Science.gov

Sample records for 10-12 hz frequency

  1. Frequency-agile, rapid scanning spectroscopy: absorption sensitivity of 2 × 10-12 cm-1 Hz-1/2 with a tunable diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, D. A.; Truong, G.-W.; van Zee, R. D.; Plusquellic, D. F.; Hodges, J. T.

    2014-03-01

    We present ultrasensitive measurements of molecular absorption using frequency-agile rapid scanning, cavity ring-down spectroscopy with an external-cavity diode laser. A microwave source that drives an electro-optic phase modulator with a bandwidth of 20 GHz generates pairs of sidebands on the probe laser. The optical cavity provides for high sensitivity and filters the carrier and all but a single, selected sideband. Absorption spectra were acquired by stepping the tunable sideband from mode-to-mode of the ring-down cavity at a rate that was limited only by the cavity decay time. This approach allows for scanning rates of 8 kHz per cavity resonance, a minimum detectable absorption coefficient of 1.7 × 10-11 cm-1 after only 20 ms of averaging, and a noise-equivalent absorption coefficient of 1.7 × 10-12 cm-1 Hz-1/2. By comparison with cavity-enhanced laser absorption spectrometers reported in the literature, the present system is, to the best of our knowledge, among the most sensitive and has by far the highest spectrum scanning rate.

  2. Microwave differential dilatometer measures 10 - 12 m, at 1 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschero, G.; Mango, F.; Gizdulich, P.

    1996-12-01

    To check and measure the converse piezoelectric effect in bone samples, we had to detect displacements in the range of 1-100 pm with three kinds of restrictions: (1) the biological nature of the samples imposes severe limits in selecting a suitable device and method; (2) such a method has to take into account some clinical applications to which the experiment is devoted; (3) the piezoelectric behavior of bone samples is particularly interesting at low frequencies, around 1 Hz. For such reasons we modified an existing dilatometer based on a microwave differential spectrometer. A 14 GHz klystron, linearly modulated in frequency by a triangular 50 Hz voltage applied to the repeller, is connected, via magic T, to two identical cavities tunable around 14 GHz and whose resonance curves are recorded by crystal detectors. When one of the two cavities changes its height according to the length variations of the sample, its resonance frequency varies resulting in a shift of the resonant curve with respect to the resonance curve of the other cavity acting as reference. The comparison between the cavities' responses is performed by a pulse technique transforming the frequency shifts into time intervals, that are then converted into dc voltages. The differential character of this measurement avoids the need for the microwave source stabilization. The relative shift in frequency is measured with an accuracy better than 500 Hz. This accuracy allows us to measure displacements smaller than 7 nm in the cavity's height. After 2 h of warmup, thanks to the differential arrangement of the system, thermal or other drifts are not detectable within a lapse of time of 12 h. This feature allows coherent signal averaging over long periods. With a piezoelectric ceramic stack moving 100 pm in square wave fashion at 50 mHz we found that the signal to noise ratio was 20 dB after 1000 cycles of signal averaging, when our bandpass filter was tuned at 1 Hz. In conclusion, this system can detect

  3. The 10 Hz Frequency: A Fulcrum For Transitional Brain States

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rill, E.; D’Onofrio, S.; Luster, B.; Mahaffey, S.; Urbano, F. J.; Phillips, C.

    2016-01-01

    A 10 Hz rhythm is present in the occipital cortex when the eyes are closed (alpha waves), in the precentral cortex at rest (mu rhythm), in the superior and middle temporal lobe (tau rhythm), in the inferior olive (projection to cerebellar cortex), and in physiological tremor (underlying all voluntary movement). These are all considered resting rhythms in the waking brain which are “replaced” by higher frequency activity with sensorimotor stimulation. That is, the 10 Hz frequency fulcrum is replaced on the one hand by lower frequencies during sleep, or on the other hand by higher frequencies during volition and cognition. The 10 Hz frequency fulcrum is proposed as the natural frequency of the brain during quiet waking, but is replaced by higher frequencies capable of permitting more complex functions, or by lower frequencies during sleep and inactivity. At the center of the transition shifts to and from the resting rhythm is the reticular activating system, a phylogenetically preserved area of the brain essential for preconscious awareness. PMID:27547831

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging at frequencies below 1 kHz.

    PubMed

    Hilschenz, Ingo; Körber, Rainer; Scheer, Hans-Jürgen; Fedele, Tommaso; Albrecht, Hans-Helge; Mario Cassará, Antonino; Hartwig, Stefan; Trahms, Lutz; Haase, Jürgen; Burghoff, Martin

    2013-02-01

    Within the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) community the trend is going to higher and higher magnetic fields, ranging from 1.5 T to 7 T, corresponding to Larmor frequencies of 63.8-298 MHz. Since for high-field MRI the magnetization increases with the applied magnetic field, the signal-to-noise-ratio increases as well, thus enabling higher image resolutions. On the other hand, MRI is possible also at ultra-low magnetic fields, as was shown by different groups. The goal of our development was to reach a Larmor frequency range of the low-field MRI system corresponding to the frequency range of human brain activities ranging from near zero-frequency (near-DC) to over 1 kHz. Here, first 2D MRI images of phantoms taken at Larmor frequencies of 100 Hz and 731 Hz will be shown and discussed. These frequencies are examples of brain activity triggered by electrostimulation of the median nerve. The method will allow the magnetic fields of the brain currents to influence the magnetic resonance image, and thus lead to a direct functional imaging modality of neuronal currents.

  5. High-frequency (1000 Hz) tympanometry in normal neonates.

    PubMed

    Kei, Joseph; Allison-Levick, Julie; Dockray, Jacqueline; Harrys, Rachel; Kirkegard, Christina; Wong, Janet; Maurer, Marion; Hegarty, Jayne; Young, June; Tudehope, David

    2003-01-01

    The characteristics of high frequency (1000 Hz) acoustic admittance results obtained from normal neonates were described in this study. Participants were 170 healthy neonates (96 boys and 74 girls) aged between 1 and 6 days (mean = 3.26 days, SD = 0.92). Transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs), and 226 Hz and 1000 Hz probe tone tympanograms were obtained from the participants using a Madsen Capella OAE/middle ear analyser. The results showed that of the 170 neonates, 34 were not successfully tested in both ears, 14 failed the TEOAE screen in one or both ears, and 122 (70 boys, 52 girls) passed the TEOAE screen in both ears and also maintained an acceptable probe seal during tympanometry. The 1000 Hz tympanometric data for the 122 neonates (244 ears) showed a single-peaked tympanogram in 225 ears (92.2%), a flat-sloping tympanogram in 14 ears (5.7%), a double-peaked tympanogram in 3 ears (1.2%) and other unusual shapes in 2 ears (0.8%). There was a significant ear effect, with right ears showing significantly higher mean peak compensated static admittance and tympanometric width, but lower mean acoustic admittance at +200 daPa and gradient than left ears. No significant gender effects or its interaction with ear were found. The normative tympanometric data derived from this cohort may serve as a guide for detecting middle ear dysfunction in neonates.

  6. 47 CFR 90.253 - Use of frequency 5167.5 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use of frequency 5167.5 kHz. 90.253 Section 90.253 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES... frequency 5167.5 kHz. The frequency 5167.5 kHz may be used by any station authorized under this part...

  7. Comparison of coupling of humans to electric and magnetic fields with frequencies between 100 Hz and 100 kHz

    SciTech Connect

    Kaune, W.T.; Guttman, J.L.; Kavet, R.

    1997-03-01

    Recent laboratory and epidemiological results have stimulated interest in the hypothesis that human beings may exhibit biological responses to magnetic and/or electric field transients with frequencies in the range between 100 Hz and 100 kHz. Much can be learned about the response of a system to a transient stimulation by understanding its response to sinusoidal disturbances over the entire frequency range of interest. Thus, the main effort of this paper was to compare the strengths of the electric fields induced in homogeneous ellipsoidal models by uniform 100 Hz through 100 kHz electric and magnetic fields. Over this frequency range, external electric fields of about 25--2,000 V/m (depending primarily on the orientation of the body relative to the field) are required to induce electric fields inside models of adults and children that are similar in strength to those induced by an external 1 {mu}T magnetic field. Additional analysis indicates that electric fields induced by uniform external electric and magnetic fields and by the nonuniform electric and magnetic fields produced by idealized point sources will not differ by more than a factor of two until the sources are brought close to the body. Published data on electric and magnetic field transients in residential environments indicate that, for most field orientations, the magnetic component will induce stronger electric fields inside adults and children than the electric component. This conclusion is also true for the currents induced in humans by typical levels of 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields in US residences.

  8. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator of 5000 Hz frequency provides better analgesia than that of 100 Hz frequency in mice muscle pain model.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Hung-Tsung; Chien, Hsiao-Jung; Lin, Ya-Chi; Liu, Yen-Chin

    2017-04-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulators (TENSs) have been proved to be effective in muscle pain management for several decades. However, there is no consensus for the optimal TENS program. Previous research demonstrated that a 100 Hz TENS (L-TENS) provided better analgesia than a conventional TENS (< 5 Hz). However, no research compared a higher-frequency (> 100 Hz) TENS with a 100 Hz TENS. We used a 5000 Hz (5 kHz) frequency TENS (M-TENS) and an L-TENS to compare analgesic effect on a mice skin/muscle incision retraction model. Three groups of mice were used (sham, L-TENS, and M-TENS) and applied with different TENS programs on Day 4 after the mice skin/muscle incision retraction model; TENS therapy was continued as 20 min/d for 3 days. Mice analgesic effects were measured via Von Frey microfilaments with the up-down method. After therapy, mice spinal cord dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) were harvested for cytokine evaluation (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β) with the Western blotting method. Our data demonstrated that the M-TENS produced better analgesia than the L-TENS. Cytokine in the spinal cord or DRG all expressed lower than that of the sham group. However, there is no difference in both cytokine levels between TENSs of different frequencies in the spinal cord and DRG. We concluded that the M-TENS produced faster and better mechanical analgesia than the L-TENS in the mice skin/muscle incision retraction model. Those behavior differences were not in accordance with cytokine changes in the spinal cord or DRG.

  9. Low frequency, ca. 40 Hz, pulse trains recorded in the humpback whale assembly in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Darling, James D

    2015-11-01

    During studies of humpback whale song and social sounds in Hawaii, bouts of low frequency (ca. 40 Hz) pulses were periodically recorded. One example was made near an active group of eight adults (included 22 bouts, 2-13 s long, over 90 min); another close to an adult male-female pair (12 bouts, 9-93 s long, over 22 min). The mean peak and center frequencies (39 to 40 Hz) and bandwidth (13 Hz) were similar in both, but the organization of the pulses differed. Song components, social sounds, bubble trains, or other species do not provide a ready explanation for this sound.

  10. Low-frequency sounds and psychological tests at 7, 18, and 40 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damijan, Zbigniew; Kasprzak, Cezary; Panuszka, Ryszard

    2004-05-01

    Research included the results of tests aimed to determine how LFN (low-frequency noise) with the dominating frequency (7 Hz at 120 dB, 18 Hz at 120 dB, and 40 Hz at 110 dB) influences human brain potentials and understanding the dependency of results achieved in psychological questionnaires. The psychological questionnaires (EPQ-R Eysencks and SSS-5 Zuckermans) were analyzed. Presented issue existences difference, relative influence LFN on human biopotentials, dependence from acquired results in ranges EPQ-R Eysencks and SSS-5 Zuckermans. The test included 96 experiments. Standard EEG potentials, ECG potentials, and EDP (dermal) were recorded before, during and after subject's 35-min exposures to LFN. Evident differences in changed bio-signals especially in EEG subject's dispersion, were easily determined and correlated to questionnaire reports.

  11. Extended high-frequency audiometry (9,000-20,000 Hz). Usefulness in audiological diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Valiente, Antonio; Roldán Fidalgo, Amaya; Villarreal, Ithzel M; García Berrocal, José R

    2016-01-01

    Early detection and appropriate treatment of hearing loss are essential to minimise the consequences of hearing loss. In addition to conventional audiometry (125-8,000 Hz), extended high-frequency audiometry (9,000-20,000 Hz) is available. This type of audiometry may be useful in early diagnosis of hearing loss in certain conditions, such as the ototoxic effect of cisplatin-based treatment, noise exposure or oral misunderstanding, especially in noisy environments. Eleven examples are shown in which extended high-frequency audiometry has been useful in early detection of hearing loss, despite the subject having a normal conventional audiometry. The goal of the present paper was to highlight the importance of the extended high-frequency audiometry examination for it to become a standard tool in routine audiological examinations.

  12. Dependence of kHz quasi-periodic oscillation frequencies on accretion-related parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkut, M. Hakan; Catmabacak, Onur; Duran, Sivan; Çatmabacak, Önder

    2016-07-01

    To study the possible dependence of kHz QPO frequencies on the parameters such as the mass accretion rate, the surface magnetic field strength, mass, and radius of the neutron star, we consider the up-to-date distribution of neutron star LMXBs in the kHz QPO frequency versus X-ray luminosity plane. We confirm the absence of any correlation between QPO frequencies and luminosity in the ensemble of LMXBs. Searching for the dependence of QPO data on accretion-related parameters, we find a correlation between the lower kHz QPO frequency and the parameter combining mass accretion rate with magnetic field strength. The correlation cannot be adequately described by a simple power law due to observed scattering of individual source data in the ensemble of Z and atoll sources. Based on disk-magnetosphere boundary region, the model function for QPO frequency can delineate the correlation taking into account the scattering of individual sources. In addition to mass accretion rate and magnetic field strength, the model function also depends on the radial width of the boundary region near the magnetopause. Modelling the variation of the width with mass accretion rate, we also provide an explanation for the parallel tracks phenomenon observed in the case of individual sources.

  13. Atmospheric Electric Field Measurements at 100 Hz and High Frequency Electric Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conceição, Ricardo; Gonçalves da Silva, Hugo; Matthews, James; Bennett, Alec; Chubb, John

    2016-04-01

    Spectral response of Atmospheric Electric Potential Gradient (PG), symmetric to the Atmospheric Electric Field, gives important information about phenomena affecting these measurements with characteristic time-scales that appear in the spectra as specific periodicities. This is the case of urban pollution that has a clear weekly dependence and reveals itself on PG measurements by a ~7 day periodicity (Silva et al., 2014). While long-term time-scales (low frequencies) have been exhaustively explored in literature, short-term time-scales (high frequencies), above 1 Hz, have comparatively received much less attention (Anisimov et al., 1999). This is mainly because of the technical difficulties related with the storage of such a huge amount of data (for 100 Hz sampling two days of data uses a ~1 Gb file) and the response degradation of the field-meters at such frequencies. Nevertheless, important Electric Phenomena occurs for frequencies above 1 Hz that are worth pursuing, e.g. the Schumann Resonances have a signature of worldwide thunderstorm activity at frequencies that go from ~8 up to ~40 Hz. To that end the present work shows preliminary results on PG measurements at 100 Hz that took place on two clear-sky days (17th and 18th June 2015) on the South of Portugal, Évora (38.50° N, 7.91° W). The field-mill used is a JCI 131F installed in the University of Évora campus (at 2 m height) with a few trees and two buildings in its surroundings (~50 m away). This device was developed by John Chubb (Chubb, 2014) and manufactured by Chilworth (UK). It was calibrated in December 2013 and recent work by the author (who is honored in this study for his overwhelming contribution to atmospheric electricity) reveals basically a flat spectral response of the device up to frequencies of 100 Hz (Chubb, 2015). This makes this device suitable for the study of High Frequency Electric Phenomena. Anisimov, S.V., et al. (1999). On the generation and evolution of aeroelectric structures

  14. Harvesting Low-Frequency (<5 Hz) Irregular Mechanical Energy: A Possible Killer Application of Triboelectric Nanogenerator.

    PubMed

    Zi, Yunlong; Guo, Hengyu; Wen, Zhen; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Hu, Chenguo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-04-26

    Electromagnetic generators (EMGs) and triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) are the two most powerful approaches for harvesting ambient mechanical energy, but the effectiveness of each depends on the triggering frequency. Here, after systematically comparing the performances of EMGs and TENGs under low-frequency motion (<5 Hz), we demonstrated that the output performance of EMGs is proportional to the square of the frequency, while that of TENGs is approximately in proportion to the frequency. Therefore, the TENG has a much better performance than that of the EMG at low frequency (typically 0.1-3 Hz). Importantly, the extremely small output voltage of the EMG at low frequency makes it almost inapplicable to drive any electronic unit that requires a certain threshold voltage (∼0.2-4 V), so that most of the harvested energy is wasted. In contrast, a TENG has an output voltage that is usually high enough (>10-100 V) and independent of frequency so that most of the generated power can be effectively used to power the devices. Furthermore, a TENG also has advantages of light weight, low cost, and easy scale up through advanced structure designs. All these merits verify the possible killer application of a TENG for harvesting energy at low frequency from motions such as human motions for powering small electronics and possibly ocean waves for large-scale blue energy.

  15. Cosmic ray scintillations in the frequency range from 0.00001 to 0.01 Hz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Lheureux, J.

    1978-01-01

    Power spectra of the flux variations in cosmic rays of energy greater than a few GeV are presented. The data were obtained at balloon altitudes (40-45 km) from two scintillation-type detectors flown for six hours from Palestine, Texas, on November 4, 1972. The large area detectors had effective count rates up to 2000 cps setting the Poisson noise level in the power spectra of the relative fluctuations at 0.001/Hz. The analysis was made on the singles rate of each of the counters as well as on the coincidence rates between them. In all cases, the spectra between 0.0001 and 0.002 Hz are power laws in frequency of the form f to the exponent negative gamma, where gamma is between 1.5 and 2.0. No significant peaks in the range 0.0001 to 0.01 Hz are observed.

  16. Orbit compensation for the time-varying elliptically polarized wiggler with switching frequency at 100 hz

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, O.; Krinsky, S.

    1997-07-01

    In October 1996, the elliptically polarized wiggler, installed in the X13 straight section of the NSLS X-ray ring, was commissioned at an operating frequency of 100 hz. This wiggler generates circularly polarized photons in the energy range of 0.1 to 10 keV with AC modulation of polarization helicity. The vertical magnetic field is produced by a hybrid permanent magnet structure, and the horizontal magnetic field is generated by an electromagnet capable of switching at frequencies up to 100 hz. Here, the authors discuss the compensation of the residual vertical and horizontal orbit motion utilizing a time-domain algorithm employing a function generator to drive trim coils at the wiggler ends, and the wideband high precision orbit measurement system of the X-ray ring. The residual orbit motion has been reduced to a level below 1 micron, and the device has been run in regular operations with no negative effect on other users.

  17. Determination of the dielectric constant of GaN in the kHz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, M. J.; Uren, M. J.; Wallis, D. J.; Wright, P. J.; Soley, D. E. J.; Simons, A. J.; Martin, T.

    2011-08-01

    Capacitance techniques are used to show that the dielectric constant ɛ|| of GaN in the kHz frequency range is 10.6 ± 0.3. The data allow depth information to be accurately extracted using methods such as mercury probe capacitance profiling. The measurements complement the pre-existing data which are derived from infrared reflectivity and which give a value of 10.4 ± 0.3.

  18. Effects of 3 Hz and 60 Hz Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields on Anxiety-Like Behaviors, Memory Retention of Passive Avoidance and Electrophysiological Properties of Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Amin; Shahani, Minoo; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza; Semnanian, Saeed; Rahmati Roudsari, Mohammad; Rezaei Tavirani, Mostafa; Hasanzadeh, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The effects of electromagnetic fields on biological organisms have been a controversial and also interesting debate over the past few decades, despite the wide range of investigations, many aspects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF/EMFs) effects including mechanism of their interaction with live organisms and also their possible biological applications still remain ambiguous. In the present study, we investigated whether the exposures of ELF/EMF with frequencies of 3 Hz and 60 Hz can affect the memory, anxiety like behaviors, electrophysiological properties and brain’s proteome in rats. Methods: Male rats were exposed to 3 Hz and 60 Hz ELF/EMFs in a protocol consisting of 2 cycles of 2 h/day exposure for 4 days separated with a 2-day interval. Short term memory and anxiety like behaviors were assessed immediately, 1 and 2 weeks after the exposures. Effects of short term exposure were also assessed using electrophysiological approach immediately after 2 hours exposure. Results: Behavioral test revealed that immediately after the end of exposures, locomotor activity of both 3 Hz and 60 Hz exposed groups significantly decreased compared to sham group. This exposure protocol had no effect on anxiety like behavior during the 2 weeks after the treatment and also on short term memory. A significant reduction in firing rate of locus coeruleus (LC) was found after 2 hours of both 3 Hz and 60 Hz exposures. Proteome analysis also revealed global changes in whole brain proteome after treatment. Conclusion: Here, some evidence regarding the fact that such exposures can alter locomotor activity and neurons firing rate in male rats were presented. PMID:27330708

  19. Upgrading a high-throughput spectrometer for high-frequency (<400 kHz) measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, T.; Nornberg, M. D.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Craig, D.

    2016-11-01

    The upgraded spectrometer used for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the Madison Symmetric Torus resolves emission fluctuations up to 400 kHz. The transimpedance amplifier's cutoff frequency was increased based upon simulations comparing the change in the measured photon counts for time-dynamic signals. We modeled each signal-processing stage of the diagnostic and scanned the filtering frequency to quantify the uncertainty in the photon counting rate. This modeling showed that uncertainties can be calculated based on assuming each amplification stage is a Poisson process and by calibrating the photon counting rate with a DC light source to address additional variation.

  20. Human exposure standards in the frequency range 1 Hz To 100 kHz: the case for adoption of the IEEE standard.

    PubMed

    Patrick Reilly, J

    2014-10-01

    Differences between IEEE C95 Standards (C95.6-2002 and C95.1-2005) in the low-frequency (1 Hz-100 kHz) and the ICNIRP-2010 guidelines appear across the frequency spectrum. Factors accounting for lack of convergence include: differences between the IEEE standards and the ICNIRP guidelines with respect to biological induction models, stated objectives, data trail from experimentally derived thresholds through physical and biological principles, selection and justification of safety/reduction factors, use of probability models, compliance standards for the limbs as distinct from the whole body, defined population categories, strategies for central nervous system protection below 20 Hz, and correspondence of environmental electric field limits with contact currents. This paper discusses these factors and makes the case for adoption of the limits in the IEEE standards.

  1. Discovery of a Neutron Star with Spin Frequency 530 Hz in A1744-361

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Markwardt, Craig B.; Swank, Jean H.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2005-01-01

    We report the detection with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) Proportional Counter Array (PCA) of 530 Hz burst oscillations in a thermonuclear (Type I) burst from the transient X-ray source A1744-361. This is only the second burst ever observed from this source, and the first to be seen in any detail. Our results confirm that A1744-361 is a low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) system harboring a rapidly rotating neutron star. The oscillations are first detected along the rising edge of the burst, and show evidence for frequency evolution of a magnitude similar to that seen in other burst sources. The modulation amplitude and its increase with photon energy are also typical of burst oscillations. The lack of any strong indication of photospheric radius expansion during the burst suggests a 9 kpc upper limit of the source distance. We also find energy dependent dips, establishing A1744-361 as a high inclination, dipping LMXB. The timescale between the two episodes of observed dips suggests an orbital period of approx. 97 min. We have also detected a 2 - 4 Hz quasi-periodic-oscillation (QPO) for the first time from this source. This QPO appears consistent with approx. 1 Hz QPOs seen from other high inclination systems. We searched for kilohertz QPOs, and found a suggestive 2.3 sigma feature at 800 Hz in one observation. The frequency, strength and quality factor are consistent with that of a lower frequency kilohertz QPO, but the relatively low significance argues for caution, so we consider this a tentative detection requiring confirmation.

  2. Low frequency band gaps below 10 Hz in radial flexible elastic metamaterial plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Nansha; Hou, Hong; Wu, Jiu Hui; Cheng, Baozhu

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the low frequency acoustic properties of a new proposed elastic metamaterial, which is arranged in the axial coordinate. The band structures, transmission spectra, and eigenmode displacement fields of this metamaterial are different from previous elastic metamaterial structures. Numerical calculation results show that the first order band gap of the radial flexible elastic metamaterial plate is below 10 Hz. A multiple-vibration coupling mechanism is proposed to explain the low frequency band gaps. By changing the geometrical dimensions h 1, h 2, b 1, and b 1 of the centre part, the location and width of the low frequency band gaps can be varied easily. The effects of density and Young’s modulus are also discussed in detail. In summary, the radial flexible elastic metamaterial plate can restrain low frequency vibration, owing to which it can potentially be used to protect infrasound, generate filters, and design acoustic devices.

  3. Review of Studies Concerning Electromagnetic Field (EMF) Exposure Assessment in Europe: Low Frequency Fields (50 Hz-100 kHz).

    PubMed

    Gajšek, Peter; Ravazzani, Paolo; Grellier, James; Samaras, Theodoros; Bakos, József; Thuróczy, György

    2016-09-01

    We aimed to review the findings of exposure assessment studies done in European countries on the exposure of the general public to low frequency electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) of various frequencies. The study shows that outdoor average extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) in public areas in urban environments range between 0.05 and 0.2 µT in terms of flux densities, but stronger values (of the order of a few µT) may occur directly beneath high-voltage power lines, at the walls of transformer buildings, and at the boundary fences of substations. In the indoor environment, high values have been measured close to several domestic appliances (up to the mT range), some of which are held close to the body, e.g., hair dryers, electric shavers. Common sources of exposure to intermediate frequencies (IF) include induction cookers, compact fluorescent lamps, inductive charging systems for electric cars and security or anti-theft devices. No systematic measurement surveys or personal exposimetry data for the IF range have been carried out and only a few reports on measurements of EMFs around such devices are mentioned. According to the available European exposure assessment studies, three population exposure categories were classified by the authors regarding the possible future risk analysis. This classification should be considered a crucial advancement for exposure assessment, which is a mandatory step in any future health risk assessment of EMFs exposure.

  4. The phonological function of vowels is maintained at fundamental frequencies up to 880 Hz.

    PubMed

    Friedrichs, Daniel; Maurer, Dieter; Dellwo, Volker

    2015-07-01

    In a between-subject perception task, listeners either identified full words or vowels isolated from these words at F0s between 220 and 880 Hz. They received two written words as response options (minimal pair with the stimulus vowel in contrastive position). Listeners' sensitivity (A') was extremely high in both conditions at all F0s, showing that the phonological function of vowels can also be maintained at high F0s. This indicates that vowel sounds may carry strong acoustic cues departing from common formant frequencies at high F0s and that listeners do not rely on consonantal context phenomena for their identification performance.

  5. SSVEP-BCI implementation for 37-40 Hz frequency range.

    PubMed

    Müller, Sandra Mara Torres; Diez, Pablo F; Bastos-Filho, Teodiano Freire; Sarcinelli-Filho, Mário; Mut, Vicente; Laciar, Eric

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) based on Steady State Visual Evoked Potentials (SSVEP), using higher stimulus frequencies (>30 Hz). Using a statistical test and a decision tree, the real-time EEG registers of six volunteers are analyzed, with the classification result updated each second. The BCI developed does not need any kind of settings or adjustments, which makes it more general. Offline results are presented, which corresponds to a correct classification rate of up to 99% and a Information Transfer Rate (ITR) of up to 114.2 bits/min.

  6. Neurone bioelectric activity under magnetic fields of variable frequency in the range of 0.1-80 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Bruzón, R. N.; Azanza, María. J.; Calvo, Ana C.; del Moral, A.

    2004-05-01

    Intracellular recordings from single unit molluscan neurones under exposure to ELF-MF (1 mT, 0.1-80 Hz), show that neurone frequency activity, f, decreases with the applied magnetic field frequency, fM, a phenomenon which indicates a frequency-window effect for the neurone membrane response. The HMHW of the window amounts between 2-10 Hz. An explanation of this phenomenon is proposed.

  7. Copper bromide vapor brightness amplifiers with 100 kHz pulse repetition frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigub, M. V.; Evtushenko, G. S.; Torgaev, S. N.; Shiyanov, D. V.; Evtushenko, T. G.

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents a laser monitor with 10 μs time-resolution based on a high-frequency copper bromide vapor brightness amplifier. A sync circuit has been designed for single-pulse imaging. The analysis of amplifying characteristics of the active elements and active optical system (laser monitor) parameters allowed to determine the optimal concentration of HBr at which the images can be obtained with minimum distortions. For the active element operating at high frequencies (more than 50 kHz) as a brightness amplifier, the concentration of HBr must be lower than that needed for obtaining the maximum output power. The limiting brightness temperature of the background radiation which does not affect the image quality is determined. The potential feasibility of using a proposed brightness amplifier for visualizing processes blocked from viewing by the background radiation with the brightness temperature up to 8000 K is demonstrated.

  8. 200 Hz repetition frequency joule-level high beam quality Nd:YAG nanosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jisi; Tang, Xiongxin; Fan, Zhongwei; Wang, Haocheng

    2016-06-01

    A joule-level Nd:YAG nanosecond laser of high repetition frequency and high beam quality is developed out. The laser is designed as a MOPA system mainly including single longitudinal mode seed, pre-amplifier unit an d power amplifier unit. In order to obtain the high-quality laser beam output, phase conjugation is adopted to compensate the laser beam distortion. Under the condition of 200 Hz high repetition frequency and 8.19 μJ single pulse energy injected by the single longitudinal mode seed, 1.53 J output energy is gained. The output laser beam is of 9 mm diameter, 7.41 ns pulse width, the far field beam spot 1.32 times the value of the diffraction limit, 1.2% energy stability (RMS) and less than 13 μrad far field beam spot angle shift.

  9. Study on sound-speed dispersion in a sandy sediment at frequency ranges of 0.5-3 kHz and 90-170 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sheng-qi; Liu, Bao-hua; Yu, Kai-ben; Kan, Guang-ming; Yang, Zhi-guo

    2017-03-01

    In order to study the properties of sound-speed dispersion in a sandy sediment, the sound speed was measured both at high frequency (90-170 kHz) and low frequency (0.5-3 kHz) in laboratory environments. At high frequency, a sampling measurement was conducted with boiled and uncooked sand samples collected from the bottom of a large water tank. The sound speed was directly obtained through transmission measurement using single source and single hydrophone. At low frequency, an in situ measurement was conducted in the water tank, where the sandy sediment had been homogeneously paved at the bottom for a long time. The sound speed was indirectly inverted according to the traveling time of signals received by three buried hydrophones in the sandy sediment and the geometry in experiment. The results show that the mean sound speed is approximate 1710-1713 m/s with a weak positive gradient in the sand sample after being boiled (as a method to eliminate bubbles as much as possible) at high frequency, which agrees well with the predictions of Biot theory, the effective density fluid model (EDFM) and Buckingham's theory. However, the sound speed in the uncooked sandy sediment obviously decreases (about 80%) both at high frequency and low frequency due to plenty of bubbles in existence. And the sound-speed dispersion performs a weak negative gradient at high frequency. Finally, a water-unsaturated Biot model is presented for trying to explain the decrease of sound speed in the sandy sediment with plenty of bubbles.

  10. Low frequency geomagnetic fluctuations (.04 to 25 Hz) on land and on the floor of Monterey Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDevitt, G. R.; Homan, B. B.

    1980-06-01

    A coil antenna consisting of approximately 6000 turns of copper wire was used to measure the horizontal component of fluctuations of the Earth's magnetic field on the floor of Monterey Bay in water depth of approximately 50 meters. The results indicate that the power spectral density of the fluctuations varies from 10(nT)-sq/Hz at 0.04 Hz to 0.000001(nT)-sq/Hz at 25 Hz, a monotonic decrease of about 6 dB/octave, except in the 8-20 Hz region where the Schuman resonances occur. While the sensitivity of the equipment was insufficient to measure the vertical component of the fluctuation we can put an upper limit of 0.001(nT)-sq/Hz at 1 Hz and 0.000001(nT)-sq/Hz) at 10 Hz on the magnitude of this component. The same sensor was also used to measure various components of the field fluctuations at a remote land site (Chew's Ridge). In the frequency range observed the general shape of the spectra was similar to those obtained at sea. However, a strong azimuthal variation at certain frequencies was noted in the land data. The possibility that these directional signals are of man made origin cannot be excluded at this time.

  11. 52 W kHz-linewidth low-noise linearly-polarized all-fiber single-frequency MOPA laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Changsheng; Xu, Shanhui; Chen, Dan; Zhang, Yuanfei; Zhao, Qilai; Li, Can; Zhou, Kaijun; Feng, Zhouming; Gan, Jiulin; Yang, Zhongmin

    2016-05-01

    An all-fiber Yb-doped kHz-linewidth low-noise linearly polarized single-frequency master-oscillator power-amplifier (MOPA) laser with a stable CW output power of >52 W is demonstrated. By suppressing the intensity noise of the DBR phosphate fiber oscillator, the linewidth of MOPA laser is not noticeably broadened, and an ultra-narrow linewidth of <3 kHz is obtained. Furthermore, the low-noise behavior of MOPA lasers is investigated. A measured relative intensity noise of < -130 dB Hz-1 at frequencies of over 2 MHz, a phase noise above 1 kHz of <5 μrad/Hz1/2, and a signal-to-noise ratio of >63 dB are achieved.

  12. Band limited emission with central frequency around 2 Hz accompanying powerful cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troitskaia, V. A.; Shepetnov, K. S.; Dvobnia, B. D.

    1992-01-01

    It has been found that powerful cyclones are proceeded, accompanied and followed by narrow band electromagnetic emission with central frequency around 2 Hz. It is shown that the signal from this emission is unique and clearly distinguishable from known types of magnetic pulsations, spectra of local thunderstorms, and signals from industrial sources. This emission was first observed during an unusually powerful cyclone with tornadoes in the western European part of the Soviet Union, which passed by the observatory of Borok from south to north-east. The emission has been confirmed by analysis of similar events in Antarctica. The phenomenon described presents a new aspect of interactions of processes in the lower atmosphere and the ionosphere.

  13. Note: Suppression of kHz-frequency switching noise in digital micro-mirror devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueck, Klaus; Mazurenko, Anton; Luick, Niclas; Lompe, Thomas; Moritz, Henning

    2017-01-01

    High resolution digital micro-mirror devices (DMDs) make it possible to produce nearly arbitrary light fields with high accuracy, reproducibility, and low optical aberrations. However, using these devices to trap and manipulate ultracold atomic systems for, e.g., quantum simulation is often complicated by the presence of kHz-frequency switching noise. Here we demonstrate a simple hardware extension that solves this problem and makes it possible to produce truly static light fields. This modification leads to a 47 fold increase in the time that we can hold ultracold 6Li atoms in a dipole potential created with the DMD. Finally, we provide reliable and user friendly APIs written in Matlab and Python to control the DMD.

  14. 486nm blue laser operating at 500 kHz pulse repetition frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creeden, Daniel; Blanchard, Jon; Pretorius, Herman; Limongelli, Julia; Setzler, Scott D.

    2016-03-01

    Compact, high power blue light in the 470-490nm region is difficult to generate due to the lack of laser sources which are easily convertible (through parametric processes) to those wavelengths. By using a pulsed Tm-doped fiber laser as a pump source for a 2-stage second harmonic generation (SHG) scheme, we have generated ~2W of 486.5nm light at 500kHz pulse repetition frequency (PRF). To our knowledge, this is the highest PRF and output power achieved in the blue region based on a frequency converted, monolithic fiber laser. This pump laser is a pulsed Tm-doped fiber laser/amplifier which generates 12.8W of 1946nm power at 500kHz PRF with diffraction-limited output from a purely single-mode fiber. The output from this laser is converted to 973nm through second harmonic generation (SHG). The 973nm is then converted to 486.5nm via another SHG stage. This architecture operates with very low peak power, which can be challenging from a nonlinear conversion standpoint. However, the low peak power enables the use of a single-mode monolithic fiber amplifier without undergoing nonlinear effects in the fiber. This also eliminates the need for novel fiber designs, large-mode area fiber, or free-space coupling to rod-type amplifiers, improving reliability and robustness of the laser source. Higher power and conversion efficiency are possible through the addition of Tm-doped fiber amplification stages as well as optimization of the nonlinear conversion process and nonlinear materials. In this paper, we discuss the laser layout, results, and challenges with generating blue light using a low peak power approach.

  15. PULSE AMPLITUDE DEPENDS ON kHz QPO FREQUENCY IN THE ACCRETING MILLISECOND PULSAR SAX J1808.4-3658

    SciTech Connect

    Bult, Peter; Van der Klis, Michiel

    2015-01-10

    We study the relation between the 300-700 Hz upper kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) and the 401 Hz coherent pulsations across all outbursts of the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658 observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We find that the pulse amplitude systematically changes by a factor of ∼2 when the upper kHz QPO frequency passes through 401 Hz: it halves when the QPO moves to above the spin frequency and doubles again on the way back. This establishes for the first time the existence of a direct effect of kHz QPOs on the millisecond pulsations and provides a new clue to the origin of the upper kHz QPO. We discuss several scenarios and conclude that while more complex explanations can not formally be excluded, our result strongly suggests that the QPO is produced by azimuthal motion at the inner edge of the accretion disk, most likely orbital motion. Depending on whether this azimuthal motion is faster or slower than the spin, the plasma then interacts differently with the neutron-star magnetic field. The most straightforward interpretation involves magnetospheric centrifugal inhibition of the accretion flow that sets in when the upper kHz QPO becomes slower than the spin.

  16. Electrorotation of single yeast cells at frequencies between 100 Hz and 1.6 GHz.

    PubMed Central

    Hölzel, R

    1997-01-01

    The determination of complete electrorotation spectra of living cells has been made possible by the development of a quadrature generator and an electrode assembly that span the frequency range between 100 Hz and 1.6 GHz. Multiple spectra of single cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been measured at different medium conductivities ranging from 0.7 to 550 microS cm-1. A spherical four-shell model was applied that simulated the experimental data well and disclosed the four-layer structure of the cell envelope attributed to the plasma membrane, the periplasmic space, and a thick inner and a thin outer wall region. Below 10 kHz an additional rotation effect was found, which changed its direction depending on the ionic strength of the medium. This is supposed to be connected with properties of the cell surface and its close vicinity. From the four-shell simulation the following physical properties of cell compartments could be derived: specific capacitance of plasma membrane (0.76 microF cm-2), periplasmic space (0.5 microF cm-2), and outer wall region (0.1 microF cm-2). The conductivity of cytoplasm, plasma membrane, and inner wall region were found to vary with medium ionic strength from 9 to 12 mS cm-1, 5.8 nS cm-1 to approximately 50 nS cm-1, and 6 microS cm-1 to 240 microS cm-1, respectively. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:9251826

  17. Dielectric properties of skeletal muscle during ischemia in the frequency range from 50 Hz to 200 MHz.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, M; Kirlum, H J; Schlegel, C; Gebhard, M M

    1999-04-20

    The complex dielectric properties of canine skeletal muscles were measured at 25 degrees C during ischemia in the frequency range from 50 Hz to 200 MHz. The dielectric spectrum of skeletal muscle shows an alpha-dispersion below 1 kHz and a beta-dispersion with a relaxation frequency of about 100 kHz. The alpha-dispersion disappears between 450 and 500 min of ischemia time, the same time during which mechanical contraction was observed, and was restored later. During ischemia, the beta-dispersion is shifted continuously to higher frequencies; and at frequencies above 50 MHz, a decrease of the real part of the dielectric permittivity was measured. The dielectric loss factor decreases during ischemia at frequencies below 500 kHz, only interrupted by a short increase, coinciding with the disappearance of the alpha-dispersion. The principal processes that happen during ischemia inside the skeletal muscle tissues were studied with the help of a model especially designed to simulate membrane effects on the dielectric spectrum. The disappearance of the alpha-dispersion is explained by an increase of conductivity in the membrane of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Shifting beta-dispersion to higher frequencies is a result of metabolically produced ions and therefore increasing conductivity of the intracellular medium. Decreasing dielectric permittivity at frequencies above 50 MHz and decreasing dielectric loss factor at low frequencies are caused by the cell edema.

  18. Profiles of Stimulus-Frequency Otoacoustic Emissions from 0.5 to 20 kHz in Humans.

    PubMed

    Dewey, James B; Dhar, Sumitrajit

    2017-02-01

    The characteristics of human otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) have not been thoroughly examined above the standard audiometric frequency range (>8 kHz). This is despite the fact that deterioration of cochlear function often starts at the basal, high-frequency end of the cochlea before progressing apically. Here, stimulus-frequency OAEs (SFOAEs) were obtained from 0.5 to 20 kHz in 23 young, audiometrically normal female adults and three individuals with abnormal audiograms, using a low-to-moderate probe level of 36 dB forward pressure level (FPL). In audiometrically normal ears, SFOAEs were measurable at frequencies approaching the start of the steeply sloping high-frequency portion of the audiogram (∼12-15 kHz), though their amplitudes often declined substantially above ∼7 kHz, rarely exceeding 0 dB SPL above 8 kHz. This amplitude decline was typically abrupt and occurred at a frequency that was variable across subjects and not strongly related to the audiogram. In contrast, certain ears with elevated mid-frequency thresholds but regions of normal high-frequency sensitivity could possess surprisingly large SFOAEs (>10 dB SPL) above 7 kHz. When also measured, distortion-product OAEs (DPOAEs) usually remained stronger at higher stimulus frequencies and mirrored the audiogram more closely than SFOAEs. However, the high-frequency extent of SFOAE and DPOAE responses was similar when compared as a function of the response frequency, suggesting that middle ear transmission may be a common limiting factor at high frequencies. Nevertheless, cochlear factors are more likely responsible for complexities observed in high-frequency SFOAE spectra, such as abrupt amplitude changes and narrowly defined response peaks above 10 kHz, as well as the large responses in abnormal ears. These factors may include altered cochlear reflectivity due to subtle damage or the reduced spatial extent of the SFOAE generation region at the cochlear base. The use of higher probe levels is

  19. Synthesizing High-Frequency (1-25 HZ) Regional Phases at Large Distances (>1000 KM) Using Generalized Screen Propagators (GSP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    seismology and earthquake seismology . The generalized screen propagator (GSP) is based on the one-way wave equation and the one-return approximation. The...High-Frequency (1-25 HZ) Regional Phases at Large Distances O (>1000 KM) Using Generalized Screen Propagators (GSP) SApproved for public release...DTRA 01-97-1-0004 Synthesizing High-Freguency (1-25 HZ) Regional Phases at Large Distances (1 > 1000 KM) Using Generalized Screen Propagators (GSP) 5b

  20. 10-kHz High-Frequency SCS Therapy: A Clinical Summary

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Marc; Van Buyten, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Objective Chronic pain remains a serious public health problem worldwide. A spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy called HF10 SCS uses 10-kHz high-frequency stimulation to provide pain relief without paresthesia. In this article, we describe the therapy, device, and the methods of implant and then review the safety and effectiveness data for this therapy. Results HF10 SCS uses a charge-balanced stimulation waveform that has been shown to be safe in both animal and human studies. Data from a multicenter, prospective clinical trial shows that the therapy provides substantial back and leg pain relief. Numerous additional reports suggest improved pain relief in other body areas and for complex pain patterns, even for patients who have previously failed other neuromodulation therapies. Conclusions The clinical experience reported in this article supports the efficacy and pain relief provided by HF10 SCS therapy. Clinical studies have also concluded that HF10 SCS does not generate paresthesia nor was it necessary to provide adequate coverage for pain relief. As clinical evidence accumulates and technological innovation improves patient outcomes, neuromodulatory techniques will be sought earlier in the treatment continuum to reduce the suffering for the many with otherwise intractable chronic pain. PMID:25377278

  1. Report on key comparison COOMET.AUV.A-K5: pressure calibration of laboratory standard microphones in the frequency range 2 Hz to 10 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrowolska, D.; Kosterov, A.

    2016-01-01

    This is the final report for regional key comparison COOMET.AUV.A-K5 on the pressure calibration of laboratory standard microphones in the frequency range from 2 Hz to 10 kHz. Two laboratories—Central Office of Measures (GUM)—the national metrology institute for Poland and the State Enterprise Scientific-Research Institute for Metrology of Measurement and Control Systems (DP NDI Systema)— the designated institute for acoustics in Ukraine took part in this comparison with the GUM as a pilot. One travelling type LS1P microphone was circulated to the participants and results in the form of regular calibration certificates were collected. The results of the DP NDI Systema obtained in this comparison were linked to the CCAUV.A-K5 key comparison through the joint participation of the GUM. The degrees of equivalence were computed for DP NDI Systema with respect to the CCAUV.A-K5 key comparison reference value. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCAUV, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  2. Final report on key comparison CCAUV.A-K5: pressure calibration of laboratory standard microphones in the frequency range 2 Hz to 10 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avison, Janine; Barham, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This document and the accompanying spreadsheets constitute the final report for key comparison CCAUV.A-K5 on the pressure calibration of laboratory standard microphones in the frequency range from 2 Hz to 10 kHz. Twelve national measurement institutes took part in the key comparison and the National Physical Laboratory piloted the project. Two laboratory standard microphones IEC type LS1P were circulated to the participants and results in the form of regular calibration certificates were collected throughout the project. One of the microphones was subsequently deemed to have compromised stability for the purpose of deriving a reference value. Consequently the key comparison reference value (KCRV) has been made based on the weighted mean results for sensitivity level and for sensitivity phase from just one of the microphones. Corresponding degrees of equivalence (DoEs) have also been calculated and are presented. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCAUV, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  3. Nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet using a combination of 50 kHz/2 MHz dual-frequency power sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yong-Jie; Yuan, Qiang-Hua; Li, Fei; Wang, Xiao-Min; Yin, Gui-Qin; Dong, Chen-Zhong

    2013-11-15

    An atmospheric pressure plasma jet is generated by dual sinusoidal wave (50 kHz and 2 MHz). The dual-frequency plasma jet exhibits the advantages of both low frequency and radio frequency plasmas, namely, the long plasma plume and the high electron density. The radio frequency ignition voltage can be reduced significantly by using dual-frequency excitation compared to the conventional radio frequency without the aid of the low frequency excitation source. A larger operating range of α mode discharge can be obtained using dual-frequency excitation which is important to obtain homogeneous and low-temperature plasma. A larger controllable range of the gas temperature of atmospheric pressure plasma could also be obtained using dual-frequency excitation.

  4. Conduction block in myelinated axons induced by high-frequency (kHz) non-symmetric biphasic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shouguo; Yang, Guangning; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R.; de Groat, William C.; Tai, Changfeng

    2015-01-01

    This study used the Frankenhaeuser–Huxley axonal model to analyze the effects of non-symmetric waveforms on conduction block of myelinated axons induced by high-frequency (10–300 kHz) biphasic electrical stimulation. The results predict a monotonic relationship between block threshold and stimulation frequency for symmetric waveform and a non-monotonic relationship for non-symmetric waveforms. The symmetric waveform causes conduction block by constantly activating both sodium and potassium channels at frequencies of 20–300 kHz, while the non-symmetric waveforms share the same blocking mechanism from 20 kHz up to the peak threshold frequency. At the frequencies above the peak threshold frequency the non-symmetric waveforms block axonal conduction by either hyperpolarizing the membrane (if the positive pulse is longer) or depolarizing the membrane (if the negative pulse is longer). This simulation study further increases our understanding of conduction block in myelinated axons induced by high-frequency biphasic electrical stimulation, and can guide future animal experiments as well as optimize stimulation parameters that might be used for electrically induced nerve block in clinical applications. PMID:26217217

  5. Low Frequency (11 mHz) Oscillations in H1743-322: A New Class of Black Hole QPOs?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altamirano, D.; Strohmayer, T.

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) at approx 11 mHz in two RXTE observations and one Chandra observation of the black hole candidate HI743-322. The QPO is observed only at the beginning of the 2010 and 2011 outbursts at similar hard color and intensity, suggestive of an accretion state dependence for the QPO. Although its frequency appears to be correlated with Xray intensity on timescales of a day, in successive outbursts eight months apart we measure a QPO frequency that differs by less than approximately equals 0.0015 Hz while the intensity had changed significantly. We show that this 11 mHz QPO is different from the so-called Type-C QPOs seen in black holes and that the mechanisms that produce the two flavors of variability are most probably independent. We compare the 11 mHz QPO with other variability phenomena seen in accreting black holes and neutron stars and conclude that although at 1-2 orders of magnitude lower in frequency, they best resemble the so-called "1 Hz" QPOs seen in dipping neutron star systems. If confirmed, H1743-322 is the first black hole showing this type of variability. Given the unusual characteristics and the hard-state dependence of the 11 mHz QPO, we speculate that these oscillations might instead be related to the radio jets observed in HI743-322. It remains unexplained, however, why similar QPOs have not yet been identified in other black holes and why they have only been seen in the last two outbursts of HI743-322.

  6. Effects of 35 kHz, low-frequency ultrasound application in vitro on human fibroblast morphology and migration patterns.

    PubMed

    Conner-Kerr, Teresa; Malpass, Gloria; Steele, Arhalia; Howlett, Allyn

    2015-03-01

    Low-frequency ultrasound (LFU) in the frequency range 30-40 kHz administered using different delivery methods (waterbath and noncontact spray) has shown positive effects on chronic wound healing rates in humans, but the underlying mechanisms are only beginning to be explored. To examine the effects of LFU delivered at 35 kHz on the morphology and migration of human fibroblasts, real-time videography was used to record the rate and character of cultured human fibroblast migration at 8-hour increments for 48 hours in a wound assay model. Cells were treated with 35 kHz LFU or saline only (control). Cellular morphology (cell shape, packing, and apparent length) and migration patterns including orientation were analyzed using time-lapse videography. LFU delivered at a frequency of 35 kHz produced a different pattern of fibroblast migration in vitro (varied orientation versus vertical orientation for untreated cells) and altered cell morphology compared to controls. The observed pattern of migration was more varied and widely distributed across multiple angles versus the predominant parallel orientation of the migrating untreated cells. The potential implications of these findings on collagen placement in the extracellular matrix, which may affect degree of soft tissue scarring, should be further investigated.

  7. In vitro Neurons in Mammalian Cortical Layer 4 Exhibit Intrinsic Oscillatory Activity in the 10- to 50-Hz Frequency Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llinas, Rodolfo R.; Grace, Anthony A.; Yarom, Yosef

    1991-02-01

    We report here the presence of fast subthreshold oscillatory potentials recorded in vitro from neurons within layer 4 of the guinea pig frontal cortex. Two types of oscillatory neurons were recorded: (i) One type exhibited subthreshold oscillations whose frequency increased with membrane depolarization and encompassed a range of 10-45 Hz. Action potentials in this type of neuron demonstrated clear after-hyperpolarizations. (ii) The second type of neuron was characterized by narrow-frequency oscillations near 35-50 Hz. These oscillations often outlasted the initiating depolarizing stimulus. No calcium component could be identified in their action potential. In both types of cell the subthreshold oscillations were tetrodotoxin-sensitive, indicating that the depolarizing phase of the oscillation was generated by a voltage-dependent sodium conductance. The initial depolarizing phase was followed by a potassium conductance responsible for the falling phase of the oscillatory wave. In both types of cell, the subthreshold oscillation could trigger spikes at the oscillatory frequency, if the membrane was sufficiently depolarized. Combining intracellular recordings with Lucifer yellow staining showed that the narrow-frequency oscillatory activity was produced by a sparsely spinous interneuron located in layer 4 of the cortex. This neuron has extensive local axonal collaterals that ramify in layers 3 and 4 such that they may contribute to the columnar synchronization of activity in the 40- to 50-Hz range. Cortical activity in this frequency range has been proposed as the basis for the "conjunctive properties" of central nervous system networks.

  8. Post-stimulation block of frog sciatic nerve by high-frequency (kHz) biphasic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guangning; Xiao, Zhiying; Wang, Jicheng; Shen, Bing; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2017-04-01

    This study determined if high-frequency biphasic stimulation can induce nerve conduction block that persists after the stimulation is terminated, i.e., post-stimulation block. The frog sciatic nerve-muscle preparation was used in the study. Muscle contraction force induced by low-frequency (0.5 Hz) nerve stimulation was recorded to indicate the occurrence and recovery of nerve block induced by the high-frequency (5 or 10 kHz) biphasic stimulation. Nerve block was observed during high-frequency stimulation and after termination of the stimulation. The recovery from post-stimulation block occurred in two distinct phases. During the first phase, the complete block induced during high-frequency stimulation was maintained. The average maximal duration for the first phase was 107 ± 50 s. During the second phase, the block gradually or abruptly reversed. The duration of both first and second phases was dependent on stimulation intensity and duration but not frequency. Stimulation of higher intensity (1.4-2 times block threshold) and longer duration (5 min) produced the longest period (249 ± 58 s) for a complete recovery. Post-stimulation block can be induced by high-frequency biphasic stimulation, which is important for future investigations of the blocking mechanisms and for optimizing the stimulation parameters or protocols in clinical applications.

  9. 200 kHz Commercial Sonar Systems Generate Lower Frequency Side Lobes Audible to Some Marine Mammals

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Southall, Brandon; Carlson, Thomas J.; Xu, Jinshan; Martinez, Jayson J.; Weiland, Mark A.; Ingraham, John M.

    2014-04-15

    The spectral properties of pulses transmitted by three commercially available 200 kHz echo sounders were measured to assess the possibility that sound energy in below the center (carrier) frequency might be heard by marine mammals. The study found that all three sounders generated sound at frequencies below the center frequency and within the hearing range of some marine mammals and that this sound was likely detectable by the animals over limited ranges. However, at standard operating source levels for the sounders, the sound below the center frequency was well below potentially harmful levels. It was concluded that the sounds generated by the sounders could affect the behavior of marine mammals within fairly close proximity to the sources and that that the blanket exclusion of echo sounders from environmental impact analysis based solely on the center frequency output in relation to the range of marine mammal hearing should be reconsidered.

  10. 30 Hz-linewidth, diode-laser-pumped, Nd:GGG nonplanar ring oscillators by active frequency stabilisation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, T.; Nilsson, A. C.; Fejer, M. M.; Farinas, A. D.; Gustafson, E. K.

    1989-01-01

    A heterodyne linewidth of less than 30 Hz for the beatnote between the outputs of two 282 THz Nd:GGG nonplanar ring oscillators (NPROs) is reported. The lasers were independently locked to adjacent axial modes of a high-finesse interferometer. The remnant frequency noise appears to be dominated by free spectral range fluctuations in the reference interferometer rather than by residual laser noise.

  11. 200 kHz commercial sonar systems generate lower frequency side lobes audible to some marine mammals.

    PubMed

    Deng, Z Daniel; Southall, Brandon L; Carlson, Thomas J; Xu, Jinshan; Martinez, Jayson J; Weiland, Mark A; Ingraham, John M

    2014-01-01

    The spectral properties of pulses transmitted by three commercially available 200 kHz echo sounders were measured to assess the possibility that marine mammals might hear sound energy below the center (carrier) frequency that may be generated by transmitting short rectangular pulses. All three sounders were found to generate sound at frequencies below the center frequency and within the hearing range of some marine mammals, e.g. killer whales, false killer whales, beluga whales, Atlantic bottlenose dolphins, harbor porpoises, and others. The frequencies of these sub-harmonic sounds ranged from 90 to 130 kHz. These sounds were likely detectable by the animals over distances up to several hundred meters but were well below potentially harmful levels. The sounds generated by the sounders could potentially affect the behavior of marine mammals within fairly close proximity to the sources and therefore the exclusion of echo sounders from environmental impact analysis based solely on the center frequency output in relation to the range of marine mammal hearing should be reconsidered.

  12. 200 kHz Commercial Sonar Systems Generate Lower Frequency Side Lobes Audible to Some Marine Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Z. Daniel; Southall, Brandon L.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Xu, Jinshan; Martinez, Jayson J.; Weiland, Mark A.; Ingraham, John M.

    2014-01-01

    The spectral properties of pulses transmitted by three commercially available 200 kHz echo sounders were measured to assess the possibility that marine mammals might hear sound energy below the center (carrier) frequency that may be generated by transmitting short rectangular pulses. All three sounders were found to generate sound at frequencies below the center frequency and within the hearing range of some marine mammals, e.g. killer whales, false killer whales, beluga whales, Atlantic bottlenose dolphins, harbor porpoises, and others. The frequencies of these sub-harmonic sounds ranged from 90 to 130 kHz. These sounds were likely detectable by the animals over distances up to several hundred meters but were well below potentially harmful levels. The sounds generated by the sounders could potentially affect the behavior of marine mammals within fairly close proximity to the sources and therefore the exclusion of echo sounders from environmental impact analysis based solely on the center frequency output in relation to the range of marine mammal hearing should be reconsidered. PMID:24736608

  13. Areas V1 and V2 show microsaccade-related 3-4-Hz covariation in gamma power and frequency.

    PubMed

    Lowet, E; Roberts, M J; Bosman, C A; Fries, P; De Weerd, P

    2016-05-01

    Neuronal gamma-band synchronization (25-80 Hz) in visual cortex appears sustained and stable during prolonged visual stimulation when investigated with conventional averages across trials. However, recent studies in macaque visual cortex have used single-trial analyses to show that both power and frequency of gamma oscillations exhibit substantial moment-by-moment variation. This has raised the question of whether these apparently random variations might limit the functional role of gamma-band synchronization for neural processing. Here, we studied the moment-by-moment variation in gamma oscillation power and frequency, as well as inter-areal gamma synchronization, by simultaneously recording local field potentials in V1 and V2 of two macaque monkeys. We additionally analyzed electrocorticographic V1 data from a third monkey. Our analyses confirm that gamma-band synchronization is not stationary and sustained but undergoes moment-by-moment variations in power and frequency. However, those variations are neither random and nor a possible obstacle to neural communication. Instead, the gamma power and frequency variations are highly structured, shared between areas and shaped by a microsaccade-related 3-4-Hz theta rhythm. Our findings provide experimental support for the suggestion that cross-frequency coupling might structure and facilitate the information flow between brain regions.

  14. (1)H NMR at Larmor frequencies down to 3Hz by means of Field-Cycling techniques.

    PubMed

    Kresse, B; Becher, M; Privalov, A F; Hofmann, M; Rössler, E A; Vogel, M; Fujara, F

    2017-04-01

    Field-Cycling (FC) NMR experiments were carried out at (1)H Larmor frequencies down to about 3Hz. This could be achieved by fast switching a high polarizing magnetic field down to a low evolution field which is tilted with respect to the polarization field. Then, the low frequency Larmor precession of the nuclear spin magnetization about this evolution field is registered by means of FIDs in a high detection field. The crucial technical point of the experiment is the stabilization of the evolution field, which is achieved by compensating for temporal magnetic field fluctuations of all three spatial components. The paper reports on some other basic low field experiments such as the simultaneous measurement of the Larmor frequency and the spin-lattice relaxation time in such small fields as well as the irradiation of oscillating transversal magnetic field pulses at very low frequencies as a novel method for field calibration in low field FC NMR. The potential of low field FC is exemplified by the (1)H relaxation dispersion of water at frequencies below about 2kHz stemming from the slow proton exchange process.

  15. Family food involvement and frequency of family dinner meals among Australian children aged 10-12years. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations with dietary patterns.

    PubMed

    Leech, Rebecca M; McNaughton, Sarah A; Crawford, David A; Campbell, Karen J; Pearson, Natalie; Timperio, Anna

    2014-04-01

    Involvement in meal preparation and eating meals with the family are associated with better dietary patterns in adolescents, however little research has included older children or longitudinal study designs. This 3-year longitudinal study examines cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between family food involvement, family dinner meal frequency and dietary patterns during late childhood. Questionnaires were completed by parents of 188 children from Greater Melbourne, Australia at baseline in 2002 (mean age=11.25years) and at follow-up in 2006 (mean age=14.16years). Principal components analysis (PCA) was used to identify dietary patterns. Factor analysis (FA) was used to determine the principal factors from six indicators of family food involvement. Multiple linear regression models were used to predict the dietary patterns of children and adolescents at baseline and at follow-up, 3years later, from baseline indicators of family food involvement and frequency of family dinner meals. PCA revealed two dietary patterns, labeled a healthful pattern and an energy-dense pattern. FA revealed one factor for family food involvement. Cross-sectionally among boys, family food involvement score (β=0.55, 95% CI: 0.02, 1.07) and eating family dinner meals daily (β=1.11, 95% CI: 0.27, 1.96) during late childhood were positively associated with the healthful pattern. Eating family dinner meals daily was inversely associated with the energy-dense pattern, cross-sectionally among boys (β=-0.56, 95% CI: -1.06, -0.06). No significant cross-sectional associations were found among girls and no significant longitudinal associations were found for either gender. Involvement in family food and eating dinner with the family during late childhood may have a positive influence on dietary patterns of boys. No evidence was found to suggest the effects on dietary patterns persist into adolescence.

  16. Device for recording the 20 Hz - 200 KHz sound frequency spectrum using teletransmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baciu, I.

    1974-01-01

    The device described consists of two distinct parts: (1) The sound pickup system consisting of the wide-frequency band condenser microphone which contains in the same assembly the frequency-modulated oscillator and the output stage. Being transistorized and small, this system can be easily moved, so that sounds can be picked up even in places that are difficult to reach with larger devices. (2) The receiving and recording part is separate and can be at a great distance from the sound pickup system. This part contains a 72 MHz input stage, a frequency changer that gives an intermediate frequency of 30 MHz and a multichannel analyzer coupled to an oscilloscope and a recorder.

  17. Behavioral responses of California sea lions to mid-frequency (3250-3450 Hz) sonar signals.

    PubMed

    Houser, Dorian S; Martin, Stephen W; Finneran, James J

    2013-12-01

    Military sonar has the potential to negatively impact marine mammals. To investigate factors affecting behavioral disruption in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus), fifteen sea lions participated in a controlled exposure study using a simulated tactical sonar signal (1 s duration, 3250-3450 Hz) as a stimulus. Subjects were placed into groups of three and each group received a stimulus exposure of 125, 140, 155, 170, or 185 dB re: 1 μPa (rms). Each subject was trained to swim across an enclosure, touch a paddle, and return to the start location. Sound exposures occurred at the mid-point of the enclosure. Control and exposure sessions were run consecutively and each consisted of ten, 30-s trials. The occurrence and severity of behavioral responses were used to create acoustic dose-response and dose-severity functions. Age of the subject significantly affected the dose-response relationship, but not the dose-severity relationship. Repetitive exposures did not affect the dose-response relationship.

  18. Influence of a 50 hz extra low frequency electromagnetic field on spermatozoa motility and fertilization rates in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Roychoudhury, Shubhadeep; Jedlicka, Jaroslav; Parkanyi, Vladimir; Rafay, Jan; Ondruska, Lubomir; Massanyi, Peter; Bulla, Jozef

    2009-08-01

    Effects of a 50 Hz extra-low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF EMF) on in vitro rabbit spermatozoa motility were analyzed, as well as the effect on fertilization rates after insemination. Pooled semen samples and a control were exposed to 50 Hz ELF EMF. The difference of the samples of the test groups G1 and G2 with the control group CG (75.56%) for spermatozoa motility were found to be significant (P < 0.01). Differences were significant (P < 0.01) for curvilinear velocity (VCL) between the test group G3 (122.38 microm/s) and the control group CG (112.02 microm/s). Hormonally stimulated adult (9-12 months) females (n = 140) were inseminated with semen samples from G1, G2, G3 and CG (0.88 x 109 spermatozoa/0.5 mL average insemination portion) immediately after ELF EMF exposure and fertilization (kindling) rates were calculated. For the G2 it was 54.28% data indicate 50 Hz ELF EMF induced alterations of spermatozoa motility and kindling rate in rabbits, therefore influencing fertility.

