Science.gov

Sample records for 10-3 omega cm

  1. 4H-SiC Power Bipolar Junction Transistor with a Very Low Specific On-resistance of 2.9 mOmega.cm2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-12

    pp1381-1382, 2004. [2] C.-F. Huang and J. A. Cooper, Jr., “High current gain 4H-SiC NPN Bipolar Junction Transistors ,” IEEE Electron Device Lett...4H-SiC Power Bipolar Junction Transistor with a Very Low Specific On-resistance of 2.9 mΩ.cm2 Jianhui Zhang, member, IEEE, Petre Alexandrov...specific on-resistance (Rsp,on) of power 4H-SiC bipolar junction transistors (BJT). A 4H-SiC BJT based on a 12 um drift-layer shows a record low

  2. B Meson Decays to mega K*, omega rho, omega omega, omega phi, and omega f0

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G.S.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U. /Clermont-Ferrand U. /Basilicata U., Potenza

    2006-07-28

    The authors describe searches for B meson decays to the charmless vector-vector final states {omega}K*, {omega}p, {omega}{omega}, and {omega}{phi} with 233 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV. They also search for the vector-scalar B decay to {omega}f{sub 0}.

  3. Omega Electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Unwuchola, A. D.; Connell, Simon H.; Aurousseau, M.; Dalton, Mark M.

    2013-08-01

    The differential cross section for p(e, e'ω)p has been studied at Q{sup 2} ~ 5.5 (GeV/c)2. Here Q{sup 2} represents the four momentum squared of the virtual photon in the excitation of baryonic resonances by an electron projectile. In order to extract the ω-meson differential cross section from the JLAB data, the data was compared to a full Monte Carlo simulation of the detector based on events generated for omega production in a way that the production cross section was varied to achieve a match to the data. The bin selected for this procedure takes into account the measure of robustness of the stripping of the ω peak from the multi-pion background as well as the statistics in the measured data and the Monte Carlo simulation of the signal and background physics. An error estimation technique for the cross section was based on determining the dependence of the extracted cross section parameters on the experimental set-up (including parameters for the spectrometer, target beam geometeries and performance). We compare our results with a Regge-based model for hadronic content in the t-channel exchange of a photon in Q{sup 2} region of overlap. There is an extension of this data into a completely new region, which is the highest yet measured.

  4. Omega documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Howerton, R.J.; Dye, R.E.; Giles, P.C.; Kimlinger, J.R.; Perkins, S.T.; Plechaty, E.F.

    1983-08-01

    OMEGA is a CRAY I computer program that controls nine codes used by LLNL Physical Data Group for: 1) updating the libraries of evaluated data maintained by the group (UPDATE); 2) calculating average values of energy deposited in secondary particles and residual nuclei (ENDEP); 3) checking the libraries for internal consistency, especially for energy conservation (GAMCHK); 4) producing listings, indexes and plots of the library data (UTILITY); 5) producing calculational constants such as group averaged cross sections and transfer matrices for diffusion and Sn transport codes (CLYDE); 6) producing and updating standard files of the calculational constants used by LLNL Sn and diffusion transport codes (NDFL); 7) producing calculational constants for Monte Carlo transport codes that use group-averaged cross sections and continuous energy for particles (CTART); 8) producing and updating standard files used by the LLNL Monte Carlo transport codes (TRTL); and 9) producing standard files used by the LANL pointwise Monte Carlo transport code MCNP (MCPOINT). The first four of these functions and codes deal with the libraries of evaluated data and the last five with various aspects of producing calculational constants for use by transport codes. In 1970 a series, called PD memos, of internal and informal memoranda was begun. These were intended to be circulated among the group for comment and then to provide documentation for later reference whenever questions arose about the subject matter of the memos. They have served this purpose and now will be drawn upon as source material for this more comprehensive report that deals with most of the matters covered in those memos.

  5. Omega-3 fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine evidence for the role of omega-3 fatty acids in cardiovascular disease. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE PubMed was searched for articles on the role of omega-3 fatty acids in cardiovascular disease. Level I and II evidence indicates that omega-3 fatty acids are beneficial in improving cardiovascular outcomes. MAIN MESSAGE Dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids has declined by 80% during the last 100 years, while intake of omega-6 fatty acids has greatly increased. Omega-3 fatty acids are cardioprotective mainly due to beneficial effects on arrhythmias, atherosclerosis, inflammation, and thrombosis. There is also evidence that they improve endothelial function, lower blood pressure, and significantly lower triglycerides. CONCLUSION There is good evidence in the literature that increasing intake of omega-3 fatty acids improves cardiac outcomes. Physicians need to integrate dietary recommendations for consumption of omega-3 fatty acids into their usual cardiovascular care. PMID:16812965

  6. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    Omega-6 fatty acids are types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean oils. Other types of omega-6 fatty acids are found in black currant seed, borage seed, ...

  7. Omega-3 fatty acids (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Omega-3 fatty acids are a form of polyunsaturated fat that the body derives from food. Omega-3s (and omega-6s) are known as essential fatty acids (EFAs) because they are important for good health. ...

  8. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the amount of triglycerides (a fat-like ... people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of medications called antilipemic ...

  9. Progress in Cryogenic Target Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Glebov, V. Yu; Goncharov, V. N.; Harding, D. R.; Hu, S. X.; Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F. J.; McKenty, P. W.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Seka, W.; Short, R. W.; Shvarts, D.; Skupsky, S.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Soures, J. M.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Yaakobi, B.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Séguin, F. H.; Casey, D. T.

    2016-10-01

    Cryogenic deuterium-tritium targets are imploded on the OMEGA Laser System in a direct-drive configuration. Areal densities of approximately 200 mg/cm2 have been measured with implosion velocities of 3 × 107 cm/s. These implosions are used to study the dynamics of cryogenic target compression and to develop areal-density diagnostics that will be used as part of the ignition campaign on the National Ignition Facility.

  10. 24 CFR 10.3 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applicability. 10.3 Section 10.3 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development RULEMAKING: POLICY AND PROCEDURES General § 10.3 Applicability. (a) This part prescribes general...

  11. 1 CFR 10.3 - Format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Format. 10.3 Section 10.3 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER SPECIAL EDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PRESIDENTIAL PAPERS Regular Publication § 10.3 Format. The Daily Compilation of Presidential Documents is published online...

  12. 1 CFR 10.3 - Format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Format. 10.3 Section 10.3 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER SPECIAL EDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PRESIDENTIAL PAPERS Regular Publication § 10.3 Format. The Daily Compilation of Presidential Documents is published online...

  13. 10 CFR 10.3 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false 10.3 Section 10.3 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION CRITERIA AND PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA OR NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION OR AN EMPLOYMENT CLEARANCE General Provisions § 10.3...

  14. 10 CFR 10.3 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false 10.3 Section 10.3 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION CRITERIA AND PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA OR NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION OR AN EMPLOYMENT CLEARANCE General Provisions § 10.3...

  15. 10 CFR 10.3 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false 10.3 Section 10.3 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION CRITERIA AND PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA OR NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION OR AN EMPLOYMENT CLEARANCE General Provisions § 10.3...

  16. 10 CFR 10.3 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false 10.3 Section 10.3 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION CRITERIA AND PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA OR NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION OR AN EMPLOYMENT CLEARANCE General Provisions § 10.3...

  17. 10 CFR 10.3 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false 10.3 Section 10.3 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION CRITERIA AND PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA OR NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION OR AN EMPLOYMENT CLEARANCE General Provisions § 10.3...

  18. B meson decays to {omega}K*, {omega}{rho}, {omega}{omega}, {omega}{phi}, and {omega}f{sub 0}

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.

    2006-09-01

    We describe searches for B meson decays to the charmless vector-vector final states {omega}K*, {omega}{rho}, {omega}{omega}, and {omega}{phi} with 233x10{sup 6} BB pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} BB annihilation at {radical}(s)=10.58 GeV. We also search for the vector-scalar B decay to {omega}f{sub 0}. We measure the following branching fractions in units of 10{sup -6}: B(B{sup 0}{yields}{omega}K*{sup 0})=2.4{+-}1.1{+-}0.7 (<4.2), B(B{sup +}{yields}{omega}K*{sup +})=0.6{sub -1.2-0.9}{sup +1.4+1.1} (<3.4), B(B{sup 0}{yields}{omega}{rho}{sup 0})=-0.6{+-}0.7{sub -0.3}{sup +0.8} (<1.5), B(B{sup +}{yields}{omega}{rho}{sup +})=10.6{+-}2.1{sub -1.0}{sup +1.6}, B(B{sup 0}{yields}{omega}{omega})=1.8{sub -0.9}{sup +1.3}{+-}0.4 (<4.0), B(B{sup 0}{yields}{omega}{phi})=0.1{+-}0.5{+-}0.1 (<1.2), and B(B{sup 0}{yields}{omega}f{sub 0})=0.9{+-}0.4{sub -0.1}{sup +0.2} (<1.5). In each case the first error quoted is statistical, the second systematic, and the upper limits are defined at the 90% confidence level. For B{sup +}{yields}{omega}{rho}{sup +} decays we also measure the longitudinal spin component f{sub L}=0.82{+-}0.11{+-}0.02 and the charge asymmetry A{sub CP}=0.04{+-}0.18{+-}0.02.

  19. 42 CFR 10.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... contracts with purchasers, such as hospitals, nursing homes, and home health agencies, to aggregate... or employee of the Department of Health and Human Services to whom the authority involved has been... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Definitions. 10.3 Section 10.3 Public Health...

  20. 21 CFR 10.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Definitions. 10.3 Section 10.3 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE PRACTICES AND... 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, and 19: Act means the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act unless...

  1. 21 CFR 10.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Definitions. 10.3 Section 10.3 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE PRACTICES AND... 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, and 19: Act means the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act unless...

  2. [Omega-3 and health].

    PubMed

    Herbaut, C

    2006-09-01

    N-3 PUFA (omega-3), and the n-6 PUFA (omega-6) are essential fatty acids. They must be absorbed by alimentation and play a very important role in the coagulation (inhibition of platelets aggregation) and in the inflammatory reaction (anti-inflammatory effects). Their effects have been studied in different sicknesses. In cardiovascular diseases, particularly in coronary diseases, studies demonstrated a decreased mortality in populations who eat an omega-3 rich diet or who take an omega-3 supplement. Among others, sudden death after myocardial infarction is decreased. In inflammatory diseases an effect seem to be found in some studies. In rheumatoid arthritis a decrease of different biological markers of inflammation and in some case a clinical improvement has been noticed. It may be the same in COPD. On the other hand, they seem not to give any protection against cancer in general. At this moment the recommendations for healthy people are to eat twice a week fat fish and to take omega-3 rich oils. For pathological cases, recommendations exist only for coronary disease: 1 g of fish oils : mixture of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids (EPA/DHA) should be given after a myocardial infarction.

  3. From Alpha To Omega

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Doc

    2002-05-01

    Galileo, the Father of Modern Science put forth the first significant Modern Scientific Era/Philosophy. Best represented per: x' = x (+/-) vt. Locating/defining the dynamic x' per a fixed, Cartesian Coordinate, reference frame.----- Einstein, the popularized relativist, utilizing Lorentz's transformation Equations: x' = (x-vt)/squareroot [1 - (v squared/c squared)], c the velocity of light. Arbitrarily decreed that c must be the ultimate universal velocity. Thus, Reporters, the general Public, and Scientists consider/considered, Einstein's OPINION of our Universe, the 'Omega Concept'. ----- Castellano, since 1955, has PROVEN his "Castellano Transformation Equations": X' = (X - vt)/squareroot [ 1 - (v squared/c squared)]. Capital C = or greater than c; IS THE OMEGA CONCEPT. And his "MAPHICS" combining the Philosophy of Mathematics with the Philosophy of Physics is "THE OMEGA PHILOSOPHY". Sufficient PROOFS and details at: http://hometown.aol.com/phdco/myhomepage/index.html Thank you for your interest. My sincere appreciation for your attention and deserved acknowledgments.

  4. From Alpha To Omega

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Doc

    2002-08-01

    Galileo, the Father of Modern Science, put forth the first significant Modern Scientific Era/Philosophy. Best represented per: x' = x (+/-) vt. Locating/defining the dynamic x' in an Euclidean, fixed frame Universe. Einstein, the popularized relativist, utilizing Lorentz's transformation equations: x' = (x - vt)/square root [ 1- (v squared/c squared)], c the velocity of light. Arbitrarily decreed that c must be the ultimate, universal velocity. Thus, Reporters, the general Public and Scientists consider/considered, Einstein's OPINION of our Universe, 'The Omega Concept'. Castellano, since 1954, has PROVEN the "C Transformation Equations": X' = (X - vt)/square root [ 1 - (v squared/C squared)], Capital C = or greater than c; IS THE OMEGA CONCEPT. And "MAPHICS", combining the Philosophy of Mathematics with the Philosophy of Physics is "THE OMEGA PHILOSOPHY". Sufficient PROOFS & details are at: http://hometown.aol.com/phdco/myhomepage/index/html ----- Thank you for your interest. My sincere appreciation for deserved acknowledgements.

  5. High accuracy OMEGA timekeeping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbier, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) operates a worldwide satellite tracking network which uses a combination of OMEGA as a frequency reference, dual timing channels, and portable clock comparisons to maintain accurate epoch time. Propagational charts from the U.S. Coast Guard OMEGA monitor program minimize diurnal and seasonal effects. Daily phase value publications of the U.S. Naval Observatory provide corrections to the field collected timing data to produce an averaged time line comprised of straight line segments called a time history file (station clock minus UTC). Depending upon clock location, reduced time data accuracies of between two and eight microseconds are typical.

  6. Improvements for Omega RF preamplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, L.

    1976-01-01

    An improved Omega navigation system preamplifier, which provides both ADF and Omega outputs from a single antenna input, is described. This preamp has tuneable bandpass filtering, zero phase shift at both output ports, adjustable gain at the Omega output, and it receives power via the coaxial cable to the receiver front-end.

  7. The Omega Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanni, Robert P.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a game in which the symbol omega becomes equivalent to the word ohm, and is then modified or incorporated into a picture to represent a common word or phrase. Recommends the game as a way of humanizing the beginning course. (GA)

  8. 32 CFR 10.3 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MILITARY COMMISSIONS MILITARY COMMISSION INSTRUCTIONS § 10.3 Applicability. This part, and, unless stated otherwise, all other Military Commission..., the Military Departments, the Chairman and Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the...

  9. 36 CFR 10.3 - Application; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... post office address for Yellowstone National Park is Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, and for Wind Cave National Park is Hot Springs, South Dakota. (b) Applicants desiring animals which are to be held in....3 Section 10.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  10. 36 CFR 10.3 - Application; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... post office address for Yellowstone National Park is Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, and for Wind Cave National Park is Hot Springs, South Dakota. (b) Applicants desiring animals which are to be held in....3 Section 10.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  11. 36 CFR 10.3 - Application; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... post office address for Yellowstone National Park is Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, and for Wind Cave National Park is Hot Springs, South Dakota. (b) Applicants desiring animals which are to be held in....3 Section 10.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  12. 36 CFR 10.3 - Application; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... post office address for Yellowstone National Park is Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, and for Wind Cave National Park is Hot Springs, South Dakota. (b) Applicants desiring animals which are to be held in....3 Section 10.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  13. 36 CFR 10.3 - Application; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... post office address for Yellowstone National Park is Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, and for Wind Cave National Park is Hot Springs, South Dakota. (b) Applicants desiring animals which are to be held in....3 Section 10.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  14. Ubiquitous CM and DM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, Sandra L.

    2000-01-01

    Ubiquitous is a real word. I thank a former Total Quality Coach for my first exposure some years ago to its existence. My version of Webster's dictionary defines ubiquitous as "present, or seeming to be present, everywhere at the same time; omnipresent." While I believe that God is omnipresent, I have come to discover that CM and DM are present everywhere. Oh, yes; I define CM as Configuration Management and DM as either Data or Document Management. Ten years ago, I had my first introduction to the CM world. I had an opportunity to do CM for the Space Station effort at the NASA Lewis Research Center. I learned that CM was a discipline that had four areas of focus: identification, control, status accounting, and verification. I was certified as a CMIl graduate and was indoctrinated about clear, concise, and valid. Off I went into a world of entirely new experiences. I was exposed to change requests and change boards first hand. I also learned about implementation of changes, and then of technical and CM requirements.

  15. Damper Spring For Omega Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maclaughlin, Scott T.; Montgomery, Stuart K.

    1993-01-01

    Damper spring reduces deflections of omega-cross-section seal, reducing probability of failure and extending life of seal. Spring is split ring with U-shaped cross section. Placed inside omega seal and inserted with seal into seal cavity. As omega seal compressed into cavity, spring and seal make contact near convolution of seal, and spring becomes compressed also. During operation, when seal dynamically loaded, spring limits deflection of seal, reducing stress on seal.

  16. Low cost omega navigation receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilley, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    The development of a low cost Omega navigation receiver is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the completion and testing of a modular, multipurpose Omega receiver which utilizes a digital memory-aided, phase-locked loop to provide phase measurement data to a variety of applications interfaces. The functional units contained in the prototype device are described. The receiver is capable of receiving and storing phase measurements for up to eight Omega signals and computes two switch-selectable lines of position, displaying this navigation data in chart-recorded form.

  17. Omega-3 fats: Good for your heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... arteries - omega-3s; Coronary artery disease - omega-3s; Heart disease - omega-3s ... Omega-3s are good for your heart and blood vessels in several ways. They reduce triglycerides , a type of fat in your blood. They reduce the risk of an ...

  18. Analysis of the vertices {Omega}{sub Q}*{Omega}{sub Q{phi}} and radiative decays {Omega}{sub Q}*{yields}{Omega}{sub Q{gamma}}

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhigang

    2010-02-01

    In this article, we study the vertices {Omega}{sub Q}*{Omega}{sub Q{phi}} with the light-cone QCD sum rules, then assume the vector meson dominance of the intermediate {phi}(1020), and calculate the radiative decays {Omega}{sub Q}*{yields}{Omega}{sub Q{gamma}}.

  19. Omega-3 Fatty Acids during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS DURING PREGNANCY S HARE W ITH W OMEN OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS DURING PREGNANCY During pregnancy, your baby gets most ... eat and vitamins you take. Omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3s) are an important family of building ...

  20. Short Zoom Into Omega Centauri

    NASA Video Gallery

    This is a zoom into a simulated model of the globular star cluster Omega Centauri. All the stars appear to be moving in random directions, like a swarm of bees. Astronomers used Hubble's exquisite ...

  1. Characterization of omega-3 tablets.

    PubMed

    Vestland, Tina Lien; Jacobsen, Øyvind; Sande, Sverre Arne; Myrset, Astrid Hilde; Klaveness, Jo

    2016-04-15

    Omega-3 nutraceuticals are extensively used as health supplements worldwide. Various administration forms for delivery of omega-3 are available. However, the niche omega-3 tablets have so far remained unexplored. In this work tablets containing 25-40% (w/w) omega-3 oil as triglycerides or ethyl esters were prepared utilizing a direct compaction grade powder with β-cyclodextrin as encapsulating agent. It was found that powders with up to 35% (w/w) triglyceride oil and 30% (w/w) ethyl ester oil, respectively, can be directly compressed into tablets of excellent quality. Physical properties of omega-3 containing powders and tablets are described. The powder X-ray diffractograms of the powders and crushed tablets show evidence of the formation of new crystalline phases not present in β-cyclodextrin. In addition, (1)H NMR data suggest that the ethyl esters form inclusion complexes with β-cyclodextrin. Compaction of other, commercially available, omega-3 powders was performed as a comparison and deemed unsuccessful.

  2. Omega, the final multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, T. N.

    2008-12-01

    The application of optimisation theory to vegetation processes has rarely extended beyond the context of diurnal to intra-annual gas exchange of individual leaves and crowns. One reason is that the Lagrange multipliers in the leaf-scale solutions, which are marginal products for allocatable photosynthetic resource inputs (water and nitrogen), are mysterious in origin, and their numerical values are difficult to measure -- let alone to predict or interpret in concrete physiological or ecological terms. These difficulties disappear, however, when the optimisation paradigm itself is extended to encompass carbon allocation and growth at the lifespan scale. The trajectories of leaf (and canopy) level marginal products are then implicit in the trajectory of plant and stand structure predicted by optimal carbon allocation. Furthermore, because the input and product are the same resource -- carbon -- in the whole plant optimisation, the product in one time step defines the input constraint, and hence implicitly the marginal product for carbon, in the next time step. This effectively converts the problem from a constrained optimisation of a definite integral, in which the multipliers are undetermined, to an unconstrained maximisation of a state, in which the multipliers are all implicit. This talk will explore how the marginal products for photosynthetic inputs as well as the marginal product for carbon -- i.e., the 'final multiplier,' omega -- are predicted to vary over time and in relation to environmental change during tree growth.

  3. Spatial profile reconstruction of individual componentsof the nonlinear susceptibility tensors {chi}-circumflex {sup (3)}(z, {omega}', {omega}' -{omega}, {omega}) and {chi}-circumflex {sup (3)}(z, 2{omega}{+-}{omega}', {+-}{omega}', {omega}, {omega}) of a one-dimensionally inhomogeneous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Golubkov, A A; Makarov, Vladimir A

    2011-06-30

    We have proved for the first time and proposed an algorithm of unique spatial profile reconstruction of the components {chi}-circumflex {sup (3)}{sub yyyy} of complex tensors {chi}-circumflex {sup (3)}(z, {omega}', {omega}', -{omega}, {omega}) and {chi}-circumflex {sup (3)}(z, 2{omega}{+-}{omega}', {+-}{omega}', {omega}, {omega}), describing four-photon interaction of light waves in a one-dimensionally inhomogeneous plate, whose medium has a symmetry plane m{sub y} that is perpendicular to its surface. For the media with an additional symmetry axis 2{sub z}, 4{sub z}, 6{sub z} or {infinity}{sub z} that is perpendicular to the plate surface, the proposed method can be used to reconstruct about one-fifth of all independent components of the above tensors. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  4. omega-Helices in proteins.

    PubMed

    Enkhbayar, Purevjav; Boldgiv, Bazartseren; Matsushima, Norio

    2010-05-01

    A modification of the alpha-helix, termed the omega-helix, has four residues in one turn of a helix. We searched the omega-helix in proteins by the HELFIT program which determines the helical parameters-pitch, residues per turn, radius, and handedness-and p = rmsd/(N - 1)(1/2) estimating helical regularity, where "rmsd" is the root mean square deviation from the best fit helix and "N" is helix length. A total of 1,496 regular alpha-helices 6-9 residues long with p < or = 0.10 A were identified from 866 protein chains. The statistical analysis provides a strong evidence that the frequency distribution of helices versus n indicates the bimodality of typical alpha-helix and omega-helix. Sixty-two right handed omega-helices identified (7.2% of proteins) show non-planarity of the peptide groups. There is amino acid preference of Asp and Cys. These observations and analyses insist that the omega-helices occur really in proteins.

  5. 46 CFR 113.10-3 - Cable runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cable runs. 113.10-3 Section 113.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Fire and Smoke Detecting and Alarm Systems § 113.10-3 Cable runs. Cable runs...

  6. 46 CFR 113.10-3 - Cable runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cable runs. 113.10-3 Section 113.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Fire and Smoke Detecting and Alarm Systems § 113.10-3 Cable runs. Cable runs...

  7. 46 CFR 188.10-3 - Approved container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Approved container. 188.10-3 Section 188.10-3 Shipping... PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-3 Approved container. This term means a container which is properly labeled, marked and approved by DOT for the commodity which it contains....

  8. 39 CFR 10.3 - Post-employment activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Post-employment activities. 10.3 Section 10.3 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE U.S. POSTAL SERVICE RULES OF CONDUCT FOR POSTAL SERVICE GOVERNORS (ARTICLE X) § 10.3 Post-employment activities. Governors are...

  9. 46 CFR 30.10-3 - Approved-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Approved-TB/ALL. 30.10-3 Section 30.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-3 Approved—TB/ALL. The term approved means approved by the Commandant unless otherwise stated....

  10. 46 CFR 30.10-3 - Approved-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Approved-TB/ALL. 30.10-3 Section 30.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-3 Approved—TB/ALL. The term approved means approved by the Commandant unless otherwise stated....

  11. 46 CFR 113.10-3 - Cable runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cable runs. 113.10-3 Section 113.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Fire and Smoke Detecting and Alarm Systems § 113.10-3 Cable runs. Cable runs...

  12. 46 CFR 113.10-3 - Cable runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cable runs. 113.10-3 Section 113.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Fire and Smoke Detecting and Alarm Systems § 113.10-3 Cable runs. Cable runs...

  13. 46 CFR 113.10-3 - Cable runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cable runs. 113.10-3 Section 113.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Fire and Smoke Detecting and Alarm Systems § 113.10-3 Cable runs. Cable runs...

  14. 50 CFR 10.3 - Other applicable laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Other applicable laws. 10.3 Section 10.3... GENERAL PROVISIONS Introduction § 10.3 Other applicable laws. No statute or regulation of any State shall..., or customs laws or regulations, or other Service enforced statutes or regulations....

  15. 46 CFR 76.10-3 - Water availability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Water availability. 76.10-3 Section 76.10-3 Shipping... Fire Main System, Details § 76.10-3 Water availability. (a) On all vessels on an international voyage, regardless of the date of construction, water pressure from the firemain protecting enclosed spaces shall...

  16. 46 CFR 76.10-3 - Water availability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Water availability. 76.10-3 Section 76.10-3 Shipping... Fire Main System, Details § 76.10-3 Water availability. (a) On all vessels on an international voyage, regardless of the date of construction, water pressure from the firemain protecting enclosed spaces shall...

  17. 46 CFR 76.10-3 - Water availability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Water availability. 76.10-3 Section 76.10-3 Shipping... Fire Main System, Details § 76.10-3 Water availability. (a) On all vessels on an international voyage, regardless of the date of construction, water pressure from the firemain protecting enclosed spaces shall...

  18. 46 CFR 76.10-3 - Water availability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Water availability. 76.10-3 Section 76.10-3 Shipping... Fire Main System, Details § 76.10-3 Water availability. (a) On all vessels on an international voyage, regardless of the date of construction, water pressure from the firemain protecting enclosed spaces shall...

  19. 46 CFR 76.10-3 - Water availability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Water availability. 76.10-3 Section 76.10-3 Shipping... Fire Main System, Details § 76.10-3 Water availability. (a) On all vessels on an international voyage, regardless of the date of construction, water pressure from the firemain protecting enclosed spaces shall...

  20. Omega 3 oils and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Shawn

    2004-01-01

    Women can safely commence omega 3 intake in early pregnancy to allow the full benefits to be incorporated into the body. Pregnant women should consider the intake of omega 3 oils and evening primrose oil throughout pregnancy in order possibly to prevent preterm delivery, promote an easier birth, assist the baby's brain and eye health and preprogram the baby's cell membranes for optimum lifelong wellness. Benefits to the mother may include prevention of postnatal depression and the comfort of knowing that she is giving her baby a healthy start in life.

  1. An Increase in the Omega-6/Omega-3 Fatty Acid Ratio Increases the Risk for Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Simopoulos, Artemis P.

    2016-01-01

    In the past three decades, total fat and saturated fat intake as a percentage of total calories has continuously decreased in Western diets, while the intake of omega-6 fatty acid increased and the omega-3 fatty acid decreased, resulting in a large increase in the omega-6/omega-3 ratio from 1:1 during evolution to 20:1 today or even higher. This change in the composition of fatty acids parallels a significant increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity. Experimental studies have suggested that omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids elicit divergent effects on body fat gain through mechanisms of adipogenesis, browning of adipose tissue, lipid homeostasis, brain-gut-adipose tissue axis, and most importantly systemic inflammation. Prospective studies clearly show an increase in the risk of obesity as the level of omega-6 fatty acids and the omega-6/omega-3 ratio increase in red blood cell (RBC) membrane phospholipids, whereas high omega-3 RBC membrane phospholipids decrease the risk of obesity. Recent studies in humans show that in addition to absolute amounts of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acid intake, the omega-6/omega-3 ratio plays an important role in increasing the development of obesity via both AA eicosanoid metabolites and hyperactivity of the cannabinoid system, which can be reversed with increased intake of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). A balanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio is important for health and in the prevention and management of obesity. PMID:26950145

  2. An Increase in the Omega-6/Omega-3 Fatty Acid Ratio Increases the Risk for Obesity.

    PubMed

    Simopoulos, Artemis P

    2016-03-02

    In the past three decades, total fat and saturated fat intake as a percentage of total calories has continuously decreased in Western diets, while the intake of omega-6 fatty acid increased and the omega-3 fatty acid decreased, resulting in a large increase in the omega-6/omega-3 ratio from 1:1 during evolution to 20:1 today or even higher. This change in the composition of fatty acids parallels a significant increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity. Experimental studies have suggested that omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids elicit divergent effects on body fat gain through mechanisms of adipogenesis, browning of adipose tissue, lipid homeostasis, brain-gut-adipose tissue axis, and most importantly systemic inflammation. Prospective studies clearly show an increase in the risk of obesity as the level of omega-6 fatty acids and the omega-6/omega-3 ratio increase in red blood cell (RBC) membrane phospholipids, whereas high omega-3 RBC membrane phospholipids decrease the risk of obesity. Recent studies in humans show that in addition to absolute amounts of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acid intake, the omega-6/omega-3 ratio plays an important role in increasing the development of obesity via both AA eicosanoid metabolites and hyperactivity of the cannabinoid system, which can be reversed with increased intake of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). A balanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio is important for health and in the prevention and management of obesity.

  3. Digital time slot display for Omega receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    Methods of decoding a digital word to display alpha-numeric characters for driving a standard seven-segment LED display have been devised for Omega station identification. The circuit could replace the system now being used in Ohio University's Omega receivers, which lights one of eight LED's to signify the Omega time slot being received. The letters A through H, representing the Omega stations, can be read directly from the seven-segment display.

  4. Multivariate Analog of Hays Omega-Squared.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachdeva, Darshan

    The multivariate analog of Hays omega-squared for estimating the strength of the relationship in the multivariate analysis of variance has been proposed in this paper. The multivariate omega-squared is obtained through the use of Wilks' lambda test criterion. Application of multivariate omega-squared to a numerical example has been provided so as…

  5. Measurement of the Omega0(c) lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Iori, M.; Ayan, A.S.; Akgun, U.; Alkhazov, G.; Amaro-Reyes, J.; Atamantchouk, A.G.; Balatz, M.Y.; Blanco-Covarrubias, A.; Bondar, N.F.; Cooper, P.S.; Dauwe, L.J.; /Ball State U. /Bogazici U. /Carnegie Mellon U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Fermilab /Serpukhov, IHEP /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Moscow, ITEP /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Moscow State U. /St. Petersburg, INP

    2007-01-01

    The authors report a precise measurement of the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} lifetime. The data were taken by the SELEX (E781) experiment using 600 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -}, {pi}{sup -} and p beams. The measurement has been made using 83 {+-} 19 reconstructed {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} in the {Omega}{sup -} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} and {Omega}{sup -} {pi}{sup +} decay modes. The lifetime of the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} is measured to be 65 {+-} 13(stat) {+-} 9(sys) fs.

  6. 22 CFR 19.10-3 - Marriage after retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Marriage after retirement. 19.10-3 Section 19... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.10-3 Marriage after retirement. If an... marriage irrevocably elect to receive a reduced annuity and to provide, subject to any obligation...

  7. 22 CFR 19.10-3 - Marriage after retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Marriage after retirement. 19.10-3 Section 19... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.10-3 Marriage after retirement. If an... marriage irrevocably elect to receive a reduced annuity and to provide, subject to any obligation...

  8. 22 CFR 19.10-3 - Marriage after retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Marriage after retirement. 19.10-3 Section 19... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.10-3 Marriage after retirement. If an... marriage irrevocably elect to receive a reduced annuity and to provide, subject to any obligation...

  9. 22 CFR 19.10-3 - Marriage after retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Marriage after retirement. 19.10-3 Section 19... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.10-3 Marriage after retirement. If an... marriage irrevocably elect to receive a reduced annuity and to provide, subject to any obligation...

  10. 22 CFR 19.10-3 - Marriage after retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Marriage after retirement. 19.10-3 Section 19... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.10-3 Marriage after retirement. If an... marriage irrevocably elect to receive a reduced annuity and to provide, subject to any obligation...

  11. 46 CFR 25.10-3 - Navigation light certification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Navigation light certification requirements. 25.10-3... Navigation Lights § 25.10-3 Navigation light certification requirements. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, each navigation light must— (1) Meet the technical standards of the...

  12. 43 CFR 10.3 - Intentional archaeological excavations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Intentional archaeological excavations. 10.3 Section 10.3 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATIVE AMERICAN GRAVES PROTECTION AND REPATRIATION REGULATIONS Human Remains, Funerary Objects, Sacred Objects, or Objects...

  13. 43 CFR 10.3 - Intentional archaeological excavations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Intentional archaeological excavations. 10.3 Section 10.3 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATIVE AMERICAN GRAVES PROTECTION AND REPATRIATION REGULATIONS Human Remains, Funerary Objects, Sacred Objects, or Objects...

  14. 43 CFR 10.3 - Intentional archaeological excavations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Intentional archaeological excavations. 10.3 Section 10.3 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATIVE AMERICAN GRAVES PROTECTION AND REPATRIATION REGULATIONS Human Remains, Funerary Objects, Sacred Objects, or Objects...

  15. 43 CFR 10.3 - Intentional archaeological excavations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Intentional archaeological excavations. 10.3 Section 10.3 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATIVE AMERICAN GRAVES PROTECTION AND REPATRIATION REGULATIONS Human Remains, Funerary Objects, Sacred Objects, or Objects...

  16. 43 CFR 10.3 - Intentional archaeological excavations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Intentional archaeological excavations. 10.3 Section 10.3 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATIVE AMERICAN GRAVES PROTECTION AND REPATRIATION REGULATIONS Human Remains, Funerary Objects, Sacred Objects, or Objects...

  17. 46 CFR 111.10-3 - Two generating sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Two generating sources. 111.10-3 Section 111.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS... drilling unit must have at least two electric generating sources....

  18. 46 CFR 111.10-3 - Two generating sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Two generating sources. 111.10-3 Section 111.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS... drilling unit must have at least two electric generating sources....

  19. 46 CFR 111.10-3 - Two generating sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Two generating sources. 111.10-3 Section 111.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS... drilling unit must have at least two electric generating sources....

  20. 46 CFR 111.10-3 - Two generating sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Two generating sources. 111.10-3 Section 111.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS... drilling unit must have at least two electric generating sources....

  1. 46 CFR 111.10-3 - Two generating sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Two generating sources. 111.10-3 Section 111.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS... drilling unit must have at least two electric generating sources....

  2. 46 CFR 25.10-3 - Navigation light certification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Navigation light certification requirements. 25.10-3... Navigation Lights § 25.10-3 Navigation light certification requirements. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, each navigation light must— (1) Meet the technical standards of the...

  3. 46 CFR 25.10-3 - Navigation light certification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Navigation light certification requirements. 25.10-3... Navigation Lights § 25.10-3 Navigation light certification requirements. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, each navigation light must— (1) Meet the technical standards of the...

  4. 46 CFR 25.10-3 - Navigation light certification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Navigation light certification requirements. 25.10-3... Navigation Lights § 25.10-3 Navigation light certification requirements. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, each navigation light must— (1) Meet the technical standards of the...

  5. 46 CFR 25.10-3 - Navigation light certification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Navigation light certification requirements. 25.10-3... Navigation Lights § 25.10-3 Navigation light certification requirements. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, each navigation light must— (1) Meet the technical standards of the...

  6. Murray and the Omega Minus

    SciTech Connect

    Samios, N.P.

    2010-08-20

    The exciting findings and activities in particle physics in the 50's and 60's will be discussed from an experimentalist's viewpoint. Particular emphasis will be placed on the description of several crucial discoveries (including the omega minus) and on the remarkable insight, guidance, and major contributions of Murray Gell-Mann to the understanding of the symmetry of hadrons which led to the development of the standard model of the strong interactions.

  7. Murray and the Omega Minus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samios, Nicholas P.

    The exciting findings and activities in particle physics in the 50's and 60's will be discussed from an experimentalist's viewpoint. Particular emphasis will be placed on the description of several crucial discoveries (including the omega minus) and on the remarkable insight, guidance, and major contributions of Murray Gell-Mann to the understanding of the symmetry of hadrons which led to the development of the standard model of the strong interactions.

  8. Murray and the Omega Minus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samios, Nicholas P.

    2011-11-01

    The exciting findings and activities in particle physics in the 50's and 60's will be discussed from an experimentalist's viewpoint. Particular emphasis will be placed on the description of several crucial discoveries (including the omega minus) and on the remarkable insight, guidance, and major contributions of Murray Gell-Mann to the understanding of the symmetry of hadrons which led to the development of the standard model of the strong interactions.

  9. Omega-3 deficiency impairs honey bee learning

    PubMed Central

    Arien, Yael; Dag, Arnon; Zarchin, Shlomi; Masci, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Deficiency in essential omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), particularly the long-chain form of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), has been linked to health problems in mammals, including many mental disorders and reduced cognitive performance. Insects have very low long-chain PUFA concentrations, and the effect of omega-3 deficiency on cognition in insects has not been studied. We show a low omega-6:3 ratio of pollen collected by honey bee colonies in heterogenous landscapes and in many hand-collected pollens that we analyzed. We identified Eucalyptus as an important bee-forage plant particularly poor in omega-3 and high in the omega-6:3 ratio. We tested the effect of dietary omega-3 deficiency on olfactory and tactile associative learning of the economically highly valued honey bee. Bees fed either of two omega-3–poor diets, or Eucalyptus pollen, showed greatly reduced learning abilities in conditioned proboscis-extension assays compared with those fed omega-3–rich diets, or omega-3–rich pollen mixture. The effect on performance was not due to reduced sucrose sensitivity. Omega-3 deficiency also led to smaller hypopharyngeal glands. Bee brains contained high omega-3 concentrations, which were only slightly affected by diet, suggesting additional peripheral effects on learning. The shift from a low to high omega-6:3 ratio in the Western human diet is deemed a primary cause of many diseases and reduced mental health. A similar shift seems to be occurring in bee forage, possibly an important factor in colony declines. Our study shows the detrimental effect on cognitive performance of omega-3 deficiency in a nonmammal. PMID:26644556

  10. Omega-X micromachining system

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Donald M.

    1978-01-01

    A micromachining tool system with X- and omega-axes is used to machine spherical, aspherical, and irregular surfaces with a maximum contour error of 100 nonometers (nm) and surface waviness of no more than 0.8 nm RMS. The omega axis, named for the angular measurement of the rotation of an eccentric mechanism supporting one end of a tool bar, enables the pulse increments of the tool toward the workpiece to be as little as 0 to 4.4 nm. A dedicated computer coordinates motion in the two axes to produce the workpiece contour. Inertia is reduced by reducing the mass pulsed toward the workpiece to about one-fifth of its former value. The tool system includes calibration instruments to calibrate the micromachining tool system. Backlash is reduced and flexing decreased by using a rotary table and servomotor to pulse the tool in the omega-axis instead of a ball screw mechanism. A thermally-stabilized spindle rotates the workpiece and is driven by a motor not mounted on the micromachining tool base through a torque-smoothing pulley and vibrationless rotary coupling. Abbe offset errors are almost eliminated by tool setting and calibration at spindle center height. Tool contour and workpiece contour are gaged on the machine; this enables the source of machining errors to be determined more readily, because the workpiece is gaged before its shape can be changed by removal from the machine.

  11. The Effect of Low Omega-3/Omega-6 Ratio on Auditory Nerve Conduction in Rat Pups.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Saeid; Motasaddi Zarandy, Masoud; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Shidfar, Farzad; Jalaie, Shohreh; Rahimi, Vida

    2015-01-01

    The biological effects of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are determined by their mutual interactions. This interaction extremely affects various functions. Lower consumption of omega-3 during gestation leads to various disorders, even in hearing. We aimed to assess the effect of low omega-3/omega-6 ratios on auditory nerve conduction. In this experimental study, the auditory brainstem response test was performed on 24-day-old rat (n=14). The rats were divided into case (low omega-3/omega-6 ratio during gestation and lactation) and control groups. Variables such as P1, P3, and P4 absolute latency period, interpeaks (P3-P4, P1-P3, and P1-P4), and P4/P1 amplitude ratio were measured. We found an increased P4 omega-3/omega-6 ratio in the group with a low omega-3/omega-6 ratio (P<0.01). No significant difference was observed in the P1 and P3 absolute latency period between the studied groups  (P>0.05).  Also, no significant difference was observed between the groups with respect to the P1-P3 interpeak latency (IPL) periods (P>0.05); while the P1-P4 and P3-P4 IPLs were significantly increased in the group with a low omega-3/omega-6 ratio (P<0.05). The P4/P1 amplitude ratio significantly decreased in the group with a low omega-3/omega-6 ratio (P<0.05). Results confirmed the negative effects of low omega-3/omega-6 ratio on the auditory system and hearing.

  12. FY15 LLNL OMEGA Experimental Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Heeter, R. F.; Baker, K. L.; Barrios, M. A.; Beckwith, M. A.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. M.; Chen, H.; Coppari, F.; Fournier, K. B.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Frenje, J.; Huntington, C. M.; Kraus, R. G.; Lazicki, A. E.; Martinez, D. A.; McNaney, J. M.; Millot, M. A.; Pak, A. E.; Park, H. S.; Ping, Y.; Pollock, B. B.; Smith, R. F.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Widmann, K.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Wan, A.; Hsing, W.

    2015-12-04

    In FY15, LLNL’s High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) and Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF-ID) programs conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall these LLNL programs led 468 target shots in FY15, with 315 shots using just the OMEGA laser system, 145 shots using just the EP laser system, and 8 Joint shots using Omega and EP together. Approximately 25% of the total number of shots (56 OMEGA shots and 67 EP shots, including the 8 Joint shots) supported the Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Campaign (ICF-ID). The remaining 75% (267 OMEGA shots and 86 EP shots) were dedicated to experiments for High-Energy-Density Physics (HED). Highlights of the various HED and ICF campaigns are summarized in the following reports.

  13. FY14 LLNL OMEGA Experimental Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Heeter, R. F.; Fournier, K. B.; Baker, K.; Barrios, M.; Bernstein, L.; Brown, G.; Celliers, P.; Chen, H.; Coppari, F.; Fratanduono, D.; Johnson, M. G.; Huntington, C.; Jenei, A.; Kraus, R.; Ma, T.; Martinez, D.; McNabb, D.; Millot, M.; Moore, A.; Nagel, S.; Park, H. S.; Patel, P.; Perez, F.; Ping, Y.; Pollock, B.; Ross, J. S.; Rygg, J. R.; Smith, R.; Zylstra, A.; Collins, G.; Landen, O.; Wan, A.; Hsing, W.

    2014-10-13

    In FY14, LLNL’s High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) and Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF-ID) programs conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall these LLNL programs led 324 target shots in FY14, with 246 shots using just the OMEGA laser system, 62 shots using just the EP laser system, and 16 Joint shots using Omega and EP together. Approximately 31% of the total number of shots (62 OMEGA shots, 42 EP shots) shots supported the Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Campaign (ICF-ID). The remaining 69% (200 OMEGA shots and 36 EP shots, including the 16 Joint shots) were dedicated to experiments for High- Energy-Density Physics (HED). Highlights of the various HED and ICF campaigns are summarized in the following reports.

  14. Serpentine Nanotubes in CM Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zega, Thomas J.; Garvie, Laurence A. J.; Dodony, Istvan; Buseck, Peter R.

    2004-01-01

    The CM chondrites are primitive meteorites that formed during the early solar system. Although they retain much of their original physical character, their matrices and fine-grained rims (FGRs) sustained aqueous alteration early in their histories [1- 3]. Serpentine-group minerals are abundant products of such alteration, and information regarding their structures, compositions, and spatial relationships is important for determining the reactions that produced them and the conditions under which they formed. Our recent work on FGRs and matrices of the CM chondrites has revealed new information on the structures and compositions of serpentine-group minerals [4,5] and has provided insights into the evolution of these primitive meteorites. Here we report on serpentine nanotubes from the Mighei and Murchison CM chondrites [6].

  15. 26 CFR 36.3121(l)(10)-3 - Returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Returns. 36.3121(l)(10)-3 Section 36.3121(l)(10....3121(l)(10)-3 Returns. (a) The forms prescribed for use in making returns of the taxes imposed by the... returns of its liability under an agreement entered into as provided in § 36.3121(l)(1)-1. Returns of...

  16. 26 CFR 36.3121(l)(10)-3 - Returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Returns. 36.3121(l)(10)-3 Section 36.3121(l)(10....3121(l)(10)-3 Returns. (a) The forms prescribed for use in making returns of the taxes imposed by the... returns of its liability under an agreement entered into as provided in § 36.3121(l)(1)-1. Returns of...

  17. 26 CFR 36.3121(l)(10)-3 - Returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Returns. 36.3121(l)(10)-3 Section 36.3121(l)(10....3121(l)(10)-3 Returns. (a) The forms prescribed for use in making returns of the taxes imposed by the... returns of its liability under an agreement entered into as provided in § 36.3121(l)(1)-1. Returns of...

  18. 26 CFR 36.3121(l)(10)-3 - Returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Returns. 36.3121(l)(10)-3 Section 36.3121(l)(10....3121(l)(10)-3 Returns. (a) The forms prescribed for use in making returns of the taxes imposed by the... returns of its liability under an agreement entered into as provided in § 36.3121(l)(1)-1. Returns of...

  19. 26 CFR 36.3121(l)(10)-3 - Returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Returns. 36.3121(l)(10)-3 Section 36.3121(l)(10....3121(l)(10)-3 Returns. (a) The forms prescribed for use in making returns of the taxes imposed by the... returns of its liability under an agreement entered into as provided in § 36.3121(l)(1)-1. Returns of...

  20. Using Caenorhabditis elegans to Uncover Conserved Functions of Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a powerful model organism to study functions of polyunsaturated fatty acids. The ability to alter fatty acid composition with genetic manipulation and dietary supplementation permits the dissection of the roles of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in many biological process including reproduction, aging and neurobiology. Studies in C. elegans to date have mostly identified overlapping functions of 20-carbon omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in reproduction and in neurons, however, specific roles for either omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids are beginning to emerge. Recent findings with importance to human health include the identification of a conserved Cox-independent prostaglandin synthesis pathway, critical functions for cytochrome P450 derivatives of polyunsaturated fatty acids, the requirements for omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in sensory neurons, and the importance of fatty acid desaturation for long lifespan. Furthermore, the ability of C. elegans to interconvert omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids using the FAT-1 omega-3 desaturase has been exploited in mammalian studies and biotechnology approaches to generate mammals capable of exogenous generation of omega-3 fatty acids. PMID:26848697

  1. Using Caenorhabditis elegans to Uncover Conserved Functions of Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Watts, Jennifer L

    2016-02-02

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a powerful model organism to study functions of polyunsaturated fatty acids. The ability to alter fatty acid composition with genetic manipulation and dietary supplementation permits the dissection of the roles of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in many biological process including reproduction, aging and neurobiology. Studies in C. elegans to date have mostly identified overlapping functions of 20-carbon omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in reproduction and in neurons, however, specific roles for either omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids are beginning to emerge. Recent findings with importance to human health include the identification of a conserved Cox-independent prostaglandin synthesis pathway, critical functions for cytochrome P450 derivatives of polyunsaturated fatty acids, the requirements for omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in sensory neurons, and the importance of fatty acid desaturation for long lifespan. Furthermore, the ability of C. elegans to interconvert omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids using the FAT-1 omega-3 desaturase has been exploited in mammalian studies and biotechnology approaches to generate mammals capable of exogenous generation of omega-3 fatty acids.

  2. 344 cm x 86 cm low mass vacuum window

    SciTech Connect

    Reimers, R.M.; Porter, J.; Meneghetti, J.; Wilde, S.; Miller, R.

    1983-08-01

    The LBL Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) superconducting magnet contains a 1 m x 3.45 m x 2 m vacuum tank in its gap. A full aperture thin window was needed to minimize background as the products of nuclear collisions move from upstream targets to downstream detectors. Six windows were built and tested in the development process. The final window's unsupported area is 3m/sup 2/ with a 25 cm inward deflection. The design consists of a .11 mm Nylon/aluminum/polypropylene laminate as a gas seal and .55 mm woven aramid fiber for strength. Total mass is 80 milligrams per cm/sup 2/. Development depended heavily on past experience and testing. Safety considerations are discussed.

  3. High-Z Coating Experiments on Omega EP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasik, Max; Oh, J.; Stoeckl, C.; Schmitt, A. J.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Obenschain, S. P.

    2016-10-01

    Previous experiments on Nike KrF laser (λ=248nm) at NRL found that a thin (400-800 Å) high-Z (Au or Pd) overcoat on the target is effective in suppressing broadband imprint. Implementation of this technique on the tripled Nd:glass (351nm) NIF would enable higher uniformity direct-drive experiments there. To this end, we are carrying out experiments using the NIF-like beams of Omega EP. On Nike, a low-intensity, highly smooth prepulse heats and pre-expands the low thermal mass metallic coating to 100 um scale length. This likely improves imprint reduction for longer spatial scales because of increased distance between laser absorption and the ablation surface. The 3 ω beams of Omega EP do not have this feature due to nonlinear harmonic conversion. We introduced a means of pre-expanding the high-Z coating to similar length scale on Omega EP using a soft x-ray prepulse, generated by irradiating an auxiliary Au foil 1cm in front of the main target tens of ns prior to the main target drive. Coating dynamics are measured using side-on radiography. The effectiveness of pre-expansion on imprint reduction will be assessed by measurements of the RT-amplified imprint using monochromatic curved crystal radiography. Work supported by the Department of Energy/NNSA.

  4. The MicrOmega Investigation Onboard Hayabusa2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibring, J.-P.; Hamm, V.; Langevin, Y.; Pilorget, C.; Arondel, A.; Bouzit, M.; Chaigneau, M.; Crane, B.; Darié, A.; Evesque, C.; Hansotte, J.; Gardien, V.; Gonnod, L.; Leclech, J.-C.; Meslier, L.; Redon, T.; Tamiatto, C.; Tosti, S.; Thoores, N.

    2017-03-01

    MicrOmega is a near-IR hyperspectral microscope designed to characterize in situ the texture and composition of the surface materials of the Hayabusa2 target asteroid. MicrOmega is implemented within the MASCOT lander (Ho et al. in Space Sci. Rev., 2016, this issue, doi:10.1007/s11214-016-0251-6). The spectral range (0.99-3.65 μm) and the spectral sampling ( 20 cm^{-1}) of MicrOmega have been chosen to allow the identification of most potential constituent minerals, ices and organics, within each 25 μm pixel of the 3.2× 3.2 mm2 FOV. Such an unprecedented characterization will (1) enable the identification of most major and minor phases, including the potential organic phases, and ascribe their mineralogical context, as a critical set of clues to decipher the origin and evolution of this primitive body, and (2) provide the ground truth for the orbital measurements as well as a reference for the analyses later performed on returned samples.

  5. Modulation of prostate cancer genetic risk by omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Berquin, Isabelle M.; Min, Younong; Wu, Ruping; Wu, Jiansheng; Perry, Donna; Cline, J. Mark; Thomas, Mike J.; Thornburg, Todd; Kulik, George; Smith, Adrienne; Edwards, Iris J.; D’Agostino, Ralph; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Hong; Kang, Jing X.; Chen, Yong Q.

    2007-01-01

    Although a causal role of genetic alterations in human cancer is well established, it is still unclear whether dietary fat can modulate cancer risk in a predisposed population. Epidemiological studies suggest that diets rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids reduce cancer incidence. To determine the influence of fatty acids on prostate cancer risk in animals with a defined genetic lesion, we used prostate-specific Pten-knockout mice, an immune-competent, orthotopic prostate cancer model, and diets with defined polyunsaturated fatty acid levels. We found that omega-3 fatty acids reduced prostate tumor growth, slowed histopathological progression, and increased survival, whereas omega-6 fatty acids had opposite effects. Introducing an omega-3 desaturase, which converts omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids, into the Pten-knockout mice reduced tumor growth similarly to the omega-3 diet. Tumors from mice on the omega-3 diet had lower proportions of phosphorylated Bad and higher apoptotic indexes compared with those from mice on omega-6 diet. Knockdown of Bad eliminated omega-3–induced cell death, and introduction of exogenous Bad restored the sensitivity to omega-3 fatty acids. Our data suggest that modulation of prostate cancer development by polyunsaturated fatty acids is mediated in part through Bad-dependent apoptosis. This study highlights the importance of gene-diet interactions in prostate cancer. PMID:17607361

  6. FY16 LLNL Omega Experimental Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Heeter, R. F.; Ali, S. J.; Benstead, J.; Celliers, P. M.; Coppari, F.; Eggert, J.; Erskine, D.; Panella, A. F.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Hua, R.; Huntington, C. M.; Jarrott, L. C.; Jiang, S.; Kraus, R. G.; Lazicki, A. E.; LePape, S.; Martinez, D. A.; McNaney, J. M.; Millot, M. A.; Moody, J.; Pak, A. E.; Park, H. S.; Ping, Y.; Pollock, B. B.; Rinderknecht, H.; Ross, J. S.; Rubery, M.; Sio, H.; Smith, R. F.; Swadling, G. F.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Wan, A.; Hsing, W.

    2016-12-01

    In FY16, LLNL’s High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) and Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF-ID) programs conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall these LLNL programs led 430 target shots in FY16, with 304 shots using just the OMEGA laser system, and 126 shots using just the EP laser system. Approximately 21% of the total number of shots (77 OMEGA shots and 14 EP shots) supported the Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Campaign (ICF-ID). The remaining 79% (227 OMEGA shots and 112 EP shots) were dedicated to experiments for High-Energy- Density Physics (HED). Highlights of the various HED and ICF campaigns are summarized in the following reports. In addition to these experiments, LLNL Principal Investigators led a variety of Laboratory Basic Science campaigns using OMEGA and EP, including 81 target shots using just OMEGA and 42 shots using just EP. The highlights of these are also summarized, following the ICF and HED campaigns. Overall, LLNL PIs led a total of 553 shots at LLE in FY 2016. In addition, LLNL PIs also supported 57 NLUF shots on Omega and 31 NLUF shots on EP, in collaboration with the academic community.

  7. LLNL Experiments at OMEGA in FY05

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R E

    2005-10-06

    During FY05, LLNL was scheduled for 372 shots on Omega. These were distributed into 191 planned shots for the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program, and 181 planned shots for the High Energy Density Sciences (HEDS) program. The actual Omega performance averaged 6% more shots than scheduled. A brief summary of the various campaigns follows, starting with HEDS experiments.

  8. M54 + SAGITTARIUS = {omega} CENTAURI

    SciTech Connect

    Carretta, E.; Bragaglia, A.; Bellazzini, M.; Gratton, R. G.; Lucatello, S.; Momany, Y.; D'Orazi, V.; Catanzaro, G.; Leone, F.; Piotto, G. E-mail: angela.bragaglia@oabo.inaf.it E-mail: raffaele.gratton@oapd.inaf.it E-mail: valentina.dorazi@oapd.inaf.it

    2010-05-01

    We derive homogeneous abundances of Fe, O, Na, and {alpha}-elements from high-resolution FLAMES spectra for 76 red giant stars in NGC 6715 (M54) and for 25 red giants in the surrounding nucleus of the Sagittarius (Sgr) dwarf galaxy. Our main findings are the following. (1) We confirm that M54 shows intrinsic metallicity dispersion, {approx}0.19 dex rms. (2) When the stars of the Sgr nucleus are included, the metallicity distribution strongly resembles that in {omega} Cen; the relative contribution of the most metal-rich stars is, however, different in these two objects. (3) In both globular clusters (GCs) there is a very extended Na-O anticorrelation, which is a signature of different stellar generations born within the cluster. (4) The metal-poor and metal-rich components in M54 (and {omega} Cen) show clearly distinct extension of the Na-O anticorrelation, the most heavily polluted stars being those of the metal-rich component. We propose a tentative scenario for cluster formation that could explain these features. Finally, similarities and differences found in the two most massive GCs in our Galaxy can be easily explained if they are similar objects (nuclear clusters in dwarf galaxies) observed at different stages of their dynamical evolution.

  9. 46 CFR 39.10-3 - Definitions-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS VAPOR CONTROL SYSTEMS General § 39.10-3... processing unit. Vapor control system means an arrangement of piping and equipment used to control vapor... processing unit means the components of a vapor control system that recovers, destroys, or disperses...

  10. 46 CFR 39.10-3 - Definitions-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS VAPOR CONTROL SYSTEMS General § 39.10-3... processing unit. Vapor control system means an arrangement of piping and equipment used to control vapor... processing unit means the components of a vapor control system that recovers, destroys, or disperses...

