-01

    The study intended to make a critical review on use of pulmonary hyperventilation maneuvers and the different positive end-expiratory pressures applied to traumatic brain injury patients. As a reference were used publications in English, Spanish and Portuguese, contained in the following databases: MedLine, SciELO and LILACS, from 2000 to 2007, we included all studies about the use of pulmonary hyperventilation maneuvers and the different positive end-expiratory levels used for adult patients with brain injury at acute or chronic stage. Thirty one trials were selected, 13 about pulmonary hyperventilation, as prophylaxis, prolonged or optimized and 9 shows the levels of positive end-expiratory pressures used, ranging from 0 to 15 cmH2O. The prophylactic hyperventilation maneuver in the first 24 hours can lead to an increase of cerebral ischemia; the prolonged hyperventilation must be avoided if intracranial pressure did not increase; however optimized hyperventilation seems to be the most promising technique for control of the intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure; the rise of the positive end-expiratory pressure, up to 15cmH2O, can be applied in a conscientious form aiming to increase arterial oxygen saturation in lung injury.

  13. Inspiratory and expiratory resistive load detection in normal and asthmatic subjects. A sensory decision theory analysis.

    PubMed

    Bonnel, A M; Mathiot, M J; Grimaud, C

    1985-01-01

    The ability to detect added external inspiratory and expiratory resistive loads was studied in normal and asthmatic subjects using sensory decision theory as a psychophysical method. Performances P(A)/delta R [where P(A) represents the index of sensitivity and delta R the additional resistor] were similar in normal and asthmatic subjects, but when sensitivity was expressed in relation to airway resistance [P(A)/delta R/Raw], asthmatics showed higher inspiratory and expiratory performances than normal subjects. After bronchodilation the relative sensitivity in the asthmatic group was impaired and approached that of normal subjects. Comparing inspiratory and expiratory load detection, normal subjects showed a higher sensitivity for expiratory than for inspiratory loads. In contrast, there was no difference in the asthmatic group. The response bias remained the same across conditions. If one accepts the assumption that the variability of sensitivity presented by asthmatic and normal subjects might be related to the variable state of their pulmonary function, our results can be interpreted as demonstrating a relationship between sensitivity and pulmonary distension or airway obstruction. These results are in agreement with the hypothesis that the site of perception for respiratory load detection is the chest wall. PMID:4023435

  14. Acoustic characteristics of voluntary expiratory sounds after swallow for detecting dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, M; Yokoyama, K; Takei, Y; Furuya, N; Nakamichi, Y; Ihara, Y; Takahashi, K; Groher, M E

    2014-09-01

    This research was designed to investigate the acoustic characteristics of voluntary expiratory sounds after swallow for detecting dysphagia. Forty-nine patients with complaints of swallow difficulty received a videofluorographic (VF) examination. They were divided into three groups: nine who did not have any apparent disease (Group N), 22 patients with head and neck cancer (Group H&N) and 18 patients with other diseases including cerebrovascular disease (Group OD). After liquid barium swallows, they exhaled voluntarily without voicing. Videofluorographic findings were classified into four groups: normal (Normal), acceptable swallow (Acceptable), swallow with residue (Resid) and swallows with penetration or aspiration (Pen/Asp). The duration of expiratory sounds was measured on the time waveform. Frequency characteristics of expiratory sounds were obtained using one-third octave band analysis ranging from 62·5 to 2000·0 Hz of central frequency. The averaged level of the 1000·0-Hz band was chosen as the reference band level (RB level). The revised averaged level of each band was obtained by subtracting the RB level from the averaged level of each band. Zero decibel of the revised magnitude of the 125·0-Hz band was set as the critical value to differentiate dysphagia (Resid or Pen/Asp) from no dysphagia (Normal or Acceptable). Comparison of this assessment with VF findings showed a significant percentage agreement (85·4%). These results suggest that frequency characteristics of post-swallow expiratory sounds can differentiate dysphagia from no dysphagia among multiple dysphagic patient groups.

  15. The differential effects of inspiratory, expiratory, and combined resistive breathing on healthy lung

    PubMed Central

    Loverdos, Konstantinos; Toumpanakis, Dimitrios; Litsiou, Eleni; Karavana, Vassiliki; Glynos, Constantinos; Magkou, Christina; Theocharis, Stamatios; Vassilakopoulos, Theodoros

    2016-01-01

    Combined resistive breathing (CRB) is the hallmark of obstructive airway disease pathophysiology. We have previously shown that severe inspiratory resistive breathing (IRB) induces acute lung injury in healthy rats. The role of expiratory resistance is unknown. The possibility of a load-dependent type of resistive breathing-induced lung injury also remains elusive. Our aim was to investigate the differential effects of IRB, expiratory resistive breathing (ERB), and CRB on healthy rat lung and establish the lowest loads required to induce injury. Anesthetized tracheostomized rats breathed through a two-way valve. Varying resistances were connected to the inspiratory, expiratory, or both ports, so that the peak inspiratory pressure (IRB) was 20%–40% or peak expiratory (ERB) was 40%–70% of maximum. CRB was assessed in inspiratory/expiratory pressures of 30%/50%, 40%/50%, and 40%/60% of maximum. Quietly breathing animals served as controls. At 6 hours, respiratory system mechanics were measured, and bronchoalveolar lavage was performed for measurement of cell and protein concentration. Lung tissue interleukin-6 and interleukin-1β levels were estimated, and a lung injury histological score was determined. ERB produced significant, load-independent neutrophilia, without mechanical or permeability derangements. IRB 30% was the lowest inspiratory load that provoked lung injury. CRB increased tissue elasticity, bronchoalveolar lavage total cell, macrophage and neutrophil counts, protein and cytokine levels, and lung injury score in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, CRB load dependently deranges mechanics, increases permeability, and induces inflammation in healthy rats. ERB is a putative inflammatory stimulus for the lung. PMID:27499619

  16. Long-term facilitation of expiratory and sympathetic activities following acute intermittent hypoxia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lemes, Eduardo V.; Aiko, Simone; Orbem, Caroline B.; Formentin, Cleiton; Bassi, Mirian; Colombari, Eduardo; Zoccal, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) promotes persistent increases in ventilation and sympathetic activity, referred as long-term facilitation (LTF). Augmented inspiratory activity is suggested as a major component of respiratory LTF. In the present study, we hypothesized that AIH also elicits a sustained increase in expiratory motor activity. We also investigated whether the expiratory LTF contributes to the development of sympathetic LTF after AIH. Methods Rats were exposed to AIH (10 × 6–7 % O2 for 45 s, every 5 min) and the cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated during 60 min using in vivo and in situ approaches. Results In unanesthetized conditions (n=9), AIH elicited a modest but sustained increase in baseline mean arterial pressure (MAP, 104±2 vs 111±3 mmHg, P<0.05) associated with enhanced sympathetic and respiratory-related variabilities. In the in situ preparations (n=9), AIH evoked LTF in phrenic (33±12%), thoracic sympathetic (75±25%) and abdominal nerve activities (69±14%). The sympathetic overactivity after AIH was phase-locked with the emergence of bursts in abdominal activity during the late-expiratory phase. In anesthetized vagus-intact animals, AIH increased baseline MAP (113±3 vs 122±2 mmHg, P<0.05) and abdominal muscle activity (535±94%), which were eliminated after pharmacological inhibition of the retrotrapezoid nucleus/parafacial respiratory group (RTN/pFRG). Conclusion These findings indicate that increased expiratory activity is also an important component of AIH-elicited respiratory LTF. Moreover, the development of sympathetic LTF after AIH is linked to the emergence of active expiratory pattern and depends on the integrity of the neurones of the RTN/pFRG. PMID:26910756

  17. Correlated Variability in the Breathing Pattern and End-Expiratory Lung Volumes in Conscious Humans

    PubMed Central

    Dellaca, Raffaele L.; Aliverti, Andrea; Lo Mauro, Antonella; Lutchen, Kenneth R.; Pedotti, Antonio; Suki, Bela

    2015-01-01

    In order to characterize the variability and correlation properties of spontaneous breathing in humans, the breathing pattern of 16 seated healthy subjects was studied during 40 min of quiet breathing using opto-electronic plethysmography, a contactless technology that measures total and compartmental chest wall volumes without interfering with the subjects breathing. From these signals, tidal volume (VT), respiratory time (TTOT) and the other breathing pattern parameters were computed breath-by-breath together with the end-expiratory total and compartmental (pulmonary rib cage and abdomen) chest wall volume changes. The correlation properties of these variables were quantified by detrended fluctuation analysis, computing the scaling exponentα. VT, TTOT and the other breathing pattern variables showed α values between 0.60 (for minute ventilation) to 0.71 (for respiratory rate), all significantly lower than the ones obtained for end-expiratory volumes, that ranged between 1.05 (for rib cage) and 1.13 (for abdomen) with no significant differences between compartments. The much stronger long-range correlations of the end expiratory volumes were interpreted by a neuromechanical network model consisting of five neuron groups in the brain respiratory center coupled with the mechanical properties of the respiratory system modeled as a simple Kelvin body. The model-based α for VT is 0.57, similar to the experimental data. While the α for TTOT was slightly lower than the experimental values, the model correctly predicted α for end-expiratory lung volumes (1.045). In conclusion, we propose that the correlations in the timing and amplitude of the physiological variables originate from the brain with the exception of end-expiratory lung volume, which shows the strongest correlations largely due to the contribution of the viscoelastic properties of the tissues. This cycle-by-cycle variability may have a significant impact on the functioning of adherent cells in the

  18. 5-HT-1A receptor-mediated modulation of medullary expiratory neurones in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Lalley, P M; Bischoff, A M; Richter, D W

    1994-01-01

    The involvement of the 5-HT-1A receptor in serotoninergic responses of stage 2 expiratory (E-2) neurones was investigated in pentobarbitone-anaesthetized, mechanically ventilated cats. The specific agonist of the 5-HT-1A receptor, 8-hydroxy-diproplaminotetralin (8-OH-DPAT), administered systemically or by ionophoresis directly on to the neurones, had a clear depressant effect. Administration of 8-OH-DPAT at doses of 10-50 micrograms kg-1 (I.V.) increased the membrane hyperpolarizations of E-2 neurones during the inspiratory and postinspiratory phases, and shortened their duration of activity in association with shortening of phrenic nerve activity. Discharges of E-2 neurones were also less intense. At doses of 50-90 micrograms kg-1, 8-OH-DPAT reduced or abolished inspiratory hyperpolarizations, and reduced expiratory depolarizations of membrane potential and discharge in parallel with inhibition of phrenic nerve discharges. The effects of the larger doses were reversed by I.V. injection of NAN-190, an antagonist at the 5-HT-1A receptor. Dose-dependent effects on the membrane potential and discharge of E-2 neurones, but not on phrenic nerve activity, were also seen by ionophoretic administration of 8-OH-DPAT on to E-2 neurones. At low currents, ejection of 8-OH-DPAT hyperpolarized the neurones without affecting the duration of inspiratory hyperpolarization and expiratory depolarization. This hyperpolarization depressed the intensity and the duration of expiratory discharges. Ejection with larger currents hyperpolarized the E-2 neurones further, and depressed expiratory depolarization leading to blockade of expiratory discharges. The effects on membrane potential were accompanied by decreased neuronal input resistance. This depressed the excitability of E-2 neurones as tested by discharge evoked by intracellular current injection. The amplitudes of action potentials decreased in parallel with the changes in input resistance. The effects were attributed to a

  19. Early warning and prevention of pneumonia in acute leukemia by patient education, spirometry, and positive expiratory pressure: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Møller, Tom; Moser, Claus; Adamsen, Lis; Rugaard, Grith; Jarden, Mary; Bøtcher, Tina S; Wiedenbein, Liza; Kjeldsen, Lars

    2016-03-01

    Long-lasting neutropenia associated with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and its treatment gives rise to a high risk of pneumonia. The use of broad-spectrum antibiotic prophylaxis during outpatient management has not completely protected patients against admission due to infections and neutropenic fever, emphasizing the need to approach infection protection with complementary efforts. In a randomized controlled design, we examined the applicability of patient-performed daily spirometry [forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)] as an early warning tool and explored the effectiveness of positive expiratory pressure (PEP) in preventing pneumonia among 80 AML patients. Twenty-five incidences of pneumonia were detected among 23 patients (6 interventions, 17 controls), giving a prevalence of 28.75% during 5420 days of observation. We found a significant difference in incidence between intervention versus control group (2.17 per 1000 days vs. 6.52 per 1000 days, P = 0.021, respectively). A cross point at 80-76% of the personal FEV1 reference value showed high sensitivity and specificity on pneumonia development. Our data demonstrate the feasibility of educating AML patients in their continuous daily measurement of FEV1 and use of PEP. Daily measures of FEV1 may be an important early warning tool for assessment of pulmonary deterioration during critical phases of neutropenia. We suggest that strategic patient education in the use of spirometry and PEP should be part of standard of care for AML patients undergoing induction chemotherapy. PMID:26661344

  20. Early warning and prevention of pneumonia in acute leukemia by patient education, spirometry, and positive expiratory pressure: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Møller, Tom; Moser, Claus; Adamsen, Lis; Rugaard, Grith; Jarden, Mary; Bøtcher, Tina S; Wiedenbein, Liza; Kjeldsen, Lars

    2016-03-01

    Long-lasting neutropenia associated with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and its treatment gives rise to a high risk of pneumonia. The use of broad-spectrum antibiotic prophylaxis during outpatient management has not completely protected patients against admission due to infections and neutropenic fever, emphasizing the need to approach infection protection with complementary efforts. In a randomized controlled design, we examined the applicability of patient-performed daily spirometry [forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)] as an early warning tool and explored the effectiveness of positive expiratory pressure (PEP) in preventing pneumonia among 80 AML patients. Twenty-five incidences of pneumonia were detected among 23 patients (6 interventions, 17 controls), giving a prevalence of 28.75% during 5420 days of observation. We found a significant difference in incidence between intervention versus control group (2.17 per 1000 days vs. 6.52 per 1000 days, P = 0.021, respectively). A cross point at 80-76% of the personal FEV1 reference value showed high sensitivity and specificity on pneumonia development. Our data demonstrate the feasibility of educating AML patients in their continuous daily measurement of FEV1 and use of PEP. Daily measures of FEV1 may be an important early warning tool for assessment of pulmonary deterioration during critical phases of neutropenia. We suggest that strategic patient education in the use of spirometry and PEP should be part of standard of care for AML patients undergoing induction chemotherapy.

  1. Oahu Solar Measurement Grid (1-Year Archive): 1-Second Solar Irradiance; Oahu, Hawaii (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Sengupta, M.; Andreas, A.

    2010-03-16

    Seventeen measurement stations in the south western region of the island of Oahu collected data at 1-second intervals over the course of a year. The sensors are located in a 1-kilometer grid and the information then can be used to predict what PV outputs might be at 1-second intervals for medium-sized and large PV systems. This DOE-funded study by NREL supports the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI), a multifaceted program to substantially increase the use of renewable energy in Hawaii.

  2. Expiratory muscle loading increases intercostal muscle blood flow during leg exercise in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulos, Dimitris; Louvaris, Zafeiris; Cherouveim, Evgenia; Andrianopoulos, Vasilis; Roussos, Charis; Zakynthinos, Spyros; Vogiatzis, Ioannis

    2010-08-01

    We investigated whether expiratory muscle loading induced by the application of expiratory flow limitation (EFL) during exercise in healthy subjects causes a reduction in quadriceps muscle blood flow in favor of the blood flow to the intercostal muscles. We hypothesized that, during exercise with EFL quadriceps muscle blood flow would be reduced, whereas intercostal muscle blood flow would be increased compared with exercise without EFL. We initially performed an incremental exercise test on eight healthy male subjects with a Starling resistor in the expiratory line limiting expiratory flow to approximately 1 l/s to determine peak EFL exercise workload. On a different day, two constant-load exercise trials were performed in a balanced ordering sequence, during which subjects exercised with or without EFL at peak EFL exercise workload for 6 min. Intercostal (probe over the 7th intercostal space) and vastus lateralis muscle blood flow index (BFI) was calculated by near-infrared spectroscopy using indocyanine green, whereas cardiac output (CO) was measured by an impedance cardiography technique. At exercise termination, CO and stroke volume were not significantly different during exercise, with or without EFL (CO: 16.5 vs. 15.2 l/min, stroke volume: 104 vs. 107 ml/beat). Quadriceps muscle BFI during exercise with EFL (5.4 nM/s) was significantly (P = 0.043) lower compared with exercise without EFL (7.6 nM/s), whereas intercostal muscle BFI during exercise with EFL (3.5 nM/s) was significantly (P = 0.021) greater compared with that recorded during control exercise (0.4 nM/s). In conclusion, increased respiratory muscle loading during exercise in healthy humans causes an increase in blood flow to the intercostal muscles and a concomitant decrease in quadriceps muscle blood flow.

  3. Negative Expiratory Pressure Technique: An Awake Test to Measure Upper Airway Collapsibility in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Helena Larramona; Marcus, Carole L.; McDonough, Joseph M.; Morera, Joan C. Oliva; Huang, Jingtao; Farre, Ramon; Montserrat, Josep M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Upper airway (UA) collapsibility is a major pathophysiologic feature of the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). In adolescents, it is measured by obtaining the slope of pressure-flow relationship (SPF) while applying negative nasal pressure during sleep. An easier technique to assess UA collapsibility, consisting of application of negative expiratory pressure (NEP) during wakefulness, has demonstrated differences between control and OSAS subjects. We hypothesized that the NEP technique would correlate with SPF as a measurement of UA collapsibility in adolescents. Design: During wakefulness, NEP of −5 cm H2O in the seated and supine position was applied during the first second of expiration. The area under the expiratory flow-volume curve during NEP was compared to tidal breathing (RatioNEP). In addition, adolescents underwent SPF measurements during sleep. Two SPF techniques were performed to measure the activated and relatively hypotonic UA. Setting: Pediatric sleep laboratory. Participants: Seven adolescents with OSAS and 20 controls. Results: In the seated position, there was a correlation between RatioNEP and both hypotonic SPF (r = −0.39, P = 0.04) and activated SPF (r = −0.62, P = 0.001). In the supine position, there was a correlation between RatioNEP and activated SPF (r = −0.43, P = 0.03) and a trend for hypotonic SPF (r = −0.38, P = 0.06). Conclusions: The negative expiratory pressure (NEP) technique correlates with the hypotonic and activated slope of pressure-flow relationship measurements. The seated position showed the strongest correlation. The NEP technique can be used as an alternative method to evaluate upper airway collapsibility in adolescents. Citation: Carrera HL, Marcus CL, McDonough JM, Morera JC, Huang J, Farre R, Montserrat JM. Negative expiratory pressure technique: an awake test to measure upper airway collapsibility in adolescents. SLEEP 2015;38(11):1783–1791. PMID:26158888

  4. Cerebral blood flow assessment of preterm infants during respiratory therapy with the expiratory flow increase technique

    PubMed Central

    Bassani, Mariana Almada; Caldas, Jamil Pedro Siqueira; Netto, Abimael Aranha; Marba, Sérgio Tadeu Martins

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To assess the impact of respiratory therapy with the expiratory flow increase technique on cerebral hemodynamics of premature newborns. Methods: This is an intervention study, which included 40 preterm infants (≤34 weeks) aged 8-15 days of life, clinically stable in ambient air or oxygen catheter use. Children with heart defects, diagnosis of brain lesion and/or those using vasoactive drugs were excluded. Ultrasonographic assessments with transcranial Doppler flowmetry were performed before, during and after the increase in expiratory flow session, which lasted 5min. Cerebral blood flow velocity and resistance and pulsatility indices in the pericallosal artery were assessed. Results: Respiratory physical therapy did not significantly alter flow velocity at the systolic peak (p=0.50), the end diastolic flow velocity (p=0.17), the mean flow velocity (p=0.07), the resistance index (p=0.41) and the pulsatility index (p=0.67) over time. Conclusions: The expiratory flow increase technique did not affect cerebral blood flow in clinically-stable preterm infants. PMID:26611888

  5. Expiratory Time Constant and Sleep Apnea Severity in the Overlap Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wiriyaporn, Darunee; Wang, Lu; Aboussouan, Loutfi S.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Lung mechanics in the overlap of COPD and sleep apnea impact the severity of sleep apnea. Specifically, increased lung compliance with hyperinflation protects against sleep apnea, whereas increased airway resistance worsens sleep apnea. We sought to assess whether the expiratory time constant, which reflects lung mechanics, is associated with sleep apnea severity in such patients. Methods: Polysomnographies in 34 subjects with the overlap syndrome were reviewed. Three time constants were measured for each of up to 5 stages (wake, NREM stages, and REM). The time constants were derived by fitting time and pressure coordinates on the expiratory portion of a nasal pressure signal along an exponentially decaying equation, and solving for the time constant. Demographics, morphometrics, wake end-tidal CO2, right diaphragmatic arc on a chest radiograph, and the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) were recorded. Results: The time constant was not associated with age, gender, body mass index, right diaphragmatic arc, or wake end-tidal CO2, and was not significantly different between sleep stages. A mean time constant (TC) was therefore obtained. Subjects with a TC > 0.5 seconds had a greater AHI than those with a TC ≤ 0.5 seconds (median AHI 58 vs. 18, respectively, p = 0.003; Odds ratio of severe sleep apnea 10.6, 95% CI 3.9–51.1, p = 0.005). Conclusions: A larger time constant in the overlap syndrome is associated with increased odds of severe sleep apnea, suggesting a greater importance of airway resistance relative to lung compliance in sleep apnea causation in these subjects. Citation: Wiriyaporn D, Wang L, Aboussouan LS. Expiratory time constant and sleep apnea severity in the overlap syndrome. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(3):327–332. PMID:26414979

  6. Maximal expiratory and inspiratory flow-volume curves in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bogaard, J M; Hovestadt, A; Meerwaldt, J; vd Meché, F G; Stigt, J

    1989-03-01

    In order to investigate the type and degree of upper airway obstruction (UAO) in a group of patients with Parkinson's disease in different stages of the disease, we obtained maximal expiratory and inspiratory flow-volume (MEFV and MIFV) curves and maximal static mouth pressures. The clinical disability was indicated by a Hoehn-Yahr (H-Y) scale, ranging from III to V, and a more continuous Northwestern University Disability Scale (NUDS), ranging from zero to 50. Twelve patients were in H-Y Group III, and eleven and eight were in Groups IV and V, respectively. The pattern of the flow-volume curves was classified as either normal, or with superimposed regular or irregular oscillations (A), or with rounded-off and delayed expiratory peak appearance (B). Mean MEFV curves in Groups III and IV were not appreciably different from reference. In Group V, the mean curve showed a lower peak expiratory flow (PEF) and a more convex tail. Only the effort-dependent variables PEF, peak inspiratory flow (PIF), and maximal mouth pressures at RV and TLC (PmTLC and PmRV) appeared to be significantly correlated with the NUDS index and decreased with increasing clinical disability. The mean values of those variables were also significantly different between the H-Y groups. The number of normal curves decreased from H-Y Group III to Group V. The contribution of A and B curves was relatively equal in the groups, with only a small number of A curves.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Effects of chest wall compression on expiratory flow rates in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Nozoe, Masafumi; Mase, Kyoshi; Ogino, Tomoyuki; Murakami, Shigefumi; Takashima, Sachie; Domen, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Manual chest wall compression (CWC) during expiration is a technique for removing airway secretions in patients with respiratory disorders. However, there have been no reports about the physiological effects of CWC in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Objective: To compare the effects of CWC on expiratory flow rates in patients with COPD and asymptomatic controls. Method: Fourteen subjects were recruited from among patients with COPD who were receiving pulmonary rehabilitation at the University Hospital (COPD group). Fourteen age-matched healthy subjects were also consecutively recruited from the local community (Healthy control group). Airflow and lung volume changes were measured continuously with the subjects lying in supine position during 1 minute of quiet breathing (QB) and during 1 minute of CWC by a physical therapist. Results: During CWC, both the COPD group and the healthy control group showed significantly higher peak expiratory flow rates (PEFRs) than during QB (mean difference for COPD group 0.14 L/sec, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.04 to 0.24, p<0.01, mean difference for healthy control group 0.39 L/sec, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.57, p<0.01). In the between-group comparisons, PEFR was significantly higher in the healthy control group than in the COPD group (-0.25 L/sec, 95% CI -0.43 to -0.07, p<0.01). However, the expiratory flow rates at the lung volume at the PEFR during QB and at 50% and 25% of tidal volume during QB increased in the healthy control group (mean difference for healthy control group 0.31 L/sec, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.47, p<0.01: 0.31 L/sec, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.47, p<0.01: 0.27 L/sec, 95% CI 0.13 to 0.41, p<0.01, respectively) but not in the COPD group (0.05 L/sec, 95% CI -0.01 to 0.12: -0.01 L/sec, 95% CI -0.11 to 0.08: 0.02 L/sec, 95% CI -0.05 to 0.90) with the application of CWC. Conclusion: The effects of chest wall compression on expiratory flow rates was different between COPD patients and asymptomatic

  8. Quantifying the shape of maximal expiratory flow-volume curves in healthy humans and asthmatic patients.

    PubMed

    Dominelli, Paolo B; Molgat-Seon, Yannick; Foster, Glen E; Dominelli, Giulio S; Haverkamp, Hans C; Henderson, William R; Sheel, A William

    2016-01-01

    Differences in the absolute flow and volume of maximal expiratory flow-volume (MEFV) curves have been studied extensively in health and disease. However, the shapes of MEFV curves have received less attention. We questioned if the MEFV curve shape was associated with (i) expiratory flow limitation (EFL) in health and (ii) changes in bronchial caliber in asthmatics. Using the slope-ratio (SR) index, we quantified MEFV curve shape in 84 healthy subjects and 8 matched asthmatics. Healthy subjects performed a maximal exercise test to assess EFL. Those with EFL during had a greater SR (1.15 ± 0.20 vs. 0.85 ± 0.20, p<0.05) yet, there was no association between maximal oxygen consumption and SR (r=0.14, p>0.05). Asthmatics average SR was greater than the healthy subjects (1.35 ± 0.03 vs. 0.90 ± 0.11, p<0.05), but there were no differences when bronchial caliber was manipulated. In conclusion, a greater SR is related to EFL and this metric could aid in discriminating between groups known to differ in the absolute size of MEFV curves.

  9. [Chronic cough in the elderly is associated with expiratory flow limitation].

    PubMed

    Frappé, E; Gautier-Guillot, M; Barthélémy, J-C; Maudoux, D; Roche, F; Costes, F

    2013-03-01

    As chronic respiratory symptoms and the presence of expiratory flow limitation (EFL) are commonly reported in the elderly, we investigated whether they were associated in a population of 75 years old volunteers. We analyzed the results of a prevalence survey of chronic respiratory symptoms and respiratory infections, and performed spirometry and measured EFL after application of a negative expiratory pressure at the mouth (NEP). EFL was present in 170 (46%) subjects, a chronic cough in 49 (13%), chronic sputum in 58 (29%) and a history of respiratory infection in 62 (17%). Chronic cough and the composite outcome "chronic cough or sputum" were significantly associated with the presence of EFL (respectively 60% vs. 43%, OR=2.04 [1.09 to 3.78], P=0.023, and 56% vs. 43%, OR=1.74 [1.05 to 2.87], P=0.04), after controlling for smoking or airway obstruction. History of respiratory infections were not associated with an increased prevalence of EFL. We concluded that the presence of a LED could be an interesting indicator of respiratory aging. Its detection could be advocated in elderly subjects presenting with respiratory symptoms.

  10. Dynamic pulmonary hyperinflation occurs without expiratory flow limitation in chronic heart failure during exercise.

    PubMed

    Chiari, Stefania; Torregiani, Chiara; Boni, Enrico; Bassini, Sonia; Vizzardi, Enrico; Tantucci, Claudio

    2013-10-01

    To assess the occurrence of tidal expiratory flow limitation (EFL) and/or dynamic pulmonary hyperinflation (DH) in chronic heart failure (CHF) during exercise 15 patients with stable systolic CHF, aged 69 ± 6yr, underwent pulmonary function testing and incremental cardio-pulmonary exercise testing. They subsequently performed constant load exercise testing at 30, 60 and 90% of respective maximum workload. At each step the presence of EFL, by negative expiratory pressure technique, and changes in inspiratory capacity (IC) were assessed. Ejection fraction amounted to 36 ± 6% and VO₂, peak (77 ± 19% pred.) was reduced. EFL was absent at any step during constant load exercise. In 6 patients IC decreased more than 10% pred. at highest step. Only in these patients TLC, FRC, RV FEF(25-75%) and DL(CO) were decreased at rest. VO₂, peak correlated with DL(CO), TLC and IC at rest and with IC (r(2)=0.59; p<0.001) and decrease in IC (r(2)=0.44; p<0.001) at 90% of maximum workload. During exercise CHF patients do not exhibit EFL, but some of them develop DH that is associated with lower VO₂, peak.

  11. A model of end-expiratory lung impedance dependency on total extracellular body water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchomel, J.; Sobota, V.

    2013-04-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is an attractive method for clinical monitoring of patients during mechanical ventilation. This study evaluates lung impedance measurements using Dräger PulmoVista 500 EIT system on an animal model. Mechanically ventilated model was created. Vital signs were monitored as well as mechanical ventilation parameters. Extracellular fluid balance and blood volume were handled as follows: 30-40% of total blood volume were removed and returned back, 0.5 to 1 litre of Ringer's solution was injected afterwards. The quantity of injected fluids was recorded for each animal. During this process thoracic electrical impedance measurement was performed. Recorded data from PulmoVista 500 EIT system were analysed using the official Dräger EIT Data Analysis Tool. The dependency of end-expiratory lung impedance on the change of fluid balance was observed. The relation between end-expiratory (minimum impedance value) frames and changes of fluid balance is shown. Preliminary results strongly support the expectation that electrical impedance of thorax can be affected by total extracellular fluid change.

  12. [Chronic cough in the elderly is associated with expiratory flow limitation].

    PubMed

    Frappé, E; Gautier-Guillot, M; Barthélémy, J-C; Maudoux, D; Roche, F; Costes, F

    2013-03-01

    As chronic respiratory symptoms and the presence of expiratory flow limitation (EFL) are commonly reported in the elderly, we investigated whether they were associated in a population of 75 years old volunteers. We analyzed the results of a prevalence survey of chronic respiratory symptoms and respiratory infections, and performed spirometry and measured EFL after application of a negative expiratory pressure at the mouth (NEP). EFL was present in 170 (46%) subjects, a chronic cough in 49 (13%), chronic sputum in 58 (29%) and a history of respiratory infection in 62 (17%). Chronic cough and the composite outcome "chronic cough or sputum" were significantly associated with the presence of EFL (respectively 60% vs. 43%, OR=2.04 [1.09 to 3.78], P=0.023, and 56% vs. 43%, OR=1.74 [1.05 to 2.87], P=0.04), after controlling for smoking or airway obstruction. History of respiratory infections were not associated with an increased prevalence of EFL. We concluded that the presence of a LED could be an interesting indicator of respiratory aging. Its detection could be advocated in elderly subjects presenting with respiratory symptoms. PMID:23497927

  13. Quantifying the shape of maximal expiratory flow-volume curves in healthy humans and asthmatic patients.

    PubMed

    Dominelli, Paolo B; Molgat-Seon, Yannick; Foster, Glen E; Dominelli, Giulio S; Haverkamp, Hans C; Henderson, William R; Sheel, A William

    2016-01-01

    Differences in the absolute flow and volume of maximal expiratory flow-volume (MEFV) curves have been studied extensively in health and disease. However, the shapes of MEFV curves have received less attention. We questioned if the MEFV curve shape was associated with (i) expiratory flow limitation (EFL) in health and (ii) changes in bronchial caliber in asthmatics. Using the slope-ratio (SR) index, we quantified MEFV curve shape in 84 healthy subjects and 8 matched asthmatics. Healthy subjects performed a maximal exercise test to assess EFL. Those with EFL during had a greater SR (1.15 ± 0.20 vs. 0.85 ± 0.20, p<0.05) yet, there was no association between maximal oxygen consumption and SR (r=0.14, p>0.05). Asthmatics average SR was greater than the healthy subjects (1.35 ± 0.03 vs. 0.90 ± 0.11, p<0.05), but there were no differences when bronchial caliber was manipulated. In conclusion, a greater SR is related to EFL and this metric could aid in discriminating between groups known to differ in the absolute size of MEFV curves. PMID:26388199

  14. Dynamic pulmonary hyperinflation occurs without expiratory flow limitation in chronic heart failure during exercise.

    PubMed

    Chiari, Stefania; Torregiani, Chiara; Boni, Enrico; Bassini, Sonia; Vizzardi, Enrico; Tantucci, Claudio

    2013-10-01

    To assess the occurrence of tidal expiratory flow limitation (EFL) and/or dynamic pulmonary hyperinflation (DH) in chronic heart failure (CHF) during exercise 15 patients with stable systolic CHF, aged 69 ± 6yr, underwent pulmonary function testing and incremental cardio-pulmonary exercise testing. They subsequently performed constant load exercise testing at 30, 60 and 90% of respective maximum workload. At each step the presence of EFL, by negative expiratory pressure technique, and changes in inspiratory capacity (IC) were assessed. Ejection fraction amounted to 36 ± 6% and VO₂, peak (77 ± 19% pred.) was reduced. EFL was absent at any step during constant load exercise. In 6 patients IC decreased more than 10% pred. at highest step. Only in these patients TLC, FRC, RV FEF(25-75%) and DL(CO) were decreased at rest. VO₂, peak correlated with DL(CO), TLC and IC at rest and with IC (r(2)=0.59; p<0.001) and decrease in IC (r(2)=0.44; p<0.001) at 90% of maximum workload. During exercise CHF patients do not exhibit EFL, but some of them develop DH that is associated with lower VO₂, peak. PMID:23851110

  15. Effect of expiratory resistive loading on the noninvasive tension-time index in COPD.

    PubMed

    Thompson, W H; Carvalho, P; Souza, J P; Charan, N B

    2000-11-01

    Expiratory resistive loading (ERL) is used by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients to improve respiratory function. We, therefore, used a noninvasive tension-time index of the inspiratory muscles (TT(mus) = I/PI(max) x TI/TT, where I is mean inspiratory pressure estimated from the mouth occlusion pressure, PI(max) is maximal inspiratory pressure, TI is inspiratory time, and TT is total respiratory cycle time) to better define the effect of ERL on COPD patients. To accomplish this, we measured airway pressures, mouth occlusion pressure, respiratory cycle flow rates, and functional residual capacity (FRC) in 14 COPD patients and 10 normal subjects with and without the application of ERL. TT(mus) was then calculated and found to drop in both COPD and normal subjects (P<0.05). The decline in TT(mus) in both groups resulted solely from a prolongation of expiratory time with ERL (P<0.001 for COPD, P<0.05 for normal subjects). In contrast to the COPD patients, normal subjects had an elevation in I and FRC, thus minimizing the decline in TT(mus). In conclusion, ERL reduces the potential for inspiratory muscle fatigue in COPD by reducing TI/TT without affecting FRC and I. PMID:11053356

  16. Benefit of educational feedback for the use of positive expiratory pressure device

    PubMed Central

    Reychler, Gregory; Jacquemart, Manon; Poncin, William; Aubriot, Anne-Sophie; Liistro, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Positive expiratory pressure (PEP) is regularly used as a self-administered airway clearance technique. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the need to teach the correct use of the PEP device and to measure the progress of the success rate of the maneuver after training. METHOD: A PEP system (PariPEP-S Sytem) was used to generate PEP in 30 healthy volunteers. They were instructed by a qualified physical therapist to breathe correctly through the PEP device. Then they were evaluated during a set of ten expirations. Two other evaluations were performed at day 2 and day 8 (before and after feedback). The mean PEP and the success rate were calculated for each set of expirations. The number of maneuvers needed to obtain a correct use was calculated on the first session. RESULTS: An optimal PEP was reached after 7.5 SD 2.7 attempts by all subjects. Success rates and mean pressures were similar between the different sets of expirations (p=0.720 and p=0.326, respectively). Pressure variability was around 10%. After one week, 30% of subjects generated more than two non-optimal pressures in the set of ten expirations. No difference in success rate was observed depending on the evaluations. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that good initial training on the use of the PEP device and regular follow-up are required for the subject to reach optimal expiratory pressure. PMID:26647746

  17. Respiratory and abdominal muscle responses to expiratory threshold loading in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Cerny, F; Armitage, L; Hirsch, J A; Bishop, B

    1992-03-01

    We hypothesized that the hyperinflation and pulmonary dysfunction of cystic fibrosis (CF) would distort feedback and therefore alter the abdominal muscle response to graded expiratory threshold loads (ETLs). We compared the respiratory and abdominal muscle responses with graded ETLs of seven CF patients with severe lung dysfunction with those of matched healthy control subjects in the supine and 60 degrees head-up positions. Breathing frequency, tidal volume, and ventilatory timing were determined from inspiratory flow recordings. Abdominal electromyograms (EMGs) were detected with surface electrodes placed unilaterally over the external and internal oblique and the rectus abdominis muscles. Thresholds, times of onset, and durations of phasic abdominal activity were determined from raw EMGs; peak amplitudes were determined from integrated EMGs. Graded ETLs were imposed by submerging a tube from the expiratory port of the breathing valve into a column of water at depths of 0-25 cmH2O. We found that breathing frequency, tidal volume, and expired minute ventilation were higher in CF patients than in control subjects during low ETLs; a change in body position did not alter these ventilatory responses in the CF patients but did in the control subjects. All CF patients, but none of the control subjects, had tonic abdominal activity while supine. CF patients recruited abdominal muscles at lower loads, earlier in the respiratory cycle, and to a higher recruitment level in both positions than the control subjects, but burst duration of phasic activity was not different between groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Effect of simultaneous application of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training on the enhancement of the swallowing function of patients with dysphagia caused by parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Haewon

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of simultaneous application of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training on the enhancement of the swallowing function of patients with dysphagia caused by Parkinson's disease. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 18 patients who received simultaneous application of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training and 15 patients who received expiratory muscle strength training only. Postural techniques were conducted in the order of chin tucking, head rotation, head tilting, bending head back, and lying down, while expiratory muscle strength training was conducted at a resistance level of about 70% of the maximal expiratory pressure. Swallowing recovery was assessed by using the Functional Dysphagia Scale based on videofluoroscopic studies. [Results] The mean value obtained in the videofluoroscopic studies for both groups decreased after the treatment. In the postural techniques plus expiratory muscle strength training group, the decrease was significantly greater than that in the expiratory muscle strength training-only group. [Conclusion] The results imply that simultaneous performance of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training is more effective than expiratory muscle strength training alone when applied in the swallowing rehabilitation for patients with dysphagia caused by Parkinson's disease.

  19. Early warning and prevention of pneumonia in acute leukemia by patient education, spirometry, and positive expiratory pressure: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Claus; Adamsen, Lis; Rugaard, Grith; Jarden, Mary; Bøtcher, Tina S.; Wiedenbein, Liza; Kjeldsen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Long‐lasting neutropenia associated with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and its treatment gives rise to a high risk of pneumonia. The use of broad‐spectrum antibiotic prophylaxis during outpatient management has not completely protected patients against admission due to infections and neutropenic fever, emphasizing the need to approach infection protection with complementary efforts. In a randomized controlled design, we examined the applicability of patient‐performed daily spirometry [forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)] as an early warning tool and explored the effectiveness of positive expiratory pressure (PEP) in preventing pneumonia among 80 AML patients. Twenty‐five incidences of pneumonia were detected among 23 patients (6 interventions, 17 controls), giving a prevalence of 28.75% during 5420 days of observation. We found a significant difference in incidence between intervention versus control group (2.17 per 1000 days vs. 6.52 per 1000 days, P = 0.021, respectively). A cross point at 80‐76% of the personal FEV1 reference value showed high sensitivity and specificity on pneumonia development. Our data demonstrate the feasibility of educating AML patients in their continuous daily measurement of FEV1 and use of PEP. Daily measures of FEV1 may be an important early warning tool for assessment of pulmonary deterioration during critical phases of neutropenia. We suggest that strategic patient education in the use of spirometry and PEP should be part of standard of care for AML patients undergoing induction chemotherapy. Am. J. Hematol. 91:271–276, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. American Journal of Hematology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26661344

  20. Short-Term Effects of High-Frequency Chest Compression and Positive Expiratory Pressure in Patients With Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Fainardi, Valentina; Longo, Francesco; Faverzani, Silvia; Tripodi, Maria Candida; Chetta, Alfredo; Pisi, Giovanna

    2011-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis patients require daily airway clearance therapies. The primary objective of this study was to compare the short-term efficacy of high-frequency chest compression and positive expiratory pressure mask on expectorated sputum, pulmonary function, and oxygen saturation in patients with CF hospitalized for an acute pulmonary exacerbation. Methods A controlled randomized cross-over trial with 24 hours between treatments was used. Thirty-four CF patients (26 ± 6.5 years) were included in the study. Before and 30 minutes after each treatment were recorded: pulmonary function testing, oxygen saturation, and perceived dyspnea. Preference for the two devices was assessed. Results No statistically significant difference between high-frequency chest compression and positive expiratory pressure mask was found in sputum production and in lung function testing. A reduction in SpO2 was found after positive expiratory pressure mask (98 ± 1.0% versus 97 ± 1.2%; P < 0.001). Both treatments induced a statistically significant increase in Borg scale for dyspnea without differences between them. Patients reported greater satisfaction with positive expiratory pressure mask than with high-frequency chest compression (P < 0.001). Conclusion High-frequency chest compression and positive expiratory pressure mask have comparable short-term effects on expectorated sputum and lung function. Although positive expiratory pressure mask was associated with a lower SpO2, it was better tolerated than high-frequency chest compression. Keywords Airway clearance therapies; High-frequency chest compression; Sputum; Cystic fibrosis PMID:22393338

  1. High or conventional positive end-expiratory pressure in adult respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Alersi, R; Navarro-Ramírez, C

    2014-01-01

    Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome may require high positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) levels, though the optimum level remains to be established. Several clinical trials have compared high PEEP levels versus conventional PEEP. Overall, although high PEEP levels improve oxygenation and are safe, they do not result in a significant reduction of the mortality rates. Nevertheless, some metaanalyses have revealed 2 situations in which high PEEP may decrease mortality: When used in severe distress and when PEEP is set following the characteristics of lung mechanics. Five studies have explored this latter scenario. Unfortunately, all of them have small sample sizes and have used different means to determine optimum PEEP. It is therefore necessary to conduct studies of sufficient sample size to compare the treatment of patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, using a protective ventilation strategy with high PEEP guided by the characteristics of lung mechanics and ventilation with the protocol proposed by the ARDS Network.

  2. Inspiratory and expiratory steady flow analysis in a model symmetrically bifurcating airway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Brunskill, C T; Lieber, B B

    1997-02-01

    Steady inspiratory and expiratory flow in a symmetrically bifurcating airway model was studied numerically using the finite element method (FIDAP). Flows of Reynolds number of 500 and 1000 during inspiration and a flow of Reynolds number of 500 during expiration were analyzed. Since the geometry of the bifurcation model used in this study is exactly the same as the model used in the experimental studies, the computed results were compared to the experimental findings. Results show that most of the important flow features that were observed in the experiment, such as the skewed velocity profiles in the daughter branches during inspiration and velocity peak in the parent tube during expiration, were captured in the numerical simulation. Quantitatively, the computed velocity profiles are in good agreement with the measured profiles. This comparison validates the computational simulations.

  3. Inspiratory and expiratory steady flow analysis in a model symmetrically bifurcating airway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Brunskill, C T; Lieber, B B

    1997-02-01

    Steady inspiratory and expiratory flow in a symmetrically bifurcating airway model was studied numerically using the finite element method (FIDAP). Flows of Reynolds number of 500 and 1000 during inspiration and a flow of Reynolds number of 500 during expiration were analyzed. Since the geometry of the bifurcation model used in this study is exactly the same as the model used in the experimental studies, the computed results were compared to the experimental findings. Results show that most of the important flow features that were observed in the experiment, such as the skewed velocity profiles in the daughter branches during inspiration and velocity peak in the parent tube during expiration, were captured in the numerical simulation. Quantitatively, the computed velocity profiles are in good agreement with the measured profiles. This comparison validates the computational simulations. PMID:9083849

  4. Unusual case of acute tracheal injury complicated by application of positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP).

    PubMed

    Farooqui, Asif Masroor; Mbarushimana, Simon; Faheem, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Blunt neck trauma can be caused by a variety of injuries such as deceleration, road traffic accidents and crush injuries. The worst scenario is airway rupture. We report an unusual case of acute tracheal injury in a 34-year-old Irish man who presented with a history of strangulation while working with a tractor. On arrival, he had one episode of mild haemoptysis and reported pain around the base of the neck and voice hoarseness. His chest X-ray revealed pneumopericardium and CT of thorax showed airway oedema. After elective intubation, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 5 cm H2O caused deterioration in his clinical condition with increasing surgical emphysema and rise of carbon dioxide partial pressure (PaCO2), which was completely reversed after stopping PEEP. This case shows how PEEP and intermittent positive pressure ventilation can worsen air leak and compromise stability in patients with acute tracheal injury. PMID:25398917

  5. Individualized positive end-expiratory pressure application in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pintado, M C; de Pablo, R

    2014-11-01

    Current treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome is based on ventilatory support with a lung protective strategy, avoiding the development of iatrogenic injury, including ventilator-induced lung injury. One of the mechanisms underlying such injury is atelectrauma, and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is advocated in order to avoid it. The indicated PEEP level has not been defined, and in many cases is based on the patient oxygen requirements for maintaining adequate oxygenation. However, this strategy does not consider the mechanics of the respiratory system, which varies in each patient and depends on many factors-including particularly the duration of acute respiratory distress syndrome. A review is therefore made of the different methods for adjusting PEEP, focusing on the benefits of individualized application.

  6. Correlates of peak expiratory flow rate: a study of sand stone quarry workers in desert.

    PubMed

    Mathur, M L; Dixit, A K; Lakshminarayana, J

    1996-10-01

    The study assesses the relationship between selected demographic, anthropometeric, radiological, work-history and smoking-history related variables with Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR) in a sample of 286 sand stone quarry workers from a desert region. Age, height, profusion of radiological opacities, age at beginning of work, duration of work and duration of smoking were found significantly associated with PEFR while duration of exposure to dust, nature of job and number of biries smoked per day failed to establish their significant association. Mean PEFR of these workers was found significantly lower than the same among healthy adults from the study area. The subset of predictors of PEFR only included age, height and profusion of radiological opacities as identified by multiple regression analysis.

  7. Individualized positive end-expiratory pressure application in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pintado, M C; de Pablo, R

    2014-11-01

    Current treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome is based on ventilatory support with a lung protective strategy, avoiding the development of iatrogenic injury, including ventilator-induced lung injury. One of the mechanisms underlying such injury is atelectrauma, and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is advocated in order to avoid it. The indicated PEEP level has not been defined, and in many cases is based on the patient oxygen requirements for maintaining adequate oxygenation. However, this strategy does not consider the mechanics of the respiratory system, which varies in each patient and depends on many factors-including particularly the duration of acute respiratory distress syndrome. A review is therefore made of the different methods for adjusting PEEP, focusing on the benefits of individualized application. PMID:24485531

  8. Respiratory pressures and expiratory peak flow rate of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gimenes, Camila; de Godoy, Irma; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Gimenes, Rodrigo; Okoshi, Marina Politi; Okoshi, Katashi

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background To evaluate clinical and laboratorial parameters that predict decreased respiratory function in patients subjected to coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). Material/Methods This was a prospective study evaluating 61 patients subjected to CABG with cardiopulmonary bypass, median sternotomy, and under mechanical ventilation for up to 24 h. One day before surgery, clinical information was recorded. Maximal inspiratory (MIP) and expiratory (MEP) pressures, and expiratory peak flow rate (EPFR) values were assessed 1 day before surgery and on the fifth postoperative day. Student’s t test, 2-way ANOVA, Pearson’s linear correlation, and logistic regression were used for statistical analysis. Results Patients were 63±10 years old, 67% males. Arterial hypertension was found in 75.4% of the patients, diabetes in 31.2%, dyslipidemia in 63.9%, tabagism in 25%, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in 16.4%. Previous myocardial infarction was found in 67%. Preoperative hemoglobin levels were 12.8±1.71 g/dL. Older individuals had lower preoperative MEP and EPFR values. Preoperatively, positive association was found between hemoglobin levels and maximal respiratory pressures and EPFR values. Patients with both class III angina and COPD presented higher reductions in pulmonary pressures between the preoperative period and the 5th postoperative day. Conclusions Older age and low hemoglobin levels are associated with preoperative low maximal respiratory pressures and EPFR. The combination of severe angina and COPD results in higher postoperative reduction of maximal respiratory pressures for patients who underwent CABG. PMID:22936191

  9. Associations between air pollution and peak expiratory flow among patients with persistent asthma.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhengmin; Lin, Hung-Mo; Chinchilli, Vernon M; Lehman, Erik B; Stewart, Walter F; Shah, Nirav; Duan, Yinkang; Craig, Timothy J; Wilson, William E; Liao, Duanping; Lazarus, Stephen C; Bascom, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    Responses of patients with persistent asthma to ambient air pollution may be different from those of general populations. For example, asthma medications may modify the effects of ambient air pollutants on peak expiratory flow (PEF). Few studies examined the association between air pollution and PEF in patients with persistent asthma on well-defined medication regimens using asthma clinical trial data. Airway obstruction effects of ambient air pollutants, using 14,919 person-days of daily self-measured peak expiratory flow (PEF), were assessed from 154 patients with persistent asthma during the 16 wk of active treatment in the Salmeterol Off Corticosteroids Study trial. The three therapies were an inhaled corticosteroid, an inhaled long-acting beta-agonist, and placebo. The participants were nonsmokers aged 12 through 63 yr, recruited from 6 university-based ambulatory care centers from February 1997 to January 1999. Air pollution data were derived from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Aerometric Information Retrieval System. An increase of 10 ppb of ambient daily mean concentrations of NO2 was associated with a decrease in PEF of 1.53 L/min (95% confidence interval [CI] -2.93 to -0.14) in models adjusted for age, gender, race/ethnicity, asthma clinical center, season, week, daily average temperature, and daily average relative humidity. The strongest association between NO2 and PEF was observed among the patients treated with salmeterol. Negative associations were also found between PEF and SO2 and between PEF and PM(10), respectively. The results show that the two medication regimens protected against the effects of PM(10). However, salmeterol increased the sensitivity to NO2 and triamcinalone enhanced the sensitivity to SO2.