  19. Children with autism spectrum disorder have reduced otoacoustic emissions at the 1 kHz mid-frequency region.

    PubMed

    Bennetto, Loisa; Keith, Jessica M; Allen, Paul D; Luebke, Anne E

    2017-02-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a behaviorally diagnosed disorder of early onset characterized by impairment in social communication and restricted and repetitive behaviors. Some of the earliest signs of ASD involve auditory processing, and a recent study found that hearing thresholds in children with ASD in the mid-range frequencies were significantly related to receptive and expressive language measures. In addition, otoacoustic emissions have been used to detect reduced cochlear function in the presence of normal audiometric thresholds. We were interested then to know if otoacoustic emissions in children with normal audiometric thresholds would also reveal differences between children with ASD and typical developing (TD) controls in mid-frequency regions. Our objective was to specifically measure baseline afferent otoacoustic emissions (distortion-product otoacoustic emissions [DPOAEs]), transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TrOAEs), and efferent suppression, in 35 children with high-functioning ASD compared with 42 aged-matched TD controls. All participants were males 6-17 years old, with normal audiometry, and rigorously characterized via Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule. Children with ASD had greatly reduced DPOAE responses in the 1 kHz frequency range, yet had comparable DPOAE responses at 0.5 and 4-8 kHz regions. Furthermore, analysis of the spectral features of TrOAEs revealed significantly decreased emissions in ASD in similar frequencies. No significant differences were noted in DPOAE or TrOAE noise floors, middle ear muscle reflex activity, or efferent suppression between children with ASD and TD controls. In conclusion, attention to specific-frequency deficits using non-invasive measures of cochlear function may be important in auditory processing impairments found in ASD. Autism Res 2017, 10: 337-345. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Field measurements and modeling of attenuation from near-surface bubbles for frequencies 1-20 kHz.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Peter H; Choi, Jee Woong; Williams, Neil J; Graber, Hans C

    2008-09-01

    Measurements of excess attenuation from near-surface bubbles from the Shallow Water '06 experiment are reported. These are transmission measurements made over the frequency range 1-20 kHz, and they demonstrate a frequency, grazing angle, and wind speed dependence in attenuation. Data modeling points to bubble void fractions of order 10(-6) in effect for wind speeds 10-13 m/s. Simultaneous measures of wind speed made within 1.5 and 11 km of the open water experimental location differed by 2 m/s in their respective 30 min average; this has cautionary implications for empirical models for bubble attenuation that are a strong function of wind speed.

  1. An Evaluation for Coupling of Human to Magnetic Fields in Human Ellipsoidal Models With Frequency up to 100kHz

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    with Frequencies Between 100Hz and 100 kHz, Bioelectromagnetics 18:67-76, 1997. [3] Tomenius, L. 50-Hz electromagnetic environment and the incidence...of childhood tumors in Stockholm county. Bioelectromagnetics ; 7:191– 207; 1986. [4] Linet, M. S.; Hatch, E. E.; Kleinerman, R. A.; Robinson, L. L...Power Lines and Adequate Predictor of Exposure, Bioelectromagnetics , 18:47-57, 1997. [13] Durney, C.H., Mussoudi, H., Iskender, MF., 1986.Radio

  2. Unmyelinated axons in the rat hippocampus hyperpolarize and activate an H current when spike frequency exceeds 1 Hz

    PubMed Central

    Soleng, A F; Chiu, K; Raastad, M

    2003-01-01

    The mammalian cortex is densely populated by extensively branching, thin, unmyelinated axons that form en passant synapses. Some thin axons in the peripheral nervous system hyperpolarize if action potential frequency exceeds 1-5 Hz. To test the hypothesis that cortical axons also show activity-induced hyperpolarization, we recorded extracellularly from individual CA3 pyramidal neurons while activating their axon with trains consisting of 30 electrical stimuli. Synaptic excitation was blocked by kynurenic acid. We observed a positive correlation between stimulation strength and the number of consecutive axonal stimuli that resulted in soma spikes, suggesting that the threshold increased as a function of the number of spikes. During trains without response failures there was always a cumulative increase in the soma response latency. Intermittent failures, however, decreased the latency of the subsequent response. At frequencies of > 1 Hz, the threshold and latency increases were enhanced by blocking the hyperpolarization-activated H current (Ih)by applying the specific Ih blocker ZD7288 (25 μM) or 2 mM Cs+. Under these conditions, response failures occurred after 15–25 stimuli, independent of the stimulation strength. Adding GABA receptor blockers (saclofen and bicuculline) and a blocker of metabotropic glutamate receptors did not change the activity-induced latency increase in recordings of the compound action potential. We interpret these results as an activity-induced hyperpolarization that is partly counteracted by Ih. Such a hyperpolarization may influence transmitter release and the conduction reliability of these axons. PMID:14561829

  3. Integrated mixed signal control IC for 500-kHz switching frequency buck regulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Keng; Zhang, Hong

    2015-12-01

    The main purpose for this work is to study the challenges of designing a digital buck regulator using pipelined analog to digital converter (ADC). Although pipelined ADC can achieve high sampling speed, it will introduce additional phase lag to the buck circuit. Along with the latency brought by processing time of additional digital circuits, as well as the time delay associated with the switching frequency, the closed loop will be unstable; moreover, raw ADC outputs have low signal-to-noise ratio, which usually need back-end calibration. In order to compensate these phase lag and make control loop unconditional stable, as well as boost up signal-to-noise ratio of the ADC block with cost-efficient design, a finite impulse response filter followed by digital proportional-integral-derivative blocks were designed. All these digital function blocks were optimised with processing speed. In the system simulation, it can be found that this controller achieved output regulation within 10% of nominal 5 V output voltage under 1 A/µs load transient condition; moreover, with the soft-start method, there is no turn-on overshooting. The die size of this controller is controlled within 3 mm2 by using 180 nm CMOS technology.

  4. Free-field Calibration of the Pressure Sensitivity of Microphones at Frequencies up to 80 kHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, G. C.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Elbing, Brian R.

    2006-01-01

    A free-field (FF) substitution method for calibrating the pressure sensitivity of microphones at frequencies up to 80 kHz is demonstrated with both grazing and normal incidence geometries. The substitution-based method, as opposed to a simultaneous method, avoids problems associated with the non-uniformity of the sound field and, as applied here, uses a 1/2 -inch air-condenser pressure microphone as a known reference. Best results were obtained with a centrifugal fan, which is used as a random, broadband sound source. A broadband source minimizes reflection-related interferences that often plague FF measurements. Calibrations were performed on 1/4-inch FF air-condenser, electret, and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) microphones in an anechoic chamber. The accuracy of this FF method is estimated by comparing the pressure sensitivity of an air-condenser microphone, as derived from the FF measurement, with that of an electrostatic actuator calibration and is typically 0.3 dB (95% confidence), over the range 2-80 kHz.

  5. High Frequency Tympanometry (1,000 Hz) for Neonates with Normal and Abnormal Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei, Mohammad; Nahrani, Morteza Hamidi; Bolandi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives This paper aimed at evaluating the characteristics of high-frequency (1,000 Hz) acoustic admittance (ya) for the neonates with transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE) as either pass or refer group. Subjects and Methods Using a 1,000 Hz probe tone, 297neonates (152 male, 145 female aged 0–104 days old) were evaluated. Tympanometric parameters admittance value at +200 dapa, middle ear admittance, and tympanometric peak pressure were calculated for each tympanogram. Results The mean of ya was 0.9678 mmho in the TEOAE for the pass group and 0.7229 mmho in the refer group. The mean of acoustic admittance at +200 (y200) was 2.0657 in the TEOAE for the pass group and 1.7191 for the refer group. The mean of Tpp was 23/8591 in the TEOAE for the pass group and 59/7619 for the refer group. Conclusions There were significant differences in the distribution of different types of tympanograms, the mean of ya, tympanic peak pressure, and y200 between the TEOAEs for the pass and the refer groups. PMID:27942601

  6. Modification of S. cerevisiae Growth Dynamics Using Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields in the 1-2 kHz Range

    PubMed Central

    Barabáš, Ján; Radil, Roman; Malíková, Ivona

    2015-01-01

    This paper details our further experiments pertaining to the influence of low frequency electromagnetic fields (LF EMF) on the growth dynamics of two wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strands. We opted to explore frequencies beyond the usual 50–60 Hz range, motivated by the ion parametric resonance theory and several studies which discovered and recorded endogenous biosignals in various Saccharomyces cerevisiae strands in the 0.4–2.0 kHz frequency range, most probably stemming from microtubules. Both yeast strands used in our experiments have been subjected to continuous 66-hour session of LF EMF exposure (frequencies 1.2, 1.4, 1.6, 1.8, and 2.0 kHz; average magnetic flux density 2.43 mT) under identical ambient conditions. Experiment results indicate a frequency-dependent proliferative response of both yeast strands. PMID:26290871

  7. Assessment of low-frequency hearing with narrow-band chirp-evoked 40-Hz sinusoidal auditory steady-state response.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Uzma S; Kaf, Wafaa A; Danesh, Ali A; Lichtenhan, Jeffery T

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the clinical utility of narrow-band chirp-evoked 40-Hz sinusoidal auditory steady state responses (s-ASSR) in the assessment of low-frequency hearing in noisy participants. Design Tone bursts and narrow-band chirps were used to respectively evoke auditory brainstem responses (tb-ABR) and 40-Hz s-ASSR thresholds with the Kalman-weighted filtering technique and were compared to behavioral thresholds at 500, 2000, and 4000 Hz. A repeated measure ANOVA and post-hoc t-tests, and simple regression analyses were performed for each of the three stimulus frequencies. Study sample Thirty young adults aged 18-25 with normal hearing participated in this study. Results When 4000 equivalent response averages were used, the range of mean s-ASSR thresholds from 500, 2000, and 4000 Hz were 17-22 dB lower (better) than when 2000 averages were used. The range of mean tb-ABR thresholds were lower by 11-15 dB for 2000 and 4000 Hz when twice as many equivalent response averages were used, while mean tb-ABR thresholds for 500 Hz were indistinguishable regardless of additional response averaging. Conclusion Narrow-band chirp-evoked 40-Hz s-ASSR requires a ∼15 dB smaller correction factor than tb-ABR for estimating low-frequency auditory threshold in noisy participants when adequate response averaging is used.

  8. High-sensitivity operation of single-beam optically pumped magnetometer in a kHz frequency range

    DOE PAGES

    Savukov, Igor Mykhaylovich; Kim, Y. J.; Shah, V.; ...

    2017-02-02

    Here, optically pumped magnetometers (OPM) can be used in various applications, from magnetoencephalography to magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). OPMs provide high sensitivity and have the significant advantage of non-cryogenic operation. To date, many magnetometers have been demonstrated with sensitivity close to 1 fT, but most devices are not commercialized. Most recently, QuSpin developed a model of OPM that is low cost, high sensitivity, and convenient for users, which operates in a single-beam configuration. Here we developed a theory of single-beam (or parallel two-beam) magnetometers and showed that it is possible to achieve good sensitivity beyond theirmore » usual frequency range by tuning the magnetic field. Experimentally we have tested and optimized a QuSpin OPM for operation in the frequency range from DC to 1.7 kHz, and found that the performance was only slightly inferior despite the expected decrease due to deviation from the spin-exchange relaxation-free regime.« less

  9. High-sensitivity operation of single-beam optically pumped magnetometer in a kHz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savukov, I.; Kim, Y. J.; Shah, V.; Boshier, M. G.

    2017-03-01

    Optically pumped magnetometers (OPM) can be used in various applications, from magnetoencephalography to magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). OPMs provide high sensitivity and have the significant advantage of non-cryogenic operation. To date, many magnetometers have been demonstrated with sensitivity close to 1 fT, but most devices are not commercialized. Most recently, QuSpin developed a model of OPM that is low cost, high sensitivity, and convenient for users, which operates in a single-beam configuration. Here we developed a theory of single-beam (or parallel two-beam) magnetometers and showed that it is possible to achieve good sensitivity beyond their usual frequency range by tuning the magnetic field. Experimentally we have tested and optimized a QuSpin OPM for operation in the frequency range from DC to 1.7 kHz, and found that the performance was only slightly inferior despite the expected decrease due to deviation from the spin-exchange relaxation-free regime.

  10. The Frequency Spectral Properties of Electrode-Skin Contact Impedance on Human Head and Its Frequency-Dependent Effects on Frequency-Difference EIT in Stroke Detection from 10Hz to 1MHz

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ge; Li, Weichen; Fu, Feng; Shi, Xuetao; Dong, Xiuzhen

    2017-01-01

    Frequency-difference electrical impedance tomography (fdEIT) reconstructs frequency-dependent changes of a complex impedance distribution. It has a potential application in acute stroke detection because there are significant differences in impedance spectra between stroke lesions and normal brain tissues. However, fdEIT suffers from the influences of electrode-skin contact impedance since contact impedance varies greatly with frequency. When using fdEIT to detect stroke, it is critical to know the degree of measurement errors or image artifacts caused by contact impedance. To our knowledge, no study has systematically investigated the frequency spectral properties of electrode-skin contact impedance on human head and its frequency-dependent effects on fdEIT used in stroke detection within a wide frequency band (10 Hz-1 MHz). In this study, we first measured and analyzed the frequency spectral properties of electrode-skin contact impedance on 47 human subjects’ heads within 10 Hz-1 MHz. Then, we quantified the frequency-dependent effects of contact impedance on fdEIT in stroke detection in terms of the current distribution beneath the electrodes and the contact impedance imbalance between two measuring electrodes. The results showed that the contact impedance at high frequencies (>100 kHz) significantly changed the current distribution beneath the electrode, leading to nonnegligible errors in boundary voltages and artifacts in reconstructed images. The contact impedance imbalance at low frequencies (<1 kHz) also caused significant measurement errors. We conclude that the contact impedance has critical frequency-dependent influences on fdEIT and further studies on reducing such influences are necessary to improve the application of fdEIT in stroke detection. PMID:28107524

  11. Tunable two-mode Cr{sup 2+} : ZnSe laser with a frequency-noise spectral density of 0.03 Hz Hz{sup -1/2}

    SciTech Connect

    Gubin, Mikhail A; Kireev, A N; Kozlovskii, Vladimir I; Korostelin, Yurii V; Pnev, A B; Podmar'kov, Yu P; Tyurikov, D A; Frolov, M P; Shelestov, D A; Shelkovnikov, Aleksandr S

    2012-06-30

    An optically pumped cw laser on a Cr{sup 2+} : ZnSe crystal with a tunable (in the range of 2.3 - 2 .6 mm) wavelength, operating with generation of two axial modes, has been developed. It is shown that the minimum laser frequency-noise spectral density does not exceed 0.03 Hz Hz{sup -1/2}. Application of this laser in problems of Doppler and Doppler-free spectroscopy makes it possible to detect spectral absorption lines of gases with sensitivities of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} and 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} cm{sup -1}, respectively (averaging time {tau} = 1 s). Having stabilised this laser with respect to the Doppler-free resonances of saturated dispersion of methane molecule, one can obtain a short-term frequency stability of 10{sup -15} - 10{sup -16} ({tau} = 1 s).

  12. Measurements of seismic wave attenuation for frequencies between 0.1 and 100 Hz in a Paterson Rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madonna, C.; Tisato, N.; Delle Piane, C.; Saenger, E. H.

    2012-04-01

    The study of wave attenuation in partially saturated porous rocks over a broad frequency range provides valuable information about reservoir fluid systems, which are inherently composed of multiple phase fluid. Following an original idea initiated by Luigi, we designed and set up a specific instrument, the Seismic Wave Attenuation Module (SWAM), to experimentally measure the bulk attenuation on partially saturated rocks at frequencies between 0.01 and 100 Hz, using natural rock samples under in situ conditions. We present its bench-top calibration, a series of data collected from different kind of rocks at different confing pressure and the numerical simulations, supporting the obtained results. We employ the sub-resonance test. Assuming that the rock behaves as a linear time invariant (LTI) system, the attenuation factor 1/Q (Q is the quality factor) is equal to the tangent of the phase shift between the stress and the strain signal. The new attenuation measurement equipment is calibrated in a gas apparatus (Paterson rig) using aluminum as elastic standard and Plexiglas as a viscoelastic standard. Measurements were performed on 25.4 mm diameter, 60 mm long samples. Berea sandstone samples with 20% porosity, and ~500 mD permeability have been measured at different saturation conditions. Attenuation measurements show dependence upon saturation. Moreover, measurements on two well-characterized shale samples have been performed. The two shales have significantly different quality factors; which result to be dependent on both the saturation state of the samples and the propagation direction of the oscillatory signal with respect to the sedimentary bedding. The attenuation coefficient parallel to bedding is less than that vertical to bedding. Thanks to Luigi's initiative and inspiration two generations of his Ph.D. students are now able to jointly present these new challenging experimental results.

  13. Final report of supplementary comparison AFRIMETS.AUV.A-S1: primary pressure calibration of LS2aP microphones according to IEC 61094-2, over the frequency range 1 Hz to 31.5 kHz.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nel, R.; Barrera-Figueroa, S.; Dobrowolska, D.; Defilippo Soares, Z. M.; Maina, A. K.; Hof, C.

    2016-01-01

    This is the final report of the AFRIMETS.AUV-S1 comparison of the pressure sensitivity, modulus and phase, of LS2aP microphones in the frequency range 1 Hz to 31.5 kHz in accordance with IEC 61094-2. Six national metrology institutes from three different regional metrology organisations participated in the comparison for which two LS2aP microphones were circulated simultaneously to all the participants in a hybrid-star configuration. The comparison reference values were calculated as the weighted mean for modulus and phase for each individual microphone. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCAUV, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  14. Preliminary estimation of high-frequency (4-20 Hz) energy released from the 2016 Kumamoto, Japan, earthquake sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawazaki, Kaoru; Nakahara, Hisashi; Shiomi, Katsuhiko

    2016-11-01

    We estimate high-frequency (4-20 Hz) energy release due to the 2016 Kumamoto, Japan, earthquake sequence, within a time period from April 14 to 26 through envelope inversion analysis applied to the Hi-net continuous seismograms. We especially focus on energy releases after each of the April 14 M JMA6.5 and the April 16 M JMA7.3 earthquakes. The cumulative energy release from aftershocks of the April 14 event reaches 60% of that from the April 14 event itself by the lapse time of 27 h (pre-April 16 period). On the other hand, the cumulative energy release from aftershocks of the April 16 event reaches only 11 and 13% of that from the April 16 event itself by the lapse times of 27 h and 10 days (post-April 16 period), respectively. This discrepancy in the normalized cumulative energy release (NCER) indicates that the April 14 event was followed by much larger relative aftershock productivity than the April 16 event. Thus, NCER would provide information that reflects relative aftershock productivity and ongoing seismicity pattern after a large earthquake. We also find that the temporal decay of the energy release rate obeys the power law. The exponent p E of the power-law decay is estimated to be 1.7-2.1, which is much larger than the typical p value of the Omori-Utsu law: slightly larger than 1. We propose a simple relationship given by p E = βp/ b, where p value, b value of the Gutenberg-Richter law, and β value of the magnitude-energy release relationship are combined.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. 50-Hz extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields enhance cell proliferation and DNA damage: possible involvement of a redox mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Federica I; Torsello, Angela; Tedesco, Beatrice; Fasanella, Silvia; Boninsegna, Alma; D'Ascenzo, Marcello; Grassi, Claudio; Azzena, Gian Battista; Cittadini, Achille

    2005-03-22

    HL-60 leukemia cells, Rat-1 fibroblasts and WI-38 diploid fibroblasts were exposed for 24-72 h to 0.5-1.0-mT 50-Hz extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF). This treatment induced a dose-dependent increase in the proliferation rate of all cell types, namely about 30% increase of cell proliferation after 72-h exposure to 1.0 mT. This was accompanied by increased percentage of cells in the S-phase after 12- and 48-h exposure. The ability of ELF-EMF to induce DNA damage was also investigated by measuring DNA strand breaks. A dose-dependent increase in DNA damage was observed in all cell lines, with two peaks occurring at 24 and 72 h. A similar pattern of DNA damage was observed by measuring formation of 8-OHdG adducts. The effects of ELF-EMF on cell proliferation and DNA damage were prevented by pretreatment of cells with an antioxidant like alpha-tocopherol, suggesting that redox reactions were involved. Accordingly, Rat-1 fibroblasts that had been exposed to ELF-EMF for 3 or 24 h exhibited a significant increase in dichlorofluorescein-detectable reactive oxygen species, which was blunted by alpha-tocopherol pretreatment. Cells exposed to ELF-EMF and examined as early as 6 h after treatment initiation also exhibited modifications of NF kappa B-related proteins (p65-p50 and I kappa B alpha), which were suggestive of increased formation of p65-p50 or p65-p65 active forms, a process usually attributed to redox reactions. These results suggest that ELF-EMF influence proliferation and DNA damage in both normal and tumor cells through the action of free radical species. This information may be of value for appraising the pathophysiologic consequences of an exposure to ELF-EMF.

  16. Active frequency stabilization of a 1.062-micron, Nd:GGG, diode-laser-pumped nonplanar ring oscillator to less than 3 Hz of relative linewidth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, T.; Gustafson, E. K.; Byer, R. L.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on the frequency stabilization of two diode-laser-pumped ring lasers that are independently locked to the same high-finesse interferometer. The relative frequency stability is measured by locking the lasers one free spectral range apart and observing the heterodyne beat note. The resultant beat note width of 2.9 Hz is consistent with the theoretical system noise-limited linewidth and is approximately 20 times that expected for shot-noise-limited performance.

  17. Effects of frequency, tidal volume, and lung volume on CO2 elimination in dogs by high frequency (2-30 Hz), low tidal volume ventilation.

    PubMed Central

    Slutsky, A S; Kamm, R D; Rossing, T H; Loring, S H; Lehr, J; Shapiro, A H; Ingram, R H; Drazen, J M

    1981-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that effective pulmonary ventilation is possible with tidal volumes (VT) less than the anatomic dead-space if the oscillatory frequency (f) is sufficiently large. We systematically studied the effect on pulmonary CO2 elimination (VCO2) of varying f (2-30 Hz) and VT (1-7 ml/kg) as well as lung volume (VL) in 13 anesthetized, paralyzed dogs in order to examine the contribution of those variables that are thought to be important in determining gas exchange by high frequency ventilation. All experiments were performed when the alveolar PCO2 was 40 +/- 1.5 mm Hg. In all studies, VCO2 increased monotonically with f at constant VT. We quantitated the effects of f and VT on VCO2 by using the dimensionless equation VCO2/VOSC = a(VT/VTo)b(f/fo)c where: VOSC = f X VT, VTo = mean VT, fo = mean f and a, b, c, are constants obtained by multiple regression. The mean values of a, b, and c for all dogs were 2.12 X 10(-3), 0.49, and 0.08, respectively. The most important variable in determining VCO2 was VOSC; however, there was considerable variability among dogs in the independent effect of VT and f on VCO2, with a doubling of VT at a constant VOSC causing changes in VCO2 ranging from -13 to +110% (mean = +35%). Increasing VL from functional residual capacity (FRC) to the lung volume at an airway opening minus body surface pressure of 25 cm H2O had no significant effect on VCO2. PMID:6798071

  18. LOW-FREQUENCY (11 mHz) OSCILLATIONS IN H1743-322: A NEW CLASS OF BLACK HOLE QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS?

    SciTech Connect

    Altamirano, D.; Strohmayer, T.

    2012-08-01

    We report the discovery of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) at {approx}11 mHz in two RXTE and one Chandra observations of the black hole candidate H1743-322. The QPO is observed only at the beginning of the 2010 and 2011 outbursts at similar hard color and intensity, suggestive of an accretion state dependence for the QPO. Although its frequency appears to be correlated with X-ray intensity on timescales of a day, in successive outbursts eight months apart, we measure a QPO frequency that differs by less than Almost-Equal-To 2.2 mHz while the intensity had changed significantly. We show that this {approx}11 mHz QPO is different from the so-called Type C QPOs seen in black holes and that the mechanisms that produce the two flavors of variability are most probably independent. After comparing this QPO with other variability phenomena seen in accreting black holes and neutron stars, we conclude that it best resembles the so-called 1 Hz QPOs seen in dipping neutron star systems, although having a significantly lower (1-2 orders of magnitude) frequency. If confirmed, H1743-322 is the first black hole showing this type of variability. Given the unusual characteristics and the hard-state dependence of the {approx}11 mHz QPO, we also speculate whether these oscillations could instead be related to the radio jets observed in H1743-322. A systematic search for this type of low-frequency QPOs in similar systems is needed to test this speculation. In any case, it remains unexplained why these QPOs have only been seen in the last two outbursts of H1743-322.

  19. Transitions of an atmospheric-pressure diffuse dielectric barrier discharge in helium for frequencies increasing from kHz to MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, J.-S.; Margot, J.; Massines, F.

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that tuning a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in the medium-frequency range (MF: from 0.3 to 3 MHz) allows a low-power and a high-power mode to be sustained. In the present article the effect of the driving frequency on a DBD is studied from the low-frequency range (LF: from 30 to 300 kHz) to the high-frequency range (HF: from 3 to 30 MHz). This is achieved using fast imaging together with electrical and spectroscopic diagnostics. At every frequency, a diffuse discharge is sustained. It is observed that at 25 kHz the discharge is an atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) while at 15 MHz the discharge behaves as a capacitive discharge in the RF-α mode. The usual LF APGD behavior is observed up to 100 kHz. Above 200 kHz, the positive column remains during the whole cycle so that the hybrid mode is sustained. At 5 MHz, the hybrid mode finally turns into the RF-α mode. In addition to the LF APGD, RF-α and hybrid modes obtained when the applied voltage is significantly higher than the ignition value, two other modes can be reached at low applied voltage. A Townsend-like mode is achieved from 50 to 100 kHz while in the medium-frequency range, the Ω mode is sustained. Moreover, only from 1.0 to 2.7 MHz there is a large hysteresis occurring when the discharge transits back and forth from the Ω to the hybrid mode. It is also found that when the frequency increases from 25 kHz to 15 MHz, the rms current increases over two orders of magnitudes while the rms voltage decreases by about 60%. The gas temperature estimated from N2 rotational spectra is always close to room temperature but the discharge is more energy efficient (in the HF range) as a lower fraction of energy turns into gas heating.

  20. Alcohol enhances unprovoked 22-28 kHz USVs and suppresses USV mean frequency in High Alcohol Drinking (HAD-1) male rats.

    PubMed

    Thakore, Neha; Reno, James M; Gonzales, Rueben A; Schallert, Timothy; Bell, Richard L; Maddox, W Todd; Duvauchelle, Christine L

    2016-04-01

    Heightened emotional states increase impulsive behaviors such as excessive ethanol consumption in humans. Though positive and negative affective states in rodents can be monitored in real-time through ultrasonic vocalization (USV) emissions, few animal studies have focused on the role of emotional status as a stimulus for initial ethanol drinking. Our laboratory has recently developed reliable, high-speed analysis techniques to compile USV data during multiple-hour drinking sessions. Since High Alcohol Drinking (HAD-1) rats are selectively bred to voluntarily consume intoxicating levels of alcohol, we hypothesized that USVs emitted by HAD-1 rats would reveal unique emotional phenotypes predictive of alcohol intake and sensitive to alcohol experience. In this study, male HAD-1 rats had access to water, 15% and 30% EtOH or water only (i.e., Controls) during 8 weeks of daily 7-h drinking-in-the-dark (DID) sessions. USVs, associated with both positive (i.e., 50-55 kHz frequency-modulated or FM) and negative (i.e., 22-28 kHz) emotional states, emitted during these daily DID sessions were examined. Findings showed basal 22-28 kHz USVs were emitted by both EtOH-Naïve (Control) and EtOH-experienced rats, alcohol experience enhanced 22-28 kHz USV emissions, and USV acoustic parameters (i.e., mean frequency in kHz) of both positive and negative USVs were significantly suppressed by chronic alcohol experience. These data suggest that negative affective status initiates and maintains excessive alcohol intake in selectively bred HAD-1 rats and support the notion that unprovoked emissions of negative affect-associated USVs (i.e., 22-28 kHz) predict vulnerability to excessive alcohol intake in distinct rodent models.

  1. Effect of non-symmetric waveform on conduction block induced by high-frequency (kHz) biphasic stimulation in unmyelinated axon.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shouguo; Yang, Guangning; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2014-10-01

    The effect of a non-symmetric waveform on nerve conduction block induced by high-frequency biphasic stimulation is investigated using a lumped circuit model of the unmyelinated axon based on Hodgkin-Huxley equations. The simulation results reveal that the block threshold monotonically increases with the stimulation frequency for the symmetric stimulation waveform. However, a non-monotonic relationship between block threshold and stimulation frequency is observed when the stimulation waveform is non-symmetric. Constant activation of potassium channels by the high-frequency stimulation results in the increase of block threshold with increasing frequency. The non-symmetric waveform with a positive pulse 0.4-0.8 μs longer than the negative pulse blocks axonal conduction by hyperpolarizing the membrane and causes a decrease in block threshold as the frequency increases above 12-16 kHz. On the other hand, the non-symmetric waveform with a negative pulse 0.4-0.8 μs longer than the positive pulse blocks axonal conduction by depolarizing the membrane and causes a decrease in block threshold as the frequency increases above 40-53 kHz. This simulation study is important for understanding the potential mechanisms underlying the nerve block observed in animal studies, and may also help to design new animal experiments to further improve the nerve block method for clinical applications.

  2. Energy dependence of r.m.s amplitude of low frequency broadband noise and kHz quasi periodic oscillations in 4U 1608-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Soma

    2016-07-01

    The neutron star low mass X-ray binary 4U 1608-52 is known to show kHz QPOs as well as low frequency broad band noise. The energy dependence of the fractional r.m.s of these variations reflect the underlying radiative mechanism responsible for the phenomena. In this work we compute the energy depedence for 26 instances of kHz QPO observed by RXTE. We typically find as reported before, that the r.m.s increases with energy with slope of ˜0.5. This indicates that the variation is in the hot thermal compotonization component and in particular the QPO is likely to be driven by variation in the thermal heating rate of the hot plasma. For the same data, we compute the energy dependent r.m.s variability of the low frequency broad band noise component by considering the light curves. In contrast to the behaviour seen for the kHz QPO, the energy dependence is nearly flat i.e. the r.m.s. is energy independent. This indicates that the driver here may be the soft photon source. Thus the radiative mechanism driving the low frequency broad band noise and the high frequency QPO are different in nature.

  3. Influence of 50 Hz frequency sinusoidal magnetic field on the blood-brain barrier permeability of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Oztaş, Baria; Kalkan, Tunaya; Tuncel, Handan

    2004-07-01

    The combined effects of diabetes and a 50 Hz, 5 mT RMS flux density sinusoidal magnetic field for 8 h a day, for 21 consecutive days on the permeation of Evans-blue dye through the blood-brain barrier were studied in male Wistar albino rats. Our results suggest that magnetic field has no effect on the blood-brain barrier permeability in normoglycemic animals, but that diabetic rats are vulnerable to magnetic fields.

  4. [Efficacy of dynamic magnetotherapy with modulation frequency 10Hz in the complex of spa rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Gurova, N Iu; Babina, L M

    2007-01-01

    Two groups of children with cerebral paralysis received combined therapy. Treatment of one of the groups included a course of magnetotherapy (AMO-ATOS unit, 10 Hz) according to the suboccipital-lumbar method, the other group was control (no magnetotherapy). The study of cliniconeurophysiological indices showed significantly higher efficacy of the therapeutic complex with a course of magnetotherapy. The highest beneficial effect was observed on bioelectrogenesis of the brain, rheoencephalographic parameters and clinical manifestation of muscular spasticity.

  5. Afferent inputs to cortical fast-spiking interneurons organize pyramidal cell network oscillations at high-gamma frequencies (60–200 Hz)

    PubMed Central

    Crone, Nathan E.; Franaszczuk, Piotr J.

    2014-01-01

    High-gamma activity, ranging in frequency between ∼60 Hz and 200 Hz, has been observed in local field potential, electrocorticography, EEG and magnetoencephalography signals during cortical activation, in a variety of functional brain systems. The origin of these signals is yet unknown. Using computational modeling, we show that a cortical network model receiving thalamic input generates high-gamma responses comparable to those observed in local field potential recorded in monkey somatosensory cortex during vibrotactile stimulation. These high-gamma oscillations appear to be mediated mostly by an excited population of inhibitory fast-spiking interneurons firing at high-gamma frequencies and pacing excitatory regular-spiking pyramidal cells, which fire at lower rates but in phase with the population rhythm. The physiological correlates of high-gamma activity, in this model of local cortical circuits, appear to be similar to those proposed for hippocampal ripples generated by subsets of interneurons that regulate the discharge of principal cells. PMID:25210164

  6. Exposure of high resolution fetuses in advanced pregnant woman models at different stages of pregnancy to uniform magnetic fields at the frequency of 50 Hz.

    PubMed

    Liorni, Ilaria; Parazzini, Marta; Fiocchi, Serena; Ravazzani, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) have been considered as a possible risk factor for childhood leukemia by several epidemiological studies. In this work the exposure assessment of fetuses at 3, 7 and 9 months of Gestational Age (GA) to differently polarized uniform magnetic fields at the frequency of 50 Hz by means of high resolution numerical models of pregnant women is carried out. This set of models is used to analyze the fetal tissue-specific induced electric fields and current densities as a function of both the incident magnetic field polarization and the GA.

  7. The direct influence of electromagnetic fields on nerve- and muscle cells of man within the frequency range of 1 Hz to 30 MHz.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, J

    1979-01-01

    By using several biophysical approximations and considering man as free space model limiting order-of-magnitude values for external electric and magnetic field strengths which may be hazardous for human beings were calculated. Danger may occur by excitation processes below 30 kHz for field strengths exceeding these limiting values; for frequencies larger than 60 kHz, thermal effects are predominant before excitation occurs. The external electric field strength necessary for causing action potentials in the central nervous system exceeds by far the corona forming level. But excitation is possible by strong alternating magnetic fields. Furthermore, by comparing the electrically and magnetically induced currents with the naturally flowing currents in man caused by the brain's and heart's electrical activity, a "lower boundary-line" was estimated. Regarding electric or magnetic field strengths undercutting this boundary-line, direct effects on the central nervous system may be excluded. Other mechanisms should be responsible for demonstrated biological effects.

  8. Extremely low frequency 7 Hz 100 microT electromagnetic radiation promotes differentiation in the human epithelial cell line HaCaT.

    PubMed

    Lisi, Antonella; Foletti, Alberto; Ledda, Mario; Rosola, Emanuela; Giuliani, Livio; D'Emilia, Enrico; Grimaldi, Settimio

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetic therapy is a treatment method in which an electromagnetic or magnetic stimulus is used to achieve physiological changes in the body. The specific aim of the present work concerns the effectiveness of low frequency electromagnetic fields to modify the biochemical properties of human keratinocytes (HaCaT). Cells exposed to a 7 Hz 100 microT electromagnetic field for one hour (twice daily), indicated modification in shape and morphology. These modifications were also associated with different actin distribution as revealed by phalloidin fluorescence analysis. Indirect immunofluorescence with fluorescent antibodies against involucrin and beta-Catenin, both differentiation and adhesion markers, revealed an increase in involucrin and beta-Catenin expression, supporting the conclusion that exposure to electromagnetic field carries keratinocytes to an upper differentiation level. This study confirms our previous observation and supports the hypothesis that 7 Hz electromagnetic field, may modify cell biochemistry interfering in the differentiation and cellular adhesion of normal keratinocytes.

  9. The changes of the frequency specific impedance of the human body due to the resonance in the kHz range in cancer diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalak, K. P.; Nawrocka-Bogusz, H.

    2011-12-01

    The frequency-specific absorption of kHz signals has been postulated for different tissues, trace elements, vitamins, toxins, pathogens, allergens etc. for low-power (μV) signals. An increase in the impedance of the human body is observed only up to the given power of the applied signal. The highest amplification of the given signal being damped by the body makes it possible to determine the intensity of the given process in the body (e.g. amount of the toxin, trace element, intensity of the allergy) being connected with a given frequency spectrum of the signal. The mechanism of frequency-specific absorption can be explained by means of the Quantum Field Theory being applied to the structure of the water. Substantially high coincidence between the frequencies of the rotation of free quasi-excited electrons in coherent domains of water and the frequencies being used in the MORA diagnostics (Med-Tronic GmbH, EN ISO 13485, EN ISO 9001) can be observed. These frequencies are located in the proximity of f = 7kHz · i (i = 1,3,5,7,...). This fact suggests that the coherent domains with the admixtures of the given substances create structure-specific coherent domains that possess frequency-specific absorption spectra. The diagnostic tool called "MORA System diagnosis" was used to investigate 102 patients with different types and stages of cancer. Many signals were observed to be absorbed by many cancer patients, e.g.: 'Cellular defense system', 'Degeneration tendencies', Manganese, Magnesium, Zinc, Selenium, Vitamin E, Glutamine, Glutathione, Cysteine, Candida albicans, Mycosis. The results confirm the role of oxidative stress, immunological system deficiency and mitochondria malfunction in the development of cancer.

  10. Review of Studies Concerning Electromagnetic Field (EMF) Exposure Assessment in Europe: Low Frequency Fields (50 Hz–100 kHz)

    PubMed Central

    Gajšek, Peter; Ravazzani, Paolo; Grellier, James; Samaras, Theodoros; Bakos, József; Thuróczy, György

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to review the findings of exposure assessment studies done in European countries on the exposure of the general public to low frequency electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) of various frequencies. The study shows that outdoor average extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) in public areas in urban environments range between 0.05 and 0.2 µT in terms of flux densities, but stronger values (of the order of a few µT) may occur directly beneath high-voltage power lines, at the walls of transformer buildings, and at the boundary fences of substations. In the indoor environment, high values have been measured close to several domestic appliances (up to the mT range), some of which are held close to the body, e.g., hair dryers, electric shavers. Common sources of exposure to intermediate frequencies (IF) include induction cookers, compact fluorescent lamps, inductive charging systems for electric cars and security or anti-theft devices. No systematic measurement surveys or personal exposimetry data for the IF range have been carried out and only a few reports on measurements of EMFs around such devices are mentioned. According to the available European exposure assessment studies, three population exposure categories were classified by the authors regarding the possible future risk analysis. This classification should be considered a crucial advancement for exposure assessment, which is a mandatory step in any future health risk assessment of EMFs exposure. PMID:27598182

  11. 1-MW peak power, 574-kHz repetition rate picosecond pulses at 515 nm from a frequency-doubled fiber amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Feng; Wang, Ziwei; Wang, Zhaokun; Bai, Yang; Li, Qiurui; Zhou, Jun

    2016-11-01

    1-MW peak power picosecond, 574-kHz repetition rate green laser at 515-nm is generated from a frequency-doubled fiber amplifier. 12-ps pulses with 13.9-μJ energy at 515 nm are achieved with a noncritically phase-matched lithium triborate (LBO) crystal through second harmonic generation of a 1030 nm infrared source. The infrared source employs ultra-large-mode-area rod-type photonic crystal fiber (Rod-PCF) for direct picosecond amplification and delivers 20-W 11.6-ps 2.97-MW pulse train with near-diffraction-limited beam quality (M2 = 1.01).

  12. Investigation of dielectric properties of polymer composites reinforced with carbon nanotubes in the frequency band of 0.01 Hz - 10 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goshev, A. A.; Eseev, M. K.; Kapustin, S. N.; Vinnik, L. N.; Volkov, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this work is experimental study of dielectric properties of polymer nanocomposites reinforced with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in alternating electric field in low frequency band of 0.01 Hz - 10 MHz. We investigated the influence, functionalization degree, aspect ratio, concentration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on dielectric properties of polymer sample. We also studied the dependence of dielectric properties on the polymerization temperature. The dependence of CNTs agglomeration on sample polymerization temperature and temperature's influence on conductivity has been shown. We conducted model calculation of percolation threshold and figured out its dependence on CNTs aspect ratio.

  13. Intermediate frequency magnetic field at 23 kHz does not modify gene expression in human fetus-derived astroglia cells.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Tomonori; Narita, Eijiro; Shinohara, Naoki; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2012-12-01

    The increased use of induction heating (IH) cooktops in Japan and Europe has raised public concern on potential health effects of the magnetic fields generated by IH cooktops. In this study, we evaluated the effects of intermediate frequency (IF) magnetic fields generated by IH cooktops on gene expression profiles. Human fetus-derived astroglia cells were exposed to magnetic fields at 23 kHz and 100 µT(rms) for 2, 4, and 6 h and gene expression profiles in cells were assessed using cDNA microarray. There were no detectable effects of the IF magnetic fields at 23 kHz on the gene expression profile, whereas the heat treatment at 43 °C for 2 h, as a positive control, affected gene expression including inducing heat shock proteins. Principal component analysis and hierarchical analysis showed that the gene profiles of IF-exposed groups were similar to the sham-exposed group and were different than the heat treatment group. These results demonstrated that exposure of human fetus-derived astroglia cells to an IF magnetic field at 23 kHz and 100 µT(rms) for up to 6 h did not induce detectable changes in gene expression profile.

  14. 50 CFR 10.12 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Definitions § 10.12 Definitions. Aircraft means any contrivance used for flight in the air. Amphibians means a... dead, including without limitation any wild mammal, bird, reptile, amphibian, fish, mollusk,...

  15. 50 CFR 10.12 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Definitions § 10.12 Definitions. Aircraft means any contrivance used for flight in the air. Amphibians means a... dead, including without limitation any wild mammal, bird, reptile, amphibian, fish, mollusk,...

  16. 50 CFR 10.12 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Definitions § 10.12 Definitions. Aircraft means any contrivance used for flight in the air. Amphibians means a... dead, including without limitation any wild mammal, bird, reptile, amphibian, fish, mollusk,...

  17. 50 CFR 10.12 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Definitions § 10.12 Definitions. Aircraft means any contrivance used for flight in the air. Amphibians means a... dead, including without limitation any wild mammal, bird, reptile, amphibian, fish, mollusk,...

  18. 50 CFR 10.12 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Definitions § 10.12 Definitions. Aircraft means any contrivance used for flight in the air. Amphibians means a... dead, including without limitation any wild mammal, bird, reptile, amphibian, fish, mollusk,...

  19. Modelling the spectral induced polarization response of water-saturated sands in the intermediate frequency range (102-105 Hz) using mechanistic and empirical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Thomas; Schmutz, Myriam; Leroy, Philippe; Agrinier, Pierre; Maineult, Alexis

    2016-11-01

    The intermediate frequency range 102-105 Hz forms the transition range between the spectral induced polarization frequency domain and the dielectric spectroscopy frequency domain. Available experimental data showed that the spectral induced polarization response of sands fully saturated with water was particularly sensitive to variations of the saturating water electrical conductivity value in the intermediate frequency range. An empirical and a mechanistic model have been developed and confronted to this experimental data. This confrontation showed that the Maxwell Wagner polarization alone is not sufficient to explain the observed signal in the intermediate frequency range. The SIP response of the media was modelled by assigning relatively high dielectric permittivity values to the sand particle or high effective permittivity values to the media. Such high values are commonly observed in the dielectric spectroscopy literature when entering the intermediate frequency range. The physical origin of these high dielectric permittivity values is discussed (grain shape, electromagnetic coupling), and a preliminary study is presented which suggests that the high impedance values of the non-polarizable electrodes might play a significant role in the observed behaviour.

  20. Effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (50 Hz) on pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures in mice.

    PubMed

    Fadakar, Kaveh; Saba, Valiallah; Farzampour, Shahrokh

    2013-06-01

    The electromagnetic fields (EMF) have various behavioral and biological effects on human body. There are growing concerns about the consequences of exposure to EMF. However, some studies have shown beneficial effects of these waves on human. In this paper, we study the effect of acute, sub acute and long-term exposure to 50 Hz, 0.1 mT magnetic fields (MF) on the seizure induction threshold in mice. 64 mice are used and divided into four groups. Eight mice in any group were selected to be exposed to MF for specific duration and the others were used as a control group. The duration of the applied exposures was as follows: (1) 1 day (acute), (2) 3 days (sub acute), (3) 2 weeks (sub acute), (4) 1 month (long term). The mice were exposed 2 h for a day. After exposure, the pentylentetrazol (PTZ) is injected to the mice to induce seizure and the needed dose for the seizure induction threshold is measured. In the acute exposure, the threshold to induce seizure in the exposed and sham-exposed groups was 44.25 and 46.5 mg, respectively, while the difference was not significant (p value = 0.5). In the sub acute exposure (3 days), the mean amount of drug to induce seizure was 47.38 mg in the exposed and 43.88 mg in the sham-exposed groups, however, the difference was not significant (p value = 0.3). The results were 52.38 and 46.75 mg after 2 weeks of exposure which were not significantly different either (p value = 0.2). After 1 month of exposure to MF, the threshold for the induction of seizure was significantly increased (p value < 0.05). The mean dosage to induce seizure in the exposed and control group was 54.3 and 45.75 mg, respectively. However, considering the p value, the difference in the seizure induction threshold between the exposed and sham-exposed groups after acute and sub acute exposure was not significant, analyzing the effects of acute, sub acute and long-term exposures totally indicates that increasing the exposure time increases the

  1. Deposition of organosilicone thin film from hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) with 50 kHz/33 MHz dual-frequency atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiaojiao, LI; Qianghua, YUAN; Xiaowei, CHANG; Yong, WANG; Guiqin, YIN; Chenzhong, DONG

    2017-04-01

    The deposition of organosilicone thin films from hexamethyldisiloxane(HMDSO) by using a dual-frequency (50 kHz/33 MHz) atmospheric-pressure micro-plasma jet with an admixture of a small volume of HMDSO and Ar was investigated. The topography was measured by using scanning electron microscopy. The chemical bond and composition of these films were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results indicated that the as-deposited film was constituted by silicon, carbon, and oxygen elements, and FTIR suggested the films are organosilicon with the organic component (–CH x ) and hydroxyl functional group(–OH) connected to the Si–O–Si backbone. Thin-film hardness was recorded by an MH–5–VM Digital Micro-Hardness Tester. Radio frequency power had a strong impact on film hardness and the hardness increased with increasing power.

  2. Dual-frequency (20/40 kHz) ultrasonic assisted photocatalysis for degradation of methylene blue effluent: synergistic effect and kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shao Feng; Yin, Zhou Lan; Yuan, Zhang Fu; Yan, Wen Bin; Yang, Wen Yin; Liu, Jin Jian; Zhang, Fan

    2012-07-01

    Dual-frequency ultrasonic assisted photocatalysis (DUAP) was proposed to enhance the degradation efficiency of methylene blue (MB) solution. The influence of operational parameters, i.e., irradiation time, ultrasonic arrangement, TiO(2) concentration and power density, was studied. The results implied that the rapid degradation of MB solution was achieved in 18 min under DUAP with the dual frequencies of 20/40 kHz. Kinetic investigation of MB degradation for the DUAP process was conducted on the basis of first-order kinetic equation and the synergistic effect was assessed by examination of the apparent rate constant. The effect of ultrasonic arrangement was analyzed by comparison of the pressure amplitude of ultrasonic superposition field. The evolvement of intermediate products and the role of active species during DUAP were distinguished by UV-Vis spectra and the free radical scavenging experiment.

  3. Electric field of the power terrestrial sources observed by microsatellite Chibis-M in the Earth's ionosphere in frequency range 1-60 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkin, Fedir; Korepanov, Valery; Dudkin, Denis; Pilipenko, Vyacheslav; Pronenko, Vira; Klimov, Stanislav

    2015-07-01

    The power line emission (PLE) 50/60 Hz and the Schumann resonance (SR) harmonics were detected by the use of a compact electrical field sensor of length 0.42 m during microsatellite Chibis-M mission in years 2012-2014. The initial orbit of Chibis-M has altitude 500 km and inclination 52°. We present the space distribution of PLE and its connections with the possible overhead power lines. PLE has been recorded both in the shade and sunlit parts of the orbits as opposed to SR which have been recorded only in the nightside of the Earth. The cases of an extra long distance of PLE propagation in the Earth's ionosphere and increased value of SR Q factor have been also observed. These results should stimulate the ionosphere model refinement for ultralow frequency and extremely low frequency electromagnetic wave propagation as well as a study on new possibility of the ionosphere diagnostics.

  4. Dielectric constant dispersion of yttrium-doped (Ba,Sr)TiO3 films in the high-frequency (10 kHz-67 GHz) domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Doo Seok; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Baniecki, J. D.; Shioga, T.; Kurihara, K.; Kamehara, N.; Ishii, M.

    2005-12-01

    The frequency dispersion of the dielectric constant of yttrium (Y)-doped (Ba,Sr)TiO3 thin films (Y-BST) in the high-frequency domain (10kHz-67GHz) was investigated. In order to remove the substantial parasitic capacitances, inductances, and resistances from the measured impedance data, test samples, short-circuit standard, and open-circuit standard structures were fabricated and their frequency response was measured. Before removing parasitic components, the measured dielectric response showed a rolloff at approximately 4GHz. However, after circuit calibration, the dielectric constant was almost constant up to 40GHz where another rolloff was observed. However, this rolloff was due to the uncompensated small parasitic components. Therefore, the dielectric constant of the Y-BST films (170 with a film thickness of 30nm) showed small frequency dispersion corresponding to the Curie-von Schweidler dispersion, of which the exponent is -0.0131, up to 40GHz. Furthermore, the decrease of the capacitance was 17% in the frequency range from 10kHzto40GHz.

  5. Structural FRF Measurements up to 50 kHz to Assist Frequency Band Selection for Machinery Health Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Christopher G.

    To set up condition indicators for machinery health monitoring it is preferable to run multiple machines with seeded defects and with no defects and measure the resulting vibration signatures; however, this can be a prohibitively expensive undertaking, especially when the machinery has many monitored components. Instead, measurement of the defect-to-monitoring-sensor transfer path dynamics provides a picture of the frequency bands which will amplify the desired vibration signal and those bands which will attenuate it. Since measurement of the true transfer path (from gear tooth or bearing race to the vibration sensor) can also be a costly task, this work seeks to demonstrate that, in cases where the monitored bearing is near the machine surface, a transfer path measurement from the surface near the bearing load zone reasonably approximates the true transfer path, sufficiently for selecting frequency bands of vibration signal amplification and avoidance of bands of signal attenuation. To demonstrate this in the lab, piezoelectric bearing excitation devices were constructed and placed in a US Army Apache helicopter's intermediate gearbox and the true-transfer-path measurements were compared to surface-mounted excitation FRFs. As these compared favorably, the surface measurement method was used on all the gearboxes for each of the following rotorcraft: Apache, Kiowa, Chinook, and Blackhawk. Since the Chinook and the Blackhawk are built in a special-ops version which is equipped with a rotor brake, those components were measured on both standard and special-ops versions. In the interest of space, only the complete results from the Blackhawk are shown here; however, the US Army has made all of the data and reports from the project publicly available.

  6. 10 kHz accuracy of an optical frequency reference based on (12)C2H2-filled large-core kagome photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Knabe, Kevin; Wu, Shun; Lim, Jinkang; Tillman, Karl A; Light, Philip S; Couny, Francois; Wheeler, Natalie; Thapa, Rajesh; Jones, Andrew M; Nicholson, Jeffrey W; Washburn, Brian R; Benabid, Fetah; Corwin, Kristan L

    2009-08-31

    Saturated absorption spectroscopy reveals the narrowest features so far in molecular gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. The 48-68 mum core diameter of the kagome-structured fiber used here allows for 8 MHz full-width half-maximum sub-Doppler features, and its wavelength-insensitive transmission is suitable for high-accuracy frequency measurements. A fiber laser is locked to the (12)C2H2 nu(1); + nu(3) P(13) transition inside kagome fiber, and compared with frequency combs based on both a carbon nanotube fiber laser and a Cr:forsterite laser, each of which are referenced to a GPS-disciplined Rb oscillator. The absolute frequency of the measured line center agrees with those measured in power build-up cavities to within 9.3 kHz (1 sigma error), and the fractional frequency instability is less than 1.2 x 10(-11) at 1 s averaging time.

  7. English Literature Grades 10-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructional Objectives Exchange, Los Angeles, CA.

    This collection is composed of objectives and evaluation items in poetry, novel, short story, drama, and essay for Senior High, Grades 10-12. Each objective contains four elements: (1) the objective, (2) measurement items, (3) means for judging the adequacy of the student response, and (4) an IOX (Instructional Objectives Exchange) acceptability…

  8. 43 CFR 10.12 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... REPATRIATION REGULATIONS Human Remains, Funerary Objects, Sacred Objects, or Objects of Cultural Patrimony in Museums and Federal Collections § 10.12 Civil penalties. (a) The Secretary's authority to assess civil penalties. The Secretary is authorized by section 9 of the Act to assess civil penalties on any museum...

  9. 43 CFR 10.12 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... REPATRIATION REGULATIONS Human Remains, Funerary Objects, Sacred Objects, or Objects of Cultural Patrimony in Museums and Federal Collections § 10.12 Civil penalties. (a) The Secretary's authority to assess civil penalties. The Secretary is authorized by section 9 of the Act to assess civil penalties on any museum...

  10. 43 CFR 10.12 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REPATRIATION REGULATIONS Human Remains, Funerary Objects, Sacred Objects, or Objects of Cultural Patrimony in Museums and Federal Collections § 10.12 Civil penalties. (a) The Secretary's authority to assess civil penalties. The Secretary is authorized by section 9 of the Act to assess civil penalties on any museum...

  11. 43 CFR 10.12 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... REPATRIATION REGULATIONS Human Remains, Funerary Objects, Sacred Objects, or Objects of Cultural Patrimony in Museums and Federal Collections § 10.12 Civil penalties. (a) The Secretary's authority to assess civil penalties. The Secretary is authorized by section 9 of the Act to assess civil penalties on any museum...

  12. 43 CFR 10.12 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... REPATRIATION REGULATIONS Human Remains, Funerary Objects, Sacred Objects, or Objects of Cultural Patrimony in Museums and Federal Collections § 10.12 Civil penalties. (a) The Secretary's authority to assess civil penalties. The Secretary is authorized by section 9 of the Act to assess civil penalties on any museum...

  13. Dielectric behavior of wild-type yeast and vacuole-deficient mutant over a frequency range of 10 kHz to 10 GHz.

    PubMed Central

    Asami, K; Yonezawa, T

    1996-01-01

    Dielectric behavior of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type and vacuole-deficient mutant cells has been studied over a frequency range of 10 kHz to 10 GHz. Both types of cells harvested at the early stationary growth phase showed dielectric dispersion that was phenomenologically formulated by a sum of three separate dispersion terms: beta 1-dispersion (main dispersion) and beta 2-dispersion (additional dispersion) and gamma-dispersion due to orientation of water molecules. The beta 1-dispersion centered at a few MHz, which has been extensively studied so far, is due to interfacial polarization (or the Maxwell-Wagner effect) related to the plasma membrane. The beta 2-dispersion for the vacuole-deficient mutant centered at approximately 50 MHz was explained by taking the cell wall into account, whereas, for the wild-type cells, the beta 2-dispersion around a few tens MHz involved the contributions from the vacuole and cell wall. PMID:8889195

  14. Differential recruitment of high frequency wavelets (600 Hz) and primary cortical response (N20) in human median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Klostermann, F; Nolte, G; Losch, F; Curio, G

    1998-11-06

    Human median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials contain a burst of high-frequency (600 Hz) wavelets superimposed on the primary cortical response (N20). These presumably reflect highly-synchronized repetitive thalamic and/or intracortical population spike bursts and are diminished in non-REM sleep with N20 persisting. Here the burst/N20 relation in awake subjects was examined by using eight different intensities of electric median nerve stimuli. In all subjects the amplitude recruitment of both N20 and burst could be modeled adequately as a sigmoidal function of stimulus intensity. While 8/10 subjects showed a parallel recruitment, 2/10 subjects required significantly higher stimulation intensities for burst than for N20 recruitment. This dampened burst recruitment possibly reflects slight vigilance fluctuations in open-eyed awake subjects; a further increase of burst thresholds could explain the burst attenuation when entering shallow sleep.

  15. Octave-wide frequency comb centered at 4 μm based on a subharmonic OPO with Hz-level relative comb linewidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolski, V. O.; Xu, J.; Schunemann, P. G.; Vodopyanov, K. L.

    2016-03-01

    We study coherence properties of a more-than-octave-wide (2.6-7.5 μm) mid-IR frequency comb based on a 2-μm Tmfiber- laser-pumped degenerate (subharmonic) optical parametric oscillator (OPO) that uses orientation-patterned gallium arsenide (OP-GaAs) as gain element. By varying intracavity dispersion, we observed a 'phase' transition from a singlecomb state (at exactly OPO degeneracy) to a two-comb state (near-degenerate operation), characterized by two spectrally overlapping combs (signal and idler) with distinct carrier-envelope offset frequencies. We achieve this by generating a supercontinuum (SC) from the mode-locked Tm laser that spans most of the near-IR range, and observing RF beats between the SC and parasitic sum-frequency light (pump + OPO) that also falls into the near-IR. We found RF linewidth to be <15 Hz (a resolution of our spectrum analyzer), which proves that coherence of the pump laser comb is preserved to a high degree in a subharmonic OPO. Transition to a two-comb state was characterized by a symmetric splitting of the RF peak. Low pump threshold (down to 7 mW), high (73 mW) average power and high (up to 90%) pump depletion make this comb source very attractive for numerous applications including trace molecular detection and chemical sensing with massively parallel spectral data acquisition.

  16. Ex-Vivo Characterization of Bioimpedance Spectroscopy of Normal, Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Rabbit Brain Tissue at Frequencies from 10 Hz to 1 MHz

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Zhang, Ge; Song, Jiali; Dai, Meng; Xu, Canhua; Dong, Xiuzhen; Fu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a severe cerebrovascular disease and is the second greatest cause of death worldwide. Because diagnostic tools (CT and MRI) to detect acute stroke cannot be used until the patient reaches the hospital setting, a portable diagnostic tool is urgently needed. Because biological tissues have different impedance spectra under normal physiological conditions and different pathological states, multi-frequency electrical impedance tomography (MFEIT) can potentially detect stroke. Accurate impedance spectra of normal brain tissue (gray and white matter) and stroke lesions (ischemic and hemorrhagic tissue) are important elements when studying stroke detection with MFEIT. To our knowledge, no study has comprehensively measured the impedance spectra of normal brain tissue and stroke lesions for the whole frequency range of 1 MHz within as short as possible an ex vivo time and using the same animal model. In this study, we established intracerebral hemorrhage and ischemic models in rabbits, then measured and analyzed the impedance spectra of normal brain tissue and stroke lesions ex vivo within 15 min after animal death at 10 Hz to 1 MHz. The results showed that the impedance spectra of stroke lesions significantly differed from those of normal brain tissue; the ratio of change in impedance of ischemic and hemorrhagic tissue with regard to frequency was distinct; and tissue type could be discriminated according to its impedance spectra. These findings further confirm the feasibility of detecting stroke with MFEIT and provide data supporting further study of MFEIT to detect stroke. PMID:27869707

  17. Comparison of the genotoxic effects induced by 50 Hz extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields and 1800 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic fields in GC-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Duan, Weixia; Liu, Chuan; Zhang, Lei; He, Mindi; Xu, Shangcheng; Chen, Chunhai; Pi, Huifeng; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Yanwen; Zhong, Min; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2015-03-01

    Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) and radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) have been considered to be possibly carcinogenic to humans. However, their genotoxic effects remain controversial. To make experiments controllable and results comparable, we standardized exposure conditions and explored the potential genotoxicity of 50 Hz ELF-EMF and 1800 MHz RF-EMF. A mouse spermatocyte-derived GC-2 cell line was intermittently (5 min on and 10 min off) exposed to 50 Hz ELF-EMF at an intensity of 1, 2 or 3 mT or to RF-EMF in GSM-Talk mode at the specific absorption rates (SAR) of 1, 2 or 4 W/kg. After exposure for 24 h, we found that neither ELF-EMF nor RF-EMF affected cell viability using Cell Counting Kit-8. Through the use of an alkaline comet assay and immunofluorescence against γ-H2AX foci, we found that ELF-EMF exposure resulted in a significant increase of DNA strand breaks at 3 mT, whereas RF-EMF exposure had insufficient energy to induce such effects. Using a formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG)-modified alkaline comet assay, we observed that RF-EMF exposure significantly induced oxidative DNA base damage at a SAR value of 4 W/kg, whereas ELF-EMF exposure did not. Our results suggest that both ELF-EMF and RF-EMF under the same experimental conditions may produce genotoxicity at relative high intensities, but they create different patterns of DNA damage. Therefore, the potential mechanisms underlying the genotoxicity of different frequency electromagnetic fields may be different.

  18. Discovery of Nearly Coherent Oscillations with a Frequency of approximately 567 Hz During Type I X-ray Bursts of the X-ray Transient and Eclipsing Binary X1658-298

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wijnands, Rudy; Strohmayer, Tod; Franco, Lucia M.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We report the discovery of nearly coherent oscillations with a frequency of approximately 567 Hz during type I X-ray bursts from the X-ray transient and eclipsing binary X1658-298. If these oscillations are directly related to the neutron star rotation, then the spin period of the neutron star in X1658-298 is approximately 1.8 ms. The oscillations can be present during the rise or decay phase of the bursts. Oscillations during the decay phase of the bursts show an increase in frequency of approximately 0.5-1 Hz. However, in one particular burst the oscillations reappear at the end of the decay phase at about 571.5 Hz. This represents an increase in oscillation frequency of about 5 Hz, which is the largest frequency change seen so far in a burst oscillation. It is unclear if such a large change can be accommodated by present models used to explain the frequency evolution of the oscillations. The oscillations at 571.5 Hz are unusually soft compared to the oscillations found at 567 Hz. We also observed several bursts during which the oscillations are detected at much lower significance or not at all. Most of these bursts happen during periods of X-ray dipping behavior, suggesting that the X-ray dipping might decrease the amplitude of the oscillations (although several complications exist with this simple picture). We discuss our discovery in the framework of the neutron star spin interpretation.

  19. Three Three-Year Aging of Prototype Flight Laser at 10 kHz and 1 ns Pulses With External Frequency Doubler for ICESat-2 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konoplev, Oleg A.; Chiragh, Furqan L.; Vasilyev, Aleksey A.; Edwards, Ryan; Stephen, Mark A.; Troupaki, Elisavet; Yu, Anthony W.; Krainak, Michael A.; Sawruk, Nick; Hovis, Floyd; Culpepper, Charles F.; Strickler, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of three year life-aging of a specially designed prototype flight source laser operating at 1064 nm, 10 kHz, 1ns, 15W average power and external frequency doubler. The Fibertek-designed, slightly pressurized air, enclosed-container source laser operated at 1064 nm in active Q-switching mode. The external frequency doubler was set in a clean room at a normal air pressure. The goal of the experiment was to measure degradation modes at 1064 and 532 nm discreetly. The external frequency doubler consisted of a Lithium triborate, LiB3O5, crystal operated at non-critical phase-matching. Due to 1064 nm diagnostic needs, the amount of fundamental frequency power available for doubling was 13.7W. The power generated at 532 nm was between 8.5W and 10W, depending on the level of stress and degradation. The life-aging consisted of double stress-step operation for doubler crystal, at 0.35 Jcm2 for almost 1 year, corresponding to normal conditions, and then at 0.93 Jcm2 for the rest of the experiment, corresponding to accelerated testing. We observed no degradation at the first step and linear degradation at the second step. The linear degradation at the second stress-step was related to doubler crystal output surface changes and linked to laser-assisted contamination. We discuss degradation model and estimate the expected lifetime for the flight laser at 532 nm. This work was done within the laser testing for NASAs Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) LIDAR at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD with the goal of 1 trillion shots lifetime.