  11. Observation of an Excited Charm Baryon Omega^*_C Decaying to Omega^0_C Gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B

    2006-11-15

    The authors report the first observation of an excited singly-charmed baryon {Omega}*{sub c} (css) in the radiative decay {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0}{gamma}, where the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} baryon is reconstructed in the decays to the final states {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {Omega}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}, {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, and {Xi}{sup -} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}. This analysis is performed using a dataset of 230.7 fb{sup -1} collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The mass difference between the {Omega}*{sub c} and the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} baryons is measured to be 70.8 {+-} 1.0(stat) {+-} 1.1(syst) MeV/c{sup 2}. They also measure the ratio of inclusive production cross sections of {Omega}*{sub c} and {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation.

  12. Omega-3 fatty acids and neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Young, Genevieve; Conquer, Julie

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that dietary consumption of the long chain omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), commonly found in fish or fish oil, may modify the risk for certain neuropsychiatric disorders. As evidence, decreased blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids have been associated with several neuropsychiatric conditions, including Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorder, Alzheimer's Disease, Schizophrenia and Depression. Supplementation studies, using individual or combination omega-3 fatty acids, suggest the possibility for decreased symptoms associated with some of these conditions. Thus far, however, the benefits of supplementation, in terms of decreasing disease risk and/or aiding in symptom management, are not clear and more research is needed. The reasons for blood fatty acid alterations in these disorders are not known, nor are the potential mechanisms by which omega-3 fatty acids may function in normal neuronal activity and neuropsychiatric disease prevention and/or treatment. It is clear, however, that DHA is the predominant n-3 fatty acid found in the brain and that EPA plays an important role as an anti-inflammatory precursor. Both DHA and EPA can be linked with many aspects of neural function, including neurotransmission, membrane fluidity, ion channel and enzyme regulation and gene expression. This review summarizes the knowledge in terms of dietary omega-3 fatty acid intake and metabolism, as well as evidence pointing to potential mechanisms of omega-3 fatty acids in normal brain functioning, development of neuropsychiatric disorders and efficacy of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in terms of symptom management.

  13. Understanding the branching ratios of {chi}{sub c1{yields}{phi}{phi}}, {omega}{omega}, {omega}{phi} observed at BES-III

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Dianyong; He Jun; Li Xueqian; Liu Xiang

    2010-04-01

    In this work, we discuss the contribution of the mesonic loops to the decay rates of {chi}{sub c1{yields}{phi}{phi}}, {omega}{omega}, which are suppressed by the helicity selection rules and {chi}{sub c1{yields}{phi}{omega}}, which is a double-Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka forbidden process. We find that the mesonic loop effects naturally explain the clear signals of {chi}{sub c1{yields}{phi}{phi}}, {omega}{omega} decay modes observed by the BES Collaboration. Moreover, we investigate the effects of the {omega}-{phi} mixing, which may result in the order of magnitude of the branching ratio BR({chi}{sub c1{yields}{omega}{phi}}) being 10{sup -7}. Thus, we are waiting for the accurate measurements of the BR({chi}{sub c1{yields}{omega}{omega}}), BR({chi}{sub c1{yields}{phi}{phi}}), and BR({chi}{sub c1{yields}{omega}{phi}}), which may be very helpful for testing the long-distant contribution and the {omega}-{phi} mixing in {chi}{sub c1{yields}{phi}{phi}}, {omega}{omega}, {omega}{phi} decays.

  14. Diurnal measurements with prototype CMOS Omega receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burhans, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    Diurnal signals from eight omega channels have been monitored at 10.2 KHz for selected station pairs. All eight Omega stations have been received at least 50 percent of the time over a 24 hour period during the month of October 1976. The data presented confirm the expected performance of the CMOS omega sensor processor in being able to digsignals out of a noisy environment. Of particular interest are possibilities for use of antipodal reception phenomena and a need for some ways of correcting for multi-modal propagation effects.

  15. Omega Navigation System Course Book. Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-01

    operational information needed to understand the characteristics, operation, and use of the Omega Navigation System. It is designed to be used as a self-paced...guard time) between the signal transmissions in the Omega signal format was chosen to be 0.2 sec? Answer: The interval is designed for the worst...as Radux-Omega, was designed to use the 200 Hz m•Julation to resolve the (approximately) 8 nautical mile "lane"* of the 10 kHz transmission. This

  16. Mars Express OMEGA Observations over Terra Meridiani

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, R. E.; Poulet, F.; Bibring, J.-P.; Wolff, M.; Gendrin, A.; Morris, R. V.; Freeman, J. J.; Bellucci, G.

    2005-01-01

    The OMEGA hyperspectral imager (0.35 to 5.08 micrometers) covered the hematite-bearing plains and underlying etched terrains of Terra Meridiani during several orbits with spatial resolutions ranging from several hundred meters to approximately 2 km. We extracted and analyzed surface reflectance spectra from OMEGA data for the approximately 864,000 square kilometers surrounding the Opportunity site. In this paper we focus on analysis of OMEGA orbit 485 data for the plains and etched terrains located to the northeast of the Opportunity landing site.

  17. Laser-Driven Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnak, D. H.

    2016-10-01

    Magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) is an approach that combines the implosion and compression of fusion fuel (a hallmark of inertial fusion) with strongly magnetized plasmas that suppress electron heat losses (a hallmark of magnetic fusion). It is of interest because it could potentially reduce some of the traditional velocity, pressure, and convergence ratio requirements of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept being studied at the Z Pulsed-Power Facility is a key target concept in the U.S. ICF Program. Laser-driven MagLIF is being developed to enable a test of the scaling of MagLIF over a range of absorbed energy from of the order of 20 kJ (on OMEGA) to 500 kJ (on Z). It is also valuable as a platform for studying the key physics of MIF. An energy-scaled point design has been developed for the Omega Laser Facility that is roughly 10 × smaller in linear dimensions than Z MagLIF targets. A 0.6-mm-outer-diam plastic cylinder filled with 2.4 mg/cm3 of D2 is placed in a 10-T axial magnetic field, generated by MIFEDS (magneto-inertial fusion electrical discharge system), the cylinder is compressed by 40 OMEGA beams, and the gas fill is preheated by a single OMEGA beam propagating along the axis. Preheating to >100 eV and axially uniform compression over a 0.7-mm height have been demonstrated, separately, in a series of preparatory experiments that meet our initial expectations. Preliminary results from the first integrated experiments combining magnetization, compression, and preheat will be reported for the first time. The scaling of laser-driven MagLIF from OMEGA up to the 1800 kJ available on the NIF (National Ignition Facility) will also be described briefly. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  18. Detecting charged fusion products in high-fluence conditions on OMEGA and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waugh, C.; Rosenberg, M.; Zylstra, A.; Rinderknecht, H.; Sinenian, N.; Manuel, M.; Casey, D.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F.; Frenje, J.; Petrasso, R.; Glebov, V.; Sangster, T. C.; Pape, S.; Bionta, R.; MacKinnon, A.; Landen, O.; Kim, Y.; Hermann, H.; Kilkenny, J.; Nikroo, A.

    2011-10-01

    CR-39 solid state nuclear track plastic, used as charged particle detectors on the ``back-end'' of OMEGA and NIF diagnostics/spectrometers, is ideally suited to record particle fluences up to ~ 3x104 / cm2. However, conditions on OMEGA and the NIF can often result in fluences two orders of magnitude greater. By using shorter etch times than the standard (6 hrs), and cross calibrating to CR39 shot on the MIT accelerator to the equivalent (ICF) fluence, the dynamic range of the CR39 can be significantly extended. Specific examples of this analysis from both OMEGA and the NIF will be presented for the case of D3He exploding pushers. This work was supported in part by LLE, the NLUF, the FSC, the US DOE, LLNL, and GA.

  19. Reactive Carbonyl Species Derived from Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Cui, Ping

    2015-07-22

    Inflammation-related reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are associated with the development of cancer. ROS and RNS can directly damage biomacromolecules such as proteins, DNA, and lipids. Lipid peroxidation, however, can result in reactive carbonyl species (RCS) that can also modify proteins and DNA. In contrast to an extensive literature on the modification of proteins and DNA from omega-6 fatty acids, there are few studies on RCS generation from other fatty acids, particularly omega-3 fatty acids, which are frequently consumed from the diet and diet supplements. Therefore, a comparison between omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids has been conducted. LC-MS/MS analysis of carbonyl-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) standards yielded characteristic fragment ions. Autoxidation products of α-linolenic acid and linoleic acid were then derivatized with DNPH and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. The results showed that α-linolenic acid, an omega-3 fatty acid, generated more acrolein and crotonaldehyde than did linoleic acid, an omega-6 fatty acid. Omega-3 fatty acids might be easily degraded to smaller monoaldehydes or dicarbonyls. Omega-3 fatty acids have been considered as health improvement components for a long time. However, on the basis of the results presented here, use of omega-3 fatty acids should be re-evaluated in vivo for safety purposes.

  20. Phase-matched four-wave mixing of sub-100-TW/ cm2 femtosecond laser pulses in isolated air-guided modes of a hollow photonic-crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Konorov, S O; Serebryannikov, E E; Akimov, D A; Ivanov, A A; Alfimov, M V; Zheltikov, A M

    2004-12-01

    Hollow-core photonic-crystal fibers are shown to allow propagation and nonlinear-optical frequency conversion of high-intensity ultrashort laser pulses in the regime of isolated guided modes confined in the hollow gas-filled fiber core. With a specially designed dispersion of such modes, the 3omega=2omega+2omega-omega four-wave mixing of fundamental (omega) and second-harmonic (2omega) sub-100- TW/ cm(2) femtosecond pulses of a Cr:forsterite laser can be phase matched in a hollow photonic-crystal fiber within a spectral band of more than 10 nm, resulting in the efficient generation of femtosecond pulses in a well-resolved higher-order air-guided mode of 417-nm radiation.

  1. OMEGA for the Future of Biofuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trent, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    OMEGA: Offshore Membrane Enclosure for Growing Algae. To develop a photobioreactor (PBR) for growing algae (Oil, food, fertilizer) that does not compete with agriculture for land (deployed offshore), water or fertilizer (uses/treats wastewater).

  2. Zooming in on Omega Centauri Stellar Motion

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie sequence begins with a ground-based image of the giant globular star cluster Omega Centauri and zooms very tightly in to a Hubble Space Telescope image of the central region of the clust...

  3. Elementary Education: What Is Project Omega?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirman, Joseph M.

    1980-01-01

    Describes Project Omega for Research in Remote Sensing Education, a program in space education designed for inservice training of elementary social studies teachers. Explains a few research areas dealing with the classroom applications of Landsat imagery. (CS)

  4. North Pacific Omega Navigation System Validation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-31

    based upon comparisons with "Loran-C, radar and visual" whose absolute accuracy as references could not be assessed. Similarly, the M/S Nopal Lane...Mellon ..................................... A-82 A5.1.5 M/S Nopal Lane ................... ......... .... .. A-83 A5.1.6 Submarine Omega Performance...From Omega Log of M/S NOPAL LANE .................... A-84 A5-2 Western Airlines Flights - 1978 .......................... A-85 AA-1 Difference Between

  5. Optical Omega network: a compact implementation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, K. W.; Cheng, L. M.

    1995-10-01

    We propose a technique for the compact implementation of an optical Omega network. This technique utilizes the concept that both the perfect-shuffle interconnection and the switching stages can be realized by the same procedures, i.e., duplicate, shift, superimpose, and mask. As a result, a single set of optics is sufficient to realize the whole Omega network in a time-multiplexed recursive manner. Optical setups were designed and a proof-of-principle experiment was performed.

  6. Omega-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Jain, A P; Aggarwal, K K; Zhang, P-Y

    2015-01-01

    Cardioceuticals are nutritional supplements that contain all the essential nutrients including vitamins, minerals, omega-3-fatty acids and other antioxidants like a-lipoic acid and coenzyme Q10 in the right proportion that provide all round protection to the heart by reducing the most common risks associated with the cardiovascular disease including high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels and factors that contribute to coagulation of blood. Omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to significantly reduce the risk for sudden death caused by cardiac arrhythmias and all-cause mortality in patients with known coronary heart disease. Omega-3 fatty acids are also used to treat hyperlipidemia and hypertension. There are no significant drug interactions with omega-3 fatty acids. The American Heart Association recommends consumption of two servings of fish per week for persons with no history of coronary heart disease and at least one serving of fish daily for those with known coronary heart disease. Approximately 1 g/day of eicosapentaenoic acid plus docosahexaenoic acid is recommended for cardio protection. Higher dosages of omega-3 fatty acids are required to reduce elevated triglyceride levels (2-4 g/day). Modest decreases in blood pressure occur with significantly higher dosages of omega-3 fatty acids.

  7. Neurological benefits of omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Dyall, S C; Michael-Titus, A T

    2008-01-01

    The central nervous system is highly enriched in long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) of the omega-6 and omega-3 series. The presence of these fatty acids as structural components of neuronal membranes influences cellular function both directly, through effects on membrane properties, and also by acting as a precursor pool for lipid-derived messengers. An adequate intake of omega-3 PUFA is essential for optimal visual function and neural development. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence that increased intake of the long-chain omega-3 PUFA, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), may confer benefits in a variety of psychiatric and neurological disorders, and in particular neurodegenerative conditions. However, the mechanisms underlying these beneficial effects are still poorly understood. Recent evidence also indicates that in addition to the positive effects seen in chronic neurodegenerative conditions, omega-3 PUFA may also have significant neuroprotective potential in acute neurological injury. Thus, these compounds offer an intriguing prospect as potentially new therapeutic approaches in both chronic and acute conditions. The purpose of this article is to review the current evidence of the neurological benefits of omega-3 PUFA, looking specifically at neurodegenerative conditions and acute neurological injury.

  8. Barium Abundances in Omega Centauri Candidate Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skipper, Joy Nicole; Sobeck, Jennifer; Majewski, Steven R.; Rochford Hayes, Christian; Cunha, Katia M. L.; Smith, Verne V.; Damke, Guillermo; García Pérez, Ana; Nidever, David L.

    2017-01-01

    The "globular cluster" omega Centauri has several peculiar features that set it apart from other Milky Way globular clusters, such as its large mass, extended size, oblate shape, internal rotation, large age and metallicity spreads, and retrograde orbit. Because of these properties it is thought that Omega Cen may be a heavily stripped remnant of a Milky Way-captured dwarf spheroidal galaxy, now currently orbiting (backwards) near the Galactic plane (e.g., Lee et al. 1999, Majewski et al. 2000). A previous search within a large, all-sky low resolution spectroscopic and photometric catalog of giant stars by Majewski et al. (2012) identified candidate retrograde stars near that plane also having kinematics consistent with being stripped debris from omega Cen, based on tidal destruction models of the system. To confirm their status as omega Centauri members, high resolution spectroscopy was undertaken of a subsample of a dozen of these candidates, and most were found by Majewski et al. to exhibit very high relative Ba abundances (as measured by the 5854 transition) — a peculiar characteristic of the omega Centauri system as originally shown by Smith et al. (2000) and Norris & Da Costa (1998). Thus, these results showed the likelihood of a connection between these widely distributed field stars and omega Centauri.We have continued this spectroscopic investigation with an expanded sample of candidate tidally-stripped omega Cen giant stars. High-resolution spectra were obtained in the wavelength region (4140~6210A) with the Ultraviolet Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) on the 8.0-m Very Large Telescope (VLT) for additional candidates. For these data, we have employed multiple transitions to derive reliable [Ba/Fe] ratios. We will compare these and other derived abundances to those of the omega Cen core, other globular cluster and field stars. Any additionally-confirmed omega Cen debris stars to combine with those from the previous studies will allow for a more

  9. Measurements of B meson decays to (omega)K* and (omega)(rho)

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; . Wright, D M; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R H; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Y G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Abe, T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, G; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Keith, D W . S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, H; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Collaboration, B

    2006-03-14

    The authors describe searches for B meson decays to the charmless vector-vector final states {omega}K* and {omega}{rho} in 89 million B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV.

  10. Meat quality of Argentinean "Camperos" chicken enhanced in omega-3 and omega-9 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Azcona, J O; Garcia, P T; Cossu, M E; Iglesias, B F; Picallo, A; Perez, C; Gallinger, C I; Schang, M J; Canet, Z E

    2008-07-01

    Five diets were assessed with the aim of increasing oleic fatty acid and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid content in 'campero' poultry meat and evaluating their influence on sensory attributes. Animals from treatment 1 (T1) were confined and fed with corn/soybean diet; in T2, animals were fed with a corn/soybean mix with free access to pasture; T3 diet had high oleic sunflower seeds (HOSS) and linseeds with access to pasture; T4 diet was similar to T2 with free access to chicory instead of pasture and T5 diet was similar to T3 with free access to chicory instead of pasture. Linseeds and HOSS supplementation significantly increased the fatty acids profile, regardless of forage supply. T3 MUFA content was significantly higher than in the other treatments. Due to the high presence of omega-3 PUFA in linseeds and HOSS treatments (T3 and T5), meat omega-6/omega-3 ratio decreased from 9 to 4. The presence of off-flavours was not influenced by diets but there was an interaction between portion and storage conditions. 'Poultry meat' aroma was only influenced by the storage conditions, being slight after 4 months of freezing, while presence of off-aromas was affected by diets. We conclude that it is possible to produce 'campero' poultry meat with enhanced omega-3 and omega-9 content and a low omega-6/omega-3 ratio using diets based on linseed and HOSS, without any important change in sensory properties.

  11. Balancing omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTF).

    PubMed

    Brenna, J Thomas; Akomo, Peter; Bahwere, Paluku; Berkley, James A; Calder, Philip C; Jones, Kelsey D; Liu, Lei; Manary, Mark; Trehan, Indi; Briend, André

    2015-05-15

    Ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTFs) are a key component of a life-saving treatment for young children who present with uncomplicated severe acute malnutrition in resource limited settings. Increasing recognition of the role of balanced dietary omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in neurocognitive and immune development led two independent groups to evaluate RUTFs. Jones et al. (BMC Med 13:93, 2015), in a study in BMC Medicine, and Hsieh et al. (J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2015), in a study in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, reformulated RUTFs with altered PUFA content and looked at the effects on circulating omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) status as a measure of overall omega-3 status. Supplemental oral administration of omega-3 DHA or reduction of RUTF omega-6 linoleic acid using high oleic peanuts improved DHA status, whereas increasing omega-3 alpha-linolenic acid in RUTF did not. The results of these two small studies are consistent with well-established effects in animal studies and highlight the need for basic and operational research to improve fat composition in support of omega-3-specific development in young children as RUTF use expands.

  12. Thermodynamical properties of dark energy with the equation of state {omega}={omega}{sub 0}+{omega}{sub 1}z

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yongping; Yi Zelong; Zhang Tongjie; Liu Wenbiao

    2008-01-15

    The thermodynamical properties of dark energy are usually investigated with the equation of state {omega}={omega}{sub 0}+{omega}{sub 1}z. Recent observations show that our Universe is accelerating, and the apparent horizon and the event horizon vary with redshift z. Because definitions of the temperature and entropy of a black hole are used to describe the two horizons of the Universe, we examine the thermodynamical properties of the Universe, which is enveloped by the apparent horizon and the event horizon, respectively. We show that the first and the second laws of thermodynamics inside the apparent horizon in any redshift are satisfied, while they are broken down inside the event horizon in some redshifts. Therefore, the apparent horizon for the Universe may be the boundary of thermodynamical equilibrium for the Universe like the event horizon for a black hole.

  13. Rare B Meson Decays With Omega Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; /Colorado U.

    2006-04-24

    Rare charmless hadronic B decays are particularly interesting because of their importance in understanding the CP violation, which is essential to explain the matter-antimatter asymmetry in our universe, and of their roles in testing the ''effective'' theory of B physics. The study has been done with the BABAR experiment, which is mainly designed for the study of CP violation in the decays of neutral B mesons, and secondarily for rare processes that become accessible with the high luminosity of the PEP-II B Factory. In a sample of 89 million produced B{bar B} pairs on the BABAR experiment, we observed the decays B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}K{sup 0} and B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{rho}{sup +} for the first time, made more precise measurements for B{sup +} {yields} {omega}h{sup +} and reported tighter upper limits for B {yields} {omega}K* and B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}{rho}{sup 0}.

  14. A protective lipidomic biosignature associated with a balanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio in fat-1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Astarita, Giuseppe; McKenzie, Jennifer H; Wang, Bin; Strassburg, Katrin; Doneanu, Angela; Johnson, Jay; Baker, Andrew; Hankemeier, Thomas; Murphy, James; Vreeken, Rob J; Langridge, James; Kang, Jing X

    2014-01-01

    A balanced omega-6/omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) ratio has been linked to health benefits and the prevention of many chronic diseases. Current dietary intervention studies with different sources of omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3) lack appropriate control diets and carry many other confounding factors derived from genetic and environmental variability. In our study, we used the fat-1 transgenic mouse model as a proxy for long-term omega-3 supplementation to determine, in a well-controlled manner, the molecular phenotype associated with a balanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio. The fat-1 mouse can convert omega-6 to omega-3 PUFAs, which protect against a wide variety of diseases including chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer. Both wild-type (WT) and fat-1 mice were subjected to an identical diet containing 10% corn oil, which has a high omega-6 content similar to that of the Western diet, for a six-month duration. We used a multi-platform lipidomic approach to compare the plasma lipidome between fat-1 and WT mice. In fat-1 mice, an unbiased profiling showed a significant increase in the levels of unesterified eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), EPA-containing cholesteryl ester, and omega-3 lysophosphospholipids. The increase in omega-3 lipids is accompanied by a significant reduction in omega-6 unesterified docosapentaenoic acid (omega-6 DPA) and DPA-containing cholesteryl ester as well as omega-6 phospholipids and triacylglycerides. Targeted lipidomics profiling highlighted a remarkable increase in EPA-derived diols and epoxides formed via the cytochrome P450 (CYP450) pathway in the plasma of fat-1 mice compared with WT mice. Integration of the results of untargeted and targeted analyses has identified a lipidomic biosignature that may underlie the healthful phenotype associated with a balanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio, and can potentially be used as a circulating biomarker for monitoring the health status and the efficacy of omega-3 intervention in humans.

  15. A Protective Lipidomic Biosignature Associated with a Balanced Omega-6/Omega-3 Ratio in fat-1 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Strassburg, Katrin; Doneanu, Angela; Johnson, Jay; Baker, Andrew; Hankemeier, Thomas; Murphy, James; Vreeken, Rob J.; Langridge, James; Kang, Jing X.

    2014-01-01

    A balanced omega-6/omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) ratio has been linked to health benefits and the prevention of many chronic diseases. Current dietary intervention studies with different sources of omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3) lack appropriate control diets and carry many other confounding factors derived from genetic and environmental variability. In our study, we used the fat-1 transgenic mouse model as a proxy for long-term omega-3 supplementation to determine, in a well-controlled manner, the molecular phenotype associated with a balanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio. The fat-1 mouse can convert omega-6 to omega-3 PUFAs, which protect against a wide variety of diseases including chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer. Both wild-type (WT) and fat-1 mice were subjected to an identical diet containing 10% corn oil, which has a high omega-6 content similar to that of the Western diet, for a six-month duration. We used a multi-platform lipidomic approach to compare the plasma lipidome between fat-1 and WT mice. In fat-1 mice, an unbiased profiling showed a significant increase in the levels of unesterified eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), EPA-containing cholesteryl ester, and omega-3 lysophosphospholipids. The increase in omega-3 lipids is accompanied by a significant reduction in omega-6 unesterified docosapentaenoic acid (omega-6 DPA) and DPA-containing cholesteryl ester as well as omega-6 phospholipids and triacylglycerides. Targeted lipidomics profiling highlighted a remarkable increase in EPA-derived diols and epoxides formed via the cytochrome P450 (CYP450) pathway in the plasma of fat-1 mice compared with WT mice. Integration of the results of untargeted and targeted analyses has identified a lipidomic biosignature that may underlie the healthful phenotype associated with a balanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio, and can potentially be used as a circulating biomarker for monitoring the health status and the efficacy of omega-3 intervention in humans. PMID

  16. Theory of hydro-equivalent ignition for inertial fusion and its applications to OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Nora, R.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.; Christopherson, A. R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; McCrory, R. L.

    2014-05-15

    The theory of ignition for inertial confinement fusion capsules [R. Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010)] is used to assess the performance requirements for cryogenic implosion experiments on the Omega Laser Facility. The theory of hydrodynamic similarity is developed in both one and two dimensions and tested using multimode hydrodynamic simulations with the hydrocode DRACO [P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 032702 (2005)] of hydro-equivalent implosions (implosions with the same implosion velocity, adiabat, and laser intensity). The theory is used to scale the performance of direct-drive OMEGA implosions to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) energy scales and determine the requirements for demonstrating hydro-equivalent ignition on OMEGA. Hydro-equivalent ignition on OMEGA is represented by a cryogenic implosion that would scale to ignition on the NIF at 1.8 MJ of laser energy symmetrically illuminating the target. It is found that a reasonable combination of neutron yield and areal density for OMEGA hydro-equivalent ignition is 3 to 6 × 10{sup 13} and ∼0.3 g/cm{sup 2}, respectively, depending on the level of laser imprinting. This performance has not yet been achieved on OMEGA.

  17. Theory of hydro-equivalent ignition for inertial fusion and its applications to OMEGA and the National Ignition Facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nora, R.; Betti, R.; Anderson, K. S.; Shvydky, A.; Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.; Christopherson, A. R.; Marozas, J. A.; Collins, T. J. B.; Radha, P. B.; Hu, S. X.; Epstein, R.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; Sangster, T. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2014-05-01

    The theory of ignition for inertial confinement fusion capsules [R. Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010)] is used to assess the performance requirements for cryogenic implosion experiments on the Omega Laser Facility. The theory of hydrodynamic similarity is developed in both one and two dimensions and tested using multimode hydrodynamic simulations with the hydrocode DRACO [P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 032702 (2005)] of hydro-equivalent implosions (implosions with the same implosion velocity, adiabat, and laser intensity). The theory is used to scale the performance of direct-drive OMEGA implosions to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) energy scales and determine the requirements for demonstrating hydro-equivalent ignition on OMEGA. Hydro-equivalent ignition on OMEGA is represented by a cryogenic implosion that would scale to ignition on the NIF at 1.8 MJ of laser energy symmetrically illuminating the target. It is found that a reasonable combination of neutron yield and areal density for OMEGA hydro-equivalent ignition is 3 to 6 × 1013 and ˜0.3 g/cm2, respectively, depending on the level of laser imprinting. This performance has not yet been achieved on OMEGA.

  18. Motion perception: from phi to omega.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, D; Blake, R

    1998-01-01

    When human observers view dynamic random noise, such as television 'snow', through a curved or annular aperture, they experience a compelling illusion that the noise is moving smoothly and coherently around the curve (the 'omega effect'). In several series of experiments, we have investigated the conditions under which this effect occurs and the possible mechanisms that might cause it. We contrast the omega effect with 'phi motion', seen when an object suddenly changes position. Our conclusions are that the visual scene is first segmented into objects before a coherent velocity is assigned to the texture on each object's surface. The omega effect arises because there are motion mechanisms that deal specifically with object rotation and these interact with pattern mechanisms sensitive to curvature. PMID:9684292

  19. OMEGA Observations of Mars Analogue Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonello, G.; Bibring, J. P.; Morris, R. V.; Mustard, J. F.

    2003-01-01

    In the last 20 years, imaging spectrometry in the visible and near infrared onboard spacecraft has become an essential technique to study surfaces and atmospheres of planetary objects, prior and in addition to in-situ analyses. Remote sensing experiments analyzing the sunlight reflected by planetary surfaces can be used to derive the mineralogical composition and physical properties of the natural surfaces and atmospheres observed. This technique was successfully used on Mars with ISM instrument. As an improvement of ISM, OMEGA onboard MARS-EXPRESS will play a key role in the mineralogical mapping of the Martian surface. We present the reflectance measurements made with OMEGA during on ground calibration sessions on natural slabs of rocks and minerals part of a database which will be used on similar future American instruments (as CRISM onboard MRO). We discuss the implication on the scientific capabilities of OMEGA instrument.

  20. Dietary omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids compete in producing tissue compositions and tissue responses.

    PubMed

    Lands, Bill

    2014-11-01

    Serious food-related health disorders may be prevented by recognizing the molecular processes that connect the dietary intake of vitamin-like fatty acids to tissue accumulation of precursors of potent hormone-like compounds that cause harmful tissue responses. Conversion of dietary 18-carbon omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids to tissue 20- and 22-carbon highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs) is catalyzed by promiscuous enzymes that allow different types of fatty acid to compete among each other for accumulation in tissue HUFA. As a result, food choices strongly influence the types of accumulated tissue HUFA. However, the conversion of tissue HUFA to active hormones and their receptor-mediated actions occurs with discriminating enzymes and receptors that give more intense responses for the omega-6 and omega-3 hormones. Undesired chronic health disorders, which are made worse by excessive omega-6 hormone actions, can be prevented by eating more omega-3 fats, less omega-6 fats, and fewer calories per meal.

  1. Effects of Diets Enriched in Omega-9 or Omega-6 Fatty Acids on Reproductive Process

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Seyedeh Neda; Koohdani, Fariba; Shidfar, Farzad; Shafiei-Neek, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Maternal type and amounts of dietary fatty acids affect on reproductive process in the mice. The present study investigated the effects of maternal supplementation with different amounts of omega-6 or omega-9 during pregnancy on the number of offspring, sex-ratio and duration of gestation. Materials and methods: Eight-week-old female C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned into four dietary groups including low omega-6 (16%; LO6), low omega-9 (16%; LO9), high omega-6 (45%; HO6) and high omega-9 (45%; HO9) during gestation. Number of offspring, sex-ratio and duration of pregnancy were compared among four dietary groups. Results: There was significant difference between LO6 and HO6 (p < 0.0001), LO9 and HO9 (p < 0.0001) groups in total number of pups. The number of female and male offspring were significantly different between LO6 and LO9 (p = 0.009 and p = 0.001, respectively), LO9 and HO9 (p = 0.01 and p = 0.025) groups. Duration of pregnancy was significantly higher in low fat diet than high fat diet groups (< 0.001). Conclusion: High fat diet reduced number of pups, gestation duration and lead to early labor. Omega-9 fatty acids shifted sex of offspring to females. PMID:27648098

  2. High-yield bang time detector for the OMEGA laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Mileham, C.; Roberts, S.; Lerche, R. A.

    2006-10-01

    A simple, low-cost, high-yield neutron bang time (HYNBT) detector has been developed and implemented on the 60-beam, 30kJ OMEGA Laser Facility at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The HYNBT consists of three chemical-vapor deposition diamond detectors of different sizes and sensitivities placed in a lead-shielded housing. The HYNBT is located in a reentrant tube 50cm from the center of the target chamber. The HYNBT has been temporally cross calibrated against the streak-camera-based neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) for both D2 and DT implosions. The HYNBT has an internal time resolution better than 20ps and is able to measure bang time for yields above 1010 for DT and 5×1010 for D2 implosions. The implementation of the HYNBT on the National Ignition Facility will be discussed.

  3. First evaluation of the thermodynamic properties for spheres to elongated micelles transition of some propanediyl-alpha,omega-bis(dimethylalkylammonium bromide) surfactants in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Fisicaro, Emilia; Compari, Carlotta; Duce, Elenia; Contestabili, Cristina; Viscardi, Guido; Quagliotto, Pierluigi

    2005-02-10

    The apparent and partial molar enthalpies, apparent molar volumes, and adiabatic compressibilities at 298 K of the aqueous solutions of the cationic gemini surfactants propanediyl-alpha,omega-bis(octyldimethylammonium bromide) (8-3-8) and propanediyl-alpha,omega-bis(dodecyldimethylammonium bromide) (12-3-12) have been measured as a function of concentration. The trends of the partial molar enthalpies versus concentration are the first well documented thermodynamic evidence of sphere to rod transition in the micellar phase, involving a detectable quantity of heat, and allow the determination of the change in enthalpy associated with this transition. The changes in enthalpies upon micellization and for the sphere to elongated micelles transition, DeltaH(s)(-->)(r), have been obtained from the experimental data by using a pseudo-phase transition approach: -1.5 kJ mol(-1) for 8-3-8 and -3.9 kJ mol(-1) for 12-3-12. No evidence of the above transition is found in the trends of volumetric properties versus m. The apparent adiabatic molar compressibilities for the compounds under investigation are also reported here for the first time: a negative group contribution for the methylene group is evaluated, when the surfactants are present in solution as a single molecule, reflecting its solvation structure. In the micellar phase, the -CH(2)- group contribution becomes positive. A value of 1.17 x 10(-3) cm(3) bar(-1) mol(-1) for the change in adiabatic molar compressibility upon micellization is obtained. The lower values of the methylene group contributions to the volumetric properties for the monomers support the hypothesis of partial association of the chains before the cmc.

  4. Dual-shank attachment design for omega seals

    DOEpatents

    Sattinger, Stanley S.

    1978-01-01

    An improved apparatus and process for attaching welded omega seal segments to reactor heads, standpipes, mechanisms, and plugs comprises a first shank in combination with a second shank to attach an omega seal at a metal-to-metal interface.

  5. Measurement of the spin of the omega(-) hyperon.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-09-15

    A measurement of the spin of the Omega(-) hyperon produced through the exclusive process Xi(c)(0)-->Omega(-)K(+) is presented using a total integrated luminosity of 116 fb(-1) recorded with the BABAR detector at the e(+)e(-) asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC. Under the assumption that the Xi(c)(0) has spin 1/2, the angular distribution of the Lambda from Omega(-)-->LambdaK(-) decay is inconsistent with all half-integer Omega(-) spin values other than 3/2. Lower statistics data for the process Omega(c)(0)-->Omega(-)pi(+) from a 230 fb(-1) sample are also found to be consistent with Omega(-) spin 3/2. If the Xi(c)(0) spin were 3/2, an Omega(-) spin of 5/2 could not be excluded.

  6. Flight evaluation: Ohio University omega receiver base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, K. A.; Lilley, R. W.; Salter, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A flight evaluation is presented of the Ohio University Omega Receiver Base, developed under the NASA Tri-University Program in Air Transportation, to provide a vehicle for the transfer of flight-test data to NASA and to other participants in the Tri-University program. Chart recordings of flight data are given, along with chronological listings of significant events which occurred during the flight. Digital data was prepared in data-processing card form for distribution. Data include phase measurements from all eight Omega time-slots for the duration of the flight, plus event marks which serve to correlate the phase data with flight-path documentation.

  7. Hierarchical Analysis of the Omega Ontology

    SciTech Connect

    Joslyn, Cliff A.; Paulson, Patrick R.

    2009-12-01

    Initial delivery for mathematical analysis of the Omega Ontology. We provide an analysis of the hierarchical structure of a version of the Omega Ontology currently in use within the US Government. After providing an initial statistical analysis of the distribution of all link types in the ontology, we then provide a detailed order theoretical analysis of each of the four main hierarchical links present. This order theoretical analysis includes the distribution of components and their properties, their parent/child and multiple inheritance structure, and the distribution of their vertical ranks.

  8. OmegaCAM: ESO's Newest Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuijken, K.

    2011-12-01

    OmegaCAM, the 300-megapixel wide-field optical camera on the new VLT Survey Telescope (VST), was commissioned between March and August of this year. This new capability in ESO's arsenal takes images of 1 degree by 1° patches of the sky, at 0.2 arcseconds per pixel resolution and of image quality well-matched to the natural seeing on Paranal. The commissioning and OmegaCAM's scientific niche as a high image quality, ultra-violet- sensitive wide-field survey instrument are briefly discussed.

  9. Omega 3 fatty acids and the eye.

    PubMed

    Cakiner-Egilmez, Tulay

    2008-01-01

    The health benefits of fish oil have been known for decades. Most of the health benefits of fish oil can be attributed to the presence of omega-3 essential fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Clinical studies have suggested that DHA and EPA lower triglycerides; slow the buildup of atherosclerotic plaques; lower blood pressure slightly; as well as reduce the risk of death, heart attack, and arrhythmias. Studies have also shown that omega-3 fatty acids may slow the progression of vision loss from AMD and reverse the signs of dry eye syndrome.

  10. [Antioxidant activity of vegetable oils with various omega-6/omega-3 fatty acids ratio].

    PubMed

    Guseva, D A; Prozorovskaia, N N; Shironin, A V; Sanzhakov, M A; Evteeva, N M; Rusina, I F; Kasaikina, O T

    2010-01-01

    Antioxidant activity and the oxidative stability were investigated in flax, sesame, silybum oils and oils with different omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio. The content of antioxidants (AO) in crude oils and their reactivity towards peroxyl radicals were studied using kinetic method for addition of oil in a model reaction of cumol oxidation. There were correlations between PUFA/omega-9 and thermal stability (50 degrees C); between gamma-tocopherol content and resistantance to oxidative changes after storage at (10 +/- 2) degrees C for 6 months.

  11. Gas-Phase Oxidation of Cm+ and Cm2+ -- Thermodynamics of neutral and ionized CmO

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, John K; Haire, Richard G.; Santos, Marta; Pires de Matos, Antonio; Marcalo, Joaquim

    2008-12-08

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry was employed to study the products and kinetics of gas-phase reactions of Cm+ and Cm2+; parallel studies were carried out with La+/2+, Gd+/2+ and Lu+/2+. Reactions with oxygen-donor molecules provided estimates for the bond dissociation energies, D[M+-O](M = Cm, Gd, Lu). The first ionization energy, IE[CmO], was obtained from the reactivity of CmO+ with dienes, and the second ionization energies, IE[MO+](M = Cm, La, Gd, Lu), from the rates of electron-transfer reactions from neutrals to the MO2+ ions. The following thermodynamic quantities for curium oxide molecules were obtained: IE[CmO]= 6.4+-0.2 eV; IE[CmO+]= 15.8+-0.4 eV; D[Cm-O]= 710+-45 kJ mol-1; D[Cm+-O]= 670+-40 kJ mol-1; and D[Cm2+-O]= 342+-55 kJ mol-1. Estimates for the M2+-O bond energies for M = Cm, La, Gd and Lu are all intermediate between D[N2-O]and D[OC-O]--i.e., 167 kJ mol-1< D[M2+-O]< 532 kJ mol-1 -- such that the four MO2+ ions fulfill the thermodynamic requirement for catalytic O-atom transport from N2O to CO. It was demonstrated that the kinetics are also favorable and that the CmO2+, LaO2+, GdO2+ and LuO2+ dipositive ions each catalyze the gas-phase oxidation of CO to CO2 by N2O. The CmO2+ ion appeared during the reaction of Cm+ with O2 when the intermediate, CmO+, was not collisionally cooled -- although its formation is kinetically and/or thermodynamically unfavorable, CmO2+ is a stable species.

  12. Baryon spectroscopy and the omega minus

    SciTech Connect

    Samios, N.P.

    1994-12-31

    In this report, I will mainly discuss baryon resonances with emphasis on the discovery of the {Omega}{sup {minus}}. However, for completeness, I will also present some data on the meson resonances which together with the baryons led to the uncovering of the SU(3) symmetry of particles and ultimately to the concept of quarks.

  13. Coefficient Omega Bootstrap Confidence Intervals: Nonnormal Distributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Miguel A.; Divers, Jasmin

    2013-01-01

    The performance of the normal theory bootstrap (NTB), the percentile bootstrap (PB), and the bias-corrected and accelerated (BCa) bootstrap confidence intervals (CIs) for coefficient omega was assessed through a Monte Carlo simulation under conditions not previously investigated. Of particular interests were nonnormal Likert-type and binary items.…

  14. Omega-3 Index and Cardiovascular Health

    PubMed Central

    von Schacky, Clemens

    2014-01-01

    Recent large trials with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in the cardiovascular field did not demonstrate a beneficial effect in terms of reductions of clinical endpoints like total mortality, sudden cardiac arrest or other major adverse cardiac events. Pertinent guidelines do not uniformly recommend EPA + DHA for cardiac patients. In contrast, in epidemiologic findings, higher blood levels of EPA + DHA were consistently associated with a lower risk for the endpoints mentioned. Because of low biological and analytical variability, a standardized analytical procedure, a large database and for other reasons, blood levels of EPA + DHA are frequently assessed in erythrocytes, using the HS-Omega-3 Index® methodology. A low Omega-3 Index fulfills the current criteria for a novel cardiovascular risk factor. Neutral results of intervention trials can be explained by issues of bioavailability and trial design that surfaced after the trials were initiated. In the future, incorporating the Omega-3 Index into trial designs by recruiting participants with a low Omega-3 Index and treating them within a pre-specified target range (e.g., 8%–11%), will make more efficient trials possible and provide clearer answers to the questions asked than previously possible. PMID:24566438

  15. Omega-3 Fatty Acids in the Management of Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Tejada, Silvia; Martorell, Miquel; Capó, Xavier; Tur, Josep A; Pons, Antoni; Sureda, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) with multiple double bonds. Linolenic and alpha-linolenic acids are omega-6 and omega-3 PUFAs, precursors for the synthesis of long-chain PUFAs (LC-PUFAs), such as arachidonic acid (omega-6 PUFA), and eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids (omega-3 PUFAs). The three most important omega-3 fatty acids are alpha-linolenic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids, which cannot be synthesized in enough amounts by the body, and therefore they must be supplied by the diet. Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for the correct functioning of the organism and participate in many physiological processes in the brain. Epilepsy is a common and heterogeneous chronic brain disorder characterized by recurrent epileptic seizures leading to neuropsychiatric disabilities. The prevalence of epilepsy is high achieving about 1% of the general population. There is evidence suggesting that omega-3 fatty acids may have neuroprotective and anticonvulsant effects and, accordingly, may have a potential use in the treatment of epilepsy. In the present review, the potential use of omega-3 fatty acids in the treatment of epilepsy, and the possible proposed mechanisms of action are discussed. The present article summarizes the recent knowledge of the potential protective role of dietary omega-3 fatty acids in epilepsy.

  16. Rapid induction of omega-3 fatty acids (EPA) in Nannochloropsis sp. by UV-C radiation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kalpesh; Schenk, Peer M

    2015-06-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids, such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), provide substantial health benefits. As global fish stocks are declining and in some cases are contaminated with heavy metals, there is a need to find more sustainable land-based sources of these essential fatty acids. The oleaginous microalga Nannochloropsis sp. has been identified as a highly efficient producer of omega-3 fatty acids. In this study, we present a new process to rapidly induce biosynthesis of essential fatty acids, including EPA in Nannochloropsis sp. BR2. Short exposure to UV-C at a dose of 100 or 250 mJ/cm(2) led to a significant increase in total cellular lipid contents when compared to mock-treated controls. A low dosage of 100 mJ/cm(2) also led to a twofold increase in total EPA content within 24 h that constituted 30% of total fatty acids and up to 12% of total dry weight at higher dosages. UV-C radiation may find uses as an easily applicable external inducer for large-scale production of omega-3 production from microalgae.

  17. A host-microbiome interaction mediates the opposing effects of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids on metabolic endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Kaliannan, Kanakaraju; Wang, Bin; Li, Xiang-Yong; Kim, Kui-Jin; Kang, Jing X

    2015-06-11

    Metabolic endotoxemia, commonly derived from gut dysbiosis, is a primary cause of chronic low grade inflammation that underlies many chronic diseases. Here we show that mice fed a diet high in omega-6 fatty acids exhibit higher levels of metabolic endotoxemia and systemic low-grade inflammation, while transgenic conversion of tissue omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids dramatically reduces endotoxemic and inflammatory status. These opposing effects of tissue omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids can be eliminated by antibiotic treatment and animal co-housing, suggesting the involvement of the gut microbiota. Analysis of gut microbiota and fecal transfer revealed that elevated tissue omega-3 fatty acids enhance intestinal production and secretion of intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP), which induces changes in the gut bacteria composition resulting in decreased lipopolysaccharide production and gut permeability, and ultimately, reduced metabolic endotoxemia and inflammation. Our findings uncover an interaction between host tissue fatty acid composition and gut microbiota as a novel mechanism for the anti-inflammatory effect of omega-3 fatty acids. Given the excess of omega-6 and deficiency of omega-3 in the modern Western diet, the differential effects of tissue omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids on gut microbiota and metabolic endotoxemia provide insight into the etiology and management of today's health epidemics.

  18. New insights into the health effects of dietary saturated and omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases and cancers are leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Reducing dietary saturated fat and replacing it with polyunsaturated fat is still the main dietary strategy to prevent cardiovascular diseases, although major flaws have been reported in the analyses supporting this approach. Recent studies introducing the concept of myocardial preconditioning have opened new avenues to understand the complex interplay between the various lipids and the risk of cardiovascular diseases. The optimal dietary fat profile includes a low intake of both saturated and omega-6 fatty acids and a moderate intake of omega-3 fatty acids. This profile is quite similar to the Mediterranean diet. On the other hand, recent studies have found a positive association between omega-6 and breast cancer risk. In contrast, omega-3 fatty acids do have anticancer properties. It has been shown that certain (Mediterranean) polyphenols significantly increase the endogenous synthesis of omega-3 whereas high intake of omega-6 decreases it. Finally, epidemiological studies suggest that a high omega-3 to omega-6 ratio may be the optimal strategy to decrease breast cancer risk. Thus, the present high intake of omega-6 in many countries is definitely not the optimal strategy to prevent cardiovascular disease and cancers. A moderate intake of plant and marine omega-3 in the context of the traditional Mediterranean diet (low in saturated and omega-6 fatty acids but high in plant monounsaturated fat) appears to be the best approach to reduce the risk of both cardiovascular diseases and cancers, in particular breast cancer. PMID:22613931

  19. Parallel processing: The Cm/sup */ experience

    SciTech Connect

    Siewiorek, D.; Gehringer, E.; Segall, Z.

    1986-01-01

    This book describes the parallel-processing research with CM/sup */ at Carnegie-Mellon University. Cm/sup */ is a tightly coupled 50-processor multiprocessing system that has been in operation since 1977. Two complete operating systems-StarOS and Medusa-are part of its development along with a number of applications.

  20. A high-resolving-power x-ray spectrometer for the OMEGA EP Laser (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilson, P. M.; Ehrne, F.; Mileham, C.; Mastrosimone, D.; Jungquist, R. K.; Taylor, C.; Stillman, C. R.; Ivancic, S. T.; Boni, R.; Hassett, J.; Lonobile, D. J.; Kidder, R. W.; Shoup, M. J.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Froula, D. H.; Hill, K. W.; Gao, L.; Bitter, M.; Efthimion, P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2016-11-01

    A high-resolving-power x-ray spectrometer has been developed for the OMEGA EP Laser System based on a spherically bent Si [220] crystal with a radius of curvature of 330 mm and a Spectral Instruments (SI) 800 Series charge-coupled device. The instrument measures time-integrated x-ray emission spectra in the 7.97- to 8.11-keV range, centered on the Cu Kα1 line. To demonstrate the performance of the spectrometer under high-power conditions, Kα1,2 emission spectra were measured from Cu foils irradiated by the OMEGA EP laser with 100-J, 1-ps pulses at focused intensities above 1018 W/cm2. The ultimate goal is to couple the spectrometer to a picosecond x-ray streak camera and measure temperature-equilibration dynamics inside rapidly heated materials. The plan for these ultrafast streaked x-ray spectroscopy studies is discussed.

  1. A high-resolving-power x-ray spectrometer for the OMEGA EP Laser (invited).

    PubMed

    Nilson, P M; Ehrne, F; Mileham, C; Mastrosimone, D; Jungquist, R K; Taylor, C; Stillman, C R; Ivancic, S T; Boni, R; Hassett, J; Lonobile, D J; Kidder, R W; Shoup, M J; Solodov, A A; Stoeckl, C; Theobald, W; Froula, D H; Hill, K W; Gao, L; Bitter, M; Efthimion, P; Meyerhofer, D D

    2016-11-01

    A high-resolving-power x-ray spectrometer has been developed for the OMEGA EP Laser System based on a spherically bent Si [220] crystal with a radius of curvature of 330 mm and a Spectral Instruments (SI) 800 Series charge-coupled device. The instrument measures time-integrated x-ray emission spectra in the 7.97- to 8.11-keV range, centered on the Cu Kα1 line. To demonstrate the performance of the spectrometer under high-power conditions, Kα1,2 emission spectra were measured from Cu foils irradiated by the OMEGA EP laser with 100-J, 1-ps pulses at focused intensities above 10(18) W/cm(2). The ultimate goal is to couple the spectrometer to a picosecond x-ray streak camera and measure temperature-equilibration dynamics inside rapidly heated materials. The plan for these ultrafast streaked x-ray spectroscopy studies is discussed.

  2. OMEGA navigation system status and future plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolan, T. P.; Scull, D. C.

    1974-01-01

    OMEGA is described as a very low frequency (VLF) radio navigational system operating in the internationally allocated navigation band in the electromagentic spectrum between 10 and 14 kilohertz. Full system implementation with worldwide coverage from eight transmitting stations is planned for the latter 1970's. Experimental stations have operated since 1966 in support of system evaluation and test. These stations provided coverage over most of the North Atlantic, North American Continent, and eastern portions of the North Pacific. This coverage provided the fundamental basis for further development of the system and has been essential to the demonstrated feasibility of the one to two nautical mile root-mean-square system accuracy. OMEGA is available to users in all nations, both on ships and in aircraft.

  3. Cardioprotective mechanism of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Endo, Jin; Arita, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), such as eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, are widely regarded as cardioprotective. Several large-scale, randomized clinical trials have shown that dietary intake of omega-3 PUFAs improves the prognosis of patients with symptomatic heart failure or recent myocardial infarction. Therefore, dietary consumption of omega-3 PUFA is recommended in international guidelines for the general population to prevent the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). However, the precise mechanisms underlying the cardioprotective effects of omega-3 PUFAs are not fully understood. Omega-3 PUFAs can be incorporated into the phospholipid bilayer of cell membranes and can affect membrane fluidity, lipid microdomain formation, and signaling across membranes. Omega-3 PUFAs also modulate the function of membrane ion channels, such as Na and L-type Ca channels, to prevent lethal arrhythmias. Moreover, omega-3 PUFAs also prevent the conversion of arachidonic acid into pro-inflammatory eicosanoids by serving as an alternative substrate for cyclooxygenase or lipoxygenase, resulting in the production of less potent products. In addition, a number of enzymatically oxygenated metabolites derived from omega-3 PUFAs were recently identified as anti-inflammatory mediators. These omega-3 metabolites may contribute to the beneficial effects against CVDs that are attributed to omega-3 PUFAs.

  4. OMEGA FY13 HED requests - LANL

    SciTech Connect

    Workman, Jonathan B; Loomis, Eric N

    2012-06-25

    This is a summary of scientific work to be performed on the OMEGA laser system located at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics in Rochester New York. The work is funded through Science and ICF Campagins and falls under the category of laser-driven High-Energy Density Physics experiments. This summary is presented to the Rochester scheduling committee on an annual basis for scheduling and planning purposes.

  5. Semileptonic Decays of Heavy Omega Baryons in a Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Muslema Pervin; Winston Roberts; Simon Capstick

    2006-03-24

    The semileptonic decays of {Omega}{sub c} and {Omega}{sub b} are treated in the framework of a constituent quark model developed in a previous paper on the semileptonic decays of heavy {Lambda} baryons. Analytic results for the form factors for the decays to ground states and a number of excited states are evaluated. For {Omega}{sub b} to {Omega}{sub c} the form factors obtained are shown to satisfy the relations predicted at leading order in the heavy-quark effective theory at the non-recoil point. A modified fit of nonrelativistic and semirelativistic Hamiltonians generates configuration-mixed baryon wave functions from the known masses and the measured {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Lambda}e{sup +}{nu} rate, with wave functions expanded in both harmonic oscillator and Sturmian bases. Decay rates of {Omega}{sub b} to pairs of ground and excited {Omega}{sub c} states related by heavy-quark symmetry calculated using these configuration-mixed wave functions are in the ratios expected from heavy-quark effective theory, to a good approximation. Our predictions for the semileptonic elastic branching fraction of {Omega}{sub Q} vary minimally within the models we use. We obtain an average value of (84 {+-} 2%) for the fraction of {Omega}{sub c} {yields} {Xi}{sup (*)} decays to ground states, and 91% for the fraction of {Omega}{sub c} {yields} {Omega}{sup (*)} decays to the ground state {Omega}. The elastic fraction of {Omega}{sub b} {yields} {Omega}{sub c} ranges from about 50% calculated with the two harmonic-oscillator models, to about 67% calculated with the two Sturmian models.

  6. Simulations of Fuel Assembly and Fast-Electron Transport in Integrated Fast-Ignition Experiments on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodov, A. A.; Theobald, W.; Anderson, K. S.; Shvydky, A.; Epstein, R.; Betti, R.; Myatt, J. F.; Stoeckl, C.; Jarrott, L. C.; McGuffey, C.; Qiao, B.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Stephens, R. B.

    2013-10-01

    Integrated fast-ignition experiments on OMEGA benefit from improved performance of the OMEGA EP laser, including higher contrast, higher energy, and a smaller focus. Recent 8-keV, Cu-Kα flash radiography of cone-in-shell implosions and cone-tip breakout measurements showed good agreement with the 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations using the code DRACO. DRACO simulations show that the fuel assembly can be further improved by optimizing the compression laser pulse, evacuating air from the shell, and by adjusting the material of the cone tip. This is found to delay the cone-tip breakout by ~220 ps and increase the core areal density from ~80 mg/cm2 in the current experiments to ~500 mg/cm2 at the time of the OMEGA EP beam arrival before the cone-tip breakout. Simulations using the code LSP of fast-electron transport in the recent integrated OMEGA experiments with Cu-doped shells will be presented. Cu-doping is added to probe the transport of fast electrons via their induced Cu K-shell fluorescent emission. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration DE-NA0001944 and the Office of Science under DE-FC02-04ER54789.

  7. Omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids predict accelerated decline of peripheral nerve function in older persons

    PubMed Central

    Lauretani, F.; Bandinelli, S.; Benedetta, B.; Cherubini, A.; Iorio, A. D.; Blè, A.; Giacomini, V.; Corsi, A. M.; Guralnik, J. M.; Ferrucci, L.

    2009-01-01

    Pre-clinical studies suggest that both omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids have beneficial effects on peripheral nerve function. Rats feed a diet rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) showed modification of phospholipid fatty acid composition in nerve membranes and improvement of sciatic nerve conduction velocity (NCV). We tested the hypothesis that baseline plasma omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids levels predict accelerated decline of peripheral nerve function. Changes between baseline and the 3-year follow-up in peripheral nerve function was assessed by standard surface ENG of the right peroneal nerve in 384 male and 443 female participants of the InCHIANTI study (age range: 24–97 years). Plasma concentrations of selected fatty acids assessed at baseline by gas chromatography. Independent of confounders, plasma omega-6 fatty acids and linoleic acid were significantly correlated with peroneal NCV at enrollment. Lower plasma PUFA, omega-6 fatty acids, linoleic acid, ratio omega-6/omega-3, arachidonic acid and docosahexanoic acid levels were significantly predicted a steeper decline in nerve function parameters over the 3-year follow-up. Low plasma omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids levels were associated with accelerated decline of peripheral nerve function with aging. PMID:17594339

  8. Omega Centauri Looks Radiant in Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version

    A cluster brimming with millions of stars glistens like an iridescent opal in this image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Called Omega Centauri, the sparkling orb of stars is like a miniature galaxy. It is the biggest and brightest of the 150 or so similar objects, called globular clusters, that orbit around the outside of our Milky Way galaxy. Stargazers at southern latitudes can spot the stellar gem with the naked eye in the constellation Centaurus.

    Globular clusters are some of the oldest objects in our universe. Their stars are over 12 billion years old, and, in most cases, formed all at once when the universe was just a toddler. Omega Centauri is unusual in that its stars are of different ages and possess varying levels of metals, or elements heavier than boron. Astronomers say this points to a different origin for Omega Centauri than other globular clusters: they think it might be the core of a dwarf galaxy that was ripped apart and absorbed by our Milky Way long ago.

    In this new view of Omega Centauri, Spitzer's infrared observations have been combined with visible-light data from the National Science Foundation's Blanco 4-meter telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. Visible-light data with a wavelength of .55 microns is colored blue, 3.6-micron infrared light captured by Spitzer's infrared array camera is colored green and 24-micron infrared light taken by Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer is colored red.

    Where green and red overlap, the color yellow appears. Thus, the yellow and red dots are stars revealed by Spitzer. These stars, called red giants, are more evolved, larger and dustier. The stars that appear blue were spotted in both visible and 3.6-micron-, or near-, infrared light. They are less evolved, like our own sun. Some of the red spots in the picture are distant galaxies beyond our own.

