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Sample records for 1-year mortality conclusions

  1. Observational Study of 1-Year Mortality Rates Before and After a Major Earthquake Among Chinese Nonagenarians

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Birong; Wu, Hongmei; Zhang, Yanling; Guralnik, Jack M.; Malmstrom, Theodore K.; Morley, John E.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Little is known about mortality among nonagenarians after an earthquake. Methods. Using secondary data analyses from the 2005 study called the Project of Longevity and Aging in Dujiangyan(n = 870), 1-year mortality rates were compared among a pre-earthquake group and a post-earthquake group of nonagenarians. All participants were from Dujiangyan, 50 km from the epicenter of the May 12, 2008 earthquake, in China. The pre-earthquake group was a subset of the 870 Project of Longevity and Aging in Dujiangyan participants, ages 93–95 years at the beginning of “Time Frame 1” (July 2005 through June 2006; n = 228). The post-earthquake group was a different subset of the 870 Project of Longevity and Aging in Dujiangyan participants, ages 93–95 years and alive at the beginning of Time Frame 2 (July 2008 through June 2009; n = 235). Time Frame 2 excluded a 7-week period following the earthquake in order to account for deaths due to trauma. Pre-earthquake health assessment data from the 2005 Project of Longevity and Aging in Dujiangyan study were used to calculate unadjusted/adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for mortality. Results. One-year mortality rates were 8.3% (19/228) and 16.2% (38/235) in the pre-earthquake group and the post-earthquake group, respectively (p =.01). In unadjusted analyses, only “being in the post-earthquake group” was associated with death (HR = 2.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.17–3.53; p = .011). In the multivariable Cox regression model, being in the post-earthquake group continued to be the strongest risk factor associated with mortality (HR = 2.47; 95% CI, 1.39–4.40; p = .002). Other significant risk factors included impaired cognition (HR = 1.97; 95% CI, 1.10–3.53; p = .024), serum albumin (HR = 0.90; 95% CI, 0.82–0.98; p < .015), and serum triglycerides (HR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.15–1.99; p = .003). Conclusion. The May 12, 2008 earthquake in Wenchuan, China, was associated with a twofold increase in the 1-year

  2. Anhedonia Predicts Major Adverse Cardiac Events and Mortality in Patients 1 Year After Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Karina W.; Burg, Matthew M.; Kronish, Ian M.; Shimbo, Daichi; Dettenborn, Lucia; Mehran, Roxana; Vorchheimer, David; Clemow, Lynn; Schwartz, Joseph E.; Lespérance, Francois; Rieckmann, Nina

    2010-01-01

    Context Depression is a consistent predictor of recurrent events and mortality in ACS patients, but it has 2 core diagnostic criteria with distinct biological correlates—depressed mood and anhedonia. Objective To determine if depressed mood and/or anhedonia (loss of pleasure or interest) predict 1-year medical outcomes for patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS). Design Observational cohort study of post-ACS patients hospitalized between May 2003 and June 2005. Within one week of admission, patients underwent a structured psychiatric interview to assess clinically impairing depressed mood, anhedonia, and major depressive episode (MDE); also assessed were the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events risk score, Charlson comorbidity index, left ventricular ejection fraction, antidepressant use, and depressive symptom severity. Setting Coronary care and cardiac care step-down units of 3 university hospitals in New York and Connecticut. Participants Consecutive sample of 453 ACS patients (aged 25–93 years; 42% women). Main Outcomes Measures All-cause mortality (ACM) and documented major adverse cardiac events (MACE; myocardial infarction, hospitalization for unstable angina, or urgent revascularization) were actively surveyed for 1 year after admission. Results There were 67 events (16 deaths and 51 MACE; 14.8%). 108 (24%) and 77 (17%) patients with anhedonia and depressed mood, respectively. After controlling for sex, age, and medical covariates, anhedonia (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.58; 95% confidence interval, 1.16–2.14; P<.01) and MDE (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–2.04; P=.02) were significant predictors of combined MACE/ACM, but depressed mood was not. Anhedonia continued to significantly predict outcomes controlling for MDE diagnosis and depressive symptom severity, each of which were no longer significant. Conclusions Anhedonia identifies risk for MACE/ACM beyond that of established medical prognostic indicators

  3. Spiritual absence and 1-year mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Deidre B; Christian, Lisa M; Patidar, Seema; Bishop, Michelle M; Dodd, Stacy M; Athanason, Rebecca; Wingard, John R; Reddy, Vijay S

    2010-08-01

    Religiosity and spirituality have been associated with better survival in large epidemiologic studies. This study examined the relationship between spiritual absence and 1-year all-cause mortality in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. Depression and problematic compliance were examined as possible mediators of a significant spiritual absence-mortality relationship. Eighty-five adults (mean = 46.85 years old, SD = 11.90 years) undergoing evaluation for allogeneic HSCT had routine psychologie evaluation prior to HSCT admission. The Millon Behavioral Medicine Diagnostic was used to assess spiritual absence, depression, and problematic compliance, the psychosocial predictors of interest. Patient status at 1 year and survival time in days were abstracted from medical records. Cox regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between the psychosocial factors of interest and mortality after adjusting for relevant biobehavioral factors. Twenty-nine percent (n = 25) of participants died within 1 year of HSCT. After covarying for disease type, individuals with the highest spiritual absence and problematic compliance scores were significantly more likely to die 1-year post-HSCT (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.49, P = .043 and HR = 3.74, P = .029, respectively), particularly secondary to infection, sepsis, or graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (HR = 4.56, P = .01 and HR = 5.61, P = .014), relative to those without elevations on these scales. Depression was not associated with 1-year mortality, and problematic compliance did not mediate the relationship between spiritual absence and mortality. These preliminary results suggest that both spiritual absence and problematic compliance may be associated with poorer survival following HSCT. Future research should examine these relations in a larger sample using a more comprehensive assessment of spirituality. PMID:20227510

  4. 30-day mortality after coronary artery bypass grafting and valve surgery has greatly improved over the last decade, but the 1-year mortality remains constant

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Laura Sommer; Hjortdal, Vibeke Elisabeth; Andreasen, Jan Jesper; Mortensen, Poul Erik; Jakobsen, Carl-Johan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation (EuroSCORE) is a valuable tool in control of the quality of cardiac surgery. However, the validity of the risk score for the individual patient may be questioned. The present study was carried out to investigate whether the continued fall in short-term mortality reflects an actual improvement in late mortality, and subsequently, to investigate EuroSCORE as predictor of 1-year mortality. Methods: A population-based cohort study of 25,602 patients from a 12-year period from three public university hospitals undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or valve surgery. Analysis was carried out based on EuroSCORE, age and co-morbidity factors (residual EuroSCORE). Results: During the period the average age increased from 65.1 ± 10.0 years to 68.9 ± 10.7 years (P < 0.001, one-way ANOVA), and the number of females increased from 26.0% to 28.2% (P = 0.0012, Chi-square test). The total EuroSCORE increased from 4.67 to 5.68 while the residual EuroSCORE decreased from 2.64 to 1.83. Thirty-day mortality decreased from 4.07% in 1999–2000 to 2.44% in 2011–2012 (P = 0.0056; Chi-square test), while 1-year mortality was unchanged (6.50% in 1999–2000 vs. 6.25% in 2011–2012 [P = 0.8086; Chi-square test]). Discussion: The study demonstrates that both co-morbidity and age has a great impact on 30-day mortality. However, with time the impact of co-morbidity seems less. Thus, age is more important than co-morbidity in late mortality. The various developments in short and long-term mortality are not readily explained. Conclusion: Although 30-day mortality of CABG and valve surgery patients has decreased during the 12-year period, the 1-year mortality remains the same. PMID:25849679

  5. Factors associated with postoperative complications and 1-year mortality after surgery for colorectal cancer in octogenarians and nonagenarians

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Wan; Kim, Ik Yong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify the factors affecting 30-day postoperative complications and 1-year mortality after surgery for colorectal cancer in octogenarians and nonagenarians. Methods Between 2005 and 2014, a total of 204 consecutive patients aged ≥80 years who underwent major colorectal surgery were included. Results One hundred patients were male (49%) and 52 patients had American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score ≥3 (25%). Combined surgery was performed in 32 patients (16%). Postoperative complications within 30 days after surgery occurred in 54 patients (26%) and 30-day mortality occurred in five patients (2%). Independent risk factors affecting 30-day postoperative complications were older age (≥90 years, hazard ratio [HR] with 95% confidence interval [CI] =4.95 [1.69−14.47], P=0.004), an ASA score ≥3 (HR with 95% CI =4.19 [1.8−9.74], P=0.001), performance of combined surgery (HR with 95% CI =3.1 [1.13−8.46], P=0.028), lower hemoglobin level (<10 g/dL, HR with 95% CI =7.56 [3.07−18.63], P<0.001), and lower albumin level (<3.4 g/dL, HR with 95% CI =3.72 [1.43−9.69], P=0.007). An ASA score ≥3 (HR with 95% CI =2.72 [1.15−6.46], P=0.023), tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage IV (HR with 95% CI =3.47 [1.44−8.39], P=0.006), and occurrence of postoperative complications (HR with 95% CI =4.42 [1.39−14.09], P=0.012) were significant prognostic factors for 1-year mortality. Conclusion Patient-related factors (older age, higher ASA score, presence of anemia, and lower serum albumin) and procedure-related factors (performance of combined surgical procedure) increased postoperative complications. Avoidance of 30-day postoperative complications may decrease 1-year mortality. PMID:27279741

  6. Artificial neural network models for predicting 1-year mortality in elderly patients with intertrochanteric fractures in China

    PubMed Central

    Shi, L.; Wang, X.C.; Wang, Y.S.

    2013-01-01

    The mortality rate of older patients with intertrochanteric fractures has been increasing with the aging of populations in China. The purpose of this study was: 1) to develop an artificial neural network (ANN) using clinical information to predict the 1-year mortality of elderly patients with intertrochanteric fractures, and 2) to compare the ANN's predictive ability with that of logistic regression models. The ANN model was tested against actual outcomes of an intertrochanteric femoral fracture database in China. The ANN model was generated with eight clinical inputs and a single output. ANN's performance was compared with a logistic regression model created with the same inputs in terms of accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and discriminability. The study population was composed of 2150 patients (679 males and 1471 females): 1432 in the training group and 718 new patients in the testing group. The ANN model that had eight neurons in the hidden layer had the highest accuracies among the four ANN models: 92.46 and 85.79% in both training and testing datasets, respectively. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves of the automatically selected ANN model for both datasets were 0.901 (95%CI=0.814-0.988) and 0.869 (95%CI=0.748-0.990), higher than the 0.745 (95%CI=0.612-0.879) and 0.728 (95%CI=0.595-0.862) of the logistic regression model. The ANN model can be used for predicting 1-year mortality in elderly patients with intertrochanteric fractures. It outperformed a logistic regression on multiple performance measures when given the same variables. PMID:24270906

  7. Risk Score to Predict 1-Year Mortality after Haemodialysis Initiation in Patients with Stage 5 Chronic Kidney Disease under Predialysis Nephrology Care

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Few risk scores are available for predicting mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients undergoing predialysis nephrology care. Here, we developed a risk score using predialysis nephrology practice data to predict 1-year mortality following the initiation of haemodialysis (HD) for CKD patients. Methods This was a multicenter cohort study involving CKD patients who started HD between April 2006 and March 2011 at 21 institutions with nephrology care services. Patients who had not received predialysis nephrology care at an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of approximately 10 mL/min per 1.73 m2 were excluded. Twenty-nine candidate predictors were selected, and the final model for 1-year mortality was developed via multivariate logistic regression and was internally validated by a bootstrapping technique. Results A total of 688 patients were enrolled, and 62 (9.0%) patients died within one year of HD initiation. The following variables were retained in the final model: eGFR, serum albumin, calcium, Charlson Comorbidity Index excluding diabetes and renal disease (modified CCI), performance status (PS), and usage of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA). Their β-coefficients were transformed into integer scores: three points were assigned to modified CCI≥3 and PS 3–4; two to calcium>8.5 mg/dL, modified CCI 1–2, and no use of ESA; and one to albumin<3.5 g/dL, eGFR>7 mL/min per 1.73 m2, and PS 1–2. Predicted 1-year mortality risk was 2.5% (score 0–4), 5.5% (score 5–6), 15.2% (score 7–8), and 28.9% (score 9–12). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.83 (95% confidence interval, 0.79–0.89). Conclusions We developed a simple 6-item risk score predicting 1-year mortality after the initiation of HD that might help nephrologists make a shared decision with patients and families regarding the initiation of HD. PMID:26057129

  8. Mortality in primary angioplasty patients starting antiplatelet therapy with prehospital prasugrel or clopidogrel: a 1-year follow-up from the European MULTIPRAC Registry

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Patrick; Grieco, Niccolò; Ince, Hüseyin; Danchin, Nicolas; Ramos, Yvonne; Goedicke, Jochen; Clemmensen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Aim MULTIPRAC was designed to provide insights into the use and outcomes associated with prehospital initiation of antiplatelet therapy with either prasugrel or clopidogrel in the context of primary percutaneous coronary intervention. After a previous report on efficacy and safety outcomes during hospitalization, we report here the 1-year follow-up data, including cardiovascular (CV) mortality. Methods and results MULTIPRAC is a multinational, prospective registry of patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) from 25 hospitals in nine countries, all of which had an established practice of prehospital start of dual antiplatelet therapy in place. The key outcome was CV death at 1 year. Among 2,036 patients followed-up through 1 year, 49 died (2.4%), 10 during the initial hospitalization and 39 within 1 year after hospital discharge. The primary analysis was based on the P2Y12-inhibitor, used from prehospital loading dose through hospital discharge. Prasugrel (n=824) was more commonly used than clopidogrel (n=425). The observed 1-year rates for CV death were 0.5% with prasugrel and 2.6% with clopidogrel. After adjustment for differences in baseline characteristics, treatment with prasugrel was associated with a significantly lower risk of CV death than treatment with clopidogrel (odds ratio 0.248; 95% confidence interval 0.06–0.89). Conclusion In STEMI patients from routine practice undergoing primary angioplasty, who were able to start oral antiplatelet therapy prehospital, treatment with prasugrel as compared to clopidogrel was associated with a lower risk of CV death at 1-year follow-up. PMID:27143908

  9. A risk score for predicting 1-year mortality in patients ≥75 years of age presenting with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Angeli, Fabio; Cavallini, Claudio; Verdecchia, Paolo; Morici, Nuccia; Del Pinto, Maurizio; Petronio, Anna Sonia; Antonicelli, Roberto; Murena, Ernesto; Bossi, Irene; De Servi, Stefano; Savonitto, Stefano

    2015-07-15

    Approximately 1/3 of patients with non-ST-segment elevation (NSTE) acute coronary syndromes (ACS) are ≥75 years of age. Risk stratification in these patients is generally difficult because supporting evidence is scarce. The investigators developed and validated a simple risk prediction score for 1-year mortality in patients ≥75 years of age presenting with NSTE ACS. The derivation cohort was the Italian Elderly ACS trial, which included 313 patients with NSTE ACS aged ≥75 years. A logistic regression model was developed to predict 1-year mortality. The validation cohort was a registry cohort of 332 patients with NSTE ACS meeting the same inclusion criteria as for the Italian Elderly ACS trial but excluded from the trial for any reason. The risk score included 5 statistically significant covariates: previous vascular event, hemoglobin level, estimated glomerular filtration rate, ischemic electrocardiographic changes, and elevated troponin level. The model allowed a maximum score of 6. The score demonstrated a good discriminating power (C statistic = 0.739) and calibration, even among subgroups defined by gender and age. When validated in the registry cohort, the scoring system confirmed a strong association with the risk for all-cause death. Moreover, a score ≥3 (the highest baseline risk group) identified a subset of patients with NSTE ACS most likely to benefit from an invasive approach. In conclusion, the risk for 1-year mortality in patients ≥75 years of age with NSTE ACS is substantial and can be predicted through a score that can be easily derived at the bedside at hospital presentation. The score may help in guiding treatment strategy. PMID:25978978

  10. Predicting 1-Year Mortality Rate for Patients Admitted With an Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease to an Intensive Care Unit: An Opportunity for Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Batzlaff, Cassandra M.; Karpman, Craig; Afessa, Bekele; Benzo, Roberto P.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a model to aid clinicians in better predicting 1-year mortality rate for patients with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease admitted to the medical intensive care unit (ICU) with the goal of earlier initiation of palliative care and end-of-life communications in this patient population. This retrospective cohort study included patients from a medical ICU from April 1, 1995, to November 30, 2009. Data collected from the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III database included demographic characteristics; severity of illness scores; noninvasive and invasive mechanical ventilation time; ICU and hospital length of stay; and ICU, hospital, and 1-year mortality. Statistically significant univariate variables for 1-year mortality were entered into a multivariate model, and the independent variables were used to generate a scoring system to predict 1-year mortality rate. At 1-year follow-up, 295 of 591 patients died (50%). Age and hospital length of stay were identified as independent determinants of mortality at 1 year by using multivariate analysis, and the predictive model developed had an area under the operating curve of 0.68. Bootstrap analysis with 1000 iterations validated the model, age, and hospital length of stay, entered the model 100% of the time (area under the operating curve=0.687; 95% CI, 0.686–0.688). A simple model using age and hospital length of stay may be informative for providers willing to identify patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with high 1-year mortality rate who may benefit from end-of-life communications and from palliative care. PMID:24656805

  11. Incidence of WHO Stage 3 and 4 Events, Tuberculosis, and Mortality in Untreated, HIV-Infected Children Enrolling in Care Before 1 Year of Age: An Iedea (International Epidemiologic Databases To Evaluate AIDS) East Africa Regional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ciaranello, Andrea; Lu, Zhigang; Ayaya, Samuel; Losina, Elena; Musick, Beverly; Vreeman, Rachel; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Abrams, Elaine J.; Dillabaugh, Lisa; Doherty, Katie; Ssali, John; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T.; Wools-Kaloustian, Kara

    2014-01-01

    Background Few studies have reported CD4%- and age-stratified rates of WHO Stage 3 (WHO3) events, WHO Stage 4 (WHO4) events, tuberculosis (TB), and mortality in HIV-infected infants before initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods HIV-infected children enrolled before 1 year of age in the International Epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS (IeDEA) East Africa region (10/01/2002-11/30/2008) were included. We estimated incidence rates of earliest clinical event (WHO3, WHO4, and TB), prior to ART initiation per local guidelines, stratified by current age (< or ≥6 months) and current CD4% (<15%, 15–24%, ≥25%). CD4%-stratified mortality rates were estimated separately for children who did not experience a clinical event (“background” mortality) and for children who experienced an event, including “acute” mortality (≤30 days post-event) and “later” mortality (>30 days post-event). Results Among 847 children (median enrollment age: 4.8 months; median pre-ART follow-up: 10.8 months; 603 (71%) with ≥1 CD4% recorded), event rates were comparable for those aged <6 and ≥6 months. Current CD4% was associated with risk of WHO4 events for children <6 months old, and with all evaluated events for children ≥6 months old (p<0.05). “Background” mortality was 3.7–8.4/100py. “Acute” mortality (≤30 days post-event) was 33.8/100py (after TB) and 41.1/100py (after WHO3 or WHO4). “Later” mortality (>30 days post-event) ranged by CD4% from 4.7–29.1/100py. Conclusions In treatment-naïve, HIV-infected infants, WHO3, WHO4, and TB events were common before and after 6 months of age and led to substantial increases in mortality. Early infant HIV diagnosis and treatment are critically important, regardless of CD4%. PMID:24378935

  12. External validation of the Hospital-patient One-year Mortality Risk (HOMR) model for predicting death within 1 year after hospital admission

    PubMed Central

    van Walraven, Carl; McAlister, Finlay A.; Bakal, Jeffrey A.; Hawken, Steven; Donzé, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Background: Predicting long-term survival after admission to hospital is helpful for clinical, administrative and research purposes. The Hospital-patient One-year Mortality Risk (HOMR) model was derived and internally validated to predict the risk of death within 1 year after admission. We conducted an external validation of the model in a large multicentre study. Methods: We used administrative data for all nonpsychiatric admissions of adult patients to hospitals in the provinces of Ontario (2003–2010) and Alberta (2011–2012), and to the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston (2010–2012) to calculate each patient’s HOMR score at admission. The HOMR score is based on a set of parameters that captures patient demographics, health burden and severity of acute illness. We determined patient status (alive or dead) 1 year after admission using population-based registries. Results: The 3 validation cohorts (n = 2 862 996 in Ontario, 210 595 in Alberta and 66 683 in Boston) were distinct from each other and from the derivation cohort. The overall risk of death within 1 year after admission was 8.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 8.7% to 8.8%). The HOMR score was strongly and significantly associated with risk of death in all populations and was highly discriminative, with a C statistic ranging from 0.89 (95% CI 0.87 to 0.91) to 0.92 (95% CI 0.91 to 0.92). Observed and expected outcome risks were similar (median absolute difference in percent dying in 1 yr 0.3%, interquartile range 0.05%–2.5%). Interpretation: The HOMR score, calculated using routinely collected administrative data, accurately predicted the risk of death among adult patients within 1 year after admission to hospital for nonpsychiatric indications. Similar performance was seen when the score was used in geographically and temporally diverse populations. The HOMR model can be used for risk adjustment in analyses of health administrative data to predict long-term survival among hospital patients

  13. Sweet Conclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirley, Britt M.; Wooldridge, Barbara Ross; Camp, Kerri M.

    2012-01-01

    Jen Harrington is the owner and pastry chef of Sweet Conclusion, a bakery in Tampa, Florida. Most of Harrington's business comes from baking wedding cakes, but she has been attempting to attract customers to her retail bakery, where she sells cupcakes, pies, ice cream, and coffee. Nearly four years she opened Sweet Conclusion, the retail part of…

  14. [Prognostic factors of hospital mortality from diarrhea or pneumonia in infants younger than 1 year old. A case-control study].

    PubMed

    Post, C L; Victora, C G; Valente, J G; Leal, M do C; Niobey, F M; Sabroza, P C

    1992-12-01

    Diarrhea and pneumonia are common diseases in children aged under one year, for which there are simple therapeutic measures. However, infant mortality due to these diseases is still very high, varying markedly according to socio-economic status. The characteristics of children who died (cases) and of those who were hospitalized with diarrhea or pneumonia, but survived (controls), were studied. The following groups of variables were studied: socio-economic, environmental and biological conditions, nutritional status and breast-feeding. Information on cases and controls was collected from hospital records and through home interviews. Important losses occurred in the latter: 40% of cases and 50% of controls were not interviewed. There were no significant differences between cases who were included and those who were not, in terms of age, sex or place of residence. To estimate relative risks of prognostic factors unconditional Logistic Regression was used to calculate the odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals. Prematurity, low birth weight, weight/age deficit, presence of edema and poor general status at hospital admission were prognostic factors for hospital case-fatality. In relation to the anthropometric variables, it was not possible to conclude for certain whether the increased case-fatality was linearly or non-linearly (threshold) associated with nutritional deficit. The duration of breast-feeding was only associated with case-fatality for pneumonia. Socio-economic factors were not important for the prognosis of children admitted to hospital with diarrhea or pneumonia. Some of the expected risk factor associations were not detected, maybe due to the small sample size (resulting from the high losses) which was insufficient to show small differences. In this study the biological conditions of children with diarrhea or pneumonia appeared to be the important prognostic factors for hospital case-fatality. PMID:1342527

  15. Emotional Development: 1 Year Olds

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Emotional Development: 1 Year Olds Page Content Article Body Throughout her ... for shelter. She may seem to change from one moment to the next, or she may seem ...

  16. Social Development: 1 Year Olds

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stages Prenatal Baby Toddler Fitness Nutrition Toilet Training Preschool Gradeschool Teen Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Toddler > Social Development: 1 Year Olds Ages & Stages Listen Español ...

  17. Beginning without a Conclusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Describes a series of activities without conclusions to introduce scientific reasoning in a ninth grade physical science course. Uses popcorn popping to get students to think about the concepts of graphing, histograms, frequency, probability, and scientific methodology. (CW)

  18. Conclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivancevic, Vladimir G.; Reid, Darryn J.

    2015-11-01

    It is often held that things should always be made simple, which presumes that either that they can always be made simple or that all the jetisoned logic doesn't matter anyway. Alledgedly, anything should be explainable so that anyone can understand it. Don't get bogged down in dreary details. It should be effortless for the reader: low-dimensional systems exhibit complex behaviour while high-dimensional systems exhibit simple behaviour (to return to our prolegomonal opening), competition is a universal solution, demand must increase as price falls, and everything under the sun neatly fits a power law. Or so the story goes...

  19. Conclusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Wong, Terry T.

    2011-01-01

    This compilation of papers in this book represents approximately half of the works discussed at the MS&T 2010 symposium entitled Tools, Models, Databases, and Simulation Tools Developed and Needed to Realize the Vision of Integrated Computational Materials Engineering at Materials Science & Technology wherein five sessions comprised of 33 presentations was organized. The goal of the symposium was two fold To provide a forum in which current state-of-the-art methods for ICME (e.g., information informatics, experimentation, and modeling) could be openly discussed and critiqued by not only materials scientist but also structural engineers/researchers, component designers, industrial leaders and government program managers. To leave the symposium and in particular the panel discussion with a clear idea of the gaps and barriers (both technical, cultural and economical) that must be addressed in order for ICME to fully succeed. The organizers felt that these goals were met, as particularly evident by the standing room only attendance during a lively panel discussion session at the end of the Symposium. However it is the firm belief of the editors of this book that this symposium was merely a start in the right direction, and that subsequent conferences/symposium (e.g., First World Congress on Integrated Computational Materials Engineering to be held July 10-14, 2011 at Seven Springs Mountain Resort in Pennsylvania) must work hard to ensure that a truly diverse, multidisciplinary, community of researchers and practitioners are present and have ample opportunity for interaction. This will ensure that a proper balance between push and pull disciplines and technologies is maintained so that this emerging focus area, Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME), has the greatest potential for success and impact on "system-level" payoffs. Similarly, a pro-active approach is required to reform historical modes of operation in industry, government and the academic sectors so as to facilitate multidisciplinary collaboration and to clearly articulate the vision and scope of ICME.

  20. Conclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahonen, Pasi; Alahuhta, Petteri; Daskala, Barbara; Delaitre, Sabine; Hert, Paul De; Lindner, Ralf; Maghiros, Ioannis; Moscibroda, Anna; Schreurs, Wim; Verlinden, Michiel

    Some say that an increase in security does not necessarily mean a further encroachment on privacy - indeed, security is necessary to protect personal data and our privacy. Networks must be secure, our personal devices, reliable, dependable and trustworthy. But security is a multifaceted term, with many dimensions. We are of the view that an increase in security most likely will encroach upon our privacy in an ambient intelligence world. Surveillance cameras will continue to proliferate. We assume that, whatever the law is, whatever privacy protections government and business say they honour, our telecommunications, e-mails and Internet usage will be monitored to an increasing degree. The same will be true of our interfaces with the world of ambient intelligence.

  1. Conclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoma, Klaus; Hiller, Daniel; Leismann, Tobias; Drees, Birgit

    Considering the breadth of perspectives in security research among Europeans, as exemplified within this publication, one may certainly note that a tremendous development of this young discipline has occurred in a short period of time. Only three years have passed since the discipline was promoted to an individual theme within the specific programme on `Cooperation' of the European Commission FP7. Since then, a conceptual framework has been established and the first collaborative projects have been executed on different levels, all at an impressive pace. Although the future of security research will remain closely linked to the political will of EU member states, the established base will serve as a solid foundation for the further development of the discipline on a European scale.

  2. Varicella paediatric hospitalisations in Belgium: a 1-year national survey

    PubMed Central

    Blumental, Sophie; Sabbe, Martine; Lepage, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background Varicella universal vaccination (UV) has been implemented in many countries for several years. Nevertheless, varicella UV remains debated in Europe and few data are available on the real burden of infection. We assessed the burden of varicella in Belgium through analysis of hospitalised cases during a 1-year period. Methods Data on children admitted to hospital with varicella were collected through a national network from November 2011 to October 2012. Inclusion criteria were either acute varicella or related complications up to 3 weeks after the rash. Results Participation of 101 hospitals was obtained, covering 97.7% of the total paediatric beds in Belgium. 552 children were included with a median age of 2.1 years. Incidence of paediatric varicella hospitalisations reached 29.5/105 person-years, with the highest impact among those 0–4 years old (global incidence and odds of hospitalisation: 79/105 person-years and 1.6/100 varicella cases, respectively). Only 14% (79/552) of the cohort had an underlying chronic condition. 65% (357/552) of children had ≥1 complication justifying their admission, 49% were bacterial superinfections and 10% neurological disorders. Only a quarter of children (141/552) received acyclovir. Incidence of complicated hospitalised cases was 19/105 person-years. Paediatric intensive care unit admission and surgery were required in 4% and 3% of hospitalised cases, respectively. Mortality among Belgian paediatric population was 0.5/106 and fatality ratio 0.2% among our cohort. Conclusions Varicella demonstrated a substantial burden of disease in Belgian children, especially among the youngest. Our thorough nationwide study, run in a country without varicella UV, offers data to support varicella UV in Belgium. PMID:26130380

  3. Conclusions. [hydrogen-based energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Conclusions are presented according to general areas of technology with some specific examples of research and technology needs identified. These conclusions provide a base for the future development of detailed program plans and identify research needs that are not being given attention or are not being supported at a sufficient level. Emphasis is placed on hydrogen production and use.

  4. Surgical Mortality Audit–lessons Learned in a Developing Nation

    PubMed Central

    Bindroo, Sandiya; Saraf, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Surgical audit is a systematic, critical analysis of the quality of surgical care that is reviewed by peers against explicit criteria or recognized standards. It is used to improve surgical practice with the ultimate goal of improving patient care. As the pattern of surgical care is different in the developing world, we analyzed mortalities in a referral medical institute of India to suggest interventions for improvement. An analysis of total admissions, different surgeries, and mortalities over 1 year in an urban referral medical institute of northern India was performed, followed by “peer review” of the mortalities. Mortality rates as outcomes and classification was done to provide comparative results. Of 10,005 surgical patients, 337 (male = 221, female = 116) deaths were reported over 1 year. The overall mortality rate was 3.36%, while mortality in operative cases was 1.76%. Total deaths were classified into (1) Viable: 153 (45%), (2) Nonviable: 174 (52%), and (3) Indeterminate: 10 (3%). Exclusion of the nonviable group reduced the mortality rate from 3.36% to 1.62%. Trauma was the major cause of mortality (n = 235; 70%) as compared to other surgical patients (n = 102; 30%). Increased mortality was also associated with emergency procedures (3.66%) as compared to elective surgeries (0.34%). In conclusion, audit of mortality and morbidity helps in initiating and implementing preventive strategies to improve surgical practice and patient care, and to reduce mortality rates. The mortality and morbidity forum is an important educational activity. It should be considered a mandatory activity in all postgraduate training programs. PMID:26414825

  5. Conclusive exclusion of quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Somshubhro; Jain, Rahul; Oppenheim, Jonathan; Perry, Christopher

    2014-02-01

    In the task of quantum state exclusion, we consider a quantum system prepared in a state chosen from a known set. The aim is to perform a measurement on the system which can conclusively rule that a subset of the possible preparation procedures cannot have taken place. We ask what conditions the set of states must obey in order for this to be possible and how well we can complete the task when it is not. The task of quantum state discrimination forms a subclass of this set of problems. Within this paper, we formulate the general problem as a semidefinite program (SDP), enabling us to derive sufficient and necessary conditions for a measurement to be optimal. Furthermore, we obtain a necessary condition on the set of states for exclusion to be achievable with certainty, and we give a construction for a lower bound on the probability of error. This task of conclusively excluding states has gained importance in the context of the foundations of quantum mechanics due to a result from Pusey, Barrett, and Rudolph (PBR). Motivated by this, we use our SDP to derive a bound on how well a class of hidden variable models can perform at a particular task, proving an analog of Tsirelson's bound for the PBR experiment and the optimality of a measurement given by PBR in the process. We also introduce variations of conclusive exclusion, including unambiguous state exclusion, and state exclusion with worst-case error.

  6. Age at menarche, total mortality and mortality from ischaemic heart disease and stroke: the Adventist Health Study, 1976–88

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, B K; Oda, K; Knutsen, S F; Fraser, G E

    2009-01-01

    Background Little is known about the relationship between age at menarche and total mortality and mortality from ischaemic heart disease and stroke. Methods A cohort study of 19 462 Californian Seventh-Day Adventist women followed-up from 1976 to 1988. A total of 3313 deaths occurred during follow-up, of which 809 were due to ischaemic heart disease and 378 due to stroke. Results An early menarche was associated with increased total mortality (P-value for linear trend <0.001), ischaemic heart disease (P-value for linear trend = 0.01) and stroke (P-value for linear trend = 0.02) mortality. There were, however, also some indications of an increased ischaemic heart disease mortality in women aged 16–18 at menarche (5% of the women). When assessed as a linear relationship, a 1-year delay in menarche was associated with 4.5% (95% CI 2.3–6.7) lower total mortality. The association was stronger for ischaemic heart disease [6.0% (95% CI 1.2–10.6)] and stroke [8.6% (95% CI 1.6–15.1)] mortality. Conclusions The results suggest that there is a linear, inverse relationship between age at menarche and total mortality as well as with ischaemic heart disease and stroke mortality. PMID:19188208

  7. [Infant mortality in Peru].

    PubMed

    Ramos Padilla, M A

    1987-01-01

    Bolivia, Haiti, and Peru have infant mortality levels as high as those of the developed countries a century ago. The decline of general and especially infant mortality experienced in Latin America beginning in the 1940s was uneven throughout the continent. Cuba's infant mortality rate declined by 86% between 1940-80, but Peru's declined by only 48% despite its higher initial level. In 1984, 34% of all deaths in Peru were to children under 1 year and about 21% were to children 1-5 years old. Socioeconomic factors are the major explanation of Peru's poor infant mortality levels. Regional and social disparities in access to housing, food, urban infrastructure, and other vital goods and services are reflected in infant mortality statistics. Infant mortality has declined in both rural and urban areas, but the magnitude of the decline was much greater in urban areas. Between 1960-75, the infant mortality rate declined from 133 to 80/1000 live births in urban areas, but only from 180 to 150/1000 in rural areas. Investment in the infrastructure and services of the cities during the 1950s and 60s was not matched by any significant investment in rural infrastructure. Rural-urban mortality differentials are not as profound in countries which distribute public investment more evenly between rural and urban areas. Cuba's rural infant mortality rate is only 16% greater than its urban rate, while Peru's rural rate is 47% higher. The rural-urban differential in Peru hides a steep gap between the metropolitan zone of Lima-Callao, which has an infant mortality rate of 55/1000, and that of all cities, which have a rate 45% higher. Metropolitan Lima has the highest levels of living in Peru, including the highest incomes and best housing and service infrastructure. A majority of Peru's economic and industrial development has been concentrated in Lima. Peru's infant mortality differentials are also striking at the departmental level. The 5 departments with the highest infant mortality

  8. Mortality after hip fracture in Austria 2008-2011.

    PubMed

    Brozek, Wolfgang; Reichardt, Berthold; Kimberger, Oliver; Zwerina, Jochen; Dimai, Hans Peter; Kritsch, Daniela; Klaushofer, Klaus; Zwettler, Elisabeth

    2014-09-01

    Osteoporosis-related hip fractures represent a substantial cause of mortality and morbidity in industrialized countries like Austria. Identification of groups at high risk for mortality after hip fracture is crucial for health policy decisions. To determine in-hospital, long-term, and excess mortality after osteoporosis-related hip fracture in Austrian patients, we conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of pseudonymized invoice data from Austrian social insurance authorities covering roughly 98 % of the entire population. The data set included 31,668 subjects aged 50 years and above sustaining a hip fracture between July 2008 and December 2010 with follow-up until June 2011, and an age-, gender-, and regionally matched control population without hip fractures (56,320 subjects). Kaplan-Meier and Cox hazard regression analyses served to determine unadjusted and adjusted mortality rates: Unadjusted all-cause 1-year mortality amounted to 20.2 % (95 % CI: 19.7-20.7 %). Males had significantly higher long-term, in-hospital, and excess mortality rates than females, but younger males exhibited lower excess mortality than their female counterparts. Advanced age correlated with increased long-term and in-hospital mortality, but lower excess mortality. Excess mortality, particularly in males, was highest in the first 6 months after hip fracture, but remained statistically significantly elevated throughout the observation period of 3 years. Longer hospital stay per fracture was correlated with mortality reduction in older patients and in patients with more subsequent fractures. In conclusion, more efforts are needed to identify causes and effectively prevent excess mortality especially in male osteoporosis patients. PMID:24989776

  9. Infant Mortality

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infant Mortality Infant Mortality: What is CDC Doing? Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Teen Pregnancy Contraception CDC Contraceptive Guidance for ... and low birth weight Maternal complications of pregnancy Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) Injuries (e.g., suffocation). The top ...

  10. Risk factors and predictors of mortality for proximal humeral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Gooding, Benjamin WT; Manning, Paul A; Wallace, W Angus; Geoghegan, John M

    2014-01-01

    Background Risk factors for mortality after proximal humeral fracture, including socioeconomic status, are poorly defined. This retrospective review of prospectively collected data defines the epidemiology and predictors of mortality in association with proximal humeral fractures. Methods Patients who sustained proximal humeral fractures were identified from fragility fracture and trauma databases between May 2001 and September 2012. Results In total, 1880 patients with a mean age of 69 years and a male to female ratio of 2 : 3 were identified. Socioeconomic distribution is skewed towards the lowest and highest quintiles. Low-energy mechanisms caused 88% of fractures. Men sustain fractures when they are aged 10 years younger and via higher-energy mechanisms. In total, 536 patients (29%) died within the study period with a 1-year mortality of 9.8%, rising to 28.2% at 5 years. Female gender, increasing age, pathological fracture and increased number of co-morbidities were independent variables for increased mortality. Conclusions The present study, which was conducted over an 11-year period, is the first to combine the epidemiology and risk factors for mortality with socioeconomic rank. One-year mortality risk is twice that of the background matched population. Patient counselling with respect to increased mortality should be considered, especially in higher-risk elderly females with multiple co-morbidities.

  11. ICMR Task Force National Collaborative Study on Identification of High Risk Families, Mothers and Outcome of their Off-springs with particular reference to the problem of maternal nutrition, low birth weight, perinatal and infant morbidity and mortality in rural and urban slum communities. Summary, conclusions and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, S K; Singh, K K; Saxena, B N

    1991-12-01

    The objectives was to assess the determinants of and rates of abortion, stillbirth, and infant mortality for a cohort of pregnant women from slums in New Delhi, Calcutta, and Madras, India and rural slums in Hyderabad, Varanasi, and Chandigarh, India in 1981. The relationship of low birthweight (LBW) and high risk pregnancies to social, environmental, nutritional, cultural, and biological factors was of interest. The results showed variation both between and within urban and rural areas. Rural pregnancy outcome showed fewer LBWs and perinatal and neonatal mortality. Perinatal, neonatal, and infant mortality rates were consistent with prior findings. There was a demonstrated need for prenatal care and referral due to the 10-12% with a poor obstetric history and the significant number with anemia, bleeding, hypertension, toxemia, and urinary tract infections during this pregnancy. Many women were malnourished (body weight 40 kg, height 145 cm, and midarm circumference of 22.5 cm. These women can be identified as high risk. Other risk factors identified were women with disadvantageous personal habits: smoking, alcohol use, tobacco chewing, and working. 10-25% of pregnancies were not registered even though the prenatal clinic was accessible and outreach was provided. 20% completed the recommended number of prenatal visits. 75-85% visited at least once and sometimes more often. Screening for high risk must be done at the 1st visit. Women had strong feelings about the preference for a Dai during delivery and for place of delivery. Poor training of health workers was reflected in the lack of adequate sanitation during the birthing process. Neonatal units were lacking and primary care absent. 10-14% of births were preterm of which 50% occurred at 36 weeks. Multiple regression identified risk factors for fetal and neonatal mortality and LBW as maternal age, preterm birth, maternal anemia, previous preterm or LBW, birth interval, and previous fetal and neonatal mortality

  12. Secondary preventive medication persistence and adherence 1 year after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Olson, D.M.; Zhao, X.; Pan, W.; Zimmer, L.O.; Goldstein, L.B.; Alberts, M.J.; Fagan, S.C.; Fonarow, G.C.; Johnston, S.C.; Kidwell, C.; LaBresh, K.A.; Ovbiagele, B.; Schwamm, L.; Peterson, E.D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Data on long-term use of secondary prevention medications following stroke are limited. The Adherence eValuation After Ischemic stroke–Longitudinal (AVAIL) Registry assessed patient, provider, and system-level factors influencing continuation of prevention medications for 1 year following stroke hospitalization discharge. Methods: Patients with ischemic stroke or TIA discharged from 106 hospitals participating in the American Heart Association Get With The Guidelines–Stroke program were surveyed to determine their use of warfarin, antiplatelet, antihypertensive, lipid-lowering, and diabetes medications from discharge to 12 months. Reasons for stopping medications were ascertained. Persistence was defined as continuation of all secondary preventive medications prescribed at hospital discharge, and adherence as continuation of prescribed medications except those stopped according to health care provider instructions. Results: Of the 2,880 patients enrolled in AVAIL, 88.4% (2,457 patients) completed 1-year interviews. Of these, 65.9% were regimen persistent and 86.6% were regimen adherent. Independent predictors of 1-year medication persistence included fewer medications prescribed at discharge, having an adequate income, having an appointment with a primary care provider, and greater understanding of why medications were prescribed and their side effects. Independent predictors of adherence were similar to those for persistence. Conclusions: Although up to one-third of stroke patients discontinued one or more secondary prevention medications within 1 year of hospital discharge, self-discontinuation of these medications is uncommon. Several potentially modifiable patient, provider, and system-level factors associated with persistence and adherence may be targets for future interventions. PMID:21900638

  13. Avoidable mortality in Lithuania.

    PubMed Central

    Gaizauskiene, A; Gurevicius, R

    1995-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The study aimed to analyse avoidable mortality in Lithuania as an index of the quality of health care and to assess trends in avoidable mortality from 1970-90. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS--All deaths of Lithuanian residents aged between 0 and 64 years between 1970 and 1990 were analysed. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--Twenty seven per cent of all deaths in this age group were avoidable. Avoidable deaths were grouped into preventable and treatable ones. Treatable causes of death accounted for 54%, and preventable, 46% of avoidable mortality. Time trends showed that general mortality and mortality from avoidable causes of death in this age group were almost stable between 1970 and 1990. Mortality from treatable causes of death fell, while deaths from preventable causes increased. The results in the preventable group were greatly affected by deaths from malignant neoplasms of trachea, bronchus, and lungs. Differences were noted between the sexes in total mortality as well as in avoidable mortality. CONCLUSIONS--Avoidable causes of death are relatively common and, consequently, they are of practical importance for public health and studies of the health care quality in Lithuania. Reorganisation of health care is to be carried out and considerable emphasis will be placed on health education, promotion, and prevention, as primary prevention measures have not been effective thus far. PMID:7629464

  14. Disparities in Under-Five Child Injury Mortality between Developing and Developed Countries: 1990–2013

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yun; Wu, Yue; Schwebel, David C.; Zhou, Liang; Hu, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Using estimates from the 2013 Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study, we update evidence on disparities in under-five child injury mortality between developing and developed countries from 1990 to 2013. Methods: Mortality rates were accessed through the online visualization tool by the GBD study 2013 group. We calculated percent change in child injury mortality rates between 1990 and 2013. Data analysis was conducted separately for <1 year and 1–4 years to specify age differences in rate changes. Results: Between 1990 and 2013, over 3-fold mortality gaps were observed between developing countries and developed countries for both age groups in the study time period. Similar decreases in injury rates were observed for developed and developing countries (<1 year: −50% vs. −50% respectively; 1–4 years: −56% vs. −58%). Differences in injury mortality changes during 1990–2013 between developing and developed nations varied with injury cause. There were greater reductions in mortality from transport injury, falls, poisoning, adverse effects of medical treatment, exposure to forces of nature, and collective violence and legal intervention in developed countries, whereas there were larger decreases in mortality from drowning, exposure to mechanical forces, and animal contact in developing countries. Country-specific analysis showed large variations across countries for both injury mortality and changes in injury mortality between 1990 and 2013. Conclusions: Sustained higher child injury mortality during 1990–2013 for developing countries merits the attention of the global injury prevention community. Countries that have high injury mortality can benefit from the success of other countries. PMID:27399740

  15. Multiple biomarkers for mortality prediction in peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Amrock, Stephen M; Weitzman, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Few studies have assessed which biomarkers influence mortality risk among those with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). We analyzed data from 556 individuals identified to have PAD (i.e. ankle-brachial index ⩽0.9) with available measurements of C-reactive protein, the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), homocysteine, and the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) in the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We investigated whether a combination of these biomarkers improved the prediction of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality beyond conventional risk factors. During follow-up (median, 8.1 years), 277 of 556 participants died; 63 deaths were attributed to cardiovascular disease. After adjusting for conventional risk factors, Cox proportional-hazards models showed the following to be most strongly associated with all-cause mortality (each is followed by the adjusted hazard ratio [HR] per 1 standard deviation increment in the log values): homocysteine (1.31), UACR (1.21), and NLR (1.20). UACR alone significantly predicted cardiovascular mortality (1.53). Persons in the highest quintile of multimarker scores derived from regression coefficients of significant biomarkers had elevated risks of all-cause mortality (adjusted HR, 2.45; 95% CI, 1.66-3.62; p for trend, <0.001) and cardiovascular mortality (adjusted HR, 2.20; 95% CI, 1.02-4.71; p for trend, 0.053) compared to those in the lowest two quintiles. The addition of continuous multimarker scores to conventional risk factors improved risk stratification of all-cause mortality (integrated discrimination improvement [IDI], 0.162; p<0.00001) and cardiovascular mortality (IDI, 0.058; p<0.00001). In conclusion, the addition of a continuous multimarker score to conventional risk factors improved mortality prediction among patients with PAD. PMID:26762418

  16. Mortality among aircraft manufacturing workers

    PubMed Central

    Boice, J. D.; Marano, D. E.; Fryzek, J. P.; Sadler, C. J.; McLaughlin, J. K.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the risk of cancer and other diseases among workers engaged in aircraft manufacturing and potentially exposed to compounds containing chromate, trichloroethylene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and mixed solvents. METHODS: A retrospective cohort mortality study was conducted of workers employed for at least 1 year at a large aircraft manufacturing facility in California on or after 1 January 1960. The mortality experience of these workers was determined by examination of national, state, and company records to the end of 1996. Standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) were evaluated comparing the observed numbers of deaths among workers with those expected in the general population adjusting for age, sex, race, and calendar year. The SMRs for 40 cause of death categories were computed for the total cohort and for subgroups defined by sex, race, position in the factory, work duration, year of first employment, latency, and broad occupational groups. Factory job titles were classified as to likely use of chemicals, and internal Poisson regression analyses were used to compute mortality risk ratios for categories of years of exposure to chromate, TCE, PCE, and mixed solvents, with unexposed factory workers serving as referents. RESULTS: The study cohort comprised 77,965 workers who accrued nearly 1.9 million person-years of follow up (mean 24.2 years). Mortality follow up, estimated as 99% complete, showed that 20,236 workers had died by 31 December 1996, with cause of death obtained for 98%. Workers experienced low overall mortality (all causes of death SMR 0.83) and low cancer mortality (SMR 0.90). No significant increases in risk were found for any of the 40 specific cause of death categories, whereas for several causes the numbers of deaths were significantly below expectation. Analyses by occupational group and specific job titles showed no remarkable mortality patterns. Factory workers estimated to have been routinely exposed to chromate were

  17. Comparison of weight loss outcomes 1 year after sleeve gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in patients aged above 50 years

    PubMed Central

    Praveenraj, Palanivelu; Gomes, Rachel M; Kumar, Saravana; Perumal, Sivalingam; Senthilnathan, Palanisamy; Parthasarathi, Ramakrishnan; Rajapandian, Subbiah; Palanivelu, Chinnusamy

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Safe, effective weight loss with resolution of comorbidities has been convincingly demonstrated with bariatric surgery in the aged obese. They, however, lose less weight than younger individuals. It is not known if degree of weight loss is influenced by the choice of bariatric procedure. The aim of this study was to compare the degree of weight loss between laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) and laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) in patients above the age of 50 years at 1 year after surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis was performed of all patients more than 50 years of age who underwent LSG or LRYGB between February 2012 and July 2013 with at least 1 year of follow-up. Data evaluated at 1 year included age, sex, weight, body mass index (BMI), mean operative time, percentage of weight loss and excess weight loss, resolution/remission of diabetes, morbidity and mortality. RESULTS: Of a total of 86 patients, 54 underwent LSG and 32 underwent LRYGB. The mean percentage of excess weight loss at the end of 1 year was 60.19 ± 17.45 % after LSG and 82.76 ± 34.26 % after LRYGB (P = 0.021). One patient developed a sleeve leak after LSG, and 2 developed iron deficiency anaemia after LRYGB. The remission/improvement in diabetes mellitus and biochemistry was similar. CONCLUSION: LRYGB may offer better results than LSG in terms of weight loss in patients over 50 years of age. PMID:27279392

  18. Increased Mortality in Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Ohayon, Maurice M.; Black, Jed; Lai, Chinglin; Eller, Mark; Guinta, Diane; Bhattacharyya, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the mortality rate in patients with narcolepsy. Design: Data were derived from a large database representative of the US population, which contains anonymized patient-linked longitudinal claims for 173 million individuals. Setting: Symphony Health Solutions (SHS) Source Lx, an anonymized longitudinal patient dataset. Patients/Participants: All records of patients registered in the SHS database between 2008 and 2010. Interventions: None Measurements and Results: Identification of patients with narcolepsy was based on ≥ 1 medical claim with the diagnosis of narcolepsy (ICD-9 347.xx) from 2002 to 2012. Dates of death were acquired from the Social Security Administration via a third party; the third party information was encrypted in the same manner as the claims data such that anonymity is ensured prior to receipt by SHS. Annual all-cause mortality rates for 2008, 2009, and 2010 were calculated retrospectively for patients with narcolepsy and patients without narcolepsy in the database, and standardized mortality ratios (SMR) were calculated. Mortality rates were also compared with the general US population (Centers for Disease Control data). SMRs of the narcolepsy population were consistent over the 3-year period and showed an approximate 1.5-fold excess mortality relative to those without narcolepsy. The narcolepsy population had consistently higher mortality rates relative to those without narcolepsy across all age groups, stratified by age decile, from 25-34 years to 75+ years of age. The SMR for females with narcolepsy was lower than for males with narcolepsy. Conclusions: Narcolepsy was associated with approximately 1.5-fold excess mortality relative to those without narcolepsy. While the cause of this increased mortality is unknown, these findings warrant further investigation. Citation: Ohayon MM; Black J; Lai C; Eller M; Guinta D; Bhattacharyya A. Increased mortality in narcolepsy. SLEEP 2014;37(3):439-444. PMID:24587565

  19. Choking - unconscious adult or child over 1 year

    MedlinePlus

    Choking - unconscious adult or child over 1 year; First aid - choking - unconscious adult or child over 1 year; ... or the local emergency number while you begin first aid and CPR. If you are alone, shout for ...

  20. Choking - unconscious adult or child over 1 year

    MedlinePlus

    ... choking - unconscious adult or child over 1 year; CPR - choking - unconscious adult or child over 1 year ... emergency number while you begin first aid and CPR. If you are alone, shout for help and ...

  1. Percutaneous coronary intervention in the elderly: procedural success and 1-year outcomes.

    PubMed

    Eckart, Robert E; Shry, Eric A; Simpson, Daniel E; Stajduhar, Karl C

    2003-01-01

    Clinical trials have found increased morbidity in elderly persons presenting for percutaneous coronary intervention for chronic stable angina. Long-term follow-up is limited for the elderly following percutaneous coronary intervention. The authors reviewed all coronary interventions performed from January 1998 to August 2001. One year following the procedure, subjects were screened for death, need for revascularization, and myocardial infarction. There were 401 subjects aged >/=65 years (mean 73.4+/-6.0 years) and 479 subjects aged <65 years (mean 55.6+/-6.7 years). Although there was no difference in 1-year rate of subsequent myocardial infarction or in revascularization, the elderly were more likely to die during hospitalization (4.7% vs. 1.0%, p<0.01), and at 1 year (10.2% vs. 4.0%, p<0.01). When controlled for ejection fraction, age was no longer significant in either predischarge mortality or in 1-year mortality. Excess postpercutaneous coronary intervention mortality in the elderly may be due to underlying comorbidities and not due to subsequent myocardial infarction or revascularization. PMID:14610387

  2. Otitis media with effusion in children younger than 1 year

    PubMed Central

    Di Francesco, Renata Cantisani; Barros, Vivian Boschesi; Ramos, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To determine the prevalence of otitis media with effusion in children younger than 1 year and its association with the season of the year, artificial feeding, environmental and perinatal factors. Methods: Retrospective study of 184 randomly included medical records from a total of 982 healthy infants evaluated for hearing screening tests. Diagnosis of otitis media with effusion was based on otoscopy (amber-gold color, fluid level, handle of malleus position), type B tympanometric curves and absence of otoacoustic emissions. Incomplete medical records or those describing acute otitis media, upper respiratory tract infections on the assessment day or in the last 3 months, neuropathies and craniofacial anomalies were excluded. Data such as gestational age, birth weight, Apgar score, type of feeding and day care attendance were compared between children with and without otitis media with effusion through likelihood tests and multivariate analysis. Results: 25.3% of 184 infants had otitis media with bilateral effusion; 9.2% had unilateral. In infants with otitis media, the following were observed: chronological age of 9.6±1.7 months; gestational age >38 weeks in 43.4% and birth weight >2500g in 48.4%. Otitis media with effusion was associated with winter/fall, artificial feeding, Apgar score <7 and day care attendance. The multivariate analysis showed that artificial feeding is the factor most often associated to otitis media with effusion. Conclusions: Otitis media with effusion was found in about one third of children younger than 1 year and was mainly associated with artificial feeding. PMID:26559603

  3. Optimism and Mortality in Older Men and Women: The Rancho Bernardo Study

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Ericha G.; Kritz-Silverstein, Donna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To examine the associations of optimism and pessimism with all-cause, cardiovascular disease (CVD), coronary heart disease (CHD), and cancer mortality in a population-based sample of older men and women followed ≤12 years. Methods. 367 men and 509 women aged ≥50 from the Rancho Bernardo Study attended a 1999–2002 research clinic visit when demographic, behavioral, and medical history were obtained and completed a 1999 mailed survey including the Life Orientation Test-Revised (LOT-R). Mortality outcomes were followed through 2012. Results. Average age at baseline was 74.1 years; during follow-up (mean = 8.1 years), 198 participants died, 62 from CVD, 22 from CHD, and 49 from cancer. Total LOT-R, optimism and pessimism scores were calculated. Participants with the highest optimism were younger and reported less alcohol use and smoking and more exercise. Cox proportional hazard models showed that higher total LOT-R and optimism, but not pessimism scores, were associated with reduced odds of CHD mortality after adjusting for age, sex, alcohol, smoking, obesity, physical exercise, and medication (HR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.75, 0.99; HR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.61, 0.99, resp.). No associations were found for all-cause, CVD, or cancer mortality. Conclusions. Optimism was associated with reduced CHD mortality in older men and women. The association of positive attitudes with mortality merits further study. PMID:27042351

  4. Tackling Health Inequities in Chile: Maternal, Newborn, Infant, and Child Mortality Between 1990 and 2004

    PubMed Central

    Requejo, Jennifer Harris; Nien, Jyh Kae; Merialdi, Mario; Bustreo, Flavia; Betran, Ana Pilar

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We analyzed trends in maternal, newborn, and child mortality in Chile between 1990 and 2004, after the introduction of national interventions and reforms, and examined associations between trends and interventions. Methods. Data were provided by the Chilean Ministry of Health on all pregnancies between 1990 and 2004 (approximately 4 000 000). We calculated yearly maternal mortality ratios, stillbirth rates, and mortality rates for neonates, infants (aged > 28 days and < 1 year), and children aged 1 to 4 years. We also calculated these statistics by 5-year intervals for Chile's poorest to richest district quintiles. Results. During the study period, the maternal mortality ratio decreased from 42.1 to 18.5 per 100 000 live births. The mortality rate for neonates decreased from 9.0 to 5.7 per 1000 births, for infants from 7.8 to 3.1 per 1000 births, and for young children from 3.1 to 1.7 per 1000 live births. The stillbirth rate declined from 6.0 to 5.0 per 1000 births. Disparities in these mortality statistics between the poorest and richest district quintiles also decreased, with the largest mortality reductions in the poorest quintile. Conclusions. During a period of socioeconomic development and health sector reforms, Chile experienced significant mortality and inequity reductions. PMID:19443831

  5. Mortality Among Patients With Familial Hypercholesterolemia: A Registry‐Based Study in Norway, 1992–2010

    PubMed Central

    Mundal, Liv; Sarancic, Mirza; Ose, Leiv; Iversen, Per Ole; Borgan, Jens‐Kristian; Veierød, Marit B.; Leren, Trond P.; Retterstøl, Kjetil

    2014-01-01

    Background Untreated patients with familial hypercholesterolemia are at increased risk of premature cardiovascular death. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether this is also the case in the statin era. Methods and Results In this registry‐based study, 4688 male and female patients from the Unit for Cardiac and Cardiovascular Genetics (UCCG) Registry with verified molecular genetic diagnosis of familial hypercholesterolemia in the period 1992–2010 were linked to the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry. Standardized mortality ratios and 95% CIs were estimated. There were 113 deaths. Mean age of death was 61.1 years. Cardiovascular disease was the most common cause of death (46.0%), followed by cancer (30.1%). Compared with the Norwegian population, cardiovascular disease mortality was significantly higher in the UCCG Registry in all age groups younger than 70 years (standardized mortality ratio 2.29, 95% CI 1.65 to 3.19 in men and women combined; standardized mortality ratio 2.00, 95% CI 1.32 to 3.04 in men; standardized mortality ratio 3.03, 95% CI 1.76 to 5.21 in women). No significant differences were found in all‐cause mortality or cancer mortality. Conclusions Despite prescription of lipid‐lowering drugs, familial hypercholesterolemia patients still had significantly increased cardiovascular disease mortality compared with the general Norwegian population. PMID:25468658

  6. Increased 1-year survival and discharge to independent living in overweight hip fracture patients.

    PubMed

    Flodin, Lena; Laurin, Agnes; Lökk, Johan; Cederholm, Tommy; Hedström, Margareta

    2016-04-01

    Background and purpose - Hip fracture patients usually have low body mass index (BMI), and suffer further postoperative catabolism. How BMI relates to outcome in relatively healthy hip fracture patients is not well investigated. We investigated the association between BMI, survival, and independent living 1 year postoperatively. Patients and methods - This prospective multicenter study involved 843 patients with a hip fracture (mean age 82 (SD 7) years, 73% women), without severe cognitive impairment and living independently before admission. We investigated the relationship between BMI and both 1-year mortality and ability to return to independent living. Results - Patients with BMI > 26 had a lower mortality rate than those with BMI < 22 and those with BMI 22-26 (6%, 16%, and 18% respectively; p = 0.006). The odds ratio (OR) for 1-year survival in the group with BMI > 26 was 2.6 (95% CI: 1.2-5.5) after adjustment for age, sex, and physical status. Patients with BMI > 26 were also more likely to return to independent living after the hip fracture (OR = 2.6, 95% CI: 1.4-5.0). Patients with BMI < 22 had similar mortality and a similar likelihood of independent living to those with BMI 22-26. Interpretation - In this selected group of patients with hip fracture, the overweight and obese patients (BMI > 26) had a higher survival rate at 1 year, and returned to independent living to a higher degree than those of normal (healthy) weight. The obesity paradox and the recommendations for optimal BMI need further consideration in patients with hip fracture. PMID:26986549

  7. Increased 1-year survival and discharge to independent living in overweight hip fracture patients

    PubMed Central

    Flodin, Lena; Laurin, Agnes; Lökk, Johan; Cederholm, Tommy; Hedström, Margareta

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — Hip fracture patients usually have low body mass index (BMI), and suffer further postoperative catabolism. How BMI relates to outcome in relatively healthy hip fracture patients is not well investigated. We investigated the association between BMI, survival, and independent living 1 year postoperatively. Patients and methods — This prospective multicenter study involved 843 patients with a hip fracture (mean age 82 (SD 7) years, 73% women), without severe cognitive impairment and living independently before admission. We investigated the relationship between BMI and both 1-year mortality and ability to return to independent living. Results — Patients with BMI > 26 had a lower mortality rate than those with BMI < 22 and those with BMI 22–26 (6%, 16%, and 18% respectively; p = 0.006). The odds ratio (OR) for 1-year survival in the group with BMI > 26 was 2.6 (95% CI: 1.2–5.5) after adjustment for age, sex, and physical status. Patients with BMI > 26 were also more likely to return to independent living after the hip fracture (OR = 2.6, 95% CI: 1.4–5.0). Patients with BMI < 22 had similar mortality and a similar likelihood of independent living to those with BMI 22–26. Interpretation — In this selected group of patients with hip fracture, the overweight and obese patients (BMI > 26) had a higher survival rate at 1 year, and returned to independent living to a higher degree than those of normal (healthy) weight. The obesity paradox and the recommendations for optimal BMI need further consideration in patients with hip fracture. PMID:26986549

  8. Mortality Resulting From Congenital Heart Disease Among Children and Adults in the United States, 1999 to 2006

    PubMed Central

    Gilboa, Suzanne M.; Salemi, Jason L.; Nembhard, Wendy N.; Fixler, David E.; Correa, Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous reports suggest that mortality resulting from congenital heart disease (CHD) among infants and young children has been decreasing. There is little population-based information on CHD mortality trends and patterns among older children and adults. Methods and Results We used data from death certificates filed in the United States from 1999 to 2006 to calculate annual CHD mortality by age at death, race-ethnicity, and sex. To calculate mortality rates for individuals ≥1 year of age, population counts from the US Census were used in the denominator; for infant mortality, live birth counts were used. From 1999 to 2006, there were 41 494 CHD-related deaths and 27 960 deaths resulting from CHD (age-standardized mortality rates, 1.78 and 1.20 per 100 000, respectively). During this period, mortality resulting from CHD declined 24.1% overall. Mortality resulting from CHD significantly declined among all race-ethnicities studied. However, disparities persisted; overall and among infants, mortality resulting from CHD was consistently higher among non-Hispanic blacks compared with non-Hispanic whites. Infant mortality accounted for 48.1% of all mortality resulting from CHD; among those who survived the first year of life, 76.1% of deaths occurred during adulthood (≥18 years of age). Conclusions CHD mortality continued to decline among both children and adults; however, differences between race-ethnicities persisted. A large proportion of CHD-related mortality occurred during infancy, although significant CHD mortality occurred during adulthood, indicating the need for adult CHD specialty management. PMID:21098447

  9. Health Care Costs 1 Year After Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rivara, Frederick P.; Vavilala, Monica S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study sought to estimate total health care costs for mild, moderate, and severe pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) and to compare individual- and population-level costs across levels of TBI severity. Methods. Using 2007 to 2010 MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters data, we estimated total quarterly health care costs 1 year after TBI among enrollees (aged < 18 years). We compared costs across levels of TBI severity using generalized linear models. Results. Mild TBI accounted for 96.6% of the 319 103 enrollees with TBI; moderate and severe TBI accounted for 1.7% and 1.6%, respectively. Adjusted individual health care costs for moderate and severe TBI were significantly higher than mild TBI in the year after injury (P < .01). At the population level, moderate and severe TBI costs were 88% and 75% less than mild TBI, respectively. Conclusions. Individually, moderate and severe TBI initially generated costs that were markedly higher than those of mild TBI. At the population level, costs following mild TBI far exceeded those of more severe cases, a result of the extremely high population burden of mild TBI. PMID:26270293

  10. Impact on Left Ventricular Function and Remodeling and on 1-Year Outcome in Patients With Left Bundle Branch Block After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Carrabba, Nazario; Valenti, Renato; Migliorini, Angela; Marrani, Marco; Cantini, Giulia; Parodi, Guido; Dovellini, Emilio Vincenzo; Antoniucci, David

    2015-07-01

    Conflicting results have been reported about the prognostic impact of left bundle branch block (LBBB) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of LBBB after TAVI on left ventricular (LV) function and remodeling and on 1-year outcomes. Of 101 TAVI patients, 9 were excluded. All complications were evaluated according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 definition. Of 92 patients, 34 developed LBBB without more advanced myocardial damage or inflammation biomarkers in comparison with patients without LBBB. The only predictor of new LBBB was larger baseline LV end-diastolic volume. LBBB plus advanced atrioventricular block was strongly correlated with permanent pacemaker implantation (p <0.0001). Patients with LBBB had a higher rate of permanent pacemaker implantation at 30 days (59% vs 19%, p <0.0001) and less recovery of LV systolic function and a trend toward a lower rate of LV reverse remodeling at 1 year. The development of acute kidney injury and the logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation score were associated with poor outcomes (all-cause mortality and heart failure) (hazard ratio 6.86, 95% confidence interval 2.51 to 18.74, p <0.0001, and hazard ratio 1.04, 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 1.08, p = 0.021, respectively), but not LBBB. In conclusion, after TAVI, 37% of patients developed new LBBB without more advanced myocardial damage or inflammation biomarkers. LBBB was associated with a higher rate of permanent pacemaker implantation, which negatively affected the recovery of LV systolic function. The development of acute kidney injury, rather than LBBB, increases the 1-year risk for mortality and hospitalization for heart failure. PMID:25937352

  11. 4.11 Summary and Conclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noßke, D.; Mattsson, S.; Johansson, L.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '4.11 Summary and Conclusions' of the Chapter '4 Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy'.

  12. Predictors of long-term mortality in new start statin users

    PubMed Central

    Kazerooni, Rashid; Lim, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases are among the leading causes of death worldwide and studies have found a direct relationship between levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and coronary heart disease. Statins are the most commonly prescribed medications to lower cholesterol, a major controllable risk factor for coronary heart disease. Objective This study aims to find what factors in the first year of statin therapy are predictive of long-term all-cause mortality. Methods Data for this retrospective cohort study were collected on patients identified as new statin users between December 1, 2006 and November 30, 2007 at five Veterans Affairs Healthcare Systems from Southern California and Nevada. Multiple independent variables were assessed utilizing a logistic regression model assessing for all cause mortality at 6 years follow-up. The independent variables included race, age, ethnicity, body mass index, socioeconomic status, and baseline comorbidities. Secondary analysis analyzed high-density lipoprotein levels, adherence, total cholesterol, and triglycerides. Results Increased age, increased medication count, hypertension, diabetes, tobacco use, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and congestive heart failure were all associated with an increased risk of mortality. Hispanic ethnicity, Asian race, and increased body mass index were associated with decreased risk of mortality. There were no significant associations between mortality and race, LDL outcomes at 1 year, or annual income level. Conclusion There is clear evidence that statin use is associated with decreased events in cardiovascular disease and total mortality. This study found multiple independent variables as predictors of mortality in new start statin users after a 6 year follow-up, but differences in lipid groups after 1 year were not predictive of long-term mortality in the cohort studied.

  13. Patient characteristics associated with in-hospital mortality in children following tracheotomy

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Jay G; Graham, Robert J; Roberson, David W; Rhein, Lawrence; Graham, Dionne A; Zhou, Jing; O’Brien, Jane; Putney, Heather; Goldmann, Donald A

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To identify children at risk for in-hospital mortality following tracheotomy. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting 25 746 876 US hospitalisations for children within the Kids’ Inpatient Database 1997, 2000, 2003 and 2006. Participants 18 806 hospitalisations of children ages 0–18 years undergoing tracheotomy, identified from ICD-9-CM tracheotomy procedure codes. Main outcome measure Mortality during the initial hospitalisation when tracheotomy was performed in relation to patient demographic and clinical characteristics (neuromuscular impairment (NI), chronic lung disease, upper airway anomaly, prematurity, congenital heart disease, upper airway infection and trauma) identified with ICD-9-CM codes. Results Between 1997 and 2006, mortality following tracheotomy ranged from 7.7% to 8.5%. In each year, higher mortality was observed in children undergoing tracheotomy who were aged <1 year compared with children aged 1–4 years (mortality range: 10.2–13.1% vs 1.1–4.2%); in children with congenital heart disease, compared with children without congenital heart disease (13.1–18.7% vs 6.2–7.1%) and in children with prematurity, compared with children who were not premature (13.0–19.4% vs 6.8–7.3%). Lower mortality was observed in children with an upper airway anomaly compared with children without an upper airway anomaly (1.5–5.1% vs 9.1–10.3%). In 2006, the highest mortality (40.0%) was observed in premature children with NI and congenital heart disease, who did not have an upper airway anomaly. Conclusions Congenital heart disease, prematurity, the absence of an upper airway anomaly and age <1 year were characteristics associated with higher mortality in children following tracheotomy. These findings may assist provider communication with children and families regarding early prognosis following tracheotomy. PMID:20522454

  14. Prediction of Mortality in Nonagenarians Following the Surgical Repair of Hip Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Fansa, Ashraf; Ebraheim, Nabil

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to report on the mortality of nonagenarians who underwent surgical treatment for a hip fracture, specifically in regards to preexisting comorbidities. Furthermore, we assessed the effectiveness of the Deyo score in predicting such mortality. Methods Thirty-nine patients over the age of 90 who underwent surgical repair of a hip fracture were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty-six patients (66.7%) suffered femoral neck fractures, while the remaining 13 (33.3%) presented with trochanteric type fractures. Patient charts were examined to determine previously diagnosed patient comorbidities as well as living arrangements and mobility before and after surgery. Results Deyo index scores did not demonstrate statistically significant correlations with postoperative mortality or functional outcomes. The hazard of in-hospital mortality was found to be 91% (p = 0.036) and 86% (p = 0.05) less in patients without a history of congestive heart failure (CHF) and chronic pulmonary disease (CPD), respectively. Additionally, the hazard of 90-day mortality was 88% (p = 0.01) and 81% (p = 0.024) less in patients without a history of dementia and CPD, respectively. The hazard of 1-year mortality was also found to be 75% (p = 0.01) and 80% (p = 0.01) less in patients without a history of dementia and CPD, respectively. Furthermore, dementia patients stayed in-hospital postoperatively an average of 5.3 days (p = 0.013) less than nondementia patients and only 38.5% returned to preoperative living conditions (p = 0.036). Conclusions Nonagenarians with a history of CHF and CPD have a higher risk of in-hospital mortality following the operative repair of hip fractures. CPD and dementia patients over 90 years old have higher 90-day and 1-year mortality hazards postoperatively. Dementia patients are also discharged more quickly than nondementia patients. PMID:27247737

  15. Mortal assets

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, Geoffrey R.; Zablotska, Lydia B.; Fix, John J.; Egel, John N.; Buchanan, Jeffrey A.

    2005-11-01

    Workers employed in 15 utilities that generate nuclear power in the United States have been followed for up to 18 years between 1979 and 1997. Their cumulative dose from whole-body ionizing radiation has been determined from the dose records maintained by the facilities themselves and the REIRS and REMS systems maintained by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy, respectively. Mortality in the cohort from a number of causes has been analyzed with respect to individual radiation doses. The cohort displays a very substantial healthy worker effect, i.e. considerably lower cancer and noncancer mortality than the general population. Based on 26 and 368 deaths, respectively, positive though statistically nonsignificant associations were seen for mortality from leukemia (excluding chronic lymphocytic leukemia) and all solid cancers combined, with excess relative risks per sievert of 5.67 (95% confidence interval (CI) -2.56, 30.4) and 0.596 (95% CI -2.01, 4.64), respectively. These estimates are very similar to those from the atomic bomb survivors study, though the wide confidence intervals are also consistent with lower or higher risk estimates. A strong positive and statistically significant association between radiation dose and deaths from arteriosclerotic heart disease including coronary heart disease was also observed in the cohort, with an ERR of 8.78 (95% CI 2.10, 20.0). Whle associations with heart disease have been reported in some other occupational studies, the magnitude of the present association is not consistent with them and therefore needs cautious interpretation and merits further attention. At present, the relatively small number of deaths and the young age of the cohort (mean age at end of follow-up is 45 years) limit the power of the study, but further follow-up is 45 years) limit the power of the study, but further follow-up and the inclusion of the present data in an ongoing IARC combined analysis of nuclear workers from 15

  16. Choking first aid - adult or child over 1 year - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100222.htm Choking first aid - adult or child over 1 year - series—Part ... occur in as little as 4 minutes. Rapid first aid for choking can save a life. The universal ...

  17. Choking first aid - infant under 1 year - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100221.htm Choking first aid - infant under 1 year - series—Part 1 To ... Loss of consciousness if blockage is not cleared FIRST AID 1. DO NOT perform these steps if the ...

