Science.gov

Sample records for 10-3 cm h-1

  1. H1 in RSA galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, OTTO-G.

    1993-01-01

    The original Revised Shapley-Ames (RSA) galaxy sample of almost 1300 galaxies has been augmented with further bright galaxies from the RSA appendix as well as newer galaxy catalogs. A complete and homogeneous, strictly magnitude-limited all-sky sample of 2345 galaxies brighter than 13.4 in apparent blue magnitude was formed. New 21 cm H1 line observations for more than 600 RSA galaxies have been combined with all previously available H1 data from the literature. This new extentise data act allows detailed tests of widely accepted 'standard' reduction and analysis techniques.

  2. 44 CFR 10.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Definitions. 10.3 Section 10.3 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS General § 10.3 Definitions. (a) Regional Administrator...

  3. 1 CFR 10.3 - Format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Format. 10.3 Section 10.3 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER SPECIAL EDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PRESIDENTIAL PAPERS Regular Publication § 10.3 Format. The Daily Compilation of Presidential Documents is published online...

  4. 1 CFR 10.3 - Format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Format. 10.3 Section 10.3 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER SPECIAL EDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PRESIDENTIAL PAPERS Regular Publication § 10.3 Format. The Daily Compilation of Presidential Documents is published online...

  5. 1 CFR 10.3 - Format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Format. 10.3 Section 10.3 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER SPECIAL EDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PRESIDENTIAL PAPERS Regular Publication § 10.3 Format. The Daily Compilation of Presidential Documents is published online...

  6. 10 CFR 10.3 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false 10.3 Section 10.3 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION CRITERIA AND PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA OR NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION OR AN EMPLOYMENT CLEARANCE General Provisions § 10.3...

  7. 1 CFR 10.3 - Format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Format. 10.3 Section 10.3 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER SPECIAL EDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PRESIDENTIAL PAPERS Regular Publication § 10.3 Format. The Daily Compilation of Presidential Documents is published online...

  8. 1 CFR 10.3 - Format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Format. 10.3 Section 10.3 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER SPECIAL EDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PRESIDENTIAL PAPERS Regular Publication § 10.3 Format. The Daily Compilation of Presidential Documents is published online...

  9. 21 CFR 10.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Definitions. 10.3 Section 10.3 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE PRACTICES AND PROCEDURES General Provisions § 10.3 Definitions. (a) The following definitions apply in this part and parts 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, and 19: Act...

  10. A CM chondrite cluster and CM streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodd, R. T.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1993-01-01

    An elongate year-day concentration of CM meteoroid falls between 1921 and 1969 is inconsistent with a random flux of CM meteoroids and suggests that most or all such meteorites, and perhaps the Kaidun C-E chondrite breccia, resulted from streams of meteoroids in nearly circular, Earth-like orbits. To establish whether the post-1920 cluster might have arisen from random sampling, we determined the year-day distribution of 14 falls between 1879 and 1969 by treating each as the corner of a cell of specified dimensions (e.g. 30 years x 30 days) and calculated how many falls occurred in that cell. We then compared the CM cell distribution with random distributions over the same range of years. The results show that for 30 x 30 and 45 x 45 cells, fewer than 5 percent of random sets match the CM distribution with respect to maximum cell content and number of one-fall cells.

  11. 21 CFR 10.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Definitions. 10.3 Section 10.3 Food and Drugs FOOD... 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, and 19: Act means the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act unless otherwise... which the Commissioner relies to support the action. Agency means the Food and Drug...

  12. 21 CFR 10.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Definitions. 10.3 Section 10.3 Food and Drugs FOOD... 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, and 19: Act means the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act unless otherwise... which the Commissioner relies to support the action. Agency means the Food and Drug...

  13. 44 CFR 10.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Definitions. 10.3 Section 10.3 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... the Regional Administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency for the region in which FEMA...

  14. 44 CFR 10.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Definitions. 10.3 Section 10.3 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... the Regional Administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency for the region in which FEMA...

  15. 44 CFR 10.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Definitions. 10.3 Section 10.3 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... the Regional Administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency for the region in which FEMA...

  16. 44 CFR 10.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Definitions. 10.3 Section 10.3 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Regional Administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency for the region in which FEMA is...

  17. Cooperative interaction of histone H1 with DNA.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, F

    1986-04-25

    The cooperative binding of histone H1 with DNA was studied using a fluorescently labelled histone H1. The titration data were analysed in terms of the large ligand model. The stoichiometric number, n = 65 +/- 10 bases/H1, was independent of NaCl concentration (0.02 - 0.35 M). The nucleation and the cooperative binding constants, K' and K, and the cooperativity parameter q were sensitive to salt concentration; K = 3.6 +/- 0.8 X 10(7) M-1 and q = 1.1 +/- 0.4 X 10(3) at 0.2 M NaCl. The dependence of K' on NaCl concentration revealed that 6 Na+ ions were released from DNA upon complex formation. An extrapolation of K' to 1M NaCl yielded a small value, K' = 5 +/- 2 M-1. Thus the binding of H1 is essentially electrostatic, being compatible with its independence of temperature. A calculation of K' based on the counterion release reproduced the salt concentration dependence of K'. Therefore, the binding of H1 is of an electrostatic territorial type. Thus, H1 may move along the DNA chain to a certain extent, when both salt concentration and the degree of saturation are sufficiently low. The condition is so restricted that the sliding would not play an important role in vivo. It was concluded from the DNA concentration independent binding isotherm that H1 can cooperatively bind onto a single DNA molecule. A simple power law dependence of the cooperativity parameter q upon NaCl concentration was found; q oc[NaCl]h with h = 0.72, though the physical basis of this dependence remains unknown.

  18. 36 CFR 10.3 - Application; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... post office address for Yellowstone National Park is Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, and for Wind Cave National Park is Hot Springs, South Dakota. (b) Applicants desiring animals which are to be held in....3 Section 10.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  19. 36 CFR 10.3 - Application; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... post office address for Yellowstone National Park is Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, and for Wind Cave National Park is Hot Springs, South Dakota. (b) Applicants desiring animals which are to be held in....3 Section 10.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  20. 36 CFR 10.3 - Application; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... post office address for Yellowstone National Park is Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, and for Wind Cave National Park is Hot Springs, South Dakota. (b) Applicants desiring animals which are to be held in....3 Section 10.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  1. 36 CFR 10.3 - Application; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... post office address for Yellowstone National Park is Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, and for Wind Cave National Park is Hot Springs, South Dakota. (b) Applicants desiring animals which are to be held in....3 Section 10.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  2. 27 CFR 10.3 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY LIQUORS COMMERCIAL BRIBERY Scope of Regulations § 10.3 Application. (a) General. The regulations in this part apply to transactions between industry members and employees, officers, or... only to transactions between industry members and employees of State agencies operating as...

  3. Origin of H1 linker histones.

    PubMed

    Kasinsky, H E; Lewis, J D; Dacks, J B; Ausió, J

    2001-01-01

    In which taxa did H1 linker histones appear in the course of evolution? Detailed comparative analysis of the histone H1 and histone H1-related sequences available to date suggests that the origin of histone H1 can be traced to bacteria. The data also reveal that the sequence corresponding to the 'winged helix' motif of the globular structural domain, a domain characteristic of all metazoan histone H1 molecules, is evolutionarily conserved and appears separately in several divergent lines of protists. Some protists, however, appear to have only a lysine-rich basic protein, which has compositional similarity to some of the histone H1-like proteins from eubacteria and to the carboxy-terminal domain of the H1 linker histones from animals and plants. No lysine-rich basic proteins have been described in archaebacteria. The data presented in this review provide the surprising conclusion that whereas DNA-condensing H1-related histones may have arisen early in evolution in eubacteria, the appearance of the sequence motif corresponding to the globular domain of metazoan H1s occurred much later in the protists, after and independently of the appearance of the chromosomal core histones in archaebacteria.

  4. Ubiquitous CM and DM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, Sandra L.

    2000-01-01

    Ubiquitous is a real word. I thank a former Total Quality Coach for my first exposure some years ago to its existence. My version of Webster's dictionary defines ubiquitous as "present, or seeming to be present, everywhere at the same time; omnipresent." While I believe that God is omnipresent, I have come to discover that CM and DM are present everywhere. Oh, yes; I define CM as Configuration Management and DM as either Data or Document Management. Ten years ago, I had my first introduction to the CM world. I had an opportunity to do CM for the Space Station effort at the NASA Lewis Research Center. I learned that CM was a discipline that had four areas of focus: identification, control, status accounting, and verification. I was certified as a CMIl graduate and was indoctrinated about clear, concise, and valid. Off I went into a world of entirely new experiences. I was exposed to change requests and change boards first hand. I also learned about implementation of changes, and then of technical and CM requirements.

  5. Halogens in CM Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menard, J. M.; Caron, B.; Jambon, A.; Michel, A.; Villemant, B.

    2013-09-01

    We set up an extraction line of halogens (fluorine, chlorine) by pyrohydrolysis with 50 mg of rock. We analyzed 7 CM2 chondrites found in Antarctica and found that the Cl content of meteorites with an intact fusion crust is higher than those without.

  6. H1N1 influenza (Swine flu)

    MedlinePlus

    ... regular (seasonal) flu vaccine. You cannot get H1N1 flu virus from eating pork or any other food, drinking ... pools, or using hot tubs or saunas. Any flu virus can spread from person to person when: Someone ...

  7. Computing at h1 - Experience and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckerlin, G.; Gerhards, R.; Kleinwort, C.; KrÜNer-Marquis, U.; Egli, S.; Niebergall, F.

    The H1 experiment has now been successfully operating at the electron proton collider HERA at DESY for three years. During this time the computing environment has gradually shifted from a mainframe oriented environment to the distributed server/client Unix world. This transition is now almost complete. Computing needs are largely determined by the present amount of 1.5 TB of reconstructed data per year (1994), corresponding to 1.2 × 107 accepted events. All data are centrally available at DESY. In addition to data analysis, which is done in all collaborating institutes, most of the centrally organized Monte Carlo production is performed outside of DESY. New software tools to cope with offline computing needs include CENTIPEDE, a tool for the use of distributed batch and interactive resources for Monte Carlo production, and H1 UNIX, a software package for automatic updates of H1 software on all UNIX platforms.

  8. 42 CFR 52h.1 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS SCIENTIFIC PEER REVIEW OF RESEARCH GRANT APPLICATIONS AND RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CONTRACT PROJECTS § 52h.1 Applicability. (a) This part... reference in this part to grants includes cooperative agreements) for biomedical and behavioral...

  9. Thermosensitive H1 plasmids determining citrate utilization.

    PubMed

    Smith, H W; Parsell, Z; Green, P

    1978-12-01

    Twelve thermosensitive H1 plasmids from strains of Salmonella typhi that had caused outbreaks of chloramphenicol-resistant typhoid fever in Vietnam, Thailand and India mediated citrate utilization (Cit+) in a prototrophic Escherichia coli K12 strain but not in the S. typhi strains from which they were derived. Four H1 plasmids from a similar outbreak in Mexico differed from the Far Eastern plasmids in not mediating citrate utlization but in mediating mercury resistance. H1 plasmids resembling the Far Eastern and the Mexican plasmids in regard to citrate utilization and mercury resistance were found in sewage in Britain. Citrate utilization was transferred to eight pathogenic strains of E. coli and to one strain each of Shigella flexneri and Shigella sonnei. Cultures of Cit+ bacteria grew more rapidly in citrate media at 28 degrees C than at 37 degrees C. Plasmid mutants that were more efficient at utilizing citrate were present in all such cultures--they grew equally well or better at 37 degrees C than at 28 degrees C. None of 222 strains of E. coli or Shigella that contained a variety of different plasmids were able to utilize citrate. This property was not transferred to the prototrophic E. coli K12 strain from Citrobacter (3 strains), Salmonella (39 strains), Proteus (44 strains), Klebsiella pneumoniae (33 strains) or Pseudomonas aeruginosa (44 strains).

  10. 50 CFR 10.3 - Other applicable laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Other applicable laws. 10.3 Section 10.3... GENERAL PROVISIONS Introduction § 10.3 Other applicable laws. No statute or regulation of any State shall..., or customs laws or regulations, or other Service enforced statutes or regulations....

  11. 46 CFR 76.10-3 - Water availability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Water availability. 76.10-3 Section 76.10-3 Shipping... Fire Main System, Details § 76.10-3 Water availability. (a) On all vessels on an international voyage, regardless of the date of construction, water pressure from the firemain protecting enclosed spaces shall...

  12. 46 CFR 76.10-3 - Water availability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Water availability. 76.10-3 Section 76.10-3 Shipping... Fire Main System, Details § 76.10-3 Water availability. (a) On all vessels on an international voyage, regardless of the date of construction, water pressure from the firemain protecting enclosed spaces shall...

  13. 46 CFR 76.10-3 - Water availability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Water availability. 76.10-3 Section 76.10-3 Shipping... Fire Main System, Details § 76.10-3 Water availability. (a) On all vessels on an international voyage, regardless of the date of construction, water pressure from the firemain protecting enclosed spaces shall...

  14. 46 CFR 76.10-3 - Water availability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Water availability. 76.10-3 Section 76.10-3 Shipping... Fire Main System, Details § 76.10-3 Water availability. (a) On all vessels on an international voyage, regardless of the date of construction, water pressure from the firemain protecting enclosed spaces shall...

  15. 46 CFR 188.10-3 - Approved container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Approved container. 188.10-3 Section 188.10-3 Shipping... PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-3 Approved container. This term means a container which is properly labeled, marked and approved by DOT for the commodity which it contains....

  16. 46 CFR 30.10-3 - Approved-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Approved-TB/ALL. 30.10-3 Section 30.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-3 Approved—TB/ALL. The term approved means approved by the Commandant unless otherwise stated....

  17. 46 CFR 30.10-3 - Approved-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Approved-TB/ALL. 30.10-3 Section 30.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-3 Approved—TB/ALL. The term approved means approved by the Commandant unless otherwise stated....

  18. 46 CFR 30.10-3 - Approved-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Approved-TB/ALL. 30.10-3 Section 30.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-3 Approved—TB/ALL. The term approved means approved by the Commandant unless otherwise stated....

  19. 46 CFR 30.10-3 - Approved-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Approved-TB/ALL. 30.10-3 Section 30.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-3 Approved—TB/ALL. The term approved means approved by the Commandant unless otherwise stated....

  20. 39 CFR 10.3 - Post-employment activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Post-employment activities. 10.3 Section 10.3 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE U.S. POSTAL SERVICE RULES OF CONDUCT FOR POSTAL SERVICE GOVERNORS (ARTICLE X) § 10.3 Post-employment activities. Governors are...

  1. 19 CFR 10.3 - Drawback; internal-revenue tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Drawback; internal-revenue tax. 10.3 Section 10.3... and Returned § 10.3 Drawback; internal-revenue tax. (a) Except as prescribed in § 10.1(f) or in... tax is imposed on the importation of like articles not previously exported from the United States...

  2. 46 CFR 113.10-3 - Cable runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cable runs. 113.10-3 Section 113.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Fire and Smoke Detecting and Alarm Systems § 113.10-3 Cable runs. Cable runs...

  3. 46 CFR 113.10-3 - Cable runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cable runs. 113.10-3 Section 113.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Fire and Smoke Detecting and Alarm Systems § 113.10-3 Cable runs. Cable runs...

  4. 46 CFR 113.10-3 - Cable runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cable runs. 113.10-3 Section 113.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Fire and Smoke Detecting and Alarm Systems § 113.10-3 Cable runs. Cable runs...

  5. 46 CFR 113.10-3 - Cable runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cable runs. 113.10-3 Section 113.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Fire and Smoke Detecting and Alarm Systems § 113.10-3 Cable runs. Cable runs...

  6. 46 CFR 113.10-3 - Cable runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cable runs. 113.10-3 Section 113.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Fire and Smoke Detecting and Alarm Systems § 113.10-3 Cable runs. Cable runs...

  7. 39 CFR 10.3 - Post-employment activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Post-employment activities. 10.3 Section 10.3... CONDUCT FOR POSTAL SERVICE GOVERNORS (ARTICLE X) § 10.3 Post-employment activities. Governors are subject to the restrictions on the post-employment activities of special Government employees imposed by 18...

  8. 46 CFR 111.10-3 - Two generating sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Two generating sources. 111.10-3 Section 111.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Power Supply § 111.10-3 Two generating sources. In addition to the emergency...

  9. 46 CFR 30.10-3 - Approved-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Approved-TB/ALL. 30.10-3 Section 30.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-3 Approved—TB/ALL. The term approved means approved by the Commandant unless otherwise stated....

  10. 50 CFR 10.3 - Other applicable laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Other applicable laws. 10.3 Section 10.3... GENERAL PROVISIONS Introduction § 10.3 Other applicable laws. No statute or regulation of any State shall..., or customs laws or regulations, or other Service enforced statutes or regulations....

  11. Photoperiod-H1 (Ppd-H1) Controls Leaf Size.

    PubMed

    Digel, Benedikt; Tavakol, Elahe; Verderio, Gabriele; Tondelli, Alessandro; Xu, Xin; Cattivelli, Luigi; Rossini, Laura; von Korff, Maria

    2016-09-01

    Leaf size is a major determinant of plant photosynthetic activity and biomass; however, it is poorly understood how leaf size is genetically controlled in cereal crop plants like barley (Hordeum vulgare). We conducted a genome-wide association scan for flowering time, leaf width, and leaf length in a diverse panel of European winter cultivars grown in the field and genotyped with a single-nucleotide polymorphism array. The genome-wide association scan identified PHOTOPERIOD-H1 (Ppd-H1) as a candidate gene underlying the major quantitative trait loci for flowering time and leaf size in the barley population. Microscopic phenotyping of three independent introgression lines confirmed the effect of Ppd-H1 on leaf size. Differences in the duration of leaf growth and consequent variation in leaf cell number were responsible for the leaf size differences between the Ppd-H1 variants. The Ppd-H1-dependent induction of the BARLEY MADS BOX genes BM3 and BM8 in the leaf correlated with reductions in leaf size and leaf number. Our results indicate that leaf size is controlled by the Ppd-H1- and photoperiod-dependent progression of plant development. The coordination of leaf growth with flowering may be part of a reproductive strategy to optimize resource allocation to the developing inflorescences and seeds. PMID:27457126

  12. Photoperiod-H1 (Ppd-H1) Controls Leaf Size1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Digel, Benedikt; Tavakol, Elahe; Verderio, Gabriele; Xu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Leaf size is a major determinant of plant photosynthetic activity and biomass; however, it is poorly understood how leaf size is genetically controlled in cereal crop plants like barley (Hordeum vulgare). We conducted a genome-wide association scan for flowering time, leaf width, and leaf length in a diverse panel of European winter cultivars grown in the field and genotyped with a single-nucleotide polymorphism array. The genome-wide association scan identified PHOTOPERIOD-H1 (Ppd-H1) as a candidate gene underlying the major quantitative trait loci for flowering time and leaf size in the barley population. Microscopic phenotyping of three independent introgression lines confirmed the effect of Ppd-H1 on leaf size. Differences in the duration of leaf growth and consequent variation in leaf cell number were responsible for the leaf size differences between the Ppd-H1 variants. The Ppd-H1-dependent induction of the BARLEY MADS BOX genes BM3 and BM8 in the leaf correlated with reductions in leaf size and leaf number. Our results indicate that leaf size is controlled by the Ppd-H1- and photoperiod-dependent progression of plant development. The coordination of leaf growth with flowering may be part of a reproductive strategy to optimize resource allocation to the developing inflorescences and seeds. PMID:27457126

  13. Phosphorylation of the butyrate-enhanced protein, histone H1/sup 0/, in Chinese hamster cells. [Effects on H1 configuration and on H1-DNA interactions

    SciTech Connect

    D'Anna, J.A.; Gurley, L.R.; Becker, R.R.; Barham, S.S.; Walters, R.A.; Tobey, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Although the model studies focus attention upon the ability of H1 phosphorylation to alter H1-DNA interactions, the molecular effects of H1 phosphorylation in chromatin remain unresolved. Part of the difficulty has been technical. For example, most H1 molecules become dephosphorylated during the isolation of chromatin and chromosomes; therefore, it has not been possible to compare the properties of fully phosphorylated chromatin or chromatin subunits with those of their unphosphorylated counterparts. Recent reports, however, suggest that it may be possible to replace unphosphorylated H1 with phosphorylated H1 in oligonucleosomes, nucleosomes, and chromatosomes. Hence, in the near future, we anticipate significant advances in this area.

  14. Antifungal properties of wheat histones (H1-H4) and purified wheat histone H1.

    PubMed

    De Lucca, Anthony J; Heden, Lars-Olof; Ingber, Bruce; Bhatnagar, Deepak

    2011-07-13

    Wheat ( Triticum spp.) histones H1, H2, H3, and H4 were extracted, and H1 was further purified. The effect of these histones on specific fungi that may or may not be pathogenic to wheat was determined. These fungi included Aspergillus flavus , Aspergillus fumigatus , Aspergillus niger , Fusarium oxysporum , Fusarium verticillioides , Fusarium solani , Fusarium graminearum , Penicillium digitatum , Penicillium italicum , and Greeneria uvicola . Non-germinated and germinating conidia of these fungi were bioassayed separately. The non-germinated and germinating conidia of all Fusarium species were highly susceptible to the mixture (H1-H4) as well as pure H1, with viability losses of 99-100% found to be significant (p < 0.001) at ≤10 μM or less for the histone mixture and pure H1. F. graminearum was the most sensitive to histone activity. The histones were inactive against all of the non-germinated Penicillium spp. conidia. However, they significantly reduced the viability of the germinating conidia of the Penicillium spp. conidia, with 95% loss at 2.5 μM. Non-germinated and germinating conidia viability of the Aspergillus spp. and G. uvicola were unaffected when exposed to histones up to 10 μM. Results indicate that Fusarium spp. pathogenic to wheat are susceptible to wheat histones, indicating that these proteins may be a resistance mechanism in wheat against fungal infection.

  15. Pandemic H1N1 influenza

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anand

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus that has targeted not only those with chronic medical illness, the very young and old, but also a large segment of the patient population that has previously been afforded relative protection - those who are young, generally healthy, and immune naive. The illness is mild in most, but results in hospitalization and severe ARDS in an important minority. Among those who become critically ill, 20-40% will die, predominantly of severe hypoxic respiratory failure. However, and potentially in part due to the young age of those affected, intensive care with aggressive oxygenation support will allow most people to recover. The volume of patients infected and with critical illness placed substantial strain on the capacity of the health care system and critical care most specifically. Despite this, the 2009 pandemic has engaged our specialty and highlighted its importance like no other. Thus far, the national and global critical care response has been brisk, collaborative and helpful - not only for this pandemic, but for subsequent challenges in years ahead. PMID:22263101

  16. 22 CFR 19.10-3 - Marriage after retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Marriage after retirement. 19.10-3 Section 19... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.10-3 Marriage after retirement. If an... marriage irrevocably elect to receive a reduced annuity and to provide, subject to any obligation...

  17. 46 CFR 25.10-3 - Navigation light certification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... stating the following: (i) “USCG Approval 33 CFR 183.810” (ii) “MEETS __.” (Insert the identification name... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Navigation light certification requirements. 25.10-3... Navigation Lights § 25.10-3 Navigation light certification requirements. (a) Except as provided by...

  18. 46 CFR 25.10-3 - Navigation light certification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... stating the following: (i) “USCG Approval 33 CFR 183.810” (ii) “MEETS __.” (Insert the identification name... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Navigation light certification requirements. 25.10-3... Navigation Lights § 25.10-3 Navigation light certification requirements. (a) Except as provided by...

  19. 46 CFR 111.10-3 - Two generating sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Two generating sources. 111.10-3 Section 111.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS... drilling unit must have at least two electric generating sources....

  20. 46 CFR 111.10-3 - Two generating sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Two generating sources. 111.10-3 Section 111.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS... drilling unit must have at least two electric generating sources....

  1. 46 CFR 25.10-3 - Navigation light certification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... stating the following: (i) “USCG Approval 33 CFR 183.810” (ii) “MEETS __.” (Insert the identification name... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Navigation light certification requirements. 25.10-3... Navigation Lights § 25.10-3 Navigation light certification requirements. (a) Except as provided by...

  2. 46 CFR 25.10-3 - Navigation light certification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... stating the following: (i) “USCG Approval 33 CFR 183.810” (ii) “MEETS __.” (Insert the identification name... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Navigation light certification requirements. 25.10-3... Navigation Lights § 25.10-3 Navigation light certification requirements. (a) Except as provided by...

  3. 46 CFR 25.10-3 - Navigation light certification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... stating the following: (i) “USCG Approval 33 CFR 183.810” (ii) “MEETS __.” (Insert the identification name... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Navigation light certification requirements. 25.10-3... Navigation Lights § 25.10-3 Navigation light certification requirements. (a) Except as provided by...

  4. 22 CFR 19.10-3 - Marriage after retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Marriage after retirement. 19.10-3 Section 19... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.10-3 Marriage after retirement. If an... marriage irrevocably elect to receive a reduced annuity and to provide, subject to any obligation...

  5. 22 CFR 19.10-3 - Marriage after retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Marriage after retirement. 19.10-3 Section 19... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.10-3 Marriage after retirement. If an... marriage irrevocably elect to receive a reduced annuity and to provide, subject to any obligation...

  6. 22 CFR 19.10-3 - Marriage after retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Marriage after retirement. 19.10-3 Section 19... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.10-3 Marriage after retirement. If an... marriage irrevocably elect to receive a reduced annuity and to provide, subject to any obligation...

  7. 22 CFR 19.10-3 - Marriage after retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Marriage after retirement. 19.10-3 Section 19... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.10-3 Marriage after retirement. If an... marriage irrevocably elect to receive a reduced annuity and to provide, subject to any obligation...

  8. 46 CFR 111.10-3 - Two generating sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Two generating sources. 111.10-3 Section 111.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS... drilling unit must have at least two electric generating sources....

  9. 46 CFR 111.10-3 - Two generating sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Two generating sources. 111.10-3 Section 111.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS... drilling unit must have at least two electric generating sources....

  10. H1-antihistamines for chronic spontaneous urticaria.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Maulina; Bennett, Cathy; Cohen, Stuart N; Carter, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) is characterised by the development of crops of red, itchy, raised weals or hives with no identifiable external cause.Objectives To assess the effects of H1-antihistamines for CSU.Search methods We searched the following databases up to June 2014: Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL (2014, Issue 5), MEDLINE(from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974) and PsycINFO (from 1806). We searched five trials registers and checked articles for references to relevant randomised controlled trials.Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials of H1-antihistamines for CSU. Interventions included single therapy or a combination of H1-antihistamines compared with no treatment (placebo) or another active pharmacological compound at any dose.Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures as expected by The Cochrane Collaboration.Our primary outcome measures were proportion of participants with complete suppression of urticaria: 'good or excellent' response,50% or greater improvement in quality of life measures, and adverse events.We present risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals(CIs). Main results We identified 73 studies (9759 participants); 34 studies provided data for 23 comparisons. The duration of the intervention was up to two weeks (short-term) or longer than two weeks and up to three months (intermediate-term).Cetirizine 10mg once daily in the short term and in the intermediate term led to complete suppression of urticaria by more participants than was seen with placebo (RR 2.72, 95% CI 1.51 to 4.91). For this same outcome, comparison of desloratadine versus placebo in the intermediate term (5 mg) (RR 37.00, 95% CI 2.31 to 593.70) and in the short term (20 mg) (RR 15.97, 95% CI 1.04 to 245.04)favoured desloratadine, but no differences were seen between 5 mg and 10 mg for short-term treatment.Levocetirizine 20 mg per day (short-term) was more effective for complete suppression of

  11. H1-antihistamines for chronic spontaneous urticaria.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Maulina; Bennett, Cathy; Cohen, Stuart N; Carter, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) is characterised by the development of crops of red, itchy, raised weals or hives with no identifiable external cause.Objectives To assess the effects of H1-antihistamines for CSU.Search methods We searched the following databases up to June 2014: Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL (2014, Issue 5), MEDLINE(from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974) and PsycINFO (from 1806). We searched five trials registers and checked articles for references to relevant randomised controlled trials.Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials of H1-antihistamines for CSU. Interventions included single therapy or a combination of H1-antihistamines compared with no treatment (placebo) or another active pharmacological compound at any dose.Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures as expected by The Cochrane Collaboration.Our primary outcome measures were proportion of participants with complete suppression of urticaria: 'good or excellent' response,50% or greater improvement in quality of life measures, and adverse events.We present risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals(CIs). Main results We identified 73 studies (9759 participants); 34 studies provided data for 23 comparisons. The duration of the intervention was up to two weeks (short-term) or longer than two weeks and up to three months (intermediate-term).Cetirizine 10mg once daily in the short term and in the intermediate term led to complete suppression of urticaria by more participants than was seen with placebo (RR 2.72, 95% CI 1.51 to 4.91). For this same outcome, comparison of desloratadine versus placebo in the intermediate term (5 mg) (RR 37.00, 95% CI 2.31 to 593.70) and in the short term (20 mg) (RR 15.97, 95% CI 1.04 to 245.04)favoured desloratadine, but no differences were seen between 5 mg and 10 mg for short-term treatment.Levocetirizine 20 mg per day (short-term) was more effective for complete suppression of

  12. Sequential Seasonal H1N1 Influenza Virus Infections Protect Ferrets against Novel 2009 H1N1 Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Donald M.; Bloom, Chalise E.; Nascimento, Eduardo J. M.; Marques, Ernesto T. A.; Craigo, Jodi K.; Cherry, Joshua L.; Lipman, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals <60 years of age had the lowest incidence of infection, with ∼25% of these people having preexisting, cross-reactive antibodies to novel 2009 H1N1 influenza. Many people >60 years old also had preexisting antibodies to novel H1N1. These observations are puzzling because the seasonal H1N1 viruses circulating during the last 60 years were not antigenically similar to novel H1N1. We therefore hypothesized that a sequence of exposures to antigenically different seasonal H1N1 viruses can elicit an antibody response that protects against novel 2009 H1N1. Ferrets were preinfected with seasonal H1N1 viruses and assessed for cross-reactive antibodies to novel H1N1. Serum from infected ferrets was assayed for cross-reactivity to both seasonal and novel 2009 H1N1 strains. These results were compared to those of ferrets that were sequentially infected with H1N1 viruses isolated prior to 1957 or more-recently isolated viruses. Following seroconversion, ferrets were challenged with novel H1N1 influenza virus and assessed for viral titers in the nasal wash, morbidity, and mortality. There was no hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) cross-reactivity in ferrets infected with any single seasonal H1N1 influenza viruses, with limited protection to challenge. However, sequential H1N1 influenza infections reduced the incidence of disease and elicited cross-reactive antibodies to novel H1N1 isolates. The amount and duration of virus shedding and the frequency of transmission following novel H1N1 challenge were reduced. Exposure to multiple seasonal H1N1 influenza viruses, and not to any single H1N1 influenza virus, elicits a breadth of antibodies that neutralize novel H1N1 even though the host was never exposed to the novel H1N1 influenza viruses. PMID:23115287

  13. Protective efficacy of an inactivated Eurasian avian-like H1N1 swine influenza vaccine against homologous H1N1 and heterologous H1N1 and H1N2 viruses in mice.

    PubMed

    Sui, Jinyu; Yang, Dawei; Qiao, Chuanling; Xu, Huiyang; Xu, Bangfeng; Wu, Yunpu; Yang, Huanliang; Chen, Yan; Chen, Hualan

    2016-07-19

    Eurasian avian-like H1N1 (EA H1N1) swine influenza viruses are prevalent in pigs in Europe and Asia, but occasionally cause human infection, which raises concern about their pandemic potential. Here, we produced a whole-virus inactivated vaccine with an EA H1N1 strain (A/swine/Guangxi/18/2011, SW/GX/18/11) and evaluated its efficacy against homologous H1N1 and heterologous H1N1 and H1N2 influenza viruses in mice. A strong humoral immune response, which we measured by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and virus neutralization (VN), was induced in the vaccine-inoculated mice upon challenge. The inactivated SW/GX/18/11 vaccine provided complete protection against challenge with homologous SW/GX/18/11 virus in mice and provided effective protection against challenge with heterologous H1N1 and H1N2 viruses with distinctive genomic combinations. Our findings suggest that this EA H1N1 vaccine can provide protection against both homologous H1N1 and heterologous H1N1 or H1N2 virus infection. As such, it is an excellent vaccine candidate to prevent H1N1 swine influenza.

  14. 19 CFR 10.3 - Drawback; internal-revenue tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... exempted from duty in accordance with sec. 10.3(c)) 24 cents each. Hosiery, nylon 45 cents per dozen. Lead....03226 per square meter. Piece goods, nylon: Dyed $0.29086 per square meter. Piece goods, rayon:...

  15. 19 CFR 10.3 - Drawback; internal-revenue tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... exempted from duty in accordance with sec. 10.3(c)) 24 cents each. Hosiery, nylon 45 cents per dozen. Lead....03226 per square meter. Piece goods, nylon: Dyed $0.29086 per square meter. Piece goods, rayon:...

  16. 19 CFR 10.3 - Drawback; internal-revenue tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... exempted from duty in accordance with sec. 10.3(c)) 24 cents each. Hosiery, nylon 45 cents per dozen. Lead....03226 per square meter. Piece goods, nylon: Dyed $0.29086 per square meter. Piece goods, rayon:...

  17. 26 CFR 36.3121(l)(10)-3 - Returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Returns. 36.3121(l)(10)-3 Section 36.3121(l)(10....3121(l)(10)-3 Returns. (a) The forms prescribed for use in making returns of the taxes imposed by the... returns of its liability under an agreement entered into as provided in § 36.3121(l)(1)-1. Returns of...

  18. 26 CFR 36.3121(l)(10)-3 - Returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Returns. 36.3121(l)(10)-3 Section 36.3121(l)(10....3121(l)(10)-3 Returns. (a) The forms prescribed for use in making returns of the taxes imposed by the... returns of its liability under an agreement entered into as provided in § 36.3121(l)(1)-1. Returns of...

  19. 26 CFR 36.3121(l)(10)-3 - Returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Returns. 36.3121(l)(10)-3 Section 36.3121(l)(10....3121(l)(10)-3 Returns. (a) The forms prescribed for use in making returns of the taxes imposed by the... returns of its liability under an agreement entered into as provided in § 36.3121(l)(1)-1. Returns of...

  20. 26 CFR 36.3121(l)(10)-3 - Returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Returns. 36.3121(l)(10)-3 Section 36.3121(l)(10....3121(l)(10)-3 Returns. (a) The forms prescribed for use in making returns of the taxes imposed by the... returns of its liability under an agreement entered into as provided in § 36.3121(l)(1)-1. Returns of...

  1. 26 CFR 36.3121(l)(10)-3 - Returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Returns. 36.3121(l)(10)-3 Section 36.3121(l)(10....3121(l)(10)-3 Returns. (a) The forms prescribed for use in making returns of the taxes imposed by the... returns of its liability under an agreement entered into as provided in § 36.3121(l)(1)-1. Returns of...

  2. Colds and the Flu: H1N1 Influenza

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Colds and the Flu | H1N1 Influenza What is H1N1 influenza? H1N1 influenza (also known as swine flu) is an infection caused by ... or illness that is more than “just a cold.” When should I see my doctor? If you’ ...

  3. Histone H1 Limits DNA Methylation in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Michael; Ji, Lexiang; Santos, Alex M.; Kamei, Masayuki; Sasaki, Takahiko; Basenko, Evelina Y.; Schmitz, Robert J.; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Lewis, Zachary A.

    2016-01-01

    Histone H1 variants, known as linker histones, are essential chromatin components in higher eukaryotes, yet compared to the core histones relatively little is known about their in vivo functions. The filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa encodes a single H1 protein that is not essential for viability. To investigate the role of N. crassa H1, we constructed a functional FLAG-tagged H1 fusion protein and performed genomic and molecular analyses. Cell fractionation experiments showed that H1-3XFLAG is a chromatin binding protein. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation combined with sequencing (ChIP-seq) revealed that H1-3XFLAG is globally enriched throughout the genome with a subtle preference for promoters of expressed genes. In mammals, the stoichiometry of H1 impacts nucleosome repeat length. To determine if H1 impacts nucleosome occupancy or nucleosome positioning in N. crassa, we performed micrococcal nuclease digestion in the wild-type and the ΔhH1 strain followed by sequencing (MNase-seq). Deletion of hH1 did not significantly impact nucleosome positioning or nucleosome occupancy. Analysis of DNA methylation by whole-genome bisulfite sequencing (MethylC-seq) revealed a modest but global increase in DNA methylation in the ΔhH1 mutant. Together, these data suggest that H1 acts as a nonspecific chromatin binding protein that can limit accessibility of the DNA methylation machinery in N. crassa. PMID:27172195

  4. 2009 H1N1 Flu Vaccine Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Flu 2009 H1N1 Flu Vaccine Facts Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents ... H1N1 flu vaccine. 1 The 2009 H1N1 flu vaccine is safe and well tested. Clinical trials conducted ...

  5. 26 CFR 31.3406(h)-1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Definitions. 31.3406(h)-1 Section 31.3406(h)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND... Income Tax at Source § 31.3406(h)-1 Definitions. (a) In general. For purposes of section 3406 and...

  6. 26 CFR 1.1033(h)-1 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Effective date. 1.1033(h)-1 Section 1.1033(h)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Common Nontaxable Exchanges § 1.1033(h)-1 Effective date. Except as...

  7. 26 CFR 31.3121(h)-1 - American employer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false American employer. 31.3121(h)-1 Section 31.3121(h)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT....3121(h)-1 American employer. (a) The term “American employer” means an employer which is (1) the...

  8. 26 CFR 31.3406(h)-1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definitions. 31.3406(h)-1 Section 31.3406(h)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND... Income Tax at Source § 31.3406(h)-1 Definitions. (a) In general. For purposes of section 3406 and...

  9. 26 CFR 31.3121(h)-1 - American employer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false American employer. 31.3121(h)-1 Section 31.3121(h)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT....3121(h)-1 American employer. (a) The term “American employer” means an employer which is (1) the...

  10. 26 CFR 1.1033(h)-1 - Effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Effective date. 1.1033(h)-1 Section 1.1033(h)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Common Nontaxable Exchanges § 1.1033(h)-1 Effective date. Except as provided otherwise...

  11. Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and Seasonal Influenza A (H1N1) Co-infection, New Zealand, 2009

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Richard J.; Sonnberg, Stephanie; Ducatez, Mariette; Paine, Shevaun; Nicol, Mackenzie; Ralston, Jacqui C.; Bandaranayake, Don; Hope, Virginia; Webby, Richard J.; Huang, Sue

    2010-01-01

    Co-infection with seasonal influenza A (H1N1) and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 could result in reassortant viruses that may acquire new characteristics of transmission, virulence, and oseltamivir susceptibility. Results from oseltamivir-sensitivity testing on viral culture suggested the possibility of co-infections with oseltamivir-resistant (seasonal A [H1N1]) and -susceptible (pandemic [H1N1] 2009) viruses. PMID:20875294

  12. Serpentine Nanotubes in CM Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zega, Thomas J.; Garvie, Laurence A. J.; Dodony, Istvan; Buseck, Peter R.

    2004-01-01

    The CM chondrites are primitive meteorites that formed during the early solar system. Although they retain much of their original physical character, their matrices and fine-grained rims (FGRs) sustained aqueous alteration early in their histories [1- 3]. Serpentine-group minerals are abundant products of such alteration, and information regarding their structures, compositions, and spatial relationships is important for determining the reactions that produced them and the conditions under which they formed. Our recent work on FGRs and matrices of the CM chondrites has revealed new information on the structures and compositions of serpentine-group minerals [4,5] and has provided insights into the evolution of these primitive meteorites. Here we report on serpentine nanotubes from the Mighei and Murchison CM chondrites [6].

  13. 344 cm x 86 cm low mass vacuum window

    SciTech Connect

    Reimers, R.M.; Porter, J.; Meneghetti, J.; Wilde, S.; Miller, R.

    1983-08-01

    The LBL Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) superconducting magnet contains a 1 m x 3.45 m x 2 m vacuum tank in its gap. A full aperture thin window was needed to minimize background as the products of nuclear collisions move from upstream targets to downstream detectors. Six windows were built and tested in the development process. The final window's unsupported area is 3m/sup 2/ with a 25 cm inward deflection. The design consists of a .11 mm Nylon/aluminum/polypropylene laminate as a gas seal and .55 mm woven aramid fiber for strength. Total mass is 80 milligrams per cm/sup 2/. Development depended heavily on past experience and testing. Safety considerations are discussed.

  14. Differences in histamine H1 and H2 receptor responses in several rabbit arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, C.P.; Maxson, S.

    1982-06-01

    Responses of helically cut segments from six different rabbit arteries to the selective histamine H1 receptor agonist 2-pyridylethylamine (PEA) and, in strips contracted by 10-4 M phenylephrine, to the selective histamine H2 agonist dimaprit have been determined. 10-3 M PEA contracted the renal artery, 96 +/- 2%; mesenteric artery, 92 +/- 2%; coeliac artery, 88 +/- 11% aorta 75 +/- 4%' ear artery 64 +/- 10% and pulmonary artery 48 +/- 5% of the maximal contraction to norepinephrine. 10-3 M dimaprit relaxed the phenylephrine contracted ear artery 48 +/- 8%; renal artery, 43 +/- 8%; coeliac artery 41 +/- 8%; mesenteric artery 36 +/- 5%; aorta 16 +/- 3%; and pulmonary artery 11 +/- 1% of the initial contractile tension. Strips in which histamine H1 receptors are blocked by 7 X 10-6 M mepyramine which are contracted by phenylephrine are partially relaxed by histamine. Cooling these strips markedly enhanced relaxations of the mesenteric and coeliac arteries but not those of the other four vessels. Exposure of the strips to dibenamine potentiated relaxations of all of the arteries except the ear artery and pulmonary artery. Thus there is heterogeneity among the arteries in their responses to histamine H1 and H2 receptor activation.

  15. 40 CFR 10.3 - Administrative claims; who may file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administrative claims; who may file. 10... CLAIMS UNDER FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT Procedures § 10.3 Administrative claims; who may file. (a) A claim... by any other person legally entitled to assert such a claim under applicable State law. (d) A...

  16. 15 CFR 10.3 - Development of a proposed standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... & Technology. (Copies of the recommended format may be obtained from the Office of Product Standards Policy... DEVELOPMENT OF VOLUNTARY PRODUCT STANDARDS § 10.3 Development of a proposed standard. (a) A proposed standard..., product requirements, design stipulations, component requirements, test methods, testing...

  17. 46 CFR 39.10-3 - Definitions-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... a bulk liquid cargo from a tank vessel to a service vessel. Marine Safety Center means the... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS VAPOR CONTROL SYSTEMS General § 39.10-3... over the cargo tanks. Existing vapor collection system means a vapor collection system which...

  18. 46 CFR 39.10-3 - Definitions-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... a bulk liquid cargo from a tank vessel to a service vessel. Marine Safety Center means the... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS VAPOR CONTROL SYSTEMS General § 39.10-3... over the cargo tanks. Existing vapor collection system means a vapor collection system which...

  19. 46 CFR 39.10-3 - Definitions-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... a bulk liquid cargo from a tank vessel to a service vessel. Marine Safety Center means the... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS VAPOR CONTROL SYSTEMS General § 39.10-3... over the cargo tanks. Existing vapor collection system means a vapor collection system which...

  20. H1N1 (Originally Referred to As Swine Flu)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Changes H7N9 H3N2v H1N1 - Swine Flu H5N1 - Avian/Bird Flu Planning & Preparedness Business Planning Community Planning School ... Changes H7N9 H3N2v H1N1 - Swine Flu H5N1 - Avian/Bird Flu H1N1 - originally referred to as Swine Flu ...

  1. The effect of carotenoids obtained from saffron on histone H1 structure and H1-DNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Ashrafi, M; Bathaie, S Z; Taghikhani, M; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A

    2005-09-15

    It is already known that transcriptional activation of genes occurs due to the H1 dissociation from linker DNA; hence, histone H1-DNA complex is considered as a model of chromatin. Anticancer property of saffron and its carotenoids has already been reported. The present study aimed at investigating the effect of saffron carotenoids on H1 structure and H1-DNA interaction as a possible mechanism of their anticarcinogenic action. After purification of the saffron carotenoids (crocin, crocetin and dimethylcrocetin), their interaction with histone H1 was studied using spectrophotometry and spectrofluorometry. Some changes on the absorption spectra of H1 indicated the complex formation between this protein and saffron carotenoids. Also, the fluorescence emission of H1 was quenched by the mentioned ligands. The binding parameters of all the three ligands were obtained through Schatchard analysis of the quenching data. Then, the effect of each ligand on the H1-DNA interaction was studied. The results showed a shift in the precipitation curve to the left in the presence of the mentioned carotenoids, which is due to the reduction in the interaction of H1 with DNA. These observations led to the suggesting a mechanism in which the H1 depletion may promote transcription.

  2. H1 receptor antagonist treatment of chronic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Simons, F E; Simons, K J

    1988-05-01

    In patients with chronic rhinitis, H1 receptor antagonists play an important role in relieving the symptoms of sneezing, itching, and rhinorrhea. New information about the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of first-generation H1 receptor antagonists such as chlorpheniramine has become available in the past few years. Comprehensive pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies of new relatively nonsedating H1 receptor antagonists such as terfenadine, astemizole, loratadine, and cetirizine are appearing. An understanding of the differences in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics among H1 receptor antagonists is required for optimal use of these drugs.

  3. Exploring the energetics of histone H1.1 and H1.4 duplex DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Machha, V R; Jones, S B; Waddle, J R; Le, V H; Wellman, S; Lewis, E A

    2014-01-01

    H1.1 and H1.4 bind tightly to both short DNA oligomers and to CT-DNA (Ka≈1×10(7)). Binding is accompanied by an unfavorable enthalpy change (∆H≈+22 kcal/mol) and a favorable entropy change (-T∆S≈-30 kcal/mol). The Tm for the H1.4/CT-DNA complex is increased by 9 °C over the Tm for the free DNA. H1.4 titrations of the DNA oligomers yield stoichiometries (H1/DNA) of 0.64, 0.96, 1.29, and 2.04 for 24, 36, 48, and 72-bp DNA oligomers. The stoichiometries are consistent with a binding site size of 37±1 bp. CT-DNA titration data are consistent with binding site sizes of 32 bp for H1.1 and 36 bp for H1.4. The heat capacity changes, ΔCp, for formation of the H1.1 and H1.4/CT-DNA complexes are -160 cal mol(-1) K(-1) and -192 cal mol(-1)K(-1) respectively. The large negative ΔCp values indicate the loss of water from the protein DNA interface in the complex. PMID:24317196

  4. VP2 capsid domain of the H-1 parvovirus determines susceptibility of human cancer cells to H-1 viral infection.

    PubMed

    Cho, I-R; Kaowinn, S; Song, J; Kim, S; Koh, S S; Kang, H-Y; Ha, N-C; Lee, K H; Jun, H-S; Chung, Y-H

    2015-05-01

    Although H-1 parvovirus is used as an antitumor agent, not much is known about the relationship between its specific tropism and oncolytic activity. We hypothesize that VP2, a major capsid protein of H-1 virus, determines H-1-specific tropism. To assess this, we constructed chimeric H-1 viruses expressing Kilham rat virus (KRV) capsid proteins, in their complete or partial forms. Chimeric H-1 viruses (CH1, CH2 and CH3) containing the whole KRV VP2 domain could not induce cytolysis in HeLa, A549 and Panc-1 cells. However, the other chimeric H-1 viruses (CH4 and CH5) expressing a partial KRV VP2 domain induced cytolysis. Additionally, the significant cytopathic effect caused by CH4 and CH5 infection in HeLa cells resulted from preferential viral amplification via DNA replication, RNA transcription and protein synthesis. Modeling of VP2 capsid protein showed that two variable regions (VRs) (VR0 and VR2) of H-1 VP2 protein protrude outward, because of the insertion of extra amino-acid residues, as compared with those of KRV VP2 protein. This might explain the precedence of H-1 VP2 protein over KRV in determining oncolytic activity in human cancer cells. Taking these results together, we propose that the VP2 protein of oncolytic H-1 parvovirus determines its specific tropism in human cancer cells.

  5. Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Encephalitis in Woman, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Aristine; Kuo, Kuei-Hong

    2011-01-01

    We report an unusual case of pandemic (H1N1) 2009–related encephalitis in an immunocompetent woman. Although rare cases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 associated with encephalitis have been reported previously, in this patient, direct viral invasion of the central nervous system was shown by simultaneous detection of viral RNA and pleocytosis. PMID:22000373

  6. Influenza A (H1N1) organising pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Torrego, Alfons; Pajares, Virginia; Mola, Anna; Lerma, Enrique; Franquet, Tomás

    2010-04-27

    In November 2009, countries around the world reported confirmed cases of pandemic influenza H1N1, including over 6000 deaths. No peak in activity has been seen. The most common causes of death are pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. We report a case of a 55-year-old woman who presented with organising pneumonia associated with influenza A (H1N1) infection confirmed by transbronchial lung biopsy. Organising pneumonia should also be considered as a possible complication of influenza A (H1N1) infection, given that these patients can benefit from early diagnosis and appropriate specific management.

  7. Interplay between histone H1 structure and function.

    PubMed

    Roque, Alicia; Ponte, Inma; Suau, Pedro

    2016-03-01

    H1 linker histones are involved both in the maintenance of higher-order chromatin structure and in gene regulation. Histone H1 exists in multiple isoforms, is evolutionarily variable and undergoes a large variety of post-translational modifications. We review recent progress in the understanding of the folding and structure of histone H1 domains with an emphasis on the interactions with DNA. The importance of intrinsic disorder and hydrophobic interactions in the folding and function of the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) is discussed. The induction of a molten globule-state in the CTD by macromolecular crowding is also considered. The effects of phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinases on the structure of the CTD, as well as on chromatin condensation and oligomerization, are described. We also address the extranuclear functions of histone H1, including the interaction with the β-amyloid peptide. PMID:26415976

  8. H1-antihistamines induce vacuolation in astrocytes through macroautophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Wei-Wei; Yang, Ying; Wang, Zhe; Shen, Zhe; Zhang, Xiang-Nan; Wang, Guang-Hui; Chen, Zhong

    2012-04-15

    H1-antihistamines induce vacuolation in vascular smooth muscle cells, which may contribute to their cardiovascular toxicity. The CNS toxicity of H1-antihistamines may also be related to their non-receptor-mediated activity. The aim of this study was to investigate whether H1-antihistamines induce vacuolation in astrocytes and the mechanism involved. The H1-antihistamines induced large numbers of giant vacuoles in astrocytes. Such vacuoles were marked with both the lysosome marker Lysotracker Red and the alkalescent fluorescence dye monodansylcadaverine, which indicated that these vacuoles were lysosome-like acidic vesicles. Quantitative analysis of monodansylcadaverine fluorescence showed that the effect of H1-antihistamines on vacuolation in astrocytes was dose-dependent, and was alleviated by extracellular acidification, but aggravated by extracellular alkalization. The order of potency to induce vacuolation at high concentrations of H1-antihistamines (diphenhydramine > pyrilamine > astemizole > triprolidine) corresponded to their pKa ranking. Co-treatment with histamine and the histamine receptor-1 agonist trifluoromethyl toluidide did not inhibit the vacuolation. Bafilomycin A1, a vacuolar (V)-ATPase inhibitor, which inhibits intracellular vacuole or vesicle acidification, clearly reversed the vacuolation and intracellular accumulation of diphenhydramine. The macroautophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine largely reversed the percentage of LC3-positive astrocytes induced by diphenhydramine, while only partly reversing the number of monodansylcadaverine-labeled vesicles. In Atg5{sup −/−} mouse embryonic fibroblasts, which cannot form autophagosomes, the number of vacuoles induced by diphenhydramine was less than that in wild-type cells. These results indicated that H1-antihistamines induce V-ATPase-dependent acidic vacuole formation in astrocytes, and this is partly mediated by macroautophagy. The pKa and alkalescent characteristic of H1-antihistamines may be the

  9. Evaluated kinetics of terminal and non-terminal addition of hydrogen atoms to 1-alkenes: a shock tube study of H + 1-butene.

    PubMed

    Manion, Jeffrey A; Awan, Iftikhar A

    2015-01-22

    Single-pulse shock tube methods have been used to thermally generate hydrogen atoms and investigate the kinetics of their addition reactions with 1-butene at temperatures of 880 to 1120 K and pressures of 145 to 245 kPa. Rate parameters for the unimolecular decomposition of 1-butene are also reported. Addition of H atoms to the π bond of 1-butene results in displacement of either methyl or ethyl depending on whether addition occurs at the terminal or nonterminal position. Postshock monitoring of the initial alkene products has been used to determine the relative and absolute reaction rates. Absolute rate constants have been derived relative to the reference reaction of displacement of methyl from 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (135TMB). With k(H + 135TMB → m-xylene + CH3) = 6.7 × 10(13) exp(-3255/T) cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1), we find the following: k(H + 1-butene → propene + CH3) = k10 = 3.93 × 10(13) exp(-1152 K/T) cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1), [880-1120 K; 145-245 kPa]; k(H + 1-butene → ethene + C2H5) = k11 = 3.44 × 10(13) exp(-1971 K/T) cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1), [971-1120 K; 145-245 kPa]; k10/k11 = 10((0.058±0.059)) exp [(818 ± 141) K/T), 971-1120 K. Uncertainties (2σ) in the absolute rate constants are about a factor of 1.5, while the relative rate constants should be accurate to within ±15%. The displacement rate constants are shown to be very close to the high pressure limiting rate constants for addition of H, and the present measurements are the first direct determination of the branching ratio for 1-olefins at high temperatures. At 1000 K, addition to the terminal site is favored over the nonterminal position by a factor of 2.59 ± 0.39, where the uncertainty is 2σ and includes possible systematic errors. Combining the present results with evaluated data from the literature pertaining to temperatures of <440 K leads us to recommend the following: k∞(H + 1-butene → 2-butyl) = 1.05 × 10(9)T(1.40) exp(-366/T) cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1), [220-2000 K]; k∞(H + 1-butene → 1

  10. Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Cases, Buenos Aires, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Querci, Marcia; Marcone, Débora; Videla, Cristina; Martínez, Alfredo; Bonvehi, Pablo; Carballal, Guadalupe

    2010-01-01

    To determine clinical and virologic characteristics of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 in Buenos Aires, Argentina, we conducted real-time reverse transcription–PCR on samples from patients with influenza-like illness, June 11–30, 2009. Of 513 patients tested, 54% were positive for influenza virus subtype H1N1. Infection rate was lowest for patients ≥60 years of age. PMID:20113568

  11. H1-antihistamines induce vacuolation in astrocytes through macroautophagy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei-Wei; Yang, Ying; Wang, Zhe; Shen, Zhe; Zhang, Xiang-Nan; Wang, Guang-Hui; Chen, Zhong

    2012-04-15

    H1-antihistamines induce vacuolation in vascular smooth muscle cells, which may contribute to their cardiovascular toxicity. The CNS toxicity of H1-antihistamines may also be related to their non-receptor-mediated activity. The aim of this study was to investigate whether H1-antihistamines induce vacuolation in astrocytes and the mechanism involved. The H1-antihistamines induced large numbers of giant vacuoles in astrocytes. Such vacuoles were marked with both the lysosome marker Lysotracker Red and the alkalescent fluorescence dye monodansylcadaverine, which indicated that these vacuoles were lysosome-like acidic vesicles. Quantitative analysis of monodansylcadaverine fluorescence showed that the effect of H1-antihistamines on vacuolation in astrocytes was dose-dependent, and was alleviated by extracellular acidification, but aggravated by extracellular alkalization. The order of potency to induce vacuolation at high concentrations of H1-antihistamines (diphenhydramine>pyrilamine>astemizole>triprolidine) corresponded to their pKa ranking. Co-treatment with histamine and the histamine receptor-1 agonist trifluoromethyl toluidide did not inhibit the vacuolation. Bafilomycin A1, a vacuolar (V)-ATPase inhibitor, which inhibits intracellular vacuole or vesicle acidification, clearly reversed the vacuolation and intracellular accumulation of diphenhydramine. The macroautophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine largely reversed the percentage of LC3-positive astrocytes induced by diphenhydramine, while only partly reversing the number of monodansylcadaverine-labeled vesicles. In Atg5⁻/⁻ mouse embryonic fibroblasts, which cannot form autophagosomes, the number of vacuoles induced by diphenhydramine was less than that in wild-type cells. These results indicated that H1-antihistamines induce V-ATPase-dependent acidic vacuole formation in astrocytes, and this is partly mediated by macroautophagy. The pKa and alkalescent characteristic of H1-antihistamines may be the major

  12. Germline-specific H1 variants: the "sexy" linker histones.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Montero, Salvador; Carbonell, Albert; Azorín, Fernando

    2016-03-01

    The eukaryotic genome is packed into chromatin, a nucleoprotein complex mainly formed by the interaction of DNA with the abundant basic histone proteins. The fundamental structural and functional subunit of chromatin is the nucleosome core particle, which is composed by 146 bp of DNA wrapped around an octameric protein complex formed by two copies of each core histone H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. In addition, although not an intrinsic component of the nucleosome core particle, linker histone H1 directly interacts with it in a monomeric form. Histone H1 binds nucleosomes near the exit/entry sites of linker DNA, determines nucleosome repeat length and stabilizes higher-order organization of nucleosomes into the ∼30 nm chromatin fiber. In comparison to core histones, histone H1 is less well conserved through evolution. Furthermore, histone H1 composition in metazoans is generally complex with most species containing multiple variants that play redundant as well as specific functions. In this regard, a characteristic feature is the presence of specific H1 variants that replace somatic H1s in the germline and during early embryogenesis. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge about their structural and functional properties.

  13. Germline-specific H1 variants: the "sexy" linker histones.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Montero, Salvador; Carbonell, Albert; Azorín, Fernando

    2016-03-01

    The eukaryotic genome is packed into chromatin, a nucleoprotein complex mainly formed by the interaction of DNA with the abundant basic histone proteins. The fundamental structural and functional subunit of chromatin is the nucleosome core particle, which is composed by 146 bp of DNA wrapped around an octameric protein complex formed by two copies of each core histone H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. In addition, although not an intrinsic component of the nucleosome core particle, linker histone H1 directly interacts with it in a monomeric form. Histone H1 binds nucleosomes near the exit/entry sites of linker DNA, determines nucleosome repeat length and stabilizes higher-order organization of nucleosomes into the ∼30 nm chromatin fiber. In comparison to core histones, histone H1 is less well conserved through evolution. Furthermore, histone H1 composition in metazoans is generally complex with most species containing multiple variants that play redundant as well as specific functions. In this regard, a characteristic feature is the presence of specific H1 variants that replace somatic H1s in the germline and during early embryogenesis. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge about their structural and functional properties. PMID:25921218

  14. 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1)

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Wun-Ju; Blau, Dianna M.; Denison, Amy M.; DeLeon-Carnes, Marlene; Adem, Patricia; Bhatnagar, Julu; Sumner, John; Liu, Lindy; Patel, Mitesh; Batten, Brigid; Greer, Patricia; Jones, Tara; Smith, Chalanda; Bartlett, Jeanine; Montague, Jeltley; White, Elizabeth; Rollin, Dominique; Gao, Rongbao; Seales, Cynthia; Jost, Heather; Metcalfe, Maureen; Goldsmith, Cynthia S.; Humphrey, Charles; Schmitz, Ann; Drew, Clifton; Paddock, Christopher; Uyeki, Timothy M.; Zaki, Sherif R.