    Spitzer found very little dust

  9. OMEGA - an operational glacier monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellikka, P. K. E.

    2003-04-01

    Glacier changes reflect local climate changes and are one of the most important direct indicators of global climate change. In general, the glaciers are retreating in Europe, but some glaciers are advancing. However, even in small areas glacier responses can be different. The application of glaciers as indicators requires sufficient amount of glaciers, which is possible only with remote sensing methods. Remote sensing data have been used for glacier monitoring from the late 19th century, first as terrestrial photographs, but later as aerial photographs. A new era began in the 1970’s as optical satellite data became available. Since late 1990’s the glacier monitoring could be performed with numerous satellite and airborne sensors ranging from satellite radar data to airborne laser scanner data. All together, the development of new remote sensing technologies and methods provides many possibilities for studies of glacier features and parameters. The glacier parameters of interest in operational monitoring are the changes of glacier area and volume, and the variation of glacier zones, such as snow, firn and ice. These parameters enable the estimation of relative volume change, AAR and equilibrium line, for example. Operational monitoring involves that the remote sensing data to be used is available continuously, the image processing methods are accurate and the processing chain is developed so that the derivation of the aimed parameters works fluently. The OMEGA project aims at the development of an operational glacier monitoring system applying all the potential remote sensing data. The objectives are to develop workflows and semi-automatic image processing methodologies for different data types in order to retrieve glacier parameters, to construct databases of the study glaciers and to develop the prototype of an operational monitoring system. The test glaciers are Hintereisferner in Austria and Engabreen in Norway. The deliverable of the project is the OMEGA

  10. Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acid, Ratio of Omega-6 to Omega-3 Intake, Inflammation, and Survival in Long-term Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Noori, Nazanin; Dukkipati, Ramanath; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Sim, John J.; Feroze, Usama; Murali, Sameer B.; Bross, Rachelle; Benner, Debbie; Kopple, Joel D; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2011-01-01

    Background Mortality among long-term hemodialysis patients is high, mostly attributed to cardiovascular events, and may be related to chronic inflammation. We hypothesized that the anti-inflammatory benefits of higher dietary omega-3, compared to omega-6, poly-unsaturated fatty acids may modulate the inflammatory processes and reduce death risk. Study design Prospective cohort study using linear and Cox proportional regressions. Setting and Participants 145 hemodialysis patients from 8 DaVita dialysis clinics in Southern California during 2001-2007 Predictors Intake of dietary omega-3 and ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 using 3-day food record supplemented by dietary interview. Outcomes One-year change in serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and 6-year survival. Results Patients were 53±14 years old (mean±SD) and included 43% women and 42% African-Americans. Median (25th-75 percentile) of dietary omega-3 intake, ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 intake, baseline serum CRP, and change in CRP over one year were 1.1(0.8-1.6) g/day, 9.3(7.6-11.3), 3.1(0.8-6.8) mg/L, and +0.2(−0.4 to +0.8) mg/L, respectively. In regression models adjusted for case-mix, dietary calorie and fat intake, body mass index and history of hypertension, each 1-unit higher ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 intake was associated with 0.55 mg/L increase in serum CRP (p=0.03). In fully adjusted model, the death hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) for the 1st(1.7-<7.6) 2nd(7.6-<9.3), 3rd(9.3-<11.3) and 4th(11.3-17.4) quartiles of dietary omega-6 to omega-3 ratio were 0.39(0.14-1.18), 0.30(0.09-0.99), 0.67(0.25-1.79) and 1.00(reference), respectively (p-for-trend=0.06). Limitations Three-day food record may underestimate actual dietary fat intake at individual level. Conclusions Higher dietary omega-6 to omega-3 ratio appears associated with both worsening inflammation over time and a trend towards higher death risk in hemodialysis patients. Additional studies including interventional trials are needed to examine

  11. Chilled Mirror Dew Point Hygrometer (CM) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Ritsche, MT

    2005-01-01

    The CM systems have been developed for the ARM Program to act as a moisture standard traceable to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). There are three CM systems that are each fully portable, self-contained, and require only 110 V AC power. The systems include a CM sensor, air sampling and filtration system, a secondary reference (Rotronic HP043 temperature and relative humidity sensor) to detect system malfunctions, a data acquisition system, and data storage for more than one month of 1-minute data. The CM sensor directly measures dew point temperature at 1 m, air temperature at 2 m, and relative humidity at 2 m. These measurements are intended to represent self-standing data streams that can be used independently or in combinations.

  12. Conducting Retrospective Ontological Clinical Trials in ICD-9-CM in the Age of ICD-10-CM

    PubMed Central

    Venepalli, Neeta K; Shergill, Ardaman; Dorestani, Parvaneh; Boyd, Andrew D

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To quantify the impact of International Classification of Disease 10th Revision Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) transition in cancer clinical trials by comparing coding accuracy and data discontinuity in backward ICD-10-CM to ICD-9-CM mapping via two tools, and to develop a standard ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM bridging methodology for retrospective analyses. BACKGROUND While the transition to ICD-10-CM has been delayed until October 2015, its impact on cancer-related studies utilizing ICD-9-CM diagnoses has been inadequately explored. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three high impact journals with broad national and international readerships were reviewed for cancer-related studies utilizing ICD-9-CM diagnoses codes in study design, methods, or results. Forward ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM mapping was performing using a translational methodology with the Motif web portal ICD-9-CM conversion tool. Backward mapping from ICD-10-CM to ICD-9-CM was performed using both Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) general equivalence mappings (GEMs) files and the Motif web portal tool. Generated ICD-9-CM codes were compared with the original ICD-9-CM codes to assess data accuracy and discontinuity. RESULTS While both methods yielded additional ICD-9-CM codes, the CMS GEMs method provided incomplete coverage with 16 of the original ICD-9-CM codes missing, whereas the Motif web portal method provided complete coverage. Of these 16 codes, 12 ICD-9-CM codes were present in 2010 Illinois Medicaid data, and accounted for 0.52% of patient encounters and 0.35% of total Medicaid reimbursements. Extraneous ICD-9-CM codes from both methods (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services general equivalent mapping [CMS GEMs, n = 161; Motif web portal, n = 246]) in excess of original ICD-9-CM codes accounted for 2.1% and 2.3% of total patient encounters and 3.4% and 4.1% of total Medicaid reimbursements from the 2010 Illinois Medicare database. DISCUSSION Longitudinal data analyses post-ICD-10

  13. A microcomputer-based low-cost Omega navigation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilley, R. W.; Salter, R. J., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The application of a low cost, commercially available microcomputer as the navigation processor for a simplified OMEGA navigation system is an area of current research. The interface of a low cost front end OMEGA sensor is described and an example of the phase processing software and navigation routines is given. Emphasis is placed on the description of results obtained with the software version of the OMEGA burst filter known as the memory aided phase locked loop.

  14. Detections of 2 cm formaldehyde emissions towards Galactic star-forming regions with 6 cm counterpart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Xiao-Qiong; Yang, Kai; Li, Juan; Wang, Jun-Zhi; Wu, Ya-Jun; Zhao, Rong-Bin; Wang, Jin-Qing; Dong, Jian; Jiang, Dong-Rong; Li, Bin

    2017-01-01

    We report the detections of H2CO emission at the 2 cm transition towards Galactic star-forming regions with known 6 cm counterpart using the Shanghai Tianma Radio Telescope (TMRT). One significant detection (in NGC7538) and two possible detections (in G23.01-0.41 and G29.96-0.02) were made. Comparing with previous observations, we found that there is a time lag of appearance of 2 cm and 6 cm emissions detected in NGC7538, contradicting with the prediction of radiative pumping via radio continuum radiation. Combinations of the variability of 6 cm masers in NGC7538 suggest that collisional pumping via high-velocity shocks could better explain the 6 cm H2CO maser emission. Under this scheme, excitation of the 2 cm maser may require a higher collision energy compared to the 6 cm transition.

  15. Dynamical coupled channels calculation of pion and omega meson production

    SciTech Connect

    Paris, Mark W.

    2009-02-15

    The dynamical coupled-channels approach developed at the Excited Baryon Analysis Center is extended to include the {omega}N channel to study {pi}- and {omega}-meson production induced by scattering pions and photons from the proton. Six intermediate channels, including {pi}N, {eta}N, {pi}{delta}, {sigma}N, {rho}N, and {omega}N, are employed to describe unpolarized and polarized data. Bare parameters in an effective hadronic Lagrangian are determined in a fit to the data for {pi}N{yields}{pi}N, {gamma}N{yields}{pi}N, {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{omega}n, and {gamma}p{yields}{omega}p reactions at center-of-mass energies from threshold to W<2.0 GeV. The T matrix determined in these fits is used to calculate the photon beam asymmetry for {omega}-meson production and the {omega}N{yields}{omega}N total cross section and {omega}N-scattering lengths. The calculated beam asymmetry is in good agreement with the observed in the range of energies near threshold to W < or approx. 2.0 GeV.

  16. Determining the coordinate dependence of some components of the cubic susceptibility tensor {chi}-hat{sub yyyy}{sup (3)}(z, {omega}, -{omega}, {omega}, {omega}) of a one-dimensionally inhomogeneous absorbing plate at an arbitrary frequency dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Golubkov, A A; Makarov, Vladimir A

    2010-12-29

    The possibility of unique reconstruction of the spatial profile of the cubic nonlinear susceptibility tensor component {chi}-hat{sub yyyy}{sup (3)}(z, {omega}, -{omega}, {omega}, {omega}) of a one-dimensionally inhomogeneous plate whose medium has a symmetry plane m{sub y} perpendicular to its surface is proved for the first time and the unique reconstruction algorithm is proposed. The amplitude complex coefficients of reflection and transmission (measured in some range of angles of incidence) as well as of conversion of an s-polarised plane signal monochromatic wave into two waves propagating on both sides of the plate make it possible to reconstruct the profile. These two waves result from nonlinear interaction of a signal wave with an intense plane wave incident normally on the plate. All the waves under consideration have the same frequency {omega}, and so its variation helps study the frequency dispersion of the cubic nonlinear susceptibility tensor component {chi}-hat{sub yyyy}{sup (3)}(z, {omega}, -{omega}, {omega}, {omega}). For media with additional symmetry axes 2{sub z}, 4{sub z}, 6{sub z}, or {infinity}{sub z} that are perpendicular to the plate surface, the proposed method can be used to reconstruct the profile and to examine the frequency dispersion of about one third of all independent complex components of the tensor {chi}-hat{sup (3)}. (nonlinear-optics phenomena)

  17. 46 CFR 35.10-3 - Display of plans-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Display of plans-TB/ALL. 35.10-3 Section 35.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Fire and Emergency Requirements § 35.10-3 Display of plans—TB/ALL. Barges with sleeping accommodations for more than six...

  18. 46 CFR 35.10-3 - Display of plans-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Display of plans-TB/ALL. 35.10-3 Section 35.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Fire and Emergency Requirements § 35.10-3 Display of plans—TB/ALL. Barges with sleeping accommodations for more than six...

  19. 46 CFR 35.10-3 - Display of plans-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Display of plans-TB/ALL. 35.10-3 Section 35.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Fire and Emergency Requirements § 35.10-3 Display of plans—TB/ALL. Barges with sleeping accommodations for more than six...

  20. 46 CFR 35.10-3 - Display of plans-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Display of plans-TB/ALL. 35.10-3 Section 35.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Fire and Emergency Requirements § 35.10-3 Display of plans—TB/ALL. Barges with sleeping accommodations for more than six...

  1. 46 CFR 35.10-3 - Display of plans-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Display of plans-TB/ALL. 35.10-3 Section 35.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Fire and Emergency Requirements § 35.10-3 Display of plans—TB/ALL. Barges with sleeping accommodations for more than six...

  2. 5 CFR 10.3 - OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... management programs and practices. 10.3 Section 10.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE RULES AGENCY ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEMS; OPM AUTHORITY TO REVIEW PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS (RULE X) § 10.3 OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices. The Office...

  3. 5 CFR 10.3 - OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... management programs and practices. 10.3 Section 10.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE RULES AGENCY ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEMS; OPM AUTHORITY TO REVIEW PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS (RULE X) § 10.3 OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices. The Office...

  4. 5 CFR 10.3 - OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... management programs and practices. 10.3 Section 10.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE RULES AGENCY ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEMS; OPM AUTHORITY TO REVIEW PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS (RULE X) § 10.3 OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices. The Office...

  5. 5 CFR 10.3 - OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... management programs and practices. 10.3 Section 10.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE RULES AGENCY ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEMS; OPM AUTHORITY TO REVIEW PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS (RULE X) § 10.3 OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices. The Office...

  6. 5 CFR 10.3 - OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... management programs and practices. 10.3 Section 10.3 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE RULES AGENCY ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEMS; OPM AUTHORITY TO REVIEW PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS (RULE X) § 10.3 OPM authority to review personnel management programs and practices. The Office...

  7. A Comparison of 1 T(Omega) and 10 T (Omega) High Resistance Standards Between NIST and Sandia

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrett, D.G.; Dziuba, R.F.; Kraft, M.E.

    1999-04-23

    NIST-built 10 T{Omega} and commercial 1 T{Omega} standard resistors were hand carried between NIST and Sandia for a high resistance comparison. The comparison tested the ruggedness of the new NIST-built standard resistors, provided a check of the scaling between the two laboratories, supported measurements to reestablish NIST calibration services at 10 T{Omega} and 100 T{Omega}, and demonstrated the possibility of establishing a NIST high resistance measurement assurance program (MAP). The comparison has demonstrated agreement on the order of 0.07% which is within the expanded uncertainties (coverage factor = 2) of NIST and Sandia at 1 T{Omega} and 10 T{Omega}.

  8. Detection of Thermal 2 cm and 1 cm Formaldehyde Emission in NGC 7538

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Liang; Araya, E. D.; Hofner, P.; Kurtz, S.; Pihlstrom, Y.

    2011-05-01

    Formaldehyde is a tracer of high density gas in massive star forming regions. The K-doublet lines from the three lowest rotational energy levels of ortho-formaldehyde correspond to wavelengths of 6, 2 and 1 cm. Thermal emission of these transitions is rare, and maser emission has only been detected in the 6 cm line. NGC 7538 is an active site of massive star formation in the Galaxy, and one of only a few regions known to harbor 6 cm formaldehyde (H2CO) masers. Using the NRAO 100 m Green Bank Telescope (GBT), we detected 2 cm H2CO emission toward NGC 7538 IRS1. The velocity of the 2 cm H2CO line is very similar to the velocity of one of the 6 cm H2CO masers but the linewidth is greater. To investigate the nature of the 2 cm emission, we conducted observations of the 1 cm H2CO transition, and obtained a cross-scan map of the 2 cm line. We detected 1 cm emission and found that the 2 cm emission is extended (greater than 30"), which implies brightness temperatures of ˜0.2 K. Assuming optically thin emission, LTE, and that the 1 cm and 2 cm lines originate from the same volume of gas, both these detections are consistent with thermal emission of gas at ˜30 K. We conclude that the 1 cm and 2 cm H2CO lines detected with the GBT are thermal, which implies molecular densities above ˜105 cm-3. LY acknowledges support from WIU. PH acknowledges partial support from NSF grant AST-0908901.

  9. Effect of a diet enriched with omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids on the pig liver transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Szostak, Agnieszka; Ogłuszka, Magdalena; Te Pas, Marinus F W; Poławska, Ewa; Urbański, Paweł; Juszczuk-Kubiak, Edyta; Blicharski, Tadeusz; Pareek, Chandra Shekhar; Dunkelberger, Jenelle R; Horbańczuk, Jarosław O; Pierzchała, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    The optimal ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is important for keeping the homeostasis of biological processes and metabolism, yet the underlying biological mechanism is poorly understood. The objective of this study was to identify changes in the pig liver transcriptome induced by a diet enriched with omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids and to characterize the biological mechanisms related to PUFA metabolism. Polish Landrace pigs (n = 12) were fed diet enriched with linoleic acid (LA, omega-6) and α-linolenic acid (ALA, omega-3) or standard diet as a control. The fatty acid profiling was assayed in order to verify how feeding influenced the fatty acid content in the liver, and subsequently next-generation sequencing (NGS) was used to identify differentially expressed genes (DEG) between transcriptomes between dietary groups. The biological mechanisms and pathway interaction networks were identified using DAVID and Cytoscape tools. Fatty acid profile analysis indicated a higher contribution of PUFAs in the liver for LA- and ALA-enriched diet group, particularly for the omega-3 fatty acid family, but not omega-6. Next-generation sequencing identified 3565 DEG, 1484 of which were induced and 2081 were suppressed by PUFA supplementation. A low ratio of omega-6/omega-3 fatty acids resulted in the modulation of fatty acid metabolism pathways and over-representation of genes involved in energy metabolism, signal transduction, and immune response pathways. In conclusion, a diet enriched with omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids altered the transcriptomic profile of the pig liver and would influence animal health status.

  10. Probing lepton asymmetry with 21 cm fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Kohri, Kazunori; Oyama, Yoshihiko; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: oyamayo@post.kek.jp E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the issue of how accurately we can constrain the lepton number asymmetry ξ{sub ν}=μ{sub ν}/T{sub ν} in the Universe by using future observations of 21 cm line fluctuations and cosmic microwave background (CMB). We find that combinations of the 21 cm line and the CMB observations can constrain the lepton asymmetry better than big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). Additionally, we also discuss constraints on ξ{sub ν} in the presence of some extra radiation, and show that the 21 cm line observations can substantially improve the constraints obtained by CMB alone, and allow us to distinguish the effects of the lepton asymmetry from the ones of extra radiation.

  11. Effect of dietary intake of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids on severity of asthma in children.

    PubMed

    Hodge, L; Salome, C M; Hughes, J M; Liu-Brennan, D; Rimmer, J; Allman, M; Pang, D; Armour, C; Woolcock, A J

    1998-02-01

    We assessed the clinical and biochemical effects in asthmatic children of fish oil supplementation and a diet that increases omega-3 and reduces omega-6 fatty acids. Thirty nine asthmatic children aged 8-12 yrs participated in a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial for 6 months during which they received fish oil capsules plus canola oil and margarine (omega-3 group) or safflower oil capsules plus sunflower oil and margarine (omega-6 group). Plasma fatty acids, stimulated tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) production, circulating eosinophil numbers and lung function were measured at baseline and after 3 and 6 months of dietary modification. Day and night symptoms, peak flow rates and medication use were recorded for 1 week prior to laboratory visits. Plasma phospholipid omega-3 fatty acids were significantly greater in the omega-3 group at 3 and 6 months compared to the omega-6 group (p<0.001). In the omega-3 group TNFalpha production fell significantly compared with baseline (p=0.026), but the magnitude of change between groups did not reach significance (p=0.075). There were no significant changes in clinical outcome measures. Dietary enrichment of omega-3 fatty acids over 6 months increased plasma levels of these fatty acids, reduced stimulated tumour necrosis factor alpha production, but had no effect on the clinical severity of asthma in these children.

  12. The role of the tissue omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio in regulating tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jing X; Liu, Angela

    2013-06-01

    Angiogenesis is a necessary step in tumor growth and metastasis. It is well established that the metabolites of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids, which must be obtained through the diet and cannot be synthesized de novo in mammals, have differential effects on cellular processes. Omega-6 fatty acid (n-6 FA)-derived metabolites promote angiogenesis by increasing growth factor expression whereas omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FA) have anti-angiogenic and antitumor properties. However, most studies thus far have failed to account for the role of the n-6 FA/n-3 FA ratio in angiogenesis and instead examined the absolute levels of n-6 and n-3 FA. This review highlights the biochemical interactions between n-6 and n-3 FA and focuses on how the n-6/n-3 FA ratio in tissues modulates tumor angiogenesis. We suggest that future work should consider the n-6/n-3 FA ratio to be a key element in experimental design and analysis. Furthermore, we recommend that clinical interventions should aim to both reduce n-6 metabolites and simultaneously increase n-3 FA intake.

  13. Observation of {chi}{sub c1} Decays into Vector Meson Pairs {phi}{phi}, {omega}{omega}, and {omega}{phi}

    SciTech Connect

    Ablikim, M.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Berger, N.; Bian, J. M.; Cai, X.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, X. X.; Chang, J. F.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, Y. P.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Deng, Z. Y.; Dong, L. Y.

    2011-08-26

    Using (106{+-}4)x10{sup 6} {psi}(3686) events accumulated with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, we present the first measurement of decays of {chi}{sub c1} to vector meson pairs {phi}{phi}, {omega}{omega}, and {omega}{phi}. The branching fractions are measured to be (4.4{+-}0.3{+-}0.5)x10{sup -4}, (6.0{+-}0.3{+-}0.7)x10{sup -4}, and (2.2{+-}0.6{+-}0.2)x10{sup -5}, for {chi}{sub c1}{yields}{phi}{phi}, {omega}{omega}, and {omega}{phi}, respectively, which indicates that the hadron helicity selection rule is significantly violated in {chi}{sub cJ} decays. In addition, the measurement of {chi}{sub cJ}{yields}{omega}{phi} provides the first indication of the rate of doubly OZI-suppressed {chi}{sub cJ} decay. Finally, we present improved measurements for the branching fractions of {chi}{sub c0} and {chi}{sub c2} to vector meson pairs.

  14. 21 CM searches for DIM galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disney, Mike; Banks, Gareth

    1997-04-01

    We review very strong selection effects which operate against the detection of dim (i.e. low surface brightness) galaxies. The Parkes multibeam instrument offers a wonderful opportunity to turn up new populations of such galaxies. However, to explore the newly accessible parameter space, it will be necessary to survey both a very deep patch (105 s/pointing, limiting N hi ˜ 1018 cm-2) and a deep patch (104 s/pointing, limiting N hi ˜ 3 × 1018 cm-2) in carefully selected areas, and we outline the case to do this.

  15. A novel lead compound CM-118

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lanfang; Shu, Mengjun; Chen, Yaqing; Yang, Dexiao; He, Qun; Zhao, Hui; Feng, Zhiyong; Liang, Chris; Yu, Ker

    2014-01-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and the c-Met receptor tyrosine kinase play essential roles in the pathogenesis in multiple human cancers and present emerging targets for cancer treatment. Here, we describe CM-118, a novel lead compound displaying low nanomolar biochemical potency against both ALK and c-Met with selectivity over >90 human kinases. CM-118 potently abrogated hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-induced c-Met phosphorylation and cell migration, phosphorylation of ALK, EML4-ALK, and ALK resistance mutants in transfected cells. CM-118 inhibited proliferation and/or induced apoptosis in multiple c-Met- and ALK-addicted cancer lines with dose response profile correlating target blockade. We show that the CM-118-induced apoptosis in c-Met-amplified H1993 NSCLC cells involved a rapid suppression of c-Met activity and c-Met-to-EGFR cross-talk, and was profoundly potentiated by EGFR inhibitors as shown by the increased levels of apoptotic proteins cleaved-PARP and Bim as well as reduction of the survival protein Mcl-1. Bim-knockdown or Mcl-1 overexpression each significantly attenuated apoptosis. We also revealed a key role by mTOR in mediating CM-118 action against the EML4-ALK-dependent NSCLC cells. Abrogation of EML4-ALK in H2228 cells profoundly reduced signaling capacity of the rapamycin-sensitive mTOR pathway leading to G1 cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial hyperpolarization, a metabolic perturbation linked to mTOR inhibition. Depletion of mTOR or mTORC1 inhibited H2228 cell growth, and mTOR inhibitors potentiated CM-118’s antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Oral administration of CM-118 at a wide range of well tolerated dosages diminished c-Met- and ALK phosphorylation in vivo, and caused tumor regression or growth inhibition in multiple c-Met- and ALK-dependent tumor xenografts in mice. CM-118 exhibits favorable pharmacokinetic and drug metabolism properties hence presents a candidate for clinical evaluation. PMID:24618813

  16. A Propensity for n-omega-Amino Acids in Thermally-Altered Antarctic Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Aaron S.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Martin, Mildred G.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Johnson, Natasha M.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2012-01-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites are known to contain a wealth of indigenous organic molecules, including amino acids, which suggests that these meteorites could have been an important source of prebiotic organic material during the origins of life on Earth and possibly elsewhere. We report the detection of extraterrestrial amino acids in thermally-altered type 3 CV and CO carbonaceous chondrites and ureilites recovered from Antarctica. The amino acid concentrations of the thirteen Antarctic meteorites were generally less abundant than in more amino acid-rich CI, CM, and CR carbonaceous chondrites that experienced much lower temperature aqueous alteration on their parent bodies. In contrast to low-temperature aqueously-altered meteorites that show complete structural diversity in amino acids formed predominantly by Strecker-cyanohydrin synthesis, the thermally-altered meteorites studied here are dominated by small, straight-chain, amine terminal (n-omega-amino) amino acids that are not consistent with Strecker formation. The carbon isotopic ratios of two extraterrestrial n-omega-amino acids measured in one of the CV chondrites are consistent with C-13-depletions observed previously in hydrocarbons produced by Fischer-Tropsch type reactions. The predominance of n-omega-amino acid isomers in thermally-altered meteorites hints at cosmochemical mechanisms for the preferential formation and preservation of a small subset of the possible amino acids.

  17. OmegaCAM: The VST Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappellarao, E.

    2005-06-01

    OmegaCAM is the large-format CCD pixels imaging camera that has been designed to exploit the square degree field of view of the VST while sampling the excellent seeing of Paranal (Kuijken et al. 2002, The Messenger 110, 15). The instrument is built by a consortium which comprises institutes in the Netherlands, Germany and Italy, and is headed by PI Konrad Kuijken (Groningen and Leiden University) with co-PI's Ralf Bender (Munich USM/MPE) and Enrico Cappellaro (INAF Naples), and project management by Bernhard Muschielok and Reinhold Häfner (USM). The Optical Detector Team at ESO has designed and built the detector system.

  18. North Atlantic OMEGA Navigation System Validation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-21

    Coordinates 7-18 7-7 Aeroflot Flight Zone OMEGA Accuracies vs DME or DME /VOR Coordinates 7-18 7-8 Alabama Getty Measurements 7-20 7-9 British Respect...navigation equipment on board the aircraft during the tests consisted of TAC.N VOR/ DME , sextant and a driftmeter. The majority of flight hours were...measurement of two (2) distances from DME , or azimuth and distance for VOR/ DME with distances from the radio beacons of not more than 40 KM. During the

  19. Gamma bang time analysis at OMEGA.

    PubMed

    McEvoy, A M; Herrmann, H W; Horsfield, C J; Young, C S; Miller, E K; Mack, J M; Kim, Y; Stoeffl, W; Rubery, M; Evans, S; Sedillo, T; Ali, Z A

    2010-10-01

    Absolute bang time measurements with the gas Cherenkov detector (GCD) and gamma reaction history (GRH) diagnostic have been performed to high precision at the OMEGA laser facility at the University of Rochester with bang time values for the two diagnostics agreeing to within 5 ps on average. X-ray timing measurements of laser-target coupling were used to calibrate a facility-generated laser timing fiducial with rms spreads in the measured coupling times of 9 ps for both GCD and GRH. Increased fusion yields at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will allow for improved measurement precision with the GRH easily exceeding NIF system design requirements.

  20. [Cutaneous Melanoma (CM): Current Diagnosis and Treatment].

    PubMed

    Gallegos Hernández, José Francisco; Nieweg, Omgo E

    2014-12-01

    Cutaneous melanoma (CM) is the third most common cancer of the skin, but it is the neoplasia with the greatest impact on mortality. Its etiology is multifactorial and it has been reported that its prevalence has increased in the last two decades. In Mexico, CM ranks seventh in frequency among all malignancies and 80% of cases are in locally advanced stages. The prognosis depends on the stage. The prognostic factors with greatest impact in survival are nodal status, tumor thickness or Breslow depth, ulceration, and in thin melanomas (< 1 mm thickness, without ulceration and Clarck level III), the mitotic index. The diagnostic approach is of great importance to achieve adequate treatment. Adherence to global guidelines of treatment allows us to obtain the best rates of locoregional control, which is the first target to be achieved in patients with CM. The goal of this manuscript is to provide a synthesis of the most important aspects in the diagnosis and treatment of CM, based on current evidence obtained in the literature.

  1. Neutron Resonance Parameters for Cm-242 (Curium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Volume 24 `Neutron Resonance Parameters' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It provides the neutron resonance parameters for the isotope Cm-242 (Curium).

  2. Anomalous RR Lyrae stars(?): CM Leonis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Fabrizio, L.; Clementini, G.; Marconi, M.; Carretta, E.; Ivans, I. I.; Bragaglia, A.; Di Tomaso, S.; Merighi, R.; Smith, H. A.; Sneden, C.; Tosi, M.

    2002-11-01

    Time-series of B, V, I CCD photometry and radial velocity measurements from high-resolution spectroscopy (R= 30 000) covering the full pulsation cycle are presented for the field RR Lyrae star CM Leonis. The photometric data span a 6-yr interval from 1994 to 1999, and allow us to firmly establish the pulsation mode and periodicity of the variable. The derived period P= 0.361 699 d (+/-0.000001) is very close to the value published in the Fourth Edition of the General Catalogue of Variable Stars (P= 0.361 732 d). However, contrary to what was previously found, the amplitude and shape of the light curve qualify CM Leo as a very regular first overtone pulsator with a prominent hump on the rising branch of its multicolour light curves. According to an abundace analysis performed on three spectra taken near minimum light (0.42 < φ < 0.61), CM Leo is a metal-poor star with metal abundance [Fe/H]=-1.93 +/- 0.20. The photometric and radial velocity curves of CM Leo have been compared with the predictions of suitable pulsational models to infer tight constraints on the stellar mass, effective temperature, and distance modulus of the star. We derive a true distance modulus of CM Leo of μ0= 13.11 +/- 0.02 mag and a corresponding absolute magnitude of MV= 0.47 +/- 0.04. This absolute magnitude, once corrected for evolutionary and metallicity effects, leads to a true distance modulus of the Large Magellanic Cloud of μ0= 18.43 +/- 0.06 mag, in better agreement with the long astronomical distance scale.

  3. Towards the 1-cm SARAL orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelensky, Nikita P.; Lemoine, Frank G.; Chinn, Douglas S.; Beckley, Brian D.; Bordyugov, Oleg; Yang, Xu; Wimert, Jesse; Pavlis, Despina

    2016-12-01

    We have investigated the quality of precise orbits for the SARAL altimeter satellite using Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) data from March 14, 2013 to August 10, 2014. We have identified a 4.31 ± 0.14 cm error in the Z (cross-track) direction that defines the center-of-mass of the SARAL satellite in the spacecraft coordinate system, and we have tuned the SLR and DORIS tracking point offsets. After these changes, we reduce the average RMS of the SLR residuals for seven-day arcs from 1.85 to 1.38 cm. We tuned the non-conservative force model for SARAL, reducing the amplitude of the daily adjusted empirical accelerations by eight percent. We find that the best dynamic orbits show altimeter crossover residuals of 5.524 cm over cycles 7-15. Our analysis offers a unique illustration that high-elevation SLR residuals will not necessarily provide an accurate estimate of radial error at the 1-cm level, and that other supporting orbit tests are necessary for a better estimate. Through the application of improved models for handling time-variable gravity, the use of reduced-dynamic orbits, and through an arc-by-arc estimation of the C22 and S22 coefficients, we find from analysis of independent SLR residuals and other tests that we achieve 1.1-1.2 cm radial orbit accuracies for SARAL. The limiting errors stem from the inadequacy of the DPOD2008 and SLRF2008 station complements, and inadequacies in radiation force modeling, especially with respect to spacecraft self-shadowing and modeling of thermal variations due to eclipses.

  4. Particle-number conserving analysis of rotational bands in {sup 247,249}Cm and {sup 249}Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zhenhua; Zeng Jinyan; Zhao Enguang; Zhou Shangui

    2011-01-15

    The recently observed high-spin rotational bands in odd-A nuclei {sup 247,249}Cm and {sup 249}Cf[Tandel et al., Phys. Rev. C 82, 041301(R) (2010)] are investigated by using the cranked-shell model (CSM) with the pairing correlations treated by a particle-number conserving (PNC) method in which the blocking effects are taken into account exactly. The experimental moments of inertia and alignments and their variations with the rotational frequency {omega} are reproduced very well by the PNC-CSM calculations. By examining the {omega} dependence of the occupation probability of each cranked Nilsson orbital near the Fermi surface and the contributions of valence orbitals to the angular momentum alignment in each major shell, the level crossing and upbending mechanism in each nucleus is understood clearly.

  5. Interaction between omega 3 PUFA and UVB radiation: Photoprotective effect in normal and tumoral murine melanocytes?

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Renata Ottes; Bustos, Silvina Odete; Gonzalez, Juliana Ramos; Soares, Camila Wink; Barbosa, Makely Daiane; Chammas, Roger; Votto, Ana Paula de Souza; Trindade, Gilma Santos

    2016-11-01

    Omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega 3 PUFA) are attracting a growing interest as potential adjuvants for cancer prevention and treatment. There is evidence about photoprotection in normal cells, but few previous studies have evaluated it in tumoral cells. Therefore, this study investigated the effect of α-linolenic acid (ALA) in normal murine melanocytic cells (Melan-a) and in tumoral murine melanocytic cells (B16F10) exposed to UVB radiation. Our results showed that ALA exhibited an antiproliferative effect in B16F10 cells, and had minimal effect in Melan-a cells, as demonstrated by MTT assay. On the other hand, the combination of ALA (7.5μM) and UVB (0.01J/cm(2)) showed a protective effect for both cell lines, Melan-a and B16F10. ALA and UVB combined or UVB alone induced an accumulation of cell lines at the S/G2/M phase. In addition, the combination of ALA and UVB, and UVB alone, both induced cell death in 24h; and in 48h, ALA attenuated this effect in both cells. Further to these findings, it was demonstrated that ALA did not alter ROS levels in both cells exposed to UVB radiation. The effect of an omega 6 PUFA, linoleic acid, under the same conditions of ALA were tested. It was not protective in either cell line. Therefore, our results can be very important since it was shown another role to an omega 3 PUFA as a photoprotective agent in a melanoma cell.

  6. Selected bibliography of OMEGA, VLF and LF techniques applied to aircraft navigation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A bibliography is presented which includes references to the OMEGA navigation system, very low frequencies, time-frequency measurements, air traffic control, radio navigation, and applications of OMEGA.

  7. Prenatal omega-3 fatty acids: review and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Robin G

    2010-01-01

    The influence of dietary omega-3 fatty acids on health outcomes is widely recognized. The adequate intake of omega-3 fatty acids docasahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in particular can increase gestation length and improve infant cognitive and visual performance. Adequate levels of omega-3 fatty acids have also been shown to reduce the incidence of preterm birth in some populations. Research on prenatal omega-3 intake and other outcomes, such as preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction, is inconclusive. Women in the United States consume low levels of omega-3 fatty acids compared to omega-6 fatty acids; this dietary pattern is associated with poor health outcomes. Omega-3 fatty acids are found primarily in fish, yet many pregnant women avoid fish because of concerns about potential mercury and polychlorinated biphenyl contamination. It is important for prenatal care providers to assess women's diets for omega-3 fatty acid intake and ensure that pregnant women are consuming between 200 and 300 mg daily from safe food sources. Purified fish, algal oil supplements, and DHA-enriched eggs are alternative sources for pregnant women who do not eat fish.

  8. A proposed microcomputer implementation of an Omega navigation processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    A microprocessor navigation systems using the Omega process is discussed. Several methods for correcting incoming sky waves are presented along with the hardware design which depends on a microcomputer. The control program is discussed, and block diagrams of the Omega processor and interface systems are presented.

  9. Cloning and characterization of a novel feline IFN-omega.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Min; Xue, Qing-Hua; Sun, Lei; Zhu, Yi-Ping; Liu, Wen-Jun

    2007-02-01

    The interferons (IFNs) are a large family of multifunctional secreted protein involved in antiviral defense, cell growth regulation, and immune activation. The human IFNs are used worldwide as antiviral drugs. Here, we present cDNAs encoding 13 novel feline IFN-omega (FeIFN-omega) subtypes that share 95%-99% amino acid sequence identity. FeIFN-omega2 and FeIFN-omega4 have seven additional amino acids at position 109 that are not present in other subtypes. Sequence identity of the present FeIFN proteins encoded by the 13 subtypes is approximately 57% compared with human IFN-omega (HuIFN-omega). All 13 FeIFN-omega subtypes were expressed in Escherichia coli using a periplasmic expression system. The antiviral activity of each product was evaluated in vitro. In addition, subtype FeIFN-omega2 was cytoplasm expressed in E. coli and secretion expressed in Pichia pastoris. The purified mature recombinant protein demonstrated significant antiviral activity on both homologous and heterologous animal cells in vitro.

  10. Advanced-Ignition-Concept Exploration on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Theobald, W; Anderson, K S; Betti, R; Craxton, R S; Delettrez, J A; Frenje, J A; Glebov, V Yu; Gotchev, O V; Kelly, J H; Li, C K; Mackinnon, A J; Marshall, F J; McCrory, R L; Meyerhofer, D D; Myatt, J F; Norreys, P A; Nilson, P M; Patel, P K; Petrasso, R D; Radha, P B; Ren, C; Sangster, T C; Seka, W; Smalyuk, V A; Solodov, A A; Stephens, R B; Stoeckl, C; Yaakobi, B

    2009-11-24

    Advanced ignition concepts, such as fast ignition and shock ignition, are being investigated at the Omega Laser Facility. Integrated fast-ignition experiments with room-temperature re-entrant cone targets have begun, using 18 kJ of 351 nm drive energy to implode empty 40μm thick CD shells, followed by 1.0 kJ of 1053 nm wavelength, short-pulse energy. Short pulses of 10 ps width have irradiated the inside of a hollow gold re-entrant cone at the time of peak compression. A threefold increase in the time-integrated, 2 to 7 keV x-ray emission was observed with x-ray pinhole cameras, indicating that energy is coupled from the short-pulse laser into the core by fast electrons. In shock-ignition experiments, spherical plastic-shell targets were compressed to high areal densities on a low adiabat, and a strong shock wave was sent into the converging, compressed capsule. In one experiment, 60 beams were used with an intensity spike at the end of the laser pulse, and the implosion performance was studied through neutron-yield and areal-density measurements. In a second experiment, the 60 OMEGA beams were split into a 40+20 configuration, with 40 low-intensity beams used for fuel assembly and 20 delayed beams with a short, high-intensity pulse shape (up to 1×1016 Wcm^-2) for shock generation.

  11. Advanced-Ignition-Concept Exploration on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Theobald, W; Anderson, K S; Betti, R; Craxton, R S; Delettrez, J A; Frenje, J A; Glebov, V Yu; Gotchev, O V; Kelly, J H; Li, C K; Mackinnon, A J; Marshall, F J; McCrory, R L; Meyerhofer, D D; Myatt, J F; Norreys, P A; Nilson, P M; Patel, P K; Petrasso, R D; Radha, P B; Ren, C; Sangster, T C; Seka, W; Smalyuk, V A; Solodov, A A; Stephens, R B; Stoeckl, C; Yaakobi, B

    2009-11-24

    Advanced ignition concepts, such as fast ignition and shock ignition, are being investigated at the Omega Laser Facility. Integrated fast-ignition experiments with room-temperature re-entrant cone targets have begun, using 18 kJ of 351 nm drive energy to implode empty 40μm thick CD shells, followed by 1.0 kJ of 1053 nm wavelength, short-pulse energy. Short pulses of 10 ps width have irradiated the inside of a hollow gold re-entrant cone at the time of peak compression. A threefold increase in the time-integrated, 2 to 7 keV x-ray emission was observed with x-ray pinhole cameras, indicating that energy is coupled from the short-pulse laser into the core by fast electrons. In shock-ignition experiments, spherical plastic-shell targets were compressed to high areal densities on a low adiabat, and a strong shock wave was sent into the converging, compressed capsule. In one experiment, 60 beams were used with an intensity spike at the end of the laser pulse, and the implosion performance was studied through neutron-yield and areal-density measurements. In a second experiment, the 60 OMEGA beams were split into a 40+20 configuration, with 40 low-intensity beams used for fuel assembly and 20 delayed beams with a short, high-intensity pulse shape (up to 1×1016 Wcm-2) for shock generation.

  12. Measurements of Output Factors For Small Photon Fields Up to 10 cm x 10 cm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacala, Angelina

    Field output factors (OF) for photon beams from a 6 MV medical accelerator were measured using five different detectors in a scanning water phantom. The measurements were taken for square field sizes of integral widths ranging from 1 cm to 10 cm for two reference source-to-surface distances (SSD) and depths in water. For the diode detectors, square field widths as small as 2.5 mm were also studied. The photon beams were collimated by using either the jaws or the multileaf collimators. Measured OFs are found to depend upon the field size, SSD, depth and also upon the type of beam collimation, size and type of detector used. For field sizes larger than 3 cm x 3 cm, the OF measurements agree to within 1% or less. The largest variation in OF occurs for jawsshaped field of size 1 cm x 1cm, where a difference of more than 18% is observed.

  13. Interpreting Sky-Averaged 21-cm Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirocha, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    Within the first ~billion years after the Big Bang, the intergalactic medium (IGM) underwent a remarkable transformation, from a uniform sea of cold neutral hydrogen gas to a fully ionized, metal-enriched plasma. Three milestones during this epoch of reionization -- the emergence of the first stars, black holes (BHs), and full-fledged galaxies -- are expected to manifest themselves as extrema in sky-averaged ("global") measurements of the redshifted 21-cm background. However, interpreting these measurements will be complicated by the presence of strong foregrounds and non-trivialities in the radiative transfer (RT) modeling required to make robust predictions.I have developed numerical models that efficiently solve the frequency-dependent radiative transfer equation, which has led to two advances in studies of the global 21-cm signal. First, frequency-dependent solutions facilitate studies of how the global 21-cm signal may be used to constrain the detailed spectral properties of the first stars, BHs, and galaxies, rather than just the timing of their formation. And second, the speed of these calculations allows one to search vast expanses of a currently unconstrained parameter space, while simultaneously characterizing the degeneracies between parameters of interest. I find principally that (1) physical properties of the IGM, such as its temperature and ionization state, can be constrained robustly from observations of the global 21-cm signal without invoking models for the astrophysical sources themselves, (2) translating IGM properties to galaxy properties is challenging, in large part due to frequency-dependent effects. For instance, evolution in the characteristic spectrum of accreting BHs can modify the 21-cm absorption signal at levels accessible to first generation instruments, but could easily be confused with evolution in the X-ray luminosity star-formation rate relation. Finally, (3) the independent constraints most likely to aide in the interpretation

  14. Omega-3 fatty acids in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Marlene P

    2009-01-01

    Patients with major depressive disorder have high rates of cardiovascular disease and other medical comorbidity. Omega-3 fatty acids, particularly those found in fish and seafood, have cardiovascular health benefits and may play an adjunctive role in the treatment of mood disorders. However, existing studies on omega-3 fatty acids in depression have limitations such as small sample sizes and a wide variance in study design, and results regarding efficacy are mixed. The preponderance of data from placebo-controlled treatment studies suggests that omega-3 fatty acids are a reasonable augmentation strategy for the treatment of major depressive disorder. More research is necessary before omega-3 supplements can be recommended as monotherapy for the treatment of depression. For many individuals with major depressive disorder, augmentation with omega-3 fatty acids should be considered, as general health benefits are well established and adjunctive use is low risk.

  15. Observation of in-medium modifications of the omega meson.

    PubMed

    Trnka, D; Anton, G; Bacelar, J C S; Bartholomy, O; Bayadilov, D; Beloglazov, Y A; Bogendörfer, R; Castelijns, R; Crede, V; Dutz, H; Ehmanns, A; Elsner, D; Ewald, R; Fabry, I; Fuchs, M; Essig, K; Funke, Ch; Gothe, R; Gregor, R; Gridnev, A B; Gutz, E; Höffgen, S; Hoffmeister, P; Horn, I; Hössl, J; Jaegle, I; Junkersfeld, J; Kalinowsky, H; Klein, Frank; Klein, Fritz; Klempt, E; Konrad, M; Kopf, B; Kotulla, M; Krusche, B; Langheinrich, J; Löhner, H; Lopatin, I V; Lotz, J; Lugert, S; Menze, D; Messchendorp, J G; Mertens, T; Metag, V; Morales, C; Nanova, M; Novotny, R; Ostrick, M; Pant, L M; van Pee, H; Pfeiffer, M; Roy, A; Radkov, A; Schadmand, S; Schmidt, Ch; Schmieden, H; Schoch, B; Shende, S; Suft, G; Sumachev, V V; Szczepanek, T; Süle, A; Thoma, U; Varma, R; Walther, D; Weinheimer, Ch; Wendel, Ch

    2005-05-20

    The photoproduction of omega mesons on nuclei has been investigated using the Crystal Barrel/TAPS experiment at the ELSA tagged photon facility in Bonn. The aim is to study possible in-medium modifications of the omega meson via the reaction gamma + A --> omega + X --> pi(0)gamma + X('). Results obtained for Nb are compared to a reference measurement on a LH2 target. While for recoiling, long-lived mesons (pi(0), eta, and eta;(')), which decay outside of the nucleus, a difference in the line shape for the two data samples is not observed, we find a significant enhancement towards lower masses for omega mesons produced on the Nb target. For momenta less than 500 MeV/c an in-medium omega meson mass of M(medium) = [722(+4)(-4)(stat)+35-5(syst)] MeV/c(2) has been deduced at an estimated average nuclear density of 0.6rho(0).

  16. Electromagnetic Tunneling and Resonances in Pseudochiral Omega Slabs

    PubMed Central

    Razzaz, Faroq; Alkanhal, Majeed A. S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents theoretical investigation of the electromagnetic wave tunneling and anomalous transmission around the trapped modes in a pseudochiral omega slab. The dispersion relation, the conditions of the trapped modes, and the evanescent wave coupling and tunneling in two different reciprocal pseudochiral omega slab structures are derived. The Berreman’s matrix method is applied to obtain the transmission coefficients across the pseudochiral omega slab. When the structure is perturbed, a resonance phenomenon is detected around the trapped modes. This resonance results in transmission anomalies (total transmission and total reflection) and dramatic field amplifications around the trapped modes. The number of the discrete trapped modes and then the resonance frequencies are prescribed by the parameters of the pseudochiral omega slab such as the value of the omega parameter and its orientation and the slab thickness. PMID:28165058

  17. Bioavailability of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Schuchardt, Jan Philipp; Hahn, Andreas

    2013-07-01

    Supplements have reached a prominent role in improving the supply of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, such as Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA 20:5n-3) and Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA 22:6n-3). Similar to other nutrients, the availability of omega-3 fatty acids is highly variable and determined by numerous factors. However, the question of omega-3 fatty acids bioavailability has long been disregarded, which may have contributed to the neutral or negative results concerning their effects in several studies. This review provides an overview of the influence of chemical binding form (free fatty acids bound in ethylesters, triacylglycerides or phospholipids), matrix effects (capsule ingestion with concomitant intake of food, fat content in food) or galenic form (i.e. microencapsulation, emulsification) on the bioavailability of omega-3 fatty acids. There is a need to systematically investigate the bioavailability of omega-3 fatty acids formulations, which might be a key to designing more effective studies in the future.

  18. Data Simulation for 21 cm Cosmology Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pober, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    21 cm cosmologists seek a measurement of the hyperfine line of neutral hydrogen from very high redshifts. While this signal has the potential to provide an unprecedented view into the early universe, it is also buried under exceedingly bright foreground emission. Over the last several years, 21 cm cosmology research has led to an improved understanding of how low frequency radio interferometers will affect the separation of cosmological signal from foregrounds. This talk will describe new efforts to incorporate this understanding into simulations of the most realistic data sets for the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER), the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), and the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA). These high fidelity simulations are essential for robust algorithm design and validation of early results from these experiments.

  19. Extended Performance 8-cm Mercury Ion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantenieks, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    A slightly modified 8-cm Hg ion thruster demonstrated significant increase in performance. Thrust was increased by almost a factor of five over that of the baseline thruster. Thruster operation with various three grid ion optics configurations; thruster performance as a function of accelerator grid open area, cathode baffle, and cathode orifice size; and a life test of 614 hours at a beam current of 250 mA (17.5 mN thrust) are discussed. Highest thruster efficiency was obtained with the smallest open area accelerator grid. The benefits in efficiency from the low neutral loss grids were mitigated, however, by the limitation such grids place on attainable ion beam current densities. The thruster components suffered negligible weight losses during a life test, which indicated that operation of the 8-cm thruster at extended levels of thrust and power is possible with no significant loss of lifetime.

  20. Omega-6 to Omega-3 Fatty Acid Ratio in Patients with ADHD: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    LaChance, Laura; McKenzie, Kwame; Taylor, Valerie H.; Vigod, Simone N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids have been shown to be deficient in individuals with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder compared to controls (Hawkey & Nigg, 2014). Clinical trials of omega-3 and omega-6 supplements as treatment for ADHD have demonstrated minimal efficacy (Bloch & Qawasmi, 2011; Gillies, Sinn, Lad, Leach, & Ross, 2011; Hawkey & Nigg, 2014; Puri & Martins, 2014; Sonuga-Barke et al., 2013). Existing trials have analyzed omega-3 and omega-6 separately although the tissue ratio of these fatty acids (n6/n3) may be more important than absolute levels of either. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between blood n6/n3 and arachidonic acid to eicosapentaenoic acid (AA/EPA), to ADHD symptoms. Method: A systematic literature review identified original articles measuring blood n6/n3 or AA/EPA ratio in children and youth with ADHD, compared to controls without ADHD. Three databases were searched. Blood n6/n3, and AA/EPA ratios were compared between individuals with ADHD and controls. Results were pooled across studies using quantitative synthesis. Results: Five articles met inclusion criteria for the meta-analysis. The pooled mean difference between patients with ADHD and controls was 1.97 (0.90–3.04) for n6/n3 (n=5 studies, I2 83%) and 8.25 (5.94–10.56) for AA/EPA (n=3 studies, I2 0%). Conclusions: Children and youth with ADHD have elevated ratios of both blood n6/n3 and AA/EPA fatty acids compared to controls. Thus an elevated n6/n3, and more specifically AA/EPA, ratio may represent the underlying disturbance in essential fatty acid levels in patients with ADHD. These findings have implications for the development of future interventions using essential fatty acids to treat ADHD, and for the use of these ratios as biomarkers for titrating and monitoring ADHD treatment with essential fatty acids. PMID:27274744

  1. 15 cm multipole gas ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaacson, G. C.; Kaufman, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    A 15-cm multipole thruster was operated on argon and xenon. The multipole approach used has been shown capable of low discharge losses and flat ion beam profiles with a minimum of redesign. This approach employs low magnetic field strengths and flat or cylindrical sheet-metal parts, hence is suited to rapid optimization and scaling. Only refractory metal cathodes were used in this investigation.

  2. Mapmaking for precision 21 cm cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, Joshua S.; Tegmark, Max; Liu, Adrian; Ewall-Wice, Aaron; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; Morales, Miguel F.; Neben, Abraham R.; Parsons, Aaron R.; Zheng, Haoxuan

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the "Cosmic Dawn" and the Epoch of Reionization with 21 cm tomography, we need to statistically separate the cosmological signal from foregrounds known to be orders of magnitude brighter. Over the last few years, we have learned much about the role our telescopes play in creating a putatively foreground-free region called the "EoR window." In this work, we examine how an interferometer's effects can be taken into account in a way that allows for the rigorous estimation of 21 cm power spectra from interferometric maps while mitigating foreground contamination and thus increasing sensitivity. This requires a precise understanding of the statistical relationship between the maps we make and the underlying true sky. While some of these calculations would be computationally infeasible if performed exactly, we explore several well-controlled approximations that make mapmaking and the calculation of map statistics much faster, especially for compact and highly redundant interferometers designed specifically for 21 cm cosmology. We demonstrate the utility of these methods and the parametrized trade-offs between accuracy and speed using one such telescope, the upcoming Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array, as a case study.

  3. Polyhedral Serpentine Grains in CM Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zega, Thomas J.; Garvie, Laurence A. J.; Dodony, Istvan; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2005-01-01

    CM chondrites are primitive rocks that experienced aqueous alteration in the early solar system. Their matrices and fine-grained rims (FGRs) sustained the effects of alteration, and the minerals within them hold clues to the aqueous reactions. Sheet silicates are an important product of alteration, and those of the serpentine group are abundant in the CM2 chondrites. Here we expand on our previous efforts to characterize the structure and chemistry of serpentines in CM chondrites and report results on a polyhedral form that is structurally similar to polygonal serpentine. Polygonal serpentine consists of tetrahedral (T) sheets joined to M(2+)-centered octahedral (O) sheets (where (M2+) is primarily Mg(2+) and Fe(2+)), which give rise to a 1:1 (TO) layered structure with a 0.7-nm layer periodicity. The structure is similar to chrysotile in that it consists of concentric lizardite layers wrapped around the fiber axis. However, unlike the rolled-up chrysotile, the tetrahedral sheets of the lizardite layers are periodically inverted and kinked, producing sectors. The relative angles between sectors result in 15- and 30-sided polygons in terrestrial samples.

  4. ICD-10-CM/PCS: Transferring Knowledge from ICD-9-CM

    PubMed Central

    Sand, Jaime N.; Elison-Bowers, Patt

    2013-01-01

    The transition to ICD-10-CM/PCS has expanded educational opportunities for educators and trainers who are taking on the responsibility of training coders on the new system. Coding education currently faces multiple challenges in the areas of how to train the new workforce, what might be the most efficient method of providing that training, how much retraining of the current workforce with ICD-9-CM training will be required, and how to meet the national implementation deadline of 2014 in the most efficacious manner. This research sought to identify if there was a difference between a group of participants with no knowledge of ICD-9-CM and those with some knowledge of ICD-9-CM in scores on an ICD-10-CM/PCS quiz. Results indicate a difference, supporting the idea of knowledge transfer between the systems and providing additional insight into coding education. PMID:23861677

  5. Detailed modelling of the 21-cm forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semelin, B.

    2016-01-01

    The 21-cm forest is a promising probe of the Epoch of Reionization. The local state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) is encoded in the spectrum of a background source (radio-loud quasars or gamma-ray burst afterglow) by absorption at the local 21-cm wavelength, resulting in a continuous and fluctuating absorption level. Small-scale structures (filaments and minihaloes) in the IGM are responsible for the strongest absorption features. The absorption can also be modulated on large scales by inhomogeneous heating and Wouthuysen-Field coupling. We present the results from a simulation that attempts to preserve the cosmological environment while resolving some of the small-scale structures (a few kpc resolution in a 50 h-1 Mpc box). The simulation couples the dynamics and the ionizing radiative transfer and includes X-ray and Lyman lines radiative transfer for a detailed physical modelling. As a result we find that soft X-ray self-shielding, Ly α self-shielding and shock heating all have an impact on the predicted values of the 21-cm optical depth of moderately overdense structures like filaments. A correct treatment of the peculiar velocities is also critical. Modelling these processes seems necessary for accurate predictions and can be done only at high enough resolution. As a result, based on our fiducial model, we estimate that LOFAR should be able to detect a few (strong) absorptions features in a frequency range of a few tens of MHz for a 20 mJy source located at z = 10, while the SKA would extract a large fraction of the absorption information for the same source.

  6. BVRI CCD photometry of Omega Centauri

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaino, G.; Liller, W.

    1987-12-01

    Color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of V vs B-V, V vs V-I, and V vs B-I have been constructed based on 179 BVRI CCD frames of two adjoining 4x2.5-arcmin fields in Omega Cen (NGC 5139) obtained with the 1.54-m Danish La Silla telescope. The spread in the main sequences noted in the three CMDs indicates that the wide range in chemical composition among the evolved stars in this cluster persists as well in the unevolved stars. This result suggests that the abundance variations are primordial. A difference in magnitude between the turnoff and the horizontal branch of 3.8 + or - 0.15 is found which is greater than a previous value. 38 references.

  7. Hubble Space Telescope Image of Omega Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In this sturning image provided by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), the Omega Nebula (M17) resembles the fury of a raging sea, showing a bubbly ocean of glowing hydrogen gas and small amounts of other elements such as oxygen and sulfur. The nebula, also known as the Swan Nebula, is a hotbed of newly born stars residing 5,500 light-years away in the constellation Sagittarius. The wavelike patterns of gas have been sculpted and illuminated by a torrent of ultraviolet radiation from the young massive stars, which lie outside the picture to the upper left. The ultraviolet radiation is carving and heating the surfaces of cold hydrogen gas clouds. The warmed surfaces glow orange and red in this photograph. The green represents an even hotter gas that masks background structures. Various gases represented with color are: sulfur, represented in red; hydrogen, green; and oxygen blue.

  8. Long Duration Backlighter Experiments at Omega

    SciTech Connect

    Reighard, A; Glendinning, S; Young, P; Hsing, W; Foord, M; Schneider, M; Lu, K; Dittrich, T; Wallace, R; Sorce, C

    2008-05-01

    We have successfully demonstrated a 7.5 ns-duration pinhole-apertured backlighter at the Omega laser facility. Pinhole-apertured point-projection backlighting for 8 ns will be useful for imaging evolving features in experiments at the National Ignition Facility. The backlighter consisted of a 20 {micro}m diameter pinhole in a 75 {micro}m thick Ta substrate separated from a Zn emitter (9 keV) by a 400 {micro}m thick high-density carbon piece. The carbon prevented the shock from the laser-driven surface from reaching the substrate before 8 ns and helped minimize x-ray ablation of the pinhole substrate. Grid wires in x-ray framing camera images of a gold grid have a source-limited resolution significantly smaller than the pinhole diameter due to the high aspect ratio of the pinhole, but do not become much smaller at late times.

  9. [Antiinflammatory therapy in ostheoarthritis including omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids].

