Science.gov

Sample records for 10-3 cm h-1

  1. H-1 Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    Alignment of the H-1 engine performed in the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA ), building 4708, in February 1960. A cluster of eight H-1 engines were used to thrust the first stage of the Saturn I launch vehicle. The H-1 engine was developed under the direction of the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  2. H-1 Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    The H-1 engines for the Saturn I vehicle in the alignment fixture. A cluster of eight H-1 engines were used to thrust the first stage of the Saturn I launch vehicle. The H-1 engine was developed under the direction of the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  3. 24 CFR 10.3 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applicability. 10.3 Section 10.3 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development RULEMAKING: POLICY AND PROCEDURES General § 10.3 Applicability. (a) This part prescribes general...

  4. 1 CFR 10.3 - Format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Format. 10.3 Section 10.3 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER SPECIAL EDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PRESIDENTIAL PAPERS Regular Publication § 10.3 Format. The Daily Compilation of Presidential Documents is published online...

  5. 1 CFR 10.3 - Format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Format. 10.3 Section 10.3 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER SPECIAL EDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PRESIDENTIAL PAPERS Regular Publication § 10.3 Format. The Daily Compilation of Presidential Documents is published online...

  6. 10 CFR 10.3 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false 10.3 Section 10.3 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION CRITERIA AND PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA OR NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION OR AN EMPLOYMENT CLEARANCE General Provisions § 10.3...

  7. 10 CFR 10.3 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false 10.3 Section 10.3 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION CRITERIA AND PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA OR NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION OR AN EMPLOYMENT CLEARANCE General Provisions § 10.3...

  8. 10 CFR 10.3 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false 10.3 Section 10.3 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION CRITERIA AND PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA OR NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION OR AN EMPLOYMENT CLEARANCE General Provisions § 10.3...

  9. 10 CFR 10.3 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false 10.3 Section 10.3 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION CRITERIA AND PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA OR NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION OR AN EMPLOYMENT CLEARANCE General Provisions § 10.3...

  10. 10 CFR 10.3 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false 10.3 Section 10.3 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION CRITERIA AND PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA OR NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION OR AN EMPLOYMENT CLEARANCE General Provisions § 10.3...

  11. 42 CFR 10.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... contracts with purchasers, such as hospitals, nursing homes, and home health agencies, to aggregate... or employee of the Department of Health and Human Services to whom the authority involved has been... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Definitions. 10.3 Section 10.3 Public Health...

  12. 21 CFR 10.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Definitions. 10.3 Section 10.3 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE PRACTICES AND... 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, and 19: Act means the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act unless...

  13. 21 CFR 10.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Definitions. 10.3 Section 10.3 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE PRACTICES AND... 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, and 19: Act means the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act unless...

  14. Absorption of intact beta-casomorphins (beta-CM) in rabbit ileum in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mahè, S; Tomè, D; Dumontier, A M; Desjeux, J F

    1989-01-01

    The functional significance of the presence of opioid peptides in enzymatic digestion of bovine milk beta-casein remains unclear. Opiates modify intestinal electrolyte transport by acting on receptors located on the serosal side of the intestine. The aim of the present study is to determine under which conditions beta-casomorphins could act from the luminal side of the intestine. The effect of natural morphiceptin (beta-CM4-NH2) and the non metabolized analogue beta-[DAla2,4, Try5]-CM5-NH2 were studied on isolated rabbit ileum mounted in Ussing chambers. Both peptides caused a naloxone-reversible reduction in short-circuit current (lsc) and stimulated Na and Cl absorption after addition to the serosal side of the tissue. After mucosal addition, only the analogue (10(-3) M) crossed the epithelium intact (Jm-s = 3.5 +/- 1.2 nmol.h-1.cm-2) and reduced lsc. Morphiceptin, under the same conditions, was degraded by the intestinal mucosa without opiate action on electrolyte transport. Pretreatment of the ileum by 10(-3)M diisopropylfluorophosphate that inhibited brush-border dipeptidylpeptidase IV, prevented mucosal degradation of morphiceptin. Under these conditions, the peptide (10(-3)M) crossed the epithelium intact (Jm-s = 1.8 +/- 0.16 nmol.h-1.cm-2) and stimulated electrolyte absorption by means of an opioid mechanism. These results show that both natural morphiceptin and the protected analogue have an opiate activity on intestinal electrolyte transport. Their action from the lumen depends on their transfer intact to the serosal side of the intestine where opiate receptors are located. The limiting step in this transfer is at the brush-border membrane where dipeptidylpeptidase IV in particular seems to play a major role.

  15. 32 CFR 10.3 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MILITARY COMMISSIONS MILITARY COMMISSION INSTRUCTIONS § 10.3 Applicability. This part, and, unless stated otherwise, all other Military Commission..., the Military Departments, the Chairman and Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the...

  16. 36 CFR 10.3 - Application; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... post office address for Yellowstone National Park is Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, and for Wind Cave National Park is Hot Springs, South Dakota. (b) Applicants desiring animals which are to be held in....3 Section 10.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  17. 36 CFR 10.3 - Application; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... post office address for Yellowstone National Park is Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, and for Wind Cave National Park is Hot Springs, South Dakota. (b) Applicants desiring animals which are to be held in....3 Section 10.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  18. 36 CFR 10.3 - Application; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... post office address for Yellowstone National Park is Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, and for Wind Cave National Park is Hot Springs, South Dakota. (b) Applicants desiring animals which are to be held in....3 Section 10.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  19. 36 CFR 10.3 - Application; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... post office address for Yellowstone National Park is Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, and for Wind Cave National Park is Hot Springs, South Dakota. (b) Applicants desiring animals which are to be held in....3 Section 10.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  20. 36 CFR 10.3 - Application; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... post office address for Yellowstone National Park is Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, and for Wind Cave National Park is Hot Springs, South Dakota. (b) Applicants desiring animals which are to be held in....3 Section 10.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  1. Ubiquitous CM and DM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, Sandra L.

    2000-01-01

    Ubiquitous is a real word. I thank a former Total Quality Coach for my first exposure some years ago to its existence. My version of Webster's dictionary defines ubiquitous as "present, or seeming to be present, everywhere at the same time; omnipresent." While I believe that God is omnipresent, I have come to discover that CM and DM are present everywhere. Oh, yes; I define CM as Configuration Management and DM as either Data or Document Management. Ten years ago, I had my first introduction to the CM world. I had an opportunity to do CM for the Space Station effort at the NASA Lewis Research Center. I learned that CM was a discipline that had four areas of focus: identification, control, status accounting, and verification. I was certified as a CMIl graduate and was indoctrinated about clear, concise, and valid. Off I went into a world of entirely new experiences. I was exposed to change requests and change boards first hand. I also learned about implementation of changes, and then of technical and CM requirements.

  2. [Influenza pandemic (H1N1) 2009].

    PubMed

    Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2009-12-01

    In the past, influenza pandemics have been occurring every 20 to 30 years. Highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) has been causing unprecedented global outbreaks since 2003 and many human cases with a high case fatality rate have also been reported. But the virus that caused a pandemic in 2009 was A(H1N1) that was originated from swine influenza. The same subtype, A(H1N1) has been circulating in human population since 1977. This pandemic (H1N1) 2009 is also not as virulent as A(H5N1) in humans. Many aspects of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 are different from what we had been expecting. We should reconsider the concepts and the strategies for influenza pandemic by reviewing current pandemic (H1N1).

  3. Computing at h1 - Experience and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckerlin, G.; Gerhards, R.; Kleinwort, C.; KrÜNer-Marquis, U.; Egli, S.; Niebergall, F.

    The H1 experiment has now been successfully operating at the electron proton collider HERA at DESY for three years. During this time the computing environment has gradually shifted from a mainframe oriented environment to the distributed server/client Unix world. This transition is now almost complete. Computing needs are largely determined by the present amount of 1.5 TB of reconstructed data per year (1994), corresponding to 1.2 × 107 accepted events. All data are centrally available at DESY. In addition to data analysis, which is done in all collaborating institutes, most of the centrally organized Monte Carlo production is performed outside of DESY. New software tools to cope with offline computing needs include CENTIPEDE, a tool for the use of distributed batch and interactive resources for Monte Carlo production, and H1 UNIX, a software package for automatic updates of H1 software on all UNIX platforms.

  4. Antifungal properties of wheat histones (H1-H4) and purified wheat histone H1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat (Triticum sp.) histones H1, H2, H3, and H4 were extracted. H1 was further purified. Their activities against fungi with varying degrees of wheat pathogenicity were determined. They included Aspergillus flavus, A. fumigatus, A. niger, F. oxysporum, F. verticillioides, F. solani, F. graminearu...

  5. H1 histones: current perspectives and challenges.

    PubMed

    Harshman, Sean W; Young, Nicolas L; Parthun, Mark R; Freitas, Michael A

    2013-11-01

    H1 and related linker histones are important both for maintenance of higher-order chromatin structure and for the regulation of gene expression. The biology of the linker histones is complex, as they are evolutionarily variable, exist in multiple isoforms and undergo a large variety of posttranslational modifications in their long, unstructured, NH2- and COOH-terminal tails. We review recent progress in understanding the structure, genetics and posttranslational modifications of linker histones, with an emphasis on the dynamic interactions of these proteins with DNA and transcriptional regulators. We also discuss various experimental challenges to the study of H1 and related proteins, including limitations of immunological reagents and practical difficulties in the analysis of posttranslational modifications by mass spectrometry.

  6. 46 CFR 113.10-3 - Cable runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cable runs. 113.10-3 Section 113.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Fire and Smoke Detecting and Alarm Systems § 113.10-3 Cable runs. Cable runs...

  7. 46 CFR 113.10-3 - Cable runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cable runs. 113.10-3 Section 113.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Fire and Smoke Detecting and Alarm Systems § 113.10-3 Cable runs. Cable runs...

  8. 46 CFR 188.10-3 - Approved container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Approved container. 188.10-3 Section 188.10-3 Shipping... PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-3 Approved container. This term means a container which is properly labeled, marked and approved by DOT for the commodity which it contains....

  9. 39 CFR 10.3 - Post-employment activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Post-employment activities. 10.3 Section 10.3 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE U.S. POSTAL SERVICE RULES OF CONDUCT FOR POSTAL SERVICE GOVERNORS (ARTICLE X) § 10.3 Post-employment activities. Governors are...

  10. 46 CFR 30.10-3 - Approved-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Approved-TB/ALL. 30.10-3 Section 30.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-3 Approved—TB/ALL. The term approved means approved by the Commandant unless otherwise stated....

  11. 46 CFR 30.10-3 - Approved-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Approved-TB/ALL. 30.10-3 Section 30.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-3 Approved—TB/ALL. The term approved means approved by the Commandant unless otherwise stated....

  12. 46 CFR 113.10-3 - Cable runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cable runs. 113.10-3 Section 113.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Fire and Smoke Detecting and Alarm Systems § 113.10-3 Cable runs. Cable runs...

  13. 46 CFR 113.10-3 - Cable runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cable runs. 113.10-3 Section 113.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Fire and Smoke Detecting and Alarm Systems § 113.10-3 Cable runs. Cable runs...

  14. 46 CFR 113.10-3 - Cable runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cable runs. 113.10-3 Section 113.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Fire and Smoke Detecting and Alarm Systems § 113.10-3 Cable runs. Cable runs...

  15. 50 CFR 10.3 - Other applicable laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Other applicable laws. 10.3 Section 10.3... GENERAL PROVISIONS Introduction § 10.3 Other applicable laws. No statute or regulation of any State shall..., or customs laws or regulations, or other Service enforced statutes or regulations....

  16. 46 CFR 76.10-3 - Water availability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Water availability. 76.10-3 Section 76.10-3 Shipping... Fire Main System, Details § 76.10-3 Water availability. (a) On all vessels on an international voyage, regardless of the date of construction, water pressure from the firemain protecting enclosed spaces shall...

  17. 46 CFR 76.10-3 - Water availability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Water availability. 76.10-3 Section 76.10-3 Shipping... Fire Main System, Details § 76.10-3 Water availability. (a) On all vessels on an international voyage, regardless of the date of construction, water pressure from the firemain protecting enclosed spaces shall...

  18. 46 CFR 76.10-3 - Water availability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Water availability. 76.10-3 Section 76.10-3 Shipping... Fire Main System, Details § 76.10-3 Water availability. (a) On all vessels on an international voyage, regardless of the date of construction, water pressure from the firemain protecting enclosed spaces shall...

  19. 46 CFR 76.10-3 - Water availability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Water availability. 76.10-3 Section 76.10-3 Shipping... Fire Main System, Details § 76.10-3 Water availability. (a) On all vessels on an international voyage, regardless of the date of construction, water pressure from the firemain protecting enclosed spaces shall...

  20. 46 CFR 76.10-3 - Water availability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Water availability. 76.10-3 Section 76.10-3 Shipping... Fire Main System, Details § 76.10-3 Water availability. (a) On all vessels on an international voyage, regardless of the date of construction, water pressure from the firemain protecting enclosed spaces shall...

  1. Photoperiod-H1 (Ppd-H1) Controls Leaf Size1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Digel, Benedikt; Tavakol, Elahe; Verderio, Gabriele; Xu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Leaf size is a major determinant of plant photosynthetic activity and biomass; however, it is poorly understood how leaf size is genetically controlled in cereal crop plants like barley (Hordeum vulgare). We conducted a genome-wide association scan for flowering time, leaf width, and leaf length in a diverse panel of European winter cultivars grown in the field and genotyped with a single-nucleotide polymorphism array. The genome-wide association scan identified PHOTOPERIOD-H1 (Ppd-H1) as a candidate gene underlying the major quantitative trait loci for flowering time and leaf size in the barley population. Microscopic phenotyping of three independent introgression lines confirmed the effect of Ppd-H1 on leaf size. Differences in the duration of leaf growth and consequent variation in leaf cell number were responsible for the leaf size differences between the Ppd-H1 variants. The Ppd-H1-dependent induction of the BARLEY MADS BOX genes BM3 and BM8 in the leaf correlated with reductions in leaf size and leaf number. Our results indicate that leaf size is controlled by the Ppd-H1- and photoperiod-dependent progression of plant development. The coordination of leaf growth with flowering may be part of a reproductive strategy to optimize resource allocation to the developing inflorescences and seeds. PMID:27457126

  2. Anomalous RR Lyrae stars(?): CM Leonis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Fabrizio, L.; Clementini, G.; Marconi, M.; Carretta, E.; Ivans, I. I.; Bragaglia, A.; Di Tomaso, S.; Merighi, R.; Smith, H. A.; Sneden, C.; Tosi, M.

    2002-11-01

    Time-series of B, V, I CCD photometry and radial velocity measurements from high-resolution spectroscopy (R= 30 000) covering the full pulsation cycle are presented for the field RR Lyrae star CM Leonis. The photometric data span a 6-yr interval from 1994 to 1999, and allow us to firmly establish the pulsation mode and periodicity of the variable. The derived period P= 0.361 699 d (+/-0.000001) is very close to the value published in the Fourth Edition of the General Catalogue of Variable Stars (P= 0.361 732 d). However, contrary to what was previously found, the amplitude and shape of the light curve qualify CM Leo as a very regular first overtone pulsator with a prominent hump on the rising branch of its multicolour light curves. According to an abundace analysis performed on three spectra taken near minimum light (0.42 < φ < 0.61), CM Leo is a metal-poor star with metal abundance [Fe/H]=-1.93 +/- 0.20. The photometric and radial velocity curves of CM Leo have been compared with the predictions of suitable pulsational models to infer tight constraints on the stellar mass, effective temperature, and distance modulus of the star. We derive a true distance modulus of CM Leo of μ0= 13.11 +/- 0.02 mag and a corresponding absolute magnitude of MV= 0.47 +/- 0.04. This absolute magnitude, once corrected for evolutionary and metallicity effects, leads to a true distance modulus of the Large Magellanic Cloud of μ0= 18.43 +/- 0.06 mag, in better agreement with the long astronomical distance scale.

  3. Antifungal properties of wheat histones (H1-H4) and purified wheat histone H1.

    PubMed

    De Lucca, Anthony J; Heden, Lars-Olof; Ingber, Bruce; Bhatnagar, Deepak

    2011-07-13

    Wheat ( Triticum spp.) histones H1, H2, H3, and H4 were extracted, and H1 was further purified. The effect of these histones on specific fungi that may or may not be pathogenic to wheat was determined. These fungi included Aspergillus flavus , Aspergillus fumigatus , Aspergillus niger , Fusarium oxysporum , Fusarium verticillioides , Fusarium solani , Fusarium graminearum , Penicillium digitatum , Penicillium italicum , and Greeneria uvicola . Non-germinated and germinating conidia of these fungi were bioassayed separately. The non-germinated and germinating conidia of all Fusarium species were highly susceptible to the mixture (H1-H4) as well as pure H1, with viability losses of 99-100% found to be significant (p < 0.001) at ≤10 μM or less for the histone mixture and pure H1. F. graminearum was the most sensitive to histone activity. The histones were inactive against all of the non-germinated Penicillium spp. conidia. However, they significantly reduced the viability of the germinating conidia of the Penicillium spp. conidia, with 95% loss at 2.5 μM. Non-germinated and germinating conidia viability of the Aspergillus spp. and G. uvicola were unaffected when exposed to histones up to 10 μM. Results indicate that Fusarium spp. pathogenic to wheat are susceptible to wheat histones, indicating that these proteins may be a resistance mechanism in wheat against fungal infection.

  4. 22 CFR 19.10-3 - Marriage after retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Marriage after retirement. 19.10-3 Section 19... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.10-3 Marriage after retirement. If an... marriage irrevocably elect to receive a reduced annuity and to provide, subject to any obligation...

  5. 22 CFR 19.10-3 - Marriage after retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Marriage after retirement. 19.10-3 Section 19... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.10-3 Marriage after retirement. If an... marriage irrevocably elect to receive a reduced annuity and to provide, subject to any obligation...

  6. 22 CFR 19.10-3 - Marriage after retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Marriage after retirement. 19.10-3 Section 19... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.10-3 Marriage after retirement. If an... marriage irrevocably elect to receive a reduced annuity and to provide, subject to any obligation...

  7. 22 CFR 19.10-3 - Marriage after retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Marriage after retirement. 19.10-3 Section 19... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.10-3 Marriage after retirement. If an... marriage irrevocably elect to receive a reduced annuity and to provide, subject to any obligation...

  8. 22 CFR 19.10-3 - Marriage after retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Marriage after retirement. 19.10-3 Section 19... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.10-3 Marriage after retirement. If an... marriage irrevocably elect to receive a reduced annuity and to provide, subject to any obligation...

  9. 46 CFR 25.10-3 - Navigation light certification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Navigation light certification requirements. 25.10-3... Navigation Lights § 25.10-3 Navigation light certification requirements. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, each navigation light must— (1) Meet the technical standards of the...

  10. 43 CFR 10.3 - Intentional archaeological excavations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Intentional archaeological excavations. 10.3 Section 10.3 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATIVE AMERICAN GRAVES PROTECTION AND REPATRIATION REGULATIONS Human Remains, Funerary Objects, Sacred Objects, or Objects...

  11. 43 CFR 10.3 - Intentional archaeological excavations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Intentional archaeological excavations. 10.3 Section 10.3 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATIVE AMERICAN GRAVES PROTECTION AND REPATRIATION REGULATIONS Human Remains, Funerary Objects, Sacred Objects, or Objects...

  12. 43 CFR 10.3 - Intentional archaeological excavations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Intentional archaeological excavations. 10.3 Section 10.3 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATIVE AMERICAN GRAVES PROTECTION AND REPATRIATION REGULATIONS Human Remains, Funerary Objects, Sacred Objects, or Objects...

  13. 43 CFR 10.3 - Intentional archaeological excavations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Intentional archaeological excavations. 10.3 Section 10.3 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATIVE AMERICAN GRAVES PROTECTION AND REPATRIATION REGULATIONS Human Remains, Funerary Objects, Sacred Objects, or Objects...

  14. 43 CFR 10.3 - Intentional archaeological excavations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Intentional archaeological excavations. 10.3 Section 10.3 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATIVE AMERICAN GRAVES PROTECTION AND REPATRIATION REGULATIONS Human Remains, Funerary Objects, Sacred Objects, or Objects...

  15. 46 CFR 111.10-3 - Two generating sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Two generating sources. 111.10-3 Section 111.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS... drilling unit must have at least two electric generating sources....

  16. 46 CFR 111.10-3 - Two generating sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Two generating sources. 111.10-3 Section 111.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS... drilling unit must have at least two electric generating sources....

  17. 46 CFR 111.10-3 - Two generating sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Two generating sources. 111.10-3 Section 111.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS... drilling unit must have at least two electric generating sources....

  18. 46 CFR 111.10-3 - Two generating sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Two generating sources. 111.10-3 Section 111.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS... drilling unit must have at least two electric generating sources....

  19. 46 CFR 111.10-3 - Two generating sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Two generating sources. 111.10-3 Section 111.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS... drilling unit must have at least two electric generating sources....

  20. 46 CFR 25.10-3 - Navigation light certification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Navigation light certification requirements. 25.10-3... Navigation Lights § 25.10-3 Navigation light certification requirements. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, each navigation light must— (1) Meet the technical standards of the...

  1. 46 CFR 25.10-3 - Navigation light certification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Navigation light certification requirements. 25.10-3... Navigation Lights § 25.10-3 Navigation light certification requirements. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, each navigation light must— (1) Meet the technical standards of the...

  2. 46 CFR 25.10-3 - Navigation light certification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Navigation light certification requirements. 25.10-3... Navigation Lights § 25.10-3 Navigation light certification requirements. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, each navigation light must— (1) Meet the technical standards of the...

  3. 46 CFR 25.10-3 - Navigation light certification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Navigation light certification requirements. 25.10-3... Navigation Lights § 25.10-3 Navigation light certification requirements. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, each navigation light must— (1) Meet the technical standards of the...

  4. H1-antihistamines for chronic spontaneous urticaria.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Maulina; Bennett, Cathy; Cohen, Stuart N; Carter, Ben

    2014-11-14

    Background Chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) is characterised by the development of crops of red, itchy, raised weals or hives with no identifiable external cause.Objectives To assess the effects of H1-antihistamines for CSU.Search methods We searched the following databases up to June 2014: Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL (2014, Issue 5), MEDLINE(from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974) and PsycINFO (from 1806). We searched five trials registers and checked articles for references to relevant randomised controlled trials.Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials of H1-antihistamines for CSU. Interventions included single therapy or a combination of H1-antihistamines compared with no treatment (placebo) or another active pharmacological compound at any dose.Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures as expected by The Cochrane Collaboration.Our primary outcome measures were proportion of participants with complete suppression of urticaria: 'good or excellent' response,50% or greater improvement in quality of life measures, and adverse events.We present risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals(CIs). Main results We identified 73 studies (9759 participants); 34 studies provided data for 23 comparisons. The duration of the intervention was up to two weeks (short-term) or longer than two weeks and up to three months (intermediate-term).Cetirizine 10mg once daily in the short term and in the intermediate term led to complete suppression of urticaria by more participants than was seen with placebo (RR 2.72, 95% CI 1.51 to 4.91). For this same outcome, comparison of desloratadine versus placebo in the intermediate term (5 mg) (RR 37.00, 95% CI 2.31 to 593.70) and in the short term (20 mg) (RR 15.97, 95% CI 1.04 to 245.04)favoured desloratadine, but no differences were seen between 5 mg and 10 mg for short-term treatment.Levocetirizine 20 mg per day (short-term) was more effective for complete suppression of

  5. Replication process of the parvovirus H-1. IX. Physical mapping studies of the H-1 genome.

    PubMed Central

    Rhode, S L

    1977-01-01

    The cleavage map of H-1 replicative-form DNA to the bacterial restriction endonuclease EcoRI, HaeII, HaeIII, HindII, HindIII, and HpaII has been determined. The 5'-phosphoryl end of the viral strand is on the right end of the molecule at or near the replication origin. Evidence is presented for the presence of inverted self-complementary sequences at the right end that differ from those at the left end. These sequences allow a foldback of the DNA after denaturation, and a minority of the native replicative-form DNA has the foldback configuration. The possible role of these structures in H-1 DNA synthesis is discussed. Images PMID:864835

  6. Crystalline 1H-1,2,3-triazol-5-ylidenes

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, Guy; Gulsado-Barrios, Gregorio; Bouffard, Jean; Donnadieu, Bruno

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides novel and stable crystalline 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes and metal complexes of 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes. The present invention also provides methods of making 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes and metal complexes of 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes. The present invention also provides methods of using 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes and metal complexes of 1H-1,2,3 triazolium carbenes in catalytic reactions.

  7. Serpentine Nanotubes in CM Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zega, Thomas J.; Garvie, Laurence A. J.; Dodony, Istvan; Buseck, Peter R.

    2004-01-01

    The CM chondrites are primitive meteorites that formed during the early solar system. Although they retain much of their original physical character, their matrices and fine-grained rims (FGRs) sustained aqueous alteration early in their histories [1- 3]. Serpentine-group minerals are abundant products of such alteration, and information regarding their structures, compositions, and spatial relationships is important for determining the reactions that produced them and the conditions under which they formed. Our recent work on FGRs and matrices of the CM chondrites has revealed new information on the structures and compositions of serpentine-group minerals [4,5] and has provided insights into the evolution of these primitive meteorites. Here we report on serpentine nanotubes from the Mighei and Murchison CM chondrites [6].

  8. 26 CFR 36.3121(l)(10)-3 - Returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Returns. 36.3121(l)(10)-3 Section 36.3121(l)(10....3121(l)(10)-3 Returns. (a) The forms prescribed for use in making returns of the taxes imposed by the... returns of its liability under an agreement entered into as provided in § 36.3121(l)(1)-1. Returns of...

  9. 26 CFR 36.3121(l)(10)-3 - Returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Returns. 36.3121(l)(10)-3 Section 36.3121(l)(10....3121(l)(10)-3 Returns. (a) The forms prescribed for use in making returns of the taxes imposed by the... returns of its liability under an agreement entered into as provided in § 36.3121(l)(1)-1. Returns of...

  10. 26 CFR 36.3121(l)(10)-3 - Returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Returns. 36.3121(l)(10)-3 Section 36.3121(l)(10....3121(l)(10)-3 Returns. (a) The forms prescribed for use in making returns of the taxes imposed by the... returns of its liability under an agreement entered into as provided in § 36.3121(l)(1)-1. Returns of...

  11. 26 CFR 36.3121(l)(10)-3 - Returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Returns. 36.3121(l)(10)-3 Section 36.3121(l)(10....3121(l)(10)-3 Returns. (a) The forms prescribed for use in making returns of the taxes imposed by the... returns of its liability under an agreement entered into as provided in § 36.3121(l)(1)-1. Returns of...

  12. 26 CFR 36.3121(l)(10)-3 - Returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Returns. 36.3121(l)(10)-3 Section 36.3121(l)(10....3121(l)(10)-3 Returns. (a) The forms prescribed for use in making returns of the taxes imposed by the... returns of its liability under an agreement entered into as provided in § 36.3121(l)(1)-1. Returns of...

  13. Detailed modelling of the 21-cm forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semelin, B.

    2016-01-01

    The 21-cm forest is a promising probe of the Epoch of Reionization. The local state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) is encoded in the spectrum of a background source (radio-loud quasars or gamma-ray burst afterglow) by absorption at the local 21-cm wavelength, resulting in a continuous and fluctuating absorption level. Small-scale structures (filaments and minihaloes) in the IGM are responsible for the strongest absorption features. The absorption can also be modulated on large scales by inhomogeneous heating and Wouthuysen-Field coupling. We present the results from a simulation that attempts to preserve the cosmological environment while resolving some of the small-scale structures (a few kpc resolution in a 50 h-1 Mpc box). The simulation couples the dynamics and the ionizing radiative transfer and includes X-ray and Lyman lines radiative transfer for a detailed physical modelling. As a result we find that soft X-ray self-shielding, Ly α self-shielding and shock heating all have an impact on the predicted values of the 21-cm optical depth of moderately overdense structures like filaments. A correct treatment of the peculiar velocities is also critical. Modelling these processes seems necessary for accurate predictions and can be done only at high enough resolution. As a result, based on our fiducial model, we estimate that LOFAR should be able to detect a few (strong) absorptions features in a frequency range of a few tens of MHz for a 20 mJy source located at z = 10, while the SKA would extract a large fraction of the absorption information for the same source.

  14. 344 cm x 86 cm low mass vacuum window

    SciTech Connect

    Reimers, R.M.; Porter, J.; Meneghetti, J.; Wilde, S.; Miller, R.

    1983-08-01

    The LBL Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) superconducting magnet contains a 1 m x 3.45 m x 2 m vacuum tank in its gap. A full aperture thin window was needed to minimize background as the products of nuclear collisions move from upstream targets to downstream detectors. Six windows were built and tested in the development process. The final window's unsupported area is 3m/sup 2/ with a 25 cm inward deflection. The design consists of a .11 mm Nylon/aluminum/polypropylene laminate as a gas seal and .55 mm woven aramid fiber for strength. Total mass is 80 milligrams per cm/sup 2/. Development depended heavily on past experience and testing. Safety considerations are discussed.

  15. 2009 H1N1 Flu Vaccine Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Flu 2009 H1N1 Flu Vaccine Facts Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents ... H1N1 flu vaccine. 1 The 2009 H1N1 flu vaccine is safe and well tested. Clinical trials conducted ...

  16. Histone H1 Limits DNA Methylation in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Michael; Ji, Lexiang; Santos, Alex M; Kamei, Masayuki; Sasaki, Takahiko; Basenko, Evelina Y; Schmitz, Robert J; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Lewis, Zachary A

    2016-07-07

    Histone H1 variants, known as linker histones, are essential chromatin components in higher eukaryotes, yet compared to the core histones relatively little is known about their in vivo functions. The filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa encodes a single H1 protein that is not essential for viability. To investigate the role of N. crassa H1, we constructed a functional FLAG-tagged H1 fusion protein and performed genomic and molecular analyses. Cell fractionation experiments showed that H1-3XFLAG is a chromatin binding protein. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation combined with sequencing (ChIP-seq) revealed that H1-3XFLAG is globally enriched throughout the genome with a subtle preference for promoters of expressed genes. In mammals, the stoichiometry of H1 impacts nucleosome repeat length. To determine if H1 impacts nucleosome occupancy or nucleosome positioning in N. crassa, we performed micrococcal nuclease digestion in the wild-type and the [Formula: see text]hH1 strain followed by sequencing (MNase-seq). Deletion of hH1 did not significantly impact nucleosome positioning or nucleosome occupancy. Analysis of DNA methylation by whole-genome bisulfite sequencing (MethylC-seq) revealed a modest but global increase in DNA methylation in the [Formula: see text]hH1 mutant. Together, these data suggest that H1 acts as a nonspecific chromatin binding protein that can limit accessibility of the DNA methylation machinery in N. crassa.

  17. Epidemiology and full genome sequence analysis of H1N1pdm09 from Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyan; Kong, Mei; Chen, Jinying; Su, Xu; Zou, Ming; Guo, Liru; Li, Lin; Ding, Jianqing

    2013-10-01

    Pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus (H1N1pdm09) was a novel tri-assortment virus that emerged in Mexico and North America in 2009 and caused the first influenza pandemic in the 21st century. This study investigated the prevalence pattern and molecular characteristics of H1N1pdm09 in three continuous years from April 2009 to March 2012 in populations of Tianjin, Northeast China. Totally, 3,068 influenza viruses (25.4 %) were detected from 12,089 respiratory specimens. Among them, 41.4 % (1,269/3,068) were H1N1pdm09 positive. 15.1 % (192/1,269) severe respiratory infection cases were H1N1pdm09 positive. H1N1pdm09 was the predominant prevalence subtype in October 2009-March 2010 (69.1 %, 930/1,346) and October 2010-March 2011 (42.1 %, 220/523). Eight isolated H1N1pdm09 viruses from severe infection/death cases in three different years were selected to sequence the whole genome through splicing the sequences following 46 PCRs. HA sequences of seven H1N1pdm09 isolates from mild infection cases were detected. Phylogenetic analysis showed that HA, NA, M, NP and NS genes of H1N1pdm09 viruses gathered together with swine influenza A (H1N1), whereas PB2 and PA genes originated from avian influenza virus, and PB1 gene originated from human seasonal influenza virus. Identity analysis indicated that all the genes were highly conserved. Compared with vaccine strain A/California/07/2009(H1N1), the maximal mutation gene was HA (0.7-2.6 %), then NA (0.6-1.7 %), last one was M (mutation rate 0-0.6 %). More site substitutions were observed in 2011 isolates than in 2009 and 2010 isolates of HA (p = 0.002), NA (p = 0.003) and PA (p = 0.001) proteins. The amino acid substitution rates were varied among eight gene segments, ranging from 7.39 × 10(-4) for PB2 to 7.40 × 10(-3) for NA. The higher d N / d S rates were observed in HA, PA and NS segments in H1N1pdm09 in Tianjin. Three HA amino acid site substitutions occurred at the HA receptor-binding sites and

  18. Amino acids transitioning of 2009 H1N1pdm in Taiwan from 2009 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang-Wu; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Huang, Chung-Guei; Gong, Yu-Nong; Chang, Shih-Cheng; Liu, Yi-Chun; Wu, Hsiao-Han; Yang, Shu-Li; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2012-01-01

    A swine-origin influenza A was detected in April 2009 and soon became the 2009 H1N1 pandemic strain (H1N1pdm). The current study revealed the genetic diversity of H1N1pdm, based on 77 and 70 isolates which we collected, respectively, during the 2009/2010 and 2010/2011 influenza seasons in Taiwan. We focused on tracking the amino acid transitioning of hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes in the early diversification of the virus and compared them with H1N1pdm strains reported worldwide. We identified newly emerged mutation markers based on A/California/04/2009, described how these markers shifted from the first H1N1pdm season to the one that immediately followed, and discussed how these observations may relate to antigenicity, receptor-binding, and drug susceptibility. It was found that the amino acid mutation rates of H1N1pdm were elevated, from 9.29×10(-3) substitutions per site in the first season to 1.46×10(-2) in the second season in HA, and from 5.23×10(-3) to 1.10×10(-2) in NA. Many mutation markers were newly detected in the second season, including 11 in HA and 8 in NA, and some were found having statistical correlation to disease severity. There were five noticeable HA mutations made to antigenic sites. No significant titer changes, however, were detected based on hemagglutination inhibition tests. Only one isolate with H275Y mutation known to reduce susceptibility to NA inhibitors was detected. As limited Taiwanese H1N1pdm viruses were isolated after our sampling period, we gathered 8,876 HA and 6,017 NA H1N1pdm sequences up to April 2012 from NCBI to follow up the dynamics of mentioned HA mutations. While some mutations described in this study seemed to either settle in or die out in the 2011-2012 season, a number of them still showed signs of transitioning, prompting the importance of continuous monitoring of this virus for more seasons to come.

  19. Differences in histamine H1 and H2 receptor responses in several rabbit arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, C.P.; Maxson, S.

    1982-06-01

    Responses of helically cut segments from six different rabbit arteries to the selective histamine H1 receptor agonist 2-pyridylethylamine (PEA) and, in strips contracted by 10-4 M phenylephrine, to the selective histamine H2 agonist dimaprit have been determined. 10-3 M PEA contracted the renal artery, 96 +/- 2%; mesenteric artery, 92 +/- 2%; coeliac artery, 88 +/- 11% aorta 75 +/- 4%' ear artery 64 +/- 10% and pulmonary artery 48 +/- 5% of the maximal contraction to norepinephrine. 10-3 M dimaprit relaxed the phenylephrine contracted ear artery 48 +/- 8%; renal artery, 43 +/- 8%; coeliac artery 41 +/- 8%; mesenteric artery 36 +/- 5%; aorta 16 +/- 3%; and pulmonary artery 11 +/- 1% of the initial contractile tension. Strips in which histamine H1 receptors are blocked by 7 X 10-6 M mepyramine which are contracted by phenylephrine are partially relaxed by histamine. Cooling these strips markedly enhanced relaxations of the mesenteric and coeliac arteries but not those of the other four vessels. Exposure of the strips to dibenamine potentiated relaxations of all of the arteries except the ear artery and pulmonary artery. Thus there is heterogeneity among the arteries in their responses to histamine H1 and H2 receptor activation.

  20. Screening of allergic components mediated by H(1)R in homoharringtonine injection through H(1)R/CMC-HPLC/MS.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying; Han, Shengli; Cao, Jingjing; Liu, Qi; Zhang, Tao

    2014-12-01

    It has been reported that the histamine H1 receptor (H(1)R) gene is up-regulated in patients with allergic rhinitis and H(1)R expression level strongly correlates with the severity of allergy symptoms. Drugs for therapy should avoid allergy symptoms, especially for patients with over-expressed H(1)R. Therefore, screening of the components which could induce H(1)R activation is urgently needed for drug safety evaluation. Homoharringtonine injection is a preparation for acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, which is approved by China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA) and US Food and Drug Administration. However, severely adverse reactions often occur with intravenous injection of the preparation. In present study, an H(1)R/CMC model was applied for capturing membrane retained components which could induce H(1)R activation. Retention components were enriched and analyzed by H(1)R/CMC-HPLC/MS. Homoharringtonine was recognized, separated and identified in homoharringtonine injection. Ca(2+) flux assay and p-IP3R expression founded that homoharringtonine retained by the H1 R/CMC model increased phosphorylation of IP3R and promoted cytosolic free Ca(2+) elevation in a dose-dependent manner which further verified the activity of homoharringtonine in activating the H1 R. In conclusion, homoharringtonine was screened and identified as a potential allergic factor. This provides an indication that a patient with over-expressed H1 R should be aware of possible allergic reaction when applying homoharringtonine injection.

  1. The embryonic linker histone H1 variant of Drosophila, dBigH1, regulates zygotic genome activation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Montero, Salvador; Carbonell, Albert; Morán, Tomás; Vaquero, Alejandro; Azorín, Fernando

    2013-09-30

    Histone H1 is an essential chromatin component. Metazoans usually contain multiple stage-specific H1s. In particular, specific variants replace somatic H1s during early embryogenesis. In this regard, Drosophila was an exception because a single dH1 was identified that, starting at cellularization, is detected throughout development in somatic cells. Here, we identify the embryonic H1 of Drosophila, dBigH1. dBigH1 is abundant before cellularization occurs, when somatic dH1 is absent and the zygotic genome is inactive. Upon cellularization, when the zygotic genome is progressively activated, dH1 replaces dBigH1 in the soma, but not in the primordial germ cells (PGCs) that have delayed zygotic genome activation (ZGA). In addition, a loss-of-function mutant shows premature ZGA in both the soma and PGCs. Mutant embryos die at cellularization, showing increased levels of active RNApol II and zygotic transcripts, along with DNA damage and mitotic defects. These results show an essential function of dBigH1 in ZGA regulation.

  2. 46 CFR 39.10-3 - Definitions-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS VAPOR CONTROL SYSTEMS General § 39.10-3... processing unit. Vapor control system means an arrangement of piping and equipment used to control vapor... processing unit means the components of a vapor control system that recovers, destroys, or disperses...

  3. 46 CFR 39.10-3 - Definitions-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS VAPOR CONTROL SYSTEMS General § 39.10-3... processing unit. Vapor control system means an arrangement of piping and equipment used to control vapor... processing unit means the components of a vapor control system that recovers, destroys, or disperses...

  4. H1 Antihistamines: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    In this review, we compare and contrast the clinical pharmacology, efficacy, and safety of first-generation H1 antihistamines and second-generation H1 antihistamines. First-generation H1 antihistamines cross the blood-brain barrier, and in usual doses, they potentially cause sedation and impair cognitive function and psychomotor performance. These medications, some of which have been in use for more than 6 decades, have never been optimally investigated. Second-generation H1 antihistamines such as cetirizine, desloratadine, fexofenadine, levocetirizine, and loratadine cross the blood-brain barrier to a significantly smaller extent than their predecessors. The clinical pharmacology, efficacy, and safety of these medications have been extensively studied. They are therefore the H1 antihistamines of choice in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis, and urticaria. In the future, clinically advantageous H1 antihistamines developed with the aid of molecular techniques might be available. PMID:23282578

  5. Histone H1 Depletion Impairs Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Kaixiang; Krauth, Beth; Ho, Po-Yi; Medrzycki, Magdalena; Berhe, Dawit T.; Pan, Chenyi; McDevitt, Todd C.; Fan, Yuhong

    2012-01-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are known to possess a relatively open chromatin structure; yet, despite efforts to characterize the chromatin signatures of ESCs, the role of chromatin compaction in stem cell fate and function remains elusive. Linker histone H1 is important for higher-order chromatin folding and is essential for mammalian embryogenesis. To investigate the role of H1 and chromatin compaction in stem cell pluripotency and differentiation, we examine the differentiation of embryonic stem cells that are depleted of multiple H1 subtypes. H1c/H1d/H1e triple null ESCs are more resistant to spontaneous differentiation in adherent monolayer culture upon removal of leukemia inhibitory factor. Similarly, the majority of the triple-H1 null embryoid bodies (EBs) lack morphological structures representing the three germ layers and retain gene expression signatures characteristic of undifferentiated ESCs. Furthermore, upon neural differentiation of EBs, triple-H1 null cell cultures are deficient in neurite outgrowth and lack efficient activation of neural markers. Finally, we discover that triple-H1 null embryos and EBs fail to fully repress the expression of the pluripotency genes in comparison with wild-type controls and that H1 depletion impairs DNA methylation and changes of histone marks at promoter regions necessary for efficiently silencing pluripotency gene Oct4 during stem cell differentiation and embryogenesis. In summary, we demonstrate that H1 plays a critical role in pluripotent stem cell differentiation, and our results suggest that H1 and chromatin compaction may mediate pluripotent stem cell differentiation through epigenetic repression of the pluripotency genes. PMID:22589736

  6. Symmetric Peripheral Gangrene Associated with H1N1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kaulgud, Ram S.; Kamath, Vasantha; Patil, Vijayalaxmi; Desai, Sagar

    2013-01-01

    More and more cases of H1N1 influenza are being detected in India and so also the variety of complications this virus can cause. Here, we report a case of symmetric peripheral gangrene following H1N1 infection. PMID:24319562

  7. Control of ammonium assimilation in Rhizobium 32H1.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, R A

    1978-01-01

    The symbiotic, nitrogen-fixing bacterium Rhizobium sp. 32H1 is a specialized ammonium producer during symbiosis. However, during free-living growth, Rhizobium 32H1 assimilates ammonium very poorly. Two pathways of ammonium assimilation exist in enteric bacteria. One is mediated by glutamate dehydrogenase, and the other is mediated by glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase. The former pathway is altogether inoperative in Rhizobium 32H1; the latter pathway operates at a slow rate and is under strict negative control by ammonium itself. Rhizobium 32H1 glutamine synthetase activity is modulated by both repression-derepression and reversible adenylylation. For a biochemical process lacking an alternative pathway, such a regulatory pattern exacerbates the very process. This suggests that Rhizobium 32H1 restricts its own ammonium assimilation to maximize the contribution of fixed nitrogen to the host plant during symbiosis. PMID:27498

  8. Complex Evolutionary History of the Mammalian Histone H1.1-H1.5 Gene Family.

    PubMed

    Ponte, Inma; Romero, Devani; Yero, Daniel; Suau, Pedro; Roque, Alicia

    2017-01-18

    H1 is involved in chromatin higher-order structure and gene regulation. H1 has a tripartite structure. The central domain is stably folded in solution, while the N- and C-terminal domains are intrinsically disordered. The terminal domains are encoded by DNA of low sequence complexity, and are thus prone to short insertions/deletions (indels). We have examined the evolution of the H1.1-H1.5 gene family from 27 mammalian species. Multiple sequence alignment has revealed a strong preferential conservation of the number and position of basic residues among paralogs, suggesting that overall H1 basicity is under a strong purifying selection. The presence of a conserved pattern of indels, ancestral to the splitting of mammalian orders, in the N- and C-terminal domains of the paralogs, suggests that slippage may have favored the rapid divergence of the subtypes and that purifying selection has maintained this pattern because it is associated with function. Evolutionary analyses have found evidences of positive selection events in H1.1, both before and after the radiation of mammalian orders. Positive selection ancestral to mammalian radiation involved changes at specific sites that may have contributed to the low relative affinity of H1.1 for chromatin. More recent episodes of positive selection were detected at codon positions encoding amino acids of the C-terminal domain of H1.1, which may modulate the folding of the CTD. The detection of putative recombination points in H1.1-H1.5 subtypes suggests that this process may has been involved in the acquisition of the tripartite H1 structure.

  9. H1N1pdm in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Lessler, Justin; dos Santos, Thais; Aguilera, Ximena; Brookmeyer, Ron; Cummings, Derek A T

    2010-09-01

    In late April 2009 the emergence of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1pdm) virus was detected in humans. From its detection through July 18th, 2009, confirmed cases of H1N1pdm in the Americas were periodically reported to the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) by member states. Because the Americas span much of the world's latitudes, this data provides an excellent opportunity to examine variation in H1N1pdm transmission by season. Using reports from PAHO member states from April 26th, 2009 through July 18th, 2009, we characterize the early spread of the H1N1 pandemic in the Americas. For a geographically representative sample of member states we estimate the reproductive number (R) of H1N1pdm over the reporting period. The association between these estimates and latitude, temperature, humidity and population age structure was estimated. Estimates of the peak reproductive number of H1N1pdm ranged from 1.3 (for Panama, Colombia) to 2.1 (for Chile). We found that reproductive number estimates were most associated with latitude in both univariate and multivariate analyses. To the extent that latitude is a proxy for seasonal changes in climate and behavior, this association suggests a strong seasonal component to H1N1pdm transmission. However, the reasons for this seasonality remain unclear.

  10. A Set of Novel Monoclonal Antibodies Against Swine-Origin Pandemic H1N1 Differentiate Swine H1N1 and Human Seasonal H1N1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In April 2009, a novel H1N1 influenza virus (S-OIV) emerged in North America and caused the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century. The new pandemic strain is a triple reassortant influenza virus of swine origin containing genes from avian, swine and human influenza viruses. It is genetically ...

  11. A model for tumor suppression using H-1 parvovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Telerman, A; Tuynder, M; Dupressoir, T; Robaye, B; Sigaux, F; Shaulian, E; Oren, M; Rommelaere, J; Amson, R

    1993-01-01

    A model system is proposed to investigate, at the molecular level, the pathways of tumor suppression. As a tool for the selection of cells with a suppressed phenotype, we used the H-1 parvovirus that preferentially kills various neoplastic cells. From the human K562 leukemia cells, we isolated a clone, KS, that is resistant to the cytopathic effect of the H-1 virus and displays a suppressed malignant phenotype. The suppressed malignancy and the cellular resistance to H-1 killing appear to depend on the activity of wild-type p53. Whereas the KS cells express wild-type p53, the protein is undetectable in the parental K562 cells. Experiments with p53 mutants suggest that wild-type p53, in its functionally intact state, contributes to the resistance against the cytopathic effect of H-1 parvovirus. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8378352

  12. H1-MAPT and the Risk for Familial Essential Tremor

    PubMed Central

    García-Martín, Elena; Martínez, Carmen; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Benito-León, Julián; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Pastor, Pau; López-Alburquerque, Tomás; Samaranch, Lluis; Lorenzo, Elena; Agúndez, José A. G.; Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix Javier

    2012-01-01

    The most frequent MAPT H1 haplotype is associated with the risk for developing progressive supranuclear palsy and other neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease. A recent report suggests that the MAPT H1 is associated with the risk for developing essential tremor. We wanted to confirm this association in a different population. We analyzed the distribution of allelic and genotype frequencies of rs1052553, which is an H1/H2 SNP, in 200 subjects with familial ET and 291 healthy controls. rs1052553 genotype and allelic frequencies did not differ significantly between subjects with ET and controls and were unrelated with the age at onset of tremor or gender, and with the presence of head, voice, chin, and tongue tremor. Our study suggests that the MAPT H1 rs1052553 is not associated with the risk for developing familial ET in the Spanish population. PMID:22911817

  13. Evaluated kinetics of terminal and non-terminal addition of hydrogen atoms to 1-alkenes: a shock tube study of H + 1-butene.

    PubMed

    Manion, Jeffrey A; Awan, Iftikhar A

    2015-01-22

    Single-pulse shock tube methods have been used to thermally generate hydrogen atoms and investigate the kinetics of their addition reactions with 1-butene at temperatures of 880 to 1120 K and pressures of 145 to 245 kPa. Rate parameters for the unimolecular decomposition of 1-butene are also reported. Addition of H atoms to the π bond of 1-butene results in displacement of either methyl or ethyl depending on whether addition occurs at the terminal or nonterminal position. Postshock monitoring of the initial alkene products has been used to determine the relative and absolute reaction rates. Absolute rate constants have been derived relative to the reference reaction of displacement of methyl from 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (135TMB). With k(H + 135TMB → m-xylene + CH3) = 6.7 × 10(13) exp(-3255/T) cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1), we find the following: k(H + 1-butene → propene + CH3) = k10 = 3.93 × 10(13) exp(-1152 K/T) cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1), [880-1120 K; 145-245 kPa]; k(H + 1-butene → ethene + C2H5) = k11 = 3.44 × 10(13) exp(-1971 K/T) cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1), [971-1120 K; 145-245 kPa]; k10/k11 = 10((0.058±0.059)) exp [(818 ± 141) K/T), 971-1120 K. Uncertainties (2σ) in the absolute rate constants are about a factor of 1.5, while the relative rate constants should be accurate to within ±15%. The displacement rate constants are shown to be very close to the high pressure limiting rate constants for addition of H, and the present measurements are the first direct determination of the branching ratio for 1-olefins at high temperatures. At 1000 K, addition to the terminal site is favored over the nonterminal position by a factor of 2.59 ± 0.39, where the uncertainty is 2σ and includes possible systematic errors. Combining the present results with evaluated data from the literature pertaining to temperatures of <440 K leads us to recommend the following: k∞(H + 1-butene → 2-butyl) = 1.05 × 10(9)T(1.40) exp(-366/T) cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1), [220-2000 K]; k∞(H + 1-butene → 1

  14. H1-antihistamines induce vacuolation in astrocytes through macroautophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Wei-Wei; Yang, Ying; Wang, Zhe; Shen, Zhe; Zhang, Xiang-Nan; Wang, Guang-Hui; Chen, Zhong

    2012-04-15

    H1-antihistamines induce vacuolation in vascular smooth muscle cells, which may contribute to their cardiovascular toxicity. The CNS toxicity of H1-antihistamines may also be related to their non-receptor-mediated activity. The aim of this study was to investigate whether H1-antihistamines induce vacuolation in astrocytes and the mechanism involved. The H1-antihistamines induced large numbers of giant vacuoles in astrocytes. Such vacuoles were marked with both the lysosome marker Lysotracker Red and the alkalescent fluorescence dye monodansylcadaverine, which indicated that these vacuoles were lysosome-like acidic vesicles. Quantitative analysis of monodansylcadaverine fluorescence showed that the effect of H1-antihistamines on vacuolation in astrocytes was dose-dependent, and was alleviated by extracellular acidification, but aggravated by extracellular alkalization. The order of potency to induce vacuolation at high concentrations of H1-antihistamines (diphenhydramine > pyrilamine > astemizole > triprolidine) corresponded to their pKa ranking. Co-treatment with histamine and the histamine receptor-1 agonist trifluoromethyl toluidide did not inhibit the vacuolation. Bafilomycin A1, a vacuolar (V)-ATPase inhibitor, which inhibits intracellular vacuole or vesicle acidification, clearly reversed the vacuolation and intracellular accumulation of diphenhydramine. The macroautophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine largely reversed the percentage of LC3-positive astrocytes induced by diphenhydramine, while only partly reversing the number of monodansylcadaverine-labeled vesicles. In Atg5{sup −/−} mouse embryonic fibroblasts, which cannot form autophagosomes, the number of vacuoles induced by diphenhydramine was less than that in wild-type cells. These results indicated that H1-antihistamines induce V-ATPase-dependent acidic vacuole formation in astrocytes, and this is partly mediated by macroautophagy. The pKa and alkalescent characteristic of H1-antihistamines may be the

  15. Regulation of H1-receptor coupling and H1-receptor mRNA by histamine in bovine tracheal smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Pype, J L; Dupont, L J; Mak, J C W; Barnes, P J; Verleden, G M

    1998-01-01

    Pretreatment of bovine tracheal smooth muscle (BTSM) with histamine (1–100 μM, 1 h) induced a concentration-dependent desensitization of the contractile response to subsequently administered histamine, with a reduction of the maximum response of 72±8% (n=5) following pre-exposure to 100 μM histamine. In contrast, concentration-response curves to the muscarinic agonist, methacholine were not affected following histamine pretreatment, indicating a homologous desensitization. Furthermore, concentration-response curves to NaF, a G-protein activator, were not altered following histamine pre-incubation.The histamine H1-receptor (H1R) desensitization could be antagonized by mepyramine (an H1-receptor antagonist, 1 μM) but not by cimetidine (an H2-receptor antagonist, 10 μM), indicating that the desensitization occurred via stimulation of histamine H1-receptors, without evidence for the involvement of histamine H2-receptors.Indomethacin (10 μM) did not block the H1R desensitization, suggesting no involvement of prostaglandins. Furthermore, histamine pre-incubation in calcium free medium still induced a functional uncoupling of H1R.GF 109203X, a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, and H-7, a non-selective kinase inhibitor, did not antagonize the homologous H1R desensitization.The steady-state level of H1R mRNA, assessed by Northern blot analysis, was not affected by prolonged histamine exposure (100 μM, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 16 and 24 h).These results suggest that histamine induces desensitization of the H1R at the level of the receptor protein, which involves a mechanism independent of PKC, PKA, PKG and calcium influx, suggesting the involvement of a receptor-specific kinase. PMID:9535029

  16. Germline-specific H1 variants: the "sexy" linker histones.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Montero, Salvador; Carbonell, Albert; Azorín, Fernando

    2016-03-01

    The eukaryotic genome is packed into chromatin, a nucleoprotein complex mainly formed by the interaction of DNA with the abundant basic histone proteins. The fundamental structural and functional subunit of chromatin is the nucleosome core particle, which is composed by 146 bp of DNA wrapped around an octameric protein complex formed by two copies of each core histone H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. In addition, although not an intrinsic component of the nucleosome core particle, linker histone H1 directly interacts with it in a monomeric form. Histone H1 binds nucleosomes near the exit/entry sites of linker DNA, determines nucleosome repeat length and stabilizes higher-order organization of nucleosomes into the ∼30 nm chromatin fiber. In comparison to core histones, histone H1 is less well conserved through evolution. Furthermore, histone H1 composition in metazoans is generally complex with most species containing multiple variants that play redundant as well as specific functions. In this regard, a characteristic feature is the presence of specific H1 variants that replace somatic H1s in the germline and during early embryogenesis. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge about their structural and functional properties.

  17. The 2009 H1N1 Pandemic Influenza in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In late March of 2009, an outbreak of influenza in Mexico, was eventually identified as H1N1 influenza A. In June 2009, the World Health Organization raised a pandemic alert to the highest level. More than 214 countries have reported confirmed cases of pandemic H1N1 influenza A. In Korea, the first case of pandemic influenza A/H1N1 infection was reported on May 2, 2009. Between May 2009 and August 2010, 750,000 cases of pandemic influenza A/H1N1 were confirmed by laboratory test. The H1N1-related death toll was estimated to reach 252 individuals. Almost one billion cases of influenza occurs globally every year, resulting in 300,000 to 500,000 deaths. Influenza vaccination induces virus-neutralizing antibodies, mainly against hemagglutinin, which provide protection from invading virus. New quadrivalent inactivated influenza vaccine generates similar immune responses against the three influenza strains contained in two types of trivalent vaccines and superior responses against the additional B strain. PMID:27066083

  18. Characteristics of the mouse genomic histamine H1 receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Isao; Taniuchi, Ichiro; Kitamura, Daisuke

    1996-08-15

    We report here the molecular cloning of a mouse histamine H1 receptor gene. The protein deduced from the nucleotide sequence is composed of 488 amino acid residues with characteristic properties of GTP binding protein-coupled receptors. Our results suggest that the mouse histamine H1 receptor gene is a single locus, and no related sequences were detected. Interspecific backcross analysis indicated that the mouse histamine H1 receptor gene (Hrh1) is located in the central region of mouse Chromosome 6 linked to microphthalmia (Mitfmi), ras-related fibrosarcoma oncogene 1 (Raf1), and ret proto-oncogene (Ret) in a region of homology with human chromosome 3p. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  19. H1N1, globalization and the epidemiology of inequality.

    PubMed

    Sparke, Matthew; Anguelov, Dimitar

    2012-07-01

    This paper examines the lessons learned from the 2009 H1N1 pandemic in relation to wider work on globalization and the epidemiology of inequality. The media attention and economic resources diverted to the threats posed by H1N1 were significant inequalities themselves when contrasted with weaker responses to more lethal threats posed by other diseases associated with global inequality. However, the multiple inequalities revealed by H1N1 itself in 2009 still provide important insights into the future of global health in the context of market-led globalization. These lessons relate to at least four main forms of inequality: (1) inequalities in blame for the outbreak in the media; (2) inequalities in risk management; (3) inequalities in access to medicines; and (4) inequalities encoded in the actual emergence of new flu viruses.