  18. The common premise for uncommon conclusions.

    PubMed

    Coady, C A J

    2013-05-01

    Recent controversy over philosophical advocacy of infanticide (or the comically-styled euphemism 'postnatal abortion') reveals a surprisingly common premise uniting many of the opponents and supporters of the practice. This is the belief that the moral status of the early fetus or embryo with respect to a right to life is identical to that of a newly born or even very young baby. From this premise, infanticidists and strong anti-abortionists draw opposite conclusions, the former that the healthy newly born have no inherent right to life and the latter that minute embryos and the very early fetus have the same right to life as young babies. (Indeed strong anti-abortionists tend to regard this right to life as identical to that possessed by adult humans.) This paper argues that these opposed conclusions are both deeply implausible and that the implausibility resides in the common premise. The argument requires some attention to the structure of the philosophical case underpinning the supposed vice of speciesism that has been given intellectual currency by many philosophers, most notably Peter Singer, and also to the reasoning behind the strong anti-abortionist adoption of the common premise. PMID:23637428

  19. Epistemology applied to conclusions of expert reports.

    PubMed

    Lucena-Molina, Jose-Juan

    2016-07-01

    It is believed that to build a robust reasoning logic to make probabilistic inferences in forensic science from a merely mathematical or logistical viewpoint is not enough. Mathematical logic is the positive science of reasoning and as for that it is only interested in the positive calculus of its validity, regardless any prior ontological assumption. But without a determined ontology and epistemology which imply to define the concepts that they will use, it seems difficult that the proposed scientifically correct mathematical solution be successful as a European standard for making conclusions in forensic reports because it has to be based on judicial language. Forensic experts and Courts are not interested in the development of a positive science but in a practical science: in clarifying whether certain known facts are related to a possible crime. Therefore, not only the coherence of the demonstrative logic reasoning used (logic of propositions) is important, but also the precision of the concepts used by language and consistency among them in reasoning (logic of concepts). There is a linguistic level essential for a successful communication between the forensic practitioner and the Court which is mainly related, in our opinion, to semantics and figures of speech. The first one is involved because words used in forensic conclusions often have different meanings - it is said that they are polysemic - and the second one because there is often metonymy as well. Besides, semantic differences among languages regarding words with the same etymological root add another difficulty for a better mutual understanding. The two main European judicial systems inherit a wide and deep culture related to evidence in criminal proceedings and each of them has coined their own terminology but there are other two more abstract levels such as logical and epistemological, where we can find solid arguments by which terms used at legal level on conclusions of forensic reports could be

  20. Weight changes in children in foster care for 1 year

    PubMed Central

    Schneiderman, Janet U.; Smith, Caitlin; Arnold, Janet S.; Fuentes, Jorge; Duan, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study of predominately racial/ethnic minority children in foster care (N = 360, birth to 19 years old) in Los Angeles, CA were to examine the (1) prevalence of obesity (≥ 95 percentile) and overweight/obese(≥ 85 percentile) upon entrance to foster care (T1) and after 1 year in foster care (T2); (2) comparison of high weight categories to national statistics; (3) relationship of changes in weight status to age, reason for entry into foster care, and placement. Methods Chi-square test and McNemar test comparing paired proportions were used to determine whether there were significant changes in the proportion of high weight categories between T1 and T2. Chi-square test or Fisher’s exact test were used to evaluated the association between age, placement, and reason for foster care with the change in weight category. Changes in weight were categorized as (1) decreased in weight, (2) remained at overweight or obese, (3) increased in weight, or (4) remained normal. Results The proportion of obese and obese/overweight children between age 2 and 5 were significantly lower at T2 than T1. There were no significant changes in the prevalence of obesity for the total population at T2. Children age 6 or older had a higher prevalence of obesity and overweight/obesity compared to national statistics. Of children at all ages, 64.7% of children of all ages entered foster care with a normal weight and stayed in the normal range during their first year in foster care, 12.2% decreased their weight, 15.4% remained overweight or obese, and 7.7% increased their weight. Age and parental substance use was related to change in weight category from T1 to T2. Conclusions Children did not become more overweight or obese in foster care; however 28% of the children were obese or overweight upon entry into foster care. Children who are 6 years or older and obese upon entering foster care should be targeted for weight reduction. The pediatric community and child

  1. Cancer mortality in workers exposed to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    SciTech Connect

    Fingerhut, M.A.; Halperin, W.E.; Marlow, D.A.; Piacitelli, L.A.; Honchar, P.A.; Sweeney, M.H.; Greife, A.L.; Dill, P.A.; Steenland, K.; Suruda, A.J. )

    1991-01-24

    In both animal and epidemiologic studies, exposure to dioxin (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, or TCDD) has been associated with an increased risk of cancer. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of mortality among the 5172 workers at 12 plants in the United States that produced chemicals contaminated with TCDD. Occupational exposure was documented by reviewing job descriptions and by measuring TCDD in serum from a sample of 253 workers. Causes of death were taken from death certificates. Mortality from several cancers previously associated with TCDD (stomach, liver, and nasal cancers, Hodgkin's disease, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma) was not significantly elevated in this cohort. Mortality from soft-tissue sarcoma was increased, but not significantly (4 deaths; standardized mortality ratio (SMR), 338; 95 percent confidence interval, 92 to 865). In the subcohort of 1520 workers with greater than or equal to 1 year of exposure and greater than or equal to 20 years of latency, however, mortality was significantly increased for soft-tissue sarcoma (3 deaths; SMR, 922; 95 percent confidence interval, 190 to 2695) and for cancers of the respiratory system (SMR, 142; 95 percent confidence interval, 103 to 192). Mortality from all cancers combined was slightly but significantly elevated in the overall cohort (SMR, 115; 95 percent confidence interval, 102 to 130) and was higher in the subcohort with greater than or equal to 1 year of exposure and greater than or equal to 20 years of latency (SMR, 146; 95 percent confidence interval, 121 to 176). This study of mortality among workers with occupational exposure to TCDD does not confirm the high relative risks reported for many cancers in previous studies. Conclusions about an increase in the risk of soft-tissue sarcoma are limited by small numbers and misclassification on death certificates.

  2. Restoration of the Ellipsoid Zone and Visual Prognosis at 1 Year after Surgical Macular Hole Closure

    PubMed Central

    Hasebe, Hiruma; Matsuoka, Naoki; Terashima, Hiroko; Sasaki, Ryo; Ueda, Eriko; Fukuchi, Takeo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the restoration of the ellipsoid zone (EZ) and its influence on visual prognosis 1 year after surgical macular hole (MH) closure. Method. Subjects were patients with stage 2, 3, or 4 idiopathic MH who underwent primary vitrectomy that resulted in successful hole closure. Nineteen eyes with both EZ disruption with foveal detachment and a continuous external limiting membrane on optical coherence tomography during the early postoperative period were included in this study. Result. EZ disruption was restored in 10 eyes (53%, Group A) and remained in 9 eyes (47%, Group B) at 1 year after surgery. In Group B, the diameter of the residual EZ disruption was 54.7 ± 33.1 μm. LogMAR visual acuity (VA) 1 year after surgery was significantly better than preoperative VA in each group (Group A: −0.007 ± 0.102; P < 0.001; Group B: 0.051 ± 0.148; P < 0.001), but there was no significant difference between the 2 groups (P = 0.332). There was no significant correlation between logMAR VA and EZ disruption diameter at 1 year after surgery. Conclusion. EZ was restored in 53% of eyes at 1 year after surgical closure of idiopathic MH. Mean residual EZ disruption diameter was 54.7 ± 33.1 μm. Neither resolved nor residual EZ disruption influenced postoperative VA. PMID:26941999

  3. The Apollo SWC Experiment: Results, Conclusions, Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiss, J.; Bühler, F.; Cerutti, H.; Eberhardt, P.; Filleux, Ch.; Meister, J.; Signer, P.

    2004-01-01

    interplanetary space at the time of the five foil exposures. Finally, we discuss, from today's perspective, some of the implications and conclusions that can be drawn from the SWC results, concerning the Sun and its history, the solar system, the galaxy and the universe.

  4. Mortality Patterns of Native Hawaiians Across Their Lifespan: 1990–2000

    PubMed Central

    Mau, Marjorie K.; Williams, David R.; McNally, James W.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We examined mortality patterns across the lifespan of Native Hawaiians and compared mortality disparities across races. Methods. We determined the age-specific and age-adjusted mortality rates of Native Hawaiians from 1990 to 2000 by using national census and vital registration data. Results. Among Native Hawaiians aged younger than 1 year, expected deaths were 15% lower than for Blacks and 50% higher than for Whites. Among older adults, Native Hawaiians had higher rates of mortality compared with the general population, particularly in 1990 and 1995. Crude death rates for Native Hawaiians were similar to those for Blacks in 1990 and 1995 but were 20% lower than those for Blacks by 2000. Crude death rates for Native Hawaiians were 30% higher than for Whites in 1990 and 1995 and more than 40% higher than for Whites in 2000. Conclusions. Compared with Whites, Native Hawaiians and Blacks face similar challenges regarding infant and early-life mortality and increasing risks of mortality in mid-life and early old age. Our analyses document a need for renewed efforts to identify the determinants of ill health and commitment to address them. PMID:20864716

  5. Sexual function 1-year after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Noerskov, K H; Schjødt, I; Syrjala, K L; Jarden, M

    2016-06-01

    Treatment with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is associated with short and long-term toxicities that can result in alterations in sexual functioning. The aims of this prospective evaluation were to determine: (1) associations between HSCT and increased sexual dysfunction 1 year after treatment; and (2) associations between sexual dysfunction, body image, anxiety and depression. This controlled prospective cohort study was conducted from October 2010 to November 2013. Patients completed assessments 2-3 weeks before HSCT (N=124) and 1 year after treatment (N=63). Assessment included descriptive data, Sexual Functioning Questionnaire, Body Image Scale and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The results showed a significant decline in overall sexual function in both men and women (P=<0.001, P=0.010, respectively), although men generally scored higher than women. Forty-seven percent of men and 60% of women reported at least one physical sexual problem 1 year after HSCT. Patients with chronic GVHD trended toward reporting lower levels of sexual function. Finally, women with chronic GVHD scored lower than those without chronic GVHD on the sexual function problem subscale (P=0.008). Sexual dysfunction remains a major problem for men and women 1 year after HSCT and requires routine evaluation and treatment after HSCT. PMID:26878660

  6. Anxiety Sensitivity and Panic Attacks: A 1-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Wen; Zinbarg, Richard E.

    2007-01-01

    The hypothesis that anxiety sensitivity (AS) is a risk factor for panic genesis has obtained compelling support, but the clinical/practical importance of AS in panic genesis has been questioned. In addition, the association between panic experience and AS increase has not been clearly demonstrated. Through this 1-year longitudinal study among…

  7. The contribution of HIV to pregnancy-related mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Calvert, Clara; Ronsmans, Carine

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Although much is known about the contribution of HIV to adult mortality, remarkably little is known about the mortality attributable to HIV during pregnancy. In this article we estimate the proportion of pregnancy-related deaths attributable to HIV based on empirical data from a systematic review of the strength of association between HIV and pregnancy-related mortality. Methods: Studies comparing mortality during pregnancy and the postpartum in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women were included. Summary estimates of the relative and attributable risks for the association between HIV and pregnancy-related mortality were calculated through meta-analyses. Varying estimates of HIV prevalence were used to predict the impact of the HIV epidemic on pregnancy-related mortality at the population level. Results: Twenty-three studies were included (17 from sub-Saharan Africa). Meta-analysis of the risk ratios indicated that HIV-infected women had eight times the risk of a pregnancy-related death compared with HIV-uninfected women [pooled risk ratio 7.74, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 5.37–11.16]. The excess mortality attributable to HIV among HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women was 994 per 100 000 pregnant women. We predict that 12% of all deaths during pregnancy and up to 1-year postpartum are attributable to HIV/AIDS in regions with a prevalence of HIV among pregnant women of 2%. This figure rises to 50% in regions with a prevalence of 15%. Conclusion: The substantial excess of pregnancy-related mortality associated with HIV highlights the importance of integrating HIV and reproductive health services in areas of high HIV prevalence and pregnancy-related mortality. PMID:23435296

  8. Predictive Factors of Hospital Mortality Due to Myocardial Infarction: A Multilevel Analysis of Iran's National Data

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Ali; Soori, Hamid; Mehrabi, Yadollah; Etemad, Koorosh; Sajjadi, Homeira; Sadeghi, Mehraban

    2015-01-01

    Background: Regarding failure to establish the statistical presuppositions for analysis of the data by conventional approaches, hierarchical structure of the data as well as the effect of higher-level variables, this study was conducted to determine the factors independently associated with hospital mortality due to myocardial infarction (MI) in Iran using a multilevel analysis. Methods: This study was a national, hospital-based, and cross-sectional study. In this study, the data of 20750 new MI patients between April, 2012 and March, 2013 in Iran were used. The hospital mortality due to MI was considered as the dependent variable. The demographic data, clinical and behavioral risk factors at the individual level and environmental data were gathered. Multilevel logistic regression models with Stata software were used to analyze the data. Results: Within 1-year of study, the frequency (%) of hospital mortality within 30 days of admission was derived 2511 (12.1%) patients. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of mortality with (95% confidence interval [CI]) was derived 2.07 (95% CI: 1.5–2.8) for right bundle branch block, 1.5 (95% CI: 1.3–1.7) for ST-segment elevation MI, 1.3 (95% CI: 1.1–1.4) for female gender, and 1.2 (95% CI: 1.1–1.3) for humidity, all of which were considered as risk factors of mortality. But, OR of mortality was 0.7 for precipitation (95% CI: 0.7–0.8) and 0.5 for angioplasty (95% CI: 0.4–0.6) were considered as protective factors of mortality. Conclusions: Individual risk factors had independent effects on the hospital mortality due to MI. Variables in the province level had no significant effect on the outcome of MI. Increasing access and quality to treatment could reduce the mortality due to MI. PMID:26730342

  9. Comparative Mortality and Risk Factors for Death among US Supreme Court Justices (1789-2013).

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Robert J; Kush, Scott J; Day, Steven M; Vachon, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Objectives .- To compare the mortality experience of 112 justices of the US Supreme Court with that expected in the general population. To identify variables associated with mortality within this cohort. Background .- Supreme Court justices are a select occupational cohort. High socio-economic status, advanced education, lifetime appointment, and the healthy worker effect suggest lower mortality. Sedentary work, stress, and a tendency to work beyond typical retirement age may attenuate this. Methods .- Standardized mortality ratios compare the observed mortality rates of justices with those expected in age- and sex-matched contemporary general populations. Poisson regression analyzes variables associated with mortality within the cohort. Results .- From 1789 to 2013, 112 justices (108 male) contributed 2,355 person-years of exposure. Mean age (standard deviation) at appointment was 53.1 years (6.7); at retirement 69.7 years (9.9); at death (n = 100) 74.4 years (10.3); and at end of the study for those alive (n = 12) 72.1 years (11.8). Standardized mortality ratios (95% ci) were: overall 0.87 (0.70-1.05); prior to 1950 0.92 (0.61-1.33); and from 1950 to 2013 0.66 (0.42-0.99). Variables in the final Poisson model and their associated mortality rate ratios (95% ci) were: age 1.06 (1.03-1.09); calendar year 0.99 (0.99-1.00); active status 0.41 (0.25-0.68); career length 1.04 (1.01-1.07); and chief justice 1.08 (0.59-1.84). Conclusions .- Supreme Court mortality was lower than that of the general population in the period from 1950 to the present, but was on par prior to 1950. Increasing age and career length were associated with greater mortality, while active status and later calendar year with lower. These results may add to a body of knowledge that may help to develop or refine models of mortality risk in increasingly aged working populations. PMID:27584804

  10. Weekend Versus Weekday, Morning Versus Evening Admission in Relationship to Mortality in Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients in 6 Middle Eastern Countries: Results from Gulf Race 2 Registry

    PubMed Central

    Al-Lawati, Jawad A; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Sulaiman, Kadhim; Al-Habib, Khalid; Al Suwaidi, Jassim; Panduranga, Prashanth; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A; Almahmeed, Wael; Al Faleh, Husam; Al Saif, Shukri; Hersi, Ahmad; Asaad, Nidal; Al-Motarreb, Ahmed; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Amin, Haitham

    2012-01-01

    We used prospective cohort data of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) to compare their management on weekdays/mornings with weekends/nights, and the possible impact of this on 1-month and 1-year mortality. Analyses were evaluated using univariate and multivariate statistics. Of the 4,616 patients admitted to hospitals with ACS, 76% were on weekdays. There were no significant differences in 1-month (odds ratio (OR), 0.88; 95% CI: 0.68-1.14) and 1-year mortality (OR, 0.88; 95% CI: 0.70-1.10), respectively, between weekday and weekend admissions. Similarly, there were no significant differences in 1-month (OR, 0.92; 95% CI: 0.73-1.15) and 1-year mortality (OR, 0.98; 95% CI: 0.80-1.20), respectively, between nights and day admissions. In conclusion, apart from lower utilization of angiography (P < .001) at weekends, there were largely no significant discrepancies in the management and care of patients admitted with ACS on weekdays and during morning hours compared with patients admitted on weekends and night hours, and the overall 30-day and 1-year mortality was similar between both the cohorts. PMID:23002404

  11. The clinical outcome of scaphoid fracture malunion at 1 year.

    PubMed

    Forward, D P; Singh, H P; Dawson, S; Davis, T R C

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of malunion of scaphoid fractures on the clinical outcome at 1 year. Forty-two consecutive patients with united scaphoid waist fractures which had been treated non-operatively underwent longitudinal CT scans to confirm union and assess malunion at 12 to 18 weeks after injury. A blind clinical assessment was made and the Patient Evaluation Measure (PEM) and DASH questionnaires were completed by all the patients 1 year after injury. The group consisted of 38 men and four women with a mean age of 31 years at the time of injury. Correlation analysis revealed no significant relationships between any of the outcome measures (range of motion, grip strength and PEM and DASH scores) and any of the three measures of malunion (height-to-length ratio, the dorsal cortical angle and the lateral intra-scaphoid angle). PMID:19129358

  12. Hypomagnesemia Is Associated with Increased Mortality among Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhiwei; Zhu, Beixia; Fei, Jinping; Xue, Congping; Wu, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hypomagnesemia has been associated with an increase in mortality among the general population as well as patients with chronic kidney disease or those on hemodialysis. However, this association has not been thoroughly studied in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between serum magnesium concentrations and all-cause and cardiovascular mortalities in peritoneal dialysis patients. Methods This single-center retrospective study included 253 incident peritoneal dialysis patients enrolled between July 1, 2005 and December 31, 2014 and followed to June 30, 2015. Patient’s demographic characteristics as well as clinical and laboratory measurements were collected. Results Of 253 patients evaluated, 36 patients (14.2%) suffered from hypomagnesemia. During a median follow-up of 29 months (range: 4–120 months), 60 patients (23.7%) died, and 35 (58.3%) of these deaths were attributed to cardiovascular causes. Low serum magnesium was positively associated with peritoneal dialysis duration (r = 0.303, p < 0.001) as well as serum concentrations of albumin (r = 0.220, p < 0.001), triglycerides (r = 0.160, p = 0.011), potassium (r = 0.156, p = 0.013), calcium(r = 0.299, p < 0.001)and phosphate (r = 0.191, p = 0.002). Patients in the hypomagnesemia group had a lower survival rate than those in the normal magnesium groups (p < 0.001). In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, serum magnesium was an independent negative predictor of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.075, p = 0.011) and cardiovascular mortality (HR = 0.003, p < 0.001), especially in female patients. However, in univariate and multivariate Cox analysis, △Mg(difference between 1-year magnesium and baseline magnesium) was not an independent predictor of all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality. Conclusion Hypomagnesemia was common among peritoneal dialysis patients and was independently associated with all

  13. Management and 1-year outcomes of patients with atrial fibrillation in the Middle East: Gulf survey of atrial fibrillation events.

    PubMed

    Zubaid, Mohammad; Rashed, Wafa A; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; AlMahmeed, Wael; Shehab, Abdullah; Sulaiman, Kadhim; Qudaimi, Ahmed Al; Asaad, Nidal; Amin, Haitham

    2015-05-01

    We describe management and outcomes of patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF) in the Middle East. Consecutive patients with AF presenting to emergency departments (EDs) were prospectively enrolled. Among 1721 patients with nonvalvular AF, mean age was 59 ± 16 years and 44% were women. Comorbidities were common such as hypertension (59%), diabetes (33%), and coronary artery disease (33%). Warfarin was not prescribed to 40% of patients with Congestive heart failure, Hypertension, Age, Diabetes mellitus, Stroke/TIA2 score of ≥2. One-year rates of stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA) and all-cause mortality were 4.2% and 15.3%, respectively. Warfarin use at hospital-ED discharge was independently associated with lower 1-year rate of stroke/TIA (odds ratio [OR], 0.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.17-0.85; P = .015) and all-cause mortality (OR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.32-0.83; P = .006). Prior history of heart failure and peripheral vascular disease was independent mortality predictors. Our patients are relatively young with significant cardiovascular risk. Their anticoagulation treatment is suboptimal, and 1-year all-cause mortality and stroke/TIA event rates are relatively high. PMID:24904179

  14. Elder Self-neglect and Abuse and Mortality Risk in a Community-Dwelling Population

    PubMed Central

    Dong, XinQi; Simon, Melissa; de Leon, Carlos Mendes; Fulmer, Terry; Beck, Todd; Hebert, Liesi; Dyer, Carmel; Paveza, Gregory; Evans, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Context Both elder self-neglect and abuse have become increasingly prominent public health issues. The association of either elder self-neglect or abuse with mortality remains unclear. Objective To examine the relationship of elder self-neglect or abuse reported to social services agencies with all-cause mortality among a community-dwelling elderly population. Design, Setting, and Participants Prospective, population-based cohort study (conducted from 1993 to 2005) of residents living in a geographically defined community of 3 adjacent neighborhoods in Chicago, Illinois, who were participating in the Chicago Health and Aging Project (CHAP; a longitudinal, population-based, epidemiological study of residents aged ≥65 years). A subset of these participants had suspected elder self-neglect or abuse reported to social services agencies. Main Outcome Measures Mortality ascertained during follow-up and by use of the National Death Index. Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess independent associations of self-neglect or elder abuse reporting with the risk of all-cause mortality using time-varying covariate analyses. Results Of 9318 CHAP participants, 1544 participants were reported for elder self-neglect and 113 participants were reported for elder abuse from 1993 to 2005. All CHAP participants were followed up for a median of 6.9 years (interquartile range, 7.4 years), during which 4306 deaths occurred. In multivariable analyses, reported elder self-neglect was associated with a significantly increased risk of 1-year mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 5.82; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.20–6.51). Mortality risk was lower but still elevated after 1 year (HR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.67–2.14). Reported elder abuse also was associated with significantly increased risk of overall mortality (HR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.07–1.84). Confirmed elder self-neglect or abuse also was associated with mortality. Increased mortality risks associated with either elder self-neglect or

  15. Mortality among Navajo uranium miners.

    PubMed Central

    Roscoe, R J; Deddens, J A; Salvan, A; Schnorr, T M

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. To update mortality risks for Navajo uranium miners, a retrospective cohort mortality study was conducted of 757 Navajos from the cohort of Colorado Plateau uranium miners. METHODS. Vital status was followed from 1960 to 1990. Standardized mortality ratios were estimated, with combined New Mexico and Arizona non-White mortality rates used for comparison. Cox regression models were used to evaluate exposure-response relationships. RESULTS. Elevated standardized mortality ratios were found for lung cancer (3.3), tuberculosis (2.6), and pneumoconioses and other respiratory diseases (2.6). Lowered ratios were found for heart disease (0.6), circulatory disease (0.4), and liver cirrhosis (0.5). The estimated relative risk for a 5-year duration of exposure vs none was 3.7 for lung cancer, 2.1 for pneumoconioses and other respiratory diseases, and 2.0 for tuberculosis. The relative risk for lung cancer was 6.9 for the midrange of cumulative exposure to radon progeny compared with the least exposed. CONCLUSIONS. Findings were consistent with those from previous studies. Twenty-three years after their last exposure to radon progeny, these light-smoking Navajo miners continue to face excess mortality risks from lung cancer and pneumoconioses and other respiratory diseases. PMID:7702118

  16. Jewish mortality reconsidered.

    PubMed

    Staetsky, Laura Daniel; Hinde, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    It is known that mortality of Jews is different from the mortality of the populations that surround them. However, the existence of commonalities in mortality of different Jewish communities across the world has not received scholarly attention. This paper aims to identify common features of the evolution of Jewish mortality among Jews living in Israel and the Diaspora. In the paper the mortality of Jews in Israel is systematically compared with the mortality of the populations of developed countries, and the findings from the earlier studies of mortality of Jews in selected Diaspora communities are re-examined. The outcome is a re-formulation and extension of the notion of the 'Jewish pattern of mortality'. The account of this pattern is based on the consistently low level of behaviourally induced mortality, the migration history of Jewish populations and the enduring influence of early-life conditions on mortality at older ages. PMID:24784140

  17. Mortality of tuberculosis patients in Chennai, India.

    PubMed Central

    Kolappan, C.; Subramani, R.; Karunakaran, K.; Narayanan, P. R.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to measure the mortality rate and excess general mortality as well as identify groups at high risk for mortality among a cohort of tuberculosis patients treated in Chennai Corporation clinics in south India. METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study we followed up 2674 patients (1800 males and 874 females) who were registered and treated under the DOTS strategy in Chennai Corporation clinics in 2000. The follow-up period from the date of start of treatment to either the date of interview, or death was 600 days. FINDINGS: The mortality rate among this cohort of tuberculosis patients was 60/1000 person-years. The excess general mortality expressed as standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was 6.1 (95% confidence interval (CI)=5.4-6.9). Younger patients, men, patients with Category II disease, patients who defaulted on, or failed courses of treatment, and male smokers who were alcoholics, all had higher mortality ratios when compared to the rest of the cohort. CONCLUSION: The excess mortality in this cohort was six times more than that in the general population. Young age, male sex, smear-positivity, treatment default, treatment failure and the combination of smoking and alcoholism were identified as risk factors for tuberculosis mortality. We suggest that mortality rate and excess mortality be routinely used as a monitoring tool for evaluating the efficiency of the national control programme. PMID:16878229

  18. Mortality among patients with pleural effusion undergoing thoracentesis.

    PubMed

    DeBiasi, Erin M; Pisani, Margaret A; Murphy, Terrence E; Araujo, Katy; Kookoolis, Anna; Argento, A Christine; Puchalski, Jonathan

    2015-08-01

    Of the 1.5 million people diagnosed with pleural effusion in the USA annually, ~178 000 undergo thoracentesis. While it is known that malignant pleural effusion portends a poor prognosis, mortality of patients with nonmalignant effusions has not been well studied.This prospective cohort study evaluated 308 patients undergoing thoracentesis. Chart review was performed to obtain baseline characteristics. The aetiology of the effusions was determined using standardised criteria. Mortality was determined at 30 days and 1 year.247 unilateral and 61 bilateral thoracenteses were performed. Malignant effusion had the highest 30-day (37%) and 1-year (77%) mortality. There was substantial patient 30-day and 1-year mortality with effusions due to multiple benign aetiologies (29% and 55%), congestive heart failure (22% and 53%), and renal failure (14% and 57%, respectively). Patients with bilateral, relative to unilateral, pleural effusion were associated with higher risk of death at 30 days and 1 year (17% versus 47% (hazard ratio (HR) 2.58, 95% CI 1.44-4.63) and 36% versus 69% (HR 2.32, 95% CI 1.55-3.48), respectively).Patients undergoing thoracentesis for pleural effusion have high short- and long-term mortality. Patients with malignant effusion had the highest mortality followed by multiple benign aetiologies, congestive heart failure and renal failure. Bilateral pleural effusion is distinctly associated with high mortality. PMID:25837039

  19. Intracranial idiopathic hypertension: 1-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, D; Curone, M; Erbetta, A; Farago', G; Bianchi-Marzoli, S; Ciasca, P; Bussone, G; Chiapparini, L

    2014-05-01

    Standard guidelines for ongoing management, as well as definitive data about the long-term course of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) are not available. The aim of this study was to compare several clinical and instrumental variables as assessed at the time of diagnosis and then after 1 year in a sample of IIH patients. A total of 21 patients were studied. Our results confirmed that headache and TVO are the most frequent symptoms in IIH patients, and that overweight is a very common feature. A trend towards a favorable outcome in patients followed for 1 year and treated by usual medical therapy was found: intracranial pressure was lower at follow-up; improvement of headache and transient visual obscurations, as well as of papilledema, was reported in most patients. On the other hand, neuroradiological findings (such as empty sella, perioptic subarachnoid space distension, narrowing of the transverse sinuses) were substantially stable at follow. These findings may be relevant for future research as far as understanding the role of different clinical and instrumental findings as diagnostic items as well as predictors of outcome in IIH. PMID:24867861

  20. Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty with 1-year follow-up: factors predictive of success

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Nava, G.; Galvao, M.; Bautista-Castaño, I.; Fernandez-Corbelle, J. P.; Trell, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Bariatric endoscopy has emerged as an aid in the nonsurgical treatment of obesity. The objective of this study is to critically provide the results and follow-up of endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty 1 year after the procedure. Patients and methods: Prospective single-center follow-up study of 25 patients (5 men, 20 women) who underwent flexible endoscopic suturing for endoluminal gastric volume reduction. A multidisciplinary team provided post-procedure care. Patient outcomes were recorded at 1 year after the procedure. Linear regression analysis was done to evaluate the variables associated with best results at 1 year of follow-up. Results: Mean body mass index (BMI) was 38.5 ± 4.6 kg/m2 (range 30 – 47) and mean age 44.5 ± 8.2 years (range 29 – 60). At 1 year, 22 patients continued with the follow-up (2 dropped out at 6 months and 1 at 3 months). There were no major intra-procedural, early, or delayed adverse events. Mean BMI loss was 7.3 ± 4.2 kg/m2, and mean percentage of total body weight loss was 18.7 ± 10.7 at 1 year. In the linear regression analysis, adjusted by initial BMI, variables associated with %TBWL involved the frequency of nutritional (β = 0.563, P = 0.014) and psychological contacts (β = 0.727, P = 0.025). The number of nutritional and psychological contacts were predictive of good weight loss results. Conclusions: Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty is a feasible, reproducible, and effective procedure to treat obesity. Nutritional and psychological interaction are predictive of success. PMID:26878054

  1. Relationship between Stroke and Mortality in Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Phadnis, Milind A.; Ellerbeck, Edward F.; Shireman, Theresa I.; Rigler, Sally K.; Mahnken, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Stroke is common in patients undergoing long-term dialysis, but the implications for mortality after stroke in these patients are not fully understood. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A large cohort of dually-eligible (Medicare and Medicaid) patients initiating dialysis from 2000 to 2005 and surviving the first 90 days was constructed. Medicare claims were used to ascertain ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes occurring after 90-day survival. A semi-Markov model with additive hazard extension was generated to estimate the association between stroke and mortality, to calculate years of life lost after a stroke, and to determine whether race was associated with differential survival after stroke. Results The cohort consisted of 69,371 individuals representing >112,000 person-years of follow-up. Mean age±SD was 60.8±15.5 years. There were 21.1 (99% confidence interval [99% CI], 20.0 to 22.3) ischemic strokes and 4.7 (99% CI, 4.2 to 5.3) hemorrhagic strokes after cohort entry per 1000 patient-years. At 30 days, mortality was 17.9% for ischemic stroke and 53.4% for hemorrhagic stroke. The adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) depended on time since entry into the cohort; for patients who experienced a stroke at 1 year after cohort entry, for example, the AHR of hemorrhagic stroke for mortality was 25.4 (99% CI, 22.4 to 28.4) at 1 week, 9.9 (99% CI, 8.4 to 11.6) at 3 months, 5.9 (99% CI, 5.0 to 7.0) at 6 months, and 1.8 (99% CI, 1.5 to 2.1) at 24 months. The corresponding AHRs for ischemic stroke were 11.7 (99% CI, 10.2 to 13.1) at 1 week, 6.6 (99% CI, 6.4 to 6.7) at 3 months, and 4.7 (99% CI, 4.5 to 4.9) at 6 months, remaining significantly >1.0 even at 48 months. Median months of life lost were 40.7 for hemorrhagic stroke and 34.6 for ischemic stroke. For both stroke types, mortality did not differ by race. Conclusions Dialysis recipients have high mortality after a stroke with corresponding decrements in remaining years of life. Poststroke

  2. Circadian activity rhythms and mortality: the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Tranah, Gregory J.; Blackwell, Terri; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Paudel, Misti L.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; Cauley, Jane A.; Redline, Susan; Hillier, Teresa A.; Cummings, Steven R; Stone, Katie L.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine whether circadian activity rhythms are associated with mortality in community-dwelling older women. DESIGN Prospective study of mortality. SETTING A cohort study of health and aging. PARTICIPANTS 3,027 community-dwelling women from the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures cohort (mean age 84 years). MEASUREMENTS Activity data were collected with wrist actigraphy for a minimum of three 24-hour periods and circadian activity rhythms were computed. Parameters of interest included height of activity peak (amplitude), mean activity level (mesor), strength of activity rhythm (robustness), and time of peak activity (acrophase). Vital status, with cause of death adjudicated through death certificates, was prospectively ascertained. RESULTS Over an average of 4.1 years of follow-up there were 444 (15%) deaths. There was an inverse association between peak activity height and all-cause mortality rates with higher mortality rates observed in the lowest activity quartile (Hazard ratio [HR]=2.18, 95% CI, 1.63–2.92) compared with the highest quartile after adjusting for age, clinic site, race, BMI, cognitive function, exercise, IADL impairments, depression, medications, alcohol, smoking, self-reported health status, married status, and co-morbidities. Increased risk of all-cause mortality was observed between lower mean activity level (HR=1.71, 95% CI, 1.29–2.27) and rhythm robustness (HR=1.97, 95% CI, 1.50–2.60). Increased mortality from cancer (HR=2.09, 95% CI, 1.04–4.22) and stroke (HR=2.64, 95% CI, 1.11–6.30) was observed for a delayed timing of peak activity (after 4:33PM; >1.5 SD from mean) when compared to the mean peak range (2:50PM–4:33PM). CONCLUSION Older women with weak circadian activity rhythms have higher mortality risk. If confirmed in other cohorts, studies will be needed to test whether interventions (e.g. physical activity, bright light exposure) that regulate circadian activity rhythms will improve health outcomes in the elderly

  3. Representation to the accident and emergency department within 1-year of a fractured neck of femur

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The fractured neck of femur (NOF) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The mortality attendant upon such fractures is 10% at 1 month and 30% at one year with a cost to the NHS of £1.4 billion annually. This retrospective study sought to examine rates and prevailing trends in representation to A&E in the year following a NOF fracture in an attempt to identify the leading causes behind the morbidity and mortality associated with this fracture. Methods 1108 patients who suffered a fractured NOF between 1 January 2002 and 31 December 2007 were identified from a University Hospital A&E database. This database was then used to identify those patients who represented within 1-year following the initial fracture. The presenting complaint, provisional diagnosis and the outcome of this presentation were identified at this time. Results 234 patients (21%) returned to A&E on 368 occasions in the year following a hip fracture. 77% (284/368) of these presentations necessitated admission. Falls, infection and fracture were the leading causes of representation. Falls accounted for 20% (57/284) of admissions; 20.7% of patients were admitted because of a fracture, while 56.6% of admissions were for medical ailments of which infection was the chief precipitant (28% (45/161)). Discussion The causes for representation are varied and multifactorial. The results of this study suggest that some of those events or ailments necessitating readmission may be obviated and potentially reduced by interventions that can be instituted during the primary admission and continued following discharge. PMID:22189063

  4. Mortality table construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutawanir

    2015-12-01

    Mortality tables play important role in actuarial studies such as life annuities, premium determination, premium reserve, valuation pension plan, pension funding. Some known mortality tables are CSO mortality table, Indonesian Mortality Table, Bowers mortality table, Japan Mortality table. For actuary applications some tables are constructed with different environment such as single decrement, double decrement, and multiple decrement. There exist two approaches in mortality table construction : mathematics approach and statistical approach. Distribution model and estimation theory are the statistical concepts that are used in mortality table construction. This article aims to discuss the statistical approach in mortality table construction. The distributional assumptions are uniform death distribution (UDD) and constant force (exponential). Moment estimation and maximum likelihood are used to estimate the mortality parameter. Moment estimation methods are easier to manipulate compared to maximum likelihood estimation (mle). However, the complete mortality data are not used in moment estimation method. Maximum likelihood exploited all available information in mortality estimation. Some mle equations are complicated and solved using numerical methods. The article focus on single decrement estimation using moment and maximum likelihood estimation. Some extension to double decrement will introduced. Simple dataset will be used to illustrated the mortality estimation, and mortality table.

  5. Strategies to reduce neonatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Singh, M

    1990-01-01

    In India, 60% of deaths in infants under 1 year of age occur in the 1st 4 weeks after birth. The neonatal mortality rate is currently 76/1000 live births in rural areas and 39/1000 in urban areas. The Government if India has launched a plan of action of address the cycle of poorly spaced pregnancies, inadequate maternal health care and nutrition, and high incidence of low birthweight babies that contributes to this high neonatal mortality phenomenon. Crucial to such a plan is the expansion, strengthening, and improved organization of maternal-child health services. At the level of maternal health services, efforts will be made to identify pregnant women early, arrange a minimum of 4 prenatal visits, provide dietary supplementation and immunization against tetanus toxoid, create more sterile conditions for home deliveries, identify and refer high-risk pregnancies and deliveries, and provide postnatal follow-up care. Child health service staff are motivating mothers to breastfeed and screening newborns for jaundice and bacterial infection. A risk approach, in which there is a minimum necessary level of care for all pregnant women but more intensive management and follow-up of those at high risk, is most cost-efficient given the lack of human and financial resources. Attention must also be given to the determinants of low birthweight (maternal undernutrition, closely spaced pregnancies, severe anemia, adolescent childbearing, prenatal infections, strenuous work responsibilities, and maternal hypertension), which is a co-factor in neonatal mortality. PMID:12316586

  6. Short-term mortality following surgical procedures for the diagnosis of pediatric brain tumors: outcome analysis in 5533 children from SEER, 2004-2011.

    PubMed

    Hankinson, Todd C; Dudley, Roy W R; Torok, Michelle R; Patibandla, Mohana Rao; Dorris, Kathleen; Poonia, Seerat; Wilkinson, C Corbett; Bruny, Jennifer L; Handler, Michael H; Liu, Arthur K

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Thirty-day mortality is increasingly a reference metric regarding surgical outcomes. Recent data estimate a 30-day mortality rate of 1.4-2.7% after craniotomy for tumors in children. No detailed analysis of short-term mortality following a diagnostic neurosurgical procedure (e.g., resection or tissue biopsy) for tumor in the US pediatric population has been conducted. METHODS The Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data sets identified patients ≤ 21 years who underwent a diagnostic neurosurgical procedure for primary intracranial tumor from 2004 to 2011. One- and two-month mortality was estimated. Standard statistical methods estimated associations between independent variables and mortality. RESULTS A total of 5533 patients met criteria for inclusion. Death occurred within the calendar month of surgery in 64 patients (1.16%) and by the conclusion of the calendar month following surgery in 95 patients (1.72%). Within the first calendar month, patients < 1 year of age (n = 318) had a risk of death of 5.66%, while those from 1 to 21 years (n = 5215) had a risk of 0.88% (p < 0.0001). By the end of the calendar month following surgery, patients < 1 year (n = 318) had a risk of death of 7.23%, while those from 1 to 21 years (n = 5215) had a risk of 1.38% (p < 0.0001). Children < 1 year at diagnosis were more likely to harbor a high-grade lesion than older children (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.5-2.4). CONCLUSIONS In the SEER data sets, the risk of death within 30 days of a diagnostic neurosurgical procedure for a primary pediatric brain tumor is between 1.16% and 1.72%, consistent with contemporary data from European populations. The risk of mortality in infants is considerably higher, between 5.66% and 7.23%, and they harbor more aggressive lesions. PMID:26588456

  7. Mortality differentials among Israeli men.

    PubMed Central

    Manor, O; Eisenbach, Z; Peritz, E; Friedlander, Y

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined differentials in mortality among adult Israeli men with respect to ethnic origin, marital status, and several measures of social status. METHODS: Data were based on a linkage of records from a 20% sample of the 1983 census to records of deaths occurring before the end of 1992. The study population included 72,527 men, and the number of deaths was 17,378. RESULTS: Differentials is mortality by origin show that mortality was higher among individuals of North African origin than among those of Asian and European origin. After allowance for several socioeconomic indicators, the excess mortality among North African Jews was eliminated. Substantial and consistent differences in mortality were found according to education, occupation, income, possession of a car, housing, and household amenities. Differentials among the elderly were markedly narrower than those among men younger than 70 years. CONCLUSIONS: Some sectors of Israeli society have higher risks of death than others, including, among the male population, these who are poor, less educated, unmarried, unskilled, out of the labor force, and of North African origin. PMID:10589307

  8. Mortality from Congenital Heart Disease in Mexico: A Problem on the Rise

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Cosme, José Luis; Rolón-Porras, Constanza; Aguinaga-Ríos, Mónica; Acosta-Granado, Pedro Manuel; Reyes-Muñoz, Enrique; Murguía-Peniche, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Temporal trends in mortality from congenital heart disease (CHD) vary among regions. It is therefore necessary to study this problem in each country. In Mexico, congenital anomalies were responsible for 24% of infant mortality in 2013 and CHD represented 55% of total deaths from congenital anomalies among children under 1 year of age. The objectives of this study were to analyze the trends in infant mortality from CHD in Mexico (1998 to 2013), its specific causes, age at death and associated socio-demographic factors. Methods Population-based study which calculated the compounded annual growth rate of death rom CHD between 1998 and 2013. Specific causes, age at which death from CHD occurred and risk factors associated with mortality were analyzed for the year 2013. Results Infant mortality from CHD increased 24.8% from 1998 to 2013 (114.4 to 146.4/ 100,000 live births). A total of 3,593 CHD deaths occurred in 2013; the main causes were CHD with left-to-right shunt (n = 487; 19.8/100,000 live births) and cyanotic heart disease (n = 410; 16.7/100,000). A total of 1,049 (29.2%) deaths from CHD occurred during the first week of life. Risk factors associated with mortality from CHD were, in order of magnitude: non-institutional birth, rural area, birth in a public hospital and male sex. Conclusions Mortality from CHD has increased in Mexico. The main causes were CHD with left-to-right shunt, which are not necessarily fatal if treated promptly. Populations vulnerable to death from CHD were identified. Approximately one-third of the CHD occurred during the first week of life. It is important to promote early diagnosis, especially for non-institutional births. PMID:26937635

  9. Caregiver burden at 1 year following severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Marsh, N V; Kersel, D A; Havill, J H; Sleigh, J W

    1998-12-01

    Sixty-nine primary caregivers of adults with a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) were assessed at 1-year post-injury. Caregivers completed questionnaires on the physical, cognitive, emotional, behavioural, and social functioning of the person with TBI. Caregiver objective burden, psychosocial functioning, and subjective burden were also assessed. Clinically significant levels of anxiety and depression were evident in over a third of the caregivers. Similarly, a quarter of the caregivers reported poor social adjustment. There was no consistent relationship between the prevalence of various types of objective burden and the level of subjective distress that resulted from these changes. The person with TBI's emotional difficulties, in particular their anger, apathy, and dependency, caused the greatest distress for caregivers. With regard to the impact that caregiving had on their own lives, caregivers were most distressed by the loss of personal free time. Results from a regression analysis indicated that the person with TBI's physical impairment, number of behavioural problems, and social isolation were the strongest predictors of caregiver burden. The impact that caring for a person with severe TBI can have on the extended family unit is discussed. PMID:9876864

  10. Respiratory tract mortality in cement workers: a proportionate mortality study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The evidence regarding the association between lung cancer and occupational exposure to cement is controversial. This study investigated causes of deaths from cancer of respiratory tract among cement workers. Methods The deaths of the Greek Cement Workers Compensation Scheme were analyzed covering the period 1969-1998. All respiratory, lung, laryngeal and urinary bladder cancer proportionate mortality were calculated for cement production, maintenance, and office workers in the cement industry. Mortality from urinary bladder cancer was used as an indirect indicator of the confounding effect of smoking. Results Mortality from all respiratory cancer was significantly increased in cement production workers (PMR = 1.91; 95% CI 1.54 to 2.33). The proportionate mortality from lung cancer was significantly elevated (PMR = 2.05; 95% CI 1.65 to 2.52). A statistically significant increase in proportionate mortality due to respiratory (PMR = 1.7; 95% CI 1.2 to 2.34). and lung cancer (PMR = 1.67;95% CI = 1.15-2.34) among maintenance workers has been observed. The PMR among the three groups of workers (production, maintenance, office) did differ significantly for lung cancer (p = 0.001), while the PMR for urinary bladder cancer found to be similar among the three groups of cement workers. Conclusion Cement production, and maintenance workers presented increased lung and respiratory cancer proportionate mortality, and this finding probably cannot be explained by the confounding effect of smoking alone. Further research including use of prospective cohort studies is needed in order to establish a causal association between occupational exposure to cement and risk of lung cancer. PMID:22738120

  11. Cognitive and affective assessment in day care versus institutionalized elderly patients: a 1-year longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Maseda, Ana; Balo, Aránzazu; Lorenzo–López, Laura; Lodeiro–Fernández, Leire; Rodríguez–Villamil, José Luis; Millán–Calenti, José Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cognitive decline and depression are two common mental health problems that may create a need for long-term care among the elderly. In the last decade, the percentage of older adults who receive health care in nursing homes, day care centers, or home support services has increased in Europe. The objectives of this descriptive and nonrandomized longitudinal study were to evaluate and to compare the cognitive and affective evolution of day care versus institutionalized older patients through a 1-year period, and to assess the presence of cognitive and affective impairment as a function of the care setting. Patients and methods Ninety-four patients were assessed at baseline, and 63 (67.0%) were reassessed 1 year later. Neuropsychological assessment included measures of cognitive performance (general cognitive status, visuospatial, and language abilities) and affective status (depressive symptoms). Results Our findings indicated that the majority of the participants (day care and institutionalized patients) had mild–moderate cognitive impairment at baseline, which significantly increased in both groups after 1-year follow-up. However, the rate of change in global cognitive function did not significantly differ between groups over time. Regarding language abilities, naming function maintained among day care patients in comparison with institutionalized patients, who showed worse performance at follow-up. As regards to affective status, results revealed that institutionalized patients had a significant reduction in depressive symptoms at follow-up, when compared to day care patients. Results also highlight the high frequency of cognitive impairment and depressive symptoms regardless of the care setting. Conclusion Our findings revealed a similar global cognitive decline rate between patients receiving day care services and those residing in a nursing home at the 1-year follow-up, and slightly different trajectories in other outcomes such as naming function and

  12. Fathers' Depression Related to Positive and Negative Parenting Behaviors With 1-Year-Old Children

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Matthew M.; Freed, Gary L.; Clark, Sarah J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the associations between depression in fathers of 1-year-old children and specific positive and negative parenting behaviors discussed by pediatric providers at well-child visits. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional secondary analysis by using interview data from 1746 fathers of 1-year-old children in the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study. Positive parenting behaviors included fathers' reports of playing games, singing songs, and reading stories to their children ≥3 days in a typical week. Negative parenting behavior included fathers' reports of spanking their 1-year-old children in the previous month. Depression was assessed by using the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview Short Form. Weighted bivariate and multivariate analyses of parenting behaviors were performed while controlling for demographics and paternal substance abuse. RESULTS: Overall, 7% of fathers had depression. In bivariate analyses, depressed fathers were more likely than nondepressed fathers to report spanking their 1-year-old children in the previous month (41% compared with 13%; P < .01). In multivariate analyses, depressed fathers were less likely to report reading to their children ≥3 days in a typical week (adjusted odds ratio: 0.38 [95% confidence interval: 0.15–0.98]) and much more likely to report spanking (adjusted odds ratio: 3.92 [95% confidence interval: 1.23–12.5]). Seventy-seven percent of depressed fathers reported talking to their children's doctor in the previous year. CONCLUSIONS: Paternal depression is associated with parenting behaviors relevant to well-child visits. Pediatric providers should consider screening fathers for depression, discussing specific parenting behaviors (eg, reading to children and appropriate discipline), and referring for treatment if appropriate. PMID:21402627

  13. A Simple Tool to Predict ESRD Within 1 Year in Elderly Patients with Advanced CKD

    PubMed Central

    Drawz, Paul E.; Goswami, Puja; Azem, Reem; Babineau, Denise C.; Rahman, Mahboob

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common in older patients; currently, no tools are available to predict the risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) within 1 year. The goal of this study was to develop and validate a model to predict the 1 year risk for ESRD in elderly subjects with advanced CKD. DESIGN Retrospective study SETTING Veterans Affairs Medical Center PARTICIPANTS Patients over 65 years of age with CKD with an estimated (eGFR) less than 30mL/min/1.73m2. MEASUREMENTS The outcome was ESRD within 1 year of the index eGFR. Cox regression was used to develop a predictive model (VA risk score) which was validated in a separate cohort. RESULTS Of the 1,866 patients in the developmental cohort, 77 developed ESRD. Risk factors for ESRD in the final model were age, congestive heart failure, systolic blood pressure, eGFR, potassium, and albumin. In the validation cohort, the C index for the VA risk score was 0.823. The risk for developing ESRD at 1 year from lowest to highest tertile was 0.08%, 2.7%, and 11.3% (P<0.001). The C-index for the recently published Tangri model in the validation cohort was 0.780. CONCLUSION A new model using commonly available clinical measures shows excellent ability to predict the onset of ESRD within the next year in elderly subjects. Additionally, the Tangri model had very good predictive ability. Patients and physicians can use these risk models to inform decisions regarding preparation for renal replacement therapy in patients with advanced CKD. PMID:23617782

  14. Frequency of abnormal findings detected by comprehensive clinical evaluation at 1 year after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stephanie J; Seaborn, Travis; Mao, Frances J; Massey, Susan C; Luu, Ngoc Q; Schubert, Mary A; Chien, Jason W; Carpenter, Paul A; Moravec, Carina; Martin, Paul J; Flowers, Mary E D

    2009-04-01

    Consensus guidelines recommend various screening examinations for survivors after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but how often these examinations detect abnormal findings is unknown. We reviewed the medical records of 118 patients who received comprehensive, standardized evaluations at 1 year after allogeneic HCT at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance. Abnormal findings were common, including moderate to severe pulmonary dysfunction (16%), fasting hyperlipidemia (56%), osteopenia (52%), osteoporosis (6%), and active chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) (64%). Recurrent malignancy (4%) and cGVHD (29%) were detected in previously unsuspected cases. Only 3% of patients had no abnormal findings. We conclude that comprehensive evaluation at 1 year after allogeneic HCT detects a high prevalence of medical problems. Longer follow-up is needed to determine whether early detection and intervention affect later morbidity and mortality. PMID:19285628

  15. [Mortality. The behavior of mortality through 1987].

    PubMed

    Jimenez, R

    1988-01-01

    Mexico's crude death rate has declined from 33/1000 in the early 20th century to about 6/1000 in 1985-87. Mortality declined sharply from 1640-60. more slowly from 1960-77, and rapidly again beginning around 1980. The explanation for the mortality decline lies both in advances in medical and health care and in economic growth of the country. The mortality declines in the late 1970s and early 1980s probably resulted primarily from extension of primary health care programs in rural areas. The infant mortality rate has declined from 288.6/1000 live births in 1900 to 73.8 in 1960 and 42 in 1986-87. At present 30% of deaths in Mexico are to children under 5, but little is known of the impact of the country's economic crisis on mortality in this age group. The strong mortality decline between 1950-70 was in the economically active age group of 15-64 years. Excess male mortality in this group reached a maximum in 1980: for each death of woman there were 150 male deaths. Between 1960-80 the rate of deaths due to infection, parasfitism, and respiratory disease declined by 5%, the rate of death from cancer remained almost unchanged, and the rate of death from cardiovascular diseases increased by 9%. Deaths from accidents, homicide, suicide, and other violence increased by 38%. Male general mortality rates were 25% higher than female in 1980. Mexican life expectancy increased from 49.6 years in 195 to 67 in 1987. Life expectancy was 65.6 for males and 71.7 for females. Average life expectancy was 69 for the more privileged social sectors and 56.7 for agricultural workers in 1965-79. The life expectancy of urban women was 3 years longer than that of rural women and 10.4 years longer than that of rural men. PMID:12158030

  16. Body Composition and Mortality after Adult Lung Transplantation in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Jonathan P.; Peterson, Eric R.; Snyder, Mark E.; Katz, Patricia P.; Golden, Jeffrey A.; D’Ovidio, Frank; Bacchetta, Matthew; Sonett, Joshua R.; Kukreja, Jasleen; Shah, Lori; Robbins, Hilary; Van Horn, Kristin; Shah, Rupal J.; Diamond, Joshua M.; Wickersham, Nancy; Sun, Li; Hays, Steven; Arcasoy, Selim M.; Palmer, Scott M.; Ware, Lorraine B.; Christie, Jason D.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Obesity and underweight are contraindications to lung transplantation based on their associations with mortality in studies performed before implementation of the lung allocation score (LAS)–based organ allocation system in the United States Objectives: To determine the associations of body mass index (BMI) and plasma leptin levels with survival after lung transplantation. Methods: We used multivariable-adjusted regression models to examine associations between BMI and 1-year mortality in 9,073 adults who underwent lung transplantation in the United States between May 2005 and June 2011, and plasma leptin and mortality in 599 Lung Transplant Outcomes Group study participants. We measured body fat and skeletal muscle mass using whole-body dual X-ray absorptiometry in 142 adult lung transplant candidates. Measurements and Main Results: Adjusted mortality rates were similar among normal weight (BMI 18.5–24.9 kg/m2), overweight (BMI 25.0–29.9), and class I obese (BMI 30–34.9) transplant recipients. Underweight (BMI < 18.5) was associated with a 35% increased rate of death (95% confidence interval, 10–66%). Class II–III obesity (BMI ≥ 35 kg/m2) was associated with a nearly twofold increase in mortality (hazard ratio, 1.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.3–2.8). Higher leptin levels were associated with increased mortality after transplant surgery performed without cardiopulmonary bypass (P for interaction = 0.03). A BMI greater than or equal to 30 kg/m2 was 26% sensitive and 97% specific for total body fat–defined obesity. Conclusions: A BMI of 30.0–34.9 kg/m2 is not associated with 1-year mortality after lung transplantation in the LAS era, perhaps because of its low sensitivity for obesity. The association between leptin and mortality suggests the need to validate alternative methods to measure obesity in candidates for lung transplantation. A BMI greater than or equal to 30 kg/m2 may no longer contraindicate lung transplantation. PMID

  17. Vitamin D Deficiency Is Highly Concomitant but Not Strong Risk Factor for Mortality in Patients Aged 50 Year and Older with Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gyeong-Hak; Lim, Jung-Won; Park, Yong-Gum

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to ascertain the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and risk factors associated with mortality in patients ≥50-year-of-age with hip fractures. Methods A total of 489 patients ≥50-year-of-age who sustained a hip fracture from January 2010 to October 2014 were followed-up for a minimum of 1 year. Clinical and radiological outcomes were evaluated including prevalence of vitamin D deficiency. Crude mortality rates were calculated, and the effects of different risk factors on mortality were assessed. Results Vitamin D deficiency was present in 76.5% of cases (n=237). The prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency was 12.3%, and only 11.2% of patients had normal vitamin D levels. Accumulated mortality was 11% (54 patients) at 1 year. A univariate analysis showed that vitamin D deficiency (P=0.012), age (P<0.001), BMI (P<0.001), type of management (P<0.001), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score (P=0.009), pre-fracture ambulatory status (P<0.001), and osteoporosis (P<0.001) were associated with mortality. A multivariate analysis performed using a Cox proportional hazards model demonstrated that ASA score (P=0.001) and pre-fracture ambulatory status (P=0.011) were independently associated with mortality after hip fracture. Conclusions We did not find a relationship between serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D levels and mortality after hip fracture, although we observed a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and a significant association with mortality in the univariate analysis. PMID:26713312

  18. Prevalence and 1-year prognosis of transient heart failure following coronary revascularization.

    PubMed

    Ambrosetti, Marco; Griffo, Raffaele; Tramarin, Roberto; Fattirolli, Francesco; Temporelli, Pier Luigi; Faggiano, Pompilio; De Feo, Stefania; Vestri, Anna Rita; Giallauria, Francesco; Greco, Cesare

    2014-09-01

    The occurrence of heart failure during the whole pre-discharge course of coronary revascularization, as far as its influence on subsequent prognosis, is poorly understood. The present study examined the effect of transient heart failure (THF) developing in the acute and rehabilitative phase on survival after coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Patients in the Italian survey on cardiac rehabilitation and secondary prevention after cardiac revascularization (ICAROS) were analyzed for THF, the latter being defined either as signs and symptoms consistent with decompensation or cardiogenic shock. ICAROS was a prospective, multicenter registry of 1,262 consecutive patients discharged from 62 cardiac rehabilitation (CR) facilities, providing data on risk factors, lifestyle habits, drug treatments, and major cardiovascular events (MACE) during a 1-year follow-up. Records were linked to the official website of the Italian Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation (GICR-IACPR). The overall prevalence of pre-discharge THF was 7.6%, with 69.8% of cases in acute wards, 22.9% during CR, and 7.3% in both settings. THF affected more frequently patients with chronic cardiac condition (42.7 vs. 30.6%; p < 0.05), age ≥75 years (33.3 vs. 23.1%; p < 0.005), COPD (19.8 vs. 12.3%; p < 0.05), and chronic kidney disease (17.7 vs. 7%; p < 0.001). After discharge, THF patients showed good maintenance rates of RAAS modulators (90.6%) and beta-blockers (83.3%), while statin therapy significantly decreased from 81.3 to 64.6% (p < 0.05). The pursuit of secondary prevention targets, as far as self-reported drug adherence, was not different among groups. Patients with THF had increased 1-year mortality (8.3 vs. 1.6%, p < 0.001). Moreover, THF independently predicted adverse outcome with OR for recurrent events (mainly further episodes of decompensation) of 2.4 (CI 1.4-4.3). Patients who experienced THF after coronary

  19. Cancer mortality in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Isabelle R.; de Souza, Dyego L.B.; Bernal, María M.; Costa, Íris do C.C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cancer is currently in the spotlight due to their heavy responsibility as main cause of death in both developed and developing countries. Analysis of the epidemiological situation is required as a support tool for the planning of public health measures for the most vulnerable groups. We analyzed cancer mortality trends in Brazil and geographic regions in the period 1996 to 2010 and calculate mortality predictions for the period 2011 to 2030. This is an epidemiological, demographic-based study that utilized information from the Mortality Information System on all deaths due to cancer in Brazil. Mortality trends were analyzed by the Joinpoint regression, and Nordpred was utilized for the calculation of predictions. Stability was verified for the female (annual percentage change [APC] = 0.4%) and male (APC = 0.5%) sexes. The North and Northeast regions present significant increasing trends for mortality in both sexes. Until 2030, female mortality trends will not present considerable variations, but there will be a decrease in mortality trends for the male sex. There will be increases in mortality rates until 2030 for the North and Northeast regions, whereas reductions will be verified for the remaining geographic regions. This variation will be explained by the demographic structure of regions until 2030. There are pronounced regional and sex differences in cancer mortality in Brazil, and these discrepancies will continue to increase until the year 2030, when the Northeast region will present the highest cancer mortality rates in Brazil. PMID:25906105

  20. Impact of malnutrition on pediatric risk of mortality score and outcome in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Nangalu, Romi; Pooni, Puneet Aulakh; Bhargav, Siddharth; Bains, Harmesh Singh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study was done to determine the effect of malnutrition on mortality in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) and on the pediatric risk of mortality (PRISM) scoring. Subjects and Methods: This was a prospective study done over 1 year. There were total 400 patients (1 month 14 years), who were divided into cases with weight for age <3rd centile and controls with ≥3rd centile of WHO charts. Cases were subdivided into mild/moderate (61–80% of expected weight for age) and severe malnutrition (<60%). Results: Out of total, 38.5% patients were underweight, and malnutrition was more in infancy, 61/104, i.e. 58.5% (P - 0.003). There was no significant difference in vitals at admission. Cases needed prolonged mechanical ventilation (P - 0.0063) and hospital stay (P - 0.0332) compared to controls. Mean and median PRISM scores were comparable in both the groups, but mortality was significantly higher in severely malnourished (P value 0.027). Conclusion: Severe malnutrition is independently associated with higher mortality even with similar PRISM score. There is need to give an additional score to children with weight for age <60% of expected. PMID:27555691

  1. Readmission for Acute Exacerbation within 30 Days of Discharge Is Associated with a Subsequent Progressive Increase in Mortality Risk in COPD Patients: A Long-Term Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Mónica; Crisafulli, Ernesto; Liapikou, Adamantia; Huerta, Arturo; Gabarrús, Albert; Chetta, Alfredo; Soler, Nestor; Torres, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Twenty per cent of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients are readmitted for acute exacerbation (AECOPD) within 30 days of discharge. The prognostic significance of early readmission is not fully understood. The objective of our study was to estimate the mortality risk associated with readmission for acute exacerbation within 30 days of discharge in COPD patients. Methods The cohort (n = 378) was divided into patients readmitted (n = 68) and not readmitted (n = 310) within 30 days of discharge. Clinical, laboratory, microbiological, and severity data were evaluated at admission and during hospital stay, and mortality data were recorded at four time points during follow-up: 30 days, 6 months, 1 year and 3 years. Results Patients readmitted within 30 days had poorer lung function, worse dyspnea perception and higher clinical severity. Two or more prior AECOPD (HR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.51–4.05) was the only variable independently associated with 30-day readmission. The mortality risk during the follow-up period showed a progressive increase in patients readmitted within 30 days in comparison to patients not readmitted; moreover, 30-day readmission was an independent risk factor for mortality at 1 year (HR, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.10–5.59). In patients readmitted within 30 days, the estimated absolute increase in the mortality risk was 4% at 30 days (number needed to harm NNH, 25), 17% at 6-months (NNH, 6), 19% at 1-year (NNH, 6) and 24% at 3 years (NNH, 5). Conclusion In conclusion a readmission for AECOPD within 30 days is associated with a progressive increased long-term risk of death. PMID:26943928

  2. One-year outcomes and predictors of mortality after MitraClip therapy in contemporary clinical practice: results from the German transcatheter mitral valve interventions registry

    PubMed Central

    Puls, Miriam; Lubos, Edith; Boekstegers, Peter; von Bardeleben, Ralph Stephan; Ouarrak, Taoufik; Butter, Christian; Zuern, Christine S.; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Sievert, Horst; Nickenig, Georg; Eggebrecht, Holger; Senges, Jochen; Schillinger, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Aims The transcatheter mitral valve interventions (TRAMI) registry was established in order to assess safety and efficacy of catheter-based mitral valve interventional techniques in Germany, and prospectively enrolled 828 MitraClip patients (median age 76 years, median log. EuroSCORE I 20.0%) between August 2010 and July 2013. We present the 1-year outcome in this MitraClip cohort—which is the largest published to date. Methods and results Seven forty-nine patients (90.5%) were available for 1-year follow-up and included in the following analyses. Mortality, major adverse cardiovascular event rates, and New York Heart Association (NYHA) classes were recorded. Predictors of 1-year mortality were identified by multivariate analysis using a Cox regression model with stepwise forward selection. The 1-year mortality was 20.3%. At 1 year, 63.3% of TRAMI patients pertained to NYHA functional classes I or II (compared with 11.0% at baseline), and self-rated health status (on EuroQuol visual analogue scale) also improved significantly by 10 points. Importantly, a significant proportion of patients regained the complete independence in self-care after MitraClip implantation (independence in 74.0 vs. 58.6% at baseline, P = 0.005). Predictors of 1-year mortality were NYHA class IV (hazard ratio, HR 1.62, P = 0.02), anaemia (HR 2.44, P = 0.02), previous aortic valve intervention (HR 2.12, P = 0.002), serum creatinine ≥1.5 mg/dL (HR 1.77, P = 0.002), peripheral artery disease (HR 2.12, P = 0.0003), left ventricular ejection fraction <30% (HR 1.58, P = 0.01), severe tricuspid regurgitation (HR 1.84, P = 0.003), and procedural failure (defined as operator-reported failure, conversion to surgery, failure of clip placement, or residual post-procedural severe mitral regurgitation) (HR 4.36, P < 0.0001). Conclusions Treatment of significant MR with MitraClip resulted in significant clinical improvements in a high proportion of TRAMI patients after 12 months. In the TRAMI cohort

  3. Migration, urbanisation and mortality: 5-year longitudinal analysis of the PERU MIGRANT study

    PubMed Central

    Pena, Melissa S Burroughs; Bernabé-Ortiz, Antonio; Carrillo-Larco, Rodrigo M; Sánchez, Juan F; Quispe, Renato; Pillay, Timesh D; Málaga, Germán; Gilman, Robert H; Smeeth, Liam; Miranda, J Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare all-cause and cause-specific mortality among 3 distinct groups: within-country, rural-to-urban migrants, and rural and urban dwellers in a longitudinal cohort in Peru. Methods The PERU MIGRANT Study, a longitudinal cohort study, used an age-stratified and sex-stratified random sample of urban dwellers in a shanty town community in the capital city of Peru, rural dwellers in the Andes, and migrants from the Andes to the shanty town community. Participants underwent a questionnaire and anthropomorphic measurements at a baseline evaluation in 2007–2008 and at a follow-up visit in 2012–2013. Mortality was determined by death certificate or family interview. Results Of the 989 participants evaluated at baseline, 928 (94%) were evaluated at follow-up (mean age 48 years; 53% female). The mean follow-up time was 5.1 years, totalling 4732.8 person-years. In a multivariable survival model, and relative to urban dwellers, rural participants had lower all-cause mortality (HR=0.27; 95% CI 0.07 to 0.98), and both the rural (HR=0.07; 95% CI 0.01 to 0.87) and migrant (HR=0.13; 95% CI 0.02 to 0.81) groups had lower cardiovascular mortality. Conclusions Cardiovascular mortality of migrants remains similar to that of the rural group, suggesting that rural-to-urban migrants do not appear to catch up with urban mortality in spite of having a more urban cardiovascular risk factor profile. PMID:25987723

  4. Factors Predicting and Reducing Mortality in Patients with Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Disease in a Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, Emma K.; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Wongsuvan, Gumphol; Limmathurosakul, Direk; Srisamang, Pramot; Mahavanakul, Weera; Thaipadungpanit, Janjira; Shah, Krupal R.; Arayawichanont, Arkhom; Amornchai, Premjit; Thanwisai, Aunchalee; Day, Nicholas P.; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Invasive Staphylococcus aureus infection is increasingly recognised as an important cause of serious sepsis across the developing world, with mortality rates higher than those in the developed world. The factors determining mortality in developing countries have not been identified. Methods A prospective, observational study of invasive S. aureus disease was conducted at a provincial hospital in northeast Thailand over a 1-year period. All-cause and S. aureus-attributable mortality rates were determined, and the relationship was assessed between death and patient characteristics, clinical presentations, antibiotic therapy and resistance, drainage of pus and carriage of genes encoding Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL). Principal Findings A total of 270 patients with invasive S. aureus infection were recruited. The range of clinical manifestations was broad and comparable to that described in developed countries. All-cause and S. aureus-attributable mortality rates were 26% and 20%, respectively. Early antibiotic therapy and drainage of pus were associated with a survival advantage (both p<0.001) on univariate analysis. Patients infected by a PVL gene-positive isolate (122/248 tested, 49%) had a strong survival advantage compared with patients infected by a PVL gene-negative isolate (all-cause mortality 11% versus 39% respectively, p<0.001). Multiple logistic regression analysis using all variables significant on univariate analysis revealed that age, underlying cardiac disease and respiratory infection were risk factors for all-cause and S. aureus-attributable mortality, while one or more abscesses as the presenting clinical feature and procedures for infectious source control were associated with survival. Conclusions Drainage of pus and timely antibiotic therapy are key to the successful management of S. aureus infection in the developing world. Defining the presence of genes encoding PVL provides no practical bedside information and draws attention

  5. Impact of Bleeding and Bivalirudin Therapy on Mortality Risk in Women Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (from the REPLACE-2, ACUITY, and HORIZONS-AMI Trials).