    2010-01-01

    In the spring of 2009, a novel influenza A (H1N1) virus emerged in North America and spread worldwide to cause the first influenza pandemic since 1968. During the first 4 months, over 500 deaths in the United States had been associated with confirmed 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) [2009 H1N1] virus infection. Pathological evaluation of respiratory specimens from initial influenza-associated deaths suggested marked differences in viral tropism and tissue damage compared with seasonal influenza and prompted further investigation. Available autopsy tissue samples were obtained from 100 US deaths with laboratory-confirmed 2009 H1N1 virus infection. Demographic and clinical data of these case-patients were collected, and the tissues were evaluated by multiple laboratory methods, including histopathological evaluation, special stains, molecular and immunohistochemical assays, viral culture, and electron microscopy. The most prominent histopathological feature observed was diffuse alveolar damage in the lung in all case-patients examined. Alveolar lining cells, including type I and type II pneumocytes, were the primary infected cells. Bacterial co-infections were identified in >25% of the case-patients. Viral pneumonia and immunolocalization of viral antigen in association with diffuse alveolar damage are prominent features of infection with 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus. Underlying medical conditions and bacterial co-infections contributed to the fatal outcome of this infection. More studies are needed to understand the multifactorial pathogenesis of this infection. PMID:20508031

  15. The 2009 H1N1 Pandemic Influenza in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In late March of 2009, an outbreak of influenza in Mexico, was eventually identified as H1N1 influenza A. In June 2009, the World Health Organization raised a pandemic alert to the highest level. More than 214 countries have reported confirmed cases of pandemic H1N1 influenza A. In Korea, the first case of pandemic influenza A/H1N1 infection was reported on May 2, 2009. Between May 2009 and August 2010, 750,000 cases of pandemic influenza A/H1N1 were confirmed by laboratory test. The H1N1-related death toll was estimated to reach 252 individuals. Almost one billion cases of influenza occurs globally every year, resulting in 300,000 to 500,000 deaths. Influenza vaccination induces virus-neutralizing antibodies, mainly against hemagglutinin, which provide protection from invading virus. New quadrivalent inactivated influenza vaccine generates similar immune responses against the three influenza strains contained in two types of trivalent vaccines and superior responses against the additional B strain. PMID:27066083

  16. Crystal structure of the major peanut allergen Ara h 1.

    PubMed

    Cabanos, Cerrone; Urabe, Hiroyuki; Tandang-Silvas, Mary Rose; Utsumi, Shigeru; Mikami, Bunzo; Maruyama, Nobuyuki

    2011-10-01

    Ara h 1, a 7S globulin, is one of the three major peanut allergens. We previously reported the crystallization of the core region of recombinant Ara h 1. Here, we present the crystal structure of the Ara h 1 core at a resolution of 2.43 Å. We also assayed the Ara h 1 core thermal stability and compared its final structure against other 7S globulins. The Ara h 1 core has a thermal denaturation temperature of 88.3°C and a structure that is very similar to other 7S globulins. Previously identified linear IgE epitopes were also mapped on the three-dimensional structure. Most linear epitopes were found in the extended loop domains and the coils between the N- and C-terminal modules, while others were found in the less accessible β-sheets of the C-terminal core β-barrel domain of each monomer. Most of these epitopes become either slightly or significantly buried upon trimer formation, implying that allergen digestion in the gut is required for these epitopes to be accessible to immunoglobulins. Our findings also suggest that both intact and partially degraded allergens should be employed in future diagnostic and immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:21903274

  17. Selective dephosphorylation of histone H1 by nuclear phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Jakes, S.; Schlender, K.K.

    1987-05-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the sites of H1 phosphorylated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (kinase A) and the CaS phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (kinase C) and to study their dephosphorylation by nuclear protein phosphatases. H1 was phosphorylated on a ser residue to approx. 1 mole (TSP)/mole H1 with either kinase A or C. The sites of phosphorylation were differentiated by digestion of the H1 by thrombin or N-bromosuccinimide. Phosphopeptide maps on reversed phase HPLC and gel filtration HPLC clearly showed that the kinase C phosphorylated a different site than the well characterized kinase A site. H1, phosphorylated by kinase C or kinase A, was used as a substrate for the nuclear phosphatases. The nuclear phosphatases were purified from salt extracted rat liver chromatin and separated into 2 forms based on heat-stable inhibitor sensitivity and polycation stimulation. Polycation-stimulated phosphatase rapidly dephosphorylated the kinase C site and slowly dephosphorylated the kinase A site. The inhibitor-sensitive enzyme showed little activity toward either site under standard assay conditions.

  18. H1N1, globalization and the epidemiology of inequality.

    PubMed

    Sparke, Matthew; Anguelov, Dimitar

    2012-07-01

    This paper examines the lessons learned from the 2009 H1N1 pandemic in relation to wider work on globalization and the epidemiology of inequality. The media attention and economic resources diverted to the threats posed by H1N1 were significant inequalities themselves when contrasted with weaker responses to more lethal threats posed by other diseases associated with global inequality. However, the multiple inequalities revealed by H1N1 itself in 2009 still provide important insights into the future of global health in the context of market-led globalization. These lessons relate to at least four main forms of inequality: (1) inequalities in blame for the outbreak in the media; (2) inequalities in risk management; (3) inequalities in access to medicines; and (4) inequalities encoded in the actual emergence of new flu viruses.

  19. The comparative pharmacokinetics of H1-receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Simons, F E; Simons, K J; Chung, M; Yeh, J

    1987-12-01

    H1-receptor antagonists appear to be absorbed rapidly after oral administration, with peak serum concentrations being reached one to three hours after a dose. For most of these drugs, the absolute bioavailability is unknown because no intravenous formulations are available for comparative purposes. The serum elimination half-life values of these agents are variable: a few hours for terfenadine and triprolidine; about 9 hours for cetirizine, azatadine, and loratadine; from 20 to 25 hours for hydroxyzine, chlorpheniramine, and brompheniramine; and from 5 to 14 days for astemizole. Few pharmacokinetic studies of H1-receptor antagonists in children have been reported. However, it is known that chlorpheniramine, hydroxyzine, cetirizine, and terfenadine have shorter elimination half-life values in children than in adults. Regardless of the age of patients, for most of the H1-receptor antagonists the apparent volumes of distribution and total body clearances appear to be large (3.4 to 18.5 L/kg and 4.4 to 32.1 mL/min/kg, respectively). Cetirizine is an exception, with values of 0.8 L/kg and 0.5 mL/min/kg. Urinary excretion of unchanged antihistamine is higher after cetirizine (60% of dose) than any other H1 blocker. For H1-receptor antagonists with long half-life values, steady state may not be reached for several days (chlorpheniramine and brompheniramine) or several weeks (astemizole), and significant accumulation of drug occurs if the dosing interval is more frequent than every half-life. There is no evidence for the introduction of metabolism of H1-receptor antagonists, even after months of treatment.

  20. H1N1 influenza pneumonia and bacterial coinfection.

    PubMed

    Calbo, Esther; Robles, Alejandro; Sangil, Anna; Benet, Susana; Viladot, Maria Eugenia; Pascual, Vanesa; Barreiro, Bienvenido

    2011-12-01

    The model described by Bewick et al seems to be able to distinguish between H1N1 influenza-related pneumonia and non-H1N1 community acquired pneumonia (CAP) based on five criteria. However, bacterial infection in the influenza group has not been accurately excluded. Therefore, this model could misidentify these patients and lead to an inappropriate treatment. We conducted a prospective observational study to compare mixed pneumonia vs viral pneumonia. In the mixed pneumonia group patients were older, had higher levels of procalcitonine and higher scores of severity. In our cohort the model proposed by Bewick et al would not identify patients with coinfection. PMID:21994246

  1. Safing of H-1 second stage after spacecraft separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, K.

    At the end of its operation, the H-1 launch vehicle's second stage contains about 1000 l of LH2 and 200 l of LOX; most of this liquid will remain in the tanks, to evaporate and be vented through mechanical, self-regulating relief valves that maintain the pressure differential across the common bulkhead within structural limits. An idle-mode firing of the engine has been incorporated in the schedule of more recent H-1 flights to preclude second-stage structure breakup due to evaporating fuel overpressures.

  2. 77 FR 8877 - ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance (C&M) Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance (C&M... Standards Staff, announces the following meeting. Name: ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance (C&M... attend the ICD- 9-CM C&M meeting on March 5, 2012, must submit their name and organization by February...

  3. [Pharmacological effects of CM6912 and its main metabolites].

    PubMed

    Morishita, H; Kushiku, K; Furukawa, T; Yamaki, Y; Izawa, M; Shibazaki, Y; Shibata, U

    1985-07-01

    Pharmacodynamic effects of ethyl 7-chloro-2,3-dihydro-5-(2-fluorophenyl)-2-oxo-1H-1,4- benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate (CM6912), a new benzodiazepine derivative, and its main metabolites (CM6913 = M1, CM7116 = M2) on the peripheral systems were investigated in several species of animals. In pentobarbital-anesthetized rabbits, CM6912 and M2 (1 or 5 mg/kg, i.v.) had little effect on blood pressure, heart rate and ECG, but it slightly reduced the respiration rate. M1 decreased the heart rate without affecting respiration, blood pressure and ECG. In conscious rabbits, CM6912 and M2 (1 mg/kg, i.v.) did not affect respiration, blood pressure, heart rate and ECG, but M1 (1 mg/kg, i.v.) increased the heart rate. CM6912 (5 or 30 mg/kg), when administered orally, also increased heart rate. In pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs, CM6912 and its metabolites (5 mg/kg, i.v.) decreased respiration and heart rate without affecting blood pressure and ECG. CM 6912 (5 mg/kg, i.v.) did not affect cardiovascular responses to the carotid occlusion, vagus stimulation, and pre- and post-ganglionic stimulation of cardiac ganglion in anesthetized dogs. CM6912 and its metabolites affected neither the spontaneous contraction nor the heart rate of isolated rabbit atria. These compounds also had no action on isolated aortic strips from rabbits. CM6912 and its metabolites did not affect the muscle tone of isolated guinea pig intestine, and it had no effects on the contractile responses to acetylcholine, histamine, serotonin and barium chloride. In isolated rabbit intestine, CM6912 and M2 slightly reduced the amplitude of contraction, while M1 had no effect. CM6912 and its metabolites did not affect the spontaneous motility of isolated non-pregnant and pregnant rat uteri as well as in situ non-pregnant rat uterus and isolated guinea pig vas deferens, including the contractile response to adrenaline. CM6912 and M2 relaxed isolated guinea pig trachea strips only at high concentrations. CM6912 and its

  4. Extended hopane derivatives in sediments - Identification by H-1 NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J.; Wardroper, A. M. K.; Maxwell, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Sedimentary C32 hopanoic acid, one of the most abundant in nature and of probable bacterial origin, has been isolated for the first time as a single component and characterized by H-1 NMR. The 17 alpha H, 21 beta H configuration of the C31 alkane has been similarly confirmed.

  5. Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 in captive cheetah.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Beate; Hietala, Sharon; Hunt, Tania; Benjamin, Glenn; Martinez, Marie; Darnell, Daniel; Rubrum, Adam; Webby, Richard

    2012-02-01

    We describe virus isolation, full genome sequence analysis, and clinical pathology in ferrets experimentally inoculated with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus recovered from a clinically ill captive cheetah that had minimal human contact. Evidence of reverse zoonotic transmission by fomites underscores the substantial animal and human health implications of this virus.

  6. Identification of swine H1N2/pandemic H1N1 reassortant influenza virus in pigs, United States.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ahmed; Khatri, Mahesh; Wang, Leyi; Saif, Yehia M; Lee, Chang-Won

    2012-07-01

    In October and November 2010, novel H1N2 reassortant influenza viruses were identified from pigs showing mild respiratory signs that included cough and depression. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis showed that the novel H1N2 reassortants possesses HA and NA genes derived from recent H1N2 swine isolates similar to those isolated from Midwest. Compared to the majority of reported reassortants, both viruses preserved human-like host restrictive and putative antigenic sites in their HA and NA genes. The four internal genes, PB2, PB1, PA, and NS were similar to the contemporary swine triple reassortant viruses' internal genes (TRIG). Interestingly, NP and M genes of the novel reassortants were derived from the 2009 pandemic H1N1. The NP and M proteins of the two isolates demonstrated one (E16G) and four (G34A, D53E, I109T, and V313I) amino acid changes in the M2 and NP proteins, respectively. Similar amino acid changes were also noticed upon incorporation of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 NP in other reassortant viruses reported in the U.S. Thus the role of those amino acids in relation to host adaptation need to be further investigated. The reassortments of pandemic H1N1 with swine influenza viruses and the potential of interspecies transmission of these reassortants from swine to other species including human indicate the importance of systematic surveillance of swine population to determine the origin, the prevalence of similar reassortants in the U.S. and their impact on both swine production and public health.

  7. Compositional Homogeneity of CM Parent Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernazza, P.; Marsset, M.; Beck, P.; Binzel, R. P.; Birlan, M.; Cloutis, E. A.; DeMeo, F. E.; Dumas, C.; Hiroi, T.

    2016-09-01

    CM chondrites are the most common type of hydrated meteorites, making up ˜1.5% of all falls. Whereas most CM chondrites experienced only low-temperature (˜0°C–120°C) aqueous alteration, the existence of a small fraction of CM chondrites that suffered both hydration and heating complicates our understanding of the early thermal evolution of the CM parent body(ies). Here, we provide new constraints on the collisional and thermal history of CM-like bodies from a comparison between newly acquired spectral measurements of main-belt Ch/Cgh-type asteroids (70 objects) and existing laboratory spectral measurements of CM chondrites. It first appears that the spectral variation observed among CM-like bodies is essentially due to variations in the average regolith grain size. Second, the spectral properties of the vast majority (unheated) of CM chondrites resemble both the surfaces and the interiors of CM-like bodies, implying a “low” temperature (<300°C) thermal evolution of the CM parent body(ies). It follows that an impact origin is the likely explanation for the existence of heated CM chondrites. Finally, similarly to S-type asteroids and (2) Pallas, the surfaces of large (D > 100 km)—supposedly primordial—Ch/Cgh-type main-belt asteroids likely expose the interiors of the primordial CM parent bodies, a possible consequence of impacts by small asteroids (D < 10 km) in the early solar system.

  8. Compositional Homogeneity of CM Parent Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernazza, P.; Marsset, M.; Beck, P.; Binzel, R. P.; Birlan, M.; Cloutis, E. A.; DeMeo, F. E.; Dumas, C.; Hiroi, T.

    2016-09-01

    CM chondrites are the most common type of hydrated meteorites, making up ˜1.5% of all falls. Whereas most CM chondrites experienced only low-temperature (˜0°C-120°C) aqueous alteration, the existence of a small fraction of CM chondrites that suffered both hydration and heating complicates our understanding of the early thermal evolution of the CM parent body(ies). Here, we provide new constraints on the collisional and thermal history of CM-like bodies from a comparison between newly acquired spectral measurements of main-belt Ch/Cgh-type asteroids (70 objects) and existing laboratory spectral measurements of CM chondrites. It first appears that the spectral variation observed among CM-like bodies is essentially due to variations in the average regolith grain size. Second, the spectral properties of the vast majority (unheated) of CM chondrites resemble both the surfaces and the interiors of CM-like bodies, implying a “low” temperature (<300°C) thermal evolution of the CM parent body(ies). It follows that an impact origin is the likely explanation for the existence of heated CM chondrites. Finally, similarly to S-type asteroids and (2) Pallas, the surfaces of large (D > 100 km)—supposedly primordial—Ch/Cgh-type main-belt asteroids likely expose the interiors of the primordial CM parent bodies, a possible consequence of impacts by small asteroids (D < 10 km) in the early solar system.

  9. Persistence of the 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus on N95 respirators.

    PubMed

    Coulliette, A D; Perry, K A; Edwards, J R; Noble-Wang, J A

    2013-04-01

    In the United States, the 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus (pH1N1) infected almost 20% of the population and caused >200,000 hospitalizations and >10,000 deaths from April 2009 to April 2010. On 24 April 2009, the CDC posted interim guidance on infection control measures in health care settings explicitly for pH1N1 and recommended using filtering face respirators (FFRs) when in close contact with a suspected- or confirmed-to-be-infected individual, particularly when performing aerosol-generating procedures. The persistence and infectivity of pH1N1 were evaluated on FFRs, specifically N95 respirators, under various conditions of absolute humidity (AH) (4.1 × 10(5) mPa, 6.5 × 10(5) mPa, and 14.6 × 10(5) mPa), sample matrices (2% fetal bovine serum [FBS], 5 mg/ml mucin, and viral medium), and times (4, 12, 24, 48, 72, and 144 h). pH1N1 was distributed onto N95 coupons (3.8 to 4.2 cm(2)) and extracted by a vortex-centrifugation-filtration process, and the ability of the remaining virus to replicate was quantified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to determine the log10 concentration of the infectious virus per coupon. Overall, pH1N1 remained infectious for 6 days, with an approximately 1-log10 loss of virus concentrations over this time period. Time and AH both affected virus survival. We found significantly higher (P ≤ 0.01) reductions in virus concentrations at time points beyond 24 to 72 h (-0.52-log10 reduction) and 144 h (-0.74) at AHs of 6.5 × 10(5) mPa (-0.53) and 14.6 × 10(5) mPa (-0.47). This research supports discarding respirators after close contact with a person with suspected or confirmed influenza infection due to the virus's demonstrated ability to persist and remain infectious. PMID:23335770

  10. Gas-Phase Oxidation of Cm+ and Cm2+ -- Thermodynamics of neutral and ionized CmO

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, John K; Haire, Richard G.; Santos, Marta; Pires de Matos, Antonio; Marcalo, Joaquim

    2008-12-08

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry was employed to study the products and kinetics of gas-phase reactions of Cm+ and Cm2+; parallel studies were carried out with La+/2+, Gd+/2+ and Lu+/2+. Reactions with oxygen-donor molecules provided estimates for the bond dissociation energies, D[M+-O](M = Cm, Gd, Lu). The first ionization energy, IE[CmO], was obtained from the reactivity of CmO+ with dienes, and the second ionization energies, IE[MO+](M = Cm, La, Gd, Lu), from the rates of electron-transfer reactions from neutrals to the MO2+ ions. The following thermodynamic quantities for curium oxide molecules were obtained: IE[CmO]= 6.4+-0.2 eV; IE[CmO+]= 15.8+-0.4 eV; D[Cm-O]= 710+-45 kJ mol-1; D[Cm+-O]= 670+-40 kJ mol-1; and D[Cm2+-O]= 342+-55 kJ mol-1. Estimates for the M2+-O bond energies for M = Cm, La, Gd and Lu are all intermediate between D[N2-O]and D[OC-O]--i.e., 167 kJ mol-1< D[M2+-O]< 532 kJ mol-1 -- such that the four MO2+ ions fulfill the thermodynamic requirement for catalytic O-atom transport from N2O to CO. It was demonstrated that the kinetics are also favorable and that the CmO2+, LaO2+, GdO2+ and LuO2+ dipositive ions each catalyze the gas-phase oxidation of CO to CO2 by N2O. The CmO2+ ion appeared during the reaction of Cm+ with O2 when the intermediate, CmO+, was not collisionally cooled -- although its formation is kinetically and/or thermodynamically unfavorable, CmO2+ is a stable species.

  11. Measurement of diffractive dijet production at the H1 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raičević, Nataša

    2016-03-01

    The new results on measurement of dijet production in diffractive deep inelastic ep scattering, ep → eXY, obtained with the H1 detector are presented. The system X contains at least two jets. Measurements are performed using two approaches. One approach is based on detection of the diffractive processes with Y being a proton or its low mass excitation. Diffractive events are selected by demanding a large empty rapidity gap interval separating the final state hadronic systems X and Y. In another approach, the leading final state proton from the process ep → eXp is detected in the H1 Very Forward Proton Spectrometer. The measurements are compared with predictions from NLO QCD calculations based on diffractive parton densities.

  12. Galaxy Populations and Evolution in Clusters IV Deep H 1 Observations of Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conselice, Christopher J.; ONeil, Karen; Gallagher, John S.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present deep Arecibo H I and WIYN optical observations of Virgo Cluster dwarf elliptical galaxies. Based on this data we argue that a significant fraction of low-mass galaxies in the Virgo Cluster recently underwent evolution. Our new observations consist of H I 21 cm line observations for 22 classified dE galaxies with optical radial velocities consistent with membership in the Virgo Cluster. Cluster members VCC 390 and VCC 1713 are detected with H 1 masses M H1= 6 x 10 sup 7 and 8 x 10 sup 7 M , respectively, while MH I values in the remaining 20 dE galaxies have upper limits as low as about 5 x 1O sup 5 M. We combine our results with those for 26 other Virgo Cluster dE galaxies with H 1 observations in the literature, seven of which have H I detection claims.

  13. Integrated microfluidic system for rapid detection of influenza H1N1 virus using a sandwich-based aptamer assay.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yi-Ting; Wang, Chih-Hung; Chang, Chih-Peng; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2016-08-15

    The rapid spread of influenza-associated H1N1 viruses has caused serious concern in recent years. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of automatic, point-of-care devices for rapid diagnosis of the influenza virus. Conventional approaches suffer from several critical issues; notably, they are time-consuming, labor-intensive, and are characterized by relatively low sensitivity. In this work, we present a new approach for fluorescence-based detection of the influenza A H1N1 virus using a sandwich-based aptamer assay that is automatically performed on an integrated microfluidic system. The entire detection process was shortened to 30min using this chip-based system which is much faster than the conventional viral culture method. The limit of detection was significantly improved to 0.032 hemagglutination unit due to the high affinity and high specificity of the H1N1-specific aptamers. The results showed that the two-aptamer microfluidic system had about 10(3) times higher sensitivity than the conventional serological diagnosis. It was demonstrated that the developed microfluidic system may play as a powerful tool in the detection of the H1N1 virus.

  14. Integrated microfluidic system for rapid detection of influenza H1N1 virus using a sandwich-based aptamer assay.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yi-Ting; Wang, Chih-Hung; Chang, Chih-Peng; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2016-08-15

    The rapid spread of influenza-associated H1N1 viruses has caused serious concern in recent years. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of automatic, point-of-care devices for rapid diagnosis of the influenza virus. Conventional approaches suffer from several critical issues; notably, they are time-consuming, labor-intensive, and are characterized by relatively low sensitivity. In this work, we present a new approach for fluorescence-based detection of the influenza A H1N1 virus using a sandwich-based aptamer assay that is automatically performed on an integrated microfluidic system. The entire detection process was shortened to 30min using this chip-based system which is much faster than the conventional viral culture method. The limit of detection was significantly improved to 0.032 hemagglutination unit due to the high affinity and high specificity of the H1N1-specific aptamers. The results showed that the two-aptamer microfluidic system had about 10(3) times higher sensitivity than the conventional serological diagnosis. It was demonstrated that the developed microfluidic system may play as a powerful tool in the detection of the H1N1 virus. PMID:27054814

  15. Simultaneous discrimination and detection of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal influenza A viruses using a rapid immunogold biosensor.

    PubMed

    Apiwat, Chayachon; Wiriyachaiporn, Natpapas; Maneeprakorn, Weerakanya; Dharakul, Tararaj; Thepthai, Charin; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; Siritantikorn, Sontana; Horthongkham, Navin

    2014-07-01

    A rapid immunogold biosensor for the simultaneous discrimination of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal influenza A viruses was developed successfully. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that were specific for the hemagglutinin protein of the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus were produced, and the best mAb pairs were selected. Using an mAb that was specific for the influenza A nucleoprotein, a rapid immunogold biosensor for the discrimination and detection of A(H1N1)pdm09/seasonal influenza viruses was developed. When tested with 72 virus isolates, the system achieved 100 % detection of the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus without cross-reactivity against seasonal influenza A (H1, H3 subtypes) and B viruses, parainfluenza viruses, respiratory syncytial viruses, and adenoviruses. The detection limits for A(H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal strains were 5 × 10(2)-7.5 × 10(3) and 1 × 10(3)-7.5 × 10(5) TCID50/mL, respectively. When tested with 49 clinical specimens, the specificity was high (100 %). The sensitivity for the detection of A(H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal strains was 90 % and 100 %, respectively, which correlated with the results of real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction as a reference method. The ability of the system to detect and discriminate the A(H1N1)pdm09 strain from the seasonal strains suggests that this method may be beneficial for investigation of outbreaks and diagnostic applications. Furthermore, this method might be a useful platform for developing a rapid diagnostic system for the simultaneous discrimination of other influenza virus subtypes during future outbreaks. PMID:24402634

  16. Activity, stability, and structure of metagenome-derived LC11-RNase H1, a homolog of Sulfolobus tokodaii RNase H1

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tri-Nhan; Angkawidjaja, Clement; Kanaya, Eiko; Koga, Yuichi; Takano, Kazufumi; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2012-01-01

    Metagenome-derived LC11-RNase H1 is a homolog of Sulfolobus tokodaii RNase H1 (Sto-RNase H1). It lacks a C-terminal tail, which is responsible for hyperstabilization of Sto-RNase H1. Sto-RNase H1 is characterized by its ability to cleave not only an RNA/DNA hybrid but also a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). To examine whether LC11-RNase H1 also exhibits both RNase H and dsRNase activities, LC11-RNase H1 was overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized. LC11-RNase H1 exhibited RNase H activity with similar metal ion preference, optimum pH, and cleavage mode of substrate with those of Sto-RNase H1. However, LC11-RNase H1 did not exhibit dsRNase activity at any condition examined. LC11-RNase H1 was less stable than Sto-RNases H1 and its derivative lacking the C-terminal tail (Sto-RNase H1ΔC6) by 37 and 13°C in Tm, respectively. To understand the structural bases for these differences, the crystal structure of LC11-RNase H1 was determined at 1.4 Å resolution. The LC11-RNase H1 structure is highly similar to the Sto-RNase H1 structure. However, LC11-RNase H1 has two grooves on protein surface, one containing the active site and the other containing DNA-phosphate binding pocket, while Sto-RNase H1 has one groove containing the active site. In addition, LC11-RNase H1 contains more cavities and buried charged residues than Sto-RNase H1. We propose that LC11-RNase H1 does not exhibit dsRNase activity because dsRNA cannot fit to the two grooves on protein surface and that LC11-RNase H1 is less stable than Sto-RNase H1ΔC6 because of the increase in cavity volume and number of buried charged residues. PMID:22389131

  17. Antigenic and genetic variation in influenza A (H1N1) virus isolates recovered from a persistently infected immunodeficient child.

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, E; Cox, N J; Black, R A; Harmon, M W; Harrison, C J; Kendal, A P

    1991-01-01

    Antigenic and genetic variations have been analyzed in eight consecutive isolates recovered from a child with severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome persistently infected with naturally acquired type A (H1N1) influenza virus over a 10-month period. Hemagglutination inhibition reactions and T1 oligonucleotide fingerprinting demonstrated that these viruses were related to strains causing outbreaks in the United States at that time (1983 to 1984) but that antigenic and genetic differences between consecutive isolates could be detected. This variation between isolates was examined further by sequencing the RNAs encoding the HA1 region of the hemagglutinin (HA) and the nucleoprotein (NP) in five of the consecutive isolates. Multiple point mutations were detected in both genes, and a deletion of one amino acid was detected in the HA. Depending on the isolates compared, 5.8 x 10(-3) to 17 x 10(-3) substitutions per nucleotide site per year were detected in the RNAs encoding the HA1, and 3.5 x 10(-3) to 24 x 10(-3) substitutions per nucleotide site per year were detected in the NP gene. Fifty-four percent of the base changes in the HA1 and 73% in the NP led to amino acid substitutions. A progressive accumulation of mutations over time was not observed, suggesting that the genetic diversity of these viruses may best be interpreted as the result of shifts in the population equilibrium (quasi-species) of replicating variant genomes. PMID:2016763

  18. Genetic characterization of influenza A virus subtypes H1N3 and H1N9 isolated from free-grazing ducks in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chaiyawong, Supassama; Boonyapisitsopa, Supanat; Jairak, Waleemas; Nonthabenjawan, Nutthawan; Tangwangvivat, Ratanaporn; Bunpapong, Napawan; Amonsin, Alongkorn

    2016-10-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) subtype H1 has been reported to infect birds, pigs and humans. In this study, we characterized IAVs subtype H1N3 and H1N9 isolated from free-grazing ducks in Thailand. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Thai IAV-H1 isolates cluster with avian Eurasian-lineage but not pandemic H1N1 viruses. Analysis of the viruses indicated low-pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) characteristics. This study is the first report of avian H1N3 and H1N9 in Thailand. Although Thai IAV-H1 viruses do not pose a risk of a pandemic, routine surveillance and genetic monitoring of IAVs should be conducted. PMID:27383209

  19. Experimental infection with H1N1 European swine influenza virus protects pigs from an infection with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 human influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Busquets, Núria; Segalés, Joaquim; Córdoba, Lorena; Mussá, Tufaria; Crisci, Elisa; Martín-Valls, Gerard E; Simon-Grifé, Meritxell; Pérez-Simó, Marta; Pérez-Maíllo, Monica; Núñez, Jose I; Abad, Francesc X; Fraile, Lorenzo; Pina, Sonia; Majó, Natalia; Bensaid, Albert; Domingo, Mariano; Montoya, María

    2010-01-01

    The recent pandemic caused by human influenza virus A(H1N1) 2009 contains ancestral gene segments from North American and Eurasian swine lineages as well as from avian and human influenza lineages. The emergence of this A(H1N1) 2009 poses a potential global threat for human health and the fact that it can infect other species, like pigs, favours a possible encounter with other influenza viruses circulating in swine herds. In Europe, H1N1, H1N2 and H3N2 subtypes of swine influenza virus currently have a high prevalence in commercial farms. To better assess the risk posed by the A(H1N1) 2009 in the actual situation of swine farms, we sought to analyze whether a previous infection with a circulating European avian-like swine A/Swine/Spain/53207/2004 (H1N1) influenza virus (hereafter referred to as SwH1N1) generated or not cross-protective immunity against a subsequent infection with the new human pandemic A/Catalonia/63/2009 (H1N1) influenza virus (hereafter referred to as pH1N1) 21 days apart. Pigs infected only with pH1N1 had mild to moderate pathological findings, consisting on broncho-interstitial pneumonia. However, pigs inoculated with SwH1N1 virus and subsequently infected with pH1N1 had very mild lung lesions, apparently attributed to the remaining lesions caused by SwH1N1 infection. These later pigs also exhibited boosted levels of specific antibodies. Finally, animals firstly infected with SwH1N1 virus and latter infected with pH1N1 exhibited undetectable viral RNA load in nasal swabs and lungs after challenge with pH1N1, indicating a cross-protective effect between both strains.

  20. Pathogenesis of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) and triple-reassortant swine influenza A (H1) viruses in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pandemic H1N1 virus of 2009 (2009 H1N1) continues to cause illness worldwide, primarily in younger age groups. To better understand the pathogenesis of these viruses in mammals, we used a mouse model to evaluate the relative virulence of selected 2009 H1N1 viruses and compared them to a represe...

  1. Globular Head-Displayed Conserved Influenza H1 Hemagglutinin Stalk Epitopes Confer Protection against Heterologous H1N1 Virus

    PubMed Central

    Klausberger, Miriam; Tscheliessnig, Rupert; Neff, Silke; Nachbagauer, Raffael; Wohlbold, Teddy John; Wilde, Monika; Palmberger, Dieter; Krammer, Florian; Jungbauer, Alois; Grabherr, Reingard

    2016-01-01

    Significant genetic variability in the head region of the influenza A hemagglutinin, the main target of current vaccines, makes it challenging to develop a long-lived seasonal influenza prophylaxis. Vaccines based on the conserved hemagglutinin stalk domain might provide broader cross-reactive immunity. However, this region of the hemagglutinin is immunosubdominant to the head region. Peptide-based vaccines have gained much interest as they allow the immune system to focus on relevant but less immunogenic epitopes. We developed a novel influenza A hemagglutinin-based display platform for H1 hemagglutinin stalk peptides that we identified in an epitope mapping assay using human immune sera and synthetic HA peptides. Flow cytometry and competition assays suggest that the identified stalk sequences do not recapitulate the epitopes of already described broadly neutralizing stalk antibodies. Vaccine constructs displaying 25-mer stalk sequences provided up to 75% protection from lethal heterologous virus challenge in BALB/c mice and induced antibody responses against the H1 hemagglutinin. The developed platform based on a vaccine antigen has the potential to be either used as stand-alone or as prime-vaccine in combination with conventional seasonal or pandemic vaccines for the amplification of stalk-based cross-reactive immunity in humans or as platform to evaluate the relevance of viral peptides/epitopes for protection against influenza virus infection. PMID:27088239

  2. Globular Head-Displayed Conserved Influenza H1 Hemagglutinin Stalk Epitopes Confer Protection against Heterologous H1N1 Virus.

    PubMed

    Klausberger, Miriam; Tscheliessnig, Rupert; Neff, Silke; Nachbagauer, Raffael; Wohlbold, Teddy John; Wilde, Monika; Palmberger, Dieter; Krammer, Florian; Jungbauer, Alois; Grabherr, Reingard

    2016-01-01

    Significant genetic variability in the head region of the influenza A hemagglutinin, the main target of current vaccines, makes it challenging to develop a long-lived seasonal influenza prophylaxis. Vaccines based on the conserved hemagglutinin stalk domain might provide broader cross-reactive immunity. However, this region of the hemagglutinin is immunosubdominant to the head region. Peptide-based vaccines have gained much interest as they allow the immune system to focus on relevant but less immunogenic epitopes. We developed a novel influenza A hemagglutinin-based display platform for H1 hemagglutinin stalk peptides that we identified in an epitope mapping assay using human immune sera and synthetic HA peptides. Flow cytometry and competition assays suggest that the identified stalk sequences do not recapitulate the epitopes of already described broadly neutralizing stalk antibodies. Vaccine constructs displaying 25-mer stalk sequences provided up to 75% protection from lethal heterologous virus challenge in BALB/c mice and induced antibody responses against the H1 hemagglutinin. The developed platform based on a vaccine antigen has the potential to be either used as stand-alone or as prime-vaccine in combination with conventional seasonal or pandemic vaccines for the amplification of stalk-based cross-reactive immunity in humans or as platform to evaluate the relevance of viral peptides/epitopes for protection against influenza virus infection. PMID:27088239

  3. 5 CFR 10.3 - OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... management programs and practices. 10.3 Section 10.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE RULES AGENCY ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEMS; OPM AUTHORITY TO REVIEW PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS (RULE X) § 10.3 OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices. The Office...

  4. 5 CFR 10.3 - OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... management programs and practices. 10.3 Section 10.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE RULES AGENCY ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEMS; OPM AUTHORITY TO REVIEW PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS (RULE X) § 10.3 OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices. The Office...

  5. 5 CFR 10.3 - OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... management programs and practices. 10.3 Section 10.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE RULES AGENCY ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEMS; OPM AUTHORITY TO REVIEW PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS (RULE X) § 10.3 OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices. The Office...

  6. 5 CFR 10.3 - OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... management programs and practices. 10.3 Section 10.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE RULES AGENCY ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEMS; OPM AUTHORITY TO REVIEW PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS (RULE X) § 10.3 OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices. The Office...

  7. 5 CFR 10.3 - OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... management programs and practices. 10.3 Section 10.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE RULES AGENCY ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEMS; OPM AUTHORITY TO REVIEW PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS (RULE X) § 10.3 OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices. The Office...

  8. H1 photonic crystal cavities for hybrid quantum information protocols.

    PubMed

    Hagemeier, Jenna; Bonato, Cristian; Truong, Tuan-Anh; Kim, Hyochul; Beirne, Gareth J; Bakker, Morten; van Exter, Martin P; Luo, Yunqiu; Petroff, Pierre; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2012-10-22

    Hybrid quantum information protocols are based on local qubits, such as trapped atoms, NV centers, and quantum dots, coupled to photons. The coupling is achieved through optical cavities. Here we demonstrate far-field optimized H1 photonic crystal membrane cavities combined with an additional back reflection mirror below the membrane that meet the optical requirements for implementing hybrid quantum information protocols. Using numerical optimization we find that 80% of the light can be radiated within an objective numerical aperture of 0.8, and the coupling to a single-mode fiber can be as high as 92%. We experimentally prove the unique external mode matching properties by resonant reflection spectroscopy with a cavity mode visibility above 50%. PMID:23187235

  9. H1 photonic crystal cavities for hybrid quantum information protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagemeier, Jenna; Bonato, Cristian; Truong, Tuan-Anh; Kim, Hyochul; Beirne, Gareth J.; Bakker, Morten; van Exter, Martin P.; Luo, Yunqiu; Petroff, Pierre; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2012-10-01

    Hybrid quantum information protocols are based on local qubits, such as trapped atoms, NV centers, and quantum dots, coupled to photons. The coupling is achieved through optical cavities. Here we demonstrate far-field optimized H1 photonic crystal membrane cavities combined with an additional back reflection mirror below the membrane that meet the optical requirements for implementing hybrid quantum information protocols. Using numerical optimization we find that 80% of the light can be radiated within an objective numerical aperture of 0.8, and the coupling to a single-mode fiber can be as high as 92%. We experimentally prove the unique external mode matching properties by resonant reflection spectroscopy with a cavity mode visibility above 50%.

  10. The new H1 luminosity system for HERA II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, V.; Boudry, V.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Levonian, S.; Moreau, F.; Sheviakov, I.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Yu.; Specka, A.; Usik, A.

    2002-11-01

    At HERA, luminosity is determined on-line and bunch by bunch by measuring the bremsstrahlung spectrum from e-p collisions. The H1 collaboration has built a completely new luminosity system in order to sustain the harsh running conditions after the four-fold luminosity increase. Namely, the higher synchrotron radiation doses and the increased event pile-up have governed the design of the two major components, a radiation-resistant quartz-fiber electro-magnetic calorimeter, and a fast readout electronics with on-line energy histogramming at a rate of 500 kHz. An overview of the different components of the new luminosity system is given, and the commissioning status is reported.

  11. Citrullination regulates pluripotency and histone H1 binding to chromatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christophorou, Maria A.; Castelo-Branco, Gonçalo; Halley-Stott, Richard P.; Oliveira, Clara Slade; Loos, Remco; Radzisheuskaya, Aliaksandra; Mowen, Kerri A.; Bertone, Paul; Silva, José C. R.; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena; Nielsen, Michael L.; Gurdon, John B.; Kouzarides, Tony

    2014-03-01

    Citrullination is the post-translational conversion of an arginine residue within a protein to the non-coded amino acid citrulline. This modification leads to the loss of a positive charge and reduction in hydrogen-bonding ability. It is carried out by a small family of tissue-specific vertebrate enzymes called peptidylarginine deiminases (PADIs) and is associated with the development of diverse pathological states such as autoimmunity, cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, prion diseases and thrombosis. Nevertheless, the physiological functions of citrullination remain ill-defined, although citrullination of core histones has been linked to transcriptional regulation and the DNA damage response. PADI4 (also called PAD4 or PADV), the only PADI with a nuclear localization signal, was previously shown to act in myeloid cells where it mediates profound chromatin decondensation during the innate immune response to infection. Here we show that the expression and enzymatic activity of Padi4 are also induced under conditions of ground-state pluripotency and during reprogramming in mouse. Padi4 is part of the pluripotency transcriptional network, binding to regulatory elements of key stem-cell genes and activating their expression. Its inhibition lowers the percentage of pluripotent cells in the early mouse embryo and significantly reduces reprogramming efficiency. Using an unbiased proteomic approach we identify linker histone H1 variants, which are involved in the generation of compact chromatin, as novel PADI4 substrates. Citrullination of a single arginine residue within the DNA-binding site of H1 results in its displacement from chromatin and global chromatin decondensation. Together, these results uncover a role for citrullination in the regulation of pluripotency and provide new mechanistic insights into how citrullination regulates chromatin compaction.

  12. Technicon H*1 Hematology System: Optical Design Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colella, G. M.; Tycko, D. H.; Groner, W.

    1988-06-01

    The Technicon H*1 systemTM is a clinical laboratory flow cytometer which performs a complete hematology profile, providing quantitative information on the various types of cells in a blood sample. A light-scattering method, using a HeNe laser, determines in a single flow channel the red cell count, platelet count, and the distributions of red cell volume, red cell hemoglobin concentration, and platelet volume. To accomplish this the scattered light from each red cell in the sample is measured in real time at two angular intervals. The cell volume and the hemoglobin concentration within the cell are derived from these two measurements. Severe accuracy and precision specifications are placed on the medically important red cell count (RBC) and the mean red cell volume (MCV). From the point of view of optical system design, the dominant factor is the requirement that RBC and MCV have precision and accuracy of the order of 2%. Signal-to-noise and scattering-angle definition requirements dictated the choice of a HeNe laser light source. The optics includes an illumination system for producing a sharply defined, uniformly illuminated scattering region and a detection system which must accurately define the accepted scattering angles. In previous cytometric methods for determining MCV only a single quantity was measured for each cell. Such methods cannot disentangle the independent effects of cell size and hemoglobin concentration on the measurement, thus compromising MCV accuracy. The present double-angle scattering method overcomes this accuracy problem. The H*1 red cell method, the supporting optical design and data demonstrating that the use of this technique eliminates interference between the observed red cell indices are presented.

  13. Chilled Mirror Dew Point Hygrometer (CM) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Ritsche, MT

    2005-01-01

    The CM systems have been developed for the ARM Program to act as a moisture standard traceable to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). There are three CM systems that are each fully portable, self-contained, and require only 110 V AC power. The systems include a CM sensor, air sampling and filtration system, a secondary reference (Rotronic HP043 temperature and relative humidity sensor) to detect system malfunctions, a data acquisition system, and data storage for more than one month of 1-minute data. The CM sensor directly measures dew point temperature at 1 m, air temperature at 2 m, and relative humidity at 2 m. These measurements are intended to represent self-standing data streams that can be used independently or in combinations.

  14. Detection of Thermal 2 cm and 1 cm Formaldehyde Emission in NGC 7538

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Liang; Araya, E. D.; Hofner, P.; Kurtz, S.; Pihlstrom, Y.

    2011-05-01

    Formaldehyde is a tracer of high density gas in massive star forming regions. The K-doublet lines from the three lowest rotational energy levels of ortho-formaldehyde correspond to wavelengths of 6, 2 and 1 cm. Thermal emission of these transitions is rare, and maser emission has only been detected in the 6 cm line. NGC 7538 is an active site of massive star formation in the Galaxy, and one of only a few regions known to harbor 6 cm formaldehyde (H2CO) masers. Using the NRAO 100 m Green Bank Telescope (GBT), we detected 2 cm H2CO emission toward NGC 7538 IRS1. The velocity of the 2 cm H2CO line is very similar to the velocity of one of the 6 cm H2CO masers but the linewidth is greater. To investigate the nature of the 2 cm emission, we conducted observations of the 1 cm H2CO transition, and obtained a cross-scan map of the 2 cm line. We detected 1 cm emission and found that the 2 cm emission is extended (greater than 30"), which implies brightness temperatures of ˜0.2 K. Assuming optically thin emission, LTE, and that the 1 cm and 2 cm lines originate from the same volume of gas, both these detections are consistent with thermal emission of gas at ˜30 K. We conclude that the 1 cm and 2 cm H2CO lines detected with the GBT are thermal, which implies molecular densities above ˜105 cm-3. LY acknowledges support from WIU. PH acknowledges partial support from NSF grant AST-0908901.

  15. Identification of Human H1N2 and Human-Swine Reassortant H1N2 and H1N1 Influenza A Viruses among Pigs in Ontario, Canada (2003 to 2005)†

    PubMed Central

    Karasin, Alexander I.; Carman, Suzanne; Olsen, Christopher W.

    2006-01-01

    Since 2003, three novel genotypes of H1 influenza viruses have been recovered from Canadian pigs, including a wholly human H1N2 virus and human-swine reassortants. These isolates demonstrate that human-lineage H1N2 viruses are infectious for pigs and that viruses with a human PB1/swine PA/swine PB2 polymerase complex can replicate in pigs. PMID:16517910

  16. A monoclonal antibody-based ELISA for differential diagnosis of 2009 pandemic H1N1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The swine-origin 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus (pdmH1N1) is genetically related to North American swine H1 influenza viruses and unrelated to human seasonal H1 viruses. Currently, specific diagnosis of pdmH1N1 relies on RT-PCR. In order to develop an assay that does not rely in amplification of the viral...

  17. Probing lepton asymmetry with 21 cm fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Kohri, Kazunori; Oyama, Yoshihiko; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: oyamayo@post.kek.jp E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the issue of how accurately we can constrain the lepton number asymmetry ξ{sub ν}=μ{sub ν}/T{sub ν} in the Universe by using future observations of 21 cm line fluctuations and cosmic microwave background (CMB). We find that combinations of the 21 cm line and the CMB observations can constrain the lepton asymmetry better than big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). Additionally, we also discuss constraints on ξ{sub ν} in the presence of some extra radiation, and show that the 21 cm line observations can substantially improve the constraints obtained by CMB alone, and allow us to distinguish the effects of the lepton asymmetry from the ones of extra radiation.

  18. CV and CM chondrite impact melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunning, Nicole G.; Corrigan, Catherine M.; McSween, Harry Y.; Tenner, Travis J.; Kita, Noriko T.; Bodnar, Robert J.

    2016-09-01

    Volatile-rich and typically oxidized carbonaceous chondrites, such as CV and CM chondrites, potentially respond to impacts differently than do other chondritic materials. Understanding impact melting of carbonaceous chondrites has been hampered by the dearth of recognized impact melt samples. In this study we identify five carbonaceous chondrite impact melt clasts in three host meteorites: a CV3red chondrite, a CV3oxA chondrite, and a regolithic howardite. The impact melt clasts in these meteorites respectively formed from CV3red chondrite, CV3oxA chondrite, and CM chondrite protoliths. We identified these impact melt clasts and interpreted their precursors based on their texture, mineral chemistry, silicate bulk elemental composition, and in the case of the CM chondrite impact melt clast, in situ measurement of oxygen three-isotope signatures in olivine. These impact melts typically contain euhedral-subhedral olivine microphenocrysts, sometimes with relict cores, in glassy groundmasses. Based on petrography and Raman spectroscopy, four of the impact melt clasts exhibit evidence for volatile loss: these melt clasts either contain vesicles or are depleted in H2O relative to their precursors. Volatile loss (i.e., H2O) may have reduced the redox state of the CM chondrite impact melt clast. The clasts that formed from the more oxidized precursors (CV3oxA and CM chondrites) exhibit phase and bulk silicate elemental compositions consistent with higher intrinsic oxygen fugacities relative to the clast that formed from a more reduced precursor (CV3red chondrite). The mineral chemistries and assemblages of the CV and CM chondrite impact melt clasts identified here provide a template for recognizing carbonaceous chondrite impact melts on the surfaces of asteroids.

  19. Genomic reassortants of pandemic A (H1N1) 2009 virus and endemic porcine H1 and H3 viruses in swine in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kirisawa, Rikio; Ogasawara, Yoshitaka; Yoshitake, Hayato; Koda, Asuka; Furuya, Tokujiro

    2014-11-01

    From 2010 to 2013 in Japan, we isolated 11 swine influenza viruses (SIVs) from pigs showing respiratory symptoms. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses showed that 6 H1N1 viruses originated from the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 (pdm 09) virus and the other 5 viruses were reassortants between SIVs and pdm 09 viruses, representing 4 genotypes. Two H1N2 viruses contained H1 and N2 genes originated from Japanese H1N2 SIV together with internal genes of pdm 09 viruses. Additionally, 1 H1N2 virus contained a further NP gene originating from Japanese H1N2 SIV. One H1N1 virus contained only the H1 gene originating from Japanese H1 SIV in a pdm 09 virus background. One H3N2 virus contained H3 and N2 genes originating from Japanese H3N2 SIV together with internal genes of pdm 09 virus. The results indicate that pdm 09 viruses are distributed widely in the Japanese swine population and that several reassortments with Japanese SIVs have occurred.

  20. Genetic Characterization of H1N1 and H1N2 Influenza A Viruses Circulating in Ontario Pigs in 2012.

    PubMed

    Grgić, Helena; Costa, Marcio; Friendship, Robert M; Carman, Susy; Nagy, Éva; Poljak, Zvonimir

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize H1N1 and H1N2 influenza A virus isolates detected during outbreaks of respiratory disease in pig herds in Ontario (Canada) in 2012. Six influenza viruses were included in analysis using full genome sequencing based on the 454 platform. In five H1N1 isolates, all eight segments were genetically related to 2009 pandemic virus (A(H1N1)pdm09). One H1N2 isolate had hemagglutinin (HA), polymerase A (PA) and non-structural (NS) genes closely related to A(H1N1)pdm09, and neuraminidase (NA), matrix (M), polymerase B1 (PB1), polymerase B2 (PB2), and nucleoprotein (NP) genes originating from a triple-reassortant H3N2 virus (tr H3N2). The HA gene of five Ontario H1 isolates exhibited high identity of 99% with the human A(H1N1)pdm09 [A/Mexico/InDRE4487/09] from Mexico, while one Ontario H1N1 isolate had only 96.9% identity with this Mexican virus. Each of the five Ontario H1N1 viruses had between one and four amino acid (aa) changes within five antigenic sites, while one Ontario H1N2 virus had two aa changes within two antigenic sites. Such aa changes in antigenic sites could have an effect on antibody recognition and ultimately have implications for immunization practices. According to aa sequence analysis of the M2 protein, Ontario H1N1 and H1N2 viruses can be expected to offer resistance to adamantane derivatives, but not to neuraminidase inhibitors. PMID:26030614

  1. Genetic Characterization of H1N1 and H1N2 Influenza A Viruses Circulating in Ontario Pigs in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Grgić, Helena; Costa, Marcio; Friendship, Robert M.; Carman, Susy; Nagy, Éva; Poljak, Zvonimir

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize H1N1 and H1N2 influenza A virus isolates detected during outbreaks of respiratory disease in pig herds in Ontario (Canada) in 2012. Six influenza viruses were included in analysis using full genome sequencing based on the 454 platform. In five H1N1 isolates, all eight segments were genetically related to 2009 pandemic virus (A(H1N1)pdm09). One H1N2 isolate had hemagglutinin (HA), polymerase A (PA) and non-structural (NS) genes closely related to A(H1N1)pdm09, and neuraminidase (NA), matrix (M), polymerase B1 (PB1), polymerase B2 (PB2), and nucleoprotein (NP) genes originating from a triple-reassortant H3N2 virus (tr H3N2). The HA gene of five Ontario H1 isolates exhibited high identity of 99% with the human A(H1N1)pdm09 [A/Mexico/InDRE4487/09] from Mexico, while one Ontario H1N1 isolate had only 96.9% identity with this Mexican virus. Each of the five Ontario H1N1 viruses had between one and four amino acid (aa) changes within five antigenic sites, while one Ontario H1N2 virus had two aa changes within two antigenic sites. Such aa changes in antigenic sites could have an effect on antibody recognition and ultimately have implications for immunization practices. According to aa sequence analysis of the M2 protein, Ontario H1N1 and H1N2 viruses can be expected to offer resistance to adamantane derivatives, but not to neuraminidase inhibitors. PMID:26030614

  2. In Vitro Reassortment between Endemic H1N2 and 2009 H1N1 Pandemic Swine Influenza Viruses Generates Attenuated Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Hause, Ben M.; Collin, Emily A.; Ran, Zhiguang; Zhu, Laihua; Webby, Richard J.; Simonson, Randy R.; Li, Feng

    2012-01-01

    The pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) influenza virus was first reported in humans in the spring of 2009 and soon thereafter was identified in numerous species, including swine. Reassortant viruses, presumably arising from the co-infection of pH1N1 and endemic swine influenza virus (SIV), were subsequently identified from diagnostic samples collected from swine. In this study, co-infection of swine testicle (ST) cells with swine-derived endemic H1N2 (MN745) and pH1N1 (MN432) yielded two reassortant H1N2 viruses (R1 and R2), both possessing a matrix gene derived from pH1N1. In ST cells, the reassortant viruses had growth kinetics similar to the parental H1N2 virus and reached titers approximately 2 log10 TCID50/mL higher than the pH1N1 virus, while in A549 cells these viruses had similar growth kinetics. Intranasal challenge of pigs with H1N2, pH1N1, R1 or R2 found that all viruses were capable of infecting and transmitting between direct contact pigs as measured by real time reverse transcription PCR of nasal swabs. Lung samples were also PCR-positive for all challenge groups and influenza-associated microscopic lesions were detected by histology. Interestingly, infectious virus was detected in lung samples for pigs challenged with the parental H1N2 and pH1N1 at levels significantly higher than either reassortant virus despite similar levels of viral RNA. Results of our experiment suggested that the reassortant viruses generated through in vitro cell culture system were attenuated without gaining any selective growth advantage in pigs over the parental lineages. Thus, reassortant influenza viruses described in this study may provide a good system to study genetic basis of the attenuation and its mechanism. PMID:22720066

  3. Genetic Characterization of H1N1 and H1N2 Influenza A Viruses Circulating in Ontario Pigs in 2012.

    PubMed

    Grgić, Helena; Costa, Marcio; Friendship, Robert M; Carman, Susy; Nagy, Éva; Poljak, Zvonimir

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize H1N1 and H1N2 influenza A virus isolates detected during outbreaks of respiratory disease in pig herds in Ontario (Canada) in 2012. Six influenza viruses were included in analysis using full genome sequencing based on the 454 platform. In five H1N1 isolates, all eight segments were genetically related to 2009 pandemic virus (A(H1N1)pdm09). One H1N2 isolate had hemagglutinin (HA), polymerase A (PA) and non-structural (NS) genes closely related to A(H1N1)pdm09, and neuraminidase (NA), matrix (M), polymerase B1 (PB1), polymerase B2 (PB2), and nucleoprotein (NP) genes originating from a triple-reassortant H3N2 virus (tr H3N2). The HA gene of five Ontario H1 isolates exhibited high identity of 99% with the human A(H1N1)pdm09 [A/Mexico/InDRE4487/09] from Mexico, while one Ontario H1N1 isolate had only 96.9% identity with this Mexican virus. Each of the five Ontario H1N1 viruses had between one and four amino acid (aa) changes within five antigenic sites, while one Ontario H1N2 virus had two aa changes within two antigenic sites. Such aa changes in antigenic sites could have an effect on antibody recognition and ultimately have implications for immunization practices. According to aa sequence analysis of the M2 protein, Ontario H1N1 and H1N2 viruses can be expected to offer resistance to adamantane derivatives, but not to neuraminidase inhibitors.

  4. Characterization of 8-cm engineering model thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, W. S.

    1984-01-01

    Development of 8 cm ion thruster technology which was conducted in support of the Ion Auxiliary Propulsion System (IAPS) flight contract (Contract NAS3-21055) is discussed. The work included characterization of thruster performance, stability, and control; a study of the effects of cathode aging; environmental qualification testing; and cyclic lifetesting of especially critical thruster components.

  5. The Multidimensional Curriculum Model (MdCM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidergor, Hava E.

    2010-01-01

    The multidimensional Curriculum Model (MdCM) helps teachers to better prepare gifted and able students for our changing world, acquiring much needed skills. It is influenced by general learning theory of constructivism, notions of preparing students for 21st century, Teaching the Future Model, and current comprehensive curriculum models for…

  6. Viable RNaseH1 knockout mice show RNaseH1 is essential for R loop processing, mitochondrial and liver function

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Walt F.; Murray, Heather M.; Damle, Sagar S.; Hart, Christopher E.; Hung, Gene; De Hoyos, Cheryl Li; Liang, Xue-Hai; Crooke, Stanley T.

    2016-01-01

    Viable constitutive and tamoxifen inducible liver-specific RNase H1 knockout mice that expressed no RNase H1 activity in hepatocytes showed increased R-loop levels and reduced mitochondrial encoded DNA and mRNA levels, suggesting impaired mitochondrial R-loop processing, transcription and mitochondrial DNA replication. These changes resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction with marked changes in mitochondrial fusion, fission, morphology and transcriptional changes reflective of mitochondrial damage and stress. Liver degeneration ensued, as indicated by apoptosis, fibrosis and increased transaminase levels. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) designed to serve as substrates for RNase H1 were inactive in the hepatocytes from the RNase H1 knockout mice and in vivo, demonstrating that RNase H1 is necessary for the activity of DNA-like ASOs. During liver regeneration, a clone of hepatocytes that expressed RNase H1 developed and partially restored mitochondrial and liver function. PMID:27131367

  7. Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Two-blade NACA 10-(3)(062)-045 Propeller and of a Two-blade NACA 10-(3)(08)-045 Propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, William

    1953-01-01

    Characteristics are given for the two-blade NACA 10-(3)(062)-045 propeller and for the two-blade NACA 10-(3)(08)-045 propeller over a range of advance ratio from 0.5 to 3.8, through a blade-angle range from 20 degrees to 55 degrees measured at the 0.75 radius. Maximum efficiencies of the order of 91.5 to 92 percent were obtained for the propellers. The propeller with the thinner airfoil sections over the outboard portion of the blades, the NACA 10-(3)(062)-045 propeller, had lower losses at high tip speeds, the difference amounting to about 5 percent at a helical tip Mach number of 1.10.

  8. Measurements of Output Factors For Small Photon Fields Up to 10 cm x 10 cm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacala, Angelina

    Field output factors (OF) for photon beams from a 6 MV medical accelerator were measured using five different detectors in a scanning water phantom. The measurements were taken for square field sizes of integral widths ranging from 1 cm to 10 cm for two reference source-to-surface distances (SSD) and depths in water. For the diode detectors, square field widths as small as 2.5 mm were also studied. The photon beams were collimated by using either the jaws or the multileaf collimators. Measured OFs are found to depend upon the field size, SSD, depth and also upon the type of beam collimation, size and type of detector used. For field sizes larger than 3 cm x 3 cm, the OF measurements agree to within 1% or less. The largest variation in OF occurs for jawsshaped field of size 1 cm x 1cm, where a difference of more than 18% is observed.