    PubMed

    Dzielska-Olczak, Małgorzata; Nowak, Jerzy Z

    2012-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (ostheoarthrosis, OA) is characterized by progressive destruction of articular cartilage, remodeling of the periarticular bone and inflammation of the synovial membrane. In patients occur joints pain, impaired joints motion and disability. The results of many studies indicate an inflammation as foundation of this disease. The management of OA include a combination of pharmacological treatments and nonpharmacological interventions. Pharmacological treatments include used paracetamol, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and chondroprotectives (glucosamine, chondroitin sulfate and so on). NSAIDs long-term use associated with serious adverse effects. OA symptoms are effectively reduced by nutrients such omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids (PUFAs as EPA, DHA), which decrease the need for non-steroidal drugs and may less adverse events. They exerts, particularly EPA, anti-inflammatory effect, inhibit catabolic processes, stimulate the anabolic process in the cartilage in the joint. Many different evidence validate that omega 3 alleviate the progression of osteoarthritis and have exciting therapeutic potential for preventing cartilage degradation associated with chronic inflammatory in joints.

  10. Isotope shifts in methane near 6000/cm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, K.; Halsey, G. W.; Jennings, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Isotope shifts for cleanly resolved vibrational-rotational absorption lines of CH4-12 and CH4-13 were measured by a 5-m focal length Littrow spectrometer in the 6000/cm range. The methane isotopes were held in separate absorption cells: 20 torr of CH4-13 in a 1-m cell, and 5 torr of CH4-12 in a White cell of 4-m optical path length. Measured shifts for the cleanly resolved singlets R(0), R(1), Q(1) and P(1) are summarized in tabular form.

  11. An engineering model 30 cm ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poeschel, R. L.; King, H. J.; Schnelker, D. E.

    1973-01-01

    Thruster development at Hughes Research Laboratories and NASA Lewis Research Center has brought the 30-cm mercury bombardment ion thruster to the state of an engineering model. This thruster has been designed to have sufficient internal strength for direct mounting on gimbals, to weigh 7.3 kg, to operate with a corrected overall efficiency of 71%, and to have 10,000 hours lifetime. Subassemblies, such as the ion optical system, isolators, etc., have been upgraded to meet launch qualification standards. This paper presents a summary of the design specifications and performance characteristics which define the interface between the thruster module and the remainder of the propulsion system.

  12. A 30-cm diameter argon ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    A 30 cm diameter argon ion source was evaluated. Ion source beam currents up to 4a were extracted with ion energies ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 KeV. An ion optics scaling relation was developed for predicting ion beam extraction capability as a function of total extraction voltage, gas type, and screen grid open area. Ignition and emission characteristics of several hollow cathode geometries were assessed for purposes of defining discharge chamber and neutralizer cathodes. Also presented are ion beam profile characteristics which exhibit broad beam capability well suited for ion beam sputtering applications.

  13. The Role of Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Diets.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Candela, C; Roldan Puchalt, M C; Palma Milla, S; Lopez Plaza, B; Bermejo, L

    2015-01-01

    The article is a summary of Dra. Carmen Gómez Candela's presentation at the Science in Nutrition 3rd International Congress in Milan, March 2014. The article covers omega-3 fatty acids use in different medical areas and several institutions' opinions in relation to the topic. Omega-3 acids are essential fatty acids. A certain amount of omega-3 is needed in our daily diet; however, the usual consumption is generally less than the recommended amount. Changes in dietary patterns in the course of history have led to deficit levels of omega-3 in the human body. Currently, there is increasing evidence of the benefits of omega-3 in different medical specialities. There are still some gaps regarding its role in illnesses such as dementia, psychiatric disorders, and inflammatory diseases. Nevertheless, stronger evidence is being proved in cardiovascular diseases and cancer. This article provides a reflection on possible ways to increase omega-3 daily consumption and the constraints associated with food with high contents of heavy metals, which, in turn, are also rich in omega-3s.

  14. Modification of the omega-meson lifetime in nuclear matter.

    PubMed

    Kotulla, M; Trnka, D; Mühlich, P; Anton, G; Bacelar, J C S; Bartholomy, O; Bayadilov, D; Beloglazov, Y A; Bogendörfer, R; Castelijns, R; Crede, V; Dutz, H; Ehmanns, A; Elsner, D; Ewald, R; Fabry, I; Fuchs, M; Essig, K; Funke, Ch; Gothe, R; Gregor, R; Gridnev, A B; Gutz, E; Höffgen, S; Hoffmeister, P; Horn, I; Hössl, J; Jaegle, I; Junkersfeld, J; Kalinowsky, H; Klein, Frank; Klein, Fritz; Klempt, E; Konrad, M; Kopf, B; Krusche, B; Langheinrich, J; Löhner, H; Lopatin, I V; Lotz, J; Lugert, S; Menze, D; Messchendorp, J G; Mertens, T; Metag, V; Mosel, U; Nanova, M; Novotny, R; Ostrick, M; Pant, L M; van Pee, H; Pfeiffer, M; Roy, A; Radkov, A; Schadmand, S; Schmidt, Ch; Schmieden, H; Schoch, B; Shende, S; Suft, G; Sumachev, V V; Szczepanek, T; Süle, A; Thoma, U; Varma, R; Walther, D; Weinheimer, Ch; Wendel, Ch

    2008-05-16

    Information on hadron properties in the nuclear medium has been derived from the photoproduction of omega mesons on the nuclei C, Ca, Nb, and Pb using the Crystal Barrel/TAPS detector at the ELSA tagged photon facility in Bonn. The dependence of the omega-meson cross section on the nuclear mass number has been compared with three different types of models: a Glauber analysis, a Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck analysis of the Giessen theory group, and a calculation by the Valencia theory group. In all three cases, the inelastic omega width is found to be 130-150 MeV/c(2) at normal nuclear matter density for an average 3-momentum of 1.1 GeV/c. In the rest frame of the omega meson, this inelastic omega width corresponds to a reduction of the omega lifetime by a factor approximately 30. For the first time, the momentum dependent omegaN cross section has been extracted from the experiment and is in the range of 70 mb.

  15. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Heart Rate Variability

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Jeppe Hagstrup

    2011-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) may modulate autonomic control of the heart because omega-3 PUFA is abundant in the brain and other nervous tissue as well as in cardiac tissue. This might partly explain why omega-3 PUFA offer some protection against sudden cardiac death (SCD). The autonomic nervous system is involved in the pathogenesis of SCD. Heart rate variability (HRV) can be used as a non-invasive marker of cardiac autonomic control and a low HRV is a predictor for SCD and arrhythmic events. Studies on HRV and omega-3 PUFA have been performed in several populations such as patients with ischemic heart disease, patients with diabetes mellitus, patients with chronic renal failure, and in healthy subjects as well as in children. The studies have demonstrated a positive association between cellular content of omega-3 PUFA and HRV and supplementation with omega-3 PUFA seems to increase HRV which could be a possible explanation for decreased risk of arrhythmic events and SCD sometimes observed after omega-3 PUFA supplementation. However, the results are not consistent and further research is needed. PMID:22110443

  16. Production and Decay of Omega_c^0

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B

    2007-03-21

    We present an analysis of inclusive {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} baryon production and decays in 230.5 fb{sup -1} of data recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} baryons are reconstructed in four final states ({Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}, {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {Xi}{sup -}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) and the ratios of branching fractions for these final states are measured. We also measure the momentum spectrum of the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} baryons in the e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass frame. From the spectrum, they observe {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} production from B decays and in c{bar c} events, and extract the two rates of production.

  17. New portrait of Omega Nebula's glistening watercolours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-07-01

    The Omega Nebula, sometimes called the Swan Nebula, is a dazzling stellar nursery located about 5500 light-years away towards the constellation of Sagittarius (the Archer). An active star-forming region of gas and dust about 15 light-years across, the nebula has recently spawned a cluster of massive, hot stars. The intense light and strong winds from these hulking infants have carved remarkable filigree structures in the gas and dust. When seen through a small telescope the nebula has a shape that reminds some observers of the final letter of the Greek alphabet, omega, while others see a swan with its distinctive long, curved neck. Yet other nicknames for this evocative cosmic landmark include the Horseshoe and the Lobster Nebula. Swiss astronomer Jean-Philippe Loys de Chéseaux discovered the nebula around 1745. The French comet hunter Charles Messier independently rediscovered it about twenty years later and included it as number 17 in his famous catalogue. In a small telescope, the Omega Nebula appears as an enigmatic ghostly bar of light set against the star fields of the Milky Way. Early observers were unsure whether this curiosity was really a cloud of gas or a remote cluster of stars too faint to be resolved. In 1866, William Huggins settled the debate when he confirmed the Omega Nebula to be a cloud of glowing gas, through the use of a new instrument, the astronomical spectrograph. In recent years, astronomers have discovered that the Omega Nebula is one of the youngest and most massive star-forming regions in the Milky Way. Active star-birth started a few million years ago and continues through today. The brightly shining gas shown in this picture is just a blister erupting from the side of a much larger dark cloud of molecular gas. The dust that is so prominent in this picture comes from the remains of massive hot stars that have ended their brief lives and ejected material back into space, as well as the cosmic detritus from which future suns form. The

  18. Fuel elements of research reactor CM

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, A.V.; Morozov, A.V.; Vatulin, A.V.; Ershov, S.A.

    2013-07-01

    In 1961 the CM research reactor was commissioned at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (Dimitrovgrad, Russia), it was intended to carry on investigations and the production of transuranium nuclides. The reactor is of a tank type. Original fuel assembly contained plate fuels that were spaced with vanes and corrugated bands. Nickel was used as a cladding material, fuel meat was produced from UO{sub 2} + electrolytic nickel composition. Fuel plates have been replaced by self-spacing cross-shaped dispersion fuels clad in stainless steel. In 2005 the reactor was updated. The purpose of this updating was to increase the quantity of irradiation channels in the reactor core and to improve the neutron balance. The updating was implemented at the expense of 20 % reduction in the quantity of fuel elements in the core which released a space for extra channels and decreased the mass of structural materials in the core. The updated reactor is loaded with modified standard fuel elements with 20 % higher uranium masses. At the same time stainless steel in fuel assembly shrouds was substituted by zirconium alloy. Today in progress are investigations and work to promote the second stage of reactor updating that involve developments of cross-shaped fuel elements having low neutron absorption matrix materials. This article gives an historical account of the design and main technical changes that occurred for the CM reactor since its commissioning.

  19. Redundant Array Configurations for 21 cm Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, Joshua S.; Parsons, Aaron R.

    2016-08-01

    Realizing the potential of 21 cm tomography to statistically probe the intergalactic medium before and during the Epoch of Reionization requires large telescopes and precise control of systematics. Next-generation telescopes are now being designed and built to meet these challenges, drawing lessons from first-generation experiments that showed the benefits of densely packed, highly redundant arrays—in which the same mode on the sky is sampled by many antenna pairs—for achieving high sensitivity, precise calibration, and robust foreground mitigation. In this work, we focus on the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) as an interferometer with a dense, redundant core designed following these lessons to be optimized for 21 cm cosmology. We show how modestly supplementing or modifying a compact design like HERA’s can still deliver high sensitivity while enhancing strategies for calibration and foreground mitigation. In particular, we compare the imaging capability of several array configurations, both instantaneously (to address instrumental and ionospheric effects) and with rotation synthesis (for foreground removal). We also examine the effects that configuration has on calibratability using instantaneous redundancy. We find that improved imaging with sub-aperture sampling via “off-grid” antennas and increased angular resolution via far-flung “outrigger” antennas is possible with a redundantly calibratable array configuration.

  20. THE METALLICITY OF THE CM DRACONIS SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Terrien, Ryan C.; Fleming, Scott W.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Deshpande, Rohit; Bender, Chad F.; Ramsey, Lawrence W.; Feiden, Gregory A.

    2012-11-20

    The CM Draconis system comprises two eclipsing mid-M dwarfs of nearly equal mass in a 1.27 day orbit. This well-studied eclipsing binary has often been used for benchmark tests of stellar models, since its components are among the lowest mass stars with well-measured masses and radii ({approx}< 1% relative precision). However, as with many other low-mass stars, non-magnetic models have been unable to match the observed radii and effective temperatures for CM Dra at the 5%-10% level. To date, the uncertain metallicity of the system has complicated comparison of theoretical isochrones with observations. In this Letter, we use data from the SpeX instrument on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility to measure the metallicity of the system during primary and secondary eclipses, as well as out of eclipse, based on an empirical metallicity calibration in the H and K near-infrared (NIR) bands. We derive an [Fe/H] = -0.30 {+-} 0.12 that is consistent across all orbital phases. The determination of [Fe/H] for this system constrains a key dimension of parameter space when attempting to reconcile model isochrone predictions and observations.

  1. Design study of large area 8 cm x 8 cm wrapthrough cells for space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garlick, George F. J.; Lillington, David R.

    1987-01-01

    The design of large area silicon solar cells for the projected NASA space station is discussed. It is based on the NASA specification for the cells which calls for an 8 cm by 8 cm cell of wrapthrough type with gridded back contacts. The beginning of life (BOL) power must be 1.039 watts per cell or larger and maximum end of life (EOL) after 10 years in the prescribed orbit under an equivalent 1MeV electron radiation damage fluence of 5 times 10 to the 13th power e/square cm. On orbit efficiency is to be optimized by a low thermal absorptance goal (thermal alpha) of .63.

  2. Aliphatic Amines in Antarctic CR2, CM2, and CM1/2 Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aponte, Jose C.; McLain, Hannah L.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.

    2016-01-01

    Meteoritic water-soluble organic compounds provide a unique record of the processes that occurred during the formation of the solar system and the chemistry preceding the origins of life on Earth. We have investigated the molecular distribution, compound-specific delta13C isotopic ratios and enantiomeric compositions of aliphatic monoamines present in the hot acid-water extracts of the carbonaceous chondrites LAP 02342 (CR2), GRA 95229 (CR2), LON 94101 (CM2), LEW 90500 (CM2), and ALH 83100 (CM1/2). Analyses of the concentration of monoamines in these meteorites revealed: (a) the CR2 chondrites studied here contain higher concentrations of monoamines relative to the analyzed CM2 chondrites; (b) the concentration of monoamines decreases with increasing carbon number; and (c) isopropylamine is the most abundant monoamine in these CR2 chondrites, while methylamine is the most abundant amine species in these CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites. The delta13C values of monoamines in CR2 chondrite do not correlate with the number of carbon atoms; however, in CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites, the 13C enrichment decreases with increasing monoamine carbon number. The delta13C values of methylamine in CR2 chondrites ranged from -1 to +10per mille, while in CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites the delta13C values of methylamine ranged from +41 to +59per mille. We also observed racemic compositions of sec-butylamine, 3-methyl-2-butylamine, and sec-pentylamine in the studied carbonaceous chondrites. Additionally, we compared the abundance and delta13C isotopic composition of monoamines to those of their structurally related amino acids. We found that monoamines are less abundant than amino acids in CR2 chondrites, with the opposite being true in CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites. We used these collective data to evaluate different primordial synthetic pathways for monoamines in carbonaceous chondrites and to understand the potential common origins these molecules may share with meteoritic amino acids.

  3. Aliphatic amines in Antarctic CR2, CM2, and CM1/2 carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aponte, José C.; McLain, Hannah L.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.

    2016-09-01

    Meteoritic water-soluble organic compounds provide a unique record of the processes that occurred during the formation of the solar system and the chemistry preceding the origins of life on Earth. We have investigated the molecular distribution, compound-specific δ13C isotopic ratios and enantiomeric compositions of aliphatic monoamines present in the hot acid-water extracts of the carbonaceous chondrites LAP 02342 (CR2), GRA 95229 (CR2), LON 94101 (CM2), LEW 90500 (CM2), and ALH 83100 (CM1/2). Analyses of the concentration of monoamines in these meteorites revealed: (a) the CR2 chondrites studied here contain higher concentrations of monoamines relative to the analyzed CM2 chondrites; (b) the concentration of monoamines decreases with increasing carbon number; and (c) isopropylamine is the most abundant monoamine in these CR2 chondrites, while methylamine is the most abundant amine species in these CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites. The δ13C values of monoamines in CR2 chondrite do not correlate with the number of carbon atoms; however, in CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites, the 13C enrichment decreases with increasing monoamine carbon number. The δ13C values of methylamine in CR2 chondrites ranged from -1 to +10‰, while in CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites the δ13C values of methylamine ranged from +41 to +59‰. We also observed racemic compositions of sec-butylamine, 3-methyl-2-butylamine, and sec-pentylamine in the studied carbonaceous chondrites. Additionally, we compared the abundance and δ13C isotopic composition of monoamines to those of their structurally related amino acids. We found that monoamines are less abundant than amino acids in CR2 chondrites, with the opposite being true in CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites. We used these collective data to evaluate different primordial synthetic pathways for monoamines in carbonaceous chondrites and to understand the potential common origins these molecules may share with meteoritic amino acids.

  4. Search for lepton flavor violating decays tau+/--->l+/-omega.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Ayad, R; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Nash, J A; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Biesiada, J; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Miyashita, T S; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2008-02-22

    A search for lepton flavor violating decays of a tau to a lighter-mass charged lepton and an omega vector meson is performed using 384.1 fb(-1) of e(+)e(-) annihilation data collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center PEP-II storage ring. No signal is found, and the upper limits on the branching ratios are determined to be B(tau(+/-)-->e;{+/-}omega)<1.1 x10 (-7) and B(tau(+/-)-->micro(+/-)omega)<1.0 x 10(-7) at 90% confidence level.

  5. A Comparison of Composite Reliability Estimators: Coefficient Omega Confidence Intervals in the Current Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Miguel A.; Divers, Jasmin

    2016-01-01

    Coefficient omega and alpha are both measures of the composite reliability for a set of items. Unlike coefficient alpha, coefficient omega remains unbiased with congeneric items with uncorrelated errors. Despite this ability, coefficient omega is not as widely used and cited in the literature as coefficient alpha. Reasons for coefficient omega's…

  6. Large aperture cube corner interferometer with a resolution of 0.001 cm(-1).

    PubMed

    Kauppinen, J; Horneman, V M

    1991-06-20

    The interferometer of the Fourier transform spectrometer at the University of Oulu has been modified so that the maximum instrumental resolution is better than 10(-3) cm(-1). The resolution of the previous interferometer was 4.5 x 10(-3) cm(-1). The present interferometer consists of large cube corner mirrors and a large Mylar beam splitter. Each corner mirror has been made with three flat mirrors on an adjustable supporting frame. The interferometer was already in practical use in 1985. The first spectra (H(2)O, CO(2), N(2)O, OCS) recorded on this interferometer have been presented in HANDBOOK OF INFRARED STANDARDS WITH SPECTRAL MAPS AND TRANSITION ASSIGNMENTS BETWEEN 3 AND 2600 microm, G. Guelachvili and K. Narahari Rao, Eds. (Academic, New York, 1986).

  7. Anti-inflammatory Effects of Omega 3 and Omega 6 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Cardiovascular Disease and Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tortosa-Caparrós, Esther; Navas-Carrillo, Diana; Marín, Francisco; Orenes-Piñero, Esteban

    2016-01-08

    A lipid excess produces a systemic inflammation process due to tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein synthesis. Simultaneously, this fat excess promotes the appearance of insulin resistance. All this contributes to the development of atherosclerosis and increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases. On the other hand, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), especially eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid (omega 3), and arachidonic acid (omega 6) have shown anti-inflammatory properties. Lately, an inverse relationship between omega-3 fatty acids, inflammation, obesity and cardiovascular diseases has been demonstrated. To check fatty acids effect, the levels of some inflammation biomarkers have been analyzed. Leptin, adiponectin and resistin represent a group of hormones associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases, obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance and are modified in obese-overweight people comparing to normal weight people. Omega-3 PUFAs have been shown to decrease the production of inflammatory mediators, having a positive effect in obesity and diabetes mellitus type-2. Moreover, they significantly decrease the appearance of cardiovascular disease risk factors. Regarding omega-6 PUFA, there is controversy whether their effects are pro- or anti-inflammatory. The aim of this manuscript is to provide a comprehensive overview about the role of omega-3 and omega-6 PUFAs in cardiovascular diseases and metabolic syndrome.

  8. Improving the hot-spot pressure and demonstrating ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic deuterium tritium implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Collins, T. J.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Follett, R. K.; Forrest, C. J.; Froula, D. H.; Yu. Glebov, V.; Harding, D. R.; Henchen, R. J.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Janezic, R.; Kelly, J. H.; Kessler, T. J.; Kosc, T. Z.; Loucks, S. J.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Maximov, A. V.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Nora, R.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Shmayda, W. T.; Short, R.W.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Casey, D. T.

    2014-05-01

    Reaching ignition in direct-drive (DD) inertial confinement fusion implosions requires achieving central pressures in excess of 100 Gbar. The OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] is used to study the physics of implosions that are hydrodynamically equivalent to the ignition designs on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)]. It is shown that the highest hot-spot pressures (up to 40 Gbar) are achieved in target designs with a fuel adiabat of α ≅ 4, an implosion velocity of 3.8 × 10⁷ cm/s, and a laser intensity of ~10¹⁵ W/cm². These moderate-adiabat implosions are well understood using two-dimensional hydrocode simulations. The performance of lower-adiabat implosions is significantly degraded relative to code predictions, a common feature between DD implosions on OMEGA and indirect-drive cryogenic implosions on the NIF. Simplified theoretical models are developed to gain physical understanding of the implosion dynamics that dictate the target performance. These models indicate that degradations in the shell density and integrity (caused by hydrodynamic instabilities during the target acceleration) coupled with hydrodynamics at stagnation are the main failure mechanisms in low-adiabat designs. To demonstrate ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic implosions on OMEGA, the target-design robustness to hydrodynamic instability growth must be improved by reducing laser-coupling losses caused by cross beam energy transfer.

  9. Fatty acid composition in major depression: decreased omega 3 fractions in cholesteryl esters and increased C20: 4 omega 6/C20:5 omega 3 ratio in cholesteryl esters and phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Maes, M; Smith, R; Christophe, A; Cosyns, P; Desnyder, R; Meltzer, H

    1996-04-26

    Recently, there were some reports that major depression may be accompanied by alterations in serum total cholesterol, cholesterol ester and omega 3 essential fatty acid levels and by an increased C20: 4 omega 6/C20: 5 omega 3, i.e., arachidonic acid/eicosapentaenoic, ratio. The present study aimed to examine fatty acid composition of serum cholesteryl esters and phospholipids in 36 major depressed, 14 minor depressed and 24 normal subjects. Individual saturated (e.g., C14:0; C16:0, C18:0) and unsaturated (e.g., C18:1, C18:2, C20:4) fatty acids in phospholipid and cholesteryl ester fractions were assayed and the sums of the percentages of omega 6 and omega 3, saturated, branched chain and odd chain fatty acids, monoenes as well as the ratios omega 6/omega 3 and C20:4 omega 6/C20:5 omega 3 were calculated. Major depressed subjects had significantly higher C20:4 omega 6/C20:5 omega 3 ratio in both serum cholesteryl esters and phospholipids and a significantly increased omega 6/omega 3 ratio in cholesteryl ester fraction than healthy volunteers and minor depressed subjects. Major depressed subjects had significantly lower C18:3 omega 3 in cholesteryl esters than normal controls. Major depressed subjects showed significantly lower total omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in cholesteryl esters and significantly lower C20:5 omega 3 in serum cholesteryl esters and phospholipids than minor depressed subjects and healthy controls. These findings suggest an abnormal intake or metabolism of essential fatty acids in conjunction with decreased formation of cholesteryl esters in major depression.

  10. The 30-cm ion thruster power processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, B. G.; Hopper, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    A power processor unit for powering and controlling the 30 cm Mercury Electron-Bombardment Ion Thruster was designed, fabricated, and tested. The unit uses a unique and highly efficient transistor bridge inverter power stage in its implementation. The system operated from a 200 to 400 V dc input power bus, provides 12 independently controllable and closely regulated dc power outputs, and has an overall power conditioning capacity of 3.5 kW. Protective circuitry was incorporated as an integral part of the design to assure failure-free operation during transient and steady-state load faults. The implemented unit demonstrated an electrical efficiency between 91.5 and 91.9 at its nominal rated load over the 200 to 400 V dc input bus range.

  11. Evaluation of Argonne 9-cm and 10-cm Annular Centrifugal Contactors for SHINE Solution Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Wardle, Kent E.; Pereira, Candido; Vandegrift, George

    2015-02-01

    Work is in progress to evaluate the SHINE Medical Technologies process for producing Mo-99 for medical use from the fission of dissolved low-enriched uranium (LEU). This report addresses the use of Argonne annular centrifugal contactors for periodic treatment of the process solution. In a letter report from FY 2013, Pereira and Vandegrift compared the throughput and physical footprint for the two contactor options available from CINC Industries: the V-02 and V-05, which have rotor diameters of 5 cm and 12.7 cm, respectively. They suggested that an intermediately sized “Goldilocks” contactor might provide a better balance between throughput and footprint to meet the processing needs for the uranium extraction (UREX) processing of the SHINE solution to remove undesired fission products. Included with the submission of this letter report are the assembly drawings for two Argonne-design contactors that are in this intermediate range—9-cm and 10-cm rotors, respectively. The 9-cm contactor (drawing number CE-D6973A, stamped February 15, 1978) was designed as a single-stage unit and built and tested in the late 1970s along with other size units, both smaller and larger. In subsequent years, a significant effort to developed annular centrifugal contactors was undertaken to support work at Hanford implementing the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process. These contactors had a 10-cm rotor diameter and were fully designed as multistage units with four stages per assembly (drawing number CMT-E1104, stamped March 14, 1990). From a technology readiness perspective, these 10-cm units are much farther ahead in the design progression and, therefore, would require significantly less re-working to make them ready for UREX deployment. Additionally, the overall maximum throughput of ~12 L/min is similar to that of the 9-cm unit (10 L/min), and the former could be efficiently operated over much of the same range of throughput. As a result, only the 10-cm units are considered here

  12. Homoclinic {omega}-explosion and domains of hyperbolicity

    SciTech Connect

    Sten'kin, O V; Shil'nikov, L P

    1998-04-30

    The existence of domains of hyperbolicity is proved for general one-parameter families of multidimensional systems that undergo a homoclinic {omega}-explosion and the structure of the hyperbolic sets is studied for such families.

  13. Mitigating Sleep Loss: Assessment of Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-15

    from EEG and cytokines support the hypothesis that the improved perfroamnce is due to reduced inflammatory activity with Omega supplementation . These...treatment found that Omega-3 supplementation improved this metric. 10 | P a g e Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release... supplementation led to significantly better accuracy on both parameters for both tasks, Fs (8,219) > 2.79, ps < .01, but only marginally faster

  14. Ambiguity resolution in systems using Omega for position location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenkel, G.; Gan, D. G.

    1974-01-01

    The lane ambiguity problem prevents the utilization of the Omega system for many applications such as locating buoys and balloons. The method of multiple lines of position introduced herein uses signals from four or more Omega stations for ambiguity resolution. The coordinates of the candidate points are determined first through the use of the Newton iterative procedure. Subsequently, a likelihood function is generated for each point, and the ambiguity is resolved by selecting the most likely point. The method was tested through simulation.

  15. MANGANESE ABUNDANCES IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER {omega} CENTAURI

    SciTech Connect

    Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.; Bergemann, Maria; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Lambert, David L.

    2010-07-01

    We present manganese abundances in 10 red giant members of the globular cluster {omega} Centauri; eight stars are from the most metal-poor population (RGB MP and RGB MInt1) while two targets are members of the more metal-rich groups (RGB MInt2 and MInt3). This is the first time Mn abundances have been studied in this peculiar stellar system. The LTE values of [Mn/Fe] in {omega} Cen overlap those of Milky Way stars in the metal-poor {omega} Cen populations ([Fe/H] {approx}-1.5 to -1.8), however unlike what is observed in Milky Way halo and disk stars, [Mn/Fe] declines in the two more metal-rich RGB MInt2 and MInt3 targets. Non-LTE calculations were carried out in order to derive corrections to the LTE Mn abundances. The non-LTE results for {omega} Cen in comparison with the non-LTE [Mn/Fe] versus [Fe/H] trend obtained for the Milky Way confirm and strengthen the conclusion that the manganese behavior in {omega} Cen is distinct. These results suggest that low-metallicity supernovae (with metallicities {<=} -2) of either Type II or Type Ia dominated the enrichment of the more metal-rich stars in {omega} Cen. The dominance of low-metallicity stars in the chemical evolution of {omega} Cen has been noted previously in the s-process elements where enrichment from metal-poor asymptotic giant branch stars is indicated. In addition, copper, which also has metallicity-dependent yields, exhibits lower values of [Cu/Fe] in the RGB MInt2 and MInt3 {omega} Cen populations.

  16. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Skeletal Muscle Health.

    PubMed

    Jeromson, Stewart; Gallagher, Iain J; Galloway, Stuart D R; Hamilton, D Lee

    2015-11-19

    Skeletal muscle is a plastic tissue capable of adapting and mal-adapting to physical activity and diet. The response of skeletal muscle to adaptive stimuli, such as exercise, can be modified by the prior nutritional status of the muscle. The influence of nutrition on skeletal muscle has the potential to substantially impact physical function and whole body metabolism. Animal and cell based models show that omega-3 fatty acids, in particular those of marine origin, can influence skeletal muscle metabolism. Furthermore, recent human studies demonstrate that omega-3 fatty acids of marine origin can influence the exercise and nutritional response of skeletal muscle. These studies show that the prior omega-3 status influences not only the metabolic response of muscle to nutrition, but also the functional response to a period of exercise training. Omega-3 fatty acids of marine origin therefore have the potential to alter the trajectory of a number of human diseases including the physical decline associated with aging. We explore the potential molecular mechanisms by which omega-3 fatty acids may act in skeletal muscle, considering the n-3/n-6 ratio, inflammation and lipidomic remodelling as possible mechanisms of action. Finally, we suggest some avenues for further research to clarify how omega-3 fatty acids may be exerting their biological action in skeletal muscle.

  17. Study of the decay B0bar -> D* omega pi

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-04-24

    We report on a study of the decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}{omega}{pi}{sup -} with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B-factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Based on a sample of 232 million B{bar B} decays, we measure the branching fraction {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}{omega}{pi}{sup -}) = (2.88 {+-} 0.21(stat.) {+-} 0.31(syst.)) x 10{sup -3}. We study the invariant mass spectrum of the {omega}{pi}{sup -} system in this decay. This spectrum is in good agreement with expectations based on factorization and the measured spectrum in {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}}. We also measure the polarization of the D*{sup +} as a function of the {omega}{pi}{sup -} mass. In the mass region 1.1 to 1.9 GeV we measure the fraction of longitudinal polarization of the D*{sup +} to be {Lambda}{sub L}/{Lambda} = 0.654 {+-} 0.042(stat.) {+-} 0.016(syst.). This is in agreement with the expectations from heavy-quark effective theory and factorization assuming that the decay proceeds as {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}{rho}(1450), {rho}(1450) {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -}.

  18. The role of omega-3 fatty acids in mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Lauren A; Begg, Denovan P; Weisinger, Richard S; Sinclair, Andrew J

    2008-01-01

    Research has established that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), plays a fundamental role in brain structure and function. Epidemiological and cross-sectional studies have also identified a role for long-chain omega-3 PUFA, which includes DHA, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosapentaenoic acid, in the etiology of depression. In the past ten years, there have been 12 intervention studies conducted using various preparations of longchain omega-3 PUFA in unipolar and bipolar depression. The majority of these studies administered long-chain omega-3 PUFA as an adjunct therapy. The studies have been conducted over 4 to 16 weeks of intervention and have often included small cohorts. In four out of the seven studies conducted in depressed individuals and in two out of the five studies in bipolar patients, individuals have reported a positive outcome following supplementation with ethyl-eicosapentaenoic acid or fish oil containing long-chain omega-3 PUFA. In the three trials that researched the influence of DHA-rich preparations, no significant effects were reported. The mechanisms that have been invoked to account for the benefits of long-chain omega-3 PUFA in depression include reductions in prostaglandins derived from arachidonic acid, which lead to decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels and/or alterations in blood flow to the brain.

  19. Omega-3 fatty acids: cardiovascular benefits, sources and sustainability.

    PubMed

    Lee, John H; O'Keefe, James H; Lavie, Carl J; Harris, William S

    2009-12-01

    The evidence for the cardioprotective nature of omega-3 fatty acids is abundant, and currently available data indicate that patients with known coronary heart disease should consume at least 1 g daily of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids from either oily fish or fish-oil supplements, and that individuals without disease should consume at least 250-500 mg daily. However, this area of research poses two questions. Firstly, which is the best source of omega-3 fatty acids-fish or fish-oil supplements? Secondly, are recommendations for omega-3 supplementation warranted in view of the rapid depletion of world fish stocks? The argument that eating fish is better than taking fish-oil supplements stems from the fact that several important nutrients, such as vitamin D, selenium, and antioxidants, are missing from the supplements. However, three major prevention trials have clearly indicated that omega-3 fatty acid capsules confer cardiovascular benefits and, therefore, that both are cardioprotective. Sustainable sources of omega-3 fatty acids will need to be identified if long-term cardiovascular risk reduction is to be achieved at the population level.

  20. Engineering model 8-cm thruster subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, B. G.; Hyman, J.; Hopper, D. J.; Williamson, W. S.; Dulgeroff, C. R.; Collett, C. R.

    1978-01-01

    An Engineering Model (EM) 8 cm Ion Thruster Propulsion Subsystem was developed for operation at a thrust level 5 mN (1.1 mlb) at a specific impulse 1 sub sp = 2667 sec with a total system input power P sub in = 165 W. The system dry mass is 15 kg with a mercury-propellant-reservoir capacity of 8.75 kg permitting uninterrupted operation for about 12,500 hr. The subsystem can be started from a dormant condition in a time less than or equal to 15 min. The thruster has a design lifetime of 20,000 hr with 10,000 startup cycles. A gimbal unit is included to provide a thrust vector deflection capability of + or - 10 degrees in any direction from the zero position. The EM subsystem development program included thruster optimization, power-supply circuit optimization and flight packaging, subsystem integration, and subsystem acceptance testing including a cyclic test of the total propulsion package.

  1. The 15 cm diameter ion thruster research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    The startup reliability of a 15 cm diameter mercury bombardment ion thruster which employs a pulsed high voltage tickler electrode on the main and neutralizer cathodes is examined. Startup of the thruster is achieved 100% of the time on the main cathode and 98.7% of the time on the neutralizer cathode over a 3640 cycle test. The thruster was started from a 20 C initial condition and operated for an hour at a 600 mA beam current. An energy efficiency of 75% and a propellant utilization efficiency of 77% was achieved over the complete cycle. The effect of a single cusp magnetic field thruster length on its performance is discussed. Guidelines are formulated for the shaping of magnetic field lines in thrusters. A model describing double ion production in mercury discharges is presented. The production route is shown to occur through the single ionic ground state. Photographs of the interior of an operating-hollow cathode are presented. A cathode spot is shown to be present if the cathode is free of low work-function surfaces. The spot is observed if a low work-function oxide coating is applied to the cathode insert. Results show that low work-function oxide coatings tend to migrate during thruster operation.

  2. Source geometric considerations for OMEGA Dante measurements.

    PubMed

    May, M J; Patterson, J R; Sorce, C; Widmann, K; Fournier, K B; Perez, F

    2012-10-01

    The Dante is a 15 channel filtered diode array which is installed on the OMEGA laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester. The system yields the spectrally and temporally resolved radiation flux from 50 eV to 10 keV from various targets (i.e., Hohlraum, gas pipes, etc.). The absolute flux is determined from the radiometric calibration of the x-ray diodes, filters, and mirrors and an unfold algorithm applied to the recorded voltages from each channel. The unfold algorithm assumes an emitting source that is spatially uniform and has a constant area as a function of photon energy. The emitting x-ray source is usually considered to be the laser entrance hole (LEH) of a given diameter for Hohlraum type targets or the effective wall area of high conversion efficiency K-shell type targets. This assumption can be problematic for several reasons. High intensity regions or "hot spots" in the x-ray are observed where the drive laser beams strike the target. The "hot spots" create non-uniform emission seen by the Dante. Additionally, thinned walled (50 μm) low-Z targets (C(22)H(10)N(2)O(5)) have an energy dependent source size since the target's walls will be fully opaque for low energies (E < 2-3 keV) yet fully transmissive at higher energies. Determining accurate yields can be challenging for these types of targets. Discussion and some analysis will be presented.

  3. KULL Simulations of OMEGA Radiation Flow Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallman, J.; MacLaren, S.; Baker, K.; Amala, P.; Lewis, K.; Zika, M.

    2012-10-01

    The problem of radiation flow in a right circular cylinder is of interest for the verification and validation of radiation codes, which utilize several mechanisms for determining radiation transport (diffusion, discrete ordinates, and Monte Carlo). This flow is analogous to free molecular flow in a similar geometry.footnotetextE. Garelis and T.E. Wainwright. Phys. Fluids. 16, 4 (1973) A series of experiments were conducted on the OMEGA laser in cases with a low-density heated cylindrical wall. The experiments consisted of a 1.6 mm diameter gold hohlraum containing an on-axis 700 μm diameter SiO2 cylinder contained in an 80 μm thick carbon foam tube. Five shots panning three test cases were used: the nominal geometry described above (heated wall), the carbon tube replaced with solid gold, and a gold cap placed on the laser end of the cylinder assembly to block axial radiation flow. Simulations of each experimental target type were run with the KULL radiation code, and were used to compare the different radiation transport packages in KULL by employing synthetic diagnostics to match the experimental DANTE cavity radiation temperature time history and soft x-ray images taken by a streak camera imaging the far end of the hohlraum.

  4. Uncertainty analysis technique for OMEGA Dante measurementsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, M. J.; Widmann, K.; Sorce, C.; Park, H.-S.; Schneider, M.

    2010-10-01

    The Dante is an 18 channel x-ray filtered diode array which records the spectrally and temporally resolved radiation flux from various targets (e.g., hohlraums, etc.) at x-ray energies between 50 eV and 10 keV. It is a main diagnostic installed on the OMEGA laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester. The absolute flux is determined from the photometric calibration of the x-ray diodes, filters and mirrors, and an unfold algorithm. Understanding the errors on this absolute measurement is critical for understanding hohlraum energetic physics. We present a new method for quantifying the uncertainties on the determined flux using a Monte Carlo parameter variation technique. This technique combines the uncertainties in both the unfold algorithm and the error from the absolute calibration of each channel into a one sigma Gaussian error function. One thousand test voltage sets are created using these error functions and processed by the unfold algorithm to produce individual spectra and fluxes. Statistical methods are applied to the resultant set of fluxes to estimate error bars on the measurements.

  5. Uncertainty analysis technique for OMEGA Dante measurements.

    PubMed

    May, M J; Widmann, K; Sorce, C; Park, H-S; Schneider, M

    2010-10-01

    The Dante is an 18 channel x-ray filtered diode array which records the spectrally and temporally resolved radiation flux from various targets (e.g., hohlraums, etc.) at x-ray energies between 50 eV and 10 keV. It is a main diagnostic installed on the OMEGA laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester. The absolute flux is determined from the photometric calibration of the x-ray diodes, filters and mirrors, and an unfold algorithm. Understanding the errors on this absolute measurement is critical for understanding hohlraum energetic physics. We present a new method for quantifying the uncertainties on the determined flux using a Monte Carlo parameter variation technique. This technique combines the uncertainties in both the unfold algorithm and the error from the absolute calibration of each channel into a one sigma Gaussian error function. One thousand test voltage sets are created using these error functions and processed by the unfold algorithm to produce individual spectra and fluxes. Statistical methods are applied to the resultant set of fluxes to estimate error bars on the measurements.

  6. Source geometric considerations for OMEGA Dante measurementsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, M. J.; Patterson, J. R.; Sorce, C.; Widmann, K.; Fournier, K. B.; Perez, F.

    2012-10-01

    The Dante is a 15 channel filtered diode array which is installed on the OMEGA laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester. The system yields the spectrally and temporally resolved radiation flux from 50 eV to 10 keV from various targets (i.e., Hohlraum, gas pipes, etc.). The absolute flux is determined from the radiometric calibration of the x-ray diodes, filters, and mirrors and an unfold algorithm applied to the recorded voltages from each channel. The unfold algorithm assumes an emitting source that is spatially uniform and has a constant area as a function of photon energy. The emitting x-ray source is usually considered to be the laser entrance hole (LEH) of a given diameter for Hohlraum type targets or the effective wall area of high conversion efficiency K-shell type targets. This assumption can be problematic for several reasons. High intensity regions or "hot spots" in the x-ray are observed where the drive laser beams strike the target. The "hot spots" create non-uniform emission seen by the Dante. Additionally, thinned walled (50 μm) low-Z targets (C22H10N2O5) have an energy dependent source size since the target's walls will be fully opaque for low energies (E < 2-3 keV) yet fully transmissive at higher energies. Determining accurate yields can be challenging for these types of targets. Discussion and some analysis will be presented.

  7. KULL Simulations of OMEGA Radiation Flow Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallman, J.; MacLaren, S.; Baker, K.; Brunner, T.; Lewis, K.; Zika, M.

    2013-10-01

    The problem of radiation flow in a right circular cylinder is of interest for the verification and validation of radiation codes since the flow is analytically analogous to diffusive free molecular flow in a similar geometry. Experiments were conducted on the OMEGA laser utilizing a low-density heated-cylindrical-wall target. The targets consisted of a 1.6 mm diameter gold hohlraum containing an on-axis 700 μm diameter SiO2 cylinder inside an 80 μm thick Ta2O5 aerogel tube. The FY13 targets also feature ``light-pipe'' diagnostics to measure the progression of the radiation front inside the foam. Simulations were run with the KULL multi-physics code, employing a new laser ray-tracing package. Comparisons of synthetic diagnostics derived from code results to x-ray measurements of drive temperature and heat front propagation provide a methodology to constrain simulation models. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Omega-3 and omega-6 content of medicinal foods for depressed patients: implications from the Iranian Traditional Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tavakkoli-Kakhki, Mandana; Motavasselian, Malihe; Mosaddegh, Mahmoud; Esfahani, Mohammad Mahdi; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Nematy, Mohsen; Eslami, Saeid

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Considering the increasing prevalence of depression in modern societies and the positive effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on depression, this study aims to investigate the omega-3 and omega-6 content of various foodstuffs, prescribed or prohibited by Iranian Traditional Medicine (ITM). Materials and Methods: Firstly, reliable sources of Iranian Traditional Medicine were reviewed in order to identify the prescribed and prohibited foodstuffs for depressed patients. Afterwards, according to the online database of United States Department of Agriculture (URL: http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/search/list), the ratio of linoleic acid to alpha linolenic acid (as representatives of omega-6 and omega-3, respectively) was identified in each foodstuff. Finally, the ratios of omega-6 to omega-3 were compared between seven food groups of vegetables, fruits, dry goods, high protein products, dairies, breads, and spices. Results: Based on the resources of Iranian Traditional Medicine, the following foods are prescribed for depressed patients: basil, coriander, spinach, lettuce, squash, peppermint, dill, chicory, celery, beet, quince, cucumber, watermelon, grape, peach, pomegranate, banana, apple, currant, pistachio, dried fig, almond, egg, chicken, lamb, trout, milk, bread without bran, saffron, oregano, and coriander seeds. On the other hand, cabbage, eggplant, onion, garlic, broad beans, lentils, beef, whole wheat bread, and mustard are prohibited. It should be noted that omega-3 content in some prescribed foods is more than that of the prohibited ones. Conclusion: The present study showed that mint, basil, spinach, lettuce, squash, lamb, saffron, oregano, cucumber, pistachio, milk, and also wild trout can be considered as medicinal foods for depressed patients. PMID:25068136

  9. Plasma omega-3 and omega-6 concentrations and risk of cutaneous basal and squamous cell carcinomas in Australian adults.

    PubMed

    Wallingford, Sarah C; Hughes, Maria Celia; Green, Adèle C; van der Pols, Jolieke C

    2013-10-01

    Laboratory-based evidence suggests that omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids may affect skin photocarcinogenesis, but epidemiologic evidence is inconsistent. In 1,191 White Australian adults, we prospectively investigated associations between baseline plasma concentrations of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids and cutaneous basal cell carcinomas (BCC) and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated on the basis of number of histologically confirmed tumors diagnosed during follow-up (1997-2007). Plasma eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) concentrations and omega-3/-6 ratio showed significant inverse associations with SCC tumors, comparing higher tertiles with the lowest, in age- and sex-adjusted models (Ptrend = 0.02 and 0.03, respectively) which weakened after adjustment for past sun exposure. Associations between EPA and SCC were stronger among participants with a history of skin cancer at baseline (n = 378; highest vs. lowest tertile: RR = 0.50; 95% CI, 0.28-0.92; Ptrend = 0.01). Total omega-6 was inversely associated with BCC tumors in multivariate models (P = 0.04; highest vs. lowest tertile: RR = 0.71; 95% CI, 0.51-0.99), and more strongly in the subgroup with past skin cancer. Linoleic and linolenic acids were also inversely associated with BCC occurrence in this subgroup. When fatty acids were analyzed as continuous variables, however, there was no evidence of any linear or nonlinear associations. This study provides some support for reduced skin cancer risk with high plasma concentrations of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, but results depended on how fatty acid data were modeled. Further investigation of these associations in larger datasets is needed.

  10. Balancing proportions of competing omega-3 and omega-6 highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA) in tissue lipids.

    PubMed

    Bibus, Doug; Lands, Bill

    2015-08-01

    People eating different balances of omega-3 and omega-6 nutrients develop predictably different proportions of competing highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA) in their tissue lipids. While epidemiological studies have associated wide differences in HUFA balance with disease severity, some clinical studies that did not examine wide differences failed to confirm the association. We examined the degree to which the relative amount of arachidonic acid, the major precursor of omega-6 eicosanoids, differs among people who have widely different dietary intakes of omega-3 and omega-6 nutrients. Gas chromatographic analyses of human blood samples describe the balance among n-3 and n-6 HUFA for different individuals. The proportion of the omega-6 arachidonic acid, from which potent eicosanoids are formed, is not constant. It ranges from 30% to 70% of HUFA while the competing n-3 HUFA range from 60% to 10% of HUFA. Significant differences in clinical outcomes between control and intervention groups have been seen when using dietary interventions that shift the balance of n-3 and n-6 nutrients far enough to create a biologically significant difference in the HUFA balance.

  11. Theoretical properties of Omega-loops in the convective zone of the Sun. 3: Extended updrafts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1995-01-01

    It was pointed out in an earlier paper that the continuing emergence of Omega-loops at localized sites on the surface of the Sun indicates a continuing updraft at those sites. The updraft evidently extends all the way from the base of the convective zone to somewhat near (approximately 10(exp 9)cm) the surface. We pointed out that such updrafts enhance the convective heat transport to the surface, accounting for a major part of the increased solar brightness or irradiance during times of solar activity. The problem is to work out, as much as possible, the dynamical nature of the extended updrafts, initiated as the wakes of successive rising Omega-loops and driven therafter by the convective forces. The question is, does the updraft take on a long-lived columnar form of its own, or does it never devlop beyond a sequence of rising wakes, resembling beads on a string? The dynamics of a columnar updraft is complicated by both the large Reynolds number and the strong stratication of the atmosphere, and by a total lack of direct observational information. Extended slender updrafts are not a spontaneous occurrence in numerical simulations of thermal convection in a stratified atmosphere, although slender concentrated downdrafts commonly occur. This paper examines several aspects of a columnar updrft in a convective atmosphere under various idealized circumstances to investigate to what extent that state can be maintained against the diminishing vorticity and expansion in the updraft. It appears that the successive passage of Omega-loops from the bottom to the top of the convective zone is an essential feature of the continuing existence of the updraft.

  12. Lowered omega3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in serum phospholipids and cholesteryl esters of depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Maes, M; Christophe, A; Delanghe, J; Altamura, C; Neels, H; Meltzer, H Y

    1999-03-22

    Depression is associated with a lowered degree of esterification of serum cholesterol, an increased C20:4omega6/C20:5omega3 ratio and decreases in omega3 fractions in fatty acids (FAs) or in the red blood cell membrane. The aims of the present study were to examine: (i) serum phospholipid and cholesteryl ester compositions of individual saturated fatty acids (SFAs), monounsaturated FAs (MUFAs) and polyunsaturated FAs (PUFAs) in major depressed patients vs. healthy volunteers; (ii) the relationships between the above FAs and lowered serum zinc (Zn), a marker of the inflammatory response in depression; and (iii) the effects of subchronic treatment with antidepressants on FAs in depression. The composition of the FAs was determined by means of thin layer chromatography in conjunction with gas chromatography. Lipid concentrations were assayed by enzymatic colorimetric methods. The oxidative potential index (OPI) of FAs was computed in 34 major depressed inpatients and 14 normal volunteers. Major depression was associated with: increased MUFA and C22:5omega3 proportions and increased C20:4omega6/C20:5omega3 and C22:5omega6/C22:6omega3 ratios; lower C22:4omega6, C20:5omega3 and C22:5omega3 fractions in phospholipids; lower C18:3omega3, C20:5omega3 and total (sigma)omega3 FAs, and higher C20:4omega6/C20:5omega3 and sigmaomega6/sigmaomega3 ratios in cholesteryl esters; lower serum concentrations of phospholipids and cholesteryl esters; and a decreased OPI. In depression, there were significant and positive correlations between serum Zn and C20:5omega3 and C22:6omega3 fractions in phospholipids; and significant inverse correlations between serum Zn and the sigmaomega6/sigmaomega3, C20:4omega6/C20:5omega3, and C22:5omega6/C22:6omega3 ratios in phospholipids. There was no significant effect of antidepressive treatment on any of the FAs. The results show that, in major depression, there is a deficiency of omega3 PUFAs and a compensatory increase in MUFAs and C22:5omega6 in

  13. Unbalanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio in red meat products in China

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ming; Gao, Qianqian; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Li, Lin; Wang, Ying; Dai, Yifan

    2013-01-01

    Dietary meats play a crucial role in human health. The objective of this survey was to determine the fatty acid content and omega-6/omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-6/n-3 PUFA) ratio of fresh red meat (beef and pork) from four cities (Shanghai, Nanjing, Yinchuan and Hohhot) in China. The results showed that the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio from all the samples ranged from 6 to 23. The total n-6 PUFA concentrations ranged from 290.54 mg/100 g in beef from Nanjing to 1601.48 mg/100 g in pork from Hohhot, whereas the total concentrations of n-3 PUFA ranged from 46.34 mg/100 g in beef from Nanjing to 96.03 mg/100 g in pork from Nanjing. The results indicated that the n-6/n-3 ratio in the red meat from all four regions is unbalanced and is much higher than that (< 5:1) recommended by the WHO/FAO. The total amount of n-3 PUFA was far lower than the required daily dose. Therefore, potential solutions to increase the n-3 PUFA content in meat products or to provide alternative source of n-3 PUFA should be explored. PMID:24086169

  14. Separation of dietary omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in food by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Laiel C; Donkor, Kingsley K; Church, John S; Cinel, Bruno; Prema, Dipesh; Dugan, Michael E R

    2013-10-01

    A lower dietary omega-6/omega-3 (n-6/n-3) fatty acid ratio (<4) has been shown to be beneficial in preventing a number of chronic illnesses. Interest exists in developing more rapid and sensitive analytical methods for profiling fatty acid levels in foods. An aqueous CE method was developed for the simultaneous determination of 15 n-3 and n-6 relevant fatty acids. The effect of pH and concentration of buffer, type and concentration of organic modifier, and additive on the separation was investigated in order to determine the best conditions for the analysis. Baseline separations of the 15 fatty acids were achieved using 40 mM borate buffer at pH 9.50 containing 50 mM SDS, 10 mM β-cyclodextrin, and 10% acetonitrile. The developed CE method has LODs of <5 mg/L and good linearity (R(2) > 0.980) for all fatty acids studied. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids in flax seed, Udo® oils and a selection of grass-fed and grain-fed beef muscle samples.

  15. Helping women to good health: breast cancer, omega-3/omega-6 lipids, and related lifestyle factors.

    PubMed

    de Lorgeril, Michel; Salen, Patricia

    2014-03-27

    In addition to genetic predisposition and sex hormone exposure, physical activity and a healthy diet play important roles in breast cancer (BC). Increased intake of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3) associated with decreased omega-6 (n-6), resulting in a higher n-3/n-6 ratio compared with the western diet, are inversely associated with BC risk, as shown by Yang et al. in their meta-analysis in BMC Cancer. High consumption of polyphenols and organic foods increase the n-3/n-6 ratio, and in turn may decrease BC risk. Intake of high fiber foods and foods with low glycemic index decreases insulin resistance and diabetes risk, and in turn may decrease BC risk. The modernized Mediterranean diet is an effective strategy for combining these recommendations, and this dietary pattern reduces overall cancer risk and specifically BC risk. High-risk women should also eliminate environmental endocrine disruptors, including those from foods. Drugs that decrease the n-3/n-6 ratio or that are suspected of increasing BC or diabetes risk should be used with great caution by high-risk women and women wishing to decrease their BC risk.Please see related article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2407/14/105/abstract.

  16. Accuracy of free energies of hydration using CM1 and CM3 atomic charges.

    PubMed

    Udier-Blagović, Marina; Morales De Tirado, Patricia; Pearlman, Shoshannah A; Jorgensen, William L

    2004-08-01

    Absolute free energies of hydration (DeltaGhyd) have been computed for 25 diverse organic molecules using partial atomic charges derived from AM1 and PM3 wave functions via the CM1 and CM3 procedures of Cramer, Truhlar, and coworkers. Comparisons are made with results using charges fit to the electrostatic potential surface (EPS) from ab initio 6-31G* wave functions and from the OPLS-AA force field. OPLS Lennard-Jones parameters for the organic molecules were used together with the TIP4P water model in Monte Carlo simulations with free energy perturbation theory. Absolute free energies of hydration were computed for OPLS united-atom and all-atom methane by annihilating the solutes in water and in the gas phase, and absolute DeltaGhyd values for all other molecules were computed via transformation to one of these references. Optimal charge scaling factors were determined by minimizing the unsigned average error between experimental and calculated hydration free energies. The PM3-based charge models do not lead to lower average errors than obtained with the EPS charges for the subset of 13 molecules in the original study. However, improvement is obtained by scaling the CM1A partial charges by 1.14 and the CM3A charges by 1.15, which leads to average errors of 1.0 and 1.1 kcal/mol for the full set of 25 molecules. The scaled CM1A charges also yield the best results for the hydration of amides including the E/Z free-energy difference for N-methylacetamide in water.

  17. Omega-3 Fatty acids and airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma.

    PubMed

    Mickleborough, Timothy D; Ionescu, Alina A; Rundell, Kenneth W

    2004-12-01

    Despite the progress that has been made in the treatment of asthma, the prevalence and burden of this disease has continued to increase. Exercise is a powerful trigger of asthma symptoms and reversible airflow obstruction and may result in the avoidance of physical activity by patients with asthma, resulting in detrimental consequences to their health. Approximately 90% of patients with asthma are hyperresponsive to exercise and experience exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). While pharmacologic treatment of asthma is usually highly effective, medications often have significant side-effects or exhibit tachyphylaxis. Alternative therapies for treatment (complementary medicine) that reduce the dose requirements of pharmacologic interventions would be beneficial, and could potentially reduce the public health burden of this disease. There is accumulating evidence that dietary modification has potential to influence the severity of asthma and reduce the prevalence and incidence of this condition. A possible contributing factor to the increased incidence of asthma in Western societies may be the consumption of a proinflammatory diet. In the typical Western diet, 20- to 25-fold more omega- 6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) than omega-3 PUFA are consumed, which causes the release of proinflammatory arachidonic acid metabolites (leukotrienes and prostanoids). This review analyzes the existing literature on omega-3 PUFA supplementation as a potential modifier of airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma and includes studies concerning the efficacy of omega-3 PUFA supplementation in EIB. While clinical data evaluating the effect of omega-3 PUFA supplementation in asthma has been equivocal, it has recently been shown that pharmaceutical-grade fish oil (omega-3 PUFA) supplementation reduces airway hyperresponsiveness after exercise, medication use, and proinflammatory mediator generation in nonatopic elite athletes with EIB. These findings are provocative and suggest that

  18. Hubble Space Telescope Image of Omega Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This sturning image, taken by the newly installed Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), is an image of the center of the Omega Nebula. It is a hotbed of newly born stars wrapped in colorful blankets of glowing gas and cradled in an enormous cold, dark hydrogen cloud. The region of nebula shown in this photograph is about 3,500 times wider than our solar system. The nebula, also called M17 and the Swan Nebula, resides 5,500 light-years away in the constellation Sagittarius. The Swan Nebula is illuminated by ultraviolet radiation from young, massive stars, located just beyond the upper-right corner of the image. The powerful radiation from these stars evaporates and erodes the dense cloud of cold gas within which the stars formed. The blistered walls of the hollow cloud shine primarily in the blue, green, and red light emitted by excited atoms of hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur. Particularly striking is the rose-like feature, seen to the right of center, which glows in the red light emitted by hydrogen and sulfur. As the infant stars evaporate the surrounding cloud, they expose dense pockets of gas that may contain developing stars. One isolated pocket is seen at the center of the brightest region of the nebula. Other dense pockets of gas have formed the remarkable feature jutting inward from the left edge of the image. The color image is constructed from four separate images taken in these filters: blue, near infrared, hydrogen alpha, and doubly ionized oxygen. Credit: NASA, H. Ford (JHU), G. Illingworth (USCS/LO), M. Clampin (STScI), G. Hartig (STScI), the ACS Science Team, and ESA.