    PubMed

    Ng, Vivian G; Baumbach, Andreas; Grinfeld, Liliana; Lincoff, A Michael; Mehran, Roxana; Stone, Gregg W; Lansky, Alexandra J

    2016-01-15

    Women have higher bleeding complication and mortality rates after percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). The contribution of female gender to bleeding and mortality is poorly understood. We evaluated the effect of gender and bleeding on outcomes of patients treated with bivalirudin during PCI by performing a patient-level pooled analysis of 3 randomized controlled trials (the Randomized Evaluation in PCI Linking Angiomax to Reduced Clinical Events, Acute Catheterization and Urgent Intervention Triage strategY, and Harmonizing Outcomes with Revascularization and Stents in Acute Myocardial Infarction) comparing bivalirudin versus heparin plus glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor (GPI) treatment in patients undergoing PCI. Of 14,784 patients, 7,413 patients received bivalirudin (1,870 women) and 7,371 patients received heparin + GPI (1,910 women). Women had significantly higher 30-day non-coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG)-related major bleeding rates (7.6% vs 3.8%, p <0.0001). After multivariate adjustment, female gender increased the hazard of major bleeding by 80% (hazard ratio 1.80, 95% confidence interval 1.52 to 2.11, p <0.001). Furthermore, women had a higher 1-year mortality rate (3.7% vs 2.7%, p = 0.002) than men; 30-day major bleeding was the strongest independent predictor of 1-year mortality in women (hazard ratio 2.48, 95% confidence interval 1.57 to 3.91, p = 0.001). Bivalirudin therapy in women reduced 30-day non-CABG-related major bleeding (5.6% vs 9.7%, p <0.0001) and 1-year mortality (2.9% vs 4.4%, p = 0.02) compared to standard therapy. In conclusion, in this cohort of patients treated for acute coronary syndrome and ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, women have a near 2-fold increase in bleeding complications compared to men after PCI. Bleeding complications rather than gender is the strongest independent predictor of 1-year mortality in patients undergoing PCI. Furthermore, we observed a more pronounced clinical benefit in women

  6. Structural pluralism and all-cause mortality.

    PubMed Central

    Young, F W; Lyson, T A

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study tested the hypothesis that "structural pluralism" reduces age-standardized mortality rates. Structural pluralism is defined as the potential for political competition in communities. METHODS: US counties were the units of analysis. Multiple regression techniques were used to test the hypothesis. RESULTS: Structural pluralism is a stronger determinant of lower mortality than any of the other variables examined--specifically, income, education, and medical facilities. CONCLUSIONS: These findings support the case for a new structural variable, pluralism, as a possible cause of lower mortality, and they indirectly support the significance of comparable ecologic dimensions, such as social trust. PMID:11189808

  7. Neurodevelopment at 1 year of age in infants with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Dittrich, H; Bührer, C; Grimmer, I; Dittrich, S; Abdul-Khaliq, H; Lange, P E

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To assess psychomotor development and neurological sequelae in infants after surgery for congenital heart defects. Design and setting: Single institution prospective cohort study. Patients: 90 of 112 consecutive surviving infants of less than 1 year of age, without brain anomalies, conditions, or syndromes associated with delayed mental development, who underwent cardiac surgery during an 18 month period; 20 control infants with minor or no congenital heart defects. Main outcome measures: Griffiths developmental scales and standardised neurological examination at 1 year. Results: Mean (SD) developmental quotient (DQ) in index infants was 99 (10.6), compared with 106.7 (6.6) in controls (p < 0.001). DQ was lower in infants after palliative surgery (n = 16; 88 (12.2)) than after corrective surgery (n = 74; 101.4 (8.6)) (p < 0.001). Of the 90 index infants, 24 (27%) had a DQ below 93.5 (more than 2 SD below the mean of controls). Developmental delay (DQ < 93.5) was more common after palliative surgery (10/16, 63%) than after corrective surgery (14/74, 19%) (p < 0.001). Of the 90 index infants, 29 (32%) had neurological abnormalities, compared with only one of the 20 controls (5%) (p = 0.013). Neurological abnormalities were more frequent after palliative surgery (11/16, 69%) than after corrective surgery (18/74, 24%) (p < 0.001). Conclusions: There is a considerable rate of neurodevelopmental impairment at 1 year of age in infants after cardiac surgery. Psychomotor impairment and neurological sequelae are apparently more severe in infants in whom only palliative surgery is possible. PMID:12639876

  8. The value of pre-operative multicompartment pelvic floor ultrasonography: a 1-year prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Lone, F; Stankiewicz, A; Thakar, R

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Comprehensive assessment of the pelvic floor (PF) provides information and diagnoses of coexisting abnormalities that may affect operative decisions. Our aim was to establish if pre-operative PF ultrasonography (PFUS) in patients complaining of PF dysfunction can complement clinical findings and contribute to additional management strategies. Methods: Females were recruited from the urogynaecology/gynaecology clinics between July and October 2009 and underwent pelvic organ prolapse quantification (POPQ) by an independent examiner. PFUS was performed using two-dimensional (2D) transperineal ultrasound (TPUS), high-frequency 2D/three-dimensional (3D) endovaginal ultrasound (EVUS) using a biplane probe with linear and transverse arrays and a 360° rotational 3D-EVUS. The clinician performing PFUS was blinded to POPQ results. POPQ and PFUS were repeated at 1 year. Two clinicians analysed the scans independently. Results: 158 of 160 females had a POPQ and PFUS. 105 females had pelvic organ prolapse and/or incontinence and 53 asymptomatic females were controls. 26 additional ultrasound diagnoses were noted at baseline and 46 at 1 year using 2D-TPUS and EVUS. Only one female with additional diagnoses on PFUS needed surgical intervention for this condition. Conclusion: Multicompartment PFUS identifies additional conditions to that diagnosed on clinical assessment. However, it neither changes the initial surgical management nor the management at 1-year follow-up and therefore clinical assessment should not be substituted by PFUS. Advances in knowledge: PFUS can be helpful in providing additional information; however, it does not change the initial management of the patient and therefore should not replace clinical assessment. PMID:24959953

  9. Does parity affect mortality among parous women?

    PubMed Central

    Koski‐Rahikkala, H; Pouta, A; Pietiläinen, K; Hartikainen, A‐L

    2006-01-01

    Objective To find out whether there is an association between parity and mortality. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Northern Finland, 1966–2001. Participants and methods 12 055 women in the two northernmost provinces of Finland were followed up from pregnancy in 1966–2001, the coverage percentage being 96%. The data on age, smoking, body mass index, socioeconomic position, age at menarche and age at first birth were collected during pregnancy, and data on deaths were obtained from the National Cause of Death Statistics, maintained by Statistics Finland. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to estimate relative mortality between parity groups. Results Total mortality was lowest among the women with 2–4 children (reference group). High parity was associated with an up to twofold risk of mortality from vascular complications, but after adjustment for all background factors, this significance disappeared. Mortality from haemorrhagic stroke was fourfold higher among the women with ⩾10 births compared with those of the reference group. No differences in cerebral infarction or total cancer mortality were seen between the groups. Primiparity was associated with increased mortality from accidental death (relative risk 2.6, 95% confidence interval 1.6 to 4.4). Conclusions High parity was associated with an increased risk of mortality from vascular complications, especially haemorrhagic stroke, and primiparity with an increased risk of accidental death. PMID:17053286

  10. Dioxins and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Humblet, Olivier; Birnbaum, Linda; Rimm, Eric; Mittleman, Murray A.; Hauser, Russ

    2008-01-01

    Objective In this systematic review we evaluated the evidence on the association between dioxin exposure and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in humans. Data sources and extraction We conducted a PubMed search in December 2007 and considered all English-language epidemiologic studies and their citations regarding dioxin exposure and CVD mortality. To focus on dioxins, we excluded cohorts that were either primarily exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls or from the leather and perfume industries, which include other cardiotoxic coexposures. Data synthesis We included results from 12 cohorts in the review. Ten cohorts were occupationally exposed. We divided analyses according to two well-recognized criteria of epidemiologic study quality: the accuracy of the exposure assessment, and whether the exposed population was compared with an internal or an external (e.g., general population) reference group. Analyses using internal comparisons with accurate exposure assessments are the highest quality because they minimize both exposure misclassification and confounding due to workers being healthier than the general population (“healthy worker effect”). The studies in the highest-quality group found consistent and significant dose-related increases in ischemic heart disease (IHD) mortality and more modest associations with all-CVD mortality. Their primary limitation was a lack of adjustment for potential confounding by the major risk factors for CVD. Conclusions The results of this systematic review suggest that dioxin exposure is associated with mortality from both IHD and all CVD, although more strongly with the former. However, it is not possible to determine the potential bias, if any, from confounding by other risk factors for CVD. PMID:19057694

  11. Lower Mortality in Magnet Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Matthew D.; Kelly, Lesly A.; Smith, Herbert L.; Wu, Evan S.; Vanak, Jill M.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although there is evidence that hospitals recognized for nursing excellence—Magnet hospitals—are successful in attracting and retaining nurses, it is uncertain whether Magnet recognition is associated with better patient outcomes than non-Magnets, and if so why. Objectives To determine whether Magnet hospitals have lower risk-adjusted mortality and failure-to-rescue compared with non-Magnet hospitals, and to determine the most likely explanations. Method and Study Design Analysis of linked patient, nurse, and hospital data on 56 Magnet and 508 non-Magnet hospitals. Logistic regression models were used to estimate differences in the odds of mortality and failure-to-rescue for surgical patients treated in Magnet versus non-Magnet hospitals, and to determine the extent to which differences in outcomes can be explained by nursing after accounting for patient and hospital differences. Results Magnet hospitals had significantly better work environments and higher proportions of nurses with bachelor's degrees and specialty certification. These nursing factors explained much of the Magnet hospital effect on patient outcomes. However, patients treated in Magnet hospitals had 14% lower odds of mortality (odds ratio 0.86; 95% confidence interval, 0.76–0.98; P = 0.02) and 12% lower odds of failure-to-rescue (odds ratio 0.88; 95% confidence interval, 0.77–1.01; P = 0.07) while controlling for nursing factors as well as hospital and patient differences. Conclusions The lower mortality we find in Magnet hospitals is largely attributable to measured nursing characteristics but there is a mortality advantage above and beyond what we could measure. Magnet recognition identifies existing quality and stimulates further positive organizational behavior that improves patient outcomes. PMID:24022082

  12. Infectious complications more than 1 year after liver transplantation: a 3-decade nationwide experience.

    PubMed

    Aberg, F; Mäkisalo, H; Höckerstedt, K; Isoniemi, H

    2011-02-01

    Because few reports have addressed infections late (≥1 year) after liver transplantation (LT), we evaluated the incidence, risk factors and pathogens involved. Infection data were from the Finnish LT registry, with starting date, type and relevant pathogens for 501 Finnish adult LT patients surviving ≥1 year post-transplant. Follow-up end points were end of study, death or retransplantation. Logistic regression to assess risk factors was adjusted for age, gender and follow-up time. With 3923 person-years of follow-up, overall infection incidence was 66/1000 person-years; 155 (31%) suffered 259 infections, and two-thirds experienced only one infection. Cholangitis (20%), pneumonia (19%) and sepsis (14%) were most common. The most frequent bacteria were Enterococcus spp. and Escherichia coli, and the most frequent viruses cytomegalovirus and varicella zoster virus. Fungal infections were rare (n = 7). With 13 fatal infections, 17% of all late deaths involved infection. Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and Roux-en-Y-type biliary anastomosis were associated with cholangitis; 18% of PSC patients suffered late cholangitis. Late acute rejection was associated with sepsis. Age, gender or cytomegalovirus did not significantly influence late infections. In conclusion, although infection risk under maintenance immunosuppression therapy is relatively low, particular vigilance regarding cholangitis, pneumonia and sepsis seems appropriate. PMID:21219571

  13. Safety and efficacy of nurse-controlled analgesia in patients less than 1 year of age

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Hina; Tumin, Dmitry; Wrona, Sharon; Martin, David; Bhalla, Tarun; Tobias, Joseph D

    2016-01-01

    Background The management of acute pain presents unique challenges in the younger pediatric population. Although patient-controlled devices are frequently used in patients ≥6 years of age, alternative modes of analgesic delivery are needed in infants. Objective To examine the safety and efficacy of nurse-controlled analgesia (NCA) in neonates less than 1 year of age. Methods Data from patients <1 year of age receiving NCA as ordered by the Acute Pain Service at our institution were collected over a 5-year period and reviewed retrospectively. The primary outcomes were activation of the institution’s Rapid Response Team (RRT) or Code Blue, signifying severe adverse events. Pain score after NCA initiation was a secondary outcome. Results Among 338 girls and 431 boys, the most common opioid used for NCA was fentanyl, followed by morphine and hydromorphone. There were 39 (5%) cases involving RRT or Code Blue activation, of which only one (Code Blue) was activated due to a complication of NCA (apnea). Multivariable logistic regression demonstrated morphine NCA to be associated with greater odds of RRT activation (OR=3.29, 95% CI=1.35, 8.03, P=0.009) compared to fentanyl NCA. There were no statistically significant differences in pain scores after NCA initiation across NCA agents. Conclusion NCA is safe in neonates and infants, with comparable efficacy demonstrated for the three agents used. The elevated incidence of RRT activation in patients receiving morphine suggests caution in its use and consideration of alternative agents in this population.

  14. War and Children's Mortality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlton-Ford, Steve; Houston, Paula; Hamill, Ann

    2000-01-01

    Examines impact of war on young children's mortality in 137 countries. Finds that years recently at war (1990-5) interact with years previously at war (1946-89) to elevate mortality rates. Religious composition interacts with years recently at war to reduce effect. Controlling for women's literacy and access to safe water eliminates effect for…

  15. Hanford study: a review of its limitations and controversial conclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1984-10-01

    The Hanford data set has attracted attention primarily because of analyses conducted by Mancuso, Stewart, and Kneale (MSK). These investigators claim that the Hanford data provide evidence that our current estimates of cancer mortality resulting from radiation exposure are too low, and advocate replacing estimates based on populations exposed at relatively high doses (such as the Japanese atom bomb survivors) with estimates based on the Hanford data. In this paper, it is shown that the only evidence of association of radiation exposure and mortality provided by the Hanford data is a small excess of multiple myeloma, and that this data set is not adequate for reliable risk estimation. It is demonstrated that confidence limits for risk estimates are very wide, and that the data are not adequate to differentiate among models. The more recent MSK analyses, which claim to provide adequate models and risk estimates, are critiqued. 18 references, 1 table.

  16. [Mortality of myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Bonnefoy, E; Kirkorian, G

    2011-12-01

    Coronary disease is a major cause of death and disability. From 1975 to 2000, coronary mortality was reduced by half. Better treatments and reduction of risk factors are the main causes. This phenomenon is observed in most developed countries, but mortality from coronary heart disease continues to increase in developing countries. In-hospital mortality of ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is in the range of 7 to 10% in registries. In infarction without ST segment elevation (NSTEMI), in-hospital mortality is around 5%. More recent studies found a similar in-hospital mortality for STEMI and NSTEMI. Because of patient selection and monitoring, mortality in clinical trials is much lower. After adjustment for the extent of coronary disease, age, risk factors, history of myocardial infarction, the excess mortality observed in women is fading. Many clinical, biological and laboratory parameters are associated with mortality in myocardial infarction. They refer to the immediate risk of death (ventricular rhythm disturbances, shock…), the extent of infarction (number of leads with ST elevation on the ECG, release of biomarkers, ejection fraction…), the presence of heart failure, the failure of reperfusion and the patient's baseline risk (age, renal function…). Risk scores, and more specifically the GRACE risk score, synthesize these different markers to predict the risk of death in a given patient. However, their use for the treatment of myocardial only concerns NSTEMI. Only a limited number of mechanical or pharmacological interventions reduces mortality of heart attack. The main benefits are observed with reperfusion by thrombolysis or primary angioplasty in STEMI, aspirin, heparin, beta-blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. Some medications such as bivalirudin and fondaparinux reduce mortality by decreasing the incidence of hemorrhagic complications. The guidelines classify interventions according to their benefit and especially their ability

  17. One-Year Mortality in Older Patients with Cancer: Development and External Validation of an MNA-Based Prognostic Score

    PubMed Central

    Bourdel-Marchasson, Isabelle; Diallo, Abou; Bellera, Carine; Blanc-Bisson, Christelle; Durrieu, Jessica; Germain, Christine; Mathoulin-Pélissier, Simone; Soubeyran, Pierre; Rainfray, Muriel; Fonck, Mariane; Doussau, Adelaïde

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The MNA (Mini Nutritional Assessment) is known as a prognosis factor in older population. We analyzed the prognostic value for one-year mortality of MNA items in older patients with cancer treated with chemotherapy as the basis of a simplified prognostic score. Methods The prospective derivation cohort included 606 patients older than 70 years with an indication of chemotherapy for cancers. The endpoint to predict was one-year mortality. The 18 items of the Full MNA, age, gender, weight loss, cancer origin, TNM, performance status and lymphocyte count were considered to construct the prognostic model. MNA items were analyzed with a backward step-by-step multivariate logistic regression and other items were added in a forward step-by-step regression. External validation was performed on an independent cohort of 229 patients. Results At one year 266 deaths had occurred. Decreased dietary intake (p = 0.0002), decreased protein-rich food intake (p = 0.025), 3 or more prescribed drugs (p = 0.023), calf circumference <31cm (p = 0.0002), tumor origin (p<0.0001), metastatic status (p = 0.0007) and lymphocyte count <1500/mm3 (0.029) were found to be associated with 1-year mortality in the final model and were used to construct a prognostic score. The area under curve (AUC) of the score was 0.793, which was higher than the Full MNA AUC (0.706). The AUC of the score in validation cohort (229 subjects, 137 deaths) was 0.698. Conclusion Key predictors of one-year mortality included cancer cachexia clinical features, comorbidities, the origin and the advanced status of the tumor. The prognostic value of this model combining a subset of MNA items and cancer related items was better than the full MNA, thus providing a simple score to predict 1-year mortality in older patients with an indication of chemotherapy. PMID:26859298

  18. Mortality in Asia.

    PubMed

    1981-01-01

    Although the general trend in mortality between 1950 and 1975 in South and East Asia has been downward, there is considerable country-to-country variation in the rate of decline. In countries where combined economic, social, and political circumstances resulted in controlling the disease spectrum (e.g., China, Malaysia, Sri Lanka), mortality levels declined to those seen in low-mortality countries. In most of the large countries of the region however, mortality declined at a slower rate, even slowing down considerably in the 1970's while the death rates remained high (e.g., India, Bangladesh, Thailand, Philippines); this slowing down of mortality level is attributed essentially to the poverty-stricken masses of society which were not able to take advantage of social, technological, and health-promoting behavioral changes conducive to mortality decline. Infant mortality levels, although declining since 1950, followed the same dismal pattern of the general mortality level. The rate varies from less than 10/1000 live births (Japan) to more than 140/1000 (Bangladesh, Laos, Nepal). Generally, rural areas exhibited higher infant mortality than urban areas. The level of child mortality declines with increases in the mother's educational level in Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, and Thailand. The largest decline in child mortality occurs when at least 1 parent has secondary education. The premature retardation of mortality decline is caused by several factors: economic development, nutrition and food supply, provision and adequacy of health services, and demographic trends. The outlook for the year 2000 for most of Asia's countries will depend heavily on significant population increases. In most countries, particularly in South Asia, population is expected to increase by 75%, much of it in rural areas and among poorer socioeconomic groups. In view of this, Asia's health planners and policymakers will have to develop health policies which will strike a balance

  19. The Effect of the First Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis Event on the Mortality of Cirrhotic Patients with Ascites: A Nationwide Population-Based Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Tsung-Hsing; Tsai, Chen-Chi; Hsieh, Yu-Hsi; Tsai, Chih-Chun; Tseng, Chih-Wei; Tseng, Kuo-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) contributes to poorer short-term mortality in cirrhotic patients with ascites. However, it is unknown how long the effect of the first SBP event persists in these patients. Methods The National Health Insurance Database, derived from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, was used to identify and enroll 7,892 cirrhotic patients with ascites who were hospitalized between January 1 and December 31, 2007. All patients were free from episodes of SBP from 1996 to 2006. Results The study included 1,176 patients with SBP. The overall 30-day, 90-day, 1-year, and 3-year mortality rates in this group were 21.8%, 38.9%, 57.5%, and 73.4%, respectively. The overall 30-day, 90-day, 1-year, and 3-year mortality rates in the non-SBP group were 15.7%, 32.5%, 53.3%, and 72.5%, respectively. After adjusting for gender, age, and other medical comorbidities, the adjusted hazard ratios of SBP for 30-day, 30- to 90-day, 90-day to 1-year, and 1- to 3-year mortality were 1.49 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.30 to 1.71), 1.19 (95% CI, 1.02 to 1.38), 1.04 (95% CI, 0.90 to 1.20), and 0.90 (95% CI, 0.77 to 1.05), respectively, compared with the non-SBP group. Conclusions The effect of SBP on the mortality of cirrhotic patients with ascites disappeared in those surviving more than 90 days after the first SBP event. PMID:27563023

  20. Trends in colorectal cancer mortality in Europe: retrospective analysis of the WHO mortality database

    PubMed Central

    Ait Ouakrim, Driss; Pizot, Cécile; Boniol, Magali; Malvezzi, Matteo; Boniol, Mathieu; Negri, Eva; Bota, Maria; Jenkins, Mark A; Bleiberg, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine changes in colorectal cancer mortality in 34 European countries between 1970 and 2011. Design Retrospective trend analysis. Data source World Health Organization mortality database. Population Deaths from colorectal cancer between 1970 and 2011. Profound changes in screening and treatment efficiency took place after 1988; therefore, particular attention was paid to the evolution of colorectal cancer mortality in the subsequent period. Main outcomes measures Time trends in rates of colorectal cancer mortality, using joinpoint regression analysis. Rates were age adjusted using the standard European population. Results From 1989 to 2011, colorectal cancer mortality increased by a median of 6.0% for men and decreased by a median of 14.7% for women in the 34 European countries. Reductions in colorectal cancer mortality of more than 25% in men and 30% in women occurred in Austria, Switzerland, Germany, the United Kingdom, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Luxembourg, and Ireland. By contrast, mortality rates fell by less than 17% in the Netherlands and Sweden for both sexes. Over the same period, smaller or no declines occurred in most central European countries. Substantial mortality increases occurred in Croatia, the former Yugoslav republic of Macedonia, and Romania for both sexes and in most eastern European countries for men. In countries with decreasing mortality, reductions were more important for women of all ages and men younger than 65 years. In the 27 European Union member states, colorectal cancer mortality fell by 13.0% in men and 27.0% in women, compared with corresponding reductions of 39.8% and 38.8% in the United States. Conclusion Over the past 40 years, there has been considerable disparity in the level of colorectal cancer mortality between European countries, as well as between men and women and age categories. Countries with the largest reductions in colorectal cancer mortality are characterised by better accessibility to screening

  1. Effectiveness of counselling over 1 year on changes in lifestyle and coronary heart disease risk factors.

    PubMed

    Nisbeth, O; Klausen, K; Andersen, L B

    2000-05-01

    Many have studied the effects of different lifestyles on disease, mortality or risk factors for a disease, but little is known about how behaviour is changed in the population. We studied the need for counselling and its effect on willingness and ability to change lifestyle, and subsequent changes in CHD risk factors. All 152 male employees in a computer company, 25-45 years of age, were invited to participate. Subjects were randomized into an intervention group (I-group) and a control group. The I-group was divided into subgroups based on baseline behaviour and risk factor status. Changes were evaluated after 1 year. After an initial health examination, participants from the I-group were counselled at baseline and after 5 months. Eighty-five (56%) males participated. Twenty-nine were assigned to a control group and 56 to an intervention group (I-group) (dropout = 8). An exercise group (E-group) was advised to exercise aerobically three times/week, a diet group to reduce the intake of saturated fat and increase fish products, and smokers to quit smoking. Forty subjects were recommended one or more behavioural changes and eight had no need. Thirty-four were willing to make behavioural changes. Compared to the control group, the fitness level increased (P < 0.01) and body weight decreased in the I-group (P < 0.05). It may be concluded that individual counselling promotes regular exercise with subsequent improvements in CHD risk factors. The diet- and smoking counselling models were less successful in terms of adherence. PMID:10771366

  2. Infant mortality and crisis in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bronfman, M

    1992-01-01

    Data derived from the Encuesta Nacional de Fecundidad y Salud (ENFES) confirm that overall levels of infant mortality in Mexico have been steadily declining. However, a more specific analysis furnishes evidence that this decline has occurred at varying rates within different social groups, reflecting an increase in social inequalities. The analytical strategy used in this article leads to three basic conclusions: (1) the impact of the economic crisis on infant mortality is reflected not in a reversal of the declining trend but an increase in social inequalities; (2) certain variables universally accepted as determinants of infant mortality, such as mother's education, seem nonsignificant for some social sectors; and (3) certain biodemographic characteristics assumed to have a uniform mortality-related behavior vary among sectors, suggesting that even these constants are determined by social factors. PMID:1735623

  3. Air pollution and infant mortality from pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Penna, M.L.; Duchiade, M.P. )

    1991-03-01

    This study examines the relationship between air pollution, measured as concentration of suspended particulates in the atmosphere, and infant mortality due to pneumonia in the metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro. Multiple linear regression (progressive or stepwise method) was used to analyze infant mortality due to pneumonia, diarrhea, and all causes in 1980, by geographic area, income level, and degree of contamination. While the variable proportion of families with income equivalent to more than two minimum wages was included in the regressions corresponding to the three types of infant mortality, the average contamination index had a statistically significant coefficient (b = 0.2208; t = 2.670; P = 0.0137) only in the case of mortality due to pneumonia. This would suggest a biological association, but, as in any ecological study, such conclusions should be viewed with caution. The authors believe that air quality indicators are essential to consider in studies of acute respiratory infections in developing countries.

  4. Lower Mortality in Magnet Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Matthew D.; Kelly, Lesly A.; Smith, Herbert L.; Wu, Evan S.; Vanak, Jill M.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although there is evidence that hospitals recognized for nursing excellence— Magnet hospitals—are successful in attracting and retaining nurses, it is uncertain whether Magnet recognition is associated with better patient outcomes than non-Magnets, and if so why. Objectives To determine whether Magnet hospitals have lower risk-adjusted mortality and failure-to-rescue compared to non-Magnet hospitals, and to determine the most likely explanations. Method and Study Design Analysis of linked patient, nurse, and hospital data on 56 Magnet and 508 non-Magnet hospitals. Logistic regression models were used to estimate differences in the odds of mortality and failure-to-rescue for surgical patients treated in Magnet vs. non-Magnet hospitals, and to determine the extent to which differences in outcomes can be explained by nursing after accounting for patient and hospital differences. Results Magnet hospitals had significantly better work environments and higher proportions of nurses with bachelor’s degrees and specialty certification. These nursing factors explained much of the Magnet hospital effect on patient outcomes. However, patients treated in Magnet hospitals had 14% lower odds of mortality (OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.76-0.98, p=0.02) and 12% lower odds of failure-to-rescue (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.77-1.01, p=0.07) while controlling for nursing factors as well as hospital and patient differences. Conclusions Magnet hospitals have lower mortality than is fully accounted for by measured characteristics of nursing. Magnet recognition likely both identifies existing quality and stimulates further positive organizational behavior that improves patient outcomes. PMID:23047129

  5. Maternal mortality in Sirur.

    PubMed

    Shrotri, A; Pratinidhi, A; Shah, U

    1990-01-01

    The research aim was 1) to determine the incidence of maternal mortality in a rural health center area in Sirur, Maharashtra state, India; 2) to determine the relative risk; and 3) to make suggestions about reducing maternal mortality. The data on deliveries was obtained between 1981 and 1984. Medical care at the Rural Training Center was supervised by the Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, the B.J. Medical College in Pune. Deliveries numbered 5994 singleton births over the four years; 5919 births were live births. 15 mothers died: 14 after delivery and 1 predelivery. The maternal mortality rate was 2.5/1000 live births. The maternal causes of death included 9 direct obstetric causes, 3 from postpartum hemorrhage of anemic women, and 3 from puerperal sepsis of anemic women with prolonged labor. 2 deaths were due to eclampsia, and 1 death was unexplained. There were 5 (33.3%) maternal deaths due to indirect causes (3 from hepatitis and 2 from thrombosis). One woman died of undetermined causes. Maternal jaundice during pregnancy was associated with the highest relative risk of maternal death: 106.4. Other relative risk factors were edema, anemia, and prolonged labor. Attributable risk was highest for anemia, followed by jaundice, edema, and maternal age of over 30 years. Maternal mortality at 30 years and older was 3.9/1000 live births. Teenage maternal mortality was 3.3/1000. Maternal mortality among women 20-29 years old was lowest at 2.1/1000. Maternal mortality for women with a parity of 5 or higher was 3.6/1000. Prima gravida women had a maternal mortality rate of 2.9/1000. Parities between 1 and 4 had a maternal mortality rate of 2.3/1000. The lowest maternal mortality was at parity of 3. Only 1 woman who died had received more than 3 prenatal visits. 11 out of 13 women medically examined prenatally were identified with the following risk factors: jaundice, edema, anemia, young or old maternal age, parity, or poor obstetric history. The local

  6. 37 CFR 251.52 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... COPYRIGHT ARBITRATION ROYALTY PANEL RULES AND PROCEDURES COPYRIGHT ARBITRATION ROYALTY PANEL RULES OF PROCEDURE Procedures of Copyright Arbitration Royalty Panels § 251.52 Proposed findings and conclusions....

  7. 37 CFR 251.52 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... COPYRIGHT ARBITRATION ROYALTY PANEL RULES AND PROCEDURES COPYRIGHT ARBITRATION ROYALTY PANEL RULES OF PROCEDURE Procedures of Copyright Arbitration Royalty Panels § 251.52 Proposed findings and conclusions....

  8. Mortality among a cohort of uranium mill workers: an update

    PubMed Central

    Pinkerton, L; Bloom, T; Hein, M; Ward, E

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the mortality experience of 1484 men employed in seven uranium mills in the Colorado Plateau for at least one year on or after 1 January 1940. Methods: Vital status was updated through 1998, and life table analyses were conducted. Results: Mortality from all causes and all cancers was less than expected based on US mortality rates. A statistically significant increase in non-malignant respiratory disease mortality and non-significant increases in mortality from lymphatic and haematopoietic malignancies other than leukaemia, lung cancer, and chronic renal disease were observed. The excess in lymphatic and haematopoietic cancer mortality was due to an increase in mortality from lymphosarcoma and reticulosarcoma and Hodgkin's disease. Within the category of non-malignant respiratory disease, mortality from emphysema and pneumoconioses and other respiratory disease was increased. Mortality from lung cancer and emphysema was higher among workers hired prior to 1955 when exposures to uranium, silica, and vanadium were presumably higher. Mortality from these causes of death did not increase with employment duration. Conclusions: Although the observed excesses were consistent with our a priori hypotheses, positive trends with employment duration were not observed. Limitations included the small cohort size and limited power to detect a moderately increased risk for some outcomes of interest, the inability to estimate individual exposures, and the lack of smoking data. Because of these limitations, firm conclusions about the relation of the observed excesses in mortality and mill exposures are not possible. PMID:14691274

  9. Severe mental illness and mortality of hospitalized ACS patients in the VHA

    PubMed Central

    Plomondon, Mary E; Ho, P Michael; Wang, Li; Greiner, Gwendolyn T; Shore, James H; Sakai, Joseph T; Fihn, Stephan D; Rumsfeld, John S

    2007-01-01

    Background Severe mental illness (SMI) has been associated with more medical co-morbidity and less cardiovascular procedure use for older patients with myocardial infarction. However, it is unknown whether SMI is associated with increased long term mortality risk among patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). We tested the hypothesis that SMI is associated with higher one-year mortality following ACS hospitalization. Methods All ACS patients (n = 14,194) presenting to Veterans Health Administration (VHA) hospitals between October 2003 and September 2005 were included. Survival analysis evaluated the association between SMI and one-year all-cause mortality, adjusting for demographics, co-morbidities, in-hospital treatment, and discharge medications. Results Overall, 18.4 % of ACS patients had SMI. Patients with SMI were more likely female, younger, Caucasian race, have a history of alcohol abuse, liver disease, dementia, hypertension and more likely to be a current smoker; however, prior cardiac history was similar between the 2 groups. There were no significant differences in cardiac procedure use, including coronary angiogram (38.7% vs. 40.3%, p = 0.14) or coronary revascularization (31.0% vs. 32.3%, p = 0.19), and discharge medications between those with and without SMI. One-year mortality was lower for patients with SMI (15.8% vs. 19.1%, p < 0.001). However, in multivariable analysis, there were no significant differences in mortality (HR 0.91; 95% CI 0.81–1.02) between patients with and without SMI. Conclusion Among ACS patients in the VHA, SMI is prevalent, affecting almost 1 in 5 patients. However, patients with SMI were as likely to undergo coronary revascularization and be prescribed evidence-based medications at hospital discharge, and were not at elevated risk of adverse 1-year outcomes compared to patients without SMI. PMID:17877804

  10. Sepsis in intensive care unit patients with traumatic brain injury: factors associated with higher mortality

    PubMed Central

    Cardozo, Luis Carlos Maia; da Silva, Redson Ruy

    2014-01-01

    Objective Patients with traumatic brain injury are particularly susceptible to sepsis, which may exacerbate the systemic inflammatory response and lead to organ dysfunction. The influence of clinical variables on the mortality of intensive care unit patients with traumatic brain injury and sepsis was investigated. Methods The present investigation was a retrospective study involving 175 patients with traumatic brain injury who were treated in a period of 1 year at a reference hospital for trauma and who had sepsis, severe sepsis, or septic shock. Demographic and clinical data were obtained, and the SOFA score was calculated at the time sepsis was found and after 72 hours. Results There was a predominance of young men with severe traumatic brain injury, multiple head injuries, sepsis with a pulmonary focus, prolonged hospital stay, and high mortality (37.7%). Circulatory and respiratory failure had a high incidence, but renal and coagulation failure were less frequent, and liver failure was not observed. After logistic regression, the presence of septic shock and respiratory failure 72 hours after the sepsis diagnosis was associated with higher mortality, with an odds ratio of 7.56 (95%CI=2.04-27.31, p=0.0024) and 6.62 (95%CI=1.93-22.78, p=0.0027), respectively. In addition, there was a higher mortality among patients who had no organ failure on D1 but who developed the condition after 72 hours of sepsis and in those patients who already had organ failure at the time sepsis was diagnosed and remained in this condition after 72 hours. Conclusion Septic shock and progressive organ (particularly respiratory) dysfunction increases the mortality of patients with traumatic brain injury and sepsis. PMID:25028949

  11. The Use of Hypnotics and Mortality - A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Tzuo-Yun; Zeng, Ya-Fang; Tang, Gau-Jun; Kao, Hui-Chuan; Chiu, Hsien-Jane; Lan, Tsuo-Hung; Ho, Hsiao-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background Sleep disorders, especially chronic insomnia, have become major health problem worldwide and, as a result, the use of hypnotics is steadily increasing. However, few studies with a large sample size and long-term observation have been conducted to investigate the relationship between specific hypnotics and mortality. Methods We conducted this retrospective cohort study using data from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. Information from claims data including basic characteristics, the use of hypnotics, and survival from 2000 to 2009 for 1,320,322 individuals were included. The use of hypnotics was divided into groups using the defined daily dose and the cumulative length of use. Hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated from a Cox proportional hazards model, with two different matching techniques to examine the associations. Results Compared to the non-users, both users of benzodiazepines (HR = 1.81; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.78–1.85) and mixed users (HR = 1.44; 95% CI = 1.42–1.47) had a higher risk of death, whereas the users of other non-benzodiazepines users showed no differences. Zolpidem users (HR = 0.73; 95% CI = 0.71–0.75) exhibited a lower risk of mortality in the adjusted models. This pattern remained similar in both matching techniques. Secondary analysis indicated that zolpidem users had a reduced risk of major cause-specific mortality except cancer, and that this protective effect was dose-responsive, with those using for more than 1 year having the lowest risk. Conclusions The effects of different types of hypnotics on mortality were diverse in this large cohort with long-term follow-up based on representative claims data in Taiwan. The use of zolpidem was associated with a reduced risk of mortality. PMID:26709926

  12. Infant mortality rates declining, but still high.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, M

    1992-10-01

    Family planning can improve infant survival. Specifically, use of family planning methods can minimize family size, increase birth spacing, and reduce the likelihood of pregnancy for teenagers and women aged 40 or older. Immunizations and oral rehydration are responsible for the falling infant mortality rats since 1977 in developing countries, especially among 1-12 month old infants. Yet, neonatal mortality in developing countries had not changed. WHO intends to step up efforts to improve newborn survival. Accurate data are needed, however. Even in developed countries which keep good statistics, infant mortality bias exists. For example, in Japan, some infant deaths are called fetal deaths. In developing countries, much of the data come from hospitals, yet most birth do not occur in hospitals. Even in surveys, bias exists, such as problems with recall. Many researchers use traditional birth attendants (TBAs) to follow up on all births in an area which may eliminate some biases. Such a prospective and longitudinal study in Trairi county in northeastern Brazil shows the infant mortality rate to be less than half of the official rate (65 vs. 142). The major causes of infant death in developed countries, which tends to occur in the neonatal period, are low birth weight, prematurity, birth complications, and congenital defects; developing countries; they are vaccine preventable infectious diseases, diarrhea and dehydration, and respiratory illnesses, all complicated by malnutrition. To make further strides in reducing infant mortality, public health workers must concentrate on the neonatal period. Training TBAs in sterile techniques, appropriate technology, resuscitation of infants, and identification of potential problems is a positive step. Yet, unpredictable conditions (e.g., AIDS) exist and/or will arise which erode improvements. For example, in Nicaragua, within 1 year after the new government introduced health budget cuts which resulted in the poor paying for

  13. 10 CFR 2.712 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 2.712 Section 2.712 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION AGENCY RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Rules for Formal Adjudications § 2.712 Proposed findings and conclusions. (a) Any party to a proceeding may, or if directed...

  14. 10 CFR 2.712 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 2.712 Section 2.712 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION AGENCY RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Rules for Formal Adjudications § 2.712 Proposed findings and conclusions. (a) Any party to a proceeding may, or if directed...

  15. 29 CFR 2700.65 - Proposed findings, conclusions and orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions and orders. 2700.65 Section 2700.65 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION PROCEDURAL RULES Hearings § 2700.65 Proposed findings, conclusions and orders. The Judge may require the submission of proposed findings of...

  16. 29 CFR 2700.65 - Proposed findings, conclusions and orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions and orders. 2700.65 Section 2700.65 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION PROCEDURAL RULES Hearings § 2700.65 Proposed findings, conclusions and orders. The Judge may require the submission of proposed findings of...

  17. 49 CFR 511.46 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. 511.46 Section 511.46 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ADJUDICATIVE PROCEDURES Hearings § 511.46 Proposed findings, conclusions, and...

  18. 29 CFR 2700.65 - Proposed findings, conclusions and orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions and orders. 2700.65 Section 2700.65 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION PROCEDURAL RULES Hearings § 2700.65 Proposed findings, conclusions and orders. The Judge may require the submission of proposed findings of...

  19. 39 CFR 952.23 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... submit proposed findings of fact, conclusions of law, orders, and supporting reasons. Unless given orally... record or given consideration. (b) Except when presented orally before the close of the hearing, proposed... proposed findings. Each proposed conclusion shall be separately stated. (c) Except when presented...

  20. On symbolic models for Single-Conclusion Logic of Proofs

    SciTech Connect

    Krupski, Vladimir N

    2011-05-31

    In this paper we define symbolic models for Single-Conclusion Logics of Proofs. We prove the soundness and completeness of these logics with respect to the corresponding classes of symbolic models. We apply the semantic methods developed in this paper to justify the use of terms of single-conclusion logic of proofs as notation for derivations in this logic. Bibliography: 17 titles.

  1. 49 CFR 511.46 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. 511.46 Section 511.46 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ADJUDICATIVE PROCEDURES Hearings § 511.46 Proposed findings, conclusions, and...

  2. Move Sequences in Graduate Research Paper Introductions and Conclusions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madrunio, Marilu Rañosa

    2012-01-01

    Graduate students submit academic papers at the end of the term as part of their coursework. Such papers contain introduction moves which may be troublesome and conclusion moves which may contain sub-moves not really required. This paper is aimed at assessing what particular moves are employed in the introduction and conclusion sections of 21…

  3. Perioperative and Anesthesia-Related Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Pignaton, Wangles; Braz, José Reinaldo C.; Kusano, Priscila S.; Módolo, Marília P.; de Carvalho, Lídia R.; Braz, Mariana G.; Braz, Leandro G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In 2006, a previous study at our institution reported high perioperative and anesthesia-related mortality rates of 21.97 and 1.12 per 10,000 anesthetics, respectively. Since then, changes in surgical practices may have decreased these rates. However, the actual perioperative and anesthesia-related mortality rates in Brazil remains unknown. The study aimed to reexamine perioperative and anesthesia-related mortality rates in one Brazilian tertiary teaching hospital. In this observational study, deaths occurring in the operation room and postanesthesia care unit between April 2005 and December 2012 were identified from an anesthesia database. The data included patient characteristics, surgical procedures, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status, and medical specialty teams, as well as the types of surgery and anesthesia. All deaths were reviewed and grouped by into 1 of 4 triggering factors groups: totally anesthesia-related, partially anesthesia-related, surgery-related, or disease/condition-related. The mortality rates are expressed per 10,000 anesthetics with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A total of 55,002 anesthetics and 88 deaths were reviewed, representing an overall mortality rate of 16.0 per 10,000 anesthetics (95% CI: 13.0–19.7). There were no anesthesia-related deaths. The major causes of mortality were patient disease/condition-related (13.8, 95% CI: 10.7–16.9) followed by surgery-related (2.2, 95% CI: 1.0–3.4). The major risks of perioperative mortality were children younger than 1-year-old, older patients, patients with poor ASA physical status (III–V), emergency, cardiac or vascular surgeries, and multiple surgeries performed under the same anesthetic technique (P < 0.0001). There were no anesthesia-related deaths. However, the high mortality rate caused by the poor physical conditions of some patients suggests that primary prevention might be the key to reducing perioperative mortality. These findings

  4. Factors Associated with Caregiver Burden in Dementia: 1-Year Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Sang Hong; Kang, Hyo Shin; Kim, Ji Hae

    2016-01-01

    Objective Dementia symptoms (cognitive function, daily-living function, and neuropsychiatric symptoms) become more serious over time, which is likely to increase caregiver burden. The aim of this study is to investigate which dementia-related symptoms, and how the progression of these symptoms, have influenced caregiver burden during a 1-year follow-up assessment. Methods A total of 110 patients with dementia were assessed for their cognitive function, daily-living function, and neuropsychiatric symptoms. Caregivers were assessed for their caregiver burden. Bivariate analyses were conducted between caregiver burden and dementia patients' symptoms, in order to examine which particular symptoms were significantly associated with caregiver burden at the baseline. A multiple regression analysis was then conducted with each significantly associated variable with a view to identifying determinants, influencing caregiver burden. Additionally, bivariate analyses were conducted between the changes in caregiver burden and the changes in patients' symptoms, to investigate which patient variable could best describe caregiver burden from baseline to the 1-year follow-up. A multiple regression analysis was conducted with each significantly-associated change in symptom, in order to identify determinants that influence a change in caregiver burden. Results Neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as irritability, aberrant motor-behavior, delusions and disinhibition were found to be significant predictors of caregiver burden at baseline, according to multiple regression analysis. In addition, changes in neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as delusions, agitation and memory-related functioning in daily-living significantly predict a change in caregiver burden. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that neuropsychiatric symptoms and memory impairment in daily-living functions are significant predictors of an increase in caregiver burden. PMID:26766945

  5. Glomerular filtration rate in patients with atrial fibrillation and 1-year outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Boriani, Giuseppe; Laroche, Cécile; Diemberger, Igor; Popescu, Mircea Ioachim; Rasmussen, Lars Hvilsted; Petrescu, Lucian; Crijns, Harry J. G. M.; Tavazzi, Luigi; Maggioni, Aldo P.; Lip, Gregory Y. H.

    2016-01-01

    We assessed 1-year outcomes in patients with atrial fibrillation enrolled in the EurObservational Research Programme AF General Pilot Registry (EORP-AF), in relation to kidney function, as assessed by glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). In a cohort of 2398 patients (median age 69 years; 61% male), eGFR (ml/min/1.73 m2) calculated using the CKD-EPI formula was ≥80 in 35.1%, 50–79 in 47.2%, 30–49 in 13.9% and <30 in 3.7% of patients. In a logistic regression analysis, eGFR category was an independent predictor of stroke/TIA or death, with elevated odds ratios associated with severe to mild renal impairment, ie. eGFR < 30 ml/min/1.73 m2 [OR 3.641, 95% CI 1.572–8.433, p < 0.0001], 30–49 ml/min/1.73 m2 [OR 3.303, 95% CI 1.740–6.270, p = 0.0026] or 50–79 ml/min/1.73 m2 [OR 2.094, 95% CI 1.194–3.672, p = 0.0003]. The discriminant capability for the risk of death was tested among various eGFR calculation algorithms: the best was the Cockcroft-Gault equation adjusted for BSA, followed by Cockcroft-Gault equation, and CKD-EPI equation, while the worst was the MDRD equation. In conclusion in this prospective observational registry, renal function was a major determinant of adverse outcomes at 1 year, and even mild or moderate renal impairments were associated with an increased risk of stroke/TIA/death. PMID:27466080

  6. Metabolic Changes Following a 1-Year Diet and Exercise Intervention in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Albu, Jeanine B.; Heilbronn, Leonie K.; Kelley, David E.; Smith, Steven R.; Azuma, Koichiro; Berk, Evan S.; Pi-Sunyer, F. Xavier; Ravussin, Eric

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize the relationships among long-term improvements in peripheral insulin sensitivity (glucose disposal rate [GDR]), fasting glucose, and free fatty acids (FFAs) and concomitant changes in weight and adipose tissue mass and distribution induced by lifestyle intervention in obese individuals with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We measured GDR, fasting glucose, and FFAs during a euglycemic clamp and adipose tissue mass and distribution, organ fat, and adipocyte size by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, CT scan, and adipose tissue biopsy in 26 men and 32 women in the Look-AHEAD trial before and after 1 year of diet and exercise aimed at weight loss. RESULTS Weight and fasting glucose decreased significantly (P < 0.0001) and significantly more in men than in women (−12 vs. −8% and −16 vs. −7%, respectively; P < 0.05), while FFAs during hyperinsulinemia decreased and GDR increased significantly (P < 0.00001) and similarly in both sexes (−53 vs. −41% and 63 vs. 43%; P = NS). Men achieved a more favorable fat distribution by losing more from upper compared with lower and from deeper compared with superficial adipose tissue depots (P < 0.01). Decreases in weight and adipose tissue mass predicted improvements in GDR but not in fasting glucose or fasting FFAs; however, decreases in FFAs during hyperinsulinemia significantly determined GDR improvements. Hepatic fat was the only regional fat measure whose change contributed independently to changes in metabolic variables. CONCLUSIONS Patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing a 1-year lifestyle intervention had significant improvements in GDR, fasting glucose, FFAs and adipose tissue distribution. However, changes in overall weight (adipose tissue mass) and hepatic fat were the most important determinants of metabolic improvements. PMID:20028945

  7. Infant Aphakia Treatment Study: Effects of persistent fetal vasculature on outcome at 1 year of age

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, David G.; Wilson, M. Edward; Trivedi, Rupal H.; Lambert, Scott R.; Lynn, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Background The Infant Aphakia Treatment Study (IATS) is a randomized trial comparing the treatment of unilateral congenital cataract with primary intraocular lens (IOL) implantation versus aphakic contact lens (CL). The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes for infants with lens opacity associated with persistent fetal vasculature (PFV) to those without. Methods Retrospective subgroup analysis of grating visual acuity at 1 year of age and adverse events up to 1 year after surgery in eyes identified intraoperatively as having evidence of mild PFV from the IATS. Results Of 83 infants, 18 (22%: 11 CL, 7 IOL) had PFV. Median logMAR visual acuity was 0.88 for patients with PFV and 0.80 for patients without PFV (P = 0.46). One or more adverse events up to one year after surgery occurred in 12 infants (67%) with PFV and 30 infants (46%) without PFV (P = 0.18). The incidence of adverse events was significantly higher in patients with PFV compared to patients without PFV in the CL group (55% vs 20%, P = 0.049) but not in the IOL group (86% vs 71%, P = 0.65), possibly because all children receiving IOLs had higher rates of adverse events when compared to aphakic children (73% vs 29%, P < 0.001). Conclusions Aphakic infants with mild PFV treated with CL had a higher incidence of adverse events following lensectomy compared to children with other forms of unilateral congenital cataract; nevertheless, similar visual outcomes at one year after surgery were obtained. PMID:22108353

  8. Glomerular filtration rate in patients with atrial fibrillation and 1-year outcomes.

    PubMed

    Boriani, Giuseppe; Laroche, Cécile; Diemberger, Igor; Popescu, Mircea Ioachim; Rasmussen, Lars Hvilsted; Petrescu, Lucian; Crijns, Harry J G M; Tavazzi, Luigi; Maggioni, Aldo P; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-01-01

    We assessed 1-year outcomes in patients with atrial fibrillation enrolled in the EurObservational Research Programme AF General Pilot Registry (EORP-AF), in relation to kidney function, as assessed by glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). In a cohort of 2398 patients (median age 69 years; 61% male), eGFR (ml/min/1.73 m(2)) calculated using the CKD-EPI formula was ≥80 in 35.1%, 50-79 in 47.2%, 30-49 in 13.9% and <30 in 3.7% of patients. In a logistic regression analysis, eGFR category was an independent predictor of stroke/TIA or death, with elevated odds ratios associated with severe to mild renal impairment, ie. eGFR < 30 ml/min/1.73 m(2) [OR 3.641, 95% CI 1.572-8.433, p < 0.0001], 30-49 ml/min/1.73 m(2) [OR 3.303, 95% CI 1.740-6.270, p = 0.0026] or 50-79 ml/min/1.73 m2 [OR 2.094, 95% CI 1.194-3.672, p = 0.0003]. The discriminant capability for the risk of death was tested among various eGFR calculation algorithms: the best was the Cockcroft-Gault equation adjusted for BSA, followed by Cockcroft-Gault equation, and CKD-EPI equation, while the worst was the MDRD equation. In conclusion in this prospective observational registry, renal function was a major determinant of adverse outcomes at 1 year, and even mild or moderate renal impairments were associated with an increased risk of stroke/TIA/death. PMID:27466080

  9. Endovascular stents in children under 1 year of age: acute impact and late results.

    PubMed Central

    Hatai, Y.; Nykanen, D. G.; Williams, W. G.; Freedom, R. M.; Benson, L. N.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To review efficacy and safety of endovascular stent implants in children < 1 year of age with congenital heart lesions. DESIGN--Retrospective study of patients in a tertiary care setting. PATIENTS--26 children (median age of 4.7 months, range 2 days to 1 year) with various vascular obstructive lesions. INTERVENTION--Percutaneous or intraoperative implantation of balloon expandable endovascular stents. RESULTS--Optimal stent placement was obtained in 31 of the 37 deployed implants. Complications resulted primarily from stent malpositioning and one episode of bleeding at a puncture site. Stent implantation in three patients with a restrictive arterial duct allowed for patency and five patients with conduit stenosis had mean (SD) right ventricule to systemic artery pressure ratios falling from 0.99 (0.20) to 0.52 (0.18) (P < 0.05). In 10 patients with pulmonary artery stenosis, the mean vessel diameter increased from 2.8 (0.9) mm to 5.8 (1.4) mm (P << 0.001). No clinical improvement was seen in two patients because of diffuse hypoplasia of the pulmonary vessels. Nine of 10 patients with miscellaneous obstructive lesions improved clinically. Recatheterisation was performed in 19 patients (median 8 months, range 12 days to 28 months) and 11 patients required redilatation (17 stents). CONCLUSIONS--Stent implantation is technically feasible in infants and under specific circumstances may provide an alternative to surgical palliation or avoid reoperation. The long term impact on clinical course, however, involves further interventions directed at stent management. Images PMID:8541180

  10. A longitudinal study of back dimension changes over 1 year in sports horses.

    PubMed

    Greve, Line; Dyson, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Major back dimension changes over time have been observed in some horses, the speed of which may be influenced by work type, skeletal maturity, nutrition and saddle fit. Currently, there are no longitudinal data quantifying changes in back dimensions. The objectives of this study were to quantify back dimension changes over time, to identify the effects of horse, saddle and rider on these dimensions, and to determine their association with season, weight, work and saddle management. A prospective, longitudinal study was performed, using stratified random sampling within a convenience sample of 104 sports horses in normal work. Thoracolumbar dimensions/symmetry were measured at predetermined sites every second month over 1 year; weight, work and saddle management changes were recorded. Descriptive statistics, and univariable and multiple mixed effects linear regression were performed to assess the association between management changes, horse-saddle-rider factors and back dimension changes. Complete data was available for 63/104 horses, including horses used for dressage (n= 26), showjumping (n= 26), eventing (n= 26) and general purpose (n= 26), with age groups 3-5 years (n = 24), 6-8 years (n = 28), 9-12 years (n = 24) and ≥ 13 years (n = 28). There were considerable variations in back dimensions over 1 year. In the multivariable analysis, the presence of gait abnormalities at initial examination and back asymmetry were significant and had a negative effect on changes in back dimensions. Subsequent improved saddle fit, similar or increased work intensity, season (summer versus winter) and increased bodyweight retained significance, having positive effects on changes in back dimensions. In conclusion, quantifiable changes in back dimensions occur throughout the year. Saddle fit should be reassessed professionally several times a year, especially if there has been a change in work intensity. PMID:25510314

  11. Statin Use Is Associated with Reduced Mortality in Patients with Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We hypothesized that statin use begun before the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease is associated with reduced mortality. Methods We studied all patients diagnosed with interstitial lung disease in the entire Danish population from 1995 through 2009, comparing statin use versus no statin use in a nested 1:2 matched study. Results The cumulative survival as a function of follow-up time from the date of diagnosis of interstitial lung disease (n = 1,786+3,572) and idiopathic lung fibrosis (n = 261+522) was higher for statin users versus never users (log-rank: P = 7·10−9 and P = 0.05). The median survival time in patients with interstitial lung disease was 3.3 years in statin users and 2.1 years in never users. Corresponding values in patients with idiopathic lung fibrosis were 3.4 versus 2.4 years. After multivariable adjustment, the hazard ratio for all-cause mortality for statin users versus never users was 0.73 (95% confidence interval, 0.68 to 0.79) in patients with interstitial lung disease and 0.76 (0.62 to 0.93) in patients with idiopathic lung fibrosis. Results were robust in all sensitivity analyses. Conclusion Among patients with interstitial lung disease statin use was associated with reduced all-cause mortality. PMID:26473476

  12. Effects on Metabolic Health after a 1-Year-Lifestyle Intervention in Overweight and Obese Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Waling, Maria; Bäcklund, Catharina; Lind, Torbjörn; Larsson, Christel

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effect of a family-based intervention on anthropometric and metabolic markers in overweight and obese children. Methods. Overweight or obese 8–12 years olds (n = 93) were randomized into intervention or control groups. The intervention group participated in a program aiming for lifestyle changes regarding food habits and physical activity. Anthropometric measures and venous blood samples were collected from all children at baseline and after 1 year. Results. BMI z-scores decreased in both groups, 0.22 (P = 0.002) and 0.23 (P = 0.003) in intervention and control group, respectively, during the 1-year study, but there was no difference in BMI between the groups at 1-year measurement (P = 0.338). After 1 year, there was a significant difference in waist circumference, waist/hip ratio, and apolipoprotein B/A1 ratio between intervention and control group. Conclusions. The intervention had limited effects on anthropometrics and metabolic markers, which emphasizes the need of preventing childhood overweight and obesity. PMID:21941639

  13. A randomized double-blind clinical trial of posterior composite restorations with or without bevel: 1-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    COELHO-DE-SOUZA, Fábio Herrmann; CAMARGO, Junara Cristina; BESKOW, Tiago; BALESTRIN, Matheus Dalmolin; KLEIN-JÚNIOR, Celso Afonso; DEMARCO, Flávio Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Objective This randomized double-blind clinical trial compared the performance of posterior composite restorations with or without bevel, after 1-year follow-up. Material and Methods Thirteen volunteers requiring at least two posterior composite restorations were selected. Twenty-nine cavities were performed, comprising 14 without bevel (butt joint) and 15 with bevel preparation of the enamel cavosurface angle. All cavities were restored with simplified adhesive system (Adper Single Bond) and composite resin (Filtek P60). A halogen light curing unit was used through the study. Restorations were polished immediately. Analysis was carried out at baseline, after 6 months and after 1 year by a calibrated evaluator (Kappa), according to the FDI criteria. Data were statistically analyzed by Mann-Whitney test (p<0.05). Results Beveled and non-beveled cavities performed similarly after 1 year follow-up, regarding to fractures and retention, marginal adaptation, postoperative hypersensitivity, recurrence of caries, surface luster and anatomic form. However, for surface and marginal staining, beveled cavities showed significantly better performance (p<0.05) than butt joint restorations. Conclusions It was concluded that the restorations were acceptable after 1 year, but restorations placed in cavities with marginal beveling showed less marginal staining than those placed in non-beveled cavities. PMID:22666833

  14. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation–Specific Comorbidity Index Predicts Inpatient Mortality and Survival in Patients Who Received Allogeneic Transplantation Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Ulas D.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Liu, Ping; Ciurea, Stefan O.; Rondon, Gabriela; de Lima, Marcos; Cardenas-Turanzas, Marylou; Price, Kristen J.; Champlin, Richard E.; Nates, Joseph L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the prognostic value of the Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation–Specific Comorbidity Index (HCT-CI) in patients who received transplantation admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Patients and Methods We investigated the association of HCT-CI with inpatient mortality and overall survival (OS) among 377 patients who were admitted to the ICU within 100 days of allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (ASCT) at our institution. HCT-CI scores were collapsed into four groups and were evaluated in univariate and multivariate analyses using logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models. Results The most common pretransplantation comorbidities were pulmonary and cardiac diseases, and respiratory failure was the primary reason for ICU admission. We observed a strong trend for higher inpatient mortality and shorter OS among patients with HCT-CI values ≥ 2 compared with patients with values of 0 to 1 in all patient subsets studied. Multivariate analysis showed that patients with HCT-CI values ≥ 2 had significantly higher inpatient mortality than patients with values of 0 to 1 and that HCT-CI values ≥ 4 were significantly associated with shorter OS compared with values of 0 to 1 (hazard ratio, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.23 to 2.47). The factors associated with lower inpatient mortality were ICU admission during the ASCT conditioning phase or the use of reduced-intensity conditioning regimens. The overall inpatient mortality rate was 64%, and the 1-year OS rate was 15%. Among patients with HCT-CI scores of 0 to 1, 2, 3, and ≥ 4, the 1-year OS rates were 22%, 17%, 18%, and 9%, respectively. Conclusion HCT-CI is a valuable predictor of mortality and survival in critically ill patients after ASCT. PMID:24127454

  15. Evaluation of Circulating Proteins and Hemodynamics Towards Predicting Mortality in Children with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Brandie D.; Takatsuki, Shinichi; Accurso, Frank J.; Ivy, David Dunbar

    2013-01-01

    Background Although many predictors have been evaluated, a set of strong independent prognostic mortality indicators has not been established in children with pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The aim of this study was to identify a combination of clinical and molecular predictors of survival in PAH. Methods This single-center, retrospective cohort study was performed from children with PAH between 2001 and 2008 at Children's Hospital Colorado. Blood samples from 83 patients (median age of 8.3 years-old) were obtained. We retrospectively analyzed 46 variables, which included 27 circulating proteins, 7 demographic variables and 12 hemodynamic and echocardiographic variables for establishing the best predictors of mortality. A data mining approach was utilized to evaluate predictor variables and to uncover complex data structures while performing variable selection in high dimensional problems. Results Thirteen children (16%) died during follow-up (median; 3.1 years) and survival rates from time of sample collection at 1 year, 3 years and 5 years were 95%, 85% and 79%, respectively. A subset of potentially informative predictors were identified, the top four are listed here in order of importance: Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1), apolipoprotein-AI, RV/LV diastolic dimension ratio and age at diagnosis. In univariate analysis, TIMP-1 and apolipoprotein-AI had significant association with survival time (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval]: 1.25 [1.03, 1.51] and 0.70 [0.54–0.90], respectively). Patients grouped by TIMP-1 and apolipoprotein-AI values had significantly different survival risks (p<0.01). Conclusion Important predictors of mortality were identified from a large number of circulating proteins and clinical markers in this cohort. If confirmed in other populations, measurement of a subset of these predictors could aid in management of pediatric PAH by identifying patients at risk for death. These findings also further

  16. Allometry of Herring mortality

    SciTech Connect

    McGurk, M.D. )

    1993-11-01

    The author calculated the relationship between instantaneous natural mortality, M (d[sup [minus]1]), and dry body weight, W ([mu]g), for herring larvae and adults using data from the scientific literature. Geometric mean mortality of adult Pacific herring Clupea pallasi (0.52[center dot]year[sup [minus]1]), was about three times greater than that of adult Atlantic herring Clupea harengus (0.18 year[sup [minus]1]), which may reflect greater reproductive effort per unit size by Pacific herring than by Atlantic herring. Geometric mean mortality of Pacific herring larvae (0.083[center dot]d[sup [minus]1]) was 30% greater than that of Atlantic herring larvae (0.064[center dot]d[sup [minus]1]), but the difference was not significant. The functional regression for Atlantic herring was log[sub e](M) = -0.4924 - 0.4064[center dot]log[sub e](W), and the regression for Pacific herring was log[sub e](M) = 0.1553 0.3935[center dot]log[sub e](W). The regressions provide preliminary estimates of average M of herring eggs and juveniles, life history stages for which there are few direct estimates of mortality. They also indicate that the weight exponent of instantaneous growth of herring should be greater than -0.4. Allometry of herring mortality implies that year-class strength of herring should be positively correlated with size at recruitment. 78 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. Pulmonary embolism and mortality following total ankle replacement: a data linkage study using the NJR data set

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Razi; MacGregor, Alexander; Cro, Suzie; Goldberg, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the mortality rate following total ankle replacement (TAR) and incidence of 90 day pulmonary embolism (PE) along with the associated risk factors. Design Data-linkage study of the UK National Joint Registry (NJR) data and Hospital Episodes Statistics (HES) database. Linkage was performed in a deterministic fashion. HES episodes 90 days after the index procedure were analysed for PE. Mortality data were obtained pertaining to all the index procedures from the NJR for analysis. Participants All primary and revision ankle replacement patients captured on the NJR between February 2008 and February 2013. Results The 90-day mortality following TAR was 0.13% (95% CI 0.03 to 0.52) and 1-year mortality was 0.72% (95% CI 0.40 to 1.30); no deaths were as a result of PE. The incidence of PE within 90 days following primary TAR was 0.51% (95% CI 0.23 to 1.13). There was only one PE following revision surgery. Patients with an Royal College of Surgeons Charlson score greater than zero were at 13 times greater risk of PE (p=0.003). Conclusions There is low incidence of PE following TAR, but multiple comorbidities are a leading risk factor for its occurrence. PMID:27329444

  18. Independent and joint effects of sedentary time and cardiorespiratory fitness on all-cause mortality: the Cooper Center Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Shuval, Kerem; Finley, Carrie E; Barlow, Carolyn E; Nguyen, Binh T; Njike, Valentine Y; Pettee Gabriel, Kelley

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine the independent and joint effects of sedentary time and cardiorespiratory fitness (fitness) on all-cause mortality. Design, setting, participants A prospective study of 3141 Cooper Center Longitudinal Study participants. Participants provided information on television (TV) viewing and car time in 1982 and completed a maximal exercise test during a 1-year time frame; they were then followed until mortality or through 2010. TV viewing, car time, total sedentary time and fitness were the primary exposures and all-cause mortality was the outcome. The relationship between the exposures and outcome was examined utilising Cox proportional hazard models. Results A total of 581 deaths occurred over a median follow-up period of 28.7 years (SD=4.4). At baseline, participants’ mean age was 45.0 years (SD=9.6), 86.5% were men and their mean body mass index was 24.6 (SD=3.0). Multivariable analyses revealed a significant linear relationship between increased fitness and lower mortality risk, even while adjusting for total sedentary time and covariates (p=0.02). The effects of total sedentary time on increased mortality risk did not quite reach statistical significance once fitness and covariates were adjusted for (p=0.05). When examining this relationship categorically, in comparison to the reference category (≤10 h/week), being sedentary for ≥23 h weekly increased mortality risk by 29% without controlling for fitness (HR=1.29, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.63); however, once fitness and covariates were taken into account this relationship did not reach statistical significance (HR=1.20, 95% CI 0.95 to 1.51). Moreover, spending >10 h in the car weekly significantly increased mortality risk by 27% in the fully adjusted model. The association between TV viewing and mortality was not significant. Conclusions The relationship between total sedentary time and higher mortality risk is less pronounced when fitness is taken into account. Increased car time, but

  19. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation and Morbidity and Mortality-Related Factors: a 5-Year Experience in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Souza, André Luiz Silveira; Salgado, Constantino González; Mourilhe-Rocha, Ricardo; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Lima, Luciana Cristina Lima Correia; de Mattos, Nelson Durval Ferreira Gomes; Rabischoffsky, Arnaldo; Fagundes, Francisco Eduardo Sampaio; Colafranceschi, Alexandre Siciliano; Carvalho, Luiz Antonio Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation has become an option for high-surgical-risk patients with aortic valve disease. Objective To evaluate the in-hospital and one-year follow-up outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Methods Prospective cohort study of transcatheter aortic valve implantation cases from July 2009 to February 2015. Analysis of clinical and procedural variables, correlating them with in-hospital and one-year mortality. Results A total of 136 patients with a mean age of 83 years (80-87) underwent heart valve implantation; of these, 49% were women, 131 (96.3%) had aortic stenosis, one (0.7%) had aortic regurgitation and four (2.9%) had prosthetic valve dysfunction. NYHA functional class was III or IV in 129 cases (94.8%). The baseline orifice area was 0.67 ± 0.17 cm2 and the mean left ventricular-aortic pressure gradient was 47.3±18.2 mmHg, with an STS score of 9.3% (4.8%-22.3%). The prostheses implanted were self-expanding in 97% of cases. Perioperative mortality was 1.5%; 30-day mortality, 5.9%; in-hospital mortality, 8.1%; and one-year mortality, 15.5%. Blood transfusion (relative risk of 54; p = 0.0003) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (relative risk of 5.3; p = 0.036) were predictive of in-hospital mortality. Peak C-reactive protein (relative risk of 1.8; p = 0.013) and blood transfusion (relative risk of 8.3; p = 0.0009) were predictive of 1-year mortality. At 30 days, 97% of patients were in NYHA functional class I/II; at one year, this figure reached 96%. Conclusion Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was performed with a high success rate and low mortality. Blood transfusion was associated with higher in-hospital and one-year mortality. Peak C-reactive protein was associated with one-year mortality. PMID:27192383

  20. The mortality of companies.

    PubMed

    Daepp, Madeleine I G; Hamilton, Marcus J; West, Geoffrey B; Bettencourt, Luís M A

    2015-05-01

    The firm is a fundamental economic unit of contemporary human societies. Studies on the general quantitative and statistical character of firms have produced mixed results regarding their lifespans and mortality. We examine a comprehensive database of more than 25 000 publicly traded North American companies, from 1950 to 2009, to derive the statistics of firm lifespans. Based on detailed survival analysis, we show that the mortality of publicly traded companies manifests an approximately constant hazard rate over long periods of observation. This regularity indicates that mortality rates are independent of a company's age. We show that the typical half-life of a publicly traded company is about a decade, regardless of business sector. Our results shed new light on the dynamics of births and deaths of publicly traded companies and identify some of the necessary ingredients of a general theory of firms. PMID:25833247

  1. The mortality of companies

    PubMed Central

    Daepp, Madeleine I. G.; Hamilton, Marcus J.; West, Geoffrey B.; Bettencourt, Luís M. A.

    2015-01-01

    The firm is a fundamental economic unit of contemporary human societies. Studies on the general quantitative and statistical character of firms have produced mixed results regarding their lifespans and mortality. We examine a comprehensive database of more than 25 000 publicly traded North American companies, from 1950 to 2009, to derive the statistics of firm lifespans. Based on detailed survival analysis, we show that the mortality of publicly traded companies manifests an approximately constant hazard rate over long periods of observation. This regularity indicates that mortality rates are independent of a company's age. We show that the typical half-life of a publicly traded company is about a decade, regardless of business sector. Our results shed new light on the dynamics of births and deaths of publicly traded companies and identify some of the necessary ingredients of a general theory of firms. PMID:25833247

  2. Autoantibodies, mortality and ageing.

    PubMed

    Richaud-Patin, Y; Villa, A R

    1995-01-01

    Immunological failure may be the cause of predisposition to certain infections, neoplasms, and vascular diseases in adulthood. Mortality risks through life may reflect an undetermined number of causes. This study describes the prevalence of positivity of autoantibodies through life, along with general and specific mortality causes in three countries with different socioeconomic development (Guatemala, Mexico and the United States). Prevalence of autoantibodies by age was obtained from previous reports. In spite of having involved different ethnic groups, the observed trends in prevalence of autoantibodies, as well as mortality through life, showed a similar behavior. Thus, both the increase in autoantibody production and death risk as age rises, may share physiopathological phenomena related to the ageing process. PMID:7539882

  3. Hospitalization for Pneumonia is Associated With Decreased 1-Year Survival in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: Results From a Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Marco; Tiseo, Giusy; Russo, Alessandro; Giordo, Laura; Manzini, Elisa; Bertazzoni, Giuliano; Palange, Paolo; Taliani, Gloria; Cangemi, Roberto; Farcomeni, Alessio; Vullo, Vincenzo; Violi, Francesco; Venditti, Mario

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a frequent comorbid conditions among patients with pneumonia living in the community.The aim of our study is to evaluate the impact of hospitalization for pneumonia on early (30 day) and late mortality (1 year) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.Prospective comparative cohort study of 203 patients with type 2 diabetes hospitalized for pneumonia versus 206 patients with diabetes hospitalized for other noninfectious causes from January 2012 to December 2013 at Policlinico Umberto I (Rome). Enrolled patients were followed up to discharge and up to 1 year after initial hospital admission or death.Overall, 203 patients with type 2 diabetes admitted to hospital for pneumonia were compared to 206 patients with type 2 diabetes admitted for other causes (39.3% decompensated diabetes, 21.4% cerebrovascular diseases, 9.2% renal failure, 8.3% acute myocardial infarction, and 21.8% other causes). Compared to control patients, those admitted for pneumonia showed a higher 30-day (10.8% vs 1%, P < 0.001) and 1-year mortality rate (30.3% vs 16.8%, P < 0.001). Compared to survivors, nonsurvivor patients with pneumonia had a higher incidence of moderate to severe chronic kidney disease, hemodialysis, and malnutrition were more likely to present with a mental status deterioration, and had a higher number of cardiovascular events during the follow-up period. Cox regression analysis found age, Charlson comorbidity index, pH < 7.35 at admission, hemodialysis, and hospitalization for pneumonia as variables independently associated with mortality.Hospitalization for pneumonia is associated with decreased 1-year survival in patients with type 2 diabetes, and appears to be a major determinant of long-term outcome in these patients. PMID:26844461

  4. Parental Incarceration and Child Mortality in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Signe Hald; Lee, Hedwig; Karlson, Kristian Bernt

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We used Danish registry data to examine the association between parental incarceration and child mortality risk. Methods. We used a sample of all Danish children born in 1991 linked with parental information. We conducted discrete-time survival analysis separately for boys (n = 30 146) and girls (n = 28 702) to estimate the association of paternal and maternal incarceration with child mortality, controlling for parental sociodemographic characteristics. We followed the children until age 20 years or death, whichever came first. Results. Results indicated a positive association between paternal and maternal imprisonment and male child mortality. Paternal imprisonment was associated with lower child mortality risks for girls. The relationship between maternal imprisonment and female child mortality changed directions depending on the model, suggesting no clear association. Conclusions. These results indicate that the incarceration of a parent may influence child mortality but that it is important to consider the gender of both the child and the incarcerated parent. PMID:24432916

  5. Snakebite Mortality in India: A Nationally Representative Mortality Survey

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Bijayeeni; Warrell, David A.; Suraweera, Wilson; Bhatia, Prakash; Dhingra, Neeraj; Jotkar, Raju M.; Rodriguez, Peter S.; Mishra, Kaushik; Whitaker, Romulus; Jha, Prabhat

    2011-01-01

    Background India has long been thought to have more snakebites than any other country. However, inadequate hospital-based reporting has resulted in estimates of total annual snakebite mortality ranging widely from about 1,300 to 50,000. We calculated direct estimates of snakebite mortality from a national mortality survey. Methods and Findings We conducted a nationally representative study of 123,000 deaths from 6,671 randomly selected areas in 2001–03. Full-time, non-medical field workers interviewed living respondents about all deaths. The underlying causes were independently coded by two of 130 trained physicians. Discrepancies were resolved by anonymous reconciliation or, failing that, by adjudication. A total of 562 deaths (0.47% of total deaths) were assigned to snakebites. Snakebite deaths occurred mostly in rural areas (97%), were more common in males (59%) than females (41%), and peaked at ages 15–29 years (25%) and during the monsoon months of June to September. This proportion represents about 45,900 annual snakebite deaths nationally (99% CI 40,900 to 50,900) or an annual age-standardised rate of 4.1/100,000 (99% CI 3.6–4.5), with higher rates in rural areas (5.4/100,000; 99% CI 4.8–6.0), and with the highest state rate in Andhra Pradesh (6.2). Annual snakebite deaths were greatest in the states of Uttar Pradesh (8,700), Andhra Pradesh (5,200), and Bihar (4,500). Conclusions Snakebite remains an underestimated cause of accidental death in modern India. Because a large proportion of global totals of snakebites arise from India, global snakebite totals might also be underestimated. Community education, appropriate training of medical staff and better distribution of antivenom, especially to the 13 states with the highest prevalence, could reduce snakebite deaths in India. PMID:21532748

  6. Estrogen Plus Progestin and Colorectal Cancer Incidence and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Michael S.; Chlebowski, Rowan T.; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Johnson, Karen C.; Muskovitz, Andrew; Kato, Ikuko; Young, Alicia; Hubbell, F. Allan; Prentice, Ross L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose During the intervention phase in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) clinical trial, use of estrogen plus progestin reduced the colorectal cancer diagnosis rate, but the cancers were found at a substantially higher stage. To assess the clinical relevance of the findings, analyses of the influence of combined hormone therapy on colorectal cancer incidence and colorectal cancer mortality were conducted after extended follow-up. Patients and Methods The WHI study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial involving 16,608 postmenopausal women with an intact uterus who were randomly assigned to daily 0.625 mg conjugated equine estrogen plus 2.5 mg medroxyprogesterone acetate (n = 8,506) or matching placebo (n = 8,102). Colorectal cancer diagnosis rates and colorectal cancer mortality were assessed. Results After a mean of 5.6 years (standard deviation [SD], 1.03 years) of intervention and 11.6 years (SD, 3.1 years) of total follow-up, fewer colorectal cancers were diagnosed in the combined hormone therapy group compared with the placebo group (diagnoses/year, 0.12% v 0.16%; hazard ratio [HR], 0.72; 95% CI, 0.56 to 0.94; P = .014). Bowel screening examinations were comparable between groups throughout. Cancers in the combined hormone therapy group more commonly had positive lymph nodes (50.5% v 28.6%; P < .001) and were at higher stage (regional or distant, 68.8% v 51.4%; P = .003). Although not statistically significant, there was a higher number of colorectal cancer deaths in the combined hormone therapy group (37 v 27 deaths; 0.04% v 0.03%; HR, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.78 to 2.11; P = .320). Conclusion The findings, suggestive of diagnostic delay, do not support a clinically meaningful benefit for combined hormone therapy on colorectal cancer. PMID:23008295

  7. Clinical characteristics, management and 1-year outcomes of patients with acute coronary syndrome in Iran: the Iranian Project for Assessment of Coronary Events 2 (IPACE2)

    PubMed Central

    Kassaian, Seyed Ebrahim; Masoudkabir, Farzad; Sezavar, Hashem; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Pourmoghaddas, Ali; Kojouri, Javad; Ghaffari, Samad; Sanaati, Hamidreza; Alaeddini, Farshid; Pourmirza, Bahin; Mir, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess contemporary data on characteristics, management and 1-year postdischarge outcomes in Iranian patients hospitalised with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Setting 11 tertiary care hospitals in 5 major cities in the Islamic Republic of Iran. Participants Patients aged ≥20 and ≤80 years discharged alive with confirmed diagnosis of ACS including ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), non-STEMI (NSTEMI) and high-risk unstable angina (HR-UA). Primary and secondary outcome measures Patients were followed up regarding the use of medications and the end points of the study at 1 month and 1 year after discharge. The primary end point of the study was 1-year postdischarge major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCEs), defined as mortality (cardiac and non-cardiac), ACS and cerebrovascular attack (stroke and/or transient ischaemic attack). The secondary end points were hospital admission because of congestive heart failure, revascularisation by coronary artery bypass grafting surgery or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and major and minor bleeds. Results A total of 1799 patients (25.7% STEMI and 74.3% HR-UA/NSTEMI) discharged alive with confirmed diagnosis of ACS were included in the final analysis. During hospitalisation, the majority of the patients received aspirin (98.6%), clopidogrel (91.8%), anticoagulants (93.4%), statins (94.3%) and β-blockers (89.3%). Reperfusion therapy was performed in 62.6% of patients with STEMI (46.3% thrombolytic therapy and 17.3% primary PCI). The mean door-to-balloon and door-to-needle times were 82.9 and 45.6 min, respectively. In our study, 64.7% and 79.5% of the patients in HR-UA/NSTEMI and STEMI groups, respectively, underwent coronary angiography. During the 12 months after discharge, MACCEs occurred in 15.0% of all patients. Conclusions Our study showed that the composition of Iranian patients with ACS regarding the type of ACS is similar to that in developed European

  8. Iraq War mortality estimates: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Tapp, Christine; Burkle, Frederick M; Wilson, Kumanan; Takaro, Tim; Guyatt, Gordon H; Amad, Hani; Mills, Edward J

    2008-01-01

    Background In March 2003, the United States invaded Iraq. The subsequent number, rates, and causes of mortality in Iraq resulting from the war remain unclear, despite intense international attention. Understanding mortality estimates from modern warfare, where the majority of casualties are civilian, is of critical importance for public health and protection afforded under international humanitarian law. We aimed to review the studies, reports and counts on Iraqi deaths since the start of the war and assessed their methodological quality and results. Methods We performed a systematic search of 15 electronic databases from inception to January 2008. In addition, we conducted a non-structured search of 3 other databases, reviewed study reference lists and contacted subject matter experts. We included studies that provided estimates of Iraqi deaths based on primary research over a reported period of time since the invasion. We excluded studies that summarized mortality estimates and combined non-fatal injuries and also studies of specific sub-populations, e.g. under-5 mortality. We calculated crude and cause-specific mortality rates attributable to violence and average deaths per day for each study, where not already provided. Results Thirteen studies met the eligibility criteria. The studies used a wide range of methodologies, varying from sentinel-data collection to population-based surveys. Studies assessed as the highest quality, those using population-based methods, yielded the highest estimates. Average deaths per day ranged from 48 to 759. The cause-specific mortality rates attributable to violence ranged from 0.64 to 10.25 per 1,000 per year. Conclusion Our review indicates that, despite varying estimates, the mortality burden of the war and its sequelae on Iraq is large. The use of established epidemiological methods is rare. This review illustrates the pressing need to promote sound epidemiologic approaches to determining mortality estimates and to establish

  9. Epigenetic Analysis of Neurocognitive Development at 1 year of Age in a Community-Based Pregnancy Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Laura E.; Palmer, Frederick B.; Graff, J. Carolyn; Sutter, Thomas R.; Mozhui, Khyobeni; Hovinga, Collin A.; Thomas, Fridtjof; Park, Vicki; Tylavsky, Frances A.; Adkins, Ronald M.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple studies show that molecular genetic changes and epigenetic modifications affect the risk of cognitive disability or impairment. However, the role of epigenetic variation in cognitive development of neurotypical young children remains largely unknown. Using data from a prospective, community-based study of mother-infant pairs, we investigated the association of DNA methylation patterns in neonatal umbilical cord blood with cognitive and language development at 1 year of age. No CpG loci achieved genome-wide significance, although a small number of weakly suggestive associations with Bayley-III Receptive Communication scales were noted. While umbilical cord blood is a convenient resource for genetic analyses of birth outcomes, our results do not provide conclusive evidence that its use for DNA methylation profiling yields epigenetic markers that are directly related to postnatal neurocognitive outcomes at 1 year of age. PMID:24452678

  10. Jumping to conclusions and paranoid ideation in the general population.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Daniel; Pugh, Katherine; Garety, Philippa

    2008-07-01

    An association of a 'jumping to conclusions' (JTC) reasoning style and delusions has been repeatedly found. The data-gathering bias has been particularly implicated with higher levels of delusional conviction in schizophrenia. For the first time the symptom, psychological and social correlates of jumping to conclusions are examined in a large general population sample. This is based upon the recognition that delusional ideation in non-clinical populations is on a continuum of severity with delusions in psychosis. Two hundred individuals completed a probabilistic reasoning task and assessments of paranoid ideation, intellectual functioning, affective symptoms, anomalies of experience, cognitive flexibility, illicit drug use, social support, and trauma. The jumping to conclusions reasoning bias was found in 20% of the non-clinical sample. JTC was strongly associated with higher levels of conviction in paranoid thoughts and the occurrence of perceptual anomalies, but not with the presence of affective symptoms. The results indicate that jumping to conclusions is a reasoning bias specifically associated with levels of delusional conviction, and is not a product of generally high levels of distress and affect. The association of jumping to conclusions with the types of anomalies of experience seen in psychotic disorders is intriguing, and consistent with recent dopamine dysregulation theories and the importance of reasoning to perception. The study is a further illustration of the need to consider the dimensions of delusional experience separately. PMID:18442898

  11. Estimating Geriatric Mortality after Injury Using Age, Injury Severity, and Performance of a Transfusion: The Geriatric Trauma Outcome Score

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Frank Z.; Wolf, Steven E.; Nakonezny, Paul A.; Minhajuddin, Abu; Rhodes, Ramona L.; Paulk, M. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: A tool to determine the probability of mortality for severely injured geriatric patients is needed. Objective: We sought to create an easily calculated geriatric trauma prognostic score based on parameters available at the bedside to aid in mortality probability determination. Methods: All patients ≥65 years of age were identified from our Level I trauma center's registry between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2013. Measurements included age, Injury Severity score (ISS), units of packed red blood cells (PRBCs) transfused in the first 24 hours, and patients' mortality status at the end of their index hospitalization. As a first step, a logistic regression model with maximum likelihood estimation and robust standard errors was used to estimate the odds of mortality from age, ISS, and PRBCs after dichotomizing PRBCs as yes/no. We then constructed a Geriatric Trauma Outcome (GTO) score that became the sole predictor in the re-specified logistic regression model. Results: The sample (n=3841) mean age was 76.5±8.1 years and the mean ISS was 12.4±9.8. In-hospital mortality was 10.8%, and 11.9% received a transfusion by 24 hours. Based on the logistic regression model, the equation with the highest discriminatory ability to estimate probability of mortality was GTO Score=age+(2.5×ISS)+22 (if given PRBCs). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for this model was 0.82. Selected GTO scores and their related probability of dying were: 205=75%, 233=90%, 252=95%, 310=99%. The range of GTO scores was 67.5 (survivor) to 275.1 (died). Conclusion: The GTO model accurately estimates the probability of dying, and can be calculated at bedside by those possessing a working knowledge of ISS calculation. PMID:25974408

  12. Relation between income inequality and mortality: empirical demonstration.

    PubMed

    Wolfson, M C; Kaplan, G; Lynch, J; Ross, N; Backlund, E

    2000-01-01

    Objective To assess the extent to which observed associations between income inequality and mortality at population level are statistical artifacts. Design Indirect "what if" simulation using observed risks of mortality at individual level as a function of income to construct hypothetical state-level mortality specific for age and sex as if the statistical artifact argument were 100% correct. Method Data from the 1990 census for the 50 US states plus Washington, DC, were used for population distributions by age, sex, state, and income range; data disaggregated by age, sex, and state from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were used for mortality; and regressions from the national longitudinal mortality study were used for the individual-level relation between income and risk of mortality. Results Hypothetical mortality, although correlated with inequality (as implied by the logic of the statistical artifact argument), showed a weaker association with the level of income inequality in each state than the observed mortality. Conclusions The observed associations in the United States at the state level between income inequality and mortality cannot be entirely or substantially explained as statistical artifacts of an underlying individual-level relation between income and mortality. There remains an important association between income inequality and mortality at state level above anything that could be accounted for by any statistical artifact. This result reinforces the need to consider a broad range of factors, including the social milieu, as fundamental determinants of health. PMID:18751209

  13. Model-based patterns in prostate cancer mortality worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Fontes, F; Severo, M; Castro, C; Lourenço, S; Gomes, S; Botelho, F; La Vecchia, C; Lunet, N

    2013-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer mortality has been decreasing in several high income countries and previous studies analysed the trends mostly according to geographical criteria. We aimed to identify patterns in the time trends of prostate cancer mortality across countries using a model-based approach. Methods: Model-based clustering was used to identify patterns of variation in prostate cancer mortality (1980–2010) across 37 European, five non-European high-income countries and four leading emerging economies. We characterised the patterns observed regarding the geographical distribution and gross national income of the countries, as well as the trends observed in mortality/incidence ratios. Results: We identified three clusters of countries with similar variation in prostate cancer mortality: pattern 1 (‘no mortality decline'), characterised by a continued increase throughout the whole period; patterns 2 (‘later mortality decline') and 3 (‘earlier mortality decline') depict mortality declines, starting in the late and early 1990s, respectively. These clusters are also homogeneous regarding the variation in the prostate cancer mortality/incidence ratios, while are heterogeneous with reference to the geographical region of the countries and distribution of the gross national income. Conclusion: We provide a general model for the description and interpretation of the trends in prostate cancer mortality worldwide, based on three main patterns. PMID:23660943

  14. Nonelective Rehospitalizations and Postdischarge Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Ragins, Arona; Scheirer, Peter; Liu, Vincent; Robles, Jay; Kipnis, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hospital discharge planning has been hampered by the lack of predictive models. Objective: To develop predictive models for nonelective rehospitalization and postdischarge mortality suitable for use in commercially available electronic medical records (EMRs). Design: Retrospective cohort study using split validation. Setting: Integrated health care delivery system serving 3.9 million members. Participants: A total of 360,036 surviving adults who experienced 609,393 overnight hospitalizations at 21 hospitals between June 1, 2010 and December 31, 2013. Main Outcome Measure: A composite outcome (nonelective rehospitalization and/or death within 7 or 30 days of discharge). Results: Nonelective rehospitalization rates at 7 and 30 days were 5.8% and 12.4%; mortality rates were 1.3% and 3.7%; and composite outcome rates were 6.3% and 14.9%, respectively. Using data from a comprehensive EMR, we developed 4 models that can generate risk estimates for risk of the combined outcome within 7 or 30 days, either at the time of admission or at 8 am on the day of discharge. The best was the 30-day discharge day model, which had a c-statistic of 0.756 (95% confidence interval, 0.754–0.756) and a Nagelkerke pseudo-R2 of 0.174 (0.171–0.178) in the validation dataset. The most important predictors—a composite acute physiology score and end of life care directives—accounted for 54% of the predictive ability of the 30-day model. Incorporation of diagnoses (not reliably available for real-time use) did not improve model performance. Conclusions: It is possible to develop robust predictive models, suitable for use in real time with commercially available EMRs, for nonelective rehospitalization and postdischarge mortality. PMID:26465120

  15. [Changes in infant mortality].