  9. Interpreting Sky-Averaged 21-cm Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirocha, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    Within the first ~billion years after the Big Bang, the intergalactic medium (IGM) underwent a remarkable transformation, from a uniform sea of cold neutral hydrogen gas to a fully ionized, metal-enriched plasma. Three milestones during this epoch of reionization -- the emergence of the first stars, black holes (BHs), and full-fledged galaxies -- are expected to manifest themselves as extrema in sky-averaged ("global") measurements of the redshifted 21-cm background. However, interpreting these measurements will be complicated by the presence of strong foregrounds and non-trivialities in the radiative transfer (RT) modeling required to make robust predictions.I have developed numerical models that efficiently solve the frequency-dependent radiative transfer equation, which has led to two advances in studies of the global 21-cm signal. First, frequency-dependent solutions facilitate studies of how the global 21-cm signal may be used to constrain the detailed spectral properties of the first stars, BHs, and galaxies, rather than just the timing of their formation. And second, the speed of these calculations allows one to search vast expanses of a currently unconstrained parameter space, while simultaneously characterizing the degeneracies between parameters of interest. I find principally that (1) physical properties of the IGM, such as its temperature and ionization state, can be constrained robustly from observations of the global 21-cm signal without invoking models for the astrophysical sources themselves, (2) translating IGM properties to galaxy properties is challenging, in large part due to frequency-dependent effects. For instance, evolution in the characteristic spectrum of accreting BHs can modify the 21-cm absorption signal at levels accessible to first generation instruments, but could easily be confused with evolution in the X-ray luminosity star-formation rate relation. Finally, (3) the independent constraints most likely to aide in the interpretation

  10. Balloon observations of the radiance of the earth between 2100 cm(-1) and 2700 cm(-1).

    PubMed

    Shaw, J H; McClatchey, R A; Schaper, P W

    1967-02-01

    A grating spectrometer capable of measuring small radiation fluxes with a spectral resolution of 95 at 4.3 micro is described. Bands of CO(2), N(2)O, and O(3) are identified in spectra between 2100 cm(-1) and 2700 cm(-1) of the earth and lower atmosphere obtained from an altitude of 30 km with this instrument. Scattering of solar radiation by clouds was observed between 2400 cm(-1) and 2700 cm(-1). A temperature profile of the atmosphere to 30 km determined from an analysis of the measurements in the region of the 4.3 micro CO(2) band is compared with radiosonde observations made during the flight.

  11. Hydrogen-Broadened Water from 50 to 300 cm-1 and 1300 to 4000 cm-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, L.; Peterson, D.; Plymate, C.

    1995-01-01

    To support remote sensing of the outer planets, absorption spectra of H2O broadened by H2 were recorded at room temperature using two Fourier transform spectrometers. The data from 1300 to 4000 cm-1 were obtained at 0.012 cm-1 resolution with the McMath FTS located at Kitt Peak National Observatory/National Solar Observatory. The remainder of the spectral data from 55 to 320 cm-1 were taken at 0.0056 cm-1 with the Bruker FTS.

  12. Magnetic susceptibility of curium pnictides. [/sup 248/CmP, /sup 248/CmSb

    SciTech Connect

    Nave, S.E.; Huray, P.G.; Peterson, J.R.; Damien, D.A.; Haire, R.G.

    1981-09-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of microgram quantities of /sup 248/CmP and /sup 248/CmSb has been determined with the use of a SQUID micromagnetic susceptometer over the temperature range 4.2 to 340 K and in the applied magnetic field range of 0.45 to 1600 G. The fcc (NaCl-type) samples yield magnetic transitions at 73K and 162 K for the phosphide and antimonide, respectively. Together with published magnetic data for CmN and CmAs, these results indicate spatially extended exchange interactions between the relatively localized 5f electrons of the metallic actinide atoms.

  13. Extended Performance 8-cm Mercury Ion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantenieks, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    A slightly modified 8-cm Hg ion thruster demonstrated significant increase in performance. Thrust was increased by almost a factor of five over that of the baseline thruster. Thruster operation with various three grid ion optics configurations; thruster performance as a function of accelerator grid open area, cathode baffle, and cathode orifice size; and a life test of 614 hours at a beam current of 250 mA (17.5 mN thrust) are discussed. Highest thruster efficiency was obtained with the smallest open area accelerator grid. The benefits in efficiency from the low neutral loss grids were mitigated, however, by the limitation such grids place on attainable ion beam current densities. The thruster components suffered negligible weight losses during a life test, which indicated that operation of the 8-cm thruster at extended levels of thrust and power is possible with no significant loss of lifetime.

  14. 15 cm multipole gas ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaacson, G. C.; Kaufman, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    A 15-cm multipole thruster was operated on argon and xenon. The multipole approach used has been shown capable of low discharge losses and flat ion beam profiles with a minimum of redesign. This approach employs low magnetic field strengths and flat or cylindrical sheet-metal parts, hence is suited to rapid optimization and scaling. Only refractory metal cathodes were used in this investigation.

  15. Late type close binary system CM Dra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalomeni, Belinda

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we present new observations of the close binary system CM Dra. We analyzed all the available data of the system and estimated the physical parameters of the system stars highly accurately. Using the newly obtained parameters the distance of the system is determined to be 11.6 pc. A possible giant planet orbiting the close binary system has been detected. This orbital period would likely make it one of the longest known orbital period planet.

  16. Constraining dark matter through 21-cm observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdés, M.; Ferrara, A.; Mapelli, M.; Ripamonti, E.

    2007-05-01

    Beyond reionization epoch cosmic hydrogen is neutral and can be directly observed through its 21-cm line signal. If dark matter (DM) decays or annihilates, the corresponding energy input affects the hydrogen kinetic temperature and ionized fraction, and contributes to the Lyα background. The changes induced by these processes on the 21-cm signal can then be used to constrain the proposed DM candidates, among which we select the three most popular ones: (i) 25-keV decaying sterile neutrinos, (ii) 10-MeV decaying light dark matter (LDM) and (iii) 10-MeV annihilating LDM. Although we find that the DM effects are considerably smaller than found by previous studies (due to a more physical description of the energy transfer from DM to the gas), we conclude that combined observations of the 21-cm background and of its gradient should be able to put constrains at least on LDM candidates. In fact, LDM decays (annihilations) induce differential brightness temperature variations with respect to the non-decaying/annihilating DM case up to ΔδTb = 8 (22) mK at about 50 (15) MHz. In principle, this signal could be detected both by current single-dish radio telescopes and future facilities as Low Frequency Array; however, this assumes that ionospheric, interference and foreground issues can be properly taken care of.

  17. Polyhedral Serpentine Grains in CM Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zega, Thomas J.; Garvie, Laurence A. J.; Dodony, Istvan; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2005-01-01

    CM chondrites are primitive rocks that experienced aqueous alteration in the early solar system. Their matrices and fine-grained rims (FGRs) sustained the effects of alteration, and the minerals within them hold clues to the aqueous reactions. Sheet silicates are an important product of alteration, and those of the serpentine group are abundant in the CM2 chondrites. Here we expand on our previous efforts to characterize the structure and chemistry of serpentines in CM chondrites and report results on a polyhedral form that is structurally similar to polygonal serpentine. Polygonal serpentine consists of tetrahedral (T) sheets joined to M(2+)-centered octahedral (O) sheets (where (M2+) is primarily Mg(2+) and Fe(2+)), which give rise to a 1:1 (TO) layered structure with a 0.7-nm layer periodicity. The structure is similar to chrysotile in that it consists of concentric lizardite layers wrapped around the fiber axis. However, unlike the rolled-up chrysotile, the tetrahedral sheets of the lizardite layers are periodically inverted and kinked, producing sectors. The relative angles between sectors result in 15- and 30-sided polygons in terrestrial samples.

  18. H1TF2A, the large subunit of a heterodimeric, glutamine-rich CCAAT-binding transcription factor involved in histone H1 cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, R; Heintz, N

    1994-01-01

    H1TF2 is a CCAAT transcription factor that binds to the histone H1 subtype-specific consensus sequence, which has previously been shown to be necessary for temporal regulation of histone H1 transcription during the cell cycle (F. La Bella, P. Gallinari, J. McKinney, and N. Heintz, Genes Dev. 3:1982-1990, 1989). In this study, we report that H1TF2 is a heteromeric CCAAT-binding protein composed of two polypeptide doublets of 33 and 34 kDa and 43 and 44 kDa that are not antigenically related. The 33- and 34-kDa species were not detected in our previous studies (P. Gallinari, F. La Bella, and N. Heintz, Mol. Cell. Biol. 9:1566-1575, 1989) because of technical problems in detection of these heavily glycosylated subunits. The cloning of H1TF2A, the large subunit of this factor, reveals it to be a glutamine-rich protein with extremely limited similarity to previously cloned CCAAT-binding proteins. A monospecific antiserum produced against bacterially synthesized H1TF2A was used to establish that HeLa cell H1TF2A is phosphorylated in vivo and that, in contrast to the H2b transcription factor Oct1 (S. B. Roberts, N. Segil, and N. Heintz, Science 253:1022-1026, 1991; N. Segil, S. B. Roberts, and N. Heintz, Cold Spring Harbor Symp. Quant. Biol. 56:285-292, 1991), no gross change in H1TF2A phosphorylation is evident during the cell cycle. Further immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that H1TF2 is heterodimeric in the absence of DNA in vivo and identified several H1TF2-interacting proteins that may play a role in H1TF2 function in vivo. Images PMID:7969168

  19. Decay Data Evaluation Project (DDEP): evaluation of the main 243Cm and 245Cm decay characteristics.

    PubMed

    Chechev, Valery P

    2012-09-01

    The results of new decay data evaluations are presented for (243)Cm (α) decay to nuclear levels in (239)Pu and (245)Cm (α) decay to nuclear levels in (241)Pu. These evaluated data have been obtained within the Decay Data Evaluation Project using information published up to 2011.

  20. 77 FR 3284 - Comment Request for Information Collection for the H-1B Technical Skills Training (H-1B) and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ... [Federal Register Volume 77, Number 14 (Monday, January 23, 2012)] [Notices] [Pages 3284-3286] [FR... Secretary, Employment and Training Administration. [FR Doc. 2012-1226 Filed 1-20-12; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE... Technical Skills Training (H-1B) and the H-1B Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge (JIAC)...

  1. Antigenic variation of H1N1, H1N2 and H3N2 swine influenza viruses in Japan and Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Takemae, Nobuhiro; Nguyen, Tung; Ngo, Long Thanh; Hiromoto, Yasuaki; Uchida, Yuko; Pham, Vu Phong; Kageyama, Tsutomu; Kasuo, Shizuko; Shimada, Shinichi; Yamashita, Yasutaka; Goto, Kaoru; Kubo, Hideyuki; Le, Vu Tri; Van Vo, Hung; Do, Hoa Thi; Nguyen, Dang Hoang; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Matsuu, Aya; Saito, Takehiko

    2013-04-01

    The antigenicity of the influenza A virus hemagglutinin is responsible for vaccine efficacy in protecting pigs against swine influenza virus (SIV) infection. However, the antigenicity of SIV strains currently circulating in Japan and Vietnam has not been well characterized. We examined the antigenicity of classical H1 SIVs, pandemic A(H1N1)2009 (A(H1N1)pdm09) viruses, and seasonal human-lineage SIVs isolated in Japan and Vietnam. A hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay was used to determine antigenic differences that differentiate the recent Japanese H1N2 and H3N2 SIVs from the H1N1 and H3N2 domestic vaccine strains. Minor antigenic variation between pig A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses was evident by HI assay using 13 mAbs raised against homologous virus. A Vietnamese H1N2 SIV, whose H1 gene originated from a human strain in the mid-2000s, reacted poorly with post-infection ferret serum against human vaccine strains from 2000-2010. These results provide useful information for selection of optimal strains for SIV vaccine production.

  2. DNA stable pentaploid H1 (ES) cells obtained from an octaploid cell induced from tetraploid cells polyploidized using demecolcine.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa-Yamamoto, Kohzaburo; Luo, Xianwen; Miyagoshi, Minoru; Yamagishi, Hiroko

    2010-05-01

    Pentaploid H1 (ES) cells (5H1 cells) were accidentally obtained through one-cell cloning of octaploid H1 (ES) cells (8H1 cells) that were established from tetraploid H1 (ES) cells (4H1 cells) polyploidized using demecolcine. The number of chromosomes of 5H1 cells was 100, unlike the 40 of diploid H1 (ES) cells (2H1 cells), 80 of 4H1, and 160 of 8H1 cells. The durations of G(1), S, and G(2)/M phases of 5H1 cells were 3, 7, and 6 h, respectively, almost the same as those of 2H1, 4H1, and 8H1 cells. The cell volume of 5H1 cells was half of that of 8H1 cells, suggesting that 5H1 cells were created through abnormal cell divisions of 8H1 cells. The morphology of growing 5H1 cells was a spherical cluster similar to that of 2H1 cells and differing from the flagstone-like shape of 4H1 and 8H1 cells. Pentaploid solid tumors were formed from 5H1 cells after interperitoneal injection into the mouse abdomen, and they contained endodermal, mesodermal, and ectodermal cells as well as undifferentiated cells, suggesting both that the DNA content of 5H1 cells was retained during tumor formation and that the 5H1 cells were pluripotent. The DNA content of 5H1 cells was stable in long-term culturing as 2H1 cells, meaning that 5H1 and 2H1 cells shared similarities in DNA structure. The excellent stability of the DNA content of 5H1 cells was explained using a hypothesis for the DNA structure of polyploid cells because the pairing of homologous chromosomes in 5H1 cells is spatially forbidden. PMID:20082301

  3. Anti-Human H1N1pdm09 and swine H1N1 Virus Antibodies among Swine Workers in Guangdong Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jie; Yi, Lina; Ni, Hanzhong; Zou, Lirong; Zhang, Hongbin; Zeng, Xianqiao; Liang, Lijun; Li, Laiqing; Zhong, Haojie; Zhang, Xin; Lin, Jin-yan; Ke, Changwen

    2015-01-01

    To assess the potential transmission for zoonotic influenza, sero-antibodies against two kinds of influenza viruses—classical swine H1N1 and human H1N1pdm09 virus were detected in persons whose profession involved contact with swine in Guangdong province, China. Compared to the non-exposed control group, a significantly higher proportion of subjects with occupational contact to pigs exhibited positive seroreaction against the classical H1N1 SIV. Participants aged 26–50 years were at high risk of classic swine H1N1 infections. Seropositive rate to 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus among swine workers was similar with controls. The major impact of age was apparent for younger populations. Our present study has documented evidence for swine influenza virus infection among persons with occupational swine exposures. The differences of seroreactivity for the two tested influenza subtypes emphasize the necessity of regular surveillance both in pigs and human. PMID:26205221

  4. Syntheses and modulations in the chromatin contents of histones H1/sup o/ and H1 during G/sub 1/ and S phases in Chinese hamsters cells

    SciTech Connect

    D'Anna, J.A.; Gurley, L.R.; Tobey, R.A.

    1982-08-17

    Flow cytometry, conventional autoradiography, and autoradiography employing high concentrations of high specific activity (/sup 3/H)thymidine indicate that (1) treatment of Chinese hamster ovary (line CHO) cells with butyrate truly blocks cells in G/sub 1/ and (2) cells blocked in G/sub 1/ by isoleucine deprivation remain blocked in G/sub 1/ when they are released into complete medium containing butyrate. Measurements of H1/sup o/ content relative to core histones and H1/sup o/:H1 ratios indicate that H1/sup o/ is enhanced somewhat in G/sub 1/ cells arrested by isoleucine deprivation; however, (1) treatment with butyrate greatly increases the H1/sup o/ content in G/sub 1/-blocked cells, and (2) the enhancement is very sensitive to butyrate concentration. Measurements of relative histone contents in the isolated chromatin of synchronized cultures also suggest that the acid-soluble content of histone H1 (relative to core histones) becomes greatly depleted in the isolated chromatin when synchronized cells are blocked in early S phase by sequential use of isoleucine deprivation and hydroxyurea blockade. We also have measured (/sup 3/H)lysine incorporation, various protein ratios, and relative rates of deposition of newly synthesized H1/sup o/, H1, and H4 onto chromatin during G/sub 1/ and S in the absence of butyrate. The results suggest a dynamic picture of chromatin organization in which (1) newly synthesized histone H1/sup o/ binds to chromatin during traverse of G/sub 1/ and S phases and (2) histone H1 dissociates from (or becomes loosely bound to) chromatin during prolonged early S-phase block with hydroxyurea.

  5. Isolation and genetic characterization of avian-like H1N1 and novel ressortant H1N2 influenza viruses from pigs in China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai; Zhang, Peng-Chao; Zhou, Yan-Jun; Li, Guo-Xin; Pan, Jie; Yan, Li-Ping; Shi, Xiao-Xiao; Liu, Hui-Li; Tong, Guang-Zhi

    2009-08-21

    As pigs are susceptible to both human and avian influenza viruses, they have been proposed to be intermediate hosts or mixing vessels for the generation of pandemic influenza viruses through reassortment or adaptation to the mammalian host. In this study, we reported avian-like H1N1 and novel ressortant H1N2 influenza viruses from pigs in China. Homology and phylogenetic analyses showed that the H1N1 virus (A/swine/Zhejiang/1/07) was closely to avian-like H1N1 viruses and seemed to be derived from the European swine H1N1 viruses, which was for the first time reported in China; and the two H1N2 viruses (A/swine/Shanghai/1/07 and A/swine/Guangxi/13/06) were novel ressortant H1N2 influenza viruses containing genes from the classical swine (HA, NP, M and NS), human (NA and PB1) and avian (PB2 and PA) lineages, which indicted that the reassortment among human, avian, and swine influenza viruses had taken place in pigs in China and resulted in the generation of new viruses. The isolation of avian-like H1N1 influenza virus originated from the European swine H1N1 viruses, especially the emergence of two novel ressortant H1N2 influenza viruses provides further evidence that pigs serve as intermediate hosts or "mixing vessels", and swine influenza virus surveillance in China should be given a high priority.

  6. Influenza virus A(H1N1)2009 antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity in young children prior to the H1N1 pandemic.

    PubMed

    Mesman, Annelies W; Westerhuis, Brenda M; Ten Hulscher, Hinke I; Jacobi, Ronald H; de Bruin, Erwin; van Beek, Josine; Buisman, Annemarie M; Koopmans, Marion P; van Binnendijk, Robert S

    2016-09-01

    Pre-existing immunity played a significant role in protection during the latest influenza A virus H1N1 pandemic, especially in older age groups. Structural similarities were found between A(H1N1)2009 and older H1N1 virus strains to which humans had already been exposed. Broadly cross-reactive antibodies capable of neutralizing the A(H1N1)2009 virus have been implicated in this immune protection in adults. We investigated the serological profile of a group of young children aged 9 years (n=55), from whom paired blood samples were available, just prior to the pandemic wave (March 2009) and shortly thereafter (March 2010). On the basis of A(H1N1)2009 seroconversion, 27 of the 55 children (49 %) were confirmed to be infected between these two time points. Within the non-infected group of 28 children (51 %), high levels of seasonal antibodies to H1 and H3 HA1 antigens were detected prior to pandemic exposure, reflecting past infection with H1N1 and H3N2, both of which had circulated in The Netherlands prior to the pandemic. In some children, this reactivity coincided with specific antibody reactivity against A(H1N1)2009. While these antibodies were not able to neutralize the A(H1N1)2009 virus, they were able to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vitro upon interaction with the A(H1N1)2009 virus. This finding suggests that cross-reactive antibodies could contribute to immune protection in children via ADCC.

  7. An engineering model 30 cm ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poeschel, R. L.; King, H. J.; Schnelker, D. E.

    1973-01-01

    Thruster development at Hughes Research Laboratories and NASA Lewis Research Center has brought the 30-cm mercury bombardment ion thruster to the state of an engineering model. This thruster has been designed to have sufficient internal strength for direct mounting on gimbals, to weigh 7.3 kg, to operate with a corrected overall efficiency of 71%, and to have 10,000 hours lifetime. Subassemblies, such as the ion optical system, isolators, etc., have been upgraded to meet launch qualification standards. This paper presents a summary of the design specifications and performance characteristics which define the interface between the thruster module and the remainder of the propulsion system.

  8. 26 CFR 31.3402(h)(1)-1 - Withholding on basis of average wages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...(h)(1)-1 Section 31.3402(h)(1)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(h)(1)-1 Withholding on basis... basis of average estimated tips—(1) In general. Subject to certain limitations and conditions,...

  9. 26 CFR 1.1402(h)-1 - Members of certain religious groups opposed to insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... insurance. 1.1402(h)-1 Section 1.1402(h)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...(h)-1 Members of certain religious groups opposed to insurance. (a) In general. An individual—(1) Who... acceptance of the benefits of any private or public insurance which makes payments in the event of...

  10. 77 FR 53912 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; H-1B...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-04

    ... the Federal Register on January 23, 2012 (77 FR 3284). Interested parties are encouraged to send...; H-1B Technical Skills Training Grants and H-1B Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge Grants... Training Grants and H-1B Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge Grants,'' to the Office of...

  11. Purification and recombinant expression of major peanut allergen Ara h 1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhihua; Yan, Fei; Wei, Xiaonan; Li, Xin; Tong, Ping; Yang, Anshu; Tang, Ronghua; Chen, Hongbing

    2015-01-01

    Reaction to peanut, as one of the major food allergens, has become an increasingly common life-threatening disorder. Although peanut allergens have been extensively identified, Ara h 1 is still too expensive to be applied in food safety or clinical utility. In this study, the purification, expression, and immunological analyses of Ara h 1 are investigated. It was shown that a high purity (>95%) of Ara h 1 could be prepared by either purification or expression. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), Western blot, and mass spectroscopy were used to identify the Ara h 1, and it was found that natural Ara h 1 (nAra h 1) and expressed Ara h 1 (rAra h 1) have the same properties, including amino acid sequence. In particular, rAra h 1 reacted positively with anti-nAra h 1 serum, showing their similar immunological property. Thus, by either purification or expression, Ara h 1 could be prepared with low cost, as performed in the present work. SDS-PAGE, mag trix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF MS), and immunological analysis confirmed that both forms of Ara h 1 had the same properties. PMID:25036339

  12. Factors Influencing School Closure and Dismissal Decisions: Influenza A (H1N1), Michigan 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dooyema, Carrie A.; Copeland, Daphne; Sinclair, Julie R.; Shi, Jianrong; Wilkins, Melinda; Wells, Eden; Collins, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Background: In fall 2009, many US communities experienced school closures during the influenza A H1N1 pandemic (pH1N1) and the state of Michigan reported 567 closures. We conducted an investigation in Michigan to describe pH1N1-related school policies, practices, and identify factors related to school closures. Methods: We distributed an online…

  13. 26 CFR 301.6223(h)-1 - Responsibilities of pass-thru partner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... October 4, 2001. For years beginning prior to October 4, 2001, see § 301.6223(h)-1T contained in 26 CFR...(h)-1 Section 301.6223(h)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Assessment In General §...

  14. 26 CFR 301.6501(h)-1 - Net operating loss or capital loss carrybacks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Net operating loss or capital loss carrybacks. 301.6501(h)-1 Section 301.6501(h)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Assessment and Collection § 301.6501(h)-1 Net operating loss or capital loss carrybacks. In the case of...

  15. 26 CFR 25.2523(h)-1 - Denial of double deduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Denial of double deduction. 25.2523(h)-1 Section 25.2523(h)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GIFT TAX; GIFTS MADE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 1954 Deductions § 25.2523(h)-1 Denial of...

  16. 26 CFR 25.2523(h)-1 - Denial of double deduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Denial of double deduction. 25.2523(h)-1 Section 25.2523(h)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GIFT TAX; GIFTS MADE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 1954 Deductions § 25.2523(h)-1 Denial of...

  17. Purification and recombinant expression of major peanut allergen Ara h 1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhihua; Yan, Fei; Wei, Xiaonan; Li, Xin; Tong, Ping; Yang, Anshu; Tang, Ronghua; Chen, Hongbing

    2015-01-01

    Reaction to peanut, as one of the major food allergens, has become an increasingly common life-threatening disorder. Although peanut allergens have been extensively identified, Ara h 1 is still too expensive to be applied in food safety or clinical utility. In this study, the purification, expression, and immunological analyses of Ara h 1 are investigated. It was shown that a high purity (>95%) of Ara h 1 could be prepared by either purification or expression. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), Western blot, and mass spectroscopy were used to identify the Ara h 1, and it was found that natural Ara h 1 (nAra h 1) and expressed Ara h 1 (rAra h 1) have the same properties, including amino acid sequence. In particular, rAra h 1 reacted positively with anti-nAra h 1 serum, showing their similar immunological property. Thus, by either purification or expression, Ara h 1 could be prepared with low cost, as performed in the present work. SDS-PAGE, mag trix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF MS), and immunological analysis confirmed that both forms of Ara h 1 had the same properties.

  18. 26 CFR 301.6223(h)-1 - Responsibilities of pass-thru partner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... October 4, 2001. For years beginning prior to October 4, 2001, see § 301.6223(h)-1T contained in 26 CFR...(h)-1 Section 301.6223(h)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Assessment In General §...

  19. 26 CFR 48.6416(h)-1 - Accounting procedures for like articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Accounting procedures for like articles. 48.6416(h)-1 Section 48.6416(h)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Administrative Provisions of Special Application to Retailers and Manufacturers Taxes § 48.6416(h)-1...

  20. 26 CFR 1.643(h)-1 - Distributions by certain foreign trusts through intermediaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... intermediaries. 1.643(h)-1 Section 1.643(h)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Estates, Trusts, and Beneficiaries § 1.643(h)-1... section, FT is deemed to have distributed XYZ stock with a value of 85X to C on December 1, 2001....

  1. 26 CFR 1.167(h)-1 - Life tenants and beneficiaries of trusts and estates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Life tenants and beneficiaries of trusts and estates. 1.167(h)-1 Section 1.167(h)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... and Corporations § 1.167(h)-1 Life tenants and beneficiaries of trusts and estates. (a) Life...

  2. 26 CFR 31.3402(h)(1)-1 - Withholding on basis of average wages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Withholding on basis of average wages. 31.3402(h)(1)-1 Section 31.3402(h)(1)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(h)(1)-1 Withholding on...

  3. 26 CFR 25.2523(h)-1 - Denial of double deduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Denial of double deduction. 25.2523(h)-1 Section 25.2523(h)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES GIFT TAX; GIFTS MADE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 1954 Deductions § 25.2523(h)-1 Denial...

  4. 26 CFR 301.6501(h)-1 - Net operating loss or capital loss carrybacks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Net operating loss or capital loss carrybacks. 301.6501(h)-1 Section 301.6501(h)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Assessment and Collection § 301.6501(h)-1 Net operating loss or capital loss carrybacks. In the case of...

  5. Redundant Array Configurations for 21 cm Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, Joshua S.; Parsons, Aaron R.

    2016-08-01

    Realizing the potential of 21 cm tomography to statistically probe the intergalactic medium before and during the Epoch of Reionization requires large telescopes and precise control of systematics. Next-generation telescopes are now being designed and built to meet these challenges, drawing lessons from first-generation experiments that showed the benefits of densely packed, highly redundant arrays—in which the same mode on the sky is sampled by many antenna pairs—for achieving high sensitivity, precise calibration, and robust foreground mitigation. In this work, we focus on the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) as an interferometer with a dense, redundant core designed following these lessons to be optimized for 21 cm cosmology. We show how modestly supplementing or modifying a compact design like HERA’s can still deliver high sensitivity while enhancing strategies for calibration and foreground mitigation. In particular, we compare the imaging capability of several array configurations, both instantaneously (to address instrumental and ionospheric effects) and with rotation synthesis (for foreground removal). We also examine the effects that configuration has on calibratability using instantaneous redundancy. We find that improved imaging with sub-aperture sampling via “off-grid” antennas and increased angular resolution via far-flung “outrigger” antennas is possible with a redundantly calibratable array configuration.

  6. THE METALLICITY OF THE CM DRACONIS SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Terrien, Ryan C.; Fleming, Scott W.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Deshpande, Rohit; Bender, Chad F.; Ramsey, Lawrence W.; Feiden, Gregory A.

    2012-11-20

    The CM Draconis system comprises two eclipsing mid-M dwarfs of nearly equal mass in a 1.27 day orbit. This well-studied eclipsing binary has often been used for benchmark tests of stellar models, since its components are among the lowest mass stars with well-measured masses and radii ({approx}< 1% relative precision). However, as with many other low-mass stars, non-magnetic models have been unable to match the observed radii and effective temperatures for CM Dra at the 5%-10% level. To date, the uncertain metallicity of the system has complicated comparison of theoretical isochrones with observations. In this Letter, we use data from the SpeX instrument on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility to measure the metallicity of the system during primary and secondary eclipses, as well as out of eclipse, based on an empirical metallicity calibration in the H and K near-infrared (NIR) bands. We derive an [Fe/H] = -0.30 {+-} 0.12 that is consistent across all orbital phases. The determination of [Fe/H] for this system constrains a key dimension of parameter space when attempting to reconcile model isochrone predictions and observations.

  7. Combining galaxy and 21-cm surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, J. D.; White, Martin; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Holder, Gil; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Doré, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic waves travelling through the early Universe imprint a characteristic scale in the clustering of galaxies, QSOs and intergalactic gas. This scale can be used as a standard ruler to map the expansion history of the Universe, a technique known as baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). BAO offer a high-precision, low-systematics means of constraining our cosmological model. The statistical power of BAO measurements can be improved if the `smearing' of the acoustic feature by non-linear structure formation is undone in a process known as reconstruction. In this paper, we use low-order Lagrangian perturbation theory to study the ability of 21-cm experiments to perform reconstruction and how augmenting these surveys with galaxy redshift surveys at relatively low number densities can improve performance. We find that the critical number density which must be achieved in order to benefit 21-cm surveys is set by the linear theory power spectrum near its peak, and corresponds to densities achievable by upcoming surveys of emission line galaxies such as eBOSS and DESI. As part of this work, we analyse reconstruction within the framework of Lagrangian perturbation theory with local Lagrangian bias, redshift-space distortions, {k}-dependent noise and anisotropic filtering schemes.

  8. The Metallicity of the CM Draconis System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrien, Ryan C.; Fleming, Scott W.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Deshpande, Rohit; Feiden, Gregory A.; Bender, Chad F.; Ramsey, Lawrence W.

    2012-11-01

    The CM Draconis system comprises two eclipsing mid-M dwarfs of nearly equal mass in a 1.27 day orbit. This well-studied eclipsing binary has often been used for benchmark tests of stellar models, since its components are among the lowest mass stars with well-measured masses and radii (lsim 1% relative precision). However, as with many other low-mass stars, non-magnetic models have been unable to match the observed radii and effective temperatures for CM Dra at the 5%-10% level. To date, the uncertain metallicity of the system has complicated comparison of theoretical isochrones with observations. In this Letter, we use data from the SpeX instrument on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility to measure the metallicity of the system during primary and secondary eclipses, as well as out of eclipse, based on an empirical metallicity calibration in the H and K near-infrared (NIR) bands. We derive an [Fe/H] = -0.30 ± 0.12 that is consistent across all orbital phases. The determination of [Fe/H] for this system constrains a key dimension of parameter space when attempting to reconcile model isochrone predictions and observations.

  9. Fuel elements of research reactor CM

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, A.V.; Morozov, A.V.; Vatulin, A.V.; Ershov, S.A.

    2013-07-01

    In 1961 the CM research reactor was commissioned at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (Dimitrovgrad, Russia), it was intended to carry on investigations and the production of transuranium nuclides. The reactor is of a tank type. Original fuel assembly contained plate fuels that were spaced with vanes and corrugated bands. Nickel was used as a cladding material, fuel meat was produced from UO{sub 2} + electrolytic nickel composition. Fuel plates have been replaced by self-spacing cross-shaped dispersion fuels clad in stainless steel. In 2005 the reactor was updated. The purpose of this updating was to increase the quantity of irradiation channels in the reactor core and to improve the neutron balance. The updating was implemented at the expense of 20 % reduction in the quantity of fuel elements in the core which released a space for extra channels and decreased the mass of structural materials in the core. The updated reactor is loaded with modified standard fuel elements with 20 % higher uranium masses. At the same time stainless steel in fuel assembly shrouds was substituted by zirconium alloy. Today in progress are investigations and work to promote the second stage of reactor updating that involve developments of cross-shaped fuel elements having low neutron absorption matrix materials. This article gives an historical account of the design and main technical changes that occurred for the CM reactor since its commissioning.

  10. Co-circulation of pandemic 2009 H1N1, classical swine H1N1 and avian-like swine H1N1 influenza viruses in pigs in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Zhang, Jian; Qiao, Chuanling; Yang, Huanliang; Zhang, Ying; Xin, Xiaoguang; Chen, Hualan

    2013-01-01

    The pandemic A/H1N1 influenza viruses emerged in both Mexico and the United States in March 2009, and were transmitted efficiently in the human population. They were transmitted occasionally from humans to other mammals including pigs, dogs and cats. In this study, we report the isolation and genetic analysis of novel viruses in pigs in China. These viruses were related phylogenetically to the pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza viruses isolated from humans and pigs, which indicates that the pandemic virus is currently circulating in swine populations, and this hypothesis was further supported by serological surveillance of pig sera collected within the same period. Furthermore, we isolated another two H1N1 viruses belonging to the lineages of classical swine H1N1 virus and avian-like swine H1N1 virus, respectively. Multiple genetic lineages of H1N1 viruses are co-circulating in the swine population, which highlights the importance of intensive surveillance for swine influenza in China.

  11. Aliphatic amines in Antarctic CR2, CM2, and CM1/2 carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aponte, José C.; McLain, Hannah L.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.

    2016-09-01

    Meteoritic water-soluble organic compounds provide a unique record of the processes that occurred during the formation of the solar system and the chemistry preceding the origins of life on Earth. We have investigated the molecular distribution, compound-specific δ13C isotopic ratios and enantiomeric compositions of aliphatic monoamines present in the hot acid-water extracts of the carbonaceous chondrites LAP 02342 (CR2), GRA 95229 (CR2), LON 94101 (CM2), LEW 90500 (CM2), and ALH 83100 (CM1/2). Analyses of the concentration of monoamines in these meteorites revealed: (a) the CR2 chondrites studied here contain higher concentrations of monoamines relative to the analyzed CM2 chondrites; (b) the concentration of monoamines decreases with increasing carbon number; and (c) isopropylamine is the most abundant monoamine in these CR2 chondrites, while methylamine is the most abundant amine species in these CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites. The δ13C values of monoamines in CR2 chondrite do not correlate with the number of carbon atoms; however, in CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites, the 13C enrichment decreases with increasing monoamine carbon number. The δ13C values of methylamine in CR2 chondrites ranged from -1 to +10‰, while in CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites the δ13C values of methylamine ranged from +41 to +59‰. We also observed racemic compositions of sec-butylamine, 3-methyl-2-butylamine, and sec-pentylamine in the studied carbonaceous chondrites. Additionally, we compared the abundance and δ13C isotopic composition of monoamines to those of their structurally related amino acids. We found that monoamines are less abundant than amino acids in CR2 chondrites, with the opposite being true in CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites. We used these collective data to evaluate different primordial synthetic pathways for monoamines in carbonaceous chondrites and to understand the potential common origins these molecules may share with meteoritic amino acids.

  12. Overcoming the Challenges of 21cm Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pober, Jonathan

    The highly-redshifted 21cm line of neutral hydrogen is one of the most promising and unique probes of cosmology for the next decade and beyond. The past few years have seen a number of dedicated experiments targeting the 21cm signal from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) begin operation, including the LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR), the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), and the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER). For these experiments to yield cosmological results, they require new calibration and analysis algorithms which will need to achieve unprecedented levels of separation between the 21cm signal and contaminating foreground emission. Although much work has been spent developing these algorithms over the past decade, their success or failure will ultimately depend on their ability to overcome the complications associated with real-world systems and their inherent complications. The work in this dissertation is closely tied to the late-stage commissioning and early observations with PAPER. The first two chapters focus on developing calibration algorithms to overcome unique problems arising in the PAPER system. To test these algorithms, I rely on not only simulations, but on commissioning observations, ultimately tying the success of the algorithm to its performance on actual, celestial data. The first algorithm works to correct gain-drifts in the PAPER system caused by the heating and cooling of various components (the amplifiers and above ground co-axial cables, in particular). It is shown that a simple measurement of the ambient temperature can remove ˜ 10% gain fluctuations in the observed brightness of calibrator sources. This result is highly encouraging for the ability of PAPER to remove a potentially dominant systematic in its power spectrum and cataloging measurements without resorting to a complicated system overhaul. The second new algorithm developed in this dissertation solves a major calibration challenge not

  13. Pharmacological profile of astemizole-derived compounds at the histamine H1 and H4 receptor--H1/H4 receptor selectivity.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Eva; Wittmann, Hans-Joachim; Elz, Sigurd; Strasser, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    Astemizole, a H1R antagonist shows high affinity to the histamine H1 receptor but only a moderate affinity to the histamine H4 receptor. This study aims to modify the astemizole to keep high affinity to the histamine H1 receptor and to increase affinity to the histamine H4 receptor. Therefore, 13 astemizole-derived compounds and astemizole-JNJ7777120-derived hybrid compounds were synthesized and pharmacologically characterized at the histamine H1 and H4 receptors. The new compounds show affinity to the histamine H1 receptor in the pK i range from 5.3 to 8.8, whereas the affinity of these compounds to the histamine H4 receptor was surprisingly rather low (pK i from 4.4 to 5.6). Three representative compounds were docked into the histamine H1 receptor and molecular dynamic studies were performed to explain the binding mode and the experimental results on a molecular level. Furthermore, taking into account the binding mode of compounds with high affinity to the histamine H4 receptor, a H1/H4-pharmacophore hypothesis was developed. PMID:24241585

  14. Pathogenesis and transmission of triple-reassortant swine H1N1 influenza viruses isolated before the 2009 H1N1 pandemic.

    PubMed

    Belser, Jessica A; Gustin, Kortney M; Maines, Taronna R; Blau, Dianna M; Zaki, Sherif R; Katz, Jacqueline M; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2011-02-01

    The 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus represents the greatest incidence of human infection with an influenza virus of swine origin to date. Moreover, triple-reassortant swine (TRS) H1N1 viruses, which share similar host and lineage origins with 2009 H1N1 viruses, have been responsible for sporadic human cases since 2005. Similar to 2009 H1N1 viruses, TRS viruses are capable of causing severe disease in previously healthy individuals and frequently manifest with gastrointestinal symptoms; however, their ability to cause severe disease has not been extensively studied. Here, we evaluated the pathogenicity and transmissibility of two TRS viruses associated with disease in humans in the ferret model. TRS and 2009 H1N1 viruses exhibited comparable viral titers and histopathologies following virus infection and were similarly unable to transmit efficiently via respiratory droplets in the ferret model. Utilizing TRS and 2009 H1N1 viruses, we conducted extensive hematologic and blood serum analyses on infected ferrets to identify lymphohematopoietic parameters associated with mild to severe influenza virus infection. Following H1N1 or H5N1 influenza virus infection, ferrets were found to recapitulate several laboratory abnormalities previously documented with human disease, furthering the utility of the ferret model for the assessment of influenza virus pathogenicity.

  15. Guanine nucleotide exchange factor H1 can be a new biomarker of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jie; Guo, Bingyu; Zhang, Yu; Hui, Qiang; Chang, Peng; Tao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factor H1 (GEF-H1), which couples microtubule dynamics to RhoA activation, is a microtubule-regulated exchange factor. Studies have shown that GEF-H1 can be involved in various cancer pathways; however, the clinical significance of GEF-H1 expression and functions in melanoma has not been established. In this study, we investigated the relationship between clinical outcomes and GEF-H1 functions in melanoma. A total of 60 cases of different grades of melanoma samples were used to detect the expression of GEF-H1. Results showed that both messenger RNA and protein levels of GEF-H1 were significantly higher in high-grade melanomas. Furthermore, patients with high GEF-H1 expression had a shorter overall survival (22 months) than patients with low level of GEF-H1 expression (33.38 months). We also found that GEF-H1 can promote the proliferation and metastasis of melanoma cells. In summary, these results suggested that GEF-H1 may be a valuable biomarker for assessing the degree and prognosis of melanoma following surgery. PMID:27462139

  16. Identification of reassortant pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in Korean pigs.

    PubMed

    Han, Jae Yeon; Park, Sung Jun; Kim, Hye Kwon; Rho, Semi; Nguyen, Giap Van; Song, Daesub; Kang, Bo Kyu; Moon, Hyung Jun; Yeom, Min Joo; Park, Bong Kyun

    2012-05-01

    Since the 2009 pandemic human H1N1 influenza A virus emerged in April 2009, novel reassortant strains have been identified throughout the world. This paper describes the detection and isolation of reassortant strains associated with human pandemic influenza H1N1 and swine influenza H1N2 (SIV) viruses in swine populations in South Korea. Two influenza H1N2 reassortants were detected, and subtyped by PCR. The strains were isolated using Madin- Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, and genetically characterized by phylogenetic analysis for genetic diversity. They consisted of human, avian, and swine virus genes that were originated from the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus and a neuraminidase (NA) gene from H1N2 SIV previously isolated in North America. This identification of reassortment events in swine farms raises concern that reassortant strains may continuously circulate within swine populations, calling for the further study and surveillance of pandemic H1N1 among swine.

  17. 70-cm radar observations of 433 Eros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, D. B.; Pettengill, G. H.; Shapiro, I. I.

    1976-01-01

    Radar observations of 433 Eros were made at the Arecibo Observatory using a wavelength of 70 cm during the close approach of Eros to earth in mid-January, 1975. A peak radar cross section of plus or minus 15 sq km was observed. The spectral broadening obtained was approximately 30 Hz, which is consistent with a value of 16 km for the maximum radius of the asteroid. The surface of Eros appears to be relatively rough at the scale of a wavelength as compared to the surfaces of the terrestrial planets and the moon. The composition of the surface is not well determined, except that it cannot be a highly conducting metal. A single measurement each of round-trip echo times delay and Doppler shift was made.

  18. NASA 30 Cm Ion Thruster Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.; Haag, Thomas W.; Rawlin, Vincent K.; Kussmaul, Michael T.

    1995-01-01

    A 30 cm diameter xenon ion thruster is under development at NASA to provide an ion propulsion option for missions of national interest and it is an element of the NASA Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Applications Readiness (NSTAR) program established to validate ion propulsion for space flight applications. The thruster has been developed to an engineering model level and it incorporates innovations in design, materials, and fabrication techniques compared to those employed to conventional ion thrusters. The performance of both functional and engineering model thrusters has been assessed including thrust stand measurements, over an input power range of 0.5-2.3 kW. Attributes of the engineering model thruster include an overall mass of 6.4 kg, and an efficiency of 65 percent and thrust of 93 mN at 2.3 kW input power. This paper discusses the design, performance, and lifetime expectations of the functional and engineering model thrusters under development at NASA.

  19. 21 Cm Tomography With the Alfalfa Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, Alexander B.; Boutan, C.; Carroll, P. A.; Hazelton, B.; Morales, M. F.

    2011-01-01

    Neutral hydrogen (HI) 21cm intensity mapping, or HI tomography is a promising technique being utilized by several upcoming experiments (LOFAR, MWA, SKA). The measurement of volume averaged neutral hydrogen mass density in synoptic sky surveys can be applied to the study of the HI mass function, the distribution of large scale structure, the reionization of the universe, and the expansion history of the universe through such standard rulers as baryonic acoustic oscillations. In order to prepare for future experiments, in particular the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), we analyze the Arecbo Legacy Fast ALFA (Arecibo L-Band Feed Array) Feed Array (ALFALFA) survey data to probe the spatial density variations of HI in our local universe (z <0.06) where data is currently available. We address challenges unique to data of this kind, such as identifying and subtracting out signal from RFI and local galactic sources, and characterizing the ALFA array beam pattern which dictates sensitivity and resolution.

  20. The 30-cm ion thruster power processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, B. G.; Hopper, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    A power processor unit for powering and controlling the 30 cm Mercury Electron-Bombardment Ion Thruster was designed, fabricated, and tested. The unit uses a unique and highly efficient transistor bridge inverter power stage in its implementation. The system operated from a 200 to 400 V dc input power bus, provides 12 independently controllable and closely regulated dc power outputs, and has an overall power conditioning capacity of 3.5 kW. Protective circuitry was incorporated as an integral part of the design to assure failure-free operation during transient and steady-state load faults. The implemented unit demonstrated an electrical efficiency between 91.5 and 91.9 at its nominal rated load over the 200 to 400 V dc input bus range.

  1. The N-terminal domain determines the affinity and specificity of H1 binding to chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Oeberg, Christine; Belikov, Sergey

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer wt Human histone H1.4 and hH1.4 devoid of N-terminal domain, {Delta}N-hH1.4, were compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both histones bind to chromatin, however, {Delta}N-hH1.4 displays lower binding affinity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction of {Delta}N-hH1.4 with chromatin includes a significant unspecific component. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-terminal domain is a determinant of specificity of histone H1 binding to chromatin. -- Abstract: Linker histone H1, one of the most abundant nuclear proteins in multicellular eukaryotes, is a key component of the chromatin structure mainly due to its role in the formation and maintenance of the 30 nm chromatin fiber. It has a three-domain structure; a central globular domain flanked by a short N-terminal domain and a long, highly basic C-terminal domain. Previous studies have shown that the binding abilities of H1 are at large determined by the properties of the C-terminal domain; much less attention has been paid to role of the N-terminal domain. We have previously shown that H1 can be reconstituted via cytoplasmic mRNA injection in Xenopus oocytes, cells that lack somatic H1. The heterologously expressed H1 proteins are incorporated into in vivo assembled chromatin at specific sites and the binding event is monitored as an increase in nucleosomal repeat length (NRL). Using this setup we have here compared the binding properties of wt-H1.4 and hH1.4 devoid of its N-terminal domain ({Delta}N-hH1.4). The {Delta}N-hH1.4 displays a drastically lower affinity for chromatin binding as compared to the wild type hH1.4. Our data also indicates that {Delta}N-hH1.4 is more prone to unspecific chromatin binding than the wild type. We conclude that the N-terminal domain of H1 is an important determinant of affinity and specificity of H1-chromatin interactions.

  2. Galaxy-cluster masses via 21st-century measurements of lensing of 21-cm fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovetz, Ely D.; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2013-03-01

    We discuss the prospects to measure galaxy-cluster properties via weak lensing of 21-cm fluctuations from the dark ages and the epoch of reionization (EOR). We choose as a figure of merit the smallest cluster mass detectable through such measurements. We construct the minimum-variance quadratic estimator for the cluster mass based on lensing of 21-cm fluctuations at multiple redshifts. We discuss the tradeoff among frequency bandwidth, angular resolution, and the number of redshift shells available for a fixed noise level for the radio detectors. Observations of lensing of the 21-cm background from the dark ages will be capable of detecting M≳1012h-1M⊙ mass halos, but will require futuristic experiments to overcome the contaminating sources. Next-generation radio measurements of 21-cm fluctuations from the EOR will, however, have the sensitivity to detect galaxy clusters with halo masses M≳1013h-1M⊙, given enough observation time (for the relevant sky patch) and collecting area to maximize their resolution capabilities.

  3. Evaluation of Argonne 9-cm and 10-cm Annular Centrifugal Contactors for SHINE Solution Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Wardle, Kent E.; Pereira, Candido; Vandegrift, George

    2015-02-01

    Work is in progress to evaluate the SHINE Medical Technologies process for producing Mo-99 for medical use from the fission of dissolved low-enriched uranium (LEU). This report addresses the use of Argonne annular centrifugal contactors for periodic treatment of the process solution. In a letter report from FY 2013, Pereira and Vandegrift compared the throughput and physical footprint for the two contactor options available from CINC Industries: the V-02 and V-05, which have rotor diameters of 5 cm and 12.7 cm, respectively. They suggested that an intermediately sized “Goldilocks” contactor might provide a better balance between throughput and footprint to meet the processing needs for the uranium extraction (UREX) processing of the SHINE solution to remove undesired fission products. Included with the submission of this letter report are the assembly drawings for two Argonne-design contactors that are in this intermediate range—9-cm and 10-cm rotors, respectively. The 9-cm contactor (drawing number CE-D6973A, stamped February 15, 1978) was designed as a single-stage unit and built and tested in the late 1970s along with other size units, both smaller and larger. In subsequent years, a significant effort to developed annular centrifugal contactors was undertaken to support work at Hanford implementing the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process. These contactors had a 10-cm rotor diameter and were fully designed as multistage units with four stages per assembly (drawing number CMT-E1104, stamped March 14, 1990). From a technology readiness perspective, these 10-cm units are much farther ahead in the design progression and, therefore, would require significantly less re-working to make them ready for UREX deployment. Additionally, the overall maximum throughput of ~12 L/min is similar to that of the 9-cm unit (10 L/min), and the former could be efficiently operated over much of the same range of throughput. As a result, only the 10-cm units are considered here

  4. In vivo and in vitro studies on the antiviral activities of viperin against influenza H1N1 virus infection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kai Sen; Olfat, Farzad; Phoon, Meng Chee; Hsu, Jung Pu; Howe, Josephine L C; Seet, Ju Ee; Chin, Keh Chuang; Chow, Vincent T K

    2012-06-01

    Influenza A virus has caused a number of pandemics in past decades, including the recent H1N1-2009 pandemic. Viperin is an interferon (IFN)-inducible protein of innate immunity, and acts as a broad-spectrum antiviral protein. We explored the antiviral activities and mechanisms of viperin during influenza virus (IFV) infection in vitro and in vivo. Wild-type (WT) HeLa and viperin-expressing HeLa cells were infected with influenza A/WSN/33/H1N1 (WSN33) virus, and subjected to virological, light and electron microscopic analyses. Viperin expression reduced virus replication and titres, and restricted viral budding. Young and old viperin-knockout (KO) mice and WT control animals were challenged with influenza WSN33 at lethal doses of 10(3) and 10(4) p.f.u. via the intratracheal route. Lungs were subjected to histopathological, virological and molecular studies. Upon lethal IFV challenge, both WT and KO mice revealed similar trends of infection and recovery with similar mortality rates. Viral quantification assay and histopathological evaluation of lungs from different time points showed no significant difference in viral loads and lung damage scores between the two groups of mice. Although the in vitro studies demonstrated the ability of viperin to restrict influenza H1N1 virus replication, the viperin-deficient mouse model indicated that absence of viperin enhanced neither the viral load nor pulmonary damage in the lungs of infected mice. This may be due to the compensation of IFN-stimulated genes in the lungs and/or the influenza non-structural protein 1-mediated IFN antagonism dampening the IFN response, thereby rendering the loss of viperin insignificant. Nevertheless, further investigations that exploit the antiviral mechanisms of viperin as prophylaxis are still warranted.

  5. 20 CFR 655.700 - What statutory provisions govern the employment of H-1B, H-1B1, and E-3 nonimmigrants and how do...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (Public Law 106-95) and the regulations issued thereunder, 20 CFR part 655, subparts L and M. (3) E-3... U.S.C. 1101(a)(15)(H)(i)(b1)), under the U.S.-Chile and U.S.-Singapore Free Trade Agreements as long... condition application is for an “E-3 Australia,” “H-1B1 Chile,” or “H-1B1 Singapore” nonimmigrant....

  6. 20 CFR 655.700 - What statutory provisions govern the employment of H-1B, H-1B1, and E-3 nonimmigrants and how do...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (Public Law 106-95) and the regulations issued thereunder, 20 CFR part 655, subparts L and M. (3) E-3... U.S.C. 1101(a)(15)(H)(i)(b1)), under the U.S.-Chile and U.S.-Singapore Free Trade Agreements as long... condition application is for an “E-3 Australia,” “H-1B1 Chile,” or “H-1B1 Singapore” nonimmigrant....

  7. 20 CFR 655.700 - What statutory provisions govern the employment of H-1B, H-1B1, and E-3 nonimmigrants and how do...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (Public Law 106-95) and the regulations issued thereunder, 20 CFR part 655, subparts L and M. (3) E-3... U.S.C. 1101(a)(15)(H)(i)(b1)), under the U.S.-Chile and U.S.-Singapore Free Trade Agreements as long... condition application is for an “E-3 Australia,” “H-1B1 Chile,” or “H-1B1 Singapore” nonimmigrant....

  8. 20 CFR 655.700 - What statutory provisions govern the employment of H-1B, H-1B1, and E-3 nonimmigrants and how do...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (Public Law 106-95) and the regulations issued thereunder, 20 CFR part 655, subparts L and M. (3) E-3... U.S.C. 1101(a)(15)(H)(i)(b1)), under the U.S.-Chile and U.S.-Singapore Free Trade Agreements as long... condition application is for an “E-3 Australia,” “H-1B1 Chile,” or “H-1B1 Singapore” nonimmigrant....

  9. 20 CFR 655.700 - What statutory provisions govern the employment of H-1B, H-1B1, and E-3 nonimmigrants and how do...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (Public Law 106-95) and the regulations issued thereunder, 20 CFR part 655, subparts L and M. (3) E-3... U.S.C. 1101(a)(15)(H)(i)(b1)), under the U.S.-Chile and U.S.-Singapore Free Trade Agreements as long... condition application is for an “E-3 Australia,” “H-1B1 Chile,” or “H-1B1 Singapore” nonimmigrant....

  10. H1N1 viral proteome peptide microarray predicts individuals at risk for H1N1 infection and segregates infection versus Pandemrix(®) vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ambati, Aditya; Valentini, Davide; Montomoli, Emanuele; Lapini, Guilia; Biuso, Fabrizio; Wenschuh, Holger; Magalhaes, Isabelle; Maeurer, Markus

    2015-07-01

    A high content peptide microarray containing the entire influenza A virus [A/California/08/2009(H1N1)] proteome and haemagglutinin proteins from 12 other influenza A subtypes, including the haemagglutinin from the [A/South Carolina/1/1918(H1N1)] strain, was used to gauge serum IgG epitope signatures before and after Pandemrix(®) vaccination or H1N1 infection in a Swedish cohort during the pandemic influenza season 2009. A very narrow pattern of pandemic flu-specific IgG epitope recognition was observed in the serum from individuals who later contracted H1N1 infection. Moreover, the pandemic influenza infection generated IgG reactivity to two adjacent epitopes of the neuraminidase protein. The differential serum IgG recognition was focused on haemagglutinin 1 (H1) and restricted to classical antigenic sites (Cb) in both the vaccinated controls and individuals with flu infections. We further identified a novel epitope VEPGDKITFEATGNL on the Ca antigenic site (251-265) of the pandemic flu haemagglutinin, which was exclusively recognized in serum from individuals with previous vaccinations and never in serum from individuals with H1N1 infection (confirmed by RNA PCR analysis from nasal swabs). This epitope was mapped to the receptor-binding domain of the influenza haemagglutinin and could serve as a correlate of immune protection in the context of pandemic flu. The study shows that unbiased epitope mapping using peptide microarray technology leads to the identification of biologically and clinically relevant target structures. Most significantly an H1N1 infection induced a different footprint of IgG epitope recognition patterns compared with the pandemic H1N1 vaccine.

  11. Linker histone H1 and H3K56 acetylation are antagonistic regulators of nucleosome dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Morgan; Luo, Yi; Nwokelo, Kingsley C; Goodwin, Michelle; Dreher, Sarah J; Zhang, Pei; Parthun, Mark R; Fondufe-Mittendorf, Yvonne; Ottesen, Jennifer J; Poirier, Michael G

    2015-12-09

    H1 linker histones are highly abundant proteins that compact nucleosomes and chromatin to regulate DNA accessibility and transcription. However, the mechanisms that target H1 regulation to specific regions of eukaryotic genomes are unknown. Here we report fluorescence measurements of human H1 regulation of nucleosome dynamics and transcription factor (TF) binding within nucleosomes. H1 does not block TF binding, instead it suppresses nucleosome unwrapping to reduce DNA accessibility within H1-bound nucleosomes. We then investigated H1 regulation by H3K56 and H3K122 acetylation, two transcriptional activating histone post translational modifications (PTMs). Only H3K56 acetylation, which increases nucleosome unwrapping, abolishes H1.0 reduction of TF binding. These findings show that nucleosomes remain dynamic, while H1 is bound and H1 dissociation is not required for TF binding within the nucleosome. Furthermore, our H3K56 acetylation measurements suggest that a single-histone PTM can define regions of the genome that are not regulated by H1.

  12. Impaired spatial learning and reduced adult hippocampal neurogenesis in histamine H1-receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Ambrée, Oliver; Buschert, Jens; Zhang, Weiqi; Arolt, Volker; Dere, Ekrem; Zlomuzica, Armin

    2014-08-01

    The histamine H1-receptor (H1R) is expressed in wide parts of the brain including the hippocampus, which is involved in spatial learning and memory. Previous studies in H1R knockout (H1R-KO) mice revealed deficits in a variety of learning and memory tasks. It was also proposed that H1R activation is crucial for neuronal differentiation of neural progenitors. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate negatively reinforced spatial learning in the water-maze and to assess survival and neuronal differentiation of newborn cells in the adult hippocampus of H1R-KO mice. H1R-KO and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to the following sequence of tests: (a) cued version, (b) place learning, (c) spatial probe, (d) long-term retention and (e) reversal learning. Furthermore hippocampal neurogenesis in terms of survival and differentiation was assessed in H1R-KO and WT mice. H1R-KO mice showed normal cued learning, but impaired place and reversal learning as well as impaired long-term retention performance. In addition, a marked reduction of newborn neurons in the hippocampus but no changes in differentiation of neural progenitors into neuronal and glial lineage was found in H1R-KO mice. Our data suggest that H1R deficiency in mice is associated with pronounced deficits in hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory. Furthermore, we herein provide first evidence that H1R deficiency in the mouse leads to a reduced neurogenesis. However, the exact mechanisms for the reduced number of cells in H1R-KO mice remain elusive and might be due to a reduced survival of newborn hippocampal neurons and/or a reduction in cell proliferation.

  13. Immune history shapes specificity of pandemic H1N1 influenza antibody responses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Myers, Jaclyn L.; Bostick, David L.; Sullivan, Colleen B.; Madara, Jonathan; Linderman, Susanne L.; Liu, Qin; Carter, Donald M.; Wrammert, Jens; Esposito, Susanna; Principi, Nicola; Plotkin, Joshua B.; Ross, Ted M.; Ahmed, Rafi; Wilson, Patrick C.

    2013-01-01

    Human antibody responses against the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus are predominantly directed against conserved epitopes in the stalk and receptor-binding domain of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein. This is in stark contrast to pH1N1 antibody responses generated in ferrets, which are focused on the variable Sa antigenic site of HA. Here, we show that most humans born between 1983 and 1996 elicited pH1N1 antibody responses that are directed against an epitope near the HA receptor–binding domain. Importantly, most individuals born before 1983 or after 1996 did not elicit pH1N1 antibodies to this HA epitope. The HAs of most seasonal H1N1 (sH1N1) viruses that circulated between 1983 and 1996 possess a critical K133 amino acid in this HA epitope, whereas this amino acid is either mutated or deleted in most sH1N1 viruses circulating before 1983 or after 1996. We sequentially infected ferrets with a 1991 sH1N1 virus and then a pH1N1 virus. Sera isolated from these animals were directed against the HA epitope involving amino acid K133. These data suggest that the specificity of pH1N1 antibody responses can be shifted to epitopes near the HA receptor–binding domain after sequential infections with sH1N1 and pH1N1 viruses that share homology in this region. PMID:23857983

  14. SAR-dependent mobilization of histone H1 by HMG-I/Y in vitro: HMG-I/Y is enriched in H1-depleted chromatin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, K; Käs, E; Gonzalez, E; Laemmli, U K

    1993-08-01

    An experimental assay was developed to search for proteins capable of antagonizing histone H1-mediated general repression of transcription. T7 RNA polymerase templates containing an upstream scaffold-associated region (SAR) were highly selectively repressed by H1 relative to non-SAR control templates. This is due to the nucleation of H1 assembly into flanking DNA brought about by the numerous A-tracts (AT-rich sequences containing short homopolymeric runs of dA.dT base pairs) of the SAR. Partial, selective titration of these A-tracts by the high mobility group (HMG) protein HMG-I/Y led to the complete derepression of transcription from the SAR template by inducing the redistribution of H1 on to non-SAR templates. SARs are associated with many highly transcribed regulated genes where they may serve to facilitate the HMG-I/Y-mediated displacement of histone H1 in chromatin. Indeed, HMG-I/Y was found to be strongly enriched in the H1-depleted subfraction which can be isolated from chromatin.

