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Sample records for 1-year mortality results

  1. Spiritual absence and 1-year mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Deidre B; Christian, Lisa M; Patidar, Seema; Bishop, Michelle M; Dodd, Stacy M; Athanason, Rebecca; Wingard, John R; Reddy, Vijay S

    2010-08-01

    Religiosity and spirituality have been associated with better survival in large epidemiologic studies. This study examined the relationship between spiritual absence and 1-year all-cause mortality in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. Depression and problematic compliance were examined as possible mediators of a significant spiritual absence-mortality relationship. Eighty-five adults (mean = 46.85 years old, SD = 11.90 years) undergoing evaluation for allogeneic HSCT had routine psychologie evaluation prior to HSCT admission. The Millon Behavioral Medicine Diagnostic was used to assess spiritual absence, depression, and problematic compliance, the psychosocial predictors of interest. Patient status at 1 year and survival time in days were abstracted from medical records. Cox regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between the psychosocial factors of interest and mortality after adjusting for relevant biobehavioral factors. Twenty-nine percent (n = 25) of participants died within 1 year of HSCT. After covarying for disease type, individuals with the highest spiritual absence and problematic compliance scores were significantly more likely to die 1-year post-HSCT (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.49, P = .043 and HR = 3.74, P = .029, respectively), particularly secondary to infection, sepsis, or graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (HR = 4.56, P = .01 and HR = 5.61, P = .014), relative to those without elevations on these scales. Depression was not associated with 1-year mortality, and problematic compliance did not mediate the relationship between spiritual absence and mortality. These preliminary results suggest that both spiritual absence and problematic compliance may be associated with poorer survival following HSCT. Future research should examine these relations in a larger sample using a more comprehensive assessment of spirituality.

  2. The Safe Dates program: 1-year follow-up results.

    PubMed Central

    Foshee, V A; Bauman, K E; Greene, W F; Koch, G G; Linder, G F; MacDougall, J E

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: An earlier report described desirable 1-month follow-up effects of the Safe Dates program on psychological, physical, and sexual dating violence. Mediators of the program-behavior relationship also were identified. The present report describes the 1-year follow-up effects of the Safe Dates program. METHODS: Fourteen schools were in the randomized experiment. Data were gathered by questionnaires in schools before program activities and 1 year after the program ended. RESULTS: The short-term behavioral effects had disappeared at 1 year, but effects on mediating variables such as dating violence norms, conflict management skills, and awareness of community services for dating violence were maintained. CONCLUSIONS: The findings are considered in the context of why program effects might have decayed and the possible role of boosters for effect maintenance. PMID:11029999

  3. Effectiveness of a multidisciplinary heart failure disease management programme on 1-year mortality: Prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Laborde-Castérot, Hervé; Agrinier, Nelly; Zannad, Faiez; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Rossignol, Patrick; Girerd, Nicolas; Alla, François; Thilly, Nathalie

    2016-09-01

    We performed a multicenter prospective observational cohort study (Epidémiologie et Pronostic de l'Insuffisance Cardiaque Aiguë en Lorraine, Epidemiology and Prognosis of Acute Heart Failure in Lorraine [EPICAL2]) to evaluate the effectiveness on mortality of a community-based multidisciplinary disease management programme (DMP) for heart failure (HF) patients.Between October 2011 and October 2012, 1816 patients, who were hospitalized for acute HF or who developed acute HF during a hospitalization, were included from 21 hospitals in a northeast region of France. At hospital admission, their mean age was 77.3 (standard deviation [SD] 11.6) years and mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 45.0 (SD 16.0)%. A subset of patients were enrolled in a multidimensional DMP for HF (n = 312, 17.2%), based on structured patient education, home monitoring visits by HF-trained nurses, and automatic alerts triggered by significant clinical and biological changes to the patient. The DMP involved general practitioners, nurses, and cardiologists collaborating via an individual web-based medical electronic record. The outcome was all-cause mortality from the 3rd to the 12th month after discharge. During the follow-up, a total of 377 (20.8%) patients died: 321 (21.3%) in the control group and 56 (17.9%) in the DMP group. In a propensity score analysis, DMP was associated with lower 1-year all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 0.65, 95% CI 0.46-0.92). Instrumental variable analysis gave similar results (hazard ratio 0.56, 0.27-1.16).In a real world setting, a multidimensional DMP for HF with structured patient education, home nurse monitoring, and appropriate physician alerts may improve survival when implemented after discharge from hospitalization due to worsening HF.

  4. Prognosis of stroke in the south of Greece: 1 year mortality, functional outcome and its determinants: the Arcadia Stroke Registry

    PubMed Central

    Vemmos, K; Bots, M; Tsibouris, P; Zis, V; Takis, C; Grobbee, D; Stamatelopoulos, S

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—For Greece, data on incidence of stroke, type of stroke, and prognosis of stroke is limited. Recently, results on incidence of stroke were published. Here 1 year mortality, functional outcome after a first ever stroke, and determinants of the prognosis are described.
METHODS—A population based registry was established in the Arcadia area, located in eastern central Peloponessos in southern Greece. Between 1 November 1993 and 31 October 1995, 555 patients with a first ever stroke were identified using information from death certificates, hospital records, public health centres and general practitioners. Extensive information on cardiovascular risk factors and stroke characteristics was obtained. After 1 year a modified Rankin score was determined in all surviving patients.
RESULTS—After 1 year of follow up, 204 (36.8%) patients died. The probability of survival 1 year after stroke was higher for cerebral infarction than for intracerebral haemorrhage; 67.8% (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 64-72) and 46.4% (35-57), respectively. Of the survivors, 68.9% had either no symptoms or symptoms that would not interfere with their capacity to look after themselves (Rankin score 0 to 2). Increasing age and low Glasgow coma scale score were the most powerful predictors of death within 1 year (p<0.01), whereas increasing age, atrial fibrillation, and low Glasgow coma scale score were the most important predictors of functional outcome 1 year after a stroke (p<0.01).
CONCLUSIONS—One year mortality from stroke in Greece is similar to that of other industrialised countries. The most important factors that affect the prognosis of a patient with a first ever stroke are increasing age, stroke severity, and atrial fibrillation.

 PMID:11032610

  5. Barriers to Care and 1-Year Mortality Among Newly Diagnosed HIV-Infected People in Durban, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Sharon M.; Giddy, Janet; Bogart, Laura M.; Chaisson, Christine E.; Ross, Douglas; Flash, Moses J. E.; Govender, Tessa; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Losina, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Background: Prompt entry into HIV care is often hindered by personal and structural barriers. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of self-perceived barriers to health care on 1-year mortality among newly diagnosed HIV-infected individuals in Durban, South Africa. Methods: Before HIV testing at 4 outpatient sites, adults (≥18 years) were surveyed regarding perceived barriers to care including (1) service delivery, (2) financial, (3) personal health perception, (4) logistical, and (5) structural. We assessed deaths via phone calls and the South African National Population Register. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to determine the association between number of perceived barriers and death within 1 year. Results: One thousand eight hundred ninety-nine HIV-infected participants enrolled. Median age was 33 years (interquartile range: 27–41 years), 49% were females, and median CD4 count was 192/μL (interquartile range: 72–346/μL). One thousand fifty-seven participants (56%) reported no, 370 (20%) reported 1–3, and 460 (24%) reported >3 barriers to care. By 1 year, 250 [13%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 12% to 15%] participants died. Adjusting for age, sex, education, baseline CD4 count, distance to clinic, and tuberculosis status, participants with 1–3 barriers (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.49, 95% CI: 1.06 to 2.08) and >3 barriers (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.81, 95% CI: 1.35 to 2.43) had higher 1-year mortality risk compared with those without barriers. Conclusions: HIV-infected individuals in South Africa who reported perceived barriers to medical care at diagnosis were more likely to die within 1 year. Targeted structural interventions, such as extended clinic hours, travel vouchers, and streamlined clinic operations, may improve linkage to care and antiretroviral therapy initiation for these people. PMID:28060226

  6. Factors associated with postoperative complications and 1-year mortality after surgery for colorectal cancer in octogenarians and nonagenarians

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Wan; Kim, Ik Yong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify the factors affecting 30-day postoperative complications and 1-year mortality after surgery for colorectal cancer in octogenarians and nonagenarians. Methods Between 2005 and 2014, a total of 204 consecutive patients aged ≥80 years who underwent major colorectal surgery were included. Results One hundred patients were male (49%) and 52 patients had American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score ≥3 (25%). Combined surgery was performed in 32 patients (16%). Postoperative complications within 30 days after surgery occurred in 54 patients (26%) and 30-day mortality occurred in five patients (2%). Independent risk factors affecting 30-day postoperative complications were older age (≥90 years, hazard ratio [HR] with 95% confidence interval [CI] =4.95 [1.69−14.47], P=0.004), an ASA score ≥3 (HR with 95% CI =4.19 [1.8−9.74], P=0.001), performance of combined surgery (HR with 95% CI =3.1 [1.13−8.46], P=0.028), lower hemoglobin level (<10 g/dL, HR with 95% CI =7.56 [3.07−18.63], P<0.001), and lower albumin level (<3.4 g/dL, HR with 95% CI =3.72 [1.43−9.69], P=0.007). An ASA score ≥3 (HR with 95% CI =2.72 [1.15−6.46], P=0.023), tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage IV (HR with 95% CI =3.47 [1.44−8.39], P=0.006), and occurrence of postoperative complications (HR with 95% CI =4.42 [1.39−14.09], P=0.012) were significant prognostic factors for 1-year mortality. Conclusion Patient-related factors (older age, higher ASA score, presence of anemia, and lower serum albumin) and procedure-related factors (performance of combined surgical procedure) increased postoperative complications. Avoidance of 30-day postoperative complications may decrease 1-year mortality. PMID:27279741

  7. Prognostic role of D-dimer for in-hospital and 1-year mortality in exacerbations of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guoping; Wu, Yankui; Zhou, Yumin; Wu, Zelong; Wei, Liping; Li, Yuqun; Peng, GongYong; Liang, Weiqiang; Ran, Pixin

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective Serum D-dimer is elevated in respiratory disease. The objective of our study was to investigate the effect of D-dimer on in-hospital and 1-year mortality after acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). Methods Upon admission, we measured 343 AECOPD patients’ serum D-dimer levels and arterial blood gas analysis, and recorded their clinical characteristics. The level of D-dimer that discriminated survivors and non-survivors was determined using a receiver operator curve (ROC). The risk factors for in-hospital mortality were identified through univariate analysis and multiple logistic regression analyses. To evaluate the predictive role of D-dimer for 1-year mortality, univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were performed. Results In all, 28 patients died, and 315 patients survived in the in-hospital period. The group of dead patients had lower pH levels (7.35±0.11 vs 7.39±0.05, P<0.0001), higher D-dimer, arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2), C-reactive protein (CRP), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels (D-dimer 2,244.9±2,310.7 vs 768.2±1,078.4 µg/L, P<0.0001; PaCO2: 58.8±29.7 vs 46.1±27.0 mmHg, P=0.018; CRP: 81.5±66, P=0.001; BUN: 10.20±6.87 vs 6.15±3.15 mmol/L, P<0.0001), and lower hemoglobin levels (118.6±29.4 vs 128.3±18.2 g/L, P=0.001). The areas under the ROC curves of D-dimer for in-hospital death were 0.748 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.641–0.854). D-dimer ≥985 ng/L was a risk factor for in-hospital mortality (relative risk =6.51; 95% CI 3.06–13.83). Multivariate logistic regression analysis also showed that D-dimer ≥985 ng/L and heart failure were independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality. Both univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses showed that D-dimer ≥985 ng/L was an independent risk factor for 1-year death (hazard ratio (HR) 3.48, 95% CI 2.07–5.85 for the univariate analysis; and HR 1.96, 95% CI 1.05–3.65 for the multivariate analysis

  8. Clinical and imaging predictors of 1-year and long-term mortality in light chain (AL) amyloidosis: a 5-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Migrino, Raymond Q; Harmann, Leanne; Christenson, Richard; Hari, Parameswaran

    2014-11-01

    Light chain amyloidosis (AL) involves multiorgan failure induced by amyloidogenic light chain proteins, and is associated with high mortality. We aimed to identify clinical, laboratory, and imaging parameters that would predict 1-year and long-term AL mortality. Forty-four biopsy-proven AL patients (61.5 ± 12 years, 20 females) underwent clinical evaluation including laboratory assays, echocardiography, and contrast cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR, n = 31) prior to chemotherapy. Patients were prospectively followed for median duration of 62.7 months (interquartile range 35.5 months). Clinical and laboratory parameters were compared between 1-year survivors and nonsurvivors. Univariate Kaplan-Meier survival plots were calculated followed by stepwise logistic regression analysis to assess independent predictors of long-term survival. Eighteen (40.9 %) patients died within 1 year and an additional 10 subjects died during long-term follow-up. Patients who expired within 1 year presented with more advanced class of heart failure, higher alkaline phosphatase and uric acid, lower limb lead voltage on electrocardiography, shorter left ventricular ejection time (ET) on echocardiography, and a higher proportion of late gadolinium enhancement on CMR. On multivariable analysis, only ET ≤240 ms on echocardiography (hazard ratio (HR) 5.07, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.83-14.1, P = 0.002) and New York Heart Association functional class II-IV presentation (HR 1.0058, 95 % CI 1.0014-1.0103, P = 0.01) were independent predictors of AL mortality. In conclusion, AL amyloidosis is associated with high 1-year and long-term mortality. Among clinical, laboratory, and imaging parameters tested, an echocardiographic finding of ET ≤240 ms has independent and additive prognostic value to clinical heart failure evaluation in determining long-term survival of AL patients. This result may be important in the early identification of patients at risk.

  9. Comparing the predictive accuracy of frailty, comorbidity, and disability for mortality: a 1-year follow-up in patients hospitalized in geriatric wards

    PubMed Central

    Ritt, Martin; Ritt, Julia Isabel; Sieber, Cornel Christian; Gaßmann, Karl-Günter

    2017-01-01

    Background Studies evaluating and comparing the power of frailty, comorbidity, and disability instruments, together and in parallel, for predicting mortality are limited. Objective This study aimed to evaluate and compare the measures of frailty, comorbidity, and disability in predicting 1-year mortality in geriatric inpatients. Design Prospective cohort study. Patients and setting A total of 307 inpatients aged ≥65 years in geriatric wards of a general hospital participated in the study. Measurements The patients were evaluated in relation to different frailty, comorbidity, and disability instruments during their hospital stays. These included three frailty (the seven-category Clinical Frailty Scale [CFS-7], a 41-item frailty index [FI], and the FRAIL scale), two comorbidity (the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale for Geriatrics [CIRS-G] and the comorbidity domain of the FI [Comorbidity-D-FI]), and two disability instruments (disability in basic activities of daily living [ADL-Katz] and the instrumental and basic activities of daily living domains of the FI [IADL/ADL-D-FI]). The patients were followed-up over 1 year. Results Using FI, CIRS-G, Comorbidity-D-FI, and ADL-Katz, this study identified a patient group with a high (≥50%) 1-year mortality rate in all of the patients and the two patient subgroups (ie, patients aged 65–82 years and ≥83 years). The CFS-7, FI, FRAIL scale, CIRS-G, Comorbidity-D-FI, and IADL/ADL-D-FI (analyzed as full scales) revealed useful discriminative accuracy for 1-year mortality (ie, an area under the curve >0.7) in all the patients and the two patient subgroups (all P<0.001). Thereby, CFS-7 (in all patients and the two patient subgroups) and FI (in the subgroup of patients aged ≥83 years) showed greater discriminative accuracy for 1-year mortality compared to other instruments (all P<0.05). Conclusion All the different instruments emerged as suitable tools for risk stratification in geriatric inpatients. Among them, CFS-7, and in

  10. Efficacy of risedronate in men with primary and secondary osteoporosis: results of a 1-year study.

    PubMed

    Ringe, J D; Faber, H; Farahmand, P; Dorst, A

    2006-03-01

    Osteoporosis is prevalent in men with an estimated one in eight men older than 50 years suffering from osteoporotic fracture, and a higher mortality rate after fracture among men compared with women. There are few approved therapies for osteoporosis in men. This observational study assesses the efficacy and safety of risedronate in the treatment of men with primary and secondary osteoporosis. A single-center, open label, randomized, prospective 1-year study was conducted in men with primary or secondary osteoporosis. Patients were randomized to risedronate (risedronate 5 mg/day plus calcium 1,000 mg/day and vitamin D 800 IU/day) or control groups (alfacalcidol 1 mug/day plus calcium 500 mg/day or vitamin D 1,000 IU/day plus calcium 800 mg/day). Bone mineral density (BMD) measurements, X-rays of the spine, a medical history and physical exam, and patient self-assessments of back pain were performed at baseline and 12 months. Blinded semi-quantitative fracture assessment was conducted by a radiologist. A total of 316 men with osteoporosis were enrolled in the trial (risedronate, n=158; control, n=158). At 1 year lumbar spine BMD increased by 4.7% in the risedronate group versus an increase of 1.0% in the control group (P<0.001). Significant increases in BMD at the total hip and femoral neck were also observed with risedronate compared with the control group. The incidence of new vertebral fracture in the risedronate group was reduced by 60% versus the control group (P=0.028). Daily treatment with risedronate for 12 months significantly increased BMD at the lumbar spine, femoral neck and total hip and significantly reduced the incidence of new vertebral fractures. This is the first prospective, randomized, controlled trial to demonstrate a significant reduction in vertebral fractures in 1 year in men with primary or secondary osteoporosis.

  11. Evaluation of the management of Hr-HPV+/PapTest- women: results at 1-year recall.

    PubMed

    Chiappetta, Caterina; Puggioni, Chiara; Lendaro, Eugenio; Cacciotti, Jessica; Zaralli, Roberto; Migliore, Giovanna; Bellardini, Paola; Petrozza, Vincenzo; Della Rocca, Carlo; Di Cristofano, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    With cervical cancer screening the choice of 1-year as a period of follow-up in positive high-risk HPV women without cytological lesions is still under discussion. We evaluated the management of these women and the role of HPV genotyping test. We did a cervical cancer screening study of women aged 35-64 with primary high-risk HPV test. Women positive for high-risk HPV with negative cytology were followed-up after 1 year. In this study we selected women with high-risk HPV+/PapTest- resulted high-risk HPV+ at recall and performed the PapTest and HPV genotyping test. The detection rate of squamous high grade (CIN2+) relative to the total screened cohort was 2.1‰, and it was 0.2‰ at the 1-year recall. The colposcopy performed in women referred at the 1-year recall accounted for 48.8% of the total (baseline + 1-year recall), and 84.3% of these women had no cytological lesions. The most frequent hr-HPV genotype detected was HPV16 and 66.7% of co-infections were due to HPV16 and HPV18. 54.5% of women presented a persistent infection at 1-year recall with the same HPV subtype, 50% of persistent infections was due to HPV16 and 16.7% of these were determined to be CIN2+ histological lesions. Our data show that it may be useful to extend the period of follow-up for women hr-HPV+/PapTest- so as to reduce the number of unnecessary colposcopies due to the transitory infections and that the genotyping test could help to identify the persistent infections in which HPV16 is involved.

  12. XEN Glaucoma Implant with Mitomycin C 1-Year Follow-Up: Result and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Bilgic, Alper; Eltanamly, Rasha

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate gel microstent (XEN, Aquesys, Inc) for treatment of primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods. In this prospective interventional study, 13 eyes with POAG underwent XEN implantation with subconjunctival mitomycin-C. Of those eyes, 3 were pseudophakic and 10 underwent simultaneous phacoemulsification and XEN. Patients had uncontrolled IOP, had intolerance to therapy, or had maximal therapy but undergoing cataract extraction. Follow-up visits included IOP, number of medications, vision, and complications and lasted for 1 year. Complete success was defined as IOP reduction ≥20% from preoperative baseline at 1 year without any glaucoma medications while partial success as IOP reduction of ≥20% at 1 year with medications. Results. IOP dropped from 16 ± 4 mmHg pre-op to 9 ± 5, 11 ± 6, 12 ± 5, 12 ± 4, and 12 ± 3 mmHg at 1 week, 1, 3, 6, and 12 months (p = 0.004, 0.026, 0.034, 0.01, and 0.01, Wilcoxon Signed Ranks) consecutively. BCVA (LogMAR) was 0.33 ± 0.34 and improved to 0.13 ± 0.11 at 1 year. Mean number of medications dropped from 1.9 ± 1 preoperatively to 0.3 ± 0.49 (p = 0.003) at 1 year. 42% of eyes achieved complete success and 66% qualified success. Complications included choroidal detachment in 2 eyes, and implant extrusion in 1 eye, and 2 eyes underwent trabeculectomy. Conclusion. XEN implant is an effective surgical treatment for POAG, with significant reduction in IOP and glaucoma medications at 1 year follow-up. PMID:28348884

  13. Mortality in primary angioplasty patients starting antiplatelet therapy with prehospital prasugrel or clopidogrel: a 1-year follow-up from the European MULTIPRAC Registry

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Patrick; Grieco, Niccolò; Ince, Hüseyin; Danchin, Nicolas; Ramos, Yvonne; Goedicke, Jochen; Clemmensen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Aim MULTIPRAC was designed to provide insights into the use and outcomes associated with prehospital initiation of antiplatelet therapy with either prasugrel or clopidogrel in the context of primary percutaneous coronary intervention. After a previous report on efficacy and safety outcomes during hospitalization, we report here the 1-year follow-up data, including cardiovascular (CV) mortality. Methods and results MULTIPRAC is a multinational, prospective registry of patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) from 25 hospitals in nine countries, all of which had an established practice of prehospital start of dual antiplatelet therapy in place. The key outcome was CV death at 1 year. Among 2,036 patients followed-up through 1 year, 49 died (2.4%), 10 during the initial hospitalization and 39 within 1 year after hospital discharge. The primary analysis was based on the P2Y12-inhibitor, used from prehospital loading dose through hospital discharge. Prasugrel (n=824) was more commonly used than clopidogrel (n=425). The observed 1-year rates for CV death were 0.5% with prasugrel and 2.6% with clopidogrel. After adjustment for differences in baseline characteristics, treatment with prasugrel was associated with a significantly lower risk of CV death than treatment with clopidogrel (odds ratio 0.248; 95% confidence interval 0.06–0.89). Conclusion In STEMI patients from routine practice undergoing primary angioplasty, who were able to start oral antiplatelet therapy prehospital, treatment with prasugrel as compared to clopidogrel was associated with a lower risk of CV death at 1-year follow-up. PMID:27143908

  14. Corneal Aberrations, Contrast Sensitivity, and Light Distortion in Orthokeratology Patients: 1-Year Results

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the corneal higher-order aberrations (HOA), contrast sensitivity function (CSF), and light distortion (LD) in patients undergoing orthokeratology (OK). Methods. Twenty healthy subjects (mean age: 21.40 ± 8 years) with mean spherical equivalent refractive error M = −2.19 ± 0.97 D were evaluated at 1 day, 1 month, and 1 year after starting OK treatment. Monocular LD, photopic monocular CSF, and corneal HOA for 6 mm pupil size were measured. Results. LD showed an increase after the first night (p < 0.05) and recovery to baseline after 1 month, remaining stable after 1 year (p > 0.05). Spherical-like, coma-like, and secondary astigmatism HOA RMS increased significantly (p ≤ 0.022) from baseline to 1-month visit, remaining unchanged over the follow-up. Contrast sensitivity for medium frequencies (3.0, 4.24, and 6.00 cpd) was significantly correlated with LD parameters at baseline (r ≤ −0.529, p < 0.001). However, after 1 year of treatment, this correlation was only statistically significant for 12 cpd spatial frequency (r ≤ −0.565, p < 0.001). Spherical-like RMS for 6 mm pupil size correlated with irregularity of the LD (r = −0.420, p < 0.05) at the 1-year visit. Conclusion. LD experienced by OK patients recovers after one month of treatment and remains stable in the long term while optical aberrations remain significantly higher than baseline. PMID:27867660

  15. Corneal Aberrations, Contrast Sensitivity, and Light Distortion in Orthokeratology Patients: 1-Year Results.

    PubMed

    Santolaria-Sanz, Elena; Cerviño, Alejandro; González-Méijome, José M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the corneal higher-order aberrations (HOA), contrast sensitivity function (CSF), and light distortion (LD) in patients undergoing orthokeratology (OK). Methods. Twenty healthy subjects (mean age: 21.40 ± 8 years) with mean spherical equivalent refractive error M = -2.19 ± 0.97 D were evaluated at 1 day, 1 month, and 1 year after starting OK treatment. Monocular LD, photopic monocular CSF, and corneal HOA for 6 mm pupil size were measured. Results. LD showed an increase after the first night (p < 0.05) and recovery to baseline after 1 month, remaining stable after 1 year (p > 0.05). Spherical-like, coma-like, and secondary astigmatism HOA RMS increased significantly (p ≤ 0.022) from baseline to 1-month visit, remaining unchanged over the follow-up. Contrast sensitivity for medium frequencies (3.0, 4.24, and 6.00 cpd) was significantly correlated with LD parameters at baseline (r ≤ -0.529, p < 0.001). However, after 1 year of treatment, this correlation was only statistically significant for 12 cpd spatial frequency (r ≤ -0.565, p < 0.001). Spherical-like RMS for 6 mm pupil size correlated with irregularity of the LD (r = -0.420, p < 0.05) at the 1-year visit. Conclusion. LD experienced by OK patients recovers after one month of treatment and remains stable in the long term while optical aberrations remain significantly higher than baseline.

  16. Results of 1 year of clinical experience with independent dose calculation software for VMAT fields

    PubMed Central

    Colodro, Juan Fernando Mata; Berna, Alfredo Serna; Puchades, Vicente Puchades; Amores, David Ramos; Baños, Miguel Alcaraz

    2014-01-01

    It is widely accepted that a redundant independent dose calculation (RIDC) must be included in any treatment planning verification procedure. Specifically, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique implies a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) program in which RIDC should be included. In this paper, the results obtained in 1 year of clinical experience are presented. Eclipse from Varian is the treatment planning system (TPS), here in use. RIDC were performed with the commercial software; Diamond® (PTW) which is capable of calculating VMAT fields. Once the plan is clinically accepted, it is exported via Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) to RIDC, together with the body contour, and then a point dose calculation is performed, usually at the isocenter. A total of 459 plans were evaluated. The total average deviation was -0.3 ± 1.8% (one standard deviation (1SD)). For higher clearance the plans were grouped by location in: Prostate, pelvis, abdomen, chest, head and neck, brain, stereotactic radiosurgery, lung stereotactic body radiation therapy, and miscellaneous. The highest absolute deviation was -0.8 ± 1.5% corresponding to the prostate. A linear fit between doses calculated by RIDC and by TPS produced a correlation coefficient of 0.9991 and a slope of 1.0023. These results are very close to those obtained in the validation process. This agreement led us to consider this RIDC software as a valuable tool for QA in VMAT plans. PMID:25525309

  17. Results of 1 year of clinical experience with independent dose calculation software for VMAT fields.

    PubMed

    Colodro, Juan Fernando Mata; Berna, Alfredo Serna; Puchades, Vicente Puchades; Amores, David Ramos; Baños, Miguel Alcaraz

    2014-10-01

    It is widely accepted that a redundant independent dose calculation (RIDC) must be included in any treatment planning verification procedure. Specifically, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique implies a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) program in which RIDC should be included. In this paper, the results obtained in 1 year of clinical experience are presented. Eclipse from Varian is the treatment planning system (TPS), here in use. RIDC were performed with the commercial software; Diamond(®) (PTW) which is capable of calculating VMAT fields. Once the plan is clinically accepted, it is exported via Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) to RIDC, together with the body contour, and then a point dose calculation is performed, usually at the isocenter. A total of 459 plans were evaluated. The total average deviation was -0.3 ± 1.8% (one standard deviation (1SD)). For higher clearance the plans were grouped by location in: Prostate, pelvis, abdomen, chest, head and neck, brain, stereotactic radiosurgery, lung stereotactic body radiation therapy, and miscellaneous. The highest absolute deviation was -0.8 ± 1.5% corresponding to the prostate. A linear fit between doses calculated by RIDC and by TPS produced a correlation coefficient of 0.9991 and a slope of 1.0023. These results are very close to those obtained in the validation process. This agreement led us to consider this RIDC software as a valuable tool for QA in VMAT plans.

  18. Experience with cinacalcet in primary hyperparathyroidism: results after 1 year of treatment

    PubMed Central

    García-Martín, Antonia; Luque-Pazos, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the characteristics of patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) treated with cinacalcet and to evaluate its efficacy in reducing serum calcium and parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations after 1 year of treatment. Methods: The study included 20 patients with PHPT who had completed at least 12 months of treatment with cinacalcet (eight patients for refusal of parathyroidectomy, three for surgery not possible due to comorbidities and nine for progressive hypercalcemia prior to surgery). We recorded clinical and biochemical data at baseline, and after 3, 6 and 12 months of treatment. We also monitored adverse events. Cinacalcet was administered in increasing doses until normal serum calcium was reached or side effects preventing a further increase occurred. Results: After 3 months of treatment, serum calcium significantly decreased (11.73 ± 0.85 versus 10.71 ± 1.63 mg/dl, p < 0.001) and serum phosphorus significantly increased (2.41 ± 0.48 versus 2.63 ± 0.70 mg/dl, p = 0.004) while no significant change occurred in PTH (181.91 ± 102.37 versus 195.47 ± 111.71 pg/ml, p = 0.695). No further variation was observed after 6 months compared with 3 months of follow up. However, after 12 months of treatment, there was a significant decrease in PTH concentrations compared with baseline (181.91 ± 102.37 versus 152.47± 70.16 pg/ml, p = 0.028) as well as serum calcium (11.73 ± 0.85 versus 10.20± 0.95 mg/dl, p < 0.001); serum phosphorus significantly increased (2.41 ± 0.48 versus 2.71 ± 0.43 mg/dl, p = 0.01). Normocalcemia (S-Ca < 10.2 mg/dl) was achieved in 55% of patients. The medication was usually well tolerated (83.4%). Most common adverse events were nausea and vomiting, especially at the beginning of therapy. Conclusion: Cinacalcet rapidly reduced serum calcium in patients with PHPT and this reduction remained stable after 1 year of treatment. We also observed a decrease in PTH. Cinacalcet is an effective alternative in nonsurgical

  19. Hypomagnesemia as a predictor of mortality in hemodialysis patients and the role of proton pump inhibitors: A cross-sectional, 1-year, retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ago, Rika; Shindo, Toshihiro; Banshodani, Masataka; Shintaku, Sadanori; Moriishi, Misaki; Masaki, Takao; Kawanishi, Hideki

    2016-10-01

    Introduction This study aimed to evaluate the association between proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use and serum magnesium levels, and the role of hypomagnesemia and PPI use as a risk factor for mortality in hemodialysis patients. Methods An observational study, including a cross-sectional and 1-year retrospective cohort study. The study comprised 399 hemodialysis patients at a single center, and was conducted from January to September 2014. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to investigate the independent relationship between serum magnesium levels and baseline demographic and clinical variables, including PPI and histamine-2 receptor antagonist use. Cox regression model was used to identify lower serum magnesium level and PPI as a predictor of 1-year mortality. Findings Serum magnesium levels were lower with PPI use than non-PPI use (2.39 ± 0.36 vs. 2.56 ± 0.39 mg/dL, P < 0.001). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that PPI use, low serum albumin levels, and low serum potassium and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels were significantly associated with low serum magnesium levels. A total of 29 deaths occurred during the follow-up period. According to Cox regression analysis stratified by hs-CRP, only high serum hs-CRP levels (>4.04 mg/L) in association with low serum magnesium levels was an independent risk factor for 1-year mortality (hazard ratio: 2.92; 95% CI: 1.53-6.40, P < 0.001). Discussion Serum magnesium levels are lower in PPI use. In the inflammatory state, a low serum magnesium level is a significant predictor of mortality in hemodialysis patients.

  20. Validation of the 6-Month GRACE Score in Predicting 1-Year Mortality of Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome Admitted to the Arabian Gulf Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Thalib, Lukman; Furuya-Kanamori, Luis; AlHabib, Khalid F; Alfaleh, Hussam F; AlShamiri, Mostafa Q; Amin, Haitham; Al Suwaidi, Jassim; Sulaiman, Kadhim; Almahmeed, Wael; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A; Al-Motarreb, Ahmed; Doi, Suhail A R

    2017-03-01

    Acute coronary syndromes (ACS) are the most common cardiovascular diseases and are associated with a significant risk of mortality and morbidity. The Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) risk score postdischarge is a widely used ACS prediction model for risk of mortality (low, intermediate, and high); however, it has not yet been validated in patients from the Arabian Gulf. This prospective multicenter study (second Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events) provides detailed information of the GRACE risk score postdischarge in patients from the Arabian Gulf. Its prognostic utility was validated at 1-year follow-up in over 5000 patients with ACS from 65 hospitals in 6 Arabian Gulf countries (Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Oman, United Arab Emirates, and Yemen). Overall, the goodness of fit (Hosmer and Lemeshow statistic P value = .826), calibration, and discrimination (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.695; 95% confidence interval: 0.668-0.722) were good. The GRACE risk score postdischarge can be used to stratify 1 year mortality risk in the Arabian Gulf population; it does not require further calibration and has a good discriminatory ability.

  1. Ablation for atrial fibrillation during mitral valve surgery: 1-year results through continuous subcutaneous monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bogachev-Prokophiev, Alexandr; Zheleznev, Sergey; Romanov, Alexander; Pokushalov, Evgeny; Pivkin, Alexey; Corbucci, Giorgio; Karaskov, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Continuous monitoring of cardiac rhythm may play an important role in measuring the true symptomatic/asymptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF) burden and improve the management of anti-arrhythmic and anti-thrombotic therapies. Forty-seven patients with mitral valve disease and longstanding persistent AF (LSPAF) underwent a left atrial maze procedure with bipolar radiofrequency and valve surgery. The follow-up data recorded by an implanted loop recorder were analysed after 3, 6 and 12 months. On discharge, 40 (85.1%) patients were in stable sinus rhythm, as documented by in-office electrocardiography (ECG), 4 (8.5%) were in pacemaker rhythm and 3 (6.4%) were in AF. One (2.1%) patient died after 7 months. On 12-month follow-up examination, 30 (65.2%) patients had an AF burden <0.5% and were classified as responders. Three (6.5%) of the 16 non-responders had atrial flutter and 13 (27.7%) had documented AF recurrences with an AF burden >0.5%. Two (4.3%) patients with AF recurrences were completely asymptomatic. Among the symptomatic events stored by the patients, only 27.6% was confirmed as genuine AF recurrences according to the concomitant ECG recorded by the implanted loop recorder. A concomitant bipolar maze procedure during mitral valve surgery is effective in treating AF, as proved by detailed 1-year continuous monitoring.

  2. Ablation for atrial fibrillation during mitral valve surgery: 1-year results through continuous subcutaneous monitoring†

    PubMed Central

    Bogachev-Prokophiev, Alexandr; Zheleznev, Sergey; Romanov, Alexander; Pokushalov, Evgeny; Pivkin, Alexey; Corbucci, Giorgio; Karaskov, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of cardiac rhythm may play an important role in measuring the true symptomatic/asymptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF) burden and improve the management of anti-arrhythmic and anti-thrombotic therapies. Forty-seven patients with mitral valve disease and longstanding persistent AF (LSPAF) underwent a left atrial maze procedure with bipolar radiofrequency and valve surgery. The follow-up data recorded by an implanted loop recorder were analysed after 3, 6 and 12 months. On discharge, 40 (85.1%) patients were in stable sinus rhythm, as documented by in-office electrocardiography (ECG), 4 (8.5%) were in pacemaker rhythm and 3 (6.4%) were in AF. One (2.1%) patient died after 7 months. On 12-month follow-up examination, 30 (65.2%) patients had an AF burden <0.5% and were classified as responders. Three (6.5%) of the 16 non-responders had atrial flutter and 13 (27.7%) had documented AF recurrences with an AF burden >0.5%. Two (4.3%) patients with AF recurrences were completely asymptomatic. Among the symptomatic events stored by the patients, only 27.6% was confirmed as genuine AF recurrences according to the concomitant ECG recorded by the implanted loop recorder. A concomitant bipolar maze procedure during mitral valve surgery is effective in treating AF, as proved by detailed 1-year continuous monitoring. PMID:22514258

  3. Selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT): 1-year results in early and advanced open angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Schlote, Torsten; Kynigopoulos, Myron

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) in eyes with early and more advanced stages of open angle glaucoma within 1 year of follow-up. Retrospective chart review in a consecutive series of patients treated by SLT to reduce intraocular pressure (IOP) or decrease number of topical medications in cases of discomfort and allergy. The cup-to-disc ratio of the optic nerve and the GSS 2 (glaucoma staging system 2) was used to differentiate between early (group 1) and more advanced (group 2) stages of glaucoma. At the time of SLT treatment, no new signs of glaucoma progression were seen. Only the first treated eye of every patient was included in the analysis. In group 1 (early glaucoma), 27 eyes were included. IOP reduction <21 mmHg/>20 % of the preoperative IOP-value and reduction of medication were achieved in 17 eyes (62.96 %). Successful re-treatment was necessary in 2 eyes (7.4 %). In group 2 (advanced glaucoma), 44 eyes underwent SLT. In eight eyes (18.18 %), filtrating surgery was necessary after initial SLT. In the remaining 36 eyes, IOP reduction <21 mmHg/>20 % of the baseline IOP was achieved in 26 eyes (59.09 % of 44 eyes) and IOP reduction <18 mmHg/> 30 % of the baseline IOP in 22 eyes (50 % of 44 eyes). SLT was safe and effective in nearly 2/3 of early glaucoma patients and also in 50 % of advanced glaucoma patients using stronger criteria of success. Failure of SLT in advanced glaucoma should lead to immediate filtrating surgery, which seems not to be associated with higher risk of fibrosis.

  4. Video game addiction and college performance among males: results from a 1 year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Zachary L; Livingston, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the pattern of video game usage and video game addiction among male college students and examined how video game addiction was related to expectations of college engagement, college grade point average (GPA), and on-campus drug and alcohol violations. Participants were 477 male, first year students at a liberal arts college. In the week before the start of classes, participants were given two surveys: one of expected college engagement, and the second of video game usage, including a measure of video game addiction. Results suggested that video game addiction is (a) negatively correlated with expected college engagement, (b) negatively correlated with college GPA, even when controlling for high school GPA, and (c) negatively correlated with drug and alcohol violations that occurred during the first year in college. Results are discussed in terms of implications for male students' engagement and success in college, and in terms of the construct validity of video game addiction.

  5. Results-Based Financing in Mozambique’s Central Medical Store: A Review After 1 Year

    PubMed Central

    Spisak, Cary; Morgan, Lindsay; Eichler, Rena; Rosen, James; Serumaga, Brian; Wang, Angela

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Public health commodity supply chains are typically weak in low-income countries, partly because they have many disparate yet interdependent functions and components. Approaches to strengthening supply chains in such settings have often fallen short—they address technical weaknesses, but not the incentives that motivate staff to perform better. Methods: We reviewed the first year of a results-based financing (RBF) program in Mozambique, which began in January 2013. The program aimed to improve the performance of the central medical store—Central de Medicamentos e Artigos Medicos (CMAM)—by realigning incentives. We completed in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with 33 key informants, including representatives from CMAM and donor agencies, and collected quantitative data on performance measures and use of funds. Implementation: The RBF agreement linked CMAM performance payments to quarterly results on 5 performance indicators related to supply planning, distribution planning, and warehouse management. RBF is predicated on the theory that a combination of carrot and stick—i.e., shared financial incentives, plus increased accountability for results—will spur changes in behavior. Important design elements: (1) indicators were measured against quarterly targets, and payments were made only for indicators that met those targets; (2) targets were set based on documented performance, at levels that could be reasonably attained, yet pushed for improvement; (3) payment was shared with and dependent on all staff, encouraging teamwork and collaboration; (4) results were validated by verifiable data sources; and (5) CMAM had discretion over how to use the funds. Findings: We found that CMAM’s performance continually improved over baseline and that CMAM achieved many of its performance targets, for example, timely submission of quarterly supply and distribution planning reports. Warehouse indicators, such as inventory management and

  6. Effect of a fish oil diet on asthma: results of a 1-year double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Dry, J; Vincent, D

    1991-01-01

    Airway inflammation is a major component of asthma. Food intake of N-3 fatty acids (FA) is associated with a low incidence of inflammatory diseases, such as asthma. We treated 12 asthmatic patients with FA and report the positive results of this 1-year double-blind study. A positive effect on forced expiratory volume in 1 s was observed after the 9 month of treatment. Our results are in favor of the use of FA, but have to be confirmed by other studies.

  7. Incidence of WHO Stage 3 and 4 Events, Tuberculosis, and Mortality in Untreated, HIV-Infected Children Enrolling in Care Before 1 Year of Age: An Iedea (International Epidemiologic Databases To Evaluate AIDS) East Africa Regional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ciaranello, Andrea; Lu, Zhigang; Ayaya, Samuel; Losina, Elena; Musick, Beverly; Vreeman, Rachel; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Abrams, Elaine J.; Dillabaugh, Lisa; Doherty, Katie; Ssali, John; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T.; Wools-Kaloustian, Kara

    2014-01-01

    Background Few studies have reported CD4%- and age-stratified rates of WHO Stage 3 (WHO3) events, WHO Stage 4 (WHO4) events, tuberculosis (TB), and mortality in HIV-infected infants before initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods HIV-infected children enrolled before 1 year of age in the International Epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS (IeDEA) East Africa region (10/01/2002-11/30/2008) were included. We estimated incidence rates of earliest clinical event (WHO3, WHO4, and TB), prior to ART initiation per local guidelines, stratified by current age (< or ≥6 months) and current CD4% (<15%, 15–24%, ≥25%). CD4%-stratified mortality rates were estimated separately for children who did not experience a clinical event (“background” mortality) and for children who experienced an event, including “acute” mortality (≤30 days post-event) and “later” mortality (>30 days post-event). Results Among 847 children (median enrollment age: 4.8 months; median pre-ART follow-up: 10.8 months; 603 (71%) with ≥1 CD4% recorded), event rates were comparable for those aged <6 and ≥6 months. Current CD4% was associated with risk of WHO4 events for children <6 months old, and with all evaluated events for children ≥6 months old (p<0.05). “Background” mortality was 3.7–8.4/100py. “Acute” mortality (≤30 days post-event) was 33.8/100py (after TB) and 41.1/100py (after WHO3 or WHO4). “Later” mortality (>30 days post-event) ranged by CD4% from 4.7–29.1/100py. Conclusions In treatment-naïve, HIV-infected infants, WHO3, WHO4, and TB events were common before and after 6 months of age and led to substantial increases in mortality. Early infant HIV diagnosis and treatment are critically important, regardless of CD4%. PMID:24378935

  8. Vitamin D Status, Insulin Resistance, Leptin-To-Adiponectin Ratio in Adolescents: Results of a 1-Year Lifestyle Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Rambhojan, Christine; Larifla, Laurent; Clepier, Josiane; Bouaziz-Amar, Elodie; Velayoudom-Cephise, Fritz-Line; Blanchet-Deverly, Anne; Armand, Christophe; Plumasseau, Jean; Lacorte, Jean-Marc; Foucan, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    AIM: We aimed to study the relationships between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], insulin resistance and leptin-to-adiponectin (L/A) ratio in Guadeloupean children and adolescents and to analyse the changes in 25(OH)D levels after a 1-year lifestyle intervention program. METHODS: 25(OH)D concentrations were measured via a chemiluminescence assay. Cardiometabolic risk factors, homoeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and adipokines were measured. The lifestyle intervention included dietary counselling, regular physical activity. RESULTS: Among 117 girls and boys (11–15 years old, 31.6% obese), 40% had vitamin D deficiency (25(OH)D levels < 20 ng/mL). With linear regression models where 25(OH)D and HOMA-IR acted as independent variables and age, sex, BMI, L/A ratio as covariates, 25(OH)D was significantly associated with HOMA-IR alone (P = 0.036). HOMA-IR was also associated with BMI z-score ≥ 2, L/A ratio and an interaction term BMI z-score ≥ 2*L/A ratio (P < 0.001 for all). After one year, in 78 children/adolescent, mean serum 25(OH)D increased significantly from 21.4 ± 4.9 ng/mL at baseline to 23.2 ± 6.0 after 1 year; P = 0.003 whereas BMI z-score, HOMA-IR and L/A ratio decreased significantly (P = 0.003, P < 0.001 and P = 0.012; respectively). CONCLUSION: The association between 25(OH)D and HOMA-IR, independently of obesity and the high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency should be considered in order to prevent the later incidence of T2DM. A healthy lifestyle including non-sedentary and outdoor activities could be a way for improving vitamin D status. PMID:28028397

  9. Diet in 1-year-old farm and control children and allergy development: results from the FARMFLORA birth cohort

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Karin; Green, My; Barman, Malin; Sjöberg, Agneta; Brekke, Hilde K.; Wold, Agnes E.; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie

    2016-01-01

    Background A farming environment confers strong protection against allergy development. We have previously shown that farming mothers consume more full-fat dairy than control mothers, who instead consume more low-fat dairy, margarine, and oils; margarine and oil intake was associated with increased risk of allergy development in their children. Objectives The aims of this study were to investigate the differences in diet between children in farming and control families at 1 year of age, to investigate the relation between the diets of the mothers and their children, and to relate the children's diet to allergy development. Design The diet of 1-year-old children from dairy farming families (n=28) and from control families in the same rural area (n=37) was assessed by 24-h dietary recalls, followed by 24-h food diaries. Allergy was diagnosed by pediatricians at 3 years of age using strict predefined criteria. Results Farm children had a higher intake of farm milk, whole cream, cholesterol, saturated fat, and fat in total and tended to eat more butter, while controls consumed more carbohydrates and poultry and tended to eat more margarine. Farm children also had higher intakes of homemade porridge/gruel, oily fish, and iodine. The intake of butter and whole milk in children and mothers correlated significantly in farm families but not in controls. A weak negative association was found between seafood intake and allergy development, while allergy was positively associated with the intake of pork as well as zinc in the control group; these intakes also correlated with each other. Conclusions Consistent with mothers in farming families, the children consumed more full-fat dairy and saturated fat than did controls, but this could not be linked to the low risk of allergy in the farming group. Seafood intake might protect against allergy development, in accordance with earlier findings. PMID:27534847

  10. Bactercline®-coated implants: Clinical results up to 1 year after loading from a controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Carinci, Francesco; Grecchi, Emma; Bignozzi, Carlo Alberto; Murmura, Giovanna; Piattelli, Adriano; Scarano, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Background: Titanium dioxide exists in three different crystal lattices, anatase, rutile, and brookite. Anatase coating releases, under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, free radicals such as ·OH, O2-, HO2-, and H2O2. This potent oxidizing power characteristically results in the lysis of bacteria and other organic substances. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bone response to implants made of titanium alloy or coated with a new combination of anatase and Bactercline® product. Materials and Methods: In the period between July 2009 and June 2010, 26 patients (10 females and 16 males; median age 51 ± 11 years, min. 27 years, max. 72 years) were operated and 62 implants were inserted. Lost fixtures and peri-implant bone resorption were considered as predictors of clinical outcomes. Pearson χ2-test was used. Prosthesis and implant failures, any complications after loading, and peri-implant marginal bone-level changes were assessed by a masked assessor. All patients were followed up to 1 year after loading. Results: No implant was lost. Average bone resorption around implant was 0.33 mm (both for 25 standard and 37 Bactercline-coated implants), and thus no statistical difference was detected. Conclusion: These results shown that no adverse effects on osseo-integration were present. PMID:23814572

  11. Hospitalization for Pneumonia is Associated With Decreased 1-Year Survival in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: Results From a Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Marco; Tiseo, Giusy; Russo, Alessandro; Giordo, Laura; Manzini, Elisa; Bertazzoni, Giuliano; Palange, Paolo; Taliani, Gloria; Cangemi, Roberto; Farcomeni, Alessio; Vullo, Vincenzo; Violi, Francesco; Venditti, Mario

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a frequent comorbid conditions among patients with pneumonia living in the community.The aim of our study is to evaluate the impact of hospitalization for pneumonia on early (30 day) and late mortality (1 year) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.Prospective comparative cohort study of 203 patients with type 2 diabetes hospitalized for pneumonia versus 206 patients with diabetes hospitalized for other noninfectious causes from January 2012 to December 2013 at Policlinico Umberto I (Rome). Enrolled patients were followed up to discharge and up to 1 year after initial hospital admission or death.Overall, 203 patients with type 2 diabetes admitted to hospital for pneumonia were compared to 206 patients with type 2 diabetes admitted for other causes (39.3% decompensated diabetes, 21.4% cerebrovascular diseases, 9.2% renal failure, 8.3% acute myocardial infarction, and 21.8% other causes). Compared to control patients, those admitted for pneumonia showed a higher 30-day (10.8% vs 1%, P < 0.001) and 1-year mortality rate (30.3% vs 16.8%, P < 0.001). Compared to survivors, nonsurvivor patients with pneumonia had a higher incidence of moderate to severe chronic kidney disease, hemodialysis, and malnutrition were more likely to present with a mental status deterioration, and had a higher number of cardiovascular events during the follow-up period. Cox regression analysis found age, Charlson comorbidity index, pH < 7.35 at admission, hemodialysis, and hospitalization for pneumonia as variables independently associated with mortality.Hospitalization for pneumonia is associated with decreased 1-year survival in patients with type 2 diabetes, and appears to be a major determinant of long-term outcome in these patients.

  12. Optimising iron chelation therapy with deferasirox for non-transfusion-dependent thalassaemia patients: 1-year results from the THETIS study.

    PubMed

    Taher, Ali T; Cappellini, M Domenica; Aydinok, Yesim; Porter, John B; Karakas, Zeynep; Viprakasit, Vip; Siritanaratkul, Noppadol; Kattamis, Antonis; Wang, Candace; Zhu, Zewen; Joaquin, Victor; Uwamahoro, Marie José; Lai, Yong-Rong

    2016-03-01

    Efficacy and safety of iron chelation therapy with deferasirox in iron-overloaded non-transfusion-dependent thalassaemia (NTDT) patients were established in the THALASSA study. THETIS, an open-label, single-arm, multicentre, Phase IV study, added to this evidence by investigating earlier dose escalation by baseline liver iron concentration (LIC) (week 4: escalation according to baseline LIC; week 24: adjustment according to LIC response, maximum 30mg/kg/day). The primary efficacy endpoint was absolute change in LIC from baseline to week 52. 134 iron-overloaded non-transfusion-dependent anaemia patients were enrolled and received deferasirox starting at 10mg/kg/day. Mean actual dose±SD over 1year was 14.70±5.48mg/kg/day. At week 52, mean LIC±SD decreased significantly from 15.13±10.72mg Fe/g dw at baseline to 8.46±6.25mg Fe/g dw (absolute change from baseline, -6.68±7.02mg Fe/g dw [95% CI: -7.91, -5.45]; P<0.0001). Most common drug-related adverse events were gastrointestinal: abdominal discomfort, diarrhoea and nausea (n=6 each). There was one death (pneumonia, not considered drug related). With significant and clinically relevant reductions in iron burden alongside a safety profile similar to that in THALASSA, these data support earlier escalation with higher deferasirox doses in iron-overloaded non-transfusion-dependent anaemia patients.

  13. Longitudinal Changes in Retinal Nerve Fibre Layer Thickness after an Isolated Unilateral Retrobulbar Optic Neuritis: 1-Year Results

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Gordon S. K.; Lee, Jacky W. Y.; Lau, Patrick P. K.; Tam, Victor T. Y.; Wong, Winnie W. Y.; Yuen, Can Y. F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to investigate the longitudinal changes in retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness 1 year after an episode of unilateral acute optic neuritis. This prospective cohort study recruited consecutive patients with a first episode of isolated, unilateral acute optic neuritis from October 2010 to June 2013. RNFL thickness of the attack and normal fellow eyes was measured by optical coherence tomography on presentation and 3, 6, and 12 months post attack in both the treatment and non-treatment groups. The treatment group consisted of subjects that opted for systemic steroids to hasten recovery time. In 20 subjects, 11 received systemic steroids and 9 were treated conservatively. The baseline RNFL thickness was similar in the attack and fellow eyes (p ≥ 0.4). Progressive RNFL thinning was seen in the attack eye over the 12-month period, with significant differences for baseline versus 3 months; baseline versus 12 months; and 3 versus 12 months (all p < 0.0001). At 12 months, the attack eye had a thinner average RNFL than the fellow eye (100.9 ± 6.1 versus 107.3 ± 5.5 µm; p = 0.002). The 12-month RNFL was similar between the treatment and non-treatment groups (p ≥ 0.6). A single episode of optic neuritis triggered an accelerated, progressive RNFL thinning up to 6 months post attack. Initial treatment with systemic steroids did not seem to alter the degree of RNFL loss at 12 months. PMID:27928326

  14. Psychological and Work Stress Assessment of Patients following Angioplasty or Heart Surgery: Results of 1-year Follow-up Study.

    PubMed

    Fiabane, Elena; Giorgi, Ines; Candura, Stefano M; Argentero, Piergiorgio

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore changes in subjective psychological health and perceived work stress among patients who returned to work (RTW) after a multidisciplinary cardiac rehabilitation (CR) following cardiac interventions. A total of 108 patients were evaluated at the beginning of their CR, at 6 and 12 months after discharge. Self-report questionnaires were used to assess depression, anxiety, illness perception and work stress at each time stage. Results showed reports of depressive symptoms significantly decreased (p < 0.05) and subjective mental (p = 0.001) and physical health (p < 0.001) improved over time. Patients revealed a decrease in Type A behaviour pattern (p < 0.001) and in job satisfaction levels (p = 0.01), greater internal locus of control (p < 0.01) and increased use of the coping strategy 'Involvement' (p < 0.01). Major findings are that cardiac patients had an improvement in subjective psychological health and did not perceive increased work stress after their RTW. Patients' psychological health and work stress need to be assessed during the CR and should be also carefully monitored after the RTW in order to identify patients' psychological and work-related barriers and facilitate a safe and successful work reintegration.

  15. How did Nepal reduce the maternal mortality? A result from analysing the determinants of maternal mortality.

    PubMed

    Karkee, R

    2012-01-01

    Nepal reportedly reduced the maternal mortality ratio by 48% within one decade between 1996-2005 and received the Millennium development goal award for this. However, there is debate regarding the accuracy of this figure. On the basis of framework of determinants of maternal mortality proposed by McCarthy and Maine in 1992 and successive data from Nepal demographic health survey of 1996, 2001 and 2006, a literature analysis was done to identify the important factors behind this decline. Although facility delivery and skilled birth attendants are acclaimed as best strategy of reducing maternal mortality, a proportionate increase in these factors was not found to account the maternal mortality rate reduction in Nepal. Alternatively, intermediate factors particularly women awareness, family planning and safe abortion might have played a significant role. Hence, Nepal as well as similar other developing countries should pay equal attention to such intermediate factors while concentrating on biomedical care strategy.

  16. Effect of 1 year of an intentional weight loss intervention on bone mineral density in type 2 diabetes: results from the Look AHEAD randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Ann V; Johnson, Karen C; Kahn, Steven E; Shepherd, John A; Nevitt, Michael C; Peters, Anne L; Walkup, Michael P; Hodges, Amelia; Williams, Carrie C; Bray, George A

    2012-03-01

    Intentional weight loss is an important component of treatment for overweight patients with type 2 diabetes, but the effects on bone density are not known. We used data from the Look AHEAD trial to determine the impact of an intensive lifestyle weight loss intervention (ILI) compared with diabetes support and education (DSE) on changes in bone mineral density (BMD) over 12 months. Overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to ILI or DSE. In a substudy of BMD conducted at 5 of 16 clinical centers, hip, spine, and whole body dual X-ray absorptiometry scans were obtained at baseline and 1-year later on 642 of 739 ILI and 632 of 740 DSE participants. At baseline, mean age was 58.4 years, and average body mass index was 35.2 kg/m(2). Total hip BMD T-score was <-2.5 in 1% and <-1.0 in 8%. At 1 year, weight loss was greater in ILI than DSE (-8.6% versus -0.7%), and glycemic control and fitness were also improved. Bone loss over 1 year was greater in ILI at the total hip (-1.4% versus -0.4%; p < 0.001) and femoral neck (-1.5% versus -0.8%; p = 0.009), but change in BMD for the lumbar spine and whole body did not differ between groups. In ILI, bone loss at the total hip was independently associated with weight loss in men and women and with poorer glycemic control in men, but was not associated with changes in fitness. One year of an intensive lifestyle intervention in adults with type 2 diabetes, resulting in weight loss, was associated with a modest increase in hip bone loss despite improved fitness and glycemic control.

  17. Neonatal mortality in dogs: Prognostic value of Doppler ductus venosus waveform evaluation - Preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Barella, Gabriele; Faverzani, Stefano; Faustini, Massimo; Groppetti, Debora; Pecile, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To define the prognostic value of Doppler ultrasonographic morphology of ductus venosus (DV) waveform on canine neonatal mortality. Materials and Methods: Fifty-four healthy pregnant bitches underwent fetal ultrasonographic assessment. The DV waveforms were classified as diphasic (dDVw) or triphasic (tDVw) and compared with neonatal mortality. Results: Ninety-three fetuses were evaluated. Twenty fetuses belonged to litters with neonatal mortality, in which tDVw was observed. Seven fetuses belonged to litters without neonatal mortality, in which tDVw was observed. Fifty-eight fetuses belonged to litters without neonatal mortality, in which only dDVw was observed. Eight fetuses belonged to litters with neonatal mortality, in which only dDVw was observed. The correlation between tDVw and neonatal mortality was statistically significant (odds ratio [OR], 20.7; p<0.0001). Considering only pregnancies with one or two fetuses with the same DV waveform: Two fetuses with tDVw belonged to litters with neonatal mortality; 1 foetus with tDVw belonged to litter without neonatal mortality and 26 fetuses showed dDVw without neonatal mortality. The correlation between tDVw and neonatal mortality even in litters up to two pups was statistically significant (OR, 88.3; p=0.01). Conclusion: Echo-Doppler assessment of DV is feasible in canine fetuses, and the presence tDVw seems to be related to neonatal mortality. PMID:27182129

  18. Clinical Performance and Safety of 108 SpineJack Implantations: 1-Year Results of a Prospective Multicentre Single-Arm Registry Study.

    PubMed

    Noriega, David; Maestretti, Gianluca; Renaud, Christian; Francaviglia, Natale; Ould-Slimane, Mourad; Queinnec, Steffen; Ekkerlein, Helmut; Hassel, Frank; Gumpert, Rainer; Sabatier, Pascal; Huet, Hervé; Plasencia, Miguel; Theumann, Nicolas; Kunsky, Alexander; Krüger, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    This prospective, consecutive, multicentre observational registry aimed to confirm the safety and clinical performance of the SpineJack system for the treatment of vertebral compression fractures (VCF) of traumatic origin. We enrolled 103 patients (median age: 61.6 years) with 108 VCF due to trauma, or traumatic VCF with associated osteoporosis. Primary outcome was back pain intensity (VAS). Secondary outcomes were Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), EuroQol-VAS, and analgesic consumption. 48 hours after surgery, a median relative decrease in pain intensity of 81.5% was observed associated with a significant reduction in analgesic intake. Improvements in disability (91.3% decrease in ODI score) and in quality of life (increase 21.1% of EQ-VAS score) were obtained 3 months after surgery. All results were maintained at 12 months. A reduction in the kyphotic angulation was observed postoperatively (-5.4 ± 6.3°; p < 0.001), remained at 12 months (-4.4 ± 6.0°, p = 0.002). No adverse events were implant-related and none required device removal. Three patients (2.9%) experienced procedure-related complications. The overall adjacent fracture rate up to 1 year after surgery was 2.9%. The SpineJack procedure is an effective, low-risk procedure for patients with traumatic VCF allowing a fast and sustained improvement in quality of life over 1 year after surgery.

  19. Clinical Performance and Safety of 108 SpineJack Implantations: 1-Year Results of a Prospective Multicentre Single-Arm Registry Study

    PubMed Central

    Noriega, David; Maestretti, Gianluca; Renaud, Christian; Francaviglia, Natale; Ould-Slimane, Mourad; Queinnec, Steffen; Ekkerlein, Helmut; Hassel, Frank; Gumpert, Rainer; Sabatier, Pascal; Huet, Hervé; Plasencia, Miguel; Theumann, Nicolas; Kunsky, Alexander; Krüger, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    This prospective, consecutive, multicentre observational registry aimed to confirm the safety and clinical performance of the SpineJack system for the treatment of vertebral compression fractures (VCF) of traumatic origin. We enrolled 103 patients (median age: 61.6 years) with 108 VCF due to trauma, or traumatic VCF with associated osteoporosis. Primary outcome was back pain intensity (VAS). Secondary outcomes were Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), EuroQol-VAS, and analgesic consumption. 48 hours after surgery, a median relative decrease in pain intensity of 81.5% was observed associated with a significant reduction in analgesic intake. Improvements in disability (91.3% decrease in ODI score) and in quality of life (increase 21.1% of EQ-VAS score) were obtained 3 months after surgery. All results were maintained at 12 months. A reduction in the kyphotic angulation was observed postoperatively (−5.4 ± 6.3°; p < 0.001), remained at 12 months (−4.4 ± 6.0°, p = 0.002). No adverse events were implant-related and none required device removal. Three patients (2.9%) experienced procedure-related complications. The overall adjacent fracture rate up to 1 year after surgery was 2.9%. The SpineJack procedure is an effective, low-risk procedure for patients with traumatic VCF allowing a fast and sustained improvement in quality of life over 1 year after surgery. PMID:26844224

  20. Thermal Aging Study of a Dow Corning SE 1700 Porous Structure Made by Direct Ink Writing: 1-Year Results and Long-Term Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Small, Ward; Pearson, Mark A.; Maiti, Amitesh; Metz, Thomas R.; Duoss, Eric B.; Wilson, Thomas S.

    2015-11-13

    Dow Corning SE 1700 (reinforced polydimethylsiloxane) porous structures were made by direct ink writing (DIW). The specimens (~50% porosity) were subjected to various compressive strains (15, 30, 45%) and temperatures (room temperature, 35, 50, 70°C) in a nitrogen atmosphere (active purge) for 1 year. Compression set and load retention of the aged specimens were measured periodically during the study. Compression set increased with strain and temperature. After 1 year, specimens aged at room temperature, 35, and 50°C showed ~10% compression set (relative to the applied compressive deflection), while those aged at 70°C showed 20-40%. Due to the increasing compression set, load retention decreased with temperature, ranging from ~90% at room temperature to ~60-80% at 70°C. Long-term compression set and load retention at room temperature were predicted by applying time-temperature superposition (TTS). The predictions show compression set relative to the compressive deflection will be ~10-15% with ~70-90% load retention after 50 years at 15-45% strain, suggesting the material will continue to be mechanically functional. Comparison of the results to previously acquired data for cellular (M97*, M9760, M9763) and RTV (S5370) silicone foams suggests that the SE 1700 DIW porous specimens are on par with, or outperform, the legacy foams.

  1. Assesment of perinatal mortality in two different periods: results of a single center

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Serdar Sadık; Kavuncuoğlu, Sultan; Sarı, Ferhat; Aldemir, Esin Yıldız; Kavçık, Nazlı; Demir, Ferhat

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to investigate the perinatal mortality rate with 37 864 deliveries which occured in two different periods in a single center, to compare the components of perinatal mortality and affecting factors with the results of the study related with perinatal mortality which we conducted in 1999 and to emphasize the precautions directed to reduce mortality rates. Material and Methods: All live births and stillbirths which occurred in Bakırköy Obstetrics and Pediatrics Training and Research Hospital between January 2007 and December 2007 were evaluated. The results were compared with the results of the study conducted in 1999. Newborns with a weight above five hundred grams and a gestational age above 22 weeks were enrolled in the study. The stillbirth rate, early neonatal mortality rate, late neonatal mortality rate, perinatal mortality rate and corrected perinatal mortality rate were calculated. Modified Wigglesworth Classification was used for evaluating the perinatal mortality and the subjects were examined in 7 groups. The characteristics belonging to the years of 2007 and 1999 were examined, the differences were recorded and the results were discussed. When the two periods were compared, it was observed that the perinatal mortality rate increased from 23.5‰ to 26‰. Result: When the causes were investigated, it was observed that the stillbirth rate was increased in 2007 (84%) and especially congenital anomalies had an important role in this increment. The early neonatal mortality rate declined from 0.8% in 1999 to 0.4% in 2007. It was found that especially the premature mortality rate (Group 3) and the mortality rate related with perinatal asphyxia (Group 4) were significantly decreased. Conclusion: The decrease in early neonatal mortality rate could be best explained by productive operation of the new neonatal intensive care unit which had been established after 2002. PMID:27738396

  2. Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial of An Athletic Trainer-Directed Spit (Smokeless) Tobacco Intervention for Collegiate Baseball Athletes: Results After 1 Year

    PubMed Central

    Gansky, Stuart A; Ellison, James A; Rudy, Diane; Bergert, Ned; Letendre, Mark A; Nelson, Lisa; Kavanagh, Catherine; Walsh, Margaret M

    2005-01-01

    Context: Athletes in the United States are at high risk for using spit (smokeless) tobacco (ST) and incurring its associated adverse health effects. Objective: To examine whether an athletic trainer-directed ST intervention could decrease initiation and promote cessation of ST use among male collegiate baseball athletes. Design: Stratified, cluster-randomized controlled trial. Setting: Fifty-two California colleges. Patients or Other Participant(s): A total of 883 subjects in 27 intervention colleges and 702 subjects in 25 control colleges participated, as did 48 certified athletic trainers. Intervention(s): For college athletic trainers and associated dental professionals, a 3-hour video conference, and for collegiate athletes, an oral cancer screening with feedback and brief counseling during the preseason health screenings, athletic trainer support for cessation, and a peer-led educational baseball team meeting. Main Outcome Measure(s): The subjects' ST use over 1 year was assessed by self-report. At the end of the study, the certified athletic trainers were mailed a survey assessing their tobacco use and perceptions and behavior related to tobacco control in the athletic environment. We used multivariable logistic regression models for clustered responses (generalized estimating equations) to test the difference between groups in ST-use initiation and cessation and to identify significant overall predictors of noninitiation and cessation of ST use. Results: Of the 1585 athletes recruited, 1248 (78.7%) were followed up at 12 months. In addition, 48 of the 52 athletic trainers (92%) responded to the 1-year follow-up survey. The ST-use initiation (incidence) was 5.1% in intervention colleges and 8.4% in control colleges (generalized estimating equation odds ratio = 0.58, 95% confidence interval = 0.35–0.99). Predictors of ST noninitiation were low lifetime tobacco and monthly alcohol use (odds ratio = 1.98, 95% confidence interval = 1.40– 2.82) and athletic

  3. Delayed insemination results in embryo mortality in a brooding ascidian.

    PubMed

    Stewart-Savage, J; Phillippi, A; Yund, P O

    2001-08-01

    We explored the effects of temporal variation in sperm availability on fertilization and subsequent larval development in the colonial ascidian Botryllus schlosseri, a brooding hermaphrodite that has a sexual cycle linked to an asexual zooid replacement cycle. We developed a method to quantify the timing of events early in this cycle, and then isolated colonies before the start of the cycle and inseminated them at various times. Colony-wide fertilization levels (assayed by early cleavage) increased from zero to 100% during the period when the siphons of a new generation of zooids were first opening, and remained high for 24 h before slowly declining over the next 48 h. Because embryos are brooded until just before the zooids degenerate at the end of a cycle, delayed fertilization might also affect whether embryos can complete development within the cycle. Consequently, we also determined the effect of delayed insemination on successful embryo development through larval release and metamorphosis. When fertilization was delayed beyond the completion of siphon opening, there was an exponential decline in the percentage of eggs that ultimately produced a metamorphosed larva at the end of the cycle. Thus, even though the majority of oocytes can be fertilized when insemination is delayed for up to 48 h, the resulting embryos cannot complete development before the brooding zooids degenerate.

  4. Further Evidence for the JuSt Program as Treatment for Insomnia in Adolescents: Results from a 1-Year Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Roeser, Karolin; Schwerdtle, Barbara; Kübler, Andrea; Schlarb, Angelika A.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Insomnia in adolescence adversely affects young people's current and future functioning, as well as their mental and physical health. Thus, effective and economic treatment is invaluable. The present study evaluated a 6-session multimodal group therapy, JuSt, for adolescents suffering from insomnia including cognitive-behavioral elements and clinical hypnosis. Methods: Participants (n = 19, 68.4% female) were aged 11–16 years and suffered from insomnia. Sleep onset latency (SOL), time spent awake time after sleep onset (WASO), and sleep efficiency (SE) were measured with sleep logs before and after treatment, and at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up. Results: Compared to baseline, SOL and WASO significantly decreased, while there was a significant increase in SE and the feeling of being rested after the JuSt treatment. At 12-month follow-up, all parameters were still significantly different from their baseline level. The long-term effect sizes were at least as large as the short-term effects, indicating a stable improvement. Conclusions: These results suggest that the JuSt program represents a potent intervention to sustainably reduce insomniac complaints in adolescents. Given the unselected nature of our sample, a broad indication can be assumed. To further evaluate the program's efficacy, randomized controlled trials should be conducted. Citation: Roeser K, Schwerdtle B, Kübler A, Schlarb AA. Further evidence for the just program as treatment for insomnia in adolescents: results from a 1-year follow-up study. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(2):257–262. PMID:26446249

  5. Single-Center Experience and 1-Year Follow-up Results of 'Sandwich Technique' in the Management of Common Iliac Artery Aneurysms During EVAR

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, Carmelo; Ceccherini, Claudio Cini, Marco; Vigni, Francesco; Leonini, Sara; Tommasino, Giulio; Muzzi, Luigi; Tucci, Enrico; Benvenuti, Antonio; Neri, Eugenio

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) accompanied by common iliac artery (CIA) aneurysms requires a more demanding procedure owing to the difficulties in obtaining an adequate distal landing zone for the stent-graft limb(s), a potential site of endoleak. The 'sandwich technique' is a procedure to increase EVAR feasibility in the setting of adverse or challenging CIA anatomy. Its main advantages include no restrictions in terms of CIA diameter or length or internal iliac artery (IIA) diameter, no need to wait for a specific stent-graft. Our purpose is to describe our single-center experience and one year follow-up results of this new procedure. Materials and Methods: From April 2009 to June 2010, the sandwich technique was performed in our institution in 7 patients treated for AAA and unilateral CIA aneurysms (n. 5) or bilateral CIA aneurysms (n. 2). Inclusion criteria were the presence of unilateral or bilateral CIA aneurysm (independently from its diameter), IIA artery measuring up to 9 mm in its maximum diameter, not dilatation of IIA and EIA. Results: The mean follow-up length was 15 months (range: 14-20 months). All stent-implanted iliac branches remained patent on 1 year follow-up and IIA flow was preserved. None of the patients had symptoms of pelvic ischemia. CT scan follow-up showed aneurysm shrinkage in five patients, without any sign of endoleaks in all cases. Conclusions: In selected cases, the 'sandwich technique' showed good outcomes confirming to be a safe and easy to perform way to overcome anatomical constraints and expanding the limits of EVAR.

  6. A matter of life and death: population mortality and football results

    PubMed Central

    Kirkup, W; Merrick, D

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether football results are associated with mortality from circulatory disease. Design: Retrospective study, comparing mortality on days of football matches between 18 August 1994 and 28 December 1999 with the results of the football matches. Setting: Newcastle and North Tyneside, Sunderland, Tees, and Leeds Health Authority areas of England. Subjects: All persons resident in Newcastle and North Tyneside, Sunderland, Tees, and Leeds Health Authority areas of England. Main outcome measures: Mortality attributable to acute myocardial infarction and stroke. Results: On days when the local professional football team lost at home, mortality attributable to acute myocardial infarction and stroke increased significantly in men (relative risk 1.28, 95% confidence intervals 1.11 to 1.47). No increase was observed in women. Conclusions: Results achieved by the local professional football team are associated systematically with circulatory disease death rates over a five year period in men, but not women. PMID:12775788

  7. Fine particulate air pollution and mortality in nine California counties: results from CALFINE.

    PubMed

    Ostro, Bart; Broadwin, Rachel; Green, Shelley; Feng, Wen-Ying; Lipsett, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Many epidemiologic studies provide evidence of an association between daily counts of mortality and ambient particulate matter<10 microm in diameter (PM10). Relatively few studies, however, have investigated the relationship of mortality with fine particles [PM<2.5 microm in diameter (PM2.5)], especially in a multicity setting. We examined associations between PM2.5 and daily mortality in nine heavily populated California counties using data from 1999 through 2002. We considered daily counts of all-cause mortality and several cause-specific subcategories (respiratory, cardiovascular, ischemic heart disease, and diabetes). We also examined these associations among several subpopulations, including the elderly (>65 years of age), males, females, non-high school graduates, whites, and Hispanics. We used Poisson multiple regression models incorporating natural or penalized splines to control for covariates that could affect daily counts of mortality, including time, seasonality, temperature, humidity, and day of the week. We used meta-analyses using random-effects models to pool the observations in all nine counties. The analysis revealed associations of PM2.5 levels with several mortality categories. Specifically, a 10-microg/m3 change in 2-day average PM2.5 concentration corresponded to a 0.6% (95% confidence interval, 0.2-1.0%) increase in all-cause mortality, with similar or greater effect estimates for several other subpopulations and mortality subcategories, including respiratory disease, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, age>65 years, females, deaths out of the hospital, and non-high school graduates. Results were generally insensitive to model specification and the type of spline model used. This analysis adds to the growing body of evidence linking PM2.5 with daily mortality.