  20. Structure of the human histamine H1 receptor gene.

    PubMed Central

    De Backer, M D; Loonen, I; Verhasselt, P; Neefs, J M; Luyten, W H

    1998-01-01

    Histamine H1 receptor expression has been reported to change in disorders such as allergic rhinitis, autoimmune myocarditis, rheumatoid arthritis and atherosclerosis. Here we report the isolation and characterization of genomic clones containing the 5' flanking (regulatory) region of the human histamine H1 receptor gene. An intron of approx. 5.8 kb was identified in the 5' untranslated region, which suggests that an entire subfamily of G-protein-coupled receptors may contain an intron immediately upstream of the start codon. The transcription initiation site was mapped by 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends to a region 6.2 kb upstream of the start codon. Immediately upstream of the transcription start site a fragment of 1.85 kb was identified that showed promoter activity when placed upstream of a luciferase reporter gene and transiently transfected into cells expressing the histamine H1 receptor. The promoter sequence shares a number of characteristics with the promoter sequences of other G-protein-coupled receptor encoding genes, including binding sites for several transcription factors, and the absence of TATA and CAAT sequences at the appropriate locations. The promoter sequence described here differs from that reported previously [Fukui, Fujimoto, Mizuguchi, Sakamoto, Horio, Takai, Yamada and Ito (1994) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 201, 894-901] because the reported genomic clone was chimaeric. Furthermore our study provides evidence that the 3' untranslated region of the H1 receptor mRNA is much longer than previously accepted. Together, these findings provide a complete view of the structure of the human histamine H1 receptor gene. Both the coding region of the H1 receptor gene and its promoter region were independently mapped to chromosome 3p25. PMID:9794809

  1. CmMYB19 Over-Expression Improves Aphid Tolerance in Chrysanthemum by Promoting Lignin Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinjie; Sheng, Liping; Zhang, Huanru; Du, Xinping; An, Cong; Xia, Xiaolong; Chen, Fadi; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei

    2017-01-01

    The gene encoding the MYB (v-myb avian myeloblastosis vira l oncogene homolog) transcription factor CmMYB19 was isolated from chrysanthemum. It encodes a 200 amino acid protein and belongs to the R2R3-MYB subfamily. CmMYB19 was not transcriptionally activated in yeast, while a transient expression experiment conducted in onion epidermal cells suggested that the CmMYB19 product localized to the nucleus. CmMYB19 transcription was induced by aphid (Macrosiphoniella sanborni) infestation, and the abundance of transcript was higher in the leaf and stem than in the root. The over-expression of CmMYB19 restricted the multiplication of the aphids. A comparison of transcript abundance of the major genes involved in lignin synthesis showed that CmPAL1 (phenylalanine ammonia lyase 1), CmC4H (cinnamate4 hydroxylase), Cm4CL1 (4-hydroxy cinnamoyl CoA ligase 1), CmHCT (hydroxycinnamoyl CoA-shikimate/quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase), CmC3H1 (coumarate3 hydroxylase1), CmCCoAOMT1 (caffeoyl CoA O-methyltransferase 1) and CmCCR1 (cinnamyl CoA reductase1) were all upregulated, in agreement with an increase in lignin content in CmMYB19 over-expressing plants. Collectively, the over-expression of CmMYB19 restricted the multiplication of the aphids on the host, mediated by an enhanced accumulation of lignin. PMID:28287502

  2. Gas-Phase Oxidation of Cm+ and Cm2+ -- Thermodynamics of neutral and ionized CmO

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, John K; Haire, Richard G.; Santos, Marta; Pires de Matos, Antonio; Marcalo, Joaquim

    2008-12-08

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry was employed to study the products and kinetics of gas-phase reactions of Cm+ and Cm2+; parallel studies were carried out with La+/2+, Gd+/2+ and Lu+/2+. Reactions with oxygen-donor molecules provided estimates for the bond dissociation energies, D[M+-O](M = Cm, Gd, Lu). The first ionization energy, IE[CmO], was obtained from the reactivity of CmO+ with dienes, and the second ionization energies, IE[MO+](M = Cm, La, Gd, Lu), from the rates of electron-transfer reactions from neutrals to the MO2+ ions. The following thermodynamic quantities for curium oxide molecules were obtained: IE[CmO]= 6.4+-0.2 eV; IE[CmO+]= 15.8+-0.4 eV; D[Cm-O]= 710+-45 kJ mol-1; D[Cm+-O]= 670+-40 kJ mol-1; and D[Cm2+-O]= 342+-55 kJ mol-1. Estimates for the M2+-O bond energies for M = Cm, La, Gd and Lu are all intermediate between D[N2-O]and D[OC-O]--i.e., 167 kJ mol-1< D[M2+-O]< 532 kJ mol-1 -- such that the four MO2+ ions fulfill the thermodynamic requirement for catalytic O-atom transport from N2O to CO. It was demonstrated that the kinetics are also favorable and that the CmO2+, LaO2+, GdO2+ and LuO2+ dipositive ions each catalyze the gas-phase oxidation of CO to CO2 by N2O. The CmO2+ ion appeared during the reaction of Cm+ with O2 when the intermediate, CmO+, was not collisionally cooled -- although its formation is kinetically and/or thermodynamically unfavorable, CmO2+ is a stable species.

  3. Extended hopane derivatives in sediments - Identification by H-1 NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J.; Wardroper, A. M. K.; Maxwell, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Sedimentary C32 hopanoic acid, one of the most abundant in nature and of probable bacterial origin, has been isolated for the first time as a single component and characterized by H-1 NMR. The 17 alpha H, 21 beta H configuration of the C31 alkane has been similarly confirmed.

  4. Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 in captive cheetah.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Beate; Hietala, Sharon; Hunt, Tania; Benjamin, Glenn; Martinez, Marie; Darnell, Daniel; Rubrum, Adam; Webby, Richard

    2012-02-01

    We describe virus isolation, full genome sequence analysis, and clinical pathology in ferrets experimentally inoculated with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus recovered from a clinically ill captive cheetah that had minimal human contact. Evidence of reverse zoonotic transmission by fomites underscores the substantial animal and human health implications of this virus.

  5. 2009 H1N1 fatalities: the New Mexico experience.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Erin G; Bryce, Clare H; Avery, Catherine; Smelser, Chad; Thompson, Deborah; Nolte, Kurt B

    2012-11-01

    Histopathologic features of New Mexico 2009 H1N1 fatalities have not been representative of those reported nationwide. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of all New Mexico 2009 pandemic influenza A (pH1N1) fatalities (n = 50). In cases in which autopsy was performed (n = 12), histologic sections and culture results were examined. In contrast to previously published studies, the majority of our fatalities did not have diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) (2/12; 16.7%). Common findings included pulmonary interstitial inflammation and edema, tracheobronchitis, and pneumonia. Two cases had significant extra-pulmonary manifestations: myocarditis and cerebral edema with herniation. The majority had a rapid disease course: range from 1 to 12 days (median, 2 days), and Native Americans were disproportionately represented among fatalities. These findings suggest that New Mexico H1N1 fatalities generally did not survive long enough to develop the classic picture of DAD. Pathologists should be aware that H1N1 may cause extra-pulmonary pathology and perform postmortem cultures and histologic sampling accordingly.

  6. Identification of swine H1N2/pandemic H1N1 reassortant influenza virus in pigs, United States.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ahmed; Khatri, Mahesh; Wang, Leyi; Saif, Yehia M; Lee, Chang-Won

    2012-07-06

    In October and November 2010, novel H1N2 reassortant influenza viruses were identified from pigs showing mild respiratory signs that included cough and depression. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis showed that the novel H1N2 reassortants possesses HA and NA genes derived from recent H1N2 swine isolates similar to those isolated from Midwest. Compared to the majority of reported reassortants, both viruses preserved human-like host restrictive and putative antigenic sites in their HA and NA genes. The four internal genes, PB2, PB1, PA, and NS were similar to the contemporary swine triple reassortant viruses' internal genes (TRIG). Interestingly, NP and M genes of the novel reassortants were derived from the 2009 pandemic H1N1. The NP and M proteins of the two isolates demonstrated one (E16G) and four (G34A, D53E, I109T, and V313I) amino acid changes in the M2 and NP proteins, respectively. Similar amino acid changes were also noticed upon incorporation of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 NP in other reassortant viruses reported in the U.S. Thus the role of those amino acids in relation to host adaptation need to be further investigated. The reassortments of pandemic H1N1 with swine influenza viruses and the potential of interspecies transmission of these reassortants from swine to other species including human indicate the importance of systematic surveillance of swine population to determine the origin, the prevalence of similar reassortants in the U.S. and their impact on both swine production and public health.

  7. H1N1 Preparedness and Recent Lessons Learned

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-25

    elderly, no change in virulence, no significant genetic drift 2011 MHS Conference 2009 H1N1  Sensitive to Oseltamivir & Zanamivir – Rare... Oseltamivir resistance identified ~ 1%  No protection from seasonal influenza vaccine per CDC but – DoD data suggests vaccine effectiveness up to 50% for... Oseltamivir represented bulk of DoD stockpile – 8M treatment courses • 1M @ MTFs • 7M @ Depots  Funding received for – More Zanamivir - Will

  8. Parallel processing: The Cm/sup */ experience

    SciTech Connect

    Siewiorek, D.; Gehringer, E.; Segall, Z.

    1986-01-01

    This book describes the parallel-processing research with CM/sup */ at Carnegie-Mellon University. Cm/sup */ is a tightly coupled 50-processor multiprocessing system that has been in operation since 1977. Two complete operating systems-StarOS and Medusa-are part of its development along with a number of applications.

  9. Galaxy Populations and Evolution in Clusters IV Deep H 1 Observations of Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conselice, Christopher J.; ONeil, Karen; Gallagher, John S.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present deep Arecibo H I and WIYN optical observations of Virgo Cluster dwarf elliptical galaxies. Based on this data we argue that a significant fraction of low-mass galaxies in the Virgo Cluster recently underwent evolution. Our new observations consist of H I 21 cm line observations for 22 classified dE galaxies with optical radial velocities consistent with membership in the Virgo Cluster. Cluster members VCC 390 and VCC 1713 are detected with H 1 masses M H1= 6 x 10 sup 7 and 8 x 10 sup 7 M , respectively, while MH I values in the remaining 20 dE galaxies have upper limits as low as about 5 x 1O sup 5 M. We combine our results with those for 26 other Virgo Cluster dE galaxies with H 1 observations in the literature, seven of which have H I detection claims.

  10. Post-translational modifications of linker histone H1 variants in mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkova, T. Yu; Polyanichko, A. M.; Artamonova, T. O.; Khodorkovskii, M. A.; Kostyleva, E. I.; Chikhirzhina, E. V.; Tomilin, A. N.

    2017-02-01

    The covalent modifications of the linker histone H1 and the core histones are thought to play an important role in the control of chromatin functioning. Histone H1 variants from K562 cell line (hH1), mouse (mH1) and calf (cH1) thymi were studied by matrix-activated laser desorption/ionization fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass-spectroscopy (MALDI-FT-ICR-MS). The proteomics analysis revealed novel post-translational modifications of the histone H1, such as meK34-mH1.4, meK35-cH1.1, meK35-mH1.1, meK75-hH1.2, meK75-hH1.3, acK26-hH1.4, acK26-hH1.3 and acK17-hH1.1. The comparison of the hH1, mH1 and cH1 proteins has demonstrated that the types and positions of the post-translational modifications of the globular domains of the H1.2–H1.4 variants are very conservative. However, the post-translational modifications of the N- and C-terminal tails of H1.2, H1.3 and H1.4 are different. The differences of post-translational modifications in the N- and C-terminal tails of H1.2, H1.3 and H1.4 likely lead to the differences in DNA-H1 and H1-protein interactions.

  11. Post-translational modifications of linker histone H1 variants in mammals.

    PubMed

    Starkova, T Yu; Polyanichko, A M; Artamonova, T O; Khodorkovskii, M A; Kostyleva, E I; Chikhirzhina, E V; Tomilin, A N

    2017-02-16

    The covalent modifications of the linker histone H1 and the core histones are thought to play an important role in the control of chromatin functioning. Histone H1 variants from K562 cell line (hH1), mouse (mH1) and calf (cH1) thymi were studied by matrix-activated laser desorption/ionization fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass-spectroscopy (MALDI-FT-ICR-MS). The proteomics analysis revealed novel post-translational modifications of the histone H1, such as meK34-mH1.4, meK35-cH1.1, meK35-mH1.1, meK75-hH1.2, meK75-hH1.3, acK26-hH1.4, acK26-hH1.3 and acK17-hH1.1. The comparison of the hH1, mH1 and cH1 proteins has demonstrated that the types and positions of the post-translational modifications of the globular domains of the H1.2-H1.4 variants are very conservative. However, the post-translational modifications of the N- and C-terminal tails of H1.2, H1.3 and H1.4 are different. The differences of post-translational modifications in the N- and C-terminal tails of H1.2, H1.3 and H1.4 likely lead to the differences in DNA-H1 and H1-protein interactions.

  12. On total variation flows with H-1 penalty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderli, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    We analyze the time flow of a version of the Rudin-Osher-Fatemi [5] model for image restoration using the bounded variation semi-norm with H-1 penalty. We will define an appropriate weak solution of the time flow and prove existence and uniqueness of the solution using the method of semigroups, as used by Andreu, Ballester, Caselles, Mazön [1] for their analysis of total variation flow without penalty. We also note two interesting properties for the time solutions.

  13. Chilled Mirror Dew Point Hygrometer (CM) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Ritsche, MT

    2005-01-01

    The CM systems have been developed for the ARM Program to act as a moisture standard traceable to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). There are three CM systems that are each fully portable, self-contained, and require only 110 V AC power. The systems include a CM sensor, air sampling and filtration system, a secondary reference (Rotronic HP043 temperature and relative humidity sensor) to detect system malfunctions, a data acquisition system, and data storage for more than one month of 1-minute data. The CM sensor directly measures dew point temperature at 1 m, air temperature at 2 m, and relative humidity at 2 m. These measurements are intended to represent self-standing data streams that can be used independently or in combinations.

  14. Conducting Retrospective Ontological Clinical Trials in ICD-9-CM in the Age of ICD-10-CM

    PubMed Central

    Venepalli, Neeta K; Shergill, Ardaman; Dorestani, Parvaneh; Boyd, Andrew D

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To quantify the impact of International Classification of Disease 10th Revision Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) transition in cancer clinical trials by comparing coding accuracy and data discontinuity in backward ICD-10-CM to ICD-9-CM mapping via two tools, and to develop a standard ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM bridging methodology for retrospective analyses. BACKGROUND While the transition to ICD-10-CM has been delayed until October 2015, its impact on cancer-related studies utilizing ICD-9-CM diagnoses has been inadequately explored. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three high impact journals with broad national and international readerships were reviewed for cancer-related studies utilizing ICD-9-CM diagnoses codes in study design, methods, or results. Forward ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM mapping was performing using a translational methodology with the Motif web portal ICD-9-CM conversion tool. Backward mapping from ICD-10-CM to ICD-9-CM was performed using both Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) general equivalence mappings (GEMs) files and the Motif web portal tool. Generated ICD-9-CM codes were compared with the original ICD-9-CM codes to assess data accuracy and discontinuity. RESULTS While both methods yielded additional ICD-9-CM codes, the CMS GEMs method provided incomplete coverage with 16 of the original ICD-9-CM codes missing, whereas the Motif web portal method provided complete coverage. Of these 16 codes, 12 ICD-9-CM codes were present in 2010 Illinois Medicaid data, and accounted for 0.52% of patient encounters and 0.35% of total Medicaid reimbursements. Extraneous ICD-9-CM codes from both methods (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services general equivalent mapping [CMS GEMs, n = 161; Motif web portal, n = 246]) in excess of original ICD-9-CM codes accounted for 2.1% and 2.3% of total patient encounters and 3.4% and 4.1% of total Medicaid reimbursements from the 2010 Illinois Medicare database. DISCUSSION Longitudinal data analyses post-ICD-10

  15. Host Modulators of H1N1 Cytopathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Samuel E.; Kim, Hyun Seok; Komurov, Kakajan; Mendiratta, Saurabh; Tsai, Pei-Ling; Schmolke, Mirco; Satterly, Neal; Manicassamy, Balaji; Forst, Christian V.; Roth, Michael G.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Blazewska, Katarzyna M.; McKenna, Charles E.; Fontoura, Beatriz M.; White, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Influenza A virus infects 5–20% of the population annually, resulting in ∼35,000 deaths and significant morbidity. Current treatments include vaccines and drugs that target viral proteins. However, both of these approaches have limitations, as vaccines require yearly development and the rapid evolution of viral proteins gives rise to drug resistance. In consequence additional intervention strategies, that target host factors required for the viral life cycle, are under investigation. Here we employed arrayed whole-genome siRNA screening strategies to identify cell-autonomous molecular components that are subverted to support H1N1 influenza A virus infection of human bronchial epithelial cells. Integration across relevant public data sets exposed druggable gene products required for epithelial cell infection or required for viral proteins to deflect host cell suicide checkpoint activation. Pharmacological inhibition of representative targets, RGGT and CHEK1, resulted in significant protection against infection of human epithelial cells by the A/WS/33 virus. In addition, chemical inhibition of RGGT partially protected against H5N1 and the 2009 H1N1 pandemic strain. The observations reported here thus contribute to an expanding body of studies directed at decoding vulnerabilities in the command and control networks specified by influenza virulence factors. PMID:22876275

  16. Safety profile of bilastine: 2nd generation H1-antihistamines.

    PubMed

    Scaglione, F

    2012-12-01

    Bilastine is a new H1 antagonist with no sedative side effects, no cardiotoxic effects, and no hepatic metabolism. In addition, bilastine has proved to be effective for the symptomatic treatment of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and urticaria. Pharmacological studies have shown that bilastine is highly selective for the H1 receptor in both in vivo and in vitro studies, and with no apparent affinity for other receptors. The absorption of bilastine is fast, linear and dose-proportional; it appears to be safe and well tolerated at all doses levels in healthy population. Multiple administration of bilastine has confirmed the linearity of the kinetic parameters. The distribution in the brain is undetectable. The safety profile in terms of adverse effects is very similar to placebo in all Phase I, II and III clinical trials. Bilastine (20 mg), unlike cetirizine, does not increase alcohol effects on the CNS. Bilastine 20 mg does not increase the CNS depressant effect of lorazepam. Bilastine 20 mg is similar to placebo in the driving test. Therefore, it meets the current criteria for medication used in the treatment of allergic rhinitis and urticaria.

  17. [Mass communication during the "H1N1 flu"].

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, E; Martino, G; Balli, M; Puggelli, F; Tiscione, E; Bonaccorsi, G; Bonanni, P

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays communication plays a key role in healthcare, especially when a detailed risk analysis is important for correct information, as in the case of the H1N1 flu virus A. Through our study we have analyzed how the event "H1N1 flu" was addressed by the media, considering the period April 2009-June 2010. We collected the information from "Il Corriere della Sera", "La Repubblica" and "City", in addition to an online site for general information such as "TGCOM". The analyzed peak of daily news was seen a few weeks before the pandemic peak; in addition, after the peak of the pandemic, the interest of the press has completely collapsed, and eventually disappeared altogether. The media can influence the thought and consequentially how the recipients act, leading to a misperception of risk ('risk') and danger ('hazard'). Moreover the institutions and health professionals are not always able to communicate effectively to meet the needs for correct information. It is desirable in the future a greater degree of collaboration between media and authorities to have a clearer simpler and less misleading communication in the health field, helping recipients to act properly.

  18. Mapping of six somatic linker histone H1 variants in human breast cancer cells uncovers specific features of H1.2.

    PubMed

    Millán-Ariño, Lluís; Islam, Abul B M M K; Izquierdo-Bouldstridge, Andrea; Mayor, Regina; Terme, Jean-Michel; Luque, Neus; Sancho, Mónica; López-Bigas, Núria; Jordan, Albert

    2014-04-01

    Seven linker histone H1 variants are present in human somatic cells with distinct prevalence across cell types. Despite being key structural components of chromatin, it is not known whether the different variants have specific roles in the regulation of nuclear processes or are differentially distributed throughout the genome. Using variant-specific antibodies to H1 and hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged recombinant H1 variants expressed in breast cancer cells, we have investigated the distribution of six H1 variants in promoters and genome-wide. H1 is depleted at promoters depending on its transcriptional status and differs between variants. Notably, H1.2 is less abundant than other variants at the transcription start sites of inactive genes, and promoters enriched in H1.2 are different from those enriched in other variants and tend to be repressed. Additionally, H1.2 is enriched at chromosomal domains characterized by low guanine-cytosine (GC) content and is associated with lamina-associated domains. Meanwhile, other variants are associated with higher GC content, CpG islands and gene-rich domains. For instance, H1.0 and H1X are enriched at gene-rich chromosomes, whereas H1.2 is depleted. In short, histone H1 is not uniformly distributed along the genome and there are differences between variants, H1.2 being the one showing the most specific pattern and strongest correlation with low gene expression.

  19. Mapping of six somatic linker histone H1 variants in human breast cancer cells uncovers specific features of H1.2

    PubMed Central

    Millán-Ariño, Lluís; Islam, Abul B. M. M. K.; Izquierdo-Bouldstridge, Andrea; Mayor, Regina; Terme, Jean-Michel; Luque, Neus; Sancho, Mónica; López-Bigas, Núria; Jordan, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Seven linker histone H1 variants are present in human somatic cells with distinct prevalence across cell types. Despite being key structural components of chromatin, it is not known whether the different variants have specific roles in the regulation of nuclear processes or are differentially distributed throughout the genome. Using variant-specific antibodies to H1 and hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged recombinant H1 variants expressed in breast cancer cells, we have investigated the distribution of six H1 variants in promoters and genome-wide. H1 is depleted at promoters depending on its transcriptional status and differs between variants. Notably, H1.2 is less abundant than other variants at the transcription start sites of inactive genes, and promoters enriched in H1.2 are different from those enriched in other variants and tend to be repressed. Additionally, H1.2 is enriched at chromosomal domains characterized by low guanine–cytosine (GC) content and is associated with lamina-associated domains. Meanwhile, other variants are associated with higher GC content, CpG islands and gene-rich domains. For instance, H1.0 and H1X are enriched at gene-rich chromosomes, whereas H1.2 is depleted. In short, histone H1 is not uniformly distributed along the genome and there are differences between variants, H1.2 being the one showing the most specific pattern and strongest correlation with low gene expression. PMID:24476918

  20. Detections of 2 cm formaldehyde emissions towards Galactic star-forming regions with 6 cm counterpart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Xiao-Qiong; Yang, Kai; Li, Juan; Wang, Jun-Zhi; Wu, Ya-Jun; Zhao, Rong-Bin; Wang, Jin-Qing; Dong, Jian; Jiang, Dong-Rong; Li, Bin

    2017-01-01

    We report the detections of H2CO emission at the 2 cm transition towards Galactic star-forming regions with known 6 cm counterpart using the Shanghai Tianma Radio Telescope (TMRT). One significant detection (in NGC7538) and two possible detections (in G23.01-0.41 and G29.96-0.02) were made. Comparing with previous observations, we found that there is a time lag of appearance of 2 cm and 6 cm emissions detected in NGC7538, contradicting with the prediction of radiative pumping via radio continuum radiation. Combinations of the variability of 6 cm masers in NGC7538 suggest that collisional pumping via high-velocity shocks could better explain the 6 cm H2CO maser emission. Under this scheme, excitation of the 2 cm maser may require a higher collision energy compared to the 6 cm transition.

  1. Genetic characterization of influenza A virus subtypes H1N3 and H1N9 isolated from free-grazing ducks in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chaiyawong, Supassama; Boonyapisitsopa, Supanat; Jairak, Waleemas; Nonthabenjawan, Nutthawan; Tangwangvivat, Ratanaporn; Bunpapong, Napawan; Amonsin, Alongkorn

    2016-10-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) subtype H1 has been reported to infect birds, pigs and humans. In this study, we characterized IAVs subtype H1N3 and H1N9 isolated from free-grazing ducks in Thailand. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Thai IAV-H1 isolates cluster with avian Eurasian-lineage but not pandemic H1N1 viruses. Analysis of the viruses indicated low-pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) characteristics. This study is the first report of avian H1N3 and H1N9 in Thailand. Although Thai IAV-H1 viruses do not pose a risk of a pandemic, routine surveillance and genetic monitoring of IAVs should be conducted.

  2. 46 CFR 35.10-3 - Display of plans-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Display of plans-TB/ALL. 35.10-3 Section 35.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Fire and Emergency Requirements § 35.10-3 Display of plans—TB/ALL. Barges with sleeping accommodations for more than six...

  3. 46 CFR 35.10-3 - Display of plans-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Display of plans-TB/ALL. 35.10-3 Section 35.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Fire and Emergency Requirements § 35.10-3 Display of plans—TB/ALL. Barges with sleeping accommodations for more than six...

  4. 46 CFR 35.10-3 - Display of plans-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Display of plans-TB/ALL. 35.10-3 Section 35.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Fire and Emergency Requirements § 35.10-3 Display of plans—TB/ALL. Barges with sleeping accommodations for more than six...

  5. 46 CFR 35.10-3 - Display of plans-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Display of plans-TB/ALL. 35.10-3 Section 35.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Fire and Emergency Requirements § 35.10-3 Display of plans—TB/ALL. Barges with sleeping accommodations for more than six...

  6. 46 CFR 35.10-3 - Display of plans-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Display of plans-TB/ALL. 35.10-3 Section 35.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Fire and Emergency Requirements § 35.10-3 Display of plans—TB/ALL. Barges with sleeping accommodations for more than six...

  7. 5 CFR 10.3 - OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... management programs and practices. 10.3 Section 10.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE RULES AGENCY ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEMS; OPM AUTHORITY TO REVIEW PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS (RULE X) § 10.3 OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices. The Office...

  8. 5 CFR 10.3 - OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... management programs and practices. 10.3 Section 10.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE RULES AGENCY ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEMS; OPM AUTHORITY TO REVIEW PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS (RULE X) § 10.3 OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices. The Office...

  9. 5 CFR 10.3 - OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... management programs and practices. 10.3 Section 10.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE RULES AGENCY ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEMS; OPM AUTHORITY TO REVIEW PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS (RULE X) § 10.3 OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices. The Office...

  10. 5 CFR 10.3 - OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... management programs and practices. 10.3 Section 10.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE RULES AGENCY ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEMS; OPM AUTHORITY TO REVIEW PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS (RULE X) § 10.3 OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices. The Office...

  11. 5 CFR 10.3 - OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... management programs and practices. 10.3 Section 10.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE RULES AGENCY ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEMS; OPM AUTHORITY TO REVIEW PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS (RULE X) § 10.3 OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices. The Office...

  12. Detection of Thermal 2 cm and 1 cm Formaldehyde Emission in NGC 7538

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Liang; Araya, E. D.; Hofner, P.; Kurtz, S.; Pihlstrom, Y.

    2011-05-01

    Formaldehyde is a tracer of high density gas in massive star forming regions. The K-doublet lines from the three lowest rotational energy levels of ortho-formaldehyde correspond to wavelengths of 6, 2 and 1 cm. Thermal emission of these transitions is rare, and maser emission has only been detected in the 6 cm line. NGC 7538 is an active site of massive star formation in the Galaxy, and one of only a few regions known to harbor 6 cm formaldehyde (H2CO) masers. Using the NRAO 100 m Green Bank Telescope (GBT), we detected 2 cm H2CO emission toward NGC 7538 IRS1. The velocity of the 2 cm H2CO line is very similar to the velocity of one of the 6 cm H2CO masers but the linewidth is greater. To investigate the nature of the 2 cm emission, we conducted observations of the 1 cm H2CO transition, and obtained a cross-scan map of the 2 cm line. We detected 1 cm emission and found that the 2 cm emission is extended (greater than 30"), which implies brightness temperatures of ˜0.2 K. Assuming optically thin emission, LTE, and that the 1 cm and 2 cm lines originate from the same volume of gas, both these detections are consistent with thermal emission of gas at ˜30 K. We conclude that the 1 cm and 2 cm H2CO lines detected with the GBT are thermal, which implies molecular densities above ˜105 cm-3. LY acknowledges support from WIU. PH acknowledges partial support from NSF grant AST-0908901.

  13. Experimental infection with H1N1 European swine influenza virus protects pigs from an infection with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 human influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Busquets, Núria; Segalés, Joaquim; Córdoba, Lorena; Mussá, Tufaria; Crisci, Elisa; Martín-Valls, Gerard E; Simon-Grifé, Meritxell; Pérez-Simó, Marta; Pérez-Maíllo, Monica; Núñez, Jose I; Abad, Francesc X; Fraile, Lorenzo; Pina, Sonia; Majó, Natalia; Bensaid, Albert; Domingo, Mariano; Montoya, María

    2010-01-01

    The recent pandemic caused by human influenza virus A(H1N1) 2009 contains ancestral gene segments from North American and Eurasian swine lineages as well as from avian and human influenza lineages. The emergence of this A(H1N1) 2009 poses a potential global threat for human health and the fact that it can infect other species, like pigs, favours a possible encounter with other influenza viruses circulating in swine herds. In Europe, H1N1, H1N2 and H3N2 subtypes of swine influenza virus currently have a high prevalence in commercial farms. To better assess the risk posed by the A(H1N1) 2009 in the actual situation of swine farms, we sought to analyze whether a previous infection with a circulating European avian-like swine A/Swine/Spain/53207/2004 (H1N1) influenza virus (hereafter referred to as SwH1N1) generated or not cross-protective immunity against a subsequent infection with the new human pandemic A/Catalonia/63/2009 (H1N1) influenza virus (hereafter referred to as pH1N1) 21 days apart. Pigs infected only with pH1N1 had mild to moderate pathological findings, consisting on broncho-interstitial pneumonia. However, pigs inoculated with SwH1N1 virus and subsequently infected with pH1N1 had very mild lung lesions, apparently attributed to the remaining lesions caused by SwH1N1 infection. These later pigs also exhibited boosted levels of specific antibodies. Finally, animals firstly infected with SwH1N1 virus and latter infected with pH1N1 exhibited undetectable viral RNA load in nasal swabs and lungs after challenge with pH1N1, indicating a cross-protective effect between both strains.

  14. Globular Head-Displayed Conserved Influenza H1 Hemagglutinin Stalk Epitopes Confer Protection against Heterologous H1N1 Virus

    PubMed Central

    Klausberger, Miriam; Tscheliessnig, Rupert; Neff, Silke; Nachbagauer, Raffael; Wohlbold, Teddy John; Wilde, Monika; Palmberger, Dieter; Krammer, Florian; Jungbauer, Alois; Grabherr, Reingard

    2016-01-01

    Significant genetic variability in the head region of the influenza A hemagglutinin, the main target of current vaccines, makes it challenging to develop a long-lived seasonal influenza prophylaxis. Vaccines based on the conserved hemagglutinin stalk domain might provide broader cross-reactive immunity. However, this region of the hemagglutinin is immunosubdominant to the head region. Peptide-based vaccines have gained much interest as they allow the immune system to focus on relevant but less immunogenic epitopes. We developed a novel influenza A hemagglutinin-based display platform for H1 hemagglutinin stalk peptides that we identified in an epitope mapping assay using human immune sera and synthetic HA peptides. Flow cytometry and competition assays suggest that the identified stalk sequences do not recapitulate the epitopes of already described broadly neutralizing stalk antibodies. Vaccine constructs displaying 25-mer stalk sequences provided up to 75% protection from lethal heterologous virus challenge in BALB/c mice and induced antibody responses against the H1 hemagglutinin. The developed platform based on a vaccine antigen has the potential to be either used as stand-alone or as prime-vaccine in combination with conventional seasonal or pandemic vaccines for the amplification of stalk-based cross-reactive immunity in humans or as platform to evaluate the relevance of viral peptides/epitopes for protection against influenza virus infection. PMID:27088239

  15. Pathogenesis of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) and triple-reassortant swine influenza A (H1) viruses in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pandemic H1N1 virus of 2009 (2009 H1N1) continues to cause illness worldwide, primarily in younger age groups. To better understand the pathogenesis of these viruses in mammals, we used a mouse model to evaluate the relative virulence of selected 2009 H1N1 viruses and compared them to a represe...

  16. Serologic cross reactivity of avian influenza H1 vaccinated commercial U.S. turkeys to the emergent H1N1 influenza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, the 2009 human H1N1 influenza virus was identified in turkey breeders in Chile, Canada and the U.S. resulting in infection and production losses. In these studies sera from turkeys vaccinated against avian influenza H1 were tested against the recent human pandemic H1N1 virus. Genetic ana...

  17. Pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in Chilean commercial turkeys with genetic and serologic comparisons to U.S. H1N1 avian influenza vaccine isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beginning in April 2009, a novel H1N1 influenza virus has caused acute respiratory disease in humans, first in Mexico and then spreading around the world. The resulting pandemic influenza A H1N1 2009 (pH1N1) virus was isolated in swine in Canada in June, 2009, and later in turkey breeders in Chile, ...

  18. Genetic and Antigenic Characterization of H1 Influenza Viruses from United States Swine Prior to the Emergence of the 2009 Pandemic H1N1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swine play a role for the evolution of influenza A viruses. Prior to the introduction of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus from humans into pigs, four phylogenetic clusters of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene from H1 influenza viruses could be found in U.S. swine. Viruses from the classical H1N1 swine lineage...

  19. Sequence specific binding of chlamydial histone H1-like protein.

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, R; Allen, M; Bradbury, E M; Wenman, W M

    1996-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is one of the few prokaryotic organisms known to contain proteins that bear homology to eukaryotic histone H1. Changes in macromolecular conformation of DNA mediated by the histone H1-like protein (Hc1) appear to regulate stage specific differentiation. We have developed a cross-linking immunoprecipitation protocol to examine in vivo protein-DNA interaction by immune precipitating chlamydial Hc1 cross linked to DNA. Our results strongly support the presence of sequence specific binding sites on the chlamydial plasmid and hc1 gene upstream of its open reading frame. The preferential binding sites were mapped to 520 bp BamHI-XhoI and 547 bp BamHI-DraI DNA fragments on the plasmid and hc1 respectively. Comparison of these two DNA sequences using Bestfit program has identified a 24 bp region with >75% identity that is unique to the chlamydial genome. Double-stranded DNA prepared by annealing complementary oligonucleotides corresponding to the conserved 24 bp region bind Hc1, in contrast to control sequences with similar A+T ratios. Further, Hc1 binds to DNA in a strand specific fashion, with preferential binding for only one strand. The site specific affinity to plasmid DNA was also demonstrated by atomic force microscopy data images. Binding was always followed by coiling, shrinking and aggregation of the affected DNA. Very low protein-DNA ratio was required if incubations were carried out in solution. However, if DNA was partially immobilized on mica substrate individual strands with dark foci were still visible even after the addition of excess Hc1. PMID:8760883

  20. Technicon H*1 Hematology System: Optical Design Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colella, G. M.; Tycko, D. H.; Groner, W.

    1988-06-01

    The Technicon H*1 systemTM is a clinical laboratory flow cytometer which performs a complete hematology profile, providing quantitative information on the various types of cells in a blood sample. A light-scattering method, using a HeNe laser, determines in a single flow channel the red cell count, platelet count, and the distributions of red cell volume, red cell hemoglobin concentration, and platelet volume. To accomplish this the scattered light from each red cell in the sample is measured in real time at two angular intervals. The cell volume and the hemoglobin concentration within the cell are derived from these two measurements. Severe accuracy and precision specifications are placed on the medically important red cell count (RBC) and the mean red cell volume (MCV). From the point of view of optical system design, the dominant factor is the requirement that RBC and MCV have precision and accuracy of the order of 2%. Signal-to-noise and scattering-angle definition requirements dictated the choice of a HeNe laser light source. The optics includes an illumination system for producing a sharply defined, uniformly illuminated scattering region and a detection system which must accurately define the accepted scattering angles. In previous cytometric methods for determining MCV only a single quantity was measured for each cell. Such methods cannot disentangle the independent effects of cell size and hemoglobin concentration on the measurement, thus compromising MCV accuracy. The present double-angle scattering method overcomes this accuracy problem. The H*1 red cell method, the supporting optical design and data demonstrating that the use of this technique eliminates interference between the observed red cell indices are presented.

  1. Citrullination regulates pluripotency and histone H1 binding to chromatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christophorou, Maria A.; Castelo-Branco, Gonçalo; Halley-Stott, Richard P.; Oliveira, Clara Slade; Loos, Remco; Radzisheuskaya, Aliaksandra; Mowen, Kerri A.; Bertone, Paul; Silva, José C. R.; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena; Nielsen, Michael L.; Gurdon, John B.; Kouzarides, Tony

    2014-03-01

    Citrullination is the post-translational conversion of an arginine residue within a protein to the non-coded amino acid citrulline. This modification leads to the loss of a positive charge and reduction in hydrogen-bonding ability. It is carried out by a small family of tissue-specific vertebrate enzymes called peptidylarginine deiminases (PADIs) and is associated with the development of diverse pathological states such as autoimmunity, cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, prion diseases and thrombosis. Nevertheless, the physiological functions of citrullination remain ill-defined, although citrullination of core histones has been linked to transcriptional regulation and the DNA damage response. PADI4 (also called PAD4 or PADV), the only PADI with a nuclear localization signal, was previously shown to act in myeloid cells where it mediates profound chromatin decondensation during the innate immune response to infection. Here we show that the expression and enzymatic activity of Padi4 are also induced under conditions of ground-state pluripotency and during reprogramming in mouse. Padi4 is part of the pluripotency transcriptional network, binding to regulatory elements of key stem-cell genes and activating their expression. Its inhibition lowers the percentage of pluripotent cells in the early mouse embryo and significantly reduces reprogramming efficiency. Using an unbiased proteomic approach we identify linker histone H1 variants, which are involved in the generation of compact chromatin, as novel PADI4 substrates. Citrullination of a single arginine residue within the DNA-binding site of H1 results in its displacement from chromatin and global chromatin decondensation. Together, these results uncover a role for citrullination in the regulation of pluripotency and provide new mechanistic insights into how citrullination regulates chromatin compaction.

  2. Probing lepton asymmetry with 21 cm fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Kohri, Kazunori; Oyama, Yoshihiko; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: oyamayo@post.kek.jp E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the issue of how accurately we can constrain the lepton number asymmetry ξ{sub ν}=μ{sub ν}/T{sub ν} in the Universe by using future observations of 21 cm line fluctuations and cosmic microwave background (CMB). We find that combinations of the 21 cm line and the CMB observations can constrain the lepton asymmetry better than big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). Additionally, we also discuss constraints on ξ{sub ν} in the presence of some extra radiation, and show that the 21 cm line observations can substantially improve the constraints obtained by CMB alone, and allow us to distinguish the effects of the lepton asymmetry from the ones of extra radiation.

  3. 21 CM searches for DIM galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disney, Mike; Banks, Gareth

    1997-04-01

    We review very strong selection effects which operate against the detection of dim (i.e. low surface brightness) galaxies. The Parkes multibeam instrument offers a wonderful opportunity to turn up new populations of such galaxies. However, to explore the newly accessible parameter space, it will be necessary to survey both a very deep patch (105 s/pointing, limiting N hi ˜ 1018 cm-2) and a deep patch (104 s/pointing, limiting N hi ˜ 3 × 1018 cm-2) in carefully selected areas, and we outline the case to do this.

  4. A novel lead compound CM-118

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lanfang; Shu, Mengjun; Chen, Yaqing; Yang, Dexiao; He, Qun; Zhao, Hui; Feng, Zhiyong; Liang, Chris; Yu, Ker

    2014-01-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and the c-Met receptor tyrosine kinase play essential roles in the pathogenesis in multiple human cancers and present emerging targets for cancer treatment. Here, we describe CM-118, a novel lead compound displaying low nanomolar biochemical potency against both ALK and c-Met with selectivity over >90 human kinases. CM-118 potently abrogated hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-induced c-Met phosphorylation and cell migration, phosphorylation of ALK, EML4-ALK, and ALK resistance mutants in transfected cells. CM-118 inhibited proliferation and/or induced apoptosis in multiple c-Met- and ALK-addicted cancer lines with dose response profile correlating target blockade. We show that the CM-118-induced apoptosis in c-Met-amplified H1993 NSCLC cells involved a rapid suppression of c-Met activity and c-Met-to-EGFR cross-talk, and was profoundly potentiated by EGFR inhibitors as shown by the increased levels of apoptotic proteins cleaved-PARP and Bim as well as reduction of the survival protein Mcl-1. Bim-knockdown or Mcl-1 overexpression each significantly attenuated apoptosis. We also revealed a key role by mTOR in mediating CM-118 action against the EML4-ALK-dependent NSCLC cells. Abrogation of EML4-ALK in H2228 cells profoundly reduced signaling capacity of the rapamycin-sensitive mTOR pathway leading to G1 cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial hyperpolarization, a metabolic perturbation linked to mTOR inhibition. Depletion of mTOR or mTORC1 inhibited H2228 cell growth, and mTOR inhibitors potentiated CM-118’s antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Oral administration of CM-118 at a wide range of well tolerated dosages diminished c-Met- and ALK phosphorylation in vivo, and caused tumor regression or growth inhibition in multiple c-Met- and ALK-dependent tumor xenografts in mice. CM-118 exhibits favorable pharmacokinetic and drug metabolism properties hence presents a candidate for clinical evaluation. PMID:24618813

  5. [Cutaneous Melanoma (CM): Current Diagnosis and Treatment].

    PubMed

    Gallegos Hernández, José Francisco; Nieweg, Omgo E

    2014-12-01

    Cutaneous melanoma (CM) is the third most common cancer of the skin, but it is the neoplasia with the greatest impact on mortality. Its etiology is multifactorial and it has been reported that its prevalence has increased in the last two decades. In Mexico, CM ranks seventh in frequency among all malignancies and 80% of cases are in locally advanced stages. The prognosis depends on the stage. The prognostic factors with greatest impact in survival are nodal status, tumor thickness or Breslow depth, ulceration, and in thin melanomas (< 1 mm thickness, without ulceration and Clarck level III), the mitotic index. The diagnostic approach is of great importance to achieve adequate treatment. Adherence to global guidelines of treatment allows us to obtain the best rates of locoregional control, which is the first target to be achieved in patients with CM. The goal of this manuscript is to provide a synthesis of the most important aspects in the diagnosis and treatment of CM, based on current evidence obtained in the literature.

  6. Neutron Resonance Parameters for Cm-242 (Curium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Volume 24 `Neutron Resonance Parameters' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It provides the neutron resonance parameters for the isotope Cm-242 (Curium).

  7. Towards the 1-cm SARAL orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelensky, Nikita P.; Lemoine, Frank G.; Chinn, Douglas S.; Beckley, Brian D.; Bordyugov, Oleg; Yang, Xu; Wimert, Jesse; Pavlis, Despina

    2016-12-01

    We have investigated the quality of precise orbits for the SARAL altimeter satellite using Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) data from March 14, 2013 to August 10, 2014. We have identified a 4.31 ± 0.14 cm error in the Z (cross-track) direction that defines the center-of-mass of the SARAL satellite in the spacecraft coordinate system, and we have tuned the SLR and DORIS tracking point offsets. After these changes, we reduce the average RMS of the SLR residuals for seven-day arcs from 1.85 to 1.38 cm. We tuned the non-conservative force model for SARAL, reducing the amplitude of the daily adjusted empirical accelerations by eight percent. We find that the best dynamic orbits show altimeter crossover residuals of 5.524 cm over cycles 7-15. Our analysis offers a unique illustration that high-elevation SLR residuals will not necessarily provide an accurate estimate of radial error at the 1-cm level, and that other supporting orbit tests are necessary for a better estimate. Through the application of improved models for handling time-variable gravity, the use of reduced-dynamic orbits, and through an arc-by-arc estimation of the C22 and S22 coefficients, we find from analysis of independent SLR residuals and other tests that we achieve 1.1-1.2 cm radial orbit accuracies for SARAL. The limiting errors stem from the inadequacy of the DPOD2008 and SLRF2008 station complements, and inadequacies in radiation force modeling, especially with respect to spacecraft self-shadowing and modeling of thermal variations due to eclipses.

  8. 77 FR 53912 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; H-1B...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-04

    ...; H-1B Technical Skills Training Grants and H-1B Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge Grants... Administration (ETA) sponsored information collection request (ICR) proposal titled, ``H-1B Technical Skills Training Grants and H-1B Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge Grants,'' to the Office of...

  9. Induction of cell surface human leukocyte antigen-G expression in pandemic H1N1 2009 and seasonal H1N1 influenza virus-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hai-Xiao; Chen, Bao-Guo; Shi, Wei-Wu; Zhen, Rui; Xu, Dan-Ping; Lin, Aifen; Yan, Wei-Hua

    2011-02-01

    A novel H1N1 virus of swine origin (H1N1v) recently caused a pandemic; however, knowledge of immunologic aspects of the virus infection are limited. Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) was speculated to play critical roles in viral infection, although its clinical relevance in H1N1 infection remains unknown. In this study, HLA-G expression in peripheral T lymphocytes, monocytes, and CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells (in 50 H1N1v-infected and 41 seasonal H1N1-infected patients and 27 control subjects) were analyzed by flow cytometry. Plasma-soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G, in 28 H1N1v-infected, 29 seasonal H1N1-infected patients and 85 control subjects) were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The percentage of HLA-G-positive T lymphocytes and monocytes among patients with H1N1v and seasonal H1N1 infections was dramatically increased compared with controls (all p < 0.001). Treg was markedly increased among H1N1v- infected patients compared with normal controls (p = 0.041), but not for the seasonal H1N1-infected patients. Meanwhile, no significant difference was observed for sHLA-G levels between the groups. Together, cell surface HLA-G expression was markedly induced in H1N1v-infected and seasonal H1N1-infected patients, and increased Treg was observed only in H1N1v-infected patients. Given its immune-suppressive property, elevated cell surface HLA-G expression may help to explain the virus escaping from host immune responses.

  10. Measurements of Output Factors For Small Photon Fields Up to 10 cm x 10 cm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacala, Angelina

    Field output factors (OF) for photon beams from a 6 MV medical accelerator were measured using five different detectors in a scanning water phantom. The measurements were taken for square field sizes of integral widths ranging from 1 cm to 10 cm for two reference source-to-surface distances (SSD) and depths in water. For the diode detectors, square field widths as small as 2.5 mm were also studied. The photon beams were collimated by using either the jaws or the multileaf collimators. Measured OFs are found to depend upon the field size, SSD, depth and also upon the type of beam collimation, size and type of detector used. For field sizes larger than 3 cm x 3 cm, the OF measurements agree to within 1% or less. The largest variation in OF occurs for jawsshaped field of size 1 cm x 1cm, where a difference of more than 18% is observed.

  11. Interpreting Sky-Averaged 21-cm Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirocha, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    Within the first ~billion years after the Big Bang, the intergalactic medium (IGM) underwent a remarkable transformation, from a uniform sea of cold neutral hydrogen gas to a fully ionized, metal-enriched plasma. Three milestones during this epoch of reionization -- the emergence of the first stars, black holes (BHs), and full-fledged galaxies -- are expected to manifest themselves as extrema in sky-averaged ("global") measurements of the redshifted 21-cm background. However, interpreting these measurements will be complicated by the presence of strong foregrounds and non-trivialities in the radiative transfer (RT) modeling required to make robust predictions.I have developed numerical models that efficiently solve the frequency-dependent radiative transfer equation, which has led to two advances in studies of the global 21-cm signal. First, frequency-dependent solutions facilitate studies of how the global 21-cm signal may be used to constrain the detailed spectral properties of the first stars, BHs, and galaxies, rather than just the timing of their formation. And second, the speed of these calculations allows one to search vast expanses of a currently unconstrained parameter space, while simultaneously characterizing the degeneracies between parameters of interest. I find principally that (1) physical properties of the IGM, such as its temperature and ionization state, can be constrained robustly from observations of the global 21-cm signal without invoking models for the astrophysical sources themselves, (2) translating IGM properties to galaxy properties is challenging, in large part due to frequency-dependent effects. For instance, evolution in the characteristic spectrum of accreting BHs can modify the 21-cm absorption signal at levels accessible to first generation instruments, but could easily be confused with evolution in the X-ray luminosity star-formation rate relation. Finally, (3) the independent constraints most likely to aide in the interpretation

  12. The H1 Trigger with Emphasis on Tracking Triggers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedlberger, J.

    1995-11-01

    Since the commissioning of the electron proton collider HERA in 1992 at DESY the H1 experiment collected data with stable performance. The collision frequency of 10.4 MHz necessitates a pipelined design of the data acquisition and the trigger. A multilevel trigger is used to provide the required selectivity on physics processes and to allow for fast rejection of background events. Subdetector-based, deadtime-free triggers are combined to produce a first level trigger. The dcr φ trigger described herein, extracts its data from the central driftchamber. The drifttime of the signals is measured online and logical functions are applied on the digitized time measurements. To account for different performance parameters of the driftchamber the hardware demands a high flexibility, thus leading to a design with Programmable Gate Arrays (XILINX). Track-finding is achieved by means of ten thousand look-up tables, each with typically 20 inputs. Although the signals for one event will arrive within 1.1 μs, it is possible to determine the timing of the event online within one bunchcrossing (0.096 μs).

  13. Data Simulation for 21 cm Cosmology Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pober, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    21 cm cosmologists seek a measurement of the hyperfine line of neutral hydrogen from very high redshifts. While this signal has the potential to provide an unprecedented view into the early universe, it is also buried under exceedingly bright foreground emission. Over the last several years, 21 cm cosmology research has led to an improved understanding of how low frequency radio interferometers will affect the separation of cosmological signal from foregrounds. This talk will describe new efforts to incorporate this understanding into simulations of the most realistic data sets for the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER), the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), and the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA). These high fidelity simulations are essential for robust algorithm design and validation of early results from these experiments.

  14. Extended Performance 8-cm Mercury Ion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantenieks, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    A slightly modified 8-cm Hg ion thruster demonstrated significant increase in performance. Thrust was increased by almost a factor of five over that of the baseline thruster. Thruster operation with various three grid ion optics configurations; thruster performance as a function of accelerator grid open area, cathode baffle, and cathode orifice size; and a life test of 614 hours at a beam current of 250 mA (17.5 mN thrust) are discussed. Highest thruster efficiency was obtained with the smallest open area accelerator grid. The benefits in efficiency from the low neutral loss grids were mitigated, however, by the limitation such grids place on attainable ion beam current densities. The thruster components suffered negligible weight losses during a life test, which indicated that operation of the 8-cm thruster at extended levels of thrust and power is possible with no significant loss of lifetime.

  15. 15 cm multipole gas ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaacson, G. C.; Kaufman, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    A 15-cm multipole thruster was operated on argon and xenon. The multipole approach used has been shown capable of low discharge losses and flat ion beam profiles with a minimum of redesign. This approach employs low magnetic field strengths and flat or cylindrical sheet-metal parts, hence is suited to rapid optimization and scaling. Only refractory metal cathodes were used in this investigation.

  16. Genomic reassortants of pandemic A (H1N1) 2009 virus and endemic porcine H1 and H3 viruses in swine in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kirisawa, Rikio; Ogasawara, Yoshitaka; Yoshitake, Hayato; Koda, Asuka; Furuya, Tokujiro

    2014-11-01

    From 2010 to 2013 in Japan, we isolated 11 swine influenza viruses (SIVs) from pigs showing respiratory symptoms. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses showed that 6 H1N1 viruses originated from the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 (pdm 09) virus and the other 5 viruses were reassortants between SIVs and pdm 09 viruses, representing 4 genotypes. Two H1N2 viruses contained H1 and N2 genes originated from Japanese H1N2 SIV together with internal genes of pdm 09 viruses. Additionally, 1 H1N2 virus contained a further NP gene originating from Japanese H1N2 SIV. One H1N1 virus contained only the H1 gene originating from Japanese H1 SIV in a pdm 09 virus background. One H3N2 virus contained H3 and N2 genes originating from Japanese H3N2 SIV together with internal genes of pdm 09 virus. The results indicate that pdm 09 viruses are distributed widely in the Japanese swine population and that several reassortments with Japanese SIVs have occurred.

  17. Genetic Characterization of H1N1 and H1N2 Influenza A Viruses Circulating in Ontario Pigs in 2012.

    PubMed

    Grgić, Helena; Costa, Marcio; Friendship, Robert M; Carman, Susy; Nagy, Éva; Poljak, Zvonimir

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize H1N1 and H1N2 influenza A virus isolates detected during outbreaks of respiratory disease in pig herds in Ontario (Canada) in 2012. Six influenza viruses were included in analysis using full genome sequencing based on the 454 platform. In five H1N1 isolates, all eight segments were genetically related to 2009 pandemic virus (A(H1N1)pdm09). One H1N2 isolate had hemagglutinin (HA), polymerase A (PA) and non-structural (NS) genes closely related to A(H1N1)pdm09, and neuraminidase (NA), matrix (M), polymerase B1 (PB1), polymerase B2 (PB2), and nucleoprotein (NP) genes originating from a triple-reassortant H3N2 virus (tr H3N2). The HA gene of five Ontario H1 isolates exhibited high identity of 99% with the human A(H1N1)pdm09 [A/Mexico/InDRE4487/09] from Mexico, while one Ontario H1N1 isolate had only 96.9% identity with this Mexican virus. Each of the five Ontario H1N1 viruses had between one and four amino acid (aa) changes within five antigenic sites, while one Ontario H1N2 virus had two aa changes within two antigenic sites. Such aa changes in antigenic sites could have an effect on antibody recognition and ultimately have implications for immunization practices. According to aa sequence analysis of the M2 protein, Ontario H1N1 and H1N2 viruses can be expected to offer resistance to adamantane derivatives, but not to neuraminidase inhibitors.

  18. Mapmaking for precision 21 cm cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, Joshua S.; Tegmark, Max; Liu, Adrian; Ewall-Wice, Aaron; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; Morales, Miguel F.; Neben, Abraham R.; Parsons, Aaron R.; Zheng, Haoxuan

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the "Cosmic Dawn" and the Epoch of Reionization with 21 cm tomography, we need to statistically separate the cosmological signal from foregrounds known to be orders of magnitude brighter. Over the last few years, we have learned much about the role our telescopes play in creating a putatively foreground-free region called the "EoR window." In this work, we examine how an interferometer's effects can be taken into account in a way that allows for the rigorous estimation of 21 cm power spectra from interferometric maps while mitigating foreground contamination and thus increasing sensitivity. This requires a precise understanding of the statistical relationship between the maps we make and the underlying true sky. While some of these calculations would be computationally infeasible if performed exactly, we explore several well-controlled approximations that make mapmaking and the calculation of map statistics much faster, especially for compact and highly redundant interferometers designed specifically for 21 cm cosmology. We demonstrate the utility of these methods and the parametrized trade-offs between accuracy and speed using one such telescope, the upcoming Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array, as a case study.

  19. Polyhedral Serpentine Grains in CM Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zega, Thomas J.; Garvie, Laurence A. J.; Dodony, Istvan; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2005-01-01

    CM chondrites are primitive rocks that experienced aqueous alteration in the early solar system. Their matrices and fine-grained rims (FGRs) sustained the effects of alteration, and the minerals within them hold clues to the aqueous reactions. Sheet silicates are an important product of alteration, and those of the serpentine group are abundant in the CM2 chondrites. Here we expand on our previous efforts to characterize the structure and chemistry of serpentines in CM chondrites and report results on a polyhedral form that is structurally similar to polygonal serpentine. Polygonal serpentine consists of tetrahedral (T) sheets joined to M(2+)-centered octahedral (O) sheets (where (M2+) is primarily Mg(2+) and Fe(2+)), which give rise to a 1:1 (TO) layered structure with a 0.7-nm layer periodicity. The structure is similar to chrysotile in that it consists of concentric lizardite layers wrapped around the fiber axis. However, unlike the rolled-up chrysotile, the tetrahedral sheets of the lizardite layers are periodically inverted and kinked, producing sectors. The relative angles between sectors result in 15- and 30-sided polygons in terrestrial samples.

  20. Viable RNaseH1 knockout mice show RNaseH1 is essential for R loop processing, mitochondrial and liver function

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Walt F.; Murray, Heather M.; Damle, Sagar S.; Hart, Christopher E.; Hung, Gene; De Hoyos, Cheryl Li; Liang, Xue-Hai; Crooke, Stanley T.

    2016-01-01

    Viable constitutive and tamoxifen inducible liver-specific RNase H1 knockout mice that expressed no RNase H1 activity in hepatocytes showed increased R-loop levels and reduced mitochondrial encoded DNA and mRNA levels, suggesting impaired mitochondrial R-loop processing, transcription and mitochondrial DNA replication. These changes resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction with marked changes in mitochondrial fusion, fission, morphology and transcriptional changes reflective of mitochondrial damage and stress. Liver degeneration ensued, as indicated by apoptosis, fibrosis and increased transaminase levels. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) designed to serve as substrates for RNase H1 were inactive in the hepatocytes from the RNase H1 knockout mice and in vivo, demonstrating that RNase H1 is necessary for the activity of DNA-like ASOs. During liver regeneration, a clone of hepatocytes that expressed RNase H1 developed and partially restored mitochondrial and liver function. PMID:27131367

  1. ICD-10-CM/PCS: Transferring Knowledge from ICD-9-CM

    PubMed Central

    Sand, Jaime N.; Elison-Bowers, Patt

    2013-01-01

    The transition to ICD-10-CM/PCS has expanded educational opportunities for educators and trainers who are taking on the responsibility of training coders on the new system. Coding education currently faces multiple challenges in the areas of how to train the new workforce, what might be the most efficient method of providing that training, how much retraining of the current workforce with ICD-9-CM training will be required, and how to meet the national implementation deadline of 2014 in the most efficacious manner. This research sought to identify if there was a difference between a group of participants with no knowledge of ICD-9-CM and those with some knowledge of ICD-9-CM in scores on an ICD-10-CM/PCS quiz. Results indicate a difference, supporting the idea of knowledge transfer between the systems and providing additional insight into coding education. PMID:23861677

  2. rapidSTRIPE H1N1 test for detection of the pandemic swine origin influenza A (H1N1) virus.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pranav; Graser, Elmara; Robst, Stephan; Hillert, Roger; Meye, Axel; Hillebrand, Timo; Niedrig, Matthias

    2011-04-01

    The rapidSTRIPE H1N1 test, based on a nucleic acid lateral-flow assay, has been developed for diagnosis of a swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus. This test is simple and cost-effective and allows specific detection of the S-OIV A (H1N1) virus from swab sampling to final detection on a lateral-flow stripe within 2 to 3 h.

  3. Irradiation with narrowband-ultraviolet B suppresses phorbol ester-induced up-regulation of H1 receptor mRNA in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Kentaro; Kitayama, Mika; Fujii, Tatsuya; Fujioka, Akira; Matsushita, Toshio; Mukai, Takashi; Kubo, Yoshiaki; Kubo, Nobuo; Fukui, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion These findings suggest that low dose irradiation with 310 nm NB-UVB specifically suppressed the up-regulation of H1R gene expression without inducing apoptosis and that UVB of shorter or longer wavelength than 310 nm NB-UVB had no such effects. Objective To develop a narrowband-ultraviolet B(NB-UVB) phototherapy for allergic rhinitis, this study investigated the effects of irradiation with NB-UVB at wavelength of 310 nm on phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-induced up-regulation of histamine H1 receptor (H1R) mRNA in HeLa cells. Methods The mRNA levels of H1R in HeLa cells were measured using real-time RT-PCR. Apoptosis were evaluated with DNA fragmentation assay. Results PMA induced a significant increase in H1R mRNA expression in HeLa cells. Irradiation with 305 nm UVB and 310 nm NB-UVB, but not with 315 nm UVB at doses of 200 and 300 mJ/cm(2) significantly suppressed PMA-induced up-regulation of H1R mRNA. At a dose of 200 mJ/cm(2), irradiation with 305 nm UVB, but not with 310 nm NB-UVB, induced apoptosis, although exposure of the cells to both 305 and 310 nm UVB induced apoptosis at a dose of 300 mJ/cm(2) after PMA treatment in HeLa cells. Conversely, irradiation with 315 nm UVB at doses of 200 and 300 mJ/cm(2) did not induce apoptosis.

  4. Structurally divergent histone H1 variants in chromosomes containing highly condensed interphase chromatin.

    PubMed

    Schulze, E; Nagel, S; Gavenis, K; Grossbach, U

    1994-12-01

    Condensed and late-replicating interphase chromatin in the Dipertan insect Chironomus contains a divergent type of histone H1 with an inserted KAP-KAP repeat that is conserved in single H1 variants of Caenorhabditis elegans and Volvox carteri. H1 peptides comprising the insertion interact specifically with DNA. The Chironomid Glyptotendipes exhibits a corresponding correlation between the presence of condensed chromosome sections and the appearance of a divergent H1 subtype. The centromere regions and other sections of Glyptotendipes barbipes chromosomes are inaccessible to immunodecoration by anti-H2B and anti-H1 antibodies one of which is known to recognize nine different epitopes in all domains of the H1 molecule. Microelectrophoresis of the histones from manually isolated unfixed centromeres revealed the presence of H1 and core histones. H1 genes of G. barpipes were sequenced and found to belong to two groups. H1 II and H1 III are rather similar but differ remarkably from H1 I. About 30% of the deduced amino acid residues were found to be unique to H1 I. Most conspicuous is the insertion, SPAKSPGR, in H1 I that is lacking in H1 II and H1 III and at its position gives rise to the sequence repeat SPAKSPAKSPGR. The homologous H1 I gene in Glyptotendipes salinus encodes the very similar repeat TPAKSPAKSPGR. Both sequences are structurally related to the KAPKAP repeat in H1 I-1 specific for condensed chromosome sites in Chironomus and to the SPKKSPKK repeat in sea urchin sperm H1, lie at almost the same distance from the central globular domain, and could interact with linker DNA in packaging condensed chromatin.