  15. N- and C-terminal domains determine differential nucleosomal binding geometry and affinity of linker histone isotypes H1(0) and H1c.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Payal; Brown, David T

    2012-04-01

    Eukaryotic linker or H1 histones modulate DNA compaction and gene expression in vivo. In mammals, these proteins exist as multiple isotypes with distinct properties, suggesting a functional significance to the heterogeneity. Linker histones typically have a tripartite structure composed of a conserved central globular domain flanked by a highly variable short N-terminal domain and a longer highly basic C-terminal domain. We hypothesized that the variable terminal domains of individual subtypes contribute to their functional heterogeneity by influencing chromatin binding interactions. We developed a novel dual color fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assay system in which two H1 proteins fused to spectrally separable fluorescent proteins can be co-expressed and their independent binding kinetics simultaneously monitored in a single cell. This approach was combined with domain swap and point mutagenesis to determine the roles of the terminal domains in the differential binding characteristics of the linker histone isotypes, mouse H1(0) and H1c. Exchanging the N-terminal domains between H1(0) and H1c changed their overall binding affinity to that of the other variant. In contrast, switching the C-terminal domains altered the chromatin interaction surface of the globular domain. These results indicate that linker histone subtypes bind to chromatin in an intrinsically specific manner and that the highly variable terminal domains contribute to differences between subtypes. The methods developed in this study will have broad applications in studying dynamic properties of additional histone subtypes and other mobile proteins. PMID:22334665

  16. N- and C-terminal domains determine differential nucleosomal binding geometry and affinity of linker histone isotypes H1(0) and H1c.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Payal; Brown, David T

    2012-04-01

    Eukaryotic linker or H1 histones modulate DNA compaction and gene expression in vivo. In mammals, these proteins exist as multiple isotypes with distinct properties, suggesting a functional significance to the heterogeneity. Linker histones typically have a tripartite structure composed of a conserved central globular domain flanked by a highly variable short N-terminal domain and a longer highly basic C-terminal domain. We hypothesized that the variable terminal domains of individual subtypes contribute to their functional heterogeneity by influencing chromatin binding interactions. We developed a novel dual color fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assay system in which two H1 proteins fused to spectrally separable fluorescent proteins can be co-expressed and their independent binding kinetics simultaneously monitored in a single cell. This approach was combined with domain swap and point mutagenesis to determine the roles of the terminal domains in the differential binding characteristics of the linker histone isotypes, mouse H1(0) and H1c. Exchanging the N-terminal domains between H1(0) and H1c changed their overall binding affinity to that of the other variant. In contrast, switching the C-terminal domains altered the chromatin interaction surface of the globular domain. These results indicate that linker histone subtypes bind to chromatin in an intrinsically specific manner and that the highly variable terminal domains contribute to differences between subtypes. The methods developed in this study will have broad applications in studying dynamic properties of additional histone subtypes and other mobile proteins.

  17. ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM Codes: What? Why? How?

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Donna J.

    2013-01-01

    The wound care industry will gain many benefits when International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10-Clinical Modification (CM) is implemented. One of the main benefits is that the disease classifications will be consistent with current clinical practice and medical technology advances. The new classification codes will be very granular, which means the level of specificity will greatly improve. Numerous new codes will represent more specific anatomic sites, etiologies, comorbidities, and complications, and will improve the ability to demonstrate severity of illness. For instance, the new feature of laterality is directly built into the new codes: separate codes will distinguish right, left, and bilateral, where needed. The increased granularity will provide better analysis of disease patterns and outbreak of disease. Additionally, the United States will finally be using the same diagnosis coding system as the rest of the world. This article will describe what the ICD-9-CM/ICD-10-CM codes are, why they are so important, and how clinicians and researchers will convert from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM effective October 1, 2014. PMID:24761333

  18. The 15 cm diameter ion thruster research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    The startup reliability of a 15 cm diameter mercury bombardment ion thruster which employs a pulsed high voltage tickler electrode on the main and neutralizer cathodes is examined. Startup of the thruster is achieved 100% of the time on the main cathode and 98.7% of the time on the neutralizer cathode over a 3640 cycle test. The thruster was started from a 20 C initial condition and operated for an hour at a 600 mA beam current. An energy efficiency of 75% and a propellant utilization efficiency of 77% was achieved over the complete cycle. The effect of a single cusp magnetic field thruster length on its performance is discussed. Guidelines are formulated for the shaping of magnetic field lines in thrusters. A model describing double ion production in mercury discharges is presented. The production route is shown to occur through the single ionic ground state. Photographs of the interior of an operating-hollow cathode are presented. A cathode spot is shown to be present if the cathode is free of low work-function surfaces. The spot is observed if a low work-function oxide coating is applied to the cathode insert. Results show that low work-function oxide coatings tend to migrate during thruster operation.

  19. Engineering model 8-cm thruster subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, B. G.; Hyman, J.; Hopper, D. J.; Williamson, W. S.; Dulgeroff, C. R.; Collett, C. R.

    1978-01-01

    An Engineering Model (EM) 8 cm Ion Thruster Propulsion Subsystem was developed for operation at a thrust level 5 mN (1.1 mlb) at a specific impulse 1 sub sp = 2667 sec with a total system input power P sub in = 165 W. The system dry mass is 15 kg with a mercury-propellant-reservoir capacity of 8.75 kg permitting uninterrupted operation for about 12,500 hr. The subsystem can be started from a dormant condition in a time less than or equal to 15 min. The thruster has a design lifetime of 20,000 hr with 10,000 startup cycles. A gimbal unit is included to provide a thrust vector deflection capability of + or - 10 degrees in any direction from the zero position. The EM subsystem development program included thruster optimization, power-supply circuit optimization and flight packaging, subsystem integration, and subsystem acceptance testing including a cyclic test of the total propulsion package.

  20. North American triple reassortant and Eurasian H1N1 swine influenza viruses do not readily reassort to generate a 2009 pandemic H1N1-like virus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenjun; Liu, Qinfang; Qiao, Chuanling; del Real, Gustavo; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Webby, Richard J; Richt, Jürgen A

    2014-03-11

    The 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus (pH1N1) was derived through reassortment of North American triple reassortant and Eurasian avian-like swine influenza viruses (SIVs). To date, when, how and where the pH1N1 arose is not understood. To investigate viral reassortment, we coinfected cell cultures and a group of pigs with or without preexisting immunity with a Eurasian H1N1 virus, A/Swine/Spain/53207/2004 (SP04), and a North American triple reassortant H1N1 virus, A/Swine/Kansas/77778/2007 (KS07). The infected pigs were cohoused with one or two groups of contact animals to investigate viral transmission. In coinfected MDCK or PK15 continuous cell lines with KS07 and SP04 viruses, more than 20 different reassortant viruses were found. In pigs without or with preexisting immunity (immunized with commercial inactivated swine influenza vaccines) and coinfected with both viruses, six or seven reassortant viruses, as well as the parental viruses, were identified in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples from the lungs. Interestingly, only one or two viruses transmitted to and were detected in contact animals. No reassortant containing a gene constellation similar to that of pH1N1 virus was found in either coinfected cells or pigs, indicating that the reassortment event that resulted in the generation of this virus is a rare event that likely involved specific viral strains and/or a favorable, not-yet-understood environment. IMPORTANCE The 2009 pandemic-like H1N1 virus could not be reproduced either in cell cultures or in pigs coinfected with North American triple reassortant H1N1 and Eurasian H1N1 swine influenza viruses. This finding suggests that the generation of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus by reassortment was a rare event that likely involved specific viral strains and unknown factors. Different reassortant viruses were detected in coinfected pigs with and without preexisting immunity, indicating that host immunity plays a relevant role in driving viral reassortment of

  1. The H1 linker histones: multifunctional proteins beyond the nucleosomal core particle

    PubMed Central

    Hergeth, Sonja P; Schneider, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The linker histone H1 family members are a key component of chromatin and bind to the nucleosomal core particle around the DNA entry and exit sites. H1 can stabilize both nucleosome structure and higher-order chromatin architecture. In general, H1 molecules consist of a central globular domain with more flexible tail regions at both their N- and C-terminal ends. The existence of multiple H1 subtypes and a large variety of posttranslational modifications brings about a considerable degree of complexity and makes studying this protein family challenging. Here, we review recent progress in understanding the function of linker histones and their subtypes beyond their role as merely structural chromatin components. We summarize current findings on the role of H1 in heterochromatin formation, transcriptional regulation and embryogenesis with a focus on H1 subtypes and their specific modifications. PMID:26474902

  2. A sub-cm micromachined electron microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinerman, A. D.; Crewe, D. A.; Perng, D. C.; Shoaf, S. E.; Crewe, A. V.

    1993-01-01

    A new approach for fabricating macroscopic (approximately 10x10x10 mm(exp 3)) structures with micron accuracy has been developed. This approach combines the precision of semiconductor processing and fiber optic technologies. A (100) silicon wafer is anisotropically etched to create four orthogonal v-grooves and an aperture on each 10x12 mm die. Precision 308 micron optical fibers are sandwiched between the die to align the v-grooves. The fiber is then anodically bonded to the die above and below it. This procedure is repeated to create thick structures and a stack of 5 or 6 die will be used to create a miniature scanning electron microscope (MSEM). Two die in the structure will have a segmented electrode to deflect the beam and correct for astigmatism. The entire structure is UHV compatible. The performance of an SEM improves as its length is reduced and a sub-cm 2 keV MSEM with a field emission source should have approximately 1 nm resolution. A low voltage high resolution MSEM would be useful for the examination of biological specimens and semiconductors with a minimum of damage. The first MSEM will be tested with existing 6 micron thermionic sources. In the future a micromachined field emission source will be used. The stacking technology presented in this paper can produce an array of MSEMs 1 to 30 mm in length with a 1 mm or larger period. A key question being addressed by this research is the optimum size for a low voltage MSEM which will be determined by the required spatial resolution, field of view, and working distance.

  3. Interleukin-6 Is a Potential Biomarker for Severe Pandemic H1N1 Influenza A Infection

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Stéphane G.; Banner, David; Zhao, Zhen; Fang, Yuan; Huang, Stephen S. H.; Leόn, Alberto J.; Ng, Derek C. K.; Almansa, Raquel; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Ramirez, Paula; Socias, Lorenzo; Loza, Ana; Blanco, Jesus; Sansonetti, Paola; Rello, Jordi; Andaluz, David; Shum, Bianche; Rubino, Salvatore; de Lejarazu, Raul Ortiz; Tran, Dat; Delogu, Giovanni; Fadda, Giovanni; Krajden, Sigmund; Rubin, Barry B.; Bermejo-Martin, Jesús F.; Kelvin, Alyson A.; Kelvin, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Pandemic H1N1 influenza A (H1N1pdm) is currently a dominant circulating influenza strain worldwide. Severe cases of H1N1pdm infection are characterized by prolonged activation of the immune response, yet the specific role of inflammatory mediators in disease is poorly understood. The inflammatory cytokine IL-6 has been implicated in both seasonal and severe pandemic H1N1 influenza A (H1N1pdm) infection. Here, we investigated the role of IL-6 in severe H1N1pdm infection. We found IL-6 to be an important feature of the host response in both humans and mice infected with H1N1pdm. Elevated levels of IL-6 were associated with severe disease in patients hospitalized with H1N1pdm infection. Notably, serum IL-6 levels associated strongly with the requirement of critical care admission and were predictive of fatal outcome. In C57BL/6J, BALB/cJ, and B6129SF2/J mice, infection with A/Mexico/4108/2009 (H1N1pdm) consistently triggered severe disease and increased IL-6 levels in both lung and serum. Furthermore, in our lethal C57BL/6J mouse model of H1N1pdm infection, global gene expression analysis indicated a pronounced IL-6 associated inflammatory response. Subsequently, we examined disease and outcome in IL-6 deficient mice infected with H1N1pdm. No significant differences in survival, weight loss, viral load, or pathology were observed between IL-6 deficient and wild-type mice following infection. Taken together, our findings suggest IL-6 may be a potential disease severity biomarker, but may not be a suitable therapeutic target in cases of severe H1N1pdm infection due to our mouse data. PMID:22679491

  4. Comparative analyses of pandemic H1N1 and seasonal H1N1, H3N2, and influenza B infections depict distinct clinical pictures in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Huang, Stephen S H; Banner, David; Fang, Yuan; Ng, Derek C K; Kanagasabai, Thirumagal; Kelvin, David J; Kelvin, Alyson A

    2011-01-01

    Influenza A and B infections are a worldwide health concern to both humans and animals. High genetic evolution rates of the influenza virus allow the constant emergence of new strains and cause illness variation. Since human influenza infections are often complicated by secondary factors such as age and underlying medical conditions, strain or subtype specific clinical features are difficult to assess. Here we infected ferrets with 13 currently circulating influenza strains (including strains of pandemic 2009 H1N1 [H1N1pdm] and seasonal A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and B viruses). The clinical parameters were measured daily for 14 days in stable environmental conditions to compare clinical characteristics. We found that H1N1pdm strains had a more severe physiological impact than all season strains where pandemic A/California/07/2009 was the most clinically pathogenic pandemic strain. The most serious illness among seasonal A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 groups was caused by A/Solomon Islands/03/2006 and A/Perth/16/2009, respectively. Among the 13 studied strains, B/Hubei-Wujiagang/158/2009 presented the mildest clinical symptoms. We have also discovered that disease severity (by clinical illness and histopathology) correlated with influenza specific antibody response but not viral replication in the upper respiratory tract. H1N1pdm induced the highest and most rapid antibody response followed by seasonal A/H3N2, seasonal A/H1N1 and seasonal influenza B (with B/Hubei-Wujiagang/158/2009 inducing the weakest response). Our study is the first to compare the clinical features of multiple circulating influenza strains in ferrets. These findings will help to characterize the clinical pictures of specific influenza strains as well as give insights into the development and administration of appropriate influenza therapeutics.

  5. Single-Molecule Studies of the Linker Histone H1 Binding to DNA and the Nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Yue, Hongjun; Fang, He; Wei, Sijie; Hayes, Jeffrey J; Lee, Tae-Hee

    2016-04-12

    Linker histone H1 regulates chromatin structure and gene expression. Investigating the dynamics and stoichiometry of binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome is crucial to elucidating its functions. Because of the abundant positive charges and the strong self-affinity of H1, quantitative in vitro studies of its binding to DNA and the nucleosome have generated results that vary widely and, therefore, should be interpreted in a system specific manner. We sought to overcome this limitation by developing a specially passivated microscope slide surface to monitor binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome at a single-molecule level. According to our measurements, the stoichiometry of binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome is very heterogeneous with a wide distribution whose averages are in reasonable agreement with previously published values. Our study also revealed that H1 does not dissociate from DNA or the nucleosome on a time scale of tens of minutes. We found that histone chaperone Nap1 readily dissociates H1 from DNA and superstoichiometrically bound H1 from the nucleosome, supporting a hypothesis whereby histone chaperones contribute to the regulation of the H1 profile in chromatin. PMID:27010485

  6. Glutamylation of Nap1 modulates histone H1 dynamics and chromosome condensation in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kelly E; Heald, Rebecca

    2015-04-27

    Linker histone H1 is required for mitotic chromosome architecture in Xenopus laevis egg extracts and, unlike core histones, exhibits rapid turnover on chromatin. Mechanisms regulating the recruitment, deposition, and dynamics of linker histones in mitosis are largely unknown. We found that the cytoplasmic histone chaperone nucleosome assembly protein 1 (Nap1) associates with the embryonic isoform of linker histone H1 (H1M) in egg extracts. Immunodepletion of Nap1 decreased H1M binding to mitotic chromosomes by nearly 50%, reduced H1M dynamics as measured by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and caused chromosome decondensation similar to the effects of H1M depletion. Defects in H1M dynamics and chromosome condensation were rescued by adding back wild-type Nap1 but not a mutant lacking sites subject to posttranslational modification by glutamylation. Nap1 glutamylation increased the deposition of H1M on sperm nuclei and chromatin-coated beads, indicating that charge-shifting posttranslational modification of Nap1 contributes to H1M dynamics that are essential for higher order chromosome architecture. PMID:25897082

  7. Serological Evidence of Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Virus Infections in Greek Swine.

    PubMed

    Kyriakis, C S; Papatsiros, V G; Athanasiou, L V; Valiakos, G; Brown, I H; Simon, G; Van Reeth, K; Tsiodras, S; Spyrou, V; Billinis, C

    2016-08-01

    The introduction of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) influenza virus in pigs changed the epidemiology of influenza A viruses (IAVs) in swine in Europe and the rest of the world. Previously, three IAV subtypes were found in the European pig population: an avian-like H1N1 and two reassortant H1N2 and H3N2 viruses with human-origin haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase proteins and internal genes of avian decent. These viruses pose antigenically distinct HAs, which allow the retrospective diagnosis of infection in serological investigations. However, cross-reactions between the HA of pH1N1 and the HAs of the other circulating H1 IAVs complicate serological diagnosis. The prevalence of IAVs in Greek swine has been poorly investigated. In this study, we examined and compared haemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody titres against previously established IAVs and pH1N1 in 908 swine sera from 88 herds, collected before and after the 2009 pandemic. While we confirmed the historic presence of the three IAVs established in European swine, we also found that 4% of the pig sera examined after 2009 had HI antibodies only against the pH1N1 virus. Our results indicate that pH1N1 is circulating in Greek pigs and stress out the importance of a vigorous virological surveillance programme. PMID:26477456

  8. Phenotypic variation of erythrocyte linker histone H1.c in a pheasant (Phasianus colchicus L.) population.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Andrzej; Pa Yga, Jan; Górnicka-Michalska, Ewa; Bernacki, Zenon; Adamski, Marek

    2010-07-01

    Our goal was to characterize a phenotypic variation of the pheasant erythrocyte linker histone subtype H1.c. By using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis three histone H1.c phenotypes were identified. The differently migrating allelic variants H1.c1 and H1.c2 formed either two homozygous phenotypes, c1 and c2, or a single heterozygous phenotype, c1c2. In the pheasant population screened, birds with phenotype c2 were the most common (frequency 0.761) while individuals with phenotype c1 were rare (frequency 0.043).

  9. Single-Molecule Studies of the Linker Histone H1 Binding to DNA and the Nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Yue, Hongjun; Fang, He; Wei, Sijie; Hayes, Jeffrey J; Lee, Tae-Hee

    2016-04-12

    Linker histone H1 regulates chromatin structure and gene expression. Investigating the dynamics and stoichiometry of binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome is crucial to elucidating its functions. Because of the abundant positive charges and the strong self-affinity of H1, quantitative in vitro studies of its binding to DNA and the nucleosome have generated results that vary widely and, therefore, should be interpreted in a system specific manner. We sought to overcome this limitation by developing a specially passivated microscope slide surface to monitor binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome at a single-molecule level. According to our measurements, the stoichiometry of binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome is very heterogeneous with a wide distribution whose averages are in reasonable agreement with previously published values. Our study also revealed that H1 does not dissociate from DNA or the nucleosome on a time scale of tens of minutes. We found that histone chaperone Nap1 readily dissociates H1 from DNA and superstoichiometrically bound H1 from the nucleosome, supporting a hypothesis whereby histone chaperones contribute to the regulation of the H1 profile in chromatin.

  10. Effects of H1 and H2 receptor antagonists on Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Csaba, G; László, V; Darvas, Z

    1978-01-01

    In Tetrahymena pyriformis the phagocytotic rate increases in response to histamine, but neither the H1 antagonist phenindamine nor the H2 antagonist metiamide stimulate phagocytosis. The H1 antagonist counteracts the effect of histamine, whereas the H2 antagonist does not. The histamine receptor of Tetrahymena is of H1-type, since it cannot distinguish between histamine and antagonists which are closely related to it chemically. It does, however, distinguish between histamine and the chemically unrelated H1 antagonist, phenindamine. The H2 antagonist does not interact with the receptor.

  11. Serological Evidence of Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Virus Infections in Greek Swine.

    PubMed

    Kyriakis, C S; Papatsiros, V G; Athanasiou, L V; Valiakos, G; Brown, I H; Simon, G; Van Reeth, K; Tsiodras, S; Spyrou, V; Billinis, C

    2016-08-01

    The introduction of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) influenza virus in pigs changed the epidemiology of influenza A viruses (IAVs) in swine in Europe and the rest of the world. Previously, three IAV subtypes were found in the European pig population: an avian-like H1N1 and two reassortant H1N2 and H3N2 viruses with human-origin haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase proteins and internal genes of avian decent. These viruses pose antigenically distinct HAs, which allow the retrospective diagnosis of infection in serological investigations. However, cross-reactions between the HA of pH1N1 and the HAs of the other circulating H1 IAVs complicate serological diagnosis. The prevalence of IAVs in Greek swine has been poorly investigated. In this study, we examined and compared haemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody titres against previously established IAVs and pH1N1 in 908 swine sera from 88 herds, collected before and after the 2009 pandemic. While we confirmed the historic presence of the three IAVs established in European swine, we also found that 4% of the pig sera examined after 2009 had HI antibodies only against the pH1N1 virus. Our results indicate that pH1N1 is circulating in Greek pigs and stress out the importance of a vigorous virological surveillance programme.

  12. Score to identify the severity of adult patients with influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus infection at hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Capelastegui, A; Quintana, J M; Bilbao, A; España, P P; Garin, O; Alonso, J; Astray, J; Cantón, R; Castilla, J; Castro, A; Delgado-Rodríguez, M; Godoy, P; Gónzález-Candelas, F; Martín, V; Mayoral, J M; Pumarola, T; Tamames, S; Soldevila, N; Baricot, M; Domínguez, A

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this paper was to develop a prognostic index for severe complications among hospitalized patients with influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus infection. We conducted a prospective observational cohort study of 618 inpatients with 2009 H1N1 virus infection admitted to 36 Spanish hospitals between July 2009 and February 2010. Risk factors evaluated included host-related factors and clinical data at admission. We developed a composite index of severe in-hospital complications (SIHC), which included: mortality, mechanical ventilation, septic shock, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and requirement for resuscitation maneuvers. Six factors were independently associated with SIHC: age >45 years, male sex, number of comorbidities, pneumonia, dyspnea, and confusion. From the β parameter obtained in the multivariate model, a weight was assigned to each factor to compute the individual influenza risk score. The score shows an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.77. The SIHC rate was 1.9 % in the low-risk group, 10.3 % in the intermediate-risk group, and 29.6 % in the high-risk group. The odds ratio for complications was 21.8 for the high-risk group compared with the low-risk group. This easy-to-score influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus infection risk index accurately stratifies patients hospitalized for H1N1 virus infection into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups for SIHC.

  13. An equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) vectored H1 vaccine protects against challenge with swine-origin influenza virus H1N1.

    PubMed

    Said, Abdelrahman; Damiani, Armando; Ma, Guanggang; Kalthoff, Donata; Beer, Martin; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2011-12-29

    In 2009, a novel swine-origin H1N1 influenza A virus (S-OIV), antigenically and genetically divergent from seasonal H1N1, caused a flu pandemic in humans. Development of an effective vaccine to limit transmission of S-OIV in animal reservoir hosts and from reservoir hosts to humans and animals is necessary. In the present study, we constructed and evaluated a vectored vaccine expressing the H1 hemagglutinin of a recent S-OIV isolate using equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) as the delivery vehicle. Expression of the recombinant protein was demonstrated by immunofluorescence and western blotting and the in vitro growth properties of the modified live vector were found to be comparable to those of the parental virus. The EHV-1-H1 vaccine induced an influenza virus-specific antibody response when inoculated into mice by both the intranasal and subcutaneous routes. Upon challenge infection, protection of vaccinated mice could be demonstrated by reduction of clinical signs and faster virus clearance. Our study shows that an EHV-1-based influenza H1N1 vaccine may be a promising alternative for protection against S-OIV infection.

  14. Recent developments in nucleon spin structure with focus on h_{1L}^{\\perp} and pretzelosity h_{1T}^\\perp

    SciTech Connect

    Avagyan, Harutyun; Efremov, A.V.; Schweitzer, Peter; Metz, Andreas; Teckentrup, T.

    2008-07-20

    The leading twist transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions h_{1L}^{\\perp} and h_{1T}^\\perp, which is sometimes called "pretzelosity," are studied. For h_{1L}^{\\perp} we consider a "Wandzura-Wilczek-type" approximation, which follows from QCD equations of motion upon the neglect of pure twist-3 terms and allows to express it in terms of transversity. On the basis of available data from HERMES we test the practical usefulness of this approximation and discuss how it can be further tested by future CLAS and COMPASS data. We review the theoretical properties of retzelosity and observe an interesting relation valid in a large class of relativistic models: The difference between helicity and transversity distributions, which is often said to be a 'measure of relativistic effects' in the nucleon, is nothing but the transverse moment of pretzelosity. We discuss preliminary deuteron target data from COMPASS on the single spin asymmetry (SSA) in semi-incl

  15. Simulating the 21 cm signal from reionization including non-linear ionizations and inhomogeneous recombinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Sultan; Davé, Romeel; Finlator, Kristian; Santos, Mario G.

    2016-04-01

    We explore the impact of incorporating physically motivated ionization and recombination rates on the history and topology of cosmic reionization and the resulting 21 cm power spectrum, by incorporating inputs from small-volume hydrodynamic simulations into our semi-numerical code, SIMFAST21, that evolves reionization on large scales. We employ radiative hydrodynamic simulations to parametrize the ionization rate Rion and recombination rate Rrec as functions of halo mass, overdensity and redshift. We find that Rion scales superlinearly with halo mass ({R_ion}∝ M_h^{1.41}), in contrast to previous assumptions. Implementing these scalings into SIMFAST21, we tune our one free parameter, the escape fraction fesc, to simultaneously reproduce recent observations of the Thomson optical depth, ionizing emissivity and volume-averaged neutral fraction by the end of reionization. This yields f_esc=4^{+7}_{-2} per cent averaged over our 0.375 h-1 Mpc cells, independent of halo mass or redshift, increasing to 6 per cent if we also constrain to match the observed z = 7 star formation rate function. Introducing superlinear Rion increases the duration of reionization and boosts small-scale 21 cm power by two to three times at intermediate phases of reionization, while inhomogeneous recombinations reduce ionized bubble sizes and suppress large-scale 21 cm power by two to three times. Gas clumping on sub-cell scales has a minimal effect on the 21 cm power. Superlinear Rion also significantly increases the median halo mass scale for ionizing photon output to ˜ 1010 M⊙, making the majority of reionizing sources more accessible to next-generation facilities. These results highlight the importance of accurately treating ionizing sources and recombinations for modelling reionization and its 21 cm power spectrum.

  16. Pandemic influenza vaccine: characterization of A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) recombinant hemagglutinin protein and insights into H1N1 antigen stability

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The recent H1N1 influenza pandemic illustrated the shortcomings of the vaccine manufacturing process. The A/California/07/2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine or A(H1N1)pdm09 was available late and in short supply as a result of delays in production caused by low yields and poor antigen stability. Recombinant technology offers the opportunity to shorten manufacturing time. A trivalent recombinant hemagglutinin (rHA) vaccine candidate for seasonal influenza produced using the baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS) was shown to be as effective and safe as egg-derived trivalent inactivated vaccine (TIV) in human clinical studies. In this study, we describe the characterization of the A/California/07/2009 rHA protein and compare the H1N1 pandemic rHA to other seasonal rHA proteins. Results Our data show that, like other rHA proteins, purified A/California/07/2009 rHA forms multimeric rosette-like particles of 20–40 nm that are biologically active and immunogenic in mice as assayed by hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) antibody titers. However, proteolytic digest analysis revealed that A/California/07/2009 rHA is more susceptible to proteolytic degradation than rHA proteins derived from other seasonal influenza viruses. We identified a specific proteolytic site conserved across multiple hemagglutinin (HA) proteins that is likely more accessible in A/California/07/2009 HA, possibly as a result of differences in its protein structure, and may contribute to lower antigen stability. Conclusion We conclude that, similar to the recombinant seasonal influenza vaccine, recombinant A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine is likely to perform comparably to licensed A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccines and could offer manufacturing advantages. PMID:23110350

  17. North American Triple Reassortant and Eurasian H1N1 Swine Influenza Viruses Do Not Readily Reassort to Generate a 2009 Pandemic H1N1-Like Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wenjun; Liu, Qinfang; Qiao, Chuanling; del Real, Gustavo; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Webby, Richard J.; Richt, Jürgen A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus (pH1N1) was derived through reassortment of North American triple reassortant and Eurasian avian-like swine influenza viruses (SIVs). To date, when, how and where the pH1N1 arose is not understood. To investigate viral reassortment, we coinfected cell cultures and a group of pigs with or without preexisting immunity with a Eurasian H1N1 virus, A/Swine/Spain/53207/2004 (SP04), and a North American triple reassortant H1N1 virus, A/Swine/Kansas/77778/2007 (KS07). The infected pigs were cohoused with one or two groups of contact animals to investigate viral transmission. In coinfected MDCK or PK15 continuous cell lines with KS07 and SP04 viruses, more than 20 different reassortant viruses were found. In pigs without or with preexisting immunity (immunized with commercial inactivated swine influenza vaccines) and coinfected with both viruses, six or seven reassortant viruses, as well as the parental viruses, were identified in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples from the lungs. Interestingly, only one or two viruses transmitted to and were detected in contact animals. No reassortant containing a gene constellation similar to that of pH1N1 virus was found in either coinfected cells or pigs, indicating that the reassortment event that resulted in the generation of this virus is a rare event that likely involved specific viral strains and/or a favorable, not-yet-understood environment. PMID:24618255

  18. Supply of Neuraminidase Inhibitors Related to Reduced Influenza A (H1N1) Mortality during the 2009–2010 H1N1 Pandemic: An Ecological Study

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Roderick J.; Li, Jiabai; Meyer, Alison E.; Stephens, Peter; Mounts, Anthony W.; Rolfes, Melissa A.; Penn, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    Background The influenza A (H1N1) pandemic swept across the globe from April 2009 to August 2010 affecting millions. Many WHO Member States relied on antiviral drugs, specifically neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) oseltamivir and zanamivir, to treat influenza patients in critical condition. Such drugs have been found to be effective in reducing severity and duration of influenza illness, and likely reduced morbidity during the pandemic. However, it is less clear whether NAIs used during the pandemic reduced H1N1 mortality. Methods Country-level data on supply of oseltamivir and zanamivir were used to predict H1N1 mortality (per 100,000 people) from July 2009 to August 2010 in forty-two WHO Member States. Poisson regression was used to model the association between NAI supply and H1N1 mortality, with adjustment for economic, demographic, and health-related confounders. Results After adjustment for potential confounders, each 10% increase in kilograms of oseltamivir, per 100,000 people, was associated with a 1.6% reduction in H1N1 mortality over the pandemic period (relative rate (RR) = 0.84 per log increase in oseltamivir supply). While the supply of zanamivir was considerably less than that of oseltamivir in each Member State, each 10% increase in kilogram of active zanamivir, per 100,000, was associated with a 0.3% reduction in H1N1 mortality (RR = 0.97 per log increase). Conclusion While there are limitations to the ecologic nature of these data, this analysis offers evidence of a protective relationship between antiviral drug supply and influenza mortality and supports a role for influenza antiviral use in future pandemics. PMID:22984431

  19. Swine influenza H1N1 virus induces acute inflammatory immune responses in pig lungs: a potential animal model for human H1N1 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Mahesh; Dwivedi, Varun; Krakowka, Steven; Manickam, Cordelia; Ali, Ahmed; Wang, Leyi; Qin, Zhuoming; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J; Lee, Chang-Won

    2010-11-01

    Pigs are capable of generating reassortant influenza viruses of pandemic potential, as both the avian and mammalian influenza viruses can infect pig epithelial cells in the respiratory tract. The source of the current influenza pandemic is H1N1 influenza A virus, possibly of swine origin. This study was conducted to understand better the pathogenesis of H1N1 influenza virus and associated host mucosal immune responses during acute infection in humans. Therefore, we chose a H1N1 swine influenza virus, Sw/OH/24366/07 (SwIV), which has a history of transmission to humans. Clinically, inoculated pigs had nasal discharge and fever and shed virus through nasal secretions. Like pandemic H1N1, SwIV also replicated extensively in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts, and lung lesions were typical of H1N1 infection. We detected innate, proinflammatory, Th1, Th2, and Th3 cytokines, as well as SwIV-specific IgA antibody in lungs of the virus-inoculated pigs. Production of IFN-γ by lymphocytes of the tracheobronchial lymph nodes was also detected. Higher frequencies of cytotoxic T lymphocytes, γδ T cells, dendritic cells, activated T cells, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were detected in SwIV-infected pig lungs. Concomitantly, higher frequencies of the immunosuppressive T regulatory cells were also detected in the virus-infected pig lungs. The findings of this study have relevance to pathogenesis of the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in humans; thus, pigs may serve as a useful animal model to design and test effective mucosal vaccines and therapeutics against influenza virus.

  20. PROCESS OF PRODUCING Cm$sup 244$ AND Cm$sup 24$$sup 5$

    DOEpatents

    Manning, W.M.; Studier, M.H.; Diamond, H.; Fields, P.R.

    1958-11-01

    A process is presented for producing Cm and Cm/sup 245/. The first step of the process consists in subjecting Pu/sup 2339/ to a high neutron flux and subsequently dissolving the irradiated material in HCl. The plutonium is then oxidized to at least the tetravalent state and the solution is contacted with an anion exchange resin, causing the plutonium values to be absorbed while the fission products and transplutonium elements remain in the effluent solution. The effluent solution is then contacted with a cation exchange resin causing the transplutonium, values to be absorbed while the fission products remain in solution. The cation exchange resin is then contacted with an aqueous citrate solution and tbe transplutonium elements are thereby differentially eluted in order of decreasing atomic weight, allowing collection of the desired fractions.

  1. 78 FR 5210 - Open Government Initiative: Implementation of the iCERT Labor Certification Registry for the H-1B...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-24

    ... Certification Registry for the H-1B, H-1B1, E-3, H-2A, H-2B and Permanent Labor Certification Employment-Based... to the general public appropriately redacted copies of H-1B, H-1B1, E-3, H-2A, H-2B and permanent... a labor certification or, in the case of an H-1B, H-1B1, or E-3 visa, a labor condition...

  2. H1N1 Flu & U.S. Schools: Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    A severe form of influenza known as H1N1, commonly being called swine flu, has health officials around the world concerned. In the United States, the outbreak of H1N1 has prompted school closures and cancellation of school-related events. As the flu spreads, the Department of Education encourages school leaders, parents and students to know how to…

  3. Histone H1 compacts DNA under force and during chromatin assembly.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Botao; Freedman, Benjamin S; Miller, Kelly E; Heald, Rebecca; Marko, John F

    2012-12-01

    Histone H1 binds to linker DNA between nucleosomes, but the dynamics and biological ramifications of this interaction remain poorly understood. We performed single-molecule experiments using magnetic tweezers to determine the effects of H1 on naked DNA in buffer or during chromatin assembly in Xenopus egg extracts. In buffer, nanomolar concentrations of H1 induce bending and looping of naked DNA at stretching forces below 0.6 pN, effects that can be reversed with 2.7-pN force or in 200 mM monovalent salt concentrations. Consecutive tens-of-nanometer bending events suggest that H1 binds to naked DNA in buffer at high stoichiometries. In egg extracts, single DNA molecules assemble into nucleosomes and undergo rapid compaction. Histone H1 at endogenous physiological concentrations increases the DNA compaction rate during chromatin assembly under 2-pN force and decreases it during disassembly under 5-pN force. In egg cytoplasm, histone H1 protects sperm nuclei undergoing genome-wide decondensation and chromatin assembly from becoming abnormally stretched or fragmented due to astral microtubule pulling forces. These results reveal functional ramifications of H1 binding to DNA at the single-molecule level and suggest an important physiological role for H1 in compacting DNA under force and during chromatin assembly. PMID:23097493

  4. H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu) - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu) URL of this page: https:// ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu) - Multiple Languages To use the ...

  5. Seizures and retrograde amnesia with cerebrospinal fluid changes following H1N1 influenza vaccination.

    PubMed

    Mitrakrishnan, Shivanthan; Ranjanie, Gamage; Thirunavakarasu, Thivakaran; Manjula, Caldera; Nayananjani, Karunasena

    2011-08-26

    Vaccination against H1N1 influenza of healthcare workers of has been a standard measure to control the epidemic in many countries. Most side effects are minor and transient. Guillain Barre Syndrome and optic neuritis have been major concerns. We report a case of seizures with retrograde amnesia associated with cerebrospinal fluid changes following the H1N1 vaccine.

  6. 78 FR 69539 - Removal of Attestation Process for Facilities Using H-1A Registered Nurses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ...=FR . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In 1989, Congress created an H-1A nonimmigrant classification... implemented the H-1A program through regulations at 20 CFR part 655 Subparts D and E. See 55 FR 50500 (Dec. 6, 1990), as amended by 59 FR 874 (Jan. 6, 1994). Because of the expiration of the authorizing...

  7. Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Surveillance in Marginalized Populations, Tijuana, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rodwell, Timothy C; Robertson, Angela M; Aguirre, Norma; Vera, Alicia; Anderson, Christy M; Lozada, Remedios; Chait, Lwbba; Schooley, Robert T; Zhang, Xing-quan; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2010-08-01

    To detect early cases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 infection, in 2009 we surveyed 303 persons from marginalized populations of drug users, sex workers, and homeless persons in Tijuana, Mexico. Six confirmed cases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 were detected, and the use of rapid, mobile influenza testing was demonstrated.

  8. [MOLECULAR-GENETIC POLYMORPHISM OF chs_H1 GENE IN UKRAINIAN HOP VARIETIES].

    PubMed

    Venzer, A M; Volkova, N E; Sivolap, Yu M

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphism of chs_H1 gene encoding the "true" chalcone synthase was determined by alignment of sequences. The polymorphism associates with single nucleotide changes, insertions or deletions (indels) in the promoter, exons, intron, 3'-untranslated region. The molecular-genetic polymorphism in gene chs_H1 different regions of hop varieties of Polessye Agriculture Institute' breeding NAAS was analyzed. PMID:26638493

  9. Characterization of Xylanase of Cladosporium cladosporioides H1 Isolated from Janggyeong Panjeon in Haeinsa Temple.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jin-Young; Kim, Young-Hee; Jung, Mi-Hwa; Jo, Chang-Wook; Choi, Jung-Eun

    2011-12-01

    Cladosporium cladosporioides H1 was found to be the most abundant microbe in Janggyeong Panjeon. C. cladosporioides H1 produced a 20 kDa xylanase, which was generally stable below 60℃ and had specialized activity in an acidic condition. Our results may lead to the development of a strategy for preservation of organic cultural heritage environments.

  10. A historical perspective of influenza A(H1N2) virus.

    PubMed

    Komadina, Naomi; McVernon, Jodie; Hall, Robert; Leder, Karin

    2014-01-01

    The emergence and transition to pandemic status of the influenza A(H1N1)A(H1N1)pdm09) virus in 2009 illustrated the potential for previously circulating human viruses to re-emerge in humans and cause a pandemic after decades of circulating among animals. Within a short time of the initial emergence of A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, novel reassortants were isolated from swine. In late 2011, a variant (v) H3N2 subtype was isolated from humans, and by 2012, the number of persons infected began to increase with limited person-to-person transmission. During 2012 in the United States, an A(H1N2)v virus was transmitted to humans from swine. During the same year, Australia recorded its first H1N2 subtype infection among swine. The A(H3N2)v and A(H1N2)v viruses contained the matrix protein from the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, raising the possibility of increased transmissibility among humans and underscoring the potential for influenza pandemics of novel swine-origin viruses. We report on the differing histories of A(H1N2) viruses among humans and animals.

  11. Enhanced Pneumonia With Pandemic 2009 A/H1N1 Swine Influenza Virus in Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction. Swine influenza A viruses (SIV) in the major swine producing regions of North America consist of multiple subtypes of endemic H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 derived from swine, avian and human influenza viruses with a triple reassortant internal gene (TRIG) constellation (1). Genetic drift and r...

  12. Antigenic Patterns and Evolution of the Human Influenza A (H1N1) Virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mi; Zhao, Xiang; Hua, Sha; Du, Xiangjun; Peng, Yousong; Li, Xiyan; Lan, Yu; Wang, Dayan; Wu, Aiping; Shu, Yuelong; Jiang, Taijiao

    2015-09-28

    The influenza A (H1N1) virus causes seasonal epidemics that result in severe illnesses and deaths almost every year. A deep understanding of the antigenic patterns and evolution of human influenza A (H1N1) virus is extremely important for its effective surveillance and prevention. Through development of antigenicity inference method for human influenza A (H1N1), named PREDAC-H1, we systematically mapped the antigenic patterns and evolution of the human influenza A (H1N1) virus. Eight dominant antigenic clusters have been inferred for seasonal H1N1 viruses since 1977, which demonstrated sequential replacements over time with a similar pattern in Asia, Europe and North America. Among them, six clusters emerged first in Asia. As for China, three of the eight antigenic clusters were detected in South China earlier than in North China, indicating the leading role of South China in H1N1 transmission. The comprehensive view of the antigenic evolution of human influenza A (H1N1) virus can help formulate better strategy for its prevention and control.

  13. Adoption of Preventive Measures and Attitudes toward the H1N1 Influenza Pandemic in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pérez, Anna; Rodríguez, Tània; López, Maria José; Continente, Xavier; Nebot, Manel

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study describes the perceived impact of H1N1 influenza and the adoption of the recommended measures to address the pandemic in schools. Methods: A cross-sectional self-reported survey was conducted in 433 schools in Barcelona addressed to the school principal or the H1N1 influenza designated person. A descriptive analysis was…

  14. Removing Peanut Allergen Ara h 1 from Peanut Extracts Using p-Aminobenzamidine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rationale: Ara h 1 is one of 3 major allergens in peanut. Removing Ara h 1 from a peanut extract may produce a hypoallergenic peanut extract for immunotherapy and other purposes. Methods: Peanut extracts were treated overnight with and without 10 mM p-aminobenzamidine (pABA, a protease inhibitor) i...

  15. 26 CFR 25.2523(h)-1 - Denial of double deduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Denial of double deduction. 25.2523(h)-1 Section 25.2523(h)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... double deduction. The value of an interest in property may not be deducted for Federal gift tax...

  16. 26 CFR 25.2523(h)-1 - Denial of double deduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Denial of double deduction. 25.2523(h)-1 Section 25.2523(h)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... double deduction. The value of an interest in property may not be deducted for Federal gift tax...

  17. 46 CFR 53.10-3 - Inspection and tests (modifies HG-500 through HG-540).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 53.01-1). The Authorized Inspector shall hold a valid commission issued by the National Board of Boiler and Pressure Vessel Inspectors. After installation, heating... ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS Tests, Inspection, Stamping, and Reporting (Article 5) § 53.10-3 Inspection...

  18. 46 CFR 53.10-3 - Inspection and tests (modifies HG-500 through HG-540).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 53.01-1). The Authorized Inspector shall hold a valid commission issued by the National Board of Boiler and Pressure Vessel Inspectors. After installation, heating... ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS Tests, Inspection, Stamping, and Reporting (Article 5) § 53.10-3 Inspection...

  19. 46 CFR 53.10-3 - Inspection and tests (modifies HG-500 through HG-540).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 53.01-1). The Authorized Inspector shall hold a valid commission issued by the National Board of Boiler and Pressure Vessel Inspectors. After installation, heating... ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS Tests, Inspection, Stamping, and Reporting (Article 5) § 53.10-3 Inspection...

  20. 46 CFR 53.10-3 - Inspection and tests (modifies HG-500 through HG-540).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 53.01-1). The Authorized Inspector shall hold a valid commission issued by the National Board of Boiler and Pressure Vessel Inspectors. After installation, heating... ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS Tests, Inspection, Stamping, and Reporting (Article 5) § 53.10-3 Inspection...

  1. 46 CFR 53.10-3 - Inspection and tests (modifies HG-500 through HG-540).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 53.01-1). The Authorized Inspector shall hold a valid commission issued by the National Board of Boiler and Pressure Vessel Inspectors. After installation, heating... ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS Tests, Inspection, Stamping, and Reporting (Article 5) § 53.10-3 Inspection...

  2. Microtubules regulate GEF-H1 in response to extracellular matrix stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Jessica N.; Ponik, Suzanne M.; Garcia-Mendoza, Maria G.; Pehlke, Carolyn A.; Inman, David R.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Keely, Patricia J.

    2012-01-01

    Breast epithelial cells sense the stiffness of the extracellular matrix through Rho-mediated contractility. In turn, matrix stiffness regulates RhoA activity. However, the upstream signaling mechanisms are poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that the Rho exchange factor GEF-H1 mediates RhoA activation in response to extracellular matrix stiffness. We demonstrate the novel finding that microtubule stability is diminished by a stiff three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix, which leads to the activation of GEF-H1. Surprisingly, activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway did not contribute to stiffness-induced GEF-H1 activation. Loss of GEF-H1 decreases cell contraction of and invasion through 3D matrices. These data support a model in which matrix stiffness regulates RhoA through microtubule destabilization and the subsequent release and activation of GEF-H1. PMID:22593214

  3. Involvement of histone H1.2 in apoptosis induced by DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Akimitsu; Shimizu, Shigeomi; Hirota, Junko; Takao, Toshifumi; Fan, Yuhong; Matsuoka, Yosuke; Zhang, Lilin; Yoneda, Yoshihiro; Fujii, Yoshitaka; Skoultchi, Arthur I; Tsujimoto, Yoshihide

    2003-09-19

    It is poorly understood how apoptotic signals arising from DNA damage are transmitted to mitochondria, which release apoptogenic factors into the cytoplasm that activate downstream destruction programs. Here, we identify histone H1.2 as a cytochrome c-releasing factor that appears in the cytoplasm after exposure to X-ray irradiation. While all nuclear histone H1 forms are released into the cytoplasm in a p53-dependent manner after irradiation, only H1.2, but not other H1 forms, induced cytochrome c release from isolated mitochondria in a Bak-dependent manner. Reducing H1.2 expression enhanced cellular resistance to apoptosis induced by X-ray irradiation or etoposide, but not that induced by other stimuli including TNF-alpha and UV irradiation. H1.2-deficient mice exhibited increased cellular resistance in thymocytes and the small intestine to X-ray-induced apoptosis. These results indicate that histone H1.2 plays an important role in transmitting apoptotic signals from the nucleus to the mitochondria following DNA double-strand breaks.

  4. Novel nucleosomal particles containing core histones and linker DNA but no histone H1.

    PubMed

    Cole, Hope A; Cui, Feng; Ocampo, Josefina; Burke, Tara L; Nikitina, Tatiana; Nagarajavel, V; Kotomura, Naoe; Zhurkin, Victor B; Clark, David J

    2016-01-29

    Eukaryotic chromosomal DNA is assembled into regularly spaced nucleosomes, which play a central role in gene regulation by determining accessibility of control regions. The nucleosome contains ∼147 bp of DNA wrapped ∼1.7 times around a central core histone octamer. The linker histone, H1, binds both to the nucleosome, sealing the DNA coils, and to the linker DNA between nucleosomes, directing chromatin folding. Micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digests the linker to yield the chromatosome, containing H1 and ∼160 bp, and then converts it to a core particle, containing ∼147 bp and no H1. Sequencing of nucleosomal DNA obtained after MNase digestion (MNase-seq) generates genome-wide nucleosome maps that are important for understanding gene regulation. We present an improved MNase-seq method involving simultaneous digestion with exonuclease III, which removes linker DNA. Remarkably, we discovered two novel intermediate particles containing 154 or 161 bp, corresponding to 7 bp protruding from one or both sides of the nucleosome core. These particles are detected in yeast lacking H1 and in H1-depleted mouse chromatin. They can be reconstituted in vitro using purified core histones and DNA. We propose that these 'proto-chromatosomes' are fundamental chromatin subunits, which include the H1 binding site and influence nucleosome spacing independently of H1.

  5. Tissue-expressed B7-H1 Critically Controls Intestinal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Scandiuzzi, Lisa; Ghosh, Kaya; Hofmeyer, Kimberly A.; Abadi, Yael M.; Lázár-Molnár, Eszter; Lin, Elaine Y.; Liu, Qiang; Jeon, Hyungjun; Almo, Steven C.; Chen, Lieping; Nathenson, Stanley G.; Zang, Xingxing

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY B7-H1 (PD-L1) on immune cells plays an important role in T cell coinhibition by binding its receptor PD-1. Here we show that both human and mouse intestinal epithelium expressed B7-H1 and that B7-H1-deficient mice were highly susceptible to dextran sodium sulfate- or trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced gut injury. B7-H1 deficiency during intestinal inflammation led to high mortality and morbidity, which were associated with severe pathological manifestations in the colon, including loss of epithelial integrity and overgrowth of commensal bacteria. Results from bone marrow chimeric and knock-out mice showed B7-H1 expressed on intestinal parenchyma, but not on hematopoietic cells, controlled intestinal inflammation in an adaptive immunity-independent fashion. Finally, we demonstrated that B7-H1 dampened intestinal inflammation by inhibiting TNF-α production and by stimulating IL-22 from CD11c+CD11b+ lamina propria cells. Thus, our data uncover a new mechanism by which intestinal tissue-expressed B7-H1 functions as an essential ligand for innate immune cells to prevent gut inflammation. PMID:24529703

  6. Augmentation of Antigen Receptor–mediated Responses by Histamine H1 Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Banu, Yasmin; Watanabe, Takeshi

    1999-01-01

    Histamine is considered one of the important mediators of immediate hypersensitivity and inflammation, and acts via G protein–coupled receptors. Here, we report that histamine may affect antigen receptor–mediated immune responses of T and B cells via a signal(s) from histamine H1 receptors (H1Rs). Histamine exhibited enhancing effects on the in vitro proliferative responses of anti-CD3ε– or anti-IgM–stimulated spleen T and B cells, respectively, at the culture condition that the fetal calf serum was dialyzed before culture and c-kit–positive cells were depleted from the spleen cells. In studies of histamine H1R knockout mice, H1R-deficient T cells had low proliferative responses to anti-CD3ε cross-linking or antigen stimulation in vitro. B cells from H1R-deficient mice were also affected, demonstrating low proliferative responses to B cell receptor cross-linking. Antibody production against trinitrophenyl-Ficoll was reduced in H1R-deficient mice. Other aspects of T and B cell function were normal in the H1R knockout mice. H1R-deficient T and B cells showed normal responses upon stimulation with interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, CD40 ligand, CD40 ligand plus IL-4, and lipopolysaccharide. Collectively, these results imply that the signal generated by histamine through H1R augments antigen receptor–mediated immune responses, suggesting cross-talk between G protein–coupled receptors and antigen receptor–mediated signaling. PMID:9989982

  7. Alice in Wonderland syndrome in H1N1 influenza: case report.

    PubMed

    Augarten, Arie; Aderka, Dan

    2011-02-01

    The different aspects of the global H1N1 influenza and its complications are currently of great interest. Neurological complications of the disease and its frequency are still unknown. We report a case of an 11-year-old girl who developed Alice in Wonderland syndrome associated with H1N1 influenza. This unique clinical syndrome was previously described in other diseases. The clinician's awareness of the existence of this syndrome in H1N1 influenza might save the child from undergoing extensive diagnostic procedures. PMID:21293218

  8. The study of histamine H1- and H2-receptors in human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kondratenko, T Y; Zacharova, I V; Katukov VYu; Kuzina, N V; Severin, E S; Kornilova, Z Ch; Perelman, M I

    1993-11-01

    Data on human lung histamine H1- and H2-receptors in cancer and chronic inflammatory processes are reported. It has been found that the number of histamine H1-receptors significantly increases both in cancer and chronic pneumonia and does not practically change in tuberculosis lung parenchyma. The binding parameters of histamine H2-receptors both in cancer and inflammatory processes were similar to those obtained for the normal tissue. The important role of parenchymal histamine H1-receptors in the neuromodulation of airways in human lung adenocarcinoma is discussed.

  9. 26 CFR 1.642(h)-1 - Unused loss carryovers on termination of an estate or trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... estate or trust. 1.642(h)-1 Section 1.642(h)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF....642(h)-1 Unused loss carryovers on termination of an estate or trust. (a) If, on the final termination...(h)(1) to the beneficiaries succeeding to the property of the estate or trust. See § 1.641(b)-3...

  10. Evaluation of the attenuation, immunogenicity, and efficacy of a live virus vaccine generated by codon-pair bias de-optimization of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Andrew J; Santos, Celia P; Anafu, Amanda; Wimmer, Eckard; Mueller, Steffen; Subbarao, Kanta

    2016-01-20

    Codon-pair bias de-optimization (CPBD) of viruses involves re-writing viral genes using statistically underrepresented codon pairs, without any changes to the amino acid sequence or codon usage. Previously, this technology has been used to attenuate the influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1) virus. The de-optimized virus was immunogenic and protected inbred mice from challenge. In order to assess whether CPBD could be used to produce a live vaccine against a clinically relevant influenza virus, we generated an influenza A/California/07/2009 pandemic H1N1 (2009 pH1N1) virus with de-optimized HA and NA gene segments (2009 pH1N1-(HA+NA)(Min)), and evaluated viral replication and protein expression in MDCK cells, and attenuation, immunogenicity, and efficacy in outbred ferrets. The 2009 pH1N1-(HA+NA)(Min) virus grew to a similar titer as the 2009 pH1N1 wild type (wt) virus in MDCK cells (∼10(6)TCID50/ml), despite reduced HA and NA protein expression on western blot. In ferrets, intranasal inoculation of 2009 pH1N1-(HA+NA)(Min) virus at doses ranging from 10(3) to 10(5) TCID50 led to seroconversion in all animals and protection from challenge with the 2009 pH1N1 wt virus 28 days later. The 2009 pH1N1-(HA+NA)(Min) virus did not cause clinical illness in ferrets, but replicated to a similar titer as the wt virus in the upper and lower respiratory tract, suggesting that de-optimization of additional gene segments may be warranted for improved attenuation. Taken together, our data demonstrate the potential of using CPBD technology for the development of a live influenza virus vaccine if the level of attenuation is optimized. PMID:26655630

  11. Pediatric Healthcare Response to Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Influenza Stakeholder Meeting - Summary of Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    HCTT CHE

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the meeting was to bring together subject matter experts to develop tools and resources for use by the pediatric healthcare community in response to 2009 (H1N1) pandemic influenza activity during the 2009 influenza season.

  12. Cell Lines Expressing Nuclear and/or Mitochondrial RNAse H1 | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD), Program in Genomics of Differentiation, seeks interested parties to further co-develop small molecule inhibitors of RNase H1, especially in regards to genome instability, transcription, and translation.

  13. Piezoresistive measurement of Swine H1N1 Hemagglutinin peptide binding with microcantilever arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajwa, N.; Maldonado, C. J.; Thundat, T.; Passian, A.

    2014-03-01

    Effective detection of Swine H1N1 Hemagglutinin peptide is crucial as it could be used as a positive control to screen for highly infectious flu strains such as Swine-Origin Influenza A (H1N1). Piezoresistive microcantilever arrays present a pathway towards highly sensitive and label-free detection of biomolecules by transducing the antigen-antibody binding into change in resistivity via induced surface stress variation. We demonstrate a mechanical transduction of Swine H1N1 Hemagglutinin peptide binding and suggest the employed technique may offer a potential platform for detection of the H1N1 virus, which could be clinically used to diagnose and provide subsequent relief.

  14. 9. COLD CALIBRATION TEST STAND (H1) FROM LEFT TO RIGHT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. COLD CALIBRATION TEST STAND (H-1) FROM LEFT TO RIGHT - WORK BENCH, CONTROL PANEL, CHEMICAL TANK. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Cold Calibration Test Stand, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  15. H1N1 infection in emergency surgery: A cautionary tale.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, J G; Butler, J S; Pead, M; Twomey, A

    2010-01-01

    Pandemic 2009 influenza A H1N1 has spread rapidly since its first report in Mexico in March 2009. This is the first influenza pandemic in over 40 years and it atypically affects previously healthy young adults, with higher rates of morbidity and mortality. The medical literature has been inundated with reports of H1N1 infection, the majority found in critical care and internal medicine journals with a relative paucity in the surgical literature. Despite this, it remains an important entity that can impact greatly on acute surgical emergencies. We present a case of previously healthy 31-year-old male who underwent open appendectomy. His post-operative recovery was complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to H1N1 infection. This case report highlights the impact that H1N1 virus can have on acute surgical emergencies and how it can complicate the post-operative course. PMID:22096662

  16. Akt inhibitor MK2206 prevents influenza pH1N1 virus infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Denisova, Oxana V; Söderholm, Sandra; Virtanen, Salla; Von Schantz, Carina; Bychkov, Dmitrii; Vashchinkina, Elena; Desloovere, Jens; Tynell, Janne; Ikonen, Niina; Theisen, Linda L; Nyman, Tuula A; Matikainen, Sampsa; Kallioniemi, Olli; Julkunen, Ilkka; Muller, Claude P; Saelens, Xavier; Verkhusha, Vladislav V; Kainov, Denis E

    2014-07-01

    The influenza pH1N1 virus caused a global flu pandemic in 2009 and continues manifestation as a seasonal virus. Better understanding of the virus-host cell interaction could result in development of better prevention and treatment options. Here we show that the Akt inhibitor MK2206 blocks influenza pH1N1 virus infection in vitro. In particular, at noncytotoxic concentrations, MK2206 alters Akt signaling and inhibits endocytic uptake of the virus. Interestingly, MK2206 is unable to inhibit H3N2, H7N9, and H5N1 viruses, indicating that pH1N1 evolved specific requirements for efficient infection. Thus, Akt signaling could be exploited further for development of better therapeutics against pH1N1 virus. PMID:24752266

  17. Pandemic H1N1 influenza surveillance in Haiti, July-December 2009.

    PubMed

    Fitter, David L; Freeman, Nicole M; Buteau, Josiane; Magloire, Roc; Sessions, Wendy M; Guo, Lizheng; Katz, Mark A; Boncy, Jacques

    2013-09-01

    From June 2009 through December 2009, Haiti conducted sentinel surveillance for influenza. 499 samples were collected and tested using real-time RT-PCR. 197 (39.5%) were positive for influenza, including 95 (48%) pandemic (H1N1) 2009, 57 (29%) seasonal influenza A and 45 (23%) influenza B. The median age of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 cases was 21.7; two-thirds of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 cases were in patients aged 6 years - 35 years. Pandemic activity peaked in September and co-circulated with other influenza subtypes. The age distribution and seasonality of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 in Haiti were similar to other countries in the Caribbean region.