  19. New λ6 cm and λ11 cm observations of the supernova remnant CTA 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X. H.; Reich, W.; Wang, C.; Han, J. L.; Reich, P.

    2011-11-01

    Aims: We attempt to study spatial variations in the spectrum and rotation measures (RMs) of the large-diameter, high-latitude supernova remnant (SNR) CTA 1. Methods: We conducted new λ6 cm and λ11 cm observations of CTA 1 using the Urumqi 25-m and Effelsberg 100-m telescopes. Data at other wavelengths were included to investigate the spectrum and polarisation properties. Results: We obtained new total intensity and polarisation maps at λ6 cm and λ11 cm with angular resolutions of 9'.5and 4'.4, respectively. We derived a spectral index of α = -0.63 ± 0.05 (Sν ∝ να) based on the integrated flux densities at 408 MHz, 1420 MHz, 2639 MHz, and 4800 MHz. The spectral index map calculated from data at the four frequencies shows a clear steepening of the spectrum from the strong shell emission towards the north-western breakout region with weak diffuse emission. The decrease of the spectral index is up to about Δα = 0.3. The RM map derived from polarisation data at λ6 cm and λ11 cm shows a sharp transition between positive RMs in the north-eastern and negative RMs in the south-western part of the SNR. We note a corresponding RM pattern of extragalactic sources and propose the existence of a large-diameter Faraday screen in front of CTA 1, which covers the north-eastern part of the SNR. The RM of the Faraday screen is estimated to be about +45 rad m-2. A RM structure function of CTA 1 indicates a very regular magnetic field within the Faraday screen, which is stronger than about 2.7 μG for a distance of 500 pc. Conclusions: CTA 1 is a large-diameter shell-type SNR located out of the Galactic plane, which makes it an ideal object to study its properties without suffering confusion. The previous detection of the rare breakout phenomenon in CTA 1 is confirmed. We identify a Faraday screen partly covering CTA 1 with a regular magnetic field in the opposite direction to the interstellar magnetic field. The detection of Faraday screens in the Galactic plane is

  20. Absorption of intact beta-casomorphins (beta-CM) in rabbit ileum in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mahè, S; Tomè, D; Dumontier, A M; Desjeux, J F

    1989-01-01

    The functional significance of the presence of opioid peptides in enzymatic digestion of bovine milk beta-casein remains unclear. Opiates modify intestinal electrolyte transport by acting on receptors located on the serosal side of the intestine. The aim of the present study is to determine under which conditions beta-casomorphins could act from the luminal side of the intestine. The effect of natural morphiceptin (beta-CM4-NH2) and the non metabolized analogue beta-[DAla2,4, Try5]-CM5-NH2 were studied on isolated rabbit ileum mounted in Ussing chambers. Both peptides caused a naloxone-reversible reduction in short-circuit current (lsc) and stimulated Na and Cl absorption after addition to the serosal side of the tissue. After mucosal addition, only the analogue (10(-3) M) crossed the epithelium intact (Jm-s = 3.5 +/- 1.2 nmol.h-1.cm-2) and reduced lsc. Morphiceptin, under the same conditions, was degraded by the intestinal mucosa without opiate action on electrolyte transport. Pretreatment of the ileum by 10(-3)M diisopropylfluorophosphate that inhibited brush-border dipeptidylpeptidase IV, prevented mucosal degradation of morphiceptin. Under these conditions, the peptide (10(-3)M) crossed the epithelium intact (Jm-s = 1.8 +/- 0.16 nmol.h-1.cm-2) and stimulated electrolyte absorption by means of an opioid mechanism. These results show that both natural morphiceptin and the protected analogue have an opiate activity on intestinal electrolyte transport. Their action from the lumen depends on their transfer intact to the serosal side of the intestine where opiate receptors are located. The limiting step in this transfer is at the brush-border membrane where dipeptidylpeptidase IV in particular seems to play a major role.

  1. PROCESS OF PRODUCING Cm$sup 244$ AND Cm$sup 24$$sup 5$

    DOEpatents

    Manning, W.M.; Studier, M.H.; Diamond, H.; Fields, P.R.

    1958-11-01

    A process is presented for producing Cm and Cm/sup 245/. The first step of the process consists in subjecting Pu/sup 2339/ to a high neutron flux and subsequently dissolving the irradiated material in HCl. The plutonium is then oxidized to at least the tetravalent state and the solution is contacted with an anion exchange resin, causing the plutonium values to be absorbed while the fission products and transplutonium elements remain in the effluent solution. The effluent solution is then contacted with a cation exchange resin causing the transplutonium, values to be absorbed while the fission products remain in solution. The cation exchange resin is then contacted with an aqueous citrate solution and tbe transplutonium elements are thereby differentially eluted in order of decreasing atomic weight, allowing collection of the desired fractions.

  2. Demonstration of the highest deuterium-tritium areal density using multiple-picket cryogenic designs on OMEGA.

    PubMed

    Goncharov, V N; Sangster, T C; Boehly, T R; Hu, S X; Igumenshchev, I V; Marshall, F J; McCrory, R L; Meyerhofer, D D; Radha, P B; Seka, W; Skupsky, S; Stoeckl, C; Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Petrasso, R D

    2010-04-23

    The performance of triple-picket deuterium-tritium cryogenic target designs on the OMEGA Laser System [T. R. Boehly, Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] is reported. These designs facilitate control of shock heating in low-adiabat inertial confinement fusion targets. Areal densities up to 300 mg/cm2 (the highest ever measured in cryogenic deuterium-tritium implosions) are inferred in the experiments with an implosion velocity approximately 3x10(7) cm/s driven at peak laser intensities of 8x10(14) W/cm2. Extension of these designs to ignition on the National Ignition Facility [J. A. Paisner, Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)] is presented.

  3. Omega-3 fatty acids in inflammation and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Simopoulos, Artemis P

    2002-12-01

    Among the fatty acids, it is the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) which possess the most potent immunomodulatory activities, and among the omega-3 PUFA, those from fish oil-eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)--are more biologically potent than alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). Some of the effects of omega-3 PUFA are brought about by modulation of the amount and types of eicosanoids made, and other effects are elicited by eicosanoid-independent mechanisms, including actions upon intracellular signaling pathways, transcription factor activity and gene expression. Animal experiments and clinical intervention studies indicate that omega-3 fatty acids have anti-inflammatory properties and, therefore, might be useful in the management of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Coronary heart disease, major depression, aging and cancer are characterized by an increased level of interleukin 1 (IL-1), a proinflammatory cytokine. Similarly, arthritis, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis and lupus erythematosis are autoimmune diseases characterized by a high level of IL-1 and the proinflammatory leukotriene LTB(4) produced by omega-6 fatty acids. There have been a number of clinical trials assessing the benefits of dietary supplementation with fish oils in several inflammatory and autoimmune diseases in humans, including rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, psoriasis, lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis and migraine headaches. Many of the placebo-controlled trials of fish oil in chronic inflammatory diseases reveal significant benefit, including decreased disease activity and a lowered use of anti-inflammatory drugs.

  4. Cardiac mortality is associated with low levels of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in the heart of cadavers with a history of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Chattipakorn, Nipon; Settakorn, Jongkolnee; Petsophonsakul, Petnoi; Suwannahoi, Padiphat; Mahakranukrauh, Pasuk; Srichairatanakool, Somdet; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2009-10-01

    The benefits of omega-3 (ie, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]) and omega-6 (ie, linoleic acid and arachidonic acid [AA]) fatty acids on reducing cardiac mortality are still debated. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that high levels of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in heart tissues are associated with low cardiac mortality in Thai cadavers. One hundred fresh cadavers were examined in this study. The cause of death, history of coronary heart disease (CHD), and fish consumption habits were obtained from death certificates, cadaver medical record profiles, and a questionnaire to a person who lived with the subject before death. In each cadaver, biopsies of cardiac tissues were taken from the interventricular septum for measurement of fatty acid. Of the 100 cadavers (average age, 69 +/- 13 years), 60 were men. The frequency of fish consumption was directly associated with omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in heart tissues (P < .01). History of CHD and cause of death (cardiac vs noncardiac) were not significantly associated with levels of omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids. However, in cadavers with a history of CHD, high levels of omega-3 and omega-6, particularly DHA and AA, were associated with low cardiac mortality (P < .05). Fish consumption is associated with levels of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in heart tissues. Although omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are not associated with cardiac mortality in the overall studied population, their low levels (especially DHA and AA) in heart tissues are associated with high cardiac mortality in cadavers with a history of CHD.

  5. Promotion of prostatic metastatic migration towards human bone marrow stoma by Omega 6 and its inhibition by Omega 3 PUFAs

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M D; Hart, C A; Gazi, E; Bagley, S; Clarke, N W

    2006-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown not only a relationship between the intake of dietary lipids and an increased risk of developing metastatic prostate cancer, but also the type of lipid intake that influences the risk of metastatic prostate cancer. The Omega-6 poly-unsaturated fatty acid, Arachidonic acid, has been shown to enhance the proliferation of malignant prostate epithelial cells and increase the risk of advanced prostate cancer. However, its role in potentiating the migration of cancer cells is unknown. Here we show that arachidonic acid at concentrations ⩽5 μM is a potent stimulator of malignant epithelial cellular invasion, which is able to restore invasion toward hydrocortisone-deprived adipocyte-free human bone marrow stroma completely. This observed invasion is mediated by the arachidonic acid metabolite prostaglandin E2 and is inhibited by the Omega-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid at a ratio of 1 : 2 Omega-3 : Omega-6, and by the COX-2 inhibitor NS-398. These results identify a mechanism by which arachidonic acid may potentiate the risk of metastatic migration and secondary implantation in vivo, a risk which can be reduced with the uptake of Omega-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acids. PMID:16523199

  6. Evidence for the decay X(3872) -> J/\\psi\\omega

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-11

    We present a study of the decays B{sup 0,+} --> J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}K{sup 0,+}, using 467x10{sup 6} B{anti B} pairs recorded with the BABAR detector. We present evidence for the decay mode X(3872) --> J/{psi}{omega}, with product branching fractions B(B{sup +} --> X(3872)K{sup +}) x B(X(3872) --> J/{psi}{omega}) = [0.6 {+-} 0.2(stat) {+-} 0.1(syst)] x 10{sup -5}, and B(B{sup 0} --> X(3872)K{sup 0}) x B(X(3872) --> J/{psi}{omega}) = [0.6 {+-} 0.3(stat) {+-} 0.1(syst)] x 10{sup -5}. A detailed study of the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} mass distribution from X(3872) decay favors a negative-parity assignment.

  7. Rapid lipid enrichment in omega3 fatty acids: liver data.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Yvon A; Peltier, Sebastien; Portois, Laurence; Sener, Abdullah; Malaisse, Willy J

    2008-03-01

    The bolus intravenous injection of a novel medium-chain triglyceride:fish oil emulsion to normal subjects was recently reported to enrich within 60 min the phospholipid content of leucocytes and platelets in long-chain polyunsaturated omega3 fatty acids. The present study, conducted in second generation omega3-depleted rats, aims at investigating whether such a procedure may also increase within 60 min the phospholipid content of omega3 fatty acids in cells located outwards of the bloodstream, in this case liver cells, and whether this coincides with correction of the perturbation in the liver triglyceride fatty acid content and profile otherwise prevailing in these rats. The results indicate that such is indeed the case and further suggest a cause-to-effect relationship between the two events.

  8. The Fifth Omega Laser Facility Users Group Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-10-01

    A capacity gathering of over 100 researchers from 25 universities and laboratories met at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) for the Fifth Omega Laser Facility Users Group (OLUG) workshop. The purpose of the 2.5-day workshop was to facilitate communications and exchanges among individual Omega users and between users and the LLE management; to present ongoing and proposed research; to encourage research opportunities and collaborations that could be undertaken at the Omega Laser Facility and in a complementary fashion at other facilities [such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) or the Laboratoire pour l’Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI)]; to provide an opportunity for students, postdoctoral fellows, and young researchers to present their research in an informal setting; and to provide feedback to LLE management from the users about ways to improve the facility and future experimental campaigns.

  9. Constraining omega and bias from the Stromlo-APM survey

    SciTech Connect

    Loveday, J.

    1995-05-01

    Galaxy redshift surveys provide a distorted picture of the universe due to the non-Hubble component of galaxy motions. By measuring such distortions in the linear regime one can constrain the quantity {beta} = {Omega}{sup 0.6} where {Omega} is the cosmological density parameter and b is the (linear) bias factor for optically-selected galaxies. In this paper we estimate {beta} from the Stromlo-APM redshift survey by comparing the amplitude of the direction-averaged redshift space correlation function to the real space correlation function. We find a 95% confidence upper limit of {beta} = 0.75, with a `best estimate` of {beta} {approx} 0.48. A bias parameter b {approx} 2 is thus required if {Omega} {equivalent_to} 1. However, higher-order correlations measured from the APM galaxy survey indicate a low value for the bias parameter b {approx} 1, requiring that Q {approx_lt} 0.6.

  10. Deeply virtual and exclusive production of the omega meson

    SciTech Connect

    M. Garcon; L. Morand; D. Dore; J.-M. Laget; S. Morrow; F. Sabatie

    2005-04-01

    Exclusive {omega} electroproduction off the proton was measured at the highest possible four-momentum transfer with the (close to) 6 GeV beam now available at CEBAF. Cross sections are presented, together with an analysis of the {omega} spin density matrix elements. Indications are that {pi}{sup 0} exchange in the t-channel (or rather the exchange of the corresponding saturating Regge trajectory) seems to dominate the process {gamma}*p {yields} {omega}p, even for photon virtuality Q{sup 2} as large as 5 GeV{sup 2}. Contributions of the handbag type, related to Generalized Parton Distributions in the nucleon, are therefore difficult to extract from this particular process.

  11. The Sixth Omega Laser Facility Users Group Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Petrasso, R. D.

    2014-10-01

    A capacity gathering of over 100 researchers from 25 universities and laboratories met at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) for the Sixth Omega Laser Facility Users Group (OLUG) workshop. The purpose of the 2.5-day workshop was to facilitate communications and exchanges among individual OMEGA users, and between users and the LLE management; to present ongoing and proposed research; to encourage research opportunities and collaborations that could be undertaken at the Omega Laser Facility and in a complementary fashion at other facilities [such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) or the Laboratoire pour l’Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI)]; to provide an opportunity for students, postdoctoral fellows, and young researchers to present their research in an informal setting; and to provide feedback from the users to LLE management about ways to improve and keep the facility and future experimental campaigns at the cutting edge.

  12. Search for Lepton Flavor Violating Decays Tau+- to L+- Omega

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, S.; /Heidelberg U.

    2011-11-30

    This paper reports on a search for lepton flavor violating decays of a {tau} lepton to a lighter-mass charged lepton and an {omega} vector meson. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 384 fb{sup -1} recorded by the BaBar experiment at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory. No evidence for a signal is found and the upper limits on the branching ratios are determined to be B({tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} e{sup {+-}}{omega}) < 1.1 x 10{sup -7} and B({tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{omega}) < 1.0 x 10{sup -7} at 90% confidence level.

  13. 46 CFR 53.10-3 - Inspection and tests (modifies HG-500 through HG-540).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS Tests, Inspection, Stamping, and Reporting (Article 5) § 53.10-3 Inspection and... commission issued by the National Board of Boiler and Pressure Vessel Inspectors. After installation, heating... heating boilers must have the operation of their pressure relieving devices checked after the...

  14. 46 CFR 53.10-3 - Inspection and tests (modifies HG-500 through HG-540).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS Tests, Inspection, Stamping, and Reporting (Article 5) § 53.10-3 Inspection and... commission issued by the National Board of Boiler and Pressure Vessel Inspectors. After installation, heating... heating boilers must have the operation of their pressure relieving devices checked after the...

  15. 46 CFR 53.10-3 - Inspection and tests (modifies HG-500 through HG-540).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS Tests, Inspection, Stamping, and Reporting (Article 5) § 53.10-3 Inspection and... commission issued by the National Board of Boiler and Pressure Vessel Inspectors. After installation, heating... heating boilers must have the operation of their pressure relieving devices checked after the...

  16. 46 CFR 53.10-3 - Inspection and tests (modifies HG-500 through HG-540).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS Tests, Inspection, Stamping, and Reporting (Article 5) § 53.10-3 Inspection and... commission issued by the National Board of Boiler and Pressure Vessel Inspectors. After installation, heating... heating boilers must have the operation of their pressure relieving devices checked after the...

  17. 46 CFR 53.10-3 - Inspection and tests (modifies HG-500 through HG-540).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ENGINEERING HEATING BOILERS Tests, Inspection, Stamping, and Reporting (Article 5) § 53.10-3 Inspection and... commission issued by the National Board of Boiler and Pressure Vessel Inspectors. After installation, heating... heating boilers must have the operation of their pressure relieving devices checked after the...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10214 - Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle (generic). 721.10214 Section 721.10214... Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle (generic... identified generically as poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10214 - Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle (generic). 721.10214 Section 721.10214... Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle (generic... identified generically as poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10214 - Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle (generic). 721.10214 Section 721.10214... Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle (generic... identified generically as poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10286 - Formaldehyde, polymer with .alpha.- (2-aminomethylethyl)- .omega. - (2 - aminomethylethoxy)poly...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-aminomethylethyl)- .omega. - (2 - aminomethylethoxy)poly and 4 - (1,1 -dimethylethyl) phenol. 721.10286 Section 721... Formaldehyde, polymer with .alpha.- (2-aminomethylethyl)- .omega. - (2 - aminomethylethoxy)poly and 4 - (1,1... substance identified as formaldehyde, polymer with...

  2. Towards the Industrial Production of Omega-3 Long Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids from a Genetically Modified Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Mary L.; Warwick, Joanna; Terry, Anya; Allen, Michael J.; Napier, Johnathan A.; Sayanova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    and F/2 nutrients was 24.8% EPA and 10.3% DHA. Transgenic strain grown in RP produced the highest levels of EPA (12.8%) incorporated in neutral lipids. However, the highest partitioning of DHA in neutral lipids was observed in cultures grown in PBR (7.1%). Our results clearly demonstrate the potential for the development of the transgenic Pt_Elo5 as a platform for the commercial production of EPA and DHA. PMID:26658738

  3. Towards the Industrial Production of Omega-3 Long Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids from a Genetically Modified Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Mary L; Warwick, Joanna; Terry, Anya; Allen, Michael J; Napier, Johnathan A; Sayanova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    and F/2 nutrients was 24.8% EPA and 10.3% DHA. Transgenic strain grown in RP produced the highest levels of EPA (12.8%) incorporated in neutral lipids. However, the highest partitioning of DHA in neutral lipids was observed in cultures grown in PBR (7.1%). Our results clearly demonstrate the potential for the development of the transgenic Pt_Elo5 as a platform for the commercial production of EPA and DHA.

  4. A DEEP CHANDRA X-RAY LIMIT ON THE PUTATIVE IMBH IN OMEGA CENTAURI

    SciTech Connect

    Haggard, Daryl; Cool, Adrienne M.; Heinke, Craig O.; Van der Marel, Roeland; Anderson, Jay; Cohn, Haldan N.; Lugger, Phyllis M. E-mail: cool@sfsu.edu

    2013-08-20

    We report a sensitive X-ray search for the proposed intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) in the massive Galactic cluster, {omega} Centauri (NGC 5139). Combining Chandra X-ray Observatory data from Cycles 1 and 13, we obtain a deep ({approx}291 ks) exposure of the central regions of the cluster. We find no evidence for an X-ray point source near any of the cluster's proposed dynamical centers, and place an upper limit on the X-ray flux from a central source of f{sub X}(0.5-7.0 keV) {<=}5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -16} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, after correcting for absorption. This corresponds to an unabsorbed X-ray luminosity of L{sub X}(0.5-7.0 keV) {<=}1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg s{sup -1}, for a cluster distance of 5.2 kpc, Galactic column density N{sub H} = 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}, and power-law spectrum with {Gamma} = 2.3. If a {approx}10{sup 4} M{sub sun} IMBH resides in the cluster's core, as suggested by some stellar dynamical studies, its Eddington luminosity would be L{sub Edd} {approx}10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. The new X-ray limit would then establish an Eddington ratio of L{sub X}/L{sub Edd} {approx}< 10{sup -12}, a factor of {approx}10 lower than even the quiescent state of our Galaxy's notoriously inefficient supermassive black hole Sgr A*, and imply accretion efficiencies as low as {eta} {approx}< 10{sup -6}-10{sup -8}. This study leaves open three possibilities: either {omega} Cen does not harbor an IMBH or, if an IMBH does exist, it must experience very little or very inefficient accretion.

  5. Low-cost mechanical filters for OMEGA receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burhans, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A pair of prototype low frequency mechanical filters were obtained for use as the RF front-end components of an OMEGA-VLF navigation receiver. The filter units are of interest because of very narrow bandwidths and high skirt selectivity to minimize noise and off-channel carriers in the reception of OMEGA signals. In addition, the filters have a characteristic low impedance of 75 to 5,000 ohms which results in less critical PC board circuitry compared to some previous resonators with termination resistances of 25,000 ohms to 5 megohms.

  6. VLA Images of Venus at 1.3 CM and 2 CM Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleiman, S. H.; Kolodner, M. A.; Butler, B. J.; Steffes, P. G.

    1996-09-01

    On April 5, 1996, we performed an observation of Venus using the Very Large Array (VLA) at 15 GHz (2 cm) and 22 GHz (1.3 cm) simultaneously. High resolution continuum images for Venus were obtained at both frequencies. These images show significant polar darkening at latitudes above 60(deg) which is consistent with the results obtained by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter Infrared Radiometer (OIR) experiment (Taylor et al., J. Geophys. Res. 85, 7963-8006, 1980). These images are currently being used to detect potential spatial (longitudinal and latitudinal) variations in the abundances of gaseous sulfur dioxide (SO_2) and gaseous sulfuric acid (H_2SO_4) across the disk of Venus. Our new radiative transfer model (RTM) has shown that the emission spectrum is especially sensitive to the abundances of these constituents at these wavelengths. The detection of these constituents is being accomplished by matching the computed emission from our RTM to the measured emission of Venus by the VLA. Our RTM incorporates the newly developed Ben Reuven formalism which provides a more accurate characterization of the microwave absorption of gaseous SO_2 (Suleiman et al., J. Geophys. Res. 101, 4623-4635, 1996). A description of the observation, visibility data, and images are presented. This work was supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program under grant NAGW-533.

  7. A Study of Production and Decay of Omega_c^0 Baryons in BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /University of Bergen, Institute of Physics, N-5007 Bergen, Norway /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-09-28

    Production and decay of {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} baryons is studied with {approx} 230 fb{sup -1} of data recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} asymmetric-energy storage ring at SLAC. The {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} is reconstructed through its decays into {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {Xi}{sup -}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} final states. The invariant mass spectra are presented and the signal yields are extracted. Ratios of branching fractions are measured relative to the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} {yields} {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} mode {Beta}({Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} {yields} {Xi}{sup -} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +})/{Beta}({Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} {yields} {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.31 {+-} 0.15(stat.) {+-} 0.04(syst.), {Beta}({Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} {yields} {Omega}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/{Beta}({Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} {yields} {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) < 0.30 (90%CL). The momentum spectrum (not corrected for efficiency) of {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} baryons is extracted from decays into {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, establishing the first observation of {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} production from B decays.

  8. Enhanced Performance of Large 3(omega) Optics Using UV and IR Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, R R; Bruere, J; Peterson, J; Halpin, J; Borden, M; Hackel, R P

    2003-11-01

    We have developed techniques using small-beam raster scanning to laser-condition fused silica optics to increase their damage threshold. Further, we showed that CO{sub 2} lasers could be used to mitigate and stabilize damage sites while still on the order of a few tens of microns in size, thereby greatly increasing the lifetime of an optic. We recently activated the Phoenix pre-production facility to condition and mitigate optics as large as 43 cm x 43 cm. Several full-scale optics have been processed in Phoenix. The optics were first photographed using a damage mapping system to identify scratches, digs, or other potential sites for initiation of laser damage. We then condition the optic, raster scanning with the excimer laser. The first scan is performed at a low fluence. A damage map is then acquired and any new damage sites or any sites that have grown in size are mitigated using the CO{sub 2} laser. The process is repeated at successively higher fluences until a factor of 1.7 above the nominal operating fluence is reached. After conditioning, optics were tested in a large beam 3{omega} laser and showed no damage at fluences of 8 J/cm{sup 2} average.

  9. Spherical Rayleigh-Taylor Growth of Three-Dimensional Broadband Perturbations on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V.A.; Hu, S.X.; Hager, J.D.; Delettrez, J.A.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Sangster, T.C.; Shvarts, D.

    2009-11-10

    Spherical Rayleigh–Taylor (RT) growth experiments of three-dimensional (3D) broadband nonuniformities were conducted in the acceleration phase of spherical implosions on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The targets consisted of 20- and 24-um-thick plastic spherical shells having diagnostic openings for backlighter x rays to image shell modulations. Experiments were conducted with square laser pulses at a low drive intensity of ~2 x 10^14 W/cm^2, high drive intensity of ~1 x 10^15 W/cm^2, and a shaped pulse consisting of a low-intensity foot and high-intensity drive part (peak intensity of ~1 x 10^15 W/cm^2). In low-intensity experiments, large RT growth was measured, resulting in shells being broken up by 3D modulations at the end of the drive. In the high-intensity experiments, no RT growth of the 3D modulations was detected. In the shaped-pulse experiments, perturbations grew during the low-intensity part of the drive and were stabilized later during the high-intensity part of the drive. The measured RT growth stabilization with the high-intensity drive was similar to previous observations in planar geometry [V. A. Smalyuk et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 025002 (2008)].

  10. Antioxidant activity of sesamol and omega-oryzanol towards fish oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two natural antioxidants, sesamol and omega-oryzanol, were examined for their antioxidant activity towards omega-3 oil. Sesamol and omega-oryzanol have been known to provide antioxidant effects at high temperatures such as those used for frying. In this study, the effects of 0.84 mM and 8.4 mM oryza...

  11. Estimating [omega][subscript h] for Structures Containing Two Group Factors: Perils and Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinbarg, Richard E.; Revelle, William; Yovel, Iftah

    2007-01-01

    One of the most serious difficulties in the estimation of omega[subscript hierarchical] ([omega][subscript h]) has not been previously studied. Although it is true that one can impose a set of identifying constraints on one's solution to derive an estimate of [omega][subscript h] in the two-group factor case, there is the potential for introducing…

  12. Reverse bias voltage testing of 8 cm x 8cm silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woike, T.; Stotlar, S.; Lungu, C.

    1991-01-01

    A study is described of the reverse I-V characteristics of the largest space qualified silicon solar cells currently available (8 x 8 cm) and of reverse bias voltage (RBV) testing performed on these cells. This study includes production grade cells, both with and without cover glass. These cells span the typical output range seen in production. Initial characteristics of these cells are measured at both 28 and 60 C. These measurements show weak correlation between cell output and reverse characteristics. Analysis is presented to determine the proper conditions for RBV stress to simulate shadowing effects on a particular array design. After performing the RBV stress the characteristics of the stressed cells are remeasured. The degradation in cell performance is highly variable which exacerbates cell mismatching over time. The effect of this degradation on array lifetime is also discussed. Generalization of these results to other array configurations is also presented.

  13. Chrysanthemum CmNAR2 interacts with CmNRT2 in the control of nitrate uptake

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Chunsun; Zhang, Xiaoxue; Jiang, Jiafu; Guan, Zhiyong; Zhao, Shuang; Fang, Weimin; Liao, Yuan; Chen, Sumei; Chen, Fadi

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate transporters are an important component of plant growth and development. Chrysanthemum morifolium is an important ornamental species, for which a sufficient supply of nitrogenous fertilizer is required to maintain economic yields. In this study, the full-length cDNA of the nitrate transporter genes CmNRT2 and CmNAR2 were isolated. CmNRT2 transcript accumulation was inducible by both nitrate and ammonium, but the latter ion down-regulated the transcript accumulation of CmNAR2. CmNRT2 might be a plasma membrane localized protein, while CmNAR2 was distributed throughout the cell. CmNAR2 was shown to interact with CmNRT2 by in vitro and in vivo assays. Arabidopsis thaliana plants heterologously expressing CmNRT2 showed an increased rate of nitrate influx, while this trait was unaltered in plants expressing CmNAR2. Double transformants (CmNRT2 plus CmNAR2) exhibited an enhanced rate of nitrate influx into the root. Our data indicated that the interaction of CmNAR2 with CmNRT2 contributed to the uptake of nitrate. PMID:25060485

  14. The least-action method, cold dark matter, and omega

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, A. M.; Laflamme, R.

    1995-01-01

    Peebles has suggested an interesting technique, called the least-action method, to trace positions of galaxies back in time. This method applied on the Local Group galaxies seems to indicate that we live in an omega approximately = 0.1 universe. We have studied a cold dark matter (CDM) N-body simulation with omega = 0.2 and H = 50 km/s/Mpc and compared trajectories traced back by the least-action method with the ones given by the center of mass of the CDM halos. We show that the agreement between these sets of trajectories is at best qualitative. We also show that the line-of-sight peculiar velocities of halos are underestimated. This discrepancy is due to orphans, i.e., CDM particles which do not end up in halos. We vary the value of omega in the least-action method until the line-of-sight velocities agree with the CDM ones. The best value for this omega underestimates one of the CDM simulations by a factor of 4-5.

  15. Omega-3 fatty acids for breast cancer prevention and survivorship.

    PubMed

    Fabian, Carol J; Kimler, Bruce F; Hursting, Stephen D

    2015-05-04

    Women with evidence of high intake ratios of the marine omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) relative to the omega-6 arachidonic acid have been found to have a reduced risk of breast cancer compared with those with low ratios in some but not all case-control and cohort studies. If increasing EPA and DHA relative to arachidonic acid is effective in reducing breast cancer risk, likely mechanisms include reduction in proinflammatory lipid derivatives, inhibition of nuclear factor-κB-induced cytokine production, and decreased growth factor receptor signaling as a result of alteration in membrane lipid rafts. Primary prevention trials with either risk biomarkers or cancer incidence as endpoints are underway but final results of these trials are currently unavailable. EPA and DHA supplementation is also being explored in an effort to help prevent or alleviate common problems after a breast cancer diagnosis, including cardiac and cognitive dysfunction and chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. The insulin-sensitizing and anabolic properties of EPA and DHA also suggest supplementation studies to determine whether these omega-3 fatty acids might reduce chemotherapy-associated loss of muscle mass and weight gain. We will briefly review relevant omega-3 fatty acid metabolism, and early investigations in breast cancer prevention and survivorship.

  16. Prevention of Sports Injuries by Marine Omega-3 Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Bryhn, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Sport injuries are common and costly for the professional athlete, the "weekend warrior," and the community. Acute injuries are treated according to current guidelines with the aim of bringing the athlete back into the arena. These guidelines have not taken into account new scientific results of the inflammatory process following a trauma. The 4 hallmarks of inflammation, namely, pain, swelling, redness, and heat, are results of an adequate inflammatory response with the aim of bringing the affected tissue back to restitution (Latin: restitutio ad integrum). Cooling of the affected limb and anti-inflammatory drugs are widely used but may deter healing. The healing process is governed by fatty acids of the omega-3 and omega-6 series. In order to facilitate healing, these fatty acids have to be present in significant amounts in the affected tissues before the trauma occurs. This is particularly relevant for marine omega-3 fatty acids, which are often running low due to insignificant intake of seafood, common in individuals practicing sports. High-energy sports often lead to head and brain trauma. Continuous head traumata may even result in later mental defects. Saturation of brain cells with omega-3 fatty acids, in particular docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), may facilitate healing after brain trauma, thereby counteracting negative long-term results. The present understanding of a normal inflammatory process leading to restitution will be discussed along with data from recent scientific trials.

  17. High-Energy Petawatt Capability for the Omega Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Waxer, L.J.; Maywar, D.N.; Kelly, J.H.; Kessler, T.J.; Kruschwitz, B.E.; Loucks, S.J.; McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Morse, S.F.B.; Stoeckl, C.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2005-07-25

    The 60-beam Omega laser system at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) has been a workhorse on the frontier of laser fusion and high-energy-density physics for more than a decade. LLE scientists are currently extending the performance of this unique, direct-drive laser system by adding high-energy petawatt capabilities.

  18. A picosecond beam-timing system for the OMEGA laser

    DOE PAGES

    Donaldson, W. R.; Katz, J.; Huff, R.; ...

    2016-05-27

    Here, a timing system is demonstrated for the OMEGA Laser System that guarantees all 60 beams will arrive on target simultaneously with a root mean square variability of 4 ps. The system relies on placing a scattering sphere at the target position to couple the UV light from each beam into a single photodetector.

  19. Do we need 'new' omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids formulations?

    PubMed

    Cicero, Arrigo F G; Morbini, Martino; Borghi, Claudio

    2015-02-01

    The therapeutic value of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), mainly (but not only) found in fish oils, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids (EPA and DHA, respectively), has been extensively studied in a wide variety of disease conditions, predominantly in cardiovascular disease. However, the significant difference in efficacy observed in various conditions with different dosages seems to be at least partly related to the large discrepancy in quality of the product and to the bioavailability of the omega-3 PUFA. The research of new sources (e.g., from arctic Krill oil) and pharmaceutical forms of omega-3 PUFA (e.g., omega-3 carboxylic acids) is needed in order to detect the one with the best bioavailability and efficacy, and with a parallel reduction in the production costs. There is also the need to understand if long-term PUFA supplementation could increase the efficacy of the already-available evidence-based therapies for cardiovascular disease prevention and for the management of the diseases where the use of PUFA could have a possible improving effect.

  20. Maternal micronutrients, omega-3 fatty acids, and placental PPARγ expression.

    PubMed

    Meher, Akshaya P; Joshi, Asmita A; Joshi, Sadhana R

    2014-07-01

    An altered one-carbon cycle is known to influence placental and fetal development. We hypothesize that deficiency of maternal micronutrients such as folic acid and vitamin B12 will lead to increased oxidative stress, reduced long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, and altered expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPARγ) in the placenta, and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation to these diets will increase the expression of PPARγ. Female rats were divided into 5 groups: control, folic acid deficient, vitamin B12 deficient, folic acid deficient + omega-3 fatty acid supplemented, and vitamin B12 deficient + omega-3 fatty acid supplemented. Dams were dissected on gestational day 20. Maternal micronutrient deficiency leads to lower (p < 0.05) levels of placental docosahexaenoic acid, arachidonic acid, PPARγ expression and higher (p < 0.05) levels of plasma malonidialdehyde, placental IL-6, and TNF-α. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation to a vitamin B12 deficient diet normalized the expression of PPARγ and lowered the levels of placental TNF-α. In the case of supplementation to a folic acid deficient diet it lowered the levels of malonidialdehyde and placental IL-6 and TNF-α. This study has implications for fetal growth as oxidative stress, inflammation, and PPARγ are known to play a key role in the placental development.

  1. Quark diagrams and the. cap omega. /sup -/ nonleptonic decays

    SciTech Connect

    Ponce, W.A.

    1980-09-01

    The quark-diagram model for nonleptonic two-body baryon decays is discussed and applied to the decay of the ..cap omega../sup -/ particle. Current algebra is not employed, but the relation between the quark diagrams and current algebra is explored.

  2. Omega-3 fatty acids: a novel resort against gastrointestinal injury.

    PubMed

    Ianiro, G; Franceschi, F; Bibbò, S; Gasbarrini, A

    2014-10-01

    The integrity of gastric barrier derives from the balance between defending and damaging factors. In particular, prostaglandins play a relevant role in the maintenance of gastric homeostasis and prevention of peptic disease, at different levels. Omega-3 fatty acids, particularly eicosapentanoic acid, are the precursors of the third series of prostaglandins (with anti-inflammatory properties), also reducing the formation of the second series of prostaglandins (pro-inflammatory ones). Such a pathophysiological rationale brought to the experimental application, both in animal models and, more recently, in humans, of omega-3 fatty acids against gastrointestinal damage. Omega-3 fatty acids have shown interesting results in preventing different types of gastric damage in mouse models. A large retrospective case-control study on patients taking both anti-thrombotic therapy and eicosapentanoic acid showed (although only at unadjusted analysis) an inverse correlation between consumption of eicosapentanoic acid and gastrointestinal injury. Prospective, well-designed, comparative studies are warranted to clarify if omega-3 fatty acids may represent, or not, a novel resort against gastrointestinal injury.

  3. An algorithm for the automatic synchronization of Omega receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stonestreet, W. M.; Marzetta, T. L.

    1977-01-01

    The Omega navigation system and the requirement for receiver synchronization are discussed. A description of the synchronization algorithm is provided. The numerical simulation and its associated assumptions were examined and results of the simulation are presented. The suggested form of the synchronization algorithm and the suggested receiver design values were surveyed. A Fortran of the synchronization algorithm used in the simulation was also included.

  4. Coefficients Alpha, Beta, Omega, and the glb: Comments on Sijtsma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revelle, William; Zinbarg, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    There are three fundamental problems in Sijtsma ("Psychometrika," 2008): (1) contrary to the name, the glb is not the greatest lower bound of reliability but rather is systematically less than omega[subscript t] (McDonald, "Test theory: A unified treatment," Erlbaum, Hillsdale, 1999), (2) we agree with Sijtsma that when considering how well a test…

  5. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and oxygenated metabolism in atherothrombosis.

    PubMed

    Guichardant, Michel; Calzada, Catherine; Bernoud-Hubac, Nathalie; Lagarde, Michel; Véricel, Evelyne

    2015-04-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies and clinical trials have reported the health benefits of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), including a lower risk of coronary heart diseases. This review mainly focuses on the effects of alpha-linolenic (ALA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids on some risk factors associated with atherothrombosis, including platelet activation, plasma lipid concentrations and oxidative modification of low-density lipoproteins (LDL). Special focus is given to the effects of marine PUFA on the formation of eicosanoids and docosanoids, and to the bioactive properties of some oxygenated metabolites of omega-3 PUFA produced by cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases. The antioxidant effects of marine omega-3 PUFA at low concentrations and the pro-oxidant effects of DHA at high concentrations on the redox status of platelets and LDL are highlighted. Non enzymatic peroxidation end-products deriving from omega-3 PUFA such as hydroxy-hexenals, neuroketals and EPA-derived isoprostanes are also considered in relation to atherosclerosis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Oxygenated metabolism of PUFA: analysis and biological relevance".

  6. Avery D. Weisman, M.D.: An Omega Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omega: Journal of Death and Dying, 1993

    1993-01-01

    In this interview, Avery D. Weisman, M.D., distinguished contributor to study of human encounter with death, discusses personal and professional facets of his long and productive career. Includes review of his concepts of appropriate death and middle knowledge; and findings of Project Omega, clinical research study directed by Weisman for 18…

  7. A 1.3 cm line survey toward Orion KL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Y.; Henkel, C.; Thorwirth, S.; Spezzano, S.; Menten, K. M.; Walmsley, C. M.; Wyrowski, F.; Mao, R. Q.; Klein, B.

    2015-09-01

    regions. Elemental and isotopic abundance ratios are also estimated: He/H = (8.7 ± 0.7)% derived from the ratios between helium RRLs and hydrogen RRLs; 12C/13C = 63 ± 17 from 12CH3OH/13CH3OH; 14N/15N =100 ± 51 from 14NH3/15NH3; and D/H = (8.3 ± 4.5) × 10-3 from NH2D/NH3. The dispersion of the He/H ratios derived from Hα/Heα pairs to Hδ/Heδ pairs is very small, which is consistent with theoretical predictions that the departure coefficients bn factors for hydrogen and helium are nearly identical. Based on a non-LTE code that neglects excitation by the infrared radiation field and a likelihood analysis, we find that the denser regions have lower kinetic temperature, which favors an external heating of the hot core. Tables 2 and 4 and appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgThe reduced spectra as FITS files are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/581/A48

  8. Effect of dietary omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids on clotting activities of Factor V, VII and X in fatty liver haemorrhagic syndrome-susceptible laying hens.

    PubMed

    Yeh, E; Wood, R D; Leeson, S; Squires, E J

    2009-05-01

    1. The relationship between concentrations of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in plasma and Factor V, VII and X clotting activities was determined using a crossover feeding trial with diets supplemented with either soy oil or flax oil. 2. Laying hens on the soy diet, which is high in omega-6 fatty acids, had substantially higher clotting activity for all three factors compared to laying hens on the flax diet that was high in omega-3 fatty acids. 3. Positive associations were seen between liver haemorrhage score and the percentage of liver weight and between the percentage of liver weight and the severity of haemorrhagic and fatty changes seen on histology. 4. These results support the hypothesis that concentrations of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in plasma affect clotting activity; however, there was no relationship between the extent of liver haemorrhages and the composition of plasma fatty acids.

  9. Improving the hot-spot pressure and demonstrating ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic deuterium–tritium implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Follett, R. K.; Forrest, C. J.; Froula, D. H.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Henchen, R. J.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Janezic, R.; Kelly, J. H.; and others

    2014-05-15

    Reaching ignition in direct-drive (DD) inertial confinement fusion implosions requires achieving central pressures in excess of 100 Gbar. The OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] is used to study the physics of implosions that are hydrodynamically equivalent to the ignition designs on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)]. It is shown that the highest hot-spot pressures (up to 40 Gbar) are achieved in target designs with a fuel adiabat of α ≃ 4, an implosion velocity of 3.8 × 10{sup 7} cm/s, and a laser intensity of ∼10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. These moderate-adiabat implosions are well understood using two-dimensional hydrocode simulations. The performance of lower-adiabat implosions is significantly degraded relative to code predictions, a common feature between DD implosions on OMEGA and indirect-drive cryogenic implosions on the NIF. Simplified theoretical models are developed to gain physical understanding of the implosion dynamics that dictate the target performance. These models indicate that degradations in the shell density and integrity (caused by hydrodynamic instabilities during the target acceleration) coupled with hydrodynamics at stagnation are the main failure mechanisms in low-adiabat designs. To demonstrate ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic implosions on OMEGA, the target-design robustness to hydrodynamic instability growth must be improved by reducing laser-coupling losses caused by cross beam energy transfer.

  10. Omega-3/Omega-6 Fatty Acids for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mats; Ostlund, Sven; Fransson, Gunnar; Kadesjo, Bjorn; Gillberg, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to assess omega 3/6 fatty acids (eye q) in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: The study included a randomized, 3-month, omega 3/6 placebo-controlled, one-way crossover trial with 75 children and adolescents (8-18 years), followed by 3 months with omega 3/6 for all. Investigator-rated ADHD…

  11. Mars surface thermal inertia and heterogeneities from OMEGA/MEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audouard, J.; Poulet, F.; Vincendon, M.; Bibring, J.-P.; Forget, F.; Langevin, Y.; Gondet, B.

    2014-05-01

    The thermophysical structure of the martian surface is the result of various processes that have shaped the martian surface through time. Previous dedicated heliosynchronous measurements of the thermal infrared (IR) flux of the martian surface have revealed the diversity of martian surface thermal properties, as well as its complexity linked to the heterogeneous nature of terrains. We present the first retrieval of thermophysical properties of the martian surface using near-infrared (NIR) Observatoire pour la Minéralogie, l’Eau, les Glaces et l’Activité (OMEGA) onboard Mars Express (MEX) thermal measurements from 5 to 5.1 μm. MEX orbit around Mars is elliptical and therefore OMEGA has performed surface temperature measurements at various local times and seasons over more than 4 full martian years. We have developed a method to exploit these unprecedented measurements using a one-dimensional energy balance code derived from a Global Climate Model that allows retrieval of the thermal properties of the martian surface using OMEGA data. Regional maps of the thermal inertia at a resolution up to 32 pixels per degree and a global map at 4 pixels per degree are presented. OMEGA-derived thermal inertia values agree with previous mappings by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) onboard Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) and Thermal Emission Imaging Spectrometer (THEMIS) onboard Mars Odyssey and highlight the key role of dust for the thermal behavior of the martian surface. OMEGA directly reveals for the first time some diurnal variations of apparent TI attributable to surface heterogeneities at macroscopic scale and enables to quantify these heterogeneities. In Nili Patera and Tharsis, local surface heterogeneities are modeled with layering and horizontal admixture of divergent slopes respectively.

  12. The OMEGA Instrument on board Mars Express: First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, G.; Altieri, F.; Bibring, J. P.; OMEGA Team

    OMEGA (Observatoire pour la Mineralogie, l'Eau, le Glace e l'Activité) is a visible and near infrared mapping spectrometer, operating in the spectral range (0.35 - 5.1 μm). Combining imagery and spectrometry, OMEGA is designed to provide the mineralogical and molecular composition of the surface and atmosphere of Mars through the spectral analysis of the diffused solar light and surface thermal emission. OMEGA will provide a global coverage at medium resolution (2 to 5 km) of the entire surface of Mars from altitudes 1500 to 4000 km, and high resolution (< 400 m) spectral images of selected areas, amounting to a few percents of the surface, when observed close to periapsis (< 300 km altitude). OMEGA will address major questions associated to internal structure, geologic and chemical evolution, past activity and present surface variegation. It will greatly contribute to the understanding of the evolution of Mars from geological time scales to seasonal variations. It will in particular give unique clues for understanding the H2O and CO2 cycles over the Mars history. It will play a major role in identifying areas of interest for the future martian in situ explorations. OMEGA is an international collaboration between France, Italy and Russia, involving the following Institutions: IAS (Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale, Orsay, France), DESPA (Département de Recherches Spatiales, Observatoire de Paris/Meudon, France), IFSI (Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario, Rome, Italy) and IKI (Institute for Space Research, Moscow, Russia). In this paper we present the first results after few months from starting of its observations.

  13. Effect of inorganic salts on bacterial omega-3 PUFA production.

    PubMed

    Abd Elrazak, Ahmed; Ward, Alan C; Glassey, Jarka

    2017-03-16

    The increasing demand of omega-3 in the market and the challenges facing its conventional supplies led to an increasing interest to microbial omega-3 sources. This research concentrates on the statistical role of some metal ions on the biosynthesis and productivity of eicosapentaenoic acid (essential omega-3 element) in bacterial isolate, Shewanella 717. A Plackett-Burman design was applied to screen the main effect of all metal salts entrenched in the artificial sea water medium components. Four salts, in particular, in addition to the interaction among them were highlighted as having a statistically significant effect upon the growth and/or eicosapentaenoic acid production. A subsequent central composite design was performed to determine the exact optimum concentration of each of the chosen variables which was found to be 2.5, 1.8, 1.2, and 23 g/l, for Na2HPO4, MgSO4, KCl, and NaCl, respectively. All the experiments were performed with the minimal amount of carbon and nitrogen to eliminate any potential masking effect. A bioreactor batch run was operated and the ion uptake was monitored, using EDAX® electron microscopy, concluding that the process of microbial omega-3 production could be a phosphate-limited process. Optimizing the concentration of the tested metal ions led to a remarkable increase in the omega-3 productivity resulted in a 30, 9, and 10 times increase in yield, concentration, and percentage to the total fatty acids, respectively, even though the carbon and nitrogen were kept constant all over the research work.

  14. Omega-3 fatty acids: proven benefit or just a "fish story"?

    PubMed

    Martin, Caren McHenry

    2008-03-01

    The potential health benefit of omega-3 fatty acids has been the focus of much research in the past decade. While the typical diet in the United States has a much greater ratio of omega-6 fatty acids compared with omega-3 fatty acids, research is showing that shifting this ratio-by increased consumption of fatty fish or fish oil supplements-may provide significant health benefits. Reductions in cardiovascular risk, depression, and rheumatoid arthritis symptoms have been correlated with omega-3 fatty acid intake, and there is increased interest in the use of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation for other psychiatric illnesses and prevention of Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Measurements of CP-Violating Asymmetries and BranchingFractions in B Decays to omegaK and omegaPi

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-03-23

    We present measurements of CP-violating asymmetries and branching fractions for the decays B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup +}, B{sup +} {yields} {omega}K{sup +}, and B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}K{sup 0}. The data sample corresponds to 232 million B{bar B} pairs produced by e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. For the decay B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}K{sub s}{sup 0}, we measure the time-dependent CP-violation parameters S = 0.51{sub -0.39}{sup +0.35} {+-} 0.02, and C = -0.55{sub -0.26}{sup +0.28} {+-} 0.03. We also measure the branching fractions, in units of 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup +}) = 6.1 {+-} 0.7 {+-} 0.4, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {omega}K{sup +}) = 6.1 {+-} 0.6 {+-} 0.4, and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}K{sup 0}) = 6.2 {+-} 1.0 {+-} 0.4, and charge asymmetries {Alpha}{sub ch}(B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup +}) = -0.01 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.01 and {Alpha}{sub ch}(B{sup +} {yields} {omega}K{sup +}) = 0.05 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.01.

  16. Detection of omega-3 oxylipins in human plasma and response to treatment with omega-3 acid ethyl esters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The long chain omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FAs), eicosapentaenoic (EPA), and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids have beneficial health effects, but the molecular mediators of these effects are not well-characterized. Oxygenated n-3 FAs (oxylipins) may be an important class of mediators. Members of this chemic...

  17. Reduction of omega-3 oil oxidation in stable emulsion of caseinate-omega-3 oil-oat beta-glucan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipid oxidation, particularly oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids such as omega-3 fatty acids, has posed a serious challenge to the food industry trying to incorporate heart-healthy oil products into their lines of healthful foods and beverages. In this study, heart healthy plant and marine based o...

  18. Omega Omega and Proton-Antiproton Production in Two Photon Interactions at ARGUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsipolitis, George

    1990-01-01

    The reactions gammagamma to 2pi^+2pi ^-2pi^0 and gamma gammatopi^+pi^-pi ^0pi^0 have been studied by using the ARGUS detector at the e^+e^ - storage ring DORIS II at DESY. In the 2pi^+2pi^ -2pi^0 final state the production of omega-mesons is observed and in particular the reaction gammagamma to omegaomega is seen for the first time. The cross section for gammagamma to omegaomega is found to have an enhancement at ~1.9GeV/c ^2 of about 12 nb. The topological cross sections for the reactions gammagamma to 2pi^+2 pi^-2pi^0 and gammagamma to omegapi^+pi^-pi ^0 are also measured. The production of charged rho -mesons is observed in the pi^+pi ^-pi^0pi^0 final state. The cross section for the reaction gamma gamma to rho ^+rho^- is measured for the first time. The cross section did not show a threshold enhancement similar to that found in the reaction gammagamma to rho^0rho^0 and is about a factor of four smaller. A spin parity analysis of the rho^+rho^- system shows that the cross section is dominated by the two amplitudes J^{P} = 0^+ and J^{P } = 2^+ with helicity 2.

  19. On the possibility of an alpha-sq omega-type dynamo in a thin layer inside the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhuri, Arnab Rai

    1990-01-01

    If the solar dynamo operates in a thin layer of 10,000-km thickness at the interface between the convection zone and the radiative core, using the facts that the dynamo should have a period of 22 years and a half-wavelength of 40 deg in the theta-direction, it is possible to impose restrictions on the values which various dynamo parameters are allowed to have. It is pointed out that the dynamo should be of alpha-sq omega nature, and kinematical calculations are presented for free dynamo waves and for dynamos in thin rectangular slabs with appropriate boundary conditions. An alpha-sq omega dynamo is expected to produce a significant poloidal field which does not leak to the solar surface. It is found that the turbulent diffusity eta and alpha-coefficient are restricted to values within about a factor of 10, the median values being eta of about 10 to the 10th sq cm/sec and alpha of about 10 cm/sec. On the basis of mixing length theory, it is pointed out that such values imply a reasonable turbulent velocity of the order 30 m/s, but rather small turbulent length scales like 300 km.

  20. Using gamma-ray emission to measure ablator areal density of imploded capsules at the Omega laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, N.; Rubery, M.; Herrmann, H.; Kim, Y.; Young, C.; Mack, J.; Wilson, D.; McEvoy, A.; Evans, S.; Sedillo, T.; Stoeffl, W.; Horsfield, C.; Glebov, V.

    2010-11-01

    We have measured the ablator areal density of plastic-shell implosions at the Omega laser, using gamma-ray emission from the capsules detected by the prototype Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostic. The intensity of 4.44-MeV gamma emission from ^12C nuclei in the ablator is proportional to the product of ablator areal density and yield of fusion neutrons, so by detecting the gammas we can infer the ablator areal density, provided we also have a measurement of total neutron yield. Neutron yield is determined from the nTOF experiment at Omega in our approach; alternatively one could use 16.7-MeV gammas from DT fusion. Inferred values of time-averaged carbon areal density are in the range 10-30 mg/cm^2, for a range of implosions. These values are smaller than predicted values based on 1D simulations, which are typically in the range 30-40 mg/cm^2. We discuss possible reasons for the discrepancy, primarily related to mixing.

  1. Low-energy {omega} ({yields}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}) meson photoproduction in the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Swapan

    2011-06-15

    The {pi}{sup 0{gamma}} invariant mass distribution spectra in the ({gamma},{pi}{sup 0{gamma}}) reaction were measured by the TAPS/ELSA Collaboration to look for the hadron parameters of the {omega} meson in the Nb nucleus. We study the mechanism for this reaction, where we consider that the elementary reaction in the Nb nucleus proceeds as {gamma}N{yields}{omega}N;{omega}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}. The {omega}-meson photoproduction amplitude for this reaction is extracted from the measured four-momentum transfer distribution in the {gamma}p{yields}{omega}p reaction. The propagation of the {omega} meson and the distorted wave function for the {pi}{sup 0} meson in the final state are described by the eikonal form. The {omega} and {pi}{sup 0} mesons' nucleus optical potentials, appearing in the {omega} meson propagator and {pi}{sup 0} meson distorted wave function respectively, are estimated using the t{rho} approximation. The effects of pair correlation and color transparency are also studied. The calculated results do not show medium modification for the {omega} meson produced in the nucleus for momentum greater than 200 MeV. It occurs because the {omega} meson predominantly decays outside the nucleus. The dependence of the cross section on the final-state interaction is also investigated. The broadening of the {omega}-meson mass distribution spectra is shown to occur due to the large resolution width associated with the detector used in the experiment.

  2. Omega-3 Fatty Acid and Nutrient Deficits in Adverse Neurodevelopment and Childhood Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Hibbeln, Joseph. R.; Gow, Rachel V.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Nutritional insufficiencies of omega-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs) may have adverse effects on brain development and neurodevelopmental outcomes. A recent meta-analysis of ten randomized controlled trials of omega-3 HUFAs reported a small to modest effect size for the efficacy of omega-3 for treating symptoms of ADHD in youth. Several controlled trials of omega-3 HUFAs combined with micronutrients (vitamins, minerals) show sizeable reductions in aggressive, antisocial, and violent behavior in youth and in young adult prisoners. Meta-analyses report efficacy for depressive symptoms in adults, and preliminary findings suggest anti-suicidal properties in adults, but studies in youth are insufficient to draw any conclusions regarding mood. Dietary adjustments to increase omega-3 and reduce omega-6 HUFA consumption are sensible recommendations for youth and adults based on general health considerations, while the evidence base for omega-3 HUFAs as potential psychiatric treatments develops. PMID:24975625

  3. Vitamin E supplementation modulates the biological effects of omega-3 fatty acids in naturally aged rats.

    PubMed

    Narayanankutty, Arunaksharan; Kottekkat, Anagha; Mathew, Shaji E; Illam, Soorya P; Suseela, Indu M; Raghavamenon, Achuthan C

    2017-03-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids are well-known class of nutraceuticals with established health benefits. Recently, the oxidation products of these fatty acids are gaining attention, as they are likely to disturb body redox balance. Therefore, the efficacy of omega-3 fats under conditions of diminished antioxidant status, such as aging, is always a concern. Present study assessed the effects of omega-3 fats (DHA and EPA) together with or without vitamin-E in naturally aged rats. It was found that in omega-3 fats alone consumed rats the lipid profile was improved, while in omega-3 fat with vitamin-E-consumed group (OMVE), the hepato protective and antioxidant properties were pronounced, especially the redox status of brain tissue. It is possible that vitamin-E might have reduced the peroxidation of omega-3 fats, thereby allowing their synergistic effects. Hence, the use of vitamin-E along with omega-3 fat may be beneficial under aged conditions.

  4. Prediction of peroxide value in omega-3 rich microalgae oil by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy combined with chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Cebi, Nur; Yilmaz, Mustafa Tahsin; Sagdic, Osman; Yuce, Hande; Yelboga, Emrah

    2017-06-15

    Our work explored, for the first time, monitoring peroxide value (PV) of omega-3 rich algae oil using ATR-FTIR spectroscopic technique. The PV of the developed method was compared by that obtained by standard method of Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC). In this study, peak area integration (PAI), Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR), and Principal Component Regression (PCR) were used as the calibration techniques. PV obtained by the AOAC method and by FTIR-ATR technique were well correlated considering the peak area related to trans double bonds and chemometrics techniques of PLSR and PCR. Calibration model was established using the band with a peak point at 966cm(-1) (990-940cm(-1)) related to CH out of plane deformation vibration of trans double bond. Algae oil oxidation could be successfully quantified using PAI, PLSR and PCR techniques. Additionally, hierarchical cluster analysis was performed and significant discrimination was observed coherently with oxidation process.