  10. How does HeO2 increase maximum expiratory flow in human lungs?

    PubMed Central

    Mink, S N; Wood, L D

    1980-01-01

    We used the retrograde catheter technique to investigate the effect of HeO2 on resistance to maximum expiratory flow (Vmax) in airways subsegments between alveoli and the equal pressure point (EPP), and between EPP and the flow-limiting segment (FLS). FLS were found at the same airway site in sublobar bronchi (i.d., 0.54 +/- 0.13 cm) on both air and HeO2 in the six human excised lungs studied. Static elastic recoil pressure (5 +/- 1 cm H2O) and the lateral pressure at FLS (critical transmural airway pressure -6 +/- 3 cm H2O) were not different on the two gases. delta Vmax averaged 37 +/- 8.9% and was similar to the value found in healthy subjects of similar age (66 +/- 10 yr). EPP were located on HeO2 in peripheral airways (i.d., 0.33 +/- 0.03 cm), and EPP on air were located more downstream. Resistance between EPP and FLS was highly density dependent. Resistance between alveoli and EPP behaved as if it were density independent, due in part to Poiseuille flow in the peripheral airways and in part to the consequent narrowing of peripheral airways on HeO2. This density-independent behavior in peripheral airways reduced delta Vmax on HeO2 from its predicted maximal amount of 62%. Assuming that FLS is the "choke point" these findings are consistent with wave-speed theory of flow limitation modified to include functionally density-independent pressure losses in peripheral airways. These results and conclusions are similar to those found in living dogs. They question previous interpretation of delta Vmax as an index of peripheral airway obstruction, and demonstrate the utility of the wave-speed theory in explaining complicated mechanisms of expiratory flow limitation. PMID:7419718

  11. Upper airway collapsibility and patterns of flow limitation at constant end-expiratory lung volume.

    PubMed

    Owens, Robert L; Edwards, Bradley A; Sands, Scott A; Butler, James P; Eckert, Danny J; White, David P; Malhotra, Atul; Wellman, Andrew

    2012-09-01

    The passive pharyngeal critical closing pressure (Pcrit) is measured using a series of pressure drops. However, pressure drops also lower end-expiratory lung volume (EELV), which independently affects Pcrit. We describe a technique to measure Pcrit at a constant EELV. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)-treated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients and controls were instrumented with an epiglottic catheter, magnetometers (to measure change in EELV), and nasal mask/pneumotachograph and slept supine on nasal CPAP. Pcrit was measured in standard fashion and using our novel "biphasic technique" in which expiratory pressure only was lowered for 1 min before the inspiratory pressure was dropped; this allowed EELV to decrease to the drop level before performing the pressure drop. Seven OSA and three controls were studied. The biphasic technique successfully lowered EELV before the inspiratory pressure drop. Pcrit was similar between the standard and biphasic techniques (-0.4 ± 2.6 vs. -0.6 ± 2.3 cmH(2)O, respectively, P = 0.84). Interestingly, we noted three different patterns of flow limitation: 1) classic Starling resistor type: flow fixed and independent of downstream pressure; 2) negative effort dependence within breaths: substantial decrease in flow, sometimes with complete collapse, as downstream pressure decreased; and 3) and negative effort dependence across breaths: progressive reductions in peak flow as respiratory effort on successive breaths increased. Overall, EELV changes do not influence standard passive Pcrit measurements if breaths 3-5 of pressure drops are used. These results also highlight the importance of inspiratory collapse in OSA pathogenesis. The cause of negative effort dependence within and across breaths is not known and requires further study. PMID:22628372

  12. Positive End-expiratory Pressure Titration after Alveolar Recruitment Directed by Electrical Impedance Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Long, Yun; Liu, Da-Wei; He, Huai-Wu; Zhao, Zhan-Qi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a real-time bedside monitoring tool, which can reflect dynamic regional lung ventilation. The aim of the present study was to monitor regional gas distribution in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) during positive-end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration using EIT. Methods: Eighteen ARDS patients under mechanical ventilation in Department of Critical Care Medicine of Peking Union Medical College Hospital from January to April in 2014 were included in this prospective observational study. After recruitment maneuvers (RMs), decremental PEEP titration was performed from 20 cmH2O to 5 cmH2O in steps of 3 cmH2O every 5–10 min. Regional over-distension and recruitment were monitored with EIT. Results: After RMs, patient with arterial blood oxygen partial pressure (PaO2) + carbon dioxide partial pressure (PaCO2) >400 mmHg with 100% of fractional inspired oxygen concentration were defined as RM responders. Thirteen ARDS patients was diagnosed as responders whose PaO2 + PaCO2 were higher than nonresponders (419 ± 44 mmHg vs. 170 ± 73 mmHg, P < 0.0001). In responders, PEEP mainly increased recruited pixels in dependent regions and over-distended pixels in nondependent regions. PEEP alleviated global inhomogeneity of tidal volume and end-expiratory lung volume. PEEP levels without significant alveolar derecruitment and over-distension were identified individually. Conclusions: After RMs, PEEP titration significantly affected regional gas distribution in lung, which could be monitored with EIT. EIT has the potential to optimize PEEP titration. PMID:26021494

  13. Submental sEMG and Hyoid Movement during Mendelsohn Maneuver, Effortful Swallow, and Expiratory Muscle Strength Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler-Hegland, Karen M.; Rosenbek, John C.; Sapienza, Christine M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the concurrent biomechanical and electromyographic properties of 2 swallow-specific tasks (effortful swallow and Mendelsohn maneuver) and 1 swallow-nonspecific (expiratory muscle strength training [EMST]) swallow therapy task in order to examine the differential effects of each on hyoid motion and associated…

  14. Dangerous Pressurization and Inappropriate Alarms during Water Occlusion of the Expiratory Circuit of Commonly Used Infant Ventilators

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-invasive continuous positive airways pressure is commonly a primary respiratory therapy delivered via multi-purpose ventilators in premature newborns. Expiratory limb occlusion due to water accumulation or ‘rainout’ from gas humidification is a frequent issue. A case of expiratory limb occlusion due to rainout causing unexpected and excessive repetitive airway pressurisation in a Draeger VN500 prompted a systematic bench test examination of currently available ventilators. Objective To assess neonatal ventilator response to partial or complete expiratory limb occlusion when set to non-invasive continuous positive airway pressure mode. Design Seven commercially available neonatal ventilators connected to a test lung using a standard infant humidifier circuit with partial and/or complete expiratory limb occlusion were examined in a bench test study. Each ventilator was set to deliver 6 cmH2O in non-invasive mode and respiratory mechanics data for 75%, 80% and 100% occlusion were collected. Results Several ventilators responded inappropriately with complete occlusion by cyclical pressurisation/depressurisation to peak pressures of between 19·4 and 64·6 cm H2O at rates varying between 2 to 77 inflations per minute. Tidal volumes varied between 10·1 and 24·3mL. Alarm responses varied from ‘specific’ (tube occluded) to ‘ambiguous’ (Safety valve open). Carefusion Avea responded by continuing to provide the set distending pressure and displaying an appropriate alarm message. Draeger Babylog 8000 did not alarm with partial occlusions and incorrectly displayed airways pressure at 6·1cmH2O compared to the measured values of 13cmH2O. Conclusions This study found a potential for significant adverse ventilator response due to complete or near complete expiratory limb occlusion in CPAP mode. PMID:27116224

  15. Respiratory symptoms and peak expiratory flow rates among furniture-decoration students.

    PubMed

    Arbak, Peri; Bilgin, Cahit; Balbay, Oner; Yeşildal, Nuray; Annakkaya, Ali Nihat; Ulger, Füsun

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of furniture production, mainly including fir tree (aberia mulleriana), on respiratory health of young workers and to compare the results with those obtained from previous studies. Sixty-four furniture-decoration students (57 males and 7 females) and 62 controls (54 male, 8 female) from different departments in the same school were included into the study. All participants were assessed with a questionnaire (concerning history of occupational exposure, work-related respiratory and other symptoms, smoking history, previous asthma history), full physical examination, spirometric evaluation and chest radiograph. Participants then performed serial monitoring of peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR) at work and away from work within a month. Mean age of students was 20.9 +/- 3.7 years, 20.5 +/- 2.6 years in controls. There was no difference between study and control groups with regard to age, gender, smoking status and previous asthma history. Reported cough (23.4 % vs. 8.1 %) and shortness of breath (18.8 % vs. 6.5 %) were significantly higher in furniture-decoration students than in controls (p = 0.016 and p = 0.034, respectively). Furniture-decoration students had higher conjunctivitis (34.4 % vs. 9.7 %, p = 0.001) and rhinitis (34.4 % vs. 19.4 %, p = 0.044) history when compared with controls. Both students and controls were normal in terms of respiratory examination. PEF recordings were performed for approximately one month. Diurnal variability greater than 20 % was seen in 12/64 (18.7 %) of students at work, whereas it was detected in 4/62 (6.4 %) of controls (p = 0.034). When comparing for the presence of diurnal variability greater than 20 % in weekends, no difference was found between groups (p = 0.457). In conclusion, early detection of work-related respiratory changes by serial monitoring of peak expiratory flows should save the workers from hazardous respiratory effects of the furniture production, especially in

  16. Study Looking at End Expiratory Pressure for Altitude Illness Decrease (SLEEP-AID).

    PubMed

    Lipman, Grant S; Kanaan, Nicholas C; Phillips, Caleb; Pomeranz, Dave; Cain, Patrick; Fontes, Kristin; Higbee, Becky; Meyer, Carolyn; Shaheen, Michael; Wentworth, Sean; Walsh, Diane

    2015-06-01

    Lipman, Grant S., Nicholas C. Kanaan, Caleb Phillips, Dave Pomeranz, Patrick Cain, Kristin Fontes, Becky Higbee, Carolyn Meyer, Michael Shaheen, Sean Wentworth, and Diane Walsh. Study Looking at End Expiratory Pressure for Altitude Illness Decrease (SLEEP-AID). High Alt Med Biol 16:154-161, 2015.--Acute mountain sickness (AMS) affects 25%-70% of the tens of millions of high altitude travelers annually, with hypoxia and nocturnal desaturations as major contributing factors. This is the first double blind randomized placebo controlled trial to assess expiratory positive airway pressure (EPAP) for AMS prevention and nocturnal hypoxic events. Healthy adult participants trekking in the Khumbu region of the Himalayas were randomized to a single-use EPAP nasal strip, or a visually identical sham device (placebo) prior to first night sleeping between 4371-4530 m (14,340-14,800 ft). The primary outcome was AMS incidence, measured by Lake Louise Questionnaire (LLQ), with secondary outcomes of AMS severity (by LLQ) and physiologic sleep indices measured by continuous sleep monitor. Intent-to-treat analysis included 219 participants with comparable demographic characteristics, of which 115 received EPAP and 104 placebo. There was no decrease in AMS with EPAP intervention (14% EPAP vs. 17% placebo; p=0.65; risk difference (-)3.15%, 95% CI (-)12.85%-6.56%). While overall AMS severity was not different between groups, EPAP reported decreased incidence of headache (64% vs. 76%; p<0.05, OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.27-0.95) and dizziness (81% vs. 98%; p<0.03, OR 0.29, 95% CI 0.09-0.78). During sleep, EPAP resulted in significant improvements in average peripheral oxygenation (Spo(2)) (80% versus 78%; p<0.01, mean difference=2, 95% CI 0.58-3.63) and a reduced percentage of time below 80% Spo(2) (31% vs. 46%; p<0.03, median difference=16, 95% CI 2.22-28.18). This lightweight and inexpensive EPAP device did not prevent acute mountain sickness, but did reduce the subgroup incidence of

  17. Effects of descending positive end-expiratory pressure on lung mechanics and aeration in healthy anaesthetized piglets

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Alysson Roncally S; Jandre, Frederico C; Pino, Alexandre V; Bozza, Fernando A; Salluh, Jorge I; Rodrigues, Rosana S; Soares, João HN; Giannella-Neto, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Atelectasis and distal airway closure are common clinical entities of general anaesthesia. These two phenomena are expected to reduce the ventilation of dependent lung regions and represent major causes of arterial oxygenation impairment in anaesthetic conditions. The behaviour of the elastance of the respiratory system (Ers), as well as the lung aeration assessed by computed tomography (CT) scan, was evaluated during a descendent positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration. This work sought to evaluate the potential usefulness of Ers monitoring to set the PEEP in order to prevent tidal recruitment and hyperinflation of healthy lungs under general anaesthesia. Methods PEEP titration (from 16 to 0 cmH2O, tidal volume of 8 ml/kg) was performed, and at each PEEP, CT scans were obtained during end-expiratory and end-inspiratory pauses in six healthy, anaesthetized and paralyzed piglets. The distribution of lung aeration was determined and the tidal re-aeration was calculated as the difference between end-expiratory and end-inspiratory poorly aerated and normally aerated areas. Similarly, tidal hyperinflation was obtained as the difference between end-inspiratory and end-expiratory hyperinflated areas. Ers was estimated from the equation of motion of the respiratory system during all PEEP titration with the least-squares method. Results Hyperinflated areas decreased from PEEP 16 to 0 cmH2O (ranges decreased from 24–62% to 1–7% at end-expiratory pauses and from 44–73% to 4–17% at end-inspiratory pauses) whereas normally aerated areas increased (from 30–66% to 72–83% at end-expiratory pauses and from 19–48% to 73–77% at end-inspiratory pauses). From 16 to 8 cmH2O, Ers decreased with a corresponding reduction in tidal hyperinflation. A flat minimum of Ers was observed from 8 to 4 cmH2O. For PEEP below 4 cmH2O, Ers increased in association with a rise in tidal re-aeration and a flat maximum of the normally aerated areas. Conclusion In

  18. Determination of breath isoprene allows the identification of the expiratory fraction of the propofol breath signal during real-time propofol breath monitoring.

    PubMed

    Hornuss, Cyrill; Dolch, Michael E; Janitza, Silke; Souza, Kimberly; Praun, Siegfried; Apfel, Christian C; Schelling, Gustav

    2013-10-01

    Real-time measurement of propofol in the breath may be used for routine clinical monitoring. However, this requires unequivocal identification of the expiratory phase of the respiratory propofol signal as only expiratory propofol reflects propofol blood concentrations. Determination of CO2 breath concentrations is the current gold standard for the identification of expiratory gas but usually requires additional equipment. Human breath also contains isoprene, a volatile organic compound with low inspiratory breath concentration and an expiratory concentration plateau. We investigated whether breath isoprene could be used similarly to CO2 to identify the expiratory fraction of the propofol breath signal. We investigated real-time breath data obtained from 40 study subjects during routine anesthesia. Propofol, isoprene, and CO2 breath concentrations were determined by a combined ion molecule reaction/electron impact mass spectrometry system. The expiratory propofol signal was identified according to breath CO2 and isoprene concentrations and presented as median of intervals of 30 s duration. Bland-Altman analysis was applied to detect differences (bias) in the expiratory propofol signal extracted by the two identification methods. We investigated propofol signals in a total of 3,590 observation intervals of 30 s duration in the 40 study subjects. In 51.4 % of the intervals (1,844/3,590) both methods extracted the same results for expiratory propofol signal. Overall bias between the two data extraction methods was -0.12 ppb. The lower and the upper limits of the 95 % CI were -0.69 and 0.45 ppb. Determination of isoprene breath concentrations allows the identification of the expiratory propofol signal during real-time breath monitoring.

  19. A comprehensive breath plume model for disease transmission via expiratory aerosols.

    PubMed

    Halloran, Siobhan K; Wexler, Anthony S; Ristenpart, William D

    2012-01-01

    The peak in influenza incidence during wintertime in temperate regions represents a longstanding, unresolved scientific question. One hypothesis is that the efficacy of airborne transmission via aerosols is increased at lower humidities and temperatures, conditions that prevail in wintertime. Recent work with a guinea pig model by Lowen et al. indicated that humidity and temperature do modulate airborne influenza virus transmission, and several investigators have interpreted the observed humidity dependence in terms of airborne virus survivability. This interpretation, however, neglects two key observations: the effect of ambient temperature on the viral growth kinetics within the animals, and the strong influence of the background airflow on transmission. Here we provide a comprehensive theoretical framework for assessing the probability of disease transmission via expiratory aerosols between test animals in laboratory conditions. The spread of aerosols emitted from an infected animal is modeled using dispersion theory for a homogeneous turbulent airflow. The concentration and size distribution of the evaporating droplets in the resulting "Gaussian breath plume" are calculated as functions of position, humidity, and temperature. The overall transmission probability is modeled with a combination of the time-dependent viral concentration in the infected animal and the probability of droplet inhalation by the exposed animal downstream. We demonstrate that the breath plume model is broadly consistent with the results of Lowen et al., without invoking airborne virus survivability. The results also suggest that, at least for guinea pigs, variation in viral kinetics within the infected animals is the dominant factor explaining the increased transmission probability observed at lower temperatures.

  20. 323 Annual Change of Peak Expiratory Flow Rate in Asthma and COPD

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Kwang H. A.; Lee, Kye Young

    2012-01-01

    Background Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR) is a useful measurement for the follow-up examination in a chronic airway disease because it has the advantage of simple measuring and repetitive examination. The aim of this study is to examine the annual decrease of PEFR in asthma and COPD patients and to confirm the factors which influence the annual decreasing rate of PEFR. Methods From May, 2003 to September, 2010, the annual decreasing rate of PEFR is obtained from the asthma and COPD patients attending an outpatient pulmonary clinic. PEFR was measured using Mini-Wright (Clement Clarke International Ltd. UK). We conducted an analysis of the factors to influence on the change of PEFR and the average of it. Results The result indicated decrease of 3.72 ± 12.55 L/min annually in the asthmatic patient and decrease of 8.69 ± 8.87 L/min annually in the COPD patient. In the asthma, age and FEV1 are the predictive factor to influence on the change, on the other hand, age, FEV1, smoking and the number of aggravation are the factors in the COPD. Conclusions We could confirm the annual decreasing rate in patients of chronic airway disease and similar factor with FEV1 to influence on the change.

  1. Changes in intrathoracic pressures induced by positive end-expiratory pressure ventilation after cardiac surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, F; Fischler, M; Dubois, C L; Brodaty, D; Pluskwa, F; Guilmet, D; Vourc'h, G

    1986-10-01

    The consequences of controlled ventilation with positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) were studied, after cardiac surgical procedures, in two groups of patients supposed to have different lung and chest wall mechanical properties. The first group included 6 patients who had undergone coronary artery graft surgical procedures (CGS). The second group included 5 patients who had undergone a mitral valve replacement (MVR). Postoperatively, static lung and chest wall compliance was measured by stepwise inflation and deflation of the thorax. Esophageal, pericardial, and pleural pressures were then measured, and cardiac output was determined while PEEP was increased from 0 to 20 cm H2O. Lung and chest wall compliance values sharply decreased in MVR patients. This accounts for the lower values for pleural and pericardial pressures in this group than in the CGS patient group, but the transmission of airway pressure was identical in the two groups when PEEP was increased. The decrease in cardiac output induced by PEEP was similar in the two groups. The results suggest that the opposing influences of lung and chest wall compliance on airway pressure transmission could at least partly explain the hemodynamic effects of PEEP in patients in whom the mechanical properties of the lung and thorax are impaired. PEEP ventilation should be used cautiously in patients suspected of having thoracic rigidity. PMID:3532981

  2. Effect of positive end-expiratory pressure on acoustic wave propagation in experimental porcine lung injury.

    PubMed

    Räsänen, Jukka; Nemergut, Michael E; Gavriely, Noam

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on sound propagation through injured lungs, we injected a multifrequency broad-band sound signal into the airway of eight anesthetized, intubated and mechanically ventilated pigs, while recording transmitted sound at three locations bilaterally on the chest wall. Oleic acid injections effected a severe pulmonary oedema predominately in the dependent lung regions, with an average increase in venous admixture from 19 ± 15 to 59 ± 14% (P < 0.001), and a reduction in dynamic respiratory system compliance from 34 ± 7 to 14 ± 4 ml cmH2 O(-1) (P < 0.001). A concomitant decrease in sound transit time was seen in the dependent lung regions (P < 0.05); no statistically significant change occurred in the lateral or non-dependent areas. The application of PEEP resulted in a decrease in venous admixture, increase in respiratory system compliance and return of the sound transit time to pre-injury levels in the dependent lung regions. Our results indicate that sound transmission velocity increases in lung tissue affected by permeability-type pulmonary oedema in a manner reversible during alveolar recruitment with PEEP.

  3. [Effect of fog on diurnal changes in peak expiratory flow rates in an asthmatic].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Honma, S; Imada, A; Sugaya, F; Nishi, M; Abe, S

    1995-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of fog on asthmatics, we analyzed the symptoms of a 45-year-old female during the foggy season and the relation between diurnal peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) and fog and other meteorological factors. Her asthma attacks had been induced by specific smells: perfume, smoke from burning grass or industrial smoke. Two years previously, she had moved to the suburbs of Sapporo, where fog frequently occurs. From that time her asthmatic symptoms had been exacerbated, so it was suspected that the fog might have had some influence. We analyzed 251 measures of PEFR from June to August 1994. The average and standard deviation of PEFR in the absence of fog and specific smells was 403 +/- 40 L/min (n = 195). PEFR was significantly lower (p < 0.01) when it was foggy (347 +/- 60 L/min; n = 40), when specific smells were present (333 +/- 60 L/min; n = 5) and when there were both fog and specific smells (340 +/- 53 L/min: n = 11). On the other hand, there were no changes associated with other meteorological factors: barometric pressures, relative humidity, mean temperature, minimal temperature and most frequent wind direction. These results suggested that the inhalation of fog decreases PEFR and is an exacerbating factor in bronchial asthma.

  4. Pulmonary clearance of radiotracers after positive end-expiratory pressure or acute lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Barrowcliffe, M.P.; Zanelli, G.D.; Jones, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    In anesthetized rabbits we measured clearance from lung to blood of eight aerosolized technetium-99m-labeled compounds: diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (99mTc-DTPA); cytochrome c; myoglobin; a myoglobin polymer; albumin; and anionic, cationic, and neutral dextrans of equivalent molecular size. We investigated the effect of applying positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and, on a subsequent occasion, of injecting oleic acid intravenously to produce acute lung injury on the pulmonary clearance rate. Base-line clearance rates were monoexponential and varied with the molecular weights of the radiotracers. For each tracer the rate of clearance was increased a similar degree by either PEEP or oleic acid. However, with PEEP, clearance remained monoexponential, whereas after oleic acid, smaller molecular-weight radiotracers had multiexponential clearance curves. This suggests that after oleic acid the alveolar epithelium breaks down in a nonuniform fashion. We conclude that differentiation of the effect of PEEP from that of severe lung injury caused by oleic acid is not readily accomplished by either increasing the size of the tracer molecule or by varying the molecular charge.

  5. Comparison of normal and asthmatic circadian rhythms in peak expiratory flow rate.

    PubMed Central

    Hetzel, M R; Clark, T J

    1980-01-01

    A computer technique (cosinor analysis) has been used to evaluate circadian rhythms in airway calibre in normals and asthmatics. Two hundred and twenty-one normal subjects recorded peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) at home four times a day for seven days. Rhythm detection was statistically significant in 145 of them (65.6%) who showed a mean amplitude of 8.3% of individual mean PEFR (+/- SD 5.2%). Amplitude was independent of age, sex, atopy, family history of asthma, and smoking habit. Fifteen of them were also studied three times a day for five days in the laboratory with flow-volume loops. Eleven showed significant PEFR rhythms at home. No single measurement from the flow-volume loop showed periodicity in as many of them but rhythms were now also detected in the other four normal subjects in some components of the loop. Fifty-six asthma patients were studied with a similar protocol of PEFR measurement and compared with the 145 rhythmic normal subjects. Mean phases of the normal and asthmatic rhythms were not significantly different with acrophases (peak of rhythm cycle) at 1557 and 1526 respectively. The mean asthmatic amplitude was, however, significantly greater at 50.9%. Nocturnal asthma, therefore, probably represents an exaggeration of a normal circadian rhythm in airway calibre. The amplitude of the PEFR rhythm is an index of bronchial lability and is thus valuable in monitoring asthma patients. An amplitude of greater than 20% should be a useful screening test for asthma. PMID:7466721

  6. [Effect of fog on diurnal changes in peak expiratory flow rates in an asthmatic].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Honma, S; Imada, A; Sugaya, F; Nishi, M; Abe, S

    1995-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of fog on asthmatics, we analyzed the symptoms of a 45-year-old female during the foggy season and the relation between diurnal peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) and fog and other meteorological factors. Her asthma attacks had been induced by specific smells: perfume, smoke from burning grass or industrial smoke. Two years previously, she had moved to the suburbs of Sapporo, where fog frequently occurs. From that time her asthmatic symptoms had been exacerbated, so it was suspected that the fog might have had some influence. We analyzed 251 measures of PEFR from June to August 1994. The average and standard deviation of PEFR in the absence of fog and specific smells was 403 +/- 40 L/min (n = 195). PEFR was significantly lower (p < 0.01) when it was foggy (347 +/- 60 L/min; n = 40), when specific smells were present (333 +/- 60 L/min; n = 5) and when there were both fog and specific smells (340 +/- 53 L/min: n = 11). On the other hand, there were no changes associated with other meteorological factors: barometric pressures, relative humidity, mean temperature, minimal temperature and most frequent wind direction. These results suggested that the inhalation of fog decreases PEFR and is an exacerbating factor in bronchial asthma. PMID:7726750

  7. A Comprehensive Breath Plume Model for Disease Transmission via Expiratory Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halloran, S. K.; Wexler, A. S.; Ristenpart, W. D.

    2012-11-01

    The peak in influenza incidence during wintertime represents a longstanding unresolved scientific question. One hypothesis is that the efficacy of airborne transmission via aerosols is increased at low humidity and temperature, conditions that prevail in wintertime. Recent experiments with guinea pigs suggest that transmission is indeed maximized at low humidity and temperature, a finding which has been widely interpreted in terms of airborne influenza virus survivability. This interpretation, however, neglects the effect of the airflow on the transmission probability. Here we provide a comprehensive model for assessing the probability of disease transmission via expiratory aerosols between test animals in laboratory conditions. The spread of aerosols emitted from an infected animal is modeled using dispersion theory for a homogeneous turbulent airflow. The concentration and size distribution of the evaporating droplets in the resulting ``Gaussian breath plume'' are calculated as functions of downstream position. We demonstrate that the breath plume model is broadly consistent with the guinea pig experiments, without invoking airborne virus survivability. Moreover, the results highlight the need for careful characterization of the airflow in airborne transmission experiments.

  8. How many times per day should peak expiratory flow rates be assessed when investigating occupational asthma?

    PubMed Central

    Malo, J. L.; Côté, J.; Cartier, A.; Boulet, L. P.; L'Archevêque, J.; Chan-Yeung, M.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Serial peak expiratory flow rate (PEF) recording has been advocated as a sensitive and specific means of confirming work related asthma. The optimum number of recordings per day to achieve the best between-reader and within-reader reproducibility and sensitivity/specificity ratio compared with the final diagnosis determined by specific inhalation challenges is unknown. METHODS--PEF recording was carried out every two hours in 74 subjects referred for possible occupational asthma. Specific inhalation challenges performed in a hospital laboratory or at the workplace (positive in 33 subjects and negative in 41) were considered the gold standard. The duration of monitoring at work and away from work was at least two weeks each. Graphs of PEF recordings were generated in four different ways: every two hours, four times/day, three times/day, and every morning and evening. The graphs were assessed by three readers in three different centres in a blind manner. Furthermore, one third of each type of graph was read blind by the same reader one week after the initial interpretation. RESULTS--Agreement between the three readers was a little more frequent (82%) in the case of the every two hour readings than for the other types of readings (70% v 77%). Agreement between at least two of the three readers occurred in 73% of positive challenges (sensitivity) and in 78% of negative challenges (specificity) for every two hour readings. The figures varied from 61% to 70% for positive challenges and from 78% to 88% for negative challenges for the other types of readings. Within-subject reproducibility from one reading to the next (one week apart) was excellent (83% to 100%). CONCLUSIONS--Recording PEF every two hours results in a slightly more satisfactory agreement between readers and in concordance in terms of sensitivity/specificity than less frequent PEF readings, although the four times a day assessment is almost as satisfactory. PMID:8303625

  9. New parachute cuff and positive end-expiratory pressure to minimize tracheal injury and prevent aspiration.

    PubMed

    Nordin, U; Lyttkens, L

    1979-01-01

    A new parachute cuff has been tested in combination with a positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on mongrel dogs. During positive-pressure ventilation the intracuff and intratracheal pressures showed synchronous, identical pressure variations, and therefore theoretically with this type of cuff the pressure against the tracheal wall would be minimal. The cuff provided a seal against gas leakage from the lungs throughout the entire test period, i.e., for up to 7 h. To avoid aspiration of mouth contents during the passive exhalation phase, different amounts of PEEP were tested. A PEEP of 4.0--8.0 cm H2O always produced a seal against a column of fluid in the mouth exerting a hydrostatic pressure of 5.4--8.8 cm H2O against the cuff. This seal was maintained during the whole test period. No difference in sealing capacity was found when the cuff was used with a normal respiratory frequency (20/min) and with high-frequency positive-pressure ventilation (60/min). When the PEEP is eliminated, e.g., when the respirator is disconnected for suction of the endotracheal tube, the sealing effect will be abolished. As the cuff extends up into the larynx there will be no pooling of fluid above the cuff. The risk of aspiration can therefore be diminished by suction of oral cavity before disconnecting the respirator. With the use of the pneumatic valve principle together with high-frequency positive-pressure ventilation, an open respirator system can produce a continuous PEEP, thereby preventing aspiration even during suctioning of the tracheal tube.

  10. Positive end-expiratory pressure oscillation facilitates brain vascular reactivity monitoring.

    PubMed

    Brady, Ken M; Easley, R Blaine; Kibler, Kathleen; Kaczka, David W; Andropoulos, Dean; Fraser, Charles D; Smielewski, Peter; Czosnyka, Marek; Adams, Gerald J; Rhee, Christopher J; Rusin, Craig G

    2012-11-01

    The pressure reactivity index (PRx) identifies optimal cerebral perfusion pressure after traumatic brain injury. We describe a method to improve PRx precision by induced variations in arterial blood pressure (ABP) using positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) modulation (iPRx). Neonatal swine (n = 10) were ventilated with static PEEP and then with PEEP oscillated between 5 and 10 cmH(2)O at a frequency of 1/min. PRx was recorded as a moving correlation coefficient between ABP and intracranial pressure (ICP) from spontaneous ABP activity (0.05-0.003 Hz) during static PEEP. iPRx was similarly recorded with PEEP oscillation-induced ABP waves. The lower limit of autoregulation (LLA) was delineated with continuous cortical laser Doppler flux monitoring. PEEP oscillation increased autoregulation-monitoring precision. The ratios of median absolute deviations to range of possible values for the PRx and iPRx were 9.5% (8.3-13.7%) and 6.2% (4.2-8.7%), respectively (P = 0.006; median, interquartile range). The phase-angle difference between ABP and ICP above LLA was 161° (150°-166°) and below LLA, -31° (-42° to 12°, P < 0.0001). iPRx above LLA was -0.42 (-0.67 to -0.29) and below LLA, 0.32 (0.22-0.43, P = 0.0004). A positive iPRx was 97% specific and 91% sensitive for perfusion pressure below LLA. PEEP oscillation caused stable, low-frequency ABP oscillations that reduced noise in the PRx. Safe translation of these findings to clinical settings is expected to yield more accurate and rapid delineation of individualized optimal perfusion-pressure goals for patients.

  11. Nasal Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure Devices (Provent) for OSA: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Muhammad; Certal, Victor; Nigam, Gaurav; Abdullatif, Jose; Zaghi, Soroush; Kushida, Clete A; Camacho, Macario

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To quantify the effectiveness of nasal expiratory positive airway pressure (nasal EPAP) devices or Provent as treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods. PubMed and six other databases were searched through November 15, 2015, without language limitations. Results. Eighteen studies (920 patients) were included. Pre- and post-nasal EPAP means ± standard deviations (M ± SD) for apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) in 345 patients decreased from 27.32 ± 22.24 to 12.78 ± 16.89 events/hr (relative reduction = 53.2%). Random effects modeling mean difference (MD) was -14.78 events/hr [95% CI -19.12, -10.45], p value < 0.00001. Oxygen desaturation index (ODI) in 247 patients decreased from 21.2 ± 19.3 to 12.4 ± 14.1 events/hr (relative reduction = 41.5%, p value < 0.00001). Lowest oxygen saturation (LSAT) M ± SD improved in 146 patients from 83.2 ± 6.8% to 86.2 ± 11.1%, MD 3 oxygen saturation points [95% CI 0.57, 5.63]. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) M ± SD improved (359 patients) from 9.9 ± 5.3 to 7.4 ± 5.0, MD -2.5 [95% CI -3.2, -1.8], p value < 0.0001. Conclusion. Nasal EPAP (Provent) reduced AHI by 53.2%, ODI by 41.5% and improved LSAT by 3 oxygen saturation points. Generally, there were no clear characteristics (demographic factors, medical history, and/or physical exam finding) that predicted favorable response to these devices. However, limited evidence suggests that high nasal resistance could be associated with treatment failure. Additional studies are needed to identify demographic and polysomnographic characteristics that would predict therapeutic success with nasal EPAP (Provent). PMID:26798519

  12. Nasal Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure Devices (Provent) for OSA: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Riaz, Muhammad; Certal, Victor; Nigam, Gaurav; Abdullatif, Jose; Zaghi, Soroush; Kushida, Clete A.; Camacho, Macario

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To quantify the effectiveness of nasal expiratory positive airway pressure (nasal EPAP) devices or Provent as treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods. PubMed and six other databases were searched through November 15, 2015, without language limitations. Results. Eighteen studies (920 patients) were included. Pre- and post-nasal EPAP means ± standard deviations (M ± SD) for apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) in 345 patients decreased from 27.32 ± 22.24 to 12.78 ± 16.89 events/hr (relative reduction = 53.2%). Random effects modeling mean difference (MD) was −14.78 events/hr [95% CI −19.12, −10.45], p value < 0.00001. Oxygen desaturation index (ODI) in 247 patients decreased from 21.2 ± 19.3 to 12.4 ± 14.1 events/hr (relative reduction = 41.5%, p value < 0.00001). Lowest oxygen saturation (LSAT) M ± SD improved in 146 patients from 83.2 ± 6.8% to 86.2 ± 11.1%, MD 3 oxygen saturation points [95% CI 0.57, 5.63]. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) M ± SD improved (359 patients) from 9.9 ± 5.3 to 7.4 ± 5.0, MD −2.5 [95% CI −3.2, −1.8], p value < 0.0001. Conclusion. Nasal EPAP (Provent) reduced AHI by 53.2%, ODI by 41.5% and improved LSAT by 3 oxygen saturation points. Generally, there were no clear characteristics (demographic factors, medical history, and/or physical exam finding) that predicted favorable response to these devices. However, limited evidence suggests that high nasal resistance could be associated with treatment failure. Additional studies are needed to identify demographic and polysomnographic characteristics that would predict therapeutic success with nasal EPAP (Provent). PMID:26798519

  13. Peak expiratory flow rates among women exposed to different cooking fuels in rural India.

    PubMed

    Neelam, Sukhsohale D; Uday, Narlawar W; Sushama, Thakre S; Suresh, Ughade N

    2013-09-01

    Plant or animal based material burned for cooking or heating (biofuels) can cause indoor air pollution. We studied the effect of exposure to biofuel and other types of fuel smoke on peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR) among rural Indian women. We conducted a community based cross-sectional study of 760 non-smoking women who cooked using one of four types of fuel: biofuel, kerosene, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) or a combination of two or more fuels. A PEFR <80% of predicted was considered abnormal. An abnormal PEFR was seen in 43.3% of women using biofuels, 20.5% of those using kerosene, 23.4% of those using LPG and 21.4% of those using mixed fuel. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed among those using mixed fuel, age [OR: - 2.08, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.32 - 3.28, p = 0.00], height (OR: -1.06, 95% CI: 1.00 - 1.12, p = 0.02) and exposure index (estimated hours spent cooking daily multiplied by the years cooked) (OR: -2.74, 95% CI: 1.68 - 4.47, p = 0.00) were significant predictors of abnormal PEFR. Among women using biofuels and LPG, only exposure index was found to be a significant predictor of abnormal PEFR (p<0.05). No significant association was found between abnormal PEFR and exposure index among women who used only kerosene for fuel (p>0.05). Using mixed fuel was found to be more likely to cause an abnormal PEFR.

  14. Peak expiratory flow at increased barometric pressure: comparison of peak flow meters and volumetric spirometer.

    PubMed

    Thomas, P S; Ng, C; Bennett, M

    2000-01-01

    Increasing numbers of patients are receiving hyperbaric oxygen therapy as an intensive care treatment, some of whom have pre-existing airway obstruction. Spirometers are the ideal instruments for measuring airway obstruction, but peak flow meters are useful and versatile devices. The behaviour of both types of device was therefore studied in a hyperbaric unit under conditions of increased pressure. It is important to have a non-electrical indicator of airway obstruction, to minimize the fire risk in the hyperoxic environment. The hypothesis was tested that, assuming that dynamic resistance is unchanged, both the Wright's standard and mini-peak flow meters would over-read peak expiratory flow (PEF) under increased pressure when compared with a volumetric spirometer, as the latter is unaffected by air density. It was postulated that a correction factor could be derived so that PEF meters could be used in this setting. Seven normal subjects performed volume-dependent spirometry to derive PEF, and manoeuvres using both standard and mini PEF meters at sea level, under hyperbaric conditions at 303, 253 and 152 kPa (3, 2.5 and 1.5 atmospheres respectively; 1 atmosphere absolute=101.08 kPa), and again at sea level. There was a progressive and significant decline in PEF with increasing pressure as measured by the spirometer (69.46+/-0.8% baseline at 303 kPa compared with 101 kPa), while the PEF meters showed a progressive increase in their readings (an increase of 7.86+/-1.69% at 303 kPa with the mini PEF meter). Using these data points, a correction factor was derived which allows appropriate values to be calculated from the Wright's meter readings under these conditions. PMID:10600666

  15. High positive end-expiratory pressure: only a dam against oedema formation?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Healthy piglets ventilated with no positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and with tidal volume (VT) close to inspiratory capacity (IC) develop fatal pulmonary oedema within 36 h. In contrast, those ventilated with high PEEP and low VT, resulting in the same volume of gas inflated (close to IC), do not. If the real threat to the blood-gas barrier is lung overinflation, then a similar damage will occur with the two settings. If PEEP only hydrostatically counteracts fluid filtration, then its removal will lead to oedema formation, thus revealing the deleterious effects of overinflation. Methods Following baseline lung computed tomography (CT), five healthy piglets were ventilated with high PEEP (volume of gas around 75% of IC) and low VT (25% of IC) for 36 h. PEEP was then suddenly zeroed and low VT was maintained for 18 h. Oedema was diagnosed if final lung weight (measured on a balance following autopsy) exceeded the initial one (CT). Results Animals were ventilated with PEEP 18 ± 1 cmH2O (volume of gas 875 ± 178 ml, 89 ± 7% of IC) and VT 213 ± 10 ml (22 ± 5% of IC) for the first 36 h, and with no PEEP and VT 213 ± 10 ml for the last 18 h. On average, final lung weight was not higher, and actually it was even lower, than the initial one (284 ± 62 vs. 347 ± 36 g; P = 0.01). Conclusions High PEEP (and low VT) do not merely impede fluid extravasation but rather preserve the integrity of the blood-gas barrier in healthy lungs. PMID:23844622

  16. Expiratory washout versus optimization of mechanical ventilation during permissive hypercapnia in patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Richecoeur, J; Lu, Q; Vieira, S R; Puybasset, L; Kalfon, P; Coriat, P; Rouby, J J

    1999-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare three ventilatory techniques for reducing PaCO2 in patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with permissive hypercapnia: (1) expiratory washout alone at a flow of 15 L/min, (2) optimized mechanical ventilation defined as an increase in the respiratory frequency to the maximal rate possible without development of intrinsic positive end- expiratory pressure (PEEP) combined with a reduction of the instrumental dead space, and (3) the combination of both methods. Tidal volume was set according to the pressure-volume curve in order to obtain an inspiratory plateau airway pressure equal to the upper inflection point minus 2 cm H2O after setting the PEEP at 2 cm H2O above the lower inflection point and was kept constant throughout the study. The three modalities were compared at the same inspiratory plateau airway pressure through an adjustment of the extrinsic PEEP. During conventional mechanical ventilation using a respiratory frequency of 18 breaths/min, respiratory acidosis (PaCO2 = 84 +/- 24 mm Hg and pH = 7.21 +/- 0.12) was observed. Expiratory washout and optimized mechanical ventilation (respiratory frequency of 30 +/- 4 breaths/min) had similar effects on CO2 elimination (DeltaPaCO2 = -28 +/- 11% versus -27 +/- 12%). A further decrease in PaCO2 was observed when both methods were combined (DeltaPaCO2 = -46 +/- 7%). Extrinsic PEEP had to be reduced by 5.3 +/- 2.1 cm H2O during expiratory washout and by 7.3 +/- 1.3 cm H2O during the combination of the two modes, whereas it remained unchanged during optimized mechanical ventilation alone. In conclusion, increasing respiratory rate and reducing instrumental dead space during conventional mechanical ventilation is as efficient as expiratory washout to reduce PaCO2 in patients with severe ARDS and permissive hypercapnia. When used in combination, both techniques have additive effects and result in PaCO2 levels close to normal values. PMID:10390383

  17. The effect of expiratory rib cage compression before endotracheal suctioning on the vital signs in patients under mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Bousarri, Mitra Payami; Shirvani, Yadolah; Agha-Hassan-Kashani, Saeed; Nasab, Nouredin Mousavi

    2014-01-01

    Background: In patients undergoing mechanical ventilation, mucus production and secretion is high as a result of the endotracheal tube. Because endotracheal suction in these patients is essential, chest physiotherapy techniques such as expiratory rib cage compression before endotracheal suctioning can be used as a means to facilitate mobilizing and removing airway secretion and improving alveolar ventilation. As one of the complications of mechanical ventilation and endotracheal suctioning is decrease of cardiac output, this study was carried out to determine the effect of expiratory rib cage compression before endotracheal suctioning on the vital signs in patients under mechanical ventilation. Materials and Methods: This study was a randomized clinical trial with a crossover design. The study subjects included 50 mechanically ventilated patients, hospitalized in intensive care wards of Valiasr and Mousavi hospitals in Zanjan, Iran. Subjects were selected by consecutive sampling and randomly allocated to groups 1 and 2. The patients received endotracheal suctioning with or without rib cage compression, with a minimum of 3 h interval between the two interventions. Expiratory rib cage compression was performed for 5 min before endotracheal suctioning. Vital signs were measured 5 min before and 15 and 25 min after endotracheal suctioning. Data were recorded on a data recording sheet. Data were analyzed using paired t-tests. Results: There were statistically significant differences in the means of vital signs measured 5 min before with 15 and 25 min after endotracheal suctioning with rib cage compression (P < 0. 01). There was no significant difference in the means of diastolic pressure measured 25 min after with baseline in this stage). But on the reverse mode, there was a significant difference between the means of pulse and respiratory rate 15 min after endotracheal suctioning and the baseline values (P < 0.002). This effect continued up to 25 min after endotracheal

  18. Effects of Ropivacaine on Postoperative Pain and Peak Expiratory Flow Rate in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Imani, Farsad; Zamani, Somayyeh; Etezadi, Farhad; Shariat Moharari, Reza; Khajavi, Mohammad Reza; Hosseini, Seyed Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative analgesic effects of ropivacaine have been demonstrated in various surgical procedures; however, its beneficial effect on postoperative pain relief and ability to breathe out air in urological surgeries, particularly in local interventions such as percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL), has remained uncertain. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of ropivacaine on postoperative pain severity and peak expiratory flow (PEF) in patients undergoing PCNL procedure. Patients and Methods: This randomized double-blinded clinical trial was performed on 55 consecutive adult patients aged 15 to 60 years who underwent Tubeless PCNL surgery. The patients were randomly assigned to instill 30 mL of ropivacaine 0.2% or 30 mL of isotonic saline with the same protocol. The parameters of visual analogue scale (VAS) (for assessment of pain severity) and PEF (for assessment of ability to breathe out air) were measured 4 and 6 hours after completing the procedure. Moreover, the amounts of opioids or analgesics administered within 6 hours after the operation were recorded. Results: We found no difference in the mean pain severity score between the case and control groups 4 hours (P = 0.332) and 6 hours (P = 0.830) after the operation. The mean PEF at baseline was similar in case and control groups (P = 0.738). Moreover, no difference was revealed in PEF index 4 hours (P = 0.398) and 6 hours (P = 0.335) after PCNL between the groups. The mean VAS scores 4 hours after the operation slightly decreased 2 hours later (P < 0.001) in the both groups. Moreover, in the both groups, a sudden decrease in PEF index was observed within 4 hours after the operation and increased with a mild gradient for the next 2 hours. No difference was found in the amount of postoperative analgesic used in the both groups. Conclusions: Instillation of ropivacaine 0.2% (30 mL) within tubeless PCNL surgery does not have a significant effect on postoperative pain relief

  19. Effect of the Prolonged Inspiratory to Expiratory Ratio on Oxygenation and Respiratory Mechanics During Surgical Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin Ha; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Jae Hoon; Shin, Seokyung; Min, Nar Hyun; Kim, Min-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Prolonged inspiratory to expiratory (I:E) ratio ventilation has been researched to reduce lung injury and improve oxygenation in surgical patients with one-lung ventilation (OLV) or carbon dioxide (CO2) pneumoperitoneum. We aimed to confirm the efficacy of the 1:1 equal ratio ventilation (ERV) compared with the 1:2 conventional ratio ventilation (CRV) during surgical procedures. Electronic databases, including PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science, and Google Scholar were searched. Prospective interventional trials that assessed the effects of prolonged I:E ratio of 1:1 during surgical procedures. Adult patients undergoing OLV or CO2 pneumoperitoneum as specific interventions depending on surgical procedures. The included studies were examined with the Cochrane Collaboration's tool. The data regarding intraoperative oxygenation and respiratory mechanics were extracted, and then pooled with standardized mean difference (SMD) using the method of Hedges. Seven trials (498 total patients, 274 with ERV) were included. From overall analysis, ERV did not improve oxygenation at 20 or 30 minutes after specific interventions (SMD 0.193, 95% confidence interval (CI): −0.094 to 0.481, P = 0.188). From subgroup analyses, ERV provided significantly improved oxygenation only with laparoscopy (SMD 0.425, 95% CI: 0.167–0.682, P = 0.001). At 60 minutes after the specific interventions, ERV improved oxygenation significantly in the overall analysis (SMD 0.447, 95% CI: 0.209–0.685, P < 0.001) as well as in the subgroup analyses with OLV (SMD 0.328, 95% CI: 0.011–0.644, P = 0.042) and laparoscopy (SMD 0.668, 95% CI: 0.052–1.285, P = 0.034). ERV provided lower peak airway pressure (Ppeak) and plateau airway pressure (Pplat) than CRV, regardless of the type of intervention. The relatively small number of the included articles and their heterogeneity could be the main limitations. ERV improved oxygenation

  20. Effect of the Prolonged Inspiratory to Expiratory Ratio on Oxygenation and Respiratory Mechanics During Surgical Procedures.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Ha; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Jae Hoon; Shin, Seokyung; Min, Nar Hyun; Kim, Min-Soo

    2016-03-01

    Prolonged inspiratory to expiratory (I:E) ratio ventilation has been researched to reduce lung injury and improve oxygenation in surgical patients with one-lung ventilation (OLV) or carbon dioxide (CO2) pneumoperitoneum. We aimed to confirm the efficacy of the 1:1 equal ratio ventilation (ERV) compared with the 1:2 conventional ratio ventilation (CRV) during surgical procedures. Electronic databases, including PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science, and Google Scholar were searched.Prospective interventional trials that assessed the effects of prolonged I:E ratio of 1:1 during surgical procedures. Adult patients undergoing OLV or CO2 pneumoperitoneum as specific interventions depending on surgical procedures. The included studies were examined with the Cochrane Collaboration's tool. The data regarding intraoperative oxygenation and respiratory mechanics were extracted, and then pooled with standardized mean difference (SMD) using the method of Hedges. Seven trials (498 total patients, 274 with ERV) were included. From overall analysis, ERV did not improve oxygenation at 20 or 30 minutes after specific interventions (SMD 0.193, 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.094 to 0.481, P = 0.188). From subgroup analyses, ERV provided significantly improved oxygenation only with laparoscopy (SMD 0.425, 95% CI: 0.167-0.682, P = 0.001). At 60 minutes after the specific interventions, ERV improved oxygenation significantly in the overall analysis (SMD 0.447, 95% CI: 0.209-0.685, P < 0.001) as well as in the subgroup analyses with OLV (SMD 0.328, 95% CI: 0.011-0.644, P = 0.042) and laparoscopy (SMD 0.668, 95% CI: 0.052-1.285, P = 0.034). ERV provided lower peak airway pressure (Ppeak) and plateau airway pressure (Pplat) than CRV, regardless of the type of intervention. The relatively small number of the included articles and their heterogeneity could be the main limitations. ERV improved oxygenation at all of the

  1. Impact of the prolonged slow expiratory maneuver on respiratory mechanics in wheezing infants *

    PubMed Central

    Lanza, Fernanda de Cordoba; Wandalsen, Gustavo Falbo; da Cruz, Carolina Lopes; Solé, Dirceu

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate changes in respiratory mechanics and tidal volume (VT) in wheezing infants in spontaneous ventilation after performing the technique known as the prolonged, slow expiratory (PSE) maneuver. METHODS: We included infants with a history of recurrent wheezing and who had had no exacerbations in the previous 15 days. For the assessment of the pulmonary function, the infants were sedated and placed in the supine position, and a face mask was used and connected to a pneumotachograph. The variables of tidal breathing (VT and RR) as well as those of respiratory mechanics-respiratory system compliance (Crs), respiratory system resistance (Rrs), and the respiratory system time constant (prs)-were measured before and after three consecutive PSE maneuvers. RESULTS: We evaluated 18 infants. The mean age was 32 ± 11 weeks. After PSE, there was a significant increase in VT (79.3 ± 15.6 mL vs. 85.7 ± 17.2 mL; p = 0.009) and a significant decrease in RR (40.6 ± 6.9 breaths/min vs. 38.8 ± 0,9 breaths/min; p = 0.042). However, no significant differences were found in the variables of respiratory mechanics (Crs: 11.0 ± 3.1 mL/cmH2O vs. 11.3 ± 2.7 mL/cmH2O; Rrs: 29.9 ± 6.2 cmH2O • mL−1 • s−1 vs. 30.8 ± 7.1 cmH2O • mL−1 • s−1; and prs: 0.32 ± 0.11 s vs. 0.34 ±0.12 s; p > 0.05 for all). CONCLUSIONS: This respiratory therapy technique is able to induce significant changes in VT and RR in infants with recurrent wheezing, even in the absence of exacerbations. The fact that the variables related to respiratory mechanics remained unchanged indicates that the technique is safe to apply in this group of patients. Studies involving symptomatic infants are needed in order to quantify the functional effects of the technique. PMID:23503488

  2. High-inflation pressure and positive end-expiratory pressure. Injurious to the lung? No.

    PubMed

    Nelson, L D

    1996-07-01

    during ARDS) and limiting exposure to toxic concentrations of oxygen minimize ventilator-induced secondary lung injury and maximize chances for survival. Arbitrary limitations of peak inspiratory or end-expiratory airway pressure or mandatory tidal volume in patients with severe ARDS seem to be unfounded. Failure to achieve adequate physiologic end-points in these patients may increase morbidity and mortality rates.