  18. H1N1 'Swine Flu' Vaccine Unlikely to Raise Birth Defect Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... strain made headlines in 2009-2010 as "swine flu" reached pandemic levels in the United States. But the new Swedish study "indicates that first trimester administration of H1N1 vaccine does not seem to increase congenital birth ...

  19. Structural Basis of Preexisting Immunity to the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic Influenza Virus

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Rui; Ekiert, Damian C.; Krause, Jens C.; Hai, Rong; Crowe, Jr., James E.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-05-25

    The 2009 H1N1 swine flu is the first influenza pandemic in decades. The crystal structure of the hemagglutinin from the A/California/04/2009 H1N1 virus shows that its antigenic structure, particularly within the Sa antigenic site, is extremely similar to those of human H1N1 viruses circulating early in the 20th century. The cocrystal structure of the 1918 hemagglutinin with 2D1, an antibody from a survivor of the 1918 Spanish flu that neutralizes both 1918 and 2009 H1N1 viruses, reveals an epitope that is conserved in both pandemic viruses. Thus, antigenic similarity between the 2009 and 1918-like viruses provides an explanation for the age-related immunity to the current influenza pandemic.

  20. 46. OUTLET WORKS: ELECTRICAL SYSTEM NO. 1. Sheet H1, date ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. OUTLET WORKS: ELECTRICAL SYSTEM NO. 1. Sheet H-1, date stamped May, 1939. File no. SA 342/9. - Prado Dam, Outlet Works, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  1. Pandemic and post-pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) infection in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is a vast amount of information published regarding the impact of 2009 pandemic Influenza A (pH1N1) virus infection. However, a comparison of risk factors and outcome during the 2010-2011 post-pandemic period has not been described. Methods A prospective, observational, multi-center study was carried out to evaluate the clinical characteristics and demographics of patients with positive RT-PCR for H1N1 admitted to 148 Spanish intensive care units (ICUs). Data were obtained from the 2009 pandemic and compared to the 2010-2011 post-pandemic period. Results Nine hundred and ninety-seven patients with confirmed An/H1N1 infection were included. Six hundred and forty-eight patients affected by 2009 (pH1N1) virus infection and 349 patients affected by the post-pandemic Influenza (H1N1)v infection period were analyzed. Patients during the post-pandemic period were older, had more chronic comorbid conditions and presented with higher severity scores (Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA)) on ICU admission. Patients from the post-pandemic Influenza (H1N1)v infection period received empiric antiviral treatment less frequently and with delayed administration. Mortality was significantly higher in the post-pandemic period. Multivariate analysis confirmed that haematological disease, invasive mechanical ventilation and continuous renal replacement therapy were factors independently associated with worse outcome in the two periods. HIV was the only new variable independently associated with higher ICU mortality during the post-pandemic Influenza (H1N1)v infection period. Conclusion Patients from the post-pandemic Influenza (H1N1)v infection period had an unexpectedly higher mortality rate and showed a trend towards affecting a more vulnerable population, in keeping with more typical seasonal viral infection. PMID:22126648

  2. B7-H1 Expression in Wilms Tumor: Correlation With Tumor Biology and Disease Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Routh, Jonathan C.; Ashley, Richard A.; Sebo, Thomas J.; Lohse, Christine M.; Husmann, Douglas A.; Kramer, Stephen A.; Kwon, Eugene D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Despite tremendous gains in improving prognosis, 10% of patients with Wilms tumor will ultimately experience disease recurrence. The identification of novel prognostic markers and tumor associated targets for patients at risk could enable clinicians to treat recurrences more aggressively and, thus, optimize outcomes. We have previously shown that tumor expression of the T cell coregulatory ligand B7-H1 portends a poor prognosis for adults with renal cell carcinoma and represents a promising target to improve therapy. We hypothesize that this finding may be true for Wilms tumor. Materials and Methods We identified 81 patients with Wilms tumor treated at 1 institution between 1968 and 2004. Histopathological features, including Wilms tumor B7-H1 expression, were correlated with clinical observations and outcome. Results Tumor recurrences were noted in 22% of patients with Wilms tumor and 14% died. B7-H1 was expressed in 11 tumors (14%) and was more likely to occur in anaplastic Wilms tumor (p = 0.03). Tumor B7-H1 expression was associated with a 2.7-fold increased risk of recurrence, although this difference did not achieve statistical significance (p = 0.06). However, in favorable histology tumors B7-H1 expression was associated with a 3.7-fold increased risk of recurrence (p = 0.03). Conclusions B7-H1 is expressed by Wilms tumor, correlates with tumor biology and is associated with an increased risk of recurrence in patients with favorable histology tumors. B7-H1 may prove useful in identifying high risk patients who could benefit from more aggressive initial treatment regimens, and may represent a promising therapeutic target. Multi-institutional studies to elucidate the role of B7-H1 in the treatment of Wilms tumor are warranted. PMID:18355839

  3. Antibody Recognition of the Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin Receptor Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Minsun; Lee, Peter S.; Hoffman, Ryan M. B.; Zhu, Xueyong; Krause, Jens C.; Laursen, Nick S.; Yoon, Sung-il; Song, Langzhou; Tussey, Lynda; Crowe, James E.; Ward, Andrew B.

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus is a global health concern due to its unpredictable pandemic potential. This potential threat was realized in 2009 when an H1N1 virus emerged that resembled the 1918 virus in antigenicity but fortunately was not nearly as deadly. 5J8 is a human antibody that potently neutralizes a broad spectrum of H1N1 viruses, including the 1918 and 2009 pandemic viruses. Here, we present the crystal structure of 5J8 Fab in complex with a bacterially expressed and refolded globular head domain from the hemagglutinin (HA) of the A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) pandemic virus. 5J8 recognizes a conserved epitope in and around the receptor binding site (RBS), and its HCDR3 closely mimics interactions of the sialic acid receptor. Electron microscopy (EM) reconstructions of 5J8 Fab in complex with an HA trimer from a 1986 H1 strain and with an engineered stabilized HA trimer from the 2009 H1 pandemic virus showed a similar mode of binding. As for other characterized RBS-targeted antibodies, 5J8 uses avidity to extend its breadth and affinity against divergent H1 strains. 5J8 selectively interacts with HA insertion residue 133a, which is conserved in pandemic H1 strains and has precluded binding of other RBS-targeted antibodies. Thus, the RBS of divergent HAs is targeted by 5J8 and adds to the growing arsenal of common recognition motifs for design of therapeutics and vaccines. Moreover, consistent with previous studies, the bacterially expressed H1 HA properly refolds, retaining its antigenic structure, and presents a low-cost and rapid alternative for engineering and manufacturing candidate flu vaccines. PMID:24027321

  4. Oseltamivir-Resistant Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Gonzalez, José Ernesto; Gonzalez-Duran, Elizabeth; Alcantara-Perez, Patricia; Wong-Arambula, Claudia; Olivera-Diaz, Hiram; Cortez-Ortiz, Iliana; Barrera-Badillo, Gisela; Nguyen, Ha; Gubareva, Larisa; Lopez-Martinez, Irma; Díaz-Quiñonez, Jose Alberto; Lezana-Fernández, Miguel Angel; Gatell-Ramírez, Hugo Lopez; Villalobos, Jose Angel Cordova; Hernández-Avila, Mauricio

    2011-01-01

    During May 2009–April 2010, we analyzed 692 samples of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus from patients in Mexico. We detected the H275Y substitution of the neuraminidase gene in a specimen from an infant with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 who was treated with oseltamivir. This virus was susceptible to zanamivir and resistant to adamantanes and oseltamivir. PMID:21291607

  5. Antibody recognition of the pandemic H1N1 Influenza virus hemagglutinin receptor binding site.

    PubMed

    Hong, Minsun; Lee, Peter S; Hoffman, Ryan M B; Zhu, Xueyong; Krause, Jens C; Laursen, Nick S; Yoon, Sung-Il; Song, Langzhou; Tussey, Lynda; Crowe, James E; Ward, Andrew B; Wilson, Ian A

    2013-11-01

    Influenza virus is a global health concern due to its unpredictable pandemic potential. This potential threat was realized in 2009 when an H1N1 virus emerged that resembled the 1918 virus in antigenicity but fortunately was not nearly as deadly. 5J8 is a human antibody that potently neutralizes a broad spectrum of H1N1 viruses, including the 1918 and 2009 pandemic viruses. Here, we present the crystal structure of 5J8 Fab in complex with a bacterially expressed and refolded globular head domain from the hemagglutinin (HA) of the A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) pandemic virus. 5J8 recognizes a conserved epitope in and around the receptor binding site (RBS), and its HCDR3 closely mimics interactions of the sialic acid receptor. Electron microscopy (EM) reconstructions of 5J8 Fab in complex with an HA trimer from a 1986 H1 strain and with an engineered stabilized HA trimer from the 2009 H1 pandemic virus showed a similar mode of binding. As for other characterized RBS-targeted antibodies, 5J8 uses avidity to extend its breadth and affinity against divergent H1 strains. 5J8 selectively interacts with HA insertion residue 133a, which is conserved in pandemic H1 strains and has precluded binding of other RBS-targeted antibodies. Thus, the RBS of divergent HAs is targeted by 5J8 and adds to the growing arsenal of common recognition motifs for design of therapeutics and vaccines. Moreover, consistent with previous studies, the bacterially expressed H1 HA properly refolds, retaining its antigenic structure, and presents a low-cost and rapid alternative for engineering and manufacturing candidate flu vaccines.

  6. H1N1pdm Influenza Infection in Hospitalized Cancer Patients: Clinical Evolution and Viral Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bozza, Fernando A.; Mesquita, Milene; Soares, Márcio; Motta, Fernando C.; Pitrowsky, Melissa Tassano; de Lourdes Oliveira, Maria; Mishin, Vasiliy P.; Gubareva, Larissa V.; Whitney, Anne; Rocco, Sandra Amaral; Gonçalves, Vânia Maria C.; Marques, Venceslaine Prado; Velasco, Eduardo; Siqueira, Marilda M.

    2010-01-01

    Background The novel influenza A pandemic virus (H1N1pdm) caused considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide in 2009. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical course, duration of viral shedding, H1N1pdm evolution and emergence of antiviral resistance in hospitalized cancer patients with severe H1N1pdm infections during the winter of 2009 in Brazil. Methods We performed a prospective single-center cohort study in a cancer center in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Hospitalized patients with cancer and a confirmed diagnosis of influenza A H1N1pdm were evaluated. The main outcome measures in this study were in-hospital mortality, duration of viral shedding, viral persistence and both functional and molecular analyses of H1N1pdm susceptibility to oseltamivir. Results A total of 44 hospitalized patients with suspected influenza-like illness were screened. A total of 24 had diagnosed H1N1pdm infections. The overall hospital mortality in our cohort was 21%. Thirteen (54%) patients required intensive care. The median age of the studied cohort was 14.5 years (3–69 years). Eighteen (75%) patients had received chemotherapy in the previous month, and 14 were neutropenic at the onset of influenza. A total of 10 patients were evaluated for their duration of viral shedding, and 5 (50%) displayed prolonged viral shedding (median 23, range = 11–63 days); however, this was not associated with the emergence of a resistant H1N1pdm virus. Viral evolution was observed in sequentially collected samples. Conclusions Prolonged influenza A H1N1pdm shedding was observed in cancer patients. However, oseltamivir resistance was not detected. Taken together, our data suggest that severely ill cancer patients may constitute a pandemic virus reservoir with major implications for viral propagation. PMID:21152402

  7. Experience of influenza A H1N1 in a paediatric emergency unit.

    PubMed

    Biçer, Suat; Ercan Sariçoban, Hülya; Özen, Ahmet Oğuzhan; Saf, Coşkun; Ergenekon Ulutaş, Pinar; Gürol, Yeşim; Yilmaz, Gülden; Vitrinel, Ayça; Özelgün, Berna

    2015-06-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate symptoms, clinical findings, treatment options and complications of H1N1 influenza infection in patients who applied to our emergency unit during the influenza season in 2009. The clinical and laboratory findings of children with influenza A (H1N1) during the influenza season in 2009 were evaluated retrospectively. Influenza A was diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction and/or rapid antigen test. Clinical and laboratory findings of the patients with H1N1 (group I) and without H1N1 (group II) were compared. Fever and myalgia were noted to be higher in group I (p <0.05). The mean body temperature in group I was 39.0?, which was statistically different from group II (p <0.001). Myalgia was observed only in group I (15.4%), but not in group II (p <0.05). There were three patients with diarrhoea, two of whom were in group I, and they had no significant respiratory symptoms. Lymphopenia was seen in 18 patients (81.8%) in group I and in four patients (23.5%) in group II (p <0.05). Oseltamivir treatment was applied to 28 patients, where 24 had severe symptoms, nine had comorbid factors and two did not have any of these. The fever was higher in group I and myalgia was present only in group I. In group I, the lymphocyte count was significantly lower than in group II. The fever was higher in patients of H1N1 (average of 39°C) and myalgia was present only in patients with H1N1. The lymphocyte count was significantly lower in patients with H1N1 than those without H1N1. While none of the patients required intensive care, three patients requiring hospitalization were discharged after referral and completion of their treatment.

  8. A 1.3 cm line survey toward Orion KL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Y.; Henkel, C.; Thorwirth, S.; Spezzano, S.; Menten, K. M.; Walmsley, C. M.; Wyrowski, F.; Mao, R. Q.; Klein, B.

    2015-09-01

    regions. Elemental and isotopic abundance ratios are also estimated: He/H = (8.7 ± 0.7)% derived from the ratios between helium RRLs and hydrogen RRLs; 12C/13C = 63 ± 17 from 12CH3OH/13CH3OH; 14N/15N =100 ± 51 from 14NH3/15NH3; and D/H = (8.3 ± 4.5) × 10-3 from NH2D/NH3. The dispersion of the He/H ratios derived from Hα/Heα pairs to Hδ/Heδ pairs is very small, which is consistent with theoretical predictions that the departure coefficients bn factors for hydrogen and helium are nearly identical. Based on a non-LTE code that neglects excitation by the infrared radiation field and a likelihood analysis, we find that the denser regions have lower kinetic temperature, which favors an external heating of the hot core. Tables 2 and 4 and appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgThe reduced spectra as FITS files are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/581/A48

  9. Effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccine against pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus, Australia, 2010.

    PubMed

    Fielding, James E; Grant, Kristina A; Garcia, Katherine; Kelly, Heath A

    2011-07-01

    To estimate effectiveness of seasonal trivalent and monovalent influenza vaccines against pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus, we conducted a test-negative case-control study in Victoria, Australia, in 2010. Patients seen for influenza-like illness by general practitioners in a sentinel surveillance network during 2010 were tested for influenza; vaccination status was recorded. Case-patients had positive PCRs for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus, and controls had negative influenza test results. Of 319 eligible patients, test results for 139 (44%) were pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus positive. Adjusted effectiveness of seasonal vaccine against pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus was 79% (95% confidence interval 33%-93%); effectiveness of monovalent vaccine was 47% and not statistically significant. Vaccine effectiveness was higher among adults. Despite some limitations, this study indicates that the first seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine to include the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus strain provided significant protection against laboratory-confirmed pandemic (H1N1) 2009 infection. PMID:21762570

  10. Numerical analysis of an H1-Galerkin mixed finite element method for time fractional telegraph equation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinfeng; Zhao, Meng; Zhang, Min; Liu, Yang; Li, Hong

    2014-01-01

    We discuss and analyze an H(1)-Galerkin mixed finite element (H(1)-GMFE) method to look for the numerical solution of time fractional telegraph equation. We introduce an auxiliary variable to reduce the original equation into lower-order coupled equations and then formulate an H(1)-GMFE scheme with two important variables. We discretize the Caputo time fractional derivatives using the finite difference methods and approximate the spatial direction by applying the H(1)-GMFE method. Based on the discussion on the theoretical error analysis in L(2)-norm for the scalar unknown and its gradient in one dimensional case, we obtain the optimal order of convergence in space-time direction. Further, we also derive the optimal error results for the scalar unknown in H(1)-norm. Moreover, we derive and analyze the stability of H(1)-GMFE scheme and give the results of a priori error estimates in two- or three-dimensional cases. In order to verify our theoretical analysis, we give some results of numerical calculation by using the Matlab procedure.

  11. The early diversification of influenza A/H1N1pdm

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Martha; Spiro, David; Wentworth, David; Fan, Jiang; Beck, Eric; St. George, Kirsten; Ghedin, Elodie; Halpin, Rebecca; Bera, Jayati; Hine, Erin; Proudfoot, Kathleen; Stockwell, Tim; Lin, Xudong; Griesemer, Sara; Bose, Michael; Jurgens, Lisa; Kumar, Swati; Viboud, Cecile; Holmes, Edward; Henrickson, Kelly

    2009-01-01

    Background Since its initial detection in April 2009, the A/H1N1pdm influenza virus has spread rapidly in humans, with over 5,700 human deaths. However, little is known about the evolutionary dynamics of H1N1pdm and its geographic and temporal diversification. Methods Phylogenetic analysis was conducted upon the concatenated coding regions of whole-genome sequences from 290 H1N1pdm isolates sampled globally between April 1 – July 9, 2009, including relatively large samples from the US states of Wisconsin and New York. Results At least 7 phylogenetically distinct viral clades have disseminated globally and co-circulated in localities that experienced multiple introductions of H1N1pdm. The epidemics in New York and Wisconsin were dominated by two different clades, both phylogenetically distinct from the viruses first identified in California and Mexico, suggesting an important role for founder effects in determining local viral population structures. Conclusions Determining the global diversity of H1N1pdm is central to understanding the evolution and spatial spread of the current pandemic, and to predict its future impact on human populations. Our results indicate that H1N1pdm has already diversified into distinct viral lineages with defined spatial patterns. PMID:20029664

  12. Arsenic and cadmium are inhibitors of cyanobacterial dinitrogenase reductase (nifH1) gene.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shilpi; Shrivastava, A K; Singh, V K

    2014-09-01

    The enzyme nitrogenase complex is a key component conferring nitrogen fixation in all known diazotrophs. This study for the first time examines the impact of As, Na, Cd, Cu and butachlor on component II (dinitrogenase reductase, nifH1) of nitrogenase from diazotrophic cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120 using in silico and wet lab approaches. The nifH1 of Anabaena is a glycine-rich stable protein having DNA-binding properties and shows close similarity with free living compared with symbiotic diazotrophs. Phylogenetic tree revealed an adverse effect of the selected stresses on close homologs across the diazotroph community. The protein interaction network demonstrated the presence of nirA, glnA, glnB, alr4255 and alr2485 proteins besides nif proteins, suggesting their involvement in nitrogen fixation along with nifH1. Homology modelling and docking under As, Na, Cd, Cu and butachlor revealed an interaction between stressors and nifH1 protein which was further validated by a transcript of the gene through quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Presence of binding sites for As, Na, Cd and Cu on oxyR promoter attested their adverse affects on nifH1. Maximum down-regulation of nifH1 in Cd and As followed by salt, copper and butachlor revealed that arsenic and cadmium were most potential inhibitors of nitrogenase of diazotrophic community, which might negatively affect crop yield.

  13. PKC-dependent Phosphorylation of the H1 Histamine Receptor Modulates TRPC6 Activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xingjuan; Egly, Christian; Riley, Ashley M; Li, Wennan; Tewson, Paul; Hughes, Thomas E; Quinn, Anne Marie; Obukhov, Alexander G

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6) is a cation selective, DAG-regulated, Ca2+-permeable channel activated by the agonists of Gq-protein-coupled heptahelical receptors. Dysfunctions of TRPC6 are implicated in the pathogenesis of various cardiovascular and kidney conditions such as vasospasm and glomerulosclerosis. When stimulated by agonists of the histamine H1 receptor (H1R), TRPC6 activity decays to the baseline despite the continuous presence of the agonist. In this study, we examined whether H1R desensitization contributes to regulating the decay rate of TRPC6 activity upon receptor stimulation. We employed the HEK expression system and a biosensor allowing us to simultaneously detect the changes in intracellular diacylglycerol (DAG) and Ca2+ concentrations. We found that the histamine-induced DAG response was biphasic, in which a transient peak was followed by maintained elevated plateau, suggesting that desensitization of H1R takes place in the presence of histamine. The application of PKC inhibitor Gö6983 slowed the decay rate of intracellular DAG concentration. Activation of the mouse H1R mutant lacking a putative PKC phosphorylation site, Ser399, responsible for the receptor desensitization, resulted in a prolonged intracellular DAG increase and greater Mn2+ influx through the TRPC6 channel. Thus, our data support the hypothesis that PKC-dependent H1R phosphorylation leads to a reduced production of intracellular DAG that contributes to TRPC6 activity regulation.

  14. Characteristics and influences of H1N1 communication on college students

    PubMed Central

    Koskan, Alexis; Foster, Caroline; Karlis, Jack; Rose, India; Tanner, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess how college students received and responded to H1N1 pandemic emergency preparedness information and to assess college students’ knowledge and attitudes towards H1N1 during the height of the H1N1 epidemic and corresponding public health response to the outbreak. Design/methodology/approach Using a case study approach, the researchers conducted five focus groups at a large Southeastern US university between October 20–29, 2009. Findings In order to effectively communicate emergency preparedness information to college students, universities should rely on interpersonal communication and mediated communication from trusted sources. College students need to understand the health-related emergency, the risk of the emergency, basic steps to avoid it, and only pertinent cues to action. Oversaturation of this information can lead college students to lessen their perceived importance of the disaster prevention information. Research limitations/implications Focus groups were conducted during only two consecutive weeks of the H1N1 epidemic, and snowball sampling may have led to sample bias. Originality/value This research was conducted during the height of the H1N1 pandemic, and is the only study to date that explores college students’ knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors towards H1N1. PMID:25328288

  15. College students' perceptions of H1N1 flu risk and attitudes toward vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Meagan A; Marczinski, Cecile A

    2011-10-13

    College students are highly susceptible to the H1N1 virus, yet previous studies suggest that college students perceive themselves at low risk for the flu. We surveyed 514 undergraduates to assess their perceptions of H1N1 flu risk and opinions about flu vaccines. A third of respondents stated that they were not at risk of getting the H1N1 flu because they were young. Responses indicated a distrust of the safety and effectiveness of influenza vaccinations; only 15.8% of participants planned on receiving H1N1 vaccination. Top reasons for refusing the H1N1 vaccine included questioning vaccine safety and effectiveness, and concerns about potential serious and/or benign side effects. Top reasons for H1N1 vaccination acceptance included receiving a doctor recommendation for the vaccine, having previously gotten a seasonal vaccine, and being at high-risk for influenza. Our findings suggest that college students are inaccurate in assessing their risk level and are unlikely to seek vaccinations.

  16. Mechanisms of triggering H1 helix in prion proteins unfolding revealed by molecular dynamic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Chih-Yuan; Lee, H. C.

    2006-03-01

    In template-assistance model, normal Prion protein (PrP^C), the pathogen to cause several prion diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob (CJD) in human, Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) in cow, and scrapie in sheep, converts to infectious prion (PrP^Sc) through a transient interaction with PrP^Sc. Furthermore, conventional studies showed S1-H1-S2 region in PrP^C to be the template of S1-S2 β-sheet in PrP^Sc, and Prion protein's conformational conversion may involve an unfolding of H1 and refolding into β-sheet. Here we prepare several mouse prion peptides that contain S1-H1-S2 region with specific different structures, which are corresponding to specific interactions, to investigate possible mechanisms to trigger H1 α-helix unfolding process via molecular dynamic simulation. Three properties, conformational transition, salt-bridge in H1, and hydrophobic solvent accessible surface (SAS) are analyzed. From these studies, we found the interaction that triggers H1 unfolding to be the one that causes dihedral angle at residue Asn^143 changes. Whereas interactions that cause S1 segment's conformational changes play a minor in this process. These studies offers an additional evidence for template-assistance model.

  17. [Epidemiology of Pandemic Influenza (H1N1) 2009 in Aichi Medical University Hospital].

    PubMed

    Tani, Hiroya; Yamagishi, Yuka; Fuzimaki, Eriko; Kishi, Takahiko; Goto, Minehiro; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2010-01-01

    We have analyzed epidemiology of pandemic influenza (H1N1) 2009 in Aichi Medical University hospital. As a result, the characteristics of pandemic influenza (H1N1) 2009 was as follows. (1) The number of ordered rapid diagnostic test was 2.8 times compared with the seasonal influenza period. The number of ordered rapid diagnostic test of the seasonal influenza period had the peak in January to March. However, the peak in pandemic influenza (H1N1) 2009 was November. Also, the number of samples on the weekend had been more than that of the weekday. (2) Positive rate of each diagnostic kit did not have the difference between the seasonal influenza (31.3 ± 1.8%) and pandemic influenza (H1N1) 2009 (29.6%). (3) Age on most ordered samples were less than ten years old, and the number of samples in 11 to 20 years old was twice in comparison with the seasonal influenza. (4) Pandemic influenza (H1N1) 2009 in influenza A accounted for 96.9%. (5) Sensitivity and specificity of ESPLINE Influenza A&B-N (FUJIREBIO, Inc., Tokyo, Japan) to the pandemic influenza (H1N1) 2009 were 100% and 100%, respectively. Also, sensitivity and specificity of prorasuto Flu (Mitsubishi Chemical Medience Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) were 77.3%and 98.5%, respectively.

  18. Numerical analysis of an H1-Galerkin mixed finite element method for time fractional telegraph equation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinfeng; Zhao, Meng; Zhang, Min; Liu, Yang; Li, Hong

    2014-01-01

    We discuss and analyze an H(1)-Galerkin mixed finite element (H(1)-GMFE) method to look for the numerical solution of time fractional telegraph equation. We introduce an auxiliary variable to reduce the original equation into lower-order coupled equations and then formulate an H(1)-GMFE scheme with two important variables. We discretize the Caputo time fractional derivatives using the finite difference methods and approximate the spatial direction by applying the H(1)-GMFE method. Based on the discussion on the theoretical error analysis in L(2)-norm for the scalar unknown and its gradient in one dimensional case, we obtain the optimal order of convergence in space-time direction. Further, we also derive the optimal error results for the scalar unknown in H(1)-norm. Moreover, we derive and analyze the stability of H(1)-GMFE scheme and give the results of a priori error estimates in two- or three-dimensional cases. In order to verify our theoretical analysis, we give some results of numerical calculation by using the Matlab procedure. PMID:25184148

  19. Drug Resistance of Enteric Bacteria VI. Introduction of Bacteriophage P1CM into Salmonella typhi and Formation of P1dCM and F-CM Elements

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Eiko; Mitsuhashi, Susumu

    1966-01-01

    Kondo, Eiko (Gunma University, Maebashi, Japan), and Susumu Mitsuhashi. Drug resistance of enteric bacteria. VI. Introduction of bacteriophage P1CM into Salmonella typhi and formation of P1dCM and F-CM elements. J. Bacteriol. 91:1787–1794. 1966.—Bacteriophage P1CM was introduced into Salmonella typhi by means of both phage infection and conjugation with Escherichia coli F+ lysogenic for the phage. Upon incubation with a P1CM phage lysate, S. typhi and S. abony yield CMr cells which are lysogenic for P1CM, but S. typhimurium LT2 does not. The P1CM phage is adsorbed slightly to S. typhi, but no infectious centers are formed when the phage is plated on this strain. Tests on P1CM-adsorbing capacity of the S. typhi P1CM+ strain and on plaque formation and transduction ability of the recovered phage from this strain indicated that the cell and the phage population did not have any special advantage over the original cell and phage population. Conjugation of S. typhi with E. coli F+ carrying P1CM+ gave three types of S. typhi CMr clones: those which carry the whole P1CM phage, those with the P1dCM element, and those with nontransferable CMr. The second type has the F factor and is sensitive to f phages in spite of its typical behavior, serologically and biochemically, as S. typhi. It can donate the P1dCM and F+ characters to E. coli F− or F−/P1 strains. As a consequence of conjugation with the E. coli F+ strain, the CMr character of the third type of S. typhi, the nontransferable CMr element, acquired conjugational transferability, owing to the formation of the element, F-CM. This element can be transferred to an E. coli F− strain at a very high frequency (ca. 100). Both the F and CMr determinants are jointly transduced with P1 phage and are jointly eliminated by acridine dye treatment. PMID:5327907

  20. Extracellular vesicles shed by melanoma cells contain a modified form of H1.0 linker histone and H1.0 mRNA-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schiera, Gabriella; Di Liegro, Carlo Maria; Puleo, Veronica; Colletta, Oriana; Fricano, Anna; Cancemi, Patrizia; Di Cara, Gianluca; Di Liegro, Italia

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are now recognized as a fundamental way for cell-to-cell horizontal transfer of properties, in both physiological and pathological conditions. Most of EV-mediated cross-talk among cells depend on the exchange of proteins, and nucleic acids, among which mRNAs, and non-coding RNAs such as different species of miRNAs. Cancer cells, in particular, use EVs to discard molecules which could be dangerous to them (for example differentiation-inducing proteins such as histone H1.0, or antitumor drugs), to transfer molecules which, after entering the surrounding cells, are able to transform their phenotype, and even to secrete factors, which allow escaping from immune surveillance. Herein we report that melanoma cells not only secrete EVs which contain a modified form of H1.0 histone, but also transport the corresponding mRNA. Given the already known role in tumorigenesis of some RNA binding proteins (RBPs), we also searched for proteins of this class in EVs. This study revealed the presence in A375 melanoma cells of at least three RBPs, with apparent MW of about 65, 45 and 38 kDa, which are able to bind H1.0 mRNA. Moreover, we purified one of these proteins, which by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was identified as the already known transcription factor MYEF2. PMID:27633859

  1. Paper-based enzyme-free immunoassay for rapid detection and subtyping of influenza A H1N1 and H3N2 viruses.

    PubMed

    Lei, Kin Fong; Huang, Chia-Hao; Kuo, Rei-Lin; Chang, Cheng-Kai; Chen, Kuan-Fu; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Tsang, Ngan-Ming

    2015-07-01

    Development of rapid screening in the ambulatory environment is the most pressing needs for the control of spread of infectious disease. Despite there are many methods to detect the immunoassay results, quantitative measurement in rapid disease screening is still a great challenge for point-of-care applications. In this work, based on the internal structural protein, i.e., nucleoprotein (NP), and outer surface glycoproteins, i.e., H1 and H3, of the influenza viruses, specific and sensitive immunoassay on paper-based platform was evaluated and confirmed. Detection and subtyping of influenza A H1N1 and H3N2 viruses found in people were demonstrated by colorimetric paper-based sandwich immunoassay. Concentration-dependent response to influenza viruses was shown and the detection limits could achieve 2.7×10(3) pfu/assay for H1 detection and 2.7×10(4) pfu/assay for H3 detection, which are within the clinical relevant level. Moreover, detection of influenza virus from infected cell lysate and clinical samples was demonstrated to further confirm the reliability of the paper-based immunoassay. The use of paper for the development of diagnostic devices has the advantages of lightweight, ease-of-use, and low cost and paper-based immunoassay is appropriate to apply for rapid screening in point-of-care applications.

  2. Double interpenetration in a chiral three-dimensional magnet with a (10,3)-a structure.

    PubMed

    Grancha, Thais; Mon, Marta; Lloret, Francesc; Ferrando-Soria, Jesús; Journaux, Yves; Pasán, Jorge; Pardo, Emilio

    2015-09-21

    A unique chiral three-dimensional magnet with an overall racemic double-interpenetrated (10,3)-a structure of the formula [(S)-(1-PhEt)Me3N]4[Mn4Cu6(Et2pma)12](DMSO)3]·3DMSO·5H2O (1; Et2pma = N-2,6-diethylphenyloxamate) has been synthesized by the self-assembly of a mononuclear copper(II) complex acting as a metalloligand toward Mn(II) ions in the presence of a chiral cationic auxiliary, constituting the first oxamato-based chiral coordination polymer exhibiting long-range magnetic ordering. PMID:26322529

  3. Double interpenetration in a chiral three-dimensional magnet with a (10,3)-a structure.

    PubMed

    Grancha, Thais; Mon, Marta; Lloret, Francesc; Ferrando-Soria, Jesús; Journaux, Yves; Pasán, Jorge; Pardo, Emilio

    2015-09-21

    A unique chiral three-dimensional magnet with an overall racemic double-interpenetrated (10,3)-a structure of the formula [(S)-(1-PhEt)Me3N]4[Mn4Cu6(Et2pma)12](DMSO)3]·3DMSO·5H2O (1; Et2pma = N-2,6-diethylphenyloxamate) has been synthesized by the self-assembly of a mononuclear copper(II) complex acting as a metalloligand toward Mn(II) ions in the presence of a chiral cationic auxiliary, constituting the first oxamato-based chiral coordination polymer exhibiting long-range magnetic ordering.

  4. Abundance of intrinsic structural disorder in the histone H1 subtypes.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    The intrinsically disordered proteins consist of partially structured regions linked to the unstructured stretches, which consequently form the transient and dynamic conformational ensembles. They undergo disorder to order transition upon binding their partners. Intrinsic disorder is attributed to histones H1, perceived as assemblers of chromatin structure and the regulators of DNA and proteins activity. In this work, the comparison of intrinsic disorder abundance in the histone H1 subtypes was performed both by the analysis of their amino acid composition and by the prediction of disordered stretches, as well as by identifying molecular recognition features (MoRFs) and ANCHOR protein binding regions (APBR) that are responsible for recognition and binding. Both human and model organisms-animals, plants, fungi and protists-have H1 histone subtypes with the properties typical of disordered state. They possess a significantly higher content of hydrophilic and charged amino acid residues, arranged in the long regions, covering over half of the whole amino acid residues in chain. Almost complete disorder corresponds to histone H1 terminal domains, including MoRFs and ANCHOR. Those motifs were also identified in a more ordered histone H1 globular domain. Compared to the control (globular and fibrous) proteins, H1 histones demonstrate the increased folding rate and a higher proportion of low-complexity segments. The results of this work indicate that intrinsic disorder is an inherent structural property of histone H1 subtypes and it is essential for establishing a protein conformation which defines functional outcomes affecting on DNA- and/or partner protein-dependent cell processes.

  5. Seroprevalence following the first wave of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in Turkey, 2009.

    PubMed

    Gözalan, Ayşegül; Altaş, Ayşe Başak; Sevencan, Funda; Akın, Levent; Korukluoğlu, Gülay; Kara, Sükran; Sevindi, Demet Furkan; Ertek, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we sought to describe the community seropositivity of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in order to estimate immunity shortly after the peak of the first pandemic wave in two provinces in Turkey. This cross-sectional study was conducted in the provinces of Diyarbakir and Ankara, after the first wave of H1N1 incidences in 2009. It was designed to evaluate 276 houses in Diyarbakir and 455 houses in Ankara. Everyone living in these houses was included in the study. An antibody titer of ≥1:40 was considered as a positive result for all age groups. Antibody titers of ≤1:20 were considered as 1 while calculating the log titer and geometric mean. The pandemic H1N1 seropositivity was found to be 24.1% for Ankara and 27.7% for Diyarbakir. In Ankara, seropositivity was statistically associated with the 15-24 age group (odds ratio [OR] = 11.47), pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccination (OR = 20.95), and influenza-like illness history (OR = 1.60). In Diyarbakir, H1N1 seropositivity was associated with the 15-24 age group (OR = 8.99) and pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccination (OR = 9.94). Because individuals less than 25 years old played an important role in the community transmission of infection and were largely protected against the pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus, these individuals should be given a high priority for pandemic influenza vaccination in the event of the emergence of another novel pandemic strain.

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of surface proteins of novel H1N1 virus isolated from 2009 pandemic.

    PubMed

    Danishuddin, Mohd; Khan, Shahper N; Khan, Asad U

    2009-09-30

    Swine Influenza Virus (H1N1) is a known causative agent of swine flu. Transmission of Swine Influenza Virus form pig to human is not a common event and may not always cause human influenza. The 2009 outbreak by subtype H1N1 in humans is due to transfer of Swine Influenza Virus from pig to human. Thus to analyze the origin of this novel virus we compared two surface proteins (HA and NA) with influenza viruses of swine, avian and humans isolates recovered from 1918 to 2008 outbreaks. Phylogenetic analyses of hemagglutinin gene from 2009 pandemic found to be clustered with swine influenza virus (H1N2) circulated in U.S.A during the 1999-2004 outbreaks. Whereas, neuraminidase gene was clustered with H1N1 strains isolated from Europe and Asia during 1992-2007 outbreaks. This study concludes that the new H1N1 strain appeared in 2009 outbreak with high pathogenicity to human was originated as result of re-assortment (exchange of gene). Moreover, our data also suggest that the virus will remain sensitive to the pre-existing therapeutic strategies.

  7. Relevance of arginines in the mode of binding of H1 histones to DNA.

    PubMed

    Piscopo, Marina; Conte, Mariachiara; Di Paola, Flaviano; Conforti, Salvatore; Rana, Gina; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Fucci, Laura; Geraci, Giuseppe

    2010-07-01

    The mode of binding of sperm and somatic H1 histones to DNA has been investigated by analyzing the effect of their addition on the electrophoretic mobility of linear and circular plasmid molecules. Low concentrations of sperm histones do not appear to alter the electrophoretic mobility of DNA, whereas at increasing concentrations, an additional DNA band is observed near the migration origin. This band then becomes the only component at higher values. In contrast, somatic histones cause a gradual retardation in the mobility of the DNA band at low concentrations and aggregated structures are observed only at higher values. Experiments on the H1 globular domain obtained by limited proteolysis indicate that the mode of binding to DNA depends on the H1 globular domain. The arginine residues appear to be relevant for the different effects as indicated by experiments on sperm histone and on protamine with arginines deguanidinated to ornithines. The modified molecules influence DNA mobility like somatic H1s, indicating that the positive guanidino groups of arginines cannot be substituted by the positive amino groups of ornithines. Modifications of the amino groups of lysines show that these residues are necessary for the binding of H1 histones to DNA but they have no influence on the binding mode. PMID:20438368

  8. Interaction of chromatin with a histone H1 containing swapped N- and C-terminal domains

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Jordana B.; Cheema, Manjinder S.; Wang, Jason; Missiaen, Krystal; Finn, Ron; Gonzalez Romero, Rodrigo; Th’ng, John P. H.; Hendzel, Michael; Ausió, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Although the details of the structural involvement of histone H1 in the organization of the nucleosome are quite well understood, the sequential events involved in the recognition of its binding site are not as well known. We have used a recombinant human histone H1 (H1.1) in which the N- and C-terminal domains (NTD/CTD) have been swapped and we have reconstituted it on to a 208-bp nucleosome. We have shown that the swapped version of the protein is still able to bind to nucleosomes through its structurally folded wing helix domain (WHD); however, analytical ultracentrifuge analysis demonstrates its ability to properly fold the chromatin fibre is impaired. Furthermore, FRAP analysis shows that the highly dynamic binding association of histone H1 with the chromatin fibre is altered, with a severely decreased half time of residence. All of this suggests that proper binding of histone H1 to chromatin is determined by the simultaneous and synergistic binding of its WHD–CTD to the nucleosome. PMID:26182371

  9. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 during air travel

    PubMed Central

    Neatherlin, John; Cramer, Elaine H.; Dubray, Christine; Marienau, Karen J.; Russell, Michelle; Sun, Hong; Whaley, Melissa; Hancock, Kathy; Duong, Krista K.; Kirking, Hannah L.; Schembri, Christopher; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Cohen, Nicole J.; Fishbein, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The global spread of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus (pH1N1) associated with travelers from North America during the onset of the 2009 pandemic demonstrates the central role of international air travel in virus migration. To characterize risk factors for pH1N1 transmission during air travel, we investigated travelers and airline employees from four North American flights carrying ill travelers with confirmed pH1N1 infection. Of 392 passengers and crew identified, information was available for 290 (74%) passengers were interviewed. Overall attack rates for acute respiratory infection and influenza-like illness 1–7 days after travel were 5.2% and 2.4% respectively. Of 43 individuals that provided sera, 4 (9.3%) tested positive for pH1N1 antibodies, including 3 with serologic evidence of asymptomatic infection. Investigation of novel influenza aboard aircraft may be instructive. However, beyond the initial outbreak phase, it may compete with community-based mitigation activities, and interpretation of findings will be difficult in the context of established community transmission. PMID:23523241

  10. Illinois department of public health H1N1/A pandemic communications evaluation survey.

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, D.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2010-09-16

    Because of heightened media coverage, a 24-hour news cycle and the potential miscommunication of health messages across all levels of government during the onset of the H1N1 influenza outbreak in spring 2009, the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) decided to evaluate its H1N1 influenza A communications system. IDPH wanted to confirm its disease information and instructions were helping stakeholders prepare for and respond to a novel influenza outbreak. In addition, the time commitment involved in preparing, issuing, monitoring, updating, and responding to H1N1 federal guidelines/updates and media stories became a heavy burden for IDPH staff. The process and results of the H1N1 messaging survey represent a best practice that other health departments and emergency management agencies can replicate to improve coordination efforts with stakeholder groups during both emergency preparedness and response phases. Importantly, the H1N1 survey confirmed IDPH's messages were influencing stakeholders decisions to activate their pandemic plans and initiate response operations. While there was some dissatisfaction with IDPH's delivery of information and communication tools, such as the fax system, this report should demonstrate to IDPH that its core partners believe it has the ability and expertise to issue timely and accurate instructions that can help them respond to a large-scale disease outbreak in Illinois. The conclusion will focus on three main areas: (1) the survey development process, (2) survey results: best practices and areas for improvement and (3) recommendations: next steps.

  11. Histone H1 functions as a stimulatory factor in backup pathways of NHEJ

    PubMed Central

    Rosidi, Bustanur; Wang, Minli; Wu, Wenqi; Sharma, Aparna; Wang, Huichen; Iliakis, George

    2008-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced in the genome of higher eukaryotes by ionizing radiation (IR) are predominantly removed by two pathways of non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) termed D-NHEJ and B-NHEJ. While D-NHEJ depends on the activities of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and DNA ligase IV/XRCC4/XLF, B-NHEJ utilizes, at least partly, DNA ligase III/XRCC1 and PARP-1. Using in vitro end-joining assays and protein fractionation protocols similar to those previously applied for the characterization of DNA ligase III as an end-joining factor, we identify here histone H1 as an additional putative NHEJ factor. H1 strongly enhances DNA-end joining and shifts the product spectrum from circles to multimers. While H1 enhances the DNA-end-joining activities of both DNA Ligase IV and DNA Ligase III, the effect on ligase III is significantly stronger. Histone H1 also enhances the activity of PARP-1. Since histone H1 has been shown to counteract D-NHEJ, these observations and the known functions of the protein identify it as a putative alignment factor operating preferentially within B-NHEJ. PMID:18250087

  12. Effects of histamine H(1) receptor antagonists on depressive-like behavior in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Shoko; Miyata, Shigeo; Onodera, Kenji; Kamei, Junzo

    2006-02-01

    We previously reported that streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice showed depressive-like behavior in the tail suspension test. It is well known that the central histaminergic system regulates many physiological functions including emotional behaviors. In this study, we examined the role of the central histaminergic system in the diabetes-induced depressive-like behavior in the mouse tail suspension test. The histamine contents in the hypothalamus were significantly higher in diabetic mice than in non-diabetic mice. The histamine H(1) receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine (1-10 mg/kg, s.c.) dose-dependently and significantly reduced the duration of immobility in both non-diabetic and diabetic mice. In contrast, the selective histamine H(1) receptor antagonists epinastine (0.03-0.3 microg/mouse, i.c.v.) and cetirizine (0.01-0.1 microg/mouse, i.c.v.) dose-dependently and significantly suppressed the duration of immobility in diabetic mice, but not in non-diabetic mice. Spontaneous locomotor activity was not affected by histamine H(1) receptor antagonists in either non-diabetic or diabetic mice. In addition, the number and affinity of histamine H(1) receptors in the frontal cortex were not affected by diabetes. In conclusion, we suggest that the altered neuronal system mediated by the activation of histamine H(1) receptors is involved, at least in part, in the depressive-like behavior seen in diabetic mice.

  13. Emergence and characterisation of pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses in Hungarian swine herds.

    PubMed

    Bálint, Adám; Kiss, István; Bányai, Krisztián; Biksi, Imre; Szentpáli-Gavallér, Katalin; Magyar, Tibor; Jankovics, István; Rózsa, Mónika; Szalai, Bálint; Takács, Mária; Tóth, Adám György; Dán, Adám

    2013-03-01

    In 2010, two novel porcine H1N1 influenza viruses were isolated from pigs with influenza-like illness in Hungarian swine herds. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of these strains revealed that they shared molecular features with the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus strains, which emerged globally during 2009. The PB2, HA and NA genes contained unique amino acid changes compared to the available new H1N1 influenza virus sequences of pig origin. Furthermore, the investigated strains could be separated with respect to parallel amino acid substitutions affecting the polymerase genes (PB2, PB1 and PA) and the nucleoprotein (NP) gene, supporting the proposed complementarities between these proteins, all required for the viral fitness. Molecular characterisation of two Hungarian human pandemic H1N1 isolates was also performed, so that we could compare contemporaneous strains of different host species origins. Shared molecular motifs in various genes of animal and human influenza strains suggested that the Hungarian porcine strains could have originated from humans through direct interspecies transmission. This study is among the few that support the natural human-to-pig transmission of the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus.

  14. Framing of Influenza A (H1N1) pandemic in a Singaporean newspaper.

    PubMed

    Basnyat, Iccha; Lee, Seow Ting

    2015-12-01

    This study seeks to understand how public health messages provided by the government in Singapore during an Influenza A (H1N1) pandemic were framed by the news media for the public. News articles were analyzed to explore how the global pandemic was framed as a local event, providing a unique exploration of the dynamic involving public health communication, news media and the state. Thematic analysis (n = 309) included the government-issued press releases disseminating public health information about H1N1 that were directly linked to news stories (n = 56) and news stories about H1N1 generated by the newspaper (n = 253). Four themes were found: (i) imported disease, (ii) war/battle metaphors, (iii) social responsibility and (iv) lockdown policies. Frame analysis revealed that the news coverage during the H1N1 pandemic reflected how the newspaper framed and mediated the information flow, amplified a positive tone for the government response, emphasized individual responsibility and utilized gain frames to construct local messages about the global H1N1 pandemic that reified Singapore as a nation-state.

  15. Whole genome characterization of human influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses isolated from Kenya during the 2009 pandemic.

    PubMed

    Gachara, George; Symekher, Samuel; Otieno, Michael; Magana, Japheth; Opot, Benjamin; Bulimo, Wallace

    2016-06-01

    An influenza pandemic caused by a novel influenza virus A(H1N1)pdm09 spread worldwide in 2009 and is estimated to have caused between 151,700 and 575,400 deaths globally. While whole genome data on new virus enables a deeper insight in the pathogenesis, epidemiology, and drug sensitivities of the circulating viruses, there are relatively limited complete genetic sequences available for this virus from African countries. We describe herein the full genome analysis of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses isolated in Kenya between June 2009 and August 2010. A total of 40 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses isolated during the pandemic were selected. The segments from each isolate were amplified and directly sequenced. The resulting sequences of individual gene segments were concatenated and used for subsequent analysis. These were used to infer phylogenetic relationships and also to reconstruct the time of most recent ancestor, time of introduction into the country, rates of substitution and to estimate a time-resolved phylogeny. The Kenyan complete genome sequences clustered with globally distributed clade 2 and clade 7 sequences but local clade 2 viruses did not circulate beyond the introductory foci while clade 7 viruses disseminated country wide. The time of the most recent common ancestor was estimated between April and June 2009, and distinct clusters circulated during the pandemic. The complete genome had an estimated rate of nucleotide substitution of 4.9×10(-3) substitutions/site/year and greater diversity in surface expressed proteins was observed. We show that two clades of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus were introduced into Kenya from the UK and the pandemic was sustained as a result of importations. Several closely related but distinct clusters co-circulated locally during the peak pandemic phase but only one cluster dominated in the late phase of the pandemic suggesting that it possessed greater adaptability.

  16. Attitudes toward and Uptake of H1N1 Vaccine among Health Care Workers during the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Henriksen Hellyer, Joan M.; DeVries, Aaron S.; Jenkins, Sarah M.; Lackore, Kandace A.; James, Katherine M.; Ziegenfuss, Jeanette Y.; Poland, Gregory A.; Tilburt, Jon C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Though recommended by many and mandated by some, influenza vaccination rates among health care workers, even in pandemics, remain below optimal levels. The objective of this study was to assess vaccination uptake, attitudes, and distinguishing characteristics (including doctor-nurse differences) of health care workers who did and did not receive the pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine in late 2009. Methodology/Principal Findings In early 2010 we mailed a self-administered survey to 800 physicians and 800 nurses currently licensed and practicing in Minnesota. 1,073 individuals responded (cooperation rate: 69%). 85% and 62% of Minnesota physicians and nurses, respectively, reported being vaccinated. Accurately estimating the risk of vaccine side effects (OR 2.0; 95% CI 1.5–2.7), agreeing with a professional obligation to be vaccinated (OR 10.1; 95% CI 7.1–14.2), an ethical obligation to follow public health authorities' recommendations (OR 9.9; 95% CI 6.6–14.9), and laws mandating pandemic vaccination (OR 3.1; 95% CI 2.3–4.1) were all independently associated with receiving the H1N1 influenza vaccine. Conclusions/Significance While a majority of health care workers in one midwestern state reported receiving the pandemic H1N1 vaccine, physicians and nurses differed significantly in vaccination uptake. Several key attitudes and perceptions may influence health care workers' decisions regarding vaccination. These data inform how states might optimally enlist health care workers' support in achieving vaccination goals during a pandemic. PMID:22216290

  17. Influenza A viral loads in respiratory samples collected from patients infected with pandemic H1N1, seasonal H1N1 and H3N2 viruses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA), nasal swab (NS), and throat swab (TS) are common specimens used for diagnosis of respiratory virus infections based on the detection of viral genomes, viral antigens and viral isolation. However, there is no documented data regarding the type of specimen that yields the best result of viral detection. In this study, quantitative real time RT-PCR specific for M gene was used to determine influenza A viral loads present in NS, NPA and TS samples collected from patients infected with the 2009 pandemic H1N1, seasonal H1N1 and H3N2 viruses. Various copy numbers of RNA transcripts derived from recombinant plasmids containing complete M gene insert of each virus strain were assayed by RT-PCR. A standard curve for viral RNA quantification was constructed by plotting each Ct value against the log quantity of each standard RNA copy number. Results Copy numbers of M gene were obtained through the extrapolation of Ct values of the test samples against the corresponding standard curve. Among a total of 29 patients with severe influenza enrolled in this study (12 cases of the 2009 pandemic influenza, 5 cases of seasonal H1N1 and 12 cases of seasonal H3N2 virus), NPA was found to contain significantly highest amount of viral loads and followed in order by NS and TS specimen. Viral loads among patients infected with those viruses were comparable regarding type of specimen analyzed. Conclusion Based on M gene copy numbers, we conclude that NPA is the best specimen for detection of influenza A viruses, and followed in order by NS and TS. PMID:20403211

  18. Caring from Afar: Asian H1B Migrant Workers and Aging Parents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeon-Shim; Chaudhuri, Anoshua; Yoo, Grace J

    2015-09-01

    With the growth in engineering/technology industries, the United States has seen an increase in the arrival of highly skilled temporary migrant workers on H1B visas from various Asian countries. Limited research exists on how these groups maintain family ties from afar including caring for aging parents. This study explores the experiences and challenges that Asian H1B workers face when providing care from a distance. A total of 21 Chinese/Taiwanese, Korean, and Indian H1B workers participated in in-depth qualitative interviews. Key findings indicate that despite distance, caring relationships still continue through regular communications, financial remittances, and return visits, at the same time creating emotional, psychological, and financial challenges for the workers. Findings highlight the need for further research in understanding how the decline of aging parent's health impacts the migrants' adjustment and health in the United States. PMID:26267591

  19. Metabolism of human gliomas: Assessment with H-1 MR spectroscopy and F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET

    SciTech Connect

    Alger, J.R.; Frank, J.A.; Bizzi, A.; Fulham, M.J.; DeSouza, B.X.; Duhaney, M.O.; Inscoe, S.W.; Black, J.L.; van Zijl, P.C.; Moonen, C.T. , Bethesda, MD )

    1990-12-01

    Localized hydrogen-1 magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy and fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) were employed to obtain metabolic information from intracranial gliomas. Advantages and difficulties associated with comparison of results from the two modalities were realized. Forty patients were studied with H-1 MR spectroscopy. MR signal intensities from lactate, N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline, and creatine from a volume of interest containing the tumor and a contralateral volume were obtained and evaluated. NAA signal intensities were generally decreased in the tumor spectra, and choline signal intensities were elevated. H-1 MR spectroscopy was unsuccessful in eight patients, and FDG PET scans were not obtained in four of the patients with successful MR spectroscopic examinations. Lactate signal intensity was detected in 10 of the 28 patients who had successful H-1 MR spectroscopic and FDG PET studies. Lactate signal intensities were observed in lesions shown at FDG PET to be hypermetabolic, as well as in lesions found to be hypometabolic.

  20. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in pigs, Togo, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Ducatez, Mariette F.; Awoume, Félix; Webby, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    We collected 325 nasal swabs from freshly slaughtered previously healthy pigs from October 2012 through January 2014 in a slaughterhouse near Lomé in Togo. Influenza A virus genome was detected by RT-PCR in 2.5% to 12.3% of the pooled samples, and results of hemagglutinin subtyping RT-PCR assays showed the virus in all the positive pools to be A(H1N1)pdm09. Virus was isolated on MDCK cells from a representative specimen, A/swine/Togo/ONA32/2013(H1N1). The isolate was fully sequenced and harbored 8 genes similar to A(H1N1)pdm09 virus genes circulating in humans in 2012–2013, suggesting human-to-swine transmission of the pathogen. PMID:25778544

  1. Congenital Cataracts and Gut Dysmotility in a DYNC1H1 Dyneinopathy Patient

    PubMed Central

    Gelineau-Morel, Rose; Lukacs, Marshall; Weaver, K. Nicole; Hufnagel, Robert B.; Gilbert, Donald L.; Stottmann, Rolf W.

    2016-01-01

    Whole exome sequencing continues to end the diagnostic odyssey for a number of patients and expands our knowledge of phenotypes associated with gene mutations. We describe an 11-year-old female patient with a constellation of symptoms including congenital cataracts, gut dysmotility, sensory neuropathy, and bifrontal polymicrogyria. Whole exome sequencing was performed and identified a de novo heterozygous missense mutation in the ATPase motor domain of cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain 1 (DYNC1H1), which is known to be involved in neuronal migration and retrograde axonal transport. The mutation was found to be highly damaging by multiple prediction programs. The residue is highly conserved, and reported mutations in this gene result in a variety of phenotypes similar to that of our patient. We report only the second case of congenital cataracts and the first of gut dysmotility in a patient with DYNC1H1, thus expanding the spectrum of disease seen in DYNC1H1 dyneinopathies. PMID:27754416

  2. Electrostatic effect of H1-histone protein binding on nucleosome repeat length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Teif, Vladimir B.

    2014-08-01

    Within a simple biophysical model we describe the effect of electrostatic binding of H1 histone proteins on the nucleosome repeat length in chromatin. The length of wrapped DNA optimizes its binding energy to the histone core and the elastic energy penalty of DNA wrapping. The magnitude of the effect predicted from our model is in agreement with the systematic experimental data on the linear variation of nucleosome repeat lengths with H1/nucleosome ratio (Woodcock C L et al 2006 Chromos. Res. 14 17-25). We compare our model to the data for different cell types and organisms, with a widely varying ratio of bound H1 histones per nucleosome. We underline the importance of this non-specific histone-DNA charge-balance mechanism in regulating the positioning of nucleosomes and the degree of compaction of chromatin fibers in eukaryotic cells.

  3. Two seasons' experience with pandemic A H1N1 influenza infection in neonates.

    PubMed

    Martic, Jelena; Savic, Natasa; Jankovic, Borisav; Nedeljkovic, Jasminka; Rakonjac, Zorika; Pejic, Katarina; Markovic-Sovtic, Gordana

    2012-01-01

    There are only a few reports on influenza A H1N1 infection in neonates. In this paper, we present our additional experience on the clinical characteristics, epidemiology and treatment of influenza A H1N1 (2009) infection in 10 newborn infants (aged 9-24 days). Influenza A H1N1 infection was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction of the nasopharyngeal swab specimens. The majority of neonates presented with fever, respiratory symptoms and lethargy. The respiratory illness ranged from mild symptoms to severe pneumonia requiring mechanical ventilation. Antiviral treatment with oseltamivir was started in five patients (50%). One lethal outcome was observed, while nine patients (90%) had complete recovery. To our knowledge, this is the largest presented series of neonatal cases with different clinical symptoms. We discuss the necessity of initiation of oseltamivir in infants with different clinical features.

  4. Predicting young adults' intentions to get the H1N1 vaccine: an integrated model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Z Janet

    2015-01-01

    Young adults 19 through 24 years of age were among the populations that had the highest frequency of infection from the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. However, over the 2009-2010 flu season, H1N1 vaccine uptake among college students nationwide was around 8%. To explore the social cognitive factors that influenced their intentions to get the H1N1 vaccine, this study compares the predictive power of the theory of planned behavior (TPB), the health belief model (HBM), and an integrated model. The final model shows that several HBM variables influenced behavioral intentions through the TPB variables. The results suggest that even though the TPB seemed a superior model for behavior prediction, the addition of the HBM variables could inform future theory development by offering health-specific constructs that potentially enhance the predictive validity of TPB variables. PMID:24870976

  5. Serological survey of 2009 H1N1 influenza in residents of Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Deng, Y; Pang, X H; Yang, P; Shi, W X; Tian, L L; Liu, B W; Li, S; Cui, S J; Li, Y; Lu, G L; Zhang, L; Zhang, X; Liu, B; Seale, H; Huang, F; Wang, Q Y

    2011-01-01

    In order to determine the prevalence of antibody against 2009 H1N1 influenza in Beijing, we conducted a serological survey in 710 subjects, 1 month after the epidemic peak. We found that 13·8% of our cohort was seropositive. Subjects aged ≥60 years recorded the lowest seroprevalence (4·5%). The age-weighted seroprevalence of 14·0% was far lower than the supposed infection rate at the epidemic peak, derived from the basic reproduction number for 2009 H1N1 virus. For subjects who had received the pandemic vaccine seroprevalence was 51·4%. In subjects aged ≥60 years the seasonal influenza vaccination was not significantly associated with being seropositive. Our study suggests that many factors, and not just the immunological level against 2009 H1N1 influenza in the community, affected the spread of the virus within the population of Beijing. PMID:20854713

  6. Caring from Afar: Asian H1B Migrant Workers and Aging Parents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeon-Shim; Chaudhuri, Anoshua; Yoo, Grace J

    2015-09-01

    With the growth in engineering/technology industries, the United States has seen an increase in the arrival of highly skilled temporary migrant workers on H1B visas from various Asian countries. Limited research exists on how these groups maintain family ties from afar including caring for aging parents. This study explores the experiences and challenges that Asian H1B workers face when providing care from a distance. A total of 21 Chinese/Taiwanese, Korean, and Indian H1B workers participated in in-depth qualitative interviews. Key findings indicate that despite distance, caring relationships still continue through regular communications, financial remittances, and return visits, at the same time creating emotional, psychological, and financial challenges for the workers. Findings highlight the need for further research in understanding how the decline of aging parent's health impacts the migrants' adjustment and health in the United States.