  5. Isotope shifts in methane near 6000/cm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, K.; Halsey, G. W.; Jennings, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Isotope shifts for cleanly resolved vibrational-rotational absorption lines of CH4-12 and CH4-13 were measured by a 5-m focal length Littrow spectrometer in the 6000/cm range. The methane isotopes were held in separate absorption cells: 20 torr of CH4-13 in a 1-m cell, and 5 torr of CH4-12 in a White cell of 4-m optical path length. Measured shifts for the cleanly resolved singlets R(0), R(1), Q(1) and P(1) are summarized in tabular form.

  6. An engineering model 30 cm ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poeschel, R. L.; King, H. J.; Schnelker, D. E.

    1973-01-01

    Thruster development at Hughes Research Laboratories and NASA Lewis Research Center has brought the 30-cm mercury bombardment ion thruster to the state of an engineering model. This thruster has been designed to have sufficient internal strength for direct mounting on gimbals, to weigh 7.3 kg, to operate with a corrected overall efficiency of 71%, and to have 10,000 hours lifetime. Subassemblies, such as the ion optical system, isolators, etc., have been upgraded to meet launch qualification standards. This paper presents a summary of the design specifications and performance characteristics which define the interface between the thruster module and the remainder of the propulsion system.

  7. A 30-cm diameter argon ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    A 30 cm diameter argon ion source was evaluated. Ion source beam currents up to 4a were extracted with ion energies ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 KeV. An ion optics scaling relation was developed for predicting ion beam extraction capability as a function of total extraction voltage, gas type, and screen grid open area. Ignition and emission characteristics of several hollow cathode geometries were assessed for purposes of defining discharge chamber and neutralizer cathodes. Also presented are ion beam profile characteristics which exhibit broad beam capability well suited for ion beam sputtering applications.

  8. Fuel elements of research reactor CM

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, A.V.; Morozov, A.V.; Vatulin, A.V.; Ershov, S.A.

    2013-07-01

    In 1961 the CM research reactor was commissioned at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (Dimitrovgrad, Russia), it was intended to carry on investigations and the production of transuranium nuclides. The reactor is of a tank type. Original fuel assembly contained plate fuels that were spaced with vanes and corrugated bands. Nickel was used as a cladding material, fuel meat was produced from UO{sub 2} + electrolytic nickel composition. Fuel plates have been replaced by self-spacing cross-shaped dispersion fuels clad in stainless steel. In 2005 the reactor was updated. The purpose of this updating was to increase the quantity of irradiation channels in the reactor core and to improve the neutron balance. The updating was implemented at the expense of 20 % reduction in the quantity of fuel elements in the core which released a space for extra channels and decreased the mass of structural materials in the core. The updated reactor is loaded with modified standard fuel elements with 20 % higher uranium masses. At the same time stainless steel in fuel assembly shrouds was substituted by zirconium alloy. Today in progress are investigations and work to promote the second stage of reactor updating that involve developments of cross-shaped fuel elements having low neutron absorption matrix materials. This article gives an historical account of the design and main technical changes that occurred for the CM reactor since its commissioning.

  9. Redundant Array Configurations for 21 cm Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, Joshua S.; Parsons, Aaron R.

    2016-08-01

    Realizing the potential of 21 cm tomography to statistically probe the intergalactic medium before and during the Epoch of Reionization requires large telescopes and precise control of systematics. Next-generation telescopes are now being designed and built to meet these challenges, drawing lessons from first-generation experiments that showed the benefits of densely packed, highly redundant arrays—in which the same mode on the sky is sampled by many antenna pairs—for achieving high sensitivity, precise calibration, and robust foreground mitigation. In this work, we focus on the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) as an interferometer with a dense, redundant core designed following these lessons to be optimized for 21 cm cosmology. We show how modestly supplementing or modifying a compact design like HERA’s can still deliver high sensitivity while enhancing strategies for calibration and foreground mitigation. In particular, we compare the imaging capability of several array configurations, both instantaneously (to address instrumental and ionospheric effects) and with rotation synthesis (for foreground removal). We also examine the effects that configuration has on calibratability using instantaneous redundancy. We find that improved imaging with sub-aperture sampling via “off-grid” antennas and increased angular resolution via far-flung “outrigger” antennas is possible with a redundantly calibratable array configuration.

  10. THE METALLICITY OF THE CM DRACONIS SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Terrien, Ryan C.; Fleming, Scott W.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Deshpande, Rohit; Bender, Chad F.; Ramsey, Lawrence W.; Feiden, Gregory A.

    2012-11-20

    The CM Draconis system comprises two eclipsing mid-M dwarfs of nearly equal mass in a 1.27 day orbit. This well-studied eclipsing binary has often been used for benchmark tests of stellar models, since its components are among the lowest mass stars with well-measured masses and radii ({approx}< 1% relative precision). However, as with many other low-mass stars, non-magnetic models have been unable to match the observed radii and effective temperatures for CM Dra at the 5%-10% level. To date, the uncertain metallicity of the system has complicated comparison of theoretical isochrones with observations. In this Letter, we use data from the SpeX instrument on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility to measure the metallicity of the system during primary and secondary eclipses, as well as out of eclipse, based on an empirical metallicity calibration in the H and K near-infrared (NIR) bands. We derive an [Fe/H] = -0.30 {+-} 0.12 that is consistent across all orbital phases. The determination of [Fe/H] for this system constrains a key dimension of parameter space when attempting to reconcile model isochrone predictions and observations.

  11. Design study of large area 8 cm x 8 cm wrapthrough cells for space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garlick, George F. J.; Lillington, David R.

    1987-01-01

    The design of large area silicon solar cells for the projected NASA space station is discussed. It is based on the NASA specification for the cells which calls for an 8 cm by 8 cm cell of wrapthrough type with gridded back contacts. The beginning of life (BOL) power must be 1.039 watts per cell or larger and maximum end of life (EOL) after 10 years in the prescribed orbit under an equivalent 1MeV electron radiation damage fluence of 5 times 10 to the 13th power e/square cm. On orbit efficiency is to be optimized by a low thermal absorptance goal (thermal alpha) of .63.

  12. Aliphatic Amines in Antarctic CR2, CM2, and CM1/2 Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aponte, Jose C.; McLain, Hannah L.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.

    2016-01-01

    Meteoritic water-soluble organic compounds provide a unique record of the processes that occurred during the formation of the solar system and the chemistry preceding the origins of life on Earth. We have investigated the molecular distribution, compound-specific delta13C isotopic ratios and enantiomeric compositions of aliphatic monoamines present in the hot acid-water extracts of the carbonaceous chondrites LAP 02342 (CR2), GRA 95229 (CR2), LON 94101 (CM2), LEW 90500 (CM2), and ALH 83100 (CM1/2). Analyses of the concentration of monoamines in these meteorites revealed: (a) the CR2 chondrites studied here contain higher concentrations of monoamines relative to the analyzed CM2 chondrites; (b) the concentration of monoamines decreases with increasing carbon number; and (c) isopropylamine is the most abundant monoamine in these CR2 chondrites, while methylamine is the most abundant amine species in these CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites. The delta13C values of monoamines in CR2 chondrite do not correlate with the number of carbon atoms; however, in CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites, the 13C enrichment decreases with increasing monoamine carbon number. The delta13C values of methylamine in CR2 chondrites ranged from -1 to +10per mille, while in CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites the delta13C values of methylamine ranged from +41 to +59per mille. We also observed racemic compositions of sec-butylamine, 3-methyl-2-butylamine, and sec-pentylamine in the studied carbonaceous chondrites. Additionally, we compared the abundance and delta13C isotopic composition of monoamines to those of their structurally related amino acids. We found that monoamines are less abundant than amino acids in CR2 chondrites, with the opposite being true in CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites. We used these collective data to evaluate different primordial synthetic pathways for monoamines in carbonaceous chondrites and to understand the potential common origins these molecules may share with meteoritic amino acids.

  13. Aliphatic amines in Antarctic CR2, CM2, and CM1/2 carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aponte, José C.; McLain, Hannah L.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.

    2016-09-01

    Meteoritic water-soluble organic compounds provide a unique record of the processes that occurred during the formation of the solar system and the chemistry preceding the origins of life on Earth. We have investigated the molecular distribution, compound-specific δ13C isotopic ratios and enantiomeric compositions of aliphatic monoamines present in the hot acid-water extracts of the carbonaceous chondrites LAP 02342 (CR2), GRA 95229 (CR2), LON 94101 (CM2), LEW 90500 (CM2), and ALH 83100 (CM1/2). Analyses of the concentration of monoamines in these meteorites revealed: (a) the CR2 chondrites studied here contain higher concentrations of monoamines relative to the analyzed CM2 chondrites; (b) the concentration of monoamines decreases with increasing carbon number; and (c) isopropylamine is the most abundant monoamine in these CR2 chondrites, while methylamine is the most abundant amine species in these CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites. The δ13C values of monoamines in CR2 chondrite do not correlate with the number of carbon atoms; however, in CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites, the 13C enrichment decreases with increasing monoamine carbon number. The δ13C values of methylamine in CR2 chondrites ranged from -1 to +10‰, while in CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites the δ13C values of methylamine ranged from +41 to +59‰. We also observed racemic compositions of sec-butylamine, 3-methyl-2-butylamine, and sec-pentylamine in the studied carbonaceous chondrites. Additionally, we compared the abundance and δ13C isotopic composition of monoamines to those of their structurally related amino acids. We found that monoamines are less abundant than amino acids in CR2 chondrites, with the opposite being true in CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites. We used these collective data to evaluate different primordial synthetic pathways for monoamines in carbonaceous chondrites and to understand the potential common origins these molecules may share with meteoritic amino acids.

  14. Large aperture cube corner interferometer with a resolution of 0.001 cm(-1).

    PubMed

    Kauppinen, J; Horneman, V M

    1991-06-20

    The interferometer of the Fourier transform spectrometer at the University of Oulu has been modified so that the maximum instrumental resolution is better than 10(-3) cm(-1). The resolution of the previous interferometer was 4.5 x 10(-3) cm(-1). The present interferometer consists of large cube corner mirrors and a large Mylar beam splitter. Each corner mirror has been made with three flat mirrors on an adjustable supporting frame. The interferometer was already in practical use in 1985. The first spectra (H(2)O, CO(2), N(2)O, OCS) recorded on this interferometer have been presented in HANDBOOK OF INFRARED STANDARDS WITH SPECTRAL MAPS AND TRANSITION ASSIGNMENTS BETWEEN 3 AND 2600 microm, G. Guelachvili and K. Narahari Rao, Eds. (Academic, New York, 1986).

  15. 20 CFR 655.700 - What statutory provisions govern the employment of H-1B, H-1B1, and E-3 nonimmigrants and how do...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... obtained from an DHS district or area office. (3) If DHS approves the H-1B classification, the nonimmigrant... nurses. Therefore, the references in this part to “H-1B nonimmigrant” apply to any Mexican citizen nonimmigrant who is classified by DHS as “TN.” In the case of a registered nurse, the following...

  16. Antigenic variation of H1N1, H1N2 and H3N2 swine influenza viruses in Japan and Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Takemae, Nobuhiro; Nguyen, Tung; Ngo, Long Thanh; Hiromoto, Yasuaki; Uchida, Yuko; Pham, Vu Phong; Kageyama, Tsutomu; Kasuo, Shizuko; Shimada, Shinichi; Yamashita, Yasutaka; Goto, Kaoru; Kubo, Hideyuki; Le, Vu Tri; Van Vo, Hung; Do, Hoa Thi; Nguyen, Dang Hoang; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Matsuu, Aya; Saito, Takehiko

    2013-04-01

    The antigenicity of the influenza A virus hemagglutinin is responsible for vaccine efficacy in protecting pigs against swine influenza virus (SIV) infection. However, the antigenicity of SIV strains currently circulating in Japan and Vietnam has not been well characterized. We examined the antigenicity of classical H1 SIVs, pandemic A(H1N1)2009 (A(H1N1)pdm09) viruses, and seasonal human-lineage SIVs isolated in Japan and Vietnam. A hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay was used to determine antigenic differences that differentiate the recent Japanese H1N2 and H3N2 SIVs from the H1N1 and H3N2 domestic vaccine strains. Minor antigenic variation between pig A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses was evident by HI assay using 13 mAbs raised against homologous virus. A Vietnamese H1N2 SIV, whose H1 gene originated from a human strain in the mid-2000s, reacted poorly with post-infection ferret serum against human vaccine strains from 2000-2010. These results provide useful information for selection of optimal strains for SIV vaccine production.

  17. 20 CFR 655.705 - What Federal agencies are involved in the H-1B and H-1B1 programs, and what are the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Employers Seeking To Employ Nonimmigrants on H-1b Visas in Specialty Occupations and as Fashion Models, and... whether the individual is a fashion model of distinguished merit and ability, and whether the... § 655.700(d)(4). Each employer seeking an H-1B nonimmigrant in a specialty occupation or as a...

  18. The 30-cm ion thruster power processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, B. G.; Hopper, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    A power processor unit for powering and controlling the 30 cm Mercury Electron-Bombardment Ion Thruster was designed, fabricated, and tested. The unit uses a unique and highly efficient transistor bridge inverter power stage in its implementation. The system operated from a 200 to 400 V dc input power bus, provides 12 independently controllable and closely regulated dc power outputs, and has an overall power conditioning capacity of 3.5 kW. Protective circuitry was incorporated as an integral part of the design to assure failure-free operation during transient and steady-state load faults. The implemented unit demonstrated an electrical efficiency between 91.5 and 91.9 at its nominal rated load over the 200 to 400 V dc input bus range.

  19. Pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in Chilean commercial turkeys with genetic and serologic comparisons to U.S. H1N1 avian influenza vaccine isolates.

    PubMed

    Kapczynski, Darrell R; Gonder, Eric; Tilley, Becky; Hernandez, Andres; Hodgson, Jorge; Wojcinski, Helen; Jiang, Haijun; Suarez, David L

    2011-12-01

    Beginning in April 2009, a novel H1N1 influenza virus caused acute respiratory disease in humans, first in Mexico and then around the world. The resulting pandemic influenza A H1N1 2009 (pH1N1) virus was isolated in swine in Canada in June 2009 and later in breeder turkeys in Chile, Canada, and the United States. The pH1N1 virus consists of gene segments of avian, human, and swine influenza origin and has the potential for infection in poultry following exposure to infected humans or swine. We examined the clinical events following the initial outbreak of pH1N1 in turkeys and determined the relatedness of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene segments from the pH1N1 to two H1N1 avian influenza (AI) isolates used in commercial turkey inactivated vaccines. Overall, infection of turkey breeder hens with pH1N1 resulted in -50% reduction of egg production over 3-4 weeks. Genetic analysis indicated one H1N1 AI vaccine isolate (Alturkey/North Carolina/17026/1988) contained approximately 92% nucleotide sequence similarity to the pH1N1 virus (A/Mexico/4109/2009); whereas, a more recent AI vaccine isolate (A/ swine/North Carolina/00573/2005) contained 75.9% similarity. Comparison of amino acids found at antigenic sites of the HA protein indicated conserved epitopes at the Sa site; however, major differences were found at the Ca2 site between pH1N1 and A/ turkey/North Carolina/127026/1988. Hemagglutinin-inhibition (HI) tests were conducted with sera produced in vaccinated turkeys in North Carolina to determine if protection would be conferred using U.S. AI vaccine isolates. HI results indicate positive reactivity (HI titer > or = 5 log2) against the vaccine viruses over the course of study. However, limited cross-reactivity to the 2009 pH1N1 virus was observed, with positive titers in a limited number of birds (6 out of 20) beginning only after a third vaccination. Taken together, these results demonstrate that turkeys treated with these vaccines would likely not be protected against pH

  20. Isolation and genetic characterization of avian-like H1N1 and novel ressortant H1N2 influenza viruses from pigs in China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai; Zhang, Peng-Chao; Zhou, Yan-Jun; Li, Guo-Xin; Pan, Jie; Yan, Li-Ping; Shi, Xiao-Xiao; Liu, Hui-Li; Tong, Guang-Zhi

    2009-08-21

    As pigs are susceptible to both human and avian influenza viruses, they have been proposed to be intermediate hosts or mixing vessels for the generation of pandemic influenza viruses through reassortment or adaptation to the mammalian host. In this study, we reported avian-like H1N1 and novel ressortant H1N2 influenza viruses from pigs in China. Homology and phylogenetic analyses showed that the H1N1 virus (A/swine/Zhejiang/1/07) was closely to avian-like H1N1 viruses and seemed to be derived from the European swine H1N1 viruses, which was for the first time reported in China; and the two H1N2 viruses (A/swine/Shanghai/1/07 and A/swine/Guangxi/13/06) were novel ressortant H1N2 influenza viruses containing genes from the classical swine (HA, NP, M and NS), human (NA and PB1) and avian (PB2 and PA) lineages, which indicted that the reassortment among human, avian, and swine influenza viruses had taken place in pigs in China and resulted in the generation of new viruses. The isolation of avian-like H1N1 influenza virus originated from the European swine H1N1 viruses, especially the emergence of two novel ressortant H1N2 influenza viruses provides further evidence that pigs serve as intermediate hosts or "mixing vessels", and swine influenza virus surveillance in China should be given a high priority.

  1. Evaluation of Argonne 9-cm and 10-cm Annular Centrifugal Contactors for SHINE Solution Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Wardle, Kent E.; Pereira, Candido; Vandegrift, George

    2015-02-01

    Work is in progress to evaluate the SHINE Medical Technologies process for producing Mo-99 for medical use from the fission of dissolved low-enriched uranium (LEU). This report addresses the use of Argonne annular centrifugal contactors for periodic treatment of the process solution. In a letter report from FY 2013, Pereira and Vandegrift compared the throughput and physical footprint for the two contactor options available from CINC Industries: the V-02 and V-05, which have rotor diameters of 5 cm and 12.7 cm, respectively. They suggested that an intermediately sized “Goldilocks” contactor might provide a better balance between throughput and footprint to meet the processing needs for the uranium extraction (UREX) processing of the SHINE solution to remove undesired fission products. Included with the submission of this letter report are the assembly drawings for two Argonne-design contactors that are in this intermediate range—9-cm and 10-cm rotors, respectively. The 9-cm contactor (drawing number CE-D6973A, stamped February 15, 1978) was designed as a single-stage unit and built and tested in the late 1970s along with other size units, both smaller and larger. In subsequent years, a significant effort to developed annular centrifugal contactors was undertaken to support work at Hanford implementing the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process. These contactors had a 10-cm rotor diameter and were fully designed as multistage units with four stages per assembly (drawing number CMT-E1104, stamped March 14, 1990). From a technology readiness perspective, these 10-cm units are much farther ahead in the design progression and, therefore, would require significantly less re-working to make them ready for UREX deployment. Additionally, the overall maximum throughput of ~12 L/min is similar to that of the 9-cm unit (10 L/min), and the former could be efficiently operated over much of the same range of throughput. As a result, only the 10-cm units are considered here

  2. A Novel Approach for Studying Histone H1 Function in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Siriaco, Giorgia; Deuring, Renate; Mawla, Gina D.; Tamkun, John W.

    2015-01-01

    In this report, we investigate the mechanisms that regulate Drosophila histone H1 expression and its association with chromatin in vivo. We show that histone H1 is subject to negative autoregulation and exploit this result to examine the effects of mutations of the main phosphorylation site of histone H1. PMID:25805849

  3. Genetic and antigenic characterization of H1 influenza viruses from United States swine from 2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swine play an important role in the evolution of influenza A viruses. Prior to the introduction of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus from humans into pigs, four phylogenetic clusters of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene from H1 influenza viruses could be found in U.S. swine. Viruses from the classical H1N1 sw...

  4. Factors Influencing School Closure and Dismissal Decisions: Influenza A (H1N1), Michigan 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dooyema, Carrie A.; Copeland, Daphne; Sinclair, Julie R.; Shi, Jianrong; Wilkins, Melinda; Wells, Eden; Collins, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Background: In fall 2009, many US communities experienced school closures during the influenza A H1N1 pandemic (pH1N1) and the state of Michigan reported 567 closures. We conducted an investigation in Michigan to describe pH1N1-related school policies, practices, and identify factors related to school closures. Methods: We distributed an online…

  5. Characterization of H1N1 swine influenza viruses circulating in Canadian pigs in 2009

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1), of apparent swine origin, may have evolved in pigs unnoticed because of insufficient surveillance. Consequently, the need for surveillance of influenza viruses circulating in pigs has received added attention. In this study we characterized H1N1 viruses isolated from ...

  6. Engineering model 8-cm thruster subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, B. G.; Hyman, J.; Hopper, D. J.; Williamson, W. S.; Dulgeroff, C. R.; Collett, C. R.

    1978-01-01

    An Engineering Model (EM) 8 cm Ion Thruster Propulsion Subsystem was developed for operation at a thrust level 5 mN (1.1 mlb) at a specific impulse 1 sub sp = 2667 sec with a total system input power P sub in = 165 W. The system dry mass is 15 kg with a mercury-propellant-reservoir capacity of 8.75 kg permitting uninterrupted operation for about 12,500 hr. The subsystem can be started from a dormant condition in a time less than or equal to 15 min. The thruster has a design lifetime of 20,000 hr with 10,000 startup cycles. A gimbal unit is included to provide a thrust vector deflection capability of + or - 10 degrees in any direction from the zero position. The EM subsystem development program included thruster optimization, power-supply circuit optimization and flight packaging, subsystem integration, and subsystem acceptance testing including a cyclic test of the total propulsion package.

  7. The 15 cm diameter ion thruster research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    The startup reliability of a 15 cm diameter mercury bombardment ion thruster which employs a pulsed high voltage tickler electrode on the main and neutralizer cathodes is examined. Startup of the thruster is achieved 100% of the time on the main cathode and 98.7% of the time on the neutralizer cathode over a 3640 cycle test. The thruster was started from a 20 C initial condition and operated for an hour at a 600 mA beam current. An energy efficiency of 75% and a propellant utilization efficiency of 77% was achieved over the complete cycle. The effect of a single cusp magnetic field thruster length on its performance is discussed. Guidelines are formulated for the shaping of magnetic field lines in thrusters. A model describing double ion production in mercury discharges is presented. The production route is shown to occur through the single ionic ground state. Photographs of the interior of an operating-hollow cathode are presented. A cathode spot is shown to be present if the cathode is free of low work-function surfaces. The spot is observed if a low work-function oxide coating is applied to the cathode insert. Results show that low work-function oxide coatings tend to migrate during thruster operation.

  8. Pathogenesis and transmission of triple-reassortant swine H1N1 influenza viruses isolated before the 2009 H1N1 pandemic.

    PubMed

    Belser, Jessica A; Gustin, Kortney M; Maines, Taronna R; Blau, Dianna M; Zaki, Sherif R; Katz, Jacqueline M; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2011-02-01

    The 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus represents the greatest incidence of human infection with an influenza virus of swine origin to date. Moreover, triple-reassortant swine (TRS) H1N1 viruses, which share similar host and lineage origins with 2009 H1N1 viruses, have been responsible for sporadic human cases since 2005. Similar to 2009 H1N1 viruses, TRS viruses are capable of causing severe disease in previously healthy individuals and frequently manifest with gastrointestinal symptoms; however, their ability to cause severe disease has not been extensively studied. Here, we evaluated the pathogenicity and transmissibility of two TRS viruses associated with disease in humans in the ferret model. TRS and 2009 H1N1 viruses exhibited comparable viral titers and histopathologies following virus infection and were similarly unable to transmit efficiently via respiratory droplets in the ferret model. Utilizing TRS and 2009 H1N1 viruses, we conducted extensive hematologic and blood serum analyses on infected ferrets to identify lymphohematopoietic parameters associated with mild to severe influenza virus infection. Following H1N1 or H5N1 influenza virus infection, ferrets were found to recapitulate several laboratory abnormalities previously documented with human disease, furthering the utility of the ferret model for the assessment of influenza virus pathogenicity.

  9. Characterization of H1N1 swine influenza viruses circulating in Canadian pigs in 2009.

    PubMed

    Nfon, Charles K; Berhane, Yohannes; Hisanaga, Tamiko; Zhang, Shunzhen; Handel, Katherine; Kehler, Helen; Labrecque, Olivia; Lewis, Nicola S; Vincent, Amy L; Copps, John; Alexandersen, Soren; Pasick, John

    2011-09-01

    The 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1), of apparent swine origin, may have evolved in pigs unnoticed because of insufficient surveillance. Consequently, the need for surveillance of influenza viruses circulating in pigs has received added attention. In this study we characterized H1N1 viruses isolated from Canadian pigs in 2009. Isolates from May 2009 were comprised of hemagglutinin and neuraminidase (NA) genes of classical SIV origin in combination with the North American triple-reassortant internal gene (TRIG) cassette, here termed contemporary SIV (conSIV) H1N1. These conSIV H1N1 viruses were contiguous with the North American αH1 cluster, which was distinct from the pH1N1 isolates that were antigenically more related to the γH1 cluster. After the initial isolation of pH1N1 from an Alberta pig farm in early May 2009, pH1N1 was found several times in Canadian pigs. These pH1N1 isolates were genetically and antigenically homogeneous. In addition, H1N1 viruses bearing seasonal human H1 and N1 genes together with the TRIG cassette and an NA encoding an oseltamivir-resistance marker were isolated from pigs. The NS gene of one of these seasonal human-like SIV (shSIV) H1N1 isolates was homologous to pH1N1 NS, implicating reassortment between the two strains. Antigenic cross-reactivity was observed between pH1N1 and conSIV but not with shSIV H1N1. In summary, although there was cocirculation of pH1N1 with conSIV and shSIV H1N1 in Canadian pigs after May 2009, there was no evidence supporting the presence of pH1N1 in pigs prior to May 2009. The possibility for further reassortants being generated exists and should be closely monitored.

  10. Pin1 promotes histone H1 dephosphorylation and stabilizes its binding to chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Raghuram, Nikhil; Strickfaden, Hilmar; McDonald, Darin; Williams, Kylie; Fang, He; Mizzen, Craig; Hayes, Jeffrey J.; Th’ng, John

    2013-01-01

    Histone H1 plays a crucial role in stabilizing higher order chromatin structure. Transcriptional activation, DNA replication, and chromosome condensation all require changes in chromatin structure and are correlated with the phosphorylation of histone H1. In this study, we describe a novel interaction between Pin1, a phosphorylation-specific prolyl isomerase, and phosphorylated histone H1. A sub-stoichiometric amount of Pin1 stimulated the dephosphorylation of H1 in vitro and modulated the structure of the C-terminal domain of H1 in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Depletion of Pin1 destabilized H1 binding to chromatin only when Pin1 binding sites on H1 were present. Pin1 recruitment and localized histone H1 phosphorylation were associated with transcriptional activation independent of RNA polymerase II. We thus identify a novel form of histone H1 regulation through phosphorylation-dependent proline isomerization, which has consequences on overall H1 phosphorylation levels and the stability of H1 binding to chromatin. PMID:24100296

  11. Guanine nucleotide exchange factor H1 can be a new biomarker of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jie; Guo, Bingyu; Zhang, Yu; Hui, Qiang; Chang, Peng; Tao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factor H1 (GEF-H1), which couples microtubule dynamics to RhoA activation, is a microtubule-regulated exchange factor. Studies have shown that GEF-H1 can be involved in various cancer pathways; however, the clinical significance of GEF-H1 expression and functions in melanoma has not been established. In this study, we investigated the relationship between clinical outcomes and GEF-H1 functions in melanoma. A total of 60 cases of different grades of melanoma samples were used to detect the expression of GEF-H1. Results showed that both messenger RNA and protein levels of GEF-H1 were significantly higher in high-grade melanomas. Furthermore, patients with high GEF-H1 expression had a shorter overall survival (22 months) than patients with low level of GEF-H1 expression (33.38 months). We also found that GEF-H1 can promote the proliferation and metastasis of melanoma cells. In summary, these results suggested that GEF-H1 may be a valuable biomarker for assessing the degree and prognosis of melanoma following surgery. PMID:27462139

  12. Identification of reassortant pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in Korean pigs.

    PubMed

    Han, Jae Yeon; Park, Sung Jun; Kim, Hye Kwon; Rho, Semi; Nguyen, Giap Van; Song, Daesub; Kang, Bo Kyu; Moon, Hyung Jun; Yeom, Min Joo; Park, Bong Kyun

    2012-05-01

    Since the 2009 pandemic human H1N1 influenza A virus emerged in April 2009, novel reassortant strains have been identified throughout the world. This paper describes the detection and isolation of reassortant strains associated with human pandemic influenza H1N1 and swine influenza H1N2 (SIV) viruses in swine populations in South Korea. Two influenza H1N2 reassortants were detected, and subtyped by PCR. The strains were isolated using Madin- Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, and genetically characterized by phylogenetic analysis for genetic diversity. They consisted of human, avian, and swine virus genes that were originated from the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus and a neuraminidase (NA) gene from H1N2 SIV previously isolated in North America. This identification of reassortment events in swine farms raises concern that reassortant strains may continuously circulate within swine populations, calling for the further study and surveillance of pandemic H1N1 among swine.

  13. The N-terminal domain determines the affinity and specificity of H1 binding to chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Oeberg, Christine; Belikov, Sergey

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer wt Human histone H1.4 and hH1.4 devoid of N-terminal domain, {Delta}N-hH1.4, were compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both histones bind to chromatin, however, {Delta}N-hH1.4 displays lower binding affinity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction of {Delta}N-hH1.4 with chromatin includes a significant unspecific component. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-terminal domain is a determinant of specificity of histone H1 binding to chromatin. -- Abstract: Linker histone H1, one of the most abundant nuclear proteins in multicellular eukaryotes, is a key component of the chromatin structure mainly due to its role in the formation and maintenance of the 30 nm chromatin fiber. It has a three-domain structure; a central globular domain flanked by a short N-terminal domain and a long, highly basic C-terminal domain. Previous studies have shown that the binding abilities of H1 are at large determined by the properties of the C-terminal domain; much less attention has been paid to role of the N-terminal domain. We have previously shown that H1 can be reconstituted via cytoplasmic mRNA injection in Xenopus oocytes, cells that lack somatic H1. The heterologously expressed H1 proteins are incorporated into in vivo assembled chromatin at specific sites and the binding event is monitored as an increase in nucleosomal repeat length (NRL). Using this setup we have here compared the binding properties of wt-H1.4 and hH1.4 devoid of its N-terminal domain ({Delta}N-hH1.4). The {Delta}N-hH1.4 displays a drastically lower affinity for chromatin binding as compared to the wild type hH1.4. Our data also indicates that {Delta}N-hH1.4 is more prone to unspecific chromatin binding than the wild type. We conclude that the N-terminal domain of H1 is an important determinant of affinity and specificity of H1-chromatin interactions.

  14. Accuracy of free energies of hydration using CM1 and CM3 atomic charges.

    PubMed

    Udier-Blagović, Marina; Morales De Tirado, Patricia; Pearlman, Shoshannah A; Jorgensen, William L

    2004-08-01

    Absolute free energies of hydration (DeltaGhyd) have been computed for 25 diverse organic molecules using partial atomic charges derived from AM1 and PM3 wave functions via the CM1 and CM3 procedures of Cramer, Truhlar, and coworkers. Comparisons are made with results using charges fit to the electrostatic potential surface (EPS) from ab initio 6-31G* wave functions and from the OPLS-AA force field. OPLS Lennard-Jones parameters for the organic molecules were used together with the TIP4P water model in Monte Carlo simulations with free energy perturbation theory. Absolute free energies of hydration were computed for OPLS united-atom and all-atom methane by annihilating the solutes in water and in the gas phase, and absolute DeltaGhyd values for all other molecules were computed via transformation to one of these references. Optimal charge scaling factors were determined by minimizing the unsigned average error between experimental and calculated hydration free energies. The PM3-based charge models do not lead to lower average errors than obtained with the EPS charges for the subset of 13 molecules in the original study. However, improvement is obtained by scaling the CM1A partial charges by 1.14 and the CM3A charges by 1.15, which leads to average errors of 1.0 and 1.1 kcal/mol for the full set of 25 molecules. The scaled CM1A charges also yield the best results for the hydration of amides including the E/Z free-energy difference for N-methylacetamide in water.

  15. Effect of priming with H1N1 influenza viruses of variable antigenic distances on challenge with 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Christopher D; Wright, Amber; Vogel, Leatrice N; Wei, Chih-Jen; Nabel, Gary J; Subbarao, Kanta

    2012-08-01

    Compared to seasonal influenza viruses, the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus caused greater morbidity and mortality in children and young adults. People over 60 years of age showed a higher prevalence of cross-reactive pH1N1 antibodies, suggesting that they were previously exposed to an influenza virus or vaccine that was antigenically related to the pH1N1 virus. To define the basis for this cross-reactivity, ferrets were infected with H1N1 viruses of variable antigenic distance that circulated during different decades from the 1930s (Alaska/35), 1940s (Fort Monmouth/47), 1950s (Fort Warren/50), and 1990s (New Caledonia/99) and challenged with 2009 pH1N1 virus 6 weeks later. Ferrets primed with the homologous CA/09 or New Jersey/76 (NJ/76) virus served as a positive control, while the negative control was an influenza B virus that should not cross-protect against influenza A virus infection. Significant protection against challenge virus replication in the respiratory tract was observed in ferrets primed with AK/35, FM/47, and NJ/76; FW/50-primed ferrets showed reduced protection, and NC/99-primed ferrets were not protected. The hemagglutinins (HAs) of AK/35, FM/47, and FW/50 differ in the presence of glycosylation sites. We found that the loss of protective efficacy observed with FW/50 was associated with the presence of a specific glycosylation site. Our results suggest that changes in the HA occurred between 1947 and 1950, such that prior infection could no longer protect against 2009 pH1N1 infection. This provides a mechanistic understanding of the nature of serological cross-protection observed in people over 60 years of age during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic.

  16. Effect of Priming with H1N1 Influenza Viruses of Variable Antigenic Distances on Challenge with 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Virus

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Christopher D.; Wright, Amber; Vogel, Leatrice N.; Wei, Chih-Jen; Nabel, Gary J.

    2012-01-01

    Compared to seasonal influenza viruses, the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus caused greater morbidity and mortality in children and young adults. People over 60 years of age showed a higher prevalence of cross-reactive pH1N1 antibodies, suggesting that they were previously exposed to an influenza virus or vaccine that was antigenically related to the pH1N1 virus. To define the basis for this cross-reactivity, ferrets were infected with H1N1 viruses of variable antigenic distance that circulated during different decades from the 1930s (Alaska/35), 1940s (Fort Monmouth/47), 1950s (Fort Warren/50), and 1990s (New Caledonia/99) and challenged with 2009 pH1N1 virus 6 weeks later. Ferrets primed with the homologous CA/09 or New Jersey/76 (NJ/76) virus served as a positive control, while the negative control was an influenza B virus that should not cross-protect against influenza A virus infection. Significant protection against challenge virus replication in the respiratory tract was observed in ferrets primed with AK/35, FM/47, and NJ/76; FW/50-primed ferrets showed reduced protection, and NC/99-primed ferrets were not protected. The hemagglutinins (HAs) of AK/35, FM/47, and FW/50 differ in the presence of glycosylation sites. We found that the loss of protective efficacy observed with FW/50 was associated with the presence of a specific glycosylation site. Our results suggest that changes in the HA occurred between 1947 and 1950, such that prior infection could no longer protect against 2009 pH1N1 infection. This provides a mechanistic understanding of the nature of serological cross-protection observed in people over 60 years of age during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. PMID:22674976

  17. Vitamin D Levels, Natural H1N1 Infection and Response to H1N1 Vaccine among HIV-Infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Momplaisir, Florence; Frank, Ian; Meyer, Wa; Kim, Deborah; Kappes, Rosemary; Tebas, Pablo

    2012-05-20

    BACKGROUND: Beyond its role in calcium homeostasis, vitamin D plays a critical role in immunological responses to pathogens. We evaluated the relationship between 25-OH vitamin D levels and susceptibility to natural H1N1 infection and H1N1 vaccine responses in HIV infected individuals. METHODS: This was a sub study of an H1N1 vaccine trial conducted at the University of Pennsylvania in 2009/10. We compared the 25-OH vitamin D levels among individuals with and without baseline evidence of prior H1N1 infection and between vaccine responders and non-responders. RESULTS: 120 participants enrolled in the trial, 71% male, 68% African American, median age 46 years. The majority had controlled HIV disease. At baseline, 86% had 25-OH vitamin D levels < 30 ng/ml and 54% had levels < 20 ng/ml. Thirty participants (25%) had evidence of prior H1N1 exposure. There was no difference in mean 25-OH vitamin D levels among patients with or without prior natural H1N1 infection (21 ng/ml vs 20 ng/ml, p=0.72). Among participants without previous H1N1 exposure, only 61% developed protective antibody titers following vaccination. 25-OH vitamin D levels were similar between vaccine responders (20 ng/ml) and non-responders (20 ng/ml) (p=0.83). CONCLUSION: Although 25-OH vitamin D deficiency was very common among HIV-infected individuals, it was not associated with natural susceptibility to H1N1 or to vaccine responses.

  18. Linker histone H1 and H3K56 acetylation are antagonistic regulators of nucleosome dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Morgan; Luo, Yi; Nwokelo, Kingsley C; Goodwin, Michelle; Dreher, Sarah J; Zhang, Pei; Parthun, Mark R; Fondufe-Mittendorf, Yvonne; Ottesen, Jennifer J; Poirier, Michael G

    2015-12-09

    H1 linker histones are highly abundant proteins that compact nucleosomes and chromatin to regulate DNA accessibility and transcription. However, the mechanisms that target H1 regulation to specific regions of eukaryotic genomes are unknown. Here we report fluorescence measurements of human H1 regulation of nucleosome dynamics and transcription factor (TF) binding within nucleosomes. H1 does not block TF binding, instead it suppresses nucleosome unwrapping to reduce DNA accessibility within H1-bound nucleosomes. We then investigated H1 regulation by H3K56 and H3K122 acetylation, two transcriptional activating histone post translational modifications (PTMs). Only H3K56 acetylation, which increases nucleosome unwrapping, abolishes H1.0 reduction of TF binding. These findings show that nucleosomes remain dynamic, while H1 is bound and H1 dissociation is not required for TF binding within the nucleosome. Furthermore, our H3K56 acetylation measurements suggest that a single-histone PTM can define regions of the genome that are not regulated by H1.

  19. Linker histone H1 and H3K56 acetylation are antagonistic regulators of nucleosome dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bernier, Morgan; Luo, Yi; Nwokelo, Kingsley C.; Goodwin, Michelle; Dreher, Sarah J.; Zhang, Pei; Parthun, Mark R.; Fondufe-Mittendorf, Yvonne; Ottesen, Jennifer J.; Poirier, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    H1 linker histones are highly abundant proteins that compact nucleosomes and chromatin to regulate DNA accessibility and transcription. However, the mechanisms that target H1 regulation to specific regions of eukaryotic genomes are unknown. Here we report fluorescence measurements of human H1 regulation of nucleosome dynamics and transcription factor (TF) binding within nucleosomes. H1 does not block TF binding, instead it suppresses nucleosome unwrapping to reduce DNA accessibility within H1-bound nucleosomes. We then investigated H1 regulation by H3K56 and H3K122 acetylation, two transcriptional activating histone post translational modifications (PTMs). Only H3K56 acetylation, which increases nucleosome unwrapping, abolishes H1.0 reduction of TF binding. These findings show that nucleosomes remain dynamic, while H1 is bound and H1 dissociation is not required for TF binding within the nucleosome. Furthermore, our H3K56 acetylation measurements suggest that a single-histone PTM can define regions of the genome that are not regulated by H1. PMID:26648124

  20. Predicting H1N1 vaccine uptake and H1N1-related health beliefs: the role of individual difference in consideration of future consequences.

    PubMed

    Nan, Xiaoli; Kim, Jarim

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the influence of individual difference in consideration of future consequences on H1N1 vaccine uptake and H1N1-related health beliefs (i.e., perceived susceptibility to and severity of the H1N1 flu, perceived efficacy and safety of the H1N1 vaccine, and perceived self-efficacy in obtaining the H1N1 vaccine). A survey of 411 college students showed that consideration of future consequences had no direct effect on vaccine uptake, but higher consideration of future consequences was associated with greater perceived severity of the flu, higher perceived effectiveness of the vaccine, and greater perceived self-efficacy. Additional analysis suggested that consideration of future consequences had a significant indirect effect on vaccine uptake through perceived vaccine efficacy. Results of the study also revealed gender and racial differences in some of the H1N1-related health beliefs. Implications of the findings for vaccine risk communication are discussed.

  1. SAR-dependent mobilization of histone H1 by HMG-I/Y in vitro: HMG-I/Y is enriched in H1-depleted chromatin.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, K; Käs, E; Gonzalez, E; Laemmli, U K

    1993-01-01

    An experimental assay was developed to search for proteins capable of antagonizing histone H1-mediated general repression of transcription. T7 RNA polymerase templates containing an upstream scaffold-associated region (SAR) were highly selectively repressed by H1 relative to non-SAR control templates. This is due to the nucleation of H1 assembly into flanking DNA brought about by the numerous A-tracts (AT-rich sequences containing short homopolymeric runs of dA.dT base pairs) of the SAR. Partial, selective titration of these A-tracts by the high mobility group (HMG) protein HMG-I/Y led to the complete derepression of transcription from the SAR template by inducing the redistribution of H1 on to non-SAR templates. SARs are associated with many highly transcribed regulated genes where they may serve to facilitate the HMG-I/Y-mediated displacement of histone H1 in chromatin. Indeed, HMG-I/Y was found to be strongly enriched in the H1-depleted subfraction which can be isolated from chromatin. Images PMID:8344261

  2. Proteomic characterization of the nucleolar linker histone H1 interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Szerlong, Heather J.; Herman, Jacob A.; Krause, Christine M.; DeLuca, Jennifer G.; Skoultchi, Arthur; Winger, Quinton A.; Prenni, Jessica E.; Hansen, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between linker histone H1 and protein-protein interactions in the nucleolus, biochemical and proteomics approaches were used to characterize nucleoli purified from cultured human and mouse cells. Mass spectrometry identified 175 proteins in human T-cell nucleolar extracts that bound to sepharose-immobilized H1 in vitro. Gene ontology analysis found significant enrichment for H1 binding proteins with functions related to nucleolar chromatin structure and RNA polymerase I transcription regulation, rRNA processing, and mRNA splicing. Consistent with the affinity binding results, H1 existed in large (400 to >650 kDa) macromolecular complexes in human T cell nucleolar extracts. To complement the biochemical experiments, the effects of in vivo H1 depletion on protein content and structural integrity of the nucleolus were investigated using the H1 triple isoform knock out (H1ΔTKO) mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) model system. Proteomic profiling of purified wild type mESC nucleoli identified a total of 613 proteins, only ~60% of which were detected in the H1 mutant nucleoli. Within the affected group, spectral counting analysis quantitated 135 specific nucleolar proteins whose levels were significantly altered in H1ΔTKO mESC. Importantly, the functions of the affected proteins in mESC closely overlapped with those of the human T cell nucleolar H1 binding proteins. Immunofluorescence microscopy of intact H1ΔTKO mESC demonstrated both a loss of nucleolar RNA content and altered nucleolar morphology resulting from in vivo H1 depletion. We conclude that H1 organizes and maintains an extensive protein-protein interaction network in the nucleolus required for nucleolar structure and integrity. PMID:25584861

  3. Specificities and genomic distribution of somatic mammalian histone H1 subtypes.

    PubMed

    Millán-Ariño, Lluís; Izquierdo-Bouldstridge, Andrea; Jordan, Albert

    2016-03-01

    Histone H1 is a structural component of chromatin that may have a role in the regulation of chromatin dynamics. Unlike core histones, the linker histone H1 family is evolutionarily diverse and many organisms have multiple H1 variants or subtypes, distinguishable between germ-line and somatic cells. In mammals, the H1 family includes seven somatic H1 variants with a prevalence that varies between cell types and over the course of differentiation, H1.1 to H1.5 being expressed in a replication-dependent manner, whereas H1.0 and H1X are replication-independent. Until recently, it has not been known whether the different variants had specific roles in the regulation of nuclear processes or were differentially distributed across the genome. To address this, an increasing effort has been made to investigate divergent features among H1 variants, regarding their structure, expression patterns, chromatin dynamics, post-translational modifications and genome-wide distribution. Although H1 subtypes seem to have redundant functions, several reports point to the idea that they are also differently involved in specific cellular processes. Initial studies investigating the genomic distribution of H1 variants have started to suggest that despite a wide overlap, different variants may be enriched or preferentially located at different chromatin types, but this may depend on the cell type, the relative abundance of the variants, the differentiation state of the cell, or whether cells are derived from a neoplastic process. Understanding the heterogeneity of the histone H1 family is crucial to elucidate their role in chromatin organization, gene expression regulation and other cellular processes.

  4. New λ6 cm and λ11 cm observations of the supernova remnant CTA 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X. H.; Reich, W.; Wang, C.; Han, J. L.; Reich, P.

    2011-11-01

    Aims: We attempt to study spatial variations in the spectrum and rotation measures (RMs) of the large-diameter, high-latitude supernova remnant (SNR) CTA 1. Methods: We conducted new λ6 cm and λ11 cm observations of CTA 1 using the Urumqi 25-m and Effelsberg 100-m telescopes. Data at other wavelengths were included to investigate the spectrum and polarisation properties. Results: We obtained new total intensity and polarisation maps at λ6 cm and λ11 cm with angular resolutions of 9'.5and 4'.4, respectively. We derived a spectral index of α = -0.63 ± 0.05 (Sν ∝ να) based on the integrated flux densities at 408 MHz, 1420 MHz, 2639 MHz, and 4800 MHz. The spectral index map calculated from data at the four frequencies shows a clear steepening of the spectrum from the strong shell emission towards the north-western breakout region with weak diffuse emission. The decrease of the spectral index is up to about Δα = 0.3. The RM map derived from polarisation data at λ6 cm and λ11 cm shows a sharp transition between positive RMs in the north-eastern and negative RMs in the south-western part of the SNR. We note a corresponding RM pattern of extragalactic sources and propose the existence of a large-diameter Faraday screen in front of CTA 1, which covers the north-eastern part of the SNR. The RM of the Faraday screen is estimated to be about +45 rad m-2. A RM structure function of CTA 1 indicates a very regular magnetic field within the Faraday screen, which is stronger than about 2.7 μG for a distance of 500 pc. Conclusions: CTA 1 is a large-diameter shell-type SNR located out of the Galactic plane, which makes it an ideal object to study its properties without suffering confusion. The previous detection of the rare breakout phenomenon in CTA 1 is confirmed. We identify a Faraday screen partly covering CTA 1 with a regular magnetic field in the opposite direction to the interstellar magnetic field. The detection of Faraday screens in the Galactic plane is

  5. Predicting the antigenic structure of the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza virus hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Manabu; Ito, Kimihito; Yoshida, Reiko; Tomabechi, Daisuke; Kida, Hiroshi; Takada, Ayato

    2010-01-01

    The pandemic influenza virus (2009 H1N1) was recently introduced into the human population. The hemagglutinin (HA) gene of 2009 H1N1 is derived from "classical swine H1N1" virus, which likely shares a common ancestor with the human H1N1 virus that caused the pandemic in 1918, whose descendant viruses are still circulating in the human population with highly altered antigenicity of HA. However, information on the structural basis to compare the HA antigenicity among 2009 H1N1, the 1918 pandemic, and seasonal human H1N1 viruses has been lacking. By homology modeling of the HA structure, here we show that HAs of 2009 H1N1 and the 1918 pandemic virus share a significant number of amino acid residues in known antigenic sites, suggesting the existence of common epitopes for neutralizing antibodies cross-reactive to both HAs. It was noted that the early human H1N1 viruses isolated in the 1930s-1940s still harbored some of the original epitopes that are also found in 2009 H1N1. Interestingly, while 2009 H1N1 HA lacks the multiple N-glycosylations that have been found to be associated with an antigenic change of the human H1N1 virus during the early epidemic of this virus, 2009 H1N1 HA still retains unique three-codon motifs, some of which became N-glycosylation sites via a single nucleotide mutation in the human H1N1 virus. We thus hypothesize that the 2009 H1N1 HA antigenic sites involving the conserved amino acids will soon be targeted by antibody-mediated selection pressure in humans. Indeed, amino acid substitutions predicted here are occurring in the recent 2009 H1N1 variants. The present study suggests that antibodies elicited by natural infection with the 1918 pandemic or its early descendant viruses play a role in specific immunity against 2009 H1N1, and provides an insight into future likely antigenic changes in the evolutionary process of 2009 H1N1 in the human population.

  6. Predicting the Antigenic Structure of the Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Manabu; Ito, Kimihito; Yoshida, Reiko; Tomabechi, Daisuke; Kida, Hiroshi; Takada, Ayato

    2010-01-01

    The pandemic influenza virus (2009 H1N1) was recently introduced into the human population. The hemagglutinin (HA) gene of 2009 H1N1 is derived from “classical swine H1N1” virus, which likely shares a common ancestor with the human H1N1 virus that caused the pandemic in 1918, whose descendant viruses are still circulating in the human population with highly altered antigenicity of HA. However, information on the structural basis to compare the HA antigenicity among 2009 H1N1, the 1918 pandemic, and seasonal human H1N1 viruses has been lacking. By homology modeling of the HA structure, here we show that HAs of 2009 H1N1 and the 1918 pandemic virus share a significant number of amino acid residues in known antigenic sites, suggesting the existence of common epitopes for neutralizing antibodies cross-reactive to both HAs. It was noted that the early human H1N1 viruses isolated in the 1930s–1940s still harbored some of the original epitopes that are also found in 2009 H1N1. Interestingly, while 2009 H1N1 HA lacks the multiple N-glycosylations that have been found to be associated with an antigenic change of the human H1N1 virus during the early epidemic of this virus, 2009 H1N1 HA still retains unique three-codon motifs, some of which became N-glycosylation sites via a single nucleotide mutation in the human H1N1 virus. We thus hypothesize that the 2009 H1N1 HA antigenic sites involving the conserved amino acids will soon be targeted by antibody-mediated selection pressure in humans. Indeed, amino acid substitutions predicted here are occurring in the recent 2009 H1N1 variants. The present study suggests that antibodies elicited by natural infection with the 1918 pandemic or its early descendant viruses play a role in specific immunity against 2009 H1N1, and provides an insight into future likely antigenic changes in the evolutionary process of 2009 H1N1 in the human population. PMID:20049332

  7. North American triple reassortant and Eurasian H1N1 swine influenza viruses do not readily reassort to generate a 2009 pandemic H1N1-like virus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenjun; Liu, Qinfang; Qiao, Chuanling; del Real, Gustavo; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Webby, Richard J; Richt, Jürgen A

    2014-03-11

    The 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus (pH1N1) was derived through reassortment of North American triple reassortant and Eurasian avian-like swine influenza viruses (SIVs). To date, when, how and where the pH1N1 arose is not understood. To investigate viral reassortment, we coinfected cell cultures and a group of pigs with or without preexisting immunity with a Eurasian H1N1 virus, A/Swine/Spain/53207/2004 (SP04), and a North American triple reassortant H1N1 virus, A/Swine/Kansas/77778/2007 (KS07). The infected pigs were cohoused with one or two groups of contact animals to investigate viral transmission. In coinfected MDCK or PK15 continuous cell lines with KS07 and SP04 viruses, more than 20 different reassortant viruses were found. In pigs without or with preexisting immunity (immunized with commercial inactivated swine influenza vaccines) and coinfected with both viruses, six or seven reassortant viruses, as well as the parental viruses, were identified in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples from the lungs. Interestingly, only one or two viruses transmitted to and were detected in contact animals. No reassortant containing a gene constellation similar to that of pH1N1 virus was found in either coinfected cells or pigs, indicating that the reassortment event that resulted in the generation of this virus is a rare event that likely involved specific viral strains and/or a favorable, not-yet-understood environment. IMPORTANCE The 2009 pandemic-like H1N1 virus could not be reproduced either in cell cultures or in pigs coinfected with North American triple reassortant H1N1 and Eurasian H1N1 swine influenza viruses. This finding suggests that the generation of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus by reassortment was a rare event that likely involved specific viral strains and unknown factors. Different reassortant viruses were detected in coinfected pigs with and without preexisting immunity, indicating that host immunity plays a relevant role in driving viral reassortment of

  8. PROCESS OF PRODUCING Cm$sup 244$ AND Cm$sup 24$$sup 5$

    DOEpatents

    Manning, W.M.; Studier, M.H.; Diamond, H.; Fields, P.R.

    1958-11-01

    A process is presented for producing Cm and Cm/sup 245/. The first step of the process consists in subjecting Pu/sup 2339/ to a high neutron flux and subsequently dissolving the irradiated material in HCl. The plutonium is then oxidized to at least the tetravalent state and the solution is contacted with an anion exchange resin, causing the plutonium values to be absorbed while the fission products and transplutonium elements remain in the effluent solution. The effluent solution is then contacted with a cation exchange resin causing the transplutonium, values to be absorbed while the fission products remain in solution. The cation exchange resin is then contacted with an aqueous citrate solution and tbe transplutonium elements are thereby differentially eluted in order of decreasing atomic weight, allowing collection of the desired fractions.

  9. The H1 linker histones: multifunctional proteins beyond the nucleosomal core particle

    PubMed Central

    Hergeth, Sonja P; Schneider, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The linker histone H1 family members are a key component of chromatin and bind to the nucleosomal core particle around the DNA entry and exit sites. H1 can stabilize both nucleosome structure and higher-order chromatin architecture. In general, H1 molecules consist of a central globular domain with more flexible tail regions at both their N- and C-terminal ends. The existence of multiple H1 subtypes and a large variety of posttranslational modifications brings about a considerable degree of complexity and makes studying this protein family challenging. Here, we review recent progress in understanding the function of linker histones and their subtypes beyond their role as merely structural chromatin components. We summarize current findings on the role of H1 in heterochromatin formation, transcriptional regulation and embryogenesis with a focus on H1 subtypes and their specific modifications. PMID:26474902

  10. Functional Interplay Between Histone H1 and HMG Proteins in Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Postnikov, Yuri V.; Bustin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic interaction of nucleosome binding proteins with their chromatin targets is an important element in regulating the structure and function of chromatin. Histone H1 variants and High Mobility Group (HMG) proteins are ubiquitously expressed in all vertebrate cells, bind dynamically to chromatin, and are known to affect chromatin condensation and the ability of regulatory factors to access their genomic binding sites. Here, we review the studies that focus on the interactions between H1 and HMGs and highlight the functional consequences of the interplay between these architectural chromatin binding proteins. H1 and HMG proteins are mobile molecules that bind to nucleosomes as members of a dynamic protein network. All HMGs compete with H1 for chromatin binding sites, in a dose dependent fashion, but each HMG family has specific effects on the interaction of H1 with chromatin. The interplay between H1 and HMGs affects chromatin organization and plays a role in epigenetic regulation. PMID:26455954

  11. The H1 linker histones: multifunctional proteins beyond the nucleosomal core particle.

    PubMed

    Hergeth, Sonja P; Schneider, Robert

    2015-11-01

    The linker histone H1 family members are a key component of chromatin and bind to the nucleosomal core particle around the DNA entry and exit sites. H1 can stabilize both nucleosome structure and higher-order chromatin architecture. In general, H1 molecules consist of a central globular domain with more flexible tail regions at both their N- and C-terminal ends. The existence of multiple H1 subtypes and a large variety of posttranslational modifications brings about a considerable degree of complexity and makes studying this protein family challenging. Here, we review recent progress in understanding the function of linker histones and their subtypes beyond their role as merely structural chromatin components. We summarize current findings on the role of H1 in heterochromatin formation, transcriptional regulation and embryogenesis with a focus on H1 subtypes and their specific modifications.

  12. Simulating the 21 cm signal from reionization including non-linear ionizations and inhomogeneous recombinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Sultan; Davé, Romeel; Finlator, Kristian; Santos, Mario G.

    2016-04-01

    We explore the impact of incorporating physically motivated ionization and recombination rates on the history and topology of cosmic reionization and the resulting 21 cm power spectrum, by incorporating inputs from small-volume hydrodynamic simulations into our semi-numerical code, SIMFAST21, that evolves reionization on large scales. We employ radiative hydrodynamic simulations to parametrize the ionization rate Rion and recombination rate Rrec as functions of halo mass, overdensity and redshift. We find that Rion scales superlinearly with halo mass ({R_ion}∝ M_h^{1.41}), in contrast to previous assumptions. Implementing these scalings into SIMFAST21, we tune our one free parameter, the escape fraction fesc, to simultaneously reproduce recent observations of the Thomson optical depth, ionizing emissivity and volume-averaged neutral fraction by the end of reionization. This yields f_esc=4^{+7}_{-2} per cent averaged over our 0.375 h-1 Mpc cells, independent of halo mass or redshift, increasing to 6 per cent if we also constrain to match the observed z = 7 star formation rate function. Introducing superlinear Rion increases the duration of reionization and boosts small-scale 21 cm power by two to three times at intermediate phases of reionization, while inhomogeneous recombinations reduce ionized bubble sizes and suppress large-scale 21 cm power by two to three times. Gas clumping on sub-cell scales has a minimal effect on the 21 cm power. Superlinear Rion also significantly increases the median halo mass scale for ionizing photon output to ˜ 1010 M⊙, making the majority of reionizing sources more accessible to next-generation facilities. These results highlight the importance of accurately treating ionizing sources and recombinations for modelling reionization and its 21 cm power spectrum.

  13. Single-Molecule Studies of the Linker Histone H1 Binding to DNA and the Nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Yue, Hongjun; Fang, He; Wei, Sijie; Hayes, Jeffrey J; Lee, Tae-Hee

    2016-04-12

    Linker histone H1 regulates chromatin structure and gene expression. Investigating the dynamics and stoichiometry of binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome is crucial to elucidating its functions. Because of the abundant positive charges and the strong self-affinity of H1, quantitative in vitro studies of its binding to DNA and the nucleosome have generated results that vary widely and, therefore, should be interpreted in a system specific manner. We sought to overcome this limitation by developing a specially passivated microscope slide surface to monitor binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome at a single-molecule level. According to our measurements, the stoichiometry of binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome is very heterogeneous with a wide distribution whose averages are in reasonable agreement with previously published values. Our study also revealed that H1 does not dissociate from DNA or the nucleosome on a time scale of tens of minutes. We found that histone chaperone Nap1 readily dissociates H1 from DNA and superstoichiometrically bound H1 from the nucleosome, supporting a hypothesis whereby histone chaperones contribute to the regulation of the H1 profile in chromatin.