  3. Effort and volume dependence of forced-deflation flow-volume relationships in intubated infants.

    PubMed

    Hammer, J; Newth, C J

    1996-01-01

    The application of negative pressure to the airway opening [called the forced-deflation (FD) technique] allows the examination of maximal expiratory flow-volume curves in intubated infants who are unable to generate a voluntary maximal expiratory maneuver. We explored the questions of effort and volume dependence of flows generated by FD in 18 intubated, sedated, and paralyzed infants [age 10.6 +/- 2.0 (SE) mo; weight 7.2 +/- 0.7 kg] with normal lungs. Effort dependence was assessed by isovolume pressure-flow curves that were constructed in 10 infants from repeated FD maneuvers from total lung capacity (defined as +40 cmH2O) by varying airway opening pressures from 0 (barometric pressure) to -100 cmH2O at intervals of 20 cmH2O. The effect of volume history was assessed by initiating FD maneuvers from different inspiratory volumes delineated by the inspiratory pressures +10, +20, +30, and +40 cmH2O. We compared maximal expiratory flows at isovolume points [50, 25, and 10% forced vital capacity (FVC) of the standard +40/-40 cmH2O FD maneuver] and found that flow limitation consistently occurred in all infants at and below 25% FVC with -40 cmH2O or greater airway opening pressure. We found no significant influence of volume history on maximal flows at and below 25% FVC. Under well-controlled study conditions, we demonstrated excellent reproducibility of maximal expiratory flows at low lung volumes, analogous to those of voluntary forced expiratory maneuvers in adults and older children. This information may be helpful in setting standards for performance and interpretation of FD maneuvers in intubated infants. PMID:8847326

  4. Effects of expiratory muscle strength training on oropharyngeal dysphagia in subacute stroke patients: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Park, J S; Oh, D H; Chang, M Y; Kim, K M

    2016-05-01

    Expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) involves forcible blowing as a means of generating high expiratory pressure, against adjustable resistance. EMST has recently been introduced as a potential treatment for dysphagia. This study was performed to investigate the effects of EMST on the activity of suprahyoid muscles, aspiration and dietary stages in stroke patients with dysphagia. Twenty-seven stroke patients with dysphagia were randomly divided into two groups. The experimental group performed EMST with a 70% threshold value of maximal expiratory pressure, using an EMST device, 5 days a week for 4 weeks. The placebo group trained with a sham device. The EMST regime involved 5 sets of 5 breaths through the EMST device for a total of 25 breaths per day. Activity in the suprahyoid muscle group was measured using surface electromyography (sEMG). Further, the penetration-aspiration scale (PAS) was used to assess the results of the videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS). In addition, dietary stages were evaluated using the Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS). The experimental group exhibited improved suprahyoid muscle group activity and PAS results, when compared to the placebo group. Following intervention, statistical analysis indicated significant differences in measured suprahyoid muscle activity (P = 0·01), liquid PAS outcomes (P = 0·03) and FOIS results (P = 0·06), but not semisolid type PAS outcomes (P = 0·32), between the groups. This study confirms EMST as an effective treatment for the development of suprahyoid muscle activity in stroke patients with dysphagia. Additionally, improvements in aspiration and penetration outcomes were observed. PMID:26803525

  5. Influence of respiratory rate and end-expiratory pressure variation on cyclic alveolar recruitment in an experimental lung injury model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Cyclic alveolar recruitment/derecruitment (R/D) is an important mechanism of ventilator-associated lung injury. In experimental models this process can be measured with high temporal resolution by detection of respiratory-dependent oscillations of the paO2 (ΔpaO2). A previous study showed that end-expiratory collapse can be prevented by an increased respiratory rate in saline-lavaged rabbits. The current study compares the effects of increased positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) versus an individually titrated respiratory rate (RRind) on intra-tidal amplitude of Δ paO2 and on average paO2 in saline-lavaged pigs. Methods Acute lung injury was induced by bronchoalveolar lavage in 16 anaesthetized pigs. R/D was induced and measured by a fast-responding intra-aortic probe measuring paO2. Ventilatory interventions (RRind (n = 8) versus extrinsic PEEP (n = 8)) were applied for 30 minutes to reduce Δ paO2. Haemodynamics, spirometry and Δ paO2 were monitored and the Ventilation/Perfusion distributions were assessed by multiple inert gas elimination. The main endpoints average and Δ paO2 following the interventions were analysed by Mann-Whitney-U-Test and Bonferroni's correction. The secondary parameters were tested in an explorative manner. Results Both interventions reduced Δ paO2. In the RRind group, ΔpaO2 was significantly smaller (P < 0.001). The average paO2 continuously decreased following RRind and was significantly higher in the PEEP group (P < 0.001). A sustained difference of the ventilation/perfusion distribution and shunt fractions confirms these findings. The RRind application required less vasopressor administration. Conclusions Different recruitment kinetics were found compared to previous small animal models and these differences were primarily determined by kinetics of end-expiratory collapse. In this porcine model, respiratory rate and increased PEEP were both effective in reducing the amplitude of paO2 oscillations. In contrast to

  6. High-frequency oscillations in membrane potentials of medullary inspiratory and expiratory neurons (including laryngeal motoneurons).

    PubMed

    Huang, W X; Cohen, M I; Yu, Q; See, W R; He, Q

    1996-09-01

    1. In midcollicular decerebrate, unanesthetized, paralyzed cats ventilated with a cycle-triggered pump system, the properties of high-frequency oscillations (HFOs, 50-100 Hz) in membrane potentials (MPs) of medullary inspiratory (I) and expiratory (E) cells were studied. Simultaneous recordings were taken from bilateral phrenic and recurrent laryngeal (RL) nerves and from cells in the intermediate ventral respiratory group (intVRG, 0-1 mm rostral to the obex) or the caudal ventral respiratory group (cVRG, 2-4 mm caudal to the obex). 2. Spectral coherence analyses were used to detect the presence of HFOs during I in I and E cell MPs. Cross-correlation histograms (CCHs) between the cell and phrenic signals were used to ascertain cell-nerve HFO phase relations and to identify cells as RL motoneurons. Of the 103 cells that had significant HFOs (cell-phrenic coherences > or = 0.1), measurable HFO peak lags in the CCH were seen in 53 cells: 1) RL cells (9 I cells and 7 E cells); and 2) other types of cell (8 intVRG I cells, 18 intVRG E cells, and 11 cVRG E cells). These cells had high HFO correlations; the cell-phrenic coherence range was 0.35-0.94, with a mean HFO frequency of 58 Hz. 3. The cell-phrenic HFO lag (in ms) was measured in the CCH as the lag of the primary peak (peak located nearest to 0 lag). The phase lag was defined as (lag of primary peak in ms)/(HFO period in ms). The phase lags differed markedly between two subsets of cells: 1) RL I cells had HFO depolarization peaks that lagged the phrenic HFO peaks (average cell-phrenic phase lag = -0.18); and 2) the non-RL cells, regardless of location (intVRG or cVRG) and type (I or E), had HFO depolarization peaks leading (preceding) the phrenic HFO peaks (average cell-phrenic phase lag = 0.28). In addition, the cVRG E cells had significantly shorter cell-phrenic phase lags than the intVRG E cells (0.23 vs. 0.31, respectively). 4. These lags can be compared with the (I unit)-phrenic phase lags (average

  7. Numerical and experimental study of expiratory flow in the case of major upper airway obstructions with fluid structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouly, F.; van Hirtum, A.; Lagrée, P.-Y.; Pelorson, X.; Payan, Y.

    2008-02-01

    This study deals with the numerical prediction and experimental description of the flow-induced deformation in a rapidly convergent divergent geometry which stands for a simplified tongue, in interaction with an expiratory airflow. An original in vitro experimental model is proposed, which allows measurement of the deformation of the artificial tongue, in condition of major initial airway obstruction. The experimental model accounts for asymmetries in geometry and tissue properties which are two major physiological upper airway characteristics. The numerical method for prediction of the fluid structure interaction is described. The theory of linear elasticity in small deformations has been chosen to compute the mechanical behaviour of the tongue. The main features of the flow are taken into account using a boundary layer theory. The overall numerical method entails finite element solving of the solid problem and finite differences solving of the fluid problem. First, the numerical method predicts the deformation of the tongue with an overall error of the order of 20%, which can be seen as a preliminary successful validation of the theory and simulations. Moreover, expiratory flow limitation is predicted in this configuration. As a result, both the physical and numerical models could be useful to understand this phenomenon reported in heavy snorers and apneic patients during sleep.

  8. Cross-shift peak expiratory flow changes are unassociated with respirable coal dust exposure among South African coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Naidoo, R.N.; Robins, T.G.; Becklake, M.; Seixas, N.; Thompson, M.L.

    2007-12-15

    he objectives of this study were to determine whether cross-shift changes in peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) were related to respirable dust exposure in South African coalminers. Fifty workers were randomly selected from a cohort of 684 miners from 3 bituminous coal mines in Mpumalanga, South Africa. Peak expiratory efforts were measured prior to the commencement of the shift, and at the end of the shift on at least two occasions separated by at least 2 weeks, with full shift personal dust sampling being conducted on each occasion for each participant. Interviews were conducted, work histories were obtained and cumulative exposure estimates were constructed. Regression models examined the associations of cross-shift changes in PEFR with current and cumulative exposure, controlling for shift, smoking and past history of tuberculosis. There were marginal differences in cross-shift PEFR (ranging from 0.1 to 2 L/min). Linear regression analyses showed no association between cross-shift change in PEFR and current or cumulative exposure. The specific shift worked by participants in the study showed no effect. Our study showed no association between current respirable dust exposure and cross-shift changes in PEFR. There was a non-significant protective effect of cumulative dust exposure on the outcome, suggesting the presence of a 'healthy worker survivor effect' in this data.

  9. Nuclear forces

    SciTech Connect

    Machleidt, R.

    2013-06-10

    These lectures present an introduction into the theory of nuclear forces. We focus mainly on the modern approach, in which the forces between nucleons emerge from low-energy QCD via chiral effective field theory.

  10. Effect of simultaneous application of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training on the enhancement of the swallowing function of patients with dysphagia caused by parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Haewon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of simultaneous application of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training on the enhancement of the swallowing function of patients with dysphagia caused by Parkinson’s disease. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 18 patients who received simultaneous application of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training and 15 patients who received expiratory muscle strength training only. Postural techniques were conducted in the order of chin tucking, head rotation, head tilting, bending head back, and lying down, while expiratory muscle strength training was conducted at a resistance level of about 70% of the maximal expiratory pressure. Swallowing recovery was assessed by using the Functional Dysphagia Scale based on videofluoroscopic studies. [Results] The mean value obtained in the videofluoroscopic studies for both groups decreased after the treatment. In the postural techniques plus expiratory muscle strength training group, the decrease was significantly greater than that in the expiratory muscle strength training-only group. [Conclusion] The results imply that simultaneous performance of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training is more effective than expiratory muscle strength training alone when applied in the swallowing rehabilitation for patients with dysphagia caused by Parkinson’s disease. PMID:27390429

  11. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people ages 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or the institutionalized population, such as prison inmates. Determining the size of the labor force is a way of determining how big the economy can get. The size of the labor force depends on two…

  12. Computerised determination of spontaneous inspiratory and expiratory times in premature neonates during intermittent positive pressure ventilation. II: Results from 20 babies.

    PubMed Central

    Ahluwalia, J S; Morley, C J; Mockridge, J N

    1994-01-01

    Twenty premature infants ventilated for respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) were studied using a new computerised technique to determine spontaneous inspiratory and expiratory times. The technique is continuous and non-invasive. Infants were studied during intermittent positive pressure ventilation for periods of up to 45 minutes. Median birth weight and gestation were 1477 g and 30 weeks. The median number of breaths analysed for each baby was 925. The median (range) for spontaneous inspiratory time was 0.30 (0.26 to 0.34) seconds and for spontaneous expiratory time it was 0.46 (0.34 to 0.66) seconds. The spontaneous inspiratory and expiratory times were different from the ventilator settings. PMID:7820709

  13. Contribution of the retrotrapezoid nucleus/parafacial respiratory region to the expiratory-sympathetic coupling in response to peripheral chemoreflex in rats.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Davi J A; Dias, Mirela B; Cavalcanti-Kwiatkoski, Roberta; Machado, Benedito H; Zoccal, Daniel B

    2012-08-01

    Central mechanisms of coupling between respiratory and sympathetic systems are essential for the entrainment between the enhanced respiratory drive and sympathoexcitation in response to hypoxia. However, the brainstem nuclei and neuronal network involved in these respiratory-sympathetic interactions remain unclear. Here, we evaluated whether the increase in expiratory activity and expiratory-modulated sympathoexcitation produced by the peripheral chemoreflex activation involves the retrotrapezoid nucleus/parafacial respiratory region (RTN/pFRG). Using decerebrated arterially perfused in situ rat preparations (60-80 g), we recorded the activities of thoracic sympathetic (tSN), phrenic (PN), and abdominal nerves (AbN) as well as the extracellular activity of RTN/pFRG expiratory neurons, and reflex responses to chemoreflex activation were evaluated before and after inactivation of the RTN/pFRG region with muscimol (1 mM). In the RTN/pFRG, we identified late-expiratory (late-E) neurons (n = 5) that were silent at resting but fired coincidently with the emergence of late-E bursts in AbN after peripheral chemoreceptor activation. Bilateral muscimol microinjections into the RTN/pFRG region (n = 6) significantly reduced basal PN frequency, mean AbN activity, and the amplitude of respiratory modulation of tSN (P < 0.05). With respect to peripheral chemoreflex responses, muscimol microinjections in the RTN/pFRG enhanced the PN inspiratory response, abolished the evoked late-E activity of AbN, but did not alter either the magnitude or pattern of the tSN reflex response. These findings indicate that the RTN/pFRG region is critically involved in the processing of the active expiratory response but not of the expiratory-modulated sympathetic response to peripheral chemoreflex activation of rat in situ preparations.

  14. Model for predicting peak expiratory flow rate of Nigerian workers in a cement factory in Itori, Ogun State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ismaila, Salami Olasunkanmi; Akanbi, Olusegun Gabriel; Olaoniye, Wasiu

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of the study was to propose a model for predicting the peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) of Nigerian workers in a cement factory. Sixty randomly selected non-smoker and healthy workers (30 in production sections, 30 in the administrative section of the factory) participated in the study. Their physical characteristics and PEFR were measured. Multiple correlations using SPSS version 16.0 were performed on the data. The values of PEFR, using the obtained model, were compared with the measured values using a two-tailed t test. There were positive correlations among age, height and PEFR. A prediction equation for PEFR based on age, height, weight and years of exposure (experience) was obtained with R² = .843 (p < 0.001). The developed model will be useful for the management in determining PEFR of workers in the cement industry for possible medical attention. PMID:26694007

  15. Model for predicting peak expiratory flow rate of Nigerian workers in a cement factory in Itori, Ogun State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ismaila, Salami Olasunkanmi; Akanbi, Olusegun Gabriel; Olaoniye, Wasiu

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of the study was to propose a model for predicting the peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) of Nigerian workers in a cement factory. Sixty randomly selected non-smoker and healthy workers (30 in production sections, 30 in the administrative section of the factory) participated in the study. Their physical characteristics and PEFR were measured. Multiple correlations using SPSS version 16.0 were performed on the data. The values of PEFR, using the obtained model, were compared with the measured values using a two-tailed t test. There were positive correlations among age, height and PEFR. A prediction equation for PEFR based on age, height, weight and years of exposure (experience) was obtained with R² = .843 (p < 0.001). The developed model will be useful for the management in determining PEFR of workers in the cement industry for possible medical attention.

  16. Assessment of impact of high particulate concentration on peak expiratory flow rate of lungs of sand stone quarry workers.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suresh Kumar; Chowdhary, G R; Purohit, Gopal

    2006-12-01

    This study was designed to assess the impact of high particulate concentration on peak expiratory flow rate of lungs of sand stone quarry workers. The workers were engaged in different types of activities such as drilling, loading and dressing. These different working conditions had different concentrations of RSPM, leading to different exposure levels in workers. It was found that exposure duration and exposure concentrations were the main factors responsible for damage to the respiratory tracts of the workers. The particles were deposited at various areas of the respiratory system and reduced the peak flow rate. It was also revealed from the study that most of the workers suffered from silicosis if the exposure duration was more than 20 years.

  17. The effects of prophylactic expiratory positive airway pressure on the resolution of oleic acid-induced lung injury in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Luce, J M; Huang, T W; Robertson, H T; Colley, P S; Gronka, R; Nessly, M L; Cheney, F W

    1983-01-01

    It is not known whether positive end-expiratory airway pressure (PEEP) merely improves gas exchange in patients with the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or if it also affects the resolution of their lung injury. The present investigation was performed to determine whether expiratory positive airway pressure (EPAP), a form of PEEP, is prophylactic in preventing the lung injury induced by oleic acid in dogs or in enhancing its resolution. Arterial and mixed venous blood gases and functional residual capacity (FRC) were measured in 14 pairs of mongrel dogs with indwelling catheters and permanent tracheostomies. One member of each pair was treated with 10 cm H2O EPAP through a valve attached to the tracheostomy tube. Both dogs received 0.06 ml/kg oleic acid intravenously at hour 0. Measurements were made at three, 12, and 24 hours, when EPAP was discontinued, and over the next six days. Five dog pairs were sacrificed at 72 hours; the other surviving animals were sacrificed at 168 hours. FRC was higher at three, 12, and 24 hours in dogs receiving EPAP than in the untreated dogs. The arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) was higher and the venous admixture (Qva/Qt) was lower at three and 12 hours in the dogs receiving EPAP than in the untreated dogs. However, after 24 hours, no differences were noted between the two groups in FRC, PaO2, Qav/Qt, mortality, final lung compliance to initial lung compliance differences, lung water to dry lung weight ratios, or histology. It is concluded that EPAP improves gas exchange during its administration, but has no demonstrable prophylactic effect on the resolution of lung injury in the oleic acid model of human ARDS. Images Fig. 7. Fig. 7. PMID:6338844

  18. Spontaneously breathing anesthetized patients with a laryngeal mask airway: positive end-expiratory pressure does not improve oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    Froessler, B; Brommundt, J; Anton, J; Khanduja, R; Kuhlen, R; Rossaint, R; Coburn, M

    2010-11-01

    Spontaneous ventilation is a popular mode of ventilation for patients with the laryngeal mask airway (LMA). Studies have shown, however, that spontaneous ventilation impairs gas exchange and that assisting or controlling ventilation results in higher oxygen saturation. Atelectasis during general anesthesia is a well described mechanism which impacts on gas exchange. Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) increases the lung volume available for gas exchange. This study investigated whether the application of PEEP leads to an improvement of oxygen saturation in unassisted spontaneously breathing patients with a LMA. A total of 80 adult patients under general anesthesia were prospectively randomized into two groups. Both groups were left to breathe spontaneously. In group 1 the adjustable pressure limiting (APL) valve was opened resulting in zero end-expiratory pressure. In group 2 the valve was set to a PEEP of +7 cm H₂O. Oxygen saturation was measured by pulse oxymetry at four different phases: pre-induction, after induction and insertion of the LMA, during maintenance and in recovery. The application of PEEP did not improve oxygen saturation. In both groups the mean oxygen saturation was similar (97.2±1.8% in group 1 versus 97.2±1.9% in group 2, p=0.941) during maintenance. No effect on oxygen saturation in recovery could be found either (96.0±1.8% in group 1 versus 96.1±2.0% in group 2, p=0.952) and hemodynamics were unaffected by the application of PEEP. The application of a PEEP of +7 cm H₂O with a LMA under spontaneous ventilation cannot be recommended. Limitations of our study were the selection of healthy patients and omitting pre-oxygenation before induction which might have limited the development of atelectasis. In addition arterial partial pressure of oxygen (p(a)O₂) measurements could have revealed subtle changes in oxygenation.

  19. One Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotas, Ronald R.

    2002-04-01

    There is only one entity that can extend force and couple through space; and it should be apparent that Electromagnetism is that entity. In the cases of the nuclear strong force and the nuclear weak force, this is the same fundamental Electromagnetism manifesting itself in two different ways in the nucleus. It remains the same basic Electromagnetism. On the other hand, General Relativity fails to produce force at a distance, fails the Cavendish experiment, and does not allow an apple to fall to the ground. The result shows there is only Electromagnetism that functions through physical nature providing gravity, actions in the nucleus, as well as all other physical actions universally, including Gravity and Gravitation. There are many direct proofs of this, the same proofs as in NUCLEAR QUANTUM GRAVITATION. In contrast, General Relativity plainly relies on fallacy abstract and incoherent proofs; proofs which have now been mostly disproved. In the past it was deemed necessary by some to have an "ether" to propagate Electromagnetic waves. The fallacy concept of time space needs "space distortions" in order to cause gravity. However, Electromagnetic gravity does not have this problem. Clearly there is only ONE FORCE that causes Gravity, Electromagnetism, the Nuclear Strong Force, and the Nuclear Weak Force, and that ONE FORCE is Electromagnetism.

  20. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people aged 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or institutionalized people, such as prison inmates. Quantifying this total supply of labor is a way of determining how big the economy can get. Labor force participation rates vary significantly…

  1. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1993-05-11

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components is described. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  2. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1993-01-01

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  3. Dosimetric Analysis of Organs at Risk During Expiratory Gating in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Cullen M.; Murphy, James D.; Eclov, Neville; Atwood, Todd F.; Kielar, Kayla N.; Christman-Skieller, Claudia; Mok, Ed; Xing, Lei; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To determine how the respiratory phase impacts dose to normal organs during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Eighteen consecutive patients with locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma treated with SBRT were included in this study. On the treatment planning 4-dimensional computed tomography (CT) scan, the planning target volume (PTV), defined as the gross tumor volume plus 3-mm margin, the duodenum, and the stomach were contoured on the end-expiration (CT{sub exp}) and end-inspiration (CT{sub insp}) phases for each patient. A separate treatment plan was constructed for both phases with the dose prescription of 33 Gy in 5 fractions with 95% coverage of the PTV by the 100% isodose line. The dose-volume histogram (DVH) endpoints, volume of duodenum that received 20 Gy (V{sub 20}), V{sub 25}, and V{sub 30} and maximum dose to 5 cc of contoured organ (D{sub 5cc}), D{sub 1cc}, and D{sub 0.1cc}, were evaluated. Results: Dosimetric parameters for the duodenum, including V{sub 25}, V{sub 30}, D{sub 1cc}, and D{sub 0.1cc} improved by planning on the CT{sub exp} compared to those on the CT{sub insp}. There was a statistically significant overlap of the PTV with the duodenum but not the stomach during the CT{sub insp} compared to the CT{sub exp} (0.38 ± 0.17 cc vs 0.01 ± 0.01 cc, P=.048). A larger expansion of the PTV, in accordance with a Danish phase 2 trial, showed even more overlapping volume of duodenum on the CT{sub insp} compared to that on the CT{sub exp} (5.5 ± 0.9 cc vs 3.0 ± 0.8 cc, P=.0003) but no statistical difference for any stomach dosimetric DVH parameter. Conclusions: Dose to the duodenum was higher when treating on the inspiratory than on the expiratory phase. These data suggest that expiratory gating may be preferable to inspiratory breath-hold and free breathing strategies for minimizing risk of toxicity.

  4. Vacuum force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yongquan

    2015-03-01

    To study on vacuum force, we must clear what is vacuum, vacuum is a space do not have any air and also ray. There is not exist an absolute the vacuum of space. The vacuum of space is relative, so that the vacuum force is relative. There is a certain that vacuum vacuum space exists. In fact, the vacuum space is relative, if the two spaces compared to the existence of relative vacuum, there must exist a vacuum force, and the direction of the vacuum force point to the vacuum region. Any object rotates and radiates. Rotate bend radiate- centripetal, gravity produced, relative gravity; non gravity is the vacuum force. Gravity is centripetal, is a trend that the objects who attracted wants to Centripetal, or have been do Centripetal movement. Any object moves, so gravity makes the object curve movement, that is to say, the radiation range curve movement must be in the gravitational objects, gravity must be existed in non vacuum region, and make the object who is in the region of do curve movement (for example: The earth moves around the sun), or final attracted in the form gravitational objects, and keep relatively static with attract object. (for example: objects on the earth moves but can't reach the first cosmic speed).

  5. Acute Effects of Asian Dust Events on Respiratory Symptoms and Peak Expiratory Flow in Children with Mild Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Young; Choung, Ji Tae; Yu, Jinho; Kim, Do Kyun

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible adverse effects of Asian dust events on respiratory health in asthmatic children. Fifty-two children with mild asthma were studied for eight consecutive weeks in the spring of 2004 (March 8 to May 2). During the study period, five Asian dust days were identified; we included a lag period of two days following each of the events. Subjects recorded their respiratory symptom diaries and peak expiratory flow (PEF) twice daily during the study period; and they underwent methacholine bronchial challenge tests. The subjects reported a significantly higher frequency of respiratory symptoms during the Asian dust days than during the control days. They showed significantly more reduced morning and evening PEF values, and more increased PEF variability (10.1%±3.5% vs. 5.5%±2.2%) during the Asian dust days than during the control days. Methacholine PC20 was not significantly different between before and after the study period (geometric mean: 2.82 mg/mL vs. 3.16 mg/mL). These results suggest that the short-term Asian dust events might be associated with increased acute respiratory symptoms and changes in PEF outcomes. However, there might be little long-term influence on airway hyperresponsiveness in children with mild asthma. PMID:18303201

  6. VARIATIONS IN PEAK EXPIRATORY FLOW MEASUREMENTS ASSOCIATED TO AIR POLLUTION AND ALLERGIC SENSITIZATION IN CHILDREN IN SAO PAULO, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    de M Correia-Deur, Joya Emilie; Claudio, Luz; Imazawa, Alice Takimoto; Eluf-Neto, Jose

    2012-01-01

    Background In the last 20 years, there has been an increase in the incidence of allergic respiratory diseases worldwide and exposure to air pollution has been discussed as one of the factors associated with this increase. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of air pollution on peak expiratory flow (PEF) and FEV1 in children with and without allergic sensitization. Methods Ninety-six children were followed from April to July, 2004 with spirometry measurements. They were tested for allergic sensitization (IgE, skin prick test, eosinophilia) and asked about allergic symptoms. Air pollution, temperature and relative humidity data were available. Results Decrements in PEF were observed with previous 24-h average exposure to air pollution, as well as with 3 to 10 day average exposure and were associated mainly with PM10, NO2 and O3. in all three categories of allergic sensitization. Even though allergic sensitized children tended to present larger decrements in the PEF measurements they were not statistically different from the non-allergic sensitized. Decrements in FEV1 were observed mainly with previous 24-h average exposure and 3-day moving average. Conclusions Decrements in PEF associated with air pollution were observed in children independent from their allergic sensitization status. Their daily exposure to air pollution can be responsible for a chronic inflammatory process that might impair their lung growth and later their lung function in adulthood. PMID:22544523

  7. The effects of oscillating positive expiratory pressure therapy in adults with stable non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Annemarie L; Williamson, Hannah C; Lorensini, Sarah; Spencer, Lissa M

    2015-02-01

    Airway clearance techniques (ACTs) are recommended for patients with stable non-cystic fibrosis (non-CF) bronchiectasis, but the efficacy of oscillating positive expiratory pressure (PEP) therapy compared to other techniques has not been reviewed. A systematic review of studies was conducted in stable patients comparing the effect of oscillating PEP therapy to other ACTs or a control condition. Data were extracted related to sputum expectoration, lung function, gas exchange, quality of life (QOL), symptoms, and exacerbation rate. Seven studies were included with a total of 146 patients, with a mean (SD) PEDro score of 7(1). Oscillating PEP therapy enhanced sputum expectoration compared to no treatment, but has equivalent benefits as the active cycle of breathing technique with gravity-assisted drainage (mean difference [95% CI] -2.8 g [-8.8 to 3.2 g]). Oscillating PEP has a similar effect as other ACTs on dynamic lung volumes, gas exchange and breathlessness. Use of oscillating PEP improved disease-specific QOL (p < 0.001) and cough-related QOL (p < 0.002) compared to no treatment but did not reduce exacerbation rate. In conclusion, in stable non-CF bronchiectasis, oscillating PEP therapy is associated with improvement in sputum expectoration and QOL compared to no treatment. Compared to other ACTs, the effect upon sputum expectoration, lung function, gas exchange, and symptoms are equivalent. PMID:25518845

  8. Forced expirations against a variable resistance: a new chest physiotherapy method in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Oberwaldner, B; Evans, J C; Zach, M S

    1986-01-01

    Twenty patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) were trained to mobilize intrabronchial secretions by a new method of positive expiratory pressure mask (PEP mask) physiotherapy (PT). Patients repeatedly expired forcefully through the PEP mask; expiratory resistance was varied by eight different internal diameter resistors at the outlet. Forced vital capacity with the mask (FVCPEP) was determined for each resistor and was compared with the one measured without the instrument (FVC); simultaneously the sustained expiratory pressure (SEP) developed against the resistance was recorded. After training, each patient exceeded FVC with one or more resistors; "optimum" FVCPEP was 124 +/- 16% FVC at a SEP of 61 +/- 21 cm H2O. Using the PEP mask, patients cleared a higher percentage of their daily sputum volume than with conventional PT (78 +/- 22% versus 53 +/- 17%, p less than 0.01). In 11 patients (subgroup 1), multiple aspects of lung function were measured at the beginning of the study, after 10 months with PEP mask PT, after two further months without using the mask but with conventional PT, and after six more months with PEP mask PT. Results showed significantly increased expiratory flow rates, significantly decreased hyperinflation and airway instability with PEP mask PT, and a marked decline of lung function without it. The remaining nine patients (subgroup 2) entered into the same protocol; based on findings in subgroup 1 and on ethical considerations, however, the control period without PEP mask PT was then omitted, resulting in a steady and statistically significant improvement of lung function over the entire observation period. In the course of preliminary trials, two children transiently used a suboptimal resistance (FVCPEP less than FVC) and responded with a deterioration of lung function. By dilating airways and evacuating trapped gas, this method of PEP mask PT improves lung function and mucus clearance in CF. Thorough practice with the technique and frequent

  9. Inspiratory and expiratory respiratory muscle training as an adjunct to concurrent strength and endurance training provides no additional 2000 m performance benefits to rowers.

    PubMed

    Bell, Gordon J; Game, Alex; Jones, Richard; Webster, Travis; Forbes, Scott C; Syrotuik, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine respiratory muscle training (RMT) combined with 9 weeks of resistance and endurance training on rowing performance and cardiopulmonary responses. Twenty-seven rowers (mean ± SD: age = 27 ± 9 years; height = 176.9 ± 10.8 cm; and body mass = 76.1 ± 12.6 kg) were randomly assigned to an inspiratory only (n = 13) or expiratory only (n = 14) training group. Both RMT programs were 3 sets of 10 reps, 6 d/wk in addition to an identical 3 d/wk resistance and 3 d/wk endurance training program. Both groups showed similar improvements in 2000 m rowing performance, cardiorespiratory fitness, strength, and maximum inspiratory (PImax) and expiratory (PEmax) pressures (p < .05). It was concluded that there were no additional benefits of 9 weeks of inspiratory or expiratory RMT on simulated 2000 m rowing performance or cardiopulmonary responses when combined with resistance and endurance training in rowers.

  10. Respiratory muscle force and lung volume changes in a population of children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Ong, Bruce A; Caboot, Jason; Jawad, Abbas; McDonough, Joseph; Jackson, Tannoa; Arens, Raanan; Marcus, Carole L; Smith-Whitley, Kim; Mason, Thornton B A; Ohene-Frempong, Kwaku; Allen, Julian L

    2013-10-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a disorder known to impact the respiratory system. We sought to identify respiratory muscle force and lung volume relationships in a paediatric SCD population. Thirty-four SCD-SS subjects underwent pulmonary function testing. Height, weight, age, and gender-adjusted percent predicted maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) values were compared to spirometry and lung volumes. Statistical analyses were performed using Pearson's correlation coefficient and paired two-tailed t-test. The mean ± standard deviation (SD) MIP and MEP was 69·6 ± 31·6 cm H2 O and 66·9 ± 22·9 cm H2 O, respectively, and mean ± SD percent predicted MIP (101·3 ± 45·9) exceeded MEP (72·1 ± 26·0) (P = 0·002). MIP correlated with forced vital capacity (FVC; r = 0·51, P = 0·001) and TLC (r = 0·54, P < 0·0001). MEP also correlated with FVC (r = 0·43, P = 0·011) and total lung capacity (TLC; r = 0·42, P = 0·013). Pearson's correlation coefficient testing yielded relationships between MIP and MEP (r = 0·64, P < 0·0001). SCD-SS patients showed correlations between respiratory muscle force and lung volume, and reduced percent predicted expiratory muscle force compared to inspiratory muscle force. Respiratory muscle strength may affect lung volumes in these patients, and expiratory muscles may be more susceptible than the diaphragm to SCD-induced vaso-occlusive damage.

  11. The effect of postoperative positive end-expiratory pressure on postoperative bleeding after off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting

    PubMed Central

    Salihoglu, Ece; Celik, Sezai; Ugurlucan, Murat; Caglar, Ilker Murat; Turhan-Caglar, Fatma Nihan; Isik, Omer

    2014-01-01

    Introduction To compare postoperative prophylactic use of two positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) levels in order to prevent postoperative bleeding in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. Material and methods Sixty patients undergoing an elective off-pump CABG operation were included in this prospective, nonrandomized clinical trial. Patients were divided into two groups as receiving either 5 cm H2O (group 1) or 8 cm H2O PEEP (group 2) after the operation until being extubated. Chest tube outputs, use of blood products and other fluids, postoperative hemoglobin levels, accumulation of pleural and pericardial fluid after the removal of chest tubes, and duration of hospital stay were recorded and compared. Results Low- and high-pressure PEEP groups did not differ with regard to postoperative chest tube outputs, amounts of transfusions and crystalloid/colloid infusion requirements, or postoperative hemoglobin levels. However, low-pressure PEEP application was associated with significantly higher pleural (92 ±37 ml vs. 69 ±29 ml, p = 0.03) and pericardial fluid (17 ±5 ml vs. 14 ±6 ml, p = 0.04) accumulation. On the other hand, high-pressure PEEP application was associated with significantly longer duration of hospitalization (6.25 ±1.21 days vs. 5.25 ±0.91 days, p = 0.03). Conclusions Prophylactic administration of postoperative PEEP levels of 8 cm H2O, although safe, does not seem to reduce chest-tube output or transfusion requirements in off-pump CABG when compared to the lower level of PEEP. Further studies with larger sample sizes are warranted to confirm the benefits and identify ideal levels of PEEP administration in this group of patients. PMID:25395944

  12. Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) does not depress left ventricular function in patients with pulmonary edema

    SciTech Connect

    Calvin, J.E.; Driedger, A.A.; Sibbald, W.J.

    1981-08-01

    Researchers evaluated the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on left ventricular function in 15 patients with acute respiratory insufficiency secondary to pulmonary edema with invasive (pressure; flow) measurements and radionuclide angiography (RA). Using RNA allowed a definition of the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and then calculation of the left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV), both before and after PEEP. With a mean PEEP of 14.2 +/- 1.8 cm H2O (mean +/- SD) (range, 10 to 15), a fall in the cardiac index (4.34 +/- 1.5 to 3.84 +/- 1.4 L/min/M2; p less than 0.001) was accompanied by a significant decrease in the stroke volume index (42 +/- 13 to 39 +/- 12 ml/beat M2; p less than 0.01) and pulse rate (103.4 +/- 14.3 to 98 +/- 13.5 beats/min; p less than 0.01). The decrease in the stroke volume index was primarily due to a significant decrease in left ventricular preload (LVEDV) from 85.9 +/- 19 to 71.4 +/- 21.4 ml/m2 (p less than 0.01). Simultaneously, the mean LVEF increased from 0.47 +/- 0.10 to 0.53 +/- 0.08 (p less than 0.05), despite a significant increase in the systemic vascular resistance (1,619 +/- 575 to 1,864 +/- 617 dynes . s. cm-5/M2; p less than 0.01). Researchers concluded that the use of PEEP in patients with acute pulmonary edema, to the degree used in this study, may depress cardiac output by simply decreasing left ventricular preload. Researchers were unable to produce any evidence that would support a change in the contractile state of the left ventricle as a cause of depressed forward flow with the use of PEEP.

  13. A comparative study of the peak expiratory flow rate of Indian and Nepalese young adults in a teaching institute.

    PubMed

    Debray, P; Shreevatsa, B M; M G, R B; Sen, T K; Roy, S; Saha, C G

    2008-01-01

    Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) measurement is the easiest and cheapest method to evaluate respiratory functions. So, the study was carried out to evaluate PEFR of healthy Nepalese adults and compare their values with healthy Indian counterparts to know whether Indian prediction equations for PEFR can be used for Nepalese adult population or not. One hundred twenty-three healthy, young, non smoker adult Indian (64: 28 Males, 36 Females) and Nepalese (59: 32 Males, 27 Females) medical students of 18 to 20 years of age participated in the study. The mean PEFR of Indian (male: 490.4 liter/min, female: 386.0 liter/min) and Nepalese (male: 485.9 liter/min, Female: 365.2 liter/min) young adults were found to have no significant differences. As there is no significant difference in the mean PEFR of Indian and Nepalese young adults, prediction equations made for Indian adults can be used to predict PEFR of Nepalese subjects. Therefore, an attempt has been made to formulate a regression equation from the combined Indian and Nepalese subjects. A stepwise, multiple, linear, regression analysis was performed for this purpose. The analysis showed that height is the best predictor for PEFR in the present study. The regression equation based on height for the combined Indian and Nepalese young adults is calculated as: PEFR = 5.687 x Height (cm) - 495.787. However, a stepwise, multiple, linear, regression equation with residual analysis for the best fit model was performed to formulate prediction equation for PEFR and this showed a change of the earlier regression equation to PEFR = 5.930 x Height (cm) - 536.131.

  14. Expiratory flows decreased in Los Angeles children from 1984 to 1987: Is this evidence of effects of air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Kilburn, K.H.; Warshaw, R.H.; Thornton, J.C. )

    1992-10-01

    To estimate the effects of air pollution we measured expiratory flows and vital capacities in 556 Mexican-American Los Angeles children in 1984 and 251 in 1987. They included 106 who were measured in 1984 and 1987 and 145 measured only in 1987. Pulmonary function values were standardized for growth be expressing them as percentages of predicted (% pred) based on sex and height. In 1987 mean values for FEV1 and FEF25-75 were lower by 4.5% pred and 13.6% pred respectively (P < 0.001), while vital capacities were not different in 213 children tested as fifth graders in 1984 and 251 fifth grade children in 1987. For the 106 children tested at both sessions (in second grade in 1984 and in fifth grade in 1987) FVC was also not different but FEV1 was 2.0% pred lower (P < 0.06) and FEF25-75 was 7.0% pred lower (P < 0.001). For the 450 children tested only in 1984 and the 106 retested in 1987 there were no significant differences in mean values for FVC, FEV1, and FEF 25-75. Similarly there were no significant differences between the 1987 mean values for 145 children who were studied longitudinally were not different from the 1984 and 1987 cross-sectional cohorts. Across this interval FEV1 and midflows diminished but vital capacities did not. Airways obstruction worsened during children's residence in Los Angeles from 1984 to 1987 and this is probably due to air pollution.

  15. Peripheral chemoreceptors tune inspiratory drive via tonic expiratory neuron hubs in the medullary ventral respiratory column network.

    PubMed

    Segers, L S; Nuding, S C; Ott, M M; Dean, J B; Bolser, D C; O'Connor, R; Morris, K F; Lindsey, B G

    2015-01-01

    Models of brain stem ventral respiratory column (VRC) circuits typically emphasize populations of neurons, each active during a particular phase of the respiratory cycle. We have proposed that "tonic" pericolumnar expiratory (t-E) neurons tune breathing during baroreceptor-evoked reductions and central chemoreceptor-evoked enhancements of inspiratory (I) drive. The aims of this study were to further characterize the coordinated activity of t-E neurons and test the hypothesis that peripheral chemoreceptors also modulate drive via inhibition of t-E neurons and disinhibition of their inspiratory neuron targets. Spike trains of 828 VRC neurons were acquired by multielectrode arrays along with phrenic nerve signals from 22 decerebrate, vagotomized, neuromuscularly blocked, artificially ventilated adult cats. Forty-eight of 191 t-E neurons fired synchronously with another t-E neuron as indicated by cross-correlogram central peaks; 32 of the 39 synchronous pairs were elements of groups with mutual pairwise correlations. Gravitational clustering identified fluctuations in t-E neuron synchrony. A network model supported the prediction that inhibitory populations with spike synchrony reduce target neuron firing probabilities, resulting in offset or central correlogram troughs. In five animals, stimulation of carotid chemoreceptors evoked changes in the firing rates of 179 of 240 neurons. Thirty-two neuron pairs had correlogram troughs consistent with convergent and divergent t-E inhibition of I cells and disinhibitory enhancement of drive. Four of 10 t-E neurons that responded to sequential stimulation of peripheral and central chemoreceptors triggered 25 cross-correlograms with offset features. The results support the hypothesis that multiple afferent systems dynamically tune inspiratory drive in part via coordinated t-E neurons.

  16. PEAK EXPIRATORY FLOW AS A PREDICTOR OF SUBSEQUENT DISABILITY AND DEATH IN COMMUNITY-LIVING OLDER PERSONS

    PubMed Central

    Vaz Fragoso, Carlos A.; Gahbauer, Evelyne A.; Van Ness, Peter H.; Concato, John; Gill, Thomas M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine whether peak expiratory flow (PEF), when expressed by a validated method using standardized residual (SR) percentile, is associated with subsequent disability and death in older persons. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting New Haven, Connecticut. Participants 754 initially nondisabled, community-living persons aged 70 years or older. Measurements PEF was assessed at baseline along with chronic conditions and smoking history. The onset of persistent disability in activities of daily living (ADL), continuous mobility disability, and death were ascertained during monthly interviews over a five-year period. Results The mean age was 78.4 years; 63.7% had a smoking history and 17.4% reported chronic lung disease. The incidence rates per 100 person-months (95% confidence intervals) were 1.00 (0.90, 1.12) for ADL disability, 0.80 (0.70, 0.93) for mobility disability, and 0.44 (0.38, 0.51) for death. At a PEF < 10th SR-percentile, identifying nearly a quarter of the cohort, hazard ratios (HR) adjusted for multiple confounders, including age, smoking, and chronic lung disease, demonstrated an increased risk of ADL disability (HR [95% confidence interval]: 1.79 [1.23, 2.62]), mobility disability (1.89 [1.15, 3.10]), and death (2.31 [1.29, 4.12]). Conclusion In our elderly cohort, we found that a diminished PEF, when expressed as an SR-percentile, is independently associated with subsequent disability and death. These results support the use of PEF as a potentially valuable risk assessment tool among community-living older persons. PMID:18422951

  17. Transient changes in the pulmonary function of welders: a cross sectional study of Monday peak expiratory flow.

    PubMed Central

    Donoghue, A M; Glass, W I; Herbison, G P

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--The aim was to compare the peak expiratory flow (PEF) of welders and non-welders over a 12 hour period from the start of work on Monday. METHODS--The two study groups consisted of 20 welders and 20 non-welders, all men who had essentially never smoked, with no significant difference in age, height, ethnicity, or baseline spirometry between the groups. The PEF was measured for each welder before the start of work and 15 minutes, 30 minutes, and 1, 2, 4, 7, and 12 hours after the start of welding. The same method was applied to the non-welders, for whom a proxy time for the start of welding was used. RESULTS--The percentage change in baseline PEF was calculated for each subject at each of the recording times. The welder and non-welder group means for these results were significantly different at 15 minutes (p = 0.028). Also, the group mean for maximum fall in PEF (at any of the recording times during the 12 hour period) was significantly greater for the welders (p = 0.011). 50% of the welders (10/20), but only 5% of the non-welders (1/20), experienced a fall in PEF in excess of 5% (p = 0.0046). 25% of the welders (5/20) experienced drops of greater than 5% within the first 15 minutes. CONCLUSION--The results are suggestive of an immediate type reaction in welders, similar to that seen in some cases of occupational asthma, although not so severe. Studies to determine if these reactions reflect non-specific bronchial hyper-responsiveness would be useful. It is recommended that future studies also undertake breathing zone measurements to relate the response to particular constituents of the welding plume, especially the gases ozone and nitrogen dioxide. PMID:7951781

  18. Observational study on efficacy of negative expiratory pressure test proposed as screening for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome among commercial interstate bus drivers - protocol study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a respiratory disease characterized by the collapse of the extrathoracic airway and has important social implications related to accidents and cardiovascular risk. The main objective of the present study was to investigate whether the drop in expiratory flow and the volume expired in 0.2 s during the application of negative expiratory pressure (NEP) are associated with the presence and severity of OSA in a population of professional interstate bus drivers who travel medium and long distances. Methods/Design An observational, analytic study will be carried out involving adult male subjects of an interstate bus company. Those who agree to participate will undergo a detailed patient history, physical examination involving determination of blood pressure, anthropometric data, circumference measurements (hips, waist and neck), tonsils and Mallampati index. Moreover, specific questionnaires addressing sleep apnea and excessive daytime sleepiness will be administered. Data acquisition will be completely anonymous. Following the medical examination, the participants will perform a spirometry, NEP test and standard overnight polysomnography. The NEP test is performed through the administration of negative pressure at the mouth during expiration. This is a practical test performed while awake and requires little cooperation from the subject. In the absence of expiratory flow limitation, the increase in the pressure gradient between the alveoli and open upper airway caused by NEP results in an increase in expiratory flow. Discussion Despite the abundance of scientific evidence, OSA is still underdiagnosed in the general population. In addition, diagnostic procedures are expensive, and predictive criteria are still unsatisfactory. Because increased upper airway collapsibility is one of the main determinants of OSA, the response to the application of NEP could be a predictor of this disorder. With the enrollment of this study

  19. Maintaining end-expiratory transpulmonary pressure prevents worsening of ventilator-induced lung injury caused by chest wall constriction in surfactant-depleted rats

    PubMed Central

    Loring, Stephen H.; Pecchiari, Matteo; Valle, Patrizia Della; Monaco, Ario; Gentile, Guendalina; D'Angelo, Edgardo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To see whether in acute lung injury (ALI) 1) compression of the lungs caused by thoracoabdominal constriction degrades lung function and worsens ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), and 2) maintaining end-expiratory transpulmonary pressure (Pl) by increasing positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) reduces the deleterious effects of chest wall constriction. Design Experimental study in rats. Setting Physiology laboratory. Interventions ALI was induced in 3 groups of 9 rats by saline lavage. Nine animals immediately sacrificed served as control group. Group L had lavage only, group LC had the chest wall constricted with an elastic binder, and group LCP had the same chest constriction but with PEEP raised to maintain end-expiratory Pl. After lavage, all groups were ventilated with the same pattern for 1½ hr. Measurements and Main Results Pl, measured with an esophageal balloon-catheter, lung volume changes, arterial blood gasses and pH were assessed during mechanical ventilation (MV). Lung wet-to-dry ratio (W/D), albumin, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and MIP-2 in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and serum E-selectin and von Willebrand Factor (vWF) were measured at the end of MV. Lavage caused hypoxemia and acidemia, increased lung resistance and elastance, and decreased end-expiratory lung volume. With prolonged MV, lung mechanics, hypoxemia, and W/D were significantly worse in group LC. Pro-inflammatory cytokines except E-selectin were elevated in serum and BALF in all groups, with significantly greater levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in group LC, which also exhibited significantly worse bronchiolar injury and greater heterogeneity of airspace expansion at a fixed Pl than other groups. Conclusions Chest wall constriction in ALI reduces lung volume, worsens hypoxemia, and increases pulmonary edema, mechanical abnormalities, pro-inflammatory mediator release, and histological signs of VILI. Maintaining end-expiratory Pl at preconstriction

  20. Strategic forces

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    The Air Force now plans to retain the Minuteman II and III missile force through fiscal year 2008. Introduced about 25 years ago, these missiles have served as a nuclear deterrence for longer than initially envisioned. Over the extended lives of the systems, questions have arisen over their continued reliability and operational effectiveness, particularly the Minuteman II system. Limited flight testing, due to a shortage of test missiles, and reduced reliability caused by age-related deterioration of guidance computers and propulsion motors are two factors undermining confidence in the Minuteman II. GAO believes that the Minuteman II could be retired before 1998 as presently contemplated under an assumption of a Strategic Arms Reduction Talks agreement. An alternative would be to reinstate the Air Force's plans to replace deteriorated missile components and acquire the assets needed to resume flight testing at rates necessary to restore and sustain confidence in the system's performance through fiscal year 2008. However, on the basis of current test schedules, GAO is concerned that components to test the missile's warheads will be depleted by about 1999.

  1. End-expiratory and tidal volumes measured in conscious mice using single projection x-ray images.

    PubMed

    Lai-Fook, Stephen J; Houtz, Pamela K; Lai, Yih-Loong

    2008-02-01

    The evaluation of airway resistance (R(aw)) in conscious mice requires both end-expiratory (V(e)) and tidal volumes (V(t)) (Lai-Fook SJ and Lai YL. J Appl Physiol 98: 2204-2218, 2005). In anesthetized BALB/c mice we measured lung area (A(L)) from ventral-to-dorsal x-ray images taken at FRC (V(e)) and after air inflation with 0.25 and 0.50 ml (DeltaV(L)). Total lung volume (V(L)) described by equation: V(L) = DeltaV(L) + V(FRC) = KA(L)(1.5) assumed uniform (isotropic) inflation. Total V(FRC) averaged 0.55 ml, consisting of 0.10 ml tissue, 0.21 ml blood and 0.24 ml air. K averaged 1.84. In conscious mice in a sealed box, we measured the peak-to-peak box pressure excursions (DeltaP(b)) and x-rays during several cycles. K was used to convert measured A(L)(1.5) to V(L) values. We calculated V(e) and V(t) from the plot of V(L) vs. cos(alpha - phi). Phase angle alpha was the minimum point of the P(b) cycle to the x-ray exposure. Phase difference between the P(b) and V(L) cycles (phi) was measured from DeltaP(b) values using both room- and body-temperature humidified box air. A similar analysis was used after aerosol exposures to bronchoconstrictor methacholine (Mch), except that phi depended also on increased R(aw). In conscious mice, V(e) (0.24 ml) doubled after Mch (50-125 mg/ml) aerosol exposure with constant V(t), frequency (f), DeltaP(b), and R(aw). In anesthetized mice, in addition to an increased V(e), repeated 100 mg/ml Mch exposures increased both DeltaP(b) and R(aw) and decreased f to apnea in 10 min. Thus conscious mice adapted to Mch by limiting R(aw), while anesthesia resulted in airway closure followed by diaphragm fatigue and failure.

  2. Influence of treatment on peak expiratory flow and its relation to airway hyperresponsiveness and symptoms. The Dutch CNSLD Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Kerstjens, H. A.; Brand, P. L.; de Jong, P. M.; Koëter, G. H.; Postma, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Despite effective treatments, the morbidity and mortality of obstructive airways disease (asthma and COPD) remains high. Home monitoring of peak expiratory flow (PEF) is increasingly being advocated as an aid to better management of obstructive airways disease. The few available studies describing effects of treatment on the level and variation of PEF have involved relatively small numbers of subjects and did not use control groups. METHODS--Patients aged 18-60 years were selected with PC20 < or = 8 mg/ml and FEV1 < 95% confidence interval of predicted normal. They were randomised to receive, in addition to a beta 2 agonist, either an inhaled corticosteroid (BA+CS), an anticholinergic (BA+AC), or a placebo (BA+PL). One hundred and forty one of these subjects with moderately severe obstructive airways disease completed seven periods of two weeks of morning and afternoon PEF measurements at home during 18 months of blind follow up. RESULTS--Improvements in PEF occurred within the first three months of treatment with BA+CS and was subsequently maintained: the mean (SE) increase in morning PEF was 51 (8) l/min in the BA+CS group compared with no change in the other two groups. Similarly, afternoon PEF increased by 22 (7) l/min. Diurnal variation in PEF (amplitude %mean) decreased from 18.0% to 10.2% in the first three months of treatment with BA+CS. Within-subject relations between changes in diurnal variation in PEF and changes in PC20 were found to be predominantly negative (median rho-0.40) but with a large scatter. Relations between diurnal variation in PEF and changes in symptom scores, FEV1, and bronchodilator response were even weaker. CONCLUSIONS--In patients with moderately severe obstructive airways disease, PEF rates and variation are greatly improved by inhaled corticosteroids. Since the relation of diurnal PEF variation with PC20, symptoms, FEV1, and bronchodilator response were all weak, these markers of disease severity may all provide

  3. A study of the dispersion of expiratory aerosols in unidirectional downward and ceiling-return type airflows using a multiphase approach.