  20. In Vitro Developmental Neurotoxicity Following Chronic Exposure to 50 Hz Extremely Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Fields in Primary Rat Cortical Cultures.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Martje W G D M; van Kleef, Regina G D M; de Groot, Aart; Westerink, Remco H S

    2016-02-01

    Exposure to 50-60 Hz extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) has increased considerably over the last decades. Several epidemiological studies suggested that ELF-EMF exposure is associated with adverse health effects, including neurotoxicity. However, these studies are debated as results are often contradictory and the possible underlying mechanisms are unknown. Since the developing nervous system is particularly vulnerable to insults, we investigate effects of chronic, developmental ELF-EMF exposure in vitro. Primary rat cortical neurons received 7 days developmental exposure to 50 Hz block-pulsed ELF-EMF (0-1000 μT) to assess effects on cell viability (Alamar Blue/CFDA assay), calcium homeostasis (single cell fluorescence microscopy), neurite outgrowth (β(III)-Tubulin immunofluorescent staining), and spontaneous neuronal activity (multi-electrode arrays). Our data demonstrate that cell viability is not affected by developmental ELF-EMF (0-1000 μT) exposure. Depolarization- and glutamate-evoked increases in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) are slightly increased at 1 μT, whereas both basal and stimulation-evoked [Ca(2+)]i show a modest inhibition at 1000 μT. Subsequent morphological analysis indicated that neurite length is unaffected up to 100 μT, but increased at 1000 μT. However, neuronal activity appeared largely unaltered following chronic ELF-EMF exposure up to 1000 μT. The effects of ELF-EMF exposure were small and largely restricted to the highest field strength (1000 μT), ie, 10 000 times above background exposure and well above current residential exposure limits. Our combined data therefore indicate that chronic ELF-EMF exposure has only limited (developmental) neurotoxic potential in vitro.

  1. Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Field (50 Hz, 0.5 mT) Reduces Oxidative Stress in the Brain of Gerbils Submitted to Global Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Rauš Balind, Snežana; Selaković, Vesna; Radenović, Lidija; Prolić, Zlatko; Janać, Branka

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic field as ecological factor has influence on all living beings. The aim of this study was to determine if extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF, 50 Hz, 0.5 mT) affects oxidative stress in the brain of gerbils submitted to 10-min global cerebral ischemia. After occlusion of both carotid arteries, 3-month-old gerbils were continuously exposed to ELF-MF for 7 days. Nitric oxide and superoxide anion production, superoxide dismutase activity and index of lipid peroxidation were examined in the forebrain cortex, striatum and hippocampus on the 7th (immediate effect of ELF-MF) and 14th day after reperfusion (delayed effect of ELF-MF). Ischemia per se increased oxidative stress in the brain on the 7th and 14th day after reperfusion. ELF-MF also increased oxidative stress, but to a greater extent than ischemia, only immediately after cessation of exposure. Ischemic gerbils exposed to ELF-MF had increased oxidative stress parameters on the 7th day after reperfusion, but to a lesser extent than ischemic or ELF-MF-exposed animals. On the 14th day after reperfusion, oxidative stress parameters in the brain of these gerbils were mostly at the control levels. Applied ELF-MF decreases oxidative stress induced by global cerebral ischemia and thereby reduces possible negative consequences which free radical species could have in the brain. The results presented here indicate a beneficial effect of ELF-MF (50 Hz, 0.5 mT) in the model of global cerebral ischemia. PMID:24586442

  2. Effects of long-term 50Hz power-line frequency electromagnetic field on cell behavior in Balb/c 3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    An, Guang-Zhou; Xu, Hui; Zhou, Yan; Du, Le; Miao, Xia; Jiang, Da-Peng; Li, Kang-Chu; Guo, Guo-Zhen; Zhang, Chen; Ding, Gui-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Power-line frequency electromagnetic field (PF-EMF) was reported as a human carcinogen by some epidemiological research, but the conclusion is lack of robust experiment evidence. To identify the effects of long-term PF-EMF exposure on cell behavior, Balb/c 3T3 cells in exponential growth phase were exposed or sham-exposed to 50 Hertz (Hz) PF-EMF at 2.3 mT for 2 hours (h) one day, 5 days every week. After 11 weeks exposure, cells were collected instantly. Cell morphology was observed under invert microscope and Giemsa staining, cell viability was detected by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, cell cycle and apoptosis was examined by flow cytometry, the protein level of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) and CyclinD1 was detected by western blot, cell transformation was examined by soft agar clone assay and plate clone forming test, and cell migration ability was observed by scratch adhesion test. It was found that after PF-EMF exposure, cell morphology, apoptosis, cell migration ability and cell transformation didn't change. However, compared with sham group, cell viability obviously decreased and cell cycle distribution also changed after 11 weeks PF-EMF exposure. Meanwhile, the protein level of PCNA and CyclinD1 significantly decreased after PF-EMF exposure. These data suggested that although long-term 50Hz PF-EMF exposure under this experimental condition had no effects on apoptosis, cell migration ability and cell transformation, it could affect cell proliferation and cell cycle by down-regulation the expression of PCNA and CyclinD1 protein.

  3. Three-year aging of prototype flight laser at 10 kHz and 1 ns pulses with external frequency doubler for ICESat-2 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konoplev, Oleg A.; Chiragh, Furqan L.; Vasilyev, Aleksey A.; Edwards, Ryan; Stephen, Mark A.; Troupaki, Elisavet; Yu, Anthony W.; Krainak, Michael A.; Sawruk, Nick; Hovis, Floyd; Culpepper, Charles F.; Strickler, Kathy

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of a three-year operational-aging test of a specially designed prototype flight laser operating at 1064 nm, 10 kHz, 1ns, 15W average power and externally frequency-doubled. Fibertek designed and built the q-switched, 1064nm laser and this laser was in a sealed container of dry air pressurized to 1.3 atm. The external frequency doubler was in a clean room at a normal air pressure. The goal of the experiment was to measure degradation modes at 1064 and 532 nm separately. The external frequency doubler consisted of a Lithium triborate, LiB3O5, non-critically phase-matched crystal. After some 1064 nm light was diverted for diagnostics, 13.7W of fundamental power was available to pump the doubling crystal. Between 8.5W and 10W of 532nm power was generated, depending on the level of stress and degradation. The test consisted of two stages, the first at 0.3 J/cm2 for almost 1 year, corresponding to expected operational conditions, and the second at 0.93 J/cm2 for the remainder of the experiment, corresponding to accelerated optical stress testing. We observed no degradation at the first stress-level and linear degradation at the second stress-level. The linear degradation was linked to doubler crystal output surface changes from laser-assisted contamination. We estimate the expected lifetime for the flight laser at 532 nm using fluence as the stress parameter. This work was done for NASA's Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) LIDAR at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD with the goal of 1 trillion shots lifetime.

  4. Low frequency (<1Hz) Large Magnitude Earthquake Simulations in Central Mexico: the 1985 Michoacan Earthquake and Hypothetical Rupture in the Guerrero Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez Guzman, L.; Contreras Ruíz Esparza, M.; Aguirre Gonzalez, J. J.; Alcántara Noasco, L.; Quiroz Ramírez, A.

    2012-12-01

    We present the analysis of simulations at low frequency (<1Hz) of historical and hypothetical earthquakes in Central Mexico, by using a 3D crustal velocity model and an idealized geotechnical structure of the Valley of Mexico. Mexico's destructive earthquake history bolsters the need for a better understanding regarding the seismic hazard and risk of the region. The Mw=8.0 1985 Michoacan earthquake is among the largest natural disasters that Mexico has faced in the last decades; more than 5000 people died and thousands of structures were damaged (Reinoso and Ordaz, 1999). Thus, estimates on the effects of similar or larger magnitude earthquakes on today's population and infrastructure are important. Moreover, Singh and Mortera (1991) suggest that earthquakes of magnitude 8.1 to 8.4 could take place in the so-called Guerrero Gap, an area adjacent to the region responsible for the 1985 earthquake. In order to improve previous estimations of the ground motion (e.g. Furumura and Singh, 2002) and lay the groundwork for a numerical simulation of a hypothetical Guerrero Gap scenario, we recast the 1985 Michoacan earthquake. We used the inversion by Mendoza and Hartzell (1989) and a 3D velocity model built on the basis of recent investigations in the area, which include a velocity structure of the Valley of Mexico constrained by geotechnical and reflection experiments, and noise tomography, receiver functions, and gravity-based regional models. Our synthetic seismograms were computed using the octree-based finite element tool-chain Hercules (Tu et al., 2006), and are valid up to a frequency of 1 Hz, considering realistic velocities in the Valley of Mexico ( >60 m/s in the very shallow subsurface). We evaluated the model's ability to reproduce the available records using the goodness-of-fit analysis proposed by Mayhew and Olsen (2010). Once the reliablilty of the model was established, we estimated the effects of a large magnitude earthquake in Central Mexico. We built a

  5. Electric and Dielectric Properties of Au/ZnS-PVA/n-Si (MPS) Structures in the Frequency Range of 10-200 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraz, Nalan; Yücedağ, İbrahim; Azizian-Kalandaragh, Yashar; Ersöz, Gülçin; Orak, İkram; Altındal, Şemsettin; Akbari, Bashir; Akbari, Hossein

    2017-02-01

    Pure polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) capped ZnS semiconductor nanocrystals were prepared by microwave-assisted method, and the optical and structural properties of the as-prepared materials were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) techniques. The XRD pattern shows the formation of ZnS nanocrystals, and the UV-Vis spectroscopy results show a blue shift of about 1.2 eV in its band gap due to the confinement of very small nanostructures. The concentration of donor atoms (N D), diffusion potential (V D), Fermi energy level (E F), and barrier height (ΦB (C-V)) values were obtained from the reverse bias C -2-V plots for each frequency. The voltage dependent profile of series resistance (R s) and surface states (N ss) were also obtained using admittance and low-high frequency methods, respectively. R s-V and N ss-V plots both have distinctive peaks in the depletion region due to the spatial distribution charge at the surface states. The effect of R s and interfacial layer on the C-V and G/ω-V characteristics was found remarkable at high frequencies. Therefore, the high frequency C-V and G/ω-V plots were corrected to eliminate the effect of R s. The real and imaginary parts of dielectric constant (ɛ' and ɛ″) and electric modulus (M' and M″), loss tangent (tan δ), and ac electrical conductivity (σ ac) were also obtained using C and G/ω data and it was found that these parameters are indeed strong functions of frequency and applied bias voltage. Experimental results confirmed that the N ss, R s , and interfacial layer of the MPS structure are important parameters that strongly influence both the electrical and dielectric properties. The low values of N ss ( 109 eV-1 cm-2) and the value of dielectric constant (ɛ' = 1.3) of ZnS-PVA interfacial layer even at 10 kHz are very suitable for electronic devices when compared with the SiO2. These results confirmed that the ZnS-PVA considerably improves the performance of Au/n-Si (MS

  6. Neuritin reverses deficits in murine novel object associative recognition memory caused by exposure to extremely low-frequency (50 Hz) electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qian-Ru; Lu, Jun-Mei; Yao, Jin-Jing; Zhang, Zheng-Yu; Ling, Chen; Mei, Yan-Ai

    2015-07-03

    Animal studies have shown that electromagnetic field exposure may interfere with the activity of brain cells, thereby generating behavioral and cognitive disturbances. However, the underlying mechanisms and possible preventions are still unknown. In this study, we used a mouse model to examine the effects of exposure to extremely low-frequency (50 Hz) electromagnetic fields (ELF MFs) on a recognition memory task and morphological changes of hippocampal neurons. The data showed that ELF MFs exposure (1 mT, 12 h/day) induced a time-dependent deficit in novel object associative recognition memory and also decreased hippocampal dendritic spine density. This effect was observed without corresponding changes in spontaneous locomotor activity and was transient, which has only been seen after exposing mice to ELF MFs for 7-10 days. The over-expression of hippocampal neuritin, an activity-dependent neurotrophic factor, using an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector significantly increased the neuritin level and dendritic spine density. This increase was paralleled with ELF MFs exposure-induced deficits in recognition memory and reductions of dendritic spine density. Collectively, our study provides evidence for the association between ELF MFs exposure, impairment of recognition memory, and resulting changes in hippocampal dendritic spine density. Neuritin prevented this ELF MFs-exposure-induced effect by increasing the hippocampal spine density.

  7. The effect of extremely low-frequency magnetic field (50–60 Hz) exposure on spontaneous apoptosis: The results of a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mansourian, Mahsa; Marateb, Hamid Reza; Vaseghi, Golnaz

    2016-01-01

    Background: This paper is a meta-analysis of the published data from in vitro studies to evaluate whether spontaneous apoptosis might be influenced by extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields (MFs). Materials and Methods: A comprehensive scientific literature search in electronic databases was conducted and studies covering the period 2000–2010 were selected. Then, published studies involving the desired topic were retrieved. The inclusion criteria were percentage of apoptosis in the cells exposed to 50–60 Hz ELF-MFs. The statistical analysis was performed by comprehensive meta-analysis version 2. Results: The summary measure of association (95% confidence interval) for all 18 effect estimated from 8 studies was 1.18 (1.15, 1.20). Heterogeneity among studies was found. There was no evidence of publication bias for the association between exposure to MF and apoptosis risk. Conclusion: Our meta-analysis provided conclusive data that ELF-MFs can increase apoptosis in cancer and normal cells. Furthermore, there is a possibly individual intensity and time range with maximum created effect according to window effect. PMID:27656610

  8. Neuritin reverses deficits in murine novel object associative recognition memory caused by exposure to extremely low-frequency (50 Hz) electromagnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qian-Ru; Lu, Jun-Mei; Yao, Jin-Jing; Zhang, Zheng-Yu; Ling, Chen; Mei, Yan-Ai

    2015-01-01

    Animal studies have shown that electromagnetic field exposure may interfere with the activity of brain cells, thereby generating behavioral and cognitive disturbances. However, the underlying mechanisms and possible preventions are still unknown. In this study, we used a mouse model to examine the effects of exposure to extremely low-frequency (50 Hz) electromagnetic fields (ELF MFs) on a recognition memory task and morphological changes of hippocampal neurons. The data showed that ELF MFs exposure (1 mT, 12 h/day) induced a time-dependent deficit in novel object associative recognition memory and also decreased hippocampal dendritic spine density. This effect was observed without corresponding changes in spontaneous locomotor activity and was transient, which has only been seen after exposing mice to ELF MFs for 7-10 days. The over-expression of hippocampal neuritin, an activity-dependent neurotrophic factor, using an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector significantly increased the neuritin level and dendritic spine density. This increase was paralleled with ELF MFs exposure-induced deficits in recognition memory and reductions of dendritic spine density. Collectively, our study provides evidence for the association between ELF MFs exposure, impairment of recognition memory, and resulting changes in hippocampal dendritic spine density. Neuritin prevented this ELF MFs-exposure-induced effect by increasing the hippocampal spine density. PMID:26138388

  9. Spectral power time-courses of human sleep EEG reveal a striking discontinuity at approximately 18 Hz marking the division between NREM-specific and wake/REM-specific fast frequency activity.

    PubMed

    Merica, Helli; Fortune, Ronald D

    2005-07-01

    Spectral power time-courses over the ultradian cycle of the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) provide a useful window for exploring the temporal correlation between cortical EEG and sub-cortical neuronal activities. Precision in the measurement of these time-courses is thus important, but it is hampered by lacunae in the definition of the frequency band limits that are in the main based on wake EEG conventions. A frequently seen discordance between the shape of the beta power time-course across the ultradian cycle and that reported for the sequential mean firing rate of brainstem-thalamic activating neurons invites a closer examination of these band limits, especially since the sleep EEG literature indicates in several studies an intriguing non-uniformity of time-course comportment across the traditional beta band frequencies. We ascribe this tentatively to the sharp reversal of slope we have seen at approximately 18 Hz in our data and that of others. Here, therefore, using data for the first four ultradian cycles from 18 healthy subjects, we apply several criteria based on changes in time-course comportment in order to examine this non-uniformity as we move in 1 Hz bins through the frequency range 14-30 Hz. The results confirm and describe in detail the striking discontinuity of shape at around 18 Hz, with only the upper range (18-30 Hz) displaying a time-course similar to that of the firing-rate changes measured in brainstem activating neurons and acknowledged to engender states of brain activation. Fast frequencies in the lower range (15-18 Hz), on the other hand, are shown to be specific to non-rapid-eye-movement sleep. Splitting the beta band at approximately 18 Hz therefore permits a significant improvement in EEG measurement and a more precise correlation with cellular activity.

  10. Effect of 50 Hz Extremely Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Fields on the DNA Methylation and DNA Methyltransferases in Mouse Spermatocyte-Derived Cell Line GC-2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Liu, Wen-bin; Liu, Kai-jun; Ao, Lin; Zhong, Julia Li; Cao, Jia; Liu, Jin-yi

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the male reproductive system is one of the most sensitive organs to electromagnetic radiation. However, the biological effects and molecular mechanism are largely unclear. Our study was designed to elucidate the epigenetic effects of 50 Hz ELF-EMF in vitro. Mouse spermatocyte-derived GC-2 cell line was exposed to 50 Hz ELF-EMF (5 min on and 10 min off) at magnetic field intensity of 1 mT, 2 mT, and 3 mT with an intermittent exposure for 72 h. We found that 50 Hz ELF-EMF exposure decreased genome-wide methylation at 1 mT, but global methylation was higher at 3 mT compared with the controls. The expression of DNMT1 and DNMT3b was decreased at 1 mT, and 50 Hz ELF-EMF can increase the expression of DNMT1 and DNMT3b of GC-2 cells at 3 mT. However, 50 Hz ELF-EMF had little influence on the expression of DNMT3a. Then, we established DNA methylation and gene expression profiling and validated some genes with aberrant DNA methylation and expression at different intensity of 50 Hz ELF-EMF. These results suggest that the alterations of genome-wide methylation and DNMTs expression may play an important role in the biological effects of 50 Hz ELF-EMF exposure.

  11. Effect of 50 Hz Extremely Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Fields on the DNA Methylation and DNA Methyltransferases in Mouse Spermatocyte-Derived Cell Line GC-2

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong; Liu, Wen-bin; Liu, Kai-jun; Ao, Lin; Zhong, Julia Li; Cao, Jia; Liu, Jin-yi

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the male reproductive system is one of the most sensitive organs to electromagnetic radiation. However, the biological effects and molecular mechanism are largely unclear. Our study was designed to elucidate the epigenetic effects of 50 Hz ELF-EMF in vitro. Mouse spermatocyte-derived GC-2 cell line was exposed to 50 Hz ELF-EMF (5 min on and 10 min off) at magnetic field intensity of 1 mT, 2 mT, and 3 mT with an intermittent exposure for 72 h. We found that 50 Hz ELF-EMF exposure decreased genome-wide methylation at 1 mT, but global methylation was higher at 3 mT compared with the controls. The expression of DNMT1 and DNMT3b was decreased at 1 mT, and 50 Hz ELF-EMF can increase the expression of DNMT1 and DNMT3b of GC-2 cells at 3 mT. However, 50 Hz ELF-EMF had little influence on the expression of DNMT3a. Then, we established DNA methylation and gene expression profiling and validated some genes with aberrant DNA methylation and expression at different intensity of 50 Hz ELF-EMF. These results suggest that the alterations of genome-wide methylation and DNMTs expression may play an important role in the biological effects of 50 Hz ELF-EMF exposure. PMID:26339596

  12. Origin of Noise in AlGaN/GaN Heterostructures in the Range of 1Hz-100 MHz and its Up-Conversion in High-Frequency Noise of Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitusevich, S. A.

    2007-07-01

    This paper gives an overview of our recently obtained results on investigation of noise properties in undoped AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors for the development of low-noise oscillators. The features observed in the carrier transport and noise spectra in two-dimensional AlGaN/GaN conducting channels grown on sapphire substrate are explained on the basis of a model taking into account the overheating effect and dynamic redistribution of potential. The low-frequency noise investigation of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures grown on SiC substrate showed that passivation significantly decreased the level of channel noise, but the noise coming from contact regions was found to be dominant in passivated devices. For the frequency range of 10-100 MHz in the structures, the fluctuations of electron concentration on the first quantum level of the quantum well and the scattering of the electrons in the barrier have been established. The measured phase noise of the oscillator shows that the low-frequency noise of the microwave active device is up-converted into phase fluctuations of the high-frequency carrier. The up-conversion factor of the oscillator for an offset frequency of 100 kHz is only about 15 kHz/V, which results in very low oscillator phase noise of - 105 dBc/Hz.

  13. [Polish regulations on maximum admissible intensities for electric and magnetic frequencies of 60 Hz and the European Union recommendations for electrical power engineering].

    PubMed

    Groszko, Marian

    2003-01-01

    Electric and magnetic fields of 50 Hz from electric power devices affect not only workers, but also the general population, as these devices are also located in populated areas, hence the duality of regulations on maximum admissible intensities. This paper presents these regulations and discusses in detail the changes of 2001. Based on the Polish regulations, hygienic evaluation of electric power devices has been attempted. The Polish regulations on the 50 Hz electromagnetic fields were compared with relevant international regulations of CENELEC and the European Union recommendations. Our maximum admissible intensities have been found to conform with the international standards.

  14. The effect of signal duration on the underwater detection thresholds of a harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) for single frequency-modulated tonal signals between 0.25 and 160 kHz.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Hoek, Lean; de Jong, Christ A F; Wensveen, Paul J

    2010-11-01

    The underwater hearing sensitivity of a young male harbor porpoise for tonal signals of various signal durations was quantified by using a behavioral psychophysical technique. The animal was trained to respond only when it detected an acoustic signal. Fifty percent detection thresholds were obtained for tonal signals (15 frequencies between 0.25-160 kHz, durations 0.5-5000 ms depending on the frequency; 134 frequency-duration combinations in total). Detection thresholds were quantified by varying signal amplitude by the 1-up 1-down staircase method. The hearing thresholds increased when the signal duration fell below the time constant of integration. The time constants, derived from an exponential model of integration [Plomp and Bouman, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 31, 749-758 (1959)], varied from 629 ms at 2 kHz to 39 ms at 64 kHz. The integration times of the porpoises were similar to those of other mammals including humans, even though the porpoise is a marine mammal and a hearing specialist. The results enable more accurate estimations of the distances at which porpoises can detect short-duration environmental tonal signals. The audiogram thresholds presented by Kastelein et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 112, 334-344 (2002)], after correction for the frequency bandwidth of the FM signals, are similar to the results of the present study for signals of 1500 ms duration. Harbor porpoise hearing is more sensitive between 2 and 10 kHz, and less sensitive above 10 kHz, than formerly believed.

  15. Sporadic Geomagnetic Pulsations at Frequencies of up to 15 HZ in the Magnetic Storm of November 7-14, 2004: Features of the Amplitude and Polarization Spectra and their Connection with Ion-Cyclotron Waves in the Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakova, E. N.; Yahnin, A. G.; Yahnina, T. A.; Demekhov, A. G.; Kotik, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamics of the geomagnetic-pulsation spectra at unusually high frequencies (including the frequencies exceeding the Schumann resonance frequency 8 Hz), which were detected for the first time at the Novaya Zhizn' midlatitude station (the McIlwain parameter L = 2.6) at the time of a strong magnetic storm on November 07-14, 2004. To interpret the observed pulsation frequencies, we used the data from the NOAA low-orbit satellites which recorded localized precipitations of energetic protons (with energies of 30 to 80 keV) and calculations of the singlepass cyclotron amplification of electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves. Amplitude and polarization characteristics of the radiation spectra at frequencies of up to 15 Hz at the Novaya Zhizn' and Lovozero stations (L = 5.2) are compared. It is shown that the magnetic field oscillations in the frequency range 7-15 Hz correlate with proton precipitations and proton auroras at geomagnetic latitudes 50°-57° (L = 2.42-3.37). It is also shown that for a high anisotropy of the pitch-angle distribution of the ring-current protons at such low geomagnetic latitudes, the frequency spectrum of observed high-frequency radiation agrees well with the calculated location of the maximum of the single-pass cyclotron amplification of electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves. Analysis of the data and calculation results has led to the conclusion that inherently the recorded signals are a high-frequency counterpart of the Pc1 pulsations and are due to the generation of ion-cyclotron waves in the magnetosphere at unusually low latitudes, which are probably stipulated by the shift of the plasma pause to these latitudes during a strong magnetic storm.

  16. Search for a correlation between kHz quasi-periodic oscillation frequencies and accretion-related parameters in the ensemble of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çatmabacak, Önder; Erkut, M. Hakan; Catmabacak, Onur; Duran, Sivan

    2016-07-01

    The distribution of neutron star sources in the ensemble of low-mass X-ray binaries shows no evidence for a correlation between kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequencies and X-ray luminosity. Sources differing by orders of magnitude in luminosity can exhibit similar range of QPO frequencies. We study the possibility for the existence of a correlation between kHz QPO frequencies and accretion related parameters. The parameters such as the mass accretion rate and the size of the boundary region in the innermost disk are expected to be related to X-ray luminosity. Using the up-to-date data of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries, we search for a possible correlation between lower kHz QPO frequencies and mass accretion rate through the mass and radius values predicted by different equations of state for the neutron star. The range of mass accretion rate for each source can be estimated if the accretion luminosity is assumed to be represented well by the X-ray luminosity of the source. Although we find no correlation between mass accretion rate and QPO frequencies, the source distribution seems to be in accordance with a correlation between kHz QPO frequencies and the parameter combining the neutron star magnetic field and the mas accretion rate. The model function we employ to descibe the correlation is able to account for the scattering of individual sources around a simple power law. The correlation argues disk-magnetosphere interaction as the origin of these millisecond oscillations.

  17. 24 CFR 10.12 - Additional rulemaking proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Additional rulemaking proceedings. 10.12 Section 10.12 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development RULEMAKING: POLICY AND PROCEDURES Procedures § 10.12 Additional rulemaking...

  18. 1 CFR 10.12 - Format, indexes, and ancillaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Format, indexes, and ancillaries. 10.12 Section 10.12 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER SPECIAL EDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PRESIDENTIAL PAPERS Annual Publication § 10.12 Format, indexes, and ancillaries. (a)...

  19. 1 CFR 10.12 - Format, indexes, and ancillaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Format, indexes, and ancillaries. 10.12 Section 10.12 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER SPECIAL EDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PRESIDENTIAL PAPERS Annual Publication § 10.12 Format, indexes, and ancillaries. (a)...

  20. 46 CFR 90.10-12 - Gas free.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gas free. 90.10-12 Section 90.10-12 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 90.10-12 Gas free. This term means free from dangerous concentrations...

  1. 46 CFR 90.10-12 - Gas free.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gas free. 90.10-12 Section 90.10-12 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 90.10-12 Gas free. This term means free from dangerous concentrations...

  2. 46 CFR 90.10-12 - Gas free.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gas free. 90.10-12 Section 90.10-12 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 90.10-12 Gas free. This term means free from dangerous concentrations...

  3. 46 CFR 90.10-12 - Gas free.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gas free. 90.10-12 Section 90.10-12 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 90.10-12 Gas free. This term means free from dangerous concentrations...

  4. 46 CFR 90.10-12 - Gas free.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gas free. 90.10-12 Section 90.10-12 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 90.10-12 Gas free. This term means free from dangerous concentrations...

  5. 10 CFR 10.12 - Interview and other investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Interview and other investigation. 10.12 Section 10.12... Eligibility for Access to Restricted Data or National Security Information or an Employment Clearance § 10.12... pursuant to § 10.11(a) (5) and (12). (c) If the Director, Division of Facilities and Security, cannot...

  6. 10 CFR 10.12 - Interview and other investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interview and other investigation. 10.12 Section 10.12... Eligibility for Access to Restricted Data or National Security Information or an Employment Clearance § 10.12... pursuant to § 10.11(a) (5) and (12). (c) If the Director, Division of Facilities and Security, cannot...

  7. 10 CFR 10.12 - Interview and other investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Interview and other investigation. 10.12 Section 10.12... Eligibility for Access to Restricted Data or National Security Information or an Employment Clearance § 10.12... pursuant to § 10.11(a) (5) and (12). (c) If the Director, Division of Facilities and Security, cannot...

  8. 10 CFR 10.12 - Interview and other investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interview and other investigation. 10.12 Section 10.12... Eligibility for Access to Restricted Data or National Security Information or an Employment Clearance § 10.12... pursuant to § 10.11(a) (5) and (12). (c) If the Director, Division of Facilities and Security, cannot...

  9. 10 CFR 10.12 - Interview and other investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interview and other investigation. 10.12 Section 10.12... Eligibility for Access to Restricted Data or National Security Information or an Employment Clearance § 10.12... pursuant to § 10.11(a) (5) and (12). (c) If the Director, Division of Facilities and Security, cannot...

  10. Testing the relativistic precession model using low-frequency and kHz quasi-periodic oscillations in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries with known spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Doesburgh, Marieke; van der Klis, Michiel

    2017-03-01

    We analyse all available RXTE data on a sample of 13 low-mass X-ray binaries with known neutron star spin that are not persistent pulsars. We carefully measure the correlations between the centroid frequencies of the quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). We compare these correlations to the prediction of the relativistic precession model that, due to frame dragging, a QPO will occur at the Lense-Thirring precession frequency νLT of a test-particle orbit whose orbital frequency is the upper kHz QPO frequency νu. Contrary to the most prominent previous studies, we find two different oscillations in the range predicted for νLT that are simultaneously present over a wide range of νu. Additionally, one of the low-frequency noise components evolves into a (third) QPO in the νLT range when νu exceeds 600 Hz. The frequencies of these QPOs all correlate to νu following power laws with indices between 0.4 and 3.3, significantly exceeding the predicted value of 2.0 in 80 per cent of the cases (at 3 to >20σ). Also, there is no evidence that the neutron star spin frequency affects any of these three QPO frequencies, as would be expected for frame dragging. Finally, the observed QPO frequencies tend to be higher than the νLT predicted for reasonable neutron star specific moment of inertia. In the light of recent successes of precession models in black holes, we briefly discuss ways in which such precession can occur in neutron stars at frequencies different from test-particle values and consistent with those observed. A precessing torus geometry and other torques than frame dragging may allow precession to produce the observed frequency correlations, but can only explain one of the three QPOs in the νLT range.

  11. Quasi-flat-top frequency-doubled Nd:glass laser for pumping of high-power Ti:sapphire amplifiers at a 0.1 Hz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Yanovsky, Victor; Kalinchenko, Galina; Rousseau, Pascal; Chvykov, Vladimir; Mourou, Gerard; Krushelnick, Karl

    2008-04-20

    A Nd:glass laser based on a novel design delivers up to 120 J energy pulses with a quasi-flat-top spatial profile at a 0.1 Hz repetition rate. The laser output is frequency-doubled with 50% efficiency and used to pump Ti:sapphire amplifiers. The developed design is perspective for use in the currently contemplated next step in ultra-high-intensity laser development.

  12. Comparison of 10-kHz High-Frequency and Traditional Low-Frequency Spinal Cord Stimulation for the Treatment of Chronic Back and Leg Pain: 24-Month Results From a Multicenter, Randomized, Controlled Pivotal Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cong; Doust, Matthew W.; Gliner, Bradford E.; Vallejo, Ricardo; Sitzman, B. Todd; Amirdelfan, Kasra; Morgan, Donna M.; Yearwood, Thomas L.; Bundschu, Richard; Yang, Thomas; Benyamin, Ramsin; Burgher, Abram H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pain relief with spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has focused historically on paresthesias overlapping chronically painful areas. A higher level evidence supports the use of SCS in treating leg pain than supports back pain, as it is difficult to achieve adequate paresthesia coverage, and then pain relief, in the low back region. In comparison, 10-kHz high-frequency (HF10 therapy) SCS therapy does not rely on intraoperative paresthesia mapping and remains paresthesia-free during therapy. OBJECTIVE: To compare long-term results of HF10 therapy and traditional low-frequency SCS. METHODS: A pragmatic randomized, controlled, pivotal trial with 24-month follow-up was conducted across 11 comprehensive pain treatment centers. Subjects had Visual Analog Scale scores of ≥5.0/10.0 cm for both back and leg pain, and were assigned randomly (1:1) to receive HF10 therapy or low-frequency SCS. The primary end point was a responder rate, defined as ≥50% back pain reduction from baseline at 3 months with a secondary end point at 12 months (previously reported). In this article, 24-month secondary results are presented. Non-inferiority was first assessed, and if demonstrated the results were tested for superiority. RESULTS: In the study, 198 subjects were randomized (101 HF10 therapy, 97 traditional SCS). One hundred seventy-one subjects (90 HF10 therapy, 81 traditional SCS) successfully completed a short-term trial and were implanted. Subjects averaged 54.9 ± 12.9 years old, 13.6 ± 11.3 years since diagnosis, 86.6% had back surgery, 88.3% were taking opioid analgesics. At 3 months, 84.5% of implanted HF10 therapy subjects were responders for back pain and 83.1% for leg pain, and 43.8% of traditional SCS subjects were responders for back pain and 55.5% for leg pain (P < .001 for both back and leg pain comparisons, non-inferiority and superiority). At 24 months, more subjects were responders to HF10 therapy than traditional SCS (back pain: 76.5% vs 49.3%; 27

  13. The effect of Non- ionizing electromagnetic field with a frequency of 50 Hz in Rat ovary: A transmission electron microscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Khaki, Amir Afshin; Khaki, Arash; Ahmadi, Seyed Shahin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recently, there are increasing concerns and interests about the potential effects of Electromagnetic Field (EMF) on both human and animal health. Objective: The goal of this study was to evaluate the harmful effects of 50 Hz non-ionizing EMF on rat oocytes. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study 30 rats were randomly taken from laboratory animals and their ags and weights were determined. These 3 month's old rats were randomly divided into 3 groups. The control group consisted of 10 rats without receiving any treatment and kept under normal conditions. Experimental group 1 (10 rats) received EMF for 8 weeks (3 weeks intrauterine +5 weeks after births) and experimental group 2 (10 rats) received EMF for 13 weeks (3 weeks intrauterine +10 weeks after birth). After removing the ovaries and isolating follicles, granulosa cells were fixed in glutaraldehyde and osmium tetroxide. Electron microscopy was used to investigate the traumatic effects of EMF on follicles. Results: In control group nucleus membrane and mitochondria in follicle’s cytoplasm seemed normal in appearance. Theca layer of primary follicles in experimental group was separated clearly, zona layer demonstrated trot with irregular thickness and ovarian stroma seemed isolated with dilated vessels showing infiltration. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, it can be concluded that EMF has harmful effects on the ovarian follicles. PMID:27200427

  14. Behavior of 1 Ω resistors at frequencies below 1 Hz and the problem of assigning a dc value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Nick; Götz, Martin; Rolland, Benjamin; Pesel, Eckart

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a systematic study of the effects of reversals of current polarity on 1 Ω standard resistors. A selection of 1 Ω standards were measured on a dc cryogenic current comparator bridge and also on an ac current comparator bridge operating at 1 Hz. We find that the apparent 4 terminal resistance depends strongly on the dc reversal rate, in one case showing a variation of more than 0.1 μΩ/Ω for cycle times between 10 s and 1000 s. Even in the best cases, effects of at least 0.01 μΩ/Ω are present. Furthermore, the assumption that the apparent resistance value converges to a limiting value for long waiting times after reversal is not always upheld, making it difficult to quote a simple dc value. Existing models of Peltier heating at wire junctions do not completely explain our observations. The problems presented have been the limiting factor for 1 Ω measurements as part of a recent on-site comparison of quantum Hall effect resistance standards.

  15. Energetic Particle Propagation in the Inner Heliosphere as Deduced from Low Frequency (less than 100 kHz) Observations of Type III Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Erickson, W. C.

    2003-01-01

    Solar energetic particle (SEP) events are well-associated with solar flares. It is observed that the delay between the time of the flare and the first-arriving particles at a spacecraft increases with increasing difference between the flare longitude and the footpoint of the field line on which the spacecraft is located. This difference we call the "connection angle" and can be as large as approximately 120 deg. Recently it has been found that all SEP events are preceded by type III radio bursts. These bursts are plasma emission caused by the propagation of 2-50 keV flare electrons through the solar corona and into the solar wind. The drift of these type III radio bursts to lower and lower frequencies enables the propagation of the flare electrons to be traced from the Sun to about 1 AU. We have made an extensive analysis of the type III bursts associated with greater than 20 MeV proton events and find that, in most cases, the radio emission extends to the local plasma frequency when the energetic particles arrive within a few hours of the flare. We conclude that this emission at the lowest possible frequency is generated close to the spacecraft. We then use the time from when the burst started at the Sun to when it reached the local plasma frequency to infer the time it took the radio producing electrons to travel to the spacecraft. We find that these delay times are organized by the connection angle and correlate with the proton delay times. We also find that the differences between the radio delays at Wind and Ulysses are matched by differences in the relative arrival times of the energetic particles at the two spacecraft. The consistent timing between the relative arrival times of energetic electrons and protons and the start of the lowest frequency radio emissions suggests that the first arriving particles of both species are accelerated as part of the flare process and that they propagate to the spacecraft along trajectories similar to those of the lower

  16. 10 Hz flicker improves recognition memory in older people

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jonathan; Ramaswamy, Deepa; Oulhaj, Abderrahim

    2006-01-01

    Background 10 Hz electroencephalographic (EEG) alpha rhythms correlate with memory performance. Alpha and memory decline in older people. We wished to test if alpha-like EEG activity contributes to memory formation. Flicker can elicit alpha-like EEG activity. We tested if alpha-frequency flicker enhances memory in older people. Pariticpants aged 67–92 identified short words that followed 1 s of flicker at 9.0 Hz, 9.5 Hz, 10.0 Hz, 10.2 Hz, 10.5 Hz, 11.0 Hz, 11.5 Hz or 500 Hz. A few minutes later, we tested participants' recognition of the words (without flicker). Results Flicker frequencies close to 10 Hz (9.5–11.0 Hz) facilitated the identification of the test words in older participants. The same flicker frequencies increased recognition of the words more than other frequencies (9.0 Hz, 11.5 Hz and 500 Hz), irrespective of age. Conclusion The frequency-specificity of flicker's effects in our participants paralleled the power spectrum of EEG alpha in the general population. This indicates that alpha-like EEG activity may subserve memory processes. Flicker may be able to help memory problems in older people. PMID:16515710

  17. Low-frequency ultrasound (20-40 kHz) as an adjunctive therapy for chronic wound healing: a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis of eight randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Jeffrey; Wendelken, Martin; Driver, Vickie; Alvarez, Oscar M

    2011-12-01

    Ultrasound as a therapeutic agent in chronic wound healing has been studied extensively. This systematic review and meta-analysis specifically examines low-frequency (20-30 kHz) ultrasound delivered at either low or high intensity. The objective of this review was to determine whether low-frequency ultrasound used as an adjunctive therapy improves the outcomes of complete healing and reduction of size of chronic lower limb wounds. PubMed, Cochrane/CENTRAL, technical assessment, relevant wound-related journals, and clinical guidelines were searched along with contacting manufacturers and authors of relevant randomized controlled trials were completed. Searches focused on the use of low-frequency ultrasound in randomized controlled trials. Data were collected via a data collection form and was adjudicated independently via coauthors. Meta-analyses and heterogeneity checks were performed using Mantel-Haenszel and inverse variance (fixed and random effects) statistical methods on studies with similar outcomes (complete healing and percent wound area reduction) over similar time periods. Single study results were reported via the statistical methods used in the study. Eight randomized controlled trials were identified. Results demonstrated that early healing (at ≤5 months) in patients with venous stasis and diabetic foot ulcers was favorably influenced by both high- and low-intensity ultrasound delivered at a low frequency-either via contact or noncontact techniques. However, the quality of the data may be suspect, especially for low-frequency low-intensity noncontact ultrasound because of significant biases. In patients presenting with either venous stasis or diabetic foot ulcers (Wagner classification 1-3), early healing appears to be facilitated by either low-frequency low-intensity noncontact ultrasound or low-frequency high-intensity contact ultrasound.

  18. Gerbil middle-ear sound transmission from 100 Hz to 60 kHz1

    PubMed Central

    Ravicz, Michael E.; Cooper, Nigel P.; Rosowski, John J.

    2008-01-01

    Middle-ear sound transmission was evaluated as the middle-ear transfer admittance HMY (the ratio of stapes velocity to ear-canal sound pressure near the umbo) in gerbils during closed-field sound stimulation at frequencies from 0.1 to 60 kHz, a range that spans the gerbil’s audiometric range. Similar measurements were performed in two laboratories. The HMY magnitude (a) increased with frequency below 1 kHz, (b) remained approximately constant with frequency from 5 to 35 kHz, and (c) decreased substantially from 35 to 50 kHz. The HMY phase increased linearly with frequency from 5 to 35 kHz, consistent with a 20–29 μs delay, and flattened at higher frequencies. Measurements from different directions showed that stapes motion is predominantly pistonlike except in a narrow frequency band around 10 kHz. Cochlear input impedance was estimated from HMY and previously-measured cochlear sound pressure. Results do not support the idea that the middle ear is a lossless matched transmission line. Results support the ideas that (1) middle-ear transmission is consistent with a mechanical transmission line or multiresonant network between 5 and 35 kHz and decreases at higher frequencies, (2) stapes motion is pistonlike over most of the gerbil auditory range, and (3) middle-ear transmission properties are a determinant of the audiogram. PMID:18646983

  19. Gerbil middle-ear sound transmission from 100 Hz to 60 kHz.

    PubMed

    Ravicz, Michael E; Cooper, Nigel P; Rosowski, John J

    2008-07-01

    Middle-ear sound transmission was evaluated as the middle-ear transfer admittance H(MY) (the ratio of stapes velocity to ear-canal sound pressure near the umbo) in gerbils during closed-field sound stimulation at frequencies from 0.1 to 60 kHz, a range that spans the gerbil's audiometric range. Similar measurements were performed in two laboratories. The H(MY) magnitude (a) increased with frequency below 1 kHz, (b) remained approximately constant with frequency from 5 to 35 kHz, and (c) decreased substantially from 35 to 50 kHz. The H(MY) phase increased linearly with frequency from 5 to 35 kHz, consistent with a 20-29 micros delay, and flattened at higher frequencies. Measurements from different directions showed that stapes motion is predominantly pistonlike except in a narrow frequency band around 10 kHz. Cochlear input impedance was estimated from H(MY) and previously-measured cochlear sound pressure. Results do not support the idea that the middle ear is a lossless matched transmission line. Results support the ideas that (1) middle-ear transmission is consistent with a mechanical transmission line or multiresonant network between 5 and 35 kHz and decreases at higher frequencies, (2) stapes motion is pistonlike over most of the gerbil auditory range, and (3) middle-ear transmission properties are a determinant of the audiogram.

  20. Effects of co-exposure to extremely low frequency (50 Hz) magnetic fields and xenobiotics determined in vitro by the alkaline comet assay.

    PubMed

    Villarini, Milena; Moretti, Massimo; Scassellati-Sforzolini, Giuseppina; Boccioli, Bruno; Pasquini, Rossana

    2006-05-15

    In the present study, we used human peripheral blood leukocytes from 4 different donors, to investigate in vitro the possible genotoxic and/or co-genotoxic activity of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) at 3 mT intensity. Two model mutagens were used to study the possible interaction between ELF-MF and xenobiotics: N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and 4-nitroquinoline N-oxide (4NQO). Primary DNA damage was evaluated by the alkaline single-cell microgel-electrophoresis ("comet") assay. Control cells (leukocytes not exposed to ELF-MF, nor treated with genotoxins) from the different blood donors showed a comparable level of basal DNA damage, whereas the contribution of individual susceptibility toward ELF-MF and the tested genotoxic compounds led to differences in the extent of DNA damage observed following exposure to the genotoxins, both in the presence and in the absence of an applied ELF-MF. A 3 mT ELF-MF alone was unable to cause direct primary DNA damage. In leukocytes exposed to ELF-MF and genotoxins, the extent of MNNG-induced DNA damage increased with exposure duration compared to sham-exposed cells. The opposite was observed in cells treated with 4NQO. In this case the extent of 4NQO-induced DNA damage was somewhat reduced in leukocytes exposed to ELF-MF compared to sham-exposed cells. Moreover, in cells exposed to ELF-MF an increased concentration of GSH was always observed, compared to sham-exposed cells. Since following GSH conjugation the genotoxic pattern of MNNG and 4NQO is quite different, an influence of ELF-MF on the activity of the enzyme involved in the synthesis of GSH leading to different activation/deactivation of the model mutagens used was hypothesized to explain the different trends observed in MNNG and 4NQO genotoxic activity in the presence of an applied ELF-MF. The possibility that ELF-MF might interfere with the genotoxic activity of xenobiotics has important implications, since human populations are likely to be

  1. Assessment of the neurotoxic potential of exposure to 50Hz extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) in naïve and chemically stressed PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Martje W G D M; Kock, Marjolijn D M; Westerink, Remco H S

    2014-09-01

    Increasing exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF), generated by power lines and electric appliances, raises concern about potential adverse health effects of ELF-EMF. The central nervous system is expected to be particularly vulnerable to ELF-EMF as its function strongly depends on electrical excitability. We therefore investigated effects of acute (30min) and sub-chronic (48h) exposure to 50Hz ELF-EMF on naïve and chemically stressed pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. The latter have higher levels of iron and/or reactive oxygen species (ROS) and display increased vulnerability to environmental insults. Effects of ELF-EMF on Ca(2+)-homeostasis, ROS production and membrane integrity were assessed using Fura-2 single cell fluorescence microscopy, H2-DCFDA and CFDA assays, respectively. Our data demonstrate that acute exposure of naïve PC12 cells to 50Hz ELF-EMF up to 1000μT fails to affect basal or depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i. Moreover, sub-chronic ELF-EMF exposure up to 1000μT has no consistent effects on Ca(2+)-homeostasis in naïve PC12 cells and does not affect ROS production and membrane integrity. Notably, in chemically stressed PC12 cells both acute and sub-chronic ELF-EMF exposure also failed to exert consistent effects on Ca(2+)-homeostasis, ROS production and membrane integrity. Our combined findings thus indicate that exposure to 50Hz ELF-EMF up to 1000μT, i.e. 10,000 times above background exposure, does not induce neurotoxic effects in vitro, neither in naïve nor in chemically stressed PC12 cells. Though our data require confirmation, e.g. in developing neuronal cells in vitro or (developing) animals, it appears that the neurotoxic risk of ELF-EMF exposure is limited.

  2. Music, Grades 10-12. Secondary Schools Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cranston School Dept., RI.

    Nine courses are included in this music guide for grades 10-12: Music Theory; Humanities: Renaissance, Baroque, and Classical; Humanities: Idealism vs. Realism; Humanities: 20th Century Man and His World; A Capella Choir; Chorale; Band; and Basic Keyboard Study. Major objectives, numbered objectives, and activities indicate level of learning,…

  3. Social Studies, Grades 10-12. Secondary Schools Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cranston School Dept., RI.

    This curriculum guide provides a one-year course in social studies for grades 10-12. The guide is intended to serve as a resource to teachers, students, department chairmen, guidance personnel, curriculum planners, and anyone else involved in present or future curriculum planning. The course is divided into 22 section areas covering the topics of…

  4. Newspapers and Law-Related Education. Grades 10-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Sandra; Riekes, Linda

    Designed to assist teachers of students in grades 10-12 who wish to use the newspaper as a supplemental tool in law-related education, this guide provides model lessons demonstrating ways in which the daily newspaper can enhance textbook material. Although the guide is based on ongoing law-related education programs in St. Louis Public Schools, it…

  5. Black American Literature, Grades 10-12. Experimental.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunn, Evelyn, Ed.

    This black American literature course for grades 10-12 is designed to introduce students to the unique contribution that the black American has made to American life. The course guide is divided into four units--Slave Narrative and Autobiography, Poetry, Short Story, Drama--with suggested activites, including class discussions, small group…

  6. Low frequency/high sensitivity triaxial monolithic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acernese, F.; Canonico, R.; De Rosa, R.; Giordano, G.; Romano, R.; Barone, F.

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes a new mechanical implementation of a triaxial sensor, configurable as seismometer and/or as accelerometer, consisting of three one-dimensional monolithic FP sensors, suitably geometrically positioned. The triaxial sensor is, therefore, compact, light, scalable, tunable instrument (frequency < 100 mHz with large band (10-7 Hz - 10 Hz), high quality factor (Q < 1500 in air) with good immunity to environmental noises, guaranteed by an integrated laser optical readout. The measured sensitivity curve is in very good agreement with the theoretical ones (10-12m/√Hz) in the band (0.1 ÷ 10Hz). Typical applications are in the field of earthquake engineering, geophysics, civil engineering and in all applications requiring large band-low frequency performances coupled with high sensitivities.

  7. Very low frequency/high sensitivity triaxial monolithic inertial sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acernese, F.; De Rosa, R.; Giordano, G.; Romano, R.; Barone, F.

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a new mechanical implementation of a triaxial sensor, configurable as seismometer and/or as accelerometer, consisting of three one-dimensional monolithic FP sensors, suitably geometrically positioned. The triaxial sensor is, therefore, compact, light, scalable, tunable instrument (frequency < 100mHz), with large band (10-7 Hz - 10Hz), high quality factor (Q > 2500 in air) with good immunity to environmental noises, guaranteed by an integrated laser optical readout. The measured sensitivity curve is in very good agreement with the theoretical ones (10-12m/√Hz) in the band (0.1 ÷ 10Hz). Typical applications are in the field of earthquake engineering, geophysics, civil engineering and in all applications requiring large band-low frequency performances coupled with high sensitivities.

  8. Low frequency/high sensitivity triaxial monolithic inertial sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acernese, F.; De Rosa, R.; Giordano, G.; Romano, Rocco; Barone, F.

    2013-10-01

    This paper describes a new mechanical implementation of a triaxial sensor, configurable as seismometer and/or as accelerometer, consisting of three one-dimensional monolithic FP sensors, suitably geometrically positioned. The triaxial sensor is, therefore, compact, light, scalable, tunable instrument (frequency < 100mHz), with large band (10-7 Hz - 10Hz), high quality factor (Q < 2500 in air) with good immunity to environmental noises, guaranteed by an integrated laser optical readout. The measured sensitivity curve is in very good agreement with the theoretical ones (10-12m/pHz) in the band (0.1 ÷ 10Hz). Typical applications are in the field of earthquake engineering, geophysics, civil engineering and in all applications requiring large band-low frequency performances coupled with high sensitivities.

  9. 47 CFR 80.882 - 2182 kHz watch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 2182 kHz watch. 80.882 Section 80.882 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... kHz watch. Ships subject to this subpart must maintain a watch on the frequency 2182 kHz pursuant...

  10. 47 CFR 80.882 - 2182 kHz watch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false 2182 kHz watch. 80.882 Section 80.882 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... kHz watch. Ships subject to this subpart must maintain a watch on the frequency 2182 kHz pursuant...

  11. 47 CFR 80.882 - 2182 kHz watch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 2182 kHz watch. 80.882 Section 80.882 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... kHz watch. Ships subject to this subpart must maintain a watch on the frequency 2182 kHz pursuant...

  12. 47 CFR 80.882 - 2182 kHz watch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false 2182 kHz watch. 80.882 Section 80.882 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... kHz watch. Ships subject to this subpart must maintain a watch on the frequency 2182 kHz pursuant...

  13. 47 CFR 80.882 - 2182 kHz watch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 2182 kHz watch. 80.882 Section 80.882 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... kHz watch. Ships subject to this subpart must maintain a watch on the frequency 2182 kHz pursuant...

  14. Sub-kHz lasing of a CaF₂ whispering gallery mode resonator stabilized fiber ring laser.

    PubMed

    Collodo, M C; Sedlmeir, F; Sprenger, B; Svitlov, S; Wang, L J; Schwefel, H G L

    2014-08-11

    We utilize a high quality calcium fluoride whispering-gallery-mode resonator to passively stabilize a simple erbium doped fiber ring laser with an emission frequency of 196THz (wavelength 1530nm) to an instantaneous linewidth below 650Hz. This corresponds to a relative stability of 3.3 × 10(-12) over 16μs. In order to characterize the linewidth we use two identical self-built lasers and a commercial laser to determine the individual lasing linewidth via the three-cornered-hat method. We further show that the lasers are finely tunable throughout the erbium gain region.

  15. Muscle plasticity: comparison of a 30-Hz burst with 10-Hz continuous stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, A S; Stone, H E; Roessmann, U; Burke, M; Tisdale, E; Mortimer, J T

    1989-03-01

    The changes in the contractile properties induced by a 30-Hz phasic stimulation paradigm were measured and compared with the changes induced by a 10-Hz continuous stimulation paradigm. The study was performed on the tibialis anterior muscles of cats with one paradigm applied to one hindlimb muscle and the other to the contralateral limb. Both hindlimb muscles received the same number of stimuli in a day, making the average stimulation frequency 10 Hz. Two periods of daily stimulation were studied, 8 and 24 h/day. Muscles stimulated at 30 Hz produced greater overall tetanic tension and, during a prolonged stimulation test, exerted a greater mean tension than muscles stimulated at 10 Hz (50 and 32% increase for animals stimulated for 8 and 24 h/day, respectively). Muscle mass was least reduced and fewer pathological abnormalities were observed in the muscles stimulated at 30 Hz. There were no apparent differences in the histochemistry or biochemistry between muscles stimulated at 10 and 30 Hz, which could account for these differences in muscle properties. These results indicate the 30-Hz paradigm may be better suited than 10 Hz continuous stimulation for applications requiring sustained muscle tension such as correction of scoliosis or muscle conditioning for motor prostheses.

  16. An optical fiber spool for laser stabilization with reduced acceleration sensitivity to 10-12/g

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yong-Qi; Dong, Jing; Huang, Jun-Chao; Li, Tang; Liu, Liang

    2015-10-01

    Environmental vibration causes mechanical deformation in optical fibers, which induces excess frequency noise in fiber-stabilized lasers. In order to solve such a problem, we propose an ultralow acceleration sensitivity fiber spool with symmetrically mounted structure. By numerical analysis with the finite element method, we obtain the optimal geometry parameters of the spool with which the horizontal and vertical acceleration sensitivity can be reduced to 3.25 × 10-12/g and 5.38 × 10-12/g respectively. Moreover, the structure features the insensitivity to the variation of geometry parameters, which will minimize the influence from numerical simulation error and manufacture tolerance. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11034008 and 11274324) and the Key Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. KJZD-EW-W02).

  17. The impact of electromagnetic field at a frequency of 50 Hz and a magnetic induction of 2.5 mT on viability of pineal cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Koziorowska, A; Pasiud, E; Fila, M; Romerowicz-Misielak, M

    2016-01-01

    The impact of electromagnetic fields (EMF) on the pineal gland has been described in numerous studies, but many questions still remain unanswered. The aim of the experiment described in this study was to evaluate the effect of EMF on the viability of the pineal gland cells of pig in vitro. Primary culture of the pineal gland cells has been exposed to the influence of an EMF at a frequency of 50 Hz with 1, 2 or 3 hours and for 3 hours every 2 or 3 days. After the experiment, viability of cells was assessed by MTT assay and compared to a control culture not exposed to electromagnetic fields. We noticed that in respect to the control, exposure of the cells to the EMF induced a significant increase in viability of cells at 2 and 3 hours of exposure. After three days of 3-hour exposure to EMF, we observed a significant decrease in cell viability in relation to the control. The results of these studies suggest that EMF can have a significant biological effect on the cells of the pineal gland in a time-dependent exposure to its action.

  18. Low frequency ultrasound (42 kHz) assisted degradation of Acid Blue 113 in the presence of visible light driven rare earth nanoclusters loaded TiO2 nanophotocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Sathishkumar, Panneerselvam; Mangalaraja, Ramalinga Viswanathan; Rozas, Oscar; Mansilla, Héctor D; Gracia-Pinilla, M A; Anandan, Sambandam

    2014-09-01

    An attempt has been made to render the visible light driven photocatalytic activity to the TiO2 nanocatalysts by loading 1 wt% of rare earth (RE) nanoclusters (Gd(3+), Nd(3+) and Y(3+)) using a low frequency (42 kHz) producing commercial sonicator. The STEM-HAADF analysis confirms that the RE nanoclusters were residing at the surface of the TiO2. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses confirm that the loading of RE nanoclusters cannot make any significant changes in the crystal structure of TiO2. However, the optical properties of the resulted nanocatalysts were significantly modified and the nanocatalysts were employed to study the sonocatalytic, photocatalytic and sonophotocatalytic decolorization as well as mineralization of Acid Blue 113 (AB113). Among the experimented nanocatalysts maximum degradation of AB113 was achieved in the presence Y(3+)-TiO2 nanocatalysts. The decolorization of AB113 in the presence and absence of Y(3+) loaded TiO2 ensues the following order sonolysis

  19. Modification of the ultrasound induced activity by the presence of an electrode in a sono-reactor working at two low frequencies (20 and 40 kHz). Part II: Mapping flow velocities by particle image velocimetry (PIV).

    PubMed

    Mandroyan, A; Doche, M L; Hihn, J Y; Viennet, R; Bailly, Y; Simonin, L

    2009-01-01

    Sonoelectrochemical experiments differ from sonochemical ones by the introduction of electrodes in the sonicated reaction vessel. The aim of the study is to characterize the changes in the ultrasonic activity induced by the presence of an electrode located in front of the transducer. The scope of our investigations concerns two low frequency vibration modes: 20 and 40 kHz. For this purpose, two laser visualization techniques have been used. The first part of the study, described in a previous paper (Part I), deals with the laser tomography technique which provides an accurate picture of the reactor active zones, related to numerous cavitation events. The second part of the paper (Part II) will describe the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique used to measure the velocity vector field in the fluid portion between the horn and the electrode. As for the previous study, two parameters were studied: the electrical power supplied to the transducer and the electrode/transducer distance. The velocity vector fields show a main flow in the reactor axis. This flow seems to correspond to the conical cavitation bubbles structure which is observed on the laser tomography pictures. When an electrode is introduced into the reactor, two additional symmetric transversal flows can be quantified on both sides of the electrode.

  20. Enhanced therapeutic anti-inflammatory effect of betamethasone upon topical administration with low frequency, low intensity (20 kHz, 100 mW/cm2) ultrasound exposure on carrageenan-induced arthritis in mice model

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Gadi; Natsheh, Hiba; Sunny, Youhan; Bawiec, Christopher R.; Touitou, Elka; Lerman, Melissa A.; Lazarovici, Philip; Lewin, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate whether low frequency, low intensity (LFLI, 20 kHz, <100 mW/cm2, spatial-peak, temporal-peak) ultrasound (US), delivered by a light-weight (<100g), tether-free, fully wearable, battery powered applicator is capable of reducing inflammation in a mouse model of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). The therapeutic, acute, anti-inflammatory effect was estimated by the relative swelling induced in mice hind limb paws. In an independent, indirect approach, the inflammation was bio-imaged by measuring glycolytic activity with near infrared labeled 2-deoxy-glucose (2DG). The outcome of the experiments indicated that the combination of US exposure with topical application of 0.1% w/w betamethasone gel, exhibited statistically significant (p<0.05) enhanced anti-inflammatory properties in comparison with the drug or US treatment alone. The present study underscores the potential benefits of LFLI US assisted drug delivery. However, the proof of concept presented indicates the need for additional experiments to systematically evaluate and optimize the potential of, and the conditions for, safe, LFLI ultrasound promoted non-invasive drug delivery. PMID:26003010

  1. Morphological analysis on the coherence of kHz QPOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Chang, H. K.; Zhang, C. M.; Wang, D. H.; Chen, L.; Qu, J. L.; Song, L. M.

    2012-12-01

    We take the recently published data of twin kHz quasi-period oscillations (QPOs) in neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) as the samples, and investigate the morphology of the samples, which focuses on the quality factor, peak frequency of kHz QPOs, and try to infer their physical mechanism. We notice that: (1) The quality factors of upper kHz QPOs are low (2˜20 in general) and increase with the kHz QPO peak frequencies for both Z and Atoll sources. (2) The distribution of quality factor versus frequency for the lower kHz QPOs are quite different between Z and Atoll sources. For most Z source samples, the quality factors of lower kHz QPOs are low (usually lower than 15) and rise steadily with the peak frequencies except for Sco X-1, which drop abruptly at the frequency of about 750 Hz. While for most Atoll sources, the quality factors of lower kHz QPOs are very high (from 2 to 200) and usually have a rising part, a maximum and an abrupt drop. (3) There are three Atoll sources (4U 1728-34, 4U 1636-53 and 4U 1608-52) of displaying very high quality factors for lower kHz QPOs. These three sources have been detected with the spin frequencies and sidebands, in which the source with higher spin frequency presents higher quality factor of lower kHz QPOs and lower difference between sideband frequency and lower kHz QPO frequency.

  2. Watts linkage based large band low frequency sensors for scientific applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, F.; Giordano, G.; Acernese, F.; Romano, R.

    2016-07-01

    The UNISA Folded Pendulum class of horizontal and vertical sensors, based on an innovative configuration of the classical Watt's linkage mechanical architecture, allows the design and implementation of very large band monolithic sensors (10-7 Hz to102 Hz), whose sensitivities for the most common applications are defined by the noise introduced by their readouts (e.g. <10-12 m /√{ Hz } with classical LVDT readouts). These unique features, coupled other relevant properties like scalability, compactness, lightness, high directivity, frequency tunability (typical resonance frequencies in the band 10-1 Hz to102 Hz), very high immunity to environmental noises and low cost make this class of sensors very effective for the implementation of uniaxial (horizontal and/or vertical) and triaxial seismometers and accelerometers for ground, space and underwater applications, including UHV and cryogenics ones.

  3. Studies on the possible biological effects of 50 Hz electric and/or magnetic fields: evaluation of some glycolytic enzymes, glycolytic flux, energy and oxido-reductive potentials in human erythrocytes exposed in vitro to power frequency fields.

    PubMed

    Dachà, M; Accorsi, A; Pierotti, C; Vetrano, F; Mantovani, R; Guidi, G; Conti, R; Nicolini, P

    1993-01-01

    An attempt has been made to understand whether 50 Hz electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) are involved in producing bioeffects by exposing human erythrocytes in vitro. The study evaluated some key glycolytic enzymes, glucose consumption, lactate production, energy charge, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, and reduced glutathione levels, all of which are biochemical parameters significant to erythrocyte function. Cells exposed to individual or superimposed EMFs have not shown any significant difference compared with the controls.

  4. Megawatt, 330 Hz PRF tunable gyrotron experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spark, S. N.; Cross, A. W.; Phelps, A. D. R.; Ronald, K.

    1994-12-01

    Repetitively pulsed and cw gyrotrons have hitherto used thermionic cathodes, whereas cold cathode gyrotrons have normally operated as ‘single shot’ devices. The novel results presented here show that cold cathode gyrotrons can be successfully pulsed repetitively. A tunable gyrotron with a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 150Hz is demonstrated. This system developed >4MW mm-wave output pulses at 100GHz. The gyrotron is based on a two-electrode configuration comprising a field-immersed, field emission, cold cathode and a shaped anode cavity. A superconducting magnet was used to produce the homogeneous intra-cavity magnetic field and a cable pulser was used to drive the electron beam. This pulser produced up to a (200±20)kV pulse with 10ns rise time, a 100ns flat top, a 10ns decay with a characteristic impedance of 200Ω. The energy storage capacity of the cable pulser was 35J. The charging unit limited the maximum PRF to 330Hz. Due to spark gap switching limitations 330Hz was only obtainable in 5 to 10 pulse bursts. For substantial periods of the order of 30 seconds, 100Hz PRF was achieved over an oscillating range of 28 to 100GHz and 150Hz PRF was achieved at 80GHz. No degradation effects on the mm-wave output pulse was evident due to diode recovery time throughout this series of results. A subsequent conclusion is that the diode recovery time in our cold cathode gyrotron is less than 3ms.

  5. RHIC 10 Hz global orbit feedback system

    SciTech Connect

    Michnoff, R.; Arnold, L.; Carboni, L.; Cerniglia, P; Curcio, A.; DeSanto, L.; Folz, C.; Ho, C.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.; Karl, R.; Luo, Y.; Liu, C.; MacKay, W.; Mahler, G.; Meng, W.; Mernick, K.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Olsen, R.; Piacentino, J.; Popken, P.; Przybylinski, R.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ritter, J.; Schoenfeld, R.; Thieberger, P.; Tuozzolo, J.; Weston, A.; White, J.; Ziminski, P.; Zimmerman, P.