  8. Low heel ultrasound parameters predict mortality in men: results from the European Male Ageing Study (EMAS)

    PubMed Central

    Pye, Stephen R.; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Boonen, Steven; Gielen, Evelien; Adams, Judith E.; Ward, Kate A.; Lee, David M.; Bartfai, György; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Finn, Joseph D.; Forti, Gianni; Giwercman, Aleksander; Han, Thang S.; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T.; Kula, Krzysztof; Lean, Michael E.; Pendleton, Neil; Punab, Margus; Wu, Frederick C.; O'Neill, Terence W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: low bone mineral density measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry is associated with increased mortality. The relationship between other skeletal phenotypes and mortality is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between quantitative heel ultrasound parameters and mortality in a cohort of European men. Methods: men aged 40–79 years were recruited for participation in a prospective study of male ageing: the European Male Ageing Study (EMAS). At baseline, subjects attended for quantitative ultrasound (QUS) of the heel (Hologic—SAHARA) and completed questionnaires on lifestyle factors and co-morbidities. Height and weight were measured. After a median of 4.3 years, subjects were invited to attend a follow-up assessment, and reasons for non-participation, including death, were recorded. The relationship between QUS parameters (broadband ultrasound attenuation [BUA] and speed of sound [SOS]) and mortality was assessed using Cox proportional hazards model. Results: from a total of 3,244 men (mean age 59.8, standard deviation [SD] 10.8 years), 185 (5.7%) died during the follow-up period. After adjusting for age, centre, body mass index, physical activity, current smoking, number of co-morbidities and general health, each SD decrease in BUA was associated with a 20% higher risk of mortality (hazard ratio [HR] per SD = 1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0–1.4). Compared with those in higher quintiles (2nd–5th), those in the lowest quintile of BUA and SOS had a greater mortality risk (BUA: HR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.1–2.3 and SOS: HR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.2–2.2). Conclusion: lower heel ultrasound parameters are associated with increased mortality in European men. PMID:26162912

  9. Sacral Reconstruction with a 3D-Printed Implant after Hemisacrectomy in a Patient with Sacral Osteosarcoma: 1-Year Follow-Up Result

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Doyoung; Lim, Jun-Young; Shim, Kyu-Won; Han, Jung Woo; Yi, Seong; Yoon, Do Heum; Kim, Keung Nyun; Ha, Yoon; Ji, Gyu Yeul

    2017-01-01

    Pelvic reconstruction after sacral resection is challenging in terms of anatomical complexity, excessive loadbearing, and wide defects. Nevertheless, the technological development of 3D-printed implants enables us to overcome these difficulties. Here, we present a case of sacral osteosarcoma surgically treated with hemisacrectomy and sacral reconstruction using a 3D-printed implant. The implant was printed as a customized titanium prosthesis from a 3D real-sized reconstruction of a patient's CT images. It consisted mostly of a porous mesh and incorporated a dense strut. After 3-months of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, the patient underwent hemisacretomy with preservation of contralateral sacral nerves. The implant was anatomically installed on the defect and fixed with a screw-rod system up to the level of L3. Postoperative pain was significantly low and the patient recovered sufficiently to walk as early as 2 weeks postoperatively. The patient showed left-side foot drop only, without loss of sphincter function. In 1-year follow-up CT, excellent bony fusion was noticed. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of hemisacral reconstruction using a custom-made 3D-printed implant. We believe that this technique can be applied to spinal reconstructions after a partial or complete spondylectomy in a wide variety of spinal diseases. PMID:28120579

  10. Sacral Reconstruction with a 3D-Printed Implant after Hemisacrectomy in a Patient with Sacral Osteosarcoma: 1-Year Follow-Up Result.

    PubMed

    Kim, Doyoung; Lim, Jun Young; Shim, Kyu Won; Han, Jung Woo; Yi, Seong; Yoon, Do Heum; Kim, Keung Nyun; Ha, Yoon; Ji, Gyu Yeul; Shin, Dong Ah

    2017-03-01

    Pelvic reconstruction after sacral resection is challenging in terms of anatomical complexity, excessive loadbearing, and wide defects. Nevertheless, the technological development of 3D-printed implants enables us to overcome these difficulties. Here, we present a case of sacral osteosarcoma surgically treated with hemisacrectomy and sacral reconstruction using a 3D-printed implant. The implant was printed as a customized titanium prosthesis from a 3D real-sized reconstruction of a patient's CT images. It consisted mostly of a porous mesh and incorporated a dense strut. After 3-months of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, the patient underwent hemisacretomy with preservation of contralateral sacral nerves. The implant was anatomically installed on the defect and fixed with a screw-rod system up to the level of L3. Postoperative pain was significantly low and the patient recovered sufficiently to walk as early as 2 weeks postoperatively. The patient showed left-side foot drop only, without loss of sphincter function. In 1-year follow-up CT, excellent bony fusion was noticed. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of hemisacral reconstruction using a custom-made 3D-printed implant. We believe that this technique can be applied to spinal reconstructions after a partial or complete spondylectomy in a wide variety of spinal diseases.

  11. Effects of one-month continuous passive motion after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: results at 1-year follow-up of a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Raffaele; Conti, Marco; Notarnicola, Angela; Maradei, Leonardo; Giardella, Antonio; Castagna, Alessandro

    2010-05-01

    The study included 100 patients who underwent an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. All patients suffered about a rotator cuff tear that was repaired arthroscopically with a suture anchor technique. Immediately postoperatively, patients were randomly allocated to one of two different postoperative physiotherapy regimens: passive self-assisted range of motion exercise (controls: 46 patients) versus passive self-assisted range of motion exercise associated with use of continuous passive motion (CPM) for a total of 2 h per day (experimental group: 54 patients), for 4 weeks. After this time, all the patients of both groups underwent the same physical therapy protocol. An independent examiner assessed the patients at 2.5, 6 and 12 months particularly about pain with the VAS scale (0-10) and the range of motion (ROM). Our findings show that postoperative treatment of an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with passive self-assisted exercises associated with 2-h CPM a day provides a significant advantage in terms of ROM improvement and pain relief when compared to passive self-assisted exercise alone, at the short-term follow-up. No significant differences between the two groups were observed at 1 year postoperatively.

  12. [Mortality resulting from femoral neck fractures in Norway 1980-94].

    PubMed

    Lund, E

    1998-08-10

    Based on information obtained from the central register of death certificates held by the Norwegian National Bureau of Statistics trends in mortality resulting from fractura colli femoris were analysed for the period 1980-94. Mortality decreased by 30% (95% CI; 26%-34%) among women aged 60-98 years, whereas it remained constant among men. For both genders the risk of death from fractura colli femoris increased with age by approximately 20% per year. These changes are discussed in relation to the alleged epidemic of fractura colli femoris.

  13. Foot complications and mortality: results from Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD)

    PubMed Central

    McEwen, Laura N.; Ylitalo, Kelly R.; Munson, Michael; Herman, William H.; Wrobel, James S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Our objective was to study the impact of foot complications on 10 year mortality independent of other demographic and biological risk factors in a racially and socioeconomically diverse managed care population with access to high-quality medical care. Methods We studied 6,992 patients with diabetes in Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD), a prospective observational study of diabetes care in managed care. Foot complications were assessed using administrative claims data. The National Death Index was searched for deaths over 10 years of followup (2000–2009). Results Charcot neuroosteoarthropathy (CN) and diabetic foot ulcer with debridement (DFU) were associated with an increased risk of mortality; however, the associations were not significant in fully adjusted models. Lower extremity amputation (LEA) was associated with an increased risk of mortality in both unadjusted (HR 3.21, 95% CI 2.50–4.12) and fully adjusted models (HR 1.84, 95% CI 1.28–2.63). When we examined the associations between LEA and mortality stratified by sex and race, risk was increased in men (HR 1.96, 95% CI 1.25–3.07), Hispanics (HR 5.17, 95% CI 1.48–18.01), and Whites (HR 2.18, 95% CI 1.37–3.47). In sensitivity analyses, minor LEA tended to increase the risk of mortality (HR 1.48, 95% CI 0.92–2.40) and major LEA was associated with a significantly higher risk of death at 10 years (HR 1.89, 95% CI 1.18–3.01). Conclusions In this managed care population with access to high-quality medical care, LEA remained a robust independent predictor of mortality. The association was strongest in men and differed by race. PMID:26895355

  14. Green tea consumption and cause-specific mortality: Results from two prospective cohort studies in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Long-Gang; Li, Hong-Lan; Sun, Jiang-Wei; Yang, Yang; Ma, Xiao; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Zheng, Wei; Xiang, Yong-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Background Green tea is one of the most widely consumed beverages in Asia. While a possible protective role of green tea against various chronic diseases has been suggested in experimental studies, evidence from human studies remains controversial. Methods We conducted this study using data from Shanghai Men's Health Study (SMHS) and Shanghai Women's Health Study (SWHS), two population-based prospective cohorts of middle-aged and elderly Chinese adults in urban Shanghai, China. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for risk of all-cause and cause-specific mortality associated with green tea intake were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression models. Results During a median follow-up of 8.3 and 14.2 years for men and women, respectively, 6517 (2741 men and 3776 women) deaths were documented. We found that green tea consumption was inversely associated with risk of all-cause mortality (HR 0.95; 95% CI, 0.90–1.01), particularly among never-smokers (HR 0.89; 95% CI, 0.82–0.96). The inverse association with cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality (HR 0.86; 95% CI, 0.77–0.97) was slightly stronger than that with all-cause mortality. No significant association was observed between green tea intake and cancer mortality (HR 1.01; 95% CI, 0.93–1.10). Conclusions Green tea consumption may be inversely associated with risk of all-cause and CVD mortality in middle-aged and elderly Chinese adults, especially among never smokers. PMID:28135196

  15. Preventive home visits postpone mortality – a controlled trial with time-limited results

    PubMed Central

    Sahlen, Klas-Göran; Dahlgren, Lars; Hellner, Britt Mari; Stenlund, Hans; Lindholm, Lars

    2006-01-01

    Background There is a debate on whether preventive home visits to older people have any impact. This study was undertaken to investigate whether preventive home visits by professional health workers to older persons can postpone mortality in a Swedish context. Method A controlled trial in a small community in the north of Sweden. Participants are healthy pensioners aged 75 years and over. 196 pensioners were selected as the intervention group and 346 as the control group. The intervention, two visits per year, lasted two years. Results During the intervention, mortality was 27 per 1000 in the intervention group and 48 per 1000 in the control group. The incidence rate ratio for the control group IR2000–2001 was 1,79 (95%CI = 0,94–3,40). Analysing the data with an "on treatment approach" gave a significant result, 2,31 (95%CI = 1,07–5,02) After the trial the difference between the groups disappeared. Conclusion Preventive home visits in a healthy older population can postpone mortality in a Swedish context if they are carried out by professional health-workers in a structured way. When the home visit programme ended the effect on mortality disappeared. These findings are dependent on contextual factors that make it difficult to form general policy recommendations. PMID:16945128

  16. Changes to dryland rainfall result in rapid moss mortality and altered soil fertility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, Sasha C.; Coe, Kirsten K.; Sparks, Jed P.; Housman, David C.; Zelikova, Tamara J.; Belnap, Jayne

    2012-01-01

    Arid and semi-arid ecosystems cover ~40% of Earth’s terrestrial surface, but we know little about how climate change will affect these widespread landscapes. Like many drylands, the Colorado Plateau in southwestern United States is predicted to experience elevated temperatures and alterations to the timing and amount of annual precipitation. We used a factorial warming and supplemental rainfall experiment on the Colorado Plateau to show that altered precipitation resulted in pronounced mortality of the widespread moss Syntrichia caninervis. Increased frequency of 1.2 mm summer rainfall events reduced moss cover from ~25% of total surface cover to <2% after only one growing season, whereas increased temperature had no effect. Laboratory measurements identified a physiological mechanism behind the mortality: small precipitation events caused a negative moss carbon balance, whereas larger events maintained net carbon uptake. Multiple metrics of nitrogen cycling were notably different with moss mortality and had significant implications for soil fertility. Mosses are important members in many dryland ecosystems and the community changes observed here reveal how subtle modifications to climate can affect ecosystem structure and function on unexpectedly short timescales. Moreover, mortality resulted from increased precipitation through smaller, more frequent events, underscoring the importance of precipitation event size and timing, and highlighting our inadequate understanding of relationships between climate and ecosystem function in drylands.

  17. The Washington University-EPRI Veterans' Cohort Mortality Study: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Lipfert, F W; Perry, H M; Miller, J P; Baty, J D; Wyzga, R E; Carmody, S E

    2000-01-01

    This article presents the design of and some results from a new prospective mortality study of a national cohort of about 50,000 U.S. veterans who were diagnosed as hypertensive in the mid 1970s, based on approximately 21 yr of follow-up. This national cohort is male with an average age at recruitment of 51 +/- 12 yr; 35% were black and 81% had been smokers at one time. Because the subjects have been receiving care at various U.S. Veterans Administration (VA) hospitals, access to and quality of medical care are relatively homogeneous. The health endpoints available for analysis include all-cause mortality and specific diagnoses for morbidity during VA hospitalizations; only the mortality results are discussed here. Nonpollution predictor variables in the baseline model include race, smoking (ever or at recruitment), age, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), and body mass index (BMI). Interactions of BP and BMI with age were also considered. Although this study essentially controls for socioeconomic status by design because of the homogeneity of the cohort, selected ecological variables were also considered at the ZIP code and county levels, some of which were found to be significant predictors. Pollutants were averaged by year and county for TSP, PM10, CO, O3, and NO2; SO2 and Pb were considered less thoroughly. Both mean and peak levels were considered for gases. SO(4)2- data from the AIRS database and PM2.5, coarse particles, PM15, and SO(4)2- from the U.S. EPA Inhalable Particulate (IP) Network were also considered. Four relevant exposure periods were defined: 1974 and earlier (back to 1953 for TSP), 1975-1981, 1982-1988, and 1989-1996. Deaths during each of the three most recent exposure periods were considered separately, yielding up to 12 combinations of exposure and mortality periods for each pollutant. Associations between concurrent air quality and mortality periods were considered to relate to acute responses; delayed associations with prior

  18. Short-Term Clinical Result of Cortical Bone Trajectory Technique for the Treatment of Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis with More than 1-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa, Kazuya; Nakamura, Akira; Imai, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective follow-up study on the result of surgical treatment for patients with degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis (DLS) using cortical bone trajectory (CBT) technique. Purpose To evaluate the capability of CBT to manage patients with DLS. Overview of Literature CBT is a recently advocated, novel, less-invasive technique of lumbar pedicle screw, which provides enhanced screw purchase by maximizing the thread contact with higher density bone surface. Despite the frequent use of CBT technique in the lumbar spine surgery, little is known of the capability of this technique to manage patients with DLS. Methods Thirty two consecutive patients (5 males, 27 females) surgically treated with single-level DLS in our institute using CBT were included. All patients were followed up at least 12 months (mean 24 months). Their clinical and radiological features were measured. Results Good leg pain relief was achieved in all patients. The mean postoperative percentage slip demonstrated significant reduction with significant neurological recovery when compared with preoperative percentage slip, and it was maintained until the latest follow-up. Loss of correction of more than 3 mm during the follow-up period was observed in 3 cases. Surgical site infection was observed in one case; however, pull-out of PSs or neurological deterioration was not found. No patient needed additional surgery during the follow-up period. Conclusions These preliminary results confirmed that CBT is useful for the treatment for patients with DLS. This technique allows good reduction of spondylolisthesis and neurological improvement. PMID:27114763

  19. Alcohol abuse and liver enzymes (AALE): results of an intercompany study of mortality.

    PubMed

    Titcomb, C; Braun, R; Roudebush, B; Mast, J; Woodman, H

    2001-01-01

    Evaluation of applicants for life insurance who have elevations of their liver function tests or an increased probability of alcohol abuse has always been difficult for underwriters. This paper reports the results of an intercompany study in which the pooled mortality experience of a group of insureds with evidence of alcohol abuse, an adverse driving record or elevations of the liver transaminases or gamma-glutamyl transferase is summarized.

  20. Immediate Placement and Occlusal Loading of Single-Tooth Restorations on Partially Threaded, Titanium-Tantalum Combined Dental Implants: 1-Year Results.

    PubMed

    Peron, Cristian; Romanos, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Single nonrestorable teeth were atraumatically extracted and hybrid titanium implants with tantalum-based midsections (TM) were placed in fresh extraction sockets. Provisional acrylic crowns were delivered (in occlusion) immediately after surgery. Occlusal contacts were present in the maximal intercuspation but not in the lateral movements of the mandible. Two weeks after placement, the implants were finally restored with screw-retained or cemented lithium disilicate crowns. A total of 25 patients were treated (26 implants). Most implants were placed in maxillary premolar locations and in lower-density bone. Mean crestal bone loss was 0.58 ± 0.34 mm. Implant survival and success rates were 100%, respectively (follow-up: 14.1 ± 1.5 months). Within the limitations of this study, immediate placement and loading of TM implants resulted in predictable clinical, functional, and esthetic outcomes.

  1. Use of a Collagen Matrix as a Substitute for Free Mucosal Grafts in Pre-Prosthetic Surgery: 1 Year Results From a Clinical Prospective Study on 15 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Maiorana, Carlo; Beretta, Mario; Pivetti, Luca; Stoffella, Enrico; Grossi, Giovanni B.; Herford, Alan S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The presence of keratinized tissue around dental implants is more than desirable either from a functional and aesthetic point of view, making soft tissue grafting a common practice in implant rehabilitation. Autogenous soft tissue grafting procedures are usually associated with high morbidity. Aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a xenogeneic collagen matrix as a substitute for soft tissue grafting around dental implants. Methods: 15 consecutive patients underwent a vestibuloplasty and grafting, both in the mandible and the maxilla, with a collagen matrix. Results: The primary endpoint was to evaluate the resorption of the graft along with the re-epithelization grafted area. The percentage of the resorption was 44,4%, with a mean gain in vestibular height of 3 mm. Secondary endpoints evaluated the clinical appearance, the hemostatic effect and the post-operative pain. All subjects referred minimal pain with no bleeding. No adverse reaction nor infection were noted. Conclusion: This study showed that the used collagen matrix can find major interest in those patients who need a greater aesthetic outcome as the matrix has a perfect integration with the surrounding tissues. Furthermore it is strongly recommended for those patients who can bear little pain. Clinical Significance: Post-operative morbidity of autologous grafts is the biggest concern of this type of surgery. The possibility to use a soft tissue substitute is a great achievement as morbidity decreases and bigger areas can be treated in a single surgery. The present study showed the efficacy of a collagen matrix as this kind of substitute. PMID:27583050

  2. Use of Percutaneous Aspiration Thrombectomy vs. Anticoagulation Therapy to Treat Acute Iliofemoral Venous Thrombosis: 1-year Follow-up Results of a Randomised, Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Cakir, Volkan; Gulcu, Aytac; Akay, Emrah; Capar, Ahmet E.; Gencpinar, Tugra; Kucuk, Banu; Karabay, Ozalp; Goktay, A. Yigit

    2014-08-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy (PAT) followed by standard anticoagulant therapy, with anticoagulation therapy alone, for the treatment of acute proximal lower extremity deep vein thrombosis.MethodsIn this randomised, prospective study, 42 patients with acute proximal iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis documented via Doppler ultrasound examination, were separated into an interventional treatment group (16 males, 5 females, average age 51 years) and a medical treatment group (13 males, 8 females, average age 59 years). In the interventional group, PAT with large-lumen 9-F diameter catheterisation was applied, after initiation of standard anticoagulant therapy. Balloon angioplasty (n 19) and stent implementation (n: 14) were used to treat patients with residual stenosis (>50 %) after PAT. Prophylactic IVC filters were placed in two patients. The thrombus clearance status of the venous system was evaluated by venography. In both the medical and interventional groups, venous patency rates and clinical symptom scores were evaluated at months 1, 3, and 12 after treatment.ResultsDeep venous systems became totally cleared of thrombi in 12 patients treated with PAT. The venous patency rates in month 12 were 57.1 and 4.76 % in the interventional and medical treatment groups, respectively. A statistically significant improvement was observed in clinical symptom scores of the interventional group (PAT) with or without stenting (4.23 ± 0.51 before treatment; 0.81 ± 0.92 at month 12) compared with the medical treatment group (4.00 ± 0.63 before treatment; 2.43 ± 0.67 at month 12). During follow-up, four patients in the medical treatment and one in the interventional group developed pulmonary embolisms.ConclusionsFor treatment of acute deep vein thrombosis, PAT with or without stenting is superior to anticoagulant therapy alone in terms of both ensuring venous patency and improving clinical

  3. Twenty five year mortality and air pollution: results from the French PAARC survey

    PubMed Central

    Filleul, L; Rondeau, V; Vandentorren, S; Le Moual, N; Cantagrel, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Charpin, D; Declercq, C; Neukirch, F; Paris, C; Vervloet, D; Brochard, P; Tessier, J; Kauffmann, F; Baldi, I

    2005-01-01

    Aims and Methods: Long term effects of air pollution on mortality were studied in 14 284 adults who resided in 24 areas from seven French cities when enrolled in the PAARC survey (air pollution and chronic respiratory diseases) in 1974. Daily measurements of sulphur dioxide, total suspended particles, black smoke, nitrogen dioxide, and nitric oxide were made in 24 areas for three years (1974–76). Cox proportional hazards models controlling for individual confounders (smoking, educational level, body mass index, occupational exposure) were applied, and frailty models used to take into account spatial correlation. Indicators of air pollution were the mean concentration. Results: Models were run before and after exclusion of six area monitors influenced by local traffic (NO/NO2 >3 in ppb). After exclusion of these areas, analyses showed that adjusted risk ratios (95% CI) for TSP, BS, NO2, and NO for non-accidental mortality were 1.05 (1.02 to 1.08), 1.07 (1.03 to 1.10), 1.14 (1.03 to 1.25), and 1.11 (1.05 to 1.17) for 10 µg/m3 respectively. Consistent patterns for lung cancer and cardiopulmonary causes were observed. Conclusions: Urban air pollution assessed in the 1970s was associated with increased mortality over 25 years in France. PMID:15961621

  4. Morbidity, mortality and quality of life in the ageing haemodialysis population: results from the ELDERLY study

    PubMed Central

    Dschietzig, Wilfried; Leimenstoll, Gerd; Rob, Peter M.; Kuhlmann, Martin K.; Pommer, Wolfgang; Fraass, Uwe; Ritz, Eberhard; Schwenger, Vedat

    2016-01-01

    Background The physical–functional and social–emotional health as well as survival of the elderly (≥75 years of age) haemodialysis patient is commonly thought to be poor. In a prospective, multicentre, non-interventional, observational study, the morbidity, mortality and quality of life (QoL) in this patient group were examined and compared with a younger cohort. Methods In 92 German dialysis centres, 2507 prevalent patients 19–98 years of age on haemodialysis for a median of 19.2 months were included in a drug monitoring study of darbepoetin alfa. To examine outcome and QoL parameters, 24 months of follow-up data in the age cohorts <75 and ≥75 years were analysed. Treatment parameters, adverse and intercurrent events, hospitalizations, morbidity and mortality were assessed. QoL was evaluated by means of the 47-item Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy–Anaemia score (FACT-An, version 4). Results The 2-year mortality rate was 34.7% for the older cohort and 15.8% for the younger cohort. The mortality rate for the haemodialysed elderly patients was 6.2% higher in absolute value compared with the age-matched background population. A powerful predictor of survival was the baseline FACT-An score and a close correlation with the 20-item anaemia subscale (AnS) was demonstrated. While the social QoL in the elderly patients was more stable than in the younger cohort (leading to equivalent values at the end of the study period), a pronounced deterioration of physical and functional status was observed. The median number of all-cause hospital days per patient-year was 12.3 for the elderly cohort and 8.9 for the younger patient population. The overall 24-month hospitalization rate was only marginally higher in the elderly cohort (34.0 versus 33.3%). Conclusions In this observational study, the mortality rate of elderly haemodialysis patients was not exceedingly high compared with the age-matched background population. Furthermore, the hospitalization

  5. A Case of Cerebral Sinus Venous Thrombosis Resulting in Mortality in Severe Preeclamptic Pregnant Woman

    PubMed Central

    Soydinc, Hatice Ender; Ozler, Ali; Evsen, Mehmet Sıddık; Sak, Muhammet Erdal; Basaranoglu, Serdar; Dusak, Abdurrahim; Cetincakmak, Mehmet Guli

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a rarely encountered condition during pregnancy. A 21-year-old pregnant woman with labour pains was hospitalized in our clinic. Diagnosis of severe preeclampsia was made based on her clinical and laboratory findings. She suffered from convulsive episodes during postpartum period which lead to initiation of treatment for eclampsia. However neurological and radiological examinations were performed after emergence of additional neurological symptoms disclosed the diagnosis of CVST. In this paper, we aimed to present a case with CVST which diagnosis was confused with eclampsia and resulting in maternal mortality. PMID:23509646

  6. Asbestos disease in sheet metal workers: the results of a proportional mortality analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zoloth, S.; Michaels, D.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a proportional mortality analysis of a cohort of sheet metal workers who have only intermittent exposure to asbestos demonstrates a significant excess of cancer at the three sites most frequently associated with asbestos: lung, colon and rectum, and the mesothelium. No excess nonmalignant respiratory disease was detected. These data strongly suggest that significant asbestos-related disease is present in populations with secondary exposure to asbestos and emphasize the importance of considering possible asbestos-related disease when treating patients with a history of employment in the construction industry.

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Mortality Among Women During 36 Years of Prospective Follow-Up: Results From the Nurses’ Health Study

    PubMed Central

    SPARKS, JEFFREY A.; CHANG, SHUN-CHIAO; LIAO, KATHERINE P.; LU, BING; FINE, ALEXANDER R.; SOLOMON, DANIEL H.; COSTENBADER, KAREN H.; KARLSON, ELIZABETH W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and mortality risk among women followed prospectively in the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS). Methods We analyzed 119,209 women in the NHS who reported no connective tissue disease at enrollment in 1976. Comorbidity and lifestyle data were collected through biennial questionnaires. Incident RA cases were validated by medical records review. Cause of death was determined by death certificate and medical records review. Cox regression models estimated hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for all-cause, cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer, and respiratory disease mortality for women with RA compared to those without RA. Results We validated 964 incident RA cases and identified 28,808 deaths during 36 years of prospective follow-up. Of 307 deaths among women with RA, 80 (26%) were from cancer, 70 (23%) were from CVD, and 44 (14%) were from respiratory causes. Women with RA had increased total mortality (HR 1.40, 95% CI 1.25–1.57) compared to those without RA, independent of mortality risk factors, including smoking. RA was associated with significantly increased respiratory disease mortality (HR 2.06, 95% CI 1.51–2.80) and cardiovascular disease mortality (HR 1.45, 95% CI 1.14–1.83), but not cancer mortality (HR 0.93, 95% CI 0.74–1.15). For women with seropositive RA, respiratory disease mortality was nearly 3-fold higher than among non-RA women (HR 2.67, 95% CI 1.89–3.77). Conclusion Women with RA had significantly increased mortality compared to those without RA. Respiratory disease and cardiovascular disease mortality were both significantly elevated for women with RA. The nearly 3-fold increased relative risk of respiratory disease mortality was observed only for those with seropositive RA. PMID:26473946

  8. Evidence that mortality from Vibrio vulnificus infection results from single strains among heterogeneous populations in shellfish.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, J K; Murphree, R L; Tamplin, M L

    1997-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is the leading cause of food-related mortality reported in the state of Florida. It is normal microflora in marine environments, where seawater and molluscan shellfish are the primary vectors of V. vulnificus disease. Risk correlates with seasonally high numbers of V. vulnificus bacteria during the summer months. Currently, the infectious dose for humans, as well as whether the disease is caused by single or multiple strains found in molluscan shellfish, is unknown. In this work, we studied pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles of V. vulnificus strains isolated from blood and oysters associated with V. vulnificus disease. Results showed that ca. 10(3) V. vulnificus bacteria/gram of oyster and higher concentrations were associated with human infections and that a single V. vulnificus strain, evidenced by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles, was isolated from human tissues. PMID:9230389

  9. Social Development: 1 Year Olds

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Social Development: 1 Year Olds Page Content Article Body During his second year, your toddler will develop a very specific image of his social world, friends, and acquaintances. He ...

  10. Declines in stillbirth and neonatal mortality rates in Europe between 2004 and 2010: results from the Euro-Peristat project

    PubMed Central

    Zeitlin, Jennifer; Mortensen, Laust; Cuttini, Marina; Lack, Nicholas; Nijhuis, Jan; Haidinger, Gerald; Blondel, Béatrice; Hindori-Mohangoo, Ashna D

    2016-01-01

    Background Stillbirth and neonatal mortality rates declined in Europe between 2004 and 2010. We hypothesised that declines might be greater for countries with higher mortality in 2004 and disproportionally affect very preterm infants at highest risk. Methods Data about live births, stillbirths and neonatal deaths by gestational age (GA) were collected using a common protocol by the Euro-Peristat project in 2004 and 2010. We analysed stillbirths at ≥28 weeks GA in 22 countries and live births ≥24 weeks GA for neonatal mortality in 18 countries. Per cent changes over time were assessed by calculating risk ratios (RR) for stillbirth, neonatal mortality and preterm birth rates in 2010 vs 2004. We used meta-analysis techniques to derive pooled RR using random-effects models overall, by GA subgroups and by mortality level in 2004. Results Between 2004 and 2010, stillbirths declined by 17% (95% CI 10% to 23%), with a range from 1% to 39% by country. Neonatal mortality declined by 29% (95% CI 23% to 35%) with a range from 9% to 67%. Preterm birth rates did not change: 0% (95% CI −3% to 3%). Mortality declines were of a similar magnitude at all GA; mortality levels in 2004 were not associated with RRs. Conclusions Stillbirths and neonatal deaths declined at all gestational ages in countries with both high and low levels of mortality in 2004. These results raise questions about how low-mortality countries achieve continued declines and highlight the importance of improving care across the GA spectrum. PMID:26719590

  11. Temperature-Dependent Galleria mellonella Mortality as a Result of Yersinia entomophaga Infection

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, Amy K.; Jones, Sandra A.; Hsu, Pei-Chun; Calder, Joanne; van Koten, Chikako

    2015-01-01

    The bacterium Yersinia entomophaga is pathogenic to a range of insect species, with death typically occurring within 2 to 5 days of ingestion. Per os challenge of larvae of the greater wax moth (Galleria mellonella) confirmed that Y. entomophaga was virulent when fed to larvae held at 25°C but was avirulent when fed to larvae maintained at 37°C. At 25°C, a dose of ∼4 × 107 CFU per larva of a Y. entomophaga toxin complex (Yen-TC) deletion derivative, the Y. entomophaga ΔTC variant, resulted in 27% mortality. This low level of activity was restored to near-wild-type levels by augmentation of the diet with a sublethal dose of purified Yen-TC. Intrahemocoelic injection of ∼3 Y. entomophaga or Y. entomophaga ΔTC cells per larva gave a 4-day median lethal dose, with similar levels of mortality observed at both 25 and 37°C. Following intrahemocoelic injection of a Yen-TC YenA1 green fluorescent protein fusion strain into larvae maintained at 25°C, the bacteria did not fluoresce until the population density reached 2 × 107 CFU ml−1 of hemolymph. The observed cells also took an irregular form. When the larvae were maintained at 37°C, the cells were small and the observed fluorescence was sporadic and weak, being more consistent at a population density of ∼3 × 109 CFU ml−1 of hemolymph. These findings provide further understanding of the pathobiology of Y. entomophaga in insects, showing that the bacterium gains direct access to the hemocoelic cavity, from where it rapidly multiplies to cause disease. PMID:26162867

  12. Temporal Trends of Suicide Mortality in Mainland China: Results from the Age-Period-Cohort Framework

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenkun; Wang, Jinyao; Bao, Junzhe; Gao, Xudong; Yu, Chuanhua; Xiang, Huiyun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the long-term trends of suicide mortality in China. We implemented the age-period-cohort (APC) framework, using data from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013. Our results showed that the net drift of suicide mortality was −4.727% (95% CI: −4.821% to −4.634%) per year for men and −6.633% (95% CI: −6.751% to −6.515%) per year for women, and the local drift values were below 0 in all age groups (p < 0.01 for all) for both sexes during the period of 1994–2013. Longitudinal age curves indicated that, in the same birth cohort, suicide death risk increased rapidly to peak at the life stage of 20–24 years old and 15–24 years old for men and women, respectively, and then showed a decelerated decline, followed by a rise thereafter after 54 years old for men and a slight one after 69 years old for women. The estimated period and cohort RRs were found to show similar monotonic downward patterns (significantly with p < 0.01 for all) for both sexes, with more quickly decreasing for women than for men during the whole period. The decreasing trend of suicide was likely to be related to the economic rapid growth, improvements in health care, enhancement on the level of education, and increasing awareness of suicide among the public in China. In addition, fast urbanization and the effective control of pesticides and rodenticides might be the special reasons behind these trends we observed in this study. PMID:27527195

  13. Is albumin administration in the acutely ill associated with increased mortality? Results of the SOAP study

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Jean-Louis; Sakr, Yasser; Reinhart, Konrad; Sprung, Charles L; Gerlach, Herwig; Ranieri, V Marco

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Albumin administration in the critically ill has been the subject of some controversy. We investigated the use of albumin solutions in European intensive care units (ICUs) and its relationship to outcome. Methods In a cohort, multicenter, observational study, all patients admitted to one of the participating ICUs between 1 May and 15 May 2002 were followed up until death, hospital discharge, or for 60 days. Patients were classified according to whether or not they received albumin at any time during their ICU stay. Results Of 3,147 admitted patients, 354 (11.2%) received albumin and 2,793 (88.8%) did not. Patients who received albumin were more likely to have cancer or liver cirrhosis, to be surgical admissions, and to have sepsis. They had a longer length of ICU stay and a higher mortality rate, but were also more severely ill, as manifested by higher simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores than the other patients. A Cox proportional hazard model indicated that albumin administration was significantly associated with decreased 30-day survival. Moreover, in 339 pairs matched according to a propensity score, ICU and hospital mortality rates were higher in the patients who had received albumin than in those who had not (34.8 versus 20.9% and 41.3 versus 27.7%, respectively, both p < 0.001). Conclusion Albumin administration was associated with decreased survival in this population of acutely ill patients. Further prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to examine the effects of albumin administration in sub-groups of acutely ill patients. PMID:16356223

  14. [The age and sex indicators of mortality of population and years of life lost as a result of premature mortality in the Russian Federation in 2012].

    PubMed

    Boiytsov, S A; Samorodskaya, I V

    2014-01-01

    The age-specific mortality coefficients and years of life lost as a result of premature mortality are among important medical demographic characteristics of population health. The study analyzed age and sex indicators of mortality of population in the Russian Federation. The number of years of life lost as a result of premature mortality is calculated. The comparison of values of years of life lost in various subjects of the Russian Federation was carried out. The data of Rosstat concerning population size and number of the deceased in year age groups in the Russian Federation and subjects of the Russian Federation in 2012 was used. The indicator was calculated on the basis of technique included into "The global burden of diseases report" (2010). The minimal indicators of mortality of males are noted at the age of 11 years (25.4 per 100 000 of population) and females at the age of 10 years (18.2 per 100 000 of population). The maximal differences in indicators of mortality of males and females are marked in the age group 20-29 years (314.5 of males and 92.3 of females per 100 000 of population). The percentage of deceased prior 70 years consists 63.2% among males and 29.9% among females. The total number of years of life lost in the Russian Federation consisted 36 864 309 and out of them 24 321 992 (65.9%) as a result of death of males and 12 542 317 (34.1%) as a result of death of females. The maximum percentage of years of life lost among males is marked in the age group of 51-60 years (24.61%) and among females in the age group of 71-80 years (22.38%). The indicator of years of life lost per 100 000 of population consisted 25769 for total population, 36 753 for male population and 16 314 for female population. The highest rate of indicator of years of life lost is marked in the Chukchi Autonomous Okrug and the lowest rate in the Republics of the Northern Caucasus and Moscow. However, in all subjects of the Russian Federation indicator of years of life lost is

  15. Long-Term Trial Results Show No Mortality Benefit from Annual Prostate Cancer Screening

    Cancer.gov

    Thirteen year follow-up data from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) cancer screening trial show higher incidence but similar mortality among men screened annually with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test and digital rectal examination

  16. Calprotectin--a marker of mortality in COPD? Results from a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Holmgaard, Dennis B; Mygind, Lone H; Titlestad, Ingrid; Madsen, Hanne; Pedersen, Svend Stenvang; Mortensen, Ole H; Pedersen, Court

    2013-10-01

    Calprotectin comprises more than 45% of the cytosolic content of neutrophil granulocytes. Because pathogenesis, disease activity and disease progression in COPD are believed to be partly dependent of neutrophil driven inflammation we decided to investigate whether plasma level of calprotectin (p-calprotectin) was associated with all-cause mortality in patients with COPD. We measured p-calprotectin in blood samples from 460 patients with moderate to very severe COPD in stable phase. Patients were stratified into three groups according to p-calprotectin level. Outcome measure was all-cause mortality. Analyses were adjusted for factors known to influence mortality using a Cox regression analysis. We found a time dependent correlation between p-calprotectin levels and mortality during the first 5 years of follow-up. Increasing levels of p-calprotectin were associated with concomitant increases in mortality from HR 1.56 (CI 95%: 1.03 -2.38) at calprotectin between 100 -200 ng/ml to HR 2.02 (CI 95%: 1.27-3.19) at calprotectin >200 ng/ml. P-calprotectin could be a useful marker of all-cause mortality in patients suffering from moderate to very severe COPD.

  17. Language Development: 1 Year Olds

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Language Development: 1 Year Olds Page Content Article Body ... assured, it’s not your imagination. He’s developing his language and comprehension skills right on schedule. This giant ...

  18. Development of a New Technique to Assess Susceptibility to Predation Resulting from Sublethal Stresses (Indirect Mortality)

    SciTech Connect

    Cada, G.F.

    2003-08-25

    Fish that pass through a hydroelectric turbine may not be killed directly, but may nonetheless experience sublethal stresses that will increase their susceptibility to predators (indirect mortality). There is a need to develop reliable tests for indirect mortality so that the full consequences of passage through turbines (and other routes around a hydroelectric dam) can be assessed. We evaluated a new technique for assessing indirect mortality, based on a behavioral response to a startling stimulus (akin to perceiving an approaching predator). We compare this technique to the standard predator preference test. The behavioral response is a rapid movement commonly referred to as a startle response, escape response, or C-shape, based on the characteristic body position assumed by the fish. When viewed from above, a startled fish bends into a C-shape, then springs back and swims away in a direction different from its original orientation. This predator avoidance (escape) behavior can be compromised by sublethal stresses that temporarily stun or disorient the fish. We subjected striped shiners and fathead minnows to varying intensities of either turbulence (10-, 20- or 30-min) or 2-min exposures to a fish anesthetic (100 or 200 mg/L of tricaine methanesulfonate), and evaluated their subsequent behavior. Individual fish were given a startle stimulus and filmed with a high-speed video camera. Each fish was startled and filmed twice before being stressed, and then at 1-, 5-, 15-, and 30-min post-exposure. The resulting image files were analyzed for a variety of behavioral measures including: presence of a response, time to first reaction, duration of reaction, time to formation of maximum C-shape, time to completion of C-shape, and completeness of C-shape. The most immediate measure of potential changes in fish behavior was whether stressed fish exhibited a startle response. For striped shiners, the number of fish not responding to the stimulus was significantly different

  19. Tempo-Spatial Variations of Ambient Ozone-Mortality Associations in the USA: Results from the NMMAPS Data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Zeng, Weilin; Lin, Hualiang; Rutherford, Shannon; Xiao, Jianpeng; Li, Xing; Li, Zhihao; Qian, Zhengmin; Feng, Baixiang; Ma, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    Although the health effects of ambient ozone have been widely assessed, their tempo-spatial variations remain unclear. We selected 20 communities (ten each from southern and northern USA) based on the US National Morbidity, Mortality, and Air Pollution Study (NMMAPS) dataset. A generalized linear model (GLM) was used to estimate the season-specific association between each 10 ppb (lag0-2 day average) increment in daily 8 h maximum ozone concentration and mortality in every community. The results showed that in the southern communities, a 10 ppb increment in ozone was linked to an increment of mortality of −0.07%, −0.17%, 0.40% and 0.27% in spring, summer, autumn and winter, respectively. For the northern communities, the excess risks (ERs) were 0.74%, 1.21%, 0.52% and −0.65% in the spring, summer, autumn and winter seasons, respectively. City-specific ozone-related mortality effects were positively related with latitude, but negatively related with seasonal average temperature in the spring, summer and autumn seasons. However, a reverse relationship was found in the winter. We concluded that there were different seasonal patterns of ozone effects on mortality between southern and northern US communities. Latitude and seasonal average temperature were identified as modifiers of the ambient ozone-related mortality risks. PMID:27571094

  20. Time trends in socioeconomic inequalities in cancer mortality: results from a 35 year prospective study in British men

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Socioeconomic inequalities in cancer mortality in Britain have been shown to be present in the 1990s and early 2000s. Little is known about on-going patterns in such inequalities in cancer mortality. We examined time trends in socioeconomic inequalities in cancer mortality in Britain between 1978 and 2013. Methods A socially representative cohort of 7489 British men with data on longest-held occupational social class, followed up for 35 years, in whom 1484 cancer deaths occurred. Results The hazard ratio for cancer mortality for manual vs. non-manual social classes remained unchanged; among men aged 50–59 years it was 1.62 (95%CI 1.17–2.24) between 1980–1990 and 1.65 (95%CI 1.14–2.40) between 1990–2000. The absolute difference (non-manual minus manual) in probability of surviving death from cancer to 70 years remained at 3% over the follow-up. The consistency of risks over time was similar for both smoking-related and non-smoking related cancer mortality. Conclusion Socioeconomic inequalities in cancer mortality in Britain remain unchanged over the last 35 years and need to be urgently addressed. PMID:24975430

  1. [Mortality among workers of the rubber industry. III. Results of further observation of the male cohort].

    PubMed

    Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N; Wilczyńska, U; Strzelecka, A; Sobala, W

    1995-01-01

    Mortality among workers of the rubber industry was assessed following the observation of the cohort comprised of 6,978 male workers who had started their employment in the plant producing rubber footwear during the years 1945-1973, and worked for, at least, three months. The condition of the cohort was assessed for December 31, 1990. Standardised mortality rate (SMR) was used as a measurement tool and it was calculated by means of the man-year method. The general population of Poland was taken as the reference population. General mortality in the cohort was significantly higher than in the reference population (2020 death, SMR = 110). Significant excess mortality due to atherosclerosis (205 deaths, SMR = 135) and cirrhosis of the liver (48 deaths, SMR = 170) was also noted. Total number of deaths due to malignant neoplasms-421-was slightly higher than expected. Significant excess of the bladder cancer (13 deaths, SMR = 357), the larynx cancer (23 deaths, SMR = 180) and the lung cancer (148 deaths, SMR = 122) was revealed. Significantly increased risk of the large intestine cancer (15 deaths, SMR = 242) was observed in the subcohort of workers employed in direct production departments.

  2. Diesel exposure and mortality among railway workers: results of a pilot study.

    PubMed Central

    Schenker, M B; Smith, T; Muñoz, A; Woskie, S; Speizer, F E

    1984-01-01

    A pilot study of the mortality of railway workers was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of studying the association of exposure to diesel exhaust and cause specific mortality. The cohort consisted of 2519 white male subjects aged 45-64 with at least 10 years of railway service by 1967. Subjects were selected on the basis of job classification, and cause specific mortality was ascertained for subjects who died (n = 501) up to 1979. The total follow up period was 28.4 (X 1000) person-years. The standardised mortality ratio (SMR) for the cohort, based on United States national rates, was 87 (95% confidence limits 80, 95), and there were no significant differences from expected number of deaths for any specific neoplasm. The directly standardised rate ratio for respiratory cancer among diesel exposed subjects relative to unexposed subjects was 1.42 +/- 0.50 (means +/- SE). A proportional hazards model was consistent with the findings of the standardised rate ratio, but in neither analysis was the increased risk of respiratory cancer in diesel exposed subjects statistically significant. PMID:6743578

  3. Physical Activity Related to Depression and Predicted Mortality Risk: Results from the Americans' Changing Lives Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Pai-Lin; Lan, William; Lee, Charles C.-L.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the association between three types of physical activities (PA) and depression, and the relationship between PA and later mortality. Previous studies rarely assessed these associations in one single study in randomly selected population samples. Few studies have assessed these relations by adjusting the covariate of…

  4. [Smoking and mortality in Swiss physicians: results of an 18-year survey].

    PubMed

    Gsell, O; Abelin, T; Wieltschnig, E

    1979-03-01

    A prospective mortality study of tobacco smoking of Swiss physicians is reported over a period of 18 years (1955-1973). The mortality rate increases with the intensity of the daily smoking quantity, going till to the double of non-smokers. This elevation is not seen in late smokers. Contrary to the habits of English doctors, who smoke mostly cigarettes, in Switzerland the death rates of cigars (mostly Stumpen) and pipe smokers are as much elevated as for cigarette smokers. In intensive smokers the mortality reached for all 3 the same rate (2,4-2,6). Under the various causes of death lung cancer was only seen in smokers (92,5% intensive smokers). Heart infarctions death has in smokers the highest rate in the age of 35-54 years, going back till 75 years where the death rate is nearly the same as in non-smokers. The passover in mortality of the intensive smokers in full activity of life is documentated by the statistic of Swiss Doctors. Therefore it is a positive factor that in the last 18 years the number of cigarette-smokers in physicians declined from 37% to 21% and the number of past-smokers has gone up from 17 to 38%, but the number of only cigars and pipesmokers is always the same.

  5. Factors Affecting Infant Mortality in Rural Bangladesh: Results from a Retrospective Sample Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Bimal Kanti

    1990-01-01

    Data from interviews with 1,787 women in rural Bangladesh revealed that infant mortality was highly correlated with smaller birth interval and absence of contraceptive use, followed by younger age of mother, prior pregnancy loss, smaller family landholdings, and birth of less preferred sex. Contains 49 references. (Author/SV)

  6. Measuring Adult Mortality Using Sibling Survival: A New Analytical Method and New Results for 44 Countries, 1974–2006

    PubMed Central

    Obermeyer, Ziad; Rajaratnam, Julie Knoll; Park, Chang H.; Gakidou, Emmanuela; Hogan, Margaret C.; Lopez, Alan D.; Murray, Christopher J. L.

    2010-01-01

    15—the probability of a 15-y old dying before his or her 60th birthday—for 44 countries with DHS sibling survival data. Our findings suggest that levels of adult mortality prevailing in many developing countries are substantially higher than previously suggested by other analyses of sibling history data. Generally, our estimates show the risk of adult death between ages 15 and 60 y to be about 20%–35% for females and 25%–45% for males in sub-Saharan African populations largely unaffected by HIV. In countries of Southern Africa, where the HIV epidemic has been most pronounced, as many as eight out of ten men alive at age 15 y will be dead by age 60, as will six out of ten women. Adult mortality levels in populations of Asia and Latin America are generally lower than in Africa, particularly for women. The exceptions are Haiti and Cambodia, where mortality risks are comparable to many countries in Africa. In all other countries with data, the probability of dying between ages 15 and 60 y was typically around 10% for women and 20% for men, not much higher than the levels prevailing in several more developed countries. Conclusions Our results represent an expansion of direct knowledge of levels and trends in adult mortality in the developing world. The CSS method provides grounds for renewed optimism in collecting sibling survival data. We suggest that all nationally representative survey programs with adequate sample size ought to implement this critical module for tracking adult mortality in order to more reliably understand the levels and patterns of adult mortality, and how they are changing. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:20405004

  7. Sleep disturbances and cause-specific mortality: Results from the GAZEL cohort study.

    PubMed

    Rod, Naja Hulvej; Vahtera, Jussi; Westerlund, Hugo; Kivimaki, Mika; Zins, Marie; Goldberg, Marcel; Lange, Theis

    2011-02-01

    Poor sleep is an increasing problem in modern society, but most previous studies on the association between sleep and mortality rates have addressed only duration, not quality, of sleep. The authors prospectively examined the effects of sleep disturbances on mortality rates and on important risk factors for mortality, such as body mass index, hypertension, and diabetes. A total of 16,989 participants in the GAZEL cohort study were asked validated questions on sleep disturbances in 1990 and were followed up until 2009, with <1% loss to follow-up. Body mass index, hypertension, and diabetes were measured annually through self-reporting. During follow-up, a total of 1,045 men and women died. Sleep disturbances were associated with a higher overall mortality risk in men (P = 0.005) but not in women (P = 0.33). This effect was most pronounced for men <45 years of age (≥3 symptoms vs. none: hazard ratio = 2.03, 95% confidence interval: 1.24, 3.33). There were no clear associations between sleep disturbances and cardiovascular mortality rates, although men and women with sleep disturbances were more likely to develop hypertension and diabetes (P < 0.001). Compared with people with no sleep disturbances, men who reported ≥3 types of sleep disturbance had an almost 5 times' higher risk of committing suicide (hazard ratio = 4.99, 95% confidence interval: 1.59, 15.7). Future strategies to prevent premature deaths may benefit from assessment of sleep disturbances, especially in younger individuals.

  8. Mortality of centrarchid fishes in the Potomac drainage: Survey results and overview of potential contributing factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blazer, Vicki; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Starliper, Clifford E.; Zaugg, Steven D.; Burkhardt, Mark R.; Barbash, P.; Hedrick, J.D.; Reeser, S.J.; Mullican, J.E.; Kelble, J.

    2010-01-01

    Skin lesions and spring mortality events of smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu and selected other species were first noted in the South Branch of the Potomac River in 2002. Since that year morbidity and mortality have also been observed in the Shenandoah and Monocacy rivers. Despite much research, no single pathogen, parasite, or chemical cause for the lesions and mortality has been identified. Numerous parasites, most commonly trematode metacercariae and myxozoans; the bacterial pathogens Aeromonas hydrophila, Aeromonas salmonicida, and Flavobacterium columnare; and largemouth bass virus have all been observed. None have been consistently isolated or observed at all sites, however, nor has any consistent microscopic pathology of the lesions been observed. A variety of histological changes associated with exposure to environmental contaminants or stressors, including intersex (testicular oocytes), high numbers of macrophage aggregates, oxidative damage, gill lesions, and epidermal papillomas, were observed. The findings indicate that selected sensitive species may be stressed by multiple factors and constantly close to the threshold between a sustainable (healthy) and nonsustainable (unhealthy) condition. Fish health is often used as an indicator of aquatic ecosystem health, and these findings raise concerns about environmental degradation within the Potomac River drainage. Unfortunately, while much information has been gained from the studies conducted to date, due to the multiple state jurisdictions involved, competing interests, and other issues, there has been no coordinated approach to identifying and mitigating the stressors. This synthesis emphasizes the need for multiyear, interdisciplinary, integrative research to identify the underlying stressors and possible management actions to enhance ecosystem health.

  9. Campaigns with oral polio vaccine may lower mortality and create unexpected results.

    PubMed

    Benn, C S; Jacobsen, L H; Fisker, A B; Rodrigues, A; Sartono, E; Lund, N; Whittle, H C; Aaby, P

    2017-02-22

    Three studies from Guinea-Bissau found conflicting effects of OPV-at-birth (OPV0) on child survival. One study from 2004 suggested excess male mortality among children receiving OPV0 compared with children receiving NoOPV0 during a period of shortage of OPV. However, two subsequent studies showed beneficial effects of OPV0. In 2004, two national OPV-campaigns had been conducted in Guinea-Bissau. In a reanalysis of the 2004-study, in a survival analysis the age-adjusted mortality rate of study participants was 67% (95% CI=42-81%) lower after the OPV-campaigns than before the campaigns. In the OPV0 group only 22% (655/3031 person-years (pyrs)) of follow-up time was "after" the OPV-campaigns whereas 55% (473/859 pyrs) of the time in the NoOPV0 group was post-campaign (p<0.0001, Chi(2)). Censoring for OPV-campaigns in the original study removed excess male mortality and made the three studies more homogeneous. Overall, there is now considerable evidence that OPV, like other live vaccines, has important beneficial non-specific effects.

  10. Active social participation and mortality risk among older people in Japan: results from a nationally representative sample.

    PubMed

    Minagawa, Yuka; Saito, Yasuhiko

    2015-07-01

    A large literature suggests that active social participation contributes to the well-being of older people. Japan provides a compelling context to test this hypothesis due to its rapidly growing elderly population and the phenomenal health of the population. Using the Nihon University Japanese Longitudinal Study of Aging, this study examines how social participation, measured by group membership, is related to the risk of overall mortality among Japanese elders aged 65 and older. Results from Cox proportional hazards models show that group affiliation confers advantages against mortality risk, even after controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, physical health measures, and family relationship variables. In particular, activities geared more toward self-development, such as postretirement employment and lifelong learning, are strongly associated with lower levels of mortality. Findings suggest that continued social participation at advanced ages produces positive health consequences, highlighting the importance of active aging in achieving successful aging in the Japanese context.

  11. How much are Ecuadorians Willing to Pay to Reduce Maternal Mortality? Results from a Pilot Study on Contingent Valuation

    PubMed Central

    Roldós, María Isabel; Corso, Phaedra; Ingels, Justin

    2017-01-01

    Context: There is an established association between the provision of health care services and maternal mortality. In Ecuador, little is known if the societal value is greater than the resources expended in preventive medicine. Aims: The purpose of this research is to investigate Ecuadorians’ willingness to pay to prevent maternal death and disabilities due to complications of care during childbirth in the context of universal coverage. Methods and Materials: The study elicited a “contingent” market on morbidity and mortality outcomes, specific to Ecuador’s epidemiologic profiles between a hypothetical market that included a 50% reduction in the risk of maternal mortality from 100 to 50 per 100,000, and a market that included a 50% reduction in the risk of maternal morbidity from 4,000 to 2,000 per 100,000. Results: The average amount participants are willing to pay (WTP) to prevent maternal mortality in the context of universal coverage, was $176 a year (95% CI=$172, $179). The unadjusted mean WTP for a reduction in the maternal morbidity risk was $135 (95% CI=$132, $139). Translated into Value of statistical Life, participant´s from this study valued the prevention of one statistical maternal death at USD $352,000. Conclusion: Results suggest that the costs of maternal care do not outweigh the benefit of prevention, and that Ecuadorians are willing to pay a significant amount to reduce the risk of maternal mortality. Global Health Implications: Reduction of maternal mortality will remain an important global developmental goal in the upcoming years. Having a monetary approximation on the value of these losses may have important implications in the allotting financial and technical resources to reduce it. PMID:28058202

  12. Afoxolaner against fleas: immediate efficacy and resultant mortality after short exposure on dogs

    PubMed Central

    Beugnet, Frédéric; deVos, Christa; Liebenberg, Julian; Halos, Lénaïg; Fourie, Josephus

    2014-01-01

    The speed of efficacy of afoxolaner (NexGard®) against Ctenocephalides felis fleas was evaluated in two studies. Study A assessed the efficacy against existing fleas whereas study B assessed the efficacy against new infesting fleas. In study A, 12 dogs were allocated to the untreated group and 20 dogs to the treated group. All dogs were infested by 100 fleas each at Day −1, treated at Day 0 and flea combed at 2 h or at 6 h post treatment. In study B, 6 dogs were allocated to the untreated group and 10 to the treated group. They were infested with 100 fleas each on Days 2, 7, 14, 21 and 28. Fleas were removed and counted at 6 h post-infestation. Immediate and persistent efficacies were evaluated by counting fleas on the dogs. To evaluate induced mortality after exposure on dogs, fleas collected alive were placed in an insectarium for 24 h and assessed for viability. The immediate efficacy on dogs was significant at 6 h with 100%. The induced death of the fleas collected live from dogs 2 h after exposure was 99.7%. Concerning new infesting fleas, the observed efficacy at 6 h and the induced mortality were significantly different (p < 0.05) from the control at all time-points. At 6 h, the prophylactic efficacy was > 97% at Day 2 and Day 8 and > 90% at Day 14. The induced mortality after 6 h of exposure on dogs varied between 73.3% and 100% for the whole study. PMID:25148564

  13. Afoxolaner against fleas: immediate efficacy and resultant mortality after short exposure on dogs.

    PubMed

    Beugnet, Frédéric; deVos, Christa; Liebenberg, Julian; Halos, Lénaïg; Fourie, Josephus

    2014-01-01

    The speed of efficacy of afoxolaner (NexGard) against Ctenocephalides felis fleas was evaluated in two studies. Study A assessed the efficacy against existing fleas whereas study B assessed the efficacy against new infesting fleas. In study A, 12 dogs were allocated to the untreated group and 20 dogs to the treated group. All dogs were infested by 100 fleas each at Day -1, treated at Day 0 and flea combed at 2 h or at 6 h post treatment. In study B, 6 dogs were allocated to the untreated group and 10 to the treated group. They were infested with 100 fleas each on Days 2, 7, 14, 21 and 28. Fleas were removed and counted at 6 h post-infestation. Immediate and persistent efficacies were evaluated by counting fleas on the dogs. To evaluate induced mortality after exposure on dogs, fleas collected alive were placed in an insectarium for 24 h and assessed for viability. The immediate efficacy on dogs was significant at 6 h with 100%. The induced death of the fleas collected live from dogs 2 h after exposure was 99.7%. Concerning new infesting fleas, the observed efficacy at 6 h and the induced mortality were significantly different (p < 0.05) from the control at all time-points. At 6 h, the prophylactic efficacy was > 97% at Day 2 and Day 8 and > 90% at Day 14. The induced mortality after 6 h of exposure on dogs varied between 73.3% and 100% for the whole study.

  14. Calcium and Vitamin D Intake and Mortality: Results from the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos)

    PubMed Central

    Langsetmo, Lisa; Berger, Claudie; Kreiger, Nancy; Kovacs, Christopher S.; Hanley, David A.; Jamal, Sophie A.; Whiting, Susan J.; Genest, Jacques; Morin, Suzanne N.; Hodsman, Anthony; Prior, Jerilynn C.; Lentle, Brian; Patel, Millan S.; Brown, Jacques P.; Anastasiades, Tassos; Towheed, Tanveer; Josse, Robert G.; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Adachi, Jonathan D.; Leslie, William D.; Davison, K. Shawn; Goltzman, David

    2016-01-01

    Context Calcium and vitamin D are recommended for bone health, but there are concerns about adverse risks. Some clinical studies suggest that calcium intake may be cardioprotective, whereas others report increased risk associated with calcium supplements. Both low and high serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D have been associated with increased mortality. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the association between total calcium and vitamin D intake and mortality and heterogeneity by source of intake. Design The Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study cohort is a population-based longitudinal cohort with a 10-year follow-up (1995–2007). Setting This study included randomly selected community-dwelling men and women. Participants A total of 9033 participants with nonmissing calcium and vitamin D intake data and follow-up were studied. Exposure Total calcium intake (dairy, nondairy food, and supplements) and total vitamin D intake (milk, yogurt, and supplements) were recorded. Outcome The outcome variable was all-cause mortality. Results There were 1160 deaths during the 10-year period. For women only, we found a possible benefit of higher total calcium intake, with a hazard ratio of 0.95 (95% confidence interval, 0.89–1.01) per 500-mg increase in daily calcium intake and no evidence of heterogeneity by source; use of calcium supplements was also associated with reduced mortality, with hazard ratio of 0.78 (95% confidence interval, 0.66–0.92) for users vs nonusers with statistically significant reductions remaining among those with doses up to 1000 mg/d. These associations were not modified by levels of concurrent vitamin D intake. No definitive associations were found among men. Conclusions Calcium supplements, up to 1000 mg/d, and increased dietary intake of calcium may be associated with reduced risk of mortality in women. We found no evidence of mortality benefit or harm associated with vitamin D intake. PMID:23703722

  15. Trends and social differentials in child mortality in Rwanda 1990–2010: results from three demographic and health surveys

    PubMed Central

    Musafili, Aimable; Essén, Birgitta; Baribwira, Cyprien; Binagwaho, Agnes; Persson, Lars-Åke; Selling, Katarina Ekholm

    2015-01-01

    Background Rwanda has embarked on ambitious programmes to provide equitable health services and reduce mortality in childhood. Evidence from other countries indicates that advances in child survival often have come at the expense of increasing inequity. Our aims were to analyse trends and social differentials in mortality before the age of 5 years in Rwanda from 1990 to 2010. Methods We performed secondary analyses of data from three Demographic and Health Surveys conducted in 2000, 2005 and 2010 in Rwanda. These surveys included 34 790 children born between 1990 and 2010 to women aged 15–49 years. The main outcome measures were neonatal mortality rates (NMR) and under-5 mortality rates (U5MR) over time, and in relation to mother's educational level, urban or rural residence and household wealth. Generalised linear mixed effects models and a mixed effects Cox model (frailty model) were used, with adjustments for confounders and cluster sampling method. Results Mortality rates in Rwanda peaked in 1994 at the time of the genocide (NMR 60/1000 live births, 95% CI 51 to 65; U5MR 238/1000 live births, 95% CI 226 to 251). The 1990s and the first half of the 2000s were characterised by a marked rural/urban divide and inequity in child survival between maternal groups with different levels of education. Towards the end of the study period (2005–2010) NMR had been reduced to 26/1000 (95% CI 23 to 29) and U5MR to 65/1000 (95% CI 61 to 70), with little or no difference between urban and rural areas, and household wealth groups, while children of women with no education still had significantly higher U5MR. Conclusions Recent reductions in child mortality in Rwanda have concurred with improved social equity in child survival. Current challenges include the prevention of newborn deaths. PMID:25870163

  16. Cold-water event of January 2010 results in catastrophic benthic mortality on patch reefs in the Florida Keys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colella, M. A.; Ruzicka, R. R.; Kidney, J. A.; Morrison, J. M.; Brinkhuis, V. B.

    2012-06-01

    The Florida Keys are periodically exposed to extreme cold-water events that can have pronounced effects on coral reef community structure. In January 2010, the Florida Keys experienced one of the coldest 12-day periods on record, during which water temperatures decreased below the lethal limit for many tropical reef taxa for several consecutive days. This study provides a quantitative assessment of the scleractinian mortality and acute changes to benthic cover at four patch reefs in the middle and upper Keys that coincided with this cold-water event. Significant decreases in benthic cover of scleractinian corals, gorgonians, sponges, and macroalgae were observed between summer 2009 and February 2010. Gorgonian cover declined from 25.6 ± 4.6% (mean ± SE) to 13.3 ± 2.7%, scleractinian cover from 17.6 ± 1.4% to 10.7 ± 0.9%, macroalgal cover from 8.2 ± 5.2% to 0.7 ± 0.3%, and sponge cover from 3.8 ± 1.4% to 2.3 ± 1.2%. Scleractinian mortality varied across sites depending upon the duration of lethal temperatures and the community composition. Montastraea annularis complex cover was reduced from 4.4 ± 2.4% to 0.6 ± 0.2%, and 93% of all colonies surveyed suffered complete or partial mortality. Complete or partial mortality was also observed in >50% of all Porites astreoides and Montastraea cavernosa colonies and resulted in a significant reduction in cover. When compared with historical accounts of cold-water-induced mortality, our results suggest that the 2010 winter mortality was one of the most severe on record. The level of coral mortality on patch reefs is of particular concern because corals in these habitats had previously demonstrated resistance against stressors (e.g., disease and warm-water bleaching) that had negatively affected corals in other habitats in the Florida Keys during recent decades.

  17. Associations between Fine and Coarse Particles and Mortality in Mediterranean Cities: Results from the MED-PARTICLES Project

    PubMed Central

    Stafoggia, Massimo; Rodopoulou, Sophia; Ostro, Bart; Declercq, Christophe; Alessandrini, Ester; Díaz, Julio; Karanasiou, Angeliki; Kelessis, Apostolos G.; Le Tertre, Alain; Pandolfi, Paolo; Randi, Giorgia; Scarinzi, Cecilia; Zauli-Sajani, Stefano; Katsouyanni, Klea; Forastiere, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Background: Few studies have investigated the independent health effects of different size fractions of particulate matter (PM) in multiple locations, especially in Europe. Objectives: We estimated the short-term effects of PM with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm (PM10), ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5), and between 2.5 and 10 μm (PM2.5–10) on all-cause, cardiovascular, and respiratory mortality in 10 European Mediterranean metropolitan areas within the MED-PARTICLES project. Methods: We analyzed data from each city using Poisson regression models, and combined city-specific estimates to derive overall effect estimates. We evaluated the sensitivity of our estimates to co-pollutant exposures and city-specific model choice, and investigated effect modification by age, sex, and season. We applied distributed lag and threshold models to investigate temporal patterns of associations. Results: A 10-μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 was associated with a 0.55% (95% CI: 0.27, 0.84%) increase in all-cause mortality (0–1 day cumulative lag), and a 1.91% increase (95% CI: 0.71, 3.12%) in respiratory mortality (0–5 day lag). In general, associations were stronger for cardiovascular and respiratory mortality than all-cause mortality, during warm versus cold months, and among those ≥ 75 versus < 75 years of age. Associations with PM2.5–10 were positive but not statistically significant in most analyses, whereas associations with PM10 seemed to be driven by PM2.5. Conclusions: We found evidence of adverse effects of PM2.5 on mortality outcomes in the European Mediterranean region. Associations with PM2.5–10 were positive but smaller in magnitude. Associations were stronger for respiratory mortality when cumulative exposures were lagged over 0–5 days, and were modified by season and age. PMID:23687008

  18. Heart disease mortality following widowhood: some results from the OPCS Longitudinal Study. Office of Population Censuses and Surveys.

    PubMed

    Jones, D R

    1987-01-01

    Many studies have suggested that following the experience of 'stressful' life events the risks of myocardial infarction, accidents and perhaps other diseases are elevated. In the OPCS Longitudinal Study routinely collected data on deaths, and deaths of a spouse occurring in a 1% sample of the population of England and Wales in the period 1971-1981 are linked together, and with 1971 census records of sample members. The timing and patterns of death following the potentially very stressful event of conjugal bereavement may thus be analysed. Overall the mortality (from ischaemic heart disease) was less than 10% in excess of that in all members of the LS sample. As in many earlier studies, some increases in death rates shortly after widowhood are observed. Unusually, for deaths from all causes these increases are more marked in widows than in widowers with, for example, a two-fold increase in mortality from all causes in the first month after widowhood. However, no peak of post-bereavement mortality from ischaemic heart disease is clearly established in either sex. Although the study is large, with a well-chosen control group, only a limited characterisation of study members from data collected in the census is possible. In particular, no measures of personality, behaviour or diet are available. Investigation of potential effects of social or familial support, as measured by household structure and numbers of children, led to equivocal results. Several possible explanations for the increased mortality rates are examined. Hypotheses based on common marital environment, homogamy or simultaneous accidental death are seen to be of very limited value. The observed patterns, although consistent with an early effect of a stressful life event, do not suggest that stress following bereavement leads to an excess of ischaemic heart disease mortality.

  19. Long-Term Exposure to Constituents of Fine Particulate Air Pollution and Mortality: Results from the California Teachers Study

    PubMed Central

    Ostro, Bart; Lipsett, Michael; Reynolds, Peggy; Goldberg, Debbie; Hertz, Andrew; Garcia, Cynthia; Henderson, Katherine D.; Bernstein, Leslie

    2010-01-01

    Background Several studies have reported associations between long-term exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM) and cardiovascular mortality. However, the health impacts of long-term exposure to specific constituents of PM2.5 (PM with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm) have not been explored. Methods We used data from the California Teachers Study, a prospective cohort of active and former female public school professionals. We developed estimates of long-term exposures to PM2.5 and several of its constituents, including elemental carbon, organic carbon (OC), sulfates, nitrates, iron, potassium, silicon, and zinc. Monthly averages of exposure were created using pollution data from June 2002 through July 2007. We included participants whose residential addresses were within 8 and 30 km of a monitor collecting PM2.5 constituent data. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated for long-term exposure for mortality from all nontraumatic causes, cardiopulmonary disease, ischemic heart disease (IHD), and pulmonary disease. Results Approximately 45,000 women with 2,600 deaths lived within 30 km of a monitor. We observed associations of all-cause, cardiopulmonary, and IHD mortality with PM2.5 mass and each of its measured constituents, and between pulmonary mortality and several constituents. For example, for cardiopulmonary mortality, HRs for interquartile ranges of PM2.5, OC, and sulfates were 1.55 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.43–1.69], 1.80 (95% CI, 1.68–1.93), and 1.79 (95% CI, 1.58–2.03), respectively. Subsequent analyses indicated that, of the constituents analyzed, OC and sulfates had the strongest associations with all four outcomes. Conclusions Long-term exposures to PM2.5 and several of its constituents were associated with increased risks of all-cause and cardiopulmonary mortality in this cohort. Constituents derived from combustion of fossil fuel (including diesel), as well as those of crustal origin, were associated with some of the greatest risks

  20. Clinical and Serum-Based Markers Are Associated with Death within 1 year of de novo Implant in Primary Prevention ICD Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiyi; Guallar, Eliseo; Blasco-Colmenares, Elena; Dalal, Darshan; Butcher, Barbara; Norgard, Sanaz; Tjong, Fleur V. Y.; Eldadah, Zayd; Dickfeld, Timm; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A.; Marine, Joseph E.; Tomaselli, Gordon F.; Cheng, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Background Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation is contraindicated in those with <1 year life expectancy. Objective To develop a risk prediction score for 1-year mortality in patients with primary prevention ICDs and to determine the incremental improvement in discrimination when incorporating serum-based biomarkers to traditional clinical variables. Methods We analyzed data from the PROSE-ICD study, a large prospective observational study of patients undergoing primary prevention ICD implantation who were extensively phenotyped for clinical and serum markers. We identified variables predicting 1-year mortality and synthesized them into a comprehensive risk scoring construct using backward selection. Results Among 1,189 patients deemed by their treating physicians as having reasonable 1 year life expectancy, 62 patients died within 1 year of ICD implantation. The risk score, comprised of 6 clinical factors (age ≥75 years, New York Heart Association class III/IV, atrial fibrillation, eGFR <30mL/min/1.73m2, diabetes, and use of diuretics), had good discrimination (AUC=0.77) for 1-year mortality. Addition of 3 biomarkers (TNF-αRII, pro-BNP, and cTnT) further improved model discrimination to 0.82. Patients with 0-1, 2-3, 4-6, or 7-9 risk factors had 1-year mortality rates of 0.8%, 2.7%, 16.1% and 46.2%, respectively. Conclusions Individuals with more co-morbidities and elevations of specific serum biomarkers were at increased risk for all-cause mortality despite being deemed as having reasonable 1 year life expectancy. A simple risk score comprised of readily available clinical data and serum biomarkers may better identify patients at high risk of early mortality and improve patient selection and counseling for primary prevention ICD therapy. PMID:25446153

  1. A Novel Model of Severe Gallstone Pancreatitis: Murine Pancreatic Duct Ligation Results in Systemic Inflammation and Substantial Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Isaac; Yuan, Zuobiao; Meyerholz, David K.; Twait, Erik; Williard, Deborah E.; Kempuraj, Duraisamy

    2010-01-01

    Background Suitable experimental models of gallstone pancreatitis with systemic inflammation and mortality are limited. We developed a novel murine model of duct-ligation-induced acute pancreatitis associated with multiorgan dysfunction and severe mortality. Methods Laparotomy was done on C57/BL6 mice followed by pancreatic duct (PD) ligation, bile duct (BD) ligation without PD ligation, or sham operation. Results Only mice with PD ligation developed acute pancreatitis and had 100% mortality. Pulmonary compliance was significantly reduced after PD ligation but not BD ligation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid neutrophil count and interleukin-1β concentration, and the plasma creatinine level, were significantly elevated with PD ligation but not BD ligation. Pancreatic nuclear factor κB (p65) and activator protein 1 (c-Jun) were activated within 1 h of PD ligation. Conclusion PD-ligation-induced acute pancreatitis in mice is associated with systemic inflammation, acute lung injury, multiorgan dysfunction and death. The development of this novel model is an exciting and notable advance in the field. PMID:20975317

  2. Mortality risk in a historical cohort of nuclear power plant workers in Germany: results from a second follow-up.

    PubMed

    Merzenich, Hiltrud; Hammer, Gaël P; Tröltzsch, Katrin; Ruecker, Kai; Buncke, Johanna; Fehringer, Franz; Blettner, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Possible health effects of low and protracted doses of ionizing radiation are relevant for persons who are exposed to an occupational context like nuclear industry workers. A historical cohort study was therefore conducted to examine mortality risks following occupational radiation exposure among 4,844 German nuclear power plant workers. This cohort included workers from ten nuclear power plants with an observational period from 1991 until 1997. The results of an enlarged cohort with 8,972 workers from all 17 nuclear power plants in West Germany are now available. During the extended follow-up period from 1991 to 2008, a total of 310 deaths among men were observed. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) from all causes of deaths was estimated at 0.50 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.45-0.56]. A total of 126 deaths due to cancer occurred (SMR = 0.65; 95 % CI 0.51-0.82) and seven deaths due to leukemia (SMR = 1.23; 95 % CI 0.42-2.84). Overall, a reduced mortality compared to the general population of West Germany was observed indicating a healthy worker effect. In the dose-response analysis, no statistically significant risk due to ionizing radiation was seen. The hazard ratio (HR/mSv) for leukemia excluding chronic lymphocytic leukemia was estimated at 1.004 (95 % CI 0.997-1.011). In conclusion, the cohort is small and made up of young workers, most of whom were still employed at the end of the observational period in 2008. Results of the external analysis are difficult to interpret as influenced by a healthy worker effect. In the internal analysis, no excess of risk due to radiation was detected.