  14. Prothymosin alpha modulates the interaction of histone H1 with chromatin.

    PubMed Central

    Karetsou, Z; Sandaltzopoulos, R; Frangou-Lazaridis, M; Lai, C Y; Tsolas, O; Becker, P B; Papamarcaki, T

    1998-01-01

    Prothymosin alpha (ProTalpha) is an abundant acidic nuclear protein that may be involved in cell proliferation. In our search for its cellular partners, we have recently found that ProTalpha binds to linker histone H1. We now provide further evidence for the physiological relevance of this interaction by immunoisolation of a histone H1-ProTalpha complex from NIH 3T3 cell extracts. A detailed analysis of the interaction between the two proteins suggests contacts between the acidic region of ProTalpha and histone H1. In the context of a physiological chromatin reconstitution reaction, the presence of ProTalpha does not affect incorporation of an amount of histone H1 sufficient to increase the nucleosome repeat length by 20 bp, but prevents association of all further H1. Consistent with this finding, a fraction of histone H1 is released when H1-containing chromatin is challenged with ProTalpha. These results imply at least two different interaction modes of H1 with chromatin, which can be distinguished by their sensitivity to ProTalpha. The properties of ProTalpha suggest a role in fine tuning the stoichiometry and/or mode of interaction of H1 with chromatin. PMID:9628907

  15. Phenotypic variation of erythrocyte linker histone H1.c in a pheasant (Phasianus colchicus L.) population.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Andrzej; Pa Yga, Jan; Górnicka-Michalska, Ewa; Bernacki, Zenon; Adamski, Marek

    2010-07-01

    Our goal was to characterize a phenotypic variation of the pheasant erythrocyte linker histone subtype H1.c. By using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis three histone H1.c phenotypes were identified. The differently migrating allelic variants H1.c1 and H1.c2 formed either two homozygous phenotypes, c1 and c2, or a single heterozygous phenotype, c1c2. In the pheasant population screened, birds with phenotype c2 were the most common (frequency 0.761) while individuals with phenotype c1 were rare (frequency 0.043).

  16. Serological Evidence of Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Virus Infections in Greek Swine.

    PubMed

    Kyriakis, C S; Papatsiros, V G; Athanasiou, L V; Valiakos, G; Brown, I H; Simon, G; Van Reeth, K; Tsiodras, S; Spyrou, V; Billinis, C

    2016-08-01

    The introduction of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) influenza virus in pigs changed the epidemiology of influenza A viruses (IAVs) in swine in Europe and the rest of the world. Previously, three IAV subtypes were found in the European pig population: an avian-like H1N1 and two reassortant H1N2 and H3N2 viruses with human-origin haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase proteins and internal genes of avian decent. These viruses pose antigenically distinct HAs, which allow the retrospective diagnosis of infection in serological investigations. However, cross-reactions between the HA of pH1N1 and the HAs of the other circulating H1 IAVs complicate serological diagnosis. The prevalence of IAVs in Greek swine has been poorly investigated. In this study, we examined and compared haemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody titres against previously established IAVs and pH1N1 in 908 swine sera from 88 herds, collected before and after the 2009 pandemic. While we confirmed the historic presence of the three IAVs established in European swine, we also found that 4% of the pig sera examined after 2009 had HI antibodies only against the pH1N1 virus. Our results indicate that pH1N1 is circulating in Greek pigs and stress out the importance of a vigorous virological surveillance programme.

  17. Prior infection of chickens with H1N1 or H1N2 avian influenza elicits partial heterologous protection against highly pathogenic H5N1.

    PubMed

    Nfon, Charles; Berhane, Yohannes; Pasick, John; Embury-Hyatt, Carissa; Kobinger, Gary; Kobasa, Darwyn; Babiuk, Shawn

    2012-01-01

    There is a critical need to have vaccines that can protect against emerging pandemic influenza viruses. Commonly used influenza vaccines are killed whole virus that protect against homologous and not heterologous virus. Using chickens we have explored the possibility of using live low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) A/goose/AB/223/2005 H1N1 or A/WBS/MB/325/2006 H1N2 to induce immunity against heterologous highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A/chicken/Vietnam/14/2005 H5N1. H1N1 and H1N2 replicated in chickens but did not cause clinical disease. Following infection, chickens developed nucleoprotein and H1 specific antibodies, and reduced H5N1 plaque size in vitro in the absence of H5 neutralizing antibodies at 21 days post infection (DPI). In addition, heterologous cell mediated immunity (CMI) was demonstrated by antigen-specific proliferation and IFN-γ secretion in PBMCs re-stimulated with H5N1 antigen. Following H5N1 challenge of both pre-infected and naïve controls chickens housed together, all naïve chickens developed acute disease and died while H1N1 or H1N2 pre-infected chickens had reduced clinical disease and 70-80% survived. H1N1 or H1N2 pre-infected chickens were also challenged with H5N1 and naïve chickens placed in the same room one day later. All pre-infected birds were protected from H5N1 challenge but shed infectious virus to naïve contact chickens. However, disease onset, severity and mortality was reduced and delayed in the naïve contacts compared to directly inoculated naïve controls. These results indicate that prior infection with LPAI virus can generate heterologous protection against HPAI H5N1 in the absence of specific H5 antibody.

  18. Histamine H1 receptor cell membrane chromatography online high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry method reveals houttuyfonate as an activator of the histamine H1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying; Han, Shengli; Cao, Jingjing; Zhang, Tao; He, Langchong

    2014-11-01

    Allergy is an abnormal reaction of the body to an allergen. Histamine is responsible for many of the acute symptoms of allergic diseases. Many of the allergic and inflammatory actions of histamine are mediated by the histamine H1 receptor. In the present study, we established a two-dimensional histamine H1 receptor/cell membrane chromatography with online high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry method for screening potential histamine-activating components in a traditional Chinese medicine injection. The specification of the method was validated by screening, separating, and identifying a mixed standard solution of diphenhydramine hydrochloride, gefitinib, tamsulosin, and nitrendipine. The Yujin injection, an example of traditional Chinese medicine injection, was screened and potential allergic components acting on the histamine H1 receptor were identified. A Ca(2+) flux assay showed that houttuyfonate and Yujin injection induced calcium release in a dose-dependent manner. This suggests that houttuyfonate is an activator of the histamine H1 receptor. The mechanism of houttuyfonate activation involves phosphorylation of the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor. In conclusion, this two-dimensional method can rapidly detect and enrich target components isolated from the Yujin injection. This indicates that individuals with an overexpression of the histamine H1 receptor should be aware of possible allergic reactions when receiving the Yujin injection.

  19. Searching for a hidden charm h1 state in the X(4660)→ηh1 and X(4660)→ηD*D¯* decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Weihong; Albaladejo, M.; Oset, E.

    2013-10-01

    We explore the possibility of experimentally detecting a predicted h1[IG(JPC)=0-(1+-)] state of hidden charm made out from the D*D¯* interaction. The method consists in measuring the decay of X(4660) into ηD*D¯* and determining the binding energy with respect to the D*D¯* threshold from the shape of the D*D¯* invariant mass distribution. A complementary method consists in looking at the inclusive X(4660)→ηX decay and searching for a peak in the X invariant mass distribution. We make calculations to determine the partial decay width of X(4660)→ηh1 from the measured X(4660)→ηD*D¯* distribution. This estimation should serve in an experiment to foresee the possibility of detecting the h1 state on top of the background of inclusive events.

  20. 46 CFR 53.10-3 - Inspection and tests (modifies HG-500 through HG-540).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS Tests, Inspection, Stamping, and Reporting (Article 5) § 53.10-3 Inspection and... commission issued by the National Board of Boiler and Pressure Vessel Inspectors. After installation, heating... heating boilers must have the operation of their pressure relieving devices checked after the...

  1. 46 CFR 53.10-3 - Inspection and tests (modifies HG-500 through HG-540).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS Tests, Inspection, Stamping, and Reporting (Article 5) § 53.10-3 Inspection and... commission issued by the National Board of Boiler and Pressure Vessel Inspectors. After installation, heating... heating boilers must have the operation of their pressure relieving devices checked after the...

  2. 46 CFR 53.10-3 - Inspection and tests (modifies HG-500 through HG-540).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS Tests, Inspection, Stamping, and Reporting (Article 5) § 53.10-3 Inspection and... commission issued by the National Board of Boiler and Pressure Vessel Inspectors. After installation, heating... heating boilers must have the operation of their pressure relieving devices checked after the...

  3. 46 CFR 53.10-3 - Inspection and tests (modifies HG-500 through HG-540).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS Tests, Inspection, Stamping, and Reporting (Article 5) § 53.10-3 Inspection and... commission issued by the National Board of Boiler and Pressure Vessel Inspectors. After installation, heating... heating boilers must have the operation of their pressure relieving devices checked after the...

  4. 46 CFR 53.10-3 - Inspection and tests (modifies HG-500 through HG-540).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS Tests, Inspection, Stamping, and Reporting (Article 5) § 53.10-3 Inspection and... commission issued by the National Board of Boiler and Pressure Vessel Inspectors. After installation, heating... heating boilers must have the operation of their pressure relieving devices checked after the...

  5. Swine influenza H1N1 virus induces acute inflammatory immune responses in pig lungs: a potential animal model for human H1N1 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Mahesh; Dwivedi, Varun; Krakowka, Steven; Manickam, Cordelia; Ali, Ahmed; Wang, Leyi; Qin, Zhuoming; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J; Lee, Chang-Won

    2010-11-01

    Pigs are capable of generating reassortant influenza viruses of pandemic potential, as both the avian and mammalian influenza viruses can infect pig epithelial cells in the respiratory tract. The source of the current influenza pandemic is H1N1 influenza A virus, possibly of swine origin. This study was conducted to understand better the pathogenesis of H1N1 influenza virus and associated host mucosal immune responses during acute infection in humans. Therefore, we chose a H1N1 swine influenza virus, Sw/OH/24366/07 (SwIV), which has a history of transmission to humans. Clinically, inoculated pigs had nasal discharge and fever and shed virus through nasal secretions. Like pandemic H1N1, SwIV also replicated extensively in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts, and lung lesions were typical of H1N1 infection. We detected innate, proinflammatory, Th1, Th2, and Th3 cytokines, as well as SwIV-specific IgA antibody in lungs of the virus-inoculated pigs. Production of IFN-γ by lymphocytes of the tracheobronchial lymph nodes was also detected. Higher frequencies of cytotoxic T lymphocytes, γδ T cells, dendritic cells, activated T cells, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were detected in SwIV-infected pig lungs. Concomitantly, higher frequencies of the immunosuppressive T regulatory cells were also detected in the virus-infected pig lungs. The findings of this study have relevance to pathogenesis of the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in humans; thus, pigs may serve as a useful animal model to design and test effective mucosal vaccines and therapeutics against influenza virus.

  6. North American Triple Reassortant and Eurasian H1N1 Swine Influenza Viruses Do Not Readily Reassort to Generate a 2009 Pandemic H1N1-Like Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wenjun; Liu, Qinfang; Qiao, Chuanling; del Real, Gustavo; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Webby, Richard J.; Richt, Jürgen A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus (pH1N1) was derived through reassortment of North American triple reassortant and Eurasian avian-like swine influenza viruses (SIVs). To date, when, how and where the pH1N1 arose is not understood. To investigate viral reassortment, we coinfected cell cultures and a group of pigs with or without preexisting immunity with a Eurasian H1N1 virus, A/Swine/Spain/53207/2004 (SP04), and a North American triple reassortant H1N1 virus, A/Swine/Kansas/77778/2007 (KS07). The infected pigs were cohoused with one or two groups of contact animals to investigate viral transmission. In coinfected MDCK or PK15 continuous cell lines with KS07 and SP04 viruses, more than 20 different reassortant viruses were found. In pigs without or with preexisting immunity (immunized with commercial inactivated swine influenza vaccines) and coinfected with both viruses, six or seven reassortant viruses, as well as the parental viruses, were identified in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples from the lungs. Interestingly, only one or two viruses transmitted to and were detected in contact animals. No reassortant containing a gene constellation similar to that of pH1N1 virus was found in either coinfected cells or pigs, indicating that the reassortment event that resulted in the generation of this virus is a rare event that likely involved specific viral strains and/or a favorable, not-yet-understood environment. PMID:24618255

  7. H1N1 Flu & U.S. Schools: Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    A severe form of influenza known as H1N1, commonly being called swine flu, has health officials around the world concerned. In the United States, the outbreak of H1N1 has prompted school closures and cancellation of school-related events. As the flu spreads, the Department of Education encourages school leaders, parents and students to know how to…

  8. 78 FR 69539 - Removal of Attestation Process for Facilities Using H-1A Registered Nurses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... Facilities Using H-1A Registered Nurses AGENCY: Employment and Training Administration, Department of Labor... governing health care facilities using nonimmigrant foreign workers as registered nurses under the H-1A visa... exclusively for the temporary admission and employment of registered nurses, which permitted employers...

  9. Adoption of Preventive Measures and Attitudes toward the H1N1 Influenza Pandemic in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pérez, Anna; Rodríguez, Tània; López, Maria José; Continente, Xavier; Nebot, Manel

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study describes the perceived impact of H1N1 influenza and the adoption of the recommended measures to address the pandemic in schools. Methods: A cross-sectional self-reported survey was conducted in 433 schools in Barcelona addressed to the school principal or the H1N1 influenza designated person. A descriptive analysis was…

  10. Antigenic Patterns and Evolution of the Human Influenza A (H1N1) Virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mi; Zhao, Xiang; Hua, Sha; Du, Xiangjun; Peng, Yousong; Li, Xiyan; Lan, Yu; Wang, Dayan; Wu, Aiping; Shu, Yuelong; Jiang, Taijiao

    2015-09-28

    The influenza A (H1N1) virus causes seasonal epidemics that result in severe illnesses and deaths almost every year. A deep understanding of the antigenic patterns and evolution of human influenza A (H1N1) virus is extremely important for its effective surveillance and prevention. Through development of antigenicity inference method for human influenza A (H1N1), named PREDAC-H1, we systematically mapped the antigenic patterns and evolution of the human influenza A (H1N1) virus. Eight dominant antigenic clusters have been inferred for seasonal H1N1 viruses since 1977, which demonstrated sequential replacements over time with a similar pattern in Asia, Europe and North America. Among them, six clusters emerged first in Asia. As for China, three of the eight antigenic clusters were detected in South China earlier than in North China, indicating the leading role of South China in H1N1 transmission. The comprehensive view of the antigenic evolution of human influenza A (H1N1) virus can help formulate better strategy for its prevention and control.

  11. [MOLECULAR-GENETIC POLYMORPHISM OF chs_H1 GENE IN UKRAINIAN HOP VARIETIES].

    PubMed

    Venzer, A M; Volkova, N E; Sivolap, Yu M

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphism of chs_H1 gene encoding the "true" chalcone synthase was determined by alignment of sequences. The polymorphism associates with single nucleotide changes, insertions or deletions (indels) in the promoter, exons, intron, 3'-untranslated region. The molecular-genetic polymorphism in gene chs_H1 different regions of hop varieties of Polessye Agriculture Institute' breeding NAAS was analyzed.

  12. Generalized anhidrosis in a child following presumptive H1N1 influenza.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Partha S; Mitra, Sudeshna; Fealey, Robert D

    2012-04-01

    We report an 8-year-old girl who developed generalized anhidrosis following presumptive H1N1 infection. Pure autonomic dysfunction is an unusual complication following H1N1 infection and specially generalized anhidrosis without other autonomic dysfunction have not been reported before.

  13. Novel route of exposure explains outbreaks of pH1N1 influenza in turkeys

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence of avian and swine influenza virus genes in the 2009 novel H1N1 pandemic virus (pH1N1) raises the potential for infection in poultry following exposure to infected humans or swine. This is especially true for turkeys because of their known susceptibility to type A influenza viruses and...

  14. Absence of Pandemic H1N1 Influenza A Virus in Fresh Pork

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pigs experimentally infected with pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus developed respiratory disease; however, there was no evidence for systemic disease to suggest that pork from pigs infected with H1N1 influenza would contain infectious virus. These findings support the WHO recommendation that po...

  15. Isolation and characterization of pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses in pigs in Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Influenza A virus (IAV) infections are endemic diseases in pork producing countries around the world. The emergence of the pandemic 2009 human H1N1 influenza A virus (pH1N1) raised questions about the occurrence of this virus in Brazilian swine populations. During a 2009-2010 swine influenza virus r...

  16. Susceptibility of turkeys to pandemic H1N1 virus by reproductive tract insemination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beginning in April 2009, cases of acute respiratory disease were reported in humans caused by a novel H1N1 influenza A virus (pH1N1) in Mexico which has since spread globally in the human population and been declared a pandemic. Initial studies using intranasal route of inoculation failed to produc...

  17. Susceptibility of poultry to pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beginning in April 2009, cases of acute respiratory disease were reported in humans caused by a novel H1N1 influenza A virus in Mexico. The causative agent was complex reassortant influenza A virus with gene segments from North American classic H1N1 swine viruses, North American avian viruses, huma...

  18. Enhanced Pneumonia With Pandemic 2009 A/H1N1 Swine Influenza Virus in Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction. Swine influenza A viruses (SIV) in the major swine producing regions of North America consist of multiple subtypes of endemic H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 derived from swine, avian and human influenza viruses with a triple reassortant internal gene (TRIG) constellation (1). Genetic drift and r...

  19. 20 CFR 655.736 - What are H-1B-dependent employers and willful violators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... required to make determinations of H-1B-dependency status? Every employer that intends to file an LCA... H-1B-dependent employer or willful violator may use an LCA filed before January 19, 2001, and during... in paragraph (c)(1) of this section), then that status must be reflected on the employer's LCA...

  20. 20 CFR 655.736 - What are H-1B-dependent employers and willful violators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... required to make determinations of H-1B-dependency status? Every employer that intends to file an LCA... H-1B-dependent employer or willful violator may use an LCA filed before January 19, 2001, and during... in paragraph (c)(1) of this section), then that status must be reflected on the employer's LCA...

  1. Role of H1 linker histones in mammalian development and stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chenyi; Fan, Yuhong

    2016-03-01

    H1 linker histones are key chromatin architectural proteins facilitating the formation of higher order chromatin structures. The H1 family constitutes the most heterogeneous group of histone proteins, with eleven non-allelic H1 variants in mammals. H1 variants differ in their biochemical properties and exhibit significant sequence divergence from one another, yet most of them are highly conserved during evolution from mouse to human. H1 variants are differentially regulated during development and their cellular compositions undergo dramatic changes in embryogenesis, gametogenesis, tissue maturation and cellular differentiation. As a group, H1 histones are essential for mouse development and proper stem cell differentiation. Here we summarize our current knowledge on the expression and functions of H1 variants in mammalian development and stem cell differentiation. Their diversity, sequence conservation, complex expression and distinct functions suggest that H1s mediate chromatin reprogramming and contribute to the large variations and complexity of chromatin structure and gene expression in the mammalian genome.

  2. Characterization of Xylanase of Cladosporium cladosporioides H1 Isolated from Janggyeong Panjeon in Haeinsa Temple

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hee; Jung, Mi-Hwa; Jo, Chang-Wook; Choi, Jung-Eun

    2011-01-01

    Cladosporium cladosporioides H1 was found to be the most abundant microbe in Janggyeong Panjeon. C. cladosporioides H1 produced a 20 kDa xylanase, which was generally stable below 60℃ and had specialized activity in an acidic condition. Our results may lead to the development of a strategy for preservation of organic cultural heritage environments. PMID:22783122

  3. Removing Peanut Allergen Ara h 1 from Peanut Extracts Using p-Aminobenzamidine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rationale: Ara h 1 is one of 3 major allergens in peanut. Removing Ara h 1 from a peanut extract may produce a hypoallergenic peanut extract for immunotherapy and other purposes. Methods: Peanut extracts were treated overnight with and without 10 mM p-aminobenzamidine (pABA, a protease inhibitor) i...

  4. VLA Images of Venus at 1.3 CM and 2 CM Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleiman, S. H.; Kolodner, M. A.; Butler, B. J.; Steffes, P. G.

    1996-09-01

    On April 5, 1996, we performed an observation of Venus using the Very Large Array (VLA) at 15 GHz (2 cm) and 22 GHz (1.3 cm) simultaneously. High resolution continuum images for Venus were obtained at both frequencies. These images show significant polar darkening at latitudes above 60(deg) which is consistent with the results obtained by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter Infrared Radiometer (OIR) experiment (Taylor et al., J. Geophys. Res. 85, 7963-8006, 1980). These images are currently being used to detect potential spatial (longitudinal and latitudinal) variations in the abundances of gaseous sulfur dioxide (SO_2) and gaseous sulfuric acid (H_2SO_4) across the disk of Venus. Our new radiative transfer model (RTM) has shown that the emission spectrum is especially sensitive to the abundances of these constituents at these wavelengths. The detection of these constituents is being accomplished by matching the computed emission from our RTM to the measured emission of Venus by the VLA. Our RTM incorporates the newly developed Ben Reuven formalism which provides a more accurate characterization of the microwave absorption of gaseous SO_2 (Suleiman et al., J. Geophys. Res. 101, 4623-4635, 1996). A description of the observation, visibility data, and images are presented. This work was supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program under grant NAGW-533.

  5. The linker histone H1.0 generates epigenetic and functional intratumor heterogeneity*

    PubMed Central

    Burney, Matthew J.; Patel, Harshil; Henser-Brownhill, Tristan; Cohen, Ayelet-Hashahar Shapira; Li, Yilong; Ben-Hamo, Rotem; Nye, Emma; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Chakravarty, Probir; Efroni, Sol; Matthews, Nik; Misteli, Tom; Meshorer, Eran; Scaffidi, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Tumors comprise functionally diverse subpopulations of cells with distinct proliferative potential. Here, we show that dynamic epigenetic states defined by the linker histone H1.0 determine which cells within a tumor can sustain the long-term cancer growth. Numerous cancer types exhibit high inter- and intratumor heterogeneity of H1.0, with H1.0 levels correlating with tumor differentiation status, patient survival and, at the single-cell level, cancer stem cell markers. Silencing of H1.0 promotes maintenance of self-renewing cells by inducing de-repression of megabase-sized gene domains harboring downstream effectors of oncogenic pathways. Self-renewing epigenetic states are not stable and re-expression of H1.0 in subsets of tumor cells establishes transcriptional programs that restrict cancer cell long-term proliferative potential and drive their differentiation. Our results uncover epigenetic determinants of tumor-maintaining cells. PMID:27708074

  6. Primer retention owing to the absence of RNase H1 is catastrophic for mitochondrial DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Holmes, J Bradley; Akman, Gokhan; Wood, Stuart R; Sakhuja, Kiran; Cerritelli, Susana M; Moss, Chloe; Bowmaker, Mark R; Jacobs, Howard T; Crouch, Robert J; Holt, Ian J

    2015-07-28

    Encoding ribonuclease H1 (RNase H1) degrades RNA hybridized to DNA, and its function is essential for mitochondrial DNA maintenance in the developing mouse. Here we define the role of RNase H1 in mitochondrial DNA replication. Analysis of replicating mitochondrial DNA in embryonic fibroblasts lacking RNase H1 reveals retention of three primers in the major noncoding region (NCR) and one at the prominent lagging-strand initiation site termed Ori-L. Primer retention does not lead immediately to depletion, as the persistent RNA is fully incorporated in mitochondrial DNA. However, the retained primers present an obstacle to the mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ in subsequent rounds of replication and lead to the catastrophic generation of a double-strand break at the origin when the resulting gapped molecules are copied. Hence, the essential role of RNase H1 in mitochondrial DNA replication is the removal of primers at the origin of replication.

  7. Evaluation of a new immunochromatographic assay for rapid identification of influenza A, B, and A(H1N1)2009 viruses.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Keiko; Kawakami, Chiharu; Shimizu, Hideaki; Abe, Takashi; Konomi, Yasushi; Yasumi, Yuki; Yamazaki, Masahiko; Ichikawa, Masataka; Sugaya, Norio

    2013-08-01

    We evaluated Clearline Influenza A/B/(H1N1)2009, a new multi-line immunochromatographic assay for rapid detection of antigens of influenza A (Flu A), B (Flu B), and A(H1N1)2009 viruses. Clearline detected Flu A, Flu B, and A(H1N1)2009 viruses with a detection limit of 4.6 × 10(3) to 7.5 × 10(4) pfu/assay. The sensitivity and specificity of detection of influenza virus by Clearline, using RT-PCR as reference standard, were determined for A(H1N1)2009, Flu A, and Flu B, in nasopharyngeal aspirate, nasopharyngeal swab, and self-blown nasal discharge specimens. Sensitivity for nasopharyngeal aspirate specimens was: A(H1N1)2009 = 97.3 %, Flu A = 94.5 %, and Flu B = 96.8 %, and specificity was Flu A = 99.1 % and Flu B = 100 %. Sensitivity for nasopharyngeal swab specimens was: A(H1N1)2009 = 91.9 %, Flu A = 92.8 %, and Flu B = 100 %, and specificity was Flu A = 98.2 % and Flu B = 100 %. Sensitivity for self-blown nasal discharge specimens was: A(H1N1)2009 = 75.7 %, Flu A = 86.5 %, and Flu B = 76.2 %, and specificity was Flu A = 98.4 % and Flu B = 100 %. Sensitivity and specificity of Clearline were sufficient for nasopharyngeal aspirate and swab specimens. For self-blown nasal discharge specimens, sensitivity was lower than for nasopharyngeal aspirates and nasopharyngeal swabs. The sensitivity of Clearline for A(H1N1)2009 was good even 6 h after the onset of symptoms. These findings suggest that Clearline may be useful for early clinical diagnosis of influenza.

  8. Classical swine H1N1 influenza viruses confer cross protection from swine-origin 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus infection in mice and ferrets.

    PubMed

    Min, Ji-Young; Chen, Grace L; Santos, Celia; Lamirande, Elaine W; Matsuoka, Yumiko; Subbarao, Kanta

    2010-12-05

    The hemagglutinin of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus is a derivative of and is antigenically related to classical swine but not to seasonal human H1N1 viruses. We compared the A/California/7/2009 (CA/7/09) virus recommended by the WHO as the reference virus for vaccine development, with two classical swine influenza viruses A/swine/Iowa/31 (sw/IA/31) and A/New Jersey/8/1976 (NJ/76) to establish the extent of immunologic cross-reactivity and cross-protection in animal models. Primary infection with 2009 pandemic or NJ/76 viruses elicited antibodies against the CA/7/09 virus and provided complete protection from challenge with this virus in ferrets; the response in mice was variable and conferred partial protection. Although ferrets infected with sw/IA/31 virus developed low titers of cross-neutralizing antibody, they were protected from pulmonary replication of the CA/7/09 virus. The data suggest that prior exposure to antigenically related H1N1 viruses of swine-origin provide some protective immunity against the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus.

  9. Challenge of Pigs with Natural Immunity to H1 and H3 Swine Influenza Virus with Pandemic 2009 H1N1 Influenza Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction. The emergence of the pandemic 2009 human H1N1 influenza A virus raised many questions about the implications for this virus in swine (1). One such question is, does prior exposure to influenza virus confer any protection against the new virus? This report describes a study to evaluate ...

  10. 20 CFR 655.705 - What Federal agencies are involved in the H-1B and H-1B1 programs, and what are the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... EMPLOYMENT OF FOREIGN WORKERS IN THE UNITED STATES Labor Condition Applications and Requirements for... offer a position filled by an H-1B nonimmigrant to an equally or better qualified United States worker... authorization to work in the United States for that employer or, in the case of a nonimmigrant...

  11. Reverse bias voltage testing of 8 cm x 8cm silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woike, T.; Stotlar, S.; Lungu, C.

    1991-01-01

    A study is described of the reverse I-V characteristics of the largest space qualified silicon solar cells currently available (8 x 8 cm) and of reverse bias voltage (RBV) testing performed on these cells. This study includes production grade cells, both with and without cover glass. These cells span the typical output range seen in production. Initial characteristics of these cells are measured at both 28 and 60 C. These measurements show weak correlation between cell output and reverse characteristics. Analysis is presented to determine the proper conditions for RBV stress to simulate shadowing effects on a particular array design. After performing the RBV stress the characteristics of the stressed cells are remeasured. The degradation in cell performance is highly variable which exacerbates cell mismatching over time. The effect of this degradation on array lifetime is also discussed. Generalization of these results to other array configurations is also presented.

  12. Chrysanthemum CmNAR2 interacts with CmNRT2 in the control of nitrate uptake

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Chunsun; Zhang, Xiaoxue; Jiang, Jiafu; Guan, Zhiyong; Zhao, Shuang; Fang, Weimin; Liao, Yuan; Chen, Sumei; Chen, Fadi

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate transporters are an important component of plant growth and development. Chrysanthemum morifolium is an important ornamental species, for which a sufficient supply of nitrogenous fertilizer is required to maintain economic yields. In this study, the full-length cDNA of the nitrate transporter genes CmNRT2 and CmNAR2 were isolated. CmNRT2 transcript accumulation was inducible by both nitrate and ammonium, but the latter ion down-regulated the transcript accumulation of CmNAR2. CmNRT2 might be a plasma membrane localized protein, while CmNAR2 was distributed throughout the cell. CmNAR2 was shown to interact with CmNRT2 by in vitro and in vivo assays. Arabidopsis thaliana plants heterologously expressing CmNRT2 showed an increased rate of nitrate influx, while this trait was unaltered in plants expressing CmNAR2. Double transformants (CmNRT2 plus CmNAR2) exhibited an enhanced rate of nitrate influx into the root. Our data indicated that the interaction of CmNAR2 with CmNRT2 contributed to the uptake of nitrate. PMID:25060485

  13. Different herd level factors associated with H1N1 or H1N2 influenza virus infections in fattening pigs.

    PubMed

    Fablet, C; Simon, G; Dorenlor, V; Eono, F; Eveno, E; Gorin, S; Quéguiner, S; Madec, F; Rose, N

    2013-11-01

    Herd-level factors associated with European H1N1 or H1N2 swine influenza virus (SIV) infections were assessed by mean of a cross-sectional study carried out in 125 herds in France. Serum samples from 15 fattening pigs in each herd were tested by haemagglutination inhibition. Data related to herd characteristics, biosecurity, management and housing conditions were collected by questionnaire during the farm visit. Climatic conditions in the post-weaning and fattening rooms, where the sampled pigs were housed, were measured over 20 h. Factors associated with H1N1 or H1N2 sero-positive status of the herd were identified by logistic regressions for binary outcome. For both subtypes, the odds for a herd to be SIV sero-positive increased if there were more than two pig herds in the vicinity (OR=3.2, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.4-7.6, p<0.01 and OR=3.5, 95% CI: 1.5-8.1 p<0.01 for H1N1 and H1N2 respectively). Different factors were specifically associated with either H1N1 or H1N2 SIV infections. The odds for a herd to be H1N1 sero-positive were significantly increased by having a large number of pigs per pen in the post-weaning room (OR=3.2, 95% CI: 1.2-8.6, p=0.02), temperature setpoints below 25 °C (OR=2.6, 95% CI: 1.1-6.4, p=0.03) and below 24 °C (OR=2.6, 95% CI: 1.1-6.1, p=0.03) for the heating device in the farrowing room and the ventilation controller, respectively, and moving the pigs to the fattening facility via a room housing older pigs (OR=3.3, 95% CI: 1.1-9.6, p=0.03). A H1N2 sero-positive status was associated with a brief down period in the farrowing room (OR=2.6, 95% CI: 1.1-6.3, p=0.03), small floor area per pig in the post-weaning pen (OR=2.9, 95% CI: 1.2-7.0, p=0.02), large-sized fattening room (OR=2.5, 95% CI: 1.1-5.9, p=0.03), lack of all-in all-out management in the fattening room (OR=2.4, 95% CI: 1.0-5.8, p=0.04) and a temperature range of less than 5 °C controlling ventilation in the fattening facilities (OR=3.2, 95% CI: 1.4-7.4, p<0

  14. A 1.3 cm line survey toward Orion KL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Y.; Henkel, C.; Thorwirth, S.; Spezzano, S.; Menten, K. M.; Walmsley, C. M.; Wyrowski, F.; Mao, R. Q.; Klein, B.

    2015-09-01

    regions. Elemental and isotopic abundance ratios are also estimated: He/H = (8.7 ± 0.7)% derived from the ratios between helium RRLs and hydrogen RRLs; 12C/13C = 63 ± 17 from 12CH3OH/13CH3OH; 14N/15N =100 ± 51 from 14NH3/15NH3; and D/H = (8.3 ± 4.5) × 10-3 from NH2D/NH3. The dispersion of the He/H ratios derived from Hα/Heα pairs to Hδ/Heδ pairs is very small, which is consistent with theoretical predictions that the departure coefficients bn factors for hydrogen and helium are nearly identical. Based on a non-LTE code that neglects excitation by the infrared radiation field and a likelihood analysis, we find that the denser regions have lower kinetic temperature, which favors an external heating of the hot core. Tables 2 and 4 and appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgThe reduced spectra as FITS files are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/581/A48

  15. Differential effect of H1 variant overexpression on cell cycle progression and gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D T; Alexander, B T; Sittman, D B

    1996-01-01

    To identify functional differences among non-allelic variants of the mammalian H1 linker histones a system for the overexpression of individual H1 variants in vivo was developed. Mouse 3T3 cells were transformed with an expression vector containing the coding regions for the H1c or H10 variant under the control of an inducible promoter. Stable, single colony transformants, in which the normal stoichiometry of H1 variants was perturbed, displayed normal viability, unaltered morphology and no long-term growth arrest. However, upon release from synchronization at different points in the cell cycle transformants significantly overproducing H10 exhibited transient inhibition of both G1 and S phase progression. Overexpression of H1c to comparable levels had no effect on cell cycle progression. Analysis of transcript levels for several cell cycle-regulated and housekeeping genes indicated that overexpression of H10 resulted in significantly reduced expression of all genes tested. Surprisingly, overexpression of H1c to comparable levels resulted in either a negligible effect or, in some cases, a dramatic increase in transcript levels. These results support the suggestion that functional differences exist among H1 variants. PMID:8602362

  16. Drosophila ISWI Regulates the Association of Histone H1 With Interphase Chromosomes in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Siriaco, Giorgia; Deuring, Renate; Chioda, Mariacristina; Becker, Peter B.; Tamkun, John W.

    2009-01-01

    Although tremendous progress has been made toward identifying factors that regulate nucleosome structure and positioning, the mechanisms that regulate higher-order chromatin structure remain poorly understood. Recent studies suggest that the ISWI chromatin-remodeling factor plays a key role in this process by promoting the assembly of chromatin containing histone H1. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the function of H1 in Drosophila. The association of H1 with salivary gland polytene chromosomes is regulated by a dynamic, ATP-dependent process. Reducing cellular ATP levels triggers the dissociation of H1 from polytene chromosomes and causes chromosome defects similar to those resulting from the loss of ISWI function. H1 knockdown causes even more severe defects in chromosome structure and a reduction in nucleosome repeat length, presumably due to the failure to incorporate H1 during replication-dependent chromatin assembly. Our findings suggest that ISWI regulates higher-order chromatin structure by modulating the interaction of H1 with interphase chromosomes. PMID:19380479

  17. Epidemiology of pandemic H1N1 strains in a tertiary hospital of Maharashtra.

    PubMed

    Shrikhande, Sunanda; Bhoyar, S K; Tenpe, S H; Deogade, N G

    2012-01-01

    Swine-flu is a viral fever caused by a new mutated strain Influenza A virus subtype H1N1, which infects humans. Pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1/2009) virus was detected in the first quarter of 2009 in the west coastal region of North America and spread very rapidly to the other countries during April-June, 2009. This study was conducted to assess the epidemiology of pandemic H1N1 strains using a cross-sectional study design in a tertiary hospital. The symptomatic patients attending the flu outpatient department (OPD)/emergency from August 2009 to April 2011 at Indira Gandhi Government Medical College, Nagpur were included using a standard case definition. A total of 67 (27.01%) samples from 247 patients were pandemic influenza A/H1N1 positive. None of the patients had a history of foreign travel, whereas 23.88% of the patients gave history of travel to an endemic area. Overall, 22.38% of the patients came in contact with proven cases of pandemic H1N1. pH1N1 transmission activity has increased since May 2010.

  18. Perspectives of Pulmonologists on the 2009-2010 H1N1 Vaccination Effort.

    PubMed

    Clark, Sarah J; Cowan, Anne E; Wortley, Pascale M

    2012-01-01

    Persons with high-risk conditions such as asthma were a target group for H1N1 vaccine recommendations. We conducted a mailed survey of a national sample of pulmonologists to understand their participation in the 2009-2010 H1N1 vaccine campaign. The response rate was 59%. The majority of pulmonologists strongly recommended H1N1 vaccine for children (73%) and adults aged 25-64 years (51%). Only 60% of respondents administered H1N1 vaccine in their practice compared to 87% who offered seasonal influenza vaccine. Other than vaccine supply, respondents who provided H1N1 vaccine reported few logistical problems. Two-thirds of respondents would be very likely to vaccinate during a future influenza pandemic; this rate was higher among those who provided H1N1 vaccine and/or seasonal flu vaccine. In total, the H1N1 vaccine-related experiences of pulmonologists seemed to be positive. However, additional efforts are needed to increase participation in future pandemic vaccination campaigns.

  19. Histamine H1 Receptor Gene Expression and Drug Action of Antihistamines.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Hiroyuki; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Nemoto, Hisao; Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Kashiwada, Yoshiki; Takeda, Noriaki

    2016-11-25

    The upregulation mechanism of histamine H1 receptor through the activation of protein kinase C-δ (PKCδ) and the receptor gene expression was discovered. Levels of histamine H1 receptor mRNA and IL-4 mRNA in nasal mucosa were elevated by the provocation of nasal hypersensitivity model rats. Pretreatment with antihistamines suppressed the elevation of mRNA levels. Scores of nasal symptoms were correlatively alleviated to the suppression level of mRNAs above. A correlation between scores of nasal symptoms and levels of histamine H1 receptor mRNA in the nasal mucosa was observed in patients with pollinosis. Both scores of nasal symptoms and the level of histamine H1 receptor mRNA were improved by prophylactic treatment of antihistamines. Similar to the antihistamines, pretreatment with antiallergic natural medicines showed alleviation of nasal symptoms with correlative suppression of gene expression in nasal hypersensitivity model rats through the suppression of PKCδ. Similar effects of antihistamines and antiallergic natural medicines support that histamine H1 receptor-mediated activation of histamine H1 receptor gene expression is an important signaling pathway for the symptoms of allergic diseases. Antihistamines with inverse agonist activity showed the suppression of constitutive histamine H1 receptor gene expression, suggesting the advantage of therapeutic effect.

  20. Influenza vaccination coverage among pregnant women--National 2009 H1N1 Flu Survey (NHFS).

    PubMed

    Ding, Helen; Santibanez, Tammy A; Jamieson, Denise J; Weinbaum, Cindy M; Euler, Gary L; Grohskopf, Lisa A; Lu, Peng-Jun; Singleton, James A

    2011-06-01

    We sought to describe vaccination with influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent (2009 H1N1) and trivalent seasonal (seasonal) vaccines among pregnant women during the 2009 through 2010 influenza season. A national H1N1 flu survey was conducted April through June 2010. The 2009 H1N1 and seasonal vaccination coverage estimates were 45.7% and 32.1%, respectively, among pregnant women aged 18-49 years. Receipt of a health care provider's recommendation for vaccination, perceived effectiveness of influenza vaccinations, and perceived high chance of influenza infection were independently associated with higher 2009 H1N1 and seasonal vaccination coverage. Pregnancy during October 2009 through January 2010 was independently associated with higher 2009 H1N1 vaccination coverage. The 2009 H1N1 vaccination level among pregnant women was higher than the seasonal vaccination level during the 2009 through 2010 season; it was also higher than vaccination among nonpregnant women with and without high-risk conditions. Health care providers and public health messaging played important roles in influencing vaccination behavior.

  1. Altered telomere homeostasis and resistance to skin carcinogenesis in Suv39h1 transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Petti, Eleonora; Jordi, Fabian; Buemi, Valentina; Dinami, Roberto; Benetti, Roberta; Blasco, Maria A; Schoeftner, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The Suv39h1 and Suv39h2 H3K9 histone methyltransferases (HMTs) have a conserved role in the formation of constitutive heterochromatin and gene silencing. Using a transgenic mouse model system we demonstrate that elevated expression of Suv39h1 increases global H3K9me3 levels in vivo. More specifically, Suv39h1 overexpression enhances the imposition of H3K9me3 levels at constitutive heterochromatin at telomeric and major satellite repeats in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Chromatin compaction is paralleled by telomere shortening, indicating that telomere length is controlled by H3K9me3 density at telomeres. We further show that increased Suv39h1 levels result in an impaired clonogenic potential of transgenic epidermal stem cells and Ras/E1A transduced transgenic primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Importantly, Suv39h1 overexpression in mice confers resistance to a DMBA/TPA induced skin carcinogenesis protocol that is characterized by the accumulation of activating H-ras mutations. Our results provide genetic evidence that Suv39h1 controls telomere homeostasis and mediates resistance to oncogenic stress in vivo. This identifies Suv39h1 as an interesting target to improve oncogene induced senescence in premalignant lesions. PMID:25789788

  2. Dynamic behavior of histone H1 microinjected into HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, L.H.; Kuehl, L.; Rechsteiner, M.

    1986-01-01

    Histone H1 was purified from bovine thymus and radiolabeled with tritium by reductive methylation or with /sup 125/I using chloramine-T. Red blood cell-mediated microinjection was then used to introduce the labeled H1 molecules into HeLa cells synchronized in S phase. The injected H1 molecules rapidly entered HeLa nuclei, and a number of tests indicate that their association with chromatin was equivalent to that of endogenous histone H1. The injected molecules copurified with HeLa cell nucleosomes, exhibited a half-life of approx.100h, and were hyperphosphorylated at mitosis. When injected HeLa cells were fused with mouse 3T3 fibroblasts < 10% of the labeled H1 molecules migrated to mouse nuclei during the next 48 h. Despite their slow rate of migration between nuclei, the injected H1 molecules were evenly distributed on mouse and human genomes soon after mitosis of HeLa-3T3 heterokaryons. These results suggest that although most histone H1 molecules are stably associated with interphase chromatin, they undergo extensive redistribution after mitosis.

  3. Tissue-expressed B7-H1 Critically Controls Intestinal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Scandiuzzi, Lisa; Ghosh, Kaya; Hofmeyer, Kimberly A.; Abadi, Yael M.; Lázár-Molnár, Eszter; Lin, Elaine Y.; Liu, Qiang; Jeon, Hyungjun; Almo, Steven C.; Chen, Lieping; Nathenson, Stanley G.; Zang, Xingxing

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY B7-H1 (PD-L1) on immune cells plays an important role in T cell coinhibition by binding its receptor PD-1. Here we show that both human and mouse intestinal epithelium expressed B7-H1 and that B7-H1-deficient mice were highly susceptible to dextran sodium sulfate- or trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced gut injury. B7-H1 deficiency during intestinal inflammation led to high mortality and morbidity, which were associated with severe pathological manifestations in the colon, including loss of epithelial integrity and overgrowth of commensal bacteria. Results from bone marrow chimeric and knock-out mice showed B7-H1 expressed on intestinal parenchyma, but not on hematopoietic cells, controlled intestinal inflammation in an adaptive immunity-independent fashion. Finally, we demonstrated that B7-H1 dampened intestinal inflammation by inhibiting TNF-α production and by stimulating IL-22 from CD11c+CD11b+ lamina propria cells. Thus, our data uncover a new mechanism by which intestinal tissue-expressed B7-H1 functions as an essential ligand for innate immune cells to prevent gut inflammation. PMID:24529703

  4. Novel nucleosomal particles containing core histones and linker DNA but no histone H1.

    PubMed

    Cole, Hope A; Cui, Feng; Ocampo, Josefina; Burke, Tara L; Nikitina, Tatiana; Nagarajavel, V; Kotomura, Naoe; Zhurkin, Victor B; Clark, David J

    2016-01-29

    Eukaryotic chromosomal DNA is assembled into regularly spaced nucleosomes, which play a central role in gene regulation by determining accessibility of control regions. The nucleosome contains ∼147 bp of DNA wrapped ∼1.7 times around a central core histone octamer. The linker histone, H1, binds both to the nucleosome, sealing the DNA coils, and to the linker DNA between nucleosomes, directing chromatin folding. Micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digests the linker to yield the chromatosome, containing H1 and ∼160 bp, and then converts it to a core particle, containing ∼147 bp and no H1. Sequencing of nucleosomal DNA obtained after MNase digestion (MNase-seq) generates genome-wide nucleosome maps that are important for understanding gene regulation. We present an improved MNase-seq method involving simultaneous digestion with exonuclease III, which removes linker DNA. Remarkably, we discovered two novel intermediate particles containing 154 or 161 bp, corresponding to 7 bp protruding from one or both sides of the nucleosome core. These particles are detected in yeast lacking H1 and in H1-depleted mouse chromatin. They can be reconstituted in vitro using purified core histones and DNA. We propose that these 'proto-chromatosomes' are fundamental chromatin subunits, which include the H1 binding site and influence nucleosome spacing independently of H1.

  5. The PSP-associated MAPT H1 subhaplotype in Guadeloupean atypical parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Camuzat, Agnès; Romana, Marc; Dürr, Alexandra; Feingold, Josué; Brice, Alexis; Ruberg, Merle; Lannuzel, Annie

    2008-12-15

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the H1 subhaplotype in MAPT associated with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) in Caucasians confers risk for PSP-like atypical parkinsonism in Guadeloupe, a tauopathy. Guadeloupean controls and patients with atypical and idiopathic parkinsonism and ethnically and age-matched controls were genotyped for H1 and H2 alleles, then for the H1 subhaplotype associated with PSP in Caucasians, using previously described haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (Ht-SNPs) in linkage disequilibrium at the MAPT locus. Most Guadeloupean controls and patients were homozygous for the H1 allele; only 5% were heterozygous for the H2 allele, consistent with the European contribution to the racial admixture in Guadeloupe, but equivalent to the frequency found in Caucasian PSP patients. The frequencies of the Ht-SNPs used to determine the PSP-associated H1 subhaplotype in both Guadeloupean controls and parkinsonians were similar, indicating that the H1 subhaplotype associated with PSP in Caucasians was not a risk factor for PSP-like atypical parkinsonism in Guadeloupe. Interestingly, they were also similar to the frequencies in Caucasian PSP patients. The major H1 subhaplotype in Guadeloupe, determined by analysis of linkage desequibrium, differed from the major Caucasian subhaplotype, but corresponded to minor alleles previously described.

  6. Phosphoinositide hydrolysis mediated by H1 receptors in autoimmune myocarditis mice

    PubMed Central

    Goren, Nora; Leiros, Claudia Perez; Sterin-Borda, Leonor

    1993-01-01

    Stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis in myocardium from autoimmune myocarditis mice by ThEA and histamine was assayed. Myocardium from autoimmune heart, but not the normal forms, specifically increased phosphoinositide turnover in the presence of histaminergic agonists. This increment was blocked by a specific H1 antagonist mepyramine and to the same extent by the phospholipase C inhibitor NCDC. By using a binding assay H1 histaminergic receptors were detected in autoimmune heart membrane preparations, but this was not observed in normal heart. These data suggest that autoimmune myocardium expressed a functional H1 receptor that could involve a distinctive mechanism operating in the disease. PMID:18475540

  7. Hexagonal phase based gel-emulsion (O/H1 gel-emulsion): formation and rheology.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mohammad Mydul; Aramaki, Kenji

    2008-11-04

    The formation, stability, and rheological behavior of a hexagonal phase based gel-emulsion (O/H1 gel-emulsion) have been studied in water/C12EO8/hydrocarbon oil systems. A partial phase behavior study indicates that the oil nature has no effect on the phase sequences in the ternary phase diagram of water/C12EO8/oil systems but the domain size of the phases or the oil solubilization capacity considerably changes with oil nature. Excess oil is in equilibrium with the hexagonal phase (H1) in the ternary phase diagram in the H1+O region. The O/H1 gel-emulsion was prepared (formation) and kept at 25 degrees C to check stability. It has been found that the formation and stability of the O/H1 gel-emulsion depends on the oil nature. After 2 min observation (formation), the results show that short chain linear hydrocarbon oils (heptane, octane) are more apt to form a O/H1 gel-emulsion compared to long chain linear hydrocarbon oils (tetradecane, hexadecane), though the stability is not good enough in either system, that is, oil separates within 24 h. Nevertheless, the formation and stability of the O/H1 gel-emulsion is appreciably increased in squalane and liquid paraffin. It is surmised that the high transition temperature of the H1+O phase and the presence of a bicontinuous cubic phase (V1) might hamper the formation of a gel-emulsion. It has been pointed out that the solubilization of oil in the H1 phase could be related to emulsion stability. On the other hand, the oil nature has little or no effect on the formation and stability of a cubic phase based gel-emulsion (O/I1 gel-emulsion). From rheological measurements, it has found that the rheogram of the O/H1 gel-emulsion indicates gel-type structure and shows shear thinning behavior similar to the case of the O/I1 gel-emulsion. Rheological data infer that the O/I1 gel-emulsion is more viscous than the O/H1 gel-emulsion at room temperature but the O/H1 gel-emulsion shows consistency at elevated temperature.

  8. Transplantation of solid organs procured from influenza A H1N1 infected donors.

    PubMed

    Cockbain, Andrew J; Jacob, Matthew; Ecuyer, Clare; Hostert, Lutz; Ahmad, Niaz

    2011-12-01

    Following the influenza A H1N1 (swine flu) pandemic, there remains little evidence informing the safety of transplanting organs from donors suspected or diagnosed with H1N1. Limited guidelines from the major transplant societies leave the use of such organs at the discretion of individual transplant centres, and practice varies considerably both nationally and internationally. We present the largest published series of outcome following transplantation of organs from H1N1 positive donors and demonstrate that these organs can be transplanted safely and with good short-term outcome. We discuss our local policy for treatment of recipients with Oseltamivir.

  9. Cyclic sulfoxides-garlicnins K1, K2, and H1-extracted from Allium sativum.

    PubMed

    Nohara, Toshihiro; Fujiwara, Yukio; Komota, Yusuke; Kondo, Yoshihiko; Saku, Taiki; Yamaguchi, Koki; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Takeya, Motohiro

    2015-01-01

    Newly identified cyclic sulfoxides-garlicnins K1 (1), K2 (2), and H1 (3)-were isolated from the acetone extracts of the bulbs of garlic, Allium sativum. Garlicnin H1 (3) demonstrated potential to suppress tumor cell proliferation by regulating macrophage activation. The structures of garlicnins K1 and K2, 3,4-dimethyl-5-allyl-tetrahydrothiophen-2-one-S-oxides, and the structure of garlicnin H1, 3-carboxy-3-hydroxy-4-methyl-5-allylsulfoxide-tetrahydrothiophen-2-(ethane-1,2-diol)-S-oxide were characterized by spectroscopic analysis.

  10. Molecular requirements for degradation of a modified sense RNA strand by Escherichia coli ribonuclease H1

    PubMed Central

    Yazbeck, Daniel R.; Min, Kyung-Lyum; Damha, Masad J.

    2002-01-01

    The structural requirements for DNA/RNA hybrids to be suitable substrates for RNase H1 are well described; however the tolerance level of this enzyme towards modifications that do not alter the duplex conformation is not clearly understood, especially with respect to the sense RNA strand. In order to investigate the molecular requirements of Escherichia coli RNase H1 (termed RNase H1 here) with respect to the sense RNA strand, we synthesized a series of oligonucleotides containing 2′-deoxy-2′-fluoro-β-d-ribose (2′F-RNA) as a substitute for the natural β-d-ribose sugars found in RNA. Our results from a series of RNase H1 binding and cleavage studies indicated that 2′F-RNA/DNA hybrids are not substrates of RNase H1 and ultimately led to the conclusion that the 2′-hydroxyl moiety of the RNA strand in a DNA/RNA hybrid is required for both binding and hydrolysis by RNase H1. Through the synthesis of a series of chimeric sense oligonucleotides of mixed RNA and 2′F-RNA composition, the gap requirements of RNase H1 within the sense strand were examined. Results from these studies showed that RNase H1 requires at least five or six natural RNA residues within the sense RNA strand of a hybrid substrate for both binding and hydrolysis. The RNase H1-mediated degradation patterns of these hybrids agree with previous suggestions on the processivity of RNase H1, mainly that the binding site is located 5′ to the catalytic site with respect to the sense strand. They also suggest, however, that the binding and catalytic domains of RNase H1 might be closer than has been previously suggested. In addition to the above, physicochemical studies have revealed the thermal stabilities and relative conformations of these modified heteroduplexes under physiological conditions. These findings offer further insights into the physical binding and catalytic properties of the RNase H1–substrate interaction, and have been incorporated into a general model summarizing the mechanism

  11. [Virological characteristics of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza virus].

    PubMed

    Horimoto, Taisuke; Yamada, Shinya; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2010-06-01

    In the spring of 2009, a novel swine-origin H1N1 virus, whose antigenicity is quite different from those of seasonal human H1N1 strains, emerged in Mexico and readily transmitted and spread among humans, resulting in the first influenza pandemic in the 21st century. This novel H1N1 virus was shown to be a triple reassortant comprising genes derived from avian, human, and swine viruses. Here, we review our current knowledge of this pandemic influenza virus and discuss future aspects of the pandemic.

  12. Evaporation Rates of Chemical Warfare Agents using 5 CM Wind Tunnels. 5. VX From Sand and Concrete

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    S ? J8 S ? gi op r^ co eft eft en eft -I 1——H 1- a E E s > Eg y 8 u> s ID in «~ • CM c o 1 c...AGENTS USING 5 CM WIND TUNNELS V. VX FROM SAND AND CONCRETE Carol A. S . Brevett Christopher V. Giannaras John J. Pence Joseph P. Myers Robert G...Wind Tunnels V. VX from Sand and Concrete 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER DAAD13-03-D-0017 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S

  13. 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1): Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention- Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Swedish, Kristin A

    2011-04-01

    The 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) was responsible for the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century. The virus- a previously unknown triple-reassortant virus containing segments of avian, human, and swine origins- generally caused mild disease. Unlike seasonal influenza, 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) primarily affected adults 18 to 64 years of age. During the course of the pandemic, public health officials tried to facilitate diagnostic procedures and share information about treatment modalities globally. Efforts to contain the spread of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) included personal protective mechanisms and the 2009 H1N1 vaccine, which was not produced quickly enough or in large enough quantities. The lessons learned from this pandemic should be applied to ensure better preparedness in case of future pandemics.

  14. Pediatric Healthcare Response to Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Influenza Stakeholder Meeting - Summary of Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    HCTT CHE

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the meeting was to bring together subject matter experts to develop tools and resources for use by the pediatric healthcare community in response to 2009 (H1N1) pandemic influenza activity during the 2009 influenza season.

  15. Structural Basis of Preexisting Immunity to the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic Influenza Virus

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Rui; Ekiert, Damian C.; Krause, Jens C.; Hai, Rong; Crowe, Jr., James E.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-05-25

    The 2009 H1N1 swine flu is the first influenza pandemic in decades. The crystal structure of the hemagglutinin from the A/California/04/2009 H1N1 virus shows that its antigenic structure, particularly within the Sa antigenic site, is extremely similar to those of human H1N1 viruses circulating early in the 20th century. The cocrystal structure of the 1918 hemagglutinin with 2D1, an antibody from a survivor of the 1918 Spanish flu that neutralizes both 1918 and 2009 H1N1 viruses, reveals an epitope that is conserved in both pandemic viruses. Thus, antigenic similarity between the 2009 and 1918-like viruses provides an explanation for the age-related immunity to the current influenza pandemic.

  16. Measurement of Swine H1N1 Hemagglutinin Peptide binding with Piezoresistive Microcantilever Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Bajwa, Navdeep K; Maldonado, Carlos J.; Thundat, Thomas George; Passian, Ali

    2014-03-24

    The effective detection of Swine H1N1 Hemagglutinin peptide is crucial as it could be used as a positive control to screen for highly infectious flu strains such as Swine-Origin Influenza A (H1N1). Piezoresistive microcantilever arrays present a pathway towards highly sensitive and label-free detection of biomolecules by transducing the antigen-antibody binding into change in resistivity via induced surface stress variation. We also demonstrate a mechanical transduction of Swine H1N1 Hemagglutinin peptide binding and suggest the employed technique may offer a potential platform for detection of the H1N1 virus, which could be clinically used to diagnose and provide subsequent relief.

  17. 9. COLD CALIBRATION TEST STAND (H1) FROM LEFT TO RIGHT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. COLD CALIBRATION TEST STAND (H-1) FROM LEFT TO RIGHT - WORK BENCH, CONTROL PANEL, CHEMICAL TANK. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Cold Calibration Test Stand, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  18. 46. OUTLET WORKS: ELECTRICAL SYSTEM NO. 1. Sheet H1, date ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. OUTLET WORKS: ELECTRICAL SYSTEM NO. 1. Sheet H-1, date stamped May, 1939. File no. SA 342/9. - Prado Dam, Outlet Works, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  19. Piezoresistive measurement of Swine H1N1 Hemagglutinin peptide binding with microcantilever arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajwa, N.; Maldonado, C. J.; Thundat, T.; Passian, A.

    2014-03-01

    Effective detection of Swine H1N1 Hemagglutinin peptide is crucial as it could be used as a positive control to screen for highly infectious flu strains such as Swine-Origin Influenza A (H1N1). Piezoresistive microcantilever arrays present a pathway towards highly sensitive and label-free detection of biomolecules by transducing the antigen-antibody binding into change in resistivity via induced surface stress variation. We demonstrate a mechanical transduction of Swine H1N1 Hemagglutinin peptide binding and suggest the employed technique may offer a potential platform for detection of the H1N1 virus, which could be clinically used to diagnose and provide subsequent relief.

  20. Structural basis of preexisting immunity to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rui; Ekiert, Damian C; Krause, Jens C; Hai, Rong; Crowe, James E; Wilson, Ian A

    2010-04-16

    The 2009 H1N1 swine flu is the first influenza pandemic in decades. The crystal structure of the hemagglutinin from the A/California/04/2009 H1N1 virus shows that its antigenic structure, particularly within the Sa antigenic site, is extremely similar to those of human H1N1 viruses circulating early in the 20th century. The cocrystal structure of the 1918 hemagglutinin with 2D1, an antibody from a survivor of the 1918 Spanish flu that neutralizes both 1918 and 2009 H1N1 viruses, reveals an epitope that is conserved in both pandemic viruses. Thus, antigenic similarity between the 2009 and 1918-like viruses provides an explanation for the age-related immunity to the current influenza pandemic.