    2011-03-28

    Vibrations of the cryogenic triplet magnets at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are suspected to be causing the horizontal beam perturbations observed at frequencies around 10 Hz. Several solutions to counteract the effect have been considered in the past, including a local beam feedback system at each of the two experimental areas, reinforcing the magnet base support assembly, and a mechanical servo feedback system. However, the local feedback system was insufficient because perturbation amplitudes outside the experimental areas were still problematic, and the mechanical solutions are very expensive. A global 10 Hz orbit feedback system consisting of 36 beam position monitors (BPMs) and 12 small dedicated dipole corrector magnets in each of the two 3.8 km circumference counter-rotating rings has been developed and commissioned in February 2011. A description of the system architecture and results with beam will be discussed.

  6. Humans perceive flicker artifacts at 500 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, James; Hsieh, Yi-Hsuan; Lee, Hung-Chi

    2015-02-01

    Humans perceive a stable average intensity image without flicker artifacts when a television or monitor updates at a sufficiently fast rate. This rate, known as the critical flicker fusion rate, has been studied for both spatially uniform lights, and spatio-temporal displays. These studies have included both stabilized and unstablized retinal images, and report the maximum observable rate as 50-90 Hz. A separate line of research has reported that fast eye movements known as saccades allow simple modulated LEDs to be observed at very high rates. Here we show that humans perceive visual flicker artifacts at rates over 500 Hz when a display includes high frequency spatial edges. This rate is many times higher than previously reported. As a result, modern display designs which use complex spatio-temporal coding need to update much faster than conventional TVs, which traditionally presented a simple sequence of natural images.

  7. Frequency flicker of 2.3 GHz AlN-sapphire high-overtone bulk acoustic resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudot, Rodolphe; Martin, Gilles; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Rubiola, Enrico

    2016-12-01

    We report the detailed characterization of 2.3 GHz AlN-Sapphire high-overtone bulk acoustic resonators (HBARs), with a typical loaded Q-factor of 25-30 × 103, 15-20 dB insertion loss, and resonances separated by about 10 MHz. The temperature coefficient of frequency of HBARs is measured to be about -25 ppm/K. We observe at high-input microwave power a significant distortion of the HBAR resonance lineshape, attributed to non-linear effects. The power-induced fractional frequency variation of the HBAR resonance is measured to be about -5 × 10-10/μW. The residual phase noise of a HBAR is measured in the range of -110 to -130 dBrad2/Hz at 1 Hz Fourier frequency, yielding resonator fractional frequency fluctuations at the level of -205 to -225 dB/Hz at 1 Hz and an ultimate HBAR-limited oscillator Allan deviation about 7 × 10-12 at 1 s integration time. The 1/f noise of the HBAR resonator is found to increase with the input microwave power. A HBAR resonator is used for the development of a low phase noise 2.3 GHz oscillator. An absolute phase noise of -60, -120, and -145 dBrad2/Hz for offset frequencies of 10 Hz, 1 kHz, and 10 kHz, respectively, in excellent agreement with the Leeson effect, is measured.

  8. Upper limit on the amplitude of gravitational waves around 0.1Â Hz from the Global Positioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Shohei; Tazai, Rina; Ichiki, Kiyotomo

    2014-03-01

    The global positioning system (GPS) is composed of 31 satellites having atomic clocks with 10-15 accuracy on board and enables one to calibrate the primary standard for frequency on the ground. Using the fact that oscillators on the ground have been successfully stabilized with high accuracy by receiving radio waves emitted from the GPS satellites, we set a constraint on the strain amplitude of the gravitational wave background hc. We find that the GPS has already placed a meaningful constraint, and the constraint on the continuous component of gravitational waves is given as hc<4.8×10-12(1/f) at 10-2≲f ≲100 Hz for stabilized oscillators with Δν /ν≃10-12. Thanks to the advantage of the Doppler tracking method, seismic oscillations do not affect the current constraint. Constraints on hc in the same frequency range from the velocity measurements by the lunar explorers in the Apollo mission are also derived.

  9. Comparing microbubble cavitation at 500 kHz and 70 kHz related to micellar drug delivery using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Diaz de la Rosa, Mario A; Husseini, Ghaleb A; Pitt, William G

    2013-02-01

    We have previously reported that ultrasonic drug release at 70kHz was found to correlate with the presence of subharmonic emissions. No evidence of drug release or of the subharmonic emissions were detected in experiments at 500kHz. In an attempt to understand the difference in drug release behavior between low- and mid-frequency ultrasound, a mathematical model of a bubble oscillator was developed to explore the difference in the behavior of a single 10-μm bubble under 500- and 70-kHz ultrasound. The dynamics were found to be fundamentally different; the 500-kHz bubble follows a period-doubling route to chaos while a 70-kHz bubble follows an intermittent route to chaos. We propose that this type of "intermittent subharmonic" oscillation behavior is associated with the drug release observed experimentally.

  10. Laser radiation frequency conversion in carbon- and cluster-containing plasma plumes under conditions of single and two-color pumping by pulses with a 10-Hz repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeev, R. A.

    2013-07-01

    This work reviews a series of investigations of different plasma plumes using single- and two-color laser systems that emit femtosecond pulses with a 10-Hz repetition rate. Results of investigation of the resonant enhancement of harmonics in tin plasma with the use of two types of pumps are analyzed, and it is shown that the tuning of the wavelengths of harmonics to ion-resonance levels plays an important role in increasing the conversion efficiency to high-order harmonics of the radiation to be converted. Investigations of different carbon-containing plasma media (carbon nanotubes, graphite, carbon aerogel, etc.) exhibit attractive properties of the nonlinear medium of this type for efficient generation of high-order harmonics. The results of the first experiments on the use of nanoparticles produced directly in the course of laser ablation of metals for increasing the efficiency of harmonics generated in this cluster-containing medium are analyzed. It is shown that new approaches realized in these investigations give hope that the nonlinear optical response of plasma media in the far-ultraviolet range can be further increased.

  11. Effects of Contralateral Noise on the 20-Hz Auditory Steady State Response - Magnetoencephalography Study

    PubMed Central

    Usubuchi, Hajime; Kawase, Tetsuaki; Kanno, Akitake; Yahata, Izumi; Miyazaki, Hiromitsu; Nakasato, Nobukazu; Kawashima, Ryuta; Katori, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    The auditory steady state response (ASSR) is an oscillatory brain response, which is phase locked to the rhythm of an auditory stimulus. ASSRs have been recorded in response to a wide frequency range of modulation and/or repetition, but the physiological features of the ASSRs are somewhat different depending on the modulation frequency. Recently, the 20-Hz ASSR has been emphasized in clinical examinations, especially in the area of psychiatry. However, little is known about the physiological properties of the 20-Hz ASSR, compared to those of the 40-Hz and 80-Hz ASSRs. The effects of contralateral noise on the ASSR are known to depend on the modulation frequency to evoke ASSR. However, the effects of contralateral noise on the 20-Hz ASSR are not known. Here we assessed the effects of contralateral white noise at a level of 70 dB SPL on the 20-Hz and 40-Hz ASSRs using a helmet-shaped magnetoencephalography system in 9 healthy volunteers (8 males and 1 female, mean age 31.2 years). The ASSRs were elicited by monaural 1000-Hz 5-s tone bursts amplitude-modulated at 20 and 39 Hz and presented at 80 dB SPL. Contralateral noise caused significant suppression of both the 20-Hz and 40-Hz ASSRs, although suppression was significantly smaller for the 20-Hz ASSRs than the 40-Hz ASSRs. Moreover, the greatest suppression of both 20-Hz and 40-Hz ASSRs occurred in the right hemisphere when stimuli were presented to the right ear with contralateral noise. The present study newly showed that 20-Hz ASSRs are suppressed by contralateral noise, which may be important both for characterization of the 20-Hz ASSR and for interpretation in clinical situations. Physicians must be aware that the 20-Hz ASSR is significantly suppressed by sound (e.g. masking noise or binaural stimulation) applied to the contralateral ear. PMID:24915061

  12. Effects of contralateral noise on the 20-Hz auditory steady state response--magnetoencephalography study.

    PubMed

    Usubuchi, Hajime; Kawase, Tetsuaki; Kanno, Akitake; Yahata, Izumi; Miyazaki, Hiromitsu; Nakasato, Nobukazu; Kawashima, Ryuta; Katori, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    The auditory steady state response (ASSR) is an oscillatory brain response, which is phase locked to the rhythm of an auditory stimulus. ASSRs have been recorded in response to a wide frequency range of modulation and/or repetition, but the physiological features of the ASSRs are somewhat different depending on the modulation frequency. Recently, the 20-Hz ASSR has been emphasized in clinical examinations, especially in the area of psychiatry. However, little is known about the physiological properties of the 20-Hz ASSR, compared to those of the 40-Hz and 80-Hz ASSRs. The effects of contralateral noise on the ASSR are known to depend on the modulation frequency to evoke ASSR. However, the effects of contralateral noise on the 20-Hz ASSR are not known. Here we assessed the effects of contralateral white noise at a level of 70 dB SPL on the 20-Hz and 40-Hz ASSRs using a helmet-shaped magnetoencephalography system in 9 healthy volunteers (8 males and 1 female, mean age 31.2 years). The ASSRs were elicited by monaural 1000-Hz 5-s tone bursts amplitude-modulated at 20 and 39 Hz and presented at 80 dB SPL. Contralateral noise caused significant suppression of both the 20-Hz and 40-Hz ASSRs, although suppression was significantly smaller for the 20-Hz ASSRs than the 40-Hz ASSRs. Moreover, the greatest suppression of both 20-Hz and 40-Hz ASSRs occurred in the right hemisphere when stimuli were presented to the right ear with contralateral noise. The present study newly showed that 20-Hz ASSRs are suppressed by contralateral noise, which may be important both for characterization of the 20-Hz ASSR and for interpretation in clinical situations. Physicians must be aware that the 20-Hz ASSR is significantly suppressed by sound (e.g. masking noise or binaural stimulation) applied to the contralateral ear.

  13. A frequency band analysis of two-year-olds' memory processes.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, Kimberly; Raj, Vinaya; Bell, Martha Ann

    2012-03-01

    Research on the functional meaning of EEG frequency bands during memory processing has only examined two developmental periods: infancy and from late childhood to adulthood. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in EEG power for three toddler EEG frequency bands (3-5Hz, 6-9Hz, 10-12Hz) during a verbal recall task. To this end, we asked three questions: (a) Which frequency band(s) discriminate baseline from memory processing?; (b) Which frequency band(s) differentiate between memory encoding and retrieval processes?; (c) Which frequency band(s) distinguish toddlers with high and low verbal recall performance? Analysis of 2-year-olds' (n=79) power values revealed that all three frequency bands differentiated the retrieval and encoding phases from the baseline phase; however, the particular regions that exhibited this dissociation varied. Retrieval-related increases in 3-5Hz (theta) power were widespread. Only the 3-5Hz and 6-9Hz bands distinguished encoding and retrieval processes; retrieval power values were higher than encoding power values. High and low verbal recall performers were discriminated by all frequency bands; high performers had greater power values than low performers. Thus, the 3-5Hz (theta) and 6-9Hz (alpha) bands were most informative about 2-year-olds' memory processes. Theta and alpha rhythms are critical to memory processes during late childhood and adulthood, and our findings provide initial evidence that these rhythms are also intricately linked to memory processing during toddlerhood. These findings are discussed in relation to behavioral changes in memory processes.

  14. Development of high precision digital driver of acoustic-optical frequency shifter for ROG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rong; Kong, Mei; Xu, Yameng

    2016-10-01

    We develop a high precision digital driver of the acoustic-optical frequency shifter (AOFS) based on the parallel direct digital synthesizer (DDS) technology. We use an atomic clock as the phase-locked loop (PLL) reference clock, and the PLL is realized by a dual digital phase-locked loop. A DDS sampling clock up to 320 MHz with a frequency stability as low as 10-12 Hz is obtained. By constructing the RF signal measurement system, it is measured that the frequency output range of the AOFS-driver is 52-58 MHz, the center frequency of the band-pass filter is 55 MHz, the ripple in the band is less than 1 dB@3MHz, the single channel output power is up to 0.3 W, the frequency stability is 1 ppb (1 hour duration), and the frequency-shift precision is 0.1 Hz. The obtained frequency stability has two orders of improvement compared to that of the analog AOFS-drivers. For the designed binary frequency shift keying (2-FSK) and binary phase shift keying (2-PSK) modulation system, the demodulating frequency of the input TTL synchronous level signal is up to 10 kHz. The designed digital-bus coding/decoding system is compatible with many conventional digital bus protocols. It can interface with the ROG signal detecting software through the integrated drive electronics (IDE) and exchange data with the two DDS frequency-shift channels through the signal detecting software.

  15. NASA Rat Acoustic Tolerance Test 1994-1995: 8 kHz, 16 kHz, 32 kHz Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mele, Gary D.; Holley, Daniel C.; Naidu, Sujata

    1996-01-01

    Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to chronic applied sound (74 to 79 dB, SPL) with octave band center frequencies of either 8, 16 or 32 kHz for up to 60 days. Control cages had ambient sound levels of about 62 dB (SPL). Groups of rats (test vs. control; N=9 per group) were euthanized after 0. 5. 14, 30, and 60 days. On each euthanasia day, objective evaluation of their physiology and behavior was performed using a Stress Assessment Battery (SAB) of measures. In addition, rat hearing was assessed using the brain stem auditory evoked potential (BAER) method after 60 days of exposure. No statistically significant differences in mean daily food use could be attributed to the presence of the applied test sound. Test rats used 5% more water than control rats. In the 8 kHz and 32 kHz tests this amount was statistically significant(P less than .05). This is a minor difference of questionable physiological significance. However, it may be an indication of a small reaction to the constant applied sound. Across all test frequencies, day 5 test rats had 6% larger spleens than control rats. No other body or organ weight differences were found to be statistically significant with respect to the application of sound. This spleen effect may be a transient adaptive process related to adaptation to the constant applied noise. No significant test effect on differential white blood cell counts could be demonstrated. One group demonstrated a low eosinophil count (16 kHz experiment, day 14 test group). However this was highly suspect. Across all test frequencies studied, day 5 test rats had 17% fewer total leukocytes than day 5 control rats. Sound exposed test rats exhibited 44% lower plasma corticosterone concentrations than did control rats. Note that the plasma corticosterone concentration was lower in the sound exposed test animals than the control animals in every instance (frequency exposure and number of days exposed).

  16. Tunable mechanical monolithic sensors for large band low frequency monitoring and characterization of sites and structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, F.; Giordano, G.; Acernese, F.; Romano, R.

    2016-10-01

    Among the different mechanical architectures present in literature, the Watts linkage is one of the most promising ones for the implementation of a new class of mechanical accelerometers (horizontal, vertical and angular). In this paper, we present monolithic implementations of uniaxial and triaxial mechanical seismometers and accelerometers based on the UNISA Folded Pendulum mechanical configuration, optimized for low frequency characterization of sites (including underground sites) and structures as inertial sensor (seismometer). This mechanical architecture allows the design and implementation of very large band monolithic sensors (10-7Hz 102 Hz), whose sensitivities for the most common applications are defined by the noise introduced by their readouts (e.g. ¡ 10-12 m/sqrt(Hz) with classical LVDT readouts). These unique features, coupled other relevant properties like scalability, compactness, lightness, high directivity, frequency tunability (typical resonance frequencies in the band 10-1 Hz 102 Hz), very high immunity to environmental noises and low cost make this class of sensors very effective for the implementation of uniaxial (horizontal and/or vertical) and triaxial seismometers and accelerometers for ground, space and underwater applications, including UHV and cryogenics ones. Typical applications of this class of monolithic sensors are in the field of earthquake engineering, seismology, geophysics, civil engineering, characterization of sites (including underground sites), structures (e.g. buildings, bridges, historical monuments), and, in general, in all applications requiring large band-low frequency performances coupled with high sensitivities and compactness.

  17. Low-Frequency Shallow Water Acoustics (20 to 500 Hz),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    Shear Wave Velocities and Gradients in Depth The effects of sediment rigidity can also be important for long-range sound...Gershfeld65 used viscoelastic theory to compare the effect of vary- ing shear wave velocity on the angular loss rate as a function of sediment type...1983). 12. H.P. Bucker, J.A. Whitney, and D.L. Keir, "Use of Stoneley waves to determine the shear velocity in ocean sediments," J. Acoust . Soc. Am.

  18. Optical Frequency Standards Based on Neutral Atoms and Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riehle, Fritz; Helmcke, Juergen

    The current status and prospects of optical frequency standards based on neutral atomic and molecular absorbers are reviewed. Special attention is given to an optical frequency standard based on cold Ca atoms which are interrogated with a pulsed excitation scheme leading to resolved line structures with a quality factor Q > 10^12. The optical frequency was measured by comparison with PTB's primary clock to be νCa = 455 986 240 494.13 kHz with a total relative uncertainty of 2.5 x10^-13. After a recent recommendation of the International Committee of Weights and Measures (CIPM), this frequency standard now represents one of the most accurate realizations of the length unit.

  19. Comparison of the Effects of 1 Hz and 20 Hz rTMS on Motor Recovery in Subacute Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chul; Choi, Hee Eun; Lee, Byeong-Ju; Lee, Ki Hoon; Lim, Young-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the low frequency (1 Hz) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) with high frequency (20 Hz) rTMS on motor functional improvement of the affected upper extremity in subacute stroke patients. Methods Forty patients with subacute ischemic stroke participated in this study. The first group received 10 sessions of 20 Hz rTMS at ipsilesional M1 area and the other group received 10 sessions of 1 Hz rTMS at contralesional M1 area. Motor training of the hemiparetic hand was conducted after each rTMS train. All the patients received conventional occupational therapy immediately after each rTMS session. Manual function test (MFT), Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale (FMS), Modified Barthel Index (MBI), Brunnstrom recovery stage, and grip strength were used to assess motor function before, at the end of, and one month after the last session of rTMS. Results No adverse side effects were reported during the course of the experiment using rTMS. No significant difference in motor function of the affected upper extremity was observed between the two groups before rTMS. Significant improvements in MFT, FMS, MBI, and Brunnstrom stage were observed in the both groups at the end of the last rTMS session and one month later (p<0.05). No significant difference was found between the two groups (p>0.05). Conclusion There was no significant difference in motor function of the affected upper extremity between 1 Hz and 20 Hz rTMS during the subacute period of ischemic stroke. Thus, we cannot conclude which has a greater effect. PMID:25379487

  20. Frequency stability optimization of an OEO using phase-locked-loop and self-injection-locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Rongrong; Jin, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Yanhong; Jin, Xiangdong; Yu, Xianbin; Zheng, Shilie; Chi, Hao; Zhang, Xianmin

    2017-03-01

    Frequency stability optimization of an X-band optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) using the technique of phase-locked loop (PLL) and dual loop self-injection-locking (DSIL) is proposed and demonstrated. The relationship between the loop transfer characteristics of a PLL and the phase noise of the oscillation signal is analyzed. The close-in phase noise and frequency overlapping Allan deviation (ADEV) of the OEO are optimized by properly choosing the bandwidth of the loop filter of the PLL. The phase noise of the OEO is suppressed by 41.5 dB at 100 Hz offset and 21.3 dB at 10 kHz offset with PLL and DSIL. The frequency overlapping ADEV achieved 7.03×10-12 at average time of 100 s, which is several orders of magnitude better than that of the DSIL OEO and the free-running OEO, proves the high oscillation stability of proposed scheme.

  1. Secondary School Curriculum Guide. Music. Grades 10-12. Draft Copy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Arnold R., Ed.; And Others

    This draft curriculum guide provides curriculum materials that are organized into behavioral objectives with a scope and sequence. Divided by grade and levels, each section includes level objectives and suggested activities. To be covered in grades 10-12 are 5 levels of musical content. They are: 1) why man creates and how he perceives; 2) the…

  2. Steps towards Healthy Growth; Health Education Curriculum Guide. Grades 10-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dippo, Jeanette, Ed.

    GRADES OR AGES: Grades 10-12. SUBJECT MATTER: Health Education--includes chapters on a) nutrition; b) disease prevention and control; c) tobacco; d) alcohol; e) drugs; f) personality development; g) family life and sexuality; h) environmental, public, and world health; i) consumer health; and j) safety, first aid, and survival education.…

  3. A Resource File for Social Studies in Utah. Level 10-12: U.S. Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This resource file contains information for Utah secondary school teachers to help their students at level 10-12 to meet the state's instructional objectives in the social studies. This particular student level emphasizes U.S. studies. The following disciplines are covered in the resource file: psychology, anthropology, sociology, geography,…

  4. Modeling a 300 kHz Bathymetric Sonar System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    AD-A257 378 /7 Modeling A 300 kHz Bathymetric Sonar System by Kenneth Alan Malmquist B.S., Drexel University, Philadelphia (1985) Submitted in...Massachusetts Institute of Technology/ Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution 92-28033 Vll1 Nlf • 92 BLANK PAR Modeling A 300 kIz Bathymetric Sonar System by...Deep Submergence Laboratory has developed a family of calibrated high frequency bathymetric sonar systems for underwater survey. It is useful to have a

  5. Comparison of ultrasonic degradation rates constants of methylene blue at 22.8 kHz, 127 kHz, and 490 kHz.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Honma, Chiemi; Suzuki, Atsushi; Takahashi, Tomoki; Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Kuroda, Chiaki; Otake, Katsuto; Shono, Atsushi

    2012-07-01

    Techniques such as solvent extraction, incineration, chemical dehalogenation, and biodegradation have been investigated for the degradation of hazardous organic compounds. We found ultrasound to be an attractive technology for the degradation of hazardous organic compounds in water. However, the effects of ultrasonic frequency on degradation rate constants were not investigated quantitatively. In this study, the degradation process of a model for hazardous organic compound methylene blue was investigated using ultrasonic irradiation. The study focused on the effects of ultrasonic frequency and ultrasonic power on the degradation rate constant. The apparent degradation rate constants were estimated based on time dependence of methylene blue concentration assuming pseudo-first-order kinetics for the decomposition. A linear relationship between the apparent degradation rate constant and ultrasonic power was identified. In addition, the apparent degradation rate constants at frequencies of 127 and 490 kHz were much larger than those at 22.8 kHz. A relationship between the apparent degradation rate constant and the sonochemical efficiency value (SE value) was also found. Based on these results, a simple model for estimating the apparent degradation rate constant of methylene blue based on the ultrasonic power and the SE value is proposed in this study.

  6. XMM-Newton discovery of mHz quasi-periodic oscillations in the high-mass X-ray binary IGR J19140+0951

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidoli, L.; Esposito, P.; Motta, S. E.; Israel, G. L.; Rodríguez Castillo, G. A.

    2016-08-01

    We report on the discovery of mHz quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) from the high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) IGR J19140+0951, during a 40 ks XMM-Newton observation performed in 2015, which caught the source in its faintest state ever observed. At the start of the observation, IGR J19140+0951 was at a low flux of 2 × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 (2-10 keV; LX = 3 × 1033 erg s-1 at 3.6 kpc), then its emission rose reaching a flux ˜10 times higher, in a flare-like activity. The investigation of the power spectrum reveals the presence of QPOs, detected only in the second part of the observation, with a strong peak at a frequency of 1.46 ± 0.07 mHz, together with higher harmonics. The X-ray spectrum is highly absorbed (NH = 1023 cm-2), well fitted by a power law with a photon index in the range 1.2-1.8. The re-analysis of a Chandra archival observation shows a modulation at ˜0.17 ± 0.05 mHz, very likely the neutron-star spin period (although a QPO cannot be excluded). We discuss the origin of the 1.46 mHz QPO in the framework of both disc-fed and wind-fed HMXBs, favouring the quasi-spherical accretion scenario. The low flux observed by XMM-Newton leads to about three orders of magnitude the source dynamic range, overlapping with the one observed from Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXTs). However, since its duty cycle is not as low as in SFXTs, IGR J19140+0951 is an intermediate system between persistent supergiant HMXBs and SFXTs, suggesting a smooth transition between these two sub-classes.

  7. BOLD fractional contribution to resting-state functional connectivity above 0.1 Hz

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingyuan; Glover, Gary H.

    2014-01-01

    Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) spontaneous signals from resting-state (RS) brains have typically been characterized by low-pass filtered timeseries at frequencies ≤ 0.1 Hz, and studies of these low-frequency fluctuations have contributed exceptional understanding of the baseline functions of our brain. Very recently, emerging evidence has demonstrated that spontaneous activities may persist in higher frequency bands (even up to 0.8 Hz), while presenting less variable network patterns across the scan duration. However, as an indirect measure of neuronal activity, BOLD signal results from an inherently slow hemodynamic process, which in fact might be too slow to accommodate the observed high-frequency functional connectivity (FC). To examine whether the observed high-frequency spontaneous FC originates from BOLD contrast, we collected RS data as a function of echo time (TE). Here we focus on two specific resting state networks – the default-mode network (DMN) and executive control network (ECN), and the major findings are fourfold: (1) we observed BOLD-like linear TE-dependence in the spontaneous activity at frequency bands up to 0.5 Hz (the maximum frequency that can be resolved with TR = 1s), supporting neural relevance of the RSFC at higher frequency range; (2) Conventional models of hemodynamic response functions must be modified to support resting state BOLD contrast, especially at higher frequencies; (3) there are increased fractions of non-BOLD-like contributions to the RSFC above the conventional 0.1 Hz (non-BOLD/BOLD contrast at 0.4~0.5 Hz is ~ 4 times that at <0.1 Hz); and (4) the spatial patterns of RSFC are frequency-dependent. Possible mechanisms underlying the present findings and technical concerns regarding RSFC above 0.1 Hz are discussed. PMID:25497686

  8. Observations of backscatter from sand and gravel seafloors between 170 and 250 kHz.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas C; Ward, Larry G

    2015-10-01

    Interpreting observations of frequency-dependence in backscatter from the seafloor offers many challenges, either because multiple frequencies are used for different observations that will later be merged or simply because seafloor scattering models are not well-understood above 100 kHz. Hindering the understanding of these observations is the paucity of reported, calibrated acoustic measurements above 100 kHz. This manuscript seeks to help elucidate the linkages between seafloor properties and frequency-dependent seafloor backscatter by describing observations of backscatter collected from sand, gravel, and bedrock seafloors at frequencies between 170 and 250 kHz and at a grazing angle of 45°. Overall, the frequency dependence appeared weak for all seafloor types, with a slight increase in seafloor scattering strength with increasing frequency for an area with unimodal, very poorly to moderately well sorted, slightly granular to granular medium sand with significant amounts of shell debris and a slight decrease in all other locations.

  9. Tympanometry in Infants: A Study of the Sensitivity and Specificity of 226-Hz and 1,000-Hz Probe Tones

    PubMed Central

    Carmo, Michele Picanço; Costa, Nayara Thais de Oliveira; Momensohn-Santos, Teresa Maria

    2013-01-01

    Introduction For infants under 6 months, the literature recommends 1,000-Hz tympanometry, which has a greater sensitivity for the correct identification of middle ear disorders in this population. Objective To systematically analyze national and international publications found in electronic databases that used tympanometry with 226-Hz and 1,000-Hz probe tones. Data Synthesis Initially, we identified 36 articles in the SciELO database, 11 in the Latin American and Caribbean Literature on the Health Sciences (LILACS) database, 199 in MEDLINE, 0 in the Cochrane database, 16 in ISI Web of Knowledge, and 185 in the Scopus database. We excluded 433 articles because they did not fit the selection criteria, leaving 14 publications that were analyzed in their entirety. Conclusions The 1,000-Hz tone test has greater sensitivity and specificity for the correct identification of tympanometric curve changes. However, it is necessary to clarify the doubts that still exist regarding the use of this test frequency. Improved methods for rating curves, standardization of normality criteria, and the types of curves found in infants should be addressed. PMID:25992044

  10. Changes in acoustic startle reflex in rats induced by playback of 22-kHz calls.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Hideaki; Ushida, Takahiro

    2017-02-01

    In aversive or dangerous situations, adult rats emit long characteristic ultrasonic calls, often termed "22-kHz calls," which have been suggested to play a role of alarm calls. Although the playback experiment is one of the most effective ways to investigate the alarming properties of 22-kHz calls, clear behavioral evidence showing the anxiogenic effects of these playback stimuli has not been directly obtained to date. In this study, we investigated whether playback of 22-kHz calls or synthesized sine tones could change the acoustic startle reflex (ASR), enhancement of which is widely considered to be a reliable index of anxiety-related negative affective states in rats. Playback of 22-kHz calls significantly enhanced the ASR in rats. Enhancement effects caused by playback of 22-kHz calls from young rats were relatively weak compared to those after calls from adult rats. Playback of synthesized 25-kHz sine tones enhanced ASR in subjects, but not synthesized 60-kHz tones. Further, shortening the individual call duration of synthesized 25-kHz sine tones also enhanced the ASR. Accordingly, it is suggested that 22-kHz calls induce anxiety by socially communicated alarming signals in rats. The results also demonstrated that call frequency, i.e., of 22kHz, appears important for ultrasonic alarm-signal communication in rats.

  11. Coherent Phonon Rabi Oscillations with a High-Frequency Carbon Nanotube Phonon Cavity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dong; Wang, Xin-He; Kong, Wei-Cheng; Deng, Guang-Wei; Wang, Jiang-Tao; Li, Hai-Ou; Cao, Gang; Xiao, Ming; Jiang, Kai-Li; Dai, Xing-Can; Guo, Guang-Can; Nori, Franco; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2017-02-08

    Phonon-cavity electromechanics allows the manipulation of mechanical oscillations similar to photon-cavity systems. Many advances on this subject have been achieved in various materials. In addition, the coherent phonon transfer (phonon Rabi oscillations) between the phonon cavity mode and another oscillation mode has attracted many interest in nanoscience. Here, we demonstrate coherent phonon transfer in a carbon nanotube phonon-cavity system with two mechanical modes exhibiting strong dynamical coupling. The gate-tunable phonon oscillation modes are manipulated and detected by extending the red-detuned pump idea of photonic cavity electromechanics. The first- and second-order coherent phonon transfers are observed with Rabi frequencies 591 and 125 kHz, respectively. The frequency quality factor product fQm ∼ 2 × 10(12) Hz achieved here is larger than kBTbase/h, which may enable the future realization of Rabi oscillations in the quantum regime.

  12. Sounds in the Ocean at 1-100 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcock, William S. D.; Stafford, Kathleen M.; Andrew, Rex K.; Odom, Robert I.

    2014-01-01

    Very-low-frequency sounds between 1 and 100 Hz propagate large distances in the ocean sound channel. Weather conditions, earthquakes, marine mammals, and anthropogenic activities influence sound levels in this band. Weather-related sounds result from interactions between waves, bubbles entrained by breaking waves, and the deformation of sea ice. Earthquakes generate sound in geologically active regions, and earthquake T waves propagate throughout the oceans. Blue and fin whales generate long bouts of sounds near 20 Hz that can dominate regional ambient noise levels seasonally. Anthropogenic sound sources include ship propellers, energy extraction, and seismic air guns and have been growing steadily. The increasing availability of long-term records of ocean sound will provide new opportunities for a deeper understanding of natural and anthropogenic sound sources and potential interactions between them.

  13. Sounds in the ocean at 1-100 Hz.

    PubMed

    Wilcock, William S D; Stafford, Kathleen M; Andrew, Rex K; Odom, Robert I

    2014-01-01

    Very-low-frequency sounds between 1 and 100 Hz propagate large distances in the ocean sound channel. Weather conditions, earthquakes, marine mammals, and anthropogenic activities influence sound levels in this band. Weather-related sounds result from interactions between waves, bubbles entrained by breaking waves, and the deformation of sea ice. Earthquakes generate sound in geologically active regions, and earthquake T waves propagate throughout the oceans. Blue and fin whales generate long bouts of sounds near 20 Hz that can dominate regional ambient noise levels seasonally. Anthropogenic sound sources include ship propellers, energy extraction, and seismic air guns and have been growing steadily. The increasing availability of long-term records of ocean sound will provide new opportunities for a deeper understanding of natural and anthropogenic sound sources and potential interactions between them.

  14. Tropical Cyclone Paka's Initial Explosive Development (10-12 December, 1997)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, Edward B.; Halverson, Jeff; Simpson, Joanne; Olson, William; Pierce, Harold

    1999-01-01

    Convection associated with an equatorial westerly wind burst was first observed late November during the strong El Nino of 1997 at approximately 2000 km southwest of the Hawaiian Islands. This region of convection lead to the formation of twin tropical cyclones, one in the southern hemisphere named Pam and the other in the northern hemisphere named Paka. During the first week in December, tropical cyclone Paka, the system of concern, reached tropical storm stage as it moved rapidly westward at relatively low latitudes. During the 10-12 of December, Paka rapidly developed into a typhoon.

  15. a Theoretical Investigation on 10-12 Potential of Hydrogen-Hydrogen Covalent Bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taneri, Sencer

    2013-05-01

    This is an analytical investigation of well-known 10-12 potential of hydrogen-hydrogen covalent bond. In this research, we will make an elaboration of the well-known 6-12 Lennard-Jones potential in case of this type of bond. Though the results are illustrated in many text books and literature, an analytical analysis for these potentials is missing almost everywhere. The power laws are valid for small radial distances, which are calculated to some extent. The internuclear separation as well as the binding energy of the hydrogen molecule are evaluated with success.

  16. Pilot Study EURAMET.AUV.V-P1: Bilateral comparison on magnitude of the complex charge sensitivity of accelerometers from 10 Hz to 10 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoli, Claire; Hermawanto, Denny

    2017-01-01

    The results of a Pilot Study EURAMET.AUV.V-P1 between LNE (France) and RCM-LIPI (Indonesia) are reported. This bilateral comparison of sinusoidal vibration was organized after the implementation of various improvements at RCM-LIPI following a previous (unpublished) comparison that had revealed discrepancies in their results at frequencies above 5 kHz. The results of this Pilot Study, using the same accelerometers as the earlier comparison, demonstrate that the discrepancies at high frequencies have been resolved. For both the back-to-back and the single-ended accelerometers tested, the sensitivities of the RCM-LIPI and the LNE over the frequency range from 10 Hz to 10 kHz now agree within their declared uncertainties. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCAUV.

  17. Evaluation of MG-101 course Machine guarding'' taught in Stanford, California, November 10--12, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.S.

    1993-03-01

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Machine Guarding,'' (MG-101) which was conducted November 10--12, 1992 at Stanford Linear Accelerator, in Stanford, California. This report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course, including presents examination results, and recommendations for course improvement. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction were very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded most of the students' expectations of the course. This course is now in the format that has been requested by past attendees. It appears to be meeting their needs. Results from the final examination showed that students gained appropriate knowledge from the course.

  18. Observation of 20-400 kHz fluctuations in the U-3M torsatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreval, M. B.; Yakovenko, Yu. V.; Sorokovoy, E. L.; Slavnyj, A. S.; Pavlichenko, R. O.; Kulaga, A. E.; Zamanov, N. V.; Hirose, A.

    2016-02-01

    First observations of quasi-coherent fluctuations in the frequency range of 20-400 kHz in Alfvén-wave-heated plasmas of the U-3M torsatron are presented. The excitation conditions of these modes depend on the radio frequency antenna type and the plasma density, the appearance of the modes correlating with the presence of both suprathermal electrons and high-energy ions in the plasma, which supports our opinion that the modes are excited by energetic particles. Complicated evolution of the mode frequencies with abrupt changes at the instants of plasma confinement transitions is observed at the initial stage of each discharge. The frequencies become stable at the stage of the plasma current flattop. Raw estimates show that toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes could be responsible for the 150-400 kHz fluctuations. Low-frequency 20-70 kHz bursts are observed during plasma confinement transitions. The poloidal mode number of one of these bursts with the frequency of 20 kHz burst was determined to be m = 2. This mode rotated in the electron diamagnetic rotation direction with a frequency lower than the geodesic acoustic mode frequency and can be identified as a drift-sound-type mode.

  19. L- and M-cone input to 12Hz and 30Hz flicker ERGs across the human retina.

    PubMed

    Challa, N K; McKeefry, D; Parry, N R A; Kremers, J; Murray, I J; Panorgias, A

    2010-09-01

    We recorded L- and M-cone isolating ERGs from human subjects using a silent substitution technique at temporal rates of 12 and 30 Hz. These frequencies isolate the activity of cone-opponent and non-opponent post-receptoral mechanisms, respectively. ERGs were obtained using a sequence of stimuli with different spatial configurations comprising; (1) circular stimuli of different sizes which increased in 10° steps up to 70°diameter, or (2) annular stimuli with a 70° outer diameter but with different sized central ablations from 10° up to 60°. L- and M-cone isolating ERGs were obtained from five colour normal subjects using a DTL fibre electrode. Fourier analysis of the ERGs was performed and we measured the amplitude of the first harmonic of the response. For 12 Hz ERGs the L:M cone response amplitude ratio (L:M(ERG)) was close to unity and remained stable irrespective of the spatial configuration of the stimulus. The maintenance of this balanced ratio points to the existence of cone selective input across the human retina for the L-M cone opponent mechanism. For 30 Hz the L:M(ERG) ratio was greater than unity but varied depending upon which region of the retina was being stimulated. This variation we consider to be a consequence of the global response properties of M-cone ERGs rather than representing a real variation in L:M cone ratios across the retina.

  20. Investigation on Two-Stage 300 HZ Pulse Tube Cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, H. K.; Yang, L. W.; Hong, G. T.; Luo, E. C.; Zhou, Y.

    2010-04-01

    In the past few years, ultra-high frequency pulse tube cryocoolers are becoming a research hotspot for their portability and compactness in aerospace and aviation applications. For preliminary research, a two-stage pulse tube cryocooler working at 300 Hz driven by a thermoacoustic engine is established to investigate the problems due to ultra high frequency, and several results have been derived in our early reports. In order to study the effect of thermal penetration depth, this paper presents the cooler adopting copper mesh as the regenerator, and comparison with stainless steel mesh is given. In addition, the influence of inertance tube on the lowest possible cooler temperature is also tested. Finally, we discuss the improvement for getting a lower temperature.

  1. Benefits of 20 kHz PMAD in a nuclear space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, Gale R.

    1987-01-01

    Compared to existing systems, high frequency ac power provides higher efficiency, lower cost, and improved safety benefits. The 20 kHz power system has exceptional flexibility, is inherently user friendly, and is compatible with all types of energy sources; photovoltaic, solar dynamic, rotating machines and nuclear. A 25 kW, 20 kHz ac power distribution system testbed was recently (1986) developed. The testbed possesses maximum flexibility, versatility, and transparency to user technology while maintaining high efficiency, low mass, and reduced volume. Several aspects of the 20 kHz power management and distribution (PMAD) system that have particular benefits for a nuclear power Space Station are discussed.

  2. Environmental and Pharmacological Modulation of Amphetamine-Induced 50-kHz Ultrasonic Vocalizations in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rippberger, Henrike; van Gaalen, Marcel M.; Schwarting, Rainer K.W.; WÖhr, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Rats emit high-frequency 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USV) in appetitive situations like social interactions. Drugs of abuse are probably the most potent non-social elicitors of 50-kHz USV, possibly reflecting their euphorigenic properties. Psychostimulants induce the strongest elevation in 50-kHz USV emission, particularly amphetamine (AMPH), either when applied systemically or locally into the nucleus accumbens (Nacc). Emission of AMPH-induced 50-kHz USV depends on test context, such as the presence of conspecifics, and can be manipulated pharmacologically by targeting major neurotransmitter systems, including dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA), and serotonin (5-HT), but also protein kinase C (PKC) signaling. Several D1 and D2 receptor antagonists, as well as typical and atypical antipsychotics block the AMPH-induced elevation in 50-kHz USV. Inhibiting D1 and D2 receptors in the Nacc abolishes AMPH-induced 50-kHz USV, indicating a key role for this brain area. NA neurotransmission also regulates AMPH-induced 50-kHz USV emission given that α1 receptor antagonists and α2 receptor agonists exert attenuating effects. Supporting the involvement of the 5-HT system, AMPH-induced 50-kHz USV are attenuated by 5-HT2C receptor activation, whereas 5-HT2C receptor antagonism leads to the opposite effect. Finally, treatment with lithium, tamoxifen, and myricitrin was all found to result in a complete abolishment of the AMPH-induced increase in 50-kHz USV, suggesting the involvement of PKC signaling. Neurotransmitter systems involved in AMPH-induced 50-kHz USV emission only partially overlap with other AMPH-induced behaviors like hyperlocomotion. The validity of AMPH-induced 50-kHz USV as a preclinical model for neuropsychiatric disorders is discussed, particularly with relevance to altered drive and mood seen in bipolar disorder. PMID:26411764

  3. Flight test of 4-Hz and 30-Hz Omega receiver front-end

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, L.

    1976-01-01

    In-flight information was gathered on two Omega receiver analog modules, one having a 4-Hz bandwidth and the other a 30-Hz bandwidth. The Mini-O receiver was also monitored. An improved signal-to-noise characteristic of the narrower bandwidth front-end with negligible loss in dynamic range indicates that the 4-Hz front-end is the more desirable for the prototype Omega receivers. The Mini-O receiver was found to function quite satisfactorily on its second test flight, and has a very real potential for a low-cost, low-power, compact and light-weight Omega receiver.

  4. 2 kHz high power smart transducer for acoustic sub-bottom profiling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathishkumar, R.

    2013-09-01

    In this study, a 2 kHz Tonpilz projector was designed using a Terfenol-D and modeled in ATILA. For the purpose of modeling studies, it has been determined that a radiating head mass exhibits better transmitting current response (TCR) at 136 mm diameter, where the resonance occurs at 2.4 kHz and the peak value of 118 dB re 1 μPa/A at 1 m occurs at 12 kHz. Also bolt at a 46 mm distance from the center of the head mass offers resonance at 2.4 kHz, and the peak value of 115.3 dB re 1 μPa/A at 1m occurs at 11.5 kHz. This optimized design is fabricated and molded with polyurethane of 3 mm thickness. The prototype was tested at the Acoustic Test Facility (ATF) of National Institute of Ocean Technology (NIOT) for its underwater performances. Based on the result, the fundamental resonance was determined to be 2.18 kHz and the peak value of TCR of 182 dB re 1 μPa/A at 1m occurs at 14 kHz. The maximum value of the RS was found to be -190 dB re 1V/μPa at 1m at a frequency of 2.1 kHz.

  5. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Liang, W; Eliyahu, D; Ilchenko, V S; Savchenkov, A A; Matsko, A B; Seidel, D; Maleki, L

    2015-08-11

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than -60 dBc Hz(-1) at 10 Hz, -90 dBc Hz(-1) at 100 Hz and -170 dBc Hz(-1) at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10(-10) at 1-100 s integration time-orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption.

  6. Variations of magnetic and electrostatic atmospheric parameters and dynamics of the heart rate in mHz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagorskiy, Petr; Zenchenko, Tatiana; Breus, Tamara; Smirnov, Sergey

    and disappearance. The highest degree of synchronization of HR with the variations of the geomagnetic field (in all four conducted experiments in this day) was observed in the most geomagnetically quiet day - 04.10.12 (Ap = 1), while the lowest one - in the day of the geomagnetic disturbances - 01.10.12 (Ap = 32). The characteristics of the electric field variations in the time-frequency domain in the experiments conducted indoors and outdoors differ fundamentally.

  7. Behavior of the Aurora During 10-12 May, 1999 When The Solar Wind Nearly Disappeared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, G.; Brittnacher, M.; Chua, D.; Fillingim, M.; Germany, G.; Spann, J.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The aurora was still active with occasional pseudobreakup events when the solar wind density diminished to unusually small densities (0.2 cc -1) during May 10-12, 1999. The aurora was observed at high magnetic latitudes indicating that the electron precipitation source moved northward as the geomagnetic activity decreased. The events we have studied indicate that the solar wind density alone is not the primary parameter that controls the auroral activity. The weak auroral activity was observed with 150 nT magnetic bays and when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz was small and positive resulting in small _ parameter. A new auroral feature was observed on May 11, 1999, between 0900-2000 UT. The electron precipitation was energetic, uniform, and covered the region commonly identified as the polar cap. This precipitation lasted for more than 10 hours and was stable over time scales of tens of minutes. On May 12, as the solar wind began to recover, a prolonged period of dayside activity occurred and was followed by a typical aurora at 0500 UT.

  8. Plasma antennas driven by 5–20 kHz AC power supply

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jiansen Chen, Yuli; Sun, Yang; Wu, Huafeng; Liu, Yue; Yuan, Qiumeng

    2015-12-15

    The experiments described in this work were performed with the aim of introducing a new plasma antenna that was excited by a 5–20 kHz alternating current (AC) power supply, where the antenna was transformed into a U-shape. The results show that the impedance, voltage standing-wave ratio (VSWR), radiation pattern and gain characteristics of the antenna can be controlled rapidly by varying not only the discharge power, but also by varying the discharge frequency in the range from 5 to 20 kHz. When the discharge frequency is adjusted from 10 to 12 kHz, the gain is higher within a relatively broad frequency band and the switch-on time is less than 1 ms when the discharge power is less than 5 W, meaning that the plasma antenna can be turned on and off rapidly.

  9. Plasma antennas driven by 5-20 kHz AC power supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiansen; Chen, Yuli; Sun, Yang; Wu, Huafeng; Liu, Yue; Yuan, Qiumeng

    2015-12-01

    The experiments described in this work were performed with the aim of introducing a new plasma antenna that was excited by a 5-20 kHz alternating current (AC) power supply, where the antenna was transformed into a U-shape. The results show that the impedance, voltage standing-wave ratio (VSWR), radiation pattern and gain characteristics of the antenna can be controlled rapidly by varying not only the discharge power, but also by varying the discharge frequency in the range from 5 to 20 kHz. When the discharge frequency is adjusted from 10 to 12 kHz, the gain is higher within a relatively broad frequency band and the switch-on time is less than 1 ms when the discharge power is less than 5 W, meaning that the plasma antenna can be turned on and off rapidly.

  10. Excessive synchronization of basal ganglia neurons at 20 Hz slows movement in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiung Chu; Litvak, Vladimir; Gilbertson, Thomas; Kühn, Andrea; Lu, Chin Song; Lee, Shih Tseng; Tsai, Chon Haw; Tisch, Stephen; Limousin, Patricia; Hariz, Marwan; Brown, Peter

    2007-05-01

    Excessive synchronization of neuronal activity at around 20 Hz is a common finding in the basal ganglia of patients with untreated Parkinson's disease (PD). Correlative evidence suggests, but does not prove, that this spontaneous activity may contribute to slowness of movement in this condition. Here we investigate whether externally imposed synchronization through direct stimulation of the region of the subthalamic nucleus at 20 Hz can slow motor performance in a simple unimanual tapping task and whether this effect is frequency selective. Tapping rates were recorded on 42 sides in 22 patients with PD after overnight withdrawal of medication. Tapping was performed without stimulation and during bilateral stimulation at 20 Hz, 50 Hz and 130 Hz. We found that tapping rates were slowed by 8.2+/-3.2% (p=0.014) during 20-Hz stimulation in subjects with relatively preserved baseline function in the task. This effect was frequency selective. The current data provide proof of the principle that excessive beta synchrony within the basal ganglia-cortical loop may contribute to the slowing of movements in Parkinson's disease.

  11. The influence of visuospatial attention on unattended auditory 40 Hz responses.

    PubMed

    Roth, Cullen; Gupta, Cota Navin; Plis, Sergey M; Damaraju, Eswar; Khullar, Siddharth; Calhoun, Vince D; Bridwell, David A

    2013-01-01

    Information must integrate from multiple brain areas in healthy cognition and perception. The present study examined the extent to which cortical responses within one sensory modality are modulated by a complex task conducted within another sensory modality. Electroencephalographic (EEG) responses were measured to a 40 Hz auditory stimulus while individuals attended to modulations in the amplitude of the 40 Hz stimulus, and as a function of the difficulty of the popular computer game Tetris. The steady-state response to the 40 Hz stimulus was isolated by Fourier analysis of the EEG. The response at the stimulus frequency was normalized by the response within the surrounding frequencies, generating the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Seven out of eight individuals demonstrate a monotonic increase in the log SNR of the 40 Hz responses going from the difficult visuospatial task to the easy visuospatial task to attending to the auditory stimuli. This pattern is represented statistically by a One-Way ANOVA, indicating significant differences in log SNR across the three tasks. The sensitivity of 40 Hz auditory responses to the visuospatial load was further demonstrated by a significant correlation between log SNR and the difficulty (i.e., speed) of the Tetris task. Thus, the results demonstrate that 40 Hz auditory cortical responses are influenced by an individual's goal-directed attention to the stimulus, and by the degree of difficulty of a complex visuospatial task.

  12. Optical frequency standard using acetylene-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Triches, Marco; Michieletto, Mattia; Hald, Jan; Lyngsø, Jens K; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bang, Ole

    2015-05-04

    Gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers are used to stabilize a fiber laser to the 13C2H2 P(16) (ν1+ν3) transition at 1542 nm using saturated absorption. Four hollow-core fibers with different crystal structure are compared in terms of long term lock-point repeatability and fractional frequency instability. The locked fiber laser shows a fractional frequency instability below 4 × 10(-12) for averaging time up to 10(4) s. The lock-point repeatability over more than 1 year is 1.3 × 10(-11), corresponding to a standard deviation of 2.5 kHz. A complete experimental investigation of the light-matter interaction between the spatial modes excited in the fibers and the frequency of the locked laser is presented. A simple theoretical model that explains the interaction is also developed.

  13. SOFT LAGS IN NEUTRON STAR kHz QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS: EVIDENCE FOR REVERBERATION?

    SciTech Connect

    Barret, Didier

    2013-06-10

    High frequency soft reverberation lags have now been detected from stellar mass and supermassive black holes. Their interpretation involves reflection of a hard source of photons onto an accretion disk, producing a delayed reflected emission, with a time lag consistent with the light travel time between the irradiating source and the disk. Independently of the location of the clock, the kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) emission is thought to arise from the neutron star boundary layer. Here, we search for the signature of reverberation of the kHz QPO emission, by measuring the soft lags and the lag energy spectrum of the lower kHz QPOs from 4U1608-522. Soft lags, ranging from {approx}15 to {approx}40 {mu}s, between the 3-8 keV and 8-30 keV modulated emissions are detected between 565 and 890 Hz. The soft lags are not constant with frequency and show a smooth decrease between 680 Hz and 890 Hz. The broad band X-ray spectrum is modeled as the sum of a disk and a thermal Comptonized component, plus a broad iron line, expected from reflection. The spectral parameters follow a smooth relationship with the QPO frequency, in particular the fitted inner disk radius decreases steadily with frequency. Both the bump around the iron line in the lag energy spectrum and the consistency between the lag changes and the inferred changes of the inner disk radius, from either spectral fitting or the QPO frequency, suggest that the soft lags may indeed involve reverberation of the hard pulsating QPO source on the disk.

  14. Coherent neocortical 40-Hz oscillations are not present during REM sleep.

    PubMed

    Castro, Santiago; Falconi, Atilio; Chase, Michael H; Torterolo, Pablo

    2013-04-01

    During cognitive processes there are extensive interactions between various regions of the cerebral cortex. Oscillations in the gamma frequency band (≈40 Hz) of the electroencephalogram (EEG) are involved in the binding of spatially separated but temporally correlated neural events, which results in a unified perceptual experience. The extent of these interactions can be examined by means of a mathematical algorithm called 'coherence', which reflects the 'strength' of functional interactions between cortical areas. The present study was conducted to analyse EEG coherence in the gamma frequency band of the cat during alert wakefulness (AW), quiet wakefulness (QW), non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Cats were implanted with electrodes in the frontal, parietal and occipital cortices to monitor EEG activity. Coherence values within the gamma frequency (30-100 Hz) from pairs of EEG recordings were analysed. A large increase in coherence occurred between all cortical regions in the 30-45 Hz frequency band during AW compared with the other behavioral states. As the animal transitioned from AW to QW and from QW to NREM sleep, coherence decreased to a moderate level. Remarkably, there was practically no EEG coherence in the entire gamma band spectrum (30-100 Hz) during REM sleep. We conclude that functional interactions between cortical areas are radically different during sleep compared with wakefulness. The virtual absence of gamma frequency coherence during REM sleep may underlie the unique cognitive processing that occurs during dreams, which is principally a REM sleep-related phenomenon.

  15. Near infrared standard sources, generated by electro-optic frequency comb, using injection-locked DFB laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung Hun; Suh, Ho Suhng

    2014-02-01

    Stable, near-infrared laser sources were generated by an electro-optic modulator with selected comb-mode seeding. The single comb mode was selected from the fiber laser comb using a Fabry-Pèrot cavity (FPC) of 1.25 GHz spacing, and injection locking technique. An electro-optic frequency comb (EOFC) with spacing of 25 GHz was generated as the side mode of the injection-locked comb mode. Using a single mode of the EOFC, we measured the frequency of the acetylene stabilized laser used as the calibration reference frequency light source for optical communication. The absolute frequency and estimated stability of the acetylene stabilized laser were 194 369 569 384.6 kHz and 2.3×10-12 (average time 1 s), respectively.

  16. Frequency interactions in human epileptic brain.

    PubMed

    Cotic, Marija; Zalay, Osbert; Valiante, Taufik; Carlen, Peter L; Bardakjian, Berj L

    2011-01-01

    We have used two algorithms, wavelet phase coherence (WPC) and modulation index (MI) analysis to study frequency interactions in the human epileptic brain. Quantitative analyses were performed on intracranial electroencephalographic (iEEG) segments from three patients with neocortical epilepsy. Interelectrode coherence was measured using WPC and intraelectrode frequency interactions were analyzed using MI. WPC was performed on electrode pairings and the temporal evolution of phase couplings in the following frequency ranges: 1-4 Hz, 4-8 Hz, 8-13 Hz, 13-30 Hz and 30-100 Hz was studied. WPC was strongest in the 1-4 Hz frequency range during both seizure and non-seizure activities; however, WPC values varied minimally between electrode pairings. The 13-30 Hz band showed the lowest WPC values during seizure activity. MI analysis yielded two prominent patterns of frequency-specific activity, during seizure and non-seizure activities, which were present across all patients.

  17. Influence of 60-Hz magnetic fields on sea urchin development

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, S.; Zimmerman, A.M.; Winters, W.D.; Cameron, I.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Continuous exposure of sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) embryos at 18 degrees C to a cyclic 60-Hz magnetic field at 0.1 mT rms beginning 4 min after insemination caused a significant developmental delay during the subsequent 23 hours. No delay in development was recorded for periods up to 18 hours after fertilization. At 18 h, most embryos were in the mesenchyme blastula stage. At 23 h, most control embryos were in mid-gastrula whereas most magnetic-field-exposed embryos were in the early gastrula stage. Thus an estimated 1-h delay occurred between these developmental stages. The results are discussed in terms of possible magnetic-field modification of transcription as well as interference with cell migration during gastrulation. The present study extends and supports the growing body of information about potential effects of exposures to extremely-low-frequency (ELF) magnetic fields on developing organisms.

  18. EV drivetrain inverter with V/HZ optimization

    DOEpatents

    Gritter, David J.; O'Neil, Walter K.

    1986-01-01

    An inverter (34) which provides power to an A.C. machine (28) is controlled by a circuit (36) employing PWM control strategy whereby A.C. power is supplied to the machine at a preselectable frequency and preselectable voltage. This is accomplished by the technique of waveform notching in which the shapes of the notches are varied to determine the average energy content of the overall waveform. Through this arrangement, the operational efficiency of the A.C. machine is optimized. The control circuit includes a micro-computer which calculates optimized machine control data signals from various parametric inputs and during steady state load conditions, seeks a best V/HZ ratio to minimize battery current drawn (system losses) from a D.C. power source (32). In the preferred embodiment, the present invention is incorporated within an electric vehicle (10) employing a 144 VDC battery pack and a three-phase induction motor (18).

  19. 78 FR 42102 - Termination of Radiotelephone Medium Frequency 2182 kHz Watchkeeping, 2187.5 kHz Digital...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-15

    ... coupled with antenna site deterioration, costly upkeep, and extensive maintenance required to support the... detailed review of several Coast Guard MF sites revealed significant antenna ground deterioration...

  20. 20 kHz Space Station power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Irving G.; Wolff, Fredrick J.

    1986-01-01

    The Space Station represents the next major U.S. commitment in space. The efficient delivery of power to multiple user loads is key to that success. In 1969, NASA Lewis Research Center began a series of studies with component and circuit developments that led to the high frequency bi-directional, four quadrant resonant driven converter. Additional studies and subsequent developments into the early 1980's have shown how the high frequency ac power system could provide overall advantages to many aerospace power systems. Because of its wide versatility, it also has outstanding advantages for the Space Station Program and its wide range of users. High frequency ac power provides higher efficiency, lower cost, and improved safety. The 20 kHz power system has exceptional flexibility, is inherently user friendly, and is compatible with all types of energy sources - photovoltaic, solar dynamic, rotating machines or nuclear Lewis distribution system testbed. The testbed demonstrates flexibility, versatility, and transparency to user technology as well as high efficiency, low mass, and reduced volume.

  1. 2- to 3-kHz continuum emissions as possible indications of global heliospheric 'breathing'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grzedzielski, S.; Lazarus, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    The paper analyzes the main features of 2- to 3-kHz heliospheric emissions in the context of a general heliospheric 'breathing' as inferred from the Voyager 2 solar wind average ram pressure data. Triggers for the three 3-kHz emission events seen to date are suggested, and good agreement is obtained in timing and expected postshock frequency for termination shock distances of about 90 AU. It is suggested that the visibility of the individual 3-kHz events and their observed upward frequency drift are enhanced when the postulated global heliospheric expansion results in the formation of a transient, compressed external plasma barrier around the heliopause that prevents radiation escape for several months. The average termination shock distance is estimated to be in the range 80-90 AU.

  2. Dynamics of the EEG power in the frequency and spatial domains during observation and execution of manual movements.

    PubMed

    Frenkel-Toledo, Silvi; Bentin, Shlomo; Perry, Anat; Liebermann, Dario G; Soroker, Nachum

    2013-05-06

    Mu suppression is the attenuation of EEG power in the alpha frequency range (8-12 Hz) while executing or observing a motor action. Whereas typically observed at central scalp sites, there are diverging reports about the extent of the attenuation over the cortical mantle, its exact frequency range and the specificity of this phenomenon. We investigated the modulation of EEG oscillations in frequency-bands between 4 to 12 Hz at frontal, central, parietal and occipital sites during the execution of manual movements and during observation of similar actions from allocentric (i.e., facing the actor) and egocentric (i.e., seeing the actor from behind) viewpoints. Suppression was determined relative to observation of a non-biological movement. Action observation elicited greater suppression in the lower (8-10 Hz) compared to the higher mu range (10-12 Hz), and greater suppression in the entire range (4-12 Hz) at frontal and central sites compared to parietal and occipital sites. In addition, suppression tended to be greater during observation of a motor action from allocentric compared to egocentric viewpoints. During execution of movement, suppression of the EEG occurred primarily in the higher alpha range and was absent at occipital sites. In the theta range (4-8 Hz), the EEG amplitude was suppressed during action observation and execution. The results suggest a functional distinction between modulation of mu and alpha rhythms, and between the higher and lower ranges of the mu rhythms. The activity of the presumed human mirror-neuron system seems primarily evident in the lower mu range and in the theta range.

  3. Statistical mechanics of neocortical interactions: Constraints on 40-Hz models of short-term memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingber, Lester

    1995-10-01

    Calculations presented in L. Ingber and P.L. Nunez, Phys. Rev. E 51, 5074 (1995) detailed the evolution of short-term memory in the neocortex, supporting the empirical 7+/-2 rule of constraints on the capacity of neocortical processing. These results are given further support when other recent models of 40-Hz subcycles of low-frequency oscillations are considered.

  4. Multiple-address radio systems, allocation of forty-eight 25 kHz channels in the 900 MHz range; and establishment of a new standard for frequency tolerance in the 952-960 MHz band: Federal Communications Commission. Third notice of proposed rulemaking.

    PubMed

    1981-02-04

    In response to a petition, the Commission proposes the reallocation of forty-eight 25 kHz channels in the 928-929 and 952-960 MHz band segments to the Private Operational-Fixed Microwave Service and the Domestic Public Land Mobile Radio Service for distribution automation and wide-area control and repeater operations, respectively. The spectrum from 928 to 929 MHz is presently reserved for Land Mobile. The 952-950 MHz band is currently allocated to the Private Operational-Fixed Microwave Service and the International Control Services.

  5. Strand V: Education for Survival. First Aid and Survival Education. Health Curriculum Materials Grades 10-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    GRADES OR AGES: Grades 10-12. SUBJECT MATTER: First aid and survival education. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The guide is divided into six sections: transportation of the injured, automobile accidents, conditions resulting from nuclear explosion, chemical warfare, natural catastrophes, and psychological first aid. The publication format…

  6. Dynamics of Clothing II. Curriculum Guide. A Family and Consumer Sciences Education Course of Study for Grades 10-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunger, Dean-Ellen, Ed.; Hancey, Helen-Louise; Hendrickson, Diane; Hicks, Camille; Munns, Barbara; Price, Barbara

    This document is a nine-unit curriculum guide for a high school (grades 10-12) course in clothing instruction. The units contain one or two lessons on the following topics: (1) psychological aspects of clothing (behavior, image, and dress; self-concept and self-image); (2) wardrobe selections (wardrobe consumerism, wardrobe evaluation and…

  7. Evidence for a High-Pressure Phase Transition of ε-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) Using Vibrational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ciezak, J.; Jenkins, T; Liu, Z

    2007-01-01

    The high-pressure response of {epsilon}-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitrohexaazaisowurtizane (CL-20) has been examined to 27 GPa in diamond anvil cells using vibrational spectroscopy. The results reveal evidence of an {epsilon}{yields}{Upsilon} pressure-induced phase transition between 4.1 and 6.4 GPa and suggest the existence of a {Upsilon}{yields}{zeta} transition near 18.7 GPa. Several Raman and infrared frequencies were found to decrease in intensity as the phase boundaries are approached. An anomalous intensity increase was noted in the C-N-C infrared mode that is believed to result from an increase in the Raman cross-section due to a stronger interlayer coupling under pressure.

  8. 40 Hz auditory steady state response to linguistic features of stimuli during auditory hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Ying, Jun; Yan, Zheng; Gao, Xiao-rong

    2013-10-01

    The auditory steady state response (ASSR) may reflect activity from different regions of the brain, depending on the modulation frequency used. In general, responses induced by low rates (≤40 Hz) emanate mostly from central structures of the brain, and responses from high rates (≥80 Hz) emanate mostly from the peripheral auditory nerve or brainstem structures. Besides, it was reported that the gamma band ASSR (30-90 Hz) played an important role in working memory, speech understanding and recognition. This paper investigated the 40 Hz ASSR evoked by modulated speech and reversed speech. The speech was Chinese phrase voice, and the noise-like reversed speech was obtained by temporally reversing the speech. Both auditory stimuli were modulated with a frequency of 40 Hz. Ten healthy subjects and 5 patients with hallucination symptom participated in the experiment. Results showed reduction in left auditory cortex response when healthy subjects listened to the reversed speech compared with the speech. In contrast, when the patients who experienced auditory hallucinations listened to the reversed speech, the auditory cortex of left hemispheric responded more actively. The ASSR results were consistent with the behavior results of patients. Therefore, the gamma band ASSR is expected to be helpful for rapid and objective diagnosis of hallucination in clinic.

  9. Probing the accretion disc structure by the twin kHz QPOs and spins of neutron stars in LMXBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D. H.; Zhang, C. M.; Lei, Y. J.; Chen, L.; Qu, J. L.; Zhi, Q. J.

    2017-04-01

    We analyse the relation between the emission radii of twin kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) and the co-rotation radii of the 12 neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (NS-LMXBs), which are simultaneously detected with the twin kHz QPOs and NS spins. We find that the average co-rotation radius of these sources is ∼ 32 km, and all the emission positions of twin kHz QPOs lie inside the co-rotation radii, indicating that the twin kHz QPOs are formed in the spin-up process. It is noticed that the upper frequency of twin kHz QPOs is higher than NS spin frequency by ≥10 per cent, which may account for a critical velocity difference between the Keplerian motion of accretion matter and NS spin that is corresponding to the production of twin kHz QPOs. In addition, we also find that ∼83 per cent of twin kHz QPOs cluster around the radius range of 15-20 km, which may be affected by the hard surface or the local strong magnetic field of the NS. As a special case, SAX J1808.4-3658 shows the larger emission radii of twin kHz QPOs of r ∼ 21-24 km, which may be due to its low accretion rate or small measured NS mass (<1.4 M⊙).