  3. Your Child's Development: 1 Year (12 Months)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Year-Old Your Child’s Development: 1 Year (12 Months) KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child’s Development: 1 Year (12 Months) A A A Your little one is now ... THIS TOPIC Your Child's Checkup: 1 Year (12 Months) Your Baby's Growth: 12 Months Your Baby's Hearing, ...

  4. Disparities in road crash mortality among pedestrians using wheelchairs in the USA: results of a capture–recapture analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, John D; Benton, Connor S

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aims to quantify and describe the burden of fatal pedestrian crashes among persons using wheelchairs in the USA from 2006 to 2012. Design The occurrence of fatal pedestrian crashes among pedestrians using wheelchairs was assessed using two-source capture-recapture. Descriptive analysis of fatal crashes was conducted using customary approaches. Setting Two registries were constructed, both of which likely undercounted fatalities among pedestrians who use wheelchairs. The first used data from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System, and the second used a LexisNexis news search. Outcome measures Mortality rate (per 100 000 person-years) and crash-level, driver-level and pedestrian-level characteristics of fatal crashes. Results This study found that, from 2006 to 2012, the mortality rate for pedestrians using wheelchairs was 2.07/100 000 person-years (95% CI 1.60 to 2.54), which was 36% higher than the overall population pedestrian mortality rate (p=0.02). Men's risk was over fivefold higher than women's risk (p<0.001). Compared to the overall population, persons aged 50–64 using wheelchairs had a 38% increased risk (p=0.04), and men who use wheelchairs aged 50–64 had a 75% increased risk over men of the same age in the overall population (p=0.006). Almost half (47.6%; 95% CI 42.8 to 52.5) of fatal crashes occurred in intersections and 38.7% (95% CI 32.0 to 45.0) of intersection crashes occurred at locations without traffic control devices. Among intersection crashes, 47.5% (95% CI 40.6 to 54.5) involved wheelchair users in a crosswalk; no crosswalk was available for 18.3% (95% CI 13.5 to 24.4). Driver failure to yield right-of-way was noted in 21.4% (95% CI 17.7 to 25.7) of crashes, and no crash avoidance manoeuvers were detected in 76.4% (95% CI 71.0 to 81.2). Conclusions Persons who use wheelchairs experience substantial pedestrian mortality disparities calling for behavioural and built environment interventions. PMID:26589426

  5. Antimicrobial Susceptibilities of 1,684 Streptococcus pneumoniae and 2,039 Streptococcus pyogenes Isolates and Their Ecological Relationships: Results of a 1-Year (1998–1999) Multicenter Surveillance Study in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Trallero, E.; Fernández-Mazarrasa, C.; García-Rey, C.; Bouza, E.; Aguilar, L.; García-de-Lomas, J.; Baquero, F.

    2001-01-01

    A nationwide multicenter susceptibility surveillance study which included 1,684 Streptococcus pneumoniae and 2,039 S. pyogenes isolates was carried out over 1 year in order to assess the current resistance patterns for the two most important gram-positive microorganisms responsible for community-acquired infections in Spain. Susceptibility testing was done by a broth microdilution method according to National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards M100-S10 interpretative criteria. For S. pneumoniae, the prevalences of highly resistant strains were 5% for amoxicillin and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid; 7% for cefotaxime; 22% for penicillin; 31% for cefuroxime; 35% for erythromycin, clarithromycin, and azithromycin; and 42% for cefaclor. For S. pyogenes, the prevalence of erythromycin resistance was 20%. Efflux was encountered in 90% of S. pyogenes and 5% of S. pneumoniae isolates that exhibited erythromycin resistance. Erythromycin resistance was associated with clarithromycin and azithromycin in both species, regardless of phenotype. Despite the different nature of the mechanisms of resistance, a positive correlation (r = 0.612) between the two species in the prevalence of erythromycin resistance was found in site-by-site comparisons, suggesting some kind of link with antibiotic consumption. Regarding ciprofloxacin, the MIC was ≥4 μg/ml for 7% of S. pneumoniae and 3.5% of S. pyogenes isolates. Ciprofloxacin resistance (MIC, ≥4 μg/ml) was significantly (P < 0.05) associated with macrolide resistance in both S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae and with penicillin nonsusceptibility in S. pneumoniae. PMID:11709305

  6. Long-term safety and efficacy of once-daily topical brimonidine tartrate gel 0.5% for the treatment of moderate to severe facial erythema of rosacea: results of a 1-year open-label study.

    PubMed

    Moore, Angela; Kempers, Steven; Murakawa, George; Weiss, Jonathan; Tauscher, Amanda; Swinyer, Leonard; Liu, Hong; Leoni, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Once-daily topical brimonidine tartrate (BT) gel 0.5% was shown to be efficacious and safe for the treatment of erythema of rosacea in previous studies including a 4-week treatment phase. In the present 1-year study, we aimed to assess the long-term safety and efficacy of the treatment. Subjects with moderate to severe erythema of rosacea were instructed to apply topical BT gel 0.5% once daily for 12 months. Severity of erythema and adverse events (AEs) were evaluated. Approximately 345 subject years of exposure to BT gel 0.5% was achieved in the study. The incidence of AEs and AEs judged to be related to the study drug was higher at the beginning and decreased over the course of the study. Similar safety profiles were observed between the subjects who had received or not received concomitant therapies for the inflammatory lesions of rosacea. Effect of topical BT gel 0.5% on erythema severity was observed after the first application and the durability of the effect was maintained until the end of the study at month 12, with no tachyphylaxis observed. In conclusion, once-daily topical BT gel 0.5% is safe and consistently effective for the long-term treatment of moderate to severe erythema of rosacea, even in the presence of concomitant therapies for the inflammatory lesions of rosacea.

  7. [Age, marital status, fecundity and mortality of the population of Colombia: demographic results of the National Household Survey, June 1978].

    PubMed

    1980-06-01

    This paper presents the results of the National Household Survey conducted in Colombia in June 1978, which covered about 0.2% of the total population, and which interviewed 60,000 people in rural and in urban areas. Main findings were: 1) a decrease in the percentage of the population aged 0-4, and 5-9, as compared to the population aged 10-14; 2) a decrease in the number of live births, especially in young women; and, 3) average parity per woman was 3.7, a decrease of 12% since 1976. Crude birth rate was measured to be 27.4/1000, while it was 31.1/1000 in 1976. Life expectancy was estimated to be 65.1 for women, and 55.1 for men, much too low to be acceptable, and possibly caused by wrong information given to interviewers. Total mortality was 6.7/1000, too low to be acceptable, while infant mortality was 69/1000.

  8. Acute Effects of Ambient Particulate Matter on Mortality in Europe and North America: Results from the APHENA Study

    PubMed Central

    Samoli, Evangelia; Peng, Roger; Ramsay, Tim; Pipikou, Marina; Touloumi, Giota; Dominici, Francesca; Burnett, Rick; Cohen, Aaron; Krewski, Daniel; Samet, Jon; Katsouyanni, Klea

    2008-01-01

    Background The APHENA (Air Pollution and Health: A Combined European and North American Approach) study is a collaborative analysis of multicity time-series data on the effect of air pollution on population health, bringing together data from the European APHEA (Air Pollution and Health: A European Approach) and U.S. NMMAPS (National Morbidity, Mortality and Air Pollution Study) projects, along with Canadian data. Objectives The main objective of APHENA was to assess the coherence of the findings of the multicity studies carried out in Europe and North America, when analyzed with a common protocol, and to explore sources of possible heterogeneity. We present APHENA results on the effects of particulate matter (PM) ≤ 10 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10) on the daily number of deaths for all ages and for those < 75 and ≥ 75 years of age. We explored the impact of potential environmental and socioeconomic factors that may modify this association. Methods In the first stage of a two-stage analysis, we used Poisson regression models, with natural and penalized splines, to adjust for seasonality, with various degrees of freedom. In the second stage, we used meta-regression approaches to combine time-series results across cites and to assess effect modification by selected ecologic covariates. Results Air pollution risk estimates were relatively robust to different modeling approaches. Risk estimates from Europe and United States were similar, but those from Canada were substantially higher. The combined effect of PM10 on all-cause mortality across all ages for cities with daily air pollution data ranged from 0.2% to 0.6% for a 10-μg/m3 increase in ambient PM10 concentration. Effect modification by other pollutants and climatic variables differed in Europe and the United States. In both of these regions, a higher proportion of older people and higher unemployment were associated with increased air pollution risk. Conclusions Estimates of the increased mortality

  9. Applying the sisterhood method for estimating maternal mortality to a health facility-based sample: a comparison with results from a household-based sample.

    PubMed

    Danel, I; Graham, W; Stupp, P; Castillo, P

    1996-10-01

    Researchers compared maternal mortality estimates using the sisterhood method in a household survey conducted in November 1991 and in an outpatient health facility survey conducted in July 1992. Both surveys were conducted in Region I, a predominantly rural, mountainous area in northern Nicaragua. They analyzed data from 9232 interviews with adults younger than 49. The estimated lifetime risk of maternal death and the corresponding maternal mortality ratio were essentially identical for both the household and health facility surveys (0.145 and 0.144 [i.e., 1 in 69 of reproductive age died due to pregnancy-related events] and 243 and 241/100,000 live births, respectively). The estimates were similar for both surveys, even when the results were standardized for age, residence, and socioeconomic characteristics. An important limitation to the sisterhood method of estimating maternal mortality is that it estimates maternal mortality for a period about 10-12 years before the study and therefore cannot be used to assess the immediate effect of interventions to reduce maternal mortality. Nevertheless, in areas with poor maternal mortality surveillance or where no alternative exists to collecting population-based data, the sisterhood method can reliably estimate maternal mortality. These findings suggest that health facilities-based studies using the sisterhood method is a feasible, low-cost, and efficient method to estimate maternal mortality in certain settings at subnational levels.

  10. Can We Understand Why Cognitive Function Predicts Mortality? Results from the Caerphilly Prospective Study (CaPS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallacher, John; Bayer, Anthony; Dunstan, Frank; Yarnell, John; Elwood, Peter; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav

    2009-01-01

    The association between cognitive function and mortality is of increasing interest. We followed 1870 men aged 55-69 years at cognitive assessment for 16 years to establish associations with all case and cause specific mortality. Cognitive assessment included AH4, 4 choice reaction time (used as estimates of mid-life cognition) and the National…

  11. Assessing the potential impacts to riparian ecosystems resulting from hemlock mortality in Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Scott W; Tankersley, Roger; Orvis, Kenneth H

    2009-08-01

    Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Adelges tsugae) is spreading across forests in eastern North America, causing mortality of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis [L.] Carr.) and Carolina hemlock (Tsuga caroliniana Engelm.). The loss of hemlock from riparian forests in Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP) may result in significant physical, chemical, and biological alterations to stream environments. To assess the influence of riparian hemlock stands on stream conditions and estimate possible impacts from hemlock loss in GSMNP, we paired hardwood- and hemlock-dominated streams to examine differences in water temperature, nitrate concentrations, pH, discharge, and available photosynthetic light. We used a Geographic Information System (GIS) to identify stream pairs that were similar in topography, geology, land use, and disturbance history in order to isolate forest type as a variable. Differences between hemlock- and hardwood-dominated streams could not be explained by dominant forest type alone as forest type yields no consistent signal on measured conditions of headwater streams in GSMNP. The variability in the results indicate that other landscape variables, such as the influence of understory Rhododendron species, may exert more control on stream conditions than canopy composition. The results of this study suggest that the replacement of hemlock overstory with hardwood species will have minimal impact on long-term stream conditions, however disturbance during the transition is likely to have significant impacts. Management of riparian forests undergoing hemlock decline should, therefore, focus on facilitating a faster transition to hardwood-dominated stands to minimize long-term effects on water quality.

  12. High-Dose Conformal Radiotherapy Reduces Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality: Results of a Meta-analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Viani, Gustavo Arruda; Godoi Bernardes da Silva, Lucas; Stefano, Eduardo Jose

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To determine in a meta-analysis whether prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), biochemical or clinical failure (BCF), and overall mortality (OM) in men with localized prostate cancer treated with conformal high-dose radiotherapy (HDRT) are better than those in men treated with conventional-dose radiotherapy (CDRT). Methods and Materials: The MEDLINE, Embase, CANCERLIT, and Cochrane Library databases, as well as the proceedings of annual meetings, were systematically searched to identify randomized, controlled studies comparing conformal HDRT with CDRT for localized prostate cancer. Results: Five randomized, controlled trials (2508 patients) that met the study criteria were identified. Pooled results from these randomized, controlled trials showed a significant reduction in the incidence of PCSM and BCF rates at 5 years in patients treated with HDRT (p = 0.04 and p < 0.0001, respectively), with an absolute risk reduction (ARR) of PCSM and BCF at 5 years of 1.7% and 12.6%, respectively. Two trials evaluated PCSM with 10 years of follow up. The pooled results from these trials showed a statistical benefit for HDRT in terms of PCSM (p = 0.03). In the subgroup analysis, trials that used androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) showed an ARR for BCF of 12.9% (number needed to treat = 7.7, p < 0.00001), whereas trials without ADT had an ARR of 13.6% (number needed to treat = 7, p < 0.00001). There was no difference in the OM rate at 5 and 10 years (p = 0.99 and p = 0.11, respectively) between the groups receiving HDRT and CDRT. Conclusions: This meta-analysis is the first study to show that HDRT is superior to CDRT in preventing disease progression and prostate cancer-specific death in trials that used conformational technique to increase the total dose. Despite the limitations of our study in evaluating the role of ADT and HDRT, our data show no benefit for HDRT arms in terms of BCF in trials with or without ADT.

  13. Analysis of Environmental Issues Related to Small-Scale Hydroelectric Development IV: Fish Mortality Resulting From Turbine Passage

    SciTech Connect

    Turbak, Susan C.; Reichle, Donna R.; Shriner, Carole R.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide summary information for use by potential developers and regulators of small-scale hydroelectric projects (defined as existing dams that can be retrofitted to a total site capacity of ≤30 MW), where turbine-related mortality of fish is a potential issue affecting site-specific development. Mitigation techniques for turbine-related mortality are not covered in this report.

  14. Vitamin D, PTH and the risk of overall and disease-specific mortality: Results of the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam.

    PubMed

    El Hilali, Jamila; de Koning, Elisa J; van Ballegooijen, Adriana J; Lips, Paul; Sohl, Evelien; van Marwijk, Harm W J; Visser, Marjolein; van Schoor, Natasja M

    2016-11-01

    Observational studies suggest that low concentrations of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and high concentrations of parathyroid hormone (PTH) are associated with a higher risk of mortality. The aim of this study was to examine whether 25(OH)D and PTH concentrations are independently associated with overall and disease-specific (cardiovascular and cancer-related) mortality in a large, prospective population-based cohort of older adults. Data from 1317 men and women (65-85 years) of the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam were used. Cox proportional hazard analyses were used to examine whether 25(OH)D and PTH at baseline were associated with overall mortality (with a follow-up of 18 years) and disease-specific mortality (with a follow-up of 13 years). Compared to persons in the reference category of ≥75nmol/L, persons with serum 25(OH)D <25nmol/L (HR 1.46; 95% CI: 1.12-1.91) and 25-49.9nmol/L (HR 1.24; 95% CI: 1.01-1.53) had a significantly higher risk of overall mortality, as well as men with baseline PTH concentrations ≥7pmol/L (HR 2.54 (95% CI: 1.58-4.08)), compared to the reference category of <2.33pmol/L. The relationship of 25(OH)D with overall mortality was partly mediated by PTH. Furthermore, men with PTH concentrations of ≥7pmol/L (HR 3.22; 95% CI: 1.40-7.42) had a higher risk of cardiovascular mortality, compared to the reference category. No significant associations of 25(OH)D or PTH with cancer-related mortality were observed. Both 25(OH)D and PTH should be considered as important health markers.

  15. [Oral rehydration therapy: an analysis of its results and impact on the hospitalization and mortality of children with diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Dohi-Fujii, B; Godoy-Olvera, L M; Durazo-Ortíz, J

    1993-11-01

    We present results of four years in oral rehydration therapy (ORT) in the Hospital Infantil del Estado de Sonora. There was 10.2 consults by diarrhoea for day. Children lower of one year old received oral rehydration therapy in 86.8%, were included 11% of prolonged diarrhoea and 32.3% of children with malnutrition. During the procedure diarrhoea there was complicated in 3% with paralytic ileus sepsis and pneumonia. Effectivity of ORT was in 90.9%; 92.8% in light dehydration and 78.7% moderate. Failure in 8.6% was due to vomitus, no acceptation of the oral solution, abundant evacuations and other complication presented. Were observed reduction in hospitalization, rate of 19.2% in 1986 to 38.4% in 1989. The diarrheal mortality decreased in the Urgence Department in 42% and in the Infectology Department in 54%. We considered these results as satisfactory, but are susceptible to better when we diffuse more the oral rehydration therapy in own region.

  16. Hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer mortality in Swedish women: results after adjustment for 'healthy drug-user' effect.

    PubMed

    Yuen, J; Persson, I; Bergkvist, L; Hoover, R; Schairer, C; Adami, H O

    1993-07-01

    No change of breast cancer mortality has been reported previously after long-term hormone replacement therapy. A conceivable explanation for the apparent discrepancy between incidence and mortality may be selection bias due to lower prevalence of breast cancer in women who receive replacement hormones, compared with nonexposed women. We used a new approach to correct for bias due to this 'healthy drug-user effect,' by adjusting the external, population-based, mortality rates for such cases prevalent during the recruitment period of our cohort. In this cohort of some 23,000 Swedish women, who were prescribed various hormone replacement regimens, breast cancer mortality was analyzed after follow-up to 12 years. External analyses revealed overall standardized mortality ratios for breast cancer rising from 0.71 to 0.81, but not significantly different from unity, after adjustment procedures. In multivariate regression models, excluding prevalent cases in the cohort, women prescribed estradiol, conjugated estrogens, or an estrogen-progestin combination were not at a higher risk relative to those given other and weak estrogens, relative risks being 0.81 and 0.68, respectively. On the basis of the present analytical approach, we conclude that breast cancer mortality does not appear to be changed overall or in subgroups, despite increased incidence.

  17. Social determinants of child mortality in Niger: Results from the 2012 National Verbal and Social Autopsy Study

    PubMed Central

    Koffi, Alain K; Maina, Abdou; Yaroh, Asma Gali; Habi, Oumarou; Bensaïd, Khaled; Kalter, Henry D

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding the determinants of preventable deaths of children under the age of five is important for accelerated annual declines – even as countries achieve the UN’s Millennium Development Goals and the target date of 2015 has been reached. While research has documented the extent and nature of the overall rapid decline in child mortality in Niger, there is less clear evidence to provide insight into the contributors to such deaths. This issue is the central focus of this paper. Methods We analyzed a nationally representative cross–sectional sample of 620 child deaths from the 2012 Niger Verbal Autopsy/Social Autopsy (VASA) Survey. We conducted a descriptive analysis of the data on preventive and curative care, guided by the coverage of proven indicators along the continuum of well child care and illness recognition and care–seeking for child illnesses encompassed by the BASICS/CDC Pathway to Survival model. Results Six hundred twenty deaths of children (1–59 months of age) were confirmed from the VASA survey. The majority of these children lived in households with precarious socio–economic conditions. Among the 414 children whose fatal illnesses began at age 0–23 months, just 24.4% were appropriately fed. About 24% of children aged 12–59 months were fully immunized. Of 601 children tracked through the Pathway to Survival, 62.4% could reach the first health care provider after about 67 minutes travel time. Of the 306 children who left the first health care provider alive, 161 (52.6%) were not referred for further care nor received any home care recommendations, and just 19% were referred to a second provider. About 113 of the caregivers reported cost (35%), distance (35%) and lack of transport (30%) as constraints to care–seeking at a health facility. Conclusion Despite Niger’s recent major achievements in reducing child mortality, the following determinants are crucial to continue building on the gains the country has made

  18. Improvement in Growth After 1 Year of Growth Hormone Therapy in Well-Nourished Infants with Growth Retardation Secondary to Chronic Renal Failure: Results of a Multicenter, Controlled, Randomized, Open Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, M. Llanos; Neto, Arlete; Ariceta, Gema; Vara, Julia; Alonso, Angel; Bueno, Alberto; Afonso, Alberto Caldas; Correia, António Jorge; Muley, Rafael; Barrios, Vicente; Gómez, Carlos; Argente, Jesús

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Our aim was to evaluate the growth-promoting effect of growth hormone (GH) treatment in infants with chronic renal failure (CRF) and persistent growth retardation despite adequate nutritional and metabolic management. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: The study design included randomized, parallel groups in an open, multicenter trial comparing GH (0.33 mg/kg per wk) with nontreatment with GH during 12 months. Sixteen infants who had growth retardation, were aged 12 ± 3 months, had CRF (GFR ≤60 ml/min per 1.73 m2), and had adequate nutritional intake and good metabolic control were recruited from eight pediatric nephrology departments from Spain and Portugal. Main outcome measures were body length, body weight, bone age, biochemical and hormonal analyses, renal function, bone mass, and adverse effects. Results: Length gain in infants who were treated with GH was statistically greater (P < 0.05) than that of nontreated children (14.5 versus 9.5 cm/yr; SD score 1.43 versus −0.11). The GH-induced stimulation of growth was associated with no undesirable effects on bone maturation, renal failure progression, or metabolic control. In addition, GH treatment improved forearm bone mass and increased serum concentrations of total and free IGF-I and IGF-binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), whereas IGF-II, IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2, GH-binding protein, ghrelin, and leptin were not modified. Conclusions: Infants with CRF and growth retardation despite good metabolic and nutritional control benefit from GH treatment without adverse effects during 12 months of therapy. PMID:20522533

  19. Candle Flames in Microgravity: USML-1 Results - 1 Year Later

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, H. D.; Dietrich, D. L.; Tien, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    We report on the sustained behavior of a candle flame in microgravity determined in the glovebox facility aboard the First United States Microgravity Labomtofy. In a quiescent, microgmvjfy environment, diffusive transport becomes the dominant mode of heat and mass transfer; whether the diffusive transport rate is fast enough to sustain low-gravity candle flames in air was unknown to this series of about 70 tests. After an initial transient in which soot is observed, the microgravity candle flame in air becomes and remains hemispherical and blue (apparently soot-Ne) with a large flame standoff distance. Near flame extinction, spontaneous flame oscillations are regularly observed; these are explained as a flashback of flame through a premixed combustible gas followed by a retreat owed to flame quenching. The frequency of oscillations can be related to diffusive transport rates, and not to residual buoyant convective flow. The fact that the flame tip is the last point of the flame to survive suggests that it is the location of maximum fuel reactivity; this is unlike normal gravity, where the location of maximum fuel reactivity is the flame base. The flame color, size, and shape behaved in a quasi-steady manner; the finite size of the glovebox, combined with the restricted passages of the candlebox, inhibited the observation of true steady-state burning. Nonetheless, through calculations, and inference from the series of shuttle tests, if is concluded that a candle can burn indefinitely in a large enough ambient of air in microgravity. After igniting one candle, a second candle in close pximity could not be lit. This may be due to wax coating the wick and/or local oxygen depletion around the second, unlit candle. Post-mission testing suggests that simultaneous ignition may overcome these behaviors and enable both candles to be ignited.

  20. Analysis of environmental issues related to small-scale hydroelectric development IV: fish mortality resulting from turbine passage

    SciTech Connect

    Turbak, S. C.; Reichle, D. R.; Shriner, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    This document presents a state-of-the-art review of literature concerning turbine-related fish mortality. The review discusses conventional and, to a lesser degree, pumped-storage (reversible) hydroelectric facilities. Much of the research on conventional facilities discussed in this report deals with studies performed in the Pacific Northwest and covers both prototype and model studies. Research conducted on Kaplan and Francis turbines during the 1950s and 1960s has been extensively reviewed and is discussed. Very little work on turbine-related fish mortality has been undertaken with newer turbine designs developed for more modern small-scale hydropower facilities; however, one study on a bulb unit (Kaplan runner) has recently been released. In discussing turbine-related fish mortality at pumped-storage facilities, much of the literature relates to the Ludington Pumped Storage Power Plant. As such, it is used as the principal facility in discussing research concerning pumped storage.

  1. Wire Marking Results in a Small but Significant Reduction in Avian Mortality at Power Lines: A BACI Designed Study

    PubMed Central

    Barrientos, Rafael; Ponce, Carlos; Palacín, Carlos; Martín, Carlos A.; Martín, Beatriz; Alonso, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Background Collision with electric power lines is a conservation problem for many bird species. Although the implementation of flight diverters is rapidly increasing, few well-designed studies supporting the effectiveness of this costly conservation measure have been published. Methodology/Principal Findings We provide information on the largest worldwide marking experiment to date, including carcass searches at 35 (15 experimental, 20 control) power lines totalling 72.5 km, at both transmission (220 kV) and distribution (15 kV–45 kV) lines. We found carcasses of 45 species, 19 of conservation concern. Numbers of carcasses found were corrected to account for carcass losses due to removal by scavengers or being overlooked by researchers, resulting in an estimated collision rate of 8.2 collisions per km per month. We observed a small (9.6%) but significant decrease in the number of casualties after line marking compared to before line marking in experimental lines. This was not observed in control lines. We found no influence of either marker size (large vs. small spirals, sample of distribution lines only) or power line type (transmission vs. distribution, sample of large spirals only) on the collision rate when we analyzed all species together. However, great bustard mortality was slightly lower when lines were marked with large spirals and in transmission lines after marking. Conclusions Our results confirm the overall effectiveness of wire marking as a way to reduce, but not eliminate, bird collisions with power lines. If raw field data are not corrected by carcass losses due to scavengers and missed observations, findings may be biased. The high cost of this conservation measure suggests a need for more studies to improve its application, including wire marking with non-visual devices. Our findings suggest that different species may respond differently to marking, implying that species-specific patterns should be explored, at least for species of conservation

  2. Mortality and morbidity during and after Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial: results by sex.

    PubMed

    Oparil, Suzanne; Davis, Barry R; Cushman, William C; Ford, Charles E; Furberg, Curt D; Habib, Gabriel B; Haywood, L Julian; Margolis, Karen; Probstfield, Jeffrey L; Whelton, Paul K; Wright, Jackson T

    2013-05-01

    To determine whether an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (lisinopril) or calcium channel blocker (amlodipine) is superior to a diuretic (chlorthalidone) in reducing cardiovascular disease incidence in sex subgroups, we carried out a prespecified subgroup analysis of 15 638 women and 17 719 men in the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT). Total follow-up (active treatment + passive surveillance using national administrative databases to ascertain deaths and hospitalizations) was 8 to 13 years. The primary outcome was fatal coronary heart disease or nonfatal myocardial infarction. Secondary outcomes included all-cause mortality, stroke, combined cardiovascular disease (coronary heart disease death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, stroke, angina, coronary revascularization, heart failure [HF], or peripheral vascular disease), and end-stage renal disease. In-trial rates of HF, stroke, and combined cardiovascular disease were significantly higher for lisinopril compared with chlorthalidone, and rates of HF were significantly higher for amlodipine compared with chlorthalidone in both men and women. There were no significant treatment sex interactions. These findings did not persist through the extension period with the exception of the HF result for amlodipine versus chlorthalidone, which did not differ significantly by sex. For both women and men, rates were not lower in the amlodipine or lisinopril groups than in the chlorthalidone group for either the primary coronary heart disease outcome or any other cardiovascular disease outcome, and chlorthalidone-based treatment resulted in the lowest risk of HF. Neither lisinopril nor amlodipine is superior to chlorthalidone for initial treatment of hypertension in either women or men. Clinical Trial Registration- clinicaltrials.gov; Identifier: NCT00000542.

  3. Incident Subjective Cognitive Decline Does Not Predict Mortality in the Elderly – Results from the Longitudinal German Study on Ageing, Cognition, and Dementia (AgeCoDe)

    PubMed Central

    Roehr, Susanne; Luck, Tobias; Heser, Kathrin; Fuchs, Angela; Ernst, Annette; Wiese, Birgitt; Werle, Jochen; Bickel, Horst; Brettschneider, Christian; Koppara, Alexander; Pentzek, Michael; Lange, Carolin; Prokein, Jana; Weyerer, Siegfried; Mösch, Edelgard; König, Hans-Helmut; Maier, Wolfgang; Scherer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Subjective cognitive decline (SCD) might represent the first symptomatic representation of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), which is associated with increased mortality. Only few studies, however, have analyzed the association of SCD and mortality, and if so, based on prevalent cases. Thus, we investigated incident SCD in memory and mortality. Methods Data were derived from the German AgeCoDe study, a prospective longitudinal study on the epidemiology of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia in primary care patients over 75 years covering an observation period of 7.5 years. We used univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses to examine the relationship of SCD and mortality. Further, we estimated survival times by the Kaplan Meier method and case-fatality rates with regard to SCD. Results Among 971 individuals without objective cognitive impairment, 233 (24.0%) incidentally expressed SCD at follow-up I. Incident SCD was not significantly associated with increased mortality in the univariate (HR = 1.0, 95% confidence interval = 0.8–1.3, p = .90) as well as in the multivariate analysis (HR = 0.9, 95% confidence interval = 0.7–1.2, p = .40). The same applied for SCD in relation to concerns. Mean survival time with SCD was 8.0 years (SD = 0.1) after onset. Conclusion Incident SCD in memory in individuals with unimpaired cognitive performance does not predict mortality. The main reason might be that SCD does not ultimately lead into future cognitive decline in any case. However, as prevalence studies suggest, subjectively perceived decline in non-memory cognitive domains might be associated with increased mortality. Future studies may address mortality in such other cognitive domains of SCD in incident cases. PMID:26766555

  4. Impact of physical function impairment and multimorbidity on mortality among community-living older persons with sarcopaenia: results from the ilSIRENTE prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Landi, Francesco; Calvani, Riccardo; Tosato, Matteo; Martone, Anna Maria; Bernabei, Roberto; Onder, Graziano; Marzetti, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    Objective Sarcopaenia and physical function impairment may have a greater effect on survival than other clinical characteristics, including multimorbidity. In this study, we evaluated the impact of sarcopaenia on all-cause mortality and the interaction among muscle loss, physical function impairment and multimorbidity on mortality risk over 10 years in older community-dwellers. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Population-based study. Participants All persons aged 80+ years living in the community in the Sirente geographic area (L'Aquila, Italy) (n=364). Participants were categorised in the sarcopaenic or non-sarcopaenic group based on the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People criteria. Primary and secondary outcome measures (1) All-cause mortality over 10 years according to the presence of sarcopaenia and (2) impact of physical function impairment, assessed using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), and multimorbidity on 10-year mortality risk in persons with sarcopaenia. Results Sarcopaenia was identified in 103 participants (29.1%). A total of 253 deaths were recorded over 10 years: 90 among sarcopaenic participants (87.4%) and 162 among non-sarcopaenic persons (65.1%; p<0.001). Participants with sarcopaenia had a higher risk of death than those without sarcopaenia (HR=2.15; 95% CI 1.02 to 4.54). When examining the effect of sarcopaenia and physical function impairment on mortality, participants with low physical performance levels showed greater mortality. Conversely, the mortality risk was unaffected by multimorbidity. Conclusions Our findings show that physical function impairment, but not multimorbidity, is predictive of mortality in older community-dwellers with sarcopaenia. Hence, in sarcopaenic older persons, interventions against functional decline may be more effective at preventing or postponing negative health outcomes than those targeting multimorbidity. PMID:27456324

  5. Mortality Associated with Night and Weekend Admissions to ICU with On-Site Intensivist Coverage: Results of a Nine-Year Cohort Study (2006-2014)

    PubMed Central

    Brunot, Vincent; Landreau, Liliane; Corne, Philippe; Platon, Laura; Besnard, Noémie; Buzançais, Aurèle; Daubin, Delphine; Serre, Jean Emmanuel; Molinari, Nicolas; Klouche, Kada

    2016-01-01

    Background The association between mortality and time of admission to ICU has been extensively studied but remains controversial. We revaluate the impact of time of admission on ICU mortality by retrospectively investigating a recent (2006–2014) and large ICU cohort with on-site intensivist coverage. Patients and Methods All adults (≥ 18 years) admitted to a tertiary care medical ICU were included in the study. Patients' characteristics, medical management, and mortality were prospectively collected. Patients were classified according to their admission time: week working days on- and off-hours, and weekends. ICU mortality was the primary outcome and adjusted Hazard-ratios (HR) of death were analysed by multivariate Cox model. Results 2,428 patients were included: age 62±18 years; male: 1,515 (62%); and median SAPSII score: 38 (27–52). Overall ICU mortality rate was 13.7%. Admissions to ICU occurred during open-hours in 680 cases (28%), during night-time working days in 1,099 cases (45%) and during weekends in 649 cases (27%). Baseline characteristics of patients were similar between groups except that patients admitted during the second part of night (00:00 to 07:59) have a significantly higher SAPS II score than others. ICU mortality was comparable between patients admitted during different time periods but was significantly higher for those admitted during the second part of the night. Multivariate analysis showed however that admission during weeknights and weekends was not associated with an increased ICU mortality as compared with open-hours admissions. Conclusion Time of admission, especially weeknight and weekend (off-hour admissions), did not influence the prognosis of ICU patients. The higher illness severity of patients admitted during the second part of the night (00:00–07:59) may explain the observed increased mortality. PMID:28033395

  6. Varicella paediatric hospitalisations in Belgium: a 1-year national survey

    PubMed Central

    Blumental, Sophie; Sabbe, Martine; Lepage, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background Varicella universal vaccination (UV) has been implemented in many countries for several years. Nevertheless, varicella UV remains debated in Europe and few data are available on the real burden of infection. We assessed the burden of varicella in Belgium through analysis of hospitalised cases during a 1-year period. Methods Data on children admitted to hospital with varicella were collected through a national network from November 2011 to October 2012. Inclusion criteria were either acute varicella or related complications up to 3 weeks after the rash. Results Participation of 101 hospitals was obtained, covering 97.7% of the total paediatric beds in Belgium. 552 children were included with a median age of 2.1 years. Incidence of paediatric varicella hospitalisations reached 29.5/105 person-years, with the highest impact among those 0–4 years old (global incidence and odds of hospitalisation: 79/105 person-years and 1.6/100 varicella cases, respectively). Only 14% (79/552) of the cohort had an underlying chronic condition. 65% (357/552) of children had ≥1 complication justifying their admission, 49% were bacterial superinfections and 10% neurological disorders. Only a quarter of children (141/552) received acyclovir. Incidence of complicated hospitalised cases was 19/105 person-years. Paediatric intensive care unit admission and surgery were required in 4% and 3% of hospitalised cases, respectively. Mortality among Belgian paediatric population was 0.5/106 and fatality ratio 0.2% among our cohort. Conclusions Varicella demonstrated a substantial burden of disease in Belgian children, especially among the youngest. Our thorough nationwide study, run in a country without varicella UV, offers data to support varicella UV in Belgium. PMID:26130380

  7. Prediction of cancer and coronary heart disease mortality by means of a personality inventory: results of a 15-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Eysenck, H J

    1993-04-01

    This paper reports on the 1982-1986 follow-up of two samples of healthy persons first studied in 1972 and followed up in 1982 when mortality and cause of death were established (N = 2,146). Both were related to stress and personality type according to clearly elaborated theories, and results were very much in accordance with theory. The second follow-up was instigated to answer criticisms of the first study and to test whether results would still support the theories involved. The data support the previous results strongly and show that psychosocial data can predict with considerable accuracy mortality and cause of death over 14 years ahead.

  8. The American Cancer Society challenge goal to reduce US cancer mortality by 50% between 1990 and 2015: Results and reflections.

    PubMed

    Byers, Tim; Wender, Richard C; Jemal, Ahmedin; Baskies, Arnold M; Ward, Elizabeth E; Brawley, Otis W

    2016-09-01

    In 1996, the Board of Directors of the American Cancer Society (ACS) challenged the United States to reduce what looked to be possible peak cancer mortality in 1990 by 50% by the year 2015. This analysis examines the trends in cancer mortality across this 25-year challenge period from 1990 to 2015. In 2015, cancer death rates were 26% lower than in 1990 (32% lower among men and 22% lower among women). The 50% reduction goal was more fully met for the cancer sites for which there was enactment of effective approaches for prevention, early detection, and/or treatment. Among men, mortality rates dropped for lung cancer by 45%, for colorectal cancer by 47%, and for prostate cancer by 53%. Among women, mortality rates dropped for lung cancer by 8%, for colorectal cancer by 44%, and for breast cancer by 39%. Declines in the death rates of all other cancer sites were substantially smaller (13% among men and 17% among women). The major factors that accounted for these favorable trends were progress in tobacco control and improvements in early detection and treatment. As we embark on new national cancer goals, this recent past experience should teach us that curing the cancer problem will require 2 sets of actions: making new discoveries in cancer therapeutics and more completely applying those discoveries in cancer prevention we have already made. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:359-369. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  9. Sex Differences in Stroke Incidence, Prevalence, Mortality and DALYs: Results from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013

    PubMed Central

    Barker-Collo, Suzanne L.; Bennett, Derrick A.; Krishnamurthi, Rita; Parmar, Priya; Feigin, Valery L; Naghavi, Mohsen; Forouzanfar, Mohammad H.; Johnson, Catherine; Nguyen, Grant; Mensah, George A.; Vos, Theo; Murray, Christopher; Roth, Gregory A.; Abd-Allah, Foad; Abera, Semaw Ferede; Akinyemi, Rufus, O.; Bahit, Cecilia; Banerjee, Amitava; Basu, Sanjay; Brainin, Michael; Bornstein, Natan M.; Caso, Valeria; Catalá-López, Ferrán; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Christensen, Hanne; Colomar, Merceded; Davis, Stephen; deVeber, Gabrielle; Dharmaratne, Samath D.; Donnan, Geoffrey; Dorairaj, Prabhakaran; Dokova, Klara; Endres, Matthias; Fernandes, Jefferson G; Geleijnse, J. Marianne; Gillum, Richard F.; Giroud, Maurice; Guohong, Jiang; Hamadeh, Randah R.; Hankey, Graeme J.; Jeemon, Panniyammakal; Jin, Kim Yun; Jonas, Jost B.; Kalkonde, Yogesh; Kengne, Andre P; Kim, Daniel; Kissela, Brett M.; Kokubo, Yoshihiro; Lavados, Pablo; Lindsay, Patrice; Lotufo, Paulo A; Mackay, Mark T.; Malekzadeh, Reza; Mehndiratta, Man Mohan; Nand, Devina; Norrving, Bo; Pandian, Jeyaraj Durai; Perkins, Harry; Pourmalek, Farshad; Ricci, Stefano; Riccio, Patricia M.; Rojas-Rueda, David; Roy, Nobhojit; Sacco, Ralph, L.; Sahathevan, Ramesh; Sheth, Kevin N.; Shiue, Ivy; Sposato, Luciano A.; Tanne, David; Thrift, Amanda; Thurston, George; Tirschwell, David; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Vlassov, Vasiliy; Westerman, Ronny; Wolfe, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Background Accurate information on stroke burden in men and women are important for evidence-based health care planning and resource allocation. Previously, limited research suggested that the absolute number of deaths from stroke in women was greater than in men, but the incidence and mortality rates were greater in men. However, sex differences in various metrics of stroke burden on a global scale have not been a subject of comprehensive and comparable assessment for most regions of the world, nor have sex differences in stroke burden been examined for trends over time. Methods Stroke incidence, prevalence, mortality, disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) and healthy years lost due to disability (YLDs) were estimated as part of the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2013 Study. Data inputs included all available information on stroke incidence, prevalence, and death and case fatality rates. Analysis was performed separately by sex and 5-year age categories for 188 countries. Statistical models were employed to produce globally comprehensive results over time. All rates were age-standardized to a global population and 95% uncertainty intervals (UI) were computed. Findings In 2013 global ischaemic stroke (IS) and haemorrhagic stroke (HS) incidence (per 100 000) in men (IS 132.77 [95% UI, 125.34-142.77]; HS 64.89 [95% UI 59.82-68.85]) exceeded those of women (IS 98.85 [95%UI, 92.11 - 106.62]; HS 45.48 [95% UI, 42.43-48.53]). IS incidence rates were lower in 2013 compared with 1990 rates for both sexes (1990 male IS incidence 147.40 [95% UI, 137.87-157-66]; 1990 female IS incidence 113.31 [95%UI, 103.52 – 123.40]), but the only significant change in IS incidence was among women. Changes in global HS incidence were not statistically significant for males (1990 = 65.31 [95% UI, 61.63 – 69.0], 2013 = 64.89[95% UI, 59.82-68.85]), but was significant for females (1990= 64.892 [95% UI, 59.82-68.85], 2013= 45.48 [95% UI, 42.427-48.53]). The number of DALYs related to IS

  10. Comparing modelled predictions of neonatal mortality impacts using LiST with observed results of community-based intervention trials in South Asia

    PubMed Central

    Friberg, Ingrid K; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Darmstadt, Gary L; Bang, Abhay; Cousens, Simon; Baqui, Abdullah H; Kumar, Vishwajeet; Walker, Neff; Lawn, Joy E

    2010-01-01

    Background There is an increasing body of evidence from trials suggesting that major reductions in neonatal mortality are possible through community-based interventions. Since these trials involve packages of varying content, determining how much of the observed mortality reduction is due to specific interventions is problematic. The Lives Saved Tool (LiST) is designed to facilitate programmatic prioritization by modelling mortality reductions related to increasing coverage of specific interventions which may be combined into packages. Methods To assess the validity of LiST outputs, we compared predictions generated by LiST with observed neonatal mortality reductions in trials of packages which met inclusion criteria but were not used as evidence inputs for LiST. Results Four trials, all from South Asia, met the inclusion criteria. The neonatal mortality rate (NMR) predicted by LiST matched the observed rate very closely in two effectiveness-type trials. LiST predicted NMR reduction was close (absolute difference <5/1000 live births) in a third study. The NMR at the end of the fourth study (Shivgarh, India) was overestimated by 39% or 16/1000 live births. Conclusions These results suggest that LiST is a reasonably reliable tool for use by policymakers to prioritize interventions to reduce neonatal deaths, at least in South Asia and where empirical data are unavailable. Reasons for the underestimated reduction in one trial likely include the inability of LiST to model all effective interventions. PMID:20348113

  11. Cumulative Resting Heart Rate Exposure and Risk of All-Cause Mortality: Results from the Kailuan Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Quanhui; Li, Haibin; Wang, Anxin; Guo, Jin; Yu, Junxing; Luo, Yanxia; Chen, Shuohua; Tao, Lixin; Li, Yuqing; Li, Aiping; Guo, Xiuhua; Wu, Shouling

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between cumulative exposure to resting heart rate (cumRHR) and mortality remain unclear in the general population. In the Kailuan cohort study, resting heart rate (RHR) was repeatedly measured at baseline and at years 2 and 4 by electrocardiogram among 47,311 adults aged 48.70 ± 11.68. The cumRHR was defined as the summed average RHR between two consecutive examinations multiplied by the time interval between with two examinations [(beats/min) * year]. A higher RHR was defined as ≥80 beats/min, and the number of visits with a higher RHR was counted. During a median of 4.06 years of follow-up, a total of 1,025 participants died. After adjusting for major traditional cardiovascular risk factors and baseline RHR, the hazard ratio for the highest versus lowest quartile of cumRHR was 1.39 (95% CI: 1.07–1.81) for all-cause mortality. Each 1-SD increment in cumRHR was associated with a 37% (HR: 1.37, 95% CI: 1.23–1.52) increased risk of death and displayed a J-shaped relationship. Compared with no exposure, adults who had a higher RHR at all 3 study visits were associated with a 1.86-fold higher risk (95% CI: 1.33–2.61) of mortality. In summary, cumulative exposure to higher RHR is independently associated with an increased risk of mortality. PMID:28067310

  12. Land use mix and five-year mortality in later life: Results from the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-Tzu; Prina, A. Matthew; Jones, Andy; Barnes, Linda E.; Matthews, Fiona E.; Brayne, Carol; MRC CFAS

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the potential modifying effect of age and mediation effect of co-morbidity on the association between land use mix, a measure of neighbourhood walkability, and five-year mortality among the 2424 individuals participating in the year-10 follow-up of the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study in England. Postcodes of participants were mapped onto Lower-layer Super Output Areas, a small area level geographical unit in the UK, and linked to Generalised Land Use data. Cox regression models were fitted to investigate the association. For the younger older age group (75–79 years), the effect of high land use mix on an elevated risk of mortality was mediated by co-morbidity. For older old age groups (80–84, 85+ years), a higher land use mix was directly associated with a 10% lower risk of five-year mortality. The findings suggest differential impacts of land use mix on the health of the younger and older old. PMID:26798962

  13. Cancer mortality among arc welders exposed to fumes containing chromium and nickel. Results of a third follow-up: 1989-1995.

    PubMed

    Becker, N

    1999-04-01

    For the historical follow-up study among arc welders exposed to chromium and nickel, which was started in 1980 in Germany, a third follow-up extending the observation period to the years 1989 through 1995 has been carried out. By 1995, of the 1213 welders and 1688 turners (control group) who were originally included in the study, 274 welders and 448 turners had died. Death certificates could be obtained for approximately 96% of the deceased. Results of the evaluation presented in this article showed that cancer mortality remains significantly increased, compared with the general population and the control group, by approximately 35%. There was an elevation of approximately 50% or 60% in mortality from cancers of the respiratory tract, which is also statistically significant. However, this increase is predominantly due to a large excess in mortality from mesothelioma, which is known to be caused chiefly by asbestos exposure. Lung cancer mortality is nonsignificantly increased by approximately 20% to 30%. An indirect assessment of asbestos-related lung cancers and total cancer indicates that the observed increase of mortality might be mainly due to asbestos exposure. Beyond that, no indication of an elevated cancer risk specifically associated with the exposure to welding fumes containing chromium and nickel could be determined.

  14. Mortality, Morbidity and Health-Seeking Behaviour during the Ebola Epidemic 2014–2015 in Monrovia Results from a Mobile Phone Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kuehne, Anna; Lynch, Emily; Marshall, Esaie; Tiffany, Amanda; Alley, Ian; Bawo, Luke; Massaquoi, Moses; Lodesani, Claudia; Le Vaillant, Philippe; Porten, Klaudia; Gignoux, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Between March 2014 and July 2015 at least 10,500 Ebola cases including more than 4,800 deaths occurred in Liberia, the majority in Monrovia. However, official numbers may have underestimated the size of the outbreak. Closure of health facilities and mistrust in existing structures may have additionally impacted on all-cause morbidity and mortality. To quantify mortality and morbidity and describe health-seeking behaviour in Monrovia, Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) conducted a mobile phone survey from December 2014 to March 2015. We drew a random sample of households in Monrovia and conducted structured mobile phone interviews, covering morbidity, mortality and health-seeking behaviour from 14 May 2014 until the day of the survey. We defined an Ebola-related death as any death meeting the Liberian Ebola case definition. We calculated all-cause and Ebola-specific mortality rates. The sample consisted of 6,813 household members in 905 households. We estimated a crude mortality rate (CMR) of 0.33/10,000 persons/day (95%CI:0.25–0.43) and an Ebola-specific mortality rate of 0.06/10,000 persons/day (95%-CI:0.03–0.11). During the recall period, 17 Ebola cases were reported including those who died. In the 30 days prior to the survey 277 household members were reported sick; malaria accounted for 54% (150/277). Of the sick household members, 43% (122/276) did not visit any health care facility. The mobile phone-based survey was found to be a feasible and acceptable alternative method when data collection in the community is impossible. CMR was estimated well below the emergency threshold of 1/10,000 persons/day. Non-Ebola-related mortality in Monrovia was not higher than previous national estimates of mortality for Liberia. However, excess mortality directly resulting from Ebola did occur in the population. Importantly, the small proportion of sick household members presenting to official health facilities when sick might pose a challenge for future outbreak detection

  15. The EMECAM project: a multicentre study on air pollution and mortality in Spain: combined results for particulates and for sulfur dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Ballester, F; Saez, M; Perez-Hoyos, S; Iniguez, C; Gandarillas, A; Tobias, A; Bellido, J; Taracido, M; Arribas, F; Daponte, A; Alonso, E; Canada, A; Guillen-Grima, F; Cirera, L; Perez-Boillos, M; Saurina, C; Gomez, F; Tenias, J

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The EMECAM study is a collaborative effort to evaluate the impact of air pollution on mortality in Spain. In this paper the combined results are presented for the short term effects of particulates and sulfur dioxide on both daily mortality for all and for specific causes. Methods: The relation between daily mortality for all causes, cardiovascular diseases, and respiratory diseases, and air pollution for particulates (daily concentrations) and SO2 (24 and 1 hour concentrations) was assessed in 13 Spanish cities for the period 1990–6. With a standardised method, magnitude of association in each city was estimated by Poisson regression in a generalised additive model. Local estimates were obtained from both single and two pollutant analyses. Lastly, combined estimates for each cause and pollutant were obtained. Results: For combined results, in single pollutant models a 10 µg/m3 increase in the concentration of the mean of the concurrent and one day lag for black smoke was associated with a 0.8% (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.4 to 1.1%) increase in total mortality. The estimates for total suspended particles (TSPs) and particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter <10 µm (PM10) and total mortality were slightly lower. The same increase in concentrations of SO2 was associated with a 0.5% increase in daily deaths. For groups of specific causes, higher estimations were found, specially for respiratory conditions. Peak concentrations of SO2 showed significant associations with the three groups of mortality. When two pollutant analyses were performed, estimates for particulates, specially for black smoke, did not substantially change. The estimates for daily concentrations of SO2 were greatly reduced, but, on the contrary, the association with peak concentrations of SO2 did not show any change. Conclusions: There is an association between mortality and pollution through particulates among city populations in Spain. Peak rather than daily concentrations

  16. Estimating fetal morbidity and mortality resulting from cigarette smoke exposure by measuring cotinine levels in maternal serum.

    PubMed

    Haddow, J E; Knight, G J; Palomaki, G E; Haddow, P K

    1988-01-01

    An essay for cotinine levels in maternal serum was used to define cigarette smoking exposure level and fetal morbidity and mortality. Cotinine, a metabolite of nicotine, has a circulating half-life of about a day, making it more reliable than nicotine as an indicator or active and passive smoke exposure. Maternal smoking has been linked in previous studies with low Apgar scores, low birthweight, decreased placental blood flow, fetal activity, fetal breathing movements, depressed prostacyclin synthesis in umbilical artery, increased perinatal mortality and spontaneous abortion. In this study, 8063 2nd trimester pregnant women whose serum had been collected and frozen in 1979-1983 were analyzed for smoking habit determined from intake questionnaires. Cotinine levels correlated with 95% of those reporting no smoking, and 93% of those reporting smoking. Smokers with cotinine 10 ng/ml was higher than expected, possible because some women quit before blood was drawn. Cotinine levels did not correlate as well as number of cigarettes per day reported. There was a significant association between serum cotinine and birthweight at the 10 and 20 cigarette/day level, and a trend toward a link between cotinine and fetal deaths in 2nd and 3rd trimesters. Among infants of the 30% of women exposed to passive smoke whose serum cotinine levels were 1 ng/ml, the average birth weight was 107 g lower than those of non-exposed women, a difference remaining after controlling for maternal weight and height, infant's sex, maternal age, gravidity and education.

  17. Surgical Mortality Audit-lessons Learned in a Developing Nation.

    PubMed

    Bindroo, Sandiya; Saraf, Rakesh

    2015-06-01

    Surgical audit is a systematic, critical analysis of the quality of surgical care that is reviewed by peers against explicit criteria or recognized standards. It is used to improve surgical practice with the ultimate goal of improving patient care. As the pattern of surgical care is different in the developing world, we analyzed mortalities in a referral medical institute of India to suggest interventions for improvement. An analysis of total admissions, different surgeries, and mortalities over 1 year in an urban referral medical institute of northern India was performed, followed by "peer review" of the mortalities. Mortality rates as outcomes and classification was done to provide comparative results. Of 10,005 surgical patients, 337 (male = 221, female = 116) deaths were reported over 1 year. The overall mortality rate was 3.36%, while mortality in operative cases was 1.76%. Total deaths were classified into (1) Viable: 153 (45%), (2) Nonviable: 174 (52%), and (3) Indeterminate: 10 (3%). Exclusion of the nonviable group reduced the mortality rate from 3.36% to 1.62%. Trauma was the major cause of mortality (n = 235; 70%) as compared to other surgical patients (n = 102; 30%). Increased mortality was also associated with emergency procedures (3.66%) as compared to elective surgeries (0.34%). In conclusion, audit of mortality and morbidity helps in initiating and implementing preventive strategies to improve surgical practice and patient care, and to reduce mortality rates. The mortality and morbidity forum is an important educational activity. It should be considered a mandatory activity in all postgraduate training programs.

  18. Comparison of different exposure settings in a case--crossover study on air pollution and daily mortality: counterintuitive results.

    PubMed

    Zauli Sajani, Stefano; Hänninen, Otto; Marchesi, Stefano; Lauriola, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Because of practical problems associated with measurement of personal exposures to air pollutants in larger populations, almost all epidemiological studies assign exposures based on fixed-site ambient air monitoring stations. In the presence of multiple monitoring stations at different locations, the selection of them may affect the observed epidemiological concentration--response (C-R) relationships. In this paper, we quantify these impacts in an observational ecologic case--crossover study of air pollution and mortality. The associations of daily concentrations of PM(10), O(3), and NO(2) with daily all-cause non-violent mortality were investigated using conditional logistic regression to estimate percent increase in the risk of dying for an increase of 10 μg/m(3) in the previous day air pollutant concentrations (lag 1). The study area covers the six main cities in the central-western part of Emilia-Romagna region (population of 1.1 million). We used four approaches to assign exposure to air pollutants for each individual considered in the study: nearest background station; city average of all stations available; average of all stations in a macro-area covering three cities and average of all six cities in the study area (50 × 150 km(2)). Odds ratios generally increased enlarging the spatial dimension of the exposure definition and were highest for six city-average exposure definition. The effect is especially evident for PM(10), and similar for NO(2), whereas for ozone, we did not find any change in the C-R estimates. Within a geographically homogeneous region, the spatial aggregation of monitoring station data leads to higher and more robust risk estimates for PM(10) and NO(2), even if monitor-to-monitor correlations showed a light decrease with distance. We suggest that the larger aggregation improves the representativity of the exposure estimates by decreasing exposure misclassification, which is more profound when using individual stations vs regional

  19. Effectiveness of Hospital Functions for Acute Ischemic Stroke Treatment on In-Hospital Mortality: Results From a Nationwide Survey in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Tetsuya; Hashimoto, Hideki; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Background Though evidence is limited in Japan, clinical controlled studies overseas have revealed that specialized care units are associated with better outcomes for acute stoke patients. This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of hospital functions for acute care of ischemic stroke on in-hospital mortality, with statistical accounting for referral bias. Methods We derived data from a large Japanese claim-based inpatient database linked to the Survey of Medical Care Institutions and Hospital Report data. We compared the mortality of acute ischemic stroke patients (n = 41 476) in hospitals certified for acute stroke treatment with that in non-certified institutions. To adjust for potential referral bias, we used differential distance to hospitals from the patient’s residence as an instrumental variable and constructed bivariate probit models. Results With the ordinary probit regression model, in-hospital mortality in certified hospitals was not significantly different from that in non-certified institutions. Conversely, the model with the instrumental variable method showed that admission to certified hospitals reduced in-hospital mortality by 30.7% (P < 0.001). This difference remained after adjusting for hospital size, volume, staffing, and intravenous use of tissue plasminogen activator. Conclusions Comparison accounting for referral selection found that certified hospital function for acute ischemic stroke care was associated with significantly lower in-hospital mortality. Our results indicate that organized stroke care—with certified subspecialty physicians and around-the-clock availability of personnel, imaging equipment, and emergency neurosurgical procedures in an intensive stroke care unit—is effective in improving outcomes in acute ischemic stroke care. PMID:26165489

  20. Mortality as a key driver of the spatial distribution of aboveground biomass in Amazonian forests: results from a Dynamic Vegetation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delbart, N.; Ciais, P.; Chave, J.; Viovy, N.; Malhi, Y.; Le Toan, T.

    2010-04-01

    Dynamic Vegetation Models (DVMs) simulate energy, water and carbon fluxes between the ecosystem and the atmosphere, between the vegetation and the soil, and between plant organs. They also estimate the potential biomass of a forest in equilibrium having grown under a given climate and atmospheric CO2 level. In this study, we evaluate the above ground woody biomass (AGWB) and the above ground woody Net Primary Productivity (NPPAGW) simulated by the DVM ORCHIDEE across Amazonian forests, by comparing the simulation results to a large set of ground measurements (220 sites for biomass, 104 sites for NPPAGW). We found that the NPPAGW is on average overestimated by 63%. We also found that the fraction of biomass that is lost through mortality is 85% too high. These model biases nearly compensate each other to give an average simulated AGWB close to the ground measurement average. Nevertheless, the simulated AGWB spatial distribution differs significantly from the observations. Then, we analyse the discrepancies in biomass with regards to discrepancies in NPPAGW and those in the rate of mortality. When we correct for the error in NPPAGW, the errors on the spatial variations in AGWB are exacerbated, showing clearly that a large part of the misrepresentation of biomass comes from a wrong modelling of mortality processes. Previous studies showed that Amazonian forests with high productivity have a higher mortality rate than forests with lower productivity. We introduce this relationship, which results in strongly improved modelling of biomass and of its spatial variations. We discuss the possibility of modifying the mortality modelling in ORCHIDEE, and the opportunity to improve forest productivity modelling through the integration of biomass measurements, in particular from remote sensing.

  1. Mortality as a key driver of the spatial distribution of aboveground biomass in Amazonian forest: results from a dynamic vegetation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delbart, N.; Ciais, P.; Chave, J.; Viovy, N.; Malhi, Y.; Le Toan, T.

    2010-10-01

    Dynamic Vegetation Models (DVMs) simulate energy, water and carbon fluxes between the ecosystem and the atmosphere, between the vegetation and the soil, and between plant organs. They also estimate the potential biomass of a forest in equilibrium having grown under a given climate and atmospheric CO2 level. In this study, we evaluate the Above Ground Woody Biomass (AGWB) and the above ground woody Net Primary Productivity (NPPAGW) simulated by the DVM ORCHIDEE across Amazonian forests, by comparing the simulation results to a large set of ground measurements (220 sites for biomass, 104 sites for NPPAGW). We found that the NPPAGW is on average overestimated by 63%. We also found that the fraction of biomass that is lost through mortality is 85% too high. These model biases nearly compensate each other to give an average simulated AGWB close to the ground measurement average. Nevertheless, the simulated AGWB spatial distribution differs significantly from the observations. Then, we analyse the discrepancies in biomass with regards to discrepancies in NPPAGW and those in the rate of mortality. When we correct for the error in NPPAGW, the errors on the spatial variations in AGWB are exacerbated, showing clearly that a large part of the misrepresentation of biomass comes from a wrong modelling of mortality processes. Previous studies showed that Amazonian forests with high productivity have a higher mortality rate than forests with lower productivity. We introduce this relationship, which results in strongly improved modelling of biomass and of its spatial variations. We discuss the possibility of modifying the mortality modelling in ORCHIDEE, and the opportunity to improve forest productivity modelling through the integration of biomass measurements, in particular from remote sensing.

  2. Influence of social support on cognitive change and mortality in old age: results from the prospective multicentre cohort study AgeCoDe

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Social support has been suggested to positively influence cognition and mortality in old age. However, this suggestion has been questioned due to inconsistent operationalisations of social support among studies and the small number of longitudinal studies available. This study aims to investigate the influence of perceived social support, understood as the emotional component of social support, on cognition and mortality in old age as part of a prospective longitudinal multicentre study in Germany. Methods A national subsample of 2,367 primary care patients was assessed twice over an observation period of 18 months regarding the influence of social support on cognitive function and mortality. Perceived social support was assessed using the 14-item version of the FSozU, which is a standardised and validated questionnaire of social support. Cognition was tested by the neuropsychological test battery of the Structured Interview for the Diagnosis of Dementia (SIDAM). The influence of perceived support on cognitive change was analysed by multivariate ANCOVA; mortality was analysed by multivariate logistic and cox regression. Results Sample cognitive change (N = 1,869): Mean age was 82.4 years (SD 3.3) at the beginning of the observation period, 65.9% were female, mean cognition was 49 (SD 4.4) in the SIDAM. Over the observation period cognitive function declined in 47.2% by a mean of 3.4 points. Sample mortality (N = 2,367): Mean age was 82.5 years (SD 3.4), 65.7% were female and 185 patients died during the observation period. Perceived social support showed no longitudinal association with cognitive change (F = 2.235; p = 0.135) and mortality (p = 0.332; CI 0.829-1.743). Conclusions Perceived social support did not influence cognition and mortality over an 18 months observation period. However, previous studies using different operationalisations of social support and longer observation periods indicate that such an influence may exist. This influence is

  3. Do acute myocardial infarction and stroke mortality vary by distance to hospitals in Switzerland? Results from the Swiss National Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Zwahlen, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Objective Switzerland has mountains and valleys complicating the access to a hospital and critical care in case of emergencies. Treatment success for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or stroke depends on timely treatment. We examined the relationship between distance to different hospital types and mortality from AMI or stroke in the Swiss National Cohort (SNC) Study. Design and setting The SNC is a longitudinal mortality study of the census 2000 population of Switzerland. For 4.5 million Swiss residents not living in a nursing home and older than 30 years in the year 2000, we calculated driving time and straight-line distance from their home to the nearest acute, acute with emergency room, central and university hospital (in total 173 hospitals). On the basis of quintiles, we used multivariable Cox proportional hazard models to estimate HRs of AMI and stroke mortality for driving time distance groups compared to the closest distance group. Results Over 8 years, 19 301 AMI and 21 931 stroke deaths occurred. Mean driving time to the nearest acute hospital was 6.5 min (29.7 min to a university hospital). For AMI mortality, driving time to a university hospital showed the strongest association among the four types of hospitals with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.19 (95% CI 1.10 to 1.30) and 1.10 (95% CI 1.01 to 1.20) for men and women aged 65+ years when comparing the highest quintile with the lowest quintile of driving time. For stroke mortality, the association with university hospital driving time was less pronounced than for AMI mortality and did not show a clear incremental pattern with increasing driving time. There was no association with driving time to the nearest hospital. Conclusions The increasing AMI mortality with increasing driving time to the nearest university hospital but not to any nearest hospital reflects a complex interplay of many factors along the care pathway. PMID:27803109

  4. Effect of oral beta-blocker on short and long-term mortality in patients with acute respiratory failure: results from the BASEL-II-ICU study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is responsible for about one-third of intensive care unit (ICU) admissions and is associated with adverse outcomes. Predictors of short- and long-term outcomes in unselected ICU-patients with ARF are ill-defined. The purpose of this analysis was to determine predictors of in-hospital and one-year mortality and assess the effects of oral beta-blockers in unselected ICU patients with ARF included in the BASEL-II-ICU study. Methods The BASEL II-ICU study was a prospective, multicenter, randomized, single-blinded, controlled trial of 314 (mean age 70 (62 to 79) years) ICU patients with ARF evaluating impact of a B-type natriuretic peptide- (BNP) guided management strategy on short-term outcomes. Results In-hospital mortality was 16% (51 patients) and one-year mortality 41% (128 patients). Multivariate analysis assessed that oral beta-blockers at admission were associated with a lower risk of both in-hospital (HR 0.33 (0.14 to 0.74) P = 0.007) and one-year mortality (HR 0.29 (0.16 to 0.51) P = 0.0003). Kaplan-Meier analysis confirmed the lower mortality in ARF patients when admitted with oral beta-blocker and further shows that the beneficial effect of oral beta-blockers at admission holds true in the two subgroups of patients with ARF related to cardiac or non-cardiac causes. Kaplan-Meier analysis also shows that administration of oral beta-blockers before hospital discharge gives striking additional beneficial effects on one-year mortality. Conclusions Established beta-blocker therapy appears to be associated with a reduced mortality in ICU patients with acute respiratory failure. Cessation of established therapy appears to be hazardous. Initiation of therapy prior to discharge appears to confer benefit. This finding was seen regardless of the cardiac or non-cardiac etiology of respiratory failure. Trial registration clinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00130559 PMID:21047406

  5. Mortality, morbidity, and haematological results from a cohort of long-term workers involved in 1,3-butadiene monomer production.

    PubMed Central

    Cowles, S R; Tsai, S P; Snyder, P J; Ross, C E

    1994-01-01

    A retrospective mortality analysis and prospective morbidity and haematological analyses were performed for Shell Deer Park Manufacturing Complex (DPMC) male employees who worked in jobs with potential exposure to 1,3-butadiene from 1948 to 1989. 614 employees qualified for the mortality study (1948-89), 438 of those were still employed during the period of the morbidity study (1982-9), and 429 of those had haematological data available for analysis. Industrial hygiene data from 1979 to 1992 showed that most butadiene exposures did not exceed 10 ppm (eight-hour time weighted average (8 hour TWA)), and most were below 1 ppm, with an arithmetic mean of 3.5 ppm. 24 deaths occurred during the mortality study period. For all causes of death, the standardised mortality ratio (SMR) was 48 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 31-72), and the all cancer SMR was 34 (95% CI = 9-87). There were only two deaths due to lung cancer (SMR 42, 95% CI = 5-151) and none due to lymphohaematopoietic cancer (expected = 1.2). Morbidity (illness absence) events of six days or more for the 438 butadiene employees were compared with the rest of the complex. No cause of morbidity was in excess for this group; the all cause standardised morbidity ratio (SMbR) was 85 (95% CI = 77-93) and the all neoplasms SMbR was 51 (95% CI = 22-100). Haematological results for the 429 with laboratory data were compared with results for the rest of the complex. No significant differences occurred between the two groups and the distributions of results between butadiene and non-butadiene groups were virtually identical. These results suggest that butadiene exposures at concentrations common at DPMC in the past 10-20 years do not pose a health hazard to employees. PMID:8199682

  6. Infant Mortality

    MedlinePlus

    ... Control and Prevention. (2013). CDC health disparities and inequalities report—United States, 2013. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly ... M. (2008). The fall and rise of U.S. inequalities in premature mortality: 1960–2002. PLOS Medicine, 5 ( ...

  7. Temporal and spatial relations between age specific mortality and ambient air quality in the United States: regression results for counties, 1960–97

    PubMed Central

    Lipfert, F; Morris, S

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate longitudinal and spatial relations between air pollution and age specific mortality for United States counties (except Alaska) from 1960 to the end of 1997. Methods: Cross sectional regressions for five specific periods using published data on mortality, air quality, demography, climate, socioeconomic status, lifestyle, and diet. Outcome measures are statistical relations between air quality and county mortalities by age group for all causes of death, other than AIDS and trauma. Results: A specific regression model was developed for each period and age group, using variables that were significant (p<0.05), not substantially collinear (variance inflation factor <2), and had the expected algebraic sign. Models were initially developed without the air pollution variables, which varied in spatial coverage. Residuals were then regressed in turn against current and previous air quality, and dose-response plots were constructed. The validity of this two stage procedure was shown by comparing a subset of results with those obtained with single stage models that included air quality (correlation=0.88). On the basis of attributable risks computed for overall mean concentrations, the strongest associations were found in the earlier periods, with attributable risks usually less than 5%. Stronger relations were found when mortality and air quality were measured in the same period and when the locations considered were limited to those of previous cohort studies (for PM2.5 and SO42-). Thresholds were suggested at 100–130 µg/m3 for mean total suspended particulate (TSP), 7–10 µg/m3 for mean sulfate, 10–15 ppm for peak (95th percentile) CO, 20–40 ppb for mean SO2. Contrary to expectations, associations were often stronger for the younger age groups (<65 y). Responses to PM, CO, and SO2 declined over time; responses in elderly people to peak O3 increased over time as did responses to NO2 for the younger age groups. These results generally agreed

  8. Lifestyle, nutritional status, health, and mortality in elderly people across Europe: a review of the longitudinal results of the SENECA study.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Lisette C P M G; Verheijden, Marieke W; de Henauw, Stefaan; Schroll, Marianne; van Staveren, Wija A

    2004-12-01

    This article provides an overview of the longitudinal Survey in Europe on Nutrition and the Elderly: a Concerted Action (SENECA) study, which was designed to assess differences in dietary and lifestyle factors among elderly Europeans, and to identify the factors that contribute to healthy aging. Elderly people from Belgium, Denmark, France, Italy, Portugal, Spain, Switzerland, and The Netherlands participated in the SENECA study. Standardized measurements were conducted at baseline in 1988-1989 and were repeated in 1993 and 1999. Diet, physical activity, and smoking, as well as maintenance of health and survival, were assessed. At baseline, considerable differences in lifestyle factors existed among elderly people. Mealtime patterns as well as dietary intake varied across Europe, and geographical patterns were apparent. Similar results were found for engagement in sport or professional activities. The smoking prevalence among women was generally low. Distinct geographical differences were also observed in percentages of deaths during the SENECA study and in overall survival time. A healthy lifestyle was related to stable self-perceived health, a delay in functional dependence, and mortality. Inactivity and smoking, and to a lesser extent a low-quality diet, increased mortality risk. A combined effect of multiple unhealthy lifestyle factors was also observed. The SENECA study showed that a healthy lifestyle at older ages is related to a delay in the deterioration of health status and a reduced mortality risk. Improving and maintaining a healthy lifestyle in elderly people across Europe is a great challenge for the European Community.

  9. Gait Asymmetries Persist 1 Year After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    White, Kathleen; Logerstedt, David; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Background: After anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), motivation to return to previous levels of activity is high. Very few studies have used return-to-activity criteria to determine when to permit athletic play. Return-to-activity measures objectively evaluate functional limb symmetry; however, previous biomechanical studies have found gait deviations in these individuals that persist up to 2 years after surgery. Purpose: To evaluate gait biomechanics in a specific cohort of ACL patients 1 year after surgery and retrospectively compare individuals who pass return-to-activity criteria 6 months after surgery with those who fail. Study Design: Prospective analysis. Methods: A total of 40 athletes who participated regularly (>50 h/y) in cutting, jumping, and pivoting activities and who sustained an isolated, unilateral ACL rupture were included in this study. All participants underwent reconstruction by the same surgeon and received individualized postoperative rehabilitation. Performance-based and self-report data were measured 6 months after surgery to assess readiness to return to activity (90% outcome required to pass); 20 subjects passed return-to-activity criteria and 20 subjects did not. Motion analysis was performed 1 year after surgery, and knee flexion angles, moments, and excursions were measured during gait and evaluated for all subjects. Results: There was no limb × group interaction or effect of group for all measures. Decreased knee measures were seen on the involved limb compared with the uninvolved limb for all subjects, and failed subjects demonstrated larger differences between limbs. Conclusion: Patients continued to demonstrate biomechanical limb asymmetries 1 year after ACLR, regardless of performance-based measures at 6 months. Early return to activity did not ensure limb symmetry at 1 year. Clinical Relevance: Gait asymmetries were seen in all subjects 1 year after surgery regardless of status at 6 months. Potentially prolonging

  10. Trajectory of body shape in early and middle life and all cause and cause specific mortality: results from two prospective US cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Frank B; Wu, Kana; Must, Aviva; Chan, Andrew T; Willett, Walter C; Giovannucci, Edward L

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess body shape trajectories in early and middle life in relation to risk of mortality. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Nurses’ Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Population 80 266 women and 36 622 men who recalled their body shape at ages 5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 years and provided body mass index at age 50, followed from age 60 over a median of 15-16 years for death. Main outcome measures All cause and cause specific mortality. Results Using a group based modeling approach, five distinct trajectories of body shape from age 5 to 50 were identified: lean-stable, lean-moderate increase, lean-marked increase, medium-stable/increase, and heavy-stable/increase. The lean-stable group was used as the reference. Among never smokers, the multivariable adjusted hazard ratio for death from any cause was 1.08 (95% confidence interval 1.02 to 1.14) for women and 0.95 (0.88 to 1.03) for men in the lean-moderate increase group, 1.43 (1.33 to 1.54) for women and 1.11 (1.02 to 1.20) for men in the lean-marked increase group, 1.04 (0.97 to 1.12) for women and 1.01 (0.94 to 1.09) for men in the medium-stable/increase group, and 1.64 (1.49 to 1.81) for women and 1.19 (1.08 to 1.32) for men in the heavy-stable/increase group. For cause specific mortality, participants in the heavy-stable/increase group had the highest risk, with a hazard ratio among never smokers of 2.30 (1.88 to 2.81) in women and 1.45 (1.23 to 1.72) in men for cardiovascular disease, 1.37 (1.14 to 1.65) in women and 1.07 (0.89 to 1.30) in men for cancer, and 1.59 (1.38 to 1.82) in women and 1.10 (0.95 to 1.29) in men for other causes. The trajectory-mortality association was generally weaker among ever smokers than among never smokers (for all cause mortality: P for interaction <0.001 in women and 0.06 in men). When participants were classified jointly according to trajectories and history of type 2 diabetes, the increased risk of death associated with heavier

  11. Long-Term Results after Placement of Aortic Bifurcation Self-Expanding Stents: 10 Year Mortality, Stent Restenosis, and Distal Disease Progression

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, J. Graeme Bhat, Raj; Ross, Rose; Stonebridge, Peter A.