    PubMed

    Chao, C Y H; Wan, M P

    2006-08-01

    Dispersion characteristics of expiratory aerosols were investigated in an enclosure with two different idealized airflow patterns: the ceiling-return and the unidirectional downward. A multiphase numerical model, which was able to capture the polydispersity and evaporation features of the aerosols, was adopted. Experiments employing optical techniques were conducted in a chamber with downward airflow pattern to measure the dispersion of aerosols. Some of the numerical results were compared with the chamber measurement results. Reasonable agreement was found. Small aerosols (initial size expiratory aerosols in ventilated indoor environments. Dispersion by turbulence was about an order of magnitude less than that by bulk flow transport but considerable distance could be achieved by turbulent dispersion with long enough settling time. It was demonstrated that the dispersion of expiratory aerosol could be controlled by manipulating the ventilation airflow patterns in indoor environments.

  4. The effect of smartphone usage time on posture and respiratory function

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sang In; Lee, Na Kyung; Kang, Kyung Woo; Kim, Kyoung; Lee, Do Youn

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in posture and respiratory functions depending on the duration of smartphone usage. [Subjects and Methods] Participants were randomly allocated to 2 groups: group 1 (subjects who used smartphones for <4 hours/day, n=25) and group 2 (subjects who used smartphones for >4 hours/day, n=25). The craniovertebral angles of all participants were measured and scapular indices were calculated to assess the change in posture and forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity, and peak expiratory flow were measured to assess changes in respiratory function. [Results] There were significant differences in the craniovertebral angle, scapular index, and peak expiratory flow depending on the duration of smartphone usage. [Conclusion] The result of this study showed that prolonged use of smartphones could negatively affect both, posture and respiratory function. PMID:26957754

  5. Serum Methylarginines and Spirometry-Measured Lung Function in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    McEvoy, Mark A.; Schofield, Peter W.; Smith, Wayne T.; Agho, Kingsley; Mangoni, Arduino A.; Soiza, Roy L.; Peel, Roseanne; Hancock, Stephen J.; Carru, Ciriaco; Zinellu, Angelo; Attia, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Methylarginines are endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitors that have been implicated in animal models of lung disease but have not previously been examined for their association with spirometric measures of lung function in humans. Objectives This study measured serum concentrations of asymmetric and symmetric dimethylarginine in a representative sample of older community-dwelling adults and determined their association with spirometric lung function measures. Methods Data on clinical, lifestyle, and demographic characteristics, methylated arginines, and L-arginine (measured using LC-MS/MS) were collected from a population-based sample of older Australian adults from the Hunter Community Study. The five key lung function measures included as outcomes were Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 second, Forced Vital Capacity, Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 second to Forced Vital Capacity ratio, Percent Predicted Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 second, and Percent Predicted Forced Vital Capacity. Measurements and Main Results In adjusted analyses there were statistically significant independent associations between a) higher asymmetric dimethylarginine, lower Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 second and lower Forced Vital Capacity; and b) lower L-arginine/asymmetric dimethylarginine ratio, lower Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 second, lower Percent Predicted Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 second and lower Percent Predicted Forced Vital Capacity. By contrast, no significant associations were observed between symmetric dimethylarginine and lung function. Conclusions After adjusting for clinical, demographic, biochemical, and pharmacological confounders, higher serum asymmetric dimethylarginine was independently associated with a reduction in key measures of lung function. Further research is needed to determine if methylarginines predict the decline in lung function. PMID:23690915

  6. Effects of the insertional and appositional forces of the canine diaphragm on the lower ribs.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Theodore A; De Troyer, André

    2013-07-15

    The diaphragm has an inspiratory action on the lower ribs, and current conventional wisdom maintains that this action is the result of two mechanisms, namely, the force applied by the muscle fibres on the ribs into which they insert (insertional force) and the transmission of abdominal pressure through the zone of apposition (appositional force). The magnitude of the diaphragmatic force and the relative contributions of the insertional and appositional components, however, are unknown. To assess these forces, the inspiratory intercostal muscles in all interspaces were severed in anaesthetized dogs, so that the diaphragm was the only muscle active during inspiration, and the displacements of the lower ribs along the craniocaudal and laterolateral axes were measured during quiet breathing, during occluded breaths and during passive lung inflation. From these data, the isolated effects of pleural pressure and transdiaphragmatic pressure on rib displacement were determined. Then external forces were applied to the ribs in the cranial and the lateral direction to simulate, respectively, the effects of the insertional and appositional forces, and the rib trajectories for these external forces were used as the basis for a vector analysis to obtain the relative magnitudes of the insertional and appositional contributions to the rib displacement driven by transdiaphragmatic pressure. The results show that, per unit pressure, the inspiratory effect of the diaphragmatic force on the lower ribs is equal to the expiratory effect of pleural pressure, and that the insertional force contributes 60% of that inspiratory effect.

  7. Surface electromyography activity of the rectus abdominis, internal oblique, and external oblique muscles during forced expiration in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kenichi; Nonaka, Koji; Ogaya, Shinya; Ogi, Atsushi; Matsunaka, Chiaki; Horie, Jun

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to characterize rectus abdominis, internal oblique, and external oblique muscle activity in healthy adults under expiratory resistance using surface electromyography. We randomly assigned 42 healthy adult subjects to 3 groups: 30%, 20%, and 10% maximal expiratory intraoral pressure (PEmax). After measuring 100% PEmax and muscle activity during 100% PEmax, the activity and maximum voluntary contraction of each muscle during the assigned experimental condition were measured. At 100% PEmax, the external oblique (p<0.01) and internal oblique (p<0.01) showed significantly elevated activity compared with the rectus abdominis muscle. Furthermore, at 20% and 30% PEmax, the external oblique (p<0.05 and<0.01, respectively) and the internal oblique (p<0.05 and<0.01, respectively) showed significantly elevated activity compared with the rectus abdominis muscle. At 10% PEmax, no significant differences were observed in muscle activity. Although we observed no significant difference between 10% and 20% PEmax, activity during 30% PEmax was significantly greater than during 20% PEmax (external oblique: p<0.05; internal oblique: p<0.01). The abdominal oblique muscles are the most active during forced expiration. Moreover, 30% PEmax is the minimum intensity required to achieve significant, albeit very slight, muscle activity during expiratory resistance.

  8. Expiratory-modulated laryngeal motoneurons exhibit a hyperpolarization preceding depolarization during superior laryngeal nerve stimulation in the in vivo adult rat.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Tara G; Sun, Qi-Jian; Pilowsky, Paul M

    2012-03-22

    Swallowing requires the sequential activation of tongue, pharyngeal and esophageal muscles to propel the food bolus towards the stomach. Aspiration during swallow is prevented by adduction of the vocal cords during the oropharyngeal phase. Expiratory-modulated laryngeal motoneurons (ELM) exhibit a burst of action potentials during swallows elicited by electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN). Here we sought to investigate changes in membrane potential in ELM during superior laryngeal nerve stimulation in the anaesthetised, in vivo adult rat preparation. Intracellular recordings of ELM in the caudal nucleus ambiguus (identified by antidromic activation from the recurrent laryngeal nerve) demonstrated that ELM bursting activity following SLN stimulation is associated with a depolarization that is preceded by a small hyperpolarization. During spontaneous ELM bursts, the preceding hyperpolarization separated the bursting activity from its usual post-inspiratory activity. These findings demonstrate that the in vivo adult rat preparation is suitable for the study of swallow-related activity in laryngeal motoneurons. PMID:22326041

  9. Peak Expiratory Flow Rate In Healthy Rural School Going Children (5-16 Years) of Bellur Region For Construction of Nomogram

    PubMed Central

    CB, Manjunath; SC, Kotinatot; Babu, Manjunatha

    2013-01-01

    Background: Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR) recording is an essential measure in the management and evaluation of asthmatic children.It is helpful in monitoring disease progression and response to treatment. The PEFR can be measured by a simple instrument—peak expiratory flow meter. Aims and Objectives: To construct nomogram of PEFR in healthy rural school going children from Mandya district of Karnataka state, India and to use these nomograms for comparison with that of children with obstructive lung diseases for this region. Material and Methods: The study was conducted on Healthy rural school going children, both boys and girls between the age group of 5-16 years. For the determination of PEFR we used Mini Wright Peak Flow Meter. At three time measurement, the highest value of PEFR was recorded. Formula for prediction of PEFR was estimated by linear regression analysis after the correlation of PEFR with age and height for both boys and girls. Results: PEFR was measured in 1028 children aged 5 to 16 years by using Wright’s mini peak flow meter. Prediction equations were derived for PEFR with height in boys and girls. Normograms were plotted based on the observed values of PEFR in the study population. Significant linear correlation was seen of PEFR with height in boys (p<0.001, r=0.7624) and in girls (p<0.001, r=0.8825). Prediction equation for PEFR are -317.43 + 4.40 x height (cm) in boys and – 321.21 + 4.25 x height (cm) in girls. Conclusion: Reference values of PEFR are affected by regional, environmental and anthropometric factors. Hence, it is necessary to have regional reference values for children. Among different factors affecting PEFR, height correlates better with PEFR than weight and sex. Hence nomograms constructed can be used for this region PMID:24551654

  10. The swim force as a body force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wen; Brady, John

    2015-11-01

    Net (as opposed to random) motion of active matter results from an average swim (or propulsive) force. It is shown that the average swim force acts like a body force - an internal body force [Yan and Brady, Soft Matter, DOI:10.1039/C5SM01318F]. As a result, the particle-pressure exerted on a container wall is the sum of the swim pressure [Takatori et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2014, 113, 028103] and the `weight' of the active particles. A continuum mechanical description is possible when variations occur on scales larger than the run length of the active particles and gives a Boltzmann-like distribution from a balance of the swim force and the swim pressure. Active particles may also display `action at a distance' and accumulate adjacent to (or be depleted from) a boundary without any external forces. In the momentum balance for the suspension - the mixture of active particles plus fluid - only external body forces appear.

  11. Nanonet Force Microscopy for Measuring Cell Forces.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Kevin; Wang, Ji; Zhao, Wei; Kapania, Rakesh; Nain, Amrinder S

    2016-07-12

    The influence of physical forces exerted by or felt by cells on cell shape, migration, and cytoskeleton arrangement is now widely acknowledged and hypothesized to occur due to modulation of cellular inside-out forces in response to changes in the external fibrous environment (outside-in). Our previous work using the non-electrospinning Spinneret-based Tunable Engineered Parameters' suspended fibers has revealed that cells are able to sense and respond to changes in fiber curvature and structural stiffness as evidenced by alterations to focal adhesion cluster lengths. Here, we present the development and application of a suspended nanonet platform for measuring C2C12 mouse myoblast forces attached to fibers of three diameters (250, 400, and 800 nm) representing a wide range of structural stiffness (3-50 nN/μm). The nanonet force microscopy platform measures cell adhesion forces in response to symmetric and asymmetric external perturbation in single and cyclic modes. We find that contractility-based, inside-out forces are evenly distributed at the edges of the cell, and that forces are dependent on fiber structural stiffness. Additionally, external perturbation in symmetric and asymmetric modes biases cell-fiber failure location without affecting the outside-in forces of cell-fiber adhesion. We then extend the platform to measure forces of (1) cell-cell junctions, (2) single cells undergoing cyclic perturbation in the presence of drugs, and (3) cancerous single-cells transitioning from a blebbing to a pseudopodial morphology. PMID:27410747

  12. Positive end-expiratory pressure at minimal respiratory elastance represents the best compromise between mechanical stress and lung aeration in oleic acid induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Alysson Roncally S; Jandre, Frederico C; Pino, Alexandre V; Bozza, Fernando A; Salluh, Jorge; Rodrigues, Rosana; Ascoli, Fabio O; Giannella-Neto, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Protective ventilatory strategies have been applied to prevent ventilator-induced lung injury in patients with acute lung injury (ALI). However, adjustment of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) to avoid alveolar de-recruitment and hyperinflation remains difficult. An alternative is to set the PEEP based on minimizing respiratory system elastance (Ers) by titrating PEEP. In the present study we evaluate the distribution of lung aeration (assessed using computed tomography scanning) and the behaviour of Ers in a porcine model of ALI, during a descending PEEP titration manoeuvre with a protective low tidal volume. Methods PEEP titration (from 26 to 0 cmH2O, with a tidal volume of 6 to 7 ml/kg) was performed, following a recruitment manoeuvre. At each PEEP, helical computed tomography scans of juxta-diaphragmatic parts of the lower lobes were obtained during end-expiratory and end-inspiratory pauses in six piglets with ALI induced by oleic acid. The distribution of the lung compartments (hyperinflated, normally aerated, poorly aerated and non-aerated areas) was determined and the Ers was estimated on a breath-by-breath basis from the equation of motion of the respiratory system using the least-squares method. Results Progressive reduction in PEEP from 26 cmH2O to the PEEP at which the minimum Ers was observed improved poorly aerated areas, with a proportional reduction in hyperinflated areas. Also, the distribution of normally aerated areas remained steady over this interval, with no changes in non-aerated areas. The PEEP at which minimal Ers occurred corresponded to the greatest amount of normally aerated areas, with lesser hyperinflated, and poorly and non-aerated areas. Levels of PEEP below that at which minimal Ers was observed increased poorly and non-aerated areas, with concomitant reductions in normally inflated and hyperinflated areas. Conclusion The PEEP at which minimal Ers occurred, obtained by descending PEEP titration with a protective

  13. Force propagation and force generation in cells.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Oliver; Duschl, Claus

    2010-09-01

    Determining how forces are produced by and propagated through the cytoskeleton (CSK) of the cell is of great interest as dynamic processes of the CSK are intimately correlated with many molecular signaling pathways. We are presenting a novel approach for integrating measurements on cell elasticity, transcellular force propagation, and cellular force generation to obtain a comprehensive description of dynamic and mechanical properties of the CSK under force loading. This approach uses a combination of scanning force microscopy (SFM) and Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. We apply well-defined loading schemes onto the apical cell membrane of fibroblasts using the SFM and simultaneously use TIRF microscopy to image the topography of the basal cell membrane. The locally distinct changes of shape and depth of the cytoskeletal imprints onto the basal membrane are interpreted as results of force propagation through the cytoplasm. This observation provides evidence for the tensegrity model and demonstrates the usefulness of our approach that does not depend on potentially disturbing marker compounds. We confirm that the actin network greatly determines cell stiffness and represents the substrate that mediates force transduction through the cytoplasm of the cell. The latter is an essential feature of tensegrity. Most importantly, our new finding that, both intact actin and microtubule networks are required for enabling the cell to produce work, can only be understood within the framework of the tensegrity model. We also provide, for the first time, a direct measurement of the cell's mechanical power output under compression at two femtowatts. PMID:20607861

  14. Limited Lung Function: Impact of Reduced Peak Expiratory Flow on Health Status, Health-Care Utilization, and Expected Survival in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Melissa H.; Mapel, Douglas W.

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined whether peak expiratory flow (PEF) is a valid measure of health status in older adults. Survey and test data from the 2006 and 2008 cycles of the Health and Retirement Study, a longitudinal study of US adults over age 50 years (with biennial surveys initiated in 1992), were used to develop predicted PEF regression models and to examine relations between low PEF values and other clinical factors. Low PEF (<80% of predicted value) was prevalent among persons with chronic conditions, including frequent pain, obstructive lung disease, heart disease, diabetes, and psychological distress. Persons with higher physical disability scores had substantially higher adjusted odds of having low PEF, on par with those for conditions known to be associated with poor health (cancer, heart disease, and stroke). In a multivariate regression model for difficulty with mobility, PEF remained an independent factor (odds ratio (OR) = 1.69, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.53, 1.86). Persons with low PEF in 2006 were more likely to be hospitalized (OR = 1.26, 95% CI: 1.10, 1.43) within the subsequent 2 years and to estimate their chances of surviving for 10 or more years at less than 50% (OR = 1.69, 95% CI: 1.24, 2.30). PEF is a valid measure of health status in older persons, and low PEF is an independent predictor of hospitalization and poor subjective mortality assessment. PMID:22759722

  15. Comparison of changes in the contraction of the lateral abdominal muscles between the abdominal drawing-in maneuver and breathe held at the maximum expiratory level.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiroshi; Hirose, Ryohei; Watanabe, Susumu

    2012-10-01

    The abdominal drawing-in maneuver (ADIM) is commonly used as a fundamental component of lumbar stabilization training programs. One potential limitation of lumbar stabilization programs is that it can be difficult and time consuming to train people to perform the ADIM. The transverse abdominis (TrA), internal oblique (IO), and external oblique (EO) muscles are the most powerful muscles involved in expiration. However, little is known about the differences in the recruitment of the abdominal muscles between the ADIM and breathe held at maximum expiratory level (maximum expiration). The thickness of the TrA and IO muscles was measured by ultrasound imaging, and the activity of the EO muscle was measured by electromyography (EMG) in 33 healthy male performing the ADIM and maximum expiration. Maximum expiration produced a significant increase in the thickness of the TrA and IO muscles compared to the ADIM (p < 0.001). The EMG activity of the EO muscle was significantly higher during maximum expiration than during the ADIM (p < 0.001). The intensity of the EMG activity of the EO muscle was approximately 30% of the maximal voluntary contraction during maximum expiration. Thus, maximum expiration may be an effective method for training of co-activation of the lateral abdominal muscles.

  16. Peak expiratory flow mediates the relationship between handgrip strength and timed up and go performance in elderly women, but not men

    PubMed Central

    Ritti-Dias, Raphael Mendes; Cucato, Gabriel Grizzo; de Mello Franco, Fábio Gazelato; Cendoroglo, Maysa Seabra; Nasri, Fábio; Monteiro-Costa, Maria Luiza; de Carvalho, José Antonio Maluf; de Matos, Luciana Diniz Nagem Janot

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to verify if there is sex difference in the associations among handgrip strength, peak expiratory flow (PEF) and timed up and go (TUG) test results. METHODS: The sample included 288 consecutive elderly men (n=93) and women (n=195). Functional capacity was measured using the TUG test, and muscle strength was measured based on handgrip. Moreover, as a measure of current health status, PEF was evaluated. Linear regression procedures were performed to analyze the relationships between handgrip and both PEF and TUG test results, with adjustment for confounders, and to identify the possible mediating role of PEF in the association between handgrip strength and TUG test results. RESULTS: In men, handgrip strength was associated with both PEF and TUG performance (p<0.01). After adjustment for PEF, the relationship between handgrip strength and TUG performance remained significant. In women, handgrip strength was also associated with both PEF and TUG performance (p<0.01). However, after adjustment for PEF, the relationship between handgrip strength and TUG performance was no longer significant. CONCLUSION: Mobility in the elderly is sex dependent. In particular, PEF mediates the relationship between handgrip strength and TUG performance in women, but not in men.

  17. Effect of indoor air pollution during cooking on peak expiratory flow rate and its association with exposure index in rural women.

    PubMed

    Sukhsohale, Neelam D; Narlawar, Uday W; Phatak, Mrunal S; Agrawal, Sanjay B; Ughade, Suresh N

    2013-01-01

    Routine exposure to domestic cooking fuels is an important source of indoor air pollution causing deterioration of lung function. We conducted a community based cross-sectional study in 760 non-smoking rural women involved in household cooking with four types of cooking fuels i.e. Biomass, Kerosene stove, Liquid Petroleum Gas (LPG) and Mixed (combination of two and more cooking fuels). Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR) less than 80% of the predicted was considered as abnormal PEFR. The overall prevalence of abnormal PEFR was found to be 29.1% with greater predominance among biomass fuel users (43.3%) with high risk ratio (1.86) as compared to kerosene (0.63), LPG (0.75) and mixed (0.66) fuel users. However the pair wise comparison of different groups of cooking fuels by Marascuilo procedure reported significant differences within different groups except kerosene--mixed group. The study also demonstrated a negative correlation between observed PEFR and exposure indices in different cooking fuels (r = -0.51). Our results indicate that prolonged exposure to cooking fuels particularly biomass fuels as a source of cooking adversely affects PEFR in nonsmoking rural women.

  18. Peak expiratory flow mediates the relationship between handgrip strength and timed up and go performance in elderly women, but not men

    PubMed Central

    Ritti-Dias, Raphael Mendes; Cucato, Gabriel Grizzo; de Mello Franco, Fábio Gazelato; Cendoroglo, Maysa Seabra; Nasri, Fábio; Monteiro-Costa, Maria Luiza; de Carvalho, José Antonio Maluf; de Matos, Luciana Diniz Nagem Janot

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to verify if there is sex difference in the associations among handgrip strength, peak expiratory flow (PEF) and timed up and go (TUG) test results. METHODS: The sample included 288 consecutive elderly men (n=93) and women (n=195). Functional capacity was measured using the TUG test, and muscle strength was measured based on handgrip. Moreover, as a measure of current health status, PEF was evaluated. Linear regression procedures were performed to analyze the relationships between handgrip and both PEF and TUG test results, with adjustment for confounders, and to identify the possible mediating role of PEF in the association between handgrip strength and TUG test results. RESULTS: In men, handgrip strength was associated with both PEF and TUG performance (p<0.01). After adjustment for PEF, the relationship between handgrip strength and TUG performance remained significant. In women, handgrip strength was also associated with both PEF and TUG performance (p<0.01). However, after adjustment for PEF, the relationship between handgrip strength and TUG performance was no longer significant. CONCLUSION: Mobility in the elderly is sex dependent. In particular, PEF mediates the relationship between handgrip strength and TUG performance in women, but not in men. PMID:27652833

  19. Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Describes some experiments showing both qualitatively and quantitatively that aerodynamic lift is a reaction force. Demonstrates reaction forces caused by the acceleration of an airstream and the deflection of an airstream. Provides pictures of demonstration apparatus and mathematical expressions. (YP)

  20. The effect of lumbar stabilization exercise on the pulmonary function of stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dae-Sik; Park, Si-Eun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was aimed at assessing the effect of lumbar stabilization exercise on the pulmonary function of stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly allocated into lumbar stabilization exercise group and a general physical therapy group. The program consisted of 30-min sessions conducted 3 days a week for 8 weeks. Pulmonary function was assessed based on lung performance parameters, including forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume at 1 second, ratio of forced expiratory volume at 1 second to forced vital capacity, and peak expiratory flow. [Results] In the assessment of pulmonary function, the values of all the lung performance parameters were significantly increased in the lumbar stabilization exercise group but were significantly decreased in the general physical therapy group. [Conclusion] These results indicate that lumbar stabilization exercise had a more positive effect on pulmonary function than general physical therapy. PMID:27390442

  1. The effect of lumbar stabilization exercise on the pulmonary function of stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dae-Sik; Park, Si-Eun

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This study was aimed at assessing the effect of lumbar stabilization exercise on the pulmonary function of stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly allocated into lumbar stabilization exercise group and a general physical therapy group. The program consisted of 30-min sessions conducted 3 days a week for 8 weeks. Pulmonary function was assessed based on lung performance parameters, including forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume at 1 second, ratio of forced expiratory volume at 1 second to forced vital capacity, and peak expiratory flow. [Results] In the assessment of pulmonary function, the values of all the lung performance parameters were significantly increased in the lumbar stabilization exercise group but were significantly decreased in the general physical therapy group. [Conclusion] These results indicate that lumbar stabilization exercise had a more positive effect on pulmonary function than general physical therapy.

  2. Microprocessor controlled force actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, D. C.; Inman, D. J.; Horner, G. C.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanical and electrical design of a prototype force actuator for vibration control of large space structures (LSS) is described. The force actuator is an electromagnetic system that produces a force by reacting against a proof-mass. The actuator has two colocated sensors, a digital microcontroller, and a power amplifier. The total weight of actuator is .998 kg. The actuator has a steady state force output of approximately 2.75 N from approximately 2 Hz to well beyond 1000 Hz.

  3. Fluid force transducer

    DOEpatents

    Jendrzejczyk, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    An electrical fluid force transducer for measuring the magnitude and direction of fluid forces caused by lateral fluid flow, includes a movable sleeve which is deflectable in response to the movement of fluid, and a rod fixed to the sleeve to translate forces applied to the sleeve to strain gauges attached to the rod, the strain gauges being connected in a bridge circuit arrangement enabling generation of a signal output indicative of the magnitude and direction of the force applied to the sleeve.

  4. Forces in General Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2010-01-01

    Many textbooks dealing with general relativity do not demonstrate the derivation of forces in enough detail. The analyses presented herein demonstrate straightforward methods for computing forces by way of general relativity. Covariant divergence of the stress-energy-momentum tensor is used to derive a general expression of the force experienced…

  5. Turkish Students' Force Meanings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menekse, Muhsin; Clark, Douglas B.; Ozdemir, Gokhan; D'angelo, Cynthia; Scheligh, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    What are Turkish pre, elementary, middle, and high school students' force ideas? And, how do Turkish students' non-normative force ideas differ or be similar to the well-known force misconceptions reported in the literature? Students have false and persistent beliefs about the physical world and they struggle with challenging misconceptions based…

  6. Debunking Coriolis Force Myths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakur, Asif

    2014-01-01

    Much has been written and debated about the Coriolis force. Unfortunately, this has done little to demystify the paradoxes surrounding this fictitious force invoked by an observer in a rotating frame of reference. It is the purpose of this article to make another valiant attempt to slay the dragon of the Coriolis force! This will be done without…

  7. Crossflow force transducer. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T M

    1982-05-01

    A force transducer for measuring lift and drag coefficients for a circular cylinder in turbulent water flow is presented. In addition to describing the actual design and construction of the strain-gauged force- ring based transducer, requirements for obtained valid fluid force test data are discussed, and pertinent flow test experience is related.

  8. Efficacy of climate forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Sato, M.; Ruedy, R.; Nazarenko, L.; Lacis, A.; Schmidt, G. A.; Russell, G.; Aleinov, I.; Bauer, M.; Bauer, S.; Bell, N.; Cairns, B.; Canuto, V.; Chandler, M.; Cheng, Y.; Del Genio, A.; Faluvegi, G.; Fleming, E.; Friend, A.; Hall, T.; Jackman, C.; Kelley, M.; Kiang, N.; Koch, D.; Lean, J.; Lerner, J.; Lo, K.; Menon, S.; Miller, R.; Minnis, P.; Novakov, T.; Oinas, V.; Perlwitz, Ja.; Perlwitz, Ju.; Rind, D.; Romanou, A.; Shindell, D.; Stone, P.; Sun, S.; Tausnev, N.; Thresher, D.; Wielicki, B.; Wong, T.; Yao, M.; Zhang, S.

    2005-09-01

    We use a global climate model to compare the effectiveness of many climate forcing agents for producing climate change. We find a substantial range in the "efficacy" of different forcings, where the efficacy is the global temperature response per unit forcing relative to the response to CO2 forcing. Anthropogenic CH4 has efficacy ˜110%, which increases to ˜145% when its indirect effects on stratospheric H2O and tropospheric O3 are included, yielding an effective climate forcing of ˜0.8 W/m2 for the period 1750-2000 and making CH4 the largest anthropogenic climate forcing other than CO2. Black carbon (BC) aerosols from biomass burning have a calculated efficacy ˜58%, while fossil fuel BC has an efficacy ˜78%. Accounting for forcing efficacies and for indirect effects via snow albedo and cloud changes, we find that fossil fuel soot, defined as BC + OC (organic carbon), has a net positive forcing while biomass burning BC + OC has a negative forcing. We show that replacement of the traditional instantaneous and adjusted forcings, Fi and Fa, with an easily computed alternative, Fs, yields a better predictor of climate change, i.e., its efficacies are closer to unity. Fs is inferred from flux and temperature changes in a fixed-ocean model run. There is remarkable congruence in the spatial distribution of climate change, normalized to the same forcing Fs, for most climate forcing agents, suggesting that the global forcing has more relevance to regional climate change than may have been anticipated. Increasing greenhouse gases intensify the Hadley circulation in our model, increasing rainfall in the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), Eastern United States, and East Asia, while intensifying dry conditions in the subtropics including the Southwest United States, the Mediterranean region, the Middle East, and an expanding Sahel. These features survive in model simulations that use all estimated forcings for the period 1880-2000. Responses to localized forcings, such

  9. Cell adhesion force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sagvolden, G.; Giaever, I.; Pettersen, E. O.; Feder, J.

    1999-01-01

    The adhesion forces of cervical carcinoma cells in tissue culture were measured by using the manipulation force microscope, a novel atomic force microscope. The forces were studied as a function of time and temperature for cells cultured on hydrophilic and hydrophobic polystyrene substrates with preadsorbed proteins. The cells attached faster and stronger at 37°C than at 23°C and better on hydrophilic than on hydrophobic substrates, even though proteins adsorb much better to the hydrophobic substrates. Because cell adhesion serves to control several stages in the cell cycle, we anticipate that the manipulation force microscope can help clarify some cell-adhesion related issues. PMID:9892657

  10. Entropic force between biomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Song, Fan

    2016-08-01

    Undulation force, an entropic force, stems from thermally excited fluctuations, and plays a key role in the essential interactions between neighboring surfaces of objects. Although the characteristics of the undulation force have been widely studied theoretically and experimentally, the distance dependence of the force, which constitutes its most fundamental characteristic, remains poorly understood. In this paper, first, we obtain a novel expression for the undulation force by employing elasticity and statistical mechanics and prove it to be in good agreement with existing experimental results. Second, we clearly demonstrate that the two representative forms of the undulation force proposed by Helfrich and Freund were respectively the upper and lower bounds of the present expression when the separation between membranes is sufficiently small, which was intrinsically different from the existing results where Helfrich's and Freund's forms of the undulation force were only suitable for the intermediate and small separations. The investigations show that only in a sufficiently small separation does Helfrich's result stand for the undulation force with a large wave number and Freund's result express the force with a small wave number. Finally, a critical acting distance of the undulation force, beyond which the entropic force will rapidly decay approaching zero, is presented.

  11. Forces in molecules.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Fang, De-Chai; Bader, Richard F W

    2007-01-01

    Chemistry is determined by the electrostatic forces acting within a collection of nuclei and electrons. The attraction of the nuclei for the electrons is the only attractive force in a molecule and is the force responsible for the bonding between atoms. This is the attractive force acting on the electrons in the Ehrenfest force and on the nuclei in the Feynman force, one that is countered by the repulsion between the electrons in the former and by the repulsion between the nuclei in the latter. The virial theorem relates these forces to the energy changes resulting from interactions between atoms. All bonding, as signified by the presence of a bond path, has a common origin in terms of the mechanics determined by the Ehrenfest, Feynman and virial theorems. This paper is concerned in particular with the mechanics of interaction encountered in what are classically described as 'nonbonded interactions'--are atoms that 'touch' bonded or repelling one another?

  12. Forces in molecules.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Fang, De-Chai; Bader, Richard F W

    2007-01-01

    Chemistry is determined by the electrostatic forces acting within a collection of nuclei and electrons. The attraction of the nuclei for the electrons is the only attractive force in a molecule and is the force responsible for the bonding between atoms. This is the attractive force acting on the electrons in the Ehrenfest force and on the nuclei in the Feynman force, one that is countered by the repulsion between the electrons in the former and by the repulsion between the nuclei in the latter. The virial theorem relates these forces to the energy changes resulting from interactions between atoms. All bonding, as signified by the presence of a bond path, has a common origin in terms of the mechanics determined by the Ehrenfest, Feynman and virial theorems. This paper is concerned in particular with the mechanics of interaction encountered in what are classically described as 'nonbonded interactions'--are atoms that 'touch' bonded or repelling one another? PMID:17328425

  13. Detection of new HLA-DPB1 alleles generated by interallelic gene conversion using PCR amplification of DPB1 second exon sequences from sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Erlich, H.; Zangenberg, G.; Bugawan, T.

    1994-09-01

    The rate at which allelic diversity at the HLA class I and class II loci evolves has been the subject of considerable controversy as have the mechanisms which generate new alleles. The patchwork pattern of polymorphism, particularly within the second exon of the HLA-DPB1 locus where the polymorphic sequence motifs are localized to 6 discrete regions, is consistent with the hypothesis that much of the allelic sequence variation may have been generated by segmental exchange (gene conversion). To measure the rate of new DPB1 variant generation, we have developed a strategy in which DPB1 second exon sequences are amplified from pools of FACS-sorted sperm (n=50) from a heterozygous sperm donor. Pools of sperm from these heterozygous individuals are amplified with an allele-specific primer for one allele and analyzed with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (SSOP) complementary to the other allele. This screening procedure, which is capable of detecting a single variant molecule in a pool of parental alleles, allows the identification of new variants that have been generated by recombination and/or gene conversion between the two parental alleles. To control for potential PCR artifacts, the same screening procedure was carried out with mixtures of sperm from DPB1 *0301/*0301 and DPB1 *0401/ 0401 individuals. Pools containing putative new variants DPB1 alleles were analyzed further by cloning into M13 and sequencing the M13 clones. Our current estimate is that about 1/10,000 sperm from these heterozygous individuals represents a new DPB1 allele generated by micro-gene conversion within the second exon.

  14. Force-Measuring Clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Force-measuring clamps have been invented to facilitate and simplify the task of measuring the forces or pressures applied to clamped parts. There is a critical need to measure clamping forces or pressures in some applications for example, while bonding sensors to substrates or while clamping any sensitive or delicate parts. Many manufacturers of adhesives and sensors recommend clamping at specific pressures while bonding sensors or during adhesive bonding between parts in general. In the absence of a force-measuring clamp, measurement of clamping force can be cumbersome at best because of the need for additional load sensors and load-indicating equipment. One prior method of measuring clamping force involved the use of load washers or miniature load cells in combination with external power sources and load-indicating equipment. Calibrated spring clamps have also been used. Load washers and miniature load cells constitute additional clamped parts in load paths and can add to the destabilizing effects of loading mechanisms. Spring clamps can lose calibration quickly through weakening of the springs and are limited to the maximum forces that the springs can apply. The basic principle of a force-measuring clamp can be implemented on a clamp of almost any size and can enable measurement of a force of almost any magnitude. No external equipment is needed because the component(s) for transducing the clamping force and the circuitry for supplying power, conditioning the output of the transducers, and displaying the measurement value are all housed on the clamp. In other words, a force-measuring clamp is a complete force-application and force-measurement system all in one package. The advantage of unitary packaging of such a system is that it becomes possible to apply the desired clamping force or pressure with precision and ease.

  15. Force Limited Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry; Chang, Kurng Y.

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the concept and applications of Force Limited Vibration Testing. The goal of vibration testing of aerospace hardware is to identify problems that would result in flight failures. The commonly used aerospace vibration tests uses artificially high shaker forces and responses at the resonance frequencies of the test item. It has become common to limit the acceleration responses in the test to those predicted for the flight. This requires an analysis of the acceleration response, and requires placing accelerometers on the test item. With the advent of piezoelectric gages it has become possible to improve vibration testing. The basic equations have are reviewed. Force limits are analogous and complementary to the acceleration specifications used in conventional vibration testing. Just as the acceleration specification is the frequency spectrum envelope of the in-flight acceleration at the interface between the test item and flight mounting structure, the force limit is the envelope of the in-flight force at the interface . In force limited vibration tests, both the acceleration and force specifications are needed, and the force specification is generally based on and proportional to the acceleration specification. Therefore, force limiting does not compensate for errors in the development of the acceleration specification, e.g., too much conservatism or the lack thereof. These errors will carry over into the force specification. Since in-flight vibratory force data are scarce, force limits are often derived from coupled system analyses and impedance information obtained from measurements or finite element models (FEM). Fortunately, data on the interface forces between systems and components are now available from system acoustic and vibration tests of development test models and from a few flight experiments. Semi-empirical methods of predicting force limits are currently being developed on the basis of the limited flight and system test

  16. The simultaneous application of positive-end expiratory pressure with the Trendelenburg position minimizes respiratory fluctuations in internal jugular vein size

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sun Sook; Han, Woong Ki; Ko, Dong Chan

    2014-01-01

    Background The respiratory cycle alters the size of the right internal jugular vein (RIJV). We assessed the changes in RIJV size during the respiratory cycle in patients under positive pressure ventilation. Moreover, we examined the effects of positive-end expiratory pressure (PEEP) and the Trendelenburg position on respiratory fluctuations. Methods A prospective study of 24 patients undergoing general endotracheal anesthesia was performed. Images of the RIJV were obtained in the supine position with no PEEP (baseline, S0) and after applying three different maneuvers in random order: (1) a PEEP of 10 cmH2O (S10), (2) a 10° Trendelenburg tilt position (T0), and (3) a 10° Trendelenburg tilt position combined with a PEEP of 10 cmH2O (T10). Using the images when the area was smallest and largest, cross-sectional area (CSA), anteroposterior diameter, and transverse diameter were measured. Results All maneuvers minimized the fluctuation in RIJV size (all P = 0.0004). During the respiratory cycle, the smallest CSA compared to the largest CSA at S0, S10, T0, and T10 decreased by 28.3 8.5, 8.0, and 4.4%, respectively. Furthermore, compared to S0, a 10° Trendelenburg tilt position with a PEEP of 10 cmH2O significantly increased the CSA in the largest areas by 83.8% and in the smallest areas by 169.4%. Conclusions A 10° Trendelenburg tilt position combined with a PEEP of 10 cmH2O not only increases the size of the RIJV but also reduces fluctuation by the respiratory cycle. PMID:24910725

  17. Comparison of high-frequency chest wall oscillation and oscillating positive expiratory pressure in the home management of cystic fibrosis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Oermann, C M; Sockrider, M M; Giles, D; Sontag, M K; Accurso, F J; Castile, R G

    2001-11-01

    Enhanced airway clearance is thought to result in better-maintained pulmonary function in cystic fibrosis (CF). Postural drainage, percussion, and vibration (PDPV) have been the primary airway clearance technique (ACT) employed in CF for over 40 years. Two new airway clearance modalities are high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) and oscillating positive expiratory pressure (OPEP). This pilot study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of these techniques during home use, assess patient satisfaction with them as compared to PDPV, and assess the feasibility of performing a definitive comparative trial. The prospective, randomized, multicenter crossover trial was conducted at three urban academic CF Care Centers. Twenty-nine CF patients, 9-39 years of age, participated. Subjects performed 4 weeks each of HFCWO and OPEP following 2-week lead-in/washout periods. Spirometry, lung volumes, National Institutes of Health and Petty Scores, and a satisfaction survey were performed at baseline and after each treatment period. An ACT preference survey was completed at the conclusion of the study. Twenty-four subjects completed both therapies. There were no statistically significant differences between therapies for spirometry, lung volumes, or clinical scores. No significant safety issues arose during the study period. Compliance between therapies was similar. Significant differences among therapies existed in patient satisfaction. Given a choice of therapy, 50% of subjects chose HFCWO, 37% OPEP, and 13% PDPV. This study suggests that HFCWO and OPEP are safe and as effective as patients' routine therapies when used for airway clearance in a home setting. Patient satisfaction and preference differ among ACTs and should be considered when prescribing home therapy. A definitive, multi-center, comparative study evaluating long-term efficacy of these techniques is feasible.

  18. Coulomb force as an entropic force

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Tower

    2010-05-15

    Motivated by Verlinde's theory of entropic gravity, we give a tentative explanation to the Coulomb's law with an entropic force. When trying to do this, we find the equipartition rule should be extended to charges and the concept of temperature should be reinterpreted. If one accepts the holographic principle as well as our generalizations and reinterpretations, then Coulomb's law, the Poisson equation, and the Maxwell equations can be derived smoothly. Our attempt can be regarded as a new way to unify the electromagnetic force with gravity, from the entropic origin. Possibly some of our postulates are related to the D-brane picture of black hole thermodynamics.

  19. Coulomb force as an entropic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tower

    2010-05-01

    Motivated by Verlinde’s theory of entropic gravity, we give a tentative explanation to the Coulomb’s law with an entropic force. When trying to do this, we find the equipartition rule should be extended to charges and the concept of temperature should be reinterpreted. If one accepts the holographic principle as well as our generalizations and reinterpretations, then Coulomb’s law, the Poisson equation, and the Maxwell equations can be derived smoothly. Our attempt can be regarded as a new way to unify the electromagnetic force with gravity, from the entropic origin. Possibly some of our postulates are related to the D-brane picture of black hole thermodynamics.

  20. Quantum Fictitious Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Białynicki-Birula, I.; Cirone, M. A.; Dahl, J. P.; Seligman, T. H.; Straub, F.; Schleich, W. P.

    2003-09-01

    We present Heisenberg's equation of motion for the radial variable of a free non-relativistic particle in D dimensions. The resulting radial force consists of three contributions: (i) the quantum fictitious force which is either attractive or repulsive depending on the number of dimensions, (ii) a singular quantum force located at the origin, and (iii) the centrifugal force associated with non-vanishing angular momentum. Moreover, we use Heisenberg's uncertainty relation to introduce a lower bound for the kinetic energy of an ensemble of neutral particles. This bound is quadratic in the number of atoms and can be traced back to the repulsive quantum fictitious potential. All three forces arise for a free particle: “Force without force”.

  1. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  2. Debunking Coriolis Force Myths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakur, Asif

    2014-11-01

    Much has been written and debated about the Coriolis force.1-8 Unfortunately, this has done little to demystify the paradoxes surrounding this fictitious force invoked by an observer in a rotating frame of reference. It is the purpose of this article to make another valiant attempt to slay the dragon of the Coriolis force! This will be done without unleashing the usual mathematical apparatus, which we believe is more of a hindrance than a help.

  3. Electrodynamic force law controversy.

    PubMed

    Graneau, P; Graneau, N

    2001-05-01

    Cavalleri et al. [Phys. Rev. E 52, 2505 (1998); Eur. J. Phys. 17, 205 (1996)] have attempted to resolve the electrodynamic force law controversy. This attempt to prove the validity of either the Ampère or Lorentz force law by theory and experiment has revealed only that the two are equivalent when predicting the force on part of a circuit due to the current in the complete circuit. However, in our analysis of internal stresses, only Ampère's force law agrees with experiment. PMID:11415053

  4. Climate forcings and feedbacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James

    1993-01-01

    Global temperature has increased significantly during the past century. Understanding the causes of observed global temperature change is impossible in the absence of adequate monitoring of changes in global climate forcings and radiative feedbacks. Climate forcings are changes imposed on the planet's energy balance, such as change of incoming sunlight or a human-induced change of surface properties due to deforestation. Radiative feedbacks are radiative changes induced by climate change, such as alteration of cloud properties or the extent of sea ice. Monitoring of global climate forcings and feedbacks, if sufficiently precise and long-term, can provide a very strong constraint on interpretation of observed temperature change. Such monitoring is essential to eliminate uncertainties about the relative importance of various climate change mechanisms including tropospheric sulfate aerosols from burning of coal and oil smoke from slash and burn agriculture, changes of solar irradiance changes of several greenhouse gases, and many other mechanisms. The considerable variability of observed temperature, together with evidence that a substantial portion of this variability is unforced indicates that observations of climate forcings and feedbacks must be continued for decades. Since the climate system responds to the time integral of the forcing, a further requirement is that the observations be carried out continuously. However, precise observations of forcings and feedbacks will also be able to provide valuable conclusions on shorter time scales. For example, knowledge of the climate forcing by increasing CFC's relative to the forcing by changing ozone is important to policymakers, as is information on the forcing by CO2 relative to the forcing by sulfate aerosols. It will also be possible to obtain valuable tests of climate models on short time scales, if there is precise monitoring of all forcings and feedbacks during and after events such as a large volcanic eruption

  5. Elementary Particles and Forces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigg, Chris

    1985-01-01

    Discusses subatomic particles (quarks, leptons, and others) revealed by higher accelerator energies. A connection between forces at this subatomic level has been established, and prospects are good for a description of forces that encompass binding atomic nuclei. Colors, fundamental interactions, screening, camouflage, electroweak symmetry, and…

  6. Polarizable force fields.

    PubMed

    Antila, Hanne S; Salonen, Emppu

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the most common methods for including an explicit description of electronic polarization in molecular mechanics force fields: the induced point dipole, shell, and fluctuating charge models. The importance of including polarization effects in biomolecular simulations is discussed, and some of the most important achievements in the development of polarizable biomolecular force fields to date are highlighted.

  7. Forces in yeast flocculation.

    PubMed

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Vincent, Stéphane P; Abellán Flos, Marta; Hols, Pascal; Lipke, Peter N; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2015-02-01

    In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cell-cell adhesion ("flocculation") is conferred by a family of lectin-like proteins known as the flocculin (Flo) proteins. Knowledge of the adhesive and mechanical properties of flocculins is important for understanding the mechanisms of yeast adhesion, and may help controlling yeast behaviour in biotechnology. We use single-molecule and single-cell atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the nanoscale forces engaged in yeast flocculation, focusing on the role of Flo1 as a prototype of flocculins. Using AFM tips labelled with mannose, we detect single flocculins on Flo1-expressing cells, showing they are widely exposed on the cell surface. When subjected to force, individual Flo1 proteins display two distinct force responses, i.e. weak lectin binding forces and strong unfolding forces reflecting the force-induced extension of hydrophobic tandem repeats. We demonstrate that cell-cell adhesion bonds also involve multiple weak lectin interactions together with strong unfolding forces, both associated with Flo1 molecules. Single-molecule and single-cell data correlate with microscale cell adhesion behaviour, suggesting strongly that Flo1 mechanics is critical for yeast flocculation. These results favour a model in which not only weak lectin-sugar interactions are involved in yeast flocculation but also strong hydrophobic interactions resulting from protein unfolding.

  8. Forces in yeast flocculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Vincent, Stéphane P.; Abellán Flos, Marta; Hols, Pascal; Lipke, Peter N.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2015-01-01

    In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cell-cell adhesion (``flocculation'') is conferred by a family of lectin-like proteins known as the flocculin (Flo) proteins. Knowledge of the adhesive and mechanical properties of flocculins is important for understanding the mechanisms of yeast adhesion, and may help controlling yeast behaviour in biotechnology. We use single-molecule and single-cell atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the nanoscale forces engaged in yeast flocculation, focusing on the role of Flo1 as a prototype of flocculins. Using AFM tips labelled with mannose, we detect single flocculins on Flo1-expressing cells, showing they are widely exposed on the cell surface. When subjected to force, individual Flo1 proteins display two distinct force responses, i.e. weak lectin binding forces and strong unfolding forces reflecting the force-induced extension of hydrophobic tandem repeats. We demonstrate that cell-cell adhesion bonds also involve multiple weak lectin interactions together with strong unfolding forces, both associated with Flo1 molecules. Single-molecule and single-cell data correlate with microscale cell adhesion behaviour, suggesting strongly that Flo1 mechanics is critical for yeast flocculation. These results favour a model in which not only weak lectin-sugar interactions are involved in yeast flocculation but also strong hydrophobic interactions resulting from protein unfolding.

  9. Force Concept Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hestenes, David; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Reports the rationale, design, validation, and uses of the "Force Concept Inventory," an instrument to assess the students' beliefs on force. Includes results and implications of two studies that compared the inventory with the "Mechanics Baseline." Includes a copy of the instrument. (MDH)

  10. SCM-Forcing Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Xie, Shaocheng; Tang,Shuaiqi; Zhang,Yunyan; Zhang,Minghua

    2016-07-01

    Single-Column Model (SCM) Forcing Data are derived from the ARM facility observational data using the constrained variational analysis approach (Zhang and Lin 1997 and Zhang et al., 2001). The resulting products include both the large-scale forcing terms and the evaluation fields, which can be used for driving the SCMs and Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs) and validating model simulations.

  11. Lorentz force velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Thess, A; Votyakov, E V; Kolesnikov, Y

    2006-04-28

    We describe a noncontact technique for velocity measurement in electrically conducting fluids. The technique, which we term Lorentz force velocimetry (LFV), is based on exposing the fluid to a magnetic field and measuring the drag force acting upon the magnetic field lines. Two series of measurements are reported, one in which the force is determined through the angular velocity of a rotary magnet system and one in which the force on a fixed magnet system is measured directly. Both experiments confirm that the measured signal is a linear function of the flow velocity. We then derive the scaling law that relates the force on a localized distribution of magnetized material to the velocity of an electrically conducting fluid. This law shows that LFV, if properly designed, has a wide range of potential applications in metallurgy, semiconductor crystal growth, and glass manufacturing. PMID:16712237

  12. Conservative entropic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Matt

    2011-10-01

    Entropic forces have recently attracted considerable attention as ways to reformulate, retrodict, and perhaps even "explain" classical Newtonian gravity from a rather specific thermodynamic perspective. In this article I point out that if one wishes to reformulate classical Newtonian gravity in terms of an entropic force, then the fact that Newtonian gravity is described by a conservative force places significant constraints on the form of the entropy and temperature functions. (These constraints also apply to entropic reinterpretations of electromagnetism, and indeed to any conservative force derivable from a potential.) The constraints I will establish are sufficient to present real and significant problems for any reasonable variant of Verlinde's entropic gravity proposal, though for technical reasons the constraints established herein do not directly impact on either Jacobson'sor Padmanabhan's versions of entropic gravity. In an attempt to resolve these issues, I will extend the usual notion of entropic force to multiple heat baths with multiple "temperatures" and multiple "entropies".

  13. Measuring lung function using sound waves: role of the forced oscillation technique and impulse oscillometry system.

    PubMed

    Brashier, Bill; Salvi, Sundeep

    2015-03-01

    Measuring lung function is an important component in the decision making process for patients with obstructive airways disease (OAD). Not only does it help in arriving at a specific diagnosis, but it also helps in evaluating severity so that appropriate pharmacotherapy can be instituted, it helps determine prognosis and it helps evaluate response to therapy. Spirometry is currently the most commonly performed lung function test in clinical practice and is considered to be the gold standard diagnostic test for asthma and COPD. However, spirometry is not an easy test to perform because the forceful expiratory and inspiratory manoeuvres require good patient co-operation. Children aged <5 years, elderly people and those with physical and cognitive limitations cannot perform spirometry easily. PMID:26306104

  14. Measuring lung function using sound waves: role of the forced oscillation technique and impulse oscillometry system.

    PubMed

    Brashier, Bill; Salvi, Sundeep

    2015-03-01

    Measuring lung function is an important component in the decision making process for patients with obstructive airways disease (OAD). Not only does it help in arriving at a specific diagnosis, but it also helps in evaluating severity so that appropriate pharmacotherapy can be instituted, it helps determine prognosis and it helps evaluate response to therapy. Spirometry is currently the most commonly performed lung function test in clinical practice and is considered to be the gold standard diagnostic test for asthma and COPD. However, spirometry is not an easy test to perform because the forceful expiratory and inspiratory manoeuvres require good patient co-operation. Children aged <5 years, elderly people and those with physical and cognitive limitations cannot perform spirometry easily.