  10. Validity and interunit reliability of 10 Hz and 15 Hz GPS units for assessing athlete movement demands.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Richard J; Watsford, Mark L; Kelly, Stephen J; Pine, Matthew J; Spurrs, Robert W

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the validity and interunit reliability of 10 Hz (Catapult) and 15 Hz (GPSports) Global Positioning System (GPS) units and investigate the differences between these units as measures of team sport athlete movement demands. A team sport simulation circuit was completed by 8 trained male participants. The movement demands examined included: total distance covered (TD), average peak speed, and the distance covered, time spent, and the number of efforts performed low-speed running (0.00-13.99 km · h(-1)), high-speed running (14.00-19.99 km · h(-1)), and very high-speed running (>20.00 km · h(-1)). The degree of difference between the 10 Hz and the 15 Hz GPS units and validity was assessed using a paired samples t-test. Pearson's correlations were also used for validity assessment. Interunit reliability was established using percentage typical error of measurement (%TEM) and intraclass correlations. The findings revealed that 10 Hz GPS units were a valid (p > 0.05) and reliable (%TEM = 1.3%) measure of TD. In contrast, the 15 Hz GPS units exhibited lower validity for TD and average peak speed. Further, as the speed of movement increased the level of error for the 10 Hz and 15 Hz GPS units increased (%TEM = 0.8-19.9). The findings from this study suggest that comparisons should not be undertaken between 10 Hz and 15 Hz GPS units. In general, the 10 Hz GPS units measured movement demands with greater validity and interunit reliability than the 15 Hz units, however, both 10 Hz and 15 Hz units provided the improved measures of movement demands in comparison to 1 Hz and 5 Hz GPS units.

  11. Laser frequency stabilization for LISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Guido; McNamara, Paul; Thorpe, Ira; Camp, Jordan

    2005-01-01

    The requirement on laser frequency noise in the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) depends on the velocity and our knowledge of the position of each spacecraft of the interferometer. Currently it is assumed that the lasers must have a pre-stabilized frequency stability of 30Hz/square root of Hz over LISA'S most sensitive frequency band (3 mHz - 30 mHz). The intrinsic frequency stability of even the most stable com- mercial lasers is several orders of magnitude above this level. Therefore it is necessary to stabilize the laser frequency to an ultra-stable frequency reference which meets the LISA requirements. The baseline frequency reference for the LISA lasers are high finesse optical cavities based on ULE spacers. We measured the stability of two ULE spacer cavities with respect to each other. Our current best results show a noise floor at, or below, 30 Hz/square root of Hz above 3 mHz. In this report we describe the experimental layout of the entire experiment and discuss the limiting noise sources.

  12. Long-term depression in the sensorimotor cortex induced by repeated delivery of 10 Hz trains in vivo.

    PubMed

    Werk, C M; Klein, H S; Nesbitt, C E; Chapman, C A

    2006-06-19

    Memory consolidation in the neocortex is thought to be mediated in part by bi-directional modifications of synaptic strength. The sensorimotor cortex shows marked spontaneous activity near 10 Hz during both waking and sleep in the form of electroencephalographic spindle waves, and is also sensitive to electrical activation of inputs at 10 Hz. Induction of long-term synaptic depression in corpus callosum inputs to layer V of the sensorimotor cortex of the awake, adult rat requires repeated low-frequency stimulation over many days. To determine if 10 Hz stimulation may facilitate the induction of long-term depression, we compared the amounts of long-term depression induced by conventional 1 Hz trains, repeated delivery of 450 pairs of stimulation pulses using a 100 ms interpulse interval, and 45 short, 2 s, 10 Hz trains. Each pattern was delivered daily for 10 days and was matched for total duration and number of pulses. Changes in synaptic responses were assessed by monitoring field potentials evoked by stimulation of the corpus callosum. A facilitation of synaptic responses in layer V was observed during delivery of both paired-pulse trains and 10 Hz trains. There was no significant difference in long-term depression induced by 1 Hz stimulation and repeated paired-pulse stimulation, but 10 Hz trains induced significantly greater long-term depression than 1 Hz trains in both the early monosynaptic and late polysynaptic field potential components. The effectiveness of short 10 Hz trains for the induction of long-term depression suggests that synchronous population activity at frequencies near 10 Hz such as spindle waves may contribute to endogenous synaptic depression in sensorimotor cortex.

  13. Adsorption of 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) on a soil organic matter. A DFT M05 computational study.

    PubMed

    Sviatenko, Liudmyla K; Gorb, Leonid; Shukla, Manoj K; Seiter, Jennifer M; Leszczynska, Danuta; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2016-04-01

    Adsorption of 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) by soil organic matter considering the Leonardite Humic Acid (LHA) model at the M05/tzvp level of Density Functional Theory (DFT) applying cluster approximation has been investigated. Different orientations of CL-20 toward LHA surface were examined. It was found that deprotonation of LHA is required to obtain stable complexes with CL-20. Hydrogen bonds between CL-20 and deprotonated LHA were analyzed applying the atoms in molecules (AIM) theory. An attachment or removal of an electron with respect to the complex does not have significant effect on mutual orientation of the adsorbent in complexes. It was shown that adsorbed CL-20 does not undergo redox transformation and, therefore, adsorption on soil organic matter may be responsible for decrease of the degradation rate of CL-20 in soil.

  14. A microrod-resonator Brillouin laser with 240 Hz absolute linewidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, William; Becker, Joe; Cole, Daniel C.; Coillet, Aurelien; Baynes, Fred N.; Papp, Scott B.; Diddams, Scott A.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate an ultralow-noise microrod-resonator based laser that oscillates on the gain supplied by the stimulated Brillouin scattering optical nonlinearity. Microresonator Brillouin lasers are known to offer an outstanding frequency noise floor, which is limited by fundamental thermal fluctuations. Here, we show experimental evidence that thermal effects also dominate the close-to-carrier frequency fluctuations. The 6 mm diameter microrod resonator used in our experiments has a large optical mode area of ˜100 μm2, and hence its 10 ms thermal time constant filters the close-to-carrier optical frequency noise. The result is an absolute laser linewidth of 240 Hz with a corresponding white-frequency noise floor of 0.1 Hz2 Hz-1. We explain the steady-state performance of this laser by measurements of its operation state and of its mode detuning and lineshape. Our results highlight a mechanism for noise that is common to many microresonator devices due to the inherent coupling between intracavity power and mode frequency. We demonstrate the ability to reduce this noise through a feedback loop that stabilizes the intracavity power.

  15. Terahertz time-domain and low-frequency Raman spectroscopy of organic materials.

    PubMed

    Parrott, Edward P J; Zeitler, J Axel

    2015-01-01

    With the ongoing proliferation of terahertz time-domain instrumentation from semiconductor physics into applied spectroscopy over the past decade, measurements at terahertz frequencies (1 THz ≡ 10(12) Hz ≡ 33 cm(-1)) have attracted a sustained growing interest, in particular the investigation of hydrogen-bonding interactions in organic materials. More recently, the availability of Raman spectrometers that are readily able to measure in the equivalent spectral region very close to the elastic scattering background has also grown significantly. This development has led to renewed efforts in performing spectroscopy at the interface between dielectric relaxation phenomena and vibrational spectroscopy. In this review, we briefly outline the underlying technology, the physical phenomena governing the light-matter interaction at terahertz frequencies, recent examples of spectroscopic studies, and the current state of the art in assigning spectral features to vibrational modes based on computational techniques.

  16. DISCOVERY OF A 552 Hz BURST OSCILLATION IN THE LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY EXO 0748-676

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, Duncan K.; Lin Jinrong; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Hartman, Jacob M.

    2010-03-10

    We report the detection of pulsations at 552 Hz in the rising phase of two type-I (thermonuclear) X-ray bursts observed from the accreting neutron star EXO 0748-676 in 2007 January and December, by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. The fractional amplitude was 15% (rms). The dynamic power density spectrum for each burst revealed an increase in frequency of {approx}1-2 Hz while the oscillation was present. The frequency drift, the high significance of the detections and the almost identical signal frequencies measured in two bursts separated by 11 months, confirms this signal as a burst oscillation similar to those found in 13 other sources to date. We thus conclude that the spin frequency in EXO 0748 - 676 is within a few Hz of 552 Hz, rather than 45 Hz as was suggested from an earlier signal detection by Villarreal and Strohmayer. Consequently, Doppler broadening must significantly affect spectral features arising from the neutron star surface, so that the narrow absorption features previously reported from an XMM-Newton spectrum could not have arisen there. The origin of both the previously reported 45 Hz oscillation and the X-ray absorption lines is now uncertain.

  17. Comparative evaluation of hand wrist radiographs with cervical vertebrae for skeletal maturation in 10-12 years old children.

    PubMed

    Kamal, M; Goyal, S

    2006-09-01

    A comparative evaluation of hand wrist and cervical vertebrae was done to know the validity of cervical vertebrae as maturity indicators. A sample of 50 subjects (25 females and 25 males) in the age group of 10-12 years were selected on criteria of normal occlusion and the result showed that cervical vertebrae can be used with the same confidence as hand wrist radiographs to evaluate skeletal maturity, thus avoiding the need for an additional radiograph.

  18. Statistical analysis of Stromboli VLP tremor in the band [0.1-0.5] Hz: some consequences for vibrating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lauro, E.; de Martino, S.; Falanga, M.; Palo, M.

    2006-08-01

    We analyze time series of Strombolian volcanic tremor, focusing our attention on the frequency band [0.1-0.5] Hz (very long period (VLP) tremor). Although this frequency band is largely affected by noise, we evidence two significant components by using Independent Component Analysis with the frequencies, respectively, of ~0.2 and ~0.4 Hz. We show that these components display wavefield features similar to those of the high frequency Strombolian signals (>0.5 Hz). In fact, they are radially polarised and located within the crater area. This characterization is lost when an enhancement of energy appears. In this case, the presence of microseismic noise becomes relevant. Investigating the entire large data set available, we determine how microseismic noise influences the signals. We ascribe the microseismic noise source to Scirocco wind. Moreover, our analysis allows one to evidence that the Strombolian conduit vibrates like the asymmetric cavity associated with musical instruments generating self-sustained tones.

  19. Study on a pneumatically driven split stirling cryocooler operating above 100 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. Y.; Yuan, Y.; Ge, Z. G.; Song, Y. J.; Gan, Z. H.; Wu, Y. N.

    2014-01-01

    Higher operating frequency can improve power density in a cryocooler thereby can effectively reduce the volume and weight of the whole system while maintaining comparable efficiency. A pneumatically driven split-Stirling cryocooler operating above 100 Hz was designed, manufactured and tested. Effect of parameters on the performance was investigated using Sage. Experiments on the cold head were performed using a commercial linear compressor. The cryocooler achieved a no-load temperature of about 77 K with a cool down time to 80 K of 6.9 min at 105 Hz and 2.50 MPa, and the maximum net cooling power of 0.31 W was gained at 90.0 K at 105 Hz and 3.25 MPa.

  20. Rodent ultrasonic communication: Male prosocial 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations elicit social approach behavior in female rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    Willadsen, Maria; Seffer, Dominik; Schwarting, Rainer K W; Wöhr, Markus

    2014-02-01

    Rats emit distinct types of ultrasonic vocalizations (USV), which serve as situation-dependent affective signals with important communicative functions. Low-frequency 22-kHz USV typically occur in aversive situations, such as social defeat, whereas high-frequency 50-kHz USV can be observed in appetitive situations, like rough-and-tumble-play in juveniles or mating in adults. The 2 main USV types serve distinct communicative functions and induce call-specific behavioral responses in the receiver. While 22-kHz USV probably serve as alarm calls, 50-kHz USV appear to serve a prosocial communicative function in the sexual and the nonsexual context. In the sexual context, however, this view has recently been challenged by playback studies where only very limited behavioral changes were observed in response to prosocial 50-kHz USV. The aim of the present study was therefore to test whether female rats display social approach behavior in response to male prosocial 50-kHz USV by means of our established playback paradigm. To this aim, we exposed female rats to playback of the following 2 acoustic stimuli: (a) natural male 50-kHz USV and (b) time- and amplitude-matched white noise, with the latter serving as acoustic control for novelty-induced changes in behavior not linked to the communicative function of male prosocial 50-kHz USV. Our present findings show that female rats display high levels of social approach behavior in response to male prosocial 50-kHz USV, but not time- and amplitude-matched white noise, supporting the conclusion that male prosocial 50-kHz USV are likely to play an important role in establishing social proximity and possibly regulate mating behavior.

  1. A radio pulsar spinning at 716 Hz.

    PubMed

    Hessels, Jason W T; Ransom, Scott M; Stairs, Ingrid H; Freire, Paulo C C; Kaspi, Victoria M; Camilo, Fernando

    2006-03-31

    We have discovered a 716-hertz eclipsing binary radio pulsar in the globular cluster Terzan 5 using the Green Bank Telescope. It is the fastest spinning neutron star found to date, breaking the 24-year record held by the 642-hertz pulsar B1937+21. The difficulty in detecting this pulsar, because of its very low flux density and high eclipse fraction (approximately 40% of the orbit), suggests that even faster spinning neutron stars exist. If the pulsar has a mass less than twice the mass of the Sun, then its radius must be constrained by the spin rate to be <16 kilometers. The short period of this pulsar also constrains models that suggest that gravitational radiation, through an r-mode (Rossby wave) instability, limits the maximum spin frequency of neutron stars.

  2. Doubly Fed Induction Generator in an Offshore Wind Power Plant Operated at Rated V/Hz: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, E.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.

    2012-06-01

    This paper introduces the concept of constant Volt/Hz operation of offshore wind power plants. The deployment of offshore WPPs requires power transmission from the plant to the load center inland. Since this power transmission requires submarine cables, there is a need to use High-Voltage Direct Current transmission, which is economical for transmission distances longer than 50 kilometers. In the concept presented here, the onshore substation is operated at 60 Hz synced with the grid, and the offshore substation is operated at variable frequency and voltage, thus allowing the WPP to be operated at constant Volt/Hz.

  3. Multiscale temporal variations of pulsating auroras: On-off pulsation and a few Hz modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Takanori; Sakanoi, Takeshi; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Hampton, Donald L.; Katoh, Yuto; Kataoka, Ryuho; Okano, Shoichi

    2014-05-01

    A statistical study on the cross-scale property on the temporal variations of pulsating aurora intensity was conducted on 53 events observed at the Poker Flat Research Range during the period from 1 December 2011 to 1 March 2012. The observed modulation frequency ranged from 1.5 to 3.3 Hz, and strong modulations were not seen in the frequency range higher than about 3 Hz. This suggests that the time of flight of electrons has a time-smoothing effect on the more rapid variations above 3 Hz. Furthermore, the frequency of modulation showed relatively strong correlation to auroral intensity (correlation coefficient of 0.58), and it can be explained with nonlinear wave growth theory, in which the modulation frequency increases with the wave amplitude of the whistler mode chorus. In contrast, the on-off pulsations showed no significant correlations with auroral intensity. This result probably implies that several different plasma processes with different time scales from nonlinear wave growth should be taken into account when determining the on-off periods. In particular, we suggest that long-term variations in the cold plasma density play a dominant role in controlling the conditions of wave-particle interactions that have temporal scale of the on-off pulsation periods.

  4. CFD simulation of a 300 Hz thermoacoustic standing wave engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guoyao; Dai, W.; Luo, Ercang

    2010-09-01

    High frequency operation of standing wave thermoacoustic heat engines is attractive for space applications due to compact size and high reliability. To expedite practical use, further improvement and optimization should be based on deep understanding and quantitative analysis. This article focuses on using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to investigate nonlinear phenomena and processes of a 300 Hz standing wave thermoacoustic engine (SWTE). The calculated model was tested in detail, which indicated that the co-axially stacked tube model was suitable for the simulation of SWTEs. Two methods of imposing temperature gradient across the stack were studied, and the processes of mean pressure increasing, pressure wave amplification and saturation were obtained under the thermal boundary condition of applying heating power. The acoustic fields were given, and the flow vortices and their evolution in both ends of the stack and resonator were observed. Moreover, a comparison between the simulation and experiments was made, which demonstrated the validity and power of the CFD simulation for characterizing complicated nonlinear phenomenon involved in the self-excited SWTEs.

  5. Spectral analysis of oscillation instabilities in frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lippincott, S.

    1970-01-01

    Phase and frequency fluctuations, inherent in oscillators used as frequency standards, are measured over spectral frequency range of 1 Hz to 5 kHz. Basic measurement system consists of electromechanical phase-locked loop that extracts phase and frequency fluctuations and error multiplier that extends threshold sensitivity.

  6. The effect of 10 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of posterior parietal cortex on visual attention.

    PubMed

    Dombrowe, Isabel; Juravle, Georgiana; Alavash, Mohsen; Gießing, Carsten; Hilgetag, Claus C

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) at frequencies lower than 5 Hz transiently inhibits the stimulated area. In healthy participants, such a protocol can induce a transient attentional bias to the visual hemifield ipsilateral to the stimulated hemisphere. This bias might be due to a relatively less active stimulated hemisphere and a relatively more active unstimulated hemisphere. In a previous study, Jin and Hilgetag (2008) tried to switch the attention bias from the hemifield ipsilateral to the hemifield contralateral to the stimulated hemisphere by applying high frequency rTMS. High frequency rTMS has been shown to excite, rather than inhibit, the stimulated brain area. However, the bias to the ipsilateral hemifield was still present. The participants' performance decreased when stimuli were presented in the hemifield contralateral to the stimulation site. In the present study we tested if this unexpected result was related to the fact that participants were passively resting during stimulation rather than performing a task. Using a fully crossed factorial design, we compared the effects of high frequency rTMS applied during a visual detection task and high frequency rTMS during passive rest on the subsequent offline performance in the same detection task. Our results were mixed. After sham stimulation, performance was better after rest than after task. After active 10 Hz rTMS, participants' performance was overall better after task than after rest. However, this effect did not reach statistical significance. The comparison of performance after rTMS with task and performance after sham stimulation with task showed that 10 Hz stimulation significantly improved performance in the whole visual field. Thus, although we found a trend to better performance after rTMS with task than after rTMS during rest, we could not reject the hypothesis that high frequency rTMS with task and high frequency rTMS during rest

  7. The Effect of 10 Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of Posterior Parietal Cortex on Visual Attention

    PubMed Central

    Dombrowe, Isabel; Juravle, Georgiana; Alavash, Mohsen; Gießing, Carsten; Hilgetag, Claus C.

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) at frequencies lower than 5 Hz transiently inhibits the stimulated area. In healthy participants, such a protocol can induce a transient attentional bias to the visual hemifield ipsilateral to the stimulated hemisphere. This bias might be due to a relatively less active stimulated hemisphere and a relatively more active unstimulated hemisphere. In a previous study, Jin and Hilgetag (2008) tried to switch the attention bias from the hemifield ipsilateral to the hemifield contralateral to the stimulated hemisphere by applying high frequency rTMS. High frequency rTMS has been shown to excite, rather than inhibit, the stimulated brain area. However, the bias to the ipsilateral hemifield was still present. The participants’ performance decreased when stimuli were presented in the hemifield contralateral to the stimulation site. In the present study we tested if this unexpected result was related to the fact that participants were passively resting during stimulation rather than performing a task. Using a fully crossed factorial design, we compared the effects of high frequency rTMS applied during a visual detection task and high frequency rTMS during passive rest on the subsequent offline performance in the same detection task. Our results were mixed. After sham stimulation, performance was better after rest than after task. After active 10 Hz rTMS, participants’ performance was overall better after task than after rest. However, this effect did not reach statistical significance. The comparison of performance after rTMS with task and performance after sham stimulation with task showed that 10 Hz stimulation significantly improved performance in the whole visual field. Thus, although we found a trend to better performance after rTMS with task than after rTMS during rest, we could not reject the hypothesis that high frequency rTMS with task and high frequency rTMS during rest

  8. Prevalence of Malocclusion among 10-12-year-old Schoolchildren in Kozhikode District, Kerala: An Epidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Jeseem, MT; Kumar, TV Anupam

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: A malocclusion is an irregularity of the teeth or a malrelationship of the dental arches beyond the range of what is accepted as normal. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of malocclusion in children aged 10-12 years in Kozhikode district of Kerala, South India. Materials and methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among schoolchildren aged 10-12 years in six schools in Kozhikode district of Kerala, South India. A total of 2,366 children satisfied the inclusion criteria. Occlusal characteristics like crossbite, open bite, deep bite, protrusion of teeth, midline deviations, midline diastema and tooth rotation were recorded. The data were tabulated and analyzed using Chi-square test. Results: The results revealed that the overall prevalence of malocclusion was 83.3%. Of this, 69.8% of the children had Angle’s class I malocclusion, 9.3% had class II malocclusion (division 1 = 8.85%, division 2 = 0.5%) and 4.1% had class III malocclusion; 23.2% showed an increased overjet (>3 mm), 0.4% reverse overjet, 35.6% increased overbite (>3 mm), 0.29% open bite, 7.2% crossbite with 4.6% crossbite of complete anterior teeth, 63.3% deviation of midline, 0.76% midline diastema and 3.25% rotated tooth. No significant differences in gender distributions of malocclusions were noted except for increased overjet and overbite. Conclusion: There is high prevalence of malocclusion among schoolchildren in Kozhikode district of Kerala. Early interception and early correction of these malocclusions will eliminate the potential irregularities and malpositions in the developing dentofacial complex. How to cite this article: Narayanan RK, Jeseem MT, Kumar TVA. Prevalence of Malocclusion among 10-12-year-old Schoolchildren in Kozhikode District, Kerala: An Epidemiological Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(1):50-55. PMID:27274156

  9. Safety study of 50 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Benninger, David H.; Lomarev, Mikhail; Wassermann, Eric; Lopez, Grisel; Houdayer, Elise; Fasano, Rebecca E.; Dang, Nguyet; Hallett, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Objective Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has shown promising results in treating Parkinson’s disease (PD), but the best values for rTMS parameters are not established. 50 Hz rTMS may be superior to ≤ 25 Hz rTMS investigated so far. The objective of this study was to determine if 50 Hz rTMS could be delivered safely in PD patients since current safety limits are exceeded. Methods 50 Hz rTMS was applied with a circular coil on the primary motor cortex (M1). Stimulation intensity was first tested at 60% rest motor threshold [RMT] and 0.5 sec train duration and then increased in 0.5 sec steps to 2 sec, and by 10% steps to 90% RMT. Multi-channel electromyography (EMG) was recorded to control for signs of increasing time-locked EMG activity including correlates of the spread of excitation and after-discharges, or an increase of M1 excitability. Pre- and post-50 Hz rTMS assessments included EEG, Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Grooved Pegboard Test, Serial Reaction Time Task (SRTT), Folstein Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) and Verbal Fluency to control for motor and cognitive side effects. Results Ten PD patients were investigated. Multi-channel EMG showed no signs of increased time-locked EMG activity including correlates of the spread of excitation and after-discharges, or increased M1 excitability in 9 patients. A PD patient with bi-temporal spikes in the pre-testing EEG had clinical and EMG correlates of spread of excitation at 90% RMT, but no seizure activity. Pre- and post-50 Hz assessment showed no changes. No adverse events were observed. 50 Hz rTMS was well tolerated except by one patient who wished to terminate the study due to facial muscle stimulation. Conclusion 50 Hz rTMS at an intensity of 90% RMT for 2 sec appears safe in patients with PD, but caution should be taken for patients with paroxysmal EEG activity. For this reason, comprehensive screening should include EEG before higher-frequency rTMS is applied

  10. Status of 20 kHz space station power distribution technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Irving G.

    1988-01-01

    Power Distribution on the NASA Space Station will be accomplished by a 20 kHz sinusoidal, 440 VRMS, single phase system. In order to minimize both system complexity and the total power coversion steps required, high frequency power will be distributed end-to-end in the system. To support the final design of flight power system hardware, advanced development and demonstrations have been made on key system technologies and components. The current status of this program is discussed.

  11. 50 kHz PIV of a Swept-Ramp Shock-Wave Boundary-Layer Interaction at Mach 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanstone, Leon; Musta, Mustafa Nail; Seckin, Serdar; Saleem, Mohammad; Clemens, Noel

    2016-11-01

    The interaction from a 30° sweep, 22.5° compression ramp in a Mach 2 flow is examined using wide-field 5Hz and 50 kHz PIV. The high-speed PIV is fast enough to resolve the large-scale unsteady motions of the SWBLI and can be band-pass filtered to investigate the driving mechanisms of unsteadiness and the widefield PIV allows comparisons with mean flow-fields. Preliminary investigation looked at three distinct frequency bands: 10-50 kHz (0.025-0.25 U∞ /δ99), 1-10 kHz (0.025-0.25 U∞ /δ99), and 0-1 kHz (0-0.025 U∞ /δ99). The unsteadiness associated with 10-50 kHz shows no correlation with the upstream boundary layer and accounts for 40% of the amplitude. The unsteadiness associated with 1-10 kHz is correlated with the upstream boundary-layer and also accounts for 40% of unsteadiness. This frequency is similar to those of boundary-layer superstructures. The unsteadiness associated with 0-1 kHz shows the strongest correlation with the upstream boundary-layer but accounts for only 20% of the amplitude. Clearly a range of unsteadiness mechanisms are present, with significant amplitude associated with higher frequencies. Future work will focus on expanding these findings with surface pressure and additional PIV. This work is sponsored by the AFOSR under Grant FA9550-14-1-0167 with Ivett Leyva as the program manager. This source of support is gratefully acknowledged. Further, Mustafa Musta thanks the Scientific and Technological research Council of Turkey.

  12. 200 Deg C Demonstration Transformer Operates Efficiently at 50 kHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, Janis M.; Schwarze, Gene E. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A compact, high temperature demonstration transformer was constructed, using a moly permalloy powder core and Teflon -insulated copper wire. At 50 kHz and 200 C, this 1:2 ratio transformer is capable of 98 percent efficiency when operating at a specific power of 6.1 kW/kg at 4 kW. This roughly 7 cm diameter transformer has a mass of 0.65 kg. Although Teflon is unstable above 200 C, about the same electrical performance was seen at 250 C. A plot of winding loss versus frequency illustrates the need to control these losses at high frequency.

  13. Chromatid damage in human lymphocytes is not affected by 50 Hz electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Hone, P; Lloyd, D; Szłuińska, M; Edwards, A

    2006-01-01

    Cultured human blood lymphocytes were exposed during the S/G(2) phases of the cell cycle to continuous extremely low frequency (50 Hz) electromagnetic fields of 0.23, 0.47 or 0.7 mT either alone or immediately after an acute exposure to 1.0 Gy of gamma rays. The ionising radiation, as expected, induced chromosomal aberrations of the chromatid-type observed at the next metaphase. The field applied alone did not induce chromosomal damage nor did it modify the frequency of aberrations caused by the gamma rays.

  14. High-energy, efficient, 30-Hz ultraviolet laser sources for airborne ozone-lidar systems.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Khaled A; Chen, Songsheng; Petway, Larry B; Meadows, Byron L; Marsh, Waverly D; Edwards, William C; Barnes, James C; DeYoung, Russell J

    2002-05-20

    Two compact, high-pulse-energy, injection-seeded, 30-Hz frequency-doubled Nd:YAG-laser-pumped Ti: sapphire lasers were developed and operated at infrared wavelengths of 867 and 900 nm. Beams with laser pulse energy >30 mJ at ultraviolet wavelengths of 289 and 300 nm were generated through a tripling of the frequencies of these Ti:sapphire lasers. This work is directed at the replacement of dye lasers for use in an airborne ozone differential absorption lidar system. The ultraviolet pulse energy at 289 and 300 nm had 27% and 31% absolute optical energy conversion efficiencies from input pulse energies at 867 and 900 nm, respectively.

  15. Compact frequency standard using atoms trapped on a chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Martínez, F.; Lacroûte, C.; Rosenbusch, P.; Reinhard, F.; Deutsch, C.; Schneider, T.; Reichel, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present a compact atomic frequency standard based on the interrogation of magnetically trapped 87Rb atoms. Two photons, in the microwave and radiofrequency domain excite the atomic transition. At a magnetic field of 3.23 G this transition from ∣F = 1, mF = -1> to ∣F = 2, mF = 1> is 1st order insensitive to magnetic field variations. Long Ramsey interrogation times can thus be achieved, leading to a projected stability in the low 10-13 at 1 s. This makes this device a viable alternative to LITE and HORACE as a good candidate for replacing or complementing the rubidium frequency standards and passive hydrogen masers already on board of the GPS, GLONASS, and GALILEO satellites. Here we present preliminary results. We use an atom chip to cool and trap the atoms. A coplanar waveguide is integrated to the chip to carry the Ramsey interrogation signal, making the physics package potentially as small as (5 cm)3. We describe the experimental apparatus and show preliminary Ramsey fringes of 1.25 Hz linewidth. We also show a preliminary frequency stability σy = 1.5 × 10-12τ-1/2 for 10 < τ < 103 s. This represents one order of magnitude improvement with respect to previous experiments.

  16. Intermittent 20-HZ-photic stimulation leads to a uniform reduction of alpha-global field power in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Rau, R; Raschka, C; Koch, H J

    2001-01-01

    19-channel-EEGs were recorded from scalp surface of 30 healthy subjects (16m, 14f, mean age: 34 ys, SD: 11.7 ys) at rest and under IPS (Intermittent Photic Stimulation) at rates of 5, 10 and 20 Hertz (Hz). Digitalized data underwent spectral analysis with fast fourier transfomation (FFT) yielding the basis for the computation of global field power (GFP). For quantification GFP values in the frequency ranges of 5, 10 and 20 Hz at rest were divided by the corresponding data gained under IPS. While ratios from PDE data showed no stable parameter due to high interindividual variability, ratios of alpha-power turned out to be uniform in all subjects: IPS at 20 Hz always led to a suppression of alpha-power. Dividing alpha-GFP at rest by alpha-GFP under 20-Hz IPS thus resulted in a ratio < 1. We conclude that ratios from GFP data are a stable diagnostic paradigma.

  17. 60 Hz electric field changes the membrane potential during burst phase in pancreatic β-cells: in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Neves, Gesilda F; Silva, José R F; Moraes, Renato B; Fernandes, Thiago S; Tenorio, Bruno M; Nogueira, Romildo A

    2014-06-01

    The production, distribution and use of electricity can generate low frequency electric and magnetic fields (50-60 Hz). Considering that some studies showed adverse effects on pancreatic β-cells exposed to these fields; the present study aimed to analyze the effects of 60 Hz electric fields on membrane potential during the silent and burst phases in pancreatic β-cells using a mathematical model. Sinusoidal 60 Hz electric fields with amplitude ranging from 0.5 to 4 mV were applied on pancreatic β-cells model. The sinusoidal electric field changed burst duration, inter-burst intervals (silent phase) and spike sizes. The parameters above presented dose-dependent response with the voltage amplitude applied. In conclusion, theoretical analyses showed that a 60 Hz electric field with low amplitudes changes the membrane potential in pancreatic β-cells.

  18. Potassium Model for Slow (2-3 Hz) In Vivo Neocortical Paroxysmal Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Bazhenov, M.; Timofeev, I.; Steriade, M.; Sejnowski, T. J.

    2010-01-01

    In slow neocortical paroxysmal oscillations, the de- and hyperpolarizing envelopes in neocortical neurons are large compared with slow sleep oscillations. Increased local synchrony of membrane potential oscillations during seizure is reflected in larger electroencephalographic oscillations and the appearance of spike- or polyspike-wave complex recruitment at 2- to 3-Hz frequencies. The oscillatory mechanisms underlying this paroxysmal activity were investigated in computational models of cortical networks. The extracellular K+ concentration ([K+]o) was continuously computed based on neuronal K+ currents and K+ pumps as well as glial buffering. An increase of [K+]o triggered a transition from normal awake-like oscillations to 2- to 3-Hz seizure-like activity. In this mode, the cells fired periodic bursts and nearby neurons oscillated highly synchronously; in some cells depolarization led to spike inactivation lasting 50–100 ms. A [K+]o increase, sufficient to produce oscillations could result from excessive firing (e.g., induced by external stimulation) or inability of K+ regulatory system (e.g., when glial buffering was blocked). A combination of currents including high-threshold Ca2+, persistent Na+ and hyperpolarization-activated depolarizing (Ih) currents was sufficient to maintain 2- to 3-Hz activity. In a network model that included lateral K+ diffusion between cells, increase of [K+]o in a small region was generally sufficient to maintain paroxysmal oscillations in the whole network. Slow changes of [K+]o modulated the frequency of bursting and, in some case, led to fast oscillations in the 10- to 15-Hz frequency range, similar to the fast runs observed during seizures in vivo. These results suggest that modifications of the intrinsic currents mediated by increase of [K+]o can explain the range of neocortical paroxysmal oscillations in vivo. PMID:15056684

  19. CHARACTERIZING INTERMITTENCY OF 4-Hz QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATION IN XTE J1550–564 USING HILBERT–HUANG TRANSFORM

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Yi-Hao; Chou, Yi; Hu, Chin-Ping; Yang, Ting-Chang E-mail: yichou@astro.ncu.edu.tw

    2015-12-10

    We present time-frequency analysis results based on the Hilbert–Huang transform (HHT) for the evolution of a 4-Hz low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillation (LFQPO) around the black hole X-ray binary XTE J1550–564. The origin of LFQPOs is still debated. To understand the cause of the peak broadening, we utilized a recently developed time-frequency analysis, HHT, for tracking the evolution of the 4-Hz LFQPO from XTE J1550–564. By adaptively decomposing the ∼4-Hz oscillatory component from the light curve and acquiring its instantaneous frequency, the Hilbert spectrum illustrates that the LFQPO is composed of a series of intermittent oscillations appearing occasionally between 3 and 5 Hz. We further characterized this intermittency by computing the confidence limits of the instantaneous amplitudes of the intermittent oscillations, and constructed both the distributions of the QPO’s high- and low-amplitude durations, which are the time intervals with and without significant ∼4-Hz oscillations, respectively. The mean high-amplitude duration is 1.45 s and 90% of the oscillation segments have lifetimes below 3.1 s. The mean low-amplitude duration is 0.42 s and 90% of these segments are shorter than 0.73 s. In addition, these intermittent oscillations exhibit a correlation between the oscillation’s rms amplitude and mean count rate. This correlation could be analogous to the linear rms-flux relation found in the 4-Hz LFQPO through Fourier analysis. We conclude that the LFQPO peak in the power spectrum is broadened owing to intermittent oscillations with varying frequencies, which could be explained by using the Lense–Thirring precession model.

  20. Characterizing Intermittency of 4-Hz Quasi-periodic Oscillation in XTE J1550-564 Using Hilbert-Huang Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yi-Hao; Chou, Yi; Hu, Chin-Ping; Yang, Ting-Chang

    2015-12-01

    We present time-frequency analysis results based on the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) for the evolution of a 4-Hz low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillation (LFQPO) around the black hole X-ray binary XTE J1550-564. The origin of LFQPOs is still debated. To understand the cause of the peak broadening, we utilized a recently developed time-frequency analysis, HHT, for tracking the evolution of the 4-Hz LFQPO from XTE J1550-564. By adaptively decomposing the ˜4-Hz oscillatory component from the light curve and acquiring its instantaneous frequency, the Hilbert spectrum illustrates that the LFQPO is composed of a series of intermittent oscillations appearing occasionally between 3 and 5 Hz. We further characterized this intermittency by computing the confidence limits of the instantaneous amplitudes of the intermittent oscillations, and constructed both the distributions of the QPO’s high- and low-amplitude durations, which are the time intervals with and without significant ˜4-Hz oscillations, respectively. The mean high-amplitude duration is 1.45 s and 90% of the oscillation segments have lifetimes below 3.1 s. The mean low-amplitude duration is 0.42 s and 90% of these segments are shorter than 0.73 s. In addition, these intermittent oscillations exhibit a correlation between the oscillation’s rms amplitude and mean count rate. This correlation could be analogous to the linear rms-flux relation found in the 4-Hz LFQPO through Fourier analysis. We conclude that the LFQPO peak in the power spectrum is broadened owing to intermittent oscillations with varying frequencies, which could be explained by using the Lense-Thirring precession model.

  1. High-sensitivity cooled coil system for nuclear magnetic resonance in kHz range

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Tingting; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Lee, Yong-Ho; Lin, Jun

    2014-11-15

    In several low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (LF-NMR) and surface nuclear magnetic resonance applications, i.e., in the frequency range of kHz, high sensitivity magnetic field detectors are needed. Usually, low-T{sub c} superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) with a high field sensitivity of about 1 fT/Hz{sup 1/2} are employed as detectors. Considering the flux trapping and operational difficulties associated with low-T{sub c} SQUIDs, we designed and fabricated liquid-nitrogen-cooled Cu coils for NMR detection in the kHz range. A cooled coil system consisting of a 9-cm diameter Cu coil and a low noise preamplifier was systematically investigated and reached a sensitivity of 2 fT/Hz{sup 1/2} at 77 K, which is 3 times better compared to the sensitivity at 300 K. A Q-switch circuit as an essential element for damping the ringing effects of the pickup coil was developed to acquire free induction decay signals of a water sample with minimum loss of signal. Our studies demonstrate that cooled Cu coils, if designed properly, can provide a comparable sensitivity to low-T{sub c} SQUIDs.

  2. Deficits in high- (>60 Hz) gamma-band oscillations during visual processing in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Grützner, Christine; Wibral, Michael; Sun, Limin; Rivolta, Davide; Singer, Wolf; Maurer, Konrad; Uhlhaas, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Current theories of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia have focused on abnormal temporal coordination of neural activity. Oscillations in the gamma-band range (>25 Hz) are of particular interest as they establish synchronization with great precision in local cortical networks. However, the contribution of high gamma (>60 Hz) oscillations toward the pathophysiology is less established. To address this issue, we recorded magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data from 16 medicated patients with chronic schizophrenia and 16 controls during the perception of Mooney faces. MEG data were analysed in the 25–150 Hz frequency range. Patients showed elevated reaction times and reduced detection rates during the perception of upright Mooney faces while responses to inverted stimuli were intact. Impaired processing of Mooney faces in schizophrenia patients was accompanied by a pronounced reduction in spectral power between 60–120 Hz (effect size: d = 1.26) which was correlated with disorganized symptoms (r = −0.72). Our findings demonstrate that deficits in high gamma-band oscillations as measured by MEG are a sensitive marker for aberrant cortical functioning in schizophrenia, suggesting an important aspect of the pathophysiology of the disorder. PMID:23532620

  3. Metabolically distinct weight loss by 10,12 CLA and caloric restriction highlight the importance of subcutaneous white adipose tissue for glucose homeostasis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shari; Goodspeed, Leela; Wietecha, Tomasz; Houston, Barbara; Omer, Mohamed; Ogimoto, Kayoko; Subramanian, Savitha; Gowda, G. A. Nagana; O’Brien, Kevin D.; Kaiyala, Karl J.; Morton, Gregory J.; Chait, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Background Widely used as a weight loss supplement, trans-10,cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid (10,12 CLA) promotes fat loss in obese mice and humans, but has also been associated with insulin resistance. Objective We therefore sought to directly compare weight loss by 10,12 CLA versus caloric restriction (CR, 15–25%), an acceptable healthy method of weight loss, to determine how 10,12 CLA-mediated weight loss fails to improve glucose metabolism. Methods Obese mice with characteristics of human metabolic syndrome were either supplemented with 10,12 CLA or subjected to CR to promote weight loss. Metabolic endpoints such as energy expenditure, glucose and insulin tolerance testing, and trunk fat distribution were measured. Results By design, 10,12 CLA and CR caused equivalent weight loss, with greater fat loss by 10,12 CLA accompanied by increased energy expenditure, reduced respiratory quotient, increased fat oxidation, accumulation of alternatively activated macrophages, and browning of subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT). Moreover, 10,12 CLA-supplemented mice better defended their body temperature against a cold challenge. However, 10,12 CLA concurrently induced the detrimental loss of subcutaneous WAT without reducing visceral WAT, promoted reduced plasma and WAT adipokine levels, worsened hepatic steatosis, and failed to improve glucose metabolism. Obese mice undergoing CR were protected from subcutaneous-specific fat loss, had improved hepatic steatosis, and subsequently showed the expected improvements in WAT adipokines, glucose metabolism and WAT inflammation. Conclusions These results suggest that 10,12 CLA mediates the preferential loss of subcutaneous fat that likely contributes to hepatic steatosis and maintained insulin resistance, despite significant weight loss and WAT browning in mice. Collectively, we have shown that weight loss due to 10,12 CLA supplementation or CR results in dramatically different metabolic phenotypes, with the latter

  4. Surface complexation studied via combined grazing-incidence EXAFS and surface diffraction: Arsenate on hematite (0001) and (10-12)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waychunas, G.; Trainor, T.; Eng, P.; Catalano, J.; Brown, G.; Davis, J.; Rogers, J.; Bargar, J.

    2005-01-01

    X-ray diffraction [crystal-truncation-rod (CTR)] studies of the surface structure of moisture-equilibrated hematite reveal sites for complexation not present on the bulk oxygen-terminated surface, and impose constraints on the types of inner-sphere sorption topologies. We have used this improved model of the hematite surface to analyze grazing-incidence EXAFS results for arsenate sorption on the c(0001) and r(10-12) surfaces measured in two electric vector polarizations. This work shows that the reconfiguration of the surface under moist conditions is responsible for an increased adsorption density of arsenate complexes on the (0001) surface relative to predicted ideal termination, and an abundance of "edge-sharing" bidentate complexes on both studied surfaces. We consider possible limitations on combining the methods due to differing surface sensitivities, and discuss further analysis possibilities using both methods. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  5. Colorimetric Detection of Some Highly Hydrophobic Flavonoids Using Polydiacetylene Liposomes Containing Pentacosa-10,12-diynoyl Succinoglycan Monomers

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Deokgyu; Jeong, Daham; Cho, Eunae; Jung, Seunho

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids are a group of plant secondary metabolites including polyphenolic molecules, and they are well known for antioxidant, anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory and anti-viral propertied. In general, flavonoids are detected with various non-colorimetric detection methods such as column liquid chromatography, thin-layer chromatography, and electrochemical analysis. For the first time, we developed a straightforward colorimetric detection system allowing recognition of some highly hydrophobic flavonoids such as alpha-naphthoflavone and beta-naphthoflavone, visually using 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid (PCDA) derivatized with succinoglycan monomers isolated from Sinorhizobium meliloti. Besides changes in visible spectrum, we also demonstrate fluorescence changes using our detection system in the presence of those flavonoids. The succinoglycan monomers attached to PCDA molecules may function as an unstructured molecular capturer for some highly hydrophobic flavonoids by hydrophobic interactions, and transmit their molecular interactions as a color change throughout the PCDA liposome. PMID:26600071

  6. Extension of non-invasive EEG into the kHz range for evoked thalamocortical activity by means of very low noise amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Scheer, H J; Fedele, T; Curio, G; Burghoff, M

    2011-12-01

    Ultrafast electroencephalographic signals, having frequencies above 500 Hz, can be observed in somatosensory evoked potential measurements. Usually, these recordings have a poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) because weak signals are overlaid by intrinsic noise of much higher amplitude like that generated by biological sources and the amplifier. As an example, recordings at the scalp taken during electrical stimulation of the median nerve show a 600 Hz burst with submicro-volt amplitudes which can be extracted from noise by the use of massive averaging and digital signal processing only. We have investigated this signal by means of a very low noise amplifier made in-house (minimal voltage noise 2.7 nV Hz(-1/2), FET inputs). We examined how the SNR of the data is altered by the bandwidth and the use of amplifiers with different intrinsic amplifier noise levels of 12 and 4.8 nV Hz(-1/2), respectively. By analyzing different frequency contributions of the signal, we found an extremely weak 1 kHz component superimposed onto the well-known 600 Hz burst. Previously such high-frequency electroencephalogram responses around 1 kHz have only been observed by deep brain electrodes implanted for tremor therapy of Parkinson patients. For the non-invasive measurement of such signals, we recommend that amplifier noise should not exceed 4 nV Hz(-1/2).

  7. Clinical Utilisation of High-frequency DPOAEs.

    PubMed

    Poling, Gayla; Lee, Jungmee; Siegel, Jonathan; Dhar, Sumitrajit

    2012-01-01

    The value of assessing auditory function at frequencies above 8kHz to detect age-related changes and ototoxic damage in the cochlea is well established but not commonplace. Physiological changes in the auditory periphery due to age and ototoxicity are initially evident, and most prominent, at frequencies above 8kHz [1]. The most well investigated use of hearing thresholds and otoacoustic emissions above 8kHz is in monitoring auditory function in patients undergoing chemotherapy [2]. Ototoxic changes in hearing thresholds at frequencies between 10-14kHz prior to the manifestation of any changes at lower frequencies have been consistently documented in these patients. Age-related changes in hearing also appear at frequencies above 8kHz prior to any observable changes at regular audiometric frequencies [3]. The value of using hearing thresholds at frequencies above 8kHz to detect noise-induced hearing loss is debated in the literature with some reports of hearing thresholds at frequencies above 8kHz demonstrating more sensitivity to noise-induced damage than others [4].

  8. Degradation of PAHs by high frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Manariotis, Ioannis D; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V

    2011-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are persistent organic compounds, which have been reported in the literature to efficiently degrade at low (e.g. 20 kHz) and moderate (e.g. 506 kHz) ultrasound frequencies. The present study focuses on degradation of naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene by ultrasound at three different relatively high frequencies (i.e. 582, 862, and 1142 kHz). The experimental results indicate that for all three frequencies and power inputs ≥ 133 W phenanthrene degrades to concentrations lower than our experimental detection limit (<1 μg/L). Phenanthrene degrades significantly faster at 582 kHz than at 862 and 1142 kHz. For all three frequencies, the degradation rates per unit mass are similar for naphthalene and phenanthrene and lower for pyrene. Furthermore, naphthalene degradation requires less energy than phenanthrene, which requires less energy than pyrene under the same conditions. No hexane-extractable metabolites were identified in the solutions.

  9. Acoustic emission spectra and sonochemical activity in a 36 kHz sonoreactor.

    PubMed

    Son, Younggyu; Lim, Myunghee; Khim, Jeehyeong; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2012-01-01

    During ultrasound-induced cavitation in liquids, acoustic emissions at fundamental and harmonic frequencies can be detected. The effect of acoustic emissions at harmonic frequencies on the sonochemical and sonophysical activities has not been explored, especially in large-scale sonoreactors. In this study, the acoustic emissions in the range, 0-250 kHz in a 36 kHz sonoreactor with varying liquid heights were studied and compared with the sonochemical activities. The acoustic pressures at both fundamental and harmonics decreased drastically as the liquid height was increased due to the attenuation of sound energy. It was observed that the increase in input power resulted in only an increase in the acoustic emissions at derivative frequencies such as, harmonics and subharmonics. The sonochemical activity, evaluated in terms of sonochemiluminescence and H2O2 yield, was not significantly enhanced at higher input power levels. This suggests that at higher power levels, the "extra" acoustic energy is not effectively used to generate primary cavitation activity; rather it is converted to generate acoustic emissions at harmonic and subharmonic frequencies. This is an important observation for the design of energy efficiency large-scale sonochemical reactors.

  10. 1 Hz linewidth Ti:sapphire laser as local oscillator for (40)Ca(+) optical clocks.

    PubMed

    Bian, Wu; Huang, Yao; Guan, Hua; Liu, Peiliang; Ma, Longsheng; Gao, Kelin

    2016-06-01

    A Ti:sapphire laser at 729 nm is frequency stabilized to an ultra-stable ultra-low thermal expansion coefficient (ULE) cavity by means of Pound-Drever-Hall method. An acousto-optic modulator is used as the fast frequency feedback component. 1 Hz linewidth and 2 × 10(-15) frequency stability at 1-100 s are characterized by optical beating with a separated Fabry-Perot cavity stabilized diode laser. Compared to the universal method that the error signal feedback to inject current of a diode laser, this scheme is demonstrated to be simple and also effective for linewidth narrowing. The temperature of zero coefficient of the thermal expansion of the ULE cavity is measured with the help of a femto-second frequency comb. And the performance of the laser is well defined by locking it to the unperturbed clock transition line-center of 4 S1/2-3 D5/2 clock transition of a single laser cooled (40)Ca(+) ion. A Fourier-transform limited resonance of 6 Hz (Δv/v = 1.5 × 10(-14)) is observed. This laser is also used as the local oscillator for the comparison experiment of two (40)Ca(+) ion optical clocks and improves the stability of comparison for an order of magnitude better than the previous results.

  11. 1 Hz linewidth Ti:sapphire laser as local oscillator for 40Ca+ optical clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Wu; Huang, Yao; Guan, Hua; Liu, Peiliang; Ma, Longsheng; Gao, Kelin

    2016-06-01

    A Ti:sapphire laser at 729 nm is frequency stabilized to an ultra-stable ultra-low thermal expansion coefficient (ULE) cavity by means of Pound-Drever-Hall method. An acousto-optic modulator is used as the fast frequency feedback component. 1 Hz linewidth and 2 × 10-15 frequency stability at 1-100 s are characterized by optical beating with a separated Fabry-Perot cavity stabilized diode laser. Compared to the universal method that the error signal feedback to inject current of a diode laser, this scheme is demonstrated to be simple and also effective for linewidth narrowing. The temperature of zero coefficient of the thermal expansion of the ULE cavity is measured with the help of a femto-second frequency comb. And the performance of the laser is well defined by locking it to the unperturbed clock transition line-center of 4 S1/2-3 D5/2 clock transition of a single laser cooled 40Ca+ ion. A Fourier-transform limited resonance of 6 Hz (Δv/v = 1.5 × 10-14) is observed. This laser is also used as the local oscillator for the comparison experiment of two 40Ca+ ion optical clocks and improves the stability of comparison for an order of magnitude better than the previous results.

  12. Underwater detection of tonal signals between 0.125 and 100 kHz by harbor seals (Phoca vitulina).

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Wensveen, Paul J; Hoek, Lean; Verboom, Willem C; Terhune, John M

    2009-02-01

    The underwater hearing sensitivities of two 1-year-old female harbor seals were quantified in a pool built for acoustic research, using a behavioral psychoacoustic technique. The animals were trained to respond when they detected an acoustic signal and not to respond when they did not (go/no-go response). Pure tones (0.125-0.25 kHz) and narrowband frequency modulated (tonal) signals (center frequencies 0.5-100 kHz) of 900 ms duration were tested. Thresholds at each frequency were measured using the up-down staircase method and defined as the stimulus level resulting in a 50% detection rate. The audiograms of the two seals did not differ statistically: both plots showed the typical mammalian U-shape, but with a wide and flat bottom. Maximum sensitivity (54 dB re 1 microPa, rms) occurred at 1 kHz. The frequency range of best hearing (within 10 dB of maximum sensitivity) was from 0.5 to 40 kHz (6(1/3) octaves). Higher hearing thresholds (indicating poorer sensitivity) were observed below 1 and above 40 kHz. Thresholds below 4 kHz were lower than those previously described for harbor seals, which demonstrates the importance of using quiet facilities, built specifically for acoustic research, for hearing studies in marine mammals. The results suggest that under unmasked conditions many anthropogenic noise sources and sounds from conspecifics are audible to harbor seals at greater ranges than formerly believed.

  13. Performance of a 30-kV, 1-kHz, nanosecond source

    SciTech Connect

    Cravey, W.R.; Freytag, K.; Goerz, D.

    1992-06-01

    An existing pulser at LLNL was modified to increase its repetition rate to 1000 Hz. Spark gap recovery measurements were made for both the Marx and the Blumlein output switches. Recovery times of less than 1 ms were recorded without gas flow in the switch chambers. Low pressure synthetic air was used as the switch dielectric. Longer recovery times were necessary to over-voltage the switch. The output of the pulser was used to drive a log-periodic-dipole-array. Measurements were made on the transmitted pulses in an anechoic chamber and yielded a center frequency of 80 MHz. This paper describes the modifications made on the pulse generator, discusses the spark gap recovery data, and summarizes the performance of the pulser at 1 kHz. In addition, a brief description of the antenna is given along with the field measurements that were made in the EMPEROR facility.

  14. 47 CFR 18.301 - Operating frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operating frequencies. 18.301 Section 18.301... Standards § 18.301 Operating frequencies. ISM equipment may be operated on any frequency above 9 kHz except as indicated in § 18.303. The following frequency bands, in accordance with § 2.106 of the rules,...

  15. 47 CFR 18.301 - Operating frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operating frequencies. 18.301 Section 18.301... Standards § 18.301 Operating frequencies. ISM equipment may be operated on any frequency above 9 kHz except as indicated in § 18.303. The following frequency bands, in accordance with § 2.106 of the rules,...

  16. 47 CFR 18.301 - Operating frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operating frequencies. 18.301 Section 18.301... Standards § 18.301 Operating frequencies. ISM equipment may be operated on any frequency above 9 kHz except as indicated in § 18.303. The following frequency bands, in accordance with § 2.106 of the rules,...

  17. 47 CFR 18.301 - Operating frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operating frequencies. 18.301 Section 18.301... Standards § 18.301 Operating frequencies. ISM equipment may be operated on any frequency above 9 kHz except as indicated in § 18.303. The following frequency bands, in accordance with § 2.106 of the rules,...

  18. 47 CFR 18.301 - Operating frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operating frequencies. 18.301 Section 18.301... Standards § 18.301 Operating frequencies. ISM equipment may be operated on any frequency above 9 kHz except as indicated in § 18.303. The following frequency bands, in accordance with § 2.106 of the rules,...

  19. Variability, regularity and coupling measures distinguish PD tremor from voluntary 5Hz tremor.

    PubMed

    Morrison, S; Cortes, N; Newell, K M; Silburn, P A; Kerr, G

    2013-02-08

    A characteristic of Parkinson's disease (PD) is the development of tremor within the 4-6Hz range. One method used to better understand pathological tremor is to compare the responses to tremor-type actions generated intentionally in healthy adults. This study was designed to investigate the similarities and differences between voluntarily generated 4-6Hz tremor and PD tremor in regards to their amplitude, frequency and coupling characteristics. Tremor responses for 8 PD individuals (on- and off-medication) and 12 healthy adults were assessed under postural and resting conditions. Results showed that the voluntary and PD tremor were essentially identical with regards to the amplitude and peak frequency. However, differences between the groups were found for the variability (SD of peak frequency, proportional power) and regularity (Approximate Entropy, ApEn) of the tremor signal. Additionally, coherence analysis revealed strong inter-limb coupling during voluntary conditions while no bilateral coupling was seen for the PD persons. Overall, healthy participants were able to produce a 5Hz tremulous motion indistinguishable to that of PD patients in terms of peak frequency and amplitude. However, differences in the structure of variability and level of inter-limb coupling were found for the tremor responses of the PD and healthy adults. These differences were preserved irrespective of the medication state of the PD persons. The results illustrate the importance of assessing the pattern of signal structure/variability to discriminate between different tremor forms, especially where no differences emerge in standard measures of mean amplitude as traditionally defined.

  20. Lack of Teratological Effects in Rats Exposed to 20 or 60 kHz Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Izumi; Oshima, Atsushi; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Negishi, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A risk assessment of magnetic field (MF) exposure conducted by the World Health Organization indicated the need for biological studies on primary hazard identification and quantitative risk evaluation of intermediate frequency (300 Hz–100 kHz) MFs. Because induction heating cookers generate such MFs for cooking, reproductive and developmental effects are a concern due to the close proximity of the fields' source to a cook's abdomen. METHODS: Pregnant Crl:CD(SD) rats (25/group) were exposed to a 20 kHz, 0.2 mT(rms) or 60 kHz, 0.1 mT(rms) sinusoidal MF or sham-exposed for 22 hr/day during organogenesis, and their fetuses were examined for malformations on gestation day 20. All teratological evaluations were conducted in a blind fashion, and experiments were duplicated for each frequency to confirm consistency of experimental outcomes. RESULTS: No exposure-related changes were found in clinical signs, gross pathology, or number of implantation losses. The number of live fetuses and low-body-weight fetuses as well as the incidence of external, visceral, and skeletal malformations in the fetuses did not indicate significant differences between MF-exposed and sham-exposed groups. Although some fetuses showed isolated changes in sex ratio and skeletal variation and ossification, such changes were neither reproduced in duplicate experiments nor were they common to specific field frequencies. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure of rats to MFs during organogenesis did not show significant reproducible teratogenicity under experimental conditions. Present findings do not support the hypothesis that intermediate frequency MF exposure after implantation carries a significant risk for developing mammalian fetuses. Birth Defects Res (Part B) 92:469–477, 2011. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:21770026

  1. Brain oscillatory 4-30 Hz responses during a visual n-back memory task with varying memory load.

    PubMed

    Pesonen, Mirka; Hämäläinen, Heikki; Krause, Christina M

    2007-03-23

    Brain oscillatory responses of 4-30 Hz EEG frequencies elicited during the performance of a visual n-back task were examined in 36 adult volunteers. Event-related desynchronization (ERD) and event-related synchronization (ERS) responses were examined separately for targets and non-targets in four different memory load conditions (0-, 1-, 2- and 3-back). The presentation of all stimuli in all memory load conditions elicited long-lasting theta frequency (approximately 4-6 Hz) ERS responses which were of greater magnitude for the target stimuli as compared to the non-target stimuli. Alpha frequency range (approximately 8-12 Hz) ERD responses were observed in all memory load conditions for both targets and non-targets. The duration of these alpha ERD responses increased with increasing memory load and reaction time. In all memory load conditions, early appearing beta rhythm (approximately 14-30 Hz) ERD responses were elicited, and with increasing memory load, these beta ERD responses became longer in duration. Additionally, beta ERS responses were observed in the 0- and 1-back memory load conditions. The current results reveal a complex interplay between brain oscillations at different frequencies during a cognitive task performance.

  2. 40-Hz EEG activity during hypnotic induction and hypnotic testing.

    PubMed

    DePascalis, V; Penna, P M

    1990-04-01

    The present study evaluates changes in left and right 40-Hz EEG production for 19 high and 20 low hypnotizable female Ss during the hypnotic induction and the administration of the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (SHSS:C) of the Weitzenhoffer and Hilgard (1962). Scalp recorded 40-Hz EEG density was obtained from the middle of the O1-P3-T5 and O2-P4-T6 triangles. As the hypnotic induction proceeded, high hypnotizable Ss exhibited a shift to greater right-hemisphere activity as compared to a waking-state rest condition. In contrast, low hypnotizable Ss, showed a reduction in left- and right-hemisphere activity. No differences between groups for SHSS:C ideomotor items were observed. A main effect for Hypnotizability among SHSS:C imaginative items was found. A Hypnotizability x Hemisphere x Trial interaction was found for both sensory distortion and imaginative SHSS:C items. A comparison was made between low versus high hypnotizable Ss of 40-Hz EEG activity while they passed the same item. The results of these comparisons indicate that differences in brain activity might be partially related to the differences between experiencing a hypnotic suggestion or failing to do so. Significant relationships between 40-Hz EEG production and hypnotizability and 40-Hz EEG production and level of amnesia were also found.

  3. Coherent 40-Hz Oscillation Characterizes Dream State in Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llinas, Rodolfo; Ribary, Urs

    1993-03-01

    Magnetic recording from five normal human adults demonstrates large 40-Hz coherent magnetic activity in the awake and in rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep states that is very reduced during delta sleep (deep sleep characterized by delta waves in the electroencephalogram). This 40-Hz magnetic oscillation has been shown to be reset by sensory stimuli in the awake state. Such resetting is not observed during REM or delta sleep. The 40 Hz in REM sleep is characterized, as is that in the awake state, by a fronto-occiptal phase shift over the head. This phase shift has a maximum duration of thickapprox12-13 msec. Because 40-Hz oscillation is seen in wakefulness and in dreaming, we propose it to be a correlate of cognition, probably resultant from coherent 40-Hz resonance between thalamocortical-specific and nonspecific loops. Moreover, we proposed that the specific loops give the content of cognition, and a nonspecific loop gives the temporal binding required for the unity of cognitive experience.

  4. Abnormal reactivity of the approximately 20-Hz motor cortex rhythm in Unverricht Lundborg type progressive myoclonus epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Silén, T; Forss, N; Jensen, O; Hari, R

    2000-12-01

    The approximately 20-Hz component of the human mu rhythm originates predominantly in the primary motor cortex. We monitored with a whole-scalp neuromagnetometer the reactivity of the approximately 20-Hz rhythm as an index of the functional state of the primary motor cortex in seven patients suffering from Unverricht-Lundborg type (ULD) progressive myoclonus epilepsy (PME) and in seven healthy control subjects. In patients, the motor cortex rhythm was on average 5 Hz lower in frequency and its strength was double compared with controls. To study reactivity of the approximately 20-Hz rhythm, left and right median nerves were stimulated alternately at wrists. In controls, these stimuli elicited a small transient decrease, followed by a strong increase ("rebound") of the approximately 20-Hz level. In contrast, the patients showed no significant rebounds of the rhythm. As the approximately 20-Hz rebounds apparently reflect increased cortical inhibition, our results indicate that peripheral stimuli excite motor cortex for prolonged periods in patients with ULD.

  5. DFT studies on a high energy density cage compound 4-trinitroethyl-2,6,8,10,12-pentanitrohezaazaisowurtzitane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-ying; Du, Hong-chen; Wang, Fang; Gong, Xue-dong; Huang, Yin-sheng

    2011-06-23

    Polynitro cage compound 4-trinitroethyl-2,6,8,10,12-pentanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane has the same framework with but higher stability than CL-20 and is a potential new high energy density compound (HEDC). In this paper, the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) method of density functional theory (DFT) has been used to study its heat of formation, IR spectrum, and thermodynamic properties. The stability of the compound was evaluated by the bond dissociation energies. The calculated results show that the first step of pyrolysis is the rupture of the N-NO(2) bond in the side chain and verify the experimental observation that the title compound has better stability than CL-20. The crystal structure obtained by molecular mechanics belongs to the P2(1)2(1)2(1) space group, with lattice parameters a = 12.59 Å, b = 10.52 Å, c = 12.89 Å, Z = 4, and ρ = 2.165 g·cm(-3). Both the detonation velocity of 9.767 km·s(-1) and the detonation pressure of 45.191 GPa estimated using the Kamlet-Jacobs equation are better than those of CL-20. Considering that this cage compound has a better detonation performance and stability than CL-20, it may be a superior HEDC.