    2007-02-15

    Purpose. To retrospectively evaluate the 10 year follow-up results in patients who had 'kissing' self-expanding stent aortic bifurcation reconstruction. Methods. Forty-three patients were treated with 'kissing' self-expanding stents for aortoiliac occlusive disease. Early follow-up with clinical and ankle brachial pressure indices (ABPI) was performed at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months and with intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography at 12-24 months; clinical and angiographic follow-up was performed for symptom recurrence up to 10 years after treatment. Retrospective record review was performed to assess mortality, clinical patency, angiographic patency, and secondary assisted patency of both stents and downstream peripheral vessels at 5 and 10 years follow-up. Results. The 2 year primary angiographic and secondary assisted stent patencies were 89% and 93%, respectively. At 10 years follow-up in 40 patients the mortality was 38% (due to myocardial infarction, stroke, chronic renal failure, malignancy, and liver failure). At 5 and 10 years follow-up the primary clinical stent patency was 82% and 68%, and the secondary assisted stent patency 93% and 86%, respectively. At 5 and 10 years, the distal vessel patency was 86% and 72%, and the secondary assisted distal vessel patency treated by surgical or endovascular techniques was 94% and 88%, respectively. At 10 years there was no limb loss. Conclusion. The long-term (10 year) results of aortic bifurcation arterial self-expanding stent placement in patients with arterial occlusive disease show a 10 year primary stent patency rate of 68% but a secondary assisted patency rate of 86%. In addition there is a high overall mortality due to other cardiovascular causes and the rate of distal disease progression and loss of patency is similar to the loss of stent patency rate.

  12. Impact of cervical screening on cervical cancer mortality: estimation using stage-specific results from a nested case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Landy, Rebecca; Pesola, Francesca; Castañón, Alejandra; Sasieni, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is well established that screening can prevent cervical cancer, but the magnitude of the impact of regular screening on cervical cancer mortality is unknown. Methods: Population-based case–control study using prospectively recorded cervical screening data, England 1988–2013. Case women had cervical cancer diagnosed during April 2007–March 2013 aged 25–79 years (N=11 619). Two cancer-free controls were individually age matched to each case. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate the odds ratio (OR) of developing stage-specific cancer for women regularly screened or irregularly screened compared with women not screened in the preceding 15 years. Mortality was estimated from excess deaths within 5 years of diagnosis using stage-specific 5-year relative survival from England with adjustment for age within stage based on SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results, USA) data. Results: In women aged 35–64 years, regular screening is associated with a 67% (95% confidence interval (CI): 62–73%) reduction in stage 1A cancer and a 95% (95% CI: 94–97%) reduction in stage 3 or worse cervical cancer: the estimated OR comparing regular (⩽5.5yearly) screening to no (or minimal) screening are 0.18 (95% CI: 0.16–0.19) for cancer incidence and 0.08 (95% CI: 0.07–0.09) for mortality. It is estimated that in England screening currently prevents 70% (95% CI: 66–73%) of cervical cancer deaths (all ages); however, if everyone attended screening regularly, 83% (95% CI: 82–84%) could be prevented. Conclusions: The association between cervical cancer screening and incidence is stronger in more advanced stage cancers, and screening is more effective at preventing death from cancer than preventing cancer itself. PMID:27632376

  13. No Evidence of Association Between Anti–Tumor Necrosis Factor Treatment and Mortality in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis: Results From the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register

    PubMed Central

    Lunt, Mark; Watson, Kath D; Dixon, William G; Symmons, Deborah P M; Hyrich, Kimme L

    2010-01-01

    Objective To study the association between anti–tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy and mortality in a national cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods We prospectively followed up 12,672 patients who were beginning anti-TNF therapy and 3,522 biologic-naive patients receiving disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) until either July 31, 2008, or death, whichever occurred first. Notification of death and cause of death was received from the UK National Death Register. Mortality was compared using Cox proportional hazards models. Inverse probability of treatment weighting was used to adjust for the confounding effects of baseline differences between groups, including age, sex, disease severity, disability, and comorbidity. Missing baseline data were accounted for using multiple imputation. Results When compared with the DMARD cohort, the anti-TNF cohort was younger (median age 57 years versus 61 years), had greater disease activity (median Disease Activity Score in 28 joints 6.6 versus 5.1), and had greater disability (median Health Assessment Questionnaire score 2.1 versus 1.6). Patients in the DMARD cohort were more likely to have a history of myocardial infarction (4.8% versus 3.1%) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (8.1% versus 4.8%) but were less likely to have had depression (16.5% versus 18.9%). There were 9,445 and 50,803 person-years of followup in the DMARD and anti-TNF cohorts, respectively, during which time 204 DMARD-treated and 856 anti-TNF–treated patients died. The weighted mortality hazard ratios in the anti-TNF cohort were as follows: all-cause 0.86 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.64–1.16), circulatory disease 0.73 (95% CI 0.44–1.23), neoplasm 0.65 (95% CI 0.39–1.09), and respiratory disease 0.81 (95% CI 0.36–1.83). Conclusion Our results indicate that, compared with standard DMARD therapy, treatment with anti-TNF therapies was not associated with an increase in mortality. PMID:20662063

  14. Reduced short-term complications and mortality following Enhanced Recovery primary hip and knee arthroplasty: results from 6,000 consecutive procedures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Enhanced Recovery (ER) is a well-established multidisciplinary strategy in lower limb arthroplasty and was introduced in our department in May 2008. This retrospective study reviews short-term outcomes in a consecutive unselected series of 3,000 procedures (the “ER” group), and compares them to a numerically comparable cohort that had been operated on previously using a traditional protocol (the “Trad” group). Methods Prospectively collected data on surgical endpoints (length of stay (LOS), return to theater (RTT), re-admission, and 30- and 90-day mortality) and medical complications (stroke, gastrointestinal bleeding, myocardial infarction, and pneumonia within 30 days; deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism within 60 days) were compared. Results ER included 1,256 THR patients and 1,744 TKR patients (1,369 THRs and 1,631 TKRs in Trad). The median LOS in the ER group was reduced (3 days vs. 6 days; p = 0.01). Blood transfusion rate was also reduced (7.6% vs. 23%; p < 0.001), as was RTT rate (p = 0.05). The 30-day incidence of myocardial infarction declined (0.4% vs. 0.9%; p = 0.03) while that of stroke, gastrointestinal bleeding, pneumonia, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism was not statistically significantly different. Mortality at 30 days and at 90 days was 0.1% and 0.5%, respectively, as compared to 0.5% and 0.8% using the traditional protocol (p = 0.03 and p = 0.1, respectively). Interpretation This is the largest study of ER arthroplasty, and provides safety data on a consecutive unselected series. The program has achieved a statistically significant reduction in LOS and in cardiac ischemic events for our patients, with a near-significant decrease in return to theater and in mortality rates. PMID:24359028

  15. Stability of physical assessment of older drivers over 1 year.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew; Marshall, Shawn; Porter, Michelle; Ha, Linda; Bédard, Michel; Gélinas, Isabelle; Man-Son-Hing, Malcolm; Mazer, Barbara; Rapoport, Mark; Tuokko, Holly; Vrkljan, Brenda

    2013-12-01

    Older adults represent the fastest-growing population of drivers with a valid driver's licence. Also common in this age group are multiple chronic medical conditions that may have an effect on physical function and driving ability. Determining the reliability of physical measures used to assess older drivers' functional ability is important to identifying those who are safe to continue driving. Most previous reliability studies of clinical physical measures of health used test-retest intervals shorter than those between patient visits with a clinician. In the present study we examined a more clinically representative interval of 1 year to determine the stability of commonly used physical measures collected during the Candrive II prospective cohort study of older drivers. Reliability statistics indicate that the sequential finger-thumb opposition, rapid pace walk and the Pelli-Robson contrast sensitivity tests have adequate stability over 1 year. Poor stability was observed for the one-legged stance and Snellen visual acuity test. Several assessments with nominal data (Marottoli method [functional neck range of motion], whispered voice test, range of motion and strength testing) lacked sufficient variability to conduct reliability analyses; however, a lack of variability between test days suggests consistency over a 1-year time frame. Our results provide evidence that specific physical measures are stable in monitoring functional ability over the course of a year.

  16. Secondary preventive medication persistence and adherence 1 year after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Olson, D.M.; Zhao, X.; Pan, W.; Zimmer, L.O.; Goldstein, L.B.; Alberts, M.J.; Fagan, S.C.; Fonarow, G.C.; Johnston, S.C.; Kidwell, C.; LaBresh, K.A.; Ovbiagele, B.; Schwamm, L.; Peterson, E.D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Data on long-term use of secondary prevention medications following stroke are limited. The Adherence eValuation After Ischemic stroke–Longitudinal (AVAIL) Registry assessed patient, provider, and system-level factors influencing continuation of prevention medications for 1 year following stroke hospitalization discharge. Methods: Patients with ischemic stroke or TIA discharged from 106 hospitals participating in the American Heart Association Get With The Guidelines–Stroke program were surveyed to determine their use of warfarin, antiplatelet, antihypertensive, lipid-lowering, and diabetes medications from discharge to 12 months. Reasons for stopping medications were ascertained. Persistence was defined as continuation of all secondary preventive medications prescribed at hospital discharge, and adherence as continuation of prescribed medications except those stopped according to health care provider instructions. Results: Of the 2,880 patients enrolled in AVAIL, 88.4% (2,457 patients) completed 1-year interviews. Of these, 65.9% were regimen persistent and 86.6% were regimen adherent. Independent predictors of 1-year medication persistence included fewer medications prescribed at discharge, having an adequate income, having an appointment with a primary care provider, and greater understanding of why medications were prescribed and their side effects. Independent predictors of adherence were similar to those for persistence. Conclusions: Although up to one-third of stroke patients discontinued one or more secondary prevention medications within 1 year of hospital discharge, self-discontinuation of these medications is uncommon. Several potentially modifiable patient, provider, and system-level factors associated with persistence and adherence may be targets for future interventions. PMID:21900638

  17. Estimating the risks of cancer mortality and genetic defects resulting from exposures to low levels of ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Buhl, T.E.; Hansen, W.R.

    1984-05-01

    Estimators for calculating the risk of cancer and genetic disorders induced by exposure to ionizing radiation have been recommended by the US National Academy of Sciences Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations, the UN Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, and the International Committee on Radiological Protection. These groups have also considered the risks of somatic effects other than cancer. The US National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements has discussed risk estimate procedures for radiation-induced health effects. The recommendations of these national and international advisory committees are summarized and compared in this report. Based on this review, two procedures for risk estimation are presented for use in radiological assessments performed by the US Department of Energy under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). In the first procedure, age- and sex-averaged risk estimators calculated with US average demographic statistics would be used with estimates of radiation dose to calculate the projected risk of cancer and genetic disorders that would result from the operation being reviewed under NEPA. If more site-specific risk estimators are needed, and the demographic information is available, a second procedure is described that would involve direct calculation of the risk estimators using recommended risk-rate factors. The computer program REPCAL has been written to perform this calculation and is described in this report. 25 references, 16 tables.

  18. Increased Heart Rate Is Associated With Higher Mortality in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation (AF): Results From the Outcomes Registry for Better Informed Treatment of AF (ORBIT-AF)

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Benjamin A; Kim, Sunghee; Thomas, Laine; Fonarow, Gregg C; Gersh, Bernard J; Holmqvist, Fredrik; Hylek, Elaine; Kowey, Peter R; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Naccarelli, Gerald; Reiffel, James A; Chang, Paul; Peterson, Eric D; Piccini, Jonathan P

    2015-01-01

    Background Most patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) require rate control; however, the optimal target heart rate remains under debate. We aimed to assess rate control and subsequent outcomes among patients with permanent AF. Methods and Results We studied 2812 US outpatients with permanent AF in the Outcomes Registry for Better Informed Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation. Resting heart rate was measured longitudinally and used as a time-dependent covariate in multivariable Cox models of all-cause and cause-specific mortality during a median follow-up of 24 months. At baseline, 7.4% (n=207) had resting heart rate <60 beats per minute (bpm), 62% (n=1755) 60 to 79 bpm, 29% (n=817) 80 to 109 bpm, and 1.2% (n=33) ≥110 bpm. Groups did not differ by age, previous cerebrovascular disease, heart failure status, CHA2DS2-VASc scores, renal function, or left ventricular function. There were significant differences in race (P=0.001), sinus node dysfunction (P=0.004), and treatment with calcium-channel blockers (P=0.006) and anticoagulation (P=0.009). In analyses of continuous heart rates, lower heart rate ≤65 bpm was associated with higher all-cause mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.15 per 5-bpm decrease; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.32; P=0.04). Similarly, increasing heart rate >65 bpm was associated with higher all-cause mortality (adjusted HR, 1.10 per 5-bpm increase; 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.15; P<0.0001). This relationship was consistent across endpoints and in a broader sensitivity analysis of permanent and nonpermanent AF patients. Conclusions Among patients with permanent AF, there is a J-shaped relationship between heart rate and mortality. These data support current guideline recommendations, and clinical trials are warranted to determine optimal rate control. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov/. Unique identifier: NCT01165710. PMID:26370445

  19. Sociodemographic, behavioral, and environmental factors of child mortality in Eastern Region of Cameroon: results from a social autopsy study

    PubMed Central

    Koffi, Alain K; Wounang, Romain S; Nguefack, Félicitée; Moluh, Seidou; Libite, Paul–Roger; Kalter, Henry D

    2017-01-01

    Background While most child deaths are caused by highly preventable and treatable diseases such as pneumonia, diarrhea, and malaria, several sociodemographic, cultural and health system factors work against children surviving from these diseases. Methods A retrospective verbal/social autopsy survey was conducted in 2012 to measure the biological causes and social determinants of under–five years old deaths from 2007 to 2010 in Doume, Nguelemendouka, and Abong–Mbang health districts in the Eastern Region of Cameroon. The present study sought to identify important sociodemographic and household characteristics of the 1–59 month old deaths, including the coverage of key preventive indicators of normal child care, and illness recognition and care–seeking for the children along the Pathway to Survival model. Findings Of the 635 deceased children with a completed interview, just 26.8% and 11.2% lived in households with an improved source of drinking water and sanitation, respectively. Almost all of the households (96.1%) used firewood for cooking, and 79.2% (n = 187) of the 236 mothers who cooked inside their home usually had their children beside them when they cooked. When 614 of the children became fatally ill, the majority (83.7%) of caregivers sought or tried to seek formal health care, but with a median delay of 2 days from illness onset to the decision to seek formal care. As a result, many (n = 111) children were taken for care only after their illness progressed from mild or moderate to severe. The main barriers to accessing the formal health system were the expenses for transportation, health care and other related costs. Conclusions The most common social factors that contributed to the deaths of 1–59–month old children in the study setting included poor living conditions, prevailing customs that led to exposure to indoor smoke, and health–related behaviors such as delaying the decision to seek care. Increasing caregivers’ ability to

  20. Predictions of mortality from pleural mesothelioma in Italy: a model based on asbestos consumption figures supports results from age-period-cohort models.

    PubMed

    Marinaccio, Alessandro; Montanaro, Fabio; Mastrantonio, Marina; Uccelli, Raffaella; Altavista, Pierluigi; Nesti, Massimo; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Gorini, Giuseppe

    2005-05-20

    Italy was the second main asbestos producer in Europe, after the Soviet Union, until the end of the 1980s, and raw asbestos was imported on a large scale until 1992. The Italian pattern of asbestos consumption lags on average about 10 years behind the United States, Australia, the United Kingdom and the Nordic countries. Measures to reduce exposure were introduced in the mid-1970s in some workplaces. In 1986, limitations were imposed on the use of crocidolite and in 1992 asbestos was definitively banned. We have used primary pleural cancer mortality figures (1970-1999) to predict mortality from mesothelioma among Italian men in the next 30 years by age-cohort-period models and by a model based on asbestos consumption figures. The pleural cancer/mesothelioma ratio and mesothelioma misdiagnosis in the past were taken into account in the analysis. Estimated risks of birth cohorts born after 1945 decrease less quickly in Italy than in other Western countries. The findings predict a peak with about 800 mesothelioma annual deaths in the period 2012-2024. Results estimated using age-period-cohort models were similar to those obtained from the asbestos consumption model.

  1. Which Is More Useful in Predicting Hospital Mortality -Dichotomised Blood Test Results or Actual Test Values? A Retrospective Study in Two Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Mohammed A.; Rudge, Gavin; Wood, Gordon; Smith, Gary; Nangalia, Vishal; Prytherch, David; Holder, Roger; Briggs, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Background Routine blood tests are an integral part of clinical medicine and in interpreting blood test results clinicians have two broad options. (1) Dichotomise the blood tests into normal/abnormal or (2) use the actual values and overlook the reference values. We refer to these as the “binary” and the “non-binary” strategy respectively. We investigate which strategy is better at predicting the risk of death in hospital based on seven routinely undertaken blood tests (albumin, creatinine, haemoglobin, potassium, sodium, urea, and white blood cell count) using tree models to implement the two strategies. Methodology A retrospective database study of emergency admissions to an acute hospital during April 2009 to March 2010, involving 10,050 emergency admissions with routine blood tests undertaken within 24 hours of admission. We compared the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curve for predicting in-hospital mortality using the binary and non-binary strategy. Results The mortality rate was 6.98% (701/10050). The mean predicted risk of death in those who died was significantly (p-value <0.0001) lower using the binary strategy (risk = 0.181 95%CI: 0.193 to 0.210) versus the non-binary strategy (risk = 0.222 95%CI: 0.194 to 0.251), representing a risk difference of 28.74 deaths in the deceased patients (n = 701). The binary strategy had a significantly (p-value <0.0001) lower area under the ROC curve of 0.832 (95% CI: 0.819 to 0.845) versus the non-binary strategy (0.853 95% CI: 0.840 to 0.867). Similar results were obtained using data from another hospital. Conclusions Dichotomising routine blood test results is less accurate in predicting in-hospital mortality than using actual test values because it underestimates the risk of death in patients who died. Further research into the use of actual blood test values in clinical decision making is required especially as the infrastructure to implement this potentially promising

  2. Comparative Soot Diagnostics: 1 Year Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David L.; Griffin, DeVon W.; Gard, Melissa Y.

    1998-01-01

    The motivation for the Comparative Soot Diagnostics (CSD) experiment lies in the broad practical importance of understanding combustion generated particulate. Depending upon the circumstances, particulate matter can affect the durability and performance of combustion equipment, can be a pollutant, can be used to detect fires and, in the form of soot, can be the dominant source of radiant energy from flames. Bright sooty fires are desirable for efficient energy extraction in furnaces and power equipment. In contrast, soot-enhanced radiation is undesirable in many propulsion systems (e.g. jet engines). The non-buoyant structure of most flames of practical interest (turbulent) makes understanding of soot processes in low gravity flames important to our ability to predict fire behavior on earth. These studies also have direct applications to fire safety in human-crew spacecraft, since smoke is the indicator used for automated detection in current spacecraft. In addition, recent tests conducted on MIR showed that a candle in a truly quiescent spacecraft environment can burn for tens of minutes. Consequently, this test and many earlier tests have demonstrated that fires in spacecraft can be considered a credible risk. In anticipation of this risk, NASA has included fire detectors on Skylab, smoke detectors on the Space Shuttle (STS), and smoke detectors in the design for the International Space Station (ISS). In the CSD experiment, these smoke detectors were tested using, quasi-steady, low-gravity, particulate generating materials. Samples of the particulate were also obtained from these low-gravity sources. This experiment provides the first such measurements aimed toward understanding of soot processes here on earth and for the testing and design of advanced spacecraft smoke detection systems. This paper describes the operation and preliminary results of the CSD experiment which was was conducted in the Middeck Glovebox Facility (MGBX) on USMP-3. The objectives of CSD

  3. Fruit and vegetable intake and mortality from ischaemic heart disease: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Heart study

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, Francesca L.; Roddam, Andrew W.; Key, Timothy J.; Appleby, Paul N.; Overvad, Kim; Jakobsen, Marianne U.; Tjønneland, Anne; Hansen, Louise; Boeing, Heiner; Weikert, Cornelia; Linseisen, Jakob; Kaaks, Rudolf; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Misirli, Gesthimani; Lagiou, Pagona; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Pala, Valeria; Palli, Domenico; Tumino, Rosario; Panico, Salvatore; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Boer, Jolanda; van Gils, Carla H.; Beulens, Joline W.J.; Barricarte, Aurelio; Rodríguez, Laudina; Larrañaga, Nerea; Sánchez, Maria-José; Tormo, María-José; Buckland, Genevieve; Lund, Eiliv; Hedblad, Bo; Melander, Olle; Jansson, Jan-Håkan; Wennberg, Patrik; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Slimani, Nadia; Romieu, Isabelle; Jenab, Mazda; Danesh, John; Gallo, Valentina; Norat, Teresa; Riboli, Elio

    2011-01-01

    Aims A higher intake of fruits and vegetables has been associated with a lower risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD), but there is some uncertainty about the interpretation of this association. The objective was to assess the relation between fruit and vegetable intake and risk of mortality from IHD in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Heart study. Methods and results After an average of 8.4 years of follow-up, there were 1636 deaths from IHD among 313 074 men and women without previous myocardial infarction or stroke from eight European countries. Participants consuming at least eight portions (80 g each) of fruits and vegetables a day had a 22% lower risk of fatal IHD [relative risk (RR) = 0.78, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.65–0.95] compared with those consuming fewer than three portions a day. After calibration of fruit and vegetable intake to account for differences in dietary assessment between the participating centres, a one portion (80 g) increment in fruit and vegetable intake was associated with a 4% lower risk of fatal IHD (RR = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.92–1.00, P for trend = 0.033). Conclusion Results from this large observational study suggest that a higher intake of fruits and vegetables is associated with a reduced risk of IHD mortality. Whether this association is causal and, if so, the biological mechanism(s) by which fruits and vegetables operate to lower IHD risks remains unclear. PMID:21245490

  4. Inequalities in institutional delivery uptake and maternal mortality reduction in the context of cash incentive program, Janani Suraksha Yojana: results from nine states in India.

    PubMed

    Randive, Bharat; San Sebastian, Miguel; De Costa, Ayesha; Lindholm, Lars

    2014-12-01

    Proportion of women giving birth in health institutions has increased sharply in India since the introduction of cash incentive program, Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY) in 2005. JSY was intended to benefit disadvantaged population who had poor access to institutional care for childbirth and who bore the brunt of maternal deaths. Increase in institutional deliveries following the implementation of JSY needs to be analysed from an equity perspective. We analysed data from nine Indian states to examine the change in socioeconomic inequality in institutional deliveries five years after the implementation of JSY using the concentration curve and concentration index (CI). The CI was then decomposed in order to understand pathways through which observed inequalities occurred. Disparities in access to emergency obstetric care (EmOC) and in maternal mortality reduction among different socioeconomic groups were also assessed. Slope and relative index of inequality were used to estimate absolute and relative inequalities in maternal mortality ratio (MMR). Results shows that although inequality in access to institutional delivery care persists, it has reduced since the introduction of JSY. Nearly 70% of the present inequality was explained by differences in male literacy, EmOC availability in public facilities and poverty. EmOC in public facilities was grossly unavailable. Compared to richest division in nine states, poorest division has 135 more maternal deaths per 100,000 live births in 2010. While MMR has decreased in all areas since JSY, it has declined four times faster in richest areas compared to the poorest, resulting in increased inequalities. These findings suggest that in order for the cash incentive to succeed in reducing the inequalities in maternal health outcomes, it needs to be supported by the provision of quality health care services including EmOC. Improved targeting of disadvantaged populations for the cash incentive program could be considered.

  5. Plant Survival and Mortality during Drought Can be Mediated by Co-occurring Species' Physiological and Morphological Traits: Results from a Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, X.; Mackay, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    susceptibility to cavitation. The results showed that co-occurring species' morphological traits could alleviate or aggravate stress imposed by drought and should therefore be considered together with plant physiological traits in predicting plant mortality and ecosystem structural shift under future climate conditions.

  6. Are the acute effects of particulate matter on mortality in the National Morbidity, Mortality, and Air Pollution Study the result of inadequate control for weather and season? A sensitivity analysis using flexible distributed lag models.

    PubMed

    Welty, Leah J; Zeger, Scott L

    2005-07-01

    Time-series studies have linked daily variations in nonaccidental deaths with daily variations in ambient particulate matter air pollution, while controlling for qualitatively larger influences of weather and season. Although time-series analyses typically include nonlinear terms for weather and season, questions remain as to whether models to date have completely controlled for these important predictors. In this paper, the authors use two flexible versions of distributed lag models to control extensively for the confounding effects of weather and season. One version builds on the current approach to controlling for weather, while the other version offers a new approach. The authors conduct a comprehensive sensitivity analysis of the particulate matter-mortality relation by applying these methods to the recently updated National Morbidity, Mortality, and Air Pollution Study database that comprises air pollution, weather, and mortality time series from 1987 to 2000 for 100 US cities. They combine city-specific estimates of the short-term effects of particulate matter on mortality using a Bayesian hierarchical model. They conclude that, within the broad classes of models considered, national average estimates of particulate matter relative risk are consistent with previous estimates from this study and are robust to model specification for weather and seasonal confounding.

  7. Part 1. Short-term effects of air pollution on mortality: results from a time-series analysis in Chennai, India.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Kalpana; Ganguli, Bhaswati; Ghosh, Santu; Sankar, S; Thanasekaraan, Vijaylakshmi; Rayudu, V N; Caussy, Harry

    2011-03-01

    This report describes the results of a time-series analysis of the effect of short-term exposure to particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter < or = 10 pm (PM10) on mortality in metropolitan Chennai, India (formerly Madras). This was one of three sites in India chosen by HEI as part of its Public Health and Air Pollution in Asia (PAPA) initiative. The study involved integration and analysis of retrospective data for the years 2002 through 2004. The data were obtained from relevant government agencies in charge of routine data collection. Data on meteorologic confounders (including temperature, relative humidity, and dew point) were available on all days of the study period. Data on mortality were also available on all days, but information on cause-of-death (including accidental deaths) could not be reliably ascertained. Hence, only all-cause daily mortality was used as the major outcome for the time-series analyses. Data on PM10, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) were limited to a much smaller number of days, but spanned the full study period. Data limitations resulting from low sensitivity of gaseous pollutant measurements led to using only PM10 in the main analysis. Of the eight operational ambient air quality monitor (AQM) stations in the city, seven met the selection criteria set forth in the common protocol developed for the three PAPA studies in India. In addition, all raw data used in the analysis were subjected to additional quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) criteria to ensure the validity of the measurements. Two salient features of the PM10 data set in Chennai were a high percentage of missing readings and a low correlation among daily data recorded by the AQMs. The latter resulted partly because each AQM had a small footprint (approximate area over which the air pollutant measurements recorded in the AQM are considered valid), and partly because of differences in source profiles among the 10 zones within the city. The

  8. Chemotherapy effectiveness and mortality prediction in surgically treated osteosarcoma dogs: A validation study.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, A F; Nielen, M; Withrow, S J; Selmic, L E; Burton, J H; Klungel, O H; Groenwold, R H H; Kirpensteijn, J

    2016-03-01

    Canine osteosarcoma is the most common bone cancer, and an important cause of mortality and morbidity, in large purebred dogs. Previously we constructed two multivariable models to predict a dog's 5-month or 1-year mortality risk after surgical treatment for osteosarcoma. According to the 5-month model, dogs with a relatively low risk of 5-month mortality benefited most from additional chemotherapy treatment. In the present study, we externally validated these results using an independent cohort study of 794 dogs. External performance of our prediction models showed some disagreement between observed and predicted risk, mean difference: -0.11 (95% confidence interval [95% CI]-0.29; 0.08) for 5-month risk and 0.25 (95%CI 0.10; 0.40) for 1-year mortality risk. After updating the intercept, agreement improved: -0.0004 (95%CI-0.16; 0.16) and -0.002 (95%CI-0.15; 0.15). The chemotherapy by predicted mortality risk interaction (P-value=0.01) showed that the chemotherapy compared to no chemotherapy effectiveness was modified by 5-month mortality risk: dogs with a relatively lower risk of mortality benefited most from additional chemotherapy. Chemotherapy effectiveness on 1-year mortality was not significantly modified by predicted risk (P-value=0.28). In conclusion, this external validation study confirmed that our multivariable risk prediction models can predict a patient's mortality risk and that dogs with a relatively lower risk of 5-month mortality seem to benefit most from chemotherapy.

  9. Neurophysiological findings in patients 1 year after snake bite induced neurotoxicity in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Bell, D J; Wijegunasinghe, D; Samarakoon, S; Palipana, H; Gunasekera, S; de Silva, H A; Lalloo, D G; Ranawaka, U K; de Silva, H J

    2010-05-01

    Snake bite causes significant morbidity and mortality in Sri Lanka. Snake venoms contain neurotoxins that block neuromuscular junction transmission. Presynaptic neurotoxicity most commonly causes destruction of nerve terminals with recovery by regrowth, whilst postsynaptic neurotoxicity usually involves competition at the acetylcholine receptor. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there were long-term clinical or neurophysiological changes in snake bite survivors 1 year after their envenoming. Detailed neurophysiological tests and clinical examinations were performed on 26 snake bite victims who had presented with neurotoxicity 12 months previously, and their results were compared with controls recruited from the same communities. Significant differences were observed in some nerve conduction parameters in some snake bite victims compared with controls, predominantly in those thought to have elapid bites, including prolongation of sensory, motor and F-wave latencies and reduction of conduction velocities. There was no evidence of any residual deficits in neuromuscular junction transmission. These results suggest a possible demyelinating type polyneuropathy. None of the cases or controls had abnormalities on clinical examination. This is one of the few studies to report possible long-term neurological damage following systemic neurotoxicity after snake bite. The clinical significance of these neurophysiological abnormalities is uncertain and further studies are required to investigate whether the abnormalities persist and to see whether clinical consequences develop.

  10. Risk factors and predictors of mortality for proximal humeral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Gooding, Benjamin WT; Manning, Paul A; Wallace, W Angus; Geoghegan, John M

    2014-01-01

    Background Risk factors for mortality after proximal humeral fracture, including socioeconomic status, are poorly defined. This retrospective review of prospectively collected data defines the epidemiology and predictors of mortality in association with proximal humeral fractures. Methods Patients who sustained proximal humeral fractures were identified from fragility fracture and trauma databases between May 2001 and September 2012. Results In total, 1880 patients with a mean age of 69 years and a male to female ratio of 2 : 3 were identified. Socioeconomic distribution is skewed towards the lowest and highest quintiles. Low-energy mechanisms caused 88% of fractures. Men sustain fractures when they are aged 10 years younger and via higher-energy mechanisms. In total, 536 patients (29%) died within the study period with a 1-year mortality of 9.8%, rising to 28.2% at 5 years. Female gender, increasing age, pathological fracture and increased number of co-morbidities were independent variables for increased mortality. Conclusions The present study, which was conducted over an 11-year period, is the first to combine the epidemiology and risk factors for mortality with socioeconomic rank. One-year mortality risk is twice that of the background matched population. Patient counselling with respect to increased mortality should be considered, especially in higher-risk elderly females with multiple co-morbidities. PMID:27582921

  11. Mortality among aircraft manufacturing workers

    PubMed Central

    Boice, J. D.; Marano, D. E.; Fryzek, J. P.; Sadler, C. J.; McLaughlin, J. K.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the risk of cancer and other diseases among workers engaged in aircraft manufacturing and potentially exposed to compounds containing chromate, trichloroethylene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and mixed solvents. METHODS: A retrospective cohort mortality study was conducted of workers employed for at least 1 year at a large aircraft manufacturing facility in California on or after 1 January 1960. The mortality experience of these workers was determined by examination of national, state, and company records to the end of 1996. Standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) were evaluated comparing the observed numbers of deaths among workers with those expected in the general population adjusting for age, sex, race, and calendar year. The SMRs for 40 cause of death categories were computed for the total cohort and for subgroups defined by sex, race, position in the factory, work duration, year of first employment, latency, and broad occupational groups. Factory job titles were classified as to likely use of chemicals, and internal Poisson regression analyses were used to compute mortality risk ratios for categories of years of exposure to chromate, TCE, PCE, and mixed solvents, with unexposed factory workers serving as referents. RESULTS: The study cohort comprised 77,965 workers who accrued nearly 1.9 million person-years of follow up (mean 24.2 years). Mortality follow up, estimated as 99% complete, showed that 20,236 workers had died by 31 December 1996, with cause of death obtained for 98%. Workers experienced low overall mortality (all causes of death SMR 0.83) and low cancer mortality (SMR 0.90). No significant increases in risk were found for any of the 40 specific cause of death categories, whereas for several causes the numbers of deaths were significantly below expectation. Analyses by occupational group and specific job titles showed no remarkable mortality patterns. Factory workers estimated to have been routinely exposed to chromate were

  12. Post-diagnosis body mass index and mortality among women diagnosed with endometrial cancer: Results from the Women’s Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Arem, Hannah; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Moore, Steven C.; Irwin, Melinda L.; LaMonte, Michael J.; Sarto, Gloria E.; Nassir, Rami; Luo, Juhua; Chlebowski, Rowan T.; Brinton, Louise A.; Matthews, Charles E.

    2017-01-01

    Higher body mass index (BMI) measured before endometrial cancer diagnosis has been associated with greater risk of developing endometrial cancer and higher mortality, but the association between BMI measured after diagnosis and mortality risk is unclear. We identified 467 women (91 deaths) in the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) with information on BMI measured after diagnosis and used Cox proportional hazards regression to generate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for all-cause mortality. Comparing BMI 35+ with <25 kg/m2, we observed no association with all-cause mortality (HR = 1.02, 95% CI 0.55–1.91). Our study does not support the hypothesis that higher BMI after endometrial cancer diagnosis is associated with poorer survival. PMID:28152055

  13. Glycemic Control Modifies Difference in Mortality Risk Between Hemodialysis and Peritoneal Dialysis in Incident Dialysis Patients With Diabetes: Results From a Nationwide Prospective Cohort in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Jung; Kwon, Young Eun; Park, Kyoung Sook; Kee, Youn Kyung; Yoon, Chang-Yun; Han, In Mee; Han, Seung Gyu; Oh, Hyung Jung; Park, Jung Tak; Han, Seung Hyeok; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Yong-Lim; Kim, Yon Su; Yang, Chul Woo; Kim, Nam-Ho; Kang, Shin-Wook

    2016-03-01

    Although numerous studies have tried to elucidate the best dialysis modality in end-stage renal disease patients with diabetes, results were inconsistent and varied with the baseline characteristics of patients. Furthermore, none of the previous studies on diabetic dialysis patients accounted for the impact of glycemic control. We explored whether glycemic control had modifying effect on mortality between hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) in incident dialysis patients with diabetes. A total of 902 diabetic patients who started dialysis between August 2008 and December 2013 were included from a nationwide prospective cohort in Korea. Based on the interaction analysis between hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and dialysis modalities for patient survival (P for interaction = 0.004), subjects were stratified into good and poor glycemic control groups (HbA1c< or ≥8.0%). Differences in survival rates according to dialysis modalities were ascertained in each glycemic control group after propensity score matching. During a median follow-up duration of 28 months, the relative risk of death was significantly lower in PD compared with HD in the whole cohort and unmatched patients (whole cohort, hazard ratio [HR] = 0.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.47-0.90, P = 0.01; patients with available HbA1c [n = 773], HR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.46-0.91, P = 0.01). In the good glycemic control group, there was a significant survival advantage of PD (HbA1c <8.0%, HR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.37-0.94, P = 0.03). However, there was no significant difference in survival rates between PD and HD in the poor glycemic control group (HbA1c ≥8.0%, HR = 1.21, 95% CI = 0.46-2.76, P = 0.80). This study demonstrated that the degree of glycemic control modified the mortality risk between dialysis modalities, suggesting that glycemic control might partly contribute to better survival of PD in incident dialysis patients with diabetes.

  14. Does exposure to aircraft noise increase the mortality from cardiovascular disease in the population living in the vicinity of airports? Results of an ecological study in France

    PubMed Central

    Evrard, Anne-Sophie; Bouaoun, Liacine; Champelovier, Patricia; Lambert, Jacques; Laumon, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    The impact of aircraft noise on health is of growing concern. We investigated the relationship between this exposure and mortality from cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, myocardial infarction, and stroke. We performed an ecological study on 161 communes (commune being the smallest administrative unit in France) close to the following three major French airports: Paris-Charles de Gaulle, Lyon Saint-Exupéry, and Toulouse-Blagnac. The mortality data were provided by the French Center on Medical Causes of Death for the period 2007-2010. Based on the data provided by the French Civil Aviation Authority, a weighted average exposure to aircraft noise (Lden AEI) was computed at the commune level. A Poisson regression model with commune-specific random intercepts, adjusted for potential confounding factors including air pollution, was used to investigate the association between mortality rates and Lden AEI. Positive associations were observed between Lden AEI and mortality from cardiovascular disease [adjusted mortality rate ratio (MRR) per 10 dB(A) increase in Lden AEI = 1.18; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11-1.25], coronary heart disease [MRR = 1.24 (1.12-1.36)], and myocardial infarction [MRR = 1.28 (1.11-1.46]. Stroke mortality was more weakly associated with Lden AEI [MRR = 1.08 (0.97-1.21]. These significant associations were not attenuated after the adjustment for air pollution. The present ecological study supports the hypothesis of an association between aircraft noise exposure and mortality from cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction. However, the potential for ecological bias and the possibility that this association could be due to residual confounding cannot be excluded. PMID:26356375

  15. Does exposure to aircraft noise increase the mortality from cardiovascular disease in the population living in the vicinity of airports? Results of an ecological study in France.

    PubMed

    Evrard, Anne-Sophie; Bouaoun, Liacine; Champelovier, Patricia; Lambert, Jacques; Laumon, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    The impact of aircraft noise on health is of growing concern. We investigated the relationship between this exposure and mortality from cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, myocardial infarction, and stroke. We performed an ecological study on 161 communes (commune being the smallest administrative unit in France) close to the following three major French airports: Paris-Charles de Gaulle, Lyon Saint-Exupéry, and Toulouse-Blagnac. The mortality data were provided by the French Center on Medical Causes of Death for the period 2007-2010. Based on the data provided by the French Civil Aviation Authority, a weighted average exposure to aircraft noise (L den AEI) was computed at the commune level. A Poisson regression model with commune-specific random intercepts, adjusted for potential confounding factors including air pollution, was used to investigate the association between mortality rates and L den AEI. Positive associations were observed between L den AEI and mortality from cardiovascular disease [adjusted mortality rate ratio (MRR) per 10 dB(A) increase in L den AEI = 1.18; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11-1.25], coronary heart disease [MRR = 1.24 (1.12-1.36)], and myocardial infarction [MRR = 1.28 (1.11-1.46]. Stroke mortality was more weakly associated with L den AEI [MRR = 1.08 (0.97-1.21]. These significant associations were not attenuated after the adjustment for air pollution. The present ecological study supports the hypothesis of an association between aircraft noise exposure and mortality from cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction. However, the potential for ecological bias and the possibility that this association could be due to residual confounding cannot be excluded.

  16. Comparison of weight loss outcomes 1 year after sleeve gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in patients aged above 50 years

    PubMed Central

    Praveenraj, Palanivelu; Gomes, Rachel M; Kumar, Saravana; Perumal, Sivalingam; Senthilnathan, Palanisamy; Parthasarathi, Ramakrishnan; Rajapandian, Subbiah; Palanivelu, Chinnusamy

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Safe, effective weight loss with resolution of comorbidities has been convincingly demonstrated with bariatric surgery in the aged obese. They, however, lose less weight than younger individuals. It is not known if degree of weight loss is influenced by the choice of bariatric procedure. The aim of this study was to compare the degree of weight loss between laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) and laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) in patients above the age of 50 years at 1 year after surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis was performed of all patients more than 50 years of age who underwent LSG or LRYGB between February 2012 and July 2013 with at least 1 year of follow-up. Data evaluated at 1 year included age, sex, weight, body mass index (BMI), mean operative time, percentage of weight loss and excess weight loss, resolution/remission of diabetes, morbidity and mortality. RESULTS: Of a total of 86 patients, 54 underwent LSG and 32 underwent LRYGB. The mean percentage of excess weight loss at the end of 1 year was 60.19 ± 17.45 % after LSG and 82.76 ± 34.26 % after LRYGB (P = 0.021). One patient developed a sleeve leak after LSG, and 2 developed iron deficiency anaemia after LRYGB. The remission/improvement in diabetes mellitus and biochemistry was similar. CONCLUSION: LRYGB may offer better results than LSG in terms of weight loss in patients over 50 years of age. PMID:27279392

  17. Clinical Features, Short-Term Mortality, and Prognostic Risk Factors of Septic Patients Admitted to Internal Medicine Units: Results of an Italian Multicenter Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Antonino; Dentali, Francesco; La Regina, Micaela; Foglia, Emanuela; Gambacorta, Maurizia; Garagiola, Elisabetta; Bonardi, Giorgio; Clerici, Pierangelo; Concia, Ercole; Colombo, Fabrizio; Campanini, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Only a few studies provided data on the clinical history of sepsis within internal Medicine units. The aim of the study was to assess the short-term mortality and to evaluate the prognostic risk factors in a large cohort of septic patients treated in internal medicine units. Thirty-one internal medicine units participated to the study. Within each participating unit, all admitted patients were screened for the presence of sepsis. A total of 533 patients were included; 78 patients (14.6%, 95%CI 11.9, 18.0%) died during hospitalization; mortality rate was 5.5% (95% CI 3.1, 9.6%) in patients with nonsevere sepsis and 20.1% (95%CI 16.2, 28.8%) in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. Severe sepsis or septic shock (OR 4.41, 95%CI 1.93, 10.05), immune system weakening (OR 2.10, 95%CI 1.12, 3.94), active solid cancer (OR 2.14, 95% CI 1.16, 3.94), and age (OR 1.03 per year, 95% CI 1.01, 1.06) were significantly associated with an increased mortality risk, whereas blood culture positive for Escherichia coli was significantly associated with a reduced mortality risk (OR 0.46, 95%CI 0.24, 0.88). In-hospital mortality of septic patients treated in internal medicine units appeared similar to the mortality rate obtained in recent studies conducted in the ICU setting.

  18. Systemic inflammation (Interleukin 6) predicts all-cause mortality in men: results from a 9-year follow-up of the MEMO Study.

    PubMed

    Baune, Bernhard T; Rothermundt, Matthias; Ladwig, Karl H; Meisinger, Christine; Berger, Klaus

    2011-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association of biomarkers among circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines with all-cause mortality in elderly community dwellings of the MEMO study, Germany. All-cause mortality (cancer, cardiovascular diseases (CVD), and other causes of death) was assessed in a general population sample (N = 385) of the elderly (age 65-83 years) 9 years after baseline assessment in 1998. As markers of inflammation, a variety of cytokines (IL-1beta, IL-4sR, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, TNF-alpha) were assessed in serum. Cox proportional Hazard model was used to estimate the association of cytokines with all-cause mortality over 9 years. In total, 110 deaths had occurred during follow-up (cancer N = 36; CVD N = 56; other = 18). Deaths were more frequent in male (N  = 76, 37.4%) as compared to females (N = 40, 21.9%; p  = 0.001). Among individual cytokines, IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-alpha were associated with all-cause mortality, of which IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 remained significant after adjusting for confounders. When the upper tertiles of these cytokines were compared to the lower tertiles, only IL-6 was consistently related to all-cause mortality independently of the level of adjustment and showing a dose-response relationship between IL-6 tertiles and risk of death. This effect originated in the male population. The study shows that IL-6 is a powerful predictor of all-cause mortality in male elderly community dwellings. Higher levels of IL-6 may reflect a chronic low-level systemic inflammation prospectively increasing the risk of death in the elderly.

  19. Disparities in Under-Five Child Injury Mortality between Developing and Developed Countries: 1990–2013

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yun; Wu, Yue; Schwebel, David C.; Zhou, Liang; Hu, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Using estimates from the 2013 Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study, we update evidence on disparities in under-five child injury mortality between developing and developed countries from 1990 to 2013. Methods: Mortality rates were accessed through the online visualization tool by the GBD study 2013 group. We calculated percent change in child injury mortality rates between 1990 and 2013. Data analysis was conducted separately for <1 year and 1–4 years to specify age differences in rate changes. Results: Between 1990 and 2013, over 3-fold mortality gaps were observed between developing countries and developed countries for both age groups in the study time period. Similar decreases in injury rates were observed for developed and developing countries (<1 year: −50% vs. −50% respectively; 1–4 years: −56% vs. −58%). Differences in injury mortality changes during 1990–2013 between developing and developed nations varied with injury cause. There were greater reductions in mortality from transport injury, falls, poisoning, adverse effects of medical treatment, exposure to forces of nature, and collective violence and legal intervention in developed countries, whereas there were larger decreases in mortality from drowning, exposure to mechanical forces, and animal contact in developing countries. Country-specific analysis showed large variations across countries for both injury mortality and changes in injury mortality between 1990 and 2013. Conclusions: Sustained higher child injury mortality during 1990–2013 for developing countries merits the attention of the global injury prevention community. Countries that have high injury mortality can benefit from the success of other countries. PMID:27399740

  20. Morbidity and mortality of vermiculite miners and millers exposed to tremolite-actinolite: Part II. Mortality

    SciTech Connect

    Amandus, H.E.; Wheeler, R.

    1987-01-01

    The vermiculite ore and concentrate of a mine and mill located near Libby, Montana was found to be contaminated with a fiber of the tremolite/acetinolite series. A study was conducted to estimate the exposure-response relationship for mortality for 575 men who had been hired prior to 1970 and employed at least 1 year at the Montana site. Individual cumulative fiber exposure (fiber-years) was calculated. Results indicated that mortality from nonmalignant respiratory disease (NMRD) and lung cancer was significantly increased compared to the U.S. white male population. For those workers more than 20 years since hire, the standard mortality rate (SMR) for lung cancer (ICDA 162-163) was 84.7, 225.1, 109.3, and 671.3 for less than 50, 50-99, 100-399, and more than 399 fiber-years respectively. Corresponding results for NMRD (ICDA 460-519) were 327.8, 283.5, 0, and 278.4. Based on a linear model for greater than 20 years since hire, the estimated percentage increase in lung cancer mortality risk was 0.6% for each fiber-year of exposure. At 5 fiber-years, the estimated percentage was 2.9% from an unrestricted (nonthreshold) linear model and 0.6% from a survival model.

  1. A time series study on the effects of heat on mortality and evaluation of heterogeneity into European and Eastern-Southern Mediterranean cities: results of EU CIRCE project

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Mediterranean region is particularly vulnerable to the effect of summer temperature. Within the CIRCE project this time-series study aims to quantify for the first time the effect of summer temperature in Eastern-Southern Mediterranean cities and compared it with European cities around the Mediterranean basin, evaluating city characteristics that explain between-city heterogeneity. Methods The city-specific effect of maximum apparent temperature (Tappmax) was assessed by Generalized Estimation Equations, assuming a linear threshold model. Then, city-specific estimates were included in a random effect meta-regression analysis to investigate the effect modification by several city characteristics. Results Heterogeneity in the temperature-mortality relationship was observed among cities. Thresholds recorded higher values in the warmest cities of Tunis (35.5°C) and Tel-Aviv (32.8°C) while the effect of Tappmax above threshold was greater in the European cities. In Eastern-Southern Mediterranean cities a higher effect was observed among younger age groups (0–14 in Tunis and 15–64 in Tel-Aviv and Istanbul) in contrast with the European cities where the elderly population was more vulnerable. Climate conditions explained most of the observed heterogeneity and among socio-demographic and economic characteristics only health expenditure and unemployment rate were identified as effect modifiers. Conclusions The high vulnerability observed in the young populations in Eastern-Southern Mediterranean cities represent a major public health problem. Considering the large political and economic changes occurring in this region as well future temperature increase due to climate change, it is important to strengthen research and public health efforts in these Mediterranean countries. PMID:23822609

  2. Changes in the Effect of Heat on Mortality in the Last 20 Years in Nine European Cities. Results from the PHASE Project.

    PubMed

    de' Donato, Francesca K; Leone, Michela; Scortichini, Matteo; De Sario, Manuela; Katsouyanni, Klea; Lanki, Timo; Basagaña, Xavier; Ballester, Ferran; Åström, Christofer; Paldy, Anna; Pascal, Mathilde; Gasparrini, Antonio; Menne, Bettina; Michelozzi, Paola

    2015-12-08

    The European project PHASE aims to evaluate patterns of change in the temperature-mortality relationship and in the number of deaths attributable to heat in nine European cities in two periods, before and after summer 2003 (1996-2002 and 2004-2010). We performed age-specific Poisson regression models separately in the two periods, controlling for seasonality, air pollution and time trends. Distributed lag non-linear models were used to estimate the Relative Risks of daily mortality for increases in mean temperature from the 75th to 99th percentile of the summer distribution for each city. In the recent period, a reduction in the mortality risk associated to heat was observed only in Athens, Rome and Paris, especially among the elderly. Furthermore, in terms of heat-attributable mortality, 985, 787 and 623 fewer deaths were estimated, respectively, in the three cities. In Helsinki and Stockholm, there is a suggestion of increased heat effect. Noteworthy is that an effect of heat was still present in the recent years in all cities, ranging from +11% to +35%. In Europe, considering the warming observed in recent decades and population ageing, effective intervention measures should be promoted across countries, especially targeting vulnerable subgroups of the population with lower adaptive resources.

  3. Changes in the Effect of Heat on Mortality in the Last 20 Years in Nine European Cities. Results from the PHASE Project

    PubMed Central

    de’ Donato, Francesca K.; Leone, Michela; Scortichini, Matteo; De Sario, Manuela; Katsouyanni, Klea; Lanki, Timo; Basagaña, Xavier; Ballester, Ferran; Åström, Christofer; Paldy, Anna; Pascal, Mathilde; Gasparrini, Antonio; Menne, Bettina; Michelozzi, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The European project PHASE aims to evaluate patterns of change in the temperature–mortality relationship and in the number of deaths attributable to heat in nine European cities in two periods, before and after summer 2003 (1996–2002 and 2004–2010). We performed age-specific Poisson regression models separately in the two periods, controlling for seasonality, air pollution and time trends. Distributed lag non-linear models were used to estimate the Relative Risks of daily mortality for increases in mean temperature from the 75th to 99th percentile of the summer distribution for each city. In the recent period, a reduction in the mortality risk associated to heat was observed only in Athens, Rome and Paris, especially among the elderly. Furthermore, in terms of heat-attributable mortality, 985, 787 and 623 fewer deaths were estimated, respectively, in the three cities. In Helsinki and Stockholm, there is a suggestion of increased heat effect. Noteworthy is that an effect of heat was still present in the recent years in all cities, ranging from +11% to +35%. In Europe, considering the warming observed in recent decades and population ageing, effective intervention measures should be promoted across countries, especially targeting vulnerable subgroups of the population with lower adaptive resources. PMID:26670239

  4. Nut consumption is inversely associated with both cancer and total mortality in a Mediterranean population: prospective results from the Moli-sani study.

    PubMed

    Bonaccio, Marialaura; Di Castelnuovo, Augusto; De Curtis, Amalia; Costanzo, Simona; Bracone, Francesca; Persichillo, Mariarosaria; Donati, Maria Benedetta; de Gaetano, Giovanni; Iacoviello, Licia

    2015-09-14

    Nut intake has been associated with reduced inflammatory status and lower risk of CVD and mortality. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between nut consumption and mortality and the role of inflammation. We conducted a population-based prospective investigation on 19 386 subjects enrolled in the Moli-sani study. Food intake was recorded by the Italian version of the European Project Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition FFQ. C-reactive protein, leucocyte and platelet counts and the neutrophil:lymphocyte ratio were used as biomarkers of low-grade inflammation. Hazard ratios (HR) were calculated using multivariable Cox proportional hazard models. During a median follow-up of 4·3 years, 334 all-cause deaths occurred. As compared with subjects who never ate nuts, rare intake (≤2 times/month) was inversely associated with mortality (multivariable HR=0·68; 95 % CI 0·54, 0·87). At intake ≥8 times/month, a greater protection was observed (HR=0·53; 0·32, 0·90). Nut intake (v. no intake) conveyed a higher protection to individuals poorly adhering to the Mediterranean diet (MD). A significant reduction in cancer deaths (HR=0·64; 95 % CI 0·44, 0·94) was also observed, whereas the impact on CVD deaths was limited to an inverse, but not significant, trend. Biomarkers of low-grade inflammation were reduced in nut consumers but did not account for the association with mortality. In conclusion, nut intake was associated with reduced cancer and total mortality. The protection was stronger in individuals with lower adherence to MD, whereas it was similar in high-risk groups (diabetics, obese, smokers or those with the metabolic syndrome), as compared with low-risk subjects. Inflammation did not explain the observed relationship.

  5. Choking first aid - infant under 1 year - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100221.htm Choking first aid - infant under 1 year - series—Part 1 To ... Loss of consciousness if blockage is not cleared FIRST AID 1. DO NOT perform these steps if the ...

  6. Choking first aid - adult or child over 1 year - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100222.htm Choking first aid - adult or child over 1 year - series—Part ... occur in as little as 4 minutes. Rapid first aid for choking can save a life. The universal ...

  7. Weather-Related Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Brooke G.; Bell, Michelle L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Many studies have linked weather to mortality; however, role of such critical factors as regional variation, susceptible populations, and acclimatization remain unresolved. Methods We applied time-series models to 107 US communities allowing a nonlinear relationship between temperature and mortality by using a 14-year dataset. Second-stage analysis was used to relate cold, heat, and heat wave effect estimates to community-specific variables. We considered exposure timeframe, susceptibility, age, cause of death, and confounding from pollutants. Heat waves were modeled with varying intensity and duration. Results Heat-related mortality was most associated with a shorter lag (average of same day and previous day), with an overall increase of 3.0% (95% posterior interval: 2.4%–3.6%) in mortality risk comparing the 99th and 90th percentile temperatures for the community. Cold-related mortality was most associated with a longer lag (average of current day up to 25 days previous), with a 4.2% (3.2%–5.3%) increase in risk comparing the first and 10th percentile temperatures for the community. Mortality risk increased with the intensity or duration of heat waves. Spatial heterogeneity in effects indicates that weather–mortality relationships from 1 community may not be applicable in another. Larger spatial heterogeneity for absolute temperature estimates (comparing risk at specific temperatures) than for relative temperature estimates (comparing risk at community-specific temperature percentiles) provides evidence for acclimatization. We identified susceptibility based on age, socioeconomic conditions, urbanicity, and central air conditioning. Conclusions Acclimatization, individual susceptibility, and community characteristics all affect heat-related effects on mortality. PMID:19194300

  8. Animal mortality resulting from uniform exposures to photon radiations: Calculated LD/sub 50/s and a compilation of experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T.D.; Morris, M.D.; Wells, S.M.; Young, R.W.

    1986-12-01

    Studies conducted during the 1950s and 1960s of radiation-induced mortality to diverse animal species under various exposure protocols were compiled into a mortality data base. Some 24 variables were extracted and recomputed from each of the published studies, which were collected from a variety of available sources, primarily journal articles. Two features of this compilation effort are (1) an attempt to give an estimate of the uniform dose received by the bone marrow in each treatment so that interspecies differences due to body size were minimized and (2) a recomputation of the LD/sub 50/ where sufficient experimental data are available. Exposure rates varied in magnitude from about 10/sup -2/ to 10/sup 3/ R/min. This report describes the data base, the sources of data, and the data-handling techniques; presents a bibliography of studies compiled; and tabulates data from each study. 103 refs., 44 tabs.

  9. Body Mass Index and Mortality in Acute Myocardial Infarction Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bucholz, Emily M.; Rathore, Saif S.; Reid, Kimberly J.; Jones, Philip G.; Chan, Paul S.; Rich, Michael W.; Spertus, John A.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies have described an “obesity paradox” with heart failure, whereby higher body mass index (BMI) is associated with lower mortality. However, little is known about the impact of obesity on survival after acute myocardial infarction. Methods Data from 2 registries of patients hospitalized in the United States with acute myocardial infarction between 2003–04 (PREMIER) and 2005–08 (TRIUMPH) were used to examine the association of BMI with mortality. Patients (n=6359) were categorized into BMI groups (kg/m2) using baseline measurements. Two sets of analyses were performed using Cox proportional hazards regression with fractional polynomials to model BMI as categorical and continuous variables. To assess the independent association of BMI with mortality, analyses were repeated adjusting for 7 domains of patient and clinical characteristics. Results Median BMI was 28.6. BMI was inversely associated with crude 1-year mortality (normal, 9.2%; overweight, 6.1%; obese, 4.7%; morbidly obese; 4.6%; p<0.001), which persisted after multivariable adjustment. When BMI was examined as a continuous variable, the hazards curve declined with increasing BMI and then increased above a BMI of 40. Compared with patients with a BMI of 18.5, patients with higher BMIs had a 20% to 68% lower mortality at 1 year. No interactions between age (p=0.37), gender (p=0.87) or diabetes mellitus (p=0.55) were observed. Conclusions There appears to be an “obesity paradox” among acute myocardial infarction patients such that higher BMI is associated with lower mortality, an effect that was not modified by patient characteristics and was comparable across age, gender, and diabetes subgroups. PMID:22483510

  10. Temperature, Not Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5), is Causally Associated with Short-Term Acute Daily Mortality Rates: Results from One Hundred United States Cities.

    PubMed

    Cox, Tony; Popken, Douglas; Ricci, Paolo F

    2012-01-01

    Exposures to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in air (C) have been suspected of contributing causally to increased acute (e.g., same-day or next-day) human mortality rates (R). We tested this causal hypothesis in 100 United States cities using the publicly available NMMAPS database. Although a significant, approximately linear, statistical C-R association exists in simple statistical models, closer analysis suggests that it is not causal. Surprisingly, conditioning on other variables that have been extensively considered in previous analyses (usually using splines or other smoothers to approximate their effects), such as month of the year and mean daily temperature, suggests that they create strong, nonlinear confounding that explains the statistical association between PM2.5 and mortality rates in this data set. As this finding disagrees with conventional wisdom, we apply several different techniques to examine it. Conditional independence tests for potential causation, non-parametric classification tree analysis, Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA), and Granger-Sims causality testing, show no evidence that PM2.5 concentrations have any causal impact on increasing mortality rates. This apparent absence of a causal C-R relation, despite their statistical association, has potentially important implications for managing and communicating the uncertain health risks associated with, but not necessarily caused by, PM2.5 exposures.

  11. Joint effects of tobacco use and body mass on all-cause mortality in Mumbai, India: results from a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Pednekar, Mangesh S; Gupta, Prakash C; Hebert, James R; Hakama, Matti

    2008-02-01

    The joint effects of tobacco use and body mass on mortality have not been well characterized, although evidence regarding the effect of smoking on the association between body mass and mortality is accumulating. To study the joint effects of these important risk factors, the authors conducted a prospective cohort study of 148,173 men and women aged > or =35 years in Mumbai, India. Subjects were recruited during 1991-1997 and then followed for approximately 5-6 years (1997-2003). During 774,129 person-years of follow-up, 13,261 deaths were observed. Tobacco use increased the risk of death across different categories of body mass, with particularly high risks being observed in extreme body mass categories. Among men, obese smokers and obese never users of tobacco were at 56% and 34% increased risks of death, respectively, compared with overweight never users of tobacco. Similarly, at highest risk were extremely thin males who smoked bidis (relative risk = 3.45) or cigarettes (relative risk = 3.32). Body mass and all forms of tobacco use had independent as well as multiplicative joint effects on mortality risk. Tobacco use and undernutrition are serious problems in India. The current study indicates that obesity may emerge as a serious public health problem with which tobacco use may interact.

  12. Mortal assets

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, Geoffrey R.; Zablotska, Lydia B.; Fix, John J.; Egel, John N.; Buchanan, Jeffrey A.

    2005-11-01

    Workers employed in 15 utilities that generate nuclear power in the United States have been followed for up to 18 years between 1979 and 1997. Their cumulative dose from whole-body ionizing radiation has been determined from the dose records maintained by the facilities themselves and the REIRS and REMS systems maintained by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy, respectively. Mortality in the cohort from a number of causes has been analyzed with respect to individual radiation doses. The cohort displays a very substantial healthy worker effect, i.e. considerably lower cancer and noncancer mortality than the general population. Based on 26 and 368 deaths, respectively, positive though statistically nonsignificant associations were seen for mortality from leukemia (excluding chronic lymphocytic leukemia) and all solid cancers combined, with excess relative risks per sievert of 5.67 (95% confidence interval (CI) -2.56, 30.4) and 0.596 (95% CI -2.01, 4.64), respectively. These estimates are very similar to those from the atomic bomb survivors study, though the wide confidence intervals are also consistent with lower or higher risk estimates. A strong positive and statistically significant association between radiation dose and deaths from arteriosclerotic heart disease including coronary heart disease was also observed in the cohort, with an ERR of 8.78 (95% CI 2.10, 20.0). Whle associations with heart disease have been reported in some other occupational studies, the magnitude of the present association is not consistent with them and therefore needs cautious interpretation and merits further attention. At present, the relatively small number of deaths and the young age of the cohort (mean age at end of follow-up is 45 years) limit the power of the study, but further follow-up is 45 years) limit the power of the study, but further follow-up and the inclusion of the present data in an ongoing IARC combined analysis of nuclear workers from 15

  13. Important factors in predicting mortality outcome from stroke: findings from the Anglia Stroke Clinical Network Evaluation Study

    PubMed Central

    O. Bachmann, Max; Loke, Yoon Kong; D. Musgrave, Stanley; Price, Gill M.; Hale, Rachel; Metcalf, Anthony Kneale; Turner, David A.; Day, Diana J.; A. Warburton, Elizabeth; Potter, John F.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background although variation in stroke service provision and outcomes have been previously investigated, it is less well known what service characteristics are associated with reduced short- and medium-term mortality. Methods data from a prospective multicentre study (2009–12) in eight acute regional NHS trusts with a catchment population of about 2.6 million were used to examine the prognostic value of patient-related factors and service characteristics on stroke mortality outcome at 7, 30 and 365 days post stroke, and time to death within 1 year. Results a total of 2,388 acute stroke patients (mean (standard deviation) 76.9 (12.7) years; 47.3% men, 87% ischaemic stroke) were included in the study. Among patients characteristics examined increasing age, haemorrhagic stroke, total anterior circulation stroke type, higher prestroke frailty, history of hypertension and ischaemic heart disease and admission hyperglycaemia predicted 1-year mortality. Additional inclusion of stroke service characteristics controlling for patient and service level characteristics showed varying prognostic impact of service characteristics on stroke mortality over the disease course during first year after stroke at different time points. The most consistent finding was the benefit of higher nursing levels; an increase in one trained nurses per 10 beds was associated with reductions in 30-day mortality of 11–28% (P < 0.0001) and in 1-year mortality of 8–12% (P < 0.001). Conclusions there appears to be consistent and robust evidence of direct clinical benefit on mortality up to 1 year after acute stroke of higher numbers of trained nursing staff over and above that of other recognised mortality risk factors. PMID:28181626

  14. [Maternal mortality and perinatal mortality].

    PubMed

    Boutaleb, Y; Mesbahi, M; Lahlou, D; Aderdour, M

    1982-01-01

    94 maternal deaths and 1546 fetal and neonatal deaths were registered among 28,706 births at the CHU Averroes in Casablanca between 1978-80. 45% of women who deliver at the clinic are very poor and only 10% are relatively well off. Obstetrical antecedents were noted in 27% of the fetal deaths. 70% of the maternal deaths occurred in women aged 20-34. 32 maternal deaths occurred among 16,232 women with 1-2 children, 30 among 6514 women with 3-5 children, and 32 among 5960 women with 6-14 children. 11,027 of the 28,706 were primaparas. Perinatal mortality was 4.46% among primaparas, 8.24% among grand multiparas, and 4.1% among secondiparas. In 58 of the 94 cases of maternal mortality the woman was hospitalized after attempting delivery at home or in a village clinic. Among women with 1 or 2 children, hemorrhage was the cause of death in 8 cases, infection in 7 cases, eclampsia in 3 cases, thromboembolism in 2 cases, uterine inversion in 2 cases, pulmonary tuberculosis in 1 case, embolism in 5 cases, and other causes 1 case each. Among women with 3-5 children hemorrhage was the cause of death in 10 cases, septicemia in 3 cases, uterine rupture in 3 cases, eclampsia in 3 cases, uterine inversion in 2 cases, viral hepatitis in 2 cases, emboli in 2 cases, and other reasons 1 case each. Among grand multiparas hemorrhage was the cause of death in 11 cases, uterine rupture in 12 cases, peritonitis in 2 cases, eclampsia in 2 cases, emboli in 2 cases, and other causes 1 case each. 19 of the maternal deaths were judged to have been avoidable with better management. Prematurity and birth weight of 1000-2500 g associated or not with other pathology were found in 714 of 1546 perinatal deaths. Of 390 cases of death in utero with retention and maceration, 68 were caused by reno-vascular syndromes, 76 by maternal infections, 33 by maternal syphilis, 26 by fetal malformation, 18 by maternal diabetes, 10 by Rh incompatability, and 159 by indeterminate causes. In 795 cases of

  15. The ability of three different models of frailty to predict all-cause mortality: results from the European Male Aging Study (EMAS).

    PubMed

    Ravindrarajah, Rathi; Lee, David M; Pye, Stephen R; Gielen, Evelien; Boonen, Steven; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Pendleton, Neil; Finn, Joseph D; Tajar, Abdelouahid; O'Connell, Matthew D L; Rockwood, Kenneth; Bartfai, György; Casanueva, Felipe F; Forti, Gianni; Giwercman, Aleksander; Han, Thang S; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T; Kula, Krzysztof; Lean, Michael E J; Punab, Margus; Wu, Frederick C W; O'Neill, Terence W

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have directly compared the ability of the most commonly used models of frailty to predict mortality among community-dwelling individuals. Here, we used a frailty index (FI), frailty phenotype (FP), and FRAIL scale (FS) to predict mortality in the EMAS. Participants were aged 40-79 years (n=2929) at baseline and 6.6% (n=193) died over a median 4.3 years of follow-up. The FI was generated from 39 deficits, including self-reported health, morbidities, functional performance and psychological assessments. The FP and FS consisted of five phenotypic criteria and both categorized individuals as robust when they had 0 criteria, prefrail as 1-2 criteria and frail as 3+ criteria. The mean FI increased linearly with age (r(2)=0.21) and in Cox regression models adjusted for age, center, smoking and partner status the hazard ratio (HR) for death for each unit increase of the FI was 1.49. Men who were prefrail or frail by either the FP or FS definitions, had a significantly increased risk of death compared to their robust counterparts. Compared to robust men, those who were FP frail at baseline had a HR for death of 3.84, while those who were FS frail had a HR of 3.87. All three frailty models significantly predicted future mortality among community-dwelling, middle-aged and older European men after adjusting for potential confounders. Our data suggest that the choice of frailty model may not be of paramount importance when predicting future risk of death, enabling flexibility in the approach used.

  16. The mortality of companies

    PubMed Central

    Daepp, Madeleine I. G.; Hamilton, Marcus J.; West, Geoffrey B.; Bettencourt, Luís M. A.

    2015-01-01

    The firm is a fundamental economic unit of contemporary human societies. Studies on the general quantitative and statistical character of firms have produced mixed results regarding their lifespans and mortality. We examine a comprehensive database of more than 25 000 publicly traded North American companies, from 1950 to 2009, to derive the statistics of firm lifespans. Based on detailed survival analysis, we show that the mortality of publicly traded companies manifests an approximately constant hazard rate over long periods of observation. This regularity indicates that mortality rates are independent of a company's age. We show that the typical half-life of a publicly traded company is about a decade, regardless of business sector. Our results shed new light on the dynamics of births and deaths of publicly traded companies and identify some of the necessary ingredients of a general theory of firms. PMID:25833247

  17. Disclusion time measurement studies: stability of disclusion time--a 1-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kerstein, R

    1994-08-01

    Six of seven women were recalled after 1 year to remeasure their right- and left-side working disclusion times. Before the occlusal adjustment technique known as immediate complete anterior guidance development (ICAGD), these patients presented lengthy mean disclusion times (> 1.0 second) and multiple chronic myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome (MPDS) symptoms. After ICAGD, these patients presented with short mean disclusion times (< 0.7 second) and no chronic MPDS symptoms were observed. At 1-year follow-up, there was no statistical difference between present measurements of disclusion time and those of 1 year earlier. In addition, all six posttreatment patients demonstrated no observed chronic MPDS symptoms. However, the symptom of nocturnal bruxism appeared to recur with some chronic regularity. These results suggest that, for this population, disclusion time was stable over the 1-year period of observation, and the short disclusion time appears to allow normal daily muscle function with significantly lessened appearance of chronic myofacial pain dysfunction symptoms.

  18. Outcomes of surgery among the Medicare aged: mortality after surgery.

    PubMed

    Lubitz, J; Riley, G; Newton, M

    1985-01-01

    This study examines post-surgical mortality, up to 1 year after surgery, for eight common operations among aged Medicare enrollees. The operations with the highest mortality in the 1.5 months after surgery were femur fracture reduction, hip arthroplasty (other, i.e., not total replacement), and coronary artery bypass. Mortality was still above average for femur fracture reduction, hip arthroplasty (other), and transurethral prostatectomy 1 year after surgery. The highest mortality rates following surgery were for people 85 years of age or over. This raises the following question: Should certain elective surgery be performed at younger ages if it appears that surgery may eventually be needed?

  19. Cause-specific mortality among children and young adults with epilepsy: Results from the U.S. National Child Death Review Case Reporting System.

    PubMed

    Tian, Niu; Shaw, Esther C; Zack, Matthew; Kobau, Rosemarie; Dykstra, Heather; Covington, Theresa M

    2015-04-01

    We investigated causes of death in children and young adults with epilepsy by using data from the U.S. National Child Death Review Case Reporting System (NCDR-CRS), a passive surveillance system composed of comprehensive information related to deaths reviewed by local child death review teams. Information on a total of 48,697 deaths in children and young adults 28days to 24years of age, including 551 deaths with epilepsy and 48,146 deaths without epilepsy, was collected from 2004 through 2012 in 32 states. In a proportionate mortality analysis by official manner of death, decedents with epilepsy had a significantly higher percentage of natural deaths but significantly lower percentages of deaths due to accidents, homicide, and undetermined causes compared with persons without epilepsy. With respect to underlying causes of death, decedents with epilepsy had significantly higher percentages of deaths due to drowning and most medical conditions including pneumonia and congenital anomalies but lower percentages of deaths due to asphyxia, weapon use, and unknown causes compared with decedents without epilepsy. The increased percentages of deaths due to pneumonia and drowning in children and young adults with epilepsy suggest preventive interventions including immunization and better instruction and monitoring before or during swimming. State-specific and national population-based mortality studies of children and young adults with epilepsy are recommended.

  20. Self-perceptions of aging predict mortality and change with approaching death: 16-year longitudinal results from the Berlin Aging Study.

    PubMed

    Kotter-Grühn, Dana; Kleinspehn-Ammerlahn, Anna; Gerstorf, Denis; Smith, Jacqui

    2009-09-01

    Satisfaction with one's own aging and feeling young are indicators of positive well-being in late life. Using 16-year longitudinal data from participants of the Berlin Aging Study (P. B. Baltes & K. U. Mayer, 1999; N = 439; 70- to 100-year-olds), the authors examined whether and how these self-perceptions of aging change with age and how such changes relate to distance from death. Extending previous studies, they found that it is not only higher aging satisfaction and younger subjective age but also more favorable change patterns (e.g., less decline in aging satisfaction) that are uniquely associated with lower mortality hazards. These effects are robust after controls for objective measures such as age, gender, socioeconomic status, diagnosis of dementia, or number of illnesses. As individuals approach death, they become less satisfied with their aging and report feeling older. For aging satisfaction, mortality-related decline is much steeper than age-related decline, whereas change in subjective age is best characterized as an age-related process. The authors discuss how self-perceptions of aging are embedded in mechanisms underlying pathways of dying late in life.