  5. Omega-3 fatty acids and incident type 2 diabetes: the Singapore Chinese Health Study1234

    PubMed Central

    Brostow, Diana P; Odegaard, Andrew O; Koh, Woon-Puay; Duval, Sue; Gross, Myron D; Yuan, Jian-Min; Pereira, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    Background: The role of omega-3 (n–3) fatty acids (FAs) in the development of type 2 diabetes is uncertain, especially with regard to any differential influence of α-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Objective: The objective was to examine the association between total omega-3 FAs, marine omega-3 (EPA, DHA), nonmarine omega-3 (ALA), and omega-6 (n–6) FAs and omega-6:omega-3 ratio and risk of type 2 diabetes in a Chinese population in Singapore. Design: The analysis included 43,176 Chinese men and women free of chronic disease, aged 45–74 y, in the Singapore Chinese Health Study. Baseline data collection occurred between 1993 and 1998, with follow-up interviews between 1999 and 2004. Cox regression models were used to examine the associations between FA intakes at baseline and risk of developing diabetes. Results: Increased intakes of total omega-3 FAs were inversely associated with diabetes incidence [hazard ratio (HR) for the fifth compared with the first quintile: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.65, 0.94; P for trend = 0.02]. Omega-3 FAs from marine sources were not associated with diabetes risk, whereas nonmarine omega-3 FA intake was strongly associated (HR for the fifth compared with the first quintile: 0.79; 95% CI: 0.67, 0.93; P for trend = 0.004). Omega-6 and omega-6:omega-3 ratio were not associated with incidence of type 2 diabetes. Conclusion: Consumption of nonmarine sources (ALA) of omega-3 FAs is associated with a decreased risk of type 2 diabetes in Chinese Singaporeans. PMID:21593505

  6. Omega-3 and omega-6 Fatty acids in blood and breast tissue of high-risk women and association with atypical cytomorphology.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Brandon H; Li, Shengqi; Harvey, Katherine E; Carlson, Susan E; Sullivan, Debra K; Kimler, Bruce F; Zalles, Carola M; Fabian, Carol J

    2015-05-01

    The ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids, especially the long-chain eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) + docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) to arachidonic acid (AA) ratio, is inversely associated with breast cancer risk. We measured the association between cytologic atypia, a biomarker for short-term risk of breast cancer development, and omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid intake and levels in blood and breast tissue. Blood and benign breast tissue, sampled by random periareolar fine-needle aspiration (RPFNA), was obtained from 70 women at elevated risk for breast cancer. Self-reported dietary intake was assessed by the NCI's Food Frequency Questionnaire. The fatty acid composition of five lipid compartments, red blood cell, plasma and breast phospholipids, and plasma and breast triaclyglycerides (TAG), was analyzed by gas chromatography as weight percent. Median daily intakes of EPA+DHA and total omega-3 fatty acids were 80 mg and 1.1 g, respectively. The median total omega-3:6 intake ratio was 1:10. Compared with women without atypia, those with cytologic atypia had lower total omega-3 fatty acids in red blood cell and plasma phospholipids and lower omega-3:6 ratios in plasma TAGs and breast TAGs (P < 0.05). The EPA+DHA:AA ratio in plasma TAGs was also lower among women with atypia. This is the first report of associations between tissue levels of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids and a reversible tissue biomarker of breast cancer risk. RPFNA cytomorphology could serve as a surrogate endpoint for breast cancer prevention trials of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation.

  7. Double interpenetration in a chiral three-dimensional magnet with a (10,3)-a structure.

    PubMed

    Grancha, Thais; Mon, Marta; Lloret, Francesc; Ferrando-Soria, Jesús; Journaux, Yves; Pasán, Jorge; Pardo, Emilio

    2015-09-21

    A unique chiral three-dimensional magnet with an overall racemic double-interpenetrated (10,3)-a structure of the formula [(S)-(1-PhEt)Me3N]4[Mn4Cu6(Et2pma)12](DMSO)3]·3DMSO·5H2O (1; Et2pma = N-2,6-diethylphenyloxamate) has been synthesized by the self-assembly of a mononuclear copper(II) complex acting as a metalloligand toward Mn(II) ions in the presence of a chiral cationic auxiliary, constituting the first oxamato-based chiral coordination polymer exhibiting long-range magnetic ordering.

  8. Design of a Production Process to Enhance Optical Performance of 3(omega) Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, R R; Bruere, J R; Halpin, J; Lucero, P; Mills, S; Bernacil, M; Hackel, R P

    2003-11-01

    Using the Phoenix pre-production conditioning facility we have shown that raster scanning of 3{omega} optics using a XeF excimer laser and mitigation of the resultant damage sites with a CO{sub 2} laser can enhance their optical damage resistance. Several large-scale (43 cm x 43 cm) optics have been processed in this facility. A production facility capable of processing several large optics a week has been designed based on our experience in the pre-production facility. The facility will be equipped with UV conditioning lasers--351-nm XeF excimer lasers operating at 100 Hz and 23 ns. The facility will also include a CO{sub 2} laser for damage mitigation, an optics stage for raster scanning large-scale optics, a damage mapping system (DMS) that images large-scale optics and can detect damage sites or precursors as small as {approx} 15 {micro}m, and two microscopes to image damage sites with {approx} 5 {micro}m resolution. The optics will be handled in a class 100 clean room, within the facility that will be maintained at class 1000.

  9. Observation of the 63 micron (0 1) emission line in the Orion and Omega Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melnick, G.; Gull, G. E.; Harwit, M.

    1978-01-01

    The 63 micron fine structure transition P4 : 3Pl yields 3P2 for neutral atomic oxygen was obtained during a series of flights at an altitude of approximately 13.7 km. In the Orion Nebula (M42), the observed line strength was 8 x 10 to the minus 15 power watt cm/2 which is estimated to be approximately 0.3 o/o of the energy radiated at all wavelengths. For the Omega Nebulae (M17), the line strength was 2.4 x 10 to the minus 15 power watt cm/2, and the fraction of the total radiated power was slightly higher. These figures refer to a 4' x 6' field of view centered on the peak for infrared emission from each source. The uncertainty in the line strength is approximately 50% and is caused by variable water vapor absorption along the flight path of the airplane. The line position estimate is 63.2 micron (+0.1, -0.2) micron. The prime uncertainty is due to the uncertain position of the (0 I) emitting regions in the field of view.

  10. Crystal structure of the collagen triple helix model [(Pro-Pro-Gly)(10)](3).

    PubMed

    Berisio, Rita; Vitagliano, Luigi; Mazzarella, Lelio; Zagari, Adriana

    2002-02-01

    The first report of the full-length structure of the collagen-like polypeptide [(Pro-Pro-Gly)(10)](3) is given. This structure was obtained from crystals grown in a microgravity environment, which diffracted up to 1.3 A, using synchrotron radiation. The final model, which was refined to an R(factor) of 0.18, is the highest-resolution description of a collagen triple helix reported to date. This structure provides clues regarding a series of aspects related to collagen triple helix structure and assembly. The strict dependence of proline puckering on the position inside the Pro-Pro-Gly triplets and the correlation between backbone and side chain dihedral angles support the propensity-based mechanism of triple helix stabilization/destabilization induced by hydroxyproline. Furthermore, the analysis of [(Pro-Pro-Gly)(10)](3) packing, which is governed by electrostatic interactions, suggests that charges may act as locking features in the axial organization of triple helices in the collagen fibrils.

  11. Effects of electron irradiation and temperature on 1 ohm-cm and 10 ohm-cm silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicoletta, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    One OHM-cm and 10 OHM-cm silicon solar cells were exposed to 1.0 MeV electrons at a fixed flux of 10 to the 11th power e/sq cm/sec and fluences of 10 to the 13th power, 10 to the 14th power and 10 to the 15th power e/sq.cm. 1-V curves of the cells were made at room temperature, - 63 C and + or - 143 C after each irradiation. A value of 139.5 mw/sq cm was used as AMO incident energy rate per unit area. The 10 OHM-cm cells appear more efficient than 1 OHM-cm cells after exposure to a fluence greater than 10 to the 14th power e/sq cm. The 1.0 MeV electron damage coefficients for both 1 OHM-cm and 10 OHM-cm cells are somewhat less than those for previously irradiated cells at room temperature. The values of the damage coefficients increase as the cell temperatures decrease. Efficiencies pertaining to maximum power output are about the same as those of n on p silicon cells evaluated previously.

  12. Branching Fraction Measurement of B to omega l nu decays

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R.Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V.E.; /more authors..

    2012-06-13

    We present a measurement of the B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu} branching fraction based on a sample of 467 million B{bar B} pairs recorded by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. We observe 1041 {+-} 133 signal decays, corresponding to a branching fraction of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (1.15 {+-} 0.15 {+-} 0.12) x 10{sup -4}, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The dependence of the decay rate on q{sup 2}, the momentum transfer squared to the lepton system, is compared to QCD predictions of the form factors based on a quark model and light-cone sum rules.

  13. Absorption of the {omega} and {phi} Mesons in Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, M. H.; Nasseripour, R.; Berman, B. L.; Briscoe, W. J.; Munevar, E.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Paolone, M.; Djalali, C.; Gothe, R. W.; Graham, L.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Tkachenko, S.; Zhao, Z. W.; Weygand, D. P.; Batourine, V.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Deur, A.; Guo, L.; Nadel-Turonski, P.

    2010-09-10

    Because of their long lifetimes, the {omega} and {phi} mesons are the ideal candidates for the study of possible modifications of the in-medium meson-nucleon interaction through their absorption inside the nucleus. During the E01-112 experiment at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, the mesons were photoproduced from {sup 2}H, C, Ti, Fe, and Pb targets. This Letter reports the first measurement of the ratio of nuclear transparencies for the e{sup +}e{sup -} channel. The ratios indicate larger in-medium widths compared with what have been reported in other reaction channels. The absorption of the {omega} meson is stronger than that reported by the CBELSA-TAPS experiment and cannot be explained by recent theoretical models.

  14. Omega Centauri - the glittering giant of the southern skies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-12-01

    Omega Centauri is one of the finest jewels of the southern hemisphere night sky, as ESO's latest stunning image beautifully illustrates. Containing millions of stars, this globular cluster is located roughly 17 000 light-years from Earth in the constellation of Centaurus. Omega Centauri ESO PR Photo 44/08 The Glittering Giant Sparkling away at magnitude 3.7 and appearing nearly as large as the full moon on the southern night sky, Omega Centauri is visible with the unaided eye from a clear, dark observing site. Even through a modest amateur telescope, the cluster is revealed as an incredible, densely packed sphere of glittering stars. But astronomers need to use the full power of professional telescopes to uncover the amazing secrets of this beautiful globular cluster. This new image is based on data collected with the Wide Field Imager (WFI), mounted on the 2.2-metre diameter Max-Planck/ESO telescope, located at ESO's La Silla observatory, high up in the arid mountains of the southern Atacama Desert in Chile. Omega Centauri is about 150 light-years across and is the most massive of all the Milky Way's globular clusters. It is thought to contain some ten million stars! Omega Centauri has been observed throughout history. Both the great astronomer Ptolemy and later Johann Bayer catalogued the cluster as a star. It was not until much later, in the early 19th century, that an Englishman, the astronomer John Frederick William Herschel (son of the discoverer of Uranus), realised that Omega Centauri was in fact a globular cluster. Globular clusters are some of the oldest groupings of stars to be found in the halos that surround galaxies like our own Milky Way. Omega Centauri itself is thought to be around 12 billion years old. Recent research into this intriguing celestial giant suggests that there is a medium sized black hole sitting at its centre. Observations made with the Hubble Space Telescope (see heic0809 ) and the Gemini Observatory showed that stars at the

  15. Unambiguous UML Composite Structures: The OMEGA2 Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ober, Iulian; Dragomir, Iulia

    Starting from version 2.0, UML introduced hierarchical composite structures, which are a very expressive way of defining complex software architectures, but which have a very loosely defined semantics in the standard. In this paper we propose a set of consistency rules that ensure UML composite structures are unambiguous and can be given a precise semantics. Our primary application of the static consistency rules defined in this paper is within the OMEGA UML profile [6], but these rules are general and applicable to other hierarchical component models based on the same concepts, such as MARTE GCM or SysML. The rule set has been formalized in OCL and is currently used in the OMEGA UML compiler.

  16. Digital correlation detector for low-cost Omega navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, K. A.

    1976-01-01

    Techniques to lower the cost of using the Omega global navigation network with phase-locked loops (PLL) were developed. The technique that was accepted as being "optimal" is called the memory-aided phase-locked loop (MAPLL) since it allows operation on all eight Omega time slots with one PLL through the implementation of a random access memory. The receiver front-end and the signals that it transmits to the PLL were first described. A brief statistical analysis of these signals was then made to allow a rough comparison between the front-end presented in this work and a commercially available front-end to be made. The hardware and theory of application of the MAPLL were described, ending with an analysis of data taken with the MAPLL. Some conclusions and recommendations were also given.

  17. OMEGA: The operational multiscale environment model with grid adaptivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, D.P.

    1995-07-01

    This review talk describes the OMEGA code, used for weather simulation and the modeling of aerosol transport through the atmosphere. Omega employs a 3D mesh of wedge shaped elements (triangles when viewed from above) that adapt with time. Because wedges are laid out in layers of triangular elements, the scheme can utilize structured storage and differencing techniques along the elevation coordinate, and is thus a hybrid of structured and unstructured methods. The utility of adaptive gridding in this moded, near geographic features such as coastlines, where material properties change discontinuously, is illustrated. Temporal adaptivity was used additionally to track moving internal fronts, such as clouds of aerosol contaminants. The author also discusses limitations specific to this problem, including manipulation of huge data bases and fixed turn-around times. In practice, the latter requires a carefully tuned optimization between accuracy and computation speed.

  18. Laser scattering from long scalelength plasmas on Omega. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R.P.; Seka, W.; Craxton, R.S.; Bauer, B.S.

    1998-12-31

    In this project, the authors accomplished the tasks called for in the revised statement of work associated with this grant. Specifically, they accomplished: (1) active participation in the design of long-scalelength plasmas for Omega and in experiments to characterize these plasmas; (2) development of software that permits the rapid evaluation of laser-scattering diagnostic possibilities involving the standard parametric instabilities. It must be able to account for all 60 beams in Omega in addition to a probe beam and variable detector locations; and (3) design, purchase of components for, and assembly of instrumentation to make such measurements, providing for long-term versatility in the type of measurement. The project background and these accomplishments are discussed.

  19. 3w Transmitted Beam Diagnostic at the Omega Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D H; Rekow, V; Sorce, C; Piston, K; Knight, R; Alvarez, S; Griffith, R; Hargrove, D; Ross, J S; Dixit, S; Pollock, B; Divol, L; Glenzer, S H; Armstrong, W; Bahr, R; Thorp, K; Pien, G

    2006-04-24

    A 3{omega} transmitted beam diagnostic has been commissioned on the Omega Laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester [Soures et.al., Laser Part. Beams 11 (1993)]. Transmitted light from one beam is collected by a large focusing mirror and directed onto a diagnostic platform. The near field of the transmitted light is imaged; the system collects information from twice the original f-cone of the beam. Two gated optical cameras capture the near field image of the transmitted light. Thirteen spatial positions around the measurement region are temporally resolved using fast photodiodes to allow a measure of the beam spray evolution. The Forward stimulated Raman scattering and forward simulated Brillion scattering are spectrally and temporally resolved at 5 independent locations within twice the original f-cone. The total transmitted energy is measured in two spectral bands ({delta}{lambda} < 400 nm and {delta}{lambda} > 400 nm).

  20. Multidimensional Study of High-Adiabat OMEGA Cryogenic Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, T. J. B.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Christopherson, A. R.; Knauer, J. P.; Marozas, J. A.; Maximov, A. V.; Mora, A.; Radha, P. B.; Shang, W.; Shvydky, A.; Stoeckl, C.; Woo, K. M.; Varchas, G.

    2016-10-01

    Despite recent advances in modeling laser direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, there remains a predictability gap. This is particularly shown by the shortfall in hot-spot pressures inferred from OMEGA cryogenic implosions. To address this, a series of high-adiabat, cryogenic implosions were performed on OMEGA. These shots were performed with and without single-beam smoothing by spectral dispersion, at low and high drive intensities. These shots represent a regime where good agreement with simulation is expected because of the high adiabat. Multidimensional simulations of these shots will be presented with an emphasis on comparison with experimental indicators of departure from spherical symmetry (``1-D-ness''). The roles of short- and long-wavelength perturbations are considered. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  1. Associations between variants of FADS genes and omega-3 and omega-6 milk fatty acids of Canadian Holstein cows

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fatty acid desaturase 1 (FADS1) and 2 (FADS2) genes code respectively for the enzymes delta-5 and delta-6 desaturases which are rate limiting enzymes in the synthesis of polyunsaturated omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids (FAs). Omega-3 and-6 FAs as well as conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) are present in bovine milk and have demonstrated positive health effects in humans. Studies in humans have shown significant relationships between genetic variants in FADS1 and 2 genes with plasma and tissue concentrations of omega-3 and-6 FAs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent of sequence variations within these two genes in Canadian Holstein cows as well as the association between sequence variants and health promoting FAs in milk. Results Thirty three SNPs were detected within the studied regions of genes including a synonymous mutation (FADS1-07, rs42187261, 306Tyr > Tyr) in exon 8 of FADS1, a non-synonymous mutation (FADS2-14, rs211580559, 294Ala > Val) within FADS2 exon 7, a splice site SNP (FADS2-05, rs211263660), a 3′UTR SNP (FADS2-23, rs109772589), and another 3′UTR SNP with an effect on a microRNA binding site within FADS2 gene (FADS2-19, rs210169303). Association analyses showed significant relations between three out of seven tested SNPs and several FAs. Significant associations (FDR P < 0.05) were recorded between FADS2-23 (rs109772589) and two omega-6 FAs (dihomogamma linolenic acid [C20:3n6] and arachidonic acid [C20:4n6]), FADS1-07 (rs42187261) and one omega-3 FA (eicosapentaenoic acid, C20:5n3) and tricosanoic acid (C23:0), and one intronic SNP, FADS1-01 (rs136261927) and C20:3n6. Conclusion Our study has demonstrated positive associations between three SNPs within FADS1 and FADS2 genes (a SNP within the 3’UTR, a synonymous SNP and an intronic SNP), with three milk PUFAs of Canadian Holstein cows thus suggesting possible involvement of synonymous and non-coding region variants in FA synthesis. These SNPs may serve as

  2. Hepatic microsomal. omega. -oxidation of leukotriene B/sub 4/

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhtar, H.; Bik, D.P.; Das, M.; Bickers, D.R.

    1986-03-01

    In this study the authors investigated the metabolism of LTB/sub 4/ by rat hepatic microsomes. /sup 3/H-LTB/sub 4/ (9 ..mu..M) was incubated for 20 min in the presence3 of oxygen, NADPH and liver microsomes (1.5 mg). Incubation was followed by extraction and analysis by HPLC. Metabolite identification was based on cochromatography with reference standards. At least three radioactive peaks were observed; two of which were ..omega..-oxidation products 20-OH-LTB/sub 4/ and 20-COOH-LTB/sub 4/. The rate of formation of 20-OH-LTB/sub 4/ (14.6 nmoles/min/mg protein) was higher than that of 20-COOH-LTB/sub 4/ (2.5 nmoles/min/mg protein). The third radioactive peak remains unidentified. Product formation was negligible with boiled microsomes. LTB/sub 4/ ..omega..-hydroxylase activity required NADPH and oxygen, was linear with respect to incubation time and protein, and was maximal at pH 7.4. Enzyme activity was inhibited (>90%) by carbon monoxide, SKF 525A (1 mM), but was not affected by ..cap alpha..-naphthoflavone. Phenobarbital (PB, 80 mg/kg for 3 days), AROCLOR 1254 (100 mg/kg for 3 days) or 3-methylcholanthrene (40 mg/kg for 3 days) administration to rats resulted in only slight (<20%) or no increase in LTB/sub 4/ ..omega..-hydroxylase activity. However, the formation of the unidentified peak was increased (>100%) by PB treatment. These results suggest that ..omega..-oxidation is the major pathway for biotransformation of LTB/sub 4/ in liver microsomes and that this reaction is mediated by cytochrome P-450.

  3. Flight test and evaluation of Omega navigation for general aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwoschinsky, P. V.

    1975-01-01

    A seventy hour flight test program was performed to determine the suitability and accuracy of a low cost Omega navigation receiver in a general aviation aircraft. An analysis was made of signal availability in two widely separated geographic areas. Comparison is made of the results of these flights with other navigation systems. Conclusions drawn from the test experience indicate that developmental system improvement is necessary before a competent fail safe or fail soft area navigation system is offered to general aviation.

  4. MAGNESIUM ISOTOPE RATIOS IN {omega} CENTAURI RED GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Da Costa, G. S.; Norris, John E.; Yong, David

    2013-05-20

    We have used the high-resolution observations obtained at the Anglo-Australian Telescope with Ultra-High Resolution Facility (R {approx} 100,000) and at Gemini-S with b-HROS (R {approx} 150,000) to determine magnesium isotope ratios for seven {omega} Cen red giants that cover a range in iron abundance from [Fe/H] = -1.78 to -0.78 dex, and for two red giants in M4 (NGC 6121). The {omega} Cen stars sample both the ''primordial'' (i.e., O-rich, Na- and Al-poor) and the ''extreme'' (O-depleted, Na- and Al-rich) populations in the cluster. The primordial population stars in both {omega} Cen and M4 show ({sup 25}Mg, {sup 26}Mg)/{sup 24}Mg isotopic ratios that are consistent with those found for the primordial population in other globular clusters with similar [Fe/H] values. The isotopic ratios for the {omega} Cen extreme stars are also consistent with those for extreme population stars in other clusters. The results for the extreme population stars studied indicate that the {sup 26}Mg/{sup 24}Mg ratio is highest at intermediate metallicities ([Fe/H] < -1.4 dex), and for the highest [Al/Fe] values. Further, the relative abundance of {sup 26}Mg in the extreme population stars is notably higher than that of {sup 25}Mg, in contrast to model predictions. The {sup 25}Mg/{sup 24}Mg isotopic ratio in fact does not show any obvious dependence on either [Fe/H] or [Al/Fe] nor, intriguingly, any obvious difference between the primordial and extreme population stars.

  5. Metathesis process for preparing an alpha, omega-functionalized olefin

    DOEpatents

    Burdett, Kenneth A.; Mokhtarzadeh, Morteza; Timmers, Francis J.

    2010-10-12

    A cross-metathesis process for preparing an .alpha.,.omega.-functionalized olefin, such as methyl 9-decenoate, and an .alpha.-olefin having three or more carbon atoms, such as 1-decene. The process involves contacting in a first reaction zone an .alpha.-functionalized internal olefin, such as methyl oleate, and an .alpha.-olefinic monomer having three or more carbon atoms, such as 1-decene, with a first metathesis catalyst to prepare an effluent stream containing the .alpha.,.omega.-functionalized olefin, such as methyl 9-decenoate, an unfunctionalized internal olefin, such as 9-octadecene, unconverted reactant olefins, and optionally, an .alpha.,.omega.-difunctionalized internal olefinic dimer, such as dimethyl 9-octadecen-1,18-dioate; separating said effluent streams; then contacting in a second reaction zone the unfunctionalized internal olefin with ethylene in the presence of a second metathesis catalyst to obtain a second product effluent containing the .alpha.-olefinic monomer having three or more carbon atoms; and cycling a portion of the .alpha.-olefinic monomer stream(s) to the first zone.

  6. Neutron Measurements in Small MagLIF Experiments on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebov, V. Yu.; Barnak, D. H.; Davies, J. R.; Knauer, J. P.; Betti, R.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Campbell, E. M.

    2016-10-01

    The Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) is participating in laser-driven magnetized linear inertial fusion (MagLIF) research on the OMEGA Laser System in partnership with Sandia as part of ARPA-E's ALPHA Program. In the current OMEGA setup, a CH cylindrical tube filled with D2 gas is compressed by 40 laser beams, preheated by one of the beams, and an axial magnetic field is applied to limit electron heat loss. Two copper coils provide 10-T magnetic fields. A neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector has been designed, fabricated, and calibrated to diagnose primary D-D fusion neutron yield in the range of 1 ×107 to 5 ×109 and ion temperature from 2 to 8 keV. The design details and calibration results of these nTOF detectors will be presented together with neutron measurement results from recent laser-driven MagLIF experiments on OMEGA. The information, data, or work presented herein was funded in part by the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), U.S. Department of Energy, under Award Number DE-AR0000568, and the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  7. rho/sup 0/. omega. production in photon photon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Derby, K.A.

    1987-08-01

    The subject of this dissertation is the production of the rho/sup 0/..omega.. final state in photon photon interactions. The production of the rho/sup 0/..omega.. final state has been of interest primarily because of its similarity to the related process ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. rho/sup 0/rho/sup 0/. The cross section for rho/sup 0/rho/sup 0/ production demonstrates a peaking near threshold, the mechanism of which has been the subject of considerable speculation. The data sample used for the analysis was obtained using the TPC detector facility at the PEP e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring, and corresponds to an integrated e/sup +/e/sup -/ luminosity of 64 pb/sup -1/ at 29 GeV center of mass energy. Our estimate of the rho/sup 0/..omega.. cross section is compared to the predictions of several models which have been used to account for the observed rho/sup 0/rho/sup 0/ cross section. The experimental results are consistent with the predictions of a threshold enhancement model, as well as those of a four quark (qq anti q anti q) resonance model. However, they disagree with the predictions of a t-channel factorization approach.

  8. THE DYNAMICS OF THE OUTER PARTS OF {omega} CENTAURI

    SciTech Connect

    Da Costa, G. S.

    2012-05-20

    The multi-object fiber-fed spectrograph AAOmega at the Anglo-Australian Telescope has been used to establish and measure accurate ({<=}1 km s{sup -1}) radial velocities for a new sample of members in the outer parts of the stellar system {omega} Centauri. The new sample more than doubles the number of known members with precise velocities that lie between 25' and 45' from the cluster center. Combining this sample with earlier work confirms that the line-of-sight velocity dispersion of {omega} Cen remains approximately constant at {approx}6.5 km s{sup -1} in the outer parts of the cluster, which contain only a small fraction of the total cluster stellar mass. It is argued that the approximately constant velocity dispersion in the outer regions is most likely a consequence of external influences, such as the tidal shock heating that occurs each time {omega} Cen crosses the Galactic plane. There is therefore no requirement to invoke dark matter or non-standard gravitational theories.

  9. Omega from the anisotropy of the redshift correlation function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, A. J. S.

    1993-01-01

    Peculiar velocities distort the correlation function of galaxies observed in redshift space. In the large scale, linear regime, the distortion takes a characteristic quadrupole plus hexadecapole form, with the amplitude of the distortion depending on the cosmological density parameter omega. Preliminary measurements are reported here of the harmonics of the correlation function in the CfA, SSRS, and IRAS 2 Jansky redshift surveys. The observed behavior of the harmonics agrees qualitatively with the predictions of linear theory on large scales in every survey. However, real anisotropy in the galaxy distribution induces large fluctuations in samples which do not yet probe a sufficiently fair volume of the Universe. In the CfA 14.5 sample in particular, the Great Wall induces a large negative quadrupole, which taken at face value implies an unrealistically large omega 20. The IRAS 2 Jy survey, which covers a substantially larger volume than the optical surveys and is less affected by fingers-of-god, yields a more reliable and believable value, omega = 0.5 sup +.5 sub -.25.

  10. A New Theory of Mix in Omega Capsule Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoll, Dana; Chacon, Luis; Rauenzahn, Rick; Simakov, Andrei; Taitano, William; Welser-Sherrill, Leslie

    2014-10-01

    We put forth a new mix model that relies on the development of a charge-separation electrostatic double-layer at the fuel-pusher interface early in the implosion of an Omega plastic ablator capsule. The model predicts a sizable pusher mix (several atom %) into the fuel. The expected magnitude of the double-layer field is consistent with recent radial electric field measurements in Omega plastic ablator implosions. Our theory relies on two distinct physics mechanisms. First, and prior to shock breakout, the formation of a double layer at the fuel-pusher interface due to fast preheat-driven ionization. The double-layer electric field structure accelerates pusher ions fairly deep into the fuel. Second, after the double-layer mix has occurred, the inward-directed fuel velocity and temperature gradients behind the converging shock transports these pusher ions inward. We first discuss the foundations of this new mix theory. Next, we discuss our interpretation of the radial electric field measurements on Omega implosions. Then we discuss the second mechanism that is responsible for transporting the pusher material, already mixed via the double-layer deep into the fuel, on the shock convergence time scale. Finally we make a connection to recent mix motivated experimental data on. This work conducted under the auspices of the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy at Los Alamos National Laboratory, managed by LANS, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  11. [Omega-3 fatty acids: the science and the beliefs].

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, Avidor; Stahl, Ziva; Leventhal, Alex

    2009-02-01

    The importance of Omega-3 fatty acids intake from dietary supplements or from food sources (mainly fish) has recently become "common knowledge" in the mass media as well as in popular science magazines and advertisements. Therefore, the authors wish to review the updated evidence-based literature regarding the relationship between Omega-3 fatty acid intake and morbidity and its preventative effects in cardiovascular, bone, kidney autoimmune, GI tract diseases, CNS and mental diseases, cancer, diabetes, asthma, ophthalmological health, organ transplants and child and maternal health. Recommendations regarding optimal intake of these fatty acids throughout the lifecycle by various health authorities are cited. The conclusion presents the authors' recommendations for optimal Omega-3 intake in Israel: Recommendations for the general population is to consume at least two weekly portions of fatty fish. For patients with hypertriglyceridemia, dietary supplements containing fish oil, in addition to the above diet, can be considered to be part of the complete medical treatment and follow-up. Limiting fish consumption in risk group populations, such as pregnant women, will also be considered.

  12. Deeply virtual and exclusive electroproduction of omega mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Morand, L; Et. Al.

    2005-04-01

    The exclusive omega electroproduction off the proton was studied in a large kinematical domain above the nucleon resonance region and for the highest possible photon virtuality (Q{sup 2}) with the 5.75 GeV beam at CEBAF and the CLAS spectrometer. Cross sections were measured up to large values of the four-momentum transfer (-t < 2.7 GeV{sup 2}) to the proton. The contributions of the interference terms sigma{sub TT} and sigma{sub TL} to the cross sections, as well as an analysis of the omega spin density matrix, indicate that helicity is not conserved in this process. The t-channel pi{sup 0} exchange, or more generally the exchange of the associated Regge trajectory, seems to dominate the reaction {gamma}* p {yields} omega p, even for Q{sup 2} as large as 5 GeV{sub 2}. Contributions of handbag diagrams, related to Generalized Parton Distributions in the nucleon, are therefore difficult to extract for this process. Remarkably, the high-t behavior of the cross sections is nearly Q{sup 2}-independent, which may be interpreted as a coupling of the photon to a point-like object in this kinematical limit.

  13. Astrometry of the omega Centauri Hubble Space Telescope Calibration Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mighell, Kenneth J.

    2000-01-01

    Astrometry, on the International Celestial Reference Frame (epoch J2000.0), is presented for the Walker (1994, PASP, 106, 828) stars in the omega Centauri (=NGC 5139=C 1323-1472) Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field/Planetary Camera (WF/PC) calibration field of Harris et al. (1993, AJ, 105, 1196). Harris et al. stars were first identified on a WFPC2 observation of the omega Cen HST calibration field. Relative astrometry of the Walker stars in this field was then obtained using Walker's CCD positions and astrometry derived using the STSDAS METRIC task on the positions of the Harris et al. stars on the WFPC2 observation. Finally, the relative astrometry, which was based on the HST Guide Star Catalog, is placed on the International Celestial Reference Frame with astrometry from the USNO-A2.0 catalog. An ASCII text version of the astrometric data of the Walker stars in the omega Cen HST calibration field is available electronically in the online version of the article.

  14. Charged Particle Spectroscopy on Omega (Final report)

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, K.; Padalino, S.; Schwartz, B.; Olsen, M.; Wakeman, T.; Petrasso, R.

    2001-01-01

    Using the 2-MeV Van de Graaf Accelerator at SUNY Geneseo's Nuclear Structure Laboratory, a {sup 3}He-implanted tantalum target was bombarded by 450-keV deuterons to produce high energy protons via the {sup 3}He(d,p){sup 4}He reaction. A 1500-{micro}m surface barrier detector with a 3/16 inch diameter collimator was placed at 8.75 cm from the target and 135{sup o} from the incident beam. A movable arm was setup so that an array of aluminum filters of varying thicknesses could be rotated in front of the detector. A 6-{micro}m mylar filter was also mounted on the movable arm and was used to calibrate the detector as described in the CR-39 experiment report. Eight aluminum filters with thicknesses ranging from 250pm to 1100{micro}m were in turn rotated in front of the collimator and spectra were taken for each. The results are shown on the attached graphs. The theoretical curve for each graph was generated using TRIM The exact energy distribution of the proton beam incident on the target was not known; because no such spectrum could be taken due to the high count rate for elastically scattered deuterons. Instead, it was assumed that the incident beam had a distribution similar to that measured through the 6-{micro}m mylar, namely, an average energy of 13.798 MeV with a standard deviation of 0.027 MeV. A program developed locally was used to generate an input file for TRIM with this distribution. Using this input file, TRIM simulations were run for various thicknesses of Aluminum, from 200 to 1100 {micro}m in 50-{micro}m increments. The solid line on the graph indicates the energies of the transmitted protons. The two dashed lines indicate one standard deviation above and below the average exit energy. TRIM agrees well with the experimental results.

  15. Design and Performance of 40 cm Ion Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    2001-01-01

    A 40 cm ion thruster is being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to obtain input power and propellant throughput capabilities of 10 kW and 550 kg. respectively. The technical approach here is a continuation of the "derating" technique used for the NSTAR ion thruster. The 40 cm ion thruster presently utilizes the NSTAR ion optics aperture geometry to take advantage of the large database of lifetime and performance data already available. Dome-shaped grids were chosen for the design of the 40 cm ion optics because this design is naturally suited for large-area ion optics. Ion extraction capabilities and electron backstreaming limits for the 40 cm ion optics were estimated by utilizing NSTAR 30 cm ion optics data. A preliminary service life assessment showed that the propellant throughput goal of 550 kg of xenon may be possible with molybdenum 40 cm ion optics. One 40 cm ion optics' set has been successfully fabricated to date. Additional ion optics' sets are presently being fabricated. Preliminary performance tests were conducted on a laboratory model 40 cm ion thruster.

  16. Photofraction of a 5 cm x 2 cm BGO scintillator. [bismuth germanate crystal for use in cosmic gamma ray detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunphy, P. P.; Forrest, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The photofraction of a 5.1 cm x 2.0 cm bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillator was measured over a gamma-ray energy range of 0.2 to 6.1 MeV. Several methods, used to minimize the effect of room scattering on the measurement, are discussed. These include a gamma-gamma coincidence technique, a beta-gamma coincidence technique, and the use of sources calibrated with a standard 7.6 cm x 7.6 cm sodium iodide scintillator.

  17. Effects of proton irradiation and temperature on 1 ohm-cm and 10 ohm-cm silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicoletta, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    The 1 ohm-cm and 10 ohm-cm silicon solar cells were exposed to 1.0 MeV protons at a fixed flux of 10 to the 9th power P/sq cm-sec and fluences of 10 to the 10th power, 10 to the 11th power, 10 to the 12th power and 3 X 10 to the 12th power P/sq cm. I-V curves of the cells were made at room temperature, 65 C and 165 C after each irradiation. A value of 139.5 mw/sq cm was taken as AMO incident energy rate per unit area. Degradation occurred for both uncovered 1 ohm-cm and 10 ohm-cm cells. Efficiencies are generally higher than those of comparable U.S. cells tested earlier. Damage (loss in maximum power efficiency) with proton fluence is somewhat higher for 10 ohm-cm cells, measured at the three temperatures, for fluences above 2 X 10 to the 11th power P/sq cm. Cell efficiency, as expected, changes drastically with temperature.

  18. Fast neutron induced fission cross sections of {sup 242m}Am, {sup 245}Cm, {sup 247}Cm

    SciTech Connect

    Fursov, B.I.; Samylin, B.F.; Smirenkin, G.N.; Polynov, V.N.

    1994-12-31

    The experimental data on {sup 242m}Am, {sup 245}Cm and {sup 247}Cm fission cross sections in the 0.13-7.2 Mev neutron energy range are presented. The measurements were made at Van-de-Graaf accelerators with monoenergetic neutron sources. The total data errors are 3.8% for {sup 242m}Am, 3.5% for {sup 245}Cm and 4.5% for {sup 247}Cm. The results given in this paper are preliminary ones.

  19. Hydrodynamic simulations of long-scale-length two-plasmon-decay experiments at the Omega Laser Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Michel, D. T.; Edgell, D. H.; Froula, D. H.; Follett, R. K.; Goncharov, V. N.; Myatt, J. F.; Skupsky, S.; Yaakobi, B.

    2013-03-01

    Direct-drive-ignition designs with plastic CH ablators create plasmas of long density scale lengths (Ln ≥ 500 μm) at the quarter-critical density (Nqc) region of the driving laser. The two-plasmon-decay (TPD) instability can exceed its threshold in such long-scale-length plasmas (LSPs). To investigate the scaling of TPD-induced hot electrons to laser intensity and plasma conditions, a series of planar experiments have been conducted at the Omega Laser Facility with 2-ns square pulses at the maximum laser energies available on OMEGA and OMEGA EP. Radiation-hydrodynamic simulations have been performed for these LSP experiments using the two-dimensional hydrocode draco. The simulated hydrodynamic evolution of such long-scale-length plasmas has been validated with the time-resolved full-aperture backscattering and Thomson-scattering measurements. draco simulations for CH ablator indicate that (1) ignition-relevant long-scale-length plasmas of Ln approaching ˜400 μm have been created; (2) the density scale length at Nqc scales as Ln(μm)≃(RDPP×I1/4/2); and (3) the electron temperature Te at Nqc scales as Te(keV)≃0.95×√I , with the incident intensity (I) measured in 1014 W/cm2 for plasmas created on both OMEGA and OMEGA EP configurations with different-sized (RDPP) distributed phase plates. These intensity scalings are in good agreement with the self-similar model predictions. The measured conversion fraction of laser energy into hot electrons fhot is found to have a similar behavior for both configurations: a rapid growth [fhot≃fc×(Gc/4)6 for Gc < 4] followed by a saturation of the form, fhot≃fc×(Gc/4)1.2 for Gc ≥ 4, with the common wave gain is defined as Gc=3 × 10-2×IqcLnλ0/Te, where the laser intensity contributing to common-wave gain Iqc, Ln, Te at Nqc, and the laser wavelength λ0 are, respectively, measured in [1014 W/cm2], [μm], [keV], and [μm]. The saturation level fc is observed to be fc ≃ 10-2 at around Gc ≃ 4. The hot

  20. Hydrodynamic simulations of long-scale-length two-plasmon-decay experiments at the Omega Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S. X.; Michel, D. T.; Edgell, D. H.; Froula, D. H.; Follett, R. K.; Goncharov, V. N.; Myatt, J. F.; Skupsky, S.; Yaakobi, B.

    2013-03-15

    Direct-drive-ignition designs with plastic CH ablators create plasmas of long density scale lengths (L{sub n} {>=} 500 {mu}m) at the quarter-critical density (N{sub qc}) region of the driving laser. The two-plasmon-decay (TPD) instability can exceed its threshold in such long-scale-length plasmas (LSPs). To investigate the scaling of TPD-induced hot electrons to laser intensity and plasma conditions, a series of planar experiments have been conducted at the Omega Laser Facility with 2-ns square pulses at the maximum laser energies available on OMEGA and OMEGA EP. Radiation-hydrodynamic simulations have been performed for these LSP experiments using the two-dimensional hydrocode draco. The simulated hydrodynamic evolution of such long-scale-length plasmas has been validated with the time-resolved full-aperture backscattering and Thomson-scattering measurements. draco simulations for CH ablator indicate that (1) ignition-relevant long-scale-length plasmas of L{sub n} approaching {approx}400 {mu}m have been created; (2) the density scale length at N{sub qc} scales as L{sub n}({mu}m) Asymptotically-Equal-To (R{sub DPP} Multiplication-Sign I{sup 1/4}/2); and (3) the electron temperature T{sub e} at N{sub qc} scales as T{sub e}(keV) Asymptotically-Equal-To 0.95 Multiplication-Sign {radical}(I), with the incident intensity (I) measured in 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} for plasmas created on both OMEGA and OMEGA EP configurations with different-sized (R{sub DPP}) distributed phase plates. These intensity scalings are in good agreement with the self-similar model predictions. The measured conversion fraction of laser energy into hot electrons f{sub hot} is found to have a similar behavior for both configurations: a rapid growth [f{sub hot} Asymptotically-Equal-To f{sub c} Multiplication-Sign (G{sub c}/4){sup 6} for G{sub c} < 4] followed by a saturation of the form, f{sub hot} Asymptotically-Equal-To f{sub c} Multiplication-Sign (G{sub c}/4){sup 1.2} for G{sub c} {>=} 4, with the

  1. A combination of omega-3 fatty acids, folic acid and B-group vitamins is superior at lowering homocysteine than omega-3 alone: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Samantha Loren; Bowe, Steven John; Crowe, Timothy Charles

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to assess whether omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation alone or in combination with folic acid and B-group vitamins is effective in lowering homocysteine. The Medline Ovid, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched for randomized-controlled trial studies that intervened with omega-3 supplementation (with or without folic acid) and measured changes in homocysteine concentration. Studies were pooled using a random effects model for meta-analysis. Three different models were analyzed: all trials combined, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid trials, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids with folic acid and B-group vitamin trials. Nineteen studies were included, consisting of 3267 participants completing 21 trials. Studies were heterogeneous; varying by dose, duration and participant health conditions. Across all trials, omega-3 supplementation was effective in lowering homocysteine by an average of 1.18μmol/L (95%CI: (-1.89, -0.48), P=.001). The average homocysteine-lowering effect was greater when omega-3 supplementation was combined with folic acid and B-group vitamins (-1.37μmol/L, 95%CI: (-2.38, -0.36), P<.01) compared to omega-3 supplementation alone (-1.09μmol/L 95%CI: (-2.04, -0.13), P=.03). Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation was associated with a modest reduction in homocysteine. For the purposes of reducing homocysteine, a combination of omega-3s (0.2-6g/day), folic acid (150 - 2500μg/day) and vitamins B6 and B12 may be more effective than omega-3 supplementation alone.

  2. Theory of laser enhancement and suppression of cold reactions: the fermion-boson 6Li+7Li2<-->(variant Planck's over 2pi omega0) 6Li7Li+7Li radiative collision.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Parker, Gregory A; Brumer, Paul; Thanopulos, Ioannis; Shapiro, Moshe

    2008-03-28

    We present a nonperturbative time-dependent quantum mechanical theory of the laser catalysis and control of a bifurcating A+BC<-->(variant Planck's over 2pi omega(0))ABC*(v)<-->(variant Planck's over 2pi omega(0) )AB+C reaction, with ABC*(v) denoting an intermediate, electronically excited, complex of ABC in the vth vibrational state. We apply this theory to the low collision energy fermion-boson light-induced exchange reaction, (6)Li((2)S)+(7)Li(2)((3)Sigma(u)(+))<-->(variant Planck's over 2pi omega(0))((6)Li(7)Li(7)Li)*<-->(variant Planck's over 2pi omega(0))(6)Li(7)Li((3)Sigma(+))+(7)Li((2)S). We show that at very low collision energies and energetically narrow (approximately 0.01 cm(-1)) initial reactant wave packets, it is possible to tune the yield of the exchange reaction from 0 to near-unity (yield >or=99%) values. Controllability is somewhat reduced at collisions involving energetically wider (approximately 1 cm(-1)) initial reactant wave packets. At these energetic bandwidths, the radiative reactive control, although still impressive, is limited to the 0%-76% reactive-probabilities range.

  3. Fourier transform IR spectroscopic study of hydration-induced structure changes in the solid state of omega-gliadins.

    PubMed Central

    Wellner, N; Belton, P S; Tatham, A S

    1996-01-01

    The hydration of omega-gliadins and party deamidated and esterified omega-gliadins has been studied by Fourier transform IR spectroscopy. The secondary structure of the fully hydrated proteins was a mixture of beta-turns and extended chains, with a small amount of intermolecular beta-sheets. The absorption of the glutamine side chain amide groups contributed considerably to the amide I band with two well-defined peaks at 1658 and 1610 cm-1. the amide I band of the dry native sample could not be resolved into single component bands. There the backbone structure seemed to be distorted by extensive hydrogen bonding involving glutamine side chains. With increasing water content, these hydrogen bonds were broken successively by water molecules, resulting in an increase in extended, hydrated structures, which gave rise to the formation of intermolecular beta-sheet structures. Above 35% (w/w) water the beta-sheet content fell sharply and was replaced by extensively hydrated extended structures. An amide I band similar to dissolved poly-L-proline proved that parts of the polymer were in a solution-like state. The replacement of many glutamine side chains in the esterified protein produced more resolved secondary structures even in the dry sample. The beta-sheet content of the dry sample was higher than in the native omega-gliadins, but hydration generally caused very similar changes. At all hydration levels the spectra indicated a more ordered structure than in the native sample. Overall, the modification caused changes that go beyond the simple presence or absence of glutamine bands. PMID:8920975

  4. Fourier transform IR spectroscopic study of hydration-induced structure changes in the solid state of omega-gliadins.

    PubMed

    Wellner, N; Belton, P S; Tatham, A S

    1996-11-01

    The hydration of omega-gliadins and party deamidated and esterified omega-gliadins has been studied by Fourier transform IR spectroscopy. The secondary structure of the fully hydrated proteins was a mixture of beta-turns and extended chains, with a small amount of intermolecular beta-sheets. The absorption of the glutamine side chain amide groups contributed considerably to the amide I band with two well-defined peaks at 1658 and 1610 cm-1. the amide I band of the dry native sample could not be resolved into single component bands. There the backbone structure seemed to be distorted by extensive hydrogen bonding involving glutamine side chains. With increasing water content, these hydrogen bonds were broken successively by water molecules, resulting in an increase in extended, hydrated structures, which gave rise to the formation of intermolecular beta-sheet structures. Above 35% (w/w) water the beta-sheet content fell sharply and was replaced by extensively hydrated extended structures. An amide I band similar to dissolved poly-L-proline proved that parts of the polymer were in a solution-like state. The replacement of many glutamine side chains in the esterified protein produced more resolved secondary structures even in the dry sample. The beta-sheet content of the dry sample was higher than in the native omega-gliadins, but hydration generally caused very similar changes. At all hydration levels the spectra indicated a more ordered structure than in the native sample. Overall, the modification caused changes that go beyond the simple presence or absence of glutamine bands.

  5. The omega-6/omega-3 ratio and dementia or cognitive decline: a systematic review on human studies and biological evidence.

    PubMed

    Loef, Martin; Walach, Harald

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that the intake of certain fatty acids may influence the risk of dementia. However, current reviews have focused only on the therapeutic effects of omega-3 fatty acids, mostly as supplements. To date, the evidence for the relevance of the omega-6/omega-3 ratio has been neglected. Therefore, we searched the databases Alois, Medline, Biosis, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for "essential fatty acids" and "dementia" and aimed to conduct a comprehensive review across study types. All studies that reported on the association between the n-6/n-3 ratio and dementia or cognitive decline were selected. In the 13 animal studies we examined, the dietary n-6/n-3 ratio was shown to affect brain composition, Alzheimer's disease pathology, and behavior. Our review of the 14 studies in humans that fulfilled the selection criteria (7 prospective studies, 3 cross-sectional studies, 1 controlled trial, 3 case-control studies) provided evidence, albeit limited, supporting an association between the n-6/n-3 ratio, cognitive decline, and incidence of dementia. This review supports growing evidence of a positive association between the dietary n-6/n-3 ratio and the risk of Alzheimer's disease.

  6. 40 CFR 721.10092 - Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.-sulfo-.omega.-[[1-[(2-propen-1-yloxy)methyl]undecyl]oxy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....-sulfo-.omega.- undecyl]oxy]-, ammonium salt (1:1); Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.-sulfo-.omega...-.omega.- undecyl]oxy]-, ammonium salt (1:1); Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.-sulfo-.omega.- tridecyl...) The chemical substance identified as poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.-sulfo-.omega.-...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10092 - Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.-sulfo-.omega.-[[1-[(2-propen-1-yloxy)methyl]undecyl]oxy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....-sulfo-.omega.- undecyl]oxy]-, ammonium salt (1:1); Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.-sulfo-.omega...-.omega.- undecyl]oxy]-, ammonium salt (1:1); Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.-sulfo-.omega.- tridecyl...) The chemical substance identified as poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.-sulfo-.omega.-...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10092 - Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.-sulfo-.omega.-[[1-[(2-propen-1-yloxy)methyl]undecyl]oxy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....-sulfo-.omega.- undecyl]oxy]-, ammonium salt (1:1); Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.-sulfo-.omega...-.omega.- undecyl]oxy]-, ammonium salt (1:1); Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.-sulfo-.omega.- tridecyl...) The chemical substance identified as poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.-sulfo-.omega.-...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10092 - Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.-sulfo-.omega.-[[1-[(2-propen-1-yloxy)methyl]undecyl]oxy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....-sulfo-.omega.- undecyl]oxy]-, ammonium salt (1:1); Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.-sulfo-.omega...-.omega.- undecyl]oxy]-, ammonium salt (1:1); Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.-sulfo-.omega.- tridecyl...) The chemical substance identified as poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.-sulfo-.omega.-...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10092 - Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.-sulfo-.omega.-[[1-[(2-propen-1-yloxy)methyl]undecyl]oxy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....-sulfo-.omega.- undecyl]oxy]-, ammonium salt (1:1); Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.-sulfo-.omega...-.omega.- undecyl]oxy]-, ammonium salt (1:1); Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.-sulfo-.omega.- tridecyl...) The chemical substance identified as poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), .alpha.-sulfo-.omega.-...

  11. Omega-3 supplementation in autism spectrum disorders: A still open question?

    PubMed Central

    Posar, Annio; Visconti, Paola

    2016-01-01

    One of the most commonly used complementary and alternative practices in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is the supplementation of omega-3. We describe the case of a child with ASD who seemed to respond to omega-3 supplementation in a relevant and lasting manner. So far, based on the results of randomized clinical trials, evidence-based medicine negates the effectiveness of omega-3 in ASD children. Nevertheless, considering anecdotal experiences, including that of our patient, and nonrandomized trials, the presence of a subgroup of ASD patients who are really responders to omega-3 cannot be excluded. These responders might not appear when evaluating the omega-3 effects in a sample taken as a whole. Studies that check for the possible presence of this subgroup of ASD individuals responders to omega-3 are necessary. PMID:27857792

  12. The hot bands of silane between 2120 and 2270 cm -1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terki-Hassaïne, M.; Pierre, G.; Boudon, V.; Aït Hamadouche, G.; Guelachvili, G.

    2005-04-01

    The infrared spectrum of the SiH 4 molecule has been recorded between 2040 and 2320 cm -1 using the high-resolution Fourier interferometer of the Laboratoire de Photophysique Moléculaire ( Orsay, France). The resolution was 5.4 × 10 -3 cm -1. In this region, many lines were previously analyzed and assigned to the ν1/ ν3 stretching dyad of 28SiH 4, 29SiH 4, and 30SiH 4 molecules [J. Mol. Spectrosc. 143 (1990) 35]. However, several lines in the spectrum were not assigned. The results obtained in our previous study [J. Mol. Spectrosc. 197 (1999) 307] of the infrared spectrum of 28SiH 4, in the bending-stretching tetrad region at 3100 cm -1, enabled us to assign 204 of the observed transitions to hot bands (the ν1 + ν2/ ν1 + ν4/ ν2 + ν3/ ν3 + ν4 bending-stretching tetrad minus the ν2/ ν4 bending dyad). These transitions were used to refine the set of the Hamiltonian parameters of the bending-stretching tetrad. The analysis is performed using the tensorial formalism developed in Dijon for tetrahedral molecules and implemented in the STDS software ( http://www.u-bourgogne.fr/LPUB/shTDS.html).

  13. OMEGA System Performance Assessment and Coverage Evaluation (PACE) Workstation Design and Implementation. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-15

    contract number * * DI2~ 3 -89-C-20008, Task Order 90-0001, Task No. 5834, for * * the Omega Navigation System Center (ONSN), Alexardria, VA. * * IJR * * Ts...CG-ONSCEN-02.2-𔄃 1’ OMEGA SYSTEM PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT AND COVERAGE EVALUATION (PACE) WORKSTATION DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION AD- A239 7 24 George R...Springfield, Virginia 22161 Prepared for: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION UNITED STATES COAST GUARD OMEGA Navigation System Center Alexandria, Virginia

  14. OMEGA Japan Antenna System: Modification and Validation Tests. Volume 2. Data Sheets.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-15

    INFORMATION Electronic measurements were performed on the OMEGA Japan Antenna System during the months of October and November 1 978. The work was...TITLE (end Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED OMEGA JAPAN ANTENNA SYSTEM: MODIFICATION AND Final VALIDATION TESTS (Two Volumes) S Volume2...Electronic measurements were performed on the OMEGA Japan antenna system during October- November 1978. The work was performed by Megatek

  15. Omega from the anisotropy of the redshift correlation function in the IRAS 2 Jansky survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, A. J. S.

    1993-01-01

    Peculiar velocities distort the correlation function of galaxies in redshift space. In the linear regime, the distortion has a characteristic quadrupole plus hexadecapole form, with amplitude depending on the cosmological density parameter Omega. I report here measurements of the anisotropy of the correlation function in the IRAS 2 Jy redshift survey. The inferred value of Omega is Omega = 0.5 + 0.5 or - 0.25.

  16. Eight-cm mercury ion thruster system technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The technology status of 8 cm diameter electron bombardment ion thrusters is presented. Much of the technology resulting from the 5 cm diameter thruster has been adapted and improved upon to increase the reliability, durability, and efficiency of the 8 cm thruster. Technology discussed includes: dependence of neutralizer tip erosion upon neutralizer flow rate; impregnated and rolled-foil insert cathode performance and life testing; neutralizer position studies; thruster ion beam profile measurements; high voltage pulse ignition; high utilization ion machined accelerator grids; deposition internal and external to the thruster; thruster vectoring systems; thruster cycling life testing and thruster system weights for typical mission applications.

  17. Ion accelerator systems for high power 30 cm thruster operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G.

    1982-01-01

    Two and three-grid accelerator systems for high power ion thruster operation were investigated. Two-grid translation tests show that over compensation of the 30 cm thruster SHAG grid set spacing the 30 cm thruster radial plasma density variation and by incorporating grid compensation only sufficient to maintain grid hole axial alignment, it is shown that beam current gains as large as 50% can be realized. Three-grid translation tests performed with a simulated 30 cm thruster discharge chamber show that substantial beamlet steering can be reliably affected by decelerator grid translation only, at net-to-total voltage ratios as low as 0.05.

  18. Alteration and formation of rims on the CM parent body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, Lauren B.; McSween, Harry Y., Jr.; Zolensky, Michael

    1994-03-01

    All types of coarse-grained components in CM chondrites are surrounded by fine-grained dust coatings, but the origin of these rims is not yet clear. Although a strictly nebular origin seems likely for rims in the relatively unaltered type 3 chondrites, the rims in CM chondrites are dominated by secondary alteration phases. It has been argued that either the coarse-grained cores accreted altered rim materials while still in the nebula or that alteration of primary rim phases occurred on the CM parent body. To constrain the origin of alteration phases in rim material, we have analyzed the textures and mineral associations from 10 CM chondritic falls by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Our results indicate that the secondary phases in CM chondritic rims were produced by parent body fluid-rock interactions which redefined some primary rim textures and may have produced, in some cases, both coarse-grained components and the rims that surround them. Textural features demonstrate the interactive exchange of alteration fluids between rims, matrix, and chondrules on the CM parent body. For example, most matrix-rim contacts are gradational, suggesting the synchronous alteration of both components. Several observations suggest the possibility of in situ rim production. For example, tochilinite and phyllosilicates commonly form rims around matrix carbonates, which are generally believed to have precipitated from alteration fluids on the CM parent body. This suggests that the rims surrounding matrix carbonates may also have been produced by alteration processes. Partially replaced chondrule olivines bear a striking resemblance to many rimmed olivines in the matrix which suggests, by analogy, that site-specific precipitation of S-bearing phases may also be responsible for the occurrence of many tochilinite-rich rims around isolated matrix olivines. Non-silicate rims precipitate around olivines of any composition, but the process is most effective for fayalitic olivines

  19. Reduced cardiac remodelling and prevention of glutathione deficiency after omega-3 supplementation in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuehua; Favre, Julie; Vercauteren, Magalie; Laillet, Brigitte; Remy-Jouet, Isabelle; Skiba, Mohamed; Lallemand, Françoise; Dehaudt, Cathy; Monteil, Christelle; Thuillez, Christian; Mulder, Paul

    2011-06-01

    n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3) supplementation is associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality and post-infarction death. However, the impact of omega-3 supplementation in congestive heart failure (CHF) is still unknown. This study assesses the effects of omega-3 supplementation on left ventricular (LV) function and remodelling. We assessed, in rats with CHF induced by left coronary ligation, the effects of a 1-week and a 12-week supplementation with omega-3 (450 mg/kg per day) on LV hemodynamics, function and structure. Chronic omega-3 reduces total peripheral resistance due to an increase in cardiac output without modification of arterial pressure. Only chronic omega-3 reduces LV end-diastolic pressure and LV relaxation constant. Moreover, chronic omega-3 decreases LV systolic and diastolic diameters, LV weight and collagen density. Acute and chronic omega-3 increase LV γ-glutamyl-cysteine synthetase and oppose glutathione deficiency resulting in a reduction of myocardial oxidized glutathione. In experimental CHF, long-term omega-3 supplementation improves LV hemodynamics and function and prevents LV remodelling and glutathione deficiency. The latter might be one of the mechanisms involved, but whether other mechanism, independent of myocardial redox 'status', such as reduced inflammation, are implicated remains to be confirmed.