  6. Moderate physical activity correlates with elevated leptin in physically active 10-12-year-old boys with normal BMI.

    PubMed

    Cicchella, Antonio; Stefanelli, Claudio; Jürimäe, Toivo; Saar, Meeli; Purge, Priit

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relations between physical activity of differing intensity and duration with body energy-balance hormone leptin in 10-12-year-old boys (N = 94) who participated in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity at least four to five times per week. The boys reported their physical activity using a questionnaire. They had normal body mass index (BMI, kg/ m2), and were at Tanner Stage 2 of development. Boys were divided into three subgroups by leptin levels: normal serum leptin (M +/- .5 SD, n = 44, 1.2-3.9 ng/ml), low leptin (< or = M - .5 SD; n = 31, < 1.2 ng/ml), and high leptin (> or = M + .5 SD; n = 19, > 3.9 ng/ml). There were significant differences between subgroups in anthropometric parameters and serum leptin levels, but not in physical activity. A significant correlation was found between leptin and moderate physical activity of at least five times per week for at least 30 minutes each time in the high leptin group (r = .61). In conclusion, the correlations between physical activity and leptin are weak; only moderate physical activity was correlated with leptin levels in the high leptin

  7. Three-dimensional magnetic cloak working from d.c. to 250 kHz

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianfei; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Yichao; Yin, Ge; Yuan, Jun; He, Sailing; Ma, Yungui

    2015-01-01

    Invisible cloaking is one of the major outcomes of the metamaterial research, but the practical potential, in particular for high frequencies (for example, microwave to visible light), is fatally challenged by the complex material properties they usually demand. On the other hand, it will be advantageous and also technologically instrumental to design cloaking devices for applications at low frequencies where electromagnetic components are favourably uncoupled. In this work, we vastly develop the bilayer approach to create a three-dimensional magnetic cloak able to work in both static and dynamic fields. Under the quasi-static approximation, we demonstrate a perfect magnetic cloaking device with a large frequency band from 0 to 250 kHz. The practical potential of our device is experimentally verified by using a commercial metal detector, which may lead us to having a real cloaking application where the dynamic magnetic field can be manipulated in desired ways. PMID:26596641

  8. 0.26-Hz-linewidth ultrastable lasers at 1557 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lifei; Jiang, Yanyi; Ma, Chaoqun; Qi, Wen; Yu, Hongfu; Bi, Zhiyi; Ma, Longsheng

    2016-04-01

    Narrow-linewidth ultrastable lasers at 1.5 μm are essential in many applications such as coherent transfer of light through fiber and precision spectroscopy. Those applications all rely on the ultimate performance of the lasers. Here we demonstrate two ultrastable lasers at 1557 nm with a most probable linewidth of 0.26 Hz by independently frequency-stabilizing to the resonance of 10-cm-long ultrastable Fabry-Pérot cavities at room temperature. The fractional frequency instability of each laser system is nearly 8 × 10-16 at 1-30 s averaging time, approaching the thermal noise limit of the reference cavities. A remarkable frequency instability of 1 × 10-15 is achieved on the long time scale of 100-4000 s.

  9. 0.26-Hz-linewidth ultrastable lasers at 1557 nm.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lifei; Jiang, Yanyi; Ma, Chaoqun; Qi, Wen; Yu, Hongfu; Bi, Zhiyi; Ma, Longsheng

    2016-04-27

    Narrow-linewidth ultrastable lasers at 1.5 μm are essential in many applications such as coherent transfer of light through fiber and precision spectroscopy. Those applications all rely on the ultimate performance of the lasers. Here we demonstrate two ultrastable lasers at 1557 nm with a most probable linewidth of 0.26 Hz by independently frequency-stabilizing to the resonance of 10-cm-long ultrastable Fabry-Pérot cavities at room temperature. The fractional frequency instability of each laser system is nearly 8 × 10(-16) at 1-30 s averaging time, approaching the thermal noise limit of the reference cavities. A remarkable frequency instability of 1 × 10(-15) is achieved on the long time scale of 100-4000 s.

  10. Three-dimensional magnetic cloak working from d.c. to 250 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianfei; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Yichao; Yin, Ge; Yuan, Jun; He, Sailing; Ma, Yungui

    2015-11-01

    Invisible cloaking is one of the major outcomes of the metamaterial research, but the practical potential, in particular for high frequencies (for example, microwave to visible light), is fatally challenged by the complex material properties they usually demand. On the other hand, it will be advantageous and also technologically instrumental to design cloaking devices for applications at low frequencies where electromagnetic components are favourably uncoupled. In this work, we vastly develop the bilayer approach to create a three-dimensional magnetic cloak able to work in both static and dynamic fields. Under the quasi-static approximation, we demonstrate a perfect magnetic cloaking device with a large frequency band from 0 to 250 kHz. The practical potential of our device is experimentally verified by using a commercial metal detector, which may lead us to having a real cloaking application where the dynamic magnetic field can be manipulated in desired ways.

  11. Three-dimensional magnetic cloak working from d.c. to 250 kHz.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianfei; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Yichao; Yin, Ge; Yuan, Jun; He, Sailing; Ma, Yungui

    2015-11-24

    Invisible cloaking is one of the major outcomes of the metamaterial research, but the practical potential, in particular for high frequencies (for example, microwave to visible light), is fatally challenged by the complex material properties they usually demand. On the other hand, it will be advantageous and also technologically instrumental to design cloaking devices for applications at low frequencies where electromagnetic components are favourably uncoupled. In this work, we vastly develop the bilayer approach to create a three-dimensional magnetic cloak able to work in both static and dynamic fields. Under the quasi-static approximation, we demonstrate a perfect magnetic cloaking device with a large frequency band from 0 to 250 kHz. The practical potential of our device is experimentally verified by using a commercial metal detector, which may lead us to having a real cloaking application where the dynamic magnetic field can be manipulated in desired ways.

  12. 0.26-Hz-linewidth ultrastable lasers at 1557 nm

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lifei; Jiang, Yanyi; Ma, Chaoqun; Qi, Wen; Yu, Hongfu; Bi, Zhiyi; Ma, Longsheng

    2016-01-01

    Narrow-linewidth ultrastable lasers at 1.5 μm are essential in many applications such as coherent transfer of light through fiber and precision spectroscopy. Those applications all rely on the ultimate performance of the lasers. Here we demonstrate two ultrastable lasers at 1557 nm with a most probable linewidth of 0.26 Hz by independently frequency-stabilizing to the resonance of 10-cm-long ultrastable Fabry-Pérot cavities at room temperature. The fractional frequency instability of each laser system is nearly 8 × 10−16 at 1–30 s averaging time, approaching the thermal noise limit of the reference cavities. A remarkable frequency instability of 1 × 10−15 is achieved on the long time scale of 100–4000 s. PMID:27117356

  13. High frequency testing of rubber mounts.

    PubMed

    Vahdati, Nader; Saunders, L Ken Lauderbaugh

    2002-04-01

    Rubber and fluid-filled rubber engine mounts are commonly used in automotive and aerospace applications to provide reduced cabin noise and vibration, and/or motion accommodations. In certain applications, the rubber mount may operate at frequencies as high as 5000 Hz. Therefore, dynamic stiffness of the mount needs to be known in this frequency range. Commercial high frequency test machines are practically nonexistent, and the best high frequency test machine on the market is only capable of frequencies as high as 1000 Hz. In this paper, a high frequency test machine is described that allows test engineers to study the high frequency performance of rubber mounts at frequencies up to 5000 Hz.

  14. Temporary threshold shifts at 1500 and 2000 Hz induced by loud voice signals communicated through earphones in the pinball industry.

    PubMed

    Idota, Nozomi; Horie, Seichi; Tsutsui, Takao; Inoue, Jinro

    2010-10-01

    To assess the risk of hearing loss among workers using earphones as communication devices at noisy worksites, we compared temporary threshold shifts (TTS) between ears on which workers wore earphones and ears on which no earphones were worn. We measured ambient noise and personal noise exposure as well as noise generated by and passed through earphones by applying frequency analysis at three pinball facilities during their hours of actual operation. We assessed hearing levels before and after a work shift (prework and postwork) of 54 workers by pure tone audiometry at six frequencies. The time-weighted averages for ambient noise and personal noise exposure exceeded 85 dB(A) and 90 dB(A), respectively. Overall sound pressure levels generated by and passing through earphones reached 109 dB(A). The one-third octave band spectrum of the earphone noise during the shift exceeded 90 dB(SPL) in the range of 315-2000 Hz. The number of ears demonstrating a TTS, defined as a shift of 10 dB or more in postwork over prework hearing thresholds, was significantly greater at 1500 and 2000 Hz among ears with earphones (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively) compared to those without. The reverse was observed at 4000 Hz for ears without earphones (P < 0.01). Workers wearing earphones or headsets as communication devices in noisy environments are exposed to high risk of hearing loss, particularly at the frequencies of 1500 and 2000 Hz. Ideally, hearing conservation programs for such workers should account for potential hearing losses at frequencies of 2000 Hz or lower frequencies induced by amplified voice signals.

  15. 33 CFR 86.03 - Limits of fundamental frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... frequency of a whistle shall be between the following limits: (a) 70-200 Hz, for a vessel 200 meters or more in length; (b) 130-350 Hz, for a vessel 75 meters but less than 200 meters in length; (c) 250-525 Hz, for a vessel less than 75 meters in length....

  16. Characterization of Hearing Thresholds from 500 to 16,000 Hz in Dentists: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Claudia Giglio de Oliveira; Santos, Luciana; Lobato, Diolen; Ribas, Angela; Lacerda, Adriana Bender Moreira; Marques, Jair

    2014-01-01

    Introduction High-level noise exposure in dentists' workplaces may cause damages to the auditory systems. High-frequency audiometry is an important tool in the investigation in the early diagnosis of hearing loss. Objectives To analyze the auditory thresholds at frequencies from 500 to 16,000 Hz of dentists in the city of Curitiba. Methods This historic cohort study retrospectively tested hearing thresholds from 500 to 16,000 Hz with a group of dentists from Curitiba, in the state of Paraná, Brazil. Eighty subjects participated in the study, separated into a dentist group and a control group, with the same age range and gender across groups but with no history of occupational exposure to high levels of sound pressure in the control group. Subjects were tested with conventional audiometry and high-frequency audiometry and answered a questionnaire about exposure to noise. Results Results showed that 81% of dentists did not receive any information regarding noise at university; 6 (15%) dentists had sensorineural hearing impairment; significant differences were observed between the groups only at frequencies of 500 Hz and 1,000, 6,000 and 8,000 Hz in the right ear. There was no significant difference between the groups after analysis of mean hearing thresholds of high frequencies with the average hearing thresholds in conventional frequencies; subjects who had been working as dentists for longer than 10 years had worse tonal hearing thresholds at high frequencies. Conclusions In this study, we observed that dentists are at risk for the development of sensorineural hearing loss especially after 10 years of service. PMID:25992172

  17. Characterization of hearing thresholds from 500 to 16,000 hz in dentists: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Claudia Giglio de Oliveira; Santos, Luciana; Lobato, Diolen; Ribas, Angela; Lacerda, Adriana Bender Moreira; Marques, Jair

    2015-04-01

    Introduction High-level noise exposure in dentists' workplaces may cause damages to the auditory systems. High-frequency audiometry is an important tool in the investigation in the early diagnosis of hearing loss. Objectives To analyze the auditory thresholds at frequencies from 500 to 16,000 Hz of dentists in the city of Curitiba. Methods This historic cohort study retrospectively tested hearing thresholds from 500 to 16,000 Hz with a group of dentists from Curitiba, in the state of Paraná, Brazil. Eighty subjects participated in the study, separated into a dentist group and a control group, with the same age range and gender across groups but with no history of occupational exposure to high levels of sound pressure in the control group. Subjects were tested with conventional audiometry and high-frequency audiometry and answered a questionnaire about exposure to noise. Results Results showed that 81% of dentists did not receive any information regarding noise at university; 6 (15%) dentists had sensorineural hearing impairment; significant differences were observed between the groups only at frequencies of 500 Hz and 1,000, 6,000 and 8,000 Hz in the right ear. There was no significant difference between the groups after analysis of mean hearing thresholds of high frequencies with the average hearing thresholds in conventional frequencies; subjects who had been working as dentists for longer than 10 years had worse tonal hearing thresholds at high frequencies. Conclusions In this study, we observed that dentists are at risk for the development of sensorineural hearing loss especially after 10 years of service.

  18. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Liang, W.; Eliyahu, D.; Ilchenko, V. S.; Savchenkov, A. A.; Matsko, A. B.; Seidel, D.; Maleki, L.

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than −60 dBc Hz−1 at 10 Hz, −90 dBc Hz−1 at 100 Hz and −170 dBc Hz−1 at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10−10 at 1–100 s integration time—orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption. PMID:26260955

  19. Nonuniform temporal weighting of interaural time differences in 500 Hz tones

    PubMed Central

    Stecker, G. Christopher; Bibee, Jacqueline M.

    2014-01-01

    The discrimination and lateralization of interaural time differences (ITD) in rapidly modulated high-frequency sounds is dominated by cues present in the initial portion of the sound (i.e., at sound onset). The importance of initial ITD at low frequencies is, however, less clear. Here, ITD discrimination thresholds were measured in 500 Hz pure tones with diotic envelopes and static or dynamic fine-structure ITD. Static-ITD thresholds improved as tone duration increased from 40 to 640 ms but by an amount less than expected from uniform temporal weighting of binaural information. Dynamic conditions eliminated ITD from either the beginning or end of the sound by presenting slightly different frequencies to the two ears. While overall thresholds were lower when ITD was available at sound onset than when it was not, listeners differed appreciably in that regard. The results demonstrate that weighting of ITD is not temporally uniform. Instead, for many listeners, ITD discrimination at 500 Hz appears dominated by ITD cues present in the initial part of the sound. To a variable degree, other listeners rely more equally on ITD cues occurring near sound onsets and offsets, although no listeners appear to utilize such cues uniformly throughout the sound's duration. PMID:24907817

  20. A four kHz repetition rate compact TEA CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yijun; Tan, Rongqing

    2013-09-01

    A compact transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser with high repetition-rate was reported. The size of the laser is 380 mm×300 mm×200 mm, and the discharge volume is 12×103 mm3. The laser cavity has a length of 320mm and consists of a totally reflective concave mirror with a radius of curvature of 4 m (Cu metal substrate coated with Au) and a partially reflecting mirror. The ultraviolet preionization makes the discharge even and stable,the output energy can be as high as 28 mJ under the circumstance of free oscillation, and the width of the light pulse is 60ns.To acquire the high wind velocity, a turbocharger is used in the system of the fast-gas flow cycle. When the wind speed is 100m/s, the repetition rate of the transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser is up to 2 kHz. On this basis, a dual modular structure with two sets of the gas discharge unit is adopted to obtain a higher pulse repetition frequency output. The dual discharge unit composed two sets of electrodes and two sets of turbo fan. Alternate trigger technology is used to make the two sets of discharge module work in turn with repetition frequency of 2 kHz, the discharge interval of two sets of the gas discharge unit can be adjusted continuously from 20 microseconds to 250 microseconds. Under the conditions of maintaining the other parameters constant, the repetition frequency of the laser pulse is up to 4 kHz. The total size of laser with dual modular structure is 380mm×520mm×200mm, and the discharge volume is 24×103 mm3 with the cavity length of 520mm.

  1. Thermal Noise Limit in Frequency Stabilization of Lasers with Rigid Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Kemery, Amy; Camp, Jordan

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated thermal noise (Brownian motion) in a rigid reference cavity used for frequency stabilization of lasers, based on the mechanical loss of cavity materials and the numerical analysis of the mirror-spacer mechanics with t.he direct application of the fluctuation dissipation theorem. This noise sets a fundamental limit for the frequency stability achieved with a rigid frequency- reference cavity of order 1 Hz/square root Hz(0.01 Hz/square root Hz) at 10 mHz (100 Hz) at room temperature. This level coincides with the world-highest level stabilization results.

  2. Optimizations of ozone generator at low resonance frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garamoon, A. A.; Elakshar, F. F.; Elsawah, M.

    2009-11-01

    The effect of the frequency on the different parameters of ozone generation in the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) has been investigated. It is found that at low frequency, (f0 = 325 Hz), an electric resonance can be obtained in the electric circuit. The onset voltage, at which the ozone starts to build up, was reduced from 3.25 kV at 50 Hz to 1.57 kV at 325 Hz. The efficiency has been increased from nearly zero at 50 Hz to 232.94 g/kW h at 200 Hz under applied voltage of 2.025 kV. in here

  3. Diode-Pumped Long-Pulse-Length Ho:Tm:YLiF4 Laser at 10 Hz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jani, Mahendra G.; Naranjo, Felipe L.; Barnes, Norman P.; Murray, Keith E.; Lockard, George E.

    1995-01-01

    An optical efficiency of 0.052 under normal mode operation for diode-pumped Ho:Tm:YLiF4 at a pulse repetition frequency of 10 Hz has been achieved. Laser output energy of 30 mJ in single Q-switched pulses with 600-ns pulse length were obtained for an input energy of 3 J. A diffusion-bonded birefringent laser rod consisting of Ho:Tm-doped and undoped pieces of YLF was utilized for 10-Hz operation.

  4. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 77, RBRC SCIENTIFIC REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING, OCTOBER 10-12, 2005

    SciTech Connect

    SAMIOS, N.P.

    2005-10-10

    The eighth evaluation of the RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) took place on October 10-12, 2005, at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The members of the Scientific Review Committee (SRC) were Dr. Jean-Paul Blaizot, Professor Makoto Kobayashi, Dr. Akira Masaike, Professor Charles Young Prescott (Chair), Professor Stephen Sharpe (absent), and Professor Jack Sandweiss. We are grateful to Professor Akira Ukawa who was appointed to the SRC to cover Professor Sharpe's area of expertise. In addition to reviewing this year's program, the committee, augmented by Professor Kozi Nakai, evaluated the RBRC proposal for a five-year extension of the RIKEN BNL Collaboration MOU beyond 2007. Dr. Koji Kaya, Director of the Discovery Research Institute, RIKEN, Japan, presided over the session on the extension proposal. In order to illustrate the breadth and scope of the RBRC program, each member of the Center made a presentation on higher research efforts. In addition, a special session was held in connection with the RBRC QCDSP and QCDOC supercomputers. Professor Norman H. Christ, a collaborator from Columbia University, gave a presentation on the progress and status of the project, and Professor Frithjof Karsch of BNL presented the first physics results from QCDOC. Although the main purpose of this review is a report to RIKEN Management (Dr. Ryoji Noyori, RIKEN President) on the health, scientific value, management and future prospects of the Center, the RBRC management felt that a compendium of the scientific presentations are of sufficient quality and interest that they warrant a wider distribution. Therefore we have made this compilation and present it to the community for its information and enlightenment.

  5. Thermographic detection of fatigue damage of pressure vessel steels at 1,000 Hz and 20 Hz

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, P.K.; Wang, H.; Jiang, L.; Yang, B.; Huang, J.Y.; Kuo, R.C.; Huang, J.G.

    2000-01-31

    Fatigue behavior is strongly affected by the environment, materials, and loading conditions. The process of fatigue can be categorized into three stages: crack initiation, growth, and final fracture. Nondestruction evaluation (NDE) of fatigue damage is of critical importance for life assessments and structural integrity evaluations. Several NDE methods, including ultrasonics, acoustic emission, and thermography, have been used to monitor fatigue damage. However, relatively little work has been conducted to assess fatigue characteristics using thermographic infrared techniques. In this paper, a thermographic infrared imaging system was used to detect the heat conditions of fatigued pressure vessel steels at 1,000 Hz and 20 Hz. Moreover, the fatigue behavior has been investigated at 1,000 Hz using an advanced electrohydraulic machine.

  6. Syllabic (~2-5 Hz) and fluctuation (~1-10 Hz) ranges in speech and auditory processing

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Erik; Chang, Edward F.

    2013-01-01

    Given recent interest in syllabic rates (~2-5 Hz) for speech processing, we review the perception of “fluctuation” range (~1-10 Hz) modulations during listening to speech and technical auditory stimuli (AM and FM tones and noises, and ripple sounds). We find evidence that the temporal modulation transfer function (TMTF) of human auditory perception is not simply low-pass in nature, but rather exhibits a peak in sensitivity in the syllabic range (~2-5 Hz). We also address human and animal neurophysiological evidence, and argue that this bandpass tuning arises at the thalamocortical level and is more associated with non-primary regions than primary regions of cortex. The bandpass rather than low-pass TMTF has implications for modeling auditory central physiology and speech processing: this implicates temporal contrast rather than simple temporal integration, with contrast enhancement for dynamic stimuli in the fluctuation range. PMID:24035819

  7. Integrated optics magnetic sensor from 2 kHz to 9 GHz.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bao; Chen, Fushen; Chen, Kaixin

    2011-04-10

    A new type of integrated optical magnetic field sensor is presented in this paper. The proposed sensor consists of a Mach-Zehnder waveguide interferometer and a doubly loaded loop antenna. Such a structure can successfully avoid detection of the undesired electric field signal. The size of the sensor is 35 mm×6 mm×1 mm. The measurements show that the frequency response is from 2 kHz to 9 GHz, the dynamic range is 98 dB, and the minimum detectable magnetic field is 51.8 μA/m at 1 GHz. Therefore, this sensing system can be used in electromagnetic compatibility measurements.

  8. Large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia in rats exposed to intermittent 60 Hz magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Anderson, L E; Morris, J E; Miller, D L; Rafferty, C N; Ebi, K L; Sasser, L B

    2001-04-01

    An animal model for large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia in male Fischer 344 rats was utilized to determine whether magnetic field exposure can be shown to influence the progression of leukemia. We previously reported that exposure to continuous 60 Hz, 1 mT magnetic fields did not significantly alter the clinical progression of LGL leukemia in young male rats following injection of spleen cells from donor leukemic rats. Results presented here extend those studies with the following objectives: (a) to replicate the previous study of continuous 60 Hz magnetic field exposures, but using fewer LGL cells in the inoculum, and (b) to determine if intermittent 60 Hz magnetic fields can alter the clinical progression of leukemia. Rats were randomly assigned to four treatment groups (18/group) as follows: (1) 1 mT (10 G) continuous field, (2) 1 mT intermittent field (off/on at 3 min intervals), (3) ambient controls ( < 0.1 microT), and (4) positive control (5 Gy whole body irradiation from cobalt-60 four days prior to initiation of exposure). All rats were injected intraperitoneally with 2.2 x 10(6) fresh, viable LGL leukemic spleen cells at the beginning of the study. The fields were activated for 20 h per day, 7 days per week, and all exposure conditions were superimposed over the natural ambient magnetic field. The rats were weighed and palpated for splenomegaly weekly. Splenomegaly developed 9-11 weeks after transplantation of the leukemia cells. Hematological evaluations were performed at 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16 weeks of exposure. Peripheral blood hemoglobin concentration, red blood cells, and packed cell volume declined, and total white blood cells and LGL cells increased dramatically in all treatment groups after onset of leukemia. Although the positive control group showed different body weight curves and developed signs of leukemia earlier than other groups, differences were not detected between exposure groups and ambient controls. Furthermore, there were no

  9. Frequency comb swept lasers

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Zhou, Chao; Adler, Desmond C.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a frequency comb (FC) swept laser and a frequency comb Fourier domain mode locked (FC-FDML) laser for applications in optical coherence tomography (OCT). The fiber-based FC swept lasers operate at a sweep rate of 1kHz and 120kHz, respectively over a 135nm tuning range centered at 1310nm with average output powers of 50mW. A 25GHz free spectral range frequency comb filter in the swept lasers causes the lasers to generate a series of well defined frequency steps. The narrow bandwidth (0.015nm) of the frequency comb filter enables a ~−1.2dB sensitivity roll off over ~3mm range, compared to conventional swept source and FDML lasers which have −10dB and −5dB roll offs, respectively. Measurements at very long ranges are possible with minimal sensitivity loss, however reflections from outside the principal measurement range of 0–3mm appear aliased back into the principal range. In addition, the frequency comb output from the lasers are equally spaced in frequency (linear in k-space). The filtered laser output can be used to self-clock the OCT interference signal sampling, enabling direct fast Fourier transformation of the fringe signals, without the need for fringe recalibration procedures. The design and operation principles of FC swept lasers are discussed and designs for short cavity lasers for OCT and interferometric measurement applications are proposed. PMID:19997365

  10. Frequency comb swept lasers.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Zhou, Chao; Adler, Desmond C; Fujimoto, James G

    2009-11-09

    We demonstrate a frequency comb (FC) swept laser and a frequency comb Fourier domain mode locked (FC-FDML) laser for applications in optical coherence tomography (OCT). The fiber-based FC swept lasers operate at a sweep rate of 1kHz and 120kHz, respectively over a 135nm tuning range centered at 1310nm with average output powers of 50mW. A 25GHz free spectral range frequency comb filter in the swept lasers causes the lasers to generate a series of well defined frequency steps. The narrow bandwidth (0.015nm) of the frequency comb filter enables a approximately -1.2dB sensitivity roll off over approximately 3mm range, compared to conventional swept source and FDML lasers which have -10dB and -5dB roll offs, respectively. Measurements at very long ranges are possible with minimal sensitivity loss, however reflections from outside the principal measurement range of 0-3mm appear aliased back into the principal range. In addition, the frequency comb output from the lasers are equally spaced in frequency (linear in k-space). The filtered laser output can be used to self-clock the OCT interference signal sampling, enabling direct fast Fourier transformation of the fringe signals, without the need for fringe recalibration procedures. The design and operation principles of FC swept lasers are discussed and designs for short cavity lasers for OCT and interferometric measurement applications are proposed.

  11. Toxic effects of 50 Hz electromagnetic field on memory consolidation in male and female mice.

    PubMed

    Foroozandeh, Elham; Derakhshan-Barjoei, Pouya; Jadidi, Mohsen

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the effect of exposure to an 8 mT, 50 Hz extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF EMF) on memory consolidation of adult male and female mice was studied. For this purpose male and female mice were randomly distributed among six groups (n = 10 in each group). Using passive avoidance task, despite its natural tendency, mouse learns to stay on a small platform to avoidant electric shock. Immediately after the learning session, laboratory animals in the experimental groups were placed in an 8 mT, 50 Hz sinusoidal EMF for 4 h. The second male and female groups were sham exposed (exposure device off) and the third groups were considered as the controls. Twenty-four hours after the learning session, the animals were placed on small platform again and step-down latency was measured as the memory consolidation index. Significant (p < 0.05) decreases were determined among groups in memory function and results showed that exposure to an 8 mT, 50 Hz EMF for 4 h has devastating effects on memory consolidation in male and female mice.

  12. Prestimulus oscillatory phase at 7 Hz gates cortical information flow and visual perception.

    PubMed

    Hanslmayr, Simon; Volberg, Gregor; Wimber, Maria; Dalal, Sarang S; Greenlee, Mark W

    2013-11-18

    Although we have the impression that visual information flows continuously from our sensory channels, recent studies indicate that this is likely not the case. Rather, we sample visual stimuli rhythmically, oscillating at 5-10 Hz. Electroencephalography (EEG) studies have demonstrated that this rhythmicity is reflected by the phase of ongoing brain oscillations in the same frequency. Theoretically, brain oscillations could underlie the rhythmic nature of perception by providing transient time windows for information exchange, but this question has not yet been systematically addressed. We recorded simultaneous EEG-fMRI while human participants performed a contour integration task and show that ongoing brain oscillations prior to stimulus onset predict functional connectivity between higher and lower level visual processing regions. Specifically, our results demonstrate that the phase of a 7 Hz oscillation prior to stimulus onset predicts perceptual performance and the bidirectional information flow between the left lateral occipital cortex and right intraparietal sulcus, as indicated by psychophysiological interaction and dynamic causal modeling. These findings suggest that human brain oscillations periodically gate visual perception at around 7 Hz by providing transient time windows for long-distance cortical information transfer. Such gating might be a general mechanism underlying the rhythmic nature of human perception.

  13. High Sensitivity Optomechanical Reference Accelerometer over 10 kHz

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-05

    measurements and observations in seismology and gravimetry. 2 High sensitivity optomechanical reference accele Approved for public release; distribution is...and this category of accelerometers, outlining a path for high sensitivity reference acceleration measurements and observations in seismology and...Traditional applications require either high acceleration resolution, such as in gravimetry or seismology well below 100 Hz, or large bandwidths, as for

  14. Evaluation of the economic burden of Herpes Zoster (HZ) infection

    PubMed Central

    Panatto, Donatella; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Rizzitelli, Emanuela; Bonanni, Paolo; Boccalini, Sara; Icardi, Giancarlo; Gasparini, Roberto; Amicizia, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the economic burden of Herpes Zoster (HZ) infection. The review was conducted in accordance with the standards of the “Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses” guidelines. The following databases were accessed: ISI/Web of Knowledge (WoS), MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus, ProQuest, the Cochrane Library and EconLit. Specific literature on health economics was also manually inspected. Thirty-three studies were included. The quality of the studies assessed in accordance with the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards checklist was good. All studies evaluated direct costs, apart from one which dealt only with indirect costs. Indirect costs were evaluated by 12 studies. The economic burden of HZ has increased over time. HZ management and drug prescriptions generate the highest direct costs. While increasing age, co-morbidities and drug treatment were found to predict higher direct costs, being employed was correlated with higher indirect costs, and thus with the onset age of the disease. Despite some differences among the selected studies, particularly with regard to indirect costs, all concur that HZ is a widespread disease which has a heavy social and economic burden. PMID:25483704

  15. Frequency-Shift Hearing Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed hearing aid maps spectrum of speech into band of lower frequencies at which ear remains sensitive. By redirecting normal speech frequencies into frequency band from 100 to 1,500 Hz, hearing aid allows people to understand normal conversation, including telephone calls. Principle operation of hearing aid adapted to other uses such as, clearing up noisy telephone or radio communication. In addition, loud-speakers more easily understood in presence of high background noise.

  16. Study on Electric field assisted low frequency (20 kHz) ultrasonic spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Ilkyeong; Seong, Baekhoon; Marten, Darmawan; Byun, Doyoung

    2015-11-01

    Ultrasonic spray is one of the fabulous techniques to discharge small size of droplets because it utilizes ultrasonic vibration on nozzle. However, spray patterns and size of ejected droplet is hardly controlled in conventional ultrasonic spray method. Therefore, here we present electric field assisted ultrasonic spray, which combined conventional technique with electric field in order to control spray pattern and droplet size precisely. Six kinds of various liquid (D.I water, Ethanol, Acetone, Iso-propanol, Toluene, Hexane) with various dielectric constants were used to investigate the mechanism of this method. Also, PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) was used and various variables were obtained including spray angle, amplitude of liquid vibration, current, and size distribution of ejected droplets. Our electric field assisted ultrasonic spray show that the standard deviation of atomized droplet was decreased up to 39.6%, and it shows the infinite possibility to be utilized in various applications which require precise control of high transfer efficiency. This work was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2014-023284).

  17. Medium, Long and Very Long Wave Propagation (at Frequencies Less than 3000 kHz)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    Alectrique de 15 km environ accord6e A la fr~quence d𔄀mission. L’Universiti de Paris utilise un 6metteur de I KW qui alimente l’antenne avec un courant...maxi- mum de 8 amperes. L’Aerospace Corporation utilise l’metteur TVLF, le courant d’antenne est alors compris entre 20 et 45 ampbres. Les...cepteur VLF da SCATHA utilise 2 antennas pour d~tecter lea composantes magn~tique at Alactrique des Amissions. La sensibilitA du r~captaur ast A 1.3 KHz

  18. A recirculating delayed self-heterodyne method using a Mach-Zehnder modulator for kHz-linewidth measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Shuo; Li, Min; Gao, Hongyun; Dai, Yawen

    2016-09-01

    A laser linewidth measurement method which uses a Mach-Zehnder electro-optic modulator (MZM) is proposed in a loss-compensated recirculating delayed self-heterodyne interferometer (LC-RDSHI). Compared with the traditional acousto-optic modulator (AOM), the electro-optic modulator has the merits of broader bandwidth, lower insertion loss, higher extinction ratio and thus, a wider application. A theoretical analysis shows that the power spectrum curve of the novel measurement system is a Lorentzian line, which fits well with experiment. The linewidth is measured to be 137 ± 7 kHz at a frequency shift of 4 GHz. Measurement of a distributed feedback Bragg (DFB) laser has manifested that the linewidth broadens from 98.5 kHz to 137.4 kHz as the operating temperature changes by 16 °C. This work will allow investigation of narrow linewidth semiconductor and fiber laser stability.

  19. Extended frequency turbofan model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, J. R.; Park, J. W.; Jaekel, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    The fan model was developed using two dimensional modeling techniques to add dynamic radial coupling between the core stream and the bypass stream of the fan. When incorporated into a complete TF-30 engine simulation, the fan model greatly improved compression system frequency response to planar inlet pressure disturbances up to 100 Hz. The improved simulation also matched engine stability limits at 15 Hz, whereas the one dimensional fan model required twice the inlet pressure amplitude to stall the simulation. With verification of the two dimensional fan model, this program formulated a high frequency F-100(3) engine simulation using row by row compression system characteristics. In addition to the F-100(3) remote splitter fan, the program modified the model fan characteristics to simulate a proximate splitter version of the F-100(3) engine.

  20. Controlled Study of 50 Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for the Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Benninger, David H.; Iseki, Kazumi; Kranick, Sarah; Luckenbaugh, David A.; Houdayer, Elise; Hallett, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the safety and efficacy of 50Hz repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation(rTMS) in the treatment of motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease(PD). Background Progression of PD is characterized by the emergence of motor deficits, which eventually respond less to dopaminergic therapy and pose a therapeutic challenge. RTMS has shown promising results in improving gait, a major cause of disability, and may provide a therapeutic alternative. Controlled studies suggest increasing stimulation frequency might enhance therapeutic efficacy. Methods In this randomized, double blind, sham-controlled study, we investigated safety and efficacy of 50Hz-rTMS of the motor cortices in 8sessions over 2weeks. Assessment of safety and clinical efficacy over a 1-month period included timed tests of gait and bradykinesia, UPDRS and additional clinical, neurophysiological and neuropsychological parameters. In addition, safety of 50Hz-rTMS was tested with EMG-EEG-monitoring during and after stimulation. Results We investigated 26 patients with mild to moderate PD: 13 received 50Hz-rTMS and 13 sham-stimulation. 50Hz-rTMS did not improve gait, bradykinesia, global and motor UPDRS, but there appeared a short-lived “on”-state improvement in activities of daily living (UPDRS II). 50Hz-rTMS lengthened the cortical silent period, but other neurophysiology and neuropsychological measures remained unchanged. EMG/EEG recorded no pathological increase of cortical excitability or epileptic activity. There were no adverse effects. Conclusion 50Hz-rTMS of the motor cortices appears safe, but fails to improve motor performance and functional status in PD. Prolonged stimulation or other techniques with rTMS might be more efficacious, but need to be established in future research. PMID:22593114

  1. Evaluation of potential health effects of 10 kHz magnetic fields: a rodent reproductive study.

    PubMed

    Dawson, B V; Robertson, I G; Wilson, W R; Zwi, L J; Boys, J T; Green, A W

    1998-01-01

    New technology involving the use of high-frequency inductive power distribution (HID) has recently been developed for use in materials handling and personnel transfer. Sinusoidal magnetic fields at a frequency of 10 kHz with field intensities of approximately 0.2 mT are generated directly between the current-carrying coils of this equipment. Effects of 10 kHz magnetic fields on cell division, migration, and differentiation have never been previously investigated. To evaluate potential effects on these parameters, a rodent reproductive study was undertaken using Wistar rats. Exposures were at 0.095, 0.24, and 0.95 mT with a background exposure of 5-10 microT. Three sets of parental rats were exposed continuously for 20-23.5 h/day to the fields: maternal rats during gestation, paternal rats for at least 45 days prior to mating and maternal rats 1 month prior to mating. Exposure phases thus covered spermatogenesis, maturation of the ovum and ovulation, fertilization, implantation, embryogenesis, organogenesis, and maturation of the fetus immediately prior to parturition. In all experiments pregnancy outcome was assessed. These studies failed to demonstrate any reproductive toxicity resulting from maternal or fetal exposure during gestation or following paternal or maternal exposure for several weeks prior to mating. No quantitative or qualitative effects on spermatogenesis occurred after exposure, and no effects on the estrous cycle or ovulation could be demonstrably linked to the 10 kHz magnetic field exposure at 0.095, 0.25, or 0.95 mT. Where possible, parental clinical chemistry and hematology were also examined. As in mouse toxicology studies previously reported, minor differences were observed between control and treated groups. These were regarded as statistically, but not biologically, significant and could not categorically be attributed to magnetic field exposure.

  2. Testing energy quantization at the level of 100 kHz by neutron crystal diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summhammer, J.

    1996-10-01

    For the study of energy quantization in low-frequency potentials and the accompanying quantum effects we analyze a silicon double-crystal arrangement exploiting dynamical diffraction of neutrons to achieve the required extremely high energy resolution. The first crystal prepares a minimum-uncertainty beam that passes a potential region whose influence on the neutron energy is analyzed by the second crystal. With realistic parameters, changes of neutron energy below 0.5 neV can be resolved. This permits a test of quantized energy transfer in periodically time-dependent potentials of a frequency below 100 kHz. We also discuss three specific examples how to observe the quantum phenomena arising from the macroscopic wave packets thereby generated.

  3. Space station 20-kHz power management and distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, I. G.; Sundberg, G. R.

    1986-01-01

    During the conceptual design phase a 20-kHz power distribution system was selected as the reference for the space station. The system is single-phase 400 VRMS, with a sinusoidal wave form. The initial user power level will be 75 kW with growth to 300 kW. The high-frequency system selection was based upon considerations of efficiency, weight, safety, ease of control, interface with computers, and ease of paralleling for growth. Each of these aspects will be discussed as well as the associated trade-offs involved. An advanced development program has been instituted to accelerate the maturation of the high-frequency system. Some technical aspects of the advanced development will be discussed.

  4. A broadband, capacitive, surface-micromachined, omnidirectional microphone with more than 200 kHz bandwidth.

    PubMed

    Kuntzman, Michael L; Hall, Neal A

    2014-06-01

    A surface micromachined microphone is presented with 230 kHz bandwidth. The structure uses a 2.25 μm thick, 315 μm radius polysilicon diaphragm suspended above an 11 μm gap to form a variable parallel-plate capacitance. The back cavity of the microphone consists of the 11 μm thick air volume immediately behind the moving diaphragm and also an extended lateral cavity with a radius of 504 μm. The dynamic frequency response of the sensor in response to electrostatic signals is presented using laser Doppler vibrometry and indicates a system compliance of 0.4 nm/Pa in the flat-band of the response. The sensor is configured for acoustic signal detection using a charge amplifier, and signal-to-noise ratio measurements and simulations are presented. A resolution of 0.80 mPa/√Hz (32 dB sound pressure level in a 1 Hz bin) is achieved in the flat-band portion of the response extending from 10 kHz to 230 kHz. The proposed sensor design is motivated by defense and intelligence gathering applications that require broadband, airborne signal detection.

  5. Brain oscillatory 4-35 Hz EEG responses during an n-back task with complex visual stimuli.

    PubMed

    Palomäki, Jussi; Kivikangas, Markus; Alafuzoff, Aleksander; Hakala, Tero; Krause, Christina M

    2012-05-10

    Brain oscillatory responses of 4-35 Hz EEG frequencies elicited during performance of a visual n-back task with complex visual stimuli were assessed in 20 adult volunteers. Spectral power changes were assessed separately for target and non-target stimuli in four different memory load conditions (0, 1, 2, and 3-back). The presentation of both target and non-target stimuli elicited long-lasting ~4-8 Hz power increases, which were more prominent at the beginning of stimulus onset during presentation of target stimuli, as compared to non-target stimuli, in the 0-back memory load condition. ~8-25 Hz power decreases appeared at stimulus onset. These power decreases were more prominent during the presentation of target stimuli, as compared to non-target stimuli, and their duration increased as a function of memory load between the 0-, 1-, and 2-back, but not the 3-back, memory load conditions. The current results provide further evidence in support of the notion of a complex interplay between both ~4-8 Hz power increases and ~8-25 Hz power decreases during cognitive memory task performance.

  6. 35 Hz shape memory alloy actuator with bending-twisting mode

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sung-Hyuk; Lee, Jang-Yeob; Rodrigue, Hugo; Choi, Ik-Seong; Kang, Yeon June; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) materials are widely used as an actuating source for bending actuators due to their high power density. However, due to the slow actuation speed of SMAs, there are limitations in their range of possible applications. This paper proposes a smart soft composite (SSC) actuator capable of fast bending actuation with large deformations. To increase the actuation speed of SMA actuator, multiple thin SMA wires are used to increase the heat dissipation for faster cooling. The actuation characteristics of the actuator at different frequencies are measured with different actuator lengths and results show that resonance can be used to realize large deformations up to 35 Hz. The actuation characteristics of the actuator can be modified by changing the design of the layered reinforcement structure embedded in the actuator, thus the natural frequency and length of an actuator can be optimized for a specific actuation speed. A model is used to compare with the experimental results of actuators with different layered reinforcement structure designs. Also, a bend-twist coupled motion using an anisotropic layered reinforcement structure at a speed of 10 Hz is also realized. By increasing their range of actuation characteristics, the proposed actuator extends the range of application of SMA bending actuators. PMID:26892438

  7. Reduction of dopamine synaptic activity: degradation of 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalization in rats.

    PubMed

    Ciucci, Michelle R; Ahrens, Allison M; Ma, Sean T; Kane, Jacqueline R; Windham, E Blake; Woodlee, Martin T; Schallert, Timothy

    2009-04-01

    Vocal deficits are prevalent and debilitating in Parkinson's disease. These deficits may be related to the initial pathology of the nigrostriatal dopamine neurons and resulting dopamine depletion, which contributes to dysfunction of fine motor control in multiple functions. Although vocalization in animals and humans may differ in many respects, we evaluated complex (50-kHz) ultrasonic mate calls in 2 rat models of Parkinson's disease, including unilateral infusions of 6-hydroxydopamine to the medial forebrain bundle and peripheral administration of a nonakinesia dose of the dopamine antagonist haloperidol. We examined the effects of these treatments on multiple aspects of the acoustic signal. The number of trill-like (frequency modulated) 50-kHz calls was significantly reduced, and appeared to be replaced by simpler (flat) calls. The bandwidth and maximum intensity of simple and frequency-modulated calls were significantly decreased, but call duration was not. Our findings suggest that the nigrostriatal dopamine pathway is involved to some extent in fine sensorimotor function that includes USV production and complexity.

  8. Quasi-periodic (~mHz) dayside auroral brightennings associated with high-speed solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, K.

    2013-12-01

    It has been reported that dayside auroral pulsations of a few mHz frequency can occur when variations of solar wind dynamic pressure at the same frequency appear. Magnetospheric compression/decompression is attributed to the auroral pulsations. Here we report another type of dayside auroral pulsations not associated with solar wind dynamic pressure changes by using global auroral images acquired from the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) on board the Polar satellite. From one periodic (~2 - 8 mHz) auroral event that occurred on February 8, 2000, it is found that the auroral enhancements covered most of the day (~05 - 16 MLT) sector and did not show a latitudinal dependence. Based on in situ particle data from DMSP SSJ/4, the brightennings were associated mainly with enhanced particle precipitations from the central plasma sheet (i.e., diffuse aurora). There was no geomagnetic pulsation on the ground and in the dawn sector of the magnetosheath as indicated by the Geotail measurements. While the auroral pulsations occurred during high solar wind speed (> 600 km/s), they commenced when the interplanetary magnetic field turned northward, suggesting the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability being a source of the pulsations. We will present detail analysis results and discuss other possible mechanisms in the context of current theories.

  9. 35 Hz shape memory alloy actuator with bending-twisting mode.

    PubMed

    Song, Sung-Hyuk; Lee, Jang-Yeob; Rodrigue, Hugo; Choi, Ik-Seong; Kang, Yeon June; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-02-19

    Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) materials are widely used as an actuating source for bending actuators due to their high power density. However, due to the slow actuation speed of SMAs, there are limitations in their range of possible applications. This paper proposes a smart soft composite (SSC) actuator capable of fast bending actuation with large deformations. To increase the actuation speed of SMA actuator, multiple thin SMA wires are used to increase the heat dissipation for faster cooling. The actuation characteristics of the actuator at different frequencies are measured with different actuator lengths and results show that resonance can be used to realize large deformations up to 35 Hz. The actuation characteristics of the actuator can be modified by changing the design of the layered reinforcement structure embedded in the actuator, thus the natural frequency and length of an actuator can be optimized for a specific actuation speed. A model is used to compare with the experimental results of actuators with different layered reinforcement structure designs. Also, a bend-twist coupled motion using an anisotropic layered reinforcement structure at a speed of 10 Hz is also realized. By increasing their range of actuation characteristics, the proposed actuator extends the range of application of SMA bending actuators.

  10. The 67 Hz Feature in the Black Hole Candidate GRS 1915+105 as a Possible Diskoseismic Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowak, Michael A.; Wagoner, Robert V.; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Lehr, Dana E.

    1997-01-01

    The Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer has made feasible for the first time the search for high-frequency (greater than or equal to 100 Hz) periodic features in Black Hole Candidate (BHC) systems. Such a feature, with a 67 Hz frequency, recently has been discovered in the BHC GRS 1915+105 (Morgan, Remillard, & Greiner). This feature is weak (rms variability approx. 0.3%-1.6%), stable in frequency (to within approx. 2 Hz) despite appreciable luminosity fluctuations, and narrow (quality factor Q approx. 20). Several of these properties are what one expects for a 'diskoseismic' g-mode in an accretion disk about a 10.6 M(solar mass) (nonrotating) to 36.3 M(solar mass) (maximally rotating) black hole (if we are observing the fundamental-mode frequency). We explore this possibility by considering the expected luminosity modulation, as well as possible excitation and growth mechanisms-including turbulent excitation, damping, and 'negative' radiation damping. We conclude that a diskoseismic interpretation of the observations is viable.

  11. Calcium protects differentiating neuroblastoma cells during 50 Hz electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Tonini, R; Baroni, M D; Masala, E; Micheletti, M; Ferroni, A; Mazzanti, M

    2001-11-01

    Despite growing concern about electromagnetic radiation, the interaction between 50- to 60-Hz fields and biological structures remains obscure. Epidemiological studies have failed to prove a significantly correlation between exposure to radiation fields and particular pathologies. We demonstrate that a 50- to 60-Hz magnetic field interacts with cell differentiation through two opposing mechanisms: it antagonizes the shift in cell membrane surface charges that occur during the early phases of differentiation and it modulates hyperpolarizing K channels by increasing intracellular Ca. The simultaneous onset of both mechanisms prevents alterations in cell differentiation. We propose that cells are normally protected against electromagnetic insult. Pathologies may arise, however, if intracellular Ca regulation or K channel activation malfunctions.

  12. Two different mechanisms associated with ripple-like oscillations (100-250 Hz) in the human epileptic subiculum in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Rojas, C; Huberfeld, G; Baulac, M; Clemenceau, S; Charpier, S; Miles, R; Menendez de la Prida, L; Le Van Quyen, M

    2015-01-01

    Transient high-frequency oscillations (150-600 Hz) in local field potential generated by human hippocampal and parahippocampal areas have been related to both physiological and pathological processes. The cellular basis and effects of normal and abnormal forms of high-frequency oscillations (HFO) has been controversial. Here, we searched for HFOs in slices of the subiculum prepared from human hippocampal tissue resected for treatment of pharmacoresistant epilepsy. HFOs occurred spontaneously in extracellular field potentials during interictal discharges (IID) and also during pharmacologically induced preictal discharges (PID) preceding ictal-like events. While most of these events might be considered pathological since they invaded the fast ripple band (>250 Hz), others were spectrally similar to physiological ripples (150-250 Hz). Do similar cellular mechanisms underly IID-ripples and PID-ripples? Are ripple-like oscillations a valid proxy of epileptogenesis in human TLE? With combined intra- or juxta-cellular and extracellular recordings, we showed that, despite overlapping spectral components, ripple-like IID and PID oscillations were associated with different cellular and synaptic mechanisms. IID-ripples were associated with rhythmic GABAergic and glutamatergic synaptic potentials with moderate neuronal firing. In contrast, PID-ripples were associated with depolarizing synaptic inputs frequently reaching the threshold for bursting in most cells. Thus ripple-like oscillations (100-250 Hz) in the human epileptic hippocampus are associated with different mechanisms for synchrony reflecting distinct dynamic changes in inhibition and excitation during interictal and pre-ictal states. PMID:25448920

  13. Surface gravity waves and their acoustic signatures, 1-30 Hz, on the mid-Pacific sea floor.

    PubMed

    Farrell, W E; Munk, Walter

    2013-10-01

    In 1999, Duennebier et al. deployed a hydrophone and geophone below the conjugate depth in the abyssal Pacific, midway between Hawaii and California. Real time data were transmitted for 3 yr over an abandoned ATT cable. These data have been analyzed in the frequency band 1 to 30 Hz. Between 1 and 6 Hz, the bottom data are interpreted as acoustic radiation from surface gravity waves, an extension to higher frequencies of a non-linear mechanism proposed by Longuet-Higgins in 1950 to explain microseisms. The inferred surface wave spectrum for wave lengths between 6 m and 17 cm is saturated (wind-independent) and roughly consistent with the traditional Phillips κ(-4) wave number spectrum. Shorter ocean waves have a strong wind dependence and a less steep wave number dependence. Similar features are found in the bottom record between 6 and 30 Hz. But this leads to an enigma: The derived surface spectrum inferred from the Longuet-Higgins mechanism with conventional assumptions for the dispersion relation is associated with mean square slopes that greatly exceed those derived from glitter. Regardless of the generation mechanism, the measured bottom intensities between 10 and 30 Hz are well below minimum noise standards reported in the literature.

  14. The strain in the array is mainly in the plane (waves below ~1 Hz)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.; Pavlis, G.; Bodin, P.

    1999-01-01

    We compare geodetic and single-station methods of measuring dynamic deformations and characterize their causes in the frequency bands 0.5-1.0 Hz and 4.0-8.0 Hz. The geodetic approach utilizes data from small-aperture seismic arrays, applying techniques from geodesy. It requires relatively few assumptions and a priori information. The single-station method uses ground velocities recorded at isolated or single stations and assumes all the deformation is due to plane-wave propagation. It also requires knowledge of the azimuth and horizontal velocity of waves arriving at the recording station. Data employed come from a small-aperture, dense seismic array deployed in Geyokcha, Turkmenistan, and include seismograms recorded by broadband STS2 and short-period L28 sensors. Poor agreement between geodetic and single-station estimates in the 4.0-8.0 Hz passband indicates that the displacement field may vary nonlinearly with distance over distances of ~50 m. STS2 geodetic estimates provide a robust standard in the 0.5-1.0 Hz passband because they appear to be computationally stable and require fewer assumptions than single-station estimates. The agreement between STS2 geodetic estimates and single-station L28 estimates is surprisingly good for the S-wave and early surface waves, suggesting that the single-station analysis should be useful with commonly available data. These results indicate that, in the 0.5 to 1.0 Hz passband, the primary source of dynamic deformation is plane-wave propagation along great-circle source-receiver paths. For later arriving energy, the effects of scattering become important. The local structure beneath the array exerts a strong control on the geometry of the dynamic deformation, implying that it may be difficult to infer source characteristics of modern or paleoearthquakes from indicators of dynamic deformations. However, strong site control also suggests that the dynamic deformations may be predictable, which would be useful for engineering

  15. Upper Limits on a Stochastic Gravitational-Wave Background Using LIGO and Virgo Interferometers at 600-1000 Hz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M. C.; Aston, S. M.; Blackburn, L.; Cannizzo, J.

    2012-01-01

    A stochastic background of gravitational waves is expected to arise from a superposition of many incoherent sources of gravitational waves, of either cosmological or astrophysical origin. This background is a target for the current generation of ground-based detectors. In this article we present the first joint search for a stochastic background using data from the LIGO and Virgo interferometers. In a frequency band of 600-1000 Hz, we obtained a 95% upper limit on the amplitude of omega(sub GW)(f) = omega(sub 3) (f/900Hz)3, of omega(sub 3) < 0.33, assuming a value of the Hubble parameter of h(sub 100) = 0.72. These new limits are a factor of seven better than the previous best in this frequency band.

  16. Effects of spatial selective attention on the steady-state visual evoked potential in the 20-28 Hz range.

    PubMed

    Müller, M M; Picton, T W; Valdes-Sosa, P; Riera, J; Teder-Sälejärvi, W A; Hillyard, S A

    1998-04-01

    Steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) were recorded from the scalp of subjects who attended to a flickering LED display in one visual field while ignoring a similar display (flickering at a different frequency) in the opposite visual field. The flicker frequencies were 20.8 Hz in the left-field display and 27.8 Hz in the right-field display. The SSVEP to the flicker in either field was enhanced in amplitude when attention was directed to its location. The scalp distribution of this SSVEP enhancement was narrowly focused over the posterior scalp contralateral to the visual field of stimulation. A source analysis using Variable Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (VARETA) indicated that the source current densities for the SSVEP attention effect had a focal origin in the contralateral parieto-occipital cortex.

  17. Ultralow-frequency-noise stabilization of a laser by locking to an optical fiber-delay line.

    PubMed

    Kéfélian, Fabien; Jiang, Haifeng; Lemonde, Pierre; Santarelli, Giorgio

    2009-04-01

    We report the frequency stabilization of an erbium-doped fiber distributed-feedback laser using an all-fiber-based Michelson interferometer of large arm imbalance. The interferometer uses a 1 km SMF-28 optical fiber spool and an acousto-optic modulator allowing heterodyne detection. The frequency-noise power spectral density is reduced by more than 40 dB for Fourier frequencies ranging from 1 Hz to 10 kHz, corresponding to a level well below 1 Hz2/Hz over the entire range; it reaches 10(-2) Hz2/Hz at 1 kHz. Between 40 Hz and 30 kHz, the frequency noise is shown to be comparable to the one obtained by Pound-Drever-Hall locking to a high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity. Locking to a fiber delay line could consequently represent a reliable, simple, and compact alternative to cavity stabilization for short-term linewidth reduction.

  18. A high frequency silicon pressure sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahng, S. K.; Gross, C.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical and design considerations as well as fabrication and experimental work involved in the development of high-frequency silicon pressure sensors with an ultra-small diaphragm are discussed. A sensor is presented with a rectangular diaphragm of 0.0127 cm x 0.0254 cm x 1.06 micron; the sensor has a natural frequency of 625 kHz and a sensitivity of 0.82 mv/v-psi. High-frequency results from shock tube testing and low-frequency (less than 50 kHz) comparison with microphones are given.

  19. 47 CFR 90.214 - Transient frequency behavior.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....0 ms 25.0 ms t3 4 ±25.0 kHz 5.0 ms 10.0 ms Transient Frequency Behavior for Equipment Designed to Operate on 12.5 kHz Channels t1 4 ±12.5 kHz 5.0 ms 10.0 ms t2 ±6.25 kHz 20.0 ms 25.0 ms t3 4 ±12.5 kHz 5.0... ±6.25 kHz 5.0 ms 10.0 ms t2 ±3.125 kHz 20.0 ms 25.0 ms t3 4 ±6.25 kHz 5.0 ms 10.0 ms 1 on is...

  20. 47 CFR 90.214 - Transient frequency behavior.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ....0 ms 25.0 ms t3 4 ±25.0 kHz 5.0 ms 10.0 ms Transient Frequency Behavior for Equipment Designed to Operate on 12.5 kHz Channels t1 4 ±12.5 kHz 5.0 ms 10.0 ms t2 ±6.25 kHz 20.0 ms 25.0 ms t3 4 ±12.5 kHz 5.0... ±6.25 kHz 5.0 ms 10.0 ms t2 ±3.125 kHz 20.0 ms 25.0 ms t3 4 ±6.25 kHz 5.0 ms 10.0 ms 1 on is...

  1. Suggestions for Curriculum Development [And] Handbook High School Grades, Part D, 10-12. Environmental Education Interdependence: A Concept Approach. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, David C.; Wood, Jayne Millar

    Two booklets comprise the grades 10-12 component of a series of guides for incorporating environmental education into the existing curriculum. The guide and handbook emphasize a multidisciplinary approach, use the concept of interdependence as an organizing theme, and offer suggestions for using the local community as a resource. The guide…

  2. A 1.6-kW, 110-kHz dc-dc converter optimized for IGBT's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Keming; Stuart, Thomas A.

    1993-01-01

    A full bridge dc-dc converter using a zero-current and zero-voltage switching technique is described. This circuit utilizes the characteristics of the IGBT to achieve power and frequency combinations that are much higher than previously reported for this device. Experimental results are included for a 1.6-kW, 110-kHz converter with 95 percent efficiency.

  3. Postural effect on respiratory sinus arrhythmia with various respiratory frequencies.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, H

    1996-03-01

    Heart rate variations during steady state respiration with various frequencies were studied on seven healthy male students at two different body positions. Respiration was controlled at four different frequencies (0.083, 0.100, 0.200, 0.250Hz), and the tidal volume was simultaneously controlled at 1500ml (0.083, 0.100Hz) or 1000ml (0.200, 0.250Hz). A tilting bed was used for changing body position, and the measurements were conducted at horizontal and vertical position. RSA (respiratory sinus arrhythmia) amplitude at 0.250Hz was significantly decreased at vertical position compared with horizontal position. At 0.200Hz the significant decrease could not be obtained although some tendency of decrease appeared. Contrary to these high frequencies, the amplitudes at low frequencies (0.083, 0.100Hz) were significantly increased (p < 0.01) during vertical position. This postural effect on the low frequency RSA could be regarded as a similar result on MWSA (Mayer wave relate sinus arrhythmia) which reflects sympathetic nervous activity. Furthermore, the ratio between the amplitude at 0.100Hz and that at 0.250Hz was significantly correlated with mean heart rate (n = 56, r = 0.73). From these results it was assumed that the RSA amplitude at low frequency associate a with not only parasympathetic nerves but also sympathetic nerves whereas the amplitude at high frequency was solely mediated by parasympathetic nerves.

  4. Performance of a 260 Hz pulse tube cooler with metal fiber as the regenerator material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaotao; Zhang, Shuang; Yu, Guoyao; Dai, Wei; Luo, Ercang

    2014-01-01

    Pulse tube coolers operating at higher frequency lead to a high energy density and result in a more compact system. This paper describes the performance of a 300 Hz pulse tube cooler driven by a linear compressor. Such high frequency operation leads to decreased thermal penetration, which requires a smaller hydraulic diameter and smaller wire diameter in the regenerator. In our previous experiments, the stainless steel mesh with a mesh number of 635 was used as the regenerator material, and a no-load temperature of 63 K was obtained. Both the numerical and experimental results indicate this material causes a large loss in the regenerator. A stainless steel fiber regenerator is introduced and studied in this article. Because this fiber has a wide range of wire diameter and porosity, such material might be more suitable for higher frequency pulse tube coolers. With the fiber as the regenerator material and after a series of optimizations, a no-load temperature of 45 K is acquired in the experiment. Influences of various parameters such as frequency and inertance tube length have been investigated experimentally.

  5. A simple electrical lumped-element model simulates intra-cochlear sound pressures and cochlear impedance below 2 kHz.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, Torsten; Hensel, Johannes

    2013-11-01

    Low-frequency sounds displace large parts of the basilar membrane (BM) and can have a modulating and possibly disturbing effect on hearing at other frequencies. A better understanding of the transfer of such sounds onto the BM is therefore desirable. Lumped-element models have previously been employed to determine the low-frequency acoustic properties of the cochlea. Although helpful in illustrating schematically the role of the helicotrema, BM compliance, and the round window on low-frequency hearing, these models, when applied quantitatively, have not been able to explain experimental data in detail. Building on these models, an extended electrical analog requires just 13 lumped elements to capture, in surprising detail, the physiologically determined frequency-dependence of intra-cochlear pressure and cochlear impedance between 10 Hz and 2 kHz. The model's verification is based on data from cat, guinea pig, and humans, who differ principally in their low-frequency cochlear acoustics. The modeling data suggest that damping within the helicotrema plays a less prominent role than previously assumed. A resonance feature, which is often observed experimentally near 150 Hz in these animals and near 50 Hz in humans, is presumably a phenomenon local to the apex and not the result of a standing wave between stapes and helicotrema.

  6. A laser-cooled cesium fountain frequency standard and a measurement of the frequency shift due to ultra-cold collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibble, Kurt; Kasapi, Steven; Chu, Steven

    1993-01-01

    A frequency standard based on an atomic fountain of cesium atoms may have an accuracy of 10(exp -16) due to longer interaction times and smaller anticipated systematic errors. All of the known systematic effects that now limit the accuracy of the Cs frequency standard increase either linearly or as some higher power of the atom's velocity. The one systematic frequency shift which is dramatically different is the frequency shift due to the collisions between the laser cooled atoms. At a temperature of a few micro-K, the de Broglie wavelength (lambda(sub deB) = h/p, where h is Planck's constant and p is the momentum of the atom) is much larger than the scale of the interatomic potential. Under these conditions the collision cross sections can be as large as (lambda(sub deB)(sup 2))/Pi and the frequency shift due to these collisions was recently calculated. In our Cs atomic fountain, we laser cooled and trapped 10(exp 10) Cs atoms in 0.4 s. By shifting the frequencies of the laser beams, the atoms were launched upwards at 2.5 m/s and a fraction of the atoms were optically pumped into the F=3 ground state. The unwanted atoms in the F=4 ground state were removed from the fountain with radiation pressure from a laser beam tuned to excite only those atoms. The Cs atoms in the F=3 state traveled ballistically upwards, were excited by the microwave cavity, and then returned back through the same cavity in the atomic fountain configuration. By varying the cold atom density, a density dependent shift of -12.9 +/- 0.7 mHz or -1.4 x 10-12 for an average fountain density of (2.7 +/- 1.5) 10(exp 9) atoms/cm(sup 3) was measured.

  7. Synthetic aperture acoustic imaging of canonical targets with a 2-15 kHz linear FM chirp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignola, Joseph F.; Judge, John A.; Good, Chelsea E.; Bishop, Steven S.; Gugino, Peter M.; Soumekh, Mehrdad

    2011-06-01

    Synthetic aperture image reconstruction applied to outdoor acoustic recordings is presented. Acoustic imaging is an alternate method having several military relevant advantages such as being immune to RF jamming, superior spatial resolution, capable of standoff side and forward-looking scanning, and relatively low cost, weight and size when compared to 0.5 - 3 GHz ground penetrating radar technologies. Synthetic aperture acoustic imaging is similar to synthetic aperture radar, but more akin to synthetic aperture sonar technologies owing to the nature of longitudinal or compressive wave propagation in the surrounding acoustic medium. The system's transceiver is a quasi mono-static microphone and audio speaker pair mounted on a rail 5meters in length. Received data sampling rate is 80 kHz with a 2- 15 kHz Linear Frequency Modulated (LFM) chirp, with a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 10 Hz and an inter-pulse period (IPP) of 50 milliseconds. Targets are positioned within the acoustic scene at slant range of two to ten meters on grass, dirt or gravel surfaces, and with and without intervening metallic chain link fencing. Acoustic image reconstruction results in means for literal interpretation and quantifiable analyses. A rudimentary technique characterizes acoustic scatter at the ground surfaces. Targets within the acoustic scene are first digitally spotlighted and further processed, providing frequency and aspect angle dependent signature information.

  8. Design and performance of a 250 Hz alexandrite laser

    SciTech Connect

    Sam, R.C.; Yeh, J.J.; Leslie, K.R.; Rapoport, W.R.

    1988-06-01

    The design, analysis, and performance of a 250 Hz alexandrite laser are described. Built as the wavelength selective laser for a molecular laser isotope separation program, the laser has to satisfy specifications on its tuning band, linewidth, output energy, temporal behavior, and repetition rate required by the process. The key design feature is the use of a tandem rod oscillator with concave curvature on rod ends for thermal lensing compensation. A model was developed to project the stability range and beam quality relative to repetition rate. The performance results of a delivered system are presented and future developments are discussed.

  9. 1-kHz-repetition-rate femtosecond Raman laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenko, N. V.; Konyashchenko, A. V.; Kostryukov, P. V.; Losev, L. L.; Pazyuk, V. S.; Tenyakov, S. Yu

    2016-07-01

    A femtosecond Raman laser utilising compressed hydrogen is experimentally investigated under pumping by radiation from a 1-kHz-repetition-rate Ti : sapphire laser. In the regime of double-pulse pumping, the conditions are determined, which correspond to the minimal energy dispersion of Stokes pulses. The optical scheme is realised, which is capable of ensuring the long-term stability of the average power of the first Stokes component with a variation of less than 2%. The Stokes pulses are produced with a pulse duration of 60 fs and energy of 0.26 mJ at a conversion efficiency of 14%.