    PubMed

    Aguirre, A

    1997-01-01

    Mexico's infant mortality rate is estimated to have declined from 189 in 1930 to 129 in 1950 and 30 in 1995. The infant mortality rate has continued its decline despite the economic crisis of recent years. The use of oral rehydration therapy has reduced mortality from diarrhea, and the spread of family planning has reduced the numbers of births at high risk due to maternal age, parity, or short birth intervals. The types of causes of infant death have changed as the numbers have decreased. They can be grouped in ascending order according to the difficulty of prevention: diseases preventable by immunization, acute diarrhea, acute respiratory infections, perinatal disorders, and congenital anomalies. Over two-thirds of infant deaths recorded since 1950 have been due to these causes. Infectious diseases, including diarrhea, acute respiratory infections, and conditions preventable by immunization predominated as causes of infant mortality before 1930. As the epidemiological transition progresses, diseases preventable by immunization lose importance, and diarrhea and respiratory infections occupy the first two places, with perinatal disorders being third. Between 1980 and 1990, in Mexico, diarrhea and acute respiratory infections dropped to second and third place after perinatal disorders, with congenital anomalies in fourth place. In most developed countries, perinatal disorders and congenital anomalies are the two most frequent causes of death, while diarrhea and respiratory infections no longer appear in the top five. In 1995, the four main causes in Mexico in descending order were perinatal disorders, congenital anomalies, acute respiratory infections, and diarrhea. PMID:12158082

  16. Accelerating global forest mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, N. G.

    2014-12-01

    Forest mortality is apparently accelerating globally. The evidence supporting this contention is now substantial, as is the evidence suggesting the acceleration has just begun and will become progressively worse in upcoming decades. I will review the data and models used to make these contentions.

  17. Determinants of Mortality in a Combined Cohort of 501 Patients With HIV-Associated Cryptococcal Meningitis: Implications for Improving Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Joseph N.; Bicanic, Tihana; Loyse, Angela; Namarika, Daniel; Jackson, Arthur; Nussbaum, Jesse C.; Longley, Nicky; Muzoora, Conrad; Phulusa, Jacob; Taseera, Kabanda; Kanyembe, Creto; Wilson, Douglas; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Brouwer, Annemarie E.; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; White, Nicholas; van der Horst, Charles; Wood, Robin; Meintjes, Graeme; Bradley, John; Jaffar, Shabbar; Harrison, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background. Cryptococcal meningitis (CM) is a leading cause of death in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Identifying factors associated with mortality informs strategies to improve outcomes. Methods. Five hundred one patients with HIV-associated CM were followed prospectively for 10 weeks during trials in Thailand, Uganda, Malawi, and South Africa. South African patients (n = 266) were followed for 1 year. Similar inclusion/exclusion criteria were applied at all sites. Logistic regression identified baseline variables independently associated with mortality. Results. Mortality was 17% at 2 weeks and 34% at 10 weeks. Altered mental status (odds ratio [OR], 3.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7–5.9), high cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fungal burden (OR, 1.4 per log10 colony-forming units/mL increase; 95% CI, 1.0–1.8), older age (>50 years; OR, 3.9; 95% CI, 1.4–11.1), high peripheral white blood cell count (>10 × 109 cells/L; OR, 8.7; 95% CI, 2.5–30.2), fluconazole-based induction treatment, and slow clearance of CSF infection were independently associated with 2-week mortality. Low body weight, anemia (hemoglobin <7.5 g/dL), and low CSF opening pressure were independently associated with mortality at 10 weeks in addition to altered mental status, high fungal burden, high peripheral white cell count, and older age. In those followed for 1 year, overall mortality was 41%. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome occurred in 13% of patients and was associated with 2-week CSF fungal burden (P = .007), but not with time to initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Conclusions. CSF fungal burden, altered mental status, and rate of clearance of infection predict acute mortality in HIV-associated CM. The results suggest that earlier diagnosis, more rapidly fungicidal amphotericin-based regimens, and prompt immune reconstitution with ART are priorities for improving outcomes. PMID:24319084

  18. Maternal and perinatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Krishna Menon, M K

    1972-01-01

    A brief analysis of data from the records of the Government Hospital for Women and Children in Madras for a 36-year period (1929-1964) is presented. India with a population of over 550 million has only 1 doctor for each 6000 population. For the 80% of the population which is rural, the doctor ratio is only 88/1 million. There is also a shortage of paramedical personnel. During the earlier years of this study period, abortions, puerperal infections; hemorrhage, and toxemia accounted for nearly 75% of all meternal deaths, while in later years deaths from these causes were 40%. Among associated factors in maternal mortality, anemia was the most frequent, it still accounts for 20% and is a contributory factor in another 20%. The mortality from postpartum hemorrhage was 9.3% but has now decreased to 2.8%. Eclampsia is a preventable disease and a marked reduction in maternal and perinatal mortality from this cause has been achieved. Maternal deaths from puerperal infections have dropped from 25% of all maternal deaths to 7%. Uterine rupture has been reduced from 75% to 9.3% due to modern facilities. Operative deliveries still have an incidence of 2.1% and a mortality rate of 1.4% of all deliveries. These rates would be further reduced by more efficient antenatal and intranatal care. Reported perinatal mortality of infants has been reduced from 182/1000 births to an average of 78/1000 in all areas, but is 60.6/1000 in the city of Madras. Socioeconomic standards play an important role in perinatal mortality, 70% of such deaths occurring in the lowest economic groups. Improvement has been noted in the past 25 years but in rural areas little progress has been made. Prematurity and low birth weights are still larger factors in India than in other countries, with acute infectious diseases, anemia, and general malnutrition among mothers the frequent causes. Problems requiring further efforts to reduce maternal and infant mortality are correct vital statistics, improved

  19. Mortality and development revisited.

    PubMed

    Preston, S H

    1985-01-01

    This paper attempts to update results reported in 2 earlier papers about the role of socioeconomic factors in worldwide mortality declines since the 1930s. Preston (1975) demonstrated that the relationship between life expectancy at birth and per capita income (in constant dollars) had shifted between the 1930s and the 1960s. A country at a particular level of national income per capita was estimated to have a level of life expectancy at birth that was, on average, 9.7 years higher in the 1960s than it would have been in the 1930s at the same level of income. That shift clearly was attributable to factors other than measured income gains. To identify the contribution of advances in literacy and nutrition to the apparent shift, Preston (1980) added those variables to income in regression equations estimated with data on 36 countries around 1940 and 120 countries around 1970. For the less developed countries (LDCs), the shift in the relationship between 1940-70 was estimated to be 8.8 years after those variables were introduced along with income. Thus, literacy and nutritional gains were responsible for relatively little of the shift. The goal here is to estimate the amount of shift in the relation between mortality and other development indicators during the 1965-69 to 1975-79 period. The focus is on the 70% of the developing world (exclude China) where, in the aggregate, there are indications of a slowdown in the pace of mortality change during the 1960s and the early 1970s. In all cases a mortality indicator was used as the dependent variable in a cross-national regression analysis that includes data from LDCs and from developed countries. Also, in all cases, the set of independent variables included some transformation of the following: the percentage of adults who were literate, gross domestic product per capita in constant dollars, and the excess of per capita daily calories supplied above 1500. Data were drawn from the standard UN, UNESCO, and World Bank

  20. Residential property values predict prevalent obesity but do not predict 1 year weight change

    PubMed Central

    Drewnowski, Adam; Aggarwal, Anju; Tang, Wesley; Moudon, Anne Vernez

    2014-01-01

    Objective Lower socioeconomic status (SES) has been linked with higher obesity rates but not with weight gain. This study examined whether SES can predict short-term weight change. Design and Methods The Seattle Obesity Study II was based on an observational cohort of 440 adults. Weights and heights were measured at baseline and at 1 y. Self-reported education and incomes were obtained by questionnaire. Home addresses were linked to tax parcel property values from the King Co. tax assessor. Associations among SES variables, prevalent obesity, and 1 y weight change were examined using multivariable linear regressions. Results Low residential property values at tax parcel predicted prevalent obesity at baseline and at 1 y. Living in the top quartile of house prices reduced obesity risk by 80% at both time points. At 1 year, about 38% of the sample lost >1kg body weight; 32% maintained (± 1kg), and 30% gained >1kg. In adjusted models, none of the baseline SES measures had any impact on 1 y weight change. Conclusions SES variables, including tax parcel property values predicted prevalent obesity but did not predict short-term weight change. These findings, based on longitudinal cohort data, suggest other mechanisms are involved in short-term weight change. PMID:25684713

  1. Hydrocephalus in children less than 1 year of age in northern Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Salvador, Sérgio F.; Henriques, João Carlos; Munguambe, Missael; Vaz, Rui M. C.; Barros, Henrique P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In developed countries, the incidence of neonatal hydrocephalus ranges from 3 to 5 cases per 1000 live births, but little is known about the frequency of hydrocephalus in Africa. In Mozambique, there is no primary information related to this disorder, but using the above data, the expected incidence of neonatal hydrocephalus would range from 2900 to 4800 cases per year. Methods: This study is based on 122 children younger than 1 year with neonatal hydrocephalus, followed up between January 2010 and December 2012, their origin and treatment, and aims to evaluate difficulties with diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up in northern Mozambique. Results: Identified cases were mainly less than 6 months old (77%), with severe macrocephaly and the classic stigmata of this condition. A high rate of follow-up loss (44.3%) was detected, particularly among children from more distant locations. Our findings contrast with the expected 1000-1700 cases that would occur in the area during the study period, being considerably lower. Conclusions: Hydrocephalus is a serious problem in sub-Saharan Africa, whose effects can be minimized by a better organization of the health system in hydrocephalus prevention, referral, and follow-up. New management alternatives to provide treatment to more children with this disorder and reduction of the follow-up difficulties caused due to geographical reasons for the children undergoing treatment are essential. PMID:25593759

  2. Laboratory Tests Ordered By a Chiropractic Sports Physician on Elite Athletes Over a 1-Year Period

    PubMed Central

    Nabhan, Dustin C.; Moreau, William J.; Barylski, Chad

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to describe and discuss laboratory tests ordered on elite athletes in an interdisciplinary sports medicine clinic by a doctor of chiropractic over 1 calendar year. Methods A retrospective review of laboratory tests ordered during routine clinical practice as standard screening and diagnostic tests from November 1, 2009, to November 1, 2010 was performed. Data were collected during clinical encounters at one sports medicine clinic and entered into a database for analysis. Descriptive and frequency statistics were used to describe the tests ordered and the frequency of abnormal findings. Results Five hundred and thirty-nine studies were ordered for diagnostic and routine screenings on 137 athlete patients (86 males, 51 females), representing 49 types of tests. Sample sources included blood, urine, skin lesions, and fecal matter. The most commonly ordered tests were complete blood count, comprehensive metabolic panel, serum ferritin, creatine kinase, serum iron and total iron binding capacity, total cortisol, thyroid stimulating hormone, and lipid panels. There were 217 studies (40%) flagged as abnormal by the reporting laboratory. Conclusion This report provides greater insight into the diverse array of laboratory studies ordered over a 1-year period for diagnosis and screening of elite athletes. A high percentage of the results were flagged as abnormal by the laboratory. These findings show that the unique physiology of the elite athlete must be considered when interpreting laboratory findings in this population. PMID:26257590

  3. Hippocampal Neuron Number Is Unchanged 1 Year After Fractionated Whole-Brain Irradiation at Middle Age

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Lei Molina, Doris P.; Robbins, Michael E.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To determine whether hippocampal neurons are lost 12 months after middle-aged rats received a fractionated course of whole-brain irradiation (WBI) that is expected to be biologically equivalent to the regimens used clinically in the treatment of brain tumors. Methods and Materials: Twelve-month-old Fischer 344 X Brown Norway male rats were divided into WBI and control (CON) groups (n = 6 per group). Anesthetized WBI rats received 45 Gy of {sup 137}Cs {gamma} rays delivered as 9 5-Gy fractions twice per week for 4.5 weeks. Control rats were anesthetized but not irradiated. Twelve months after WBI completion, all rats were anesthetized and perfused with paraformaldehyde, and hippocampal sections were immunostained with the neuron-specific antibody NeuN. Using unbiased stereology, total neuron number and the volume of the neuronal and neuropil layers were determined in the dentate gyrus, CA3, and CA1 subregions of hippocampus. Results: No differences in tissue integrity or neuron distribution were observed between the WBI and CON groups. Moreover, quantitative analysis demonstrated that neither total neuron number nor the volume of neuronal or neuropil layers differed between the two groups for any subregion. Conclusions: Impairment on a hippocampal-dependent learning and memory test occurs 1 year after fractionated WBI at middle age. The same WBI regimen, however, does not lead to a loss of neurons or a reduction in the volume of hippocampus.

  4. De novo gastric adenocarcinoma 1 year after sleeve gastrectomy in a transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Masrur, M.; Elli, E.; Gonzalez-Ciccarelli, L.F.; Giulianotti, P.C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It has been reported in the literature that upper gastrointestinal malignancies after bariatric surgery are mostly gastro-esophageal, although it is not clear whether bariatric surgery represents a risk factor for the development of esophageal and/or gastric cancer. We report a case of a de novo gastric adenocarcinoma occurring in a transplant patient 1 year after a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. Presentation of case A 44 year-old woman with a BMI of 38 kg/m2, hypertension, type 1 diabetes mellitus, multiple malignancies and a pancreas transplant underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. The patient presented with intense dysphagias during the follow up. Studies were performed and the diagnoses of grade 2/3 adenocarcinoma were made. The patient underwent a robotic assisted total gastrectomy with a roux-en-y intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy. The procedure resulted in multiple metastasic lymph nodes, focal and transmural invasions to multiple organs with a tumor free margin resection. The patient presented with a postoperative pleural effusion, with no further complications. Discussion The diagnosis of gastroesophageal cancer after bariatric surgery is usually late since these patients have common upper gastrointestinal symptoms related to the procedure that could delay the diagnosis. De novo gastric cancer after sleeve gastrectomy has only been reported in one instance, in contrast with other bariatric surgery procedures. Conclusions No direct relation has been established between sleeve gastrectomy and the development of gastric cancer. Robotic procedures allow for complex multiorgan resections, while preserving the benefits of minimally invasive surgery. PMID:26774417

  5. 22 CFR 18.18 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 18.18 Section 18.18 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL REGULATIONS CONCERNING POST EMPLOYMENT CONFLICT OF INTEREST Administrative Enforcement Proceedings § 18.18 Proposed findings and...

  6. Safety Specialist Manpower Conclusions and Recommendations, Volume IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booz Allen and Hamilton, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This final volume of a four-volume report on highway safety manpower includes conclusions and recommendations regarding prospects for staffing individual programs, with emphasis on the adequacy of both manpower resources and training capacity. The data indicate that reaching maximum staffing levels by 1977 is unlikely, although minimum levels…

  7. 40 CFR 22.26 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. 22.26 Section 22.26 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL CONSOLIDATED RULES OF PRACTICE GOVERNING THE ADMINISTRATIVE ASSESSMENT OF CIVIL PENALTIES AND THE REVOCATION/TERMINATION OR SUSPENSION OF PERMITS...

  8. 40 CFR 22.26 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. 22.26 Section 22.26 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL CONSOLIDATED RULES OF PRACTICE GOVERNING THE ADMINISTRATIVE ASSESSMENT OF CIVIL PENALTIES AND THE REVOCATION/TERMINATION OR SUSPENSION OF PERMITS...

  9. Hypothesis, Prediction, and Conclusion: Using Nature of Science Terminology Correctly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastwell, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This paper defines the terms "hypothesis," "prediction," and "conclusion" and shows how to use the terms correctly in scientific investigations in both the school and science education research contexts. The scientific method, or hypothetico-deductive (HD) approach, is described and it is argued that an understanding of the scientific method,…

  10. Consultation on Higher Education and Social Justice: Statement and Conclusions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Frontiers in Education, 1974

    1974-01-01

    A group of 35 educators, mostly principals and teachers of colleges, met at Bangalore, India in May 1974 for a 5-day consultation on higher education's role in the promotion of social justice. The final statement and other conclusions of the Consultation are presented. (Author/PG)

  11. 39 CFR 954.18 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 954.18 Section 954.18 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO THE DENIAL, SUSPENSION, OR REVOCATION OF PERIODICALS MAIL PRIVILEGES § 954.18 Proposed...

  12. 39 CFR 954.18 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 954.18 Section 954.18 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO THE DENIAL, SUSPENSION, OR REVOCATION OF PERIODICALS MAIL PRIVILEGES § 954.18 Proposed...

  13. 39 CFR 954.18 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 954.18 Section 954.18 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO THE DENIAL, SUSPENSION, OR REVOCATION OF PERIODICALS MAIL PRIVILEGES § 954.18 Proposed...

  14. 39 CFR 954.18 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 954.18 Section 954.18 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO THE DENIAL, SUSPENSION, OR REVOCATION OF PERIODICALS MAIL PRIVILEGES § 954.18 Proposed...

  15. 39 CFR 954.18 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 954.18 Section 954.18 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO THE DENIAL, SUSPENSION, OR REVOCATION OF PERIODICALS MAIL PRIVILEGES § 954.18 Proposed...

  16. BNP, NTproBNP, CMBK, and MMP-2 predict mortality in severe Chagas cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sherbuk, Jacqueline E.; Okamoto, Emi E.; Marks, Morgan A.; Fortuny, Enzo; Clark, Eva H.; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Vasquez-Villar, Angel; Fernandez, Antonio B.; Crawford, Thomas C.; Do, Rose Q.; Flores-Franco, Jorge Luis; Colanzi, Rony; Gilman, Robert H.; Bern, Caryn

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas cardiomyopathy is a chronic sequela of infection by the parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi. Advanced cardiomyopathy is associated with a high mortality rate, and clinical characteristics have been used to predict mortality risk. Though multiple biomarkers have been associated with Chagas cardiomyopathy, it is unknown how these are related to survival. Objectives Our study aimed to identify biomarkers associated with mortality in individuals with severe Chagas cardiomyopathy in an urban Bolivian hospital. Methods The population included individuals with and without T. cruzi infection recruited in an urban hospital in Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Baseline characteristics, ECG findings, medications, and serum cardiac biomarker levels (BNP, NTproBNP, CKMB, troponin I, MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, TIMP-2, TGFb1, and TGFb2) were ascertained. Echocardiograms were preferentially performed on those with cardiac symptoms or electrocardiogram abnormalities. Participants were contacted by phone approximately 1 year after initial evaluation; deaths were reported by family members. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to optimize cut-off values for each marker. For markers with area under curve > 0.55, Cox proportional hazards models were performed to determine the hazards ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the association of each marker with mortality. Results The median follow-up time was 14.1 months (interquartile range 12.5- 16.7 months). Of 254 individuals with complete cardiac data, 220 (87%) had follow-up data. Of 50 patients with severe Chagas cardiomyopathy, 20 (40%) had died. Higher baseline levels of BNP (HR[95% CI]:3.1 [1.2, 8.4]), NTproBNP (4.4[1.8,11.0]), CKMB (3.3[1.3, 8.0]), and MMP-2 (4.2[1.5, 11.8]) were significantly associated with subsequent mortality. Conclusions Severe Chagas cardiomyopathy is associated with high short-term mortality. BNP, NTproBNP, CKMB and MMP2 have added predictive value for mortality, even in the presence of

  17. Associations between Long-Term Exposure to Chemical Constituents of Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5) and Mortality in Medicare Enrollees in the Eastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Dominici, Francesca; Wang, Yun; Coull, Brent A.; Bell, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several epidemiological studies have reported that long-term exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is associated with higher mortality. Evidence regarding contributions of PM2.5 constituents is inconclusive. Objectives: We assembled a data set of 12.5 million Medicare enrollees (≥ 65 years of age) to determine which PM2.5 constituents are a) associated with mortality controlling for previous-year PM2.5 total mass (main effect); and b) elevated in locations exhibiting stronger associations between previous-year PM2.5 and mortality (effect modification). Methods: For 518 PM2.5 monitoring locations (eastern United States, 2000–2006), we calculated monthly mortality rates, monthly long-term (previous 1-year average) PM2.5, and 7-year averages (2000–2006) of major PM2.5 constituents [elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon matter (OCM), sulfate (SO42–), silicon (Si), nitrate (NO3–), and sodium (Na)] and community-level variables. We applied a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate location-specific mortality rates associated with previous-year PM2.5 (model level 1) and identify constituents that contributed to the spatial variability of mortality, and constituents that modified associations between previous-year PM2.5 and mortality (model level 2), controlling for community-level confounders. Results: One–standard deviation (SD) increases in 7-year average EC, Si, and NO3– concentrations were associated with 1.3% [95% posterior interval (PI): 0.3, 2.2], 1.4% (95% PI: 0.6, 2.4), and 1.2% (95% PI: 0.4, 2.1) increases in monthly mortality, controlling for previous-year PM2.5. Associations between previous-year PM2.5 and mortality were stronger in combination with 1-SD increases in SO42– and Na. Conclusions: Long-term exposures to PM2.5 and several constituents were associated with mortality in the elderly population of the eastern United States. Moreover, some constituents increased the association between long-term exposure to PM2.5 and

  18. Cryoplasty for Occlusive Disease of the Femoropopliteal Arteries: 1-Year Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Korteweg, Mies A.; Gils, Marjon van; Hoedt, Marco T.; Valk, Pieter H. M. van der; Tutein Noltenius, Rudolf P.; Avontuur, Jurgen A.; Bronswijk-Monster, Krien F.; Elgersma, Otto E. H.

    2009-03-15

    Atherosclerosis of femoropopliteal arteries is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) has only limited success in treating these arteries, mainly because of the high rate of recurrent stenosis. Cryoplasty has been proposed as a technique which might improve treatment outcome. This study reports our single-center experience with cryoplasty. Thirty-two claudicants, 33 arteries, in whom conservative therapy failed, were consecutively included. Duplex ultrasound (US), angiography, and ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurement were performed before the procedure; ABI and duplex US, 2 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months after the procedure. Patients' symptoms were categorized according to the Rutherford classification. Lesions were classified as TASC A, B, or C according to angiographic appearance. Differences in ABI before and after the procedure were defined as significant at p < 0.05 by paired t-test. Patency was evaluated using duplex US by determining the peak systolic velocity ratio. Sixteen TASC A lesions, 13 TASC B lesions, and 4 TASC C lesions were included. ABI improved significantly for TASC A lesions 2 weeks and 3 months postprocedure. Patency after 2 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months was 93%, 67%, and 64% for TASC A lesions, 83%, 31%, and 31% for TASC B lesions, and 100%, 50%, and 33% for TASC C lesions, respectively. In conclusion, cryoplasty has good immediate success rates and patency rates similar to the results of conventional PTA in the literature.

  19. Statistical Conclusion Validity: Some Common Threats and Simple Remedies

    PubMed Central

    García-Pérez, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    The ultimate goal of research is to produce dependable knowledge or to provide the evidence that may guide practical decisions. Statistical conclusion validity (SCV) holds when the conclusions of a research study are founded on an adequate analysis of the data, generally meaning that adequate statistical methods are used whose small-sample behavior is accurate, besides being logically capable of providing an answer to the research question. Compared to the three other traditional aspects of research validity (external validity, internal validity, and construct validity), interest in SCV has recently grown on evidence that inadequate data analyses are sometimes carried out which yield conclusions that a proper analysis of the data would not have supported. This paper discusses evidence of three common threats to SCV that arise from widespread recommendations or practices in data analysis, namely, the use of repeated testing and optional stopping without control of Type-I error rates, the recommendation to check the assumptions of statistical tests, and the use of regression whenever a bivariate relation or the equivalence between two variables is studied. For each of these threats, examples are presented and alternative practices that safeguard SCV are discussed. Educational and editorial changes that may improve the SCV of published research are also discussed. PMID:22952465

  20. Long-term morbidity and mortality after hospitalization with community-acquired pneumonia: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Jennie; Eurich, Dean T; Majumdar, Sumit R; Jin, Yan; Marrie, Thomas J

    2008-11-01

    Little is known about the long-term sequelae of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Therefore, we describe the long-term morbidity and mortality of patients after pneumonia requiring hospitalization. We specifically hypothesized that the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI), designed to predict 30-day pneumonia-related mortality, would also be associated with longer-term all-cause mortality. Between 2000 and 2002, 3415 adults with CAP admitted to 6 hospitals in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, were prospectively enrolled in a population-based cohort. At the time of hospital admission, demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected and the PSI was calculated for each patient. Postdischarge outcomes through to 2006 were ascertained using multiple linked administrative databases. Outcomes included all-cause mortality, hospital admissions, and re-hospitalization for pneumonia over a maximum of 5.4 years of follow-up. Follow-up data were available for 3284 (96%) patients; 66%were > or =65 years of age, 53% were male, and according to the PSI fully 63% were predicted to have greater than 18% 30-day pneumonia-related mortality (that is, PSI class IV-V). Median follow-up was 3.8 years. The 30-day, 1-year, and end of study mortality rates were 12%, 28%, and 53%, respectively. Overall, 82(19%) patients aged <45 years died compared with 1456 (67%) patients aged > or =65 years (hazard ratio [HR], 5.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.06-6.34). Male patients were more likely to die than female patients during follow-up (971 [56%] vs. 767 [49%], respectively; HR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.13-1.37). Initial PSI classification predicted not only 30-day mortality, but also long-term postdischarge mortality, with 92 (15%) of PSI class I-II patients dying compared with 616 (82%) PSI class V patients (HR, 11.80; 95% CI, 4.70-14.70). Of 2950 patients who survived the initial CAP hospitalization, 72% were hospitalized again (median, 2 admissions over follow-up) and 16% were re-hospitalized with

  1. Mortality in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction who do not undergo reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Wood, Frances O; Leonowicz, Nicholas A; Vanhecke, Thomas E; Dixon, Simon R; Grines, Cindy L

    2012-08-15

    Reperfusion therapy reduces mortality in patients presenting with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarctions (STEMI). However, some patients may not receive thrombolytic therapy or undergo primary percutaneous coronary intervention. The decision making and clinical outcomes of these patients have not been well described. In this study, 139 patients were identified from a total of 1,126 patients with STEMI who did not undergo reperfusion therapy at a high-volume percutaneous coronary intervention center from October 2006 to March 2011. Clinical data, reasons for no reperfusion, management, and mortality were obtained by chart review. The mean age was 80 ± 13 years (61% women, 31% diabetic, and 37% known coronary artery disease). Of the 139 patients, 72 (52%) presented with primary diagnoses other than STEMI, and 39 (28%) developed STEMI >24 hours after admission. The most common reasons for no reperfusion were advanced age, co-morbid conditions, acute or chronic kidney injury, delayed presentation, advance directives precluding reperfusion, patient preference, and dementia. Eighty-four patients (60%) had ≥ 3 reasons for no reperfusion. Factors associated with hospital mortality were cardiogenic shock, intubation, and advance directives prohibiting reperfusion after physician consultation. In hospital and 1-year mortality were 53% and 69%, respectively. In conclusion, at a high-volume percutaneous coronary intervention center, most patients presenting with STEMI underwent immediate catheterization. The decision for no reperfusion was multifactorial, with advanced age reported as the most common factor. Outcomes were poor in this population, and fewer than half of these patients survived to hospital discharge. PMID:22633204

  2. Heart Rate at Hospital Discharge in Patients With Heart Failure Is Associated With Mortality and Rehospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Laskey, Warren K.; Alomari, Ihab; Cox, Margueritte; Schulte, Phillip J.; Zhao, Xin; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Heidenreich, Paul A.; Eapen, Zubin J.; Yancy, Clyde; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Fonarow, Gregg C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Whether heart rate upon discharge following hospitalization for heart failure is associated with long‐term adverse outcomes and whether this association differs between patients with sinus rhythm (SR) and atrial fibrillation (AF) have not been well studied. Methods and Results We conducted a retrospective cohort study from clinical registry data linked to Medicare claims for 46 217 patients participating in Get With The Guidelines®–Heart Failure. Cox proportional‐hazards models were used to estimate the association between discharge heart rate and all‐cause mortality, all‐cause readmission, and the composite outcome of mortality/readmission through 1 year. For SR and AF patients with heart rate ≥75, the association between heart rate and mortality (expressed as hazard ratio [HR] per 10 beats‐per‐minute increment) was significant at 0 to 30 days (SR: HR 1.30, 95% CI 1.22 to 1.39; AF: HR 1.23, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.29) and 31 to 365 days (SR: HR 1.15, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.20; AF: HR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.08). Similar associations between heart rate and all‐cause readmission and the composite outcome were obtained for SR and AF patients from 0 to 30 days but only in the composite outcome for SR patients over the longer term. The HR from 0 to 30 days exceeded that from 31 to 365 days for both SR and AF patients. At heart rates <75, an association was significant for mortality only for both SR and AF patients. Conclusions Among older patients hospitalized with heart failure, higher discharge heart rate was associated with increased risks of death and rehospitalization, with higher risk in the first 30 days and for SR compared with AF. PMID:25904590

  3. Maternal mortality in Yazd Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Karimi-Zarchi, Mojgan; Ghane-Ezabadi, Marzie; Vafaienasab, Mohammadreza; Dehghan, Ali; Ghasemi, Fateme; Zaidabadi, Mahbube; Zanbagh, Leila; Yazdian-Anari, Pouria; Teimoori, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Five hundred thousand maternal deaths occur each year worldwide, many of which are in developing countries. The maternal mortality rate is a measure that demonstrates the degree of adequacy of prenatal care and of economic and social conditions. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and causes of pregnancy-related mortality rates in Yazd Province. Methods This cross-sectional study examined the maternal deaths related to pregnancy that were recorded in Yazd Province, Iran, from 2002 to 2011. All maternal deaths that occurred during pregnancy, during delivery, and 42 days after birth were analyzed in this study. The data were collected through a questionnaire, and both direct and indirect causes of maternal deaths were determined. Results Forty pregnancy-related deaths occurred in this period, and the maternal mortality rate was 20.8 deaths per 100,000 live births. The mean age of death in the mothers in this study was 29.17. Fifty-five percent of women of the women who died delivered their babies by cesarean section, and only 20% of them delivered their babies vaginally. Bleeding was the most common cause of maternal mortality (30%), and it was associated directly with maternal mortality. Furthermore 20% of the mothers died due to heart disease and cardiac complications, which were associated indirectly with maternal mortality. Conclusion Cesarean section and its complications were the main cause of death in many cases. Thus, providing a strategic plan to reduce the use of this procedure, educate mothers, and ensure adequate access to pre-maternal care and to care during pregnancy are the most important measures that can be taken to decrease the maternal mortality rate. PMID:27054003

  4. Mortality and fertility control.

    PubMed

    Tietze, C; Lewit, S

    1977-01-01

    The authors present a continuation of the thesis suggesting that the most rational procedure for regulating fertility is a perfectly safe, even though not completely effective, contraceptive method combined with safe methods for terminating pregnancy when the contraceptive fails. This analysis demonstrates that, compared with the risk of death from pregnancy and childbirth, major reversible methods of fertility control--the pill, IUDs, condoms, and diaphragms--and abortion are associated with very low levels of mortality. The exception to this statement is pill use after age 40 by women who smoke. This analysis also confirms the very low mortality associated with using the condom and diaphragm with early induced abortion as a backup to terminate pregnancies resulting from contraceptive failures. PMID:606579

  5. Unintentional injury mortality in India, 2005: Nationally representative mortality survey of 1.1 million homes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Unintentional injuries are an important cause of death in India. However, no reliable nationally representative estimates of unintentional injury deaths are available. Thus, we examined unintentional injury deaths in a nationally representative mortality survey. Methods Trained field staff interviewed a living relative of those who had died during 2001-03. The verbal autopsy reports were sent to two of the130 trained physicians, who independently assigned an ICD-10 code to each death. Discrepancies were resolved through reconciliation and adjudication. Proportionate cause specific mortality was used to produce national unintentional injury mortality estimates based on United Nations population and death estimates. Results In 2005, unintentional injury caused 648 000 deaths (7% of all deaths; 58/100 000 population). Unintentional injury mortality rates were higher among males than females, and in rural versus urban areas. Road traffic injuries (185 000 deaths; 29% of all unintentional injury deaths), falls (160 000 deaths, 25%) and drowning (73 000 deaths, 11%) were the three leading causes of unintentional injury mortality, with fire-related injury causing 5% of these deaths. The highest unintentional mortality rates were in those aged 70years or older (410/100 000). Conclusions These direct estimates of unintentional injury deaths in India (0.6 million) are lower than WHO indirect estimates (0.8 million), but double the estimates which rely on police reports (0.3 million). Importantly, they revise upward the mortality due to falls, particularly in the elderly, and revise downward mortality due to fires. Ongoing monitoring of injury mortality will enable development of evidence based injury prevention programs. PMID:22741813

  6. Causes of Mortality and Risk Factors for Injury Mortality among Children in the Agricultural Health Study.

    PubMed

    Flower, Kori B; Hoppin, Jane A; Shore, David L; Lynch, Charles F; Blair, Aaron; Knott, Charles; Alavanja, Michael C R; Sandler, Dale P

    2007-06-01

    Farm children face unique health risks due to sharing their residential environment with hazardous machinery and materials. Causes of mortality among farm children have not been comprehensively described. OBJECTIVE: In the Agricultural Health Study (AHS) cohort, we examined causes of mortality among 21,360 children in Iowa and North Carolina between 1975 and 1998. METHODS: We matched identifying information for children provided by mothers on self-administered questionnaires to state death registries (1975-1998). Data on farm and family characteristics were provided by parents via enrollment questionnaires (1993-1997). Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated, using state mortality data to generate expected deaths. We used logistic regression to examine parent, child and farm characteristics associated with injury mortality. RESULTS: There were 162 deaths in Iowa (SMR=0.69; 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.60, 0.81) and 26 deaths in North Carolina (SMR=0.42; 95%CI=0.28, 0.61) in children aged 0-19 years. This deficit was largely due to deaths in the first year of life. Although deaths from overall unintentional injury were not increased, excess agricultural machinery mortality was observed in Iowa (SMR=9.25; 95% CI=5.12, 16.70). In case-control comparisons, maternal age less than 25 years at child's birth (OR=2.17; 95%CI=1.05, 4.49) and having more than 2 children in the family (OR=2.79; 95%CI=1.47, 5.30) were associated with increased child injury mortality. For children under 14 years, participation in farm work was associated with increased risk of agricultural machine-related mortality (OR=3.92; 95% CI=1.04, 14.78). CONCLUSIONS: Parent and child characteristics associated with child injury mortality could be used to target farm safety interventions. PMID:18535666

  7. Serum Calcification Propensity Is a Strong and Independent Determinant of Cardiac and All-Cause Mortality in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Dahle, D O; Åsberg, A; Hartmann, A; Holdaas, H; Bachtler, M; Jenssen, T G; Dionisi, M; Pasch, A

    2016-01-01

    Calcification of the vasculature is associated with cardiovascular disease and death in kidney transplant recipients. A novel functional blood test measures calcification propensity by quantifying the transformation time (T50 ) from primary to secondary calciprotein particles. Accelerated T50 indicates a diminished ability of serum to resist calcification. We measured T50 in 1435 patients 10 weeks after kidney transplantation during 2000-2003 (first era) and 2009-2012 (second era). Aortic pulse wave velocity (APWV) was measured at week 10 and after 1 year in 589 patients from the second era. Accelerated T50 was associated with diabetes, deceased donor, first transplant, rejection, stronger immunosuppression, first era, higher serum phosphate and lower albumin. T50 was not associated with progression of APWV. During a median follow-up of 5.1 years, 283 patients died, 70 from myocardial infarction, cardiac failure or sudden death. In Cox regression models, accelerated T50 was strongly and independently associated with both all-cause and cardiac mortality, low versus high T50 quartile: hazard ratio 1.60 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00-2.57), ptrend   = 0.03, and 3.60 (95% CI 1.10-11.83), ptrend   = 0.02, respectively. In conclusion, calcification propensity (T50 ) was strongly associated with all-cause and cardiac mortality of kidney transplant recipients, potentially via a cardiac nonAPWV-related pathway. Whether therapeutic improvement of T50 improves outcome awaits clarification in a randomized trial. PMID:26375609

  8. Disparities in cervical and breast cancer mortality in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Girianelli, Vania Reis; Gamarra, Carmen Justina; Azevedo e Silva, Gulnar

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze cervical and breast cancer mortality in Brazil according to socioeconomic and welfare indicators. METHODS Data on breast and cervical cancer mortality covering a 30-year period (1980-2010) were analyzed. The data were obtained from the National Mortality Database, population data from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics database, and socioeconomic and welfare information from the Institute of Applied Economic Research. Moving averages were calculated, disaggregated by capital city and municipality. The annual percent change in mortality rates was estimated by segmented linear regression using the joinpoint method. Pearson’s correlation coefficients were conducted between average mortality rate at the end of the three-year period and selected indicators in the state capital and each Brazilian state. RESULTS There was a decline in cervical cancer mortality rates throughout the period studied, except in municipalities outside of the capitals in the North and Northeast. There was a decrease in breast cancer mortality in the capitals from the end of the 1990s onwards. Favorable socioeconomic indicators were inversely correlated with cervical cancer mortality. A strong direct correlation was found with favorable indicators and an inverse correlation with fertility rate and breast cancer mortality in inner cities. CONCLUSIONS There is an ongoing dynamic process of increased risk of cervical and breast cancer and attenuation of mortality because of increased, albeit unequal, access to and provision of screening, diagnosis and treatment.  PMID:25119941

  9. Cancer mortality among magazine printing workers.

    PubMed Central

    Luce, D; Landre, M F; Clavel, T; Limousin, I; Dimerman, S; Moulin, J J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: After an inquiry from the employees of an offset printing plant, a historical cohort study was conducted to investigate cancer mortality among these workers. METHODS: The cohort comprised 262 men, who contributed 2771 person-years of observation. 16 deaths were identified during the follow up period (1980-91). Expected numbers of deaths were derived from age specific regional rates. Standardised mortality ratios (SMR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated. RESULTS: An increased cancer mortality was found after 10 years of employment (SMR 213, 95% CI 98 to 405, based on nine deaths), mainly due to a high mortality from lung cancer (SMR 381, 95% CI 104 to 975, four deaths), and from oesophageal cancer (SMR 1049, 95% CI 216 to 3065, three deaths). For workers with at least 20 years since the start of employment, the SMR was 262 (95% CI 105 to 540) for all cancer sites, 447 (95% CI 92 to 1306) for lung cancer, and 1094 (95% CI 132 to 3952) for oesophageal cancer. The increased cancer mortality was concentrated among pressmen. CONCLUSION: Although based on small numbers, the findings suggest an increased risk of cancer among these workers, which should be further investigated. PMID:9166132

  10. Morbidity and mortality of vermiculite miners and millers exposed to tremolite-actinolite: Part II. Mortality

    SciTech Connect

    Amandus, H.E.; Wheeler, R.

    1987-01-01

    The vermiculite ore and concentrate of a mine and mill located near Libby, Montana was found to be contaminated with a fiber of the tremolite/acetinolite series. A study was conducted to estimate the exposure-response relationship for mortality for 575 men who had been hired prior to 1970 and employed at least 1 year at the Montana site. Individual cumulative fiber exposure (fiber-years) was calculated. Results indicated that mortality from nonmalignant respiratory disease (NMRD) and lung cancer was significantly increased compared to the U.S. white male population. For those workers more than 20 years since hire, the standard mortality rate (SMR) for lung cancer (ICDA 162-163) was 84.7, 225.1, 109.3, and 671.3 for less than 50, 50-99, 100-399, and more than 399 fiber-years respectively. Corresponding results for NMRD (ICDA 460-519) were 327.8, 283.5, 0, and 278.4. Based on a linear model for greater than 20 years since hire, the estimated percentage increase in lung cancer mortality risk was 0.6% for each fiber-year of exposure. At 5 fiber-years, the estimated percentage was 2.9% from an unrestricted (nonthreshold) linear model and 0.6% from a survival model.

  11. Generalized measurement and conclusive teleportation with nonmaximal entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyunjae; Cheong, Yong Wook; Lee, Hai-Woong

    2004-07-01

    We present linear optical schemes to perform generalized measurements for conclusive teleportation when the sender and the receiver share nonmaximal entanglement resulting from amplitude errors during propagation or generation. Three different cases are considered for which the states to be teleported are unknown superpositions of (a) single-photon and vacuum states (b) vertically polarized and horizontally polarized photon states, and (c) two coherent states of opposite phases. The generalized measurement scheme for each case is analyzed, which indicates that the success probability is much more resistant to amplitude errors for case (c) than for case (a) or (b)

  12. Emergency contraception with a Copper IUD or oral levonorgestrel: an observational study of 1-year pregnancy rates

    PubMed Central

    Turok, David K.; Jacobson, Janet C.; Dermish, Amna I.; Simonsen, Sara E.; Gurtcheff, Shawn; McFadden, Molly; Murphy, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective We investigated the one-year pregnancy rates for emergency contraception (EC) users who selected the copper T380 IUD or oral levonorgestrel (LNG) for EC. Study Design This prospective study followed women for 1 year after choosing either the copper T380 IUD or oral LNG for EC. The study was powered to detect a 6% difference in pregnancy rates within the year after presenting for EC. Results Of the 542 women who presented for EC, agreed to participate in the trial, and meet inclusion criteria, 215 (40%) chose the copper IUD and 327 (60%) chose oral LNG. In the IUD group, 127 (59%) were nulligravid. IUD insertion failed in 42 women (19%). The 1-year follow-up rate was 443/542 (82%); 64% of IUD users contacted at 1 year still had their IUDs in place. The 1-year cumulative pregnancy rate in women choosing the IUD was 6.5% vs. 12.2% in those choosing oral LNG (HR= 0.53, 95% CI: 0.29–0.97, p=0.041). By type of EC method actually received, corresponding values were 5.2% for copper IUD users vs. 12.3% for oral LNG users, HR 0.42 (95% CI: 0.20–0.85, p= 0.017). A multivariable logistic regression model controlling for demographic variables demonstrates that women who chose the IUD for EC had fewer pregnancies in the following year than those who chose oral LNG (HR 0.50, 95% CI: 0.26–0.96, p=0.037). Conclusion One year after presenting for EC women choosing the copper IUD for EC were half as likely to have a pregnancy compared to those choosing oral LNG. PMID:24332433

  13. Cognitive functions over the course of 1 year in multiple sclerosis patients treated with disease modifying therapies

    PubMed Central

    Utz, Kathrin S.; Lee, De-Hyung; Lämmer, Alexandra; Waschbisch, Anne; Linker, Ralf A.; Schenk, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) are applied to delay or prevent disease progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). While this has mostly been proven for physical symptoms, available studies regarding long-term effects of DMTs on cognitive functions are rare and sometimes inconsistent due to methodological shortcomings. Particularly in the case of fingolimod, comprehensive data on cognitive functions are not yet available. Therefore, we set out to reliably assess cognitive functions in patients with relapsing–remitting MS (RRMS) treated with DMTs over 1 year. Methods: Cognitive functions were assessed with eight tests at three timepoints: baseline, 6-month follow up and 12-month follow up. First, we investigated whether the stability of cognitive functions (i.e. not falling below the 5% cut-off in more than one test) over 1 year in RRMS patients (n = 41) corresponds to the stability in healthy individuals (n = 40) of a previous study. Second, we compared the percentage of declined and improved patients in the different tests. Third, we compared patients treated with fingolimod (n = 22) with patients treated with natalizumab (n = 11) with regard to cognitive stability. Fourth, based on the patient data, the Reliable Change Index was applied to compute cut-offs for reliable cognitive change. Results: Approximately 75% of RRMS patients treated with DMTs remained stable over the course of 1 year. The Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT) and the Spatial Recall Test (SPART), produced improvements in 12.5% and 30.6%, respectively, probably due to practice effects. Patients treated with fingolimod did not differ from patients treated with natalizumab with regard to cognitive stability. Conclusions: Cognitive functions remain relatively stable under DMT treatment over 1 year, irrespective of the type of medication. Furthermore, the tests PASAT and SPART should be interpreted cautiously in studies examining performance changes over time. The provided RCI

  14. Neonatal mortality in Meerut district.

    PubMed

    Garg, S K; Mishra, V N; Singh, J V; Bhatnagar, M; Chopra, H; Singh, R B

    1993-09-01

    A study of neonatal mortality in Meerut district revealed an infant mortality rate of 50.1 per 1000 live births. Neonatal mortality accounted for 37.8% of infant mortality with a neonatal mortality rate of 19.0 per 1000 live births. 90.5% of these neonates were delivered at home largely by untrained personnel (57.2%). Only 28.6% of these neonates were treated by qualified doctors and only 30.9% of their mothers were fully immunized against tetanus. At least 2/3rd of neonatal mortality was due to exogenous factors with tetanus neonatorum and septicaemia being the principal causes of mortality each accounting for a mortality rate of 4.7 per 1000 live births. PMID:8112786

  15. Incidence, Predictors and Impact of Severe Periprocedural Bleeding According to VARC-2 Criteria on 1-Year Clinical Outcomes in Patients After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Kochman, Janusz; Rymuza, Bartosz; Huczek, Zenon; Kołtowski, Łukasz; Ścisło, Piotr; Wilimski, Radosław; Ścibisz, Anna; Stanecka, Paulina; Filipiak, Krzysztof J; Opolski, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    There are differences in reporting bleeding complications after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), which is a consequence of the lack of consensus for their definition. Furthermore, the amount of data on the impact of peri-procedural bleeding on the mid-term prognosis is still limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence, predictors, and impact of life-threatening and major bleedings as defined by the Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 (VARC-2) in patients after TAVI over the mid-term prognosis.Consecutive patients who underwent TAVI from March 2010 to December 2013 were included. All data were classified according to the VARC-2 criteria. We assessed the incidence and the predictors of serious bleeding events (SBE), defined as life-threatening/disabling (LT/D) or major bleeding, and analyzed their impact on 30-day and 1-year clinical outcome.A total of 129 patients were included (79.1 ± 8.3 years; mean EuroSCORE = 17.8 ± 12.7). The SBE occurred in 25 patients (19.4%), of which 9 (7.0%) had LT/D and 16 (12.4%) had major bleeding. Trans-subclavian (TS) access (OR 4.38, 95% CI 2.13-14.29, P = 0.01) and diabetes (OR 2.93, 95% CI 1.08-7.93, P = 0.03) were identified as independent predictors of SBE. Patients with SBE had higher 30-day mortality (20.0% versus 4.0% P = 0.02) and 1-year mortality (40.0% versus 11.1%, P < 0.002). SBE independently predicted 1-year, all-cause mortality (HR 5.88, 95% CI 1.7319,94, P = 0.005).SBE are frequent after TAVI and are associated with decreased short and mid-term survival. Diabetes and TS access are independent risk factors for SBE. PMID:26673439

  16. Modeling of the relationship between the environmental air pollution, clinical risk factors, and hospital mortality due to myocardial infarction in Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Mehraban; Ahmadi, Ali; Baradaran, Azar; Masoudipoor, Neda; Frouzandeh, Soleiman

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to determine the relationship between the environmental factor, clinical risk factors, and individual variables with mortality due to acute myocardial infarction (MI) in Isfahan. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed between April 2012 and March 2013. The data on the patients’ mortality due to MI in Isfahan were obtained from the MI National Registry. The international classification system (ICD10: I21-I22) was used to diagnose MI. The air quality indicators and environmental variables were used to measure the air pollution. Multilevel logistic regression in the Stata software was used to determine the factors associated with mortality in patients and odds ratios (ORs) were calculated. Results: Six hundred eleven patients with MI were studied during 1-year. 444 (72.2%) patients were male and the rest were female. 4.7% of the patients died due to MI. The mean age at MI incidence was 62.2 ± 13 years. Of the air pollution parameters, PM10 had the maximum mean concentration (49.113 ppm), followed by NOX, NO, NO2, CO, SO2, and O3. The adjusted OR of mortality was derived 2.07 (95% CI: 1.5-2.85) for right bundle branch block, 1.5 (95% CI: 1.3-1.7) for ST-segment elevation MI, 1.84 (95% CI: 1.13-3) for age, 1.06 (95% CI: 1.01-1.20) for CO, 1.1 (95% CI: 1.03-1.30) for O3, and 1.04 (95% CI: 1.01-1.4) for SO2, all of which were considered as the risk factors of mortality. However, OR of mortality was 0.79 for precipitation (95% CI: 0.74-0.84) and 0.52 for angioplasty (95% CI: 0.4-0.68) were considered as protective factors of mortality. The individual characteristics including age, history of MI in the immediate family, hypertension, and diabetes were significantly associated with mortality from MI. The indices of air pollution including SO2, CO, O3, and environmental factors such as the precipitation and temperature were the determinants of mortality in patients with MI. Conclusion: With regards to the factors

  17. Parenteral trace element provision: recent clinical research and practical conclusions.

    PubMed

    Stehle, P; Stoffel-Wagner, B; Kuhn, K S

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this systematic review (PubMed, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed and Cochrane, www.cochrane.org; last entry 31 December 2014) was to present data from recent clinical studies investigating parenteral trace element provision in adult patients and to draw conclusions for clinical practice. Important physiological functions in human metabolism are known for nine trace elements: selenium, zinc, copper, manganese, chromium, iron, molybdenum, iodine and fluoride. Lack of, or an insufficient supply of, these trace elements in nutrition therapy over a prolonged period is associated with trace element deprivation, which may lead to a deterioration of existing clinical symptoms and/or the development of characteristic malnutrition syndromes. Therefore, all parenteral nutrition prescriptions should include a daily dose of trace elements. To avoid trace element deprivation or imbalances, physiological doses are recommended. PMID:27049031

  18. Conclusive quantum steering with superconducting transition edge sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, Marcelo P.; Smith, Devin H.; Gillett, Geo; Branciard, Cyril; Fedrizzi, Alessandro; Weinhold, Till J.; Lita, Adriana; Calkins, Brice; Gertis, Thomas; Nam, Sae Woo; White, Andrew G.

    2012-02-01

    Quantum steering allows two parties to verify shared entanglement even if one measurement device is untrusted. A conclusive demonstration of steering through the violation of a steering inequality is of considerable fundamental interest and opens up applications in quantum communication. To date all experimental tests with single photon states have relied on post-selection, allowing untrusted devices to cheat by hiding unfavorable events in losses. Here we close this ``detection loophole'' by combining a highly efficient source of entangled photon pairs with superconducting transition edge sensors. We achieve an unprecedented ˜62% conditional detection efficiency of entangled photons and violate a steering inequality with the minimal number of measurement settings by 48 standard deviations. Our results provide a clear path to practical applications of steering and to a photonic loophole-free Bell test.

  19. Conclusive quantum steering with superconducting transition-edge sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Devin H.; Gillett, Geoff; de Almeida, Marcelo P.; Branciard, Cyril; Fedrizzi, Alessandro; Weinhold, Till J.; Lita, Adriana; Calkins, Brice; Gerrits, Thomas; Wiseman, Howard M.; Nam, Sae Woo; White, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    Quantum steering allows two parties to verify shared entanglement even if one measurement device is untrusted. A conclusive demonstration of steering through the violation of a steering inequality is of considerable fundamental interest and opens up applications in quantum communication. To date, all experimental tests with single-photon states have relied on post selection, allowing untrusted devices to cheat by hiding unfavourable events in losses. Here we close this 'detection loophole' by combining a highly efficient source of entangled photon pairs with superconducting transition-edge sensors. We achieve an unprecedented ~62% conditional detection efficiency of entangled photons and violate a steering inequality with the minimal number of measurement settings by 48 s.d.s. Our results provide a clear path to practical applications of steering and to a photonic loophole-free Bell test.

  20. Cardiovascular Effects of 1 Year of Alagebrium and Endurance Exercise Training in Healthy Older Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Naoki; Hastings, Jeffrey L.; Carrick-Ranson, Graeme; Shafer, Keri M.; Shibata, Shigeki; Bhella, Paul S.; Abdullah, Shuaib M.; Barkley, Kyler W.; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Boyd, Kara N.; Livingston, Sheryl A.; Palmer, Dean; Levine, Benjamin D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Lifelong exercise training maintains a youthful compliance of the left ventricle (LV), whereas a year of exercise training started later in life fails to reverse LV stiffening, possibly because of accumulation of irreversible advanced glycation end products. Alagebrium breaks advanced glycation end product crosslinks and improves LV stiffness in aged animals. However, it is unclear whether a strategy of exercise combined with alagebrium would improve LV stiffness in sedentary older humans. Methods and Results Sixty-two healthy subjects were randomized into 4 groups: sedentary+placebo; sedentary+alagebrium (200 mg/d); exercise+placebo; and exercise+alagebrium. Subjects underwent right heart catheterization to define LV pressure–volume curves; secondary functional outcomes included cardiopulmonary exercise testing and arterial compliance. A total of 57 of 62 subjects (67±6 years; 37 f/20 m) completed 1 year of intervention followed by repeat measurements. Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and LV end-diastolic volume were measured at baseline, during decreased and increased cardiac filling. LV stiffness was assessed by the slope of LV pressure–volume curve. After intervention, LV mass and end-diastolic volume increased and exercise capacity improved (by ≈8%) only in the exercise groups. Neither LV mass nor exercise capacity was affected by alagebrium. Exercise training had little impact on LV stiffness (training×time effect, P=0.46), whereas alagebrium showed a modest improvement in LV stiffness compared with placebo (medication×time effect, P=0.04). Conclusions Alagebrium had no effect on hemodynamics, LV geometry, or exercise capacity in healthy, previously sedentary seniors. However, it did show a modestly favorable effect on age-associated LV stiffening. PMID:24130005

  1. 1-year prospective real life monitoring of asthma control and quality of life in Italy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The study aimed at prospectively evaluating the evolution of asthma control in Italy, to evaluate the reasons for lack of asthma control, perceived quality of life (QoL) and association with level of asthma control, the impact of pharmacological treatment, the number of exacerbations and the healthcare resource consumption. Methods PRISMA (PRospectIve Study on asthMA control) was an observational study performed in asthmatic patients including a cross-sectional phase and a 12-month prospective phase. Asthma control was assessed with the Asthma Control Test™ (ACT) and QoL was evaluated with EuroQoL-5D questionnaire filled in and collected during 5 clinic visits together with all the other data. Results The prospective phase included 1017 patients with uncontrolled (55.7%) or partly controlled asthma (44.3%). Out of the 739 patients evaluable after 12 months, 22.2% achieved full asthma control (ACT score = 25) and 58.7% reached a good control (ACT score: 20–24). The improvement in asthma control was associated with improved QoL and reduced hospital visits. The main reasons for lack of asthma control were comorbidities, continued exposure to irritants/triggers and poor adherence to therapy. The frequency of exacerbations was lower in patients with controlled asthma. A fixed combination therapy with an inhaled corticosteroid and a long-acting β2 agonist was reported by 77.0% of patients. A better asthma control and improved QoL were achieved with extrafine beclomethasone/formoterol compared to either budesonide/formoterol or fluticasone/salmeterol. Conclusions An improvement in asthma control and QoL can be achieved during a 1-year monitoring in a real life setting. Extrafine beclomethasone/formoterol was associated with significant benefit in terms of asthma control and QoL compared to large-particles combinations. ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT01110460. PMID:23216798

  2. Robot-assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty: minimum 1-year follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Vipul; Thaly, Rahul; Shah, Ketul

    2007-02-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of robotic-assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty. Laparoscopic pyeloplasty has been shown to have a success rate comparable to that of the open surgical approach. However, the steep learning curve has hindered its acceptance into mainstream urologic practice. The introduction of robotic assistance provides advantages that have the potential to facilitate precise dissection and intracorporeal suturing. Methods: A total of 50 patients underwent robotic-assisted laparoscopic dismembered pyeloplasty. A four-trocar technique was used. Most patients were discharged home on day 1, with stent removal at 3 weeks. Patency of the ureteropelvic junction was assessed in all patients with mercaptotriglycylglycine Lasix renograms at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months, then every 6 months for 1 year, and then yearly. Results: Each patient underwent a successful procedure without open conversion or transfusion. The average estimated blood loss was 40 ml. The operative time averaged 122 minutes (range 60 to 330) overall. Crossing vessels were present in 30% of the patients and were preserved in all cases. The time for the anastomosis averaged 20 minutes (range 10 to 100). Intraoperatively, no complications occurred. Postoperatively, the average hospital stay was 1.1 days. The stents were removed at an average of 20 days (range 14 to 28) postoperatively. The average follow-up was 11.7 months; at the last follow-up visit, each patient was doing well. Of the 50 patients, 48 underwent one or more renograms, demonstrating stable renal function, improved drainage, and no evidence of recurrent obstruction. Conclusions: Robotic-assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty is a feasible technique for ureteropelvic junction reconstruction. The procedure provides a minimally invasive alternative with good short-term results.

  3. Child Mortality Estimation: Estimating Sex Differences in Childhood Mortality since the 1970s

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, Cheryl Chriss

    2012-01-01

    ratio of infant mortality peaked in the 1970s or 1980s and declined thereafter. Conclusions The methods developed here pinpoint regions and countries where sex differences in mortality merit closer examination to ensure that both sexes are sharing equally in access to health resources. Further study of the distribution of causes of death in different settings will aid the interpretation of differences in survival for boys and girls. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary. PMID:22952433

  4. Inequalities in Alcohol-Related Mortality in 17 European Countries: A Retrospective Analysis of Mortality Registers

    PubMed Central

    Mackenbach, Johan P.; Kulhánová, Ivana; Bopp, Matthias; Borrell, Carme; Deboosere, Patrick; Kovács, Katalin; Looman, Caspar W. N.; Leinsalu, Mall; Mäkelä, Pia; Martikainen, Pekka; Menvielle, Gwenn; Rodríguez-Sanz, Maica; Rychtaříková, Jitka; de Gelder, Rianne

    2015-01-01

    death, it is likely that our results underestimate the true extent of the problem. Conclusions Alcohol-related conditions play an important role in generating inequalities in total mortality in many European countries. Countering increases in alcohol-related mortality in lower socioeconomic groups is essential for reducing inequalities in mortality. Studies of why such increases have not occurred in countries like France, Switzerland, Spain, and Italy can help in developing evidence-based policies in other European countries. PMID:26625134

  5. Global Inequalities in Youth Mortality, 2007-2012

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gopal K.; Lokhande, Anagha; Azuine, Romuladus E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: There is limited cross-national research on youth mortality. We examined age-and gender-variations in all-cause mortality among youth aged 15-34 years across 52 countries. Methods: Using the 2014 WHO mortality database, mortality rates for all countries were computed for the latest available year between 2007 and 2012. Rates, rate ratios, and ordinary least squares (OLS) and Poisson regression were used to analyze international variation in mortality. Results: Mortality rates among youth aged 15-34 years varied from a low of 28.4 deaths per 100,000 population for Hong Kong to a high of 250.6 for Russia and 619.1 for South Africa. For men aged 15-34, Singapore and Hong Kong had the lowest mortality rates (≈40 per 100,000), compared with South Africa and Russia with rates of 589.7 and 383.3, respectively. Global patterns in mortality among women were similar. Youth aged 15-24 in South Africa had 14 times higher mortality and those in the Philippines, Mexico, Russia, Colombia, and Brazil had 5-7 times higher mortality than those in Hong Kong. Youth aged 25-34 in Russia and South Africa had, respectively, 10 and 29 times higher mortality than their counterparts in Hong Kong. United States (US) had the 12th highest mortality rate among youth aged 15-24 and the 13th highest rate among youth aged 25-34. Overall, the US youth had 2-3 times higher rates of mortality than their counterparts in many industrialized countries including Hong Kong, Singapore, Netherlands, Switzerland, Germany, Norway, and Sweden. Income inequality, unemployment rate, and human development explained 50-66% of the global variance in youth mortality. Compared to the countries with low unemployment and income inequality and high human development levels, countries with high unemployment and income inequality and low human development had, respectively, 343%, 213%, and 205% higher risks of youth mortality. Conclusions and Global Health Implications: Marked international disparities in

  6. Mortality Benefit of a Fourth-Generation Synchronous Telehealth Program for the Management of Chronic Cardiovascular Disease: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chi-Sheng; Yu, Jiun-Yu; Lin, Yen-Hung; Chen, Ying-Hsien; Huang, Ching-Chang; Lee, Jen-Kuang; Chuang, Pao-Yu; Chen, Ming-Fong

    2016-01-01

    Background We have shown that a fourth-generation telehealth program that analyzes and responds synchronously to data transferred from patients is associated with fewer hospitalizations and lower medical costs. Whether a fourth-generation telehealth program can reduce all-cause mortality has not yet been reported for patients with chronic cardiovascular disease. Objective We conducted a clinical epidemiology study retrospectively to determine whether a fourth-generation telehealth program can reduce all-cause mortality for patients with chronic cardiovascular disease. Methods We enrolled 576 patients who had joined a telehealth program and compared them with 1178 control patients. A Cox proportional hazards model was fitted to analyze the impact of risk predictors on all-cause mortality. The model adjusted for age, sex, and chronic comorbidities. Results There were 53 (9.3%) deaths in the telehealth group and 136 (11.54%) deaths in the control group. We found that the telehealth program violated the proportional hazards assumption by the Schoenfeld residual test. Thus, we fitted a Cox regression model with time-varying covariates. The results showed an estimated hazard ratio (HR) of 0.866 (95% CI 0.837-0.896, P<.001; number needed to treat at 1 year=55.6, 95% CI 43.2-75.7 based on HR of telehealth program) for the telehealth program on all-cause mortality after adjusting for age, sex, and comorbidities. The time-varying interaction term in this analysis showed that the beneficial effect of telehealth would increase over time. Conclusions The results suggest that our fourth-generation telehealth program is associated with less all-cause mortality compared with usual care after adjusting for chronic comorbidities. PMID:27177497

  7. Incidence, Morbidity and Mortality in Patients Older than 50 Years with Second Hip Fracture in a Jeju Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong-Geun; Jang, Sunmee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Although the incidence of a second hip fracture is relatively well described, mortality and morbidity after a second hip fracture are seldom evaluated. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence, morbidity, and mid-term mortality of a second hip fracture and evaluate the cause of death after a second hip fracture. Materials and Methods Information on patients older than 50 years, who sustained a subsequent hip fracture, were obtained from the records of eight Jeju Island hospitals between 2002 and 2011 to calculate the incidence, morbidity, and mortality of hip fractures in this age group. All patients were followed a minimum of 2 years. A systemic search for death certificates at the National Statistical Office was conducted for patients who were lost to follow-up. Results Of 2,055 hip fractures (419 men and 1,636 women), 98 were second hip fractures (13 men and 85 women) during the study period. The mean ages of the patients at the time of the first and second fractures were 78.8 and 80.8 years, respectively. The incidence of a subsequent hip fracture among the first hip fracture was 4.8%. Mean mortality rates at 6 months, 1 year, 2 years, and 5 years were 10.5%, 15.2%, 23.5%, and 42.0% respectively. Cumulative mortality after the second hip fracture at the 5 years follow-up was 41.8%. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that a secondary fracture prevention program is necessary to prevent second hip fractures in elderly patients.