  7. Susceptibility of turkeys to pandemic-H1N1 virus by reproductive tract insemination.

    PubMed

    Pantin-Jackwood, Mary; Wasilenko, Jamie L; Spackman, Erica; Suarez, David L; Swayne, David E

    2010-02-03

    The current pandemic influenza A H1N1 2009 (pH1N1) was first recognized in humans with acute respiratory diseases in April 2009 in Mexico, in swine in Canada in June, 2009 with respiratory disease, and in turkeys in Chile in June 2009 with a severe drop in egg production. Several experimental studies attempted to reproduce the disease in turkeys, but failed to produce respiratory infection in turkeys using standard inoculation routes. We demonstrated that pH1N1 virus can infect the reproductive tract of turkey hens after experimental intrauterine inoculation, causing decreased egg production. This route of exposure is realistic in modern turkey production because turkey hens are handled once a week for intrauterine insemination in order to produce fertile eggs. This understanding of virus exposure provides an improved understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease and can improve poultry husbandry to prevent disease outbreaks.

  8. The novel influenza A (H1N1) virus pandemic: An update

    PubMed Central

    Petrosillo, N.; Di Bella, S.; Drapeau, C. M.; Grilli, E.

    2009-01-01

    In the 4 months since it was first recognized, the pandemic strain of a novel influenza A (H1N1) virus has spread to all continents and, after documentation of human-to-human transmission of the virus in at least three countries in two separate World Health Organization (WHO) regions, the pandemic alert was raised to level 6. The agent responsible for this pandemic, a swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV), is characterized by a unique combination of gene segments that has not previously been identified among human or swine influenza A viruses. As of 31th July 2009, 168 countries and overseas territories/communities have each reported at least one laboratory-confirmed case of pandemic H1N1 infection. There have been a total of 162,380 reported cases and 1154 associated deaths. Influenza epidemics usually take off in autumn, and it is important to prepare for an earlier start this season. Estimates from Europe indicate that 230 millions Europe inhabitants will have clinical signs and symptoms of S-OIV this autumn, and 7–35% of the clinical cases will have a fatal outcome, which means that there will be 160,000–750,000 H1N1-related deaths. A vaccine against H1N1 is expected to be the most effective tool for controlling influenza A (H1N1) infection in terms of reducing morbidity and mortality and limiting diffusion. However, there are several issues with regard to vaccine manufacture and approval, as well as production capacity, that remain unsettled. We searched the literature indexed in PubMed as well as the websites of major international health agencies to obtain the material presented in this update on the current S-OIV pandemic. PMID:19881161

  9. Histone H1 proteins act as receptors for the 987P fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guoqiang; Chen, Huaiqing; Choi, Byung-Kwon; Del Piero, Fabio; Schifferli, Dieter M

    2005-06-17

    The tip adhesin FasG of the 987P fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli mediates two distinct adhesive interactions with brush border molecules of the intestinal epithelial cells of neonatal piglets. First, FasG attaches strongly to sulfatide with hydroxylated fatty acyl chains. This interaction involves lysine 117 and other lysine residues of FasG. Second, FasG recognizes specific intestinal brush border proteins that migrate on a sodium-dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel like a distinct set of 32-35-kDa proteins, as shown by ligand blotting assays. The protein sequence of high performance liquid chromatography-purified tryptic fragments of the major protein band matched sequences of human and murine histone H1 proteins. Porcine histone H1 proteins isolated from piglet intestinal epithelial cells demonstrated the same SDS-PAGE migration pattern and 987P binding properties as the 987P-specific protein receptors from porcine intestinal brush borders. Binding was dose-dependent and shown to be specific in adhesion inhibition and gel migration shift assays. Moreover, mapping of the histone H1 binding domain suggested that it is located in their lysine-rich C-terminal domains. Histone H1 molecules were visualized on the microvilli of intestinal epithelial cells by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Taken together these results indicated that the intestinal protein receptors for 987P are histone H1 proteins. It is suggested that histones are released into the intestinal lumen by the high turnover of the intestinal epithelium. Their strong cationic properties can explain their association with the negatively charged brush border surfaces. There, the histone H1 molecules stabilize the sulfatide-fimbriae interaction by simultaneously binding to the membrane and to 987P.

  10. [Effect of Yunnan herb Laggera pterodonta against influenza A (H1N1) virus in vitro].

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiao-ling; Sun, Qiang-ming; Wang, Xiao-dan; Zhao, Yu-jiao; Yang, Zi-feng; Huang, Qing-hui; Jiang, Zhi-hong; Wang, Xin-hua; Zhang, Rong-ping

    2015-09-01

    Laggera pterodonta is commonly used for treating influenza in Southwest China, especially in Yunnnan province. The main clinical effects of L. pterodonta include anti-influenza, anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory. To investigate the anti-influenza A (H1N1) virus effect of L. pterodonta, neutralization inhibition and proliferation inhibition tests were performed. MDCK culture method was used to observe the cytopathic effect (CPE) of extracts from L. pterodonta in inhibiting influenza A (H1N1) virus and haemagglutination titre of H1N1 virus in vitro. The culture medium were collected at 24 h, 48 h, 72 h, 96 h, and detected by Real time RT-PCR, in order to compare the effect of different extracts from L. pterodonta on in vitro proliferation of H1N1, virus. The result of neutralization inhibition test showed that hemagglutination titer of ethyl acetate extract were 8 times lower at 72 h; in proliferation inhibition test, hemagglutination titer of ethyl acetate extracts reduced by 2 and 4 times. According to the results of Real time RT-PCR test, the H1N1 inhibition ratio of ethyl acetate extract was 72.5%, while the proliferation inhibition ratio of ethyl acetate extract was 25.3%; as for petroleum ether extracts, the H1N1 inhibition ratio was 60.2%, while the proliferation inhibition ratio was 81.4%. In conclusion, both ethyl acetate extract and petroleum ether extract of L. pterodonta have significant neutralization and direct proliferation inhibition effects on influenza A virus. PMID:26983222

  11. Neuronal Antibodies in Children with or without Narcolepsy following H1N1-AS03 Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Thebault, Simon; Waters, Patrick; Snape, Matthew D.; Cottrell, Dominic; Darin, Niklas; Hallböök, Tove; Huutoniemi, Anne; Partinen, Markku; Pollard, Andrew J.; Vincent, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy is caused by deficiency of hypothalamic orexin/hypocretin. An autoimmune basis is suspected, but no specific antibodies, either causative or as biomarkers, have been identified. However, the AS03 adjuvanted split virion H1N1 (H1N1-AS03) vaccine, created to protect against the 2009 Pandemic, has been implicated as a trigger of narcolepsy particularly in children. Sera and CSFs from 13 H1N1-AS03-vaccinated patients (12 children, 1 young adult) with type 1 narcolepsy were tested for autoantibodies to known neuronal antigens including the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and contactin-associated protein 2 (CASPR2), both associated with encephalopathies that include disordered sleep, to rodent brain tissue including the lateral hypothalamus, and to live hippocampal neurons in culture. When sufficient sample was available, CSF levels of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) were measured. Sera from 44 H1N1-ASO3-vaccinated children without narcolepsy were also examined. None of these patients’ CSFs or sera was positive for NMDAR or CASPR2 antibodies or binding to neurons; 4/13 sera bound to orexin-neurons in rat brain tissue, but also to other neurons. MCH levels were a marginally raised (n = 8; p = 0.054) in orexin-deficient narcolepsy patients compared with orexin-normal children (n = 6). In the 44 H1N1-AS03-vaccinated healthy children, there was no rise in total IgG levels or in CASPR2 or NMDAR antibodies three weeks following vaccination. In conclusion, there were no narcolepsy-specific autoantibodies identified in type 1 narcolepsy sera or CSFs, and no evidence for a general increase in immune reactivity following H1N1-AS03 vaccination in the healthy children. Antibodies to other neuronal specific membrane targets, with their potential for directing use of immunotherapies, are still an important goal for future research. PMID:26090827

  12. Histamine excites neonatal rat sympathetic preganglionic neurons in vitro via activation of H1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Whyment, Andrew D; Blanks, Andrew M; Lee, Kevin; Renaud, Leo P; Spanswick, David

    2006-04-01

    The role of histamine in regulating excitability of sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPNs) and the expression of histamine receptor mRNA in SPNs was investigated using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiological recording techniques combined with single-cell reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in transverse neonatal rat spinal cord slices. Bath application of histamine (100 microM) or the H1 receptor agonist histamine trifluoromethyl toluidide dimaleate (HTMT; 10 microM) induced membrane depolarization associated with a decrease in membrane conductance in the majority (70%) of SPNs tested, via activation of postsynaptic H1 receptors negatively coupled to one or more unidentified K+ conductances. Histamine and HTMT application also induced or increased the amplitude and/or frequency of membrane potential oscillations in electrotonically coupled SPNs. The H2 receptor agonist dimaprit (10 microM) or the H3 receptor agonist imetit (100 nM) were without significant effect on the membrane properties of SPNs. Histamine responses were sensitive to the H1 receptor antagonist triprolidine (10 microM) and the nonselective potassium channel blocker barium (1 mM) but were unaffected by the H2 receptor antagonist tiotidine (10 microM) and the H3 receptor antagonist, clobenpropit (5 microM). Single cell RT-PCR revealed mRNA expression for H1 receptors in 75% of SPNs tested, with no expression of mRNA for H2, H3, or H4 receptors. These data represent the first demonstration of H1 receptor expression in SPNs and suggest that histamine acts to regulate excitability of these neurons via a direct postsynaptic effect on H1 receptors.

  13. Purification and characterization of Cyclin-H1 from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yawen; Yang, Yiyi; Xu, Yingwu

    2015-10-01

    Cyclin H (CycH), a member of the large cyclin family, participates in every process of cell division. Its biological functions and importance have received wide attention in mammalians, but not in higher plants. This work reports a protein purification protocol for obtaining Arabidopsis CycH;1 (AtCycH;1) from prokaryotic expression system, followed by characterization of its biophysical properties. The protein was constructed with a His-tag at its N-terminus. One-step nickel-affinity purification yielded high pure target protein, which behaved as a monomer in the testing condition. Circular Dichroism spectrum revealed that AtCycH;1 is a helical protein containing a significant amount of disordered structures. Further assays indicated that AtCycH;1 exhibits poor heat-resistance and can be easily degraded in room temperature, suggesting low stability for the protein. The flexible and unstable properties may be intrinsic to the protein in vivo as it has to bind with different partners during the cell cycle and be promptly degraded to meet the phase transition. The instability, however, can be improved by adding SO4(2-) ion in the protein buffer. The presence of a high concentration of SO4(2-) is capable of increasing the thermal stability and inhibiting the degradation. Irrespective of whether the association of SO4(2-) with AtCycH;1 drives the protein into more compact form or not, the current results may provide clues for a successful crystallization of AtCycH;1 and its subsequent structural analysis in the future. PMID:26073096

  14. Computational Analysis of Structure-Based Interactions for Novel H1-Antihistamines

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yinfeng; Li, Yan; Pan, Yanqiu; Wang, Jinghui; Lin, Feng; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Shuwei; Yang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    As a chronic disorder, insomnia affects approximately 10% of the population at some time during their lives, and its treatment is often challenging. Since the antagonists of the H1 receptor, a protein prevalent in human central nervous system, have been proven as effective therapeutic agents for treating insomnia, the H1 receptor is quite possibly a promising target for developing potent anti-insomnia drugs. For the purpose of understanding the structural actors affecting the antagonism potency, presently a theoretical research of molecular interactions between 129 molecules and the H1 receptor is performed through three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) techniques. The ligand-based comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) model (Q2 = 0.525, R2ncv = 0.891, R2pred = 0.807) has good quality for predicting the bioactivities of new chemicals. The cross-validated result suggests that the developed models have excellent internal and external predictability and consistency. The obtained contour maps were appraised for affinity trends for the investigated compounds, which provides significantly useful information in the rational drug design of novel anti-insomnia agents. Molecular docking was also performed to investigate the mode of interaction between the ligand and the active site of the receptor. Furthermore, as a supplementary tool to study the docking conformation of the antagonists in the H1 receptor binding pocket, molecular dynamics simulation was also applied, providing insights into the changes in the structure. All of the models and the derived information would, we hope, be of help for developing novel potent histamine H1 receptor antagonists, as well as exploring the H1-antihistamines interaction mechanism. PMID:26797608

  15. Genesis and pathogenesis of the 1918 pandemic H1N1 influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Worobey, Michael; Han, Guan-Zhu; Rambaut, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    The source, timing, and geographical origin of the 1918-1920 pandemic influenza A virus have remained tenaciously obscure for nearly a century, as have the reasons for its unusual severity among young adults. Here, we reconstruct the origins of the pandemic virus and the classic swine influenza and (postpandemic) seasonal H1N1 lineages using a host-specific molecular clock approach that is demonstrably more accurate than previous methods. Our results suggest that the 1918 pandemic virus originated shortly before 1918 when a human H1 virus, which we infer emerged before ∼1907, acquired avian N1 neuraminidase and internal protein genes. We find that the resulting pandemic virus jumped directly to swine but was likely displaced in humans by ∼1922 by a reassortant with an antigenically distinct H1 HA. Hence, although the swine lineage was a direct descendent of the pandemic virus, the post-1918 seasonal H1N1 lineage evidently was not, at least for HA. These findings help resolve several seemingly disparate observations from 20th century influenza epidemiology, seroarcheology, and immunology. The phylogenetic results, combined with these other lines of evidence, suggest that the high mortality in 1918 among adults aged ∼20 to ∼40 y may have been due primarily to their childhood exposure to a doubly heterosubtypic putative H3N8 virus, which we estimate circulated from ∼1889-1900. All other age groups (except immunologically naive infants) were likely partially protected by childhood exposure to N1 and/or H1-related antigens. Similar processes may underlie age-specific mortality differences between seasonal H1N1 vs. H3N2 and human H5N1 vs. H7N9 infections.

  16. Interactions with the bifunctional interface of the transcriptional coactivator DCoH1 are kinetically regulated.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongli; Coco, Matthew W; Rose, Robert B

    2015-02-13

    Pterin-4a-carbinolamine dehydratase (PCD) is a highly conserved enzyme that evolved a second, unrelated function in mammals, as a transcriptional coactivator. As a coactivator, PCD is known as DCoH or dimerization cofactor of the transcription factor HNF-1. These two activities are associated with a change in oligomeric state: from two dimers interacting as an enzyme in the cytoplasm to a dimer interacting with a dimer of HNF-1 in the nucleus. The same interface of DCoH forms both complexes. To determine how DCoH partitions between its two functions, we studied the folding and stability of the DCoH homotetramer. We show that the DCoH1 homotetramer is kinetically trapped, meaning once it forms it will not dissociate to interact with HNF-1. In contrast, DCoH2, a paralog of DCoH1, unfolds within hours. A simple mutation in the interface of DCoH2 from Ser-51 to Thr, as found in DCoH1, increases the kinetic stability by 9 orders of magnitude, to τ(½) ∼ 2 million years. This suggests that the DCoH1·HNF-1 complex must co-fold to interact. We conclude that simple mutations can dramatically affect the dissociation kinetics of a complex. Residue 51 represents a "kinetic hot spot" instead of a "thermodynamic hot spot." Kinetic regulation allows PCD to adopt two distinct functions. Mutations in DCoH1 associated with diabetes affect both functions of DCoH1, perhaps by disrupting the balance between the two DCoH complexes.

  17. [Effect of Yunnan herb Laggera pterodonta against influenza A (H1N1) virus in vitro].

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiao-ling; Sun, Qiang-ming; Wang, Xiao-dan; Zhao, Yu-jiao; Yang, Zi-feng; Huang, Qing-hui; Jiang, Zhi-hong; Wang, Xin-hua; Zhang, Rong-ping

    2015-09-01

    Laggera pterodonta is commonly used for treating influenza in Southwest China, especially in Yunnnan province. The main clinical effects of L. pterodonta include anti-influenza, anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory. To investigate the anti-influenza A (H1N1) virus effect of L. pterodonta, neutralization inhibition and proliferation inhibition tests were performed. MDCK culture method was used to observe the cytopathic effect (CPE) of extracts from L. pterodonta in inhibiting influenza A (H1N1) virus and haemagglutination titre of H1N1 virus in vitro. The culture medium were collected at 24 h, 48 h, 72 h, 96 h, and detected by Real time RT-PCR, in order to compare the effect of different extracts from L. pterodonta on in vitro proliferation of H1N1, virus. The result of neutralization inhibition test showed that hemagglutination titer of ethyl acetate extract were 8 times lower at 72 h; in proliferation inhibition test, hemagglutination titer of ethyl acetate extracts reduced by 2 and 4 times. According to the results of Real time RT-PCR test, the H1N1 inhibition ratio of ethyl acetate extract was 72.5%, while the proliferation inhibition ratio of ethyl acetate extract was 25.3%; as for petroleum ether extracts, the H1N1 inhibition ratio was 60.2%, while the proliferation inhibition ratio was 81.4%. In conclusion, both ethyl acetate extract and petroleum ether extract of L. pterodonta have significant neutralization and direct proliferation inhibition effects on influenza A virus.

  18. Interactions with the Bifunctional Interface of the Transcriptional Coactivator DCoH1 Are Kinetically Regulated*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongli; Coco, Matthew W.; Rose, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Pterin-4a-carbinolamine dehydratase (PCD) is a highly conserved enzyme that evolved a second, unrelated function in mammals, as a transcriptional coactivator. As a coactivator, PCD is known as DCoH or dimerization cofactor of the transcription factor HNF-1. These two activities are associated with a change in oligomeric state: from two dimers interacting as an enzyme in the cytoplasm to a dimer interacting with a dimer of HNF-1 in the nucleus. The same interface of DCoH forms both complexes. To determine how DCoH partitions between its two functions, we studied the folding and stability of the DCoH homotetramer. We show that the DCoH1 homotetramer is kinetically trapped, meaning once it forms it will not dissociate to interact with HNF-1. In contrast, DCoH2, a paralog of DCoH1, unfolds within hours. A simple mutation in the interface of DCoH2 from Ser-51 to Thr, as found in DCoH1, increases the kinetic stability by 9 orders of magnitude, to τ½ ∼2 million years. This suggests that the DCoH1·HNF-1 complex must co-fold to interact. We conclude that simple mutations can dramatically affect the dissociation kinetics of a complex. Residue 51 represents a “kinetic hot spot” instead of a “thermodynamic hot spot.” Kinetic regulation allows PCD to adopt two distinct functions. Mutations in DCoH1 associated with diabetes affect both functions of DCoH1, perhaps by disrupting the balance between the two DCoH complexes. PMID:25538247

  19. Lessons Learned From CM-2 Modal Testing and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNelis, Mark E.; Goodnight, Thomas W.; Carney, Kelly S.; Otten, Kim D.

    2002-01-01

    The Combustion Module-2 (CM-2) is a space experiment that launches on Shuttle mission STS-107 in the SPACEHAB Double Research Module. The CM-2 flight hardware is installed into SPACEHAB single and double racks. The CM-2 flight hardware was vibration tested in the launch configuration to characterize the structure's modal response. Cross-orthogonality between test and analysis mode shapes were used to assess model correlation. Lessons learned for pre-test planning and model verification are discussed.

  20. Energy Levels of the Nitrate Radical Below 2000 CM-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, J. F.; Simmons, C. S.

    2012-06-01

    Highly sophisticated quantum chemistry techniques have been employed to build a three-state diabatic Hamiltonian for the nitrate radical (NO_3). Eigenvalues of this Hamiltonian (which includes effects beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation) are consistent with the known ``vibrational'' levels of NO_3 up to ca. 2100 cm-1 above the zero-point level; with a small empirical adjustment of the diabatic coupling strength, calculated levels are within 20 cm-1 of the measured level positions for those that have been observed experimentally. Of the eleven states with e' symmetry calculated below 2000 cm-1, nine of these have been observed either in the gas phase by Hirota and collaborators as well as Neumark and Johnston, or in frozen argon by Jacox. However, the Hamiltonian produces two levels that have not been seen experimentally: one calculated to lie at 1075 cm-1 (which is the third e' state, above ν_4 and 2ν_4) and another at 1640 cm-1 which is best assigned as one of the two e' sublevels of 4ν_4. A significant result is that the state predicted at 1075 cm-1 is not far enough above the predicted 2ν_4 level (777 cm-1 v. ca. 760 cm-1 from experiment) to be plausibly assigned as 3ν_4 (which is at 1155 cm-1: experimental position: 1173 cm-1), nor is its nodal structure consistent with such an idea. Rather, it is quite unambiguously the ν_3 level. Given the fidelity of the results generated by this model Hamiltonian as compared to experiment, it can safely be concluded that the prominent infrared band seen at 1492 cm-1 (corresponding to a calculated level at 1500 cm-1) is not ν_3, but rather a multiquantum state best viewed as a sublevel of the ν_3 + ν_4 combination.

  1. Vision Loss Caused by Retinal and Lateral Geniculate Nucleus Infarction in H1N1 Influenza.

    PubMed

    Breker, Dane A; Stacey, Andrew W; Srinivasan, Ashok; Bursztyn, Lulu L C D; Trobe, Jonathan D; Johnson, Mark W

    2015-09-01

    A 13-year-old girl developed encephalopathy and severe bilateral vision loss to the level of light perception within 24 hours of having fever and myalgias heralding H1N1 influenza A. Ophthalmoscopy demonstrated findings of confluent ischemic retinopathy. Brain MRI disclosed lateral geniculate body signal abnormalities indicative of hemorrhagic infarction. Despite aggressive treatment with intravenous corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, and plasmapheresis, vision did not substantially improve. This case demonstrates that H1N1 can cause simultaneous retinal and lateral geniculate body infarctions, a combination of findings not previously described in any condition. We postulate an immunologic response to the virus marked by occlusive damage to arteriolar endothelium. PMID:25887303

  2. Influenza A/H1N1 Severe Pneumonia: Novel Morphocytological Findings in Bronchoalveolar Lavage

    PubMed Central

    Faverio, Paola; Messinesi, Grazia; Brenna, Ambrogio; Pesci, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) performed in three patients with severe influenza A/H1N1 pneumonia complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Light microscopy analysis of BAL cytocentrifugates showed the presence of characteristic large, mononuclear, plasmoblastic/plasmocytoid-like cells never described before. Via transmission electron microscopy, these cells were classified as atypical type II pneumocytes and some of them showed cytoplasmic vesicles and inclusions. We concluded that plasmoblastic/plasmocytoid-like type II pneumocytes might represent a morphologic marker of A/H1N1 influenza virus infection as well as reparative cellular activation after diffuse alveolar damage. PMID:25383078

  3. Effects of electron irradiation and temperature on 1 ohm-cm and 10 ohm-cm silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicoletta, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    One OHM-cm and 10 OHM-cm silicon solar cells were exposed to 1.0 MeV electrons at a fixed flux of 10 to the 11th power e/sq cm/sec and fluences of 10 to the 13th power, 10 to the 14th power and 10 to the 15th power e/sq.cm. 1-V curves of the cells were made at room temperature, - 63 C and + or - 143 C after each irradiation. A value of 139.5 mw/sq cm was used as AMO incident energy rate per unit area. The 10 OHM-cm cells appear more efficient than 1 OHM-cm cells after exposure to a fluence greater than 10 to the 14th power e/sq cm. The 1.0 MeV electron damage coefficients for both 1 OHM-cm and 10 OHM-cm cells are somewhat less than those for previously irradiated cells at room temperature. The values of the damage coefficients increase as the cell temperatures decrease. Efficiencies pertaining to maximum power output are about the same as those of n on p silicon cells evaluated previously.

  4. Remaining Sites Verification Package for 132-H-1, 116-H Reactor Stack Burial Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-053

    SciTech Connect

    L. M. Dittmer

    2007-06-26

    The 132-H-1 waste site includes the 116-H exhaust stack burial trench and the buried stack foundation (which contains an embedded vertical 15-cm (6-in) condensate drain line). The 116-H reactor exhaust stack and foundation were decommissioned and demolished using explosives in 1983, with the rubble buried in situ beneath clean fill at least 1 m (3.3 ft) thick. Residual concentrations support future land uses that can be represented by a rural-residential scenario and pose no threat to groundwater or the Columbia River based on RESRAD modeling.

  5. 26 CFR 1.642(h)-1 - Unused loss carryovers on termination of an estate or trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... estate or trust. 1.642(h)-1 Section 1.642(h)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Beneficiaries § 1.642(h)-1 Unused loss carryovers on termination of an estate or trust. (a) If, on the final... 642(h)(1) to the beneficiaries succeeding to the property of the estate or trust. See § 1.641(b)-3...

  6. The 2009 pandemic H1N1 and triple-reassortant swine H1N1 influenza viruses replicate efficiently but elicit an attenuated inflammatory response in polarized human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hui; Pappas, Claudia; Katz, Jacqueline M; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2011-01-01

    The pandemic H1N1 virus of 2009 (2009 H1N1) produced a spectrum of disease ranging from mild illness to severe illness and death. Respiratory symptoms were frequently associated with virus infection, with relatively high rate of gastrointestinal symptoms reported. To better understand 2009 H1N1 virus pathogenesis in humans, we studied virus and host responses following infection of two cell types: polarized bronchial and pharyngeal epithelial cells, which exhibit many features of the human airway epithelium, and colon epithelial cells to serve as a human intestinal cell model. Selected 2009 H1N1 viruses were compared to both seasonal H1N1 and triple-reassortant swine H1N1 influenza viruses that have circulated among North American pigs since before the 2009 pandemic. All H1N1 viruses replicated productively in airway cells; however, in contrast to seasonal H1N1 virus infection, infection with the 2009 H1N1 and triple-reassortant swine H1N1 viruses resulted in an attenuated inflammatory response, a weaker interferon response, and reduced cell death. Additionally, the H1N1 viruses of swine origin replicated less efficiently at the temperature of the human proximal airways (33°C). We also observed that the 2009 H1N1 viruses replicated to significantly higher titers than seasonal H1N1 virus in polarized colon epithelial cells. These studies reveal that in comparison to seasonal influenza virus, H1N1 viruses of swine origin poorly activate multiple aspects of the human innate response, which may contribute to the virulence of these viruses. In addition, their less efficient replication at human upper airway temperatures has implications for the understanding of pandemic H1N1 virus adaptation to humans.

  7. 26 CFR 1.501(h)-1 - Application of the expenditure test to expenditures to influence legislation; introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Application of the expenditure test to expenditures to influence legislation; introduction. 1.501(h)-1 Section 1.501(h)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Exempt Organizations § 1.501(h)-1...

  8. Comparative virulence of wild-type H1N1pdm09 influenza A isolates in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2009, a novel swine-origin H1N1 (H1N1pdm09) influenza A virus (IAV) reached pandemic status and was soon after detected in pigs worldwide. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether differences in the HA protein can affect pathogenicity and antigenicity of H1N1pdm09 in swine. We compared...

  9. 26 CFR 1.168(h)-1 - Like-kind exchanges involving tax-exempt use property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... property. 1.168(h)-1 Section 1.168(h)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... and Corporations § 1.168(h)-1 Like-kind exchanges involving tax-exempt use property. (a) Scope. (1... property (as defined in section 168(h)) at the time of the transfer; and (ii) Property that does not...

  10. 26 CFR 1.501(h)-1 - Application of the expenditure test to expenditures to influence legislation; introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... expenditures to influence legislation; introduction. 1.501(h)-1 Section 1.501(h)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL...) Exempt Organizations § 1.501(h)-1 Application of the expenditure test to expenditures to influence..., (except as otherwise provided in subsection (h)).” This requirement is called the substantial part...

  11. 26 CFR 1.168(h)-1 - Like-kind exchanges involving tax-exempt use property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... property. 1.168(h)-1 Section 1.168(h)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... and Corporations § 1.168(h)-1 Like-kind exchanges involving tax-exempt use property. (a) Scope. (1... property (as defined in section 168(h)) at the time of the transfer; and (ii) Property that does not...

  12. Determination of current reference viruses for serological study of swine influenza viruses after the introduction of pandemic 2009 H1N1 (pdmH1N1) in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Arunorat, Jirapat; Charoenvisal, Nataya; Woonwong, Yonlayong; Kedkovid, Roongtham; Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje

    2016-10-01

    Since the introduction of pandemic H1N1 2009 virus (pdmH1N1) in pigs, the status of Thai swine influenza virus (SIV) has changed. The pdmH1N1 and its reassortant viruses have become the predominant strain circulating in the Thai swine population based on the surveillance data from 2012 to 2014. For this reason, the reference viruses for serological assays using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test needed to be updated. Six anti-sera against reference viruses from 2006 to 2009 (enH1N1-06, enH1N1-09, enH1N2-09, pdmH1N1-09, enH3N2-07 and enH3N2-09) were used for the HI test with four contemporary viruses (enH1N1-10, pdmH1N1-10, rH1N2 and rH3N2) and the selected reference viruses were tested with sera collected from the field to determine the current SIV status. The results showed that anti-sera of swH1N1-06 had the highest titers against enH1N1-10. Anti-sera of pdmH1N1-09 had the highest titers against pdmH1N1-10 and rH1N2, whereas, anti-sera of enH3N2-09 had the highest titers against rH3N2. The results demonstrated that enH1N1-06, pdmH1N1-09 and enH3N2-09 should be selected as reference viruses for contemporary serological studies and HI tests. The seroprevalence results from 410 samples revealed enH1N1 (37.79%), pdmH1N1 (37.32%) and H3N2 (35.86%), respectively. The present study indicated that pdmH1N1 was widespread and commonly found in the Thai pig population increasing the risk of novel reassortant viruses and should be added as a reference virus for HI test. SIV surveillance program and serological studies should be conducted for the benefits of SIV control and prevention as well as monitoring for zoonotic potential. PMID:27355862

  13. "The 5 cm Rule": Biopower, Sexuality and Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Louisa

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores "the 5 cm rule", a regulation around student contact discovered during an investigation of the sexual culture of schooling with 16-19-year-olds in New Zealand. Implemented to stem "inappropriate and unwanted" touching, it stipulates that students must maintain a physical distance of 5 cm at all times. It is argued this rule…

  14. Design and Performance of 40 cm Ion Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    2001-01-01

    A 40 cm ion thruster is being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to obtain input power and propellant throughput capabilities of 10 kW and 550 kg. respectively. The technical approach here is a continuation of the "derating" technique used for the NSTAR ion thruster. The 40 cm ion thruster presently utilizes the NSTAR ion optics aperture geometry to take advantage of the large database of lifetime and performance data already available. Dome-shaped grids were chosen for the design of the 40 cm ion optics because this design is naturally suited for large-area ion optics. Ion extraction capabilities and electron backstreaming limits for the 40 cm ion optics were estimated by utilizing NSTAR 30 cm ion optics data. A preliminary service life assessment showed that the propellant throughput goal of 550 kg of xenon may be possible with molybdenum 40 cm ion optics. One 40 cm ion optics' set has been successfully fabricated to date. Additional ion optics' sets are presently being fabricated. Preliminary performance tests were conducted on a laboratory model 40 cm ion thruster.

  15. Effects of proton irradiation and temperature on 1 ohm-cm and 10 ohm-cm silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicoletta, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    The 1 ohm-cm and 10 ohm-cm silicon solar cells were exposed to 1.0 MeV protons at a fixed flux of 10 to the 9th power P/sq cm-sec and fluences of 10 to the 10th power, 10 to the 11th power, 10 to the 12th power and 3 X 10 to the 12th power P/sq cm. I-V curves of the cells were made at room temperature, 65 C and 165 C after each irradiation. A value of 139.5 mw/sq cm was taken as AMO incident energy rate per unit area. Degradation occurred for both uncovered 1 ohm-cm and 10 ohm-cm cells. Efficiencies are generally higher than those of comparable U.S. cells tested earlier. Damage (loss in maximum power efficiency) with proton fluence is somewhat higher for 10 ohm-cm cells, measured at the three temperatures, for fluences above 2 X 10 to the 11th power P/sq cm. Cell efficiency, as expected, changes drastically with temperature.

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of vaccinia virus H1L phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Roces, Laura; Knowles, Phillip P.; Fox, Gavin; Juanhuix, Jordi; Scaplehorn, Nicki; Way, Michael; McDonald, Neil Q.

    2008-01-01

    The cysteine-based protein phosphatase H1L was the first reported dual-specificity protein phosphatase. H1L is encapsidated within the vaccinia virus and is required for successful host infection and for the production of viable vaccinia progeny. H1L has therefore been proposed as a target candidate for antiviral compounds. Recombinant H1L has been expressed in a catalytically inactive form using an Escherichia coli host, leading to purification and crystallization by the microbatch method. The crystals diffract to 2.1 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. These crystals belong to space group P422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 98.31, c = 169.15 Å, and are likely to contain four molecules in the asymmetric unit. A sulfur SAD data set was collected to 2.8 Å resolution on beamline BM14 at the ESRF to facilitate structure determination. Attempts to derivatize these crystals with xenon gas changed the space group to I422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 63.28, c = 169.68 Å and a single molecule in the asymmetric unit. The relationship between these two crystal forms is discussed. PMID:18323605

  17. Household effects of school closure during pandemic (H1N1) 2009, Pennsylvania, USA.

    PubMed

    Gift, Thomas L; Palekar, Rakhee S; Sodha, Samir V; Kent, Charlotte K; Fagan, Ryan P; Archer, W Roodly; Edelson, Paul J; Marchbanks, Tiffany; Bhattarai, Achuyt; Swerdlow, David; Ostroff, Stephen; Meltzer, Martin I

    2010-08-01

    To determine the effects of school closure, we surveyed 214 households after a 1-week elementary school closure because of pandemic (H1N1) 2009. Students spent 77% of the closure days at home, 69% of students visited at least 1 other location, and 79% of households reported that adults missed no days of work to watch children. PMID:20678335

  18. Chemokine receptor 5 △32 allele in patients with severe pandemic (H1N1) 2009.

    PubMed

    Keynan, Yoav; Juno, Jennifer; Meyers, Adrienne; Ball, T Blake; Kumar, Anand; Rubinstein, Ethan; Fowke, Keith R

    2010-10-01

    Because chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) may have a role in pulmonary immune response, we explored whether patients with severe pandemic (H1N1) 2009 were more likely to carry the CCR5Δ32 allele than were members of the general population. We found a large proportion of heterozygosity for the CCR5Δ32 allele among white patients with severe disease.

  19. Learning from Successful School-based Vaccination Clinics during 2009 pH1N1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klaiman, Tamar; O'Connell, Katherine; Stoto, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The 2009 H1N1 vaccination campaign was the largest in US history. State health departments received vaccines from the federal government and sent them to local health departments (LHDs) who were responsible for getting vaccines to the public. Many LHD's used school-based clinics to ensure children were the first to receive limited…

  20. Correlates of 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccine Acceptability among Parents and Their Adolescent Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Painter, Julia E.; Gargano, Lisa M.; Sales, Jessica M.; Morfaw, Christopher; Jones, LaDawna M.; Murray, Dennis; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Hughes, James M.

    2011-01-01

    School-aged children were a priority group for receipt of the pandemic (2009) H1N1 influenza vaccine. Both parental and adolescent attitudes likely influence vaccination behaviors. Data were collected from surveys distributed to middle- and high-school students and their parents in two counties in rural Georgia. Multivariable logistic regression…

  1. In-Flight Transmission of Novel Influenza A (H1N1)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon Hyung; Lee, Dong-Han; Shin, Sang-Sook; Kang, Chun; Kim, Jin Seok; Jun, Byung Yool

    2010-01-01

    The Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed two patients, who had taken the same plane from Los Angeles to Seoul, with novel influenza A (H1N1). Through contact tracing, we concluded that the second patient was infected during the flight. PMID:21191459

  2. Zoonoses: USDA ARS Lessons Learned During Novel Influenza H1N1 Investigations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Influenza illness was first recognized in pigs during the 1918 human Spanish flu pandemic, and influenza A virus has since remained of importance to the swine industry as a primary respiratory pathogen. Influenza virus H1N1 remained relatively stable in U.S. swine for nearly 80 years following 1918...

  3. Was Mandatory Quarantine Necessary in China for Controlling the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinhai; Geng, Wenjun; Tian, Huidong; Lai, Dejian

    2013-01-01

    The Chinese government enforced mandatory quarantine for 60 days (from 10 May to 8 July 2009) as a preventative strategy to control the spread of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. Such a prevention strategy was stricter than other non-pharmaceutical interventions that were carried out in many other countries. We evaluated the effectiveness of the mandatory quarantine and provide suggestions for interventions against possible future influenza pandemics. We selected one city, Beijing, as the analysis target. We reviewed the epidemiologic dynamics of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic and the implementation of quarantine measures in Beijing. The infectious population was simulated under two scenarios (quarantined and not quarantined) using a deterministic Susceptible-Exposed-Infectious-Recovered (SEIR) model. The basic reproduction number R0 was adjusted to match the epidemic wave in Beijing. We found that mandatory quarantine served to postpone the spread of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic in Beijing by one and a half months. If mandatory quarantine was not enforced in Beijing, the infectious population could have reached 1,553 by 21 October, i.e., 5.6 times higher than the observed number. When the cost of quarantine is taken into account, mandatory quarantine was not an economically effective intervention approach against the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. We suggest adopting mitigation methods for an influenza pandemic with low mortality and morbidity. PMID:24084677

  4. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection in giant pandas, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Desheng; Zhu, Ling; Cui, Hengmin; Ling, Shanshan; Fan, Shengtao; Yu, Zhijun; Zhou, Yuancheng; Wang, Tiecheng; Qian, Jun; Xia, Xianzhu; Xu, Zhiwen; Gao, Yuwei; Wang, Chengdong

    2014-03-01

    We confirmed infection with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in giant pandas in China during 2009 by using virus isolation and serologic analysis methods. This finding extends the host range of influenza viruses and indicates a need for increased surveillance for and control of influenza viruses among giant pandas. PMID:24565026

  5. Clinical features of hospitalised children with 2009 H1N1 influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Calitri, Carmelina; Gabiano, Clara; Garazzino, Silvia; Pinon, Michele; Zoppo, Marisa; Cuozzo, Margherita; Scolfaro, Carlo; Tovo, Pier-Angelo

    2010-12-01

    Clinical features and outcome of 2009 H1N1 influenza virus in the paediatric setting is ill-defined. The epidemiologic and clinical features of children with confirmed H1N1 influenza virus infection admitted to an Italian tertiary paediatric hospital from August through December 2009 were evaluated. A total of 63 children (mean age 4.3 years) were studied; of these, 29 (46%) had chronic underlying diseases. The most frequent symptoms and signs at admission were fever (97%), cough (60%) and respiratory disturbances (24%). Forty patients (63.5%) had H1N1-related complications: 32 (51%) pulmonary diseases, three (5%) neurological disorders, such as acute encephalitis or acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and two (3%) haematological alterations. Three patients were admitted to the Intensive Care Unit. Most children (81%) were treated with oseltamivir: one developed rash during treatment; no other adverse events were noticed. All children survived without sequelae. In conclusions, 2009 H1N1 influenza virus infection in children is associated with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. Neurological disorders are not exceptional complications. Oseltamivir therapy seems safe also in infants. PMID:20652313

  6. H1N1 Preventive Health Behaviors in a University Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Rebecca; May, Larissa; Sanza, Megan; Johnston, Lindsay; Petinaux, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Background: When H1N1 emerged in 2009, institutions of higher education were immediately faced with questions about how best to protect their community from the virus, yet limited information existed to help predict student preventive behaviors. Methods: The authors surveyed students at a large urban university in November 2009 to better…

  7. Liver Biochemistry During the Course of Influenza A/H1N1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Seretis, Charalampos; Lagoudianakis, Emmanuel; Salemis, Nikolaos; Pappas, Apostolos; Gemenetzis, George; Seretis, Fotios; Gourgiotis, Stavros

    2013-01-01

    Despite the multi-systemic effects of influenza A/H1N1 virus, the occurrence of hepatic injury during the natural course of the infection remains a matter of debate. We performed a review of the published clinical studies which assess the above mentioned relationship, reviewing the studies published in PubMed database (English literature), using the key words “H1N1”, “influenza A” and “liver”. We excluded case reports and clinical studies that referred to pediatric and transplanted patients, pregnants and patients with known history of chronic liver diseases. From a total of 96 results, a total of 78 papers met one or more of the exclusion criteria set. Evaluating the remaining 18 published papers, 14 more were excluded as they did not provide any sufficient data, relevant to the subject of our review. Although the analysis of the remaining studies revealed the existence of conflicting results concerning the exact degree and the potential mechanisms of liver injury in H1N1 positive patients, it can be assumed that influenza A/H1N1 virus is -or at least could be- a hepatotropic virus.

  8. The resurgence of swine-origin influenza A (H1N1).

    PubMed

    Mossad, Sherif Beniameen

    2009-06-01

    Unexpectedly, swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV, informally known as swine flu) appeared in North America at the very end of the 2008-2009 influenza season and began to spread internationally. As the world mobilizes for a potential pandemic, this article summarizes the developments in diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. PMID:19487554

  9. Structural and immunologic characterization of Ara h 1 – a major peanut allergen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Allergic reactions to peanut and tree nuts is the major cause of anaphylaxis in the U.S. In this report; structural, immunologic, and bioinformatics analysis of natural, and a recombinant variant of the major peanut allergen Ara h 1 is presented. Small angle X-ray scattering studies show that natura...

  10. In silico binding characteristics between human histamine H1 receptor and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojian; Yang, Qian; Li, Minyong; Yin, Dali; You, Qidong

    2010-09-01

    It is widely acknowledged that the H(1) receptor antagonists have important therapeutic significance in the treatment of various allergic disorders, but little was known about the binding mode between the receptor and antagonists since the crystal structure of G-protein coupling receptors (GPCRs) were hard to obtain. In this paper, a theoretical three-dimensional model of human histamine H(1) receptor (HHR1) was developed on the basis of recently reported high resolution structures of human A(2A) adenosine receptor, human beta(2)-adrenoceptor and turkey beta(1)-adrenoceptor. Furthermore, three representative H(1) receptor antagonists were chosen for docking studies. Subsequently, a qualitative pharmacophore model was developed by Hiphop algorithm based on the docking conformations of these three antagonists. In this paper, active environment, certain key residues, and the corresponding pharmacophore features of H(1) receptor were identified by such combinations of receptor-based and ligand-based approaches, which would give sufficient guidance for the rational design of novel antihistamine agents. PMID:20179978

  11. The hemagglutinin structure of an avian H1N1 influenza A virus

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Tianwei; Wang, Gengyan; Li, Anzhang; Zhang, Qian; Wu, Caiming; Zhang, Rongfu; Cai, Qixu; Song, Wenjun; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2009-09-15

    The interaction between hemagglutinin (HA) and receptors is a kernel in the study of evolution and host adaptation of H1N1 influenza A viruses. The notion that the avian HA is associated with preferential specificity for receptors with Sia{alpha}2,3Gal glycosidic linkage over those with Sia{alpha}2,6Gal linkage is not all consistent with the available data on H1N1 viruses. By x-ray crystallography, the HA structure of an avian H1N1 influenza A virus, as well as its complexes with the receptor analogs, was determined. The structures revealed no preferential binding of avian receptor analogs over that of the human analog, suggesting that the HA/receptor binding might not be as stringent as is commonly believed in determining the host receptor preference for some subtypes of influenza viruses, such as the H1N1 viruses. The structure also showed difference in glycosylation despite the preservation of related sequences, which may partly contribute to the difference between structures of human and avian origin.

  12. 2009 H1N1: risk factors for hospitalization in a matched case-control study.

    PubMed

    Launes, Cristian; García-García, Juan-José; Martínez-Planas, Aina; Moraga, Fernando; Astigarraga, Itziar; Arístegui, Javier; Korta, Javier; Salado, Concepción; Quintana, José M; Soldevila, Núria; Domínguez, Angela

    2012-07-01

    In order to compare sociodemographical data and preexisting risk medical conditions in patients requiring hospital admission for 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus infection and those managed on an outpatient basis, a prospective observational, matched case-control study in 36 hospitals of the Spanish National Health Service was conducted from July 2009 to February 2010. Cases were patients aged 6 months to 18 years hospitalized for influenza syndrome, in whom 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus infection was confirmed using real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Controls were patients aged 6 months to 18 years with confirmed 2009 influenza A (H1N1) infection managed on an outpatient basis. There were 195 cases and 184 controls. In a multivariate model, hospitalization was more frequent in children aged <2 years (odds ratio (OR), 13.8; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.7-106.4), those with neurological and/or neuromuscular diseases (OR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.1-8.2), and those whose parents had less than a secondary educational level (OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.4-5.2). Children aged <2 years, children with neurological diseases, and children from families with a lower educational status had a higher risk of hospitalization due to influenza A (H1N1) 2009 infection.

  13. Was mandatory quarantine necessary in China for controlling the 2009 H1N1 pandemic?

    PubMed

    Li, Xinhai; Geng, Wenjun; Tian, Huidong; Lai, Dejian

    2013-10-01

    The Chinese government enforced mandatory quarantine for 60 days (from 10 May to 8 July 2009) as a preventative strategy to control the spread of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. Such a prevention strategy was stricter than other non-pharmaceutical interventions that were carried out in many other countries. We evaluated the effectiveness of the mandatory quarantine and provide suggestions for interventions against possible future influenza pandemics. We selected one city, Beijing, as the analysis target. We reviewed the epidemiologic dynamics of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic and the implementation of quarantine measures in Beijing. The infectious population was simulated under two scenarios (quarantined and not quarantined) using a deterministic Susceptible-Exposed-Infectious-Recovered (SEIR) model. The basic reproduction number R0 was adjusted to match the epidemic wave in Beijing. We found that mandatory quarantine served to postpone the spread of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic in Beijing by one and a half months. If mandatory quarantine was not enforced in Beijing, the infectious population could have reached 1,553 by 21 October, i.e., 5.6 times higher than the observed number. When the cost of quarantine is taken into account, mandatory quarantine was not an economically effective intervention approach against the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. We suggest adopting mitigation methods for an influenza pandemic with low mortality and morbidity. PMID:24084677

  14. Sensitive and selective magnetoimmunosensing platform for determination of the food allergen Ara h 1.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Valdepeñas Montiel, V; Campuzano, S; Pellicanò, A; Torrente-Rodríguez, R M; Reviejo, A J; Cosio, M S; Pingarrón, J M

    2015-06-23

    A highly sensitive disposable amperometric immunosensor based on the use of magnetic beads (MBs) is described for determination of Ara h 1, the major peanut allergen, in only 2h. The approach uses a sandwich configuration involving selective capture and biotinylated detector antibodies and carboxylic acid-modified MBs (HOOC-MBs). The MBs bearing the immunoconjugates are captured by a magnet placed under the surface of a disposable screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) and the affinity reactions are monitored amperometrically at -0.20 V (vs a Ag pseudo-reference electrode) in the presence of hydroquinone (HQ) as electron transfer mediator and upon addition of H2O2 as the enzyme substrate. The developed immunosensor exhibits a wide range of linearity between 20.8 and 1000.0 ng mL(-1) Ara h 1, a detection limit of 6.3 ng mL(-1), a great selectivity, a good reproducibility with a RSD of 6.3% for six different immunosensors and a useful lifetime of 25 days. The usefulness of the immunosensor was demonstrated by determining Ara h 1 in different matrices (food extracts and saliva). The results correlated properly with those provided by a commercial ELISA method offering a reliable and promising analytical screening tool in the development of user-friendly devices for on-site determination of Ara h 1. PMID:26092337

  15. In silico binding characteristics between human histamine H1 receptor and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojian; Yang, Qian; Li, Minyong; Yin, Dali; You, Qidong

    2010-09-01

    It is widely acknowledged that the H(1) receptor antagonists have important therapeutic significance in the treatment of various allergic disorders, but little was known about the binding mode between the receptor and antagonists since the crystal structure of G-protein coupling receptors (GPCRs) were hard to obtain. In this paper, a theoretical three-dimensional model of human histamine H(1) receptor (HHR1) was developed on the basis of recently reported high resolution structures of human A(2A) adenosine receptor, human beta(2)-adrenoceptor and turkey beta(1)-adrenoceptor. Furthermore, three representative H(1) receptor antagonists were chosen for docking studies. Subsequently, a qualitative pharmacophore model was developed by Hiphop algorithm based on the docking conformations of these three antagonists. In this paper, active environment, certain key residues, and the corresponding pharmacophore features of H(1) receptor were identified by such combinations of receptor-based and ligand-based approaches, which would give sufficient guidance for the rational design of novel antihistamine agents.

  16. Research Updates: Experimental Evaluation of 2009 Pandemic A/H1N1 in Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: In March 2009, a novel pandemic A/H1N1 emerged in the human population in North America (2). The gene constellation of the emerging virus was demonstrated to be a combination of genes from swine influenza A viruses (SIV) of North American and Eurasian lineages that had never before be...

  17. Experimental Challenge with Two Isolates of 2009 A/H1N1 in Weaned Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction. The gene constellation of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus is a unique combination from swine influenza A viruses (SIV) of North American and Eurasian lineages, but prior to April 2009 had never before been identified in swine or other species (1). Although the hemagglutinin gene is relate...

  18. Rural Responses to H1N1: A Flexible Model for Community Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Farrell, Denise; Aubrey, Debra Larsen

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines a regional 2009 H1N1 rural response model, which utilises community partnerships with local government, county emergency management, public health, private healthcare, Medical Reserve Corps volunteers, and other organisations in rural Southeast Idaho. Unique aspects of the collaborative use of federal, state, county, and…

  19. Information Entropy Analysis of the H1N1 Genetic Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martwick, Andy

    2010-03-01

    During the current H1N1 pandemic, viral samples are being obtained from large numbers of infected people world-wide and are being sequenced on the NCBI Influenza Virus Resource Database. The information entropy of the sequences was computed from the probability of occurrence of each nucleotide base at every position of each set of sequences using Shannon's definition of information entropy, [ H=∑bpb,2( 1pb ) ] where H is the observed information entropy at each nucleotide position and pb is the probability of the base pair of the nucleotides A, C, G, U. Information entropy of the current H1N1 pandemic is compared to reference human and swine H1N1 entropy. As expected, the current H1N1 entropy is in a low entropy state and has a very large mutation potential. Using the entropy method in mature genes we can identify low entropy regions of nucleotides that generally correlate to critical protein function.

  20. Determinants of Parental Acceptance of the H1N1 Vaccine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilyard, Karen M.; Quinn, Sandra Crouse; Kim, Kevin H.; Musa, Don; Freimuth, Vicki S.

    2014-01-01

    Although designated as a high-risk group during the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic, only about 40% of U.S. children received the vaccine, a relatively low percentage compared with high-risk groups in seasonal influenza, such as the elderly, whose vaccine rates typically top 70%. To better understand parental decision making and predictors of acceptance…

  1. Phylogenetic evolution of swine-origin human influenza virus: a pandemic H1N1 2009.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, A; Markowska-Daniel, I

    2010-01-01

    The knowledge of the genome constellation in pandemic influenza A virus H1N1 2009 from different countries and different hosts is valuable for monitoring and understanding of the evolution and migration of these strains. The complete genome sequences of selected worldwide distributed influenza A viruses are publicly available and there have been few longitudinal genome studies of human, avian and swine influenza A viruses. All possible to download SIV sequences of influenza A viruses available at GISAID Platform (Global Initiative on Sharing Avian Influenza Data) were analyzed firstly through the web servers of the Influenza Virus Resource in NCBI. Phylogenetic study of circulating human pandemic H1N1 virus indicated that the new variant possesses a distinctive evolutionary trait. There is no one way the pandemic H1N1 have acquired new genes from other distinguishable viruses circulating recently in local human, pig or domestic poultry populations from various geographic regions. The extensive genetic diversity among whole segments present in pandemic H1N1 genome suggests that multiple introduction of virus have taken place during the period 1999-2009. The initial interspecies transmission could have occurred in the long-range past and after it the reassortants steps lead to three lineages: classical SIV prevalent in the North America, avian-like SIV in Europe and avian-like related SIV in Asia. This analysis contributes to the evidence that pigs are not the only hosts playing the role of "mixing vessel", as it was suggested for many years.

  2. Influenza virus A (H1N1) in giant anteaters (Myrmecophaga tridactyla).

    PubMed

    Nofs, Sally; Abd-Eldaim, Mohamed; Thomas, Kathy V; Toplon, David; Rouse, Dawn; Kennedy, Melissa

    2009-07-01

    In February 2007, an outbreak of respiratory disease occurred in a group of giant anteaters (Myrmecophaga tridactyla) at the Nashville Zoo. Isolates from 2 affected animals were identified in March 2007 as a type A influenza virus related to human influenza subtype H1N1.

  3. Household effects of school closure during pandemic (H1N1) 2009, Pennsylvania, USA.

    PubMed

    Gift, Thomas L; Palekar, Rakhee S; Sodha, Samir V; Kent, Charlotte K; Fagan, Ryan P; Archer, W Roodly; Edelson, Paul J; Marchbanks, Tiffany; Bhattarai, Achuyt; Swerdlow, David; Ostroff, Stephen; Meltzer, Martin I

    2010-08-01

    To determine the effects of school closure, we surveyed 214 households after a 1-week elementary school closure because of pandemic (H1N1) 2009. Students spent 77% of the closure days at home, 69% of students visited at least 1 other location, and 79% of households reported that adults missed no days of work to watch children.

  4. Mutation screen reveals novel variants and expands the phenotypes associated with DYNC1H1

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Alleene V.; Schabhüttl, Maria; Offenbacher, Hans; Synofzik, Matthis; Hauser, Natalie S.; Brunner-Krainz, Michaela; Gruber-Sedlmayr, Ursula; Moore, Steven A.; Windhager, Reinhard; Bender, Benjamin; Harms, Matthew; Klebe, Stephan; Young, Peter; Kennerson, Marina; Garcia, Avencia Sanchez Mejias; Gonzalez, Michael A.; Züchner, Stephan; Schule, Rebecca; Shy, Michael E.; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Dynein, cytoplasmic 1, heavy chain 1 (DYNC1H1) encodes a necessary subunit of the cytoplasmic dynein complex, which traffics cargo along microtubules. Dominant DYNC1H1 mutations are implicated in neural diseases, including spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity dominance (SMA-LED), intellectual disability with neuronal migration defects, malformations of cortical development (MCD), and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, type 2O (CMT2O). We hypothesized that additional variants could be found in these and novel motoneuron and related diseases. Therefore we analysed our database of 1,024 whole exome sequencing samples of motoneuron and related diseases for novel single nucleotide variations. We filtered these results for significant variants, which were further screened using segregation analysis in available family members. Analysis revealed six novel, rare, and highly conserved variants. Three of these are likely pathogenic and encompass a broad phenotypic spectrum with distinct disease clusters. Our findings suggest that DYNC1H1 variants can cause not only lower, but also upper motor neuron disease. It thus adds DYNC1H1 to the growing list of spastic paraplegia related genes in microtubule-dependent motor protein pathways. PMID:26100331

  5. 26 CFR 1.167(h)-1 - Life tenants and beneficiaries of trusts and estates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Life tenants and beneficiaries of trusts and... and Corporations § 1.167(h)-1 Life tenants and beneficiaries of trusts and estates. (a) Life tenants. In the case of property held by one person for life with remainder to another person, the...

  6. 26 CFR 1.167(h)-1 - Life tenants and beneficiaries of trusts and estates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Life tenants and beneficiaries of trusts and... and Corporations § 1.167(h)-1 Life tenants and beneficiaries of trusts and estates. (a) Life tenants. In the case of property held by one person for life with remainder to another person, the...

  7. 26 CFR 1.167(h)-1 - Life tenants and beneficiaries of trusts and estates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Life tenants and beneficiaries of trusts and... and Corporations § 1.167(h)-1 Life tenants and beneficiaries of trusts and estates. (a) Life tenants. In the case of property held by one person for life with remainder to another person, the...

  8. 26 CFR 1.167(h)-1 - Life tenants and beneficiaries of trusts and estates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Life tenants and beneficiaries of trusts and... and Corporations § 1.167(h)-1 Life tenants and beneficiaries of trusts and estates. (a) Life tenants. In the case of property held by one person for life with remainder to another person, the...

  9. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection in giant pandas, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Desheng; Zhu, Ling; Cui, Hengmin; Ling, Shanshan; Fan, Shengtao; Yu, Zhijun; Zhou, Yuancheng; Wang, Tiecheng; Qian, Jun; Xia, Xianzhu; Xu, Zhiwen; Gao, Yuwei; Wang, Chengdong

    2014-03-01

    We confirmed infection with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in giant pandas in China during 2009 by using virus isolation and serologic analysis methods. This finding extends the host range of influenza viruses and indicates a need for increased surveillance for and control of influenza viruses among giant pandas.

  10. Mexican participation in the H1 experiment, a bit of history, a bit of physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, J. G.

    2000-08-01

    This talk has been presented during a session to honor Leon Lederman for his long time commitment to support and impulse Latin American groups in experimental high energy physics. It portraits the experience of the Mexican participation within the H1 collaboration. .

  11. Norpiperidine imidazoazepines as a new class of potent, selective, and nonsedative H1 antihistamines.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Frans; Leenaerts, Jos; Diels, Gaston; De Boeck, Benoît; Megens, Anton; Langlois, Xavier; van Rossem, Koen; Beetens, Johan; Borgers, Marcel

    2005-03-24

    Clinical doses of available H(1) antihistamines are limited mainly by sedative side effects. However, higher doses are often required to obtain optimal therapeutic activity, especially in dermatology. We report the synthesis of three norpiperidine imidazoazepines representative of a new class of selective and nonsedating H(1) antihistamines. The compounds were at least as potent as cetirizine and loratadine as measured by H(1) receptor binding affinity, by protection against compound 48/80- and histamine-induced lethality in rats and guinea pigs, respectively, and by skin reaction tests in rats, guinea pigs, and dogs. The compounds, in particular 3a, were less prone than the reference compounds to penetrate the brain and to occupy central H(1) receptors, suggesting absence of sedative side effects. In vitro and in vivo cardiovascular safety tests showed that 3a had no intrinsic potential to prolong ventricular repolarization or induce cardiac arrhythmias. Compound 3a has been selected for further clinical development, mainly for application in dermatology.