  1. Reporting errors in siblings' survival histories and their impact on adult mortality estimates: results from a record linkage study in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Helleringer, Stéphane; Pison, Gilles; Kanté, Almamy M; Duthé, Géraldine; Andro, Armelle

    2014-04-01

    Estimates of adult mortality in countries with limited vital registration (e.g., sub-Saharan Africa) are often derived from information about the survival of a respondent's siblings. We evaluated the completeness and accuracy of such data through a record linkage study conducted in Bandafassi, located in southeastern Senegal. We linked at the individual level retrospective siblings' survival histories (SSH) reported by female respondents (n = 268) to prospective mortality data and genealogies collected through a health and demographic surveillance system (HDSS). Respondents often reported inaccurate lists of siblings. Additions to these lists were uncommon, but omissions were frequent: respondents omitted 3.8 % of their live sisters, 9.1 % of their deceased sisters, and 16.6 % of their sisters who had migrated out of the DSS area. Respondents underestimated the age at death of the siblings they reported during the interview, particularly among siblings who had died at older ages (≥45 years). Restricting SSH data to person-years and events having occurred during a recent reference period reduced list errors but not age and date errors. Overall, SSH data led to a 20 % underestimate of 45 q 15 relative to HDSS data. Our study suggests new quality improvement strategies for SSH data and demonstrates the potential use of HDSS data for the validation of "unconventional" demographic techniques.

  2. Otitis Media and Language Development at 1 Year of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Ina F.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Fifteen 1-year-olds without otitis media were compared to 12 babies who were otitis positive. No significant differences were detected on the Bayley Scales of Infant Development or the Sequenced Inventory of Communication Development (SICD) Receptive scale. However, the otitis-positive group exhibited lower SICD Expressive scores than the…

  3. Anxiety Sensitivity and Panic Attacks: A 1-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Wen; Zinbarg, Richard E.

    2007-01-01

    The hypothesis that anxiety sensitivity (AS) is a risk factor for panic genesis has obtained compelling support, but the clinical/practical importance of AS in panic genesis has been questioned. In addition, the association between panic experience and AS increase has not been clearly demonstrated. Through this 1-year longitudinal study among…

  4. Tackling Health Inequities in Chile: Maternal, Newborn, Infant, and Child Mortality Between 1990 and 2004

    PubMed Central

    Requejo, Jennifer Harris; Nien, Jyh Kae; Merialdi, Mario; Bustreo, Flavia; Betran, Ana Pilar

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We analyzed trends in maternal, newborn, and child mortality in Chile between 1990 and 2004, after the introduction of national interventions and reforms, and examined associations between trends and interventions. Methods. Data were provided by the Chilean Ministry of Health on all pregnancies between 1990 and 2004 (approximately 4 000 000). We calculated yearly maternal mortality ratios, stillbirth rates, and mortality rates for neonates, infants (aged > 28 days and < 1 year), and children aged 1 to 4 years. We also calculated these statistics by 5-year intervals for Chile's poorest to richest district quintiles. Results. During the study period, the maternal mortality ratio decreased from 42.1 to 18.5 per 100 000 live births. The mortality rate for neonates decreased from 9.0 to 5.7 per 1000 births, for infants from 7.8 to 3.1 per 1000 births, and for young children from 3.1 to 1.7 per 1000 live births. The stillbirth rate declined from 6.0 to 5.0 per 1000 births. Disparities in these mortality statistics between the poorest and richest district quintiles also decreased, with the largest mortality reductions in the poorest quintile. Conclusions. During a period of socioeconomic development and health sector reforms, Chile experienced significant mortality and inequity reductions. PMID:19443831

  5. Genetic, Physiological, and Lifestyle Predictors of Mortality in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Stefan; Mackenbach, Johan; Vokó, Zoltán; Lhachimi, Stefan; Ikram, M. Arfan; Uitterlinden, André G.; Newman, Anne B.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Garcia, Melissa E.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tranah, Gregory J.; Wallaschofski, Henri; Kocher, Thomas; Launer, Lenore J.; Franceschini, Nora; Schipper, Maarten; Hofman, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated the quality of 162 variables, focusing on the contribution of genetic markers, used solely or in combination with other characteristics, when predicting mortality. Methods. In 5974 participants from the Rotterdam Study, followed for a median of 15.1 years, 7 groups of factors including age and gender, genetics, socioeconomics, lifestyle, physiological characteristics, prevalent diseases, and indicators of general health were related to all-cause mortality. Genetic variables were identified from 8 genome-wide association scans (n = 19 033) and literature review. Results. We observed 3174 deaths during follow-up. The fully adjusted model (C-statistic for 15-year follow-up [C15y] = 0.80; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.75, 0.77) predicted mortality well. Most of the additional information apart from age and sex stemmed from physiological markers, prevalent diseases, and general health. Socioeconomic factors and lifestyle contributed meaningfully to mortality risk prediction with longer prediction horizon. Although specific genetic factors were independently associated with mortality, jointly they contributed little to mortality prediction (C15y = 0.56; 95% CI = 0.55, 0.57). Conclusions. Mortality can be predicted reasonably well over a long period. Genetic factors independently predict mortality, but only modestly more than other risk indicators. PMID:22397355

  6. Pulmonary toxicity of cyclophosphamide: a 1-year study

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, C.C.; Sigler, C.; Lock, S.; Hakkinen, P.J.; Haschek, W.M.; Witschi, H.P.

    1985-01-01

    The development of cyclophosphamide-induced pulmonary lesions over a 1-year period was studied in mice. Male BALB/c mice received a single intraperitoneal injection of 100 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide. Within 3 weeks there were scattered foci of intraalveolar foamy macrophages. With time, these foci increased in size and, 1 year later, occupied large areas in all lung lobes. There was also diffuse interstitial fibrosis. Chemical determination done 3, 12, 24, and 52 weeks after cyclophosphamide showed that lungs of animals treated with cyclophosphamide had significantly more hydroxyproline per lung than controls. One year after cyclophosphamide pressure - volume curves measured in vivo were shifted down and to the right and total lung volumes were decreased. A single injection of cyclophosphamide produced an irreversible and progressive pulmonary lesion. 16 references, 5 figures, 3 tables.

  7. Utility of a Genetic Risk Score to Predict Recurrent Cardiovascular Events 1 Year After an Acute Coronary Syndrome: A Pooled Analysis of the RISCA, PRAXY, and TRIUMPH Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Labos, Christopher; Martinez, Sara C.; Leo Wang, Rui Hao; Lenzini, Petra A.; Pilote, Louise; Bogaty, Peter; Brophy, James M.; Engert, James C.; Cresci, Sharon; Thanassoulis, George

    2015-01-01

    Background Limited evidence exists regarding the utility of genetic risk scores (GRS) in predicting recurrent cardiovascular events after acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We sought to determine whether a GRS would predict early recurrent cardiovascular events within 1 year of ACS. Methods & Results Participants admitted with acute coronary syndromes from the RISCA, PRAXY, and TRIUMPH cohorts, were genotyped for 30 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) or myocardial infarction (MI) in prior genome wide association studies. A 30 SNP CAD/MI GRS was constructed. The primary endpoint was defined as all-cause mortality, recurrent ACS or cardiac re-hospitalization within 1 year of ACS admission. Results across all cohorts for the 30 SNP CAD/MI GRS were pooled using a random-effects model. There were 1040 patients from the RISCA cohort, 691 patients from the PRAXY cohort, and 1772 patients from the TRIUMPH cohort included in the analysis and 389 occurrences of the primary endpoint of recurrent events at 1-year post-ACS. In unadjusted and fully adjusted analyses, a 30 SNP GRS was not significantly associated with recurrent events (HR per allele 0.97 (95%CI 0.91–1.03) for RISCA, HR 0.99 (95%CI 0.93–1.05) for PRAXY, 0.98 (95%CI 0.94–1.02) for TRIUMPH, and 0.98 (95%CI 0.95–1.01) for the pooled analysis). Addition of this GRS to the GRACE risk model did not significantly improve risk prediction. Conclusion The 30 MI SNP GRS was not associated with recurrent events 1-year post ACS in pooled analyses across cohorts and did not improve risk discrimination or reclassification indices. Our results suggest that the genetic etiology of early events post-ACS may differ from later events. PMID:26232166

  8. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  9. Mortality of lead smelter workers

    SciTech Connect

    Selevan, S.G.; Landrigan, P.J.; Stern, F.B.; Jones, J.H.

    1985-10-01

    To examine patterns of death in lead smelter workers, a retrospective analysis of mortality was conducted in a cohort of 1,987 males employed between 1940 and 1965 at a primary lead smelter in Idaho. Overall mortality was similar to that of the United States white male population (standardized mortality ratio (SMR) = 98). Excess mortality, however, was found from chronic renal disease (SMR = 192; confidence interval (CI) = 88-364), and the risk of death from renal disease increased with increasing duration of employment, such that after 20 years employment, the standardized mortality ratio reached 392 (CI = 107-1,004). Excess mortality was also noted for nonmalignant respiratory disease (SMR = 187, CI = 128-264). Eight of 32 deaths in this category were caused by silicosis; at least five workers who died of silicosis had been miners for a part of their lives. An additional 11 deaths resulted from tuberculosis (SMR = 139; CI = 69-249); in six of these cases, silicosis was a contributory cause of death. Cancer mortality was not increased overall (SMR = 95; CI = 78-114). An increase, however, was noted for deaths from kidney cancer (six cases; SMR = 204; CI = 75-444). Finally, excess mortality was noted for injuries (SMR = 138; CI = 104-179); 13 (23%) of the 56 deaths in this category were caused by mining injuries. The data from this study are consistent with previous reports of increased mortality from chronic renal disease in persons exposed occupationally to lead.

  10. Self-reported exposure to pesticides and radiation related to pregnancy outcome--results from National Natality and Fetal Mortality Surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Savitz, D.A.; Whelan, E.A.; Kleckner, R.C. )

    1989-09-01

    Although fetal development is known to be sensitive to environmental agents, relatively little epidemiologic research has addressed this concern. Effects on pregnancy outcome of self-reported parental exposure to pesticides and to radiation were examined using data from the National Natality and Fetal Mortality Surveys, large national probability samples of live births and stillbirths occurring in 1980. In case-control analyses, maternal exposure to pesticides at home or work was associated with increased risk of stillbirth (odds ratios (ORs) = 1.5-1.6). Paternal pesticide exposure was associated with stillbirth (ORs = 1.2-1.4) and delivery of small-for-gestational-age infants (ORs = 1.4-2.0). A small increased risk of stillbirth (OR = 1.3) was found in relation to either parent's reported exposure to radiation. In spite of limitations in the quality of exposure data and the possibility of biased recall related to pregnancy outcome, associations of reported pesticide exposure to either parent with risk of stillbirth and small-for-gestational-age infants warrant further evaluation.

  11. Association Between Valvular Surgery and Mortality Among Patients With Infective Endocarditis Complicated by Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kiefer, Todd; Park, Lawrence; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Cortes, Claudia; Casillo, Roberta; Chu, Vivian; Delahaye, Francois; Durante-Mangoni, Emanuele; Edathodu, Jameela; Falces, Carlos; Logar, Mateja; Miró, José M.; Naber, Christophe; Tripodi, Marie Françoise; Murdoch, David R.; Moreillon, Philippe; Utili, Riccardo; Wang, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Context Heart failure (HF) is the most common complication of infective endocarditis. However, clinical characteristics of HF in patients with infective endocarditis, use of surgical therapy, and their associations with patient outcome are not well described. Objectives To determine the clinical, echocardiographic, and microbiological variables associated with HF in patients with definite infective endocarditis and to examine variables independently associated with in-hospital and 1-year mortality for patients with infective endocarditis and HF, including the use and association of surgery with outcome. Design, Setting, and Patients The International Collaboration on Endocarditis–Prospective Cohort Study, a prospective, multicenter study enrolling 4166 patients with definite native- or prosthetic-valve infective endocarditis from 61 centers in 28 countries between June 2000 and December 2006. Main Outcome Measures In-hospital and 1-year mortality. Results Of 4075 patients with infective endocarditis and known HF status enrolled, 1359 (33.4% [95% CI, 31.9%–34.8%]) had HF, and 906 (66.7% [95% CI, 64.2%–69.2%]) were classified as having New York Heart Association class III or IV symptom status. Within the subset with HF, 839 (61.7% [95% CI, 59.2%–64.3%]) underwent valvular surgery during the index hospitalization. In-hospital mortality was 29.7% (95% CI, 27.2%–32.1%) for the entire HF cohort, with lower mortality observed in patients undergoing valvular surgery compared with medical therapy alone (20.6% [95% CI, 17.9%–23.4%] vs 44.8% [95% CI, 40.4%–49.0%], respectively; P<.001). One-year mortality was 29.1% (95% CI, 26.0%–32.2%) in patients undergoing valvular surgery vs 58.4% (95% CI, 54.1%–62.6%) in those not undergoing surgery (P<.001). Cox proportional hazards modeling with propensity score adjustment for surgery showed that advanced age, diabetes mellitus, health care–associated infection, causative microorganism (Staphylococcus aureus or

  12. The interaction between constituent year and within-1-year effects in elite German youth basketball.

    PubMed

    Steingröver, C; Wattie, N; Baker, J; Helsen, W F; Schorer, J

    2016-03-19

    The current state of research on relative age effects in basketball shows an uneven picture. These mixed results might be caused by the interaction of constituent year and within-year effects. Our aim was to examine constituent and within-1-year effects in elite German youth basketball. The sample (n = 4400) included players competing in the JBBL (Under-16 first division) and the NBBL (Under-19 first division) from 2011/2012 until 2013/2014. A multi-way frequency analysis revealed an interaction of constituent year effects and within-1-year effects for the JBBL, χ(2) (6, 2590) = 12.76, P < 0.05. NBBL data showed significant constituent year effects, χ(2) (2, n = 1810) = 25.32, P < 0.01, and within-1-year effects for all three age bands but no interaction. The interaction between constituent year and within-1-year effects in the JBBL showed reduced within-1-year effects with increasing age. Once players enter the system in the JBBL, relatively younger players seem less likely to drop out of the system. Results offer new insight regarding how the regulations of this talent development system may influence athletes' opportunities to enter the system and their likelihood of staying at the highest levels of competition.

  13. Management and 1-year outcomes of patients with atrial fibrillation in the Middle East: Gulf survey of atrial fibrillation events.

    PubMed

    Zubaid, Mohammad; Rashed, Wafa A; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; AlMahmeed, Wael; Shehab, Abdullah; Sulaiman, Kadhim; Qudaimi, Ahmed Al; Asaad, Nidal; Amin, Haitham

    2015-05-01

    We describe management and outcomes of patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF) in the Middle East. Consecutive patients with AF presenting to emergency departments (EDs) were prospectively enrolled. Among 1721 patients with nonvalvular AF, mean age was 59 ± 16 years and 44% were women. Comorbidities were common such as hypertension (59%), diabetes (33%), and coronary artery disease (33%). Warfarin was not prescribed to 40% of patients with Congestive heart failure, Hypertension, Age, Diabetes mellitus, Stroke/TIA2 score of ≥2. One-year rates of stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA) and all-cause mortality were 4.2% and 15.3%, respectively. Warfarin use at hospital-ED discharge was independently associated with lower 1-year rate of stroke/TIA (odds ratio [OR], 0.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.17-0.85; P = .015) and all-cause mortality (OR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.32-0.83; P = .006). Prior history of heart failure and peripheral vascular disease was independent mortality predictors. Our patients are relatively young with significant cardiovascular risk. Their anticoagulation treatment is suboptimal, and 1-year all-cause mortality and stroke/TIA event rates are relatively high.

  14. Cancer mortality among man-made vitreous fiber production workers.

    PubMed

    Boffetta, P; Saracci, R; Andersen, A; Bertazzi, P A; Chang-Claude, J; Cherrie, J; Ferro, G; Frentzel-Beyme, R; Hansen, J; Olsen, J; Plato, N; Teppo, L; Westerholm, P; Winter, P D; Zocchetti, C

    1997-05-01

    We have updated the follow-up of cancer mortality for a cohort study of man-made vitreous fiber production workers from Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden, United Kingdom, Germany, and Italy, from 1982 to 1990. In the mortality analysis, 22,002 production workers contributed 489,551 person-years, during which there were 4,521 deaths. Workers with less than 1 year of employment had an increased mortality [standardized mortality ratio (SMR) = 1.45; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.37-1.53]. Workers with 1 year or more of employment, contributing 65% of person-years, had an SMR of 1.05 (95% CI = 1.02-1.09). The SMR for lung cancer was 1.34 (95% CI = 1.08-1.63, 97 deaths) among rock/slag wool workers and 1.27 (95% CI = 1.07-1.50, 140 deaths) among glass wool workers. In the latter group, no increase was present when local mortality rates were used. Among rock/slag wool workers, the risk of lung cancer increased with time-since-first-employment and duration of employment. The trend in lung cancer mortality according to technologic phase at first employment was less marked than in the previous follow-up. We obtained similar results from a Poisson regression analysis limited to rock/slag wool workers. Five deaths from pleural mesothelioma were reported, which may not represent an excess. There was no apparent excess for other categories of neoplasm. Tobacco smoking and other factors linked to social class, as well as exposures in other industries, appear unlikely to explain the whole increase in lung cancer mortality among rock/slag wool workers. Limited data on other agents do not indicate an important role of asbestos, slag, or bitumen. These results are not sufficient to conclude that the increased lung cancer risk is the result of exposure to rock/slag wool; however, insofar as respirable fibers were an important component of the ambient pollution of the working environment, they may have contributed to the increased risk.

  15. Acquired childhood aphasia. Outcome 1 year after onset.

    PubMed

    Loonen, M C; van Dongen, H R

    1990-12-01

    The effects of the variables age at onset, cause, severity and bilaterality of lesion, and type of aphasia on course and outcome were investigated in a group of 28 aphasic children. Analysis of spontaneous speech and tests of auditory verbal comprehension were used to determine the presence of aphasia. The severity of the cerebral lesion was assessed using a rating scale for computed tomographic scans. Most of the children had not recovered completely 1 year after onset. Recovery was significantly different according to etiological categories. Complete recovery was seen in the majority of traumatic cases.

  16. Patient characteristics associated with in-hospital mortality in children following tracheotomy

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Jay G; Graham, Robert J; Roberson, David W; Rhein, Lawrence; Graham, Dionne A; Zhou, Jing; O’Brien, Jane; Putney, Heather; Goldmann, Donald A

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To identify children at risk for in-hospital mortality following tracheotomy. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting 25 746 876 US hospitalisations for children within the Kids’ Inpatient Database 1997, 2000, 2003 and 2006. Participants 18 806 hospitalisations of children ages 0–18 years undergoing tracheotomy, identified from ICD-9-CM tracheotomy procedure codes. Main outcome measure Mortality during the initial hospitalisation when tracheotomy was performed in relation to patient demographic and clinical characteristics (neuromuscular impairment (NI), chronic lung disease, upper airway anomaly, prematurity, congenital heart disease, upper airway infection and trauma) identified with ICD-9-CM codes. Results Between 1997 and 2006, mortality following tracheotomy ranged from 7.7% to 8.5%. In each year, higher mortality was observed in children undergoing tracheotomy who were aged <1 year compared with children aged 1–4 years (mortality range: 10.2–13.1% vs 1.1–4.2%); in children with congenital heart disease, compared with children without congenital heart disease (13.1–18.7% vs 6.2–7.1%) and in children with prematurity, compared with children who were not premature (13.0–19.4% vs 6.8–7.3%). Lower mortality was observed in children with an upper airway anomaly compared with children without an upper airway anomaly (1.5–5.1% vs 9.1–10.3%). In 2006, the highest mortality (40.0%) was observed in premature children with NI and congenital heart disease, who did not have an upper airway anomaly. Conclusions Congenital heart disease, prematurity, the absence of an upper airway anomaly and age <1 year were characteristics associated with higher mortality in children following tracheotomy. These findings may assist provider communication with children and families regarding early prognosis following tracheotomy. PMID:20522454

  17. Individual joblessness, contextual unemployment, and mortality risk.

    PubMed

    Tapia Granados, José A; House, James S; Ionides, Edward L; Burgard, Sarah; Schoeni, Robert S

    2014-08-01

    Longitudinal studies at the level of individuals find that employees who lose their jobs are at increased risk of death. However, analyses of aggregate data find that as unemployment rates increase during recessions, population mortality actually declines. We addressed this paradox by using data from the US Department of Labor and annual survey data (1979-1997) from a nationally representative longitudinal study of individuals-the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. Using proportional hazards (Cox) regression, we analyzed how the hazard of death depended on 1) individual joblessness and 2) state unemployment rates, as indicators of contextual economic conditions. We found that 1) compared with the employed, for the unemployed the hazard of death was increased by an amount equivalent to 10 extra years of age, and 2) each percentage-point increase in the state unemployment rate reduced the mortality hazard in all individuals by an amount equivalent to a reduction of 1 year of age. Our results provide evidence that 1) joblessness strongly and significantly raises the risk of death among those suffering it, and 2) periods of higher unemployment rates, that is, recessions, are associated with a moderate but significant reduction in the risk of death among the entire population.

  18. Certolizumab pegol in combination with dose-optimised methotrexate in DMARD-naïve patients with early, active rheumatoid arthritis with poor prognostic factors: 1-year results from C-EARLY, a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III study

    PubMed Central

    Emery, P; Bingham, C O; Burmester, G R; Bykerk, V P; Furst, D E; Mariette, X; van Vollenhoven, R; Arendt, C; Mountian, I; Purcaru, O; Tatla, D; VanLunen, B; Weinblatt, M E

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To assess the efficacy and safety of certolizumab pegol (CZP)+dose-optimised methotrexate (MTX) versus placebo (PBO)+dose-optimised MTX in inducing and sustaining clinical remission in DMARD-naïve patients with moderate-to-severe, active, progressive rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with poor prognostic factors over 52 weeks. Methods DMARD-naïve patients with ≤1 year of active RA were randomised (3:1) in a double-blind manner to CZP (400 mg Weeks 0, 2, 4, then 200 mg Q2W to Week 52)+MTX or PBO+MTX (the mean optimised-MTX dose=21 and 22 mg/week, respectively). Sustained remission (sREM) and sustained low disease activity (sLDA; DAS28(ESR)<2.6 and DAS28(ESR)≤3.2, respectively, at both Weeks 40 and 52) were the primary and secondary endpoints. Results Patients were randomised to CZP+MTX (n=660) and PBO+MTX (n=219). At Week 52, significantly more patients assigned to CZP+MTX compared with PBO+MTX achieved sREM (28.9% vs 15.0%, p<0.001) and sLDA (43.8% vs 28.6%, p<0.001). Inhibition of radiographic progression and improvements in physical functioning were significantly greater for CZP+MTX versus PBO+MTX (van der Heijde modified total Sharp score (mTSS) mean absolute change from baseline (CFB): 0.2 vs 1.8, p<0.001, rate of mTSS non-progressors: 70.3% vs 49.7%, p<0.001; least squares (LS) mean CFB in Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI): −1.00 vs −0.82, p<0.001). Incidence of adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs was similar between treatment groups. Infection was the most frequent AE, with higher incidence for CZP+MTX (71.8/100 patient-years (PY)) versus PBO+MTX (52.7/100 PY); the rate of serious infection was similar between CZP+MTX (3.3/100 PY) and PBO+MTX (3.7/100 PY). Conclusions CZP+dose-optimised MTX treatment of DMARD-naïve early RA resulted in significantly more patients achieving sREM and sLDA, improved physical function and inhibited structural damage compared with PBO+dose-optimised MTX. Trial registration

  19. Oral health problems and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Ki; Baker, Lindsey A.; Davarian, Shieva; Crimmins, Eileen

    2013-01-01

    Background/purpose Previous studies have shown the relationship between individual oral health conditions and mortality; however, the relationship between mortality and multiple oral health conditions has not been examined. This study investigates the link between individual oral health problems and oral comorbidity and mortality risk. Materials and methods Data are derived from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2004, which is linked to the National Death Index for mortality follow-up through 2006. We estimated the risk of mortality among people with three individual oral health conditions—tooth loss, root caries, and periodontitis as well as with oral comorbidity—or having all three conditions. Results Significant tooth loss, root caries, and periodontal disease were associated with increased odds of dying. The relationship between oral health conditions and mortality disappeared when controlling for sociodemographic, health, and/or health behavioral indicators. Having multiple oral health problems was associated with an even higher rate of mortality. Conclusion Individual oral health conditions—tooth loss, root caries, and periodontal disease—were not related to mortality when sociodemographic, health, and/or health behavioral factors were considered, and there was no differential pattern between the three conditions. Multiple oral health problems were associated with a higher risk of dying. PMID:24416472

  20. Second cancers and late mortality in Australian children treated by allogeneic HSCT for haematological malignancy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, A S; Ashton, L J; Vajdic, C M; Le Marsney, R E; Daniels, B; Nivison-Smith, I; Wilcox, L; Dodds, A J; O'Brien, T A

    2015-02-01

    We examined risk of second cancer and late mortality in a population-based Australian cohort of 717 pediatric allogeneic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients treated for a malignant disease during 1982-2007. Record linkage with population-based death and cancer registries identified 17 second cancers at a median of 7.9 years post HSCT; thyroid cancer being the most common malignancy (n=8). The cumulative incidence of second cancer was 8.7% at follow-up, and second cancers occurred 20 times more often than in the general population (standardised incidence ratio 20.3, 95% confidence interval (CI)=12.6-32.7). Transplantation using radiation-based conditioning regimens was associated with increased second cancer risk. A total of 367 patients survived for at least 2 years post HSCT and of these 44 (12%) died at a median of 3.1 years after HSCT. Relapse was the most common cause of late mortality (n=32). The cumulative incidence of late mortality was 14.7%. The observed rate of late mortality was 36 times greater than in the matched general population (standardised mortality ratio 35.9, 95% CI=26.7-48.3). Recipients who relapsed or who had radiation-based conditioning regimens were at higher risk of late mortality. Second cancers and late mortality continue to be a risk for pediatric patients undergoing HSCT, and these results highlight the need for effective screening and survivorship programs.

  1. Diagnosis and mortality in 47,XYY persons: a registry study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sex chromosomal abnormalities are relatively common, yet many aspects of these syndromes remain unexplored. For instance epidemiological data in 47,XYY persons are still limited. Methods Using a national Danish registry, we identified 208 persons with 47,XYY or a compatible karyotype, whereof 36 were deceased; all were diagnosed from 1968 to 2008. For further analyses, we identified age matched controls from the male background population (n = 20,078) in Statistics Denmark. We report nationwide prevalence data, data regarding age at diagnosis, as well as total and cause specific mortality data in these persons. Results The average prevalence was 14.2 47,XYY persons per 100,000, which is reduced compared to the expected 98 per 100,000. Their median age at diagnosis was 17.1 years. We found a significantly decreased lifespan from 77.9 years (controls) to 67.5 years (47,XYY persons). Total mortality was significantly increased compared to controls, with a hazard ratio of 3.6 (2.6-5.1). Dividing the causes of deaths according to the International Classification of Diseases, we identified an increased hazard ratio in all informative chapters, with a significantly increased ratio in cancer, pulmonary, neurological and unspecified diseases, and trauma. Conclusion We here present national epidemiological data regarding 47,XYY syndrome, including prevalence and mortality data, showing a significantly delay to diagnosis, reduced life expectancy and an increased total and cause specific mortality. PMID:20509956

  2. Economic evaluation and 1-year survival analysis of MARS in patients with alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Hessel, Franz P; Mitzner, Steffen R; Rief, Jana; Guellstorff, Britta; Steiner, Susanne; Wasem, Jürgen

    2003-01-01

    Objective of this study was to determine 1-year survival, costs and cost-effectiveness of the artificial liver support system Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS) in patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) and an underlying alcoholic liver disease. In a case-control study, 13 patients treated with MARS were compared to 23 controls of similar age, sex and severity of disease. Inpatient hospital costs data were extracted from patients' files and hospital's internal costing. Patients and treating GPs were contacted, thus determining resource use and survival 1-year after treatment. Mean 1-year survival time in MARS group was 261 days and 148 days in controls. Kaplan-Meier analysis shows advantages of MARS patients (Logrank: P=0.057). Direct medical costs per patient for initial hospital stay and 1-year follow-up from a payer's perspective were Euro 18,792 for MARS patients and Euro 9638 for controls. The costs per life-year gained are Euro 29,719 (time horizon 1 year). From a societal perspective, the numbers are higher (costs per life-year gained: Euro 79,075), mainly because of the fact that there is no regular reimbursement of MARS and therefore intervention costs were not calculated from payer's perspective. A trade-off between medical benefit and higher costs has to be made, but 1-year results suggest an acceptable cost-effectiveness of MARS. Prolonging the time horizon and including indirect costs, which will be done in future research, would probably improve cost-effectiveness.

  3. Body mass index versus waist circumference as predictors of mortality in Canadian adults

    PubMed Central

    Staiano, AE; Reeder, BA; Elliott, S; Joffres, MR; Pahwa, P; Kirkland, SA; Paradis, G; Katzmarzyk, PT

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Elevated body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) are associated with increased mortality risk, but it is unclear which anthropometric measurement most highly relates to mortality. We examined single and combined associations between BMI, WC, waist–hip ratio (WHR) and all-cause, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer mortality. METHODS We used Cox proportional hazard regression models to estimate relative risks of all-cause, CVD and cancer mortality in 8061 adults (aged 18–74 years) in the Canadian Heart Health Follow-Up Study (1986–2004). Models controlled for age, sex, exam year, smoking, alcohol use and education. RESULTS There were 887 deaths over a mean 13 (SD 3.1) years follow-up. Increased risk of death from all-causes, CVD and cancer were associated with elevated BMI, WC and WHR (P < 0.05). Risk of death was consistently higher from elevated WC versus BMI or WHR. Ascending tertiles of each anthropometric measure predicted increased CVD mortality risk. In contrast, all-cause mortality risk was only predicted by ascending WC and WHR tertiles and cancer mortality risk by ascending WC tertiles. Higher risk of all-cause death was associated with WC in overweight and obese adults and with WHR in obese adults. Compared with non-obese adults with a low WC, adults with high WC had higher all-cause mortality risk regardless of BMI status. CONCULSION BMI and WC predicted higher all-cause and cause-specific mortality, and WC predicted the highest risk for death overall and among overweight and obese adults. Elevated WC has clinical significance in predicting mortality risk beyond BMI. PMID:22249224

  4. A retrospective mortality study among Canadian petroleum marketing and distribution workers.

    PubMed Central

    Schnatter, A R; Katz, A M; Nicolich, M J; Thériault, G

    1993-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective mortality study among 6672 petroleum marketing and distribution workers from 226 locations throughout Canada. These employees worked for at least 1 year in the marketing distribution segment from 1964 through 1983 or were annuitants as of 1964. Industrial hygienists assigned hydrocarbon (HC) exposure frequency scores for several jobs, departments, and job functions. We computed standardized mortality ratios for the total cohort, HC exposure frequency groups, and tank truck drivers, and we also used Poisson regression techniques to model mortality for selected causes of death according to HC exposure frequency. Results indicate overall mortality below that of the general Canadian population for all marketing distribution workers [Standardized mortality ratio (SMR) = 0.88]. Mortality from aortic aneurysms was significantly elevated in all marketing/distribution workers (SMR = 1.79) but was due to raised mortality in nonexposed workers (SMR = 2.80). Tank truck drivers showed significantly elevated mortality due to leukemia (SMR = 3.35) based on five deaths. The leukemia findings were not evident in the larger group of marketing distribution workers classified as exposed to hydrocarbons (SMR = 1.01). No other cause of death was elevated in truck drivers. The leukemia findings are suggestive of a possible influence due to exposure to HCs in tank truck drivers, although other explanations cannot be ruled out. Other findings of elevated mortality in the marketing distribution group are generally not statistically significant. These included moderately increased mortality due to multiple myeloma, malignant melanoma, and kidney cancer. Small numbers of observed and expected deaths limit concise interpretations for these diseases. PMID:8020452

  5. An enhanced treatment program with markedly reduced mortality after a transtibial or higher non-traumatic lower extremity amputation

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Morten T; Holm, Gitte; Krasheninnikoff, Michael; Jensen, Pia S; Gebuhr, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Historically, high 30-day and 1-year mortality post-amputation rates (> 30% and 50%, respectively) have been reported in patients with a transtibial or higher non-traumatic lower extremity amputation (LEA). We evaluated whether allocating experienced staff and implementing an enhanced, multidisciplinary recovery program would reduce the mortality rates. We also determined factors that influenced mortality rates. Patients and methods 129 patients with a LEA were consecutively included over a 2-year period, and followed after admission to an acute orthopedic ward. Mortality was compared with historical and concurrent national controls in Denmark. Results The 30-day and 1-year mortality rates were 16% and 37%, respectively, in the intervention group, as compared to 35% and 59% in the historical control group treated in the same orthopedic ward. Cox proportional harzards models adjusted for age, sex, residential and health status, the disease that caused the amputation, and the index amputation level showed that 30-day and 1-year mortality risk was reduced by 52% (HR =0.48, 95% CI: 0.25–0.91) and by 46% (HR =0.54, 95% CI: 0.35–0.86), respectively, in the intervention group. The risk of death was increased for patients living in a nursing home, for patients with a bilateral LEA, and for patients with low health status. Interpretation With similarly frail patient groups and instituting an enhanced program for patients after LEA, the risks of death by 30 days and by 1 year after LEA were markedly reduced after allocating staff with expertise. PMID:27088484

  6. Multisystemic Therapy for Juvenile Sexual Offenders: 1-Year Results from a Randomized Effectiveness Trial

    PubMed Central

    Letourneau, Elizabeth J.; Henggeler, Scott W.; Borduin, Charles M.; Schewe, Paul A.; McCart, Michael R.; Chapman, Jason E.; Saldana, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    In spite of the serious and costly problems presented by juvenile sexual offenders, rigorous tests of promising interventions have rarely been conducted. This study presents a community-based effectiveness trial comparing multisystemic therapy (MST) adapted for juvenile sexual offenders with services that are typical of those provided to juvenile sexual offenders in the U.S. Youth were randomized to MST (n = 67) or treatment as usual for juvenile sexual offenders (TAU-JSO; n = 60). Outcomes through 12 months post recruitment were assessed for problem sexual behavior, delinquency, substance use, mental health functioning, and out-of-home placements. Relative to youth who received TAU-JSO, youth in the MST condition evidenced significant reductions in sexual behavior problems, delinquency, substance use, externalizing symptoms, and out-of-home placements. The findings suggest that family- and community-based interventions, especially those with an established evidence-base in treating adolescent antisocial behavior, hold considerable promise in meeting the clinical needs of juvenile sexual offenders. PMID:19203163

  7. Stereotactic posteroventral pallidotomy: clinical methods and results at 1-year follow up.

    PubMed

    Dalvi, A; Winfield, L; Yu, Q; Côté, L; Goodman, R R; Pullman, S L

    1999-03-01

    Twenty consecutive patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease underwent stereotactic posteroventral pallidotomy. Schwab and England ADL scores in the "off" state were improved by 18% and in the "on" state the scores declined by 2%. Three patients also reported marked improvement in "off" state dystonia. One-year data are available on 12 patients who underwent evaluations according to the Core Assessment Program for Intracerebral Transplantation protocol preoperatively and at 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. Significant improvements in Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale sections II and III scores in the "off" state, composite "off" state scores of bradykinesia and rigidity, contralateral tremor in the "off" state, and contralateral dyskinesias were observed. Although there was reduction in the daily levodopa dose, this did not reach statistical significance. Major complications (15%) included hemiparesis (one of 20) and visual field cuts (two of 20); minor complications (45%) included mild cognitive dysfunction (four of 20), reading difficulty not related to visual disturbance (one of 20), and 5-10 lb weight gain (four of 20).

  8. Exercise Effects on Fitness and Bone Mineral Density in Early Postmenopausal Women: 1-Year EFOPS Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemmler, Wolfgang; Engelke, Klaus; Lauber, Dirk; Weineck, Juergen; Hensen, Johannes; Kalender, Willi A.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the effect of intense exercise training on physical fitness, coronary heart disease, bone mineral density (BMD), and parameters related to quality of life in early postmenopausal women with osteopenia. Data on woman in control and exercise training groups indicated that the intense exercise training program was effective in improving…

  9. All-cause mortality benefit of coronary revascularization vs. medical therapy in patients without known coronary artery disease undergoing coronary computed tomographic angiography: results from CONFIRM (COronary CT Angiography EvaluatioN For Clinical Outcomes: An InteRnational Multicenter Registry)

    PubMed Central

    Min, James K.; Berman, Daniel S.; Dunning, Allison; Achenbach, Stephan; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Budoff, Matthew J.; Cademartiri, Filippo; Callister, Tracy Q.; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Cheng, Victor; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha; Chow, Benjamin J.W.; Cury, Ricardo; Delago, Augustin; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Hadamitzky, Martin; Hausleiter, Joerg; Kaufmann, Philipp; Karlsberg, Ronald P.; Kim, Yong-Jin; Leipsic, Jonathon; Lin, Fay Y.; Maffei, Erica; Plank, Fabian; Raff, Gilbert; Villines, Todd; Labounty, Troy M.; Shaw, Leslee J.

    2012-01-01

    Aims To date, the therapeutic benefit of revascularization vs. medical therapy for stable individuals undergoing invasive coronary angiography (ICA) based upon coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) findings has not been examined. Methods and results We examined 15 223 patients without known coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing CCTA from eight sites and six countries who were followed for median 2.1 years (interquartile range 1.4–3.3 years) for an endpoint of all-cause mortality. Obstructive CAD by CCTA was defined as a ≥50% luminal diameter stenosis in a major coronary artery. Patients were categorized as having high-risk CAD vs. non-high-risk CAD, with the former including patients with at least obstructive two-vessel CAD with proximal left anterior descending artery involvement, three-vessel CAD, and left main CAD. Death occurred in 185 (1.2%) patients. Patients were categorized into two treatment groups: revascularization (n = 1103; 2.2% mortality) and medical therapy (n = 14 120, 1.1% mortality). To account for non-randomized referral to revascularization, we created a propensity score developed by logistic regression to identify variables that influenced the decision to refer to revascularization. Within this model (C index 0.92, χ2 = 1248, P < 0.0001), obstructive CAD was the most influential factor for referral, followed by an interaction of obstructive CAD with pre-test likelihood of CAD (P = 0.0344). Within CCTA CAD groups, rates of revascularization increased from 3.8% for non-high-risk CAD to 51.2% high-risk CAD. In multivariable models, when compared with medical therapy, revascularization was associated with a survival advantage for patients with high-risk CAD [hazards ratio (HR) 0.38, 95% confidence interval 0.18–0.83], with no difference in survival for patients with non-high-risk CAD (HR 3.24, 95% CI 0.76–13.89) (P-value for interaction = 0.03). Conclusion In an intermediate-term follow-up, coronary revascularization is

  10. Seasonal mortality in zoo ruminants.

    PubMed

    Carisch, Lea; Müller, Dennis W H; Hatt, Jean-Michel; Bingaman Lackey, Laurie; Rensch, E Eberhard; Clauss, Marcus; Zerbe, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    While seasonality has often been investigated with respect to reproduction, seasonality of mortality has received less attention. We investigated whether a seasonal signal of mortality exists in wild ruminants kept in zoos, using data from 60,591 individuals of 88 species. We quantified the mortality in the 3 consecutive months with the highest above-baseline mortality (3 MM). 3 MM was not related to relative life expectancy of species, indicating that seasonal mortality does not necessarily impact husbandry success. Although 3 MM was mainly observed in autumn/winter months, there was no evidence for an expected negative relationship with the latitude of the species' natural habitat and no positive relationship between 3 MM and the mean temperature in that habitat, indicating no evidence for species from lower latitudes/warmer climates being more susceptible to seasonal mortality under zoo conditions. 3 MM was related to reproductive biology, with seasonally reproducing species also displaying more seasonal mortality. This pattern differed between groups: In cervids, the onset of seasonal mortality appeared linked to the onset of rut in both sexes. This was less evident in bovids, where in a number of species (especially caprids), the onset of female seasonal mortality was linked to the lambing period. While showing that the origin of a species from warmer climate zones does not constrain husbandry success in ruminants in terms of an increased seasonal mortality, the results suggest that husbandry measures aimed at protecting females from rutting males are important, especially in cervids. Zoo Biol. 36:74-86, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty with 1-year follow-up: factors predictive of success

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Nava, G.; Galvao, M.; Bautista-Castaño, I.; Fernandez-Corbelle, J. P.; Trell, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Bariatric endoscopy has emerged as an aid in the nonsurgical treatment of obesity. The objective of this study is to critically provide the results and follow-up of endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty 1 year after the procedure. Patients and methods: Prospective single-center follow-up study of 25 patients (5 men, 20 women) who underwent flexible endoscopic suturing for endoluminal gastric volume reduction. A multidisciplinary team provided post-procedure care. Patient outcomes were recorded at 1 year after the procedure. Linear regression analysis was done to evaluate the variables associated with best results at 1 year of follow-up. Results: Mean body mass index (BMI) was 38.5 ± 4.6 kg/m2 (range 30 – 47) and mean age 44.5 ± 8.2 years (range 29 – 60). At 1 year, 22 patients continued with the follow-up (2 dropped out at 6 months and 1 at 3 months). There were no major intra-procedural, early, or delayed adverse events. Mean BMI loss was 7.3 ± 4.2 kg/m2, and mean percentage of total body weight loss was 18.7 ± 10.7 at 1 year. In the linear regression analysis, adjusted by initial BMI, variables associated with %TBWL involved the frequency of nutritional (β = 0.563, P = 0.014) and psychological contacts (β = 0.727, P = 0.025). The number of nutritional and psychological contacts were predictive of good weight loss results. Conclusions: Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty is a feasible, reproducible, and effective procedure to treat obesity. Nutritional and psychological interaction are predictive of success. PMID:26878054

  12. Colles' fracture treated with non-bridging external fixation: a 1-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Andersen, J K; Høgh, A; Gantov, J; Vaesel, M T; Hansen, T Baek

    2009-08-01

    The results in 75 of 105 patients with Older type II/III (AO type A2.2, A3.1, A3.2) Colles' fractures, treated with non-bridging external fixation are presented. The mean age was 67.8 years, and all patients were followed prospectively for 12 months with radiological and functional assessment. No statistically significant loss of radial length, angulation or inclination was seen between the postoperative reduction and the 1-year follow-up examination. The clinical results after 1 year were 66 (88%) excellent/good, nine (12%) fair and 0 (0%) poor according to the modified Gartland and Werley score. Mean visual analogue scale pain score after 1 year was 0.8. In three patients (4%), re-displacement of the fracture occurred and was treated with plating. Non-bridging external fixation offers a reliable method of maintaining radiological reduction of Older type II/III fractures of the distal radius and gives a good functional outcome after 1 year.

  13. Short-term effects of ambient sulphur dioxide and particulate matter on mortality in 12 European cities: results from time series data from the APHEA project. Air Pollution and Health: a European Approach.

    PubMed Central

    Katsouyanni, K.; Touloumi, G.; Spix, C.; Schwartz, J.; Balducci, F.; Medina, S.; Rossi, G.; Wojtyniak, B.; Sunyer, J.; Bacharova, L.; Schouten, J. P.; Ponka, A.; Anderson, H. R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To carry out a prospective combined quantitative analysis of the associations between all cause mortality and ambient particulate matter and sulphur dioxide. DESIGN: Analysis of time series data on daily number of deaths from all causes and concentrations of sulphur dioxide and particulate matter (measured as black smoke or particles smaller than 10 microns in diameter (PM10)) and potential confounders. SETTING: 12 European cities in the APHEA project (Air Pollution and Health: a European Approach). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Relative risk of death. RESULTS: In western European cities it was found that an increase of 50 micrograms/m3 in sulphur dioxide or black smoke was associated with a 3% (95% confidence interval 2% to 4%) increase in daily mortality and the corresponding figure for PM10 was 2% (1% to 3%). In central eastern European cities the increase in mortality associated with a 50 micrograms/m3 change in sulphur dioxide was 0.8% (-0.1% to 2.4%) and in black smoke 0.6% (0.1% to 1.1%). Cumulative effects of prolonged (two to four days) exposure to air pollutants resulted in estimates comparable with the one day effects. The effects of both pollutants were stronger during the summer and were mutually independent. CONCLUSIONS: The internal consistency of the results in western European cities with wide differences in climate and environmental conditions suggest that these associations may be causal. The long term health impact of these effects is uncertain, but today's relatively low levels of sulphur dioxide and particles still have detectable short term effects on health and further reductions in air pollution are advisable. PMID:9180068

  14. Quality of Vitamin K Antagonist Control and 1-Year Outcomes in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation: A Global Perspective from the GARFIELD-AF Registry

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Sylvia; ten Cate, Hugo; Accetta, Gabriele; Angchaisuksiri, Pantep; Bassand, Jean-Pierre; Camm, A. John; Corbalan, Ramon; Darius, Harald; Fitzmaurice, David A.; Goldhaber, Samuel Z.; Goto, Shinya; Jacobson, Barry; Kayani, Gloria; Mantovani, Lorenzo G.; Misselwitz, Frank; Pieper, Karen; Schellong, Sebastian M.; Stepinska, Janina; Turpie, Alexander G. G.; van Eickels, Martin; Kakkar, Ajay K.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) need to be individually dosed. International guidelines recommend a target range of international normalised ratio (INR) of 2.0–3.0 for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF). We analysed the time in this therapeutic range (TTR) of VKA-treated patients with newly diagnosed AF in the ongoing, global, observational registry GARFIELD-AF. Taking TTR as a measure of the quality of patient management, we analysed its relationship with 1-year outcomes, including stroke/systemic embolism (SE), major bleeding, and all-cause mortality. Methods and Results TTR was calculated for 9934 patients using 136,082 INR measurements during 1-year follow-up. The mean TTR was 55.0%; values were similar for different VKAs. 5851 (58.9%) patients had TTR<65%; 4083 (41.1%) TTR≥65%. The proportion of patients with TTR≥65% varied from 16.7% in Asia to 49.4% in Europe. There was a 2.6-fold increase in the risk of stroke/SE, 1.5-fold increase in the risk of major bleeding, and 2.4-fold increase in the risk of all-cause mortality with TTR<65% versus ≥65% after adjusting for potential confounders. The population attributable fraction, i.e. the proportion of events attributable to suboptimal anticoagulation among VKA users, was 47.7% for stroke/SE, 16.7% for major bleeding, and 45.4% for all-cause mortality. In patients with TTR<65%, the risk of first stroke/SE was highest in the first 4 months and decreased thereafter (test for trend, p = 0.021). In these patients, the risk of first major bleed declined during follow-up (p = 0.005), whereas in patients with TTR≥65%, the risk increased over time (p = 0.027). Conclusion A large proportion of patients with AF had poor VKA control and these patients had higher risks of stroke/SE, major bleeding, and all-cause mortality. Our data suggest that there is room for improvement of VKA control in routine clinical practice and that this could substantially reduce adverse outcomes. Trial Registration Clinical

  15. Mortality table construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutawanir

    2015-12-01

    Mortality tables play important role in actuarial studies such as life annuities, premium determination, premium reserve, valuation pension plan, pension funding. Some known mortality tables are CSO mortality table, Indonesian Mortality Table, Bowers mortality table, Japan Mortality table. For actuary applications some tables are constructed with different environment such as single decrement, double decrement, and multiple decrement. There exist two approaches in mortality table construction : mathematics approach and statistical approach. Distribution model and estimation theory are the statistical concepts that are used in mortality table construction. This article aims to discuss the statistical approach in mortality table construction. The distributional assumptions are uniform death distribution (UDD) and constant force (exponential). Moment estimation and maximum likelihood are used to estimate the mortality parameter. Moment estimation methods are easier to manipulate compared to maximum likelihood estimation (mle). However, the complete mortality data are not used in moment estimation method. Maximum likelihood exploited all available information in mortality estimation. Some mle equations are complicated and solved using numerical methods. The article focus on single decrement estimation using moment and maximum likelihood estimation. Some extension to double decrement will introduced. Simple dataset will be used to illustrated the mortality estimation, and mortality table.

  16. Effect of Peritoneal Dialysis Modality on the 1-Year Rate of Decline of Residual Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chan Ho; Oh, Hyung Jung; Lee, Mi Jung; Kwon, Young Eun; Kim, Yung Ly; Nam, Ki Heon; Park, Kyoung Sook; An, Seong Yeong; Ko, Kwang Il; Koo, Hyang Mo; Doh, Fa Mee; Han, Seung Hyeok; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Beom Seok; Kang, Shin-Wook

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The effect of different peritoneal dialysis (PD) modalities on the decline in residual renal function (RRF) is unclear due to inconsistencies among studies. In particular, the effect of automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) modalities [continuous cyclic peritoneal dialysis (CCPD) and nightly intermittent peritoneal dialysis (NIPD)] on RRF has not been examined in a large cohort. Materials and Methods We conducted a single-center retrospective study to investigate the association between PD modalities and decline in RRF in 142 incident PD patients [34 on CCPD, 36 on NIPD, and 72 on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD)]. RRF was measured within 2 months from PD start and at 1 year after PD initiation. Results The RRF at 1 year after PD initiation was 1.98±2.20 mL/min/1.73 m2 in CCPD patients and 3.63±3.67 mL/min/1.73 m2 in NIPD patients, which were moderately lower than 4.23±3.51 mL/min/1.73 m2 in CAPD patients (p=0.064). Moreover, there was no significant difference in the 1-year rate of decline of RRF between CCPD and NIPD patients, although APD patients had a faster 1-year RRF decline rate than CAPD patients (CCPD and NIPD vs. CAPD: -45.68 and -36.69 vs. 1.17%/year, p=0.045). APD was associated with a more rapid decline in RRF in patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing PD, although multivariate analysis attenuated the significance of this finding (β=-31.50; 95% CI, -63.61 to 0.62; p=0.052). Conclusion Our results suggest that CAPD might be more helpful than APD for preserving RRF during the first year of dialysis therapy, although there was no significant difference in the 1-year rate of decline of RRF between the two APD modalities. PMID:24339299

  17. Effects of nutritional stress and socio-economic status on maternal mortality in six German villages, 1766-1863.

    PubMed

    Scalone, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    We examined the effects of nutritional stress on maternal mortality arising from short-term economic crises in eighteenth-century and nineteenth-century Germany, and how these effects might have been mitigated by socio-economic status. Historical data from six German villages were used to assess how socio-economic conditions and short-term economic crises following poor harvests may have affected maternal mortality. The results show that 1 year after an increase in grain prices the risk of maternal death increased significantly amongst the wives of those working outside the agricultural sector, and more so than for the wives of those working on farms. Nutritional crises seem to have had a significantly stronger impact on maternal mortality in the period 2-6 weeks after childbirth, when mothers were most prone to infections and indirect, obstetrical causes of maternal death. The findings indicate that both nutritional stress and socio-economic factors contributed to maternal mortality.

  18. Comparing logistic models based on modified GCS motor component with other prognostic tools in prediction of mortality: results of study in 7226 trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Eftekhar, Behzad; Zarei, Mohammad Reza; Ghodsi, Mohammad; Moezardalan, Koorosh; Zargar, Moosa; Ketabchi, Ebrahim

    2005-08-01

    A simple reproducible and sensitive prognostic trauma tool is still needed. In this article we have introduced modified GCS motor response (MGMR) and evaluated the performance of logistic models based on this variable. The records of 8452 trauma patients admitted to major hospitals of Tehran from 1999 to 2000 were analysed. 7226 records with known outcome were included in our study. Logistic models based on outcome (death versus survival) as a dependent variable and Injury Severity Score (ISS), Revised Trauma Score (RTS), Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), GCS motor component (GMR) and MGMR (following command [=2], movement but not following [=1] command and without movement [=0]) were compared based on their accuracy and area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve. The accuracy of the Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS), RTS, GCS, GMR and MGMR models were almost the same. Considering both the area under the ROC curve and accuracy, the age included MGMR model was also comparable with other age included models (RTS+age, GCS+age, GMR+age). We concluded that although in some situations we need more sophisticated models, should our results be reproducible in other populations, MGMR (with or without age added) model may be of considerable practical value.

  19. Is Impact of Statin Therapy on All-Cause Mortality Different in HIV-Infected Individuals Compared to General Population? Results from the FHDH-ANRS CO4 Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Sylvie; Lacombe, Jean-Marc; Mary-Krause, Murielle; Partisani, Marialuisa; Bidegain, Frédéric; Cotte, Laurent; Aslangul, Elisabeth; Chéret, Antoine; Boccara, Franck; Meynard, Jean-Luc; Pradier, Christian; Roger, Pierre-Marie; Tattevin, Pierre; Costagliola, Dominique; Molina, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background The effect of statins on all-cause mortality in the general population has been estimated as 0.86 (95%CI 0.79-0.94) for primary prevention. Reported values in HIV-infected individuals have been discordant. We assessed the impact of statin-based primary prevention on all-cause mortality among HIV-infected individuals. Methods Patients were selected among controls from a multicentre nested case-control study on the risk of myocardial infarction. Patients with prior cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disorders were not eligible. Potential confounders, including variables that were associated either with statin use and/or death occurrence and statin use were evaluated within the last 3 months prior to inclusion in the case-control study. Using an intention to continue approach, multiple imputation of missing data, Cox’s proportional hazard models or propensity based weighting, the impact of statins on the 7-year all-cause mortality was evaluated. Results Among 1,776 HIV-infected individuals, 138 (8%) were statins users. During a median follow-up of 53 months, 76 deaths occurred, including 6 in statin users. Statin users had more cardiovascular risk factors and a lower CD4 T cell nadir than statin non-users. In univariable analysis, the death rate was higher in statins users (11% vs 7%, HR 1.22, 95%CI 0.53-2.82). The confounders accounted for were age, HIV transmission group, current CD4 T cell count, haemoglobin level, body mass index, smoking status, anti-HCV antibodies positivity, HBs antigen positivity, diabetes and hypertension. In the Cox multivariable model the estimated hazard ratio of statin on all-cause mortality was estimated as 0.86 (95%CI 0.34-2.19) and it was 0.83 (95%CI 0.51-1.35) using inverse probability treatment weights. Conclusion The impact of statin for primary prevention appears similar in HIV-infected individuals and in the general population. PMID:26200661

  20. Predictive Factors of Hospital Mortality Due to Myocardial Infarction: A Multilevel Analysis of Iran's National Data

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Ali; Soori, Hamid; Mehrabi, Yadollah; Etemad, Koorosh; Sajjadi, Homeira; Sadeghi, Mehraban

    2015-01-01

    Background: Regarding failure to establish the statistical presuppositions for analysis of the data by conventional approaches, hierarchical structure of the data as well as the effect of higher-level variables, this study was conducted to determine the factors independently associated with hospital mortality due to myocardial infarction (MI) in Iran using a multilevel analysis. Methods: This study was a national, hospital-based, and cross-sectional study. In this study, the data of 20750 new MI patients between April, 2012 and March, 2013 in Iran were used. The hospital mortality due to MI was considered as the dependent variable. The demographic data, clinical and behavioral risk factors at the individual level and environmental data were gathered. Multilevel logistic regression models with Stata software were used to analyze the data. Results: Within 1-year of study, the frequency (%) of hospital mortality within 30 days of admission was derived 2511 (12.1%) patients. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of mortality with (95% confidence interval [CI]) was derived 2.07 (95% CI: 1.5–2.8) for right bundle branch block, 1.5 (95% CI: 1.3–1.7) for ST-segment elevation MI, 1.3 (95% CI: 1.1–1.4) for female gender, and 1.2 (95% CI: 1.1–1.3) for humidity, all of which were considered as risk factors of mortality. But, OR of mortality was 0.7 for precipitation (95% CI: 0.7–0.8) and 0.5 for angioplasty (95% CI: 0.4–0.6) were considered as protective factors of mortality. Conclusions: Individual risk factors had independent effects on the hospital mortality due to MI. Variables in the province level had no significant effect on the outcome of MI. Increasing access and quality to treatment could reduce the mortality due to MI. PMID:26730342

  1. Impact of Neoadjuvant Prostate-Specific Antigen Kinetics on Biochemical Failure and Prostate Cancer Mortality: Results From a Prospective Patient Database

    SciTech Connect

    Foo, Marcus; Lavieri, Mariel; Pickles, Tom

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To confirm findings from an earlier report showing that neoadjuvant (NA) prostate-specific antigen (PSA) halving time (PSAHT) impacts biochemical failure (BF) rates, and to examine its association with prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS), in a large prospective cohort of patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 502 patients were selected from a prospective database, who had localized prostate adenocarcinoma treated with 2-12 months of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (N-ADT) followed by external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) between 1994 and 2000, and had at least 2 NA PSA values. Seventy-four percent of patients had high-risk prostate cancer. Median initial PSA value, N-ADT duration, total ADT duration, and radiation therapy dose were 14 ng/mL, 6.9 months, 10.8 months, and 68 Gy, respectively. Results: At a median follow-up of 9.9 years, 210 patients have had a BF. Median PSAHT was 18 days. On univariate analysis, PSAHT was not shown to predict for BF (P=.69) or PCSS (P=.28). However, NA nadir PSA (nanPSA) and post-therapy nadir PSA (ptnPSA), when analyzed as continuous or categoric variables, predicted for BF (P<.001) and PCSS (P<.001). On multivariate analysis, nanPSA (P=.037) and ptnPSA (P<.001) continued to be significantly associated with BF. However, N-ADT duration lost significance (P=.67), and PSAHT remained a nonsignificant predictor (P=.97). For PCSS, multivariate analysis showed nanPSA (P=.049) and ptnPSA (P<.001) to be significant. Again PSAHT (P=.49) remained nonsignificant. Conclusions: In this large, prospective cohort of patients, NA PSA kinetics, expressed as PSAHT, did not predict BF or PCSS. However, nadir PSAs, in both the NA and post-therapy settings, were significant predictors of BF and PCSS. Optimization of therapy could potentially be based on early PSA response, with shorter durations of ADT for those predicted to do favorably, and intensification of therapy for those likely to have poorer outcomes.

  2. Challenge of Fetal Mortality

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mortality Series 21. Data on Natality, Marriage, and Divorce Series 22. Data from the National Natality and ... Compilations of Data on Natality, Mortality, Marriage, and Divorce Vital Statistics Rapid Release Quarterly Provisional Estimates Dashboard ...

  3. The law of mortality revisited: interspecies comparisons of mortality.

    PubMed

    Olshansky, S J

    2010-01-01

    In 1825 the British actuary Benjamin Gompertz believed he had discovered a consistency in the timing of death in people that was so important that he labelled his observation a 'law of mortality'. To Gompertz, this 'law' was equivalent in importance to Newton's law of gravity because he believed it would be observed in all living things. Gompertz's quest for the 'law' eventually failed, as did similar efforts by other scientists in the 19th and most of the 20th century. However, the search for the law of mortality was successfully resolved in 1996 when my colleagues and I discovered that the only way to 'see' Gompertz's law expressed as common age patterns of death across species was to partition total mortality into its intrinsic and extrinsic components, and examine mortality schedules on a uniform time scale. Scientists had been unable to reveal the law of mortality in the past not only because they could not partition total mortality, but also because of the previous anthropocentric perspective that forced some scientists to view duration of life along a single time scale - one based on human measurements of chronological time. The law of mortality is relevant today not only because it links the epidemiology of disease, ageing and death across species, but because it creates a window into the future for those who study disease epidemiology in animals that now live long enough in protected environments to experience the biological consequences of ageing. In this paper I summarize the historical search for the law of mortality, explain why the solution could only be found by linking two seemingly unconnected scientific disciplines (evolution biology and actuarial/demographics), explain why age patterns of disease and death in humans may be used to understand and predict disease epidemiology in other species, and describe how a new scientific discipline has arisen in the modern era as a result of this research.

  4. Race and Mortality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlan, James P.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses increasing racial and socioeconomic disparities in mortality despite general declines in mortality, examining disparities in infant mortality and explaining that whenever two groups differ in their susceptibility to some condition, the less prevalent the condition, the greater will be the disparity in rates of experiencing the condition.…

  5. Contribution of Alzheimer disease to mortality in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Leurgans, Sue E.; Hebert, Liesi E.; Scherr, Paul A.; Yaffe, Kristine; Bennett, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the burden of mortality attributable to Alzheimer disease (AD) dementia in the United States. Methods: Data came from 2,566 persons aged 65 years and older (mean 78.1 years) without dementia at baseline from 2 cohort studies of aging with identical annual diagnostic assessments of dementia. Because both studies require organ donation, ascertainment of mortality was complete and dates of death accurate. Mortality hazard ratios (HRs) after incident AD dementia were estimated per 10-year age strata from proportional hazards models. Population attributable risk percentage was derived to estimate excess mortality after a diagnosis of AD dementia. The number of excess deaths attributable to AD dementia in the United States was then estimated. Results: Over an average of 8 years, 559 participants (21.8%) without dementia at baseline developed AD dementia and 1,090 (42.4%) died. Median time from AD dementia diagnosis to death was 3.8 years. The mortality HR for AD dementia was 4.30 (confidence interval = 3.33, 5.58) for ages 75–84 years and 2.77 (confidence interval = 2.37, 3.23) for ages 85 years and older (too few deaths after AD dementia in ages 65–74 were available to estimate HR). Population attributable risk percentage was 37.0% for ages 75–84 and 35.8% for ages 85 and older. An estimated 503,400 deaths in Americans aged 75 years and older were attributable to AD dementia in 2010. Conclusions: A larger number of deaths are attributable to AD dementia in the United States each year than the number (<84,000 in 2010) reported on death certificates. PMID:24598707

  6. Pediatric trauma BIG score: Predicting mortality in polytraumatized pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    El-Gamasy, Mohamed Abd El-Aziz; Elezz, Ahmed Abd El Basset Abo; Basuni, Ahmed Sobhy Mohamed; Elrazek, Mohamed El Sayed Ali Abd

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trauma is a worldwide health problem and the major cause of death and disability, particularly affecting the young population. It is important to remember that pediatric trauma care has made a significant improvement in the outcomes of these injured children. Aim of the Work: This study aimed at evaluation of pediatric trauma BIG score in comparison with New Injury Severity Score (NISS) and Pediatric Trauma Score (PTS) in Tanta University Emergency Hospital. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in Tanta University Emergency Hospital to all multiple trauma pediatric patients attended to the Emergency Department for 1 year. Pediatric trauma BIG score, PTS, and NISS scores were calculated and results compared to each other and to observed mortality. Results: BIG score ≥12.7 has sensitivity 86.7% and specificity 71.4%, whereas PTS at value ≤3.5 has sensitivity 63.3% and specificity 68.6% and NISS at value ≥39.5 has sensitivity 53.3% and specificity 54.3%. There was a significant positive correlation between BIG score value and mortality rate. Conclusion: The pediatric BIG score is a reliable mortality-prediction score for children with traumatic injuries; it uses international normalization ratio (INR), Base Excess (BE), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) values that can be measured within a few minutes of sampling, so it can be readily applied in the Pediatric Emergency Department, but it cannot be applied on patients with chronic diseases that affect INR, BE, or GCS. PMID:27994378

  7. Cognitive and affective assessment in day care versus institutionalized elderly patients: a 1-year longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Maseda, Ana; Balo, Aránzazu; Lorenzo–López, Laura; Lodeiro–Fernández, Leire; Rodríguez–Villamil, José Luis; Millán–Calenti, José Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cognitive decline and depression are two common mental health problems that may create a need for long-term care among the elderly. In the last decade, the percentage of older adults who receive health care in nursing homes, day care centers, or home support services has increased in Europe. The objectives of this descriptive and nonrandomized longitudinal study were to evaluate and to compare the cognitive and affective evolution of day care versus institutionalized older patients through a 1-year period, and to assess the presence of cognitive and affective impairment as a function of the care setting. Patients and methods Ninety-four patients were assessed at baseline, and 63 (67.0%) were reassessed 1 year later. Neuropsychological assessment included measures of cognitive performance (general cognitive status, visuospatial, and language abilities) and affective status (depressive symptoms). Results Our findings indicated that the majority of the participants (day care and institutionalized patients) had mild–moderate cognitive impairment at baseline, which significantly increased in both groups after 1-year follow-up. However, the rate of change in global cognitive function did not significantly differ between groups over time. Regarding language abilities, naming function maintained among day care patients in comparison with institutionalized patients, who showed worse performance at follow-up. As regards to affective status, results revealed that institutionalized patients had a significant reduction in depressive symptoms at follow-up, when compared to day care patients. Results also highlight the high frequency of cognitive impairment and depressive symptoms regardless of the care setting. Conclusion Our findings revealed a similar global cognitive decline rate between patients receiving day care services and those residing in a nursing home at the 1-year follow-up, and slightly different trajectories in other outcomes such as naming function and

  8. The impact of avoidable mortality on life expectancy at birth in Spain: changes between three periods, from 1987 to 2001

    PubMed Central

    Gispert, R; Serra, I; Barés, M A; Puig, X; Puigdefàbregas, A; Freitas, A

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of avoidable mortality on the changes in life expectancy at birth in Spain. Methods: Standard life table techniques and the Arriaga method were used to calculate and to decompose life expectancy (LE) changes by age, effects and groups of causes of avoidable mortality among three periods (1987–91, 1992–6 and 1997–2001). A list of causes of avoidable mortality reached by consensus and previously published in Spain was used. Main results: Life expectancy increased in all ages and both sexes. The main contribution to the increase of LE at birth was due to people over 50. Mortality in young adults produced a reduction in LE between the first two periods, but there was an important increase in LE between the last two periods; in both cases, this was the result of factors amenable to health policy interventions. The highest improvement in LE was due to non-avoidable causes, but avoidable mortality through health service interventions showed improvements in LE in those younger than 1 year and in those aged 45–75 years. Conclusions: Making a distinction between several groups of causes of avoidable mortality and using decomposition by causes, ages and effects allowed us to better explain the impact of avoidable mortality on the LE of the whole population and gave a new dimension to this indicator that could be very useful in public health. PMID:18701727

  9. Mortality among female manual workers.

    PubMed Central

    Gunnarsdóttir, H; Rafnsson, V

    1992-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim was to determine whether female manual workers have higher mortality than other women. DESIGN--This was a retrospective cohort study in which mortality was compared with that of the general female population. Main outcome measures were standardised mortality ratio (SMR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). SETTING--Reykjavík region. PARTICIPANTS--Participants were 18,878 women, the cumulated members of a pension fund for manual workers between 1970 and 1986. MAIN RESULTS--A healthy worker effect was observed in the total cohort. The study was then restricted to those who had contributed to the pension fund any time after reaching 20 years of age, and a 10 year latency period was instituted. When analysing subcohorts by duration of employment the standardised mortality ratios for all causes of death and all cancers increased with longer employment time up to 10 years. However, the ratios were low in the group with over 10 years of employment. Those who began contributing to the fund in 1977 or later had higher mortality than those who began earlier. There was an excess of lung and bladder cancer in the total cohort and in all the subcohorts except in the group with over 10 years' employment. Mortality from accidents and suicides was in excess in all the groups. CONCLUSIONS--Mortality is high among some groups of female manual workers. A deficit was found among those with the longest employment. Differences in mortality have widened in recent years. An excess of suicides shows that women in this group have, for some reason, less will to live than other women. PMID:1494075

  10. Elder Self-neglect and Abuse and Mortality Risk in a Community-Dwelling Population

    PubMed Central

    Dong, XinQi; Simon, Melissa; de Leon, Carlos Mendes; Fulmer, Terry; Beck, Todd; Hebert, Liesi; Dyer, Carmel; Paveza, Gregory; Evans, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Context Both elder self-neglect and abuse have become increasingly prominent public health issues. The association of either elder self-neglect or abuse with mortality remains unclear. Objective To examine the relationship of elder self-neglect or abuse reported to social services agencies with all-cause mortality among a community-dwelling elderly population. Design, Setting, and Participants Prospective, population-based cohort study (conducted from 1993 to 2005) of residents living in a geographically defined community of 3 adjacent neighborhoods in Chicago, Illinois, who were participating in the Chicago Health and Aging Project (CHAP; a longitudinal, population-based, epidemiological study of residents aged ≥65 years). A subset of these participants had suspected elder self-neglect or abuse reported to social services agencies. Main Outcome Measures Mortality ascertained during follow-up and by use of the National Death Index. Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess independent associations of self-neglect or elder abuse reporting with the risk of all-cause mortality using time-varying covariate analyses. Results Of 9318 CHAP participants, 1544 participants were reported for elder self-neglect and 113 participants were reported for elder abuse from 1993 to 2005. All CHAP participants were followed up for a median of 6.9 years (interquartile range, 7.4 years), during which 4306 deaths occurred. In multivariable analyses, reported elder self-neglect was associated with a significantly increased risk of 1-year mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 5.82; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.20–6.51). Mortality risk was lower but still elevated after 1 year (HR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.67–2.14). Reported elder abuse also was associated with significantly increased risk of overall mortality (HR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.07–1.84). Confirmed elder self-neglect or abuse also was associated with mortality. Increased mortality risks associated with either elder self-neglect or

  11. Three-dimensional assessment of mandibular advancement 1 year after surgery

    PubMed Central

    de Assis Ribeiro Carvalho, Felipe; Cevidanes, Lucia Helena Soares; Motta, Alexandre Trindade Simões da; de Oliveira Almeida, Marco Antonio; Phillips, Ceib

    2010-01-01

    Introduction This prospective observational study evaluated changes in the 3-dimensional position and remodeling of the mandibular rami, condyles, and chin at splint removal and 1 year after mandibular advancement surgery. Methods Presurgery, splint removal (4–6 weeks postsurgery), and 1-year postsurgery cone-beam computed tomography scans of 27 subjects were used. Superimposition on the cranial base was used to assess positional or remodeling changes in the anatomic regions of interest. Surface distance displacements were visually displayed and quantified by 3-dimensional color maps. A 1-sample t test was used to assess the average postsurgical changes of each region of interest. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results After antero-inferior chin displacement with surgery (mean, 6.81 ± 3.2 mm at splint removal), the average 1-year post-surgery displacement was not statistically significant (P = 0.44). Postsurgical adaptations greater than 2 mm were observed in 48% of the patients: 16% with an additional anterior-inferior displacement of the chin of 2 to 4 mm, and 4% with ≥4 mm; 20% had postero-superior movement of 2 to 4 mm, and 8% had postero-superior movement of ≥4 mm. The condyles tended to move, on average, ≤2 mm supero-posteriorly with surgery, and this small positional displacement was maintained 1 year postsurgery (right condyle, P = 0.58; left, P = 0.88). The rami exhibited outward (lateral) movements with surgery, with greater displacement of the inferior part of the rami (≥2 mm in 65% of the subjects). This torque of the ramus with surgery was stable 1 year postsurgery. Conclusions Three-dimensional assessment of skeletal changes with mandibular advancement surgery shows that nearly half of the patients have >2 mm change in chin position from splint removal to the 1-year follow-up, with approximately equal chances of anterior and posterior movement. Torque of the rami usually occurs with mandibular advancement surgery. PMID:20381760

  12. Infection does not increase long-term mortality in patients with acute severe alcoholic hepatitis treated with corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Dhanda, Ashwin D; Sinha, Ashish; Hunt, Vicky; Saleem, Sarah; Cramp, Matthew E; Collins, Peter L

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine whether infection in patients with acute severe alcoholic hepatitis (AAH) treated with corticosteroids is associated with increased mortality. METHODS Consecutive patients with AAH were treated with steroids and recruited to the study. Clinically relevant infections (body temperature > 38 °C or < 36 °C for more than 4 h, ascitic neutrophil count > 0.25 ×109/L, consolidation on chest radiograph or clinically relevant positive microbiological culture of bodily fluid) were recorded prospectively. Clinical and laboratory parameters were recorded and survival at 90 d and 6 mo was determined. Univariate analysis of factors associated with 90-d mortality was performed and significant variables included in a multivariate analysis. RESULTS Seventy-two patients were included in the final analysis (mean age 47.9 years, 26% female, mean discriminant function 53.0). Overall mortality in the group occurred in 15 (21%), 23 (32%) and 31 (43%) at day 28, day 90 and 1 year respectively. 36 (50%) had a clinically relevant infection during their hospitalisation (23 after initiation of steroids). The median time to development of incident infection after commencement of steroids was 10 d. The commonest site of infection was ascites (31%) and bacteraemia (31%) followed by urinary tract (19%) and respiratory tract (8%). Forty-one separate organisms were isolated in 33 patients; the most frequent genus was Escherichia (22%) and Enterococcus (20%). Infection was not associated with 90-d or 1 year mortality but was associated with higher creatinine, model for end-stage liver disease and Lille score. Baseline urea was the only independent predictor of 90-d mortality. CONCLUSION Clinically relevant infections are common in patients with AAH but are not associated with increased 90-d or 1 year mortality. PMID:28373772

  13. Mortal quintet of sickle cell diseases

    PubMed Central

    Helvaci, Mehmet Rami; Gokce, Cumali; Davran, Ramazan; Akkucuk, Seckin; Ugur, Mustafa; Oruc, Cem

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sickle cell diseases (SCDs) are chronic inflammatory processes on capillary level. We tried to understand some possible correlations between stroke and severity of SCDs. Methods: All patients with SCDs were taken into the study. Results: The study included 343 patients (174 males and 169 females). There were 30 cases (8.7%) with stroke. The mean ages were similar in both groups (32.5 versus 29.1 years in the stroke group and other, respectively, P>0.05). The female ratios were similar in both groups, too (43.3% versus 49.8%, respectively, P>0.05). Prevalences of associated thalassemia minors were also similar in them (73.3% versus 65.1%, respectively, P>0.05). Smoking was higher among the stroke cases, significantly (26.6% versus 13.0%, P<0.05). Mean white blood cell count, hematocrit value, and mean platelet count of the peripheric blood were similar in both groups (P>0.05 for all). On the other hand, although the painful crises per year, tonsilectomy, priapism, ileus, pulmonary hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, coronary heart disease, chronic renal disease, rheumatic heart disease, avascular necrosis of bones, cirrhosis, and mortality were all higher in the stroke group, the differences were only significant for acute chest syndrome (ACS), digital clubbing, and leg ulcers (P<0.05 for all), probably due to the small sample size of the stroke group. Conclusion: SCDs and smoking are chronic destructive processes on endothelium, and both terminate with early organ failures in life. Probably smoking, digital clubbing, leg ulcers, ACS, and stroke are mortal quintet of the SCDs that may indicate shortened survival in such patients. PMID:26379961

  14. Predictors of Relapse after Inpatient Opioid Detoxification during 1-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Relapse rate after opioid detoxification is very high. We studied the possibility that predetoxification patient characteristics might predict relapse at follow-up and thus conducted this 1-year follow-up study to assess the predictors of relapse after inpatient opioid detoxification. Materials and Methods. We conducted this study in our tertiary care institute in India over two-year time period (1 Jan 2014 to 31 Dec 2015). Out of 581 patients admitted, 466 patients were considered for study. Results and Discussion. No significant difference was found between relapsed and nonrelapsed patients regarding sociodemographic profile; however substance abuse pattern and forensic history showed significant differences. Relapsed patients abused greater amount and used injections more commonly, as compared to nonrelapsed group. Longer duration of abuse was also a significant risk factor. Patients with past attempt of opioid detoxification and family history (parental or first degree) of alcohol abuse had decreased possibility of maintaining remission during 1-year follow-up. Relapsed patients were found to abuse their spouse or parents. Conclusion. Our study compared profiles of relapsed and nonrelapsed patients after inpatient detoxification and concluded predictors of relapse during 1-year follow-up period. Early identification of predictors of relapse and hence high risk patients might be helpful in designing more effective and focused treatment plan. PMID:27722007

  15. Fathers' Depression Related to Positive and Negative Parenting Behaviors With 1-Year-Old Children

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Matthew M.; Freed, Gary L.; Clark, Sarah J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the associations between depression in fathers of 1-year-old children and specific positive and negative parenting behaviors discussed by pediatric providers at well-child visits. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional secondary analysis by using interview data from 1746 fathers of 1-year-old children in the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study. Positive parenting behaviors included fathers' reports of playing games, singing songs, and reading stories to their children ≥3 days in a typical week. Negative parenting behavior included fathers' reports of spanking their 1-year-old children in the previous month. Depression was assessed by using the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview Short Form. Weighted bivariate and multivariate analyses of parenting behaviors were performed while controlling for demographics and paternal substance abuse. RESULTS: Overall, 7% of fathers had depression. In bivariate analyses, depressed fathers were more likely than nondepressed fathers to report spanking their 1-year-old children in the previous month (41% compared with 13%; P < .01). In multivariate analyses, depressed fathers were less likely to report reading to their children ≥3 days in a typical week (adjusted odds ratio: 0.38 [95% confidence interval: 0.15–0.98]) and much more likely to report spanking (adjusted odds ratio: 3.92 [95% confidence interval: 1.23–12.5]). Seventy-seven percent of depressed fathers reported talking to their children's doctor in the previous year. CONCLUSIONS: Paternal depression is associated with parenting behaviors relevant to well-child visits. Pediatric providers should consider screening fathers for depression, discussing specific parenting behaviors (eg, reading to children and appropriate discipline), and referring for treatment if appropriate. PMID:21402627

  16. Zonisamide for Weight Reduction in Obese Adults A 1-Year Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gadde, Kishore M.; Kopping, Mariko F.; Wagner, H. Ryan; Yonish, Gretchen M.; Allison, David B.; Bray, George A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Obese individuals who have failed to achieve adequate weight loss with lifestyle changes have limited non-surgical therapeutic options. We evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of zonisamide, an antiepileptic drug, for enhancing weight loss in obese patients receiving diet and lifestyle guidance. Methods This was a 1-year randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted between January 2006 and September 2011 at Duke University Medical Center. Patients were 225 obese (mean [SD] body mass index 37.6 [4.9]) women (134 [59.6%]) and men (91 [40.4%]) without diabetes. Interventions were daily dosing with placebo (n=74), zonisamide 200 mg (n=76), orzonisamide 400 mg (n=75), in addition to diet and lifestyle counseling by a dietitian for 1 year. Primary outcome was change in body weight at 1-year. Results Of the 225 randomized patients, 218 (97%) provided 1-year follow-up assessments. Change(least-squares mean) in body weight was -4.0 kg (−3.7%; 95% CI, −5.8 kg to −2.3 kg) for placebo, −4.4 kg (−3.9%; −6.1 to −2.6, P=.79vs placebo) for zonisamide 200 mg, and −7.3 kg (−6.8%; −9.0 to −5.6, P=.009vs placebo) for zonisamide 400 mg. In the categorical analysis,23 (31%) on placebo, 26 (34%; P=.71) on zonisamide 200 mg, and 41 (55%; P=.007) onzonisamide 400 mg achieved ≥5% weight loss; for ≥10% weight loss, the corresponding numbers were 6 (8%), 17 (22%; P=.022), and 24 (32%; P=.001). Gastrointestinal, nervous system and psychiatric adverse events occurred at a higher incidence with zonisamide than with placebo. Conclusion Zonisamide 400 mg/d moderately enhanced weight loss achieved with diet and lifestyle counseling, but had a high incidence of adverse events. PMID:23147455

  17. Cancer mortality in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Isabelle R.; de Souza, Dyego L.B.; Bernal, María M.; Costa, Íris do C.C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cancer is currently in the spotlight due to their heavy responsibility as main cause of death in both developed and developing countries. Analysis of the epidemiological situation is required as a support tool for the planning of public health measures for the most vulnerable groups. We analyzed cancer mortality trends in Brazil and geographic regions in the period 1996 to 2010 and calculate mortality predictions for the period 2011 to 2030. This is an epidemiological, demographic-based study that utilized information from the Mortality Information System on all deaths due to cancer in Brazil. Mortality trends were analyzed by the Joinpoint regression, and Nordpred was utilized for the calculation of predictions. Stability was verified for the female (annual percentage change [APC] = 0.4%) and male (APC = 0.5%) sexes. The North and Northeast regions present significant increasing trends for mortality in both sexes. Until 2030, female mortality trends will not present considerable variations, but there will be a decrease in mortality trends for the male sex. There will be increases in mortality rates until 2030 for the North and Northeast regions, whereas reductions will be verified for the remaining geographic regions. This variation will be explained by the demographic structure of regions until 2030. There are pronounced regional and sex differences in cancer mortality in Brazil, and these discrepancies will continue to increase until the year 2030, when the Northeast region will present the highest cancer mortality rates in Brazil. PMID:25906105

  18. Consistent Predictions of Future Forest Mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, N. G.

    2014-12-01

    We examined empirical and model based estimates of current and future forest mortality of conifers in the northern hemisphere. Consistent water potential thresholds were found that resulted in mortality of our case study species, pinon pine and one-seed juniper. Extending these results with IPCC climate scenarios suggests that most existing trees in this region (SW USA) will be dead by 2050. Further, independent estimates of future mortality for the entire coniferous biome suggest widespread mortality by 2100. The validity and assumptions and implications of these results are discussed.