  10. Frequencies of Inaudible High-Frequency Sounds Differentially Affect Brain Activity: Positive and Negative Hypersonic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Ariko; Yagi, Reiko; Kawai, Norie; Honda, Manabu; Nishina, Emi; Oohashi, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    The hypersonic effect is a phenomenon in which sounds containing significant quantities of non-stationary high-frequency components (HFCs) above the human audible range (max. 20 kHz) activate the midbrain and diencephalon and evoke various physiological, psychological and behavioral responses. Yet important issues remain unverified, especially the relationship existing between the frequency of HFCs and the emergence of the hypersonic effect. In this study, to investigate the relationship between the hypersonic effect and HFC frequencies, we divided an HFC (above 16 kHz) of recorded gamelan music into 12 band components and applied them to subjects along with an audible component (below 16 kHz) to observe changes in the alpha2 frequency component (10–13 Hz) of spontaneous EEGs measured from centro-parieto-occipital regions (Alpha-2 EEG), which we previously reported as an index of the hypersonic effect. Our results showed reciprocal directional changes in Alpha-2 EEGs depending on the frequency of the HFCs presented with audible low-frequency component (LFC). When an HFC above approximately 32 kHz was applied, Alpha-2 EEG increased significantly compared to when only audible sound was applied (positive hypersonic effect), while, when an HFC below approximately 32 kHz was applied, the Alpha-2 EEG decreased (negative hypersonic effect). These findings suggest that the emergence of the hypersonic effect depends on the frequencies of inaudible HFC. PMID:24788141

  11. Discussion of human resonant frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownjohn, James M. W.; Zheng, Xiahua

    2001-06-01

    Human bodies are often exposed to vertical vibrations when they are in the workplace or on vehicles. Prolonged exposure may cause undue stress and discomfort in the human body especially at its resonant frequency. By testing the response of the human body on a vibrating platform, many researchers found the human whole-body fundamental resonant frequency to be around 5 Hz. However, in recent years, an indirect method has been prosed which appears to increase the resonant frequency to approximately 10 Hz. To explain this discrepancy, experimental work was carried out in NTU. The study shows that the discrepancy lies in the vibration magnitude used in the tests. A definition of human natural frequency in terms of vibration magnitude is proposed.

  12. Digitally enhanced optical fiber frequency reference.

    PubMed

    McRae, Terry G; Ngo, Silvie; Shaddock, Daniel A; Hsu, Magnus T L; Gray, Malcolm B

    2014-04-01

    We use digitally enhanced heterodyne interferometry to measure the stability of optical fiber laser frequency references. Suppression of laser frequency noise by over four orders of magnitude is achieved using post processing time delay interferometry, allowing us to measure the mechanical stability for frequencies as low as 100 μHz. The performance of the digitally enhanced heterodyne interferometer platform used here is not practically limited by the dynamic range or bandwidth issues that can occur in feedback stabilization systems. This allows longer measurement times, better frequency discrimination, a reduction in spatially uncorrelated noise sources and an increase in interferometer sensitivity. An optical fiber frequency reference with the stability reported here, over a signal band of 20 mHz-1 Hz, has potential for use in demanding environments, such as space-based interferometry missions and optical flywheel applications.

  13. A novel 24-kHz resonant scanner for high-resolution laser display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, Steffen; Kaufmann, Christian; Hahn, Ramon; Mehner, Jan; Doetzel, Wolfram; Gessner, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    This contribution deals with design, fabrication and test of a micromachined resonant scanner usable for horizontal deflection of the laser beam in a projection display. The electrostatically driven plate is separated from the mirror in order to reduce air damping and electrostatic non linearity. The device consists of a circularly shaped mirror which is suspended by torsion beams in the center of an elastically suspended driving plate. A resonator with two rotational degrees of freedom is arranged in this way. The rotation axes of mirror and driving plate are the same. A suitable design of the properties of the two degrees of freedom resonator leads to a significant amplification of the oscillation of the mirror compared to the oscillation of the driving plate. The first resonant mode is a rotation of both plates with nearly the same magnitude at a frequency of approx. 5 kHz. The second mode with paraphase deflection at 24 kHz shows a deflection amplification by a ratio of 53 and is used for scanning operation. A supporting part made of glass carries two electrodes in the region of the driving plate and has a micro sandblasted hole beneath the mirror. Bulk micromachining KOH wet etching of the electrode gap size on the back side of the driving plate, reactive ion etching for contour shaping of the mirror, of the driving plate and of the torsion beams and anodic bonding have been used for fabrication of the mechanical structure. The mirror is evaporated by an aluminum layer. Applying a voltage of 380V results in a mechanical deflection of +/- 5.5 degrees at 24 kHz at atmosphere pressure. The device shows very small dynamic warp (<100nm) of the mirror plate even though the relatively large size of 2.2 mm diameter because of the thickness of 280 μm. The measured mechanical Q-factor is 5100.

  14. Slip-stacking Dynamics and the 20 Hz Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Eldred, Jeffery; Zwaska, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Slip-stacking is an accumulation technique used at Fermilab since 2004 which nearly doubles the proton intensity. The Proton Improvement Plan II intensity upgrades require a reduction in slip-stacking losses by approximately a factor of 2. We study the single-particle dynamics that determine the stability of slip-stacking particles. We introduce universal area factors to calculate the available phase space area for any set of beam parameters without individual simulation. We show the particle loss as a function of time. We calculate the injection efficiency as a function of longitudinal emittance and aspect-ratio. We demonstrate that the losses from RF single particle dynamics can be reduced by a factor of 4-10 (depending on beam parameters) by upgrading the Fermilab Booster from a 15-Hz cycle-rate to a 20-Hz cycle-rate. We recommend a change in injection scheme to eliminate the need for a greater momentum aperture in the Fermilab Recycler.

  15. Endocrinological effects of strong 60-Hz electric fields on rats

    SciTech Connect

    Free, M.J.; Kaune, W.T.; Phillips, R.D.; Cheng, H.C.

    1981-01-01

    Adult male rats were exposed or sham-exposed to 60-Hz electric fields without spark discharges, ozone, or significant levels or other secondary variables. No effects were discharges, ozone, or significant levels of other secondary variables. No effects were observed on body weights or plasma hormone levels after 30 days of exposure at an effective field strength of 68 kV/m. After 120 days of exposure (effective field strength = 64 kV/m), effects were inconsistent, with signficant reductions in body weight and plasma levels of follicle-stimulating hormone and corticosterone occurring in one replicate experiment but not in the other. Plasma testosterone levels were significantly reduced after 120 days of exposure in one experiment, with a similar but not statistically significant reduction in a replicate experiment. Weanling rats, exposed or sham-exposed in electric fields with an effective field strength of 80 kV/m from 20 to 56 days of age, exhibited identical or closely similar growth trends in body and organ weights. Hormone levels in exposed and sham-exposed groups were also similar. However, there was an apparent phase shift between the two groups in the cyclic variations of concentrations of hormones at different stages of development, particularly with respect to follicle-stimulating hormone and corticosterone. We concluded that 60-Hz electric fields may bring about subtle changes in the endocrine system of rats, and that these changes may be related to alterations in episodic rhythms.

  16. Low frequency split cycle cryocooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bian, S. X.; Zhang, Y. D.; Wan, W. W.; Wang, L.; Hu, Q. C.

    1985-01-01

    A split cycle Stirling cryocooler with two different drive motors and operating at a low drive frequency can have high thermodynamic efficiency. The temperature of the cold end of the cryocooler varies with drive frequency, voltage of the input electrical power and initial charge pressure values. The cryocooler operating at 8 Hz can provide 7 watts of refrigeration at 77 K for 230 watts of electrical input power.

  17. FPGA implementation of high-frequency multiple PWM for variable voltage variable frequency controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boumaaraf, Abdelâali; Mohamadi, Tayeb; Gourmat, Laïd

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present the FPGA implementation of the multiple pulse width modulation (MPWM) signal generation with repetition of data segments, applied to the variable frequency variable voltage systems and specially at to the photovoltaic water pumping system, in order to generate a signal command very easily between 10hz to 60 hz with a small frequency and reduce the cost of the control system.

  18. Design and testing of 45 kV, 50 kHz pulse power supply for dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Surender Kumar; Shyam, Anurag

    2016-10-01

    The design, construction, and testing of high frequency, high voltage pulse power supply are reported. The purpose of the power supply is to generate dielectric barrier discharges for industrial applications. The power supply is compact and has the advantage of low cost, over current protection, and convenient control for voltage and frequency selection. The power supply can generate high voltage pulses of up to 45 kV at the repetitive frequency range of 1 kHz-50 kHz with 1.2 kW input power. The output current of the power supply is limited to 500 mA. The pulse rise time and fall time are less than 2 μs and the pulse width is 2 μs. The power supply is short circuit proof and can withstand variable plasma load conditions. The power supply mainly consists of a half bridge series resonant converter to charge an intermediate capacitor, which discharges through a step-up transformer at high frequency to generate high voltage pulses. Semiconductor switches and amorphous cores are used for power modulation at higher frequencies. The power supply is tested with quartz tube dielectric barrier discharge load and worked stably. The design details and the performance of the power supply on no load and dielectric barrier discharge load are presented.

  19. Psychophysical tuning curves at very high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Ifat; Plack, Christopher J.

    2005-10-01

    For most normal-hearing listeners, absolute thresholds increase rapidly above about 16 kHz. One hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of the hearing-threshold curve is imposed by the transmission characteristics of the middle ear, which attenuates the sound input [Masterton et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 45, 966-985 (1969)]. An alternative hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of hearing is imposed by the tonotopicity of the cochlea [Ruggero and Temchin, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 13206-13210 (2002)]. The aim of this study was to test these hypotheses. Forward-masked psychophysical tuning curves (PTCs) were derived for signal frequencies of 12-17.5 kHz. For the highest signal frequencies, the high-frequency slopes of some PTCs were steeper than the slope of the hearing-threshold curve. The results also show that the human auditory system displays frequency selectivity for characteristic frequencies (CFs) as high as 17 kHz, above the frequency at which absolute thresholds begin to increase rapidly. The findings suggest that, for CFs up to 17 kHz, the high-frequency limitation in humans is imposed in part by the middle-ear attenuation, and not by the tonotopicity of the cochlea.

  20. Epilepsy and electromagnetic fields: effects of simulated atmospherics and 100-Hz magnetic fields on audiogenic seizure in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juutilainen, J.; Björk, E.; Saali, K.

    1988-03-01

    In order to study the possible association between epileptic seizures and natural electromagnetic fields, 32 female audiogenic seizure (AGS)-susceptible rats were exposed to simulated 10 kHz and 28 kHz atmospherics and to a sinusoidally oscillating magnetic field with a frequency of 100 Hz and field strength of 1 A/m. After the electromagnetic exposure, seizures were induced in the rats with a sound stimulus. The severity of the seizure was determined on an ordinal scale, the audiogenic response score (ARS). The time from the beginning of the sound stimulus to the onset of the seizure (seizure latency) and the duration of the convulsion was measured. No differences from the control experiments were found in the experiments with simulated atmospherics, but the 100 Hz magnetic field increased the seizure latency by about 13% ( P<0.02). The results do not support the hypothesis that natural atmospheric electromagnetic signals could affect the onset of epileptic seizures, but they suggest that AGS-susceptible rats may be a useful model for studying the biological effects of electromagnetic fields.

  1. Are the kHz QPO Lags in Neutron Star 4U 1608-52 due to Reverberation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cackett, Edward M.

    2016-08-01

    X-ray reverberation lags have recently been discovered in both active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and black hole X-ray binaries. A recent study of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) 4U 1608-52 has also shown significant lags, whose properties hint at a reverberation origin. Here, we adapt general relativistic ray tracing impulse response functions used to model X-ray reverberation in AGNs for neutron star LMXBs. Assuming that relativistic reflection forms the broad iron line and associated reflection continuum, we use reflection fits to the energy spectrum along with the impulse response functions to calculate the expected lags as a function of energy over the range of observed kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequencies in 4U 1608-52. We find that the lag energy spectrum is expected to increase with increasing energy above 8 keV, while the observed lags in 4U 1608-52 show the opposite behavior. This demonstrates that the lags in the lower kHz QPO of 4U 1608-52 are not solely due to reverberation. We do note, however, that the models appear to be more consistent with the much flatter lag energy spectrum observed in the upper kHz QPO of several neutron star LMXBs, suggesting that lower and upper kHz QPOs may have different origins.

  2. Are the kHz QPO lags in neutron star 4U 1608-52 due to reverberation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cackett, Edward

    2016-04-01

    X-ray reverberation lags have recently been discovered in both active galactic nuclei (AGN) and black hole X-ray binaries. A recent study of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1608-52 has also shown significant lags, whose properties hint at a reverberation origin. Here, we adapt general relativistic ray tracing impulse response functions used to model X-ray reverberation in AGN for neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries, and calculate the expected lags as a function of energy over the range of observed kHz QPO frequencies in 4U 1608-52. We find that the lag energy spectrum is expected to increase with increasing energy above 8 keV, while the observed lags in 4U 1608-52 show the opposite behavior. This demonstrates that the lags in the lower kHz QPO of 4U 1608-52 are not solely due to reverberation. We do note, however, that the models appear to be more consistent with the much flatter lag energy spectrum observed in the upper kHz QPO of several neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries, suggesting that lower and upper kHz QPOs may have different origins.

  3. The Nature of the mHz X-ray QPOs from the Ultraluminous X-ray Source M82 X-1: Timing-Spectral (anti)-correlation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranga Reddy Pasham, Dheeraj; Strohmayer, T. E.

    2013-04-01

    We have analyzed all archival XMM-Newton observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1 in order to search for a correlation between its mHz quasiperiodic oscillation (QPO) frequency and energy spectral power-law index. These quantities are known to correlate in stellar mass black holes (StMBHs) exhibiting so-called Type-C QPOs. The detection of a similar relation in M82 X-1 would strengthen the identification of its mHz QPOs as Type-C and thus enable more reliable mass estimates by scaling of the QPO frequencies in X-1 to those of Type-C QPOs in StMBHs of known mass. We used surface brightness modeling to estimate the count rates produced by X-1 and a nearby (5'') bright source that can contribute substantial flux in XMM-Newton's 15'' (HPD) beam. We thus identify the observations in which M82 X-1 is at least as bright as the nearby source. In these observations we detect mHz QPOs with centroid frequencies spanning the range from 36 mHz to 210 mHz (the lowest and the highest yet reported from X-1). We model the 3-10 keV spectrum and find that the power-law index changes significantly from 1.7 - 2.2 during these observations. With all observations included we find evidence for an anti-correlation between the centroid frequency of the mHz QPOs and the power-law index. The value of the Pearson's correlation coefficient is -0.95. While such an anti-correlation is observed in StMBHs at high Type-C QPO frequencies (5-15 Hz), the frequency range over which it holds in StMBHs is significantly smaller (factor of 1-3) than the QPO range now reported here for X-1, which varies over a factor of 5.8 (36-210 mHz). However, we note that the correlation hinges on the observation with the lowest inferred energy spectral index and for which the fitted count rate ratio of X-1 to the nearby source is 1.1. So the implied anti-correlation needs to be confirmed with either less ``contaminated" observations or higher angular resolution spectral measurements made in tandem

  4. Optimization of EEG frequency bands for improved diagnosis of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Elgendi, Mohamed; Vialatte, Francois; Cichocki, Andrzej; Latchoumane, Charles; Jeong, Jaesung; Dauwels, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Many clinical studies have shown that electroencephalograms (EEG) of Alzheimer patients (AD) often have an abnormal power spectrum. In this paper a frequency band analysis of AD EEG signals is presented, with the aim of improving the diagnosis of AD from EEG signals. Relative power in different EEG frequency bands is used as features to distinguish between AD patients and healthy control subjects. Many different frequency bands between 4 and 30 Hz are systematically tested, besides the traditional frequency bands, e.g., theta band (4-8 Hz). The discriminative power of the resulting spectral features is assessed through statistical tests (Mann-Whitney U test). Moreover, linear discriminant analysis is conducted with those spectral features. The optimized frequency ranges (4-7 Hz, 8-15 Hz, 19-24 Hz) yield substantially better classification performance than the traditional frequency bands (4-8 Hz, 8-12 Hz, 12-30 Hz); the frequency band 4-7 Hz is the optimal frequency range for detecting AD, which is similar to the classical theta band. The frequency bands were also optimized as features through leave-one-out crossvalidation, resulting in error-free classification. The optimized frequency bands may improve existing EEG based diagnostic tools for AD. Additional testing on larger AD datasets is required to verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  5. Corticomuscular coherence is tuned to the spontaneous rhythmicity of speech at 2-3 Hz.

    PubMed

    Ruspantini, Irene; Saarinen, Timo; Belardinelli, Paolo; Jalava, Antti; Parviainen, Tiina; Kujala, Jan; Salmelin, Riitta

    2012-03-14

    Human speech features rhythmicity that frames distinctive, fine-grained speech patterns. Speech can thus be counted among rhythmic motor behaviors that generally manifest characteristic spontaneous rates. However, the critical neural evidence for tuning of articulatory control to a spontaneous rate of speech has not been uncovered. The present study examined the spontaneous rhythmicity in speech production and its relationship to cortex-muscle neurocommunication, which is essential for speech control. Our MEG results show that, during articulation, coherent oscillatory coupling between the mouth sensorimotor cortex and the mouth muscles is strongest at the frequency of spontaneous rhythmicity of speech at 2-3 Hz, which is also the typical rate of word production. Corticomuscular coherence, a measure of efficient cortex-muscle neurocommunication, thus reveals behaviorally relevant oscillatory tuning for spoken language.

  6. Mechanism for generation of 2-3 kHz radiation in the outer heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macek, W. M.

    1995-01-01

    The question of how low-frequency non-thermal radio emissions at the boundary of the heliosphere might be generated is considered. The mechanism consists of two steps. First, the beam of energetic electrons generates a high level of electrostatic Langmuir plasma waves. Second, electromagnetic radiation results from the non-linear interaction between Langmuir waves. Intensity of radio emissions at 2 to 3 kHz detected by the Voyager plasma wave instrument in the outer heliosphere can be explained provided that the electron beams generating Langmuir waves exist also in the postshock plasma due to secondary shocks in the compressed solar wind beyond the termination shock. Modification of the heliospheric shocks by the cosmic ray pressure is also taken into account. The field strengths of Langmuir waves required to generate the second harmonic emissions are of 50 to 100 microvolts per meter. These waves may be observed in situ by Voyager 1 and 2 in the near future.

  7. Effect of short-term 50 Hz electromagnetic field exposure on the behavior of rats.

    PubMed

    Balassa, T; Szemerszky, R; Bárdos, Gy

    2009-12-01

    Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field generated by transformer stations located within buildings has been suspected to initiate non-specific health problems. This possibility was examined in model experiments in rats. Following short-term exposure (50 Hz, 500 mircoT, 20 min), situational and social anxiety as well as locomotor activity pattern were examined by several different tests (elevated plus-maze, novel object exploration, social interaction and territoriality).Based on our results having obtained so far, it seems that these field parameters (that equals the official reference limit for workers) may cause some kind of discomfort, may influence behavior, increase passivity and situational anxiety, but has no verified effect on the social and territorial behavior.

  8. Influence of Liquid Height on Mechanical and Chemical Effects in 20 kHz Sonication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Khuyen Viet Bao; Asakura, Yoshiyuki; Koda, Shinobu

    2013-07-01

    We examined the influence of liquid height on mechanical and chemical effects in 20 kHz sonication with a new Langevin-type transducer. Mechanical effects were evaluated from the degradation of polyethylene oxide in aqueous solution and chemical effects were measured with potassium iodide solution. Standing waves or reactive zones were observed using sonochemical luminescence and aluminum foil erosion. The observed wavelength was reduced by coupled vibration, compared with the wavelength calculated by dividing velocity by irradiation frequency. As liquid height increased, mechanical effects were suppressed. In the case of chemical effects, the stable sonochemical efficiency gained at a height of over 120 mm, and the sonochemical efficiency were also markedly higher than those of a conventional horn-type one.

  9. Discovery of a 7 mHz X-Ray Quasi-Periodic Oscillation from the Most Massive Stellar-Mass Black Hole IC 10 X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery with XMM-Newton of an approx.. = 7 mHz X-ray (0.3-10.0 keV) quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) from the eclipsing, high-inclination black hole binary IC 10 X-1. The QPO is significant at >4.33 sigma confidence level and has a fractional amplitude (% rms) and a quality factor, Q is identical with nu/delta nu, of approx. = 11 and 4, respectively. The overall X-ray (0.3-10.0 keV) power spectrum in the frequency range 0.0001-0.1 Hz can be described by a power-law with an index of approx. = -2, and a QPO at 7 mHz. At frequencies approx. > 0.02 Hz there is no evidence for significant variability. The fractional amplitude (rms) of the QPO is roughly energy-independent in the energy range of 0.3-1.5 keV. Above 1.5 keV the low signal-to-noise ratio of the data does not allow us to detect the QPO. By directly comparing these properties with the wide range of QPOs currently known from accreting black hole and neutron stars, we suggest that the 7 mHz QPO of IC 10 X-1 may be linked to one of the following three categories of QPOs: (1) the "heartbeat" mHz QPOs of the black hole sources GRS 1915+105 and IGR J17091-3624, or (2) the 0.6-2.4 Hz "dipper QPOs" of high-inclination neutron star systems, or (3) the mHz QPOs of Cygnus X-3.

  10. DISCOVERY OF A 7 mHz X-RAY QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATION FROM THE MOST MASSIVE STELLAR-MASS BLACK HOLE IC 10 X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Strohmayer, Tod E. E-mail: richard@astro.umd.edu

    2013-07-10

    We report the discovery with XMM-Newton of an Almost-Equal-To 7 mHz X-ray (0.3-10.0 keV) quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) from the eclipsing, high-inclination black hole binary IC 10 X-1. The QPO is significant at >4.33{sigma} confidence level and has a fractional amplitude (% rms) and a quality factor, Q {identical_to} {nu}/{Delta}{nu}, of Almost-Equal-To 11 and 4, respectively. The overall X-ray (0.3-10.0 keV) power spectrum in the frequency range 0.0001-0.1 Hz can be described by a power-law with an index of Almost-Equal-To - 2, and a QPO at 7 mHz. At frequencies {approx}>0.02 Hz there is no evidence for significant variability. The fractional amplitude (rms) of the QPO is roughly energy-independent in the energy range of 0.3-1.5 keV. Above 1.5 keV the low signal-to-noise ratio of the data does not allow us to detect the QPO. By directly comparing these properties with the wide range of QPOs currently known from accreting black hole and neutron stars, we suggest that the 7 mHz QPO of IC 10 X-1 may be linked to one of the following three categories of QPOs: (1) the 'heartbeat' mHz QPOs of the black hole sources GRS 1915+105 and IGR J17091-3624, or (2) the 0.6-2.4 Hz 'dipper QPOs' of high-inclination neutron star systems, or (3) the mHz QPOs of Cygnus X-3.

  11. Arbitrary optical frequency synthesis traced to an optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zihang; Zhang, Weipeng; Yang, Honglei; Li, Yan; Wei, Haoyun

    2016-11-01

    An arbitrary optical frequency synthesizer with a broad tuning range and high frequency accuracy is presented. The system includes an external cavity diode laser (ECDL) as the output laser, an Erbium-doped optical frequency comb being a frequency reference, and a control module. The optical frequency from the synthesizer can be continuously tuned by the large-scale trans-tooth switch and the fine intra-tooth adjustment. Robust feedback control by regulating the current and PZT voltage enables the ECDL to phase-lock to the Erbium-doped optical frequency comb, therefore to keep stable frequency output. In the meanwhile, the absolute frequency of the synthesizer is determined by the repetition rate, the offset frequency and the beat frequency. All the phase lock loops in the system are traced back to a Rubidium clock. A powerful and friendly software is developed to make the operation convenient by integrating the functions of frequency setting, tuning, tracing, locking and measuring into a LabVIEW interface. The output frequency tuning span and the uncertainty of the system are evaluated as >6 THz and <3 kHz, respectively. The arbitrary optical frequency synthesizer will be a versatile tool in diverse applications, such as synthetic wavelength based absolute distance measurement and frequency-stabilized Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy.

  12. 47 CFR 15.33 - Frequency range of radiated measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... lowest frequency for which a radiated emission limit is specified, up to the frequency shown in the... level of radiated emissions within the frequency range 9 kHz to 30 MHz, such as a CB receiver or a device designed to conduct its radio frequency emissions via connecting wires or cables, e.g., a...

  13. Sex hormone status in male rats after exposure to 50 Hz, 5 mTesla magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, R M; Moustafa, Y M; Ali, F M; Shafik, A

    2006-01-01

    The question of whether extremely low frequency magnetic fields can affect biological system has attracted attention. The theoretical possibility of such an interaction is often questioned and the site of interaction is unknown. The influence of extremely low frequency magnetic field of 50 Hz, 5 mTesla on sex hormone status was studied. 60 male albino rats were divided into 6 groups and were continuously exposed to 50 Hz, 5 mTesla magnetic field generated by magnetic field chamber for periods of 1, 2 and 4 weeks. For each experimental point, sham treated group was used as a control. Assay of serum testosterone LH, FSH, and prolactin were performed. Serum testosterone showed no significant changes. FSH showed significant increase than sham exposed group after 1 week magnetic field exposure. LH showed significant increase than sham exposed group only after 4 weeks magnetic field exposure, while serum prolactin hormone level showed a significant increase in all magnetic field exposed groups than sham exposed animals. Exposure to 50 Hz, 5 mTesla magnetic field for periods of 1, 2 and 4 weeks has no effect on testosterone level, some changes on FSH and LH serum levels and increase in serum prolactin level.

  14. Evaluation of genotoxic effects in human fibroblasts after intermittent exposure to 50 Hz electromagnetic fields: a confirmatory study.

    PubMed

    Scarfí, Maria Rosaria; Sannino, Anna; Perrotta, Alessandro; Sarti, Maurizio; Mesirca, Pietro; Bersani, Ferdinando

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this investigation was to confirm the main results reported in recent studies on the induction of genotoxic effects in human fibroblasts exposed to 50 Hz intermittent (5 min field on/10 min field off) sinusoidal electromagnetic fields. For this purpose, the induction of DNA single-strand breaks was evaluated by applying the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE)/comet assay. To extend the study and validate the results, in the same experimental conditions, the potential genotoxicity was also tested by exposing the cells to a 50 Hz powerline signal (50 Hz frequency plus its harmonics). The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was applied after 24 h intermittent exposure to both sinusoidal and powerline signals to obtain information on cell cycle kinetics. The experiments were carried out on human diploid fibroblasts (ES-1). For each experimental run, exposed and sham-exposed samples were set up; positive controls were also provided by treating cells with hydrogen peroxide or mitomycin C for the comet or micronucleus assay, respectively. No statistically significant difference was detected in exposed compared to sham-exposed samples in any of the experimental conditions tested (P > 0.05). In contrast, the positive controls showed a statistically significant increase in DNA damage in all cases, as expected. Accordingly, our findings do not confirm the results reported previously for either comet induction or an increase in micronucleus frequency.

  15. Precision optical reference frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riehle, Fritz; Schnatz, Harald; Zinner, G.; Trebst, Tilmann; Helmcke, Juergen

    1999-05-01

    Optical reference frequencies are provided by lasers of which the frequencies are stabilized to suitable absorption lines. Presently, twelve reference frequencies/wavelengths within the wavelengths range from 243 nm to 10.3 micrometers are recommended by the International Committee of Weights and Measures as references for the realization of the meter and scientific applications. As typical examples, we describe a diode-pumped, frequency doubled YAG-laser stabilized to an absorption line of molecular iodine and a Ca-stabilized laser. The latter one has been developed in two versions, a transportable system utilizing a small beam of thermal Ca atoms and a stationary standard based on laser cooled and trapped Ca atoms. The frequency of the Ca standard based on cold Ca atoms has been measured by a frequency chain allowing a phase-coherent comparison against the primary standard of time and frequency, the caesium clock. Its value is vCa equals 455 986 240 494.13 kHz with a relative standard uncertainty of 2.5 (DOT) 10-13.

  16. On the Nature of the mHz X-Ray QPOs from ULX M82 X-1: Evidence for Timing-Spectral (anti) Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2013-01-01

    Using all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray (3-10 keV) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1 we searched for a correlation between its variable mHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency and its energy spectral power-law index. These quantities are known to correlate in stellar mass black holes (StMBHs) exhibiting Type-C QPOs (approx 0.2-15 Hz). The detection of such a correlation would strengthen the identification of its mHz QPOs as Type-C and enable a more reliable mass estimate by scaling its QPO frequencies to those of Type-C QPOs in StMBHs of known mass. We resolved the count rates of M82 X-1 and a nearby bright ULX (source 5/X42.3+59) through surface brightness modeling and identify observations in which M82 X-1 was at least as bright as source 5. Using only those observations, we detect QPOs in the frequency range of 36-210 mHz during which the energy spectral power-law index varied from 1.7-2.2. Interestingly, we find evidence for an anti-correlation (Pearsons correlation coefficient = -0.95) between the power-law index and the QPO centroid frequency. While such an anti-correlation is observed in StMBHs at high Type-C QPO frequencies (approx 5-15 Hz), the frequency range over which it holds in StMBHs is significantly smaller (factor of approx 1.5-3) than the QPO range reported here from M82 X-1 (factor of 6). However, it remains possible that contamination from source 5 can bias our result. Joint Chandra/XMM-Newton observations in the future can resolve this problem and confirm the timing-spectral anti-correlation reported here.

  17. A 100 kV, 60 A solid state 4 kHz switching modulator for high power klystron driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortázar, O. D.; Ganuza, D.; De La Fuente, J. M.; Zulaika, M.; Pérez, A.; Anderson, D. E.

    2013-05-01

    A solid state high power modulator capable of delivering 120 kV and 60 A developed in collaboration with the JEMA Corporation, ESS Bilbao, and the SNS (ORNL) for driving high power klystrons is presented. Pulses with less than 10 μs risetime and flatness under 0.1% are obtained with programmable frequency pulses between 2 and 50 Hz. Eight solid state switches combined with custom air-insulated high voltage transformers working at a switching frequency of 4 kHz produce high quality pulses by phase shifting the transformer drives. Each relative high frequency stage pumps a double stage high voltage Marx generator that supplies the output pulse shape and frequency. This merged topology between a Marx generator and direct modulator takes advantage of the strengths of both approaches. Low energy storage in the output stages assures safe operation in case of a load arc discharge. Real time voltage correction during the pulse is also provided to compensate for the droop inherent with the use of low energy storage in the output stages. Data at full power with a dummy resistive load are presented.

  18. Extension of the NIST AC-DC Difference Calibration Service for Current to 100 kHz.

    PubMed

    Kinard, Joseph R; Lipe, Thomas E; Childers, Clifton B

    1997-01-01

    The NIST calibration service for ac-dc difference of thermal current converters relies on multijunction thermal converters as the primary standards, and various thermal converters and thermoelements (TEs) as the reference and working standards. Calibrations are performed by comparing the ac-dc difference of a customer's thermal current converter to the ac-dc difference of a NIST standard current converter. Typical artifacts accepted for calibration include single-junction thermoelements, multijunction thermal converters, and transfer shunts for use with TEs. This paper describes the standards on which the calibration service is based and the results of the study to characterize the NIST standards over the extended frequency range from 50 kHz to 100 kHz at currents from 1 mA to 20 A. The general method for the frequency extension at high frequency involves the use of thermoelements in the 5 mA range, with small frequency dependence, as the starting point for build-up and build-down chains to cover the whole range from 1 mA to 20 A.

  19. A 100 kV, 60 A solid state 4 kHz switching modulator for high power klystron driving.

    PubMed

    Cortázar, O D; Ganuza, D; De La Fuente, J M; Zulaika, M; Pérez, A; Anderson, D E

    2013-05-01

    A solid state high power modulator capable of delivering 120 kV and 60 A developed in collaboration with the JEMA Corporation, ESS Bilbao, and the SNS (ORNL) for driving high power klystrons is presented. Pulses with less than 10 μs risetime and flatness under 0.1% are obtained with programmable frequency pulses between 2 and 50 Hz. Eight solid state switches combined with custom air-insulated high voltage transformers working at a switching frequency of 4 kHz produce high quality pulses by phase shifting the transformer drives. Each relative high frequency stage pumps a double stage high voltage Marx generator that supplies the output pulse shape and frequency. This merged topology between a Marx generator and direct modulator takes advantage of the strengths of both approaches. Low energy storage in the output stages assures safe operation in case of a load arc discharge. Real time voltage correction during the pulse is also provided to compensate for the droop inherent with the use of low energy storage in the output stages. Data at full power with a dummy resistive load are presented.

  20. development of a medium repetition rate (10 Hz - 500 Hz) diode pumped laser transmitter for airborne scanning altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, D. Barry; Lindauer, Steven J., II; Kay, Richard B.

    1998-01-01

    Since the late 1980's, NASA has developed several small, all-solid state lasers of low repetition rates for use as transmitters in prototype LIDAR and raster scanned altimetry retrieval systems. Our early laser transmitters were developed for high resolution airborne altimetry which employed cavity dumping techniques to produce a pulse shape with a 1 ns rise time. The first such laser was the SUMR (Sub-millimeter resolution) transmitter which used a side pumped, D-shaped half-rod of Nd:YAG for the oscillator active media and produced approximately 3 ns pulses of 100 micro-J energy at a 40 Hz repetition rate. (Coyle and Blair, 1993; Coyle et al., 1995) After several upgrades to improve rep rate and pulse energy, the final version produced 1.2 mJ pulses at 120 Hz with a 3.7 ns pulse width. The laser has become known as SPLT (Sharp Pulsed Laser Transmitter), and has flown successfully on a variety of airborne altimetry missions. (Coyle and Blair, 1995; Blair et al., 1994) From building these systems, we have accrued valuable experience in delivering field-deployable lasers and have become aware of the advantages and disadvantages of employing new technologies. For example, even though the laser's main operating environment is in a "cold" aircraft during flight, the laser must still operate in very warm temperatures. This is important if the mission is based in the desert or a tropical climate since ground calibration data from stationary targets must be gathered before and after each data flight. Because conductive cooling is much more convenient than closed loop water flow, achieving the highest possible laser efficiency is becoming a high priority when designing a flight laser. This is especially true for lasers with higher pulse energies and repetition rates which are needed for high altitude scanning altimeters and LIDARs.

  1. Low frequency cavitation erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardue, Sally J.; Chandekar, Gautam

    2002-11-01

    Damage of diesel engine piston sleeve liners due to cavitation of the coolant fluid can be severe. Coolant fluid additives are used to inhibit cavitation damage, and are evaluated by industry suppliers using ASTM G32-98 Standard Test Method for Cavitation Erosion Using Vibratory Apparatus. The ASTM G32-98 test procedure uses an ultrasonic horn at 20 kHz to vibrate a test button in the coolant. The test button mass loss and surface appearance are studied to sort the performance of new coolant additives. Mismatch between good lab performers and actual engine test runs has raised concerns over the current lab test. The frequency range of the current test has been targeted for investigation. A low frequency, less than 2000 Hz, test rig was built to explore the cavitation damage. The test system did produce cavitation on the surface of the test button for a period of 36 h, with minimal mass loss. The test rig experienced cyclic fatigue when test times were extended. The work is now focusing on designing a better test rig for long duration tests and on developing numerical models in order to explore the effects of cavitation excitation frequency on surface erosion.

  2. Seedless velocimetry at 100  kHz with picosecond-laser electronic-excitation tagging.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Naibo; Mance, Jason G; Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Felver, Josef J; Stauffer, Hans U; Yi, Tongxun; Danehy, Paul M; Roy, Sukesh

    2017-01-15

    Picosecond-laser electronic-excitation tagging (PLEET), a seedless picosecond-laser-based velocimetry technique, is demonstrated in non-reactive flows at a repetition rate of 100 kHz with a 1064 nm, 100 ps burst-mode laser. The fluorescence lifetime of the PLEET signal was measured in nitrogen, and the laser heating effects were analyzed. PLEET experiments with a free jet of nitrogen show the ability to measure multi-point flow velocity fluctuations at a 100 kHz detection rate or higher. Both spectral and dynamic mode decomposition analyses of velocity on a Ma=0.8 free jet show two dominant Strouhal numbers around 0.24 and 0.48, respectively, well within the shear-layer flapping frequencies of the free jets. This technique increases the laser-tagging repetition rate for velocimetry to hundreds of kilohertz. PLEET is suitable for subsonic through supersonic laminar- and turbulent-flow velocity measurements.

  3. Interpretations of Frequency Domain Analyses of Neural Entrainment: Periodicity, Fundamental Frequency, and Harmonics

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong; Melloni, Lucia; Poeppel, David; Ding, Nai

    2016-01-01

    Brain activity can follow the rhythms of dynamic sensory stimuli, such as speech and music, a phenomenon called neural entrainment. It has been hypothesized that low-frequency neural entrainment in the neural delta and theta bands provides a potential mechanism to represent and integrate temporal information. Low-frequency neural entrainment is often studied using periodically changing stimuli and is analyzed in the frequency domain using the Fourier analysis. The Fourier analysis decomposes a periodic signal into harmonically related sinusoids. However, it is not intuitive how these harmonically related components are related to the response waveform. Here, we explain the interpretation of response harmonics, with a special focus on very low-frequency neural entrainment near 1 Hz. It is illustrated why neural responses repeating at f Hz do not necessarily generate any neural response at f Hz in the Fourier spectrum. A strong neural response at f Hz indicates that the time scales of the neural response waveform within each cycle match the time scales of the stimulus rhythm. Therefore, neural entrainment at very low frequency implies not only that the neural response repeats at f Hz but also that each period of the neural response is a slow wave matching the time scale of a f Hz sinusoid. PMID:27375465

  4. Interpretations of Frequency Domain Analyses of Neural Entrainment: Periodicity, Fundamental Frequency, and Harmonics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong; Melloni, Lucia; Poeppel, David; Ding, Nai

    2016-01-01

    Brain activity can follow the rhythms of dynamic sensory stimuli, such as speech and music, a phenomenon called neural entrainment. It has been hypothesized that low-frequency neural entrainment in the neural delta and theta bands provides a potential mechanism to represent and integrate temporal information. Low-frequency neural entrainment is often studied using periodically changing stimuli and is analyzed in the frequency domain using the Fourier analysis. The Fourier analysis decomposes a periodic signal into harmonically related sinusoids. However, it is not intuitive how these harmonically related components are related to the response waveform. Here, we explain the interpretation of response harmonics, with a special focus on very low-frequency neural entrainment near 1 Hz. It is illustrated why neural responses repeating at f Hz do not necessarily generate any neural response at f Hz in the Fourier spectrum. A strong neural response at f Hz indicates that the time scales of the neural response waveform within each cycle match the time scales of the stimulus rhythm. Therefore, neural entrainment at very low frequency implies not only that the neural response repeats at f Hz but also that each period of the neural response is a slow wave matching the time scale of a f Hz sinusoid.

  5. The relationship between ultra-high frequency thresholds and transient evoked otoacoustic emissions in adults with tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Omidvar, Shaghayegh; Jafari, Zahra; Mahmoudian, Saeid; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi; Ahadi, Mohsen; Yazdani, Nasrin

    2016-01-01

    Background: The possible role of cochlear function in tinnitus generation is still a matter of debate. To assess the role of outer hair cell dysfunction in tinnitus and its possible relationship with ultra-high frequency (UHF) hearing sensitivity, transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE) and UHF hearing thresholds were investigated in normal hearing individuals with and without tinnitus. Methods: Eighteen individuals with tinnitus and 22 without tinnitus participated in this study. TEOAE was recorded with click stimulus at 80 dBpeSPL. UHF pure tone audiometry was performed at 10, 12.5, 16, and 18 kHz. Results: TEOAE was significantly abnormal in 72.2% of the tinnitus, and 18.2% of the control groups (p=0.001). The individuals with tinnitus had significantly poorer UHF hearing sensitivity compared to the control group at 12.5 and 18 kHz (p≤0.048). There was a stronger correlation between increasing UHFs hearing threshold and decreasing SNRs of TEOAEs in the tinnitus group compared to the controls. Conclusion: Our study revealed poorer UHF hearing thresholds and more TEOAE abnormalities in normal hearing individuals with tinnitus compared to the controls. Perhaps the alterations in the basal cochlea, following a decrease in UHF hearing sensitivity, affect OAEs that are originated from more apical cochlear parts in tinnitus ears more than non-tinnitus ears. PMID:28210614

  6. Frequency noise induced by fiber perturbations in a fiber-linked stabilized laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, YI; Hamilton, Jeffrey J.; Richard, Jean-Paul

    1992-01-01

    The effects of acoustic perturbations on an optical fiber that links a stabilized laser to its reference cavity are studied. An extrapolation indicates that 69 dB of acoustic noise impinging on a 1-m segment of the 10-m fiber contribute frequency noise at the level of 1 Hz/(Hz)1/2 in the 1100-2100-Hz band.

  7. 400 Gbit/s 256 QAM-OFDM transmission over 720 km with a 14 bit/s/Hz spectral efficiency by using high-resolution FDE.

    PubMed

    Omiya, Tatsunori; Yoshida, Masato; Nakazawa, Masataka

    2013-02-11

    We demonstrate 400 Gbit/s frequency-division-multiplexed and polarization-division-multiplexed 256 QAM-OFDM transmission over 720 km with a spectral efficiency of 14 bit/s/Hz by using high-resolution frequency domain equalization (FDE) and digital back-propagation (DBP) methods. A detailed analytical evaluation of the 256 QAM-OFDM transmission is also provided, which clarifies the influence of quantization error in the digital coherent receiver on the waveform distortion compensation with DBP.

  8. High-frequency electroacupuncture evidently reinforces hippocampal synaptic transmission in Alzheimer's disease rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Kong, Li-hong; Wang, Hui; Shen, Feng; Wang, Ya-wen; Zhou, Hua; Sun, Guo-jie

    2016-01-01

    The frequency range of electroacupuncture in treatment of Alzheimer's disease in rats is commonly 2–5 Hz (low frequency) and 50–100 Hz (high frequency). We established a rat model of Alzheimer's disease by injecting β-amyloid 1–42 (Aβ1–42) into the bilateral hippocampal dentate gyrus to verify which frequency may be better suited in treatment. Electroacupuncture at 2 Hz or 50 Hz was used to stimulate Baihui (DU20) and Shenshu (BL23) acupoints. The water maze test and electrophysiological studies demonstrated that spatial memory ability was apparently improved, and the ranges of long-term potentiation and long-term depression were increased in Alzheimer's disease rats after electroacupuncture treatment. Moreover, the effects of electroacupuncture at 50 Hz were better than that at 2 Hz. These findings suggest that high-frequency electroacupuncture may enhance hippocampal synaptic transmission and potentially improve memory disorders in Alzheimer's disease rats. PMID:27335565

  9. 47 CFR 80.147 - Watch on 2182 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Watch on 2182 kHz. 80.147 Section 80.147 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... 2182 kHz. Ship stations must maintain a watch on 2182 kHz as prescribed by § 80.304....

  10. 47 CFR 80.147 - Watch on 2182 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Watch on 2182 kHz. 80.147 Section 80.147... MARITIME SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Shipboard General Purpose Watches § 80.147 Watch on 2182 kHz. Ship stations must maintain a watch on 2182 kHz as prescribed by § 80.304....

  11. 47 CFR 80.147 - Watch on 2182 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Watch on 2182 kHz. 80.147 Section 80.147... MARITIME SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Shipboard General Purpose Watches § 80.147 Watch on 2182 kHz. Ship stations must maintain a watch on 2182 kHz as prescribed by § 80.304....

  12. 47 CFR 80.147 - Watch on 2182 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Watch on 2182 kHz. 80.147 Section 80.147... MARITIME SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Shipboard General Purpose Watches § 80.147 Watch on 2182 kHz. Ship stations must maintain a watch on 2182 kHz as prescribed by § 80.304....

  13. 47 CFR 80.147 - Watch on 2182 kHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Watch on 2182 kHz. 80.147 Section 80.147... MARITIME SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Shipboard General Purpose Watches § 80.147 Watch on 2182 kHz. Ship stations must maintain a watch on 2182 kHz as prescribed by § 80.304....

  14. The Effect of the 226-Hz Probe Level on Contralateral Acoustic Stapedius Reflex Thresholds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Jessica E.; Feeney, M. Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the 226-Hz probe level on the acoustic stapedius reflex threshold. Method: Contralateral reflex thresholds for a 1000-Hz pure-tone stimulus were obtained from 40 young adults with normal hearing using an experimental system at four 226-Hz probe levels (70, 75, 80, and 85 dB SPL) with…

  15. kHz Ion Acceleration Under Variable Background Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, John T.; Feister, S.; Frische, K.; Austin, D. R.; Ngirmang, G. K.; Peterson, A. C.; Smith, J.; Klim, A.; Orban, C.; Chowdhury, E. A.; Roquemore, W. R.

    2016-10-01

    High-repetition rate, ultra-high intensity lasers are coming online, opening new possibilities for statistical approaches and applications to High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) research through relativistic laser-plasma interactions (RLPI). A new experimental framework including high-repetition rate solid-density targets, high-acquisition rate detectors, data acquisition, and analysis is needed to take advantage of these new possibilities. At the Extreme Light Laboratory at AFRL, development of a liquid target system has enabled us to perform 1kHz RLPI experiments in 0.03-20 mbar background pressures and intensities up to 5 1018 W/cm2. However, RLPI studied here transpires within a moderate vacuum, which may affect the strength of the electrostatic coupling between the energetic electrons and target ions, altering expected results for both the detected electrons and accelerated ions. Both the experimental methods and measurements of the ion acceleration from sub-micron solid density targets with variable background pressures will be presented. This research was sponsored by the Quantum and Non-Equilibrium Processes Division of the AFOSR, under the management of Dr. Enrique Parra and from the DOD HPCMP Internship Program.

  16. Modulatory frequency of lasers in connection to laser beam therapeutic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucerova, Hana; Bartova, Jirina; Himmlova, Lucia; Dostalova, Tatjana; Mazanek, Jiri

    1998-04-01

    The subject of this work follows changes of the sIgA and albumin levels in the saliva of 48 patients treated after the extraction of their lower molars with either diode or He-Ne biostimulatory laser, using different modulatory frequencies (5 Hz, 292 Hz, 9000 Hz). The results were compared to the sIgA and albumin levels in the saliva of the control, i.e. not- treated group. For the tests radial immunodiffusion (RID) method was used (commercial RID kit of the Binding Site, Birmingham, Great Britain). Appropriately chosen laser beam modulatory frequency should influence the increase in the sIgA and albumin levels against the base level. In our study, this hypothesis was confirmed in the group treated with the frequency of 292 Hz and 9000 Hz (both diode GaAIAs, 670 nm, red, 20 mW, energy density 1.5 Jcm2) on albumin levels and 9000 Hz on sIgA levels. The changes of the levels of the watched markers versus the control group were at this frequencies (292 Hz and 9000 Hz) statistically significant. At the others used frequencies (5 Hz diode laser and 5 Hz He-Ne laser) the changes of the levels of the watched markers versus control group were statistically insignificant. The aim of this study was to contribute to the evaluation of specific modulatory frequencies (5 Hz, 292 Hz, 9000 Hz) for therapeutical use in a given pathological case of the oral cavity. We can conclude that using frequency 9000 Hz had best immunomodulatory effect.

  17. Homodyne digital interferometry for a sensitive fiber frequency reference.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Silvie; McRae, Terry G; Gray, Malcolm B; Shaddock, Daniel A

    2014-07-28

    Digitally enhanced homodyne interferometry enables robust interferometric sensitivity to be achieved in an optically simple configuration by shifting optical complexity into the digital signal processing regime. We use digitally enhanced homodyne interferometry in a simple, all-fiber Michelson interferometer to achieve a frequency reference stability of better than 20 Hz/√Hz from 10 mHz to 1 Hz, satisfying, for the first time in an all fiber system, the stability requirements for the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow On mission. In addition, we have demonstrated stability that satisfies the future mission objectives at frequencies down to 1 mHz. This frequency domain stability translates into a fractional Allan deviation of 3.3 × 10(-17) for an integration time of 55 seconds.

  18. Frequency division using a micromechanical resonance cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qalandar, K. R.; Strachan, B. S.; Gibson, B.; Sharma, M.; Ma, A.; Shaw, S. W.; Turner, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    A coupled micromechanical resonator array demonstrates a mechanical realization of multi-stage frequency division. The mechanical structure consists of a set of N sequentially perpendicular microbeams that are connected by relatively weak elastic elements such that the system vibration modes are localized to individual microbeams and have natural frequencies with ratios close to 1:2:⋯:2N. Conservative (passive) nonlinear inter-modal coupling provides the required energy transfer between modes and is achieved by finite deformation kinematics. When the highest frequency beam is excited, this arrangement promotes a cascade of subharmonic resonances that achieve frequency division of 2j at microbeam j for j = 1, …, N. Results are shown for a capacitively driven three-stage divider in which an input signal of 824 kHz is passively divided through three modal stages, producing signals at 412 kHz, 206 kHz, and 103 kHz. The system modes are characterized and used to delineate the range of AC input voltages and frequencies over which the cascade occurs. This narrow band frequency divider has simple design rules that are scalable to higher frequencies and can be extended to a larger number of modal stages.

  19. Electroacupuncture at 2/100 Hz Activates Antinociceptive Spinal Mechanisms Different from Those Activated by Electroacupuncture at 2 and 100 Hz in Responder Rats

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Josie Resende Torres; da Silva, Marcelo Lourenço; Prado, Wiliam Alves

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effects of intrathecal injection of desipramine and fluoxetine (selective inhibitors of norepinephrine and 5-HT uptake, resp.), thiorphan and neostigmine (inhibitors of enkephalinase and acetylcholinesterase, resp.), gabapentin (a GABA releaser), and vigabatrin (an inhibitor of GABA-transaminase) on the antinociception induced by 2 Hz, 100 Hz, or 2/100 Hz electroacupuncture (EA) applied bilaterally to the Zusanli (ST36) and Sanyinjiao (SP6) acupoints using the rat tail-flick test. We show that 2 Hz EA antinociception lasts longer after the administration of drugs that increase the spinal availability of norepinephrine, acetylcholine, or GABA; 100 Hz EA antinociception lasts longer after drug that increases the spinal availability of norepinephrine; 2/100 Hz EA antinociception lasts longer after drugs that increase the spinal availability of endogenous opioids or GABA. We conclude that the antinociceptive effect of 2/100 Hz EA is different from the synergistic effect of alternate stimulation at 2 and 100 Hz because the effect of the former is not changed by increasing the spinal availability of serotonin and lasts longer after the administration of vigabatrin. The combination of EA with drugs that increase the availability of spinal neurotransmitters involved in the modulation of nociceptive inputs may result in a synergistic antinociceptive effect in the rat tail-flick test. PMID:24159340

  20. Frequency stabilization for space-based missions using optical fiber interferometry.

    PubMed

    McRae, Terry G; Ngo, Silvie; Shaddock, Daniel A; Hsu, Magnus T L; Gray, Malcolm B

    2013-02-01

    We present measurement results for a laser frequency reference, implemented with an all-optical fiber Michelson interferometer, down to frequencies as low as 1 mHz. Optical fiber is attractive for space-based operations as it is physically robust, small and lightweight. The small free spectral range of fiber interferometers also provides the possibility to prestabilize two lasers on two distant spacecraft and ensures that the beatnote remains within the detector bandwidth. We demonstrate that these fiber interferometers are viable candidates for future laser-based gravity recovery and climate experiment missions requiring a stability of 30 Hz/√Hz over a 10 mHz-1 Hz bandwidth.

  1. Comparison of hydroxyl radical formation in aqueous solutions at different ultrasound frequencies and powers using the salicylic acid dosimeter.

    PubMed

    Milne, Louise; Stewart, Isobel; Bremner, David H

    2013-05-01

    Ultrasonic frequencies of 20kHz, 382kHz, 584kHz, 862kHz (and 998kHz) have been compared with regard to energy output and hydroxyl radical formation utilising the salicylic acid dosimeter. The 862kHz frequency inputs 6 times the number of Watts into water, as measured by calorimetry, with the other frequencies having roughly the same value under very similar conditions. A plausible explanation involving acoustic fountain formation is proposed although enhanced coupling between this frequency and water cannot be discounted. Using the salicylic acid dosimeter and inputting virtually the same Wattages it is established that 862kHz is around 10% more efficient at generating hydroxyl radicals than the 382kHz but both of these are far more effective than the other frequencies. Also, it is found that as temperature increases to 42°C then the total dihydroxybenzoic acid (Total DHBA) produced is virtually identical for 382kHz and 862kHz, though 582kHz is substantially lower, when the power levels are set at approximately 9W for all systems. An equivalent power level of 9W could not be obtained for the 998kHz transducer so a direct comparison could not be made in this instance. These results have implications for the optimum frequencies chosen for both Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) and organic synthesis augmented by ultrasound.

  2. Backscatter from a limestone seafloor at 2-3.5 kHz: measurements and modeling.

    PubMed

    Soukup, Raymond J; Gragg, Robert F

    2003-05-01

    Physics-based interface scattering models for the seafloor [H.-H. Essen, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 95, 1299-1310 (1994); Gragg et al., ibid. 110, 2878-2901 (2001)] exhibit features in their predicted grazing angle dependence. These features have a strong dependence on the assumed composition and roughness of the bottom. Verifying such predictions requires data that cover a wide range of grazing angles and involve minimal sub-bottom penetration. Such measurements were performed in the frequency band 2-3.5 kHz over an exposed limestone bottom off the Carolina coast during the second Littoral Warfare Advanced Development Focused Technology Experiment of 1996 (LWAD FTE 96-2). Direct-path bottom scattering strengths were obtained in shallow water (198-310 m deep) for grazing angles from 8 degrees to 75 degrees using data fusion from multiple experimental geometries coupled with careful signal processing. The processing included corrections for the surface-reflected path, other multipaths, and characteristics of the reverberation decay observed over the pulse duration at higher grazing angles. The resulting frequency and grazing-angle dependences exhibit trends consistent with theoretical predictions, and geoacoustic parameters obtained by inversion are consistent with values expected for limestone.

  3. Effects of 50 Hz magnetic fields on mouse spermatogenesis monitored by flow cytometric analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vita, R. de; Cavallo, D.; Raganella, L.; Eleuteri, P.; Grollino, M.G.; Calugi, A.

    1995-12-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) was performed to monitor the cellular effects of extremely-low-frequency magnetic field on mouse spermatogenesis. Groups of five male hybrid F1 mice aged 8--10 weeks were exposed to 50 Hz magnetic field. The strength of the magnetic field was 1.7 mT. Exposure times of 2 and 4 h were chosen. FCM measurements were performed 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42 days after treatment. For each experimental point, a sham-treated group was used as a control. The possible effects were studied by analyzing the DNA content distribution of the different cell types involved in spermatogenesis and using the elongated spermatids as the reference population. The relative frequencies of the various testicular cell types were calculated using specific software. In groups exposed for 2 h, no effects were observed. In groups exposed for 4 h, a statistically significant (P < 0.001) decrease in elongated spermatids was observed at 28 days after treatment. This change suggests a possible cytotoxic and/or cytostatic effect on differentiating spermatogonia. However, further studies are being carried out to investigate the effects of longer exposure times.

  4. Physics: Grades 10-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructional Objectives Exchange, Los Angeles, CA.

    The physics objectives are geared to use in college preparatory, high school physics courses and are based on the three most common physics curricula: (1) Physical Science Study Committee (PSSC); (2) The Project Physics Course; and (3) Modern Physics by Dull, Metcalf, and Williams. Since many of the sample items can be answered in various ways,…

  5. Study of the 20,22Ne+20,22Ne and 10,12,13,14,15C+12C Fusion Reactions with MUSIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, M. L.; Rehm, K. E.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Carnelli, P. F. F.; DiGiovine, B.; Esbensen, H.; Hoffman, C. R.; Jiang, C. L.; Kay, B. P.; Lai, J.; Nusair, O.; Pardo, R. C.; Santiago-Gonzalez, D.; Talwar, R.; Ugalde, C.

    2016-05-01

    A highly efficient MUlti-Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) detector has been developed for measurements of fusion reactions. A study of fusion cross sections in the 10,12,13,14,15C+12C and 20,22Ne+20,22Ne systems has been performed at ATLAS. Experimental results and comparison with theoretical predictions are presented. Furthermore, results of direct measurements of the 17O(α, n)20Ne, 23Ne(α, p)26Mg and 23Ne(α, n)26Al reactions will be discussed.

  6. Frequency dependence of organic magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fujian; Rybicki, James; Lin, Ran; Hutchinson, Kent; Hou, Jia; Wohlgenannt, Markus

    2011-03-01

    Organic magnetoresistive (OMAR) devices show a large enough magnetoresistive response (typically 10%) for potential applications as magnetic field sensors. However, applications often require sensing high frequency magnetic fields, and the examination of the frequency-dependent magnetoresistive response is therefore required. Analysis of time constants that limit the frequency response may also shed light on the mechanism behind the OMAR effect, because different OMAR mechanisms occur at different time scales In our experiments, the AC magnetic field is supplied by a coil with a ferrite core which is driven by a function generator The AC magnet shows a frequency response that is almost flat up to 1MHz. We found that the OMAR frequency limit is about 10 kHz for a typical organic semiconductor device and at least 100 kHz for devices made from a doped polymer film. We also performed capacitance and conductance vs. frequency measurements to understand the origin of the observed limit frequencies. This work was supported by Army MURI under GrantNo. W911NF-08-1-0317 and NSF under Grant No. ECS 0725280.

  7. Energy dependent time delays of kHz oscillations due to thermal Comptonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nagendra; Misra, Ranjeev

    2014-12-01

    We study the energy dependent photon variability from a thermal Comptonizing plasma that is oscillating at kHz frequencies. In particular, we solve the linearized time-dependent Kompaneets equation and consider the oscillatory perturbation to be either in the soft photon source or in the heating rate of the plasma. For each case, we self consistently consider the energy balance of the plasma and the soft photon source. The model incorporates the possibility of a fraction of the Comptonized photons impinging back into the soft photon source. We find that when the oscillation is due to the soft photon source, the variation of the fractional root mean sqaure (rms) is nearly constant with energy and the time-lags are hard. However, for the case when the oscillation is due to variation in the heating rate of the corona, and when a significant fraction of the photons impinge back into the soft photon source, the rms increases with energy and the time-lags are soft. As an example, we compare the results with the ˜850 Hz oscillation observed on 1996 March 3 for 4U 1608-52 and show that both the observed soft time-lags as well as the rms versus energy can be well described by such a model where the size of the Comptonizing plasma is ˜1 km. Thus, modelling of the time-lags as due to Comptonization delays, can provide tight constraints on the size and geometry of the system. Detailed analysis would require well-constrained spectral parameters.

  8. Compact dual-frequency fiber laser accelerometer with sub-μg resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qian; Jin, Long; Liang, Yizhi; Cheng, Linghao; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a compact and high-resolution dual-polarization fiber laser accelerometer. A spring-mass like scheme is constructed by fixing a 10-gram proof mass on the laser cavity to transduce applied vibration into beat-frequency change. The loading is located at the intensity maximum of intracavity light to maximize the optical response. The detection limit reaches 107 ng/Hz1/2 at 200 Hz. The working bandwidth ranges from 60 Hz to 600 Hz.

  9. Effects of 50 Hz electric currents on vigilance and concentration.

    PubMed Central

    Stollery, B T

    1987-01-01

    Seventy six male volunteers were studied in a crossover trial to assess the effect on the central nervous system of 50 Hz electric currents. Currents totalling 500 microamperes were passed through electrodes attached to the head, upper arms, and feet, simulating exposure to a vertical electric field of about 36 kV/m. Exposure and sham exposure sessions were assigned using double blind techniques and current passed for about 5.5 hours during the exposure session. A series of psychological tests comprising self reports of mood and performance tests of memory, attention, and verbal skills were administered. The present paper discusses the effects of those currents on vigilance and sustained concentration and examines the hypothesis that electric fields act as stressors. The results indicate that vigilance and concentration were not influenced by exposure, nor do they support the hypothesis of a stress reaction. Although brief reports of sensations at electrode sites compromised the double blind conditions to some extent, the performance changes associated with these reports were independent of exposure per se. Within the vigilance task there were two possible exposure effects on the time taken to identify non-target numbers. Firstly, the non-targets were identified more slowly during the first hour of exposure. Secondly, for subjects not reporting sensations, non-target latencies on the second day were slower in the exposed group--there were no corresponding differences on the first day. The interpretation of this effect is complicated by its apparent restriction to the second day and may indicate some kind of state dependent transfer phenomenon. PMID:3814542

  10. Cavitation thresholds of contrast agents in an in vitro human clot model exposed to 120-kHz ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Matthew J.; Bader, Kenneth B.; Holland, Christy K.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) can be employed to nucleate cavitation to achieve desired bioeffects, such as thrombolysis, in therapeutic ultrasound applications. Effective methods of enhancing thrombolysis with ultrasound have been examined at low frequencies (<1 MHz) and low amplitudes (<0.5 MPa). The objective of this study was to determine cavitation thresholds for two UCAs exposed to 120-kHz ultrasound. A commercial ultrasound contrast agent (Definity®) and echogenic liposomes were investigated to determine the acoustic pressure threshold for ultraharmonic (UH) and broadband (BB) generation using an in vitro flow model perfused with human plasma. Cavitation emissions were detected using two passive receivers over a narrow frequency bandwidth (540–900 kHz) and a broad frequency bandwidth (0.54–1.74 MHz). UH and BB cavitation thresholds occurred at the same acoustic pressure (0.3 ± 0.1 MPa, peak to peak) and were found to depend on the sensitivity of the cavitation detector but not on the nucleating contrast agent or ultrasound duty cycle. PMID:25234874

  11. Cavitation thresholds of contrast agents in an in vitro human clot model exposed to 120-kHz ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Matthew J; Bader, Kenneth B; Holland, Christy K

    2014-02-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) can be employed to nucleate cavitation to achieve desired bioeffects, such as thrombolysis, in therapeutic ultrasound applications. Effective methods of enhancing thrombolysis with ultrasound have been examined at low frequencies (<1 MHz) and low amplitudes (<0.5 MPa). The objective of this study was to determine cavitation thresholds for two UCAs exposed to 120-kHz ultrasound. A commercial ultrasound contrast agent (Definity(®)) and echogenic liposomes were investigated to determine the acoustic pressure threshold for ultraharmonic (UH) and broadband (BB) generation using an in vitro flow model perfused with human plasma. Cavitation emissions were detected using two passive receivers over a narrow frequency bandwidth (540-900 kHz) and a broad frequency bandwidth (0.54-1.74 MHz). UH and BB cavitation thresholds occurred at the same acoustic pressure (0.3 ± 0.1 MPa, peak to peak) and were found to depend on the sensitivity of the cavitation detector but not on the nucleating contrast agent or ultrasound duty cycle.

  12. Brain Gym To Increase Academic Performance Of Children Aged 10-12 Years Old ( Experimental Study in Tembalang Elementary School and Pedalangan Elementary School Semarang)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marpaung, M. G.; Sareharto, T. P.; Purwanti, A.; Hermawati, D.

    2017-02-01

    Academic performance becomes an important determinant of individual quality. it is determined by the function of affective, cognitive, psychomotor, and intelligence. Brain gym can improve learning processes and integrate all areas that related to the learning process. To prove the effect of brain gym towards academic performance of children aged 10-12 years. This study was a quasy experiment study with one group pre and post test design. Samples (n=18 male=7 and female=11) were taken from five and six grader and conducted in Tembalang and Pedalangan Elementary School, Semarang. Pretest were administered, followed by brain gym, and post test administered in the end of study. The measurement of Intelligence Quotient pre and post test using Culture Fair Intelligence Test Scale 2. Among the 18 subjects (male=7 and female=11) the average of academic performance and IQ score after brain gym showed improvement. The Improvement of IQ score with Culture Fair Test Scale 2 was analyzed by Dependent T test showed significant results (p=0,000). The improvement of Bahasa score was analyzed by Wilcoxon test showed significant results (p=0,001), an unsignificant result were shown in Mathematics p=0,079 and natural sciences p=0,306. Brain gym can increase academic performance of children aged 10-12 years old.