  8. Differences between evolution of Titan's and Earth's rivers - further conclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misiura, Katarzyna; Czechowski, Leszek

    2014-05-01

    Titan is the only celestial body, beside the Earth, where liquid is present on the surface. Liquid forms a number of lakes and rivers. In our research we use numerical model of the river to determine differences of evolution of rivers on the Earth and on Titan. We have found that transport of sediments on Titan is more effective than on Earth for the same river geometry and discharge. We have found also the theoretical explanations for this conclusion. 2.Introduction Titan is a very special body in the Solar System. It is the only moon that has dense atmosphere and flowing liquid on its surface. The Cassini-Huygens mission has found on Titan meandering rivers, and indicated processes of erosion, transport of solid material and its sedimentation. This paper is aimed to investigate the similarity and differences between these processes on Titan and the Earth. 3. Basic equations of our model The dynamical analysis of the considered rivers is performed using the package CCHE modified for the specific conditions on Titan. The package is based on the Navier-Stokes equations for depth-integrated two dimensional, turbulent flow and three dimensional convection-diffusion equation of sediment transport. 4. Parameters of the model We considered our model for a few kinds of liquid found on Titan. The liquid that falls as a rain (75% methane, 25% nitrogen) has different properties than the fluid forming lakes (74% ethane, 10% methane, 7% propane, 8.5% butane, 0.5% nitrogen). Other parameters of our model are: inflow discharge, outflow level, grain size of sediments etc. For every calculation performed for Titan's river similar calculations are performed for terrestrial ones. 5. Results and Conclusions The results of our simulation show the differences in behaviour of the flow and of sedimentation on Titan and on the Earth. Our preliminary results indicate that transport of material by Titan's rivers is more efficient than by terrestrial rivers of the same geometry parameters

  9. Serum Creatinine Modifies Associations between Body Mass Index and Mortality and Morbidity in Prevalent Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sakao, Yukitoshi; Ojima, Toshiyuki; Yasuda, Hideo; Hashimoto, Seiji; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Tsubakihara, Yoshiharu; Kato, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Background High body mass index (BMI) is paradoxically associated with better outcomes in hemodialysis (HD) patients. This study aimed to examine whether serum creatinine (Cr), a marker of muscle mass, could modify the association between BMI, and mortality and morbidity in prevalent HD patients. Methods A retrospective study was conducted using a nationwide database from the registry of the Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy. A total of 119,099 patients were selected (age: 65±12 years; median time on HD: 5.6 years; male: 62%), and we examined the association of basal BMI with mortality and morbidity after a 1-year period. Patients were stratified either by BMI into 4 groups or by serum Cr levels into 3 tertiles. Odds ratio (OR) [95% confidence interval] was calculated by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results Higher BMI did not predict a higher 1-year total mortality. However, when we stratified the patients by serum Cr levels, the risk of cardiac death became significantly higher in obese patients with the lowest Cr levels, in both males (OR 2.82 [1.51–5.27], p<0.01) and females (OR 2.00 [1.03–3.90], p<0.05). The risk of new cerebral infarction was also higher in obese male patients within the lowest Cr tertile. In contrast, there was a significantly lower risk of cardiac, cerebrovascular, and infection-related death in non-obese patients with higher levels of Cr. Higher serum Cr was also related to a lower risk of cardiovascular events and hip fracture in non-obese HD patients. Conclusions The obesity paradox was found to be present in HD patients only when obesity was defined by BMI. Decreased serum Cr levels were found to be positively associated with clinical poor outcomes in all BMI groups. Thus, irrespective of BMI, the evaluation of serum Cr levels is important to predict mortality and morbidity in patients receiving regular HD. PMID:26930325

  10. Scale decisions can reverse conclusions on community assembly processes

    PubMed Central

    Münkemüller, Tamara; Gallien, Laure; Lavergne, Sébastien; Renaud, Julien; Roquet, Cristina; Abdulhak, Sylvain; Dullinger, Stefan; Garraud, Luc; Guisan, Antoine; Lenoir, Jonathan; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Van Es, Jérémie; Vittoz, Pascal; Willner, Wolfgang; Wohlgemuth, Thomas; Zimmermann, Niklaus E.; Thuiller, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    Aim Phylogenetic diversity patterns are increasingly being used to better understand the role of ecological and evolutionary processes in community assembly. Here, we quantify how these patterns are influenced by scale choices in terms of spatial and environmental extent and organismic scales. Location European Alps. Methods We applied 42 sampling strategies differing in their combination of focal scales. For each resulting sub-dataset, we estimated the phylogenetic diversity of the species pools, phylogenetic α-diversities of local communities, and statistics commonly used together with null models in order to infer non-random diversity patterns (i.e. phylogenetic clustering versus over-dispersion). Finally, we studied the effects of scale choices on these measures using regression analyses. Results Scale choices were decisive for revealing signals in diversity patterns. Notably, changes in focal scales sometimes reversed a pattern of over-dispersion into clustering. Organismic scale had a stronger effect than spatial and environmental extent. However, we did not find general rules for the direction of change from over-dispersion to clustering with changing scales. Importantly, these scale issues had only a weak influence when focusing on regional diversity patterns that change along abiotic gradients. Main conclusions Our results call for caution when combining phylogenetic data with distributional data to study how and why communities differ from random expectations of phylogenetic relatedness. These analyses seem to be robust when the focus is on relating community diversity patterns to variation in habitat conditions, such as abiotic gradients. However, if the focus is on identifying relevant assembly rules for local communities, the uncertainty arising from a certain scale choice can be immense. In the latter case, it becomes necessary to test whether emerging patterns are robust to alternative scale choices. PMID:24791149

  11. Hyperparathyroidism: Cancer and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Soumik; Ghosh, Sujoy

    2012-01-01

    Hyperparathyroidism is a commoner endocrinopathy today with a large number of asymptomatic patients in contrast to the scenario five decades ago. Surgery is indicated for patients fulfilling the NIH criteria who are mostly symptomatic while individuals with mild disease are managed conservatively. Several studies indicate increased risk of malignancy involving several sites and related mortality in primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) with the risk persisting for several years after surgery. PHPT is associated with structural & functional cardiac abnormalities and premature death from increased cardiovascular disease with risk normalising only several years after surgery. Mortality risk is associated with pre-operative serum calcium & parathormone and parathyroid adenoma weight. However, the issue of existence of similar risk and surgical benefit in mild PHPT is mired in controversy although some studies have shown an association and beneficial trends with surgery. With current evidence, it would be prudent to follow up PHPT patients for malignancy and cardiovascular disease and possibly adopt a more liberal attitude towards surgery. PMID:23565381

  12. Accident mortality among children

    PubMed Central

    Swaroop, S.; Albrecht, R. M.; Grab, B.

    1956-01-01

    The authors present statistics on mortality from accidents, with special reference to those relating to the age-group 1-19 years. For a number of countries figures are given for the proportional mortality from accidents (the number of accident deaths expressed as a percentage of the number of deaths from all causes) and for the specific death-rates, per 100 000 population, from all causes of death, from selected causes, from all causes of accidents, and from various types of accident. From these figures it appears that, in most countries, accidents are becoming relatively increasingly prominent as a cause of death in childhood, primarily because of the conquest of other causes of death—such as infectious and parasitic diseases, which formerly took a heavy toll of children and adolescents—but also to some extent because the death-rate from motor-vehicle accidents is rising and cancelling out the reduction in the rate for other causes of accidental death. In the authors' opinion, further epidemiological investigations into accident causation are required for the purpose of devising quicker and more effective methods of accident prevention. PMID:13383361

  13. Mortality and cancer incidence among sawmill workers exposed to chlorophenate wood preservatives.

    PubMed Central

    Hertzman, C; Teschke, K; Ostry, A; Hershler, R; Dimich-Ward, H; Kelly, S; Spinelli, J J; Gallagher, R P; McBride, M; Marion, S A

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the association between exposure to chlorophenates and the risk of soft tissue sarcoma; non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; Hodgkin's disease; and cancers of the lung, nose, and nasopharynx. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted of 26487 workers employed for at least 1 year between 1950 and 1985 in 11 chlorophenate-using and 3 non-using sawmills in British Columbia, Canada. Exposures by job were ascertained with interviews of senior employees. RESULTS: Probabilistic record linkage to the Canadian Mortality Data Base and the British Columbia Cancer Registry found 4710 deaths between 1950 and 1990, and 1547 incident cases of cancer between 1969 and 1989. None of the cancers of interest had elevated mortality related to chlorophenate exposure. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma incidence (n = 65) increased with increasing chlorophenate exposure hours, yielding the following standardized incidence ratios: less than 120 hours 0.68; 120 to 1999 hours, 0.59; 2000 to 3999 hours, 1.04; 4000 to 9999 hours, 1.02; and 10000 or more hours, 1.30. CONCLUSIONS: These results are consistent with the borderline positive associations seen in other recently reported studies of chlorophenate-exposed workforces. PMID:9065230

  14. Unfolding Physiological State: Mortality Modelling in Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Ghassemi, Marzyeh; Naumann, Tristan; Doshi-Velez, Finale; Brimmer, Nicole; Joshi, Rohit; Rumshisky, Anna; Szolovits, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of a patient’s disease state and trajectory is critical in a clinical setting. Modern electronic healthcare records contain an increasingly large amount of data, and the ability to automatically identify the factors that influence patient outcomes stand to greatly improve the efficiency and quality of care. We examined the use of latent variable models (viz. Latent Dirichlet Allocation) to decompose free-text hospital notes into meaningful features, and the predictive power of these features for patient mortality. We considered three prediction regimes: (1) baseline prediction, (2) dynamic (time-varying) outcome prediction, and (3) retrospective outcome prediction. In each, our prediction task differs from the familiar time-varying situation whereby data accumulates; since fewer patients have long ICU stays, as we move forward in time fewer patients are available and the prediction task becomes increasingly difficult. We found that latent topic-derived features were effective in determining patient mortality under three timelines: inhospital, 30 day post-discharge, and 1 year post-discharge mortality. Our results demonstrated that the latent topic features important in predicting hospital mortality are very different from those that are important in post-discharge mortality. In general, latent topic features were more predictive than structured features, and a combination of the two performed best. The time-varying models that combined latent topic features and baseline features had AUCs that reached 0.85, 0.80, and 0.77 for in-hospital, 30 day post-discharge and 1 year post-discharge mortality respectively. Our results agreed with other work suggesting that the first 24 hours of patient information are often the most predictive of hospital mortality. Retrospective models that used a combination of latent topic features and structured features achieved AUCs of 0.96, 0.82, and 0.81 for in-hospital, 30 day, and 1-year mortality prediction. Our

  15. Spectroscopy of asteroid pairs - new observations support previous conclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polishook, David; Oszkiewicz, Dagmara Anna; None Kwiatkowski, Tomasz

    2015-08-01

    Asteroid pairs were split due to fast rotation of a strengthless body. Study them can reveal fundamental principles in asteroid interiors and evolution. We continue our spectroscopic survey of asteroid pairs in the near-IR range (IRTF) and work on completing the spectral coverage in the visible wavelength (SALT, NOT).Our new observations support our previous conclusions (Polishook et al. 2014):1. Primary and secondary members have very similar reflectance spectra supporting the claim that every pair originated from a single progenitor. We measured 2 more pairs that present the same taxonomy (4905-7813, 15107-291188). This increases to 22 the number of asteroid pairs with spectral similarities and supports the claim of a single progenitor for each pair to a significance of over 5 sigma.2. Rotational fission is not a function of the asteroid composition rather the asteroid’s structure. We present new reflectance spectra of S- and C-complex pairs that differ in their composition.3. Some asteroid pairs present spectral parameters that imply a fresh, non-weathered surface. This includes spectral slope, and a deep and wide absorption band at 1 micron. Among these, the asteroid 8306 can now be re-classified as a Q-type asteroid, a common class in the near-Earth environment, but rare in the main belt. 8306 is the 4th Q-type discovered within asteroid pairs (all locate in the main belt).4. A secondary member of an asteroid pair composed of ordinary chondrite (S-complex) might present a reflectance spectrum with lower spectral slope compared to its primary member. This is seen in the new measured reflectance spectrum of secondary 291188). This result supports the theory of Jacobson & Scheeres (2011) of continuous disintegration of the secondaries while still in the vicinity of their primaries.5. With time, the fresh surface becomes weathered. Dynamical calculations limit the disintegration time of the progenitor of the pair 4905-7813 to 1.65 millions years ago, what makes

  16. Cosmological Gamma-Ray Bursts and Hypernovae Conclusively Linked

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-06-01

    Clearest-Ever Evidence from VLT Spectra of Powerful Event Summary A very bright burst of gamma-rays was observed on March 29, 2003 by NASA's High Energy Transient Explorer (HETE-II) , in a sky region within the constellation Leo. Within 90 min, a new, very bright light source (the "optical afterglow") was detected in the same direction by means of a 40-inch telescope at the Siding Spring Observatory (Australia) and also in Japan. The gamma-ray burst was designated GRB 030329 , according to the date. And within 24 hours, a first, very detailed spectrum of this new object was obtained by the UVES high-dispersion spectrograph on the 8.2-m VLT KUEYEN telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile). It allowed to determine the distance as about 2,650 million light-years (redshift 0.1685). Continued observations with the FORS1 and FORS2 multi-mode instruments on the VLT during the following month allowed an international team of astronomers [1] to document in unprecedented detail the changes in the spectrum of the optical afterglow of this gamma-ray burst . Their detailed report appears in the June 19 issue of the research journal "Nature". The spectra show the gradual and clear emergence of a supernova spectrum of the most energetic class known, a "hypernova" . This is caused by the explosion of a very heavy star - presumably over 25 times heavier than the Sun. The measured expansion velocity (in excess of 30,000 km/sec) and the total energy released were exceptionally high, even within the elect hypernova class. From a comparison with more nearby hypernovae, the astronomers are able to fix with good accuracy the moment of the stellar explosion. It turns out to be within an interval of plus/minus two days of the gamma-ray burst. This unique conclusion provides compelling evidence that the two events are directly connected. These observations therefore indicate a common physical process behind the hypernova explosion and the associated emission of strong gamma

  17. Infant Mortality and Asians and Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infant Heath & Mortality Infant Mortality and Asians and Pacific Islanders Among Asian/Pacific Islanders, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is the fourth leading cause of infant mortality. Asian/Pacific Islanders women generally have lower infant mortality rates ...

  18. Evaluation of annual survival and mortality rates and longevity of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) at the United States Navy Marine Mammal Program from 2004 through 2013.

    PubMed

    Venn-Watson, Stephanie K; Jensen, Eric D; Smith, Cynthia R; Xitco, Mark; Ridgway, Sam H

    2015-04-15

    Objective-To evaluate annual survival and mortality rates and the longevity of a managed population of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). Design-Retrospective cohort study. Animals-103 bottlenose dolphins at the US Navy Marine Mammal Program (MMP). Procedures-Population age structures, annual survival and crude mortality rates, and median age at death for dolphins > 30 days old were determined from 2004 through 2013. Results-During 2004 through 2013, the annual survival rates for MMP dolphins ranged from 0.98 to 1.0, and the annual crude mortality rates ranged from 0% to 5%, with a mean of 2.7%. The median age at death was 30.1 years from 2004 through 2008 and increased to 32 years from 2009 through 2013. The maximum age for a dolphin in the study was 52 years. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Results indicated that the annual mortality rates were low and survival rates were high for dolphins in the MMP from 2004 through 2013 and that the median age at death for MMP dolphins during that time was over 10 years greater than that reported in free-ranging dolphins. These findings were likely attributable to the continually improving care and husbandry of managed dolphin populations. PMID:25835174

  19. Race and mortality after acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Waikar, Sushrut S; Curhan, Gary C; Ayanian, John Z; Chertow, Glenn M

    2007-10-01

    Black patients receiving dialysis for end-stage renal disease in the United States have lower mortality rates than white patients. Whether racial differences exist in mortality after acute renal failure is not known. We studied acute renal failure in patients hospitalized between 2000 and 2003 using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample and found that black patients had an 18% (95% confidence interval [CI] 16 to 21%) lower odds of death than white patients after adjusting for age, sex, comorbidity, and the need for mechanical ventilation. Similarly, among those with acute renal failure requiring dialysis, black patients had a 16% (95% CI 10 to 22%) lower odds of death than white patients. In stratified analyses of patients with acute renal failure, black patients had significantly lower adjusted odds of death than white patients in settings of coronary artery bypass grafting, cardiac catheterization, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, pneumonia, sepsis, and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Black patients were more likely than white patients to be treated in hospitals that care for a larger number of patients with acute renal failure, and black patients had lower in-hospital mortality than white patients in all four quartiles of hospital volume. In conclusion, in-hospital mortality is lower for black patients with acute renal failure than white patients. Future studies should assess the reasons for this difference. PMID:17855647

  20. Mortality Benefit of Participation in BOOCS Program

    PubMed Central

    Odashiro, Keita; Fukata, Mitsuhiro; Maruyama, Toru; Saito, Kazuyuki; Wakana, Chikako; Fukumitsu, Michiko; Fujino, Takehiko

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to demonstrate the protective effect on mortality among participants of a health education program, Brain-Oriented Obesity Control System (BOOCS). Methods: A quasi-experimentally designed, 15-year (1993 to 2007) follow-up study was conducted with a total of 13,835 male and 7791 female Japanese workers. They were divided into three groups: participants in the program (1565 males and 742 females), nonparticipant comparative obese controls (1230 males and 605 females), and nonparticipant reference subjects (11,012 males and 6426 females). Hazard ratios were calculated with survival curves drawn to evaluate the mortality effects by the program participation. Results: The male participants showed significantly lower mortality risk for all causes of death at hazard ratio = 0.54 (95% confidence interval: 0.31 to 0.94) with significantly different survival curves (P = 0.014 by log-rank test) than obese controls. Conclusions: The results support a protective effect on mortality by participating in BOOCS program. PMID:25634811

  1. Identifying and Targeting Mortality Disparities: A Framework for Sub-Saharan Africa Using Adult Mortality Data from South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Sartorius, Benn; Sartorius, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Background Health inequities in developing countries are difficult to eradicate because of limited resources. The neglect of adult mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is a particular concern. Advances in data availability, software and analytic methods have created opportunities to address this challenge and tailor interventions to small areas. This study demonstrates how a generic framework can be applied to guide policy interventions to reduce adult mortality in high risk areas. The framework, therefore, incorporates the spatial clustering of adult mortality, estimates the impact of a range of determinants and quantifies the impact of their removal to ensure optimal returns on scarce resources. Methods Data from a national cross-sectional survey in 2007 were used to illustrate the use of the generic framework for SSA and elsewhere. Adult mortality proportions were analyzed at four administrative levels and spatial analyses were used to identify areas with significant excess mortality. An ecological approach was then used to assess the relationship between mortality “hotspots” and various determinants. Population attributable fractions were calculated to quantify the reduction in mortality as a result of targeted removal of high-impact determinants. Results Overall adult mortality rate was 145 per 10,000. Spatial disaggregation identified a highly non-random pattern and 67 significant high risk local municipalities were identified. The most prominent determinants of adult mortality included HIV antenatal sero-prevalence, low SES and lack of formal marital union status. The removal of the most attributable factors, based on local area prevalence, suggest that overall adult mortality could be potentially reduced by ∼90 deaths per 10,000. Conclusions The innovative use of secondary data and advanced epidemiological techniques can be combined in a generic framework to identify and map mortality to the lowest administration level. The identification of high

  2. Mortality Patterns Among Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Workers

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Caroline; Hughes, Therese S; Muldoon, Susan; Aldrich, Tim; Rice, Carol; Hornung, Richard; Brion, Gail; Tollerud, David J

    2010-01-01

    Objective Determine if PGDP workers had mortality patterns that differed from the general U.S. population, and investigate if mortality patterns were associated with job title or workplace exposures. Methods A retrospective occupational cohort mortality study was conducted on 6759 workers. Standardized mortality ratio analyses compared the cohort to the referent U.S. population. Internal comparisons producing standardized rate ratios were conducted by job title, metal exposure, and cumulative internal and external radiation exposures. Results Overall mortality and cancer rates were lower than the referent population, reflecting a strong healthy worker effect. Individual non-significant SMRs and SRRs were noted for cancers of the lymphatic and hematopoietic tissue. Conclusions Although relatively low exposures to radiation and metals did not produce statistically significant health effects, non-significant elevations for lymphatic and hematopoietic cancers were consistent with previous studies of nuclear workers. PMID:20595915

  3. Child Mortality Rate in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Susuman, A Sathiya

    2012-01-01

    Ethiopia’s childhood mortality has continued to decline although at a swift pace. The drop in urban childhood mortality decline, duration of breastfeeding is the principle reason for the overall decline in mortality trends in Ethiopia. Data from the Ethiopian Demographic and Health Surveys 2000 and 2005 were used. Indirect estimation of Brass and Trussell’s methods were adopted. Selected demographic and socio-economic variables were included in the analysis with statistically significant effects. Findings clearly show neonatal and post neonatal mortality decline gradually. Even though, Ethiopia’s childhood mortality rates are still high. The result shows less than 2 years birth interval have higher infant mortality rates than higher birth interval (113 deaths per 1000). The proper spacing of births allows more time for childcare to make more maternal resources available for the care of the child and mother. Therefore, further research is urgent for regional level and national level investigation. PMID:23113145

  4. Emergency re-admissions to hospital due to adverse drug reactions within 1 year of the index admission

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Emma C; Green, Christopher F; Mottram, David R; Rowe, Philip H; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2010-01-01

    AIM The proportion of re-admissions to hospital caused by ADRs is poorly documented in the UK. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of ADRs on re-admission to hospital after a period as an inpatient. METHODS One thousand patients consecutively admitted to 12 wards were included. All subsequent admissions for this cohort within 1 year of discharge from the index admission were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS Of the 1000 patients included, 403 (40.3%, 95% CI 39.1, 45.4%) were re-admitted within 1 year. Complete data were available for 290 (70.2%) re-admitted patients, with an ADR contributing to admission in 60 (20.8%, 95% CI 16.4, 25.6%) patients. Presence of an ADR in the index admission did not predict for an ADR-related re-admission (10.5% vs. 7.2%, P = 0.25), or re-admission overall (47.2% vs. 41.2%, P = 0.15). The implicated drug was commenced in the index admission in 33/148 (22.3%) instances, with 37/148 (25%) commenced elsewhere since the index admission. Increasing age and an index admission in a medical ward were associated with a higher incidence of re-admission ADR. The most frequent causative drugs were anti-platelets and loop diuretics, with bleeding and renal impairment the most frequent ADRs. Over half (52/91, 57.1%) of the ADRs were judged to be definitely or possibly avoidable. CONCLUSIONS One fifth of patients re-admitted to hospital within 1 year of discharge from their index admission are re-admitted due to an ADR. Our data highlight drug and patient groups where interventions are needed to reduce the incidence of ADRs leading to re-admission. PMID:21039769

  5. Effectiveness of a 1-Year Resident Training Program in Clinical Research: A Controlled Before-and-After Study

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Mechthild; Wild, Beate; Nikendei, Christoph; Kroenke, Kurt; Niehoff, Dorothea; Henningsen, Peter; Zipfel, Stephan; Herzog, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    Background To increase the number of clinician scientists and to improve research skills, a number of clinical research training programs have been recently established. However, controlled studies assessing their effectiveness are lacking. Objective To investigate the effectiveness of a 1-year resident training program in clinical research. Design Controlled before-and-after study. The training program included a weekly class in clinical research methods, completion of a research project, and mentorship. Participants Intervention subjects were 15 residents participating in the 1-year training program in clinical research. Control subjects were 22 residents not participating in the training program. Measurements and Main Results Assessments were performed at the beginning and end of the program. Outcomes included methodological research knowledge (multiple-choice progress test), self-assessed research competence, progress on publications and grant applications, and evaluation of the program using quantitative and qualitative methods. Results Intervention subjects and controls were well matched with respect to research experience (5.1 ± 2.2 vs 5.6 ± 5.8 years; p = .69). Methodological knowledge improved significantly more in the intervention group compared to the control group (effect size = 2.5; p < .001). Similarly, self-assessed research competence increased significantly more in the intervention group (effect size = 1.1; p = .01). At the end of the program, significantly more intervention subjects compared to controls were currently writing journal articles (87% vs 36%; p = .003). The intervention subjects evaluated the training program as highly valuable for becoming independent researchers. Conclusions A 1-year training program in clinical research can substantially increase research knowledge and productivity. The program design makes it feasible to implement in other academic settings. PMID:17922168

  6. Individual Joblessness, Contextual Unemployment, and Mortality Risk

    PubMed Central

    Tapia Granados, José A.; House, James S.; Ionides, Edward L.; Burgard, Sarah; Schoeni, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Longitudinal studies at the level of individuals find that employees who lose their jobs are at increased risk of death. However, analyses of aggregate data find that as unemployment rates increase during recessions, population mortality actually declines. We addressed this paradox by using data from the US Department of Labor and annual survey data (1979–1997) from a nationally representative longitudinal study of individuals—the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. Using proportional hazards (Cox) regression, we analyzed how the hazard of death depended on 1) individual joblessness and 2) state unemployment rates, as indicators of contextual economic conditions. We found that 1) compared with the employed, for the unemployed the hazard of death was increased by an amount equivalent to 10 extra years of age, and 2) each percentage-point increase in the state unemployment rate reduced the mortality hazard in all individuals by an amount equivalent to a reduction of 1 year of age. Our results provide evidence that 1) joblessness strongly and significantly raises the risk of death among those suffering it, and 2) periods of higher unemployment rates, that is, recessions, are associated with a moderate but significant reduction in the risk of death among the entire population. PMID:24993734

  7. Evaluation of the management of Hr-HPV+/PapTest- women: results at 1-year recall

    PubMed Central

    Chiappetta, Caterina; Puggioni, Chiara; Lendaro, Eugenio; Cacciotti, Jessica; Zaralli, Roberto; Migliore, Giovanna; Bellardini, Paola; Petrozza, Vincenzo; Della Rocca, Carlo; Di Cristofano, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    With cervical cancer screening the choice of 1-year as a period of follow-up in positive high-risk HPV women without cytological lesions is still under discussion. We evaluated the management of these women and the role of HPV genotyping test. We did a cervical cancer screening study of women aged 35-64 with primary high-risk HPV test. Women positive for high-risk HPV with negative cytology were followed-up after 1 year. In this study we selected women with high-risk HPV+/PapTest- resulted high-risk HPV+ at recall and performed the PapTest and HPV genotyping test. The detection rate of squamous high grade (CIN2+) relative to the total screened cohort was 2.1‰, and it was 0.2‰ at the 1-year recall. The colposcopy performed in women referred at the 1-year recall accounted for 48.8% of the total (baseline + 1-year recall), and 84.3% of these women had no cytological lesions. The most frequent hr-HPV genotype detected was HPV16 and 66.7% of co-infections were due to HPV16 and HPV18. 54.5% of women presented a persistent infection at 1-year recall with the same HPV subtype, 50% of persistent infections was due to HPV16 and 16.7% of these were determined to be CIN2+ histological lesions. Our data show that it may be useful to extend the period of follow-up for women hr-HPV+/PapTest- so as to reduce the number of unnecessary colposcopies due to the transitory infections and that the genotyping test could help to identify the persistent infections in which HPV16 is involved. PMID:26884886

  8. Mortality of lead smelter workers.

    PubMed

    Selevan, S G; Landrigan, P J; Stern, F B; Jones, J H

    1985-10-01

    To examine patterns of death in lead smelter workers, a retrospective analysis of mortality was conducted in a cohort of 1,987 males employed between 1940 and 1965 at a primary lead smelter in Idaho. Overall mortality was similar to that of the United States white male population (standardized mortality ratio (SMR) = 98). Excess mortality, however, was found from chronic renal disease (SMR = 192; confidence interval (CI) = 88-364), and the risk of death from renal disease increased with increasing duration of employment, such that after 20 years employment, the standardized mortality ratio reached 392 (CI = 107-1,004). Excess mortality was also noted for nonmalignant respiratory disease (SMR = 187, CI = 128-264). Eight of 32 deaths in this category were caused by silicosis; at least five workers who died of silicosis had been miners for a part of their lives. An additional 11 deaths resulted from tuberculosis (SMR = 139; CI = 69-249); in six of these cases, silicosis was a contributory cause of death. Cancer mortality was not increased overall (SMR = 95; CI = 78-114). An increase, however, was noted for deaths from kidney cancer (six cases; SMR = 204; CI = 75-444). Finally, excess mortality was noted for injuries (SMR = 138; CI = 104-179); 13 (23%) of the 56 deaths in this category were caused by mining injuries. The data from this study are consistent with previous reports of increased mortality from chronic renal disease in persons exposed occupationally to lead. PMID:4025307

  9. Opiates or cocaine: mortality from acute reactions in six major Spanish cities. State Information System on Drug Abuse (SEIT) Working Group.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, J; Rodríguez, B; de la Fuente, L; Barrio, G; Vicente, J; Roca, J; Royuela, L

    1995-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--To describe temporal and geographical variations in mortality from acute reactions to opiates or cocaine and the demographic and toxicological characteristics of persons who died from these in major Spanish cities between 1983 and 1991. DESIGN--Descriptive study. Data were obtained retrospectively from pathologists' reports. SETTING--Cities of Madrid, Barcelona, Valencia, Seville, Zaragoza, and Bilbao. SUBJECTS--Deaths from acute reactions to opiates or cocaine were defined as those in which pathologists' reports did not indicate any other cause of death and in which evidence was found of recent consumption of these drugs. MAIN RESULTS--The mortality rate from acute reactions to opiate/cocaine per 100,000 population in the six cities as a whole rose from 1.2 in 1983 to 8.2 in 1991. Average annual rates for the whole period ranged from 1.7 in Seville to 4.9 in Barcelona. The male/female rates ratio was 5.9:1. The mean age of persons who died rose from 25.1 years in 1983 to 28 years in 1991. In more than 90% of the cases in whom toxicological tests were undertaken opiates were detected, and the proportion in which benzodiazepines or cocaine were detected increased during the period studied. CONCLUSIONS--Between 1983 and 1991 mortality from acute reactions to opiates/cocaine rose dramatically in major Spanish cities and significant differences in mortality between cities were found. Deaths were concentrated among men and young people. Acute drug reactions became one of the leading causes of death in persons 15-39 years of age, representing 11.1% of mortality from all causes in 1988 for this age group. Future studies should examine the relationship between the temporal and geographical variations in this type of mortality and various personal, environmental and social factors. PMID:7707007

  10. Clinical differences between opioid abuse classes ameliorated after 1 year of buprenorphine-medication assisted treatment.

    PubMed

    Tkacz, Joseph; Severt, Jamie; Kassed, Cheryl; Ruetsch, Charles

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the clinical and demographic profiles of three opioid-dependent user groups, and measured their response to 1 year of buprenorphine-medication assisted treatment. Opioid prescription, street, and combination (street + prescription) users completed the Addiction Severity Index multiple times over the course of one treatment year. Although groups differed on all measured demographics (P values <.05) and on six of seven Addiction Severity Index composite scores at induction (P values <.05), differences were ameliorated after 1 year. Findings highlight the disparities between the various opioid-dependent patient subpopulations and suggest that buprenorphine-medication assisted treatment is an effective treatment across user subtypes. PMID:22540432

  11. Road traffic related mortality in Vietnam: Evidence for policy from a national sample mortality surveillance system

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are among the leading causes of mortality in Vietnam. However, mortality data collection systems in Vietnam in general and for RTIs in particular, remain inconsistent and incomplete. Underlying distributions of external causes and body injuries are not available from routine data collection systems or from studies till date. This paper presents characteristics, user type pattern, seasonal distribution, and causes of 1,061 deaths attributable to road crashes ascertained from a national sample mortality surveillance system in Vietnam over a two-year period (2008 and 2009). Methods A sample mortality surveillance system was designed for Vietnam, comprising 192 communes in 16 provinces, accounting for approximately 3% of the Vietnamese population. Deaths were identified from commune level data sources, and followed up by verbal autopsy (VA) based ascertainment of cause of death. Age-standardised mortality rates from RTIs were computed. VA questionnaires were analysed in depth to derive descriptive characteristics of RTI deaths in the sample. Results The age-standardized mortality rates from RTIs were 33.5 and 8.5 per 100,000 for males and females respectively. Majority of deaths were males (79%). Seventy three percent of all deaths were aged from 15 to 49 years and 58% were motorcycle users. As high as 80% of deaths occurred on the day of injury, 42% occurred prior to arrival at hospital, and a further 29% occurred on-site. Direct causes of death were identified for 446 deaths (42%) with head injuries being the most common cause attributable to road traffic injuries overall (79%) and to motorcycle crashes in particular (78%). Conclusion The VA method can provide a useful data source to analyse RTI mortality. The observed considerable mortality from head injuries among motorcycle users highlights the need to evaluate current practice and effectiveness of motorcycle helmet use in Vietnam. The high number of deaths occurring on

  12. CKD in an Electronic Health Record Problem List: Quality of Care, ESRD, and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, Stacey E.; Navaneethan, Sankar D.; Schold, Jesse D.; Arrigain, Susana; Sharp, John W; Jain, Anil K; Schreiber, Martin J.; Simon, James F.; Nally, Joseph V

    2014-01-01

    Background Whether CKD recognition in an electronic health record (EHR) problem list improves processes of care or clinical outcomes of ESRD and death is unclear. Methods We identified patients who had at least 1 year of follow up (2005–2009) in our EHR based CKD registry (n=25,742). CKD recognition was defined by having ICD-9 codes for CKD, diabetic kidney disease, or hypertensive kidney disease in the problem list. We calculated proportions of patients with and without CKD recognition and examined differences by demographics, clinical factors, and development of ESRD or mortality. We evaluated differences in the proportion of patients with CKD specific labs checked before and after recognition among cases and propensity-matched controls. Results Only 11% (n=2735) had CKD recognition in the problem list and they were younger (68 vs. 71 yrs), a higher proportion were male (61% vs. 37%) and African-American (21% vs. 10%) compared to those unrecognized. CKD-specific labs for patients with eGFR 30–59 including iPTH (23% vs. 6%), Vitamin D (22% vs. 18%), phosphorus (29% vs. 7%), and a urine check for proteinuria (55% vs. 36%) were significantly more likely to be done among those with CKD recognition. (all p<0.05) Similar results were found for eGFR<30 except for proteinuria and in our propensity score matched control analysis. There was no independent association of CKD recognition with ESRD or mortality. Conclusions CKD recognition in the EHR problem list was low, but translated into more CKD specific processes of care; however ESRD or mortality were not affected. PMID:24714513

  13. Outcomes of minimally 1 year follow-up for the arthroscopic Remplissage technique with Hill–Sachs lesion

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sang-Hun; Shin, Seung-Myeong; Jo, Beom-Geon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated minimal 1 year follow-up results for the Remplissage technique to fill a Hill–Sachs lesion with anterior instability. Methods The subjects were 12 patients, who could be followed-up for more than 12 months after the ”Remplissage” procedures in our hospital from August 2008 to May 2010. Their mean age was 28.6 years old and the mean follow-up was 19 months. The evaluations included the ROM, the ASES score, the KSSI score, the ROWE score and postoperative MRI. Results On the postoperative functional evaluation after an average 16 months, the ASES score improved 51.4 in preoperative to 86.6 in postoperatively, the KSSI score improved from 46.6 preoperatively to 84.9 postoperatively and the ROWE score improved from 43.6 preoperatively to 91.4 postoperatively. After an average 14 months for all the cases, the range of movement was nearly in the normal range which is 174.3 ± 5.04 (170–180) degrees in foreward flexion, and 56.4 ± 9.60 (50–60) degrees in external rotation. Conclusion For recurrent shoulder instability with a large Hill–Sachs lesion, the Remplissage technique has a good outcome after more than 1 year follow-up in terms of shoulder stability, and the clinical and functional results. Level of evidence Level IV, therapeutic case series PMID:24403747

  14. Consecutive Case Series of Healed Single-Molar Sites Immediately Restored with Wide-Diameter Implants: A 1-Year Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Cherfane, Pierre; Sojod, Bouchra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. To evaluate outcomes of wide-diameter (6 mm) implants immediately provisionalized with cement-retained single crowns in posterior molar sites. Materials and Methods. Forty-eight consecutive patients received a total of 53 moderately rough-surface, 6 mm diameter implants in healed sites. All implants were immediately provisionalized with a cement-retained provisional crown. Final prosthesis with cement-retained porcelain fused to metal crowns was delivered 3–6 months later. Patients were followed up for 1 year. Outcome measures were implant failures and success rate, complications, marginal bone levels, bone level changes, papilla index, bleeding on probing, and inflammation. Results. One patient was lost to follow-up. At one year, the implant survival and success rate were 98.1%. The mean marginal bone loss after 1 year was −0.17 ± 1.84 mm. Ideal papilla score was recorded at 83.8% of the sites. More than 95.6% of the sites showed no bleeding or inflammation. No procedure-related or device-related adverse events were reported. Conclusion. Wide-diameter (6 mm) implants can safely and successfully replace single posterior molars. Longer follow-up studies are necessary to evaluate the long-term success of these implants. PMID:27195008

  15. Cognitive function, social functioning and quality of life in first-episode psychosis: A 1-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Popolo, Raffaele; Vinci, Giancarlo; Balbi, Andrea

    2010-03-01

    Abstract Objective. The majority of patients with schizophrenia have cognitive deficits early in the disease. We evaluated the relationship between cognitive function, social functioning and quality of life in patients with first-episode psychosis. Methods. This was a longitudinal study in 15 patients aged 18-30 years who had recently experienced a first psychotic episode and were treated with the atypical antipsychotic aripiprazole, cognitive-behavioural therapy, psycho-educational sessions, family supportive sessions and social interventions. Patients were evaluated at baseline and after 1 year. Cognitive assessment included attention, memory, language skills and problem solving. Social functioning, quality of life, and psychopathological evaluation were performed with validated tools. Results. At baseline, patients had a severe impairment of social functioning and a low quality of life, while a specific pattern of cognitive functions was not identified. After 1-year, we observed a significant improvement in social functioning and quality of life, without a significant decrease in cognitive function. Conclusion. Contrary to previous findings, we found that social functioning and quality of life are related, but independent of cognitive impairment. The use of antipsychotic agents that do not interefere with cognitive function plus psychological assistance is a valuable treatment approach in patients with first-episode schizophrenia. PMID:24917230

  16. Consecutive Case Series of Healed Single-Molar Sites Immediately Restored with Wide-Diameter Implants: A 1-Year Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Antoun, Hadi; Cherfane, Pierre; Sojod, Bouchra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. To evaluate outcomes of wide-diameter (6 mm) implants immediately provisionalized with cement-retained single crowns in posterior molar sites. Materials and Methods. Forty-eight consecutive patients received a total of 53 moderately rough-surface, 6 mm diameter implants in healed sites. All implants were immediately provisionalized with a cement-retained provisional crown. Final prosthesis with cement-retained porcelain fused to metal crowns was delivered 3-6 months later. Patients were followed up for 1 year. Outcome measures were implant failures and success rate, complications, marginal bone levels, bone level changes, papilla index, bleeding on probing, and inflammation. Results. One patient was lost to follow-up. At one year, the implant survival and success rate were 98.1%. The mean marginal bone loss after 1 year was -0.17 ± 1.84 mm. Ideal papilla score was recorded at 83.8% of the sites. More than 95.6% of the sites showed no bleeding or inflammation. No procedure-related or device-related adverse events were reported. Conclusion. Wide-diameter (6 mm) implants can safely and successfully replace single posterior molars. Longer follow-up studies are necessary to evaluate the long-term success of these implants. PMID:27195008

  17. Trajectories of Depressive Symptomatology in Rural Memory Clinic Patients between Baseline Diagnosis and 1-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Kosteniuk, Julie G.; Morgan, Debra G.; O'Connell, Megan E.; Kirk, Andrew; Crossley, Margaret; Stewart, Norma J.; Karunanayake, Chandima P.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims To investigate the prevalence and trajectories of depressive symptomatology at 1-year follow-up, and the severity of depressive symptoms, by dementia diagnostic group, as well as to determine the predictors of depressive symptomatology at 1-year follow-up. Methods In rural and remote patients of an interdisciplinary memory clinic between 2004 and 2014, 144 patients diagnosed with no cognitive impairment (NCI), mild cognitive impairment, dementia due to Alzheimer's disease (AD), or non-AD dementia completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies of Depression Scale to assess depressive symptomatology at both time points. Results Among patients with data at both time points, persistence of depressive symptomatology at follow-up occurred in 22.2%, remission in 17.4%, incidence in 13.2%, and absence in 47.2%. The prevalence of depressive symptomatology at baseline and persistence at follow-up were significantly greater in the NCI group than in the other diagnostic groups, but there were no differences in severity. Depressive symptomatology at follow-up was independently associated with depressive symptomatology, lower independence in activities of daily living, and lower self-rating of memory at baseline, as well as with decreased independence in activities of daily living between time points. Conclusion Future studies should further examine short-term postdiagnostic trajectories in depressive symptomatology in multiple dementia diagnostic groups to inform prognoses and treatment decisions. PMID:27350776

  18. The Association of Serum Leptin with Mortality in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Tamara B.; Hsueh, Wen-Chi; Hue, Trisha; Leak, Tennille S.; Li, Rongling; Mehta, Mira; Vaisse, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Objective Elevated levels of serum leptin are associated with increased adiposity and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Both cytokines and body adiposity have been shown to predict cardiovascular events and mortality. The primary objective of the present study is to explore the associations between serum leptin and all-cause mortality and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) over a span of 10 years, controlling for body adiposity and proinflammatory cytokines. Methods The Health, Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC) study is a prospective cohort of 3,075 older adults aged 70 to 79 years. This analysis includes 2,919 men and women with complete serum leptin and vital status data. Data on all-cause mortality and incident cardiovascular events (including Coronary Heart Disease and Congestive Heart Failure) were collected over 10 years of follow-up (mean 8.4 years). Results Women with leptin in quartile 2 and 3 were at lower risk of all-cause mortality, and those with leptin in quartile 2 were at lower risk of mortality from CVD as compared to women with lowest leptin values when adjusted for age, race, site, years of education, alcohol use, smoking, and physical activity. When these associations were additionally adjusted for body fat, C-reactive protein and pro-inflammatory cytokines, women with leptin values in quartile 3 were at lower risk of all-cause mortality and women with leptin in quartile 2 and 3 were at lower risk of mortality from CVD than women with lowest leptin values. These associations were not significant among men after adjusting for body fat and cytokines. Conclusions The present study suggests that moderately elevated concentrations of serum leptin are independently associated with lower risk of all-cause mortality and CVD-related mortality among older women. Among men, serum leptin is not associated with reduced risk of all-cause and CVD mortality after controlling for body fat and cytokines. PMID:26473487

  19. Examining Road Traffic Mortality Status in China: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Schwebel, David C.; Li, Li; Hu, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    Background Data from the Chinese police service suggest substantial reductions in road traffic injuries since 2002, but critics have questioned the accuracy of those data, especially considering conflicting data reported by the health department. Methods To address the gap between police and health department data and to determine which may be more accurate, we conducted a simulation study based on the modified Smeed equation, which delineates a non-linear relation between road traffic mortality and the level of motorization in a country or region. Our goal was to simulate trends in road traffic mortality in China and compare performances in road traffic safety management between China and 13 other countries. Results Chinese police data indicate a peak in road traffic mortalities in 2002 and a significant and a gradual decrease in population-based road traffic mortality since 2002. Health department data show the road traffic mortality peaked in 2012. In addition, police data suggest China’s road traffic mortality peaked at a much lower motorization level (0.061 motor vehicles per person) in 2002, followed by a reduction in mortality to a level comparable to that of developed countries. Simulation results based on health department data suggest high road traffic mortality, with a mortality peak in 2012 at a moderate motorization level (0.174 motor vehicles per person). Comparisons to the other 13 countries suggest the health data from China may be more valid than the police data. Conclusion Our simulation data indicate China is still at a stage of high road traffic mortality, as suggested by health data, rather than a stage of low road traffic mortality, as suggested by police data. More efforts are needed to integrate safety into road design, improve road traffic management, improve data quality, and alter unsafe behaviors of pedestrians, drivers and passengers in China. PMID:27071008

  20. The Association of Geographic Coordinates with Mortality in People with Lower and Higher Education and with Mortality Inequalities in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Regidor, Enrique; Reques, Laura; Giráldez-García, Carolina; Miqueleiz, Estrella; Santos, Juana M.; Martínez, David; de la Fuente, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Objective Geographic patterns in total mortality and in mortality by cause of death are widely known to exist in many countries. However, the geographic pattern of inequalities in mortality within these countries is unknown. This study shows mathematically and graphically the geographic pattern of mortality inequalities by education in Spain. Methods Data are from a nation-wide prospective study covering all persons living in Spain's 50 provinces in 2001. Individuals were classified in a cohort of subjects with low education and in another cohort of subjects with high education. Age- and sex-adjusted mortality rate from all causes and from leading causes of death in each cohort and mortality rate ratios in the low versus high education cohort were estimated by geographic coordinates and province. Results Latitude but not longitude was related to mortality. In subjects with low education, latitude had a U-shaped relation to mortality. In those with high education, mortality from all causes, and from cardiovascular, respiratory and digestive diseases decreased with increasing latitude, whereas cancer mortality increased. The mortality-rate ratio for all-cause death was 1.27 in the southern latitudes, 1.14 in the intermediate latitudes, and 1.20 in the northern latitudes. The mortality rate ratios for the leading causes of death were also higher in the lower and upper latitudes than in the intermediate latitudes. The geographic pattern of the mortality rate ratios is similar to that of the mortality rate in the low-education cohort: the highest magnitude is observed in the southern provinces, intermediate magnitudes in the provinces of the north and those of the Mediterranean east coast, and the lowest magnitude in the central provinces and those in the south of the Western Pyrenees. Conclusion Mortality inequalities by education in Spain are higher in the south and north of the country and lower in the large region making up the central plateau. This geographic

  1. The Impact of Profitability of Hospital Admissions on Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Lindrooth, Richard C; Konetzka, R Tamara; Navathe, Amol S; Zhu, Jingsan; Chen, Wei; Volpp, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Background Fiscal constraints faced by Medicare are leading to policies designed to reduce expenditures. Evidence of the effect of reduced reimbursement on the mortality of Medicare patients discharged from all major hospital service lines is limited. Methods We modeled risk-adjusted 30-day mortality of patients discharged from 21 hospital service lines as a function of service line profitability, service line time trends, and hospital service line and year-fixed effects. We simulated the effect of alternative revenue-neutral reimbursement policies on mortality. Our sample included all Medicare discharges from PPS-eligible hospitals (1997, 2001, and 2005). Results The results reveal a statistically significant inverse relationship between changes in profitability and mortality. A $0.19 average reduction in profit per $1.00 of costs led to a 0.010–0.020 percentage-point increase in mortality rates (p < .001). Mortality in newly unprofitable service lines is significantly more sensitive to reduced payment generosity than in service lines that remain profitable. Policy simulations that target service line inequities in payment generosity result in lower mortality rates, roughly 700–13,000 fewer deaths nationally. Conclusions The policy simulations raise questions about the trade-offs implicit in universal reductions in reimbursement. The effect of reduced payment generosity on mortality could be mitigated by targeting highly profitable services only for lower reimbursement. PMID:23346946

  2. Candidate Gene Analysis of Mortality in Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Verschuren, Jeffrey J. W.; Dekker, Friedo W.; Rabelink, Ton J.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Rotmans, Joris I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dialysis patients have high cardiovascular mortality risk. This study aimed to investigate the association between SNPs of genes involved in vascular processes and mortality in dialysis patients. Methods Forty two SNPs in 25 genes involved in endothelial function, vascular remodeling, cell proliferation, inflammation, coagulation and calcium/phosphate metabolism were genotyped in 1330 incident dialysis patients. The effect of SNPs on 5-years cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular mortality was investigated. Results The mortality rate was 114/1000 person-years and 49.4% of total mortality was cardiovascular. After correction for multiple testing, VEGF rs699947 was associated with all-cause mortality (HR1.48, 95% CI 1.14–1.92). The other SNPs were not associated with mortality. Conclusions This study provides further evidence that a SNP in the VEGF gene may contribute to the comorbid conditions of dialysis patients. Future studies should unravel the underlying mechanisms responsible for the increase in mortality in these patients. PMID:26587841

  3. Educational inequalities in tuberculosis mortality in sixteen European populations

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez, J. L.; Kunst, A. E.; Leinsalu, M.; Bopp, M.; Strand, B. H.; Menvielle, Gwenn; Lundberg, O.; Martikainen, P.; Deboosere, P.; Kalediene, R.; Artnik, B.; Mackenbach, J. P.; Richardus, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective We aim to describe the magnitude of socioeconomic inequalities in tuberculosis (TB) mortality by level of education in male, female, urban, and rural populations in several European countries. Design Data were obtained from the Eurothine project covering 16 populations between 1990 and 2003. Age- and sex-standardized mortality rates, the Relative Index of Inequality, and the slope index of inequality were used to assess educational inequalities. Results The number of TB deaths reported was 8530, with a death rate of 3 per 100 000 per year, of which 73% were males. Educational inequalities in TB mortality were present in all European populations. Inequalities in TB mortality were larger than in total mortality. Relative and absolute inequalities were large in Eastern Europe, and Baltic countries but relatively small in Southern countries and in Norway, Finland, and Sweden. Mortality inequalities were observed among both men and women, and in both rural and urban populations. Conclusions Socioeconomic inequalities in TB mortality exist in all European countries. Firm political commitment is required to reduce inequalities in the social determinants of TB incidence. Targeted public health measures are called for to improve vulnerable groups’ access to treatment and thereby reduce TB mortality. PMID:22008757

  4. Influence of hematoma location on acute mortality after intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Yong; King, Caroline; Stradling, Dana; Warren, Michael; Nguyen, Dennis; Lee, Johnny; Riola, Mark A.; Montoya, Ricardo; Patel, Dipika; Le, Vu H.; Welbourne, Susan J.; Cramer, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose The current study aimed to identify predictors of acute mortality after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), including voxel-wise analysis of hematoma location. Methods In 282 consecutive patients with acute ICH, clinical and radiological predictors of acute mortality were identified. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping examined spatial correlates of acute mortality, contrasting results in basal ganglia ICH and lobar ICH. Results Acute mortality was 47.9%. In bivariate analyses, one clinical (serum glucose) and two radiological (hematoma volume and intraventricular extension) measures significantly predicted mortality. The relationship was strongest for hematoma volume. Multivariable modeling identified four significant predictors of mortality (ICH volume, intraventricular extension, serum glucose, and serum hemoglobin), although this model only minimally improved the predictive value provided by ICH volume alone. Voxel-wise analysis found that for patients with lobar ICH, brain regions where acute hematoma was significantly associated with higher acute mortality included inferior parietal lobule and posterior insula; for patients with basal ganglia ICH, a large region extending from cortex to brainstem. Conclusions For patients with lobar ICH, acute mortality is related to both hematoma size and location, with findings potentially useful for therapeutic decision-making. The current findings also underscore differences between the syndromes of acute deep and lobar ICH. PMID:23279617

  5. Low infant mortality among Palestine refugees despite the odds

    PubMed Central

    Khader, Ali; Sabatinelli, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To present data from a 2008 infant mortality survey conducted in Jordan, Lebanon, the Syrian Arab Republic, the Gaza Strip and the West Bank and analyse infant mortality trends among Palestine refugees in 1995–2005. Methods Following the preceding birth technique, mothers who were registering a new birth were asked if the preceding child was alive or dead, the day the child was born and the date of birth of the neonate whose birth was being registered. From this information, neonatal, infant and early child mortality rates were estimated. The age at death for early child mortality was determined by the mean interval between successive births and the mean age of neonates at registration. Findings In 2005–2006, infant mortality among Palestine refugees ranged from 28 deaths per 100 000 live births in the Syrian Arab Republic to 19 in Lebanon. Thus, infant mortality in Palestine refugees is among the lowest in the Near East. However, infant mortality has stopped decreasing in recent years, although it remains at a level compatible with the attainment of Millennium Development Goal 4. Conclusion Largely owing to the primary health care provided by the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) for Palestine Refugees in the Near East and other entities, infant mortality among Palestine refugees had consistently decreased. However, it is no longer dropping. Measures to address the most likely reasons – early marriage and childbearing, poor socioeconomic conditions and limited access to good perinatal care – are needed. PMID:21479095

  6. Spatial Analysis of China Province-level Perinatal Mortality

    PubMed Central

    XIANG, Kun; SONG, Deyong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Using spatial analysis tools to determine the spatial patterns of China province-level perinatal mortality and using spatial econometric model to examine the impacts of health care resources and different socio-economic factors on perinatal mortality. Methods: The Global Moran’s I index is used to examine whether the spatial autocorrelation exists in selected regions and Moran’s I scatter plot to examine the spatial clustering among regions. Spatial econometric models are used to investigate the spatial relationships between perinatal mortality and contributing factors. Results: The overall Moran’s I index indicates that perinatal mortality displays positive spatial autocorrelation. Moran’s I scatter plot analysis implies that there is a significant clustering of mortality in both high-rate regions and low-rate regions. The spatial econometric models analyses confirm the existence of a direct link between perinatal mortality and health care resources, socio-economic factors. Conclusions: Since a positive spatial autocorrelation has been detected in China province-level perinatal mortality, the upgrading of regional economic development and medical service level will affect the mortality not only in region itself but also its adjacent regions. PMID:27398334

  7. Standardized Thyroid Cancer Mortality in Korea between 1985 and 2010

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun Mi; Jang, Eun Kyung; Kwon, Hyemi; Jeon, Min Ji; Kim, Won Gu; Shong, Young Kee; Kim, Won Bae

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of thyroid cancer has increased very rapidly in Korea. However, there is no published report focusing on thyroid cancer mortality in Korea. In this study, we aimed to evaluate standardized thyroid cancer mortality using data from Statistics Korea (the Statistical Office of Korea). Methods Population and mortality data from 1985 to 2010 were obtained from Statistics Korea. Age-standardized rates of thyroid cancer mortality were calculated according to the standard population of Korea, as well as World Health Organization (WHO) standard population and International Cancer Survival Standard (ICSS) population weights. Results The crude thyroid cancer mortality rate increased from 0.1 to 0.7 per 100,000 between 1985 and 2010. The pattern was the same for both sexes. The age-standardized mortality rate (ASMR) for thyroid cancer for Korean resident registration population increased from 0.19 to 0.67 between 1985 and 2000. However, it decreased slightly, from 0.67 to 0.55, between 2000 and 2010. When mortality was adjusted using the WHO standard population and ICSS population weights, the ASMR similarly increased until 2000, and then decreased between 2000 and 2010. Conclusion Thyroid cancer mortality increased until 2000 in Korea. It started to decrease from 2000. PMID:25559576

  8. Cancer Incidence and Mortality in China, 2007

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hong-mei; Zheng, Rong-shou; Zhang, Si-wei; He, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Objective Cancer incidence and mortality data collected from population-based cancer registries were analyzed to present the overall cancer statistics in Chinese registration areas by age, sex and geographic area in 2007. Methods In 2010, 48 cancer registries reported cancer incidence and mortality data of 2007 to National Central Cancer Registry of China. Of them, 38 registries’ data met the national criteria. Incidence and mortality were calculated by cancer sites, age, gender, and area. Age-standardized rates were described by China and World population. Results The crude incidence rate for all cancers was 276.16/100,000 (305.22/100,000 for male and 246.46/100,000 for female; 284.71/100,000 in urban and 251.07/100,000 in rural). Age-standardized incidence rates by China and World population were 145.39/100,000 and 189.46/100,000 respectively. The crude mortality rate for all cancers was 177.09/100,000 (219.15/100,000 for male and 134.10/100,000 for female; 173.55/100,000 in urban and 187.49/100,000 in rural). Age-standardized mortality rates by China and World population were 86.06/100,000 and 116.46/100,000, respectively. The top 10 most frequently common cancer sites were the lung, stomach, colon and rectum, liver, breast, esophagus, pancreas, bladder, brain and lymphoma, accounting for 76.12% of the total cancer cases. The top 10 causes of cancer death were cancers of the lung, liver, stomach, esophagus, colon and rectum, pancreas, breast, leukemia, brain and lymphoma, accounting for 84.37% of the total cancer deaths. Conclusion Cancer remains a major disease threatening people’s health in China. Prevention and control should be enhanced, especially for the main cancers. PMID:23359628

  9. Mortality and cancer morbidity among cement workers.

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsson, K; Horstmann, V; Welinder, H

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To explore associations between exposure to cement dust and cause specific mortality and tumour morbidity, especially gastrointestinal tumours. DESIGN--A retrospective cohort study. SUBJECTS AND SETTING--2400 men, employed for at least 12 months in two Swedish cement factories. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Cause specific morality from death certificates (1952-86). Cancer morbidity from tumour registry information (1958-86). Standardised mortality rates (SMRs; national reference rates) and standardised morbidity incidence rates (SIRs; regional reference rates) were calculated. RESULTS--An increased risk of colorectal cancer was found > or = 15 years since the start of employment (SIR 1.6, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.1-2.3), mainly due to an increased risk for tumours in the right part of the colon (SIR 2.7, 95% CI 1.4-4.8), but not in the left part (SIR 1.0, 95% CI 0.3-2.5). There was a numerical increase of rectal cancer (SIR 1.5, 95% CI 0.8-2.5). Exposure (duration of blue collar employment)-response relations were found for right sided colon cancer. After > or = 25 years of cement work, the risk was fourfold (SIR 4.3, 95% CI 1.7-8.9). There was no excess of stomach cancer or respiratory cancer. Neither total mortality nor cause specific mortality were significantly increased. CONCLUSIONS--Diverging risk patterns for tumours with different localisations within the large bowel were found in the morbidity study. Long term exposure to cement dust was a risk factor for right sided colon cancer. The mortality study did not show this risk. PMID:8457494

  10. Mortality among Former Love Canal Residents

    PubMed Central

    Gensburg, Lenore J.; Pantea, Cristian; Fitzgerald, Edward; Stark, Alice; Hwang, Syni-An; Kim, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Background The Love Canal is a rectangular 16-acre, 10-ft deep chemical waste landfill situated in a residential neighborhood in Niagara Falls, New York. This seriously contaminated site first came to public attention in 1978. No studies have examined mortality in the former residents of the Love Canal neighborhood (LC). Objective The aim of this study was to describe the mortality experience of the former LC residents from the years 1979–1996. Methods From 1978 to 1982, 6,181 former LC residents were interviewed. In 1996, 725 deaths from 1979–1996 were identified in this cohort, using state and national registries. We compared mortality rates with those of New York State (NYS) and Niagara County. Survival analysis examined risks by potential exposure to the landfill. Results We were unable to demonstrate differences in all-cause mortality for either comparison population for 1979 1996. Relative to NYS, the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was elevated [SMR = 1.39; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.16–1.66] for death from acute myocardial infarction (AMI), but not relative to Niagara County. Death from external causes of injury was also elevated relative to both NYS and Niagara County, especially among women (SMR = 1.95; 95% CI, 1.25 2.90). Conclusions The role of exposure to the landfill in explaining these excess risks is not clear given limitations such as multiple comparisons, a qualitative exposure assessment, an incomplete cohort, and no data on deaths prior to 1978. Lack of elevation for AMI when compared with Niagara County but not NYS suggests possible regional differences. However, direct cardiotoxic or neurotoxic effects from landfill chemicals or indirect effects mediated by psychological stress cannot be ruled out. Revisiting the cohort in the future could reveal patterns that are not yet apparent. PMID:19270790

  11. Impact of Renal Sympathetic Denervation on Left Ventricular Structure and Function at 1-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa Almeida, Manuel; de Araújo Gonçalves, Pedro; Branco, Patricia; Mesquita, João; Carvalho, Maria Salomé; Dores, Helder; Silva Sousa, Henrique; Gaspar, Augusta; Horta, Eduarda; Aleixo, Ana; Neuparth, Nuno; Mendes, Miguel; Andrade, Maria João

    2016-01-01

    Background Catheter-based sympathetic renal denervation (RDN) is a recent therapeutic option for patients with resistant hypertension. However, the impact of RDN in left ventricular (LV) mass and function is not completely established. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of RDN on LV structure and function (systolic and diastolic) in patients with resistant hypertension (HTN). Methods and Results From a single centre prospective registry including 65 consecutive patients with resistant HTN submitted to RDN between July-2011 and April-2015, 31 patients with baseline and 1-year follow-up echocardiogram were included in this analysis. Mean age was 65±7 years, 48% were males, 71% had type 2 diabetes. Most had hypertension lasting for more than 10 years (90%), and were being treated with a median number of 6 anti-hypertensive drugs, including 74% on spironolactone. At 1-year, there was a significant decrease both on office SBP (176±24 to 149±13mmHg, p<0.001) and DBP (90±14 to 79±11mmHg, p<0.001), and also in 24h ABPM SBP (150±20 to 132±14mmhg, p<0.001) and DBP (83±10 to 74±9mmHg, p<0.001). There was also a significant decrease in LV mass from 152±32 to 136±34g/m2 (p<0.001), an increase in LV end diastolic volume (93±18 to 111±27 mL, p = 0.004), an increase in LV ejection fraction (65±9 to 68±9%, p = 0.001) and mitral valve E deceleration time (225±49 to 247±51ms, p = 0.015) at 1-year follow up. There were no significant changes in left atrium volume index or in the distribution of patients among the different left ventricle geometric patterns and diastolic function subgroups. Conclusions In this single centre registry of patients with resistant hypertension, renal denervation was associated with significant reduction in both office and ABPM blood pressure and a significant decrease in left ventricle mass evaluated by transthoracic echocardiogram at 1 year follow-up. PMID:26934735

  12. Milk intake and risk of mortality and fractures in women and men: cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Wolk, Alicja; Langenskiöld, Sophie; Basu, Samar; Warensjö Lemming, Eva; Melhus, Håkan; Byberg, Liisa

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine whether high milk consumption is associated with mortality and fractures in women and men. Design Cohort studies. Setting Three counties in central Sweden. Participants Two large Swedish cohorts, one with 61 433 women (39-74 years at baseline 1987-90) and one with 45 339 men (45-79 years at baseline 1997), were administered food frequency questionnaires. The women responded to a second food frequency questionnaire in 1997. Main outcome measure Multivariable survival models were applied to determine the association between milk consumption and time to mortality or fracture. Results During a mean follow-up of 20.1 years, 15 541 women died and 17 252 had a fracture, of whom 4259 had a hip fracture. In the male cohort with a mean follow-up of 11.2 years, 10 112 men died and 5066 had a fracture, with 1166 hip fracture cases. In women the adjusted mortality hazard ratio for three or more glasses of milk a day compared with less than one glass a day was 1.93 (95% confidence interval 1.80 to 2.06). For every glass of milk, the adjusted hazard ratio of all cause mortality was 1.15 (1.13 to 1.17) in women and 1.03 (1.01 to 1.04) in men. For every glass of milk in women no reduction was observed in fracture risk with higher milk consumption for any fracture (1.02, 1.00 to 1.04) or for hip fracture (1.09, 1.05 to 1.13). The corresponding adjusted hazard ratios in men were 1.01 (0.99 to 1.03) and 1.03 (0.99 to 1.07). In subsamples of two additional cohorts, one in males and one in females, a positive association was seen between milk intake and both urine 8-iso-PGF2α (a biomarker of oxidative stress) and serum interleukin 6 (a main inflammatory biomarker). Conclusions High milk intake was associated with higher mortality in one cohort of women and in another cohort of men, and with higher fracture incidence in women. Given the observational study designs with the inherent possibility of residual confounding and reverse causation phenomena, a

  13. Association between Postoperatively Developed Atrial Fibrillation and Long-Term Mortality after Esophagectomy in Esophageal Cancer Patients: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Ji-Hyun; Moon, Young-Jin; Jo, Jun-Young; Han, Yun A.; Kim, Hyeong Ryul; Choi, In-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Background Newly developed atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients who have undergone an esophagectomy increases the incidence of postoperative complications. However, the clinical implications of AF have not been fully elucidated in these patients. This retrospective observational study investigated the predictors for AF and the effect of AF on the mortality in esophageal cancer patients undergoing esophagectomy. Methods This study evaluated 583 patients undergoing esophagectomy, from January 2005 to April 2012. AF was defined as newly developed postoperative AF requiring treatment. The risk factors for AF and the association between AF and mortality were evaluated. The long-term mortality was the all-cause mortality, for which the cutoff date was May 31, 2014. Results AF developed in 63 patients (10.8%). Advanced age (odds ratio [OR] 1.099, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.056–1.144, P < 0.001), preoperative calcium channel blocker (CCB) (OR 2.339, 95% CI 1.143–4.786, P = 0.020), and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) (OR 0.206, 95% CI 0.067–0.635, P = 0.006) were associated with the incidence of AF. The Kaplan-Meier curve showed a significantly lower survival rate in the AF group compared to the non-AF group (P = 0.045), during a median follow-up of 50.7 months. The multivariable analysis revealed associations between AF and the 1-year mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 2.556, 95% CI 1.430–4.570, P = 0.002) and between AF and the long-term mortality (HR 1.507, 95% CI 1.003–2.266, P = 0.049). Conclusions In esophageal cancer patients, the advanced age and the preoperative medications (CCB, ACEI or ARB) were associated with the incidence of AF. Furthermore, postoperatively developed AF was associated with mortality in esophageal cancer patients after esophagectomy, suggesting that a close surveillance might be required in patients who showed AF during postoperative period. PMID:27148877

  14. 1-year retention rates and performance ratings: comparing associate degree, baccalaureate, and accelerated baccalaureate degree nurses.

    PubMed

    Weathers, Suzanne M; Raleigh, Edith D Hunt

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine 1-year retention and managerial performance ratings of newly licensed RNs (NLRNs) according to nursing education program types (associate degree, traditional baccalaureate, and accelerated 2nd degree baccalaureate). Findings revealed retention and performance differences, suggesting the possibility of tradeoffs related to educational program type when selecting NLRNs for open positions. PMID:23958525

  15. Randomized Trial of a Gatekeeper Program for Suicide Prevention: 1-Year Impact on Secondary School Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyman, Peter A.; Brown, C. Hendricks; Inman, Jeff; Cross, Wendi; Schmeelk-Cone, Karen; Guo, Jing; Pena, Juan B.

    2008-01-01

    Gatekeeper-training programs, designed to increase identification and referral of suicidal individuals, are widespread but largely untested. A group-based randomized trial with 32 schools examined impact of Question, Persuade, Refer (QPR) training on a stratified random sample of 249 staff with 1-year average follow-up. To test QPR impact, the…

  16. Thai Adolescent Survivors 1 Year after the 2004 Tsunami: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuicomepee, Arunya; Romano, John L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the impact of the 2004 Asian tsunami on 400 Thai adolescents 1 year after the disaster. Quantitative analyses showed that youth behavior problems were positively associated with tsunami experiences and negatively associated with positive family functioning. Tsunami exposure, school connectedness, religious beliefs and…

  17. The Stability and Structure of Career Decision-Making Profiles: A 1-Year Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gati, Itamar; Levin, Nimrod

    2012-01-01

    The Career Decision-Making Profile (CDMP) questionnaire is a multidimensional measure of the way individuals make career decisions, developed as an alternative to the single, most-dominant trait approach. Using a sample of freshmen students, the 2-week reliability (N = 273) and 1-year stability (N = 182) of the CDMP was tested for each of the 12…

  18. A Program To Promote Positive Body Image: A 1-Year Follow-Up Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McVey, Gail L.; Davis, Ron

    2002-01-01

    Evaluated the effectiveness of a program designed to promote body image satisfaction and prevent eating problems in young adolescent girls over a 1-year period. Found no program effect. Found instead, significant increases in body image satisfaction and decreases in eating problem scores over time for participants in both the prevention and…

  19. An Analysis of 1-Year Impacts of Youth Transition Demonstration Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraker, Thomas M.; Luecking, Richard G.; Mamun, Arif A.; Martinez, John M.; Reed, Deborah S.; Wittenburg, David C.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the impacts of the Youth Transition Demonstration, an initiative of the Social Security Administration (SSA) to improve employment outcomes for youth with disabilities. Based on a random assignment design, the analysis uses data from a 1-year follow-up survey and SSA administrative records for 5,203 youth in six research…

  20. Participation as a leader in immersion weight loss treatment: a 1-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Anderson, L M; Schaumberg, K; Anderson, D A; Kirschenbaum, D S

    2016-02-01

    Non-overweight individuals may follow aggressive weight management approaches alongside overweight/obese friends or family members; thus, research has begun to evaluate subsequent effects among non-overweight populations. A prior study evaluated the short-term effects of an immersion weight loss programme on healthy young adult staff leaders. Results indicated that participation seemed to benefit, not harm, the young adults. The current investigation examined 1-year eating disorder and weight trajectories in this sample. The total sample (N = 244) consisted of staff leaders (44.3%) and demographically similar comparison participants who completed eating disorder and weight assessments across four time points: baseline, end of summer, 6-week follow-up and 1-year follow-up. Forty-seven per cent of the original sample responded to all time points (staff leaders n = 60; comparison n = 55). Over the course of 1 year, risk trajectories did not differ between groups. Staff leaders did not report significant changes in body mass index, suggesting that they maintained healthy weight over the course of 1 year. Participation as an immersion weight loss programme leader appeared to be protective against weight gain, without increasing eating disorder risk, for healthy young adults. This provides further support for using weight management interventions across a wide range of individuals. PMID:26638779

  1. A rare case of peripheral T-cell lymphoma in 1-year-old child

    PubMed Central

    Kandakumar, Vignesh; Ganesan, Prasanth; Bajpai, Peush; Rajendranath, Rejiv; Tenali, Sagar; Majhi, Urmila; Sivaprakasam, Ponni

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) represents approximately 12% of lymphoid neoplasms. They are even rarer in children and represent only 1% of Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in this age group. We report a case of PTCL in a 1-year-old female child for its rarity. PMID:22563159

  2. Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder: A 1-Year Open Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Tina R.; Axelson, David A.; Birmaher, Boris; Brent, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To describe an adapted version of dialectical behavior therapy for adolescents with bipolar disorder. Method: The dialectical behavior therapy intervention is delivered over 1 year and consists of two modalities: family skills training (conducted with individual family units) and individual therapy. The acute treatment period (6 months)…

  3. Levels of Phonological Awareness in Korean and English: A 1-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Jeung-Ryeul; McBride-Chang, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined associations of levels of phonological awareness to word recognition in Korean and English in a 1-year longitudinal study of 91 children from Masan, Korea. With performances on tasks of speeded naming, vocabulary, and Korean Hangul in 2nd grade statistically controlled, only Korean syllable deletion predicted unique…

  4. Verbal Labels Modulate Perceptual Object Processing in 1-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gliga, Teodora; Volein, Agnes; Csibra, Gergely

    2010-01-01

    Whether verbal labels help infants visually process and categorize objects is a contentious issue. Using electroencephalography, we investigated whether possessing familiar or novel labels for objects directly enhances 1-year-old children's neural processes underlying the perception of those objects. We found enhanced gamma-band (20-60 Hz)…

  5. Latent Classes of Adolescent Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Predict Functioning and Disorder after 1 Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayer, Lynsay; Danielson, Carla Kmett; Amstadter, Ananda B.; Ruggiero, Ken; Saunders, Ben; Kilpatrick, Dean

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To identify latent classes of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in a national sample of adolescents, and to test their associations with PTSD and functional impairment 1 year later. Method: A total of 1,119 trauma-exposed youth aged 12 through 17 years (mean = 14.99 years, 51% female and 49% male) participating in the…

  6. Monitoring Child Mortality through Community Health Worker Reporting of Births and Deaths in Malawi: Validation against a Household Mortality Survey

    PubMed Central

    Amouzou, Agbessi; Banda, Benjamin; Kachaka, Willie; Joos, Olga; Kanyuka, Mercy; Hill, Kenneth; Bryce, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Background The rate of decline in child mortality is too slow in most African countries to achieve the Millennium Development Goal of reducing under-five mortality by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015. Effective strategies to monitor child mortality are needed where accurate vital registration data are lacking to help governments assess and report on progress in child survival. We present results from a test of a mortality monitoring approach based on recording of births and deaths by specially trained community health workers (CHWs) in Malawi. Methods and Findings Government-employed community health workers in Malawi are responsible for maintaining a Village Health Register, in which they record births and deaths that occur in their catchment area. We expanded on this system to provide additional training, supervision and incentives. We tested the equivalence between child mortality rates obtained from data on births and deaths collected by 160 randomly-selected and trained CHWs over twenty months in two districts to those computed through a standard household mortality survey. CHW reports produced an under-five mortality rate that was 84% (95%CI: [0.71,1.00]) of the household survey mortality rate and statistically equivalent to it. However, CHW data consistently underestimated under-five mortality, with levels of under-estimation increasing over time. Under-five deaths were more likely to be missed than births. Neonatal and infant deaths were more likely to be missed than older deaths. Conclusion This first test of the accuracy and completeness of vital events data reported by CHWs in Malawi as a strategy for monitoring child mortality shows promising results but underestimated child mortality and was not stable over the four periods assessed. Given the Malawi government's commitment to strengthen its vital registration system, we are working with the Ministry of Health to implement a revised version of the approach that provides increased support to CHWs. PMID

  7. Risk of Recurrent Helicobacter pylori Infection 1 Year After Initial Eradication Therapy in 7 Latin American Communities

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Douglas R.; Torres, Javier; Sexton, Rachael; Herrero, Rolando; Salazar-Martínez, Eduardo; Robert Greenberg, E.; Bravo, Luis Eduardo; Dominguez, Ricardo L.; Ferreccio, Catterina; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo C.; Meza-Montenegro, Maria Mercedes; Peña, Edgar M.; Peña, Rodolfo; Correa, Pelayo; Martínez, María Elena; Chey, William D.; Valdivieso, Manuel; Anderson, Garnet L.; Goodman, Gary E.; Crowley, John J.; Baker, Laurence H.