  15. The biological effects of higher and lower positive end-expiratory pressure in pulmonary and extrapulmonary acute lung injury with intra-abdominal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Mechanical ventilation with high positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) has been used in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH), but the role of PEEP in minimizing lung injury remains controversial. We hypothesized that in the presence of acute lung injury (ALI) with IAH: 1) higher PEEP levels improve pulmonary morphofunction and minimize lung injury; and 2) the biological effects of higher PEEP are more effective in extrapulmonary (exp) than pulmonary (p) ALI. Methods In 48 adult male Wistar rats, ALIp and ALIexp were induced by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide intratracheally and intraperitoneally, respectively. After 24 hours, animals were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated (tidal volume of 6 mL/kg). IAH (15 mmHg) was induced and rats randomly assigned to PEEP of 5 (PEEP5), 7 (PEEP7) or 10 (PEEP10) cmH2O for 1 hour. Results In both ALIp and ALIexp, higher PEEP levels improved oxygenation. PEEP10 increased alveolar hyperinflation and epithelial cell damage compared to PEEP5, independent of ALI etiology. In ALIp, PEEP7 and PEEP10 increased lung elastance compared to PEEP5 (4.3 ± 0.7 and 4.3 ± 0.9 versus 3.1 ± 0.3 cmH2O/mL, respectively, P <0.01), without changes in alveolar collapse, interleukin-6, caspase-3, type III procollagen, receptor for advanced glycation end-products, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expressions. Moreover, PEEP10 increased diaphragmatic injury compared to PEEP5. In ALIexp, PEEP7 decreased lung elastance and alveolar collapse compared to PEEP5 (2.3 ± 0.5 versus 3.6 ± 0.7 cmH2O/mL, P <0.02, and 27.2 (24.7 to 36.8) versus 44.2 (39.7 to 56.9)%, P <0.05, respectively), while PEEP7 and PEEP10 increased interleukin-6 and type III procollagen expressions, as well as type II epithelial cell damage compared to PEEP5. Conclusions In the current models of ALI with IAH, in contrast to our primary hypothesis, higher PEEP is more effective in

  16. Acute Effects of Particulate Matter and Black Carbon from Seasonal Fires on Peak Expiratory Flow of Schoolchildren in the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Ludmilla da Silva Viana; Hacon, Sandra de Souza; de Castro, Hermano Albuquerque; Ignotti, Eliane; Artaxo, Paulo; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; de Leon, Antonio Carlos Monteiro Ponce

    2014-01-01

    Background Panel studies have shown adverse effects of air pollution from biomass burning on children's health. This study estimated the effect of current levels of outdoor air pollution in the Amazonian dry season on peak expiratory flow (PEF). Methods A panel study with 234 schoolchildren from 6 to 15 years old living in the municipality of Tangará da Serra, Brazil was conducted. PEF was measured daily in the dry season in 2008. Mixed-effects models and unified modelling repeated for every child were applied. Time trends, temperature, humidity, and subject characteristics were regarded. Inhalable particulate matter (PM10), fine particulate matter (PM2.5), and black carbon (BC) effects were evaluated based on 24-hour exposure lagged by 1 to 5 days and the averages of 2 or 3 days. Polynomial distributed lag models (PDLM) were also applied. Results The analyses revealed reductions in PEF for PM10 and PM2.5 increases of 10 µg/m3 and 1 µg/m3 for BC. For PM10, the reductions varied from 0.15 (confidence interval (CI)95%: −0.29; −0.01) to 0.25 l/min (CI95%: −0.40; −0.10). For PM2.5, they ranged from 0.46 (CI95%: −0.86 to −0.06) to 0.54 l/min (CI95%:−0.95; −0.14). As for BC, the reduction was approximately 1.40 l/min. In relation to PDLM, adverse effects were noticed in models based on the exposure on the current day through the previous 3 days (PDLM 0–3) and on the current day through the previous 5 days (PDLM 0–5), specially for PM10. For all children, for PDLM 0–5 the global effect was important for PM10, with PEF reduction of 0.31 l/min (CI95%: −0.56; −0.05). Also, reductions in lags 3 and 4 were observed. These associations were stronger for children between 6 and 8 years old. Conclusion Reductions in PEF were associated with air pollution, mainly for lagged exposures of 3 to 5 days and for younger children. PMID:25118606

  17. Traceable periodic force calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, Ch; Kieckenap, G.; Glöckner, B.; Buß, A.; Kumme, R.

    2012-06-01

    A procedure for dynamic force calibration using sinusoidal excitations of force transducers is described. The method is based on a sinusoidal excitation of force transducers equipped with an additional top mass excited with an electrodynamic shaker system. The acting dynamic force can in this way be determined according to Newton's law as mass times acceleration, whereby the acceleration is measured on the surface of the top mass with the aid of laser interferometers. The dynamic sensitivity, which is the ratio of the electrical output signal of the force transducer and the acting dynamic force, is the main point of interest of such a dynamic calibration. In addition to the sensitivity, the parameter stiffness and damping of the transducer can also be determined. The first part of the paper outlines a mathematical model to describe the dynamic behaviour of a transducer. This is followed by a presentation of the traceability of the measured quantities involved and their uncertainties. The paper finishes with an example calibration of a 25 kN strain gauge force transducer.

  18. Turbomachinery rotor forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, Norbert

    1988-01-01

    The fluid-induced forces, both steady and unsteady, acting upon an impeller of a centrifugal pump, and impeller blade-diffuser vane interaction in centrifugal pumps with vaned radial diffusers were evaluated experimentally and theoretically. Knowledge of the steady and unsteady forces, and the associated rotordynamic coefficients are required to effectively model the rotor dynamics of the High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (HPFTP) of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). These forces and rotordynamic coefficients were investigated using different impellers in combination with volutes and vaned diffusers, and axial inducers. These rotor forces are global. Local forces and pressures are also important in impeller-diffuser interaction, for they may cause cavitation damage and even vane failures. Thus, in a separate investigation, impeller wake, and impeller blade and diffuser vane pressure measurements were made. The nature of the rotordynamic forces is discussed, the experimental facility is described, and the measurements of unsteady forces and pressure are reported together with a brief and incomplete attempt to calculate these flows.

  19. OOTW Force Design Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, R.E.; Hartley, D.S.III; Packard, S.L.

    1999-05-01

    This report documents refined requirements for tools to aid the process of force design in Operations Other Than War (OOTWs). It recommends actions for the creation of one tool and work on other tools relating to mission planning. It also identifies the governmental agencies and commands with interests in each tool, from whom should come the user advisory groups overseeing the respective tool development activities. The understanding of OOTWs and their analytical support requirements has matured to the point where action can be taken in three areas: force design, collaborative analysis, and impact analysis. While the nature of the action and the length of time before complete results can be expected depends on the area, in each case the action should begin immediately. Force design for OOTWs is not a technically difficult process. Like force design for combat operations, it is a process of matching the capabilities of forces against the specified and implied tasks of the operation, considering the constraints of logistics, transport and force availabilities. However, there is a critical difference that restricts the usefulness of combat force design tools for OOTWs: the combat tools are built to infer non-combat capability requirements from combat capability requirements and cannot reverse the direction of the inference, as is required for OOTWs. Recently, OOTWs have played a larger role in force assessment, system effectiveness and tradeoff analysis, and concept and doctrine development and analysis. In the first Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR), each of the Services created its own OOTW force design tool. Unfortunately, the tools address different parts of the problem and do not coordinate the use of competing capabilities. These tools satisfied the immediate requirements of the QDR, but do not provide a long-term cost-effective solution.

  20. Manual discrimination of force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, Xiao-Dong; Tan, HONG-Z.; Durlach, Nathaniel I.

    1991-01-01

    Optimal design of human-machine interfaces for teleoperators and virtual-environment systems which involve the tactual and kinesthetic modalities requires knowledge of the human's resolving power in these modalities. The resolution of the interface should be appropriately matched to that of the human operator. We report some preliminary results on the ability of the human hand to distinguish small differences in force under a variety of conditions. Experiments were conducted on force discrimination with the thumb pushing an interface that exerts a constant force over the pushing distance and the index finger pressing against a fixed support. The dependence of the sensitivity index d' on force increment can be fit by a straight line through the origin and the just-noticeable difference (JND) in force can thus be described by the inverse of the slope of this line. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) was measured by varying the a priori probabilities of the two alternatives, reference force and reference force plus an increment, in one-interval, two-alternative, forced-choice experiments. When plotted on normal deviate coordinates, the ROC's were roughly straight lines of unit slope, thus supporting the assumption of equal-variance normal distributions and the use of the conventional d' measure. The JND was roughly 6-8 percent for reference force ranging from 2.5 to 10 newtons, pushing distance from 5 to 30 mm, and initial finger-span from 45 to 125 mm. Also, the JND remained the same when the subjects were instructed to change the average speed of pushing from 23 to 153 mm/sec. The pushing was terminated by reaching either a wall or a well, and the JND's were essentially the same in both cases.

  1. Dilatonic Entropic Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakalli, I.

    2011-08-01

    We show in detail that the entropic force of the static spherically symmetric spacetimes with unusual asymptotics can be calculated through the Verlinde's arguments. We introduce three different holographic screen candidates, which are first employed thoroughly by Myung and Kim [Phys. Rev. D 81, 105012 (2010)] for Schwarzschild black hole solutions, in order to identify the entropic force arising between a charged dilaton black hole and a test particle. The significance of the dilaton parameter on the entropic force is highlighted, and shown graphically.

  2. Written Emotional Expression as an Intervention for Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Melissa A.; Theodore, Lea A.; Patwa, Shamim S.; Margiano, Suzanne G.; Alric, Jolie M.; Peck, Heather L.

    2003-01-01

    This investigation employed a multiple baseline design across five participants to examine written emotional expression as an intervention to improve lung function in high school-aged students, college students, and adults with asthma. The predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV[subscript 1] measure of large airway functioning) and…

  3. Causal reasoning with forces

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Phillip; Barbey, Aron K.

    2015-01-01

    Causal composition allows people to generate new causal relations by combining existing causal knowledge. We introduce a new computational model of such reasoning, the force theory, which holds that people compose causal relations by simulating the processes that join forces in the world, and compare this theory with the mental model theory (Khemlani et al., 2014) and the causal model theory (Sloman et al., 2009), which explain causal composition on the basis of mental models and structural equations, respectively. In one experiment, the force theory was uniquely able to account for people's ability to compose causal relationships from complex animations of real-world events. In three additional experiments, the force theory did as well as or better than the other two theories in explaining the causal compositions people generated from linguistically presented causal relations. Implications for causal learning and the hierarchical structure of causal knowledge are discussed. PMID:25653611

  4. Forces in Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodsell, David; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes an activity to give students experience with the variables and forces impacting a moving body on an inclined plane by observing a ball as it rolls down an inclined PVC pipe of fixed length. Includes a student worksheet. (MKR)

  5. Metamaterials enhancing optical forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginis, Vincent; Tassin, Philippe; Soukoulis, Costas M.; Veretennicoff, Irina

    2014-05-01

    The interaction between light and matter involves not only an energy transfer, but also the transfer of linear momentum. In everyday life applications this linear momentum of light is too small to play any significant role. However, in nanoscale dimensions, the associated optical forces start to play an increasingly important role. These forces are, e.g., large enough for exiting experiments in the fields of cavity-optomechanics, laser cooling and optical trapping of small particles. Recently, it has been suggested that optical gradient forces can also be employed for all-optical actuation in micro- and nanophotonic systems. The typical setup consists of two slab waveguides positioned in each others vicinity such that they are coupled through the interaction of the evanescent tails. Although the gradient forces between these waveguides can be enhanced considerably using electromagnetic resonators or slow-light techniques, the resulting displacements remain relatively small. In this contribution, we present an alternative approach to enhance optical gradient forces between waveguides using a combination of transformation optics and metamaterials. Our design starts from the observation that gradient forces exponentially decay with the separation distance between the waveguides. Therefore, we employ transformation optics to annihilate the apparent distance for light between the waveguides. Analytical calculations confirm that the resulting forces indeed increase when such an annihilating cladding is inserted. Subsequently, we discuss the metamaterial implementation of this annihilating medium. Such lensing media automatically translate into anisotropic metamaterials with negative components in the permittivity and permeability tensors. Our full-wave numerical simulations show that the overall amplification is highly limited by the loss-tangent of the metamaterial cladding. However, as this cladding only needs to operate in the near-field for a specific polarization

  6. Strategic forces briefing

    SciTech Connect

    Bing, G.; Chrzanowski, P.; May, M.; Nordyke, M.

    1989-04-06

    The Strategic Forces Briefing'' is our attempt, accomplished over the past several months, to outline and highlight the more significant strategic force issues that must be addressed in the near future. Some issues are recurrent: the need for an effective modernized Triad and a constant concern for force survivability. Some issues derive from arms control: the Strategic Arms Reduction Talks (SALT) are sufficiently advanced to set broad numerical limits on forces, but not so constraining as to preclude choices among weapon systems and deployment modes. Finally, a new administration faced with serious budgetary problems must strive for the most effective strategic forces limited dollars can buy and support. A review of strategic forces logically begins with consideration of the missions the forces are charged with. We begin the briefing with a short review of targeting policy and implementation within the constraints of available unclassified information. We then review each element of the Triad with sections on SLBMs, ICBMs, and Air-Breathing (bomber and cruise missile) systems. A short section at the end deals with the potential impact of strategic defense on offensive force planning. We consider ABM, ASAT, and air defense; but we do not attempt to address the technical issues of strategic defense per se. The final section gives a brief overview of the tritium supply problem. We conclude with a summary of recommendations that emerge from our review. The results of calculation on the effectiveness of various weapon systems as a function of cost that are presented in the briefing are by Paul Chrzanowski.

  7. Force-Measuring Clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A precision clamp that accurately measures force over a wide range of conditions is described. Using a full bridge or other strain gage configuration. the elastic deformation of the clamp is measured or detected by the strain gages. Thc strain gages transmit a signal that corresponds to the degree of stress upon the clamp. Thc strain gage signal is converted to a numeric display. Calibration is achieved by ero and span potentiometers which enable accurate measurements by the force-measuring clamp.

  8. Optical ``Bernoulli'' forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movassagh, Ramis; Johnson, Steven

    2015-03-01

    By Bernoulli's law, an increase in the relative speed of a fluid around a body is accompanies by a decrease in the pressure. Therefore, a rotating body in a fluid stream experiences a force perpendicular to the motion of the fluid because of the unequal relative speed of the fluid across its surface. It is well known that light has a constant speed irrespective of the relative motion. Does a rotating body immersed in a stream of photons experience a Bernoulli-like force? We show that, indeed, a rotating dielectric cylinder experiences such a lateral force from an electromagnetic wave. In fact, the sign of the lateral force is the same as that of the fluid-mechanical analogue as long as the electric susceptibility is positive (ɛ >ɛ0), but for negative-susceptibility materials (e.g. metals) we show that the lateral force is in the opposite direction. Because these results are derived from a classical electromagnetic scattering problem, Mie-resonance enhancements that occur in other scattering phenomena also enhance the lateral force. [This talk is based on Phys. Rev. A 88, 023829 (2013).] Supported in part by the U.S. Army Research Office under contract W911NF-13-D-0001.

  9. The Missing Climate Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Sato, M.; Lacis, A.; Ruedy, R.

    1997-02-01

    Observed climate change is consistent with radiative forcings on several time scales for which the dominant forcings are known, ranging from the few years after a large volcanic eruption to glacial-to-interglacial changes. In the period with most detailed data, 1979 to the present, climate observations contain clear signatures of both natural and anthropogenic forcings. But in the full period since the industrial revolution began, global warming is only about half of that expected due to the principal forcing, increasing greenhouse gases. The direct radiative effect of anthropogenic aerosols contributes only little towards resolving this discrepancy. Unforced climate variability is an unlikely explanation. We argue on the basis of several lines of indirect evidence that aerosol effects on clouds have caused a large negative forcing, at least -1 Wm-2, which has substantially offset greenhouse warming. The tasks of observing this forcing and determining the microphysical mechanisms at its basis are exceptionally difficult, but they are essential for the prognosis of future climate change.

  10. Van der Waals Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsegian, V. Adrian

    2006-03-01

    This should prove to be the definitive work explaining van der Waals forces, how to calculate them and take account of their impact under any circumstances and conditions. These weak intermolecular forces are of truly pervasive impact, and biologists, chemists, physicists and engineers will profit greatly from the thorough grounding in these fundamental forces that this book offers. Parsegian has organized his book at three successive levels of mathematical sophistication, to satisfy the needs and interests of readers at all levels of preparation. The Prelude and Level 1 are intended to give everyone an overview in words and pictures of the modern theory of van der Waals forces. Level 2 gives the formulae and a wide range of algorithms to let readers compute the van der Waals forces under virtually any physical or physiological conditions. Level 3 offers a rigorous basic formulation of the theory. Author is among the most highly respected biophysicists Van der Waals forces are significant for a wide range of questions and problems in the life sciences, chemistry, physics, and engineering, ranging up to the macro level No other book that develops the subject vigorously, and this book also makes the subject intuitively accessible to students who had not previously been mathematically sophisticated enough to calculate them

  11. Forced respiration during the deeper water immersion causes the greater inspiratory muscle fatigue in healthy young men

    PubMed Central

    Yamashina, Yoshihiro; Yokoyama, Hisayo; Naghavi, Nooshin; Hirasawa, Yoshikazu; Takeda, Ryosuke; Ota, Akemi; Imai, Daiki; Miyagawa, Toshiaki; Okazaki, Kazunobu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of water immersion at different water depths on respiratory function and the effect of inspiratory load breathing (ILB) during water immersion at different water depths on respiratory muscle strength evaluated by maximum inspiratory and expiratory pressures (PImax and PEmax, respectively). [Subjects] Eight healthy men participated randomly in three trials. [Methods] All sessions were conducted with the participants in a sitting position immersed in a water bath. We evaluated respiratory function, PImax and PEmax during submersion at three different levels of water depth (umbilicus; 4th-rib; or clavicle, CL) and after subsequent 15-min ILB. [Results] Decreases in vital capacity and expiratory reserve volume from baseline by water immersion were significantly greater in the CL trial than those in the other trials. In the CL trial, PImax was immediately reduced after ILB compared to that at baseline, and the reduction was significantly greater than those in the other trials. PEmax was not affected by ILB in any of the trials. [Conclusion] Forced respiration during deeper water immersion caused greater inspiratory muscle fatigue in healthy young men. PMID:27064401

  12. Effects of different lifting cadences on ground reaction forces during the squat exercise.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Jason R; Amonette, William E; De Witt, John K; Hagan, R Donald

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of different lifting cadences on the ground reaction force (GRF) during the squat exercise. Squats performed with greater acceleration will produce greater inertial forces; however, it is not well understood how different squat cadences affect GRF. The hypotheses were that faster squat cadences would result in greater peak GRF and that the contributions of the body and barbell, both of equivalent mass, to total system inertial force would not be different. Six experienced male subjects (31 +/- 4 years, 180 +/- 9 cm, 88.8 +/- 13.3 kg) performed 3 sets of 3 squats using 3 different cadences (fast cadence [FC] = 1-second descent/1-second ascent; medium cadence [MC] = 3-second descent/1-second ascent; and slow cadence [SC] = 4-second descent/2-second ascent) while lifting a barbell mass equal to their body mass. Ground reaction force and velocity sensor data were used to calculate inertial force contributions of both the body and barbell to total inertial force. Peak GRF were significantly higher in FC squats compared to MC (p = 0.0002) and SC (p = 0.0002). Ranges of GRF were also significantly higher in FC compared to MC (p < 0.05) and higher in MC compared to SC (p < 0.05). The inertial forces associated with the body were larger than those associated with the barbell, regardless of cadence. Faster squat cadences result in significantly greater peak GRF as a result of the inertia of the system. This study demonstrates that GRF was more dependent on descent cadence than on ascent cadence and that researchers should not use a single point on the body to approximate the location of the center of mass during squat exercise analysis. PMID:20386484

  13. Lenz's Law: Feel the Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawicki, Charles A.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a simple, inexpensive system that allows students to have hands-on contact with simple experiments involving forces generated by induced currents. Discusses the use of a dynamic force sensor in making quantitative measurements of the forces generated. (JRH)

  14. Surgical force detection probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Roberts, Paul; Scott, Charles; Prass, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The development progress of a precision electro-mechanical instrument which allows the detection and documentation of the forces and moment applied to human tissue during surgery (under actual operation room conditions), is reported. The pen-shaped prototype probe which measures 1/2 inch in diameter and 7 inches in length was fabricated using an aerodynamic balance. The aerodynamic balance, a standard wind tunnel force and moment sensing transducer, measures the forces and the moments transmitted through the surgeon's hand to the human tissue during surgery. The prototype probe which was fabricated as a development tool was tested successfully. The final version of the surgical force detection probe will be designed based on additional laboratory tests in order to establish the full scale loads. It is expected that the final product will require a simplified aerodynamic balance with two or three force components and one moment component with lighter full scale loads. A signal conditioner was fabricated to process and display the outputs from the prototype probe. This unit will be interfaced with a PC-based data system to provide automatic data acquisition, data processing, and graphics display. The expected overall accuracy of the probe is better than one percent full scale.

  15. Radiative Forcing by Contrails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meerkoetter, R.; Schumann, U.; Doelling, D. R.; Nakajima, T.; Tsushima, Y.

    1999-01-01

    A parametric study of the instantaneous radiative impact of contrails is presented using three different radiative transfer models for a series of model atmospheres and cloud parameters. Contrails are treated as geometrically and optically thin plane parallel homogeneous cirrus layers in a static atmospheres The ice water content is varied as a function of ambient temperature. The model atmospheres include tropical, mid-latitude, and subarctic summer and winter atmospheres Optically thin contrails cause a positive net forcing at top of the atmosphere. At the surface the radiative forcing is negative during daytime. The forcing increases with the optical depth and the amount of contrail cover. At the top of the atmosphere a mean contrail cover of 0.1% with average optical depth of 0.2 to 0.5 causes about 0.01 to 0.03 W/m(exp 2)a daily mean instantaneous radiative forcing. Contrails cool the surface during the day and heat the surface during the night, and hence reduce the daily temperature amplitude The net effect depends strongly on the daily variation of contrail cloud cover. The indirect radiative forcing due to particle changes in natural cirrus clouds may be of the same magnitude as the direct one due to additional cover.

  16. Rectified Forces in Rubidium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, Timothy Todd

    The forces exerted on a three-level atom by a bichromatic standing-wave field are investigated. A theoretical analysis shows that the standing-wave dipole force can be rectified, i.e., maintain its sign over many optical wavelengths. Three systems in particular are studied: the lambda, the vee, and the cascade. Experimental results for the rubidium 5S --> 5P --> 5D cascade system are used to confirm the theory. The nearly coincident transition wavelengths for this system (780.0 nm and 776.0 nm) provide potential wells repeating at the beat wavelength (71 μm) which can accumulate laser cooled atoms. This force may have future applications in forming deep neutral atom traps as well as in the creation of new elements for atom optics. Two-color, two-photon spectroscopy of the 5D_{5/2}<=vel using the same cascade system (5S --> 5P --> 5D) was also performed.

  17. Linear force device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, John P.

    1988-01-01

    The object of the invention is to provide a mechanical force actuator which is lightweight and manipulatable and utilizes linear motion for push or pull forces while maintaining a constant overall length. The mechanical force producing mechanism comprises a linear actuator mechanism and a linear motion shaft mounted parallel to one another. The linear motion shaft is connected to a stationary or fixed housing and to a movable housing where the movable housing is mechanically actuated through actuator mechanism by either manual means or motor means. The housings are adapted to releasably receive a variety of jaw or pulling elements adapted for clamping or prying action. The stationary housing is adapted to be pivotally mounted to permit an angular position of the housing to allow the tool to adapt to skewed interfaces. The actuator mechanisms is operated by a gear train to obtain linear motion of the actuator mechanism.

  18. Carbohydrate force fields

    PubMed Central

    Foley, B. Lachele; Tessier, Matthew B.; Woods, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates present a special set of challenges to the generation of force fields. First, the tertiary structures of monosaccharides are complex merely by virtue of their exceptionally high number of chiral centers. In addition, their electronic characteristics lead to molecular geometries and electrostatic landscapes that can be challenging to predict and model. The monosaccharide units can also interconnect in many ways, resulting in a large number of possible oligosaccharides and polysaccharides, both linear and branched. These larger structures contain a number of rotatable bonds, meaning they potentially sample an enormous conformational space. This article briefly reviews the history of carbohydrate force fields, examining and comparing their challenges, forms, philosophies, and development strategies. Then it presents a survey of recent uses of these force fields, noting trends, strengths, deficiencies, and possible directions for future expansion. PMID:25530813

  19. [Forced spirometry procedure].

    PubMed

    Cortés Aguilera, Antonio Javier

    2008-11-01

    Forced spirometry consists in a complementary test which is carried out in a health office in a workplace in order to determine the lung capacity of workers exposed to determined professional risks or those susceptible to determined working conditions which could lead to the development of respiratory problems. This test has been developed based on health vigilance laws under Article 22 of the Law for Prevention of Risks in the Workplace and requires that the technician, a nurse in a workplace, who performs it have some knowledge and skills regarding its use, following the norms for forced spirometry set by the Spanish Association for Pneumatology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR). PMID:19203116

  20. Radiative Forcing of Climate Change

    SciTech Connect

    Ramaswamy, V.; Boucher, Olivier; Haigh, J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Haywood, J.; Myhre, G.; Nakajima, Takahito; Shi, Guangyu; Solomon, S.; Betts, Robert E.; Charlson, R.; Chuang, C. C.; Daniel, J. S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Feichter, J.; Fuglestvedt, J.; Forster, P. M.; Ghan, Steven J.; Jones, A.; Kiehl, J. T.; Koch, D.; Land, C.; Lean, J.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Minschwaner, K.; Penner, Joyce E.; Roberts, D. L.; Rodhe, H.; Roelofs, G.-J.; Rotstayn, Leon D.; Schneider, T. L.; Schumann, U.; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Schwartzkopf, M. D.; Shine, K. P.; Smith, Steven J.; Stevenson, D. S.; Stordal, F.; Tegen, I.; van Dorland, R.; Zhang, Y.; Srinivasan, J.; Joos, Fortunat

    2001-10-01

    Chapter 6 of the IPCC Third Assessment Report Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Sections include: Executive Summary 6.1 Radiative Forcing 6.2 Forcing-Response Relationship 6.3 Well-Mixed Greenhouse Gases 6.4 Stratospheric Ozone 6.5 Radiative Forcing By Tropospheric Ozone 6.6 Indirect Forcings due to Chemistry 6.7 The Direct Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.8 The Indirect Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.9 Stratospheric Aerosols 6.10 Land-use Change (Surface Albedo Effect) 6.11 Solar Forcing of Climate 6.12 Global Warming Potentials hydrocarbons 6.13 Global Mean Radiative Forcings 6.14 The Geographical Distribution of the Radiative Forcings 6.15 Time Evolution of Radiative Forcings Appendix 6.1 Elements of Radiative Forcing Concept References.

  1. Lorentz force particle analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Thess, André; Moreau, René; Tan, Yanqing; Dai, Shangjun; Tao, Zhen; Yang, Wenzhi; Wang, Bo

    2016-07-01

    A new contactless technique is presented for the detection of micron-sized insulating particles in the flow of an electrically conducting fluid. A transverse magnetic field brakes this flow and tends to become entrained in the flow direction by a Lorentz force, whose reaction force on the magnetic-field-generating system can be measured. The presence of insulating particles suspended in the fluid produce changes in this Lorentz force, generating pulses in it; these pulses enable the particles to be counted and sized. A two-dimensional numerical model that employs a moving mesh method demonstrates the measurement principle when such a particle is present. Two prototypes and a three-dimensional numerical model are used to demonstrate the feasibility of a Lorentz force particle analyzer (LFPA). The findings of this study conclude that such an LFPA, which offers contactless and on-line quantitative measurements, can be applied to an extensive range of applications. These applications include measurements of the cleanliness of high-temperature and aggressive molten metal, such as aluminum and steel alloys, and the clean manufacturing of semiconductors.

  2. The Force of Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ascher, Carol

    2005-01-01

    "The Force of Ideas" describes a little-known aspect of both educational history and Viennese psychoanalysis during the interwar years: the movement for psychoanalytic pedagogy. The author traces her father's own story, beginning with his application to the Vienna Psychoanalytic Society for training as a psychoanalytic pedagogue, as a way to…

  3. Force limited vibration testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry D.

    1991-01-01

    A new method of conducting lab vibration tests of spacecraft equipment was developed to more closely simulate the vibration environment experienced when the spacecraft is launched on a rocket. The improved tests are tailored to identify equipment design and workmanship problems without inducing artificial failures that would not have occurred at launch. These new, less destructive types of vibration tests are essential to JPL's protoflight test approach in which lab testing is conducted using the flight equipment, often one of a kind, to save time and money. In conventional vibration tests, only the input vibratory motion is specified; the feedback, or reaction force, between the test item and the vibration machine is ignored. Most test failures occur when the test item goes into resonance, and the reaction force becomes very large. It has long been recognized that the large reaction force is a test artifact which does not occur with the lightweight, flexible mounting structures characteristic of spacecraft and space vehicles. In new vibration tests, both the motion and the force provided to the test item by the vibration machine are controlled, so that the vibration ride experienced by the test item is as in flight.

  4. Measuring Your Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, David E.

    2005-01-01

    This article talks about the force behind education leaders. With all the challenges facing public education today, it is difficult to remain focused and to remember why one chartered this particular leadership course. Perhaps someone respected encouraged one to take this path long ago. Perhaps this kind of service to the nation and its future…

  5. Unification of Fundamental Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Abdus; Taylor, Foreword by John C.

    2005-10-01

    Foreword John C. Taylor; 1. Unification of fundamental forces Abdus Salam; 2. History unfolding: an introduction to the two 1968 lectures by W. Heisenberg and P. A. M. Dirac Abdus Salam; 3. Theory, criticism, and a philosophy Werner Heisenberg; 4. Methods in theoretical physics Paul Adrian Maurice Dirac.

  6. The Dynamic Force Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geddes, John B.; Black, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    We examine an experimental apparatus that is used to motivate the connections between the basic properties of vectors, potential functions, systems of nonlinear equations, and Newton's method for nonlinear systems of equations. The apparatus is an adaptation of a force table where we remove the center-pin and allow the center-ring to move freely.…

  7. Perpendicular-Force Latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattei, John P.; Buck, Peter A.; Williams, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    Latching mechanism simultaneously applies force in two perpendicular directions to install or remove electronic-equipment modules. Used to simplify installation and removal of modular equipment where movement restricted by protective clothing as in hazardous environments or where installation and removal to be performed by robots or remote manipulators. Concept adaptable to hydraulic, pneumatic, and mechanical systems.

  8. Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mccomiskey, Allison

    2008-01-15

    Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

  9. Chiral drag force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Krishna; Sadofyev, Andrey V.

    2015-10-01

    We provide a holographic evaluation of novel contributions to the drag force acting on a heavy quark moving through strongly interacting plasma. The new contributions are chiral in the sense that they act in opposite directions in plasmas containing an excess of left- or right-handed quarks. The new contributions are proportional to the coefficient of the axial anomaly, and in this sense also are chiral. These new contributions to the drag force act either parallel to or antiparallel to an external magnetic field or to the vorticity of the fluid plasma. In all these respects, these contributions to the drag force felt by a heavy quark are analogous to the chiral magnetic effect (CME) on light quarks. However, the new contribution to the drag force is independent of the electric charge of the heavy quark and is the same for heavy quarks and antiquarks, meaning that these novel effects do not in fact contribute to the CME current. We show that although the chiral drag force can be non-vanishing for heavy quarks that are at rest in the local fluid rest frame, it does vanish for heavy quarks that are at rest in a suitably chosen frame. In this frame, the heavy quark at rest sees counterpropagating momentum and charge currents, both proportional to the axial anomaly coefficient, but feels no drag force. This provides strong concrete evidence for the absence of dissipation in chiral transport, something that has been predicted previously via consideration of symmetries. Along the way to our principal results, we provide a general calculation of the corrections to the drag force due to the presence of gradients in the flowing fluid in the presence of a nonzero chemical potential. We close with a consequence of our result that is at least in principle observable in heavy ion collisions, namely an anticorrelation between the direction of the CME current for light quarks in a given event and the direction of the kick given to the momentum of all the heavy quarks and

  10. Amplification of actin polymerization forces

    PubMed Central

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Nédélec, François

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton drives many essential processes in vivo, using molecular motors and actin assembly as force generators. We discuss here the propagation of forces caused by actin polymerization, highlighting simple configurations where the force developed by the network can exceed the sum of the polymerization forces from all filaments. PMID:27002174

  11. Investigation of Calibrating Force Transducer Using Sinusoidal Force

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Li; Wang Yu; Zhang Lizhe

    2010-05-28

    Sinusoidal force calibration method was studied several years before at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). A similar dynamic force calibration system is developed at Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement (CIMM). It uses electro-dynamic shakers to generate dynamic force in the range from 1 N to 20 kN, and heterodyne laser interferometers are used for acceleration measurement. The force transducer to be calibrated is mounted on the shaker, and a mass block is screwed on the top of force transducer, the sinusoidal forces realized by accelerated load masses are traceable to acceleration and mass according to the force definition. The methods of determining Spatial-dependent acceleration on mass block and measuring the end mass of force transducer in dynamic force calibration are discussed in this paper.

  12. Force Feedback Joystick

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    I-FORCE, a computer peripheral from Immersion Corporation, was derived from virtual environment and human factors research at the Advanced Displays and Spatial Perception Laboratory at Ames Research Center in collaboration with Stanford University Center for Design Research. Entrepreneur Louis Rosenberg, a former Stanford researcher, now president of Immersion, collaborated with Dr. Bernard Adelstein at Ames on studies of perception in virtual reality. The result was an inexpensive way to incorporate motors and a sophisticated microprocessor into joysticks and other game controllers. These devices can emulate the feel of a car on the skid, a crashing plane, the bounce of a ball, compressed springs, or other physical phenomenon. The first products incorporating I-FORCE technology include CH- Products' line of FlightStick and CombatStick controllers.

  13. Suicide and Forced Marriage

    PubMed Central

    Pridmore, Saxby; Walter, Garry

    2013-01-01

    Background: The prevailing view that the vast majority of those who complete suicide have an underlying psychiatric disorder has been recently challenged by research on the contribution of “predicaments”, in the absence of mental illness, to suicide. In this paper, we sought data to support the notion that forced marriage may lead to suicide without the presence of psychiatric disorder. Methods: Historical records, newspapers, and the electronic media were searched for examples. Results: Two examples from ancient times and six from the last hundred years were located and described. Conclusion: These cases suggest that forced marriage may lead to suicide and complements earlier findings that loss of fortune, health, liberty, and reputation may lead to suicide in the absence of mental disorder. PMID:23983577

  14. Forces Driving Chaperone Action.

    PubMed

    Koldewey, Philipp; Stull, Frederick; Horowitz, Scott; Martin, Raoul; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-07-14

    It is still unclear what molecular forces drive chaperone-mediated protein folding. Here, we obtain a detailed mechanistic understanding of the forces that dictate the four key steps of chaperone-client interaction: initial binding, complex stabilization, folding, and release. Contrary to the common belief that chaperones recognize unfolding intermediates by their hydrophobic nature, we discover that the model chaperone Spy uses long-range electrostatic interactions to rapidly bind to its unfolded client protein Im7. Short-range hydrophobic interactions follow, which serve to stabilize the complex. Hydrophobic collapse of the client protein then drives its folding. By burying hydrophobic residues in its core, the client's affinity to Spy decreases, which causes client release. By allowing the client to fold itself, Spy circumvents the need for client-specific folding instructions. This mechanism might help explain how chaperones can facilitate the folding of various unrelated proteins. PMID:27293188

  15. Force Modulator System

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond Clark

    2009-04-30

    Many metal parts manufacturers use large metal presses to shape sheet metal into finished products like car body parts, jet wing and fuselage surfaces, etc. These metal presses take sheet metal and - with enormous force - reshape the metal into a fully formed part in a manner of seconds. Although highly efficient, the forces involved in forming metal parts also damage the press itself, limit the metals used in part production, slow press operations and, when not properly controlled, cause the manufacture of large volumes of defective metal parts. To date, the metal-forming industry has not been able to develop a metal-holding technology that allows full control of press forces during the part forming process. This is of particular importance in the automotive lightweighting efforts under way in the US automotive manufacturing marketplace. Metalforming Controls Technology Inc. (MC2) has developed a patented press control system called the Force Modulator that has the ability to control these press forces, allowing a breakthrough in stamping process control. The technology includes a series of hydraulic cylinders that provide controlled tonnage at all points in the forming process. At the same time, the unique cylinder design allows for the generation of very high levels of clamping forces (very high tonnages) in very small spaces; a requirement for forming medium and large panels out of HSS and AHSS. Successful production application of these systems testing at multiple stamping operations - including Ford and Chrysler - has validated the capabilities and economic benefits of the system. Although this technology has been adopted in a number of stamping operations, one of the primary barriers to faster adoption and application of this technology in HSS projects is system cost. The cost issue has surfaced because the systems currently in use are built for each individual die as a custom application, thus driving higher tooling costs. This project proposed to better

  16. Air Force seal activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayhew, Ellen R.

    1994-07-01

    Seal technology development is an important part of the Air Force's participation in the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) initiative, the joint DOD, NASA, ARPA, and industry endeavor to double turbine engine capabilities by the turn of the century. Significant performance and efficiency improvements can be obtained through reducing internal flow system leakage, but seal environment requirements continue to become more extreme as the engine thermodynamic cycles advance towards these IHPTET goals. Brush seal technology continues to be pursued by the Air Force to reduce leakage at the required conditions. Likewise, challenges in engine mainshaft air/oil seals are also being addressed. Counter-rotating intershaft applications within the IHPTET initiative involve very high rubbing velocities. This viewgraph presentation briefly describes past and current seal research and development programs and gives a summary of seal applications in demonstrator and developmental engine testing.

  17. The effect of forced expiration on the uniformity of 99Tcm-DTPA aerosol ventilation images in patients with excess sputum production.

    PubMed

    Middleton, E; Clout, C; Occleshaw, C; Tindale, W B; Parker, B V; Barber, D C; Barrington, N A

    1990-08-01

    This study examines the use of the forced expiratory technique (FET) as a means of improving the uniformity of radionuclide aerosol ventilation images in patients with excess sputum production. Ventilation images are objectively classified by two computer derived indices to characterize the degree of radioaerosol clumping and overall uniformity. In a series of twenty five patients with a long-standing history of daily sputum production, images acquired before and after forced expiration and again after a second ventilation immediately following FET showed no significant change in either index. The results obtained do not provide evidence to support the routine use of FET in conjunction with radioaerosol scintigraphy. The method of image classification correlates well with a visual assessment of image uniformity and has general application.

  18. Ultrasonic Force Microscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, Oleg; Briggs, Andrew

    Ultrasonic Force Microscopy, or UFM, allows combination of two apparently mutually exclusive requirements for the nanomechanical probe—high stiffness for the efficient indentation and high mechanical compliance that brings force sensitivity. Somewhat inventively, UFM allows to combine these two virtues in the same cantilever by using indention of the sample at high frequency, when cantilever is very rigid, but detecting the result of this indention at much lower frequency. That is made possible due to the extreme nonlinearity of the nanoscale tip-surface junction force-distance dependence, that acts as "mechanical diode" detecting ultrasound in AFM. After introducing UFM principles, we discuss features of experimental UFM implementation, and the theory of contrast in this mode, progressing to quantitative measurements of contact stiffness. A variety of UFM applications ranging from semiconductor quantum nanostructures, graphene, very large scale integrated circuits, and reinforced ceramics to polymer composites and biological materials is presented via comprehensive imaging gallery accompanied by the guidance for the optimal UFM measurements of these materials. We also address effects of adhesion and topography on the elasticity imaging and the approaches for reducing artifacts connected with these effects. This is complemented by another extremely useful feature of UFM—ultrasound induced superlubricity that allows damage free imaging of materials ranging from stiff solid state devices and graphene to biological materials. Finally, we proceed to the exploration of time-resolved nanoscale phenomena using nonlinear mixing of multiple vibration frequencies in ultrasonic AFM—Heterodyne Force Microscopy, or HFM, that also include mixing of ultrasonic vibration with other periodic physical excitations, eg. electrical, photothermal, etc. Significant section of the chapter analyzes the ability of UFM and HFM to detect subsurface mechanical inhomogeneities, as well as

  19. ``Force,'' ontology, and language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookes, David T.; Etkina, Eugenia

    2009-06-01

    We introduce a linguistic framework through which one can interpret systematically students’ understanding of and reasoning about force and motion. Some researchers have suggested that students have robust misconceptions or alternative frameworks grounded in everyday experience. Others have pointed out the inconsistency of students’ responses and presented a phenomenological explanation for what is observed, namely, knowledge in pieces. We wish to present a view that builds on and unifies aspects of this prior research. Our argument is that many students’ difficulties with force and motion are primarily due to a combination of linguistic and ontological difficulties. It is possible that students are primarily engaged in trying to define and categorize the meaning of the term “force” as spoken about by physicists. We found that this process of negotiation of meaning is remarkably similar to that engaged in by physicists in history. In this paper we will describe a study of the historical record that reveals an analogous process of meaning negotiation, spanning multiple centuries. Using methods from cognitive linguistics and systemic functional grammar, we will present an analysis of the force and motion literature, focusing on prior studies with interview data. We will then discuss the implications of our findings for physics instruction.

  20. Force Fluctuations and Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behringer, Robert

    1998-03-01

    Granular materials exhibit a rich array of dynamic and static phenomena which are only partly understood. Here, I focus on fluctuations in kinetic properties and in forces for slowly sheared granular materials. We have carried out a series of experiments in both 2D and in 3D. For 2D, we use a novel apparatus which allows us to quantify the forces, positions and orientations associated with individual grains. For slow to moderate shear rates, we find rate independence except for small random deviations which are associated with very long time changes in the system. The system evolves to a nearly steady average flow profile in which the velocity falls off approximately exponentially with distance from the shearing surface. The particle rotation shows systematic oscillations near the shearing surface. Velocity profiles show a complicated non-gaussian structure. Force measurements in both the 2D and 3D system are approximately exponentially distributed, but there are also some systematic deviations. Companion calculations by S. Schoellmann, S. Luding and H. Herrmann capture a number of these features. The experimental work has been carried out partially at Duke and partially at the E.S.P.C.I. Paris in collaboration with D. Howell, B. Miller, S. Tennakoon, and C. Veje.

  1. The task force process

    SciTech Connect

    Applegate, J.S.

    1995-01-31

    This paper focuses on the unique aspects of the Fernald Citizens Task Force process that have contributed to a largely successful public participation effort at Fernald. The Fernald Citizens Task Force passed quickly by many procedural issues. Instead, the Task Force concentrated on (a) educating itself about the site, its problems, and possible solutions, and (b) choosing a directed way to approach its mandate: To make recommendations on several {open_quotes}big picture{close_quotes} issues, including future use of the site, cleanup levels, waste disposition, and cleanup priorities. This paper presents the approach used at Fernald for establishing and running a focused site-specific advisory board, the key issues that have been faced, and how these issues were resolved. The success of Fernald in establishing a strong and functioning site-specific advisory board serves as a useful model for other DOE facilities, although the Fernald model is just one of many approaches that can be taken. However, the approach presented here has worked extremely well for Fernald.

  2. Modified entropic force

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Changjun

    2010-04-15

    The theory of statistical thermodynamics tells us the equipartition law of energy does not hold in the limit of very low temperatures. It is found the Debye model is very successful in explaining the experimental results for most of the solid objects. Motivated by this fact, we modify the entropic force formula which is proposed very recently. Since the Unruh temperature is proportional to the strength of the gravitational field, so the modified entropic force formula is an extension of the Newtonian gravity to the weak field. On the contrary, general relativity extends Newtonian gravity to the strong field case. Corresponding to Debye temperature, there exists a Debye acceleration g{sub D}. It is found the Debye acceleration is g{sub D}=10{sup -15} N kg{sup -1}. This acceleration is very much smaller than the gravitational acceleration 10{sup -4} N kg{sup -1} which is felt by Neptune and the gravitational acceleration 10{sup -10} N kg{sup -1} felt by the Sun. Therefore, the modified entropic force can be very well approximated by the Newtonian gravity in the Solar System and in the Galaxy. With this Debye acceleration, we find the current cosmic speeding up can be explained without invoking any kind of dark energy.

  3. Finger force perception during ipsilateral and contralateral force matching tasks

    PubMed Central

    Park, Woo-Hyung; Leonard, Charles T.; Li, Sheng

    2010-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to compare matching performance between ipsilateral and contralateral finger force matching tasks and to examine the effect of handedness on finger force perception. Eleven subjects were instructed to produce reference forces by an instructed finger (index – I or little – L finger) and to reproduce the same amount force by the same or a different finger within the hand (i.e., ipsilateral matching task), or by a finger of the other hand (i.e., contralateral matching task). The results of the ipsilateral and contralateral tasks in the present study commonly showed that 1) the reference and matching forces were matched closely when the two forces were produced by the same or homologous finger(s) such as I/I task; 2) the weaker little finger underestimated the magnitude of reference force of the index finger (I/L task), even with the higher level of effort (relative force), but the two forces were matched when considering total finger forces; 3) the stronger index finger closely matched the reference force of the little finger with the lower level of relative force (i.e., L/I task); 4) when considering the constant errors, I/L tasks showed an underestimation and L/I tasks showed an overestimation compared to I/I tasks. There was no handedness effect during ipsilateral tasks. During the contralateral task, the dominant hand overestimated the force of the non-dominant hand, while the non-dominant hand attempted to match the absolute force of the dominant hand. The overall results support the notion that the absolute, rather than relative, finger force is perceived and reproduced during ipsilateral and contralateral finger force matching tasks, indicating the uniqueness of finger force perception. PMID:18488212

  4. Atomic Force Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  5. Causal Entropic Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissner-Gross, A. D.; Freer, C. E.

    2013-04-01

    Recent advances in fields ranging from cosmology to computer science have hinted at a possible deep connection between intelligence and entropy maximization, but no formal physical relationship between them has yet been established. Here, we explicitly propose a first step toward such a relationship in the form of a causal generalization of entropic forces that we find can cause two defining behaviors of the human “cognitive niche”—tool use and social cooperation—to spontaneously emerge in simple physical systems. Our results suggest a potentially general thermodynamic model of adaptive behavior as a nonequilibrium process in open systems.

  6. Turbulent forced diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Arpaci, V.S.; Li, C.Y.

    1995-07-01

    It is the purpose of this study to introduce a turbulent microscale appropriate for forced diffusion flames and to propose models for fuel consumption and skin friction in terms of this scale. The study consists of four sections. Following the introduction, Section 2 recapitulates the laminar theories of reacting boundary layers in terms of dimensional arguments and proposes models for fuel consumption and skin friction. Section 3 extends these arguments by introducing a microscale appropriate for turbulent flames and, in terms of this scale, develops models for fuel consumption and skin friction, correlates the experimental data on skin friction, and Section 4 concludes the study.

  7. Radiative forcing of climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramanswamy, V.; Shine, Keith; Leovy, Conway; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Rodhe, Henning; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Ding, M.; Lelieveld, Joseph; Edmonds, Jae A.; Mccormick, M. Patrick

    1991-01-01

    An update of the scientific discussions presented in Chapter 2 of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report is presented. The update discusses the atmospheric radiative and chemical species of significance for climate change. There are two major objectives of the present update. The first is an extension of the discussion on the Global Warming Potentials (GWP's), including a reevaluation in view of the updates in the lifetimes of the radiatively active species. The second important objective is to underscore major developments in the radiative forcing of climate due to the observed stratospheric ozone losses occurring between 1979 and 1990.

  8. Poultry Processing Work and Respiratory Health of Latino Men and Women in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Mirabelli, Maria C.; Chatterjee, Arjun B.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Mora, Dana C.; Blocker, Jill N.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Chen, Haiying; Marín, Antonio J.; Schulz, Mark R.; Quandt, Sara A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate associations between poultry processing work and respiratory health among working Latino men and women in North Carolina. Methods Between May 2009 and November 2010, 402 poultry processing workers and 339 workers in a comparison population completed interviewer-administered questionnaires. Of these participants, 279 poultry processing workers and 222 workers in the comparison population also completed spirometry testing to provide measurements of forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity. Results Nine percent of poultry processing workers and 10% of workers in the comparison population reported current asthma. Relative to the comparison population, adjusted mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity were lower in the poultry processing population, particularly among men who reported sanitation job activities. Conclusions Despite the low prevalence of respiratory symptoms reported, poultry processing work may affect lung function. PMID:22237034

  9. Forces stabilizing proteins.

    PubMed

    Nick Pace, C; Scholtz, J Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R

    2014-06-27

    The goal of this article is to summarize what has been learned about the major forces stabilizing proteins since the late 1980s when site-directed mutagenesis became possible. The following conclusions are derived from experimental studies of hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding variants. (1) Based on studies of 138 hydrophobic interaction variants in 11 proteins, burying a -CH2- group on folding contributes 1.1±0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. (2) The burial of non-polar side chains contributes to protein stability in two ways: first, a term that depends on the removal of the side chains from water and, more importantly, the enhanced London dispersion forces that result from the tight packing in the protein interior. (3) Based on studies of 151 hydrogen bonding variants in 15 proteins, forming a hydrogen bond on folding contributes 1.1±0.8 kcal/mol to protein stability. (4) The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is strongly context dependent. (5) Hydrogen bonds by side chains and peptide groups make similar contributions to protein stability. (6) Polar group burial can make a favorable contribution to protein stability even if the polar group is not hydrogen bonded. (7) Hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds both make large contributions to protein stability.

  10. Magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Passeri, Daniele; Dong, Chunhua; Reggente, Melania; Angeloni, Livia; Barteri, Mario; Scaramuzzo, Francesca A; De Angelis, Francesca; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Antonelli, Flavia; Rinaldi, Federica; Marianecci, Carlotta; Carafa, Maria; Sorbo, Angela; Sordi, Daniela; Arends, Isabel WCE; Rossi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique in which an AFM tip with a magnetic coating is used to probe local magnetic fields with the typical AFM spatial resolution, thus allowing one to acquire images reflecting the local magnetic properties of the samples at the nanoscale. Being a well established tool for the characterization of magnetic recording media, superconductors and magnetic nanomaterials, MFM is finding constantly increasing application in the study of magnetic properties of materials and systems of biological and biomedical interest. After reviewing these latter applications, three case studies are presented in which MFM is used to characterize: (i) magnetoferritin synthesized using apoferritin as molecular reactor; (ii) magnetic nanoparticles loaded niosomes to be used as nanocarriers for drug delivery; (iii) leukemic cells labeled using folic acid-coated core-shell superparamagnetic nanoparticles in order to exploit the presence of folate receptors on the cell membrane surface. In these examples, MFM data are quantitatively analyzed evidencing the limits of the simple analytical models currently used. Provided that suitable models are used to simulate the MFM response, MFM can be used to evaluate the magnetic momentum of the core of magnetoferritin, the iron entrapment efficiency in single vesicles, or the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into cells. PMID:25050758

  11. Pairing forces in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1996-12-31

    In this contribution, the author mentions some features of pairing forces that are unique to nuclei and cover some areas of major interest in nuclear structure research, that involve pairing. At the level of most nuclear structure studies, nuclei are treated as consisting of two kinds of fermions (protons and neutrons) in a valence space with rather few levels. These features give rise to unique aspects of pairing forces in nuclei: (1) n-p pairing in T = 0 as well as the usual T = 1 pairing that is characteristic of like fermions; (2) a need to correct pairing calculations for the (1/N) effects that can typically be neglected in superconducting solids. An issue of current concern is the nature of the pairing interaction: several recent studies suggest a need for a density dependent form of the pairing interaction. There is a good deal of feedback between the questions of accurate calculations of pairing interactions and the form and magnitude of the pairing interaction. Finally, the authors discuss some many-body wave functions that are a generalization of the BCS wave function form, and apply them to a calculation of energy level spacings in superdeformed rotational bands.