  12. Community transmission of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Jiang, Tao; Li, Xiao-Feng; Tang, Fang; Wei, Mao-Ti; Yu, Man; Zhao, Hui; Yu, Xue-Dong; Liu, Li-Juan; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Cao, Wu-Chun

    2010-09-01

    Prophylaxis and treatment with oseltamivir effectively controlled a community outbreak of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in China. The genetic makeup of strains of different generations seemed to be stable. Travel in confined settings might accelerate the transmission of pandemic influenza in a community outbreak. PMID:20636129

  13. Molecular characterization of Ara h 1 before and after thermal processing.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heating and other processing techniques can alter food allergens depending upon the method and matrix involved. The increased allergenicity of Ara h 1 protein isolated from roasted peanuts is thought to be caused, at least in part, by chemical modifications. To identify what specific modifications a...

  14. Neutralization and Binding Profile of Monoclonal Antibodies Generated Against Influenza A H1N1 Viruses.

    PubMed

    Shembekar, Nachiket; Mallajosyula, Vamsee V Aditya; Malik, Ankita; Saini, Ashok; Varadarajan, Raghavan; Gupta, Satish Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) provide scope for the development of better therapeutics and diagnostic tools. Herein, we describe the binding and neutralization profile(s) for a panel of murine MAbs generated against influenza A H1N1 viruses elicited by immunization with pandemic H1 recombinant hemagglutinin (rHA)/whole virus or seasonal H1 rHA. Neutralizing MAbs, MA-2070 and MA-M, were obtained after pandemic A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) virus/rHA immunization(s). Both MAbs reacted specifically with rHA from A/California/07/2009 and A/England/195/2009 in ELISA. MA-2070 bound rHA of A/California/07/2009 with high affinity (KD = 51.36 ± 9.20 nM) and exhibited potent in vitro neutralization (IC50 = 2.50 μg/mL). MA-2070 bound within the stem domain of HA. MA-M exhibited both hemagglutination inhibition (HI, 1.50 μg/mL) and in vitro neutralization (IC50 = 0.66 μg/mL) activity against the pandemic A/California/07/2009 virus and showed higher binding affinity (KD = 9.80 ± 0.67 nM) than MA-2070. MAb, MA-H generated against the seasonal A/Solomon Islands/03/2006 (H1N1) rHA binds within the head domain and bound the seasonal H1N1 (A/Solomon Islands/03/2006 and A/New Caledonia/20/1990) rHAs with high affinity (KD; 0.72-8.23 nM). MA-H showed high HI (2.50 μg/mL) and in vitro neutralization (IC50 = 2.61 μg/mL) activity against the A/Solomon Islands/03/2006 virus. All 3 MAbs failed to react in ELISA with rHA from various strains of H2N2, H3N2, H5N1, H7N9, and influenza virus B, suggesting their specificity for either pandemic or seasonal H1N1 influenza virus. The MAbs reported here may be useful in developing diagnostic assays.

  15. Neutralization and Binding Profile of Monoclonal Antibodies Generated Against Influenza A H1N1 Viruses.

    PubMed

    Shembekar, Nachiket; Mallajosyula, Vamsee V Aditya; Malik, Ankita; Saini, Ashok; Varadarajan, Raghavan; Gupta, Satish Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) provide scope for the development of better therapeutics and diagnostic tools. Herein, we describe the binding and neutralization profile(s) for a panel of murine MAbs generated against influenza A H1N1 viruses elicited by immunization with pandemic H1 recombinant hemagglutinin (rHA)/whole virus or seasonal H1 rHA. Neutralizing MAbs, MA-2070 and MA-M, were obtained after pandemic A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) virus/rHA immunization(s). Both MAbs reacted specifically with rHA from A/California/07/2009 and A/England/195/2009 in ELISA. MA-2070 bound rHA of A/California/07/2009 with high affinity (KD = 51.36 ± 9.20 nM) and exhibited potent in vitro neutralization (IC50 = 2.50 μg/mL). MA-2070 bound within the stem domain of HA. MA-M exhibited both hemagglutination inhibition (HI, 1.50 μg/mL) and in vitro neutralization (IC50 = 0.66 μg/mL) activity against the pandemic A/California/07/2009 virus and showed higher binding affinity (KD = 9.80 ± 0.67 nM) than MA-2070. MAb, MA-H generated against the seasonal A/Solomon Islands/03/2006 (H1N1) rHA binds within the head domain and bound the seasonal H1N1 (A/Solomon Islands/03/2006 and A/New Caledonia/20/1990) rHAs with high affinity (KD; 0.72-8.23 nM). MA-H showed high HI (2.50 μg/mL) and in vitro neutralization (IC50 = 2.61 μg/mL) activity against the A/Solomon Islands/03/2006 virus. All 3 MAbs failed to react in ELISA with rHA from various strains of H2N2, H3N2, H5N1, H7N9, and influenza virus B, suggesting their specificity for either pandemic or seasonal H1N1 influenza virus. The MAbs reported here may be useful in developing diagnostic assays. PMID:27463230

  16. Modeling control strategies for concurrent epidemics of seasonal and pandemic H1N1 influenza.

    PubMed

    Prosper, Olivia; Saucedo, Omar; Thompson, Doria; Torres-Garcia, Griselle; Wang, Xiaohong; Castillo-Chavez, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The lessons learned from the 2009-2010 H1N1 influenza pandemic, as it moves out of the limelight, should not be under-estimated, particularly since the probability of novel influenza epidemics in the near future is not negligible and the potential consequences might be huge. Hence, as the world, particularly the industrialized world, responded to the potentially devastating effects of this novel A-H1N1 strain with substantial resources, reminders of the recurrent loss of life from a well established foe, seasonal influenza, could not be ignored. The uncertainties associated with the reported and expected levels of morbidity and mortality with this novel A-H1N1 live in a backdrop of deaths, over 200,000 hospitalizations, and millions of infections (20% of the population) attributed to seasonal influenza in the USA alone, each year. So, as the Northern Hemisphere braced for the possibility of a potentially "lethal" second wave of the novel A-H1N1 without a vaccine ready to mitigate its impact, questions of who should be vaccinated first if a vaccine became available, came to the forefront of the discussion. Uncertainty grew as we learned that the vaccine, once available, would be unevenly distributed around the world. Nations capable of acquiring large vaccine supplies soon became aware that those who could pay would have to compete for a limited vaccine stockpile. The challenges faced by nations dealing jointly with seasonal and novel A-H1N1 co-circulating strains under limited resources, that is, those with no access to novel A-H1N1 vaccine supplies, limited access to the seasonal influenza vaccine, and limited access to antivirals (like Tamiflu) are explored in this study. One- and two-strain models are introduced to mimic the influenza dynamics of a single and co-circulating strains, in the context of a single epidemic outbreak. Optimal control theory is used to identify and evaluate the "best" control policies. The controls account for the cost associated with

  17. Communicating uncertainty - how Australian television reported H1N1 risk in 2009: a content analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Health officials face particular challenges in communicating with the public about emerging infectious diseases of unknown severity such as the 2009 H1N1(swine 'flu) pandemic (pH1N1). Statements intended to create awareness and convey the seriousness of infectious disease threats can draw accusations of scare-mongering, while officials can be accused of complacency if such statements are not made. In these communication contexts, news journalists, often reliant on official sources to understand issues are pivotal in selecting and emphasising aspects of official discourse deemed sufficiently newsworthy to present to the public. This paper presents a case-study of news communication regarding the emergence of pH1N1. Methods We conducted a content analysis of all television news items about pH1N1. We examined news and current affairs items broadcast on 5 free-to-air Sydney television channels between April 25 2009 (the first report) and October 9 (prior to the vaccine release) for statements about [1] the seriousness of the disease [2] how the public could minimise contagion [3] government responses to emerging information. Results pH1N1 was the leading health story for eight of 24 weeks and was in the top 5 for 20 weeks. 353 news items were identified, yielding 3086 statements for analysis, with 63.4% related to the seriousness of the situation, 12.9% providing advice for viewers and 23.6% involving assurances from government. Coverage focused on infection/mortality rates, the spread of the virus, the need for public calm, the vulnerability of particular groups, direct and indirect advice for viewers, and government reassurances about effective management. Conclusions Overall, the reporting of 2009 pH1N1 in Sydney, Australia was generally non-alarmist, while conveying that pH1N1 was potentially serious. Daily infection rate tallies and commentary on changes in the pandemic alert level were seldom contextualised to assist viewers in understanding personal

  18. French Experience of 2009 A/H1N1v Influenza in Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Dubar, Grégory; Azria, Elie; Tesnière, Antoine; Dupont, Hervé; Le Ray, Camille; Baugnon, Thomas; Matheron, Sophie; Luton, Dominique; Richard, Jean-Christophe; Launay, Odile; Tsatsaris, Vassilis; Goffinet, François; Mignon, Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    Background The first reports on the pandemic influenza 2009 A/H1N1v from the USA, Mexico, and Australia indicated that this disease was associated with a high mortality in pregnant women. The aim of this study was to describe and compare the characteristics of severe critically ill and non-severe pregnant women with 2009 A/H1N1v-related illness in France. Methodology/Principal Findings A national registry was created to screen pregnant women with laboratory-confirmed 2009 A/H1N1v influenza. Three hundred and fifteen patients from 46 French hospitals were included: 40 patients were admitted to intensive care units (severe outcomes), 111 were hospitalized in obstetric or medical wards (moderate outcomes), and 164 were outpatients (mild outcomes). The 2009 A/H1N1v influenza illness occurred during all pregnancy trimesters, but most women (54%), notably the severe patients (70%), were in the third trimester. Among the severe patients, twenty (50%) underwent mechanical ventilation, and eleven (28%) were treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Three women died from A/H1N1v influenza. We found a strong association between the development of a severe outcome and both co-existing illnesses (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 5.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.2–11.8) and a delay in oseltamivir treatment after the onset of symptoms (>3 or 5 days) (adjusted OR, 4.8; 95% CI, 1.9–12.1 and 61.2, 95% CI; 14.4–261.3, respectively). Among the 140 deliveries after 22 weeks of gestation known to date, 19 neonates (14%) were admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit, mainly for preterm delivery, and two neonates died. None of these neonates developed 2009 A/H1N1v infection. Conclusions This series confirms the high incidence of complications in pregnant women infected with pandemic A/H1N1v observed in other countries but depicts a lower overall maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity than indicated in the USA or Australia. Moreover, our data demonstrate the benefit of

  19. Autophagy suppresses cell migration by degrading GEF-H1, a RhoA GEF.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tatsushi; Tsujioka, Masatsune; Honda, Shinya; Tanaka, Masato; Shimizu, Shigeomi

    2016-06-01

    Cell migration is a process crucial for a variety of biological events, such as morphogenesis and wound healing. Several reports have described the possible regulation of cell migration by autophagy; however, this remains controversial. We here demonstrate that mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking autophagy protein 5 (Atg5), an essential molecule of autophagy, moved faster than wild-type (WT) MEFs. Similar results were obtained for MEFs lacking Atg7 and unc-51-like kinase 1 (Ulk1), which are molecules required for autophagy. This phenotype was also observed in Atg7-deficient macrophages. WT MEFs moved by mesenchymal-type migration, whereas Atg5 knockout (KO) MEFs moved by amoeba-like migration. This difference was thought to be mediated by the level of RhoA activity, because Atg5 KO MEFs had higher RhoA activity, and treatment with a RhoA inhibitor altered Atg5 KO MEF migration from the amoeba type to the mesenchymal type. Autophagic regulation of RhoA activity was dependent on GEF-H1, a member of the RhoA family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors. In WT MEFs, GEF-H1 directly bound to p62 and was degraded by autophagy, resulting in low RhoA activity. In contrast, the loss of autophagy increased GEF-H1 levels and thereby activated RhoA, which caused cells to move by amoeba-like migration. This amoeba-like migration was cancelled by the silencing of GEF-H1. These results indicate that autophagy plays a role in the regulation of migration by degrading GEF-H1. PMID:27120804

  20. Academics and competing interests in H1N1 influenza media reporting

    PubMed Central

    Mandeville, Kate L; O'Neill, Sam; Brighouse, Andrew; Walker, Alice; Yarrow, Kielan; Chan, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Background Concerns have been raised over competing interests (CoI) among academics during the 2009 to 2010 A/H1N1 pandemic. Media reporting can influence public anxiety and demand for pharmaceutical products. We assessed CoI of academics providing media commentary during the early stages of the pandemic. Methods We performed a retrospective content analysis of UK newspaper articles on A/H1N1 influenza, examining quoted sources. We noted when academics made a risk assessment of the pandemic and compared this with official estimations. We also looked for promotion or rejection of the use of neuraminidase inhibitors or H1N1-specific vaccine. We independently searched for CoI for each academic. Results Academics were the second most frequently quoted source after Ministers of Health. Where both academics and official agencies estimated the risk of H1N1, one in two academics assessed the risk as higher than official predictions. For academics with CoI, the odds of a higher risk assessment were 5.8 times greater than those made by academics without CoI (Wald p value=0.009). One in two academics commenting on the use of neuraminidase inhibitors or vaccine had CoI. The odds of CoI in academics promoting the use of neuraminidase inhibitors were 8.4 times greater than for academics not commenting on their use (Fisher's exact p=0.005). Conclusions There is evidence of CoI among academics providing media commentary during the early H1N1 pandemic. Heightened risk assessments, combined with advocacy for pharmaceutical products to counter this risk, may lead to increased public anxiety and demand. Academics should declare, and journalists report, relevant CoI for media interviews. PMID:24218071

  1. Structural Characterization of H-1 Parvovirus: Comparison of Infectious Virions to Empty Capsids

    PubMed Central

    Halder, Sujata; Nam, Hyun-Joo; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Vogel, Michèle; Dinsart, Christiane; Salomé, Nathalie; McKenna, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The structure of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) packaging H-1 parvovirus (H-1PV), which is being developed as an antitumor gene delivery vector, has been determined for wild-type (wt) virions and noninfectious (empty) capsids to 2.7- and 3.2-Å resolution, respectively, using X-ray crystallography. The capsid viral protein (VP) structure consists of an α-helix and an eight-stranded anti-parallel β-barrel with large loop regions between the strands. The β-barrel and loops form the capsid core and surface, respectively. In the wt structure, 600 nucleotides are ordered in an interior DNA binding pocket of the capsid. This accounts for ∼12% of the H-1PV genome. The wt structure is identical to the empty capsid structure, except for side chain conformation variations at the nucleotide binding pocket. Comparison of the H-1PV nucleotides to those observed in canine parvovirus and minute virus of mice, two members of the genus Parvovirus, showed both similarity in structure and analogous interactions. This observation suggests a functional role, such as in capsid stability and/or ssDNA genome recognition for encapsulation. The VP structure differs from those of other parvoviruses in surface loop regions that control receptor binding, tissue tropism, pathogenicity, and antibody recognition, including VP sequences reported to determine tumor cell tropism for oncotropic rodent parvoviruses. These structures of H-1PV provide insight into structural features that dictate capsid stabilization following genome packaging and three-dimensional information applicable for rational design of tumor-targeted recombinant gene delivery vectors. PMID:23449783

  2. Aminoadamantanes with Persistent in Vitro Efficacy against H1N1 (2009) Influenza A

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of 2-adamantanamines with alkyl adducts of various lengths were examined for efficacy against strains of influenza A including those having an S31N mutation in M2 proton channel that confer resistance to amantadine and rimantadine. The addition of as little as one CH2 group to the methyl adduct of the amantadine/rimantadine analogue, 2-methyl-2-aminoadamantane, led to activity in vitro against two M2 S31N viruses A/Calif/07/2009 (H1N1) and A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) but not to a third A/WS/33 (H1N1). Solid state NMR of the transmembrane domain (TMD) with a site mutation corresponding to S31N shows evidence of drug binding. But electrophysiology using the full length S31N M2 protein in HEK cells showed no blockade. A wild type strain, A/Hong Kong/1/68 (H3N2) developed resistance to representative drugs within one passage with mutations in M2 TMD, but A/Calif/07/2009 S31N was slow (>8 passages) to develop resistance in vitro, and the resistant virus had no mutations in M2 TMD. The results indicate that 2-alkyl-2-aminoadamantane derivatives with sufficient adducts can persistently block p2009 influenza A in vitro through an alternative mechanism. The observations of an HA1 mutation, N160D, near the sialic acid binding site in both 6-resistant A/Calif/07/2009(H1N1) and the broadly resistant A/WS/33(H1N1) and of an HA1 mutation, I325S, in the 6-resistant virus at a cell-culture stable site suggest that the drugs tested here may block infection by direct binding near these critical sites for virus entry to the host cell. PMID:24793875

  3. Challenge of N95 Filtering Facepiece Respirators with Viable H1N1 Influenza Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Harnish, Delbert A.; Heimbuch, Brian K.; Husband, Michael; Lumley, April E.; Kinney, Kimberly; Shaffer, Ronald E.; Wander, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Specification of appropriate personal protective equipment for respiratory protection against influenza is somewhat controversial. In a clinical environment, N95 filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) are often recommended for respiratory protection against infectious aerosols. This study evaluates the ability of N95 FFRs to capture viable H1N1 influenza aerosols. METHODS Five N95 FFR models were challenged with aerosolized viable H1N1 influenza and inert polystyrene latex particles at continuous flow rates of 85 and 170 liters per minute. Virus was assayed using Madin-Darby canine kidney cells to determine the median tissue culture infective dose (TCID50). Aerosols were generated using a Collison nebulizer containing H1N1 influenza virus at 1 × 108 TCID50/mL. To determine filtration efficiency, viable sampling was performed upstream and downstream of the FFR. RESULTS N95 FFRs filtered 0.8-µm particles of both H1N1 influenza and inert origins with more than 95% efficiency. With the exception of 1 model, no statistically significant difference in filtration performance was observed between influenza and inert particles of similar size. Although statistically significant differences were observed for 2 models when comparing the 2 flow rates, the differences have no significance to protection. CONCLUSIONS This study empirically demonstrates that a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health–approved N95 FFR captures viable H1N1 influenza aerosols as well as or better than its N95 rating, suggesting that a properly fitted FFR reduces inhalation exposure to airborne influenza virus. This study also provides evidence that filtration efficiency is based primarily on particle size rather than the nature of the particle’s origin. PMID:23571366

  4. Autophagy suppresses cell migration by degrading GEF-H1, a RhoA GEF.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tatsushi; Tsujioka, Masatsune; Honda, Shinya; Tanaka, Masato; Shimizu, Shigeomi

    2016-06-01

    Cell migration is a process crucial for a variety of biological events, such as morphogenesis and wound healing. Several reports have described the possible regulation of cell migration by autophagy; however, this remains controversial. We here demonstrate that mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking autophagy protein 5 (Atg5), an essential molecule of autophagy, moved faster than wild-type (WT) MEFs. Similar results were obtained for MEFs lacking Atg7 and unc-51-like kinase 1 (Ulk1), which are molecules required for autophagy. This phenotype was also observed in Atg7-deficient macrophages. WT MEFs moved by mesenchymal-type migration, whereas Atg5 knockout (KO) MEFs moved by amoeba-like migration. This difference was thought to be mediated by the level of RhoA activity, because Atg5 KO MEFs had higher RhoA activity, and treatment with a RhoA inhibitor altered Atg5 KO MEF migration from the amoeba type to the mesenchymal type. Autophagic regulation of RhoA activity was dependent on GEF-H1, a member of the RhoA family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors. In WT MEFs, GEF-H1 directly bound to p62 and was degraded by autophagy, resulting in low RhoA activity. In contrast, the loss of autophagy increased GEF-H1 levels and thereby activated RhoA, which caused cells to move by amoeba-like migration. This amoeba-like migration was cancelled by the silencing of GEF-H1. These results indicate that autophagy plays a role in the regulation of migration by degrading GEF-H1.

  5. Autophagy suppresses cell migration by degrading GEF-H1, a RhoA GEF

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Masato; Shimizu, Shigeomi

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is a process crucial for a variety of biological events, such as morphogenesis and wound healing. Several reports have described the possible regulation of cell migration by autophagy; however, this remains controversial. We here demonstrate that mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking autophagy protein 5 (Atg5), an essential molecule of autophagy, moved faster than wild-type (WT) MEFs. Similar results were obtained for MEFs lacking Atg7 and unc-51-like kinase 1 (Ulk1), which are molecules required for autophagy. This phenotype was also observed in Atg7-deficient macrophages. WT MEFs moved by mesenchymal-type migration, whereas Atg5 knockout (KO) MEFs moved by amoeba-like migration. This difference was thought to be mediated by the level of RhoA activity, because Atg5 KO MEFs had higher RhoA activity, and treatment with a RhoA inhibitor altered Atg5 KO MEF migration from the amoeba type to the mesenchymal type. Autophagic regulation of RhoA activity was dependent on GEF-H1, a member of the RhoA family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors. In WT MEFs, GEF-H1 directly bound to p62 and was degraded by autophagy, resulting in low RhoA activity. In contrast, the loss of autophagy increased GEF-H1 levels and thereby activated RhoA, which caused cells to move by amoeba-like migration. This amoeba-like migration was cancelled by the silencing of GEF-H1. These results indicate that autophagy plays a role in the regulation of migration by degrading GEF-H1. PMID:27120804

  6. Transmission of Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Virus in a Train in China

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Fuqiang; Luo, Huiming; Zhou, Lei; Yin, Dapeng; Zheng, Canjun; Wang, Dingming; Gong, Jian; Fang, Gang; He, Jianfeng; McFarland, Jeffrey; Yu, Hongjie

    2011-01-01

    Background Pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus emerged in North America in April 2009 and spread globally. We describe the epidemiology and public health response to the first known outbreak of 2009 H1N1 in a train, which occurred in June 2009 in China. Methods After 2 provinces provided initial reports of 2009 H1N1 infection in 2 persons who had travelled on the same train, we conducted a retrospective epidemiologic investigation to collect information from the passengers, crew members, contacts, and health care providers. We explored the source of infection and possible routes of transmission in the train. All cases were confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction testing. Results Train #1223 traveled 40 hours, made 28 stops in 4 Chinese provinces, and boarded 2555 passengers, who logged a total of 59 144 person-hours of travel time. Nineteen confirmed 2009 H1N1 cases were identified. Of these, 13 were infected and developed symptoms on the train and 6 occurred among contacts who developed illness during medical monitoring. In addition, 3 asymptomatic cases were identified based on RT-PCR testing of respiratory swabs from contacts. The attack rate among contacts of confirmed cases in the same car was higher than that among contacts in other cars (3.15% vs. 0%, P < 0.001). Attack rates increased with exposure time. Conclusions Close contact and long exposure may have contributed to the transmission of 2009 H1N1 virus in the train. Trains may have played an important role in the 2009 influenza pandemic. PMID:21646746

  7. Mutations in the tail domain of DYNC1H1 cause dominant spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Harms, M.B.; Ori-McKenney, K.M.; Scoto, M.; Tuck, E.P.; Bell, S.; Ma, D.; Masi, S.; Allred, P.; Al-Lozi, M.; Reilly, M.M.; Miller, L.J.; Jani-Acsadi, A.; Pestronk, A.; Shy, M.E.; Muntoni, F.; Vallee, R.B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify the gene responsible for 14q32-linked dominant spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity predominance (SMA-LED, OMIM 158600). Methods: Target exon capture and next generation sequencing was used to analyze the 73 genes in the 14q32 linkage interval in 3 SMA-LED family members. Candidate gene sequencing in additional dominant SMA families used PCR and pooled target capture methods. Patient fibroblasts were biochemically analyzed. Results: Regional exome sequencing of all candidate genes in the 14q32 interval in the original SMA-LED family identified only one missense mutation that segregated with disease state—a mutation in the tail domain of DYNC1H1 (I584L). Sequencing of DYNC1H1 in 32 additional probands with lower extremity predominant SMA found 2 additional heterozygous tail domain mutations (K671E and Y970C), confirming that multiple different mutations in the same domain can cause a similar phenotype. Biochemical analysis of dynein purified from patient-derived fibroblasts demonstrated that the I584L mutation dominantly disrupted dynein complex stability and function. Conclusions: We demonstrate that mutations in the tail domain of the heavy chain of cytoplasmic dynein (DYNC1H1) cause spinal muscular atrophy and provide experimental evidence that a human DYNC1H1 mutation disrupts dynein complex assembly and function. DYNC1H1 mutations were recently found in a family with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (type 2O) and in a child with mental retardation. Both of these phenotypes show partial overlap with the spinal muscular atrophy patients described here, indicating that dynein dysfunction is associated with a range of phenotypes in humans involving neuronal development and maintenance. PMID:22459677

  8. Inside the Outbreak of the 2009 Influenza A (H1N1)v Virus in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Zepeda-Lopez, Hector M.; Perea-Araujo, Lizbeth; Miliar-García, Angel; Dominguez-López, Aarón; Xoconostle-Cázarez, Beatriz; Lara-Padilla, Eleazar; Ramírez Hernandez, Jorge A.; Sevilla-Reyes, Edgar; Orozco, Maria Esther; Ahued-Ortega, Armando; Villaseñor-Ruiz, Ignacio; Garcia-Cavazos, Ricardo J.; Teran, Luis M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Influenza viruses pose a threat to human health because of their potential to cause global disease. Between mid March and mid April a pandemic influenza A virus emerged in Mexico. This report details 202 cases of infection of humans with the 2009 influenza A virus (H1N1)v which occurred in Mexico City as well as the spread of the virus throughout the entire country. Methodology and Findings From May 1st to May 5th nasopharyngeal swabs, derived from 751 patients, were collected at 220 outpatient clinics and 28 hospitals distributed throughout Mexico City. Analysis of samples using real time RT-PCR revealed that 202 patients out of the 751 subjects (26.9%) were confirmed to be infected with the new virus. All confirmed cases of human infection with the strain influenza (H1N1)v suffered respiratory symptoms. The greatest number of confirmed cases during the outbreak of the 2009 influenza A (H1N1)v were seen in neighbourhoods on the northeast side of Mexico City including Iztapalapa, Gustavo A. Madero, Iztacalco, and Tlahuac which are the most populated areas in Mexico City. Using these data, together with data reported by the Mexican Secretariat of Health (MSH) to date, we plot the course of influenza (H1N1)v activity throughout Mexico. Conclusions Our data, which is backed up by MSH data, show that the greatest numbers of the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) cases were seen in the most populated areas. We speculate on conditions in Mexico which may have sparked this flu pandemic, the first in 41 years. We accept the hypothesis that high population density and a mass gathering which took in Iztapalapa contributed to the rapid spread of the disease which developed in three peaks of activity throughout the Country. PMID:20949040

  9. Ex vivo detection of histone H1 modified with advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Pashikanti, Srinath; Boissonneault, Gilbert A; Cervantes-Laurean, Daniel

    2011-05-15

    A number of oxidative stress agents cause DNA and protein damage, which may compromise genomic integrity. Whereas oxidant-induced DNA damage has been extensively studied, much less is known concerning the occurrence and fate of nuclear protein damage, particularly of proteins involved in the regulation and maintenance of chromatin structure. Protein damage may be caused by the formation of reactive carbonyl species such as glyoxal, which forms after lipid peroxide degradation. It may also result from degradation of early protein glycation adducts and from methylglyoxal, formed in the process of glycolytic intermediate degradation. Major adducts indicative of protein damage include the advanced glycation end product (AGE) carboxymethyllysine (CML) and argpyrimidine protein adducts. Thus, the formation of CML and argpyrimidine protein adducts represents potential biomarkers for nuclear protein damage deriving from a variety of sources. The purpose of this study was to identify and quantify AGE adducts formed in vivo in a nuclear protein, specifically histone H1, using CML and argpyrimidine as biomarkers. Histone H1 was isolated from calf thymus collected immediately after slaughter under conditions designed to minimize AGE formation before isolation. Using antibodies directed against oxidative protein adducts, we identified CML, argpyrimidine, and protein crosslinks present in the freshly isolated histone H1. Detailed mass spectroscopy analysis of histone H1 revealed the presence of two specific lysine residues modified by CML adducts. Our results strongly suggest that glycation of important nuclear protein targets such as histone H1 occurs in vivo and that these oxidative changes may alter chromatin structure, ultimately contributing to chronic changes associated with aging and diseases such as diabetes. PMID:21315148

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of vaccinia virus H1L phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Roces, Laura; Knowles, Phillip P.; Fox, Gavin; Juanhuix, Jordi; Scaplehorn, Nicki; Way, Michael; McDonald, Neil Q.

    2008-03-01

    A catalytically inactive mutant of the dual-specificity phosphatase H1L from vaccinia virus was expressed recombinantly, purified and crystallized by the microbatch method. The crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P422 and diffraction data were collected to 2.1 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. Attempts to derivatize these crystals with xenon gas lead to a space-group change to I422 with a smaller unit cell and a diffraction limit of 3.0 Å. The cysteine-based protein phosphatase H1L was the first reported dual-specificity protein phosphatase. H1L is encapsidated within the vaccinia virus and is required for successful host infection and for the production of viable vaccinia progeny. H1L has therefore been proposed as a target candidate for antiviral compounds. Recombinant H1L has been expressed in a catalytically inactive form using an Escherichia coli host, leading to purification and crystallization by the microbatch method. The crystals diffract to 2.1 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. These crystals belong to space group P422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 98.31, c = 169.15 Å, and are likely to contain four molecules in the asymmetric unit. A sulfur SAD data set was collected to 2.8 Å resolution on beamline BM14 at the ESRF to facilitate structure determination. Attempts to derivatize these crystals with xenon gas changed the space group to I422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 63.28, c = 169.68 Å and a single molecule in the asymmetric unit. The relationship between these two crystal forms is discussed.

  11. Proteolysis of the peanut allergen Ara h 1 by an endogenous aspartic protease.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Karl A; Tan-Wilson, Anna

    2015-11-01

    The 7S and 11S globulins of peanuts are subjected to proteolysis two days after seed imbibition, with Ara h 1 and the arachin acidic chains being among the first storage proteins to be mobilized. Proteolytic activity was greatest at pH 2.6-3 and is inhibited by pepstatin A, characteristic of an aspartic protease. This activity persists in seedling cotyledons up to at least 8 days after imbibition. In vitro proteolysis of Ara h 1 at pH 2.6 by extracts of cotyledons from seedlings harvested 24 h after seed imbibition generates newly appearing bands on SDS-PAGE. Partial sequences of Ara h 1 that were obtained through LC-MS/MS analysis of in-gel trypsin digests of those bands, combined with information on fragment size, suggest that proteolysis begins in the region that links the two cupin domains to produce two 33/34 kD fragments, each one encompassing an intact cupin domain. The later appearance of two 18 and 10/11 kD fragments can be explained by proteolysis within an exposed site in the cupin domains of each of the 33/34 kD fragments. The same or similar proteolytic activity was observed in developing seeds, but Ara h 1 remains intact through seed maturation. This is partly explained by the observation that acidification of the protein storage vacuoles, demonstrated by vacuolar accumulation of acridine orange that was dissipated by a membrane-permeable base, occurs only after germination. These findings suggest a method for use of the seed aspartic protease in reducing peanut allergy due to Ara h 1.

  12. 2009 H1N1 flu pandemic among professional basketball players: data from 18 countries.

    PubMed

    Kousoulis, Antonis A; Sergentanis, Theodoros N; Tsiodras, Sotirios

    2014-12-01

    Although influenza may be propagated in innumerable occasions and daily situations involving exposure, basketball may create many chances for close contact in which influenza could spread. This study aims to quantify and assess the impact of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic among professional basketball players. A multi-step strategy was followed to gather the relevant data during the 2009-10 basketball season. Possible risk factors were recorded; logistic regression was performed to assess the impact of the former. Where data were only available in the press, cases were also verified by subsequent communication with the national basketball federations. Relevant data were available for 18 countries (218 teams, 3,024 players). In all, 52 H1N1 cases in 19 teams were reported. A larger number of players presented as a risk factor for the emergence of H1N1 cases to a borderline extent (Odds Ratio, OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.00-1.41, p 0.056). A borderline association also implicated the population of the city-basis (OR 1.01, 95% CI 1.00-1.02, p 0.094). On the other hand, no significant association with risk of H1N1 emergence was demonstrated regarding latitude and longitude of the city-basis. Even in environments where the best possible preventive and other medical care is provided influenza continues to be a threat. The microenvironment (crowding index, players per team) seemed to represent the most meaningful predictor regarding H1N1 emergence in a basketball team.

  13. Uptake of 244Cm, 238Pu and other radionuclides by trees inhabiting a contaminated flood plain.

    PubMed

    Pinder, J E; McLeod, K W; Alberts, J J; Adriano, D C; Corey, J C

    1984-09-01

    The plant uptake of 244Cm, 137Cs, 238Pu and 90Sr was measured for trees in a flood plain forest whose soils were contaminated by aqueous discharges from a nuclear-fuel chemical separations facility. Uptake of the naturally occurring radionuclide 226Ra was also measured. The relative availability of the nuclides was 238Pu less than 244Cm less than 137Cs less than 226Ra less than or equal to 90Sr. The concentration ratios for 238Pu and 244Cm, 3 X 10(-4) and 3.6 X 10(-3), respectively, were similar to those reported for other plant-soil systems. The ratios for 137Cs and 90Sr, 0.11 and 3.9, were similar to those reported for other southeastern soils. However, the ratio for 226Ra, 2.1, was greater than that normally reported. These ratios, which were determined in the field, were generally similar to those reported for greenhouse studies on the same soil.

  14. The Genomic Contributions of Avian H1N1 Influenza A Viruses to the Evolution of Mammalian Strains.

    PubMed

    Koçer, Zeynep A; Carter, Robert; Wu, Gang; Zhang, Jinghui; Webster, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    Among the influenza A viruses (IAVs) in wild aquatic birds, only H1, H2, and H3 subtypes have caused epidemics in humans. H1N1 viruses of avian origin have also caused 3 of 5 pandemics. To understand the reappearance of H1N1 in the context of pandemic emergence, we investigated whether avian H1N1 IAVs have contributed to the evolution of human, swine, and 2009 pandemic H1N1 IAVs. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, we concluded that the polymerase gene segments (especially PB2 and PA) circulating in North American avian H1N1 IAVs have been reintroduced to swine multiple times, resulting in different lineages that led to the emergence of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 IAVs. Moreover, the similar topologies of hemagglutinin and nucleoprotein and neuraminidase and matrix gene segments suggest that each surface glycoprotein coevolved with an internal gene segment within the H1N1 subtype. The genotype of avian H1N1 IAVs of Charadriiformes origin isolated in 2009 differs from that of avian H1N1 IAVs of Anseriformes origin. When the antigenic sites in the hemagglutinin of all 31 North American avian H1N1 IAVs were considered, 60%-80% of the amino acids at the antigenic sites were identical to those in 1918 and/or 2009 pandemic H1N1 viruses. Thus, although the pathogenicity of avian H1N1 IAVs could not be inferred from the phylogeny due to the small dataset, the evolutionary process within the H1N1 IAV subtype suggests that the circulation of H1N1 IAVs in wild birds poses a continuous threat for future influenza pandemics in humans. PMID:26208281

  15. The Genomic Contributions of Avian H1N1 Influenza A Viruses to the Evolution of Mammalian Strains.

    PubMed

    Koçer, Zeynep A; Carter, Robert; Wu, Gang; Zhang, Jinghui; Webster, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    Among the influenza A viruses (IAVs) in wild aquatic birds, only H1, H2, and H3 subtypes have caused epidemics in humans. H1N1 viruses of avian origin have also caused 3 of 5 pandemics. To understand the reappearance of H1N1 in the context of pandemic emergence, we investigated whether avian H1N1 IAVs have contributed to the evolution of human, swine, and 2009 pandemic H1N1 IAVs. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, we concluded that the polymerase gene segments (especially PB2 and PA) circulating in North American avian H1N1 IAVs have been reintroduced to swine multiple times, resulting in different lineages that led to the emergence of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 IAVs. Moreover, the similar topologies of hemagglutinin and nucleoprotein and neuraminidase and matrix gene segments suggest that each surface glycoprotein coevolved with an internal gene segment within the H1N1 subtype. The genotype of avian H1N1 IAVs of Charadriiformes origin isolated in 2009 differs from that of avian H1N1 IAVs of Anseriformes origin. When the antigenic sites in the hemagglutinin of all 31 North American avian H1N1 IAVs were considered, 60%-80% of the amino acids at the antigenic sites were identical to those in 1918 and/or 2009 pandemic H1N1 viruses. Thus, although the pathogenicity of avian H1N1 IAVs could not be inferred from the phylogeny due to the small dataset, the evolutionary process within the H1N1 IAV subtype suggests that the circulation of H1N1 IAVs in wild birds poses a continuous threat for future influenza pandemics in humans.

  16. Humans and Ferrets with Prior H1N1 Influenza Virus Infections Do Not Exhibit Evidence of Original Antigenic Sin after Infection or Vaccination with the 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Christopher D.; Wright, Amber; Vogel, Leatrice; Boonnak, Kobporn; Treanor, John J.

    2014-01-01

    The hypothesis of original antigenic sin (OAS) states that the imprint established by an individual's first influenza virus infection governs the antibody response thereafter. Subsequent influenza virus infection results in an antibody response against the original infecting virus and an impaired immune response against the newer influenza virus. The purpose of our study was to seek evidence of OAS after infection or vaccination with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (2009 pH1N1) virus in ferrets and humans previously infected with H1N1 viruses with various antigenic distances from the 2009 pH1N1 virus, including viruses from 1935 through 1999. In ferrets, seasonal H1N1 priming did not diminish the antibody response to infection or vaccination with the 2009 pH1N1 virus, nor did it diminish the T-cell response, indicating the absence of OAS in seasonal H1N1 virus-primed ferrets. Analysis of paired samples of human serum taken before and after vaccination with a monovalent inactivated 2009 pH1N1 vaccine showed a significantly greater-fold rise in the titer of antibody against the 2009 pH1N1 virus than against H1N1 viruses that circulated during the childhood of each subject. Thus, prior experience with H1N1 viruses did not result in an impairment of the antibody response against the 2009 pH1N1 vaccine. Our data from ferrets and humans suggest that prior exposure to H1N1 viruses did not impair the immune response against the 2009 pH1N1 virus. PMID:24648486

  17. Pre-infection of pigs with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae modifies outcomes of infection with European swine influenza virus of H1N1, but not H1N2, subtype.

    PubMed

    Deblanc, C; Gorin, S; Quéguiner, S; Gautier-Bouchardon, A V; Ferré, S; Amenna, N; Cariolet, R; Simon, G

    2012-05-25

    Swine influenza virus (SIV) and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhp) are widespread in farms and are major pathogens involved in the porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). The aim of this experiment was to compare the pathogenicity of European avian-like swine H1N1 and European human-like reassortant swine H1N2 viruses in naïve pigs and in pigs previously infected with Mhp. Six groups of SPF pigs were inoculated intra-tracheally with either Mhp, or H1N1, or H1N2 or Mhp+H1N1 or Mhp+H1N2, both pathogens being inoculated at 21 days intervals in these two last groups. A mock-infected group was included. Although both SIV strains induced clinical signs when singly inoculated, results indicated that the H1N2 SIV was more pathogenic than the H1N1 virus, with an earlier shedding and a greater spread in lungs. Initial infection with Mhp before SIV inoculation increased flu clinical signs and pathogenesis (hyperthermia, loss of appetite, pneumonia lesions) due to the H1N1 virus but did not modify significantly outcomes of H1N2 infection. Thus, Mhp and SIV H1N1 appeared to act synergistically, whereas Mhp and SIV H1N2 would compete, as H1N2 infection led to the elimination of Mhp in lung diaphragmatic lobes. In conclusion, SIV would be a risk factor for the severity of respiratory disorders when associated with Mhp, depending on the viral subtype involved. This experimental model of coinfection with Mhp and avian-like swine H1N1 is a relevant tool for studying the pathogenesis of SIV-associated PRDC and testing intervention strategies for the control of the disease.

  18. Cerebral hypometabolism and grey matter density in MAPT intron 10 +3 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Deters, Kacie D; Risacher, Shannon L; Farlow, Martin R; Unverzagt, Frederick W; Kareken, David A; Hutchins, Gary D; Yoder, Karmen K; Murrell, Jill R; Spina, Salvatore; Epperson, Francine; Gao, Sujuan; Saykin, Andrew J; Ghetti, Bernardino

    2014-01-01

    Multiple systems tauopathy with presenile dementia (MSTD), a form of frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism-17 with tau inclusions (FTDP-17T), is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by an (a) to (g) transition at position +3 of intron 10 of the microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT) gene. The mutation causes overexpression of 4 repeat (4R) tau isoforms with increased 4R/3R ratio leading to neurodegeneration. Clinically, these patients primarily present with behavioral variant FTD (bvFTD) and show disinhibition, disordered social comportment, and impaired executive function, memory, and speech. While altered glucose metabolism has been reported in subjects with sporadic bvFTD, it has yet to be investigated in an FTDP-17 sample of this size. In this study, eleven mutation carriers (5 males; mean age = 48.0 ± 6.9 years) and eight non-carriers (2 males; mean age = 43.7 ± 12.0 years) from a MSTD family were imaged using [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). Eight of the MAPT intron 10 +3 mutation carriers met diagnostic criteria for bvFTD at the time of the PET scan, while three MAPT intron 10 +3 carriers were not cognitively impaired at the time of scan. Non-carriers had no clinically-relevant cognitive impairment at the time of the PET scan. Additionally, ten mutation carriers (5 males; mean age = 48.04 ± 2.1 years) and seven non-carriers (2 males; mean age 46.1 ± 4.1 years) underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which is an expanded sample size from a previous study. Seven MAPT mutation carriers met diagnostic criteria for bvFTD at the time of the MRI scan. Images were assessed on a voxel-wise basis for the effect of mutation carrier status. SPM8 was used for preprocessing and statistical analyses. Compared to non-carriers, MAPT mutation carriers showed lower [(18)F]FDG uptake bilaterally in the medial temporal lobe, and the parietal and frontal cortices. Anatomical changes were predominantly seen bilaterally in the medial

  19. Immunochemical studies on the specific agglutinogens of Staphylococcus aureus. I. Isolation and characterization of antigen h1.

    PubMed

    Grov, A; Flandrois, J P; Fleurette, J; Oeding, P

    1978-06-01

    The specific Staphylococcus aureus agglutinogen h1 has been purified and shown to be a protein with a molecular weight of about 95,000. Chemical analysis revealed all the common amino acids, except tyrosine and the sulphur-containing ones. The purified h1 antigen was strongly immunogenic in rabbits. The antiserum produced one precipitation line on double diffusion in agar against a suspension of bacteria. It also agglutinated bacteria of the h1-containing strains, as well as tanned sheep erythrocytes sensitized with h1, in high dilutions. Antibodies to other known staphylococcal antigens were not detected. The identity between h1 and Pillet's type 9 antigen was confirmed. PMID:102107

  20. Influence of chromatin structure, antibiotics, and endogenous histone methylation on phosphorylation of histones H1 and H3 in the presence of protein kinase A in rat liver nuclei in vitro.

    PubMed

    Prusov, A N; Smirnova, T A; Kolomijtseva, G Ya

    2013-02-01

    In vitro phosphorylation of histones H1 and H3 by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A and endogenous phosphokinases in the presence of [γ-³²P]ATP was studied in isolated rat liver nuclei with different variants of chromatin structural organization: condensed (diameter of fibrils 100-200 nm; N-1) and partly decondensed (diameter of fibrils ~30 nm; N-2). In the N-1 state histone, H1 is phosphorylated approximately twice as much than histone H3. Upon the decondensation of the chromatin in the N-2 state, 1.5-fold decrease of total phosphorylation of H1 is observed, while that of H3 does not change, although the endogenous phosphorylation of both histones is reduced by half. Changes in histone phosphorylation in the presence of low or high concentrations of distamycin and chromomycin differ for H1 and H3 in N-1 and N-2. It was found that distamycin (DM) stimulates the phosphorylation of tightly bound H1 fraction, which is not extractable by polyglutamic acid (PG), especially in N-1. Chromomycin (CM) increases the phosphorylation of both histones in PG extracts and in the nuclear pellets, particularly in N-2. At the same time, in N-1 one can detect phosphorylation of a tightly bound fraction of histones H1 whose N-termini are located on AT-rich sites that become inaccessible for protein kinase in the process of chromatin decondensation in N-2. At the same time, in N-2 the accessibility for protein kinase A of tightly bound H1 fractions, whose N-termini are located on GC-rich sites, increases dramatically. High concentrations of both CM and DM in N-1 and N-2 stimulated phosphorylation of the non-extractable by PG fraction of H1 whose N-termini are located on sites where AT ≈ GC. CM at high concentration stimulated 4-7 times the phosphorylation of a small fraction of H3, which is extracted by PG from both types of nuclei. We detected an effect of endogenous methylation of histones H1 and H3 in the nuclei on their subsequent phosphorylation depending on the chromatin

  1. Evaluation of CM5 Charges for Condensed-Phase Modeling.

    PubMed

    Vilseck, Jonah Z; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L

    2014-07-01

    The recently developed Charge Model 5 (CM5) is tested for its utility in condensed-phase simulations. The CM5 approach, which derives partial atomic charges from Hirshfeld population analyses, provides excellent results for gas-phase dipole moments and is applicable to all elements of the periodic table. Herein, the adequacy of scaled CM5 charges for use in modeling aqueous solutions has been evaluated by computing free energies of hydration (ΔG hyd) for 42 neutral organic molecules via Monte Carlo statistical mechanics. An optimal scaling factor for the CM5 charges was determined to be 1.27, resulting in a mean unsigned error (MUE) of 1.1 kcal/mol for the free energies of hydration. Testing for an additional 20 molecules gave an MUE of 1.3 kcal/mol. The high precision of the results is confirmed by free energy calculations using both sequential perturbations and complete molecular annihilation. Performance for specific functional groups is discussed; sulfur-containing molecules yield the largest errors. In addition, the scaling factor of 1.27 is shown to be appropriate for CM5 charges derived from a variety of density functional methods and basis sets. Though the average errors from the 1.27*CM5 results are only slightly lower than those using 1.14*CM1A charges, the broader applicability and easier access to CM5 charges via the Gaussian program are additional attractive features. The 1.27*CM5 charge model can be used for an enormous variety of applications in conjunction with many fixed-charge force fields and molecular modeling programs. PMID:25061445

  2. Proportions of H1 histone subspecies in human fibroblasts shift during density-dependent growth arrest independent of replicative senescence.

    PubMed

    Houde, M; Shmookler Reis, R J; Goldstein, S

    1989-09-01

    H1 histone subspecies have been reported to vary during tissue differentiation, during aging of mammalian tissues, and as a function of DNA replicative activity. Since cultured human fibroblasts have a limited replicative life span which features arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, we sought to distinguish whether any changes in the proportions of the principal H1 histone subspecies (H1A, H1B, and H1o) in late-passage fibroblasts were specific for senescent loss of replicative potential, or rather ensued as a result of prolonged inhibition of cell division. We observed an identical shift in the proportions of H1 histone subspecies during prolonged density-dependent inhibition of growth in both early-passage and late-passage cells. Since under these conditions there were no passage-specific changes, replicative senescence of human fibroblasts does not appear to involve a defect in the control of H1 histone proportions.

  3. Ion accelerator systems for high power 30 cm thruster operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G.

    1982-01-01

    Two and three-grid accelerator systems for high power ion thruster operation were investigated. Two-grid translation tests show that over compensation of the 30 cm thruster SHAG grid set spacing the 30 cm thruster radial plasma density variation and by incorporating grid compensation only sufficient to maintain grid hole axial alignment, it is shown that beam current gains as large as 50% can be realized. Three-grid translation tests performed with a simulated 30 cm thruster discharge chamber show that substantial beamlet steering can be reliably affected by decelerator grid translation only, at net-to-total voltage ratios as low as 0.05.

  4. Eight-cm mercury ion thruster system technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The technology status of 8 cm diameter electron bombardment ion thrusters is presented. Much of the technology resulting from the 5 cm diameter thruster has been adapted and improved upon to increase the reliability, durability, and efficiency of the 8 cm thruster. Technology discussed includes: dependence of neutralizer tip erosion upon neutralizer flow rate; impregnated and rolled-foil insert cathode performance and life testing; neutralizer position studies; thruster ion beam profile measurements; high voltage pulse ignition; high utilization ion machined accelerator grids; deposition internal and external to the thruster; thruster vectoring systems; thruster cycling life testing and thruster system weights for typical mission applications.

  5. Bioavailability, biodistribution, and CNS toxicity of clinical-grade parvovirus H1 after intravenous and intracerebral injection in rats.

    PubMed

    Geletneky, Karsten; Leoni, Anne-Laure; Pohlmeyer-Esch, Gabriele; Loebhard, Stephanie; Leuchs, Barbara; Hoefer, Constance; Jochims, Karin; Dahm, Michael; Huber, Bernard; Rommelaere, Jean; Krebs, Ottheinz; Hajda, Jacek

    2015-02-01

    The autonomous parvovirus H1 (H1PV) is transmitted in rodent populations. The natural host is the rat, in which H1PV infection is pathogenic only in fetuses and newborns. H1PV infection of human cancer cells leads to strong oncolytic effects in preclinical models. In preparation for a clinical trial of H1PV injection in patients with malignant brain tumors, H1PV had to be prepared to Good Manufacturing Practice standards, including extensive toxicology testing in rats. Because the trial involves direct intracerebral injection of H1PV into the tumor and around the resection cavity, possible toxicity to CNS tissue had to be investigated. In addition, quantitative blood levels and the tissue distribution of H1PV after single intracerebral or intravenous injection were measured. Direct injection of H1PV into rat brain at 3 dose levels (maximum, 7.96 × 107 pfu) did not cause any macroscopic or histologic pathology. Furthermore, H1PV infection of the brain did not alter central or autonomous nervous system function. H1PV DNA was detected in almost all organs at 6 h, 48 h, and 14 d after intravenous and intracerebral injection, with the highest levels in liver and spleen. H1PV concentrations in most organs were similar after intravenous and intracerebral injection, indicating high permeability of the blood-brain barrier for this small virus. The current results demonstrate wide organ distribution of H1PV after intravenous or intracerebral injection, confirm that H1PV is nonpathogenic in adult rats even after direct injection into the brain, and form the basis for the ongoing ParvOryx01 clinical trial. PMID:25730755

  6. Genetic characterization of Thai swine influenza viruses after the introduction of pandemic H1N1 2009.

    PubMed

    Charoenvisal, Nataya; Keawcharoen, Juthatip; Sreta, Donruethai; Chaiyawong, Supassama; Nonthabenjawan, Nutthawan; Tantawet, Siriporn; Jittimanee, Suphattra; Arunorat, Jirapat; Amonsin, Alongkorn; Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje

    2013-08-01

    Pandemic H1N1 2009 (pH1N1), influenza virus containing triple reassortant internal genes (TRIG) from avian, human, and swine influenza viruses emerged in 2009 as a highly infectious virus that was able to be transmitted from humans to pigs. During June 2010-May 2012, influenza virus surveillance was conducted in Thai pig population. Twenty-three samples (1.75%) were successfully isolated from total of 1,335 samples. Interestingly, pH1N1 (7 isolates, 30.34%), reassortant pH1N1 (rH1N1) (1 isolate, 4.35%), Thai endemic H1N1 (enH1N1) (3 isolates, 13.04%), reassortant H3N2 with pH1N1 internal genes (rH3N2) (9 isolates, 39.13%), and reassortant H1N2 with pH1N1 internal genes (rH1N2) (3 isolates, 13.04%) were found. It should be noted that rH1N1, rH1N2, and rH3N2 viruses contained the internal genes of pH1N1 virus having a TRIG cassette descendant from the North American swine lineage. Although all isolates in this study were obtained from mild clinically sick pigs, the viruses were still highly infective and possibly may play an important role in human-animal interfacing transmission. In addition, the TRIG cassette may have an influence on antigenic shift resulting in emergence of novel viruses, as seen in this study. Continuing surveillance of influenza A natural hosts, particularly in pigs is necessary.

  7. CM Process Improvement and the International Space Station Program (ISSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephenson, Ginny

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Configuration Management (CM) process improvements planned and undertaken for the International Space Station Program (ISSP). It reviews the 2004 findings and recommendations and the progress towards their implementation.

  8. Benchmarking and performance analysis of the CM-2. [SIMD computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, David W.; Adams, George B., II

    1988-01-01

    A suite of benchmarking routines testing communication, basic arithmetic operations, and selected kernel algorithms written in LISP and PARIS was developed for the CM-2. Experiment runs are automated via a software framework that sequences individual tests, allowing for unattended overnight operation. Multiple measurements are made and treated statistically to generate well-characterized results from the noisy values given by cm:time. The results obtained provide a comparison with similar, but less extensive, testing done on a CM-1. Tests were chosen to aid the algorithmist in constructing fast, efficient, and correct code on the CM-2, as well as gain insight into what performance criteria are needed when evaluating parallel processing machines.

  9. Spectral reflectance properties of carbonaceous chondrites: 2. CM chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloutis, E. A.; Hudon, P.; Hiroi, T.; Gaffey, M. J.; Mann, P.

    2011-11-01

    We have examined the spectral reflectance properties and available modal mineralogies of 39 CM carbonaceous chondrites to determine their range of spectral variability and to diagnose their spectral features. We have also reviewed the published literature on CM mineralogy and subclassification, surveyed the published spectral literature and added new measurements of CM chondrites and relevant end members and mineral mixtures, and measured 11 parameters and searched pair-wise for correlations between all quantities. CM spectra are characterized by overall slopes that can range from modestly blue-sloped to red-sloped, with brighter spectra being generally more red-sloped. Spectral slopes, as measured by the 2.4:0.56 μm and 2.4 μm:visible region peak reflectance ratios, range from 0.90 to 2.32, and 0.81 to 2.24, respectively, with values <1 indicating blue-sloped spectra. Matrix-enriched CM spectra can be even more blue-sloped than bulk samples, with ratios as low as 0.85. There is no apparent correlation between spectral slope and grain size for CM chondrite spectra - both fine-grained powders and chips can exhibit blue-sloped spectra. Maximum reflectance across the 0.3-2.5 μm interval ranges from 2.9% to 20.0%, and from 2.8% to 14.0% at 0.56 μm. Matrix-enriched CM spectra can be darker than bulk samples, with maximum reflectance as low as 2.1%. CM spectra exhibit nearly ubiquitous absorption bands near 0.7, 0.9, and 1.1 μm, with depths up to 12%, and, less commonly, absorption bands in other wavelength regions (e.g., 0.4-0.5, 0.65, 2.2 μm). The depths of the 0.7, 0.9, and 1.1 μm absorption features vary largely in tandem, suggesting a single cause, specifically serpentine-group phyllosilicates. The generally high Fe content, high phyllosilicate abundance relative to mafic silicates, and dual Fe valence state in CM phyllosilicates, all suggest that the phyllosilicates will exhibit strong absorption bands in the 0.7 μm region (due to Fe 3+-Fe 2+ charge

  10. CmWRKY15 Facilitates Alternaria tenuissima Infection of Chrysanthemum.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qingqing; Song, Aiping; Xin, Jingjing; Chen, Sumei; Jiang, Jiafu; Wang, Yinjie; Li, Xiran; Chen, Fadi

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) has an important role in the responses of plants to pathogens due to its ability to induce stomatal closure and interact with salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA). WRKY transcription factors serve as antagonistic or synergistic regulators in the response of plants to a variety of pathogens. Here, we demonstrated that CmWRKY15, a group IIa WRKY family member, was not transcriptionally activated in yeast cells. Subcellular localization experiments in which onion epidermal cells were transiently transfected with CmWRKY15 indicated that CmWRKY15 localized to the nucleus in vivo. The expression of CmWRKY15 could be markedly induced by the presence of Alternaria tenuissima inoculum in chrysanthemum. Furthermore, the disease severity index (DSI) data of CmWRKY15-overexpressing plants indicated that CmWRKY15 overexpression enhanced the susceptibility of chrysanthemum to A. tenuissima infection compared to controls. To illustrate the mechanisms by which CmWRKY15 regulates the response to A. tenuissima inoculation, the expression levels of ABA-responsive and ABA signaling genes, such as ABF4, ABI4, ABI5, MYB2, RAB18, DREB1A, DREB2A, PYL2, PP2C, RCAR1, SnRK2.2, SnRK2.3, NCED3A, NCED3B, GTG1, AKT1, AKT2, KAT1, KAT2, and KC1were compared between transgenic plants and controls. In summary, our data suggest that CmWRKY15 might facilitate A. tenuissima infection by antagonistically regulating the expression of ABA-responsive genes and genes involved in ABA signaling, either directly or indirectly. PMID:26600125

  11. New results on the ternary fission of 243Cm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyse, J.; Wagemans, C.; Vermote, S.; Serot, O.; Geltenbort, P.; Soldner, T.; Van Gils, J.

    2005-11-01

    Ternary fission is an important source of He and tritium gas in nuclear reactors and used fuel elements. Therefore a systematic study of the ternary fission yields for 4He and tritons (t) is being performed. In recent years the influence of the excitation energy of the fissioning nucleus on the triton emission probability (t/B) has been investigated for different Cm and Cf isotopes. In this paper we report on new results on the neutron induced fission of 243Cm.

  12. CmWRKY15 Facilitates Alternaria tenuissima Infection of Chrysanthemum

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Qingqing; Song, Aiping; Xin, Jingjing; Chen, Sumei; Jiang, Jiafu; Wang, Yinjie; Li, Xiran; Chen, Fadi

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) has an important role in the responses of plants to pathogens due to its ability to induce stomatal closure and interact with salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA). WRKY transcription factors serve as antagonistic or synergistic regulators in the response of plants to a variety of pathogens. Here, we demonstrated that CmWRKY15, a group IIa WRKY family member, was not transcriptionally activated in yeast cells. Subcellular localization experiments in which onion epidermal cells were transiently transfected with CmWRKY15 indicated that CmWRKY15 localized to the nucleus in vivo. The expression of CmWRKY15 could be markedly induced by the presence of Alternaria tenuissima inoculum in chrysanthemum. Furthermore, the disease severity index (DSI) data of CmWRKY15-overexpressing plants indicated that CmWRKY15 overexpression enhanced the susceptibility of chrysanthemum to A. tenuissima infection compared to controls. To illustrate the mechanisms by which CmWRKY15 regulates the response to A. tenuissima inoculation, the expression levels of ABA-responsive and ABA signaling genes, such as ABF4, ABI4, ABI5, MYB2, RAB18, DREB1A, DREB2A, PYL2, PP2C, RCAR1, SnRK2.2, SnRK2.3, NCED3A, NCED3B, GTG1, AKT1, AKT2, KAT1, KAT2, and KC1were compared between transgenic plants and controls. In summary, our data suggest that CmWRKY15 might facilitate A. tenuissima infection by antagonistically regulating the expression of ABA-responsive genes and genes involved in ABA signaling, either directly or indirectly. PMID:26600125

  13. Vaccine Narratives and Public Health: Investigating Criticisms of H1N1 Pandemic Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Abeysinghe, Sudeepa

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine hesitancy is often understood and explored on the level of individual decision-making. However, questions surrounding the risk and efficacy of vaccination are evident in wider public discourse; social narratives of vaccination inform and impact on the individual level. This paper takes a narrative analysis approach from the sociology of health to examine data drawn from a wider study on global public health responses to the H1N1 pandemic. The paper concentrates upon criticisms to mass vaccination as recounted within the Council of Europe’s debate of the handling of H1N1. It shows that three narratives were particularly dominant: problematizing the use of vaccination as a public health response; criticising the efficacy of the vaccines; and, questioning the safety of the strategy. This debate presents an important case study in understanding the way in which vaccines are problematized within the public discourse. PMID:25789204

  14. Molecular docking of selected phytocompounds with H1N1 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Alhazmi, Mohammed I

    2015-01-01

    The H1N1 influenza virus is a serious threat to human population. Oseltamivir and Zanamivir are known antiviral drugs for swine flu with observed side effects. These drugs are viral neuraminidase and hemagglutinin inhibitor prevents early virus multiplication by blocking sialic acid cleavage on host cells. Therefore, it is of interest to identify naturally occurring novel compounds to control viral growth. Thus, H1N1 proteins (neuraminidase and hemagglutinin) were screened with phytocompounds isolated from Tulsi plant (Ocimum sanctum L.) using molecular docking tools. This identified Apigenin as an alternative to Oseltamivir and Zanamivir with improved predicted binding properties. Hence, it is of interest to consider this compound for further in vitro and in vivo evaluation. PMID:26124560

  15. Nosocomial Pandemic (H1N1) 2009, United Kingdom, 2009–2010

    PubMed Central

    Myles, Puja R.; Openshaw, Peter J.M.; Gadd, Elaine M.; Lim, Wei Shen; Semple, Malcolm G.; Read, Robert C.; Taylor, Bruce L.; McMenamin, James; Armstrong, Colin; Bannister, Barbara; Nicholson, Karl G.; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Jonathan S.