    2013-01-01

    single-treatment course analysis that ignored the effects of re-treatment, the percentage of UBT-negative results at 1 year was 72.4% (95% CI, 69.9%–74.8%) and was significantly associated with study site (P<.001), adherence to initial therapy (AOR, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.15–0.42; P<.001), male sex (AOR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.25–2.13; P<.001), and age (AOR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.02–1.27 per decade; P=.02). One-year effectiveness among all 1463 enrolled participants, considering all missing UBT results as positive, was 72.7% (95% CI, 70.3%–74.9%). Conclusions and Relevance One year after treatment for H pylori infection, recurrence occurred in 11.5% of participants who had negative posttreatment UBT results. Recurrence determinants (ie, nonadherence and demographics) may be as important as specific antibiotic regimen in determining the long-term success of H pylori eradication interventions. Study findings are relevant to the feasibility of programs for the primary prevention of gastric cancer in high-incidence regions of Latin America. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01061437 PMID:23403682

  8. U.S. MORTALITY DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    U.S. Mortality data, collected and maintained by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), can be analyzed with the SEER*Stat software. The data covers all causes of death, not just cancer deaths. NCHS granted the SEER program limited permission to provide the mortality d...

  9. NATIONAL MORTALITY FOLLOWBACK SURVEY (NMFS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1993 National Mortality Followback Survey (NMFS) is the latest in a series of periodic surveys designed to supplement information routinely collected on the death certificate. The Mortality Followback Survey Program, begun in the 1960's by the National Center for Health Stati...

  10. Mortality rates decline in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    1991-11-01

    Experiencing remarkable decreases in mortality rates over the past 3 decades, Malaysia currently has one of the lowest mortality rates among developing countries, a rate that compares favorably with those of developed countries. Between 1957 and 1989, the crude death rate dropped from 12.4/1000 population to 4.6. Over the same period, Malaysia recorded even greater decreases in the infant mortality rate, from 75.5/1000 births to 15.2. The Maternal mortality rate also declined from 1.48 in 1970 to 0.24 in 1988. The data indicates that mortality rates vary from state to state, and that rural areas have a higher mortality than urban areas. According to a study by the National Population and Family Development Board, the use of maternal and child health services has played an important role in reducing neonatal, perinatal, infant, child, and maternal mortality rates. Nearly all women in Malaysia receive antenatal services. While the country has achieved great gains on mortality rates, programs focusing on specific age and socioeconomic groups could lead to even greater reductions. The Minister for National Unity and Social Development, Dato Napsiah Omar, has called for the development of programs designed to improve the population's quality of life. PMID:12284509

  11. Subclinical Rejection Phenotypes at 1 Year Post-Transplant and Outcome of Kidney Allografts.

    PubMed

    Loupy, Alexandre; Vernerey, Dewi; Tinel, Claire; Aubert, Olivier; Duong van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Rabant, Marion; Verine, Jérôme; Nochy, Dominique; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Martinez, Frank; Glotz, Denis; Jouven, Xavier; Legendre, Christophe; Lefaucheur, Carmen

    2015-07-01

    Kidney allograft rejection can occur in clinically stable patients, but long-term significance is unknown. We determined whether early recognition of subclinical rejection has long-term consequences for kidney allograft survival in an observational prospective cohort study of 1307 consecutive nonselected patients who underwent ABO-compatible, complement-dependent cytotoxicity-negative crossmatch kidney transplantation in Paris (2000-2010). Participants underwent prospective screening biopsies at 1 year post-transplant, with concurrent evaluations of graft complement deposition and circulating anti-HLA antibodies. The main analysis included 1001 patients. Three distinct groups of patients were identified at the 1-year screening: 727 (73%) patients without rejection, 132 (13%) patients with subclinical T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR), and 142 (14%) patients with subclinical antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). Patients with subclinical ABMR had the poorest graft survival at 8 years post-transplant (56%) compared with subclinical TCMR (88%) and nonrejection (90%) groups (P<0.001). In a multivariate Cox model, subclinical ABMR at 1 year was independently associated with a 3.5-fold increase in graft loss (95% confidence interval, 2.1 to 5.7) along with eGFR and proteinuria (P<0.001). Subclinical ABMR was associated with more rapid progression to transplant glomerulopathy. Of patients with subclinical TCMR at 1 year, only those who further developed de novo donor-specific antibodies and transplant glomerulopathy showed higher risk of graft loss compared with patients without rejection. Our findings suggest that subclinical TCMR and subclinical ABMR have distinct effects on long-term graft loss. Subclinical ABMR detected at the 1-year screening biopsy carries a prognostic value independent of initial donor-specific antibody status, previous immunologic events, current eGFR, and proteinuria. PMID:25556173

  12. Mortality Risk Prediction by Application of Pediatric Risk of Mortality Scoring System in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Khajeh, Ali; Noori, Noor Mohammad; Reisi, Mohsen; Fayyazi, Afshin; Mohammadi, Mahdi; Miri-Aliabad, Ghasem

    2013-01-01

    Objective The Pediatric Risk of Mortality (PRISM) score is one of the scores used by many pediatricians for prediction of the mortality risk in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Herein, we intend to evaluate the efficacy of PRISM score in prediction of mortality rate in PICU. Methods In this cohort study, 221 children admitted during an 18-month period to PICU, were enrolled. PRISM score and mortality risk were calculated. Follow up was noted as death or discharge. Results were analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curve, ROC curve, Log Rank (Mantel-Cox), Logistic regression model using SPSS 15. Findings Totally, 57% of the patients were males. Forty seven patients died during the study period. The PRISM score was 0-10 in 71%, 11-20 in 20.4% and 21-30 in 8.6%. PRISM score showed an increase of mortality from 10.2% in 0-10 score patients to 73.8% in 21-30 score ones. The survival time significantly decreased as PRISM score increased (P≤0.001). A 7.2 fold mortality risk was present in patients with score 21-30 compared with score 0-10. ROC curve analysis for mortality according to PRISM score showed an under curve area of 80.3%. Conclusion PRISM score is a good predictor for evaluation of mortality risk in PICU. PMID:24800015

  13. Predicting mortality from burns: the need for age-group specific models.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Sandra L; Lawless, MaryBeth; Curri, Terese; Sen, Soman; Greenhalgh, David G; Palmieri, Tina L

    2014-09-01

    Traditional burn mortality models are derived using all age groups. We hypothesized that age variably impacts mortality after burn and that age-specific models for children, adults, and seniors will more accurately predict mortality than an all-ages model. We audited data from the American Burn Association (ABA) National Burn Repository (NBR) from 2000 to 2009 and used mixed effect logistic regression models to assess the influence of age, total body surface area (TBSA) burn, and inhalation injury on mortality. Mortality models were constructed for all ages and age-specific models: children (<18 years), adults (18-60 years), and seniors (>60 years). Model performance was assessed by area under the receiver operating curve (AUC). Main effect and two-way interactions were used to construct age-group specific mortality models. Each age-specific model was compared to the All Ages model. Of 286,293 records 100,051 had complete data. Overall mortality was 4% but varied by age (17% seniors, <1% children). Age, TBSA, and inhalation injury were significant mortality predictors for all models (p<0.05). Differences in predicted mortality between the All Ages model and the age-specific models occurred in children and seniors. In the age-specific pediatric model, predicted mortality decreased with age; inhalation injury had greater effect on mortality than in the All Ages model. In the senior model mortality increased with age. Seniors had greater increase in mortality per 1% increment in burn size and 1 year increase in age than other ages. The predicted mortality in seniors using the senior-specific model was higher than in the All Ages model. "One size fits all" models for predicting burn outcomes do not accurately reflect the outcomes for seniors and children. Age-specific models for children and seniors may be advisable. PMID:24846014

  14. Intrinsic and extrinsic mortality reunited.

    PubMed

    Koopman, Jacob J E; Wensink, Maarten J; Rozing, Maarten P; van Bodegom, David; Westendorp, Rudi G J

    2015-07-01

    Intrinsic and extrinsic mortality are often separated in order to understand and measure aging. Intrinsic mortality is assumed to be a result of aging and to increase over age, whereas extrinsic mortality is assumed to be a result of environmental hazards and be constant over age. However, allegedly intrinsic and extrinsic mortality have an exponentially increasing age pattern in common. Theories of aging assert that a combination of intrinsic and extrinsic stressors underlies the increasing risk of death. Epidemiological and biological data support that the control of intrinsic as well as extrinsic stressors can alleviate the aging process. We argue that aging and death can be better explained by the interaction of intrinsic and extrinsic stressors than by classifying mortality itself as being either intrinsic or extrinsic. Recognition of the tight interaction between intrinsic and extrinsic stressors in the causation of aging leads to the recognition that aging is not inevitable, but malleable through the environment. PMID:25916736

  15. Roles of the Taql and Bsml vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms in hospital mortality of burn patients

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Glaucia R.; Azevedo, Paula S.; Polegato, Bertha F.; Zornoff, Leonardo A.M.; Paiva, Sergio A.R.; Nogueira, Celia R.; Araujo, Natalia C.; Carmona, Bruno H.M.; Conde, Sandro J.; Minicucci, Marcos F.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the roles of the Taql and Bsml vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms in hospital mortality of burn patients. METHODS: In total, 105 consecutive burn injury patients over 18 years in age who were admitted to the Burn Unit of Bauru State Hospital from January to December 2013 were prospectively evaluated. Upon admission, patient demographic information was recorded and a blood sample was taken for biochemical analysis to identify the presence of the Taql(rs731236) and Bsml(rs1544410) polymorphisms. All of the patients were followed over their hospital stay and mortality was recorded. RESULTS: Eighteen of the patients did not sign the informed consent form, and there were technical problems with genotype analysis for 7 of the patients. Thus, 80 patients (mean age, 42.5±16.1 years) were included in the final analysis. In total, 60% of the patients were male, and 16.3% died during the hospital stay. The genotype frequencies for the Taql polymorphism were 51.25% TT, 41.25% TC and 7.50% CC; for the Bsml polymorphism, they were 51.25% GG, 42.50% GA and 6.25% AA. In logistic regression analysis, after adjustments for age, gender and total body surface burn area, there were no associations between the Taql (OR: 1.575; CI95%: 0.148-16.745; p=0.706) or Bsml (OR: 1.309; CI95%: 0.128-13.430; p=0.821) polymorphisms and mortality for the burn patients. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the Taql and Bsml vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms are not associated with hospital mortality of burn patients.

  16. Management and Housing Factors Associated with Piglet Preweaning Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Friendship, Robert M.; Wilson, Michael R.; McMillan, Ian

    1986-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to establish piglet preweaning mortality rates on representative Ontario pig farms and to examine possible relationships between preweaning mortality and various management and environmental factors. Thirty randomly sampled farrow-to-finish herds were surveyed over a two year period. Mean preweaning mortality in liveborn pigs of 18.5±5.8 and 18.7±5.4 was recorded in the first and second years of the survey, respectively. Preweaning mortality was correlated positively with still-birth rate (r1=0.31, p1<0.1 (Year 1), and (r2=0.37, p2<0.05 (Year 2)) and with weaner pig mortality in the second year (r2=0.37, p2<0.05). Preweaning mortality was negatively correlated with herd size (r1=−0.30, p1<0.1 and (r2=−0.31, p2<0.1), crate utilization (r1=−0.52, p1<0.01 and (r2=−0.53, p2<0.01), and positively correlated with the number of farrowing crates per room (r1 and r2=0.52, p<0.05). There was no relationship observed between preweaning mortality and housing and management characteristics such as the use of bedding or no bedding, batch farrowing versus continuous farrowing and single-use compared to multi-use farrowing rooms. It was felt that stockmanship was an important modifier of environmental effects. PMID:17422684

  17. Long-term use of amiodarone before heart transplantation significantly reduces early post-transplant atrial fibrillation and is not associated with increased mortality after heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rivinius, Rasmus; Helmschrott, Matthias; Ruhparwar, Arjang; Schmack, Bastian; Erbel, Christian; Gleissner, Christian A; Akhavanpoor, Mohammadreza; Frankenstein, Lutz; Darche, Fabrice F; Schweizer, Patrick A; Thomas, Dierk; Ehlermann, Philipp; Bruckner, Tom; Katus, Hugo A; Doesch, Andreas O

    2016-01-01

    Background Amiodarone is a frequently used antiarrhythmic drug in patients with end-stage heart failure. Given its long half-life, pre-transplant use of amiodarone has been controversially discussed, with divergent results regarding morbidity and mortality after heart transplantation (HTX). Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of long-term use of amiodarone before HTX on early post-transplant atrial fibrillation (AF) and mortality after HTX. Methods Five hundred and thirty patients (age ≥18 years) receiving HTX between June 1989 and December 2012 were included in this retrospective single-center study. Patients with long-term use of amiodarone before HTX (≥1 year) were compared to those without long-term use (none or <1 year of amiodarone). Primary outcomes were early post-transplant AF and mortality after HTX. The Kaplan–Meier estimator using log-rank tests was applied for freedom from early post-transplant AF and survival. Results Of the 530 patients, 74 (14.0%) received long-term amiodarone therapy, with a mean duration of 32.3±26.3 months. Mean daily dose was 223.0±75.0 mg. Indications included AF, Wolff–Parkinson–White syndrome, ventricular tachycardia, and ventricular fibrillation. Patients with long-term use of amiodarone before HTX had significantly lower rates of early post-transplant AF (P=0.0105). Further, Kaplan–Meier analysis of freedom from early post-transplant AF showed significantly lower rates of AF in this group (P=0.0123). There was no statistically significant difference between patients with and without long-term use of amiodarone prior to HTX in 1-year (P=0.8596), 2-year (P=0.8620), 5-year (P=0.2737), or overall follow-up mortality after HTX (P=0.1049). Moreover, Kaplan–Meier survival analysis showed no statistically significant difference in overall survival (P=0.1786). Conclusion Long-term use of amiodarone in patients before HTX significantly reduces early post-transplant AF and is not associated with

  18. Unemployment and mortality among Finnish men, 1981-5.

    PubMed Central

    Martikainen, P T

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To ascertain whether, after controlling for several relevant background variables simultaneously, unemployment is related to mortality and to assess whether this relation is causal or whether unhealthy people are more likely to become unemployed. DESIGN--Prospective study of mortality in Finland during 1981-5 based on 1980 census data on 30-54 year old wage earner men and with particular attention to unemployment in the year before the census. SETTING--Research project at the University of Helsinki. SUBJECTS--All wage earner men in Finland aged 30-54 at the 1980 census. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Causes of death during 1981-5 and duration of unemployment in the year before the census. Background variables controlled for were age, socioeconomic state, marital state, and health. The data were analysed by log linear regression models. RESULTS--During the study period 1981-5, which covered almost 2.7 million person years, there were 9810 deaths. After controlling for all background variables relative total mortality among unemployed versus employed men was 1.93 (95% confidence interval 1.82 to 2.05). The excess mortality was highest in accidental and violent causes of death (relative mortality 2.51; 95% confidence interval 2.28 to 2.76). For circulatory diseases the relative death rate was 1.54 (95% confidence interval 1.40 to 1.70), but among neoplasms only lung cancer was associated with excess mortality. Selection for unemployment based on age, socioeconomic state, and marital state was evident but no such selection was detected based on health. Effects of unemployment on mortality were more pronounced with increasing duration of unemployment. CONCLUSIONS--The relative excess mortality of unemployed men in Finland cannot fully be explained by demographic, social, and health variables preceding unemployment. Unemployment therefore seems to have an independent causal effect on male mortality. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanisms between

  19. Risk factors for early infant mortality in Sarlahi district, Nepal.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Joanne; West, Keith P.; Khatry, Subarna K.; Christian, Parul; LeClerq, Steven C.; Pradhan, Elizabeth Kimbrough; Shrestha, Sharada Ram

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Early infant mortality has not declined as rapidly as child mortality in many countries. Identification of risk factors for early infant mortality may help inform the design of intervention strategies. METHODS: Over the period 1994-97, 15,469 live-born, singleton infants in rural Nepal were followed to 24 weeks of age to identify risk factors for mortality within 0-7 days, 8-28 days, and 4-24 weeks after the birth. FINDINGS: In multivariate models, maternal and paternal education reduced mortality between 4 and 24 weeks only: odds ratios (OR) 0.28 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.12-0.66) and 0.63 (95% CI = 0.44-0.88), respectively. Miscarriage in the previous pregnancy predicted mortality in the first week of life (OR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.37-2.87), whereas prior child deaths increased the risk of post-neonatal death (OR = 1.85, 95% CI 1.24-2.75). A larger maternal mid-upper arm circumference reduced the risk of infant death during the first week of life (OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.81-0.95). Infants of women who did not receive any tetanus vaccinations during pregnancy or who had severe illness during the third trimester were more likely to die in the neonatal period. Maternal mortality was strongly associated with infant mortality (OR = 6.43, 95% CI = 2.35-17.56 at 0-7 days; OR = 11.73, 95% CI = 3.82-36.00 at 8-28 days; and OR = 51.68, 95% CI = 20.26-131.80 at 4-24 weeks). CONCLUSION: Risk factors for early infant mortality varied with the age of the infant. Factors amenable to intervention included efforts aimed at maternal morbidity and mortality and increased arm circumference during pregnancy. PMID:14758431

  20. Worldwide socioeconomic status and stroke mortality: an ecological study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The effect of socioeconomic status (SES) on stroke mortality at population level has been controversial. This study explores the association of SES in childhood and adulthood with stroke mortality, as well as variations in this association among countries/regions. Methods Sex-specific stroke mortality at country level with death registry covering ≥ 70% population was obtained from the World Health Organization. Human Development Index (HDI) developed by the United Nations was chosen as the SES indicator. The associations between the latest available stroke mortality with HDI in 1999 (adulthood SES) and with HDI in 1960 (childhood SES) for the group aged 45–54 years among countries were examined with regression analysis. Age-standardized stroke mortality and HDI during 1974–2001 were used to estimate the association by time point. Results The population data were available mostly for low-middle to high income countries. HDI in 1960 and 1999 were both inversely associated with stroke mortality in the group aged 45–54 years in 39 countries/regions. HDI in 1960 accounted for 37% of variance of stroke mortality among countries/regions; HDI in 1999 for 35% in men and 53% in women (P < 0.001). There was a quadratic relationship between age-standardized stroke mortality and HDI for the countries from 1974 to 2001: the association was positive when HDI < 0.77 but it became negative when HDI > 0.80. Conclusions SES is a strong predictor of stroke mortality at country level. Stroke mortality increased with improvement of SES in less developed countries/region, while it decreased with advancing SES in more developed areas. PMID:23767844

  1. Cancer mortality differences among urban and rural residents in Lithuania

    PubMed Central

    Smailyte, Giedre; Kurtinaitis, Juozas

    2008-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to describe and to compare the cancer mortality rates in urban and rural residents in Lithuania. Methods Cancer mortality has been studied using the materials of the Lithuanian cancer registry. For the period 1993–2004 age-standardized urban and rural population mortality rates (World standard) were calculated for all malignant neoplasm's and for stomach, colorectal, lung, prostate, breast and cervical cancers. The annual percentage change (APC) was calculated using log-linear regression model, two-sided Mantel-Haenzel test was used to evaluate differences in cancer mortality among rural and urban populations. Results For males in rural population cancer mortality was higher than in urban (212.2 and 197.0 cases per 100000) and for females cancer mortality was higher in urban population (103.5 and 94.2 cases per 100000, p < 0.05). During the study period the age-standardized mortality rates decreased in both sexes in urban residents. The decreasing mortality trend in urban population was contributed by decline of the rates of lung and stomach cancer in male and breast, stomach and colorectal cancer in female. Mortality rates in both urban and rural population were increasing for prostate and cervical cancers. Conclusion This study shows that large rural and urban inequalities in cancer mortality exist in Lithuania. The contrast between the health of residents in urban and rural areas invites researchers for research projects to develop, implement, and enhance cancer prevention and early detection intervention strategies for rural populations. PMID:18267035

  2. Wealth and mortality at older ages: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Demakakos, Panayotes; Biddulph, Jane P; Bobak, Martin; Marmot, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the importance of socioeconomic position for survival, total wealth, which is a measure of accumulation of assets over the life course, has been underinvestigated as a predictor of mortality. We investigated the association between total wealth and mortality at older ages. Methods We estimated Cox proportional hazards models using a sample of 10 305 community-dwelling individuals aged ≥50 years from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Results 2401 deaths were observed over a mean follow-up of 9.4 years. Among participants aged 50–64 years, the fully adjusted HRs for mortality were 1.21 (95% CI 0.92 to 1.59) and 1.77 (1.35 to 2.33) for those in the intermediate and lowest wealth tertiles, respectively, compared with those in the highest wealth tertile. The respective HRs were 2.54 (1.27 to 5.09) and 3.73 (1.86 to 7.45) for cardiovascular mortality and 1.36 (0.76 to 2.42) and 2.53 (1.45 to 4.41) for other non-cancer mortality. Wealth was not associated with cancer mortality in the fully adjusted model. Similar but less strong associations were observed among participants aged ≥65 years. The use of repeated measurements of wealth and covariates brought about only minor changes, except for the association between wealth and cardiovascular mortality, which became less strong in the younger participants. Wealth explained the associations between paternal occupation at age 14 years, education, occupational class, and income and mortality. Conclusions There are persisting wealth inequalities in mortality at older ages, which only partially are explained by established risk factors. Wealth appears to be more strongly associated with mortality than other socioeconomic position measures. PMID:26511887

  3. Early Neuropsychological Tests as Correlates of Productivity 1 Year after Traumatic Brain Injury: A Preliminary Matched Case-Control Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryu, Won Hyung A.; Cullen, Nora K.; Bayley, Mark T.

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the relative strength of five neuropsychological tests in correlating with productivity 1 year after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Six moderate-to-severe TBI patients who returned to work at 1-year post-injury were matched with six controls who were unemployed after 1 year based on age, severity of injury, and Functional…

  4. Trends in child mortality in India.

    PubMed

    Behl, A S

    2013-01-01

    To assess Indias recent trends in child mortality rates and disparities and identify ways to reduce child mortality and wealth-related health disparities, we analyzed three years of data from Indias National Family Health Survey related to child mortality. Nationally, declines in average child mortality were statistically significant, but declines in inequality were not. Urban areas had lower child mortality rates than rural areas but higher inequalities. Interstate differences in child mortality rates were significant, with rates in the highest-mortality states four to six times higher than in the lowest-mortality states. However, child mortality in most states declined. PMID:23396786

  5. Factors influencing dairy calf and replacement heifer mortality in France.

    PubMed

    Raboisson, D; Maigne, E; Sans, P; Allaire, G; Cahuzac, E

    2014-01-01

    Herd-level risk factors for dairy calf and heifer mortality in France were identified by calculating herd-level variables (including mortality risk or rate) using the National Bovine Identification Database (2005 and 2006). Eleven dairy production areas representing different livestock systems were also included. Statistical analyses were based on a probit model (mortality risk or rate=0 or >0) and a linear model (mortality risk or rate >0) corrected by the sample bias Heckman method. The same associations were reported for 2005 and 2006. The mortality risks or rates for calves and heifers were positively associated with the proportion of purchased cows or being a Milk Control Program member and negatively associated with adhering to the Good Breeding Practices charter and having an autumn calving peak. The associations between mortality and the breeds or the production areas were positive or negative, depending on the classes of animal. Mortality and having a beef herd in addition to the dairy herd were negatively associated for noncrossed birth to 2-d-old calves, noncrossed 3-d- to 1-mo-old calves, and 3-d- to 1-mo-old heifers. Having a beef herd probably provides specific know-how related to newborn and young calf management that makes it easier to attain low mortality in pure-breed dairy calves. The proportion of males born was positively associated with mortality for the birth to 2-d-old calves (all classes) and for the 3-d- to 1-mo-old beef-crossed calves, but negatively for all classes of heifers. This indicates that heifer management was improved when the availability of newborn heifers decreased, resulting in low mortality. This lower mortality is apparent for all classes of heifers present on the farm during the year when the proportion of males was low, and demonstrates an anticipatory effect. In conclusion, this study shows that the presence of a beef herd in addition to the dairy herd within a farm is associated with decreased dairy calf mortality. It

  6. Exposures and mortality among chrysotile asbestos workers. Part II: mortality

    SciTech Connect

    Dement, J.M.; Harris, R.L. Jr.; Symons, M.J.; Shy, C.M.

    1983-01-01

    A retrospective cohort mortality study was conducted among a cohort of 1,261 white males employed one or more months in chrysotile asbestos textile operations and followed between 1940 and 1975. Statistically significant excess mortality was observed for all causes combined (standardized mortality ratio (SMR) . 150), lung cancer (SMR . 135), diseases of the circulatory system (SMR . 125), nonmalignant respiratory diseases (SMR . 294), and accidents (SMR . 134). Using estimated fiber exposure levels in conjunction with detailed worker job histories, exposure-response relationships were investigated. Strong exposure-response relationships for lung cancer and asbestos related non-malignant respiratory diseases were observed. Compared with data for chrysotile miners and millers, chrysotile textile workers were found to experience significantly greater lung cancer mortality at lower lifetime cumulative exposure levels. Factors such as differences in airborne fiber characteristics may partially account for the large differences in exposure response between textile workers and miners and millers.

  7. Less is still more: maintenance of the very brief exposure effect 1 year later.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Paul; Warren, Richard

    2013-04-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that an immediate effect of exposure to masked phobic stimuli on avoidance of the corresponding feared object would be maintained 1 year later. Fifty-three spider-phobic participants were identified with a questionnaire and a Behavioral Avoidance Test (BAT) with a live tarantula. One week later, they were administered 1 of 3 types of exposure: very brief (25-ms, masked) or clearly visible (125-ms, unmasked) images of spiders, or very brief images of flowers. They engaged in the BAT again immediately thereafter. One year later, they returned for a follow-up BAT. The immediate effect of exposure to very brief spiders on reducing avoidance of the tarantula was still evident 1 year later. Endurance of an effect by masked stimuli of this duration has not been reported before. Potential theoretical implications are discussed. PMID:23527506

  8. Thirty-Year Trends in Mortality from Cerebrovascular Diseases in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Won; Lee, Hye Sun; Suh, Il

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Cerebrovascular disease is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in Korea. Understanding of cerebrovascular disease mortality trends is important to reduce the health burden from cerebrovascular diseases. We examined the changing pattern of mortality related to cerebrovascular disease in Korea over 30 years from 1983 to 2012. Subjects and Methods Numbers of deaths from cerebrovascular disease, hemorrhagic stroke, and cerebral infarction were obtained from the national Cause of Death Statistics. Crude and age-adjusted mortality rates were calculated for men and women for each year. Penalized B-spline methods, which reduce bias and variability in curve fitting, were used to identify the trends of 30-year mortality and identify the year of highest mortality. Results During the 30 years, cerebrovascular disease mortality has markedly declined. The age-adjusted cerebrovascular disease mortality rate has decreased by 78% in men and by 68% in women. In the case of hemorrhagic stroke, crude mortality peaked in 2001 but age-adjusted mortality peaked in 1994. Between 1994 and 2012, age-adjusted mortality from hemorrhagic stroke has decreased by 68% in men and 59% in women. In the case of cerebral infarction, crude and age-adjusted mortality rates steeply increased until 2004 and 2003, respectively, and both rates decreased rapidly thereafter. Conclusion Cerebrovascular disease mortality rate has significantly decreased over the last 30 years in Korea, but remains a health burden. The prevalence of major cardiovascular risk factors are still highly prevalent in Korea. PMID:27482259

  9. Results with SynCardia total artificial heart beyond 1 year.

    PubMed

    Torregrossa, Gianluca; Morshuis, Michiel; Varghese, Robin; Hosseinian, Leila; Vida, Vladimiro; Tarzia, Vincenzo; Loforte, Antonio; Duveau, Daniel; Arabia, Francisco; Leprince, Pascal; Kasirajan, Vigneshwa; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Musumeci, Francesco; Hetzer, Roland; Krabatsch, Thoamas; Gummert, Jan; Copeland, Jack; Gerosa, Gino

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory support devices have been increasingly used for long-term support. We reviewed outcomes in all patients supported with a SynCardia total artificial heart (TAH) for more than 1 year to assess its safety in long-term support. As of December 2011, all 47 patients who received the TAH from 10 centers worldwide were included in this retrospective study. Clinical data were collected on survival, infections, thromboembolic and hemorrhagic events, device failures, and antithrombotic therapy. The mean age of patients was 50 ± 1.57 years, the median support time was 554 days (range 365-1373 days). The primary diagnosis was dilated cardiomiopathy in 23 patients, ischemic in 15, and "other" in 9. After a minimum of 1 year of support, 34 patients (72%) were successfully transplanted, 12 patients (24%) died while on device support, and 1 patient (2%) is still supported. Five patients (10%) had a device failure reported. Major complications were as follows: systemic infections in 25 patients (53%), driveline infections in 13 patients (27%), thromboembolic events in 9 patients (19%), and hemorrhagic events in 7 patients (14%). SynCardia TAH has proven to be a reliable and effective device in replacing the entire heart. In patients who reached a minimum of 1 year of support, device failure rate is acceptable and only in two cases was the leading cause of death. Infections and hemorrhagic events were the major causes of death. Patients who remain supported beyond 1 year are still likely to survive to transplantation. PMID:25158888

  10. Recent mortality patterns in California.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, K F; Zaharia, E S

    1998-10-01

    Mortality among people with developmental disabilities was reviewed using recent data obtained from the California Department of Developmental Services. The time interval for this report was 1991-1995. We defined two study cohorts: one beginning in January 1991 and a second in April 1993. The latter period represented the years of implementation of the Coffelt settlement. Our primary interest was in the Coffelt period cohort. Statistically significant association with increased rates of mortality was found for community residence. A trend of declining mortality was noted for the community facilities from 1991-1995, but not for the developmental centers. PMID:9803127

  11. Zebra mussel mortality with chlorine

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benschoten, J.E.; Jensen, J.N.; Harrington, D.; DeGirolamo, D.J.

    1995-05-01

    The rate of mortality of the zebra mussel in response to chlorine is described by a kinetic model that combines a statistical characterization of mussel mortality with a disinfection-type modeling approach. Parameter estimates were made with nine sets of data from experiments conducted in Niagara River water. From the kinetic model, an operational diagram was constructed that describes the time to 95% mortality as a function of chlorine concentration and temperature. Either the model or the diagram can be used to assist utilities in planning chlorination treatments for controlling zebra mussels.

  12. Snakebite mortality in the world

    PubMed Central

    Swaroop, S.; Grab, B.

    1954-01-01

    In examining the relative importance of snakebite mortality in different parts of the world, the authors review the information collected concerning both snakebite mortality and the species of snake incriminated. Available statistical data are known to be unreliable and at best can serve to provide only an approximate and highly conservative estimate of the relative magnitude of the snakebite problem. The sources of error inherent in the data are discussed, and estimates are made of the probable mortality from snakebite in various areas of the world. PMID:13150169

  13. Infants under 1 year of age have a significant risk of burn injury.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Dai Q A; Tobin, Sean; Dickson, William A; Potokar, Tom S

    2008-09-01

    A wealth of data exists concerning paediatric burn epidemiology in general, but very little exists specifically in infants under 1 year of age, a special group in which mobility begins to develop. A retrospective study of all burn admissions of infants under 1 year old to The Welsh Centre for Burns from January 2003 to January 2006 was performed. During the 3-year period there were 104 new burns cases identified which represents 11.8% of all paediatric admissions. 63.5% (66) were treated as inpatients and 36.5% (38) treated as out-patients. Burns increased in frequency with increasing age and occurred mainly in the home. Scalds were the commonest type of burn in 65% (68) whilst the second most common was contact burns which accounted for 30% (31). The most common source of scald was from cups containing hot drinks (39%) and the most common source of contact burn was radiators/hot water pipes (30%). The mean TBSA was 2.3%, (range 0.5-38%). The frequency of burns in the under 1 year old population highlights a need for emphasis of burn prevention directed to this group. Special attention is needed to look at the specific aetiology of these burns. Starting points for prevention should address the number of burns surrounding hot drinks and bottle warming practices in the case of scalds and the dangers of household radiators and hot water pipes in the case of contact burns. PMID:18378092

  14. Association of Postpartum Depression With Weight Retention 1 Year After Childbirth

    PubMed Central

    Herring, Sharon J.; Rich-Edwards, Janet W.; Oken, Emily; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L.; Kleinman, Ken P.; Gillman, Matthew W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine the extent to which early postpartum depression is associated with weight retention 1 year after childbirth. Methods and Procedures In a prospective cohort study of 850 women enrolled in Project Viva, mothers reported depressive symptoms on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) at midpregnancy and 6 months postpartum. A score >12 indicated probable depression. We assessed associations of antenatal and postpartum depression with risk of substantial weight retention (at least 5 kg) 1 year after childbirth. Results Seven-hundred thirty-six women (87%) were not depressed during or after pregnancy, 55 (6%) experienced antenatal depression only, 22 (3%) experienced both antenatal and postpartum depression, and 37 (4%) experienced postpartum depression only. At 1 year, participants retained a mean of 0.6 kg (range −16.4 to 25.5), and 12% retained at least 5 kg. In multivariate logistic regression analyses, after adjustment for weight-related covariates, maternal sociodemographics, and parity, new-onset postpartum depression was associated with more than a doubling of risk of retaining at least 5 kg (odds ratio (OR): 2.54, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06, 6.09). Antenatal depression, either alone or in combination with postpartum depression, was not associated with substantial weight retention. Discussion New-onset postpartum depression was associated with substantial weight retention in the first postpartum year. Interventions to manage depressive symptoms may help reduce excess weight retained postpartum and aid in the prevention of obesity among women. PMID:18369338

  15. Overview of epidemiological studies on wine, health and mortality.

    PubMed

    Ruf, J C

    2003-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have observed that moderate intake of alcohol including wine is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, according to several authors, moderate consumption of wine is more beneficial than that of beer or spirits. Some studies have shown that moderate consumption of wine can lower mortality from CVD and other causes. The link between drinking wine and total mortality risk (all causes combined) has been studied. The results of various prospective population studies show that intake of beer and spirits from abstention to light to moderate daily intake did not influence mortality, while wine seems to have a beneficial effect on all causes of mortality. Other studies have reached the same conclusion. In general, several authors have reported that in subjects consuming wine in moderation the risk of mortality from all causes is 20-30% lower than in abstainers. Grape wine appears to be the main alcoholic beverage that contains antioxidant phenolic substances known to inhibit oxidation of low-density lipoprotein and affect hemostasis and carcinogenesis. In conclusion, there are differences in the effects of wine, beer and spirits on health. These differences may not be significant in coronary heart disease. Only moderate wine consumption appears to have a beneficial effect on several types of cancer and on total mortality. PMID:15134372

  16. UK asbestos imports and mortality due to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wiggans, R. E.; Young, C.; Fishwick, D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have demonstrated that the rising mortality due to mesothelioma and asbestosis can be predicted from historic asbestos usage. Mortality due to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is also rising, without any apparent explanation. Aims To compare mortality due to these conditions and examine the relationship between mortality and national asbestos imports. Methods Mortality data for IPF and asbestosis in England and Wales were available from the Office for National Statistics. Data for mesothelioma deaths in England and Wales and historic UK asbestos import data were available from the Health & Safety Executive. The numbers of annual deaths due to each condition were plotted separately by gender, against UK asbestos imports 48 years earlier. Linear regression models were constructed. Results For mesothelioma and IPF, there was a significant linear relationship between the number of male and female deaths each year and historic UK asbestos imports. For asbestosis mortality, a similar relationship was found for male but not female deaths. The annual numbers of deaths due to asbestosis in both sexes were lower than for IPF and mesothelioma. Conclusions The strength of the association between IPF mortality and historic asbestos imports was similar to that seen in an established asbestos-related disease, i.e. mesothelioma. This finding could in part be explained by diagnostic difficulties in separating asbestosis from IPF and highlights the need for a more accurate method of assessing lifetime occupational asbestos exposure. PMID:26511746

  17. Is patriarchy the source of men's higher mortality?

    PubMed Central

    Stanistreet, D; Bambra, C; Scott-Samuel, A

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relation between levels of patriarchy and male health by comparing female homicide rates with male mortality within countries. Hypothesis: High levels of patriarchy in a society are associated with increased mortality among men. Design: Cross sectional ecological study design. Setting: 51 countries from four continents were represented in the data—America, Europe, Australasia, and Asia. No data were available for Africa. Results: A multivariate stepwise linear regression model was used. Main outcome measure was age standardised male mortality rates for 51 countries for the year 1995. Age standardised female homicide rates and GDP per capita ranking were the explanatory variables in the model. Results were also adjusted for the effects of general rates of homicide. Age standardised female homicide rates and ranking of GDP were strongly correlated with age standardised male mortality rates (Pearson's r = 0.699 and Spearman's 0.744 respectively) and both correlations achieved significance (p<0.005). Both factors were subsequently included in the stepwise regression model. Female homicide rates explained 48.8% of the variance in male mortality, and GDP a further 13.6% showing that the higher the rate of female homicide, and hence the greater the indicator of patriarchy, the higher is the rate of mortality among men. Conclusion: These data suggest that oppression and exploitation harm the oppressors as well as those they oppress, and that men's higher mortality is a preventable social condition, which could be tackled through global social policy measures. PMID:16166362

  18. Socioeconomic Status, Race, and Mortality: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Sarah S.; Williams, David R.; Munro, Heather M.; Hargreaves, Margaret K.; Blot, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the independent and joint effects of race, individual socioeconomic status (SES), and neighborhood SES on mortality risk. Methods. We conducted a prospective analysis involving 52 965 non-Hispanic Black and 23 592 non-Hispanic White adults taking part in the Southern Community Cohort Study. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to determine associations of race and SES with all-cause and cause-specific mortality. Results. In our cohort, wherein Blacks and Whites had similar individual SES, Blacks were less likely than Whites to die during the follow-up period (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.78; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.73, 0.84). Low household income was a strong predictor of all-cause mortality among both Blacks and Whites (HR = 1.76; 95% CI = 1.45, 2.12). Being in the lowest (vs highest) category with respect to both individual and neighborhood SES was associated with a nearly 3-fold increase in all-cause mortality risk (HR = 2.76; 95% CI = 1.99, 3.84). There was no significant mortality-related interaction between individual SES and neighborhood SES among either Blacks or Whites. Conclusions. SES is a strong predictor of premature mortality, and the independent associations of individual SES and neighborhood SES with mortality risk are similar for Blacks and Whites. PMID:25322291

  19. US infant mortality and the President’s party

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Javier M; Bound, John; Geronimus, Arline T

    2014-01-01

    Background Infant mortality rates in the US exceed those in all other developed countries and in many less developed countries, suggesting political factors may contribute. Methods Annual time series on overall, White and Black infant mortality rates in the US were analysed over the 1965–2010 time period to ascertain whether infant mortality rates varied across presidential administrations. Data were de-trended using cubic splines and analysed using both graphical and time series regression methods. Results Across all nine presidential administrations, infant mortality rates were below trend when the President was a Democrat and above trend when the President was a Republican. This was true for overall, neonatal and postneonatal mortality. Regression estimates show that, relative to trend, Republican administrations were characterized by infant mortality rates that were, on average, 3% higher than Democratic administrations. In proportional terms, effect size is similar for US Whites and Blacks. US Black rates are more than twice as high as White, implying substantially larger absolute effects for Blacks. Conclusions We found a robust, quantitatively important association between net of trend US infant mortality rates and the party affiliation of the president. There may be overlooked ways by which macro-dynamics of policy impact microdynamics of physiology, suggesting the political system is a component of the underlying mechanism generating health inequality in the USA. PMID:24381011

  20. Recessions, Job Loss, and Mortality Among Older US Adults

    PubMed Central

    Beckfield, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We analyzed how recessions and job loss jointly shape mortality risks among older US adults. Methods. We used data for 50 states from the Health and Retirement Study and selected individuals who were employed at ages 45 to 66 years during 1992 to 2011. We assessed whether job loss affects mortality risks, whether recessions moderate the effect of job loss on mortality, and whether individuals who do and do not experience job loss are differentially affected by recessions. Results. Compared with individuals not experiencing job loss, mortality risks among individuals losing their job in a recession were strongly elevated (hazard ratio = 1.6; 95% confidence interval = 1.1, 2.3). Job loss during normal times or booms is not associated with mortality. For employed workers, we found a reduction in mortality risks if local labor market conditions were depressed, but this result was not consistent across different model specifications. Conclusions. Recessions increase mortality risks among older US adults who experience job loss. Health professionals and policymakers should target resources to this group during recessions. Future research should clarify which health conditions are affected by job loss during recessions and whether access to health care following job loss moderates this relation. PMID:25211731

  1. Assessment of maternal mortality in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Walraven, G E; Mkanje, R J; van Roosmalen, J; van Dongen, P W; Dolmans, W M

    1994-05-01

    The results from a prospective community survey, a sisterhood method survey, and a hospital survey were compared in order to ascertain a reliable and inexpensive method for estimating direct deaths from obstetric complications of pregnancy. The maternal mortality ratio was used to express risk of dying during pregnancy. The surveys were conducted in Kwimba District in Mwanza region of northwestern Tanzania: in August 1989 to March 1991 in the community study within the primary health care area of Sumve Hospital, which supplied data on maternal mortality between 1986 and 1990. The sisterhood survey was conducted in 2 villages in 1990, of which 1 village was included in the community survey. The village study included 447 women, of whom 421 remained in the survey and delivered 427 infants (415 live born); there was 1 maternal death. The sisterhood method engaged 2865 respondents and the lifetime risk of maternal death was estimated at 297 and the proportional maternal mortality rate was 13.9%. There were 82 maternal deaths and 589 deaths from all causes among sisters aged 15 years and older. 7526 women were included in the hospital survey, of which 7335 births were represented; there were 62 maternal deaths. The maternal mortality risk was 845 among hospital admissions. 69% of all maternal deaths were accounted for by direct causes. Most deaths were attributed to the top 5 worldwide causes: obstructed labor, puerperal sepsis, postpartum hemorrhage, complications of abortion, and preeclampsia. There were few reports of abortions and abortion-related mortality. Relapsing fever or Borrelia infection was an indirect cause of death common to the region and particularly hazardous to pregnant women. Many hospital deaths were emergency admissions. The conclusion was that the sisterhood method provided a better indication of the extent of maternal mortality within the community. Other advantages were the small sample and the speed, quickness, and low cost. Hospital data

  2. Mediterranean diet and Alzheimer disease mortality

    PubMed Central

    Scarmeas, Nikolaos; Luchsinger, Jose A.; Mayeux, Richard; Stern, Yaakov

    2009-01-01

    Background We previously reported that the Mediterranean diet (MeDi) is related to lower risk for Alzheimer disease (AD). Whether MeDi is associated with subsequent AD course and outcomes has not been investigated. Objectives To examine the association between MeDi and mortality in patients with AD. Methods A total of 192 community-based individuals in New York who were diagnosed with AD were prospectively followed every 1.5 years. Adherence to the MeDi (0- to 9-point scale with higher scores indicating higher adherence) was the main predictor of mortality in Cox models that were adjusted for period of recruitment, age, gender, ethnicity, education, APOE genotype, caloric intake, smoking, and body mass index. Results Eighty-five patients with AD (44%) died during the course of 4.4 (±3.6, 0.2 to 13.6) years of follow-up. In unadjusted models, higher adherence to MeDi was associated with lower mortality risk (for each additional MeDi point hazard ratio 0.79; 95% CI 0.69 to 0.91; p = 0.001). This result remained significant after controlling for all covariates (0.76; 0.65 to 0.89; p = 0.001). In adjusted models, as compared with AD patients at the lowest MeDi adherence fertile, those at the middle fertile had lower mortality risk (0.65; 0.38 to 1.09; 1.33 years’ longer survival), whereas subjects at the highest fertile had an even lower risk (0.27; 0.10 to 0.69; 3.91 years’ longer survival; p for trend = 0.003). Conclusion Adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MeDi) may affect not only risk for Alzheimer disease (AD) but also subsequent disease course: Higher adherence to the MeDi is associated with lower mortality in AD. The gradual reduction in mortality risk for higher MeDi adherence tertiles suggests a possible dose–response effect. PMID:17846408

  3. Maternal mortality in Malawi, 1977–2012

    PubMed Central

    Colbourn, Tim; Lewycka, Sonia; Nambiar, Bejoy; Anwar, Iqbal; Phoya, Ann; Mhango, Chisale

    2013-01-01

    Background Millennium Development Goal 5 (MDG 5) targets a 75% reduction in maternal mortality from 1990 to 2015, yet accurate information on trends in maternal mortality and what drives them is sparse. We aimed to fill this gap for Malawi, a country in sub-Saharan Africa with high maternal mortality. Methods We reviewed the literature for population-based studies that provide estimates of the maternal mortality ratio (MMR) in Malawi, and for studies that list and justify variables potentially associated with trends in MMR. We used all population-based estimates of MMR representative of the whole of Malawi to construct a best-fit trend-line for the range of years with available data, calculated the proportion attributable to HIV and qualitatively analysed trends and evidence related to other covariates to logically assess likely candidate drivers of the observed trend in MMR. Results 14 suitable estimates of MMR were found, covering the years 1977–2010. The resulting best-fit line predicted MMR in Malawi to have increased from 317 maternal deaths/100 000 live-births in 1980 to 748 in 1990, before peaking at 971 in 1999, and falling to 846 in 2005 and 484 in 2010. Concurrent deteriorations and improvements in HIV and health system investment and provisions are the most plausible explanations for the trend. Female literacy and education, family planning and poverty reduction could play more of a role if thresholds are passed in the coming years. Conclusions The decrease in MMR in Malawi is encouraging as it appears that recent efforts to control HIV and improve the health system are bearing fruit. Sustained efforts to prevent and treat maternal complications are required if Malawi is to attain the MDG 5 target and save the lives of more of its mothers in years to come. PMID:24353257

  4. Childhood Sleep Duration and Lifelong Mortality Risk

    PubMed Central

    Duggan, Katherine A.; Reynolds, Chandra A.; Kern, Margaret L.; Friedman, Howard S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Sleep duration is known to significantly affect health in adults and children, but little is understood about long-term associations. This prospective cohort study is the first to examine whether childhood sleep duration is associated with lifelong mortality risk. Methods Data from childhood were refined and mortality data collected for 1,145 participants from the Terman Life Cycle Study. Participants were born between 1904 and 1915, lived to at least 1940, and had complete age, bedtime, and waketime data at initial data collection (1917–1926). Homogeneity of the cohort sample (intelligent, mostly white) limits generality but provides natural control of common confounds. Through 2009, 1,039 participants had confirmed deaths. Sleep duration was calculated as the difference between each child’s bed and wake times. Age-adjusted sleep (deviation from that predicted by age) was computed. Cox proportional hazards survival models evaluated childhood sleep duration as a predictor of mortality separately by sex, controlling for baseline age. Results For males, a quadratic relation emerged: male children who under-slept or over-slept compared to peers were at increased risk of lifelong all-cause mortality (HR = 1.15, CI = 1.05 – 1.27). Effect sizes were smaller and non-significant in females (HR = 1.02, CI = 0.91 – 1.14). Conclusions Male children with shorter or longer sleep durations than expected for their age were at increased risk of death at any given age in adulthood. The findings suggest that sleep may be a core biobehavioral trait, with implications for new models of sleep and health throughout the entire lifespan. PMID:24588628

  5. Challenging Gait Conditions Predict 1-Year Decline in Gait Speed in Older Adults With Apparently Normal Gait

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Subashan; VanSwearingen, Jessie M.; Hile, Elizabeth S.; Wert, David M.; Studenski, Stephanie A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Mobility often is tested under a low challenge condition (ie, over a straight, uncluttered path), which often fails to identify early mobility difficulty. Tests of walking during challenging conditions may uncover mobility difficulty that is not identified with usual gait testing. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether gait during challenging conditions predicts decline in gait speed over 1 year in older people with apparently normal gait (ie, gait speed of ≥1.0 m/s). Design This was a prospective cohort study. Methods Seventy-one older adults (mean age=75.9 years) with a usual gait speed of ≥1.0 m/s participated. Gait was tested at baseline under 4 challenging conditions: (1) narrow walk (15 cm wide), (2) stepping over obstacles (15.24 cm [6 in] and 30.48 cm [12 in]), (3) simple walking while talking (WWT), and (4) complex WWT. Usual gait speed was recorded over a 4-m course at baseline and 1 year later. A 1-year change in gait speed was calculated, and participants were classified as declined (decreased ≥0.10 m/s, n=18), stable (changed <0.10 m/s, n=43), or improved (increased ≥0.10 m/s, n=10). Analysis of variance was used to compare challenging condition cost (usual − challenging condition gait speed difference) among the 3 groups. Results Participants who declined in the ensuing year had a greater narrow walk and obstacle walk cost than those who were stable or who improved in gait speed (narrow walk cost=0.43 versus 0.33 versus 0.22 m/s and obstacle walk cost=0.35 versus 0.26 versus 0.13 m/s). Simple and complex WWT cost did not differ among the groups. Limitations The participants who declined in gait speed over time walked the fastest, and those who improved walked the slowest at baseline; thus, the potential contribution of regression to the mean to the findings should not be overlooked. Conclusions In older adults with apparently normal gait, the assessment of gait during challenging conditions appears to uncover

  6. Changes in Sexual Function in Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Patients Taking Dutasteride: 1-Year Follow-Up Results

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Byung Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Sexual adverse events (AEs), a major cause for discontinuing 5α-reductase inhibitor (5ARI) therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), are known to occur most frequently early in therapy and appear to decline over time. The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in sexual function occurring with dutasteride treatment during a 1-year follow-up period in Korean men. Materials and Methods Using the International Index of Erectile Function, we prospectively evaluated, after 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of treatment, the changes in sexual function of 55 outpatients (mean age 62.3±7.2 years) with BPH (mean volume 48.9±16.0 g) who had relatively good erectile function (EF) and were treated with dutasteride for at least 1 year. Results EF scores showed the most significant decrease at 1 month (p<0.01). Function gradually recovered thereafter but was still significantly decreased after 12 months of treatment (p<0.05). The scores for orgasmic function and sexual desire also showed the most significant reduction at 1 month but were restored to the baseline level at 6 months. No significant correlation was observed between changes in sexual function and prostate-specific antigen level, prostate volume, or International Prostate Symptom Scores. Conclusions After 1 month of treatment, dutasteride therapy resulted in a significant reduction in all investigated sexual functions. Overall, recovery in sexual function was noted at 3 months, and orgasmic function and sexual desire were restored to baseline levels at 6 months. However, EF was still significantly reduced at 12 months. PMID:22025960

  7. Diet in 1-year-old farm and control children and allergy development: results from the FARMFLORA birth cohort

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Karin; Green, My; Barman, Malin; Sjöberg, Agneta; Brekke, Hilde K.; Wold, Agnes E.; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie

    2016-01-01

    Background A farming environment confers strong protection against allergy development. We have previously shown that farming mothers consume more full-fat dairy than control mothers, who instead consume more low-fat dairy, margarine, and oils; margarine and oil intake was associated with increased risk of allergy development in their children. Objectives The aims of this study were to investigate the differences in diet between children in farming and control families at 1 year of age, to investigate the relation between the diets of the mothers and their children, and to relate the children's diet to allergy development. Design The diet of 1-year-old children from dairy farming families (n=28) and from control families in the same rural area (n=37) was assessed by 24-h dietary recalls, followed by 24-h food diaries. Allergy was diagnosed by pediatricians at 3 years of age using strict predefined criteria. Results Farm children had a higher intake of farm milk, whole cream, cholesterol, saturated fat, and fat in total and tended to eat more butter, while controls consumed more carbohydrates and poultry and tended to eat more margarine. Farm children also had higher intakes of homemade porridge/gruel, oily fish, and iodine. The intake of butter and whole milk in children and mothers correlated significantly in farm families but not in controls. A weak negative association was found between seafood intake and allergy development, while allergy was positively associated with the intake of pork as well as zinc in the control group; these intakes also correlated with each other. Conclusions Consistent with mothers in farming families, the children consumed more full-fat dairy and saturated fat than did controls, but this could not be linked to the low risk of allergy in the farming group. Seafood intake might protect against allergy development, in accordance with earlier findings. PMID:27534847

  8. Axial length, refraction, and retinal vascularization 1 year after ranibizumab or bevacizumab treatment for retinopathy of prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun-Ju; Tsai, Yi-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to report on the axial length, refraction, and retinal vascularization 1 year after ranibizumab or bevacizumab treatment for threshold retinopathy of prematurity. Methods The authors conducted a comparative, consecutive, original study. Results Twenty-five eyes of 13 patients with threshold retinopathy of prematurity received one intravitreal ranibizumab treatment, and 15 eyes of eight patients received one intravitreal bevacizumab treatment. In the ranibizumab group, the mean gestational age was 26.15±2.08 weeks, with a mean birth weight of 811.15±287.3 g. In the bevacizumab group, the mean gestational age was 26.50±2.14 weeks, with a mean birth weight of 938.38±200.4 g. The mean axial length was 20.34±0.97 mm and the mean spherical equivalent was 0.46±1.36 D in the ranibizumab group, with complete vascularization in 15 of 25 (60%) eyes. The mean axial length was 20.91±1.54 mm and the mean spherical equivalent was −0.60±3.86 D in the bevacizumab group, with complete vascularization in seven of 15 (46.7%) eyes. Conclusion There were no significant differences in the axial length and refraction between children with threshold retinopathy of prematurity who received intravitreal bevacizumab compared to those who received ranibizumab after 1 year of follow-up. It appeared that the ranibizumab treatment could achieve more complete retinal vascularization than the bevacizumab treatment; however, there was no statistical significance and long-term follow-up is needed. PMID:27499611

  9. Single Versus Multi-visit Endodontic Treatment of Teeth with Apical Periodontitis: An in vivo Study with 1-year Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Gill, GS; Bhuyan, AC; Kalita, C; Das, L; Kataki, R; Bhuyan, D

    2016-01-01

    Background: Apical periodontitis (AP) is one of the most prevalent diseases of the teeth. Treatment of AP is based on the removal of the cause, i.e., bacteria from the root canals. Achievement of adequate bacterial eradication in one appointment treatment remains a controversy. Aim: This prospective study was conducted with the objective to compare the periapical healing of teeth with AP treated in (a) single visit versus (b) two visits, either with or without Vitapex as an intracanal medicament. Subjects and Methods: Patients were selected randomly from the Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics. Forty-three patients (81 teeth) met the inclusion criteria, i.e., AP (both symptomatic and asymptomatic) visible radiographically size ≥2 mm × 2 mm, not suffering from any immune-compromising disease, age between 16 and 65 years and tooth not accessed previously. Patients were randomly divided into three groups, i.e., single-visit group (Group 1), multi-visit group without any intracanal medicament (Group 2), and multi-visit group with Vitapex as interim intracanal medicament (Group 3). Comparison was done radiographically using periapical index (PAI). The primary outcome measure was the change in periapical radiolucency after 1 year assessed by PAI scores. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to evaluate differences between groups at baseline (immediate postoperative) and at the 12-month follow-up evaluation. Change in PAI score for each group from baseline to 12-month follow-up evaluation was tested with the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The secondary outcome measures, proportion of teeth in each group that could be considered improved (decreased PAI score) or healed (PAI <2), were assessed with the Chi-square test. Results: No statistically significant difference in periapical healing was found between three groups. Conclusion: After 1-year evaluation, no difference in periapical healing was found between single-visit treatment and multi-visit treatment

  10. Long-Term Predictors of Clinical Events after Off-Label Use of Drug-Eluting Stent beyond 1 Year

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Jum Suk; Rhee, Sang Jae; Lee, Eun Mi; Yoo, Nam Jin; Kim, Nam-Ho; Oh, Seok Kyu; Jeong, Jin-Won

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives We evaluated the long-term outcomes and predictors of clinical events after off-label use of drug-eluting stents (DES) beyond 1 year after procedure. Subjects and Methods A total of 518 patients who underwent DES implantation for off-label indications and did not have any major adverse cardiac events (MACE) during the first year were analyzed. The occurrence of MACE, including cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI), stent thrombosis and target vessel revascularization, were evaluated for a median 1179 days (interquartile range 769-1541) after the first year. Results Major adverse cardiac events occurred in 43 patients (8.3%) including 8 cases (1.5%) of cardiac death, 9 cases (1.7%) of MI, 24 cases (4.6%) of target vessel revascularization, and 11 cases (2.1%) of stent thrombosis. Patients with MACE had a higher serum creatinine level, higher incidence of in-stent restenosis lesion, more overlapping stents, a greater number of stents, and longer stents than did patients without MACE. Multivariate analysis revealed that serum creatinine level >1.5 mg/dL {hazard ratio (HR) 2.3, p=0.019}, stent length >33 mm (HR 2.4, p=0.035), and in-stent restenosis lesions (HR 2.4, p=0.040) were independent risk factors for MACE. Patients with DES length >33 mm had a higher incidence of MACE than those with DES length ≤33 mm (HR 2.7, log rank p=0.002). Conclusion The risk of stent thrombosis and target vessel revascularization persisted in patients undergoing off-label DES implantation beyond 1-year follow-up. A total DES length >33 mm was a significant procedural predictor associated with the incidence of MACE. PMID:23613692

  11. A comparison of outcome of medical and surgical treatment of migraine headache: In 1 year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Omranifard, Mahmood; Abdali, Hossein; Ardakani, Mehdi Rasti; Talebianfar, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was designed to compare the efficacy of the medical treatment versus the surgical treatment approach to decompression of trigger point nerves in patients with migraine headaches. Materials and Methods: Fifty volunteers were randomly assigned to the medical treatment group (n = 25) or the surgical treatment group (n = 25) after examination by the team neurologist to ensure a diagnosis of migraine headache. All patients received botulinum toxin type A to confirm the trigger sites. The surgical treatment group underwent surgical deactivation of the trigger site(s). The medical treatment group underwent prophylactic pharmacologic interventions by the neurologist. Pretreatment and 12-month posttreatment migraine headache frequency, duration, and intensity were analyzed and compared to determine the success of the treatments. Results: Nineteen of the 25 patients (76%) in the surgical treatment group and 10 of the 25 patients (40%) in the medical treatment group experienced a successful outcome (at least a 50% decrease in migraine frequency, duration, or intensity) after 1 year from surgery. Surgical treatment had a significantly higher success rate than medical treatment (P < 0.001). Nine patients (36%) in the surgical treatment group and one patient (4%) in the medical treatment group experienced cessation of migraine headaches. The elimination rate was significantly higher in the surgical treatment group than in the medical treatment group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Based on the 1-year follow-up data, there is strong evidence that surgical manipulation of one or more migraine trigger sites can successfully eliminate or reduce the frequency, duration, and intensity of migraine headaches in a lasting manner. PMID:27563631

  12. Nonhunting mortality in sandhill cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Windingstad, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    Records of 170 sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) necropsied at the National Wildlife Health Research Center, Wisconsin, from 1976 through 1985 were reviewed as representative samples to determine causes of nonhunting mortality in the mid-continent and Rocky Mountain populations of sandhill cranes. Avian cholera, avian botulism, and ingestion of mycotoxins were leading causes of nonhunting mortality. Hailstorms, lightning, lead poisoning, predation, avian tuberculosis, and collisions with power lines also killed cranes.

  13. The effect of maternal child marriage on morbidity and mortality of children under 5 in India: cross sectional study of a nationally representative sample

    PubMed Central

    Saggurti, Niranjan; Winter, Michael; Labonte, Alan; Decker, Michele R; Balaiah, Donta; Silverman, Jay G

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess associations between maternal child marriage (marriage before age 18) and morbidity and mortality of infants and children under 5 in India. Design Cross-sectional analyses of nationally representative household sample. Generalised estimating equation models constructed to assess associations. Adjusted models included maternal and child demographics and maternal body mass index as covariates. Setting India. Population Women aged 15-49 years (n=124 385); data collected in 2005-6 through National Family Health Survey-3. Data about child morbidity and mortality reported by participants. Analyses restricted to births in past five years reported by ever married women aged 15-24 years (n=19 302 births to 13 396 mothers). Main outcome measures In under 5s: mortality related infectious diseases in the past two weeks (acute respiratory infection, diarrhoea); malnutrition (stunting, wasting, underweight); infant (age <1 year) and child (1-5 years) mortality; low birth weight (<2500 kg). Results The majority of births (73%; 13 042/19 302) were to mothers married as minors. Although bivariate analyses showed significant associations between maternal child marriage and infant and child diarrhoea, malnutrition (stunted, wasted, underweight), low birth weight, and mortality, only stunting (adjusted odds ratio 1.22, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.33) and underweight (1.24, 1.14 to 1.36) remained significant in adjusted analyses. We noted no effect of maternal child marriage on health of boys versus girls. Conclusions The risk of malnutrition is higher in young children born to mothers married as minors than in those born to women married at a majority age. Further research should examine how early marriage affects food distribution and access for children in India. PMID:20093277

  14. Relationship between Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate and Cardiovascular Mortality in a Japanese Cohort with Long-Term Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Kei; Sairenchi, Toshimi; Irie, Fujiko; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ota, Hitoshi; Yamagata, Kunihiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with renal impairment are at risk of not only end-stage kidney disease but also cardiovascular disease (CVD). The current definition of CKD stage G3a is eGFR 45–59 ml/min/1.73 m2 and of G3b is 30–44 ml/min/1.73 m2, and subjects in the CKD 3a category are considered to be at lower risk of mortality than are those in CKD 3b. Methods We evaluated the outcome of 97,043 people (33,131 men and 63,912 women) living in Ibaraki Prefecture who underwent annual community-based health checkups beginning in 1993 at age 40–80 years and who were followed for a mean of 17.1 years. Results The number of all-causes deaths was 20,534 (10,375 men and 10,159 women), of which 5,995 (2,695 men and 3,300 women) were deaths due to CVD. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio for CVD death in the eGFR 45–49 ml/min/1.73 m2 category was significantly increased (1.82; 95% confidential interval, 1.23–2.69) in non-elderly men, whereas all-cause mortality and CVD mortality in elderly men with eGFR 45–49 ml/min/1.73m2 were non significant. In contrast, both in non-elderly women and in elderly women with eGFR 45–49 ml/min/1.73 m2 showed small, but significant, increases in the risks of all-cause mortality and CVD. Conclusions We demonstrated proportionate increases in mortality with decreasing eGFR in a Japanese CKD population. Like patients in the CKD G3b subgroup, non-elderly men and women with an eGFR of 45–49 ml/min/1.73 m2 (i.e. a part of CKD G3a) are at considerable risk of CVD mortality. Age dependent and eGFR dependent finer risk recognition were required for CVD prevention in clinical practice with regard to CKD patients. PMID:27272675

  15. The influence of Imipenem resistant metallo-beta-lactamase positive and negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial infections on mortality and morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Kolhal Veerappa Yogeesha; Visweswaraiah, Divakara Siddanakatte; Kumar, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Background: Metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL) mediated resistance to carbapenems is an emerging threat in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) nosocomial infections. Limited data on role of Imipenem resistant MBL positive PA (IR-MBLP-PA) and IR-MBL negative-PA (IR-MBLN-PA) infections on mortality and morbidity initiated the present study. Objectives: The aim of this study is to determine the role of IR-MBLP-PA and IR-MBLN-PA infections on mortality and morbidity. Materials and Methods: Prospective observational study of 1 year with 110 PA nosocomial infections was conducted with Imipenem + ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid combined disc test for MBL detection. Role of IR-MBLP-PA and IR-MBLN-PA infections on the outcome and morbidity were assessed in terms of crude mortality rate, Charlson's comorbidity score and mean duration of stay in intensive care unit (ICU) until cure and until death, number of episodes of complications and underlying disease. Results were analyzed by z test for proportions and Student t-test. Results: Relatively high crude mortality was observed among IR-MBLP-PA infections than IR-MBLN-PA (42.86% [6/14] vs. 20% [2/10], Z = 0.69, P = 0.49 NS). Ventilator-associated pneumonia was the underlying disease and a confounding factor in all deaths due to IR-MBLP-PA infections. IR-MBLP-PA infections resulted in rapid downhill course to death with short mean duration of stay in ICU until death than IR-MBLN-PA infections (3.167 ± 0.98 days vs. 16 ± 2.82, P < 0.001 highly significant [HS]) with more number of complications (5.85 ± 1.65 vs. 3.7 ± 1.31, P < 0.001 HS). With the exception of previous Imipenem therapy, association of higher Charlson's comorbidity score, severe underlying diseases, multidrug and pandrug resistance and pre-disposing risk factors with IR-MBLP-PA infections was not statistically significant. Conclusions: Higher mortality in IR-MBLP-PA than in IR-MBLN-PA was not significant indicating IR as an important predictor of mortality than MBL

  16. Beverage Habits and Mortality in Chinese Adults12

    PubMed Central

    Odegaard, Andrew O; Koh, Woon-Puay; Yuan, Jian-Min; Pereira, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is limited research examining beverage habits, one of the most habitual dietary behaviors, with mortality risk. Objective: This study examined the association between coffee, black and green tea, sugar-sweetened beverages (soft drinks and juice), and alcohol and all-cause and cause-specific mortality. Methods: A prospective data analysis was conducted with the use of the Singapore Chinese Health Study, including 52,584 Chinese men and women (aged 45–74 y) free of diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and cancer at baseline (1993–1998) and followed through 2011 with 10,029 deaths. Beverages were examined with all-cause and cause-specific (cancer, CVD, and respiratory disease) mortality risk with the use of Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: The associations between coffee, black tea, and alcohol intake and all-cause mortality were modified by smoking status. Among never-smokers there was an inverse dose-response association between higher amounts of coffee and black tea intake and all-cause, respiratory-related, and CVD mortality (black tea only). The fully adjusted HRs for all-cause mortality for coffee for <1/d, 1/d, and ≥2/d relative to no coffee intake were 0.89, 0.86, and 0.83, respectively (P-trend = 0.0003). For the same black tea categories the HRs were 0.95, 0.90, and 0.72, respectively (P-trend = 0.0005). Among ever-smokers there was no association between coffee or black tea and the outcomes. Relative to no alcohol, light to moderate intake was inversely associated with all-cause mortality (HR: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.79, 0.96) in never-smokers with a similar magnitude of association in ever-smokers. There was no association between heavy alcohol intake and all-cause mortality in never-smokers and a strong positive association in ever-smokers (HR: 1.56; 95% CI: 1.40, 1.74). Green tea and sugar-sweetened beverages were not associated with all-cause or cause-specific mortality. Conclusions: Higher coffee and black tea intake was

  17. Dietary patterns and mortality in a Chinese population123

    PubMed Central

    Odegaard, Andrew O; Koh, Woon-Puay; Yuan, Jian-Min; Gross, Myron D; Pereira, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    pattern was not associated with respiratory mortality. Conclusion: Dietary patterns are strongly associated with mortality in Chinese Singaporeans. PMID:25057151

  18. Causes of Mortality and Diseases in Farmed Deer in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Sieber, Veronika; Robert, Nadia; Schybli, Martina; Sager, Heinz; Miserez, Raymond; Engels, Monika; Ryser-Degiorgis, Marie-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    To investigate diseases and causes of mortality in Swiss farmed deer, deer found dead or shot due to diseased condition between March 2003 and December 2004 were requested for a complete postmortem examination. One hundred and sixty-two animals were submitted. Perinatal mortality, necrobacillosis in 3 week to 6 month old deer, and endoparasitosis in 6 month to 2 year old deer were identified as the most important causes of loss, followed by ruminal acidosis, which was diagnosed in 22% of deer older than 1 year. Congenital malformations were observed in 15% of deer less than 6 months old. Reportable infectious diseases known as major problems in deer farming in other countries were rare (yersiniosis, malignant catarrhal fever) or not observed (tuberculosis, chronic wasting disease). Overall, the results indicate that the Swiss deer population does not present major health problems of concern for domestic animals. PMID:20706668

  19. Estimates of maternal mortality for 1995.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, K.; AbouZhar, C.; Wardlaw, T.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present estimates of maternal mortality in 188 countries, areas, and territories for 1995 using methodologies that attempt to improve comparability. METHODS: For countries having data directly relevant to the measurement of maternal mortality, a variety of adjustment procedures can be applied depending on the nature of the data used. Estimates for countries lacking relevant data may be made using a statistical model fitted to the information from countries that have data judged to be of good quality. Rather than estimate the Maternal Mortality Ratio (MMRatio) directly, this model estimates the proportion of deaths of women of reproductive age that are due to maternal causes. Estimates of the number of maternal deaths are then obtained by applying this proportion to the best available figure of the total number of deaths among women of reproductive age. FINDINGS: On the basis of this exercise, we have obtained a global estimate of 515,000 maternal deaths in 1995, with a worldwide MMRatio of 397 per 100,000 live births. The differences, by region, were very great, with over half (273,000 maternal deaths) occurring in Africa (MMRatio: > 1000 per 100,000), compared with a total of only 2000 maternal deaths in Europe (MMRatio: 28 per 100,000). Lower and upper uncertainty bounds were also estimated, on the basis of which the global MMRatio was unlikely to be less than 234 or more than 635 per 100,000 live births. These uncertainty bounds and those of national estimates are so wide that comparisons between countries must be made with caution, and no valid conclusions can be drawn about trends over a period of time. CONCLUSION: The MMRatio is thus an imperfect indicator of reproductive health because it is hard to measure precisely. It is preferable to use process indicators for comparing reproductive health between countries or across time periods, and for monitoring and evaluation purposes. PMID:11285661

  20. Mortality of workers in styrene-butadiene polymer production

    SciTech Connect

    Matanoski, G.M.; Schwartz, L.

    1987-08-01

    A total of 13,920 males who had worked in eight styrene-butadiene rubber polymer manufacturing plants in the US and Canada for at least 1 year were followed for deaths from 1943 when the industry began to 1979. Mortality ratios standardized for age, race, and calendar time using US male rates as a comparison revealed no excess mortality in this population for any cause of death. The overall standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for all causes was 0.81. Only the SMR for arteriosclerotic heart disease among black males showed a significant excess (SMR = 1.28). Examination of risks by major work areas such as production, utilities, maintenance, and other jobs, as well as by salaried and hourly pay grade, revealed no significant differences in cancer mortality by specific sites. Because the ratios for selected digestive cancers were above the all-cause SMR, this group of neoplasms is under further investigation as is the exposure profile of specific jobs within the industry.