  19. On forecasting mortality.

    PubMed

    Olshansky, S J

    1988-01-01

    Official forecasts of mortality made by the U.S. Office of the Actuary throughout this century have consistently underestimated observed mortality declines. This is due, in part, to their reliance on the static extrapolation of past trends, an atheoretical statistical method that pays scant attention to the behavioral, medical, and social factors contributing to mortality change. A "multiple cause-delay model" more realistically portrays the effects on mortality of the presence of more favorable risk factors at the population level. Such revised assumptions produce large increases in forecasts of the size of the elderly population, and have a dramatic impact on related estimates of population morbidity, disability, and health care costs.

  20. Mortality differentials among Israeli men.

    PubMed Central

    Manor, O; Eisenbach, Z; Peritz, E; Friedlander, Y

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined differentials in mortality among adult Israeli men with respect to ethnic origin, marital status, and several measures of social status. METHODS: Data were based on a linkage of records from a 20% sample of the 1983 census to records of deaths occurring before the end of 1992. The study population included 72,527 men, and the number of deaths was 17,378. RESULTS: Differentials is mortality by origin show that mortality was higher among individuals of North African origin than among those of Asian and European origin. After allowance for several socioeconomic indicators, the excess mortality among North African Jews was eliminated. Substantial and consistent differences in mortality were found according to education, occupation, income, possession of a car, housing, and household amenities. Differentials among the elderly were markedly narrower than those among men younger than 70 years. CONCLUSIONS: Some sectors of Israeli society have higher risks of death than others, including, among the male population, these who are poor, less educated, unmarried, unskilled, out of the labor force, and of North African origin. PMID:10589307

  1. Risk Prediction of One-Year Mortality in Patients with Cardiac Arrhythmias Using Random Survival Forest.

    PubMed

    Miao, Fen; Cai, Yun-Peng; Zhang, Yu-Xiao; Li, Ye; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Existing models for predicting mortality based on traditional Cox proportional hazard approach (CPH) often have low prediction accuracy. This paper aims to develop a clinical risk model with good accuracy for predicting 1-year mortality in cardiac arrhythmias patients using random survival forest (RSF), a robust approach for survival analysis. 10,488 cardiac arrhythmias patients available in the public MIMIC II clinical database were investigated, with 3,452 deaths occurring within 1-year followups. Forty risk factors including demographics and clinical and laboratory information and antiarrhythmic agents were analyzed as potential predictors of all-cause mortality. RSF was adopted to build a comprehensive survival model and a simplified risk model composed of 14 top risk factors. The built comprehensive model achieved a prediction accuracy of 0.81 measured by c-statistic with 10-fold cross validation. The simplified risk model also achieved a good accuracy of 0.799. Both results outperformed traditional CPH (which achieved a c-statistic of 0.733 for the comprehensive model and 0.718 for the simplified model). Moreover, various factors are observed to have nonlinear impact on cardiac arrhythmias prognosis. As a result, RSF based model which took nonlinearity into account significantly outperformed traditional Cox proportional hazard model and has great potential to be a more effective approach for survival analysis.

  2. A comparison of emission calculations using different modeled indicators with 1-year online measurements.

    PubMed

    Lengers, Bernd; Schiefler, Inga; Büscher, Wolfgang

    2013-12-01

    The overall measurement of farm level greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in dairy production is not feasible, from either an engineering or administrative point of view. Instead, computational model systems are used to generate emission inventories, demanding a validation by measurement data. This paper tests the GHG calculation of the dairy farm-level optimization model DAIRYDYN, including methane (CH₄) from enteric fermentation and managed manure. The model involves four emission calculation procedures (indicators), differing in the aggregation level of relevant input variables. The corresponding emission factors used by the indicators range from default per cow (activity level) emissions up to emission factors based on feed intake, manure amount, and milk production intensity. For validation of the CH₄ accounting of the model, 1-year CH₄ measurements of an experimental free-stall dairy farm in Germany are compared to model simulation results. An advantage of this interdisciplinary study is given by the correspondence of the model parameterization and simulation horizon with the experimental farm's characteristics and measurement period. The results clarify that modeled emission inventories (2,898, 4,637, 4,247, and 3,600 kg CO₂-eq. cow(-1) year(-1)) lead to more or less good approximations of online measurements (average 3,845 kg CO₂-eq. cow(-1) year(-1) (±275 owing to manure management)) depending on the indicator utilized. The more farm-specific characteristics are used by the GHG indicator; the lower is the bias of the modeled emissions. Results underline that an accurate emission calculation procedure should capture differences in energy intake, owing to milk production intensity as well as manure storage time. Despite the differences between indicator estimates, the deviation of modeled GHGs using detailed indicators in DAIRYDYN from on-farm measurements is relatively low (between -6.4% and 10.5%), compared with findings from the literature.

  3. Vermont granite workers' mortality study.

    PubMed

    Costello, J; Graham, W G

    1988-01-01

    A cohort mortality study was carried out in Vermont granite workers who had been employed between the years 1950 and 1982. The cohort included men who had been exposed to high levels of granite dust prior to 1938-1940 (average cutters to 40 million parts/cubic foot), and those employed at dust levels after 1940, which on average were less than 10 million parts/cubic foot. Deaths were coded by a qualified nosologist and standardized mortality ratios were calculated. The results confirm previous studies that show that death rates from silicosis and tuberculosis, the major health threats in the years before 1940, were essentially eliminated after dust controls. However, we found excessive mortality rates from lung cancer in stone shed workers who had been employed prior to 1930, and hence had been exposed to high levels of granite dust. When information was available, 100% of those dying from lung cancer had been smokers.

  4. Necessity and Opportunity: the 1-Year Master's ABA Program at Auburn University.

    PubMed

    Johnston, James M

    2016-05-01

    The Auburn University Master of Science program in Applied Behavior Analysis was designed to accommodate not only the requirements of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board for approved course sequences and practicum training, but unavoidable limitations in faculty and other resources. These limitations were incompatible with the more traditional 2-year curriculum model, so a 1-year program was designed that met the necessary conditions. This article describes the resulting academic and practicum curriculum, the key funding mechanisms that allowed the program to develop, and the opportunities and benefits that this model afforded.

  5. QT-Interval Duration and Mortality Rate

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiyi; Post, Wendy S.; Dalal, Darshan; Blasco-Colmenares, Elena; Tomaselli, Gordon F.; Guallar, Eliseo

    2012-01-01

    Background Extreme prolongation or reduction of the QT interval predisposes patients to malignant ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, but the association of variations in the QT interval within a reference range with mortality end points in the general population is unclear. Methods We included 7828 men and women from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Baseline QT interval was measured via standard 12-lead electrocardiographic readings. Mortality end points were assessed through December 31, 2006 (2291 deaths). Results After an average follow-up of 13.7 years, the association between QT interval and mortality end points was U-shaped. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios comparing participants at or above the 95th percentile of age-, sex-, race-, and R-R interval–corrected QT interval (≥439 milliseconds) with participants in the middle quintile (401 to <410 milliseconds) were 2.03 (95% confidence interval, 1.46-2.81) for total mortality, 2.55 (1.59-4.09) for mortality due to cardiovascular disease (CVD), 1.63 (0.96-2.75) for mortality due to coronary heart disease, and 1.65 (1.16-2.35) for non-CVD mortality. The corresponding hazard ratios comparing participants with a corrected QT interval below the fifth percentile (<377 milliseconds) with those in the middle quintile were 1.39 (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.88) for total mortality, 1.35 (0.77-2.36) for CVD mortality, 1.02 (0.44-2.38) for coronary heart disease mortality, and 1.42 (0.97-2.08) for non-CVD mortality. Increased mortality also was observed with less extreme deviations of QT-interval duration. Similar, albeit weaker, associations also were observed with Bazett-corrected QT intervals. Conclusion Shortened and prolonged QT-interval durations, even within a reference range, are associated with increased mortality risk in the general population. PMID:22025428

  6. Accelerated Gastric Emptying but No Carbohydrate Malabsorption 1 Year After Gastric Bypass Surgery (GBP)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gary; Agenor, Keesandra; Pizot, Justine; Kotler, Donald P.; Harel, Yaniv; Van Der Schueren, Bart J.; Quercia, Iliana; McGinty, James

    2013-01-01

    Background Following gastric bypass surgery (GBP), there is a post-prandial rise of incretin and satiety gut peptides. The mechanisms of enhanced incretin release in response to nutrients after GBP is not elucidated and may be in relation to altered nutrient transit time and/or malabsorption. Methods Seven morbidly obese subjects (BMI=44.5±2.8 kg/m2) were studied before and 1 year after GBP with a d-xylose test. After ingestion of 25 g of d-xylose in 200 mL of non-carbonated water, blood samples were collected at frequent time intervals to determine gastric emptying (time to appearance of d-xylose) and carbohydrate absorption using standard criteria. Results One year after GBP, subjects lost 45.0±9.7 kg and had a BMI of 27.1±4.7 kg/m2. Gastric emptying was more rapid after GBP. The mean time to appearance of d-xylose in serum decreased from 18.6±6.9 min prior to GBP to 7.9±2.7 min after GBP (p=0.006). There was no significant difference in absorption before (serum d-xylose concentrations=35.6±12.6 mg/dL at 60 min and 33.9±9.1 mg/dL at 180 min) or 1 year after GBP (serum d-xylose=31.5± 18.1 mg/dL at 60 min and 27.2±11.9 mg/dL at 180 min). Conclusions These data confirm the acceleration of gastric emptying for liquid and the absence of carbohydrate malabsorption 1 year after GBP. Rapid gastric emptying may play a role in incretin response after GBP and the resulting improved glucose homeostasis. PMID:22527599

  7. For Diabetes Shared Savings Programs, 1 Year of Data Is Not Enough.

    PubMed

    VanArsdale, Lynne; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Haugen, Heather; Smith, Nancy; Atherly, Adam

    2017-04-01

    Fee-for-service payment models are moving toward pay-for-performance designs, many of which rely on shared savings for financial sustainability. Shared savings programs divide the cost savings between health care purchaser and provider based on provider performance. Often, these programs measure provider performance as the delivery of agreed-upon clinical practice guidelines that usually are represented as evidence-based medicine (EBM). Multiyear studies show a negative relationship between total cost and EBM, indicating that long-term shared savings can be substantial. This study explores expectations for the rewards in the first year of a shared savings program. It also indicates the effectiveness of using 1 year of claims to assess cost savings from evidence-based care, especially in a patient population with high turnover. This study analyzed 1956 adults with diabetes insured through Medicaid. Results of linear regression showed that the relationship between total cost of care and each element of evidence-based medical care during a 1-year period was positive (higher cost) or insignificant. The results indicate that diabetes EBM programs cannot expect to see significant cost savings if the evaluation lasts only 1 year or less. The study concludes that improvements in EBM incentive programs could come from investigating the length of time needed to realize cost savings from each element of diabetes EBM. Investigating other factors that could affect the expected amount of cost savings also would benefit these programs, especially factors derived from sources external to insurance program information such as the medical record and care management data.

  8. SOCIOECONOMIC DISPARITIES IN MORTALITY AMONG CHINESE ELDERLY*

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Weixiang; Xie, Yu

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the association of three different SES indicators (education, economic independence, and household per-capita income) with mortality, using a large, nationally representative longitudinal sample of 12,437 Chinese ages 65 and older. While the results vary by measures used, we find overall strong evidence for a negative association between SES and all-cause mortality. Exploring the association between SES and cause-specific mortality, we find that SES is more strongly related to a reduction of mortality from more preventable causes (i.e., circulatory disease and respiratory disease) than from less preventable causes (i.e., cancer). Moreover, we consider mediating causal factors such as support networks, health-related risk behaviors, and access to health care in contributing to the observed association between SES and mortality. Among these mediating factors, medical care is of greatest importance. This pattern holds true for both all-cause and cause-specific mortality. PMID:25098961

  9. The Course of Skin and Serum Biomarkers of Advanced Glycation Endproducts and Its Association with Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, Disease Severity, and Mortality during ICU Admission in Critically Ill Patients: Results from a Prospective Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Meertens, John H.; Nienhuis, Hans L.; Lefrandt, Joop D.; Schalkwijk, Casper G.; Nyyssönen, Kristiina; Ligtenberg, Jack J. M.; Smit, Andries J.; Zijlstra, Jan G.; Mulder, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have been implicated in multiple organ failure, predominantly via their cellular receptor (RAGE) in preclinical studies. Little is known about the time course and prognostic relevance of AGEs in critically ill human patients, including those with severe sepsis. Objective 1) To explore the reliability of Skin Autofluorescence (AF) as an index of tissue AGEs in ICU patients, 2) to compare its levels to healthy controls, 3) to describe the time course of AGEs and influencing factors during ICU admission, and 4) to explore their association with disease severity, outcome, and markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. Methods Skin AF, serum N"-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL), N"-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), and soluble RAGE (sRAGE) were serially measured for a maximum of 7 days in critically ill ICU patients with multiple organ failure and compared to age-matched healthy controls. Correlations with (changes in) clinical parameters of disease severity, LDL dienes, and CRP were studied and survival analysis for in-hospital mortality was performed. Results Forty-five ICU patients (age: 59±15 years; 60% male), and 37 healthy controls (59±14; 68%) were included. Skin AF measurements in ICU patients were reproducible (CV right-left arm: 13%, day-to-day: 10%), with confounding effects of skin reflectance and plasma bilirubin levels. Skin AF was higher in ICU patients vs healthy controls (2.7±0.7 vs 1.8±0.3 au; p<0.001). Serum CEL (23±10 vs, 16±3 nmol/gr protein; p<0.001), LDL dienes (19 (15–23) vs. 9 (8–11) μmol/mmol cholesterol; <0.001), and sRAGE (1547 (998–2496) vs. 1042 (824–1388) pg/ml; p = 0.003) were significantly higher in ICU patients compared to healthy controls, while CML was not different (27 (20–39) vs 29 (25–33) nmol/gr protein). While CRP and LDL dienes decreased significantly, Skin AF and serum AGEs and sRAGE did not change significantly during the first 7 days of ICU admission. CML and CEL

  10. Development of 1-year-old computational phantom and calculation of organ doses during CT scans using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yuxi; Qiu, Rui; Gao, Linfeng; Ge, Chaoyong; Zheng, Junzheng; Xie, Wenzhang; Li, Junli

    2014-09-01

    With the rapidly growing number of CT examinations, the consequential radiation risk has aroused more and more attention. The average dose in each organ during CT scans can only be obtained by using Monte Carlo simulation with computational phantoms. Since children tend to have higher radiation sensitivity than adults, the radiation dose of pediatric CT examinations requires special attention and needs to be assessed accurately. So far, studies on organ doses from CT exposures for pediatric patients are still limited. In this work, a 1-year-old computational phantom was constructed. The body contour was obtained from the CT images of a 1-year-old physical phantom and the internal organs were deformed from an existing Chinese reference adult phantom. To ensure the organ locations in the 1-year-old computational phantom were consistent with those of the physical phantom, the organ locations in 1-year-old computational phantom were manually adjusted one by one, and the organ masses were adjusted to the corresponding Chinese reference values. Moreover, a CT scanner model was developed using the Monte Carlo technique and the 1-year-old computational phantom was applied to estimate organ doses derived from simulated CT exposures. As a result, a database including doses to 36 organs and tissues from 47 single axial scans was built. It has been verified by calculation that doses of axial scans are close to those of helical scans; therefore, this database could be applied to helical scans as well. Organ doses were calculated using the database and compared with those obtained from the measurements made in the physical phantom for helical scans. The differences between simulation and measurement were less than 25% for all organs. The result shows that the 1-year-old phantom developed in this work can be used to calculate organ doses in CT exposures, and the dose database provides a method for the estimation of 1-year-old patient doses in a variety of CT examinations.

  11. Development of 1-year-old computational phantom and calculation of organ doses during CT scans using Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuxi; Qiu, Rui; Gao, Linfeng; Ge, Chaoyong; Zheng, Junzheng; Xie, Wenzhang; Li, Junli

    2014-09-21

    With the rapidly growing number of CT examinations, the consequential radiation risk has aroused more and more attention. The average dose in each organ during CT scans can only be obtained by using Monte Carlo simulation with computational phantoms. Since children tend to have higher radiation sensitivity than adults, the radiation dose of pediatric CT examinations requires special attention and needs to be assessed accurately. So far, studies on organ doses from CT exposures for pediatric patients are still limited. In this work, a 1-year-old computational phantom was constructed. The body contour was obtained from the CT images of a 1-year-old physical phantom and the internal organs were deformed from an existing Chinese reference adult phantom. To ensure the organ locations in the 1-year-old computational phantom were consistent with those of the physical phantom, the organ locations in 1-year-old computational phantom were manually adjusted one by one, and the organ masses were adjusted to the corresponding Chinese reference values. Moreover, a CT scanner model was developed using the Monte Carlo technique and the 1-year-old computational phantom was applied to estimate organ doses derived from simulated CT exposures. As a result, a database including doses to 36 organs and tissues from 47 single axial scans was built. It has been verified by calculation that doses of axial scans are close to those of helical scans; therefore, this database could be applied to helical scans as well. Organ doses were calculated using the database and compared with those obtained from the measurements made in the physical phantom for helical scans. The differences between simulation and measurement were less than 25% for all organs. The result shows that the 1-year-old phantom developed in this work can be used to calculate organ doses in CT exposures, and the dose database provides a method for the estimation of 1-year-old patient doses in a variety of CT examinations.

  12. Early post-surgical cognitive dysfunction is a risk factor for mortality among hip fracture hospitalized older persons.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, C; Bonamassa, L; Pelini, L; Prioletta, I; Cianferotti, L; Metozzi, A; Benvenuti, E; Brandi, G; Guazzini, A; Santoro, G C; Mecocci, P; Black, D; Brandi, M L

    2017-02-01

    This study investigates the relationship between cognitive dysfunction or delirium detected in the early post-surgical phase and the 1-year mortality among 514 hip fracture hospitalized older persons. Patients with early cognitive dysfunction or delirium experienced a 2-fold increased mortality risk. Early post-operative cognitive dysfunction and delirium are negative prognostic factors for mortality.

  13. Why perinatal mortality cannot be a proxy for maternal mortality.

    PubMed

    Akalin, M Z; Maine, D; de Francisco, A; Vaughan, R

    1997-12-01

    In recent years, the perinatal mortality rate (PNMR) has been proposed as a proxy measure of maternal mortality, because perinatal deaths are more frequent and potentially more easily measured. This report assesses evidence for an association between these two statistics. This study, based upon data from Matlab, Bangladesh, shows that the maternal mortality ratio (MMR) and the PNMR do not vary together over time, and that the PNMR does not reliably indicate either the magnitude or the direction of change in the MMR from year to year. Statistical analysis shows that the correlation between the PNMR and the MMR is not significantly different from zero. An examination of the major causes of maternal and perinatal deaths indicates that the two measures cannot be expected to vary together. Almost half of perinatal deaths result from causes that do not pose a threat to the mother's life, and almost half of maternal deaths result from causes that do not lead to perinatal death. Monitoring of the PNMR can give an inaccurate picture of maternal mortality and should not be used as a proxy.

  14. Environmental exposures and respiratory morbidity among very low birth weight infants at 1 year of life

    PubMed Central

    Halterman, J S; Lynch, K A; Conn, K M; Hernandez, T E; Perry, T T; Stevens, T P

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Preterm infants have a substantially increased risk of developing respiratory illnesses. The goal of this study was to consider the impact of modifiable postnatal exposures on respiratory morbidity among a cohort of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. Objectives (1) Assess the rates of respiratory morbidity and exposure to indoor respiratory triggers in a population of VLBW infants at 1 year; (2) determine the association between exposures and respiratory morbidity. Methods We enrolled 124 VLBW infants into a prospective cohort study. Parents were called at 1 year to assess respiratory outcomes and environmental exposures. We used bivariate and multivariate analyses to assess the relationship between environmental exposures and acute care for respiratory illnesses. Results At 1 year, 9% of infants had physician-diagnosed asthma, 47% required ≥1 acute visit and 11% required hospitalisation for respiratory illness. The majority of infants (82%) were exposed to at least one indoor respiratory trigger. Infants living with a smoker (61% vs 40%) and infants exposed to pests (62% vs 39%) were more likely than unexposed infants to require acute care for respiratory problems. In a multivariate regression controlling for demographics, birth weight, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and family history of asthma or allergies, both living with a smoker (OR 2.62; CI 1.09 to 6.29) and exposure to pests (OR 4.41; CI 1.22 to 15.94) were independently associated with the need for acute care for respiratory illnesses. Conclusions In this sample, respiratory morbidity and exposure to triggers were common. VLBW infants may benefit from interventions that decrease exposure to respiratory triggers. PMID:18703545

  15. Repeated measures of body mass index and C-reactive protein in relation to all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease: results from the consortium on health and ageing network of cohorts in Europe and the United States (CHANCES).

    PubMed

    O'Doherty, Mark G; Jørgensen, Torben; Borglykke, Anders; Brenner, Hermann; Schöttker, Ben; Wilsgaard, Tom; Siganos, Galatios; Kavousi, Maryam; Hughes, Maria; Müezzinler, Aysel; Holleczek, Bernd; Franco, Oscar H; Hofman, Albert; Boffetta, Paolo; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Kee, Frank

    2014-12-01

    Obesity has been linked with elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), and both have been associated with increased risk of mortality and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Previous studies have used a single 'baseline' measurement and such analyses cannot account for possible changes in these which may lead to a biased estimation of risk. Using four cohorts from CHANCES which had repeated measures in participants 50 years and older, multivariate time-dependent Cox proportional hazards was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) to examine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and CRP with all-cause mortality and CVD. Being overweight (≥25-<30 kg/m(2)) or moderately obese (≥30-<35) tended to be associated with a lower risk of mortality compared to normal (≥18.5-<25): ESTHER, HR (95 % CI) 0.69 (0.58-0.82) and 0.78 (0.63-0.97); Rotterdam, 0.86 (0.79-0.94) and 0.80 (0.72-0.89). A similar relationship was found, but only for overweight in Glostrup, HR (95 % CI) 0.88 (0.76-1.02); and moderately obese in Tromsø, HR (95 % CI) 0.79 (0.62-1.01). Associations were not evident between repeated measures of BMI and CVD. Conversely, increasing CRP concentrations, measured on more than one occasion, were associated with an increasing risk of mortality and CVD. Being overweight or moderately obese is associated with a lower risk of mortality, while CRP, independent of BMI, is positively associated with mortality and CVD risk. If inflammation links CRP and BMI, they may participate in distinct/independent pathways. Accounting for independent changes in risk factors over time may be crucial for unveiling their effects on mortality and disease morbidity.

  16. Mortality from Congenital Heart Disease in Mexico: A Problem on the Rise

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Cosme, José Luis; Rolón-Porras, Constanza; Aguinaga-Ríos, Mónica; Acosta-Granado, Pedro Manuel; Reyes-Muñoz, Enrique; Murguía-Peniche, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Temporal trends in mortality from congenital heart disease (CHD) vary among regions. It is therefore necessary to study this problem in each country. In Mexico, congenital anomalies were responsible for 24% of infant mortality in 2013 and CHD represented 55% of total deaths from congenital anomalies among children under 1 year of age. The objectives of this study were to analyze the trends in infant mortality from CHD in Mexico (1998 to 2013), its specific causes, age at death and associated socio-demographic factors. Methods Population-based study which calculated the compounded annual growth rate of death rom CHD between 1998 and 2013. Specific causes, age at which death from CHD occurred and risk factors associated with mortality were analyzed for the year 2013. Results Infant mortality from CHD increased 24.8% from 1998 to 2013 (114.4 to 146.4/ 100,000 live births). A total of 3,593 CHD deaths occurred in 2013; the main causes were CHD with left-to-right shunt (n = 487; 19.8/100,000 live births) and cyanotic heart disease (n = 410; 16.7/100,000). A total of 1,049 (29.2%) deaths from CHD occurred during the first week of life. Risk factors associated with mortality from CHD were, in order of magnitude: non-institutional birth, rural area, birth in a public hospital and male sex. Conclusions Mortality from CHD has increased in Mexico. The main causes were CHD with left-to-right shunt, which are not necessarily fatal if treated promptly. Populations vulnerable to death from CHD were identified. Approximately one-third of the CHD occurred during the first week of life. It is important to promote early diagnosis, especially for non-institutional births. PMID:26937635

  17. Steroid hormone levels in pregnancy and 1 year postpartum using isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Soldin, Offie P.; Guo, Tiedong; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Tractenberg, Rochelle E.; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena; Soldin, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To establish normal, trimester-specific reference intervals for serum 17β-estradiol, progesterone (P), 17α-hydroxyprogesterone, cortisol, 11-deoxycortisol, androstenedione, DHEA, and DHEAS, measured simultaneously using isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry. Design Sequential cohort study. Patient(s) Healthy women undergoing a normal pregnancy (age, 25–38 years; mean, 30 years) attending a prenatal well clinic at gestation weeks 12, 22, and 32 and approximately 1 year postpartum. Main Outcome Measure(s) Trimester-specific reference intervals of endogenous steroid hormones analyzed using an isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometer equipped with an atmospheric pressure photoionization source with deuterium-labeled internal standards. Result(s) Serum estradiol, P, 17α-hydroxyprogesterone, and 11-deoxycortisol increased throughout pregnancy; cortisol increased up to the second trimester and then remained steady, while androstenedione increased by 80 percent by gestation week 12, then remained constant. Serum DHEA-S decreased by 50% by the third trimester. Conclusion(s) Trimester-specific reference intervals are reported for eight serum steroids. The ratios of individual serum hormone concentrations during pregnancy relative to their 1-year postpartum concentrations illustrate the expected normal trends of changes in hormone concentrations during pregnancy. PMID:16169406

  18. Cognitive Predictors of Academic Achievement in Young Children 1 Year Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, John B.; Yeates, Keith Owen; Taylor, H. Gerry; Walz, Nicolay C.; Wade, Shari L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine cognitive predictors of academic achievement in young children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and orthopedic injury (OI) shortly after injury and 1 year post-injury. Methods Participants included 3 to 6 year old children, 63 with TBI (46 with moderate TBI and 17 with severe TBI) and a comparison group of 80 children with OI. Academic achievement was assessed approximately 1 month and 12 months post injury, using three subtests from the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Achievement-Third Edition and the School Readiness Composite from the Bracken Basic Concepts Scale-Revised. General intellectual functioning, memory, and executive functions were measured at the initial assessment using standardized tests. Results Hierarchical linear regression was used to predict academic achievement at the initial and 1-year follow-up assessments. Memory and executive functions were significant predictors of academic achievement at both assessments, after controlling for group membership and demographic variables. Executive function remained a significant predictor of some outcomes after taking general intellectual functioning into account. Predictive relationships did not vary across the TBI and OI groups. Similar results were obtained when regression analyses were completed with only TBI participants using the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score as a predictor, although memory and executive functioning were somewhat less robust in predicting academic achievement than before. Conclusions Both memory and executive function predict academic achievement following TBI in preschool children, although some of the associations may be accounted for by general intellectual functioning. PMID:22563873

  19. High Summer Temperatures and Mortality in Estonia

    PubMed Central

    Oudin Åström, Daniel; Åström, Christofer; Rekker, Kaidi; Indermitte, Ene; Orru, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Background On-going climate change is predicted to result in a growing number of extreme weather events—such as heat waves—throughout Europe. The effect of high temperatures and heat waves are already having an important impact on public health in terms of increased mortality, but studies from an Estonian setting are almost entirely missing. We investigated mortality in relation to high summer temperatures and the time course of mortality in a coastal and inland region of Estonia. Methods We collected daily mortality data and daily maximum temperature for a coastal and an inland region of Estonia. We applied a distributed lag non-linear model to investigate heat related mortality and the time course of mortality in Estonia. Results We found an immediate increase in mortality associated with temperatures exceeding the 75th percentile of summer maximum temperatures, corresponding to approximately 23°C. This increase lasted for a couple of days in both regions. The total effect of elevated temperatures was not lessened by significant mortality displacement. Discussion We observed significantly increased mortality in Estonia, both on a country level as well as for a coastal region and an inland region with a more continental climate. Heat related mortality was higher in the inland region as compared to the coastal region, however, no statistically significant differences were observed. The lower risks in coastal areas could be due to lower maximum temperatures and cooling effects of the sea, but also better socioeconomic condition. Our results suggest that region specific estimates of the impacts of temperature extremes on mortality are needed. PMID:27167851

  20. Mortality among professional drivers.

    PubMed

    Rafnsson, V; Gunnarsdóttir, H

    1991-10-01

    The mortality of truck drivers and taxi drivers was studied in Reykjavík. The national mortality rate was used for comparison, and the follow-up lasted until 1 December 1988. The 868 truck drivers (28,788.0 person-years) had an excess of lung cancer deaths [24 observed, 11.2 expected, standardized mortality ratio (SMR) 2.14], but fewer deaths than expected from respiratory diseases (15 observed versus 30.1 expected). The SMR from lung cancer did not steadily increase as the duration of employment increased, nor did it change with the length of follow-up. The SMR values did not deviate substantially from unity for the taxi drivers. Since the high mortality from lung cancer among the truck drivers did not seem to be due to their smoking habits, it might have been caused by one or more occupational factors, especially in light of this group's exposure to engine exhaust gases.

  1. Parental spanking of 1-year-old children and subsequent child protective services involvement✩

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shawna J.; Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew; Berger, Lawrence M.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of U.S. parents spank their children, often beginning when their children are very young. We examined families (N=2,788) who participated in a longitudinal community-based study of new births in urban areas. Prospective analyses examined whether spanking by the child's mother, father, or mother's current partner when the child was 1-year-old was associated with household CPS involvement between age 1 and age 5. Results indicated that 30% of 1-year-olds were spanked at least once in the past month. Spanking at age 1 was associated with increased odds of subsequent CPS involvement (adjusted odds ratio=1.36, 95% CI [1.08, 1.71], p<.01). When compared to non-spanked children, there was a 33% greater probability of subsequent CPS involvement for children who were spanked at age 1. Given the undesirable consequences of spanking children and a lack of empirical evidence to suggest positive effects of physical punishment, professionals who work with families should counsel parents not to spank infants and toddlers. For optimal benefits, efforts to educate parents regarding alternative forms of discipline should begin during the child's first year of life. PMID:24602690

  2. Parental spanking of 1-year-old children and subsequent child protective services involvement.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shawna J; Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew; Berger, Lawrence M

    2014-05-01

    The majority of U.S. parents spank their children, often beginning when their children are very young. We examined families (N=2,788) who participated in a longitudinal community-based study of new births in urban areas. Prospective analyses examined whether spanking by the child's mother, father, or mother's current partner when the child was 1-year-old was associated with household CPS involvement between age 1 and age 5. Results indicated that 30% of 1-year-olds were spanked at least once in the past month. Spanking at age 1 was associated with increased odds of subsequent CPS involvement (adjusted odds ratio=1.36, 95% CI [1.08, 1.71], p<.01). When compared to non-spanked children, there was a 33% greater probability of subsequent CPS involvement for children who were spanked at age 1. Given the undesirable consequences of spanking children and a lack of empirical evidence to suggest positive effects of physical punishment, professionals who work with families should counsel parents not to spank infants and toddlers. For optimal benefits, efforts to educate parents regarding alternative forms of discipline should begin during the child's first year of life.

  3. Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Adolescents With Bipolar Disorder: A 1-Year Open Trial

    PubMed Central

    GOLDSTEIN, TINA R.; AXELSON, DAVID A.; BIRMAHER, BORIS; BRENT, DAVID A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To describe an adapted version of dialectical behavior therapy for adolescents with bipolar disorder. Method The dialectical behavior therapy intervention is delivered over 1 year and consists of two modalities: family skills training (conducted with individual family units) and individual therapy. The acute treatment period (6 months) includes 24 weekly sessions; sessions alternate between the two treatment modalities. Continuation treatment consists of 12 additional sessions tapering in frequency through 1 year. We conducted an open pilot trial of the treatment, designed as an adjunct to pharmacological management, to establish feasibility and acceptability of the treatment for this population. Participants included 10 patients (mean age 15.8 ± 1.5 years, range 14–18) receiving treatment in an outpatient pediatric bipolar specialty clinic. Symptom severity and functioning were assessed quarterly by an independent evaluator. Consumer satisfaction was also assessed posttreatment. Results Feasibility and acceptability of the intervention were high, with 9 of 10 patients completing treatment, 90% of scheduled sessions attended, and high treatment satisfaction ratings. Patients exhibited significant improvement from pre- to posttreatment in suicidality, nonsuicidal self-injurious behavior, emotional dysregulation, and depressive symptoms. Conclusions Dialectical behavior therapy may offer promise as an approach to the psychosocial treatment of adolescent bipolar disorder. PMID:17581446

  4. Impact of APOE4-CSF Aβ interaction on hippocampal volume loss over 1 year in MCI

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, G.C.; Insel, P.S.; Tosun, D.; Schuff, N.; Truran-Sacrey, D.; Raptentsetsang, S.T.; Thompson, P.M.; Reiman, E.M.; Jack, C.R.; Fox, N.C.; Jagust, W.J.; Harvey, D.J.; Beckett, L.A.; Gamst, A.; Aisen, P.S.; Petersen, R.C.; Weiner, M.W.

    2011-01-01

    Background The majority of studies relating amyloid pathology with brain volumes have been cross-sectional. Apolipoprotein E4 (APOE4), a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), is also associated with hippocampal volume loss. No studies have considered the effects of amyloid pathology and APOE4 together on longitudinal volume loss. Methods We evaluated whether an abnormal level of cerebrospinal fluid beta-amyloid (CSF Aβ) and APOE4 carrier status were independently associated with greater hippocampal volume loss over 1 year. We then assessed whether APOE4 status and CSF Aβ acted synergistically, testing the significance of an interaction term in the regression analysis. We included 297 participants: 77 cognitively normal (NC), 144 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 76 with AD. Results An abnormal CSF Aβ level was found to be associated with greater hippocampal volume loss over 1 year in each group. APOE4 was associated with hippocampal volume loss only in the NC and MCI groups. APOE4 carriers with abnormal CSF Aβ in the MCI group acted synergistically to produce disproportionately greater volume loss than noncarriers. Conclusion Baseline CSF Aβ predicts progression of hippocampal volume loss. APOE4 carrier status amplifies the degree of neurodegeneration in MCI. Understanding the effect of interactions between genetic risk and amyloid pathology will be important in clinical trials and our understanding of the disease process. PMID:21889115

  5. Influence of the psychological state of relatives on the quality of life of patients at 1 year after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-San-Gregorio, M A; Martín-Rodríguez, A; Pérez-Bernal, J

    2008-11-01

    We analyzed the influence of the psychological state of relatives on the quality of life of patients at 1 year after transplantation. We selected 2 groups: 94 transplant patients (47.9% liver, 40.4% kidney, and 11.7% heart) of mean age 49.42 years (SD, 11.21 years) and their close relatives (n = 94). All participants were assessed at 1 year after transplantation, using a Psychological Survey (both groups); the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Quality of Life Questionnaire (transplant patients); and the Leeds Scales for the Self-Assessment of Anxiety and Depression (relatives). The results revealed that transplant patients whose relatives had more symptoms of anxiety and depression at 1 year after transplantation showed a decreased quality of life.

  6. Indonesia lowers infant mortality.

    PubMed

    Bain, S

    1991-11-01

    Indonesia's success in reaching World Health Organization (WHO) universal immunization coverage standards is described as the result of a strong national program with timely, targeted donor support. USAID/Indonesia's Expanded Program for Immunization (EPI) and other USAID bilateral cooperation helped the government of Indonesia in its goal to immunize children against diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, polio, tuberculosis, and measles by age 1. The initial project was to identify target areas and deliver vaccines against the diseases, strengthen the national immunization organization and infrastructure, and develop the Ministry of Health's capacity to conduct studies and development activities. This EPI project spanned the period 1979-90, and set the stage for continued expansion of Indonesia's immunization program to comply with the full international schedule and range of immunizations of 3 DPT, 3 polio, 1 BCG, and 1 measles inoculation. The number of immunization sites has increased from 55 to include over 5,000 health centers in all provinces, with additional services provided by visiting vaccinators and nurses in most of the 215,000 community-supported integrated health posts. While other contributory factors were at play, program success is at least partially responsible for the 1990 infant mortality rate of 58/1,000 live births compared to 72/1,000 in 1985. Strong national leadership, dedicated health workers and volunteers, and cooperation and funding from UNICEF, the World Bank, Rotary International, and WHO also played crucially positive roles in improving immunization practice in Indonesia.

  7. Patients' characteristics and clinical implications of suboptimal CD4 T-cell gains after 1 year of successful antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Félix; Padilla, Sergio; Masiá, Mar; Iribarren, José A; Moreno, Santiago; Viciana, Pompeyo; Hernández-Quero, José; Alemán, Remedios; Vidal, Francesc; Salavert, Miguel; Blanco, José R; Leal, Manuel; Dronda, Fernando; Perez Hoyos, Santiago; del Amo, Julia

    2008-03-01

    To describe characteristics and prognosis of patients with suboptimal immunological response to combined antiretroviral therapy (CART). Using data from a multicenter cohort study, we selected patients who initiated CART and showed suboptimal CD4-T cell response (defined as <50 cells/L increase) after 1 year of therapy, despite sustained virological suppression. Characteristics of those patients were compared with subjects who showed optimal immunological response. Of 650 patients with virological suppression, 108 (16.6%) showed suboptimal CD4-T cell response. Independent predictors of suboptimal response were previous injection drug use (OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.12-2.98) and age at CART initiation (OR, 1.04 per year increase; 95%CI, 1.01-1.06). Hepatitis C virus coinfection was not associated with impaired immunological response. As compared with patients with optimal immunological response, those with suboptimal response had a higher mortality rate (3.22 versus 0.71 per 100 person-years; p=.001), but a similar rate of new AIDS-defining events. In patients with sustained virological suppression with CART, previous injection drug use, but not hepatitis C virus coinfection, and older age at initiation of therapy were associated with suboptimal CD4 T-cell responses. Patients with suboptimal response had a higher mortality over time, mainly due to diseases other than AIDS-defining events.

  8. Legal abortion mortality.

    PubMed

    Kestelman, P

    1978-04-01

    Statistics on legal abortion in Britain between 1968-1974 are presented. There was a mortality rate of 10+ or -2 per 100,000 abortions: 27+ or -11 in 1968-1969, 12+ or -4 in 1970-1972, and 6+ or -3 in 1973-1974. Legal abortion mortality increased from 4+ or -3 when performed at gestation under 9 weeks to 5+ or -2 at 9-12 weeks, 13+ or -7 at 13-16 weeks, and 62+ or -33 at 17 weeks and over. The ratio was 11+ or -6 for women under 20 years of age, increasing to 5+ or -3 at age 20-29, 10+ or -6 at age 30-39, and 23+ or -19 at age 40 and over. The parity had little influence on abortion mortality, but the technique used had a great influence. Hysterotomy, hypertonic saline, and abortifacient paste were the most dangerous, in increasing order, with mortality rates of 39+ or -30, 106+ or -75, and 152+ or -89, respectively. The rates for aspiration and curretage were 4+ or -2 and 4+ or -3, respectively. There was a higher mortality risk with abortion with sterilization. The main causes of legal abortion mortality were infection, pulmonary embolism, and complications of general anesthesia. The high incidence of mortality associated with legal abortion in Britain is partially caused by: 1) high incidence of concurrent sterilization, 2) former use of dangerous techniques, 3) significant incidence of second trimester abortion, 4) routine use of general anesthesia, and 5) previous ill health of some of the women.

  9. Risperidone in Children with Disruptive Behavior Disorders and Subaverage Intelligence: A 1-Year, Open-Label Study of 504 Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croonenberghs, Jan; Fegert, Joerg M.; Findling, Robert L.; de Smedt, Goedele; van Dongen, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine the long-term safety and effectiveness of risperidone for severe disruptive behaviors in children. Method: A multisite, 1-year, open-label study of patients aged 5 to 14 years with disruptive behaviors and subaverage intelligence was conducted. Results: Seventy-three percent of the 504 patients enrolled completed the study.…

  10. Cholesterol trials and mortality.

    PubMed

    Warren, John B; Dimmitt, Simon B; Stampfer, Hans G

    2016-07-01

    An overview of clinical trials can reveal a class effect on mortality that is not apparent from individual trials. Most large trials of lipid pharmacotherapy are not powered to detect differences in mortality and instead assess efficacy with composite cardiovascular endpoints. We illustrate the importance of all-cause mortality data by comparing survival in three different sets of the larger controlled lipid trials that underpin meta-analyses. These trials are for fibrates and statins. Fibrate treatment in five of the six main trials was associated with a decrease in survival, one fibrate trial showed a non-significant reduction in mortality that can be explained by a different target population. In secondary prevention, statin treatment increased survival in all five of the main trials, absolute mean increase ranged from 0.43% to 3.33%, the median change was 1.75%, which occurred in the largest trial. In primary prevention, statin treatment increased survival in six of the seven main trials, absolute mean change in survival ranged from -0.09% to 0.89%, median 0.49%. Composite safety endpoints are rare in these trials. The failure to address composite safety endpoints in most lipid trials precludes a balanced summary of risk-benefit when a composite has been used for efficacy. Class effects on survival provide informative summaries of the risk-benefit of lipid pharmacotherapy. We consider that the presentation of key mortality/survival data adds to existing meta-analyses to aid personal treatment decisions.

  11. Diversion Alert: 1-Year Evaluation Across Northern New England, 2013–2014

    PubMed Central

    Desrosiers, Clare

    2016-01-01

    This report describes Diversion Alert, a unique online tool aimed at reducing misuse and diversion of prescription drugs, and reports the results of a 1-year evaluation of Diversion Alert’s impact in Maine. We used a quasi-experimental research design to compare survey data in Maine with those of neighboring states (New Hampshire and Vermont, 2013 and 2014). Compared with their counterparts in New Hampshire and Vermont who did not use Diversion Alert, prescribers and pharmacists in Maine who used Diversion Alert increased their communication with patients and other providers involved in their patients’ care, became aware of patients arrested for prescription drugs possession or diversion, used best practices associated with prevention or detection of addiction and diversion more frequently, and attributed positive changes in their prescribing practices to Diversion Alert. In combination with other state and federal programs, Diversion Alert may be an effective tool to help prevent the misuse of opioid medications. PMID:27880633

  12. Shock-wave therapy for tennis and golfer's elbow--1 year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Krischek, O; Hopf, C; Nafe, B; Rompe, J D

    1999-01-01

    Thirty patients with chronic medial epicondylitis were treated with low-energy shock waves. They received 500 impulses of 0.08 mJ/mm2 three times at weekly intervals. At 1 year follow-up examinations were performed. According to the Verhaar criteria, only seven patients reached excellent or good results. In eight cases a fair outcome was recorded, and in 14 patients the outcome was poor. Only six patients were satisfied with the treatment. The average relief of pain was 32%. These data were significantly worse than for identically treated patients with chronic tennis elbow. Thus, the question arises as to whether extracorporal shock-wave therapy is indicated in medial epicondylitis.

  13. Neonatal mortality in Utah.

    PubMed

    Woolley, F R; Schuman, K L; Lyon, J L

    1982-09-01

    A cohort study of neonatal mortality (N = 106) in white singleton births (N = 14,486) in Utah for January-June 1975 was conducted. Using membership and activity in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon) as a proxy for parental health practices, i.e., tobacco and alcohol abstinence, differential neonatal mortality rates were calculated. The influence of potential confounding factors was evaluated. Low activity LDS members were found to have an excess risk of neonatal death five times greater than high activity LDS, with an upper bound of a two-sided 95% confidence interval of 7.9. The data consistently indicate a lower neonatal mortality rate for active LDS members. Non-LDS were found to have a lower rate than either medium or low activity LDS.

  14. Mortality scoring in ITU.

    PubMed

    Niewiński, Grzegorz; Kański, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Chronic shortage of ITU beds makes decisions on admission difficult and responsible. The use of computer-based mortality scoring should help in decision-making and for this purpose, a number of different scoring systems have been created; in principle, they should be easy to use, adaptable to all populations of patients and suitable for predicting the risk of mortality during both ITU and hospital stay. Most of existing scales and scoring systems were included in this review. They are frequently used in ITUs and become a necessary tool to describe ITU populations and to explain differences in mortality. As there are several pitfalls related to the interpretation of the numbers supplied by the systems, they should be used with the knowledge on the severity scoring science. Moreover, the cost and significant workload limit the use of scoring systems; in many cases an extra person has to be employed for collection and analysis of data only.

  15. Autoantibodies, mortality and ageing.

    PubMed

    Richaud-Patin, Y; Villa, A R

    1995-01-01

    Immunological failure may be the cause of predisposition to certain infections, neoplasms, and vascular diseases in adulthood. Mortality risks through life may reflect an undetermined number of causes. This study describes the prevalence of positivity of autoantibodies through life, along with general and specific mortality causes in three countries with different socioeconomic development (Guatemala, Mexico and the United States). Prevalence of autoantibodies by age was obtained from previous reports. In spite of having involved different ethnic groups, the observed trends in prevalence of autoantibodies, as well as mortality through life, showed a similar behavior. Thus, both the increase in autoantibody production and death risk as age rises, may share physiopathological phenomena related to the ageing process.

  16. Patient-centeredness and quality management in Dutch diabetes care organizations after a 1-year intervention

    PubMed Central

    Campmans-Kuijpers, Marjo JE; Lemmens, Lidwien C; Baan, Caroline A; Rutten, Guy EHM

    2016-01-01

    Background More focus on patient-centeredness in care for patients with type 2 diabetes requests increasing attention to diabetes quality management processes on patient-centeredness by managers in primary care groups and outpatient clinics. Although patient-centered care is ultimately determined by the quality of interactions between patients and clinicians at the practice level, it should be facilitated at organizational level too. This nationwide study aimed to assess the state of diabetes quality management on patient-centeredness at organizational level and its possibilities to improve after a tailored intervention. Methods This before–after study compares the quality management on patient-centeredness within Dutch diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics before and after a 1-year stepwise intervention. At baseline, managers of 51 diabetes primary care groups and 28 outpatient diabetes clinics completed a questionnaire about the organization’s quality management program. Patient-centeredness (0%–100%) was operationalized in six subdomains: facilitating self-management support, individualized care plan support, patients’ access to medical files, patient education policy, safeguarding patients’ interests, and formal patient involvement. The intervention consisted of feedback and benchmark and if requested a telephone call and/or a consultancy visit. After 1 year, the managers completed the questionnaire again. The 1-year changes were examined by dependent (non) parametric tests. Results Care groups improved significantly on patient-centeredness (from 47.1% to 53.3%; P=0.002), and on its subdomains “access to medical files” (from 42.0% to 49.4%), and “safeguarding patients’ interests” (from 58.1% to 66.2%). Outpatient clinics, which scored higher at baseline (66.7%) than care groups, did not improve on patient-centeredness (65.6%: P=0.54) or its subdomains. “Formal patient involvement” remained low in both care groups (23.2%) and

  17. Impact of malnutrition on pediatric risk of mortality score and outcome in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Nangalu, Romi; Pooni, Puneet Aulakh; Bhargav, Siddharth; Bains, Harmesh Singh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study was done to determine the effect of malnutrition on mortality in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) and on the pediatric risk of mortality (PRISM) scoring. Subjects and Methods: This was a prospective study done over 1 year. There were total 400 patients (1 month 14 years), who were divided into cases with weight for age <3rd centile and controls with ≥3rd centile of WHO charts. Cases were subdivided into mild/moderate (61–80% of expected weight for age) and severe malnutrition (<60%). Results: Out of total, 38.5% patients were underweight, and malnutrition was more in infancy, 61/104, i.e. 58.5% (P - 0.003). There was no significant difference in vitals at admission. Cases needed prolonged mechanical ventilation (P - 0.0063) and hospital stay (P - 0.0332) compared to controls. Mean and median PRISM scores were comparable in both the groups, but mortality was significantly higher in severely malnourished (P value 0.027). Conclusion: Severe malnutrition is independently associated with higher mortality even with similar PRISM score. There is need to give an additional score to children with weight for age <60% of expected. PMID:27555691

  18. Epidemiological and mortality trends in infective endocarditis, a 17-year population-based prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Chiavarelli, Mario; Scalese, Marco; Nencioni, Cesira; Valentini, Silvia; Guerrini, Francesco; D’Aiello, Incoronata; Picchi, Andrea; De Sensi, Francesco; Habib, Gilbert

    2017-01-01

    Background The population at risk, the clinical and microbiological features of infective endocarditis (IE) have changed. Aim of our study was to evaluate the contemporary epidemiological trends, over a 17-year period in a definite region of Tuscany, Italy, to analyze the clinical outcomes and associated prognostic factors. Methods From 1 January 1998 to 31 December 2014, all patients with a definite diagnosis of IE were prospectively entered in a data-base. The Health-Care system data-base was interrogated to capture patients who could have been missed. The final dataset derived by the merging of the two data-bases. Results Incidence rate of IE was 4.6/100,000/y with a significant linear incidence increase. In hospitalized patients the incidence was 1.27/1,000 admissions. Over age 65 incidence rate was 11.7/100,000/y. Male/female ratio was 1.54:1. A temporal trend towards an increase in the mean population age was found (P=0.033). There was an increase in the incidence of Health-care associated IE, P=0.016. The most common microorganisms were staphylococcus aureus (25%) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (22%). In-hospital mortality was 24%. A trend towards an increase in mortality rate was found (P=0.055). Independent predictors of mortality were older age, S. aureus infection, heart failure, septic shock and persistent bacteremia. Conclusions Our study confirms an increasing mortality trend in IE, although with a borderline significance. Elderly forms are associated with poor prognosis and higher than 1-year mortality rate even in the multivariate analysis. Ageing population, increase in healthcare-associated and staphylococcal infections, may explain the rise of IE incidence and of the mortality trend. PMID:28164010

  19. The Obesity-Mortality Paradox in Patients With Heart Failure in Taiwan and a Collaborative Meta-Analysis for East Asian Patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gen-Min; Li, Yi-Hwei; Yin, Wei-Hsian; Wu, Yen-Wen; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Hsu, Chih-Hsin; Wen, Ming-Shien; Voon, Wen-Chol; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Yeh, San-Jou; Lin, Wei-Shiang

    2016-10-01

    A global heart failure (HF) registry suggested that the inverse association between body mass index (BMI) and all-cause mortality differed by race, particularly stronger in Japanese patients at 1-year follow-up. Whether this finding was consistent across all East Asian populations was unknown. In a multicenter prospective study in Taiwan, we enrolled 1,301 patients hospitalized for systolic HF from 2013 to 2014 and followed up the mortality after their discharge for a median of 1-year period. Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were used to assess the association of BMI with all-cause mortality. The results showed that BMI was inversely associated with all-cause mortality (hazard ratio and 95% CI per 5-kg/m(2) increase: 0.75 [0.62 to 0.91]) after adjusting for demographics, traditional risk factors, HF severity, and medications at discharge. Subsequently, we sought previous studies regarding the BMI association with mortality for East Asian patients with HF from Medline, and a random-effect meta-analysis was performed by the inverse variance method. The meta-analysis including 7 previous eligible studies (3 for the Chinese and 4 for the Japanese cohorts) and the present one showed similar results that BMI was inversely associated with all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 0.65 [0.58 to 0.73], I(2) = 37%). In conclusion, our study in Taiwan and a collaborative meta-analysis confirmed a strong inverse BMI-mortality association consistently among East Asian patients with HF.

  20. Minimally invasive facet restoration implant for chronic lumbar zygapophysial pain: 1-year outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The zygapophysial (facet) joint is the primary pain generator in one third of chronic low back pain cases. Current treatment options include temporarily palliative nonsurgical approaches, facet injections, radiofrequency denervation, and, rarely, lumbar arthrodesis. The purpose of this study was to assess the safety and effectiveness of a minimally invasive implant intended to restore facet joint function in patients with chronic lumbar facetogenic pain. Methods This prospective, multi-center feasibility study enrolled patients with confirmed lumbar facetogenic joint pain at 1 or 2 levels who underwent at least 6 months of unsuccessful nonoperative care. Patients received a minimally invasive implant (Glyder® Facet Restoration Device, Zyga Technology, Inc., Minnetonka, MN) intended to restore facet joint function while preserving the native anatomy. Main outcomes included back pain severity using a visual analogue scale, back-specific disability using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and adverse events adjudicated by an independent Clinical Events Committee. Results Of 40 enrolled patients, 37 patients received the facet restoration implant and 34 patients had complete 1-year follow-up data available. Over the 1-year follow-up period, back pain severity decreased 41% and ODI decreased 34%, on average. Freedom from a device- or procedure-related serious adverse event through 1 year was 84%. Implant migration was observed in 3 patients and implant expulsion from the facet joint occurred in 3 patients. In total, 2 (5.4%) patients underwent implant removal through 1 year post-treatment. Conclusions A minimally invasive facet restoration implant is a promising treatment option in select patients with chronic lumbar zygapophysial pain who have exhausted nonsurgical treatments, with therapeutic benefit persisting at 1 year follow-up. PMID:26628910

  1. The Effect of Clozapine on Hematological Indices: A 1-Year Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jimmy; Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Fervaha, Gagan; Powell, Valerie; Bhaloo, Amaal; Bies, Robert; Remington, Gary

    2015-10-01

    Clozapine is the antipsychotic of choice for treatment-resistant schizophrenia and is linked to a need for mandatory hematological monitoring. Besides agranulocytosis, other hematological aberrations have resulted in premature termination in some cases. Considering clozapine's role in immunomodulation, we proceeded to investigate the impact of clozapine on the following 3 main hematological cell lines: red blood cells, platelets, white blood cells (WBCs), and its differential counts. Data were extracted from patients initiated on clozapine between January 2009 and December 2010 at a single hospital. Patients with a preclozapine complete blood count, who were receiving clozapine during the 1-year follow-up period, were included in the present investigation. Counts of red blood cells, platelets, WBC, and its differential including neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, and basophils were extracted and trajectories plotted. One hundred one patients were included in this study and 66 remained on clozapine at the end of 1 year. There was a synchronized but transient increase in WBC, neutrophils, monocytes, eosinophils, basophils, and platelets beginning as early as the first week of clozapine treatment. There were no cases of agranulocytosis reported in this sample, and five developed neutropenia. A spike in neutrophils immediately preceded the onset of neutropenia in three of the five. The cumulative incidence rates were 48.9% for neutrophilia, 5.9% for eosinophilia, and 3% each for thrombocytosis and thrombocytopenia. Early hematological aberrations are visible across a range of cell lines, primarily of the myeloid lineage. These disturbances are transient and are probably related to clozapine's immunomodulatory properties. We do not suggest discontinuing clozapine as a consequence of the observed aberrations.

  2. Persistent problems 1 year after mild traumatic brain injury: a longitudinal population study in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Theadom, Alice; Parag, Varsha; Dowell, Tony; McPherson, Kathryn; Starkey, Nicola; Barker-Collo, Suzanne; Jones, Kelly; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Feigin, Valery L

    2016-01-01

    Background Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a common problem in general practice settings, yet previous research does not take into account those who do not attend hospital after injury. This is important as there is evidence that effects may be far from mild. Aim To determine whether people sustain any persistent effects 1 year after mTBI, and to identify the predictors of health outcomes. Design and setting A community-based, longitudinal population study of an mTBI incidence cohort (n = 341) from a mixed urban and rural region (Hamilton and Waikato Districts) of the North Island of New Zealand (NZ). Method Adults (>16 years) completed assessments of cognitive functioning, global functioning, post-concussion symptoms, mood, and quality of life over the year after injury. Results Nearly half of participants (47.9%) reported experiencing four or more post-concussion symptoms 1 year post-injury. Additionally, 10.9% of participants revealed very low cognitive functioning. Levels of anxiety, depression, or reduced quality of life were comparable with the general population. Having at least one comorbidity, history of brain injury, living alone, non-white ethnic group, alcohol and medication use, and being female were significant predictors of poorer outcomes at 12 months. Conclusion Although some people make a spontaneous recovery after mTBI, nearly half continue to experience persistent symptoms linked to their injury. Monitoring of recovery from mTBI may be needed and interventions provided for those experiencing persistent difficulties. Demographic factors and medical history should be taken into account in treatment planning. PMID:26719482

  3. Perinatal dioxin exposure and the neurodevelopment of Vietnamese toddlers at 1 year of age.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tai The; Nishijo, Muneko; Nguyen, Anh Thi Nguyet; Tran, Nghi Ngoc; Van Hoang, Luong; Tran, Anh Hai; Nguyen, Trung Viet; Nishijo, Hisao

    2015-12-01

    Dioxin concentrations remain elevated in both the environment and in humans residing near former US Air Force bases in South Vietnam. This may potentially have adverse health effects, particularly on infant neurodevelopment. We followed 214 infants whose mothers resided in a dioxin-contaminated area in Da Nang, Vietnam, from birth until 1 year of age. Perinatal exposure to dioxins was estimated from toxic equivalent (TEQ) levels of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDDs/Fs-TEQ), and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TetraCDD) concentrations in breast milk. In infants, daily dioxin intake (DDI) was used as an index of postnatal exposure through breastfeeding. Neurodevelopment of toddlers was assessed using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition (Bayley-III). No significant differences in neurodevelopmental scores were exhibited for cognitive, language or motor functions between four exposure groups of PCDDs/Fs-TEQ or 2,3,7,8-TetraCDD. However, social-emotional scores were decreased in the high PCDDs/Fs-TEQ group and the high 2,3,7,8-TetraCDD group compared with those with mild exposure, after adjusting for confounding factors. Cognitive scores in the mild, moderate, and high DDI groups were significantly higher than those in low DDI group, but there were no differences in cognitive scores among the three higher DDI groups. These results suggest that perinatal exposure to dioxins may affect social-emotional development of 1-year-old toddlers, without diminishing global neurodevelopmental function.

  4. Identifying groups at risk for 1-year membership termination from a fitness center at enrollment.

    PubMed

    Hooker, Stephanie A; Ross, Kaile M; Ranby, Krista W; Masters, Kevin S; Peters, John C; Hill, James O

    2016-12-01

    The vast majority of Americans do not engage in adequate regular physical activity despite its well-known health benefits. Even when individuals attempt to become more active by joining a fitness center, estimates suggest that nearly half terminate their membership within the first 6 months. A better understanding of who is at risk for early membership termination upon joining may help researchers develop targeted interventions to improve the likelihood that individuals will successfully maintain memberships and physical activity. This study's purpose was to identify, based on a wellness assessment (WA) used in fitness centers, individuals at risk for fitness membership termination prior to 1-year. Center members (N = 441; Mage = 41.9, SD = 13.1; 74.4% female) completed a comprehensive WA of stress, life satisfaction, physical fitness, metabolic health, and sleep quality at the beginning of their memberships and were followed for one year. Latent class analyses utilized the WA to identify four groups: (a) healthy, (b) unhealthy, (c) poor psychological wellness, and (d) poor physical wellness. Participants in the poor psychological wellness group (OR = 2.24, p = 0.007) and the unhealthy group (OR = 2.40, p = 0.037) were significantly more likely to terminate their memberships at 1-year as compared to the healthy group. Participants with poor physical wellness visited the fitness center less frequently than healthy participants (p < 0.01). Results suggest that poor psychological wellness is a risk factor for terminating memberships, whereas poor physical wellness is not. Future studies should replicate these latent classes and develop targeted interventions to address psychological wellness as a method to improve fitness membership retention.

  5. Safety and efficacy of nurse-controlled analgesia in patients less than 1 year of age

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Hina; Tumin, Dmitry; Wrona, Sharon; Martin, David; Bhalla, Tarun; Tobias, Joseph D

    2016-01-01

    Background The management of acute pain presents unique challenges in the younger pediatric population. Although patient-controlled devices are frequently used in patients ≥6 years of age, alternative modes of analgesic delivery are needed in infants. Objective To examine the safety and efficacy of nurse-controlled analgesia (NCA) in neonates less than 1 year of age. Methods Data from patients <1 year of age receiving NCA as ordered by the Acute Pain Service at our institution were collected over a 5-year period and reviewed retrospectively. The primary outcomes were activation of the institution’s Rapid Response Team (RRT) or Code Blue, signifying severe adverse events. Pain score after NCA initiation was a secondary outcome. Results Among 338 girls and 431 boys, the most common opioid used for NCA was fentanyl, followed by morphine and hydromorphone. There were 39 (5%) cases involving RRT or Code Blue activation, of which only one (Code Blue) was activated due to a complication of NCA (apnea). Multivariable logistic regression demonstrated morphine NCA to be associated with greater odds of RRT activation (OR=3.29, 95% CI=1.35, 8.03, P=0.009) compared to fentanyl NCA. There were no statistically significant differences in pain scores after NCA initiation across NCA agents. Conclusion NCA is safe in neonates and infants, with comparable efficacy demonstrated for the three agents used. The elevated incidence of RRT activation in patients receiving morphine suggests caution in its use and consideration of alternative agents in this population. PMID:27358574

  6. Evaluation of orthodontic treatment after 1 year of retention--a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Edman Tynelius, G; Bondemark, L; Lilja-Karlander, E

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to use a randomized controlled trial methodology to evaluate and compare three different retention methods. The capacity of the retention methods to retain orthodontic treatment results was in this first phase analysed on a short-term basis, i.e. after 1 year of retention. The subjects were recruited from adolescents undergoing fixed appliance treatment at an orthodontic clinic in the National Health Service (NHS) in Sweden between 2001 and 2007. Seventy-five patients (45 girls and 30 boys with a mean age of 14.4 years at the start of retention) were randomized into three retention systems; a vacuum-formed retainer in the maxilla and bonded canine-to-canine retainer in the mandible (group V-CTC), a vacuum-formed retainer in the maxilla combined with stripping of the 10 proximal surfaces of the lower mandibular anterior teeth (group V-S), and a prefabricated positioner covering the teeth in the maxilla and mandible (group P). The main outcome measures were: Little's irregularity index (LII), intercanine and intermolar width, arch length, overjet, and overbite. Registrations were made before orthodontic treatment, when the fixed orthodontic appliance was removed, and after 12 months in retention. Differences in means between groups were tested by one-way analysis of variance. After 1 year of retention, no clinically significant difference in retention capacity was found between the three retention methods. Small but significant differences (P < 0.05) were observed between the V-CTC and V-S groups regarding mandibular canine width, mandibular arch length, and overbite. In group P, two patients failed to co-operate.

  7. Relative Deprivation, Poor Health Habits and Mortality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eibner, Christine E.; Evans, William N.

    2005-01-01

    The results of the study conducted, using the data from National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) (BRFSS), to find the relationship between the relative deprivation and mortality, while controlling individual income and reference group fixed effects, are presented.

  8. A strategy for reducing maternal mortality.

    PubMed Central

    Suleiman, A. B.; Mathews, A.; Jegasothy, R.; Ali, R.; Kandiah, N.

    1999-01-01

    A confidential system of enquiry into maternal mortality was introduced in Malaysia in 1991. The methods used and the findings obtained up to 1994 are reported below and an outline is given of the resulting recommendations and actions. PMID:10083722

  9. Association between engagement in-care and mortality in HIV-positive persons

    PubMed Central

    Sabin, Caroline A.; Howarth, Alison; Jose, Sophie; Hill, Teresa; Apea, Vanessa; Morris, Steve; Burns, Fiona

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess associations between engagement in-care and future mortality. Design: UK-based observational cohort study. Methods: HIV-positive participants with more than one visit after 1 January 2000 were identified. Each person-month was classified as being in or out-of-care based on the dates of the expected and observed next care visits. Cox models investigated associations between mortality and the cumulative proportion of months spent in-care (% IC, lagged by 1 year), and cumulative %IC prior to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in those attending clinic for more than 1 year, with adjustment for age, CD4+/viral load, year, sex, infection mode, ethnicity, and receipt/type of ART. Results: The 44 432 individuals (27.8% women; 50.5% homosexual, 28.9% black African; median age 36 years) were followed for a median of 5.5 years, over which time 2279 (5.1%) people died. Higher %IC was associated with lower mortality both before [relative hazard 0.91 (95% confidence interval 0.88–0.95)/10% higher, P = 0.0001] and after [0.90 (0.87–0.93), P = 0.0001] adjustment. Adjustment for future CD4+ changes revealed that the association was explained by poorer CD4+ cell counts in those with lower %IC. In total 8730 participants under follow-up for more than 1 year initiated ART of whom 237 (2.7%) died. Higher values of %IC prior to ART initiation were associated with a reduced risk of mortality before [0.29 (0.17–0.47)/10%, P = 0.0001] and after [0.36 (0.21–0.61)/10%, P = 0.0002] adjustment; the association was again explained by poorer post-ART CD4+/ viral load in those with lower pre-ART %IC. Conclusions: Higher levels of engagement in-care are associated with reduced mortality at all stages of infection, including in those who initiate ART. PMID:28060018

  10. [Mortality in metropolitan regions].

    PubMed

    Simoes Ccds

    1980-01-01

    Data from the 1970 census and a 1974-1975 survey carried out in Brazil by the Fundacao Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatistica are used to examine recent mortality trends in urban areas. Specifically, life expectancy in nine metropolitan areas is analyzed in relation to income, diet, and sanitary facilities in the home.