    2011-01-01

    To determine clinical characteristics of patients hospitalized in the United Kingdom with pandemic (H1N1) 2009, we studied 1,520 patients in 75 National Health Service hospitals. We characterized patients who acquired influenza nosocomially during the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak. Of 30 patients, 12 (80%) of 15 adults and 14 (93%) of 15 children had serious underlying illnesses. Only 12 (57%) of 21 patients who received antiviral therapy did so within 48 hours after symptom onset, but 53% needed escalated care or mechanical ventilation; 8 (27%) of 30 died. Despite national guidelines and standardized infection control procedures, nosocomial transmission remains a problem when influenza is prevalent. Health care workers should be routinely offered influenza vaccine, and vaccination should be prioritized for all patients at high risk. Staff should remain alert to the possibility of influenza in patients with complex clinical problems and be ready to institute antiviral therapy while awaiting diagnosis during influenza outbreaks. PMID:21470446

  16. Molecular docking of selected phytocompounds with H1N1 Proteins.

    PubMed

    Alhazmi, Mohammed I

    2015-01-01

    The H1N1 influenza virus is a serious threat to human population. Oseltamivir and Zanamivir are known antiviral drugs for swine flu with observed side effects. These drugs are viral neuraminidase and hemagglutinin inhibitor prevents early virus multiplication by blocking sialic acid cleavage on host cells. Therefore, it is of interest to identify naturally occurring novel compounds to control viral growth. Thus, H1N1 proteins (neuraminidase and hemagglutinin) were screened with phytocompounds isolated from Tulsi plant (Ocimum sanctum L.) using molecular docking tools. This identified Apigenin as an alternative to Oseltamivir and Zanamivir with improved predicted binding properties. Hence, it is of interest to consider this compound for further in vitro and in vivo evaluation. PMID:26124560

  17. [A cyclotide against influenza A H1N1 virus from Viola yedoensis].

    PubMed

    Liu, Min-Zhi; Yang, Yan; Zhang, Shu-Xiang; Tang, Liang; Wang, Hui-Min; Chen, Cheng-Juan; Shen, Zhu-Fang; Cheng, Ke-Di; Kong, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Wei

    2014-06-01

    Three cyclotides were isolated from the whole plant of Viola yedoensis in this study. The two, vary peptide E and cycloviolacin Y5, were previously reported, and a novel cycloviolacin VY1 was characterized according to the interpretation of MS/MS fragmentation of peptides which were produced from the reduced and alkylated parent peptide with the digestion of Endo Lys-C, trypsin and chymotrypsin, separately. The stability of remarkable resistance to proteolytic degradation by trypsin and chymotrypsin, and that of thermal denaturation was confirmed again. Besides, the IC50 value of cycloviolacin VY1 against influenza A H1N1 virus was (2.27 +/- 0.20) microg x mL(-1). It is the first cyclotide reported with anti-influenza A H1N1 virus activity in vitro assay.

  18. Quantum Dots in H1 Photonic Crystal Microcavities for Quantum Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagemeier, Jenna; Bonato, Cristian; Truong, Tuan-Anh; Kim, Hyochul; Bakker, Morten; Beirne, Gareth J.; van Exter, Martin P.; Petroff, Pierre; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2013-03-01

    Coupling semiconductor quantum dots to optical microcavities is a promising technique for implementing quantum information processing protocols in the solid-state. By placing one or more emitters in a cavity, it is possible to create an efficient source of single photons or to explore collective interactions of few-emitter systems. Our devices consist of two layers of quantum dots, embedded in the cavity region of H1 photonic crystal microcavities. One of the quantum dot layers can be frequency-tuned deterministically, allowing two resonant quantum dots to be coupled to a single cavity mode. Because good mode-matching between the cavity mode and the input/output channel is necessary for many applications, we optimize the far-field profiles of our H1 cavities and demonstrate strong enhancement of the external mode matching properties. We will discuss our far-field optimization results as well as our ongoing work to study interactions of multiple emitters in a cavity.

  19. Cluster analysis of the origins of the new influenza A(H1N1) virus.

    PubMed

    Solovyov, A; Palacios, G; Briese, T; Lipkin, W I; Rabadan, R

    2009-05-28

    In March and April 2009, a new strain of influenza A(H1N1) virus has been isolated in Mexico and the United States. Since the initial reports more than 10,000 cases have been reported to the World Health Organization, all around the world. Several hundred isolates have already been sequenced and deposited in public databases. We have studied the genetics of the new strain and identified its closest relatives through a cluster analysis approach. We show that the new virus combines genetic information related to different swine influenza viruses. Segments PB2, PB1, PA, HA, NP and NS are related to swine H1N2 and H3N2 influenza viruses isolated in North America. Segments NA and M are related to swine influenza viruses isolated in Eurasia. PMID:19480812

  20. Blood libel rebooted: traditional scapegoats, online media, and the H1N1 epidemic.

    PubMed

    Atlani-Duault, L; Mercier, A; Rousseau, C; Guyot, P; Moatti, J P

    2015-03-01

    This study of comments posted on major French print and TV media websites during the H1N1 epidemic illustrates the relationship between the traditional media and social media in responding to an emerging disease. A disturbing "geography of blame" was observed suggesting the metamorphosis of the folk-devil phenomenon to the Internet. We discovered a subterranean discourse about the putative origins and "objectives" of the H1N1 virus, which was absent from the discussions in mainstream television channels and large-circulation print media. These online rumours attributed hidden motives to governments, pharmaceutical companies, and figures of Otherness that were scapegoated in the social history of previous European epidemics, notably Freemasons and Jews.

  1. Novel influenza A (H1N1) in patients with hematologic disease.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ju-ying; Chen, Fei-fei; Jin, Jie; Mai, Wen-yuan; Qian, Wen-bin; Meng, Hai-tao; Mao, Li-ping; Xu, Gai-xiang; Wang, Hua-feng; Lou, Yin-jun; Tong, Hong-yan

    2010-11-01

    Patients with hematologic disease are likely to be at increased risk for infection with influenza. We retrospectively analyzed 11 cases of patients with hematologic disease who were infected with pandemic H1N1 virus in our department, including their clinical manifestations, laboratory and imaging findings, outcomes of antiviral therapy, and factors associated with mortality. Notably, nine patients had lower respiratory tract disease. Five patients progressed to respiratory failure and eventually died, despite treatment with antivirals and/or corticosteroids and/or mechanical ventilation. We concluded that H1N1 2009 infection was associated with a severe course and high rate of mortality in patients with hematologic disease, and early diagnosis and antiviral treatment were important to reduce the rate of severe complications and mortality. PMID:21077745

  2. Early Outbreak of 2009 Influenza A (H1N1) in Mexico Prior to Identification of pH1N1 Virus

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ying-Hen; Ma, Stefan; Velasco Hernandez, Jorge X.; Lee, Vernon J.; Lim, Wei Yen

    2011-01-01

    Background In the aftermath of the global spread of 2009 influenza A (pH1N1) virus, still very little is known of the early stages of the outbreak in Mexico during the early months of the year, before the virus was identified. Methodology/Main Findings We fit a simple mathematical model, the Richards model, to the number of excess laboratory-confirmed influenza cases in Mexico and Mexico City during the first 15 weeks in 2009 over the average influenza case number of the previous five baseline years of 2004-2008 during the same period to ascertain the turning point (or the peak incidence) of a wave of early influenza infections, and to estimate the transmissibility of the virus during these early months in terms of its basic reproduction number. The results indicate that there may have been an early epidemic in Mexico City as well as in all of Mexico during February/March. Based on excess influenza cases, the estimated basic reproduction number R0 for the early outbreak was 1.59 (0.55 to 2.62) for Mexico City during weeks 5–9, and 1.25 (0.76, 1.74) for all of Mexico during weeks 5–14. Conclusions We established the existence of an early epidemic in Mexico City and in all of Mexico during February/March utilizing the routine influenza surveillance data, although the location of seeding is unknown. Moreover, estimates of R0 as well as the time of peak incidence (the turning point) for Mexico City and all of Mexico indicate that the early epidemic in Mexico City in February/March had been more transmissible (larger R0) and peaked earlier than the rest of the country. Our conclusion lends support to the possibility that the virus could have already spread to other continents prior to the identification of the virus and the reporting of lab-confirmed pH1N1 cases in North America in April. PMID:21909366

  3. Synthesis and anti-cancer screening of novel heterocyclic-(2H)-1,2,3-triazoles as potential anti-cancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Penthala, Narsimha Reddy; Madhukuri, Leena; Thakkar, Shraddha; Madadi, Nikhil Reddy; Lamture, Gauri; Eoff, Robert L.; Crooks, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    trans-Cyanocombretastatin A-4 (trans-CA-4) analogues have been structurally modified to afford their more stable CA-4-(2H)-1,2,3-triazole analogues. Fifteen novel, stable 4-heteroaryl-5-aryl-(2H)-1,2,3-triazole CA-4 analogues (8a–i, 9 and 11a–e) were evaluated for anti-cancer activity against a panel of 60 human cancer cell lines. These analogues displayed potent cytotoxic activity against both hematological and solid tumor cell lines with GI50 values in the low nanomolar range. The most potent compound, 8a, was a benzothiophen-2-yl analogue that incorporated a 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl moiety connected to the (2H)-1,2,3-triazole ring system. Compound 8a exhibited GI50 values of <10 nM against 80% of the cancer cell lines in the panel. Three triazole analogues, 8a, 8b and 8g, showed particularly potent growth inhibition against the triple negative Hs578T breast cancer cell line with GI50 values of 10.3 nM, 66.5 nM and 20.3 nM, respectively. Molecular docking studies suggest that these compounds bind to the same hydrophobic pocket at the interface of α- and β-tubulin that is occupied by colchicine and cis-CA-4, and are stabilized by Van der Waals’ interactions with surrounding amino acid residues. Compound 8a was found to inhibit tubulin polymerization in vitro with an IC50 value of 1.7 µM. The potent cytotoxicity of these novel compounds and their inhibition of tubulin dynamics make these triazole analogues promising candidates for development as anti-cancer drugs. PMID:27066215

  4. Measurement of prompt photon cross sections in photoproduction at H1

    SciTech Connect

    Ferencei, Jozef

    2005-10-06

    Cross section measurements of isolated prompt photons, inclusively and associated with jets, have been made at the HERA ep collider with the H1 detector, using the data taken in the years 1996-2000 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 105 pb-1. The results are compared to a perturbative QCD calculations in next to leading order and to predictions of the event generators PYTHIA and HERWIG.

  5. The chicken H5 gene is unlinked to core and H1 histone genes.

    PubMed

    Krieg, P A; Robins, A J; D'Andrea, R; Wells, J R

    1983-02-11

    An H5 cDNA clone was used to select H5 genomal recombinants from a chicken Charon 4A library. DNA sequence analysis shows that the H5 gene contains no introns. Putative 5' promoter elements and a 3' polyadenylation site are present within the 1.8 kb of DNA examined. Analysis of 41 kb of DNA surrounding the H5 gene shows that it is not closely linked to either H1 or core histone genes.Images

  6. Aromatic derivatives of 2,3-dihydro-1H-1,5-benzodiazepine

    SciTech Connect

    Orlov, V.D.; Desenko, S.M.; Kiroga, Kh.

    1987-09-01

    The formation of 2,2,4-trisubstituted 2,3-dihydro-1H-1,5-benzodiazepines in the reactions of acetylarenes with 4-ethoxy- and 3,5-dimethyl-1,2-phenylenediamine was studied. The effect of the substituents on the individual stages of the reactions is discussed. A quantum-chemical calculation of the relative nucleophilicity of 1,2-phenylenediamine, 2,3-diaminopyridine, and 3,4-diaminofurazan was undertaken.

  7. H(1)-antihistamines and urticaria: how can we predict the best drug for our patient?

    PubMed

    Church, M K; Maurer, M

    2012-10-01

    Urticaria, and especially chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU), is a difficult condition to treat. Consequently, clinicians need to use the best H(1)-antihistamines currently available and the pharmaceutical industries need to keep developing H(1)-antihistamines that are more effective than the ones we have today. To do this we need to be able to compare the clinical efficacy of both established and new drugs. Obviously, the ideal way to do this is to use head-to-head studies in CSU. However, such studies are extremely expensive and, in the case of novel molecules, have ethical and logistical problems. Consequently, we need to have predictive models. Although determination of Ki, an indicator of the in vitro potency of an H(1)-antihistamine, may help in the initial selection of candidate molecules, the large differences in volume of distribution and tissue accumulation in humans, precludes this from being a good predictor of clinical efficacy in CSU. From the data reviewed in this article, especially the direct comparative data of desloratadine and levocetirizine in weal and flare studies and CSU, weal and flare response would appear to be the best indicator we have of effectiveness of H(1)-antihistamines in clinical practice. However, it must be pointed out that the conclusion is, essentially, based on detailed comparisons of two drugs in studies sponsored by pharmaceutical companies. Consequently, to confirm the conclusions of this review, a multicentre study independent from the influence of pharmaceutical companies should be commissioned to compare the speed of onset and effectiveness of desloratadine, fexofenadine and levocetirizine in chronic spontaneous urticaria and against histamine-induced weal and flare responses in the same patients so that we have a clear understanding of the predictive value of our models. PMID:22994340

  8. Histamine H1 receptor induces cytosolic calcium increase and aquaporin translocation in human salivary gland cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Hyun; Park, Seong-Hae; Moon, Young Wha; Hwang, Sungmin; Kim, Donghoon; Jo, Su-Hyun; Oh, Seog Bae; Kim, Joong Soo; Jahng, Jeong Won; Lee, Jong-Ho; Lee, Sung Joong; Choi, Se-Young; Park, Kyungpyo

    2009-08-01

    One of the common side effects of antihistamine medicines is xerostomia (dry mouth). The current consensus is that antihistamine-induced xerostomia comes from an antimuscarinic effect. Although the effect of antihistamines on salivary secretion is both obvious and significant, the cellular mechanism whereby this happens is still unclear because of the lack of knowledge of histamine signaling in human salivary glands. Here, we have studied histamine receptors and the effect of antihistamines on human submandibular acinar cells. In primary cultured human submandibular gland and a HSG cell line, histamine increased the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. The histamine-induced cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) increase was inhibited by histamine H1 receptor-specific antagonists, and the expression of the functional histamine H1 receptor was confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Interestingly, histamine pretreatment did not inhibit a subsequent carbachol-induced [Ca(2+)](i) rise without "heterologous desensitization." Chlorpheniramine inhibited a carbachol-induced [Ca(2+)](i) increase at a 100-fold greater concentration than histamine receptor antagonism, whereas astemizole and cetrizine showed more than 1000-fold difference, which in part explains the xerostomia-inducing potency among the antihistamines. Notably, histamine resulted in translocation of aquaporin-5 to the plasma membrane in human submandibular gland cells and green fluorescent protein-tagged aquaporin-5 expressing HSG cells. We found that histidine decarboxylase and the histamine H1 receptor are broadly distributed in submandibular gland cells, whereas choline acetyltransferase is localized only at the parasympathetic terminals. Our results suggest that human salivary gland cells express histamine H1 receptors and histamine-synthesizing enzymes, revealing the cellular mechanism of antihistamine-induced xerostomia. PMID:19443731

  9. Synthesis and pharmacological investigation of azaphthalazinone human histamine H(1) receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Procopiou, Panayiotis A; Browning, Christopher; Gore, Paul M; Lynn, Sean M; Richards, Stephen A; Slack, Robert J; Sollis, Steven L

    2012-10-15

    5-Aza, 6-aza, 7-aza and 8-aza-phthalazinone, and 5,8-diazaphthalazinone templates were synthesised by stereoselective routes starting from the appropriate pyridine/pyrazine dicarboxylic acids by activation with CDI, reaction with 4-chlorophenyl acetate ester enolate to give a β-ketoester, which was hydrolysed, and decarboxylated. The resulting ketone was condensed with hydrazine to form the azaphthalazinone core. The azaphthalazinone cores were alkylated with N-Boc-D-prolinol at N-2 by Mitsunobu reaction, de-protected, and then alkylated at the pyrrolidine nitrogen to provide the target H(1) receptor antagonists. All four mono-azaphthalazinone series had higher affinity (pK(i)) for the human H(1) receptor than azelastine, but were not as potent as the parent non-aza phthalazinone. The 5,8-diazaphthalazinone was equipotent with azelastine. The least potent series were the 7-azaphthalazinones, whereas the 5-azaphthalazinones were the most lipophilic. The more hydrophilic series were the 8-aza series. Replacement of the N-methyl substituent on the pyrrolidine with the n-butyl group caused an increase in potency (pA(2)) and a corresponding increase in lipophilicity. Introduction of a β-ether oxygen in the n-butyl analogues (2-methoxyethyl group) decreased the H(1) pA(2) slightly, and increased the selectivity against hERG. The duration of action in vitro was longer in the 6-azaphthalazinone series. The more potent and selective 6-azaphthalazinone core was used to append an H(3) receptor antagonist fragment, and to convert the series into the long acting single-ligand, dual H(1) H(3) receptor antagonist 44. The pharmacological profile of 44 was very similar to our intranasal clinical candidate 1. PMID:22985961

  10. Production of inositol trisphosphates upon. cap alpha. -adrenergic stimulation in BC3H-1 muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ambler, S.K.; Thompson, B.; Brown, J.H.; Taylor, P.

    1986-05-01

    Activation of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptors in BC3H-1 muscle cells rapidly mobilizes intracellular and results in a paradoxically slower accumulation of inositol trisphosphate. A possible explanation for this discrepancy may be provided by the recent findings of Irvine et al. of additional Ins P3 isomers besides the Ca/sup + +/-mobilizing isomer, Ins 1,4,5-P3. They have eluted and separated the inositol phosphates of BC3H-1 cells with an NH/sub 4//sup +/ x HCO/sub 2//sup -//H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ gradient on a Whatman Partisil 10SAX column using Hewlett-Packard HPLC. Commercial (/sup 3/H)Ins 1,4,5-P3 and (/sup 3/H)inositol phosphates from carbachol-stimulated parotid glands were used as standards. Little or no Ins 1,3,4-P3 could be detected in control or phenylephrine-treated BC3H-1 cells. Ins 1,4,5-P3 followed the pattern of agonist stimulation observed previously. As a positive control, Ins P3 isomers were also measured in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells. Muscarinic stimulation of 1321N1 cells results in both the rapid accumulation of Ins P3 and Ca/sup + +/ mobilization. There is no detectable basal Ins 1,3,4-P3, but carbachol stimulates a rapid production of this compound in 1321N1 cells. Agonist activation also results in a rapid increase in Ins 1,4,5-P3 above basal values. These studies indicate that Ins 1,3,4-P3 does not contribute to the InsP3 signal in BC3H-1 cells and multiple mechanisms may exist for the coupling of receptors to PI turnover.

  11. Transcriptional repression of Hox genes by C. elegans HP1/HPL and H1/HIS-24.

    PubMed

    Studencka, Maja; Wesołowski, Radosław; Opitz, Lennart; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Wisniewski, Jacek R; Jedrusik-Bode, Monika

    2012-09-01

    Elucidation of the biological role of linker histone (H1) and heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) in mammals has been difficult owing to the existence of a least 11 distinct H1 and three HP1 subtypes in mice. Caenorhabditis elegans possesses two HP1 homologues (HPL-1 and HPL-2) and eight H1 variants. Remarkably, one of eight H1 variants, HIS-24, is important for C. elegans development. Therefore we decided to analyse in parallel the transcriptional profiles of HIS-24, HPL-1/-2 deficient animals, and their phenotype, since hpl-1, hpl-2, and his-24 deficient nematodes are viable. Global transcriptional analysis of the double and triple mutants revealed that HPL proteins and HIS-24 play gene-specific roles, rather than a general repressive function. We showed that HIS-24 acts synergistically with HPL to allow normal reproduction, somatic gonad development, and vulval cell fate decision. Furthermore, the hpl-2; his-24 double mutant animals displayed abnormal development of the male tail and ectopic expression of C. elegans HOM-C/Hox genes (egl-5 and mab-5), which are involved in the developmental patterning of male mating structures. We found that HPL-2 and the methylated form of HIS-24 specifically interact with the histone H3 K27 region in the trimethylated state, and HIS-24 associates with the egl-5 and mab-5 genes. Our results establish the interplay between HPL-1/-2 and HIS-24 proteins in the regulation of positional identity in C. elegans males.

  12. Modeling of the influence of humidity on H1N1 flu in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PEI, Y.; Tian, H.; Xu, B.

    2015-12-01

    In 2009, a heavy Flu hit the whole world. It was caused by the virus H1N1. The influenza first broke out in Mexico in March and the United States in April, 2009. The World Health Organization (WHO) announced that the H1N1 influenza became pandemic, alert to a warning phase of six. By the end of 2011, 181302 H1N1 cases were reported in mainland China. To improve our understanding on the impact of environmental factors on the disease transmission, we constructed an SIR (Susceptible - Infectious - Recovered) model incorporating environmental factors. It was found that the absolute humidity was a dominant environmental factor. The study interpolated the humidity data monitored with 340 weather stations from 1951 to 2011 in mainland China. First, the break point of the trend for the absolutely humidity was detected by the BFAST (Break For Additive Season and Trend) method. Then, the SIR model with and without the absolutely humidity incorporated in the model was built and tested. Finally, the results with the two scenarios were compared. Results indicate that lower absolutely humidity may promote the transmission of the H1N1 cases. The calculated basic reproductive number ranges from 1.65 to 3.66 with a changing absolute humidity. This is consistent with the former study result with basic reproductive number ranging from 2.03 to 4.18. The average recovery duration was estimated to be 5.7 days. The average duration to get immunity from the influenza is 399.02 days. A risk map is also produced to illustrate the model results.

  13. Community-Based Measures for Mitigating the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic in China

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Sanyi; Xiao, Yanni; Yang, Youping; Zhou, Yicang; Wu, Jianhong; Ma, Zhien

    2010-01-01

    Since the emergence of influenza A/H1N1 pandemic virus in March–April 2009, very stringent interventions including Fengxiao were implemented to prevent importation of infected cases and decelerate the disease spread in mainland China. The extent to which these measures have been effective remains elusive. We sought to investigate the effectiveness of Fengxiao that may inform policy decisions on improving community-based interventions for management of on-going outbreaks in China, in particular during the Spring Festival in mid-February 2010 when nationwide traveling will be substantially increased. We obtained data on initial laboratory-confirmed cases of H1N1 in the province of Shaanxi and used Markov-chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) simulations to estimate the reproduction number. Given the estimates for the exposed and infectious periods of the novel H1N1 virus, we estimated a mean reproduction number of 1.68 (95% CI 1.45–1.92) and other A/H1N1 epidemiological parameters. Our results based on a spatially stratified population dynamical model show that the early implementation of Fengxiao can delay the epidemic peak significantly and prevent the disease spread to the general population but may also, if not implemented appropriately, cause more severe outbreak within universities/colleges, while late implementation of Fengxiao can achieve nothing more than no implementation. Strengthening local control strategies (quarantine and hygiene precaution) is much more effective in mitigating outbreaks and inhibiting the successive waves than implementing Fengxiao. Either strong mobility or high transport-related transmission rate during the Spring Festival holiday will not reverse the ongoing outbreak, but both will result in a large new wave. The findings suggest that Fengxiao and travel precautions should not be relaxed unless strict measures of quarantine, isolation, and hygiene precaution practices are put in place. Integration and prompt implementation of these

  14. H100 - A Centralised Analysis Framework for the H1 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steder, Michael; H1 Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The H1 experiment recorded an integrated luminosity of almost 0.5pb-1 (0.3G events in HERA-I, 0.8G events in HERA-II) at the ep collider HERA in the years 1992 through 2007. The goal of the H100 project is to provide a data storage and analysis environment and in particular standardised and fast event selection facilities that improve the overall H1 physics analysis efficiency and performance. The software is based on and embedded in the ROOT framework, which provides a generic collection of tools for high-performance I/O jobs, as well as for the interactive analysis environment and for the event display. In this coherent approach all different physics analyses employ the same data and MC samples, which provide the users with the best possible knowledge of the H1 collaboration. The analysis files are produced centrally in a very efficient semi-automatic procedure, allowing a very short turn-around time when installing new reconstruction and analysis software versions.

  15. EVI1 recruits the histone methyltransferase SUV39H1 for transcription repression.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Francesca; Nucifora, Giuseppina

    2008-10-01

    EVI1 is an oncoprotein inappropriately expressed in acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome cells. In vitro studies indicate that diverse biological properties can be attributed to this protein. Its role in leukemogenesis is still unclear but it is thought that overall EVI1 can act mostly as a transcription repressor through its interaction with a subset of histone deacetylases. Studies with histone deacetylase inhibitors have however indicated that EVI1-mediated repression can be only partially rescued by deacetylase inhibitor drugs, suggesting that additional chromosomal modifications might occur to induce gene repression by EVI1. To investigate whether histone methylation contributes to the repressive potential of EVI1, we examined a potential association between EVI1, the histone methyltransferase (HMT) SUV39H1, and methyltransferase activity in vitro. We find that EVI1 directly interacts with SUV39H1 and that the proteins form an active complex with methyltransferase activity in vitro. Our data indicate that SUV39H1 enhances the transcription repressive potential of EVI1 in vivo. We suggest that EVI1 affects promoters' activity in two different pathways, by association with histone deacetylases and by recruiting chromatin-modifying enzymes to impose a heterochromatin-like structure establishing a lasting transcription repression.

  16. Immunotherapy using algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain suppresses peanut allergy in mice.

    PubMed

    Gregory, James A; Shepley-McTaggart, Ariel; Umpierrez, Michelle; Hurlburt, Barry K; Maleki, Soheila J; Sampson, Hugh A; Mayfield, Stephen P; Berin, M Cecilia

    2016-07-01

    Peanut allergy is an IgE-mediated adverse reaction to a subset of proteins found in peanuts. Immunotherapy aims to desensitize allergic patients through repeated and escalating exposures for several months to years using extracts or flours. The complex mix of proteins and variability between preparations complicates immunotherapy studies. Moreover, peanut immunotherapy is associated with frequent negative side effects and patients are often at risk of allergic reactions once immunotherapy is discontinued. Allergen-specific approaches using recombinant proteins are an attractive alternative because they allow more precise dosing and the opportunity to engineer proteins with improved safety profiles. We tested whether Ara h 1 and Ara h 2, two major peanut allergens, could be produced using chloroplast of the unicellular eukaryotic alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. C. reinhardtii is novel host for producing allergens that is genetically tractable, inexpensive and easy to grow, and is able to produce more complex proteins than bacterial hosts. Compared to the native proteins, algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain and Ara h 2 have a reduced affinity for IgE from peanut-allergic patients. We further found that immunotherapy using algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain confers protection from peanut-induced anaphylaxis in a murine model of peanut allergy.

  17. Economic Analysis of the Use of Facemasks During Pandemic (H1N1) 2009

    PubMed Central

    Tracht, Samantha M.; Del Valle, Sara Y.; Edwards, Brian K.

    2012-01-01

    A large-scale pandemic could cause severe health, social, and economic impacts. The recent 2009 H1N1 pandemic confirmed the need for mitigation strategies that are cost-effective and easy to implement. Typically, in the early stages of a pandemic, as seen with pandemic (H1N1) 2009, vaccines and antivirals may be limited or non-existent, resulting in the need for non-pharmaceutical strategies to reduce the spread of disease and the economic impact. We construct and analyze a mathematical model for a population comprised of three different age groups and assume that some individuals wear facemasks. We then quantify the impact facemasks could have had on the spread of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and examine their cost effectiveness. Our analyses show that an unmitigated pandemic could result in losses of nearly $832 billion in the United States during the length of the pandemic. Based on present value of future earnings, hospital costs, and lost income estimates due to illness, this study estimates that the use of facemasks by 10%, 25%, and 50% of the population could reduce economic losses by $478 billion, $570 billion, and $573 billion, respectively. The results show that facemasks can significantly reduce the number of influenza cases as well as the economic losses due to a pandemic. PMID:22300798

  18. Economic analysis of the use of facemasks during pandemic (H1N1) 2009.

    PubMed

    Tracht, Samantha M; Del Valle, Sara Y; Edwards, Brian K

    2012-05-01

    A large-scale pandemic could cause severe health, social, and economic impacts. The recent 2009 H1N1 pandemic confirmed the need for mitigation strategies that are cost-effective and easy to implement. Typically, in the early stages of a pandemic, as seen with pandemic (H1N1) 2009, vaccines and antivirals may be limited or non-existent, resulting in the need for non-pharmaceutical strategies to reduce the spread of disease and the economic impact. We construct and analyze a mathematical model for a population comprised of three different age groups and assume that some individuals wear facemasks. We then quantify the impact facemasks could have had on the spread of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 and examine their cost effectiveness. Our analyses show that an unmitigated pandemic could result in losses of nearly $832 billion in the United States during the length of the pandemic. Based on present value of future earnings, hospital costs, and lost income estimates due to illness, this study estimates that the use of facemasks by 10%, 25%, and 50% of the population could reduce economic losses by $478 billion, $570 billion, and $573 billion, respectively. The results show that facemasks can significantly reduce the number of influenza cases as well as the economic losses due to a pandemic.

  19. Adaptation of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in experimental mouse models.

    PubMed

    Prokopyeva, E A; Sobolev, I A; Prokopyev, M V; Shestopalov, A M

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, three mouse-adapted variants of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus were obtained by lung-to-lung passages of BALB/c, C57BL/6z and CD1 mice. The significantly increased virulence and pathogenicity of all of the mouse-adapted variants induced 100% mortality in the adapted mice. Genetic analysis indicated that the increased virulence of all of the mouse-adapted variants reflected the incremental acquisition of several mutations in PB2, PB1, HA, NP, NA, and NS2 proteins. Identical amino acid substitutions were also detected in all of the mouse-adapted variants of A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, including PB2 (K251R), PB1 (V652A), NP (I353V), NA (I106V, N248D) and NS1 (G159E). Apparently, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus easily adapted to the host after serial passages in the lungs, inducing 100% lethality in the last experimental group. However, cross-challenge revealed that not all adapted variants are pathogenic for different laboratory mice. Such important results should be considered when using the influenza mice model.

  20. Boosting Heterosubtypic Neutralization Antibodies in Recipients of 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Chao; Huang, Yang; Wang, Qian; Tian, Di; Zhang, Wanju; Hu, Yunwen; Yuan, Zhenghong; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2012-01-01

    Background. A mass vaccination has been implemented to prevent the spread of 2009 pandemic influenza virus in China. Highly limited information is available on whether this vaccine induces cross-reactive neutralization antibodies against other subtypes of influenza viruses. Methods. We employed pseudovirus-based assays to analyze heterosubtypic neutralization responses in serum samples of 23 recipients of 2009 pandemic influenza vaccine. Results. One dose of pandemic vaccine not only stimulated good neutralization antibodies against cognate influenza virus 2009 influenza A (H1N1), but also raised broad cross-reactive neutralization activities against seasonal H3N2 and highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 and lesser to H2N2. The cross-reactive neutralization activities were completely abolished after the removal of immunoglobin G (IgG). In contrast, H1N1 vaccination alone in influenza-naive mice elicited only vigorous homologous neutralizing activities but not cross-reactive neutralization activities. Conclusions. Our data suggest that the cross-reactive neutralization epitopes do exist in this vaccine and could elicit significant cross-reactive neutralizing IgG antibodies in the presence of preexisting responses. The exposure to H1N1 vaccine is likely to modify the hierarchical order of preexisting immune responses to influenza viruses. These findings provide insights into the evolution of human immunity to influenza viruses after experiencing multiple influenza virus infections and vaccinations. PMID:22052887

  1. Adaptation of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in experimental mouse models.

    PubMed

    Prokopyeva, E A; Sobolev, I A; Prokopyev, M V; Shestopalov, A M

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, three mouse-adapted variants of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus were obtained by lung-to-lung passages of BALB/c, C57BL/6z and CD1 mice. The significantly increased virulence and pathogenicity of all of the mouse-adapted variants induced 100% mortality in the adapted mice. Genetic analysis indicated that the increased virulence of all of the mouse-adapted variants reflected the incremental acquisition of several mutations in PB2, PB1, HA, NP, NA, and NS2 proteins. Identical amino acid substitutions were also detected in all of the mouse-adapted variants of A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, including PB2 (K251R), PB1 (V652A), NP (I353V), NA (I106V, N248D) and NS1 (G159E). Apparently, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus easily adapted to the host after serial passages in the lungs, inducing 100% lethality in the last experimental group. However, cross-challenge revealed that not all adapted variants are pathogenic for different laboratory mice. Such important results should be considered when using the influenza mice model. PMID:26829383

  2. Reassortment Networks and the evolution of pandemic H1N1 swine-origin influenza.

    PubMed

    Bokhari, Shahid H; Pomeroy, Laura W; Janies, Daniel A

    2012-01-01

    Prior research developed Reassortment Networks to reconstruct the evolution of segmented viruses under both reassortment and mutation. We report their application to the swine-origin pandemic H1N1 virus (S-OIV). A database of all influenza A viruses, for which complete genome sequences were available in Genbank by October 2009, was created and dynamic programming was used to compute distances between all corresponding segments. A reassortment network was created to obtain the minimum cost evolutionary paths from all viruses to the exemplar S-OIV A/California/04/2009. This analysis took 35 hours on the Cray Extreme Multithreading (XMT) supercomputer, which has special hardware to permit efficient parallelization. Six specific H1N1/H1N2 bottleneck viruses were identified that almost always lie on minimum cost paths to S-OIV. We conjecture that these viruses are crucial to S-OIV evolution and worthy of careful study from a molecular biology viewpoint. In phylogenetics, ancestors are typically medians that have no functional constraints. In our method, ancestors are not inferred, but rather chosen from previously observed viruses along a path of mutation and reassortment leading to the target virus. This specificity and functional constraint render our results actionable for further experiments in vitro and in vivo. PMID:22076498

  3. Two Years after Pandemic Influenza A/2009/H1N1: What Have We Learned?

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Vincent C. C.; To, Kelvin K. W.; Tse, Herman; Hung, Ivan F. N.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The world had been anticipating another influenza pandemic since the last one in 1968. The pandemic influenza A H1N1 2009 virus (A/2009/H1N1) finally arrived, causing the first pandemic influenza of the new millennium, which has affected over 214 countries and caused over 18,449 deaths. Because of the persistent threat from the A/H5N1 virus since 1997 and the outbreak of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus in 2003, medical and scientific communities have been more prepared in mindset and infrastructure. This preparedness has allowed for rapid and effective research on the epidemiological, clinical, pathological, immunological, virological, and other basic scientific aspects of the disease, with impacts on its control. A PubMed search using the keywords “pandemic influenza virus H1N1 2009” yielded over 2,500 publications, which markedly exceeded the number published on previous pandemics. Only representative works with relevance to clinical microbiology and infectious diseases are reviewed in this article. A significant increase in the understanding of this virus and the disease within such a short amount of time has allowed for the timely development of diagnostic tests, treatments, and preventive measures. These findings could prove useful for future randomized controlled clinical trials and the epidemiological control of future pandemics. PMID:22491771

  4. Quantitative H-1 NMR Analysis of Chemical Stabilities in Anion-Exchange Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, SA; Hickner, MA

    2013-01-01

    We compared the alkaline stability of three classes of anion exchange membranes that are leading candidates for applications in platinum-free fuel cells. A methodology is presented for the study of chemical stability of anion-exchange polymers in alkaline media that provides clear and quantitative H-1 NMR spectroscopic data of dissolved polymers containing benzyltrimethylammonium functionalities. Recent studies have investigated the stabilities of benzimidazolium- and alkylimidazolium-bearing polymers using periodic H-1 NMR sampling. These studies included varying alkaline concentrations, external heating sources, and excessive processing and contained no internal standard for absolute measurements. Key aspects of our time-resolved H-1 NMR method include in situ heating and sampling within the spectrometer, fixed Stoichiometric relationships between the benzyltrimethylammonium functionalities of each polymer and potassium deuteroxide (KOD), and the incorporation of an internal standard for the absolute measurement of the polymer degradation. In addition, our method permits the identification of the degradation products to find the underlying cause of chemical lability. Our results demonstrate that a styrene-based polymer containing benzyltrimethylammonium functional groups is remarkably stable when exposed to 20 equivalents per cation of KOD at 80 degrees C with a half-life (t(1/2)) of 231 h. Under these standard conditions, functionalized poly(phenylene oxide) and poly(arylene ether sulfone) copolymers, both bearing benzyltrimethylammonium functionalities were found to degrade with a half-lives of 57.8 and 2.7 h, respectively.

  5. Role of histamine H1-and H2-receptors in the cardiovascular system of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Sakai, K

    1980-01-01

    The effects of histamine were examined on the circulation of the blood-perfused heart, kidney, intestine, and hindlimb of rabbits. Single intrarterial injections of drugs were made into the perfusion system of the coronary, renal, mesenteric, or femoral vascular bed. In the hearts, histamine caused dose-dependent positive inotropic and chronotropic responses and vaso-constriction. 2-Methylhistamine, a relatively selective histamine H1-receptor agonist, produced vascular effects very similar to those of histamine, but had no cardiac actions at low and negative inotropic responses at high doses. 4-Methylhistamine, a relatively selective histamine H2-receptor agonist, induced slight vasodilatation and positive inotropic and chronotropic responses. In the renal, mesenteric, and femoral vascular beds, histamine and 2-methylhistamine caused vasoconstriction, while 4-methylhistamine induced slight vasodilatation. Mepyramine, a selective H1-receptor antagonist, blocked the vasoconstriction in response to histamine and 2-methylhistamine, but not the positive inotropic and chronotropic responses to histamine. The combined action of mepyramine and cimetidine (a selective H2-receptor antagonist) eliminated all cardiac and vascular effects of histamine. These results strongly support the view that in the cardiovascular system of the rabbit, H1-receptors mediate negative inotropic effects and vasoconstriction, whereas H2-receptors are responsible for positive inotropic and chronotropic effects and vasodilatation.

  6. Pathological ribonuclease H1 causes R-loop depletion and aberrant DNA segregation in mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Akman, Gokhan; Desai, Radha; Bailey, Laura J.; Yasukawa, Takehiro; Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Durigon, Romina; Holmes, J. Bradley; Moss, Chloe F.; Mennuni, Mara; Houlden, Henry; Hanna, Michael G.; Pitceathly, Robert D. S.; Spinazzola, Antonella; Holt, Ian J.

    2016-01-01

    The genetic information in mammalian mitochondrial DNA is densely packed; there are no introns and only one sizeable noncoding, or control, region containing key cis-elements for its replication and expression. Many molecules of mitochondrial DNA bear a third strand of DNA, known as “7S DNA,” which forms a displacement (D-) loop in the control region. Here we show that many other molecules contain RNA as a third strand. The RNA of these R-loops maps to the control region of the mitochondrial DNA and is complementary to 7S DNA. Ribonuclease H1 is essential for mitochondrial DNA replication; it degrades RNA hybridized to DNA, so the R-loop is a potential substrate. In cells with a pathological variant of ribonuclease H1 associated with mitochondrial disease, R-loops are of low abundance, and there is mitochondrial DNA aggregation. These findings implicate ribonuclease H1 and RNA in the physical segregation of mitochondrial DNA, perturbation of which represents a previously unidentified disease mechanism. PMID:27402764

  7. Design of multiligand inhibitors for the swine flu H1N1 neuraminidase binding site

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Manoj M; Nair, Chandrasekhar B; Sanjeeva, Shilpa K; Rao, PV Subba; Pullela, Phani K; Barrow, Colin J

    2013-01-01

    Viral neuraminidase inhibitors such as oseltamivir and zanamivir prevent early virus multiplication by blocking sialic acid cleavage on host cells. These drugs are effective for the treatment of a variety of influenza subtypes, including swine flu (H1N1). The binding site for these drugs is well established and they were designed based on computational docking studies. We show here that some common natural products have moderate inhibitory activity for H1N1 neuraminidase under docking studies. Significantly, docking studies using AutoDock for biligand and triligand forms of these compounds (camphor, menthol, and methyl salicylate linked via methylene bridges) indicate that they may bind in combination with high affinity to the H1N1 neuraminidase active site. These results also indicate that chemically linked biligands and triligands of these natural products could provide a new class of drug leads for the prevention and treatment of influenza. This study also highlights the need for a multiligand docking algorithm to understand better the mode of action of natural products, wherein multiple active ingredients are present. PMID:23983477

  8. Causal analysis of H1N1pdm09 influenza infection risk in a household cohort

    PubMed Central

    Mansiaux, Yohann; Salez, Nicolas; Lapidus, Nathanael; Setbon, Michel; Andreoletti, Laurent; Leruez-Ville, Marianne; Cauchemez, Simon; Gougeon, Marie-Lise; Vély, Frédéric; Schwarzinger, Michael; Abel, Laurent; Delabre, Rosemary Markovic; Flahault, Antoine; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Carrat, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Background Obtaining a comprehensive quantitative figure of the determinants of influenza infection will help identify priority targets for future influenza mitigation interventions. We developed an original causal model integrating highly diverse factors and their dependencies, to identify the most critical determinants of pandemic influenza infection (H1N1pdm09) during the 2010–2011 influenza season. Methods We used data from 601 households (1450 participants) included in a dedicated cohort. Structural equations were used to model direct and indirect relationships between infection and risk perception, compliance with preventive behaviours, social contacts, indoor and outdoor environment, sociodemographic factors and pre-epidemic host susceptibility. Standardised estimates (βstd) were used to assess the strength of associations (ranging from −1 for a completely negative association to 1 for a completely positive association). Results Host susceptibility to H1N1pdm09 and compliance with preventive behaviours were the only two factors directly associated with the infection risk (βstd=0.31 and βstd=−0.21). Compliance with preventive behaviours was influenced by risk perception and preventive measures perception (βstd=0.14 and βstd=0.27). The number and duration of social contacts were not associated with H1N1pdm09 infection. Conclusions Our findings suggest that influenza vaccination in addition to public health communication campaigns focusing on personal preventive measures should be prioritised as potentially efficient interventions to mitigate influenza epidemics. PMID:25416792

  9. Ribonuclease H1-dependent hepatotoxicity caused by locked nucleic acid-modified gapmer antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Takeshi; Hori, Shin-Ichiro; Watanabe, Ayahisa; Nakajima, Mado; Gahara, Yoshinari; Rokushima, Masatomo; Yanagimoto, Toru; Kugimiya, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Gapmer antisense oligonucleotides cleave target RNA effectively in vivo, and is considered as promising therapeutics. Especially, gapmers modified with locked nucleic acid (LNA) shows potent knockdown activity; however, they also cause hepatotoxic side effects. For developing safe and effective gapmer drugs, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity is required. Here, we investigated the cause of hepatotoxicity derived from LNA-modified gapmers. Chemical modification of gapmer's gap region completely suppressed both knockdown activity and hepatotoxicity, indicating that the root cause of hepatotoxicity is related to intracellular gapmer activity. Gene silencing of hepatic ribonuclease H1 (RNaseH1), which catalyses gapmer-mediated RNA knockdown, strongly supressed hepatotoxic effects. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of a target mRNA did not result in any hepatotoxic effects, while the gapmer targeting the same position on mRNA as does the siRNA showed acute toxicity. Microarray analysis revealed that several pre-mRNAs containing a sequence similar to the gapmer target were also knocked down. These results suggest that hepatotoxicity of LNA gapmer is caused by RNAseH1 activity, presumably because of off-target cleavage of RNAs inside nuclei. PMID:27461380

  10. Rhabdomyolysis secondary to influenza A H1N1 vaccine resulting in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Callado, Rodrigo Barbosa; Carneiro, Tassia Gabrielle Ponte; Parahyba, Camille Carneiro da Cunha; Lima, Neiberg de Alcantara; da Silva Junior, Geraldo Bezerra; Daher, Elizabeth de Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A infection has been described as a major viral cause of infection-induced rhabdomyolysis, but to date, only one reported case was described as having been induced by influenza vaccine. We describe a case of a man who had been using statins and developed rhabdomyolysis the day after influenza A H1N1 vaccination. A 58-year-old man was admitted at the emergency room complaining of impaired gait. The patient reported receiving influenza A H1N1 vaccine 5 days prior to the admission, with symptoms beginning the day after the inoculation. He reported ascending weakness, intense myalgia in the lower back, upper and lower limbs. The admission laboratory tests showed serum creatine phosphokinase: 7600 IU/L, creatinine: 3.0 mg/dL, urea: 185 mg/dL, aspartate aminotransferase: 592 IU/L, alanine aminotransferase: 630 IU/L, potassium: 5.4 mEq/L, lactate dehydrogenase: 2828 IU/L. Despite intravenous fluid therapy, the patient still persisted with oliguria and urinary output of 0.17 ml/kg/h. Hemodialysis was initiated and renal function recovery was observed after two weeks. The patient was hemodynamically stable and asymptomatic at hospital discharge. This is a rare side effect of influenza A H1N1 vaccine. Physicians should advise patients to seek medical care when muscle symptoms are present and consider the possibility of rhabdomyolysis due to vaccination. Trials are required to better define the incidence of this important side effect.

  11. Nucleic Acid Dipstick Test for Molecular Diagnosis of Pandemic H1N1 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liang-Ta; Curran, Martin D.; Ellis, Joanna S.; Parmar, Surendra; Ritchie, Allyson V.; Sharma, Pia I.; Allain, Jean-Pierre; Jalal, Hamid; Zambon, Maria; Lee, Helen H.

    2010-01-01

    A new nucleic acid amplification-based rapid test for diagnosis of pandemic influenza (H1N1) 2009 virus was developed. The molecular test for pandemic H1N1, SAMBA (simple amplification-based assay), is based on isothermal amplification and visual detection on a dipstick characterized by high sensitivity, high specificity, a short turnaround time, and minimal technical requirements. The amplification step is monitored with an internal control to ensure correct interpretation of test results. The clinical performance of this assay was evaluated using blinded RNA samples extracted from nasal/throat swab specimens from 262 patients exhibiting influenza-like illness. Compared with the United Kingdom National Standard Method, based on quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the new assay were 95.3% (95% confidence interval, 88.5 to 98.7%), 99.4% (95% confidence interval, 96.9 to 99.9%), 98.8% (95% confidence interval, 93.5 to 99.9%), and 97.8% (95% confidence interval, 94.4 to 99.4%), respectively. The SAMBA for pandemic H1N1 provides a new technology that could potentially facilitate timely diagnosis and management of infected individuals, thereby informing decision making with regard to patient isolation during a pandemic outbreak. PMID:20668123

  12. Immunotherapy using algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain suppresses peanut allergy in mice.

    PubMed

    Gregory, James A; Shepley-McTaggart, Ariel; Umpierrez, Michelle; Hurlburt, Barry K; Maleki, Soheila J; Sampson, Hugh A; Mayfield, Stephen P; Berin, M Cecilia

    2016-07-01

    Peanut allergy is an IgE-mediated adverse reaction to a subset of proteins found in peanuts. Immunotherapy aims to desensitize allergic patients through repeated and escalating exposures for several months to years using extracts or flours. The complex mix of proteins and variability between preparations complicates immunotherapy studies. Moreover, peanut immunotherapy is associated with frequent negative side effects and patients are often at risk of allergic reactions once immunotherapy is discontinued. Allergen-specific approaches using recombinant proteins are an attractive alternative because they allow more precise dosing and the opportunity to engineer proteins with improved safety profiles. We tested whether Ara h 1 and Ara h 2, two major peanut allergens, could be produced using chloroplast of the unicellular eukaryotic alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. C. reinhardtii is novel host for producing allergens that is genetically tractable, inexpensive and easy to grow, and is able to produce more complex proteins than bacterial hosts. Compared to the native proteins, algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain and Ara h 2 have a reduced affinity for IgE from peanut-allergic patients. We further found that immunotherapy using algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain confers protection from peanut-induced anaphylaxis in a murine model of peanut allergy. PMID:26801740

  13. Ribonuclease H1-dependent hepatotoxicity caused by locked nucleic acid-modified gapmer antisense oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Kasuya, Takeshi; Hori, Shin-ichiro; Watanabe, Ayahisa; Nakajima, Mado; Gahara, Yoshinari; Rokushima, Masatomo; Yanagimoto, Toru; Kugimiya, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Gapmer antisense oligonucleotides cleave target RNA effectively in vivo, and is considered as promising therapeutics. Especially, gapmers modified with locked nucleic acid (LNA) shows potent knockdown activity; however, they also cause hepatotoxic side effects. For developing safe and effective gapmer drugs, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity is required. Here, we investigated the cause of hepatotoxicity derived from LNA-modified gapmers. Chemical modification of gapmer’s gap region completely suppressed both knockdown activity and hepatotoxicity, indicating that the root cause of hepatotoxicity is related to intracellular gapmer activity. Gene silencing of hepatic ribonuclease H1 (RNaseH1), which catalyses gapmer-mediated RNA knockdown, strongly supressed hepatotoxic effects. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of a target mRNA did not result in any hepatotoxic effects, while the gapmer targeting the same position on mRNA as does the siRNA showed acute toxicity. Microarray analysis revealed that several pre-mRNAs containing a sequence similar to the gapmer target were also knocked down. These results suggest that hepatotoxicity of LNA gapmer is caused by RNAseH1 activity, presumably because of off-target cleavage of RNAs inside nuclei. PMID:27461380

  14. Origins of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic in swine in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Mena, Ignacio; Nelson, Martha I; Quezada-Monroy, Francisco; Dutta, Jayeeta; Cortes-Fernández, Refugio; Lara-Puente, J Horacio; Castro-Peralta, Felipa; Cunha, Luis F; Trovão, Nídia S; Lozano-Dubernard, Bernardo; Rambaut, Andrew; van Bakel, Harm; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    Asia is considered an important source of influenza A virus (IAV) pandemics, owing to large, diverse viral reservoirs in poultry and swine. However, the zoonotic origins of the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic virus (pdmH1N1) remain unclear, due to conflicting evidence from swine and humans. There is strong evidence that the first human outbreak of pdmH1N1 occurred in Mexico in early 2009. However, no related swine viruses have been detected in Mexico or any part of the Americas, and to date the most closely related ancestor viruses were identified in Asian swine. Here, we use 58 new whole-genome sequences from IAVs collected in Mexican swine to establish that the swine virus responsible for the 2009 pandemic evolved in central Mexico. This finding highlights how the 2009 pandemic arose from a region not considered a pandemic risk, owing to an expansion of IAV diversity in swine resulting from long-distance live swine trade. PMID:27350259

  15. Protecting the Public from H1N1 through Points of Dispensing (PODs).

    PubMed

    Rinchiuso-Hasselmann, Anne; McKay, Ryan L; Williams, Christopher A; Starr, David T; Morgenthau, Beth Maldin; Zucker, Jane R; Raphael, Marisa

    2011-03-01

    In fall 2009, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) operated 58 points of dispensing (PODs) over 5 weekends to provide influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccination to New Yorkers. Up to 7 sites were opened each day across the 5 boroughs, with almost 50,000 New Yorkers being vaccinated. The policies and protocols used were based on those developed for New York City's POD Plan, the cornerstone of the city's mass prophylaxis planning. Before the H1N1 experience, NYC had not opened more than 5 PODs simultaneously and had only experienced the higher patient volume seen with the H1N1 PODs on 1 prior occasion. Therefore, DOHMH identified factors that contributed to the success of POD operations, as well as areas for improvement to inform future mass prophylaxis planning and response. Though this was a relatively small-scale, preplanned operation, during which a maximum of 7 PODs were operated on a given day, the findings have implications for larger-scale mass prophylaxis planning for emergencies. PMID:21361797

  16. Meteorological Influence on the 2009 Influenza A (H1N1) Pandemic in Mainland China.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X.; Cai, J.; Feng, D.; Bai, Y.; Xu, B.

    2015-12-01

    Since May 2009, a novel influenza A (H1N1) pandemic has spread rapidly in mainland China from Mexico. Although there has been substantial analysis of this influenza, reliable work estimating its spatial dynamics and determinants remain scarce. The survival and transmission of this pandemic virus not only depends on its biological properties, but also a correlation with external environmental factors. In this study, we collected daily influenza A (H1N1) cases and corresponding annual meteorological factors in mainland China from May 2009 to April 2010. By analyzing these data at county-level, a similarity index, which considered the spatio-temporal characteristics of the disease, was proposed to evaluate the role and lag time of meteorological factors in the influenza transmission. The results indicated that the influenza spanned a large geographical area, following an overall trend from east to west across the country. The spatio-temporal transmission of the disease was affected by a series of meteorological variables, especially absolute humidity with a 3-week lag. These findings confirmed that the absolute humidity and other meteorological variables contributed to the local occurrence and dispersal of influenza A (H1N1). The impact of meteorological variables and their lag effects could be involved in the improvement of effective strategies to control and prevent disease outbreaks.

  17. Human swine influenza A [H1N1]: practical advice for clinicians early in the pandemic.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Dominic A

    2009-09-01

    The influenza pandemic the world was waiting for may have arrived, but the early indications are that the first wave of human swine influenza A [H1N1], also referred to as H1N1 Mexico 09 or "swine flu", is highly transmissible but of no greater virulence than seasonal influenza to date. The new swine flu H1N1 virus is a mixture of avian, porcine and human influenza RNA. With twenty thousand confirmed cases worldwide and 117 deaths within 7 weeks of the first acknowledgement of a possible pandemic by Mexican and WHO experts, the mortality rate is less than 0.1% and the majority of deaths centred upon the origin of the epidemic in Mexico [83%]. Swine flu is thus far a relatively mild illness seen predominantly in those who are healthy and under 25 years of age, perhaps reflecting protection from previous human influenza exposure in older people. As the virus spreads internationally, border protection issues have surfaced and public health initiatives are being progressively rolled out to minimise the transmission. Vaccines are being developed which will be trialled in the coming months with a likely availability by August 2009, in time for the northern hemisphere autumn and winter. Vigilance without alarm appears to be the recommendation so far.

  18. Reassortment Networks and the evolution of pandemic H1N1 swine-origin influenza.

    PubMed

    Bokhari, Shahid H; Pomeroy, Laura W; Janies, Daniel A

    2012-01-01

    Prior research developed Reassortment Networks to reconstruct the evolution of segmented viruses under both reassortment and mutation. We report their application to the swine-origin pandemic H1N1 virus (S-OIV). A database of all influenza A viruses, for which complete genome sequences were available in Genbank by October 2009, was created and dynamic programming was used to compute distances between all corresponding segments. A reassortment network was created to obtain the minimum cost evolutionary paths from all viruses to the exemplar S-OIV A/California/04/2009. This analysis took 35 hours on the Cray Extreme Multithreading (XMT) supercomputer, which has special hardware to permit efficient parallelization. Six specific H1N1/H1N2 bottleneck viruses were identified that almost always lie on minimum cost paths to S-OIV. We conjecture that these viruses are crucial to S-OIV evolution and worthy of careful study from a molecular biology viewpoint. In phylogenetics, ancestors are typically medians that have no functional constraints. In our method, ancestors are not inferred, but rather chosen from previously observed viruses along a path of mutation and reassortment leading to the target virus. This specificity and functional constraint render our results actionable for further experiments in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Origins of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic in swine in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Mena, Ignacio; Nelson, Martha I; Quezada-Monroy, Francisco; Dutta, Jayeeta; Cortes-Fernández, Refugio; Lara-Puente, J Horacio; Castro-Peralta, Felipa; Cunha, Luis F; Trovão, Nídia S; Lozano-Dubernard, Bernardo; Rambaut, Andrew; van Bakel, Harm; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2016-06-28

    Asia is considered an important source of influenza A virus (IAV) pandemics, owing to large, diverse viral reservoirs in poultry and swine. However, the zoonotic origins of the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic virus (pdmH1N1) remain unclear, due to conflicting evidence from swine and humans. There is strong evidence that the first human outbreak of pdmH1N1 occurred in Mexico in early 2009. However, no related swine viruses have been detected in Mexico or any part of the Americas, and to date the most closely related ancestor viruses were identified in Asian swine. Here, we use 58 new whole-genome sequences from IAVs collected in Mexican swine to establish that the swine virus responsible for the 2009 pandemic evolved in central Mexico. This finding highlights how the 2009 pandemic arose from a region not considered a pandemic risk, owing to an expansion of IAV diversity in swine resulting from long-distance live swine trade.

  20. Prediction of biological functions on glycosylation site migrations in human influenza H1N1 viruses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shisheng; Wang, Qinzhe; Zhao, Fei; Chen, Wentian; Li, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Protein glycosylation alteration is typically employed by various viruses for escaping immune pressures from their hosts. Our previous work had shown that not only the increase of glycosylation sites (glycosites) numbers, but also glycosite migration might be involved in the evolution of human seasonal influenza H1N1 viruses. More importantly, glycosite migration was likely a more effectively alteration way for the host adaption of human influenza H1N1 viruses. In this study, we provided more bioinformatics and statistic evidences for further predicting the significant biological functions of glycosite migration in the host adaptation of human influenza H1N1 viruses, by employing homology modeling and in silico protein glycosylation of representative HA and NA proteins as well as amino acid variability analysis at antigenic sites of HA and NA. The results showed that glycosite migrations in human influenza viruses have at least five possible functions: to more effectively mask the antigenic sites, to more effectively protect the enzymatic cleavage sites of neuraminidase (NA), to stabilize the polymeric structures, to regulate the receptor binding and catalytic activities and to balance the binding activity of hemagglutinin (HA) with the release activity of NA. The information here can provide some constructive suggestions for the function research related to protein glycosylation of influenza viruses, although these predictions still need to be supported by experimental data.