  1. Brucella arthritis of the knee, 1 year after revision of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Papastergiou, S G; Koukoulias, N E; Koumis, P; Kyparlis, D; Santas, R

    2011-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic infection with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations. The authors report the first case in the literature of septic arthritis of the knee 1 year after revision of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Brucella melitensis biotype 3 was found in both synovial fluid and blood cultures. The patient was treated initially with arthroscopic debridement. After the diagnosis was confirmed, a second arthroscopic lavage and metal work removal was applied leaving the graft in place. Antimicrobial chemotherapy was prescribed for 3 months. The infection was fully eradicated and the patient is still asymptomatic, 4 years after the treatment. PMID:22700607

  2. Brucella arthritis of the knee, 1 year after revision of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Papastergiou, S G; Koukoulias, N E; Koumis, P; Kyparlis, D; Santas, R

    2011-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic infection with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations. The authors report the first case in the literature of septic arthritis of the knee 1 year after revision of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Brucella melitensis biotype 3 was found in both synovial fluid and blood cultures. The patient was treated initially with arthroscopic debridement. After the diagnosis was confirmed, a second arthroscopic lavage and metal work removal was applied leaving the graft in place. Antimicrobial chemotherapy was prescribed for 3 months. The infection was fully eradicated and the patient is still asymptomatic, 4 years after the treatment. PMID:22700607

  3. Traumatic spinal epidural hematoma in a 1-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Tarbé de Saint Hardouin, A-L; Grévent, D; Sainte-Rose, C; Angoulvant, F; Chéron, G

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic spinal epidural hematoma is uncommon in children, making rapid diagnosis difficult. In this report, we present a case of traumatic cervical epidural hematoma in a 1-year-old boy, diagnosed with computed tomography scanning and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Management was conservative and the lesion regressed spontaneously. The presentation in childhood is often nonspecific. MRI is the imaging modality of choice for diagnosing these lesions. Conservative treatment has to be considered in cases with a benign clinical course and provided that the patient is followed up neurologically with repeated MRI. PMID:27266638

  4. Necessity and Opportunity: the 1-Year Master's ABA Program at Auburn University.

    PubMed

    Johnston, James M

    2016-05-01

    The Auburn University Master of Science program in Applied Behavior Analysis was designed to accommodate not only the requirements of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board for approved course sequences and practicum training, but unavoidable limitations in faculty and other resources. These limitations were incompatible with the more traditional 2-year curriculum model, so a 1-year program was designed that met the necessary conditions. This article describes the resulting academic and practicum curriculum, the key funding mechanisms that allowed the program to develop, and the opportunities and benefits that this model afforded. PMID:27606193

  5. Testosterone Deficiency Increases Hospital Readmission and Mortality Rates in Male Patients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Marcelo Rodrigues; Sayegh, Ana Luiza Carrari; Groehs, Raphaela Vilar Ramalho; Fonseca, Guilherme; Trombetta, Ivani Credidio; Barretto, Antônio Carlos Pereira; Arap, Marco Antônio; Negrão, Carlos Eduardo; Middlekauff, Holly R.; Alves, Maria-Janieire de Nazaré Nunes

    2015-01-01

    Background Testosterone deficiency in patients with heart failure (HF) is associated with decreased exercise capacity and mortality; however, its impact on hospital readmission rate is uncertain. Furthermore, the relationship between testosterone deficiency and sympathetic activation is unknown. Objective We investigated the role of testosterone level on hospital readmission and mortality rates as well as sympathetic nerve activity in patients with HF. Methods Total testosterone (TT) and free testosterone (FT) were measured in 110 hospitalized male patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction < 45% and New York Heart Association classification IV. The patients were placed into low testosterone (LT; n = 66) and normal testosterone (NT; n = 44) groups. Hypogonadism was defined as TT < 300 ng/dL and FT < 131 pmol/L. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was recorded by microneurography in a subpopulation of 27 patients. Results Length of hospital stay was longer in the LT group compared to in the NT group (37 ± 4 vs. 25 ± 4 days; p = 0.008). Similarly, the cumulative hazard of readmission within 1 year was greater in the LT group compared to in the NT group (44% vs. 22%, p = 0.001). In the single-predictor analysis, TT (hazard ratio [HR], 2.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.58–4.85; p = 0.02) predicted hospital readmission within 90 days. In addition, TT (HR, 4.65; 95% CI, 2.67–8.10; p = 0.009) and readmission within 90 days (HR, 3.27; 95% CI, 1.23–8.69; p = 0.02) predicted increased mortality. Neurohumoral activation, as estimated by MSNA, was significantly higher in the LT group compared to in the NT group (65 ± 3 vs. 51 ± 4 bursts/100 heart beats; p < 0.001). Conclusion These results support the concept that LT is an independent risk factor for hospital readmission within 90 days and increased mortality in patients with HF. Furthermore, increased MSNA was observed in patients with LT. PMID:26200897

  6. Neonatal mortality in dogs: Prognostic value of Doppler ductus venosus waveform evaluation - Preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Barella, Gabriele; Faverzani, Stefano; Faustini, Massimo; Groppetti, Debora; Pecile, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To define the prognostic value of Doppler ultrasonographic morphology of ductus venosus (DV) waveform on canine neonatal mortality. Materials and Methods: Fifty-four healthy pregnant bitches underwent fetal ultrasonographic assessment. The DV waveforms were classified as diphasic (dDVw) or triphasic (tDVw) and compared with neonatal mortality. Results: Ninety-three fetuses were evaluated. Twenty fetuses belonged to litters with neonatal mortality, in which tDVw was observed. Seven fetuses belonged to litters without neonatal mortality, in which tDVw was observed. Fifty-eight fetuses belonged to litters without neonatal mortality, in which only dDVw was observed. Eight fetuses belonged to litters with neonatal mortality, in which only dDVw was observed. The correlation between tDVw and neonatal mortality was statistically significant (odds ratio [OR], 20.7; p<0.0001). Considering only pregnancies with one or two fetuses with the same DV waveform: Two fetuses with tDVw belonged to litters with neonatal mortality; 1 foetus with tDVw belonged to litter without neonatal mortality and 26 fetuses showed dDVw without neonatal mortality. The correlation between tDVw and neonatal mortality even in litters up to two pups was statistically significant (OR, 88.3; p=0.01). Conclusion: Echo-Doppler assessment of DV is feasible in canine fetuses, and the presence tDVw seems to be related to neonatal mortality. PMID:27182129

  7. Reduction in pneumonia mortality and total childhood mortality by means of community-based intervention trial in Gadchiroli, India.

    PubMed

    Bang, A T; Bang, R A; Tale, O; Sontakke, P; Solanki, J; Wargantiwar, R; Kelzarkar, P

    1990-07-28

    In a community-based intervention trial to reduce childhood mortality from pneumonia the intervention area included 58 villages (6176 children aged 0-4 years) and the control area 44 villages (3947 children) in Gadchiroli, India. The interventions included mass education about childhood pneumonia and case-management of pneumonia by paramedics, village health workers, and traditional birth attendants (TBAs) who were trained to recognise childhood pneumonia and treat it with co-trimoxazole. Parents sought treatment, and coverage was 76% without active case-detection efforts. The case-fatality rate among the 612 cases treated by health workers was 0.8%, compared with 13.5% in the control area. After a year of intervention pneumonia-specific childhood mortality was significantly lower in the intervention than in the control area (8.1 vs 17.5 deaths per 1000 children under 5 years); the difference between the areas was greatest in children under 1 year. The differences in infant mortality (89 vs 121 per 1000) and total under-5 mortality (28.5 vs 40.7 per 1000) were highly significant. Mortality from other causes remained similar in the two areas but neonatal mortality due to birth injury and prematurity was significantly lower in the intervention area, presumably owing to the combination of better maternal and neonatal care by the TBAs trained in the project and the availability of treatment for pneumonia. The cost of co-trimoxazole was US $0.025 per child per year ($2.64 per child saved). PMID:1973770

  8. Socioeconomic differences in alcohol-attributable mortality compared with all-cause mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Charlotte; Roerecke, Michael; Behrendt, Silke; Rehm, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Factors underlying socioeconomic inequalities in mortality are not well understood. This study contributes to our understanding of potential pathways to result in socioeconomic inequalities, by examining alcohol consumption as one potential explanation via comparing socioeconomic inequalities in alcohol-attributable mortality and all-cause mortality. Methods: Web of Science, MEDLINE, PsycINFO and ETOH were searched systematically from their inception to second week of February 2013 for articles reporting alcohol-attributable mortality by socioeconomic status, operationalized by using information on education, occupation, employment status or income. The sex-specific ratios of relative risks (RRRs) of alcohol-attributable mortality to all-cause mortality were pooled for different operationalizations of socioeconomic status using inverse-variance weighted random effects models. These RRRs were then combined to a single estimate. Results: We identified 15 unique papers suitable for a meta-analysis; capturing about 133 million people, 3 741 334 deaths from all causes and 167 652 alcohol-attributable deaths. The overall RRRs amounted to RRR = 1.78 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.43 to 2.22) and RRR = 1.66 (95% CI 1.20 to 2.31), for women and men, respectively. In other words: lower socioeconomic status leads to 1.5–2-fold higher mortality for alcohol-attributable causes compared with all causes. Conclusions: Alcohol was identified as a factor underlying higher mortality risks in more disadvantaged populations. All alcohol-attributable mortality is in principle avoidable, and future alcohol policies must take into consideration any differential effect on socioeconomic groups. PMID:24618188

  9. Widening Socioeconomic and Racial Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease Mortality in the United States, 1969-2013

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gopal K.; Siahpush, Mohammad; Azuine, Romuladus E.; Williams, Shanita D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study examined trends and socioeconomic and racial/ethnic disparities in cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in the United States between 1969 and 2013. Methods: National vital statistics data and the National Longitudinal Mortality Study were used to estimate racial/ethnic and area- and individual-level socioeconomic disparities in CVD mortality over time. Rate ratios and log-linear regression were used to model mortality trends and differentials. Results: Between 1969 and 2013, CVD mortality rates decreased by 2.66% per year for whites and 2.12% for blacks. Racial disparities and socioeconomic gradients in CVD mortality increased substantially during the study period. In 2013, blacks had 30% higher CVD mortality than whites and 113% higher mortality than Asians/Pacific Islanders. Compared to those in the most affluent group, individuals in the most deprived area group had 11% higher CVD mortality in 1969 but 40% higher mortality in 2007-2011. Education, income, and occupation were inversely associated with CVD mortality in both men and women. Men and women with low education and incomes had 46-76% higher CVD mortality risks than their counterparts with high education and income levels. Men in clerical, service, farming, craft, repair, construction, and transport occupations, and manual laborers had 30-58% higher CVD mortality risks than those employed in executive and managerial occupations. Conclusions and Global Health Implications: Socioeconomic and racial disparities in CVD mortality are marked and have increased over time because of faster declines in mortality among the affluent and majority populations. Disparities in CVD mortality may reflect inequalities in the social environment, behavioral risk factors such as smoking, obesity, physical inactivity, disease prevalence, and healthcare access and treatment. With rising prevalence of many chronic disease risk factors, the global burden of cardiovascular diseases is expected to increase

  10. Adverse Trends in Ischemic Heart Disease Mortality among Young New Yorkers, Particularly Young Black Women

    PubMed Central

    Smilowitz, Nathaniel R.; Maduro, Gil A.; Lobach, Iryna V.; Chen, Yu; Reynolds, Harmony R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ischemic heart disease (IHD) mortality has been on the decline in the United States for decades. However, declines in IHD mortality have been slower in certain groups, including young women and black individuals. Hypothesis Trends in IHD vary by age, sex, and race in New York City (NYC). Young female minorities are a vulnerable group that may warrant renewed efforts to reduce IHD. Methods IHD mortality trends were assessed in NYC 1980–2008. NYC Vital Statistics data were obtained for analysis. Age-specific IHD mortality rates and confidence bounds were estimated. Trends in IHD mortality were compared by age and race/ethnicity using linear regression of log-transformed mortality rates. Rates and trends in IHD mortality rates were compared between subgroups defined by age, sex and race/ethnicity. Results The decline in IHD mortality rates slowed in 1999 among individuals aged 35–54 years but not ≥55. IHD mortality rates were higher among young men than women age 35–54, but annual declines in IHD mortality were slower for women. Black women age 35–54 had higher IHD mortality rates and slower declines in IHD mortality than women of other race/ethnicity groups. IHD mortality trends were similar in black and white men age 35–54. Conclusions The decline in IHD mortality rates has slowed in recent years among younger, but not older, individuals in NYC. There was an association between sex and race/ethnicity on IHD mortality rates and trends. Young black women may benefit from targeted medical and public health interventions to reduce IHD mortality. PMID:26882207

  11. Mortality in Central Java: results from the indonesian mortality registration system strengthening project

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mortality statistics from death registration systems are essential for health policy and development. Indonesia has recently mandated compulsory death registration across the entire country in December 2006. This article describes the methods and results from activities to ascertain causes of registered deaths in two pilot registration areas in Central Java during 2006-2007. The methods involved several steps, starting with adaptation of international standards for reporting causes of registered deaths for implementation in two sites, Surakarta (urban) and Pekalongan (rural). Causes for hospital deaths were certified by attending physicians. Verbal autopsies were used for home deaths. Underlying causes were coded using ICD-10. Completeness of registration was assessed in a sample of villages and urban wards by triangulating data from the health sector, the civil registration system, and an independent household survey. Finally, summary mortality indicators and cause of death rankings were developed for each site. Findings A total of 10,038 deaths were registered in the two sites during 2006-2007; yielding annual crude death rates of 5.9 to 6.8 per 1000. Data completeness was higher in rural areas (72.5%) as compared to urban areas (52%). Adjusted life expectancies at birth were higher for both males and females in the urban population as compared to the rural population. Stroke, ischaemic heart disease and chronic respiratory disease are prominent causes in both populations. Other important causes are diabetes and cancer in urban areas; and tuberculosis and diarrhoeal diseases in rural areas. Conclusions Non-communicable diseases cause a significant proportion of premature mortality in Central Java. Implementing cause of death reporting in conjunction with death registration appears feasible in Indonesia. Better collaboration between health and registration sectors is required to improve data quality. These are the first local mortality measures for

  12. Induction of Maturogenesis by Partial Pulpotomy: 1 Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Bacaksiz, A.; Alaçam, A.

    2013-01-01

    In cariously exposed immature permanent teeth, the treatment choice is controversial in pediatric dentistry. Radical root canal treatment usually appears to be the solution for these teeth. Even partial pulpotomy is a vital treatment for traumatically exposed immature permanent teeth; extending the borders of indication towards cariously exposed immature permanent teeth with reversible pulpitis may abolish the necessity of pulpectomy. This article describes the partial pulpotomy of a cariously affected immature permanent teeth and the follow-up for 1 year. A healthy 11-year-old male patient was referred to Gazi University Faculty of Dentistry Department of Pediatric Dentistry. The patient had reversible pulpitis symptoms on teeth numbered 45. At radiographic examination, immature apex and deep caries lesion were observed and partial pulpotomy was performed by using calcium hydroxide to maintain vitality of the pulp and allow continued development of root dentin expecting the root will attain full maturity. Clinical and radiographic follow-up demonstrated a vital pulp besides not only closure of the apex (apexogenesis), but also physiologic root development (maturogenesis) after 1 year. Partial pulpotomy is an optional treatment for cariously exposed immature permanent teeth for preserving vitality and physiological root development. PMID:24324899

  13. Parental spanking of 1-year-old children and subsequent child protective services involvement✩

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shawna J.; Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew; Berger, Lawrence M.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of U.S. parents spank their children, often beginning when their children are very young. We examined families (N=2,788) who participated in a longitudinal community-based study of new births in urban areas. Prospective analyses examined whether spanking by the child's mother, father, or mother's current partner when the child was 1-year-old was associated with household CPS involvement between age 1 and age 5. Results indicated that 30% of 1-year-olds were spanked at least once in the past month. Spanking at age 1 was associated with increased odds of subsequent CPS involvement (adjusted odds ratio=1.36, 95% CI [1.08, 1.71], p<.01). When compared to non-spanked children, there was a 33% greater probability of subsequent CPS involvement for children who were spanked at age 1. Given the undesirable consequences of spanking children and a lack of empirical evidence to suggest positive effects of physical punishment, professionals who work with families should counsel parents not to spank infants and toddlers. For optimal benefits, efforts to educate parents regarding alternative forms of discipline should begin during the child's first year of life. PMID:24602690

  14. Parental spanking of 1-year-old children and subsequent child protective services involvement.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shawna J; Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew; Berger, Lawrence M

    2014-05-01

    The majority of U.S. parents spank their children, often beginning when their children are very young. We examined families (N=2,788) who participated in a longitudinal community-based study of new births in urban areas. Prospective analyses examined whether spanking by the child's mother, father, or mother's current partner when the child was 1-year-old was associated with household CPS involvement between age 1 and age 5. Results indicated that 30% of 1-year-olds were spanked at least once in the past month. Spanking at age 1 was associated with increased odds of subsequent CPS involvement (adjusted odds ratio=1.36, 95% CI [1.08, 1.71], p<.01). When compared to non-spanked children, there was a 33% greater probability of subsequent CPS involvement for children who were spanked at age 1. Given the undesirable consequences of spanking children and a lack of empirical evidence to suggest positive effects of physical punishment, professionals who work with families should counsel parents not to spank infants and toddlers. For optimal benefits, efforts to educate parents regarding alternative forms of discipline should begin during the child's first year of life. PMID:24602690

  15. Immediate Implant Placement in a Patient With Osteoporosis Undergoing Bisphosphonate Therapy: 1-Year Preliminary Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Siebert, Tomas; Jurkovic, Richard; Statelova, Dagmar; Strecha, Juraj

    2015-07-01

    The purposes of this preliminary study are to assess the risk of developing bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) in a patient with osteoporosis using zoledronic acid and to report the results of a 1-year prospective clinical study regarding 5 immediately inserted implants in the anterior mandible. For this comparative prospective study, 24 female patients, aged ≥54 years, were chosen, all with partially edentulous mandibles. Group A consisted of 12 patients with osteoporosis taking zoledronic acid receiving a once-yearly intravenous infusion of zoledronic acid (5 mg). Control group B consisted of 12 other patients without osteoporosis and not taking drugs. In both groups, the remaining teeth were extracted before 120 implants, 3.7-mm wide and 16-mm long, were immediately installed in the interforaminal region of the mandibles. The 1-year implant survival rate was 100%. No apparent necrotic bone was observed among patients receiving zoledronic acid (group A) after implant surgery. Immediate implant osseointegration can be successful in a patient with osteoporosis using bisphosphonates, suggesting the safety of implantology as a treatment modality. PMID:24041299

  16. The Effect of Body Mass Index on Pelvic Floor Support 1 Year Postpartum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Johnson, Benjamin; Li, Fangyong; King, William C; Connell, Kathleen A; Guess, Marsha K

    2016-02-01

    Elevated body mass index (BMI) is associated with the incidence, prevalence, and progression of pelvic organ prolapse (POP). This study investigated the effect of peripartum BMI on pelvic floor support 1 year postpartum (PP1y). One hundred eight nulliparous women had their BMI recorded and underwent POP assessments using the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification System at baseline, third trimester (36th to 38th week of pregnancy [G36-38w]), and PP1y. Pelvic organ prolapse was defined as ≥stage II. Women gained on average 1.9 kg between baseline and PP1y. After adjustment, increasing BMI PP1y was associated with increasing anterior wall descent (P < .0001) and higher odds of having POP PP1y (odds ratio: 1.41, 95% confidence interval: 1.01-1.97, P = .045). Trial of labor compared to unlabored cesarean delivery, POP G36-38w, and decreased fetal weight were independently associated with anterior vaginal wall laxity PP1y. Our finding suggests that postpartum BMI influences pelvic floor laxity 1 year after delivery. Postpartum weight reduction may serve as a strategy for POP prevention in some women. PMID:26494698

  17. BDNF mediates improvements in executive function following a 1-year exercise intervention.

    PubMed

    Leckie, Regina L; Oberlin, Lauren E; Voss, Michelle W; Prakash, Ruchika S; Szabo-Reed, Amanda; Chaddock-Heyman, Laura; Phillips, Siobhan M; Gothe, Neha P; Mailey, Emily; Vieira-Potter, Victoria J; Martin, Stephen A; Pence, Brandt D; Lin, Mingkuan; Parasuraman, Raja; Greenwood, Pamela M; Fryxell, Karl J; Woods, Jeffrey A; McAuley, Edward; Kramer, Arthur F; Erickson, Kirk I

    2014-01-01

    Executive function declines with age, but engaging in aerobic exercise may attenuate decline. One mechanism by which aerobic exercise may preserve executive function is through the up-regulation of brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF), which also declines with age. The present study examined BDNF as a mediator of the effects of a 1-year walking intervention on executive function in 90 older adults (mean age = 66.82). Participants were randomized to a stretching and toning control group or a moderate intensity walking intervention group. BDNF serum levels and performance on a task-switching paradigm were collected at baseline and follow-up. We found that age moderated the effect of intervention group on changes in BDNF levels, with those in the highest age quartile showing the greatest increase in BDNF after 1-year of moderate intensity walking exercise (p = 0.036). The mediation analyses revealed that BDNF mediated the effect of the intervention on task-switch accuracy, but did so as a function of age, such that exercise-induced changes in BDNF mediated the effect of exercise on task-switch performance only for individuals over the age of 71. These results demonstrate that both age and BDNF serum levels are important factors to consider when investigating the mechanisms by which exercise interventions influence cognitive outcomes, particularly in elderly populations. PMID:25566019

  18. Determinants of telomere attrition over 1 year in healthy older women: stress and health behaviors matter.

    PubMed

    Puterman, E; Lin, J; Krauss, J; Blackburn, E H; Epel, E S

    2015-04-01

    Telomere length, a reliable predictor of disease pathogenesis, can be affected by genetics, chronic stress and health behaviors. Cross-sectionally, highly stressed postmenopausal women have shorter telomeres, but only if they are inactive. However, no studies have prospectively examined telomere length change over a short period, and if rate of attrition is affected by naturalistic factors such as stress and engagement in healthy behaviors, including diet, exercise, and sleep. Here we followed healthy women over 1 year to test if major stressors that occurred over the year predicted telomere shortening, and whether engaging in healthy behaviors during this period mitigates this effect. In 239 postmenopausal, non-smoking, disease-free women, accumulation of major life stressors across a 1-year period predicted telomere attrition over the same period-for every major life stressor that occurred during the year, there was a significantly greater decline in telomere length over the year of 35 bp (P<0.05). Yet, these effects were moderated by health behaviors (interaction B=0.19, P=0.04). Women who maintained relatively higher levels of health behaviors (1 s.d. above the mean) appeared to be protected when exposed to stress. This finding has implications for understanding malleability of telomere length, as well as expectations for possible intervention effects. This is the first study to identify predictors of telomere length change over the short period of a year. PMID:25070535

  19. Residual skin damage in rats 1 year after exposure to x rays or accelerated heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Leith, J.T.; McDonald, M.; Howard, J.

    1982-01-01

    In conjunction with a study on the biological effects of accelerated heavy ions on rat spinal cord, we were able to assess the residual skin damage remaining 1 year postirradiation. In this study, rats were irradiated with 230-kVp fractionated doses of either X rays, carbon ions, or neon ions. Four radiation fractions were given at daily intervals. For the carbon and neon ion exposures, rats were irradiated in both the plateau and spread Bragg peak (4 cm) regions of ionization. Comparing doses that produced complete epilation with a slight suggestion of a residual radiation scar, it was found that the relative biological effectivesness (RBE) values 1 year postirradiation for the four fraction irradiations were: carbon ions (plateau ionization region), 1.06; carbon ions (spread Bragg peak ionization region), 1.88; neon ions (plateau region of ionization), 1.55; and neon ions (spread Bragg peak ionization region), 2.26. RBE values for production of paralysis after spinal cord irradiation (using the same X-ray total dose levels for comparison purposes) were in all cases higher than the RBE values obtained from assessment of residual skin injury.

  20. Enhancing Coparenting, Parenting, and Child Self-Regulation: Effects of Family Foundations 1 Year after Birth

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, Mark E.; Kan, Marni L.; Goslin, Megan C.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated whether a psycho-educational program with modest dosage (eight sessions), delivered in a universal framework through childbirth education programs and targeting the coparenting relationship would have a positive impact on observed family interaction and child behavior at 6-month follow-up (child age 1 year). One hundred sixty-nine couples, randomized to intervention and control conditions, participated in videotaped family observation tasks at pretest (during pregnancy) and at child age 1 year (2003–2007). Coparenting, parenting, couple relationship, and child self-regulatory behaviors were coded by teams of raters. Intent-to-treat analyses of program effects controlled for age, education, and social desirability. Evidence of significant (p<0.05) program effects at follow-up emerged in all four domains. Effect sizes ranged from 0.28 to 1.01. Targeting the coparenting relationship at the transition to parenthood represents an effective, non-stigmatizing means of promoting parenting quality and child adjustment. PMID:19381809

  1. Phase Fluctuations at Goldstone Derived from 1-Year Site Testing Interferometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James A.; Acosta, Roberto J.; Morabito, David D.

    2009-01-01

    A two-element site test interferometer has been deployed at the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) tracking complex in Goldstone, California, since May 2007. The interferometer system consists of two offset-fed 1.2 m parabolic reflectors which monitor atmospheric-induced amplitude and phase fluctuations on an unmodulated beacon signal (20.199 GHz) broadcast from a geostationary satellite (Anik F2). The geometry of the satellite and the ground-based infrastructure imposes a 48.5 elevation angle with a separation distance of 256 m along an east-west baseline. The interferometer has been recording phase fluctuation data, to date, for 1 yr with an overall system availability of 95 percent. In this paper, we provide the cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) for 1 year of recorded data, including phase rms, spatial structure function exponent, and surface meteorological measurements: surface wind speed, relative humidity, temperature, barometric pressure, and rain rate. Correlation between surface measurements, phase rms, and amplitude rms at different time scales are discussed. For 1 year, phase fluctuations at the DSN site in Goldstone, are better than 23 for 90 percent of the time (at 48.5 elevation). This data will be used to determine the suitability of the Goldstone site as a location for the Next Generation Deep Space Network.

  2. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Is Associated With Higher 1-year All-Cause Rehospitalization Rates in Patients Admitted for Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Valbusa, Filippo; Bonapace, Stefano; Grillo, Cristina; Scala, Luca; Chiampan, Andrea; Rossi, Andrea; Zoppini, Giacomo; Lonardo, Amedeo; Arcaro, Guido; Byrne, Christopher D; Targher, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    Repeat hospitalization due to acute heart failure (HF) is a global public health problem that markedly impacts on health resource use. Identifying novel predictors of rehospitalization would help physicians to determine the optimal postdischarge plan for preventing HF rehospitalization. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an emerging risk factor for many heart diseases, including HF. We assessed whether NAFLD at hospital admission predicts 1-year all-cause rehospitalization in patients with acute HF. We enrolled all patients consecutively admitted for acute HF to our General Medicine Division, from January 2013 to April 2014, after excluding patients with acute myocardial infarction, severe heart valve diseases, malignancy, known liver diseases, and those with volume overload related to extracardiac causes. NAFLD was diagnosed by ultrasonography and exclusion of competing etiologies. The primary outcome of the study was the 1-year all-cause rehospitalization rate. Among the 107 patients enrolled in the study, the cumulative rehospitalization rate was 12.1% at 1 month, 25.2% at 3 months, 29.9% at 6 months, and 38.3% at 1 year. Patients with NAFLD had markedly higher 1-year rehospitalization rates than those without NAFLD (58% vs 21% at 1 y; P < 0.001 by the log-rank test). Cox regression analysis revealed that NAFLD was associated with a 5.5-fold increased risk of rehospitalization (adjusted hazard ratio 5.56, 95% confidence interval 2.46-12.1, P < 0.001) after adjustment for multiple HF risk factors and potential confounders. In conclusion, NAFLD was independently associated with higher 1-year rehospitalization in patients hospitalized for acute HF. PMID:26886619

  3. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Is Associated With Higher 1-year All-Cause Rehospitalization Rates in Patients Admitted for Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Valbusa, Filippo; Bonapace, Stefano; Grillo, Cristina; Scala, Luca; Chiampan, Andrea; Rossi, Andrea; Zoppini, Giacomo; Lonardo, Amedeo; Arcaro, Guido; Byrne, Christopher D.; Targher, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Repeat hospitalization due to acute heart failure (HF) is a global public health problem that markedly impacts on health resource use. Identifying novel predictors of rehospitalization would help physicians to determine the optimal postdischarge plan for preventing HF rehospitalization. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an emerging risk factor for many heart diseases, including HF. We assessed whether NAFLD at hospital admission predicts 1-year all-cause rehospitalization in patients with acute HF. We enrolled all patients consecutively admitted for acute HF to our General Medicine Division, from January 2013 to April 2014, after excluding patients with acute myocardial infarction, severe heart valve diseases, malignancy, known liver diseases, and those with volume overload related to extracardiac causes. NAFLD was diagnosed by ultrasonography and exclusion of competing etiologies. The primary outcome of the study was the 1-year all-cause rehospitalization rate. Among the 107 patients enrolled in the study, the cumulative rehospitalization rate was 12.1% at 1 month, 25.2% at 3 months, 29.9% at 6 months, and 38.3% at 1 year. Patients with NAFLD had markedly higher 1-year rehospitalization rates than those without NAFLD (58% vs 21% at 1 y; P < 0.001 by the log-rank test). Cox regression analysis revealed that NAFLD was associated with a 5.5-fold increased risk of rehospitalization (adjusted hazard ratio 5.56, 95% confidence interval 2.46–12.1, P < 0.001) after adjustment for multiple HF risk factors and potential confounders. In conclusion, NAFLD was independently associated with higher 1-year rehospitalization in patients hospitalized for acute HF. PMID:26886619

  4. Hodgkin's disease mortality in Europe.

    PubMed Central

    La Vecchia, C.; Levi, F.; Lucchini, F.; Kaye, S. B.; Boyle, P.

    1991-01-01

    Trends in mortality from Hodgkin's disease between mid 1950s and the late 1980s have been analysed for 16 western European and seven eastern European countries. In all western countries there were substantial falls in mortality from the late 1960s onwards, for an overall mean decline of 50% in both sexes, although these falls were somewhat larger in Nordic countries (approaching 70% in Denmark and Sweden), and more limited (20 to 30%) in Portugal, Spain and Greece. The reductions in Hodgkin's disease mortality were evident both in younger (under 35) and middle age (35 to 64 years), as well as in children under 15 and, in several countries, in the elderly (above 65), too. They were persistent up to the most recent calendar periods, with no evidence of flattening off. The pattern of trends in Hodgkin's disease mortality was largely different in Eastern Europe. Among seven countries examined, some fall was observed only in Bulgaria and Czechoslovakia, but other countries showed no consistent pattern and there was some increase, too. In absolute terms, the reductions in Hodgkin's disease mortality in Western Europe correspond to the avoidance of over 3,000 deaths per year. This stresses the importance and urgency of improving the availability of currently defined knowledge and resources for treatment of Hodgkin's disease in Eastern Europe. PMID:1911221

  5. Postdischarge mortality in children with acute infectious diseases: derivation of postdischarge mortality prediction models

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, M O; Kumbakumba, E; Larson, C P; Ansermino, J M; Singer, J; Kissoon, N; Wong, H; Ndamira, A; Kabakyenga, J; Kiwanuka, J; Zhou, G

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To derive a model of paediatric postdischarge mortality following acute infectious illness. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting 2 hospitals in South-western Uganda. Participants 1307 children of 6 months to 5 years of age were admitted with a proven or suspected infection. 1242 children were discharged alive and followed up 6 months following discharge. The 6-month follow-up rate was 98.3%. Interventions None. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome was postdischarge mortality within 6 months following the initial hospital discharge. Results 64 children died during admission (5.0%) and 61 died within 6 months of discharge (4.9%). Of those who died following discharge, 31 (51%) occurred within the first 30 days. The final adjusted model for the prediction of postdischarge mortality included the variables mid-upper arm circumference (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.94 to 0.97, per 1 mm increase), time since last hospitalisation (OR 0.76, 95% CI 0.61 to 0.93, for each increased period of no hospitalisation), oxygen saturation (OR 0.96, 95% CI 0.93 to 0·99, per 1% increase), abnormal Blantyre Coma Scale score (OR 2.39, 95% CI 1·18 to 4.83), and HIV-positive status (OR 2.98, 95% CI 1.36 to 6.53). This model produced a receiver operating characteristic curve with an area under the curve of 0.82. With sensitivity of 80%, our model had a specificity of 66%. Approximately 35% of children would be identified as high risk (11.1% mortality risk) and the remaining would be classified as low risk (1.4% mortality risk), in a similar cohort. Conclusions Mortality following discharge is a poorly recognised contributor to child mortality. Identification of at-risk children is critical in developing postdischarge interventions. A simple prediction tool that uses 5 easily collected variables can be used to identify children at high risk of death after discharge. Improved discharge planning and care could be provided for high-risk children. PMID

  6. Chronic musculoskeletal complaints as a predictor of mortality-The HUNT study.

    PubMed

    Åsberg, Anders N; Stovner, Lars J; Zwart, John-Anker; Winsvold, Bendik S; Heuch, Ingrid; Hagen, Knut

    2016-07-01

    The impact of chronic musculoskeletal complaints (CMSC) and chronic widespread chronic musculoskeletal complaints (CWMSC) on mortality is controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between these conditions and mortality. In this prospective population-based cohort study from Norway, baseline data from the second Nord-Trøndelag Health Survey (HUNT2, performed 1995-1997) were linked to the comprehensive National Cause of Death Registry in Norway with follow-up through the year 2011. A total of 65,026 individuals (70%) participated and were categorized based on their response to CMSC questions in HUNT2 (no CMSC, CMSC, or CWMSC). Hazard ratios (HRs) of mortality during a mean of 14.1 years of follow-up were estimated using Cox regression. During the follow-up period, 12,521 subjects died, 5162 from cardiovascular diseases, 3478 from cancer, and 3881 from all other causes. In the multivariate-adjusted analyses, there was no difference in all-cause mortality between individuals with or without CMSC (HR 1.01, confidence interval, 0.97-1.05) and CWMSC (HR 1.01, confidence interval, 0.96-1.05). Similarly, there was no association between CMSC or CWMSC and cardiovascular mortality, mortality from cancer, or mortality from all other causes. Therefore, from this study, we conclude that there is no evidence for a higher mortality rate among individuals with CMSC or CWMSC. PMID:26919487

  7. Electrocardiographic Predictors of Cardiovascular Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Mozos, Ioana; Caraba, Alexandru

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the main causes of mortality. Sudden cardiac death may also appear in athletes, due to underlying congenital or inherited cardiac abnormalities. The electrocardiogram is used in clinical practice and clinical trials, as a valid, reliable, accessible, inexpensive method. The aim of the present paper was to review electrocardiographic (ECG) signs associated with cardiovascular mortality and the mechanisms underlying those associations, providing a brief description of the main studies in this area, and consider their implication for clinical practice in the general population and athletes. The main ECG parameters associated with cardiovascular mortality in the present paper are the P wave (duration, interatrial block, and deep terminal negativity of the P wave in V1), prolonged QT and Tpeak-Tend intervals, QRS duration and fragmentation, bundle branch block, ST segment depression and elevation, T waves (inverted, T wave axes), spatial angles between QRS and T vectors, premature ventricular contractions, and ECG hypertrophy criteria. PMID:26257460

  8. Mortality among British Columbia pilots.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, D A; Band, P R; Threlfall, W J; Gallagher, R P

    1991-04-01

    We studied the mortality experience of all pilots who died in the province of British Columbia between 1950 and 1984, using proportional mortality ratios (PMR) and proportional cancer mortality ratios (PCMR). There were 341 deaths during that time in males whose usual occupation was listed as pilot. The PMR for aircraft accidents was significantly elevated (PMR = 3196, 95% C.I. 2810, 3634), and the PMR for atherosclerotic heart disease was significantly depressed (PMR = 47, 95% C.I. 30, 70). Although based on small numbers of deaths, and not statistically significant, elevated PCMRs were seen for cancers of the colon, brain, and nervous system, as well as for Hodgkin's disease. These findings suggest the need for further epidemiologic studies of commercial airline pilots. PMID:2031640

  9. Universal mortality law and immortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azbel', Mark Ya.

    2004-10-01

    Well-protected human and laboratory animal populations with abundant resources are evolutionarily unprecedented. Physical approach, which takes advantage of their extensively quantified mortality, establishes that its dominant fraction yields the exact law, which is universal for all animals from yeast to humans. Singularities of the law demonstrate new kinds of stepwise adaptation. The law proves that universal mortality is an evolutionary by-product, which at any given age is reversible, independent of previous life history, and disposable. Life expectancy may be extended, arguably to immortality, by minor biological amendments in the animals. Indeed, in nematodes with a small number of perturbed genes and tissues it increased 6-fold (to 430 years in human terms), with no apparent loss in health and vitality. The law relates universal mortality to specific processes in cells and their genetic regulation.

  10. Electrocardiographic Predictors of Cardiovascular Mortality.

    PubMed

    Mozos, Ioana; Caraba, Alexandru

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the main causes of mortality. Sudden cardiac death may also appear in athletes, due to underlying congenital or inherited cardiac abnormalities. The electrocardiogram is used in clinical practice and clinical trials, as a valid, reliable, accessible, inexpensive method. The aim of the present paper was to review electrocardiographic (ECG) signs associated with cardiovascular mortality and the mechanisms underlying those associations, providing a brief description of the main studies in this area, and consider their implication for clinical practice in the general population and athletes. The main ECG parameters associated with cardiovascular mortality in the present paper are the P wave (duration, interatrial block, and deep terminal negativity of the P wave in V1), prolonged QT and Tpeak-Tend intervals, QRS duration and fragmentation, bundle branch block, ST segment depression and elevation, T waves (inverted, T wave axes), spatial angles between QRS and T vectors, premature ventricular contractions, and ECG hypertrophy criteria. PMID:26257460

  11. Trends and predictions for gastric cancer mortality in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Giusti, Angela Carolina Brandão; de Oliveira Salvador, Pétala Tuani Candido; dos Santos, Juliano; Meira, Karina Cardoso; Camacho, Amanda Rodrigues; Guimarães, Raphael Mendonça; Souza, Dyego L B

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the effect of age-period and birth cohort on gastric cancer mortality, in Brazil and across its five geographic regions, by sex, in the population over 20 years of age, as well as make projections for the period 2010-2029. METHODS: An ecological study is presented herein, which distributed gastric cancer-related deaths in Brazil and its geographic regions. The effects of age-period and birth cohort were calculated by the Poisson regression model and projections were made with the age-period-cohort model in the statistical program R. RESULTS: Progressive reduction of mortality rates was observed in the 1980’s, and then higher and lower mortality rates were verified in the 2000’s, for both sexes, in Brazil and for the South, Southeast and Midwest regions. A progressive decrease in mortality rates was observed for the Northeast (both sexes) and North (men only) regions within the period 1995-1999, followed by rising rates. CONCLUSION: Regional differences were demonstrated in the mortality rates for gastric cancer in Brazil, and the least developed regions of the country will present increases in projected mortality rates. PMID:27605887

  12. Fluid Balance, Diuretic Use, and Mortality in Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Estrella, Michelle M.; Coresh, Josef; Brower, Roy G.; Liu, Kathleen D.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Management of volume status in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) is complex, and the role of diuretics is controversial. The primary objective was to elucidate the association between fluid balance, diuretic use, and short-term mortality after AKI in critically ill patients. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Using data from the Fluid and Catheter Treatment Trial (FACTT), a multicenter, randomized controlled trial evaluating a conservative versus liberal fluid-management strategy in 1000 patients with acute lung injury (ALI), we evaluated the association of post-renal injury fluid balance and diuretic use with 60-day mortality in patients who developed AKI, as defined by the AKI Network criteria. Results 306 patients developed AKI in the first 2 study days and were included in our analysis. There were 137 in the fluid-liberal arm and 169 in the fluid-conservative arm (P = 0.04). Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. Post-AKI fluid balance was significantly associated with mortality in both crude and adjusted analysis. Higher post-AKI furosemide doses had a protective effect on mortality but no significant effect after adjustment for post-AKI fluid balance. There was no threshold dose of furosemide above which mortality increased. Conclusions A positive fluid balance after AKI was strongly associated with mortality. Post-AKI diuretic therapy was associated with 60-day patient survival in FACTT patients with ALI; this effect may be mediated by fluid balance. PMID:21393482

  13. Mortality study in an asbestos cement factory in Naples, Italy.

    PubMed

    Menegozzo, Simona; Comba, Pietro; Ferrante, Daniela; De Santis, Marco; Gorini, Giuseppe; Izzo, Francesco; Magnani, Corrado; Pirastu, Roberta; Simonetti, Andrea; Tùnesi, Sara; Menegozzo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate mortality among 1247 male asbestos-cement workers employed in an asbestos-cement plant located in Naples. The cohort included 1247 men hired between 1950 and 1986. The follow-up began on January 1st 1965. The vital status and causes of death were ascertained up to December 31 2005. Cause-specific mortality rates of the Campania Region population were used as reference. Relative risks were estimated using Standardized Mortality Ratios (SMRs), and the confidence intervals were calculated at a 95% level (95% CI). A significant increase in mortality was observed for respiratory disease (81 deaths; SMR = 187; 95% CI = 149- 233), particularly for pneumoconiosis (42 deaths; SMR = 13 313; 95% CI = 9595-17 996) of which 41 deaths for asbestosis (SMR = 43 385; 95% CI = 31 134-58 857), for pleural cancer (24 deaths; SMR = 2617; 95% CI = 1677-3893), for lung cancer (84 deaths; SMR=153; 95% CI = 122-189) and for peritoneal cancer (9 deaths; SMR = 1985; 95% CI = 908-3769). Non-significant increases were also observed for rectum cancer (6 deaths; SMR = 157; 95% CI = 58-342). In conclusion, consistently with other mortality studies on asbestos-cement workers performed in different countries, an increased mortality from asbestosis, lung cancer, pleural and peritoneal mesothelioma was detected in the present cohort. PMID:21952156

  14. The mortality of lead smelter workers: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Steenland, K.; Selevan, S.; Landrigan, P. )

    1992-12-01

    OBJECTIVES. Mortality studies of lead workers have shown excesses of nonmalignant renal disease and cerebrovascular disease. Animal studies and one human study have shown excess kidney cancer. We have updated a mortality study of male lead smelter workers (n = 1990). METHODS. An analysis was conducted using standard life table techniques. The updated analysis added 11 years of follow-up and 363 new deaths. RESULTS. The original study had found elevated but nonsignificant risks for kidney cancer, stroke, and nonmalignant renal disease, probably attributable to lead exposure. Deaths from accidents and nonmalignant respiratory disease were significantly elevated, but probably not as a result of lead exposure. In the updated study, no new deaths from nonmalignant renal disease occurred (9 observed, standardized mortality ratio = 1.21). Three more deaths from kidney cancer were observed, yielding a standardized mortality ratio of 1.93 (9 observed, 95% CI = 0.88, 3.67), which increased for those who had worked in areas with the highest lead exposure (8 observed, standardized mortality ratio = 2.39, 95% CI = 1.03, 4.71). Cerebrovascular disease remained elevated for those with more than 20 years of exposure (26 observed, standardized mortality ratio = 1.41, 95% CI = 0.92, 2.07). CONCLUSIONS. This cohort with high lead exposure showed a diminishing excess of death from nonmalignant renal disease, a continued excess from kidney cancer, and an excess of cerebrovascular disease only in those with longest exposure to lead.

  15. Socioeconomic Factors Impact Inpatient Mortality in Pediatric Lymphoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Puckett, Yana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Our objective was to determine the risk factors for inpatient mortality of pediatric patients diagnosed with lymphoma through the utilization of a large national pediatric database. Methods: This cross-sectional study uses data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database (HCUP KID) for the year of 2012 to estimate the risk factors for inpatient mortality for pediatric patients diagnosed with lymphoma. All patients diagnosed with lymphoma between the ages of one and 18 years were included. Chi-square test was used to analyze categorical variables. Independent t-test was used to analyze continuous variables. Results: A total of 2,908 study subjects with lymphoma were analyzed. Of those, 56.1% were male and the average age was three years old. Total inpatient mortality was 1.2% or 34 patients. We found that patients with four or more chronic conditions were much more likely to die while hospitalized (p < 0.0001). In addition, we also saw that patients with median household incomes below $47,999 dollars (p = 0.05) having a need for a major procedure (p = 0.008) were associated with inpatient mortality. Congestive heart failure, renal failure, coagulopathy, metastatic disease, and electrolyte abnormalities were all found to be associated with inpatient mortality. Conclusions: Pediatric lymphoma mortality in children is not only influenced by their medical condition but also by their socioeconomic condition as well. PMID:27433403

  16. Affordability of alcohol and alcohol-related mortality in Belarus.

    PubMed

    Razvodovsky, Yury E

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol abuse has numerous adverse health and social consequences. The consumer response to changes in alcohol affordability is an important issue on alcohol policy debates. Studies from many countries have shown an inverse relationship between alcohol prices and alcohol consumption in the population. There are, however, suggestions that increasing the price of alcohol by rising taxes may have limited effect on alcohol-related problems, associated with long-term heavy drinking. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between alcohol affordability and alcohol-related mortality rates in post-Soviet Belarus. For this purpose trends in alcohol-related mortality rates (mortality from liver cirrhosis, pancreatitis, alcoholism and alcohol psychoses) and affordability of vodka between 1990 and 2010 were compared. The time series analysis revealed that 1% increase in vodka affordability is associated with an increase in liver cirrhosis mortality of 0,77%, an increase in pancreatitis mortality of 0.53%, an increase in mortality from alcoholism and alcohol psychoses of 0,70%. The major conclusion emerging from this study is that affordability of alcohol is one of the most important predictor of alcohol-related problems in a population. These findings provide additional evidence that decreasing in affordability of alcohol is an effective strategy for reducing alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm. PMID:23748944

  17. Does reservoir host mortality enhance transmission of West Nile virus?

    PubMed Central

    Foppa, Ivo M; Spielman, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Background Since its 1999 emergence in New York City, West Nile virus (WNV) has become the most important and widespread cause of mosquito-transmitted disease in North America. Its sweeping spread from the Atlantic to the Pacific coast was accompanied by widespread mortality among wild birds, especially corvids. Only sporadic avian mortality had previously been associated with this infection in the Old World. Here, we examine the possibility that reservoir host mortality may intensify transmission, both by concentrating vector mosquitoes on remaining hosts and by preventing the accumulation of "herd immunity". Results Inspection of the Ross-Macdonald expression of the basic reproductive number (R0) suggests that this quantity may increase with reservoir host mortality. Computer simulation confirms this finding and indicates that the level of virulence is positively associated with the numbers of infectious mosquitoes by the end of the epizootic. The presence of reservoir incompetent hosts in even moderate numbers largely eliminated the transmission-enhancing effect of host mortality. Local host die-off may prevent mosquitoes to "waste" infectious blood meals on immune host and may thus facilitate perpetuation and spread of transmission. Conclusion Under certain conditions, host mortality may enhance transmission of WNV and similarly maintained arboviruses and thus facilitate their emergence and spread. The validity of the assumptions upon which this argument is built need to be empirically examined. PMID:17498307

  18. Mortality in Sepsis and its relationship with Gender

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Nosheen; Jamil, Bushra; Siddiqui, Shahla; Talat, Najeeha; Khan, Fauzia A.; Hussain, Rabia

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Sepsis remains a leading cause of death across the world, carrying a mortality rate of 20–50%. Women have been reported to be less likely to suffer from sepsis and to have a lower risk of mortality from sepsis compared to men. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between gender and mortality in sepsis, and compare cytokine profiles of male and female patients. Methods: This was a prospective case series on 97 patients admitted with sepsis. Clinical and microbiological data was gathered, blood samples were collected for cytokine (IL-10, IL-6 and TNFα) levels and patients were followed up for clinical outcome. Results: There were 54% males and 46% females, with no significant difference of age or comorbids between genders. Respiratory tract infection was the commonest source of sepsis, and was more common in females (60%) compared to males (39%) (p=0.034). Males had a higher mortality (p=0.048, RR 1.73) and plasma IL-6 level(p=0.040) compared to females. Mean IL-6 plasma level was significantly (p<0.01) higher in patients who died vs. who recovered. Conclusion: Our study shows that males with sepsis have a 70% greater mortality rate, and mortality is associated with a higher IL-6 plasma level. PMID:26649014

  19. National variation in United States sepsis mortality: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The regional distribution of a disease may provide important insights regarding its pathophysiology, risk factors and clinical care. While sepsis is a prominent cause of death in the United States (US), few studies have examined regional variations with this malady. We identified the national variation in sepsis deaths in the US. We conducted a descriptive analysis of 1999-2005 national vital statistics data from the National Center for Health Statistics summarized at the state-level. We defined sepsis deaths as deaths attributed to an infection, classified according to the International Classification of Diseases, Version 10. We calculated national and state age-adjusted sepsis-attributed mortality rates. Results National age-adjusted sepsis mortality was 65.5 per 100,000 persons (95% CI: 65.8 - 66.0). State level sepsis mortality varied more than two-fold (range 41 to 88.6 per 100,000 persons; median 60.8 per 100,000, IQR 53.9-74.4 per 100,000). A cluster extending from the Southeastern to the mid-Atlantic US encompassed states with the highest sepsis mortality. Conclusions Sepsis mortality varies across the US. The states with highest sepsis mortality form a contiguous cluster in the Southeastern and mid-Atlantic US. These observations highlight unanswered questions regarding the characteristics and care of sepsis. PMID:20156361

  20. Study of Hydatidosis-Attributed Mortality in Endemic Area

    PubMed Central

    Belhassen-García, Moncef; Romero-Alegria, Angela; Velasco-Tirado, Virginia; Alonso-Sardón, Montserrat; Lopez-Bernus, Amparo; Alvela-Suarez, Lucia; del Villar, Luis Perez; Carpio-Perez, Adela; Galindo-Perez, Inmaculada; Cordero-Sanchez, Miguel; Pardo-Lledias, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Background Cystic hydatid disease is still an important health problem in European Mediterranean areas. In spite of being traditionally considered as a “benign” pathology, cystic echinococcosis is an important cause of morbidity in these areas. Nevertheless, there are few analyses of mortality attributed to human hydatidosis. Objective To describe the epidemiology, the mortality rate and the causes of mortality due to E. granulosus infection in an endemic area. Methodology A retrospective study followed up over a period of 14 years (1998–2011). Principal Findings Of the 567 patients diagnosed with hydatid disease over the period 1998–2011, eleven deaths directly related to hydatid disease complications were recorded. Ten patients (90.9%) died due to infectious complications and the remaining one (9.1%) died due to mechanical complications after a massive hemoptysis. We registered a case fatality rate of 1.94% and a mortality rate of 3.1 per 100.000 inhabitants. Conclusions Hydatidosis is still a frequent parasitic disease that causes a considerable mortality. The main causes of mortality in patients with hydatidosis are complications related to the rupture of CE cysts with supurative collangitis. Therefore, an expectant management can be dangerous and it must be only employed in well-selected patients. PMID:24632824

  1. Use of early indicators in rehabilitation process to predict one-year mortality in elderly hip fracture patients.

    PubMed

    Dubljanin-Raspopović, Emilija; Markovic Denić, Ljiljana; Marinković, Jelena; Grajić, Mirko; Tomanovic Vujadinović, Sanja; Bumbaširević, Marko

    2012-01-01

    Hip fractures remain one of the most devastating injuries in the elderly. Early prediction of outcome following hip fracture potentially results in more efficient health care. The aims of this study were to explore predictors of ambulation status at hospital discharge in patients ≥65 years of age operated on for fracture of the hip, and to investigate the impact of ambulation status at hospital discharge on 1-year mortality after hip fracture. We studied 344 patients who underwent surgery for hip fracture during a 12 month period. Multivariate regression analysis was used to explore predictive factors for ambulatory status at discharge, and 1-year mortality adjusted on important baseline variables. Cumulative 1-year mortality was significantly lower for patients in the ambulatory group when compared to patients in the non-ambulatory group. Patients who were older, had severe cognitive impairment, lower functional level before injury, and in whom postoperative delirium and pressure ulcers occurred had a higher chance of not recovering their gait ability at hospital discharge, and being dead 1 year after hip fracture. Inability to walk at hospital discharge and presence of delirium are independent predictors of 1-year mortality. Every effort should be made to assure early mobilisation after hip fracture surgery, and prevention, prompt recognition and treatment of postoperative complications is important in order to facilitate better short-and long-term outcome. PMID:23233176

  2. The Effect of Intensified Low Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Reduction on Recurrent Myocardial Infarction and Cardiovascular Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei-Chun; Lin, Tzu-Wen; Chiou, Kuan-Rau; Cheng, Chin-Chang; Kuo, Feng-Yu; Chiang, Cheng-Hung; Yang, Jin-Shiou; Lin, Ko-Long; Hsiao, Shin-Hung; Yeh, Tong-Chen; Mar, Guang-Yuan; Hsiao, Hsiang-Chiang; Lin, Shoa-Lin; Chiou, Chuen-Wang; Liu, Chun-Peng

    2013-01-01

    Background Lipid-lowering therapy plays an important role in preventing the recurrence of cardiovascular events in patients after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). This study aimed to assess the effect of intensified low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) reduction on recurrent myocardial infarction and cardiovascular mortality in patients after AMI. Method The 562 enrolled AMI patients (84.2% male) were divided into two groups according to 3-month LDL-C decrease percentage equal to or more than 40% (n = 165) and less than 40% (n = 397). To evaluate the long-term efficacy of LDL-C reduction, the 5-year outcomes were collected, including time to the first occurrence of myocardial infarction and time to cardiovascular death. Results The baseline characteristics and complication rates were not different between the two study groups. The patients with 3-month LDL-C decrease ≥ 40% had higher baseline LDL-C and lower 3-month, 1-year, 2-year, 3-year, 4-year and 5-year LDL-C than the patients with 3-month LDL-C decrease < 40%. In Kaplan-Meier analyses, those patients with 3-month LDL-C decrease ≥ 40% had a higher rate of freedom from myocardial infarction (p = 0.006) and survival rate (p = 0.02) at 5-year follow-up. The 3-month LDL-C < 40% parameter was significantly related to cardiovascular death (HR: 9.62, 95% CI 1.18-78.62, p < 0.04). Conclusions After acute myocardial infarction, 3-month LDL-C decrease < 40% was identified to be a significant risk factor for predicting 5-year cardiovascular death. The patients with 3-month LDL-C decrease ≥ 40% had a higher rate of freedom from myocardial infarction and lower cardiovascular mortality, even though these patients had higher baseline LDL-C value. PMID:27122737

  3. Development and Validation of Predictive Models of Cardiac Mortality and Transplantation in Resynchronization Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Eduardo Arrais; Pereira, Francisca Tatiana Moreira; Abreu, José Sebastião; Lima, José Wellington O.; Monteiro, Marcelo de Paula Martins; Rocha Neto, Almino Cavalcante; Goés, Camilla Viana Arrais; Farias, Ana Gardênia P.; Rodrigues Sobrinho, Carlos Roberto Martins; Quidute, Ana Rosa Pinto; Scanavacca, Maurício Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background 30-40% of cardiac resynchronization therapy cases do not achieve favorable outcomes. Objective This study aimed to develop predictive models for the combined endpoint of cardiac death and transplantation (Tx) at different stages of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Methods Prospective observational study of 116 patients aged 64.8 ± 11.1 years, 68.1% of whom had functional class (FC) III and 31.9% had ambulatory class IV. Clinical, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic variables were assessed by using Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier curves. Results The cardiac mortality/Tx rate was 16.3% during the follow-up period of 34.0 ± 17.9 months. Prior to implantation, right ventricular dysfunction (RVD), ejection fraction < 25% and use of high doses of diuretics (HDD) increased the risk of cardiac death and Tx by 3.9-, 4.8-, and 5.9-fold, respectively. In the first year after CRT, RVD, HDD and hospitalization due to congestive heart failure increased the risk of death at hazard ratios of 3.5, 5.3, and 12.5, respectively. In the second year after CRT, RVD and FC III/IV were significant risk factors of mortality in the multivariate Cox model. The accuracy rates of the models were 84.6% at preimplantation, 93% in the first year after CRT, and 90.5% in the second year after CRT. The models were validated by bootstrapping. Conclusion We developed predictive models of cardiac death and Tx at different stages of CRT based on the analysis of simple and easily obtainable clinical and echocardiographic variables. The models showed good accuracy and adjustment, were validated internally, and are useful in the selection, monitoring and counseling of patients indicated for CRT. PMID:26559987

  4. Longitudinal Changes in Vascular Risk Markers and Mortality Rates among a Latino Population with Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Pflederer, Matthew C.; Long, Carlin S.; Beaty, Brenda; Havranek, Edward P.; Mehler, Philip S.; Keniston, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Vascular markers such as pulse-wave velocity and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) might improve the prediction of incident cardiovascular disease beyond traditional risk factors. These vascular markers have not been well characterized in minority populations and might be more useful than inflammatory biomarkers. We conducted a prospective, longitudinal cohort study among hypertensive patients in an urban safety-net hospital. We evaluated inflammatory biomarkers, arterial pulse-wave velocity, and carotid intima-media thickness at baseline, 1 year, and 2 years. The primary outcome variable was CIMT. Generalized linear mixed-effects models were used to evaluate associations between CIMT and predictive variables accounting for the correlation of multiple measurements within subjects over time. For our secondary outcome, we used administrative and National Death Index data to determine all-cause death, and univariate relationships were evaluated. Among 175 subjects, 117 were Latino (67%) and 117 were female (67%). Pulse-wave velocity and CIMT regressed over time (both P <0.001) and were highly correlated (P <0.001). Only pulse-wave velocity (P=0.002) and total cholesterol (P=0.03) were associated with CIMT in time-varying covariate analysis. At a median follow-up period of 80 months, 17 of 175 subjects had died (10%). Higher baseline CIMT and pulse-wave velocity were associated with increased mortality rates (both P <0.01). No serum inflammatory marker was significantly correlated with longitudinal changes in CIMT or death. In conclusion, both arterial stiffness and preclinical carotid atherosclerosis were associated with increased mortality rates and might be useful risk-stratification markers among this minority population. PMID:27127427

  5. Longitudinal Changes in Vascular Risk Markers and Mortality Rates among a Latino Population with Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pflederer, Matthew C; Long, Carlin S; Beaty, Brenda; Havranek, Edward P; Mehler, Philip S; Keniston, Angela; Krantz, Mori J

    2016-04-01

    Vascular markers such as pulse-wave velocity and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) might improve the prediction of incident cardiovascular disease beyond traditional risk factors. These vascular markers have not been well characterized in minority populations and might be more useful than inflammatory biomarkers. We conducted a prospective, longitudinal cohort study among hypertensive patients in an urban safety-net hospital. We evaluated inflammatory biomarkers, arterial pulse-wave velocity, and carotid intima-media thickness at baseline, 1 year, and 2 years. The primary outcome variable was CIMT. Generalized linear mixed-effects models were used to evaluate associations between CIMT and predictive variables accounting for the correlation of multiple measurements within subjects over time. For our secondary outcome, we used administrative and National Death Index data to determine all-cause death, and univariate relationships were evaluated. Among 175 subjects, 117 were Latino (67%) and 117 were female (67%). Pulse-wave velocity and CIMT regressed over time (both P <0.001) and were highly correlated (P <0.001). Only pulse-wave velocity (P=0.002) and total cholesterol (P=0.03) were associated with CIMT in time-varying covariate analysis. At a median follow-up period of 80 months, 17 of 175 subjects had died (10%). Higher baseline CIMT and pulse-wave velocity were associated with increased mortality rates (both P <0.01). No serum inflammatory marker was significantly correlated with longitudinal changes in CIMT or death. In conclusion, both arterial stiffness and preclinical carotid atherosclerosis were associated with increased mortality rates and might be useful risk-stratification markers among this minority population. PMID:27127427

  6. Association Between Life Space and Risk of Mortality in Advanced Age

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Patricia A.; Buchman, Aron S.; Barnes, Lisa L.; James, Bryan D.; Bennett, David A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To examine the association between life space, a measure of functional status that describes the range of movement through the environment covered during daily functioning, and the risk of mortality in older community-based persons. DESIGN Two ongoing, prospective observational cohort studies of aging. SETTING Greater metropolitan Chicago area. PARTICIPANTS One thousand four hundred forty-five community-based older persons without dementia. MEASUREMENTS Life space was measured at baseline using a series of questions designed to measure the extent of participants’ movement throughout their environment, ranging from the bedroom to out of town. The association between life space and mortality was examined using proportional hazards models adjusted for age, sex, race, and education. RESULTS Over up to 8 years of follow-up (mean 4.1 years), 329 of 1,445 (22.8%) participants died. In a proportional hazards model adjusted for age, sex, race, and education, a more-constricted life space was associated with a greater risk of death (hazard ratio = 1.18, 95% confidence interval = 1.09–1.27, P < .001), such that people with life spaces constricted to their immediate home environment (score = 3) were approximately 1.6 times as likely to die as those whose life spaces included trips out of town (score = 0). This association persisted after the addition of terms for several potential confounders, including physical activity, performance-based physical function, disability, depressive symptoms, social networks, body mass index, and number of chronic medical conditions. CONCLUSION Constricted life space is associated with greater risk of death in older community-based persons. PMID:20831722

  7. Early mortality and cause of deaths in patients using HAART in Brazil and the United States

    PubMed Central

    Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Veloso, Valdilea G.; Friedman, Ruth K.; Moreira, Ronaldo I.; Luz, Paula M.; Campos, Dayse P.; Pilotto, José H.; Cardoso, Sandra W.; Keruly, Jeanne C.; Moore, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the early mortality pattern and causes of death among patients starting HAART in Brazil and the United States. Methods: We analyzed the combined data from two clinical cohorts followed at the Johns Hopkins AIDS Service in Baltimore, United States, and the Evandro Chagas Clinical Research Institute AIDS Clinic in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Participants included those who entered either cohort between 1999 and 2007 and were antiretroviral naive. Follow-up was at 1 year since HAART initiation. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to assess the role of the city on the risk of death. Results: A total of 859 and 915 participants from Baltimore and Rio de Janeiro, respectively, were included. In Rio de Janeiro, 64.7% of deaths occurred within 90 days of HAART initiation; in Baltimore, 48.9% occurred between 180 and 365 days. AIDS-defining illness (61.8%) and non-AIDS-defining illness (55.6%) predominated as causes of death in Rio de Janeiro and Baltimore, respectively. Risk of death was similar in both cities (hazard ratio 1.04; P value=0.95) after adjusting for CD4+ T cell count, age, sex, HIV risk group, prior AIDS-defining illness, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia and Mycobacterium avium prophylaxis. Individuals with CD4+ T cell count less than or equal to 50 cells/μl (hazard ratio 4.36; P = 0.001) or older (hazard ratio, 1.03; P = 0.03) were more likely to die. Conclusion: Although late HIV diagnosis is a problem both in developed and developing countries, differences in the timing and causes of deaths clearly indicate that, besides interventions for early HIV diagnosis, different strategies to curb early mortality need to be tailored in each country. PMID:19770698

  8. Does retirement age impact mortality?

    PubMed

    Hernaes, Erik; Markussen, Simen; Piggott, John; Vestad, Ola L

    2013-05-01

    The relationship between retirement and mortality is studied with a unique administrative data set covering the full population of Norway. A series of retirement policy changes in Norway reduced the retirement age for a group of workers but not for others. Difference-in-differences estimation based on monthly birth cohorts and treatment group status show that the early retirement programme significantly reduced the retirement age; this holds true also when we account for programme substitution, for example into the disability pension. Instrumental variables estimation results show no effect on mortality of retirement age; neither do estimation results from a hazard rate model. PMID:23542020

  9. Maternal mortality in southern India.

    PubMed

    Rao, P S; Amalraj, A

    1994-01-01

    In a 4 year prospective community survey of 20,000 women randomly selected in North Arcot District of Tamil Nadu State in South India, the maternal mortality rates per 1,000 liveborn were estimated to be 17.4 and 16.6 for rural and semi-urban areas, respectively. The rates based only on direct causes were 11.9 in rural and 14.4 in semi-urban areas. As expected, these figures are considerably higher than those based on official or hospital statistics. Factors associated with such high mortality and the implications for programme planning and implementation are discussed. PMID:7855917

  10. Bactercline®-coated implants: Clinical results up to 1 year after loading from a controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Carinci, Francesco; Grecchi, Emma; Bignozzi, Carlo Alberto; Murmura, Giovanna; Piattelli, Adriano; Scarano, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Background: Titanium dioxide exists in three different crystal lattices, anatase, rutile, and brookite. Anatase coating releases, under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, free radicals such as ·OH, O2-, HO2-, and H2O2. This potent oxidizing power characteristically results in the lysis of bacteria and other organic substances. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bone response to implants made of titanium alloy or coated with a new combination of anatase and Bactercline® product. Materials and Methods: In the period between July 2009 and June 2010, 26 patients (10 females and 16 males; median age 51 ± 11 years, min. 27 years, max. 72 years) were operated and 62 implants were inserted. Lost fixtures and peri-implant bone resorption were considered as predictors of clinical outcomes. Pearson χ2-test was used. Prosthesis and implant failures, any complications after loading, and peri-implant marginal bone-level changes were assessed by a masked assessor. All patients were followed up to 1 year after loading. Results: No implant was lost. Average bone resorption around implant was 0.33 mm (both for 25 standard and 37 Bactercline-coated implants), and thus no statistical difference was detected. Conclusion: These results shown that no adverse effects on osseo-integration were present. PMID:23814572

  11. Substance use disorder counselors' job performance and turnover after 1 year: linear or curvilinear relationship?

    PubMed

    Laschober, Tanja C; de Tormes Eby, Lillian Turner

    2013-07-01

    The main goals of the current study were to investigate whether there are linear or curvilinear relationships between substance use disorder counselors' job performance and actual turnover after 1 year utilizing four indicators of job performance and three turnover statuses (voluntary, involuntary, and no turnover as the reference group). Using longitudinal data from 440 matched counselor-clinical supervisor dyads, results indicate that overall, counselors with lower job performance are more likely to turn over voluntarily and involuntarily than not to turn over. Further, one of the job performance measures shows a significant curvilinear effect. We conclude that the negative consequences often assumed to be "caused" by counselor turnover may be overstated because those who leave both voluntarily and involuntarily demonstrate generally lower performance than those who remain employed at their treatment program. PMID:22527711

  12. Predicting abuse in adolescent dating relationships over 1 year: the role of child maltreatment and trauma.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, David A; Wekerle, Christine; Scott, Katreena; Straatman, Anna-Lee; Grasley, Carolyn

    2004-08-01

    Three mediators of the relationship between childhood maltreatment and dating violence perpetration during midadolescence (i.e., trauma-related symptoms, attitudes justifying dating violence, and empathy and self-efficacy in dating relationships) were tested over 1 year with a sample of students from 10 high schools (N = 1,317). Trauma-related symptoms had a significant cross-time effect on predicting incidents of dating violence for both boys and girls. Attitudes and empathy and self-efficacy did not predict dating violence over time, although they were correlated with such behavior at both time points. Child maltreatment is a distal risk factor for adolescent dating violence, and trauma-related symptoms act as a significant mediator of this relationship. The importance of longitudinal methodology that separates correlates from predictors is discussed. PMID:15311986

  13. Whooping cough in South-East Romania: a 1-year study.

    PubMed

    Dinu, Sorin; Guillot, Sophie; Dragomirescu, Cristiana Cerasella; Brun, Delphine; Lazăr, Stefan; Vancea, Geta; Ionescu, Biatrice Mariana; Gherman, Mariana Felicia; Bjerkestrand, Andreea-Florina-Dana; Ungureanu, Vasilica; Guiso, Nicole; Damian, Maria

    2014-03-01

    The incidence of whooping cough in Romania is substantially underestimated, and, as noted by the health authorities, this is mostly due to the lack of both awareness and biological diagnosis. We conducted a 1-year study in Bucharest in order to assess the circulation of Bordetella pertussis, the main etiological agent of whooping cough. Fifty-one subjects suspected of whooping cough were enrolled. Culture, real-time PCR, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used for laboratory diagnosis. Whooping cough patients (63%) were distributed among all age groups, and most were unvaccinated, incompletely vaccinated, or had been vaccinated more than 5 years previously. Bordetella holmesii DNA was detected in 22% of the bordetellosis cases; these patients included adults; teenagers; and, surprisingly, young children. B. pertussis isolates were similar to the clinical isolates currently circulating elsewhere in Europe. One isolate does not express pertactin, an antigen included in some acellular pertussis vaccines. PMID:24355701

  14. Cognitive dysfunction at baseline predicts symptomatic 1-year outcome in first-episode schizophrenics.

    PubMed

    Moritz, S; Krausz, M; Gottwalz, E; Lambert, M; Perro, C; Ganzer, S; Naber, D

    2000-01-01

    The present study addresses the consequences of cognitive disturbances on symptomatic outcome. Fifty-three first-episode schizophrenics were reassessed (n = 32) 1 year after admission. Simple regression analyses revealed that several self-perceived cognitive deficits at baseline as measured with the Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire significantly predicted increased Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale global scores at follow-up (p = 0.05 to p = 0.005). A stepwise regression analysis proved memory dysfunction to be the strongest predictor of symptomatic worsening (p = 0.005). It is suggested that the exploration and treatment of neuropsychological deficits in schizophrenia is of great clinical importance with regard to its impact on both functional and symptomatic outcome in schizophrenia. PMID:10601828

  15. [Interferon beta 1-a in multiple sclerosis: 1-year experience in 62 patients].

    PubMed

    Tilbery, C P; Felipe, E; Moreira, M A; Mendes, M F; França, A S

    2000-06-01

    We report the results of a trial of interferon beta 1-a in 62 ambulatory patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Entry criteria included EDSS of 0 to 5.5 and at least two exacerbations in the previous 2 years. The patients received 3 million international units by subcutaneous injections three times a week. The end points were differences in exacerbation rate and treatment effect on disease progression. The annual exacerbation rate for patients that did not take the interferon beta 1-a was 1.32 and for the patients under medication 0.63. The EDSS score in patients that did not take the mediaction was 4.7 and 2.0 for the patients with interferon beta 1-a. Interferon beta 1-a was well tolerated and 85% of patients completed 1 year treatment. PMID:10920406

  16. Substance Use Disorder Counselors’ Job Performance and Turnover after 1 Year: Linear or Curvilinear Relationship?1

    PubMed Central

    Laschober, Tanja C.; de Tormes Eby, Lillian Turner

    2013-01-01

    The main goals of the current study were to investigate whether there are linear or curvilinear relationships between substance use disorder counselors’ job performance and actual turnover after 1 year utilizing four indicators of job performance and three turnover statuses (voluntary, involuntary, and no turnover as the reference group). Using longitudinal data from 440 matched counselor-clinical supervisor dyads, results indicate that overall, counselors with lower job performance are more likely to turn over voluntarily and involuntarily than not to turn over. Further, one of the job performance measures shows a significant curvilinear effect. We conclude that the negative consequences often assumed to be “caused” by counselor turnover may be overstated because those who leave both voluntarily and involuntarily demonstrate generally lower performance than those who remain employed at their treatment program. PMID:22527711

  17. Vascular Mortality in Participants of the Bipolar Genomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Fiedorowicz, Jess G.; Jancic, Dubravka; Potash, James B.; Butcher, Brandon; Coryell, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective In prior work, we have identified a relationship between symptom burden and vascular outcomes in bipolar disorder. We sought to replicate these findings using a readily accessible measure of mood disorder chronicity and vascular mortality. Methods We conducted a mortality assessment using the National Death Index for 1,716 participants with bipolar I disorder from the National Institute of Mental Health Genetics Initiative Bipolar Disorder Consortium. We assessed the relationship between the duration of the most severe depressive and manic episodes and time to vascular mortality (cardiovascular or cerebrovascular) using Cox Proportional Hazards Models, adjusting for potentially confounding variables. Results Mortality was assessed a mean of 7 years following study intake at which time 58 participants died, 18 from vascular causes. These participants were depressed much longer than their counterparts (Wilcoxon Rank Sum Z=2.30, p=0.02) and the duration of the longest depressive episode in years was significantly associated with time to vascular mortality in models (HR=1.16, 95% C.I. 1.02–1.33, p=0.02), which controlled for age, gender, vascular disease equivalents, and vascular disease risk factors. The duration of longest mania was not related to vascular mortality. Conclusion The duration of the most severe depression is independently predictive of vascular mortality, lending further support to the idea that mood disorders hasten vascular mortality in a dose-dependent fashion. Further study of relevant mechanisms by which mood disorders may hasten vascular disease and of integrated treatments for mood and cardiovascular risk factors is warranted. PMID:24746452

  18. Exploring the Association between Macroeconomic Indicators and Dialysis Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Stel, Vianda S.; Caskey, Fergus J.; Stengel, Benedicte; Elliott, Robert F.; Covic, Adrian; Geue, Claudia; Cusumano, Ana; MacLeod, Alison M.; Jager, Kitty J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Mortality on dialysis varies greatly worldwide, with patient-level factors explaining only a small part of this variation. The aim of this study was to examine the association of national-level macroeconomic indicators with the mortality of incident dialysis populations and explore potential explanations through renal service indicators, incidence of dialysis, and characteristics of the dialysis population. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Aggregated unadjusted survival probabilities were obtained from 22 renal registries worldwide for patients starting dialysis in 2003–2005. General population age and health, macroeconomic indices, and renal service organization data were collected from secondary sources and questionnaires. Linear modeling with log–log transformation of the outcome variable was applied to establish factors associated with survival on dialysis. Results Two-year survival on dialysis ranged from 62.3% in Iceland to 89.8% in Romania. A higher gross domestic product per capita (hazard ratio=1.02 per 1000 US dollar increase), a higher percentage of gross domestic product spent on healthcare (1.10 per percent increase), and a higher intrinsic mortality of the dialysis population (i.e., general population-derived mortality risk of the dialysis population in that country standardized for age and sex; hazard ratio=1.04 per death per 10,000 person years) were associated with a higher mortality of the dialysis population. The incidence of dialysis and renal service indicators were not associated with mortality on dialysis. Conclusions Macroeconomic factors and the intrinsic mortality of the dialysis population are associated with international differences in the mortality on dialysis. Renal service organizational factors and incidence of dialysis seem less important. PMID:22837275

  19. Using Highly Detailed Administrative Data to Predict Pneumonia Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Rothberg, Michael B.; Pekow, Penelope S.; Priya, Aruna; Zilberberg, Marya D.; Belforti, Raquel; Skiest, Daniel; Lagu, Tara; Higgins, Thomas L.; Lindenauer, Peter K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mortality prediction models generally require clinical data or are derived from information coded at discharge, limiting adjustment for presenting severity of illness in observational studies using administrative data. Objectives To develop and validate a mortality prediction model using administrative data available in the first 2 hospital days. Research Design After dividing the dataset into derivation and validation sets, we created a hierarchical generalized linear mortality model that included patient demographics, comorbidities, medications, therapies, and diagnostic tests administered in the first 2 hospital days. We then applied the model to the validation set. Subjects Patients aged ≥18 years admitted with pneumonia between July 2007 and June 2010 to 347 hospitals in Premier, Inc.’s Perspective database. Measures In hospital mortality. Results The derivation cohort included 200,870 patients and the validation cohort had 50,037. Mortality was 7.2%. In the multivariable model, 3 demographic factors, 25 comorbidities, 41 medications, 7 diagnostic tests, and 9 treatments were associated with mortality. Factors that were most strongly associated with mortality included receipt of vasopressors, non-invasive ventilation, and bicarbonate. The model had a c-statistic of 0.85 in both cohorts. In the validation cohort, deciles of predicted risk ranged from 0.3% to 34.3% with observed risk over the same deciles from 0.1% to 33.7%. Conclusions A mortality model based on detailed administrative data available in the first 2 hospital days had good discrimination and calibration. The model compares favorably to clinically based prediction models and may be useful in observational studies when clinical data are not available. PMID:24498090

  20. A cohort study of mortality among Ontario pipe trades workers

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, M; Verma, D

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To study mortality in a cohort of members of the United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices of the Plumbing and Pipe Fitting Industry of the United States and Canada and to compare results with two previous proportional mortality studies. Methods: A cohort of 25 285 workers who entered the trade after 1949 was assembled from records of the international head office. Mortality was ascertained by linkage to the Canadian Mortality Registry at Statistics Canada. Standardised mortality ratios were computed using Ontario general population mortality rates as the reference. Results: There were significant increases in lung cancer mortality rates (SMR 1.27; 95% CI 1.13 to 1.42). Increased lung cancer risk was observed among plumbers, pipefitters, and sprinkler fitters. Increased risk was observed among workers joining the Union as late as the 1970s. A random effects meta-analysis of this study and the two PMR studies found significant increases in oesophageal (RR 1.24; 95% CI 1.00 to 1.53), lung (RR 1.31; 95% CI 1.19 to 1.44), and haematological/lymphatic (RR 1.21; 95% CI 1.08 to 1.35) malignancies. Conclusions: The mortality pattern is consistent with the effects of occupational exposure to asbestos. Increased risk due to other respiratory carcinogens such as welding fume cannot be excluded. There are substantial amounts of asbestos in place in industrial and commercial environments. The education and training of workers to protect themselves against inhalation hazards will be necessary well into the future. PMID:15317913

  1. Correcting vital information: estimating infant mortality, Brazil, 2000-2009

    PubMed Central

    de Frias, Paulo Germano; Szwarcwald, Célia Landmann; de Souza, Paulo Roberto Borges; de Almeida, Wanessa da Silva; Lira, Pedro Israel Cabral

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To propose a simplified method of correcting vital information and estimating the coefficient of infant mortality in Brazil. METHODS Vital data in the information systems on mortality and live births were corrected using correction factors, estimated based on events not reported to the Brazilian Ministry of Health and obtained by active search. This simplified method for correcting vital information for the period 2000-2009 for Brazil and its federal units establishes the level of adequacy of information on deaths and live births by calculating the overall coefficient of mortality standardized by age and the ratio between reported and expected live births, respectively, in each Brazilian municipality. By applying correction factors to the number of deaths and live births reported in each county, the vital statistics were corrected, making it possible to estimate the coefficient of infant mortality. RESULTS The highest correction factors were related to infant deaths, reaching values higher than 7 for municipalities with very precarious mortality information. For deaths and live births, the correction factors exhibit a decreasing gradient as indicators of adequacy of the vital information improve. For the year 2008, the vital information corrected by the simplified method per state were similar to those obtained in the research of active search. Both the birth rate and the infant mortality rate decreased in the period in all Brazilian regions. In the Northeast, the annual rate of decline was 6.0%, the highest in Brazil (4.7%). CONCLUSIONS The active search of deaths and births allowed correction factors to be calculated by level of adequacy of mortality information and live births. The simplified method proposed here allowed vital information to be corrected per state for the period 2000-2009 and the progress of the coefficient of infant mortality in Brazil, its regions and states to be assessed. PMID:24626543

  2. Race, Neighborhood Economic Status, Income Inequality and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Mode, Nicolle A; Evans, Michele K; Zonderman, Alan B

    2016-01-01

    Mortality rates in the United States vary based on race, individual economic status and neighborhood. Correlations among these variables in most urban areas have limited what conclusions can be drawn from existing research. Our study employs a unique factorial design of race, sex, age and individual poverty status, measuring time to death as an objective measure of health, and including both neighborhood economic status and income inequality for a sample of middle-aged urban-dwelling adults (N = 3675). At enrollment, African American and White participants lived in 46 unique census tracts in Baltimore, Maryland, which varied in neighborhood economic status and degree of income inequality. A Cox regression model for 9-year mortality identified a three-way interaction among sex, race and individual poverty status (p = 0.03), with African American men living below poverty having the highest mortality. Neighborhood economic status, whether measured by a composite index or simply median household income, was negatively associated with overall mortality (p<0.001). Neighborhood income inequality was associated with mortality through an interaction with individual poverty status (p = 0.04). While racial and economic disparities in mortality are well known, this study suggests that several social conditions associated with health may unequally affect African American men in poverty in the United States. Beyond these individual factors are the influences of neighborhood economic status and income inequality, which may be affected by a history of residential segregation. The significant association of neighborhood economic status and income inequality with mortality beyond the synergistic combination of sex, race and individual poverty status suggests the long-term importance of small area influence on overall mortality. PMID:27171406

  3. Race, Neighborhood Economic Status, Income Inequality and Mortality.

    PubMed

    Mode, Nicolle A; Evans, Michele K; Zonderman, Alan B

    2016-01-01

    Mortality rates in the United States vary based on race, individual economic status and neighborhood. Correlations among these variables in most urban areas have limited what conclusions can be drawn from existing research. Our study employs a unique factorial design of race, sex, age and individual poverty status, measuring time to death as an objective measure of health, and including both neighborhood economic status and income inequality for a sample of middle-aged urban-dwelling adults (N = 3675). At enrollment, African American and White participants lived in 46 unique census tracts in Baltimore, Maryland, which varied in neighborhood economic status and degree of income inequality. A Cox regression model for 9-year mortality identified a three-way interaction among sex, race and individual poverty status (p = 0.03), with African American men living below poverty having the highest mortality. Neighborhood economic status, whether measured by a composite index or simply median household income, was negatively associated with overall mortality (p<0.001). Neighborhood income inequality was associated with mortality through an interaction with individual poverty status (p = 0.04). While racial and economic disparities in mortality are well known, this study suggests that several social conditions associated with health may unequally affect African American men in poverty in the United States. Beyond these individual factors are the influences of neighborhood economic status and income inequality, which may be affected by a history of residential segregation. The significant association of neighborhood economic status and income inequality with mortality beyond the synergistic combination of sex, race and individual poverty status suggests the long-term importance of small area influence on overall mortality. PMID:27171406

  4. Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli in Daycare—A 1-Year Dynamic Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hebbelstrup Jensen, Betina; Stensvold, Christen R.; Struve, Carsten; Olsen, Katharina E. P.; Scheutz, Flemming; Boisen, Nadia; Röser, Dennis; Andreassen, Bente U.; Nielsen, Henrik V.; Schønning, Kristian; Petersen, Andreas M.; Krogfelt, Karen A.