  13. Efficient 1 kHz femtosecond optical parametric amplification in BiB(3)O(6) pumped at 800 nm.

    PubMed

    Ghotbi, Masood; Ebrahim-Zadeh, Majid; Petrov, Valentin; Tzankov, Pancho; Noack, Frank

    2006-10-30

    We demonstrate efficient operation of a tunable femtosecond optical parametric amplifier based on BiB(3)O(6) pumped at 800 nm by a 1 kHz Ti:sapphire regenerative amplifier. The idler wavelength coverage extends to beyond 3 mum and the pulse duration at this wavelength is of the order of 110 fs. This new nonlinear borate crystal offers exceptionally high nonlinearity, making it a very promising candidate for power scaling of such frequency converters in the near-IR.

  14. Upper limit on a stochastic background of gravitational waves from seismic measurements in the range 0.05-1 Hz.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Michael; Harms, Jan

    2014-03-14

    In this Letter, we present an upper limit of ΩGW<1.2×108 on an isotropic stochastic gravitational-wave (GW) background integrated over a year in the frequency range 0.05-1 Hz, which improves current upper limits from high-precision laboratory experiments by about 9 orders of magnitude. The limit is obtained using the response of Earth itself to GWs via a free-surface effect described more than 40 years ago by Dyson. The response was measured by a global network of broadband seismometers selected to maximize the sensitivity.

  15. Effect on the immune system of mice exposed chronically to 50 Hz amplitude-modulated 2.45 GHz microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Elekes, E.; Thuroczy, G.; Szabo, L.D.

    1996-12-01

    The effect of continuous (CW; 2.45 GHz carrier frequency) or amplitude-modulated (AM; 50 Hz square wave) microwave radiation on the immune response was tested. CW exposures (6 days, 3 h/day) induced elevations of the number of antibody-producing cells in the spleen of male Balb/c mice (+37%). AM microwave exposure induced elevation of the spleen index (+15%) and antibody-producing cell number (+55%) in the spleen of male mice. No changes were observed in female mice. It is concluded that both types of exposure conditions induced moderate elevation of antibody production only in male mice.

  16. Deep frequency modulation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Gerberding, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Laser interferometry with pm/Hz precision and multi-fringe dynamic range at low frequencies is a core technology to measure the motion of various objects (test masses) in space and ground based experiments for gravitational wave detection and geodesy. Even though available interferometer schemes are well understood, their construction remains complex, often involving, for example, the need to build quasi-monolithic optical benches with dozens of components. In recent years techniques have been investigated that aim to reduce this complexity by combining phase modulation techniques with sophisticated digital readout algorithms. This article presents a new scheme that uses strong laser frequency modulations in combination with the deep phase modulation readout algorithm to construct simpler and easily scalable interferometers.

  17. Frequency Specific Modulation of Human Somatosensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Feurra, Matteo; Paulus, Walter; Walsh, Vincent; Kanai, Ryota

    2011-01-01

    Oscillatory neuronal activities are commonly observed in response to sensory stimulation. However, their functional roles are still the subject of debate. One-way to probe the roles of oscillatory neural activities is to deliver alternating current to the cortex at biologically relevant frequencies and examine whether such stimulation influences perception and cognition. In this study, we tested whether transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) over the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) could elicit tactile sensations in humans in a frequency-dependent manner. We tested the effectiveness of tACS over SI at frequency bands ranging from 2 to 70 Hz. Our results show that stimulation in alpha (10–14 Hz) and high gamma (52–70 Hz) frequency range produces a tactile sensation in the contralateral hand. A weaker effect was also observed for beta (16–20 Hz) stimulation. These findings highlight the frequency dependency of effective tACS over SI with the effective frequencies corresponding to those observed in previous electroencephalography/magnetoencephalography studies of tactile perception. Our present study suggests that tACS could be used as a powerful online stimulation technique to reveal the causal roles of oscillatory brain activities. PMID:21713181

  18. High-anxiety rats are less sensitive to the rewarding affects of amphetamine on 50kHz USV.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Małgorzata H; Taracha, Ewa; Kaniuga, Ewelina; Wisłowska-Stanek, Aleksandra; Wróbel, Jacek; Sobolewska, Alicja; Turzyńska, Danuta; Skórzewska, Anna; Płaźnik, Adam

    2014-12-15

    This study assessed behaviour, as measured by 50kHz calls related to positive affect, in rats with different fear conditioned response strengths: low-anxiety rats (LR) and high-anxiety rats (HR), after amphetamine injection in a two-injection protocol (TIPS). The results showed that the first dose of amphetamine evoked similar behavioural effects in frequency-modulated (FM) 50kHz calls in the LR and HR groups. The second injection of amphetamine resulted in stronger FM 50kHz calls in LR compared with HR rats. The biochemical data ('ex vivo' analysis) showed that the LR rats had increased basal levels of dopamine in the amygdala, and increased homovanilic acid (HVA), dopamine's main metabolite, in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex compared with HR rats. The 'in vivo' analysis (microdialysis study) showed that the LR rats had increased HVA concentrations in the basolateral amygdala in response to an aversively conditioned context. Research has suggested that differences in dopaminergic system activity in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex may be one of the biological factors that underlie individual differences in response to fear stimuli, which may also affect the rewarding effects of amphetamine.

  19. 20 kHz toluene planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of a jet in nearly sonic crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, V. A.; Troutman, V. A.; Mungal, M. G.; Hanson, R. K.

    2014-10-01

    This manuscript describes continuous, high-repetition-rate (20 kHz) toluene planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging in an expansion tube impulse flow facility. Cinematographic image sequences are acquired that visualize an underexpanded jet of hydrogen in Mach 0.9 crossflow, a practical flow configuration relevant to aerospace propulsion systems. The freestream gas is nitrogen seeded with toluene; toluene broadly absorbs and fluoresces in the ultraviolet, and the relatively high quantum yield of toluene produces large signals and high signal-to-noise ratios. Toluene is excited using a commercially available, frequency-quadrupled (266 nm), high-repetition-rate (20 kHz), pulsed (0.8-0.9 mJ per pulse), diode-pumped solid-state Nd:YAG laser, and fluorescence is imaged with a high-repetition-rate intensifier and CMOS camera. The resulting PLIF movie and image sequences are presented, visualizing the jet start-up process and the dynamics of the jet in crossflow; the freestream duration and a measure of freestream momentum flux steadiness are also inferred. This work demonstrates progress toward continuous PLIF imaging of practical flow systems in impulse facilities at kHz acquisition rates using practical, turn-key, high-speed laser and imaging systems.

  20. Instrument for determining the complex shear modulus of soft-tissue-like materials from 10 to 300 Hz

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, E L; Frank, G R; Hobson, M A; Lin-Gibson, S; Hall, T J; Jiang, J; Stiles, T A

    2010-01-01

    Accurate determination of the complex shear modulus of soft tissues and soft-tissue-like materials in the 10–300 Hz frequency range is very important to researchers in MR elastography and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging. A variety of instruments for making such measurements has been reported, but none of them is easily reproduced, and none have been tested to conform to causality via the Kramers–Kronig (K-K) relations. A promising linear oscillation instrument described in a previous brief report operates between 20 and 160 Hz, but results were not tested for conformity to the K-K relations. We have produced a similar instrument with our own version of the electronic components and have also accounted for instrumental effects on the data reduction, which is not addressed in the previous report. The improved instrument has been shown to conform to an accurate approximation of the K-K relations over the 10–300 Hz range. The K-K approximation is based on the Weichert mechanical circuit model. We also found that the sample thickness must be small enough to obtain agreement with a calibrated commercial rheometer. A complete description of the improved instrument is given, facilitating replication in other labs. PMID:18758002

  1. Underwater hearing sensitivity of harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) for narrow noise bands between 0.2 and 80 kHz.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Wensveen, Paul; Hoek, Lean; Terhune, John M

    2009-07-01

    The underwater hearing sensitivities of two 1.5-year-old female harbor seals were quantified in a quiet pool built specifically for acoustic research, by using a behavioral psychoacoustic technique. The animals were trained to respond when they detected an acoustic signal and not to respond when they did not ("go/no-go" response). Fourteen narrowband noise signals (1/3-octave bands but with some energy in adjacent bands), at 1/3-octave center frequencies of 0.2-80 kHz, and of 900 ms duration, were tested. Thresholds at each frequency were measured using the up-down staircase method and defined as the stimulus level resulting in a 50% detection rate. Between 0.5 and 40 kHz, the thresholds corresponded to a 1/3-octave band noise level of approximately 60 dB re 1 microPa (SD+/-3.0 dB). At lower frequencies, the thresholds increased to 66 dB re 1 microPa and at 80 kHz the thresholds rose to 114 dB re 1 microPa. The 1/3-octave noise band thresholds of the two seals did not differ from each other, or from the narrowband frequency-modulated tone thresholds at the same frequencies obtained a few months before for the same animals. These hearing threshold values can be used to calculate detection ranges of underwater calls and anthropogenic noises by harbor seals.

  2. Frequency dependency of temporal contrast adaptation in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Hohberger, Bettina; Rössler, Christopher W; Jünemann, Anselm G M; Horn, Folkert K; Kremers, Jan

    2011-06-21

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of temporal frequency of temporal contrast adaptation on contrast sensitivity in healthy subjects. Temporal contrast sensitivities (TCS) were measured monocularly in seven healthy subjects with a modified ERG full-field bowl stimulator at eight different test temporal frequencies (9, 15, 20, 25, 31, 37, 44, 51 Hz) using a two-alternative-forced-choice strategy. Before each presentation of the test stimulus, a 100% contrast adapting flicker stimulus was presented (frequencies: 9, 15, 20, 25, 31, 37, 44, 51, 100 Hz). At each adapting frequency, a complete set of TCSs was measured. All temporal contrast sensitivities decreased with increasing temporal frequencies. Adaptation led to a general temporal contrast sensitivity decrease. Largest adaptation effects were seen at an adaptation frequency of 25 Hz. Reduction of contrast sensitivity was significantly larger at 25 Hz adaptation than at 9 Hz adaptation (t-test of paired samples, Bonferroni corrected). The results of this study showed a general TCS decrease with the largest effect at an adaptation frequency of 25 Hz. This finding indicates that the contrast adaptation probably occurred in the magnocellular-pathway. In future clinical studies adaptation effects could be investigated in patients with reduced temporal contrast sensitivity.

  3. Very Broadband Rayleigh-Wave Dispersion (0.06 - 60 Hz) and Shear-Wave Velocity Structure Under Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, K. A.; Bilek, S. L.; Patton, H. J.; Abbott, R. E.; Stead, R.; Pancha, A.; White, R.

    2009-12-01

    Earth structure plays an important role in the generation of seismic waves for all sources. Nowhere is this more evident than at near-surface depths where man-made sources, such as explosions, are conducted. For example, short-period Rayleigh waves (Rg) are excited and propagate in the upper 2 km of Earth's crust. The importance of Rg in the generation of S waves from explosion sources through near-source scattering depends greatly on the shear-wave velocity structure at very shallow depths. Using three distinct datasets, we present a very broadband Rayleigh-wave phase velocity dispersion curve for the Yucca Flat (YF) region of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The first dataset consists of waveforms of historic NTS explosions recorded on regional seismic networks and will provide information for the lowest frequencies (0.06-0.3 Hz). The second dataset is comprised of waveforms from a non-nuclear explosion on YF recorded at near-local distances and will be used for mid-range frequencies (0.2-1.5 Hz). The third dataset contains high-frequency waveforms recorded from refraction microtremor surveys on YF. This dataset provides information between 1.5 and 60 Hz. Initial results from the high frequency dataset indicate velocities range from 0.45-0.9 km/s at 1.5 Hz and 0.25-0.45 km/s at 60 Hz. The broadband nature of the dispersion curve will allow us to invert for the shear-wave velocity structure to 10 km depth, with focus on shallow depths where nuclear tests were conducted in the YF region. The velocity model will be used by researchers as a tool to aid the development of new explosion source models that incorporate shear wave generation. The new model can also be used to help improve regional distance yield estimation and source discrimination for small events.

  4. Mitigation of Laser Frequency Noise for LISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, Ira J.

    2009-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a proposed detector of gravitational waves in the 0.1 mHz - 0.1 Hz band. LISA will measure gravitational wave strain at the 10(exp -21) level by monitoring the distance between freely-falling test masses s(exp -11) m. These distance measurements will be made using heterodyne interferometry with multiple light sources on moving platforms with changing baselines, all of which cause frequency noise to couple into the displacement measurement. I will describe how LISA interferometry mitigates the effects of laser frequency noise through active suppression and common mode rejection. Recent laboratory developments will also be discussed.

  5. The effects of 1 Hz rTMS preconditioned by tDCS on gait kinematics in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    von Papen, Mitra; Fisse, Mirabell; Sarfeld, Anna-Sophia; Fink, Gereon R; Nowak, Dennis A

    2014-07-01

    Hypokinetic gait is a common and very disabling symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD). Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the motor cortex has been used with variable effectiveness to treat hypokinesia in PD. Preconditioning rTMS by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may enhance its effectiveness to treat hypokinetic gait in PD. Three-dimensional kinematic gait analysis was performed (1) prior to, (2) immediately after and (3) 30 min after low-frequency rTMS (1 Hz, 900 pulses, 80% of resting motor threshold) over M1 contralateral to the more affected body side preconditioned by (1) cathodal, (2) anodal or (3) sham tDCS (amperage: 1 mA, duration: 10 min) in ten subjects with PD (7 females, mean age 63 ± 9 years) and ten healthy subjects (four females, mean age 50 ± 11 years). The effects of tDCS-preconditioned rTMS on gait kinematics were assessed by the following parameters: number of steps, step length, stride length, double support time, cadence, swing and stance phases. Our data suggest a bilateral improvement of hypokinetic gait in PD after 1 Hz rTMS over M1 of the more affected body side preceded by anodal tDCS. In contrast, 1 Hz rTMS alone (preceded by sham tDCS) and 1 Hz rTMS preceded by cathodal tDCS were ineffective to improve gait kinematics in PD. In healthy subjects, gait kinematics was unaffected by either intervention. Preconditioning motor cortex rTMS by tDCS is a promising approach to treat hypokinetic gait in PD.

  6. 33 CFR 86.01 - Frequencies and range of audibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Frequencies and range of... Frequencies and range of audibility. The fundamental frequency of the signal shall lie within the range 70-525 Hz. The range of audibility of the signal from a whistle shall be determined by those...

  7. 33 CFR 86.01 - Frequencies and range of audibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Frequencies and range of... Frequencies and range of audibility. The fundamental frequency of the signal shall lie within the range 70-525 Hz. The range of audibility of the signal from a whistle shall be determined by those...

  8. 33 CFR 86.01 - Frequencies and range of audibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Frequencies and range of... Frequencies and range of audibility. The fundamental frequency of the signal shall lie within the range 70-525 Hz. The range of audibility of the signal from a whistle shall be determined by those...

  9. 33 CFR 86.01 - Frequencies and range of audibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Frequencies and range of... Frequencies and range of audibility. The fundamental frequency of the signal shall lie within the range 70-525 Hz. The range of audibility of the signal from a whistle shall be determined by those...

  10. 33 CFR 86.01 - Frequencies and range of audibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Frequencies and range of... Frequencies and range of audibility. The fundamental frequency of the signal shall lie within the range 70-525 Hz. The range of audibility of the signal from a whistle shall be determined by those...

  11. 33 CFR 86.03 - Limits of fundamental frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Limits of fundamental frequencies... of fundamental frequencies. To ensure a wide variety of whistle characteristics, the fundamental frequency of a whistle shall be between the following limits: (a) 70-200 Hz, for a vessel 200 meters or...

  12. 47 CFR 80.143 - Required frequencies for radiotelephony.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Required frequencies for radiotelephony. 80.143... Stations § 80.143 Required frequencies for radiotelephony. (a) Except for compulsory vessels, each ship... emission on the frequency 2182 kHz. Ship stations are additionally authorized to receive and transmit...

  13. 33 CFR 86.03 - Limits of fundamental frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Limits of fundamental frequencies... of fundamental frequencies. To ensure a wide variety of whistle characteristics, the fundamental frequency of a whistle shall be between the following limits: (a) 70-200 Hz, for a vessel 200 meters or...

  14. 33 CFR 86.03 - Limits of fundamental frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Limits of fundamental frequencies... of fundamental frequencies. To ensure a wide variety of whistle characteristics, the fundamental frequency of a whistle shall be between the following limits: (a) 70-200 Hz, for a vessel 200 meters or...

  15. 47 CFR 95.629 - LPRS transmitter frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false LPRS transmitter frequencies. 95.629 Section 95... PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Technical Regulations Technical Standards § 95.629 LPRS transmitter frequencies. (a... is 25 kHz. Channel No. Center frequency (MHz) 1 216.0125 2 216.0375 3 216.0625 4 216.0875 5...

  16. 47 CFR 95.629 - LPRS transmitter frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false LPRS transmitter frequencies. 95.629 Section 95... PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Technical Regulations Technical Standards § 95.629 LPRS transmitter frequencies. (a... is 25 kHz. Channel No. Center frequency (MHz) 1 216.0125 2 216.0375 3 216.0625 4 216.0875 5...

  17. 47 CFR 95.629 - LPRS transmitter frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false LPRS transmitter frequencies. 95.629 Section 95... PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Technical Regulations Technical Standards § 95.629 LPRS transmitter frequencies. (a... is 25 kHz. Channel No. Center frequency (MHz) 1 216.0125 2 216.0375 3 216.0625 4 216.0875 5...

  18. 47 CFR 95.629 - LPRS transmitter frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false LPRS transmitter frequencies. 95.629 Section 95... PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Technical Regulations Technical Standards § 95.629 LPRS transmitter frequencies. (a... is 25 kHz. Channel No. Center frequency (MHz) 1 216.0125 2 216.0375 3 216.0625 4 216.0875 5...

  19. Low-frequency sonophoresis: a review.

    PubMed

    Mitragotri, Samir; Kost, Joseph

    2004-03-27

    Application of ultrasound enhances skin permeability to a variety of molecules (sonophoresis). The enhancement induced by ultrasound is particularly significant at low-frequencies (f<100 kHz, low-frequency sonophoresis). This review summarizes mechanisms and applications of low-frequency sonophoresis. In vitro, in vivo, as well as clinical studies demonstrating the effect of low-frequency ultrasound on transdermal drug delivery and glucose extraction are summarized. Mechanistic insights gained through a number of investigations are also reviewed. Finally, reports on the synergistic effect of low-frequency ultrasound with other enhancers including chemicals and iontophoresis are summarized.

  20. 47 CFR 80.357 - Working frequencies for Morse code and data transmission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Working frequencies for Morse code and data... maritime stations for A1A, J2A, J2B (2000-27500 kHz band only), or J2D (2000-27500 kHz band only... transmissions of meteorological and navigational warnings to ships. (3) Frequencies in the 2000-27500 kHz...

  1. Scheme for efficient extraction of low-frequency signal beyond the quantum limit by frequency-shift detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, R G; Zhang, J; Zhai, Z H; Zhai, S Q; Liu, K; Gao, J R

    2015-08-10

    Low-frequency (Hz~kHz) squeezing is very important in many schemes of quantum precision measurement. But it is more difficult than that at megahertz-frequency because of the introduction of laser low-frequency technical noise. In this paper, we propose a scheme to obtain a low-frequency signal beyond the quantum limit from the frequency comb in a non-degenerate frequency and degenerate polarization optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) operating below threshold with type I phase matching by frequency-shift detection. Low-frequency squeezing immune to laser technical noise is obtained by a detection system with a local beam of two-frequency intense laser. Furthermore, the low-frequency squeezing can be used for phase measurement in Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be enhanced greatly.

  2. Thermal Nondestructive Evaluation Report: Inspection of the Refurbished Manipulator Arm System in the Manipulator Development Facility at Johnson Space Center 10-12 January 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott

    2002-01-01

    On 4 December 2002, a failure of the Refurbished Manipulator Arm System (RMAS) occurred in the Manipulator Development Facility (MDF) at Johnson Space Center. When the Test Director commanded a should pitch maneuver to lift the arm from its payload bay pedestal, the yaw controls failed. This, coupled with a gravitational forces (due to the angle of the shoulder joint with respect to vertical), resulted in uncontrolled arm motion. The shoulder yaw joint moved approximately 20 degrees, causing the extended arm to strike and severely damage the port side MDF catwalk handrails. The arm motion stopped after impact with the handrails. On 10-12 January 2001, inspections were performed on the port face of the lower and upper arms of the RMAS using a infrared thermography developed at Langley Research Center. This paper presents the results of those nondestructive inspections and provides a complete description of the anomalies found and their locations.

  3. Reading comprehension among typically developing Swedish-speaking 10-12-year-olds: examining subgroups differentiated in terms of language and decoding skills.

    PubMed

    Asberg, Jakob; Carlsson, Marika; Oderstam, Ann-Marie; Miniscalco, Carmela

    2010-12-01

    Based on data from 156 typically developing 10-12-year-olds from Sweden, reading comprehension skills were studied in three subgroups: those classified with specific poor word decoding skills (n = 10), those with specific poor language comprehension (n = 12), and those with mixed difficulties in word decoding and language comprehension (n = 11). The mixed poor group achieved significantly lower scores than both specific groups in reading comprehension, and was the only group displaying poor reading comprehension test results relative to the performance of the full sample. Results are indicative of the necessity of a combined effect of poor word decoding and language in reading comprehension difficulties for this group. Implications and limitations are discussed.

  4. Electromagnetic radiation trapped in the magnetosphere above the plasma frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Shaw, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    An electromagnetic noise band is frequently observed in the outer magnetosphere by the Imp 6 spacecraft at frequencies from about 5 to 20 kHz. This noise band generally extends throughout the region from near the plasmapause boundary to near the magnetopause boundary. The noise typically has a broadband field strength of about 5 microvolts/meter. The noise band often has a sharp lower cutoff frequency at about 5 to 10 kHz, and this cutoff has been identified as the local electron plasma frequency. Since the plasma frequency in the plasmasphere and solar wind is usually above 20 kHz, it is concluded that this noise must be trapped in the low-density region between the plasmapause and magnetopause boundaries. The noise bands often contain a harmonic frequency structure which suggests that the radiation is associated with harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency.

  5. Firing Frequency Maxima of Fast-Spiking Neurons in Human, Monkey, and Mouse Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Ke, Wei; Guang, Jing; Chen, Guang; Yin, Luping; Deng, Suixin; He, Quansheng; Liu, Yaping; He, Ting; Zheng, Rui; Jiang, Yanbo; Zhang, Xiaoxue; Li, Tianfu; Luan, Guoming; Lu, Haidong D.; Zhang, Mingsha; Zhang, Xiaohui; Shu, Yousheng

    2016-01-01

    Cortical fast-spiking (FS) neurons generate high-frequency action potentials (APs) without apparent frequency accommodation, thus providing fast and precise inhibition. However, the maximal firing frequency that they can reach, particularly in primate neocortex, remains unclear. Here, by recording in human, monkey, and mouse neocortical slices, we revealed that FS neurons in human association cortices (mostly temporal) could generate APs at a maximal mean frequency (Fmean) of 338 Hz and a maximal instantaneous frequency (Finst) of 453 Hz, and they increase with age. The maximal firing frequency of FS neurons in the association cortices (frontal and temporal) of monkey was even higher (Fmean 450 Hz, Finst 611 Hz), whereas in the association cortex (entorhinal) of mouse it was much lower (Fmean 215 Hz, Finst 342 Hz). Moreover, FS neurons in mouse primary visual cortex (V1) could fire at higher frequencies (Fmean 415 Hz, Finst 582 Hz) than those in association cortex. We further validated our in vitro data by examining spikes of putative FS neurons in behaving monkey and mouse. Together, our results demonstrate that the maximal firing frequency of FS neurons varies between species and cortical areas. PMID:27803650

  6. The Event-Related Low-Frequency Activity of Highly and Average Intelligent Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Tongran; Shi, Jiannong; Zhao, Daheng; Yang, Jie

    2008-01-01

    Using time-frequency analysis techniques to investigate the event-related low-frequency (delta: 0.5-4 Hz; theta: 4-8 Hz) activity of auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) data of highly and average intelligent children, 18 intellectually gifted children, and 18 intellectually average children participated the present study. Present findings…

  7. Firing Frequency Maxima of Fast-Spiking Neurons in Human, Monkey, and Mouse Neocortex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Ke, Wei; Guang, Jing; Chen, Guang; Yin, Luping; Deng, Suixin; He, Quansheng; Liu, Yaping; He, Ting; Zheng, Rui; Jiang, Yanbo; Zhang, Xiaoxue; Li, Tianfu; Luan, Guoming; Lu, Haidong D; Zhang, Mingsha; Zhang, Xiaohui; Shu, Yousheng

    2016-01-01

    Cortical fast-spiking (FS) neurons generate high-frequency action potentials (APs) without apparent frequency accommodation, thus providing fast and precise inhibition. However, the maximal firing frequency that they can reach, particularly in primate neocortex, remains unclear. Here, by recording in human, monkey, and mouse neocortical slices, we revealed that FS neurons in human association cortices (mostly temporal) could generate APs at a maximal mean frequency (Fmean) of 338 Hz and a maximal instantaneous frequency (Finst) of 453 Hz, and they increase with age. The maximal firing frequency of FS neurons in the association cortices (frontal and temporal) of monkey was even higher (Fmean 450 Hz, Finst 611 Hz), whereas in the association cortex (entorhinal) of mouse it was much lower (Fmean 215 Hz, Finst 342 Hz). Moreover, FS neurons in mouse primary visual cortex (V1) could fire at higher frequencies (Fmean 415 Hz, Finst 582 Hz) than those in association cortex. We further validated our in vitro data by examining spikes of putative FS neurons in behaving monkey and mouse. Together, our results demonstrate that the maximal firing frequency of FS neurons varies between species and cortical areas.

  8. Stereospecificity of an enzymatic monoene 1,4-dehydrogenation reaction: conversion of (Z)-11-tetradecenoic acid into (E,E)-10,12-tetradecadienoic acid.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Sergio; Clapés, Pere; Camps, Francisco; Fabriàs, Gemma

    2002-04-05

    In this article, we report the first stereochemical study of an enzymatic 1,4-dehydrogenation reaction, namely, the transformation of (Z)-11-tetradecenoic acid into (E,E)-10,12-tetradecadienoic acid, involved in the sex pheromone biosynthesis of the moth Spodoptera littoralis. The investigation was carried out using the labeled substrates (R)-[10-(2)H]- and (S)-[10-(2)H]-tridecanoic acids ((R)-2 and (S)-2, respectively) and (R)-[2,2,3,3,13-(2)H(5)]- and (S)-[2,2,3,3,13-(2)H(5)]-tetradecanoic acids ((R)-1 and (S)-1, respectively). Probes (R)-2 and (S)-2 were prepared as described in a previous article.(1) The synthesis of the pentadeuterated chiral substrates (R)-1 and (S)-1 was accomplished by kinetic resolution of the racemic 12-tridecyn-2-ol (6) with immobilized porcine pancreatic lipase. The enantiomerically pure alcohols (R)-6 and (S)-6 were transformed into the final acids (S)-1 and (R)-1, respectively, by a sequence of well-established reactions. The analyses of methanolyzed lipidic extracts from glands incubated separatedly with each individual probe showed that in the transformation of (Z)-11-tetradecenoic acid into (E,E)-10,12-tetradecadienoic acid, both pro-(R) hydrogen atoms at C-10 and C-13 are removed from the substrate. This is the first example reported of a desaturase with pro-(R)/pro-(R) stereospecificities that gives rise to (E)-double bonds. A mechanistic explanation for the stereochemical outcome of this reaction is advanced.

  9. [PhSiO1.5]8,10,12 as nanoreactors for non-enzymatic introduction of ortho, meta or para-hydroxyl groups to aromatic molecules.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Mozhgan; Zhang, Xingwen; Ehsani, Morteza; Jahani, Yousef; Laine, Richard M

    2017-03-20

    Traditional electrophilic bromination follows long established "rules": electron-withdrawing substituents cause bromination selective for meta positions, whereas electron-donating substituents favor ortho and para bromination. In contrast, in the [PhSiO1.5]8,10,12 silsesquioxanes, the cages act as bulky, electron withdrawing groups equivalent to CF3; yet bromination under mild conditions, without a catalyst, greatly favors ortho substitution. Surprisingly, ICl iodination without a catalyst favors (>90%) para substitution [p-IC6H4SiO1.5]8,10,12. Finally, nitration and Friedel-Crafts acylation and sulfonylation are highly meta selective, >80%. In principle, the two halogenation formats coupled with the traditional electrophilic reactions provide selective functionalization at each position on the aromatic ring. Furthermore, halogenation serves as a starting point for the synthesis of two structural isomers of practical utility, i.e. in drug prospecting. The o-bromo and p-iodo compounds are easily modified by catalytic cross-coupling to append diverse functional groups. Thereafter, F(-)/H2O2 treatment cleaves the Si-C bonds replacing Si with OH. This represents a rare opportunity to introduce hydroxyl groups to aromatic rings, a process not easily accomplished using traditional organic synthesis methods. The as-produced phenol provides additional opportunities for modification. Each cage can be considered a nanoreactor generating 8-12 product molecules. Examples given include syntheses of 4,2'-R,OH-stilbenes and 4,4'-R,OH-stilbenes (R = Me, CN). Unoptimized cleavage of the Br/I derivatives yields 55-85% phenol. Unoptimized cleavage of the stilbene derivatives yields 35-40% (3-5 equivalents of phenol) in the preliminary studies presented here. In contrast, meta R-phenol yields are 80% (7-10 mol per cage).

  10. The effect of high-frequency electric pulses on tumor blood flow in vivo.

    PubMed

    Raeisi, E; Firoozabadi, S M P; Hajizadeh, S; Rajabi, H; Hassan, Z M

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a 5-kHz repetition frequency of electroporating electric pulses in comparison to the standard 1-Hz frequency on blood flow of invasive ductal carcinoma tumors in Balb/C mice. Electroporation was performed by the delivery of eight electric pulses of 1,000 V cm(-1) and 100 mus duration at a repetition frequency of 1 Hz or 5 kHz. Blood flow changes in tumors were measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. Monitoring was performed continuously for 10 min before application of the electric pulses as well as immediately after application of the electric pulses for 40 min. The delivery of electric pulses to tumors induced changes in tumor blood flow. The reduction in blood flow started after the stimulation and continued for the 40-min period of observation. There was a significant difference in blood flow changes 3 min after application of the electric pulses at 1-Hz or 5-kHz repetition frequency. However, after 3 min the difference became nonsignificant. The findings showed that the high pulse frequency (5 kHz) had an effect comparable to the 1-Hz frequency on tumor blood flow except at very short times after pulse delivery, when pulses at 5 kHz produced a more intense reduction of blood flow.

  11. Chronic exposure to a 60-Hz electric field: effects on synaptic transmission and peripheral nerve function in the rat.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, R A; Laszewski, B L; Carr, D B; Phillips, R D

    1980-01-01

    Several reports have suggested that the nervous system can be affected by exposure to electric fields and that these effects may have detrimental health consequences for the exposed organism. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic (30-day) exposure of rats to a 60Hz, 100-kV/m electric field on synaptic transmission and peripheral-nerve function. One hundred forty-four rats, housed in individual polycarbonate cages were exposed to uniform, vertical, 60-Hz electric fields in a system free of corona discharge and ozone formation and in which the animals did not receive spark discharges or other shocks during exposure. Following 30 days of exposure to the electric field, superior cervical sympathetic ganglia, vagus and sciatic nerves were removed from rats anesthetized with urethan, placed in a temperature-controlled chamber, and superfused with a modified mammalian Ringer's solution equilibrated with 95% O2 and 5% CO2. Several measures and tests were used to characterize synaptic transmission and peripheral-nerve function. These included amplitude, area, and configuration of the postsynaptic or whole-nerve compound-action potential; conduction velocity; accommodation; refractory period; strength-duration curves; conditioning-test (C-T) response, frequency response; post-tetanic response; and high-frequency-induced fatigue. The results of a series of neurophysiologic tests and measurements indicate that only synaptic transmission is significantly and consistently affected by chronic (30-day) exposure to a 60-Hz, 100-kV/m electric field. Specifically, and increase in synaptic excitability was detected in replicated measurements of the C-T response ratio. In addition, there are trends in other data that can be interpreted to suggest a generalized increase in neuronal excitability in exposed animals.

  12. Properties of low-frequency head-related transfer functions in the barn owl (Tyto alba).

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Laura; von Campenhausen, Mark; Wagner, Hermann

    2010-09-01

    The barn owl (Tyto alba) possesses several specializations regarding auditory processing. The most conspicuous features are the directionally sensitive facial ruff and the asymmetrically arranged ears. The frequency-specific influence of these features on sound has consequences for sound localization that might differ between low and high frequencies. Whereas the high-frequency range (>3 kHz) is well investigated, less is known about the characteristics of head-related transfer functions for frequencies below 3 kHz. In the present study, we compared 1/3 octaveband-filtered transfer functions of barn owls with center frequencies ranging from 0.5 to 9 kHz. The range of interaural time differences was 600 micros at frequencies above 4 kHz, decreased to 505 micros at 3 kHz and increased again to about 615 micros at lower frequencies. The ranges for very low (0.5-1 kHz) and high frequencies (5-9 kHz) were not statistically different. Interaural level differences and monaural gains increased monotonically with increasing frequency. No systematic influence of the body temperature on the measured localization cues was observed. These data have implications for the mechanism underlying sound localization and we suggest that the barn owl's ears work as pressure receivers both in the high- and low-frequency ranges.

  13. Nanohertz frequency determination for the gravity probe B high frequency superconducting quantum interference device signal.

    PubMed

    Salomon, M; Conklin, J W; Kozaczuk, J; Berberian, J E; Keiser, G M; Silbergleit, A S; Worden, P; Santiago, D I

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we present a method to measure the frequency and the frequency change rate of a digital signal. This method consists of three consecutive algorithms: frequency interpolation, phase differencing, and a third algorithm specifically designed and tested by the authors. The succession of these three algorithms allowed a 5 parts in 10(10) resolution in frequency determination. The algorithm developed by the authors can be applied to a sampled scalar signal such that a model linking the harmonics of its main frequency to the underlying physical phenomenon is available. This method was developed in the framework of the gravity probe B (GP-B) mission. It was applied to the high frequency (HF) component of GP-B's superconducting quantum interference device signal, whose main frequency f(z) is close to the spin frequency of the gyroscopes used in the experiment. A 30 nHz resolution in signal frequency and a 0.1 pHz/s resolution in its decay rate were achieved out of a succession of 1.86 s-long stretches of signal sampled at 2200 Hz. This paper describes the underlying theory of the frequency measurement method as well as its application to GP-B's HF science signal.

  14. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) priming of 1Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) modulates experimental pain thresholds.

    PubMed

    Moloney, Tonya M; Witney, Alice G

    2013-02-08

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of primary motor cortex (M1) modulate cortical excitability. Both techniques have been demonstrated to modulate chronic pain and experimental pain thresholds, but with inconsistent effects. Preconditioning M1 with weak tDCS (1mA) standardizes the effects of subsequent stimulation via rTMS on levels of cortical excitability. Here we examine whether 1Hz rTMS, primed with tDCS, could effectively standardize the modulation of pain thresholds. Thermal pain thresholds were determined using quantitative sensory testing (QST) of the palmar thenar of both hands in 12 healthy males pre and post tDCS - 1Hz rTMS over the hand area of the left M1. Cathodal tDCS preconditioning of 1Hz rTMS successfully reversed the normal suppressive effect of low frequency rTMS and effectively modulated cold and heat pain thresholds. Conversely, anodal tDCS - 1Hz rTMS led to a decrease in cold pain thresholds. Therefore, this study supports that preconditioning M1 using cathodal tDCS before subsequent stimulation via 1Hz rTMS facilitates the production of analgesia.

  15. Infrasonic and low-frequency insert earphone hearing threshold.

    PubMed

    Kuehler, Robert; Fedtke, Thomas; Hensel, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    Low-frequency and infrasonic pure-tone monaural hearing threshold data down to 2.5 Hz are presented. These measurements were made by means of a newly developed insert-earphone source. The source is able to generate pure-tone sound pressure levels up to 130 dB between 2 and 250 Hz with very low harmonic distortions. Behavioral hearing thresholds were determined in the frequency range from 2.5 to 125 Hz for 18 otologically normal test persons. The median hearing thresholds are comparable to values given in the literature. They are intended for stimulus calibration in subsequent brain imaging investigations.

  16. Alarm pheromone does not modulate 22-kHz calls in male rats.

    PubMed

    Muyama, Hiromi; Kiyokawa, Yasushi; Inagaki, Hideaki; Takeuchi, Yukari; Mori, Yuji

    2016-03-15

    Rats are known to emit a series of ultrasonic vocalizations, termed 22-kHz calls, when exposed to distressing stimuli. Pharmacological studies have indicated that anxiety mediates 22-kHz calls in distressed rats. We previously found that exposure to the rat alarm pheromone increases anxiety in rats. Therefore, we hypothesized that the alarm pheromone would increase 22-kHz calls in pheromone-exposed rats. Accordingly, we tested whether exposure to the alarm pheromone induced 22-kHz calls, as well as whether the alarm pheromone increased 22-kHz calls in response to an aversive conditioned stimulus (CS). Rats were first fear-conditioned to an auditory and contextual CS. On the following day, the rats were either exposed to the alarm pheromone or a control odor that was released from the neck region of odor-donor rats. Then, the rats were re-exposed to the aversive CS. The alarm pheromone neither induced 22-kHz calls nor increased 22-kHz calls in response to the aversive CS. In contrast, the control odor unexpectedly reduced the total number and duration of 22-kHz calls elicited by the aversive CS, as well as the duration of freezing. These results suggest that the alarm pheromone does not affect 22-kHz calls in rats. However, we may have found evidence for an appeasing olfactory signal, released from the neck region of odor-donor rats.

  17. Robust frequency stabilization of multiple spectroscopy lasers with large and tunable offset frequencies.

    PubMed

    Nevsky, A; Alighanbari, S; Chen, Q-F; Ernsting, I; Vasilyev, S; Schiller, S; Barwood, G; Gill, P; Poli, N; Tino, G M

    2013-11-15

    We have demonstrated a compact, robust device for simultaneous absolute frequency stabilization of three diode lasers whose carrier frequencies can be chosen freely relative to the reference. A rigid ULE multicavity block is employed, and, for each laser, the sideband locking technique is applied. A small lock error, computer control of frequency offset, wide range of frequency offset, simple construction, and robust operation are the useful features of the system. One concrete application is as a stabilization unit for the cooling and trapping lasers of a neutral-atom lattice clock. The device significantly supports and improves the clock's operation. The laser with the most stringent requirements imposed by this application is stabilized to a line width of 70 Hz, and a residual frequency drift less than 0.5 Hz/s. The carrier optical frequency can be tuned over 350 MHz while in lock.

  18. Statistical analysis of Stromboli VLP tremor in the band (0.1-0.5)Hz: Some consequences for geometrical vibrating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palo, M.; de Lauro, E.; de Martino, S.; Falanga, M.

    2006-12-01

    We analyze time series of strombolian volcanic tremor recorded during the experiment performed in 1997 by using 21 three-component broadband seismometers. This work is devoted to the careful analysis of the frequency band [0.1-0.5] Hz in order to obtain information about the properties of volcanic tremor and the microseismic noise. In fact, although this frequency band is largely affected by noise, we infer the possibility of simpler hidden structures. We evidence two significant components by using Independent Component Analysis with the frequencies, respectively, of about 0.2 and 0.4 Hz. We show that these components display wavefield features similar to those of the high frequency strombolian signals (greater than 0.5 Hz). In fact they are radially polarised and located within the crater area. This characterization is lost when an enhancement of energy appears. In this case the presence of microseismic noise becomes relevant. Investigating the entire large data- set available, we determine how microseismic noise influences the signals. We ascribed the microseismic noise source to Scirocco wind. Moreover, our analysis allows one to affirm that the strombolian conduit vibrates like the asymmetric cavity associated with musical instruments generating self-sustained tones.

  19. Mechanisms of human motor cortex facilitation induced by subthreshold 5-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Martin; Rummel, Milena; Norden, Christoph; Rothkegel, Holger; Lang, Nicolas; Paulus, Walter

    2013-06-01

    Our knowledge about the mechanisms of human motor cortex facilitation induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is still incomplete. Here we used pharmacological conditioning with carbamazepine, dextrometorphan, lorazepam, and placebo to elucidate the type of plasticity underlying this facilitation, and to probe if mechanisms reminiscent of long-term potentiation are involved. Over the primary motor cortex of 10 healthy subjects, we applied biphasic rTMS pulses of effective posterior current direction in the brain. We used six blocks of 200 pulses at 5-Hz frequency and 90% active motor threshold intensity and controlled for corticospinal excitability changes using motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes and latencies elicited by suprathreshold pulses before, in between, and after rTMS. Target muscle was the dominant abductor digiti minimi muscle; we coregistered the dominant extensor carpi radialis muscle. We found a lasting facilitation induced by this type of rTMS. The GABAergic medication lorazepam and to a lesser extent the ion channel blocker carbamazepine reduced the MEP facilitation after biphasic effective posteriorly oriented rTMS, whereas the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-antagonist dextrometorphan had no effect. Our main conclusion is that the mechanism of the facilitation induced by biphasic effective posterior rTMS is more likely posttetanic potentiation than long-term potentiation. Additional findings were prolonged MEP latency under carbamazepine, consistent with sodium channel blockade, and larger MEP amplitudes from extensor carpi radialis under lorazepam, suggesting GABAergic involvement in the center-surround balance of excitability.

  20. Acoustic effects of the ATOC signal (75 Hz, 195 dB) on dolphins and whales.

    PubMed

    Au, W W; Nachtigall, P E; Pawloski, J L

    1997-05-01

    The Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Climate (ATOC) program of Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, will broadcast a low-frequency 75-Hz phase modulated acoustic signal over ocean basins in order to study ocean temperatures on a global scale and examine the effects of global warming. One of the major concerns is the possible effect of the ATOC signal on marine life, especially on dolphins and whales. In order to address this issue, the hearing sensitivity of a false killer whale (Pseudorca crassidens) and a Risso's dolphin (Grampus griseus) to the ATOC sound was measured behaviorally. A staircase procedure with the signal levels being changed in 1-dB steps was used to measure the animals' threshold to the actual ATOC coded signal. The results indicate that small odontocetes such as the Pseudorca and Grampus swimming directly above the ATOC source will not hear the signal unless they dive to a depth of approximately 400 m. A sound propagation analysis suggests that the sound-pressure level at ranges greater than 0.5 km will be less than 130 dB for depths down to about 500 m. Several species of baleen whales produce sounds much greater than 170-180 dB. With the ATOC source on the axis of the deep sound channel (greater than 800 m), the ATOC signal will probably have minimal physical and physiological effects on cetaceans.

  1. Electromagnetic field at 15.95-16 Hz is cardio protective following acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Barzelai, Sharon; Dayan, Anat; Feinberg, Micha S; Holbova, Radka; Laniado, Shlomo; Scheinowitz, Mickey

    2009-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that pre-exposure of the heart to weak magnetic field reduces infarct size shortly after induction of myocardial ischemia. To investigate the role of AC magnetic field with a frequency of 15.95-16 Hz and 80 mT on left ventricular (LV) remodeling following chronic coronary occlusion and a short episode of ischemia followed by reperfusion (I/R). LV dimension and function were measured using echocardiography. Femur bone marrow was isolated and cells were phenotyped for endothelial linage and immuno stained for endothelial cells. The area at risk was measured using triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. A significant reduction of 27% in shortening fraction (SF) was measured following acute myocardial infarction (AMI) compared with a 7% decrease in animals exposed to magnetic field (p < 0.04). A significantly higher number of colony forming units and endothelial progenitor cells were counted within the treated groups subjected to magnetic field (p < 0.02). Exposing the heart to magnetic field prior to reperfusion did not show any preservation either on SF or on infarct size. Magnetic field was protective in the AMI but not in the I/R model. The mechanisms underlying cardiac protection induced by AC magnetic field following chronic injury deserves further investigation.

  2. Automatic detection of fast oscillations (40–200 Hz) in scalp EEG recordings

    PubMed Central

    von Ellenrieder, Nicolás; Andrade-Valença, Luciana P.; Dubeau, François; Gotman, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Objective We aim to automatically detect fast oscillations (40–200 Hz) related to epilepsy on scalp EEG recordings. Methods The detector first finds localized increments of the signal power in narrow frequency bands. A simple classification based on two features, a narrowband to wideband signal amplitude ratio and an absolute narrowband signal amplitude, then allows for an important reduction in the number of false positives. Results When compared to an expert, the performance in 15 focal epilepsy patients resulted in 3.6 false positives per minute at 95% sensitivity, with at least 40% of the detected events being true positives. In most of the patients the channels showing the highest number of events according to the expert and the automatic detector were the same. Conclusions A high sensitivity is achieved with the proposed automatic detector, but results should be reviewed by an expert to remove false positives. Significance The time required to mark fast oscillations on scalp EEG recordings is drastically reduced with the use of the proposed detector. Thus, the automatic detector is a useful tool in studies aiming to create a better understanding of the fast oscillations visible on the scalp. PMID:21940200

  3. THz generation from elliptically-focused two-color laser pulses at 1 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Yungjun; Kuk, Donghoon; Zhong, Zheqiang; Kim, Ki-Yong

    2017-01-01

    We have generated high-power terahertz (THz) radiation by elliptical focusing of two-color femtosecond laser pulses in air at a 1-kHz repetition rate. Elliptical focusing produces a 2-dimensional plasma sheet, emitting two diverging THz radiation lobes in the far field. Such radiation is collimated and refocused by a combination of cylindrical and off-axis parabolic mirrors. Here the distances between the 2-D plasma sheet, cylindrical mirror, and off-axis parabolic mirror are carefully adjusted to minimize the THz spot size at the refocus. The refocused THz field strength is estimated by measuring the THz energy, beam spot size, and waveform. Here an uncooled microbolometer camera with real-time lock-in imaging is used to monitor and measure the focused THz beam profiles with a high signal-to-noise ratio at a broad range of THz (1 40 THz) frequencies. High-pressure gas (N2 and Ar) jets puffed in air are also tested as laser targets to boost the output THz energy even further. This material is based upon work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Award Number FA9550-16-1-0163.

  4. Rat liver foci study on coexposure with 50 Hz magnetic fields and known carcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    Rannug, A.; Holmberg, B.; Ekstroem, T. ); Mild, K.H. )

    1993-01-01

    A study was performed to investigate possible interactions by magnetic fields (MF) with the processes of initiation and promotion of chemically induced preneoplastic lesions in rat liver. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a 70% partial hepatectomy followed after 24 h by i.p. injection of diethylnitrosamine (DENA) as a tumor initiator. Starting one week after the DENA-treatment phenobarbital (PB) was given to promote growth of enzymatically altered foci of liver cells. MF was applied immediately after the partial hepatectomy and continued until sacrifice after 12 weeks of PB exposure. Homogeneous horizontal AC magnetic fields with a frequency of 50Hz and flux densities of 0.5 [mu]T or 0.5 mT were used. The rats coexposed with MF and DENA plus PB did not gain weight as much as the rats exposed to the chemical agents only. The MF-exposure also resulted in a slight reduction in size and numbers of the focal lesions. The results suggest an interaction of MF with the processes of chemical carcinogenesis either as a result of stress or depending on effects on the proliferation of preneoplastic cells.

  5. Constraining the size of the Comptonizing medium by modelling the energy-dependent time lags of kHz QPOs of neutron star system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nagendra; Misra, Ranjeev

    2016-09-01

    We study the dependence of the estimated size and geometry of the medium on the time-averaged spectral model assumed and on the frequency of the kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) in the framework of a thermal Comptonization model. We use the high-quality time lag and rms obtained during 1996 March 3 observation of 4U 1608-52 by RXTE as well as other observations of the source at different QPO frequencies where a single time lag between two broad energy bands has been reported. We compare the results obtained when assuming that the time-averaged spectra are represented by the spectrally degenerate `hot (kTb ≥ 1 keV)' and `cold (kTb ≤ 0.5 keV)' seed spectral models where Tb is seed source temperature. We find that for the `hot-seed' model the medium size is in the range of 0.3-2.0 km and the size decreases with increasing QPO frequency. On the other hand, for the `cold-seed' model, the range for the sizes is much larger 0.5-20 km and hence perhaps show no variation with QPO frequency. Our results emphasize the need for broad-band spectral information combined with high-frequency timing to lift this degeneracy. We further compare the rms as a function of energy for the upper kHz QPO, and indeed we find that the driver for this QPO should be temperature variations of the corona identical to the lower kHz QPO. However, the time lag reported for the upper kHz QPO is hard, which if confirmed would challenge the simple Comptonization model presented here.

  6. 20 kHz ultrasound assisted treatment of chronic wounds with concurrent optic monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bawiec, Christopher R.; Sunny, Youhan; Diaz, David; Nadkarni, Sumati; Weingarten, Michael S.; Neidrauer, Michael; Margolis, David J.; Zubkov, Leonid; Lewin, Peter A.

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes a novel, wearable, battery powered ultrasound applicator that was evaluated as a therapeutic tool for healing of chronic wounds, such as venous ulcers. The low frequency and low intensity (~100mW/cm2) applicator works by generating ultrasound waves with peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes of 55 kPa at 20 kHz. The device was used in a pilot human study (n=25) concurrently with remote optical (diffuse correlation spectroscopy - DCS) monitoring to assess the healing outcome. More specifically, the ulcers' healing status was determined by measuring tissue oxygenation and blood flow in the capillary network. This procedure facilitated an early prognosis of the treatment outcome and - once verified - may eventually enable customization of wound management. The outcome of the study shows that the healing patients of the ultrasound treated group had a statistically improved (p<0.05) average rate of wound healing (20.6%/week) compared to the control group (5.3%/week). In addition, the calculated blood flow index (BFI) decreased more rapidly in wounds that decreased in size, indicating a correlation between BFI and wound healing prediction. Overall, the results presented support the notion that active low frequency ultrasound treatment of chronic venous ulcers accelerates healing when combined with the current standard clinical care. The ultrasound applicator described here provides a user-friendly, fully wearable system that has the potential for becoming the first device suitable for treatment of chronic wounds in patient's homes, which - in turn - would increase patients' compliance and improve quality of life.

  7. Task failure during standing heel raises is associated with increased power from 13 to 50 Hz in the activation of triceps surae.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Rafael; Schettino, Ludmila; Machado, Marco; da Silva, Pierre Augusto Victor; Pinto Neto, Osmar

    2010-09-01

    The goal of this paper was to investigate the amplitude and sub-100 Hz frequency content of surface electromyography (EMG) signals obtained from agonist, antagonist and synergist muscles during a heel-raise task sustained to failure. Twenty-two healthy adults, 14 men and 8 women participated in the study. Surface EMG data from the raising and lowering phases of the movement were studied in the time (EMG amplitude) and frequency (wavelet transform) domains. For the raising phase, we found a significant increase in the EMG amplitude of all muscles studied throughout the task (P < 0.02); however, for the lowering phase, we found a decrease in overall muscle activation for the medial gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior. Additionally, we found higher 13-30 and 30-50 Hz normalized power during the raising phase for the triceps surae prior to task failure and at task failure compared with the beginning and midway of the task (P < 0.05); during the lowering phase, however, we found higher normalized power from 30 to 50 Hz for the triceps surae (P < 0.01) and higher 13-30 Hz normalized power for the tibialis anterior (P < 0.01) at task failure compared with the beginning and midway of the task. Finally, we showed that a dynamic task performed until failure can induce different activation strategies for agonist, antagonist and synergist muscles, and that the frequency content below 100 Hz contains useful information about the neural activation of these muscles in relation to task failure that is not evident from the EMG amplitude.

  8. Low-frequency sonophoresis: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Makoto; Paliwal, Sumit; Mitragotri, Samir

    2008-06-30

    Application of ultrasound enhances skin permeability to drugs, a phenomenon referred to as sonophoresis. Significant strides have been made in sonophoresis research in recent years, especially under low-frequency conditions (20 kHzHz). This article reviews the mechanistic principles and current status of sonophoresis under low-frequency conditions. Several therapeutic macromolecules including insulin, low-molecular weight heparin, and vaccines have been delivered using low-frequency sonophoresis in vivo. Clinical trials have been performed with several drugs including lidocaine and cyclosporin. Novel theoretical and experimental approaches have provided insights into the mechanisms of low-frequency sonophoresis. Current understanding of these mechanisms is presented.

  9. Listening to the low-frequency gravitational-wave band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Scott

    2016-03-01

    Ground-based gravitational-wave detectors are beginning to explore the high-frequency band of roughly 10 to 1000 Hz. These three decades in frequency represent one of several astrophysically important wavebands. In this talk, I will focus on the astrophysics of the low-frequency band, from roughly 30 microhertz to 0.1 Hz. This band is expected to be particularly rich with very loud sources. I will survey what we expect to be important sources of low-frequency gravitational waves, and review the scientific payoff that would come from measuring them.

  10. A MEMS-based high frequency x-ray chopper.

    PubMed

    Siria, A; Dhez, O; Schwartz, W; Torricelli, G; Comin, F; Chevrier, J

    2009-04-29

    Time-resolved x-ray experiments require intensity modulation at high frequencies (advanced rotating choppers have nowadays reached the kHz range). We here demonstrate that a silicon microlever oscillating at 13 kHz with nanometric amplitude can be used as a high frequency x-ray chopper. We claim that using micro-and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS), it will be possible to achieve higher frequencies in excess of hundreds of megahertz. Working at such a frequency can open a wealth of possibilities in chemistry, biology and physics time-resolved experiments.

  11. Real-Time, High-Frequency QRS Electrocardiograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; DePalma, Jude L.; Moradi, Saeed

    2003-01-01

    An electronic system that performs real-time analysis of the low-amplitude, high-frequency, ordinarily invisible components of the QRS portion of an electrocardiographic signal in real time has been developed. Whereas the signals readily visible on a conventional electrocardiogram (ECG) have amplitudes of the order of a millivolt and are characterized by frequencies <100 Hz, the ordinarily invisible components have amplitudes in the microvolt range and are characterized by frequencies from about 150 to about 250 Hz. Deviations of these high-frequency components from a normal pattern can be indicative of myocardial ischemia or myocardial infarction

  12. On the Nature of the mHz X-Ray Quasi-periodic Oscillations from Ultraluminous X-Ray Source M82 X-1: Search for Timing-Spectral Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2013-07-01

    Using all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray (3-10 keV) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1, we searched for a correlation between its variable mHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency and its hardness ratio (5-10 keV/3-5 keV), an indicator of the energy spectral power-law index. When stellar-mass black holes (StMBHs) exhibit type-C low-frequency QPOs (~0.2-15 Hz), the centroid frequency of the QPO is known to correlate with the energy spectral index. The detection of such a correlation would strengthen the identification of M82 X-1's mHz QPOs as type-C and enable a more reliable mass estimate by scaling its QPO frequencies to those of type-C QPOs in StMBHs of known mass. We resolved the count rates and the hardness ratios of M82 X-1 and a nearby bright ULX (source 5/X42.3+59) through surface brightness modeling. We detected QPOs in the frequency range of 36-210 mHz during which M82 X-1's hardness ratio varied from 0.42 to 0.47. Our primary results are (1) that we do not detect any correlation between the mHz QPO frequency and the hardness ratio (a substitute for the energy spectral power-law index) and (2) similar to some accreting X-ray binaries, we find that M82 X-1's mHz QPO frequency increases with its X-ray count rate (Pearson's correlation coefficient = +0.97). The apparent lack of a correlation between the QPO centroid frequency and the hardness ratio poses a challenge to the earlier claims that the mHz QPOs of M82 X-1 are the analogs of the type-C low-frequency QPOs of StMBHs. On the other hand, it is possible that the observed relation between the hardness ratio and the QPO frequency represents the saturated portion of the correlation seen in type-C QPOs of StMBHs—in which case M82 X-1's mHz QPOs can still be analogous to type-C QPOs.

  13. On the Nature of the mHz X-ray Quasi-Periodic Oscillations from Ultraluminous X-ray source M82 X-1: Search for Timing-Spectral Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2013-01-01

    Using all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray (3-10 keV) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1, we searched for a correlation between its variable mHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency and its hardness ratio (5-10 keV/3-5 keV), an indicator of the energy spectral power-law index. When stellar-mass black holes (StMBHs) exhibit type-C low-frequency QPOs (0.2-15 Hz), the centroid frequency of the QPO is known to correlate with the energy spectral index. The detection of such a correlation would strengthen the identification of M82 X-1's mHz QPOs as type-C and enable a more reliable mass estimate by scaling its QPO frequencies to those of type-C QPOs in StMBHs of known mass.We resolved the count rates and the hardness ratios of M82 X-1 and a nearby bright ULX (source 5/X42.3+59) through surface brightness modeling.We detected QPOs in the frequency range of 36-210 mHz during which M82 X-1's hardness ratio varied from 0.42 to 0.47. Our primary results are (1) that we do not detect any correlation between the mHz QPO frequency and the hardness ratio (a substitute for the energy spectral power-law index) and (2) similar to some accreting X-ray binaries, we find that M82 X-1's mHz QPO frequency increases with its X-ray count rate (Pearson's correlation coefficient = +0.97). The apparent lack of a correlation between the QPO centroid frequency and the hardness ratio poses a challenge to the earlier claims that the mHz QPOs of M82 X-1 are the analogs of the type-C low-frequency QPOs of StMBHs. On the other hand, it is possible that the observed relation between the hardness ratio and the QPO frequency represents the saturated portion of the correlation seen in type-C QPOs of StMBHs-in which case M82 X-1's mHz QPOs can still be analogous to type-C QPOs.

  14. ON THE NATURE OF THE mHz X-RAY QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS FROM ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE M82 X-1: SEARCH FOR TIMING-SPECTRAL CORRELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E. E-mail: tod.strohmayer@nasa.gov

    2013-07-10

    Using all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray (3-10 keV) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1, we searched for a correlation between its variable mHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency and its hardness ratio (5-10 keV/3-5 keV), an indicator of the energy spectral power-law index. When stellar-mass black holes (StMBHs) exhibit type-C low-frequency QPOs ({approx}0.2-15 Hz), the centroid frequency of the QPO is known to correlate with the energy spectral index. The detection of such a correlation would strengthen the identification of M82 X-1's mHz QPOs as type-C and enable a more reliable mass estimate by scaling its QPO frequencies to those of type-C QPOs in StMBHs of known mass. We resolved the count rates and the hardness ratios of M82 X-1 and a nearby bright ULX (source 5/X42.3+59) through surface brightness modeling. We detected QPOs in the frequency range of 36-210 mHz during which M82 X-1's hardness ratio varied from 0.42 to 0.47. Our primary results are (1) that we do not detect any correlation between the mHz QPO frequency and the hardness ratio (a substitute for the energy spectral power-law index) and (2) similar to some accreting X-ray binaries, we find that M82 X-1's mHz QPO frequency increases with its X-ray count rate (Pearson's correlation coefficient = +0.97). The apparent lack of a correlation between the QPO centroid frequency and the hardness ratio poses a challenge to the earlier claims that the mHz QPOs of M82 X-1 are the analogs of the type-C low-frequency QPOs of StMBHs. On the other hand, it is possible that the observed relation between the hardness ratio and the QPO frequency represents the saturated portion of the correlation seen in type-C QPOs of StMBHs-in which case M82 X-1's mHz QPOs can still be analogous to type-C QPOs.

  15. Absolute frequency measurement of the 674-nm {sup 88}Sr{sup +} clock transition using a femtosecond optical frequency comb

    SciTech Connect

    Margolis, H.S.; Huang, G.; Barwood, G.P.; Lea, S.N.; Klein, H.A.; Rowley, W.R.C.; Gill, P.; Windeler, R.S.

    2003-03-01

    The frequency of the 5s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}-4d {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} electric quadrupole transition at 674 nm in a single, trapped, laser-cooled {sup 88}Sr{sup +} ion has been measured with respect to the Systeme International (SI) second using a femtosecond laser optical frequency comb. The measured frequency of 444 779 044 095.52 kHz, with an estimated standard uncertainty of 0.10 kHz, is more accurate than, and in agreement with, the value previously measured using a conventional frequency chain.

  16. Frequency Combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänsch, Theodor W.; Picqué, Nathalie

    Much of modern research in the field of atomic, molecular, and optical science relies on lasers, which were invented some 50 years ago and perfected in five decades of intense research and development. Today, lasers and photonic technologies impact most fields of science and they have become indispensible in our daily lives. Laser frequency combs were conceived a decade ago as tools for the precision spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen. Through the development of optical frequency comb techniques, technique a setup of the size 1 ×1 m2, good for precision measurements of any frequency, and even commercially available, has replaced the elaborate previous frequency-chain schemes for optical frequency measurements, which only worked for selected frequencies. A true revolution in optical frequency measurements has occurred, paving the way for the creation of all-optical clocks clock with a precision that might approach 10-18. A decade later, frequency combs are now common equipment in all frequency metrology-oriented laboratories. They are also becoming enabling tools for an increasing number of applications, from the calibration of astronomical spectrographs to molecular spectroscopy. This chapter first describes the principle of an optical frequency comb synthesizer. Some of the key technologies to generate such a frequency comb are then presented. Finally, a non-exhaustive overview of the growing applications is given.

  17. Response of the retina at low temporal frequencies.

    PubMed

    Burns, S A; Elsner, A E

    1996-03-01

    We investigated the low-frequency temporal response of the retina by measuring the corneal electroretinogram elicited by flickering lights. A sum of two temporal sine-wave modulations was used to generate difference frequencies between a 36-Hz standard stimulus and a series of low-frequency stimuli. The response of the retina at the difference frequency did not change as the low-frequency component of the stimulus was varied from 0.5 to 4 Hz. We also replicated an earlier study, stimulating the retina with a sum of two sine waves that were varied in average frequency but keeping the difference frequency constant. These data showed no change in the amplitude of the difference frequency as the average stimulus frequency was varied from 8 to almost 40 Hz. Taken together, the two sets of data support the notion that the in vivo early retinal response is low pass and extends without attenuation to frequencies greater than 30 Hz, in contrast to the sensitivity of the visual system measured by psychophysical techniques.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa FA-HZ1, an Efficient Dibenzofuran-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Fawad; Hu, Haiyang; Xu, Ping

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas sp. FA-HZ1, an efficient dibenzofuran-degrading bacterium, was isolated from landfill leachate. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of strain FA-HZ1, which contains only one circular chromosome. The complete genome sequence will be essential for revealing the molecular mechanisms of dibenzofuran degradation. PMID:28209830

  19. Sub-kHz Linewidth GaSb Semiconductor Diode Lasers Operating Near 2 Micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagheri, Mahmood; Briggs, Ryan M.; Frez, Clifford; Ksendzov, Alexander; Forouhar, Siamak

    2012-01-01

    We report on the phase noise properties of DFB lasers operating near 2.0 microns. Measured noise spectra indicate intrinsic laser linewidths below 1 kHz. An effective linewidth of less than 200 kHz for 5 ms measurement times is estimated.

  20. 1-GHz harmonically pumped femtosecond optical parametric oscillator frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Balskus, K; Leitch, S M; Zhang, Z; McCracken, R A; Reid, D T

    2015-01-26

    We present the first example of a femtosecond optical parametric oscillator frequency comb harmonically-pumped by a 333-MHz Ti:sapphire laser to achieve a stabilized signal comb at 1-GHz mode spacing in the 1.1-1.6-µm wavelength band. Simultaneous locking of the comb carrier-envelope-offset and repetition frequencies is achieved with uncertainties over 1 s of 0.27 Hz and 5 mHz respectively, which are comparable with those of 0.27 Hz and 1.5 mHz achieved for 333-MHz fundamental pumping. The phase-noise power-spectral density of the CEO frequency integrated from 1 Hz-64 kHz was 2.8 rad for the harmonic comb, 1.0 rad greater than for fundamental pumping. The results show that harmonic operation does not substantially compromise the frequency-stability of the comb, which is shown to be limited only by the Rb atomic frequency reference used.