  12. Forces Stabilizing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pace, C. Nick; Scholtz, J. Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this article is to summarize what has been learned about the major forces stabilizing proteins since the late 1980s when site-directed mutagenesis became possible. The following conclusions are derived from experimental studies of hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding variants. 1. Based on studies of 138 hydrophobic interaction variants in 11 proteins, burying a –CH2– group on folding contributes 1.1 ± 0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. 2. The burial of nonpolar side chains contributes to protein stability in two ways: first, a term that depends on the removal of the side chains from water and, more importantly, the enhanced London dispersion forces that result from the tight packing in the protein interior. 3. Based on studies of 151 hydrogen bonding variants in 15 proteins, forming a hydrogen bond on folding contributes 1.1 ± 0.8 kcal/mol to protein stability. 4. The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is strongly context dependent. 5. Hydrogen bonds by side chains and peptide groups make similar contributions to protein stability. 6. Polar group burial can make a favorable contribution to protein stability even if the polar group is not hydrogen bonded. 7. Hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds both make large contributions to protein stability. PMID:24846139

  13. Environmental Crack Driving Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, M. M.

    2013-03-01

    The effect of environment on the crack driving force is considered, first by assuming quasistatic extension of a stationary crack and second, by use of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) crack growth rate models developed previously by this author and developed further here. A quasistatic thermodynamic energy balance approach, of the Griffith-Irwin type, is used to develop stationary crack threshold expressions, tilde{J}_c , which represent the conjoint mechanical and electrochemical conditions, below which stationary cracks are stable. Expressions for the electrochemical crack driving force (CDF) were derived using an analysis that is analogous to that used by Irwin to derive his "strain energy release rate," G, which Rice showed as being equivalent to his mechanical CDF, J. The derivations show that electrochemical CDFs both for active path dissolution (APD) and hydrogen embrittlement (HE) mechanisms of SCC are simply proportional to Tafel's electrochemical anodic and cathodic overpotentials, η a and η c, respectively. Phenomenological SCC models based on the kinetics of APD and HE crack growth are used to derive expressions for the kinetic threshold, J scc, below which crack growth cannot be sustained. These models show how independent mechanical and environmental CDFs may act together to drive SCC crack advance. Development of a user-friendly computational tool for calculating Tafel's overpotentials is advocated.

  14. Force normalization in paraplegics.

    PubMed

    Serra-Añó, P; García-Massó, X; Pellicer, M; González, L-M; López-Pascual, J; Giner-Pascual, M; Toca-Herrera, J L

    2012-06-01

    The principal aim of our study was the determination of the effectiveness of a standardized ratio, allometric scaling model and a gamma function model in normalizing the isometric torque data of spinal cord patients and healthy subjects. For this purpose we studied a sample of 21 healthy males and 23 spinal cord injury males. The experiment consisted of the measurement of the force of the upper limb movement executed by all the subjects. We also determined anthropometric variables with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. The experimental data were analyzed with 3 force normalization methods. Our results indicate that the most important confounding variable was the fat free mass of the dominant upper limb (r>0.36, p<0.05). With the standardization by body mass and allometric scaling model, the normalized torque was influenced by body size variables. However, the normalized torque by the gamma function model was independent of body size measures. Paraplegics were weaker (p<0.05) in extension movements when the data were normalized by the gamma function model. In summary, this study shows that the gamma function model with fat free mass of the dominant upper limb was more effective than the standardized ratio in removing the influence of body size variables. PMID:22377940

  15. Forced emigration, favourable outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pearn, J

    2001-10-01

    The discipline of public health and preventive medicine in Australia and New Zealand had its genesis in the advocacy of 18th and 19th century military pioneers. Military (Royal Navy and British Army) surgeons were posted to Australia as part of their non-discretionary duty. Civilian doctors emigrated variously for adventure, escapism and gold fever. One group, a particularly influential group disproportionate to their numbers, came in one sense as forced emigrants because of chronic respiratory disease in general, and tuberculosis in particular. Tuberculosis was an occupational hazard of 19th century medical and surgical practice throughout western Europe. This paper analyses six examples of such emigration which had, perhaps unforeseen at the time, significant results in the advancement of public health. Such emigration was in one sense voluntary, but in another was forced upon the victims in their quest for personal survival. In Australia, such medical individuals became leading advocates and successful catalysts for change in such diverse fields as social welfare, public health, the preventive aspects of medical practice, child health, nutrition and medical education. A number of such public health pioneers today have no physical memorials; but their influence is to be seen in the ethos of medical practice in Australia and New Zealand today. Their memory is further perpetuated in the names of Australian native wildflowers and trees that symbolise not only a healthy environment but the long-term investment, accrued with interest, of the institution of public health measures for which their advocacy achieved much success.

  16. Force reflecting hand controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaffee, Douglas A. (Inventor); Snow, Edward R. (Inventor); Townsend, William T. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A universal input device for interfacing a human operator with a slave machine such as a robot or the like includes a plurality of serially connected mechanical links extending from a base. A handgrip is connected to the mechanical links distal from the base such that a human operator may grasp the handgrip and control the position thereof relative to the base through the mechanical links. A plurality of rotary joints is arranged to connect the mechanical links together to provide at least three translational degrees of freedom and at least three rotational degrees of freedom of motion of the handgrip relative to the base. A cable and pulley assembly for each joint is connected to a corresponding motor for transmitting forces from the slave machine to the handgrip to provide kinesthetic feedback to the operator and for producing control signals that may be transmitted from the handgrip to the slave machine. The device gives excellent kinesthetic feedback, high-fidelity force/torque feedback, a kinematically simple structure, mechanically decoupled motion in all six degrees of freedom, and zero backlash. The device also has a much larger work envelope, greater stiffness and responsiveness, smaller stowage volume, and better overlap of the human operator's range of motion than previous designs.

  17. Force reflecting hand controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAffee, Douglas A.; Snow, Edward R.; Townsend, William T.

    1993-03-01

    A universal input device for interfacing a human operator with a slave machine such as a robot or the like includes a plurality of serially connected mechanical links extending from a base. A handgrip is connected to the mechanical links distal from the base such that a human operator may grasp the handgrip and control the position thereof relative to the base through the mechanical links. A plurality of rotary joints is arranged to connect the mechanical links together to provide at least three translational degrees of freedom and at least three rotational degrees of freedom of motion of the handgrip relative to the base. A cable and pulley assembly for each joint is connected to a corresponding motor for transmitting forces from the slave machine to the handgrip to provide kinesthetic feedback to the operator and for producing control signals that may be transmitted from the handgrip to the slave machine. The device gives excellent kinesthetic feedback, high-fidelity force/torque feedback, a kinematically simple structure, mechanically decoupled motion in all six degrees of freedom, and zero backlash. The device also has a much larger work envelope, greater stiffness and responsiveness, smaller stowage volume, and better overlap of the human operator's range of motion than previous designs.

  18. [Acoustic and spirometric indices of forced expiration noise in the conditions of 5-day dry immersion].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlovskaia, A N; Osipova, A A; D'iachenko, A I

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic studies of forced expiration (FE) indices involved 7 normal males aged 21 to 25 participating in a 5-d experiment with dry immersion (DI). FE spirometry was conducted simultaneously with registration of tracheal noise with the help of a microphone. Indices included acoustic duration of tracheal noise (Ta), forced lung capacity (FLC), FE volume per a second (FEV1), peak expiratory rate (PER) and time to reach (T(PER)) before DI, on DI days 1 and 4, and next day after completion. PER showed a significant decrease by 8.4% on DI day-1 and rose by 8.9% on DI day-4, though remaining below pre-DI values. Throughout the experiment, FLC and FEV1 did not change on the average. There was a noticeable increase of Ta by 17 % after DI which may suggest strengthening of respiratory resistance and invites further investigation. A moderate negative correlation was stated between TA and the Gensler index (r = -0.63), whereas correlation with the other spirometric indices was weak or absent. PMID:22423491

  19. Forced vital capacity predicts long-term survival for curative-resected NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xi; Cao, Hongxin; Xu, Jun; Yu, Jianyu; Zheng, Chunlong; Meng, Long; Du, Jiajun

    2014-09-01

    We conducted a retrospective study in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who underwent curative lung resection to seek for better lung function parameters associated with long-term survival after lung resection. From January 2006 to December 2008, 470 patients who underwent lung resection with a postoperative diagnosis of NSCLC were studied. Median survival time was 60 months. Patients with pulmonary function values <80 % of predicted were defined as lung function impairment. Patients with impaired vital capacity, maximal voluntary ventilation, forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) or diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) had significant shorter overall survival time (P = 0.024; P = 0.026; P < 0.001; P = 0.027; P = 0.007). In univariate analysis, VC, FVC, FEV1 and DLCO were found to have significant effect on overall survival. In multivariate analysis, FVC (HR, 2.029; 95 % CI 1.126-3.659; P = 0.019) was found to be an independent prognostic predictor of long-term overall survival. For cancer-specific survival, FVC (HR 2.404; 95 % CI 1.300-4.445; P = 0.005) was also found to be an independent prognostic predictor in multivariable analysis. Preoperative FVC, rather than FEV1 or DLCO, is an independent prognostic predictor for long-term survival. FVC is not only an indicator of lung function but also of great value for surgeons to predict survival after lung resection.

  20. Force-Field Parameter Fitter

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-27

    ParFit is a flexible and extendable framework and library of classes for fitting force-field parameters to data from high-level ab-initio calculations on the basis of deterministic and stochastic algorithms. Currently, the code is fitting MM3 and Merck force-field parameters but could easily extend to other force-field types.

  1. Proximal arm kinematics affect grip force-load force coordination.

    PubMed

    Vermillion, Billy C; Lum, Peter S; Lee, Sang Wook

    2015-10-01

    During object manipulation, grip force is coordinated with load force, which is primarily determined by object kinematics. Proximal arm kinematics may affect grip force control, as proximal segment motion could affect control of distal hand muscles via biomechanical and/or neural pathways. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of proximal kinematics on grip force modulation during object manipulation. Fifteen subjects performed three vertical lifting tasks that involved distinct proximal kinematics (elbow/shoulder), but resulted in similar end-point (hand) trajectories. While temporal coordination of grip and load forces remained similar across the tasks, proximal kinematics significantly affected the grip force-to-load force ratio (P = 0.042), intrinsic finger muscle activation (P = 0.045), and flexor-extensor ratio (P < 0.001). Biomechanical coupling between extrinsic hand muscles and the elbow joint cannot fully explain the observed changes, as task-related changes in intrinsic hand muscle activation were greater than in extrinsic hand muscles. Rather, between-task variation in grip force (highest during task 3) appears to contrast to that in shoulder joint velocity/acceleration (lowest during task 3). These results suggest that complex neural coupling between the distal and proximal upper extremity musculature may affect grip force control during movements, also indicated by task-related changes in intermuscular coherence of muscle pairs, including intrinsic finger muscles. Furthermore, examination of the fingertip force showed that the human motor system may attempt to reduce variability in task-relevant motor output (grip force-to-load force ratio), while allowing larger fluctuations in output less relevant to task goal (shear force-to-grip force ratio). PMID:26289460

  2. Proximal arm kinematics affect grip force-load force coordination

    PubMed Central

    Vermillion, Billy C.; Lum, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    During object manipulation, grip force is coordinated with load force, which is primarily determined by object kinematics. Proximal arm kinematics may affect grip force control, as proximal segment motion could affect control of distal hand muscles via biomechanical and/or neural pathways. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of proximal kinematics on grip force modulation during object manipulation. Fifteen subjects performed three vertical lifting tasks that involved distinct proximal kinematics (elbow/shoulder), but resulted in similar end-point (hand) trajectories. While temporal coordination of grip and load forces remained similar across the tasks, proximal kinematics significantly affected the grip force-to-load force ratio (P = 0.042), intrinsic finger muscle activation (P = 0.045), and flexor-extensor ratio (P < 0.001). Biomechanical coupling between extrinsic hand muscles and the elbow joint cannot fully explain the observed changes, as task-related changes in intrinsic hand muscle activation were greater than in extrinsic hand muscles. Rather, between-task variation in grip force (highest during task 3) appears to contrast to that in shoulder joint velocity/acceleration (lowest during task 3). These results suggest that complex neural coupling between the distal and proximal upper extremity musculature may affect grip force control during movements, also indicated by task-related changes in intermuscular coherence of muscle pairs, including intrinsic finger muscles. Furthermore, examination of the fingertip force showed that the human motor system may attempt to reduce variability in task-relevant motor output (grip force-to-load force ratio), while allowing larger fluctuations in output less relevant to task goal (shear force-to-grip force ratio). PMID:26289460

  3. The evaluation of pulmonary function and blood gas analysis in patients submitted to laparoscopic versus open nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Koc, Ayfer; Inan, Gozde; Bozkirli, Fusun; Coskun, Demet; Tunc, Lutfi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The aim of this study was to assess the early postoperative pulmonary function and arterial blood gases in patients who have undergone open versus laparoscopic nephrectomy. Materials and Methods: Forty patients were randomly assigned to undergo laparoscopic (LN, n=20) or open nephrectomy (ON, n=20). Pulmonary function tests including forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume at 25% (FEF25), forced expiratory volume at 50% (FEF50), forced expiratory volume at 25% to 75% (FEF25–75), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FIV1) and peak expiratory flow (PEF) were performed one day before the operation and on the postoperative day 1. The arterial blood gas analysis (pH, pCO2, pO2, SaO2) was made at breathing room preoperatively, in the recovery phase and on postoperative day 1. Results: All spirometric variables decreased after both open and laparoscopic nephrectomy on postoperative day 1. FEV1, FVC, FEF25 and FEF25–75 values decreased on postoperative day 1 (39.7%, 37.4%, 27.7%, 51.8% respectively) in the open surgery group and they were significantly lower in laparoscopic group (29.9%, 32.5%, 23.2%, 44.5% respectively). There were no significant differences in FEF50, PEF and FIV1 between the groups. The SaO2 and pO2 values also decreased in both groups. During early recovery, pH decreased while pCO2 increased significantly but they returned to preoperative values on postoperative day 1 in both groups. Conclusion: Laparoscopic nephrectomy is better than open nephrectomy considering pulmonary functions. PMID:26742981

  4. Parallel computation with the force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, H. F.

    1985-01-01

    A methodology, called the force, supports the construction of programs to be executed in parallel by a force of processes. The number of processes in the force is unspecified, but potentially very large. The force idea is embodied in a set of macros which produce multiproceossor FORTRAN code and has been studied on two shared memory multiprocessors of fairly different character. The method has simplified the writing of highly parallel programs within a limited class of parallel algorithms and is being extended to cover a broader class. The individual parallel constructs which comprise the force methodology are discussed. Of central concern are their semantics, implementation on different architectures and performance implications.

  5. Updates on Force Limiting Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Scharton, Terry

    2013-01-01

    The following conventional force limiting methods currently practiced in deriving force limiting specifications assume one-dimensional translation source and load apparent masses: Simple TDOF model; Semi-empirical force limits; Apparent mass, etc.; Impedance method. Uncorrelated motion of the mounting points for components mounted on panels and correlated, but out-of-phase, motions of the support structures are important and should be considered in deriving force limiting specifications. In this presentation "rock-n-roll" motions of the components supported by panels, which leads to a more realistic force limiting specifications are discussed.

  6. Forced to be right.

    PubMed

    Trout, J D

    2014-05-01

    In "Forced to be Free", Neil Levy surveys the raft of documented decision-making biases that humans are heir to, and advances several bold proposals designed to enhance the patient's judgment. Gratefully, Levy is moved by the psychological research on judgment and decision-making that documents people's inaccuracy when identifying courses of action will best promote their subjective well-being. But Levy is quick to favour the patient's present preferences, to ensure they get "final say" about their treatment. I urge the opposite inclination, raising doubts about whether the patient's "present preferences" are the best expression of their "final say". When there is adequate evidence that people, by their own lights, overemphasize their present preferences about the future, we should carefully depreciate those preferences, in effect biasing them to make the right decision by their own lights.

  7. [Galileo and centrifugal force].

    PubMed

    Vilain, Christiane

    This work intends to focus on Galileo's study of what is now called "centrifugal force," within the framework of the Second Day of his Dialogo written in 1632, rather than on the previously published commentaries on the topic. Galileo proposes three geometrical demonstrations in order to prove that gravity will always overcome centrifugalforce, and that the potential rotation of the Earth, whatever its speed, cannot in any case project objects beyond it. Each of these demonstrations must consequently contain an error and it has seemed to us that the first one had not been understood up until now. Our analysis offers an opportunity to return to Galileo's geometrical representation of dynamical questions; actually, we get an insight into the sophistication of Galileo's practices more than into his mistakes. Our second point, concerning the historiography of the problem, shows an evolution from anachronic critics to more contextual considerations, in the course of the second half of the twentieth century. PMID:25029818

  8. Silicon force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Galambos, Paul C.; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Nishida, Erik E.; Burnett, Damon J.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.

    2016-07-05

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a sensor for measurement of high forces and/or high load shock rate(s), whereby the sensor utilizes silicon as the sensing element. A plate of Si can have a thinned region formed therein on which can be formed a number of traces operating as a Wheatstone bridge. The brittle Si can be incorporated into a layered structure comprising ductile and/or compliant materials. The sensor can have a washer-like configuration which can be incorporated into a nut and bolt configuration, whereby tightening of the nut and bolt can facilitate application of a compressive preload upon the sensor. Upon application of an impact load on the bolt, the compressive load on the sensor can be reduced (e.g., moves towards zero-load), however the magnitude of the preload can be such that the load on the sensor does not translate to tensile stress being applied to the sensor.

  9. [Galileo and centrifugal force].

    PubMed

    Vilain, Christiane

    This work intends to focus on Galileo's study of what is now called "centrifugal force," within the framework of the Second Day of his Dialogo written in 1632, rather than on the previously published commentaries on the topic. Galileo proposes three geometrical demonstrations in order to prove that gravity will always overcome centrifugalforce, and that the potential rotation of the Earth, whatever its speed, cannot in any case project objects beyond it. Each of these demonstrations must consequently contain an error and it has seemed to us that the first one had not been understood up until now. Our analysis offers an opportunity to return to Galileo's geometrical representation of dynamical questions; actually, we get an insight into the sophistication of Galileo's practices more than into his mistakes. Our second point, concerning the historiography of the problem, shows an evolution from anachronic critics to more contextual considerations, in the course of the second half of the twentieth century.

  10. Force Limit System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawlik, Ralph; Krause, David; Bremenour, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The Force Limit System (FLS) was developed to protect test specimens from inadvertent overload. The load limit value is fully adjustable by the operator and works independently of the test system control as a mechanical (non-electrical) device. When a test specimen is loaded via an electromechanical or hydraulic test system, a chance of an overload condition exists. An overload applied to a specimen could result in irreparable damage to the specimen and/or fixturing. The FLS restricts the maximum load that an actuator can apply to a test specimen. When testing limited-run test articles or using very expensive fixtures, the use of such a device is highly recommended. Test setups typically use electronic peak protection, which can be the source of overload due to malfunctioning components or the inability to react quickly enough to load spikes. The FLS works independently of the electronic overload protection.

  11. Forced Migration: Refugee Populations

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Joyceen S.

    2015-01-01

    Undocumented migration is a global phenomenon that manifests in various contexts. This article describes the impact of the movement of large numbers of people in several African countries, producing a unique type of migrant—the refugee. We describe issues that refugee movements create on fragile health care systems, situations that precipitate refugee movements, certain human rights violations that are of particular concern such as gender based violence (GBV) and child soldiers, and lastly, implications for nursing practice and policy. We use examples from several countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, including the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Mozambique. Drawing on key documents from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, current literature, as well as the international experience of the authors, this article presents an overview of forced migration and discusses opportunities for nurses to impact research, practice and policy related to refugee health. PMID:25645484

  12. Force protection: today's reality.

    PubMed

    Torgerson, Ron

    2004-11-11

    Most US infrastructure and major chemical manufacturing facilities as well as their supporting utility systems are inherently vulnerable to a terrorist attack. Force protection is a military and civilian term used to protect personnel and critical facilities and assets against would-be aggressors or terrorists. The war on terrorism is a 200-300-year war. Terrorist attacks on US soil could become as common-place as in the State of Israel. It is very easy to penetrate infrastructure or plants as evidenced by vulnerability assessments performed for states, cities, plants, and military facilities by Versar and others around the country. Chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive weapons can be readily used to attack facilities in the US. This paper will explain some of those vulnerabilities, outline the current DoD standard as it relates to vulnerability assessments, and explain how this may be used in commercial applications to deter potential aggressors.

  13. Comparison between static maximal force and handbrake pulling force.

    PubMed

    Chateauroux, E; Wang, X

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of maximum pulling force is important not only for specifying force limit of industrial workers but also for designing controls requiring high force. This paper presents a comparison between maximal static handbrake pulling force (FST) and force exerted during normal handbrake pulling task (FDY). These forces were measured for different handle locations and subject characteristics. Participants were asked to pull a handbrake on an adjustable car mock-up as they would do when parking their own car, then to exert a force as high as possible on the pulled handbrake. Hand pulling forces were measured using a six-axes force sensor. 5 fixed handbrake positions were tested as well as a neutral handbrake position defined by the subject. FST and FDY were significantly correlated. Both were found to be dependent on handbrake position, age and gender. As expected, women and older subjects exerted lower forces. FST was significantly higher than FDY. The ratio FmR (FDY divided by FST) was also analyzed. Women showed higher FmR than men meaning that the task required a higher amount of muscle capability for women. FmR was also influenced by handbrake location. These data will be useful for handbrake design.

  14. Normal Force and Drag Force in Magnetorheological Finishing

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, C.; Shafrir, S.N.; Lambropoulos, J.C.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2010-01-13

    The material removal in magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is known to be controlled by shear stress, tau, which equals drag force, Fd, divided by spot area, As. However, it is unclear how the normal force, Fn, affects the material removal in MRF and how the measured ratio of drag force to normal force Fd/Fn, equivalent to coefficient of friction, is related to material removal. This work studies, for the first time for MRF, the normal force and the measured ratio Fd/Fn as a function of material mechanical properties. Experimental data were obtained by taking spots on a variety of materials including optical glasses and hard ceramics with a spot-taking machine (STM). Drag force and normal force were measured with a dual load cell. Drag force decreases linearly with increasing material hardness. In contrast, normal force increases with hardness for glasses, saturating at high hardness values for ceramics. Volumetric removal rate decreases with normal force across all materials. The measured ratio Fd/Fn shows a strong negative linear correlation with material hardness. Hard materials exhibit a low “coefficient of friction”. The volumetric removal rate increases with the measured ratio Fd/Fn which is also correlated with shear stress, indicating that the measured ratio Fd/Fn is a useful measure of material removal in MRF.

  15. Flow mechanotransduction regulates traction forces, intercellular forces, and adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Lucas H.; Jahn, Jessica R.; Jung, Joon I.; Shuman, Benjamin R.; Feghhi, Shirin; Han, Sangyoon J.; Rodriguez, Marita L.

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to fluid shear stress through mechanotransduction responses that affect their cytoskeleton and cell-cell contacts. Here, endothelial cells were grown as monolayers on arrays of microposts and exposed to laminar or disturbed flow to examine the relationship among traction forces, intercellular forces, and cell-cell junctions. Cells under laminar flow had traction forces that were higher than those under static conditions, whereas cells under disturbed flow had lower traction forces. The response in adhesion junction assembly matched closely with changes in traction forces since adherens junctions were larger in size for laminar flow and smaller for disturbed flow. Treating the cells with calyculin-A to increase myosin phosphorylation and traction forces caused an increase in adherens junction size, whereas Y-27362 cause a decrease in their size. Since tugging forces across cell-cell junctions can promote junctional assembly, we developed a novel approach to measure intercellular forces and found that these forces were higher for laminar flow than for static or disturbed flow. The size of adherens junctions and tight junctions matched closely with intercellular forces for these flow conditions. These results indicate that laminar flow can increase cytoskeletal tension while disturbed flow decreases cytoskeletal tension. Consequently, we found that changes in cytoskeletal tension in response to shear flow conditions can affect intercellular tension, which in turn regulates the assembly of cell-cell junctions. PMID:22447948

  16. Microphotonic Forces from Superfluid Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAuslan, D. L.; Harris, G. I.; Baker, C.; Sachkou, Y.; He, X.; Sheridan, E.; Bowen, W. P.

    2016-04-01

    In cavity optomechanics, radiation pressure and photothermal forces are widely utilized to cool and control micromechanical motion, with applications ranging from precision sensing and quantum information to fundamental science. Here, we realize an alternative approach to optical forcing based on superfluid flow and evaporation in response to optical heating. We demonstrate optical forcing of the motion of a cryogenic microtoroidal resonator at a level of 1.46 nN, roughly 1 order of magnitude larger than the radiation pressure force. We use this force to feedback cool the motion of a microtoroid mechanical mode to 137 mK. The photoconvective forces we demonstrate here provide a new tool for high bandwidth control of mechanical motion in cryogenic conditions, while the ability to apply forces remotely, combined with the persistence of flow in superfluids, offers the prospect for new applications.

  17. Force feedback in limb lengthening.

    PubMed

    Wee, Jinyong; Rahman, Tariq; Seliktar, Rahamim; Akins, Robert; Levine, David; Richardson, Dean; Dodge, George R; Thabet, Ahmed M; Holmes, Lauren; Mackenzie, William G

    2010-01-01

    A new variable-rate distraction system using a motorized distractor driven by feedback from the distraction force was designed. The distractor was mounted on a unilateral fixator and attached to the tibiae of 6 sheep that underwent distraction osteogenesis. The sheep were divided equally into 3 groups. In group 1, the forces were recorded but were not used to drive the lengthening rate. In group 2, force feedback was used and the desired distraction force level was set to 300 N and the initial rate was 1 mm/day. Group 3 also underwent force feedback with the desired force limit at 300 N, but the rate change was initiated earlier, at 200 N. The distraction force was recorded at 15 second intervals throughout the distraction phase and stored onboard the distractor.

  18. Force oscillations simulating breathing maneuvers do not prevent force adaptation.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Chris; Jiao, Yuekan; Seow, Chun Y; Paré, Peter D; Bossé, Ynuk

    2012-07-01

    Airway inflammation in patients with asthma exposes the airway smooth muscle (ASM) to a variety of spasmogens. These spasmogens increase ASM tone, which can lead to force adaptation. Length oscillations of ASM, which occur in vivo due to breathing maneuvers, can attenuate force adaptation. However, in the presence of tone, the force oscillations required to achieve these length oscillations may be unphysiologic (i.e., magnitude greater than the ones achieved due to the swings in transpulmonary pressure required for breathing). In the present study, we applied force oscillations simulating the tension oscillations experienced by the wall of a fourth-generation airway during tidal breathing with or without deep inspirations (DI) to ASM. The goal was to investigate whether force adaptation occurs in conditions mimicking breathing maneuvers. Tone was induced by carbachol (average, 20 nM), and the force-generating capacity of the ASM was assessed at 5-minute intervals before and after carbachol administration using electrical field stimulations (EFS). The results show that force oscillations applied before the introduction of tone had a small effect on the force produced by EFS (declined to 96.8% [P > 0.05] and 92.3% [P < 0.05] with and without DI, respectively). The tone induced by carbachol transiently decreased after a DI and declined significantly (P < 0.05) due to tidal breathing oscillations (25%). These force oscillations did not prevent force adaptation (gain of force of 11.2 ± 2.2 versus 13.5 ± 2.7 and 11.2 ± 3.0% in static versus dynamic conditions with or without DI, respectively). The lack of effect of simulated breathing maneuvers on force adaptation suggests that this gain in ASM force may occur in vivo and could contribute to the development of airway hyperresponsiveness. PMID:22323367

  19. Chin force in violin playing.

    PubMed

    Obata, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    Force generated between the left mandible of violinists and the chinrest of the violin was examined using a force-sensing chinrest developed in this study. A strain-gauge force sensor was built, and it was fixed between the violin's top plate and a chin cup. Fifteen professional/amateur violinists held the violin statically, played musical scales with different sound properties and sounding techniques, as well as an excerpt from a Max Bruch concerto. Peak and mean forces were evaluated for each task. In a separate experiment, lateral movement of the lower teeth due to different levels of voluntary chin force exertion was measured. Static holding forces observed were 15 and 22 N with and without the help of the left hand, respectively. Peak force increased from 16 N at soft dynamics to 20 N at strong dynamics during scales. The force further increased to 29 N with the use of vibrato technique and 35 N during shifts. Tempo and hand position did not affect the force. Playing a Bruch concerto induced a mean peak force of 52 N, ranging from 31 to 82 N among the violinists. The developed force-sensing chinrest could accurately record the generated chin force. Typical chin force to stabilize the violin during ordinary musical performance was less than 30 N, but it could momentarily exceed 50 N when technically demanding musical pieces were performed. The lateral shift of the mandible was fairly small (<0.4 mm) even with high chin-force exertion, possibly due to clenching of the molars.

  20. Chin force in violin playing.

    PubMed

    Obata, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    Force generated between the left mandible of violinists and the chinrest of the violin was examined using a force-sensing chinrest developed in this study. A strain-gauge force sensor was built, and it was fixed between the violin's top plate and a chin cup. Fifteen professional/amateur violinists held the violin statically, played musical scales with different sound properties and sounding techniques, as well as an excerpt from a Max Bruch concerto. Peak and mean forces were evaluated for each task. In a separate experiment, lateral movement of the lower teeth due to different levels of voluntary chin force exertion was measured. Static holding forces observed were 15 and 22 N with and without the help of the left hand, respectively. Peak force increased from 16 N at soft dynamics to 20 N at strong dynamics during scales. The force further increased to 29 N with the use of vibrato technique and 35 N during shifts. Tempo and hand position did not affect the force. Playing a Bruch concerto induced a mean peak force of 52 N, ranging from 31 to 82 N among the violinists. The developed force-sensing chinrest could accurately record the generated chin force. Typical chin force to stabilize the violin during ordinary musical performance was less than 30 N, but it could momentarily exceed 50 N when technically demanding musical pieces were performed. The lateral shift of the mandible was fairly small (<0.4 mm) even with high chin-force exertion, possibly due to clenching of the molars. PMID:21952980

  1. Respiratory mechanics measured by forced oscillation technique in rheumatoid arthritis-related pulmonary abnormalities: frequency-dependence, heterogeneity and effects of smoking.

    PubMed

    Sokai, Risa; Ito, Satoru; Iwano, Shingo; Uchida, Akemi; Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kojima, Toshihisa; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-related pulmonary disorders specifically airway abnormalities and interstitial pneumonia (IP) are important extra-articular manifestations. The forced oscillation technique (FOT) is a useful method to assess respiratory impedance, respiratory resistance (Rrs) and reactance (Xrs), at different oscillatory frequencies during tidal breathing. The aim of this study was to characterize the respiratory mechanics of patients with RA and to relate them to parameters of the pulmonary function test and findings of chest CT images. Respiratory impedance of RA patients (n = 69) was measured as a function of frequency from 4 to 36 Hz using the FOT device and compared with that of healthy subjects (n = 10). Data were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were female-dominant (60.9 %) and 95.7 % had abnormal CT findings including airway and parenchymal abnormalities. Thirty-seven of 69 patients (53.6 %) were smokers. Rrs was significantly frequency-dependent in RA patients but not in the healthy subjects. Xrs were significantly frequency-dependent in both RA and healthy groups. Rrs was significantly higher during an expiratory phase in both RA and healthy groups. Xrs was significantly lower (more negative) during an expiratory phase than that during an inspiratory phase in RA patients but not in healthy subjects. Xrs of the RA group was significantly more negative than that of the normal control. There was no difference in impedance parameters between the airway lesion dominant (n = 27) and IP dominant groups (n = 23) in the RA group. The impedance parameters of the RA group significantly correlated with most parameters of the pulmonary function test. In pulmonary function test results, % of the predicted value for forced expiratory flow from 25 to 75 % of forced vital capacity was significantly lower and % of the predicted value for diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide was higher in the airway lesion dominant group than those in

  2. Mapping interaction forces with the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed Central

    Radmacher, M; Cleveland, J P; Fritz, M; Hansma, H G; Hansma, P K

    1994-01-01

    Force curves were recorded as the sample was raster-scanned under the tip. This opens new opportunities for imaging with the atomic force microscope: several characteristics of the samples can be measured simultaneously, for example, topography, adhesion forces, elasticity, van der Waals, and electrostatic interactions. The new opportunities are illustrated by images of several characteristics of thin metal films, aggregates of lysozyme, and single molecules of DNA. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:8075349

  3. An Integrated Higgs Force Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colella, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    An Integrated Higgs force theory (IHFT) was based on 2 key requirement amplifications: a matter particle/Higgs force was one and inseparable; a matter particle/Higgs force bidirectionally condensed/evaporated from/to super force. These were basis of 5 theories: particle creation, baryogenesis, superpartner/quark decays, spontaneous symmetry breaking, and stellar black holes. Our universe's 129 matter/force particles contained 64 supersymmetric Higgs particles; 9 transient matter particles/Higgs forces decayed to 8 permanent matter particles/Higgs forces; mass was given to a matter particle by its Higgs force and gravitons; and sum of 8 Higgs force energies of 8 permanent matter particles was dark energy. An IHFT's essence is the intimate physical relationships between 8 theories. These theories are independent because physicists in one theory worked independently of physicists in the other seven. An IHFT's premise is without sacrificing their integrities, 8 independent existing theories are replaced by 8 interrelated amplified theories. Requirement amplifications provide interfaces between the 8 theories. Intimate relationships between 8 theories including the above 5 and string, Higgs forces, and Super Universe are described. The sorting category selected was F. PARTICLES AND FIELDS (e.g., F1 Higgs Physics, F10 Alternative Beyond the Standard Model Physics, F11 Dark Sector Theories and Searches, and F12 Particle Cosmology).

  4. Theory of Casimir Forces without the Proximity-Force Approximation.

    PubMed

    Lapas, Luciano C; Pérez-Madrid, Agustín; Rubí, J Miguel

    2016-03-18

    We analyze both the attractive and repulsive Casimir-Lifshitz forces recently reported in experimental investigations. By using a kinetic approach, we obtain the Casimir forces from the power absorbed by the materials. We consider collective material excitations through a set of relaxation times distributed in frequency according to a log-normal function. A generalized expression for these forces for arbitrary values of temperature is obtained. We compare our results with experimental measurements and conclude that the model goes beyond the proximity-force approximation. PMID:27035293

  5. Automated force controller for amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Atsushi; Scheuring, Simon

    2016-05-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is widely used in physics, chemistry, and biology to analyze the topography of a sample at nanometer resolution. Controlling precisely the force applied by the AFM tip to the sample is a prerequisite for faithful and reproducible imaging. In amplitude modulation (oscillating) mode AFM, the applied force depends on the free and the setpoint amplitudes of the cantilever oscillation. Therefore, for keeping the applied force constant, not only the setpoint amplitude but also the free amplitude must be kept constant. While the AFM user defines the setpoint amplitude, the free amplitude is typically subject to uncontrollable drift, and hence, unfortunately, the real applied force is permanently drifting during an experiment. This is particularly harmful in biological sciences where increased force destroys the soft biological matter. Here, we have developed a strategy and an electronic circuit that analyzes permanently the free amplitude of oscillation and readjusts the excitation to maintain the free amplitude constant. As a consequence, the real applied force is permanently and automatically controlled with picoNewton precision. With this circuit associated to a high-speed AFM, we illustrate the power of the development through imaging over long-duration and at various forces. The development is applicable for all AFMs and will widen the applicability of AFM to a larger range of samples and to a larger range of (non-specialist) users. Furthermore, from controlled force imaging experiments, the interaction strength between biomolecules can be analyzed. PMID:27250433

  6. Performance of different force fields in force probe simulations.

    PubMed

    Schlesier, Thomas; Diezemann, Gregor

    2013-02-14

    We present detailed force probe molecular dynamic simulations of mechanically interlocked dimeric calix[4]arene-catenanes, comparing the results obtained using three different commonly used force fields (GROMOS G53a5, OPLS-AA, and AMBER GAFF). The model system is well characterized as a two-state system consisting of a closed compact and an elongated structure. Both states are stabilized by a different hydrogen-bond network, and complete separation of the dimer is prevented by the mechanical lock of the entangled aliphatic loops. The system shows fully reversible rebinding meaning that after bond rupture the system rejoins when the external force is relaxed. We present a detailed study of quantities determined in simulations using a force ramp, like the rupture force and rejoin force distributions. Additionally, we analyze the dynamics of the hydrogen-bond network. We find that the results obtained from using the different force fields qualitatively agree in the sense that always the fully reversible behavior is found. The details, like the mean rupture forces, however, do depend on the particular force field. Some of the differences observed can be traced back to differences in the strength of the hydrogen-bond networks.

  7. Elementary Implantable Force Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Wachs, Rebecca A.; Ellstein, David; Drazan, John; Healey, Colleen P.; Uhl, Richard L.; Connor, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    Implementing implantable sensors which are robust enough to maintain long term functionality inside the body remains a significant challenge. The ideal implantable sensing system is one which is simple and robust; free from batteries, telemetry, and complex electronics. We have developed an elementary implantable sensor for orthopaedic smart implants. The sensor requires no telemetry and no batteries to communicate wirelessly. It has no on-board signal conditioning electronics. The sensor itself has no electrical connections and thus does not require a hermetic package. The sensor is an elementary L-C resonator which can function as a simple force transducer by using a solid dielectric material of known stiffness between two parallel Archimedean coils. The operating characteristics of the sensors are predicted using a simplified, lumped circuit model. We have demonstrated sensor functionality both in air and in saline. Our preliminary data indicate that the sensor can be reasonably well modeled as a lumped circuit to predict its response to loading. PMID:24883335

  8. Tunneling magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Edward R.; Gomez, Romel D.; Adly, Amr A.; Mayergoyz, Isaak D.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a powerful new tool for studying the magnetic patterns on magnetic recording media. This was accomplished by modifying a conventional scanning tunneling microscope. The fine-wire probe that is used to image surface topography was replaced with a flexible magnetic probe. Images obtained with these probes reveal both the surface topography and the magnetic structure. We have made a thorough theoretical analysis of the interaction between the probe and the magnetic fields emanating from a typical recorded surface. Quantitative data about the constituent magnetic fields can then be obtained. We have employed these techniques in studies of two of the most important issues of magnetic record: data overwrite and maximizing data-density. These studies have shown: (1) overwritten data can be retrieved under certain conditions; and (2) improvements in data-density will require new magnetic materials. In the course of these studies we have developed new techniques to analyze magnetic fields of recorded media. These studies are both theoretical and experimental and combined with the use of our magnetic force scanning tunneling microscope should lead to further breakthroughs in the field of magnetic recording.

  9. Maximum bow force revisited.

    PubMed

    Mores, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Schelleng [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 53, 26-41 (1973)], Askenfelt [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 86, 503-516 (1989)], Schumacher [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 96, 1985-1998 (1994)], and Schoonderwaldt, Guettler, and Askenfelt [Acta Acust. Acust. 94, 604-622 (2008)] formulated-in different ways-how the maximum bow force relates to bow velocity, bow-bridge distance, string impedance, and friction coefficients. Issues of uncertainty are how to account for friction or for the rotational admittance of the strings. Related measurements at the respective transitions between regimes of Helmholtz motion and non-Helmholtz motion employ a variety of bowing machines and stringed instruments. The related findings include all necessary parameters except the friction coefficients, leaving the underlying models unconfirmed. Here, a bowing pendulum has been constructed which allows precise measurement of relevant bowing parameters, including the friction coefficients. Two cellos are measured across all strings for three different bow-bridge distances. The empirical data suggest that-taking the diverse elements of existing models as options-Schelleng's model combined with Schumacher's velocity term yields the best fit. Furthermore, the pendulum employs a bow driving mechanism with adaptive impedance which discloses that mentioned regimes are stable and transitions between them sometimes require a hysteresis on related parameters. PMID:27586745

  10. Forced air heater

    SciTech Connect

    Livezey, D.J.

    1980-09-23

    An air heating chamber is supported to project into a stove through an opening provided in the rear wall of the stove by a mounting plate mounted to the exterior of the stove rear wall. The mounting plate which forms the exterior end wall of the heating chamber, includes laterally spaced heating chamber inlet and outlet openings. A blower is detachably mounted to the exterior of the mounting plate in registration with the heating chamber inlet opening to deliver cool forced air into the heating chamber. After circulating therethrough, the air exits the heating chamber through the outlet opening and flows into a hot air manifold, which is also detachably mounted to the exterior of the mounting plate. The manifold includes an upwardly extending inlet chamber with a hot air inlet at its lower end aligned with the heating chamber outlet opening. A horizontal outlet chamber is attached to the top end of the inlet chamber to extend laterally along the back of the stove. Hot air outlets are provided at each end of the manifold outlet chamber to discharge the heated air horizontally over the top and towards the front of the stove.

  11. Deep atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, H.; Drake, B.; Randall, C.; Hansma, P. K.

    2013-12-15

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) possesses several desirable imaging features including the ability to produce height profiles as well as two-dimensional images, in fluid or air, at high resolution. AFM has been used to study a vast selection of samples on the scale of angstroms to micrometers. However, current AFMs cannot access samples with vertical topography of the order of 100 μm or greater. Research efforts have produced AFM scanners capable of vertical motion greater than 100 μm, but commercially available probe tip lengths are still typically less than 10 μm high. Even the longest probe tips are below 100 μm and even at this range are problematic. In this paper, we present a method to hand-fabricate “Deep AFM” probes with tips of the order of 100 μm and longer so that AFM can be used to image samples with large scale vertical topography, such as fractured bone samples.

  12. Force Limited Vibration Testing Monograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry D.

    1997-01-01

    The practice of limiting the shaker force in vibration tests was investigated at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in 1990 after the mechanical failure of an aerospace component during a vibration test. Now force limiting is used in almost every major vibration test at JPL and in many vibration tests at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and at many aerospace contractors. The basic ideas behind force limiting have been in the literature for several decades, but the piezo-electric force transducers necessary to conveniently implement force limiting have been available only in the last decade. In 1993, funding was obtained from the NASA headquarters Office of Chief Engineer to develop and document the technology needed to establish force limited vibration testing as a standard approach available to all NASA centers and aerospace contractors. This monograph is the final report on that effort and discusses the history, theory, and applications of the method in some detail.

  13. The Relationship Between Propulsive Force in Tethered Swimming and 200-m Front Crawl Performance.

    PubMed

    Santos, Karini B; Bento, Paulo C B; Pereira, Gleber; Rodacki, André L F

    2016-09-01

    Santos, KB, Bento, PCB, Pereira, G, and Rodacki, ALF. The relationship between propulsive force in tethered swimming and 200-m front crawl performance. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2500-2507, 2016-The aims of this study were to determine whether propulsive force (peak force, mean force, impulse, and rate of force development) and stroke rate change during 2 minutes of front crawl tethered swimming and to correlate them with the stroke rate and swimming velocity in 200-m front crawl swimming. Twenty-one swimmers (21.6 ± 4.8 years, 1.78 ± 0.06 m, 71.7 ± 8.1 kg), with 200-m front crawl swimming performance equivalent to 78% of the world record (140.4 ± 10.1 seconds), were assessed during 2 minutes of maximal front crawl tethered swimming (propulsive forces and stroke rate) and 200-m front crawl swimming (stroke rate and clean velocity). Propulsive forces decreased between the beginning and the middle instants (∼20%; p ≤ 0.05) but remained stable between the middle and the end instants (∼6%; p > 0.05). The peak force was positively correlated with the clean velocity in the 200-m front crawl swimming (mean r = 0.61; p < 0.02). The stroke rates of the tethered swimming and 200-m front crawl swimming were positively correlated (r = 45; p≤ 0.01) at the middle instant. Therefore, the propulsive force and stroke rate changed throughout the 2 minutes of tethered swimming, and the peak force is the best propulsive force variable tested that correlated with 200-m front crawl swimming performance.

  14. Prediction of peak forces for a shortening smooth muscle tissue subjected to vibration.

    PubMed

    Pidaparti, Ramana M; Dhanaraj, Nandhini; Meiss, Richard A

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to investigate the peak forces for a tracheal smooth muscle tissue subjected to an applied longitudinal vibration following isotonic shortening. A non-linear finite element analysis was carried out to simulate the vibratory response under experimental conditions that corresponds to forced length oscillations at 33 Hz for 1 second. The stiffness change and hysteresis estimated from the experimental data was used in the analysis. The finite element results of peak forces are compared to the experimental data obtained. The comparison of results indicate that the approach and the vibratory response obtained may be useful for describing the cross-bridge de-attachments within the cells as well as connective tissue connections characteristic of tracheal smooth muscle tissue.

  15. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V. C.; Wang, Chengpu

    2006-08-22

    An atomic force microscope is described having a cantilever comprising a base and a probe tip on an end opposite the base; a cantilever drive device connected to the base; a magnetic material coupled to the probe tip, such that when an incrementally increasing magnetic field is applied to the magnetic material an incrementally increasing force will be applied to the probe tip; a moveable specimen base; and a controller constructed to obtain a profile height of a specimen at a point based upon a contact between the probe tip and a specimen, and measure an adhesion force between the probe tip and the specimen by, under control of a program, incrementally increasing an amount of a magnetic field until a release force, sufficient to break the contact, is applied. An imaging method for atomic force microscopy involving measuring a specimen profile height and adhesion force at multiple points within an area and concurrently displaying the profile and adhesion force for each of the points is also described. A microscope controller is also described and is constructed to, for a group of points, calculate a specimen height at a point based upon a cantilever deflection, a cantilever base position and a specimen piezo position; calculate an adhesion force between a probe tip and a specimen at the point by causing an incrementally increasing force to be applied to the probe tip until the probe tip separates from a specimen; and move the probe tip to a new point in the group.

  16. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V.; Wang, Chengpu

    2004-11-16

    An atomic force microscope is described having a cantilever comprising a base and a probe tip on an end opposite the base; a cantilever drive device connected to the base; a magnetic material coupled to the probe tip, such that when an incrementally increasing magnetic field is applied to the magnetic material an incrementally increasing force will be applied to the probe tip; a moveable specimen base; and a controller constructed to obtain a profile height of a specimen at a point based upon a contact between the probe tip and a specimen, and measure an adhesion force between the probe tip and the specimen by, under control of a program, incrementally increasing an amount of a magnetic field until a release force, sufficient to break the contact, is applied. An imaging method for atomic force microscopy involving measuring a specimen profile height and adhesion force at multiple points within an area and concurrently displaying the profile and adhesion force for each of the points is also described. A microscope controller is also described and is constructed to, for a group of points, calculate a specimen height at a point based upon a cantilever deflection, a cantilever base position and a specimen piezo position; calculate an adhesion force between a probe tip and a specimen at the point by causing an incrementally increasing force to be applied to the probe tip until the probe tip separates from a specimen; and move the probe tip to a new point in the group.

  17. Coriolis Force on Your Arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, Robert

    2003-12-01

    The Coriolis force is a sideward force that acts on a rotating object as it moves toward or away from the center of rotation. It is important to long-range artillery and the formation of tornados, but we seldom experience this force on a human scale, unless we play on a merry-go-round or similar apparatus. This note describes a simple activity that lets us see the effect of the Coriolis force on our outstretched arms as they fall down to our sides while we rotate.

  18. Force As A Momentum Current

    SciTech Connect

    Munera, Hector A.

    2010-07-28

    Advantages of a neo-Cartesian approach to classical mechanics are noted. If conservation of linear momentum is the fundamental principle, Newton's three laws become theorems. A minor paradox in static Newtonian mechanics is identified, and solved by reinterpreting force as a current of momentum. Contact force plays the role of a mere midwife in the exchange of momentum; however, force cannot be eliminated from physics because it provides the numerical value for momentum current. In this sense, in a neo-Cartesian formulation of mechanics the concept of force becomes strengthened rather than weakened.

  19. Force As A Momentum Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Múnera, Héctor A.

    2010-07-01

    Advantages of a neo-Cartesian approach to classical mechanics are noted. If conservation of linear momentum is the fundamental principle, Newton's three laws become theorems. A minor paradox in static Newtonian mechanics is identified, and solved by reinterpreting force as a current of momentum. Contact force plays the role of a mere midwife in the exchange of momentum; however, force cannot be eliminated from physics because it provides the numerical value for momentum current. In this sense, in a neo-Cartesian formulation of mechanics the concept of force becomes strengthened rather than weakened.

  20. Adding Value to Force Diagrams: Representing Relative Force Magnitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendel, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all physics instructors recognize the instructional value of force diagrams, and this journal has published several collections of exercises to improve student skill in this area. Yet some instructors worry that too few students perceive the conceptual and problem-solving utility of force diagrams, and over recent years a rich variety of…

  1. Magnetic force and optical force sensing with ultrathin silicon resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Takahito; Esashi, Masayoshi

    2003-12-01

    In this article, we demonstrated magnetic and optical force measurements using an ultrathin silicon cantilever down to 20 nm or 50 nm in thickness. The cantilever was heated in an ultrahigh vacuum for enhancing the Q factor and a magnetic particle was mounted at the end of the cantilever using a manipulator. The vibration was measured by a laser Doppler vibrometer and its signal was fed to an opposed metal electrode for electrostatic self-oscillation. An application of a magnetic field with a coil exerted a force to the magnetic material, which results in the change of the resonant frequency. However, the change in the mechanical properties of the cantilever, due to mechanical instability and temperature variation, drifts the resonance peak. Force balancing between the magnetic force and an electrostatic force in the opposite phase can minimize the vibration amplitude. From the electrostatic force at the minimum point, the exerted force can be estimated. A magnetic moment of 4×10-20 J/T was measured by this method. The same technique was also applied to measure the optical force of ˜10-17 N, impinging on the cantilever by a laser diode.

  2. Bacterial adhesion force quantification by fluidic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potthoff, Eva; Ossola, Dario; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vorholt, Julia A.

    2015-02-01

    Quantification of detachment forces between bacteria and substrates facilitates the understanding of the bacterial adhesion process that affects cell physiology and survival. Here, we present a method that allows for serial, single bacterial cell force spectroscopy by combining the force control of atomic force microscopy with microfluidics. Reversible bacterial cell immobilization under physiological conditions on the pyramidal tip of a microchanneled cantilever is achieved by underpressure. Using the fluidic force microscopy technology (FluidFM), we achieve immobilization forces greater than those of state-of-the-art cell-cantilever binding as demonstrated by the detachment of Escherichia coli from polydopamine with recorded forces between 4 and 8 nN for many cells. The contact time and setpoint dependence of the adhesion forces of E. coli and Streptococcus pyogenes, as well as the sequential detachment of bacteria out of a chain, are shown, revealing distinct force patterns in the detachment curves. This study demonstrates the potential of the FluidFM technology for quantitative bacterial adhesion measurements of cell-substrate and cell-cell interactions that are relevant in biofilms and infection biology.Quantification of detachment forces between bacteria and substrates facilitates the understanding of the bacterial adhesion process that affects cell physiology and survival. Here, we present a method that allows for serial, single bacterial cell force spectroscopy by combining the force control of atomic force microscopy with microfluidics. Reversible bacterial cell immobilization under physiological conditions on the pyramidal tip of a microchanneled cantilever is achieved by underpressure. Using the fluidic force microscopy technology (FluidFM), we achieve immobilization forces greater than those of state-of-the-art cell-cantilever binding as demonstrated by the detachment of Escherichia coli from polydopamine with recorded forces between 4 and 8 nN for many

  3. Atomic Force Microscope Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation (large file)

    This animation is a scientific illustration of the operation of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope, or AFM. The AFM is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer, or MECA.