    2016-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) has been associated with persistent diarrhea, reduced growth acceleration, and failure to thrive in children living in developing countries and with childhood diarrhea in general in industrialized countries. The clinical implications of an EAEC carrier-status in children in industrialized countries warrants clarification. To investigate the pathological significance of an EAEC carrier-state in the industrialized countries, we designed a 1-year dynamic cohort study and performed follow-up every second month, where the study participants submitted a stool sample and answered a questionnaire regarding gastrointestinal symptoms and exposures. Exposures included foreign travel, consumption of antibiotics, and contact with a diseased animal. In the capital area of Denmark, a total of 179 children aged 0–6 years were followed in a cohort study, in the period between 2009 and 2013. This is the first investigation of the incidence and pathological significance of EAEC in Danish children attending daycare facilities. Conventional microbiological detection of enteric pathogens was performed at Statens Serum Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark, and at Hvidovre Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. Parents completed questionnaires regarding gastrointestinal symptoms. The EAEC strains were further characterized by serotyping, phylogenetic analysis, and susceptibility testing. EAEC was detected in 25 (14%) of the children during the observational period of 1 year. One or more gastrointestinal symptoms were reported from 56% of the EAEC-positive children. Diarrhea was reported in six (24%) of the EAEC positive children, but no cases of weight loss, and general failure to thrive were observed. The EAEC strains detected comprised a large number of different serotypes, confirming the genetic heterogeneity of this pathotype. EAEC was highly prevalent (n = 25, 14%) in Danish children in daycare centers and was accompanied by gastrointestinal symptoms in

  5. The Effect of Clozapine on Hematological Indices: A 1-Year Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jimmy; Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Fervaha, Gagan; Powell, Valerie; Bhaloo, Amaal; Bies, Robert; Remington, Gary

    2015-10-01

    Clozapine is the antipsychotic of choice for treatment-resistant schizophrenia and is linked to a need for mandatory hematological monitoring. Besides agranulocytosis, other hematological aberrations have resulted in premature termination in some cases. Considering clozapine's role in immunomodulation, we proceeded to investigate the impact of clozapine on the following 3 main hematological cell lines: red blood cells, platelets, white blood cells (WBCs), and its differential counts. Data were extracted from patients initiated on clozapine between January 2009 and December 2010 at a single hospital. Patients with a preclozapine complete blood count, who were receiving clozapine during the 1-year follow-up period, were included in the present investigation. Counts of red blood cells, platelets, WBC, and its differential including neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, and basophils were extracted and trajectories plotted. One hundred one patients were included in this study and 66 remained on clozapine at the end of 1 year. There was a synchronized but transient increase in WBC, neutrophils, monocytes, eosinophils, basophils, and platelets beginning as early as the first week of clozapine treatment. There were no cases of agranulocytosis reported in this sample, and five developed neutropenia. A spike in neutrophils immediately preceded the onset of neutropenia in three of the five. The cumulative incidence rates were 48.9% for neutrophilia, 5.9% for eosinophilia, and 3% each for thrombocytosis and thrombocytopenia. Early hematological aberrations are visible across a range of cell lines, primarily of the myeloid lineage. These disturbances are transient and are probably related to clozapine's immunomodulatory properties. We do not suggest discontinuing clozapine as a consequence of the observed aberrations. PMID:26267420

  6. Perinatal dioxin exposure and the neurodevelopment of Vietnamese toddlers at 1 year of age.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tai The; Nishijo, Muneko; Nguyen, Anh Thi Nguyet; Tran, Nghi Ngoc; Van Hoang, Luong; Tran, Anh Hai; Nguyen, Trung Viet; Nishijo, Hisao

    2015-12-01

    Dioxin concentrations remain elevated in both the environment and in humans residing near former US Air Force bases in South Vietnam. This may potentially have adverse health effects, particularly on infant neurodevelopment. We followed 214 infants whose mothers resided in a dioxin-contaminated area in Da Nang, Vietnam, from birth until 1 year of age. Perinatal exposure to dioxins was estimated from toxic equivalent (TEQ) levels of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDDs/Fs-TEQ), and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TetraCDD) concentrations in breast milk. In infants, daily dioxin intake (DDI) was used as an index of postnatal exposure through breastfeeding. Neurodevelopment of toddlers was assessed using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition (Bayley-III). No significant differences in neurodevelopmental scores were exhibited for cognitive, language or motor functions between four exposure groups of PCDDs/Fs-TEQ or 2,3,7,8-TetraCDD. However, social-emotional scores were decreased in the high PCDDs/Fs-TEQ group and the high 2,3,7,8-TetraCDD group compared with those with mild exposure, after adjusting for confounding factors. Cognitive scores in the mild, moderate, and high DDI groups were significantly higher than those in low DDI group, but there were no differences in cognitive scores among the three higher DDI groups. These results suggest that perinatal exposure to dioxins may affect social-emotional development of 1-year-old toddlers, without diminishing global neurodevelopmental function. PMID:26247686

  7. Memantine and brain atrophy in Alzheimer's disease: a 1-year randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, David; Fox, Nick C; Barkhof, Frederik; Phul, Ravinder; Lemming, Ole; Scheltens, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the rate of total brain atrophy (TBA) with serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), using the Brain Boundary Shift Integral (BBSI), in patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) over the course of 52 weeks of treatment with memantine or placebo. This was a multi-national, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, fixed-dose 1-year study. Patients were randomized (1 : 1) to treatment with placebo or memantine. Patients randomized to memantine were up-titrated to the target dose of 20 mg/day over 4 weeks. MRI scans were collected at screening and at Weeks 4, 42, and 52. Secondary efficacy assessments included several cognitive and behavioral scales. 518 patients were screened, 278 patients were randomized, and 217 patients completed the study. In the primary efficacy analysis, the differences in TBA rates between memantine (15.2 mL/year) and placebo (15.3 mL/year) were not statistically significant (-0.04 mL/year [(95% CI: -2.60, 2.52), p = 0.98]). There was a statistically significant correlation between change in TBA and change in most cognitive and behavioral scale scores. Patients who were not treated with acetyl cholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) showed a significantly lower TBA rate than patients treated with AChEIs. Memantine had a placebo-level incidence of adverse events. There were no statistically significant differences between memantine and placebo in total brain or hippocampal atrophy rates in patients with probable AD treated for 1 year. The biological relevance of cerebral atrophy was supported by a significant correlation between rate of atrophy and decline in cognitive and behavioral outcomes. PMID:22269160

  8. Age-period-cohort analysis on the cancer mortality in rural China: 1990–2010

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cancer has become a global health problem. China still suffers continuous increasing cancer mortality. To study the trend of cancer mortality in rural China, this paper established an Age-Period-Cohort model to discuss the age effect, period effect and cohort effect on cancer mortality in rural China. Methods The data were collected from the “China Health Statistical Yearbook” from 1990 to 2010. Collected data were analyzed by Age-Period-Cohort model and Intrinsic Estimation method. Results The age effect on the total cancer mortality represented a V trend. Compared with Group 0–4, Group 5–9 showed 71.87% lower cancer mortality risk. Compared with Group 5–9, Group 75–79 showed 38 times higher cancer mortality risk. The period effect on the total cancer mortality risk weakened firstly but then increased. It increased by 35.70% from 1990 to 2010, showing an annual average growth of 1.79%. The cohort effect on the total cancer mortality risk weakened by totally 84.94% from 1906–1910 to 2005–2010. Three “deterioration periods” and three “improvement periods” were witnessed during this period. The malignant cancer mortality varied similarly with the total cancer mortality, while benign cancer mortality and other cancer mortality represented different variation laws. Conclusions Although the total cancer mortality risk is increasing at an accelerated rate, cancer mortality risk in recent born year is decreasing, indicating very important impact of social change on the cancer mortality in rural China. PMID:24383432

  9. Density-Dependent Mortality of the Human Host in Onchocerciasis: Relationships between Microfilarial Load and Excess Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Karen S.; Soumbey-Alley, Edoh W.; Boatin, Boakye A.; Basáñez, María-Gloria

    2012-01-01

    Background The parasite Onchocerca volvulus has, until recently, been regarded as the cause of a chronic yet non-fatal condition. Recent analyses, however, have indicated that in addition to blindness, the parasite can also be directly associated with human mortality. Such analyses also suggested that the relationship between microfilarial load and excess mortality might be non-linear. Determining the functional form of such relationship would contribute to quantify the population impact of mass microfilaricidal treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings Data from the Onchocerciasis Control Programme in West Africa (OCP) collected from 1974 through 2001 were used to determine functional relationships between microfilarial load and excess mortality of the human host. The goodness-of-fit of three candidate functional forms (a (log-) linear model and two saturating functions) were explored and a saturating (log-) sigmoid function was deemed to be statistically the best fit. The excess mortality associated with microfilarial load was also found to be greater in younger hosts. The attributable mortality risk due to onchocerciasis was estimated to be 5.9%. Conclusions/Significance Incorporation of this non-linear functional relationship between microfilarial load and excess mortality into mathematical models for the transmission and control of onchocerciasis will have important implications for our understanding of the population biology of O. volvulus, its impact on human populations, the global burden of disease due to onchocerciasis, and the projected benefits of control programmes in both human and economic terms. PMID:22479660

  10. Seasonal Variation of Overall and Cardiovascular Mortality: A Study in 19 Countries from Different Geographic Locations

    PubMed Central

    Gubelmann, Cédric; Stringhini, Silvia; Bovet, Pascal; Chen, Pau-Chung; Wojtyniak, Bogdan; Paccaud, Fred; Tsai, Dai-Hua; Zdrojewski, Tomasz; Marques-Vidal, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) mortality has been shown to follow a seasonal pattern. Several studies suggested several possible determinants of this pattern, including misclassification of causes of deaths. We aimed at assessing seasonality in overall, CVD, cancer and non-CVD/non-cancer mortality using data from 19 countries from different latitudes. Methods and Findings Monthly mortality data were compiled from 19 countries, amounting to over 54 million deaths. We calculated ratios of the observed to the expected numbers of deaths in the absence of a seasonal pattern. Seasonal variation (peak to nadir difference) for overall and cause-specific (CVD, cancer or non-CVD/non-cancer) mortality was analyzed using the cosinor function model. Mortality from overall, CVD and non-CVD/non-cancer showed a consistent seasonal pattern. In both hemispheres, the number of deaths was higher than expected in winter. In countries close to the Equator the seasonal pattern was considerably lower for mortality from any cause. For CVD mortality, the peak to nadir differences ranged from 0.185 to 0.466 in the Northern Hemisphere, from 0.087 to 0.108 near the Equator, and from 0.219 to 0.409 in the Southern Hemisphere. For cancer mortality, the seasonal variation was nonexistent in most countries. Conclusions In countries with seasonal variation, mortality from overall, CVD and non-CVD/non-cancer show a seasonal pattern with mortality being higher in winter than in summer. Conversely, cancer mortality shows no substantial seasonality. PMID:25419711

  11. Leading Causes of Unintentional and Intentional Injury Mortality: United States, 2000–2009

    PubMed Central

    Regier, Michael D.; Kapusta, Nestor D.; Coben, Jeffrey H.; Miller, Ted R.; Hanzlick, Randy L.; Todd, Knox H.; Sattin, Richard W.; Kennedy, Leslie W.; Kleinig, John; Smith, Gordon S.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We have described national trends for the 5 leading external causes of injury mortality. Methods. We used negative binomial regression and annual underlying cause-of-death data for US residents for 2000 through 2009. Results. Mortality rates for unintentional poisoning, unintentional falls, and suicide increased by 128%, 71%, and 15%, respectively. The unintentional motor vehicle traffic crash mortality rate declined 25%. Suicide ranked first as a cause of injury mortality, followed by motor vehicle traffic crashes, poisoning, falls, and homicide. Females had a lower injury mortality rate than did males. The adjusted fall mortality rate displayed a positive age gradient. Blacks and Hispanics had lower adjusted motor vehicle traffic crash and suicide mortality rates and higher adjusted homicide rates than did Whites, and a lower unadjusted total injury mortality rate. Conclusions. Mortality rates for suicide, poisoning, and falls rose substantially over the past decade. Suicide has surpassed motor vehicle traffic crashes as the leading cause of injury mortality. Comprehensive traffic safety measures have successfully reduced the national motor vehicle traffic crash mortality rate. Similar efforts will be required to diminish the burden of other injury. PMID:22994256

  12. Analysis of Diagnoses Associated with Multiple Sclerosis–Related In-Hospital Mortality Using the Premier Hospital Database

    PubMed Central

    Pocoski, Jennifer; Cutter, Gary; Kaufman, David W.; Pleimes, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Background: We sought to compare mortality rates and related diagnoses in hospitalized patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), those with diabetes mellitus (DM), and the general hospitalized population (GHP). Methods: Patients who died between 2007 and 2011 were identified in the US hospital–based Premier Healthcare Database. Demographic information was collected, mortality rates calculated, and principal diagnoses categorized. Results: Of 55,152 unique patients with MS identified, 1518 died. Mean age at death was 10 years younger for the MS group (63.4 years) than for the DM (73.3 years) and GHP (73.1 years) groups. Age-adjusted mortality rates, based on the 2000 US Standard Million Population, were 1077, 1248, and 1133 per 100,000, respectively. Infection was the most common principal diagnosis at the hospital stay during which the patient died in the MS cohort (43.1% vs. 26.3% and 24.0% in the DM and GHP groups, respectively). Other common principal diagnoses in the MS group included pulmonary (17.5%) and cardiovascular (12.1%) disease. Septicemia/sepsis/septic shock was a secondary diagnosis for 50.7% of patients with MS versus 36.0% and 31.0% of patients in the DM and GHP cohorts, respectively. Conclusions: Patients with MS had a shorter life span than patients with DM or the GHP and were more likely to have a principal diagnosis of infection at their final hospital stay. However, the database was limited to codes recorded in the hospital; diagnoses received outside the hospital were not captured. PMID:27252603

  13. Mortality of people with mental retardation in California with and without Down syndrome, 1986-1991.

    PubMed

    Strauss, D; Eyman, R K

    1996-05-01

    Mortality of people with mental retardation receiving services in California was examined. The large population (N = 118,653) enabled us to work directly with mortality rates at specific ages. Up to about age 35, mortality rates of people with Down syndrome were comparable to those of people with mental retardation due to other causes. Subsequently, the increase was much more rapid in the group with Down syndrome. Mortality rates of individuals with Down syndrome doubled every 6.4 years compared to 9.6 years for people without Down syndrome. Life tables were constructed; the remaining life expectancy of a 1-year-old child with Down syndrome with mild/moderate retardation was 55 years and with profound mental retardation, 43 years. PMID:8735577

  14. Reduction of drinking in problem drinkers and all-cause mortality.

    PubMed

    Rehm, J; Roerecke, M

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol consumption has been linked with considerable mortality, and reduction of drinking, especially of heavy drinking, has been suggested as one of the main measures to reduce alcohol-attributable mortality. Aggregate-level studies including but not limited to natural experiments support this suggestion; however, causality cannot be established in ecological analysis. The results of individual-level cohort studies are ambiguous. On the other hand, randomized clinical trials with problem drinkers show that brief interventions leading to a reduction of average drinking also led to a reduction of all-cause mortality within 1 year. The results of these studies were pooled and a model for reduction of drinking in heavy drinkers and its consequences for all-cause mortality risk was estimated. Ceteris paribus, the higher the level of drinking, the stronger the effects of a given reduction. Implications for interventions and public health are discussed. PMID:23531718

  15. Tuberculosis mortality: patient characteristics and causes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the antibiotic era, tuberculosis (TB) still causes a substantial number of mortalities. We aimed to identify the causes and risks of death among TB patients. Methods Medical records of mortality cases of culture-proven TB diagnosed during 2003–2007 were reviewed. All TB deaths were classified into 2 groups (TB-related and non-TB-related), based on the underlying cause of death. Results During the study period, 2016 cases (male: 71.1%) of culture-proven TB were identified. The mean age was 59.3 (range: 0.3–96) years. The overall mortality rate was 12.3% (249 cases) and the mean age at death was 74 years; 17.3% (43 cases) of all TB deaths were TB-related. Most of the TB-related deaths occurred early (median survival: 20 days), and the patient died of septic shock. Malignancy, liver cirrhosis, renal failure, and miliary and pneumonic radiographic patterns were all independent predictors for all TB deaths. Cavitary, miliary and pneumonic radiographic patterns were all significant predictive factors for TB-related death. Extrapulmonary involvement and liver cirrhosis were also factors contributing to TB-related death. Conclusions The majority of TB deaths were ascribed to non-TB-related causes. Managing TB as well as underlying comorbidities in a multidisciplinary approach is essential to improve the outcome of patients in an aging population. However, the clinical manifestations of patients with TB-related death vary; many progressed to fulminant septic shock requiring timely recognition with prompt treatment to prevent early death. PMID:24387757

  16. Maternal mortality in St. Petersburg, Russian Federation.

    PubMed Central

    Gurina, Natalia A.; Vangen, Siri; Forsén, Lisa; Sundby, Johanne

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the levels and causes of maternal mortality in St. Petersburg, Russian Federation. METHODS: We collected data about all pregnancy-related deaths in St. Petersburg over the period 1992-2003 using several sources of information. An independent research group reviewed and classified all cases according to ICD-10 and the Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths in the United Kingdom. We tested trends of overall and cause specific ratios (deaths per 100,000 births) for four 3-year intervals using the chi2 test. FINDINGS: The maternal mortality ratio for the study period was 43 per 100,000 live births. A sharp decline of direct obstetric deaths was observed from the first to fourth 3-year interval (49.8 for 1992-94 versus 18.5 for 2001-03). Sepsis and haemorrhage were the main causes of direct obstetric deaths. Among the total deaths from sepsis, 63.8% were due to abortion. Death ratios from sepsis declined significantly from the first to second study interval. In the last study interval (2001-03), 50% of deaths due to haemorrhage were secondary to ectopic pregnancies. The death ratio from thromboembolism remained low (2.9%) and stable throughout the study period. Among indirect obstetric deaths a non-significant decrease was observed for deaths from cardiac disease. Death ratios from infectious causes and suicides increased over the study period. CONCLUSIONS: Maternal mortality levels in St. Petersburg still exceed European levels by a factor of five. Improved management of abortion, emergency care for sepsis and haemorrhage, and better identification and control of infectious diseases in pregnancy, are needed. PMID:16628301

  17. Malignant testicular tumour incidence and mortality trends

    PubMed Central

    Wojtyła-Buciora, Paulina; Więckowska, Barbara; Krzywinska-Wiewiorowska, Małgorzata; Gromadecka-Sutkiewicz, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study In Poland testicular tumours are the most frequent cancer among men aged 20–44 years. Testicular tumour incidence since the 1980s and 1990s has been diversified geographically, with an increased risk of mortality in Wielkopolska Province, which was highlighted at the turn of the 1980s and 1990s. The aim of the study was the comparative analysis of the tendencies in incidence and death rates due to malignant testicular tumours observed among men in Poland and in Wielkopolska Province. Material and methods Data from the National Cancer Registry were used for calculations. The incidence/mortality rates among men due to malignant testicular cancer as well as the tendencies in incidence/death ratio observed in Poland and Wielkopolska were established based on regression equation. The analysis was deepened by adopting the multiple linear regression model. A p-value < 0.05 was arbitrarily adopted as the criterion of statistical significance, and for multiple comparisons it was modified according to the Bonferroni adjustment to a value of p < 0.0028. Calculations were performed with the use of PQStat v1.4.8 package. Results The incidence of malignant testicular neoplasms observed among men in Poland and in Wielkopolska Province indicated a significant rising tendency. The multiple linear regression model confirmed that the year variable is a strong incidence forecast factor only within the territory of Poland. A corresponding analysis of mortality rates among men in Poland and in Wielkopolska Province did not show any statistically significant correlations. Conclusions Late diagnosis of Polish patients calls for undertaking appropriate educational activities that would facilitate earlier reporting of the patients, thus increasing their chances for recovery. Introducing preventive examinations in the regions of increased risk of testicular tumour may allow earlier diagnosis. PMID:27095941

  18. Patterns of Errors Contributing to Trauma Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Gruen, Russell L.; Jurkovich, Gregory J.; McIntyre, Lisa K.; Foy, Hugh M.; Maier, Ronald V.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To identify patterns of errors contributing to inpatient trauma deaths. Methods: All inpatient trauma deaths at a high-volume level I trauma center from 1996 to 2004 inclusive were audited. Data were collected with daily trauma registry chart abstraction, weekly morbidity and mortality reports, hospital quality assurance reports, and annual trauma registry analyses of risk of death using TRISS and HARM methodology. Deaths that met criteria for low to medium probability of mortality or those with quality of care concerns were analyzed for errors and then subjected to 3-stage peer review at weekly departmental, monthly hospital, and annual regional forums. Patterns of errors were constructed from the compiled longitudinal data. Results: In 9 years, there were 44,401 trauma patient admissions and 2594 deaths (5.8%), of which 601 met low to medium mortality risks. Sixty-four patients (0.14% admissions, 2.47% deaths) had recognized errors in care that contributed to their death. Important error patterns included: failure to successfully intubate, secure or protect an airway (16%), delayed operative or angiographic control of acute abdominal/pelvic hemorrhage (16%), delayed intervention for ongoing intrathoracic hemorrhage (9%), inadequate DVT or gastrointestinal prophylaxis (9%), lengthy initial operative procedures rather than damage control surgery in unstable patients (8%), over-resuscitation with fluids (5%), and complications of feeding tubes (5%). Resulting data-directed institutional and regional trauma system policy changes have demonstrably reduced the incidence of associated error-related deaths. Conclusions: Preventable deaths will occur even in mature trauma systems. This review has identified error patterns that are likely common in all trauma systems, and for which policy interventions can be effectively targeted. PMID:16926563

  19. Mortality among uranium enrichment workers

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.P.; Bloom, T.

    1987-01-01

    A retrospective cohort mortality study was conducted on workers at the Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment facility in Pike County, Ohio, in response to a request from the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers International Local 3-689 for information on long-term health effects. Primary hazards included inhalation exposure to uranyl fluoride containing uranium-235 and uranium-234, technetium-99 compounds, and hydrogen-fluoride. Uranium-238 presented a nephrotoxic hazard. Statistically significant mortality deficits based on U.S. death rates were found for all causes, accidents, violence, and diseases of nervous, circulatory, respiratory, and digestive systems. Standardized mortality rates were 85 and 54 for all malignant neoplasms and for other genitourinary diseases, respectively. Deaths from stomach cancer and lymphatic/hematopoietic cancers were insignificantly increased. A subcohort selected for greatest potential uranium exposure has reduced deaths from these malignancies. Insignificantly increased stomach cancer mortality was found after 15 years employment and after 15 years latency. Routine urinalysis data suggested low internal uranium exposures.

  20. Morbidity and Mortality in Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Gerke, Alicia K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review Chronic sarcoidosis is a complex disease with numerous comorbid conditions and can be fatal in some cases. Recognizing causes of morbidity and mortality is important to effectively select treatments, manage symptoms, and improve outcomes. The purpose of this review is to examine emerging knowledge on morbidity and mortality in sarcoidosis. Recent Findings Approximately one to five percent of patients with sarcoidosis die from complications of sarcoidosis. Recent population studies indicate that mortality may be increasing over the past decade. The reasons behind these trends are unclear, but could include increasing incidence, detection rates, severity of disease, or age of the population. Morbidity of sarcoidosis is reflected by a trend of increased hospitalizations over recent years and increased use of healthcare resources. Morbidity can be caused by organ damage from granulomatous inflammation, treatment complications, and psychosocial effects of the disease. Recent studies are focused on morbidity related to cardiopulmonary complications, bone health, and aging within the sarcoidosis population. Last, sarcoidosis is associated with autoimmune diseases, pulmonary embolism, and malignancy; however, the underlying mechanisms linking diseases continue to be debated. Summary Morbidity in sarcoidosis is significant and multifactorial. Mortality is infrequent, but may be increasing over the years. PMID:25029298

  1. CANCER MORTALITY MAPS AND GRAPHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Cancer Mortality Maps & Graph Web Site provides interactive maps, graphs (which are accessible to the blind and visually-impaired), text, tables and figures showing geographic patterns and time trends of cancer death rates for the time period 1950-1994 for more than 40 cancer...

  2. Infant Mortality: 1989 Research Accomplishments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    Collected in this document are reports of the National Institutes of Health's 1989 accomplishments in research on the problem of infant mortality. Reports are provided by the: (1) National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; (2) National Cancer Institute; (3) National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; (4) National Institute of…

  3. Drought, Mortality and Social Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Sanjay

    1995-01-01

    Examines the relationship between the human population explosion, resource depletion, drought, malnutrition, and disease. As a sample study, mortality trends in Rajasthan State in India in the 1980s were analyzed to correlate the increased death rate with the drought of 1987. It is demonstrated that drought-induced malnutrition was the root cause…

  4. Testosterone deficiency and cardiovascular mortality

    PubMed Central

    Morgentaler, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    New concerns have been raised regarding cardiovascular (CV) risks with testosterone (T) therapy (TTh). These concerns are based primarily on two widely reported retrospective studies. However, methodological flaws and data errors invalidate both studies as credible evidence of risk. One showed reduced adverse events by half in T-treated men but reversed this result using an unproven statistical approach. The authors subsequently acknowledged serious data errors including nearly 10% contamination of the dataset by women. The second study mistakenly used the rate of T prescriptions written by healthcare providers to men with recent myocardial infarction (MI) as a proxy for the naturally occurring rate of MI. Numerous studies suggest T is beneficial, including decreased mortality in association with TTh, reduced MI rate with TTh in men with the greatest MI risk prognosis, and reduced CV and overall mortality with higher serum levels of endogenous T. Randomized controlled trials have demonstrated benefits of TTh in men with coronary artery disease and congestive heart failure. Improvement in CV risk factors such as fat mass and glycemic control have been repeatedly demonstrated in T-deficient men treated with T. The current evidence does not support the belief that TTh is associated with increased CV risk or CV mortality. On the contrary, a wealth of evidence accumulated over several decades suggests that low serum T levels are associated with increased risk and that higher endogenous T, as well as TTh itself, appear to be beneficial for CV mortality and risk. PMID:25432501

  5. Birth Defects Prevalence and Mortality

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator describes the prevalence of birth defects present at birth and mortality rates among infants in the United States between from 1999-2008 and 1979-2007, respectively. Some scientific studies have linked birth defects with environmental exposures. This indicator p...

  6. Coral Mortality and Bleaching Output

    EPA Science Inventory

    COMBO is a spreadsheet-based model for the use of managers, conservationists, and biologists for projecting the effects of climate change on coral reefs at local-to-regional scales. The COMBO (Coral Mortality and Bleaching Output) model calculates the impacts to coral reefs from...

  7. Manatee mortality in Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mignucci-Giannoni, A. A.; Montoya-Ospina, R. A.; Jimenez-Marrero, N. M.; Rodriguez-Lopez, M.; Williams, E.H., Jr.; Bonde, R.K.

    2000-01-01

    The most pressing problem in the effective management of the West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus) in Puerto Rico is mortality due to human activities. We assessed 90 cases of manatee strandings in Puerto Rico based on historical data and a coordinated carcass salvage effort from 1990 through 1995. We determined patterns of mortality, including type of event, condition of carcasses, spatial and temporal distribution, gender, size/age class, and the cause of death. The spatial distribution of stranding events was not uniform, with the north, northeast, and south coasts having the highest numbers. Six clusters representing the highest incidence included the areas of Fajardo and Ceiba, Bahia de Jobos, Toa Baja, Guayanilla, Cabo Rojo, and Rio Grande to Luquillo. The number of reported cases has increased at an average rate of 9.6%/yr since 1990. The seasonality of stranding events showed a bimodal pattern, from February through April and in August and September. Most identified causes of death were due to human interaction, especially captures and watercraft collisions. Natural causes usually involved dependent calves. From 1990 through 1995, most deaths were attributed to watercraft collisions. A reduction in anthropogenic mortality of this endangered species can be accomplished only through education and a proactive management and conservation plan that includes law enforcement, mortality assessment, scientific research, rescue and rehabilitation, and inter- and intraagency cooperation.

  8. MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY CHART BOOK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Provides information on the progress being made in the fight against cardiovascular, lung, and blood diseases. It serves as a resource for the Institute as it plans and prioritizes future activities. Compilation of data on the size and trends of morbidity and mortality from the c...

  9. Are infant mortality rate declines exponential? The general pattern of 20th century infant mortality rate decline

    PubMed Central

    Bishai, David; Opuni, Marjorie

    2009-01-01

    Background Time trends in infant mortality for the 20th century show a curvilinear pattern that most demographers have assumed to be approximately exponential. Virtually all cross-country comparisons and time series analyses of infant mortality have studied the logarithm of infant mortality to account for the curvilinear time trend. However, there is no evidence that the log transform is the best fit for infant mortality time trends. Methods We use maximum likelihood methods to determine the best transformation to fit time trends in infant mortality reduction in the 20th century and to assess the importance of the proper transformation in identifying the relationship between infant mortality and gross domestic product (GDP) per capita. We apply the Box Cox transform to infant mortality rate (IMR) time series from 18 countries to identify the best fitting value of lambda for each country and for the pooled sample. For each country, we test the value of λ against the null that λ = 0 (logarithmic model) and against the null that λ = 1 (linear model). We then demonstrate the importance of selecting the proper transformation by comparing regressions of ln(IMR) on same year GDP per capita against Box Cox transformed models. Results Based on chi-squared test statistics, infant mortality decline is best described as an exponential decline only for the United States. For the remaining 17 countries we study, IMR decline is neither best modelled as logarithmic nor as a linear process. Imposing a logarithmic transform on IMR can lead to bias in fitting the relationship between IMR and GDP per capita. Conclusion The assumption that IMR declines are exponential is enshrined in the Preston curve and in nearly all cross-country as well as time series analyses of IMR data since Preston's 1975 paper, but this assumption is seldom correct. Statistical analyses of IMR trends should assess the robustness of findings to transformations other than the log transform. PMID:19698144

  10. Mortality amongst Patients with Influenza-Associated Severe Acute Respiratory Illness, South Africa, 2009-2013

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Cheryl; Moyes, Jocelyn; Tempia, Stefano; Groome, Michelle; Walaza, Sibongile; Pretorius, Marthi; Dawood, Halima; Chhagan, Meera; Haffejee, Summaya; Variava, Ebrahim; Kahn, Kathleen; von Gottberg, Anne; Wolter, Nicole; Cohen, Adam L.; Malope-Kgokong, Babatyi; Venter, Marietjie; Madhi, Shabir A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Data on the burden and risk groups for influenza-associated mortality from Africa are limited. We aimed to estimate the incidence and risk-factors for in-hospital influenza-associated severe acute respiratory illness (SARI) deaths. Methods Hospitalised patients with SARI were enrolled prospectively in four provinces of South Africa from 2009–2013. Using polymerase chain reaction, respiratory samples were tested for ten respiratory viruses and blood for pneumococcal DNA. The incidence of influenza-associated SARI deaths was estimated at one urban hospital with a defined catchment population. Results We enrolled 1376 patients with influenza-associated SARI and 3% (41 of 1358 with available outcome data) died. In patients with available HIV-status, the case-fatality proportion (CFP) was higher in HIV-infected (5%, 22/419) than HIV-uninfected individuals (2%, 13/620; p = 0.006). CFPs varied by age group, and generally increased with increasing age amongst individuals >5 years (p<0.001). On multivariable analysis, factors associated with death were age-group 45–64 years (odds ratio (OR) 4.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01–16.3) and ≥65 years (OR 6.5, 95%CI 1.2–34.3) compared to 1–4 year age-group who had the lowest CFP, HIV-infection (OR 2.9, 95%CI 1.1–7.8), underlying medical conditions other than HIV (OR 2.9, 95%CI 1.2–7.3) and pneumococcal co-infection (OR 4.1, 95%CI 1.5–11.2). The estimated incidence of influenza-associated SARI deaths per 100,000 population was highest in children <1 year (20.1, 95%CI 12.1–31.3) and adults aged 45–64 years (10.4, 95%CI 8.4–12.9). Adjusting for age, the rate of death was 20-fold (95%CI 15.0–27.8) higher in HIV-infected individuals than HIV-uninfected individuals. Conclusion Influenza causes substantial mortality in urban South Africa, particularly in infants aged <1 year and HIV-infected individuals. More widespread access to antiretroviral treatment and influenza vaccination may reduce this

  11. Within- and Between-Child Variation in Repeated Urinary Pesticide Metabolite Measurements over a 1-Year Period

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Michael D.; Spengler, John D.; Lu, Chensheng

    2013-01-01

    Background: Children are exposed to pesticides from many sources and routes, including dietary and incidental ingestion, dermal absorption, and inhalation. Linking health outcomes to these exposures using urinary metabolites requires understanding temporal variability within subjects to avoid exposure misclassification. Objectives: We characterized the within- and between-child variability of urinary organophosphorus and pyrethroid metabolites in 23 participants of the Children’s Pesticide Exposure Study–Washington over 1 year and examined the ability of one to four spot urine samples to categorize mean exposures. Methods: Each child provided urine samples twice daily over 7- to 16-day sessions in four seasons in 2003 and 2004. Samples were analyzed for five pyrethroid and five organophosphorus (OP) metabolites. After adjusting for specific gravity, we used a customized maximum likelihood estimation linear mixed-effects model that accounted for values below the limit of detection to calculate intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and conducted surrogate category analyses. Results: Within-child variability was 2–11 times greater than between-child variability. When restricted to samples collected during a single season, ICCs were higher in the fall, winter, and spring than in summer for OPs, and higher in summer and winter for pyrethroids, indicating an increase in between-person variability relative to within-person variability during these seasons. Surrogate category analyses demonstrated that a single spot urine sample did not categorize metabolite concentrations well, and that four or more samples would be needed to categorize children into quartiles consistently. Conclusions: Urinary biomarkers of these short half-life pesticides exhibited substantial within-person variability in children observed over four seasons. Researchers investigating pesticides and health outcomes in children may need repeated biomarker measurements to derive accurate

  12. Survival and mortality among users and non-users of hydroxyurea with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo, Olinda Maria Rodrigues; Ivo, Maria Lúcia; Ferreira, Marcos Antonio; Pontes, Elenir Rose Jardim Cury; Bispo, Ieda Maria Gonçalves Pacce; de Oliveira, Eveny Cristine Luna

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to estimate survival, mortality and cause of death among users or not of hydroxyurea with sickle cell disease. METHOD: cohort study with retrospective data collection, from 1980 to 2010 of patients receiving inpatient treatment in two Brazilian public hospitals. The survival probability was determined using the Kaplan-Meier estimator, survival calculations (SPSS version 10.0), comparison between survival curves, using the log rank method. The level of significance was p=0.05. RESULTS: of 63 patients, 87% had sickle cell anemia, with 39 using hydroxyurea, with a mean time of use of the drug of 20.0±10.0 years and a mean dose of 17.37±5.4 to 20.94±7.2 mg/kg/day, raising the fetal hemoglobin. In the comparison between those using hydroxyurea and those not, the survival curve was greater among the users (p=0.014). A total of 10 deaths occurred, with a mean age of 28.1 years old, and with Acute Respiratory Failure as the main cause. CONCLUSION: the survival curve is greater among the users of hydroxyurea. The results indicate the importance of the nurse incorporating therapeutic advances of hydroxyurea in her care actions. PMID:25806633

  13. Mortality studies of smelter workers.

    PubMed

    Enterline, P E; Marsh, G M

    1980-01-01

    In view of the historic importance of smelter workers in the field of occupational medicine, it is surprising that until very recently little data was available on the mortality experience of these workers. The problem in most studies lies in identifying the smelter workers, because smelting, strictly speaking, refers to the melting of ores for the purposes of recovering metals, whereas smelters sometimes perform the operations of roasting, calcining, sintering, converting, and refining. These distinctions are not made in most mortality studies. Most mortality studies of smelter workers conducted to date have shown some excess in lung cancer. For lead, copper, cadmium, and nickel smelters a different etiologic agent has been proposed for each. These different explanations arise partly from different initial perspectives in conducting the studies. In this paper, data are presented on a current historical-prospective study of males who worked a year or more during the period January 1, 1940 to December 31, 1964 at a copper smelter in Tacoma, Washington. This smelter (and refinery) handled a copper ore with a relatively high arsenic content and produced arsenic trioxide as a by-product. Overall 97.2% of the original study population was traced through 1976. Of the 1,061 who were found to have died, death certificates were obtained for 1,018, or 96%. For all causes of death, the mortality rates in this cohort, expressed as a Standardized Mortality Ratio (SMR), were 3.5% higher than that expected based on the United States white male mortality experience. A total of 104 respiratory system cancers were observed compared to 54.6 expected (SMR = 190.5, p less than .05). Respiratory cancer rates were found to be elevated in both smokers and nonsmokers. Overall, a gradual rise in SMR's for respiratory cancer was observed with increasing duration of exposure but not with an increasing interval from onset of exposure. This observation is consistent with the notion that the

  14. Peptic ulcers: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzes data on peptic ulcer disease based on deaths for 1951-1988 and hospital separations for 1969-1988. The source of the data are mortality and morbidity statistics provided to Statistics Canada by the provinces. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for peptic ulcer disease decreased from 1951 to 1988 by 69.4% for men (8.5 to 2.6 per 100,000 population), and 31.8% for women (2.2 to 1.5). Separation rates from hospitals during 1969-1988 for peptic ulcer disease also decreased by 59.8% for men (242.7 to 97.6 per 100,000 population) and 35.6% for women (103.2 to 66.5). Age-specific rates for both mortality and hospital separations increased with age. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease is declining in the general population. The downward trends in mortality and hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease reflect this change in incidence, but additional factors probably contribute as well to this decline. Male rates for both mortality and hospital separations were much higher than female rates at the beginning of the study period; but toward the end, the gap between the sexes narrowed considerably, mainly because the male rates declined substantially while the female rates decline moderately. The slower decline in the rates for women may be related to such factors as the increasing labour force participation among women and the slower decline in the population of female smokers. PMID:1801957

  15. Vision impairment predicts five-year mortality.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, H R; McCarty, C A; Nanjan, M B

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe predictors of mortality in the 5-year follow-up of the Melbourne Visual Impairment Project (VIP) cohort. METHODS: The Melbourne VIP was a population-based study of the distribution and determinants of age-related eye disease in a cluster random sample of Melbourne residents aged 40 years and older. Baseline examinations were conducted between 1992 and 1994. In 1997, 5-year follow-up examinations of the original cohort commenced. Causes of death were obtained from the National Death Index for all reported deaths. RESULTS: Of the original 3,271 participants, 231 (7.1%) were reported to have died in the intervening 5 years. Of the remaining 3,040 participants eligible to return for follow-up examinations, 2,594 (85% of eligible) did participate, 51 (2%) had moved interstate or overseas, 83 (3%) could not be traced, and 312 (10%) refused to participate. Best corrected visual acuity < 6/12 and cortical cataract were associated with a significantly increased risk of mortality, as were increasing age, male sex, increased duration of cigarette smoking, increased duration of hypertension, and arthritis. CONCLUSIONS: Even mild visual impairment increases the risk of death more than twofold. PMID:11190044

  16. Mortality in East African shorthorn zebu cattle under one year: predictors of infectious-disease mortality

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    East Coast Fever as the main cause of death accounting for 40% of all deaths, haemonchosis 12% and heartwater disease 7%. Conclusion The findings demonstrate the impact of endemic parasitic diseases in indigenous animals expected to be well adapted against disease pressures. Additionally, agreement between results of Cox models using data from simple diagnostic procedures and results from post-mortem analysis underline the potential use such diagnostic data to reduce calf mortality. The control strategies for the identified infectious diseases have been discussed. PMID:24010500

  17. Heat-Related Mortality in India: Excess All-Cause Mortality Associated with the 2010 Ahmedabad Heat Wave

    PubMed Central

    Azhar, Gulrez Shah; Mavalankar, Dileep; Nori-Sarma, Amruta; Rajiva, Ajit; Dutta, Priya; Jaiswal, Anjali; Sheffield, Perry; Knowlton, Kim; Hess, Jeremy J.; Azhar, Gulrez Shah; Deol, Bhaskar; Bhaskar, Priya Shekhar; Hess, Jeremy; Jaiswal, Anjali; Khosla, Radhika; Knowlton, Kim; Mavalankar, Mavalankar; Rajiva, Ajit; Sarma, Amruta; Sheffield, Perry

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In the recent past, spells of extreme heat associated with appreciable mortality have been documented in developed countries, including North America and Europe. However, far fewer research reports are available from developing countries or specific cities in South Asia. In May 2010, Ahmedabad, India, faced a heat wave where the temperatures reached a high of 46.8°C with an apparent increase in mortality. The purpose of this study is to characterize the heat wave impact and assess the associated excess mortality. Methods We conducted an analysis of all-cause mortality associated with a May 2010 heat wave in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India, to determine whether extreme heat leads to excess mortality. Counts of all-cause deaths from May 1–31, 2010 were compared with the mean of counts from temporally matched periods in May 2009 and 2011 to calculate excess mortality. Other analyses included a 7-day moving average, mortality rate ratio analysis, and relationship between daily maximum temperature and daily all-cause death counts over the entire year of 2010, using month-wise correlations. Results The May 2010 heat wave was associated with significant excess all-cause mortality. 4,462 all-cause deaths occurred, comprising an excess of 1,344 all-cause deaths, an estimated 43.1% increase when compared to the reference period (3,118 deaths). In monthly pair-wise comparisons for 2010, we found high correlations between mortality and daily maximum temperature during the locally hottest “summer” months of April (r = 0.69, p<0.001), May (r = 0.77, p<0.001), and June (r = 0.39, p<0.05). During a period of more intense heat (May 19–25, 2010), mortality rate ratios were 1.76 [95% CI 1.67–1.83, p<0.001] and 2.12 [95% CI 2.03–2.21] applying reference periods (May 12–18, 2010) from various years. Conclusion The May 2010 heat wave in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India had a substantial effect on all-cause excess mortality, even in this city where hot

  18. Predictors of mortality after transjugular portosystemic shunt

    PubMed Central

    Ascha, Mona; Abuqayyas, Sami; Hanouneh, Ibrahim; Alkukhun, Laith; Sands, Mark; Dweik, Raed A; Tonelli, Adriano R

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate if echocardiographic and hemodynamic determinations obtained at the time of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) can provide prognostic information that will enhance risk stratification of patients. METHODS: We reviewed medical records of 467 patients who underwent TIPS between July 2003 and December 2011 at our institution. We recorded information regarding patient demographics, underlying liver disease, indication for TIPS, baseline laboratory values, hemodynamic determinations at the time of TIPS, and echocardiographic measurements both before and after TIPS. We recorded patient comorbidities that may affect hemodynamic and echocardiographic determinations. We also calculated Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) score and Child Turcotte Pugh (CTP) class. The following pre- and post-TIPS echocardiographic determinations were recorded: Left ventricular ejection fraction, right ventricular (RV) systolic pressure, subjective RV dilation, and subjective RV function. We recorded the following hemodynamic measurements: Right atrial (RA) pressure before and after TIPS, inferior vena cava pressure before and after TIPS, free hepatic vein pressure, portal vein pressure before and after TIPS, and hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG). RESULTS: We reviewed 418 patients with portal hypertension undergoing TIPS. RA pressure increased by a mean ± SD of 4.8 ± 3.9 mmHg (P < 0.001), HVPG decreased by 6.8 ± 3.5 mmHg (P < 0.001). In multivariate linear regression analysis, a higher MELD score, lower platelet count, splenectomy and a higher portal vein pressure were independent predictors of higher RA pressure (R = 0.55). Three variables predicted 3-mo mortality after TIPS in a multivariate analysis: Age, MELD score, and CTP grade C. Change in the RA pressure after TIPS predicted long-term mortality (per 1 mmHg change, HR = 1.03, 95%CI: 1.01-1.06, P < 0.012). CONCLUSION: RA pressure increased immediately after TIPS particularly in

  19. Mortality of white South African gold miners.

    PubMed Central

    Reid, P J; Sluis-Cremer, G K

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--This two part study aimed to determine whether there was an excess mortality generally or for some diseases among middle aged white South African gold miners on the Witwatersrand and whether the underground dust exposure of these miners contributed to the development of lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), or ischaemic heart disease (IHD). METHODS--A cohort of 4925 white miners in South Africa, born between 1 January 1916 and 31 December 1930 who were alive and working in the vicinity of Johannesburg on 1 January 1970, then aged between 39 and 54, was followed up for 20 years by which time 2032 had died. Most were gold miners (about 87% had worked 85% or more of their shifts in gold mines). Standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated as percentages of the number of deaths observed in the cohort for a condition as stated on the death certificate divided by the number expected on the basis of concurrent mortality in the reference population (the total age specific white male population of South Africa). A case-control analysis was performed for three diseases (lung cancer, COPD, and IHD), the results of which are presented for those miners in the cohort who had spent at least 85% of their service on gold mines and had worked at least 15% of their shifts underground. RESULTS--The SMR for all causes of death was 129.6%, raised because of excess mortality due to the following causes: lung cancer (SMR = 139.8%), IHD (124.1%), COPD (189%) and cirrhosis of the liver (155.3%). Smoking was confirmed to be the main risk factor for lung cancer and COPD although cumulative dust exposure was found to increase the risk of COPD in conjunction with smoking. No significant risk of lung cancer resulted from exposure to dust. High blood pressure and smoking were found to increase the risk of IHD, but no association between IHD and the quetelet index (weight/height2) was found. CONCLUSIONS--The most significant and unexpected finding was the

  20. Cross sectional analysis of mortality by country of birth in England and Wales, 1970-92.

    PubMed Central

    Wild, S.; McKeigue, P.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare mortalities for selected groups of immigrants with the national average. DESIGN: Analysis of mortality for adults aged 20-69 in 1970-2 and 1989-92 using population data from 1971 and 1991 censuses. Mortality of Scottish and Irish immigrants aged 25-74 was also compared with mortality in Scotland and Ireland for 1991. SETTING: England and Wales. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Standardised mortality ratios for deaths from all causes, ischaemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, lung cancer, and breast cancer. RESULTS: In 1989-92 mortality from all causes was higher than the national average for Scottish immigrants, by 32% for men and 36% for women; for Irish immigrants it was higher by 39% for men and 20% for women; and for Caribbean born men it was lower by 23%. Ischaemic heart disease and lung cancer accounted for 30-40% of the excess mortality in Scottish and Irish immigrants. For south Asians, excess mortality from circulatory disease was balanced by lower mortality from cancer. Standardised mortality ratios for cerebrovascular disease in 1989-92 were highest for west African immigrants (271 for men and 181 for women). CONCLUSIONS: Widening differences in mortality ratios for migrants compared with the general population were not simply due to socioeconomic inequalities. The low mortality from all causes for Caribbean immigrants could largely be attributed to low mortality from ischaemic heart disease, which is unexplained. The excess mortality from cerebrovascular and hypertensive diseases in migrants from both west Africa and the Caribbean suggests that genetic factors underlie the susceptibility to hypertension in people of black African descent. PMID:9116545

  1. Racial Disparities in Gastrointestinal Cancers-Related Mortality in the US Population

    PubMed Central

    Jinjuvadia, Raxitkumar; Jinjuvadia, Kartikkumar

    2013-01-01

    Background Racial difference in cancer-related mortality has been described in epidemiological studies and evidence points towards higher mortalities in the minorities. To determine the magnitude of racial disparities and sex differences in GI cancer-related mortalities in the US population, we analyzed the data using the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) and related mortality data files. Methods NHANES III and its related public linked mortality files were used for this study. Our study cohort included subjects who were ≥18 years and were part of the longitudinal mortality follow-up database. The overall GI cancers related mortality was calculated using combined mortality from malignant neoplasm of esophagus, stomach, colon, liver and pancreas. The evaluation of independent predictors of overall GI cancer-related mortality and of each individual GI cancer was carried out using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results A total of 13,221 individuals were included in the analyses with the average person year follow-up of 13.9 years. During the follow-up period, 4,146 subjects died. Of these, 199 were from GI-related cancers. Non-Hispanic black (NHB) had significantly higher overall GI-cancer related mortality compared to non-Hispanic white (NHW, adjusted hazard ratio, aHR: 2.31, 95 % CI 1.57–3.38, p < 0.001). Subgroup analyses by sex demonstrated higher mortality from gastric, colorectal and primary liver cancer related mortality in NHB men compared to NHW men. Esophageal and pancreatic cancer mortalities were higher in NHB women compared to NHW women. Conclusion Overall GI cancer-related mortality is significantly higher among NHB compared to NHW in the US population. PMID:22797822

  2. Widening Geographical Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease Mortality in the United States, 1969-2011

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gopal K.; Azuine, Romuladus E.; Siahpush, Mohammad; Williams, Shanita D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study examined trends in geographical disparities in cardiovascular-disease (CVD) mortality in the United States between 1969 and 2011. Methods: National vital statistics data and the National Longitudinal Mortality Study were used to estimate regional, state, and county-level disparities in CVD mortality over time. Log-linear, weighted least squares, and Cox regression were used to analyze mortality trends and differentials. Results: During 1969-2011, CVD mortality rates declined fastest in New England and Mid-Atlantic regions and slowest in the Southeast and Southwestern regions. In 1969, the mortality rate was 9% higher in the Southeast than in New England, but the differential increased to 48% in 2011. In 2011, Southeastern states, Mississippi and Alabama, had the highest CVD mortality rates, nearly twice the rates for Minnesota and Hawaii. Controlling for individual-level covariates reduced state differentials. State- and county-level differentials in CVD mortality rates widened over time as geographical disparity in CVD mortality increased by 50% between 1969 and 2011. Area deprivation, smoking, obesity, physical inactivity, diabetes prevalence, urbanization, lack of health insurance, and lower access to primary medical care were all significant predictors of county-level CVD mortality rates and accounted for 52.7% of the county variance. Conclusions and Global Health Implications: Although CVD mortality has declined for all geographical areas in the United States, geographical disparity has widened over time as certain regions and states, particularly those in the South, have lagged behind in mortality reduction. Geographical disparities in CVD mortality reflect inequalities in socioeconomic conditions and behavioral risk factors. With the global CVD burden on the rise, monitoring geographical disparities, particularly in low- and middle-income countries, could indicate the extent to which reductions in CVD mortality are achievable and may

  3. Effect of iodine supplementation during pregnancy on infant neurodevelopment at 1 year of age.

    PubMed

    Murcia, Mario; Rebagliato, Marisa; Iñiguez, Carmen; Lopez-Espinosa, Maria-Jose; Estarlich, Marisa; Plaza, Belén; Barona-Vilar, Carmen; Espada, Mercedes; Vioque, Jesús; Ballester, Ferran

    2011-04-01

    Iodine is the main constituent of thyroid hormones, which in turn are required for fetal brain development. However, the relation between iodine intake during pregnancy, thyroid function, and child neurodevelopment needs further evaluation. The authors assessed the association of maternal iodine intake from diet and supplements during pregnancy and of maternal and neonatal thyroid function with infant neurodevelopment. The Mental Development Index and Psychomotor Development Index (PDI) for 691 children were obtained between 2005 and 2007 using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development at age 1 year in a prebirth cohort in Valencia, Spain. In multivariate analyses, a maternal thyrotropin level >4 μU/mL was associated with an increased risk of a PDI <85 (odds ratio = 3.5, P = 0.02). Maternal intake of ≥150 μg/day, compared with <100 μg/day, of iodine from supplements was associated with a 5.2-point decrease in PDI (95% confidence interval: -8.1, -2.2) and a 1.8-fold increase in the odds of a PDI <85 (95% confidence interval: 1.0, 3.3). When analyses were stratified by sex, this association was intensified for girls but was not observed for boys. Further evidence on the safety and effectiveness of iodine supplementation during pregnancy is needed before it is systematically recommended in iodine-sufficient or mildly deficient areas. PMID:21385833

  4. Ablation for atrial fibrillation during mitral valve surgery: 1-year results through continuous subcutaneous monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bogachev-Prokophiev, Alexandr; Zheleznev, Sergey; Romanov, Alexander; Pokushalov, Evgeny; Pivkin, Alexey; Corbucci, Giorgio; Karaskov, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Continuous monitoring of cardiac rhythm may play an important role in measuring the true symptomatic/asymptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF) burden and improve the management of anti-arrhythmic and anti-thrombotic therapies. Forty-seven patients with mitral valve disease and longstanding persistent AF (LSPAF) underwent a left atrial maze procedure with bipolar radiofrequency and valve surgery. The follow-up data recorded by an implanted loop recorder were analysed after 3, 6 and 12 months. On discharge, 40 (85.1%) patients were in stable sinus rhythm, as documented by in-office electrocardiography (ECG), 4 (8.5%) were in pacemaker rhythm and 3 (6.4%) were in AF. One (2.1%) patient died after 7 months. On 12-month follow-up examination, 30 (65.2%) patients had an AF burden <0.5% and were classified as responders. Three (6.5%) of the 16 non-responders had atrial flutter and 13 (27.7%) had documented AF recurrences with an AF burden >0.5%. Two (4.3%) patients with AF recurrences were completely asymptomatic. Among the symptomatic events stored by the patients, only 27.6% was confirmed as genuine AF recurrences according to the concomitant ECG recorded by the implanted loop recorder. A concomitant bipolar maze procedure during mitral valve surgery is effective in treating AF, as proved by detailed 1-year continuous monitoring. PMID:22514258

  5. A 1-year follow-up of implants of differing surface roughness placed in rabbit bone.

    PubMed

    Wennerberg, A; Ektessabi, A; Albrektsson, T; Johansson, C; Andersson, B

    1997-01-01

    Screw-shaped implants were prepared with three different surface topographies: One was left as machined, ie, a turned surface, and two were blasted surfaces with differing degrees of surface roughness. The surface topography was measured with a confocal laser scanning profilometer and the surface roughness was characterized using height and spatial descriptive parameters. The turned surface had an average surface roughness of 0.96 micron and an average peak spacing of 8.6 microns. The two blasted surfaces had surface roughness values of 1.16 microns and 1.94 microns, respectively; the corresponding values for the peak spacing parameter were 10.00 microns and 13.22 microns, respectively. After 1 year in rabbit bone, the bone response to the turned implants was compared with the response to the two blasted implant surfaces. Firmer bone fixation was found for the two blasted surfaces, with statistically significant increases in removal torque and percentage of bone-to-metal contact. Furthermore, about 2 mm from the implant surface, the titanium release was similar for the turned and the 25-micron aluminum oxide-blasted implants. PMID:9274077

  6. Effectiveness of sealing active proximal caries lesions with an adhesive system: 1-year clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Abuchaim, Clarisse; Rotta, Marina; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Reis, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a therapeutic sealant to arrest non-cavitated proximal carious lesion progression. The study population comprised 44 adolescents who had bitewing radiographs taken for caries diagnosis. Non-cavitated lesions extending up to half of dentin thickness were included in the sample. In the experimental group (n = 33), the proximal caries-lesion surfaces were sealed with an adhesive (OptiBond Solo, Kerr) after tooth separation. The control group (n = 11) received no treatment, except for oral hygiene instructions including use of dental floss. Follow-up radiographs were taken after one year and were analyzed in comparison with baseline radiographs. In a blind study setting, visual readings were performed by two examiners, blinded to whether the examined radiograph was baseline or follow-up, and whether it concerned a test or control lesion. The efficacy of sealing treatment was evaluated by the McNemar test (0.05). About 22% of the sealed lesions showed reduction, 61% showed no change and 16% showed progression. For the control lesions, the corresponding values were 27%, 36% and 36% respectively. The number of lesions that showed reduction and no changes were merged and therefore 83.3% of the sealed lesions and 63.6% of the control lesions were considered clinically successful. No statistical significance was detected (p > 0.05). In the course of 1 year, sealing proximal caries lesions was not shown to be superior to lesion monitoring. PMID:20877976

  7. Temporal associations between disordered eating and nonsuicidal self-injury: examining symptom overlap over 1 year.

    PubMed

    Turner, Brianna J; Yiu, Angelina; Layden, Brianne K; Claes, Laurence; Zaitsoff, Shannon; Chapman, Alexander L

    2015-01-01

    Disordered eating (DE) and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) commonly co-occur. This study compared several models of the longitudinal relationship between DE and NSSI, including concurrent and prospective models, and examined the possible moderating roles of self-objectification, impulsivity, and emotion dysregulation in these relationships. Individuals with NSSI (N=197) recruited from online forums completed measures of NSSI and DE every 3 months for 1 year. We tested the associations between NSSI and DE using hierarchical linear models. Results supported a concurrent relationship, wherein frequency of NSSI positively covaried with concurrent DE severity. Body surveillance moderated the concurrent relationship between NSSI and DE. Individuals who engaged in more body surveillance endorsed high levels of DE pathology, whereas those lower in body surveillance engaged in more frequent NSSI only at higher levels of DE. In addition, whereas DE did not prospectively predict NSSI, frequency of NSSI predicted more severe DE 3 months later. The prospective relationship between DE and later NSSI was moderated by emotion dysregulation, such that highly dysregulated individuals had a stronger relationship between DE and later NSSI, whereas this relationship was not significant among individuals low in emotion dysregulation. These findings add valuable information regarding the co-occurrence of self-damaging behaviors. PMID:25526840

  8. Congenital abnormality of the vagina complicated by haemato-pyocolpos in a 1-year labrador retriever.

    PubMed

    Alonge, S; Romussi, S; Grieco, V; Luvoni, G C

    2015-06-01

    A 1-year-old female Labrador retriever was referred with a few days history of haematic-like vulvar discharge. Physical examination, vaginal inspection and palpation did not reveal any remarkable finding. Transabdominal ultrasound showed echogenic fluid accumulation in the vagina suggesting haemato-pyocolpos. An exploratory laparotomy was performed: a well-delimited ectasic vagina was identified. Ovariohysterectomy and partial vaginectomy and vaginoplasty were performed to spay the bitch and to remove the ectasic vagina. Post-operative recovery and 12-month follow-up were uneventful. Clinical, morphological and histological findings were consistent with a congenital abnormality of the muscular layer of the vagina complicated by haemato-pyocolpos. The disorganization of the vaginal tunica muscularis may have acted as locus minoris resistentiae in the vaginal wall. The organ was dilated and atonic due to the gradual accumulation of physiological fluids complicated by an overgrowth of genital bacteria. This congenital disorder has to be taken into account as differential diagnosis of haemato-pyocolpos with vaginal discharge in young bitches. PMID:25661902

  9. Global distribution of deep convection reaching tropopause in 1 year GPM observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nana; Liu, Chuntao

    2016-04-01

    To characterize and quantify tropopause-reaching deep convection, 1 year of Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) Ku band radar echoes are surveyed in relation to several reference levels derived from the ERA-Interim reanalysis data set. Consistent with the observations of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission over the tropics, the GPM has detected tropopause-reaching deep convection dominantly over tropical land, especially over Panama and Central Africa. At middle and high latitudes, tropopause-reaching convective storms are mainly found over land in the Northern Hemisphere during the summer. Compared to those in the tropics, convective cores at middle and high latitudes have relatively larger sizes at the tropopause, especially those over central North America. The zonal distributions of the occurrences of 15 dBZ and 20 dBZ radar echoes at the tropopause show two comparable maxima, one in the tropics and the other in northern middle-high latitudes. This implies that the convection penetrating the tropopause at northern middle-high latitudes is as frequent as those over the tropics. It is important to understand their role in the vertical transport of trace gases between the troposphere and the stratosphere.

  10. Depression and posttraumatic stress disorder in temporary settlement residents 1 year after the Sichuan earthquake.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhang; Ma, Ning; Yang, Lei; Agho, Kingsley; Stevens, Garry; Raphael, Beverley; Cui, Lijun; Liu, Yongqiao; Yan, Baoping; Ma, Hong; Yu, Xin

    2015-03-01

    The authors sought to determine the prevalence and risk factors for major depressive disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among survivors living in temporary accommodation in the Yongxing settlement in Mianyang city 1 year after the Sichuan earthquake for further interventions. They interviewed 182 residents, using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders and a self-report questionnaire. The 12-month prevalence of depressive disorder and PTSD were 48.9% and 39.6%, respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated that bereaved survivors were 5.51 times (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 5.51; 95% confidence interval [CI] =2.14-14.22) more likely to report PTSD and 2.42 times (AOR = 2.42; 95%CI =1.00-5.48) more likely to report depressive disorder than nonbereaved survivors. Older age and receipt of government financial support were significantly associated with 12-month PTSD. Depressive disorder 12 months after the earthquake was associated with receipt of government financial support, pre-earthquake physical illness, single marital status, being currently employed, and Han ethnicity. PMID:23666829

  11. Beyond Earth: Weaving Science and Indigenous Culture - A 1-year NSF Planning Grant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Timothy; Guy, M.; Baker Big-Back, C.; Froelich, K.

    2011-01-01

    We present results of a 1-year NSF planning grant called Beyond Earth. The project is designed to engage Native American, urban, and rural families in science learning while piloting curriculum development and implementation that incorporates both Native and Western epistemologies. Physical, earth, and space science content is juxtaposed with indigenous culture, stories, language and epistemology in after-school programs and teacher training. Project partners include the Dakota Science Center, Fort Berthold Community College, and Sitting Bull College. The Native American tribes represented in this initiative illustrate partnerships between the Dakota, Lakota, Nakota, Hidatsa, Mandan, and Arikara. Over the past year the primary project deliverables include a culturally responsive curriculum Beyond Earth Moon Module, teacher training workshops, a project website. The curriculum module introduces students to the moon's appearance, phases, and positions in the sky using the Night Sky Planetarium Experience Station to explore core concepts underlying moon phases and eclipses using the interactive Nature Experience Station before engaging in the culminating Mission Challenge in which they apply their knowledge to problem solving situations and projects. The Native Science and Western Science activities developed, planetarium explorations created, and website toolkit utilizations are presented.

  12. Latent Transition Models to Study Women's Changing of Dietary Patterns From Pregnancy to 1 Year Postpartum

    PubMed Central

    Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Herring, Amy H.; Siega-Riz, Anna-Maria

    2013-01-01

    Latent class models are useful for classifying subjects by dietary patterns. Our goals were to use latent transition models to identify dietary patterns during pregnancy and postpartum, to estimate the prevalence of these dietary patterns, and to model transition probabilities between dietary patterns as a function of covariates. Women who were enrolled in the Pregnancy, Infection, and Nutrition Study (University of North Carolina, 2000–2005) were followed for 1 year postpartum, and their diets were assessed in the second trimester and at 3 and 12 months postpartum (n = 519, 484, and 374, respectively) by using a food frequency questionnaire. After adjusting for energy intake, parity, smoking status, race, and education, we identified 3 dietary patterns and named them “prudent,” “health conscious Western,” and “Western.” Nulliparas were 2.9 and 2.1 times more likely to be in the “prudent” class than the “health conscious Western” or the “Western” class, respectively. The 3 dietary patterns were very stable, with the “health conscious Western” class being the least stable; the probability for staying in the same class was 0.74 and 0.87 at 3 and 12 months postpartum, respectively. Breastfeeding mothers were more likely than nonbreastfeeding mothers to switch dietary pattern class (P = 0.0286). Except for breastfeeding mothers, most women did not switch dietary patterns from pregnancy to postpartum. PMID:23538942

  13. [Mortality in traffic accidents in Bayamo, Cuba 2011].

    PubMed

    Piña-Tornés, Arlines; González-Longoria, Lourdes; González-Pardo, Secundino; Acosta-González, Ariel; Vintimilla-Burgos, Patricio; Paspuel-Yar, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    With the objective of describing mortality from traffic accidents in Bayamo, Cuba, in 2011 a review was performed of injured and deceased patients due to traffic accidents, recorded in the Hospital Carlos M. de Céspedes. Of the 1,365 injured patients treated in the emergency room, the predominant groups were individuals aged 25 to 44 years comprising 372 patients (27.3%) and men comprising 1,071 (78.5%). 46 people died, most from the same age group and male. Multiple traumatisms (52.6%) and craniofacial trauma (34.2%) were the predominant injuries. Motor vehicle-pedestrian accidents stood out with a mortality of 26.3%. In conclusion, mortality from traffic accidents predominately occurs in young male adults, whose fatal consequences are due to multiple traumatisms from road accidents. PMID:25597725

  14. Mortality after hip fracture with vertebral compression fracture is poor.

    PubMed

    Imai, Norio; Endo, Naoto; Hoshino, Tadashi; Suda, Ken; Miyasaka, Dai; Ito, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increasing elderly population, the prevalence of osteoporotic hip fractures in Japanese patients continues to rise. It is well established that patients with either hip fracture or both symptomatic and asymptomatic morphometric vertebral compression fracture (VCF) have a poor health prognosis compared with the general population. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively investigate vertebral fracture rates among patients with hip fracture and their influence on mortality. We examined 182 cases of osteoporotic hip fracture in patients admitted to our institution between January 2009 and May 2011. The average age at the time of fracture was 85 years. Radiographs of the lumbar spine were obtained from all of the participants and the lateral spinal radiographs were examined for evidence of VCF. The patients were classified into two groups, those with VCF and those without. A VCF was identified in approximately 78 % of the patients. The mortality rate 1 year after the hip fracture was approximately 22 % and it was significantly higher in patients with VCF. Through multivariate statistics we found that VCF, post-operative complication, loss of ambulation after operation and medication for osteoporosis were statistically significant. In other words, VCF, post-operative complication and loss of ambulation were considered to be poor prognostic factors and medication for osteoporosis was likely to improve the prognosis. We concluded that the risk of mortality after hip fracture is significantly greater in patients who also have VCF compared to patients without VCF, and that medication for osteoporosis is likely to improve prognosis. PMID:25501699

  15. The efficacy and safety of weekly 35-mg risedronate dosing regimen for Chinese postmenopausal women with osteoporosis or osteopenia: 1-year data

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jie-mei; Wang, Li; Lin, Hua; Chen, De-cai; Tang, Hai; Jin, Xiao-lan; Xia, Wei-bo; Hu, Yun-qiu; Fu, Wen-zhen; He, Jin-wei; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Chun; Yue, Hua; Hu, Wei-wei; Liu, Yu-juan; Zhang, Zhen-lin

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Oral risedronate is effective in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis when administered daily, weekly, or monthly. In this 1-year, randomized, double-blind, multicenter study we compared the weekly 35-mg and daily 5-mg risedronate dosing regimens in the treatment of Chinese postmenopausal women with osteoporosis or osteopenia. Methods: Postmenopausal women with primary osteoporosis or osteopenia were randomly assigned to the weekly group or daily group (n=145 for each) that received oral risedronate 35 mg once a week or 5 mg daily, respectively, for 1 year. The subjects' bone mineral densities (BMDs), bone turnover markers (P1NP and β-CTX), new vertebral fractures, and adverse events were assessed at baseline and during the treatments. Results: All subjects in the weekly group and 144 subjects in the daily group completed the study. The primary efficacy endpoint after 1 year, ie the mean percent changes in the lumbar spine BMD (95% CI) were 4.87% (3.92% to 5.81%) for the weekly group and 4.35% (3.31% to 5.39%) for the daily group. The incidences of clinical adverse events were 48.3% in the weekly group and 54.2% in the daily group. Conclusion: The weekly 35-mg and daily 5-mg risedronate dosing regimens during 1 year of follow-up show similar efficacy in improving BMDs and biochemical markers of bone turnover in Chinese p