  20. Implementation of an experimental program to investigate the performance characteristics of OMEGA navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxa, E. G., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A theoretical formulation of differential and composite OMEGA error is presented to establish hypotheses about the functional relationships between various parameters and OMEGA navigational errors. Computer software developed to provide for extensive statistical analysis of the phase data is described. Results from the regression analysis used to conduct parameter sensitivity studies on differential OMEGA error tend to validate the theoretically based hypothesis concerning the relationship between uncorrected differential OMEGA error and receiver separation range and azimuth. Limited results of measurement of receiver repeatability error and line of position measurement error are also presented.

  1. Antibiotic resistance gene cassettes derived from the omega interposon for use in E. coli and Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Blondelet-Rouault, M H; Weiser, J; Lebrihi, A; Branny, P; Pernodet, J L

    1997-05-06

    Three antibiotic resistance gene cassettes, derived from the omega interposon (Prentki and Krisch (1984) Gene 29, 303-313) were constructed. These cassettes carry different antibiotic resistance genes, conferring resistance to geneticin, hygromycin or viomycin, flanked by short inverted repeats containing transcription and translation termination signals and synthetic polylinkers. These cassettes were designated omega aac, omega hyg and omega vph. Resistance phenotypes conferred by these constructions are selectable in E. coli and Streptomyces. These cassettes can be used for insertional mutagenesis or for vector construction.

  2. Potential Benefits of Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer.

    PubMed

    Black, Homer S; Rhodes, Lesley E

    2016-02-04

    Considerable circumstantial evidence has accrued from both experimental animal and human clinical studies that support a role for omega-3 fatty acids (FA) in the prevention of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Direct evidence from animal studies has shown that omega-3 FA inhibit ultraviolet radiation (UVR) induced carcinogenic expression. In contrast, increasing levels of dietary omega-6 FA increase UVR carcinogenic expression, with respect to a shorter tumor latent period and increased tumor multiplicity. Both omega-6 and omega-3 FA are essential FA, necessary for normal growth and maintenance of health and although these two classes of FA exhibit only minor structural differences, these differences cause them to act significantly differently in the body. Omega-6 and omega-3 FA, metabolized through the lipoxygenase (LOX) and cyclooxygenase (COX) pathways, lead to differential metabolites that are influential in inflammatory and immune responses involved in carcinogenesis. Clinical studies have shown that omega-3 FA ingestion protects against UVR-induced genotoxicity, raises the UVR-mediated erythema threshold, reduces the level of pro-inflammatory and immunosuppressive prostaglandin E2 (PGE₂) in UVR-irradiated human skin, and appears to protect human skin from UVR-induced immune-suppression. Thus, there is considerable evidence that omega-3 FA supplementation might be beneficial in reducing the occurrence of NMSC, especially in those individuals who are at highest risk.

  3. Various Effects of Omega 3 and Omega 3 Plus Vitamin E Supplementations on Serum Glucose Level and Insulin Resistance in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    SABOORI, Somayeh; DJALALI, Mahmoud; YOUSEFI RAD, Esmaeil; Nematipour, Ebrahim; SABOOR-YARAGHI, Ali Akbar; JAVANBAKHT, Mohammad Hassan; ESHRAGHIAN, Mohammad Reza; RAMEZANI, Atena; KOOHDANI, Fariba

    2016-01-01

    Background: Omega 3 and vitamin E are two critical nutrients which include beneficial effects in coronary artery disease (CAD). The aim of this study was to assess the effects of omega 3 alone supplementation or in combination with vitamin E on serum glucose and lipid levels and insulin resistance in CAD patients. Methods: Participants of this clinical trial included 60 male patients with CAD who selected from Tehran Heart Center in Tehran, Iran in 2014. They received 4 g/day omega 3 plus 400 IU/day vitamin E (OE), 4 g/day omega 3 with vitamin E placebo (OP), or omega 3 and vitamin E placebo (PP) for two months. Serum glucose, lipids and insulin were assessed and HOMA-IR was calculated before and after the trial and effects of these nutrients on the highlighted parameters were compared within the study groups. Results: Serum glucose level increased significantly in OP group (P=0.004), but not in OE group. OE and OP groups showed a significant decrease in fasting serum TG (P=0.020 and P=0.001, respectively). Serum insulin and HOMA-IR decreased significantly in OE group (P=0.044 and P=0.039, respectively) but did not change significantly in OP group. Conclusion: Although, omega 3 supplementation may include adverse effects on serum glucose level, co-administration of omega 3 and vitamin E can beneficially decrease serum insulin and insulin resistance in CAD patients. PMID:28032064

  4. Benchmarking and performance analysis of the CM-2. [SIMD computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, David W.; Adams, George B., II

    1988-01-01

    A suite of benchmarking routines testing communication, basic arithmetic operations, and selected kernel algorithms written in LISP and PARIS was developed for the CM-2. Experiment runs are automated via a software framework that sequences individual tests, allowing for unattended overnight operation. Multiple measurements are made and treated statistically to generate well-characterized results from the noisy values given by cm:time. The results obtained provide a comparison with similar, but less extensive, testing done on a CM-1. Tests were chosen to aid the algorithmist in constructing fast, efficient, and correct code on the CM-2, as well as gain insight into what performance criteria are needed when evaluating parallel processing machines.

  5. The 21-cm Signal from the cosmological epoch of recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Fialkov, A.; Loeb, A. E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-11-01

    The redshifted 21-cm emission by neutral hydrogen offers a unique tool for mapping structure formation in the early universe in three dimensions. Here we provide the first detailed calculation of the 21-cm emission signal during and after the epoch of hydrogen recombination in the redshift range of z ∼ 500–1,100, corresponding to observed wavelengths of 100–230 meters. The 21-cm line deviates from thermal equilibrium with the cosmic microwave background (CMB) due to the excess Lyα radiation from hydrogen and helium recombinations. The resulting 21-cm signal reaches a brightness temperature of a milli-Kelvin, orders of magnitude larger than previously estimated. Its detection by a future lunar or space-based observatory could improve dramatically the statistical constraints on the cosmological initial conditions compared to existing two-dimensional maps of the CMB anisotropies.

  6. CM Process Improvement and the International Space Station Program (ISSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephenson, Ginny

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Configuration Management (CM) process improvements planned and undertaken for the International Space Station Program (ISSP). It reviews the 2004 findings and recommendations and the progress towards their implementation.

  7. Baseline Blood Levels of Omega-3 and Depression Remission: A secondary analysis of data from a placebo-controlled trial of omega-3 supplements

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Robert M.; Steinmeyer, Brian C.; Freedland, Kenneth E.; Rubin, Eugene H.; Rich, Michael W.; Harris, William S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Depression is associated with low red blood cell (RBC) levels of two omega-3 fatty acids (FAs), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), suggesting that omega-3 supplements might improve depression. However, clinical trials have produced mixed results. The purpose of this secondary analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial was to determine whether baseline blood levels of omega-3, which are known to vary widely among individuals, predict depression outcomes. Methods The percentages of EPA, DHA, and the omega-6 arachidonic acid (AA) were measured in RBCs at baseline and post-treatment in 122 participants with DSM-IV major depression who were randomized between May 2005 and December 2008 to receive either 50 mg/day of sertraline and 930 mg EPA/750 mg DHA/day or sertraline plus placebo. Associations between baseline RBC omega-3 levels and remission of depression (HAM-D≤7) were analyzed by treatment arm. Results Among participants in the omega-3 arm, baseline RBC levels of EPA+DHA (p=0.002) and the EPA+DHA:AA ratio (p=0.003) were significantly higher among those whose depression subsequently remitted compared with those whose depression did not remit. No associations were detected in the sertraline plus placebo arm. Baseline levels of EPA (p=0.03) and the EPA+DHA:AA ratio (p=0.04) moderated the relationship between treatment arm and depression outcomes. Conclusion High pre-treatment RBC levels of EPA and DHA, and a high EPA+DHA:AA ratio, predict favorable depression outcomes in patients receiving omega-3 supplements. Omega-3 supplementation may be an effective treatment for depression, but the requisite dosage and duration of treatment may depend on the patient's baseline level of omega-3. PMID:26930527

  8. Risk of Malignancy in Thyroid Nodules 4 cm or Larger

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Several authors have questioned the accuracy of fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) in large nodules. Some surgeons recommend thyroidectomy for nodules ≥4 cm even in the setting of benign FNAC, due to increased risk of malignancy and increased false negative rates in large thyroid nodules. The goal of our study was to evaluate if thyroid nodule size is associated with risk of malignancy, and to evaluate the false negative rate of FNAC for thyroid nodules ≥4 cm in our patient population. Methods This is a retrospective study of 85 patients with 101 thyroid nodules, who underwent thyroidectomy for thyroid nodules measuring ≥4 cm. Results The overall risk of malignancy in nodules ≥4 cm was 9.9%. Nodule size was not associated with risk of malignancy (odds ratio, 1.02) after adjusting for nodule consistency, age, and sex (P=0.6). The false negative rate for FNAC was 0%. Conclusion Nodule size was not associated with risk of malignancy in nodules ≥4 cm in our patient population. FNAC had a false negative rate of 0. Patients with thyroid nodules ≥4 cm and benign cytology should not automatically undergo thyroidectomy. PMID:28181427

  9. Thermal properties of the martian surface inferred from OMEGA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audouard, J.; Poulet, F.; Vincendon, M.; Bibring, J.; Gondet, B.; Langevin, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Martian surface temperatures are the results of radiative exchanges between the air and the shallow subsurface. Thermal inertia (TI) and the albedo are key parameters for modulating diurnal temperature variation of surfaces. TI, which represents the resistance to change in temperature of the upper few centimeters of the subsurface throughout the day, is independent of local time, latitude, and season. Thermal infrared spectrometers TES and THEMIS that measured the surface temperature have been frequently used to derive the thermal properties of the martian surface (see e.g. Putzig et al. 2005; Fergason et al. 2006). Global TI derivation techniques usually assume that the thermophysical properties of the soil are vertically uniform (Putzig et al. 2005), while vertical heterogeneities are observed (Putzig and Mellon 2007; Bandfield and Feldman 2008). As the thermal wave penetration depth varies with season, various apparent thermal inertias are derived as a function of season for a given location (Putzig et al. 2005). Surface temperatures (larger than ~200 K) can be derived from the OMEGA/Mars Express hyperspectral observations (Jouglet et al. 2007). Of special interest is the elliptical MEX orbit that makes possible to observe a given surface element at various local time and solar longitude. This allow us to explore different parts of the thermal response of martian soils and can be used to better constrain the properties of the subsurface. We have developed an operational pixel-to-pixel climate modeling interface using the Martian Global Climate Model (Forget et al. 1999), in order to compare the surface temperature measured by OMEGA with the modeled temperature. A systematic comparison data/model covering 4 Martian years will be discussed. A few local scale thermal inertia retrievals will be then presented and compared to previous studies based on TES/MGS and THEMIS/Mars Odyssey data. We will also investigate the thermophysical properties of soils where anomalous

  10. GALEX Grism Spectroscopy of the Globular Cluster Omega Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweigart, Allen

    We propose to obtain GALEX FUV-only grism spectroscopy of the hot stars in omega Centauri, the most massive globular cluster in our Galaxy. Previous UIT imagery of omega Cen showed that it contains about 2000 hot horizontal branch (HB) stars, and we estimate that GALEX spectra can be obtained for about 500 of these stars in the outer regions of the cluster, including about 50 of the hot ``blue hook'' stars discovered with UIT. The blue hook stars appear to be both hotter (35,000 K) and less luminous in the UIT color-magnitude diagram than predicted by canonical HB models and, indeed, are unexplained by standard evolutionary theory. Brown et al. (2001) have suggested that the blue hook stars are the progeny of stars which mixed their surface hydrogen into their hot He-burning interior during a delayed helium flash subsequent to leaving the red giant branch. This ``flash-mixing'' results in a hot hydrogen-deficient star with a typical surface abundance of 96% He and 4% C by mass. The GALEX spectral region includes the strong lines of C III 1426, 1578 A, C IV 1550 A, and He II 1640 A which will allow this predicted carbon and helium enrichment to be detected. These observations will therefore provide a crucial test of the Brown et al. flash-mixing hypothesis and will determine if flash mixing represents a new evolutionary channel for populating the hot HB. The GALEX spectra will also address other questions concerning the hot HB in omega Cen including (1) the metallicity distribution of HB stars with 9,000 K < Teff < 11,000 K, (2) the effect of radiative levitation on the UV spectra of stars with Teff > 11,000 K, and (3) the origin of the subluminous HB stars found in the UIT photometry with 15,000K < Teff < 30,000 K.

  11. Final Report: Posttest Analysis of Omega II Optical Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Newlander, C D; Fisher, J H

    2007-01-30

    Preliminary posttest analyses have been completed on optical specimens exposed during the Omega II test series conducted on 14 July 2006. The Omega Facility, located at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester was used to produce X-ray environments through the interaction of intense pulsed laser radiation upon germanium-loaded silica aerogels. The optical specimen testing was supported by GH Systems through experiment design, pre- and post-test analyses, specimen acquisition, and overall technical experience. The test specimens were fabricated and characterized by Surface Optics Corporation (SOC), San Diego, CA and were simple protected gold coatings on silica substrates. Six test specimens were exposed, five filtered with thin beryllium foil filters, and one unfiltered which was exposed directly to the raw environment. The experimental objectives were: (1) demonstrate that tests of optical specimens could be performed at the Omega facility; (2) evaluate the use and survivability of beryllium foil filters as a function of thickness; (3) obtain damage data on optical specimens which ranged from no damage to damage; (4) correlate existing thermal response models with the damage data; (5) evaluate the use of the direct raw environment upon the specimen response and the ability/desirability to conduct sensitive optical specimen tests using the raw environment; and (6) initiate the development of a protocol for performing optical coatings/mirror tests. This report documents the activities performed by GH Systems in evaluating and using the environments provided by LLNL, the PUFFTFT analyses performed using those environments, and the calculated results compared to the observed and measured posttest data.

  12. Omegas and Dry Eye: More Knowledge, More Questions.

    PubMed

    Hom, Milton M; Asbell, Penny; Barry, Brendan

    2015-09-01

    The omega-3 (ω3) and omega-6 (ω6) essential fatty acid knowledge base has been exploding. In the last 5 years, at least 12 clinical trials on ω3 and ω6 supplementation and dry eye disease (DED) were published in the peer-reviewed literature (2010 to 2015), about double the amount published in the 5 years prior. Although there is increasing scientific evidence that supports the potential use of ω3 and ω6 supplementation for DED, there are limited randomized controlled trials to properly inform evidence-based medicine. Dry eye disease is one of the most common eye conditions that patients seek care for and cannot be disregarded as a trivial condition. The roles of ω3 and ω6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in the treatment of DED are still not completely understood. There are distinct and sometimes opposite effects of ω3 and ω6 PUFAs, both of which are essential and cannot be synthesized de novo in the body. These fatty acids must be obtained from the diet, which varies widely by region, even within the United States. Omega-3 PUFAs have anti-inflammatory effects; a proper ratio of ω6:ω3 in the diet must be established. Objectively correlating changes in dry eye syndrome with blood levels of ω3 PUFAs has not been done in a large-scale multisite study. Just as Wilder's law of initial value states that "the direction of response of a body function to any agent depends to a large degree on the initial level of that function," the baseline status needs to be taken into account. There is also no consensus on the dose, composition, length of treatment, and so on with ω3 or ω6 PUFAs. Increased quality evidence on the usefulness of over-the-counter supplements is needed to enable eye care providers to confidently outline specific treatment recommendations for using ω3 PUFAs in DED.

  13. Rotation and magnetic field in the Be star omega Orionis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiner, C.; Hubert, A.-M.; Frémat, Y.; Floquet, M.; Jankov, S.; Preuss, O.; Henrichs, H. F.; Zorec, J.

    2003-10-01

    omega Ori is a B2IIIe star for which rotational modulation and non-radial pulsations (NRP) have been recently investigated from two independent observational campaigns in 1998 and 1999. Putting the data of these 2 campaigns together, and adding data obtained in 2001, we search for multiperiodicity in the line profile variations and evidence for outbursts. From new spectropolarimetric data obtained at the Télescope Bernard Lyot (TBL, Pic du Midi, France) in 2001 we also measure the Stokes V parameter in the polarised light. We find evidence for the presence of a weak magnetic field in omega Ori sinusoidally varying with a period of 1.29 d. The equivalent widths (EW) of the wind sensitive UV resonance lines also show a variation with the same period, which we identify as the rotational period of the star. We propose an oblique rotator model and derive Bpol =530 +/- 230 G to explain the observations. Moreover, we carry out an abundance analysis and find the star to be N-enriched, a property which is shared with other magnetic stars. We propose omega Ori as the first known classical Be star hosting a magnetic field. Based on observations obtained using the Musicos spectropolarimeter at the Observatoire du Pic du Midi (France), during the MuSiCoS 98 campaign \\citep{neiner}, and by \\cite{balona}. Based on INES data from the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite. Table 7 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/409/275

  14. [Omega-3: from cod-liver oil to nutrigenomics].

    PubMed

    Caramia, G

    2008-08-01

    The leading role of cod-liver oil on rickets was a relevant factor in the knowledge of this disease. In 1922 the preventive and therapeutic value of cod-liver oil and sunlight against rickets in young infants was confirmed. The seasonal variation in the incidence of rickets, the role of skin pigmentation, of diet and the fact that breast milk was not an adequate source of vitamin D were understood. The discovery of essential fatty acids omega-6 and omega-3 have shown that deficiencies, mainly of omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, result in visual and cognitive impairment and disturbances in mental functions in infants and also in cognitive function in adults, as fatty acids are beneficial to vascular health and may forestall cerebrovascular disease and thus dementia. An adequate ratio of n-6 and n-3 fatty acids may promote a healthier balance of eicosanoids, which would protect membrane function with a nutraceutical function. Dietary lipids not only influence the biophysical state of the cell membranes but, via direct and indirect routes, they also act on multiple pathways including signalling, gene and protein activities, protein modifications and they probably play important role in modulating protein aggregation. Significant advances have been made in understanding the relation between dietary factors and inflammation, which is a central component of many chronic diseases, including coronary artery disease, rheumatoid arthritis, cancer prevention. However, the identification of those who will or will not benefit from dietary intervention strategies remains a major obstacle. Adequate knowledge about how the responses depend on an individual's genetic background (nutrigenetic effects), the cumulative effects of food components on genetic expression profiles through nutrigenomics mechanism, may assist in identifying responders and non-responders. Thus, fish and fish oil consumption might encourage brain development and gene expression to brain

  15. Development of omega-3 rich energy bar with flaxseed.

    PubMed

    Mridula, D; Singh, K K; Barnwal, P

    2013-10-01

    Energy bar sample were prepared with different levels of flaxseed (0-20%) in addition to cereals and pulses with varying levels of sweeteners (45, 50, and 55%) to deliver a nutritious food to the consumer. The developed bars were evaluated for textural, colour, nutritional quality, sensory attributes and total microbial load. Different levels of flaxseed and sweeteners significantly affected the hue and chroma values of the energy bar. In general the level of flaxseed in energy bar did not affect the hardness but it was decreased with increasing level of sweeteners except in control sample. The total calories obtained from the energy bar showed significant increase with the increasing levels of flaxseed, the maximum (397.95 kcal) being for bars with 20% flaxseed and 45% sweeteners. This energy bar sample also showed the maximum protein (12.41%), crude fat (11.86%), ash (1.65%), iron (3.77 mg/100 g), crude fiber (2.18%) and omega-3 as alpha-linolenic acid (22.50%, fatty acid basis) content. The overall mean sensory score for overall acceptability for samples with 10% flaxseed and 55% sweeteners and 15% flaxseed and 45% sweeteners were at par but the omega-3 and other nutrients in the later sample was higher than the former sample, hence, 15% flaxseed and 45% sweeteners along with other ingredients may be considered for production of acceptable quality omega-3 fatty acid rich energy bar at commercial scale, which also stored well at refrigerated condition.

  16. CW-cavity ring down spectroscopy of the ozone molecule in the 6625-6830 cm -1 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campargue, A.; Kassi, S.; Romanini, D.; Barbe, A.; De Backer-Barilly, M.-R.; Tyuterev, Vl. G.

    2006-11-01

    The absorption spectrum of ozone, 16O 3, has been recorded by CW-cavity ring down spectroscopy in the 6625-6830 cm -1 region. The typical sensitivity of these recordings ( αmin ˜ 3 × 10 -10 cm -1) allows observing very weak transitions with intensity down to 2 × 10 -28 cm/molecule. 483 and 299 transitions have been assigned to the 2 ν1 + 3 ν2 + 3 ν3A-type band and to the 2 ν1 + 4 ν2 + 2 ν3B-type band, respectively, which are the highest frequency bands of ozone recorded so far under high resolution. Rovibrational transitions with J and Ka values up to 46 and 12, respectively, could be assigned. Despite well-known difficulties to correctly reproduce the energy levels not far from the dissociation limit, it was possible to determine the parameters of an effective Hamiltonian which includes six vibrational states, four of them being dark states. The line positions analysis led to an rms deviation of 8.5 × 10 -3 cm -1 while the experimental line intensities could be satisfactorily reproduced. Additional experiments in the 5970-6021 cm -1 region allows detecting the (233) ← (010) hot band reaching the same upper state as the preceding cold band. From the effective parameters of the (233) state just determined and those of the (010) level available in the literature, 329 transitions could be assigned and used for a further refinement of the rovibrational parameters of the effective Hamiltonian leading to a value of 7.6 × 10 -3 cm -1 for the global rms deviation. The complete list of the experimentally determined rovibrational energy levels of the (233), (242), and (520) states is given. The determined effective Hamiltonian and transition moment operators allowed calculating a line list (intensity cut off of 10 -28 cm/molecule at 296 K), available as Supplementary material for the 6590-6860 and 5916-6021 cm -1 regions. The integrated band strength values are 1.75 × 10 -24 and 4.78 × 10 -25 cm/molecule at 296 K for the 2 ν1 + 3 ν2 + 3 ν3A-type band and

  17. Low omega-6 vs. low omega-6 plus high omega-3 dietary intervention for Chronic Daily Headache: Protocol for a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Targeted analgesic dietary interventions are a promising strategy for alleviating pain and improving quality of life in patients with persistent pain syndromes, such as chronic daily headache (CDH). High intakes of the omega-6 (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), linoleic acid (LA) and arachidonic acid (AA) may promote physical pain by increasing the abundance, and subsequent metabolism, of LA and AA in immune and nervous system tissues. Here we describe methodology for an ongoing randomized clinical trial comparing the metabolic and clinical effects of a low n-6, average n-3 PUFA diet, to the effects of a low n-6 plus high n-3 PUFA diet, in patients with CDH. Our primary aim is to determine if: A) both diets reduce n-6 PUFAs in plasma and erythrocyte lipid pools, compared to baseline; and B) the low n-6 plus high n-3 diet produces a greater decline in n-6 PUFAs, compared to the low n-6 diet alone. Secondary clinical outcomes include headache-specific quality-of-life, and headache frequency and intensity. Methods Adults meeting the International Classification of Headache Disorders criteria for CDH are included. After a 6-week baseline phase, participants are randomized to a low n-6 diet, or a low n-6 plus high n-3 diet, for 12 weeks. Foods meeting nutrient intake targets are provided for 2 meals and 2 snacks per day. A research dietitian provides intensive dietary counseling at 2-week intervals. Web-based intervention materials complement dietitian advice. Blood and clinical outcome data are collected every 4 weeks. Results Subject recruitment and retention has been excellent; 35 of 40 randomized participants completed the 12-week intervention. Preliminary blinded analysis of composite data from the first 20 participants found significant reductions in erythrocyte n-6 LA, AA and %n-6 in HUFA, and increases in n-3 EPA, DHA and the omega-3 index, indicating adherence. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01157208) PMID:21496264

  18. The omega-3 and retinopathy of prematurity relationship.

    PubMed

    Malamas, Angelakis; Chranioti, Angeliki; Tsakalidis, Christos; Dimitrakos, Stavros A; Mataftsi, Asimina

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to examine the effect of omega-3 (ω-3) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) intake on retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) by reviewing the experimental and clinical trials conducted on animal models and infants. LCPUFAs demonstrate cytoprotective and cytotherapeutic actions contributing to a number of anti-angiogenic and neuroprotective mechanisms within the retina. Their intake appears to have a beneficial effect on ischemia, oxidative stress, inflammation and cellular signaling mechanisms, influencing retinal cell gene expression and cellular differentiation. ω-3 LCPUFAs may modulate metabolic processes that activate molecules implicated in the pathogenesis of vasoproliferative and neurodegenerative retinal diseases such as ROP.

  19. The Central Velocity Distribution Function of Omega Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitzer, Patrick

    1993-12-01

    Precise radial velocities have been obtained for 870 red giant stars within 4 arcminutes of the center of the globular cluster Omega Centauri (NGC\\ 5139) using the ARGUS multiple object echelle spectrometer at CTIO. The resulting distribution of radial velocities is analyzed to derive the line of sight velocity distribution function, and is compared with various models of relaxed star clusters. The truncation of the velocity function is due to the Galactic tidal field, and some hint of the form this truncation takes is available even with this small number of stars. Observations at two epochs are available for most of the stars and are used to constrain the fraction of binary stars.

  20. Mini-O, simple Omega receiver hardware for user education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burhans, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A problem with the Omega system is a lack of suitable low cost hardware for the small user community. A collection of do it yourself circuit modules are under development intended for use by educational institutions, small boat owners, aviation enthusiasts, and others who have some skills in fabricating their own electronic equipment. Applications of the hardware to time frequency standards measurements, signal propagation monitoring, and navigation experiments are presented. A family of Mini-O systems have been constructed varying from the simplest RF preamplifiers and narrowband filters front-ends, to sophisticated microcomputer interface adapters.

  1. The NIF x-ray spectrometer calibration campaign at Omega.

    PubMed

    Pérez, F; Kemp, G E; Regan, S P; Barrios, M A; Pino, J; Scott, H; Ayers, S; Chen, H; Emig, J; Colvin, J D; Bedzyk, M; Shoup, M J; Agliata, A; Yaakobi, B; Marshall, F J; Hamilton, R A; Jaquez, J; Farrell, M; Nikroo, A; Fournier, K B

    2014-11-01

    The calibration campaign of the National Ignition Facility X-ray Spectrometer (NXS) was carried out at the Omega laser facility. Spherically symmetric, laser-driven, millimeter-scale x-ray sources of K-shell and L-shell emission from various mid-Z elements were designed for the 2-18 keV energy range of the NXS. The absolute spectral brightness was measured by two calibrated spectrometers. We compare the measured performance of the target design to radiation hydrodynamics simulations.

  2. The mothers, Omega-3 and mental health study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder (MDD) during pregnancy and postpartum depression are associated with significant maternal and neonatal morbidity. While antidepressants are readily used in pregnancy, studies have raised concerns regarding neurobehavioral outcomes in exposed infants. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation, most frequently from fish oil, has emerged as a possible treatment or prevention strategy for MDD in non-pregnant individuals, and may have beneficial effects in pregnant women. Although published observational studies in the psychiatric literature suggest that maternal docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) deficiency may lead to the development of MDD in pregnancy and postpartum, there are more intervention trials suggesting clinical benefit for supplementation with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in MDD. Methods/Design The Mothers, Omega-3 and Mental Health study is a double blind, placebo-controlled, randomized controlled trial to assess whether omega-3 fatty acid supplementation may prevent antenatal and postpartum depressive symptoms among pregnant women at risk for depression. We plan to recruit 126 pregnant women at less than 20 weeks gestation from prenatal clinics at two health systems in Ann Arbor, Michigan and the surrounding communities. We will follow them prospectively over the course of their pregnancies and up to 6 weeks postpartum. Enrolled participants will be randomized to one of three groups: a) EPA-rich fish oil supplement (1060 mg EPA plus 274 mg DHA) b) DHA-rich fish oil supplement (900 mg DHA plus 180 mg EPA; or c) a placebo. The primary outcome for this study is the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score at 6 weeks postpartum. We will need to randomize 126 women to have 80% power to detect a 50% reduction in participants' mean BDI scores with EPA or DHA supplementation compared with placebo. We will also gather information on secondary outcome measures which will include: omega-3 fatty acid concentrations in maternal plasma and cord blood

  3. The omega-3 and retinopathy of prematurity relationship

    PubMed Central

    Malamas, Angelakis; Chranioti, Angeliki; Tsakalidis, Christos; Dimitrakos, Stavros A; Mataftsi, Asimina

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to examine the effect of omega-3 (ω-3) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) intake on retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) by reviewing the experimental and clinical trials conducted on animal models and infants. LCPUFAs demonstrate cytoprotective and cytotherapeutic actions contributing to a number of anti-angiogenic and neuroprotective mechanisms within the retina. Their intake appears to have a beneficial effect on ischemia, oxidative stress, inflammation and cellular signaling mechanisms, influencing retinal cell gene expression and cellular differentiation. ω-3 LCPUFAs may modulate metabolic processes that activate molecules implicated in the pathogenesis of vasoproliferative and neurodegenerative retinal diseases such as ROP. PMID:28251092

  4. Omega 3 fatty acids for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Lee; Harrison, Roger A; Summerbell, Carolyn D; Moore, Helen; Worthington, Helen V; Ness, Andrew; Capps, Nigel; Smith, George Davey; Riemersma, Rudolph; Ebrahim, Shah

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that omega 3 (W3, n-3 or omega-3) fats from oily fish and plants are beneficial to health. Objectives To assess whether dietary or supplemental omega 3 fatty acids alter total mortality, cardiovascular events or cancers using both RCT and cohort studies. Search methods Five databases including CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched to February 2002. No language restrictions were applied. Bibliographies were checked and authors contacted. Selection criteria RCTs were included where omega 3 intake or advice was randomly allocated and unconfounded, and study duration was at least six months. Cohorts were included where a cohort was followed up for at least six months and omega 3 intake estimated. Data collection and analysis Studies were assessed for inclusion, data extracted and quality assessed independently in duplicate. Random effects meta-analysis was performed separately for RCT and cohort data. Main results Forty eight randomised controlled trials (36,913 participants) and 41 cohort analyses were included. Pooled trial results did not show a reduction in the risk of total mortality or combined cardiovascular events in those taking additional omega 3 fats (with significant statistical heterogeneity). Sensitivity analysis, retaining only studies at low risk of bias, reduced heterogeneity and again suggested no significant effect of omega 3 fats. Restricting analysis to trials increasing fish-based omega 3 fats, or those increasing short chain omega 3s, did not suggest significant effects on mortality or cardiovascular events in either group. Subgroup analysis by dietary advice or supplementation, baseline risk of CVD or omega 3 dose suggested no clear effects of these factors on primary outcomes. Neither RCTs nor cohorts suggested increased relative risk of cancers with higher omega 3 intake but estimates were imprecise so a clinically important effect could not be excluded. Authors’ conclusions It is not clear that dietary

  5. Effects of omega-3 fatty acids on orexigenic and anorexigenic modulators at the onset of anorexia.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Eduardo J B; Romanova, Irina V; Suzuki, Susumu; Chen, Chung; Ugrumov, Michael V; Sato, Tomoi; Goncalves, Carolina G; Meguid, Michael M

    2005-06-07

    In cancer anorexia, a decrease in food intake (FI) occurs concomitant with changes in orexigenic peptides such as neuropeptide Y (NPY) and anorexigenic peptides such as alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) and anorexigenic neurotransmitter serotonin. omega-3 Fatty acid (omega-3FA) inhibits cytokine synthesis, and delays tumor appearance, tumor growth, and onset of anorexia in tumor-bearing rats. We hypothesize that, in cancer anorexia, omega-3FA is associated with quantitative reversal of hypothalamic NPY, alpha-MSH, and serotonin receptor (5-HT(1B)-receptor) enhancing FI. Fischer rats were divided into: MCA tumor bearing fed chow (TB-Chow) or omega-3FA diet (TB-omega-3FA) and controls: non-tumor bearing fed chow (NTB-Chow) or omega-3FA diet (NTB-omega-3FA). Rats were euthanized at anorexia and brains were removed for hypothalamic immunohistochemical study, using NPY, alpha-MSH, and 5-HT(1B)-receptor-specific antibodies and slides assessed by image analysis. Immunostaining specificity was controlled by omission of primary or secondary antibodies and pre-absorption test. At anorexia, FI decreased (P < 0.05) in TB-Chow but did not change in TB-omega-3FA rats. In TB-omega-3FA vs. TB-Chow, NPY immunoreactivity increased 38% in arcuate nucleus (ARC; P < 0.05), and 50% in magnocellular paraventricular nucleus (mPVN; P < 0.05). alpha-MSH decreased 64% in ARC and 29% in mPVN (P < 0.05). 5-HT(1B)-receptor immunoreactivity decreased 13% only in supraoptic nucleus (P < 0.05). No immunoreactivity was found in the control sections. omega-3FA modified hypothalamic peptides and 5-HT-(1B)-receptor immunoreactivity at anorexia, concomitant with an increase in FI, were probably mediated by omega-3FA inhibition of tumor-induced cytokines.

  6. The omega-atracotoxins: selective blockers of insect M-LVA and HVA calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Chong, Youmie; Hayes, Jessica L; Sollod, Brianna; Wen, Suping; Wilson, David T; Hains, Peter G; Hodgson, Wayne C; Broady, Kevin W; King, Glenn F; Nicholson, Graham M

    2007-08-15

    The omega-atracotoxins (omega-ACTX) are a family of arthropod-selective peptide neurotoxins from Australian funnel-web spider venoms (Hexathelidae: Atracinae) that are candidates for development as biopesticides. We isolated a 37-residue insect-selective neurotoxin, omega-ACTX-Ar1a, from the venom of the Sydney funnel-web spider Atrax robustus, with high homology to several previously characterized members of the omega-ACTX-1 family. The peptide induced potent excitatory symptoms, followed by flaccid paralysis leading to death, in acute toxicity tests in house crickets. Using isolated smooth and skeletal nerve-muscle preparations, the toxin was shown to lack overt vertebrate toxicity at concentrations up to 1 microM. To further characterize the target of the omega-ACTXs, voltage-clamp analysis using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique was undertaken using cockroach dorsal unpaired median neurons. It is shown here for the first time that omega-ACTX-Ar1a, and its homolog omega-ACTX-Hv1a from Hadronyche versuta, reversibly block both mid-low- (M-LVA) and high-voltage-activated (HVA) insect calcium channel (Ca(v)) currents. This block occurred in the absence of alterations in the voltage-dependence of Ca(v) channel activation, and was voltage-independent, suggesting that omega-ACTX-1 family toxins are pore blockers rather than gating modifiers. At a concentration of 1 microM omega-ACTX-Ar1a failed to significantly affect global K(v) channel currents. However, 1 microM omega-ACTX-Ar1a caused a modest 18% block of insect Na(v) channel currents, similar to the minor block of Na(v) channels reported for other insect Ca(v) channel blockers such as omega-agatoxin IVA. These findings validate both M-LVA and HVA Ca(v) channels as potential targets for insecticides.

  7. The Role of Omega-3 Dietary Supplementation in Blepharitis and Meibomian Gland Dysfunction (An AOS Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Macsai, Marian S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Blepharitis and meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) are common sources of complaints from patients. To evaluate the effect on ocular symptoms, ocular findings, and serum and meibomian gland contents, patients with blepharitis and MGD were prospectively evaluated to determine the effects of dietary supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids. Methods In a prospective randomized placebo-controlled masked trial, patients with simple obstructive MGD and blepharitis, who had discontinued all topical medications and tetracyclines, received oral omega-3 dietary supplementation consisting of two 1000-mg capsules 3 times a day. Patients were examined every 3 months for 1 year with the Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) objective clinical measures, including tear production and stability, ocular surface and meibomian gland health, and biochemical plasma, red blood cell (RBC), and meibum evaluation. Primary outcome measures were change in tear breakup time (TBUT), meibum score, and overall OSDI score at 1 year. Results At 1 year, the omega-3 group had a 36% and 31% reduction in their omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acid ratios in RBCs and plasma, respectively (P = .3), whereas the placebo group demonstrated no change. At 12 months, the omega-3 group had an improvement in TBUT, OSDI score, and meibum score. Changes in meibum content were observed in the omega-3 group (P = .21); the level of meibum saturated fatty acids decreased. Conclusions This trial demonstrated a decrease in the RBC and plasma ratios of omega-6 to omega-3 in patients taking omega-3 dietary supplementation, as compared to controls, and improvements in their overall OSDI score, TBUT, and meibum score. This is the first demonstration of an induced change in the fatty acid saturation content in meibum as a result of dietary supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids. PMID:19277245

  8. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Inhibited Tumor Growth via Preventing the Decrease of Genomic DNA Methylation in Colorectal Cancer Rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qionglin; Wen, Juan; Chen, Guangzhao; Ge, Miaomiao; Gao, Yihua; Ye, Xiaoxia; Liu, Chunan; Cai, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Omge-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) exhibited significant effect in inhibiting various tumors. However, the mechanisms of its anticancer role have not been fully demonstrated. The declination of 5-methylcytosine (5 mC) was closely associated with poor prognosis of tumors. To explore whether omega-3 PUFAs influences on DNA methylation level in tumors, colorectal cancer (CRC) rat model were constructed using N-methyl phosphite nitrourea and omega-3 PUFAs were fed to part of the rats during tumor induction. The PUFAs contents in the rats of 3 experimental groups were measured using gas chromatography and 5 mC level were detected by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The results showed that tumor incidence in omega-3 treated rats was much lower than in CRC model rats, which confirmed significant antitumor role of omega-3 PUFAs. Six PUFA members categorized to omega-3 and omega-6 families were quantified and the ratio of omega-6/omega-3 PUFAs was remarkably lower in omega-3 PUFAs treatment group than in CRC model group. 5 mC content in omega-3 PUFAs treated rats was higher than in CRC model rats, suggesting omega-3 PUFAs promoted 5 mC synthesis. Therefore, omega-3 PUFAs probably inhibited tumor growth via regulating DNA methylation process, which provided a novel anticancer mechanism of omega-3 PUFAs from epigenetic view.

  9. Identification of similarity of skeletal structures in the range 10-5 cm - 1023 cm and the probable role of skeletal assemblies of carbon nanotube-like dust in the large-scale structure of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukushkin, A. B.; Rantsev-Kartinov, V. A.

    The role of the dust in astrophysics is analyzed from viewpoint of the hypothesis [1] (and respective proof-of-concept studies [2]) for the self-assembling of a fractal dust in laboratory electric discharges. The presence of skeletal structures of the same distinctive topology (namely, tubules and cartwheels, and their simple combinations) in the range 10-5cm - 1023cm, and a trend toward self-similarity (i.e. assembling of bigger structures from similar smaller ones), are found [3]. These evidences come from the electron micrography of dust deposits in tokamak (10-6cm - 10-3cm) [4], the images of plasma taken in laboratory electric discharges -- tokamaks, Z-pinches, plasma focus and vacuum spark (10-2cm - 10 cm) [2], hail particles (1cm - 10cm), the images of tornado (103cm - 105cm) and of a wide class of objects in space (1011cm - 1023 cm), including the solar coronal mass ejection, supernova remnants, and some galaxies [3]. The similarity of, and a trend toward self-similarity in, these skeletal structures (especially, cartwheels as the structures of essentially non-hydrodynamic nature) suggest all them to possess, similarly to skeletons in the particles of dust and hail, a fractal condensed matter of particular topology of the fractal. Specifically, this matter may be assembled from nanotubular blocks in a way similar to that in the skeletons found [4] in the submicron dust particles. An analysis of the redshift surveys of galaxies and quasars suggests the possibility to draw the above similarity up to 1026cm. This hints at the presence of a baryonic cold dark skeleton (BCDS) of the Universe [5]. The hypothesis of BCDS is shown to have no conflict with major cosmological facts (Hubble expansion and cosmic microwave background's isotropy). REFERENCES: [1] Fusion Energy 1998 (IAEA, Vienna, 1999), Vol. 3, p. 1131. [2] Advances in Plasma Phys. Research, Vol. 2 (Ed. F. Gerard, Nova Science Publishers, New York, 2002), pp. 1-22. [3] Phys. Lett. A 306, 175 (2002). [4

  10. CM Carbonaceous Chondrite Lithologies and Their Space Exposure Ages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael; Gregory, Timothy; Takenouchi, Atsushi; Nishiizumi, Kunihiko; Trieman, Alan; Berger, Eve; Le, Loan; Fagan, Amy; Velbel, Michael; Imae, Naoya; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The CMs are the most commonly falling C chondrites, and therefore may be a major component of C-class asteroids, the targets of several current and future space missions. Previous work [1] has concluded that CM chondrites fall into at least four distinct cosmic ray space exposure (CRE) age groups (0.1 million years, 0.2 million years, 0.6 million years and greater than 2.0 million years), an unusually large number, but the meaning of these groupings is unclear. It is possible that these meteorites came from different parent bodies which broke up at different times, or instead came from the same parent body which underwent multiple break-up events, or a combination of these scenarios, or something else entirely. The objective of this study is to investigate the diversity of lithologies which make up CM chondrites, in order to determine whether the different exposure ages correspond to specific, different CM lithologies, which permit us to constrain the history of the CM parent body(ies). We have already reported significant petrographic differences among CM chondrites [2-4]. We report here our new results.

  11. Initial Single-Mode Rayleigh-Taylor Growth Rates Measured with the OMEGA Laser System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Boehly, T. R.; Ofer, D.; Verdon, C. P.; Bradley, D. K.; McKenty, P. W.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    1996-11-01

    A series of single-mode growth measurements done with the OMEGA laser system are reported. These measurements were done to qualify the laser irradiation and diagnostic suite for future experiments that will use the growth of perturbations at the ablation interface to quantify improvements in irradiation uniformity, reduced growth due to increased ablation velocities, and the effect of increased density scale lengths on the growth rate at the ablation interface. This series of measurements used a laser intensity of 2 × 10^14 W/cm^2 over a spot size of 700 μm for both Gaussian and non-Gaussian shaped pulses with an rms irradiation nonuniformity of 7%. Data were collected with a gated x-ray framing camera with a 10-μm spatial resolution and a 40-ps temporal resolution. This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  12. Single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor growth-rate measurements with the OMEGA laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Knauer, J. P.; Verdon, C. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Boehly, T. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Ofer, D.; McKenty, P. W.; Glendinning, S. G.; Kalantar, D. H.; Watt, R. G.; Gobby, P. L.; Willi, O.; Taylor, R. J.

    1997-04-15

    The results from a series of single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth experiments performed on the OMEGA laser system using planar targets are reported. Planar targets with imposed mass perturbations were accelerated using five to six 351-nm laser beams overlapped with total intensities up to 2.5x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Experiments were performed with both 3-ns ramp and 3-ns flat-topped temporal pulse shapes. The use of distributed phase plates and smoothing by spectral dispersion resulted in a laser-irradiation nonuniformity of 4%-7% over a 600-{mu}m-diam region defined by the 90% intensity contour. The temporal growth of the modulation in optical depth was measured using through-foil radiography and was detected with an x-ray framing camera for CH targets with and without a foam buffer. The growth of both 31-{mu}m and 60-{mu}m wavelength perturbations was found to be in good agreement with ORCHID simulations when the experimental details, including noise, were included. The addition of a 30-mg/cc, 100-{mu}m-thick polystyrene foam buffer layer resulted in reduced growth of the 31-{mu}m perturbation and essentially unchanged growth for the 60-{mu}m case when compared to targets without foam.

  13. Single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor growth-rate measurements with the OMEGA laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauer, J. P.; Verdon, C. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Boehly, T. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Ofer, D.; McKenty, P. W.; Glendinning, S. G.; Kalantar, D. H.; Watt, R. G.; Gobby, P. L.; Willi, O.; Taylor, R. J.

    1997-04-01

    The results from a series of single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth experiments performed on the OMEGA laser system using planar targets are reported. Planar targets with imposed mass perturbations were accelerated using five to six 351-nm laser beams overlapped with total intensities up to 2.5×1014W/cm2. Experiments were performed with both 3-ns ramp and 3-ns flat-topped temporal pulse shapes. The use of distributed phase plates and smoothing by spectral dispersion resulted in a laser-irradiation nonuniformity of 4%-7% over a 600-μm-diam region defined by the 90% intensity contour. The temporal growth of the modulation in optical depth was measured using through-foil radiography and was detected with an x-ray framing camera for CH targets with and without a foam buffer. The growth of both 31-μm and 60-μm wavelength perturbations was found to be in good agreement with ORCHID simulations when the experimental details, including noise, were included. The addition of a 30-mg/cc, 100-μm-thick polystyrene foam buffer layer resulted in reduced growth of the 31-μm perturbation and essentially unchanged growth for the 60-μm case when compared to targets without foam.

  14. Single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor growth-rate measurements with the OMEGA laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Knauer, J.P.; Verdon, C.P.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Boehly, T.R.; Bradley, D.K.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Ofer, D.; McKenty, P.W.; Glendinning, S.G.; Kalantar, D.H.; Watt, R.G.; Gobby, P.L.; Willi, O.; Taylor, R.J.

    1997-04-01

    The results from a series of single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth experiments performed on the OMEGA laser system using planar targets are reported. Planar targets with imposed mass perturbations were accelerated using five to six 351-nm laser beams overlapped with total intensities up to 2.5{times}10{sup 14}W/cm{sup 2}. Experiments were performed with both 3-ns ramp and 3-ns flat-topped temporal pulse shapes. The use of distributed phase plates and smoothing by spectral dispersion resulted in a laser-irradiation nonuniformity of 4{percent}{endash}7{percent} over a 600-{mu}m-diam region defined by the 90{percent} intensity contour. The temporal growth of the modulation in optical depth was measured using through-foil radiography and was detected with an x-ray framing camera for CH targets with and without a foam buffer. The growth of both 31-{mu}m and 60-{mu}m wavelength perturbations was found to be in good agreement with {ital ORCHID} simulations when the experimental details, including noise, were included. The addition of a 30-mg/cc, 100-{mu}m-thick polystyrene foam buffer layer resulted in reduced growth of the 31-{mu}m perturbation and essentially unchanged growth for the 60-{mu}m case when compared to targets without foam. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Bremsstrahlung measurements for characterization of intense short-pulse, laser produced fast electrons with OMEGA EP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daykin, Tyler; Sawada, Hiroshi; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Pandit, Rishi; Chen, Cliff; Beg, Farhat; Chen, Hui; McLean, Harry; Patel, Pravesh; Tommasini, Riccardo

    2016-10-01

    Understanding relativistic fast electron generation and transport inside solids is important for applications such as generation of high energy x-ray sources and fast ignition. An experiment was carried out to study the scaling of the fast electron spectrum and bremsstrahlung generation in multi-pico second laser interactions using 1 ps and 10 ps OMEGA EP short-pulse beam to generate fast electrons at a similar peak intensity of 5x1018 W/cm2. The bremsstrahlung produced by collisions of the fast electrons with background ions was recorded using differential filter stacked spectrometers. A preliminary analysis with a Monte Carlo Code ITS shows that the electrons injection having an electron slope 1.8 MeV matched well with the high energy component of the 1 ps and 10 ps bremsstrahlung measurements. Details of the data analysis and modeling with Monte Carlo and a hybrid particle-in-cell codes will be presented at the conference. Work supported by the UNR Office of the Provost and by DOE/OFES under Contract No. DE-SC0008827. This collaborative work was partially supported under the auspices of the US DOE by LLNL under Contracts No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 and No. DE-FG-02-05ER54834.

  16. Demonstration of imaging X-ray Thomson scattering on OMEGA EP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belancourt, Patrick X.; Theobald, Wolfgang; Keiter, Paul A.; Collins, Tim J. B.; Bonino, Mark J.; Kozlowski, Pawel M.; Regan, Sean P.; Drake, R. Paul

    2016-11-01

    Foams are a common material for high-energy-density physics experiments because of low, tunable densities, and being machinable. Simulating these experiments can be difficult because the equation of state is largely unknown for shocked foams. The focus of this experiment was to develop an x-ray scattering platform for measuring the equation of state of shocked foams on OMEGA EP. The foam used in this experiment is resorcinol formaldehyde with an initial density of 0.34 g/cm3. One long-pulse (10 ns) beam drives a shock into the foam, while the remaining three UV beams with a 2 ns square pulse irradiate a nickel foil to create the x-ray backlighter. The primary diagnostic for this platform, the imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer, spectrally resolves the scattered x-ray beam while imaging in one spatial dimension. Ray tracing analysis of the density profile gives a compression of 3 ± 1 with a shock speed of 39 ± 6 km/s. Analysis of the scattered x-ray spectra gives an upper bound temperature of 20 eV.

  17. Proper balance of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid supplements with topical cyclosporine attenuated contact lens-related dry eye syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Chen, Xi; Hao, Jingfang; Yang, Lu

    2016-12-01

    Essential fatty acids had been applied in the treatment of dry eye syndrome (DES), but the effects of different combinations of fatty acids have not been investigated. 360 long-term contact lens wearers were included in this double-blinded study. Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids were combined in different ratios and supplied to the participants that were randomly divided into six groups, and the effects of different essential fatty acids mixture on DES with or without topical cyclosporine were investigated. More than half of long-term contact lens wearers suffered from DES, which were found to be attenuated by oral supplement of properly balanced O3FA and O6FA fatty acid. The topical cyclosporine treatment considerably inhibited the production of cytokines compared to the cyclosporine negative groups, which further relieved DES. Proper balance of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid combination significantly alleviated contact lens-related DES.

  18. A model for sunspot associated emission at 6 cm wavelength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alissandrakis, C. E.; Kundu, M. R.; Lantos, P.

    1980-01-01

    Two-dimensional maps of total intensity and circular polarization of a sunspot region at 6 cm have been calculated using a simple model for the chromosphere-corona transition region and observations of the longitudinal component of the photospheric magnetic field. The calculations are in good agreement with the high resolution observations of the same sunspot region at 6 cm, obtained with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. It is shown that the 6 cm radiation is predominantly due to gyroresonance absorption process at the second and third harmonics of the gyrofrequency (H = 900-600 G). Estimates of the conductive flux and the electron density in the transition region above the sunspot are also given.

  19. VLA observations of Uranus at 1. 3-20 cm

    SciTech Connect

    De Pater, I.; Gulkis, S.

    1988-08-01

    Observations of Uranus, obtained with resolution 0.5-1.2 arcsec at wavelengths 1.3, 2, 6, and 20 cm using the A and B configurations of the VLA in June-July 1982, October 1983, and February 1984, are reported. The disk-averaged brightness temperatures (DABTs) are determined by model fitting, and the results are presented in extensive graphs and contour maps and characterized in detail. Findings discussed include: (1) an overall spectrum which is relatively flat above 6 cm, (2) 1.3-6-cm brightness which is concentrated nearer to the pole than to the subsolar point, and (3) small changes in DABT from 1982 to 1983/1984 (consistent with an explanation based on a pole-equator temperature gradient). 16 references.

  20. Differentiating CDM and baryon isocurvature models with 21 cm fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: sekiguti@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2011-10-01

    We discuss how one can discriminate models with cold dark matter (CDM) and baryon isocurvature fluctuations. Although current observations such as cosmic microwave background (CMB) can severely constrain the fraction of such isocurvature modes in the total density fluctuations, CMB cannot differentiate CDM and baryon ones by the shapes of their power spectra. However, the evolution of CDM and baryon density fluctuations are different for each model, thus it would be possible to discriminate those isocurvature modes by extracting information on the fluctuations of CDM/baryon itself. We discuss that observations of 21 cm fluctuations can in principle differentiate these modes and demonstrate to what extent we can distinguish them with future 21 cm surveys. We show that, when the isocurvature mode has a large blue-tilted initial spectrum, 21 cm surveys can clearly probe the difference.

  1. High-resolution comparative modeling with RosettaCM.

    PubMed

    Song, Yifan; DiMaio, Frank; Wang, Ray Yu-Ruei; Kim, David; Miles, Chris; Brunette, Tj; Thompson, James; Baker, David

    2013-10-08

    We describe an improved method for comparative modeling, RosettaCM, which optimizes a physically realistic all-atom energy function over the conformational space defined by homologous structures. Given a set of sequence alignments, RosettaCM assembles topologies by recombining aligned segments in Cartesian space and building unaligned regions de novo in torsion space. The junctions between segments are regularized using a loop closure method combining fragment superposition with gradient-based minimization. The energies of the resulting models are optimized by all-atom refinement, and the most representative low-energy model is selected. The CASP10 experiment suggests that RosettaCM yields models with more accurate side-chain and backbone conformations than other methods when the sequence identity to the templates is greater than ∼15%.

  2. EPA Awards $10.3 Million to Clean Up New England Brownfield Sites, Protect Health in Communities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has awarded more than $10.3 million in Brownfield grants to municipalities and organizations working to protect people's health by assessing and cleaning up contaminated parcels in New England communities.

  3. Omega 3 Fatty Acids: Novel Neurotherapeutic Targets for Cognitive Dysfunction in Mood Disorders and Schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Knöchel, Christian; Voss, Martin; Grüter, Florian; Alves, Gilberto S; Matura, Silke; Sepanski, Beate; Stäblein, Michael; Wenzler, Sofia; Prvulovic, David; Carvalho, André F; Oertel-Knöchel, Viola

    2015-01-01

    An increasing body of evidences from preclinical as well as epidemiological and clinical studies suggest a potential beneficial role of dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids for cognitive functioning. In this narrative review, we will summarize and discuss recent findings from epidemiological, interventional and experimental studies linking dietary consumption of omega-3 fatty acids to cognitive function in healthy adults. Furthermore, affective disorders and schizophrenia (SZ) are characterized by cognitive dysfunction encompassing several domains. Cognitive dysfunction is closely related to impaired functioning and quality of life across these conditions. Therefore, the current review focues on the potential influence of omega-3 fatty acids on cognition in SZ and affective disorders. In sum, current data predominantly from mechanistic models and animal studies suggest that adjunctive omega-3 fatty acid supplementation could lead to improved cognitive functioning in SZ and affective disorders. However, besides its translational promise, evidence for clinical benefits in humans has been mixed. Notwithstanding evidences indicate that adjunctive omega-3 fatty acids may have benefit for affective symptoms in both unipolar and bipolar depression, to date no randomized controlled trial had evaluated omega-3 as cognitive enhancer for mood disorders, while a single published controlled trial suggested no therapeutic benefit for cognitive improvement in SZ. Considering the pleiotropic mechanisms of action of omega-3 fatty acids, the design of well-designed controlled trials of omega-3 supplementation as a novel, domain-specific, target for cognitive impairment in SZ and affective disorders is warranted.

  4. Omega 3 Fatty Acids: Novel Neurotherapeutic Targets for Cognitive Dysfunction in Mood Disorders and Schizophrenia?

    PubMed Central

    Knöchel, Christian; Voss, Martin; Grter, Florian; Alves, Gilberto S.; Matura, Silke; Sepanski, Beate; Stäblein, Michael; Wenzler, Sofia; Prvulovic, David; Carvalho, André F.; Oertel-Knöchel, Viola

    2015-01-01

    An increasing body of evidences from preclinical as well as epidemiological and clinical studies suggest a potential beneficial role of dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids for cognitive functioning. In this narrative review, we will summarize and discuss recent findings from epidemiological, interventional and experimental studies linking dietary consumption of omega-3 fatty acids to cognitive function in healthy adults. Furthermore, affective disorders and schizophrenia (SZ) are characterized by cognitive dysfunction encompassing several domains. Cognitive dysfunction is closely related to impaired functioning and quality of life across these conditions. Therefore, the current review focues on the potential influence of omega-3 fatty acids on cognition in SZ and affective disorders. In sum, current data predominantly from mechanistic models and animal studies suggest that adjunctive omega-3 fatty acid supplementation could lead to improved cognitive functioning in SZ and affective disorders. However, besides its translational promise, evidence for clinical benefits in humans has been mixed. Notwithstanding evidences indicate that adjunctive omega-3 fatty acids may have benefit for affective symptoms in both unipolar and bipolar depression, to date no randomized controlled trial had evaluated omega-3 as cognitive enhancer for mood disorders, while a single published controlled trial suggested no therapeutic benefit for cognitive improvement in SZ. Considering the pleiotropic mechanisms of action of omega-3 fatty acids, the design of well-designed controlled trials of omega-3 supplementation as a novel, domain-specific, target for cognitive impairment in SZ and affective disorders is warranted. PMID:26467414

  5. Omega flight-test data reduction sequence. [computer programs for reduction of navigation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilley, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    Computer programs for Omega data conversion, summary, and preparation for distribution are presented. Program logic and sample data formats are included, along with operational instructions for each program. Flight data (or data collected in flight format in the laboratory) is provided by the Ohio University Omega receiver base in the form of 6-bit binary words representing the phase of an Omega station with respect to the receiver's local clock. All eight Omega stations are measured in each 10-second Omega time frame. In addition, an event-marker bit and a time-slot D synchronizing bit are recorded. Program FDCON is used to remove data from the flight recorder tape and place it on data-processing cards for later use. Program FDSUM provides for computer plotting of selected LOP's, for single-station phase plots, and for printout of basic signal statistics for each Omega channel. Mean phase and standard deviation are printed, along with data from which a phase distribution can be plotted for each Omega station. Program DACOP simply copies the Omega data deck a controlled number of times, for distribution to users.