  1. 2-Thiazolylethylamine, a selective histamine H1 agonist, decreases seizure susceptibility in mice.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, H; Onodera, K; Iinuma, K; Watanabe, T

    1994-03-01

    The effects of intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of histamine and its selective agonists on electrically and pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions in mice were studied. The ICV administration of histamine decreased seizure susceptibility on electrically and pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions significantly and dose-dependently. The inhibitory effects of histamine were well antagonized by centrally acting histamine H1 antagonists such as pyrilamine (or mepyramine) and ketotifen, but not by a peripherally acting histamine H1 antagonist, astemizole, or a centrally acting H2 antagonist, zolantidine. The ICV administration of 2-thiazolylethylamine, a selective histamine H1 agonist, also decreased seizure susceptibility, which could be antagonized by centrally acting histamine H1 antagonists, whereas dimaprit, a selective histamine H2 agonist, did not affect seizure susceptibility. These findings strengthened the idea that the central histaminergic neuron system plays an inhibitory role in convulsions.

  2. Cell Lines Expressing Nuclear and/or Mitochondrial RNAse H1 | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD), Program in Genomics of Differentiation, seeks interested parties to further co-develop small molecule inhibitors of RNase H1, especially in regards to genome instability, transcription, and translation.

  3. Akt inhibitor MK2206 prevents influenza pH1N1 virus infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Denisova, Oxana V; Söderholm, Sandra; Virtanen, Salla; Von Schantz, Carina; Bychkov, Dmitrii; Vashchinkina, Elena; Desloovere, Jens; Tynell, Janne; Ikonen, Niina; Theisen, Linda L; Nyman, Tuula A; Matikainen, Sampsa; Kallioniemi, Olli; Julkunen, Ilkka; Muller, Claude P; Saelens, Xavier; Verkhusha, Vladislav V; Kainov, Denis E

    2014-07-01

    The influenza pH1N1 virus caused a global flu pandemic in 2009 and continues manifestation as a seasonal virus. Better understanding of the virus-host cell interaction could result in development of better prevention and treatment options. Here we show that the Akt inhibitor MK2206 blocks influenza pH1N1 virus infection in vitro. In particular, at noncytotoxic concentrations, MK2206 alters Akt signaling and inhibits endocytic uptake of the virus. Interestingly, MK2206 is unable to inhibit H3N2, H7N9, and H5N1 viruses, indicating that pH1N1 evolved specific requirements for efficient infection. Thus, Akt signaling could be exploited further for development of better therapeutics against pH1N1 virus.

  4. Evaluation of the attenuation, immunogenicity, and efficacy of a live virus vaccine generated by codon-pair bias de-optimization of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Andrew J; Santos, Celia P; Anafu, Amanda; Wimmer, Eckard; Mueller, Steffen; Subbarao, Kanta

    2016-01-20

    Codon-pair bias de-optimization (CPBD) of viruses involves re-writing viral genes using statistically underrepresented codon pairs, without any changes to the amino acid sequence or codon usage. Previously, this technology has been used to attenuate the influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1) virus. The de-optimized virus was immunogenic and protected inbred mice from challenge. In order to assess whether CPBD could be used to produce a live vaccine against a clinically relevant influenza virus, we generated an influenza A/California/07/2009 pandemic H1N1 (2009 pH1N1) virus with de-optimized HA and NA gene segments (2009 pH1N1-(HA+NA)(Min)), and evaluated viral replication and protein expression in MDCK cells, and attenuation, immunogenicity, and efficacy in outbred ferrets. The 2009 pH1N1-(HA+NA)(Min) virus grew to a similar titer as the 2009 pH1N1 wild type (wt) virus in MDCK cells (∼10(6)TCID50/ml), despite reduced HA and NA protein expression on western blot. In ferrets, intranasal inoculation of 2009 pH1N1-(HA+NA)(Min) virus at doses ranging from 10(3) to 10(5) TCID50 led to seroconversion in all animals and protection from challenge with the 2009 pH1N1 wt virus 28 days later. The 2009 pH1N1-(HA+NA)(Min) virus did not cause clinical illness in ferrets, but replicated to a similar titer as the wt virus in the upper and lower respiratory tract, suggesting that de-optimization of additional gene segments may be warranted for improved attenuation. Taken together, our data demonstrate the potential of using CPBD technology for the development of a live influenza virus vaccine if the level of attenuation is optimized.

  5. Finding an h1(1830) state in J/ψ → ηh1 → ηK*0 K ¯*0 BESII data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albaladejo, Miguel; Xie, Ju Jun; Oset, Eulogio

    2016-05-01

    A clear enhancement is seen in the BES data for the reaction J/ψ → ηK*0 K ¯*0 , close to the K* K ¯* channel threshold. If it is produced by an S -wave resonance around threshold, it would correspond to an h1 state with quantum numbers IG (JPC) = 0- (1+-). Using the local hidden gauge approach, a state around 1800 MeV is generated from the interaction of the K* K ¯* . The peak observed in J/ψ → ηK*0 K ¯*0 is naturally explained by this h1 state, for which we determine a mass and width around 1830 MeV and 110 MeV, respectively. We corroborate this result with a second, model independent analysis.

  6. Installation of H-1 Engines to Saturn IB S-IB Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Workers at the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) near New Orleans, Louisiana, install the H-1 engines into the Saturn I, S-IB (first) stage. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center and built by the Chrysler Corporation at MAF, the 90,000-pound booster utilized eight H-1 engines. Each produced 200,000 pounds of thrust, a combined thrust of 1,600,000 pounds.

  7. H1N1-Induced Venous Thromboembolic Events? Results of a Single-Institution Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Dimakakos, Evangelos; Vathiotis, Ioannis; Papaspiliou, Aggeliki; Panagiotarakou, Meropi; Manolis, Emmanouil; Syrigos, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    We describe the clinical and imaging characteristics of 7 cases with polymerase chain reaction-confirmed novel influenza A H1N1 virus (pH1N1) infection who developed venous thromboembolic events (VTEs) while being hospitalized for influenza pneumonia. Pulmonary embolism (PE) without deep vein thrombosis (DVT) was observed in 6 of 7 cases (85.7%); PE with underlying DVT was found in 1 patient (14.3%). PMID:28018924

  8. Oseltamivir-Resistant Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Gonzalez, José Ernesto; Gonzalez-Duran, Elizabeth; Alcantara-Perez, Patricia; Wong-Arambula, Claudia; Olivera-Diaz, Hiram; Cortez-Ortiz, Iliana; Barrera-Badillo, Gisela; Nguyen, Ha; Gubareva, Larisa; Lopez-Martinez, Irma; Díaz-Quiñonez, Jose Alberto; Lezana-Fernández, Miguel Angel; Gatell-Ramírez, Hugo Lopez; Villalobos, Jose Angel Cordova; Hernández-Avila, Mauricio

    2011-01-01

    During May 2009–April 2010, we analyzed 692 samples of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus from patients in Mexico. We detected the H275Y substitution of the neuraminidase gene in a specimen from an infant with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 who was treated with oseltamivir. This virus was susceptible to zanamivir and resistant to adamantanes and oseltamivir. PMID:21291607

  9. Antibody recognition of the pandemic H1N1 Influenza virus hemagglutinin receptor binding site.

    PubMed

    Hong, Minsun; Lee, Peter S; Hoffman, Ryan M B; Zhu, Xueyong; Krause, Jens C; Laursen, Nick S; Yoon, Sung-Il; Song, Langzhou; Tussey, Lynda; Crowe, James E; Ward, Andrew B; Wilson, Ian A

    2013-11-01

    Influenza virus is a global health concern due to its unpredictable pandemic potential. This potential threat was realized in 2009 when an H1N1 virus emerged that resembled the 1918 virus in antigenicity but fortunately was not nearly as deadly. 5J8 is a human antibody that potently neutralizes a broad spectrum of H1N1 viruses, including the 1918 and 2009 pandemic viruses. Here, we present the crystal structure of 5J8 Fab in complex with a bacterially expressed and refolded globular head domain from the hemagglutinin (HA) of the A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) pandemic virus. 5J8 recognizes a conserved epitope in and around the receptor binding site (RBS), and its HCDR3 closely mimics interactions of the sialic acid receptor. Electron microscopy (EM) reconstructions of 5J8 Fab in complex with an HA trimer from a 1986 H1 strain and with an engineered stabilized HA trimer from the 2009 H1 pandemic virus showed a similar mode of binding. As for other characterized RBS-targeted antibodies, 5J8 uses avidity to extend its breadth and affinity against divergent H1 strains. 5J8 selectively interacts with HA insertion residue 133a, which is conserved in pandemic H1 strains and has precluded binding of other RBS-targeted antibodies. Thus, the RBS of divergent HAs is targeted by 5J8 and adds to the growing arsenal of common recognition motifs for design of therapeutics and vaccines. Moreover, consistent with previous studies, the bacterially expressed H1 HA properly refolds, retaining its antigenic structure, and presents a low-cost and rapid alternative for engineering and manufacturing candidate flu vaccines.

  10. Pandemic and post-pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) infection in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is a vast amount of information published regarding the impact of 2009 pandemic Influenza A (pH1N1) virus infection. However, a comparison of risk factors and outcome during the 2010-2011 post-pandemic period has not been described. Methods A prospective, observational, multi-center study was carried out to evaluate the clinical characteristics and demographics of patients with positive RT-PCR for H1N1 admitted to 148 Spanish intensive care units (ICUs). Data were obtained from the 2009 pandemic and compared to the 2010-2011 post-pandemic period. Results Nine hundred and ninety-seven patients with confirmed An/H1N1 infection were included. Six hundred and forty-eight patients affected by 2009 (pH1N1) virus infection and 349 patients affected by the post-pandemic Influenza (H1N1)v infection period were analyzed. Patients during the post-pandemic period were older, had more chronic comorbid conditions and presented with higher severity scores (Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA)) on ICU admission. Patients from the post-pandemic Influenza (H1N1)v infection period received empiric antiviral treatment less frequently and with delayed administration. Mortality was significantly higher in the post-pandemic period. Multivariate analysis confirmed that haematological disease, invasive mechanical ventilation and continuous renal replacement therapy were factors independently associated with worse outcome in the two periods. HIV was the only new variable independently associated with higher ICU mortality during the post-pandemic Influenza (H1N1)v infection period. Conclusion Patients from the post-pandemic Influenza (H1N1)v infection period had an unexpectedly higher mortality rate and showed a trend towards affecting a more vulnerable population, in keeping with more typical seasonal viral infection. PMID:22126648

  11. Experience of influenza A H1N1 in a paediatric emergency unit.

    PubMed

    Biçer, Suat; Ercan Sariçoban, Hülya; Özen, Ahmet Oğuzhan; Saf, Coşkun; Ergenekon Ulutaş, Pinar; Gürol, Yeşim; Yilmaz, Gülden; Vitrinel, Ayça; Özelgün, Berna

    2015-06-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate symptoms, clinical findings, treatment options and complications of H1N1 influenza infection in patients who applied to our emergency unit during the influenza season in 2009. The clinical and laboratory findings of children with influenza A (H1N1) during the influenza season in 2009 were evaluated retrospectively. Influenza A was diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction and/or rapid antigen test. Clinical and laboratory findings of the patients with H1N1 (group I) and without H1N1 (group II) were compared. Fever and myalgia were noted to be higher in group I (p <0.05). The mean body temperature in group I was 39.0?, which was statistically different from group II (p <0.001). Myalgia was observed only in group I (15.4%), but not in group II (p <0.05). There were three patients with diarrhoea, two of whom were in group I, and they had no significant respiratory symptoms. Lymphopenia was seen in 18 patients (81.8%) in group I and in four patients (23.5%) in group II (p <0.05). Oseltamivir treatment was applied to 28 patients, where 24 had severe symptoms, nine had comorbid factors and two did not have any of these. The fever was higher in group I and myalgia was present only in group I. In group I, the lymphocyte count was significantly lower than in group II. The fever was higher in patients of H1N1 (average of 39°C) and myalgia was present only in patients with H1N1. The lymphocyte count was significantly lower in patients with H1N1 than those without H1N1. While none of the patients required intensive care, three patients requiring hospitalization were discharged after referral and completion of their treatment.

  12. Practical Methylation Procedure for (1H)-1,2,4-Triazole (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    Francis Group, LLC. 14. ABSTRACT Conversion of (1H)-1,2,4-triazole to its sodium salt with methanolic sodium methoxide is followed by reaction ...From - To) 04-06-2007 Journal Article 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Practical Methylation Procedure for (1H)-1,2,4-Triazole (Postprint...continuous extraction (chloroform/water) with a final short-path distillation under a controlled vacuum to obtain spectroscopically pure 1- methyl -1,2,4

  13. Oral Squamous Carcinoma Cells Express B7-H1 and B7-DC Receptors in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Groeger, Sabine; Howaldt, H P; Raifer, H; Gattenloehner, S; Chakraborty, T; Meyle, J

    2017-01-01

    B7-H1 and B7-DC ligands are members of the B7 family with important regulatory functions in cell-mediated immune response. Both receptors are ligands of the programmed death receptor PD-1. B7-H1 expression has been detected in the majority of human carcinomas in vivo. B7-H1 mediated signals are able to negatively regulate activated T cell functions and survival, and enable tumor cells to overcome host response. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of B7-H1 and B7-DC proteins in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) in vivo. Tissues from 15 samples were cryo-sected and following histological routine staining (HE), incubated with antibodies against human B7-H1 and B7-DC. Immuno-staining of pan-cytokeratin was performed to ascertain the epithelial origin of the tissue and CK 19 to demonstrate the proliferating stage. Confocal laser scanning microscopy confirmed the presence of both B7-H1 and B7-DC in all 15 OSCC. The B7-H1 and B7-DC staining was located in areas of the tissue that were identified as cancerous lesions in the previously stained HE sections before. Staining with Pan-CK and CK19 provided evidence for the epithelial origin and the proliferating stage of the tissue. The in vivo expression of the B7-H1 and B7-DC receptors in oral squamous cell carcinomas suggest that general mechanisms for immune evasion of tumors are also found in OSCC.

  14. Some characterizations of local bmo and h 1 on metric measure spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dafni, Galia; Yue, Hong

    2012-09-01

    We study, in the setting of a doubling metric measure space, the local bmo space and Hardy space h 1 defined by Goldberg. We state a John-Nirenberg type inequality for the local bmo space and give two proofs, via a good-lambda inequality and via duality. We also prove the boundedness of the Hardy-Littlewood maximal function from bmo to bmo. Finally, we give characterizations of bmo and h 1 using alternative mean-oscillation and moment conditions.

  15. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in pigs, Réunion Island.

    PubMed

    Cardinale, Eric; Pascalis, Hervé; Temmam, Sarah; Hervé, Séverine; Saulnier, Aure; Turpin, Magali; Barbier, Nicolas; Hoarau, Johny; Quéguiner, Stéphane; Gorin, Stéphane; Foray, Coralie; Roger, Matthieu; Porphyre, Vincent; André, Paul; Thomas, Thierry; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Dellagi, Koussay; Simon, Gaëlle

    2012-10-01

    During 2009, pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus affected humans on Réunion Island. Since then, the virus has sustained circulation among local swine herds, raising concerns about the potential for genetic evolution of the virus and possible retransmission back to humans of variants with increased virulence. Continuous surveillance of A(H1N1)pdm09 infection in pigs is recommended.

  16. GEF-H1 controls focal adhesion signaling that regulates mesenchymal stem cell lineage commitment

    PubMed Central

    Huang, I-Husan; Hsiao, Cheng-Te; Wu, Jui-Chung; Liu, Ching-Yi; Wang, Yang-Kao; Chen, Yu-Chen; Huang, Chi-Ming; del álamo, Juan C.; Chang, Zee-Fen; Tang, Ming-Jer; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Kuo, Jean-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Focal adhesions (FAs) undergo maturation that culminates in size and composition changes that modulate adhesion, cytoskeleton remodeling and differentiation. Although it is well recognized that stimuli for osteogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) drive FA maturation, actin organization and stress fiber polarization, the extent to which FA-mediated signals regulated by the FA protein composition specifies MSC commitment remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that, upon dexamethasone (osteogenic induction) treatment, guanine nucleotide exchange factor H1 (GEF-H1, also known as Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 2, encoded by ARHGEF2) is significantly enriched in FAs. Perturbation of GEF-H1 inhibits FA formation, anisotropic stress fiber orientation and MSC osteogenesis in an actomyosin-contractility-independent manner. To determine the role of GEF-H1 in MSC osteogenesis, we explore the GEF-H1-modulated FA proteome that reveals non-muscle myosin-II heavy chain-B (NMIIB, also known as myosin-10, encoded by MYH10) as a target of GEF-H1 in FAs. Inhibition of targeting NMIIB into FAs suppresses FA formation, stress fiber polarization, cell stiffness and osteogenic commitments in MSCs. Our data demonstrate a role for FA signaling in specifying MSC commitment. PMID:25107365

  17. Numerical analysis of an H1-Galerkin mixed finite element method for time fractional telegraph equation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinfeng; Zhao, Meng; Zhang, Min; Liu, Yang; Li, Hong

    2014-01-01

    We discuss and analyze an H(1)-Galerkin mixed finite element (H(1)-GMFE) method to look for the numerical solution of time fractional telegraph equation. We introduce an auxiliary variable to reduce the original equation into lower-order coupled equations and then formulate an H(1)-GMFE scheme with two important variables. We discretize the Caputo time fractional derivatives using the finite difference methods and approximate the spatial direction by applying the H(1)-GMFE method. Based on the discussion on the theoretical error analysis in L(2)-norm for the scalar unknown and its gradient in one dimensional case, we obtain the optimal order of convergence in space-time direction. Further, we also derive the optimal error results for the scalar unknown in H(1)-norm. Moreover, we derive and analyze the stability of H(1)-GMFE scheme and give the results of a priori error estimates in two- or three-dimensional cases. In order to verify our theoretical analysis, we give some results of numerical calculation by using the Matlab procedure.

  18. Mechanisms of triggering H1 helix in prion proteins unfolding revealed by molecular dynamic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Chih-Yuan; Lee, H. C.

    2006-03-01

    In template-assistance model, normal Prion protein (PrP^C), the pathogen to cause several prion diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob (CJD) in human, Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) in cow, and scrapie in sheep, converts to infectious prion (PrP^Sc) through a transient interaction with PrP^Sc. Furthermore, conventional studies showed S1-H1-S2 region in PrP^C to be the template of S1-S2 β-sheet in PrP^Sc, and Prion protein's conformational conversion may involve an unfolding of H1 and refolding into β-sheet. Here we prepare several mouse prion peptides that contain S1-H1-S2 region with specific different structures, which are corresponding to specific interactions, to investigate possible mechanisms to trigger H1 α-helix unfolding process via molecular dynamic simulation. Three properties, conformational transition, salt-bridge in H1, and hydrophobic solvent accessible surface (SAS) are analyzed. From these studies, we found the interaction that triggers H1 unfolding to be the one that causes dihedral angle at residue Asn^143 changes. Whereas interactions that cause S1 segment's conformational changes play a minor in this process. These studies offers an additional evidence for template-assistance model.

  19. College students' perceptions of H1N1 flu risk and attitudes toward vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Meagan A; Marczinski, Cecile A

    2011-10-13

    College students are highly susceptible to the H1N1 virus, yet previous studies suggest that college students perceive themselves at low risk for the flu. We surveyed 514 undergraduates to assess their perceptions of H1N1 flu risk and opinions about flu vaccines. A third of respondents stated that they were not at risk of getting the H1N1 flu because they were young. Responses indicated a distrust of the safety and effectiveness of influenza vaccinations; only 15.8% of participants planned on receiving H1N1 vaccination. Top reasons for refusing the H1N1 vaccine included questioning vaccine safety and effectiveness, and concerns about potential serious and/or benign side effects. Top reasons for H1N1 vaccination acceptance included receiving a doctor recommendation for the vaccine, having previously gotten a seasonal vaccine, and being at high-risk for influenza. Our findings suggest that college students are inaccurate in assessing their risk level and are unlikely to seek vaccinations.

  20. Pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccine: an update.

    PubMed

    Goel, M K; Goel, M; Khanna, P; Mittal, K

    2011-01-01

    The world witnessed a the first influenza pandemic in this century and fourth overall since first flu pandemic was reported during the World War I. The past experiences with influenza viruses and this pandemic of H1N1 place a consider-able strain on health services and resulted in serious illnesses and a large number of deaths. Develop-ing countries were declared more likely to be at risk from the pandemic effects, as they faced the dual problem of highly vulnerable populations and limited resources to respond H1N1. The public health experts agreed that vaccination is the most effective ways to mitigate the negative effects of the pandemic. The vaccines for H1N1 virus have been used in over 40 countries and administered to over 200 million people helped in a great way and on August 10, 2010, World Health Organization (WHO) announced H1N1 to be in postpandemic period. But based on knowledge about past pandemics, the H1N1 (2009) virus is expected to continue to circulate as a seasonal virus and may undergo some agenic-variation. As WHO strongly recommends vaccination, vigilance for regular updating of the composition of influenza vaccines, based on an assessment of the future impact of circulating viruses along with safety surveillance of the vaccines is necessary. This review has been done to take a stock of the currently available H1N1 vaccines and their possible use as public health intervention in the postpandemic period.

  1. Effect of H1- and H2-histamine receptor blockade on postexercise insulin sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Pellinger, Thomas K; Dumke, Breanna R; Halliwill, John R

    2013-01-01

    Following a bout of dynamic exercise, humans experience sustained postexercise vasodilatation in the previously exercised skeletal muscle which is mediated by activation of histamine (H1 and H2) receptors. Skeletal muscle glucose uptake is also enhanced following dynamic exercise. Our aim was to determine if blunting the vasodilatation during recovery from exercise would have an adverse effect on blood glucose regulation. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that insulin sensitivity following exercise would be reduced with H1- and H2-receptor blockade versus control (no blockade). We studied 20 healthy young subjects (12 exercise; eight nonexercise sham) on randomized control and H1- and H2-receptor blockade (fexofenadine and ranitidine) days. Following 60 min of upright cycling at 60% VO2 peak or nonexercise sham, subjects consumed an oral glucose tolerance beverage (1.0 g/kg). Blood glucose was determined from “arterialized” blood samples (heated hand vein). Postexercise whole-body insulin sensitivity (Matsuda insulin sensitivity index) was reduced 25% with H1- and H2-receptor blockade (P < 0.05), whereas insulin sensitivity was not affected by histamine receptor blockade in the sham trials. These results indicate that insulin sensitivity following exercise is blunted by H1- and H2-receptor blockade and suggest that postexercise H1- and H2-receptor–mediated skeletal muscle vasodilatation benefits glucose regulation in healthy humans. PMID:24303118

  2. The Histone Methyltransferase SUV39H1 Suppresses Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma Formation in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, Erin M.; DiBiase, Anthony; Zhou, Yi; Langenau, David M.; Zon, Leonard I.

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetics, or the reversible and heritable marks of gene regulation not including DNA sequence, encompasses chromatin modifications on both the DNA and histones and is as important as the DNA sequence itself. Chromatin-modifying factors are playing an increasingly important role in tumorigenesis, particularly among pediatric rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS), revealing potential novel therapeutic targets. We performed an overexpression screen of chromatin-modifying factors in a KRASG12D-driven zebrafish model for RMS. Here, we describe the identification of a histone H3 lysine 9 histone methyltransferase, SUV39H1, as a suppressor of embryonal RMS formation in zebrafish. This suppression is specific to the histone methyltransferase activity of SUV39H1, as point mutations in the SET domain lacked the effect. SUV39H1-overexpressing and control tumors have a similar proliferation rate, muscle differentiation state, and tumor growth rate. Strikingly, SUV39H1-overexpressing fish initiate fewer tumors, which results in the observed suppressive phenotype. We demonstrate that the delayed tumor onset occurs between 5 and 7 days post fertilization. Gene expression profiling at these stages revealed that in the context of KRASG12D overexpression, SUV39H1 may suppress cell cycle progression. Our studies provide evidence for the role of SUV39H1 as a tumor suppressor. PMID:23705022

  3. Numerical Analysis of an H1-Galerkin Mixed Finite Element Method for Time Fractional Telegraph Equation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinfeng; Zhao, Meng; Zhang, Min; Liu, Yang; Li, Hong

    2014-01-01

    We discuss and analyze an H1-Galerkin mixed finite element (H1-GMFE) method to look for the numerical solution of time fractional telegraph equation. We introduce an auxiliary variable to reduce the original equation into lower-order coupled equations and then formulate an H1-GMFE scheme with two important variables. We discretize the Caputo time fractional derivatives using the finite difference methods and approximate the spatial direction by applying the H1-GMFE method. Based on the discussion on the theoretical error analysis in L2-norm for the scalar unknown and its gradient in one dimensional case, we obtain the optimal order of convergence in space-time direction. Further, we also derive the optimal error results for the scalar unknown in H1-norm. Moreover, we derive and analyze the stability of H1-GMFE scheme and give the results of a priori error estimates in two- or three-dimensional cases. In order to verify our theoretical analysis, we give some results of numerical calculation by using the Matlab procedure. PMID:25184148

  4. Paper-based enzyme-free immunoassay for rapid detection and subtyping of influenza A H1N1 and H3N2 viruses.

    PubMed

    Lei, Kin Fong; Huang, Chia-Hao; Kuo, Rei-Lin; Chang, Cheng-Kai; Chen, Kuan-Fu; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Tsang, Ngan-Ming

    2015-07-09

    Development of rapid screening in the ambulatory environment is the most pressing needs for the control of spread of infectious disease. Despite there are many methods to detect the immunoassay results, quantitative measurement in rapid disease screening is still a great challenge for point-of-care applications. In this work, based on the internal structural protein, i.e., nucleoprotein (NP), and outer surface glycoproteins, i.e., H1 and H3, of the influenza viruses, specific and sensitive immunoassay on paper-based platform was evaluated and confirmed. Detection and subtyping of influenza A H1N1 and H3N2 viruses found in people were demonstrated by colorimetric paper-based sandwich immunoassay. Concentration-dependent response to influenza viruses was shown and the detection limits could achieve 2.7×10(3) pfu/assay for H1 detection and 2.7×10(4) pfu/assay for H3 detection, which are within the clinical relevant level. Moreover, detection of influenza virus from infected cell lysate and clinical samples was demonstrated to further confirm the reliability of the paper-based immunoassay. The use of paper for the development of diagnostic devices has the advantages of lightweight, ease-of-use, and low cost and paper-based immunoassay is appropriate to apply for rapid screening in point-of-care applications.

  5. Double interpenetration in a chiral three-dimensional magnet with a (10,3)-a structure.

    PubMed

    Grancha, Thais; Mon, Marta; Lloret, Francesc; Ferrando-Soria, Jesús; Journaux, Yves; Pasán, Jorge; Pardo, Emilio

    2015-09-21

    A unique chiral three-dimensional magnet with an overall racemic double-interpenetrated (10,3)-a structure of the formula [(S)-(1-PhEt)Me3N]4[Mn4Cu6(Et2pma)12](DMSO)3]·3DMSO·5H2O (1; Et2pma = N-2,6-diethylphenyloxamate) has been synthesized by the self-assembly of a mononuclear copper(II) complex acting as a metalloligand toward Mn(II) ions in the presence of a chiral cationic auxiliary, constituting the first oxamato-based chiral coordination polymer exhibiting long-range magnetic ordering.

  6. Presence and release of bovine sperm histone H1 during chromatin decondensation by heparin-glutathione.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vázquez, María Luisa; Flores-Alonso, Juan Carlos; Merchant-Larios, Horacio; Reyes, Rosalina

    2008-01-01

    During spermatogenesis, changes in sperm nuclear morphology are associated with the replacement of core somatic histones by protamines. Although protamines are the major nucleoproteins of mature sperm, not all species totally replace the histones. Histone H1, along with protamines, mediates chromatin condensation into an insoluble complex that is transcriptionally inactive. In vitro, heparin-reduced glutathione causes sperm decondensation, and the structures formed are morphologically similar to the in vivo male pronucleus. To study the participation of histone H1 in bovine sperm chromatin remodelling, we measured the presence and release of histone H1 by immunofluorescence, acetic acid-urea-triton-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and immunoblotting. Nuclear decondensation was induced by 80 microM heparin and 15.0 mM reduced glutathione (GSH) for 7, 14, and 21 h at 37 degrees C. Additionally, nucleons, composed of nuclei isolated from the sperm, were decondensed with 20.0 microM heparin and 5.0 mM GSH for 4.0 h at 37 degrees C. Controls were incubated in buffer for similar periods of time. Immunofluorescent localization of histone H1 was carried out with mouse monoclonal antibody, and DNA localization was visualized by 0.001% quinacrine staining. Chromatin decondensation was accompanied by increased sperm nuclei and nucleon surface area. We observed that histone H1 was localized exclusively in the nuclei of intact sperm and nucleons. Histone H1 immunofluorescent intensity did not change in control samples but decreased over time in samples treated with heparin-GSH. There was a negative correlation between the surface area of sperm nuclei and immunohistochemical intensity of histone H1 (P < 0.05). Nucleon decondensation showed a similar relationship. By electrophoresis and immunoblotting, we verified the loss of histone H1 from the sperm and nucleons and its release into the incubation media. Based on these results, we propose that histone H1 is present in the

  7. Crystal structure of the collagen triple helix model [(Pro-Pro-Gly)(10)](3).

    PubMed

    Berisio, Rita; Vitagliano, Luigi; Mazzarella, Lelio; Zagari, Adriana

    2002-02-01

    The first report of the full-length structure of the collagen-like polypeptide [(Pro-Pro-Gly)(10)](3) is given. This structure was obtained from crystals grown in a microgravity environment, which diffracted up to 1.3 A, using synchrotron radiation. The final model, which was refined to an R(factor) of 0.18, is the highest-resolution description of a collagen triple helix reported to date. This structure provides clues regarding a series of aspects related to collagen triple helix structure and assembly. The strict dependence of proline puckering on the position inside the Pro-Pro-Gly triplets and the correlation between backbone and side chain dihedral angles support the propensity-based mechanism of triple helix stabilization/destabilization induced by hydroxyproline. Furthermore, the analysis of [(Pro-Pro-Gly)(10)](3) packing, which is governed by electrostatic interactions, suggests that charges may act as locking features in the axial organization of triple helices in the collagen fibrils.

  8. Analysis of the activation mechanism of the guinea-pig Histamine H1-receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straßer, Andrea; Wittmann, Hans-Joachim

    2007-09-01

    The Histamine H1-receptor (H1R), belonging to the amine receptor-class of family A of the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) gets activated by agonists. The consequence is a conformational change of the receptor, which may involve the binding-pocket. So, for a good prediction of the binding-mode of an agonist, it is necessary to have knowledge about these conformational changes. Meanwhile some experimental data about the structural changes of GPCRs during activation exist. Based on homology modeling of the guinea-pig H1R (gpH1R), using the crystal structure of bovine rhodopsin as template, we performed several MD simulations with distance restraints in order to get an inactive and an active structure of the gpH1R. The calculations led to a Phe6.44/Trp6.48/Phe6.52-switch and linearization of the proline kinked transmembrane helix VI during receptor activation. Our calculations showed that the Trp6.48/Phe6.52-switch induces a conformational change in Phe6.44, which slides between transmembrane helices III and VI. Additionally we observed a hydrogen bond interaction of Ser3.39 with Asn7.45 in the inactive gpH1R, but because of a counterclockwise rotation of transmembrane helix III Ser3.39 establishes a water-mediated hydrogen bond to Asp2.50 in the active gpH1R. Additionally we simulated a possible mechanism for receptor activation with a modified LigPath-algorithm.

  9. Phase 1 Study of Pandemic H1 DNA Vaccine in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Crank, Michelle C.; Gordon, Ingelise J.; Yamshchikov, Galina V.; Sitar, Sandra; Hu, Zonghui; Enama, Mary E.; Holman, LaSonji A.; Bailer, Robert T.; Pearce, Melissa B.; Koup, Richard A.; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Schwartz, Richard M.; Graham, Barney S.; Ledgerwood, Julie E.

    2015-01-01

    Background A novel, swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus was detected worldwide in April 2009, and the World Health Organization (WHO) declared a global pandemic that June. DNA vaccine priming improves responses to inactivated influenza vaccines. We describe the rapid production and clinical evaluation of a DNA vaccine encoding the hemagglutinin protein of the 2009 pandemic A/California/04/2009(H1N1) influenza virus, accomplished nearly two months faster than production of A/California/07/2009(H1N1) licensed monovalent inactivated vaccine (MIV). Methods 20 subjects received three H1 DNA vaccinations (4 mg intramuscularly with Biojector) at 4-week intervals. Eighteen subjects received an optional boost when the licensed H1N1 MIV became available. The interval between the third H1 DNA injection and MIV boost was 3–17 weeks. Vaccine safety was assessed by clinical observation, laboratory parameters, and 7-day solicited reactogenicity. Antibody responses were assessed by ELISA, HAI and neutralization assays, and T cell responses by ELISpot and flow cytometry. Results Vaccinations were safe and well-tolerated. As evaluated by HAI, 6/20 developed positive responses at 4 weeks after third DNA injection and 13/18 at 4 weeks after MIV boost. Similar results were detected in neutralization assays. T cell responses were detected after DNA and MIV. The antibody responses were significantly amplified by the MIV boost, however, the boost did not increased T cell responses induced by DNA vaccine. Conclusions H1 DNA vaccine was produced quickly, was well-tolerated, and had modest immunogenicity as a single agent. Other HA DNA prime-MIV boost regimens utilizing one DNA prime vaccination and longer boost intervals have shown significant immunogenicity. Rapid and large-scale production of HA DNA vaccines has the potential to contribute to an efficient response against future influenza pandemics. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00973895 PMID:25884189

  10. Seroprevalence following the first wave of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in Turkey, 2009.

    PubMed

    Gözalan, Ayşegül; Altaş, Ayşe Başak; Sevencan, Funda; Akın, Levent; Korukluoğlu, Gülay; Kara, Sükran; Sevindi, Demet Furkan; Ertek, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we sought to describe the community seropositivity of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in order to estimate immunity shortly after the peak of the first pandemic wave in two provinces in Turkey. This cross-sectional study was conducted in the provinces of Diyarbakir and Ankara, after the first wave of H1N1 incidences in 2009. It was designed to evaluate 276 houses in Diyarbakir and 455 houses in Ankara. Everyone living in these houses was included in the study. An antibody titer of ≥1:40 was considered as a positive result for all age groups. Antibody titers of ≤1:20 were considered as 1 while calculating the log titer and geometric mean. The pandemic H1N1 seropositivity was found to be 24.1% for Ankara and 27.7% for Diyarbakir. In Ankara, seropositivity was statistically associated with the 15-24 age group (odds ratio [OR] = 11.47), pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccination (OR = 20.95), and influenza-like illness history (OR = 1.60). In Diyarbakir, H1N1 seropositivity was associated with the 15-24 age group (OR = 8.99) and pandemic influenza A (H1N1) vaccination (OR = 9.94). Because individuals less than 25 years old played an important role in the community transmission of infection and were largely protected against the pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus, these individuals should be given a high priority for pandemic influenza vaccination in the event of the emergence of another novel pandemic strain.

  11. Clinical Presentation of Novel Influenza A (H1N1) in Hospitalized Children

    PubMed Central

    Soleimani, Gholamreza; Akbarpour, Marzieh

    2011-01-01

    Objective Human pandemic influenza H1N1 virus as the cause of febrile respiratory infection ranging from self-limited to severe illness has spread globally during 2009. Signs and symptoms of upper and lower respiratory tract involvement, fever, sore throat, rhinitis, myalgia, malaise, headache, chills and fatigue are common. In this article we report the clinical presentation of Influenza A (H1N1) in our hospitalized children. Methods Between September and October 2009, all children requiring hospitalization for suspected H1N1 infection were transferred to Pediatric Infectious Diseases ward. For all patients the throat swab was taken for PCR testing to confirm or exclude the diagnosis of H1N1 Influenza A. Case patients consisted of H1N1-positive patients. Age, sex, symptoms, signs, laboratory data, CXR changes, details of therapy, duration of admission and patient outcome were documented. Findings Twenty patients were H1N1 positive. Mean age of the patients was 65.50±9.8 months. Fever and coughs were with 55% the most commonly reported symptoms. Other presentations included vomiting (55%), abdominal pain (25%), cyanosis and dyspnea (5%), body ache (40%), rhinorrhea (80%), sore throat (35%), head stiffness (5%) and loss of conciousness (5%). The median temperature of the patients was 38.5°C. Chest X-Ray changes were noted in 13 out of 20 patients (65%). Mean leukocyte and platelet was 6475 and 169000 respectively. Seventeen (85%) patients were treated with Oseltamivir, 3 patients received adjuvant antibiotics. The mean duration of admission was 3 days. Three patients required intensive care support and all of them expired due to superinfection. Conclusion Our data confirm that the presentation of influenza in children is variable and 2009 H1N1 influenza may cause leucopenia and thrombocytopenia. PMID:23056790

  12. Effects of electron irradiation and temperature on 1 ohm-cm and 10 ohm-cm silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicoletta, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    One OHM-cm and 10 OHM-cm silicon solar cells were exposed to 1.0 MeV electrons at a fixed flux of 10 to the 11th power e/sq cm/sec and fluences of 10 to the 13th power, 10 to the 14th power and 10 to the 15th power e/sq.cm. 1-V curves of the cells were made at room temperature, - 63 C and + or - 143 C after each irradiation. A value of 139.5 mw/sq cm was used as AMO incident energy rate per unit area. The 10 OHM-cm cells appear more efficient than 1 OHM-cm cells after exposure to a fluence greater than 10 to the 14th power e/sq cm. The 1.0 MeV electron damage coefficients for both 1 OHM-cm and 10 OHM-cm cells are somewhat less than those for previously irradiated cells at room temperature. The values of the damage coefficients increase as the cell temperatures decrease. Efficiencies pertaining to maximum power output are about the same as those of n on p silicon cells evaluated previously.

  13. Swine Influenza Virus (H1N2) Characterization and Transmission in Ferrets, Chile

    PubMed Central

    Bravo-Vasquez, Nicolás; Karlsson, Erik A.; Jimenez-Bluhm, Pedro; Meliopoulos, Victoria; Kaplan, Bryan; Marvin, Shauna; Cortez, Valerie; Freiden, Pamela; Beck, Melinda A.

    2017-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of the influenza hemagglutinin gene (HA) has suggested that commercial pigs in Chile harbor unique human seasonal H1-like influenza viruses, but further information, including characterization of these viruses, was unavailable. We isolated influenza virus (H1N2) from a swine in a backyard production farm in Central Chile and demonstrated that the HA gene was identical to that in a previous report. Its HA and neuraminidase genes were most similar to human H1 and N2 viruses from the early 1990s and internal segments were similar to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. The virus replicated efficiently in vitro and in vivo and transmitted in ferrets by respiratory droplet. Antigenically, it was distinct from other swine viruses. Hemagglutination inhibition analysis suggested that antibody titers to the swine Chilean H1N2 virus were decreased in persons born after 1990. Further studies are needed to characterize the potential risk to humans, as well as the ecology of influenza in swine in South America. PMID:28098524

  14. Nucleosome linker proteins HMGB1 and histone H1 differentially enhance DNA ligation reactions.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Shiho; Katayama, Eisaku; Yoshioka, Ken-ichi; Nagaki, Sumiko; Yoshida, Michiteru; Teraoka, Hirobumi

    2002-03-22

    We previously reported that HMGB1, which originally binds to chromatin in a manner competitive with linker histone H1 to modulate chromatin structure, enhances both intra-molecular and inter-molecular ligations. In this paper, we found that histone H1 differentially enhances ligation reaction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). Histone H1 stimulated exclusively inter-molecular ligation reaction of DSB with DNA ligase IIIbeta and IV, whereas HMGB1 enhanced mainly intra-molecular ligation reaction. Electron microscopy of direct DNA-protein interaction without chemical cross-linking visualized that HMGB1 bends and loops linear DNA to form compact DNA structure and that histone H1 is capable of assembling DNA in tandem arrangement with occasional branches. These results suggest that differences in the enhancement of DNA ligation reaction are due to those in alteration of DNA configuration induced by these two linker proteins. HMGB1 and histone H1 may function in non-homologous end-joining of DSB repair and V(D)J recombination in different manners.

  15. Framing of Influenza A (H1N1) pandemic in a Singaporean newspaper.

    PubMed

    Basnyat, Iccha; Lee, Seow Ting

    2015-12-01

    This study seeks to understand how public health messages provided by the government in Singapore during an Influenza A (H1N1) pandemic were framed by the news media for the public. News articles were analyzed to explore how the global pandemic was framed as a local event, providing a unique exploration of the dynamic involving public health communication, news media and the state. Thematic analysis (n = 309) included the government-issued press releases disseminating public health information about H1N1 that were directly linked to news stories (n = 56) and news stories about H1N1 generated by the newspaper (n = 253). Four themes were found: (i) imported disease, (ii) war/battle metaphors, (iii) social responsibility and (iv) lockdown policies. Frame analysis revealed that the news coverage during the H1N1 pandemic reflected how the newspaper framed and mediated the information flow, amplified a positive tone for the government response, emphasized individual responsibility and utilized gain frames to construct local messages about the global H1N1 pandemic that reified Singapore as a nation-state.

  16. Illinois department of public health H1N1/A pandemic communications evaluation survey.

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, D.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2010-09-16

    Because of heightened media coverage, a 24-hour news cycle and the potential miscommunication of health messages across all levels of government during the onset of the H1N1 influenza outbreak in spring 2009, the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) decided to evaluate its H1N1 influenza A communications system. IDPH wanted to confirm its disease information and instructions were helping stakeholders prepare for and respond to a novel influenza outbreak. In addition, the time commitment involved in preparing, issuing, monitoring, updating, and responding to H1N1 federal guidelines/updates and media stories became a heavy burden for IDPH staff. The process and results of the H1N1 messaging survey represent a best practice that other health departments and emergency management agencies can replicate to improve coordination efforts with stakeholder groups during both emergency preparedness and response phases. Importantly, the H1N1 survey confirmed IDPH's messages were influencing stakeholders decisions to activate their pandemic plans and initiate response operations. While there was some dissatisfaction with IDPH's delivery of information and communication tools, such as the fax system, this report should demonstrate to IDPH that its core partners believe it has the ability and expertise to issue timely and accurate instructions that can help them respond to a large-scale disease outbreak in Illinois. The conclusion will focus on three main areas: (1) the survey development process, (2) survey results: best practices and areas for improvement and (3) recommendations: next steps.

  17. Initial incursion of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza A virus into European pigs.

    PubMed

    Welsh, M D; Baird, P M; Guelbenzu-Gonzalo, M P; Hanna, A; Reid, S M; Essen, S; Russell, C; Thomas, S; Barrass, L; McNeilly, F; McKillen, J; Todd, D; Harkin, V; McDowell, S; Choudhury, B; Irvine, R M; Borobia, J; Grant, J; Brown, I H

    2010-05-22

    The initial incursion of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza A virus (pH1N1) into a European pig population is reported. Diagnosis of swine influenza caused by pandemic virus was made during September 2009 following routine submission of samples for differential diagnosis of causative agents of respiratory disease, including influenza A virus. All four pigs (aged six weeks) submitted for investigation from a pig herd of approximately 5000 animals in Northern Ireland, experiencing acute-onset respiratory signs in finishing and growing pigs, were positive by immunofluorescence for influenza A. Follow-up analysis of lung tissue homogenates by real-time RT-PCR confirmed the presence of pH1N1. The virus was subsequently detected on two other premises in Northern Ireland; on one premises, detection followed the pre-export health certification testing of samples from pigs presumed to be subclinically infected as no clinical signs were apparent. None of the premises was linked to another epidemiologically. Sequencing of the haemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes revealed high nucleotide identity (>99.4 per cent) with other pH1N1s isolated from human beings. Genotypic analyses revealed all gene segments to be most closely related to those of contemporary pH1N1 viruses in human beings. It is concluded that all three outbreaks occurred independently, potentially as a result of transmission of the virus from human beings to pigs.

  18. Emergence and characterisation of pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses in Hungarian swine herds.

    PubMed

    Bálint, Adám; Kiss, István; Bányai, Krisztián; Biksi, Imre; Szentpáli-Gavallér, Katalin; Magyar, Tibor; Jankovics, István; Rózsa, Mónika; Szalai, Bálint; Takács, Mária; Tóth, Adám György; Dán, Adám

    2013-03-01

    In 2010, two novel porcine H1N1 influenza viruses were isolated from pigs with influenza-like illness in Hungarian swine herds. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of these strains revealed that they shared molecular features with the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus strains, which emerged globally during 2009. The PB2, HA and NA genes contained unique amino acid changes compared to the available new H1N1 influenza virus sequences of pig origin. Furthermore, the investigated strains could be separated with respect to parallel amino acid substitutions affecting the polymerase genes (PB2, PB1 and PA) and the nucleoprotein (NP) gene, supporting the proposed complementarities between these proteins, all required for the viral fitness. Molecular characterisation of two Hungarian human pandemic H1N1 isolates was also performed, so that we could compare contemporaneous strains of different host species origins. Shared molecular motifs in various genes of animal and human influenza strains suggested that the Hungarian porcine strains could have originated from humans through direct interspecies transmission. This study is among the few that support the natural human-to-pig transmission of the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus.

  19. Tracking the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus in the Italian region Campania.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Ciro; Di Spirito, Antimo; Cuomo, Nunzia; Di Nicuolo, Giuseppe; Flaminio, Giovanni; Altamura, Fabiana; Ambrosino, Daniele; Cantalupo, Federich; Costa, Caterina; Pentimalli, Francesca; Tarro, Giulio

    2012-07-01

    A novel swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus affecting humans was detected in April 2009 in Mexico, Canada, and USA. The S-OIV infection caused a mild to severe febrile respiratory disease throughout the world. Here, we briefly review the main features of influenza A viruses, which caused also other pandemics in the past, and focus in particular on the epidemiology data of the H1N1 influenza in the Italian region Campania, which resulted the most affected by the S-OIV and the one with more lethal cases. In Campania, the peak of influenza preceded of about 2 weeks the incidence peak at the national level. Moreover, the percentage of H1N1-positive patients was much higher in the main town Naples, compared to the other Campania provinces. The age group from 7 months to 17 years was the most affected by the H1N1 infection (43.45%), similarly to what reported at the national level. Here, we discuss the possible reasons of the high H1N1 incidence in Campania and the implications that these findings could have on the future prevention campaigns.

  20. Repression activity of Tailless on h 1 and eve 1 pair-rule stripes.

    PubMed

    Andrioli, Luiz Paulo; Dos Santos, Wesley Silva; Aguiar, Francisco Dos Santos; Digiampietri, Luciano Antonio

    2016-10-20

    We investigated the hypothesis that several transcriptional repressors are necessary to set the boundaries of anterior pair-rule stripes in Drosophila. Specifically, we tested whether Tailless (Tll) is part of a repression mechanism that correctly sets the anterior boundaries of hairy 1 (h 1) and even-skipped 1 (eve 1) stripes. Single mutant tll embryos displayed subtle deviations from the normal positions of h 1 and eve 1 stripes. Moreover, we observed stronger stripe deviations in embryos lacking both Tll and Sloppy-paired 1 (Slp 1), a common repressor for anterior pair-rule stripes. Using h 1 and eve 1 reporter constructs in the genetic assays, we provided further evidence that interference with normal mechanisms of stripe expression is mediated by Tll repression. Indeed, Tll represses both h 1 and eve 1 reporter stripes when misexpressed. Investigating the expression of other anterior gap genes in different genetic backgrounds and in the misexpression assays strengthened Tll direct repression in the regulation of h 1 and eve 1. Our results are consistent with tll being a newly-identified component of a combinatorial network of repressor genes that control pair-rule stripe formation in the anterior blastoderm of Drosophila.

  1. Outcome of pandemic H1N1 infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Ljungman, Per; de la Camara, Rafael; Perez-Bercoff, Lena; Abecasis, Manuel; Nieto Campuzano, Jose Bartolo; Cannata-Ortiz, M. Jimena; Cordonnier, Catherine; Einsele, Hermann; Gonzalez-Vicent, Marta; Espigado, Ildefonso; Halter, Jörg; Martino, Rodrigo; Mohty, Bilal; Sucak, Gülsan; Ullmann, Andrew J; Vázquez, Lourdes; Ward, Katherine N.; Engelhard, Dan

    2011-01-01

    During 2009, a new strain of A/H1N1 influenza appeared and became pandemic. A prospective study was performed to collect data regarding risk factors and outcome of A/H1N1 in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. Only verified pandemic A/H1N1 influenza strains were included: 286 patients were reported, 222 allogeneic and 64 autologous recipients. The median age was 38.3 years and the median time from transplant was 19.4 months. Oseltamivir was administered to 267 patients and 15 patients received zanamivir. One hundred and twenty-five patients (43.7%) were hospitalized. Ninety-three patients (32.5%) developed lower respiratory tract disease. In multivariate analysis, risk factors were age (OR 1.025; 1.01–1.04; P=0.002) and lymphopenia (OR 2.49; 1.33–4.67; P<0.001). Thirty-three patients (11.5%) required mechanical ventilation. Eighteen patients (6.3%) died from A/H1N1 infection or its complications. Neutropenia (P=0.03) and patient age (P=0.04) were significant risk factors for death. The 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic caused severe complications in stem cell transplant recipients. PMID:21546495

  2. B7-H1 is a ubiquitous antiapoptotic receptor on cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Takeshi; Yao, Sheng; Zhu, Gefeng; Flies, Andrew S.; Flies, Sarah J.

    2008-01-01

    B7-H1 is an immunoglobulin-like immune suppressive molecule broadly detectable on the majority of human and rodent cancers, and its functions have been attributed to delivering an inhibitory signal to its counter-receptor programmed death-1 (PD-1) on T cells. Here we report that B7-H1 on cancer cells receives a signal from PD-1 to rapidly induce resistance against T cell–mediated killing because crippling signaling capacity of B7-H1 but not PD-1 ablates this resistance. Importantly, loss of B7-H1 signaling is accompanied by increased susceptibility to immune-mediated tumoricidal activity. In addition to resistance against T-cell destruction, B7-H1+ cancer cells also become refractory to apoptosis induced by Fas ligation or the protein kinase inhibitor Staurosporine. Our study reveals a new mechanism by which cancer cells use a receptor on immune cells as a ligand to induce resistance to therapy. PMID:18223165

  3. Increased histone H1 phosphorylation and relaxed chromatin structure in Rb-deficient fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Herrera, R E; Chen, F; Weinberg, R A

    1996-10-15

    Fibroblasts derived from embryos homozygous for a disruption of the retinoblastoma gene (Rb) exhibit a shorter G1 than their wild-type counterparts, apparently due to highly elevated levels of cyclin E protein and deregulated cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) activity. Here we demonstrate that the Rb-/- fibroblasts display higher levels of phosphorylated H1 throughout G1 with the maximum being 10-fold higher than that of the Rb+/+ fibroblasts. This profile of intracellular H1 phosphorylation corresponds with deregulated CDK2 activity observed in in vitro assays, suggesting that CDK2 may be directly responsible for the in vivo phosphorylation of H1. H1 phosphorylation has been proposed to lead to a relaxation of chromatin structure due to a decreased affinity of this protein for chromatin after phosphorylation. In accord with this, chromatin from the Rb-/- cells is more susceptible to micrococcal nuclease digestion than that from Rb+/+ fibroblasts. Increased H1 phosphorylation and relaxed chromatin structure have also been observed in cells expressing several oncogenes, suggesting a common mechanism in oncogene and tumor suppressor gene function.

  4. Prophylaxis and therapy of pandemic H1N1 virus infection using egg yolk antibody.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuan-e; Wen, Junlin; Zhao, Suqing; Zhang, Kun; Zhou, Yingliang

    2014-09-01

    Influenza A virus infects the human respiratory system and causes acute and fatal pulmonary diseases. The emergence of drug-resistant viral strains highlights the need for alternative therapeutic approaches. In this work, IgY antibody was raised in immunized laying hens, and its antiviral activity was evaluated in the context of passive immunization. With inactivated whole H1N1 virus, high-titer IgY antibody 9.18 mg/mL egg yolk was induced by the eighth week after immunization. Western blotting and the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test demonstrated that the IgY antibody could specifically bind the neuraminidase and hemagglutinin of the H1N1 virus. In the plaque reduction assay, the IgY antibody reduced the H1N1 viral infection in MDCK (Madin-Darby canine kidney) cells. In a mouse model, the anti-H1N1 IgY antibody exhibited in vivo protection by reducing the infectious titer of the virus in the lung while maintaining the weight and normal structure of the lung tissue. Additionally, the anti-H1N1 IgY antibody exhibited protective activity comparable to the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir. These results demonstrated that IgY can be easily produced and can offers an effective alternative approach for influenza control.

  5. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 during air travel.

    PubMed

    Neatherlin, John; Cramer, Elaine H; Dubray, Christine; Marienau, Karen J; Russell, Michelle; Sun, Hong; Whaley, Melissa; Hancock, Kathy; Duong, Krista K; Kirking, Hannah L; Schembri, Christopher; Katz, Jacqueline M; Cohen, Nicole J; Fishbein, Daniel B

    2013-01-01

    The global spread of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus (pH1N1) associated with travelers from North America during the onset of the 2009 pandemic demonstrates the central role of international air travel in virus migration. To characterize risk factors for pH1N1 transmission during air travel, we investigated travelers and airline employees from four North American flights carrying ill travelers with confirmed pH1N1 infection. Of 392 passengers and crew identified, information was available for 290 (74%) passengers were interviewed. Overall attack rates for acute respiratory infection and influenza-like illness 1-7 days after travel were 5.2% and 2.4% respectively. Of 43 individuals that provided sera, 4 (9.3%) tested positive for pH1N1 antibodies, including 3 with serologic evidence of asymptomatic infection. Investigation of novel influenza aboard aircraft may be instructive. However, beyond the initial outbreak phase, it may compete with community-based mitigation activities, and interpretation of findings will be difficult in the context of established community transmission.

  6. How to Use the H1 Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Coil for Conditions Other than Depression

    PubMed Central

    Tendler, Aron; Roth, Yiftach; Barnea-Ygael, Noam; Zangen, Abraham

    2017-01-01

    Deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (dTMS) is a relatively new technique that uses different coils for the treatment of different neuropathologies. The coils are made of soft copper windings in multiple planes that lie adjacent to the skull. They are located within a special helmet so that their magnetic fields combine and improve depth penetration. The H1 dTMS coil is designed to stimulate bilateral prefrontal cortices with greater effective stimulation over the left than the right. By positioning the left side of the coil close to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), the H1 coil was used in a multisite study, leading to FDA approval for treatment-resistant depression. In this same position, the H1 coil was also explored as a possible treatment for negative symptoms of schizophrenia, bipolar depression, and migraine. When moved to different positions over the subject's skull, the H1 coil was also explored as a possible treatment for other conditions. Such manipulation of the H1 coil was demonstrated for PTSD and alcohol dependence by positioning it over the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), for anxiety by positioning it over the right prefrontal cortex (rPFC), for auditory hallucinations and tinnitus by positioning it over the temporoparietal junction (TPJ), and for Parkinson's and fatigue from multiple sclerosis (MS) by positioning it over the motor cortex (MC) and PFC. Corresponding electrical field diagrams measured with an oscilloscope through a saline-filled head are included. PMID:28190035

  7. Attitudes toward and Uptake of H1N1 Vaccine among Health Care Workers during the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Henriksen Hellyer, Joan M.; DeVries, Aaron S.; Jenkins, Sarah M.; Lackore, Kandace A.; James, Katherine M.; Ziegenfuss, Jeanette Y.; Poland, Gregory A.; Tilburt, Jon C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Though recommended by many and mandated by some, influenza vaccination rates among health care workers, even in pandemics, remain below optimal levels. The objective of this study was to assess vaccination uptake, attitudes, and distinguishing characteristics (including doctor-nurse differences) of health care workers who did and did not receive the pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine in late 2009. Methodology/Principal Findings In early 2010 we mailed a self-administered survey to 800 physicians and 800 nurses currently licensed and practicing in Minnesota. 1,073 individuals responded (cooperation rate: 69%). 85% and 62% of Minnesota physicians and nurses, respectively, reported being vaccinated. Accurately estimating the risk of vaccine side effects (OR 2.0; 95% CI 1.5–2.7), agreeing with a professional obligation to be vaccinated (OR 10.1; 95% CI 7.1–14.2), an ethical obligation to follow public health authorities' recommendations (OR 9.9; 95% CI 6.6–14.9), and laws mandating pandemic vaccination (OR 3.1; 95% CI 2.3–4.1) were all independently associated with receiving the H1N1 influenza vaccine. Conclusions/Significance While a majority of health care workers in one midwestern state reported receiving the pandemic H1N1 vaccine, physicians and nurses differed significantly in vaccination uptake. Several key attitudes and perceptions may influence health care workers' decisions regarding vaccination. These data inform how states might optimally enlist health care workers' support in achieving vaccination goals during a pandemic. PMID:22216290

  8. Design and Performance of 40 cm Ion Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    2001-01-01

    A 40 cm ion thruster is being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to obtain input power and propellant throughput capabilities of 10 kW and 550 kg. respectively. The technical approach here is a continuation of the "derating" technique used for the NSTAR ion thruster. The 40 cm ion thruster presently utilizes the NSTAR ion optics aperture geometry to take advantage of the large database of lifetime and performance data already available. Dome-shaped grids were chosen for the design of the 40 cm ion optics because this design is naturally suited for large-area ion optics. Ion extraction capabilities and electron backstreaming limits for the 40 cm ion optics were estimated by utilizing NSTAR 30 cm ion optics data. A preliminary service life assessment showed that the propellant throughput goal of 550 kg of xenon may be possible with molybdenum 40 cm ion optics. One 40 cm ion optics' set has been successfully fabricated to date. Additional ion optics' sets are presently being fabricated. Preliminary performance tests were conducted on a laboratory model 40 cm ion thruster.

  9. Whole genome characterization of human influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses isolated from Kenya during the 2009 pandemic.

    PubMed

    Gachara, George; Symekher, Samuel; Otieno, Michael; Magana, Japheth; Opot, Benjamin; Bulimo, Wallace

    2016-06-01

    An influenza pandemic caused by a novel influenza virus A(H1N1)pdm09 spread worldwide in 2009 and is estimated to have caused between 151,700 and 575,400 deaths globally. While whole genome data on new virus enables a deeper insight in the pathogenesis, epidemiology, and drug sensitivities of the circulating viruses, there are relatively limited complete genetic sequences available for this virus from African countries. We describe herein the full genome analysis of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses isolated in Kenya between June 2009 and August 2010. A total of 40 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses isolated during the pandemic were selected. The segments from each isolate were amplified and directly sequenced. The resulting sequences of individual gene segments were concatenated and used for subsequent analysis. These were used to infer phylogenetic relationships and also to reconstruct the time of most recent ancestor, time of introduction into the country, rates of substitution and to estimate a time-resolved phylogeny. The Kenyan complete genome sequences clustered with globally distributed clade 2 and clade 7 sequences but local clade 2 viruses did not circulate beyond the introductory foci while clade 7 viruses disseminated country wide. The time of the most recent common ancestor was estimated between April and June 2009, and distinct clusters circulated during the pandemic. The complete genome had an estimated rate of nucleotide substitution of 4.9×10(-3) substitutions/site/year and greater diversity in surface expressed proteins was observed. We show that two clades of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus were introduced into Kenya from the UK and the pandemic was sustained as a result of importations. Several closely related but distinct clusters co-circulated locally during the peak pandemic phase but only one cluster dominated in the late phase of the pandemic suggesting that it possessed greater adaptability.