    The AFM is used to image the smallest Martian particles using a very sharp tip at the end of one of eight beams.

    The beam of the AFM is set into vibration and brought up to the surface of a micromachined silicon substrate. The substrate has etched in it a series of pits, 5 micrometers deep, designed to hold the Martian dust particles.

    The microscope then maps the shape of particles in three dimensions by scanning them with the tip.

    At the end of the animation is a 3D representation of the AFM image of a particle that was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress.' The sample was delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008).

    The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate.

    A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit.

    The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  4. Radiative forcing and climate response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Sato, M.; Ruedy, R.

    1997-03-01

    We examine the sensitivity of a climate model to a wide range of radiative forcings, including changes of solar irradiance, atmospheric CO2, O3, CFCs, clouds, aerosols, surface albedo, and a "ghost" forcing introduced at arbitrary heights, latitudes, longitudes, seasons, and times of day. We show that, in general, the climate response, specifically the global mean temperature change, is sensitive to the altitude, latitude, and nature of the forcing; that is, the response to a given forcing can vary by 50% or more depending upon characteristics of the forcing other than its magnitude measured in watts per square meter. The consistency of the response among different forcings is higher, within 20% or better, for most of the globally distributed forcings suspected of influencing global mean temperature in the past century, but exceptions occur for certain changes of ozone or absorbing aerosols, for which the climate response is less well behaved. In all cases the physical basis for the variations of the response can be understood. The principal mechanisms involve alterations of lapse rate and decrease (increase) of large-scale cloud cover in layers that are preferentially heated (cooled). Although the magnitude of these effects must be model-dependent, the existence and sense of the mechanisms appear to be reasonable. Overall, we reaffirm the value of the radiative forcing concept for predicting climate response and for comparative studies of different forcings; indeed, the present results can help improve the accuracy of such analyses and define error estimates. Our results also emphasize the need for measurements having the specificity and precision needed to define poorly known forcings such as absorbing aerosols and ozone change. Available data on aerosol single scatter albedo imply that anthropogenic aerosols cause less cooling than has commonly been assumed. However, negative forcing due to the net ozone change since 1979 appears to have counterbalanced 30

  5. Exotic nuclei and nuclear forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu

    2013-01-01

    I overview new aspects of the structure of exotic nuclei as compared to stable nuclei, focusing on several characteristic effects of nuclear forces. The shell structure of nuclei has been proposed by Mayer and Jensen, and has been considered to be kept valid basically for all nuclei, with well-known magic numbers, 2, 8, 20, 28, 50, …. Nuclear forces were shown, very recently, to change this paradigm. It will be presented that the evolution of shell structure occurs in various ways as more neutrons and/or protons are added, and I will present basic points of this shell evolution in terms of the monopole interaction of nuclear forces. I will discuss three types of nuclear forces. The first one is the tensor force. The tensor force is one of the most fundamental nuclear forces, but its first-order effect on the shell structure has been clarified only recently in studies on exotic nuclei. The tensor force can change the spin-orbit splitting depending on the occupation of specific orbits. This results in changes of the shell structure in many nuclei, and consequently some of Mayer-Jensen's magic numbers are lost and new ones emerge, in certain nuclei. This mechanism can be understood in an intuitive way, meaning that the effect is general and robust. The second type of nuclear forces is central force. I will show a general but unknown property of the central force in the shell-model Hamiltonian that can describe nuclear properties in a good agreement with experiment. I will then demonstrate how it can be incorporated into a simple model of the central force, and will discuss how this force works in the shell evolution. Actually, by combining this central force with the tensor force, one can understand and foresee how the same proton-neutron interaction drives the shell evolution, for examples such as Sn/Sb isotopes, N = 20 nuclei and Ni/Cu isotopes. The distribution of single-particle strength is discussed also in comparison to (e,e‧p) experiment on 48Ca. The shell

  6. How Does Force Affect Motion?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    Whether playing soccer at recess, walking to lunch, or sitting at their desk, children encounter forces every moment of their lives. The connection between force and motion is absolutely amazing to children, so anyone working with them better be prepared for the battery of tough questions they ask: "What made the ball move that way? Why does a…

  7. Low-closing-force seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergquist, L. E.

    1973-01-01

    Compress soft, inert metal gasket between cone and corresponding socket to attach tubes to vessels containing gas samples. Technique effects seals with minimum of applied force and does not contaminate contents. Seal is formed when port connector is pushed firmly into its socket. Gold washer is deformed and forced to flow into imperfections in surfaces.

  8. Minorities in the Armed Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griggs, Anthony

    1973-01-01

    Summarizes the findings of the Congressional Black Caucus and the specially formed task force; reports that high ranking officers have pledged to attack racial discrimination; and describes an association of minority officers whose purpose is to enhance the image of the armed forces within the minority community. (Author/JM)

  9. Force optimized recoil control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, P. E.; Radkiewicz, R. J.; Gartner, R. F.

    1982-05-01

    Reduction of the recoil force of high rate of fire automatic guns was proven effective. This system will allow consideration of more powerful guns for use in both helicopter and armored personnel carrier applications. By substituting the large shock loads of firing guns with a nearly constant force, both vibration and fatigue problems that prevent mounting of powerful automatic guns is eliminated.

  10. Pseudo force acting between bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruah, Abhinav Ray; Deva, Anish; Sarma, Arun

    It has been shown that a non-contact force acts between two macroscopic physical objects held close together, which is not associated with the gravitational and electrostatic force. An experiment was conducted with objects of different mass, material and geometry to find the magnitude and properties of this apparent or pseudo force. The order of magnitude was found to be 10-5 and it remained constant for all types of objects while only the coefficient increased as the distance between the objects reduced. It only started acting at small distances and failed to make a body move if it experienced static friction from any contact surface. The nature of the force was found to be attractive as well as repulsive. Due to gravitation being a solely attractive force, it was eliminated as a possible reason for the pseudo force. The experiment was performed twice, once by grounding the apparatus and then again without grounding. The order of the force remained the same for both cases. As the test objects were held by hand, they were grounded through the human body. Also, none of the objects used were in contact with each other for the duration of this work, preventing any contact electrification. Due to these factors, the force was not considered electrostatic in nature.

  11. The Forced Hard Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2006-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, various examples of the Duffing type forced spring equation with epsilon positive, are studied. Since [epsilon] is positive, all solutions to the associated homogeneous equation are periodic and the same is true with the forcing applied. The damped equation exhibits steady state trajectories with the interesting…

  12. Grasp force control in telemanipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiker, Steven F.; Duffie, Neil A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents two experiments which focus upon the issue of grasp force control in telemanipulation. The first experiment examines the ability to control and stabilize master-controller grasp force during a 30-s compensatory tracking task under different levels of master controller digit mass, friction, and backlash. The second experiment explores the potential for substituting tactile feedback in lieu of direct force-feedback to gage and control remote grasp force. Results show that subjects were better able to control force when mass and friction levels were increased. Even when perceptual gains between tactile and direct force feedback displays were matched, force reflection produced better grasp control. The lack of backlash effects and improvements in performance with direct force reflection in comparison to tactile feedback are attributable to reflexive short-loop adjustment of grasp tension afforded by the muscle's length-tension control system. The criterion of acceptable operator performance, dependent upon both the quality of the transmission of control commands and feedback, and the response of the remote device, is discussed.

  13. Simplified Relativistic Force Transformation Equation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Benjamin U.

    1979-01-01

    A simplified relativistic force transformation equation is derived and then used to obtain the equation for the electromagnetic forces on a charged particle, calculate the electromagnetic fields due to a point charge with constant velocity, transform electromagnetic fields in general, derive the Biot-Savart law, and relate it to Coulomb's law.…

  14. Origin of Enthalpic Depletion Forces.

    PubMed

    Sapir, Liel; Harries, Daniel

    2014-04-01

    Solutes excluded from macromolecules or colloids are known to drive depletion attractions. The established Asakura-Oosawa model, as well as subsequent theories aimed at explaining the effects of macromolecular crowding, attribute depletion forces to diminished hard-core excluded volume upon compaction, and hence predict depletion forces dominated by entropy. However, recent experiments measuring the effect of preferentially excluded solutes on protein folding and macromolecular association find these forces can also be enthalpic. We use simulations of macromolecular association in explicit binary cosolute-solvent mixtures, with solvent and cosolute intermolecular interactions that go beyond hard-cores, to show that not all cosolutes conform to the established entropically dominated model. We further demonstrate how the enthalpically dominated depletion forces that we find can be well described within an Asakura-Oosawa like model provided that the hard-core macromolecule-cosolute potential of mean force is augmented by a "soft" step-like repulsion.

  15. Simulated 2050 aviation radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. C.; Gettelman, A.

    2015-12-01

    The radiative forcing from aviation is investigated by using a comprehensive general circulation model in the present (2006) and the future (2050). Global flight distance is projected to increase by a factor of 4 between 2006 and 2050. However, simulated contrail cirrus radiative forcing can increase by a factor of 7, and thus does not scale linearly with fuel emission mass. Simulations indicate negative radiative forcing induced by the indirect effect of aviation sulfate aerosols on liquid clouds that increasesby a factor of 4 in 2050. As a result, the net 2050 aviation radiative forcing is a cooling. Aviation sulfates emitted at cruise altitude canbe transported down to the lowest troposphere, increasing the aerosolconcentration, thus increasing the cloud drop number concentration and persistenceof low-level clouds. Aviation black carbon aerosols produce a negligible forcing.

  16. Gene regulation by mechanical forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oluwole, B. O.; Du, W.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    Endothelial cells are subjected to various mechanical forces in vivo from the flow of blood across the luminal surface of the blood vessel. The purpose of this review was to examine the data available on how these mechanical forces, in particular cyclic strain, affect the expression and regulation of endothelial cell function. Studies from various investigators using models of cyclic strain in vitro have shown that various vasoactive mediators such as nitric oxide and prostacyclin are induced by the effect of mechanical deformation, and that the expression of these mediators may be regulated at the transcription level by mechanical forces. There also seems to be emerging evidence that endothelial cells may also act as mechanotransducers, whereby the transmission of external forces induces various cytoskeletal changes and second messenger cascades. Furthermore, it seems these forces may act on specific response elements of promoter genes.

  17. Nonadditivity of critical Casimir forces.

    PubMed

    Paladugu, Sathyanarayana; Callegari, Agnese; Tuna, Yazgan; Barth, Lukas; Dietrich, Siegfried; Gambassi, Andrea; Volpe, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    In soft condensed matter physics, effective interactions often emerge due to the spatial confinement of fluctuating fields. For instance, microscopic particles dissolved in a binary liquid mixture are subject to critical Casimir forces whenever their surfaces confine the thermal fluctuations of the order parameter of the solvent close to its critical demixing point. These forces are theoretically predicted to be nonadditive on the scale set by the bulk correlation length of the fluctuations. Here we provide direct experimental evidence of this fact by reporting the measurement of the associated many-body forces. We consider three colloidal particles in optical traps and observe that the critical Casimir force exerted on one of them by the other two differs from the sum of the forces they exert separately. This three-body effect depends sensitively on the distance from the critical point and on the chemical functionalisation of the colloid surfaces. PMID:27097797

  18. Nonadditivity of critical Casimir forces

    PubMed Central

    Paladugu, Sathyanarayana; Callegari, Agnese; Tuna, Yazgan; Barth, Lukas; Dietrich, Siegfried; Gambassi, Andrea; Volpe, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    In soft condensed matter physics, effective interactions often emerge due to the spatial confinement of fluctuating fields. For instance, microscopic particles dissolved in a binary liquid mixture are subject to critical Casimir forces whenever their surfaces confine the thermal fluctuations of the order parameter of the solvent close to its critical demixing point. These forces are theoretically predicted to be nonadditive on the scale set by the bulk correlation length of the fluctuations. Here we provide direct experimental evidence of this fact by reporting the measurement of the associated many-body forces. We consider three colloidal particles in optical traps and observe that the critical Casimir force exerted on one of them by the other two differs from the sum of the forces they exert separately. This three-body effect depends sensitively on the distance from the critical point and on the chemical functionalisation of the colloid surfaces. PMID:27097797

  19. Entropic forces in Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Nico

    2014-12-01

    Interest in the concept of entropic forces has risen considerably since Verlinde proposed in 2011 to interpret the force in Newton's second law and gravity as entropic forces. Brownian motion—the motion of a small particle (pollen) driven by random impulses from the surrounding molecules—may be the first example of a stochastic process in which such forces are expected to emerge. In this article, it is shown that at least two types of entropic force can be identified in three-dimensional Brownian motion. This analysis yields simple derivations of known results of Brownian motion, Hooke's law, and—applying an external (non-radial) force—Curie's law and the Langevin-Debye equation.

  20. Force reconstruction from tapping mode force microscopy experiments.

    PubMed

    Payam, Amir F; Martin-Jimenez, Daniel; Garcia, Ricardo

    2015-05-01

    Fast, accurate, and robust nanomechanical measurements are intensely studied in materials science, applied physics, and molecular biology. Amplitude modulation force microscopy (tapping mode) is the most established nanoscale characterization technique of surfaces for air and liquid environments. However, its quantitative capabilities lag behind its high spatial resolution and robustness. We develop a general method to transform the observables into quantitative force measurements. The force reconstruction algorithm has been deduced on the assumption that the observables (amplitude and phase shift) are slowly varying functions of the tip-surface separation. The accuracy and applicability of the method is validated by numerical simulations and experiments. The method is valid for liquid and air environments, small and large free amplitudes, compliant and rigid materials, and conservative and non-conservative forces.

  1. Climate forcing by anthropogenic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Charlson, R J; Schwartz, S E; Hales, J M; Cess, R D; Coakley, J A; Hansen, J E; Hofmann, D J

    1992-01-24

    Although long considered to be of marginal importance to global climate change, tropospheric aerosol contributes substantially to radiative forcing, and anthropogenic sulfate aerosol in particular has imposed a major perturbation to this forcing. Both the direct scattering of shortwavelength solar radiation and the modification of the shortwave reflective properties of clouds by sulfate aerosol particles increase planetary albedo, thereby exerting a cooling influence on the planet. Current climate forcing due to anthropogenic sulfate is estimated to be -1 to -2 watts per square meter, globally averaged. This perturbation is comparable in magnitude to current anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing but opposite in sign. Thus, the aerosol forcing has likely offset global greenhouse warming to a substantial degree. However, differences in geographical and seasonal distributions of these forcings preclude any simple compensation. Aerosol effects must be taken into account in evaluating anthropogenic influences on past, current, and projected future climate and in formulating policy regarding controls on emission of greenhouse gases and sulfur dioxide. Resolution of such policy issues requires integrated research on the magnitude and geographical distribution of aerosol climate forcing and on the controlling chemical and physical processes.

  2. Climate Forcing by Anthropogenic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlson, R. J.; Schwartz, S. E.; Hales, J. M.; Cess, R. D.; Coakley, J. A., Jr.; Hansen, J. E.; Hofmann, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Although long considered to be of marginal importance to global climate change, tropospheric aerosol contributes substantially to radiative forcing, and anthropogenic sulfate aerosol in particular has imposed a major perturbation to this forcing. Both the direct scattering of short-wavelength solar radiation and the modification of the shortwave reflective properties of clouds by sulfate aerosol particles increase planetary albedo, thereby exerting a cooling influence on the planet. Current climate forcing due to anthropogenic sulfate is estimated to be -1 to -2 watts per square meter, globally averaged. This perturbation is comparable in magnitude to current anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing but opposite in sign. Thus, the aerosol forcing has likely offset global greenhouse warming to a substantial degree. However, differences in geographical and seasonal distributions of these forcings preclude any simple compensation. Aerosol effects must be taken into account in evaluating anthropogenic influences on past, current, and projected future climate and in formulating policy regarding controls on emission of greenhouse gases and sulfur dioxide. Resolution of such policy issues requires integrated research on the magnitude and geographical distribution of aerosol climate forcing and on the controlling chemical and physical processes.

  3. Climate forcing by anthropogenic aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlson, R. J.; Schwartz, S. E.; Hales, J. M.; Cess, R. D.; Coakley, J. A., Jr.; Hansen, J. E.; Hofmann, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Although long considered to be of marginal importance to global climate change, tropospheric aerosol contributes substantially to radiative forcing, and anthropogenic sulfate aerosol, in particular, has imposed a major perturbation to this forcing. Both the direct scattering of short-wavelength solar radiation and the modification of the shortwave reflective properties of clouds by sulfate aerosol particles increase planetary albedo, thereby exerting a cooling influence on the planet. Current climate forcing due to anthropogenic sulfate is estimated to be -1 to -2 watts per square meter, globally averaged. This perturbation is comparable in magnitude to current anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing but opposite in sign. Thus, the aerosol forcing has likely offset global greenhouse warming to a substantial degree. However, differences in geographical and seasonal distributions of these forcings preclude any simple compensation. Aerosol effects must be taken into account in evaluating anthropogenic influences on past, current, and projected future climate and in formulating policy regarding controls on emission of greenhouse gases and sulfur dioxide. Resolution of such policy issues requires integrated research on the magnitude and geographical distribution of aerosol climate forcing and on the controlling chemical and physical processes.

  4. Differential force balances during levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Paul

    The simplest arithmetic of inertial, buoyant, magnetic and electrokinetic levitation is explored in the context of a model living system with “acceleration-sensitive structures” in which motion, if allowed, produces a biological effect. The simple model is a finite-sized object enclosed within another finite-sized object suspended in an outer fluid (liquid or vapor) medium. The inner object has density and electrical and magnetic properties quantitatively different from those of the outer object and the medium. In inertial levitation (“weightlessness”) inertial accelerations are balanced, and the forces due to them are canceled in accordance with Newton’s third law. In the presence of inertial acceleration (gravity, centrifugal) motionlessness depends on a balance between the levitating force and the inertial force. If the inner and outer objects differ in density one or the other will be subjected to an unbalanced force when one object is levitated by any other force (buoyant, magnetic, electrokinetic). The requirements for motionlessness of the internal object in the presence of a levitating force are equality of density in the case of buoyant levitation, equality of magnetic susceptibility in the case of magnetic levitation, and equality of zeta potential and dielectric constant in the case of electrokinetic levitation. Examples of internal “acceleration-sensitive structures” are cellular organelles and the organs of advanced plants and animals. For these structures fundamental physical data are important in the interpretation of the effects of forces used for levitation.

  5. Nuclear forces and chiral theories

    SciTech Connect

    Friar, J.L. |

    1995-09-01

    Recent successes in ab initio calculations of light nuclei (A=2-6) will be reviewed and correlated with the dynamical consequences of chiral symmetry. The tractability of nuclear physics evinced by these results is evidence for that symmetry. The relative importance of three-nucleon forces, four-nucleon forces, multi-pion exchanges, and relativistic corrections will be discussed in the context of effective field theories and dimensional power counting. Isospin violation in the nuclear force will also be discussed in this context.

  6. The force of impacting rain.

    PubMed

    Soto, Dan; De Larivière, Aurélie Borel; Boutillon, Xavier; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David

    2014-07-21

    Drop impacts are difficult to characterize due to their transient, non-stationary nature. We discuss the force generated during such impacts, a key quantity for animals, plants, roofs or soil erosion. Although a millimetric drop has a modest weight, it can generate collision forces on the order of thousand times this weight. We measure and discuss this amplification, considering natural parameters such as drop radius and density, impact speed and response time of the substrate. We finally imagine two kinds of devices allowing us to deduce the size of the raindrop from impact forces.

  7. Calibration of frictional forces in atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ogletree, D.F.; Carpick, R.W.; Salmeron, M.

    1996-09-01

    The atomic force microscope can provide information on the atomic-level frictional properties of surfaces, but reproducible quantitative measurements are difficult to obtain. Parameters that are either unknown or difficult to precisely measure include the normal and lateral cantilever force constants (particularly with microfabricated cantilevers), the tip height, the deflection sensor response, and the tip structure and composition at the tip-surface contact. We present an {ital in} {ital situ} experimental procedure to determine the response of a cantilever to lateral forces in terms of its normal force response. This procedure is quite general. It will work with any type of deflection sensor and does not require the knowledge or direct measurement of the lever dimensions or the tip height. In addition, the shape of the tip apex can be determined. We also discuss a number of specific issues related to force and friction measurements using optical lever deflection sensing. We present experimental results on the lateral force response of commercially available V-shaped cantilevers. Our results are consistent with estimates of lever mechanical properties using continuum elasticity theory. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. A Graphene Surface Force Balance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report a method for transferring graphene, grown by chemical vapor deposition, which produces ultraflat graphene surfaces (root-mean-square roughness of 0.19 nm) free from polymer residues over macroscopic areas (>1 cm2). The critical step in preparing such surfaces involves the use of an intermediate mica template, which itself is atomically smooth. We demonstrate the compatibility of these model surfaces with the surface force balance, opening up the possibility of measuring normal and lateral forces, including friction and adhesion, between two graphene sheets either in contact or across a liquid medium. The conductivity of the graphene surfaces allows forces to be measured while controlling the surface potential. This new apparatus, the graphene surface force balance, is expected to be of importance to the future understanding of graphene in applications from lubrication to electrochemical energy storage systems. PMID:25171130

  9. Dissipative Forces and Quantum Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eck, John S.; Thompson, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    Shows how to include the dissipative forces of classical mechanics in quantum mechanics by the use of non-Hermetian Hamiltonians. The Ehrenfest theorem for such Hamiltonians is derived, and simple examples which show the classical correspondences are given. (MLH)

  10. FORCE: FORtran for Cosmic Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombi, Stéphane; Szapudi, István

    We review the theory of cosmic errors we have recently developed for count-in-cells statistics. The corresponding FORCE package provides a simple and useful way to compute cosmic covariance on factorial moments and cumulants measured in galaxy catalogs.

  11. Molecular Force Spectroscopy on Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Baoyu; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Cheng

    2015-04-01

    Molecular force spectroscopy has become a powerful tool to study how mechanics regulates biology, especially the mechanical regulation of molecular interactions and its impact on cellular functions. This force-driven methodology has uncovered a wealth of new information of the physical chemistry of molecular bonds for various biological systems. The new concepts, qualitative and quantitative measures describing bond behavior under force, and structural bases underlying these phenomena have substantially advanced our fundamental understanding of the inner workings of biological systems from the nanoscale (molecule) to the microscale (cell), elucidated basic molecular mechanisms of a wide range of important biological processes, and provided opportunities for engineering applications. Here, we review major force spectroscopic assays, conceptual developments of mechanically regulated kinetics of molecular interactions, and their biological relevance. We also present current challenges and highlight future directions.

  12. HRP ForceShoe Evaluation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Maintaining astronaut bone and muscle health in microgravity is an ongoing concern for NASA. In May of 2014, NASA delivered the ForceShoe, designed by XSENS, to the International Space Station (ISS...

  13. Calibration of lateral force measurements in atomic force microscopy with a piezoresistive force sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Hui; Vitard, Julien; Haliyo, Sinan; Regnier, Stephane

    2008-03-15

    We present here a method to calibrate the lateral force in the atomic force microscope. This method makes use of an accurately calibrated force sensor composed of a tipless piezoresistive cantilever and corresponding signal amplifying and processing electronics. Two ways of force loading with different loading points were compared by scanning the top and side edges of the piezoresistive cantilever. Conversion factors between the lateral force and photodiode signal using three types of atomic force microscope cantilevers with rectangular geometries (normal spring constants from 0.092 to 1.24 N/m and lateral stiffness from 10.34 to 101.06 N/m) were measured in experiments using the proposed method. When used properly, this method calibrates the conversion factors that are accurate to {+-}12.4% or better. This standard has less error than the commonly used method based on the cantilever's beam mechanics. Methods such of this allow accurate and direct conversion between lateral forces and photodiode signals without any knowledge of the cantilevers and the laser measuring system.

  14. COOLING FORCE MEASUREMENTS IN CELSIUS.

    SciTech Connect

    GALNANDER, B.; FEDOTOV, A.V.; LITVINENKO, V.N.; ET AL.

    2005-09-18

    The design of future high energy coolers relies heavily on extending the results of cooling force measurements into new regimes by using simulation codes. In order to carefully benchmark these codes we have accurately measured the longitudinal friction force in CELSIUS by recording the phase shift between the beam and the RF voltage while varying the RF frequency. Moreover, parameter dependencies on the electron current, solenoid magnetic field and magnetic field alignment were carried out.

  15. Electrostatic forces for personnel restraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, N.; Ciciora, J.; Gardner, R.; Porter, K.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing electrostatic forces for personnel retention devices on exterior spacecraft surfaces was analyzed. The investigation covered: (1) determination of the state of the art; (2) analysis of potential adhesion surfaces; (3) safety considerations for personnel; (4) electromagnetic force field determination and its effect on spacecraft instrumentation; and (5) proposed advances to current technology based on documentation review, analyses, and experimental test data.

  16. Finger Forces in Clarinet Playing

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Alex; Goebl, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Clarinettists close and open multiple tone holes to alter the pitch of the tones. Their fingering technique must be fast, precise, and coordinated with the tongue articulation. In this empirical study, finger force profiles and tongue techniques of clarinet students (N = 17) and professional clarinettists (N = 6) were investigated under controlled performance conditions. First, in an expressive-performance task, eight selected excerpts from the first Weber Concerto were performed. These excerpts were chosen to fit in a 2 × 2 × 2 design (register: low–high; tempo: slow–fast, dynamics: soft–loud). There was an additional condition controlled by the experimenter, which determined the expression levels (low–high) of the performers. Second, a technical-exercise task, an isochronous 23-tone melody was designed that required different effectors to produce the sequence (finger-only, tongue-only, combined tongue-finger actions). The melody was performed in three tempo conditions (slow, medium, fast) in a synchronization-continuation paradigm. Participants played on a sensor-equipped Viennese clarinet, which tracked finger forces and reed oscillations simultaneously. From the data, average finger force (Fmean) and peak force (Fmax) were calculated. The overall finger forces were low (Fmean = 1.17 N, Fmax = 3.05 N) compared to those on other musical instruments (e.g., guitar). Participants applied the largest finger forces during the high expression level performance conditions (Fmean = 1.21 N). For the technical exercise task, timing and articulation information were extracted from the reed signal. Here, the timing precision of the fingers deteriorated the timing precision of the tongue for combined tongue-finger actions, especially for faster tempi. Although individual finger force profiles were overlapping, the group of professional players applied less finger force overall (Fmean = 0.54 N). Such sensor instruments provide useful insights into player

  17. Mechanical force analysis of peptide interactions using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Chikashi; Takeda, Seiji; Kageshima, Masami; Ito, Miyuki; Sugimoto, Naoki; Sekizawa, Kazuko; Miyake, Jun

    2004-01-01

    Some peptides have previously been reported to bind low molecular weight chemicals. One such peptide with the amino acid sequence His-Ala-Ser-Tyr-Ser was selectively screened from a phage library and bound to a cationic porphyrin, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(N-methylpyridinium-4-yl)-21H,23H-porphine (TMpyP), with a binding constant of 10(5) M(-1) (J. Kawakami, T. Kitano, and N. Sugimoto, Chemical Communications, 1999, pp. 1765-1766). The proposed binding was due to pi-electron stacking from two aromatic amino acids of histidine and tyrosine. In this study, the weak interactions between TMpyP and the peptide were further investigated by force curve analysis using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The mechanical force required to unbind the peptide-porphyrin complex was measured by vertical movement of the AFM tip. Peptide self-assembled monolayers were formed on both a gold-coated mica substrate and a gold-coated AFM tip. The TMpyPs could bind between the two peptide layers when the peptide-immobilized AFM tip contacted the peptide-immobilized substrate in solution containing TMpyP. In the retracting process a force that ruptured the interaction between TMpyPs and peptides was observed. The unbinding force values correlated to the concentration of TMpyP. A detection limit of 100 ng/mL porphyrin was obtained for the force measurement, and was similar to surface plasmon resonance sensor detection limits. Furthermore, we calculated the product of the observed force and the length of the molecular elongation to determine the work required to unbind the complexes. The obtained values of unbinding work were in a reasonable range compared to the binding energy of porphyrin-peptide.

  18. Photoinduced magnetic force between nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guclu, Caner; Tamma, Venkata Ananth; Wickramasinghe, Hemantha Kumar; Capolino, Filippo

    2015-12-01

    Photoinduced magnetic force between nanostructures, at optical frequencies, is investigated theoretically. Till now optical magnetic effects were not used in scanning probe microscopy because of the vanishing natural magnetism with increasing frequency. On the other hand, artificial magnetism in engineered nanostructures led to the development of measurable optical magnetism. Here two examples of nanoprobes that are able to generate strong magnetic dipolar fields at optical frequency are investigated: first, an ideal magnetically polarizable nanosphere and then a circular cluster of silver nanospheres that has a looplike collective plasmonic resonance equivalent to a magnetic dipole. Magnetic forces are evaluated based on nanostructure polarizabilities, i.e., induced magnetic dipoles, and magnetic-near field evaluations. As an initial assessment on the possibility of a magnetic nanoprobe to detect magnetic forces, we consider two identical magnetically polarizable nanoprobes and observe magnetic forces on the order of piconewtons, thereby bringing it within detection limits of conventional atomic force microscopes at ambient pressure and temperature. The detection of magnetic force is a promising method in studying optical magnetic transitions that can be the basis of innovative spectroscopy applications.

  19. New formula of Nuclear Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Kamal

    2011-04-01

    It is well established that the forces between nucleons are transmitted by meson. The quantitative explanation of nuclear forces in terms of meson theory was extremely tentative & in complete but this theory supplies a valuable point of view . it is fairly certain now that the nucleons within nuclear matter are in a state made rather different from their free condition by the proximity of other nucleons charge independence of nuclear forces demand the existence of neutral meson as amongst the same type of nucleolus (P-P) or (N-N). this force demand the same spin & orbital angular momentum. The exchange interaction in produced by only a neutral meson. The involving mesons without electric charge, that it gives exchanges forces between proton & Neutron & also therefore maintains charge in dependence character. It is evident for the nature of the products that neutral mesons decay by strong & weak interaction both. It means that neutral mesons constituents responsible for the electromagnetic interaction. Dramatically neutral mesons plays important role for electromagnetic & nuclear force both.

  20. Intramolecular screening of intermolecular forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ying Q.; Hunt, K. L. C.

    1993-03-01

    By use of nonlocal polarizability densities, we analyze the intramolecular screening of intermolecular fields. For two interacting molecules A and B with weak or negligible charge overlap, we show that the reaction field and the field due to the unperturbed charge distribution of the neighboring molecule are screened identically via the Sternheimer shielding tensor and its generalizations to nonuniform fields and nonlinear response. The induction force on nucleus I in molecule A, derived from perturbation theory, results from linear screening of the reaction field due to B and nonlinear screening of the field from the permanent charge distribution of B. In general, at first or second order in the molecular interaction, the screening-tensor expressions for the force on nucleus I involve susceptibilities of one order higher than the expressions derived from perturbation theory. The first-order force from perturbation theory involves permanent charge moments, while the first-order screened force involves linear response tensors; and the second-order screened force depends on hyperpolarizabilities, while second-order induction effects are specified in terms of static, lowest-order susceptibilities. The equivalence of the two formulations for these forces, order by order, is a new illustration of the interrelations we have found among permanent moments, linear-response tensors, and nonlinear response. This work also provides new insight into the dispersion forces on an individual nucleus I in molecule A by separating the forces into two distinct terms—the first term results from changes in the reaction of A to the fluctuating charge distribution of the neighboring molecule B, when nucleus I shifts infinitesimally, and the second term stems from changes in correlations of the fluctuating charge distribution of A itself. Changes in the fluctuation correlations are determined by changes in the classical Coulomb field of nucleus I and by the imaginary part of the

  1. Force measurements in aerodynamics using piezoelectric multicomponent force transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schewe, G.

    The present paper is concerned with a device for the measurement of steady and unsteady aerodynamic forces in a wind tunnel test. The paper represents a continuation of an article written by Schewe (1982) about a multicomponent balance consisting of piezoelectric force transducers for a high-pressure wind tunnel. Advantages of the piezoelectric force-measuring technique compared to other techniques are related to the high rigidity of the quartz crystal sensor elements, taking into account low interference (cross talk) for multicomponent measurements, high natural frequency, and broad dynamic range. It is pointed out that the limitations with respect to quasi-static measurements imposed by the drift of the zero point are not as extensive as generally believed, while drift correction methods improve the measurement accuracy.

  2. National Coal Study and related research. Final report from Round Three of the study

    SciTech Connect

    Attfield, M.

    1984-01-01

    Results of the National Coal Study are presented. Thirty-two coal mines were visited and 5275 miners were examined during a 5-year period. The incidence and progression of coalworkers pneumoconiosis was studied. Longitudinal declines in 1 second forced expiratory volume (FEV1) in coal miners were investigated. The author suggests that the degree and progression of pneumoconiosis was reduced by applying the 2mg/m/sup 3/ dust standard.

  3. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V. C.; Wang, Chengpu

    2003-01-01

    An atomic force microscope utilizes a pulse release system and improved method of operation to minimize contact forces between a probe tip affixed to a flexible cantilever and a specimen being measured. The pulse release system includes a magnetic particle affixed proximate the probe tip and an electromagnetic coil. When energized, the electromagnetic coil generates a magnetic field which applies a driving force on the magnetic particle sufficient to overcome adhesive forces exhibited between the probe tip and specimen. The atomic force microscope includes two independently displaceable piezo elements operable along a Z-axis. A controller drives the first Z-axis piezo element to provide a controlled approach between the probe tip and specimen up to a point of contact between the probe tip and specimen. The controller then drives the first Z-axis piezo element to withdraw the cantilever from the specimen. The controller also activates the pulse release system which drives the probe tip away from the specimen during withdrawal. Following withdrawal, the controller adjusts the height of the second Z-axis piezo element to maintain a substantially constant approach distance between successive samples.

  4. Forces driving epithelial wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuis, Jim H.; Gupta, Mukund; Colombelli, Julien; Muñoz, José J.; Brodland, G. Wayne; Ladoux, Benoit; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental feature of multicellular organisms is their ability to self-repair wounds through the movement of epithelial cells into the damaged area. This collective cellular movement is commonly attributed to a combination of cell crawling and “purse-string” contraction of a supracellular actomyosin ring. Here we show by direct experimental measurement that these two mechanisms are insufficient to explain force patterns observed during wound closure. At early stages of the process, leading actin protrusions generate traction forces that point away from the wound, showing that wound closure is initially driven by cell crawling. At later stages, we observed unanticipated patterns of traction forces pointing towards the wound. Such patterns have strong force components that are both radial and tangential to the wound. We show that these force components arise from tensions transmitted by a heterogeneous actomyosin ring to the underlying substrate through focal adhesions. The structural and mechanical organization reported here provides cells with a mechanism to close the wound by cooperatively compressing the underlying substrate. PMID:27340423

  5. Note: Helical nanobelt force sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, G.; Hashimoto, H.

    2012-12-15

    We present the fabrication and characterization of helical nanobelt force sensors. These self-sensing force sensors are based on the giant piezoresistivity of helical nanobelts. The three-dimensional helical nanobelts are self-formed from 27 nm-thick n-type InGaAs/GaAs bilayers using rolled-up techniques, and assembled onto electrodes on a micropipette using nanorobotic manipulations. The helical nanobelt force sensors can be calibrated using a calibrated atomic force microscope cantilever system under scanning electron microscope. Thanks to their giant piezoresistance coefficient (515 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} Pa{sup -1}), low stiffness (0.03125 N/m), large-displacement capability ({approx}10 {mu}m), and good fatigue resistance, they are well suited to function as stand-alone, compact ({approx}20 {mu}m without the plug-in support), light ({approx}5 g including the plug-in support), versatile and large range ({approx}{mu}N) and high resolution ({approx}nN) force sensors.

  6. Method of Calibrating a Force Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Peter A. (Inventor); Rhew, Ray D. (Inventor); Johnson, Thomas H. (Inventor); Landman, Drew (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A calibration system and method utilizes acceleration of a mass to generate a force on the mass. An expected value of the force is calculated based on the magnitude and acceleration of the mass. A fixture is utilized to mount the mass to a force balance, and the force balance is calibrated to provide a reading consistent with the expected force determined for a given acceleration. The acceleration can be varied to provide different expected forces, and the force balance can be calibrated for different applied forces. The acceleration may result from linear acceleration of the mass or rotational movement of the mass.

  7. Forces in rotary motion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilsch, Markus K.; Elliott, Gregory K.

    2008-09-01

    In many coating chambers substrates are moved by simple or planetary rotary motion systems. Isaac Newton already taught that an object in uniform motion tends to stay in uniform motion unless acted upon by a net external force. To move a substrate on a rotary trajectory, centripetal and gravitational forces must act upon the substrate. The substrate must be somehow confined. Confinement options range from firm attachment to a fixture to loose placement in a pocket. Depending on the rotary motion pattern, a loosely held substrate may slide once against a confinement boundary and then stay, or may constantly slide around. 'Rattling around' may be undesirable as it could lead to edge destruction, debris formation, precession of the substrate, and other adverse effects. Firm attachment is advantageous in most cases, but often adds process complexity. We examine the forces present on substrates in typical rotary motion systems and discuss the implications of different confinement methods.

  8. The Mouse Forced Swim Test

    PubMed Central

    Can, Adem; Dao, David T.; Arad, Michal; Terrillion, Chantelle E.; Piantadosi, Sean C.; Gould, Todd D.

    2012-01-01

    The forced swim test is a rodent behavioral test used for evaluation of antidepressant drugs, antidepressant efficacy of new compounds, and experimental manipulations that are aimed at rendering or preventing depressive-like states. Mice are placed in an inescapable transparent tank that is filled with water and their escape related mobility behavior is measured. The forced swim test is straightforward to conduct reliably and it requires minimal specialized equipment. Successful implementation of the forced swim test requires adherence to certain procedural details and minimization of unwarranted stress to the mice. In the protocol description and the accompanying video, we explain how to conduct the mouse version of this test with emphasis on potential pitfalls that may be detrimental to interpretation of results and how to avoid them. Additionally, we explain how the behaviors manifested in the test are assessed. PMID:22314943

  9. Global forcing and regional interactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1992-01-01

    The Climate System Modeling Program (CSMP) sponsored a “Global Forcing and Regional Interaction Workshop” from October 21 to 23, 1991, at Colorado State University's Pingree Park campus, to evaluate the relationship between global climate forcing and the response of the land surface on a regional scale. The general aim of the workshop was to develop specific action plans and preliminary science research strategies for regional-global interactions. Each participant was invited to identify tractable, high pay-off science issues related to global forcing and regional interactions. The workshop, with twenty-six participants about evenly split between atmospheric scientists, hydrologists, and ecologists, was also designed to facilitate a network of collaborators to prepare multidisciplinary research proposals. Discussion also focused on regional climate over the last 200 years and included the influence of atmosphere-land surface processes on natural climate variability. Several major recommendations were made on topics discussed.

  10. The mouse forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Can, Adem; Dao, David T; Arad, Michal; Terrillion, Chantelle E; Piantadosi, Sean C; Gould, Todd D

    2012-01-29

    The forced swim test is a rodent behavioral test used for evaluation of antidepressant drugs, antidepressant efficacy of new compounds, and experimental manipulations that are aimed at rendering or preventing depressive-like states. Mice are placed in an inescapable transparent tank that is filled with water and their escape related mobility behavior is measured. The forced swim test is straightforward to conduct reliably and it requires minimal specialized equipment. Successful implementation of the forced swim test requires adherence to certain procedural details and minimization of unwarranted stress to the mice. In the protocol description and the accompanying video, we explain how to conduct the mouse version of this test with emphasis on potential pitfalls that may be detrimental to interpretation of results and how to avoid them. Additionally, we explain how the behaviors manifested in the test are assessed.

  11. Forced Oscillations of Supported Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Edward D.; Basaran, Osman A.

    1996-01-01

    Oscillations of supported liquid drops are the subject of wide scientific interest, with applications in areas as diverse as liquid-liquid extraction, synthesis of ceramic powders, growing of pure crystals in low gravity, and measurement of dynamic surface tension. In this research, axisymmetric forced oscillations of arbitrary amplitude of viscous liquid drops of fixed volume which are pendant from or sessile on a rod with a fixed or moving contact line and surrounded by an inviscid ambient gas are induced by moving the rod in the vertical direction sinusiodally in time. In this paper, a preliminary report is made on the computational analysis of the oscillations of supported drops that have 'clean' interfaces and whose contact lines remain fixed throughout their motions. The relative importance of forcing to damping can be increased by either increasing the amplitude of rod motion A or Reynolds number Re. It is shown that as the ratio of forcing to damping rises, for drops starting from an initial rest state a sharp increase in deformation can occur when they are forced to oscillate in the vicinity of their resonance frequencies, indicating the incipience of hysteresis. However, it is also shown that the existence of a second stable limit cycle and the occurrence of hysteresis can be observed if the drop is subjected to a so-called frequency sweep, where the forcing frequency is first increased and then decreased over a suitable range. Because the change in drop deformation response is abrupt in the vicinity of the forcing frequencies where hysteresis occurs, it should be possible to exploit the phenomenon to accurately measure the viscosity and surface tension of the drop liquid.

  12. Finger Forces in Clarinet Playing.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Alex; Goebl, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Clarinettists close and open multiple tone holes to alter the pitch of the tones. Their fingering technique must be fast, precise, and coordinated with the tongue articulation. In this empirical study, finger force profiles and tongue techniques of clarinet students (N = 17) and professional clarinettists (N = 6) were investigated under controlled performance conditions. First, in an expressive-performance task, eight selected excerpts from the first Weber Concerto were performed. These excerpts were chosen to fit in a 2 × 2 × 2 design (register: low-high; tempo: slow-fast, dynamics: soft-loud). There was an additional condition controlled by the experimenter, which determined the expression levels (low-high) of the performers. Second, a technical-exercise task, an isochronous 23-tone melody was designed that required different effectors to produce the sequence (finger-only, tongue-only, combined tongue-finger actions). The melody was performed in three tempo conditions (slow, medium, fast) in a synchronization-continuation paradigm. Participants played on a sensor-equipped Viennese clarinet, which tracked finger forces and reed oscillations simultaneously. From the data, average finger force (F mean ) and peak force (F max ) were calculated. The overall finger forces were low (F mean = 1.17 N, F max = 3.05 N) compared to those on other musical instruments (e.g., guitar). Participants applied the largest finger forces during the high expression level performance conditions (F mean = 1.21 N). For the technical exercise task, timing and articulation information were extracted from the reed signal. Here, the timing precision of the fingers deteriorated the timing precision of the tongue for combined tongue-finger actions, especially for faster tempi. Although individual finger force profiles were overlapping, the group of professional players applied less finger force overall (F mean = 0.54 N). Such sensor instruments provide useful insights into player

  13. Finger Forces in Clarinet Playing.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Alex; Goebl, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Clarinettists close and open multiple tone holes to alter the pitch of the tones. Their fingering technique must be fast, precise, and coordinated with the tongue articulation. In this empirical study, finger force profiles and tongue techniques of clarinet students (N = 17) and professional clarinettists (N = 6) were investigated under controlled performance conditions. First, in an expressive-performance task, eight selected excerpts from the first Weber Concerto were performed. These excerpts were chosen to fit in a 2 × 2 × 2 design (register: low-high; tempo: slow-fast, dynamics: soft-loud). There was an additional condition controlled by the experimenter, which determined the expression levels (low-high) of the performers. Second, a technical-exercise task, an isochronous 23-tone melody was designed that required different effectors to produce the sequence (finger-only, tongue-only, combined tongue-finger actions). The melody was performed in three tempo conditions (slow, medium, fast) in a synchronization-continuation paradigm. Participants played on a sensor-equipped Viennese clarinet, which tracked finger forces and reed oscillations simultaneously. From the data, average finger force (F mean ) and peak force (F max ) were calculated. The overall finger forces were low (F mean = 1.17 N, F max = 3.05 N) compared to those on other musical instruments (e.g., guitar). Participants applied the largest finger forces during the high expression level performance conditions (F mean = 1.21 N). For the technical exercise task, timing and articulation information were extracted from the reed signal. Here, the timing precision of the fingers deteriorated the timing precision of the tongue for combined tongue-finger actions, especially for faster tempi. Although individual finger force profiles were overlapping, the group of professional players applied less finger force overall (F mean = 0.54 N). Such sensor instruments provide useful insights into player

  14. Forced removals embodied as tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Eugene T; Morrow, Carl D; Ho, Theodore; Fürst, Nicole; Cohelia, Rebekkah; Tram, Khai Hoan; Farmer, Paul E; Wood, Robin

    2016-07-01

    South Africa has one of the worst tuberculosis burdens in the world. Several ecological forces have contributed to this, including high HIV prevalence; failing TB control strategies; crowded, poorly ventilated indoor environments-including the complex web of political and economic interests which produce them; the development of racial capitalism; and mining and migration. In the following study, we measure CO2 levels in public transport to investigate the role extended commutes from peri-urban settlements to urban sites of work-a direct result of forced removals-potentially play in propagating the TB epidemic in Cape Town, South Africa. PMID:27239703

  15. Contact sensing from force measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bicchi, Antonio; Salisbury, J. K.; Brock, David L.

    1993-01-01

    This article addresses contact sensing (i.e., the problem of resolving the location of a contact, the force at the interface, and the moment about the contact normals). Called 'intrinsic' contact sensing for the use of internal force and torque measurements, this method allows for practical devices that provide simple, relevant contact information in practical robotic applications. Such sensors have been used in conjunction with robot hands to identify objects, determine surface friction, detect slip, augment grasp stability, measure object mass, probe surfaces, and control collision and for a variety of other useful tasks. This article describes the theoretical basis for their operation and provides a framework for future device design.

  16. Automatic HTS force measurement instrument

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, S.T.; Niemann, R.C.

    1999-03-30

    A device is disclosed for measuring the levitation force of a high temperature superconductor sample with respect to a reference magnet includes a receptacle for holding several high temperature superconductor samples each cooled to superconducting temperature. A rotatable carousel successively locates a selected one of the high temperature superconductor samples in registry with the reference magnet. Mechanism varies the distance between one of the high temperature superconductor samples and the reference magnet, and a sensor measures levitation force of the sample as a function of the distance between the reference magnet and the sample. A method is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  17. Automatic HTS force measurement instrument

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, Scott T.; Niemann, Ralph C.

    1999-01-01

    A device for measuring the levitation force of a high temperature superconductor sample with respect to a reference magnet includes a receptacle for holding several high temperature superconductor samples each cooled to superconducting temperature. A rotatable carousel successively locates a selected one of the high temperature superconductor samples in registry with the reference magnet. Mechanism varies the distance between one of the high temperature superconductor samples and the reference magnet, and a sensor measures levitation force of the sample as a function of the distance between the reference magnet and the sample. A method is also disclosed.

  18. Force-Time Entropy of Isometric Impulse.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Tsung-Yu; Newell, Karl M

    2016-01-01

    The relation between force and temporal variability in discrete impulse production has been viewed as independent (R. A. Schmidt, H. Zelaznik, B. Hawkins, J. S. Frank, & J. T. Quinn, 1979 ) or dependent on the rate of force (L. G. Carlton & K. M. Newell, 1993 ). Two experiments in an isometric single finger force task investigated the joint force-time entropy with (a) fixed time to peak force and different percentages of force level and (b) fixed percentage of force level and different times to peak force. The results showed that the peak force variability increased either with the increment of force level or through a shorter time to peak force that also reduced timing error variability. The peak force entropy and entropy of time to peak force increased on the respective dimension as the parameter conditions approached either maximum force or a minimum rate of force production. The findings show that force error and timing error are dependent but complementary when considered in the same framework with the joint force-time entropy at a minimum in the middle parameter range of discrete impulse.

  19. [Forced Oscillations of DNA Bases].

    PubMed

    Yakushevich, L V; Krasnobaeva, L A

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the studying of forced angular oscillations of the DNA bases with the help of the mathematical model consisting of two coupled nonlinear differential equations that take into account the effects of dissipation and the influence of an external periodic field. The calculation results are illustrated for sequence of gene encoding interferon alpha 17 (IFNA 17).

  20. American Indian Task Force Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackey, John E., Ed.

    Assuming that the client is central to any service program, the American Indian Task Force examined a national sample of "grass roots" social service organizations and/or individuals and schools of social work to determine the capability of providing relevant social work education to American Indians. Accordingly, the highest priorities…

  1. Forced-Flow Evaporative Cooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Wilbert E.; Niggemann, Richard E.

    1987-01-01

    Evaporative cooler absorbs heat efficiently under unusual gravitational conditions by using centrifugal force and vapor vortexes to maintain good thermal contact between heat-transfer surface and vaporizable coolant. System useful for cooling electronic or other equipment under low gravity encountered in spacecraft or under multiple-gravity conditions frequently experienced in high-performance airplanes.

  2. Forcing contact inhibition of locomotion.

    PubMed

    Roycroft, Alice; Mayor, Roberto

    2015-07-01

    Contact inhibition of locomotion drives a variety of biological phenomenon, from cell dispersion to collective cell migration and cancer invasion. New imaging techniques have allowed contact inhibition of locomotion to be visualised in vivo for the first time, helping to elucidate some of the molecules and forces involved in this phenomenon.

  3. [Forced Oscillations of DNA Bases].

    PubMed

    Yakushevich, L V; Krasnobaeva, L A

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the studying of forced angular oscillations of the DNA bases with the help of the mathematical model consisting of two coupled nonlinear differential equations that take into account the effects of dissipation and the influence of an external periodic field. The calculation results are illustrated for sequence of gene encoding interferon alpha 17 (IFNA 17). PMID:27192830

  4. Forcing contact inhibition of locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Roycroft, Alice; Mayor, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Contact inhibition of locomotion drives a variety of biological phenomenon, from cell dispersion to collective cell migration and cancer invasion. New imaging techniques have allowed contact inhibition of locomotion to be visualised in vivo for the first time, helping to elucidate some of the molecules and forces involved in this phenomenon. PMID:25981318

  5. Force10 P10 Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J; Goldstone, R; Instenes, S; Lawver, B

    2007-06-08

    The lack of an acceptable intrusion monitoring solution limits the deployment of 10GE (10 Gigabit-per-second Ethernet) technology across the LLNL's unclassified network infrastructure. The desire to operate at 10GE motivates us to evaluate the functionality and performance of a 10GE intrusion monitoring solution, the Force10 P10.