  6. Functional beverage products using caseinate–omega-3 oil-oat beta glucan emulsions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beverages with soluble dietary fiber and Omega 3 oil are highly desired by health conscious consumers. However, Omega 3 oil is prone to oxidation and accompanying deterioration of sensory profiles; there is an issue to incorporate soluble fiber into beverage products that will not interfere with oxi...

  7. Omega-3 Fatty Acids for Autistic Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bent, Stephen; Bertoglio, Kiah; Hendren, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review to determine the safety and efficacy of omega-3 fatty acids for autistic spectrum disorder (ASD). Articles were identified by a search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database using the terms autism or autistic and omega-3 fatty acids. The search identified 143 potential articles and six satisfied all…

  8. [Shrinkage In the Squared Multiple Correlation Coefficient and Unbiased Estimates of Treatment Effects Using Omega Squared.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Starrett

    The amount of variance accounted for by treatment can be estimated with omega squared or with the squared multiple correlation coefficient. Monte Carlo methods were employed to compare omega squared, the squared multiple correlation coefficient, and the squared multiple correlation coefficient to which a shrinkage formula had been applied, in…

  9. Extracting the {Omega}{sup -} electric quadrupole moment from lattice QCD data

    SciTech Connect

    Ramalho, G.; Pena, M. T.

    2011-03-01

    The {Omega}{sup -} has an extremely long lifetime, and is the most stable of the baryons with spin 3/2. Therefore the {Omega}{sup -} magnetic moment is very accurately known. Nevertheless, its electric quadrupole moment was never measured, although estimates exist in different formalisms. In principle, lattice QCD simulations provide at present the most appropriate way to estimate the {Omega}{sup -} form factors, as function of the square of the transferred four-momentum, Q{sup 2}, since it describes baryon systems at the physical mass for the strange quark. However, lattice QCD form factors, and in particular G{sub E2}, are determined at finite Q{sup 2} only, and the extraction of the electric quadrupole moment, Q{sub {Omega}}{sup -}=G{sub E2}(0)(e/2M{sub {Omega}}), involves an extrapolation of the numerical lattice results. In this work, we reproduce the lattice QCD data with a covariant spectator quark model for {Omega}{sup -} which includes a mixture of S and two D states for the relative quark-diquark motion. Once the model is calibrated, it is used to determine Q{sub {Omega}}{sup -}. Our prediction is Q{sub {Omega}}{sup -}=(0.96{+-}0.02)x10{sup -2} efm{sup 2}[G{sub E2}(0)=0.680{+-}0.012].

  10. Radiative Corrections to Asymmetry Parameter in the {Omega}{sup -{yields}{Lambda}}+K{sup -} Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Queijeiro, A.

    2010-07-29

    We compute the radiative corrections, to first order in the fine structure constant {alpha}, to the asymmetry parameter {alpha}{sub {Omega}}of the {Omega}{sup -{yields}{Lambda}}+K{sup -} decay. We use previous results where Sirlin's procedure is used to separate the radiative corrections into two parts, one independent model contribution and a model dependent one.

  11. Novel Omega-3 Fatty Acid Epoxygenase Metabolite Reduces Kidney Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Amit; Khan, Md. Abdul Hye; Levick, Scott P.; Lee, Kin Sing Stephen; Hammock, Bruce D.; Imig, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) monooxygenases epoxidize the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) docosahexaenoic acid into novel epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs) that have multiple biological actions. The present study determined the ability of the most abundant EDP regioisomer, 19,20-EDP to reduce kidney injury in an experimental unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) renal fibrosis mouse model. Mice with UUO developed kidney tubular injury and interstitial fibrosis. UUO mice had elevated kidney hydroxyproline content and five-times greater collagen positive fibrotic area than sham control mice. 19,20-EDP treatment to UUO mice for 10 days reduced renal fibrosis with a 40%–50% reduction in collagen positive area and hydroxyproline content. There was a six-fold increase in kidney α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) positive area in UUO mice compared to sham control mice, and 19,20-EDP treatment to UUO mice decreased α-SMA immunopositive area by 60%. UUO mice demonstrated renal epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) with reduced expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and elevated expression of multiple mesenchymal markers (FSP-1, α-SMA, and desmin). Interestingly, 19,20-EDP treatment reduced renal EMT in UUO by decreasing mesenchymal and increasing epithelial marker expression. Overall, we demonstrate that a novel omega-3 fatty acid metabolite 19,20-EDP, prevents UUO-induced renal fibrosis in mice by reducing renal EMT. PMID:27213332

  12. Omega-3 Fatty acids and hippocampal neurogenesis in depression.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jing X; Gleason, Erin D

    2013-06-01

    The mammalian brain and central nervous system are especially dependent on the omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) for normative signaling and function, and research suggests that n-3 fatty acid deficiencies are one contributing factor in the increasing prevalence of depressive disorders. However, the reasons for which n-3 fatty acids and mood are connected remain unknown. Atrophy in the hippocampus is one of the most significant neuroanatomical findings in depressed patients, and current therapies for depression tend to increase hippocampal neurogenesis. We recently discovered that the fat-1 transgenic mouse, which has enriched levels of DHA in the brain because it can convert n-6 to n-3 fatty acids, exhibits increased hippocampal neurogenesis. This finding suggests a mechanism by which omega-3 could influence depression and mood; here we expand on the argument that n-3 fatty acids, and DHA in particular, may help prevent and treat depression by virtue of their effects on neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Because DHA can be obtained through the diet, increasing DHA intake in depressed patients or those at risk for depression may be one way of managing the disease and perhaps providing aid to those who have not been able to achieve remission via pharmacological means.

  13. AN ECLIPSING BLUE STRAGGLER IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER {omega} CENTAURI

    SciTech Connect

    Li Kai; Qian Shengbang

    2012-12-01

    {omega} Centauri is the largest globular cluster in the Milky Way and hence contains the largest number of variable stars within a single cluster. The results of photometric solutions are presented for the EA-type binary V239 in this cluster. According to our analysis, V239 is a typical Algol-type binary. We obtain M = 1.20 {+-} 0.10 M{sub Sun }, R = 1.21 {+-} 0.03 R{sub Sun }, and L = 13.68 {+-} 0.63 L{sub Sun} for the primary component. The secondary component has M = 0.07 {+-} 0.02 M{sub Sun }, R = 0.90 {+-} 0.03 R{sub Sun }, and L = 2.17 {+-} 0.14 L{sub Sun }. The binary system is located in the blue straggler region on the color-magnitude diagram of {omega} Centauri and the mass of the primary component exceeds the mass of a turnoff star. Therefore, we think that V239 is a blue straggler and that V239 was formed by mass transfer from the present secondary component to the present primary.

  14. Omega-3 fatty acids as adjunctive therapy in Crohns disease.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Angie

    2006-01-01

    Crohns disease is an inflammatory bowel disease that can have a significant impact on the health of those afflicted. The etiology of the disease is unknown, but genetic, environmental, dietary, and immunological factors are thought to be involved. Multiple nutrients can become depleted during active disease due to inadequate intake or malabsorption. Preventing these deficiencies is paramount in the care of those suffering from Crohns disease. Often the traditional treatments (medications) have limited effectiveness and negative side effects that inhibit their use. Enteral nutrition has promising therapeutic benefits, but its use is often limited to the pediatric population due to poor patient acceptability. Omega-3 fatty acids have been investigated for their anti-inflammatory properties as an alternative to traditional care. This article reviews the etiology of Crohns disease, nutritional deficiencies, traditional treatments, and the use of omega-3 fatty acids in the prevention of Crohns recurrence. The results from clinical trials have been conflicting, but a new fish oil preparation that limits the side effects of traditional fish oil therapy shows promise as an adjunctive treatment for Crohns disease. Continued research is needed to validate these findings.

  15. Initial results from the DSPlanar experiments on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, E. S.; Merritt, E. C.; Montgomery, D. S.; Daughton, W.; Schmidt, D. W.; Cardenas, T.; Wilson, D. C.; Batha, S. H.

    2016-10-01

    Recently, LANL has begun a project aimed ultimately at fielding a neutron-producing double-shell capsule at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Initial experiments have begun at both the NIF and OMEGA laser facilities over the last year. At OMEGA, halfraum-driven planar targets will be used to study physics issues important to double shell implosions, but outside of a convergent geometry. In particular, side-on radiography through a tube has advantages over imaging through the hohlraum and double-shell capsule at NIF. We plan to study a number physics issues with this platform, including both 1-d and higher dimensional effects. In 1-d, momentum transfer from the ablator to the inner shell, and the effect of pre-heat on the inner shell can be studied. Higher dimensional effects, in the form of hydrodynamic instabilities, can also be studied. Pre-heat expansion of the inner shell can lead to an unstable interface, which can be mitigated by a tamper layer. Manufacturing tolerances can be used to mitigate against feature-driven instability growth, such as from a glue joint or fill tube. Initial results on the amount pre-heat from various ablator materials will be given, along with a discussion of future plans. Supported under the US DOE by the LANS, LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. LA-UR-16-25044.

  16. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the treatment of hypertriglyceridaemia.

    PubMed

    Pirillo, Angela; Catapano, Alberico Luigi

    2013-12-20

    Hypertriglyceridaemia (HTG) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease; high-risk patients with HTG, such as those with metabolic syndrome or diabetes, may benefit from hypolipidaemic therapies. Several lipid-lowering drugs act by reducing triglyceride (TG) levels, including fibrates, nicotinic acid and omega-3 fatty acids. The omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) dose-dependently reduce plasma TG levels; the effect tends to be greater in patients with higher TG levels at baseline. Evidence from clinical trials suggests that EPA+DHA doses of ≥ 2 g/day are required to achieve significant effects. The optimal TG-lowering doses of EPA+DHA are 3-4 g/day, with little evidence to support lipid-altering efficacy of doses of EPA and DHA <1g/day. Predicted changes in fasting serum TG levels at the recommended dietary intakes of EPA and/or DHA of 200-500 mg/day are -3.1% to -7.2%. Reductions of plasma TG levels at the optimal doses are from 25-35% up to 45% in the presence of severely elevated TG levels (≥ 500 mg/dl; ≥ 5.65 mmol/l), along with a reduction in non-high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (non-HDL-C) and an increase in HDL-C. This observation has also been confirmed in statin-treated patients.

  17. CATASTROPHIC QUENCHING IN {alpha}{Omega} DYNAMOS REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Alexander; Brandenburg, Axel

    2012-03-20

    At large magnetic Reynolds numbers, magnetic helicity evolution plays an important role in astrophysical large-scale dynamos. The recognition of this fact led to the development of the dynamical {alpha} quenching formalism, which predicts catastrophically low mean fields in open systems. Here, we show that in oscillatory {alpha}{Omega} dynamos this formalism predicts an unphysical magnetic helicity transfer between scales. An alternative technique is proposed where this artifact is removed by using the evolution equation for the magnetic helicity of the total field in the shearing advective gauge. In the traditional dynamical {alpha} quenching formalism, this can be described by an additional magnetic helicity flux of small-scale fields that does not appear in homogeneous {alpha}{sup 2} dynamos. In {alpha}{Omega} dynamos, the alternative formalism is shown to lead to larger saturation fields than what has been obtained in some earlier models with the traditional formalism. We have compared the predictions of the two formalisms to results of direct numerical simulations, finding that the alternative formulation provides a better fit. This suggests that worries about catastrophic dynamo behavior in the limit of large magnetic Reynolds number are unfounded.

  18. Laboratory astrophysical collisionless shock experiments on Omega and NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hye-Sook; Ross, J. S.; Huntington, C. M.; Fiuza, F.; Ryutov, D.; Casey, D.; Drake, R. P.; Fiksel, G.; Froula, D.; Gregori, G.; Kugland, N. L.; Kuranz, C.; Levy, M. C.; Li, C. K.; Meinecke, J.; Morita, T.; Petrasso, R.; Plechaty, C.; Remington, B.; Sakawa, Y.; Spitkovsky, A.; Takabe, H.; Zylstra, A. B.

    2016-03-01

    We are performing scaled astrophysics experiments on Omega and on NIF. Laser driven counter-streaming interpenetrating supersonic plasma flows can be studied to understand astrophysical electromagnetic plasma phenomena in a controlled laboratory setting. In our Omega experiments, the counter-streaming flow plasma state is measured using Thomson scattering diagnostics, demonstrating the plasma flows are indeed super-sonic and in the collisionless regime. We observe a surprising additional electron and ion heating from ion drag force in the double flow experiments that are attributed to the ion drag force and electrostatic instabilities. [1] A proton probe is used to image the electric and magnetic fields. We observe unexpected large, stable and reproducible electromagnetic field structures that arise in the counter-streaming flows [2]. The Biermann battery magnetic field generated near the target plane, advected along the flows, and recompressed near the midplane explains the cause of such self-organizing field structures [3]. A D3He implosion proton probe image showed very clear filamentary structures; three-dimensional Particle-In-Cell simulations and simulated proton radiography images indicate that these filamentary structures are generated by Weibel instabilities and that the magnetization level (ratio of magnetic energy over kinetic energy in the system) is ∼0.01 [4]. These findings have very high astrophysical relevance and significant implications. We expect to observe true collisionless shock formation when we use >100 kJ laser energy on NIF.

  19. Shock-Wave Acceleration of Protons on OMEGA EP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberberger, D.; Froula, D. H.; Pak, A.; Link, A.; Patel, P.; Fiuza, F.; Tochitsky, S.; Joshi, C.

    2016-10-01

    The creation of an electrostatic shock wave and ensuing ion acceleration is studied on the OMEGA EP Laser System at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Previous work using a 10- μm CO2 laser in a H2 gas jet shows promising results for obtaining narrow spectral features in the accelerated proton spectra. Scaling the shock-wave acceleration mechanism to the 1- μm-wavelength drive laser makes it possible to use petawatt-scale laser systems such as OMEGA-EP, but involves tailoring of the plasma profile. To accomplish the necessitated sharp rise to near-critical plasma density and a long exponential fall, an 1- μm-thick CH foil is illuminated on the back side by thermal x rays produced from an irradiated gold foil. The plasma density is measured using the fourth-harmonic probe system, the accelerating fields are probed using an orthogonal proton source, and the accelerated protons and ions are detected with a Thomson parabola. These results will be presented and compared with particle-in-cell simulations. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and LLNL's Laboratory Directed Research and Development program under project 15-LW-095.

  20. Two crystal x-ray spectrometers for OMEGA experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reverdin, C.; Casner, A.; Girard, F.; Lecherbourg, L.; Loupias, B.; Tassin, V.; Philippe, F.

    2016-11-01

    Two x-ray spectrometers have been built for x-ray spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas on OMEGA at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) by Commissariat a ̀ l'Energie Atomique et aux énergies alternatives (CEA). The accessible photon energy range is from 1.5 to 20 keV. The first spectrometer, called X-ray CEA Crystal Spectrometer with a Charge-Injection Device (XCCS-CID), records three spectra with three crystals coupled to a time integrated CID camera. The second one, called X-ray CEA Crystal Spectrometer (XCCS) with a framing camera, is time resolved and records four spectra with two crystals on the four frames of a framing camera. Cylindrical crystals are used in Johan geometry. Each spectrometer is positioned with a ten-inch manipulator inside the OMEGA target chamber. In each experiment, after choosing a spectral window, a specific configuration is designed and concave crystals are precisely positioned on a board with angled wedges and spacers. Slits on snouts enable 1D spatial resolution to distinguish spectra emitted from different parts of the target.

  1. Cycle life testing of 8-cm mercury ion thruster cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, E. G.

    1976-01-01

    Two main cathodes have successfully completed 2800 and 1980 cycles and three neutralizers, 3928, 3050, and 2850 cycles in ongoing cycle life tests of flight-type cathode-isolator-vaporizer and neutralizer-isolator-vaporizer assemblies for the 4.45 mN 8-cm Hg ion thruster system. Each cycle included one hour of cathode operation. Starting and operating conditions simulated those expected in a typical auxiliary propulsion mission duty cycle. This paper presents the cycle life test results and also results of an insert comparison test which led to the selection of a rolled foil insert type for the 8-cm Engineering Model Thruster cathodes.

  2. Cycle life testing of 8-cm mercury ion thruster cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, E. G.

    1976-01-01

    Two main cathodes have successfully completed 2800 and 1980 cycles and three neutralizers, 3928, 3050, and 2850 cycles in ongoing cycle life tests of flight-type cathode-isolator-vaporizer and neutralizer-isolator-vaporizer assemblies for the 4.45 mN 8-cm Hg ion thruster system. Each cycle included one hour of cathode operation. Starting and operating conditions simulated those expected in a typical auxiliary propulsion mission duty cycle. The cycle life test results are presented along with results of an insert comparison test which led to the selection of a rolled foil insert type for the 8-cm Engineering Model Thruster cathodes.

  3. 21 cm radiation: A new probe of fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Rishi; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2010-11-01

    New low frequency radio telescopes currently being built open up the possibility of observing the 21 cm radiation from redshifts 200 > z > 30, also known as the dark ages, see Furlanetto, Oh, & Briggs(2006) for a review. At these high redshifts, Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation is absorbed by neutral hydrogen at its 21 cm hyperfine transition. This redshifted 21 cm signal thus carries information about the state of the early Universe and can be used to test fundamental physics. The 21 cm radiation probes a volume of the early Universe on kpc scales in contrast with CMB which probes a surface (of some finite thickness) on Mpc scales. Thus there is many orders of more information available, in principle, from the 21 cm observations of dark ages. We have studied the constraints these observations can put on the variation of fundamental constants (Khatri & Wandelt(2007)). Since the 21 cm signal depends on atomic physics it is very sensitive to the variations in the fine structure constant and can place constraints comparable to or better than the other astrophysical experiments (Δα/α= < 10-5) as shown in Figure 1. Making such observations will require radio telescopes of collecting area 10 - 106 km2 compared to ~ 1 km2 of current telescopes, for example LOFAR. We should also expect similar sensitivity to the electron to proton mass ratio. One of the challenges in observing this 21 cm cosmological signal is the presence of the synchrotron foregrounds which is many orders of magnitude larger than the cosmological signal but the two can be separated because of their different statistical nature (Zaldarriaga, Furlanetto, & Hernquist(2004)). Terrestrial EM interference from radio/TV etc. and Earth's ionosphere poses problems for telescopes on ground which may be solved by going to the Moon and there are proposals for doing so, one of which is the Dark Ages Lunar Interferometer (DALI). In conclusion 21 cm cosmology promises a large wealth of data and provides

  4. WSRC Am/Cm Stabilization Program - Cylindrical Induction Melter Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, W.A.

    1999-02-17

    1.1.1 Kilogram quantities of Americium and Curium isotopes (Am/Cm) have been produced at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, South Carolina. These highly radioactive isotopes have both government and commercial value and are currently stored as a nitric acid solution at the Savannah River Site. The material represents the largest source term in the F canyon at SRS. It is proposed that the Am/Cm material be vitrified to stabilize the material for long term, recoverable storage. This paper reviews the progress made during the process development phase of this program using the Cylindrical Induction Melter.

  5. Evidence for live 247Cm in the early solar system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tatsumoto, M.; Shimamura, T.

    1980-01-01

    Variations of the 238U/235U ratio in the Allende meteorite, ranging from -35% to + 19%, are interpreted as evidence of live 247Cm in the early Solar System. The amounts of these and other r-products in the Solar System indicate values of (9,000??3,000) Myr for the age of the Galaxy and ??? 8 Myr for the time between the end of nucleosynthesis and the formation of meteoritic grains. Three possible explanations are presented for the different values of the latter time period which are indicated by the decay products of 247Cm, 26Al, 244Pu and 129I. ?? 1980 Nature Publishing Group.

  6. Increased capabilities of the 30-cm diameter Hg ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlin, V. K.; Hawkins, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    Some space flight missions require advanced ion thrusters which operate at conditions much different than those for which the baseline 30-cm Hg thruster was developed. Results of initial tests of a 30-cm Hg thruster with two and three grid ion accelerating systems, operated at higher values of both thrust and power and over a greater range of specific impulse than the baseline conditions are presented. Thruster lifetime at increased input power was evaluated both by extended tests and real time spectroscopic measurements.

  7. Inert gas test of two 12-cm magnetostatic thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    Comparative performance tests were conducted with 12 cm line and ring magnetic cusp thrusters. Shell anode and magnetoelectrostatic containment boundary anode configurations were evaluated with each magnet array. The best performance was achieved with the 12-cm ring cusp-shell anode configuration. Argon operation of this configuration produced 65-81 percent mass utilization efficiency at 170-208 watts/single-charged-equivalent (SCE) ampere beam. Xenon test results showed 75-95 percent utilization at 162-188 watts/SCE ampere beam.

  8. [The effect of diet ratio of polyunsaturated fatty acids of omega-3 and omega-6 families on activity of aminotransferases and gamma-glutamyltransferase in rat blood serum].

    PubMed

    Ketsa, O V; Marchenko, M M

    2014-01-01

    The effect of diet fat compositions with various ratio of omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) activities in blood serum of 45 white mongrel rats weighing 90-110 g (9 animals in group) has been investigated. Fat components in the semi-synthetic diet, compiled on the basis of AIN-93 diet, and sources of omega-6 and omega-3 PUFA were presented by sunflower oil, soybean oil and fish oil. It has been shown that four-week inclusion of linoleic acid (LA) and alpha-linolenic acid (alpha-LNA) in a ratio of 7:1 into the diet (soybean oil) as well as use of only omega-6 PUFA (sunflower oil) has lead to an increase in the activity of ALT and GGT in rat blood serum compared to control animals treated with the complex of linolenic, eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acid through the mixture of sunflower oil and fish oil (9:1) with the ratio of omega-6 and omega-3 PUFA 7:1. Along with this, the AST:ALT ratio (de Ritis ratio) was lower (p < 0.05) as compared with the control group of rat, amounting respectively 0.92 +/- 0.08 and 0.79 +/- 0.12 vs 1.26 +/- 0.10. The use of high doses of omega-3 fatty acids (600 mg EPA and 400 mg DHA per kg of animal weight per day coming through fish oil) did not affect the activity of ALT and GGT, but increased AST serum activity (0.47 +/- 0.04 micromoles/min per mg protein) and the de Ritis ratio (2.53 +/- 0.23). The diet deprived with fat increased enzyme activity of ALT, AST and GGT in rat blood serum.

  9. Streaked Imaging of Ablative Richtmyer--Meshkov Growth in ICF Targets on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotchev, O. V.; Goncharov, V. N.; Jaanimagi, P. A.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2003-10-01

    Dynamic overpressure sets the growth rate of the ablative Richtmyer--Meshkov (RM) instability and the seeds for subsequent growth of perturbations due to the Rayleigh--Taylor instability in directly driven ICF targets. It leads to temporal oscillations of the perturbed ablation front, which have been predicted analytically,(V.N. Goncharov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82), 2091 (1999). observed in 2-D ORCHID hydrodynamic simulations, and measured experimentally.(Y. Aglitskiy et al.), Phys. Plasmas 9, 2264 (2002). These predictions were verified on OMEGA by measuring the perturbation amplitudes and frequencies directly, through face-on x-ray radiography. Experiments with a high-resolution, Ir-coated Kirkpatrick--Baez microscope, coupled to a high-current streak tube, provided a continuous record of the target areal density during shock transit, while it was dominated by the evolution of the RM instability. Planar plastic targets with variable thicknesses (30 to 60 μm) and single-mode (λ = 10 to 30 μm) ripples on the front surface were irradiated with 1.5-ns square UV laser pulses with intensities---ranging from 5 × 10^13 W/cm^2 to 4 × 10^14 W/cm^2. Results clearly indicate a phase reversal in the evolution of the target areal density perturbations, in good agreement with theory and simulation. The predicted dependence of the oscillation period on laser intensity and modulation wavelength was quantified. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  10. Do long-chain omega-3 fatty acids protect from atopic dermatitis?

    PubMed

    Reese, Imke; Werfel, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids are essential for human nutrition. The number of double bonds determines whether a given fatty acid is termed two, three, or x times unsaturated. Depending on the distance of the first double bond from the fatty acid's methyl group, one distinguishes omega-3 fatty acids from omega-6 fatty acids. While the use of gamma linolenic acid, a long-chain fatty acid of the omega-6 family, has proven unsuccessful in the prevention or treatment of atopic dermatitis, supplementation of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids may represent a promising approach in the prevention of allergic disorders, especially atopic dermatitis. Whether the concept of long-chain omega-3 fatty acid administration will also become established in a therapeutic setting, depends on whether the beneficial effects observed so far can be substantiated in randomized controlled intervention studies.

  11. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Primary and Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yong; Lu, Lei; Liang, Jun; Liu, Min; Li, Xianchi; Sun, RongRong; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-05-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is increasing dramatically especially in developing countries like India. CVD is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. There has been a growing awareness of the role of nutrients in the prevention of CVD. One specific recommendation in the battle against CVD is the increased intake of omega-3 fatty acids, which are polyunsaturated fatty acids. Studies have reported inverse associations of CVD with dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids, suggesting that omega-3 fatty acids supplementation might exert protective effects on CVD. They exert their cardioprotective effect through multiple mechanisms. Omega-3 fatty acid therapy has shown promise as a useful tool in the primary and secondary prevention of CVD. This review briefly summarizes the effects of omega-3 fatty acids in primary and secondary prevention of CVD.

  12. Numerical error in electron orbits with large. omega. sub ce. delta. t

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, S.E.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1989-12-20

    We have found that running electrostatic particle codes relatively large {omega}{sub ce}{Delta}t in some circumstances does not significantly affect the physical results. We first present results from a single particle mover finding the correct first order drifts for large {omega}{sub ce}{Delta}t. We then characterize the numerical orbit of the Boris algorithm for rotation when {omega}{sub ce}{Delta}t {much gt} 1. Next, an analysis of the guiding center motion is given showing why the first order drift is retained at large {omega}{sub ce}{Delta}t. Lastly, we present a plasma simulation of a one dimensional cross field sheath, with large and small {omega}{sub ce}{Delta}t, with very little difference in the results. 15 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Measurements of the branching fractions of exclusive charmless B meson decays with eta(') or omega mesons.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Palano, A; Chen, G P; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Reinertsen, P L; Stugu, B; Abbott, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Clark, A R; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kluth, S; Kolomensky, Y G; Kral, J F; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Liu, T; Lynch, G; Meyer, A B; Momayezi, M; Oddone, P J; Perazzo, A; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Bright-Thomas, P G; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; O'Neale, S W; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Krug, J; Kunze, M; Lewandowski, B; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Andress, J C; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Chevalier, N; Clark, P J; Cottingham, W N; De Groot, N; Dyce, N; Foster, B; McFall, J D; Wallom, D; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Jolly, S; McKemey, A K; Tinslay, J; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Bukin, D A; Buzykaev, A R; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Korol, A A; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Salnikov, A A; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Y I; Telnov, V I; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Stoker, D P; Ahsan, A; Arisaka, K; Buchanan, C; Chun, S; Branson, J G; MacFarlane, D B; Prell, S; Rahatlou, S; Raven, G; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Hart, P A; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Witherell, M; Yellin, S; Beringer, J; Dorfan, D E; Eisner, A M; Frey, A; Grillo, A A; Grothe, M; Heusch, C A; Johnson, R P; Kroeger, W; Lockman, W S; Pulliam, T; Sadrozinski, H; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Metzler, S; Oyang, J; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Weaver, M; Yang, S; Zhu, R Y; Devmal, S; Geld, T L; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Barillari, T; Bloom, P; Dima, M O; Fahey, S; Ford, W T; Hall, T L; Johnson, D R; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Park, H; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Sen, S; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Wagner, D L; Blouw, J; Harton, J L; Krishnamurthy, M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dahlinger, G; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Behr, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Ferrag, S; Roussot, E; T'Jampens, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Anjomshoaa, A; Bernet, R; Khan, A; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Falbo, M; Borean, C; Bozzi, C; Dittongo, S; Folegani, M; Piemontese, L; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Xie, Y; Zallo, A; Bagnasco, S; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Musenich, R; Pallavicini, M; Parodi, R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Pia, M G; Priano, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Morii, M; Bartoldus, R; Dignan, T; Hamilton, R; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Fischer, P A; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Rosenberg, E I; Benkebil, M; Grosdidier, G; Hast, C; Höcker, A; Lacker, H M; LePeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Valassi, A; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljević, V; Lange, D J; Mugge, M; Shi, X; van Bibber, K; Wenaus, T J; Wright, D M; Wuest, C R; Carroll, M; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, M; Kay, M; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gunawardane, N J; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Smith, D; Azzopardi, D E; Back, J J; Dixon, P; Harrison, P F; Potter, R J; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Williams, M I; Cowan, G; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McGrath, P; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Scott, I; Vaitsas, G; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Boyd, J T; Forti, A C; Fullwood, J; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Savvas, N; Simopoulos, E T; Weatherall, J H; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Lillard, V; Olsen, J; Roberts, D A; Schieck, J R; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Moore, T B; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Brau, B; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Trischuk, J; Lanni, F; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Booke, M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Martin, J P; Nief, J Y; Seitz, R; Taras, P; Zacek, V; Nicholson, H; Sutton, C S; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; LoSecco, J M; Alsmiller, J R; Gabriel, T A; Handler, T; Brau, J; Frey, R; Iwasaki, M; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Colecchia, F; Dal Corso, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Michelon, G; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Torassa, E; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; De la Vaissière, C; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Le Diberder, F; Leruste, P; Lory, J; Roos, L; Stark, J; Versillé, S; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Speziali, V; Frank, E D; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J H; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Simi, G; Triggiani, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Turnbull, L; Wagoner, D E; Albert, J; Bula, C; Elmer, P; Lu, C; McDonald, K T; Miftakov, V; Schaffner, S F; Smith, A J; Tumanov, A; Varnes, E W; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Fratini, K; Lamanna, E; Leonardi, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Voena, C; Christ, S; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; De Domenico, G; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Serfass, B; Vasseur, G; Yeche, C; Zito, M; Copty, N; Purohit, M V; Singh, H; Yumiceva, F X; Adam, I; Anthony, P L; Aston, D; Baird, K; Bloom, E; Boyarski, A M; Bulos, F; Calderini, G; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Coward, D H; Dorfan, J; Doser, M; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G L; Gowdy, S J; Grosso, P; Himel, T; Huffner, M E; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocain, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Moffeit, K C; Mount, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Quinn, H; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Rochester, L S; Roodman, A; Schietinger, T; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Serbo, V V; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Spanier, S M; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Tanaka, H A; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weinstein, A J; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Cheng, C H; Kirkby, D; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; Henderson, R; Bugg, W; Cohn, H; Weidemann, A W; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Turcotte, M; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Di Girolamo, B; Gamba, D; Smol, A; Zanin, D; Lanceri, L; Pompili, A; Vaugnin, G; Panvini, R S; Brown, C M; De Silva, A; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Charles, E; Dasu, S; Di Lodovico, F; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Liu, R; Nielsen, J; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Scott, I J; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Zobernig, H; Kordich, T M; Neal, H

    2001-11-26

    We present the results of searches for B decays to charmless two-body final states containing eta(') or omega mesons, based on 20.7 fb(-1) of data collected with the BABAR detector. We find the branching fractions Beta(B(+)-->eta(')K(+)) = (70+/-8+/-5) x 10(-6), Beta(B(0)-->eta(')K(0)) = (42(+13)(-11) +/- 4) x 10(-6), and Beta(B(+)-->omega pi(+)) = (6.6(+2.1)(-1.8) +/- 0.7) x 10(-6), where the first error quoted is statistical and the second is systematic. We give measurements of four additional modes for which the 90% confidence level upper limits are Beta(B(+)-->eta(')pi(+)) < 12 x 10(-6), Beta(B(+)-->omega K(+)) < 4 x 10(-6), Beta(B(0)-->omega K(0)) < 13 x 10(-6), and Beta(B(0)-->omega pi(0)) < 3 x 10(-6).

  14. Simulation analysis of a microcomputer-based, low-cost Omega navigation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilley, R. W.; Salter, R. J., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The current status of research on a proposed micro-computer-based, low-cost Omega Navigation System (ONS) is described. The design approach emphasizes minimum hardware, maximum software, and the use of a low-cost, commercially-available microcomputer. Currently under investigation is the implementation of a low-cost navigation processor and its interface with an omega sensor to complete the hardware-based ONS. Sensor processor functions are simulated to determine how many of the sensor processor functions can be handled by innovative software. An input data base of live Omega ground and flight test data was created. The Omega sensor and microcomputer interface modules used to collect the data are functionally described. Automatic synchronization to the Omega transmission pattern is described as an example of the algorithms developed using this data base.

  15. Flight test and evaluation of Omega navigation in a general aviation aircraft. Volume 1: Technical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, J. D.; Hoffman, W. C.; Hwoschinsky, P. V.; Wischmeyer, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    A low cost flight research program was conducted to evaluate the performance of differential Omega navigation in a general aviation aircraft. The flight program consisted of two distinct parts corresponding to the two major objectives of the study. The Wallops Flight Program was conducted to obtain Omega signal and phase data in the Wallops Flight Center vicinity to provide preliminary technical information and experience in preparation for a comprehensive NASA/FAA flight test program of an experimental differential Omega system. The Northeast Corridor Flight Program was conducted to examine Omega operational suitability and performance on low altitude area navigation (RNAV) routes for city-center to city-center VTOL commercial operations in the Boston-New York-Washington corridor. The development, execution and conclusions of the flight research program are discribed. The results of the study provide both quantitative and qualitative data on the Omega Navigation System under actual operating conditions.

  16. People with schizophrenia and depression have a low omega-3 index.

    PubMed

    Parletta, Natalie; Zarnowiecki, Dorota; Cho, Jihyun; Wilson, Amy; Procter, Nicholas; Gordon, Andrea; Bogomolova, Svetlana; O'Dea, Kerin; Strachan, John; Ballestrin, Matt; Champion, Andrew; Meyer, Barbara J

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is higher in people with mental illness and is associated with a 30 year higher mortality rate in this population. Erythrocyte docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) plus eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (omega-3 index)≤4% is a marker for increased mortality risk from CVD while >8% is protective. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are also important for brain function and may ameliorate symptoms of mental illness. We investigated the erythrocyte omega-3 index in people with mental illness. One hundred and thirty adults aged 18-65 years (32.6% male) with schizophrenia (n=14) and depression (n=116) provided blood samples and completed physiological assessments and questionnaires. Both populations had risk factors for metabolic syndrome and CVD. The average omega-3 index was 3.95% (SD=1.06), compared to an estimated 5% in the Australian population. These data indicate an unfavourable omega-3 profile in people with mental illness that could contribute to higher CVD risk.

  17. Encapsulation of vegetable oils as source of omega-3 fatty acids for enriched functional foods.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Ruiz, Jorge Carlos; Ortiz Vazquez, Elizabeth De La Luz; Segura Campos, Maira Rubi

    2017-05-03

    Polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids (PUFAs), a functional component present in vegetable oils, are generally recognized as being beneficial to health. Omega-3 PUFAs are rich in double bonds and unsaturated in nature; this attribute makes them highly susceptible to lipid oxidation and unfit for incorporation into long shelf life foods. The microencapsulation of oils in a polymeric matrix (mainly polysaccharides) offers the possibility of controlled release of the lipophilic functional ingredient and can be useful for the supplementation of foods with PUFAs. The present paper provides a literature review of different vegetable sources of omega-3 fatty acids, the functional effects of omega-3 fatty acids, different microencapsulation methods that can possibly be used for the encapsulation of oils, the properties of vegetable oil microcapsules, the effect of encapsulation on oxidation stability and fatty acid composition of vegetable oils, and the incorporation of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in foods.

  18. Omega-3 fatty acids: a comprehensive review of their role in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Yashodhara, B M; Umakanth, S; Pappachan, J M; Bhat, S K; Kamath, R; Choo, B H

    2009-02-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3 FAs) are essential fatty acids with diverse biological effects in human health and disease. Reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is a well-established benefit of their intake. Dietary supplementation may also benefit patients with dyslipidaemia, atherosclerosis, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, obesity, inflammatory diseases, neurological/ neuropsychiatric disorders and eye diseases. Consumption of omega-3 FAs during pregnancy reduces the risk of premature birth and improves intellectual development of the fetus. Fish, fish oils and some vegetable oils are rich sources of omega-3 FAs. According to the UK Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition guidelines (2004), a healthy adult should consume a minimum of two portions of fish a week to obtain the health benefit. This review outlines the health implications, dietary sources, deficiency states and recommended allowances of omega-3 FAs in relation to human nutrition.

  19. Does lower Omega allow a resolution of the large-scale structure problem?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph; Vittorio, Nicola

    1987-01-01

    The intermediate angular scale anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background, peculiar velocities, density correlations, and mass fluctuations for both neutrino and baryon-dominated universes with Omega less than one are evaluated. The large coherence length associated with a low-Omega, hot dark matter-dominated universe provides substantial density fluctuations on scales up to 100 Mpc: there is a range of acceptable models that are capable of producing large voids and superclusters of galaxies and the clustering of galaxy clusters, with Omega roughly 0.3, without violating any observational constraint. Low-Omega, cold dark matter-dominated cosmologies are also examined. All of these models may be reconciled with the inflationary requirement of a flat universe by introducing a cosmological constant 1-Omega.

  20. Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Modern Parenteral Nutrition: A Review of the Current Evidence.

    PubMed

    Klek, Stanislaw

    2016-03-07

    Intravenous lipid emulsions are an essential component of parenteral nutrition regimens. Originally employed as an efficient non-glucose energy source to reduce the adverse effects of high glucose intake and provide essential fatty acids, lipid emulsions have assumed a larger therapeutic role due to research demonstrating the effects of omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on key metabolic functions, including inflammatory and immune response, coagulation, and cell signaling. Indeed, emerging evidence suggests that the effects of omega-3 PUFA on inflammation and immune response result in meaningful therapeutic benefits in surgical, cancer, and critically ill patients as well as patients requiring long-term parenteral nutrition. The present review provides an overview of the mechanisms of action through which omega-3 and omega-6 PUFA modulate the immune-inflammatory response and summarizes the current body of evidence regarding the clinical and pharmacoeconomic benefits of intravenous n-3 fatty acid-containing lipid emulsions in patients requiring parenteral nutrition.

  1. The Complexity and Challenges of the ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM Transition in Emergency Departments

    PubMed Central

    Krive, Jacob; Patel, Mahatkumar; Gehm, Lisa; Mackey, Mark; Kulstad, Erik; Li, Jianrong ‘John’; Lussier, Yves A.; Boyd, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Beginning October 2015, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) will require medical providers to utilize the vastly expanded ICD-10-CM system. Despite wide availability of information and mapping tools for the next generation of the ICD classification system, some of the challenges associated with transition from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM are not well understood. To quantify the challenges faced by emergency physicians, we analyzed a subset of a 2010 Illinois Medicaid database of emergency department ICD-9-CM codes, seeking to determine the accuracy of existing mapping tools in order to better prepare emergency physicians for the change to the expanded ICD-10-CM system. We found that 27% of 1,830 codes represented convoluted multidirectional mappings. We then analyzed the convoluted transitions and found 8% of total visit encounters (23% of the convoluted transitions) were clinically incorrect. The ambiguity and inaccuracy of these mappings may impact the work flow associated with the translation process and affect the potential mapping between ICD codes and CPT (Current Procedural Codes) codes, which determine physician reimbursement. PMID:25863652

  2. Observation of the Omega(b)- Baryon and Measurement of the Properties of the Xi(b)- and Omega(b)- Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-05-01

    The authors report the observation of the bottom, doubly-strange baryon {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} through the decay chain {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} {yields} J/{psi}{Omega}{sup -}, where J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup -}, {Omega}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}K{sup -}, and {Lambda} {yields} p {pi}{sup -}, using 4.2 fb{sup -1} of data from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, and recorded with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. A signal is observed whose probability of arising from a background fluctuation is 4.0 x 10{sup -8}, or 5.5 Gaussian standard deviations. The {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} mass is measured to be 6054.4 {+-} 6.8(stat.) {+-} 0.9(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}. The lifetime of the {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} baryon is measured to be 1.13{sub -0.40}{sup +0.53}(stat.) {+-} 0.02(syst.) ps. In addition, for the {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} baryon they measure a mass of 5790.9 {+-} 2.6(stat.) {+-} 0.8(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2} and a lifetime of 1.56{sub -0.25}{sup +0.27}(stat.) {+-} 0.02(syst.) ps.

  3. Large, omega-3 rich, pelagic diatoms under Arctic sea ice: sources and implications for food webs.

    PubMed

    Duerksen, Steven W; Thiemann, Gregory W; Budge, Suzanne M; Poulin, Michel; Niemi, Andrea; Michel, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Pelagic primary production in Arctic seas has traditionally been viewed as biologically insignificant until after the ice breakup. There is growing evidence however, that under-ice blooms of pelagic phytoplankton may be a recurrent occurrence. During the springs of 2011 and 2012, we found substantial numbers (201-5713 cells m-3) of the large centric diatom (diameter >250 µm) Coscinodiscus centralis under the sea ice in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago near Resolute Bay, Nunavut. The highest numbers of these pelagic diatoms were observed in Barrow Strait. Spatial patterns of fatty acid profiles and stable isotopes indicated two source populations for C. centralis: a western origin with low light conditions and high nutrients, and a northern origin with lower nutrient levels and higher irradiances. Fatty acid analysis revealed that pelagic diatoms had significantly higher levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (mean ± SD: 50.3 ± 8.9%) compared to ice-associated producers (30.6 ± 10.3%) in our study area. In particular, C. centralis had significantly greater proportions of the long chain omega-3 fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), than ice algae (24.4 ± 5.1% versus 13.7 ± 5.1%, respectively). Thus, C. centralis represented a significantly higher quality food source for local herbivores than ice algae, although feeding experiments did not show clear evidence of copepod grazing on C. centralis. Our results suggest that C. centralis are able to initiate growth under pack ice in this area and provide further evidence that biological productivity in ice-covered seas may be substantially higher than previously recognized.

  4. Large, Omega-3 Rich, Pelagic Diatoms under Arctic Sea Ice: Sources and Implications for Food Webs

    PubMed Central

    Duerksen, Steven W.; Thiemann, Gregory W.; Budge, Suzanne M.; Poulin, Michel; Niemi, Andrea; Michel, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Pelagic primary production in Arctic seas has traditionally been viewed as biologically insignificant until after the ice breakup. There is growing evidence however, that under-ice blooms of pelagic phytoplankton may be a recurrent occurrence. During the springs of 2011 and 2012, we found substantial numbers (201–5713 cells m−3) of the large centric diatom (diameter >250 µm) Coscinodiscus centralis under the sea ice in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago near Resolute Bay, Nunavut. The highest numbers of these pelagic diatoms were observed in Barrow Strait. Spatial patterns of fatty acid profiles and stable isotopes indicated two source populations for C. centralis: a western origin with low light conditions and high nutrients, and a northern origin with lower nutrient levels and higher irradiances. Fatty acid analysis revealed that pelagic diatoms had significantly higher levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (mean ± SD: 50.3±8.9%) compared to ice-associated producers (30.6±10.3%) in our study area. In particular, C. centralis had significantly greater proportions of the long chain omega-3 fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), than ice algae (24.4±5.1% versus 13.7±5.1%, respectively). Thus, C. centralis represented a significantly higher quality food source for local herbivores than ice algae, although feeding experiments did not show clear evidence of copepod grazing on C. centralis. Our results suggest that C. centralis are able to initiate growth under pack ice in this area and provide further evidence that biological productivity in ice-covered seas may be substantially higher than previously recognized. PMID:25473949

  5. Associations Between Whole Blood and Dietary Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Levels in Collegiate Athletes.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Patrick B; Madrigal, Leilani A

    2016-12-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have important physiological functions and may offer select benefits for athletic performance and recovery. The purpose of this investigation was to assess dietary and whole blood omega-3 PUFAs among collegiate athletes. In addition, a brief questionnaire was evaluated as a valid tool for quantifying omega-3 PUFA intake. Fifty-eight athletes (9 males, 49 females) completed a 21-item questionnaire developed to assess omega-3 PUFA intake and provided dried whole blood samples to quantify α-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and the HS-Omega-3 Index. Geometric means (95% confidence intervals) for the HS-Omega-3 Index were 4.79% (4.37-5.25%) and 4.75% (4.50-5.01%) for males and females, respectively. Median dietary intakes of ALA, EPA, and DHA were all below 100 mg. Among females, several dietary omega-3 PUFA variables were positively associated with whole blood EPA, with total EPA (rho = 0.67, p < .001) and total DHA (rho = 0.69, p < .001) intakes showing the strongest correlations. Whole blood DHA among females showed positive associations with dietary intakes, with total EPA (rho = 0.62, p < .001) and total DHA (rho = 0.64, p < .001) intakes demonstrating the strongest correlations. The HS-Omega-3 Index in females was positively correlated with all dietary variables except ALA. Among males, the only significant correlation was between food and whole blood EPA (rho = 0.83, p < .01). Collegiate athletes had relatively low intakes of omega-3 PUFAs. A 21-item questionnaire may be useful for screening female athletes for poor omega-3 PUFA status.

  6. Recent Advances in Omega-3: Health Benefits, Sources, Products and Bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Peter D.; McManus, Alexandra; Krail, Kevin; Sinclair, Andrew J.; Miller, Matt

    2014-01-01

    The joint symposium of The Omega-3 Centre and the Australasian Section American Oil Chemists Society; Recent Advances in Omega-3: Health Benefits, Sources, Products and Bioavailability, was held November 7, 2013 in Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Over 115 attendees received new information on a range of health benefits, aquaculture as a sustainable source of supply, and current and potential new and novel sources of these essential omega-3 long-chain (LC, ≥C20) polyunsaturated fatty acid nutrients (also termed LC omega-3). The theme of “Food versus Fuel” was an inspired way to present a vast array of emerging and ground breaking Omega-3 research that has application across many disciplines. Eleven papers submitted following from the Omega-3 Symposium are published in this Special Issue volume, with topics covered including: an update on the use of the Omega-3 Index (O3I), the effects of dosage and concurrent intake of vitamins/minerals on omega-3 incorporation into red blood cells, the possible use of the O3I as a measure of risk for adiposity, the need for and progress with new land plant sources of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6ω3), the current status of farmed Australian and New Zealand fish, and also supplements, in terms of their LC omega-3 and persistent organic pollutants (POP) content, progress with cheap carbon sources in the culture of DHA-producing single cell organisms, a detailed examination of the lipids of the New Zealand Greenshell mussel, and a pilot investigation of the purification of New Zealand hoki liver oil by short path distillation. The selection of papers in this Special Issue collectively highlights a range of forward looking and also new and including positive scientific outcomes occurring in the omega-3 field. PMID:25255830

  7. Recent advances in omega-3: Health Benefits, Sources, Products and Bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Peter D; McManus, Alexandra; Krail, Kevin; Sinclair, Andrew J; Miller, Matt

    2014-09-16

    The joint symposium of The Omega-3 Centre and the Australasian Section American Oil Chemists Society; Recent Advances in Omega-3: Health Benefits, Sources, Products and Bioavailability, was held November 7, 2013 in Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Over 115 attendees received new information on a range of health benefits, aquaculture as a sustainable source of supply, and current and potential new and novel sources of these essential omega-3 long-chain (LC, ≥ C20) polyunsaturated fatty acid nutrients (also termed LC omega-3). The theme of "Food versus Fuel" was an inspired way to present a vast array of emerging and ground breaking Omega-3 research that has application across many disciplines. Eleven papers submitted following from the Omega-3 Symposium are published in this Special Issue volume, with topics covered including: an update on the use of the Omega-3 Index (O3I), the effects of dosage and concurrent intake of vitamins/minerals on omega-3 incorporation into red blood cells, the possible use of the O3I as a measure of risk for adiposity, the need for and progress with new land plant sources of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6ω3), the current status of farmed Australian and New Zealand fish, and also supplements, in terms of their LC omega-3 and persistent organic pollutants (POP) content, progress with cheap carbon sources in the culture of DHA-producing single cell organisms, a detailed examination of the lipids of the New Zealand Greenshell mussel, and a pilot investigation of the purification of New Zealand hoki liver oil by short path distillation. The selection of papers in this Special Issue collectively highlights a range of forward looking and also new and including positive scientific outcomes occurring in the omega-3 field.

  8. Sayama CM2 Chondrite: Fresh but Heavily Altered

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takaoka, N.; Nakamura, T.; Noguchi, T.; Tonui, E.; Gounelle, M.; Zolensky, M. E.; Ebisawa, N.; Osawa, T.; Okazaki, R.; Nagao, K.; Yoneda, S.

    2001-01-01

    Noble gas composition and mineralogy of Sayama meteorite, that fell in Japan and recently identified as a CM2 chondrite, revealed many unique features, indicating that it experienced extensive aqueous alteration under highly oxidized condition compared with typical CMs. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Electronic and magnetic properties of Am and Cm

    SciTech Connect

    Edelstein, N.

    1985-02-01

    A review of the present status of the analyses of the optical spectra of Am and Cm in various oxidation states is given. From these analyses, the magnetic properties of the ground states of these ions can be determined. These predicted values are compared with the various magnetic measurements available.

  10. Organic Matter Inclusions in CM2 Chondrite Murchison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeters, Z.; Liebig, B.; Lee, T.

    2015-07-01

    Large (~10 μm) inclusions of pure organic carbon exist in carbonaceous chondrites. We extracted organic inclusions from Murchison, a CM2, and analyzed the sections using XANES, TEM, and nanoSIMS. The results are compared to previous results of CRs.

  11. Retrofit and acceptance test of 30-cm ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poeschel, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Six 30 cm mercury thrusters were modified to the J-series design and evaluated using standardized test procedures. The thruster performance meets the design objectives (lifetime objective requires verification), and documentation (drawings, etc.) for the design is completed and upgraded. The retrofit modifications are described and the test data for the modifications are presented and discussed.

  12. Search for Cm-248 in the early solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavielle, B.; Marti, K.; Pellas, P.; Perron, C.

    1992-01-01

    Possible evidence for the presence of Cm-248 in the early solar system was reported from fission gas studies (Rao and Gopalan, 1973) and recently from studies of very high nuclear track densities (not less than 5 x 10 exp 8/sq cm) in the merrillite of the H4 chondrite Forest Vale (F.V.) (Pellas et al., 1987). We report here an analysis of the isotopic abundances of xenon in F.V. phosphates and results of track studies in phosphate/pyroxene contacts. The fission xenon isotopic signature clearly identifies Pu-244 as the extinct progenitor. We calculate an upper limit Cm-248/Pu-244 to be less than 0.0015 at the beginning of Xe retention in F.V. phosphates. This corresponds to an upper limit of the ratio Cm-248/U-235 of not greater than 5 x 10 exp -5 further constraining the evidence for any late addition of freshly synthesized actinide elements just prior to solar system formation. The fission track density observed after annealing the phosphates at 290C (1 hr, which essentially erases spallation recoil tracks) is also in agreement with the Pu-244 abundance inferred from fission Xe. The spallation recoil tracks produced during the 76 Ma cosmic-ray exposure account for the very high track density in merrillites.

  13. Adaptation of California Measure of Mental Motivation-CM3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Özdemir, Hasan Fehmi; Demirtasli, Nükhet Çikrikçi

    2015-01-01

    Education without doubt, plays a vital role for individuals to gain the essential personal traits of the 21st century, also known as "knowledge age". One of the most important skills among these fundamental qualities which the individuals should be equipped with is critical thinking. California Measure of Mental Motivation-CM3 was…

  14. Case study: developing product lines using ICD-9-CM codes.

    PubMed

    Benz, P D; Burnham, J

    1985-12-01

    In this marketing case study, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital used a product line approach to maximize the use of its resources. The method used, based on ICD-9-CM codes, fulfilled the demands of increased efficiency by encouraging customer-oriented thinking, enhancing communication with physicians and patients, and helping the institution to compete more effectively.

  15. Oxygen isotope constraints on the alteration temperatures of CM chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdier-Paoletti, Maximilien J.; Marrocchi, Yves; Avice, Guillaume; Roskosz, Mathieu; Gurenko, Andrey; Gounelle, Matthieu

    2017-01-01

    We report a systematic oxygen isotopic survey of Ca-carbonates in nine different CM chondrites characterized by different degrees of alteration, from the least altered known to date (Paris, 2.7-2.8) to the most altered (ALH 88045, CM1). Our data define a continuous trend that crosses the Terrestrial Fractionation Line (TFL), with a general relationship that is indistinguishable within errors from the trend defined by both matrix phyllosilicates and bulk O-isotopic compositions of CM chondrites. This bulk-matrix-carbonate (BMC) trend does not correspond to a mass-dependent fractionation (i.e., slope 0.52) as it would be expected during fluid circulation along a temperature gradient. It is instead a direct proxy of the degree of O-isotopic equilibration between 17,18O-rich fluids and 16O-rich anhydrous minerals. Our O-isotopic survey revealed that, for a given CM, no carbonate is in O-isotopic equilibrium with its respective surrounding matrix. This precludes direct calculation of the temperature of carbonate precipitation. However, the O-isotopic compositions of alteration water in different CMs (inferred from isotopic mass-balance calculation and direct measurements) define another trend (CMW for CM Water), parallel to BMC but with a different intercept. The distance between the BMC and CMW trends is directly related to the temperature of CM alteration and corresponds to average carbonates and serpentine formation temperatures of 110 °C and 75 °C, respectively. However, carbonate O-isotopic variations around the BMC trend indicate that they formed at various temperatures ranging between 50 and 300 °C, with 50% of the carbonates studied here showing precipitation temperature higher than 100 °C. The average Δ17O and the average carbonate precipitation temperature per chondrite are correlated, revealing that all CMs underwent similar maximum temperature peaks, but that altered CMs experienced protracted carbonate precipitation event(s) at lower temperatures than

  16. 40 CFR 721.10121 - Poly[oxy(methyl-1,2-ethanediyl)], .alpha.-methyl-.omega.-(4-nonylphenoxy)-, branched.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Poly , .alpha.-methyl-.omega.-(4... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10121 Poly , .alpha.-methyl-.omega.-(4-nonylphenoxy)-, branched. (a... poly , .alpha.-methyl-.omega.-(4-nonylphenoxy)-, branched (PMN P-05-766; CAS No. 858944-25-9)...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10121 - Poly[oxy(methyl-1,2-ethanediyl)], .alpha.-methyl-.omega.-(4-nonylphenoxy)-, branched.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Poly , .alpha.-methyl-.omega.-(4... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10121 Poly , .alpha.-methyl-.omega.-(4-nonylphenoxy)-, branched. (a... poly , .alpha.-methyl-.omega.-(4-nonylphenoxy)-, branched (PMN P-05-766; CAS No. 858944-25-9)...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10121 - Poly[oxy(methyl-1,2-ethanediyl)], .alpha.-methyl-.omega.-(4-nonylphenoxy)-, branched.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Poly , .alpha.-methyl-.omega.-(4... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10121 Poly , .alpha.-methyl-.omega.-(4-nonylphenoxy)-, branched. (a... poly , .alpha.-methyl-.omega.-(4-nonylphenoxy)-, branched (PMN P-05-766; CAS No. 858944-25-9)...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10121 - Poly[oxy(methyl-1,2-ethanediyl)], .alpha.-methyl-.omega.-(4-nonylphenoxy)-, branched.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Poly , .alpha.-methyl-.omega.-(4... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10121 Poly , .alpha.-methyl-.omega.-(4-nonylphenoxy)-, branched. (a... poly , .alpha.-methyl-.omega.-(4-nonylphenoxy)-, branched (PMN P-05-766; CAS No. 858944-25-9)...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10121 - Poly[oxy(methyl-1,2-ethanediyl)], .alpha.-methyl-.omega.-(4-nonylphenoxy)-, branched.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Poly , .alpha.-methyl-.omega.-(4... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10121 Poly , .alpha.-methyl-.omega.-(4-nonylphenoxy)-, branched. (a... poly , .alpha.-methyl-.omega.-(4-nonylphenoxy)-, branched (PMN P-05-766; CAS No. 858944-25-9)...