  10. Photofraction of a 5 cm x 2 cm BGO scintillator. [bismuth germanate crystal for use in cosmic gamma ray detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunphy, P. P.; Forrest, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The photofraction of a 5.1 cm x 2.0 cm bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillator was measured over a gamma-ray energy range of 0.2 to 6.1 MeV. Several methods, used to minimize the effect of room scattering on the measurement, are discussed. These include a gamma-gamma coincidence technique, a beta-gamma coincidence technique, and the use of sources calibrated with a standard 7.6 cm x 7.6 cm sodium iodide scintillator.

  11. Effects of proton irradiation and temperature on 1 ohm-cm and 10 ohm-cm silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicoletta, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    The 1 ohm-cm and 10 ohm-cm silicon solar cells were exposed to 1.0 MeV protons at a fixed flux of 10 to the 9th power P/sq cm-sec and fluences of 10 to the 10th power, 10 to the 11th power, 10 to the 12th power and 3 X 10 to the 12th power P/sq cm. I-V curves of the cells were made at room temperature, 65 C and 165 C after each irradiation. A value of 139.5 mw/sq cm was taken as AMO incident energy rate per unit area. Degradation occurred for both uncovered 1 ohm-cm and 10 ohm-cm cells. Efficiencies are generally higher than those of comparable U.S. cells tested earlier. Damage (loss in maximum power efficiency) with proton fluence is somewhat higher for 10 ohm-cm cells, measured at the three temperatures, for fluences above 2 X 10 to the 11th power P/sq cm. Cell efficiency, as expected, changes drastically with temperature.

  12. Fast neutron induced fission cross sections of {sup 242m}Am, {sup 245}Cm, {sup 247}Cm

    SciTech Connect

    Fursov, B.I.; Samylin, B.F.; Smirenkin, G.N.; Polynov, V.N.

    1994-12-31

    The experimental data on {sup 242m}Am, {sup 245}Cm and {sup 247}Cm fission cross sections in the 0.13-7.2 Mev neutron energy range are presented. The measurements were made at Van-de-Graaf accelerators with monoenergetic neutron sources. The total data errors are 3.8% for {sup 242m}Am, 3.5% for {sup 245}Cm and 4.5% for {sup 247}Cm. The results given in this paper are preliminary ones.

  13. Metabolism of human gliomas: Assessment with H-1 MR spectroscopy and F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET

    SciTech Connect

    Alger, J.R.; Frank, J.A.; Bizzi, A.; Fulham, M.J.; DeSouza, B.X.; Duhaney, M.O.; Inscoe, S.W.; Black, J.L.; van Zijl, P.C.; Moonen, C.T. , Bethesda, MD )

    1990-12-01

    Localized hydrogen-1 magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy and fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) were employed to obtain metabolic information from intracranial gliomas. Advantages and difficulties associated with comparison of results from the two modalities were realized. Forty patients were studied with H-1 MR spectroscopy. MR signal intensities from lactate, N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline, and creatine from a volume of interest containing the tumor and a contralateral volume were obtained and evaluated. NAA signal intensities were generally decreased in the tumor spectra, and choline signal intensities were elevated. H-1 MR spectroscopy was unsuccessful in eight patients, and FDG PET scans were not obtained in four of the patients with successful MR spectroscopic examinations. Lactate signal intensity was detected in 10 of the 28 patients who had successful H-1 MR spectroscopic and FDG PET studies. Lactate signal intensities were observed in lesions shown at FDG PET to be hypermetabolic, as well as in lesions found to be hypometabolic.

  14. An overview of the novel H1-antihistamine bilastine in allergic rhinitis and urticaria.

    PubMed

    Jáuregui, Ignacio; García-Lirio, Eduardo; Soriano, Ana María; Gamboa, Pedro M; Antépara, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Currently available second-generation H1-antihistamines include a wide group of drugs with a better therapeutic index (or risk-benefit ratio) than the classic antihistamines, although their properties and safety profiles may differ. Bilastine is a newly registered H1-antihistamine for the oral treatment of allergic rhinitis and urticaria, with established antihistaminic and antiallergic properties. Clinical studies in allergic rhinitis and chronic urticaria show that once-daily treatment with bilastine 20 mg is effective in managing symptoms and improving patient's quality of life, with at least comparable efficacy to other nonsedative H1-antihistamines. As far as studies in healthy volunteers, clinical assays and clinical experience can establish, bilastine's safety profile is satisfactory, since it lacks anticholinergic effects, does not impair psychomotor performance or actual driving, and appears to be entirely free from cardiovascular effects.

  15. Caring from Afar: Asian H1B Migrant Workers and Aging Parents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeon-Shim; Chaudhuri, Anoshua; Yoo, Grace J

    2015-09-01

    With the growth in engineering/technology industries, the United States has seen an increase in the arrival of highly skilled temporary migrant workers on H1B visas from various Asian countries. Limited research exists on how these groups maintain family ties from afar including caring for aging parents. This study explores the experiences and challenges that Asian H1B workers face when providing care from a distance. A total of 21 Chinese/Taiwanese, Korean, and Indian H1B workers participated in in-depth qualitative interviews. Key findings indicate that despite distance, caring relationships still continue through regular communications, financial remittances, and return visits, at the same time creating emotional, psychological, and financial challenges for the workers. Findings highlight the need for further research in understanding how the decline of aging parent's health impacts the migrants' adjustment and health in the United States.

  16. The anorectic effect of neurotensin is mediated via a histamine H1 receptor in mice.

    PubMed

    Ohinata, Kousaku; Shimano, Tomoko; Yamauchi, Rena; Sakurada, Shinobu; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Yoshikawa, Masaaki

    2004-12-01

    Neurotensin (NT), a tridecapeptide found in the mammalian brain and peripheral tissues, induces a decrease in food intake after central administration. In this investigation, we examine whether the histaminergic system is involved in NT-induced suppression of feeding. Intracerebroventricular injection of NT (0.1-1 nmol/mouse) led to dose-dependent inhibition of food intake in fasted ddY mice. The anorectic effect induced by NT (0.1 nmol/mouse) was ameliorated upon co-administration of pyrilamine (3 nmol/mouse), an antagonist for histomine H1 receptor. The NT-induced anorectic effect was partially ameliorated in H1 knockout mice. The findings suggest that the H1 receptor in part mediates the NT-induced suppression of food intake.

  17. Congenital Cataracts and Gut Dysmotility in a DYNC1H1 Dyneinopathy Patient

    PubMed Central

    Gelineau-Morel, Rose; Lukacs, Marshall; Weaver, K. Nicole; Hufnagel, Robert B.; Gilbert, Donald L.; Stottmann, Rolf W.

    2016-01-01

    Whole exome sequencing continues to end the diagnostic odyssey for a number of patients and expands our knowledge of phenotypes associated with gene mutations. We describe an 11-year-old female patient with a constellation of symptoms including congenital cataracts, gut dysmotility, sensory neuropathy, and bifrontal polymicrogyria. Whole exome sequencing was performed and identified a de novo heterozygous missense mutation in the ATPase motor domain of cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain 1 (DYNC1H1), which is known to be involved in neuronal migration and retrograde axonal transport. The mutation was found to be highly damaging by multiple prediction programs. The residue is highly conserved, and reported mutations in this gene result in a variety of phenotypes similar to that of our patient. We report only the second case of congenital cataracts and the first of gut dysmotility in a patient with DYNC1H1, thus expanding the spectrum of disease seen in DYNC1H1 dyneinopathies. PMID:27754416

  18. H1N1 infection in Pregnancy: clinical course in two women.

    PubMed

    Karabulut, Aysun; Calışkan, Alpaslan; Göncü, Ferzan; Uyar, Samet; Kutlu, Murat

    2011-01-01

    Pregnant women are one of the major risk groups for disease related morbidity and mortality from influenza A (H1N1, swine flu) pandemic. Healthy pregnant women are supposed to have 4 to 5 fold increased rate of serious illness and hospitalization compared to non-pregnant subjects. Herein, the clinical course of novel influenza A (H1N1) infection in two pregnant women was presented. One woman expired due to delay in treatment, while the other one was discharged on day six after prompt treatment. We would like to emphasize that obstetricians should be aware of the clinical and radiological manifestations of influenza A for prompt diagnosis and treatment. Obstetricians also should prepare themselves to provide adequate care for pregnancy related complications encountered by pregnant women with H1N1 infection.

  19. Electrostatic effect of H1-histone protein binding on nucleosome repeat length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Teif, Vladimir B.

    2014-08-01

    Within a simple biophysical model we describe the effect of electrostatic binding of H1 histone proteins on the nucleosome repeat length in chromatin. The length of wrapped DNA optimizes its binding energy to the histone core and the elastic energy penalty of DNA wrapping. The magnitude of the effect predicted from our model is in agreement with the systematic experimental data on the linear variation of nucleosome repeat lengths with H1/nucleosome ratio (Woodcock C L et al 2006 Chromos. Res. 14 17-25). We compare our model to the data for different cell types and organisms, with a widely varying ratio of bound H1 histones per nucleosome. We underline the importance of this non-specific histone-DNA charge-balance mechanism in regulating the positioning of nucleosomes and the degree of compaction of chromatin fibers in eukaryotic cells.

  20. Genesis and pathogenesis of the 1918 pandemic H1N1 influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Worobey, Michael; Han, Guan-Zhu; Rambaut, Andrew

    2014-06-03

    The source, timing, and geographical origin of the 1918-1920 pandemic influenza A virus have remained tenaciously obscure for nearly a century, as have the reasons for its unusual severity among young adults. Here, we reconstruct the origins of the pandemic virus and the classic swine influenza and (postpandemic) seasonal H1N1 lineages using a host-specific molecular clock approach that is demonstrably more accurate than previous methods. Our results suggest that the 1918 pandemic virus originated shortly before 1918 when a human H1 virus, which we infer emerged before ∼1907, acquired avian N1 neuraminidase and internal protein genes. We find that the resulting pandemic virus jumped directly to swine but was likely displaced in humans by ∼1922 by a reassortant with an antigenically distinct H1 HA. Hence, although the swine lineage was a direct descendent of the pandemic virus, the post-1918 seasonal H1N1 lineage evidently was not, at least for HA. These findings help resolve several seemingly disparate observations from 20th century influenza epidemiology, seroarcheology, and immunology. The phylogenetic results, combined with these other lines of evidence, suggest that the high mortality in 1918 among adults aged ∼20 to ∼40 y may have been due primarily to their childhood exposure to a doubly heterosubtypic putative H3N8 virus, which we estimate circulated from ∼1889-1900. All other age groups (except immunologically naive infants) were likely partially protected by childhood exposure to N1 and/or H1-related antigens. Similar processes may underlie age-specific mortality differences between seasonal H1N1 vs. H3N2 and human H5N1 vs. H7N9 infections.

  1. Neuronal Antibodies in Children with or without Narcolepsy following H1N1-AS03 Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Thebault, Simon; Waters, Patrick; Snape, Matthew D; Cottrell, Dominic; Darin, Niklas; Hallböök, Tove; Huutoniemi, Anne; Partinen, Markku; Pollard, Andrew J; Vincent, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy is caused by deficiency of hypothalamic orexin/hypocretin. An autoimmune basis is suspected, but no specific antibodies, either causative or as biomarkers, have been identified. However, the AS03 adjuvanted split virion H1N1 (H1N1-AS03) vaccine, created to protect against the 2009 Pandemic, has been implicated as a trigger of narcolepsy particularly in children. Sera and CSFs from 13 H1N1-AS03-vaccinated patients (12 children, 1 young adult) with type 1 narcolepsy were tested for autoantibodies to known neuronal antigens including the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and contactin-associated protein 2 (CASPR2), both associated with encephalopathies that include disordered sleep, to rodent brain tissue including the lateral hypothalamus, and to live hippocampal neurons in culture. When sufficient sample was available, CSF levels of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) were measured. Sera from 44 H1N1-ASO3-vaccinated children without narcolepsy were also examined. None of these patients' CSFs or sera was positive for NMDAR or CASPR2 antibodies or binding to neurons; 4/13 sera bound to orexin-neurons in rat brain tissue, but also to other neurons. MCH levels were a marginally raised (n = 8; p = 0.054) in orexin-deficient narcolepsy patients compared with orexin-normal children (n = 6). In the 44 H1N1-AS03-vaccinated healthy children, there was no rise in total IgG levels or in CASPR2 or NMDAR antibodies three weeks following vaccination. In conclusion, there were no narcolepsy-specific autoantibodies identified in type 1 narcolepsy sera or CSFs, and no evidence for a general increase in immune reactivity following H1N1-AS03 vaccination in the healthy children. Antibodies to other neuronal specific membrane targets, with their potential for directing use of immunotherapies, are still an important goal for future research.

  2. Computational Analysis of Structure-Based Interactions for Novel H1-Antihistamines

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yinfeng; Li, Yan; Pan, Yanqiu; Wang, Jinghui; Lin, Feng; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Shuwei; Yang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    As a chronic disorder, insomnia affects approximately 10% of the population at some time during their lives, and its treatment is often challenging. Since the antagonists of the H1 receptor, a protein prevalent in human central nervous system, have been proven as effective therapeutic agents for treating insomnia, the H1 receptor is quite possibly a promising target for developing potent anti-insomnia drugs. For the purpose of understanding the structural actors affecting the antagonism potency, presently a theoretical research of molecular interactions between 129 molecules and the H1 receptor is performed through three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) techniques. The ligand-based comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) model (Q2 = 0.525, R2ncv = 0.891, R2pred = 0.807) has good quality for predicting the bioactivities of new chemicals. The cross-validated result suggests that the developed models have excellent internal and external predictability and consistency. The obtained contour maps were appraised for affinity trends for the investigated compounds, which provides significantly useful information in the rational drug design of novel anti-insomnia agents. Molecular docking was also performed to investigate the mode of interaction between the ligand and the active site of the receptor. Furthermore, as a supplementary tool to study the docking conformation of the antagonists in the H1 receptor binding pocket, molecular dynamics simulation was also applied, providing insights into the changes in the structure. All of the models and the derived information would, we hope, be of help for developing novel potent histamine H1 receptor antagonists, as well as exploring the H1-antihistamines interaction mechanism. PMID:26797608

  3. Cases of Narcolepsy-Cataplexy Syndrome Following H1N1 Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    NALBANTOĞLU, Mecbure; BENBİR, Gülçin; KARADENİZ, Derya; ALTINTAŞ, Ayşe; SAVRAN OĞUZ, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    Narcolepsy-Cataplexy syndrome is a rare sleep disorder related with human leukocyte antigens (HLA-DQB1*0602) caused by the loss of hypothalamic hypocretin/orexin producing neurons. Recently, in European countries, Narcolepsy-Cataplexy syndrome developing following H1N1 vaccination has attracted attention. Our first patient was a 9-year-old boy, who was referred to our clinic with the complaint of daytime sleepiness developed 1.5 month after H1N1 vaccination. After a couple of weeks, weakness of the upper extremities while laughing was added to the clinical picture. He also developed hypnopompic hallucinations and nightmares. Multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) following full-night polysomnography (PSG) showed that the mean sleep latency was 0.6 minutes; and all of the naps had sleep-onset REM periods. Our second patient was a 50 year-oldman, who presented to our clinic complaining of sleep paralysis and REM sleep behavior disorder developed 4 months after H1N1 vaccination. He developed daytime sleepiness 6 months after and cataplexy 8 months after H1N1 vaccination. He was also diagnosed as having Narcolepsy-Cataplexy syndrome upon PSG and MSLT. We investigated HLA-DRB1/ DQB1 locus with Polymerase Chain Reaction-Sequence Specific Primer technique. The first patient had HLA-DQB1*0602.47 and DQB1*03.01 heterozygous loci; and the second patient had HLA-DQB1*0602.47 and DQB1*02.01 heterozygous loci. These patients are the first reported cases of Narcolepsy-Cataplexy syndrome related with H1N1 vaccination in Turkey. Although there is no specific marker, temporal relationship between vaccination and onset of disease symptoms suggests a possible causal relationship. In the presence of an underlying genetic predisposition, it was thought that H1N1 vaccination could trigger Narcolepsy-Cataplexy syndrome.

  4. Label-free versus conventional cellular assays: Functional investigations on the human histamine H1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Lieb, S; Littmann, T; Plank, N; Felixberger, J; Tanaka, M; Schäfer, T; Krief, S; Elz, S; Friedland, K; Bernhardt, G; Wegener, J; Ozawa, T; Buschauer, A

    2016-12-01

    A set of histamine H1 receptor (H1R) agonists and antagonists was characterized in functional assays, using dynamic mass redistribution (DMR), electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) and various signaling pathway specific readouts (Fura-2 and aequorin calcium assays, arrestin recruitment (luciferase fragment complementation) assay, luciferase gene reporter assay). Data were gained from genetically engineered HEK293T cells and compared with reference data from GTPase assays and radioligand binding. Histamine and the other H1R agonists gave different assay-related pEC50 values, however, the order of potency was maintained. In the luciferase fragment complementation assay, the H1R preferred β-arrestin2 over β-arrestin1. The calcium and the impedimetric assay depended on Gq coupling of the H1R, as demonstrated by complete inhibition of the histamine-induced signals in the presence of the Gq inhibitor FR900359 (UBO-QIC). Whereas partial inhibition by FR900359 was observed in DMR and the gene reporter assay, pertussis toxin substantially decreased the response in DMR, but increased the luciferase signal, reflecting the contribution of both, Gq and Gi, to signaling in these assays. For antagonists, the results from DMR were essentially compatible with those from conventional readouts, whereas the impedance-based data revealed a trend towards higher pKb values. ECIS and calcium assays apparently only reflect Gq signaling, whereas DMR and gene reporter assays appear to integrate both, Gq and Gi mediated signaling. The results confirm the value of the label-free methods, DMR and ECIS, for the characterization of H1R ligands. Both noninvasive techniques are complementary to each other, but cannot fully replace reductionist signaling pathway focused assays.

  5. Precipitation of new onset diabetes by H1N1 infection.

    PubMed

    Krishna, S V S; Sunil, K; Prasad, R Devi; Modi, K D

    2012-12-01

    Infectious diseases in type 2 diabetes can complicate diabetic ketoacidosis, derange hyperglycemia, or precipitate new onset diabetes. Pulmonary tuberculosis being the most common. High index of clinical suspicion is required for co-existing H1N1 virus, which if present has high mortality if not treated. A 63-year-old female, with no known chronic illness, was hospitalized in month of Aug 2010 with influenza-like symptoms and diabetes. Quick evaluation revealed tachycardia, tachypnea, p02 90% at room air, and normotensive. Clinical chest examination was normal. Further evaluation revealed NHO in both lung fields on chest X-ray, hyperglycemia 325 mg/dl, detected for first time. Her signs and symptoms were out of proportion to clinical findings and chest X-ray findings. Patient was managed with insulin infusion and empirical broad-spectrum antibiotic coverage in ICU. As her condition worsened over next 12 hrs, infection with H1N1 was suspected and empirically started on oseltamavir after taking throat swab for H1N1 test and later, the sample was tested positive for H1N1 influenza by RT-PCR. Clinical course in the hospital was complicated by oxygen dependence requiring 10-12 ltr/hr by nasal mask. She made an uneventful recovery. In a known diabetic, infection with H1N1 quadruples ICU hospitalization, and only few cases of new onset diabetes with H1N1 were reported. Two reported from Iran had fatal outcome. This case emphasis on clinical acumen in recognition, and prompt institution of therapy will reduce associated mortality.

  6. Two histone H1-encoding genes of the green alga Volvox carteri with features intermediate between plant and animal genes.

    PubMed

    Lindauer, A; Müller, K; Schmitt, R

    1993-07-15

    Southern hybridization indicated the presence of at least two and possibly four histone H1-encoding genes occurring as singlets in the Volvox carteri genome. Two of these genes, H1-I and H1-II, have been cloned and characterized. Their coding sequences are each interrupted by three introns, but only the position of the second intron is identically conserved in both H1-I and H1-II. The encoded 260-amino-acid (aa) (H1-I) and 240-aa (H1-II) polypeptides possess the typical tripartite organization of animal H1 histones, with variable N- and C-terminal domains flanking a conserved 'globular' DNA-binding domain. Extensive differences in their variable regions suggest that H1-I and H1-II (62% identity) represent two isotypes with different functions. A prominent KAPKAP-KAA motif in the H1-I N-terminal region, similarly seen in single H1 variants of a mosquito and a nematode, has a putative function in packing condensed subtypes of chromatin. Different from higher plants, but like animals, the H1 genes of V. carteri possess a typical 3' palindrome for mRNA processing, resulting in non-polyadenylated mRNAs. Transcription initiates 33 nucleotides (nt) (H1-I) and 26 nt (H1-II) downstream of typical TATA boxes. A putative 20-bp conserved enhancer element upstream of each TATA box closely resembles the consensus sequence associated with the nucleosomal histone-encoding genes in V. carteri [Müller et al., Gene 93 (1990) 167-175] and suggests stringent regulation. Accordingly, transcription of H1 was shown to be restricted to late embryogenesis, when new flagella are produced. We discuss the inferred accessory role of histone H1 proteins in stabilizing axonemal microtubules, as has been recently observed in sea urchin flagella [Multigner et al., Nature 360 (1992) 33-39].

  7. Biochemical characterization of desloratadine, a potent antagonist of the human histamine H(1) receptor.

    PubMed

    Anthes, John C; Gilchrest, Helen; Richard, Christian; Eckel, Stephen; Hesk, Dave; West, Robert E; Williams, Shirley M; Greenfeder, Scott; Billah, Motasim; Kreutner, William; Egan, Robert E

    2002-08-09

    We have characterized desloratadine (5H-benzo[5,6]cyclohepta[1,2-b]pyridine, 8-chloro-6,11-dihydro-11-(4-piperidinylidene), CAS 100643-71-8) as a potent antagonist of the human histamine H(1) receptor. [3H]Desloratadine bound to membranes expressing the recombinant human histamine H(1) receptor in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-H(1)) in a specific and saturable manner with a K(d) of 1.1+/-0.2 nM, a B(max) of 7.9+/-2.0 pmol/mg protein, and an association rate constant of 0.011 nM(-1) x min(-1). The K(d) calculated from the kinetic measurements was 1.5 nM. Dissociation of [3H]desloratadine from the human histamine H(1) receptor was slow, with only 37% of the binding reversed at 6 h in the presence of 5 microM unlabeled desloratadine. Seventeen histamine H(1)-receptor antagonists were evaluated in competition-binding studies. Desloratadine had a K(i) of 0.9+/-0.1 nM in these competition studies. In CHO-H(1) cells, histamine stimulation resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in [Ca(2+)](i) with an EC(50) of 170+/-30 nM. After a 90-min preincubation with desloratadine, the histamine-stimulated increase in [Ca(2+)](i) was shifted to the right, with a depression of the maximal response at higher concentrations of antagonist. The apparent K(b) value was 0.2+/-0.14 nM with a slope of 1.6+/-0.1. The slow dissociation from the receptor and noncompetitive antagonism suggests that desloratadine may be a pseudoirreversible antagonist of the human histamine H(1) receptor. The mechanism of desloratadine antagonism of the human histamine H(1) receptor may help to explain the high potency and 24-h duration of action observed in clinical studies.

  8. Influenza A/H1N1 Severe Pneumonia: Novel Morphocytological Findings in Bronchoalveolar Lavage

    PubMed Central

    Faverio, Paola; Messinesi, Grazia; Brenna, Ambrogio; Pesci, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) performed in three patients with severe influenza A/H1N1 pneumonia complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Light microscopy analysis of BAL cytocentrifugates showed the presence of characteristic large, mononuclear, plasmoblastic/plasmocytoid-like cells never described before. Via transmission electron microscopy, these cells were classified as atypical type II pneumocytes and some of them showed cytoplasmic vesicles and inclusions. We concluded that plasmoblastic/plasmocytoid-like type II pneumocytes might represent a morphologic marker of A/H1N1 influenza virus infection as well as reparative cellular activation after diffuse alveolar damage. PMID:25383078

  9. Influenza A/H1N1 Severe Pneumonia: Novel Morphocytological Findings in Bronchoalveolar Lavage.

    PubMed

    Faverio, Paola; Aliberti, Stefano; Ezekiel, Clinton; Messinesi, Grazia; Brenna, Ambrogio; Pesci, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) performed in three patients with severe influenza A/H1N1 pneumonia complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Light microscopy analysis of BAL cytocentrifugates showed the presence of characteristic large, mononuclear, plasmoblastic/plasmocytoid-like cells never described before. Via transmission electron microscopy, these cells were classified as atypical type II pneumocytes and some of them showed cytoplasmic vesicles and inclusions. We concluded that plasmoblastic/plasmocytoid-like type II pneumocytes might represent a morphologic marker of A/H1N1 influenza virus infection as well as reparative cellular activation after diffuse alveolar damage.

  10. The discovery of quinoline based single-ligand human H1 and H3 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Procopiou, Panayiotis A; Ancliff, Rachael A; Gore, Paul M; Hancock, Ashley P; Hodgson, Simon T; Holmes, Duncan S; Keeling, Steven P; Looker, Brian E; Parr, Nigel A; Rowedder, James E; Slack, Robert J

    2016-12-15

    A novel series of potent quinoline-based human H1 and H3 bivalent histamine receptor antagonists, suitable for intranasal administration for the potential treatment of allergic rhinitis associated nasal congestion, were identified. Compound 18b had slightly lower H1 potency (pA2 8.8 vs 9.7 for the clinical goldstandard azelastine), and H3 potency (pKi 9.1vs 6.8 for azelastine), better selectivity over α1A, α1B and hERG, similar duration of action, making 18b a good back-up compound to our previous candidate, but with a more desirable profile.

  11. Multicomponent synthesis of 3,6-dihydro-2H-1,3-thiazine-2-thiones.

    PubMed

    Kruithof, Art; Ploeger, Marten L; Janssen, Elwin; Helliwell, Madeleine; de Kanter, Frans J J; Ruijter, Eelco; Orru, Romano V A

    2012-02-08

    Non-fused 3,6-dihydro-2H-1,3-thiazine-2-thiones constitute a so far rather unexplored class of compounds, with the latest report dating back more than two decades. Thiazine-2-thiones contain an endocyclic dithiocarbamate group, which is often found in pesticides, in substrates for radical chemistry and in synthetic intermediates towards thioureas and amidines. We now report the multicomponent reaction (MCR) of in situ-generated 1-azadienes with carbon disulfide. With this reaction, a one-step protocol towards the potentially interesting 3,6-dihydro-2H-1,3-thiazine-2-thiones was established and a small library was synthesized.

  12. The hot bands of silane between 2120 and 2270 cm -1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terki-Hassaïne, M.; Pierre, G.; Boudon, V.; Aït Hamadouche, G.; Guelachvili, G.

    2005-04-01

    The infrared spectrum of the SiH 4 molecule has been recorded between 2040 and 2320 cm -1 using the high-resolution Fourier interferometer of the Laboratoire de Photophysique Moléculaire ( Orsay, France). The resolution was 5.4 × 10 -3 cm -1. In this region, many lines were previously analyzed and assigned to the ν1/ ν3 stretching dyad of 28SiH 4, 29SiH 4, and 30SiH 4 molecules [J. Mol. Spectrosc. 143 (1990) 35]. However, several lines in the spectrum were not assigned. The results obtained in our previous study [J. Mol. Spectrosc. 197 (1999) 307] of the infrared spectrum of 28SiH 4, in the bending-stretching tetrad region at 3100 cm -1, enabled us to assign 204 of the observed transitions to hot bands (the ν1 + ν2/ ν1 + ν4/ ν2 + ν3/ ν3 + ν4 bending-stretching tetrad minus the ν2/ ν4 bending dyad). These transitions were used to refine the set of the Hamiltonian parameters of the bending-stretching tetrad. The analysis is performed using the tensorial formalism developed in Dijon for tetrahedral molecules and implemented in the STDS software ( http://www.u-bourgogne.fr/LPUB/shTDS.html).

  13. Remaining Sites Verification Package for 132-H-1, 116-H Reactor Stack Burial Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-053

    SciTech Connect

    L. M. Dittmer

    2007-06-26

    The 132-H-1 waste site includes the 116-H exhaust stack burial trench and the buried stack foundation (which contains an embedded vertical 15-cm (6-in) condensate drain line). The 116-H reactor exhaust stack and foundation were decommissioned and demolished using explosives in 1983, with the rubble buried in situ beneath clean fill at least 1 m (3.3 ft) thick. Residual concentrations support future land uses that can be represented by a rural-residential scenario and pose no threat to groundwater or the Columbia River based on RESRAD modeling.

  14. Eight-cm mercury ion thruster system technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The technology status of 8 cm diameter electron bombardment ion thrusters is presented. Much of the technology resulting from the 5 cm diameter thruster has been adapted and improved upon to increase the reliability, durability, and efficiency of the 8 cm thruster. Technology discussed includes: dependence of neutralizer tip erosion upon neutralizer flow rate; impregnated and rolled-foil insert cathode performance and life testing; neutralizer position studies; thruster ion beam profile measurements; high voltage pulse ignition; high utilization ion machined accelerator grids; deposition internal and external to the thruster; thruster vectoring systems; thruster cycling life testing and thruster system weights for typical mission applications.

  15. Ion accelerator systems for high power 30 cm thruster operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G.

    1982-01-01

    Two and three-grid accelerator systems for high power ion thruster operation were investigated. Two-grid translation tests show that over compensation of the 30 cm thruster SHAG grid set spacing the 30 cm thruster radial plasma density variation and by incorporating grid compensation only sufficient to maintain grid hole axial alignment, it is shown that beam current gains as large as 50% can be realized. Three-grid translation tests performed with a simulated 30 cm thruster discharge chamber show that substantial beamlet steering can be reliably affected by decelerator grid translation only, at net-to-total voltage ratios as low as 0.05.

  16. Alteration and formation of rims on the CM parent body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, Lauren B.; McSween, Harry Y., Jr.; Zolensky, Michael

    1994-03-01

    All types of coarse-grained components in CM chondrites are surrounded by fine-grained dust coatings, but the origin of these rims is not yet clear. Although a strictly nebular origin seems likely for rims in the relatively unaltered type 3 chondrites, the rims in CM chondrites are dominated by secondary alteration phases. It has been argued that either the coarse-grained cores accreted altered rim materials while still in the nebula or that alteration of primary rim phases occurred on the CM parent body. To constrain the origin of alteration phases in rim material, we have analyzed the textures and mineral associations from 10 CM chondritic falls by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Our results indicate that the secondary phases in CM chondritic rims were produced by parent body fluid-rock interactions which redefined some primary rim textures and may have produced, in some cases, both coarse-grained components and the rims that surround them. Textural features demonstrate the interactive exchange of alteration fluids between rims, matrix, and chondrules on the CM parent body. For example, most matrix-rim contacts are gradational, suggesting the synchronous alteration of both components. Several observations suggest the possibility of in situ rim production. For example, tochilinite and phyllosilicates commonly form rims around matrix carbonates, which are generally believed to have precipitated from alteration fluids on the CM parent body. This suggests that the rims surrounding matrix carbonates may also have been produced by alteration processes. Partially replaced chondrule olivines bear a striking resemblance to many rimmed olivines in the matrix which suggests, by analogy, that site-specific precipitation of S-bearing phases may also be responsible for the occurrence of many tochilinite-rich rims around isolated matrix olivines. Non-silicate rims precipitate around olivines of any composition, but the process is most effective for fayalitic olivines

  17. HIST1H1C Regulates Interferon-β and Inhibits Influenza Virus Replication by Interacting with IRF3

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaokun; Yang, Cha; Hu, Yong; Lei, Erming; Lin, Xian; Zhao, Lianzhong; Zou, Zhong; Zhang, Anding; Zhou, Hongbo; Chen, Huanchun; Qian, Ping; Jin, Meilin

    2017-01-01

    Influenza virus NS2 is well known for its role in viral ribonucleoprotein nuclear export; however, its function has not been fully understood. A recent study showed that NS2 might interact with HIST1H1C (H1C, H1.2). Histones have been found to affect influenza virus replication, such as the H2A, H2B, H3, and H4, but H1 has not been detected. Here, we found that H1C interacts with NS2 via its C-terminal in the nucleus and that H1C affects influenza virus replication. The H1N1 influenza virus replicates better in H1C knockout A549 cells compared to wild-type A549 cells, primarily because of the regulation of H1C on interferon-β (IFN-β). Further studies showed that the H1C phosphorylation mutant (T146A) decreases IFN-β, while H1C methylation mutants (K34A, K187A) increases IFN-β by releasing the nucleosome and promoting IRF3 binding to the IFN-β promoter. Interestingly, NS2 interacts with H1C, which reduces H1C–IRF3 interaction and results in the inhibition of IFN-β enhanced by H1C. In summary, our study reveals a novel function of H1C to regulate IFN-β and uncovers an underlying mechanism, which suggests H1C plays a role in epigenetic regulation. Moreover, our results suggest a novel mechanism for the influenza virus to antagonize the innate immune response by NS2.

  18. Differences in the binding of H1 variants to DNA. Cooperativity and linker-length related distribution.

    PubMed

    Clark, D J; Thomas, J O

    1988-12-01

    A study of the complexes formed between short linear DNA and three H1 variants, a typical somatic H1, and the extreme variants H5, from chicken erythrocytes, and spH1 from sea urchin sperm, has revealed differences between H1, H5 and spH1 that have implications for chromatin structure and folding. 1. All three histones bind cooperatively to DNA in 35 mM NaCl forming similar, but not identical, rod-like complexes. With sufficiently long DNA the complexes may be circular, circles forming more easily with H5 and spH1 than with H1. 2. The binding of H5 and spH1 to DNA is cooperative even in 5 mM NaCl, resulting in well-defined thin filaments that appear to contain two DNA molecules bridged by histone molecules. In contrast, H1 binds distributively over all the DNA molecules in 5 mM NaCl, but forms short stretches similar in appearance to the thin filaments formed with H5 and spH1. Rods appear to arise from the intertwining of regular thin filaments containing cooperatively bound histone molecules on raising the NaCl concentration to 35 mM. 3. The compositions of the rods correspond to one histone molecule for about every 47 bp (H1), 81 bp (H5) and 112 bp (spH1), suggesting average spacings of 24 bp (H1), 41 bp (H5) and 56 bp (spH1) in the component thin (double) filaments. Strikingly, these values are proportional to the linker lengths of the chromatins in which the particular H1 variant is the main or sole H1.

  19. Full-Genome Sequence of a Reassortant H1N2 Influenza A Virus Isolated from Pigs in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Candice; Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Muterle Varela, Ana Paula; Mengue Scheffer, Camila; Wendlant, Adrieli; Quoos Mayer, Fabiana; Lopes de Almeida, Laura; Franco, Ana Cláudia; Roehe, Paulo Michel

    2014-12-18

    In this study, the full-genome sequence of a reassortant H1N2 swine influenza virus is reported. The isolate has the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes from human lineage (H1-δ cluster and N2), and the internal genes (polymerase basic 1 [PB1], polymerase basic 2 [PB2], polymerase acidic [PA], nucleoprotein [NP], matrix [M], and nonstructural [NS]) are derived from human 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm09) virus.

  20. The 2009 pandemic H1N1 and triple-reassortant swine H1N1 influenza viruses replicate efficiently but elicit an attenuated inflammatory response in polarized human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hui; Pappas, Claudia; Katz, Jacqueline M; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2011-01-01

    The pandemic H1N1 virus of 2009 (2009 H1N1) produced a spectrum of disease ranging from mild illness to severe illness and death. Respiratory symptoms were frequently associated with virus infection, with relatively high rate of gastrointestinal symptoms reported. To better understand 2009 H1N1 virus pathogenesis in humans, we studied virus and host responses following infection of two cell types: polarized bronchial and pharyngeal epithelial cells, which exhibit many features of the human airway epithelium, and colon epithelial cells to serve as a human intestinal cell model. Selected 2009 H1N1 viruses were compared to both seasonal H1N1 and triple-reassortant swine H1N1 influenza viruses that have circulated among North American pigs since before the 2009 pandemic. All H1N1 viruses replicated productively in airway cells; however, in contrast to seasonal H1N1 virus infection, infection with the 2009 H1N1 and triple-reassortant swine H1N1 viruses resulted in an attenuated inflammatory response, a weaker interferon response, and reduced cell death. Additionally, the H1N1 viruses of swine origin replicated less efficiently at the temperature of the human proximal airways (33°C). We also observed that the 2009 H1N1 viruses replicated to significantly higher titers than seasonal H1N1 virus in polarized colon epithelial cells. These studies reveal that in comparison to seasonal influenza virus, H1N1 viruses of swine origin poorly activate multiple aspects of the human innate response, which may contribute to the virulence of these viruses. In addition, their less efficient replication at human upper airway temperatures has implications for the understanding of pandemic H1N1 virus adaptation to humans.

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of vaccinia virus H1L phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Roces, Laura; Knowles, Phillip P.; Fox, Gavin; Juanhuix, Jordi; Scaplehorn, Nicki; Way, Michael; McDonald, Neil Q.

    2008-01-01

    The cysteine-based protein phosphatase H1L was the first reported dual-specificity protein phosphatase. H1L is encapsidated within the vaccinia virus and is required for successful host infection and for the production of viable vaccinia progeny. H1L has therefore been proposed as a target candidate for antiviral compounds. Recombinant H1L has been expressed in a catalytically inactive form using an Escherichia coli host, leading to purification and crystallization by the microbatch method. The crystals diffract to 2.1 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. These crystals belong to space group P422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 98.31, c = 169.15 Å, and are likely to contain four molecules in the asymmetric unit. A sulfur SAD data set was collected to 2.8 Å resolution on beamline BM14 at the ESRF to facilitate structure determination. Attempts to derivatize these crystals with xenon gas changed the space group to I422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 63.28, c = 169.68 Å and a single molecule in the asymmetric unit. The relationship between these two crystal forms is discussed. PMID:18323605

  2. Correlates of 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccine Acceptability among Parents and Their Adolescent Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Painter, Julia E.; Gargano, Lisa M.; Sales, Jessica M.; Morfaw, Christopher; Jones, LaDawna M.; Murray, Dennis; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Hughes, James M.

    2011-01-01

    School-aged children were a priority group for receipt of the pandemic (2009) H1N1 influenza vaccine. Both parental and adolescent attitudes likely influence vaccination behaviors. Data were collected from surveys distributed to middle- and high-school students and their parents in two counties in rural Georgia. Multivariable logistic regression…

  3. Determinants of Parental Acceptance of the H1N1 Vaccine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilyard, Karen M.; Quinn, Sandra Crouse; Kim, Kevin H.; Musa, Don; Freimuth, Vicki S.

    2014-01-01

    Although designated as a high-risk group during the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic, only about 40% of U.S. children received the vaccine, a relatively low percentage compared with high-risk groups in seasonal influenza, such as the elderly, whose vaccine rates typically top 70%. To better understand parental decision making and predictors of acceptance…

  4. Learning from Successful School-based Vaccination Clinics during 2009 pH1N1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klaiman, Tamar; O'Connell, Katherine; Stoto, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The 2009 H1N1 vaccination campaign was the largest in US history. State health departments received vaccines from the federal government and sent them to local health departments (LHDs) who were responsible for getting vaccines to the public. Many LHD's used school-based clinics to ensure children were the first to receive limited…

  5. 20 CFR 655.736 - What are H-1B-dependent employers and willful violators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... violators? 655.736 Section 655.736 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....g., copies of H-1B petitions; payroll records described in § 655.731(b)(1)). (6) Change in corporate structure or identity of employer. If an employer which experiences a change in its corporate structure...

  6. 20 CFR 655.736 - What are H-1B-dependent employers and willful violators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... violators? 655.736 Section 655.736 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....g., copies of H-1B petitions; payroll records described in § 655.731(b)(1)). (6) Change in corporate structure or identity of employer. If an employer which experiences a change in its corporate structure...

  7. The hemagglutinin structure of an avian H1N1 influenza A virus

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Tianwei; Wang, Gengyan; Li, Anzhang; Zhang, Qian; Wu, Caiming; Zhang, Rongfu; Cai, Qixu; Song, Wenjun; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2009-09-15

    The interaction between hemagglutinin (HA) and receptors is a kernel in the study of evolution and host adaptation of H1N1 influenza A viruses. The notion that the avian HA is associated with preferential specificity for receptors with Sia{alpha}2,3Gal glycosidic linkage over those with Sia{alpha}2,6Gal linkage is not all consistent with the available data on H1N1 viruses. By x-ray crystallography, the HA structure of an avian H1N1 influenza A virus, as well as its complexes with the receptor analogs, was determined. The structures revealed no preferential binding of avian receptor analogs over that of the human analog, suggesting that the HA/receptor binding might not be as stringent as is commonly believed in determining the host receptor preference for some subtypes of influenza viruses, such as the H1N1 viruses. The structure also showed difference in glycosylation despite the preservation of related sequences, which may partly contribute to the difference between structures of human and avian origin.

  8. Prolonged glucocorticoid exposure dephosphorylates histone H1 and inactivates the MMTV promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, H L; Archer, T K

    1998-01-01

    Glucocorticoids rapidly induce transcription from the mouse mammary tumour virus (MMTV) promoter via a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated chromatin disruption event. This remodelling of chromatin is transient such that upon prolonged exposure to hormone the promoter becomes refractory to glucocorticoids. We demonstrate that this refractory state requires the continual presence of hormone and can be reversed by its removal. Our experiments show that the promoter is inactivated via a mechanism whereby histone H1 is dephosphorylated in response to glucocorticoids. Removal of glucocorticoids results in the rephosphorylation of histone H1 and the reacquisition of transcriptional competence by the promoter. This response is specific for the MMTV promoter assembled as chromatin and is not observed for another inducible gene or transiently transfected MMTV DNA. Finally, we demonstrate that H1 on the MMTV promoter is dephosphorylated when the promoter is unresponsive to glucocorticoids. These studies indicate that phosphorylated H1 is intimately linked with the GR-mediated disruption of MMTV chromatin in vivo. PMID:9482742

  9. Zoonoses: USDA ARS Lessons Learned During Novel Influenza H1N1 Investigations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Influenza illness was first recognized in pigs during the 1918 human Spanish flu pandemic, and influenza A virus has since remained of importance to the swine industry as a primary respiratory pathogen. Influenza virus H1N1 remained relatively stable in U.S. swine for nearly 80 years following 1918...

  10. Pandemic H1N1 influenza virus infection in a Canadian cat

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Cameron G.; Davies, Jennifer L.; Joseph, Tomy; Ondrich, Sarah; Rosa, Brielle V.

    2016-01-01

    A cat was presented for necropsy after being found dead at home. Histologic findings suggested viral pneumonia. Polymerase chain reaction and viral typing revealed influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. This is the first report of influenza in a Canadian cat and highlights the importance of considering influenza virus in the differential diagnosis for feline respiratory distress. PMID:27152036

  11. H1N1 Preventive Health Behaviors in a University Setting

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Rebecca; May, Larissa; Sanza, Megan; Johnston, Lindsay; Petinaux, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background: When H1N1 emerged in 2009, institutions of higher education were immediately faced with questions about how best to protect their community from the virus, yet limited information existed to help predict student preventive behaviors. Methods: The authors surveyed students at a large urban university in November 2009 to better understand how students perceived their susceptibility to and the severity of H1N1, which preventive behaviors they engaged in, and if policies impacted their preventive health decisions. Results: Preventive health behavior messaging had a mixed impact on students. Students made simple behavior changes to protect themselves from H1N1, especially if they perceived a high personal risk of contracting H1N1. Although policies were instituted to enable students to avoid classes when ill, almost no student self-isolated for the entire duration of their illness. Conclusions: These findings can help inform future decision making in a university setting to best influence preventive health behaviors. PMID:22171729

  12. Risk factors for death from pandemic (H1N1) 2009, southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Renata T C; Skalinski, Lacita M; Igansi, Cristine N; de Souza, Libia R O; Iser, Betine P M; Reis, Priscilleyne O; Barros, Eliana N C; Macário, Eduardo M; Bercini, Marilina A; Ranieri, Tani M S; Araújo, Wildo N

    2011-08-01

    To identify risk factors for death from pandemic (H1N1) 2009, we obtained data for 157 hospitalized patients with confirmed cases of this disease. Multivariate analysis showed that diabetes and class III obesity were associated with death. These findings helped define priority vaccination groups in Brazil.

  13. 76 FR 62455 - Announcement of Updated Funding Availability for H-1B Technical Skills Training Grants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... Employment and Training Administration Announcement of Updated Funding Availability for H-1B Technical Skills Training Grants AGENCY: Employment and Training Administration, Labor. ACTION: Notice of Additional Funding. SUMMARY: On May 3, 2011, the Employment and Training Administration (ETA) published a notice in...

  14. Differential influenza H1N1-specific humoral and cellular response kinetics in kidney transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Rambal, Vinay; Müller, Karin; Dang-Heine, Chantip; Sattler, Arne; Dziubianau, Mikalai; Weist, Benjamin; Luu, Si-Hong; Stoyanova, Alexandra; Nickel, Peter; Thiel, Andreas; Neumann, Avidan; Schweiger, Brunhilde; Reinke, Petra; Babel, Nina

    2014-02-01

    Renal transplant recipients (RTR) are considered at high risk for influenza-associated complications due to immunosuppression. The efficacy of standard influenza vaccination in RTRs is unclear. Hence, we evaluated activation of the adaptive immunity by the pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 (A(H1N1)pdm09) vaccine in RTRs as compared to healthy controls. To determine cross-reactivity and/or bystander activation, seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine and tetanus/diphteria toxoid (TT/DT) vaccine-specific T cells along with allospecific T cells were quantified before and after A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination. Vaccination-induced alloimmunity was additionally determined by quantifying serum creatinine and proinflammatory protein IP-10. Contrary to healthy controls, RTRs required a booster vaccination to achieve seroconversion (13.3 % day 21; 90 % day 90). In contrast to humoral immunity, sufficient A(H1N1)pdm09-specific T-cell responses were mounted in RTRs already after the first immunization with a magnitude comparable with healthy controls. Interestingly, vaccination simultaneously boosted T cells reacting to seasonal flu but not to TT/DT, suggesting cross-activation. No alloimmune effects were recorded. In conclusion, protective antibody responses required booster vaccination. However, sufficient cellular immunity is established already after the first vaccination, demonstrating differential kinetics of humoral and cellular immunity.

  15. The transcriptionally-active MMTV promoter is depleted of histone H1.

    PubMed Central

    Bresnick, E H; Bustin, M; Marsaud, V; Richard-Foy, H; Hager, G L

    1992-01-01

    We have used an ultraviolet light cross-linking and immunoadsorption assay to demonstrate that histones H1 and H2B are bound to the repressed MMTV promoter. Hormone activation results in reduced H1 content with little or no change in H2B. High resolution analysis of the glucocorticoid-inducible DNaseI hypersensitive region demonstrates an NF-1 footprint as well as specific sites of enhanced cleavage on nucleosome B and in the nucleosome B/nucleosome A linker. These results are consistent with a model in which binding of the glucocorticoid receptor to glucocorticoid regulatory elements on the surface of nucleosome B induces a chromatin transition that is necessary for transcription factor (NF-1 and TFIID) recruitment to the MMTV promoter. We hypothesize that association of histone H1 with important cis-elements on the promoter masks these sites, and glucocorticoid-induced displacement of H1 is necessary to expose factor binding sites at the 3' edge of nucleosome B, in the nucleosome B/nucleosome A linker and at the 5' edge of nucleosome A. Images PMID:1311071

  16. Influenza virus A (H1N1) in giant anteaters (Myrmecophaga tridactyla).

    PubMed

    Nofs, Sally; Abd-Eldaim, Mohamed; Thomas, Kathy V; Toplon, David; Rouse, Dawn; Kennedy, Melissa

    2009-07-01

    In February 2007, an outbreak of respiratory disease occurred in a group of giant anteaters (Myrmecophaga tridactyla) at the Nashville Zoo. Isolates from 2 affected animals were identified in March 2007 as a type A influenza virus related to human influenza subtype H1N1.

  17. Muscarinic cholinergic and histamine H1 receptor binding of phenothiazine drug metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Hals, P.A.; Hall, H.; Dahl, S.G.

    1988-01-01

    In vitro binding affinities of chlorpromazine, fluphenazine, levomepromazine, perphenazine and some of their metabolites for dopamine D2 receptors, ..cap alpha../sub 1/- and ..cap alpha../sup 2/ adrenoceptors in rat brain were previously reported from out laboratories. The present study reports the in vitro binding affinities of the same compounds for muscarinic cholinergic receptors and for histamine H1 receptors in rat brain, using /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and /sup 3/H-mepyramine as radioligands. Chlorpromazine, levomepromazine, and their metabolites had 5-30 times higher binding affinities for muscarinic cholinergic receptors than fluphenazine, perphenazine and their metabolites. Levomepromazine was the most potent and fluphenazine the least potent of the four drugs in histamine H1 receptor binding. 7-Hydroxy levomepromazine, 3-hydroxy levomepromazine and 7-hydroxy fluphenazine had only 10% of the potency of the parent drug in histamine H1 receptor binding, while the 7-hydroxy-metabolites of chlorpromazine and perphenazine had about 75% of the potency of the parent drug in this binding system. This histamine H1 receptor binding affinities indicate that metabolites may contribute to the sedative effects of chlorpromazine and levomepromazine.

  18. 11 CFR 103.2 - Depositories (2 U.S.C. 432(h)(1)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Depositories (2 U.S.C. 432(h)(1)). 103.2 Section 103.2 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL CAMPAIGN DEPOSITORIES (2 U.S.C. 432(h... Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation, or the National Credit Union Administration, as its...

  19. Narcolepsy and A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination

    PubMed Central

    van der Most, Robbert; Van Mechelen, Marcelle; Destexhe, Eric; Wettendorff, Martine; Hanon, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological data from several European countries suggested an increased risk of the chronic sleep disorder narcolepsy following vaccination with Pandemrix™, an AS03-adjuvanted, pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccine. Further research to investigate potential associations between Pandemrix™ vaccination, A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza infection and narcolepsy is required. Narcolepsy is most commonly caused by a reduction or absence of hypocretin produced by hypocretin-secreting neurons in the hypothalamus, and is tightly associated with HLA-II DQB1*06:02. Consequently, research focusing on CD4+ T-cell responses, building on the hypothesis that for disease development, T cells specific for antigen(s) from hypocretin neurons must be activated or reactivated, is considered essential. Therefore, the following key areas of research can be identified, (1) characterization of hypothetical narcolepsy-specific auto-immune CD4+ T cells, (2) mapping epitopes of such T cells, and (3) evaluating potential mechanisms that would enable such cells to gain access to the hypothalamus. Addressing these questions could further our understanding of the potential links between narcolepsy and A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination and/or infection. Of particular interest is that any evidence of a mimicry-based mechanism could also explain the association between narcolepsy and A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza infection. PMID:24342916

  20. Structural and immunologic characterization of Ara h 1 – a major peanut allergen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Allergic reactions to peanut and tree nuts is the major cause of anaphylaxis in the U.S. In this report; structural, immunologic, and bioinformatics analysis of natural, and a recombinant variant of the major peanut allergen Ara h 1 is presented. Small angle X-ray scattering studies show that natura...

  1. N-[4-(Dimethyl-amino)-benzyl-idene]-4H-1,2,4-triazol-4-amine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui-Liang; Zhang, Xiao-Min

    2012-05-01

    The title compound, C(11)H(13)N(5), is a Schiff base synthesized by the reaction of 4-amino-4H-1,2,4-triazole and 4-(dimethyl-amino)-benzaldehyde. The dihedral angle between the benzene and triazole rings is 43.09 (11)°. The crystal structure displays weak C-H⋯N inter-actions.

  2. Evolutionary complexities of swine flu H1N1 gene sequences of 2009.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Niladri Kumar; Roy, Ayan; Das, Ballari; Das, Santasabuj; Basak, Surajit

    2009-12-18

    A recently emerged novel influenza A (H1N1) virus continues to spread globally. The pandemic caused by this new H1N1 swine influenza virus presents an opportunity to analyze the evolutionary significance of the origin of the new strain of swine flu. Our study clearly suggests that strong purifying selection is responsible for the evolution of the novel influenza A (H1N1) virus among human. We observed that the 2009 viral sequences are evolutionarily widely different from the past few years' sequences. Rather, the 2009 sequences are evolutionarily more similar to the most ancient sequence reported in the NCBI Influenza Virus Resource Database collected in 1918. Analysis of evolutionary rates also supports the view that all the genes in the pandemic strain of 2009 except NA and M genes are derived from triple reassorted swine viruses. Our study demonstrates the importance of using complete-genome approach as more sequences will become available to investigate the evolutionary origin of the 1918 influenza A (H1N1) swine flu strain and the possibility of future reassortment events.

  3. Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak at camp for children with hematologic and oncologic conditions.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Cori; Maurtua-Neumann, Paola; Myint, Myo Thwin; Drury, Stacy S; Bégué, Rodolfo E

    2011-01-01

    An outbreak of influenza A pandemic (H1N1) 2009 occurred among campers and staff at a summer camp attended by children with hematologic and oncologic conditions. The overall attack rate was 36% and was highest among children and adolescents (43%), persons with cancer (48%), and persons with sickle cell disease (82%).

  4. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Virus Infection in Giant Pandas, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Desheng; Zhu, Ling; Cui, Hengmin; Ling, Shanshan; Fan, Shengtao; Yu, Zhijun; Zhou, Yuancheng; Wang, Tiecheng; Qian, Jun; Xia, Xianzhu; Xu, Zhiwen; Wang, Chengdong

    2014-01-01

    We confirmed infection with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in giant pandas in China during 2009 by using virus isolation and serologic analysis methods. This finding extends the host range of influenza viruses and indicates a need for increased surveillance for and control of influenza viruses among giant pandas. PMID:24565026

  5. sry h-1, a new Drosophila melanogaster multifingered protein gene showing maternal and zygotic expression.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, A; Kejzlarovà-Lepesant, J; Segalat, L; Yanicostas, C; Lepesant, J A

    1988-01-01

    Low-stringency hybridization of the Drosophila serendipity (sry) finger-coding sequences revealed copies of homologous DNA sequences in the genomes of members of the family Drosophilidae and higher vertebrates. sry h-1, a new Drosophila finger protein-coding gene isolated on the basis of this homology, encodes a 3.2-kilobase (kb) mRNA accumulating in eggs and abundant in early embryos. The predicted sry h-1 protein product, starting at an internal initiation site of translation, is a 868-amino-acid basic polypeptide containing eight TFIIIA-like fingers encoded by three separate exons. Links separating individual fingers in the sry h-1 protein are variable in length and sequence, in contrast with the invariant H/C link found in most multi-fingered proteins. The similarity of the developmental pattern of transcription of sry h-1 with that of several other Drosophila finger protein genes suggests the existence of a complex set of such genes encoding an information which is, at least partly, maternally provided to the embryo and required for activation of gene transcription in early embryos or maintenance of gene activity during subsequent development. Images PMID:3141791

  6. Rural Responses to H1N1: A Flexible Model for Community Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Farrell, Denise; Aubrey, Debra Larsen

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines a regional 2009 H1N1 rural response model, which utilises community partnerships with local government, county emergency management, public health, private healthcare, Medical Reserve Corps volunteers, and other organisations in rural Southeast Idaho. Unique aspects of the collaborative use of federal, state, county, and…

  7. Phylogenetic evolution of swine-origin human influenza virus: a pandemic H1N1 2009.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, A; Markowska-Daniel, I

    2010-01-01

    The knowledge of the genome constellation in pandemic influenza A virus H1N1 2009 from different countries and different hosts is valuable for monitoring and understanding of the evolution and migration of these strains. The complete genome sequences of selected worldwide distributed influenza A viruses are publicly available and there have been few longitudinal genome studies of human, avian and swine influenza A viruses. All possible to download SIV sequences of influenza A viruses available at GISAID Platform (Global Initiative on Sharing Avian Influenza Data) were analyzed firstly through the web servers of the Influenza Virus Resource in NCBI. Phylogenetic study of circulating human pandemic H1N1 virus indicated that the new variant possesses a distinctive evolutionary trait. There is no one way the pandemic H1N1 have acquired new genes from other distinguishable viruses circulating recently in local human, pig or domestic poultry populations from various geographic regions. The extensive genetic diversity among whole segments present in pandemic H1N1 genome suggests that multiple introduction of virus have taken place during the period 1999-2009. The initial interspecies transmission could have occurred in the long-range past and after it the reassortants steps lead to three lineages: classical SIV prevalent in the North America, avian-like SIV in Europe and avian-like related SIV in Asia. This analysis contributes to the evidence that pigs are not the only hosts playing the role of "mixing vessel", as it was suggested for many years.

  8. Narcolepsy as an autoimmune disease: the role of H1N1 infection and vaccination.

    PubMed

    Partinen, Markku; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Jennum, Poul; Julkunen, Ilkka; Vaarala, Outi

    2014-06-01

    Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder characterised by loss of hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin) neurons. The prevalence of narcolepsy is about 30 per 100 000 people, and typical age at onset is 12-16 years. Narcolepsy is strongly associated with the HLA-DQB1*06:02 genotype, and has been thought of as an immune-mediated disease. Other risk genes, such as T-cell-receptor α chain and purinergic receptor subtype 2Y11, are also implicated. Interest in narcolepsy has increased since the epidemiological observations that H1N1 infection and vaccination are potential triggering factors, and an increase in the incidence of narcolepsy after the pandemic AS03 adjuvanted H1N1 vaccination in 2010 from Sweden and Finland supports the immune-mediated pathogenesis. Epidemiological observations from studies in China also suggest a role for H1N1 virus infections as a trigger for narcolepsy. Although the pathological mechanisms are unknown, an H1N1 virus-derived antigen might be the trigger.

  9. 26 CFR 301.6501(h)-1 - Net operating loss or capital loss carrybacks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Net operating loss or capital loss carrybacks... Assessment and Collection § 301.6501(h)-1 Net operating loss or capital loss carrybacks. In the case of a deficiency attributable to the application to the taxpayer of a net operating loss or capital loss...

  10. Norpiperidine imidazoazepines as a new class of potent, selective, and nonsedative H1 antihistamines.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Frans; Leenaerts, Jos; Diels, Gaston; De Boeck, Benoît; Megens, Anton; Langlois, Xavier; van Rossem, Koen; Beetens, Johan; Borgers, Marcel

    2005-03-24

    Clinical doses of available H(1) antihistamines are limited mainly by sedative side effects. However, higher doses are often required to obtain optimal therapeutic activity, especially in dermatology. We report the synthesis of three norpiperidine imidazoazepines representative of a new class of selective and nonsedating H(1) antihistamines. The compounds were at least as potent as cetirizine and loratadine as measured by H(1) receptor binding affinity, by protection against compound 48/80- and histamine-induced lethality in rats and guinea pigs, respectively, and by skin reaction tests in rats, guinea pigs, and dogs. The compounds, in particular 3a, were less prone than the reference compounds to penetrate the brain and to occupy central H(1) receptors, suggesting absence of sedative side effects. In vitro and in vivo cardiovascular safety tests showed that 3a had no intrinsic potential to prolong ventricular repolarization or induce cardiac arrhythmias. Compound 3a has been selected for further clinical development, mainly for application in dermatology.