  11. Adolescents, Egocentrism, and Mortality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Jennie L.

    2017-01-01

    Adolescents are often described as egocentric, but a major source of this external behavior is the internal fear of adolescents have about feeling invisible, being different, and even their own mortality. Facing this fear through a curricular focus on death can help to combat this behavior. This can be accomplished through novel studies of books…

  12. Mortality among Swedish Journalists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furhoff, Anna-Karin; Furhoff, Lars

    1987-01-01

    Charts the various environmental factors that might influence the mortality rate of Swedish journalists. Concludes that, although there may be a slightly higher death rate among Swedish journalists in the 50-59 age group, the death rate for journalists is the same as for the population in general. (MM)

  13. Infant mortality and child health in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Alves, Denisard; Belluzzo, Walter

    2004-12-01

    Child health is a central issue in the public policy agenda of developing countries. Several policies aimed at improving child health have been implemented over the years, with varying degrees of success. In Brazil, such policies have triggered a significant decline in infant mortality rates over the last 30 years. Despite this improvement, however, mortality rates are still high compared to international standards. Moreover, there is considerable imbalance across Brazilian municipalities suggesting that various policies should be adopted. We investigate the determinants of infant mortality at the municipal level and provide an analysis of the factors affecting child health at the individual level. To analyze the mortality rate, we estimate static and dynamic panel data models using four censuses covering the period from 1970 to 2000. The demand for child health, on the other hand, is addressed through a household decision model, estimated using anthropometric data from the 1996 Standard of Living Survey. The results obtained indicate that a rise in sanitation, education and per capita income contributed to the decline of infant mortality in Brazil, with stronger impacts in the long run than in the short run. The fixed effects associated with county characteristics explain the observed dispersion in child mortality rates. The results from the decision model are confirmed by the findings of the mortality model: education, sanitation and poverty are the most important causes of poor child health in Brazil.

  14. Trends in colorectal cancer mortality in Europe: retrospective analysis of the WHO mortality database

    PubMed Central

    Ait Ouakrim, Driss; Pizot, Cécile; Boniol, Magali; Malvezzi, Matteo; Boniol, Mathieu; Negri, Eva; Bota, Maria; Jenkins, Mark A; Bleiberg, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine changes in colorectal cancer mortality in 34 European countries between 1970 and 2011. Design Retrospective trend analysis. Data source World Health Organization mortality database. Population Deaths from colorectal cancer between 1970 and 2011. Profound changes in screening and treatment efficiency took place after 1988; therefore, particular attention was paid to the evolution of colorectal cancer mortality in the subsequent period. Main outcomes measures Time trends in rates of colorectal cancer mortality, using joinpoint regression analysis. Rates were age adjusted using the standard European population. Results From 1989 to 2011, colorectal cancer mortality increased by a median of 6.0% for men and decreased by a median of 14.7% for women in the 34 European countries. Reductions in colorectal cancer mortality of more than 25% in men and 30% in women occurred in Austria, Switzerland, Germany, the United Kingdom, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Luxembourg, and Ireland. By contrast, mortality rates fell by less than 17% in the Netherlands and Sweden for both sexes. Over the same period, smaller or no declines occurred in most central European countries. Substantial mortality increases occurred in Croatia, the former Yugoslav republic of Macedonia, and Romania for both sexes and in most eastern European countries for men. In countries with decreasing mortality, reductions were more important for women of all ages and men younger than 65 years. In the 27 European Union member states, colorectal cancer mortality fell by 13.0% in men and 27.0% in women, compared with corresponding reductions of 39.8% and 38.8% in the United States. Conclusion Over the past 40 years, there has been considerable disparity in the level of colorectal cancer mortality between European countries, as well as between men and women and age categories. Countries with the largest reductions in colorectal cancer mortality are characterised by better accessibility to screening

  15. Mortality associated with cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Roberson, J B; Harper, J L; Jauch, E C

    1996-09-01

    Cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis is a rare infection but still occurs and carries a mortality rate up to 60%. It is a polymicrobial infection that is characterized by diffuse necrosis of fascial planes and subcutaneous tissues. Diagnosing early stages of cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis in relationship to other soft tissue infections of odontogenic origin is difficult and leads to less aggressive treatment with resulting increased morbidity and mortality. To prevent this significant mortality and morbidity associated with cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis early presentation, recognition and treatment by health care provider is essential.

  16. Structural pluralism and all-cause mortality.

    PubMed Central

    Young, F W; Lyson, T A

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study tested the hypothesis that "structural pluralism" reduces age-standardized mortality rates. Structural pluralism is defined as the potential for political competition in communities. METHODS: US counties were the units of analysis. Multiple regression techniques were used to test the hypothesis. RESULTS: Structural pluralism is a stronger determinant of lower mortality than any of the other variables examined--specifically, income, education, and medical facilities. CONCLUSIONS: These findings support the case for a new structural variable, pluralism, as a possible cause of lower mortality, and they indirectly support the significance of comparable ecologic dimensions, such as social trust. PMID:11189808

  17. Mortality patterns among workers exposed to acrylamide

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, J.J.; Swaen, G.M.; Marsh, G.M.; Utidjian, H.M.; Caporossi, J.C.; Lucas, L.J. )

    1989-07-01

    A cohort of 8854 men, 2293 of whom were exposed to acrylamide, was examined from 1925 to 1983 for mortality. This cohort consisted of four plant populations in two countries: the United States and The Netherlands. No statistically significant excess of all-cause or cause-specific mortality was found among acrylamide workers. Analysis by acrylamide exposure levels showed no trend of increased risk of mortality from several cancer sites. These results do not support the hypothesis that acrylamide is a human carcinogen.

  18. Seasonal Influenza Infections and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jennifer L.; Yang, Wan; Ito, Kazuhiko; Matte, Thomas D.; Shaman, Jeffrey; Kinney, Patrick L.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Cardiovascular deaths and influenza epidemics peak during winter in temperate regions. OBJECTIVES To quantify the temporal association between population increases in seasonal influenza infections and mortality due to cardiovascular causes and to test if influenza incidence indicators are predictive of cardiovascular mortality during the influenza season. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Time-series analysis of vital statistics records and emergency department visits in New York City, among cardiovascular deaths that occurred during influenza seasons between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2012. The 2009 novel influenza A(H1N1) pandemic period was excluded from temporal analyses. EXPOSURES Emergency department visits for influenza-like illness, grouped by age (≥0 years and ≥65 years) and scaled by laboratory surveillance data for viral types and subtypes, in the previous 28 days. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Mortality due to cardiovascular disease, ischemic heart disease, and myocardial infarction. RESULTS Among adults 65 years and older, who accounted for 83.0% (73 363 deaths) of nonpandemic cardiovascular mortality during influenza seasons, seasonal average influenza incidence was correlated year to year with excess cardiovascular mortality (Pearson correlation coefficients ≥0.75, P≤.05 for 4 different influenza indicators). In daily time-series analyses using 4 different influenza metrics, interquartile range increases in influenza incidence during the previous 21 days were associated with an increase between 2.3% (95% CI, 0.7%–3.9%) and 6.3% (95% CI, 3.7%–8.9%) for cardiovascular disease mortality and between 2.4% (95% CI, 1.1%–3.6%) and 6.9% (95% CI, 4.0%–9.9%) for ischemic heart disease mortality among adults 65 years and older. The associations were most acute and strongest for myocardial infarction mortality, with each interquartile range increase in influenza incidence during the previous 14 days associated with mortality

  19. Past and Present ARDS Mortality Rates: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Máca, Jan; Jor, Ondřej; Holub, Michal; Sklienka, Peter; Burša, Filip; Burda, Michal; Janout, Vladimír; Ševčík, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    ARDS is severe form of respiratory failure with significant impact on the morbidity and mortality of critical care patients. Epidemiological data are crucial for evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic interventions, designing studies, and optimizing resource distribution. The goal of this review is to present general aspects of mortality data published over the past decades. A systematic search of the MEDLINE/PubMed was performed. The articles were divided according to their methodology, type of reported mortality, and time. The main outcome was mortality. Extracted data included study duration, number of patients, and number of centers. The mortality trends and current mortality were calculated for subgroups consisting of in-hospital, ICU, 28/30-d, and 60-d mortality over 3 time periods (A, before 1995; B, 1995-2000; C, after 2000). The retrospectivity and prospectivity were also taken into account. Moreover, we present the most recent mortality rates since 2010. One hundred seventy-seven articles were included in the final analysis. General mortality rates ranged from 11 to 87% in studies including subjects with ARDS of all etiologies (mixed group). Linear regression revealed that the study design (28/30-d or 60-d) significantly influenced the mortality rate. Reported mortality rates were higher in prospective studies, such as randomized controlled trials and prospective observational studies compared with retrospective observational studies. Mortality rates exhibited a linear decrease in relation to time period (P < .001). The number of centers showed a significant negative correlation with mortality rates. The prospective observational studies did not have consistently higher mortality rates compared with randomized controlled trials. The mortality trends over 3 time periods (before 1995, 1995-2000, and after 2000) yielded variable results in general ARDS populations. However, a mortality decrease was present mostly in prospective studies. Since 2010, the

  20. Continuing the search for a fundamental law of mortality

    SciTech Connect

    Carnes, B.A.; Grahn, D.; Olshansky, S.J.

    1997-08-01

    For 170 years, scientists have attempted to explain why consistent temporal patterns of death are observed among individuals within populations. Historical efforts to identify a {open_quotes}law of mortality{close_quotes} from these patterns ended in 1935 when it was declared that such a law did not exist. These empirical tests for a law of mortality were constructed using mortality curves based on all causes of death. We predicted that patterns of mortality consistent with the historical concept of a law would be revealed if mortality curves for species were constructed using only senescent causes of death. Using data on senescent mortality for laboratory animals and humans, we demonstrate that patterns of mortality overlap when compared on a biologically comparable time scale. These results are consistent with the existence of a law of mortality following sexual maturity as asserted by Benjamin Gompertz and Raymond Pearl. The societal, medical, and research implications of such a law are discussed.

  1. Continuing the search for a fundamental law of mortality

    SciTech Connect

    Carnes, B.A.; Grahn, D.; Olshansky, S.J.

    1996-03-01

    for 170 years, scientists have attempted to explain why consistent temporal patterns of death are observed among individuals within populations. Historical efforts to identify a `law of mortality` from these patterns ended in 1935 when it was declared that such a law did not exist. These empirical tests for a law of mortality were constructed using mortality curves based on all causes of death. We predicted patterns of mortality consistent with the historical concept of a law would be revealed if mortality curves for species were constructed using only senescent causes of death. Using data on senescent mortality for laboratory animals and humans, we demonstrate patterns of mortality overlap when compared on a biologically comparable time scale. The results are consistent with the existence of a law of mortality following sexual maturity. The societal, medical, and research implications of such a law are discussed.

  2. Hyperlipidemia is associated with lower risk of poststroke mortality independent of statin use: A population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Yeramaneni, Samrat; Kleindorfer, Dawn O; Sucharew, Heidi; Alwell, Kathleen; Moomaw, Charles J; Flaherty, Matthew L; Woo, Daniel; Adeoye, Opeolu; Ferioli, Simona; de los Rios La Rosa, Felipe; Martini, Sharyl; Mackey, Jason; Khatri, Pooja; Kissela, Brett M; Khoury, Jane C

    2017-01-01

    Background Although statin therapy is associated with reduced stroke and mortality risk, some studies report that higher lipid levels are associated with improved outcomes following ischemic stroke. Aims We examined the association of hyperlipidemia (HLD) combined with statin therapy on all-cause mortality in stroke patients. Methods All stroke patients in the Greater Cincinnati Northern Kentucky region of ~1.3 million were identified using ICD-9 discharge codes in 2005 and 2010. Stroke patients with and without HLD were categorized based on their reported statin use at baseline or discharge into three groups: no-HLD/no-statins, HLD/no-statins, and HLD/on-statins. Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the risk of mortality at 30 days, 1 year, and 3 years poststroke. Results Overall, 77% (2953) of the 3813 ischemic stroke patients were diagnosed with HLD and 72% (n = 2123) of those patients were on statin medications. The mean age was 70.0 ± 14.6 years, 56% were women, and 21% were black. In adjusted analyses, the HLD/no-statins group showed 35% (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.46–0.92), 27% (aHR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.59–0.90), and 17% (aHR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.70–0.97) reduced risk of mortality at 30 days, 1 year, and 3 years, respectively, poststroke, compared with no-HLD/no-statins group. The HLD/on-statins group showed an additional 17% significant survival benefit at 3 years poststroke compared with HLD/no-statins group. Conclusions A diagnosis of HLD in ischemic stroke patients is associated with reduced short- and long-term mortality, irrespective of statin use. Statin therapy is associated with significant, additional long-term survival benefit. PMID:27649737

  3. Conifer Decline and Mortality in Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharuk, V.; Im, S.; Ranson, K.

    2015-12-01

    "Dark needle conifer" (DNC: Abies sibirica, Pinus sibirica and Picea obovata) decline and mortality increase were documented in Russia during recent decades. Here we analyzed causes and scale of Siberian pine and fir mortality in Altai-Sayan and Baikal Lake Regions and West Siberian Plane based on in situdata and remote sensing (QuickBird, Landsat, GRACE). Geographically, mortality began on the margins of the DNC range (i.e., within the forest-steppe and conifer-broadleaf ecotones) and on terrain features with maximal water stress risk (narrow-shaped hilltops, convex steep south facing slopes, shallow well-drained soils). Within ridges, mortality occurred mainly along mountain passes, where stands faced drying winds. Regularly mortality was observed to decrease with elevation increase with the exception of Baikal Lake Mountains, where it was minimal near the lake shore and increased with elevation (up to about 1000 m a.s.l.). Siberian pine and fir mortality followed a drying trend with consecutive droughts since the 1980s. Dendrochronology analysis showed that mortality was correlated with vapor pressure deficit increase, drought index, soil moisture decrease and occurrence of late frosts. In Baikal region Siberian pine mortality correlated with Baikal watershed meteorological variables. An impact of previous year climate conditions on the current growth was found (r2 = 0.6). Thus, water-stressed trees became sensitive to bark beetles and fungi impact (including Polygraphus proximus and Heterobasidion annosum). At present, an increase in mortality is observed within the majority of DNC range. Results obtained also showed a primary role of water stress in that phenomenon with a secondary role of bark beetles and fungi attacks. In future climate with increased drought severity and frequency Siberian pine and fir will partly disappear from its current range, and will be substituted by drought-tolerant species (e.g., Pinus silvestris, Larix sibirica).

  4. How to measure the burden of mortality?

    PubMed Central

    Bonneux, L

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To explore various methods to quantify the burden of mortality, with a special interest for the more recent method at the core of calculations of disability adjusted life years (DALY). Design: Various methods calculating the age schedule at death are applied to two historical life table populations. One method calculates the "years of life lost", by multiplying the numbers of deaths at age x by the residual life expectancy. This residual life expectancy may be discounted and age weighted. The other method calculates the "potential years of life lost" by multiplying the numbers of deaths at age x by the years missing to reach a defined threshold (65 years or 75 years). Methods: The period life tables describing the mortality of Dutch male populations from 1900–10 (high mortality) and from 1990–1994 (low mortality). Results: A standard life table with idealised long life expectancy increases the burden of death more if mortality is lower. People at old age, more prevalent if mortality is low, lose more life years in an idealised life table. The discounted life table decreases the burden of death strongly if mortality is high: the life lost by a person dying at a young age is discounted. Age weighting the discounted life table balances the effect of discounting. Conclusions: For the purpose of description of the burden of mortality, the aggregate life table of the studied populations gives the better description of the age schedule at death. Discounting and the use of idealised lifetables as a standard increase the burden of mortality of degenerative disease at the end of life. The age weighted discounted life table violates the principle of parsimony. PMID:11812812

  5. Tree mortality from an exceptional drought spanning mesic to semiarid ecoregions.

    PubMed

    Moore, Georgianne W; Edgar, Christopher B; Vogel, Jason G; Washington-Allen, Robert A; March, Rosaleen G; Zehnder, Rebekah

    2016-03-01

    Significant areas of the southern USA periodically experience intense drought that can lead to episodic tree mortality events. Because drought tolerance varies among species and size of trees, such events can alter the structure and function of terrestrial ecosystem in ways that are difficult to detect with local data sets or solely with remote-sensing platforms. We investigated a widespread tree mortality event that resulted from the worst 1-year drought on record for the state of Texas, USA. The drought affected ecoregions spanning mesic to semiarid climate zones and provided a unique opportunity to test hypotheses related to how trees of varying genus and size were affected. The study was based on an extensive set of 599 distributed plots, each 0.16 ha, surveyed in the summer following the drought. In each plot, dead trees larger than 12.7 cm in diameter were counted, sized, and identified to the genus level. Estimates of total mortality were obtained for each of 10 regions using a combination of design-based estimators and calibrated remote sensing using MODIS 1-yr change in normalized difference vegetation index products developed by the U.S. Forest Service. As compared with most of the publicized extreme die-off events, this study documents relatively low rates of mortality occurring over a very large area. However, statewide, regional tree mortality was massive, with an estimated 6.2% of the live trees perishing, nearly nine times greater than normal annual mortality. Dead tree diameters averaged larger than the live trees for most ecoregions, and this trend was most pronounced in the wetter climate zones, suggesting a potential re-ordering of species dominance and downward trend in tree size that was specific to climatic regions. The net effect on carbon storage was estimated to be a redistribution of 24-30 Tg C from the live tree to dead tree carbon pool. The dead tree survey documented drought mortality in more than 29 genera across all regions, and

  6. Deciphering infant mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrut, Sylvie; Pouillard, Violette; Richmond, Peter; Roehner, Bertrand M.

    2016-12-01

    This paper is about infant mortality. In line with reliability theory, "infant" refers to the time interval following birth during which the mortality (or failure) rate decreases. This definition provides a systems science perspective in which birth constitutes a sudden transition falling within the field of application of the Transient Shock (TS) conjecture put forward in Richmond and Roehner (2016c). This conjecture provides predictions about the timing and shape of the death rate peak. It says that there will be a death rate spike whenever external conditions change abruptly and drastically and also predicts that after a steep rise there will be a much longer hyperbolic relaxation process. These predictions can be tested by considering living organisms for which the transient shock occurs several days after birth. Thus, for fish there are three stages: egg, yolk-sac and young adult phases. The TS conjecture predicts a mortality spike at the end of the yolk-sac phase and this timing is indeed confirmed by observation. Secondly, the hyperbolic nature of the relaxation process can be tested using very accurate Swiss statistics for postnatal death rates spanning the period from one hour immediately after birth through to age 10 years. It turns out that since the 19th century despite a significant and large reduction in infant mortality, the shape of the age-specific death rate has remained basically unchanged. Moreover the hyperbolic pattern observed for humans is also found for small primates as recorded in the archives of zoological gardens. Our overall objective is to identify a series of cases which start from simple systems and move step by step to more complex organisms. The cases discussed here we believe represent initial landmarks in this quest.

  7. Onset of mortality increase with age and age trajectories of mortality from all diseases in the four Nordic countries

    PubMed Central

    Dolejs, Josef; Marešová, Petra

    2017-01-01

    Background The answer to the question “At what age does aging begin?” is tightly related to the question “Where is the onset of mortality increase with age?” Age affects mortality rates from all diseases differently than it affects mortality rates from nonbiological causes. Mortality increase with age in adult populations has been modeled by many authors, and little attention has been given to mortality decrease with age after birth. Materials and methods Nonbiological causes are excluded, and the category “all diseases” is studied. It is analyzed in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden during the period 1994–2011, and all possible models are screened. Age trajectories of mortality are analyzed separately: before the age category where mortality reaches its minimal value and after the age category. Results Resulting age trajectories from all diseases showed a strong minimum, which was hidden in total mortality. The inverse proportion between mortality and age fitted in 54 of 58 cases before mortality minimum. The Gompertz model with two parameters fitted as mortality increased with age in 17 of 58 cases after mortality minimum, and the Gompertz model with a small positive quadratic term fitted data in the remaining 41 cases. The mean age where mortality reached minimal value was 8 (95% confidence interval 7.05–8.95) years. The figures depict an age where the human population has a minimal risk of death from biological causes. Conclusion Inverse proportion and the Gompertz model fitted data on both sides of the mortality minimum, and three parameters determined the shape of the age–mortality trajectory. Life expectancy should be determined by the two standard Gompertz parameters and also by the single parameter in the model c/x. All-disease mortality represents an alternative tool to study the impact of age. All results are based on published data. PMID:28176929

  8. The Use of Hypnotics and Mortality - A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Tzuo-Yun; Zeng, Ya-Fang; Tang, Gau-Jun; Kao, Hui-Chuan; Chiu, Hsien-Jane; Lan, Tsuo-Hung; Ho, Hsiao-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background Sleep disorders, especially chronic insomnia, have become major health problem worldwide and, as a result, the use of hypnotics is steadily increasing. However, few studies with a large sample size and long-term observation have been conducted to investigate the relationship between specific hypnotics and mortality. Methods We conducted this retrospective cohort study using data from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. Information from claims data including basic characteristics, the use of hypnotics, and survival from 2000 to 2009 for 1,320,322 individuals were included. The use of hypnotics was divided into groups using the defined daily dose and the cumulative length of use. Hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated from a Cox proportional hazards model, with two different matching techniques to examine the associations. Results Compared to the non-users, both users of benzodiazepines (HR = 1.81; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.78–1.85) and mixed users (HR = 1.44; 95% CI = 1.42–1.47) had a higher risk of death, whereas the users of other non-benzodiazepines users showed no differences. Zolpidem users (HR = 0.73; 95% CI = 0.71–0.75) exhibited a lower risk of mortality in the adjusted models. This pattern remained similar in both matching techniques. Secondary analysis indicated that zolpidem users had a reduced risk of major cause-specific mortality except cancer, and that this protective effect was dose-responsive, with those using for more than 1 year having the lowest risk. Conclusions The effects of different types of hypnotics on mortality were diverse in this large cohort with long-term follow-up based on representative claims data in Taiwan. The use of zolpidem was associated with a reduced risk of mortality. PMID:26709926

  9. Readmission for Acute Exacerbation within 30 Days of Discharge Is Associated with a Subsequent Progressive Increase in Mortality Risk in COPD Patients: A Long-Term Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Mónica; Crisafulli, Ernesto; Liapikou, Adamantia; Huerta, Arturo; Gabarrús, Albert; Chetta, Alfredo; Soler, Nestor; Torres, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Twenty per cent of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients are readmitted for acute exacerbation (AECOPD) within 30 days of discharge. The prognostic significance of early readmission is not fully understood. The objective of our study was to estimate the mortality risk associated with readmission for acute exacerbation within 30 days of discharge in COPD patients. Methods The cohort (n = 378) was divided into patients readmitted (n = 68) and not readmitted (n = 310) within 30 days of discharge. Clinical, laboratory, microbiological, and severity data were evaluated at admission and during hospital stay, and mortality data were recorded at four time points during follow-up: 30 days, 6 months, 1 year and 3 years. Results Patients readmitted within 30 days had poorer lung function, worse dyspnea perception and higher clinical severity. Two or more prior AECOPD (HR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.51–4.05) was the only variable independently associated with 30-day readmission. The mortality risk during the follow-up period showed a progressive increase in patients readmitted within 30 days in comparison to patients not readmitted; moreover, 30-day readmission was an independent risk factor for mortality at 1 year (HR, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.10–5.59). In patients readmitted within 30 days, the estimated absolute increase in the mortality risk was 4% at 30 days (number needed to harm NNH, 25), 17% at 6-months (NNH, 6), 19% at 1-year (NNH, 6) and 24% at 3 years (NNH, 5). Conclusion In conclusion a readmission for AECOPD within 30 days is associated with a progressive increased long-term risk of death. PMID:26943928

  10. Parental Incarceration and Child Mortality in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Signe Hald; Lee, Hedwig; Karlson, Kristian Bernt

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We used Danish registry data to examine the association between parental incarceration and child mortality risk. Methods. We used a sample of all Danish children born in 1991 linked with parental information. We conducted discrete-time survival analysis separately for boys (n = 30 146) and girls (n = 28 702) to estimate the association of paternal and maternal incarceration with child mortality, controlling for parental sociodemographic characteristics. We followed the children until age 20 years or death, whichever came first. Results. Results indicated a positive association between paternal and maternal imprisonment and male child mortality. Paternal imprisonment was associated with lower child mortality risks for girls. The relationship between maternal imprisonment and female child mortality changed directions depending on the model, suggesting no clear association. Conclusions. These results indicate that the incarceration of a parent may influence child mortality but that it is important to consider the gender of both the child and the incarcerated parent. PMID:24432916

  11. A decrease in intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) levels is associated with higher mortality in prevalent hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Villa-Bellosta, Ricardo; Rodriguez-Osorio, Laura; Mas, Sebastian; Abadi, Younes; Rubert, Mercedes; de la Piedra, Concepción; Gracia-Iguacel, Carolina; Mahillo, Ignacio; Ortiz, Alberto; Egido, Jesús; González-Parra, Emilio

    2017-01-01

    Background The mortality of dialysis patients is 10- to 100-fold higher than in the general population. Baseline serum PTH levels, and more recently, changes in serum PTH levels (ΔPTH) over time, have been associated to mortality in dialysis patients. Methods We explored the relationship between ΔPTH over 1 year with mortality over the next year in a prospective cohort of 115 prevalent hemodialysis patients from a single center that had median baseline iPTH levels within guideline recommendations. Results Median baseline iPTH levels were 205 (116.5, 400) pg/ml. ΔiPTH between baseline and 1 year was 85.2 ± 57.1 pg/ml. During the second year of follow-up, 27 patients died. ΔiPTH was significantly higher in patients who survived (+157.30 ± 25.82 pg/ml) than in those who died (+39.03 ± 60.95 pg/ml), while baseline iPTH values were not significantly different. The highest mortality (48%) was observed in patients with a decrease in ΔiPTH (ΔiPTH quartile 1, negative ΔiPTH) and the lowest (12%) mortality in quartile 3 ΔiPTH (ΔiPTH increase 101–300 pg/ml). In a logistic regression model, ΔiPTH was associated with mortality with an odds ratio (OR) of 0.998 (95% CI 0.996–0999, p = 0.038). In multivariable analysis, mortality risk was 73% and 88% lower for patients with ΔiPTH 0–100 pg/ml and 101–300 pg/ml, respectively, than for those with a decrease in ΔiPTH. In patients with a decrease in ΔiPTH, the OR for death was 4.131 (1.515–11.27)(p = 0.006). Conclusions In prevalent hemodialysis patients with median baseline iPTH values within the guideline recommended range, a decrease in ΔiPTH was associated with higher mortality. Further studies are required to understand the mechanisms and therapeutic implications of this observation that challenges current clinical practice. PMID:28339474

  12. Municipal pleural cancer mortality in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Abente, G; Hernandez-Barrera, V; Pollan, M; Aragones, N; Perez-Gomez, B

    2005-01-01

    Background: Pleural cancer is a recognised indicator of exposure to asbestos and mesothelioma mortality. Aims: To investigate the distribution of municipal mortality due to this tumour, using the autoregressive spatial model proposed by Besag, York, and Molliè. Methods: It was possible to compile and ascertain the posterior distribution of relative risk on the basis of a single Bayesian spatial model covering all of Spain's 8077 municipal areas. Maps were plotted depicting standardised mortality ratios, smoothed relative risk (RR) estimates, and the distribution of the posterior probability that RR >1. Results: There was a higher risk of death due to pleural cancer in well defined towns and areas, many of which correspond to municipalities where asbestos using industries once existed for many years, the prime example being the municipal pattern registered for Barcelona Province. The quality of mortality data, the suitability of the model used, and the usefulness of municipal atlases for environmental surveillance are discussed. PMID:15723885

  13. Ovarian cancer mortality and industrial pollution.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Javier; Lope, Virginia; López-Abente, Gonzalo; González-Sánchez, Mario; Fernández-Navarro, Pablo

    2015-10-01

    We investigated whether there might be excess ovarian cancer mortality among women residing near Spanish industries, according to different categories of industrial groups and toxic substances. An ecologic study was designed to examine ovarian cancer mortality at a municipal level (period 1997-2006). Population exposure to pollution was estimated by means of distance from town to facility. Using Poisson regression models, we assessed the relative risk of dying from ovarian cancer in zones around installations, and analyzed the effect of industrial groups and pollutant substances. Excess ovarian cancer mortality was detected in the vicinity of all sectors combined, and, principally, near refineries, fertilizers plants, glass production, paper production, food/beverage sector, waste treatment plants, pharmaceutical industry and ceramic. Insofar as substances were concerned, statistically significant associations were observed for installations releasing metals and polycyclic aromatic chemicals. These results support that residing near industries could be a risk factor for ovarian cancer mortality.

  14. Hippocampal Neuron Number Is Unchanged 1 Year After Fractionated Whole-Brain Irradiation at Middle Age

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Lei Molina, Doris P.; Robbins, Michael E.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To determine whether hippocampal neurons are lost 12 months after middle-aged rats received a fractionated course of whole-brain irradiation (WBI) that is expected to be biologically equivalent to the regimens used clinically in the treatment of brain tumors. Methods and Materials: Twelve-month-old Fischer 344 X Brown Norway male rats were divided into WBI and control (CON) groups (n = 6 per group). Anesthetized WBI rats received 45 Gy of {sup 137}Cs {gamma} rays delivered as 9 5-Gy fractions twice per week for 4.5 weeks. Control rats were anesthetized but not irradiated. Twelve months after WBI completion, all rats were anesthetized and perfused with paraformaldehyde, and hippocampal sections were immunostained with the neuron-specific antibody NeuN. Using unbiased stereology, total neuron number and the volume of the neuronal and neuropil layers were determined in the dentate gyrus, CA3, and CA1 subregions of hippocampus. Results: No differences in tissue integrity or neuron distribution were observed between the WBI and CON groups. Moreover, quantitative analysis demonstrated that neither total neuron number nor the volume of neuronal or neuropil layers differed between the two groups for any subregion. Conclusions: Impairment on a hippocampal-dependent learning and memory test occurs 1 year after fractionated WBI at middle age. The same WBI regimen, however, does not lead to a loss of neurons or a reduction in the volume of hippocampus.

  15. Hydrocephalus in children less than 1 year of age in northern Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Salvador, Sérgio F.; Henriques, João Carlos; Munguambe, Missael; Vaz, Rui M. C.; Barros, Henrique P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In developed countries, the incidence of neonatal hydrocephalus ranges from 3 to 5 cases per 1000 live births, but little is known about the frequency of hydrocephalus in Africa. In Mozambique, there is no primary information related to this disorder, but using the above data, the expected incidence of neonatal hydrocephalus would range from 2900 to 4800 cases per year. Methods: This study is based on 122 children younger than 1 year with neonatal hydrocephalus, followed up between January 2010 and December 2012, their origin and treatment, and aims to evaluate difficulties with diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up in northern Mozambique. Results: Identified cases were mainly less than 6 months old (77%), with severe macrocephaly and the classic stigmata of this condition. A high rate of follow-up loss (44.3%) was detected, particularly among children from more distant locations. Our findings contrast with the expected 1000-1700 cases that would occur in the area during the study period, being considerably lower. Conclusions: Hydrocephalus is a serious problem in sub-Saharan Africa, whose effects can be minimized by a better organization of the health system in hydrocephalus prevention, referral, and follow-up. New management alternatives to provide treatment to more children with this disorder and reduction of the follow-up difficulties caused due to geographical reasons for the children undergoing treatment are essential. PMID:25593759

  16. Attenuated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis functioning predicts accelerated pubertal development in girls 1 year later.

    PubMed

    Saxbe, Darby E; Negriff, Sonya; Susman, Elizabeth J; Trickett, Penelope K

    2015-08-01

    Accelerated pubertal development has been linked to adverse early environments and may heighten subsequent mental and physical health risks. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis functioning has been posited as a mechanism whereby stress may affect pubertal development, but the literature lacks prospective tests of this mechanism. The current study assessed 277 youth (M = 10.84 years, SD = 1.14), 138 boys and 139 girls, who reported on their pubertal development and underwent the Trier Social Stress Test for Children at baseline and returned to the laboratory approximately 1 year later (M = 1.12 years, range = 0.59-1.98 years). For girls, lower cortisol area under the curve (with respect to ground) at Time 1 predicted more advanced pubertal development at Time 2, controlling for Time 1 pubertal development. This association persisted after additional covariates including age, body mass index, race, and maltreatment history were introduced, and was driven by adrenal rather than gonadal development. Cortisol was not linked to boys' subsequent pubertal development, and no interaction by gender or by maltreatment appeared. These results suggest that attenuated cortisol, reported in other studies of children exposed to early adversity, may contribute to accelerated pubertal tempo in girls.

  17. Beyond Earth: Weaving Science and Indigenous Culture - A 1-year NSF Planning Grant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Timothy; Guy, M.; Baker Big-Back, C.; Froelich, K.

    2011-01-01

    We present results of a 1-year NSF planning grant called Beyond Earth. The project is designed to engage Native American, urban, and rural families in science learning while piloting curriculum development and implementation that incorporates both Native and Western epistemologies. Physical, earth, and space science content is juxtaposed with indigenous culture, stories, language and epistemology in after-school programs and teacher training. Project partners include the Dakota Science Center, Fort Berthold Community College, and Sitting Bull College. The Native American tribes represented in this initiative illustrate partnerships between the Dakota, Lakota, Nakota, Hidatsa, Mandan, and Arikara. Over the past year the primary project deliverables include a culturally responsive curriculum Beyond Earth Moon Module, teacher training workshops, a project website. The curriculum module introduces students to the moon's appearance, phases, and positions in the sky using the Night Sky Planetarium Experience Station to explore core concepts underlying moon phases and eclipses using the interactive Nature Experience Station before engaging in the culminating Mission Challenge in which they apply their knowledge to problem solving situations and projects. The Native Science and Western Science activities developed, planetarium explorations created, and website toolkit utilizations are presented.

  18. The influence of weather on human mortality in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Yan, Y Y

    2000-02-01

    This study is the first attempt to investigate mortality seasonality and weather-mortality relationships in Hong Kong from 1980 to 1994. Monthly mortality data from all causes of death, neoplasm, circulatory and respiratory diseases were obtained from the Census and Statistics Department and the weather data were obtained from the Hong Kong Observatory. Regression analyses and ANOVA were employed. Significant winter peaks in sex specific and total deaths from all causes, circulatory and respiratory diseases were ascertained. Cancer mortality, however, was not seasonal. Mortality seasonality only existed in age groups 45-64 and > or =65. For the impact of weather on mortality, no significant relationship between weather variables and cancer mortality was observed. A significant negative association between minimum temperature and a positive relationship between cloud and deaths were found. This suggests that colder and cloudy conditions may heighten mortality. Wind was discovered to have a negative association with mortality. This finding revealed that the stressful effect of wind on mortality was negligible. There was no apparent sex difference. Deaths from the younger age groups (0-24 yr old) were not weather related. Weak weather connection with mortality for age group 25-44 was discovered, with Adj r2 values ranging from 0.05 to 0.07. The elderly (age > or =65) were more vulnerable to weather stress and strong weather-mortality relationship was uncovered, with Adj r2 values from 0.36 to 0.66. These results are important information for formulating public health policies.

  19. Power relations and premature mortality in Spain's autonomous communities.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sanz, Maica; Borrell, Carme; Urbanos, Rosa; Pasarín, M Isabel; Rico, Ana; Fraile, Marta; Ramos, Xavier; Navarro, Vicente

    2003-01-01

    This trends ecological study analyzes, across 17 autonomous communities of Spain from 1989 to 1998, the relationship between mortality (total and by main causes of death) and power relations (type of government: social democratic (SDP), conservative (CDP), and others), labor market variables, welfare state variables, income inequality, absolute income, poverty, and number of civil associations. The authors conducted a descriptive analysis; a bivariate analysis (Pearson correlation coefficients) between mortality and each of the independent variables; and a multivariate analysis, adjusting multilevel linear regression models. All dimensions of the conceptual power relations model were related to premature mortality in the direction hypothesized. The cross-pooled multilevel regression models show that total premature mortality in males, male and female cerebrovascular mortality, male and female cirrhosis mortality, and male lung cancer mortality decreased somewhat more in communities where primary health care reform was implemented more quickly. Premature mortality decreased somewhat more in SDP than in CDP communities for male and female total premature mortality, cerebrovascular mortality, and cirrhosis mortality, and male lung cancer mortality. These results are in accord with earlier studies that found a relationship among health indicators and variables related to labor market, welfare state, income inequalities, civil associations, and power relations.

  20. Significantly greater reduction in breast cancer mortality from post-diagnosis running than walking.

    PubMed

    Williams, Paul T

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of these analyses is to test prospectively whether post-diagnosis running and walking differ significantly in their association with breast cancer mortality. Cox proportional hazard analyses were used to compare breast cancer mortality to baseline exercise energy expenditure (METs, 1 MET-hour ≅1 km run) in 272 runners and 714 walkers previously diagnosed with breast cancer from the National Runners' and Walkers' Health Studies when adjusted for age, race, menopause, family history, breastfeeding and oral contraceptive use. Diagnosis occurred (mean ± SD) 7.9 ± 7.3 years before baseline. Forty-six women (13 runners and 33 walkers) died from breast cancer during 9.1-year mortality surveillance. For the 986 runners and walkers combined, breast cancer mortality decreased an average of 23.9% MET-hours/day [95% confidence interval (CI): 7.9-38.3%; p = 0.004]. There was a significantly greater decrease in risk for running than walking (risk per MET-hours/day run vs. walked: p = 0.03). For the 272 runners analyzed separately, breast cancer mortality decreased an average of 40.9% per MET-hours/day run (95% CI: 19.3-60.0%, p = 0.0004). When analyzed by categories of running energy expenditure, breast cancer mortality was 87.4% lower for the 1.8-3.6 MET-hours/day category (95% CI: 41.3-98.2% lower, p = 0.008) and 95.4% lower for the ≥3.6 MET-hours/day category (95% CI: 71.9-100% lower, p = 0.0004) compared to the <1.07 MET-hours/day category. In contrast, the 714 walkers showed a nonsignificant 4.6% decrease in breast cancer mortality per MET-hours/day walked (95% CI: 27.3% decreased risk to 21.3% increased risk, p = 0.71). These results suggest that post-diagnosis running is associated with significantly lower breast cancer mortality than post-diagnosis walking.

  1. Symmetric Dimethylarginine as Predictor of Graft loss and All-Cause Mortality in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Pihlstrøm, Hege; Mjøen, Geir; Dahle, Dag Olav; Pilz, Stefan; Midtvedt, Karsten; März, Winfried; Abedini, Sadollah; Holme, Ingar; Fellström, Bengt; Jardine, Alan; Holdaas, Hallvard

    2014-01-01

    Background Elevated symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) has been shown to predict cardiovascular events and all cause mortality in diverse populations. The potential role of SDMA as a risk marker in renal transplant recipients (RTR) has not been investigated. Methods We analyzed SDMA in the placebo arm of the Assessment of Lescol in Renal Transplantation study, a randomized controlled trial of fluvastatin in RTR. Mean follow-up was 5.1 years. Patients were grouped into quartiles based on SDMA levels at study inclusion. Relationships between SDMA and traditional risk factors for graft function and all-cause mortality were analyzed in 925 RTR using univariate and multivariate survival analyses. Results In univariate analysis, SDMA was significantly associated with renal graft loss, all-cause death, and major cardiovascular events. After adjustment for established risk factors including estimated glomerular filtration rate, an elevated SDMA-level (4th quartile, >1.38 μmol/L) was associated with renal graft loss; hazard ratio (HR), 5.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.95–15.57; P=0.001, compared to the 1st quartile. Similarly, SDMA in the 4th quartile was independently associated with all-cause mortality (HR, 4.56; 95% CI, 2.15–9.71; P<0.001), and there was a strong borderline significant trend for an association with cardiovascular mortality (HR, 2.86; 95% CI, 0.99–8.21; P=0.051). Conclusion In stable RTR, an elevated SDMA level is independently associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality and renal graft loss. PMID:24999963

  2. Sepsis in intensive care unit patients with traumatic brain injury: factors associated with higher mortality

    PubMed Central

    Cardozo, Luis Carlos Maia; da Silva, Redson Ruy

    2014-01-01

    Objective Patients with traumatic brain injury are particularly susceptible to sepsis, which may exacerbate the systemic inflammatory response and lead to organ dysfunction. The influence of clinical variables on the mortality of intensive care unit patients with traumatic brain injury and sepsis was investigated. Methods The present investigation was a retrospective study involving 175 patients with traumatic brain injury who were treated in a period of 1 year at a reference hospital for trauma and who had sepsis, severe sepsis, or septic shock. Demographic and clinical data were obtained, and the SOFA score was calculated at the time sepsis was found and after 72 hours. Results There was a predominance of young men with severe traumatic brain injury, multiple head injuries, sepsis with a pulmonary focus, prolonged hospital stay, and high mortality (37.7%). Circulatory and respiratory failure had a high incidence, but renal and coagulation failure were less frequent, and liver failure was not observed. After logistic regression, the presence of septic shock and respiratory failure 72 hours after the sepsis diagnosis was associated with higher mortality, with an odds ratio of 7.56 (95%CI=2.04-27.31, p=0.0024) and 6.62 (95%CI=1.93-22.78, p=0.0027), respectively. In addition, there was a higher mortality among patients who had no organ failure on D1 but who developed the condition after 72 hours of sepsis and in those patients who already had organ failure at the time sepsis was diagnosed and remained in this condition after 72 hours. Conclusion Septic shock and progressive organ (particularly respiratory) dysfunction increases the mortality of patients with traumatic brain injury and sepsis. PMID:25028949

  3. Evaluation of the Children at Risk Program: Results 1 Year after the End of the Program. Research in Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, Adele; Cavanagh, Shannon; Sridharan, Sanjeev

    Children at Risk (CAR) was a drug and delinquency prevention program for high-risk adolescents aged 11 to 13 years who lived in narrowly defined, severely distressed neighborhoods in: Austin, Texas; Bridgeport, Connecticut; Memphis, Tennessee; Savannah, Georgia; and Seattle, Washington. CAR delivered integrated services to the 338 young…

  4. Epigenetic Analysis of Neurocognitive Development at 1 year of Age in a Community-Based Pregnancy Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Laura E.; Palmer, Frederick B.; Graff, J. Carolyn; Sutter, Thomas R.; Mozhui, Khyobeni; Hovinga, Collin A.; Thomas, Fridtjof; Park, Vicki; Tylavsky, Frances A.; Adkins, Ronald M.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple studies show that molecular genetic changes and epigenetic modifications affect the risk of cognitive disability or impairment. However, the role of epigenetic variation in cognitive development of neurotypical young children remains largely unknown. Using data from a prospective, community-based study of mother-infant pairs, we investigated the association of DNA methylation patterns in neonatal umbilical cord blood with cognitive and language development at 1 year of age. No CpG loci achieved genome-wide significance, although a small number of weakly suggestive associations with Bayley-III Receptive Communication scales were noted. While umbilical cord blood is a convenient resource for genetic analyses of birth outcomes, our results do not provide conclusive evidence that its use for DNA methylation profiling yields epigenetic markers that are directly related to postnatal neurocognitive outcomes at 1 year of age. PMID:24452678

  5. Mortality of tanners.

    PubMed

    Pippard, E C; Acheson, E D; Winter, P D

    1985-04-01

    The mortality of 833 male tannery workers known to have been employed in the industry in 1939 and who were followed up to the end of 1982 was studied. A total of 573 men had been employed in making leather tanned by vegetable extracts for soles and heels, and 260 men had used chrome tanning to make leather for the upper parts of shoes. No significant excesses of deaths were found for any of the common sites of cancer in either group of workers. One death from nasal cancer (0.21 expected) was reported among the men who worked with sole and heel leather.

  6. Cryoplasty for Occlusive Disease of the Femoropopliteal Arteries: 1-Year Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Korteweg, Mies A.; Gils, Marjon van; Hoedt, Marco T.; Valk, Pieter H. M. van der; Tutein Noltenius, Rudolf P.; Avontuur, Jurgen A.; Bronswijk-Monster, Krien F.; Elgersma, Otto E. H.

    2009-03-15

    Atherosclerosis of femoropopliteal arteries is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) has only limited success in treating these arteries, mainly because of the high rate of recurrent stenosis. Cryoplasty has been proposed as a technique which might improve treatment outcome. This study reports our single-center experience with cryoplasty. Thirty-two claudicants, 33 arteries, in whom conservative therapy failed, were consecutively included. Duplex ultrasound (US), angiography, and ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurement were performed before the procedure; ABI and duplex US, 2 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months after the procedure. Patients' symptoms were categorized according to the Rutherford classification. Lesions were classified as TASC A, B, or C according to angiographic appearance. Differences in ABI before and after the procedure were defined as significant at p < 0.05 by paired t-test. Patency was evaluated using duplex US by determining the peak systolic velocity ratio. Sixteen TASC A lesions, 13 TASC B lesions, and 4 TASC C lesions were included. ABI improved significantly for TASC A lesions 2 weeks and 3 months postprocedure. Patency after 2 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months was 93%, 67%, and 64% for TASC A lesions, 83%, 31%, and 31% for TASC B lesions, and 100%, 50%, and 33% for TASC C lesions, respectively. In conclusion, cryoplasty has good immediate success rates and patency rates similar to the results of conventional PTA in the literature.

  7. Clinical COPD Questionnaire score (CCQ) and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Sundh, Josefin; Janson, Christer; Lisspers, Karin; Montgomery, Scott; Ställberg, Björn

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ) measures health status and can be used to assess health-related quality of life (HRQL). We investigated whether CCQ is also associated with mortality. Methods Some 1111 Swedish primary and secondary care chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients were randomly selected. Information from questionnaires and medical record review were obtained in 970 patients. The Swedish Board of Health and Welfare provided mortality data. Cox regression estimated survival, with adjustment for age, sex, heart disease, and lung function (for a subset with spirometry data, n = 530). Age and sex-standardized mortality ratios were calculated. Results Over 5 years, 220 patients (22.7%) died. Mortality risk was higher for mean CCQ ≥ 3 (37.8% died) compared with mean CCQ < 1 (11.4%), producing an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) (and 95% confidence interval [CI]) of 3.13 (1.98 to 4.95). After further adjustment for 1 second forced expiratory volume (expressed as percent of the European Community for Steel and Coal reference values ), the association remained (HR 2.94 [1.42 to 6.10]). The mortality risk was higher than in the general population, with standardized mortality ratio (and 95% CI) of 1.87 (1.18 to 2.80) with CCQ < 1, increasing to 6.05 (4.94 to 7.44) with CCQ ≥ 3. Conclusion CCQ is predictive of mortality in COPD patients. As HRQL and mortality are both important clinical endpoints, CCQ could be used to target interventions. PMID:23277739

  8. Topographical Differences of Infant Mortality in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Dev, R; Williams, M F; Fitzpatrick, A L; Connell, F A

    2016-01-01

    Background Infant mortality is a major problem in Nepal, particularly in the mountainous region of the country. Objective To identify factors that contributes to the high rate of infant mortality in the mountain zone in Nepal. Method Data were derived from the 2011 Nepal Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS). Infant mortality was analyzed across three ecological zones in a sample of 5,306 live births in the five years preceding the survey. The contribution of risk factors to the excess infant mortality was assessed using multiple logistic regression. Result Infant mortality rate (deaths per 1000 live births) in the ecological zones were 59 (95% CI: 36, 81), 44 (35, 53), and 40 (33, 47) for the mountain, hill and terai zones, respectively. Women living in the mountain zone were more likely to report that distance to care was a "big problem" and had a greater risk of infant mortality compared to the terai zone (OR=1.42, 95% CI: 1.01, 2.02, p=0.04). This increased risk was observed only among births to mothers who perceived distance to the nearest health facility as a "big problem" (aOR=1.57, 95% CI: 1.01, 2.40, p=0.04) controlling for other risk factors. Conclusion These findings suggest that the higher Infant mortality rate (IMR) in the mountain zone was among the women who perceived distance to health facilities as a big problem. Improved accessibility to health services, particularly in this zone, is an essential strategy for reducing infant mortality in Nepal.

  9. Increased cardiovascular mortality following early bilateral oophorectomy

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Cathleen M.; Grossardt, Brandon R.; Rhodes, Deborah J.; Brown, Robert D.; Roger, Véronique L.; Melton, L. Joseph; Rocca, Walter A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the mortality associated with cardiovascular diseases and the effect of estrogen treatment in women who underwent unilateral or bilateral oophorectomy before menopause. Design We conducted a cohort study with long-term follow-up of women in Olmsted County, MN, who underwent either unilateral or bilateral oophorectomy before the onset of menopause from 1950 through 1987. Each member of the oophorectomy cohort was matched by age to a referent woman from the same population who had not undergone any oophorectomy. We studied the mortality associated with cardiovascular disease in a total of 1,274 women with unilateral oophorectomy, 1,091 women with bilateral oophorectomy, and 2,383 referent women. Results Women who underwent unilateral oophorectomy experienced a reduced mortality associated with cardiovascular disease compared with referent women (hazard ratio [HR], 0.82; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67–0.99; P = 0.04). By contrast, women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy before age 45 years experienced an increased mortality associated with cardiovascular disease compared with referent women (HR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.01–2.05; P = 0.04). Within this age stratum, the HR for mortality was significantly elevated in women who were not treated with estrogen through age 45 years or longer (HR, 1.84; 95% CI, 1.27–2.68; P = 0.001) but not in women treated (HR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.30–1.41; P = 0.28; test of interaction, P = 0.01). Mortality was further increased after excluding deaths associated with cerebrovascular causes. Conclusions Bilateral oophorectomy performed before age 45 years is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality, especially with cardiac mortality. However, estrogen treatment may reduce this risk. PMID:19034050

  10. Mortality in Vietnam, 1979-1989.

    PubMed

    Merli, M G

    1998-08-01

    Little is known about past and present mortality in Vietnam, as the first official data on mortality have only recently become available from censuses taken in 1979 and 1989. Using these data, I estimate Vietnamese mortality during the intercensal period using two techniques that rely on age-specific growth rates from two successive age distributions. Intercensal emigration and differential completeness of census enumeration associated with massive outflows of refugees in the wake of the Vietnam War, population-redistribution policies, and a highly mobile population represent important sources of bias for the estimation of intercensal mortality. I incorporate several strategies to minimize bias from these sources and to select the method that is least sensitive to errors associated with them. Life expectancy at birth estimated for the 1979-1989 intercensal period is 61.4 years for males and 63.2 for females. These results suggest a trend of declining mortality between the 1970s and the 1980s and add solid empirical evidence to the debate over whether mortality in Vietnam has been deteriorating or improving.

  11. Social capital, income inequality, and mortality.

    PubMed Central

    Kawachi, I; Kennedy, B P; Lochner, K; Prothrow-Stith, D

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Recent studies have demonstrated that income inequality is related to mortality rates. It was hypothesized, in this study, that income inequality is related to reduction in social cohesion and that disinvestment in social capital is in turn associated with increased mortality. METHODS: In this cross-sectional ecologic study based on data from 39 states, social capital was measured by weighted responses to two items from the General Social Survey: per capita density of membership in voluntary groups in each state and level of social trust, as gauged by the proportion of residents in each state who believed that people could be trusted. Age-standardized total and cause-specific mortality rates in 1990 were obtained for each state. RESULTS: Income inequality was strongly correlated with both per capita group membership (r = -.46) and lack of social trust (r = .76). In turn, both social trust and group membership were associated with total mortality, as well as rates of death from coronary heart disease, malignant neoplasms, and infant mortality. CONCLUSIONS: These data support the notion that income inequality leads to increased mortality via disinvestment in social capital. PMID:9314802

  12. Doctors' strikes and mortality: a review.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Solveig Argeseanu; Mitchell, Kristina; Narayan, K M; Yusuf, Salim

    2008-12-01

    A paradoxical pattern has been suggested in the literature on doctors' strikes: when health workers go on strike, mortality stays level or decreases. We performed a review of the literature during the past forty years to assess this paradox. We used PubMed, EconLit and Jstor to locate all peer-reviewed English-language articles presenting data analysis on mortality associated with doctors' strikes. We identified 156 articles, seven of which met our search criteria. The articles analyzed five strikes around the world, all between 1976 and 2003. The strikes lasted between nine days and seventeen weeks. All reported that mortality either stayed the same or decreased during, and in some cases, after the strike. None found that mortality increased during the weeks of the strikes compared to other time periods. The paradoxical finding that physician strikes are associated with reduced mortality may be explained by several factors. Most importantly, elective surgeries are curtailed during strikes. Further, hospitals often re-assign scarce staff and emergency care was available during all of the strikes. Finally, none of the strikes may have lasted long enough to assess the effects of long-term reduced access to a physician. Nonetheless, the literature suggests that reductions in mortality may result from these strikes.

  13. Naturalization of immigrants and perinatal mortality

    PubMed Central

    Englert, Yvon; Buekens, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Background: Differences in neonatal mortality among immigrants have been documented in Belgium and elsewhere, and these disparities are poorly understood. Our objective was to compare perinatal mortality rates in immigrant mothers according to citizenship status. Methods: This was a population-based study using 2008 data from the Belgian birth register data pertaining to regions of Brussels and Wallonia. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for perinatal mortality according to naturalization status were calculated by logistic regression analyses adjusting for parents’ medical and social characteristics. Results: Four hundred and thirty-seven perinatal deaths were registered among 60 881 births (7.2‰). Perinatal mortality rate varied according to the origin of the mother and her naturalization status: among immigrants, non-naturalized immigrants had a higher incidence of perinatal mortality (10.3‰) than their naturalized counterparts (6.1‰) with an adjusted OR of 2.2, 95% CI (1.1–4.5). Conclusion: In a country with a high frequency of naturalization, and universal access to health care, naturalized immigrant mothers experience less perinatal mortality than their not naturalized counterparts. PMID:22490473

  14. Effects of the integrated Community Case Management of Childhood Illness Strategy on Child Mortality in Ethiopia: A Cluster Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Amouzou, Agbessi; Hazel, Elizabeth; Shaw, Bryan; Miller, Nathan P.; Tafesse, Mengistu; Mekonnen, Yared; Moulton, Lawrence H.; Bryce, Jennifer; Black, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a cluster randomized trial of the effects of the integrated community case management of childhood illness (iCCM) strategy on careseeking for and coverage of correct treatment of suspected pneumonia, diarrhea, and malaria, and mortality among children aged 2–59 months in 31 districts of the Oromia region of Ethiopia. We conducted baseline and endline coverage and mortality surveys approximately 2 years apart, and assessed program strength after about 1 year of implementation. Results showed strong iCCM implementation, with iCCM-trained workers providing generally good quality of care. However, few sick children were taken to iCCM providers (average 16 per month). Difference in differences analyses revealed that careseeking for childhood illness was low and similar in both study arms at baseline and endline, and increased only marginally in intervention (22.9–25.7%) and comparison (23.3–29.3%) areas over the study period (P = 0.77). Mortality declined at similar rates in both study arms. Ethiopia's iCCM program did not generate levels of demand and utilization sufficient to achieve significant increases in intervention coverage and a resulting acceleration in reductions in child mortality. This evaluation has allowed Ethiopia to strengthen its strategic approaches to increasing population demand and use of iCCM services. PMID:26787148

  15. Robot-assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty: minimum 1-year follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Vipul; Thaly, Rahul; Shah, Ketul

    2007-02-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of robotic-assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty. Laparoscopic pyeloplasty has been shown to have a success rate comparable to that of the open surgical approach. However, the steep learning curve has hindered its acceptance into mainstream urologic practice. The introduction of robotic assistance provides advantages that have the potential to facilitate precise dissection and intracorporeal suturing. Methods: A total of 50 patients underwent robotic-assisted laparoscopic dismembered pyeloplasty. A four-trocar technique was used. Most patients were discharged home on day 1, with stent removal at 3 weeks. Patency of the ureteropelvic junction was assessed in all patients with mercaptotriglycylglycine Lasix renograms at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months, then every 6 months for 1 year, and then yearly. Results: Each patient underwent a successful procedure without open conversion or transfusion. The average estimated blood loss was 40 ml. The operative time averaged 122 minutes (range 60 to 330) overall. Crossing vessels were present in 30% of the patients and were preserved in all cases. The time for the anastomosis averaged 20 minutes (range 10 to 100). Intraoperatively, no complications occurred. Postoperatively, the average hospital stay was 1.1 days. The stents were removed at an average of 20 days (range 14 to 28) postoperatively. The average follow-up was 11.7 months; at the last follow-up visit, each patient was doing well. Of the 50 patients, 48 underwent one or more renograms, demonstrating stable renal function, improved drainage, and no evidence of recurrent obstruction. Conclusions: Robotic-assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty is a feasible technique for ureteropelvic junction reconstruction. The procedure provides a minimally invasive alternative with good short-term results.

  16. Deep Sclerectomy With a New Nonabsorbable Uveoscleral Implant (Esnoper-Clip): 1-Year Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Parera-Arranz, Angels; Romera-Romera, Pau; Castellvi-Manent, Jordi; Sabala-Llopart, Antoni; de la Cámara-Hermoso, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To report the safety and the effectiveness of deep sclerectomy (DS) with a new nonabsorbable uveoscleral hema implant (Esnoper-Clip) designed to increase trabecular and uveoscleral outflow and to achieve higher intrascleral blebs. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven eyes of 27 patients with open-angle glaucoma, who underwent DS with an Esnoper-Clip implant, were included in this study. All patients were followed up after 12 months. Results: A significant decrease in intraocular pressure was observed after surgery, changing from a preoperative mean of 26.6±5.2 mm Hg to a postoperative mean of 15.3±5 mm Hg (P<0.001) at 12 months. There was also a significant reduction in the number of glaucoma drugs needed, varying from 2.5 per patient to 0.3 (P<0.001) 1 year after surgery. The main intrascleral lake height and volume at 12 months was 0.7±0.1 mm and 3.9±1.3 mm3, respectively. No intraoperative complications occurred. The main postoperative complications were a positive Seidel test result at 24 hours in 2 eyes (7.4%), hyphema in 2 eyes (7.4%), and choroidal detachment in 1 eye (3.7%). All these complications resolved successfully. The need for additional mitomycin-C injections was recorded in 4 eyes (14.8%), twice in 2 of them. Twelve eyes (44.4%) underwent postsurgical Nd:YAG laser goniopuncture with a mean time between surgery and this procedure of 4.3 months. Mean intraocular pressure after Nd:YAG laser goniopuncture decreased from 19.2 to 15.5 mm Hg (P<0.001). Conclusion: DS with an uveoscleral hema implant (Esnoper-Clip) is a safe and effective technique for the management of open-angle glaucoma. PMID:25836660

  17. Accident mortality among children

    PubMed Central

    Swaroop, S.; Albrecht, R. M.; Grab, B.

    1956-01-01

    The authors present statistics on mortality from accidents, with special reference to those relating to the age-group 1-19 years. For a number of countries figures are given for the proportional mortality from accidents (the number of accident deaths expressed as a percentage of the number of deaths from all causes) and for the specific death-rates, per 100 000 population, from all causes of death, from selected causes, from all causes of accidents, and from various types of accident. From these figures it appears that, in most countries, accidents are becoming relatively increasingly prominent as a cause of death in childhood, primarily because of the conquest of other causes of death—such as infectious and parasitic diseases, which formerly took a heavy toll of children and adolescents—but also to some extent because the death-rate from motor-vehicle accidents is rising and cancelling out the reduction in the rate for other causes of accidental death. In the authors' opinion, further epidemiological investigations into accident causation are required for the purpose of devising quicker and more effective methods of accident prevention. PMID:13383361

  18. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation and Morbidity and Mortality-Related Factors: a 5-Year Experience in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Souza, André Luiz Silveira; Salgado, Constantino González; Mourilhe-Rocha, Ricardo; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Lima, Luciana Cristina Lima Correia; de Mattos, Nelson Durval Ferreira Gomes; Rabischoffsky, Arnaldo; Fagundes, Francisco Eduardo Sampaio; Colafranceschi, Alexandre Siciliano; Carvalho, Luiz Antonio Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation has become an option for high-surgical-risk patients with aortic valve disease. Objective To evaluate the in-hospital and one-year follow-up outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Methods Prospective cohort study of transcatheter aortic valve implantation cases from July 2009 to February 2015. Analysis of clinical and procedural variables, correlating them with in-hospital and one-year mortality. Results A total of 136 patients with a mean age of 83 years (80-87) underwent heart valve implantation; of these, 49% were women, 131 (96.3%) had aortic stenosis, one (0.7%) had aortic regurgitation and four (2.9%) had prosthetic valve dysfunction. NYHA functional class was III or IV in 129 cases (94.8%). The baseline orifice area was 0.67 ± 0.17 cm2 and the mean left ventricular-aortic pressure gradient was 47.3±18.2 mmHg, with an STS score of 9.3% (4.8%-22.3%). The prostheses implanted were self-expanding in 97% of cases. Perioperative mortality was 1.5%; 30-day mortality, 5.9%; in-hospital mortality, 8.1%; and one-year mortality, 15.5%. Blood transfusion (relative risk of 54; p = 0.0003) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (relative risk of 5.3; p = 0.036) were predictive of in-hospital mortality. Peak C-reactive protein (relative risk of 1.8; p = 0.013) and blood transfusion (relative risk of 8.3; p = 0.0009) were predictive of 1-year mortality. At 30 days, 97% of patients were in NYHA functional class I/II; at one year, this figure reached 96%. Conclusion Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was performed with a high success rate and low mortality. Blood transfusion was associated with higher in-hospital and one-year mortality. Peak C-reactive protein was associated with one-year mortality. PMID:27192383

  19. A longitudinal, event-related potential pilot study of adult obsessive-compulsive disorder with 1-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Yamamuro, Kazuhiko; Okada, Koji; Kishimoto, Naoko; Ota, Toyosaku; Iida, Junzo; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Aim Earlier brain imaging research studies have suggested that brain abnormalities in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) normalize as clinical symptoms improve. However, although many studies have investigated event-related potentials (ERPs) in patients with OCD compared with healthy control subjects, it is currently unknown whether ERP changes reflect pharmacological and psychotherapeutic effects. As such, the current study examined the neurocognitive components of OCD to elucidate the pathophysiological abnormalities involved in the disorder, including the frontal-subcortical circuits. Methods The Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale was used to evaluate 14 adult patients with OCD. The present study also included ten age-, sex-, and IQ-matched controls. The P300 and mismatch negativity (MMN) components during an auditory oddball task at baseline for both groups and after 1 year of treatment for patients with OCD were measured. Results Compared with controls, P300 amplitude was attenuated in the OCD group at Cz and C4 at baseline. Pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy treatment for 1 year reduced OCD symptomology. P300 amplitude after 1 year of treatment was significantly increased, indicating normalization compared with baseline at Fz, Cz, C3, and C4. We found no differences in P300 latency, MMN amplitude, or MMN latency between baseline and after one year of treatment. Conclusion ERPs may be a useful tool for evaluating pharmacological and cognitive behavioral therapy in adult patients with OCD. PMID:27713631

  20. Cognitive functions over the course of 1 year in multiple sclerosis patients treated with disease modifying therapies

    PubMed Central

    Utz, Kathrin S.; Lee, De-Hyung; Lämmer, Alexandra; Waschbisch, Anne; Linker, Ralf A.; Schenk, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) are applied to delay or prevent disease progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). While this has mostly been proven for physical symptoms, available studies regarding long-term effects of DMTs on cognitive functions are rare and sometimes inconsistent due to methodological shortcomings. Particularly in the case of fingolimod, comprehensive data on cognitive functions are not yet available. Therefore, we set out to reliably assess cognitive functions in patients with relapsing–remitting MS (RRMS) treated with DMTs over 1 year. Methods: Cognitive functions were assessed with eight tests at three timepoints: baseline, 6-month follow up and 12-month follow up. First, we investigated whether the stability of cognitive functions (i.e. not falling below the 5% cut-off in more than one test) over 1 year in RRMS patients (n = 41) corresponds to the stability in healthy individuals (n = 40) of a previous study. Second, we compared the percentage of declined and improved patients in the different tests. Third, we compared patients treated with fingolimod (n = 22) with patients treated with natalizumab (n = 11) with regard to cognitive stability. Fourth, based on the patient data, the Reliable Change Index was applied to compute cut-offs for reliable cognitive change. Results: Approximately 75% of RRMS patients treated with DMTs remained stable over the course of 1 year. The Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT) and the Spatial Recall Test (SPART), produced improvements in 12.5% and 30.6%, respectively, probably due to practice effects. Patients treated with fingolimod did not differ from patients treated with natalizumab with regard to cognitive stability. Conclusions: Cognitive functions remain relatively stable under DMT treatment over 1 year, irrespective of the type of medication. Furthermore, the tests PASAT and SPART should be interpreted cautiously in studies examining performance changes over time. The provided RCI

  1. Effectiveness of MR Angiography for the Primary Diagnosis of Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Clinical Outcomes at 3 Months and 1 Year

    PubMed Central

    Schiebler, Mark L.; Nagle, Scott K.; François, Christopher J.; Repplinger, Michael D.; Hamedani, Azita G.; Vigen, Karl K.; Yarlagadda, Rajkumar; Grist, Thomas M.; Reeder, Scott B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effectiveness of MR angiography for pulmonary embolism (MRA-PE) in symptomatic patients. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed all patients whom were evaluated for possible pulmonary embolism (PE) using MRA-PE. A 3-month and 1-year from MRA-PE electronic medical record (EMR) review was performed. Evidence for venous thromboembolism (VTE) (or death from PE) within the year of follow-up was the outcome surrogate for this study. Results There were 190 MRA-PE exams performed with 97.4% (185/190) of diagnostic quality. There were 148 patients (120 F: 28 M) that had both a diagnostic MRA-PE exam and 1 complete year of EMR follow-up. There were 167 patients (137 F: 30 M) with 3 months or greater follow-up. We found 83% (139/167) and 81% (120/148) MRA-PE exams negative for PE at 3 months and 1 year, respectively. Positive exams for PE were seen in 14% (23/167). During the 1-year follow-up period, five patients (false negative) were diagnosed with DVT (5/148 = 3.4 %), and one of these patients also experienced a non–life-threatening PE. The negative predictive value (NPV) for MRA-PE was 97% (92–99; 95% CI) at 3 months and 96% (90–98; 95% CI) with 1 year of follow-up. Conclusion The NPV of MRA-PE, when used for the primary diagnosis of pulmonary embolism in symptomatic patients, were found to be similar to the published values for CTA-PE. In addition, the technical success rate and safety of MRA-PE were excellent. PMID:23553735

  2. Mortality and Cause of Death in Patients with Pemphigus.

    PubMed

    Kridin, Khalaf; Zelber-Sagi, Shira; Bergman, Reuven

    2017-01-17

    All-cause and cause-specific mortality among patients with pemphigus compared with the general population is yet to be established. This study investigated overall mortality and cause-specific mortality in a large immunopathologically validated cohort of patients with pemphigus. Mortality of patients with pemphigus was compared with age- and gender-matched control subjects in the general population. All-cause and cause-specific standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were estimated. The study cohort included 245 patients newly-diagnosed with pemphigus between January 1990 and June 2016, contributing 2,679.4 person-years of follow-up. Overall, 48 deaths were observed during a mean follow-up period of 10.9 ± 8.1 years, which was more than twice the number expected (SMR 2.4; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.82-3.20). The SMRs for death due to infections (22.6; 95% CI 13.6-35.3), namely pneumonia (25.7; 95% CI 11.7-48.8) and septicaemia (8.6; 95% CI 1.7-25.0), and due to cardiovascular diseases (2.8; 95% CI 1.0-6.0) were significantly higher than expected. Overall mortality among patients with pemphigus is 2.4-times greater than for the general population, mainly due to infections.

  3. Mortality Dynamics of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Immatures in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Varella, Andrea Corrêa; Menezes-Netto, Alexandre Carlos; Alonso, Juliana Duarte de Souza; Caixeta, Daniel Ferreira; Peterson, Robert K. D.; Fernandes, Odair Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    We characterized the dynamics of mortality factors affecting immature developmental stages of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Multiple decrement life tables for egg and early larval stages of S. frugiperda in maize (Zea mays L.) fields were developed with and without augmentative releases of Telenomus remus Nixon (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae) from 2009 to 2011. Total egg mortality ranged from 73 to 81% and the greatest egg mortality was due to inviability, dislodgement, and predation. Parasitoids did not cause significant mortality in egg or early larval stages and the releases of T. remus did not increase egg mortality. Greater than 95% of early larvae died from predation, drowning, and dislodgment by rainfall. Total mortality due to these factors was largely irreplaceable. Results indicate that a greater effect in reducing generational survival may be achieved by adding mortality to the early larval stage of S. frugiperda. PMID:26098422

  4. Mortality Rates Associated With Odontoid and Subaxial Cervical Spine Fractures.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christopher P; Golinvaux, Nicholas S; Brubacher, Jacob W; Bohl, Daniel D; Deng, Yanhong; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2015-06-01

    Cervical spine fractures can lead to many devastating consequences. However, mortality rates of older individuals with odontoid or subaxial spine fractures have not been definitively established. We conducted a retrospective review of all patients who underwent computed tomography of the cervical spine in the emergency department of a level I trauma center over 9 years to compare mortality rates after odontoid and subaxial fractures in elderly persons with those of the general population. We searched the National Death Index for patient death records, and compared mortality rates at 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years to sex- and age-matched data from the general population. Odontoid fracture survival was 84.4% at 3 months, 82.2% at 1 year, and 72.9% at 2 years. Male survival was significantly worse compared with age- and sex-matched counterparts (P < .001), but female survival was not (P = .568). In subaxial fractures, survival was 87.9% at 3 months and 85.7% at 1 and 2 years. Male survival was decreased compared with age- and sex-matched counterparts (P < .0001), whereas female survival was not (P = .554). In conclusion, the mortality of men with either fracture was greater compared with age-matched men initially, but this normalized. Female survival was not affected by either fracture.

  5. Long-term Survival and Late Effects among 1-year Survivors of Second Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Relapsed Acute Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Christine N.; Majhail, Navneet S.; Brazauskas, Ruta; Wang, Zhiwei; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Frangoul, Haydar A.; Hayashi, Robert J.; Hsu, Jack W.; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Kasow, Kimberly A.; Khera, Nandita; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Loren, Alison W.; Marks, David I.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Mehta, Paulette; Myers, Kasiani C.; Norkin, Maxim; Pidala, Joseph A.; Porter, David L.; Reddy, Vijay; Saber, Wael; Savani, Bipin N.; Schouten, Harry C.; Steinberg, Amir; Wall, Donna A.; Warwick, Anne B.; Wood, William A.; Yu, Lolie C.; Jacobsohn, David A.; Sorror, Mohamed L.

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the outcomes of patients who survived disease-free for 1-year or more following second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for relapsed acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndromes between 1980 and 2009. A total of 1285 patients received a second allogeneic transplant following disease relapse; among these 325 survived relapse-free at 1-year after the second HCT. The median time from first to second HCT was 17 and 24 months for children and adults, respectively. A myeloablative preparative regimen was used in the second transplant in 62% of children and 45% of adult patients. The overall 10-year conditional survival rates after second transplantation in this cohort of patients who had survived disease-free for at least one year were 55% in children and 39% in adults. Relapse was the leading cause of mortality (77% and 54% of deaths in children and adults, respectively). In multivariate analyses, only disease status prior to second HCT was significantly associated with higher risk for overall mortality (HR 1.71 for patients with disease not in complete remission prior to second HCT, P<0.01). Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) developed in 43% and 75% of children and adults following second transplant. Chronic GVHD was the leading cause of non-relapse mortality followed by organ failure and infection. The cumulative incidence of developing at least one of the studied late effects at 10-years after second HCT was 63% in children and 55% in adults. The most frequent late effects in children were growth disturbance (10-year cumulative incidence 22%) and cataracts (20%), and in adults were cataracts (20%) and avascular necrosis (13%). Among patients with acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes who receive a second allogeneic HCT for relapse and survive disease-free for at least 1-year, many can be expected to survive long term. However, they continue to be at risk for relapse and non-relapse morbidity and mortality. Novel approaches

  6. Storage time of red blood cells and mortality of transfusion recipients.

    PubMed

    Middelburg, Rutger A; van de Watering, Leo M G; Briët, Ernest; van der Bom, Johanna G

    2013-01-01

    Storage of red cells and the associated storage lesion have been suggested to contribute to adverse clinical outcomes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether increasing storage time of red cells is associated with mortality of recipients. From all patients who received red cell transfusions between January 2005 and May 2009, in the Leiden University Medical Center, we selected those who received only-young or only-old red cells, defined as below or above the median storage time. Mortality was compared in a Cox regression model. Subsequently, similar comparisons were made between subgroups with increasing contrast between old and young red cells. Among adult patients, after correction for potential confounders, the hazard ratio of death within 1 year after receiving red cells stored for more than 17 days compared with 17 days or less was 0.98 (95% confidence interval, 0.83-1.2). With increasing contrast, the hazard ratio decreased to 0.56 (95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.97) for red cells stored for more than 24 days compared with less than 10 days. In contrast to what has previously been suggested, we find an almost 2-fold increase in mortality rate after the transfusion of fresh red cells compared with old red cells. Results dependent on analyses chosen and previous studies may not have used optimal analyses. The tendency to demand ever-fresher blood could actually be detrimental for at least some patient groups.