  6. The Forced Soft Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, T. H.

    2006-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, this paper studies examples of the forced Duffing type spring equation with [epsilon] negative. By performing trial-and-error numerical experiments, the existence is demonstrated of stability boundaries in the phase plane indicating initial conditions yielding bounded solutions. Subharmonic boundaries are…

  7. Dynamic properties of force fields.

    PubMed

    Vitalini, F; Mey, A S J S; Noé, F; Keller, B G

    2015-02-28

    Molecular-dynamics simulations are increasingly used to study dynamic properties of biological systems. With this development, the ability of force fields to successfully predict relaxation timescales and the associated conformational exchange processes moves into focus. We assess to what extent the dynamic properties of model peptides (Ac-A-NHMe, Ac-V-NHMe, AVAVA, A10) differ when simulated with different force fields (AMBER ff99SB-ILDN, AMBER ff03, OPLS-AA/L, CHARMM27, and GROMOS43a1). The dynamic properties are extracted using Markov state models. For single-residue models (Ac-A-NHMe, Ac-V-NHMe), the slow conformational exchange processes are similar in all force fields, but the associated relaxation timescales differ by up to an order of magnitude. For the peptide systems, not only the relaxation timescales, but also the conformational exchange processes differ considerably across force fields. This finding calls the significance of dynamic interpretations of molecular-dynamics simulations into question.

  8. Force of an actin spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jennifer; Mahadevan, L.; Matsudaira, Paul

    2003-03-01

    The acrosomal process of the horseshoe crab sperm is a novel mechanochemical molecular spring that converts its elastic stain energy to mechanical work upon the chemical activation by Ca2+. Twisted and bent, the initial state of the acrosomal bundle features a high degree of complexity in its structure and the energy is believed to be stored in the highly strained actin filaments as an elastic potential energy. When activated, the bundle relaxes from the coil of the highly twisted and bent filaments to its straight conformation at a mean velocity of 15um/s. The mean extension velocity increases dramatically from 3um/s to 27um/s when temperature of the medium is changed from 9.6C to 32C (respective viscosities of 1.25-0.75cp), yet it exhibits a very weak dependence on changes in the medium viscosity (1cp-33cp). These experiments suggest that the uncoiling of the actin spring should be limited not by the viscosity of the medium but by the unlatching events of involved proteins at a molecular level. Unlike the viscosity-limited processes, where force is directly related to the rate of the reaction, a direct measurement is required to obtain the spring force of the acrosomal process. The extending acrosomal bundle is forced to push against a barrier and its elastic buckling response is analyzed to measure the force generated during the uncoiling.

  9. Comet Halley and nongravitational forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeomans, D. K.

    1977-01-01

    The motion of comet Halley is investigated over the 1607-1911 interval. The required nongravitational-force model was found to be most consistent with a rocket-type thrust from the vaporization of water ice in the comet's nucleus. The nongravitational effects are time-independent over the investigated interval.

  10. Parachute drag and radial force

    SciTech Connect

    Purvis, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a combination of old and new wind tunnel data in a format which illustrates the effects of inflated diameter, geometric porosity, reefing line length, suspension line length, number of gores, and number of ribbons on parachute drag. A new definition of radial force coefficient is presented, as well as a universal drag curve for flat circular and conical parachutes.

  11. Thought experiments on gravitational forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynden-Bell, D.; Katz, Joseph

    2014-03-01

    Large contributions to the near closure of the Universe and to the acceleration of its expansion are due to the gravitation of components of the stress-energy tensor other than its mass density. To familiarize astronomers with the gravitation of these components we conduct thought experiments on gravity, analogous to the real experiments that our forebears conducted on electricity. By analogy to the forces due to electric currents we investigate the gravitational forces due to the flows of momentum, angular momentum and energy along a cylinder. Under tension the gravity of the cylinder decreases but the `closure' of the 3-space around it increases. When the cylinder carries a torque the flow of angular momentum along it leads to a novel helical interpretation of Levi-Civita's external metric and a novel relativistic effect. Energy currents give gravomagnetic effects in which parallel currents repel and antiparallel currents attract, though such effects must be added to those of static gravity. The gravity of beams of light give striking illustrations of these effects and a re-derivation of light bending via the gravity of the light itself. Faraday's experiments lead us to discuss lines of force of both gravomagnetic and gravity fields. A serious conundrum arises if Landau and Lifshitz's definition of gravitational force is adopted.

  12. Structural Truss Elements and Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troyer, Steve; Griffis, Kurt; Shackelford, Ray

    2005-01-01

    In the field of construction, most structures are supported by several groups of truss systems working together synergistically. A "truss" is a group of centered and balanced elements combined to carry a common load (Warner, 2003). Trusses provide strength against loads and forces within a structure. Though a complex field of study, structural…

  13. Coffee Cup Atomic Force Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashkenaz, David E.; Hall, W. Paige; Haynes, Christy L.; Hicks, Erin M.; McFarland, Adam D.; Sherry, Leif J.; Stuart, Douglas A.; Wheeler, Korin E.; Yonzon, Chanda R.; Zhao, Jing; Godwin, Hilary A.; Van Duyne, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    In this activity, students use a model created from a coffee cup or cardstock cutout to explore the working principle of an atomic force microscope (AFM). Students manipulate a model of an AFM, using it to examine various objects to retrieve topographic data and then graph and interpret results. The students observe that movement of the AFM…

  14. Bonds that strengthen under force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Viola

    2006-03-01

    While the adhesive strength of most receptor-ligand interactions is exponentially reduced if strained, some receptor-ligand complexes exist that strengthen under force which is the hallmark of catch bonds. Although the existence of catch bonds was theoretically predicted, the first experimental demonstrations of their existence were given only recently, i.e. for the bacterial adhesin FimH that is located at the tip of type I fimbriae of E. coli and for p-selectin. In a major collaborative effort, we studied the structural origin by which the FimH-mannose bond is switched by force to a high binding state. Mutational studies were thereby combined with steered molecular dynamic simulations to decipher how force might affect protein conformation. Force-activation of FimH leads to a complex `stick-and-roll' bacterial adhesion behavior in which E. coli preferentially rolls over mannosylated surfaces at low shear but increasingly sticks firmly as the shear is increased. Interesting similarities are further seen if comparing the structural mechanisms by which liganded FimH and liganded integrins are switched to a high binding state. This comparison was made possible by docking fibronectin's 10^th type III module (fnIII10) to αVβ3 integrin. αVβ3 can switch from the ``closed'' αVβ3 integrin headpiece to the ``open'' conformation by opening the hinge angle between the βA domain and the hybrid domain of the β-integrin. The ``open'' state has been implicated by many experimental laboratories to correspond to the activated state of integrins. W. E. Thomas, E. Trintchina, M. Forero, V. Vogel, E. Sokurenko, Bacterial adhesion to target cells enhanced by shear-force, Cell, 109 (2002) 913. W. E. Thomas, L. M. Nilsson, M. Forero, E. V. Sokurenko, V. Vogel, Shear-dependent `stick-and-roll' adhesion of type 1 fimbriated Escherichia coli, Molecular Microbiology 53 (2004) 1545. W. Thomas, M. Forero, O. Yakovenko, L. Nilsson, P. Vicini, E. Sokurenko, V. Vogel, Catch Bond Model

  15. Effective Forces Between Colloidal Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tehver, Riina; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Koplik, Joel

    1999-01-01

    Colloidal suspensions have proven to be excellent model systems for the study of condensed matter and its phase behavior. Many of the properties of colloidal suspensions can be investigated with a systematic variation of the characteristics of the systems and, in addition, the energy, length and time scales associated with them allow for experimental probing of otherwise inaccessible regimes. The latter property also makes colloidal systems vulnerable to external influences such as gravity. Experiments performed in micro-ravity by Chaikin and Russell have been invaluable in extracting the true behavior of the systems without an external field. Weitz and Pusey intend to use mixtures of colloidal particles with additives such as polymers to induce aggregation and form weak, tenuous, highly disordered fractal structures that would be stable in the absence of gravitational forces. When dispersed in a polarizable medium, colloidal particles can ionize, emitting counterions into the solution. The standard interaction potential in these charged colloidal suspensions was first obtained by Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey and Overbeek. The DLVO potential is obtained in the mean-field linearized Poisson-Boltzmann approximation and thus has limited applicability. For more precise calculations, we have used ab initio density functional theory. In our model, colloidal particles are charged hard spheres, the counterions are described by a continuum density field and the solvent is treated as a homogeneous medium with a specified dielectric constant. We calculate the effective forces between charged colloidal particles by integrating over the solvent and counterion degrees of freedom, taking into account the direct interactions between the particles as well as particle-counterion, counterion-counterion Coulomb, counterion entropic and correlation contributions. We obtain the effective interaction potential between charged colloidal particles in different configurations. We evaluate two

  16. Fuel oil quality task force

    SciTech Connect

    Laisy, J.; Turk, V.

    1997-09-01

    In April, 1996, the R.W. Beckett Corporation became aware of a series of apparently unrelated symptoms that made the leadership of the company concerned that there could be a fuel oil quality problem. A task force of company employees and industry consultants was convened to address the topic of current No. 2 heating oil quality and its effect on burner performance. The task force studied changes in fuel oil specifications and trends in properties that have occurred over the past few years. Experiments were performed at Beckett and Brookhaven National Laboratory to understand the effect of changes in some fuel oil properties. Studies by other groups were reviewed, and field installations were inspected to gain information about the performance of fuel oil that is currently being used in the U.S. and Canada. There was a special concern about the use of red dye in heating oils and the impact of sulfur levels due to the October, 1993 requirement of low sulfur (<0.05%) for on-highway diesel fuel. The results of the task force`s efforts were published in July, 1996. The primary conclusion of the task force was that there is not a crisis or widespread general problem with fuel oil quality. Localized problems that were seen may have been related to refinery practices and/or non-traditional fuel sources. System cleanliness is very important and the cause of many oil burner system problems. Finally, heating oil quality should get ongoing careful attention by Beckett engineering personnel and heating oil industry groups.

  17. 22 CFR 130.3 - Armed forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Armed forces. 130.3 Section 130.3 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.3 Armed forces. Armed forces means the army, navy, marine, air force, or coast guard,...

  18. May the Force Be with You!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Timothy; Guy, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Students have a difficult time understanding force, especially when dealing with a moving object. Many forces can be acting on an object at the same time, causing it to stay in one place or move. By directly observing these forces, students can better understand the effect these forces have on an object. With a simple, student-built device called…

  19. 22 CFR 130.3 - Armed forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Armed forces. 130.3 Section 130.3 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.3 Armed forces. Armed forces means the army, navy, marine, air force, or coast guard,...

  20. 22 CFR 130.3 - Armed forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Armed forces. 130.3 Section 130.3 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.3 Armed forces. Armed forces means the army, navy, marine, air force, or coast guard,...

  1. 22 CFR 130.3 - Armed forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Armed forces. 130.3 Section 130.3 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.3 Armed forces. Armed forces means the army, navy, marine, air force, or coast guard,...

  2. 22 CFR 130.3 - Armed forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Armed forces. 130.3 Section 130.3 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.3 Armed forces. Armed forces means the army, navy, marine, air force, or coast guard,...

  3. Articulated Multimedia Physics, Lesson 7, Combining Forces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    As the seventh lesson of the Articulated Multimedia Physics Course, instructional materials are presented in this study guide with relation to the force combination. The topics are concerned with the definition and units of forces, sliding forces on inclined planes, and the equilibrant of two or more forces. The content is arranged in scrambled…

  4. The effect of occlusal forces on restorations.

    PubMed

    Larson, Thomas D

    2014-09-01

    This review will focus on the effect occlusal forces, both normal masticatory force and paranormal bruxing and clenching force, have on various restorative materials and their interaction with the teeth through a variety of bonding mechanisms. Salient physical properties of each of the materials will be reviewed, as well as the effect occlusal force has on restoration durability.

  5. Force dependent metalloprotein conductance by conducting atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianwei; Davis, Jason J.

    2003-09-01

    Our ability to analyse charge transport through a biological macromolecule, pertinent to our understanding not only of biological redox processes but also, for example, to our interpretation of tunnelling imaging, remains a significant practical and theoretical issue. Though much information can be gained by carrying out such examinations at a molecular level, there exist few methods where such controlled analyses are, in fact, feasible. Here we report on the electron transport characteristics of a blue copper metalloprotein as characterized at a refined level by conductive-probe atomic force microscopy. The modulation of this conductance with compressional force has also been examined. Though highly resistive, observations are consistent with the ability of the protein matrix to mediate appreciable tunnelling current. This work, then, paves the way for designed implementation of biomacromolecules into electronic devices.

  6. Cutting Force Control Applying Sensorless Cutting Force Monitoring Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Daisuke; Kakinuma, Yasuhiro; Katsura, Seiichiro

    Intelligent machine tools require the functions of high-accurate process monitoring and adaptive control to fit the optimum process condition in each workpieces. For realizing these functions, the various techniques to monitor the cutting process and control it using additional sensors have been proposed and widely studied. Authors propose the sensorless cutting force control method using parallel disturbance observer. The performance of our proposed method is evaluated through simulation and experiments using a linear motor driving table.

  7. Facing the partner influences exchanges in force

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Atsushi; Bagnato, Carlo; Burdet, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Many studies in psychology have documented how the behaviour of verbally communicating pairs is affected by social factors such as the partner’s gaze. However, few studies have examined whether physically interacting pairs are influenced by social factors. Here, we asked two partners to exchange forces with one another, where the goal was to accurately replicate the force back onto the other. We first measured an individual’s accuracy in reproducing a force from a robot. We then tested pairs who knowingly exchanged forces whilst separated by a curtain. These separated pairs exchanged forces as two independent individuals would, hence the force reproduction accuracy of partners is not affected by knowingly reproducing a force onto a nonvisible partner. On the other hand, pairs who exchanged forces whilst facing one another consistently under-reproduced the partner’s force in comparison to separated partners. Thus, the force reproduction accuracy of subjects is strongly biased by facing a partner. PMID:27739492

  8. Search for a new force

    SciTech Connect

    Thieberger, P.

    1987-01-01

    Horizontal motions of a well-balanced hollow copper sphere floating and almost totally submerged in a well insulated and shielded tank filled with water at 4/sup 0/C were measured in the vicinity of a large cliff. A motion was observed in a direction nearly perpendicular to, and directed away from, the face of the cliff. Conventional explanations for this effect have not been found. The observation is consistent with the existence of a weak, non-Newtonian, substance dependent, medium range force of a magnitude compatible with results deduced from gravity measurements as a function of depth in mines and with conclusions reached in a recent reanalysis of the Eoetvoes experiment. Further measurements with different elements and in different geometries will be required to establish definitely the existence, source, and description of such a new force.

  9. Archimedes force on Casimir apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shevrin, Efim

    2016-08-01

    This paper addresses a problem of Casimir apparatus in dense medium, put in weak gravitational field. The falling of the apparatus has to be governed by the equivalence principle with proper account for contributions to the weight of the apparatus from its material part and from distorted quantum fields. We discuss general expression for the corresponding force in metric with cylindrical symmetry. By way of example, we compute explicit expression for Archimedes force, acting on the Casimir apparatus of finite size, immersed into thermal bath of free scalar field. It is shown that besides universal term, proportional to the volume of the apparatus, there are non-universal quantum corrections, depending on the boundary conditions.

  10. Physicists' Forced Migrations under Hitler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyerchen, Alan

    2011-03-01

    When the Nazis came to power in early 1933 they initiated formal and informal measures that forced Jews and political opponents from public institutions such as universities. Some physicists retired and others went into industry, but most emigrated. International communication and contact made emigration a viable option despite the desperate economic times in the Great Depression. Another wave of emigrations followed the annexation of Austria in 1938. Individual cases as well as general patterns of migration and adaptation to new environments will be examined in this presentation. One important result of the forced migrations was that many of the physicists expelled under Hitler played important roles in strengthening physics elsewhere, often on the Allied side in World War II.

  11. Nuclear Force from String Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Koji

    2010-04-01

    Recent "technology" called holography, or gauge/string duality (AdS/CFT correspondence) found in string theory, makes it possible to compute various quantities of strongly coupled gauge theories. This technology was applied to QCD, and it was found that it describes surprisingly well important properties of low energy QCD, the hadron physics. We apply it further to nuclear physics. In this talk, I review a part of the developments of the holographic QCD, and show a computation of nuclear force at short distance, derived using the holographic QCD, which was done in collaboration with T. Sakai and S. Sugimoto [K. Hashimoto, T. Sakai, and S. Sugimoto, "Holographic Baryons: Static Properties and Form Factors from Gauge/String Duality," Prog. Theor. Phys. 120 (2008) 1093-1137, arXiv:0806.3122 [hep-th]; K. Hashimoto, T. Sakai, and S. Sugimoto, "Nuclear Force from String Theory," arXiv:0901.4449 [hep-th

  12. Mechanical Forces Governing Tissue Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Glenn

    2002-10-01

    We have refined a UV-laser microbeam to investigate the forces at play during morphogenesis, i.e. early biological development, in the fruit fly Drosophila (1). While the microbeam typically is used to ablate tissue with cellular spatial resolution, it has the capability for submicron and thus subcellular spatial resolution. The microbeam can be steered in two-dimensions and UV-laser dissection occurred in vivo while the tissue was imaged in real time using a (visible) laser-scanning confocal microscope. We investigated a morphogenic process, known as dorsal closure, in a genetically engineered strain of Drosophila where green fluorescent protein has been fused to a fragment of a native structural protein (2). This allowed us to visualize the fluorescing contours of two opposing, outer sheets of tissue closing over an inner tissue sheet. Time-lapse imaging captured the contours in native closure as well as in response to UV-laser dissection. Specific patterns of dissection essentially eliminated a selected force: by tracking the changes in contour geometry we estimated the relative magnitude of that force (mechanical jump). Using this approach we identified and characterized a set of forces governing tissue dynamics. We have developed a mechanical model for the dynamics of dorsal closure based on this data set. This model provides a theoretical framework for investigating defective closure in mutant flies. Dorsal closure is a model system for various aspects of cell movement in wound healing and vertebrate development. This research has been supported by the DoD MFEL Program as administered by the AFOSR and by the NIH. 1. M.S. Hutson, Y. Tokutake, M-S. Chang, J.W. Bloor, S. Venakides, D.P. Kiehart, and G.S. Edwards. "Laser dissection of morphogenetic dynamics in Drosophila dorsal closure." In preparation. 2. D.P. Kiehart, et al, J. Cell Biol. 149, 471 (2000).

  13. Physics of Forced Unsteady Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, Lawrence W. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This report contains the proceedings of a workshop held at NASA Ames Research Center in April 1990. This workshop was jointly organized by NASA, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), and the Army Research Office (ARO), and was directed toward improved understanding of the physical processes that cause unsteady separation to occur. The proceedings contain the written contributions for the workshop, and include selected viewgraphs used in the various presentations.

  14. The Falsification of Nuclear Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro Perez, R.; Amaro, J. E.; Ruiz Arriola, E.

    2016-03-01

    We review our work on the statistical uncertainty analysis of the NN force. This is based on the Granada-2013 database where a statistically meaningful partial wave analysis comprising a total of 6713 np and pp published scattering data from 1950 till 2013 below pion production threshold has been made. We stress the necessary conditions required for a correct and self-consistent statistical interpretation of the discrepancies between theory and experiment which enable a subsequent statistical error propagation and correlation analysis

  15. Forced wetting and hydrodynamic assist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Terence D.; Fernandez-Toledano, Juan-Carlos; Doyen, Guillaume; De Coninck, Joël

    2015-11-01

    Wetting is a prerequisite for coating a uniform layer of liquid onto a solid. Wetting failure and air entrainment set the ultimate limit to coating speed. It is well known in the coating art that this limit can be postponed by manipulating the coating flow to generate what has been termed "hydrodynamic assist," but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Experiments have shown that the conditions that postpone air entrainment also reduce the apparent dynamic contact angle, suggesting a direct link, but how the flow might affect the contact angle remains to be established. Here, we use molecular dynamics to compare the outcome of steady forced wetting with previous results for the spontaneous spreading of liquid drops and apply the molecular-kinetic theory of dynamic wetting to rationalize our findings and place them on a quantitative footing. The forced wetting simulations reveal significant slip at the solid-liquid interface and details of the flow immediately adjacent to the moving contact line. Our results confirm that the local, microscopic contact angle is dependent not simply only on the velocity of wetting but also on the nature of the flow that drives it. In particular, they support an earlier suggestion that during forced wetting, an intense shear stress in the vicinity of the contact line can assist surface tension forces in promoting dynamic wetting, thus reducing the velocity-dependence of the contact angle. Hydrodynamic assist then appears as a natural consequence of wetting that emerges when the contact line is driven by a strong and highly confined flow. Our theoretical approach also provides a self-consistent model of molecular slip at the solid-liquid interface that enables its magnitude to be estimated from dynamic contact angle measurements. In addition, the model predicts how hydrodynamic assist and slip may be influenced by liquid viscosity and solid-liquid interactions.

  16. Force sensitivity of plant gravisensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurinavičius, R.; Švegždien≐, D.; Gaina, V.

    Rotation at 4, 10, 50 and 100 rpm on a horizontal clinostat and in microgravity exerts limited effects on the morphogenesis of lettuce and cress root statocytes and statoliths if compared with the vertical control or 1 g spaceflight reference centrifuge. However, the average distance of statoliths from the distal wall increases. The pattern of plastid location of microgravity-grown and that of clino-rotated samples has been determined at 10, 50, and 100 rpm. Experiments on the centrifuge-clinostat and spaceflight centrifuge (acceleration forces of 0.005 to 1 g) revealed that the average statolith location depends on the amplitude of acropetally or basipetally directed mass acceleration. Decreasing the acropetally directed force from 1 g to 0.4 g dislocates statoliths towards the cell center possibly mediated by the elastic forces of the cytoskeleton. In statocytes formed on the clinostat or in microgravity, the majority of statoliths are located at the center of the cell. To force the statoliths from the center of the statocyte towards one of its poles, a threshold mass acceleration of 0.01 g is required. Statocytes with centrally-located statoliths are considerably more effective in transducing a gravistimulus than those with distally-located plastids. The latent time of the graviresponse is shorter and the response itself is enhanced in roots grown on the clinostat compared to vertically grown samples. The early phases of graviperception are independent of root growth conditions since presentation time and g-threshold are similar for roots grown stationary and those on a clinostat. We propose a sequence of events in gravitropic stimulation that considers not only the lateral displacement of statoliths, as predicted by the starch-statolith hypothesis, but also its longitudinal motion, together with differential gravisensitivity of mechanotransducing structures along the lower-most longitudinal cell wall.

  17. Torsional Oscillations with Lorentz Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul

    2007-01-01

    We have built a device that uses the Lorentz force on a current-carrying wire situated in a magnetic field, F = I L x B, in order to demonstrate a slowly varying alternating current by means of an optical lever. The apparatus consists of a horseshoe magnet, a length of thin enamel-coated wire (ours was 0.3 mm thick), a signal generator, a…

  18. Efficacy of naturopathy and yoga in bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Rao, Y Chitharanjan; Kadam, Avinash; Jagannathan, Aarti; Babina, N; Rao, Raghavendra; Nagendra, Hongasandra Ramarao

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to test the efficacy of a one month in-patient naturopathy and yoga programme for patients with asthma. Retrospective data of 159 bronchial asthma patients, undergoing the naturopathy and yoga programme, was analyzed for Forced Vital Capacity, Forced Expiratory Volume at the end of 1 second, Maximum Voluntary Ventilation and Peak Expiratory Flow Rate on admission, 11th day, on discharge and once in three months for three years. The paired sample t test results showed significant increase in the Forced Vital Capacity and Forced Expiratory Volume from the date of admission up to 6th month (P < 0.0035) post Bonferroni correction. Maximum Voluntary Ventilation significantly increased from admission till the date of discharge (P < 0.0035) and Peak Expiratory Flow Rate significantly increased from admission till the 36th month of follow-up (P < 0.0035), post Bonferroni correction. This validated the beneficial effect of combining naturopathy and yoga for the management of bronchial asthma.

  19. Nanorheology by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tai-De; Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Ortiz-Young, Deborah; Riedo, Elisa

    2014-12-01

    We present an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based method to investigate the rheological properties of liquids confined within a nanosize gap formed by an AFM tip apex and a solid substrate. In this method, a conventional AFM cantilever is sheared parallel to a substrate surface by means of a lock-in amplifier while it is approaching and retracting from the substrate in liquid. The normal solvation forces and lateral viscoelastic shear forces experienced by the AFM tip in liquid can be simultaneously measured as a function of the tip-substrate distance with sub-nanometer vertical resolution. A new calibration method is applied to compensate for the linear drift of the piezo transducer and substrate system, leading to a more precise determination of the tip-substrate distance. By monitoring the phase lag between the driving signal and the cantilever response in liquid, the frequency dependent viscoelastic properties of the confined liquid can also be derived. Finally, we discuss the results obtained with this technique from different liquid-solid interfaces. Namely, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and water on mica and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  20. Nanorheology by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Tai-De; Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Ortiz-Young, Deborah; Riedo, Elisa

    2014-12-01

    We present an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based method to investigate the rheological properties of liquids confined within a nanosize gap formed by an AFM tip apex and a solid substrate. In this method, a conventional AFM cantilever is sheared parallel to a substrate surface by means of a lock-in amplifier while it is approaching and retracting from the substrate in liquid. The normal solvation forces and lateral viscoelastic shear forces experienced by the AFM tip in liquid can be simultaneously measured as a function of the tip-substrate distance with sub-nanometer vertical resolution. A new calibration method is applied to compensate for the linear drift of the piezo transducer and substrate system, leading to a more precise determination of the tip-substrate distance. By monitoring the phase lag between the driving signal and the cantilever response in liquid, the frequency dependent viscoelastic properties of the confined liquid can also be derived. Finally, we discuss the results obtained with this technique from different liquid-solid interfaces. Namely, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and water on mica and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. PMID:25554301

  1. Nanorheology by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Tai-De; Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Ortiz-Young, Deborah; Riedo, Elisa

    2014-12-01

    We present an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based method to investigate the rheological properties of liquids confined within a nanosize gap formed by an AFM tip apex and a solid substrate. In this method, a conventional AFM cantilever is sheared parallel to a substrate surface by means of a lock-in amplifier while it is approaching and retracting from the substrate in liquid. The normal solvation forces and lateral viscoelastic shear forces experienced by the AFM tip in liquid can be simultaneously measured as a function of the tip-substrate distance with sub-nanometer vertical resolution. A new calibration method is applied to compensate for the linear drift of the piezo transducer and substrate system, leading to a more precise determination of the tip-substrate distance. By monitoring the phase lag between the driving signal and the cantilever response in liquid, the frequency dependent viscoelastic properties of the confined liquid can also be derived. Finally, we discuss the results obtained with this technique from different liquid-solid interfaces. Namely, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and water on mica and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  2. Volcanic forcing in decadal forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ménégoz, Martin; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco; Guemas, Virginie; Asif, Muhammad; Prodhomme, chloe

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions can significantly impact the climate system, by injecting large amounts of particles into the stratosphere. By reflecting backward the solar radiation, these particles cool the troposphere, and by absorbing the longwave radiation, they warm the stratosphere. As a consequence of this radiative forcing, the global mean surface temperature can decrease by several tenths of degrees. However, large eruptions are also associated to a complex dynamical response of the climate system that is particularly tricky do understand regarding the low number of available observations. Observations seem to show an increase of the positive phases of the Northern Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) the two winters following large eruptions, associated to positive temperature anomalies over the Eurasian continent. The summers following large eruptions are generally particularly cold, especially over the continents of the Northern Hemisphere. Overall, it is really challenging to forecast the climate response to large eruptions, as it is both modulated by, and superimposed to the climate background conditions, largely driven themselves by internal variability at seasonal to decadal scales. This work describes the additional skill of a forecast system used for seasonal and decadal predictions when it includes observed volcanic forcing over the last decades. An idealized volcanic forcing that could be used for real-time forecasts is also evaluated. This work consists in a base for forecasts that will be performed in the context of the next large volcanic eruption.

  3. Nanorheology by atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tai-De; Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Ortiz-Young, Deborah; Riedo, Elisa

    2014-12-15

    We present an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based method to investigate the rheological properties of liquids confined within a nanosize gap formed by an AFM tip apex and a solid substrate. In this method, a conventional AFM cantilever is sheared parallel to a substrate surface by means of a lock-in amplifier while it is approaching and retracting from the substrate in liquid. The normal solvation forces and lateral viscoelastic shear forces experienced by the AFM tip in liquid can be simultaneously measured as a function of the tip-substrate distance with sub-nanometer vertical resolution. A new calibration method is applied to compensate for the linear drift of the piezo transducer and substrate system, leading to a more precise determination of the tip-substrate distance. By monitoring the phase lag between the driving signal and the cantilever response in liquid, the frequency dependent viscoelastic properties of the confined liquid can also be derived. Finally, we discuss the results obtained with this technique from different liquid-solid interfaces. Namely, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and water on mica and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  4. 78 FR 49484 - Exchange of Air Force Real Property for Non-Air Force Real Property

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ... Department of Air Force Exchange of Air Force Real Property for Non-Air Force Real Property SUMMARY: Notice identifies excess Federal real property under administrative jurisdiction of the United States Air Force it... under the administrative jurisdiction of the Air Force. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr....

  5. Multistage Force Amplification of Piezoelectric Stacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Zuo, Lei (Inventor); Jiang, Xiaoning (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Embodiments of the disclosure include an apparatus and methods for using a piezoelectric device, that includes an outer flextensional casing, a first cell and a last cell serially coupled to each other and coupled to the outer flextensional casing such that each cell having a flextensional cell structure and each cell receives an input force and provides an output force that is amplified based on the input force. The apparatus further includes a piezoelectric stack coupled to each cell such that the piezoelectric stack of each cell provides piezoelectric energy based on the output force for each cell. Further, the last cell receives an input force that is the output force from the first cell and the last cell provides an output apparatus force In addition, the piezoelectric energy harvested is based on the output apparatus force. Moreover, the apparatus provides displacement based on the output apparatus force.

  6. Optical Forces on Metastable Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corder, Christopher Scott

    Optical forces using lasers allow precise control over the motion of atoms. The bichromatic optical force (BF) is unique in its large magnitude and velocity range, arising from the absorption and stimulated emission processes. These properties were used to transversely collimate a beam of metastable helium (He*) using the 23S - 23P transition. The collimation created a very bright beam of He*, allowing experiments of neutral atom lithography. The He* beam was used to pattern material surfaces using a resist-based lithography technique, where the pattern was determined by either mechanical or optical masks. The optical masks produced features with a separation of half the wavelength of the light used. Patterning was successfully demonstrated with both IR and UV optical masks. The etched pattern resolution was ˜ 100 nm and limited by the material surface. Further experiments were performed studying the ability of the bichromatic force to cool. The finite velocity range of the BF allows estimation of a characteristic cooling time which is independent of the excited state lifetime, only depending on the atomic mass and optical transition energy. Past experiments, including the helium collimation used for neutral atom lithography, have demonstrated that the BF can collimate and longitudinally slow atomic beams, but required long interaction times that included many spontaneous emission (SE) events. The effect of SE can be mitigated, and is predicted to not be necessary for BF cooling. Since the BF cooling time is not related to the excited state lifetime, a transition can be chosen such that the cooling time is shorter than the SE cycle time, allowing direct laser cooling on atoms and molecules that do not have cycling transitions. Experiments using the helium 2 3S-3P transition were chosen because the BF cooling time (285 ns) is on the order of the average SE cycle time (260 ns). Numerical simulations of the experimental system were run predicting compression of the

  7. Kelvin probe force microscopy in liquid using electrochemical force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Kilpatrick, Jason I; Tselev, Alexander; Okatan, M Baris; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2015-01-01

    Summary Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid–gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe–sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present). Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q water and aqueous NaCl) and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane) liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM), a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved) spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids), KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD) values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions). EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid–liquid interface. PMID:25671164

  8. Kelvin probe force microscopy in liquid using electrochemical force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Kilpatrick, Jason I; Tselev, Alexander; Okatan, M Baris; Kalinin, Sergei V; Rodriguez, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid-gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid-liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe-sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present). Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q water and aqueous NaCl) and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane) liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM), a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved) spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids), KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD) values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions). EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid-liquid interface.

  9. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy in liquid using Electrochemical Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Kilpatrick, J.; Tselev, Alexander; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Rodriguez, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid-gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe-sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present). Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q water and aqueous NaCl) and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane) liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM), a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved) spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids), KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD) values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions). EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid–liquid interface.

  10. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy in liquid using Electrochemical Force Microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Kilpatrick, J.; Tselev, Alexander; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Rodriguez, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid-gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe-sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present). Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q watermore » and aqueous NaCl) and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane) liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM), a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved) spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids), KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD) values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions). EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid–liquid interface.« less

  11. Micromachined piconewton force sensor for biophysics investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Steven J.; Thayer, Gayle E.; Corwin, Alex D.; de Boer, Maarten P.

    2006-10-01

    The authors describe a micromachined force sensor that is able to measure forces as small as 1pN in both air and water. First, they measured the force field produced by an electromagnet on individual 2.8μm magnetic beads glued to the sensor. By repeating with 11 different beads, they measured a 9% standard deviation in saturation magnetization. They next demonstrated that the sensor was fully functional when immersed in physiological buffer. These results show that the force sensors can be useful for magnetic force calibration and also for measurement of biophysical forces on chip.

  12. Micromachined piconewton force sensor for biophysics investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Steven J.; Thayer, Gayle E.; Corwin, Alex D.; Boer, Maarten P. de

    2006-10-23

    We describe a micromachined force sensor that is able to measure forces as small as 1 pN in both air and water. First, we measured the force field produced by an electromagnet on individual 2.8 {mu}m magnetic beads glued to the sensor. By repeating with 11 different beads, we measured a 9% standard deviation in saturation magnetization. We next demonstrated that the sensor was fully functional when immersed in physiological buffer. These results show that the force sensors can be useful for magnetic force calibration and also for measurement of biophysical forces on chip.

  13. Genetically encoded force sensors for measuring mechanical forces in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuexiu; Sachs, Frederick

    2011-01-01

    There are three sources of free energy for cells: chemical potential, electrical potential and mechanical potential. There is little known about the last one since there have not been simple ways to measure stress in proteins in cells. we have now developed genetically encoded force sensors to assess the stress in fibrous proteins in living cells. These FReT based fluorescence sensors can be read out at video rates and provide real time maps of the stress distribution in cells, tissues and animals. The sensors can be inserted into specific proteins and in general do not disturb the normal function or anatomy. The original sensors used mutant GFPs linked by elastic linkers. These sensors provide a linear output with applied stress but the response is linear in strain. To improve contrast and dynamic range we have now developed a new class of sensors that are smaller making them less invasive, and have much higher intrinsic sensitivity since force modulates the angle between the donor and acceptor much more than the distance between them. Known as cpstFRET, the probe shows improved biocompatibility, wider dynamic range and higher sensitivity. PMID:21966553

  14. 80 FR 27688 - Make-Up Meetings of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2015-05-14

    ... of systematic reviews on existing research, and issues recommendations. Task Force recommendations... jurisdictions and constituents. The Task Force's recommendations, along with the systematic reviews of the... Force to consider the findings of systematic reviews and issue findings and recommendations. Task...

  15. Thermal cues and the perception of force.

    PubMed

    Galie, Jessica; Jones, Lynette A

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to examine the effect of temperature on force perception. The objective of the first experiment was to quantify the change in skin temperature of the finger as a function of contact force, in order to characterize how much temperature changes under normal contact conditions. The decrease in temperature ranged from 2.3 to 4.2 degrees C as the force increased from 0.1 to 6 N, averaging 3.2 degrees C across the nine force levels studied. The changes in temperature as a function of force were well above threshold, which suggests that thermal cues could be used to discriminate between contact forces if other sources of sensory information were absent. The second experiment examined whether the perceived magnitude of forces (1-8 N) generated by the index finger changed as a function of the temperature of the contact surface against which the force was produced. A contralateral force-matching procedure was used to evaluate force perception. The results indicated that the perceived magnitude of finger forces did not change as a function of the temperature of the reference contact surface which varied from 22 to 38 degrees C. These results provide further support for the centrally generated theory of force perception and indicate that the thermal intensification of tactually perceived weight does not occur when forces are actively generated.

  16. Factors Affecting Aerosol Radiative Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingxu; Lin, Jintai; Ni, Ruijing

    2016-04-01

    Rapid industrial and economic growth has meant a large amount of aerosols in the atmosphere with strong radiative forcing (RF) upon the climate system. Over parts of the globe, the negative forcing of aerosols has overcompensated for the positive forcing of greenhouse gases. Aerosol RF is determined by emissions and various chemical-transport-radiative processes in the atmosphere, a multi-factor problem whose individual contributors have not been well quantified. In this study, we analyze the major factors affecting RF of secondary inorganic aerosols (SIOAs, including sulfate, nitrate and ammonium), primary organic aerosol (POA), and black carbon (BC). We analyze the RF of aerosols produced by 11 major regions across the globe, including but not limited to East Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, North America, and Western Europe. Factors analyzed include population size, per capita gross domestic production (GDP), emission intensity (i.e., emissions per unit GDP), chemical efficiency (i.e., mass per unit emissions) and radiative efficiency (i.e., RF per unit mass). We find that among the 11 regions, East Asia produces the largest emissions and aerosol RF, due to relatively high emission intensity and a tremendous population size. South Asia produce the second largest RF of SIOA and BC and the highest RF of POA, in part due to its highest chemical efficiency among all regions. Although Southeast Asia also has large emissions, its aerosol RF is alleviated by its lowest chemical efficiency. The chemical efficiency and radiative efficiency of BC produced by the Middle East-North Africa are the highest across the regions, whereas its RF is lowered by a small per capita GDP. Both North America and Western Europe have low emission intensity, compensating for the effects on RF of large population sizes and per capita GDP. There has been a momentum to transfer industries to Southeast Asia and South Asia, and such transition is expected to continue in the coming years. The

  17. Super Unification of All Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacinich, Edward J.

    2003-06-01

    The annihilation of Planck and anti-Planck mass is paramount in explaining the Big-Bang. This total release of primordial energy in the form of electromagnetic-like radiation through `nothing' offers a model similar to the standard model of a Riemannian hypersphere. Our model however would expand radiantly outward from time zero in the form of a hyper-wave which would carry the total energy of the Big-Bang with it. By using this wave concept and the Planck force (FPL) inherent in the quantum vacuum, it is possible to explain the space-time geometry of our universe and complete unification.

  18. Citizen groups: a creative force

    SciTech Connect

    Stoel, T.

    1981-02-01

    The role of citizen groups is as important as that of government agencies when it comes to environmental policy in a democracy. These groups spend little money, yet they have initiated the major US environmental legislation of the past two decades. They are a recent, but effective, force in developing countries even though adversarial approaches are not often appropriate. The methods used by US environmental groups range from lobbying to confrontation in court. Groups outside the US tend to use consensus in democracies and information gathering in developing countries. While the groups' primary concerns are national in scope, international awareness and cooperation are growing. (DCK)

  19. Dynamic force microscopy in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreier, M.; Anselmetti, D.; Richmond, T.; Dammer, U.; Guentherodt, H.-J.

    1994-11-01

    We applied dynamic force microscopy in a liquid environment to silanized and derivatized glass surfaces, InGaAs, as well as to biological materials such as hexagonally packed intermediate layers of deinococcus radiodurans. The vertical and lateral resolution were estimated to be less than 1 A and 7 - 10 nm, respectively. Upon immersing the cantilever into water, the resonance frequency was found to be reduced by a factor of two and the Q factor was lowered to 20 - 30. The experimental working distance between sensor and sample was determined with approach curves indicating that the range of interaction in water is much shorter compared to air.

  20. Glacial cycles and astronomical forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, R.A.; MacDonald, G.J.

    1997-07-11

    Narrow spectral features in ocean sediment records offer strong evidence that the cycles of glaciation were driven by astronomical forces. Two million years ago, the cycles match the 41,000-year period of Earth`s obliquity. This supports the Croll/Milankovitch theory, which attributes the cycles to variations in insolation. But for the past million years, the spectrum is dominated by a single 100,000-year feature and is a poor match to the predictions of insolation models. The spectrum can be accounted for by a theory that derives the cycles of glaciation from variations in the inclination of Earth`s orbital plane.

  1. Gauge unification of fundamental forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Abdus

    The following sections are included: * I. Fundamental Particles, Fundamental Forces, and Gauge Unification * II. The Emergence of Spontaneously Broken SU(2)×U(1) Gauge Theory * III. The Present and Its Problems * IV. Direct Extrapolation from the Electroweak to the Electronuclear * A. The three ideas * B. Tests of electronuclear grand unification * V. Elementarity: Unification with Gravity and Nature of Charge * A. The quest for elementarity, prequarks (preons and pre-preons * B. Post-Planck physics, supergravity, and Einstein's dreams * C. Extended supergravity, SU(8) preons, and composite gauge fields * Appendix A: Examples of Grand Unifying Groups * Appendix B: Does the Grand Plateau really exist * References

  2. General Aviation Task Force report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    General aviation is officially defined as all aviation except scheduled airlines and the military. It is the only air transportation to many communities throughout the world. In order to reverse the recent decline in general aviation aircraft produced in the United States, the Task Force recommends that NASA provide the expertise and facilities such as wind tunnels and computer codes for aircraft design. General aviation manufacturers are receptive to NASA's innovations and technological leadership and are expected to be effective users of NASA-generated technologies.

  3. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

    MedlinePlus

    ... USPSTF Our Members Conflict of Interest Disclosures Task Force 101 Resources Our Partners Reports to Congress Contact ... effort to make the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations clearer and its processes more transparent, ...

  4. The Fourth Force in Nature. Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshak, R. E.

    1971-01-01

    The properties of the weak force between the subatomic particles is described. The weak force is observed in the form of nuclear beta radioactivity. Applications are given to terrestrial and extraterrestrial phenomena. (TS)

  5. Dynamic Force Measurement with Strain Gauges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Bruce E.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the use of four strain gauges, a Wheatstone bridge, and an oscilloscope to measure forces dynamically. Included is an example of determining the centripetal force of a pendulum in a general physics laboratory. (CC)

  6. A Simple Apparatus for Electrostatic Force Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the construction of an apparatus that demonstrates that electrostatic forces can be large and also gives some idea of dependence of electrostatic forces between charged parallel discs on potential differences and separation. (CS)

  7. Down force calibration stand test report

    SciTech Connect

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-08-13

    The Down Force Calibration Stand was developed to provide an improved means of calibrating equipment used to apply, display and record Core Sample Truck (CST) down force. Originally, four springs were used in parallel to provide a system of resistance that allowed increasing force over increasing displacement. This spring system, though originally deemed adequate, was eventually found to be unstable laterally. For this reason, it was determined that a new method for resisting down force was needed.

  8. Grasp force sensor for robotic hands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheinman, Victor D. (Inventor); Bejczy, Antal K. (Inventor); Primus, Howard C. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A grasp force sensor for robotic hands is disclosed. A flexible block is located in the base of each claw through which the grasp force is exerted. The block yields minute parallelogram deflection when the claws are subjected to grasping forces. A parallelogram deflection closely resembles pure translational deflection, whereby the claws remain in substantial alignment with each other during grasping. Strain gauge transducers supply signals which provide precise knowledge of and control over grasp forces.

  9. Mammography compression force in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Poletti, J L

    1994-06-01

    Maximum compression forces have been measured in New Zealand on 37 mammography machines, using a simple hydraulic device. The median measured maximum force was 145 N, and the range 58 to 230 N. Much greater attention needs to be paid to the setting of maximum force for compression devices by service personnel. Compression devices must be included in the quality assurance programme. Where indicated by the machine, the accuracy of the indicated force for some machines is poor. PMID:8074619

  10. Force user's manual: A portable, parallel FORTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Harry F.; Benten, Muhammad S.; Arenstorf, Norbert S.; Ramanan, Aruna V.

    1990-01-01

    The use of Force, a parallel, portable FORTRAN on shared memory parallel computers is described. Force simplifies writing code for parallel computers and, once the parallel code is written, it is easily ported to computers on which Force is installed. Although Force is nearly the same for all computers, specific details are included for the Cray-2, Cray-YMP, Convex 220, Flex/32, Encore, Sequent, Alliant computers on which it is installed.

  11. Repulsive Casimir Force using metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappakrishnan, Venkatesh K.; Mundru, Pattabhiraju C.; Genov, Dentcho A.

    We investigate conditions for Casimir Force (CF) reversal between two parallel half-space metamaterial plates separated by air or vacuum at ambient temperatures. Practically, the Casimir effect can lead to stiction in nanoscale devices, degradation and decreased performance. While material realizations of repulsive CF has been proposed for high dielectric host materials, so far the CF reversal with air/vacuum as intermediate medium remain challenging. Here, we propose a two plate design based on artificial electromagnetic materials known as metamaterials. This configuration allows a simple analytical treatment that accurately describes the large and short distance asymptotics of CF and allows extraction of important parameters such as lower and upper cutoff gap distances that define the repulsive force window. A parametric study has been performed in terms of the plate's dielectric and magnetic plasma frequencies, plate separation distance and temperature. The parametric domain for achieving CF reversal is identified. If successfully implemented the proposed design could potentially result in frictionless bio-fluid transport devices, quantum levitation and coating for ultra-clean room environment.

  12. Vegetation forcing and convective motion

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, X.; Leach, M.J.; Raman, S.

    1995-04-01

    A large irrigated vegetation area in a semiarid or relatively dry location is a strong surface forcing of thermal circulations. Several observational studies have found that such thermally induced mesoscale circulation may contribute to the triggering and development of convective clouds. In the western United States, extensive areas of irrigated farmland are surrounded by hot, dry surfaces, such as a steppe. Substantial gradients of sensible heating in the horizontal direction lead to a {open_quotes}farm breeze{close_quotes} circulation from the cooler agricultural area to the warmer steppes found at Boardman, Oregon. These thermally forced circulations may trigger convection by the related convergence and updraft motion under favorable atmospheric conditions. The role of vegetative covering in convective motion is investigated using a mesoscale numerical model. Two- and three-dimensional simulations are described. The effects of atmospheric stability, moisture in the lower atmosphere, moisture in the upper atmosphere, and horizontal heating scale on thermally induced clouds are studied. The horizontal scale of inhomogeneity is also studied using the two-dimensional model. Finally, a realistic vegetation distribution similar to that of the Boardman Regional Flux Experiment is used in the three-dimensional simulations.

  13. Zero side force volute development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, P. G.; Franz, R. J.; Farmer, R. C.; Chen, Y. S.

    1995-01-01

    Collector scrolls on high performance centrifugal pumps are currently designed with methods which are based on very approximate flowfield models. Such design practices result in some volute configurations causing excessive side loads even at design flowrates. The purpose of this study was to develop and verify computational design tools which may be used to optimize volute configurations with respect to avoiding excessive loads on the bearings. The new design methodology consisted of a volute grid generation module and a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) module to describe the volute geometry and predict the radial forces for a given flow condition, respectively. Initially, the CFD module was used to predict the impeller and the volute flowfields simultaneously; however, the required computation time was found to be excessive for parametric design studies. A second computational procedure was developed which utilized an analytical impeller flowfield model and an ordinary differential equation to describe the impeller/volute coupling obtained from the literature, Adkins & Brennen (1988). The second procedure resulted in 20 to 30 fold increase in computational speed for an analysis. The volute design analysis was validated by postulating a volute geometry, constructing a volute to this configuration, and measuring the steady radial forces over a range of flow coefficients. Excellent agreement between model predictions and observed pump operation prove the computational impeller/volute pump model to be a valuable design tool. Further applications are recommended to fully establish the benefits of this new methodology.

  14. Optical forces in nanorod metamaterial

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanov, Andrey A.; Shalin, Alexander S.; Ginzburg, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Optomechanical manipulation of micro and nano-scale objects with laser beams finds use in a large span of multidisciplinary applications. Auxiliary nanostructuring could substantially improve performances of classical optical tweezers by means of spatial localization of objects and intensity required for trapping. Here we investigate a three-dimensional nanorod metamaterial platform, serving as an auxiliary tool for the optical manipulation, able to support and control near-field interactions and generate both steep and flat optical potential profiles. It was shown that the ‘topological transition’ from the elliptic to hyperbolic dispersion regime of the metamaterial, usually having a significant impact on various light-matter interaction processes, does not strongly affect the distribution of optical forces in the metamaterial. This effect is explained by the predominant near-fields contributions of the nanostructure to optomechanical interactions. Semi-analytical model, approximating the finite size nanoparticle by a point dipole and neglecting the mutual re-scattering between the particle and nanorod array, was found to be in a good agreement with full-wave numerical simulation. In-plane (perpendicular to the rods) trapping regime, saddle equilibrium points and optical puling forces (directed along the rods towards the light source), acting on a particle situated inside or at the nearby the metamaterial, were found. PMID:26514667

  15. Static in situ calibration of force plates.

    PubMed

    Hall, M G; Fleming, H E; Dolan, M J; Millbank, S F; Paul, J P

    1996-05-01

    An in situ calibration protocol for ground-to-foot force measuring platforms is described. The methodology allows verification of the function of the force plate and allows accurate calibration for three force and moment channels. The effect of cross-sensitivity on recorded data is discussed along with the need for improvements in methodology to quantify this property.

  16. 77 FR 30875 - Armed Forces Day, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ... Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-sixth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8823 of May 18, 2012 Armed Forces Day, 2012 By the President of the United... circumstances. On Armed Forces Day, we pay tribute to the unparalleled service of our Armed Forces and...

  17. 24 CFR 968.120 - Force account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Force account. 968.120 Section 968... PUBLIC HOUSING MODERNIZATION General § 968.120 Force account. (a) For both CIAP and CGP, a PHA may undertake the activities using force account labor, only where specifically approved by HUD in the...

  18. 24 CFR 968.120 - Force account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Force account. 968.120 Section 968... PUBLIC HOUSING MODERNIZATION General § 968.120 Force account. (a) For both CIAP and CGP, a PHA may undertake the activities using force account labor, only where specifically approved by HUD in the...

  19. Precipitation Response to Regional Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindell, D. T.; Voulgarakis, A.; Faluvegi, G.; Milly, G.

    2012-01-01

    Precipitation shifts can have large impacts on human society and ecosystems. Many aspects of how inhomogeneous radiative forcings influence precipitation remain unclear, however. Here we investigate regional precipitation responses to various forcings imposed in different latitude bands in a climate model. We find that several regions show strong, significant responses to most forcings, but that the magnitude and even the sign depends upon the forcing location and type. Aerosol and ozone forcings typically induce larger responses than equivalent carbon dioxide (CO2) forcing, and the influence of remote forcings often outweighs that of local forcings. Consistent with this, ozone and especially aerosols contribute greatly to precipitation changes over the Sahel and South and East Asia in historical simulations, and inclusion of aerosols greatly increases the agreement with observed trends in these areas, which cannot be attributed to either greenhouse gases or natural forcings. Estimates of precipitation responses derived from multiplying our Regional Precipitation Potentials (RPP; the response per unit forcing relationships) by historical forcings typically capture the actual response in full transient climate simulations fairly well, suggesting that these relationships may provide useful metrics. The strong sensitivity to aerosol and ozone forcing suggests that although some air quality improvements may unmask greenhouse gas-induced warming, they have large benefits for reducing regional disruption of the hydrologic cycle.

  20. Force Measurements in Vibration and Acoustic Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, T. D.

    1996-01-01

    The advent of triaxial, piezoelectric force gages and the associated signal processing is a precursor to several dynamics testing innovations. This new technology is applicable to spacecraft programs that JPL manages. An application of force measurement is force limiting (when testing spacecraft in random vibration tests). Base-drive and acoustic modal testing is a potential application.