  11. H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu) - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Protect Your Child and Family from the Flu this School Year English 本学年家长预防子女和家人感染流感应采取的措施 - 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified) PDF Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Spanish (español) Gripe H1N1 (gripe porcina) Characters not displaying ...

  12. Information Entropy Analysis of the H1N1 Genetic Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martwick, Andy

    2010-03-01

    During the current H1N1 pandemic, viral samples are being obtained from large numbers of infected people world-wide and are being sequenced on the NCBI Influenza Virus Resource Database. The information entropy of the sequences was computed from the probability of occurrence of each nucleotide base at every position of each set of sequences using Shannon's definition of information entropy, [ H=∑bpb,2( 1pb ) ] where H is the observed information entropy at each nucleotide position and pb is the probability of the base pair of the nucleotides A, C, G, U. Information entropy of the current H1N1 pandemic is compared to reference human and swine H1N1 entropy. As expected, the current H1N1 entropy is in a low entropy state and has a very large mutation potential. Using the entropy method in mature genes we can identify low entropy regions of nucleotides that generally correlate to critical protein function.

  13. Pandemic 2009 H1N1 vaccine protects against 1918 Spanish influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Medina, Rafael A; Manicassamy, Balaji; Stertz, Silke; Seibert, Christopher W; Hai, Rong; Belshe, Robert B; Frey, Sharon E; Basler, Christopher F; Palese, Peter; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2010-06-15

    The 1918 influenza A virus caused the most devastating pandemic, killing approximately 50 million people worldwide. Immunization with 1918-like and classical swine H1N1 virus vaccines results in cross-protective antibodies against the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza, indicating antigenic similarities among these viruses. In this study, we demonstrate that vaccination with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 vaccine elicits 1918 virus cross-protective antibodies in mice and humans, and that vaccination or passive transfer of human-positive sera reduced morbidity and conferred full protection from lethal challenge with the 1918 virus in mice. The spread of the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus in the population worldwide, in addition to the large number of individuals already vaccinated, suggests that a large proportion of the population now have cross-protective antibodies against the 1918 virus, greatly alleviating concerns and fears regarding the accidental exposure/release of the 1918 virus from the laboratory and the use of the virus as a bioterrorist agent.

  14. Experimental Challenge with Two Isolates of 2009 A/H1N1 in Weaned Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction. The gene constellation of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus is a unique combination from swine influenza A viruses (SIV) of North American and Eurasian lineages, but prior to April 2009 had never before been identified in swine or other species (1). Although the hemagglutinin gene is relate...

  15. Research Updates: Experimental Evaluation of 2009 Pandemic A/H1N1 in Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: In March 2009, a novel pandemic A/H1N1 emerged in the human population in North America (2). The gene constellation of the emerging virus was demonstrated to be a combination of genes from swine influenza A viruses (SIV) of North American and Eurasian lineages that had never before be...

  16. The discovery of CCR3/H1 dual antagonists with reduced hERG risk.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Ash; Barton, Patrick; Bowers, Keith; Brough, Steven; Evans, Richard; Luckhurst, Christopher A; Mochel, Tobias; Perry, Matthew W D; Rigby, Aaron; Riley, Robert J; Sanganee, Hitesh; Sisson, Adam; Springthorpe, Brian

    2012-11-01

    A series of dual CCR3/H(1) antagonists based on a bispiperidine scaffold were discovered. Introduction of an acidic group overcame hERG liability. Bioavailability was optimised by modulation of physico-chemical properties and physical form to deliver a compound suitable for clinical evaluation.

  17. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection in giant pandas, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Desheng; Zhu, Ling; Cui, Hengmin; Ling, Shanshan; Fan, Shengtao; Yu, Zhijun; Zhou, Yuancheng; Wang, Tiecheng; Qian, Jun; Xia, Xianzhu; Xu, Zhiwen; Gao, Yuwei; Wang, Chengdong

    2014-03-01

    We confirmed infection with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in giant pandas in China during 2009 by using virus isolation and serologic analysis methods. This finding extends the host range of influenza viruses and indicates a need for increased surveillance for and control of influenza viruses among giant pandas.

  18. Travel and age of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus infection.

    PubMed

    Nishiura, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Age distribution of 4,986 cases of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 in Japan was analyzed. Cases with a travel history within 10 days preceding the illness onset were significantly older than indigenous cases (p < 0.01) reflecting age-specific travel patterns. Border controls should account for the high frequency of infection among adults.

  19. 20 CFR 655.736 - What are H-1B-dependent employers and willful violators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... status? Any group treated as a single employer under the Internal Revenue Code (IRC) at 26 U.S.C. 414(b), (c), (m) or (o) shall be treated as a single employer for purposes of the determination of H-1B... respect to the following groups of employees, those employees will be treated as employees of a...

  20. Increased virulence of neuraminidase inhibitor-resistant pandemic H1N1 virus in mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Min-Suk; Hee Baek, Yun; Kim, Eun-Ha; Park, Su-Jin; Kim, Semi; Lim, Gyo-Jin; Kwon, Hyeok-il; Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q; Decano, Arun G; Lee, Byeong-Jae; Kim, Young-Il; Webby, Richard J; Choi, Young-Ki

    2013-01-01

    Pandemic H1N1 2009 (A[H1N1]pdm09) variants associated with oseltamivir resistance have emerged with a histidine-to-tyrosine substitution in the neuraminidase(NA) at position 274 (H274Y). To determine whether the H274Y variant has increased virulence potential, A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, with or without the H274Y mutation, was adapted by serial lung-to-lung passages in mice. The mouse-adapted H274Y (maCA04H274Y) variants showed increased growth properties and virulence in vitro and in vivo while maintaining high NA inhibitor resistance. Interestingly, most maCA04H274Y and maCA04 viruses acquired common mutations in HA (S183P and D222G) and NP (D101G), while only maCA04H274Y viruses had consensus additional K153E mutation in the HA gene, suggesting a potential association with the H274Y substitution. Collectively, our findings highlight the potential emergence of A(H1N1)pdm09 drug-resistant variants with increased virulence and the need for rapid development of novel antiviral drugs. PMID:23924955

  1. The resurgence of swine-origin influenza A (H1N1).

    PubMed

    Mossad, Sherif Beniameen

    2009-06-01

    Unexpectedly, swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV, informally known as swine flu) appeared in North America at the very end of the 2008-2009 influenza season and began to spread internationally. As the world mobilizes for a potential pandemic, this article summarizes the developments in diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

  2. Synthesis of parvovirus H-1 replicative form from viral DNA by DNA polymerase gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Kollek, R; Goulian, M

    1981-01-01

    The initial event in the replication cycle of parvovirus H-1 is conversion of the single-stranded linear viral DNA to the double-stranded linear replicative form. We describe here detection of an activity in uninfected cell extracts that carries out this reaction. The activity was purified and identified as DNA polymerase gamma. Images PMID:6947222

  3. Antigenic and genetic analyses of H1N1 influenza A viruses from European pigs.

    PubMed

    Brown, I H; Ludwig, S; Olsen, C W; Hannoun, C; Scholtissek, C; Hinshaw, V S; Harris, P A; McCauley, J W; Strong, I; Alexander, D J

    1997-03-01

    H1N1 influenza A viruses isolated from pigs in Europe since 1981 were examined both antigenically and genetically and compared with H1N1 viruses from other sources. H1N1 viruses from pigs and birds could be divided into three groups: avian, classical swine and 'avian-like' swine viruses. Low or no reactivity of 'avian-like' swine viruses in HI tests with monoclonal antibodies raised against classical swine viruses was associated with amino acid substitutions within antigenic sites of the haemagglutinin (HA). Phylogenetic analysis of the HA gene revealed that classical swine viruses from European pigs are most similar to each other and are closely related to North American swine strains, whilst the 'avian-like' swine viruses cluster with avian viruses. 'Avian-like' viruses introduced into pigs in the UK in 1992 apparently originated directly from strains in pigs in continental Europe at that time. The HA genes of the swine viruses examined had undergone limited variation in antigenic sites and also contained fewer potential glycosylation sites compared to human H1N1 viruses. The HA exhibited antigenic drift which was more marked in 'avian-like' swine viruses than in classical swine strains. Genetic analyses of two recent 'avian-like' swine viruses indicated that all the RNA segments are related most closely to those of avian influenza A viruses.

  4. 26 CFR 1.1402(h)-1 - Members of certain religious groups opposed to insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Tax on Self-Employment Income § 1.1402(h)-1... acceptance of the benefits of any private or public insurance which makes payments in the event of death... filing of a return by a member of a religious group opposed to insurance showing no...

  5. Molecular properties of central and peripheral histamine H1 and H2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Čarman-Kržan, Marija; Lipnik-Štangelj, Metoda

    2000-01-01

    We identified and characterised histamine H1 and H2 receptor subtypes on rat cortical astrocytes in primary culture with radioligand binding studies and compared their molecular properties with peripheral (bovine vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells) histamine H1 and H2 receptors. Our results showed the existence of a homogenous population of high affinity binding sites for (3)H-mepyramine (Bmax = 281 fmol/mg protein, KD= 3.5 +/- 0.7 nM) and (3)H-tiotidine (Bmax = 59 fmol/mg protein, KD = 1.9 +/- 0.7 nM) on astrocytes, which was further confirmed by competition binding studies using various H1 and H2 specific agonists/antagonists. We showed differences in the density of receptors and differences in the affinities of competing drugs for the same histamine receptor subtype (H1 and H2) between the tissues used, which indicate different molecular properties of the central and peripheral histamine receptors.

  6. Molecular properties of central and peripheral histamine H1 and H2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Carman-Krzan, M; Lipnik-Stangelj, M

    2000-01-01

    We identified and characterised histamine H1 and H2 receptor subtypes on rat cortical astrocytes in primary culture with radioligand binding studies and compared their molecular properties with peripheral (bovine vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells) histamine H1 and H2 receptors. Our results showed the existence of a homogenous population of high affinity binding sites for 3H-mepyramine (Bmax = 281 fmol/mg protein, K(D) = 3.5 +/- 0.7 nM) and 3H-tiotidine (Bmax = 59 fmol/mg protein, K(D) = 1.9 +/- 0.7 nM) on astrocytes, which was further confirmed by competition binding studies using various H1 and H2 specific agonists/antagonists. We showed differences in the density of receptors and differences in the affinities of competing drugs for the same histamine receptor subtype (H1 and H2) between the tissues used, which indicate different molecular properties of the central and peripheral histamine receptors.

  7. Brief report: molecular characterization of a novel reassorted pandemic H1N1 2009 in Thai pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For the past 10 years, endemic swine influenza H1 viruses in Thailand have been characterized as reassortants of swine virus genes from swine influenza viruses (SIV) in US and European pigs. Here the authors report the emergence of a novel reassorted H1N1 (rH1N1) virus consisted of human, avian, and...

  8. Full-Genome Sequence of a Reassortant H1N1 Swine Influenza Virus Isolated from Pigs in Italy.

    PubMed

    Chiapponi, Chiara; Baioni, Laura; Luppi, Andrea; Moreno, Ana; Castellan, Alberto; Foni, Emanuela

    2013-10-03

    In this study, the full-genome sequence of a novel reassortant H1N1 swine influenza virus (SIV) is reported. The isolate has a hemagglutinin (HA) gene of the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, but it carries the seven genome segments of the avian-origin H1N1 SIV currently circulating in European pig farms.

  9. Full-Genome Sequence of a Reassortant H1N1 Swine Influenza Virus Isolated from Pigs in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Chiapponi, Chiara; Baioni, Laura; Luppi, Andrea; Moreno, Ana; Castellan, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the full-genome sequence of a novel reassortant H1N1 swine influenza virus (SIV) is reported. The isolate has a hemagglutinin (HA) gene of the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, but it carries the seven genome segments of the avian-origin H1N1 SIV currently circulating in European pig farms. PMID:24092781

  10. Comparative virulence of wild-type H1N1pdm09 influenza A isolates in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2009, a novel swine-origin H1N1 (H1N1pdm09) influenza A virus (IAV) reached pandemic status and was soon after detected in pigs worldwide. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether differences in the HA protein can affect pathogenicity and antigenicity of H1N1pdm09 in swine. We compared...

  11. Safety and efficacy of a novel live attenuated influenza vaccine against pandemic H1N1 in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    On June 11, 2009 the World Health Organization (WHO) declared that the outbreaks caused by novel swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus had reached pandemic proportions. The pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) is the predominant influenza strain in the human population. It has also crossed the species barriers a...

  12. 76 FR 11686 - Registration Requirement for Petitioners Seeking to File H-1B Petitions on Behalf of Aliens...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... when the demand for H-1B visas greatly exceeds the available supply. 4. Changes Proposed--Registration.... See 8 CFR 214.2(h)(9)(i)(B). During years of high demand for H-1B workers, the H-1B cap has been... education, or a related or affiliated nonprofit entity; (2) are employed at, or have received an offer...

  13. Modeling control strategies for concurrent epidemics of seasonal and pandemic H1N1 influenza.

    PubMed

    Prosper, Olivia; Saucedo, Omar; Thompson, Doria; Torres-Garcia, Griselle; Wang, Xiaohong; Castillo-Chavez, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The lessons learned from the 2009-2010 H1N1 influenza pandemic, as it moves out of the limelight, should not be under-estimated, particularly since the probability of novel influenza epidemics in the near future is not negligible and the potential consequences might be huge. Hence, as the world, particularly the industrialized world, responded to the potentially devastating effects of this novel A-H1N1 strain with substantial resources, reminders of the recurrent loss of life from a well established foe, seasonal influenza, could not be ignored. The uncertainties associated with the reported and expected levels of morbidity and mortality with this novel A-H1N1 live in a backdrop of deaths, over 200,000 hospitalizations, and millions of infections (20% of the population) attributed to seasonal influenza in the USA alone, each year. So, as the Northern Hemisphere braced for the possibility of a potentially "lethal" second wave of the novel A-H1N1 without a vaccine ready to mitigate its impact, questions of who should be vaccinated first if a vaccine became available, came to the forefront of the discussion. Uncertainty grew as we learned that the vaccine, once available, would be unevenly distributed around the world. Nations capable of acquiring large vaccine supplies soon became aware that those who could pay would have to compete for a limited vaccine stockpile. The challenges faced by nations dealing jointly with seasonal and novel A-H1N1 co-circulating strains under limited resources, that is, those with no access to novel A-H1N1 vaccine supplies, limited access to the seasonal influenza vaccine, and limited access to antivirals (like Tamiflu) are explored in this study. One- and two-strain models are introduced to mimic the influenza dynamics of a single and co-circulating strains, in the context of a single epidemic outbreak. Optimal control theory is used to identify and evaluate the "best" control policies. The controls account for the cost associated with

  14. Benchmarking and performance analysis of the CM-2. [SIMD computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, David W.; Adams, George B., II

    1988-01-01

    A suite of benchmarking routines testing communication, basic arithmetic operations, and selected kernel algorithms written in LISP and PARIS was developed for the CM-2. Experiment runs are automated via a software framework that sequences individual tests, allowing for unattended overnight operation. Multiple measurements are made and treated statistically to generate well-characterized results from the noisy values given by cm:time. The results obtained provide a comparison with similar, but less extensive, testing done on a CM-1. Tests were chosen to aid the algorithmist in constructing fast, efficient, and correct code on the CM-2, as well as gain insight into what performance criteria are needed when evaluating parallel processing machines.

  15. The 21-cm Signal from the cosmological epoch of recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Fialkov, A.; Loeb, A. E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-11-01

    The redshifted 21-cm emission by neutral hydrogen offers a unique tool for mapping structure formation in the early universe in three dimensions. Here we provide the first detailed calculation of the 21-cm emission signal during and after the epoch of hydrogen recombination in the redshift range of z ∼ 500–1,100, corresponding to observed wavelengths of 100–230 meters. The 21-cm line deviates from thermal equilibrium with the cosmic microwave background (CMB) due to the excess Lyα radiation from hydrogen and helium recombinations. The resulting 21-cm signal reaches a brightness temperature of a milli-Kelvin, orders of magnitude larger than previously estimated. Its detection by a future lunar or space-based observatory could improve dramatically the statistical constraints on the cosmological initial conditions compared to existing two-dimensional maps of the CMB anisotropies.

  16. CM Process Improvement and the International Space Station Program (ISSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephenson, Ginny

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Configuration Management (CM) process improvements planned and undertaken for the International Space Station Program (ISSP). It reviews the 2004 findings and recommendations and the progress towards their implementation.

  17. Vibrational Spectra of 3-(Adamantan-1-YL)-4-(2-Propen-1-YL)-1 H-1,2,4-Triazole-5(4 H)-Thione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkov, L. L.; Matsukovich, A. S.; Pavich, T. A.; Gaponenko, S. V.; El-Emam, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Vibrational spectra of 3-(adamantan-1-yl)-4-(2-propen-1-yl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-5(4H)-thione (C15H21N3S), which was promising for drug development, were studied experimentally and theoretically. The geometric structure and normal modes of the molecule and its dimer were calculated using quantum-mechanical density functional theory. It was shown that the experimentally obtained vibrational spectra were due to dimeric C15H21N3S structures. This conclusion was confirmed by spectra of the isotopically substituted compound with a deuterated imine. Bands at 1496 and 1549 cm-1 were identified as markers of dimer formation. Bands at 936 and 1244 cm-1 were found to be markers of intermolecular interactions of adamantane fragments.

  18. 75 FR 11935 - Technical Change to the Filing Location of Prevailing Wage Determinations for Use in the H-1B, H...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... Determinations for Use in the H-1B, H-1B1 (Chile/Singapore), H-1C, H- 2B, E-3 (Australia), and Permanent Labor... determination requests for H-1B, H-1B1 (Chile/Singapore), H-1C, H- 2B, E-3 (Australia), and Permanent...

  19. Transmission of Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Virus in a Train in China

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Fuqiang; Luo, Huiming; Zhou, Lei; Yin, Dapeng; Zheng, Canjun; Wang, Dingming; Gong, Jian; Fang, Gang; He, Jianfeng; McFarland, Jeffrey; Yu, Hongjie

    2011-01-01

    Background Pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus emerged in North America in April 2009 and spread globally. We describe the epidemiology and public health response to the first known outbreak of 2009 H1N1 in a train, which occurred in June 2009 in China. Methods After 2 provinces provided initial reports of 2009 H1N1 infection in 2 persons who had travelled on the same train, we conducted a retrospective epidemiologic investigation to collect information from the passengers, crew members, contacts, and health care providers. We explored the source of infection and possible routes of transmission in the train. All cases were confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction testing. Results Train #1223 traveled 40 hours, made 28 stops in 4 Chinese provinces, and boarded 2555 passengers, who logged a total of 59 144 person-hours of travel time. Nineteen confirmed 2009 H1N1 cases were identified. Of these, 13 were infected and developed symptoms on the train and 6 occurred among contacts who developed illness during medical monitoring. In addition, 3 asymptomatic cases were identified based on RT-PCR testing of respiratory swabs from contacts. The attack rate among contacts of confirmed cases in the same car was higher than that among contacts in other cars (3.15% vs. 0%, P < 0.001). Attack rates increased with exposure time. Conclusions Close contact and long exposure may have contributed to the transmission of 2009 H1N1 virus in the train. Trains may have played an important role in the 2009 influenza pandemic. PMID:21646746

  20. Autophagy suppresses cell migration by degrading GEF-H1, a RhoA GEF.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tatsushi; Tsujioka, Masatsune; Honda, Shinya; Tanaka, Masato; Shimizu, Shigeomi

    2016-06-07

    Cell migration is a process crucial for a variety of biological events, such as morphogenesis and wound healing. Several reports have described the possible regulation of cell migration by autophagy; however, this remains controversial. We here demonstrate that mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking autophagy protein 5 (Atg5), an essential molecule of autophagy, moved faster than wild-type (WT) MEFs. Similar results were obtained for MEFs lacking Atg7 and unc-51-like kinase 1 (Ulk1), which are molecules required for autophagy. This phenotype was also observed in Atg7-deficient macrophages. WT MEFs moved by mesenchymal-type migration, whereas Atg5 knockout (KO) MEFs moved by amoeba-like migration. This difference was thought to be mediated by the level of RhoA activity, because Atg5 KO MEFs had higher RhoA activity, and treatment with a RhoA inhibitor altered Atg5 KO MEF migration from the amoeba type to the mesenchymal type. Autophagic regulation of RhoA activity was dependent on GEF-H1, a member of the RhoA family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors. In WT MEFs, GEF-H1 directly bound to p62 and was degraded by autophagy, resulting in low RhoA activity. In contrast, the loss of autophagy increased GEF-H1 levels and thereby activated RhoA, which caused cells to move by amoeba-like migration. This amoeba-like migration was cancelled by the silencing of GEF-H1. These results indicate that autophagy plays a role in the regulation of migration by degrading GEF-H1.

  1. Molecular character of influenza A/H1N1 2009: Implications for spread and control.

    PubMed

    Aras, Siddhesh; Aiyar, Ashok; Amedee, Angela M; Gallaher, William R

    2009-12-01

    The world is experiencing a pandemic of influenza that emerged in March 2009, due to a novel strain designated influenza A/H1N1 2009. This strain is closest in molecular sequence to swine influenza viruses, but differs from all previously known influenza by a minimum of 6.1%, and from prior "seasonal" H1N1 by 27.2%, giving it great potential for widespread human infection. While spread into India was delayed for two months by an aggressive interdiction program, since 1 August 2009 most cases in India have been indigenous. H1N1 2009 has differentially struck younger patients who are naïve susceptibles to its antigenic subtype, while sparing those >60 who have crossreactive antibody from prior experience with influenza decades ago and the 1977 "swine flu" vaccine distributed in the United States. It also appears to more severely affect pregnant women. It emanated from a single source in central Mexico, but its precise geographical and circumstantial origins, from either Eurasia or the Americas, remain uncertain. While currently a mild pandemic by the standard of past pandemics, the seriousness of H1N1 2009 especially among children should not be underestimated. There is potential for the virus, which continues to adapt to humans, to change over time into a more severe etiologic agent by any of several foreseeable mutations. Mass acceptance of the novel H1N1 2009 vaccine worldwide will be essential to its control. Having spread globally in a few months, affecting millions of people, it is likely to remain circulating in the human population for a decade or more.

  2. Mutations in the tail domain of DYNC1H1 cause dominant spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Harms, M.B.; Ori-McKenney, K.M.; Scoto, M.; Tuck, E.P.; Bell, S.; Ma, D.; Masi, S.; Allred, P.; Al-Lozi, M.; Reilly, M.M.; Miller, L.J.; Jani-Acsadi, A.; Pestronk, A.; Shy, M.E.; Muntoni, F.; Vallee, R.B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify the gene responsible for 14q32-linked dominant spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity predominance (SMA-LED, OMIM 158600). Methods: Target exon capture and next generation sequencing was used to analyze the 73 genes in the 14q32 linkage interval in 3 SMA-LED family members. Candidate gene sequencing in additional dominant SMA families used PCR and pooled target capture methods. Patient fibroblasts were biochemically analyzed. Results: Regional exome sequencing of all candidate genes in the 14q32 interval in the original SMA-LED family identified only one missense mutation that segregated with disease state—a mutation in the tail domain of DYNC1H1 (I584L). Sequencing of DYNC1H1 in 32 additional probands with lower extremity predominant SMA found 2 additional heterozygous tail domain mutations (K671E and Y970C), confirming that multiple different mutations in the same domain can cause a similar phenotype. Biochemical analysis of dynein purified from patient-derived fibroblasts demonstrated that the I584L mutation dominantly disrupted dynein complex stability and function. Conclusions: We demonstrate that mutations in the tail domain of the heavy chain of cytoplasmic dynein (DYNC1H1) cause spinal muscular atrophy and provide experimental evidence that a human DYNC1H1 mutation disrupts dynein complex assembly and function. DYNC1H1 mutations were recently found in a family with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (type 2O) and in a child with mental retardation. Both of these phenotypes show partial overlap with the spinal muscular atrophy patients described here, indicating that dynein dysfunction is associated with a range of phenotypes in humans involving neuronal development and maintenance. PMID:22459677

  3. Inside the Outbreak of the 2009 Influenza A (H1N1)v Virus in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Zepeda-Lopez, Hector M.; Perea-Araujo, Lizbeth; Miliar-García, Angel; Dominguez-López, Aarón; Xoconostle-Cázarez, Beatriz; Lara-Padilla, Eleazar; Ramírez Hernandez, Jorge A.; Sevilla-Reyes, Edgar; Orozco, Maria Esther; Ahued-Ortega, Armando; Villaseñor-Ruiz, Ignacio; Garcia-Cavazos, Ricardo J.; Teran, Luis M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Influenza viruses pose a threat to human health because of their potential to cause global disease. Between mid March and mid April a pandemic influenza A virus emerged in Mexico. This report details 202 cases of infection of humans with the 2009 influenza A virus (H1N1)v which occurred in Mexico City as well as the spread of the virus throughout the entire country. Methodology and Findings From May 1st to May 5th nasopharyngeal swabs, derived from 751 patients, were collected at 220 outpatient clinics and 28 hospitals distributed throughout Mexico City. Analysis of samples using real time RT-PCR revealed that 202 patients out of the 751 subjects (26.9%) were confirmed to be infected with the new virus. All confirmed cases of human infection with the strain influenza (H1N1)v suffered respiratory symptoms. The greatest number of confirmed cases during the outbreak of the 2009 influenza A (H1N1)v were seen in neighbourhoods on the northeast side of Mexico City including Iztapalapa, Gustavo A. Madero, Iztacalco, and Tlahuac which are the most populated areas in Mexico City. Using these data, together with data reported by the Mexican Secretariat of Health (MSH) to date, we plot the course of influenza (H1N1)v activity throughout Mexico. Conclusions Our data, which is backed up by MSH data, show that the greatest numbers of the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) cases were seen in the most populated areas. We speculate on conditions in Mexico which may have sparked this flu pandemic, the first in 41 years. We accept the hypothesis that high population density and a mass gathering which took in Iztapalapa contributed to the rapid spread of the disease which developed in three peaks of activity throughout the Country. PMID:20949040

  4. Trust during the early stages of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic.

    PubMed

    Freimuth, Vicki S; Musa, Don; Hilyard, Karen; Quinn, Sandra Crouse; Kim, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Distrust of the government often stands in the way of cooperation with public health recommendations in a crisis. The purpose of this article is to describe the public's trust in government recommendations during the early stages of the H1N1 pandemic and to identify factors that might account for these trust levels. The authors surveyed 1,543 respondents about their experiences and attitudes related to H1N1 influenza between June 3, 2009, and July 6, 2009, during the first wave of the pandemic using the Knowledge Networks online panel. This panel is representative of the U.S. population and uses a combination of random digit dialing and address-based probability sampling frames covering 99% of the U.S. household population to recruit participants. To ensure participation of low-income individuals and those without Internet access, Knowledge Networks provides hardware and access to the Internet if needed. Measures included standard demographics, a trust scale, trust ratings for individual spokespersons, involvement with H1N1, experience with H1N1, and past discrimination in health care. The authors found that trust of government was low (2.3 out of 4) and varied across demographic groups. Blacks and Hispanics reported higher trust in government than did Whites. Of the spokespersons included, personal health professionals received the highest trust ratings and religious leaders the lowest. Attitudinal and experience variables predicted trust better than demographic characteristics. Closely following the news about the flu virus, having some self-reported knowledge about H1N1, self-reporting of local cases, and previously experiencing discrimination were the significant attitudinal and experience predictors of trust. Using a second longitudinal survey, trust in the early stages of the pandemic predicted vaccine acceptance later but only for White, non-Hispanic individuals.

  5. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and postpandemic influenza in Lithuania

    PubMed Central

    Ambrozaitis, Arvydas; Radzišauskienė, Daiva; Kuprevičienė, Nerija; Gravenstein, Stefan; Jančorienė, Ligita

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study is to describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients hospitalized in Lithuania who are infected with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and to compare pandemic A(H1N1) pdm09 infection with postpandemic. In total, 146 subjects hospitalized with influenza A(H1N1) pdm09 were identified from 2009–2011. There were 53 during the initial pandemic wave in the summer of 2009, 69 during the peak pandemic period, and 24 during the “postpandemic” period that we included in this study. There were 22 subjects who died after laboratory confirmation of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. No deaths were documented during the first wave. Subjects presenting during the peak of pandemic influenza had a greater incidence of fever (100% vs 77.4%; p<0.001), dry cough (95.7% vs 82.7%; p=0.01), and vomiting (26.1% vs 1.9%, p<0.001) as compared with patients infected during the first wave. The rate of bacterial pneumonia was 18.8% (13/69) during the peak pandemic period and 12.5% (3/24, p=0.754) during the postpandemic period. None of the postpandemic influenza subjects’ intensive care unit stays were due to pneumonia. The hospitalized early 2009 H1N1 pandemic cases and postpandemic cases were milder compared with those at the peak of pandemic activity. PMID:28352819

  6. Novel mutations expand the clinical spectrum of DYNC1H1-associated spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Scoto, Mariacristina; Rossor, Alexander M.; Harms, Matthew B.; Cirak, Sebahattin; Calissano, Mattia; Robb, Stephanie; Manzur, Adnan Y.; Martínez Arroyo, Amaia; Rodriguez Sanz, Aida; Mansour, Sahar; Fallon, Penny; Hadjikoumi, Irene; Klein, Andrea; Yang, Michele; De Visser, Marianne; Overweg-Plandsoen, W.C.G. (Truus); Baas, Frank; Taylor, J. Paul; Benatar, Michael; Connolly, Anne M.; Al-Lozi, Muhammad T.; Nixon, John; de Goede, Christian G.E.L.; Foley, A. Reghan; Mcwilliam, Catherine; Pitt, Matthew; Sewry, Caroline; Phadke, Rahul; Hafezparast, Majid; Chong, W.K. “Kling”; Mercuri, Eugenio; Baloh, Robert H.; Reilly, Mary M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To expand the clinical phenotype of autosomal dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity predominance (SMA-LED) due to mutations in the dynein, cytoplasmic 1, heavy chain 1 (DYNC1H1) gene. Methods: Patients with a phenotype suggestive of a motor, non–length-dependent neuronopathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs were identified at participating neuromuscular centers and referred for targeted sequencing of DYNC1H1. Results: We report a cohort of 30 cases of SMA-LED from 16 families, carrying mutations in the tail and motor domains of DYNC1H1, including 10 novel mutations. These patients are characterized by congenital or childhood-onset lower limb wasting and weakness frequently associated with cognitive impairment. The clinical severity is variable, ranging from generalized arthrogryposis and inability to ambulate to exclusive and mild lower limb weakness. In many individuals with cognitive impairment (9/30 had cognitive impairment) who underwent brain MRI, there was an underlying structural malformation resulting in polymicrogyric appearance. The lower limb muscle MRI shows a distinctive pattern suggestive of denervation characterized by sparing and relative hypertrophy of the adductor longus and semitendinosus muscles at the thigh level, and diffuse involvement with relative sparing of the anterior-medial muscles at the calf level. Proximal muscle histopathology did not always show classic neurogenic features. Conclusion: Our report expands the clinical spectrum of DYNC1H1-related SMA-LED to include generalized arthrogryposis. In addition, we report that the neurogenic peripheral pathology and the CNS neuronal migration defects are often associated, reinforcing the importance of DYNC1H1 in both central and peripheral neuronal functions. PMID:25609763

  7. Hearing impairment in the P23H-1 retinal degeneration rat model

    PubMed Central

    Sotoca, Jorge V.; Alvarado, Juan C.; Fuentes-Santamaría, Verónica; Martinez-Galan, Juan R.; Caminos, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The transgenic P23H line 1 (P23H-1) rat expresses a variant of rhodopsin with a mutation that leads to loss of visual function. This rat strain is an experimental model usually employed to study photoreceptor degeneration. Although the mutated protein should not interfere with other sensory functions, observing severe loss of auditory reflexes in response to natural sounds led us to study auditory brain response (ABR) recording. Animals were separated into different hearing levels following the response to natural stimuli (hand clapping and kissing sounds). Of all the analyzed animals, 25.9% presented auditory loss before 50 days of age (P50) and 45% were totally deaf by P200. ABR recordings showed that all the rats had a higher hearing threshold than the control Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, which was also higher than any other rat strains. The integrity of the central and peripheral auditory pathway was analyzed by histology and immunocytochemistry. In the cochlear nucleus (CN), statistical differences were found between SD and P23H-1 rats in VGluT1 distribution, but none were found when labeling all the CN synapses with anti-Syntaxin. This finding suggests anatomical and/or molecular abnormalities in the auditory downstream pathway. The inner ear of the hypoacusic P23H-1 rats showed several anatomical defects, including loss and disruption of hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons. All these results can explain, at least in part, how hearing impairment can occur in a high percentage of P23H-1 rats. P23H-1 rats may be considered an experimental model with visual and auditory dysfunctions in future research. PMID:25278831

  8. Academics and competing interests in H1N1 influenza media reporting

    PubMed Central

    Mandeville, Kate L; O'Neill, Sam; Brighouse, Andrew; Walker, Alice; Yarrow, Kielan; Chan, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Background Concerns have been raised over competing interests (CoI) among academics during the 2009 to 2010 A/H1N1 pandemic. Media reporting can influence public anxiety and demand for pharmaceutical products. We assessed CoI of academics providing media commentary during the early stages of the pandemic. Methods We performed a retrospective content analysis of UK newspaper articles on A/H1N1 influenza, examining quoted sources. We noted when academics made a risk assessment of the pandemic and compared this with official estimations. We also looked for promotion or rejection of the use of neuraminidase inhibitors or H1N1-specific vaccine. We independently searched for CoI for each academic. Results Academics were the second most frequently quoted source after Ministers of Health. Where both academics and official agencies estimated the risk of H1N1, one in two academics assessed the risk as higher than official predictions. For academics with CoI, the odds of a higher risk assessment were 5.8 times greater than those made by academics without CoI (Wald p value=0.009). One in two academics commenting on the use of neuraminidase inhibitors or vaccine had CoI. The odds of CoI in academics promoting the use of neuraminidase inhibitors were 8.4 times greater than for academics not commenting on their use (Fisher's exact p=0.005). Conclusions There is evidence of CoI among academics providing media commentary during the early H1N1 pandemic. Heightened risk assessments, combined with advocacy for pharmaceutical products to counter this risk, may lead to increased public anxiety and demand. Academics should declare, and journalists report, relevant CoI for media interviews. PMID:24218071

  9. 2009 H1N1 flu pandemic among professional basketball players: data from 18 countries.

    PubMed

    Kousoulis, Antonis A; Sergentanis, Theodoros N; Tsiodras, Sotirios

    2014-12-01

    Although influenza may be propagated in innumerable occasions and daily situations involving exposure, basketball may create many chances for close contact in which influenza could spread. This study aims to quantify and assess the impact of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic among professional basketball players. A multi-step strategy was followed to gather the relevant data during the 2009-10 basketball season. Possible risk factors were recorded; logistic regression was performed to assess the impact of the former. Where data were only available in the press, cases were also verified by subsequent communication with the national basketball federations. Relevant data were available for 18 countries (218 teams, 3,024 players). In all, 52 H1N1 cases in 19 teams were reported. A larger number of players presented as a risk factor for the emergence of H1N1 cases to a borderline extent (Odds Ratio, OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.00-1.41, p 0.056). A borderline association also implicated the population of the city-basis (OR 1.01, 95% CI 1.00-1.02, p 0.094). On the other hand, no significant association with risk of H1N1 emergence was demonstrated regarding latitude and longitude of the city-basis. Even in environments where the best possible preventive and other medical care is provided influenza continues to be a threat. The microenvironment (crowding index, players per team) seemed to represent the most meaningful predictor regarding H1N1 emergence in a basketball team.

  10. Receptor recognition mechanism of human influenza A H1N1 (1918), avian influenza A H5N1 (2004), and pandemic H1N1 (2009) neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Jongkon, Nipa; Sangma, Chak

    2012-01-01

    Influenza A neuraminidase (NA) is a target for anti-influenza drugs. The function of this enzyme is to cleave a glycosidic linkage of a host cell receptor that links sialic acid (Sia) to galactose (Gal), to allow the virus to leave an infected cell and propagate. The receptor is an oligosaccharide on the host cell surface. There are two types of oligosaccharide receptor; the first, which is found mainly on avian epithelial cell surfaces, links Sia with Gal by an α2,3 glycosidic linkage; in the second, found mainly on human epithelial cell surfaces, linkage is via an α2,6 linkage. Some researchers believe that NAs from different viruses show selectivity for each type of linkage, but there is limited information available to confirm this hypothesis. To see if the linkage type is more specific to any particular NA, a number of NA-receptor complexes of human influenza A H1N1 (1918), avian influenza A H5N1 (2004), and a pandemic strain of H1N1 (2009) were constructed using homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulation. The results show that the two types of receptor analogues bound to NAs use different mechanisms. Moreover, it was found that a residue unique to avian virus NA is responsible for the recognition of the Siaα2,3Gal receptor, and a residue unique to human virus NA is responsible for the recognition of Siaα2,6Gal. We believe that this finding could explain how NAs of different virus origins always possess some unique residues.

  11. Cross-reactive CD8+ T-cell immunity between the pandemic H1N1-2009 and H1N1-1918 influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Gras, Stephanie; Kedzierski, Lukasz; Valkenburg, Sophie A; Laurie, Karen; Liu, Yu Chih; Denholm, Justin T; Richards, Michael J; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Kelso, Anne; Doherty, Peter C; Turner, Stephen J; Rossjohn, Jamie; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2010-07-13

    Preexisting T-cell immunity directed at conserved viral regions promotes enhanced recovery from influenza virus infections, with there being some evidence of cross-protection directed at variable peptides. Strikingly, many of the immunogenic peptides derived from the current pandemic A(H1N1)-2009 influenza virus are representative of the catastrophic 1918 "Spanish flu" rather than more recent "seasonal" strains. We present immunological and structural analyses of cross-reactive CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immunity directed at a variable (although highly cross-reactive) immunodominant NP(418-426) peptide that binds to a large B7 family (HLA-B*3501/03/0702) found throughout human populations. Memory CD8(+) T-cell specificity was probed for 12 different NP(418) mutants that emerged over the 9 decades between the 1918 and 2009 pandemics. Although there is evidence of substantial cross-reactivity among seasonal NP(418) mutants, current memory T-cell profiles show no preexisting immunity to the 2009-NP(418) variant or the 1918-NP(418) variant. Natural infection with the A(H1N1)-2009 virus, however, elicits CD8(+) T cells specific for the 2009-NP(418) and 1918-NP(418) epitopes. This analysis points to the potential importance of cross-reactive T-cell populations that cover the possible spectrum of T-cell variants and suggests that the identification of key residues/motifs that elicit cross-reactive T-cell sets could facilitate the evolution of immunization protocols that provide a measure of protection against unpredicted pandemic influenza viruses. Thus, it is worth exploring the potential of vaccines that incorporate peptide variants with a proven potential for broader immunogenicity, especially to those that are not recognized by the current memory T-cell pool generated by exposure to influenza variants that cause successive seasonal epidemics.

  12. Risk of Malignancy in Thyroid Nodules 4 cm or Larger

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Several authors have questioned the accuracy of fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) in large nodules. Some surgeons recommend thyroidectomy for nodules ≥4 cm even in the setting of benign FNAC, due to increased risk of malignancy and increased false negative rates in large thyroid nodules. The goal of our study was to evaluate if thyroid nodule size is associated with risk of malignancy, and to evaluate the false negative rate of FNAC for thyroid nodules ≥4 cm in our patient population. Methods This is a retrospective study of 85 patients with 101 thyroid nodules, who underwent thyroidectomy for thyroid nodules measuring ≥4 cm. Results The overall risk of malignancy in nodules ≥4 cm was 9.9%. Nodule size was not associated with risk of malignancy (odds ratio, 1.02) after adjusting for nodule consistency, age, and sex (P=0.6). The false negative rate for FNAC was 0%. Conclusion Nodule size was not associated with risk of malignancy in nodules ≥4 cm in our patient population. FNAC had a false negative rate of 0. Patients with thyroid nodules ≥4 cm and benign cytology should not automatically undergo thyroidectomy. PMID:28181427

  13. The Genomic Contributions of Avian H1N1 Influenza A Viruses to the Evolution of Mammalian Strains

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Gang; Zhang, Jinghui; Webster, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Among the influenza A viruses (IAVs) in wild aquatic birds, only H1, H2, and H3 subtypes have caused epidemics in humans. H1N1 viruses of avian origin have also caused 3 of 5 pandemics. To understand the reappearance of H1N1 in the context of pandemic emergence, we investigated whether avian H1N1 IAVs have contributed to the evolution of human, swine, and 2009 pandemic H1N1 IAVs. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, we concluded that the polymerase gene segments (especially PB2 and PA) circulating in North American avian H1N1 IAVs have been reintroduced to swine multiple times, resulting in different lineages that led to the emergence of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 IAVs. Moreover, the similar topologies of hemagglutinin and nucleoprotein and neuraminidase and matrix gene segments suggest that each surface glycoprotein coevolved with an internal gene segment within the H1N1 subtype. The genotype of avian H1N1 IAVs of Charadriiformes origin isolated in 2009 differs from that of avian H1N1 IAVs of Anseriformes origin. When the antigenic sites in the hemagglutinin of all 31 North American avian H1N1 IAVs were considered, 60%-80% of the amino acids at the antigenic sites were identical to those in 1918 and/or 2009 pandemic H1N1 viruses. Thus, although the pathogenicity of avian H1N1 IAVs could not be inferred from the phylogeny due to the small dataset, the evolutionary process within the H1N1 IAV subtype suggests that the circulation of H1N1 IAVs in wild birds poses a continuous threat for future influenza pandemics in humans. PMID:26208281

  14. The Genomic Contributions of Avian H1N1 Influenza A Viruses to the Evolution of Mammalian Strains.

    PubMed

    Koçer, Zeynep A; Carter, Robert; Wu, Gang; Zhang, Jinghui; Webster, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    Among the influenza A viruses (IAVs) in wild aquatic birds, only H1, H2, and H3 subtypes have caused epidemics in humans. H1N1 viruses of avian origin have also caused 3 of 5 pandemics. To understand the reappearance of H1N1 in the context of pandemic emergence, we investigated whether avian H1N1 IAVs have contributed to the evolution of human, swine, and 2009 pandemic H1N1 IAVs. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, we concluded that the polymerase gene segments (especially PB2 and PA) circulating in North American avian H1N1 IAVs have been reintroduced to swine multiple times, resulting in different lineages that led to the emergence of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 IAVs. Moreover, the similar topologies of hemagglutinin and nucleoprotein and neuraminidase and matrix gene segments suggest that each surface glycoprotein coevolved with an internal gene segment within the H1N1 subtype. The genotype of avian H1N1 IAVs of Charadriiformes origin isolated in 2009 differs from that of avian H1N1 IAVs of Anseriformes origin. When the antigenic sites in the hemagglutinin of all 31 North American avian H1N1 IAVs were considered, 60%-80% of the amino acids at the antigenic sites were identical to those in 1918 and/or 2009 pandemic H1N1 viruses. Thus, although the pathogenicity of avian H1N1 IAVs could not be inferred from the phylogeny due to the small dataset, the evolutionary process within the H1N1 IAV subtype suggests that the circulation of H1N1 IAVs in wild birds poses a continuous threat for future influenza pandemics in humans.

  15. Predicting psychological responses to influenza A, H1N1 ("swine flu"): the role of illness perceptions.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lynn; Regagliolo, Anna; Rasmussen, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Previous research on H1N1 ("Swine flu") has demonstrated that although the public reported concern about H1N1, knowledge levels were low, as were reports of behavioural changes aimed at minimising the spread of H1N1. The current study had two main aims; (i) to ascertain levels of state anxiety and knowledge about H1N1, and (ii) to examine if illness perceptions predict anxiety about H1N1, perceived risk of contracting H1N1, and knowledge about H1N1. The study was cross-sectional in design, and involved 235 participants (100 males, 135 females, mean age 22.48 years) completing self-report measures of knowledge, anxiety, and perceived risk about H1N1, and illness perceptions (BIPQ). Analyses revealed low levels of knowledge about H1N1, 37.4% of participants could not identify any of the causes of H1N1. Correlation and multiple regression analyses demonstrated that illness perceptions were associated with responses to H1N1, with negative illness perceptions predicting state anxiety (β = 0.498, p < 0.01) and perceived risk of contracting H1N1 (β = 0.346, p < 0.01). In addition, females (M = 10.07, SD = 2.68) were found to have higher levels of knowledge about H1N1, compared to males (M = 8.29, SD = 2.65), t(233) = -5.08, p < 0.001. These findings suggest low levels of knowledge about the causes, symptoms and possible preventive measures associated with H1N1. In addition, the current study points to a key role for illness perceptions in predicting psychological responses to H1N1.

  16. Pre-infection of pigs with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae modifies outcomes of infection with European swine influenza virus of H1N1, but not H1N2, subtype.

    PubMed

    Deblanc, C; Gorin, S; Quéguiner, S; Gautier-Bouchardon, A V; Ferré, S; Amenna, N; Cariolet, R; Simon, G

    2012-05-25

    Swine influenza virus (SIV) and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhp) are widespread in farms and are major pathogens involved in the porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). The aim of this experiment was to compare the pathogenicity of European avian-like swine H1N1 and European human-like reassortant swine H1N2 viruses in naïve pigs and in pigs previously infected with Mhp. Six groups of SPF pigs were inoculated intra-tracheally with either Mhp, or H1N1, or H1N2 or Mhp+H1N1 or Mhp+H1N2, both pathogens being inoculated at 21 days intervals in these two last groups. A mock-infected group was included. Although both SIV strains induced clinical signs when singly inoculated, results indicated that the H1N2 SIV was more pathogenic than the H1N1 virus, with an earlier shedding and a greater spread in lungs. Initial infection with Mhp before SIV inoculation increased flu clinical signs and pathogenesis (hyperthermia, loss of appetite, pneumonia lesions) due to the H1N1 virus but did not modify significantly outcomes of H1N2 infection. Thus, Mhp and SIV H1N1 appeared to act synergistically, whereas Mhp and SIV H1N2 would compete, as H1N2 infection led to the elimination of Mhp in lung diaphragmatic lobes. In conclusion, SIV would be a risk factor for the severity of respiratory disorders when associated with Mhp, depending on the viral subtype involved. This experimental model of coinfection with Mhp and avian-like swine H1N1 is a relevant tool for studying the pathogenesis of SIV-associated PRDC and testing intervention strategies for the control of the disease.

  17. CW-cavity ring down spectroscopy of the ozone molecule in the 6625-6830 cm -1 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campargue, A.; Kassi, S.; Romanini, D.; Barbe, A.; De Backer-Barilly, M.-R.; Tyuterev, Vl. G.

    2006-11-01

    The absorption spectrum of ozone, 16O 3, has been recorded by CW-cavity ring down spectroscopy in the 6625-6830 cm -1 region. The typical sensitivity of these recordings ( αmin ˜ 3 × 10 -10 cm -1) allows observing very weak transitions with intensity down to 2 × 10 -28 cm/molecule. 483 and 299 transitions have been assigned to the 2 ν1 + 3 ν2 + 3 ν3A-type band and to the 2 ν1 + 4 ν2 + 2 ν3B-type band, respectively, which are the highest frequency bands of ozone recorded so far under high resolution. Rovibrational transitions with J and Ka values up to 46 and 12, respectively, could be assigned. Despite well-known difficulties to correctly reproduce the energy levels not far from the dissociation limit, it was possible to determine the parameters of an effective Hamiltonian which includes six vibrational states, four of them being dark states. The line positions analysis led to an rms deviation of 8.5 × 10 -3 cm -1 while the experimental line intensities could be satisfactorily reproduced. Additional experiments in the 5970-6021 cm -1 region allows detecting the (233) ← (010) hot band reaching the same upper state as the preceding cold band. From the effective parameters of the (233) state just determined and those of the (010) level available in the literature, 329 transitions could be assigned and used for a further refinement of the rovibrational parameters of the effective Hamiltonian leading to a value of 7.6 × 10 -3 cm -1 for the global rms deviation. The complete list of the experimentally determined rovibrational energy levels of the (233), (242), and (520) states is given. The determined effective Hamiltonian and transition moment operators allowed calculating a line list (intensity cut off of 10 -28 cm/molecule at 296 K), available as Supplementary material for the 6590-6860 and 5916-6021 cm -1 regions. The integrated band strength values are 1.75 × 10 -24 and 4.78 × 10 -25 cm/molecule at 296 K for the 2 ν1 + 3 ν2 + 3 ν3A-type band and

  18. Influence of chromatin structure, antibiotics, and endogenous histone methylation on phosphorylation of histones H1 and H3 in the presence of protein kinase A in rat liver nuclei in vitro.

    PubMed

    Prusov, A N; Smirnova, T A; Kolomijtseva, G Ya

    2013-02-01

    In vitro phosphorylation of histones H1 and H3 by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A and endogenous phosphokinases in the presence of [γ-³²P]ATP was studied in isolated rat liver nuclei with different variants of chromatin structural organization: condensed (diameter of fibrils 100-200 nm; N-1) and partly decondensed (diameter of fibrils ~30 nm; N-2). In the N-1 state histone, H1 is phosphorylated approximately twice as much than histone H3. Upon the decondensation of the chromatin in the N-2 state, 1.5-fold decrease of total phosphorylation of H1 is observed, while that of H3 does not change, although the endogenous phosphorylation of both histones is reduced by half. Changes in histone phosphorylation in the presence of low or high concentrations of distamycin and chromomycin differ for H1 and H3 in N-1 and N-2. It was found that distamycin (DM) stimulates the phosphorylation of tightly bound H1 fraction, which is not extractable by polyglutamic acid (PG), especially in N-1. Chromomycin (CM) increases the phosphorylation of both histones in PG extracts and in the nuclear pellets, particularly in N-2. At the same time, in N-1 one can detect phosphorylation of a tightly bound fraction of histones H1 whose N-termini are located on AT-rich sites that become inaccessible for protein kinase in the process of chromatin decondensation in N-2. At the same time, in N-2 the accessibility for protein kinase A of tightly bound H1 fractions, whose N-termini are located on GC-rich sites, increases dramatically. High concentrations of both CM and DM in N-1 and N-2 stimulated phosphorylation of the non-extractable by PG fraction of H1 whose N-termini are located on sites where AT ≈ GC. CM at high concentration stimulated 4-7 times the phosphorylation of a small fraction of H3, which is extracted by PG from both types of nuclei. We detected an effect of endogenous methylation of histones H1 and H3 in the nuclei on their subsequent phosphorylation depending on the chromatin

  19. Identification of similarity of skeletal structures in the range 10-5 cm - 1023 cm and the probable role of skeletal assemblies of carbon nanotube-like dust in the large-scale structure of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukushkin, A. B.; Rantsev-Kartinov, V. A.

    The role of the dust in astrophysics is analyzed from viewpoint of the hypothesis [1] (and respective proof-of-concept studies [2]) for the self-assembling of a fractal dust in laboratory electric discharges. The presence of skeletal structures of the same distinctive topology (namely, tubules and cartwheels, and their simple combinations) in the range 10-5cm - 1023cm, and a trend toward self-similarity (i.e. assembling of bigger structures from similar smaller ones), are found [3]. These evidences come from the electron micrography of dust deposits in tokamak (10-6cm - 10-3cm) [4], the images of plasma taken in laboratory electric discharges -- tokamaks, Z-pinches, plasma focus and vacuum spark (10-2cm - 10 cm) [2], hail particles (1cm - 10cm), the images of tornado (103cm - 105cm) and of a wide class of objects in space (1011cm - 1023 cm), including the solar coronal mass ejection, supernova remnants, and some galaxies [3]. The similarity of, and a trend toward self-similarity in, these skeletal structures (especially, cartwheels as the structures of essentially non-hydrodynamic nature) suggest all them to possess, similarly to skeletons in the particles of dust and hail, a fractal condensed matter of particular topology of the fractal. Specifically, this matter may be assembled from nanotubular blocks in a way similar to that in the skeletons found [4] in the submicron dust particles. An analysis of the redshift surveys of galaxies and quasars suggests the possibility to draw the above similarity up to 1026cm. This hints at the presence of a baryonic cold dark skeleton (BCDS) of the Universe [5]. The hypothesis of BCDS is shown to have no conflict with major cosmological facts (Hubble expansion and cosmic microwave background's isotropy). REFERENCES: [1] Fusion Energy 1998 (IAEA, Vienna, 1999), Vol. 3, p. 1131. [2] Advances in Plasma Phys. Research, Vol. 2 (Ed. F. Gerard, Nova Science Publishers, New York, 2002), pp. 1-22. [3] Phys. Lett. A 306, 175 (2002). [4

  20. Preparation and characterization of histone H1 from the sperm of the sea-urchin Sphaerechinus granularis.

    PubMed Central

    Giancotti, V; Cosimi, S; Cary, P D; Crane-Robinson, C; Geraci, G

    1981-01-01

    The separation and purification of histone H1 from the sperm of the sea-urchin Sphaerechinus granularis is described. Physical studies were used to compare this histone H1 molecule with H1 histones from other species. C.d. and 270 MHz n.m.r. spectroscopy indicate that, despite significant compositional differences from other sea-urchin sperm H1 histones, their secondary and tertiary structures are very similar. A large difference in helicity was, however, found between S. granularis histone H1 and calf thymus histone H1, and their n.m.r. and fluorescence spectra also differ considerably. It is concluded that secondary structure and tertiary structure have not been conserved in the evolution of the H1 histone family. PMID:7306043

  1. H1- and H2-receptor characterization in the tracheal circulation of sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Webber, S. E.; Salonen, R. O.; Widdicombe, J. G.

    1988-01-01

    1. The effects of histamine, the specific H1-agonist SKF 71481-A2 and the H2-agonist dimaprit were examined on tracheal vascular resistance in sheep anaesthetized with pentobarbitone. Tracheal vascular resistance was determined by perfusing the cranial tracheal arteries at constant flows and measuring inflow pressures. Changes in tracheal smooth muscle tone were also measured. 2. Histamine and SKF 71481-A2 contracted the tracheal smooth muscle and this effect was blocked by the H1-antagonist mepyramine. Stimulation of H2-receptors with dimaprit had no effect on tracheal smooth muscle tone. 3. Histamine had a complex action on the tracheal vasculature producing either a triphasic change (early dilatation then constriction followed by late dilatation) or just a constriction. SKF 71481-A2 always produced a biphasic change in vascular resistance (dilatation followed by constriction). Dimaprit dilated the tracheal vasculature. 4. The late dilatation produced by histamine in some sheep was blocked by bilateral cervical vagotomy but the mechanism for this effect is not known. No other responses to histamine, SKF 71481-A2 or dimaprit were affected by vagotomy. 5. The vasoconstriction produced by histamine and SKF 71481-A2 was antagonized by mepyramine indicating a H1-receptor-mediated effect. Cimetidine had no effect on the vasoconstriction to histamine suggesting a lack of involvement of H2-receptors. 6. The vasodilatation produced by histamine and SKF 71481-A2 was also antagonized by mepyramine, again suggesting a H1-receptor-mediated action. Cimetidine had no effect on the vasodilator response to histamine indicating no involvement of H2-receptors in this response. 7. The dilator effect of dimaprit was antagonized by cimetidine suggesting this effect was mediated by H2-receptors. 8. We conclude that H1-receptors in the various parts of the sheep tracheal vasculature can cause increases and decreases in total tracheal vascular resistance; that H2-receptors decrease

  2. Genetic characterization of Thai swine influenza viruses after the introduction of pandemic H1N1 2009.

    PubMed

    Charoenvisal, Nataya; Keawcharoen, Juthatip; Sreta, Donruethai; Chaiyawong, Supassama; Nonthabenjawan, Nutthawan; Tantawet, Siriporn; Jittimanee, Suphattra; Arunorat, Jirapat; Amonsin, Alongkorn; Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje

    2013-08-01

    Pandemic H1N1 2009 (pH1N1), influenza virus containing triple reassortant internal genes (TRIG) from avian, human, and swine influenza viruses emerged in 2009 as a highly infectious virus that was able to be transmitted from humans to pigs. During June 2010-May 2012, influenza virus surveillance was conducted in Thai pig population. Twenty-three samples (1.75%) were successfully isolated from total of 1,335 samples. Interestingly, pH1N1 (7 isolates, 30.34%), reassortant pH1N1 (rH1N1) (1 isolate, 4.35%), Thai endemic H1N1 (enH1N1) (3 isolates, 13.04%), reassortant H3N2 with pH1N1 internal genes (rH3N2) (9 isolates, 39.13%), and reassortant H1N2 with pH1N1 internal genes (rH1N2) (3 isolates, 13.04%) were found. It should be noted that rH1N1, rH1N2, and rH3N2 viruses contained the internal genes of pH1N1 virus having a TRIG cassette descendant from the North American swine lineage. Although all isolates in this study were obtained from mild clinically sick pigs, the viruses were still highly infective and possibly may play an important role in human-animal interfacing transmission. In addition, the TRIG cassette may have an influence on antigenic shift resulting in emergence of novel viruses, as seen in this study. Continuing surveillance of influenza A natural hosts, particularly in pigs is necessary.

  3. CM Carbonaceous Chondrite Lithologies and Their Space Exposure Ages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael; Gregory, Timothy; Takenouchi, Atsushi; Nishiizumi, Kunihiko; Trieman, Alan; Berger, Eve; Le, Loan; Fagan, Amy; Velbel, Michael; Imae, Naoya; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The CMs are the most commonly falling C chondrites, and therefore may be a major component of C-class asteroids, the targets of several current and future space missions. Previous work [1] has concluded that CM chondrites fall into at least four distinct cosmic ray space exposure (CRE) age groups (0.1 million years, 0.2 million years, 0.6 million years and greater than 2.0 million years), an unusually large number, but the meaning of these groupings is unclear. It is possible that these meteorites came from different parent bodies which broke up at different times, or instead came from the same parent body which underwent multiple break-up events, or a combination of these scenarios, or something else entirely. The objective of this study is to investigate the diversity of lithologies which make up CM chondrites, in order to determine whether the different exposure ages correspond to specific, different CM lithologies, which permit us to constrain the history of the CM parent body(ies). We have already reported significant petrographic differences among CM chondrites [2-4]. We report here our new results.