  7. Mortality among a cohort of uranium mill workers: an update

    PubMed Central

    Pinkerton, L; Bloom, T; Hein, M; Ward, E

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the mortality experience of 1484 men employed in seven uranium mills in the Colorado Plateau for at least one year on or after 1 January 1940. Methods: Vital status was updated through 1998, and life table analyses were conducted. Results: Mortality from all causes and all cancers was less than expected based on US mortality rates. A statistically significant increase in non-malignant respiratory disease mortality and non-significant increases in mortality from lymphatic and haematopoietic malignancies other than leukaemia, lung cancer, and chronic renal disease were observed. The excess in lymphatic and haematopoietic cancer mortality was due to an increase in mortality from lymphosarcoma and reticulosarcoma and Hodgkin's disease. Within the category of non-malignant respiratory disease, mortality from emphysema and pneumoconioses and other respiratory disease was increased. Mortality from lung cancer and emphysema was higher among workers hired prior to 1955 when exposures to uranium, silica, and vanadium were presumably higher. Mortality from these causes of death did not increase with employment duration. Conclusions: Although the observed excesses were consistent with our a priori hypotheses, positive trends with employment duration were not observed. Limitations included the small cohort size and limited power to detect a moderately increased risk for some outcomes of interest, the inability to estimate individual exposures, and the lack of smoking data. Because of these limitations, firm conclusions about the relation of the observed excesses in mortality and mill exposures are not possible. PMID:14691274

  8. Allometric scaling of mortality rates with body mass in abalones.

    PubMed

    Rossetto, Marisa; De Leo, Giulio A; Bevacqua, Daniele; Micheli, Fiorenza

    2012-04-01

    The existence of an allometric relationship between mortality rates and body mass has been theorized and extensively documented across taxa. Within species, however, the allometry between mortality rates and body mass has received substantially less attention and the consistency of such scaling patterns at the intra-specific level is controversial. We reviewed 73 experimental studies to examine the relationship between mortality rates and body size among seven species of abalone (Haliotis spp.), a marine herbivorous mollusk. Both in the field and in the laboratory, log-transformed mortality rates were negatively correlated with log-transformed individual body mass for all species considered, with allometric exponents remarkably similar among species. This regular pattern confirms previous findings that juvenile abalones suffer higher mortality rates than adult individuals. Field mortality rates were higher overall than those measured in the laboratory, and the relationship between mortality and body mass tended to be steeper in field than in laboratory conditions for all species considered. These results suggest that in the natural environment, additional mortality factors, especially linked to predation, could significantly contribute to mortality, particularly at small body sizes. On the other hand, the consistent allometry of mortality rates versus body mass in laboratory conditions suggests that other sources of mortality, beside predation, are size-dependent in abalone.

  9. Increased Cardiovascular Events and Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: 1 Year Prospective Single Centre Study

    PubMed Central

    Ruscitti, Piero; Cipriani, Paola; Masedu, Francesco; Romano, Silvio; Berardicurti, Onorina; Liakouli, Vasiliki; Carubbi, Francesco; Di Benedetto, Paola; Alvaro, Saverio; Penco, Maria; Valenti, Marco; Giacomelli, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Several studies showed the close relationship between Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and cerebro-cardiovascular events (CVEs) and subclinical atherosclerosis. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis during the course of RA and we evaluated the possible role of both traditional cardiovascular (CV) and disease related risk factors to predict the occurrence of new CVEs and the onset of subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods We designed a single centre, bias-adjusted, prospective, observational study to investigate, in a homogeneous subset of RA patients, the occurrence of new onset of CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis. Statistical analyses were performed to evaluate the role of traditional CV and disease-related risk factors to predict the occurrence of new CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis. Results We enrolled 347 RA patients prospectively followed for 12 months. An increased percentage of patients experienced CVEs, developed subclinical atherosclerosis and was affected by systemic arterial hypertension (SAH), type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome (MS), at the end of follow up. Our analysis showed that the insurgence of both SAH and MS, during the follow up, the older age, the CVE familiarity and the lack of clinical response, were associated with a significantly increased risk to experience CVEs and to develop subclinical atherosclerosis. Conclusions Our study quantifies the increased expected risk for CVEs in a cohort of RA patients prospectively followed for 1 year. The occurrence of both new CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis in RA patients may be explained by inflammatory burden as well as traditional CV risk factors. PMID:28103312

  10. Impact of universal varicella vaccination on 1-year-olds in Uruguay: 1997–2005

    PubMed Central

    Quian, J; Rüttimann, R; Romero, C; Dall’Orso, P; Cerisola, A; Breuer, T; Greenberg, M; Verstraeten, T

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Varicella vaccination was introduced at the end of 1999 into the Uruguayan immunisation schedule for children aged 12 months. Varilrix (Oka strain; GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals) has been the only vaccine used since then and coverage has been estimated to exceed 90% since the start of the universal varicella vaccination programme. We assessed the impact of the Uruguayan varicella vaccination programme during 2005, 6 years after its introduction. Methods: Information on hospitalisations was collected from the main paediatric referral hospital and information on medical consultations for varicella was collected from two private health insurance systems in Montevideo. The proportion of hospitalisations due to varicella and the proportion of ambulatory visits for varicella since the introduction of the vaccine were compared between 1999 and 2005 and 1997 and 1999 in the following age groups: <1 year, 1–4 years, 5–9 years and 10–14 years. Results: By 2005, the proportion of hospitalisations due to varicella among children, was reduced by 81% overall and by 63%, 94%, 73% and 62% in the <1, 1–4, 5–9 and 10–14 years age groups, respectively. The incidence of ambulatory visits for varicella among children was reduced by 87% overall and by 80%, 97%, 81% and 65% in the <1, 1–4, 5–9 and 10–14 years age groups, respectively. Conclusions: The burden of varicella has decreased substantially in Uruguayan children since the introduction of the varicella vaccination, including those groups outside the recommended vaccination age. It is expected to decrease further as more cohorts of children are vaccinated and herd immunity increases. PMID:18456699

  11. PM2.5 chemical composition in five European Mediterranean cities: A 1-year study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salameh, Dalia; Detournay, Anais; Pey, Jorge; Pérez, Noemi; Liguori, Francesca; Saraga, Dikaia; Bove, Maria Chiara; Brotto, Paolo; Cassola, Federico; Massabò, Dario; Latella, Aurelio; Pillon, Silvia; Formenton, Gianni; Patti, Salvatore; Armengaud, Alexandre; Piga, Damien; Jaffrezo, Jean Luc; Bartzis, John; Tolis, Evangelos; Prati, Paolo; Querol, Xavier; Wortham, Henri; Marchand, Nicolas

    2015-03-01

    The seasonal and spatial characteristics of PM2.5 and its chemical composition in the Mediterranean Basin have been studied over a 1-year period (2011-2012) in five European Mediterranean cities: Barcelona (BCN), Marseille (MRS), Genoa (GEN), Venice (VEN), and Thessaloniki (THE). During the year under study, PM10 annual mean concentration ranged from 23 to 46 μg m- 3, while the respective PM2.5 ranged from 14 to 37 μg m- 3, with the highest concentrations observed in THE and VEN. Both cities presented an elevated number of exceedances of the PM10 daily limit value, as 32% and 20% of the days exceeded 50 μg m- 3, respectively. Similarly, exceedances of the WHO guidelines for daily PM2.5 concentrations (25 μg m- 3) were also more frequent in THE with 78% of the days during the period, followed by VEN with 39%. The lowest PM levels were measured in GEN. PM2.5 exhibited significant seasonal variability, with much higher winter concentrations for VEN and MRS, in fall for THE and in spring for BCN. PM2.5 chemical composition was markedly different even for similar PM2.5 levels. On annual average, PM2.5 was dominated by OM except in THE. OM contribution was higher in Marseille (42%), while mineral matter was the most abundant constituent in THE (32%). Moreover, PM2.5 relative mean composition during pollution episodes (PM2.5 > 25 μg m- 3) as well as the origins of the exceedances were also investigated. Results outline mainly the effect of NO3- being the most important driver and highlight the non-negligible impact of atmospheric mixing and aging processes during pollution episodes.

  12. Estrogen Plus Progestin and Colorectal Cancer Incidence and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Michael S.; Chlebowski, Rowan T.; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Johnson, Karen C.; Muskovitz, Andrew; Kato, Ikuko; Young, Alicia; Hubbell, F. Allan; Prentice, Ross L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose During the intervention phase in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) clinical trial, use of estrogen plus progestin reduced the colorectal cancer diagnosis rate, but the cancers were found at a substantially higher stage. To assess the clinical relevance of the findings, analyses of the influence of combined hormone therapy on colorectal cancer incidence and colorectal cancer mortality were conducted after extended follow-up. Patients and Methods The WHI study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial involving 16,608 postmenopausal women with an intact uterus who were randomly assigned to daily 0.625 mg conjugated equine estrogen plus 2.5 mg medroxyprogesterone acetate (n = 8,506) or matching placebo (n = 8,102). Colorectal cancer diagnosis rates and colorectal cancer mortality were assessed. Results After a mean of 5.6 years (standard deviation [SD], 1.03 years) of intervention and 11.6 years (SD, 3.1 years) of total follow-up, fewer colorectal cancers were diagnosed in the combined hormone therapy group compared with the placebo group (diagnoses/year, 0.12% v 0.16%; hazard ratio [HR], 0.72; 95% CI, 0.56 to 0.94; P = .014). Bowel screening examinations were comparable between groups throughout. Cancers in the combined hormone therapy group more commonly had positive lymph nodes (50.5% v 28.6%; P < .001) and were at higher stage (regional or distant, 68.8% v 51.4%; P = .003). Although not statistically significant, there was a higher number of colorectal cancer deaths in the combined hormone therapy group (37 v 27 deaths; 0.04% v 0.03%; HR, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.78 to 2.11; P = .320). Conclusion The findings, suggestive of diagnostic delay, do not support a clinically meaningful benefit for combined hormone therapy on colorectal cancer. PMID:23008295

  13. An Analysis of 1-Year Impacts of Youth Transition Demonstration Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraker, Thomas M.; Luecking, Richard G.; Mamun, Arif A.; Martinez, John M.; Reed, Deborah S.; Wittenburg, David C.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the impacts of the Youth Transition Demonstration, an initiative of the Social Security Administration (SSA) to improve employment outcomes for youth with disabilities. Based on a random assignment design, the analysis uses data from a 1-year follow-up survey and SSA administrative records for 5,203 youth in six research…

  14. Latent Classes of Adolescent Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Predict Functioning and Disorder after 1 Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayer, Lynsay; Danielson, Carla Kmett; Amstadter, Ananda B.; Ruggiero, Ken; Saunders, Ben; Kilpatrick, Dean

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To identify latent classes of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in a national sample of adolescents, and to test their associations with PTSD and functional impairment 1 year later. Method: A total of 1,119 trauma-exposed youth aged 12 through 17 years (mean = 14.99 years, 51% female and 49% male) participating in the…

  15. Verbal Labels Modulate Perceptual Object Processing in 1-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gliga, Teodora; Volein, Agnes; Csibra, Gergely

    2010-01-01

    Whether verbal labels help infants visually process and categorize objects is a contentious issue. Using electroencephalography, we investigated whether possessing familiar or novel labels for objects directly enhances 1-year-old children's neural processes underlying the perception of those objects. We found enhanced gamma-band (20-60 Hz)…

  16. The Stability and Structure of Career Decision-Making Profiles: A 1-Year Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gati, Itamar; Levin, Nimrod

    2012-01-01

    The Career Decision-Making Profile (CDMP) questionnaire is a multidimensional measure of the way individuals make career decisions, developed as an alternative to the single, most-dominant trait approach. Using a sample of freshmen students, the 2-week reliability (N = 273) and 1-year stability (N = 182) of the CDMP was tested for each of the 12…

  17. 29 CFR 2530.204-1 - Year of participation for benefit accrual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR EMPLOYEE PENSION BENEFIT PLANS UNDER THE EMPLOYEE... BENEFIT PLANS Participation, Vesting and Benefit Accrual § 2530.204-1 Year of participation for benefit... requirements relating to benefit accrual under a defined benefit pension plan. Some of these requirements...

  18. Thai Adolescent Survivors 1 Year after the 2004 Tsunami: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuicomepee, Arunya; Romano, John L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the impact of the 2004 Asian tsunami on 400 Thai adolescents 1 year after the disaster. Quantitative analyses showed that youth behavior problems were positively associated with tsunami experiences and negatively associated with positive family functioning. Tsunami exposure, school connectedness, religious beliefs and…

  19. Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder: A 1-Year Open Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Tina R.; Axelson, David A.; Birmaher, Boris; Brent, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To describe an adapted version of dialectical behavior therapy for adolescents with bipolar disorder. Method: The dialectical behavior therapy intervention is delivered over 1 year and consists of two modalities: family skills training (conducted with individual family units) and individual therapy. The acute treatment period (6 months)…

  20. A Program To Promote Positive Body Image: A 1-Year Follow-Up Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McVey, Gail L.; Davis, Ron

    2002-01-01

    Evaluated the effectiveness of a program designed to promote body image satisfaction and prevent eating problems in young adolescent girls over a 1-year period. Found no program effect. Found instead, significant increases in body image satisfaction and decreases in eating problem scores over time for participants in both the prevention and…

  1. Outpatient treated burns in infants younger than 1 year in Helsinki during 2005-2009.

    PubMed

    Laitakari, Elina; Koljonen, Virve; Pyörälä, Sari; Rintala, Risto

    2014-05-01

    In general, voluminous data exists concerning burns in children, but the data focusing specially on children less than 1 year of age is sporadic. We therefore focused on examining the special features of burns in children less than 1 year of age. A retrospective study of all outpatient treated burn patients <1 year old at the Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Helsinki, Finland, from January 2005 to December 2009 was performed. During the 5-year period we identified 106 outpatient treated infants with burns, representing 15% of all pediatric burns during the study period. The majority was male and aged 9-12 months. Most of the burns occurred at home, and in most cases a caregiver was present in the injury room. Scalds were the most common type of injury followed by contact burns. The most common source of scald was from cups containing hot drink, and the most common source of contact burn was hot stoves or oven doors. Special attention needs to be targeted toward the prevention of burns in children less than 1 year of age. The majority of the injuries could have been prevented with more vigilance.

  2. Relationship between tongue strength and 1-year life expectancy in elderly people needing nursing care.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Yuri; Kikutani, Takeshi; Tamura, Fumiyo; Yoshida, Mitsuyoshi

    2017-01-05

    Tongue strength is a useful indicator of oral function and has been found to decrease with aging and reduced physical functioning. The present study aimed to assess the relationships of tongue strength with physical function, mental function, and nutritional status, and also between these factors and 1-year outcomes, to determine whether tongue strength is related to life expectancy in elderly people needing nursing care. The subjects were 140 elderly individuals requiring needing nursing care (49 men and 91 women; ≥65 years). The investigated items included sex, age, activities of daily living (ADL), comorbidity, cognitive function, nutritional status, eating function, occlusal support, and tongue strength. Furthermore, a follow-up study was conducted 1 year later, and factors related to death were identified. The mean tongue strength of the total 140 subjects was 20.3 ± 8.6 kPa. Tongue strength was assessed relative to each of the investigated items, using the t test and one-way analysis of variance. Tongue strength was significantly related to ADL, comorbidity, cognitive function, calf circumference, food intake, and occlusal support. Fifteen subjects were found to have died at the 1-year follow-up study. We assessed the relationships of 1-year outcomes with each of the factors examined, and 1-year outcomes were found to be significantly related to ADL and tongue strength.

  3. Early retirement and mortality in Germany.

    PubMed

    Kühntopf, Stephan; Tivig, Thusnelda

    2012-02-01

    Differences in mortality by retirement age have an important impact on the financing of pension insurance, yet no clear-cut results for Germany exist so far. We calculate mortality rates by retirement age from microdata on all German old-age pensioners and 1.84 million deceases. The life expectancies and survival probabilities at age 65 are estimated for population subgroups according to creditable periods because of disease and pension income. Early-retired men who reach the age of 65 years live significantly longer the later early retirement occurs; the life expectancy at age 65 ranges from 13 to 17.8 years. For each retirement age, mortality of men is higher the more periods of disease are credited in the pension insurance system. For a given length of credited periods of disease, mortality of early retirees decreases with the retirement age. 'Healthy worker selection effects' operating in the labour market may contribute to these results. The 'work longer, live longer'-result is found for each pension income quintile, which resolves the J-curve pattern found in the literature. The mortality of female old-age pensioners varies little with retirement age.

  4. Understanding Trends in Kidney Function 1 Year after Kidney Transplant in the United States.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yihung; Tilea, Anca; Gillespie, Brenda; Shahinian, Vahakn; Banerjee, Tanushree; Grubbs, Vanessa; Powe, Neil; Rios-Burrows, Nilka; Pavkov, Meda; Saran, Rajiv

    2017-03-07

    Lower eGFR 1 year after kidney transplant is associated with shorter allograft and patient survival. We examined how practice changes in the past decade correlated with time trends in average eGFR at 1 year after kidney transplant in the United States in a cohort of 189,944 patients who received a kidney transplant between 2001 and 2013. We calculated the average eGFR at 1 year after transplant for the recipient cohort of each year using the appropriate Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation depending on the prevailing methodology of creatinine measurement, and used linear regression to model the effects of practice changes on the national post-transplant eGFR trend. Between the 2001-2005 period and the 2011-2013 period, average 1-year post-transplant eGFR remained essentially unchanged, with differences of 1.34 (95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 1.65) ml/min per 1.73 m(2) and 0.66 (95% confidence interval, 0.32 to 1.01) ml/min per 1.73 m(2) among deceased and living donor kidney transplant recipients, respectively. Over time, the mean age of recipients increased and more marginal organs were used; adjusting for these trends unmasked a larger temporal improvement in post-transplant eGFR. However, changes in immunosuppression practice had a positive effect on average post-transplant eGFR and balanced out the negative effect of recipient/donor characteristics. In conclusion, average 1-year post-transplant eGFR remained stable, despite increasingly unfavorable attributes in recipients and donors. With an aging ESRD population and continued organ shortage, preservation of average post-transplant eGFR will require sustained improvement in immunosuppression and other aspects of post-transplant care.

  5. Inhaled /sup 147/Pm and/or total-body gamma radiation: Early mortality and morbidity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Filipy, R.E.; Lauhala, K.E.; McGee, D.R.; Cannon, W.C.; Buschbom, R.L.; Decker, J.R.; Kuffel, E.G.; Park, J.F.; Ragan, H.A.; Yaniv, S.S.; Scott, B.R.

    1989-05-01

    Rats were given doses of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation and/or lung burdens of /sup 147/Pm (in fused aluminosilicate particles) within lethal ranges in an experiment to determine and compare morbidity and mortality responses for the radiation insults within 1 year after exposure. Radiation-induced morbidity was assessed by measuring changes in body weights, hematologic parameters, and pulmonary-function parameters. Acute mortality and morbidity from inhaled promethium were caused primarily by radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis that occurred more than 53 days after exposure. Acute mortality and morbidity from total-body gamma irradiation occurred within 30 days of exposure and resulted from the bone-marrow radiation syndrome. Gamma radiation caused transient morbidity, reflected by immediately depressed blood cell levels and by reduced body weight gain in animals that survived the acute gamma radiation syndrome. Inhaled promethium caused a loss of body weight and diminished pulmonary function, but its only effect on blood cell levels was lymphocytopenia. Combined gamma irradiation and promethium lung burdens were synergistic, in that animals receiving both radiation insults had higher morbidity and mortality rates than would be predicted based on the effect of either kind of radiation alone. Promethium lung burdens enhanced the effect of gamma radiation in rats within the first 30 days of exposure, and gamma radiation enhanced the later effect of promethium lung burdens. 70 refs., 68 figs., 21 tabs.

  6. Association of Single vs. Dual Chamber ICDs with Mortality, Readmissions and Complications among Patients Receiving an ICD for Primary Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Pamela N; Varosy, Paul D; Heidenreich, Paul A; Wang, Yongfei; Dewland, Thomas A; Curtis, Jeptha P; Go, Alan S; Greenlee, Robert T; Magid, David J; Normand, Sharon-Lise T; Masoudi, Frederick A

    2013-01-01

    Importance Randomized trials of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) for primary prevention predominantly employed single chamber devices. In clinical practice, patients often receive dual chamber ICDs, even without clear indications for pacing. The outcomes of dual versus single chamber devices are uncertain. Objective Compare outcomes of single and dual chamber ICDs for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death. Design, Setting, and Participants Retrospective cohort study. Admissions in the National Cardiovascular Data Registry’s (NCDR®) ICD Registry™ from 2006–2009 that could be linked to CMS fee for service Medicare claims data were identified. Patients were included if they received an ICD for primary prevention and did not have a documented indication for pacing. Main Outcome Measures Adjusted risks of 1-year mortality, all-cause readmission, HF readmission and device-related complications within 90 days were estimated with propensity-score matching based on patient, clinician and hospital factors. Results Among 32,034 patients, 38% (n=12,246) received a single chamber device and 62% (n=19,788) received a dual chamber device. In a propensity-matched cohort, rates of complications were lower for single chamber devices (3.5% vs. 4.7%; p<0.001; risk difference −1.20; 95% CI −1.72, −0.69), but device type was not significantly associated with mortality or hospitalization outcomes (unadjusted rate 9.9% vs. 9.8%; HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.91–1.07; p=0.792 for 1-year mortality; unadjusted rate 43.9% vs. 44.8%; HR 1.00, 95% CI 0.97–1.04; p=0.821 for 1-year all-cause hospitalization; unadjusted rate 14.7% vs. 15.4%; HR 1.05, 95% CI 0.99–1.12; p=0.189 for 1-year HF hospitalization). Conclusions and Relevance Among patients receiving an ICD for primary prevention without indications for pacing, the use of a dual chamber device compared with a single chamber device was associated with a higher risk of device-related complications but not with

  7. Mortality and immunological recovery among older adults on antiretroviral therapy at a large urban HIV clinic in Kampala, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Semeere, Aggrey Semwendero; Lwanga, Isaac; Sempa, Joseph; Parikh, Sujal; Nakasujja, Noeline; Cumming, Robert; Kambugu, Andrew; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet

    2014-01-01

    Background We describe older (> 50 years) HIV-infected adults after ART initiation, evaluating immunological recovery by age category, considering individual trajectories based on the pre-treatment CD4. We also describe mortality on ART and its risk factors by age category including the contribution of poor immunological recovery at a large urban clinic in Kampala, Uganda. Methods We performed a cohort analysis of adult (>18 years) HIV-infected patients who initiated ART between January 1, 2004 and January 3, 2012. Immunological response was evaluated using mixed-effects linear regression. We described mortality using Kaplan Meier survival methods analyzing for risk factors of mortality using multivariate Weibull survival regression stratified by age category. Results Among 9,806 individuals who initiated ART, mean age was 37 years (S.D 8.8), average follow-up 5.7 years (S.D 1.7) and median baseline CD4 was 115 cells/mm3 (IQR; 42-184). Adults <50 years had on average a higher CD4 increase of 45 cells/mm3 (95% CI; 17, 72, p=0.001) compared to counterparts aged ≥ 60 years. Mortality was highest among older adults compared to younger counterparts. Only CD4 count <100 cells/mm3 after 1 year on ART and a CD4 count less than baseline were associated with a statistically significant higher rate of death among older adults. Conclusion Older adults had a slower immunological response which was associated with mortality, but this mortality was not typically associated with opportunistic infections. Future steps would require more evaluation of possible causes of death among these older individuals if survival on ART is to be further improved. PMID:25171733

  8. Gender-related risk factors improve mortality predictive ability of VACS Index among HIV-infected women

    PubMed Central

    COHEN, Mardge H; HOTTON, Anna L; HERSHOW, Ronald C; LEVINE, Alexandra; BACCHETTI, Peter; GOLUB, Elizabeth T.; ANASTOS, Kathryn; YOUNG, Mary; GUSTAFSON, Deborah; WEBER, Kathleen M

    2015-01-01

    Background Adding gender-related modifiable characteristics or behaviors to the Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS) Index might improve the accuracy of predicting mortality among HIV-infected women on treatment. We evaluated the VACS Index in women with HIV, determined whether additional variables would improve mortality prediction, and quantified the potential for improved survival associated with reduction in these additional risk factors. Methods The VACS Index (based on age, CD4 count, HIV-1 RNA, hemoglobin, AST, ALT, platelets, creatinine and Hepatitis C status) was validated in HIV-infected women in the Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) who initiated antiretroviral therapy (ART) between January 1996 and December 2007. Models were constructed adding race, depression, abuse, smoking, substance use, transactional sex, and comorbidities to determine whether predictability improved. Population attributable fractions were calculated. Results The VACS Index accurately predicted 5-year mortality in 1057 WIHS women with 1 year on HAART with c-index 0.83 (95% CI 0.79–0.87). In multivariate analysis, the VACS Index score (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] for 5-point increment 1.30; 95% CI 1.25–1.35), depressive symptoms (aHR 1.73; 95% CI 1.17–2.56) and history of transactional sex (aHR 1.93; 95% CI 1.33–1.82) were independent statistically significant predictors of mortality. Conclusions Including depression and transactional sex significantly improved the performance of the VACS Index in predicting mortality among HIV-infected women. Providing treatment for depression and addressing economic and psychosocial instability in HIV infected women would improve health and perhaps point to a broader public health approach to reducing HIV mortality. PMID:26284531

  9. Risk of Recurrent Helicobacter pylori Infection 1 Year After Initial Eradication Therapy in 7 Latin American Communities

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Douglas R.; Torres, Javier; Sexton, Rachael; Herrero, Rolando; Salazar-Martínez, Eduardo; Robert Greenberg, E.; Bravo, Luis Eduardo; Dominguez, Ricardo L.; Ferreccio, Catterina; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo C.; Meza-Montenegro, Maria Mercedes; Peña, Edgar M.; Peña, Rodolfo; Correa, Pelayo; Martínez, María Elena; Chey, William D.; Valdivieso, Manuel; Anderson, Garnet L.; Goodman, Gary E.; Crowley, John J.; Baker, Laurence H.

    2013-01-01

    Importance The long-term effectiveness of Helicobacter pylori eradication programs for preventing gastric cancer will depend on recurrence risk and individual and community factors. Objective To estimate risk of H pylori recurrence and assess factors associated with successful eradication 1 year after treatment. Design, Setting, and Participants Cohort analysis of 1463 randomized trial participants aged 21 to 65 years from 7 Latin American communities, who were treated for H pylori and observed between September 2009 and July 2011. Interventions Randomization to 1 of 3 treatment groups: 14-day lansoprazole, amoxicillin, and clarithromycin (triple therapy); 5-day lansoprazole and amoxicillin followed by 5-day lansoprazole, clarithromycin, and metronidazole (sequential); or 5-day lansoprazole, amoxicillin, clarithromycin, and metronidazole (concomitant). Participants with a positive (13) C-urea breath test (UBT) 6 to 8 weeks posttreatment were offered voluntary re-treatment with 14-day bismuth-based quadruple therapy. Measurements Recurrent infection after a negative posttreatment UBT and factors associated with successful eradication at 1-year follow-up. Results Among participants with UBT-negative results who had a 1-year follow-up UBT (n=1091), 125 tested UBT positive, a recurrence risk of 11.5% (95% CI, 9.6%–13.5%). Recurrence was significantly associated with study site (P=.03), nonadherence to initial therapy (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.94; 95% CI, 1.31–6.13; P=.01), and children in the household (AOR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.01–1.35 per child; P=.03). Of the 281 with positive posttreatment UBT results, 138 completed re-treatment, of whom 93 tested UBT negative at 1 year. Among the 1340 who had a 1-year UBT, 80.4% (95% CI, 76.4%–83.9%), 79.8% (95% CI, 75.8%–83.5%), and 77.8% (95% CI, 73.6%–81.6%) had UBT-negative results in the triple, sequential, and concomitant groups, respectively (P=.61), with 79.3% overall effectiveness (95% CI, 77.1%–81.5%). In a

  10. Chief Complaint at Admission Relates to Troponin Level and Mortality in Patients With Non-ACS Troponin Elevation

    PubMed Central

    Piscator, Eva; Lowing Svensson, Lukas; Svensson, Per

    2015-01-01

    Background Elevated level of troponin T (TnT) in the absence of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) can be caused by a number of conditions but the relevance of the chief complaint at admission for TnT level and prognosis has not been reported previously. The aim was to study whether TnT level differs among chief complaints or underlying causes in patients with non-ACS TnT elevation and if these factors predict mortality. Methods Patients admitted with TnT elevation were categorized as ACS or non-ACS and followed for 1 year. Statistical comparisons between different chief complaints and underlying causes were performed. Results Patients with non-ACS TnT elevation (n = 71) were less likely to present with chest pain compared to ACS (n = 50) (37% vs. 74%, P < 0.001) whereas dyspnea (25%), syncope/arrhythmia (14%) or other chief complaints (24%) were more common. Patients with dyspnea and other chief complaints had higher peak values of TnT compared to chest pain (P < 0.05). The most common peak occurred within 3 hours after admission for chest pain, dyspnea and other chief complaints whereas for arrhythmia it occurred after 3 - 9 hours (P < 0.01). A peak value > 15 hours after admission was only observed among dyspnea and other chief complaints. Mortality was higher in patients presenting with dyspnea (50%) or other causes (35%) compared to chest pain (8%) or syncope/arrhythmia (10%) (P < 0.05). Renal failure was the only underlying cause that predicted mortality. Conclusion Among patients with non-ACS TnT elevation, patients presenting with dyspnea had higher TnT and higher 1-year mortality, whereas patients with chest pain were at lower risk. PMID:25883711

  11. Predictors of Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) and work status after 1 year in patients with subacromial shoulder pain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Shoulder pain is a common complaint in primary health care and has an unfavourable outcome in many patients. The objectives were to identify predictors for pain and disability (SPADI) and work status in patients with subacromial shoulder pain. Methods Secondary analyses of data from a randomized clinical controlled trial were performed. Outcome measures were the absolute values of the combined Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) and work status 1 year after treatment with supervised exercises (SE) or radial extracorporeal shockwave therapy (rESWT). Predictors of outcome were investigated using multiple linear regression (SPADI) and logistic regression (work status). Results 104 patients were included. Low education (≤ 12 years), previous shoulder pain, and a high baseline SPADI score predicted poor results with these variables explaining 29.9% of the variance in SPADI score at 1 year. Low education and poor self-reported health status predicted a work status of "not working": Odds Ratio, OR = 4.3(95% CI (1.3 to 14.9)), p = 0.02 for education, and OR = 1.06 (95% CI (1.0 to 1.1)), p = 0.001 for self-reported health status, respectively. Adjustments for age, gender, and treatment group were performed, but did not change the results. Conclusion Education was the most consistent predictor of pain and disability, and work status at 1 year follow-up. Also, baseline SPADI score, previous shoulder pain and self-reported health status predicted outcome. Trial registration Clinical trials NCT00653081 PMID:20863369

  12. Mortality and survival of white-tailed deer Odocoileus virginianus fawns on a north Atlantic coastal island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, Robert A.; O'Connell, A.F.; Harrison, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    Mortality and survival of white-tailed deer Odocoileus virginianus fawns (n=29) were studied from birth to 1 year of age during 1991-95 on Mount Desert Island (MDI), Maine where deer hunting is prohibited, coyotes Canis latrans have become recently established, and protected U. S. National Park lands are interspersed with private property. Rate of predator-caused mortality was 0.52, with coyote predation (n=8) accounting for at least 47% of mortalities from all causes (n=17). Mortality rate from drowning was 0.24 (n=3), and from vehicles was 0.14 (n=3). Of fawns radio-collared as neonates, 10 of 14 mortalities occurred during the first 2 months of life. Annual rate of fawn survival was 0.26. Survival rate from 6 months to 1 year was 0.65 and 4 mortalities (2 predation, 2 drowning) were observed during this interval. A subgroup of fawns (n = 11) captured near a residential area and along the edge of a coyote territory had a higher (P = 0.002) rate of survival to 1 year of age (S = 0.67) than did fawns from all other areas (n = 18, S = 0.00). Recruitment to 1 year of age was lower than has been observed in other deer populations in the northeastern United States. Low recruitment associated with coyote predation and mortality sources influenced by humans appears to be limiting white-tailed deer populations in this insular landscape.

  13. Early Neuropsychological Tests as Correlates of Productivity 1 Year after Traumatic Brain Injury: A Preliminary Matched Case-Control Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryu, Won Hyung A.; Cullen, Nora K.; Bayley, Mark T.

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the relative strength of five neuropsychological tests in correlating with productivity 1 year after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Six moderate-to-severe TBI patients who returned to work at 1-year post-injury were matched with six controls who were unemployed after 1 year based on age, severity of injury, and Functional…

  14. Mortality prognostic factors in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Popa, CC; Badiu, DC; Rusu, OC; Grigorean, VT; Neagu, SI; Strugaru, CR

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to present the biological prognostic factors of mortality in patients with acute pancreatitis. Methods: Several usual laboratory values were monitored: glucose, urea, partial pressure of oxygen, WBC count, hemoglobin, total bilirubin, and cholesterol. A statistical analysis was performed by using ROC curves and AUC interpretation. Results: The overall mortality rate was 21.1% and was different depending on the severity of the disease. Only 2.22% of the patients with a mild disease died, as opposed to 45.63% of the patients with a severe form. All the analyses studied were significantly elevated in the deceased patients. A close correlation between blood glucose, urea, partial pressure of oxygen, WBC, hemoglobin, total bilirubin, and cholesterol and mortality was objectified by measuring the AUC, which was of 97.1%, 95.5%, 93.4%, 92.7%, 87.4%, 82.2%, and 79.0%. Conclusions: The usual, easy to use, fast, and cheap tests were useful in predicting mortality in patients with acute pancreatitis. Our study confirmed that the combination of several factors led to an accurate mortality prediction. PMID:27928447

  15. Mortality among rubber workers: V. processing workers.

    PubMed

    Delzell, E; Monson, R R

    1982-07-01

    Cause-specific mortality was evaluated among 2,666 men employed in the processing division of a rubber manufacturing plant. The division was divided into two sections: front processing (compounding, mixing and milling operations) and back processing (extrusion, calendering, cement mixing and rubberized fabrics operations). Mortality rates for all processing workers combined and for men in each section were compared with rates for U.S. White males or for workers employed in other divisions of the same plant. Compared with either referent group, men in the processing division had increased mortality from leukemia, emphysema, and cancers of the stomach, large intestine, and biliary passages and liver. An excess number of deaths from stomach and larger intestine cancer was found predominantly among men in the front processing section (33 observed vs. 17.7 expected deaths, based on rates in nonprocessing workers). Increased mortality from leukemia (14 observed vs. 7.3 expected) and from emphysema (22 observed vs. 11.0 expected) was present among men employed in the back processing section. Examination of mortality from these causes according to age and the year starting work, duration of employment, and years since starting work in the relevant sections of the processing division suggested that observed excesses of stomach cancer, large intestine cancer, leukemia, and emphysema among processing workers are related to occupational exposures. These results are consistent with the findings of studies of other groups of rubber workers.

  16. Labor migration and child mortality in Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Yabiku, Scott T.; Agadjanian, Victor; Cau, Boaventura

    2013-01-01

    Male labor migration is widespread in many parts of the world, yet its consequences for child outcomes and especially childhood mortality remain unclear. Male labor migration could bring benefits, in the form of remittances, to the families that remain behind and thus help child survival. Alternatively, the absence of a male adult could imperil the household's well-being and its ability to care for its members, increasing child mortality risks. In this analysis, we use longitudinal survey data from Mozambique collected in 2006 and 2009 to examine the association between male labor migration and under-five mortality in families that remain behind. Using a simple migrant/non-migrant dichotomy, we find no difference in mortality rates across migrant and non-migrant men's children. When we separated successful from unsuccessful migration based on the wife's perception, however, stark contrasts emerge: children of successful migrants have the lowest mortality, followed by children of non-migrant men, followed by the children of unsuccessful migrants. Our results illustrate the need to account for the diversity of men's labor migration experience in examining the effects of migration on left-behind households. PMID:23121856

  17. Stroke Mortality Among Alaska Native People

    PubMed Central

    Horner, Ronnie D.; Day, Gretchen M.; Lanier, Anne P.; Provost, Ellen M.; Hamel, Rebecca D.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We aimed to describe the epidemiology of stroke among Alaska Natives, which is essential for designing effective stroke prevention and intervention efforts for this population. Methods. We conducted an analysis of death certificate data for the state of Alaska for the period 1984 to 2003, comparing age-standardized stroke mortality rates among Alaska Natives residing in Alaska vs US Whites by age category, gender, stroke type, and time. Results. Compared with US Whites, Alaska Natives had significantly elevated stroke mortality from 1994 to 2003 but not from 1984 to 1993. Alaska Native women of all age groups and Alaska Native men younger than 45 years of age had the highest risk, although the rates for those younger than 65 years were statistically imprecise. Over the 20-year study period, the stroke mortality rate was stable for Alaska Natives but declined for US Whites. Conclusions. Stroke mortality is higher among Alaska Natives, especially women, than among US Whites. Over the past 20 years, there has not been a significant decline in stroke mortality among Alaska Natives. PMID:19762671

  18. Inequalities in Alcohol-Related Mortality in 17 European Countries: A Retrospective Analysis of Mortality Registers

    PubMed Central

    Mackenbach, Johan P.; Kulhánová, Ivana; Bopp, Matthias; Borrell, Carme; Deboosere, Patrick; Kovács, Katalin; Looman, Caspar W. N.; Leinsalu, Mall; Mäkelä, Pia; Martikainen, Pekka; Menvielle, Gwenn; Rodríguez-Sanz, Maica; Rychtaříková, Jitka; de Gelder, Rianne

    2015-01-01

    death, it is likely that our results underestimate the true extent of the problem. Conclusions Alcohol-related conditions play an important role in generating inequalities in total mortality in many European countries. Countering increases in alcohol-related mortality in lower socioeconomic groups is essential for reducing inequalities in mortality. Studies of why such increases have not occurred in countries like France, Switzerland, Spain, and Italy can help in developing evidence-based policies in other European countries. PMID:26625134

  19. Project FLAVOR: 1-Year Outcomes of a Multicultural, School-Based Smoking Prevention Curriculum for Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Unger, Jennifer B; Chou, Chih-Ping; Palmer, Paula H; Ritt-Olson, Anamara; Gallaher, Peggy; Cen, Steven; Lichtman, Kara; Azen, Stanley; Johnson, C Anderson

    2004-02-01

    To evaluate a multicultural smoking prevention curriculum, 16 schools were randomized to receive the multicultural curriculum or a standard curriculum and program effects on 1-year smoking initiation among 1430 never smokers were assessed. Hispanic boys who received the multicultural curriculum were less likely to initiate smoking than were those who received the standard curriculum; effects were insignificant among other groups. The prevention effect among Hispanic boys is encouraging, but additional research is needed to improve prevention effects among other groups.

  20. Social, Behavioral, and Biological Factors, and Sex Differences in Mortality

    PubMed Central

    ROGERS, RICHARD G.; EVERETT, BETHANY G.; SAINT ONGE, JARRON M.; KRUEGER, PATRICK M.

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have examined whether sex differences in mortality are associated with different distributions of risk factors or result from the unique relationships between risk factors and mortality for men and women. We extend previous research by systematically testing a variety of factors, including health behaviors, social ties, socioeconomic status, and biological indicators of health. We employ the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey III Linked Mortality File and use Cox proportional hazards models to examine sex differences in adult mortality in the United States. Our findings document that social and behavioral characteristics are key factors related to the sex gap in mortality. Once we control for women’s lower levels of marriage, poverty, and exercise, the sex gap in mortality widens; and once we control for women’s greater propensity to visit with friends and relatives, attend religious services, and abstain from smoking, the sex gap in mortality narrows. Biological factors— including indicators of inflammation and cardiovascular risk—also inform sex differences in mortality. Nevertheless, persistent sex differences in mortality remain: compared with women, men have 30% to 83% higher risks of death over the follow-up period, depending on the covariates included in the model. Although the prevalence of risk factors differs by sex, the impact of those risk factors on mortality is similar for men and women. PMID:20879677

  1. Disparities in cervical and breast cancer mortality in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Girianelli, Vania Reis; Gamarra, Carmen Justina; Azevedo e Silva, Gulnar

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze cervical and breast cancer mortality in Brazil according to socioeconomic and welfare indicators. METHODS Data on breast and cervical cancer mortality covering a 30-year period (1980-2010) were analyzed. The data were obtained from the National Mortality Database, population data from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics database, and socioeconomic and welfare information from the Institute of Applied Economic Research. Moving averages were calculated, disaggregated by capital city and municipality. The annual percent change in mortality rates was estimated by segmented linear regression using the joinpoint method. Pearson’s correlation coefficients were conducted between average mortality rate at the end of the three-year period and selected indicators in the state capital and each Brazilian state. RESULTS There was a decline in cervical cancer mortality rates throughout the period studied, except in municipalities outside of the capitals in the North and Northeast. There was a decrease in breast cancer mortality in the capitals from the end of the 1990s onwards. Favorable socioeconomic indicators were inversely correlated with cervical cancer mortality. A strong direct correlation was found with favorable indicators and an inverse correlation with fertility rate and breast cancer mortality in inner cities. CONCLUSIONS There is an ongoing dynamic process of increased risk of cervical and breast cancer and attenuation of mortality because of increased, albeit unequal, access to and provision of screening, diagnosis and treatment.  PMID:25119941

  2. Healing of extraction sockets and augmented alveolar defects following 1-year treatment with bisphosphonate.

    PubMed

    Khojasteh, Arash; Behnia, Hossein; Morad, Golnaz; Dashti, Seyedeh Ghazaleh; Dehghan, Mohammad Mehdi; Shahab, Shahriyar; Abbas, Fatemeh Mashhadi

    2013-01-01

    To assess the effect of bisphosphonates on healing of extraction sockets and augmented alveolar defects, 12 adult female mongrel dogs were assigned to 2 experimental groups and a control group. The experimental groups received oral alendronate (ALN, 3.5 mg/kg/wk) or IV pamidronate (PAM, 1 mg/kg/wk) for 12 months. Animals were randomly tested for serum C-terminal telopeptide of collagen I (CTx). The right first and second premolars were extracted. After 8 weeks, extraction sites were evaluated for healing. Subsequently, 3-wall defects were created in ridges and filled with human mineralized cortical particulate bone. Two months post-augmentation, animals were sacrificed and mandibles were collected for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and histomorphometric appraisal. The obtained data were compared using 1-way ANOVA test. CTx test results in both experimental groups were comparable (<10 pg/mL) but lower than that of the control group (minimum 159.2 pg/mL). Two months post-extraction, bone sequestra were noticed in extraction sites in BP-treated groups, involving the entire alveolar bone in the PAM group and the upper rim of the alveoli in the ALN group. Histologically, bone sequestra from the PAM group demonstrated empty osteocyte lacunae, while in the ALN group areas of necrotic bone along with evidence of active bone remodeling was distinguished. Eight weeks post-augmentation, the experimental groups showed no evidence of bone formation in the augmented area, while bone formation ratio was measured to be 18.32% in the control group. The mean amount of pixel intensity calculated from the CBCT images of the ALN, PAM, and control group was 113.69 ± 11.04, 124.94 ± 4.72, and 113.69 ± 6.63, respectively. Pixel intensity in PAM-treated group was significantly higher than both other groups. This study demonstrated that 1-year treatment with ALN/PAM was associated with impairment of post-extraction and post-augmentation bone healing in dogs.

  3. How hot is too hot? Live-trapped gray wolf rectal temperatures and 1-year survival

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barber-Meyer, Shannon M.; Mech, L. David

    2014-01-01

    The ability of physically restrained and anesthetized wolves to thermoregulate is lessened and could lead to reduced survival, yet no information is available about this subject. Therefore, we analyzed rectal temperatures related to survival 1 year post-capture from 173 adult (non-pup) gray wolves (Canis lupus) captured in modified foot-hold traps for radiocollaring during June–August, 1988–2011, in the Superior National Forest of northeastern Minnesota, USA. The maximum observed rectal temperature (“maxtemp,” ° F, ° C) in each wolf during capture (x = 104.0, 40.0; SD = 2.0, 1.1; min. = 95.9, 35.5; max. = 108, 42.2) was not a significant predictor of survival to 1 year post-capture. Although no weather or morphometric variable was a significant predictor of maxtemps, wolves initially anesthetized with ketamine–xylazine rather than telazol®–xylazine averaged higher maxtemps. This information does not fully address possible effects of high body temperatures related to live-capture and handling of wolves, but it does provide a useful waypoint for future assessments of this relationship and a reassurance to wildlife practitioners that the maxtemps observed in our study did not appear to affect 1-year survival.

  4. Female education and child mortality in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Mellington, N; Cameron, L

    1999-12-01

    This paper uses a sample of 6620 women from the 1994 Indonesian Demographic and Health Survey to examine the relationship between female education and child mortality in Indonesia. Female education is measured in terms of both years of education and literacy. Both primary education and secondary schooling significantly decrease the probability of child death, while literacy plays an insignificant role. When the sample is divided into urban and rural locations, primary and secondary education are significant in both areas in reducing the likelihood of a mother experiencing child mortality. The benefits of public and private infrastructure appear to differ in rural and urban areas. The results confirm that investment in female human capital lowers the probability of child mortality.

  5. Mortality from ship emissions: a global assessment.

    PubMed

    Corbett, James J; Winebrake, James J; Green, Erin H; Kasibhatla, Prasad; Eyring, Veronika; Lauer, Axel

    2007-12-15

    Epidemiological studies consistently link ambient concentrations of particulate matter (PM) to negative health impacts, including asthma, heart attacks, hospital admissions, and premature mortality. We model ambient PM concentrations from oceangoing ships using two geospatial emissions inventories and two global aerosol models. We estimate global and regional mortalities by applying ambient PM increases due to ships to cardiopulmonary and lung cancer concentration-risk functions and population models. Our results indicate that shipping-related PM emissions are responsible for approximately 60,000 cardiopulmonary and lung cancer deaths annually, with most deaths occurring near coastlines in Europe, East Asia, and South Asia. Under current regulation and with the expected growth in shipping activity, we estimate that annual mortalities could increase by 40% by 2012.

  6. Symptomatic Atherosclerotic Disease and Decreased Risk of Cancer-Specific Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Benito-León, Julián; de la Aleja, Jesús González; Martínez-Salio, Antonio; Louis, Elan D.; Lichtman, Judith H.; Bermejo-Pareja, Félix

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The few studies that have assessed the association between symptomatic atherosclerotic disease and risk of cancer have had conflicting results. In addition, these studies ascertained participants either from treatment settings (ie, service-based studies) or by using a records linkage system (ie, medical records of patients evaluated at clinics or hospitals) and, therefore, were prone to selection bias. Our purpose was to estimate the risk of cancer mortality in a large population-based sample of elderly people, comparing participants with symptomatic atherosclerotic disease (atherosclerotic stroke and coronary disease) to their counterparts without symptomatic atherosclerotic disease (ie, controls) in the same population. In this population-based, prospective study (Neurological Disorders of Central Spain, NEDICES), 5262 elderly community-dwelling participants with and without symptomatic atherosclerotic disease were identified and followed for a median of 12.1 years, after which the death certificates of those who died were reviewed. A total of 2701 (53.3%) of 5262 participants died, including 314 (68.6%) of 458 participants with symptomatic atherosclerotic disease and 2387 (49.7%) of 4804 controls. Cancer mortality was reported significantly less often in those with symptomatic atherosclerotic disease (15.6%) than in controls (25.6%) (P < 0.001). In an unadjusted Cox model, risk of cancer-specific mortality was decreased in participants with symptomatic atherosclerotic disease (HR = 0.74, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.55−0.98, P = 0.04) vs. those without symptomatic atherosclerotic disease (reference group). In an adjusted Cox model, HR = 0.58; 95% CI, 0.38−0.89; P = 0.01. This population-based, prospective study suggests that there is an inverse association between symptomatic atherosclerotic disease and risk of cancer mortality. PMID:26266364

  7. Child Mortality: A Preventable Tragedy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seipel, Michael M. O.

    1996-01-01

    Worldwide data reveal that child mortality (ages 1-5) accounts for about 10-15% of all deaths in developing countries, and less than 1% of all deaths in developed countries. Strategies for reducing child mortality include improving health services, improving environmental conditions, enhancing the social conditions of children, and protecting and…

  8. Mortality rates decline in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    1991-11-01

    Experiencing remarkable decreases in mortality rates over the past 3 decades, Malaysia currently has one of the lowest mortality rates among developing countries, a rate that compares favorably with those of developed countries. Between 1957 and 1989, the crude death rate dropped from 12.4/1000 population to 4.6. Over the same period, Malaysia recorded even greater decreases in the infant mortality rate, from 75.5/1000 births to 15.2. The Maternal mortality rate also declined from 1.48 in 1970 to 0.24 in 1988. The data indicates that mortality rates vary from state to state, and that rural areas have a higher mortality than urban areas. According to a study by the National Population and Family Development Board, the use of maternal and child health services has played an important role in reducing neonatal, perinatal, infant, child, and maternal mortality rates. Nearly all women in Malaysia receive antenatal services. While the country has achieved great gains on mortality rates, programs focusing on specific age and socioeconomic groups could lead to even greater reductions. The Minister for National Unity and Social Development, Dato Napsiah Omar, has called for the development of programs designed to improve the population's quality of life.

  9. Educational Inequalities in Post-Hip Fracture Mortality: A NOREPOS Study.

    PubMed

    Omsland, Tone K; Eisman, John A; Naess, Øyvind; Center, Jacqueline R; Gjesdal, Clara G; Tell, Grethe S; Emaus, Nina; Meyer, Haakon E; Søgaard, Anne Johanne; Holvik, Kristin; Schei, Berit; Forsmo, Siri; Magnus, Jeanette H

    2015-12-01

    Hip fractures are associated with high excess mortality. Education is an important determinant of health, but little is known about educational inequalities in post-hip fracture mortality. Our objective was to investigate educational inequalities in post-hip fracture mortality and to examine whether comorbidity or family composition could explain any association. We conducted a register-based population study of Norwegians aged 50 years and older from 2002 to 2010. We measured total mortality according to educational attainment in 56,269 hip fracture patients (NORHip) and in the general Norwegian population. Both absolute and relative educational inequalities in mortality in people with and without hip fracture were compared. There was an educational gradient in post-hip fracture mortality in both sexes. Compared with those with primary education only, the age-adjusted relative risk (RR) of mortality in hip fracture patients with tertiary education was 0.82 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.77-0.87) in men and 0.79 (95% CI 0.75-0.84) in women. Additional adjustments for Charlson comorbidity index, marital status, and number of children did not materially change the estimates. Regardless of educational attainment, the 1-year age-adjusted mortality was three- to fivefold higher in hip fracture patients compared with peers in the general population without fracture. The absolute differences in 1-year mortality according to educational attainment were considerably larger in hip fracture patients than in the population without hip fracture. Absolute educational inequalities in mortality were higher after hip fracture compared with the general population without hip fracture and were not mediated by comorbidity or family composition. Investigation of other possible mediating factors might help to identify new targets for interventions, based on lower educational attainment, to reduce post-hip fracture mortality.

  10. Siberian Pine Decline and Mortality in Southern Siberian Mountains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharuk, V. I.; Im, S. T.; Oskorbin, P. A.; Petrov, I. A.; Ranson, K. J.

    2013-01-01

    The causes and resulting spatial patterns of Siberian pine mortality in eastern Kuznetzky Alatau Mountains, Siberia were analyzed based on satellite (Landsat, MODIS) and dendrochronology data. Climate variables studied included temperature, precipitation and Standardized Precipitation-Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI) drought index. Landsat data analysis showed that stand mortality was first detected in the year 2006 at an elevation of 650 m, and extended up to 900 m by the year 2012. Mortality was accompanied by a decrease in MODIS derived vegetation index (EVI).. The area of dead stands and the upper mortality line were correlated with increased drought. The uphill margin of mortality was limited by elevational precipitation gradients. Dead stands (i.e., >75% tree mortality) were located mainly on southern slopes. With respect to slope, mortality was observed within a 7 deg - 20 deg range with greatest mortality occurring on convex terrain. Tree radial incrementmeasurements correlate and were synchronous with SPEI (r sq = 0.37, r(sub s) = 80). Increasing synchrony between tree ring growth and SPEI indicates that drought has reduced the ecological niche of Siberian pine. The results also showed the primary role of drought stress on Siberian pine mortality. A secondary role may be played by bark beetles and root fungi attacks. The observed Siberian pine mortality is part of a broader phenomenon of "dark needle conifers" (DNC, i.e., Siberian pine, fir and spruce) decline and mortality in European Russia, Siberia, and the Russian Far East. All locations of DNC decline coincided with areas of observed drought increase. The results obtained are one of the first observations of drought-induced decline and mortality of DNC at the southern border of boreal forests. Meanwhile if model projections of increased aridity are correct DNC, within the southern part of its range may be replaced by drought-resistant Pinus silvestris and Larix sibirica.

  11. Individual, physical and psychological risk factors for neck pain in Australian office workers: a 1-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Hush, Julia M; Michaleff, Zoe; Maher, Christopher G; Refshauge, Kathryn

    2009-10-01

    Neck pain is more prevalent in office workers than in the general community. To date, findings from prospective studies that investigated causal relationships between putative risk factors and the onset of neck pain in this population have been limited by high loss to follow-up. The aim of this research was to prospectively evaluate a range of risk factors for neck pain in office workers, using validated and reliable objective measures as well as attain an estimate of 1-year incidence. We assembled a cohort of 53 office workers without neck pain and measured individual, physical, workplace and psychological factors at baseline. We followed participants for 1 year to measure the incidence of neck pain. We achieved 100% participant follow-up. Cox regression analysis was applied to examine the relationship between the putative risk factors and the cumulative incidence of neck pain. The 1-year incidence proportion of neck pain in Australian office workers was estimated in this study to be 0.49 (95% CI 0.36-0.62). Predictors of neck pain with moderate to large effect sizes were female gender (HR: 3.07; 95% CI: 1.18-7.99) and high psychological stress (HR: 1.64; 95% CI: 0.66-4.07). Protective factors included increased mobility of the cervical spine (HR: 0.44; 95% CI: 0.19-1.05) and frequent exercise (HR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.27-1.51). These results reveal that neck pain is common in Australian office workers and that there are risk factors that are potentially modifiable.

  12. Musculoskeletal Fitness and Risk of Mortality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; Craig, Cora L.

    2002-01-01

    Quantified the relationship between musculoskeletal fitness and all-cause mortality in Canada, using measures of musculoskeletal fitness (situps, pushups, grip strength, and sit- and-reach trunk flexibility) from adult male and female participants in the Canadian Fitness Survey. Results indicated that some components of musculoskeletal fitness,…

  13. Dioxins and Cardiovascular Mortality: A Review (EHP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In spite of its large public health burden, the risk factors for cardiovascular disease remain incompletely understood. Here we review the association of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality with exposure to dioxin, a pollutant resulting from the production and combustion of ch...

  14. A life course approach to mortality in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Saenz, Joseph L; Wong, Rebeca

    2016-01-01

    Objective Research on early life socioeconomic status (SES), education and mortality is less established in developing countries. This analysis aims to determine how SES and education are patterned across the life course and associated with adult mortality in Mexico. Materials and methods Data comes from 2001-2012 Mexican Health & Aging Study (Mexican adults age 50+, n=11 222). Cox proportional hazard models predict mortality using baseline covariates Results In unadjusted analyses, similar mortality was seen across levels of early life SES. Lower early life SES was associated with better survival after accounting for education in the younger cohort. Lower education was only associated with mortality in the younger cohort. Conclusions Early life SES was associated with education but the relationship between education and mortality differed across cohorts in Mexico. Selective survival and differential returns to education may explain differences. PMID:26172234

  15. Effect of the INSIGHT Responsive Parenting Intervention on Rapid Infant Weight Gain and Overweight Status at Age 1 Year

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Jennifer S.; Birch, Leann L.; Marini, Michele; Anzman-Frasca, Stephanie; Paul, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Rapid infant weight gain is associated with later obesity, but interventions to prevent rapid infant growth and reduce risk for overweight status in infancy are lacking. OBJECTIVE To examine the effect of a responsive parenting (RP) intervention on infant weight gain between birth and 28 weeks and overweight status at age 1 year. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS The Intervention Nurses Start Infants Growing on Healthy Trajectories (INSIGHT) study is an ongoing randomized clinical trial comparing an RP intervention designed to prevent childhood obesity with a safety control. The study includes primiparous mother-newborn dyads (n = 291) and was conducted at the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania, in addition to home visits. Enrollment was initiated in January 2012, and evaluable population analyses for this study were conducted between April 2015 and November 2015. INTERVENTIONS At 2 weeks post partum, initial intervention materials appropriate to the assigned treatment group were mailed to the participant’s home. Research nurses conducted home visits at 3 weeks, 16 weeks, 28 weeks, and 40 weeks, and a research center visit occurred at 1 year. The Intervention Nurses Start Infants Growing on Healthy Trajectories curriculum included messages about infant feeding, sleep hygiene, active social play, emotion regulation, and growth record education. The control group received a developmentally appropriate home safety intervention also delivered by nurse home visitors. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Conditional weight gain from birth to 28 weeks was calculated. General linear models examined intervention effect on conditional weight gain. The intervention’s effect on infant weight-for-length percentiles was tested using analysis of variance. Logistic regression compared the odds of overweight status (weight for length ≥95th percentile) at 1 year as a function of conditional weight gain. RESULTS Of the mothers included in the

  16. Suicide mortality at time of armed conflict in Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Yur'yev, Andriy; Yur'yeva, Lyudmyla

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore the dynamics of suicide mortality rates in Ukraine during an ongoing armed conflict between 2014 and 2015. Suicide mortality data were obtained by reviewing annual analytical releases from the State Service for Emergent Situations of Ukraine and annual release of Russian Federal Service of State Statistics. Suicide mortality in mainland Ukraine and in the Crimea region demonstrated a mild decrease, whereas suicide mortality in the regions directly involved in the armed conflict demonstrated a prominent decrease. The results of this review support Durkheim theory. The limitation of this review includes general concern about quality of data at time of armed conflict in the country.

  17. Clinical performance of a resin-modified glass-ionomer and two polyacid-modified resin composites in cervical lesions restorations: 1-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Chinelatti, M A; Ramos, R P; Chimello, D T; Palma-Dibb, R G

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical performance of a resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (Vitremer) and two polyacid-modified resin composites (F2000 and Freedom) over 1 year. Nineteen patients with at least three cervical lesions were selected, providing an initial sample size of 87 restorations (29 per material), being 78 to non-carious and nine to carious lesions. Restorations were evaluated at baseline, 6 months and 1 year after placement, using modified US Public Health Service criteria: colour match, marginal discoloration, caries, anatomical form, marginal integrity and surface texture. At baseline, restorations were considered as acceptable for all criteria. At 1-year recall, 21 restorations per material were re-examined. Freedom was rated Bravo or Charlie for all the examined criteria and Vitremer earned an Alfa rating solely for the criterion caries. On the contrary, F2000 showed the best overall results, although presenting significant alteration in colour match. Statistical analysis of data was performed using chi-square and Mc Nemar tests. As to the evaluated periods, significant difference was observed solely between baseline and 1-year recall. Freedom and Vitremer were statistically different (P < 0.01) as to anatomical form and surface texture. For F2000, significant difference (P < 0.05) was noticed as to colour match and anatomical form. After 1-year follow-up, F2000 showed the most acceptable results as to the analysed criteria.

  18. Modeling of the relationship between the environmental air pollution, clinical risk factors, and hospital mortality due to myocardial infarction in Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Mehraban; Ahmadi, Ali; Baradaran, Azar; Masoudipoor, Neda; Frouzandeh, Soleiman

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to determine the relationship between the environmental factor, clinical risk factors, and individual variables with mortality due to acute myocardial infarction (MI) in Isfahan. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed between April 2012 and March 2013. The data on the patients’ mortality due to MI in Isfahan were obtained from the MI National Registry. The international classification system (ICD10: I21-I22) was used to diagnose MI. The air quality indicators and environmental variables were used to measure the air pollution. Multilevel logistic regression in the Stata software was used to determine the factors associated with mortality in patients and odds ratios (ORs) were calculated. Results: Six hundred eleven patients with MI were studied during 1-year. 444 (72.2%) patients were male and the rest were female. 4.7% of the patients died due to MI. The mean age at MI incidence was 62.2 ± 13 years. Of the air pollution parameters, PM10 had the maximum mean concentration (49.113 ppm), followed by NOX, NO, NO2, CO, SO2, and O3. The adjusted OR of mortality was derived 2.07 (95% CI: 1.5-2.85) for right bundle branch block, 1.5 (95% CI: 1.3-1.7) for ST-segment elevation MI, 1.84 (95% CI: 1.13-3) for age, 1.06 (95% CI: 1.01-1.20) for CO, 1.1 (95% CI: 1.03-1.30) for O3, and 1.04 (95% CI: 1.01-1.4) for SO2, all of which were considered as the risk factors of mortality. However, OR of mortality was 0.79 for precipitation (95% CI: 0.74-0.84) and 0.52 for angioplasty (95% CI: 0.4-0.68) were considered as protective factors of mortality. The individual characteristics including age, history of MI in the immediate family, hypertension, and diabetes were significantly associated with mortality from MI. The indices of air pollution including SO2, CO, O3, and environmental factors such as the precipitation and temperature were the determinants of mortality in patients with MI. Conclusion: With regards to the factors

  19. Ozone and daily mortality in Shanghai, China

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.H.; Huang, W.; London, S.J.; Song, G.X.; Chen, G.H.; Jiang, L.L.; Zhao, N.Q.; Chen, B.H.; Kan, H.D.

    2006-08-15

    Given the changes in types of air pollution from conventional coal combustion to the mixed coal combustion/motor vehicle emissions in China's large cities, it is worthwhile to investigate the acute effect of O{sub 3} on mortality outcomes in the country. We conducted a time-series study to investigate the relation between O{sub 3} and daily mortality in Shanghai using 4 years of daily data (2001-2004). O{sub 3} was found to be significantly associated with total and cardiovascular mortality in the cold season but not in the warm season. In the whole-year analysis, an increase of 10 pg/m{sup 3} of 2-day average O{sub 3} corresponds to 0.45% (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.16-0.73%), 0.53% (95% CI, 0.10-0.96%), and 0.35% (95% CI, -0.40 to 1.09%) increase of total nonaccidental, cardiovascular, and respiratory mortality, respectively. In the cold season, the estimates increased to 1.38% (95% CI , 0.68-2.07%), 1.53% (95% CI, 0.54-2.52%), and 0.95% (95% CI, -0.71 to 2.60%), respectively. In the warm season, we did not observe significant associations for both total and causespecific mortality. The results were generally insensitive to model specifications such as lag structure of O{sub 3} concentrations and degree of freedom for time trend. Multipoflutant models indicate that the effect of O{sub 3} was not confounded by particulate matter {<=} 10 {mu} m in diameter (PM10) or by sulfur dioxide; however, after adding nitrogen dioxide into the model, the association of O{sub 3} with total and cardiovascular mortality became statistically insignificant.

  20. Predictive Factors of One-Year Mortality in a Cohort of Patients Undergoing Urgent-Start Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Luciene P.; dos Reis, Luciene M.; Graciolli, Fabiana G.; Pereira, Benedito J.; de Oliveira, Rodrigo B.; de Souza, Altay A. L.; Moyses, Rosa M.; Elias, Rosilene M.; Jorgetti, Vanda

    2017-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects 10–15% of adult population worldwide. Incident patients on hemodialysis, mainly those on urgent-start dialysis at the emergency room, have a high mortality risk, which may reflect the absence of nephrology care. A lack of data exists regarding the influence of baseline factors on the mortality of these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and laboratory characteristics of this population and identify risk factors that contribute to their mortality. Patients and methods We studied 424 patients who were admitted to our service between 01/2006 and 12/2012 and were followed for 1 year. We analyzed vascular access, risk factors linked to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mineral and bone disease associated with CKD (CKD-MBD), and clinical events that occurred during the follow-up period. Factors that influenced patient survival were evaluated by Cox regression analysis. Results The patient mean age was 50 ± 18 years, and 58.7% of them were male. Hypertension was the main cause of primary CKD (31.8%). Major risk factors were smoking (19.6%), dyslipidemia (48.8%), and CVD (41%). Upon admission, most patients had no vascular access for hemodialysis (89.4%). Biochemical results showed that most patients were anemic with high C-reactive protein levels, hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, elevated parathyroid hormone and decreased 25-hydroxy vitamin D. At the end of one year, 60 patients died (14.1%). These patients were significantly older, had a lower percentage of arteriovenous fistula in one year, and low levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D. Conclusions The combined evaluation of clinical and biochemical parameters and risk factors revealed that the mortality in urgent-start dialysis is associated with older age and low levels of vitamin D deficiency. A lack of a permanent hemodialysis access after one year was also a risk factor for mortality in this population. PMID:28045952

  1. IMF-lending programs and suicide mortality.

    PubMed

    Goulas, Eleftherios; Zervoyianni, Athina

    2016-03-01

    While the economic consequences of IMF programs have been extensively analyzed in the literature, much less is known about how key welfare indicators, including suicide-mortality rates, correlate with countries' participation in such programs. This paper examines the impact of IMF lending on suicide mortality, using data from 30 developing and transition countries that received non-concessionary IMF loans during 1991-2008. Our results support the hypothesis of a positive causal relationship between suicide mortality and participation in IMF programs but reveal no systematic suicide-increasing effect from the size of IMF loans. This holds after accounting for self-selection into programs, resulting from the endogeneity of a country's decision to resort to the IMF for funding, and after controlling for standard socio-economic influences on suicidal behaviour. In particular, we find a positive aggregate suicide-mortality differential due to IMF-program participation of between 4 and 14 percentage points. We also find that the positive association between suicides and program participation is stronger and more robust among males. Comparing age groups, individuals belonging to the age group 45-to-64 exhibit the highest increase in suicide due to program-participation, which amounts to over 18 percentage points. Overall, our results imply that when countries are exposed to IMF programs in an attempt to resolve their economic problems, social-safety nets need to be designed to protect the adversely-affected part of the population.

  2. Age structure and mortality of walleyes in Kansas reservoirs: Use of mortality caps to establish realistic management objectives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quist, M.C.; Stephen, J.L.; Guy, C.S.; Schultz, R.D.

    2004-01-01

    Age structure, total annual mortality, and mortality caps (maximum mortality thresholds established by managers) were investigated for walleye Sander vitreus (formerly Stizostedion vitreum) populations sampled from eight Kansas reservoirs during 1991-1999. We assessed age structure by examining the relative frequency of different ages in the population; total annual mortality of age-2 and older walleyes was estimated by use of a weighted catch curve. To evaluate the utility of mortality caps, we modeled threshold values of mortality by varying growth rates and management objectives. Estimated mortality thresholds were then compared with observed growth and mortality rates. The maximum age of walleyes varied from 5 to 11 years across reservoirs. Age structure was dominated (???72%) by walleyes age 3 and younger in all reservoirs, corresponding to ages that were not yet vulnerable to harvest. Total annual mortality rates varied from 40.7% to 59.5% across reservoirs and averaged 51.1% overall (SE = 2.3). Analysis of mortality caps indicated that a management objective of 500 mm for the mean length of walleyes harvested by anglers was realistic for all reservoirs with a 457-mm minimum length limit but not for those with a 381-mm minimum length limit. For a 500-mm mean length objective to be realized for reservoirs with a 381-mm length limit, managers must either reduce mortality rates (e.g., through restrictive harvest regulations) or increase growth of walleyes. When the assumed objective was to maintain the mean length of harvested walleyes at current levels, the observed annual mortality rates were below the mortality cap for all reservoirs except one. Mortality caps also provided insight on management objectives expressed in terms of proportional stock density (PSD). Results indicated that a PSD objective of 20-40 was realistic for most reservoirs. This study provides important walleye mortality information that can be used for monitoring or for inclusion into

  3. [Asthma mortality trends in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Salas Ramírez, M; Segura Méndez, N H; Martínez-Cairo Cueto, S

    1994-04-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to estimate mortality and morbidity from asthma in Mexico by federative entity (state) of residence, age, and sex during the period between 1960 and 1988. Statistics published by the National Institute of Statistics, Geography, and Information Science were reviewed, as were vital statistics and information from other sources. Data were selected on mortality, hospital admissions, and outpatient visits, as well as population by federative entity, age, and sex. Mortality and morbidity rates were adjusted for age using the direct method. From 1960 to 1987, mortality decreased for both sexes. The groups with the highest asthma mortality were those under 4 years of age and those over 50. From 1960 to the present, the state with the highest mortality was Tlaxcala. Hospitalizations increased from 10 to 140 per 100,000 population for the country as a whole. When both outpatient visits and hospitalizations were considered, the morbidity rates rose from 180 to 203.4 per 100,000 between 1960 and 1970. In 1970, hospital morbidity was higher among males than females. From 1960 up to the 1990s, the highest rates of hospitalization and outpatient visits were registered among those under 4 and those over 60. The states with the highest asthma hospitalization rates were Morelos, Baja California Sur, Nuevo León, Durango, and Tamaulipas. It is concluded that asthma mortality in Mexico is showing a downward trend, while morbidity is increasing considerably, especially among adolescents.

  4. Predictors of fatigue over 1 year among people with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Treharne, G J; Lyons, A C; Hale, E D; Goodchild, C E; Booth, D A; Kitas, G D

    2008-08-01

    Fatigue is a systemic feeling of exhaustion that is a common symptom of many chronic illnesses, including the autoimmune inflammatory disease rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We examined predictors of levels of fatigue among people with RA using Leventhal's Common-Sense Model (CSM), which states that cognitive representations of an illness spur (or halt) people's efforts to cope and thereby influence outcomes of the illness. Our use of the CSM was designed in the light of evidence in the literature specific to fatigue in RA. Current fatigue was reported on a 100 mm visual analogue scale (with anchors "No fatigue" and "Unbearable fatigue") by 114 people (73.7% women) with RA at baseline and 1 year later. Baseline employment status, pain, impact of disability, sleep disruption frequency, depressed mood, perceptions of consequences, arthritis self-efficacy and attempts to cope by praying/hoping were also self-reported. Duration of RA and a haematological measure of systemic inflammation (erythrocyte sedimentation rate; ESR) were obtained from hospital records. Unexpectedly, RA duration did not predict fatigue after 1 year, although lower baseline inflammation did (controlling for baseline fatigue and other disease impact variables). This may be due to sampling flares of RA at baseline. Baseline perceptions that RA has severe consequences and is uncontrollable also predicted greater fatigue after 1 year but this relationship was not mediated by praying/hoping. Targeted psychological care to modify perceptions of severe consequences may therefore improve later fatigue for people with RA even when the condition is longstanding, but the mechanisms of any benefit require further investigation.

  5. Exposures and mortality among chrysotile asbestos workers. Part II: mortality

    SciTech Connect

    Dement, J.M.; Harris, R.L. Jr.; Symons, M.J.; Shy, C.M.

    1983-01-01

    A retrospective cohort mortality study was conducted among a cohort of 1,261 white males employed one or more months in chrysotile asbestos textile operations and followed between 1940 and 1975. Statistically significant excess mortality was observed for all causes combined (standardized mortality ratio (SMR) . 150), lung cancer (SMR . 135), diseases of the circulatory system (SMR . 125), nonmalignant respiratory diseases (SMR . 294), and accidents (SMR . 134). Using estimated fiber exposure levels in conjunction with detailed worker job histories, exposure-response relationships were investigated. Strong exposure-response relationships for lung cancer and asbestos related non-malignant respiratory diseases were observed. Compared with data for chrysotile miners and millers, chrysotile textile workers were found to experience significantly greater lung cancer mortality at lower lifetime cumulative exposure levels. Factors such as differences in airborne fiber characteristics may partially account for the large differences in exposure response between textile workers and miners and millers.

  6. Inpatient child mortality by travel time to hospital in a rural area of Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Manongi, Rachel; Mtei, Frank; Mtove, George; Nadjm, Behzad; Muro, Florida; Alegana, Victor; Noor, Abdisalan M.; Todd, Jim; Reyburn, Hugh

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the association, if any, between child mortality and distance to the nearest hospital. METHODS The study was based on data from a 1-year study of the cause of illness in febrile paediatric admissions to a district hospital in north-east Tanzania. All villages in the catchment population were geolocated, and travel times were estimated from availability of local transport. Using bands of travel time to hospital, we compared admission rates, inpatient case fatality rates and child mortality rates in the catchment population using inpatient deaths as the numerator. RESULTS Three thousand hundred and eleven children under the age of 5 years were included of whom 4.6% died; 2307 were admitted from <3 h away of whom 3.4% died and 804 were admitted from ≥3 h away of whom 8.0% died. The admission rate declined from 125/1000 catchment population at <3 h away to 25/1000 at ≥3 h away, and the corresponding hospital deaths/catchment population were 4.3/1000 and 2.0/1000, respectively. Children admitted from more than 3 h away were more likely to be male, had a longer pre-admission duration of illness and a shorter time between admission and death. Assuming uniform mortality in the catchment population, the predicted number of deaths not benefiting from hospital admission prior to death increased by 21.4% per hour of travel time to hospital. If the same admission and death rates that were found at <3 h from the hospital applied to the whole catchment population and if hospital care conferred a 30% survival benefit compared to home care, then 10.3% of childhood deaths due to febrile illness in the catchment population would have been averted. CONCLUSIONS The mortality impact of poor access to hospital care in areas of high paediatric mortality is likely to be substantial although uncertainty over the mortality benefit of inpatient care is the largest constraint in making an accurate estimate. PMID:24661618