  4. Early Outbreak of 2009 Influenza A (H1N1) in Mexico Prior to Identification of pH1N1 Virus

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ying-Hen; Ma, Stefan; Velasco Hernandez, Jorge X.; Lee, Vernon J.; Lim, Wei Yen

    2011-01-01

    Background In the aftermath of the global spread of 2009 influenza A (pH1N1) virus, still very little is known of the early stages of the outbreak in Mexico during the early months of the year, before the virus was identified. Methodology/Main Findings We fit a simple mathematical model, the Richards model, to the number of excess laboratory-confirmed influenza cases in Mexico and Mexico City during the first 15 weeks in 2009 over the average influenza case number of the previous five baseline years of 2004-2008 during the same period to ascertain the turning point (or the peak incidence) of a wave of early influenza infections, and to estimate the transmissibility of the virus during these early months in terms of its basic reproduction number. The results indicate that there may have been an early epidemic in Mexico City as well as in all of Mexico during February/March. Based on excess influenza cases, the estimated basic reproduction number R0 for the early outbreak was 1.59 (0.55 to 2.62) for Mexico City during weeks 5–9, and 1.25 (0.76, 1.74) for all of Mexico during weeks 5–14. Conclusions We established the existence of an early epidemic in Mexico City and in all of Mexico during February/March utilizing the routine influenza surveillance data, although the location of seeding is unknown. Moreover, estimates of R0 as well as the time of peak incidence (the turning point) for Mexico City and all of Mexico indicate that the early epidemic in Mexico City in February/March had been more transmissible (larger R0) and peaked earlier than the rest of the country. Our conclusion lends support to the possibility that the virus could have already spread to other continents prior to the identification of the virus and the reporting of lab-confirmed pH1N1 cases in North America in April. PMID:21909366

  5. Detection of influenza virus types A and B and type A subtypes (H1, H3, and H5) by multiplex polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Boonsuk, Pitirat; Payungporn, Sunchai; Chieochansin, Thaweesak; Samransamruajkit, Rujipat; Amonsin, Alongkorn; Songserm, Thaweesak; Chaisingh, Arunee; Chamnanpood, Pornchai; Chutinimitkul, Salin; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Poovorawan, Yong

    2008-07-01

    Infections with influenza virus type A and B present serious public health problems on a global scale. However, only influenza A virus has been reported to cause fatal pandemic in many species. To provide suitable clinical management and prevent further virus transmission, efficient and effective clinical diagnosis is essential. Therefore, we developed multiplex PCR assays for detecting influenza types A and B and the subtypes of influenza A virus (H1, H3 and H5). Upon performing multiplex PCR assays with type-specific primer sets, the clearly distinguishable products representing influenza A and B virus were separated by agarose gel electrophoresis. In addition, the subtypes of influenza A virus (H1, H3 and H5), which are most common in humans, can be readily distinguished by PCR with subtype-specific primer sets, yielding PCR products of different sizes depending on which subtype has been amplified. This method was tested on 46 influenza virus positive specimens of avian and mammalian (dog and human) origins collected between 2006 and 2008. The sensitivity of this method, tested against known concentrations of each type and subtype specific plasmid, was established to detect 10(3) copies/microl. The method's specificity was determined by testing against other subtypes of influenza A virus (H2, H4 and H6-H15) and respiratory pathogens commonly found in humans. None of them could be amplified, thus excluding cross reactivity. In conclusion, the multiplex PCR assays developed are advantageous as to rapidity, specificity, and cost effectiveness.

  6. Passive immunity to pandemic H1N1 2009 by swine flu parties.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Nitish; Aggarwal, Pushkar

    2009-12-15

    The general population is concerned about the probable devastating effects of pandemic H1N1 2009. Based upon the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic, scientific publications and theories, the idea of swine flu parties to achieve passive immunity against pandemic H1N1 2009 has been proposed. Public health officials have asked the general public not to resort to this method. However, no concrete evidence of the reasoning behind the recommendation has been given. In this paper, we have dynamically modeled the effect of swine flu parties on the immunity achieved and associated mortality for a period of two years. The simulations show that the public should not organize or participate in swine flu parties as they will likely increase swine flu-associated mortality.

  7. Infrarenal Aorta Thrombosis Associated with H1N1 Influenza A Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Saglam, Mustafa; Arıkan, Ali; Doner, Barıs; Akıncı, Gulay

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses are members of the Orthomyxoviridae family, of which influenza A, B, and C viruses constitute three separate genera. Arterial thrombosis associated with H1N1 influenza A virus infection has rarely been reported. A Turkish man aged 28 years was admitted to our emergency department with dyspnea, bilateral lower extremity insensitivity, and cold. He reported symptoms of fever, myalgia, and cough, which he had had for fifteen days before being admitted to our hospital. The patient was tested for pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests, which were positive. Abdominal computerized tomography with contrast revealed a large occlusive thrombus within the infrarenal aorta. PMID:27872775

  8. Nosocomial Pandemic (H1N1) 2009, United Kingdom, 2009–2010

    PubMed Central

    Myles, Puja R.; Openshaw, Peter J.M.; Gadd, Elaine M.; Lim, Wei Shen; Semple, Malcolm G.; Read, Robert C.; Taylor, Bruce L.; McMenamin, James; Armstrong, Colin; Bannister, Barbara; Nicholson, Karl G.; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Jonathan S.

    2011-01-01

    To determine clinical characteristics of patients hospitalized in the United Kingdom with pandemic (H1N1) 2009, we studied 1,520 patients in 75 National Health Service hospitals. We characterized patients who acquired influenza nosocomially during the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak. Of 30 patients, 12 (80%) of 15 adults and 14 (93%) of 15 children had serious underlying illnesses. Only 12 (57%) of 21 patients who received antiviral therapy did so within 48 hours after symptom onset, but 53% needed escalated care or mechanical ventilation; 8 (27%) of 30 died. Despite national guidelines and standardized infection control procedures, nosocomial transmission remains a problem when influenza is prevalent. Health care workers should be routinely offered influenza vaccine, and vaccination should be prioritized for all patients at high risk. Staff should remain alert to the possibility of influenza in patients with complex clinical problems and be ready to institute antiviral therapy while awaiting diagnosis during influenza outbreaks. PMID:21470446

  9. Blood libel rebooted: traditional scapegoats, online media, and the H1N1 epidemic.

    PubMed

    Atlani-Duault, L; Mercier, A; Rousseau, C; Guyot, P; Moatti, J P

    2015-03-01

    This study of comments posted on major French print and TV media websites during the H1N1 epidemic illustrates the relationship between the traditional media and social media in responding to an emerging disease. A disturbing "geography of blame" was observed suggesting the metamorphosis of the folk-devil phenomenon to the Internet. We discovered a subterranean discourse about the putative origins and "objectives" of the H1N1 virus, which was absent from the discussions in mainstream television channels and large-circulation print media. These online rumours attributed hidden motives to governments, pharmaceutical companies, and figures of Otherness that were scapegoated in the social history of previous European epidemics, notably Freemasons and Jews.

  10. The histamine H1-receptor antagonist binding site. Part I: Active conformation of cyproheptadine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Drooge, Marc J.; Donné-op den Kelder, Gabriëlle M.; Timmerman, Hendrik

    1991-08-01

    The active conformation of several histamine H1-antagonists is investigated. As a template molecule we used the antagonist cyproheptadine, which consists of a piperidylene ring connected to a tricyclic system. The piperidylene moiety is shown to be flexible. The global minimum is a chair conformation but, additionally, a second chair and various boat conformations have to be considered, as their energies are less than 5 kcal/mol above the energy of the global minimum. Two semi-rigid histamine H1-antagonists, phenindamine and triprolidine, were fitted onto the various conformations of cyproheptadine in order to derive the pharmacologically active conformation of cyproheptadine. At the same time, the active conformation of both phenindamine and triprolidine was derived. It is demonstrated that, within the receptor-bound conformation of cyproheptadine, the piperidylene ring most probably exists in a boat form.

  11. Novel pandemic A (H1N1) influenza vaccination among pregnant women: motivators and barriers.

    PubMed

    Steelfisher, Gillian K; Blendon, Robert J; Bekheit, Mark M; Mitchell, Elizabeth W; Williams, Jennifer; Lubell, Keri; Peugh, Jordon; DiSogra, Charles A

    2011-06-01

    We sought to examine motivators and barriers related to monovalent 2009 influenza A (H1N1) vaccination among pregnant women. We conducted a national poll of pregnant women using a random online sample (237) and opt-in supplement (277). In all, 42% of pregnant women reported getting the vaccine. Vaccination was positively associated with attitudinal factors including believing the vaccine is very safe or benefits the baby, and with provider recommendations. Women in racial/ethnic minority groups, women with less education, and women <35 years were less likely to get the vaccine and had differing views and experiences. Despite H1N1 vaccination rates that are higher than past seasonal influenza rates, barriers like safety concerns may persist in a pandemic. Messaging from providers that encourages women to believe the vaccine is very safe and benefits their baby may be compelling. Messaging and outreach during future pandemics may require customization to increase vaccination among high-risk groups.

  12. Airports, localities and disease: representations of global travel during the H1N1 pandemic.

    PubMed

    Warren, Adam; Bell, Morag; Budd, Lucy

    2010-07-01

    During summer 2009, the UK experienced one of the highest incidences of H1N1 infection outside of the Americas and Australia. Building on existing research into biosecurity and the spread of infectious disease via the global airline network, this paper explores the biopolitics of public health in the UK through an in-depth empirical analysis of the representation of H1N1 in UK national and regional newspapers. We uncover new discourses relating to the significance of the airport as a site for control and the ethics of the treatment of the traveller as a potential transmitter of disease. We conclude by highlighting how the global spread of infectious diseases is grounded in particular localities associated with distinctive notions of biosecurity and the traveller.

  13. [Rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure in human influenza A H1N1 mediated infection].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Ornelas-Arroyo, Sofía; Pérez-Bustos, Estela; Sánchez-Zúñiga, Jesús; Uribe-Esquivel, Misael

    2009-01-01

    Rabdomiolysis and acute renal failure secondary to influenza infection are rare. Up to now, few cases have been reported and most of them are primarily among children. Myositis associated to influenza infection is caused by the toxic effect of the virus in the muscular fiber, dysregulation of inflammatory cytokines and a cross reaction between the muscle fiber and the viral particles. We present the case of a 57 year old male with a diagnosis of H1N1 influenza who developed polyuria, oligoanuria, elevation of lactic dehydrogenase, myoglobin, creatinin phosphokinase and an electromyography with a myopathic pattern. The diagnosis of rabdomyolisis and acute renal failure were made, hemodyalisis was started and the patient improved satisfactorily. This is the first report of a patient with radmoyolisis and acute renal failure secondary to A H1N1 influenza treated during the Mexico epidemic.

  14. Vaccine Narratives and Public Health: Investigating Criticisms of H1N1 Pandemic Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Abeysinghe, Sudeepa

    2015-02-25

    Vaccine hesitancy is often understood and explored on the level of individual decision-making. However, questions surrounding the risk and efficacy of vaccination are evident in wider public discourse; social narratives of vaccination inform and impact on the individual level. This paper takes a narrative analysis approach from the sociology of health to examine data drawn from a wider study on global public health responses to the H1N1 pandemic. The paper concentrates upon criticisms to mass vaccination as recounted within the Council of Europe's debate of the handling of H1N1. It shows that three narratives were particularly dominant: problematizing the use of vaccination as a public health response; criticising the efficacy of the vaccines; and, questioning the safety of the strategy. This debate presents an important case study in understanding the way in which vaccines are problematized within the public discourse.

  15. A model for sunspot associated emission at 6 cm wavelength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alissandrakis, C. E.; Kundu, M. R.; Lantos, P.

    1980-01-01

    Two-dimensional maps of total intensity and circular polarization of a sunspot region at 6 cm have been calculated using a simple model for the chromosphere-corona transition region and observations of the longitudinal component of the photospheric magnetic field. The calculations are in good agreement with the high resolution observations of the same sunspot region at 6 cm, obtained with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. It is shown that the 6 cm radiation is predominantly due to gyroresonance absorption process at the second and third harmonics of the gyrofrequency (H = 900-600 G). Estimates of the conductive flux and the electron density in the transition region above the sunspot are also given.

  16. VLA observations of Uranus at 1. 3-20 cm

    SciTech Connect

    De Pater, I.; Gulkis, S.

    1988-08-01

    Observations of Uranus, obtained with resolution 0.5-1.2 arcsec at wavelengths 1.3, 2, 6, and 20 cm using the A and B configurations of the VLA in June-July 1982, October 1983, and February 1984, are reported. The disk-averaged brightness temperatures (DABTs) are determined by model fitting, and the results are presented in extensive graphs and contour maps and characterized in detail. Findings discussed include: (1) an overall spectrum which is relatively flat above 6 cm, (2) 1.3-6-cm brightness which is concentrated nearer to the pole than to the subsolar point, and (3) small changes in DABT from 1982 to 1983/1984 (consistent with an explanation based on a pole-equator temperature gradient). 16 references.

  17. Differentiating CDM and baryon isocurvature models with 21 cm fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: sekiguti@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2011-10-01

    We discuss how one can discriminate models with cold dark matter (CDM) and baryon isocurvature fluctuations. Although current observations such as cosmic microwave background (CMB) can severely constrain the fraction of such isocurvature modes in the total density fluctuations, CMB cannot differentiate CDM and baryon ones by the shapes of their power spectra. However, the evolution of CDM and baryon density fluctuations are different for each model, thus it would be possible to discriminate those isocurvature modes by extracting information on the fluctuations of CDM/baryon itself. We discuss that observations of 21 cm fluctuations can in principle differentiate these modes and demonstrate to what extent we can distinguish them with future 21 cm surveys. We show that, when the isocurvature mode has a large blue-tilted initial spectrum, 21 cm surveys can clearly probe the difference.

  18. High-resolution comparative modeling with RosettaCM.

    PubMed

    Song, Yifan; DiMaio, Frank; Wang, Ray Yu-Ruei; Kim, David; Miles, Chris; Brunette, Tj; Thompson, James; Baker, David

    2013-10-08

    We describe an improved method for comparative modeling, RosettaCM, which optimizes a physically realistic all-atom energy function over the conformational space defined by homologous structures. Given a set of sequence alignments, RosettaCM assembles topologies by recombining aligned segments in Cartesian space and building unaligned regions de novo in torsion space. The junctions between segments are regularized using a loop closure method combining fragment superposition with gradient-based minimization. The energies of the resulting models are optimized by all-atom refinement, and the most representative low-energy model is selected. The CASP10 experiment suggests that RosettaCM yields models with more accurate side-chain and backbone conformations than other methods when the sequence identity to the templates is greater than ∼15%.

  19. DYNC2H1 mutation causes Jeune syndrome and recurrent lung infections associated with ciliopathy.

    PubMed

    Emiralioglu, Nagehan; Wallmeier, Julia; Olbrich, Heike; Omran, Heymut; Ozcelik, Ugur

    2017-03-03

    Asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy, also known as Jeune syndrome, is included in a group of syndromic skeletal ciliopathies associated with mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in the formation or function of motile cilia. Herein, we report a 6-mo-old male admitted to hospital with recurrent lung infections, thoracic dystrophy, and respiratory distress that was diagnosed as Jeune syndrome; DYNC2H1 mutation was detected via genetic analysis and ciliary dysfunction was noted via high-speed video microscopy.

  20. The 2009 Influenza A(H1N1) ’Swine Flu’ Outbreak: An Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-20

    Tamiflu and Relenza, respiratory protection devices, and other medical supplies, from the Strategic National Stockpile (SNS), to help states respond to... medical visits, and other measures. One CDC official commented that reported cases of H1N1 flu probably represent only a fraction of actual cases...with good hygienic practices recommended by the WHO, FAO, Codex Alimentarius Commission and the OIE, will not be a source of infection. To date there

  1. 4-[4-(Diethyl-amino)benzyl-ideneamino]-4H-1,2,4-triazole.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jian Xin; Zhang, Ju Zhou; Chen, Qian Wang

    2008-05-03

    The title compound, C(13)H(17)N(5), is a Schiff base synthesized by the reaction of 4-amino-4H-1,2,4-triazole and 4-(diethyl-amino)benzaldehyde. The triazole ring forms a dihedral angle of 5.77 (16)° with the benzene ring. The crystal structure is stabilized by an inter-molecular C-H⋯N hydrogen bond.

  2. Modeling of the influence of humidity on H1N1 flu in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PEI, Y.; Tian, H.; Xu, B.

    2015-12-01

    In 2009, a heavy Flu hit the whole world. It was caused by the virus H1N1. The influenza first broke out in Mexico in March and the United States in April, 2009. The World Health Organization (WHO) announced that the H1N1 influenza became pandemic, alert to a warning phase of six. By the end of 2011, 181302 H1N1 cases were reported in mainland China. To improve our understanding on the impact of environmental factors on the disease transmission, we constructed an SIR (Susceptible - Infectious - Recovered) model incorporating environmental factors. It was found that the absolute humidity was a dominant environmental factor. The study interpolated the humidity data monitored with 340 weather stations from 1951 to 2011 in mainland China. First, the break point of the trend for the absolutely humidity was detected by the BFAST (Break For Additive Season and Trend) method. Then, the SIR model with and without the absolutely humidity incorporated in the model was built and tested. Finally, the results with the two scenarios were compared. Results indicate that lower absolutely humidity may promote the transmission of the H1N1 cases. The calculated basic reproductive number ranges from 1.65 to 3.66 with a changing absolute humidity. This is consistent with the former study result with basic reproductive number ranging from 2.03 to 4.18. The average recovery duration was estimated to be 5.7 days. The average duration to get immunity from the influenza is 399.02 days. A risk map is also produced to illustrate the model results.

  3. Aromatic derivatives of 2,3-dihydro-1H-1,5-benzodiazepine

    SciTech Connect

    Orlov, V.D.; Desenko, S.M.; Kiroga, Kh.

    1987-09-01

    The formation of 2,2,4-trisubstituted 2,3-dihydro-1H-1,5-benzodiazepines in the reactions of acetylarenes with 4-ethoxy- and 3,5-dimethyl-1,2-phenylenediamine was studied. The effect of the substituents on the individual stages of the reactions is discussed. A quantum-chemical calculation of the relative nucleophilicity of 1,2-phenylenediamine, 2,3-diaminopyridine, and 3,4-diaminofurazan was undertaken.

  4. Melting muscles: novel H1N1 influenza A associated rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    D'Silva, Dimple; Hewagama, Saliya; Doherty, Richard; Korman, Tony M; Buttery, Jim

    2009-12-01

    We report the first case of myositis and rhabdomyolysis after infection with novel influenza A (H1N1/09) virus. The case demonstrates the novel virus' capacity for causing significant disease. Myositis and the possibility of rhabdomyolysis should be considered in any individual presenting with influenza-like symptoms in which severe myalgia or muscle weakness is apparent. It is likely that we will see severe clinical manifestations of infection with this novel influenza virus in the coming respiratory virus season.

  5. EPA Awards $10.3 Million to Clean Up New England Brownfield Sites, Protect Health in Communities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has awarded more than $10.3 million in Brownfield grants to municipalities and organizations working to protect people's health by assessing and cleaning up contaminated parcels in New England communities.

  6. Synthesis and anti-cancer screening of novel heterocyclic-(2H)-1,2,3-triazoles as potential anti-cancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Penthala, Narsimha Reddy; Madhukuri, Leena; Thakkar, Shraddha; Madadi, Nikhil Reddy; Lamture, Gauri; Eoff, Robert L.; Crooks, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    trans-Cyanocombretastatin A-4 (trans-CA-4) analogues have been structurally modified to afford their more stable CA-4-(2H)-1,2,3-triazole analogues. Fifteen novel, stable 4-heteroaryl-5-aryl-(2H)-1,2,3-triazole CA-4 analogues (8a–i, 9 and 11a–e) were evaluated for anti-cancer activity against a panel of 60 human cancer cell lines. These analogues displayed potent cytotoxic activity against both hematological and solid tumor cell lines with GI50 values in the low nanomolar range. The most potent compound, 8a, was a benzothiophen-2-yl analogue that incorporated a 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl moiety connected to the (2H)-1,2,3-triazole ring system. Compound 8a exhibited GI50 values of <10 nM against 80% of the cancer cell lines in the panel. Three triazole analogues, 8a, 8b and 8g, showed particularly potent growth inhibition against the triple negative Hs578T breast cancer cell line with GI50 values of 10.3 nM, 66.5 nM and 20.3 nM, respectively. Molecular docking studies suggest that these compounds bind to the same hydrophobic pocket at the interface of α- and β-tubulin that is occupied by colchicine and cis-CA-4, and are stabilized by Van der Waals’ interactions with surrounding amino acid residues. Compound 8a was found to inhibit tubulin polymerization in vitro with an IC50 value of 1.7 µM. The potent cytotoxicity of these novel compounds and their inhibition of tubulin dynamics make these triazole analogues promising candidates for development as anti-cancer drugs. PMID:27066215

  7. Oseltamivir-Resistant Influenza Virus A (H1N1), Europe, 2007–08 Season

    PubMed Central

    Lackenby, Angie; Hungnes, Olav; Lina, Bruno; van der Werf, Sylvie; Schweiger, Brunhilde; Opp, Matthias; Paget, John; van de Kassteele, Jan; Hay, Alan; Zambon, Maria

    2009-01-01

    In Europe, the 2007–08 winter season was dominated by influenza virus A (H1N1) circulation through week 7, followed by influenza B virus from week 8 onward. Oseltamivir-resistant influenza viruses A (H1N1) (ORVs) with H275Y mutation in the neuraminidase emerged independently of drug use. By country, the proportion of ORVs ranged from 0% to 68%, with the highest proportion in Norway. The average weighted prevalence of ORVs across Europe increased gradually over time, from near 0 in week 40 of 2007 to 56% in week 19 of 2008 (mean 20%). Neuraminidase genes of ORVs possessing the H275Y substitution formed a homogeneous subgroup closely related to, but distinguishable from, those of oseltamivir-sensitive influenza viruses A (H1N1). Minor variants of ORVs emerged independently, indicating multiclonal ORVs. Overall, the clinical effect of ORVs in Europe, measured by influenza-like illness or acute respiratory infection, was unremarkable and consistent with normal seasonal activity. PMID:19331731

  8. Origins of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic in swine in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Mena, Ignacio; Nelson, Martha I; Quezada-Monroy, Francisco; Dutta, Jayeeta; Cortes-Fernández, Refugio; Lara-Puente, J Horacio; Castro-Peralta, Felipa; Cunha, Luis F; Trovão, Nídia S; Lozano-Dubernard, Bernardo; Rambaut, Andrew; van Bakel, Harm; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    Asia is considered an important source of influenza A virus (IAV) pandemics, owing to large, diverse viral reservoirs in poultry and swine. However, the zoonotic origins of the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic virus (pdmH1N1) remain unclear, due to conflicting evidence from swine and humans. There is strong evidence that the first human outbreak of pdmH1N1 occurred in Mexico in early 2009. However, no related swine viruses have been detected in Mexico or any part of the Americas, and to date the most closely related ancestor viruses were identified in Asian swine. Here, we use 58 new whole-genome sequences from IAVs collected in Mexican swine to establish that the swine virus responsible for the 2009 pandemic evolved in central Mexico. This finding highlights how the 2009 pandemic arose from a region not considered a pandemic risk, owing to an expansion of IAV diversity in swine resulting from long-distance live swine trade. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16777.001 PMID:27350259

  9. Two Years after Pandemic Influenza A/2009/H1N1: What Have We Learned?

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Vincent C. C.; To, Kelvin K. W.; Tse, Herman; Hung, Ivan F. N.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The world had been anticipating another influenza pandemic since the last one in 1968. The pandemic influenza A H1N1 2009 virus (A/2009/H1N1) finally arrived, causing the first pandemic influenza of the new millennium, which has affected over 214 countries and caused over 18,449 deaths. Because of the persistent threat from the A/H5N1 virus since 1997 and the outbreak of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus in 2003, medical and scientific communities have been more prepared in mindset and infrastructure. This preparedness has allowed for rapid and effective research on the epidemiological, clinical, pathological, immunological, virological, and other basic scientific aspects of the disease, with impacts on its control. A PubMed search using the keywords “pandemic influenza virus H1N1 2009” yielded over 2,500 publications, which markedly exceeded the number published on previous pandemics. Only representative works with relevance to clinical microbiology and infectious diseases are reviewed in this article. A significant increase in the understanding of this virus and the disease within such a short amount of time has allowed for the timely development of diagnostic tests, treatments, and preventive measures. These findings could prove useful for future randomized controlled clinical trials and the epidemiological control of future pandemics. PMID:22491771

  10. Prediction of biological functions on glycosylation site migrations in human influenza H1N1 viruses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shisheng; Wang, Qinzhe; Zhao, Fei; Chen, Wentian; Li, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Protein glycosylation alteration is typically employed by various viruses for escaping immune pressures from their hosts. Our previous work had shown that not only the increase of glycosylation sites (glycosites) numbers, but also glycosite migration might be involved in the evolution of human seasonal influenza H1N1 viruses. More importantly, glycosite migration was likely a more effectively alteration way for the host adaption of human influenza H1N1 viruses. In this study, we provided more bioinformatics and statistic evidences for further predicting the significant biological functions of glycosite migration in the host adaptation of human influenza H1N1 viruses, by employing homology modeling and in silico protein glycosylation of representative HA and NA proteins as well as amino acid variability analysis at antigenic sites of HA and NA. The results showed that glycosite migrations in human influenza viruses have at least five possible functions: to more effectively mask the antigenic sites, to more effectively protect the enzymatic cleavage sites of neuraminidase (NA), to stabilize the polymeric structures, to regulate the receptor binding and catalytic activities and to balance the binding activity of hemagglutinin (HA) with the release activity of NA. The information here can provide some constructive suggestions for the function research related to protein glycosylation of influenza viruses, although these predictions still need to be supported by experimental data.

  11. Ribonuclease H1-dependent hepatotoxicity caused by locked nucleic acid-modified gapmer antisense oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Kasuya, Takeshi; Hori, Shin-ichiro; Watanabe, Ayahisa; Nakajima, Mado; Gahara, Yoshinari; Rokushima, Masatomo; Yanagimoto, Toru; Kugimiya, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Gapmer antisense oligonucleotides cleave target RNA effectively in vivo, and is considered as promising therapeutics. Especially, gapmers modified with locked nucleic acid (LNA) shows potent knockdown activity; however, they also cause hepatotoxic side effects. For developing safe and effective gapmer drugs, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity is required. Here, we investigated the cause of hepatotoxicity derived from LNA-modified gapmers. Chemical modification of gapmer’s gap region completely suppressed both knockdown activity and hepatotoxicity, indicating that the root cause of hepatotoxicity is related to intracellular gapmer activity. Gene silencing of hepatic ribonuclease H1 (RNaseH1), which catalyses gapmer-mediated RNA knockdown, strongly supressed hepatotoxic effects. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of a target mRNA did not result in any hepatotoxic effects, while the gapmer targeting the same position on mRNA as does the siRNA showed acute toxicity. Microarray analysis revealed that several pre-mRNAs containing a sequence similar to the gapmer target were also knocked down. These results suggest that hepatotoxicity of LNA gapmer is caused by RNAseH1 activity, presumably because of off-target cleavage of RNAs inside nuclei. PMID:27461380

  12. Characterization of triple reassortant H1N1 influenza A viruses from swine in Ohio.

    PubMed

    Yassine, H M; Khatri, M; Zhang, Y J; Lee, C W; Byrum, B A; O'Quin, J; Smith, K A; Saif, Y M

    2009-10-20

    An H1N1 influenza A virus, A/swine/Ohio/24366/07, was isolated from pigs in an Ohio county fair. Twenty-six people who came in contact with the infected pigs developed respiratory disease and two of these people were laboratory confirmed as H1N1 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The A/swine/Ohio/24366/07 virus we isolated from swine was shown at the CDC to have 100% identical genome sequence to the human virus associated with the county fair. This prompted us to characterize three swine and two human origin H1N1 influenza A viruses isolated at different time points in the State of Ohio. The three swine viruses were shown to be triple reassortant viruses harboring genes of human (PB1), swine (HA, NA, NP, M, and NS), and avian (PB2 and PA) lineage viruses. Although viruses evaluated in this study were isolated during a short time interval (3 years), genetic drift was observed within the HA and NA genes, including changes at the receptor binding and antigenic sites of HA1 protein. Nevertheless, all viruses exhibited antigenic similarity as evaluated with hemagglutination inhibition and virus neutralizing tests. Internal genes were similar to other reassortant viruses of various subtypes currently circulating in the United States. Interestingly, two of the swine viruses including the 2007 isolate replicated well in human airway epithelial cells, however, another virus isolated in 2006 showed very little replication.

  13. Determinants of Parental Acceptance of the H1N1 Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hilyard, Karen M; Quinn, Sandra Crouse; Kim, Kevin H; Musa, Don; Freimuth, Vicki S

    2014-06-01

    Although designated as a high-risk group during the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic, only about 40% of U.S. children received the vaccine, a relatively low percentage compared with high-risk groups in seasonal influenza, such as the elderly, whose vaccine rates typically top 70%. To better understand parental decision making and predictors of acceptance of the H1N1 vaccine, we examined data from a representative national sample of parents (n = 684), using the health belief model as a framework. The most important predictors of vaccine acceptance were "cues to action" at multiple levels, from intrapersonal to mass communication, including the influence of friends, family, the media, and modeling by the Obama family; costs and benefits and self-efficacy were also significant predictors of vaccine acceptance. Higher perceived levels of H1N1 risk were not associated with vaccine uptake. Results suggest that traditional measures of perceived risk may not account for the cost-benefit analysis inherent in vaccine decision making, and that messages designed to emphasize disease risk may be ineffective. The authors recommend emphasizing cues to action that support norming and modeling of vaccine acceptance.

  14. Protecting the Public from H1N1 through Points of Dispensing (PODs).

    PubMed

    Rinchiuso-Hasselmann, Anne; McKay, Ryan L; Williams, Christopher A; Starr, David T; Morgenthau, Beth Maldin; Zucker, Jane R; Raphael, Marisa

    2011-03-01

    In fall 2009, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) operated 58 points of dispensing (PODs) over 5 weekends to provide influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccination to New Yorkers. Up to 7 sites were opened each day across the 5 boroughs, with almost 50,000 New Yorkers being vaccinated. The policies and protocols used were based on those developed for New York City's POD Plan, the cornerstone of the city's mass prophylaxis planning. Before the H1N1 experience, NYC had not opened more than 5 PODs simultaneously and had only experienced the higher patient volume seen with the H1N1 PODs on 1 prior occasion. Therefore, DOHMH identified factors that contributed to the success of POD operations, as well as areas for improvement to inform future mass prophylaxis planning and response. Though this was a relatively small-scale, preplanned operation, during which a maximum of 7 PODs were operated on a given day, the findings have implications for larger-scale mass prophylaxis planning for emergencies.

  15. Invasive pneumococcal disease and pandemic (H1N1) 2009, Denver, Colorado, USA.

    PubMed

    Nelson, George E; Gershman, Kenneth A; Swerdlow, David L; Beall, Bernard W; Moore, Matthew R

    2012-02-01

    Pneumococcal pneumonia was a complication during previous influenza pandemics but was not evident initially during pandemic (H1N1) 2009. During October 2009 in Denver, Colorado, USA, invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 peaked simultaneously, which suggests a link. We compared cases of IPD in October 2009 with cases in February 2009, the most recent peak month of seasonal influenza. During October 2009, we observed 58 IPD cases, which was 3× the average number of IPD cases that usually occur in October in Denver. Patients with IPD in October 2009 were younger and more likely to have chronic lung disease than patients who had IPD in February 2009; a total of 10/47 patients had influenza, and 33/53 patients had influenza-like illness. Thus, ≈17%-62% cases of IPD may have been associated with pandemic (H1N1) 2009. Pneumococcal disease prevention strategies should be emphasized during future influenza pandemics.

  16. H1N1 Influenza Patient Saved by Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: First Report from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Jahangirifard, Alireza; Hossein Ahmadi, Zargham; Golestani Eraghi, Majid; Tabarsi, Payam; Marjani, Majid; Moniri, Afshin; Nadji, Seyed Ali Reza; Hashemian, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Velayati, Ali Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory failure is a serious complication of H1N1 influenza that, if not properly managed, can cause death. When mechanical ventilation is not effective, the only way to save the patient’s life is extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). A prolonged type of cardiopulmonary bypass, ECMO is a high-cost management modality compared to other conventional types and its maintenance requires skilled personnel. Such staff usually comprises the members of open-heart surgical teams. Herein, we describe a patient with H1N1 influenza and severe respiratory failure not improved by mechanical ventilation who was admitted to Masih Daneshvari Medical Center in March 2015. She was placed on ECMO, from which she was successfully weaned 9 days later. The patient was discharged from the hospital after 52 days. Follow-up till 11 months after discharge revealed completely active life with no problem. There should be a close collaboration among infectious disease specialists, cardiac anesthetists, cardiac surgeons, and intensivists for the correct timing of ECMO placement, subsequent weaning, and care of the patient. This team work was the key to our success story. This is the first patient to survive H1N1 with the use of ECMO in Iran. PMID:27956916

  17. Vaccination with Leishmania histone H1-pulsed dendritic cells confers protection in murine visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Agallou, Maria; Smirlis, Despina; Soteriadou, Ketty P; Karagouni, Evdokia

    2012-07-20

    Visceral leishmaniasis is the most severe form of leishmaniases affecting millions of people worldwide often resulting in death despite optimal therapy. Thus, there is an urgent need for the development of effective anti-infective vaccine(s). In the present study, we evaluated the prophylactic value of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs) pulsed with the Leishmania (L.) infantum histone H1. We developed fully mature BM-DCs characterized by enhanced capacity of IL-12 production after ex vivo pulsing with GST-LeishH1. Intravenous administration of these BM-DCs in naive BALB/c mice resulted in antigen-specific spleenocyte proliferation and IgG1 isotype antibody production and conferred protection against experimental challenge with L. infantum independently of CpG oligonucleotides (ODNs) co-administration. Protection was associated with a pronounced enhancement of parasite-specific IFNγ-producing cells and reduction of cells producing IL-10, whereas IL-4 production was comparable in protected and non-protected mice. The polarization of immune responses to Th1 type was further confirmed by the elevation of parasite-specific IgG2a/IgG1 ratio in protected mice. The above data indicate the immunostimulatory capacity of Leishmania histone H1 and further support its exploitation as a candidate protein for vaccine development against leishmaniasis.

  18. Human swine influenza A [H1N1]: practical advice for clinicians early in the pandemic.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Dominic A

    2009-09-01

    The influenza pandemic the world was waiting for may have arrived, but the early indications are that the first wave of human swine influenza A [H1N1], also referred to as H1N1 Mexico 09 or "swine flu", is highly transmissible but of no greater virulence than seasonal influenza to date. The new swine flu H1N1 virus is a mixture of avian, porcine and human influenza RNA. With twenty thousand confirmed cases worldwide and 117 deaths within 7 weeks of the first acknowledgement of a possible pandemic by Mexican and WHO experts, the mortality rate is less than 0.1% and the majority of deaths centred upon the origin of the epidemic in Mexico [83%]. Swine flu is thus far a relatively mild illness seen predominantly in those who are healthy and under 25 years of age, perhaps reflecting protection from previous human influenza exposure in older people. As the virus spreads internationally, border protection issues have surfaced and public health initiatives are being progressively rolled out to minimise the transmission. Vaccines are being developed which will be trialled in the coming months with a likely availability by August 2009, in time for the northern hemisphere autumn and winter. Vigilance without alarm appears to be the recommendation so far.

  19. Reassortment Networks and the evolution of pandemic H1N1 swine-origin influenza.

    PubMed

    Bokhari, Shahid H; Pomeroy, Laura W; Janies, Daniel A

    2012-01-01

    Prior research developed Reassortment Networks to reconstruct the evolution of segmented viruses under both reassortment and mutation. We report their application to the swine-origin pandemic H1N1 virus (S-OIV). A database of all influenza A viruses, for which complete genome sequences were available in Genbank by October 2009, was created and dynamic programming was used to compute distances between all corresponding segments. A reassortment network was created to obtain the minimum cost evolutionary paths from all viruses to the exemplar S-OIV A/California/04/2009. This analysis took 35 hours on the Cray Extreme Multithreading (XMT) supercomputer, which has special hardware to permit efficient parallelization. Six specific H1N1/H1N2 bottleneck viruses were identified that almost always lie on minimum cost paths to S-OIV. We conjecture that these viruses are crucial to S-OIV evolution and worthy of careful study from a molecular biology viewpoint. In phylogenetics, ancestors are typically medians that have no functional constraints. In our method, ancestors are not inferred, but rather chosen from previously observed viruses along a path of mutation and reassortment leading to the target virus. This specificity and functional constraint render our results actionable for further experiments in vitro and in vivo.

  20. Origins of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic in swine in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Mena, Ignacio; Nelson, Martha I; Quezada-Monroy, Francisco; Dutta, Jayeeta; Cortes-Fernández, Refugio; Lara-Puente, J Horacio; Castro-Peralta, Felipa; Cunha, Luis F; Trovão, Nídia S; Lozano-Dubernard, Bernardo; Rambaut, Andrew; van Bakel, Harm; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2016-06-28

    Asia is considered an important source of influenza A virus (IAV) pandemics, owing to large, diverse viral reservoirs in poultry and swine. However, the zoonotic origins of the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic virus (pdmH1N1) remain unclear, due to conflicting evidence from swine and humans. There is strong evidence that the first human outbreak of pdmH1N1 occurred in Mexico in early 2009. However, no related swine viruses have been detected in Mexico or any part of the Americas, and to date the most closely related ancestor viruses were identified in Asian swine. Here, we use 58 new whole-genome sequences from IAVs collected in Mexican swine to establish that the swine virus responsible for the 2009 pandemic evolved in central Mexico. This finding highlights how the 2009 pandemic arose from a region not considered a pandemic risk, owing to an expansion of IAV diversity in swine resulting from long-distance live swine trade.

  1. Inhibitory effect of Crocus sativus (saffron) on histamine (H1) receptors of guinea pig tracheal chains.

    PubMed

    Boskabady, M H; Ghasemzadeh Rahbardar, M; Nemati, H; Esmaeilzadeh, M

    2010-04-01

    The inhibitory effects of aqueous-ethanolic extracts of Crocus sativus (Iridaceae), on histamine (H1) receptors was examined on tracheal chains of guinea pigs. The effects of three concentrations of aqueous-ethanolic extract, 10 nM chlorpheniramine, and saline on histamine (H1) receptors were tested on three groups of guinea pig tracheal chains as follows; incubated trachea with: 1) indomethacin, 2) indomethacin, propranolol, and atropine and 3) indomethacin and propranolol. The EC50 (effective concentration of histamine causing 50% of maximum response) obtained in the presence of chlorpheniramine and all concentrations of the extract in all three groups were significantly greater than those of saline (p<0.05 to p<0.001) except low concentration of the extract in groups 1 and 3. The EC50 obtained in the presence of two higher concentrations of extract in group 2 were greater than group 1 and 3 (p<0.05 to p<0.001). Maximum response obtained in the presence of two higher concentrations of extract in group 2 were greater than those of group 1 and group 3 (p<0.001 for all cases). There were parallel right ward shift in concentration response curves obtained in the presence of only low and medium concentrations of the extract in group 2 compared to the those of saline. These results indicated an inhibitory effect of Crocus sativus at histamine H1 receptors.

  2. [Epidemiology of influenza A (H1N1) worldwide and in Spain].

    PubMed

    Vaqué, Josep

    2010-03-01

    On June 11, 2009, the World Health Organization declared an established pandemic due to a new influenza virus A (H1N1) of swine origin. Initial cases were detected in Mexico in March and within 6 weeks the virus had spread worldwide. The transmissibility of influenza A (H1NA) is slightly higher than that of the seasonal virus, but its pathogenicity and virulence are low. The main target groups of this new virus have been children and young adults under 30 years old. Mortality has affected mainly persons aged between 20 and 50 years old. In areas with temperate climates, two epidemic waves have occurred. The first one, from mid-April to mid-August, affected Mexico, the United States and, consecutively, Spain, England, Japan, and other countries in the northern hemisphere. A few weeks later, coinciding with the beginning of the influenza season, the H1N1 epidemic started in the southern hemisphere countries, especially Argentina, Chile, Australia and New Zealand; in these countries, the epidemic finished at the end of September or October. The second wave affected the northern hemisphere, starting in the United States and Mexico at the beginning of September, and a few weeks later in European countries. In mid-December, this wave was considered to have ended, although some influenza activity persists. The intensity of this second wave was higher compared to the first one.

  3. Adaptation of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in experimental mouse models.

    PubMed

    Prokopyeva, E A; Sobolev, I A; Prokopyev, M V; Shestopalov, A M

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, three mouse-adapted variants of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus were obtained by lung-to-lung passages of BALB/c, C57BL/6z and CD1 mice. The significantly increased virulence and pathogenicity of all of the mouse-adapted variants induced 100% mortality in the adapted mice. Genetic analysis indicated that the increased virulence of all of the mouse-adapted variants reflected the incremental acquisition of several mutations in PB2, PB1, HA, NP, NA, and NS2 proteins. Identical amino acid substitutions were also detected in all of the mouse-adapted variants of A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, including PB2 (K251R), PB1 (V652A), NP (I353V), NA (I106V, N248D) and NS1 (G159E). Apparently, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus easily adapted to the host after serial passages in the lungs, inducing 100% lethality in the last experimental group. However, cross-challenge revealed that not all adapted variants are pathogenic for different laboratory mice. Such important results should be considered when using the influenza mice model.

  4. Meteorological Influence on the 2009 Influenza A (H1N1) Pandemic in Mainland China.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X.; Cai, J.; Feng, D.; Bai, Y.; Xu, B.

    2015-12-01

    Since May 2009, a novel influenza A (H1N1) pandemic has spread rapidly in mainland China from Mexico. Although there has been substantial analysis of this influenza, reliable work estimating its spatial dynamics and determinants remain scarce. The survival and transmission of this pandemic virus not only depends on its biological properties, but also a correlation with external environmental factors. In this study, we collected daily influenza A (H1N1) cases and corresponding annual meteorological factors in mainland China from May 2009 to April 2010. By analyzing these data at county-level, a similarity index, which considered the spatio-temporal characteristics of the disease, was proposed to evaluate the role and lag time of meteorological factors in the influenza transmission. The results indicated that the influenza spanned a large geographical area, following an overall trend from east to west across the country. The spatio-temporal transmission of the disease was affected by a series of meteorological variables, especially absolute humidity with a 3-week lag. These findings confirmed that the absolute humidity and other meteorological variables contributed to the local occurrence and dispersal of influenza A (H1N1). The impact of meteorological variables and their lag effects could be involved in the improvement of effective strategies to control and prevent disease outbreaks.

  5. Novel H1N1 influenza A viral infection complicated by alveolar hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Christopher R; Vipul, Kumar; Baram, Michael

    2010-05-01

    We report a complication of the novel H1N1 influenza A viral infection not yet described during this 2007-2009 pandemic. Pulmonary hemorrhage is a known complication of influenza pneumonia, including well documented reports from previous pandemics. A 57-year-old African American female presented with fevers, progressive shortness of breath, and cough. After being admitted with an initial diagnosis of myocardial infarction, hemoptysis developed. Nasopharyngeal swabs rapid testing was negative for influenza A and B antigen, but a polymerase chain reaction test for influenza A type H1N1 was positive. A fiberoptic bronchoscopy for ongoing hemoptysis demonstrated diffuse erythema and bleeding, and bronchoalveolar lavage was consistent with alveolar hemorrhage. Progressive hypoxemic respiratory failure ensued, eventually leading to her demise. Our case highlights one of the more feared complications that may have been more common in prior outbreaks, such as the 1918 "Spanish Flu." Autopsy studies from the 1918 influenza pandemic found severe tracheobronchitis (oftentimes hemorrhagic), septal edema, necrotizing bronchiolitis, alveolitis, and extensive hemorrhage, as opposed to the more benign laryngitis and tracheobronchitis that is commonplace in other influenza infections. Similar pathology appearances, including pulmonary hemorrhage, have also been described in H5N1 outbreaks in China and Thailand. It is crucial for pandemic preparedness planning that additional careful and complete autopsy study of this present pandemic influenza infection be performed and reported to answer questions regarding the natural history, pathology, and pathogenesis of this novel H1N1 influenza.

  6. Peanut varieties with reduced Ara h 1 content indicating no reduced allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Krause, Susanne; Latendorf, Ties; Schmidt, Hendrik; Darcan-Nicolaisen, Yasemin; Reese, Gerald; Petersen, Arnd; Janssen, Ottmar; Becker, Wolf-Meinhard

    2010-03-01

    Peanut allergy is a major cause of food-induced severe anaphylactic reactions. To date, no medical care is available to prevent and treat peanut allergy and therefore hypoallergenic peanut varieties are of considerable health political and economic interest. Major allergens that induce IgE-responses in peanut-sensitive patients are Ara h 1, Ara h 2 and Ara h 3/4. In order to identify hypoallergenic peanuts, commercially locally available peanut varieties were screened for their allergen content. Ara h 1-deficient peanuts from Southeast Asia were identified by SDS-PAGE, immunoblotting, inhibition assays and ELISA. 2-D PAGE analyses demonstrated the different compositions of the tested extracts and revealed a number of variations of the allergen patterns of peanuts from different varieties. Mediator release experiments of these peanut extracts demonstrated similar allergenicities as compared with standard peanut extract. These results indicate that the allergenicity of peanuts with reduced Ara h 1 content might be compensated by the other allergens, and thus do not necessarily cause a reduction of allergenicity.

  7. Epidemiological characteristics of Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1-2009) in Zhanjiang, China

    PubMed Central

    Fu, JinJian; Chen, SiDong; Chen, JiaLin; Wang, Jie; Ling, ChenWen

    2011-01-01

    Background A novel influenza A virus strain (H1N1-2009) spread first in Mexico and the United Stated in late April 2009, leading to the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century. The objective of this study was to determine the epidemiological and virological characteristics of the pandemic influenza A (H1N1-2009) in Zhanjiang, China. Methods The case and outbreak reports of influenza-like illness (ILI) were collected from the Chinese information system of disease control and prevention and the influenza surveillance system of Zhanjiang city. Real-time RT-PCR was conducted, and epidemic and virological characteristics of the virus were analyzed using descriptive epidemiological methods and Chi-square trend tests. Results A total of 276 reported cases were confirmed from July 16, 2009 to June 30, 2010. The attack rate of outbreak was from 1.1% to 6.0%. The disease peak occurred in December 2009, after which the outbreak subsided gradually. The last case was confirmed in April 2010. Conclusion The main population struck by the H1N1-2009 virus was young adults, youths and children. The outbreaks most frequently occurred in schools, and most cases were acquired locally PMID:22384300

  8. TRPC3-GEF-H1 axis mediates pressure overload-induced cardiac fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Numaga-Tomita, Takuro; Kitajima, Naoyuki; Kuroda, Takuya; Nishimura, Akiyuki; Miyano, Kei; Yasuda, Satoshi; Kuwahara, Koichiro; Sato, Yoji; Ide, Tomomi; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Sumimoto, Hideki; Mori, Yasuo; Nishida, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Structural cardiac remodeling, accompanying cytoskeletal reorganization of cardiac cells, is a major clinical outcome of diastolic heart failure. A highly local Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane has been suggested to code signals to induce Rho GTPase-mediated fibrosis, but it is obscure how the heart specifically decodes the local Ca2+ influx as a cytoskeletal reorganizing signal under the conditions of the rhythmic Ca2+ handling required for pump function. We found that an inhibition of transient receptor potential canonical 3 (TRPC3) channel activity exhibited resistance to Rho-mediated maladaptive fibrosis in pressure-overloaded mouse hearts. Proteomic analysis revealed that microtubule-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor, GEF-H1, participates in TRPC3-mediated RhoA activation induced by mechanical stress in cardiomyocytes and transforming growth factor (TGF) β stimulation in cardiac fibroblasts. We previously revealed that TRPC3 functionally interacts with microtubule-associated NADPH oxidase (Nox) 2, and inhibition of Nox2 attenuated mechanical stretch-induced GEF-H1 activation in cardiomyocytes. Finally, pharmacological TRPC3 inhibition significantly suppressed fibrotic responses in human cardiomyocytes and cardiac fibroblasts. These results strongly suggest that microtubule-localized TRPC3-GEF-H1 axis mediates fibrotic responses commonly in cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts induced by physico-chemical stimulation. PMID:27991560

  9. Immunotherapy using algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain suppresses peanut allergy in mice.

    PubMed

    Gregory, James A; Shepley-McTaggart, Ariel; Umpierrez, Michelle; Hurlburt, Barry K; Maleki, Soheila J; Sampson, Hugh A; Mayfield, Stephen P; Berin, M Cecilia

    2016-07-01

    Peanut allergy is an IgE-mediated adverse reaction to a subset of proteins found in peanuts. Immunotherapy aims to desensitize allergic patients through repeated and escalating exposures for several months to years using extracts or flours. The complex mix of proteins and variability between preparations complicates immunotherapy studies. Moreover, peanut immunotherapy is associated with frequent negative side effects and patients are often at risk of allergic reactions once immunotherapy is discontinued. Allergen-specific approaches using recombinant proteins are an attractive alternative because they allow more precise dosing and the opportunity to engineer proteins with improved safety profiles. We tested whether Ara h 1 and Ara h 2, two major peanut allergens, could be produced using chloroplast of the unicellular eukaryotic alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. C. reinhardtii is novel host for producing allergens that is genetically tractable, inexpensive and easy to grow, and is able to produce more complex proteins than bacterial hosts. Compared to the native proteins, algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain and Ara h 2 have a reduced affinity for IgE from peanut-allergic patients. We further found that immunotherapy using algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain confers protection from peanut-induced anaphylaxis in a murine model of peanut allergy.

  10. Treating Clinical Depression with Repetitive Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Using the Brainsway H1-coil

    PubMed Central

    Feifel, David; Pappas, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is an emerging non-pharmacological approach to treating many brain-based disorders. rTMS uses electromagnetic coils to stimulate areas of the brain non-invasively. Deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (dTMS) with the Brainsway H1-coil system specifically is a type of rTMS indicated for treating patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) who are resistant to medication. The unique H1-coil design of this device is able to stimulate neuronal pathways that lie deeper in the targeted brain areas than those reached by conventional rTMS coils. dTMS is considered to be low-risk and well tolerated, making it a viable treatment option for people who have not responded to medication or psychotherapy trials for their depression. Randomized, sham-control studies have demonstrated that dTMS produces significantly greater improvement in depressive symptoms than sham dTMS treatment in patients with major depression that has not responded to antidepressant medication. In this paper, we will review the methodology for treating major depression with dTMS using an H1-coil. PMID:27768049

  11. Cycle life testing of 8-cm mercury ion thruster cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, E. G.

    1976-01-01

    Two main cathodes have successfully completed 2800 and 1980 cycles and three neutralizers, 3928, 3050, and 2850 cycles in ongoing cycle life tests of flight-type cathode-isolator-vaporizer and neutralizer-isolator-vaporizer assemblies for the 4.45 mN 8-cm Hg ion thruster system. Each cycle included one hour of cathode operation. Starting and operating conditions simulated those expected in a typical auxiliary propulsion mission duty cycle. This paper presents the cycle life test results and also results of an insert comparison test which led to the selection of a rolled foil insert type for the 8-cm Engineering Model Thruster cathodes.

  12. Cycle life testing of 8-cm mercury ion thruster cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, E. G.

    1976-01-01

    Two main cathodes have successfully completed 2800 and 1980 cycles and three neutralizers, 3928, 3050, and 2850 cycles in ongoing cycle life tests of flight-type cathode-isolator-vaporizer and neutralizer-isolator-vaporizer assemblies for the 4.45 mN 8-cm Hg ion thruster system. Each cycle included one hour of cathode operation. Starting and operating conditions simulated those expected in a typical auxiliary propulsion mission duty cycle. The cycle life test results are presented along with results of an insert comparison test which led to the selection of a rolled foil insert type for the 8-cm Engineering Model Thruster cathodes.

  13. 21 cm radiation: A new probe of fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Rishi; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2010-11-01

    New low frequency radio telescopes currently being built open up the possibility of observing the 21 cm radiation from redshifts 200 > z > 30, also known as the dark ages, see Furlanetto, Oh, & Briggs(2006) for a review. At these high redshifts, Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation is absorbed by neutral hydrogen at its 21 cm hyperfine transition. This redshifted 21 cm signal thus carries information about the state of the early Universe and can be used to test fundamental physics. The 21 cm radiation probes a volume of the early Universe on kpc scales in contrast with CMB which probes a surface (of some finite thickness) on Mpc scales. Thus there is many orders of more information available, in principle, from the 21 cm observations of dark ages. We have studied the constraints these observations can put on the variation of fundamental constants (Khatri & Wandelt(2007)). Since the 21 cm signal depends on atomic physics it is very sensitive to the variations in the fine structure constant and can place constraints comparable to or better than the other astrophysical experiments (Δα/α= < 10-5) as shown in Figure 1. Making such observations will require radio telescopes of collecting area 10 - 106 km2 compared to ~ 1 km2 of current telescopes, for example LOFAR. We should also expect similar sensitivity to the electron to proton mass ratio. One of the challenges in observing this 21 cm cosmological signal is the presence of the synchrotron foregrounds which is many orders of magnitude larger than the cosmological signal but the two can be separated because of their different statistical nature (Zaldarriaga, Furlanetto, & Hernquist(2004)). Terrestrial EM interference from radio/TV etc. and Earth's ionosphere poses problems for telescopes on ground which may be solved by going to the Moon and there are proposals for doing so, one of which is the Dark Ages Lunar Interferometer (DALI). In conclusion 21 cm cosmology promises a large wealth of data and provides

  14. WSRC Am/Cm Stabilization Program - Cylindrical Induction Melter Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, W.A.

    1999-02-17

    1.1.1 Kilogram quantities of Americium and Curium isotopes (Am/Cm) have been produced at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, South Carolina. These highly radioactive isotopes have both government and commercial value and are currently stored as a nitric acid solution at the Savannah River Site. The material represents the largest source term in the F canyon at SRS. It is proposed that the Am/Cm material be vitrified to stabilize the material for long term, recoverable storage. This paper reviews the progress made during the process development phase of this program using the Cylindrical Induction Melter.

  15. Evidence for live 247Cm in the early solar system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tatsumoto, M.; Shimamura, T.

    1980-01-01

    Variations of the 238U/235U ratio in the Allende meteorite, ranging from -35% to + 19%, are interpreted as evidence of live 247Cm in the early Solar System. The amounts of these and other r-products in the Solar System indicate values of (9,000??3,000) Myr for the age of the Galaxy and ??? 8 Myr for the time between the end of nucleosynthesis and the formation of meteoritic grains. Three possible explanations are presented for the different values of the latter time period which are indicated by the decay products of 247Cm, 26Al, 244Pu and 129I. ?? 1980 Nature Publishing Group.

  16. Increased capabilities of the 30-cm diameter Hg ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlin, V. K.; Hawkins, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    Some space flight missions require advanced ion thrusters which operate at conditions much different than those for which the baseline 30-cm Hg thruster was developed. Results of initial tests of a 30-cm Hg thruster with two and three grid ion accelerating systems, operated at higher values of both thrust and power and over a greater range of specific impulse than the baseline conditions are presented. Thruster lifetime at increased input power was evaluated both by extended tests and real time spectroscopic measurements.

  17. Inert gas test of two 12-cm magnetostatic thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    Comparative performance tests were conducted with 12 cm line and ring magnetic cusp thrusters. Shell anode and magnetoelectrostatic containment boundary anode configurations were evaluated with each magnet array. The best performance was achieved with the 12-cm ring cusp-shell anode configuration. Argon operation of this configuration produced 65-81 percent mass utilization efficiency at 170-208 watts/single-charged-equivalent (SCE) ampere beam. Xenon test results showed 75-95 percent utilization at 162-188 watts/SCE ampere beam.

  18. Linker histone H1 is essential for Drosophila development, the establishment of pericentric heterochromatin, and a normal polytene chromosome structure

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xingwu; Wontakal, Sandeep N.; Emelyanov, Alexander V.; Morcillo, Patrick; Konev, Alexander Y.; Fyodorov, Dmitry V.; Skoultchi, Arthur I.

    2009-01-01

    We generated mutant alleles of Drosophila melanogaster in which expression of the linker histone H1 can be down-regulated over a wide range by RNAi. When the H1 protein level is reduced to ∼20% of the level in wild-type larvae, lethality occurs in the late larval – pupal stages of development. Here we show that H1 has an important function in gene regulation within or near heterochromatin. It is a strong dominant suppressor of position effect variegation (PEV). Similar to other suppressors of PEV, H1 is simultaneously involved in both the repression of euchromatic genes brought to the vicinity of pericentric heterochromatin and the activation of heterochromatic genes that depend on their pericentric localization for maximal transcriptional activity. Studies of H1-depleted salivary gland polytene chromosomes show that H1 participates in several fundamental aspects of chromosome structure and function. First, H1 is required for heterochromatin structural integrity and the deposition or maintenance of major pericentric heterochromatin-associated histone marks, including H3K9Me2 and H4K20Me2. Second, H1 also plays an unexpected role in the alignment of endoreplicated sister chromatids. Finally, H1 is essential for organization of pericentric regions of all polytene chromosomes into a single chromocenter. Thus, linker histone H1 is essential in Drosophila and plays a fundamental role in the architecture and activity of chromosomes in vivo. PMID:19196654

  19. Doxepin and diphenhydramine increased non-rapid eye movement sleep through blockade of histamine H1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Qun; Takata, Yohko; Li, Rui; Zhang, Ze; Zhang, Meng-Qi; Urade, Yoshihiro; Qu, Wei-Min; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2015-02-01

    Histaminergic neurons have been reported to play an important role in the regulation of sleep-wake behavior through the histamine H1 receptor (R, H1R). First generation H1R antagonists, such as doxepin and diphenhydramine, produce drowsiness in humans, and are occasionally used to treat insomnia. However, if H1R antagonists function via physically blocking the H1R remains unclear. In the current study, we used H1R knockout (KO) mice to investigate if the sleep-promoting effects of doxepin and diphenhydramine are dependent on blockade of the H1R. When doxepin was administered, non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep in wild type (WT) mice increased for 4h, with an increase in the numbers of NREM sleep bouts of 256-512 s and 512-1024 s. These effects were not observed in the H1R KO mice. Furthermore, diphenhydramine increased NREM sleep for 6h in WT, and not in the H1R KO mice after the injection. These results indicate that both doxepin at 15 mg/kg and diphenhydramine at 10 mg/kg induce NREM sleep through blockade of H1R.

  20. GEF-H1 modulates localized RhoA activation during cytokinesis under the control of mitotic kinases

    PubMed Central

    Birkenfeld, Jörg; Nalbant, Perihan; Bohl, Benjamin P.; Pertz, Olivier; Hahn, Klaus M.; Bokoch, Gary M.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Formation of the mitotic cleavage furrow is dependent upon both microtubules and activity of the small GTPase RhoA. GEF-H1 is a microtubule-regulated exchange factor that couples microtubule dynamics to RhoA activation. GEF-H1 localized to the mitotic apparatus in HeLa cells, particularly at the tips of cortical microtubules and the midbody, and perturbation of GEF-H1 function induced mitotic aberrations, including asymmetric furrowing, membrane blebbing, and impaired cytokinesis. The mitotic kinases Aurora A/B and Cdk1/Cyclin B phosphorylate GEF-H1, thereby inhibiting GEF-H1 catalytic activity. Dephosphorylation of GEF-H1 occurs just prior to cytokinesis, accompanied by GEF-H1-dependent GTP-loading on RhoA. Using a live cell biosensor, we demonstrate distinct roles for GEF-H1 and Ect2 in regulating Rho activity in the cleavage furrow, with GEF-H1 catalyzing Rho activation in response to Ect2-dependent localization and initiation of cell cleavage. Our results identify a GEF-H1-dependent mechanism to modulate localized RhoA activation during cytokinesis under the control of mitotic kinases. PMID:17488622